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University of Illinois 
Annual Register 



1913-1914 



»«ftW» 



LIBRARY 
TTNIVKRSITY OK ILLINOIS 






UNIVERSITY OF 

ILLINOIS LIBRARY 

ATURBANA-CHAMPAIGN 

BOOKSTACKS 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualregister19131914univ 



IGrarning a«b Sabor 



University of Illinois 

ANNUAL REGISTER 

1913-1914 



General Announcements, 1914-1915 

Faculty and Courses, 1913-1914 

Students, 1913-1914 



URBANA 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

FEBRUARY 1914 



••^ 



REVIEW 

PRESS 

DECATUR, ILL. 



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^- ^ 



CONTENTS 



Calendar lo 

University Calendar 11 

Board of Trustees 15 

Committees of the Board 16 

Advisory Boards 17 

Administrative Officers 

The Council of Administration 19 

The Colleges and Schools 20 

General Administrative Officers 21 

Officers of Instruction 

Colleges and Schools in Urbana 23 

The Senate 23 

The University Library 41 

The College of Medicine (Chicago) 43 

The College of Dentistry (Chicago) 50 

The School of Pharmacy (Chicago) 51 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 52 

PART I. GENERAL INFORMATION 

Location 57 

History 59 

Equipment 65 

Buildings and Grounds 65 

Laboratories 74 

Museums and Collections 75 

Libraries 79 

Administration 83 

Government 83 

Departments and Courses 84 

Admission 88 

Entrance Requirements 89 

Admission by Examination 93 

Admission by Certificate 94 

Admission by Transfer of Entrance Credits 95 

Conditional Freshmen 9^ 

Admission as Special Students 96 

3 



258631 



4 Contents 

Admission to Advanced Standing 97 

Program of Examinations, Summer, igi/} 98 

Program of Examinations, September, J914 99 

Program of Examinations, January, igi5 100 

List of Accredited Schools 100 

Description of Subjects Accepted for Admission 108 

Graduation : First Degrees 118 

Honors and Competitions 120 

University Honors 120 

Debating and Oratory 121 

Prizes 122 

Military Contests and Prizes 123 

Lectures and Other General Exercises 125 

Associations, Societies, and Clubs 137 

General Organizations 137 

Honorary Societies 139 

Clubs Auxiliary to Courses of Study 140 

Fraternities, Societies, and Clubs 141 

Undergraduate Scholarships 142 

Beneficiary Aid 146 

Fees and Expenses 148 

General Fees 148 

Laboratory Fees 150 

PART n. THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 155 

Organization and Purpose 155 

Special Students 156 

General Requirements for Graduation 156 

Arrangement of Courses 161 

Courses in Business Administration 163 

General Business Course 163 

Course for Commercial and Civic Secretaries 164 

Course in Banking 165 

Course in Insurance 166 

Four-Year Course in Accountancy 167 

Tzvo-Year Course in Accountancy 16S 

Course in Railway Traffic and Accountancy 169 

Course in Railway Transportation 169 

Course for Commercial Teachers 170 

Journalism 171 



Contents 5 

Course Preliminary to Law ::..],: 172 

Household Science and Administration 173 

Course Preparatory to Medicine 175 

Courses Leading to the B.S. Degree 177 

Cottrse in Chemistry 177 

Course in Chemical Engineering 178 

Course in Ceramics '. 179 

Course in Ceramic Engineering 180 

Combined Arts and Engineering Course 180 

Honors 181 

The College of Engineering 183 

General Statement 183 

Description of Departments 183 

Architecture 184 

Civil Engineering 185 

Electrical Engineering 186 

Mechanical Engineering 187 

Mechanics, Theoretical and Applied 188 

Mining Engineering 188 

Mine Rescue Station and Laboratories 189 

Municipal and Sanitary' Engineering 190 

Physics 190 

Railway Engineering 191 

Suggested Electives 192 

Summer Reading 193 

General Engineering Lectures for Freshmen 193 

Trips of Inspection 193 

Courses of Study and Degrees 194 

Synopsis of Courses 195 

Course in Architecture 195 

Course in Architectural Engineering 196 

Course in Civil Engineering 197 

Course in Electrical Engineering 198 

Course in Mechanical Engineering 199 

Course in Mining Engineering 200 

Course in Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 201 

Course in Railway Civil Engineering 202 

Course in Raihvay Electrical Engineering 203 

Course in Railway Mechanical Engineering 204 

The College of Agriculture 205 

General Statement 205 



6 Contents 

Admission to Graduate Work in Agriculture 206 

Scholarships in Agriculture and Household Science 206 

Facilities for Instruction and Method of Work 206 

Agricultural Extension 207 

Agronomy 207 

Animal Husbandry 208 

Dairy Husbandry 209 

Horticulture 210 

Household Science 211 

Veterinary Science 212 

Requirements for Graduation 212 

General Course in Agriculture 212 

General Course in Floriculture 215 

General Course in Household Science 216 

General Course in Landscape Gardening 218 

General Course for Prospective Teachers of Agriculture.. 219 
Two-Weeks Course in Agriculture and Household Science. 220 

The Graduate School 221 

The Executive Faculty 221 

History and Organization 221 

Admission 222 

The Masters' Degrees 223 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 225 

Scholarships and Fellowships 227 

The Library School 230 

General Statement 230 

Admission 231 

Proposed Preliminary Course 231 

Advanced Standing 232 

Library Visits and Field Work 232 

Schedule of Course 232 

The School of Music 234 

General Statement 234 

Requirements for Graduation 235 

Course in Music 235 

Course in Public School Music 236 

Musical Organizations 236 

The School of Education 238 

General Statement 238 

Course 238 

Special Lectures 239 



Contents 7 

Committee on Appointment of Teachers 239 

The School of Railway Engineering and Administration... 241 

Military Science 242 

Physical Training 244 

For Men 244 

For Women 244 

The Summer Session 245 

Staff of Instruction, 1913 245 

General Statement 248 

Preparation for State Teachers' Certificates 248 

Graduate Work in the Summer Session 249 

Summer Courses in Library Training 249 

Fees 250 

Scholarships 250 

Description of Courses 250 

The College of Law 270 

General Statement 270 

Admission 270 

Suggested Preparatory Courses 271 

One-Year Course in Preparation for Law 271 

Two-Year Course in Preparation for Law 272 

Special Students 272 

Advanced Standing 273 

Instruction 273 

Moot Court 273 

Special Lectures 274 

The Law Library 274 

Requirements for Graduation and Degrees 274 

Degree of Bachelor of Laws 274 

Degree of Doctor of Law 274 

Certificate for Admission to the Illinois State Bar Exami- 
nations 275 

Course for the Degree of LL.B 276 

Privileges of Students 276 

Law Clubs 276 

Scholarship Prizes 277 

The College of Medicine 

Buildings and Equipment 278 

Clinical Facilities 278 

Quine Library 280 

Admission 281 



8 Contents 

Special Students 283 

Advanced Standing 283 

Registration 284 

Collegiate Year 284 

Fees and Expenses 284 

Scholarships 285 

Courses Offered 285 

Requirements for Graduation 286 

General Plan of Instruction 286 

Description of Courses 287 

Total Hours of Work 292 

The College of Dentistry 

Location 295 

Building and Equipment 295 

Laboratories 295 

Infirmary 295 

Library and Museum 296 

Admission 296 

Advanced Standing 297 

Length of Course 297 

Requirements for Graduation 297 

Methods of Instruction 298 

Summary of Course 298 

Fees 299 

The School of Pharmacv 300 

History 300 

Location 301 

Equipment 301 

Courses of Instruction 302 

Admission 302 

Graduation 303 

' State Registration 303 

Fees and Expenses 304 

PART III. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF COURSES.... 307 
(Arranged alphabetically by subjects) 

PART IV. AUXILIARY SCIENTIFIC BUREAUS 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 487 

The Engineering Experiment Station 491 

The State Laboratory of Natural History 494 



Contents 9 

The State Entomologist's Office 495 

The State Water Survey 496 

The State Geological Survey 497 

The Board of Examiners in Accountancy 499 

The Mine Rescue Station 500 

The Miners' and Mechanics' Institutes 502 

PART V. LISTS OF STUDENTS, DEGREES. ETC. 

Students, 1913-14 503 

The Graduate School 5^5 

Undergraduate Colleges and Schools in Urbana 518 

The College of Medicine (Chicago) 583 

The College of Dentistr>' (Chicago) 590 

The School of Pharmacy (Chicago) 591 

Degrees Conferred, 1913 59^ 

Baccalaureate Degrees 59^ 

Degrees in Law 604 

Degrees in Libran.- Science 604 

Degrees in Medicine and Pharmacy 604 

Degrees in the Graduate School 606 

Fellows and Scholars 610 

L'niversity Honors, 1912-1913 612 

Militan.' Honors, 1912-1913 615 

Intercollegiate Debaters, 1912-1913 622 

Summary of Degrees Conferred, 1913 623 

Summary of Officers, 1913-14 624; 

Summary of Students, 1913-14 626 

Director}- of Alumni Associations 628 

Index of Names 631 

General Index 641 



CALENDAR 1913, 1914, 1915 



1913 


1914 


1915 








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17 


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15 


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31,32 


23 


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19 


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21 


33 


23 


37 


38 29 


30 


31 




... 


25 


26 

• •• 


27 


38 


29 


30 


31 

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26 


27 


38 

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29 


30 

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24 

31 


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17 
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35 


19 

26 


20 
27 


21 
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32 
29 


23 
30 


22 

• •• 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


16 

23 

10 


17 

24 


18 
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19 
36 


20 
27 


21 
28 


22 
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31 
38 

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33 

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23 


24 


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1 : : : : : : i 


»- 


1 



THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1913-1914-1915 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1913-1914 



1913 
Sept. 9, Tues. 



Sept. 15-18, Mon. to Thurs. 
Sept. 22, 23, Mon., Tues. 
Sept. 24, Wed., 8 a. m. 

4 p. m. 
Oct. 6, Mon., 4 p. m, 
Nov. 3, Mon., 5 p. m. 



Nov. 14, Fri. 

Nov. 20-22, Thurs. to Sat. 
Nov. 26, Wed., 12 m. 
Dec. I, Mon., 12 m. 

4 p. m. 
Dec. 2, Tues. 
Dec. 9, Tues. 

Dec. II, Thurs. 

Dec. 12, Fri. 

Dec. 19, Fri., 5 p. m. 

Dec. 31, Wed., 5 p. m. 



1914 
Jan. 5, Mon., 12 m. 
Jan. 29, Thurs. 
Feb. 2, Mon., 4 p. m. 
Feb. 5, Thurs. 
Feb. 6, Fri. 



Quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Entrance examinations 

Registration days 

Instruction begun 

Freshman convocation 

Senate meeting 

Latest day for announcement of sub- 
jects for all undergraduate and 
graduate theses 

Russian SjTnphony Orchestra 

High School conference 

Thanksgiving recess begun 

Instruction resumed 

Senate meeting 

Illinois Day 

Quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra 

Junior promenade 

Holiday recess begun 

Latest day for submission of outlines 
of theses by candidates for profes- 
sional degrees in engineering 

Instruction resumed 
Semester examinations begun 
Senate meeting 

Semester examinations ended 
Annual sophomore cotillion 



II 



12 



University of Illinois 



SECOND 
Feb. 9, lo, Mon., Tues. 
Feb. 10, Tues. 
Feb. II, Wed., 8 a. m. 
Feb. 12, Thurs. 
Feb. 17, Tues. 
Feb. 20, Fri. 
March 2, Mon. 
March 7, Sat. 
March 10, Tues. 

April I, Wed., 5 p. m. 



April 6, Men., 4 p. m. 
April 9, Thurs., 12 m. 
April 14, Tues., 12 m. 
May 7, Thurs. 
May 15, Fri., evening 
May 14-16, Thurs. to Sat. 
May 16, Sat. 

12 m. 



May, between 15 and 31 

May 30, Sat. 

June I, Mon., 4 p. m. 



June 4, Thurs. 
June 9, Tues. 

June II, Thurs. 
June 14, Sun. 
June IS, Mon. 

June 16, Tues. 
June 17, Wed. 



SEMESTER, 1913-1914 

Registration days 

Post-exam. Jubilee 

Instruction begun 

Lincoln Day 

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra 

Annual military ball 

University Day 

Annual band concert 

Annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Latest day for filing of completed 
theses by candidates for profes- 
sional degrees in engineering 

Senate meeting 

Easter recess begun 

Instruction resumed 

Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 

Interscholastic oratorical contes^t 

Public school art exhibit 

Interscholastic athletic meet 

Latest day for receipt by the Dean 
of the Graduate School of certi- 
fied copies of doctors' theses 

Ilazleton prize drill 

Annual inspection 

Company competitive drill 

Military Day 

Senate meeting 

Latest day for acceptance of under- 
graduate theses 

Latest day for receipt by the Dean 
of the Graduate School of certi- 
fied copies of masters' theses 

Semester examinations begun 

Quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Semester examinations ended 

Baccalaureate address 

Class Dav 



Senior ball 
Alumni Day 
Forty-third 

MENT 



Annual Commence- 



The Uniz'ersitv Calendar 



13 



SUMMER SESSION, 1914 



June 22, Mon. 

June 23, Tues. 

July II, 18, 25, Aug. I. 8. 

Aug. 13, 14, Thurs., Fri. 



Registration Day 
Instruction begun 
Entrance examinations 
Final examinations 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1914-1915 



Sept. 8, Tues. 

Sept. 14-18, Mon. to Fri. 
.Sept. 21, 22, Mon., Tues. 
Sept 23, Wed., 8 a. m. 

4 p. m. 
Oct. 5, Mon., 4 p. m. 
Nov. 2, Mon., 5 p. m. 



Nov. 19-21, Thurs. to Sat. 

Nov. 25, Wed., 12 m. 

Nov. 30, Mon., 12 m. 
Dec. 2, Wed. 

Dec. 7, Mon., 4 p. m. 
Dec. 8, Tues. 

Dec. II, Fri. 

Dec. 22, Tues., 5 p. m. 

Dec. 31, Thurs., 5 p. m. 



Quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Entrance examinations 

Registration days 

Instruction begun 

Freshman convocation 

Senate meeting 

Latest day for announcement of sub- 
jects for all undergraduate and 
graduate theses 

High school conference 

Thanksgiving recess begun 

Instruction resumed 

Illinois Day 

Senate meeting 

Quarter!}' meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Junior promenade 

Holiday recess begun 

Latest day for submission of outlines 
of theses by candidates for profes- 
sional degrees in engineering 



1915 
Jan. 4, Mon., 12 m. 
Jan. 28, Thurs. 
Feb. I, Mon., 4 p. m. 
Feb. 4, Thurs. 
Feb. 5, Fri. 



Instruction resumed 
Semester examinations begun 
Senate meeting 

Semester examinations ended 
Annual sophomore cotillion 



14 



University of Illinois 



SECOND 
Feb. 8, 9, Mon., Tues. 
Feb. 9, Tues. 
Feb. 10, Wed., 8 a. m. 
Feb. 12, Fri. 
Feb. 19, Fri. 
March 2, Tues. 
March 6, Sat. 
March 9, Tues. 

April I, Thurs., 5 p. m. 



April 5, Mon., 4 p. m. 
April I, Thurs., 12 m. 
April 6, Tues., 12 m. 
May 14, Fri., evening 
May 13-15, Thurs. to Sat. 
May 15, Sat. 

12 m. 



May, between 15 and 31 

May 29, Sat. 

June I, Tues., 12 m. 



June 3, Thurs. 

June 7, Mon., 4 p. m. 

June 8, Tues. 

June 10, Thurs. 
June 13, Sun. 
June 14, Mon. 

June 15, Tues. 
June 16, Wed. 



SEMESTER, 1914-1915 

Registration days 

Post-exam. Jubilee 

Instruction begun 

Lincoln Day 

Annual military ball 

University Day 

Annual band concert 

Annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Latest day for filing of completed 
theses by candidates for profes- 
sional degrees in engineering 

Senate meeting 

Easter recess begun 

Instruction resumed 

Interscholastic oratorical contest 

Public school art exhibit 

Interscholastic athletic meet 

Latest day for receipt by the Dean 
of the Graduate School of certi- 
fied copies of doctors' theses 

Hazelton prize drill 

Annual inspection 

Company competitive drill 

Military Day 

Latest day for acceptance of under- 
graduate theses 

Latest day for receipt by the Dean 
of the Graduate School of certi- 
fied copies of masters' theses 

Semester examinations begun 

Senate meeting 

Quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Trustees 

Semester examinations ended 

Baccalaureate address 

Class Day 

Senior ball 

Alumni Day 

Forty-fourth Annual Commence- 
ment 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



MEMBERS EX OFFICIO 

The Governor of Illinois 
HON. EDWARD F. DUNNE Springfield 

The President of the State Board of Agriculture 
DR. JOHN T. MONTGOMERY Charleston 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction 
HON. FRANCIS G. BLAIR Springfield 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

(Term, 1909-1915) 

LAURA B. EVANS Taylorville 

ARTHUR MEEKER Union Stock Yards, Chicago 

ALLEN F. MOORE Monticello 

(Term, 1911-1917) 

WILLIAM L. ABBOTT 120 West Adams Street, Chicago 

MARY E. BUSEY Urhana 

OTIS W. HOIT Genesee 

(Term, 1913-1919) 

ELLEN M. HENROTIN 742 Lincoln Parkway, Chicago 

JOHN R. TREVETT Champaign 

FLORENCE E. WATSON Effingham 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

William L. Abbott, 120 West Adams Street, Chicago President 

*Charles M. McConn, Urbana Secretary 

tHARRisoN E. Cunningham, Urbana Secretary 

Matthew W. Busey, Urbana Treasurer 

George E. Frazer, Urbana Comptroller 



« 



Resigned, January 21, 1914. 
jEiected, January 21, 1914. 



IS 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
William L. Abbott, Chairman; Allen F, Moore, John R. Trevett 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Buildings and Grounds — William L. Abbott, Chairman ; Francis 
G. Blair, Mary E. Biisey, Laura B. Evans, Allen F. Moore 

Finance — Allen F. Moore, Chairman ; Otis W. Hoit, John R. 
Trevett 

Engineering — Arthur Meeker, Chairman; William L. Abbott, 
John R. Trevett 

Agriculture — Otis W. Hoit, Chairman; Arthur Meeker, John T. 
Montgomery 

College of Medicine and School of Pharmacy — John T. Mont- 
gomery, Chairman ; William L. Abbott, Ellen M. Henrotin 

Students' Welfare — Laura B, Evans, Chairman ; Mary E. Busey, 
Ellen M. Henrotin, Florence E. Watson 

Instruction — Francis G. Blair, Chairman ; Ellen M. Henrotin, 
Florence E. Watson 

Library — Mary E. Busey, Chairman ; Laura B. Evans, Florence 
E. Watson 



i6 



ADVISORY BOARDS 



COLLEGE OF LAW 




George E. Drennan 


Chicago 


• 

VVtujam R. Hunter 


Kankakee 


Walter C. Lindley 


Danville 


George T. Page 


Peoria 


Peter P. Schaefer 


Champaign 


SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 




A. G. C. Ackerman 


Chicago 


Herman Fry 


Chicago 


E. H. Ladish 


Chicago 


George C. Lescher 


Galesburg 


F. LUEDER 


Peoria 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

Conference Committee on Fuel Tests of Illinois Coals 
William L. Abbott Chicago 

For the Board of Trustees, University of Illinois 
A. Bement Chicago 

For the Western Society of Engineers 
F. H. Clark Chicago 

For the Western Railway Club 

W. F. M. Goss Urbana 

For the Engineering Experiment Station 
Adolph Mueller Decatur 

For the Illinois Manufacturers' Association 

Carl Scholz Chicago 

For the Illinois Coal Operators' Association 

17 



1 8 University of Illinois 

Conference Committee on Electric Traction Tests 

WiLUAM L. Abbott Chicago 

Chief Operating Engineer, Commonwealth Edison Company, 

Trustee of the University of Illinois 

L. E. Fisher St. Louis, Mo. 

Consulting Engineer 

T. P. Gaylord Chicago 

District Manager, Westinghouse Electric and 

Manufacturing Company 

W. F. M. Goss Urbana 

Director of the Engineering Experiment Station, University 

of Illinois 
Edward C. Schmidt Urbana 

Professor of Railway Engineering, University of Illinois 

B. E. Sunny Chicago 

General Manager, General Electric Company 

DEPARTMENT OF CERAMICS 

F. W. BuTTERWORTH DanvUlc 

A. W. Gates Monmouth 

W. D. Gates Chicago 

D. V. Purington Chicago 

J. W. Stipes Champaign 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



President of the University 
Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D. 

THE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Vice President, Dean of the Grad- 
uate School, Director of the Courses in Business Administra- 
tion, and Professor of Economics 

Eugene Davenport, M.Agr., LL.D., Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture and Professor of Thremmatology 

Oliver Albert Harker, A.M., LL.D., Dean of the College of Law 
and Professor of Law 

William Edward Quine, M.D., LL.D., Senior Dean of the College 
of Medicine and Emeritus Professor of Medicine 

Thomas Arkle Clark, B.L., Dean of Men and Professor of 
Rhetoric 

♦William Freeman Myrick Goss, M.S., D.Eng., Dean of the Col- 
lege of Engineering, Director of the School of Railway Engi- 
neering and Administration, Director of the Engineering Ex- 
periment Station, and Professor of Railway Engineering 

Kendric Charles Babcock, B.Lit, Ph.D., Dean of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Charles Russ Richards, B.M.E., M.E., M.M.E., Acting Dean of 
the College of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical En- 
gineering 

Frederick Brown Moorehead, A.B., D.D.S., M.D., Dean of the 
College of Dentistry and Professor of Oral Surgery and Path- 
ology 

Martha Jackson Kyle, A.M., Acting Dean of Women 

George Peter Dreyer, A.B., Ph.D., Junior Dean of the College of 
Medicine, Professor of Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, 
and Head of the Department of Physiology and Physiological 
Chemistry 

•On leave. 

19 



20 University of Illinois 

THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Kendric Charles Babcock, B. Lit., Ph.D., Dean 
George Henry Meyer, A.M., Assistant Dean 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
♦William Freeman Myrick Goss, M.S., D.Eng., Dean 
Charles Russ Richards, B.M.E., M.E., M.M.E., Acting Dean 
Harvey Willard Miller, M.E., Assistant Dean 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Eugene Davenport, M.Agr., LL.D., Dean 
Fred Henry Rankin, Assistant to the Dean 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 
Oliver Albert Harker, A.M., LL.D., Dean 
William Green Hale, LL.B., Secretary 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean 

THE LIBRARY SCHOOL 
Phineas Lawrence Windsor, Ph.B., Director 
Frances Simpson, M.L., B.L.S., Assistant Director 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
Charles Henry Mills, D.Mus., F.R.C.O.Eng., F.A.G.O., Director 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D., Director 
WiLFORD Stanton Miller, A.M., Secretary 

THE COURSES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Director 
Nathan Austin Weston, Ph.D., Assistant Director 

THE SCHOOL OF RAILWAY ENGINEERING AND 

ADMINISTRATION 
♦William Freeman Myrick Goss, M.S., D.Eng., Director 

THE SUMMER SESSION 
William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D., Director 

THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
William Edward Quine, M.D., LL.D. Senior Dean 
George Peter Dreyer, A.B., Ph.D., Junior Dean 
William Henry Browne, Secretary 

•On leave. 



Administrative Officers 21 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

Frederick Brown Moorehead, A.B,, D.D.S., M.D., Dean 
William Henry Browne, Secretary 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
William Baker Day, Ph.G., Acting Dean and Secretary 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

Edward Joseph Filbey, Ph.D., Private Secretary to the President 

Vergil Vivian Phelps, B.D., Ph.D., Executive Clerk 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 
David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Vice President 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER 

George Enfield Frazer, A.B., LL.B., Comptroller 

Lynn Elmer Knorr, A.B., Assistant Comptroller 

Nathaniel Hay, Purchasing Agent 

Oren Elmer Staples, Bursar 

Lloyd Morey, A.B., B. Mus., Auditor 

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Charles Maxwell McConn, A.M., Registrar 

Harrison Edward Cunningham, A.B., Assistant Registrar 

Levi Augustus Boice, Recorder 

Ira Melville Smith, LL.B., Chief Clerk 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN 

Thomas Arkle Clark, B.L., Dean 

Arthur Ray Warnock, A.B., Assistant Dean 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN 
Martha Jackson Kyle, A.M., Acting Dean 

ADVISER TO FOREIGN STUDENTS 
Arthur Romeyn Seymour, Ph.D., Adviser 



22 University of Illinois 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT 

James McLaren White, B.S., Supervising Architect 

Henry Dixon Oberdorfer, B.S., Assistant to the Supervising 

Architect 
Joseph Morrow, Superintendent of Buildings 
Evelyn Atkinson, Superintendent of Grounds 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR MEN 
George A. Huff, Director 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WOMEN 
Gertrude Evelyn Moulton, A.B., Director 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

Frank Daniel Webster, Major 20th U. S. Infantry, Commandant 
Frederick William Post, ist Sergeant U. S. A., Ret'd., Adminis- 
trative Assistant 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Phineas Lawrence Windsor, Ph.B., Librarian 

Francis Keese Wynkoop Drury, A.M., B.L.S., Assistant Librarian 

CURATORS 

Frank Smith, A.M., Professor of Systematic Zoology and Curator 

of the Museum of Natural History 
Arthur Stanley Pease, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Classics 

and Curator of the Museum of Classical Art and Archeology 
Neil Conwell Brooks, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German and 

Curator of the Museum of European Culture 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE SENATE* 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

Thomas Jonathan Burrill, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Botany, 

Emeritus 
Samuel Walker Shattuck, C.E., LL.D., Professor of Mathematics, 

Emeritus 
Nathan Clifford Ricker, D.Arch., Professor of Architecture 
Ira Osborn Baker, C.E., D.Eng., Professor of Civil Engineering 
Stephen Alfred Forbes, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Entomology 
Charles Wesley Rolfe, M.S., Professor of Geology 
Donald McIntosh, V.S., Professor of Veterinary Science 
Arthur Newell Talbot, C.E., Professor of Municipal and Sanitary 

Engineering 
Samuel Wh^son Papr, M.S., Professor of Applied Chemistry 
Herbert Jewett Barton, A.M., Professor of the Latin Language 
and Literature, Chairman of the Department of the Classics, and 
Secretary of the Senate 
Charles Melville Moss, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature 
Daniel Kilham Dodge, Ph.D., Professor of the English Language 

and Literature 
David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Economics, Vice Pres- 
ident, Dean of the Graduate School, and Director of the Courses 
in Business Administration 
Eugene Davenport, M.Agr., LL.D., Professor of Thremmatology 

and Dean of the College of Agriculture 
Albert Pruden Carman, D.Sc, Professor of Physics 
EvARTS Boutell Greene, Ph.D., Professor of History 
Thomas Arkle Clark, B.L., Professor of Rhetoric and Dean of 

Men 
Arthur Hill Daniels, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 
fNEWTON Alonzo Wells, M.P., Professor of Architectural Decora- 
tion 



*The Senate is composed of all University officers of full professorial rank 
and all others in charge of independent departments of instruction. The order 
is that of seniority. 

tOn leave. 

23 



24 University of Illinois 

Isabel Bevier, Ph.M., Professor of Household Science and Di- 
rector of the Courses in Household Science 
♦Cyril George Hopkins, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy 
Morgan Brooks, Ph.B., M.E., Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 
George A Huff, Director of Physical Training for Men 
James McLaren White, B.S., Professor of Architectural Engi- 
neering and Supervising Architect 
Herbert Windsor Mumford, B.S., Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry 
Maurice Henry Robinson, Ph.D., Professor of Industry and 

Transportation 
Joseph Cullen Blair^ M.S. A., Professor of Horticulture 
Horace Adelbert Hollister, A.M., Professor of Education and 

High School Visitor 
Oliver Albert Harker, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Law and Dean 

of the College of Law 
Edward John Lake, B.S., Assistant Professor of Art and Design 

and Acting Head of the Department of Art and Design 
Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages 
Wilber John Eraser, M.S., Professor of Dairy Farming 
Frederick Green, A.M., LL.B., Professor of Law 
Harry Sands Grindley, D.Sc, Professor of Animal Nutrition 
James Wilford Garner, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 
Edgar Jerome Townsend, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
Edward Bartow, Ph.D., Professor of Sanitary Chemistry and Di- 
rector of the State Water Survey 
William Albert Noyes, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry 

and Director of the Chemical Laboratory 
Ernest Ritson Dewsnup, A.M., Professor of Railway Adminis- 
tration 
tWiLLiAM Freeman Myrick Goss, M.S., D.Eng., Professor of 
Railway Engineering, Dean of the College of Engineering, and 
Director of the School of Railway Engineering and Adminis- 
tration 
George Abram Miller, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
Edward Gary Hayes, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 
William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D., Professor of Education and 
Director of the School of Education 



•On leave for one year from November 1, 1913. 
tOn leave. 



Senate 25 

Julius Goebel, Ph.D., Professor of German 

Charles Henry Mills, D.Mus., F.R.C.O., F.A.G.O., Professor of 

Music and Director of the School of Music 
George Alfred Goodenough, M.E., Professor of Thermodynamics 
Phineas Lawrence Windsor, Ph.B., Librarian and Director of 

the Library School 
Boyd Henry Bode, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 
Henry Baldwin Ward, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology 
Harry Harkness Stoek, B.S., E.M., Professor of Mining Engi- 
neering 
Edward Charles Schmidt, M.E., Professor of Railway Engineer- 
ing 
Stuart Pratt Sherman, Ph.D., Professor of English 
Raymond MacDonald Alden, Ph.D., Professor of English and 

Chairman of the Committee of the Department of English 
Charles Russ Richards, M.E., M.M.E., Professor of Mechani- 
cal Engineering, Head of the Department of Mechanical Engi- 
neering, and Acting Dean of the College of Engineering 
Charles Spencer Crandall, M.S.. Professor of Pomology 
Edward Harris Decker, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law and Act- 
ing Librarian of the College of Law 
♦John Archibald Fairlie, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 
Leonard Hegnauer, B.S., Professor of Crop Production 
John William Lloyd, M.S. A., Professor of Olericulture 
Jeremiah George Mosier, B.S., Professor of Soil Physics 
Gertrude Evelyn Moulton, A.B., Director of Physical Training 

for Women 
James Harvey Pettit, Ph.D., Professor of Soil Fertility 
John Norton Pomeroy, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Law 
Louie Henrie Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Breeding and 

Acting Head of the Department of Agronomyf 
Chester Garfield Vernier, Ph.B., J.D., Professor of Law 
Bruce Willet Benedict, B.S., Director of Shop Laboratories in 

the Department of Mechanical Engineering 
Lotus Delta Coffman. Ph.D., Professor of Education 
William Edward Burge, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology 
and Acting Head of the Department of Physiology 



•On leave, second semester, 1913-14. 
tActing Head from November 1, 1913. 



26 University of Illinois 

Ernest Ludlow Bogart, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 
William Green Hale, B.S., LL.B., Professor of Law and Sec- 
retary of the Faculty of the College of Law 
Madison Bentley^ B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and 

Director of the Psychological Laboratory 
Ray Thomas Stull, E.M, (Cer.), Ceramist and Acting Director 

of the Courses in Ceramics 
Charles Frederick Hottes> Ph.D., Professor of Plant Physiology 
Harry Alexis Harding, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Bacteriology 

and Head of the Department of Dairy Husbandry 
George Enfield Frazer, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Public Ac- 
counting and Comptroller 
Kendric Charles Babcock, B.Lit>, Ph.D., Dean of the College of 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Charles Hughes Johnston, Ph.D., Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation \ 
William Trelease, D.Sc, LL.D., Professor of Botany and Act- 
ing Head of the Department of Botany 
John Sterling Kingsley, D.Sc, Professor of Zoology 
Clarence Walworth Alvord, Ph.D., Professor of History 
Clarence William Balke, Ph.D., Professor of Inorganic Chem- 
istry 
William Shirley Bayley, Ph.D., Professor of Geology 
Walter Costella Coffey, M.S., Professor of Sheep Husbandry 
Martha Jackson Kyle, A.M., Instructor in English and Acting 

Dean of Women 
Laurence Marcellus Larson, Ph.D., Professor of History 
Otto Eduard Lessing, Ph.D., Professor of German 
Ellery Burton Paine, M.S., E.E., Associate Professor of Elec- 
trical Engineering and Acting Head of the Department of 
Electrical Engineering 
Henry Lewis Rietz, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematical Statistics 
Charles Mulford Robinson, A.M., Professor of Civic Design 
Frank Smith, A.M., Professor of Systematic Zoology and Cur- 
ator of the Museum of Natural History 
Joel Stebbins, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy 
Edward Wight Washburn, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chem- 
istry 
Louis Allen Harding, M.E., Professor of Experimental Mechani- 
cal Engineering 



Associate Professors 27 

LoRiNG Harvey Provine, B.S., A.E., Professor of Architectural 
Engineering and Acting Head of the Department of Archi- 
t£cture 

Frank Daniel Webster, Major 20th U. S. Infantry, Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics and Commandant 

♦Frank Lincoln Stevens, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Edward Fulton, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Rhetoric 

fDAViD HoBART Carnahan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance 

Languages 
William Abbott Oldfather, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the 

Classics 
Charles Zeleny, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology 
Albert Howe Lybyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History 
George Tobias Flom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Scandinavian 
Alexander Dyer MacGillivray, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Systematic Entomology 
Arthur Stanley Pease, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Class- 
ics and Curator of the Museum of Classical Art and Arche- 
ology 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

George Henry Meyer, A.M., Assistant Professor of German and 
Assistant Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Edward Chauncey Baldwin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish 

Neil Conwell Brooks, Ph.D,. Assistant Professor of German 
and Curator of the Museum of European Culture 

Oscar Adolph Leutwiler, M.E., Assistant Professor of Machine 
Design 

Frances Simpson, M.L., B.L.S., Assistant Professor of Library 
Economy and Assistant Director of the Library School 

Nathan Austin W^eston, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Econom- 
ics and Assistant Director of the Courses in Business Admin- 
istration 

Charles Tobias Knipp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 



•Beginning February 1, 1914. 
tOn leave. 



28 University of Illinois 

Harry Gilbert Paul, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of the English 
Language and Literature 

Thomas Edmund Savage, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Strati- 
graphic Geology 

Herbert Fisher Moore, B.S., M.M.E., Assistant Professor of 
Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Fred Henry Rankin, Assistant Professor and Superintendent of 
Agricultural Extension, Assistant to the Dean of the College of 
Agriculture 

Floyd RoWt Watson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 

Edward Hardenberch Waldo, A.B., M.S., M.E., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Electrical Engineering 

Justus Watson Folsom, D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

William Frederick Schulz, E.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Physics 

John Myron Bryant, B.S., E.E., Assistant Professor of Electri- 
cal Engineering 

Lewis Flint Anderson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

John Driscoll Fitz-Gerald H, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ro- 
mance Languages 

Jakob Kunz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematical Physics 

William Spence Robertson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
History 

♦Louis Dixon Hall, M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry 

Charles Herschel Sisam, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

John McBeath Snodgrass, B.S., Assistant Professor of Railway 
Mechanical Engineering 

Simon Litman, Dr.Jur.Pub.etRer.Cam., Assistant Professor of 
Economics 

David Ford McFarland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Applied 
Chemistry 

James Byrnie Shaw, D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Arnold Emch, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Jean Baptiste Beck, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages 

Walter Fairleigh Dodd, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political 
Science 

•On leave. 



Assistant Professors 29 

Herman Bernard Dorner, M.S., Assistant Professor of Flori- 
culture 

Melvin Lorenius Enger, B.S., C.E., Assistant Professor of Theo- 
retical and Applied Mechanics 

Nellie Esther Goldthwaite, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Household Science 

George Foss Schwartz, B.Mus., A.M., Assistant Professor of 
Music 

Alonzo Morris Buck, M.E., Assistant Professor of Railway Elec- 
trical Engineering 

Aretas Wilbur Nolan, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Agri- 
cultural Extension 

Franklin William Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 
and Secretary of the Department of English 

Harrie Stuart Vedder Jones, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish 

Otto Rahn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Bethel Stewart Pickett, M.S., Assistant Professor of Pomology 

John A Detlefsen, D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Genetics 

Allen Boyer McDaniel^ B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering 

Wilhelm Miller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Landscape Horti- 
culture 

♦Leonard Bloomfield, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Comparative 
Philology and German 

Frederic Duncalf, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 

*David Simon Blondheim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ro- 
mance Languages 

Howard Vernon Canter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of the 
Classics 

Clarence George Derick, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry 

James Lloyd Edmonds, B.S., Assistant Professor of Horse Hus- 
bandry 

Ora Stanley Fisher, B.S., Assistant Professor of Soil Fertility 

♦Nelson William Hepbltin, M.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy 
Manufactures 

Harvey Willard Miller, M.E., Assistant Professor of General 
Engineering Drawing and Assistant Dean of the College of 
Engineering 

*0n leave. 



30 University of Illinois 

Martin John Prucha, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dairy Bac- 
teriology 

Ralph Rodney Root, M.L.A., Assistant Professor of Landscape 
Gardening 

Henry Perly Rusk, M.S., Assistant Professor of Cattle Hus- 
bandry 

Constance Barlow-Smith, Assistant Professor of Sight Singing 
and Ear Training, in charge of Public School Music 

George McPhail Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

James Elmo Smith, C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing 

Henry Charles Paul Weber, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry 

Arthur Cutts Willard, B.S., Assistant Professor of Heating and 
Ventilation 

Elmer Allen Holbrook, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mining En- 
gineering 

Percy Ash, B.S., C.E., Assistant Professor of Architectural De- 
sign 

William Caldwell Titcomb, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of 
Architecture 

John Ira Parcel, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of Structural 
Engineering 

Wilbur M Wilson, M.M.E., Assistant Professor of Structural 
Engineering 

ASSOCIATES 

Charles Richard Clark, B.S., Associate in Architectural Con- 
struction 
Tiiacher Howland Guild, A.M., Associate in English 
Arthur Romeyn Seymour, Ph.D., Associate in Spanish and Ad- 
viser to Foreign Students 
Arthur Robert Crathorne, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics 
Charles Christopher Adams, Ph.D., Associate in Animal Ecology 
Robert Lacy Borger, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics 
Ernest Barnes Lytle, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics 
Jacob Zeitlin, Ph.D., Associate in English 
John Mabry Mathews, Ph.D.. Associate in Political Science 
Ernest Winfield Bailey, M.S.. Associate in Pomology 
Daniel Otis Barto, B.S., Associate in Poultry Husbandry 
RoYDEN Earl Brand, M.S., Associate in Dairy Husbandry 
Solon Justus Buck, Ph.D., Associate in History 



Associates 31 

Virgil R Fleming, B.S., Associate in Theoretical and Applied 

Mechanics 
Axel Ferdinand Gustafson, M.S., Associate in Soil Physics 
Helena Maude Pincomb, B.S., Associate in Household Science 
Arthur Howard Sutherland, Ph.D., Associate in Psychology 
Paul Hansen, B.S., Associate in Sanitary Engineering and En- 
gineer for the State Water Survey 
William Leonidas Burlison, M.S., Associate in Crop Production 
Harold Wilson Stewart, B.S., Associate in Soil Physics 
Arthur James Todd, V\\X>., Associate in Sociology 
Elmer Howard Williams, Ph.D., Associate in Physics 
Lurene Seymour^ B.S., Ph.B., Associate in Household Science 
Gustaf Eric Wahlin, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics 
Stephen Osgood Andros, A.B., B.S., E.M., Associate in Mining 

Engineering 
Frederick Charles Bauer, B.S., Associate in Soil Fertility 
Simeon James Bole, A.M., Associate in Pomology 
Sleeter Bull, M.S., Associate in Animal Nutrition 
Arthur Francis Comstock, B.S., C.E., Associate in Railway Civil 

Engineering 
William Truman Crandall, B.S., M.S., Associate in Milk Pro- 
duction 
Nina Belle Crigler, B.S., Associate in Household Science 
Florence Rising Curtis, A.B., B.L.S., Associate in Library 

Economy 
John Adlum Dent, M.E., Associate in Mechanical Engineering 
Ira Wilmer Dickerson, B.S., Associate in Farm Mechanics 
Charles Elmer Durst, M.S., Associate in Olericulture 
Karl John Theodore Ekblaw, M.S., Associate in Farm Me- 
chanics 
Ira William Fisk, M.S., Associate in Electrical Engineering 
Neal Bryant Carver, C.E., Associate in Civil Engineering 
Cora Emeline Gray, M.S., Associate in Household Science 
Walter Frederick Handschin, B.S., Associate in Animal Hus- 
bandry 
Leonard Vaughan James, M.S., E.E., Associate in Electrical En- 
gineering 
Albert Woodward Jamison, M.S., Associate in Agricultural Ex- 
tension 
Walter Edward Joseph, Ph.D., Associate in Animal Husbandry 
Charles Fabens Kelley, A.B., Associate in Art and Design 



32 University of Illinois 

LeRoy Lang, M.S., Associate in Dairy Manufactures 

♦Arno Herbert Nehrling, Associate in Floriculture 

Francis Marion Porter, M.S., Associate in General Engineering 

Drawing 
Robert Kent Steward, C.E., Associate in General Engineering 

Drawing 
Leslie Morton Turner, B.L., D.derUniversite, Associate in Ro- 
mance Languages 
Oscar S Watkins, B.S., Associate in Horticultural Chemistry 
Ruth Wheeler, Ph.D., Associate in Household Science 
Earl Archibald White, M.S., Associate in Farm Mechanics 
Albert Lemuel Whiting, Ph.D., Associate in Soil Biology 
Carroll Carson Wiley, C.E,, Associate in Civil Engineering 
Charles Henry Woolbert, A.M., Associate in Public Speaking and 

English 
Philip Sheridan Biegler, B.S., Associate in Electrical Engineering 

LECTURERS 

Edna Lyman Scott, Special Lecturer on Library Work for Chil- 
dren 

Alfred Knight Chittenden, M.F., Lecturer on Timber and Tim- 
ber Resources and Assistant to the Director of the Engineer- 
ing Experiment Station 

George Benjamin Rice, Lecturer on the Installation and Operation 
of Mechanical Equipment for Buildings and Assistant Mechani- 
cal Engineer in the Office of the Supervising Architect 

William Arthur Chase, LL.B., C.P.A., Lecturer on Accountancy 
and Commercial Lazv 

Roger Frank Little, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Business Law 

INSTRUCTORS 

David Leonard Scroggin, Instructor in Machine Shop 
Henri Jacobus van den Berg, Instructor in Piano 
Edgar Thomas Lanham, Instructor in Forge Shop 
Albert Austin Harding, Instructor in Wind Instruments and Di- 
rector of the University Military Band 
Mary Minerva Wetmore, Instructor in Art and Design 
Harry Lovering Gill, Instructor in Track Athletics 
Harry Frederick Godeke. B.S.. Instructor in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 



^Resigned, January 31, 1914, 



Instructors 33 

George Wellington Pickels, Jr., B.C.E., C.E,, Instructor in Civii 

Engineering 
Charles Marshall Poor, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
John Giffin Thompson, Ph.D., Instructor in Economics 
Frank Walker Reed, Ph.D., Instructor in Astronomy 
George Paul Boomsliter, B.S., Instructor in Theoretical and Ap- 
plied Mechanics 
Florence M Kirkup, Instructor in Voice 
Clarence Eugene Noerenberg^ B.S., A.E., Instructor in Theoretical 

and Applied Mechanics 
Fred B Seely, B.S., Instructor in Theoretical and Applied Me- 
chanics 
Charles Allyn Williams, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
Herbert Le Sourd Creek, Ph.D., Instructor in English 
Newton Edward Ensign, A.B., B.S., Instructor in Theoretical and 

Applied Mechanics 
Harrison Frederick Gonnerman, B.S., Instructor in Theoretical 

and Applied Mechanics 
Robert Edwin Kennedy, Instructor in Foundry 
William Horace Rayner, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering 
George Denton Beal, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Clarence Valentine Boyer, Ph.D., Instructor in English 
Harvey Herbert Jordan, B.S., Instructor in General Engineering 

Drawing 
Aubrey John Kempner, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics 
Duncan Arthur MacInnes, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
John Lyon Rich, Ph.D., Instructor in Geology 
Harold Ordway Rugg, C.E., Instructor in General Engineering 

Drawing 
Glen Alfred Shook, A.B., Instructor in Physics 
William Herschel Smith, M.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 
Ellis Bayley Stouffer, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics 
Raymond Earl Davis, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering 
Armin Hajman Koller, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
Joseph Howard Beard, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Physiology 
Edward Wilson Chittenden, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics 
Arthur Charles Cole, Ph.D., Instructor in History 
William Wells Denton, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics 
Herbert Seton Eames, B.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
John Joseph Gardner, B.S., Instructor in Pomology 
y B Smith Hopkins, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 



34 University of Illitwis 

Marvin Edward Jahr, A.B., Instructor in Farm Mechanics 

Robert Taylor Jones, B.S., Instructor in Architecture 

Joseph Mitchell Kellogg, M.Arch., Instructor in Architectural 

Design 
Allen Holmes Kimball, M.S., Instructor in Architectural Design 
♦Frank Carlton Loring, B.S., A.M., Instructor in Electrical Engi- 
neering 
Edson Wilfred Morphy, Instructor in Violin 
Horatio Newton Parker, Instructor in Milk Distribution 
Chester Otis Reed, B.S., Instructor in Farm Mechanics 
Lambert Thorp, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Arthur Jerrold Tieje, Ph.D., Instructor in English 
Lowell Leslie Townsend, A.M., Instructor in Piano 
Edna Almeda Treat, B.Mus., Instructor in Piano 
Charles George MacArthur, A.M., Instructor in Physiological 

Chemistry 
Olin Harris Moore, Ph.D., Instructor in Romance Languages 
Ernest James Reece, Ph.B., Instructor in Library Economy 
Ethel Bond, A.B., B.L.S., Instructor in Library Economy and 

Assistant in charge of the Collections in Library Economy 
Edwin John Manley, Instructor in Swimming 
Frederick Kitson Cowley, Instructor in Architecture 
Samuel Chatwood Burton, A.M., Instructor in Architecture 
Horace Whittier Peaslee, B.Arch., Instructor in Landscape Design 
Heber Dignam Nasmyth, Instructor in Voice 
Clarissa Rinaker, Ph.D., Instructor in English 
Harley Jones VanCleave, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology 
Stuart Jeffrey Bates, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Henry John Broderson, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Josephine Elizabeth Burns, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics 
Mervin James Curl, A.M., Instructor in English 
Easley Stephen Jones, A.M., Instructor in English 
Walter Byron McDougall, Ph.D., Instructor in Botany 
Gertrude Schoepperle, Ph.D., Instructor in English 
Queen Lois Shepherd, Ph.D., Instructor in Philosophy 
Leslie Denis Smith, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Angelo Benedetto Marino Corrubia, B.S., M.S., Instructor in 

Architecture 
James Hutchinson Forsythe, M.Arch., Instructor in Architecture 



^Resigned, December, 1913. 



Instructors 35 

RuFUS Crane, A.B., B.S., Instructor in General Engineering Draw- 
ing 
Philip Stephan Barto, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
Verna Brooks, A.B., Instructor in Physical Training for Women 
Ira Thomson Carrithers, A.B., Instructor in Intramural Athletics 
Arthur Boquer Domonoske, M.S., Instructor in Machine Design 
Elmer Tryon Ebersol, A.B., B.S., Instructor in Crop Production 
Roy Newton Fargo, B.S., Instructor in Physical Training for Men 

and Director of the Men's Gymnasium 
Forest Addison Fisher, B.S., Instructor in Soil Physics 
Georgia Elizabeth Fleming, B.S., Instructor in Textiles 
Lawrence Earl Foglesong, B.S., Instructor in Landscape Garden- 
ing 
♦Hugh Glasgow, Ph.D., Instructor in Entomology 
Stella Mary Hague, Ph.D., Instructor in Botany 
Florence Harrison, B.S., Instructor in Household Science, in 

charge of Extension Work 
Robert William Hoffman, B.S., Instructor in Landscape Garden- 
ing 
Ray Stillman Hulce, M.S., Instructor in Milk Production 
Ralph Kent Hursh, B.S., Instructor in Ceramics 
John Clark Jordan, A.M., Instructor in English 
Maude Edna Parsons, A.B., Instructor in Household Science and 

Director of the Lunch Room 
Joseph Culpepper Pendleton, Instructor in Foundry Work 
Henry Eugene Pengilly, Instructor in Fencing 
Virgil Augustus Place, B.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 
Barney S Radcliffe, M.S., Instructor in Ceramics 
GusTAV H Radebaugh, Instructor in Machine Work 
Harrison August Ruehe, B.S., Instructor in Dairy Manufactures 
Charles Bovett Sayre, B.S., Instructor in Olericulture 
Hiram Thompson Scoville, A.B., Instructor in Accountancy 
Francis Marion Simpson, B.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 
Frank A Gushing Smith, B.S., Instructor in Landscape Design 
Grace Esther Stevens, A.B., Instructor in Household Science 
Charles Manfred Thompson, Ph.D., Instructor in Economics 
George Frisbie Whicher, A.M., Instructor in English 
Harry William Waterfall, B.S., Instructor in Machine Design 
Christian Alban Ruckmich, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology 



•Resigned, November 30, 1913. 



36 University of Illinois 

Harold Eaton Babbitt, B.S., Instructor in Municipal and Sanitary 

Engineering 
Harry Gardner, M.S., Instructor in Theoretical and Applied Me- 

chanics 
Alexander Vallance, M.E., Instructor in Theoretical and Applied 

Mechanics 
Charles Earl Bradbury, B.P., Instructor in Art and Design 
Abner Richard Knight, M.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
Roger Sherman Loomis, B.Lit., A.M., Tutor in English 
Charles Henry Hecker, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Anna Viola Simon, Instructor in Voice 

Arthur Grenville Eldredge, Instructor in Photography and Direc- 
tor of the Photographic Laboratories 
Gustave Adolph Gross, Instructor in Pattern Making 
Charles Leslie Stewart, A.M., Instructor in Economics 
*Warren Hobart Pillsbury, B.L., J.D., Instructor in Law 
Lewis Emanuel Young, B.S., E.M., Instructor in Mining Engineer- 
ing 
Robert Douglas Glasgow, Ph.D., Instructor in Entomology 
Robin Beach, B.S., Instructor in General Engineering Drawing 
Alexander Green, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
Guy G Mills, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering 
♦Charles Ruby Moore, B.S., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

ASSISTANTS 

James Merion Duncan, Assistant in Pattern Making 

Sada Annis Harbarger, A.m., Assistant in English 

Ruth Kelso, A.M., Assistant in English 

Marion Charlotte Landee, Assistant in English and Assistant in 

Physical Training for Women 
Elizabeth Parnham Brush, A.M., Assistant in History 
Bessie Rose Green, A.M., Assistant in Zoology 
Alta Gwinn, A.M., Assistant in English 
Orrin Harold Smith, A.M., Assistant in Physics 
John Hamilton Whitten, A.M., Assistant in Botany 
Rosalie Mary Parr, A.M., Assistant in Botany 
Peter Joseph Rebman, Assistant in Forge Shop 
Lloyd Theodore Jones, A.M., Assistant in Physics 
Walter Albert Buchen, A.M., Assistant in English 
Oliver Arnold Keller, B.S., Assistant in Dairy Manufactures 



^Beginning February 1, 1914. 



Assistants 37 

WiLFORD Stanton Miller, A.M., Assistant in Education and Secre- 
tary of the School of Education 
Oscar Alan Randolph, M.S., Assistant in Physics 
Sidney Archie Ro\\t^nd, Jr., A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 
George Rutledge, A.M., Research Assistant in Mathematics 
George Wallace Sears, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
Felix Emil Held, A.M., Assistant in German 
Augusta Dillman Evans, A.B., Assistant in Agricultural Exten- 
sion 
Orr Milton Allyn, B.S., Assistant in Crop Production 
William Harry Bair, B.S., Assistant in Physics 
Reed O'Shea Brigham, B.S., Assistant in Botany 
Wilbur Jerome Carmichael. B.S., Assistant in Animal Husbandry 
Frank Leslie Fleener, A.B., Assistant in Geology 
John Alexander Frisk, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering and 

Mechanician in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 
Rosa Lee Gaut, B.Mus., Assistant in Physical Training for Women 
Clarence Mark Hebbert^ B.S., Assistant in Mathematics 
George William Heitkamp, A.B., Assistant in Geology 
Charles Kay Hewes, B.S.. Assistant in Chemistry 
Ralph R Jones, Assistant in Physical Training for Men 
Oliver Kamm, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry 

Walter Stephen Nelson, Assistant in General Engineering Draw- 
ing 
Clyde Ross Newell, Ph.B., M.S., Assistant in Bacteriology 
Frank Ashmore Pearson. B.S.A., Assistant in Dairy Husbandry 
Alvah Peterson, A.M., Assistant in Entomology 
John William Read, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
David Grosh Thompson, A.M.. Assistant in Geology 
Earle Horace Warner, A.B., Assistant in Physics 
John Jonathan Yoke, Assistant in Animal Husbandry 
Bert Stover Davisson, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry 
Ernest Carroll Faust, A.B., Research Assistant in Zoology 
Emerson Grant Sutcliffe, A.B., Assistant in English 
♦Bronson Barlow, M.S., Research Assistant in Bacteriology 
Ernst Kessler, Assistant in Glass Blowing 
Thomas Gregory Goodwin, A.B., Assistant in English 
John Richard Wells, B.S., Assistant in Animal Husbandry 
Lew R Sarett, A.B., Assistant in Public Speaking 
Broxislav Roman Honovski, Ph.D.. Research Assistant in Chem- 
istrv 



^Resigned November 1, 1913. 



38 University of Illinois 

Catherine Oaks, A.B., B.L.S., Reviser in the Library School 
♦Hakry Young Carson, B.S., Assistant in Architectural Engineer- 
ing and Superintendent of Construction 
Conrad Joseph Eppels, Assistant in Romance Languages 
John Raymond Shulters, A.M., Assistant in Romance Languages 
Denton Loring Geyer, A.M., Assistant in Philosophy 
Sebastian Karrar, A.M., Assistant in Physics 
Jonas Bernard Nathanson, A.M., Assistant in Physics 
Chester Harmon Allen, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry 
Jesse Melangthon Barn hart, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry in the 

Department of Dairy Husbandry 
John David Bond, A.B., Research Assistant in Astronomy 
Benjamin Lester Bowling, Assistant in the Cement Laboratory 
Lawrence Vreeland Burton, B.S., Assistant in Bacteriology 
Charles Serophin Carry, B. es L., Assistant in Romance Languages 
Joseph Harvey Checkley, B.S., Assistant in Agricultural Exten- 
sion 
Arthur Samuel Colby, B.S., Assistant in Pomology • 
Harvey Peach Corson, M.S., Assistant in Sanitary Chemistry and 

Chemist and Bacteriologist in the State Water Survey 
Edgar Wallace Engle, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry . 
Harrison Fred Theodore Fahrnkopf, B.S., Assistant in Soil Fer- 
tility 
Harry Charles Gilkerson, B.S., Assistant in Soil Fertility 
Alfred Laurence Hall-Quest, A.M., Assistant in Education 
Charles Leroy Harlan, A.B,, Assistant in Education 
Arthur Floyd Heck, B.S., Assistant in Soil Fertility 
Harry Virl Heimburger, A.B,, Assistant in Zoology 
Raymond W Hess, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry 
Ernest Michael Rudolph Lam key, A.B., Assistant in Botany 
Thomas Ernest Layng, A.M., Assistant in Chemistry 
John Marvin LeCato, A.B., Assistant in Botany 
Ralph Harlan Linkins, A.B., Assistant in Zoology 
Harrison McJohnston, A.B., Assistant in English 
William Pitt Miller, B.S., Assistant in Agricultural Extension 
Alma Jessie Neill, A.B., Assistant in Physiology 
Charles Ivan Newlin, B.S., Assistant in Animal Husbandry 
Alva LeRoy Prickett, A.B., Assistant in Economics 
Charles Claflin Rand. B.S., Assistant in Ceramics 
Clarence Samuel Ross, A.B., Assistant in Geology 
Guy Watson Smith, M.S., Assistant in Mathematics 



'Appointment to December 1, 191 ; 



Graduate Assistants 39 

Howard John Snider, B.S., Assistant in Soil Fertility 
Thomas Blaine Stanley, A.B., Assistant in English 
Scott Champlin Taylor, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
Gerritt John Van Zoeren, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry 
Harry Dwight Waggoner, A.B., Assistant in Botany 
Edward Harvey Walworth, B.S., Assistant in Crop Production 
Thor Griffith Wesenberg, A.M., Assistant in Romance Languages 
Ernest Atkins Wildman, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
William Wodin Yapp, B.S., Assistant in Dairy Husbandry 
Adolf Eduard Zucker, A.M., Assistant in German 
Harry Fletcher Lewis, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
Frederick Calkins Torrance, M.E., Assistant in Mechanical En- 
gineering Laboratory 
Lawrence Fleming Foster, A.B,, Assistant in Chemistry 
Warren Rippey Schoonover, B.S., Assistant in Soil Fertility 
Henry Charles Zeis, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 
Anna Sue Hughitt, Assistant in Physical Training for Women 
Dorothy Ruth Shoemaker, A.B., Assistant in Physical Training 

for Women 
Thomas Franklin Vance, Ph.D., Assistant in Psychology 
Alfred Chester Hanford, A.M., Assistant in Political Science 
George Washington Spindler, A.M., Assistant in German 
Louis Allen, A.B., Assistant in Romance Languages 
Franz August Aust, M.S., Assistant in Landscape Design 
Raymond Ephraim Dixon, A.M., Assistant in English 
Arthur Edwards Williams, B.S., Assistant in Ceramics 
Earle Robinson Math, B.S'., Assistant in Architectural Construc- 
tion 
Charles Christian Rees, A.B., Assistant in Pathology in Horti- 
culture 
Harry Montgomery Weeter, A.B., Assistant in Dairy Husbandry 
Paul Anders, Assistant in Glass Blowing 
Russell McCulloch Storey, A.M., Assistant in Political Science 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Robert Earl Baker, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Theodore Rally Ball, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Herbert Melville Carter, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Ernest Edward Charlton, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Homer Eldon Chenoweth, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Karl Adolph Clark, A.M.. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Margaret Vara Cobb, A.M., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Juanita Elizabeth Darrah, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 



40 University of Illinois 

DuANE Taylor Englis, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Ross Earlby Gilmore, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Gertrude Amelia Johnson, M.S., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Harry Cleveland Kremmers, A.B., Graduate Assistant Chemistry 
William Asbury Manuel, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Stewart Dent Marquis, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Henry Gustav May, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Samuel Hawthorne Scherfee, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Botany 
Clarence Scholl, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Horace Wesley Stunkard, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Everett Harvey Taylor, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Ralph Waldo Tippet, A.B., Graduatt Assistant in Chemistry 
Howard DeWitt Valentine, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Henry Joseph Weiland, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Grace Adaline Wells, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
Edward Wichers, A.B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

William Calvin Adams, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Silas Alonzo Braley, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Joseph Cohen, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Alexander Cohn, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Henry Charles Eckstein, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Agnes Hitt, Student Assistant in Physical Training for Women 

John Moller Janson, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Ralph Augustus Nelson, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Anton Prasil, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Paul Cobb Rich, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

George Benjamin Ruby, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Carl William John Sievert, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Glen Seymour Skinner, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

John Donald Snook, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Walter Addison Straw, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

ASSISTANTS IN MILITARY SCIENCE 

Edwards Hall Berry, Assistant in Military Science 
Herbert Edward Howes, Assistant in Military Science 
Harold Paul Ousley, Assistant in Military Science 
Edwin Chester Prouty, Assistant in Military Science 
Clifford Harper Westcott, Assistant in Military Science 
Frederick John Giehler. Assistant in Military Science 
Paul Cobb Rich, Assistant in Military Science 
Charles R Velzy, Assistant in Military Science 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



STAFF 



Phineas Lawrence Windsor, Ph.B., Librarian and Director of the 

Library School 
Francis Keese Wynkoop Drury, A.M., B.L.S., Assistant Librarian 
Sabra Elizabeth Stevens, A.B., General Assistant 
Marguerite Mitchell, A.B,, General Assistant 
Eleanor G Karsten, Ph.B., Secretary 
Order Department — 

Jacob Hodnefield, A.M., Exchange Assistant 

AuRELLA Knapp, A.B., B.L.S., Order Assistant (Periodicals) 

Myrtle Anna Renz^ B.L.S., Order Assistant 

Clara Agnes Ricketts, A.B., B.L.S., Order Assistant 
Loan Department — 

Emma Reed Jutton, B.L.S., Loan Librarian 

Frances Margaret Feind, A.B., B.L.S., Loan Assistant 

Sarah Elizabeth Bryan, A.B., B.L.S., Loan Assistant 

Viola Eraser, A.B., Loan Assistant 

Ina May Brown, Loan Assistant 

Thomas Parker Ayer, A.B., Shelf Assistant 

Glenn Christy, Shelf Assistant 

John George Eppinger, Shelf Assistant 

John Breedis, Shelf Assistant 

Everett Orren Fontaine, Shelf Assistant 
Binding Department — 

JosiE Batcheller Houchens, A.m., B.L.S., Binding Librarian 
Catalog Department — 

Philip Sanford Goulding, A.B,, Catalog Librarian 

Adah Patton, B.L.S., Classifier 

Nellie Mabel Robertson, A.B., B.L.S., Catalog Assistant 

Antoinette Helen Goetz, A.B,, Catalog Assistant 

Edith Emigh, Catalog Assistant 

LiLLA M Alexander, Catalog Assistant 

Fannie Dunlap. Ph.B., Catalog Assistant 

41 



42 University of Illinois 

Bertha Lee Sharp, Catalog Assistant 

Elizabeth Henrietta Cass, A.B., B.L.S., Catalog Assistant 
Nelle Uree Branch, A.B., Catalog Assistant 
Minnie Joanna Bollman, A.B., Catalog Assistant 
Hazel Yearsley Shaw, A.M., Catalog Assistant 
Mary Zeliaette Troy, A.B., Catalog Assistant 
Reference Department — 

Alice Sarah Johnson, A.B., B.L.S., Reference Assistant 
Emma Felsenthal, Ph.B., B.L.S., Reference Assistant 
Margaret Hutchins, A.B., B.L.S., Reference Assistant 
Departmental Libraries — 

Mary Torrance, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant in the Classics 
♦John Boynton Kaiser, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant in Economics 

and Sociology 
Ola M Wyeth, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant in Germanic and Romance 

Languages 
Marion Leatherman, A.B., Assistant in History and Political 

Science 
Jennie Adah Craig, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant in English 
Margaret Herdman, A.B., Assistant in Philosophy, Psychology, 

and Education 
Ethel Bond, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant in Library Economy 
Charles Edwin Janvrin, Ph.B., B.L.S., Assistant in Natural 

History 
Mary Elizabeth Love, Assistant in Natural History 
Winifred Fehrenkamp, B.L.S., Assistant in Architecture 



'Resigned, February 1, 1914. 



THE COLLEGE OF iMEDICINE 

(Congress and Honore Streets^ Chicago) 



FACULTY 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D.. President of the University 

William Edward Quine, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Medicine, 
Emeritus, and Senior Dean 

George Peter Dreyer, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology and 
Physiological Chemistry, Head of the Department of Physiology 
and Physiological Chemistry, and Junior Dean 

Henry Parker Newman, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gynecology 
and Clinical Gynecology, Emeritus 

John Erasmus Harper, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology 
and Clinical Ophthalmology, Emeritus 

Daniel Atkinson King Steele, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Sur- 
gery and Clinical Surgery and Head of the Department of Sur- 
gery 

Oscar Augustus King, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical 
Neurology and Head of the Department of Psychiatry 

Henry Tltiman Byford, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gynecology and 
Clinical Gynecology and Head of the Department of Gynecology 

William Allen Pusey, A.M., M.D., Professor of Dermatology 
and Head of the Department of Dermatology 

Thomas Archibald Davis, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank Breckenridge Earle, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics 

Adolph Gehrmann, M.D., Professor of Hygiene and Bacteriology 

William McIntyre Harsha, A.B., M.D., Professor of Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery 

Maurice Louis Goodkind, M.D., Professor of Medicine and Clin- 
ical Medicine 

Charles Spencer Williamson, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine 
and Clinical Medicine and Head of the Department of Medicine 

Bernard Fantus, M.D,, Professor of Pharmacology 

John Lincoln Porter, M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

43 



44 College of Medicine 

Albert John Ochsner, B.S., M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clin- 
ical Surgery 

William Lincoln Ballenger, M.D., Professor of Laryngology, 
Rhinology, and Otology, and Head of the Department of Lar- 
yngolgy, Rhinology, and Otology 

Frederick Tice, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Chest and 
Clinical Medicine 

Joseph McIntyre Patton, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Daniel Nathan Eisendrath, A.B., M.D., Professor of Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery 

Charles Davison, M.D,, Professor of Surgery and Clinical Sur- 
gery 

Charles Sumner Bacon, Ph.B., M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and 
Clinical Obstetrics and Head of the Department of Obstetrics 

Lee Harrison Mettler, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and 
Clinical Neurology and Head of the Department of Neurology 

Casey A Wood, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and 
Head of the Department of Ophthalmology 

Channing Whitney Barrett, M.D., Professor of Gynecology and 
Clinical Gynecology 

NoRVAL Pierce, M.D., Professor of Otology and Clinical Otology 

Albert E Halsted, M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical Sur- 
gery 

Albert Chauncey Eycleshymer, B.S., Ph.D., M.D., Professor of 
Anatomy and Head of the Department of Anatomy 

David John Davis, M.D., Acting Professor of Pathology, Acting 
Head of the Department of Pathology and Director of the Re- 
search Laboratory for Experimental Medicine 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Rachelle S Yarros, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and 
Clinical Obstetrics 

William Elliott Gamble, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of 
Clinical Ophthalmology 

Charles Edward Humiston, M.D., Associate Professor of Sur- 
gery and Clinical Surgery 

Nelson Mortimer Percy, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical 
Surgery 

Edward Milton Brown, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical 
Surgery 

William Fuller, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative Surgery 



Assistant Professors 45 

Charles Mayer Jacobs, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical 

Orthopedic Surgery 
Juuus H Hess, M.D,, Associate Professor of CliniccU Pediatrics 
Joseph C Beck, M.D., Associate Professor of Laryngology, Rhin' 

ology, and Otology 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Haim I Davis, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry 

Mary Gilruth McEwen, M.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Clin- 
ical Gynecology 

John Michael Lang, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Gyne- 
cology 

Edward Louis Heintz, Ph.G., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medi- 
cine and Clinical Medicine 

John Weatherson, C.E., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, 
Head of the Instructors in Senior Medicine, and Recording Sec- 
retary of the Faculty 

Stella May Gardner, M.D., Assistant Professor of Microscopical 
and Chemical Diagnosis 

Frederick George Dyas, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery and 
Clinical Surgery 

George Farnsworth Thompson, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor 
of Surgery and Clinical Surgery 

Frank Donald Moore, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery and 
Clinical Surgery 

Frederick Gillette Harris, M.D., Assistant Professor of Derma- 
tology and Venereal Diseases 

Ulysses Grant Darling, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 
and Clinical Neurology 

Cecil V Bachelle, M.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

Otto Herman Rohrlack, Ph.G., M.D., Assistant Professor of 
Obstetrics and Clinical Obstetrics 

Richard Hunt Brown, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical 
Laryngology, Rhinology, and Otology 

John Brown Loring, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Oph- 
thalmology 

Ephraim Kirkpatrick Findlay, M.D., Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Ophthalmology 

William Henry Welker, A.C, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Physiological Chemistry 

Emanuel Oliver Benson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of 
Pediatrics and Clinical Pediatrics 



46 College of Medicine 

Maurice Lewison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Diag- 
nosis 

Mary C Lincoln, M.D., Assistant Professor of Microscopical and 
Chemical Diagnosis 

William H Burmeister, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology 

LECTURERS 

Elmer DeWitt Brothers, M.S., LL.B., Lecturer on Medical Juris- 
prudence 

Matthew Mills, LL.B., Alternate Lecturer on Medical Jurispru- 
dence 

Bernard John Cigrand, M.S., D.D.S., Lecturer on the History of 
Medicine 

INSTRUCTORS 

Robert William Morris, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Senior Medi- 
cine 
William David McDowell, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Senior Medi- 
cine 
Ralph Randall Holmes, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Senior Medi- 
cine 
Waldemar Eberhardt, B.S., M.D,, Instructor in Senior Medicine 
Edward F Fox, M.D., Instructor in Senior Medicine 
Solomon Strouse, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine 
Wilbur Maynard French, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics 
Lois Lindsay Wynekoop, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics 
William A Ribbeck, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics and Clinical 

Pediatrics 
John A Christian, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics 
Edward Kent Armstrong, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics 
Alexander B Raff, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Chest 
Walter Bradford Metcalf, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the 

Chest 
Clarence T Roome, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Chest 
Arrie Bamberger, M.D., Instructor in Minor Surgery 
John Milton Berger, M.D., Head Instructor in Senior Surgery 

and Assistant in Clinical Surgery 
George Luther Davenport, M.D., Instructor in Senior Surgery 

and Minor Surgery 
Raymond William McNeally, M.D., Instructor in Senior Sur- 
gery 



Instructors 47 

Henry Lester Baker, M.D., Instructor in Senior Surgery and As- 
sistant in Clinical Surgery 
Howard Oscar Shafer, M.D., Instructor in Senior Surgery 
Charles Herbert Phifer, M.D., Instructor in Senior Surgery 
French S Cary, M.D., Instructor in Senior Surgery 
Irving S Koll, M.D., Instructor in Senior Surgery 
Charles M McKenna, M.D,, Instructor in Senior Surgery 
Meyer Solomon, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry and Clinical Psy- 
chiatry and Instructor in Neurology 
John Ralph Ballenger, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry and Clin- 
ical Psychiatry 
Alexander Sandor Hershfield, M.D., Instructor in Neurology 
Benjamin Braude, M.D., Instructor in Neurology 
Isador Bernard Diamond, M.D., Instructor in Neurology 
Edward F Leonard, M.D., Instructor in Neurology 
Richard Charles Steffan, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics 
John William Birk, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics 
Annie E Barron, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics 
Charles Newberger, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics 
Mary Jeanette Kearsley, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Irving Herbert Eddy, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
George Henry Van Dyke, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Clara P Seipple, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Albert John Schoenberg, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Wesley John Woolston, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Mary Blanche White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Pauline Rose Kapsa, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
Egan Walter Fischman, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology 
George J Lorch, Ph.G., M.D., Instructor in lunior Medicine 
Edward A Corcoran, M.D., Instructor in lunior Medicine 
Charles H Schmidt, M.D., Instructor in Junior Medicine 
Henry Eugene Irish, M.D., Instructor in Junior Medicine 
Harry Jerome Smejkal, M.D., Instructor in Junior Medicine 
Frank J Wright, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine 
Frank Chauvet, M.D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 
Louis Rudolph, M.D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 
John Ross Harger, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Junior Surgery and 

Minor Surgery 
David Alexander, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 
Bert Leslie Taylor Woods, M.D., Instructor in Operative Surgery 
and Assistant in Clinical Surgery 



48 College of Medicine 

William Chester Smith, M.D., Instructor in Operative Surgery 
Arthur Barnett Eustace, M.D., Instructor in Operative Sur- 
gery 
Archie James Graham, M.D., Instructor in Operative Surgery 
Adolph Hartunc, M.D., Instructor in Radiology 
Arthur William Stillians, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology 
Philip Frank Shaffner, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology 
Lillian Ethel Taylor, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology, Rhi- 

nology, and Otology 
Charles Clayton Clement, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology 
Frederic Vreeland, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology 
Richard Root Rupert, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy 
John Eddy Haskell, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Pharmacology 
Margaret May Jones, M.D,, Instructor in Clinical Laryngology, 

Attending Physician to the Dispensary 
Jacob Carl Krafft, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Pediatrics, Attend- 
ing Physician to the Dispensary 
Ernest Sisson Moore, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine, At- 
tending Physician to the Dispensary 
Robert Mosser, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine, Attending 

Physician to the Dispensary 
Georgiana Theobold, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Ophthalmology, 

Attending Physician to the Dispensary 
Lawrence W Whitmer, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Ophthal- 
mology, Attending Physician to the Dispensary 
Franklin S Wilson, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine, At- 
tending Physician to the Dispensary 

ASSISTANTS 
Frederick Hamilton Blayney, A.M., M.D., Assistant in Clinical 

Surgery 
George Washington Post, Jr., B.S,, A.M., M.D., Assistant in 

Clinical Surgery 
Robert Emmett Flannery, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Surgery 
Charles C Clark, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Surgery 
Elmer W Schnoor, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Surgery 
Max Meyerovitz, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Surgery 
Alexander Donald Ferguson, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Surgery 
Walter Charles Hammond, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics 
Harrison Willis Maltby, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 
William Arthur Clark, A.M., M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Sur- 
gery 



Student Assistants 49 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant in Physiological Chem- 
istry 
Oscar Gustav Fischer, M.D., Assista^it in Bacteriology 
Metta May Loomis, Librarian 
Thomas S Jones, Artist in the Department of Anatomy 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Clay Adler^ Ph.C, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Conrad George Appelle, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Max Brachvogel, Student Assistant in Physiology 

Charles Calvin Conley, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

James Tobias Groot, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

Eric Gosta Hakenson^ Student Technician in the Infirmary and 

Dissecting Room 
Benjamin Vaughn McClanhan, Student Assistant in Physiology 
Emil George Nadeau, Student Assistant in Physiology 
Arthur John Ochs, Student Assistant in Bacteriology 
Francis Allen Richardson, A.B., B.S., M.D., Student Assistant 

in Chemistry 
Clara Roushausen, Student Assistant in Bacteriology 
Joseph Seilen, Student Assistant in Physiology 
J Craig Small, A.B., Student Assistant in Physiological Chem- 
istry 
Leo Tarkowski, Student Assistant in the Library of the College of 
Medicine 



THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

(Harrison and Honore Streets, Chicago) 



FACULTY 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University 
Frederick Brown Moorehead, A.B., D.D.S., M.D., Professor of 
Oral Surgery and Pathology and Dean of the College of Dentis- 
try 
Donald Mackay Gallie, D.D.S., Professor of Operative Dentistry 

and Operative Technics 
George Walter Dittmar, D.D.S., Professor of Prosthetic Den- 
tistry and Prosthetic Technics, and Superintendent of the In- 
firmary 
Frederick Bogue Noyes, B.S., D.D.S., Professor of Orthodontia 

and Dental Histology 
Edgar David Coolidge, D.D.S., Professor of Materia Medica and 

Therapeutics 
Albert Chauncey Eycleshymer, B.S., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of 

Anatomy 
George Peter Dreyer, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology 
Louis Schultz, D.D.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery and Pathology 
Louis E Bake, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Operative Technics 

and Porcelain Art 
Solomon Perry Starr, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Prosthetic 

Technics 
Elmer DeWitt Brothers, LL.B., Lecturer on Dental Jurisprudence 
Henry Cooley Lee, Ph.G., D.D.S., Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry and Materia Medica 
Frank Joseph Bernard, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Dentis- 
try 
Arthur H Hixson, B.S., Instructor in Bacteriology 
John C McGuire, D.D.S., Instructor in Operative and Prosthetic 

Dentistry 
Warren C Hawthorne, B.S., Instructor in Metallurgy 
Vergil H Moon, M.S., D.D.S., M.D., Instructor in Histology 
Edgar Grim Miller, M.D., Assistant in Chemistry 
Edwin Paul Swatek, D.D.S., Assistant in Oral Surgery 

SO 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

(Michigan Boulevaio) and Twelfth Street, Chicago) 



FACULTY 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University 

William Baker Day, Ph.G., Professor of Materia Medica and 
Botany, Acting Dean, and Secretary 

Albert Henry Clark, Ph.G., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Clyde Mason Snow, Ph.G., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

Bernard Fantus, M.D., Lecturer on Physiology 

Edmund Norris Gathercoal, Ph.G., Instructor in Pharmacog- 
nosy 

Henry William Colson, Ph.C, Instructor in Chemistry 

Ben Lee Eicher, Ph.C, Instructor in Pharmacy 



51 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 

FACULTY 



COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 

Committee on Educational Policy — Professor Forbes (chair- 
man), Dean Kinley (ex officio), Professor E. B. Greene, Pro- 
fessor Mumford, Professor Noyes, Professor Pomeroy, Professor 
Schmidt 

Committee on Library — Professor Daniels (chairman), Pro- 
fessor Blair, Professor Carman, Professor Goebel, Professor 
Sherman, Professor Trelease, Librarian Windsor 

Committee on Athletics — Professor Parr (chairman). Dean 
Clark, Professor Goodenough, Director Huff, Professor White 

COMMITTEES OF THE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION 

Committee on Attendance for Men — Associate Professor Pease 
(chairman), Assistant Dean Warnock (secretary ex officio), Pro- 
fessor Coffey, Dr. Borger, Mr. Noerenbcrg 

Committee on Attendance for Women — Assistant Professor 
Goldthwaite (chairman), Acting Dean Kyle (secretar>' ex of- 
ficio), Assistant Professor Simpson 

Committee on Discipline for Men — Dean Clark (chairman ex 
officio), Professor Barton, Professor Decker, Professor Good- 
enough, Assistant Professor Rankin, Assistant Professor Scott 

Committee on Discipline for Women — Acting Dean Kyle, 
(chairman ex officio), Director Moulton, Miss Curtis 

Committee on Student Organisations and Activities — Assist- 
ant Professor Watson (chairman), Dean Clark, Acting Dean 
Kyle, Professor Lloyd, Assistant Professor Schwartz 

Committee on Student Publications — Assistant Professor Scott 
(chairman), Assistant Professor Robertson, Mr. Simpson 

52 



Committees of the Faculty 53 

Auditing Committee for Student Organizations and Publica- 
tions — Assistant Dean Wamock (chairman), Mr. Scovill, Mr. 
Noerenberg 

Committee on Students' Progress (membership ex officio) — 
Dean Clark (chairman), Acting Dean Kyle, Assistant Dean 
Meyer, Assistant Dean Miller, Assistant Professor Rankin, Pro- 
fessor Hale 

Committee on Loan Funds — Dean Clark (chairman). Assistant 
Dean Meyer, Assistant Dean Miller 

Committee on the Hospital Association — Dean Clark 

Committee on Transfer of Credits — Dean Babcock (chairman). 
Professor Hollister, Professor Goodenough, Assistant Professor 
Leutwiler, Dr. Crathorne, Dr. Seymour, Registrar McConn (sec- 
retary ex officio) 

Committee on Accredited Schools — Professor Coffman (chair- 
man), Professor Hollister, Assistant Professor Paul, Mr. Jami- 
son, Registrar McConn 

Committee on Appointment of Graduates — Professor Bagley 
(chairman), Professor Hollister, Professor Frank Smith 

Committee on Catalog — Professor Ward (chairman), Pro- 
fessor Alden, Professor Carman, Assistant Professor Scott, Regis- 
trar McConn 



PART I 
GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION 



The University of Illinois is situated in Champaign Cotmty, 
^bout fifty miles northeast of the geographical center of the State. 
It is 128 miles south of Chicago, 118 miles west of Indianapolis^ 
164 miles northeast of St. Louis, 

The campus of the University lies just within the corporate 
limits of the city of Urbana and is bounded on the west by the 
city of Champaign. These two municipalities, locally known as 
the "Twin Cities," form in fact one community of about twenty- 
four thousand inhabitants. The city halls of the two towns are 
about two miles apart, the campus half way between. The rail- 
way, express, telegraph, and telephone services of both cities are, 
therefore, equally available for the University. Mail for the in- 
stitution itself should be directed to Urbana to insure prompt de- 
livery. The Urbana post-office maintains a sub-station at the 
University, located in the Library Building. 

Urbana-Champaign 

The cities of Urbana and Champaign are in the heart of the 
"Corn Belt" and form the business and social center of a rich 
farming community. 

Both cities are well paved, well drained, and provided with 
good water suppl3^ In matters pertaining to health, conditions 
are excellent. There is a hospital within three blocks of the 
campus, in which students may be cared for at moderate expense. 

The University has no dormitories, but the number of board- 
ing houses is large, and there are forty-two residence halls erected 
by fraternities, sororities, and local clubs. The material needs of 
the student body are, therefore, provided for. 

The moral and religious conditions of the University commun- 
ity are favorable to the welfare of the students. There are thirty- 
churches, representing eleven denominations, and a number of 
students' religious associations, leagues, and guilds, including 
strong Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations. 

Under a special State law, the liquor traffic has been barred 
from all territory within a radius of four miles from the Uni- 
versity. 

57 



58 General Information 

Railway Connections 

The University is connected with neighboring cities in Illinois, 
including Bloomington, Danville, Decatur, Peoria, and Spring- 
field, and also with St. Louis, by the electric interurban lines of the 
Illinois Traction System. It will shortly be connected by other 
interurban lines with Kankakee and Chicago. 

It may be reached from Chicago and the north and from 
points in the south by the Illinois Central Railroad (time from 
Chicago by express trains, three hours and ten minutes), being on 
the direct line from Chicago to Cairo and New Orleans. It is 
joined to the east and the west by the Peoria & Eastern Division 
of the "Big Four" Route (Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. 
Louis Railway), as well as by the division of the Wabash Rail- 
way which connects Kansas City and St. Louis with Detroit and 
Buffalo. It is also reached from the west by the Havana branch 
of the Illinois Central Railroad and from Decatur by another 
branch of the same system. 

The time from New York by way of the Wabash and "Big 
Four" routes is twenty-six hours, by way of Chicago and the Illi- 
nois Central, twenty-four hours. Washington and Philadelphia 
are about equally distant in time. Pittsburg, Buffalo, Kansas 
City, and Omaha may be reached in fifteen, fourteen, thirteen, and 
seventeen hours respectively. 

The station of the Illinois Central Railroad is in Champaign. 
The Wabash and "Big Four" have stations in both Champaign 
and Urbana. These several stations are each a little more than 
a mile distant from the University campus. There are several 
hotels in Champaign and Urbana within easy reach of the Uni- 
versity, the Beardsley in Champaign and the Columbian in Ur- 
bana being the largest. 



HISTORY 



J 862. The Morrill Land Grant 

By this act the national government donated to each state in 
the Union public land scrip, in quantity equal to 30,000 acres for 
each senator and representative in Congress, "for the endowment, 
support, and maintenance of at least one college, whose leading 
object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of 
learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanical arts, * 
* * * in order to promote the liberal and practical education 
of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of 
life." 

On account of this grant the State pays the University, semi- 
annually, interest at the rate of five per cent on about $610,000 and 
deferred payments on land contracts amounting approximately^ to 
$35,000. 

Location chosen 

To secure the location of the University several counties en- 
tered into competition by proposing to donate to its use specified 
sums of money or their equivalent. Champaign County offered a 
large brick building in the suburbs of Urbana, erected for a semi- 
nary and nearly completed, about 1,000 acres of land, and $100,000 
in countj' bonds. To this the Illinois Central Railroad added 
$50,000 in freight 

1867. Incorporation 

The institution was incorporated February 28, 1867, under the 
name of the Illinois Industrial University. It was placed under 
the control of a Board of Trustees, consisting of the Governor, 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the President of the 
State Board of Agriculture, ex officio members, and twenty- 
eight citizens appointed by the Governor. The chief executive of- 
ficer was called the Regent, and was made an ex officio member 
of the Board and the presiding officer of both the Board of Trus- 
tees and the Faculty. (See also 1873 and 1887 below.) 

59 



6o General Information 

1867. Dr. Gregory Regent 

On March 12, 1867, John Milton Gregory, LL.D., was elected 
Regent of the University. On May 7, 1867, Dr. Gregory accepted 
the position and entered upon his duties. He served as Regent un- 
til September i, 1880. 

1868. The University opened 

The University opened on March 2, 1868. The number of 
students enrolled was about fifty; the faculty consisted of the Re- 
gent and two professors. During the first term another instruct- 
or was added, and the number of students increased to 77 — all 
young men. 

During the first term instruction was given in algebra, geome- 
try, physics, history, rhetoric, and Latin. Work on the farm and 
gardens or about the buildings was at first compulsory for all 
students. In March of the next year, however, compulsory labor 
was discontinued, save when it was to serve as a part of instruc- 
tion. 

1868-9. The first laboratories 

During the autumn of 1868 a chemical laboratory was fitted up ; 
and laboratory work in botany was begun the following year. 

i8yo. Pioneer shop instruction 

In January, 1870, a mechanical shop was fitted up with tools 
and machinery, and here was begun the first shop instruction 
given in any American university. In the summer of 1871 the 
Wood Shops and Testing Laboratory (burned on June 9, 1900) 
were erected and equipped for students' shop work in both wood 
and iron. 

18/O. Women admitted 

On March 9, 1870, the Trustees voted to admit women as 
students. In the year 1870-71 twenty-four availed themselves of 
the privilege. Since that time they have constituted from one- 
sixth to one-fifth of the total number of students. 

^873. First reorganisation of the Board of Trustees 

At this time the number of members was reduced from thirty- 
one (see 1867 above) to eleven — the Governor and the President 
of the State Board of Agriculture, ex officio, and nine others, who 
were still appointed by the Governor. Beginning at this time also, 
the President of the Board has been chosen by the members from 
among their own number for a term of one year. (See also 1887 
below.) 



History 6l 

iSyy. Authority to confer degrees received 

According to the original State law, the usual diplomas and 
degrees could not be granted by the University; certificates show- 
ing the studies pursued and the attainments in each were given 
instead. The certificates proved unsatisfactory to the holders, 
and in 1877 the legislature gave the University authority to confer 
degrees and issue diplomas. 

1880-81. Dr. Peabody Regent 

In June, 1880, Regent Gregory's resignation was accepted to 
take effect September i, 1880, and Selim Hobart Peabody, A.B., 
Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, was 
made Regent pro tempore. At the next annual meeting, in March, 
1881, he was elected Regent. 

1885. Change of name 

In this year the General Assembly changed the name of the in- 
stitution from the Illinois Industrial University to the University 
of Illinois. 

1885. The State Laboratory of Natural History transferred to the 
University 
See page 494. 

1887. Second reorganisation of the Board of Trustees 

In 1887 a law was passed making membership in the Board 
elective, at a general State election, and restoring the Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction as an ex officio member. There are 
now, therefore, three ex officio and nine elective members. (For 
the previous organization of the Board see 1867 and 1873 above.) 

1887. The Agricultural Experiment Station established at the 
University. 
See page 490. 

i8<;>o. Additional Federal endowment 

In 1890 the Congress of the United States made further appro- 
priations for the endowment of the institutions founded under the 
act of 1862. Under this enactment each such college or uni- 
versity received the first year $15,000, the second year $16,000, and 
in each succeeding year a sum larger by $i,oco than the amount of 
the preceding year, until the amount reached $25,000; this sum was 
to be paid yearly thereafter. 



62 General Information 

189 1. Dr. Burrill Acting Regent 

In June, 1891, Regent Peabody's resignation was accepted, to 
take effect September i, and in August Thomas Jonathan Burrill, 
A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Horticulture, was appoint- 
ed Acting Regent. Dr. Burrill served in this capacity until Sep- 
tember, 1894. 

1892. The Graduate School 

Beginning with this year, graduate work was undertaken under 
the name of the Graduate School, but without the organization of 
a separate faculty. 
1894. The Summer Session 

The first Summer Session of the University was authorized by 
a vote of the Trustees on March 13, 1894, and was opened in 
June of that year. 
1894. Dr. Draper President 

On April 13, 1894, Andrew Sloan Draper, LL.D., was elected 
Regent. He accepted May 10, 1894. On August i his title was 
changed to President. Dr. Draper entered upon his duties at the 
beginning of the school year 1894-95. He served until June, 1904. 

1896. The School of Pharmacy 

On May i, 1896, the Chicago College of Pharmacy, founded in 
1859, became the School of Pharmacy of the University of Illi- 
nois. 
T897. The College of Medicine 

Negotiations looking to the affiliation of the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Chicago with the University, which had 
been going on for several years, were concluded by the Board of 
Trustees March 9, 1897. Accordingly, the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons became, on April 21, 1897, the College of Medicine 
of the University of Illinois. (The College of Medicine was dis- 
continued on June 30, 1912, but was re-opened on February 12, 

I9U) 

1897. ^^'^ School of Music 

By vote of the Trustees on June 9, 1897, the department of mu- 
sic, which had been reorganized and enlarged in 1895, was erected 
into the School of Music, with a separate faculty and organiza- 
tion. 

1897. The State Water Survey authorized 
See page 496. 



History 63 

1897. The Library School 

In 1897 the School of Library Economy, which had been es- 
tablished in 1893 at the Armour Institute of Technology in Chi- 
cago, was transferred to the University, the Director of that 
school was appointed Librarian of the University Library, and the 
Library School was opened. 

1897. The College of Law 

Pursuant to an action of the Board of Trustees, taken Decem- 
ber 8, 1896, the School of Law was organized, and was opened 
September 13, 1897. The course of study covered two years, in 
conformity with the then existing requirements for admission to 
the bar of Illinois. In the following November, however, the 
Supreme Court of the State announced rules relating to examina- 
tions for admission to the bar which made three years of study 
necessary, and the course of study in the Law School was im- 
mediately rearranged on that basis. On February 9, 1900, the 
name of the School of Law was changed, by vote of the Board 
of Trustees, to College of Law. 

1899. The State Entomologist's Office permanently established at 

the University 
See page 495. 

1900. Courses in Business Administration 

In 1900 the General Assembly made an appropriation for the 
establishment of courses of training for business life, and, in ac- 
cordance with that action, the Trustees approved the organization 
of the Courses in Business Administration. 

1901. The College of Dentistry 

In accordance with an action taken by the Board of Trustees 
on March 12, 1901, a School of Dentistry was organized as a de- 
partment of the College of Medicine. The School was opened 
October 3, 1901. The name was changed to College of Dentistry 
on April 27, 1905. (The College of Dentistry was discontinued on 
June 30, 1912, but was re-opened on October i, 1913.) 

1903. The Board of Examiners in Accountancy created 
See page 499. 

1903. The Engineering Experiment Station established 
See page 491. 

1904. Dr. James President 

On March 8, 1904, President Draper's resignation was ac- 
cepted, to take effect July i. On August 23, 1904, Edmund Janes 



64 General Information 

James, Ph.D., LL.D., was elected President. He accepted on 
August 26, 1904, and entered upon his duties in the fall of that 
year. 

igos. The School of Education 

By a vote of April 27, 1905, the Board of Trustees established 
the School of Education, to provide for the professional training 
of teachers. 

1905. The State Geological Survey established 
See page 497. 

ipo6-;^. The School of Raihvay Engineering and Administration 
On January 30, 1906, the Board of Trustees created in the Col- 
lege of Engineering a department of railway engineering; on Jan- 
uary 22, 1907, supplementing that action, it established the School 
of Railway Engineering and Administration. 

7po6-7. The Graduate School organized as a separate faculty 

The General Assembly appropriated $50,000 for the Graduate 
School, and the Executive Faculty of that school was organized. 

7909. A Mine Rescue Station established at the University 
See page 500. 

igii. The- Mill Tax 

The General Assembly passed a law providing that in the year 
1912, and annually thereafter, the proceeds of a tax of one mill for 
each dollar of the assessed valuation of the taxable property of the 
State should be set apart as a fund for the maintenance of the Uni- 
versity. 

797^. The Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry discontinued 

The Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry were discontinued on 
June 30, 1912. 

7975. The Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry reopened 

On February 12, 1913, the Board of Trustees accepted the gift 
of the capital stock of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, do- 
nated to the University by the alumni and other friends of medi- 
cal education in Chicago, and the College of Medicine was re- 
opened. 

The College of Dentistry was reopened on October i, 1913. 

797J. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

In this year the College of Literature and Arts and the Col- 
lege of Science were united to form the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 



EQUIPMENT 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The land occupied by the University and its several depart- 
ments embraces 225 acres, besides a farm of 855 acres. There are 
at the present time some forty-five buildings on the campus. 

LIBERAL ARTS GROUP 

University Hall (erected 1873) is the "old main building" of 
the University. It occupies three sides of a quadrangle, and is five 
stories in height. It is devoted to class rooms and offices. 

Lincoln Hall (erected 191 1) has a frontage of 230 feet. The 
exterior is brick, stone, and terra cotta. This building provides 
for the advanced work of the departments of the classics, English, 
Romance languages. Germanic languages, history, economics, po- 
litical science, sociology, and philosophy. The first three floors 
provide, in addition to the ordinary class and consultation rooms, 
seminar libraries and conference rooms. On the fourth floor 
are research rooms and two museums, the Museum of Classical 
Art and Archeology, and the Museum of European Culture. 

The Commerce Building (erected 1912) is a fire-proof building 
three stories high, 153 feet on the front and 60 feet deep, with a 
one-story annex containing a lecture room 48 feet square. The 
building has a total floor area of about 29,000 square feet and is to 
house the work in business administration with its various class 
rooms, offices, and laboratories. The exterior first story finish is 
buff Bedford stone; the second and third stories are of brick with 
carved stone trimmings and cornice. The roof is of tile, and the 
interior trim is of dark oak throughout. 

GENERAL SCIENCE GROUP 

Natural History Hall (old part erected 1892; addition 1909) is 
the largest building on the campus' covering a ground area 135 feet 
by 275 feet. It is occupied by the departments of botany, entomol- 
ogy, zoolog)', physiology, geology, and mathematics, together with 
the offices and equipment of the State Geological Survey, and the 

65 



66 General Information 

State Natural History Survey, and the office of the State Ento- 
mologist. The offices of the President, the Registrar, and the Dean 
of Men, and the Business Office, are also housed in this build- 
ing. A fireproof museum 51 feet by 63 feet in size, equipped 
with fireproof and dustproof cases, occupies the center of the build- 
ing. 

The Laboratory of Physics (erected 1909) is a three-story fire- 
proof brick building trimmed with Bedford limestone. The length 
is 178 feet and the depth of the wings is 125 feet. The large lec- 
ture room has a seating capacity of two hundred sixty-two. A one- 
story annex, 78 by 28 feet, contains the ventilating and heating fans 
and the machine shop of the department. The total available floor 
area, exclusive of the basement, is about 60,000 square feet. The 
large laboratories and the recitation rooms are mostly in the west 
wing. The east wing is of heavy construction and contains about 
30 smaller laboratories for advanced experimental work. The blue 
print department of the University occupies rooms on the top floor 
of the building. Gas, distilled water, compressed air and vacuum, 
and direct and alternating electric currents of a wide range in 
amperes and in volts are available in all parts of the building. 

The Chemical Laboratory (erected 1901-2) is a three-story 
building, the ground plan of which is shaped like the letter E. The 
extreme dimensions are 230 feet along the front and 116 feet along 
the wings. The middle rear wing contains the lecture amphitheater, 
which seats 350. The end wings contain the general laboratories. 
The central part of the building is occupied by offices, museum, 
class and seminar rooms, supply rooms, and a number of special 
rooms for research work. There is a basement, which contains the 
ventilating plant and rooms for assaying and metallurgy. In this 
building are located also the general office and laboratories of the 
State Water Survey. 

The Astronomical Observatory (erected 1896) is a brick building 
with extreme dimensions of 75 by 55 feet. It has three wings and 
is surmounted by a dome 25 feet in diameter. 

The Ceramics Laboratory (erected 1910) is a two-story brick 
building in which are provided a general laboratory, plaster room, 
pottery room, rough grinding room, machine room, drawing room, 
library, recitation rooms, chemical laboratory, and office. (See also 
the Mining and Ceramics Laboratory under "Engineering Group" 
below.) 



Buildings and Grounds 67 

The Entomology Building, for the use of the State Entomolo- 
gist and his staff, is a two-story building 48 by 20 feet, with base- 
ment storerooms, and with two insectary wings of greenhouse con- 
struction, each 25 by 20 feet. It contains the office of horticultural 
inspection, a stenographer's room, rooms for the assistant inspec- 
tors and insectary assistants, and a large fireproof vault. The 
glass-covered wings are equipped for experimental entomolog\- and 
life-history studies. 

ENGINEEWNG GROUP 

Engineering Hail (erected 1894) is a four-story building, with 
a frontage of 200 feet, a depth of 76 feet on the wings and 138 feet 
on the center, and a floor area of 47,000 square feet The first and 
second floors are occupied by the offices, the recitation rooms, and 
the instrument and drafting rooms of the departments of civil engi- 
neering and municipal and sanitary engineering. The engineering 
lecture room, on the second floor, has a seating capacity of two 
hundred twenty-five. The third floor is occupied by the offices of 
the Dean of the College of Engineering and Director of the Engi- 
neering Experiment Station and by the office, recitation, and draft- 
ing rooms of the department of mechanical engineering. A portion 
of the third floor and all of the fourth floor is occupied by the de- 
partment of architecture. 

The Electrical Engineering Laboratory (erected 1898) is a two- 
story brick building with floor area of 18,000 square feet. The 
basement contains the departmental shop, the storage battery room, 
the electric furnace room, and rooms for electrical research. The 
first floor contains the undergraduate laboratory, the instrument 
room, the high potential laboratory, and the drafting, lecture, and 
recitation rooms. The second floor contains the photometric labo- 
ratory, the offices, the departmental library, and a room used by the 
Electrical Engineering Society. 

The Mechanical Engineering Laboratory (erected 1905) is a 
brick building with a frontage of 120 feet, a total depth of 182 feet, 
and a floor area of 24,000 square feet. The front section is two 
stories high, and contains offices, lecture and computation rooms, 
and an instrument room. Back of this are three bays. The middle 
bay is provided with a concrete testing floor and a lo-ton three- 
motor traveling crane of 38-foot span. The north bay contains a 
5-ton traveling crane and is used for laboratory work in connec- 
tion with the departments of civil engineering and theoretical and 
applied mechanics. 



68 General Inforfnation 

The Laboratory of Applied Mechanics (erected 1901-2) is a 
brick building having a floor area of 16,000 square feet. The front 
part contains the materials testing laboratory, and the rear wing 
contains the hydraulics laboratory. 

The Mining and Ceramics Laboratory (erected 1912) is a one- 
story building with a floor area of 11,200 square feet. It contains 
a kiln room for the department of ceramics having an area of 
4,300 square feet, a mining engineering laboratory of 3,600 feet 
area, and a chemical laboratory for the department of mining en- 
gineering. There are also offices and class rooms for the depart- 
ment of ceramics and a Mine Rescue Station equipped with Yeager 
helmets and arranged for training men in the methods of mine 
rescue work. 

The Locomotive Testing Laboratory (erected 1912) is a fire- 
proof building with brick walls 117 feet long and 42 feet wide, 
connected by a spur with the Illinois Traction System tracks. It 
houses a locomotive testing plant, which consists of supporting 
wheels on which rest the drivers of the locomotive to be tested, a 
dynamometer to which the locomotive drawbar is attached, and 
which measures the tractive force exerted by the locomotive, water 
brakes for absorbing the power developed by the locomotive, and 
other auxiliary apparatus. The exhaust gases pass through a "tran- 
site" (or asbestos board) duct to a large fan which forces them 
through a reinforced concrete cinder separator; the separator re- 
moves the cinders and discharges the gases into the air through a 
brick stack eight feet in height. 

The Transportation Building (erected 1912) is a three-story fire- 
proof building of brick trimmed with stone. The general dimen- 
sions of the building are 65x189 feet and the total floor area is 
34,225 square feet. The first and second floors of the building are 
occupied by the departments of railway and mining engineering, 
and the third floor is occupied by the department of general en- 
gineering drawing. 

The Metal Shops (erected 1902) occupy a one-story brick build- 
ing, with a floor area of 12,000 square feet, containing a lecture 
room, two office rooms, a machine shop, and a forge shop. The 
machine shop is 48 by 140 feet. Power is supplied by a 20 horse- 
power electric motor. A three-ton traveling crane of 12 foot span 
covers the center of the floor for the entire length. 

The Wood Shop (erected 1901-2) and the Foundry (added 1904) 
occupy a brick building which has a floor area of 16,000 square 



Buildings and Grounds 69 

feet. The part of the building devoted to the wood shop contains 
a bench room, lathe room, machine room, and various smaller 
rooms for lectures, exhibition purposes, etc. The part devoted to 
the foundry has a molding floor, 35x80 feet, traversed by a 5-ton 
traveling crane, and a basement room for the storage of materials. 

AGRICULTURAL GROUP 

The Agricultural Building (erected 1900) consists of four sepa- 
rate structures, built around a court and connected by corridors. 
The main building, three stories in height, contains offices, class 
rooms, and laboratories for the departments of agronomy, animal 
husbandry, dairy husbandry, horticulture, and veterinary science ; 
the chemical laboratory of the Experiment Station ; administra- 
tion rooms; and an assembly room (Morrow Hall) with a seating 
capacity of 500. The other three buildings are two stories high ; 
one is for dairy manufactures, one for farm crops, and one for 
veterinary science and stock judging. These buildings are of stone 
and brick, roofed with slate, and contain 113 rooms and a total 
floor space of about two acres. An adjacent glass structure serves 
the departments of agronomy and horticulture. There are, in addi- 
tion to these buildings, three dwellings, three barns, and a green- 
house. 

The Agronomy Building (erected 1904-5) is 50 by 100 feet in 
size, of brick and slate, trimmed vrith stone. It contains a field 
laboratory for crop work in which yields of experimental plats are 
studied, sample seeds stored, and specimens preserved. 

The Farm Mechanics Building (erected 1906-7) is a three-story 
brick structure containing class rooms, offices, lecture rooms, draft- 
ing room, library, laboratories, and tool and storage rooms. The 
third floor, which is reached by an elevator, furnishes storage room 
for the greater part of $16,000 worth of farm machiney loaned the 
College by various manufacturing companies and used for labora- 
tory work. The facilities afforded by this building, with its equip- 
ment, make possible the assembling, testing, and adjusting of all 
the important machines used in farm operations. 

The Stock Pavilion (erected 1913) is a fireproof building 54 feet 
high on the front and 148 feet deep with circular ends 92 feet in 
diameter and 20 feet high. The total ground area is 30,000 square 
feet, and the show arena is 216 feet long and 65 feet wide. Seats of 
concrete provide accommodations for 2000. Arrangements are to 
be made providing for a di\'ision of the arena into three parts giv- 
ing three separate judging rooms for instructional purposes. The 



70 General Information 

building also contains class rooms and offices. Stabling will be 
provided in a separate structure. The exterior is of brick and terra 
cotta, renaissance in design, the frieze being enriched with medal- 
lions of animals' heads. 

The Animal Husbandry Cattle Feeding Plant has a capacity for 
feeding 150 steers at a time. It consists of open and closed sheds 
with paved lots adjoining, with a storage barn 44 by 72 feet and an 
experimental silo. 

The Beef Cattle Building (erected 1904-5) is a one-story struc- 
ture of brick and slate, trimmed with stone, 217 feet across the 
front, with a wing at either end 33 by 49 feet; the central portion 
rises two stories and is used for the storage of feed. Other por- 
tions of the building are used as quarters for the breeding herd, and 
will accommodate about 100 head of cattle. 

The Sheep Barn is a wooden structure consisting of a main barn 
36 by 90 feet, and a shed, opening to the south, 25 by 100 feet in 
size. A 6-foot aisle, lined by pens on each side, runs through the 
center of the barn. This building besides accommodating the Uni- 
versity flock is used for experimental work. Its location and con- 
struction insures dry footing and ample light and ventilation 
throughout the year. 

Other buildings for the accommodation of live stock are the 
horse barn, the piggery, and two large barns on the South Farm. 

The Experimental Dairy Barns (erected 1912) comprise a round 
barn 70 feet in diameter with a reinforced concrete silo in the cen- 
ter, a semi-detached rectangular structure 40 by 70 feet with a 
Grout silo adjacent, and a small dairy house and shop 26 by 32 feet. 
The barns are of frame construction on brick walls with solid floors 
of the mill type of construction, and contain feed rooms, hay lofts, 
and other accommodations for the experimental dairy herd. The 
dairy house is of frame construction, two stories in height, and con- 
tains office, shop, coal room, dairy room, and four sleeping rooms 
for employees. 

The Horticulture Building (erected 1904-5) is a structure of 
brick and slate trimmed with stone, approximately 50 by 100 feet 
in size. It is used as a field laboratory for horticultural tests, and 
contains sorting rooms, storage rooms, and a laboratory for the 
mixing of spraying materials and other operations in connection 
with the horticultural work. 



Buildings and Grounds 71 

The Horticulture Greenhouse Group (erected 1912-13) includes 
(i) a floricultural group and (2) a vegetable and plant breeding 
group. 

(i) The Floriculture Greenhouse Group (erected 1912-13) 
consists of a two-story and basement service building 93 by 37 feet, 
and the following glass structures : four houses each 105 by 28 feet, 
three houses each 105 by 35 feet, one corridor house 139 by 10 feet, 
one storage house 50 by 12 feet, and a palm house 80 by 40 feet. 
The service building is of hollow tile and cement construction, and 
contains laboratories, lecture room, herbarium room, offices, and 
seminar room, as well as potting, storage, and work rooms. 

(2) The Vegetable and Plant Breeding Greenhouse Group 
(erected 1912-13) consists of a glass house for vegetable growing 
105 by 28 feet, two houses for plant breeding each approximately 80 
by 30 feet, a wire house 80 by 30 feet, and a two-story and base- 
ment service building 82 by 36 feet, containing laboratories, work 
rooms, class rooms, offices, and storage rooms. The type of con- 
struction of this building is the same as that of the floriculture 
service building. 

LAW BUILDING 

The Law Building (erected 1878; remodeled 1902 and 1912) is 
the second oldest building in the University group. It has two sto- 
ries and a basement. The upper floor contains the Law Library, the 
students' conference room, the private offices of the members of the 
law faculty, and the Moot Court Room, a model court room with 
a seating capacity of four hundred. On the main floor are the 
recitation rooms, the Dean's offices, and the faculty room. In the 
basement are the lockers, the students' reading room, and a court 
room for the Law Clubs. 

BUILDINGS FOR GENERAL UNIVERSITY USE 

The Library Building (erected 1896-7) is modern Romanesque 
in style, is built of Minnesota sandstone, and measures 167 by 113 
feet, with a tower 132 feet high. The first floor, or basement, con- 
tains the rooms of the catalog and order departments, the bound 
newspapers, and the University Station Postoffice. The second, or 
main floor, contains the general reference room, the periodical read- 
ing rooms, a small conference room, and the delivery room, which 
opens into the second story of the stack. The third floor contains 
the study room, lecture rooms, and office of the Library School, 
faculty study room, and the office of the librarian and assistant 



72 General Information 

librarian. The five-story book stack is a rear wing to the building, 
separated from it by a fireproof wall. The delivery room is open 
to the roof and is lighted by a dome of art glass; the lunettes arc 
decorated with frescoes symbolic of the four older colleges of the 
University — Literature and Arts, Science, Agriculture, and Engi- 
neering. 

The Auditorium (erected 1907-8) is a brick and stone building 
for general meeting purposes. It contains an auditorium seating 
about 2,200 and a memorial vestibule. All general University exer- 
cises, including convocations and the commencement gatherings, are 
held in this building. 

The Men's Gymnasium (erected 1901) is a three-story building 
of stone and pressed brick, 100 by 150 feet. On the first floor there 
is a swimming pool, 26 feet wide, 75 feet long, and 8 feet deep at 
the lower end, lined with white enamel bricks. This floor contains, 
also, the general locker room, which is fitted up with all-metal lock- 
ers, and with shower bath, and steam baths; rooms for the Univer- 
sity athletic teams ; a room for visiting teams ; a special dressing 
room for members of the faculty; and ofl&ces for the physical di- 
rector and the instructors in athletics. The entire second floor is 
one large room, which is fitted up with all the modern appliances 
for gymnastic exercises. The third floor contains an elevated run- 
ning track, 15 laps to the mile, which is properly banked on the 
turns to secure the greatest speed and comfort in running. 

The Armory (erected 1889-90) has a clear floor space of 15,000 
square feet in one hall It is equipped v^rith racks for 1,200 stands 
of arms. An annex provides for two pieces of field artillery. 

The New Armory (under construction 1913-14) comprizes a 
drill room with a clear area 200x400 feet and a height of 98 feet at 
the center, the roof being carried by fourteen three-hinged steel 
arches. The sides are of hollow tile and the ends, supported by col- 
umns, are of steel, glass, tile, and concrete with wood frames and 
sashes. The drill floor is of sufficient area to permit the maneuver- 
ing of an entire battalion of the cadet regiment. Provision has been 
made for the addition of a balcony around the drill floor with seats 
for 3000 and for the addition of three-stor}-^ facades along the sides, 
flanked by towers at each end. This will provide space for com- 
pany rooms, lockers rooms, shooting tubes, and class rooms. 

The Woman's Building (erected 1905) is in the New England 
colonial style of architecture, of reddish brown brick, with white 
stone trimmings. The central part of the structure is the woman's 



Buildings and Grounds 73 

gymnasium. On the lower floor there are a swimming tank, lock- 
ers, dressing rooms, and baths. The upper floor is devoted to the 
main gj-mnasium, which is 92 by 50 feet. The north wing of the 
building is given to the department of household science, and the 
south wing provides rooms for the social life of the women stu- 
dents. The addition to the Womans' Building (erected 1912) is a 
three-story fireproof building with basement. It is 200 feet long on 
the front and 83 feet on each connecting wing, having 43,000 square 
feet of floor area. It has a large colonade with towers on the front 
and two smaller colonades on the north and south of the inner 
court. The addition is similar to the old building in finish and sup- 
plements the working space of the departments using it. It has two 
halls for literary societies and a modern flat on the upper floor, and 
an institutional kitchen and large dining room on the second floor. 
There are also offices for the Dean of Women and the Director of 
the Courses in Household Science, laboratories, social rooms, and 
space for the expansion of gymnasium work. 

THE president's HOUSE 

The President's House (erected 1896) is a three-story frame 
building, in the colonial style. The first story is designed primarily 
for entertaining; large reception and dining parlors are so arranged 
as to open together into a central corridor. The second and third 
stories provide library and living rooms. 

SERVICE BUILDINGS 

The Central Heat and Power Plant (erected 1902; addition 
1910) is 55 by 120 feet. It contains boilers aggregating 1,800 horse- 
power. A supplemental boiler and power plant, designed ultimate- 
ly to carry the load of the present station, is equipped with boilers 
of 1,000 horse-power. These two stations furnish steam for heat- 
ing and power to all buildings on the campus. A power plant con- 
taining a 250-kilowatt Allis-Chalmers direct connected steam en- 
gine and dynamo, a 125-kilowatt direct connected Westinghouse 
engine and generator, and a lOO-kilowatt Curtiss turbo-generator, 
together with the accessories necessary to a complete power sta- 
tion, supplies current for light and power to all parts of the 
grounds. The pipe-lines of the heating system and the circuits for 
distributing electricity are carried from the central plant to the sev- 
eral buildings through brick and concrete tunnels and clay and con- 
crete conduits. Altogether there are now 6,275 feet of tunnels and 
3,800 feet of conduit for the distribution of steam and 7,000 feet of 



74 General Information 

conduit for the distribution of electricity. The new boiler and 
power plant provides temporary quarters for the electric test car 
of the department of railway engineering. 

The Pumping Station of the University water-works is a brick 
building, 38 by 73 feet, connected with the central heating station. 
Four 8-inch wells, 145 feet deep, and one 12-inch well, 148 feet deep, 
supply the University with water. A masonry reservoir provides 
for a fire-reserve supply. The pumps, tanks, and connections are 
arranged to give opportunities for experimental work, and also to 
vary the working conditions in the adjacent hydraulics laboratory. 
In this building is kept the equipment of the University fire depart- 
ment, including an electric automatic hose and chemical wagon. 

LABORATORIES 

Twenty-six departments of the University are equipped with 
laboratories. The following list shows the buildings in which these 
are located : 

GENERAL SCIENCE LABORATORIES 

Botany — Natural History Hall 
Ceramics — Ceramics Laboratory 
Chemistry — Chemical Laboratory 
Entomology — Natural History Hall 
Geology — Natural History Hall 
Physics — Laboratory of Physics 
Physiology — Natural History Hall 
Psychology — University Hall 
Zoology — Natural History Hall 

ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

Cement — Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

Electrical engineering — Electrical Engineering Laboratory 

Founding — Wood Shop 

Forging — Metal Shops 

Hydraulics — Laboratory of Applied Mechanics 

Locomotive — Locomotive Laboratory 

Machine Construction — Metal Shops 

Materials testing — Laboratory of Applied Mechanics 

Mechanical engineering — Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

Mining — Mining Engineering Laboratory 

Roads — Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

Wood Working — Wood Shop 



Museums and Collections 75 

SPECIAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES 

Agricultural Experiment Station — Agricultural Building 

Bacteriological laboratory 
Chemical laboratory- 
Physical laboratory 
Geological department — Natural History Hall 

Laboratory of economic geology 
State Entomologist's Office — Natural History Hall 

State Laboratory of Natural History — Natural History Hall 

State Water Survey — Chemical Laboratory 

Laboratory for sanitary water analysis 

MUSEUMS AND COLLECTIONS 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Liberal Arts Group 

Art. — A collection of casts, photographs, and engravings pre- 
sented to the University in 1876 by citizens of the community has, 
for want of a suitable gallery, been placed in different buildings on 
the campus. Eight large statues are in the auditorium foyer. 
Numerous pieces of this collection are now in the studios of the 
department of art and design in University Hall, and others are 
used to decorate the corridors and class rooms of University Hall, 
Natural History Hall, and the Library. A collection of eighty-one 
German and Japanese prints purchased by the department of art 
and design from the St. Louis Exposition in 1905 is displayed in the 
rooms of the department of art and design. 

Other collections of value to art students, consisting of a num- 
ber of casts of Moorish, Spanish, and German ornament and mis- 
cellaneous casts, models, prints, and drawings, are placed in the 
studios and corridors of the department of art and design. 

Classical Archeology and Art. — This museum is located in Room 
402 Lincoln Hall, and contains casts of important works of Greek 
and Roman sculpture; miscellaneous originals and models of Egyp- 
tian, Greek, and Roman antiquities ; about 1,500 Babylonian tab- 
lets ; and over 1,100 mounted photographs of historic sites and 
archeological remains in Greece, Italy, and other parts of the ancient 
world. Over 1,100 slides belonging to the department of the classics 
are also available for illustrative purposes. The museum is open 
on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons. 

Commerce. — For its courses in industrial economics and com- 
merce the University has a working collection of the materials of 



76 General Information 

commerce ; a lantern and several hundred slides ; political and in- 
dustrial maps ; and diagrams and stereoscopic views illustrating va- 
rious phases of commerce and industry. Most qI the articles con- 
stituting the commercial museum are the gift of the Philadelphia 
Commercial Museum. 

Education. — In Room 437 Lincoln Hall is a collection of illustra- 
tive material from the manual training departments of various 
schools; photographs of school buildings; drawings and construct- 
ive work by pupils in the public schools ; and the nucleus of a rep- 
resentative collection of apparatus for the school laboratory. It 
is plafined to gather here particularly materials that are illustrative 
of the development of public schools in Illinois. 

European Culture. — The Museum of European Culture is in the 
north wing of Lincoln Hall. The collection consists of casts of 
Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance art, models of early weapons 
and armor, facsimiles of miniatures and types of writing from 
medieval manuscripts, replicas of seals, reproductions of runic in- 
scriptions, of early ivory carving, of musical instruments, etc. The 
museum is open on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
afternoons. 

Science Group 

Botany. — The herbarium contains about 65,000 mounted speci- 
mens of plants. The flowering plants of North America are fairly 
well represented ; the collection of species of such plants indigenous 
to Illinois is practically complete; and a collection of foreign spe- 
cies has been made. The collection of fungi amounts to 32,000 
named specimens, and includes those most injurious to other plants, 
causing rusts, moulds, etc., and many valuable sets of published col- 
lections. 

Entomology. — The entomology collections of the University in- 
clude an elementary reference series of 6,400 specimens, represent- 
ing 1,600 common species ; and the Bolter collection, donated to the 
University by the executors of the estate of the late Andreas Bolter, 
of Chicago, which now contains about 120,000 specimens represent- 
ing over 16,000 species. The department has access, also, to the in- 
sect collections of the State Laboratory of Natural History, which 
contain 315,000 pinned insects and 23,000 vials and bottles of speci- 
mens in alcohol, mainly from Illinois. 

Geology. — The geology collections are to be found in the Natural 
History Building. Lithology is represented by type collections of 
rocks aggregating 9,000 specimens; 1,000 thin sections of rocks and 



Museums and Collections y^ 

minerals; ornamental building stones; a stratigraphic collection to 
illustrate Illinois geology; a collection of Illinois soils (104), and 
one of polished marbles, granites, and other ornamental stones. 
The mineralogy collection is rich in rock-forming minerals, ores, 
and materials of economic value. It contains over 12,000 speci- 
mens; 575 crystal models; and a collection of gems and precious 
stones. The paleontology collection (49,000 specimens) contains 
representative fossils from the entire geologic series, but is es- 
pecially rich in paleozoic forms. It embraces the private collections 
of A. H. Worthen (including 742 type specimens) ; Tyler and Mc- 
Whorter; Hertzer; the greater part of the collections made by the 
Geological Survey of the state under Worthen ; 200 thin sections 
of corals and bryozoa ; the Ward collection of casts ; and special 
collections representing the fauna and flora of particular groups. 
In September, 1913, a collection of marine and fresh water shells 
that had belonged to the late A. H. Worthen was presented to the 
Museum by Mrs. Thomas A. Worthen. This collection includes 
about 3,000 specimens. 

Zoology. — The zoology collections have been specially selected 
and prepared to illustrate the courses of study in zoology and to 
present a synoptical view of the zoology of the State. Most of 
them are placed in the new museum room in the Natural History 
Building, and in adjacent corridors. The mounted mammals in- 
clude a collection of the ruminants of the United States and rep- 
resentatives of the other orders of Mammalia except the Sirenia. 
The same orders are also represented by mounted skeletons. 

The collection of mounted birds includes representatives of all 
the orders and families of North America, together with a num- 
ber of characteristic tropical, Bornean, and New Zealand forms. 
The collection is practically complete for Illinois species. There 
is also a collection of the nests and eggs of Illinois birds. 

In June, 1913, Mr. M. K. Bamum and Major M. H. Barnum 
presented the IMuseum with a collection of 2,000 birds* eggs in orig- 
inal sets, representing about 300 species. 

The cold-blooded vertebrates are represented by a series of 
mounted skins of larger species, both terrestrial and marine; 
mounted skeletons of typical representatives of the principal 
groups; alcoholic specimens; and casts. The alcoholics include se- 
ries of the reptiles, amphibians, and fishes, the latter comprising 
about 300 species. The casts represent about seventy-five species, 
nearly all fishes. 



yS General Information 

The Mollusca are illustrated by alcoholic specimens of all classes 
and orders, and dissections showing the internal anatomy of typical 
forms. There are several thousand shells, belonging to more than 
2,000 species. The collection of the Illinois aquatic species is near- 
ly complete. 

The lower invertebrates are represented by several hundred 
dried specimens and alcoholics, and by a series of Blaschka glass 
models. 

The embryology of vertebrates and invertebrates is illustrated 
by several sets of Ziegler wax models and series of sections and 
other preparations. 

In addition to the foregoing, the collections of the State Lab- 
oratory of Natural History are available for illustrative purposes, 
as well as for original investigation by advanced students. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Architecture. — The collections of the department of architecture 
include plaster casts of architectural detail and ornament; 9,400 lan- 
tern slides of architectural subjects and 900 slides of painting and 
sculpture ; 20,000 classified plates, photographs, and 2,400 stereo- 
scopic views ; a working library of about 1,800 volumes on archi- 
tecture and the allied arts; a collection of 300 examples of Amer- 
ican woods, shown in three sections each ; and collections of archi- 
tectural drawings and of specimens of building materials, fittings, 
and appliances. 

Civil Engineering. — The department of civil engineering has 
samples of iron, steel, wood, brick, and stone; materials for roads 
and pavements ; models of arches and trusses. The department 
also possesses a collection of photographs and blue-print working 
drawings of bridges, metal skeleton buildings, masonry structures, 
standard railroad construction, etc. 

Electrical Engineering. — This department has a collection of 
samples illustrating standard practise in the industrial applications 
of electricity. There is also a growing collection of lantern slides, 
photographs, blue-prints, drawings, pamphlets, and other engineer- 
ing data. 

Mechanical Engineering. — This department includes in its equip- 
ment part of a set of Reuleaux models; models of valve gears; 
sections of steam pumps ; injectors ; valves, skeleton steam and 
water gauges; standard packings; steam-pipe coverings; and drop 
forgings. There are also examples of castings, perforated metal, 
defective boiler plates, and set of drills, with samples of oil, iron, 



Libraries 79 

and steel. A number of working drawings from leading firms form 
a valuable addition to these collections. 

Mining Engineering. — This department has a complete exhibit 
of sized coal as prepared by typical Illinois washeries, the raw ma- 
terials and the finished products illustrating the briquetting of coal, 
models of a metalliferous mine and of timber and steel mine sup- 
ports, a complete exhibit of explosive and blasting materials and ap- 
pliances, the Draeger, Fleuss, and Westphalia breathing apparatus, 
and all of the appliances necessary for mine rescue and first aid 
demonstration, a collection of safety-lamps and other mine-lighting 
devices, and working drawings and photographs of mine machin- 
ery. 

Railway Engineering. — The department of railway engineering 
has an unusually complete exhibit of photographs illustrating the 
development in transportation; an exhibit showing the progress in 
the design and manufacture of rails ; models of locomotive valve 
gears; a full-sized model of the front end of a Richmond com- 
pound locomotive; and sets of working drawings of locomotives, 
cars, and other railway equipment. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

The various agricultural departments maintain collections illus- 
trative of their work ; prominent among which are those showing 
typical specimens of standard varieties of corn; wax models of 
fruit and vegetables ; a horticulture herbarium ; specimens of breeds 
of live stock ; a collection of farm machinery ; and exhibits of neg- 
atives and samples showing the progress of certain investigations, 
especially with fruit, crops, and soils. 

See further the description of the facilities for instruction and 
methods of work of the departments of agronomy, animal hus- 
bandry, dairy husbandry, and horticulture, pages 

LIBRARY SCHOOL 

The School has made a collection of books and pamphlets on li- 
brary science; of library reports and catalogs; of mounted samples 
showing methods of administration in all departments; of labor- 
saving devices and fittings ; and of photographs and lantern slides 
illustrating the history of books and libraries. 

LIBRARIES 
(For the Library Staff see page 41.) 

The University Library includes all the books belonging to the 
colleges and schools of the University which are situated in Urbana 



8o General Information 

and also the libraries of the College of Medicine and School of 
Pharmacy in Chicago. 

On January i, 1914, the several libraries contained the following 
numbers of bound volumes and pamphlets : 

Volumes Pamphlets 
General library, including depart- 
mental collections 251,000 28,000 

State Laboratory of Natural His- 
tory library 8,100 30,000 

State Geological Survey library. 1,500 4,000 

College of Medicine library 15,150 

Pharmacy library 2,500 

The Library receives about 2,000 serial publications. 

The Library is housed, for the most part, in the Library build- 
ing, and is for the use of the whole University. The officers of 
instruction and administration of the University, the graduate stu- 
dents, and the members of the senior class have direct access to the 
shelves ; other students may have this privilege upon the recom- 
mendation of their instructors. All students have the direct use of 
10,700 volumes in the reading rooms, and in addition graduate stu- 
dents have the use of the seminar libraries. 

As a part of the Library are included several special collections : 
The University of Illinois collection, including printed material 
illustrating the history of the University: about 300 volumes. Col- 
lege Publications collection, comprising the catalogs, announce- 
ments, reports, studies, etc., of other educational institutions : about 
5,000 volumes. Thesis collection, a complete file of the original 
copies of the theses presented for graduation from the University 
of Illinois ; they are bound and filed by years : 2,000 volumes. The 
Collection of School Reports, a carefully cataloged collection of 
school reports, courses of study, and other documents published by 
public school authorities throughout the United States. The 
Dziatzko collection of Library Economy, bought in 1905, the entire 
library of Karl Dziatzko, librarian of Gottingen University : 300 
volumes, 250 pamphlets. The Dittenberger Collection of the Clas- 
sics, bought in 1907, the entire library of Wilhelm Dittenberger, 
professor of Classical Philology in the University of Halle: 5,600 
items. The Heyne collection, purchased by the University in 1909, 
the philological library of Professor Moritz Heyne, of the Univer- 
sity of Gottingen : about S,ooo items, principally on German phil- 



Libraries 8i 

ology and literature. The Karsten collection, principally on French 
and German philology and literature, the library of the late Pro- 
fessor Gustaf E. Karsten, presented by Mrs. Eleanor G, Karsten. 
The Grober collection, purchased in 1912, the entire library of the 
late Professor Gustav Grober, of Strasburg: 6,300 titles, principally 
on the Romance languages. The Vahlen collection, purchased in 
1913, the entire classical library of the late Professor Johannes 
Vahlen, of Berlin : 10,000 volumes. The Avon collection, purchased 
in 1913, the pedagogical library of the late Dr. R. Aron, of Berlin: 
20,000 volumes. 

A number of seminar and departmental collections are main- 
tained in various buildings on the campus, including the six sem- 
inars in Lincoln Hall; most of these are primarily reference collec- 
tions for the use of graduate students and advanced undergraduate 
students in the departments using the respective buildings. The 
principal departmental libraries and reading rooms are the fol- 
lowing : 

Name of library Location Number of volumes 

Philosophy, Psychology, and 

Education Lincoln Hall 9.900 

Classics Lincoln Hall 9»950 

Modern languages Lincoln Hall 19,600 

English Lincoln Hall 9-500 

History and Political Science Lincoln Hall 17,600 

Economics and Sociology Lincoln Hall 17,000 

Natural History Natural History Building *i8,300 

Law Law Building 15,000 

Commerce Reading Room Commerce Building 400 

Architecture Engineering Building 3,090 

Agriculture Reading Room Agricultural Building 300 

Chemistry Chemistry Building 4»520 

Physics Physics Building 940 

Mathematics Natural History Building 3,150 

Mason Library of Western History. The library of western his- 
tory collected by Edward G. Mason, Esq., long president of the 
Chicago Historical Society, is in the Public Library of the city 
of Champaign, and is accessible to students in the University. 



•Including the State Laboratory collection. 



82 General Information 

LIBRARY REGULATIONS 

The General Library is primarily for free reference use; any 
citizen of the State may use the books in the general reading 
rooms. The privilege of drawing books for use outside the build- 
ing is accorded to all officers of instruction and government, to 
all registered students, and to other accredited persons. Books not 
reserved for classes may be borrowed for home use for two weeks 
and may be renewed for two weeks more if not specially restricted 
or called for. All books are subject to recall at any time when 
needed for university work. 

General reference books, books reserved for classes, all general 
periodicals, and certain other groups of books are to be consulted 
in the reading rooms only. They may not be loaned from the Li- 
brary except when the reading rooms are closed. They must then 
be returned by the time the Library next opens. 

Books from the stack which are not returned on time are sub- 
ject to a fine of two cents a day. Books from the reference, re- 
serve, and periodical shelves, as well as some special collections, 
are subject to a fine of twenty-five cents for the first hour and 
five cents for each additional hour if kept overtime. Books re- 
called for university work must be returned at once upon re- 
ceipt of the notice. If not returned within two days after notice is 
mailed a fine of twenty-five cents a day is charged. All books lost 
or damaged must be replaced or paid for. Books not at the time 
needed in Urbana, or not subject to special restrictions, may be 
loaned for a limited period to other libraries in the State, for the 
use of serious students. 

Hours of Opening. The General Library is open week days dur- 
ing the general sessions of the University, from 7 :45 a. m. to 10 
p. m., and on Sundays from 2 p. m. to 6 p. m. During the Sum- 
mer Session, the Library is open from 7 145 a. m. to 10 p. m. on 
week days, but is not open on Sundays. During the summer vaca- 
tion, the Library is open from 9 a. m. to 12 m. Permits may be 
given for use at other hours. The Library is regularly closed on 
New Year's, Independence, Labor, Thanksgiving, and Christmas 
days. The hours of opening of the departmental libraries differ 
somewhat from those given above. 



ADMINISTRATION 



GOVERNMENT 

The government of the University is vested by law primarily 
in a Board of Trustees, consisting of twelve members. The Gov- 
ernor of the State, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and 
the President of the State Board of Agriculture are members ex 
officio. The other nine members are elected by the people of the 
State for terms of six years; the terms of three members expire 
every second year. 

The administration of the University is vested by the Board of 
Trustees in the President of the University, the Senate, the Coun- 
cil of Administration, the Faculties of the several colleges, and 
the Deans of the colleges and Directors of the schools. 

The President is the administrative head of the University. 

The Senate is composed of the full professors and those other 
members of the faculty who are in charge of separate departments 
of the various colleges and schools. It is charged with the direc- 
tion of the general educational policy of the University. 

The Council of Administration is composed of the President, 
the Dean of the Graduate School, the Deans of Men and Women, 
and the Deans of the several colleges. It constitutes an advisory 
board to the President, and has exclusive jurisdiction over all 
matters of discipline. The Council does not determine educational 
policy; but when any matter arises which has not been provided 
for by common usage or by rule of the Senate and cannot be con- 
veniently laid over until the next meeting of the Senate, the Coun- 
cil may act upon the same according to its discretion. 

The Faculties of the colleges and schools of the University, com- 
posed of the members of the corps of instruction of these colleges 
and schools, have jurisdiction, subject to higher University authority, 
over all matters which pertain exclusively to these organizations. 

The Dean of the Graduate School, the Deans of the several 
colleges, and the Directors of the schools are responsible for the 
carrying out of all University regulations within their respective 
departments. 

83 



84 General Information 

DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES 

For the purpose of administration, the University is divided 
into several colleges and schools. These are not educationally sep- 
arate, but are interdependent and form a single unit. 

The colleges and schools are as follows: 

I. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

II. The College of Engineering 

III. The College of Agriculture 

IV. The Graduate School 
V. The Library School 

VI. The School of Music 

VII. The School of Education 

VIII. The School of Railway Engineering and Administration 

IX. The College of Law 

X. The College of Medicine 

XI. The College of Dentistry 

XII. The School of Pharmacy 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers courses in — 

1. Philosophy and arts, including — 

(a) The ancient classical languages 

(b) The Romance languages 

(c) The Germanic languages 

(d) The English language and literature, including 

rhetoric 

(e) Mathematics 

(f) The political and social sciences — 

History 
Economics 
Political science 
Sociology 

(g) Philosophical subjects — 

Philosophy 
Psychology 
Education 
(h) Art and design 

2. General Science, affording opportunity to specialize in : 

(a) Astronomy 

(b) Geology, including mineralogy 

(c) Physics 

(d) Chemistry 



Departments and Courses 85 

(e) Ceramics 

(f) Botany, including bacteriology 

(g) Zoology 
(h) Entomology 
(i) Physiology 

By the grouping of certain subjects students in this College are 
also offered opportunities for specific vocational and professional 
training as follows : 

1. Business administration 

(a) General business 

(b) Secretarial service 
(c^l Banking 

(d) Accountancy 

(e) Railway administration — 

Railway traffic and accountancy 
Railway transportation 

(f) Insurance 

(g) Commercial teaching 

2. Teaching and school administration 

3. Journalism 

4. Chemistry'- 

5. Chemical engineering 

6. Ceramics 

7. Ceramic engineering 

8. Household science and household administration 

9. Library administration 

10. Law (combined course) 

11. Medicine (combined course) 

12. Engineering (combined course) 

The College of Engineering offers courses in — 

1. Architecture 

2. Architectural engineering 

3. Civil engineering 

4. Electrical engineering 

5. Mechanical engineering 

6. Mining engineering 

7. Municipal and sanitary engineering 

8. Railway civil engineering 

9 Raihvay electrical engineering 
10. Railway mechanical engineering 



86 General Information 

The College of Agriculture offers courses in — 

1. Agronomy 

2. Horticulture, floriculture, and landscape gardening 

3. Animal husbandry 

4. Dairy husbandry 

5. Veterinary science 

6. Household science 

7. Agricultural extension 

8. Teachers' course 

Military science and physical training are provided in all the 
undergraduate colleges in Urbana. 

The Graduate School offers courses in — 

Philology, including the classical languages, Romance lan- 
guages, Germanic languages, and English 
Mathematics 
Political and social sciences, including history, economics, 

sociology, and political science 
Philosophy, including psychology and education 
Physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, astronomy, 

and geology 
Biology, including botany, zoology, entomology, and physi- 
ology 
Engineering, including architecture, architectural engineer- 
ing, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical 
engineering, mechanics, mining engineering, municipal and 
sanitary engineering, and railway engineering 
Agriculture, including agronomy, animal husbandry, dairy 

husbandry, floriculture, horticulture, and thremmatology 
Household science 
The Library School offers a professional course of two years in 
preparation for the work of the librarian, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Library Science. Graduation from a college or uni- 
versity of approved standing is required for admission to the Li- 
brary School. 

The School of Music offers courses in vocal and instrumental 
music, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music; and provides 
training in public school methods in music. 

The School of Education enrolls, at the beginning of the junior 
year, students already registered in other colleges of the University 
who are preparing to teach, and directs their work for the remain- 
ing two years. 



Departments and Courses 87 

The School of Railway Engineering and Administration offers 
courses of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
railway civil, railway electrical, and railway mechanical engineering; 
and also courses in railway transportation and in railway traffic and 
accountancy leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

The Courses in Business Administration virtually constitute a 
school of commerce. They include courses in social and industrial 
economics, accountancy, banking, and railway administration, lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

The College of Law offers a course of three years leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Law. One year of college work in an 
institution of approved standing is required for admission to the 
College of Law. 

Students holding the bachelor's degree in arts or science may 
become candidates in this College for the degree of Doctor of 
Law (J.D.). 

The College of Medicine offers a course of four years leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Medicine; and, in conjunction with the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, a course of six years, lead- 
ing to the two degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medi- 
cine. 

The College of Dentistry offers a three-year course leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. 

The School of Pharmacy offers courses in the branches neces- 
sary to a scientific and practical knowledge of pharmacy, including 
pharmacy, chemistry, materia medica, botany, physics, and physi- 
ology. The courses lead to the degrees of Graduate in Pharmacy 
and Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

The Summer Session, of eight weeks, offered in 1913 courses in 
accountancy, agricultural education, art and design, botany, chem- 
istry, drawing (general engineering), economics, education, Eng- 
ish, entomology, French, German, history, household science. 
Latin, library science, manual training, mathematics, mechanical 
engineering, mechanics (theoretical and applied), microscopical 
technique, music, physical training for men and for women, phy- 
sics, political science, psychology, rhetoric, sociology, and zoology. 

All the courses given in the Summer Session are of collegiate 
grade and may be counted toward the bachelor's degree. Certain 
advanced courses may be counted toward the master's degree. 



ADMISSION 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

An applicant for admission to any of the colleges or schools of 
the University must be at least sixteen years of age. Candidates 
for admission to the College of Dentistry must be eighteen and for 
the School of Pharmacy (Chicago) must be seventeen years of 
age. 

Women are admitted to all departments under the same condi- 
tions and on the same terms as men. 

Students may be admitted at any time, but should enter if pos- 
sible at the beginning of the fall semester (in 1914, September 23) 
or at the beginning of the spring semester (in 1915, February 10). 
Students can seldom enter the College of Engineering to advantage 
except at the opening of the school year in September. 

The entrance requirements for the undergraduate departments, 
including the colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, 
and Agriculture, and the School of Music, amounting in each case 
to IS units of high school work, are stated in detail immediately 
below. 

The College of Law requires, in addition to 15 units of high 
school credit, one year of college work in arts, letters, and science 
in an institution having standards equal to those of the University 
of Illinois. For 1915-16 and thereafter two years of college work 
will be required. (See page 270). 

The Library School requires a bachelor's degree in arts, letters, 
or science from an institution having standards equal to those of 
the University of Illinois. (See page 231.) 

The College of Medicine (Chicago) requires, in addition to 15 
units of high school credit, two years (60 semester hours) of col- 
lege work in an institution having standards equal to those of the 
University of Illinois. (See page 281.) 

The College of Dentistry (Chicago) requires an applicant for 
admission to present a certificate of graduation from an accredited 

88 



Admission 89 

high school or the equivalent ; which equivalent is interpreted to 
mean 15 units of preparatory work in an accredited high school or 
academy or a state normal school. (See page 296.) 

The School of Pharmacy (Chicago) requires for admission to 
its shorter course, leading to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy, 
two years of high school work or the full educational equivalent ; 
and for admission to its longer course, leading to the degree of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist, graduation from an accredited high 
school or the equivalent. (See page 302.) 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS OF THE UNDERGRADUATE 

COLLEGES 

An applicant for admission to any one of the undergraduate 
departments — including the colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
Engineering, and Agriculture, and the School of Music — must offer 
credit for fifteen (15) units of high school or other secondary 
school work, so chosen as to include : 

I, Those subjects prescribed alike by all the undergraduate 
departments (see List A below). 

•IL Certain subjects prescribed in addition by the individual 
department which the student wishes to enter. 

III. Enough electives to make up the required total of 15 units. 

A unit is the amount of work represented by the pursuit of one 
preparatory subject, with the equivalent of five forty-minute recita- 
tions a week, through 2^ weeks ; or, in other words, the work of 
180 recitation periods of forty minutes each, or the equivalent in 
laboratory or other practise. 

I. Units Prescribed by All the Colleges (List A) 
Of the 15 units required, the following 5J/^ units, constituting 
List A, are prescribed for admission to the freshman class in all 
the undergraduate colleges of the University, and no substitutes are 
accepted. 

List A. Units Prescribed by All the Colleges 

English composition i unit 

English literature 2 units 

Algebra VA units 

Plane geometry i unit 

Total, List A 5^ units 



90 General Information 

II. Additional Prescriptions of Individual Colleges 
Of the 9J/4 units that remain, certain others are prescribed for 
admission by individual colleges, and in each case no substitutes are 
accepted by the college in question. These additional prescriptions 
are as follows : 

Units Prescribed in Addition by Individual Colleges 

For courses in Literature and Arts in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences : 

History i unit 

Foreign languages* 3 units 

Sciences : 

For the courses in Science' in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Science , 2 units 

For the College of Engineering: 

Solid and spherical geometry J^ unit 

Physics I unit 

For the College of Agriculture : 

Science 2 units 

For the School of Music: 

History i unit 

Foreign languages'. 3 units 

Music 2 units 

III. Electives 

The remainder of the required 15 units — after those prescribed 
(i) by all the colleges, and (2) by the individual college desired, 
have been counted — must be made up from the subjects in Lists B 
and C below. For courses in literature and arts in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, only two units from List C may be of- 
fered. For the Colleges of Engineering and Agriculture and for 
courses in science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences three 
units from List C are accepted. No subject is accepted for an 
amount less than the minimum, or greater than the maximum, men- 
tioned in the lists. For a description of the subjects required and 
accepted for admission see page 108. 



*At least two of these must be in the same language. Three units in 
Latin must be presented if the student wishes to pursue the study of that 
subject in the University. 

'Two years of German are prescribed (as well as two units in science) for 
admission to the course in chemical engineering in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

■At least two of these units must be in the same language. 



Admission 



91 



List B. Electives 

Astronomy 18 weeks ^ unit 

Botany 18 or 36 weeks V2 or i unit 

Chemistry 36 weeks i unit 

Civics 18 or 36 weeks ^ or 1 unit 

Commercial geography 18 weeks ^ unit 

Drawing 18 or 36 weeks J^ or i unit 

Economics 18 weeks ^ unit 

English literature (3rd unit) 36 weeks i unit 

French 36 to 144 weeks i to 4 units 

Geology 18 or 36 weeks V2 or i unit 

Geometry, solid and spherical 18 weeks H ui^t 

German 36 to 144 weeks i to 4 units 

Greek 36 to 108 weeks i to 3 units 

History 36 to 108 weeks i to 3 units 

Latin z'^ to 144 weeks i to 4 units 

Physics 36 weeks I unit 

Physical geography 18 or 36 weeks 5^2 or i unit 

Physiology 18 or 36 weeks J/4 or i unit 

Spanish 36 to 72 weeks i to 2 units 

Trigonometry 18 weeks J^ unit 

Zoology 18 or 36 weeks J/2 or i unit 

List Cy Limited Electives 

Agriculture 36 to 72 weeks i to 2 units 

Bookkeeping 36 weeks I unit 

Business law 18 weeks }/2 unit 

Domestic science 36 weeks i unit 

Manual training' 36 to 72 weeks i to 2 units 

Summary by Colleges 

The requirements listed above may be summarized by colleges 
as follows : 

For Courses in Literature and Arts in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences: 

I. List A (prescribed by all the colleges) 5J^ units 



*The subjects named in List C must be taught in accordance with specifica- 
tions which are set forth in the High School Manual. Further information 
may be had on application to the High School Visitor. 

*In giving credit for manual training the University specifies that the 
work is to be done by competent teachers, as determined by inspection, and 
that credit shall not exceed one unit for 360 forty-minute periods of work, 
including the necessary drawing and shop work. 



92 General Information 

II. Special prescriptions for these courses — 

History I unit 

Foreign languages (see foot-note i, page 90) 3 units 

III. Electives (not more than 2 units from List C) . . . 5J/2 units 

15 units 

For Courses in Science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: 

I. List A (prescribed by all the colleges) SJ^ units 

II. Special prescription for these courses — 

Science* 2 units 

III. Electives (not more than 3 units from List C)... 7^ units 

15 units 
For the College of Engineering : 

I. List A (prescribed by all the colleges) 55^ units 

II. Special prescriptions by this college — 

Solid and spherical geometry J^ unit 

Physics I unit 

III. Electives (not more than 3 units from List C) . . 8 units 

15 units 
For the College of Agriculture: 

I. List A (prescribed by all the colleges) 5>4 units 

II. Special prescription by this college — 

Science 2 units 

III. Electives (not more than 3 units from List C) . . 7^2 units 

15 units 
For the School of Music: 

I. List A (prescribed by all departments) sYi units 

II. Special prescriptions by this school — 

History I unit 

Foreign languages (see foot-note 3, page 90) . 3 units 

Music 2 units 

III. Electives (not more than 3 units from List C) . . 35^ units 

15 units 

'See also the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, foot-note 2 on 
page 90. 



Admission 93 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 
The credits required for admission to the undergraduate depart- 
ments, as detailed above, may be secured : 

(a) By examination, 

(b) By certificate from an accredited high school or other 
secondary school. 

(c) By transfer from another university or college of recog- 
nized standing. 

(A) ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 
I. The University Entrance Examinations 

The University entrance examinations are given at the Univer- 
sity in Urbana (in Room 228, Natural History Building) three 
times in each year : in September, immediately before the opening 
of the fall semester; in February, shortly before the opening of the 
spring semester; and in July, during the Summer Session. 

These examinations cover all the subjects required or accepted 
for admission, as outlined in the "Description of Subjects Accepted 
for Admission" on pages 108 to 117. 

For programs of these three sets of examinations for 1914-15 see 
pages 98 to 100. 

II. The Examinations of the College Entrance Examination 

Board 

The certificate of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
showing a grade of 60 per cent, or higher, will be accepted for ad- 
mission in any subject in the lists on pages 89 to 91, in the amounts 
there specified as being acceptable. These examinations will be held 
during the week of June 15-20, 1914. 

All applications for examination must be addressed to the Sec- 
retary of the College Entrance Examination Board, Post Office 
Sub-Station 84, New York, N. Y., and must be made upon a blank 
form to be obtained from the Secretary of the Board upon appli- 
cation. 

Applications for examination at points in the United States east 
of the Mississippi River, and also at Minneapolis, St. Louis, and 
other points on the Mississippi River, must be received by the Secre- 
tary of the Board at least two weeks in advance of the examinations ; 
that is, on or before Monday, June i, 1914; applications for exam- 
ination elsewhere in the United States or in Canada must be re- 
ceived at least three weeks in advance of the examinations; that 
is, on or before Monday, May 25, 1914; and applications for ex- 
amination outside of the United States and Canada must be re- 



94 General Information 

ceived at least five weeks in advance of the examinations ; that is, 
on or before Monday, May ii, 1914. 

Applications received later than the dates named will be ac- 
cepted when it is possible to arrange for the admission of the 
candidate concerned, but only upon the payment of $5.00 in addi- 
tion to the usual fee. 

The examination fee is $5.00 for all candidates examined at 
points in the United States and Canada, and $15.00 for all candi- 
dates examined outside of the United States and Canada. The 
fee (which cannot be accepted in advance of the application) 
should be remitted by postal order, express order, or draft on New 
York to the order of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

A list of the places at which examinations are to be held by the 
Board in June, 1914, will be published about March i. Requests 
that the examinations be held at particular points, to receive proper 
consideration, should be transmitted to the Secretary of the Board 
not later than February i. 

III. The New York Regents' Examinations 

Credits will be accepted, also, from the examinations conducted 
by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

(B) ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE FROM AN ACCRED- 
ITED PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Blank certificates for students wishing to enter the University 
by certificate from an accredited high school or academy may be 
had of the Registrar. They should be obtained early and should 
be filled out and sent in to the Registrar for approval as soon as 
possible after the close of the high school year in June. Certificates 
received at the University after September 17 (in 1914) will be 
held until the arrival of the student unless such certificates are ac- 
companied by an addressed envelope with a special delivery stamp. 

Accredited Schools 

The High School Visitor of the University visits and inspects 
on request high schools and other preparatory schools throughout 
the State. On the basis of his reports, approved by the Committee 
on Accredited Schools and by the Council of Administration, the 
University accredits all work which is found to be sufficiently well 
done. For a list of Accredited Schools, correct to January i, 1914, 
see page loi. Not all the schools named in this list, however, are 
accredited for the same amount of work nor all for the same sub- 
jects. A student presenting a certificate from any one of these 
schools will be given entrance credit for all the subjects named 



Admission 95 

therein for which the said school is specifically accredited as shown 
in the certificate of its accredited relation issued to the school by 
the University. 

Entrance credits will also be accepted on certificate from the 
following sources : 

1. From schools accredited by the North Central Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

2. From schools accredited to the state universities which are 
included in the membership of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

3. From the state normal schools of Illinois and other state 
normal schools having equal requirements for graduation. 

4. From schools approved by the New England College En- 
trance Certificate Board. 

Foreign Students 
Candidates for admission who come from foreign countries 
should bring complete official credentials. Certificates from oriental 
countries should be accompanied by certified translations. Upon 
arriving at the University foreign students should consult with the 
Adviser to Foreign Students, Room 214, Lincoln Hall. 

Examination in Rhetoric i 

Those students who show by examination a proficiency in com- 
position sufficient to qualify them for the second semester's work 
in Rhetoric i may be excused from the first semester's work. An 
examination to test such proficiency will be given at 7 :oo p. m., 
on the first day of registration (in 1914 September 21). The re- 
sults of this examination will be announced the following morning. 
Students who try this examination should defer their registration 
until they learn whether or not they have passed in the examina- 
tion. 

(C) ADMISSION BY TRANSFER OF ENTRANCE CREDITS 
FROM OTHER COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES 

A person who has been admitted to another college or univer- 
sity of recognized standing will be admitted to this University upon 
presenting a certificate of honorable dismissal from the institution 
from which he comes and an official statement of the subjects upon 
which he was admitted to such institution, provided it appears that 
the subjects are those required here for admission by examination 
or real equivalents. No substitutes will be accepted for the sub- 
jects prescribed for all colleges or by individual colleges as indi- 
cated above (pages 89, 90). 



96 General Information 

For admission to advanced standing by transfer of college cred- 
its see page 98 below. 

Students intending to transfer to the University of Illinois 
should send an official statement of their college credits, accom- 
panied by a summary of their preparatory work and by a letter 
of honorable dismissal, to the Registrar as early in the summer as 
possible. 

CONDITIONED FRESHMEN 

A student who lacks not more than 2 of the 15 units required 
for matriculation may be entered as a conditioned freshman, pro- 
vided the deficiencies are not in work which should precede the pre- 
scribed courses of the first semester, and provided that all his en- 
trance conditions are such as can be made up during his first year. 

A conditioned student is not matriculated and must pay a tui- 
tion fee of $7.50 a semester in addition to the regular incidental 
fee of $12.00 a semester. 

No student having entrance conditions may register for a second 
year in the University, except on the recommendation of the fac- 
ulty of the college or school in which he is enrolled, approved by 
the Council of Administration. Only in rare and especially meri- 
torious cases will such permission to continue as a conditioned stu- 
dent be granted. 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Persons over twenty-one years of age may be admitted as spe- 
cial students, provided they secure (i) the recommendation of the 
professor whose work they wish to take, and (2) the approval of 
the dean of the college concerned. They must give evidence that 
they possess the requisite information and ability to pursue profit- 
ably, as special students, their chosen subjects, and must meet 
the special requirements of the particular colleges in which they 
wish to enroll, as stated below. 

A special student is not matriculated and must pay a tuition fee 
of $7.50 a semester in addition to the regular incidental fee of 
$12.00 a semester. 

No one may enroll as a special student in any school or college 
of the University for more than two years, except by special per- 
mission, application for which must be made through the dean of 
the college. 

A person registered as a special student in one college and de- 
siring to take a course in another college of the University must 
obtain the approval of the dean of the latter college. 



Admission 97 

Special Requirements of Particular Colleges 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requires a written ap- 
plication, accompanied by official certificates, indicating the char- 
acter and extent of the applicant's preparatory work, and showing 
honorable dismissal from the school last attended. In order that 
action may be taken on such applications before registration they 
should be presented at least one week before the beginning of the 
semester. 

The College of Engineering requires that applicants for admis- 
sion as special students shall satisfy the entrance requirements in 
mathematics and English (one and one-half years of algebra, one 
year of plane geometry, one-half year of solid geometry, one year 
of English composition, and two years of English literature). 

The College of Agriculture will receive non-matriculants twenty- 
one years old or over, provided that if deficient in English as meas- 
ured by the requirements for matriculation they shall arrange to 
carry English as one subject until that deficiency is made good; 
and provided further, in the case of men, that they shall have had at 
least two years of experience in practical agriculture. 

The Library School requires a written application, accompanied 
by official certificates, indicating the character and extent of the 
applicant's preparatory and college work and showing honorable 
dismissal from the institution last attended. In order that action 
may be taken on such applications before registration they should 
be presented not later than one week before the beginning of the 
academic year. 

It is the practise of this School to admit as special students only 
those mature persons who, tho unable to meet the formal require- 
ments for entrance, are substantially prepared for thoro and ad- 
vanced work. Such persons must present evidence of possessing 
the requisite information and ability to pursue the chosen subjects 
profitably, and some substitute for the regular requirements for 
entrance, such as approved library or teaching experience, foreign 
travel, etc. Preference will be given to those already engaged in 
library work, especially in Illinois, who may desire more adequate 
training in particular subjects. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

After matriculation, an applicant may secure advanced standing 
either by examination or by transfer of credits. 

I. By examination. — Advanced standing is granted only by ex- 
amination unless the applicant is from an approved school. 



98 General Information 

2. By transfer of credits. — Credits may be accepted for ad- 
vanced standing from another university or college of recognized 
standing, from a state normal school, or from an approved high 
school (not more than the equivalent of one unit unless the high 
school course exceeded four years in length). An applicant for 
advanced standing by transfer must present a certified record of 
work done in the institution from which he comes, accompanied 
(except in cases of transfer from high schools) by a letter of 
honorable dismissal. Students intending to transfer to the Univer- 
sity of Illinois should send their credentials to the Registrar as 
early in the summer as possible. 

PROGRAMS OF UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

The University entrance examinations are given at the Univer- 
sity in Urbana (in Room 228, Natural History Building) three 
times in each year : in September, immediately before the opening of 
the fall semester; in February, shortly before the opening of the 
spring semester; and in July and August, during the Summer Ses- 
sion. 

The scope of these examinations is indicated in the "Description 
of Subjects Accepted for Admission," pages 108 to 117. 

Admission to the examinations is by permit. Permits may be 
obtained of the Registrar, 321 Natural History Building. 

Entrance Examinations, July, August, 1914 

♦History, i, 2, or 3 units Sat., July 11, 8:00 a.m. 

Civics, y2 unit or i unit Sat., July 11, 10:00 a.m. 

tPhysiology, J/2 unit or I unit Sat., July 18, 8:00 a.m. 

Commercial geography, J^ unit Sat., July 18, 8 :oo a.m. 

fPhysiography, J/2 unit or i unit Sat., July 18, 10 :oo a.m. 

Algebra, i^ units Sat, July 25, 8 :oo a.m. 

Plane geometry, i unit Sat, July 25, 8 :oo a.m. 

Solid and spherical geometry, ]/2 unit Sat., July 25, 10:00 a.m. 

English literature, 2 units Sat, Aug. 8, 8:00 a.m. 

English composition, i unit Sat, Aug. 8, 10 :oo a.m. 

Latin, i, 2, 3, or 4 units Sat, Aug. 8, 8 :oo a.m. 

German, i, 2, 3, or 4 units Sat., Aug. 8, 8 :oo a.m. 

The time for examinations in agriculture, astronomy, bookkeep- 
ing, botanyj, business law, chemistry^, domestic science, drawing 

•Three units may be offered in history, made up from the following: Ancient 
history to 800 A. D., 1 unit; medieval and modern history, 1 unit; English 
history, J unit or 1 unit; American history, J unit or 1 unit. 

tNote-book required for 1 unit; not required for i unit. 

iNote-book required. 



Admission 



99 



(freehand or mechanical), economics, the fourth unit in English, 
French, geology, Greek, physics*, Spanish, trigonometry, and 
zoology*, will be arranged with candidates. 

Fall Examinations, September, 1914 

♦Chemistry, i unit Mon. 

Geology, H unit or i unit Mon 

Astronomy, H unit Mon 

Trigonometry, ^ unit Mon 

JHistory, i, 2, or 3 units Tues 

English literature, 2 units Tues 

English composition, i unit Tues. 

Latin, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both Wed. 

♦Physics, I unit Wed. 

fPhysical geography, H unit or i unit... Wed. 

Algebra, l^^ units Wed. 

Civics, H unit or i unit Wed. 

Economics, H unit Wed. 

Geometry, plane, i unit Thurs. 

Geometry, solid and spherical, 16 unit. . .Thurs. 

fPhysiology, j6 unit or i unit Thurs. 

German, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both. . .Thurs. 
German, 3rd unit, or 4th unit, or both. . .Thurs. 
French, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both. . .Thurs. 
French, 3rd unit, or 4th unit, or both. . .Thurs. 
Spanish, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both. ..Thurs. 

Business law, ^ unit Thurs. 

Commercial geography, J^ unit Thurs. 

Latin, 3rd unit, or 4th unit, or both Fri. 

Bookkeeping, i unit Fri. 

♦Botany, J/2 unit or i unit Fri. 

*Zoology, H unit or i unit Fri. 

The time for examinations in agricultur 
manual training, freehand or mechanical draw 



bept. 


14, 


I :oo p.m. 


Sept. 


14, 


I :oo p.m. 


Sept. 


14, 


3 :30 p.m. 


Sept. 


14, 


3 130 p.m. 


Sept. 


15. 


8 :oo a.m. 


Sept. 


15, 


I :oop.m. 


Sept. 


15, 


3 :30 p.m. 


Sept. 


16, 


8 :oo a.m. 


Sept. 


16, 


8 :oo a.m. 


Sept. 


16, 


10 :30 a.m. 


Sept. 


16, 


1 .00 p.m. 


Sept. 


16, 


3 :30 p.m. 


Sept. 


16, 


3 130 p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


8 :oo a.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


10 :30 a.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


10 130 a.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


1 :00 p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


3 :30 p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


I :oo p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


3 :30 p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


I :oo p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


I :oo p.m. 


Sept. 


17, 


3 :30 p.m. 


Sept. 


18, 


8 :oo a.m. 


Sept. 


18. 


8 :oo a.m. 


Sept. 


18, 


8 :00 a.m. 


Sept. 


18, 


10 :30 a.m. 



e, domestic science, 
ing, Greek, and the 



fourth unit in English, will be arranged with applicants. 



*Note-book required. 

tNote-book required for 1 unit; not required for i unit. 

JThree units may be oflFered in history^ made up from the following: Ancient 
history to 800 A. D., 1 unit; medieval and modern history, 1 unit; English 
history, J unit or 1 unit; American history, J unit or 1 unit. 



ICX) 



General Information 



Mid- Year Examinations, February, 1915 

♦Chemistry, i unit Wed. 

Geology, J/2 unit or i unit Wed. 

Astronomy, J^ unit Wed. 

Trigonometry, ^4 unit Wed. 

^History, i, 2, or 3 units Wed. 

English literature, 2 units Thurs. 

English composition, i unit Thurs. 

Latin, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both Thurs. 

♦Physics, I unit Thurs. 

tPhysical geography, J/2 unit or i unit Thurs. 

Algebra, iH units Fri. 

Civics, 5^2 unit or I unit Fri. 

Economics, H unit Fri. 

Geometry, plane, i unit Fri. 

Geometry, solid and spherical, % unit Fri. 

tPhysiology, 14 unit or i unit Fri. 

German, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both Sat. 

German, 3rd unit, or 4th unit, or both .Sat. 

French, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both Sat. 

French, 3rd unit, or 4th unit, or both Sat. 

Spanish, ist unit, or 2nd unit, or both Sat. 

Business law, % unit Sat. 

Commercial geography, ]/2 unit Sat. 

Latin, 3rd unit, or 4th unit, or both Sat., 

Bookkeeping, i unit Sat., 

♦Botany, J/2 unit or i unit Sat. 

♦Zoology, y^ unit or i unit Sat, 

The time for examinations in agriculture, domestic science, man- 
ual training, freehand or mechanical drawing, Greek, and the fourth 
unit in English, will be arranged with applicants. 

LIST OF ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 
(Correct to January i, 19 14) 
The following high schools, having all the prescribed units, and 
enough others to make up the required total of 15 units, are in the 
list of fully accredited schools. 

Not all of these schools, however, are accredited for the same 
amount of work, nor all for the same subjects. A student present- 



, Feb. 


3, 


8:00 a.m. 


, Feb. 


3. 


8:00 a.m. 


, Feb. 


3, 


10:30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


3, 


10:30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


3, 


1 :00 p.m. 


, Feb. 


4, 


8:00 a.m. 


, Feb. 


4. 


10 :30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


4, 


I :oo p.m. 


, Feb. 


4, 


1 :00 p.m. 


, Feb. 


4, 


3:30 p.m. 


, Feb. 


5, 


8 :oo a.m. 


, Feb. 


5, 


10 :30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


5, 


10:30 a.m. 


, Feb: 


5, 


1 :00 p.m. 


, Feb. 


5, 


3 '30 p.m. 


, Feb. 


5, 


3 '30 p.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


8:00 a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


10:30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


8:00 a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


10:30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


8 :oo a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


8:00 a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


10 :30 a.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


1 :00 p.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


I :oo p.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


I :oo p.m. 


, Feb. 


6, 


3:30 p.m. 



•Note-book required. 

tNote-book required for 1 unit; not required for i unit 

JThree units may be offered in history, made up from the following: Ancient 
history to 800 A. D., 1 unit; medieval and modern history, 1 unit; English 
history, J unit or 1 unit; American history, h unit or 1 unit. 



Accredited Schools 



lOI 



ing a certificate from any one of these schools will be given en- 
trance credit for all the subjects named therein for which the said 
school is specifically accredited, as shown in the certificate of its 
accredited relation issued by the University. 

The High School Visitor of the University inspects high schools 
not previously accredited upon request, if the request is accom- 
panied by a report of the school which shows that it merits such 
inspection. The University accredits all work which is thus found 
to be suflBciently well done. For further particulars address The 
High School Visitor, in care of the University of Illinois. 

FULLY ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT 

Abingdon A. C. Butler 

Albion 

High School Elbert Waller 

Southern Collegiate Institute 

Aledo 



High School 
Drury Academy 

Altamont 

Alton 

Amboy 

Anna 

High School 
Union Academy 

Arcola 

Arispie-Indiantown Tp. 

Arlington Heights 

Armington 

Hittle Tp. 

Arth ur 

Ashland 

Assumption Tp. 

Astoria 

Atlanta 

Atwood 

Auburn 

Augusta 



F. N. Taylor 

William Harris 
R. A. Haight 
O. M. Eastman 

F. C. Prowdley 

Sheldon R. Allen 
(Tiskilwa) 

O. R. ZOLL 



Elzie L. Stewart 
James G. Norris 

J. R, Rowland 
C. D. Jacobs 
Arthur W. Niedermeyer 
Charles E. Kuechler 
C. B. Whitehouse 



AuGusTANA College Acad. {Rock Island) 
Aurora 

East High School 
West High School 
Jennings Seminary 
Austin High School 

{Chicago) 
Averyville High School 
{Peoria,) 



C. M. Bardwell 



Ella Flagg Young 



Harry E. Iler 
Henry S. Stice 
H. a. Bone 
H. G. Russell 
George H. Busier 



Barry 

Batavia 

Beardstown 

Belleville 

Bellflower Tp. 

Belvidere 

Bement 

Benton Tp. 

Biggsville Tp. 

Bloomington 

High School 

St. Mary's High School 
Bloom Tp. {Chicago Heights) 
Blue Island J. E. Lemon 



Lewis A. Reisner 

N. N. Stevenson 



J. K. Stableton 



principal 

M. P. WiLKINS 

Lee V. Matheny 
Frank B. Hines, Pres. 

A. F. Caldwell 
Dean M. In man 
F. I. Tillman 

B. C. Richardson 
Myrtle Kenney 

Charles McGinnis 
H. Wallace Stevens 
Ina L. Rabb 
F. H. Craven 
Ada R, Kruger 

Eunice Blackburn 
Grover C. Summers 
Bertha Mae Allen 
H. G. Spear 

MiLERNA ScHLUTIUS 

Carrie M. Boling 
Lottie B. Cook 
Lettie E. Bristol 

A. E. Decker 

C. W. Foss 

C. E. Lawyer 
K. C. Merrick 
Bertha A, Barber 

George H. Rockwood 

Hazel Broad 

Ruth Tipple 

E. S. Williamson 

Mrs. H. G. Russell 

H. W. Brua 

E. R. Spencer 

T. E. Almon 

B. G. Goodworth 
E. S. Lake 

J. Charles McMillan 

William Wallis 
Sister Marie Alphonsb 
E. L. Boyer 
Ray D. Crout 



102 



General Information 



SCHOOL 



SUPERINTENDENT 



BowEN High School 

(Chicago) Ella Flagg Young 

Bradley Poly. Inst. (Peoria) 
Bridgeport Tp. 



Bushnell 

Cairo 

Calumet High School 

(Chicago) 
Cambridge 
Camp Point 
Canton 
Carlinville 
Carl Schurz High School 

(Chicago) 
Carlyle 
Car MI 
Carrollton 
Carterville 
Carthage 

High School 



Carthage College Academy 



R. C. Hiett 

T. C. Clendenen 

Ella Flagg Young 
H. M. Hinkle 
W. H. Brewster 
G. W. Gaylor 
Harvey T. White 

Ella Flagg Young 
M. N. Todd 
Joseph Gersbacher 
Edwin A. Doolittle 
R. G. Crisenberry 

D. H. Wells 



W. G. Thompson 

G. T. Smith 

W. W. Earnest 
DeWitt El wood 
L. C. Smith 
A. B. Hiett 
S. E. Reecher 

Ella Flagg Young 



Casey 

Central High School 

(Peoria) 
Centralia Tp. 
Champaign 
Charleston 
Chatsworth 
Chenoa 
Chester 
Chicago Public High 

Schools 
Austin 

BoWEN 

Calumet 

Carl Schurz 

Crane, R. T. (Tech.) 

Curtis 

Englewood 

Harrison Technical 

Hyde Park 

Lake 

Lake View 

Lane Technical 

McKlNLEY 

Marshall 

Medill 

Phillips 

TULEY 

Waller 
Chicago Private Schools 
Latin School 
Harvard School 
F. W. Parker School 
Kenwood Institute 



Loyola Academy 

North Park College Academy 

University High School 
Chicago Heights 

Bloom Tp. High School 
Chillicothe Tp. 

Chrisman Winfield Scott 

Cicero 

J. Sterling Morton Tp. 
Clayton T. J. Haney 

Clinton H. H. Edmunds 



principal 

Charles I. Parker 
T. C. Burgess, Dir. 
A. F. Trams 
Mary C. Rasmussen 
Margaret Wilson 

Grant Beebe 
Zella a. Petty 
Pearl T. Brown 

I. P. RiNKER 

Margaret Hubbard 

Walter F. Slocum 
Percy C. Garwood 
Henry J. Karch 
David M. Crist 
L. L. Jones 

A. M. Wilson 

H. D. Hoover, Pres. 

W. P. Wyatt 

A, W. Beasley 
eston v. tubbs 
Lottie Switzer 
Lester R. McCarty 
Lyddia E. Klamm 
Maude Fairfield 
J. L. Bowman 



George H. Rockwood 
Charles I. Parker 
Avon S. Hall 
Walter F. Slocum 
W. J. Bartholf 
Thomas G. Hill 
James E. Armstrong 
Frank L. Morse 
Hiram B. Loomis 
Edward F. Stearns 

W. J. Bogan 
George M. Clayberg 
Louis J. Block 

Spencer R. Smith 
Franklin P. Fisk 
Oliver S. Westcott 

R. P. Bates 

T. J. SCHOBINGER 

Flora J. Cooke 
Mrs. Stella Dyer- 

LORING 

Simon Nicholas, S. J. 
C. T. Wilson 
F. W. Johnson 

E. L. BOYER 

Arthur M. Wells 
Helen E. Booker 

H. V. Church 
Irene Chapman 
J. D. Knight 



Accredited Schooh 



103 



SCHOOL 



Colfax p superintendent 

Collegiate Institute {Genese^' ^"""^^ 

COLLINSVILLE Tp \^ineseO) 

Cb^ne, R. f iTech,) High 
School (ru;^^^^\^ ^ly^a. 



School {Chicago) 
Crystal Lake 
Curtis High School 

{Lhtcago) 
Dallas City 
Danville 
Decatur 
DeKalb Tp. 

iJELAVAN 

Des Plaines 

jMmne Tp. 
Dixon 

High School 

North High School 
Downer's Grove 
Drury Academy (Aledo) 

DuQuoiN Tp. 

DWIGHT 

Earlville 

East High School 

KAurord) 
East St. Louis 

i-DWARDSVILLE 

Effingham 
Eldorado Tp. 
Elgin 

High School 

Elgin Academv 
jLlizabeth 
Elmhurst 

High School 



^^\ Flagg Young 
H. A. Dean 

S-^^A Flagg Young 
M. N. Beeman 
^. P. Randle 
J- O. Englemann 

R« W. Bakowell 



W. R. Snydeb 
H. V. Baldwin 
'j. C. Butler 

E. C. Fisher 



C. A. Brothers 
F. L. Bennett 

C. M. Bar DWELL 

D. Walter Potts 
Charles F. Ford 
^' C Bailey 

Robert L White 
R- L Lewis 

A. M. NiCHELSON 

t D 



ELMw^Sr"-^'^ Proseminar 

ElPaSO ^- ^' CONDIT 

Englewood High School Brittin 

\tfncago) P „ 

E^ANSTir^ P^OSEMINAR (£&«\,^)^^« ^OUNG 

Township High School 
EvANSTON Academy 

FAIRBURY C Tir -r^ 

Fairfield ^- ^- Powers 

Farmer City ^* Wilson 

Moore Tp. 

I^ARMINGTON TT T t^ 

Fhrkv Hall (Lake Forest) ^^ ^' ^^"" 

Forr?st"''-^^^^"°'^ Tp. 

Frances Shime» School (MLC^^rfltr''"^''''^'' 



Freeport 

Fulton 

Galena 

Galesburg 

Galva 

Geneseo 

cT.VnV ?^'^= School 
Collegiate Institute 



S. E. Raines 
Harry B. Price 
w T J^enzimer 
W. L. Steele 
F. U. White 



Geneva 
Genoa 



H. M. Coultrap 
Charles E. Lowman 



principal 
LiDA J. Smith 

■A. E. Arendt 

W. J. Bartholf 
Richard G. Breeden 

Thomas G. Hill 

A. W. Sm ALLEY 

Jesse H. Newlon 
f; M. Giles 
Marie F. Tate 

Horace L. Howard 

C. H. Anderson 
Lebbeus Woods 
M Maude Manley 
Dean M. Inman 

W. T. McKlNNEY 

Edna Beers 
C. W. HouK 
Miss E. M. Brow^.- 
Nellie L. Smith 

C. E. Lawyer 
H. J. Alvis 
J- G. Stull 
Guy C Gladson 
M. T. VanCleve 

W. L. GOBLE 

H. M. Buckley 
Carrie Beaven 

John C. Hoskinson 

HARRfET r'°r' ^'''"''^ 
Glen'g'ri^ggs'^^"'^^"^ 

James E. Armstrong 
Daniel Irion. Director 

W. F. Beardsley 
^- W. Helm 

H. D. WiLLARD 

H- D. ErCKELBERG 
tSTHER HeDQUIST 

Frances Laura Hughes 

O. A. Towns 
Hope M. Pollard 
William P. McKee, 
Dean 

L. A. Fulwider 

Mrs. C. R. Flatt 

Katharine Obye 

A. W. Willis 

Henrietta Silliman 

A. J. Beatty 

Lester S. Parker 

Mrs. Margaret Spraker 



104 



General Information 



SCHOOL 



SUPERINTENDENT 



Georgetown Tp. 
Gibson City 

Drummer Tp. 

GiLMAN 

Godfrey 

MoNTiCELLO Seminary 
Grand Prairie Seminary (Onarga) 



Roy WiTHRow 



Granite City 
Greenfield 
Greenview 
Greenville 
Griggsville 
Hamilton 
Harrisburg Tp. 
Harrison Technical High 
School (Chicago) 



L. P. Frohardt 
L. \V. Ragland 
J. P. Scheid 
S. S. Simpson 
Vail Cordell 
J. A. Johnston 



Harter- Stan ford Tp. (Flora) 



Ella Flagg Young 



J. H. Light 



Harvard 

Harvard School (Chicago) 

Harvey 

Thornton Tp. 
Havana 
Henry 
Herrin Tp. 
Hyde Park High School 

(Chicago) 
Heyworth 
Highland 
Highland Park 

Township High School 

Northwestern Military Academy 



T. S. Henry 
W. E. King 



Ella Flagg Young 
L. R. Blohm 

C. L. DiETZ 



H. J. Beckemeyer 
O. V. Schaeffer 
H. B. Fisher 

W. D. Madden 
S. K. McDowell 
Frank D. Fleming 



HiLLSBORO 

HiNDSBORo Union 

Hinsdale 

HiTTLE Tp. (Armington) 

Homer 

hoopeston 

Hume 

hutsonville tp. 

Illinois Woman's College Acad. (Jacksonville) 

Illiopolis W. p. Sullivan 

Industry Tp. 

Jacksonville 

High School Adolph Gore 

Illinois Woman's College Academy 

Whipple Academy 
Jennings Seminary (Aurora) 
Jekseyville T. Pike 

Johnston City F. D. Harwood 

John Swaney School (McNabb) 
Joliet Tp. 

J. Sterling Morton Tp. (Cicero) 
Kankakee F. N. Tracy 

Kansas R. B. Henley 

Kenilworth 

New Trier Tp. 
Kenwood Institute (Chicago) 



Kewanee 

KiNMUNDY 

Knoxville 
LaGrange 

Lyons Tp. 
LaHarpe 

Lake High School 
(Chicago) 



W. R. Curtis 
E. V. Latham 
G. G. Lafferty 



T. W. Everitt 
Ella Flagg Young 



principal 
O. P. Rees 

H. T. McKinney 
Gretta R. Wilneb 

Martina C. Ehickson 
H. H. Frost, Pres. 
Walter F. Coolidge 
Hazel D. Dollinger 
Hazel Alkin 
Waldo F. Mitchell 
Roberta S. Amrine 
Philena Clark 
Harry Taylor 

Frank L. Morse 

0. A. Towns 
Floyd E. Dewhirst 
J. J. Schobinger 

L. W. Smith 
Mrs. Sara E. Pierce 
Esther Massey 
T. H. Schutte 

Hiram B. Loomis 

Mrs. Lillian Anderson 

C. L. Dietz 

R. L. Sandwick 
Dr. II. H. Rogers 

D. O. Kime 
Emma Newell 

1. A. Wilson 
Eunice Blackburn 
Otto H. Worley 
W. R. Lowery 
Audrey Dykeman 
Harry Thrasher 
Joseph R. Harkeb, Pres. 
Zita Jackson 

Fred Mabrey 

Charles E. Collins 
Joseph R. Harker, Pres. 
Walter L. Harris 
Bertha A. Barber 

E. B. Shaker 
C. T. Ramsay 
R. K. Snapp 

J. Stanley Brown 
H. V. Church 
William R. Towsley 
Neva B. Wiley 

H. E. Brown 
Mrs. Stella Dykr- 

Loring 
Wendell S. Brooks 
Bruce H. Corzine 
Sylvia E. Smith 

G. H. Wilkinson 
Jane Robertson 

Edward F. Stearns 



Accredited Schools 



105 



SCHOOL 

Lake Forest 

Lake Forest Academy 
Ferry Hall 
Lake View High School 

(Lntcago) 
Lanark 
Lane Technic.-vl High 

School (Chicago) r 

LaSalle-Peru Tp (LaSalle) 
ftw School (Chicago) 

i-AWRENCEVILLE Tp. 



superintendent 



Ella Flagg Young 
Charles S. Cobb 

Ella Flagg Young 



PHINCIPAL 



F. p. DONNER 
^- '^- GOODIER 

C. B. Smith 
J- H. Smith 

F. L. HoLCH 
W. A. Perrin 

WILLIAM HaWKES 

G. H. Wells 



Lena 
LeRoy 
Lewistown 
Lexington 

LiBERTYVILLE 

Lincoln 
Litchfield 
LOCKPORT Tp. 
LODA 

LOVINGTON Tp 

LrlVt t'^^^^X'*^ (Chicago) 
1.YONS Tp. (LaGrange) 

McKiNLEY High Sc/ooi. 

(CJncago) -r. ^ 

McLeansboro f"-'-;^ F^^GG Young 

McNabb ^- ^' Hickman 

Mac^m^" S"""^" School 

Manteno X- "''^' Alexander 

Manual Traininp Wt^« c? ■^' Gregory 
Marengo ^'"'"''^^'^^ High School (Peoria) 



Marengo 
Marion Tp. 
Marissa Tp. 
Marseilles 

Marshall High School 

^ (Chicago) 

Marshall Tp. 

Mason City 

Mattooon 

Mazon Tp. 

Medili. High School 

^ (Chicago) 

-Men DON 

Mendota 

Metropolis 

MiLFORD Tp. 

May wood 

Proviso Tp. 
Minonk 
Moline 
Momence 
Monmouth 

MONTICELLO , ^ 

MoNTicELLo Seminary fr.^fJ ^ 
Moore Tp. (Farmer Ciyf'^^'^'y^ 
AloRGAN Park -^^ 

MoSn 'p ^^°^. School 
Morris ^^''^ ^^^ Academy 
Morrison S?^"** D. Martin 

Morton Tp. "'• E. Weaver 



Albert Reep 

E. A. Collins 

Ella Flagg Young 

G. A. Buzzard 
J. F. Wiley 

I^^A Flagg Young 
T ' u Malcomson 
J. H. Browning 
M. N. McCartney 



j8. R. Morris 

C. H. Maxson 

R- .T. Walters 

a" 11? J°i-^ER 

A. w. Gross 



W. M. Lewis 

Frances Laura Hughes 

LiNA Aukerman 

W. J. BOGAN 

D i McCormack 
K. p. Bates 
F. W. Cox 
Elsie English 
Margaret McCune 
W. L. Boles 
Theodore F. Fieker 
W. Louise Cater 

i^- B. KORB 

L)- B. Carroll 
Alfred Livingston 
Marie E. Wallin 
i" W. Chatham 
biMON Nicholas, 5". J 
G. H. Wilkinson- 
George M. Clayberg 
Robert Wilson 



R- R. Snapp 

vir ^D Maxwell 
W. P. Morgan 
Henry H. Janssen 
Horace L. Howard 

^ois Morrow 

Florence Schwartz 

William N. Brown 

^- J. Pollard 

^- G. Lentz 

Anna J. McNabney 

Elinore a. Bates 

Eouis J. Block 
Lewis W. Williams 
^- ^- Curry 
H. B. Black 
E. C. Shields 

Hazel McCreary 
f • J. Dean 

-ti- vV. McCulloch 

John E. Witmer 
Charles H. Briggs 
E. P. Nutting 
E. E. Wheeler 
Mary Findley 
Ruby L. Allen 
Martina C. Erickson 
■n. D. Eickelberg 

J. H. Heil 
Harry D, Abells 
E. C. Robey 
Mary L. Barnes 
•T. L. Cook 



io6 



General Information 



SUPERINTENDENT 

A. S. Anderson 



SCHOOL 

Mt. Carmel 
Mt. Carroll 

High School G. V. Clum 

Frances Shimer School 



M. L. Test 
C. W. Yerkes 



Mt. Pulaski Tp. 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon Tp. 
moweaqua 
Murphysboro Tp. 
Naperville 

High School O. A. Waterman 

Northwestern College Academy 
Nashville W. C. Fairweather 

Neoga Tp. 
Newman Tp. 

Newton C. E. Girhard 

New Trier Tp. (Kenilworth) 
NoKOMis Henry Buellesfield 

Normal 

High School C. F. Miller 

University High School 
North High School 

(Dixon) H. V. Baldwin 

North Park College Academy (Chicago) 
Northwestern College Academy (Naperville) 
Northwestern Military Academy (Highland Park) 
Oakland G. W. Sutton 

Oak Park & River Forest Tp. (Oak Park) 
Oblong Roscoe R. Smith 

Odell V. T. Smith 

Olney H. W. Hostettleh 

Onarga 

High School S. E. LeMarr 

Grand Prairie Seminary 
Oregon 
Ottawa Tp. 

Palatine Chester Wells 

Palestine J. M. Watters 

Pana Tp. 

Paris T. W. B. Everhart 

F. W. Parker School (Chicago) 
Pawnee Tp. 
PawPaw 
Paxton 
Pekin 
Peoria 

Averyville High 
School 

Bradley Poly. Inst. 

Central High School 



W. C. SUFT 
O. J. Bainum 
J. J. Crosby 



Harry E. Iler 
G. T. Smith 



Manual Training High School 



Petersburg 

Phillips High School 

(Chicago) 
Pittsfield 
Plain FIELD 
Plano 
Polo 

PONTIAC Tp. 

Princeton Tp. 

Prophetstown 

Proviso Tp. (May wood) 

QUINCY 

High School 

St. Mary's Academy 



H. A. Paine 

Ella Flagg Young 
T. C. Reeder 
H. J. Bassler 
R. E. Locke 
H. B. Urban 

P. F. Grove 

E. G. Bauman 



principal 
j. t. dorris 

Gayle H. Au 
William P. McKee, 

Dean 
l. f. fulwiler 
Belle Williamson 
T. M. Dickson 
J. Earl Hiett 
G. J. Koons 

V. Blanche Graham 
Thomas Finkbeiner 

ROLLA HiLLER 

W. L. Hagan 
T. H. Trinkle 

J. H. PURSIFULL 

H. E. Brown 
LuciLE Heskett 

E. L. King 

Ralph W. Pringle 

Lebbeus Woods 
C. J. Wilson 
Thomas Finkbeiner 
Dr. H. H. Rogers 
Mabel Banta 
T. Calvin Hanna 
J. M. Karns 
Helen Lyons 
B. Y. Alvis 

Marguerite D. Thomp- 
son 
H. H. Frost, Pres. 

Charles H. Kingman 
Helen Hannan 
R. A. Fraley 
W. E. Andrews 

T. J. BUCHER 

Flora J. Cooke 
W. B, Rose 
Julia H. Suft 
E. A. Messenger 
W. F. Shirley 



Hazel Broad 
T. C. Burgess, Director 
A. W. Beasley 
William N. Brown 
H. H. Stanch 

Spencer R. Smith 
Nellie A. Moore 
Verne Perry 
H. L. Tate 
Ethel C. Lowry 
Arthur Vernek 
W. R. Spurrier 
W. W. Jennings 
John E. Witmer 

Zens L. Smith 
Mother Mary Petra 



Accredited Schools 



107 



SCHOOL 



SUPERINTENDENT 



E. H. Miller 
Louis A. Tohill 
A. F. Ames 



Lewis A. Mahon'ey 
E. O. Phares 
R. G. Tones 



Rantoul 
Ridgefarm 
Riverside 
Robinson Tp. 
Rochelle 
Rock Falls 
rockford 
Rock Island 

High School H. B. Hayden 

AuGUSTANA College Academy 
Villa de Chantal Mother Borgia 

RooDHOUSE J. 0. Stanberry 

Roseville Tp. 

RossviLLE I. A. Smothers 

RusHViLLE C. E. Knapp 

Rutland W. E. Gutteridge 

St. Charles Faith McAuley 

St. Elmo R. W. Jennings 

St. Mary's Academy (.Quincy) 
St. Mary's High School (Bloomington) 
Sandwich W. W. Woodbury 

Savanna Tp. ' 

Saybrook George E. White 

Sheffield J. H. Martin 

Shelbyville a. F. Lyle 

Sheldon Rush Carley 

SiDELL Tp. 

Southern Collegiate Inst. (Albion) 

F. C. Scott 



'i^ 



H. S. Magill, Jr. 
B. T. Adkins 

WiLLLAM E. EcCLES 



J. C. Myers 
O. A. Drake 

T. H. Finley 
K. D. Waldo 



Sparta 
Springfield 

High School 

Ursuline Academy 
Stanford 
Staunton 
Sterling Tp. 
Stockland Tp. 
Stockton 
Stonington 
Streator Tp. 
Sullivan 
Sycamore 
Taylorville Tp. 
Thornton Tp. (Harvey) 

TiSKILWA 

Arispie-Indiantown Tp. 
Toulon Tp. 
TuLEY High School 

(Chicago) 
Tuscola 
Union Academy (Anna) 
University High School (Chicago) 
Upper Alton 

Western Mil. Acad. A. M. Jackson 
Urbana a. p. Johnson 

Ursuline Academy (SpringHeld) 



Ella Flagg Young 
Stanley Morris 



Vandalia 
Vermilion Grove 

Vermilion Academy 
Villa de Chantal 

(Rock Island) 
Villa Grove 

ViRDEN 

Virginia 

Waller High School 

(Chicago) 
Walnut 
Warren 



Lewis Ogilvie 



Mother Borgia 
E. L. Lawson 
Clyde Sloan 
A. M. Santee 

Ella Flagg Young 
T. F. McLamarrah 
H. H. Hagen 



principal 

Jessie McHarry 
Ethel Gwinn 

T. H. ZlEGLER 

J. O. Marberry 
Thomas R. Johnston 
Bess Burhaus 
C. P. Briggs 

A. T. Burton 
C. W. Foss 
Sister Mary Agnes 
C. A. Whiteside 
H. L. Kesslek 

R. D. Bowden 
Laura L. Knowles 
Janet Arie 
Minnie Lang will 
Dean Parrill 
Mother Mary Petra 
Sister Marie Alphonse 
Maud Webster 
C. M. Higgins 
Constance Mitchell 
Laura Schoettler 

B. H. Gault 
S. J. Berkema 
Sherman Cass 
Frank B. Hines. Pres. 
St. J. W. Wilton 

F. D. Thomson 
Mother Paul 
Lilly Stiegelmeiee 
Sara M. Marty 

E. T. Austin 
Ottis Hoskinson 
Parker Noll 
Edith Schroedeb 
O. A. Rawlins 
A. L. Smith 
Edna Koch 

R. G. Beals 
L. W. Smith 

A. W. Hussey 

Eugene L. Mendenhall 

Franklin P. Fisk 
J. Clem Hammond 
H. Wallace Stevens 

F. W. Johnson 

George D. Eaton 
Si. L. Flaningam 
Mother Paul 
Ernest T. Jackson 

EIdith Shugart 

Sister Mary Agnes 
W. F. Wollenhaupt 

Laura Mason 

Oliver S. Westcott 
Paul C. Moon 

O. M. BUSER 



io8 



General Information 



SCHOOL 



SUPERINTENDENT 



Harry Andrews 
P. M. Smith 

iAMES E. RaIBOURN 
.. W. Haviland 

E. F. Nichols 

H. H. KiRKPATRICK 

C. M. Bardwell 



Washburn 
Washington 
Waterloo 
Watseka 
Waukegan Tp. 
Wenona 
West Chicago 
West High School 

{Aurora) 
W. III. St. Normal Acad. {Macomb) 
Western Military Acad. 

{Upper Alton) A. M. Jackson 

Westfield College Acad. 
Wheaton 

High School J. B. Russell 

Wheaton College Academy 
Whipple Academy {Jacksonville) 
White Hall Hey wood Coffield 

Wilmington Guy W. Bedell 

Winchester J. B. Hendricks 

Woodstock E. C. Thomas 

Wyoming Clarence W. Pratt 

YoRKViLLE T. A. Gallaher 



PRINCIPAL 

L. Ada Kreider 
Ira W. Dingledine 
Charles F. Steiner 
Mary J. Laycock 
W. C. Knoelk 
T. Grace Walker 
Norma Conyne 

K. C. Merrick 
W. P. Morgan 

George D. Eaton 
H. M. TipswoRD 

Ellen M. Gregg 
O. D. Tyner 
Walter L. Harris 
Heywood Coffield 
Bertha M. Oldred 
Bertha Duerkop 
B. M. Aldrich 
John G. Strieber 
Edith J. Anderson 



PARTIALLY ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 



Byron 

Keithsburg 

Knoxville 

St. Alban's School 
Martinsville 
Raymond 

St. Alban's School {Knoxville) 
Salem H. J. Blue 



H. V. Lynn 
E. C. Kloutz 



Harold Bright 
W. F. Grotts 



Edna King 
W. J. Stonks 

LuciAN F. Sennett 
Harry L. Ryan 
Frank J. DuFrain 
L. B. Hastings, Rector 
E. C. Franklin 



DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ADMISSION 

The amount of work in each of the foregoing subjects which 
corresponds to the minimum number of credits assigned is shown 
by the description of subjects below. 

1. Agriculture. — Courses in agriculture should be arranged for 
periods of not less than 2^ weeks. Such a course may be accepted 
for one unit of entrance credit, and two such courses may be ac- 
cepted for two units, provided the work covered by each course, 
is so closely related in its parts as to constitute one of the gener- 
ally accepted divisions now recognized in agricultural work. At 
least one-half the time should be devoted to laboratory work, and 
note-books should be presented. 

2. Algebra. — Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, sim- 
ple equations, involution, evolution, radicals, quadratic equations 
and equations reducible to the quadratic form, surds, theory of 
exponents, and the analysis and solution of problems involving 
these. 



Admission 109 

3. Astronomy. — In addition to a knowledge of the descriptive 
matter in a good text-book, there must be some practical familiarity 
with the geography of the heavens, with the various celestial mo- 
tions, and with the positions of the conspicuous naked-eye heavenly 
bodies. 

4. Bookkeeping. — The unit of work in bookkeeping for col- 
lege entrance should consist of a working knowledge of both sin- 
gle and double entry bookkeeping for the usual lines of business. 
The student should be able to change his books from single to 
double entry and from individual to proprietorship. At least one 
set of transactions should be kept by single entry and at least two 
sets by double entry in which the uses of the ordinary bookkeep- 
ing books and commercial papers should be involved. The stu- 
dent should be drilled in the making of profit and loss statements 
and of balance sheets and should be able to explain the meanings 
of the items involved in both kinds of instruments. The work 
should be done under the immediate supervision of a teacher and 
the student should devote at least ten periods of not less than forty 
minutes full time in class each week for one academic year. 

5. Botany. — A familiar acquaintance with the general structure 
of plants, and of the principal organs and their functions, derived 
to a considerable extent from a study of the objects, is required; 
also a general knowledge of the main groups of plants; and the 
ability to classify and name the more common species. Laboratory 
note-books and herbarium collections should be presented. 

6. Business Law. — The amount of business law which is ac- 
cepted is indicated by the ground covered in any of the ordinary 
text-books on the subject, such as Spencer's Elements of Commer- 
cial Law, Burdick's Business Law, and White's Elements of Com- 
mercial Law. 

7. Chemistry. — The instruction must include both text-book 
and laboratory work. The work should be so arranged that at 
least one-half of the time shall be given to the laboratory. The 
course as it is given in the best high schools in one year will sat- 
isfy the requirements of the University for the one unit for admis- 
sion. The laboratory notes, bearing the teacher's indorsement, 
must be presented as evidence of the actual laboratory work ac- 
complished. Candidates for admission may be required to demon- 
strate their ability by laboratory tests. 

8. Civics. — Such an amount of study of the American Govern- 
ment, its history and interpretation, as is indicated by any of the 



no General Information 

usual high school text-books on civil government, is regarded as 
sufficient for one term. The work may advantageously be com- 
bined with the elements of political economy, 

9. Commercial Geography. — The amount and character of the 
work accepted in this subject is indicated by the scope of such books 
as Redways* Commercial Geography, Adam's smaller book on the 
same subject, the text-books of Brigham, or Robinson, or Trotter's 
work. 

ID. Domestic Science. — (a) An equivalent of 180 hours of 
prepared work with at least two recitation periods a week in foods. 
(b) An equivalent of 180 hours of prepared work with at least one 
recitation period a week in clothing, (c) An equivalent of 180 
hours of prepared work with at least two recitation periods a week 
on the home. (Two periods of laboratory work are considered 
equivalent to one period of prepared work.) Of the foregoing, 
(a) will be accepted as a unit's work; or two half units taken from 
(a) and (b), or (a) and (c), or (b) and (c) will be accepted as a 
unit's work. The work is to be done by trained teachers with indi- 
vidual equipment, as determined by inspection. 

11. Drawing. — Free-hand or mechanical drawing, or both. 
Drawing-books or plates must be submitted. The number of 
credits allowed depends on the quantity and quality of the work 
submitted, 

12. Economics. — The principles of economics, with economic 
history, as given in any good elementary text-book. 

13. English Composition and Rhetoric. — Correct spelling, 
capitalization, punctuation, paragraphing, idiom, and definition; the 
elements of rhetoric. The candidate will be required to write two 
paragraphs of about one hundred fifty words each to test his abil- 
ity to use the English language. This work counts for one unit. 

14. English Literature. — (a) Each candidate is expected to 
have read certain assigned literary masterpieces, and will be sub- 
jected to such an examination as will determine whether or not he 
has done so. With a view to a large freedom of choice, the books 
provided for reading are arranged in the following groups, from 
which at least ten units are to be selected, two from each group. 
Each unit is here set off by semicolons. 

I. The Old Testament, comprising at least the chief narrative 
episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and 
Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and Esther; the Iliad, 



Admission iii 

with the omission, if desired, of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, 
XXI ; the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, 
IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII ; Virgil's Aeneid. The Iliad, the Odyssey, 
and the Aeneid should be read in English translations of recognized 
literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be 
substituted. 

II. Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Midsummer Night's 
Dream; As You Like It; Twelfth Night; Henry the Fifth; Julius 
Caesar. 

III. Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I ; Goldsmith's Vicar of 
Wakefield ; Scott's Ivanhoe or Quentin Durvvard ; Hawthorne's 
House of Seven Gables; Dicken's David Copperfield or Tale of 
Two Cities; Thackeray's Henry Esmond; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; 
George Eliot's Silas Mamer; Stevenson's Treasure Island. 

IV. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Part I ; The Sir Roger de 
Coverley Papers in the Spectator; Franklin's Autobiography (con- 
densed); Irving's Sketch Book; Macaulay's Essays on Lord Clive 
and Warren Hastings ; Thackeray's English Humorists ; selections 
from Lincoln, including the two Inaugurals, the Speeches in Inde- 
pendence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, and the 
Letter to Horace Greeley, with a brief memoir or estimate ; Park- 
man's Oregon Trail; either Thoreau's Walden or selections from 
Huxley's Lay Sermons; Stevenson's Inland Voyage and Travels 
with a Donkey. 

V. Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Books II and 

III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, Burns*; 
Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard and Goldsmith's Deserted 
Village; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Lowell's Vision of Sir 
Launfal; Scott's Lady of the Lake; Byron's Childe Harold, Canto 

IV, and Prisoner of Chillon ; Palgrave's Golden Treasur>' (First 
Series), Book IV, with especial attention to Wordsworth, Keats, 
and Shelley; Poe's Raven, Longfellow's Courtship of Miles Stan- 
dish, Whittier's Snow Bound; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome 
and Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, 
Lancelot and Elaine, The Passing of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier 
Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the Goods News from 
Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from 
the Sea, Incident of the French Camp. Herve Riel, Pheidippides, 
My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa — Down in the City. 



112 General Information 

(b) In addition to the foregoing the candidate will be required 
to present a careful, systematic study, with supplementary reading, 
of the history of either English or American literature. 

(c) The candidate will be examined on the form and sub- 
stance of certain books in addition to those named under (a). For 
1914 the books will be selected from the list below. The examina- 
tion will be of such a character as to require a minute study of 
each of the works named in order to pass it successfully. The list 
is: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Comus, L'Allegro, and II Pen- 
seroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or Washing- 
ton's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration; 
Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

The work outlined in (a), (b), and (c) counts for two units. 

(d) The three units in English composition, rhetoric, and lit- 
erature, as described above, are required for all students, A fourth 
unit may be obtained for one full year's additional work in the 
study of English and American authors. 

15. French. — First year's work. — Elementary grammar, with 
the more common irregular verbs. Careful training in pronuncia- 
tion. About 100 pages of easy prose should be read. 

Second year's work. — Advanced grammar, with all the irregular 
verbs. Elementary composition, and conversation. About 300 
pages of modern French should be read. 

Third year's work. — Intermediate composition, and conversation. 
About 500 pages of standard authors should be read, including a 
few classics. 

Fourth year's work. — Advanced composition, and conversation. 
Standard modern and classical authors should be read and studied 
to the extent of 700 pages. 

16. Geology. — The student must show familiarity with the prin- 
ciples of dynamic and structural geology, and some acquaintance 
with the facts of historical geology as presented in Scott's Intro- 
duction to Geology, Brigham's Text-book of Geology, or an equiv- 
alent, together with at least an equal amount of time spent in labo- 
ratory and field work. The laboratory work should follow one 
or more of the lines indicated below, and note-books should be 
presented showing the character and amount of work done, (a) 
Studies of natural phenomena occurring in the neighborhood which 
illustrate the principles of dynamic geolog}^ Each study should 



Admission 113 

include a careful drawing of the object and a written description 
of the way in which it was produced, (b) Studies of well-marked 
types of crystalline, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks which 
will enable the student to recognize each type and state clearly the 
conditions under which it was formed, (c) Studies of minerals 
of economic value, including the characteristics of each, its origin, 
and the uses to which it is put. (d) Studies of the types of soil 
occurring in the neighborhood, including the origin of each and the 
cause of differences in appearance and fertility. 

17. Geometry. — (a) Plane Geometry. Special emphasis is 
placed on the ability to use propositions in the solution of original 
numerical exercises and of supplementary theorems. 

(b) Solid and Spherical Geometry. Applications to the solu- 
tion of original exercises are emphasized. 

18. German. — It is recommended that pupils be trained to un- 
derstand spoken German and to reproduce freely in writing and 
orally what has been read. Whatever method of teaching is used, 
however, a thoro knowledge of grammar is expected. No attempt 
is made in what follows to give more than a general outline for the 
work of successive years, but the German department welcomes 
inquiries from teachers who wish further suggestions in the plan- 
ning of courses. 

First Year's Work. — At the end of the year pupils should be able 
to read intelligently and with accurate pronunciation simple German 
prose, to translate it into idiomatic English, and to answer in Ger- 
man easy questions on the passage read. A few short poems may 
well be memorized. Elementary grammar should be mastered up 
to the subjunctive as arranged in most books for beginners. Easy 
prose composition rather than the writing of forms will be the 
test of this grammatical work in entrance examinations given by 
the University. 

Second's Years Work. — Only modern writers should be read, 
preference being given to material which has a distinctly German 
atmosphere and which lends itself readily to conversational treat- 
ment in the class room. The regular recitations should afford con- 
stant oral and written drill on the elementary grammar of the pre- 
vious year. In addition, the beginner's book should be completed, 
but more importance is attached to accuracy and facility in simple 
modes of expression than to a theoretical knowledge of advanced 
syntax. 



114 General Information 

Third Year's Work. — Most of the time should still be devoted to 
good modern prose. There should be some work in advanced 
prose composition — based on German models — and the daily reci- 
tations should continue to afford abundant oral practise. Pupils 
ought by this time to understand spoken German fairly well. 

Fourth Yea/s Work. — At the end of this year a pupil should be 
able to read at sight any prose or verse of moderate difficulty. He 
should also be able to express himself orally or in writing with 
considerable readiness and a high degree of accuracy. It is rec- 
ommended that work in composition take the form of free repro- 
duction of portions of the texts studied rather than translation of 
English selections. The reading should be divided about equally 
between modern and classical authors. 

19. Greek. — First Year's Work. — The exercises in any of the 
beginning books, and one book of the Anabasis or its equivalent. 

Second year's work. — Two additional books of the Anabasis and 
three of Homer, or their equivalents, together with an amount of 
Greek prose composition equal to one exercise a week for one 
year. 

Third year's work. — Three additional books of the Iliad, three 
of the Odyssey, and Books VI, VII, VIII of Herodotus, or an 
equivalent from other authors. 

20. History. — One, two, or three units may be presented, to be 
chosen from the following list : 

Ancient history to 800 A. D., one unit. 

Medieval and modern history, one unit. 

English history, one-half or one unit. 

American history, one-half or one unit. 

Examinations for entrance will be given in all these subjects. 
The examination for each unit is intended to cover one full year 
of high school work. 

21. Latin. — First year's work. — Such knowledge of inflections 
and syntax as is given in any good preparatory Latin book, together 
with the ability to read simple fables and stories. 

Second year's work. — Four books of Caesar's Gallic War, or its 
equivalent in Latin of equal difficulty; the ability to write simple 
Latin based on the text. 

Third year's work. — SiK orations of Cicero; the ability to write 
simple Latin based on the text; the simpler historical references 
and the fundamental facts of Latin syntax. 



Admission 115 

Fourth years work. — Six books of Virgil, with history and myth- 
ology; the scansion of hexameter verse. 

22. Manual Training. — The requirement for one unit is 
the equivalent of 360 forty-minute periods in manual training fol- 
lowing the syllabus prepared by the manual training section of the 
High School Conference. 

23. Music. — Credit in music is not accepted on certificate, but 
only by examination at the University, and only for admission 
to the School of Music. In the examination for two units in piano, 
students are required to play the following or the equivalent : Sim- 
ple scales and arpeggios at fairly rapid tempo; scales in double 
octaves at a moderate speed; Bach, two-part invention; Czerny, Op. 
229; an easy sonata of Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven. In the ex- 
amination for two units in voice, students are required to sing the 
following or the equivalent : Simple scales and arpeggios ; studies 
selected from Concone, Sieber, Panofka, and Panseron ; songs se- 
lected from Schubert, Schumann, and Mendelsshon. In the ex- 
amination for two units in violin, students are required to play the 
following or the equivalent : Gordon's Fountain Studies ; Her- 
mann's Scale Studies; Wohlfahrt's Etudes, Book I; Kayser's 
Etudes; Pleyel, Duet; selections from Weiss and Blumenstengel ; 
miscellaneous pieces by Daucla, Papini, Weidig, Sitt, etc. 

24. Physics. — One year's high school work covering the ele- 
ments of physical science as presented in the best of the current 
high school text-books of physics. Laboratory practise in ele- 
mentary quantitative experiments should accompany the text-book 
work. The candidate's laboratory note-book will be considered as 
part of the examination. 

25. Physical Geography. — The amount and character of the 
work required may be seen by referring to the texts of Gilbert and 
Brigham, or Davis ; the recitations must be supplimented by at least 
an equal amount of time devoted to laboratory work. The labora- 
tory exercises should follow one or more lines such as are indicated 
below. Each student should present a note-book showing what he 
has done. 

(a) Studies in mathematical geography in which map and scale 
only are used. These should embrace such topics as length of a de- 
gree in longitude in various latitudes ; length and breadth of con- 
tinents, etc., in degrees and miles; relative latitudes of places; dis- 
tances between cities, etc., in degrees and miles; difference in length 



ii6 General Information 

of parallels and meridians ; problems in time ; location of time 
belts, etc. 

(b) Studies of local topographic features which illustrate the 
various phases of stream work. Each study should include a draw- 
ing or topographic map of the object, and a full, clear description 
of the way in which it was formed. 

(c) Studies of glacial deposits as shown in terminal and 
ground moraines, kames, eskers, etc. ; distribution of dark and light 
colored soils; occurrences of lakes, ponds, gravel beds, clay banks, 
and waterbearing strips of sand and gravel. 

(d) Studies of stream work as shown in the topographical 
sheets which may be obtained from the United States Geological 
Survey at a nominal cost. 

(e) Studies of the form, size, direction and rate of movement 
of high and low barometer areas, and the relation of these to di- 
rection of wind, character of cloud, distribution of heat, and 
amount of moisture in the air, as shown in the daily weather maps. 
Later these studies should lead to the making of weather maps 
from the data furnished by the daily papers, and to local prediction 
of weather changes based on the student's own observation. 

(f) Studies of the climate of various countries compared with 
our own, the necessary data being derived from such topographic, 
rainfall, wind, current, and temperature maps as are found in 
Sydow-Wagner's or Longman's atlases. 

26. Physiology. — For one-half unit : The anatomy, histology, 
and physiology of the human body and the essentials of hygiene, 
taught with the aid of charts and models to the extent shown in 
Martin's Human Body (Briefer Course). For more than one-half 
unit, the course must include practical laboratory work. 

27. Spanish. — First year's work. — Elementary grammar, in- 
cluding thoro drill in the irregular verbs ; careful training in pro- 
nunciation, and translation of simple Spanish when spoken ; read- 
ing of about 100 pages of easy prose; simple composition and dic- 
tation. 

Second year's work. — In addition to the foregoing, about 300 
pages of modern prose ; elementary syntax ; dictation, composition, 
and translation of spoken Spanish continued. 

28. Trigonometry. — The work should cover the field of plane 
trigonometry, as given in standard text-books, including the solu- 



Admission 117 

tion of right and oblique triangles. Special emphasis is placed upon 
the solution of practical problems, trigonometric identities, and trig- 
onometric equations. 

29. Zoology. — The instruction must include laboratory work 
equivalent to four periods a week for a half-year, besides the time 
required for text-book and recitation work. Note-books and draw- 
ings must be presented to show the character of work done and the 
types of animals studied. The drawings are to be made from the 
objects themselves, not copied from illustrations, and the notes are 
to be a record of the student's own observations of the animals 
examined. The amount of equipment and the character of the sur- 
roundings must, of course, determine the nature of the work done 
and the kind of animals studied; but in any case the student should 
have at least a fairly accurate knowledge of the external anatomy 
of each of eight or ten animals distributed among several of the 
larger divisions of the animal kingdom, and should know something 
of their life histories and of their more obvious adaptations to en- 
vironment. It is recommended that special attention be given to 
such facts as can be gained from a careful study of the living 
animal. The names of the largest divisions of the animal king- 
dom, with their most important distinguishing characters, and with 
illustrative examples selected, when practicable, from familiar 
forms, ought also to be known. 



GRADUATION— FIRST DEGREES 



THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

A bachelor's degree is conferred upon any student who satisfac- 
torily completes the course of study described under one of the 
various colleges and schools, doing either the first three years, or 
the last year, of his work in residence at the University. 

Residence Requirement 

If the student is in residence at the University for one year 
only, that years* work must be taken in the college from which the 
degree is expected. No person will be recommended for a degree by 
the faculty of any college in the University unless he has been a 
regularly registered student in that college for at least one year. 

Requirements for Graduation 

A candidate for a bachelor's degree must pass in the subjects 
marked prescribed in his chosen course, and must conform to the 
directions given in connection with that course in regard to elect- 
ives. In the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College 
of Agriculture, credit for 130 hours is required for graduation. In 
the College of Engineering, in the College of Law, in the Library 
School, and in the School of Music, the candidate must complete 
the course of study as laid down. 

Military Science and Physical Training 

The number of hours required includes, for men, five in military 
drill and tactics and two in physical training ; and for women, three 
in physical training. Men excused from the military requirements, 
and women who do not take the course in physical training, must 
elect instead an equivalent number of hours in other subjects. 

Thesis 

In all cases in which a thesis is required,* the subject must be 
announced not later than the first Monday in November, and the 
completed thesis must be submitted to the dean of the proper col- 



*See requirements for graduation in the various colleges. 

118 



Degrees 119 

lege by June i. The work must be done under the direction of the 
professor in whose department the subject belongs, and must be in 
the line of the course of study for which a degree is expected. 
The thesis must be presented upon regulation paper; it is de- 
posited in the library of the University. 

Second Bachelor's Degree 

A student who has already received one bachelor's degree may 
receive a second bachelor's degree, provided that all specified re- 
quirements for both degrees be fully met, and provided also that 
the course offered for the second degree include at least 30 sem- 
ester hours not counted for the first degree. 

LIST OF FIRST DEGREES 

1. The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on those who 
complete a course in literature and arts, or certain courses in sci- 
ence, in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

2. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred on those 
who complete a course in the College of Engineering or in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. This degree is conferred on a graduate of the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who completes a course in 
ceramics or in chemistry and may be conferred on graduates from 
other courses in this College on recommendation of the faculty. 

3. The degree of Bachelor of Laws is conferred on those who 
complete the course in the College of Law. 

4. The degree of Doctor of Law is conferred on those who 
complete the course in the College of Law, satisfying certain special 
requirements additional to those for the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 

5. The degree of Bachelor of Library Science is conferred 
on those who complete the course in the Library School. 

6. The degree of Bachelor of Music is conferred on those 
who complete one of the courses in the School of Music. 

7. The degree of Doctor of Medicine is conferred on those 
who complete the course in the College of Medicine. 

8. The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred on 
those who complete the course in the College of Dentistry. 

9. 10. The degree of Graduate in Pharmacy, or of Pharma- 
ceutical Chemist, is conferred on those who complete the short- 
er and the longer courses, respectively, in the School of Pharmacy. 



HONORS AND COMPETITIONS 



UNIVERSITY HONORS 

The University gives public official recognition to such students 
as attain a high grade of scholarship by the following system of 
honors : 

Preliminary Honors are assigned at the completion of the 
sophomore year on the basis of the average of the grades re- 
ceived during the freshman and sophomore years in all studies ex- 
cept Military and Physical Training. The number of persons to 
whom honors are awarded may not exceed one-tenth of the mem- 
bership of the sophomore class. A failure in any subject dis- 
qualifies a student from receiving these honors. Preliminary 
Honors afford an opportunity for sophomores to secure recog- 
nition for high scholarship without waiting for graduation. 

Final Honors* are assigned on graduation on the basis of the 
average of the grades received during the junior and senior years. 
The number of persons to whom final honors are awarded may not 
exceed one-tenth of the membership of the senior class. A failure 
in any subject during the junior and senior years disqualifies a 
student from receiving these honors. Final honors are designed 
especially to favor students whose preparatory education has been 
so imperfect as to prevent them from receiving preliminary honors. 

Special Honors are awarded at the close of the senior year. No 
student may receive such honors who has not completed, before the 
beginning of his senior year, at least twenty hours' work in the 
subject, or group of allied subjects, in which the honors are pro- 
posed; he must complete thirty hours' work in the same subject, or 
group of allied subjects, by the end of his senior year, must do 
such other work as the professor in charge may assign, and must 
prepare an acceptable thesis. No student is eligible for special 



*Honors on Gradttation. — The rules governing honors on graduation in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are stated on pages 174, 175 following. 
The rules given above apply to the other undergraduate colleges and schools of 
the University. 

120 



Debating and Oratory 121 

hoii'dts Vhfb, 'during the senior y^ar, has received a grade of less 
than eighty per cent in any subject. Special honors are planned 
for especially brilliant students who prefer to concentrate their ef- 
forts upon a special course. A student may be a recipient of both 
final and special honors. 

The names of students receiving honors are published in th* 
Annual Register of the University. (See Part V.) 

DEBATING AND ORATORY 

The University engages yearly in four intercollegiate debates, 
the teams for which are chosen in a series of competitive prelimi- 
naries to which all students are eligible. Through the generosity 
of Hon. William B, McKinley a gold watch-fob is presented to 
every speaker who represents the University, either in debate or in 
oratory. 

The Central Debating Circuit of America is an association 
formed by the universities of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, 
and Wisconsin. It holds a debate at each university on the Friday 
evening following the Thanksgiving recess. 

The State University Debating League consists of the state 
universities of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Under its auspices 
three debates are held upon the second Friday in March, each uni- 
versity sending out an affirmative and a negative team. 

The Northern Oratorical League, consisting of Northwestern 
University, Oberlin College, and the state universities of Illinois, 
Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, holds an annual con- 
test on the first Friday evening in May. The contest for 1914 will 
be held on May i, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis- 
consin. The winner receives the Lowden testimonial of one hun- 
dred dollars, and the speaker awarded second place, fifty dollars. 
The Illinois representative is selected in competitive contests open 
to all undergraduates. 

The Intercollegiate Peace Association holds annual state 
and inter-state oratorical contests to which representatives of this 
Univeristy are eligible. Orations must be upon some phase of the 
peace question. Cash prizes are offered in both contests. 

A Freshman-Sophomore Debate and an Inter- Society Decl.^.- 
MATiON Contest are held yearly. 

The names of students who represented the University in de- 
bate and oratory in 1912-13 are given in the list of honors at the 
end of this volume. 



122 General Information 

The Interscholastic Oratorical Prize 

A medal of the value of twenty dollars, and two medals of the 
value of ten dollars each, are offered annually by the University to 
the high schools of the State for the best orations delivered in a 
competitive contest between their representatives. This contest 
takes place in the spring at the time of the interscholastic athletic 
meet — in 1914, on May 15. 

THE BRYAN PRIZE 

In 1898 Mr. William Jennings Bryan gave to the University the 
sum of two hundred fifty dollars, from the interest on which a 
prize of twenty-five dollars is offered biennially for the best essay 
on the science of government. The contest is open to all matricu- 
lated undergraduate students. The essays may not be less than 
three thousand, nor more than six thousand, words in length, and 
must be left at the President's office not later than the second 
Wednesday in May. The prize was offered for the first time in 
1901. It will be offered next in 1915. 

B'NAI B'RITH PRIZES 

The Champaign and Urbana lodge of the Independent Order of 
B'nai B'rith has donated to the University the sum of fifty dollars, 
to be awarded in prizes to students of the University for essays on 
Jewish subjects. The sum named is the second of five annual con- 
tributions to be given for this purpose. For information in regard 
to the conditions governing the award of the prizes, address the 
Registrar, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. 

ARCHITECTURE 

The Francis J. Plym Fellowship in Architecture 

By the generosity of Mr. Francis J. Plym, of Niles, Michigan, 
a graduate of the University of Illinois of the class of 1897, the 
Trustees have been enabled to establish a fellowship for the ad- 
vanced study of architecture. The stipend attached to this fellow- 
ship is $1,000, awarded annually by competition in Architectural 
Design. The holder of the fellowship is required to spend a year 
in study and travel abroad. For further information address the 
Department of Architecture. 

The Joseph C. Llewellyn Prize in Architectural Engineering 

In June, 1913, Mr. Joseph C. Llewellyn, of Chicago, a graduate 

of the University of the class of 1877, established, for a period of 



Contests and Prises 123 

four years, a prize of fifty dollars per annum for a problem in de- 
sign, the competition being limited to students in architectural en- 
gineering. 

The Prize in Architecture of the American Academy in Rome 
is open for competition among qualified undergraduates and gradu- 
ates of certain American architectural schools, including that of the 
University of Illinois. This prize grants three years of residence 
and travel abroad for the study of classic and Renaissance archi- 
tecture. 

MILITARY CONTESTS AND PRIZES 

The University Bronze Medals 

Bronze medals typical of the University and its Military Depart- 
ment are awarded by the University to the members of the infan- 
try companies and artillery and signal detachments which shall 
score the greatest number of points at the annual competitive drill, 
held at some time between May 15 and May 31. The members of 
the company rifle team making the highest score at gallery target 
practise are also awarded medals. The medals so awarded become 
the permanent property of the recipients. A complete roster of 
the winning organizations is published in the Annual Register of 
the University for the following year. (See Part V.) 

The University Gold Medal 

The Board of Trustees provides annually a gold medal which is 
to be awarded, at the annual competitive drill held near the close 
of the year, to the best drilled student, whose property the medal 
becomes. Each student must have matriculated in the University 
and must have completed one semester's work in Military i with a 
grade of not less than 90, and three semesters' work in Military 2 
with a grade of not less than 95 ; and he must have an average 
standing of not less than 85 per cent in all of his other studies for 
the preceding semester, which standing shall be determined by the 
Registrar. The name of the winner is published in the Annual 
Register of the University for the following year. The reward is 
made for excellence in the same details as in the Hazelton contest. 

The Hazelton Prize Medal 

Captain W. C. Hazelton provided in 1890 a medal, which is 
awarded, at a competitive drill held at some time between May 15 
and May 31, to the best drilled student. Each competitor must 
have been in attendance at the University at least sixteen weeks of 



124 General Information 

the current college year; must have had less than five unexcused 
absences from drill; and must present himself for competition in 
full uniform. 

The award is made for excellence in : 

1. Erectness of carriage, military appearance, and neatness 

2. Execution of the school of the soldier, without arms 

3. Manual of arms, with and without numbers 

The name of the successful competitor is published in the An- 
nual Register of the University for the following year. He is 
given a certificate setting forth the facts, and may wear the medal 
until the fifteenth day of the May following, when he must return 
it for the next competition. 



LECTURES AND OTHER GENERAL 

EXERCISES 



A part of the instruction afforded by the University to its stu- 
dents is given through the medium of lectures by distinguished men 
and women from outside the University faculty and by means of 
exhibitions, recitals, and other exercises distinct from the regular 
courses of instruction. A partial list of these exercises for the cal- 
endar year 1913 follows. Lectures by members of the University 
faculty are excluded from this list. 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY EXERCISES 

Convocations 

March 28. In honor of the visit of the members of the legisla- 
ture to the University. 

April 30. Dr. Washington Gladden : 'The Basis of the New 
Social Order". 

Sept. 24. Annual convocation for freshmen. 

Nov. 7. In honor of Dr. Nathan C. Ricker, Professor of 
Architecture. Addresses by President Edmund J. James, and 
Bishops E. H. Hughes and F. J. McG}NNell of the Board of 
Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Nov. 19. Commemorative of the delivery by Lincoln of his 
Gettysburg Address. 

Dedications 

Feb. 6. Formal Opening of Museum of European Culture. 
Addresses by Dr. Kuno Francke, Professor of the History of 
German Culture, and Curator of the Germanic Museum, Har- 
vard University: "European Aid to American Citizenship", 
"Erasmus as Thinker and Artist". 

Feb. 12. Lincoln Hall. 9 a. m.. Dr. Bliss Perry, Professor 
of English Literature, Harvard University, formerly editor of 
the Atlantic Monthly: "Language and Literature". 10 a. m.. 
Dr. Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Professor of Philosophy, 
Columbia University: "Philosophy". 11 a. m., Dr. Albert 
Shaw, Editor of the Review of Reviews: "The Social Sci- 
ences". 3 p. m.. Dedication Exercises; Dr. Hugh Black, Pro- 
fessor of Practical Theology, Union Theological Seminary: 

125 



126 General Information 

"How Lincoln appeared to Scotchmen" ; addresses by Hon. 
Edward F. Dunne, Governor of Illinois; Mr. W. L. Abbott, 
President of the Board of Trustees; Mr. W. Carbys Zimmer- 
man, State Architect; and Dr. Edmund J. James, President of 
the University. 4 '.30 p. m.. Bishop William F. McDowell : 
Dedication of the building to the study of the Humanities, in 
memory of Abraham Lincoln. 

April 16, 17. The Commerce Building. April 16, 2:30 p. m., Mr. 
Harry A. Wheeler, President of the Chamber of Commerce 
of the United States : "The Public Concern in Improved Busi- 
ness Administration"; Mr. S. T. Henry, Western Manager of 
the Engineering Record: "Some Business Tendencies of the 
Day"; Mr. Charles A. Ewing, of Decatur: "The Business 
Problems of Agriculture". April 16, 7 130 p. m., Reading of a 
paper by Mr. Frederick A. Cleveland, Chairman of the Presi- 
dent's Commission on Economy and Efficiency : "What a Budget 
may mean to the Administration". April 17, 9:30 a. m., Mr. 
Alexander H. Revell, President of A. H. Revell and Co. : "Com- 
mencing Right"; Mr. Leon C. Marshall, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Commerce and Administration, University of Chicago : 
"The Relation of a School of Commerce to the Practical Prob- 
lems of Business"; Mr. Howard Elting, President of the Chi- 
cago Association of Commerce : "The College Graduate a Busi- 
ness Tyro — A Problem of Adjustment"; Mr. B. F. Harris, 
President of the First National Bank of Champaign : Address 
on behalf of the Illinois Bankers Association; Mr. Julius W. 
Hegeler: Report of the committee of the Illinois Manufactur- 
ers' Association on "College Courses in Business Administra- 
tion". 3 p. m., Dedication Exercises in the Auditorium and the 
Commerce Building. 

May 8, 9. The Transportation Building and the Locomotive 
AND Mining Laboratories. May 8, 8:00 a. m., Mr. Samuel 
Insull, President of the Commonwealth Edison Company of 
Chicago : "The Influence of Engineering on Modern Civiliza- 
tion"; Mr. J. G. Pangborn, Special Representative of the Bal- 
timore and Ohio Railroad, Baltimore, Maryland : "The History 
of the Locomotive" ; Mr. Robert W. Hunt, President of Robert 
W. Hunt & Co., Chicago : "Economy in the Consumption of 
Coal". May 9, 9:30 a. m.. Railway Conference, with addresses 
by Mr. B. A. Worthington, President of the Chicago and 
Alton Railway Company, Chicago: Hon. W. B. McKinley, 



Lectures and Exercises 127 

President of the Illinois Traction System, Champaign ; Mr. 
George R. Henderson, of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Mr. Albert Reichmann, President of the 
Western Society of Engineers, Chicago; Mr. T. H. Goodnow, 
President of the Western Railway Club, Chicago; Mr. H. G, 
Hetzler, President of the Chicago and Western Indiana Rail- 
way Company, Chicago; Mr. W. L. Park, Vice-President of 
the Illinois Central Railway Company, Chicago ; Mr. Robert 
Quayle, General Superintendent of Motive Power, Chicago 
and Northwestern Railroad Company, Chicago; Mr. Samuel 
O. Dunn, Editor, Railway Age Gazette, Chicago. May 9, 9:30 
a. m.. Mining Conference, with addresses by Mr. Francis S. 
Peabody, President of the Peabody Coal Company, Chicago; 
Mr. A. J. Moorshead, President of the Madison Coal Corpora- 
tion, St. Louis, Mo.; Mr. E. W. Parker, Chief Statistician, 
United States Geological Survey, Washington, D.C. ; Mr. R. W. 
Robiquet, Past- President of the Coal Operators' Association, 
5th and 9th Districts, Belleville, lUinois. May 9, 4 p. m., Con- 
vocation Exercises. Dr. Edmund J. James, President of the Uni- 
versity : Address of Dedication ; Mr. W. L. Abbott, President 
of the Board of Trustees : Address on behalf of the Univer- 
sity; Mr. WiLLARD A. Smith, Editor of the Railway and En- 
gineering Review: Address of Congratulation. (The Mining 
Conference was continued during the evening of May 9 and 
the morning of May 10, with addresses by prominent men.) 

Nov. 9. Y. W. C. A. Building. Bishop William F. McDowell: 
Dedicatory Address. 

Exercises commemorating the admission of the name of Isaac Funk 
to the Illinois Farmers' Hall of Fame. 

Jan. 22. Hon. Thomas C. Kerrick : "Isaac Funk, the Farmer 
and Legislator"; remarks by Hon. A. P. Grout, Dr. J. T. 
Montgomery, and Dr. Eugene Davenport. 

Religious Lectures 

Feb. 12-16. Dr. Hugh Black : A series of lectures under the 
auspices of the Y. M. C. A. 

Mar. 9-13. Dr. George R. Wendling: A series of lectures un- 
der the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. 

April 28-May 2. Dr. J. H. Garrison : The annual Bondurant Bi- 
ble lectures. 



128 General Information 

Lectures under the Auspices of the Champaign County Anti-Tuber- 
culosis Health League. 

Feb. i6. Dr. William E. Quine, Dean of the College of Medi- 
cine of the University of Illinois : "Banishment of Infectious 
Diseases". 

Feb. 23. Dr. L. D. McMichael, of Chicago: "Prevention of 
Tuberculosis". 

Feb. 26. Dr. H. M. Bracken, of the Minnesota State Board of 
Health: "Problems of Health". 

Mar. 13. Dr. George T. Palmer, Director of the Springfield Tu- 
berculosis Sanitarium : "Meeting the Tuberculosis Problem in 
the Smaller City". 

Mar. 30. Dr. A. C. Eycleshymer, of Chicago : "Growing Old and 
Attempts to Prevent It". 
The Star Lecture Course 

Feb. 15. The Ben Greet Players: "The Comedy of Errors". 

Mar. 14. The Illinois-Indiana Debate. 

Oct. 10. Mr. Victor Murdock : "Marching with the New Cru- 
saders". 

Dec. 6. Mr. Benjamin Chapin : "An Interpretation of Lincoln". 

Dec. 13. The Mandolin and Glee Club Concert. 
Exhibitions 

Feb. 6, 7, 8. Electrical Show. An exhibit of electrical ap- 
paratus and appliances under the management of the Electrical 
Engineering Society, a student organization. 

Feb. 23-Mar. 3. Art Exhibit, Water colors and pastels, exhib- 
ited by the Philadelphia Water Color Club. 

Mar. 20. Exhibit of Photography. Mr. A. G. Eldredge; Por- 
traits, landscapes, biological subjects. 

May 15-24. Architectural Exhibition. Work in oil, water- 
color, and pencil by members of the department of architec- 
ture. 

May 8, g, 10. Mining Demonstration and Exhibition. Mining 
apparatus and safety appliances exhibited and demonstrated by 
the department of mining engineering and the student branch 
of the American Institute of Mining Engineering. 

June 2. Traveling Social Exhibit. From the Chicago School of 
Civics and Philanthropy. 

Oct. 14-28. Architectural Exhibition. Sketches and studies 
in oil, water-color, and pencil by members of the department 
of architecture. 



Lectures and Exercises 129 

Nov. 9. Flower Exhibit. Held in the Floricultural Green- 
houses. 

Nov. 21-22. History Exhibit. Illustrative materials and other 
aids to the teaching of history in secondary schools. 

Nov. 21-23. Architectural Exhibition. Work done by the stu- 
dents in all classes of the department of architecture. 

December 16, 17, 18. Fruit Exhibit. Held in connection with 
the Fifty-eighth Annual Convention of the State Horticul- 
tural Society. 

Entertainments 

Feb. II. Recital by Esther Plumb. 

Feb. 21, 22. Players Club: Three Irish plays, "The Hourglass", 
"The Pot of Broth", and "The Workhouse Ward". 

April 3. Annual Spring Concert. The Choral Society and Uni- 
versity Orchestra, with Bruno Steinel, Cellist. 

May 9. Literary Societies : An outdoor play, "The Chaplet of 
Pan". 

May 15. Fifteenth Annual Maypole. 

May 17. Annual Interscholastic Circus. 

May 29. The Coburn Players: "Iphigenia in Tauris". 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

College Assemblies 

Jan. 21. Mr. F. C. Enright, formerly representative to Buenos 
Ayres from the Chicago Association of Commerce : "South 
America". (Other college assemblies were addressed by mem- 
bers of the faculty.) 

Archeology 

Nov. 6-12. Sir William Ramsay, Professor of Humanity, 
Aberdeen University, Scotland : A series of lectures entitled 
"A General Description of the Travels and Missionary Methods 
of the Apostle Paul". 

Botany 

Feb. 20. Dr. E. C. Jeffrey, Professor of Botany, Harvard Uni- 
versity: "The Nature of Coal Forming Plants". 

Nov. 7. Dr. J. M. Coulter, Head of the Department of Botany, 
University of Chicago: "The Origin of Monocotyledonous 
Plants" (before the Botany Club). 



130 General Information 

Business Courses 

April 5. Publications Banquet of the Ben Franklin Club. 
Addresses by prominent journalists. 

May 20. Mr. George W. Simmons, Vice-President of the Sim- 
mons Hardware Co., of St. Louis, Mo. : "Selling Goods at 
Wholesale" (before the Commercial Club). 

Oct. 9. Mr. Frank P. Stockbridge, Managing Editor of Popular 
Mechanics: Address before the Ben Franklin Club. 

Ceramics 

Jan. 12-25. Two-Weeks Course in Ceramics, open to manufac- 
turers. 

April 18. Mr. William P. Blair, Secretary of the National Brick 
Manufacturers' Association: "Modern Methods in Brick Pave- 
ment Construction". 

Chemistry 

(Addresses before the University of Illinois Section of the Amer- 
ican Chemical Society) 

Jan. 21. Dr. A, H. Sabin, Consulting Chemist, National Lead 
Co., New York City: "The Manufacture of White Lead". 

May 21. Dr. Julius Stieglitz, Director of the Chemical Labora- 
tories and Professor of Chemistry, University of Chicago : 
"Electric Theory of Oxidation". 

Comparative Philology 
April 5, Dr. George Hempl, Professor of German, Leland Stan- 
ford Junior University : "The Etruscan Runes". 

Education 

Jan. 14. Mr. E. E. Lewis, Supervisor of the Training Depart- 
ment, Eastern Illinois State Normal School : "Vocational Edu- 
cation" (before Kappa Delta Pi). 

Mar. 6. Mr. F. E. Thompson, Professor of Education, Univer- 
sity of Colorado : "Potentiality and Stimulus in Education". 

April 10. Dr. David Felmley, President of the Illinois State 
Normal University: "Vocational Education" (before Kappa 
Delta Pi). 

April 10. Mr. August H. Kelley : "Social Relation between the 
School and Home". 
English 

March 14-15. Mr. Alfred Noyes: "The Great Green Table", 
"The Future of Poetry". 



Lectures and Exercises 131 

History 

Jan. 15, 16, 17. Dr. James T. Shotwell, Professor of History, 
Columbia University: "The Industrial Revolution", "The 
Economic Interpretation of History", "The Achievements and 
Possibilities of History". 

March 5, 7. Dr. Charles B. Gibson : "The Land of the Sul- 
tans", "The Green Caucasian Mountains". 

April 21, 26. Rev. Dr. Robert W. Rogers, Professor of Hebrew 
and Old Testament Exegesis, Drew Theological Seminary, 
Madison, N. J. : "Some Contributions of Ancient Oriental 
History to Modem Thought". 

May 5, 19. Dr. Albert Frederick Pollard, Professor of English 
History, University of London, Fellow of All Souls College, 
Oxford : "The English Parliament, Its Historical Function and 
Development". 

Nov. 6. Bishop Roots, Hankan, China: "The Revolution in 
China". 

Dec. 5. Mr. Bernard Langdon-Davies, of Cambridge Uni- 
versity, England : "International Arbitration". 

Philosophy 
Feb. 13, 14. Dr. Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Professor of Phil- 
osophy, Columbia University : "Philosophy and its History". 

Photography 

March 20. Mr. A. G. Eldredge, formerly with Doubleday, Page & 
Co. : Illustrated lecture, "Landscape and Garden Photography". 

Psychology 

March 4, 10. Dr. Felix Krueger^ Professor of Psychology, Uni- 
versity of Halle, and Roosevelt exchange professor at Colum- 
bia University: "Introduction to Psychology". 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
College Assemblies 
Jan. 10-14. Mr. A. T. North, Contracting Engineer: "Esti- 
mating". 

Jan. 15. Mr. A. N. Johnson, State Highway Commissioner of 
Illinois : "Present Status of Road Work in Illinois". 

Feb. 14. Mr. F. N. D. Buchman, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., 
Pennsylvania State College : "The Opportunities of Engineers 
in Shaping the World's Problems". 



132 General Information 

Feb. 21. Mr. H. B. McMasters, of Youngstown, Ohio: "Fire 
Tests of Building Partitions". 

Feb. 28. Mr. A, N. Rebori, Professor of Architectural Design, 
Armour Institute : "The Development of the Skyscraper". 

March 6. Mr. C. C. Thomas, Professor of Steam Engineering, 
University of Wisconsin: "Machinery of Modern Steamships". 

March 7. Mr. J. E. Conzelmann, Engineer, St. Louis, Mo. : "The 
Unit System of Reinforced Concrete Construction". 

March 14. Mr. L. V. Ludy, Professor of Experimental Engi- 
neering, Purdue University : "Automobile Efficiencies". 

April II. Mr. Langdon Pierce, Division Engineer, Sanitary Dis- 
trict, Chicago : "Methods of Sewage Disposal". 

Mr. W. B. Griffin, Architect, Chicago : "The Proposed 
National Capital City of Australia". 

Oct. 15. Dr. Sakuro Tanabe, Professor of Civil Engineering, 
Kyoto Imperial University, Kyoto, Japan : "The Past and 
Present of Kyoto City and its Engineering Features". 

Nov. 7. Mr. T. L. Condron, Consulting Civil Engineer, Chi- 
cago : "Architectural Engineering". 

Nov. 20. Mr. J. F. Hayford, Professor of Civil Engineering and 
Director of the College of Engineering, Northwestern Univer- 
sity: "Experiences on a Survey in Central America". 

Dec. 5. Mr. G. E. Tibbetts, Bridge Engineer for the Kansas City 
Terminal Railway, Kansas City, Mo. : "The Kansas City Termi- 
nal". 

Dec. II. Mr. G. R. Small, Superintendent of the label service, 
National Board of Fire Underwriters, Chicago : "The Work of 
the Laboratories of the National Board of Fire Underwriters". 

Dec. II. Mr. E. C. English, Contractor, Chicago: "Estimating". 
Mr. W. J. Smith, Architect, Chicago: "Architectural 
Design". 

Addresses before the Freshman Class 
Jan, 15. Mr. A. N. Johnson, State Highway Engineer: "Road 

Construction". 
Nov. 5. Mr. A. N. Johnson, State Highway Engineer: "Good 

Roads". 

Architecture 
Jan. 16. Mr. George Burnap, Official Landscape Architect of 
Washington, D. C. : "Landscape Gardening in Washington, D. C." 



Lectures and Exercises 133 

March 27. Mr. E. C. English : "Estimating Carpenter Work*' 
(before the Architectural Club). 

April 24. Mr. William Jones Smith : "Architectural Charac- 
ter of Buildings" (before the Architectural Club). 

Mining Engineering 

(Addresses before the Mining Societ}-) 
Feb. 27. Mr. L. W. Scott: "Gold Dredging in Siberia". 
Oct. 31. Mr. George H, Hawes : "Mining in the Lake Superior 
Region". 

Physics 

Oct. 23. Dr. W. J. Humphreys, of the U. S. Weather Bureau, 
Washington, D. C. : "Effect of Volcanic Dust in the Atmosphere 
on Temperature", "Effect of Pressure on Spectrum Lines". 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Agricultural Extension 

(Addresses before the Com Growers' and Stockmen's Convention) 
Jan. 16. Mr. George O. Shields, President, League of American 

Sportsmen : "The Value of Insect Eating Birds to the People" ; 

"Wild Animals and Birds". Illustrated. 
Jan. 18. Mr. William G. Eckhardt, Agricultural Adviser for 

DeKalb County, Illinois : "Problems and Work that should be 

done by County Agricultural Advisers". 

Jan. 20. Mr. C. C. Pervier, Sheffield, Illinois : "European Farm 
Conditions". Illustrated. 

Jan. 21. Mr. A. N. Johnson, State Highway Commissioner, 
Springfield, Illinois : "Illinois Roads". 

Jan. 22. Hon. A. P. Grout, President Illinois Farmers' Institute : 
"The Illinois Alfalfa Growers' Association". 

Jan. 22. Mr. Frank Stockdale, Representative of the Interna- 
tional Harvester Co. : "The Dawn of Plenty". Illustrated. 

Jan. 23. Mr. W. D. Gibbs : "Preliminary Work of Draining 
Illinois Lands". 

Mr. Guy L. Shaw: "What Comes after Drainage". 

Jan. 24 Mr. Ernest Burnham, of the University of Michigan: 
"Rural School Education". 

Dec. 19. Mr. McNeal C. James, Professor of Agricultural Edu- 
cation, Normal School, Valley City, N. D. : "Secondary School 
Agriculture". 



134 General Information 

Agronomy 

March ii. Mr. C. H. Oathout, Manager of the Meharry Farms, 
Tolono, Illinois : "Accomplishments on the Meharry Farms". 

March 25. Mr. J. S. Collier, Agricultural Adviser of Kankakee 
County: "The Work of the County Adviser". 

Nov. 4. Hon. F. I. Mann, of Oilman, Illinois: "Practical Agri- 
culture". 

Dec. 2. Mr. S. W. Strong, Secretary of the Illinois Grain Deal- 
ers' Association : "Improving the Quality of Grain for Illinois 
Elevators". 

Animal Husbandry 

Jan. 17. Brother Leo, of Notre Dame University: "Producing 
Carload Lots for the International". 

Hon. E. p. Hull, Mechanicsburg, Illinois: "Cattle 
Feeding: Producing International Winners in Carload Lots" 
(before the Com Growers' and Stockmen's Convention). 

April 4. Mr. Wayne Dinsmore, Secretary of the Percheron 
Breeders' Association of America: "Horse Market Conditions 
in the United States and Europe". 

July 15. Dr. Charles E. Thorne, Director of the Ohio State Ex- 
periment Station: "Live Stock Farming and Soil Fertility" (be- 
fore the Illinois Cattle Feeders' Association and visitors). 

Horticulture 

Jan. IS, 16. Mr. George Burnap, Official Landscape Architect of 
Washington, D. C: "The Home Problem," "The Washington 
Plan". 

Feb. 5, 6. Mr. James Sturgis Pray, Assistant Professor of 
Landscape Architecture, Harvard University : "Gardens Old 
and New", "Functional City Planning". 

Feb. 15-29. Mr. W. N. Rudd, President of Mt. Greenwood Ceme- 
tery Association : Lectures on horticultural subjects. 

Nov. 6. Mr. Jens Jensen, Landscape Architect, Chicago, Illinois : 
"Some Phases of Landscape Design". 

Dec. 12. Mr. Thomas Bendelow, Golf Course Architect: "Golf 
Courses". 

Dec. 16. Judge William Prentiss, of Chicago : "Horticulture — 
a Safety Valve for the Business and Professional Man". 



Lectures and Exercises 135 

Dec. 17. Mr. W. W. Thomas, Anna, Illinois: "The Strawberry 
in Illinois"; Mr. W. S. Perrine, Centralia, Illinois, and Mr. F. 
Kern, Bayfield, Wisconsin : "The Producer" ; Mrs. Carolina A. 
Bley, Chairman of the Pure Food Committee, Chicago Wom- 
man's Club: "The Consumer"; Mr. John Denny, Chicago, 
Illinois : "The Commission Man" ; Mr. L. F. Troja, Industrial 
Agent, Wells, Fargo Express Co., Chicago : "The Express Com- 
pany"; Mr. A. G. Hambrock, President of the Retail Merchants' 
Association of Illinois, Chicago : "The Retailer" ; Dr. William 
K. Jaques, of Chicago, Illinois : "Various Points of View". 

Dec. 18. Mr. A. W. Brayton, Mt. Morris, Illinois : "The National 
W)iite Pine Forest of Illinois as a State Reservation". 

Household Science 

Jan. 23. Mrs. Minnie Starr Grainger, State Secretarj- of the 

Federations of Woman's Clubs, and Miss Mary Snow, of the 

Chicago Public Schools: Addresses before the School for 
Housekeepers. 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Oct. 6. Mr. R. A- Daly : "Evolution in Law Book Publishing and 
the Modem Methods of Finding the Law", "The Mechanical and 
Typographical Devices Found in Digests and their Uses", "An- 
alyzing Statements of Fact and Finding Cases in Points", "Ex- 
hausting Authorities, Text Books, Encyclopedias, and Selected 
Cases", "Search Books and Tablets, and Answering Questions 
Concerning Law Publications". 

THE LIBRARY SCHOOL 

Jan. 14, 15. Mr. Edwin L. Shuman, Literar>^ Editor of the 
Chicago Record-Herald: "How to Judge a Book", "The Librar- 
ian and Public Taste". 

April 8. Mr. Adam Strohm, Librarian of the Detroit Public 
Library : "The Organization and Work of the Detroit Public 
Library". 

April II, 12. Miss Ethel S. Fegan, Librarian of Ladies' College, 
Cheltenham, England : "Librar>' Training in Great Britain", 
"The Great University and Reference Libraries in England". 

April 28. Miss Mary Emogene Hazeltine, Preceptor of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin Library School : "The Work of the Wis- 
consin Library Commission" and a "Book Talk". 



136 General Information 

May 6. Mr. William H. Brett, Dean of the Western Reserve 
University Library School: "The Larger Purpose of the Li- 
brary". 

Nov. 7. Dr. W. Daw^son Johnson, Librarian, Columbia Uni- 
versity: "The Mutual Advantage Accruing from Establishing a 
Vital Connection between a Library School and a University". 

Dec. 17-18. Mr. George B. Utley, Secretary of the American 
Library Association: "The American Library Association and 
Its Work", "A Library Diagnosis". 

THE SUMMER SESSION OF 1913 

Lectures 
June 23-29. Professor J. B. Stoughton Holborn, Oxford,, Eng-^ 

land : "Art in Daily Life". 
June 30-July 7. Professor J. B. Stoughton Holborn, Oxford, . 

England: "The Inspiration of Greece the Greatest Factor in, 

Modem Civilization". 
July 3. Dr. Leonard P. Ayres, Russell Sage Foundation, . New - 

York City : "The Sub-normal Child in the Public Schools"; 
July 8-16. Dr. Ruth Marshall, Rockford College: "The N^edi 

of Nature Study", "Nature Study Field Trips", "Courses ih.. 

Nature Study", "Literature of Nature Study", "Round Table. 

Discussion". 
July 29. Mr. John Adams, Professor of Education, University 

of London : "The Dullness of the School Master". 
July 30- August 5. Dr. F. H. Hayward, London, England r 

"Adolescent and Adult", "Lessons in Appreciation", "Glimpses 

into English Education", "The Moral Education Controversy", 

"Fallacies of Heredity Mongers". 
July II. Dr. T. W. Galloway, Professor of Biology, James Mil- 

likin University: "Sex Education". 
Entertainments 
July II, 12. The Ben Greet Players: "Midsummer Night's, 

Dream", "Love's Labour's Lost", "Twelfth Night". 



ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, AND 

CLUBS 



GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS 

University of Illinois Union 

The University of Illinois Union is an association of the men 
of the University, having for its general object the promotion of 
college spirit and good fellowship. The Union has purchased a 
house which is open to all university- men. All male students are 
eligible to active membership in the Union ; alumni and members 
of the faculty may become associate members. The Union elects 
annually a Student Council, consisting of eight seniors and seven 
juniors, which takes charge of certain student activities. 

The Woman's League 

The Woman's League was organized to further the spirit of 
unity among the women of the University and to be a medium for 
the maintenance of high social standards. The administrative 
power is vested in an Advisory Board and an Executive Commit- 
tee composed of representatives from the various women's organi- 
zations. Every woman in the University is, by virtue of her regis- 
tration, a member of the League. The League manages a loan 
fund, supports a room in the Burnham Hospital, and provides the 
magazines for the Woman's Building. 

Hospital Organization 

The Hospital Association is an organization of students to pro- 
vide a fund for hospital care in case of sickness. The members of 
the Association pay a fee of one dollar each semester, and the fund 
thus raised is used to pay the hospital expenses of members who 
may need such care. The fund is under the control of a commit- 
tee of the Council of Administration. During the past ten years 
the Association has rendered valuable aid to a considerable num- 
ber of members. Students are advised to join the Association, 

137 



138 General Information 

Literary Societies 

The Adelphic, Ionian, and Philomathean societies for men, 
and the Alethenai, Athenian, Illiola, and Gregorian societies 
for women, meet weekly, on Fridays, and the Jamesonian on Tues- 
days, throughout term time. 

The Christian Associations 

The present membership of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion is 1066 — believed to be the largest paid membership of any 
Student Y. M. C. A. in the world. The Association building fur- 
nishes free, for the use of all students, lounging room and library, 
parlors, organization rooms for committee meetings, correspond- 
ence tables, check room, etc. The building also contains game 
rooms, bowling alleys, and dormitories to accommodate ninety men. 
A cafeteria, whose manager is on the pay roll of the Association, 
serves 450 to 500 persons daily. Religious meetings for men are 
held occasionally on Sunday afternoon. Thursday evening meet- 
ings are addressed by prominent faculty members on ethical topics. 
Student-led classes in Bible Study are promoted, the teachers re- 
ceiving training in normal groups. In 1912-13 there were 750 men 
enrolled in voluntary Bible Study and 280 enrolled in Mission 
Study. An employment bureau managed by a special secretary, 
who maintains office hours every afternoon in the Association 
building, endeavors to help needy students to find work. 

The Y. W. C. A. is spending its first year in its new home, the 
Hannah McKinley building, recently dedicated. Dormitory space 
is provided for fifty young women. There are parlors on the first 
floor for use of the women rooming in the house, a large assembly 
room, and free use of pianos, organization rooms, and correspond- 
ence tables. A bowling alley and modem dining room are in the 
basement. There are 500 members of the Y. W. C. A. at present, 
which is twice the number previously enrolled. In 1912-13 there 
were 360 young women enrolled in voluntary Bible Study and 112 
in Mission Study. An employment bureau is maintained at the 
Y. W. C. A. to assist needy young women in finding employment. 

At the opening of the college year the Associations endeavor to 
help new students to find desirable rooming and boarding places. 
A copy of the Students' Handbook, giving information about Ur- 
bana and Champaign, the University, and the various college or- 
ganizations and activities will be sent free to prospective students. 
For this handbook or for further information address the general 
secretary of either Association. 



Societies and Clubs 139 

The Cosmopolitan Club 

The Cosmopolitan Club is an organization devoted to the pro- 
motion of social and intellectual intercourse among persons of dif- 
ferent nationalities at the University, Public meetings are held in 
Universit}^ buildings, to afford the University community informa- 
tion about the customs peculiar to the various countries of the 
world. The clubhouse on Daniel street affords a home to many 
foreign students and to a limited number of native students. 

Ma-Wan-Da 
Ma-Wan-Da is a senior society formed by the consolidation of 
the two former senior societies, Shield and Trident and Phenix. 

HONORARY SOCIETIES 

The honorary societies or fraternities named below are private 
intercollegiate organizations of students and graduates, having for 
their primary purpose the recognition and encouragement of excel- 
lence in scholarship in various departments of study. Election is 
in all cases made by the societies themselves in accordance with 
their own rules. The University assumes no responsibility for 
their elections. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Each year a certain number of the ranking students of the senior 
class are elected to membership in the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 
The number is ordinarily limited to one-fifth of the total member- 
ship of the graduating class. 

The Phi Beta Kappa Prise 
Gamma of Illinois chapter of Phi Beta Kappa offers annually a 
prize of $25.00 to that member of Gamma Chapter who at his 
graduation from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences gives 
evidence of greatest promise as a scholar in the domain of liberal 
arts. The award is based on the following considerations : (a) 
Class room records ; (b) other literary and scholarly activities in 
the University; (c) an essay, which may be a senior thesis or a 
term paper. At the discretion of the committee in charge, the 
award may be withheld if none of the essays appears worthy of the 
prize. Essays submitted in competition and all correspondence 
with reference to this prize should be addressed to the Secretary of 
the Phi Beta Kappa Society, University of Illinois. 

Sigma Xi 
Members of the senior class who give "promise of marked abil- 
ity" in scientific investigations are eligible to membership in the 



140 General Information 

Sigma Xi Society, which was founded to encourage research in 
pure and applied science. 

Other Honorary Societies 

Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemical) ; Alpha Gamma Rho (Agricul- 
tural) ; Alpha Zeta (Agricultural) ; Beta Gamma Sigma (Com- 
mercial) ; Delta Sigma Rho (Oratorical) ; Eta Kappa Nu (Electri- 
cal Engineering) ; Gamma Alpha (Scientific) ; Kappa Delta Pi (Ed- 
ucational) ; Order of the Coif (Law) ; Phi Alpha Delta (Law) ; 
Phi Delta Phi (Law) ; Phi Lambda Upsilon (Chemical) ; Scab- 
bard and Blade (Military) ; Scarab (Architectural) ; Sigma Delta 
Chi (Journalistic); Sigma Mu Rho (Medical); Tau Beta Pi (En- 
gineering); Triangle (Civil Engineering). 

CLUBS AUXILIARY TO COURSES OF STUDY 

In addition to the associations and societies of a general char- 
acter described above, there are in each college a number of so- 
cieties and clubs devoted to outside work of a literary, scientific, or 
technical nature auxiliary to the work of various departments of 
that college. Among these are the following: 

In the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences : The Botanical 
Club, the Ceramic Club, le Cercle Frangais, el Circulo Espanol, the 
Chemical Club, the University of Illinois Section of the American 
Chemical Society, the Classical Club, the Commercial Club, der 
Deutsche Verein, the English Journal Club, the Geological Journal 
Club, the History Club, the Mathematical Club, the Oratorical As- 
sociation, the Pen and Brush Club, the Philological Club, the Po- 
litical Science Club, the Romance Journal Club, the Scandinavian 
Club, the Zoological Club. 

In the College of Engineering: The Architects' Club, the 
Civil Engineers' Club, the Electrical Engineering Society, the Ur- 
bana Section of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the 
Mechanical Engineering Society, the Urbana Student Branch of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Mining Engineer- 
ing Society, the Urbana Student Branch of the American Institute 
of Mining Engineers, the Physics Club, the Railway Club. 

In the College of Agriculture: The Agricultural Club, the 
Horticultural Club, the Household Science Club, the Landscape 
Gardeners' Club. 

In the College of Law : The Fuller, John Marshall, Witena- 
gemot, and Van Twiller Law Clubs. 



Societies and Clubs 141 

In the School of Music: The University Choral and Orches- 
tral Society, the University Glee and Mandolin Club, the University 
Military Band. 

In the Library School : The Library Club. 

FRATERNITIES, SOCIETIES, AND CLUBS 

National Fraternities. — Acacia (Masonic); Alpha Delta Phi; 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Alpha Sigma Phi; Alpha Tau Omega; Beta 
Theta Pi; Chi Phi; Chi Psi; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Delta Tau 
Delta ; Delta Upsilon ; Kappa Sigma ; Phi Delta Theta ; Phi Gamma 
Delta; Phi Kappa; Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Kappa Sigma; Phi Sigma 
Kappa ; Psi Upsilon ; Sigma Alpha Epsilon ; Sigma Chi ; Sigma Nu ; 
Sigma Pi; Tau Kappa Epsilon; Theta Delta Chi; Zeta Beta Tau; 
Zeta Psi. 

Sororities. — Achoth (Eastern Star); Alpha Chi Omega; Alpha 
Delta Pi ; Alpha Omicron Pi ; Alpha Xi Delta ; Chi Omega ; Delta 
Gamma ; Gamma Phi Beta ; Kappa Alpha Theta ; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma ; Phi Beta ; Pi Beta Phi ; Sigma Kappa. 

Local Chihs. — Chi Beta; Delta Omega; Gamma Alpha; Ilus; 
Iris; Pi Omicron; Psi Delta; Tau Lambda. 

Interfraternity Organisations. — Men's Pan Hellenic Council; 
Girls' Pan Hellenic Association; Helmet; Yo Ma; Phi Delta Psi. 

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 

Other students' societies include the following: Chinese 
Students' Club ; Dixie Club ; Easterners' Club ; Egyptian Club ; H. 
H. Club ; Ivrim ; Kansas Club ; Komenian Society ; Lincoln League ; 
Mask and Bauble (Dramatic); Motorcycle Club; Scribblers' Club; 
Sewanee Circle; Shomeez (Interfraternity Missouri Club) ; Treveri. 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS 



(For circulars giving more detailed information concerning 
these scholarships, apply to the Registrar of the University.) 

COUNTY SCHOLARSHIPS 

A law passed by the General Assembly of the State of Illinois 
at the session of 1905 and embodied in the General School Law 
of 1909 provides that one scholarship may be awarded annually 
to each county of the State. The holder thereof must be at 
least sixteen years of age, and a resident of the county to which 
he is accredited. No student who has attended the University of 
Illinois is eligible for a scholarship. The holder of a scholarship is 
relieved of payment of the matriculation fee ($10.00, payable once, 
upon entrance) and incidental fees for four years ($24.00 a year) in 
any department of the University other than the professional 
schools. The term "professional schools," as here used, includes the 
College of Law, the Library School, the College of Medicine, the 
College of Dentistry, and the School of Pharmacy. 

A competitive examination, under the direction of the President 
of the University and upon such branches of study as the Presi- 
dent may select, is held, upon the first Saturday in June of each 
year, at the county court house in each county by the County Super- 
intendent of Schools. Questions for these examinations are fur- 
nished in advance to the County Superintendents. 

The successful candidates in the examinations must then meet 
in full, either by certificate from an accredited high school or by 
passing entrance examinations at the University, the requirements 
for admission to the freshman class, and must register the follow- 
ing September. 

In case the scholarship in any county is not claimed by a resi- 
dent of that county, the President of the University may fill the 
same by assigning to that county from some other county the stu- 
dent found to possess the next highest qualifications. 

142 



Undergraduate Scholarships 143 

A student holding a scholarship who shall make it appear to 
the satisfaction of the President of the University that he requires 
leave of absence for the purpose of earning funds to defray his 
expenses while in attendance, may, in the discretion of the Presi- 
dent, be granted such a leave of absence, and may be allowed an 
extension of his scholarship for not more than two years (making 
not more than six years in all from the beginning of the scholar- 
ship). Such extension will not be granted unless the student has 
been in attendance at the University for at least one full semester, 
nor unless the student's average grade during the period of his at- 
tendance has been at least 80 per cent, exclusive of grades in Mil- 
itary Science and Physical Training. 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY SCHOLARSHIPS 

The same act by which the county scholarships described above 
were established also provides that each member of the General 
Assembly may nominate annually one eligible person from his dis- 
trict for a scholarship in the University, granting the same priv- 
ileges as the county scholarships. 

A member of the General Assembly who wishes to nominate a 
candidate for a scholarship should file the name and address of his 
nominee, as early in the spring as practicable and not later than 
June I, with the President of the University and also with the 
County Superintendent of the county in which the nominee resides. 

The nominee is then required, under the statute, (i) to pass the 
scholarship examination — the same that is given to competitors for 
the county scholarships on the first Saturday in June, under the 
County Superintendent ; (2) to meet in full, either by certificate 
from an accredited high school or by passing entrance examinations 
at the University, the requirements for admission to the freshman 
class; and (3) to register in the University the following Septem- 
ber. 

If a nominee fails to make a passing grade (70) in the scholar- 
ship examination he may not receive the scholarship. In this case 
notice will be sent to the member of the General Assembly who 
made the nomination, who is then entitled to nominate a second 
candidate. This second candidate is subject to all the requirements 
stated above; the scholarship examination will be given him at the 
University on the Wednesday preceding the fall registration days 
(in 1914, September 16). 

A General Assembly scholarship may be extended under the 
same conditions as a county scholarship. 



144 General Information 

SCHOLARSHIPS IN CERAMICS 

The University offers annually to each county in the State one 
scholarship, awarded by the Trustees of the University, upon the 
nomination of the Illinois Clay Workers' Association, to applicants 
who intend to pursue either of the courses in ceramics (Ceramics, 
and Ceramic Engineering). These scholarships are good for four 
years and relieve the student from the pa3'^ment of the matricula- 
tion fee ($10.00, payable once, upon entrance) and the incidental 
fees ($24.00 a year). 

The candidate must be at least sixteen years of age, must be a 
resident of the county for which he is nominated, and must meet 
in full, before entering, by certificate from an accredited high school 
or by passing entrance examinations at the University, the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class. 

SCHOLARSHIPS IN AGRICULTURE AND HOUSEHOLD 

SCIENCE 

The University offers every year to each county in the State, 
except Cook and Lake, and to each of the first ten congressional 
districts, one scholarship for prospective students of Agriculture in 
the College of Agriculture and one for prospective students of 
Household Science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or 
the College of Agriculture. 

Appointments to scholarships in agriculture are made by the 
Trustees of the University upon the recommendation of the Exec- 
utive Committee of the Illinois Farmers' Institute ; and to scholar- 
ships in household science upon the recommendation of the County 
Domestic Science Associations, or, for counties and districts in 
which there are no domestic science associations, on the recom- 
mendation of the Illinois Farmers' Institute. Persons who have 
already attended the University are not eligible. 

Candidates who are able to meet in full the requirements for 
admission to the freshman class are eligible to appointment at 16 
years of age. Candidates who cannot meet these entrance require- 
ments are eligible to appointment as special students (in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture) at 21 years of age. 

Acceptable candidates, residents of counties or districts for which 
appointments have been made, not exceeding five in number from 
any one county or district, may be assigned to counties or districts 
for which no recommendations are made. The first nominee from 
each county or district, if duly qualified, is awarded the scholarship 



Undergraduate Scholarships 145 

at the time of registration. Other nominees must pay the regular 
fees on registration. Assignments to counties and districts for 
which there are no nominees registered are made on October 15, 
at which time the nominees so assigned to counties or districts other 
than their own receive rebates of the full amount of the matricula- 
tion and incidental fees paid. 

The scholarships are good for two years and relieve the holders 
from the payment of the matriculation fee ($10.00, payable once, 
upon matriculation), and the incidental fees ($24.00 a year). If, 
before a scholarship expires, the holder satisfies in full the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class of the college in which 
he or she is enrolled the term of the scholarship may be extended 
to four years from the date of the student's matriculation. 

MILITARY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Students who have had three semesters of class instruction in 
military science and four semesters of drill practise are eligible for 
appointment as commissioned officers of the University Corps of 
Cadets. To those attaining this rank, special military scholarships, 
good for one year, and equal in value to the university incidental 
fees for the year, are open. The amount of these scholarships is 
paid to the holders at the close of the academic year. Appoint- 
ments in the Corps of Cadets are made on the recommendation 
of the Commandant of Cadets, confirmed by the Council of Ad- 
ministration. 

OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS 

For scholarships in the College of Law, see page 277. 
For scholarships in the Summer Session, see page 250. 
For fellowships and graduate scholarships, see under Graduate 
School, page 227. 



BENEFICIARY AID 



EDWARD SNYDER DEPARTMENT OF STUDENTS' AID 

In 1899 Edward Snyder, Professor of the German Language 
and Literature, Emeritus, gave the University the sum of $12,000, 
to be lent to worthy students to enable them to finish their courses 
in the University. 

This fund is available for junior, senior, and graduate students 
who need aid to remain and complete their work. The minimum 
loan made is fifty dollars ($50) ; the maximum loan is one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars ($150) to a junior, and two hundred dollars 
($200) to a senior or graduate student. Notes of hand are taken 
for the amount of the loans, with 5 per cent interest. The maxi- 
mum time limit is for juniors three years and for seniors and grad- 
uates two years from the ensuing thirtieth of June. 

Loans are made only to matriculated students who have attained 
at least the full rank of junior, who have been in residence at the 
University at least one year, who are at the time students in resi- 
dence at the University, and who have declared their intention to 
graduate. 

In recommending loans, preference is given to those students 
who are most advanced in their university work, who have shown 
themselves most assiduous and successful in their studies, and have 
shown habitual economy in living. No distinction is made on 
account of sex or course of study. A loan will not be recommended 
for any student who is believed to have been financially or morally 
delinquent in any respect. 

Applications for loans must be made in writing and addressed to 
Dean Thomas Arkle Clark, Chairman of the Loan Fund Committee. 

CLASS OF 189s LOAN FUND 

A fund of $100.00 was established by the class of 1895, to be 
lent to needy and deserving students. According to the conditions 
of the gift, the sum of fifty dollars is to be lent annually, and the 

146 



Beneficiary Aid 147 

benefit of the fund is open only to students who, at the time of ap- 
plication, are members of the freshman class. No person may re- 
ceive the benefit of the fund more than four years. The loan bears 
interest from the time the recipient leaves the Universit}', and is 
due one-half in five years and one-half in six years after matricu- 
lation. The fund is in charge of the Loan Fund Committee of the 
Council of Administration, Applications should be made in writing 
and should be addressed to Dean Thomas Arkle Clark, Chairman 
of the Committee. 

GRADUATE CLUB LOAN FUND 

A fund of $75 was established by the members of the Graduate 
Club in 1907-1908, for the benefit of graduate students. Its ad- 
ministration is in the hands of the Loan Fund Committee of the 
Council of Administration, Applications should be made in writ- 
ing and should be addressed to Dean Thomas Arkle Clark, Chair- 
man of the Committee. 

WILLIAM B. M'KINLEY LOAN FUND 

In September, 1912, the Hon, William B, McKinley of Cham- 
paign, Illinois, turned over to the University notes aggregating 
something more than $12,000.00, this amount as it is collected to be 
used as a loan fund for undergraduate men. In making the dona- 
tion, Mr, McKinley stipulated that loans should be made to stu- 
dents upon their own personal notes, and that a preference should 
be shown in making these loans to upperclassmen. The notes draw 
interest at 5 per cent and become due two years after the student's 
graduation. Applications for loans should be made in writing and 
should be addressed to Dean Thomas Arkle Clark, Chairman of the 
Loan Fund Committee, 

HENRY STRONG LOAN FUND 

Mr, Gordon Strong, of Chicago, trustee of the Henry Strong 
Educational Fund, has for 1913-14 offered the University $500.00 to 
be loaned to self-supporting students of high scholastic attain- 
ments. The loan bears interest at 4 per cent and is payable within 
one year after graduation. The fund has been loaned to two stu- 
dents, each of whom received $250.00. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



GENERAL FEES 
All University fees are payable each semester in advance. 

G)LLEGES OF LIBERAL ArtS AND SCIENCES, ENGINEERING, AND 

Agriculture^ and Library School 

Matriculation Fee. Each student not holding a scholarship, 
upon satisfying the requirements for admission to the Uni- 
versity, pays the matriculation fee of $10.00 

Incidental Fee. All students, excepting those holding scholar- 
ships, pay, each semester, an incidental fee of 12,00 

Tuition Fee. Students conditioned on entrance requirements, 
and special students, except special students holding 
scholarships, pay, each semester, a tuition fee of 7.50 

Laboratory Fees. Each student working in laboratories, or in 
the drafting or engineering classes, is required to pay a 
fee varying from $1.00 to $10.00, to cover materials and 
apparatus used and breakages or damages. (For a list of 
Laboratory Fees, see page 150. 

Listener's Fee. Persons not connected with the University 
who attend classes as listeners, or for credit, pay for each 
course, each semester 7.50 

Late Registration Fee. A former student who enters after the 
Registration Days in either semester must pay a late regis- 
tration fee of i.oo 

Change Fee. For every change of study-list made later than 
the tenth day of instruction in either semester, there is 
charged a fee of i.oo 

Special Examination Fee. For any special examination, the 

fee is 5-00 

Diploma Fee 5-00 

148 



Fees and Expenses 149 

School of Music 

College Courses 

Matriculated students, residents of Illinois, pay, each semester, 

the incidental fee $12.00 

Non-matriculated students registered for the course in Public 
School Methods, as outlined on page 236, pay, each semester: 

(i) The incidental fee $12.00 

(2) The tuition fee 7.50 

All other students (including matriculated students not residents 
of Illinois and all conditioned and special students), pay, each 
semester : 

If they take music onl}-, special music fees, as follows: 

For two lessons a week $,>2.5o 

For one lesson a week iQ SO 

For harmony, counterpoint, fugue, etc 9.00 

If they take, in addition to music, subjects in other departments : 

( 1 ) The incidental fee $12.00 

(2) Unless matriculated, the tuition fee 7.50 

(3) Special music fees, as follows: 

For two lessons a week $25.00 

For one lesson a week 15.00 

(4) For harmony, counterpoint, fugue, etc 9.00 

Preparatory Courses 

Students taking music only pay, each semester, special music 
fees as follows : 

For two lessons a week $i9oO 

For one lesson a week 11.00 

Students taking, in addition to music, subjects in other depart- 
ments pay, each semester: 

( 1 ) The incidental fee $12.00 

(2) Unless matriculated, the tuition fee 7.50 

(3) Special music fees, as follows: 

For two lessons a week $15.00 

For one lesson a week 8.50 

Additional 

Use of a piano for practise one hour a day, each semester. .$ 3.00 

Additional hours at the same rate 
Special students, taking music only, may enter classes in 

physical training on paying, each semester 7.50 



I50 



General Information 



College of Law 

Matriculation fee, payable upon satisfying tiie entrance re- 
quirements $ 10.00 

Tuition fee, each semester 25.00 

Students conditioned on entrance requirements pay, each 

semester, an additional fee of 7.50 

Students not enrolled in the College of Law pay, each sem- 
ester, for each law course 5.00 

College of Medicine 

Matriculation fee, each year $ 5,00 

General ticket, freshman and sophomore years, each 120.00 

Junior year 140.00 

Senior year 155.00 

Laboratory deposit, freshman and sophomore years, each... 20.00 
Junior year (there is no deposit in the senior year) 5.00 

College of Dentistry 

Matriculation fee, each year $ 5.00 

Tuition, each year (including laboratory and dissection fees) 150.00 

School of Pharmacy 

Matriculation fee, paid but once $ 5.00 

Tuition fee, shorter course, each year 75-00 

Tuition fee, longer course, each year 125.00 

Laboratory deposit, shorter course, each year 10.00 

Laboratory deposit, longer course, each year 15.00 

Diploma fee 5.00 

LABORATORY FEES (FOR MATERIALS) 1913-1914 

(The fees given below are in each case for one semester only; where a course 
runs through both semesters, the fee named is to be paid each semester.) 



A.rchitecture 6 $ 

Architecture 10 

Architecture 1 3 

Architecture 14 

Architecture 15 

Architecture 19 

Architecture 3 1 

Architecture 43 

Architecture 44 

Architecture 57 

Architecture 68 



1.50 



Botany 

Botany 

Botany 

Botany 

Botany 

Botany 

Botany 

Botany 8 

Botany 9 



00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.50 
7.50 
1.50 
3.00 
6.00 
3.00 



Botany 
Botany 
Botany 
Botany 
Botany 
Botany 
Botany 



11... 
12... 
101. 
102. 
103. 
106. 
107. 



1.50 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
6.00 
3.00 
3.00 



Ceramics 1 2.00 

Ceramics 5 5.00 

Ceramics 6 5.00 



Ceramics 
Ceramics 
Ceramics 
Ceramics 
Ceramics 
Ceramics 



11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 



5.00 
2.00 
,00 
,00 
00 
,00 



Chemistry 1 8.00 

Chemistry la 6.00 

Chemistry lb ~. 6.00 

Chemistry 3 8.00 



Fees and Expenses 



151 



Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem. 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem. 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 
Chem 



Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 
Civ 



3 Ci sem.) S 

4 8 

5 a 1 

5 b 1 

5c (3 hrs,) 8 

8 8 

Qa 10 

9b 10. 

9c 10 

10a „ 5 

10b (i sem.) 5 

II (per hr.) 2 

13a 10 

1 3b 1 

IS „ 8. 

16 3. 

21 8 

22 10 

27 8. 

3 3 8. 

35 ^ 10 

61 5. 

65 S. 

66 _ 3. 

68a. ^ 8. 

68b 8. 

69 _ 3. 

70 3. 

71 3. 

72 3. 

80 3. 

102c 5. 

103 10. 

103a 10. 

105a (per hr.) 2. 

106 10. 

107 (per hr.) 2. 

108 3. 

110 „ 10. 

III (per hr.) ^ 2. 

Engineering 4 1. 

Engineering 4a.„ 1. 

Engineering 5/. 1. 

Engineering 13 1. 

Engineering 13a 

Engineering 13b 

Engineering 14 _ 1. 

Engineering 14a 

Engineering 21 1. 

Engineering 22 „ 1 



stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
stry 
strv 



00 Entomology 11 

00 Entomology 13 

00 Entomology 14 

00 Entomology 
00 Entomology 
00 Entomology 
00 Entomology 
00 General 
00 Geology 



102..„ 

103 

108... „ 

109 

Engineering Drawing 2. 



la. 

2 

4 

5a'"!" 

6 

7 



00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 8 
00 Geology 9 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 
00 Geology 

00 Geology 23 

00 Household Science 

00 Household 

00 Household 

00 Household 

00 Household 

00 Household 

00 Household 

00 Household 



10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 „ 

16 

17 .^„ 

18 



1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.25 
3.00 
2.75 
2.75 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 



1. 
2. 
2. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 



1 

4 

5 

6 

10. 

14 

17 , 

18. 



Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

00 Mechanical Engineering 3 

00 Mechanical Engineering 12 

00 Mechanical Engineering 13 

00 Mechanical Engineering 27 

50 Mechanical Engineering 32 

50 Mining Engineering 4 

50 Mining Engineering 9 

50 Mining Engineering; 10 

50| Municipal and Sanitary Eng. 2... 
50 Municipal and Sanitary Eng. 6a. 
50 Phvsics 2b 



50 Physics 

1 Engineering 21 1.00 Physics 

1 Engineering 22 „ 1.00 Physics 

Dairy Husbandry 11 4.00 Physics 

00 Physics 
00 Physics 
00, Physics 
00 Physics 



Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 



Engineering 16 3 

Engineering 22 4, 

Engineering 23 5, 

Engineering 24 5. 

Engineering 27 5. 

Engineering 28 _ 3, 

Engineering 29 4, 



00! Physics 



OOj Physics 

00 1 Physiology 

Entomology 1 „ 1. 00 1 Physiology 

I.5O1 Physiology 
1. 50 ! Physiology 
1.50! Physiology 
1.50 Physiology 
2.00 Psychology 

50 Psychology 
.50 Railway Engineering 11.. 

SO Railway Engineering 63.. 

00 



Entomology 2 

Entomology 3 

Entomology 4 

Entomology 5 

Entomology 6 



Entomology 7 1. 

Entomology 8 . 1. 

Entomology 9 ^ 1. 

Entomology 10 1. 



3 

4 

6b 

15 

16 — 

18 ^ 

20b 

25 „ 

30b 

31 

1 

2 

3 

4 

loi"""". 

3 

4 



.00 

.25 
.25 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
1.00 
3.00 
5.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
5.00 
2.00 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.59 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 



152 General Information 

Theoretical and Applied Mech. 5.. 2.00; Zoology 7 1.00 

Theoretical and Applied Mech. 9- 2.00 Zoology 9 2.00 



Theoretical and Applied Mech. 10 1.00 

Zoology 1 _ 2.50 

Zoology 2 ^. 3.50 

Zoology 3 3.00 

Zoology 6 3.00 



Zoology 11 . 1.50 

Zoology 13a (per hr.) 1.00 

Zoology 15a (per hr.) . 1.00 

Zoology 17 1.00 

Zoology 18 1.00 



AVERAGE ANNUAL EXPENSES 

The following are estimated average annual expenses for under- 
graduate students attending at Urbana, exclusive of books, clothing, 
railroad fare, laboratory fees, if any, and small miscellaneous needs : 

♦Semester fees $ 24.00 to $ 24.00 

Room rent for each student (two in room) 72.00 " 80.00 

Table board in boarding houses and clubs 144.00 " 180.00 

Washing 20.00 " 30.00 



Total $260.00 to $314.00 

Board and room in private house, a week $S-50 to $6.50 

In addition to the foregoing, freshmen pay a matriculation fee of 
$10.00, and the men are required to buy a cadet uniform, which 
costs $16.20. Freshmen engineering students will need to buy a 
set of drawing instruments at a cost of about $18.00. 

Other necessary expenses will need to be taken into considera- 
tion. For all the necessary expenses of the year the average stu- 
dent is likely to need not less than $375.00 to $450.00. Most stu- 
dents spend more than this amount. 

For information in regard to scholarships which cover the 
matriculation and incidental fees, see page 142. 

Board and Rooms 

The University does not provide dormitories nor furnish board, 
but the numerous rooming and boarding houses near the campus 
are to a certain extent under the supervision of the University. The 
Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations of the 
University will aid new students in securing rooms and board. 

Prospective women students and their parents are invited to 
correspond with the Dean of Women in regard to suitable places. 



•Students of law and music, special students, and conditioned student! 
must make needed changes in the amount given for "semester fees." 



PART II 
THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

AND SCIENCES 



For a description of the buildings used by this College, see page 
65, for museums and collections belonging to it (art, archaeology, 
commerce, education, European culture, botany, entomology, geol- 
ogy, and zoology), see pages 75, 76, for a summary of its courses, 
see pages 84, 85; for clubs and societies auxiliary to its courses 
of study, see page 140; for fees, see page 148. 

ORGANIZATION 

The organization of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in 
which are merged the former College of Literature and Arts and 
College of Science, became fully effective on July i, 1913, following 
upon an action of the Board of Trustees, taken on July 5, 1912. 
During the period of transition from the old order of two Colleges, 
to the new single College, various temporary adjustments will be 
necessary; procedure according to the regulations of the former 
Colleges, especially in matters like requirements for admission, elect- 
ive subjects, honors, and combined courses, must continue for cer- 
tain groups of students already registered. It is expected that the 
faculty of the College will have worked out a new schedule in these 
matters before the end of the first year of the union. In the mean- 
time, the requirements of the former Colleges are printed in separ- 
ate paragraphs wherever necessary. 

PURPOSE 

The purpose of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is, first, 
to secure to its students a liberal education including both the hu- 
manities and the sciences ; second, to furnish specially arranged 
courses preparator>' to later professional and technical studies by 
which good students may ordinarily obtain in six years both the 
degree in arts and a professional degree in law or medicine, or a 
technical degree in engineering ; and, third, to provide certain highly 
specialized courses in applied science (particularly chemistry), busi- 

155 



156 The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

ness administration, journalism, and household science. The degree 
of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon the completion of all these 
courses, except those in applied science for which the degree of 
Bachelor of Science is given. 

Under the modified elective system a student who desires to 
prepare for teaching may specialize to a considerable extent in the 
particular subject which he wishes to teach and may also find time 
for courses in education and related subjects which are of interest to 
teachers generally. Such students should, as a rule, continue their 
preparation in the Graduate School. 

Students who desire to devote a considerable part of their under- 
graduate course to specific preparation for some particular calling 
other than teaching may select courses in (i) business administra- 
tion, including general business, secretarial service, banking, insur- 
ance, accounting, and railway administration and transportation ; 
or (2) journalism; or (3) applied chemistry; or (4) ceramics; or 
(5) household administration. 

.ADMISSION 

See the general statement of the entrance requirements of the 
University, pages 88ff. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

For a statement of the regulations of the University in regard to 
special students, see page 96. 

It is the policy of this College to admit as special students only 
a select group of mature and serious persons who, though unable to 
meet the formal requirements for entrance, are substantially pre- 
pared for work of college grade. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The following general requirements apply to all candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

A. University Requirements. — Each candidate must meet the 
general University requirements as to residence and registration. 
He must also secure credit in approved courses (see pages 157-163 
below) amounting to 130 hours. An hour is one class period a 
week for one semester, each class period presupposing two hours' 
preparation by the student, or the equivalent in laboratory or draw- 
ing room. 



Requirements for Graduation 157 

B. Prescribed Studies. — Subjects specifically prescribed for all 
students : Rhetoric i* (6 hours) ; Physical Training, i and la for 
men, 7 and 9 for women; Military Science i and 2 for men. In ad- 
dition, students who purpose to make a science their major subject, 
are required to have Chemistry i, and Physics 2a, 2b (or i, 3) unless 
they have had one-year courses in these subjects in an accredited 
high school or acceptable equivalent courses elsewhere. 

C. I. Group Requirements for the degree according to the 
schedule of the former College of Literature and Arts. — Every can- 
didate must offer a minimum of 8 hours in each of the following 
groups : 

I. English, including literature and rhetoric. 

II. Ancient and modem languages other than English, including 
Greek, Latin, the Germanic languages, and the Romance languages. 
Only courses which require the use of a foreign language may be 
counted in this group, and the 8 hours offered must all be in the 
same language. 

III. The social sciences, including historj', economics, political 
science, and sociology. 

IV. Mathematics and philosophy, including mathematics, educa- 
tion, philosophy, and psychology. A candidate who elects mathe- 
matics must take at least five hours of it. If a student does not 
elect mathematics, his elections in this group must include work in 
at least two of the other departments of the group. That is, if he 
does not take mathematics, he must take either philosophy and 
psychology, or philosophy and education, or education and psychol- 
ogy. With the exception of mathematics, no subject of this group 
is open to freshmen. 

V. The natural sciences, including astronomy, botany, chemis- 
try, entomology, geolog>', physiolog>^ physics, and zoology. Zoology- 
16 may not be counted toward this group requirement. 

C. (2) Group Requirements for the degree according to the 
schedule of the former College of Science. — Each candidate must 
offer 8 hours in each of the following Groups : i, 2, 3 and 5. In 
Group 4, 16 hours must be offered, provided that students who 
have had three years of work in foreign language in an accredited 



•Those students who show by examination a proficiency in composition 
sufficient to qualify them for the second semester's work in Rhetoric 1 may be 
excused from the first semester's work. See page 95. 



158 The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

high school, or an equivalent course elsewhere, will be relieved from 
the requirement of Group 4, and similarly, those who have had one 
year or two years of foreign language may be relieved from 4 hours 
or 8 hours respectively of this requirement. The physics and chem- 
istry of the prescribed list may be applied on the requirements of 
Groups I and 2. 

Group I. — Mathematics, physics, astronomy, logic (Philosophy i), 
mineralogy (Geology 5). 

Group 2. — Chemistry, geology, household science, bacteriology 
(Botany 5). 

Group 3. — Botany, zoology, physiology, psychology, entomology. 

Group 4. — Foreign language. 

Group 5. — English literature, history, political science, economics, 
philosophy, education. 

D. (i) Major Subjects according to the former College of Lit- 
erature and Arts. — Each candidate must select some one subject to 
be designated as his major, and secure credit in that subject to the 
amount of 24 hours. The courses selected for the last two years 
should include some distinctly advanced work. The subjects which 
may be recognized as majors in this college are subject to additions 
from time to time ; at present they are as follows : Classics* ; eco- 
nomics; education; English^ (including English literature and rhet- 
oric) ; French*; German*; Greek*; history; household science; 
Latin* ; mathematics ; philosophy ; political science ; psychology ; so- 
ciology. 

Special requirements and suggestions for students in business 
courses and in household science are indicated below, on pages 163 
and 173 respectively. Students holding scholarships in household 
science must make that subject their major, and take one of the 
courses outlined on pages 174 and 175 below. 

D (2) Major Subjects according to the former College of Sci- 
ence. — A total credit of at least 20 hours must be secured in some 
one of the divisions of the following major elective list. Not more 
than 40 hours' work (exclusive of thesis) in any one of these divi- 
sions may be applied toward graduation. In arranging the subjects 
to be counted toward the major requirement the student is advised 



*For the definition of the major in this subject, see below page 352. 

'For tlie definition of the major in English, see below page i77. 

•A major in French must include 24 hours in addition to French 1. 

*A major in German must include 24 hours in addition to German 1 and 3. 



\ 



Requirements for Graduation 159 

to consult with the head of the department in which the major is 
taken. 

Major electives are : Astronomy, botany, chemistry, education, 
entomology, geology (including mineralogy and physical geogra- 
phy), household science, library science, mathematics, physics, 
physiology, psychology, and zoology. 

E. Elective Subjects. — The remainder of the course is made up 
of electives chosen under defined conditions. 

1. Credit is regularly given for courses properly announced in 
the following subjects: Art and design (the total credit in this 
department is limited to 20 hours) ; astronomy, botany, chemistry, 
the classics, economics (including accountancy and commercial 
law), education, English, entomology, geology, Germanic languages, 
history, household science, library science, mathematics, philosophy, 
physics, physiology, political science, psychology, Romance languages, 
sociology, zoology. 

2. Not more than 40 hours in any one subject may be counted 
for graduation, except when the student is writing a thesis. In 
this case he may count, in addition to the 40 hours, the hours of the 
seminar course in which he does his thesis work. In the depart- 
ment of English a student may take 40 hours in addition to 
Rhetoric i. 

3. No credit is granted in any subject unless the student pur- 
sues it for the full time required in the shortest course offered in 
that subject. For example, if the student elects a course which 
yields two hours of credit for one semester, he must stay in the 
class during the semester in order to get any credit at all. In order 
to secure any credit in a beginning course in a foreign language, a 
full year's work must be completed. 

4. Seniors graduating under the schedule of the former Col- 
lege of Literature and Arts who register in courses open to fresh- 
men may receive only one-half of the credit regularly assigned to 
such courses. For the year 1913-1914 the following courses are in- 
cluded in this list : Art and Design i and 2 ; Astronomy i ; Botany 
11; Chemistry i; English i, 10, 20; Entomology i; French i; 
Geology 3, 10, 14, 23; German i, 3; Greek i; History i, 11; House- 
hold Science 2, 7; Latin i; Library Science 12; Mathematics 2, 4; 
Rhetoric i ; Spanish i ; Zoology i, 16. 



i6o The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

5. A limited amount of credit toward the A.B. degree is ordi- 
narily given for courses offered in other colleges and schools of 
this University. Students who continue under the schedule of the 
former College of Science may select, with the approval of the 
Dean, approximately one-third of the work to be counted toward 
a degree, from subjects given in other colleges of the University. 
Students who continue under the schedule of the former College of 
Literature and Arts will ordinarily confine their elections of work 
in other colleges and schools to the following courses : 

Physical Training. — Not to exceed 5 semester hours. 

Military Science and Tactics. — Military Science i and 2. 

Law. — Law i (Contracts) ; Law 2 (Torts) ; Law 3 (Real Prop- 
erty) ; Law 4 (Pleading); Law 5 (Criminal Law); Law 6 (Per- 
sonal Property). The total credit is limited to 24 hours. None of 
these courses may be taken before the senior year. Law i may 
count for six hours only. 

Engineering. — General Engineering Drawing i and 2 (Mechan- 
ical Drawing and Descriptive Geometry) ; Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics 7 and 8 (Analytical Mechanics) ; Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 7 or 15 (Thermodynamics) ; Civil Engineering 10 or 21 (Survey- 
ing) ; Architecture 31, 32 (Architectural Drawing) ; Architecture 
13, 14, 15, 16, (History of Architecture) ; Electrical Engineering i 
and 21, or 2 and 26 (Principles). 

Agriculture. — Agricultural Extension 2 (Elementary Agriculture 
for teachers); Agronomy 25 (Seeds), for business students only; 
Agronomy 9 (Soil Physics); Farm Management i; Agronomy 22 
(Plant Breeding) ; Animal Husbandry 7 (Principles of Animal 
Nutrition) ; Animal Husbandry 30 (Principles of Evolution as 
Applied to the Improvement of Domesticated Animals and Plants) ; 
Horticulture 9 (Forestry) ; Horticulture loa (Landscape Garden- 
ing) ; Horticulture 12 (Evolution of Horticultural Plants) ; Horti- 
culture 19 (General Floriculture), for household science students 
only. The total credit allowed in these agricultural courses will 
not ordinarily exceed 14 hours. 

Library Science. — Library 3 (Selection of Books) ; 7 (History of 
Libraries) ; 9 (Book Making) ; 12 (General Reference) ; 13 (Public 
Documents). The total credit allowed in Library Science will not 
ordinarily exceed 14 hours. The course in General Reference (Lib. 



Requirements for Graduation i6i 

12) is of special value to students in the courses in Literature and 
Arts. 

Music. — Music i, 2, 3, 4, and 5 (courses in the history and theory 
of music). 

Courses not listed under paragraphs i to 5 above may not be 
counted for the degree of A.B., except by special permission of the 
Dean of the College. 

F. Bachelors' Theses. — A bachelor's thesis is not generally re- 
quired in this College. Students of high standing are, however, en- 
couraged to write theses in connection with their major studies. 
Credit toward the degree is given for thesis work only as a part 
of the work in some course for which the student is registered. 
Students desiring to take a thesis course in geology or mineralogy 
may add to their credits in those subjects the credits received for 
chemistry; and students in physiology may add to their credits in 
that subject those in zoology and bacteriology. Only students grad- 
uating with a thesis will, as a rule, be selected for fellowships, 
scholarships, and other similar university honors. Candidates for 
honors or the honor degree, are required by the general regula- 
tions of the University to write a thesis. See below, page 181. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 

FIRST YEAR 

Subjects Prescribed for Freshmen 

The following subjects must be taken during the freshman year: 
Rhetoric i,* three hours each semester; Military 2, one hour each 
semester, and Military i, one hour ^econd semester (for men) ; 
Physical Training (Physical Training i and la for men; 7 and 9 
— Physiology 6 — for women). Students who have entered accord- 
ing to the requirements formerly set down for the College of Lit- 
erature and Arts, must take foreign language, 4 hours each semes- 
ter; students entering as of the former College of Science, should 
take Chemistry i, unless chemistry has been accepted for admission. 

Freshman Electives 

The following subjects are open to freshmen. The total amount 
taken in any semester is limited to eighteen hours, and should not 
be less than fifteen. All freshmen in the courses in Business Ad- 
ministration must take 6 hours from Economics, 7, 22, 26, 27. 



*See footnote, page 157. 



1 62 The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

English 10^ (3)*; Rhetoric i (3). 

French i (4) or 2 (4) ; German i (4) or 3 (4) or 4 (4) or 5 
(4) ; Greek i (4) or 7 (3) ; Latin i (4) or 2 (4) ; Spanish 

1 (4). 

Mathematics 2 (3) and 4 (2). 

Economics 7 (3) and 26 (3); History i (4). 

Astronomy i (3); Botany 2^ (5), 4 (5), 11 (5); Chemistry i* 
(5) or la* (4); Entomology i (2); Geology' (5) 3* (5), 14 
(3), 23* (5) ; Physics 2a' and 2b' (5) ; Physiology 4 (s) ; 
Zoology I* (5). 

Household Science 2 (2) or 7 (2) Library Science 12 (2). 

Art and Design i (2 or 3). 

Second Semester: 

English 10' (3) ; Rhetoric i (3). 

French i (4) or 2 (4) ; German 3 (4) or 4 (4) or 5 (4) or 6 
(4) or 7 (4) ; Greek i (4), 4 (4), or 6 (3) ; Latin i (4), or 

2 (4) ; Spanish i (4). 
Mathematics 3 (2), 6 (5). 

Economics 22 (3) and 27 (3) ; History i (4) or 11 (3). 
Astronomy 4 (5) ; Botany i (5), 2" (5) ; i6b (5) ; Chemistry 
I* (5) or la* (4) or 2 and 3 (5) ; Entomology i (2) ; Geology 
la (5), 3* (5), 8 (3), 10 (3), 12 (5) ; Physics 2a'' and 2b'' (5) ; 
Zoology 2 (5), I* (5), or 16 (2). 
Household Science i (3). 
Art and Design i (2). 

SECX)ND YEAR 

Male students must continue Military 2 throughout the year. 
Students who have failed to secure credit for any of the prescribed 
subjects of the freshman year must make up such deficiencies at 
this time. 



^English 10 Is open only to rresTimen who have presented the minimum 
amount of English required for admission. See the description of this course 
in Part III. 

*The figure immediately following the subject is the number of the course 
(see "General Description of Courses," page Zi7^.) ; the figure in paren- 
thesis indicates the number of credit hours to be secured in the course each 
semester. 

^Either semester may be taken separately, or both together; entrance 
botany required. 

*May be taken in either semester, but not in both. 

•Prerequisite: Mathematics 4 (Trigonometry) which may be taken at the 
same time. 



Requirements for Graduation 163 

ELECTION 

Aside from the subjects prescribed for the first two years, each 
student selects, with the advice of the Dean or other college ad- 
visers, such courses as will enable him to meet the requirements for 
graduation as stated above. 

COURSES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Courses in economics, accountancy, banking, commerce, railway 
administration, and industry are offered in combination with courses 
in language, law, and science, with the aim of providing a univer- 
sity training for business life. The combined courses are designed 
to give the student a knowledge of the general principles that un- 
derlie all lines of business, with special training in the work of 
some particular calling. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 

The subjects of study are so arranged as to furnish training for 
(l) general business, (2) commercial and civic secretaries, (3) bank- 
ing, (4) insurance, (5) accountancy, (6) railway traffic and ac- 
counting, (7) railway transportation, (8) commercial teachers. 

The work of the class-room is supplemented by lectures by 
practical specialists, and by visits of inspection to industrial and 
mercantile establishments. 

The outlines of the courses in General Business, Secretarial 
Work, Banking, Insurance, Accountancy, Railway Administration, 
and Commercial Teaching are given below. 

GENERAL BUSINESS COURSE 

The general business course is intended for students who wish 
a general knowledge of modern business organization and methods 
and their relation to the public welfare, without specializing in 
the details of any particular business. 

Every student must take 15 to 18 hours of work each semester. 
Students desiring mathematics, or taking courses requiring it, should 
elect it the first year, omitting Economic Resources (Economics 
26), or Economic History of the United States (Economics 22), 
and science, which may then be elected the second year. 



164 



Courses in Business Administration 



Course in General Business 



First Semester 



FIRST YEAR 



Second Semester 



Prescribed Subjects 

Foreign language 

Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 

Military (Mil. 2) 

Physical Training (P. T. 1, la) 

Economic Resources (Econ. 26) or 

English Econ. Hist. (Econ. 7) 

Mathematics (Math. 2, 4) or 

Science 

SECOND 

Prescribed Subjects 

Principles of Econ. (Econ. 1) 
Amer. Nat'l Gov't (Pol. Sci. 1) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
History of U. S. (Hist. 3) or 
European History (Hist. 1) 
Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
Mathematics 
Science 



Prescribed Subjects 

Foreign language 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Military (Mil. 1, 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1) 
Modern Industries (Econ. 27) or 
Econ. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 22) 
Mathematics (Math. 6) or 
Science 

YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Money and Banking (Econ. 3) 
Business Organization (Econ. 6) 
Business Writing (Rhet. 10) 
Military (Mil. 2) 

State and Local Gov't (Pol. Sci. 3) 
History of U. S. (Hist. 3) or 
European History (Hist. 1) 

Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
Mathematics 
Science 



Ag- 
io) 



THIRD 

Prescribed Subjects 
Elementary and Intermediate 

counting (Acc'y 1) 
Corporation Managem't (Econ. 
Domestic Com. (Econ. 28) or 
Foreign Com. (Econ. 29) 

Suggested Electives 
History 

Public Finance (Econ. 5) 
Foreign language continued 
Advanced Accounting and Auditing 

(Acc'y 2) 
Railway Transportation (Econ. 41) 
State Administration (Pol. Sci. 13) 
Psychology (Psych. 1) 
Municipal Gov't (Pol. Sci. 4) 
Sales Correspondence (Rhet. 21) 



YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 
Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Organization of Foreign Com. 

(Econ. 31) or 
Tariff and Customs Regulations 
(Econ. 30) 

Suggested Electives 
History 

Indust. Consolid. (Econ. 11) 
Foreign language continued 
Advanced Accounting and Auditing 

(Acc'y 2) 
Railway Rates (Econ. 42) 
Psychology (Psych. 2) 
Logic (Phil, lb) 

Summarizing and Abstracting (Rhet. 
22) 

FOURTH YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 
Seminar (Econ. 18) 
Work Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Economic Development of Europe 
(Econ. 13) 

Suggested Electives 
5) Economic Reform (Econ. 21) 

Finan. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 4b) 
(See also third year electives) 

COURSE FOR COMMERCIAL AND CIVIC SECRETARIES 

This course is intended for students who expect to take service 
with chambers of commerce, commercial clubs, and civic organiza- 
tions. The work of the first and second years is the same as in the 
general business course. 



Prescribed Subjects 
Seminar (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written 

(Rhet. 25) 
Labor Problems (Econ. 12) 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Suggested Electives 
Political Ethics (Phil. 9) 
Constitutional Law (Pol. Sci. 
(See also third year electives) 



Course for Commercial and Civic Secretaries 165 



Course for Commercial and Civic Secretaries 



THIRD YEAR 



First Semester 



Prescribed Subjects 

Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Domestic Commerce (EU:on. 28) or 
Foreign Commerce (Econ. 29) 
Municipal Gov't (Pol. Sci. 4) 
Corporation Managem't (Eicon. 10) 

Suggested Electives 
Sales Correspondence (Rhet. 21) 
Public Finance (Econ. S) 
Prin. of Sociol. (Sociol. 1) 
State Administration (PoL Sci. 13) 
PoUtical Ethics (Phil. 9) 
Property Insurance (Econ. 34) 



Second Semester 
Prescribed Subjects 



Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 

Organization of Foreign Com- 
merce (Econ. 31) or 

Tariff and Customs Regulations 
(Econ. 30) 

Charities (Sociol. 8) 

Suggested Electives 

Summarizing and Abstracting (Rhet. 
22) 

Industr. Consolidations (Econ. 11) 

Nat. Administration (Pol. Sci. 12) 

Logic (Phil, lb) 

Gov't of Illinois (Pol. Sci. 16) 



FOURTH YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Railway Transportation (Econ. 41) 
Foreign Commerce (Econ. 29) or 
Domestic Commerce (Econ. 28) 
Conference on Written Work 

(Rhet. 25) 

Suggested Electives 
Seminar (Econ. 18) 
Constitutional Law of U. S. (Pol. 

Sci. 5) 
Labor Problems (Ek;on. 12) 
Population (Sociol. 10) 



Prescribed Subjects 



Corn- 
Work 



Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 

Railway Rates (Econ. 42) 

Tariff and Customs Regulations 

(Econ. 30) or 
Organization of Foreign 

merce (Econ. 31) 
Conference on Written 

(Rhet. 25) 

Suggested Electives 
Seminar (Econ. IS) 
Social and Industrial Problems 

(Pol. Sci. 11) 
Economic Reform (Econ. 21) 
Criminology (Sociol. 9) 



COURSE IN BANKING 

The work of the first and second years in banking is the same 
as in the course in general business, but students must take ad- 
vanced algebra (Math. 2), which is a prerequisite for the mathe- 
matics of investment (Math. 23a). 



Course in Banking 
THIRD YEAR 



First Semester 

Prescribed Subjects 

Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Corporation Managem't (Exon. 10) 
Public Finance (Econ. 5) 

Suggested Electives 
Domestic Com. (Econ. 28) 
Logic (PhiL la) 
History 



Second Semester 
Prescribed Subjects 
Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Math, of Investment (Math. 23) 
Economic Development of Europe 
(Econ. 13) 

Suggested Electives 
Tariff and Customs Regulations 

(Econ. 30) 
Indust. Consolid. (Econ. 11) 
History 



i66 



Courses in Business Administration 



Prescribed Subjects 

Practical Banking (Econ. 9) 
Foreign Com. (Econ. 29) 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Seminar (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written 

(Rhet. 25) 

Suggested Electives 
Labor Problems (Econ. 12) 
Political Ethics (Phil. 9) 
Advanced Accounting and 

ing (Acc'y 2) 



FOURTH YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

The Money Market (Econ, 8) 
Finan. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 4b) 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Seminar (Econ. 18) 
Work Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 

Suggested Electives 
Organization of Foreign Commerce 
(Econ. 31) 
Audit- Advanced Accounting and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 2) 

COURSE IN INSURANCE 

The work of the first and second years in insurance is the same 
as in the course in railway traffic and accounting, except that Eco- 
nomics 7 (Econ. Hist, of England) may take the place of Eco- 
nomic Resources (Econ. 26), and that any other science may be 
taken instead of physics. (See page 169.) 

Course in Insurance 

THIRD YEAR 



First Semester 

Prescribed Subjects 

Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Corporation Managem't (Econ. 10) 
Amer. Nat'l Gov't (Pol. Sci. 1) 
Econ. of Insurance (Econ. 33) 

Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
History of U. S. (Hist. 3) 
European History (Hist. 3) 
Public Finance (Econ. 5) 
Sales Correspondence (Rhet. 21) 

FOURTH 

Prescribed Subjects 

Property Insurance (Econ. 34) 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Sem. in Insur. (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written Work 

(Rhet. 25) 
Actuarial Theory (Math. 31) 
State Administration (Pol. Sci. 13) 

Suggested Electives 
Political Ethics (Phil. 9) 
Labor Problems (Econ. 12) 
Practical Banking (Econ. 9) 



Second Semester 
Prescribed Subjects 

Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 

Mathematics of Investment (Math. 
23) 

State and Local Gov't (Pol. Sci. 3) 
Suggested Electives 

Foreign language continued 

History of U. S. (Hist. 3) 

European History (Hist. 1) 

Summarizing and Abstracting 
(Rhet. 22) 

YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Sem. in Insur. (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written Work 

(Rhet. 25) 

Suggested Electives 
Finan. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 4b) 
Econ. Development of Europe 

(Econ. 13) 
Indus. Consolid. (Econ. 11) 
Money Market (Econ. 8) 



COURSES IN ACCOUNTANCY 

The development of the commercial, industrial, and financial 
interests of the country has given rise to a demand for three classes 
of workers in accountancy, (i) the teacher, (2) the business execu- 
tive, (3) the public accountant. 

In order to give students adequate preparation for these three 
fields, the University offers several courses of study: 



Course in Accountancy 



167 



1. A four years' course in business administration with a maxi- 
mum of work in accountancy, economics, history, political science, 
statistics, language, and other subjects. 

2. Work in accountancy open to election by students in business 
administration as part of the general training necessary to a suc- 
cessful business executive. 

3. A two years' special course in preparation for the examina- 
tions required by law for securing a certificate as a Certified Public 
Accountant. 

According to this law, passed in 1903, establishing accountancy 
upon a professional basis, candidates are required to pass examina- 
tions in commercial law as affecting accountancy, the theory of 
accounts, practical accounting, and auditing. 

Four- Year Course in Accountancy 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 
Prescribed Subjects 



Second Semester 



Foreign language 

Rhetoric (Rhet, 1) 

Military (Mil 2) 

Physical Training (P. T. 1, la) 

Algebra and Trig. (Math. 2, 4) 

English Econ. Hist. (Econ. 7) or 

Economic Resources (Econ. 26) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Foreign language 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Military (Mil. 1, 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1) 
Analytical Geom. (Math. 6) 
Modem Industries (Econ. 27) 
Econ. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 22) 



or 



SECOND YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Principles of Econ. (Econ. 1) 
Elementary and Intermediate 

counting (Acc'y 1) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
Science 

Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
Calculus (Math. 8a) 
European History (Hist. 1) 
Hist, of U. S. (Hist. 3) 
Amer. Nat'l Gov't (PoL Sci. 1) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Money and Banking (Econ. 3) 
Ac- Business Organization (Econ. 6) 
Business Writing (Rhet. 10) 
Elementary and Intermediate 

counting (Acc'y 1) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
Science 

Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
European History (Hist. 1) 
Hist, of U. S. (Hist. 3) 
State and Local Gov't (PoL Sci. 3) 



Ac- 



THIRD YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Advanced Accounting and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 2) 
Corporation Managem't (Econ. 10) 
Public Finance (Econ. 5) 
Municipal Gov't (Pol. Sci. 4) 
Suggested Electives 
Sales Correspondence (Rhet. 21) 
Foreign language 
Domestic Commerce (Econ. 28) 
Logic (Phil, la) 
Railway Transportation (Econ. 41) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Advanced Accounting and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 2) 

Indust. Consolid. (Econ. 11) 

Mathematics of Investment 
(Math. 23) 

Suggested Electives 

Summarizing and Abstracting 

(Rhet. 22) 

Foreign language 

Tariff and Customs Regulations 
(Econ. 30) 

Railway Rates (Econ. 42) 



i68 



Courses in Business Administration 



FOURTH 

Prescribed Subjects 

Accounting Problems and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 3) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 

Seminar (Econ. 18) 

Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 

Political Ethics (Phil. 9) 

Suggested Electives 

Practical Banking (Econ. 9) 

Labor Problems (Econ. 12) 



YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Accounting Problems and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 3) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 

Seminar (Econ. 18) 

Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 

Suggested Electives 

Money Market (Econ. 8) 

Finan. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 4b) 



Two- Year Course in Accountancy 

This course is open only to students in accountancy who are 
preparing for the C. P. A. examinations, who are at least 20 years 
of age and able to matriculate in the University, and who can fur- 
nish satisfactory evidence of at least one year's experience in the 
office of a practising public accountant. The course must be taken 
as outlined. No variation from it is allowed. 

Two-Ycar Course in Accountancy 



First Semester 

Prescribed Subjects 

Elementary and Intermediate 

counting (Acc'y 1) 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Principles of Econ. (Econ. 1) 
Algebra (Math. 2) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1, la) 



Ac- 



Prescribed Subjects 

Advanced Accounting and 

ing (Acc'y 2) 
Accounting Problems and 

ing (Acc'y 3) 
Corporation Managem't (Econ 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Practical Banking (Econ. 9) 
Economics of Insurance (Econ. 
Property Insurance (Econ. 34) 
Military (Mil. 2) 



FIRST YEAR 

Second Semester 

Prescribed Subjects 

Ac- Elementary and Intermediate 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Business Organization (Econ. 6) 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Money and Banking (Econ. 3) 
Mathematics of Investment 

(Math. 23) 
Military (Mil. 1, 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1) 

SECOND YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Audit- Advanced Accounting and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 3) 
Audit- Accounting Problems and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 3) 
10) Business Writing (Rhet. 10) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Industrial Consolidations (Econ. 11) 
33) State and Local Gov't (Pol. Sci. 3) 

Military (Mil. 2) 



COURSES IN RAILWAY ADMINISTRATION 

There are two courses offered under the head of railway ad- 
ministration, one emphasizing those subjects which are of most 
value to the student interested in the accounting and traffic aspects 
of railway work, the other laying stress upon the transportation 
service, properly so called, and intended to prepare men directly 
for the transportation departments of railways. 



Course in Railway Traffic and Accounting 169 

Course in Railway Traffic and Accounting 



First Semester 



FIRST YEAR 



Second Semester 



Prescribed Subjects 

Foreign language 

Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 

Military (Mil. 2) 

Physical Training (P. T. 1, la) 

Algebra and Trig. (Math. 2, 4) 

Economic Resources (Econ. 26) or 

Eng. Econ. Hist. (Econ. 7) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Foreign language 

Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) ^ 

Military (Mil. 1, 2) 

Physical Training (P. T. 1) 

Analytical Geometry (Math. 6) 

Econ. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 22) or 

Modern Industries (Econ. 27) 



SECOND YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Principles of Econ. (Econ. 1) 
Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Amer. Nat'l Gov't (Pol. Sci. 1) 
Physics (Phys. 1 and 3) 
Military (Mil. 2) 



THIRD 

Prescribed Subjects 

Adv. Accounting and Audit. (Acc'y 2) 
Corporation Managem't (Econ. 10) 
Railway Transportation (Econ. 41) 
Railway Operation (Econ. 45) or 
Traffic Administration (Econ. 43) 



FOURTH 

Prescribed Subjects 

Accounting Problems and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 3) 

Traffic Admin. (Econ. 43) or 

Railway Operation (Econ. 45) 

Sem. in R'y Admin. (Econ. 18) 

Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Money and Banking (Econ. 3) 
Business Organization (Econ. 6) 
Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Business Writing (Rhet. 10) 
Physics (Phys. 1 and 3) 
Military (Mil. 2) 

YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Adv. Accounting and Audit. (Acc'y 2) 
Indust. Consolid. (Econ. 11) 
Railway Rates (Econ. 42) 
Mathematics of Investment (Math. 23) 
Railway Operation (Econ. 45) or 
Traffic Administration (Econ. 43) 

YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Accounting Problems and Audit- 
ing (Acc'y 3) 
Traffic Admin. (Econ. 43) or 
Railway Operation (Econ. 45) 
Sem. in R'y Adm.in. (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written Work 

(Rhet. 25) 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 



Course in ILulway Transport.\tion 

In choosing additional courses to make up the required 130 hours 
of credit, six hours of such electives must be taken in history, 
political science, more advanced language, or philosophy. 

Course in Railway Transportation 



First Semester 



FIRST YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 
Foreign language 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1, la) 
Gen. Engin. Drawing (G. E. D. 1) 
Algebra and Trig. (Math. 2, 4) 



Second Semester 
Prescribed Subjects 
Foreign language 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Military (Mil. 1, 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1) 
*Descriptive G'com. (G. E. D. 
Anal. Geom. (Math. 6) 



2) 



•This subject is to be taken for three hours' credit only. 



170 



Course for Commercial Teachers 



Prescribed Subjects 
Principles of Econ. (Econ. 1) 
Calculus (Math. 7) 
Physics (Phys 1, 3) 
Military (Mil. 2) 



SECOND YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 
Money and Banking (Econ. 3) 
Business Organization (Econ. 6) 
Physics (Phys. 1, 3) 
MiHtary (Mil. 2) 
Anal. Mech. (T. and A. M. 7) 



THIRD YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Railway Transportation (Econ. 41) 
Traffic Admin. (Econ. 43) or 
Railway Operation (Econ. 45) 
Anal. Mech. and Resist, of Materials 
(T. and A. M. 8, 9) 



FOURTH 

Prescribed Subjects 

Railway Operation (Econ. 45) or 

Traffic Admin. (Econ. 43) 

Sem. in R'y Admin. (Econ. 18) 

Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 

Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 

Labor Problems (Econ. 12) 

Locomotives (R'y M. E. 1) 

Engin. Materials (T. and A. M. 6) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Business Writing (Rhet. 10) 
Railway Rates (Econ. 42) 
Traffic Administration (Econ. 43) or 
Railway Operation (Econ. 45) 
Engines and Boilers (M. E. 11) 
Electrical Engin. (E. E. 16) 
Surveying (C. E. 10) 

YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Railway Operation (Econ. 45) or 
Traffic Admin. (Econ. 43) 
Mech. Engin. Lab. (M. E. 13) 
Sem. in R'y Admin. (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written Work (Rhet. 

25) 
Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting fAcc'y 1) 
R'y Tests (R'y M. E. 11) 
Mech. Engin. Lab. (M. E. 13) 



COURSE FOR COMMERCIAL TEACHERS 

This course is intended for students who are planning to teach 
commercial subjects in secondary schools. 

Course for Commercial Teachers 



First Semester 



FIRST YEAR 



Second Semester 



Prescribed Subjects 
Foreign language 
Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
Physical Training (P. T. 1, la) 
English Economic History (Econ. 7) 

or 
Economic Resources (Econ. 26) 
Mathematics (Math. 2. 4) or 
Science 

SECOND 

Prescribed Subjects 
Principles of Econ. (Econ. 1) 
Amer. Nat'l Gov't (Pol. Sci. 1) 
Psychology (Psychol. 1) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
History of U. S. (Hist. 3) or 
European History (Hist. 1) 

Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
Mathematics 
Science 
English literature 



Prescribed Subjects 

Foreign language 

Rhetoric (Rhet. 1) 

Military (Mil. 1, 2) 

Physical Training (P. T. 1) 

Econ. Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 22) or 

Modern Industries (Econ. 27) 

Mathematics (Math. 6) or 

Science 

YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 

Money and Banking (Econ. 3) 
Business Organization (Econ. 6) 
Business Writing (Rhet. 10) 
Psychology (Psychol. 2) 
Military (Mil. 2) 
History of U. S. (Hist. 3) or 
European History (Hist. 1) 
Suggested Electives 
Foreign language continued 
Mathematics 
Science 
English literature 



Course in Journalism 



171 



THIRD YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 



Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 
Corporation Managem't (Econ. 10) 
Prin. of Education (Educ. 1) 
Domestic Commerce (Econ. 28) or 
Foreign Commerce (Econ. 29) 

Suggested Electives 
History 

Foreign language continued 
Logic (PhiL la) 
Public Finance (Econ. 5) 
Municipal Gov't (Pol. Sci. 4) 
Railway Transportation (Econ. 41) 
Sales Correspondence (Rhet. 21) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Elementary and Intermediate Ac- 
counting (Acc'y 1) 

Hist, of Education (Educ. 2) 

Organization of Foreign Com- 
merce (Econ. 31) or 

TariflF and Customs Regulationi 
(Econ. 30) 

Suggested Electives 
History 

Foreign language continued 
Intro, to Philosophy (Phil. 2) 
Prin. of Second. Educ. (Educ. 6) 
Indus. Consolidations (Econ. 11) 
Railway Rates (Econ. 42) 
Summ.arizing and Abstracting 
(Rhet. 22) 



FOURTH YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 



Seminar (Econ. 18) 

Conference on Written Work 
(Rhet. 25) 

Labor Problems (Econ. 12) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 

Observation and Technique of Teach- 
ing (Educ. 10) 

Suggested Electives 

Advanced Accounting and Auditing 
(Acc'y 2) 

Political Ethics (Phil. 9) 

Constitutional Law of U. S. (PoL 
Sci. 5) 

Practical Banking (Econ. 9) 

(See also third year electives) 



13) 



Prescribed Subjects 

Seminar (Econ. 18) 
Conference on Written Work 

(Rhet. 25) 
Econ. Deyel. of Europe (Econ. 
Commercial Law (Econ. 25) 
Social Education (Educ. 16) or 
School Hygiene (Educ. 15) 
Suggested Electives 
Advanced Accounting and Auditing 

(Acc'y 2) 
Social Reform (Econ. 21) 
Financial Hist, of U. S. (Econ. 4a 

or 4b) 
The Money Market (Econ. 8) 
(See also third year electives) 



COURSES IN JOURNALISM 

Students who are preparing to enter the advertising or man- 
agerial sides of journalistic work should elect economics as a major 
and enroll in one of the business courses. The work they will take 
will then be selected under the advice of the proper instructors, 
according to the needs of the individual student and within the 
requirements for the College for graduation. 

Students who are preparing for journalistic work on the repor- 
torial, literary, or editorial sides should take their major work in 
English. They will make up their study schedules from the follow- 
ing suggested course. With the consent of the adviser, other 
courses may, for purposes of specialization, be substituted for sug- 
gested courses. A program which satisfies the group and major 
requirements may, for instance, be so modified in the third and 
fourth years as to lay emphasis on any one of the social sciences. 



1/2 



Course Preliminary to Law 



Suggested Course in Journalism 

(Major in English) 
FIRST YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Rhetoric 1 3 

Physical training . 1 

Military 1 

Suggested Electives 
Continental European History 

(Hist. 1) 4 

Foreign language 4 

English 10 or science 3 or S 

General Reference (Library 12).... 2 

SECOND 
Prescribed Subjects 

Military 1 

Suggested Electives 

News Writing (Rhetoric 12) 2 

English 1 or science 3 or 4 or 5 

History of U. S. (Hist. 3) 3 

Foreign language continued 4 

Am. Nat'l. Govt. (Pol. Sc. 1) or 
Principles of Economics (Econ. 

1) 5 

Am. Literature (English 16) 2 



Prescribed Subjects 

Rhetoric 1 _ 3 

Physical training ..... ......-.- 1 

Military 2 

Suggested Electives 

History 1 4 

Foreign language 4 

English 10 or science „ 3 



YEAR 

Prescribed Subjects 
Military 1 

Suggested Electives 

News Writing (Rhetoric 12) 2 

Foreign language continued 4 

History of U. S. (Hist. 3) 3 

English 1 or State & Local Govt. 
(Pol. Sci. 3) (4 or 3) or Money 

and Banking (Econ. 3) 3 

Shakespeare (English 23) or 3 

Literature (English 16) 2 



THIRD YEAR 



Intermediate English (3) 

Municipal Govt. (Pol. Sc. 4) 3 

Foreign language continued . 4 

Logric (Philosophy 1) 3 

Rhetoric 15 or 6, or Psychology 1 3 
Sociology 1 „ 3 



Intermediate English (3) 

State & Local Govtr(Poi, Sc."i) or 
Political Parties (Pol. Sc. 14) 3 or 2 

Intro, to Philosophy (PhiL 2) 3 

Foreign language _ 4 

Rhetoric 15 or 17, or Psychology 1 3 
Sociology 1 3 



FOURTH YEAR 



Rhetoric 15 or English 14 3 

Political Ethics (Phil. 9) or Const. 

Law (Pol. Sc. 5) 3 

History of U. S. (Hist. 21) 3 

Public Finance, or Corporation 
Management and Finance, or La- 
bor Problems (Econ. 5 or 10 or 
12) 3 



Rhetoric 15 or English 14 3 

Contemporary politics (Pol. Sc. 18 
or 28) 2 or 3 

Social & Indust. Legis. (Pol. Sc. 
11) „. 3 

Industrial Consolidation, or Eco- 
nomic History of Europe or So- 
cialism and Social Reform 
(Econ 11 or 13 or 21) 3 



COURSE PRELIMINARY TO LAW 

It is recognized by the best authorities on legal education that 
professional studies in law should be preceded by a thorough course 
in the humanities and the sciences. As a foundation for the study 
and practise of law, the following subjects offered by this College 
are of special importance : English, with special reference to com- 
position and public speaking ; Latin and French ; logic ; constitu- 
tional and political history ; political science ; economics ; sociology. 



Household Science 173 

By the proper selection of his studies it is possible for a pros- 
pective law student to take both the degree in arts and the degree 
in law in six years. The following first year courses in the Col- 
lege of Law, not exceeding a total of 24 hours, may be counted for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts: Law i (contracts) ; Law 2 (torts) ; 
Law 3 (real property) ; Law 4 (pleading) ; Law 5 (criminal law) ; 
Law 6 (personal property-) • Law i may count for six hours only. 
Students are not permitted to take this work in law until their senior 
year. If the student is also a candidate for the degree of LL.B., or 
J.D., he should in his fourth year register in the College of Law, 
pay the usual fee of that College, and file a copy of his study-list 
with the adviser for seniors in this College. A fee of five dollars 
is charged for every law subject taken by students who do not pay 
the regular law school fee. 

Courses in law do not in themselves constitute a major in this 
College, but six hours of law are accepted as part of the require- 
ments for majors in the following departments : economics, history, 
political science, and sociology. 

When taken by students registered in the College of Law, credit 
to a total of six hours tov/ard the degree of LL.B., is accepted for 
courses offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in 
jurisprudence, international law, administrative law, and the law 
of taxation. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred at the close of the 
fourth year of the combined course provided that all the require- 
ments for the degree are met at that time. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Law (J.D.) must take 
four hours in history, economics, political science, or sociology, in 
the fourth year of their course. 

Students admitted to this University from other institutions may 
count the above courses in law for the degree of A.B. only on 
condition of completing at least 30 hours' work in residence in 
subjects offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The courses in instruction given in this department are planned 
to meet the needs of four classes of students : (a) those students 
who desire a knowledge of the general principles and facts of house- 
hold science; (b) those students who wish to make a specialty of 
household science for the purpose of teaching the subject in the 
secondary schools and colleges ; (c) those students who wish some 



174 Household Science 

knowledge of the principles underlying household administration 
and institutional management; (d) those students who are inter- 
ested in the work of dietitians. Students who hold scholarships in 
household science must make this subject their major along one 
of the lines indicated above and take each semester at least four 
hours in household science or in subjects required for admission to 
the Courses in Household Science. The suggested courses for 
teachers and for institutional workers are outlined below. The 
electives of the junior and senior years of the course in adminis- 
tration make possible a choice between lunch room management 
and institutional management, while the first three years of the 
course as outlined for teachers give a scientific basis for the work 
of the dietitian. Students who major in household science must 
also satisfy the group requirements in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences in so far as these are not covered in the courses be- 
fore mentioned. 

Suggested Course for Teachers of Household Science 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 1) 'Principles of the Selection and Prep- 
Home Architecture & Sanitation aration of Food (Household Sci. 1) 

(Household Science 2) Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 2) 

Introductory Zoology (Zool. 1) Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 3) 

Rhetoric & Themes (Rhet. 1) Rhetoric & Themes (Rhet. 1) 

Physical Training 7 Free Hand Drawing (Art & Design 1) 

Hygiene (Physical Train. 9) Physical Training 7 

SECOND YEAR 

Agricultural Analysis (Chem. 13a) Organic Chemistry (Chem. 9) 

Economic Uses of Food (Household Organic Synthesis (Chem. 9c) 

Science 6) Household Art and Clothing (House- 

Survey of English Literature (Eng. 1) hold Science 12) 

Applied Design (Art & Design 12) Survey of English Literature (Eng. 1) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 4) 

THIRD YEAR 

Minor Course in Physiol. (Phvsiol. 4) Elementary Home Decoration (House- 
General Physics (Physics 2a) hold Science 3) 

Physics Laboratory (Phys. 2b) Dietetics (Household Science 5) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 2) Bacteriology (Botany 5) 

Foreign language Foreign language 

Electives Electives 

FOURTH YEAR 

Food and Nutrition (Household Sci- Teachers' Course (Household Sci. 11) 

ence 4) Principles of Secondary Education 

Principles of Education (Edu. 1) or Observation and Technique of 

History of Home Economics (House- Teaching (Education 6 or 10) 

hold Science 13) Home Management (Household Sci- 

Electives ence 10) 

Electives 



•Attention is called to the fact that high school physics is a prerequisite 
for Household Science 1. 



Household Science 175 

The following subjects are suggested as electives for the junior 
and senior years: Psychology i, 2; Botany i; foreign language. 

Suggested Course in Household Administration 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Rhetoric & Themes (Rhet. 1) Rhetoric & Themes (Rhet. 1) 

Free Hand Drawing (Art & Design 1) Applied Design (Art & Design 12) 
Home Architecture & Sanitation Foreign language 

(Household Science 2) Introductory Zoology (Zoology 1) 

Economic Resources (Econ. 26) Textiles (ELousehold Science ") 

Foreign language Physical Training 
Hygiene (Physical Train. 9) 

SECOND YEAR 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 1) Economic History of the United 

Survey of English Literature (Eng. 1) States (Econ. 22) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 1) Survey of English Literature (Eng. 1) 

Suggested Electives 'Principles of the Selection & Prep- 

History of Fine Art (Art & Design 19) aration of Food (Household Sci. 1) 

Foreign language Household Art & Clothing (House- 

Introductory European History or hold Science 12) 

History of the United States Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 2) 
(Hist. 1 or 3) Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 3) 

Sut^gested Electives 
History of Fine Art (Art & Des. 19) 
Introductory European Hist, or Hist, 
of the United States (Hist, 1 or 3) 
Foreign language 

THIRD YEAR 

Economic Uses of Food (Household Dietetics (Household Science 5) 

Science 6) Elementary Home Decoration 

Elementary Psychology (Psychology 1) (Household Science 3) 

Minor Course in Physiology (Phys- Elementary Psychology (Psychology 
iology 4) 2) 

Suggested Electives Bacteriology (Botany 5) 

Logic (Philosophy 1) Suggested Electives 

Special Problems in the Service of 

Food (Household Science 14) 
Home Management (Household Sci. 10) 

FOURTH YEAR 

History of Home Econ. (H. Sci. 13) Suggested Electives 

Principles of Sociology (Sociology 11) Ethics (Philosophy 7) 

Suggested Electives Social Aspects of Education (Sociol- 

Lunch Room Management (House- o^y 26) 

hold Science 18) Social Education (Education 16) 

Principles of Education (Education 1) Problems in the Economics of the 

Economics of the Family (Household Family (Household Science 16) 

Science 15) 

COURSE PREPARATORY TO MEDICINE 

The following course of three years' work, outlined for students 
who are preparing for the study of medicine, includes the subjects 
offered in the first year of a standard course in medicine, with the 
exception of anatomy, together with the two years' work in arts 
and general science which is now required for admission to the 
better medical schools. Students who have completed the work 



•Attention is called to the fact that high school physics is a prerequisite 
for Household Science 1. 



176 Course Preparatory to Medicine 

of the first two years and are taking the work of the third year 
are registered for that year as medical students at the University of 
Illinois College of Medicine. 

A student who has completed the course outlined below and 
who then completes a year's work in medicine in a recognized med- 
ical school may receive credit by transfer for this year of medical 
work, and thus receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the 
University of Illinois. Under this plan the student may obtain the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medicine with six 
years' work. 

Course Preparatory to Medicine 

FIRST YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

S. H.i S.H.i 

General Chemistry (Chem. 1) 5 Descrip. Inorg. Chem. (Chem. 2).... 2 

Rhetoric and Themes (Rhet. 1) 3 Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 3) 3 

Trigonometry (Math. 4) 2 Rhetoric 1 3 

Zoology 1 5 Zoology 2 S 

Military (Mil. 2) 1 Military (1, 2) 2 

Physical Training 1 Physical Training 1 

Total 17 Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

S. H. S. H. 

German 1 or 4, or Latin* 4 German 3 or 5 or 6, or Latin' 4 

Zoology 3 3 Zoology 3 3 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. Sa) .. 5 Organic Chem. (Chem. 9, 9c). S 

Physics 2a, 2b 4 Physics 2a, 2b 4 

Military 2 1 Military 2 1 

Total 17 Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

S. H. S. H. 

German 4 4 German 5 or 6 4 

Histology (Physiology 1) 5 Physiology 2 10 

Physiological Chem. (Chem. 15) 5 Bacteriology (Botany 5) 5 

Psychology 1, 9 5 

Total 19 Total 19 

FOURTH YEAR 

No group requirements are prescribed for students who have 
completed the three years' course and desire to remain at the Uni- 
versity the fourth year. Selection from the following courses is 
recommended: Bacteriology; Chemistry 5b, 5c, 9a, 9b, 14, 21, 22, 31, 
105, and 106; Entomology 2, 3; Physiology 5; Psychology 113; 
Zoology 7, 8, 13, 13a ; modern languages ; and studies included in 
Group 5 of the general course in science. Upon the completion of 
this fourth year, the student takes his baccalaureate degree before 
going to the college of medicine. 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 
*If Latin has not been offered for entrance. 



Course in Chemistry 177 

COURSES LEADING TO THE B.S. DEGREE 

The following courses of instruction in this College lead ordi- 
narily to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY 

A student may pursue a course in general science having chem- 
istry as a major subject by conforming to the group requirements 
as outlined on page 161. Upon the completion of the course the 
candidate is granted the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

For the more specialized training of the chemist the following 
course, largely prescribed, has been arranged. It leads to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in chemistry. 

Preliminary preparation in German equivalent to two years of 
high school work or one year of university work is advised. Stu- 
dents who are unable to offer this may take German i and 3 in the 
freshman year, but will be required to take German 4 and 5 or 6 
in place of other electives. 

Course in Chemistry 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

S. H.i S. H.' 

General Elementary Chemistry Analytical Geometry (Math. 6) 5 

(Chera. 1) 5 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 

Trigonometry (Math. 4) 2 (Chem. 2) 2 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 2) 3 Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 3) 3 

German 4 _ 4 German 5 or 6 4 

Military (Mil. 2) 1 Military (Mil. 2) 1 

Gymnasium (Phys. Tr.) _ 1 Drill Regulations (Mil. 1) 1 

Gymnasium (Phys. Tr.) 1 

Total 16 Total ™.„:....I7 

SECOND YEAR 

S. H. S. H. 

French 1 4 French 1 „.... 4 

Quantitative Anal. ((Them. 5a) 5 Advanced Anal. Chem. (Chem. 5b) 5 

Physics 1, 3 5 Rhetoric 1 3 

Rhetoric 1 3 Physics 1, 3 4 

Military (Mil. 2) 1 Military (Mil. 2) 1 

Total 18 Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

S. H. S. H. 

Mineralogy (Geology 5) 5 Organic Chemistry (Chem. 14, Pbt 5 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 14, 9a).... 5 Physical Chem. (Chem. 31. 33) 5 

Journal Meeting (Chem. 92) 1 Journal Meeting (Chem. 92) 1 

Economics 2 Electives 3 

Differential and Integral Calculus English 1 or History 3 4 

(Math. 8a) ^ 5 

Total ..„ 18 Total ^ 18 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 



178 Course in Chemical Engineering 

FOURTH YEAR 

S. H. S. H. 

Journal Meeting (Chem. 93} 1 Journal Meeting (Chem. 93) 1 

Thesis 5 Ind. Chem. (Chem. 61 or Chem. 6) 2 

Electives in Chem 5 Thesis 5 

Electives, history, economics or Electives 8 

equivalent 5 

16 16 

The electives of the junior year and ten hours of the electives 
of the senior year must be taken elsewhere than in the department 
of chemistry. Some biological subject, philosophy, history, and 

« 

economics are recommended. 

COURSE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

The vi^ork of the technical chemist or superintendent is frequent- 
ly so closely associated with mechanical and other engineering 
lines as to make a knowledge of these subjects essential. To meet 
these conditions, the following four-year course in chemistry and 
related engineering subjects has been arranged. The degree given 
is that of Bachelor of Science in chemical enginering. 

Preliminary preparation in German equivalent to two years of 
high school or one year of university work is prescribed. It is 
also advised that students intending to take this course be pre- 
pared to offer mechanical drawing and manual training for en- 
trance. 

Where this preliminary training is lacking, students are advised, 
if possible, to register in shop work and general engineering draw- 
ing during the early years of their course. 

Course in Chemical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

S. H.i S. H.» 

General Elementary Chemistry Analytical Geometry (Math. 6) S 

(Chem. 1) 5 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 

Trigonometry (Math. 4) 2 (Chem. 2) 2 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 2) 3 Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 3) 3 

German 4 4 German 5 or 6 4 

Military (Mil. 2) 1 Military (Mil. 2)...' 1 

Gymnasium (Phys. Tr.) 1 Drill Regulations (Mil. 1) 1 

Gymnasium (Phys. Tr.) 1 

Total 16 Total 17 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 



Course in Ceramics 179 

SECOND YEAR 
S. H. S. H. 

Differential and Integral Calculus Analytical Mech. (T. & A. M. 7).... 3 

(Math. 8a) 5 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Quantitative Anal. (Chem. 5a) 5 (Chem. 5b) 5 

Physics 1, 3 5 Rhetoric 1 ^ 3 

Rhetoric 1 3 Physics 1, 3 _ 4 

Military (Mil. 2) 1 Economics 22 3 

Military (Mil. 2) 1 

Total 19 Total 19 

THIRD YEAR 

S. H. S. H. 

Gas and Fuel Anal. (Chem. 65) 2 Physical Chem. (Chem. 31, 33) 5 

Mineralogy (Geol. 5) 5 Organic Chem. (Chem. 14, 9b) 5 

Analytical Mech. (T. & A. M. 8) 2 J Dynamo Electric Machinery 

Resistance of Mater. (T. & A. M. 9) 3J (E. E. 16) 4 

Organic Chem. (Chem. 14, 9a) 5 Journal Meeting (Chem. 92) 1 

Journal Meeting (Chem. 92) 1 

Total 19 Total 15 

FOURTH YEAR 

Hours Hours 

Met. Lab. and Assaying (Chem. 69).. 2 Electives in Chemistry 3 

Electro-chemistry (Chem. 35) 3 Thesis (Chem. 11) 5 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 6) 2 Chemical Technology' (Chem. 6).... 2 

Metallurgy (Chem. 7) 2 Industrial Chemical Lab. (Chem. 61) 2 

Thesis (Chem. 11) 5 Journal Meeting (Chem. 93) 1 

Journal Meeting (Chem. 93) 1 Economics or Philosophy 3 

Totals 15 Totals 16 

COURSE IN CER.\MICS 

To graduate in ceramics the student must follow one of the 
courses outlined below. The conditions are such that little election 
can be allowed. 

Special courses will be arranged for those who wish a limited 
amount of work in ceramics, but those pursuing them will not be 
entitled to a degree and will not be recognized as graduates. 

Course in Ceramics 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

S. H.» S. H.i 

Chemistry 1 5 Chemistry 2 & 3 5 

Adv. Algebra (Math. 2) 3 Analyt. Geom. (Math. 6) 5 

Trig. (Math. 4) _. 2 Descript. Geom. (G. E. D. 2) 3 

Gen. Eng. Drawing 1 3 Rhetoric 1 _ 3 

Rhetoric 1 3 

Mil. & Phys. Tr, 1, la 2 Mil. & Phys. Tr. la 2 

18 18 

SECOND YEAR 

Physics 1 & 3 5 Physics 1 & 3 4 

Chemistry 5a 5 Chemistry 5b 5 

Calculus (Math. 8a) 5 Elements of Mech. (T. & A. M. 14) 4 

Military Drill 1 Ceramic Materials ((ler. 1) 3 

Military Drill 1 

16 17 



^Semester hours. For definition ssee page 307. 



i8o Course in Ceramic Engineering 

THIRD YEAR 

German 4 or French 1 or 2 4 German 6 or French 1 or 2 4 

Winning & Preparation (Cer. 2) 3 Body Making (Cer. 5) 5 

Indust. Calc. (Cer. 3) 3 Designing & Shaping (Cer. 12) 3 

Strength of Mater. (T. & A. M. 15) 3 Theory of Silicates (Cer. 17) 3 

Mining Methods (Min. 3) 2 Surveying (C. E. 10) 2 

15 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

Mineralogy (Geol. 5) 5 Eng. Geol. (Geol. 13) 5 



Glazes (Cer. 6) 5 Glass (Cer. 8) 3 

Cements (Cer. 10) -. 3 Steam Engines & Boilers (M. E. 11) 3 

Drying & Burning (Cer. 4) 4 Thesis (Cer. 11) 5 

17 16 

Course in Ceramic Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

S. H.» S. H.» 

Chemistry 1 5 Chemistry 2 & 3 5 

Adv. Algebra (Math. 2) 3 Analyt. Geom. (Math. 6) 5 

Trig. (Math. 4) 2 Descript. Geom. (G. E. D. 2) 3 

Gen. Eng. Drawing 1 3 Rhetoric 1 3 

Rhetoric 1 3 Mil. & Phys. Tr.._. 2 

Mil. & Phys. Tr. 1, la 2 

18 18 

SECOND YEAR 

Physics 1 & 3 5 Physics 1 & 3 4 

Chemistry 5a ~ 5 Chemistry Sb 4 

Calculus (Math. 7) 5 Calculus (Math. 9) 3 

Military Drill 1 Theoret. & App. Mechan. 7 3 

Ceramic Materials (Cer. 1) 3 

Military Drill 1 

T6 18 

THIRD YEAR 

German 4 or French 1 or 2 4 German 6 or French 1 or 2 4 

Winning & Preparation (Cer 2) 3 Body Making (Cer. 5) 5 

Indust. Calc. (Cer. 3) 3 Designing & Shaping (Cer. 12) 3 

Analyt. Mechanics (T. & A. M. 8).... 2i Steam Engines & Boilers (M. E. 11) 3 

Resist, of Materials (T. &A. M. 9).. 3i Surveying (C. E. 10) 2 

Te "l7 

FOURTH YEAR 

Glazes (Cer. 6) 5 Engineering Geology (Geol. 13).... 5 

Cements (Cer. 10) 3 Ceramic Constr. (Cer. 9) 5 

Drying & Burning (Cer. 4) 4 Glass (Cer. 8) 3 

Mining Methods (Min. 3) 2 Thesis (Cer. 11) 4 

Chemistry 65 2 

COMBINED ARTS AND ENGINEERING COURSE 

A graduate of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences whose 
mathematical training includes the work of the calculus, who has 
had the usual college course in physics, and sufficient training in 
the principles of mechanics to enable him to begin the mechanics 

^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 



Honors i8i 

of the junior year, may receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
the departments of the College of Engineering upon the comple- 
tion of sixty-eight credit hours in such lines (including thesis) as 
may be directed by the faculty. This work may ordinarily be done 
in two academic years. Candidates for the degree in the depart- 
ment of architecture are not required to be prepared in calculus or 
mechanics, but should possess special preparation in drawing. The 
courses in the College of Engineering which may be counted for 
the degree of A.B. are listed on page i6o above. 

PREPARATION OF TEACHERS 

For information concerning the preparation of teachers and the 
recommendation of the University committee on appointments see 
page 239. 

HONORS 

The Honor Degree 

The faculty of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences con- 
tinues for 1913-14 the system formerly carried on by the College 
of Literature and Arts of recommending candidates for the degree 
of A.B. with honors in a particular subject, under the following 
conditions : 

1. The amount of work required in the honor subject shall be 
that required for a major in that subject 

2. The candidate must also offer two minor subjects. Not less 
than 9 hours will be accepted in either subject, and the aggregate 
for both subjects must be at least 24 hours. 

3. The work done in the minor subjects must be of a distinct- 
ly superior quality; grades of at least 85 are required in all the 
minor subjects; especially poor or careless work in any other sub- 
ject may, by vote of the faculty, cause the honor degree to be with- 
held. 

4. Each candidate is required to present an acceptable thesis in 
his major subject; the thesis may be written in connection with 
some recognized course in the department. 

5. The honor subjects at present recognized in this College are 
as follows : The classics (either the classics as a whole, or Greek 
or Latin separately), economics, education, English, German, 
French, history, mathematics, philosophy, political science, psychol- 
ogy, sociology. The specific requirements for honors in particular 
subjects are stated in connection with the description of courses for 
the several departments, pages 307 below 



1 82 The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

The purpose of these honors is not to encourage premature 
specialization, but to give special recognition to students who have 
pursued with success carefully correlated courses of study, and to 
emphasize the importance, for scholarship in any given subject, of 
thoro training in other more or less related subjects. Candidates 
should announce their intention as early as possible in their college 
course and consult freely with the head of the department con- 
cerned in regard to the selection of their studies. 

Preliminary Honors 

The University regulations regarding preliminary honors are 
stated above, page 120. 

Freshman Honors 

At the close of each year a list of those members of the fresh- 
man class who have made an especially good record in scholarship 
is prepared. The names of such students are announced at an as- 
sembly of the College; notice is also sent in each case to the parent 
or guardian, and to the principal of the high school of which the 
student is a graduate. 

Honorary Societies 

For information concerning the honorary societies represented 
in the University, see page 139. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



For a description of the buildings occupied by this College, see 
page 67; for collections belonging to it (architecture, civil en- 
gineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and rail- 
way engineering), see page 78; for clubs and societies auxiliary to 
its courses of study, see page 140; for fees, see page 148; for honors, 
see page 120; for honorary societies, see page 139. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The purpose of the College is to train young men for the pro- 
fession of engineering. In arranging its courses of study and prac- 
tise, cultural subjects are interwoven with the strongly theoretical 
subjects which underlie and reinforce the more practical develop- 
ments of the several departments. The instruction of the classroom 
and the practise afforded by the library, the drafting-room, and the 
laboratory proceed hand in hand. Throughout his course the stu- 
dent works upon problems and proceeds by methods similar to those 
which enter into the experience of the practising engineer. 

ADMISSION 

See the general statement of the entrance requirements of the 
University, pages 88ff. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

See the statement of the general regulations of the University 
in regard to special students, page 96. 

DESCRIPTION OF DEPARTMENTS 
The College of Engineering comprizes the following depart- 
ments : 

Department of Architecture, with courses in — 
Architecture 

Architectural Engineering 
Department of Civil Engineering 
Department of Electrical Engineering 
Department of Mechanical Engineering 

183 



184 The College of Engineering 

Department of Mining Engineering 

Department of Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 

Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Department of Physics 

Department of Railway ENGINEERING^ with courses in — 

Railway Civil Engineering 

Railway Electrical Engineering 

Railway Mechanical Engineering 

ARCHITECTURE 

The department of architecture offers two courses leading to 
the first degree, the course in architecture and the course in archi- 
tectural engineering. The aim of these courses is to give the broad- 
est preparation for the practise of architecture. 

The course in architecture aims primarily to train the student 
to produce correct, thoughtful, and beautiful works of architecture. 
The schedule of studies includes a broad field of liberal and scien- 
tific subjects to supply the background for creative work and to 
give a knowledge of the principles involved in the processes of safe 
and economical construction. The course also includes much free- 
hand drawing for the purpose of training the eye to recognize cor- 
rect proportion and training the hand to skillful and rapid drawing. 
The main portion of the course, however, consists of the study of 
architectural forms and principles and their application in archi- 
tectural design. 

The course in architectural engineering gives a thorough ground- 
work in mathematics and applied mechanics, and includes such 
studies as strength of materials, bridge, mill, and tall building con- 
struction, reinforced concrete, etc. The general principles of these 
subjects are applied to all forms of building construction in a 
course given in the senior year, known as architectural engineering. 
While specializing in construction, this course includes also the 
study of the forms and principles of architecture through such sub- 
jects as free-hand drawing, architectural history, architectural draw- 
ing, and architectural design. 

Both courses in architecture prepare the student for the exam- 
inations of the Illinois State Board of Examiners of Architects, and 
graduates of the department are exempt from examinations required 



*The School of Railway Engineering and Administration offers, in addi- 
tion to the three courses named here, courses in railway transportation and 
railway traffic and accounting under the direction of the department of eco- 
nomics of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. See pages 168-170 
above. 



Civil Engineering 185 

for entrance into the American Institute of Architects, and from 
the preliminary examination for the prize in Architecture of the 
American Academy at Rome. The Plym Fellowship in Archi- 
tecture is awarded annually to a graduate of the department. This 
prize amounts to $1,000 and provides for one year of travel for 
the study of architecture abroad. It is awarded by competition. 

Students intending to take up the study of architecture should 
take free-hand and mechanical drawing and general history in high 
school. 

Equipment 
The collections of rendered and working drawings, lantern slides, 
plates, photographs, casts, specimens of American woods, building 
materials, and appliances are noted under "Collections" on page 78. 
A Zeiss epidiascope is used for direct projection of photographs, 
colored plates, etc., and a double electric lantern for projecting two 
pictures on the screen at once for comparative study. Geometrical 
and architectural models are lighted by a light fixed at the conven- 
tional angle for demonstration of the subjects of shades and shad- 
ows and conventional rendering. Wall space in the corridors of 
the department and in all drafting rooms has been prepared for 
exhibition purposes, and collections of drawings are constantly 
displayed. The department occupies the entire fourth floor of 
Engineering Hall, and a large part of the third ; its quarters include 
drafting rooms for undergraduate and graduate work, library, 
lecture rooms, studios for free-hand drawing, etc. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The purpose of this department is to furnish a course of theo- 
retical instruction, accompanied and illustrated by a large amount 
of practise. While the instruction aims to be practical by giving 
the student information and practise directly applicable in his future 
professional work, the prime object is the development of the men- 
tal faculties. The power to acquire information and the ability to 
use it are held to be of greater value than any amount of so-called 
practical knowledge. 

Equipment 

This department has an equipment of compasses, engineers' tran- 
sits, solar transits, levels — ordinary and precise — plane tables, sex- 
tants, etc. The department is also provided with a collection of 
structural shapes, including full-sized joints of an actual railroad 
bridge, sections of columns, I-bars, etc., and with lithographs, pho- 
tographs, and blue-prints of bridges and buildings. 



i86 The College of Engineering 

The cement laboratory occupies rooms in the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Laboratory, and is provided with slate tables, testing ma- 
chines, molding machines, sieves, etc., and sample barrels of hy- 
draulic cement, varieties of sand, and other necessary materials. 

The road laboratory occupies a room in the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Laboratory, and is provided with machines for testing the 
resistance of macadam material to impact and abrasion and for 
making the cementation test. The laboratory is also supplied with 
rattlers and other devices for testing paving material. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

This department provides a course of study in theoretical and 
applied electricity. The first two years of work are substantially 
the same as in the other engineering courses, including practical 
work in drafting room and shop, as well as instruction in the fun- 
damental principles of mathematics and physics. With the third 
year the fundamental studies relate more directly to electrical engi- 
neering. A course in dynamo machinery is followed by the theory 
of alternating currents, while laboratory and design courses em- 
phasize underlying principles. Technical courses cover the genera- 
tion, transmission, and distribution of electric power, and its va- 
rious applications. In the laboratory a study of dynamo charac- 
teristics is followed in the fourth year by progressive experiments 
involving the operation of electrical machinery in principle and prac- 
tise. Investigation of the problems of power distribution is a 
feature of advanced laboratory and thesis work. 

Equipment 

The 500 kilowatt power plant of the University supplies the elec- 
trical engineering laboratory with the current needed for its opera- 
tion. 

The power equipment in the electrical engineering laboratory in- 
cludes forty direct current machines with a total capacity of 375 
kilowatts, twenty alternating current machines with a total capacity 
of 300 kilowatts, and fifty transformers with a total capacity of 350 
kilowatts. A 17-panel experimental switchboard affords adequate 
distribution and control. 

The instrument room contains standards for the calibration of 
commercial instruments of all types. There are two hundred and 
fifty portable instruments for experimental work. A new 240- 
ampere-hour storage battery has been installed. The graduate lab- 



Mechanical Engineering 187 

oratory contains apparatus for research work, including four 
oscillographs, one 2000-cycle alternator, one 200,000-volt trans- 
former, and apparatus for high voltage direct current investigations. 
The photometer room contains apparatus for tests of the various 
light sources. Two special lOO-line switchboards are connected 
with cables and apparatus for experiments in telephony. The equip- 
ment for electrometallurgical work includes one 30-kilowatt induc- 
tion furnace, one 25-kilowatt arc furnace, two 30-kilowatt resistance 
furnaces, and an annealing furnace. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The courses in mechanical engineering are planned to present 
the theory and practise involved in the generation and transmis- 
sion of power, and in the design, construction, operation, and test- 
ing of machinery of all kinds. 

Equipment 

To supplement and amplify the theoretical work of the class 
room, the department is provided with designing rooms and lab- 
oratories as follows : 

The Designing Rooms are equipped with drawing tables, and 
are supplied with reference books, files of trade catalogs, gear 
charts, and collections of blue-prints. A collection of kinematic 
models, sectional steam specialties, lantern slides, and photographs 
is also available. 

The Mechanical Engineering Laboratory is equipped with ma- 
chines and testing instruments for instruction in steam engineering, 
gas power engineering, refrigeration, heating, and ventilation. 
Among the more important pieces of apparatus are the 210 h. p. 
experimental boiler, equipped with chain-grate stoker, fuel econo- 
mizer, and induced draft ; a separately fired steam superheater ; a 
number of t\'pes of throttling, high speed automatic, and Corliss 
steam engines ; several steam condensers ; a compound two-stage air 
compressor ; a large compound duplex steam pump ; a Kerr steam 
turbine ; a DeLaval turbo-pump ; a 200,000 lb. Lea water-flow ; a 
lo-ton ammonia compression refrigerating machine ; a number of 
typical gas, gasoline, and oil engines ; a 50 h. p. suction gas pro- 
ducer, and several house-heating boilers and furnaces. The cen- 
tral heating and power plant contains a variety of types of boilers, 
stokers, pumps, and engines in commercial service. 

The Shop Laboratories are provided with suitable machinery and 
apparatus to illustrate the several shop processes involved in the 



1 88 The College of Engineering 

manufacture of machinery. In these laboratories emphasis is 
given to the engineering principles involved in machine construc- 
tion and to the important problems of scientific shop management. 
These laboratories include the Wood Shop with an equipment of 
benches, lathes, machinery, and small tools needed in pattern con- 
struction ; the Foundry equipped with cupola, brass furnaces, core 
ovens, molding machines, and facilities for bench and floor mold- 
ing; the Forge Shop equipped with forges, anvils and small tools, 
a steam hammer, a power-driven punch and shear, and with gas and 
electric furnaces; and the Machine Shop with an equipment of 
lathes, planers, shapers, milling machines, grinders, boring mills, drill 
presses, and with typical small tools and fixtures used in manu- 
facturing. 

MECHANICS, THEORETICAL AND APPLIED 

The courses in theoretical and applied mechanics are designed 
to meet the needs of students of engineering. 

The Laboratory of Applied Mechanics comprizes the materials 
testing laboratory and the hydraulics laborator3^ The materials 
laboratory is equipped with testing machines for tension, compres- 
sion, flexure, and torsion, and for testing various kinds of struc- 
tural materials. The equipment includes a testing machine having 
a capacity of 600,000 pounds, arranged to take large and bulky 
pieces in tension, compression, and flexure. The hydraulics labo- 
ratory has a standpipe, pumps, water motors and turbine, measur- 
ing pits, Venturi meters, weir conduits, meter rating conduit, orifice 
boxes, weir boxes, and apparatus for experimental work on flow 
of water through pipes, hose, and nozzles. The University pump- 
ing station furnishes a supply of water at pressures up to 100 
pounds a square inch. 

MINING ENGINEERING 

The department of mining engineering offers courses of in- 
struction relating to the science and practise of mining and metallur- 
gy to train young men for the various phases of mineral industry. 

The work of the department adds to the usual courses in 
mathematics, languages, chemistry, physics, geology, and general 
engineering, specialized work in mining, such as mine surveying, 
mine ventilation, mining machinery, coal washing, and ore concen- 
tration, metallurgy, administration and organization of mines, min- 
ing law, and the design of mining and metallurgical structures. 



Mining Engineering 189 

In addition to its work of instruction, the department concerns 
itself with the development and dissemination of such scientific 
facts as are likely to be of service in improving the practise of min- 
ing, with reference to efficiency in operation, to the security of life 
in the mines, and to the conservation of the fuel and other min- 
eral resources of the State. 

Equipment 

The drawing rooms contain the catalogs of the manufacturers 
of mining machinery with a complete card index, the standard 
reference books on mine drafting, models of mine structures, and 
a collection of blue prints and drawings of mine structures. 

The mine-gas and safety-lamp laboratory contains safety lamps 
of different types, electric and magnetic locking appliances, a pho- 
tometer, a dark room for photometric work, Oldham and Hail- 
wood safety-lamp testing apparatus, and appliances for gas and 
dust analysis. 

The coal washing and ore dressing laboratory contains for crush- 
ing, rolls, gyratorj' and jaw crushers, and a 500-pound 3-stamp bat- 
tery; for screening and sizing, trommels, shaking and vibrating 
screens, and V boxes ; for concentrating and cleaning, pan, piston 
and pulsating jigs, bumping table, vanner, concentrating table, and 
slimer. These machines can handle from 3 to 5 tons of coal and 
one ton of ore an hour. There is also a complete sampling and 
dr>'ing equipment, a cyanide testing plant, and other small appli- 
ances used for preliminary testing. Adjoining this laboratory is a 
chemical and assay laboratory equipped for the analytical work re- 
quired in connection with coal washing and ore concentration. 

The explosives and drilling laboratory contains the principal 
types of rock drills, a diamond drill, coal cutters, and a complete 
outfit for demonstrating the use of explosives. 

Mine Rescue Station and Laboratories 

Cooperating with the department of mining engineering and 
with the State Geological Survey, the Federal Government has 
established at the University a mine rescue station in charge of a 
resident mining engineer. The purpose of the station is to interest 
all connected with the mining industry in such modern appliances 
as breathing and resuscitation apparatus, as part of the normal 
equipment of mines. At the station mine bosses and others are 
trained in the use of such apparatus, this service being rendered 
freely to all who may desire the benefits thereof. 



190 The College of Engineering 

The station offers to the student in mining engineering an ap- 
portunity for studying rescue and first aid work. Students are 
brought into contact with men in practise from all parts of Illinois 
and surrounding states who come to the station for training. About 
the present station as a nucleus other laboratories for experimental 
work in connection with mining are being developed, and are ac- 
cessible for the use of students in mining engineering. 

A laboratory is maintained jointly by the department of mining 
engineering, the State Geological Survey, and the United States 
Bureau of Mines for the study of mine dusts and mine gases. It 
is also available for the purpose of demonstration to university 
classes. 

MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY ENGINEERING 

This course is designed to train for the varied duties of the 
engineer employed on the design, construction, and operation of 
public works and public utilities, and for general engineering work. 

The methods of training are intended to develop power to take 
up and solve new problems connected with municipal public works, 
as well as to design and to superintend the ordinary constructions. 
Surveying, structural materials, and structural design are taught 
as in the civil engineering course. Chemistry and bacteriology 
are given so far as is necessary to a comprehension of the ques- 
tions involved in water supply and sewage disposal; and instruc- 
tion is given in mechanical and electrical engineering in the gen- 
eration and transmission of power. 

PHYSICS 

The department of physics occupies the Laboratory of Physics. 
This building supplies facilities and equipment for instruction and 
investigation in physics. Gas, distilled water, compressed air and 
vacuum, and direct and alternating electric currents of a v^'ide 
range in amperes and in volts are available in all parts of the build- 
ing. There is a collection of over 4,000 pieces of apparatus for 
the courses of instruction offered and also for advanced work, and 
only a small part of the equipment is antiquated. New investiga- 
tions can usually be started with the apparatus on hand. There 
are two workshops, one for the advanced students and instructors, 
and one for the mechanician of the department. The students' 
shop is equipped with lathes, drill press, bench tools, etc. The 
mechanician's shop contains lathes, milling machines, drill press, 
and other facilities for fine machine work. 



Railway Engineeritig 191 

The University library contains all the important sets of jour- 
nals of physics and the related sciences in English, French, and Ger- 
man. The recent volumes of the physical journals, together with a 
collection of text-books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, and other ref- 
erence books, are also found in the special library of the Labo- 
ratory. 

RAILWAY ENGINEERING* 

The department of railway engineering is organized to serve 
those who wish to prepare themselves for service in the technical 
departments of railways. The course in railway civil engineering 
adds to the fundamentals of a well-rounded engineering course a 
group of special subjects which concern the location, construc- 
tion, and maintenance of railways. The course in railway elec- 
trical engineering emphasizes the design and construction of those 
details peculiar to electric railway lines ; the operation and perform- 
ance of electric cars and locomotives ; and the development of the 
more general problems which arise in the electrification of exist- 
ing steam lines. The course in railway mechanical engineering 
is intended to meet the requirements of those who are especially 
interested in steam railroad equipment. It deals with the design, 
construction, and maintenance of various types of railway cars; 
with conditions affecting train resistance; with the design and oper- 
ation of steam locomotives ; and with tests disclosing their per- 
formance. 

Equipment 

Three steam roads — the Illinois Central, the Cleveland, Cincin- 
nati, Chicago & St. Louis, and the Wabash railroads — and two elec- 
tric interurban roads — the Illinois Traction System and the Kanka- 
kee and Urbana railway — enter Champaign and Urbana. The de- 
partment enjoys the interest and cooperation of the officers of these 
railways, and is afforded by their courtesy numerous opportunities- 
for practical road tests and field work. The division shops of the 
C, C, C. & St. L. railroad are located at Urbana and provide addi- 
tional opportunity for similar work. 

The department owns and operates, jointly with the Illinois 
Central Railroad, a railway test car designed for experimental 
work on steam roads. It is fully equipped for making train re- 
sistance and locomotive performance tests, and during the last 
eleven years has been in frequent operation in carr\-ing on resist- 



*See also School of Railway Engineering and Administration, page 241, 



192 The College of Engineering 

ance and tonnage rating tests on the Illinois Central Railroad and 
on several eastern roads. 

For work on electric roads the department owns also an electric 
test car, of the interurban type, especially designed and built for 
the University for experimental work. It is equipped with four 
50 horse-power direct current motors and with the Westinghouse 
multiple control system, and is provided with instruments for re- 
cording power, speed, acceleration, and the other data needed in 
road tests. Through the courtesy of the Illinois Traction System 
this car is operated on its lines, which enter the campus of the Uni- 
versity. 

The department laboratory equipment includes a drop-testing 
machine and a brake-shoe testing machine, both constructed in 
accordance with the standards of the Master Car Builders' Asso- 
ciation. The drop-testing machine is designed for use in testing 
the strength of railroad rails, car axles, car couplers, and draft 
gears, and may be used in studies of the physical properties of 
structural materials of any sort. The brake-shoe testing machine 
supplies means for determining the wearing properties and fac- 
tional qualities of brake-shoes, such as are employed in regular serv- 
ice on railroad trains. 

A locomotive testing plant, equipped from the original designs 
of the department, occupies a building 40 by 115 feet The plant 
is devoted exclusively to making tests to determine the perform- 
ance of locomotives. The locomotives tested are furnished by cer- 
tain western railroad systems under an arrangement which insures 
the maintenance in the plant of a locomotive which at all times 
shall be of latest design. 

Much of the work in the railway courses is given in the de- 
partments of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, and the 
shop and laboratory equipment of these departments is available 
for students of the railway department. 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES 

The following courses are suggested as electives for students 
in the College of Engineering whose time is not fully occupied with 
required work: 

Accountancy, Art and Design i; Astronomy 3 and 6; Chemistry 
2, 3, 16, 31, 34, 35; economics; Geology 13; Mathematics 9a, 10, 16, 
2ia, 22a; Rhetoric 3, 7, 10; Physics 15, 16, 17; Political Science 
17; Library 12; Architecture 43, 44, 55» 57; Civil Engineering 4a, 5, 



Trips of Inspection 193 

21, 22\ Electrical Engineering i, 2, 5, 6, 16, 29; Mechanical Engi- 
neering 7, 27, 30, 31; Railway Engineering 11, 61; for students of 
architecture, History i, 9; landscape design; French and German. 

SUMMER READING 

All engineering students not graduates of a literary college are 
required to complete prescribed courses of reading of a non-pro- 
fessional character during the summer vacations following the 
freshman and sophomore years. The purpose of the summer read- 
ing is to increase the acquaintance of the student with Uterature, 
history, and general science, to develop in him a taste for such 
reading, and to impress him with the importance of such knowl- 
edge not only as a source of individual enjoyment, but as a prac- 
tical aid to engineers in their social and business relations. 

A circular on summer reading is issued, containing a list of 
books from which the students may choose. The books have 
been selected for their value in providing general training, but an 
attempt has been made to include only readable and attractive 
works. A statement of the books read during the summer is re- 
quired at the beginning of the next college year. 

GENERAL ENGINEERING LECTURES FOR FRESHMEN 

One general lecture, sufficiently popular in character to interest 
and inspire young engineers, will be given each week. All fresh- 
man engineers are expected to attend this lecture. 

TRIPS OF INSPECTION 

The departments of the College of Engineering arrange trips 
of inspection for their students, to supplement the theoretical in- 
struction of the classroom. The time occupied by the trip is three 
or four days, and the works visited are usually in Chicago or Mil- 
waukee. The trips are taken during term time under the super- 
vision of University authorities. The inspection trip forms an 
integral part of the course, and it is expected that all students 
eligible will participate. Students can be excused from attend- 
ance by the head of the department only, and if so excused, they 
are required, during the period occupied by the trip, to perform 
a set schedule of work approved by the head of the department. 
Students whose standing is such that they can ill afford to take 
the time from their academic duties may be required to remain 
at the University. 

Each student who participates in a trip is required to make a 
report or submit to an examination upon the work inspected. 



194 The College of Engineering 

COURSES OF STUDY AND DEGREES 

The courses of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in the College of Engineering, as scheduled for the year 
1913-1914, are given herewith in full. Each of the ten courses given 
may ordinarily be completed in a period of four years. 

A graduate of the University of Illinois in architectural, civil, 
electrical, mechanical, mining, municipal and sanitary, or railway 
engineering may receive the degree of an allied course upon the 
completion of from thirty to thirty-six semester hours of work 
approved by the faculty. This work may ordinarily be done in 
one academic year. 

A graduate of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences of the 
University of Illinois, or of any college of equal standing, whose 
mathematical training includes the work of the calculus, who 
has had the usual course in physics, and who has had sufficient 
training in the principles of mechanics to enable him to begin the 
mechanics of the junior year, may receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Engineering upon the completion of sixty-eight credit 
hours of work in engineering under the direction of the faculty. 
This work may ordinarily be done in two academic years. Candi- 
dates for the degree in the department of architecture are not 
required to be prepared in calculus or mechanics, but should have 
special preparation in drawing. 



Course in Architecture 



195 



Course Required for Degree of B. S. in Architecture 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

S. H.» 

Math. 4' — Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Advanced Algebra 3 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

G. E. D. 2 — Descriptive Geometry 4 
Arch. 31 — Arch. and Freehand 

Drawing 4 

Mil. 2— Military Drill „ 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total „ 18 



Secokd Semester 



S. H.i 



Chem. la' or lb — Inorg. Chem 

T. & A. M. 14— Elem. Mech 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 

Arch. 32 — Arch. and Freehand 

Drawing 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium — 



Total 18 



SECOND YEAR 



Phys. 6a — Physics Lectures ~^ 2 

Phys. 6b — Physics Laboratory 2 

T. & A. M. 15— Strength of Mater 3 

Arch. 13 — History of Arch 2 

Arch. 23 — Freehand Drawing 2 

Arch. 33 — Design 3 

Arch. 43 — Working Drawings 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 



Total 



.18 



Phys. 6a — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 6b — Physics Laboratory 2 

T. & A. M. 16 — Strength of Mater. 3 

Arch. 14 — History of Arch 2 

Arch. 24 — Freehand Drawing 2 

Arch. 34 — Design 3 

Arch. 44 — Working Drawings 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 18 



THIRD YEAR 



French or German 4 

Arch. 15 — History of Arch 2 

Arch. 25 — Freehand Drawing 2 

Arch. 35 — Design 5 

Arch. 45 — Graphic Statics 3 

Arch. 55 — Building Sanitation 1 

Arch. 65 — Theory of Arch 1 

Total ^ 1 8 



French or German 4 

Arch. 16-^History of Arch 2 

Arch. 26 — Freehand Drawing 2 

Arch. 36 — Design 5 

Arch. 46 — Graphic Statics 3 

E. E. 9 — Building Illumination.... 1 
Arch. 66 — Theory of Arch 1 

Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 



Arch. 27 — Freehand Drawing 2 

Arch. 37 — Design 7 

Arch. 67 — Theory of Form & Color 2 
M. E. 38 — Heating & Ventilation.. 2 

L, A, & S. Option 3 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Econ 2 

Total „....18 



Arch. 28 — Freehand Drawing 2 

Arch. 38 — Adv'd Design or Thesis 7 

Arch. 60 — Estimatin|r 1 

Arch. 68 — Specifications „ 3 

L. A. & S. Option 3 

Total 16 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

^he numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 
•Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
'%trj lb will register in Chemistry la. 



196 



The College of Engineering 



Course Required for Degree of B. S. in Architectural Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 



S. H.» 

G. E. D. 1»— Gen- Eng. Drawing.... 4 

Math. 4 — Trigonometrv 2 

Math. 2 — Advanced Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

Arch. 20 — Arch, and Freehand 

Drawing, or M. E. 41..... 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 



Total 18 



Second Semester 



S. H.» 

G. E. D. 2" — Descriptive Geometry 4 

Math. 6 — Analytical Geometry 5 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 
6 or French 2, or English 1, or 

Spanish 1 4 

Arch. 8 — Arch. Drawing, or M. 

E. 41 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations 1 

l?hys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium I 

Total 19 



SECOND 

Math. 7 — Differential Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

Arch. 43 — Working Drawings 3 

Arch. 4 — Building Sanitation 2 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 19 



YEAR 

Math. 9 — Integral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

Arch. 44 — Working Drawings 3 

Arch. 15a — Design 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill _ 1 

Total 20 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M, 6 — Engin. Materials.. 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2J 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Matls 3i 

Arch. 6 — History of Arch 4 

Chem. lb or la' — Inorganic Chem- 
istry 4 

Arch. 11 — Arch. Seminar 1 

Econ. 2 — Principles of Econ 2 

Total .Ti 



T. & A. M. 10— Hydraulics 3 

Arch. 5 — Graphic Statics & Roofs.. 4 

Arch. 6 — History of Arch 4 

Arch. 10 — Estimating 1 

Arch. 11 — Arch. Seminar 1 

M. E. 11 — Steam Engines & Boil- 
ers _ 3 

C. E. 10— Surveying 2 

Total .18 



FOURTH YEAR 



Arch. 19 — Arch. Engineering 3 

Arch. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 1 

Arch. 34a — Arch. Eng. Seminar 1 

C. E. 12 — Bridge Analysis 2 

C. E. 13— Bridge Details 2 

C. E. 24— Metal Structures 1 

L. A. & S. Option 1 

M. E. 32 — Mech. Eng. Laboratory 1 
M. E. 38— Heating & Ventila- 
tion 3 

Total 15 



Arch. 19 — Arch. Engineering 3 

Arch. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

Arch. 68 — Specifications 3 

C. E. 6c — Masonry & Reinf, Con. 

Design 2 

C. E. 14a— Bridge Design 2 

E. E. 9— Electric Lightmg 1 

L. A. & S. Option 1 



Total IS 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

^The numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 
•Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
istry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



Course in Civil Engineering 



197 



Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Civil Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 



S. H.i 

G, E. D. 1*— Gen. Eng. Drwg. 4 

Math. + — ^Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Aav. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4 or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 ^ 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 



Second Semester 



Total .. 



.18 



S. H.» 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry - 4 

Math, 6— Analyt. Geometry 5 

French 1, or German 3 or 5, or 
English 2, or Rhetoric 11, or 

Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2 — Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations ^ 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7— DiflF. Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

C. E. 21 — Surveying 5 

MU. 2— Military DrUl..„ 1 



ToUl 



19 



Math. 9 — Integral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

C. E. 22 — Top. Surveying 4 

C. E. 23 — Railroad Curves 1 

Mil. 2— Military DrilL 1 

Total 19 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6 — Eng. Matls 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2i 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Materials.. 3J 

C. E. 4 — Railroad Surveying 5 

Chem.* lb or la — Inorganic Chem- 
istry « 4 

Total 16 



T. & A. M. 10— Hydraulics 3 

C. E. 1 — Road Engineering 2 

C. E. 20 — Graphic Statics 2 

Astron. 3 & 6, or Geol. 13 S 

M. E. 11— Steam Eng. & Boilers.. 2 
Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 

Total 17 



FOURTH YEAR 



C. E. Sr — Masonry Construction.... 4 
C. E. 51 — Cement Lab. Practise.... 1 

C. E. 12 — Bridge Analysis 2 

C. E. 13 — Bridge Details .-- 3 

C. E. 6a — Reinf. Concrete 1 

C. E. 24 — Metal Structures 1 

C. E. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 1 

M. & S. E. 2— Water Supply Eng. 4 



Total 



.17 



C. E. 6 — Masonry & Reinf. Con- 
crete Design 2 

C. E. 14 — Bridge Design 5 

C. E. 15— Adv. Bridge Anal „ 2 

C. E. 16 — Eng. Cont. & Spec „ 2 

C. E. 25 — Seminar 1 

C. E. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 2 

M. & S. E. 3— Sewerage 3 

Total 17 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. _ 

'The numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 

•Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
istry lb will register in Chemistry la ; those who have received credit for 
Chemistry la will reg^ister in Electrical Engineering 3 and 22. 



198 



The College of Engineering 



Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Electrical Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 1»— Gen. Eng. Drwg 4 

Math. 4 — Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 18 



Second Semestbb 

S. H.i 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry 4 

Math. 6 — Analyt. Geometry 5 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, or 

Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7— DiflF. Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

M. E. 24 — Mach. Design & Mech. 3 

M. E. 42 — Machine Shop 2 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 19 



Math. 9 — Integral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

Chem.' lb or la — Inorg. Chem 4 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 18 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6— Eng. Matrls 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2J 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Materials.. 3i 

E. E. 3 — Dynamo- Elec. Mach 3 

E. E, 22— Electr. Eng. Lab 2 

Phys. 4 — Elec. & Magn. Meas 2 

Chem. 4 — Inorg. Chem. & Anal... 4 

Total .ni 



T. & A. M. 10— Hydraulics 3 

E. E. 5 — Alt. Currents ^ 4 

E. E. 23— Elec. Eng. Lab 2 

Phys. 4 — Elec. & Magn. Meas 2 

M. E. 13— Mech. Eng. Lab ^ 3 

Math. 9a — Integral Calculus . 2 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 



E. E. 13 — Seminar 1 

E. E. 14— Adv. Alt. Currents 4 

E. E. 24— Elec. Eng. Lab 2 

E. E. 32 — Electrical Design 2 

M. E. 15 — Thermodynamics 3 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 

M. E. 23— Steam Eng 2 

Total 16 



E. E. 13— Seminar 1 

E. E. 17— Adv. Alt. Currents 4 

E. E. 27— Elec. Eng. Lab 2 

E. E. 34— Elec. Des. & Power PI. 3 
E. E. 35 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

Econ. 16 — Econ. Prob 2 

C. E. 10— Surveying 2 

Total 17 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

'The numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 
'Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
istry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



Course in Mechanical Engineering 



199 



Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Mechanical Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 1' — Gen. Eng. Drawing.. 4 

Math, 4 — Trigonometry ,.—.- 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 ^ 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill ^ 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

ToUl 18 



Second Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry 4 

Math. 6— Analyt. Geometry 5 

French 1 or German 3 or S or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, or 

Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise ^ 3 

Mil. 2— Military DriU 1 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations _ 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7 — Diff. Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

M. E. 42— Machine Shop 3 

M. E. 4 — Machine Desig^n 2 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total „ 19 



Math. 9— Integral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rliet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

M. E. 42— Machine Shop ^ 2 

M. E. 16 — Steam Eng 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill. „ 1 

Total „ 19 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6 — Eng. Materials 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2i 

T. & A. M. 9 — Res. of Materials 3i 

M. E. 3 — Power Meas 2 

M. E. 5 — Mechanism 3 

Math. 9a — Integral Calculus 2 

Chem.' la or Ih— Inorg. Chem 4 

Total ^ ^ 1 8 



M. E. 7 — Thermodynamics 3 

M. E. 9— Mach. Design 3 

M. E. 29— Seminar „.. 1 

T. & A. M. 11— Analyt. Mechanics 3 

E. E. 16 — Dynamo Mach 4 

Chem. 16 — Eng. Chemistry 3 

Total 17 



FOURTH YEAR 



M. E. 6 — Heat Engines ..~. 2 

M. E. 8 — Mech. of Machinery 3 

M. E. 9— Mach. Design 3 

M. E. 12— Mech. Lab ..„ 3 

M, E. 19— Seminar 1 

E. E. 6 — Alt, Currents 2 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 



Total 16 



M. E. 6 — Heat Engines 2 

M. E. 14 — Des. of Pow. Plants 2 

M. E. 33 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

M. E. 39— Heat & Ventilation 3 

R. E, 11— R. Eng. or C. E. 10— 

Sur ~ 2 

Econ. 16 — Econ. Problems ^ 2 

Elective 2 

Total 16 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

'The numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 
■Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
istry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



2CX) 



The College of Engineering 



Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Mining Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 1* — Gen. Eng. Drawing.. 4 

Math. 4 — Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 18 



Second Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry 4 

Math. 6 — Analyt. Geometry 5 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, or 

Spanish 1 . 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1— Drill Regulations 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 8a — Diff. & Int. Calculus.... 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

Min. 1 — Mining Prin 1 

Chem.' lb or la — Inorg. Chem 4 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 19 



Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

Min. 2 — Earth & Rock Excavation.. 3 
Chem. 2 & 3 — Inorg. Chem. & Anal S 
Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total .19 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2i 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Materials 3i 

Min. 3 — Mining Methods 2 

C. E. 21 — Surveying S 

Chem, 5a 5 

Total 18 



Min. 4— Mine Surveying 4 

Min. 5 — Mine Vent 3 

C. E. 20— Graphic Statics 2 

M. E. 35 — Steam Engin 3 

Geology 13 — Engin. Geology S 

Total 17 



FOURTH YEAR 



Min. 6 — Mech. Eng. of Mines 3 

Min. 9— Prep, of Coal & Ores 3 

Min. 12 — Mine Design 3 

Chem. 7 — Metallurgy..... 3 

Geol. 21— Geol. of Coal, or 2 

Chem. 69 — Assaying (2 hrs.) 

Chem. 65 — Tech. Gas & Fuel Anal. 2 

Total 16 



Min. 7 — Mine Admin. Organization 

and Law 2 

Min. 8 — Mine Plans 2 

Min. 10 — Min. Lab 2 

Min. 11 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

Geology 2 3 

E. E. 16 — Dynamo Elec. Mach 4 

Total 16 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307.^ 

'The numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 
'Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
istry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



Course in Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 201 

Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Municipal and 

Sanitary Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 1»— Gen. Eng. Drawing„ 4 

Math. 4 — Trigonometry „ 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium. .„ ~ 1 



Total _ 18 



Second Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry 4 

Math. 6 — Analyt. Geometry 5 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, 

or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7— Diff. Calculus „ 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

C. E. 21 — Surveying 5 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total ..„ 1 9 



Math. 9 — Inte^al Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

C. E. 22 — Top. Surveying 4 

C. E. 23 — Railroad Curves 1 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 19 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6 — Eng. Materials.... 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2i 

T. & A. M. 9 — Res. of Materials.. 3i 

Botany 6 — Bacteriology 2 

C. E. 4a— R. R. Surveying 3 

Chem.' lb or la — Inorganic Chem- 
istry 4 

Total 16 



T. & A. M. 10— Hydraulics 3 

C. E. 1 — Road Engineering 2 

C. E. 20— Graphic Statics 2 

M. E. 11— Steam Eng. & Boilers.. 3 
Chemistry 2, 3 and 10b — Qual. & 

Water Analysis S 

E. E. 1— Elec. Eng 2 

Total 17 



FOURTH YEAR 



M. & S. E. 2— Water Supply Eng. 4 
M. & S. E. 6a— Water Pur., Sew- 
age Disp. & Gen. Sanitation 3 

C. E. 5 — Masonry Constr 5 

C. E. 12 — Bridge Analvsis.— 2 

C. E. 13a— Bridge Details 2 

E. E. 28— Elec. Eng 1 



Total 17 



M. & S. E. 3— Sewerage 3 

M. & S. E. 6b — Water Pur., Sew- 
age Disp. & Gen. Sanitation 2 

M. & S. E. 9— Hydraul. Des. & Con. 2 
M. & S. E. 30 — Thesis or approved 

elective 2 

C. E. 6— Mas. & Reinf. Con. Design 2 

C. E. 16 — Eng. Con. & Spec... 2 

M. E. 13— Mech. Eng. Lab...„ 2 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 

Total 1 7 



^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

'The numbers refer to courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 
•Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to Chem- 
istry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



202 



The College of Engineering 



Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Railway Civil 

Engineering^ 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 



S. H." 

G. E. D. 1' — Gen. Eng. Drawing.... 4 

Math. A — Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 3 or 4, 

or English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill _ 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 



Total 18 



Second Semester 



S. H." 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry 4 

Math, 6 — Analyt. Geometry S 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, or 

Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise . 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations ^ 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7 — Diff. Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

C. E. 21 — Surveying 5 

Mil. 2 — Military Drill 1 



Total 19 



Math. 9 — Integral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— .\nalyt. Mech 3 

C. E. 22 — Top. Surveying 4 

C. E. 23 — R. R. Curves 1 

Mil. 2 — Military Drill 1 

Total 19 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6 — Eng. Materials.... 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2i 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Materials.. 3i 

C. E. 4— R. R. Surveying 5 

Chemistry* lb or la — Inorganic 
Chemistry 4 

Total 16 



T. & A. M. 10— Hydraulics 3 

R. E. 31— Ry. Yards & Terminals 3 

C. E. 20 — Graphic Statics 2 

M. E. 11— Steam Eng. & Boilers.. 3 

Astron. 3 & 6, or Geol. 13 5 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 

Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 



R. E. 33— Econ. Theory of Ry. Log. 4 

R. E. 35- Signal Eng 1 

Econ. 41 — Ry. Hist. & Organization 3 

C. E. 5 — Masonry Con 5 

C. E. 12 — Bridge Analysis 2 

C. E. 18— Tunneling 1 

C. E. 24 — Metal Structures 1 

R. E. 50— Seminar 1 

Total 18 



R. E. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

R. E. 32 — Ry. Structures 2 

R. E. 50 — Seminar 1 

Econ. 42 — Ry. Admin 3 

C. E. 6 — Mas. & Reinf. Con. Des. 2 

C. E. 14a— Bridge Design 2 

C. E. 16— Eng. Con. & Spec 2 

Total 15 



^Differs from the course in civil engineering only after the first semester 
of the third year. 

^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

•The numbers refer to the courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 

•Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to 
Chemistry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



Course in Raikvay Electrical Engineering 203 

Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Railway Electrical 

Engineering^ 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

S. H.« 

G. E. D. !■— Gen. Eng. Drawing.. 4 

Math. 4 — Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2~Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 18 



Second Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry 4 

Math. 6 — Analyt. Geometry 5 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, or 

Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41 — Shop Practise 3 

MiL 2— Military Drill I 

Mil. 1 — Drill Regulations 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7— Diff. Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

M. E. 42 — Shop Practise 2 

M. E. 24 — Mach. Design & Mech. 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill ^ 1 

Total ..19 



Math. 9 — Integral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes. 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

Chem. 1 — Inorganic Chemistry 4 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 18 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6 — Eng. Materials.... 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2i 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Materials.. 3i 

E. E. 3 — Dynamo-Elec. Mach 3 

E. E. 22— Elec. Eng. Lab 2 

Phys. 4 — Elec. & Mag. Meas 2 

Chem. 2 & 3 — Inorg. Chem. & Anal. 4 

Total 18 



T. & A. M. 10— Hydraulics 3 

E. E. 5- Alt. Currents 4 

E. E. 23— Elec. Eng. Lab 2 

Phys. 4 — Elec. & Mag. Meas _ 2 

C. E. 10 — Surveying 2 

M. E. 13— Mech. Eng. Lab 3 

Math. 9a — Integral Calculus 2 

Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 



R. E. 10 — Seminar 1 

R. E. 64 — Elec. Ry. Practise 3 

E. E. 14 — Adv. Alt. Currents 4 

E. E. 24 — Elec. Eng. Lab 2 

M. E. 15 — Thermooynamics 3 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 

M. E. 23— Steam Eng 2 

Total 17 



R. E. 10 — Seminar 1 

R. E. 63 — Rv. Lab. & Road Tests 3 

R. E. 65— Elec. Ry. Practise 3 

E. E. 34 — Elec. Design & Power 

Plants 3 

Econ. 16 — Econ. Problems 2 

R. E. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

Total 15 



^Differs from the course in electrical engineering in the fourth year only. 

'Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

■The numbers refer to the courses in the Description of Courses, page 307. 



204 



The College of Engineering 



Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Railway Mechanical 

Engineering* 



FIRST 

First Semester 

S. H.» 

G. E. D. !■— Gen. Eng. Drawing..^ 4 

Math. A — Trigonometry 2 

Math. 2 — Adv. Algebra 3 

French 1, or German 1 or 4, or 

English 1, or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium 1 

Total 18 



YEAR 

Second Semester 

S. H." 

G. E. D. 2 — Descr. Geometry .... 4 

Math. 6 — Analyt. Geometry.. .. S 

French 1, or German 3 or 5 or 6, 
or English 2, or Rhetoric 11, 

or Spanish 1 4 

M. E. 41— Shop Practise „ 3 

Mil. 2 — Military Drill 1 

Mil. 1— Drill Regulations 1 

Phys. Tr. 1 — Gymnasium «. 1 

Total 19 



SECOND YEAR 



Math. 7— Diff. Calculus 5 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 3 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

M. E. 4— Mach. Design 2 

M. E. 42— Mach. Shop 3 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total .19 



Math. 9 — Inte§;ral Calculus 3 

Phys. 1 — Physics Lectures 2 

Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

T. & A. M. 7— Analyt. Mech 3 

M. E. 16— Steam Eng. 3 

M. E. 42— Mach. Shop 2 

Mil. 2— Military Drill 1 

Total 1Q 



THIRD YEAR 



T. & A. M. 6— Eng. Materials.... 1 

T. & A. M. 8— Analyt. Mech 2) 

T. & A. M. 9— Res. of Materials.. 3 J 

M. E. 3 — Power Meas 2 

M. E. 5 — Mechanism 3 

Math. 9a — Int. Calculus 2 

Chem.* lb or la — Inorg. Chem 4 

Total 18 



M. E. 9— Mach. Design 3 

M. E. 15 — Thermodynamics 3 

M. E. 29— Seminar 1 

T. & A. M. 11— Analyt. Mechanics 3 

E. E. 16 — Dynamo Mach 4 

Chem. 16 — Eng. Chem 3 

Total 17 



FOURTH YEAR 



R. E. 1 — Locomotives 2 

R. E. 2 — Locomotive Design 3 

R. E. 4 — Locomotive Performance.. 2 

R. E. 8 — Dynamometer Car Tests.. 2 

R. E. 10 — Seminar 1 

M. E. 8— Mech. of Mach 3 

E. E. 6— Alt. Currents 2 

Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics 2 

Total 17 



R. E. 3 — Shops & Aux. Equip 2 

R. E. 7— Adv. Design 3 

R. E. 10 — Seminar 1 

R. E. 30 — Thesis or approved elec- 
tive 3 

R. E. 61 — Traction 3 

C. E. 10 — Surveying 2 

Econ. 16 — Econ. Prob 2 

Total 16 



^Differs from the course in mechanical engineering only after the first 
semester of the third year. 

^Semester hours. For definition see page 307. 

^The numbers refer to the courses in tlie Description of Courses, page 307. 

♦Students who have had chemistry in the high school equivalent to 
Chemistry lb will register in Chemistry la. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



For the buildings used by this College, see page 69; for a list of 
its courses, page 86; for clubs auxiliary to its courses of study 
page 140; for honors, page 120; for honorary societies, page 139; 
for fees and expenses, page 148. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

This College offers courses of instruction to both men and 
women. The courses offered to men are designed for three dis- 
tinct purposes : 

First, and mainly, to train for the profession of farming. 

Second, to train for the teaching of agriculture in the public 
schools. 

Third, to train for the profession of landscape gardening. 

The courses for women, offered by the department of house- 
hold science, have two purposes in view: 

First, and mainly, to train young women in the science and art 
of household affairs. 

Second, to prepare teachers for giving instruction in domestic 
science in high schools, and, in connection with the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences, to fit for college and university positions. 

In the case of both men and women the great purpose is to pre- 
pare for the practical affairs of life. Since technical knowledge and 
skill should be developed along with, and not at the expense of, 
those things which tend to the production of cultured and ver- 
satile men and women, the technical work is closely associated with 
the related sciences, and students are required to divide their time 
fairly with those subjects that develop general knowledge and 
breadth of view. 

The College offers over ninety courses of instruction in tech- 
nical subjects, besides opportunity to elect from the scientific and 
literary offerings of the other colleges of the University. 

The elective system prevails, and with a few exceptions the 
student is left free to select those subjects which seem best fitted 

205 



2o6 The College of Agriculture 

to meet his needs, always under the advice and guidance of the 
faculty. 

Credit is given for all work accomplished ; this credit counts 
toward graduation if the student desires a degree. 

ADMISSION 

For the regulations in regard to admission to the College of 
Agriculture, see the general statement of the entrance requirements 
of the University, pages 88flf. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK IN AGRICULTURE 

While in general it will be expected that applicants for admis- 
sion to the Graduate School shall have had an undergraduate 
course in scientific and technical agriculture equivalent to that of 
the University of Illinois, yet students who are otherwise eligible 
for admission to the Graduate School may be admitted to graduate 
standing in agriculture if they have had a thoro training in the 
sciences underlying agriculture, even though their undergraduate 
course of study lacked to some extent the amount and kind of 
technical work included in our course. 

SCHOLARSHIPS IN AGRICULTURE AND HOUSEHOLD 

SCIENCE 

For detailed information concerning scholarships in agricul- 
ture and household science, see page 144. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION AND METHODS OF 

WORK 

The close affiliation of the College with the work of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station not only enables the University to sup- 
port a larger faculty than would otherwise be possible, but also per- 
mits a much higher degree of specialization. For the most part 
those who teach in the College are the ones who conduct experi- 
ments in the same subjects in the Station. 

The methods of instruction vary with the nature of the courses. 
In general the laboratory method prevails. Text-books are used 
whenever good ones are available. Both the laboratory and the text 
are supplemented by lectures and reference readings. Buildings 
and laboratory space, illustrative specimens and material, and li- 
brary facilities are provided. 



Agricultural Extension 207 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 

Agricultural extension work serves as the intermediary between 
the College of Agriculture and the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion on the one hand and the local community and the farm on 
the other. Each department does extension work, and so far as 
possible provides special men for such work. The responsibility 
for the work of these men lies with their own department. For 
this reason not all of the extension effort issues from one office. 

For administrative purposes and to coordinate these activities 
through a regular channel, agricultural extension is administered as 
a separate department, conducting all extension enterprises which 
do not deal with technical subjects and cooperating with other 
departments in diffusing the results of their work in the State. 

Some of the general extension enterprises are: agricultural ex- 
tension schools and demonstrations in different localities ; the Two 
Weeks' Course given annually at the College in January; helping 
at farmers' institutes and similar gatherings, with special rail- 
way lecture trains, at the boys' state fair school, and in educa- 
tional exhibits at fairs and elsewhere; welfare work in rural com- 
munities; and excursions to the College. 

Aside from this, courses of study are offered to assist in de- 
termining what phases of agriculture are suitable for secondary 
school purposes and how they should be taught, and for the dis- 
cussion of agricultural organization, extension projects, and 
methods. 

AGRONOMY 

The department of agronomy gives instruction in those subjects 
which relate especially to the field and its affairs, as drainage, 
farm machinery, field crops; the chemistry, physics, and bacteriol- 
ogy of the soil; manures and rotation in their relation to fertility; 
plant breeding. The department possesses equipment and facili- 
ties for instruction in these subjects, and added to this are oppor- 
tunities for contact with the research work of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, especially in crop production, soil fertility, 
and plant breeding, both in the analytical and pot culture labora- 
tories and on the experiment fields at the University and in other 
parts of the State. 

Attention is called here to the fact that in case circumstances 
prohibit a regular four-year course, it is possible for a student who 
has had sufficient preparatory training so to arrange his studies 



2o8 The College of Agriculture 

as to obtain the necessary prerequisites and complete the general 
courses in soil physics and soil fertility in two years' time. (See 
Agronomy 9 and 12.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

This department offers courses covering the separate study of 
sheep, swine, poultry, and beef cattle and their products ; heavy 
and light horses with their care and training; the management of 
herds, flocks, and studs ; the principles and practise of feeding, of 
breeding, and of marketing; and the chemical and physiological 
phases of animal nutrition. 

The University herds, flocks, and studs contain about 500 pure- 
bred cattle, sheep, swine, and horses, and in addition several hun- 
dred fowls, ducks, and turkeys, which are always available for class 
purposes. These animals are also used for investigations in feed- 
ing and breeding, and for illustration of breed types and charac- 
teristics. They consist of Shorthorn, Hereford, and Aberdeen- 
Angus cattle ; Shropshire, Oxford, Southdown, Hampshire, Ram- 
bouillet, Dorset, and Cheviot sheep ; Poland-China, Berkshire, 
Duroc Jersey, Chester White, Tamworth, and Hampshire swine ; 
Percheron, Standard-bred, Shire, and American Saddle horses. 
In addition to the above pure-bred livestock, a large number of 
grade animals of the various classes of livestock furnish ample 
material for judging practises. In these practises, besides illus- 
trating standard market classes and grades of livestock, special 
attention is given to instruction in the selection of animals accord- 
ing to feed lot and market requirements. The new stock pavil- 
ion offers every opportunity for show and judging work. (For 
detailed description see page 69.) The lectures of the various 
courses are supplemented by 1000 or more lantern slides, charts, 
diagrams, models, and photographs. Pedigree and breed work is 
facilitated by 75 sets of the different herd, stud, and flock regis- 
ters, and complete files of the leading American and British jour- 
nals. 

The equipment for instruction and investigation in the feed- 
ing, breeding, and management of live stock consists of modern 
buildings for the housing of beef cattle, swine, sheep, horses, and 
poultry, with the appliances necessary for individual and collect- 
ive feeding tests; brick-paved feed lots and open sheds, in which 
steers may be fed in carload lots; a feed storage bam, with va- 
rious forms of grinding mills and other machinery for the prepa- 



Dairy Husbandry 209 

ration of feed; and various kinds of harness, vehicles, and other 
appliances for the training of horses. The department also main- 
tains a cold storage room and other equipment for conducting 
demonstrations in the cutting and handling of meats ; a collection 
of wool samples, a fibre testing machine, and microscopes for the 
study of wool. The chemical and physiological laboratories of the 
department afford facilities for advanced work in animal nutrition. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The department of dairy husbandry offers courses under the 
four general divisions of economic milk production, city milk sup- 
ply, dairy bacteriology, and dairy manufactures. 

For instructional and experimental purposes two herds of dairy 
cows are maintained, one a grade herd used primarily as an ex- 
perimental herd, the other a pure bred herd composed of Holstein, 
Friesians, Guernseys, Jerseys, and Ayrshires. 

For instruction in dairy cattle and economic milk production, 
free use is made of both herds. 

The actual business of economic milk production is illustrated 
by a twenty-acre dairj- farm conducted by the department for the 
purpose of producing the most milk possible per acre, at the least 
expense. The feeding and breeding experiments, while conducted 
primarily for the use of the Experiment Station, are of value to 
the student. 

Practical instruction in city milk supply is given in a dairy 
building used exclusively for cooling and bottling from the pure 
bred herd. Sanitary methods of delivery are still further illus- 
trated in the daily distribution of this milk on the University milk 
route. 

A bacteriological laboratory affords facilities for instruction 
in the courses in dairy bacteriology and cit}' milk supply, and for 
bacteriological studies necessary when outbreaks of communicable 
disease appear to be due to the local milk supply. The laboratory 
is used also in the investigation of specific dairy problems. 

Facilities for instruction in the manufacture of butter and 
cheese are provided in the University creamery, where 400 pounds 
of fat, in the form of whole milk and cream, are daily made into 
butter and marketed on a commercial basis. The creamery is 
equipped with cream separators, pasteurizers, cream ripeners, 
churns, and refrigerating machine. The student has free access to 
these rooms for laboratory purposes. In addition to this, the cream- 



-2IO The College of Agriculture 

«ry and apparatus are used in investigation of problems involved in 
the manufacture of butter. 

HORTICULTURE 

The department of horticulture offers instruction in forty-four 
■courses, covering the five divisions of horticulture (pomology, 
olericulture, floriculture, landscape gardening, and forestry), and 
also in subjects dealing with principles and practises applicable to 
all the divisions, such as plant propagation, spraying, the evolution 
of horticultural plants, and experimental horticulture. 

For the instruction in pomology, use is made of the various fruit 
plantations maintained by the department. The orchards of differ- 
ent ages afford opportunities for practise in pruning and studies of 
tree types; while the products furnish materials for practise in the 
grading and packing of fruits and the study of systematic pomology. 
A collection of fruit packages is maintained to illustrate the va- 
rious types used in commercial packing. There is also a collec- 
tion of wax models of fruits representing the principal varieties 
grown in Illinois. 

For the use of students in olericulture, or vegetable gardening, 
certain areas of ground are reserved, on which the various gar- 
den operations are illustrated, and various crops are grown. In 
addition to the land, the equipment for instruction in vegetable 
gardening consists of a greenhouse 105x28 feet, hotbed frames and 
sash, seed drills and wheel hoes of various types, an assortment 
of hand tools, markers, planters, and other special tools, tying 
material and packing boxes for onions, asparagus, lettuce, and 
other products, with other accessories and appliances for the 
growing and handling of vegetables. 

The equipment for instruction in floriculture includes ten glass 
houses covering an aggregate area of 28,000 square feet. Six of 
these houses, including the palm house with an area of 3,200 square 
feet, are used for instructional work exclusively, while the other 
four are intended primarily for experimental purposes, but inci- 
dentally add to the facilities for giving instruction in floricul- 
ture as conducted on a commercial basis. Besides roses, carna- 
tions, and chrysanthemums, the houses contain a selection of plants 
representing all the forms used in commercial and decorative or 
conservatory work. In connection with the greenhouses there is a 
service building, containing laboratories, class rooms and offices, as 
well as potting, storage, and work rooms. A full assortment of 



Household Science 211 

florists' supplies is maintained, Floricultural periodicals, reference 
books, and a series of over five hundred slides add to the equip- 
ment. The ornamental gardens maintained by the department fur- 
nish illustrative material for students in both floriculture and land- 
scape gardening. 

The equipment for instruction in landscape gardening includes 
two drafting rooms with desks for individual students, a her- 
barium, and library. The library contains a collection of books 
relating to the subject of landscape gardening, with a complete 
card catalog, photographs of examples of both foreign and Amer- 
ican landscape design, drawings and blue prints from representa- 
tive landscape offices, and the leading periodicals relating to land- 
scape gardening. 

The collection of shrubs and trees growing upon the campus 
and about certain residences in the vicinity of the University fur- 
nishes material for plant studies in connection with the courses in 
planting design. A series of 1,500 lantern slides is used in the 
lectures in landscape gardening. 

Instruction in forestry is facilitated by a collection of native 
woods and a forest tree plantation of some thirty acres, consisting 
of Scotch pine, white pine, Norway spruce, European larch, green 
ash, black walnut, hickory, bur oak, white elm, and other species. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The courses of instruction given in this department are planned 
to meet the needs of two classes of students, viz. : (a) those stu- 
dents who specialize in other lines of work, but desire a knowledge 
of the general principles and facts of household science ; (b) 
those students who wish to make a specialty of household science. 

The department of household science is housed in the north 
wing of the Woman's Building. The kitchen for extension work, 
with dining room adjoining and a laundry, are in the basement. 
The first floor contains two class rooms, a seminar room, an exhibi- 
tion room for illustrative material for work in house construction 
and textile fabrics, offices, and cloak rooms. On the second floor 
are individual, diet, institutional, and class kitchens, small and large 
dining rooms, chemical laboratory, two large sewing rooms, offices, 
and store rooms. On this floor provision is made for the study of 
the preparation and service of food in large quantities in the insti- 
tutional kitchen and large dining room adjoining. The equipment 
on this floor provides practise for those interested in the problems 



212 The College of Agriculture 

of lunch room management and for dietitians. The third floor con- 
tains additional sewing rooms, offices, equipment for teaching home 
care of the sick, and an apartment in which the problems of house 
construction, house furnishing, and household administration are 
studied. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

In the department of veterinary science the student is instructed 
in subjects relating to the prevention of disease among domestic 
animals and their treatment when affected by disease. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Students who have satisfied all matriculation requirements and 
have maintained throughout their course a satisfactory record of 
scholarship and moral character will be graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science, upon having completed the studies of the 
prescribed list and sufficient electives to make a total of 130 semes- 
ter hours. 

A thesis is not required for graduation, but any student who 
has completed not less than 90 hours of credit before the senior 
year may then elect a thesis course in any department in which he 
has done not less than 20 hours' work, subject to the approval of the 
head of the department in question. 

Graduates of approved colleges may expect to secure a degree 
in agriculture from the University of Illinois upon completion of 
the technical and scientific requirements. This will ordinarily re- 
quire approximately two years of residence work ; a minimum of 
one year will be exacted. 

GENERAL COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

All students except those in the special courses in household 
science, floriculture, and landscape gardening are required to take 
the same work during the freshman year and part of the sophomore 
year. This work gives the student a correct conception of the 
fundamental farm practises and an insight into the technical 
branches of agriculture, such as animal and dairy husbandry, horti- 
culture, farm crops, soils, farm mechanics, buildings, etc., and leaves 
the junior and senior years open for election. 



General Course in Agriculture 213 

One hundred thirty hours are required for graduation, as fol- 
lows : 

Agriculture prescribed first two years. 19 hours 
Agriculture prescribed as electives 40 hours 



Total agriculture required 59 hours 

Non-agriculture prescribed 42 hours 

Non-agriculture prescribed as electives. 15 hours 

Total non-agriculture required 57 hours 

Open electives 14 hours 



130 hours 

PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 

Required for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in the General 

Course in Agriculture 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Chemistry i 5 Chemistry 2 and 3 5 

Rhetoric i* 3 Rhetoric i 3 

Agronomy 25 4 Animal Husbandry 5 3 

Horticulture la 2 Dairy Husbandry 3 1 

Agricultural Extension 4a. ^ Horticulture ib 2 

Military 2 i Agricultural Extension 4b 54 

Physical Training i Military i and 2 2 

Physical Training i 

Second Year 

Chemistry 13a or Botany i . 5 Botany i or Chemistry 13a S 

Animal Husbandry 6 3 Agronomy 26 3 

Military 2 i Military 2 i 

Electives Electives 

In addition to the above, students will take the following: 

Agriculture, electives 40 hours 

Non-agriculture, electives 15 hours 

English 20 4 hours 

Science, elective 5 hours 

Open electives 14 hours 



*Those students who show by examination a proficiency in composition 
sufficient to qualify them for the second semester's work in Rhetoric 1 may 
be excused from the first semester's work. See page 95. 



214 The College of Agriculture 

Students registered previous to September, 1912, will meet the 
requirements outlined below so far as it is possible to do so: 

PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 

Required for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in the General 

Course in Agriculture 

Agronomy 6 or 7, 9, 12 12J/2 hours 

Animal Husbandry 7 3 hours 

Chemistry i, 2, 3, 13a 15 hours 

Dairy Husbandry i 3 hours 

Economics 2 2 hours 

English 20 4 hours 

Entomology 4 3 hours 

Horticulture i, loa 8 hours 

Military i, 2 5 hours 

Physical Training i, la 2 hours 

Rhetoric i 6 hours 

Animal Husbandry 30 (Genetics) 5 hours 

Total prescribed subjects 68^ hours 

Elective List A ; a minimum of 4 hours 

Elective List B; a minimum of 3 hours 

Elective List C; a minimum of 25 hours 

Elective List D ; a minimum of 10 hours 

Total 42 hours 

ELECTIVE LISTS 

List A — Animal Husbandry i to 4, li to 14, 17 to 18, 22 

Dairy Husbandry 2 
List B — English literature 2, 16, 23 

Rhetoric 16, 20, 19, 3 
List C — This list includes all subjects offered in technical agri- 
culture and not included in the prescribed list, viz. : 

Agricultural Extension i, 3 

Agronomy i to 8, 10, 13, 16 to 22 

Animal Husbandry i to 4, 8 to 14, 16, 18, 21 to 23b 

Dairy Husbandry 2, 7, 8, II to 22 

Horticulture 2 to 9, lob to 15b, 17 to 34 

Veterinary Science 2, 4, 5, 6 
List D — Botany i, Botany s, Zoology i 



General Course in Floriculture 215 

Summary 

Total prescribed subjects 68]/2 hours 

Total list electives 42 hours 

Total open electives 19J/2 hours 

Total 130 hours 

GENERAL COURSE IN FLORICULTURE 

The object of this course is to fit men and women for the pro- 
fession of floriculture. The laboratory exercises in the technical 
subjects consist of practical work in the greenhouses and garden 
and give the student a working knowledge of the best methods 
now in use. 

PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 

Required for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in General Course 

in Floriculture 

Agronomy 9, 12 10 hours 

Animal Husbandry 30 5 hours 

Botany i, 2, 7 15 hours 

Chemistry i, 2, 3, 13a 15 hours 

Economics 2 2 hours 

English 20 4 hours 

Entomology 4 3 hours 

Horticulture 4, 5, 7, loa, lob, 12, 15a, 15b, 30, 31, 32 41 hours 

Military i, 2 5 hours 

Physical Training i, la 2 hours 

Rhetoric i 6 hours 

Zoology 1 5 hours 

Total prescribed 113 hours 

Free electives 17 hours 

Total 130 hours 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

First Year 

1. Entomology 4; Chemistry i; Rhetoric i; Horticulture 4; 
Military 2; Physical Training i, la. 

2. Chemistry 2 ; Chemistry 3 ; Rhetoric i ; Horticulture 5 ; Mili- 
tary I, 2; Physical Training i, la. 



2i6 The College of Agriculture 

Second Year 

1. English 20; Chemistry 13a; Botany 2; Military 2. 

2. Zoology i; Horticulture 15a; Botany i; Military 2. 

Third Year 

1. Botany 7; Agronomy 9; Horticulture 15b; Economics 2. 

2. Agronomy 12; Horticulture 7; Electives, 8 hours. 

Fourth Year 

1. Horticulture loa; Horticulture 12a; Horticulture 31; Elec- 
tives, 6 hours. 

2. Horticulture 30; Horticulture 32; Animal Husbandry 30; 
Horticulture lob. 



GENERAL COURSE IN HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

Of the 130 hours required for graduation, 91 are provided for 
in the prescribed list and the restricted electives of List A. The 
other 39 hours of credit necessary for graduation may be taken, 
subject to the approval of the Dean of the College, from any 
courses offered in the University. Holders of scholarships in 
household science in this College take the course as laid out here. 
Variations from it can be made only by special permission of the 
Council of Administration on recommendation of the faculty of the 
College. 

PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 

Required for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in General 

Course in Household Science 

Art and Design i, 12, 19 9 hours 

Botany i, 5 10 hours 

Chemistry i, 2, 3 10 hours 

English 1 8 hours 

Household Science i, 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14 20 hours 

History i, or 3 6 or 8 hours 

Physiology 4 5 hours 

Physical Training 7, Physiology 6 3 hours 

Rhetoric i 6 hours 

Zoology 5 hours 



General Course in Household Science 217 

English or Rhetoric 5 hours 

*List A, a minimum of 4 hours 

Total required subjects 91 to 93 hours 

Electives 39 to 37 hours 

Total 130 hours 

ELECTIVES 

List A. — English 19, 24 
Horticulture la, ib, 2, 3, 5, 19, 28 
Household Science 5, 13 
Economics 2, Sociology i 
Physics 2a 
Education i, 2, 6, 9 
Agronomy 2, 5, 7 
Animal Husbandry 10, 2, 3 
Dairy Husbandry i, 3, 14, 19 

Course of Instruction 

First Year 

1. Household Science 2; Chemistry i; Rhetoric i; Physical 
Training 7 and 9; Art and Design i. 

2. Household Science i, 7 ; Chemistry 2, 3 ; Rhetoric i ; Physical 
Training 7. 

Second Year 

1. Household Science 6 ; Zoology i ; English i ; Horticulture 
19; Electives. 

2. Household Science 14 ; Botany i ; Art and Design 12 ; 
Horticulture 19 ; English i ; Electives. 

Third Year 

1. Art and Design 19; Physiology 4; Advanced English; Elec- 
tives. 

2. Household Science 3, 12 ; Advanced English ; Economics 2 ; 
Art and Design 19; Electives. 

Fourth Year 

1. Sociology i; Education i; History 3. 

2. Education 2 or 6 ; Botany 5 ; History 3 ; Household Science 
10. 

*I£ Physics has not been oflFered for entrance, its equivalent should be 
elected. 



2l8 



The College of Agriculture 



GENERAL COURSE IN LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

Course Required for the Degree of B. S. in Landscape Gardening 

A four years' course in preparation for professional practise, is 
open to any student in the University having the prerequisites or 
their equivalents. 



FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 



Prescribed Subjects 

Math. 4 — ^Trigonometry 2 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Themes 3 

Arch. 31 — Drawing 4 

Botany 11 — Introduct. Course 5 

Mil. and P. T 2 

Total 1 6 



Second Semester 



Prescribed Subjects 

Entomology A — Intr. to Econ. Ent. 3 

Rhet. 1 — -Rhetoric and Themes 3 

Arch, 32 — Arch. Drawing 4 

Hort. 5 — Plant Propagation 5 

Mil. and P. T 3 

Total 18 



SECOND YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 



Hort. 10a — Landscape Gardening.. 3 

Arch. 33 — Sophomore Design 3 

C. E. 21— Surveying 5 

Military 1 

Total 12 



Prescribed Subjects 



Hort. 10b — Landscape Design 3 

Hort. 24a — Trees and Shrubs 3 

C. E. 22 — Surveying 4 

Military _ 1 

Total 1 1 



Electives 
Plants — 

Chemistry 1 — Inorg. Chem 5 

Design — 

Art and Design 4 — Water Color 2 

Hort. 31 — Garden Flowers 3 



Electives 
Plants — 

Hort. 2 — Small Fruits 2 

Agronomy 9 — Soils 5 

Design — 

Art and Des. 12 — Theory and Prac. 2 

Geology 12 5 



THIRD YEAR 



Prescribed Subjects 

Hort. 23a — Landscape Design 3 

Hort. 24b — Trees and Shrubs 3 

Hort. 27a — Landscape Practise 3 

Arch. 6 — History of Arch 4 

Total 13 

Electives 

Plants — 

Hort. 8 — Fruit Culture 5 

Design — 

Hort. 29a — Garden Design 3 

Art and Des. 13 — Hist, and Pj-ac... 2 

Civic Design — 

Economics 2 — Prin. of Econ 2 

Sociology 1 — Prin. of Soc 3 



Prescribed Subjects 

Hort. 23b — Landscape Design 3 

Hort. 26a — Planting Design 3 

Hort. 27b — Landscape Practise 3 

Arch. 6 — History of .\rch 4 

Hort. 36 — Landscape Reading 2 

Total 15 

Electives 

Plants — 

Hort. 7 — Spraying 3 

Hort. 9 — Forestry 2 

Design — 

Hort. 29b — Garden Design 3 

.\rt and Design 8 — Modeling 2 

Civic Design — 

Rhetoric 17 — Adv. Comp 3 

Sociology 7 — The Rural Community 2 



Course for Teachers 219 

FOURTH YEAR 
Prescribed Subjects Prescribed Subjects 

Hort. 25a — Landscape Design ~ 3 Hort. 25b — Landscape Design 3 

Hort. 26b — Planting Design ~ 3 Hort. 28 — Exotics 1 

Hort. 37a — Civic Design 2 C. E. 1 — Roads and Pavements 2 

Hort. 38 — Field Practise 2 

Hort. 37b — Civic Design 3 

Total 8 Total 11 

Electives Electives 

Plants — Plants — 

Hort. 31 — Garden Flowers 3 Hort. 15a — Plant Growing 5 

Design — Design — 

Hort. 25a (Extra hotirs) -^--^ Hort. 25b (Extra hours) 

Art and Design A — Water Color 2 

Civic Design — 

Sociology 10 — Population 3 

Pol. Sci. 4 — Mun. Govern 3 

GENERAL ELECTIVES 

Modem language 8 hours 

Zoology 1 5 hours 

Horticulture 19a i hour 

Horticulture 19b i hour 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GR.\DUATION 

The following are the requirements for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Landscape Gardening: 

1. The student must complete the work outlined in the course 
as prescribed subjects. 

2. There must be obtained from the elective subjects enough 
additional credits to complete the graduation requirement of 130 
hours. 

GENERAL COURSE FOR PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS OF 

AGRICULTURE 

A general course is offered for prospective teachers of agricul- 
ture. Among the subjects recommended are the following: 

Agronomy 2, 9, 12, 25, 26; Animal Husbandry la, 2a, 4a, 5, 6, 
iia, lib, 30*; Dairy Husbandry 2, 3; Horticulture la, ib, 3, 5, loa, 
19; Agricultural Extension i, 4; Botany i, 12; Chemistry i, 2, 3, 
13a; Entomology 4; Zoology i; English 20; Rhetoric i, 5, 7, 19; 
Economics 2; Education i, 6; Library Science 12; Military i, 2; 
Physical Training i, la; foreign language. 

For further information concerning this course, address the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture. 



•Students taking the Teachers' course may take Animal Husbandry 30 
for one-half semester and receive 2^4 credits therefore. 



220 The College of Agriculture 

TWO WEEKS' COURSE IN AGRICULTURE AND 
HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

AGRICULTURE 

The Corn Growers' and Stockmen's Convention is held annually 
at the College of Agriculture (in 1914, January 19-30). At the 
time of this meeting, the College gives instruction for two weeks in 
subjects of special interest to young men on the farm, such as corn 
and stock judging, milk and seed testing, soils, etc. A morning ses- 
sion of two hours each day is devoted to the discussion of ques- 
tions of importance to the farmer. In the afternoon an hour is 
given to lectures upon topics of general interest. The rest of the 
day is filled with class work in the subjects mentioned above. Each 
year about a thousand men who are unable to spend a longer time 
away from home avail themselves of this opportunity to come in 
touch with the work of the College. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

At the same time, a two-weeks' course in household science con- 
sisting of lectures and recitation work is given in the rooms of the 
department of household science in the Woman's Building. 

ADMISSION 

No entrance examinations are required and any farmer or farm- 
er's son or daughter may enter these courses. It is important that 
everyone should be here at the opening of the session. Upon ar- 
rival at Champaign or Urbana, application should be made at the 
University Young Men's Christian Association, where information 
<:oncerning board and room may be obtained. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



THE EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University 

David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Vice-President, Dean of the Grad- 
uate School, Director of the Courses in Business Administration, 
and Professor of Economics 
Boyd Henry Bode, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 
Albert Pruden Carman, A.M., D.Sc, Prof^sor of Physics 
Julius Goebel, Ph.D., Professor of German 
EvARTS BouTELL Greene, Ph.D., Professor of History 
Herbert Windsor Mumford, B.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry 
William Abbott Oldfather, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the 

Classics 
Samuel Wilson Parr, M.S., Professor of Applied Chemistry 
Stuart Pratt Sherman, Ph.D., Professor of English 
Arthur Newell Talbot, C.E., Professor of Municipal and Sani-^ 

tary Engineering 
Henry Baldwin Ward, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology 
Edgar Jerome Townsend, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

Altho for many years the University of Illinois had offered 
advanced students facilities for study and research in various lines, 
graduate work was undertaken under the name of the Graduate 
School for the first time in 1892. In 1894 the administration of the 
School was vested in the Council of Administration, and the Vice- 
President of the University became dean of the School. In 1906 
the Graduate School was organized as a separate faculty, consist- 
ing of a dean and members of the University faculty assigned to 
this duty by the President. No means of support were provided, 
however, separate from those provided for the undergraduate work. 

221 



222 The Graduate School 

In the winter of 1906-7, the Forty-fifth General Assembly of the 
State passed an act appropriating $50,000 per year for the support 
of a Graduate School of Fine Arts and Sciences in the State Uni- 
versity. This appropriation has been continued by succeeding leg- 
islatures. 

By an act of the Board of Trustees the teaching faculty of the 
Graduate School includes all members of the University faculty 
who give instruction in courses approved for graduate credit. The 
affairs of the School, however, are in charge of the executive 
faculty appointed each year by the President. 

ADMISSION 

For admission to the Graduate School to work for a degree an 
applicant must hold a first degree either from the University of 
Illinois or from some other university or college of equivalent 
standing. Admission to particular graduate courses or departments 
may be secured only by those who have had the requisite under- 
graduate work in those courses or departments. 

In order to be enrolled as a member of the Graduate School a 
student must be doing graduate work. The possession of a first 
degree does not entitle a student to be enrolled in the Graduate 
School, if the courses which he is taking are undergraduate. 

Students of mature age who do not hold a first degree, but satis- 
fy the Dean of the School and the officers of the departments in 
which they wish to work of their earnestness of purpose and spe- 
cial fitness, may be permitted to take work in the Graduate School 
without reference to candidacy for a degree. In order to secure 
this permission, however, a candidate must have had such prelim- 
inary preparation for the work he wishes to take up as would justify 
his admission to the Graduate School as a candidate for a degree 
if he could meet the other requirements fully. 

Each student is required to attend a minimum of four class, 
lecture, or laboratory exercises a week in the first year of his grad- 
uate study; in no case is he permitted during his course to attend 
more than twelve exercises a week. 

Continuous residence and study are required of all members of 
the Graduate School, unless they are granted leave of absence by 
the Dean, upon recommendation of the professors in charge of their 
work, for the purpose of carrying on elsewhere studies or investi- 
gation in the line of work for their degrees. 



The Master's Degree 22^ 

The principal aim of graduate study is the development of the 
power of independent work and the promotion of the spirit of re- 
search. Each candidate for a degree is expected to have a wide 
knowledge of his subject and of related fields of work; for the 
graduate student is not expected to get from lecture and labora- 
tory courses all the knowledge and training necessary to meet the 
requirements for his degree. 

Students are warned against restricting themselves merely to the 
courses prescribed or suggested by the departments in which they 
are studying. Each student is expected to do a wide range of pri- 
vate reading and study; and in many cases will find it advisable to 
take one or more courses of lectures quite outside the field of his 
chosen subjects. 

Application blanks for admission may be secured from the Dean 
of the Graduate School or from the Registrar of the University. 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Sci- 
ence are required to do at least one year's work in residence and 
to write a thesis. 

A candidate for a master's degree may do all his work in one 
subject, or he may select a major and one minor, or a major and 
two minors. A major or minor denotes the field of knowledge of a 
department, or such part thereof as constitutes a separate and in- 
dependent division of that field. The candidate must do at least 
half his work in his major subject. 

Each candidate for a master's degree is also required to present 
a thesis on some subject approved by the professor in charge of 
his major work and the faculty of the School. The requirement 
of a thesis may be waived, however, upon the recommendation of 
the head of the department in which the student is doing his major 
work and the approval of the Dean, provided application to waive 
the thesis is made at the beginning of the year. In no case will per- 
mission to take the degree without a thesis be given if applied for 
later than the latest date for the approval of thesis subjects, as 
shown by the calendar. 

The thesis required from a candidate for a master's degree 
ordinarily will demand about one-fourth of the student's time. 
The thesis must be type-written, on "thesis paper," and the title- 
page must be printed. The thesis, in its final form, together with 



224 The Graduate School 

a certificate of approval by the proper officer, must be left by the 
student at the Dean's office at the time set in the calendar. 

Credit is not given for work done in other universities. The 
candidate is examined here on the subjects offered by him for the 
advanced degree. 

The Master's Degree in Engineering 

Two classes of second degrees are open to graduates of the 
College of Engineering, namely, academic and professional. 

The academic second degree in engineering is Master of Science, 
following Bachelor of Science, in Architecture, Architectural Engi- 
neering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, etc. This degree 
is conferred in accordance with the regulations described above for 
academic work in residence only. 

The professional second degrees in engineering are as follows : 

Master of Architecture after B. S. in Architecture. 

Architectural Engineer after B. S. in Architectural Engineering. 

Civil Engineer after B. S. in Civil Engineering or B. S. in Mu- 
nicipal and Sanitary Engineering. 

Electrical Engineer after B. S. in Electrical Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineer after B. S. in Mechanical Engineering. 

Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, or Mechanical Engineer, 
after B. S. in Railway Engineering, according to the course. 

Professional degrees are conferred upon two classes of candi- 
dates : I. Graduates of the College of Engineering of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois who have been engaged in acceptable professional 
work away from the University for a period of not less than three 
years after receiving the degree of Bachelor of Science. 2. Grad- 
uates of the University of Illinois, or of institutions of equal stand- 
ing, who have been engaged in acceptable professional work in resi- 
dence at the University for a period of not less than three years 
after receiving the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

In "acceptable professional work" may be included contributions 
to technical literature, activity in professional societies, investiga- 
tions of engineering problems, and the teaching of engineering sub- 
jects. 

A candidate must declare his candidacy and file with the Dean 
of the College of Engineering, as chairman of the committee in 
charge, a detailed statement covering his professional study and 
experience, not later than the first Monday in November preceding 
the commencement at which he proposes to qualify. Prior to De- 



Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 225 

cember 31 next succeeding, he must submit for approval an out- 
line of his proposed thesis and he must file his completed thesis not 
later than April i. If the statement of professional experience and 
study and the thesis are accepted, the candidate must present him- 
self at commencement in order to receive the degree. 

Candidates for professional degrees in engineering who already 
hold the degree of Master of Science may qualify for the profes- 
sional degree after two years of professional work. 

A candidate for a professional degree in engineering must 
pay the incidental fee of twenty-four dollars on being notified that 
his professional study and experience are accepted as qualifying him 
to enter as a candidate for the degree. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

General Statement of Requirements. — The requirements for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy are a thoro mastery of a selected 
field of study, evidence of the power of independent investigation 
in this field, a broad knowledge of the wider field of study of which 
this major subject is a part, a general acquaintance with related 
fields of knowledge, and a mastery of all branches of study which 
are necessary to a full knowledge of the main subject. Each student 
who is seeking this degree is expected to choose for study and final 
examination a major subject, or field of study, and a first and 
second minor. The major subject is the field in which the student 
expects to become expert and an authority. The first minor must 
be a subject closely related to the major and may, under certain 
conditions and with proper approval, be a subdivision of the major 
field of study. The second minor should be chosen outside of the 
major field of study. 

When a candidate chooses any subject as his major, and a di- 
vision of that subject as his minor, he is not permitted to choose as 
a second minor any division of work in that same department, ex- 
cepting by vote of the executive faculty of the School. 

The candidate's list of subjects must receive the approval of the 
head of the department in which he chooses his major work and 
of the Dean of the School. 

Period of Study. — The minimum period of study required for se- 
curing the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is three years. The 
degree is conferred, however, not for residence during a certain 
period, but for scholarly attainments and power of investigation, as 
proved by thesis and examinations. 



226 The Graduate School 

Candidates should note that credit is not given for work done 
in other universities, excepting in the sense that their residence 
at other institutions is counted towards the residence requirement 
for the doctor's degree. 

At least the first two or the last one of the three years required 
must be spent at this University. 

Examinations. — Towards the end of his second year of study, 
or, by special permission, at the beginning of his third year, the 
candidate for the degree must submit to a preliminary examination 
conducted by the members of the faculty with whom he is doing his 
principal work, in order to determine whether he will be accepted as 
a candidate for the degree in the following year. This examination 
is partly oral, and may be wholly so. At this time, or before, the 
candidate will be required to demonstrate his ability to read French 
and German, and any other language needed for the prosecution of 
his work. 

On or before the last Monday in May of the year in which the 
candidate expects to come up for his degree, he must submit to a 
final examination by a committee appointed by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. This examination will be partly written. The 
candidate will also have, however, an oral examination. These 
examinations will not be confined to the courses which the candidate 
has attended in the University of Illinois only, if he has done part 
of the work elsewhere; nor even to the field covered by the courses 
specifically taken in this or other universities; but will be so con- 
ducted as to determine whether the candidate has a satisfactory' 
grasp of his major subject as a whole, and a general acquaintance 
with the broad fields of knowledge represented by his course of 
study. 

Before the candidate is admitted to the final examination and 
the defense of his thesis, he may be required to take any other ex- 
amination, oral or written, that is thought proper by the various 
departments in which he has studied. If, after having passed his 
preliminary examination, he fails in the third year of his study to 
meet the expectations of the professors in charge of his work, or 
in any way fails to maintain the standard of scholarship and power 
of research expected of him, he may be refused admission to the 
final examination. 

The final examination in the major and minor subjects may not 
be divided. The examination must be taken all at one time even, 
though it requires several sessions. 



Scholarships and Fellowships 227 

Thesis. — The power of independent research must be shown by 
the production of a thesis on some topic connected with the major 
subject of study. The candidate is expected to defend his thesis or 
dissertation before the members of the faculty, or as many of them 
as may wish to question him about it, in connection with his final 
examination. 

The subject of the thesis should be chosen not later than the end 
of the second year of study, and must be submitted for formal ap- 
proval by the faculty not later than the first Monday of November 
of the year when the degree is expected. A typewritten copy of the 
complete thesis, on thesis paper, with proper certificate of approval, 
must be in the hands of the Dean not later than noon of the Satur- 
day nearest the middle of May. 

The thesis must be printed and one hundred copies deposited in 
the library of the University before the degree is conferred. If, for 
any reason, the thesis cannot be printed and one hundred copies 
deposited before commencement time, the candidate must, before 
the first Monday in June, deposit a bond acceptable to the Comp- 
troller of the University and the Dean of the Graduate School for 
the cost of printing his thesis, or such part thereof as may be regard- 
ed as sufficient to meet the requirements of the rules. 

The title page of each thesis must bear the words "Submitted in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in — (here put the major subject), in the Graduate School 
of the University of Illinois." The title page must also contain the 
full name of the author, the full title of the thesis, the year of im- 
print, and, if a reprint, the title, volume, and statement of the 
pagination of the volume from which it is reprinted. Each thesis 
must have an appendix giving a short biography of the candidate, 
including the institutions he has attended, his degrees and honors, 
the titles of his publications, and such other matters as may be per- 
tinent. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

A number of fellowships and scholarships have been established 
by the Trustees of the University. To first year graduate students 
of ability and promise there are open scholarships with a stipend of 
S250 each and freedom from tuition, incidental, and laboratory fees. 
To second and third year graduate students, that is, those who have 
had one or two years of graduate study, there are open fellowships 
with a stipend varying from $300 to $500, with freedom from fees. 
The larger stipends are given only to students who are expected to 



228 The Graduate School 

take their degrees within the year. Each holder of a fellowship or 
scholarship must pay the matriculation fee of ten dollars, unless he 
holds a first degree from the University of Illinois, and also the di- 
ploma fee of five dollars on receiving his diploma. 

Candidates for these scholarships and fellowships must be grad- 
uates of the University of Illinois, or of colleges or universities 
having equivalent requirements for bachelors* degrees. 

Application must be made upon blanks to be obtained from the 
Dean of the Graduate School. These application forms should be 
addressed to the Dean of the Graduate School as early as possible 
in Februarj of the academic year preceding that for which the 
fellowship is desired. 

Persons appointed are required to send the Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees prompt notice of their acceptance or refusal ; 
and to agree that, if accepted, the appointment will not be resigned 
to take a similar one in any other institution during the year for 
which it is awarded. 

Nominations to fellowships are made upon the grounds of worthi- 
ness of character, scholastic attainments, and promise of success in 
the principal line of study or research to which the candidate pro- 
poses to devote himself. 

Scholarships and fellowships are good for one year, but may be 
renewed for a second or a third year in special cases. An appoint- 
ment as honorary fellow, without stipend, may be made as specified 
for paid fellowships in the case of any one who has shown dis- 
tinguished merit in his work. 

Research Fellowships in the Engineering Experiment Station 

The Engineering Experiment Station is devoted entirely to re- 
search. Its purposes are the elevation of engineering education, and 
the study of problems of special importance to engineers and to 
manufacturing, railway, mining, and industrial interests. 

Ten fellowships, each of five hundred dollars a year, have been 
established in the Engineering Experiment Station. Applicants to 
whom these fellowships are awarded agree to hold them for two 
years. They devote half of their time to the work of the Engineer- 
ing Experiment Station, which work is not applicable toward a de- 
gree; the other half of their time is given to graduate study in 
candidacy for a degree. Application for these fellowships should be 
made to the Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 



The Graduate Club 22g 

THE GRADUATE CLUB 

The Graduate Club is an unofficial organization of the graduate 
students and graduate faculty. Its purpose is to furnish an oppor- 
tunity for those working in different departments to become ac- 
quainted with one another and thus counteract the tendency toward 
narrowness which graduate work often develops. 



THE LIBRARY SCHOOL 



For a description of the Library Btiilding, see page 71 ; for an 
account of the libraries themselves, see pages 79-82; for the collec- 
tion in library economy, see page 80; for fees, see page 148. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Library School offers a two years' course of instruction to 
students who wish to enter library work as a profession, and cer- 
tain library courses to students in other schools and colleges of the 
University of Illinois who may wish to elect them as a part of their 
course of training. The instruction in the first or junior year covers 
the generally accepted methods and practises in library work; 
students who complete this year's work are prepared to accept posi- 
tions in librar>' service. In the second or senior year greater em- 
phasis is placed upon historical and comparative methods of treat- 
ment; new subjects are introduced to give the student a broad out- 
look and a scholarly, technical, and administrative equipment for the 
more responsible positions. 

One or two years* training will not take the place of years of 
experience, but they will make the student more adaptable and his 
general library service more intelligent. The time spent in actual 
practise amounts to about three and a half months, counting seven 
hours to a working day, and this is more valuable, because more 
varied, than if taken in three consecutive months in any one library. 
Moreover, the library school student has the benefit of comparative 
study, while the apprentice becomes skillful in the ways of one li- 
brary only. Although stress is laid upon simplicity and economy, 
methods are taught to enable students to work in large libraries 
where bibliographic exactness is required. Emphasis is laid upon 
the extension of the activities of the public library, and upon the 
importance of cooperation between the library and the schools and 
other educational agencies. 

A student in any other school or college of the University of 
Illinois may elect any course for which he is prepared. These 
courses will help students in general reading, in research work, in 

230 



Proposed Preliminary Course 231 

club work, as high school teachers, or as members of a library 
committee or a board of trustees. The school also offers a course 
of eighteen hours on the use of the library and the ordinary ref- 
erence books, which will help in general reading or study. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the Library School is conditioned upon the pre- 
sentation of credentials showing that the applicant holds a bache- 
lor's degree in arts or science from the Universit>' of Illinois or 
has had other equivalent training. 

Application blanks for admission may be secured from the 
Director of the School, and these, filled out, should be filed, to- 
gether with such documentary material as the candidate may offer, 
showing qualifications for admission, not later than the regis- 
tration days in September. It is to the candidate's interest to pre- 
sent the application and certificates early, in order that the ques- 
tion of admission may be settled before he comes to the Univer- 
sity. 

PROPOSED PRELIMINARY COURSE 

Undergraduates who intend, on the completion of their col- 
lege work, to apply for admission to the Library School, are re- 
quested to select their courses so as to conform in general to the 
following recommended program of studies preparatory to li- 
brary work. 

Proposed Preliminary Course 

English literature, 5*; rhetoric, 2 

Latin, 4, in addition to four years of high school Latin 
German, 6, in addition to two years of high school German 
French, 4, in addition to two years of high school French 
Languages begun in college instead of in the high school should be con- 
tinued for a longer period. 

Medieval and modem European history, 3 ; history of England, 3 ; history 
of the United States, 3 

Economics, 3; political science, 2; sociology, 3 
Philosophy, 2; general psychology, 2 
Zoology, 3; botany, 2; chemistry or physics, 3 

The total of this work is loo semester hours, leaving the equiv- 
alent of one year of a four-year course free for work in other 
subjects or for more work in the subjects named. 



*The figures after each subject indicate the minimum number of lecture or 
recitation hours a week which the student should devote to that subject 
throughout one college year. 



232 The Library School 

ADVANCED STANDING 

College graduates who have had approved library experience or 
who have attended other library schools may be accorded advanced 
standing by securing credit for some of the courses required for 
graduation. After satisfying all entrance requirements and after 
matriculation, the applicant for advanced standing may secure 
suclj credit either by examination or by transfer of credits from 
another institution offering courses in library economy, 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

It is the practise of this School to admit as special students 
only those mature persons who, tho unable to meet the formal 
requirements for entrance, are substantially prepared for thoro 
and advanced work. Such persons must present evidence of pos- 
sessing the requisite information and ability to pursue profitably, 
as special students, the chosen subjects, and some substitute for 
the regular requirements for entrance, such as approved library 
or teaching experience, foreign travel, etc. Preference will be 
given to those already engaged in library work, especially in Illi- 
nois, who may desire more adequate training in particular sub- 
jects. 

LIBRARY VISITS AND FIELD WORK 

Each year all the students in the School visit the libraries, and 
certain of the book binderies, book stores, and printing establish- 
ments of either Chicago and vicinity or St. Louis and vicinity. 
During this visit, which occupies one week, the students are ac- 
companied by a member of the faculty. 

In order to assure a varied library experience, each student in 
the senior year is required to spend one month in an assigned pub- 
lic library, working, as far as practicable, under the same condi- 
tions as a member of the staff of that library. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSE 

The course is two years in length. For graduation a student 
must receive credit for all courses except those marked with an 
asterisk (*), which are elective. The degree of Bachelor of Li- 
brary Science is conferred on a student who has completed the re- 
quired work in the two years' course, and has received credit in 
courses amounting to 65 hours. 



Schedule of Course 



233 



JUNIOR YEAR 



2» 
3 

4 

16 

17 

18 
22 



6 
8 

10 

13 

IS 
24 
26 
27 



First Semester 

Reference work (3 hrs.) 2^ 

Selection of books (2 hrs.) 3 

Practise work, 4 hours per week 4 
(2 hrs.) 

Order, accession, and shelf work 7 

(2 hrs.) 19 

Classification and book numbers 20 

(3 hrs.) 21 
Cataloging (3 hrs.) 

Library administration and cur- 22 

rent library literature (1 hr.) 23 



Second Semester 
Reference work (3 hrs.) 
Selection of books (2 hrs.) 
Practise work, 4 hours per week 
(2 hrs.) 

History of libraries (2 hrs.) 
Trade bibliography (1 hr.) 
Loan department (1 hr.) 
Printing, binding, indexing (2 
hrs.) 

Library extension (3 hrs.) 
Library administration and cur- 
rent library literature (1 hr.) 



SENIOR YEAR 



Subject bibliography (2 hrs.) 6 

•Advanced reference work (2 9 

hrs.) 10 
Practice work, 8 hours per week 

(4 hrs.) 13 

Public documents (2 hrs.) 15 

Seminar (2 hrs.) 24 

Selection of books (2 hrs.) 25 
Library administration (3 hrs.) 

Bibliographical institutions (1 hr.) 26 

28 



Subject bibliography (2 hrs.) 
Bookmaking (2 hrs.) 
Practise work, 8 hours per week 
(4 hrs.) 

*Public documents (2 hrs.) 
Seminar (2 hrs.) 
Selection of books (2 hrs.) 
Advanced classification and cata- 
loging (1 hr.) 

Library administration (3 hrs.) 
•Practise work in various depart- 
ments of the library (1 to 4 hrs.) 



LIBIL\RY CLUB 

Any member of the Library School faculty or of the staff of 
the University Library and any student in the Library School may 
become a member. Six meetings are held each year to discuss 
professional questions, and for social purposes. 



*The numbers in these columns refer to the Courses in Library Science 
in the General Description of Courses. 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



For admission to tlie School of Music, see the general state- 
ment of entrance requirements of the University, page 88. For 
fees, see page 149. For the faculty of the School of Music and de- 
scriptions of the courses in Music, see under "Music" in the "Gen- 
eral Description of Courses," Part III. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The School of Music offers regular courses leading to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Music, and a teacher's certificate in public 
school music. 

Students who are not working for the degree in music may 
receive a statement from their instructors upon completing not 
less than one year of college work. 

Classes in ear training meet twice each week. The fundamen- 
tal principles of music notation are studied thoroly, and the ear 
is trained to recognize intervals, chords, etc., so that the student 
may eventually think music. Music students are required to at- 
tend these classes. 

The sight-singing classes meet twice each week. This work is 
required of music students. 

Choral, orchestral, and ensemble work is required of all students 
who are sufficiently advanced. 

All students majoring in a practical subject are required to 
take Music 28 (Recital). 

A series of lectures and recitals is given each year. Only 
artists of the best reputation appear. Music students are ad- 
mitted free and are required to attend. 

The instructors in the School of Music give recitals and lectures 
on musical subjects during the year. 

The courses in the history of music and musical theory, as well 
as the work in the University Orchestra and the University Choral 
Society, may be taken by students in other departments without 
fee. 

234 



Requirements for Graduation 



235 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must offer credit 
for 130 semester hours, including the prescribed subjects named 
below, together with an acceptable thesis on a topic related to music. 



FIRST 
First Semester 

S. H. 

Music 2, Harmony 2 

Music 7, 12 or 17, Piano, Voice, or 

Violin 6 

Music 23a, Ear Training 

*Rhet. 1, Rhetoric and Themes 3 

Foreign language, French, German, 

or Italian 4 

Phys. Tr. 7, Gymnasium (women).. 1 

Phys. Tr. 9, Hygiene (women) 1 

Phys. Tr. 1, Gymnasium (men) 1 

Phys. Tr. la, Hygiene (men) 

Mil. 2, Drill (men) 1 



YEAR 

Second Semester 

S. H. 

Music 2, Harmony 2 

Music 7, 12 or 17, Piano, Voice, or 

Violin „ 6 

Music 23a. Ear Training 

Rhet. 1, Rhetoric and Themes 3 

Foreign language, French, German, 

or Italian 

Phys. Tr. 7, Gymnasium (women).. 

Phvs. Tr. 1, Gymnasium (men) 

Mil. 2, Drill (men)..... 

Mil. 1, Drill Regulations (men) 



Total, Men 

Total, Wometu. 



17 

17 



SECOND 

Music 1, History of Music 2 

Music 3, Advanced Harmony 3 

Music 8, 13, or 18, Piano, Voice, or 

Violin „ 6 

Music 23b, Ear Training 1 

Music 24a, Sight Singing 

Foreign language, French, German, 

or Italian 4 

Mil. 2, Drill (men) 1 



Total, Men 

Total, Women- 



.17 
.16 



Total, Men 18 

Total, Women 16 

YEAR 

Music 1, History of Music 2 

Music 3, Advanced Harmony 3 

Music 8, 13, or 18, Piano, Voice, or 

Violin 6 

Music 23b, Ear Training 1 

Music 24a, Sight Singing 

Foreign language, French, German, 

or Italian 4 

Mil. 2, Drill (men) 1 

Total, Men 17 

Total, Women ; 16 



THIRD YEAR 



Music 4, Counterpoint, Canon, and 

Fugue 3 

Music 9, 14 or 19, Piano, Voice, or 

Violin 6 

Music 24b, Sight Singing 1 

Education 1, Principles 3 

English 1, Survey of English Liter- 
ature „ 4 



Music 4, Counterpoint, Canon, and 

Fugue 3 

Music 9, 14 or 19, Piano, Voice, or 

Violin 6 

Music 24b, Sight Singing 1 

Music 5a, Acoustics 1 

English 1, Survey of English Lit- 
erature 4 



Total 17 Total 15 

FOURTH YEAR 

Music 5, (jeneral Theorj', Free Com- 



Music 5, General Theory, Free Com- 
position „ 2 

Music 5 a, Acoustics 1 

Music 10, IS or 20, Piano, Voice, 

or Violin 6 

Music 7a, 12a, or 17a, Minor Sub- 
ject „ 2 

Music 28, Recital 3 

English 4, English Versification 3 

Total 17 



position 2 

Music 10, 15 or 20, Piano, Voice, 

or Violin 6 

Music 7a, 12a, or 17a, Minor Sub- 
ject 2 

Music 28, Recital 3 



Total 13 



•Those students who show by examination a proficiency in composition 
sufficient to qualify them for the second semester's work in Rhetoric 1 may 
be excused from the first semester's work. See page 95. 



236 . The School of Music 

In Addition, for Women: 4 hours elective, to make up the pre- 
scribed total of 130 hours. These four extra credits may be taken 
at any time; the election made must be approved by the student's ad- 
viser. 

Courses 7 to 20, include regular attendance in Music 21 (Orches- 
tra), Music 22 (Choral Society), and Music 27 (Ensemble Class), 
unless a student is excused by the Director of the School of Music. 

COURSE IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

The aim of the Course in Public School Music is to prepare 
competent teachers and supervisors of music for the public schools. 
Students completing the course are granted teachers* certificates. 
An opportunity for practise teaching is offered. The course is 
one year in length, and comprises the following prescribed subjects : 

Course in Public School Music 

Music 1 — History of Music 4 hours 

Music 2 — Harmony 4 hours 

Music 23a — Ear Training 2 hours 

Music 24a — Sight Singing 2 hours 

Music 25 — Methods of Teaching 8 hours 

Practical Music, major, Piano or Voice (7 or 12) 12 hours 

Practical Music, minor, Voice or Piano (12a or 7a) 4 hours 

36 hours 

Advanced students may satisfy a part of the foregoing require- 
ments by examination; in no case, however, is a student permitted 
to take less than 30 hours of work. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The University Choral and Orchestral Society is conducted by 
the Director of the School of Music, and gives a series of concerts 
throughout the year. The orchestra meets for two hours* rehearsal 
once a week ; it is open to all students who qualify for membership. 
The chorus meets once a week for rehearsal of choral works. 
Singers not connected with the University are admitted by exami- 
nation. 

The Military Band is conducted by the instructor in band instru- 
ments. Besides giving several concerts during the year, it furnishes 
music for regimental formations and ceremonies and other occasions 
as required by the President of the University. Membership is de- 
cided by competitive examination. A Second Band is also con- 
ducted, in order that all students who play band instruments or- 



Musical Organisations 237 

dinarily well may have an opportunity to play in a band. Each full 
term of service in the Band counts for one term of the required 
work in Military Science. After obtaining credit for four semesters' 
work those who are continued in the Band for not less than one year 
are paid an amount equal to the term, or "incidental," fees of the 
year. 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



FACULTY 



The faculty of the School of Education includes all those in- 
structors who offer courses primarily intended for prospective 
teachers. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

It is the purpose of the School to bring together all the resources 
of the University which contribute in a professional way to the 
preparation of three classes of workers in the public school system : 

1. The High School Principal and the High School Teacher. — 
The School provides for the needs of the high school principal by 
supplying a general knowledge of the various subjects of the high 
school curriculum, as well as a knowledge of organization and ad- 
ministration as applied to the secondar}-^ school; and for those of 
the departmental specialist by supplying a more extended knowledge 
of a few subjects. 

Funds have been appropriated and the site purchased for a 
building to house a model secondary school which will be used as a 
training school for teachers. 

2. The Supervisor of Special Subjects. — Manual training, agri- 
culture, domestic science, music, drawing, and physical training, as 
now taught in the better school systems, are subjects which demand 
specially trained supervisors; the facilities of the University for in- 
struction in these subjects are thoroly utilized. 

3. The School Superintendent. — Demanding, as he does, a 
knowledge of the development of school systems, a keen insight 
into pedagogical problems, and an appreciation of child-nature, the 
superintendent needs extended preparation; this the School of Ed- 
ucation is prepared to give. 

COURSE 

The course of study of the School of Education is made up of 
offerings selected from the work of the various departments of in- 

238 



Appointment of Teachers 239 

struction in the University. The course is elective except for the 
graduation requirements of the college in which the student is regis- 
tered. Certain subjects are, however, required of all students who 
wish to be oflEicially recommended by the University for high school 
positions. The work is arranged in four groups: 

(a) Courses in education, psychology-, and sociologv' bearing 
directly upon the profession of the teacher. 

(b) Courses especially intended for teachers, offered by various 
departments of the University. 

(c) Suggested programs for students preparing to become 
special teachers and supervisors of agriculture, domestic science, 
drawing, music, or physical training. 

(d) Suggested programs for continuous and progressive work 
in subjects represented in the high school curriculum. 

SPECIAL LECTURES 
A number of special lectures are offered each year by the School 
of Education. 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENT OF TEACHERS 

This committee has in charge the naming of candidates from 
among graduates of the University for positions as teachers or su- 
pervisors in public schools, colleges, and technical schools. 

The Director of the School of Education is chairman of this 
committee, and the oS&cial nominations of students and graduates 
of the University to public school positions are made through his 
oflSce. 

The following resolution was adopted by the University Senate, 
June 3, 1912: 

I. The University Committee on Appointments is authorized to 
issue its recommendation, signed by the committee as the agent of 
the University, in all cases in which it is satisfied with the student's 
scholarship and ability to teach. The committee shall regard the 
scholarship requirements as met if, in addition to carrj'ing the pro- 
fessional courses mentioned in the next paragraph, the student has 
passed with an average grade of 85 in the courses necessary to con- 
stitute a major in the principal subject which he wishes to teach, 
and in courses aggregating a minimum varying from six to twelve 
semester hours (according to subject, and at the discretion of the 
committee) in each of the other subjects for which he wishes to be 
recommended. The committee shall, however, in each case secure 
the written opinion of the departments concerned, of the scholar- 



240 The School of Education 

ship of the applicant, and shall view the evidence of scholarship as 
shown by the records in the light of this opinion ; and if there ap- 
pear to the committee to be reasons which, from their nature, can 
not be shown by mere records, for questioning the scholastic ability 
of the student, the committee may, in its discretion, withhold the 
recommendation. 

2. A candidate must have successfully completed the following 
courses in the department of education : 

a. An introductory course which shall aim (i) to acquaint the 
prospective teacher with the public-school system as it exists today 
in the United States, and (2) to present a brief outline of the prin- 
ciples of education. (A three-hour course.) 

b. A course in the technique of teaching, accompanied by obser- 
vation of class-room work in secondary schools, and including a 
discussion of class-management (routine and discipline), the ele- 
ments of school hygiene, and the types of school exercises. (A 
three-hour course.) 

3. The Director of the School of Education may, in his discre- 
tion, excuse a candidate from the professional courses outlined 
above (i) if the candidate is a normal school graduate or has taken 
equivalent courses in a normal school or in another college or uni- 
versity; or (2) if the candidate has had at least one year of suc- 
cessful teaching experience. If, at the time of registration with 
the Committee on Appointments, the candidate has not completed 
one of the required courses but is enrolled at that time in the 
course, a committee recommendation may be given with the ap- 
proval of the instructor in charge of the course. 

The courses mentioned in Section 2 of the above resolutions are 
(a) Education i. Introduction to Education, which is now offered 
as a three-hour course during either the first or the second semes- 
ter; and (b) Education 10, Observation and Technique of Teach- 
ing, a three-hour course. Education 10 may be taken either the 
first or the second semester. 



THE SCHOOL OF RAILWAY 

ENGINEERING AND 

ADMINISTRATION 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The School of Railway Engineering and Administration has 
been established to prepare men broadly for the technical and ad- 
ministrative departments of railroads. The work offered is ar- 
ranged in five different courses, any one of which is designed to 
occupy four years* time. The courses are : 

Railway Civil Engineering 

Railway Mechanical Engineering 

Railway Electrical Engineering 

Railway Transportation 

Railway Traffic and Accounting 

The first three of these courses are administered by the College 
of Engineering, and a description of them appears with that of 
other courses offered by this College. Students are admitted to 
them under the same conditions as to other courses of the College 
of Engineering, and they have available for their use all of the li- 
brary, drafting-room, and laboratory facilities which constitute the 
equipment of this College. The last two courses are administered 
by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ; they are described in 
detail in connection with the other courses of this College. Stu- 
dents are admitted to them under the same conditions as to other 
courses of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

It is the purpose of each of these courses to add to the broad 
foundation of discipline and training which should be supplied by 
every college course such specialized training as will be most useful 
to those who look forward to careers in railway service. 



241 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



The military instruction is under the charge of an officer of 
the United States Army, The course as a whole has special ref- 
erence to the duties of officers of the line. A full supply of arms 
and ammunition is furnished by the War Department, including 
1,200 U. S. magazine rifles (model 1898) and accouterments, two 
field pieces of artillery, and full equipment for a signal corps and 
a hospital corps. 

Every male student under twenty-five years of age, able to per- 
form military duty, and not excused for sufficient cause, is required 
to drill twice each week until he has gained credit for four semes- 
ter hours. He is also required to study drill regulations for in- 
fantry, and to recite upon the text once a week until he gains 
credit for one semester hour. 

The practical instruction begins as soon as possible after a 
student enters the University. The standings in study and drill 
are placed on record with other class credits ; one semester of 
recitations and drill counts two hours, and the three remaining 
semesters of drill three hours. This work is required for gradua- 
tion in all the undergraduate colleges of the University. 

The regiment, four battalions of four companies each, is com- 
posed mainly of the members of the freshman and sophomore 
classes. The non-commissioned officers are usually selected from 
the sophomore class, the lieutenants from the junior class, and 
the field officers and captains from the senior class and graduate 
school. There are 1,650 cadets and seventy-one commissioned 
officers in the regiment. 

Artillery and signal detachments are organized mainly from 
those students of the second year or sophomore class who have 
made more than an average standing in the work of the previous 
year. 

A special military scholarship, good for one year, is open to 
each student who attains the grade of a commissioned officer; 
its value is paid to the holder at the close of the year. Appoint- 
ments in the regiment are made on the nomination of the com- 
mandant of cadets confirmed by the Council of Administration. 

342 



Military Science 243 

Towards the close of the year a committee appointed by the 
President of the University examines candidates for nomination 
to the Governor of the State to receive commissions as brevet 
captains in the State militia. Candidates must be members of the 
senior class in full standing at the time of this examination; must 
have completed the course of military studies ; must have served 
two semesters as commissioned officers ; and must be approved 
by the Council of Administration as having good reputations as 
scholars, officers, and gentlemen. 

The uniform is of cadet gray, the coat trimmed with black 
mohair braid, the trousers with black cloth stripe, cut after the 
U. S. Army pattern. During warm weather a blue flannel shirt is 
worn instead of the coat. In order that all uniforms worn at the 
University may be, in quality, make, and finish, in strict accord- 
ance with the specifications adopted by the Board of Trustees, all 
students enrolled in the military department are required to ob- 
tain them from that firm only that may, for the time being, be un- 
der agreement and bond with the Trustees to furnish said uniforms 
at a stated price and of standard quality. 

The University military band is composed of students, and 
every full term of service therein is counted as one term of drill. 
Those who play in the band after having earned their five mil- 
itary credits necessary for graduation have their incidental fees re- 
mitted at the end of each 3'ear. Besides giving several concerts 
during the year, the band furnishes music for regimental forma- 
tions and ceremonies and other occasions as required by the Pres- 
ident of the University. Membership is decided by competitive 
examination. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 



FOR MEN 



The object of the work in this department is to preserve and 
improve the bodily health of the students by rational exercises and 
to teach proper intercollegiate sports. Regular classes are formed 
in swimming and fencing and for drill on the various gymnasium 
appliances. Lectures are given on personal hygiene. 

All competitive athletic games are under the direct supervision 
of the Director of Physical Training, and an examination is re- 
quired to show that membership on any team will not cause in- 
jury, but will tend to improve the physical condition. No student 
whose class work is unsatisfactory is allowed to play on a Uni- 
versity team. 

For a description of the Men's Gymnasium, see page 72. 

FOR WOMEN 

The object of the work of this department is to preserve and 
improve the general health, carriage, and co-ordination of the 
young women of the University. Each student is given a physical 
examination; suitable exercise is prescribed and advice given. 

The class work embraces corrective, hygienic, and recreative 
exercise, including free and light gymnastics, marching, fancy 
steps, games, and Maypole. Tennis, hockey, basket-ball, volley- 
ball, German-ball, and quoits are played in season. 

The gymnasium is open at certain hours and under suitable re- 
strictions to all women of the University. The uniform con- 
sists of black serge bloomers, white cotton blouse, black tie, and 
gymnasium shoes. 

The swimming pool is open daily, except Saturday, from 10 to 
12 a. m. and from 2 to 5 p. m. The regulation swimming suit of 
one piece must be made of either denim or mohair. 

For a description of the Women's Gymnasium, see under 
Woman's Building, page ^2. 



244 



THE SUMMER SESSION 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President of The University 
William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D., Director of The Summer 
Session 

STAFF OF INSTRUCTION— 1913 

John Adams, A.M., F.C.P., Professor of Education, University of 
London 

Lewis Flint Anderson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

Leonard Porter Ayres, Ph.D., Russell Sage Foundation, New York 
City 

William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Clarence William Balke, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic 
Chemistry 

Daniel Otis Barto, B.S., Associate in Poultry Husbandry 

Philip Stephan Barto, A.M., Assistant in German 

Herbert Jewett Barton, A.M., Professor of the Latin Language 

and Literature 
Edward Bartow, Ph.D., Professor of Sanitary Chemistry 
Frederick Charles Bauer, B.S., Instructor in Soil Fertility 
James Edgar Bell, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 
Alice Biester, A.B., Assistant in Household Science 
Simeon James Bole, A.M., Instructor in Pomology and Assistant 

in Plant Breeding 

Robert Lacy Borger, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics 

Walter Albert Buchen, xA..B., Assistant in English 

David Hobart Carnahan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 

Frederick Walton Carpenter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Zoology 
George Ernest Carscallen, A.M., Assistant in Mathematics 

245 



246 The Summer Session 

Lotus Delta Coffman, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Arthur Charles Cole, Ph.D., Instructor in History 

William Walter Cort, A.M., Instructor in Biology, Colorado Col- 
lege 

James Perry Coyle, A.B., Assistant in Physics 

Arthur Robert Crathorne, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics 

Harold Fordyce Crooks, Instructor in Swimming 

Clarence George Derick, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry 

Daniel Kilham Dodge, Ph.D., Professor of the English Language 
and Literature 

George William Dowrie, A.M., Assistant in Economics 

Charles Elmer Durst, M.S., Assistant in Olericulture 

Frederick Ellis, Instructor in Wood Working 

Newton Edward Ensign, A.B., B.S., Instructor in Theoretical and 
Applied Mechanics 

Stanley Prince Farwell, M.S., Instructor in Theoretical and 
Applied Mechanics 

Georgia Fleming, B.S., Assistant in Household Science 

Justus Watson Folsom, D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Raymond Garfield Gettell, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science, 
Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut 

Ernest Milton Halltday, A.B., LL.B., Associate in English 

Edward Gary Hayes, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 

Felix Emil Held, A.M., Assistant in German 

Mary Hill, Assistant in Art and Design 

B Smith Hopkins, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

Charles Frederick Hottes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant 
Physiology 

Harrie Stuart Vedder Jones, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish 

Lloyd Theodore Jones, A.M., Assistant in Physics 

Oliver Kamm, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 

Armin Hajman Koller, Ph.D., Instructor in German 

Philip Augustus Lehenbauer, A.M., Assistant in Botany 

Otto Eduard Lessing, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German 



Staff of Instruction 247 

Mark H Liddell, formerly Professor of English, University of 
Texas 

Ingebright L Lillehei, A.m., Assistant in Romance Languages 

Ruth Marshall, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Head of the 
Department of Biological Science, Rockford College 

Oscar Ross Martin, A.B., Assistant in Economics 

WiLFORD Stanton Miller, A. M., Assistant in Education and Secre- 
tary of the School of Education 

Charles Henry Mills, D.Mus., F.R.C.O., F.A.G.O., Professor of 
Music 

Aretas Wilbur Nolan, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Agri- 
cultural Extension 

William Abbott Oldfather, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classics 

Joseph C Park, Director of Industrial Education, Oswego, New 
York 

Maud Edna Parsons, A.B., Assistant in Household Science and Di- 
rector of Lunch Room 

David Leslie Patterson, B.S., Associate Professor of History, Uni- 
versity of Kansas 

Harry Gilbert Paul, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of the English 
Language and Literature 

Alvah Peterson, B.S., Assistant in Entomology 

Oscar Alan Randolph, B.S., Assistant in Physics 

Maurice Henry Robinson, Ph.D., Professor of Industry and 
Transportation 

Sidney Archie Rowland, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 

Harold Ordway Rugg, B.S., C.E., Instructor in General Engineer- 
ing Drawing 

George Rutledge, A.M., Research Assistant in Mathematics 

David Leonard Scroggin, Instructor in Machine Shop Practise 

George Wallace Sears, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry 

Fred B Seely, B.S., Instructor in Theoretical and Applied Mechan- 
ics 
William Herschel Smith, M.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 
Earle Kenneth Strachan, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Arthur Jerrold Tieje, Ph.D., Instructor in English 



248 The Summer Session 

Earle Horace Warner, A.B,, Assistant in Physics 
Henry Charles Paul Weber, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry 
Elmer Howard Williams, Ph.D., Associate in Physics 
Ruth Marshall, Ph.D., Instructor in Ornithology 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Summer Session o£ the University of Illinois for 1913 
opened on June 16, and closed on August 8, making a term of eight 
weeks. The Summer Session of 1914 will open on June 22, and 
close on August 14. 

All of the courses extend through the eight weeks. Students 
who wish to remain for only six weeks may obtain from the Di- 
rector of the Session a certificate of such attendance, but university 
credit will not be given for six-weeks courses. 

Students may register for courses aggregating eight credit hours 
or less. 

The primary purpose of the Summer Session is to meet the 
needs of teachers in the public schools who wish to spend a part of 
the summer vacation in study or investigation. The greater number 
of courses offered are designed particularly for high school teachers, 
supervising officers, and teachers of special subjects (art, music, 
manual training, domestic science, agriculture, etc.), and for college 
instructors, school supervisors, and principals who are working for 
advanced degrees. At the same time, students who may not fall 
within these groups are welcomed, and several courses of a more 
general nature are provided to meet their needs. 

PREPARATION FOR STATE TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

To teachers who desire to make thoro preparation for the State 
certificate examinations, the Summer Session offers marked ad- 
vantages, especially in connection with the professional subjects. 

The examination will be held July 21 and 22, 1914. Candidates 
for the "General Certificate" must take the examination in Spring- 
field. The "State Elementary-School Certificate," the "State High- 
School Certificate," and the "State Supervisory Certificate" may be 
obtained by examinations held on the above dates at the University 
of Illinois, provided that at least fifteen applicants notify the State 
Superintendent, prior to June 10, 1914, of their wish to take the ex- 
amination here. Further information concerning the examinations 



Courses in Library Training 249 

may be obtained by addressing Hon. F. G. Blair, State Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction, Springfield, Illinois. 

GRADUATE WORK IN THE SUMMER SESSION 

During the past three years the Summer Session has placed in- 
creasing emphasis upon graduate courses leading to the master's 
degree. The various departments which are closely related to high 
school teaching and to educational administration have been selected 
as the centers of this emphasis. An attempt is made to vary the 
graduate offerings from year to year so that advanced students each 
year may find acceptable work in their chosen fields. 

The normal requirement for the master's degree is full work of 
graduate grade, satisfactorily completed, through one year of resi- 
dence. This means a residence of thirty-six weeks at the Univer- 
sity. Qualified graduate students may fulfill this residence require- 
ment in four summer sessions of eight weeks each and an additional 
four weeks* study at the University under the direction of the per- 
son in charge of the major work. Thus a student, by working at 
the University for one week before or after each session under the 
direction of the professor in charge of his major subject, may earn 
the master's degree in four summers. 

In certain cases it will be possible for the graduate student to 
complete the last fourth of his residence requirement under a leave 
of absence. This privilege may be granted in the event that the stu- 
dent is able to take advantage of opportunities for research and in- 
vestigation that are not afforded in the University community. Su- 
perintendents, principals, and class-room teachers frequently find it 
possible to carry on investigations in connection with their school 
work. There are, for example, numerous problems of school admin- 
istration and of teaching for which the public school itself forms the 
only available "laborator\'." Where the investigation of such prob- 
lems is prosecuted with the co-operation of a department of the Uni- 
versity, it may be possible to count the work toward the master's 
degree. 

SUMMER COURSES IN LIBRARY TRAINING 

Beginning Monday, June 22, 1913, and continuing for six weeks 
the Library School conducted a Summer Session to which were ad- 
mitted only those actually employed as librarians or library assist- 
ants, or under definite appointment to serve in such positions. The 



250 The Summer Session 

curriculum is planned to meet especially the needs of workers in 
public libraries and in high school libraries of Illinois, and no tuition 
fee is charged students entering from this State ; students entering 
from libraries in other states pay a tuition fee of $12. The work 
is under the general direction of the faculty of the Library School. 

FEES 

A tuition fee of twelve dollars ($12) is required of all students 
in regular attendance at the Session. This entitles one to admis- 
sion to regular courses and to all special lectures. An extra labo- 
ratory fee is charged in some courses for materials used. Any 
single course may be taken for a fee of six dollars ($6) and the 
laboratory fee, if there be any in connection with the course taken. 
A single course is understood to mean not more than two and 
one-half credit hours. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

By ruling of the Board of Trustees of the University, all high 
school teachers in Illinois, and all other teachers in the State who 
are qualified to matriculate in the University as regular students, 
are entitled to Summer Session scholarships, exempting them from 
payment of the tuition fee. To matriculate regularly in the Uni- 
versity, one must either pass the entrance examinations, or present 
a certificate from an accredited high school or other evidence show- 
ing the completion of the requisite amount of preparatory work. 

By a more recent resolution of the Board of Trustees, the 
scholarship privilege is extended to persons graduating from the 
Illinois State normal schools during the academic year preceding 
the Session in which the scholarship is desired and to persons 
(otherwise qualified) who have not been teachers, but who are un- 
der contract to teach in the State during the coming year. 

Application blanks for scholarships may be obtained from the 
Director. 

REGISTRATION 

Students will present themselves for registration on Monday, 
June 22, 1914. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES— SUMMER SESSION OF 1913 

Explanation of Abbreviations 

"S," which is prefixed to each of the courses offered, means 
"summer," and is used to distinguish such courses from those of 
the same number offered during the regular college year. 



Slimmer Session Courses 251 

The number in parenthesis after each course indicates the num- 
ber of hours of credit given. For a definition of the term "credit 
hour," see page 307. 

There are usually two lectures, recitations, or laboratory pe- 
riods for each credit hour. 

Unless otherwise stated each course extends through the eight 
weeks of the session. 

The asterisk (*) indicates those courses for which graduate 
credit is granted. Only courses so marked count toward the mas- 
ter's degree. The credit in hours indicated for such courses has 
reference only to undergraduate students. Graduate students are 
not granted credit in terms of semester hours. 

ACCOUNTANCY 
(See Economics) 

AGRICULTURE 

Assistant Professor Nolan, Mr. Barto, Mr. Bauer, Mr. Smith, 

Mr. Durst, Mr. Bole 

The work in the summer session of the University is planned 
to meet the needs of teachers in the elementary and high schools, 
teaching agriculture. Courses in the elements of agriculture are 
outlined to cover suggestive work in high school agriculture. 

S I. Farm Crops. — Classification of farm crops; detailed 
studies of the principal grain crops, and forage crops ; enemies of 
farm crops; crop rotation; etc. (2^2). Mr, Bauer 

S 2. Soils and Soil Fertility. — Soil conditions essential to 
plant growth ; elements of plant food ; sources and supply of ni- 
trogen, organic matter, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. The 
Illinois system of permanent agriculture. (2^). Mr. Bauer 

S 3. History of Domestic Animals. — Origin, development, and 
management of the various kinds of live stock. This course is 
designed primarily for secondary school teachers. (2^). 

Mr. Smith 

S 4. Fundamentals of Live Stock Judging. — The names and 
location of external parts of the various kinds of live stock ; the 
use of the score card; comparative judging as a method; breed 
identification; types of farm animals. (2^). Mr. Smith 



252 The Summer Session 

S 5. Orchard and Garden. — Principles of orcharding; the 
home orchard from planting to bearing ; caring for fruit trees ; 
the home vegetable garden, (2j/^). Mr. Durst, Mr. Bole 

S 6. Special Farm Problems. — Poultry. Types and breeds of 
poultry; improving and fixing desired strains; care and feeding; 
poultry houses; raising young chicks. (2J/2). Mr. Barto 

S 7. Secondary x\griculture. — One-year course. A general 
course in the elements of agriculture, designed to cover the work 
offered in a year's high school course. Type studies of farm crops, 
fruits, animals, soils, business, and special farm problems prac- 
tical for school work. {2Y2). Assistant Professor Nolan 

S 8. Agricultural Education and Rural Life Problems. — 
Conferences and discussions of the problems of public school agri- 
culture ; the use of text-books, laboratory equipment, and lands ; 
courses of study, extension activities, community work, and coun- 
try life education, (i). Assistant Professor Nolan 

ART AND DESIGN 
Miss Hill 

S I. Elementary. — Form drawing from still life, cast, and 
nature; principles of outline and shading in pencil, charcoal, and 
crayon; lectures on the principles of perspective. (2). Miss Hill 

S 2. Light and Shade. — Shaded drawing in monochrome. 
(2). Miss Hill 

Prerequisite : Art and Design i. 

S 4. Water Color Painting, — Still life; flowers; landscapes. 
(3). Miss Hill 

Prerequisite : Art and Design i, 2. 

S 20. Art for the Common Schools. — The planning and exe- 
cution of work in the several divisions of common school art study ; 
design; black-board drawing. (2). Miss Hill 

BIOLOGY 

(See Botany, Zoology, and Entomology) 

BOTANY 
Assistant Professor Hottes, Mr. Lehenbauer 

S 21, Plant Physiology. — The more important physiological 
processes of plants. Text: Coulter, Barnes, and Cowles, Vol, 2. 
A Text-hook of Botany. (Laboratory fee $1.00.) (2). 

Assistant Professor Hottes, Mr, Lehenbauer 



Summer Session Courses 253 

Prerequisite: Entrance credit in botany or its equivalent. 

S 22. Botanical Microtechnique. — Methods of collecting, fix- 
ing, and staining of algae and fungi, and the preparation of per- 
manent slides ; the treatment of woods and other hard tissues for 
sectioning; the preparation of permanent sections of leaves, stem, 
and root tips by the paraffin and celloidin processes ; the methods 
of staining for a study of tissues and cell division. Text: Cham- 
berlain's Methods in Plant Histology, third edition, 1911. (Labo- 
ratory fee $2.00). (2) 

Assistant Professor Hottes, Mr. Lehenbauer 

Prerequisite : Botany S-21 or its equivalent. 

S 23. Heredity and Evolution. — Organic evolution with spe- 
cial reference to variation, selection, and hybridization in plants; 
the variation and correlation in plant structures. Text: Lock's 
Recent Progress in the Study of Variation, Heredity and Evolu- 
tion, new edition. (Laboratory fee $1.00). (2). 

Assistant Professor Hottes 

Prerequisite : 2 credit hours in botany or zoology. 

courses for graduates 

*S loi. Cytology. — The influence of external agents on the 
cell; investigation; reports and discussions of current literature and 
research results. (Laboratory fee $1.50 to $3.00.) 

Assistant Professor Hottes 

*S 102. Physiology. — The effects of external stimuli on growth 
and movement; reports and discussions of recent literature and re- 
search results. (Laboratory fee $1.50.) 

Assistant Professor Hottes 

CHEMISTRY 

Assistant Professor Balke, Dr. Derick, Dr. Weber, Dr. Strachan, 
Dr. Hopkins, Mr. Bell, Mr. Sears, Mr. Kamm. 

Note : — Graduate students whose major subject is not chemistry 
or agriculture may take for their graduate work S 5a, S 9. S 9a, 
S 9b, S 14, S 13a, or S 31 and S 33. Students whose major subject 
is chemistry may take S 31, S 33 and S iii. 

S I. Elementary Chemistry. — General inorganic chemistry; 
non-metallic elements. Illustrated lectures; recitations; laboratory. 
Text: Alexander Smith's General Chemistry for Colleges. (5). 
Assistant Professor Balke, Dr. Hopkins, Mr. Sears, Mr. Kamm 



254 T^^he Summer Session 

S la and S ib. Inorganic Chemistry. — (For students who 
have had one j^ear of high school chemistry, or inorganic chemistry 
for engineering students.) (4). Assistant Professor Balke 

S 2. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry. — (Continuation of S i). 
The metallic elements, their compounds, and properties. Illustrated 
lectures; recitations. Alexander Smith's General Chemistry for 
Colleges. (2). Assistant Professor Balke 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i. 

S 3. Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures; recitations; laboratory-. 
Noyes and Smith's Qualitative Analysis. (3). Dr. Weber 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 

*S 5a. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric and 
volumetric methods ; stoichiometrical relations ; the fundamental 
laws of chemistr}'- and their applications to quantitative analysis. 
Talbot's Quantitative Chemical Analysis. (5). Dr. StrachAn 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 3. 

*S 9. Organic Chemistry. — The more typical and simple or- 
ganic compounds; important classes of derivatives of carbon. 
Moore's Outline of Organic Chemistery. (3). 

Dr. Derick, Mr. Kamm 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 2, 3. 

*S 9a. — Organic Synthesis. — The preparation of the typical 
compounds discussed in S 9. Noyes* Organic Chemistry for the 
Laboratory. (2). Dr. Derick, Mr. Kamm 

Prerequisite: S 9. 

*S 9b. Organic Synthesis. — Continuation of S 9a. Noyes' 
Organic Chemistry for the Laboratory. (2). Dr. Derick, Mr. Kamm 

Prerequisite: S 9a. 

*S 14. Organic Chemistry (advanced). — Lectures; recitations. 
Noyes' Organic Chemistry. (3) Dr. Derick 

Prerequisite: Chemistry S-9 or equivalent. 

Six and *S iii. Research. — Inorganic, physical, organic, or 
analytical chemistrj'. 

Assistant Professor Balke, Dr. Derick, Dr. Weber 
(Subject to approval of Graduate School Faculty.) 

*S 13a. Agricultural Analysis. — Gravimetric determination 
and separation of the more important constituents of soils, ferti- 
lizers, and agricultural products. Talbot's Quantitative Chemical 
Analysis. (5). Dr. Strachan 



Slimmer Session Courses 255 

S 15. Physiological Chemistry. — Food nutrients, the body 
tissues and fluids ; the urine, both normal and pathological ; the pro- 
cesses which take place in the animal body. Lectures ; demonstra- 
tions; conferences; practical work. (Open to both graduates and 
undergraduates.) Hammarsten's Text Book of Physiological Chem- 
istry; Hawk's Practical Physiological Chemistry. (5). 

Mr. MacArthur 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in chemistry-. 

S 17, Teachers' Course. — (i). Assistant Professor Balke 

*S 31. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — The more import- 
ant principles and methods of physical chemistry' and electro-chemis- 
try; numerous problems. Lectures; recitations. (3). Mr. Bell 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 2, 3 ; Physics i or 2a ; Mathematics 
8a. 

*S 31a. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — (3). Mr. Bell 
Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 2, 3; Physics i or 2a. 

*S 33. — Elementary Physical Chemistry. — Molecular weight 
of gases and solutions ; chemical equilibrium ; the electrical conduc- 
tivity of solutions; thermochemistry. (Laboratory to accompany 
course 31.) (2). Mr. Bell 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a; Physics 26 or 3. 

*S no. Water Supplies. — The sources of contamination of 
water supplies and the purification of water for potable or technical 
use. Five times a week. Professor Bartow 

GENERAL ENGINEERING DRAWING 

Mr. RuGG 

S I. Elements of Drafting. — Freehand and mechanical letter- 
ing; practise in the use of instruments on standard set of w'orking 
drawing plates ; tracing, machine sketching, isometric and oblique 
projection, and perspective. (Required of all engineering students.) 
Miller's Mechanical Drafting. (4). Mr. Rugg 

S 2. Descriptive Geometry. — Problems relating to the point, 
line, and plane ; the properties of surfaces ; intersections and devel- 
opments of surfaces. Miller's Descriptive Geometry. (4). 

Mr. Rugg 



256 The Slimmer Session 

ECONOMICS 

(Including Accountancy) 
Professor Robinson, Mr. Martin, Mr. Dowrie 

S 2. Principles of Economics. — The general principles of 
Economics, with special reference to the needs of teachers, gen- 
eral readers, and university students. (2). 

Professor Robinson, Mr. Martin 

Prerequisite : Two years of university credit. 

S 3. Banking. — The history and principles of banking, with 
special reference to present conditions in the United States ; bank- 
ing reform. (3). Mr. Dowrie 

Prerequisite: For university students, Economics i; for others, 
the permission of the instructor. 

S 25. Commercial Law. — The chief principles underlying the 
law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, partnerships, in- 
surance, etc. (This course is not accepted for credit for students 
in the courses in Business Administration.) (2). 

Professor Robinson 

S 26. Commercial Geography or Economic Resources and 
Products of Different Countries. — The more important products 
and industries of different countries, with special reference to the 
character and distribution of the resources and economic activ- 
ities and products of the United States. (2). Mr. Dowrie 

*S 107. The Corporation in Economic Evolution 

Professor Robinson 
Accountancy 

S I, II. Principles of Accountancy. — The accounting for va- 
rious types of business organization, such as the partnership, cor- 
poration, etc. ; the designing of accounting systems ; the treatment 
of bad debts, goodwill, depreciation, suspense, secret reserves, and 
the like. Open to teachers of bookkeeping and those who have 
had the first semester of Accountancy i or its equivalent. (2J/2). 

Mr. Martin 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Bagley, Professor Coffman, Professor Adams, Assist- 
ant Professor Anderson, Dr. Ayres, Mr. Miller 

(Courses S 7, S 13, S20, S22, S 24, S 125 are granted graduate 
credit upon the approval of the Executive Faculty of the Graduate 
School). 



Summer Session Courses 257 

S I. Principles of Education. — The function of education; 
formal and informal education; fundamental principles of physical 
and mental development and their relation to the art of teaching; 
a brief survey of standard methods of instruction. Bagley's Edu- 
cative Process. (3). Mr. Miller 

S 6. History of Education. — The development of educational 
theory and practise in their relation to the history of civilization. 
Monroe's History of Education, Brief Course. (2^/2) . 

Assistant Professor Anderson 

S 9. Educational Psychology, — Elementary course. Espe- 
cially designed to meet the needs of students preparing for the 
State-certificate examinations. Colvin and Bagley's Human Be- 
havior. (2). Professor Bagley 

S 15. School Hygiene. — The location and construction of 
school buildings; hygiene of lighting, heating, and ventilation; 
school furniture; hygiene of eyesight and hearing; fatigue; infec- 
tious diseases. (2). Professor Bagley 

S 16. Social Aspects of Education. — Need of a social point of 
view ; social agencies and social forces in relation to the school ; 
the social organization and the social mind of the school; the re- 
fractive power of the school; the school as a determinant of public 
opinion. (2). Professor Coffman 

S 21. Instruction and Control of Individuals and Classes. 
— Gradual adaptation of psychology to the needs of the teacher; 
child study and its danger; differences between individual and 
class instruction; factors in class instruction (last 4 weeks.) (i). 

Professor Adams 

S 23. Current Educational Movements. — The important so- 
cial and educational movements that are affecting public school 
methods and curricula; the health of school children; better adap- 
tation of school work to the needs of the individual; the applica- 
tion of simple scientific methods to educational problems ; the 
adaptation of school work to vocational needs, (i). 

Dr. Ayres, Professor Coffman 

*S 7. History of Industrial Education. — The conditions 
affecting the relation of industrial to general education; the origin 
and development of school methods of trade instruction; the 
movement for giving industrial occupations a place in the curric- 
ulum of the general school, (i). Assistant Professor Anderson 



258 The Summer Session 

*S 13. Educational Classics. — A critical and comparative 
study of the works on education, generally recognized as classics ; 
the educational writings of Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Montaigne, 
Milton, Locke, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbart, Froebel, Herbert 
Spencer, and others, (ij^). Assistant Professor Anderson 

*S 20. Supervision. — The limitations, types, functions, stand- 
ards, and devices of supervision. Lectures, assigned readings, spe- 
cial investigations. (2). Professor Coffman 

*S 22. Ideals and Their Place in Education. — Nature of 
mind ; nature of knowledge ; relation of mind to the external world ; 
relation between sensation and perception in education ; nature and 
origin of ideas; the laws of thought as thought, and their resolu- 
tion into one primary necessity ; consequent possibility of teach- 
ing; knowledge as moral organon. (Last 4 weeks.) (i). 

Professor Adams 

*S 24. Theory and Practise in the Measurement of Educa- 
tional Processes and Products. — The processes and applications 
of the newer scientific quantitative methods in education ; simple 
methods of measuring educational processes in terms of educa- 
tional results, (i). Dr. Ayres, Professor Coffman 

*S 125. Educational Psychology. — The monographic litera- 
ture on the educational aspects of instincts, habits, memory, atten- 
tion, and the higher thought processes. Professor Bagley 

Prerequisite.: Graduate standing and at least one year's under- 
graduate work in psychology and education. 

ENGLISH 



Professor Dodge, Professor Liddell, Assistant Professor Jones 
Assistant Professor Paul, Mr. Halliday, Dr. Tieje, Mr. Buchen 

A.— literature and language 

S 2a. Survey of English Literature. — Nineteenth Century 
Prose. (This course with S 2b is equivalent to the second half 
of English i as described in the general Description of Courses, in 
Part III. To be credited as such an equivalent, the two parts 
should be taken simultaneously.) (2). Professor Dodge 

Prerequisite: Entrance credit in English, or its equivalent 

S 2b. Survey of English Literature. — Nineteenth Century 
Poetry. (This course with S 2a is equivalent to the second half 



Summer Sessioji Courses 259 

of English i as described in the General Description of Courses, 

in Part III.) (2). Mr. Buchen 

Prerequisite: Entrance credit in English, or its equivalent. 

S 23. Introduction to Shakespeare. — (2). 

Assistant Professor Paul 

Prerequisite: One year of college English or an equivalent. 

S 30. Wordsworth and Shelley. — The Globe Wordsworth 
and the Cambridge Shelley. (2). Professor Liddell 

Prerequisite: Two years of college English or an equivalent. 

S 15. Teachers' Course. — Outlining a course in English; 
typical classics used in high schools; the correcting of themes; dis- 
cussion of present tendencies in English teaching. (2). 

Assistant Professor Paul 

Prerequisite: The consent of the instructor. 

*S 47. Introduction to Prose Fiction. — The origins of the 
various types of fiction, of English translations and imitations of 
foreign fiction before Richardson ; the development of technique 
with reference to a proper understanding of the modern novel. 
(2). Dr. TiEjE 

Prerequisite: Two years of college English or an equivalent. 

*S 7. Chaucer. — Skeat's Student's Chaucer. (2). 

Assistant Professor Jones 

Prerequisite: Two years of college EngUsh or an equivalent. 

*S 8a. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). — Bright's Anglo-Saxon 
Reader. (3). Professor Dodge 

Prerequisite: Two 3'ears of college English, or one year of 
English and one of German. 

*S 120. Shakespeare (Advanced Course). — The Tempest in 
Furness's Variorum or in the First Folio Edition. (2). 

Professor Liddell 

Prerequisite: Three years of college English. 

B. — rhetoric 

/. Composition 

S la. Rhetoric and Themes. — (This course is equivalent to 
the first semester of Rhetoric i as described in the general De- 
scription of Courses, in Part III.) Woolley's Handbook of Com- 
position and Scott and Denney's Paragraph Writing. (3). 

Mr. BucHEN 

Prerequisite: Entrance credit in English, or its equivalent. 



26o The Summer Session 

S lb. Rhetoric and Themes. — (This course is equivalent to 
the second semester of Rhetoric i as described in the general De- 
scription of Courses, in Part III.) Scott and Denney's Paragraph 
Writing. (3). Dr. Tieje 

Prerequisite : Rhetoric la or an equivalent. 

S 3. Advanced Composition. — Short themes with an occa- 
sional long theme. (2). Assistant Professor Jones 

Prerequisite : Rhetoric i or an equivalent. 

//. Public Speaking 

S 7a. Public Speaking. — Drill in breathing, articulation, and 
gesture; reading aloud; the delivery of memorized selections. 
(Equivalent to the first semester of Rhetoric 7 as described in the 
general Description of Courses, in Part III.) (2). Mr. Halliday 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric i or an equivalent. 

S 8. Interpretive Reading. — English classics selected from 
among those most frequently taught in the high school, (i). 

Mr. Halliday 

Prerequisite : Rhetoric 7 or an equivalent. 

S II. Oral Composition. — Individual practise, with criticism. 
(This course should be preceded or accompanied by course 7.) (i). 

Mr. Halliday 

Prerequisite : Rhetoric i or an equivalent. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Folsom, Mr. Peterson 

S I. General Field and Laboratory Course. — The essential 
facts of entomology, emphasizing those of economic importance. 
Lectures; laboratory studies; field observations. (For high school 
teachers.) Folsom's Entomology with Reference to Its Biological 
and Economic Aspects. (2^). Assistant Professor Folsom 

S 2. Advanced Course. — (2]^). Assistant Professor Folsom 

S 3. Economic Entomology. — Common injurious insects in all 
their stages of development; their injurious activities; approved 
methods of control. (Equivalent to the economic entomology [En- 
tomology 4] required of agricultural students.) (2^). 

Assistant Professor Folsom 



Summer Session Courses 261 

FRENCH 

Associate Professor Carnahan, Mr. Lillehei 

S I. Beginners' Course. — Pronunciation; grammar; composi- 
tion ; reading of easy texts. Fraser and Squair's Elementary French 
Grammar; Bacon's Une Semaine a Paris. (4). Mr. Lillehei 

S 2. Reading of Modern French. — Rapid reading of modem 
authors; composition; conversation. Comfort's Prose Composi- 
tion; Colomba, Merimee ; Pecheur d'hlande, Loti ; Le Juif Polonais, 
Erckman-Chatrian ; Hernani, Hugo. (2). 

Associate Professor Carnahan 

Prerequisite: French i or an equivalent. 

S 4. Advanced Composition and Conversation. — (i). 

Associate Professor Carnahan 

Prerequisite: Two years of university French or an equivalent. 

*S 10. History of French Literature. — Lectures with collat- 
eral reading, (i). Associate Professor Carnahan 

Prerequisite: Two years of university French or an equivalent. 

GERMAN 

Associate Professor Lessing, Dr. Koller, Mr. Barto Air. Held 

S I. Beginners' Course. — (4). 

Associate Professor Lessing, Mr. Held 
S 2. Intermediate Course. — (3). Mr. Barto 

Prerequisite: German i, or an equivalent. 

S 3. Prose Reading. — Reading of narrative prose ; sight trans- 
lation; composition. (3). Dr. Koller 

Prerequisite: German 3, or an equivalent. 

S 4. Readings from the Classics. — Lessing's Minna von Barn- 
helm, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans. (3). Mr. Barto 

Prerequisite: German 4, or an equivalent. 

S 5. Prose Composition. — Translation of ordinary- prose into 
German ; study of idiomatic constructions ; practise in free composi- 
tion in German, (ij^). Mr. Held 

Prerequisite: Two years' university work in German, or an 
equivalent. 

S 6. Modern Fiction. — Reading of modem authors, such as 
Keller, Meyer, and Storm. (2). Dr. Koller 



262 The Summer Session 

Prerequisite: Two years' university work in German, or an 
equivalent. 

S 9. Teachers' Course. — Place, aim, and scope of the study of 
German in the high school; discussion of methods and the chief 
difficulties in teaching German. Observation work in the beginners' 
course. (1). Dr. Koller 

Prerequisite: Three years* university work in German, or an 
equivalent. 

S II. History of German Literature from the Reformation 
TO the Present Time. — (2). Associate Professor Lessing 

Prerequisite: Three years' university work in German, or an 
equivalent. 

HISTORY 

Professor Ford, Dr. Cole 

S lb. European History, 1300-1648. — The Renaissance, the 
Protestant Revolution; the Thirty Years War; the beginnings of 
national States. Introductory course corresponding, for the period 
covered, to History I. (The course offered in 1914 will probably 
cover the modern period.) (2J/2). Professor Ford 

S 3c. American History, 1860-1868. — The Civil War; the Re- 
construction of the Southern States; American society and politics 
in the last years of the nineteenth century. (2J-4). Dr. Cole 

*S 22. The History of the United States, 1815-1845. — The 
Monroe Doctrine ; the westward movement ; Jacksonian Democracy 
and the Whig Party. (2;^). Dr. Cole 

Prerequisite: One college course in American History or its 
equivalent and Junior standing. 

*S loi. Investigation of Selected Topics. — Conferences with 
graduate students who desire guidance in research. Professor Ford 

Prerequisite: One college course in American History and reg- 
istration in the Graduate School. 

History in Secondary Schools. — Weekly conference of teachers 
of history and others. Dr. Cole 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

Miss BiESTER, Miss Parsons, Miss Fleming 

Foods. — The work offered in foods is of two grades. A, That 
designed for those who have studied or taught household science 



Summer Session Courses 263 

and wish to prepare themselves to teach it in high schools. B, Ad- 
vanced work dealing with the general subject of nutrition. 

S I. The sources and cost of foods; the cooking of various 
types of foods ; the combinations of food as shown in planning and 
service of meals. (Laboratory Fee, $2.00.) (i>4). Miss Biester 

S 2. The relative nutritive value of foods; the methods of esti- 
mating dietetic values ; the relation of foods to the human body. 
(Laboratory Fee, $2.00.) (iH)- Miss Biester 

Prerequisite: One year's work of college rank with foods; one 
year of general chemistry; a course in general physiology. 

S 3. Lunch Room Management. — The history of the move- 
ment to feed school children ; practise in lunch room management. 
(Laboratory Fee, $3.00.) (ij^). Miss Parsons 

Prerequisite: One year's training in food principles or an equiv- 
alent ; practical experience in house management and marketing. 

S 4. Clothing. — The textiles used in clothing ; demonstrations 
in the use of patterns; drafting; the cost and care of clothing; the 
use and care of sewing machines. Laboratory; lectures; discussions. 
(i). Miss Fleming 

5. Millinery, — The construction of frames of wire, buckram 
and cape net ; the covering and finishing ; the making of bows. 
Demonstrations; laboratory, (i). Miss Fleming 

LATIN 

Professor Barton, Associate Professor Oldfather 

S I. Terence. — The reading of two plays, w^ith proper atten- 
tion to language, verse, and scenic antiquities. (iH)- 

Associate Professor Oldfather 

Prerequisite: Three or four years of high school Latin. 

S 2. Cicero. — Readings from his philosophical works and es- 
says. (iH)- Associate Professor Oldfather 

Prerequisite: Two or three years' university work in Latin, 
or an equivalent. 

*S 3. Suetonius. — Readings f r^m the Caesars ; biography, lit- 
erary work, and style of Suetonius, (i). 

Associate Professor Oldfather 



264 The Summer Session 

S 4. Teachers' Course. — The problems and methods of instruc- 
tion in Latin in the secondary schools; the essentials of Latin study 
in the first and second years; books and equipment. {1Y2). 

Professor Barton 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Miss Bond, Mr. Reece, Miss Bateman 

Note: — The courses indicated covered six weeks and received 
no university credit. Only people employed in libraries were ad- 
mitted. 

S I. Classification; Cataloging; Book Numbers. — Five times 
a week. 

S 2. Reference Work. — The selection and use of reference 
books suited to the small public library. Twice a week. 

S 3. Selection of Books. — Principles of book selection and 
lectures on subject bibliography. Tzvice a week. 

S 4. Work with Children. — Selection and discussion of chil- 
dren's books; administration of children's libraries; classification 
and cataloging. Twice a week. 

S 5. Order and Accession; Loan Department; Binding and 
Repair. Twice a week. 

S 6. Library Administration and Extension. Twice a week. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Mr. Park 

(See also Art and Design, General Engineering Drawing, and 

Mechanical Engineering) 

S I. Shop Administration. — History and theory of industrial 
education ; typical schools and systems of manual training leading 
to a better understanding of the aims and methods employed for 
the promotion of industrial education; organization of work; 
equipments and materials. (2^). Mr. Park 

S 2. Woodworking. — (A course for teachers in the 7th and 
8th Grades and high schools.) Tools — uses, names of parts, adjust- 
ments, care, how to sharpen; the making of important joints used 
in wood construction; the designing and making of arts and crafts 
furniture ; notebook work, covering talks, papers, problems, work 
at the bench. (3). Mr. Park 



Summer Session Courses 265 

S 3. Woodworking. — Advanced work in cabinet making ; de- 
signing and making furniture ; hand-wrought copper or brass drawer 
pulls, door pulls, hinges, etc.; wood turning. (3). Mr. Park 

Prerequisite: Manual Training S 2. 

MATHEMATICS 
Dr. Crathorne, Dr. Borger, Mr. Carscallen, Mr. Rowland, Mr. 

RUTLEDGE 

S 2. Algebra. — (Equivalent to Mathematics 2). Algebraic re- 
ductions ; variables and functions ; equations ; inequalities ; mathe- 
matical induction ; variation ; progressions ; complex numbers ; lim- 
its; infinite series; undetermined coefficients. (Theory of equa- 
tions will be given with Math. S 6.) Rietz and Crathorne's Col- 
lege Algebra. (3). Dr. Crathorne 

S 4. Plane Trigonometry, — (Equivalent to Mathematics 4.) 
Rothrock's Elements of Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. (2). 

Dr. BoRGER 

S 6. Analytical Geometry. — (Equivalent to Mathematics 6.) 
Plane and solid analytic geometry; theory of equations; graphs. 
Rigg's Analytic Geometry. (5). Mr. Rutledge 

S 7. Differential Calculus. — (Equivalent to Mathematics 
7.) Townsend and Goodenough's Essentials of Calculus. (5). 

Mr. Rowland 

S 9. Integral Calculus, — (Equivalent to Mathematics 9.) 
Townsend and Goodenough's Essentials of Calculus. (3). 

Mr. Carscallen 

*S 10. Theory of Equations and Determinants, — Funda- 
mental properties of an algebraic equation in one unknown; simul- 
taneous equations; linear equations; determinants, (3). 

Dr. Borger 

*S 20. Calculus of Variations. — The necessary and sufficient 
conditions for a maximum or a minimum of a definite integral ; the 
methods of Weierstrass, Kneser, and Hilbert applied to geometrical 
and physical problems. (3). Dr. Crathorne 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

(See also Manual Training). 
Mr. Ellis, Mr. Scroggin 

S I. Pattern-Shop. — The care and use of tools ; the con- 
struction of patterns, core-boxes, and the use of machines such 



266 The Summer Session 

as are found in modern pattern-shops, (3). Mr. Ellis 

S 3. Machine-Shop. — Chipping and filing ; elementary work 

on lathe, drill press, shaper, planer and grinding machine. (2J/2). 

Mr. SCROGGIN 

S 4. Advanced Machine-Shop. — The use of milling machine, 
screw machine, gear cutter, boring mill, and turret lathe ; erecting 
and testing machines and gas engines. (2J/2). Mr. Scroggin 

Note : Lectures on tools and shop processes are given frequent- 
ly, and inspection trips to shops in the local and adjoining towni- 
are made in connection with all classes in shop practise. A student 
may finish one full year's work in the shop during the summer 
term. 

MECHANICS, THEORETICAL AND APPLIED 

Mr. NoERENBERG, Mr. Farwell, Mr. Ensign 

S 7. Analytical Mechanics. — The first half of Analytical 
Mechanics as given in Maurer's Technical Mechanics. (3). 

Mr. Noerenberg 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7; registration in Mathematics 9. 

S 8. Analytical Mechanics. — The second half of Analytical 
Mechanics as given in Maurer's Technical Mechanics. (2^). 

Mr. Ensign 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 9; T. & A. M. 7. 

S 9. Resistance of Materials. — Elementary mechanics of 
materials ; experiments and investigations in the materials labora- 
tory; problems in ordinary engineering practise. (Equivalent to T. 
and A. M. 9.) Merriman's Mechanics of Materials. (3^)- 

Mr. Ensign, Mr. Farwell 

Prerequisite: T. and A. M. 7; registration in T. and A. M. 8. 

S 10. Hydraulics. — The pressure and the flow of water and 
its utilization as motive power; the observation and measurement 
of pressure, velocity, and flow ; power and efficiency ; the deter- 
mination of experimental coefficients. Recitations ; laboratory. Hos- 
kin's Hydraulics. (3). Mr. Farwell 

Prerequisite: T. and A. M. 8. 

Note: With the opening of the hydraulic laboratory for the 
Summer School, arrangements may be made to use its facilities 
for special experimental work. 



Summer Session Courses 267 

S 14. Elements of Mechanics. — The principles of kinematics, 
kinetics, and statics and their application. Moreley's Mechanics for 
Engineers. (For architects and others who have not taken the 
calculus.) (4). Mr. Noerexberg 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2, 4. 

MUSIC 

Professor Mills 

S I. Theory and Harmony. — {lYi). Professor Mills 

S 2. Counterpoint and Fugue. — (2). Professor Mllls 

S 3. History, Appreciation and Form. — (i). Professor Mills 

S 5. Chorus. Professor Mills 

PHYSICAL TIL\IXIXG FOR MEN 

Mr. Crooks 
S 3. Swimming Instruction. Mr. Crooks 

PHYSICS 

Dr. Williams, Mr. Jones, Mr. Randolph, Mr. Warner 

Mr. Coyle 

S 2al. General Physics Part i. — Mechanics; laws of motion, 
forces, equilibrium. Experimental demonstrations ; recitations. Kim- 
ball's College Physics. {lYz). Dr. Williams, Mr. Jones 

Prerequisite: Plane geometn,' ; high school algebra; plane trig- 
onometry desired. 

S 2bl. Introductory Laboratory Physics Part i. — Physical 
measurements ; mechanics ; properties of matters. Schulz's Labo- 
ratory Manual (iVz). Mr. Jones, Mr. Warner, Mr. Coyle 

Prerequisite: Registration in S 2al. 

S 2aII. General Physics Part 2. — Electricity and magnetism. 
Experimental demonstrations; recitations. Kimball's College Phys- 
ics, (ij^) Dr. Williams, Mr. Jones 

Prerequisite: Same as for S 2al. 

S 2bII. Introductory Laboratory Physics Part 2. — Experi- 
ments in electricity and magnetism to accompany S 2aII. Schulz's 
Laboratory Manual, (i^). Mr. Jones, Mr. Warner, Mr. Coyle 

S 4. Advanced Electrical and Magnetic Measurements. — 



268 The Summer Session 

Laboratory; discussions; recitations; reports, (Equivalent to the 
first semester of Physics 4.) (2). Mr. Randolph 

Prerequisite: General physics; calculus. 

S 15. Electricity and Magnetism. — Lectures; recitations; lab- 
oratory. Brooks and Poyser's and Carhart and Patterson's Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism, (ij^). Mr. Randolph 

Prerequisite: A course in general physics. 

S 16. Heat. — Thermometry; calorimetry; vapor pressure; ex- 
pansion. Lectures ; demonstrations ; recitations ; laboratory. Edser's 
Heat. (iH)- Dr. Williams, Mr. Warner 

Prerequisite: A course in general physics. 

S 18. Laboratory Manipulation. — Practical problems involved 
in the equipment for laboratory physics; glass blowing; making of 
simple apparatus; handling of tools, (i). Mr. Jones 

Prerequisite : A course in general physics, enrollment in such a 
course, or teaching experience in physics. 

*S 31. Investigation of Special Problems. — Advanced work in 
heat; electricity; magnetism. Two to five times a week. 

Dr. Williams 
*S 133. Seminar and Thesis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Professor Gettell 
S I. American Government. — The historical development of 
the Constitution ; the organization and functions of the federal and 
state governments ; political parties ; municipal and colonial govern- 
ment. (2^). Professor Gettell 

S 2. Comparative Government. — The state; government; his- 
torical development ; organization, and actual workings of govern- 
ment in England, Germany, France, and the United States. (2j^). 

Professor Gettell 

PSYCHOLOGY 
(See Education and Psychology.) 

RHETORIC 
(See English.) 

SOCIOLOGY 
Professor Hayes 
*S I. Principles OF Sociology. — Lectures; discussions; assigned 
reading. (2). Professor Hayes 



Summer Session Courses 269 

S 5. Charities and Correction. — Causes, prevention, and treat- 
ment of poverty and crime. (2). Professor Hayes 
S 7. Social Problems of the Rural Community. — (i). 

Professor Hayes 

ZOOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Carpenter^ Dr. Ruth Marshall, Mr. Cort 

S 4, Elementary Vertebrate Zoology. — Classification of the 
Chordata ; early development of the vertebrate body ; comparative 
anatomy and physiology of the vertebrate organs. Lectures; labor- 
atory. (Laboratory fee, $2.50.) (4). 

Assistant Professor Carpenter, Mr. Cort 

S 16. Ornithology. — Identification; food relations; nesting 
habits; seasonal distribution. Lectures; field trips; laboratory. (2). 

Dr. Marshall 

*S 21. Introduction to Zoological Research. — Topics in ver- 
tebrate morphology', usually repeating the work of earlier investi- 
gators; histology of the nervous system. Conferences; laboratory; 
assigned readings. (Laboratory fee, $2.00.) (2 to 4). 

Assistant Professor Carpenter 

*S 121. Problems in Vertebrate Morphology. — Conferences; 
laboratory. (Laboratory fee, $2.00.) 

Assistant Professor Carpenter 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



For the faculty of the College of Law, see page 417; for the courses 
in law, page 87; for fees and expenses, pages 150 and 152. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

It is the aim of the College to furnish its students with such a 
training as will best fit them for the practise of the law. A mere 
knowledge of what the law is will not suffice. The student must 
learn the reasons which have made it what it is. These can be 
mastered only by studying the law in the light of its historical de- 
velopment. No special course is offered on the history of the law ; 
but it is sought to present each subject so that the principles peculiar 
to it may be historically understood. It is also the aim of 
the College that the courses shall be so presented as to familiarize 
the student with legal methods of reasoning and to equip him with 
legal habits of thought. It is believed that the case method of 
instruction, properly understood and applied, is best adapted to ac- 
complish these objects. 

ADMISSION 

With the exception of special students as defined below, appli- 
cants for admission to the College of Law in 1914-15 must have 
obtained credits for one year's work in another college of this Uni- 
versity or of some other institution of recognized standing ; pro- 
vided, however, that an applicant who lacks not more than four 
semester hours of such credit may be admitted on condition of 
making up the deficiency before beginning the second year of law 
study. 

NEW REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION, 1915-16 

The requirements for admission to the College of Law for the 
year 1915-16 and thereafter will be as follows : 

For admission as a regular student and candidate for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, an applicant must be matriculated and have 60 
hours of credit in a college of this University; or have completed 
two full years of work as given at another college or university 

270 



Preparatory Courses 271 

of recognized standing; or have received by transfer 60 hours of 
university credit here. 

The faculty of the College of Law may, in its discretion, pre- 
scribe from time to time subjects which shall be required as part of 
the preliminar>' college work, subject to approval by the University 
Senate. 

A student who is 21 years of age and is entitled to admission as 
a regular student to another college of this University, will be ad- 
mitted as a special student in the College of Law\ If he attains in 
the courses of the first year an average grade of 80 or over, he will 
be admitted to regular standing, and he may receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws if in all the courses he presents for the degree his 
average grade is 80 or more. 

Note: The above is not intended to abrogate the present rule in 
regard to the admission of special students (page 272). 

SUGGESTED PREPARATORY COURSES 

Below is given a schedule of studies recommended by the faculty 
of the College of Law for students taking one year in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences to meet the present (1914-15) require- 
ment for admission to the College of Law. 

A schedule of studies covering two years is added for the guid- 
ance of those who take two years of pre-legal work, as required 
for 1915-16 and thereafter. 

One Year Course in Preparation for Law 

First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Military 2 1 Military 1 and 2 2 

Phys. Training 1 and la 1 Physical Training 1 1 

Rhetoric 1 3 Rhetoric 1 3 

Foreign Language 4 Foreign Language 4 

History 1 4 History 11 3 

Economics 7 3 Mathematics 2 3 

Total 16 Total 16 

The courses in Militar>^ and Physical Training and Rhetoric i and 
eight hours in foreign language are required of freshmen in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Latin is strongly urged for all 
students intending to study law ; but those who have not had the 
necessary preparation for college courses in Latin should substitute 
a modern language, preferably French or German. Tho credit 
is usually not given for a single semester's work in History i, ar- 



2.^2 The College of Law 

rangements have been made with the department of history by which 
a student taking only one year of work in preparation for law will 
receive credit for the first semester of History i provided that in the 
second semester he also receives credit in History ii. 

Two Year Course in Preparation for Law 

Students who give two years to preparatory work are recom- 
mended to take the schedule given below. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Military 2 1 Military 1 and 2 2 

Phys. Training 1 and la 1 Physical Training 1 1 

Rhetoric 1 3 Rhetoric 1 3 

Foreign language 4 Foreign langviage 4 

Economics 7 3 History 11 3 

Science 5 Mathematics 2 3 

Total 17 Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Military 2 1 Military 2 1 

Science or foreign language 5 or 4 English 20 4 

Political Science 1 3 Political Science 3 3 

Economics 1 5 Economics 3 3 

History 3 3 Philosophy 1 3 

History 3 3 



Total 16 or 17 Total _ 17 

COMBINED COURSE IN LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

AND LAW 

By the proper selection of his studies it is possible for a prospec- 
tive law student to take both the degree in arts and the degree in 
law in six years. (See page 172). 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students twenty-one years of age, or over, who are not able to 
satisfy the regular requirements for admission, but who have had a 
preliminary education which would entitle them to take the Illinois 
State Bar Examination, may, by permission of the faculty, be ad- 
mitted without examination as special students, but no such student 
may be a candidate for a degree. In exceptional cases, other per- 
sons may, by permission of the faculty, be admitted as special stu- 
dents. 

No one may continue as a special student for more than two 
years except by special permission of the faculty, application for 
which should be made through the Dean. 



Instruction 273 

ADVANCED STANDING 

After matriculating, an applicant may obtain advanced standing 
(i) by transfer of credits from another accredited law school upon 
presentation of a certificate of honorable dismissal and a certified 
record of work done; or (2) by examination taken at the time of 
entrance to the College of Law in first year subjects only. 

INSTRUCTION 

Courses in substantive law are taught by analyzing and compar- 
ing cases which have been carefully selected and arranged in case 
books. References, however, are constantly made to leading text 
books, and they are recommended and in certain courses required 
for collateral reading. 

Courses in the law of procedure are taught from the leading text 
books, supplemented by the examination of statutes and adjudged 
cases, and students are brought into as close touch as possible with 
actual practise, both by the method of instruction in these courses 
and by means of the Moot Court. 

The instruction gives a t.horo training in the common law, which 
constitutes a proper foundation for the practise of law in any state. 

The faculty of the College is impressed with the idea that a state 
university should teach the law of the state which supports the 
school, and to that end, without neglecting the general principles 
that lie at the foundation of the common law, especial attention is 
given in all courses to grounding the student thoroly in the law as 
determined by the courts of Illinois. Throughout the entire course, 
the students are required to consult frequently Illinois decisions and 
statutes, which are made the basis of discussion in class by students 
and instructor. In the Moot Court and through the course in Illi- 
nois procedure, especial attention is paid to the rules of pleading and 
practise that obtain in the State of Illinois. 

MOOT COURT 

The sessions of the Moot Court are held every Monday after- 
noon of the first semester for the third year class; every Tuesday 
afternoon of the first semester for the second year class ; and every 
Monday afternoon of the second semester for the second and third 
year classes together. The Court is presided over by the Dean, who 
has had an experience of twenty-five years as a judge of the Circuit 
and Appellate Courts of Illinois* Attendance is compulsory with 
second and third year classes. It is the purpose to have the work- 



274 The College of Law 

§ngs of the Moot Court parallel proceedings in the various courts 
of the State. Students are trained in the preparation of legal docu- 
ments and in the trial of cases, both civil and criminal. 

The Moot Court Bulletin is published every other week of the 
college year, and in this are printed the statements of cases, the 
briefs of opposing counsel, and the opinions of the presiding judge. 

SPECIAL LECTURES 

Addresses by prominent members of the bench and bar on prac- 
tical features of the law are given from time to time during the 
year, 

THE LAW LIBRARY 

The Law Library contains 16,000 volumes, including all the re- 
ports of the courts of last resort of all the states ; the United States 
Supreme, Circuit, and District Court reports; the English reports; 
the Irish reports; the Scotch Appeal Cases; the Current Canadian 
and Australian reports, together with complete reports of several of 
the Canadian provinces; the statutes of the various states; digests 
of the state reports; several sets of special reports, such as the 
American Reports, American State Reports, American Decisions, 
Lawyers' Reports Annotated, and American Cases Annotated ; com- 
plete National Reporter System ; all the great Encyclopedias and 
Digests ; and a carefully selected collection of text books and legal 
periodicals. 

The library is growing rapidly, new sets of reports and new 
digests, text books, and periodicals being continually added, together 
with the continuations of the reports and periodicals already in the 
library. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION AND DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be granted to all regularly 
matriculated students who complete all the courses in the first year 
list; courses 8, 10, 11, 12, 18, 20, 26 (second year) ; courses 4a, 15, 
17, 19, 21, 22, 26, 31 (third year) ; and enough of the other courses 
offered to make 84 hours of credit. 

DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAW 

The degree of Doctor of Law (J. D.) will be granted to students 
who comply with the following conditions : 

I. Complete the work required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 



Graduation and Degrees 275 

2. Secure a bachelor's degree in arts or science at least two 
academic years prior to the completion of the course for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. 

3. Obtain a minimum average grade of 85 in the College of Law. 

4. Present a thesis approved by the faculty of the College of 
Law, in accordance with the requirement hereinafter set out 

Students who receive the A.B. degree after registering in the 
College of Law, and, by counting courses in law toward both the 
degree of A.B. and the degree of LL.B., take both degrees in six 
years, must during the first year in the College of Law take four 
hours in history or the social sciences. 

Rules concerning Theses 

The following are the rules concerning theses presented for the 
degree of Doctor of Law: i. The thesis must be on a subject ap- 
proved by the Dean of the College of Law after consultation with 
him as to the proposed method of treatment. 2. The subject of the 
thesis must be filed with the Secretary on or before December 20. 
3. The thesis must be typewritten on paper Sj^xii inches, with at 
least one inch margin at the top, bottom, and sides. 4. It should 
contain not less than 4,000 nor more than 10,000 words. 5. In 
citing cases, names of parties, volume, page, and year should be 
given. Citations are not to be counted in determining the number of 
words. The student is expected to exhaust the cases decided during 
the period covered by his thesis, and to state the period for which 
the cases have been examined. 6. The thesis must be delivered to 
the Secretary of the faculty not later than May i. 

The thesis may then be returned to the writer for revision, or if 
unsatisfactory, it may be rejected altogether. If returned for revi- 
sion it may be rejected after being revised. If accepted it will be 
filed in the Law Library, and may be published by the College of 
Law or by the University. 

CERTIFICATE FOR ADMISSION TO THE ILLINOIS STATE 

BAR EXAMINATION 

Any student, altho not a candidate for a law degree, if he 
has taken the following courses: i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, li, 12, 
18, 20, 26 (2nd and 3rd year), 4a, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, and 31, is entitled 
to a certificate thereof from the University, which certificate satisfies 
the requirements as to legal studies prescribed by the Supreme 
Court of the State of Illinois for admission to the bar. 



276 The College of Law 

COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF LL.B. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester: Contracts (Law i) ; Torts (Law 2); Criminal 
Law (Law s) ; Personal Property (Law 6). 

Second Semester: Contracts (Law i) ; Torts (Law 2); Real 
Property (Law 3) ; Common Law Pleading (Law 4) ; Domestic Re- 
lations (Law 7). 

SECOND year 

First Semester: Evidence (Law 8) ; Agency (Law 11) ; Equity 
(Law 12) ; Wills (Law 18) ; Moot Court (Law 26) ; Conveyancing 
(Law 29) ; Public International Law (Law 30) ; Insurance (Law 
28). 

Second Semester: Real Property (Law 10); Damages (Law 
13) ; Equity Pleading (Law 20) ; Moot Court (Law 26) ; Sales 
(Law 9) ; Carriers (Law 14) ; Future Interests in Property (Law 
27) ] Quasi-Contracts (Law 32) ; Public Service Companies (Law 
34)- 

THIRD YEAR 

First Semester: Illinois Procedure (Law 4a) ; Bills and Notes 
(Law 15) ; Partnership (Law 19) ; Constitutional Law (a) (Law 
22) ; Moot Court (Law 26) ; Mortgages (Law 23) ; Bankruptcy 
(Law 25). 

Second Semester: Trusts (Law 16); Private Corporations 
(Law 17) ; Suretyship (Law 21) ; Constitutional Law (b) (Law 
2,3) ; Moot Court (Law 26) ; Conflict of Laws (Law 31). 

PRIVILEGES OF STUDENTS 

The students of the College of Law may take, without extra fee, 
courses of study in other departments of the University, provided 
they secure the approval of the Dean of the College of Law. Espe- 
cial attention is called to the courses in public speaking and debate, 
and to the courses in history, economics, and political science in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School. 

Law students are entitled to library privileges in the general li- 
brary as well as in the law library, and possess in general all the 
rights and privileges enjoyed by other students of the University. 

LAW CLUBS 

The law students have organized voluntary associations for the 
discussion of interesting and important questions of law, and for the 



Scholarship Prises 277 

trial of hypothetical cases of their own choice. Four of these socie- 
ties are active at present. They are known as the Van Twiller, 
Witenagemot, John Marshall, and Fuller club courts. 

SCHOLARSHIP PRIZES 

Eight scholarship prizes are open to matriculated students of the 
first and second years, to be awarded at the end of each year, four 
of $50 each and four of $25 each, available in discharge of tuition 
fees. 

The American Law Book Company of New York offers an an- 
nual prize consisting of the Students' Edition of CYC, to be 
awarded to the member of the senior class making the best average 
during his senior year. 

Callaghan & Company, Law Publishers, of Chicago, offer an an- 
nual prize consisting of a set of Andrews American Law and Pro- 
cedure (2 vols.) to be awarded to the member of the second year 
class making the best average during his second year. 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



For the faculty of the College of Medicine, see page 43. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The College buildings are located in the city block lying between 
Harrison, Congress, Honore, and Lincoln streets in Chicago. The 
main building, in which are housed all the departments except that 
of anatomy, is a brick and stone structure two hundred feet long 
by one hundred and ten feet deep, and five stories high, fronting on 
four streets. This building contains three lecture rooms with a seat- 
ing capacity of two hundred each, a clinical amphitheater with a 
seating capacity of over three hundred, and an assembly hall with a 
seating capacity of seven hundred, besides recitation rooms. It also 
contains laboratories for physiology, chemistry, materia medica, 
therapeutics, and microscopical and chemical diagnosis, each capable 
of accommodating from fifty to one hundred students at a time. 

A three-story annex to the main building contains the labora- 
tories used by the departments of biology, histology, embryology, 
pathology, bacteriology, and chemistry. All of these laboratories 
have outside light. They are furnished with work tables, desks, and 
lockers, and are equipped with the necessary apparatus. There is 
a supply of microscopes, lenses, and oil immersions, and a projec- 
tion apparatus for the illustration of lectures by means of stereop- 
ticon views. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES 

Dispensary Clinics 

The Dispensary occupies the first floor of the main building. 
Connected with the reception room are ten clinic rooms. During 
the past year there have been treated in these rooms 21,000 patients. 

During the junior year each student is required to take a course 
of instruction in each department under the direction of members 
of the Faculty. The student has opportunity to examine and treat 
the patient himself under the guidance of the teachers 

278 



Clinical Facilities 279 

Amphitheater Clinics 

More than 600 clinics besides the dispensary clinics are given 
by the College during the collegiate year. Practically all diseases 
seen in the temperate zone are demonstrated and all of the opera- 
tions of surgery are performed in these clinics. 

Senior students are required to examine and diagnosticate many 
of these cases and are detailed to assist in the operations. 

Students are prohibited from doing work that interferes in any 
way with the fulfillment of the requirements of the curriculum. The 
official clinical requirements of the curriculum may not be sub- 
stituted by unofficial clinical work. 

Maternity Clinics 

The clinical work in obstetrics is given in the University Hos- 
pital and the Chicago Lying-in Hospital and Dispensary. Daily 
clinics, in which the management of gravidae and puerperae and 
new born infants is demonstrated, are held in the University Hos- 
pital. All senior students are required to attend these clinics in sec- 
tions two hours a day for a period of two weeks. During this serv- 
ice they are also assigned to two or more cases of labor in 
the hospital. An amphitheater clinic is also given once a week 
which is attended by each half of the class alternately for one 
semester. The class sections are admitted by ticket to emer- 
gency obstetrical operations during the term of their attendance in 
the amphitheater clinic. 

All fourth year students are also required to take a course of 
two weeks in residence in the Chicago Lying-in Hospital and Dis- 
pensary. Each student sees and conducts 6 to 10 cases in the 
homes of patients under the guidance of the assisting physicians. 
The student and nurse visit mother and babe daily for ten days 
afterwards. In this service the students learn to provide the 
necessary obstetrical outfit and to deal with patients in their homes 
Pathological cases in the Dispensary are cared for in the home 01 
in the hospital of the institution or in the University Hospital. 

The fee for the course is fifteen dollars ($15.00), payable ir 
advance at the Chicago Lying-in Hospital. 

Hospital Clinics 

Hospitals — The West Side Hospital is connected with the Col- 
lege by a corridor. The building is 50x100 feet, five stories high 
It contains 95 beds, two operating rooms, and a clinical amphithea- 
ter of seventy-five seats on the fifth floor. The new West Side 



28o The College of Medicine 

Hospital is a six story, fire-proof structure containing no beds, 
three operating rooms, two electric elevators, and a laboratory. 

The University Hospital, at Ogden avenue, Congress and Lin- 
coln streets, opposite the College, is a five-story building of fire- 
proof construction containing 92 beds, two operating rooms, and 
a clinical amphitheater of seventy-five seats on the first floor. 

These institutions are located near the College and certain clin- 
ical facilities, furnished by them, are open to its students. 

Within half a block of the College is the Cook County Hos- 
pital. This institution is the chief free hospital in Chicago. Dur- 
ing the past year it has cared for 30,000 patients. In this hospital 
is conducted much of the clinical instruction of the College. 

Medical appointments in this institution are made by the Civil 
Service Board each year. The internes, sixty-four in number, and 
externes are selected each spring by competitive examination. Only 
graduates of medical colleges of Cook County are eligible for these 
examinations. The internes serve eighteen months, and receive 
their board and laundry and have rooms in the hospital. They 
do a large amount of surgical, medical, and obstetrical work. 

In addition to Cook County Hospital, there are more than sixty 
public and private hospitals in Chicago. Each of these hospitals 
appoints from two to four internes annually. 

The students of this College are required to attend the clinics 
of the Cook County Hospital during their Junior and Senior years. 
The hospital tickets cost $5.00 each, and are for sale at the office 
of the Warden. They admit the holders to all clinics and autop- 
sies and to all public operations and lectures in the hospital grounds. 

The County Morgue is located in the hospital grounds, and 
daily post-mortems are held by the pathologists of the hospital. 
Attendance is required during two years. 

Members of the Faculty are connected with and give clinical 
instruction, to which students are admitted under certain condi- 
tions, in the following hospitals : 

Cook County Hospital St. Mary's Hospital 

West Side Hospital St. Luke's Hospital 

University Hospital Michael Reese Hospital 

Augustana Hospital 

QUINE LIBRARY 

The library is located in the College building. It was named 
in honor of the Senior Dean, William E. Quine. 



Admission 281 

The bound volumes now number more than 15,000 and include 
many of the important text-books and monographs on medical 
subjects in the English language. One hundred twenty medical 
periodicals are received. 

This collection of books and periodicals is systematically classi- 
fied and cataloged by a librarian who is constantly present to 
assist and instruct students in the use of a technical library. The 
proximity of the Ubrary to the class and lecture rooms mate- 
rially augments its value. 

ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission to the College of Medicine for the col- 
legiate year beginning September i, 1914, and thereafter, must offer: 

I. Fifteen (15) units of secondary credit, including prescribed 
subjects as follows: 

English 3 units 

Algebra i unit 

Plane geometry l unit 

German, French, Latin, or Greek 2 units 

American history and civics i unit 

Electives * 7 units 

Total 15 units 

II. Sixty (60) semester hours of collegiate credit, including 
prescribed subjects as follows : 

Physics 8 hours 

Chemistry 8 hours 

Biology 8 hours 

German or French 6 hours 

Electives 30 hours 

Total 60 hours 

Either the secondary or the collegiate requirements may be satis- 
fied (a) by certificate or (b) by examination. 

I. (a) Secondary credits will be accepted by certificate frorn 
the following sources : 

(i) From high schools and academies in the State of Illinois 
which are accredited to the University of Illinois. 

(2) From the state normal schools of Illinois and other nor- 
mal schools having equal requirements for graduation. 



282 The College of Medicine 

(3) From schools accredited by the North Central Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

(4) From schools accredited to the state universities which are 
included in the membership of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

(5) From schools approved by the New England College 
Entrance Certificate Board. 

(b) Secondary credits may be made hy examination: 

(i) In the examinations conducted by the Registrar of the 
University of Illinois at the University in Urbana in January, July, 
and September of each year. For programs of these examinations 
see pages 98, 99, 100. 

(2) In the examinations conducted by the Registrar of the 
University of Illinois at the College of Medicine in September of 
each year. In 1914 these examinations will be held September 23 
to 26. Programs may be had by applying to the Secretary of the 
College of Medicine, Congress and Honore Streets, Chicago. The 
subjects offered will be the same as those included in the list on 
page 99. For a description of the ground covered in the several 
subjects see pages 108-117. 

(3) In the examinations conducted in June of each year by 
the College Entrance Examination Board. See page 93. 

(4) In the examinations conducted by the Regents of the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York. 

II. Collegiate credits will be accepted hy certificate from recog- 
nized colleges which require for admission the completion of at least 
14 units of high school work in an accredited high school, or the full 
equivalent thereof, and for graduation, in addition, four years of 
college work; or may be made hy examination in the examinations 
conducted by the Registrar of the University of Illinois at the Col- 
lege of Medicine in September of each year. Special arrangements 
must he made in advance with the Registrar for examinations in 
collegiate suhjects. 

Students are strongly urged to acquire such an elementary 
knowledge of Latin as may be obtained in four or five years' work 
in school or college. 

Students lacking the prescribed college work in any one of the 
sciences (physics, chemistry, or biology) who have had a full year's 
work in that science in an accredited high school may be admitted 
to courses in these subjects to be offered at the College of Medicine 



Advanced Standing 283 

during the summers of 1914 and IQ15, which will be of assistance to 
them in preparing for examinations to remove these deficiencies. 

It will be noted that a properly prepared student of good ability 
can complete the minimum prescriptions in collegiate work within 
two years and still have considerable time for the study of language, 
history, economics, psychology, etc. — all subjects of which it is 
eminently desirable that the future physician should know some- 
thing. 

The abov£ represent the minimum requirements for admission 
to the College of Medicine. It is strongly urged that students shall 
have completed at least three years, or, if possible, four years, in a 
standard college before taking up the study of medicine. 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The general rule of the University will apply to the College of 
Medicine : Persons over twenty-one years of age, not candidates 
for a degree, may, on special approval of the dean, be admitted to 
classes for which they are prepared. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

The University will accept scholarship and time credits for 
work done in the Medical Colleges of Class A in the list of the 
American Medical Association, and in the Colleges of the Associa- 
tion of American Medical Colleges, in so far as this work coin- 
cides with, or is the full equivalent of, the courses prescribed by 
the University. 

Students presenting credentials from Class A medical colleges 
will be exempt from examination in so far as the credentials may 
cover the work of the ye^r or years for which the applicant seeks 
to be credited. Every such student must present a letter of honor- 
able dismissal from and be eligible for promotion in the college in 
which he has pursued his medical studies, and must comply with 
the requirements for such promotion in this institution. 

Students from medical schools other than those of Class A 
who satisfy in full the entrance requirements as stated above and 
matriculate in the College of Medicine may be examined by a com- 
mittee of the faculty of the college in subjects completed in the 
medical school previously attended ; for each subject passed the 
student will receive the amount of time credit (on the four years 
required for graduation) that is assigned to that subject in the 



284 The College of Medicine 

course of the College of Medicine ; but in no case will time credit 
for more than two years be given. 

Students thus advanced may not complain of any conflict of 
hours, nor absent themselves from any part of the lower con- 
flicting course; but they may make up deficiences in the work of 
one term in any other term in which such work is offered. 

Physicians who have been graduated from medical schools rec- 
ognized at the time of graduation by the boards of health of the 
states in which they are located, who have passed state board ex- 
aminations, who have been in active practise for not less than five 
years, and who are in good standing in the medical societies of 
their cities or counties, may be admitted to the senior class. Offi- 
cial credentials covering all the conditions named must be fur- 
nished in advance. 

REGISTRATION 

Students are required to register in the office of the Secretary 
immediately upon the opening of the term for the work of that 
term, and credit will be allowed only in the branches in which the 
students are registered. Students will be registered in the order in 
which their fees are paid. Registration of students will close Octo- 
ber 7. 

COLLEGIATE YEAR 

The collegiate year of 1913-14 consists of a session of thirty-six 
weeks, beginning October i, 1913, and ending June 11, 1914, at 
which time degrees will be conferred. 

Each year is divided into two semesters of eighteen weeks each. 
Attendance upon the full session is required in order to secure 
credit for a year's work, and attendance upon four full sessions is 
required for graduation. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

For a statement of fees, see page 150. 

The expense of living in Chicago is less than in most other 
large cities. From twenty-five to thirty-five dollars per month 
may be regarded as adequate for the ordinary living expenses of a 
student exclusive of books, clothing, railroad fare, and small mis- 
cellaneous needs. 

The expense for books varies between $15.00 and $25.00 a year. 
The instructors, at the beginning of each course, direct their stu- 
dents in regard to the purchase of textbooks, 



Courses Offered 285 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the generosity of the late Prof. R. L. Rea a fund has 
been provided for four scholarships each year for indigent worthy 
students. These scholarships will be awarded by the officers of the 
faculty to the four students whose credentials and qualifications for 
the study of medicine entitle them to participate in the benefits of 
the Rea fund. 

The students whose names follow received benefit under the 
above scholarship during the session of 1913-14: 

Arthur Davis 

Dimiter George Foumadjieff 

Rose Sophia Houda 

Walter L. Johnson 

The Emily W. L. Schofield Scholarship of the Northwestern 
branch of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church was awarded in 1913-14 to Miss Beulah 
A. Cushman. 

The scholarships given by the Woman's Congregational Board 
of Missions of the Interior were awarded in 1913-14 to Miss 
Marion A. Weightman and Miss Josephine Kennedy. 

COURSES OFFERED 

The student is offered his choice of the following courses : 

1. A course of eight years— four years in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences at Urbana, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, followed by four years in the College of Medicine in Chicago, 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. This plan not only 
gives a liberal course of study and a medical course as well, but 
offers opportunity in the last two years of the medical course for 
specializing in chosen lines. This course of study is recommended 
to young men who can afford the time for it, and who are of the 
average age of graduation from the public high schools. 

2. A course of six years — the three years of the premedical 
course in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Urbana (see 
page 175), followed by three years in the College of Medicine in 
Chicago. For the satisfactory completion of this course, the Uni- 
versity confers two degrees — that of Bachelor of Arts at the end of 
the fourth year, and that of Doctor of Medicine at the end of 
the sixth year. This course is recommended to all candidates for 
the medical profession who cannot spare the time for the preced- 
ing course. 



286 The College of Medicine 

3. The four-year course as offered in the College of Medicine, 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The two years of 
work in arts and sciences required for admission to the College of 
Medicine may be taken in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
at Urbana. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirement for graduation from the College of Medicine 
is attendance during four collegiate years, the last of which must 
have been in this institution, and the completion of the required 
work of each year. Students must complete all the work re- 
quired in any branch in an uninterrupted course of instruction in 
order to receive any credit in that branch. 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The curriculum required for graduation extends over four 
years. During the first two years the work is largely confined to 
the sciences fundamental to practical medicine and the time of the 
student is about equally divided between didactic and laboratory 
instruction. During the freshman year this consists of work in an- 
atomy, biology, histology, embryology, physiology, chemistry, phar- 
macy, and bacteriologj'. During the sophomore year the study of 
anatomy, physiology, and chemistry is continued, and in addition 
the student takes up therapeutics, pathology, and autopsies. 

Wherever possible, practical laboratory work is made to supple- 
ment didactic teaching. Students are not only taught from pre- 
pared specimens, but are required to prepare their own specimens 
from the original material. 

During the junior and senior years the time is devoted to prac- 
tical medicine and surgery, and is about equally divided between 
didactic and clinical instruction. 

Attendance upon clinics is required and students are graded up- 
on and given credit for their work in the clinical courses just as 
they are for the work in the didactic and laboratory courses. The 
students of the junior year are divided into classes for dispensary 
work, and these classes have instruction in rotation in the various 
departments of practical medicine and surgery. 

For the benefit of senior students a review quiz course in 
anatomy, physiology, chemistry, pathology, and materia medica is 
maintained by the faculty. Attendance upon the quizzes is op- 
tional. 



Description of Courses 287 

Certificates showing the credits earned, including the attend- 
ance record, are issued at the end of the college year. These re- 
ports will be mailed to the students at the College, or at such 
other addresses as they may direct, as soon as possible after the 
end of the term. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

NOTE. — The semester in which each course is given, and the number of 
hours per week and per semester devoted to it, are shown at the end of the 
description of the course, for example: I, II; lee. and rec, 4-144; lab., 4-144. 
The Roman numerals indicate semesters; the arabic numeral preceding the hy- 
phen the number of hours per week; and the arabic numeral following the hy- 
phen the number of hours per semester. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

1. Human Anatomy. — Osteology; myology; arthrology; angi- 
ology (including the heart) ; phlebology; neurology; the respiratory 
and alimentary systems. Gray's Anatomy (i8th Am. ed.) ; Cunning- 
ham ; Morris; Spalteholz; Sobotta & McMurrich's Anatomical 
Atlases; Santee's Brain and Spinal Cord; Barker's Anatomic 
Nomenclature (BNA). /, //; lee. and rec, 4-144; lab., 4-144- 

Professor Eycleshymer, Dr. Rupert 

2. Biology. — One semester; lee. and rec, 1-18; lab., 1-18. 

3. Histology and Embryology. — Bailey; Stoehr; Shafer; Heis- 
ler; Bailey & Miller. I, II; lee 3-108; lab., 4-144- 

Professor Eycleshymer 

4. Physiology. — Blood; lymph; muscle; nerves. Experiments 
and demonstrations. Howell's Textbook of Physiology; Tieger- 
stedt; Stewart; Hall. One semester; lee, 3-54. 

Professor Dreyer 

5. General Chemistry. — Remsen; Simon; Holland; Jones. 
I, II; lee and rec, 4-144; lab., 6-216. 

Assistant Professor Welker, Dr. Miller, Dr. Small 

6. Prescription Writing and Pharmacy. — Weights and meas- 
ures; the preparation of galenicals; their incompatibles ; the prin- 
ciples of prescription writing; specimen pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions made by the student; individual drill in writing prescriptions. 
Fantus ; Prescription Writing and Pharmacy. One semester; lee and 
rec, 1-18; lab., 1-18. Professor Fantus, Dr. Haskell 

7. Bacteriology. — Methods of cultivation of bacteria; identi- 
fication of species ; ten non-pathogenic and ten pathogenic bacteria. 
Zapfe; Abbott; reference: Chester; McFarland. One semester; 
lee, 2-36; lab., 6-108. Professor Gehrmann 



288 The College of Medicine 

SOPHOMORE YEAR* 

1. Human Anatomy. — Dissection: head; neck; trunk; thoracic 
and abdominal organs ; the genitalia ; perineum ; peripheral nervous 
system ; the human brain and spinal cord. Study : the neurone 
and its supporting tissue; histological sections of all parts of the 
nervous system. Lectures and demonstrations : the organs of respi- 
ration, circulation, and digestion ; the ductless glands ; genito- 
urinary organs ; organs of the senses ; the central and sympathetic 
nervous systems. Gray's Anatomy, i8th American Edition. Mor- 
ris's Human Anatomy, (4th ed.) ; Cunningham; Piersol; Santee's 
Brain and Spinal Cord; Cunningham's Practical Anatomy ; Spalte- 
holz; Barker's BNA, Ij II; dem. and quiz., 3-108; lab., 4-144. 

Professor Eycleshymer^ Dr. Rupert 

2. Physiology. — Circulation ; respiration ; secretions ; digestion ; 
nutrition ; the special senses ; the nervous system. Laboratory ; 
normal hsematology; the physiology of muscle and nerve; the 
organs of circulation and respiration. Experiments on man capable 
of direct clinical application introduced wherever possible; each 
student expected to perform at least two blood-pressure experi- 
ments on the mammal with the endless roll kymograph, under the 
direct supervision of an instructor. Howell's Textbook of Phys- 
iology; Tiegerstedt; Stewart; Hall. I, II; lee. and rec, 4-144; 
lab., 3-108. Professor Dreyer 

3. Physiological and Pathological Chemistry and Toxi- 
cology. — Alimentary principles and foods ; digestive secretions and 
their actions ; solid tissues ; blood ; milk ; urine ; identification of 
poisons. Hawk ; Hammersten ; Simon. /; lee. and rec, 3-54 ; lab., 
3-54; //; lee. and rec, 2-36; lab., 3-54. 

Assistant Professor Welker, Dr. Miller, Dr. Small 

4. Pharmacology and Therapeutics. — The action and uses of 
medicines ; the symptoms, morbid anatomy, and treatment of pois- 
oning. Hydrotherapy; electrotherapy; mechanotherapy; dietetics; 
climatology. Cushny ; Sollmann ; Baruch ; Hutchinson ; Morton ; 
Cohen's System (selected vols.). I, II; lee. and rec, 5-180; lab., 64. 

Professor Fantus 

5. General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy. — Dela- 
field and Prudden. I, II; lee, 2-72; lab., 4-144.* 

6. Autopsies. — //; 2-36. 



* • *For explanation of abbreviations and descriptions of courses see note on 
page 287 following "Description of Courses." 



Description of Courses 289 

JUNIOR YEAR* 

1. Practice of Medicine. — Infectious diseases and intoxicants. 
Constitutional diseases and diseases of the kidneys. Diseases of 
the digestive organs. French. I, II; rec, 4-144. 

Assistant Professor Heintz, Dr. Lorch, Dr. Corcoran, Dr. 
Schmidt, Dr. Irish, Dr. Smejkal 
Neurology. — I, II; rec 2-72. 

2. Physical Diagnosis. — Lectures; personal training; prac- 
tice in the Dispensary. Da Costa. /, //; 3-54. 

Assistant Professor Lewison 

3. Dermatology. — Pusey. /; lee. 2-36. 

Professor Pusey, Assistant Professor Harris, Dr. Stillians 

4. Practice of Surgery. — DaCosta's Modern Surgery. I, II; 
rec, 4-144. 

Associate Professor Humiston, Dr. Moore, Dr. Dyas, Dr. Harger 

5. Orthopedic Surgery. — Bradford and Lovett; Whitman. 

/; lee, 1-18. Professor Porter 

6. Operative Surgery. — Trevis; Br>'ant; Bickham; Wharton 
and Ochsner. /; lee, 2-36. Associate Professor Fuller 

7. Surgical Pathology. — Beck. I or II; lab., 2-36. 

8. Laryngology, Rhinology, and Otology. — Ballenger. One 
semester; lee, 1-18. Professor Ballenger 

9. Obstetrics. — Normal pregnancy, labor, puerperium, and new 
bom infant. I, II; lee and rec, 2-72. 

Associate professor Yarros, assisted by other members of the de- 
partment. 

10. Laboratory Diagnosis. — Supplementary to the regular 
work, students are required to do practical work in Laboratory 
Diagnosis in the Dispensary. / or II; lab., 8-64. 

Assistant Professor Gardner 

11. Medical Jltiisprudence. — Reese. //; lee, 1-18. 

Elmer DeWitt Brothers, Lecturer 

12. Dispensary CLiNicsf. — One semester; 12-216. 

13. Medical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. Professor Tice 

14. Medical Clinic. — I, II; 1-36. 



*For explanation of abbreviations and description of courses see note on 
page 287 following "Description of Courses." 

tThe Dispensary is divided into ten departments. 

During tne junior year each student is required to attend the Dispensary 
two hours daily for one semester, during which time he takes a course of in- 
struction in each of these departments. 

The time is equally divided between the departments. 

The two-hour period in Dispensary is estimated to be equal to one hour 
of didactic work. 



290 The College of Medicine 

15. Medical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. Asst. Professor Heintz 

16. Medical Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. Asst. Professor Lewison 

17. Dermatological Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. 

Asst. Professor Harris 

18. Surgical Clinic (Orthopedic). — I, II; 1-36. 

Professor Porter 

19. Surgical Clinic (Orthopedic). — /, //; 2-72. 

Associate Professor Jacobs 

20. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. 

Associate Professor Humiston 

21. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. Asst. Professor Dyas 

22. Surgical Clinic. — I, II; 2-72, Asst. Professor Thompson 

23. Laryngological Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. Professor Ballenger 

24. Laryngological Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. 

Asst. Professor R. H. Brown 

25. Laryngological Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. 

Associate Professor J. C. Beck 

26. Otological Clinic. — I, II; 1-36. Professor Pierce 

27. Gynecological Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. 

Assistant Professor McEwen 

SENIOR YEAR* 

1. Practise of Medicine. — Osier's Modern Medicine; Osier; 
Striimpell ; Eichhorst. /, //; lee. and rec, 5-180. 

Professor Williamson, Professor Goodkind 

2. Neurology. — Gowers. /; lee. and rec, 4-72. 

Professor Mettler 

3. Psychiatry. — Defendorf. /; lee, 2-36. 

Professor King, Assistant Professor Darling 

4. Diseases of the Chest. — On the lungs, Lindsay. On the 
heart and arterial system, Colbeck. /; lee, and rec, 3-54. 

Professor Tice 

5. Pediatrics. — Holt; Chapin and Pizek; Cotton, /; lee, 3-54. 

Professor Earle, Assistant Professor Benson 
6 Practise of Surgery. — /, //; lee. and rec, 2-72. Lectures: 
October — Surgery of the Head and Neck, Professor Davison 
November — Surgery of the Thorax, Professor Eisendrath 
December — Surgery of the Stomach, Professor Steele 
January — Surgery of the Duodenum and Intestines 

Professor Ochsner 



•For explanation of abbreviations and description of courses see note on 
page 287 following "Description of Courses." 



Description of Courses 291 

February — Hernia and Post-operative Treatment 

Professor Ochsner 

March — Surgery of the Liver, Pancreas, and Spleen 

Professor Harsha 

Apml — Surgical Diseases and Injuries of the Bones 

Professor Halstead 

May — Surgical Diseases and Injuries of the Bones 

Professor Halstead 

7. Genito-Urinary Surgery and Venereal Diseases. — II; 
lee, 1-18. Professor Eisendrath 

8. Ophthalmology. — Wood and Woodruflf; De Schweinitz; 
May. /; iec, 1-18. 

Professor Wood, Associate Professor Gamble, Assistant Pro- 
fessor Lx)RiNG, Assistant Professor Findlay 

9. Obstetrics. — Pathological conditions and obstetric opera- 
tions. /, //; lee, dem., and quiz, 2-72; exercises on the manikin, 
12; hospital clinics in the University Hospital, 24; two weeks resi- 
dence at the Chicago Lying-in Hospital and Dispensary. 

Professor Bacon and Associate Professor Yarros, assisted by 
the other members of the department. 

TO. Gynecology. — Byf ord ; Penrose ; Reed ; Clarke's Gynecolog- 
ical Diagnosis. II; lee, 2-36. Professor Byford, Professor Barrett 

11. Hygiene. — Bergey; Harrington; McFarland; Park. //; lee, 
2-36. 

12. History of Medicine (Optional). — I; lee, 1-18. 

Bernard John Cigrand, Lecturer 

13. Autopsies. — I; 2-36. 

14. Dispensary Clinics (Optional). 

15. Medical Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. Professor Williamson 

16. Medical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. Professor Williamson 

17. Medical Clinic.—/, //; 1-36. Professor Goodkind 

18. Medical Clinic— /,//; 2-36. Professor Patton 

19. Medical Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. Professor Tice 

20. Neurological Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. Professor King 

21. Neurological Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. Professor Mettler 

22. Neurological Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. 

Assistant Professor H. I. Davis 

23. Pediatric Clinic. — /, //; 1-36 

Professor Earle, Asst. Professor Benson 

24. Pediatric Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. Associate Professor Hess 

25. Pediatric Clinic.—/, //; 1-36. Dr. French 



292 The College of Medicine 

26. Surgical Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. Professor Steele 

27. Surgical Clinic. — I,II; 2-72. Professor Davis 

28. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72; 

Professor Harsha, Associate Professor E. M. Brown 

29. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. Professor Ochsner 

30. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. Professor Davison 

31. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. Professor Davison 
32: Surgical Clinic (Genito Urinary). — /, //; 2-72. 

Professor Eisendrath 

33. Surgical Clinic. — /, //; 2-72. Professor Halstead 

34. Surgical Clinic. — I, II; 1-36. Professor Eisendrath 

35. Ophthalmological Clinic. — /, //; 1-36. 

Associate Professor Gamble, Assistant Professor Loring, Assistant 
Professor Findlay 

36. Gynecological Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. 

Professor Byford, Professor Barrett, Assistant Professor Lang 

37. Gynecological Clinic. — I, II; 2-72. Professor Barrett 

38. Obstetrical Clinic. — I, II; 1-36. Professor Bacon 

TOTAL HOURS OF WORK 

Freshman Year 

Didactic Laboratory 



Anatomy 144 144 

Biology 18 36 

Histology and Embryology 108 144 

Physiology 54 

General Chemistry 144 216 

Prescription Writing and Pharmacy 18 18 

Bacteriology 36 108 



Total 522 666 

Grand total 1,188 

Sophomore Year 

Didactic Laboratory 

1. Anatomy 108 144 

2. Physiology 144 108 

3. Physiological and Pathological Chemistry 

and Toxicology 90 108 

4. Pharmacology and Therapeutics 180 64 



Description of Courses 293 

5. Pathology 72 144 

6. Autopsies 36 



Total 594 604 

Grand total 1,198 

Junior Year 

Didactic and 
Laboratory Clinical 

1. Medicine 216 216 

2. Physical Diagnosis 54 36 

3. Dermatology 36 36 

4. Surgery 144 252 

5. Orthopedic Surgery 18 108 

6. Operative Surgery 36 

7. Surgical Pathology 36 

8. Laryngology, Rhinology, and Otologj' 18 252 

9. Obstetrics 72 

10. Laboratory Diagnosis 64 

11. Medical Jurisprudence 18 

12. Dispensary' Clinics 216 



Total 712 1,116 

Grand total 1,828 

Senior Year 

Didactic Clinical 

Medicine 180 216 

Neurology 72 72 

Psychiatry 36 36 

Chest Diseases 54 72 

Pediatrics 54 108 

Surgery 72 504 

Genito-Urinary and Venereal Diseases 18 72 

Ophthalmology 18 36 

Obstetrics 84 48 

Gj-necology 36 144 

Hygiene 36 

Autopsies 36 



I 
2 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
II 
12 



Total 696 1,308 

Grand total 2,004 



294 ^^^ College of Medicine 

Summary 

As will be seen by the foregoing tables, the college ofiFers work 
in the several years as follows: In the freshman year 522 hours of 
didactic and 666 hours of laboratory instruction; in the sophomore 
year 594 hours of didactic and 604 hours of laboratory instruction, 
all of which are required. In the junior year, 1,828 hours of di- 
dactic and clinical instruction, and in the senior year, 2,004 hours of 
didactic and clinical instruction are presented. Of the clinics of- 
fered in the junior and senior years, the student is required to com- 
plete approximately 40 per cent of the work presented. At the time 
of registration, his course is designated and approved by the Sec- 
retary. 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

For the special circular of the College of Medicine, address: 

The Secretary of the College of Medione 

Congress and Honore Streets, Chicago, Illinois 



COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 



For the faculty of the College of Dentistry, see page 50. 

LOCATION 

The College is situated on the comer of Harrison and Honore 
streets in Chicago. It is located directly opposite the Cook County 
Hospital, in the center of the clinical field of Chicago, which insures 
at all times an abundance of clinical material. Adjoining the school 
on the west is the West Side Hospital; and on the north are the 
buildings of the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois. 

BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT 

The six-story building in which the College is housed contains 
three amphitheaters, recitation rooms and lecture rooms, labora- 
tories, dissecting rooms, a clinical operating room, and an infirmary. 
A parlor is provided for the use of the women attendants. 

LABORATORIES 

The laboratories, each of which accommodates 120 students, oc- 
cupy four floors. They are supplied with microscopes, immersion 
lenses, microtomes, and other necessary apparatus, including a 
projection apparatus for the illustration of lectures. Electric motors 
are in use in all laboratories. Adjoining the laboratories are prep- 
aration rooms for the use of the instructors and demonstrators. 

INFIRMARY 

The infirmary occupies the top floor. It is provided with sky- 
lights, as well as with sidelights on three sides, and is divided into 
the operative, prosthetic, and orthodontia sections. These depart- 
ments are equipped with new chairs of improved pattern, with 
fountain cuspidors attached, double-decked stands for accommodat- 
ing students' operating cases, sanitary washbowls with hot and cold 
water, and a formaldehyde instrument sterilizer. 

295 



296 The College of Dentistry 

The infirmary has adjacent to it a prosthetic laboratory, in which 
the students can do their molding, soldering, and fusing. It is pro- 
vided with compressed air apparatus, electric ovens for porcelain 
work, and electric lathes. 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 

Students of the College of Dentistry have access to the Quine 
Library of the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois, 
which occupies an adjoining building. This is the second largest li- 
brary of its kind in Chicago, containing more than 15,000 bound vol- 
umes. One hundred and twenty periodicals are received regularly. 
The library is under the care of a trained librarian and assistants. 

The Chicago Public Library, the Newberry Library, and the 
John Crerar Library are accessible to the students of the college. 

The Museum, which has been founded in connection with the 
college library, contains specimens of human and comparative anat- 
omy. 

ADMISSION 

An applicant for admission to the College of Dentistry must be 
at least 18 years of age. Women are admitted on the same condi- 
tions and under the same terms as men. 

For admission to the College of Dentistry a candidate must pre- 
sent a certificate of graduation from an accredited high school, or 
an equivalent ; which equivalent is interpreted to mean fifteen (15) 
units* of preparatory work in an accredited high school or academy 
or a state normal school. 

No "conditions" can be permitted; the full 15 units must be 
offered. 

Entrance credits will be accepted on certificate from the sources 
outlined on page 94. 

Information concerning the schedule of entrance examinations 
may be obtained from the Dean. 

Applicants for admission coming from institutions of higher 
learning, whether candidates for the freshman class or for advanced 
standing, must present entrance credentials or pass entrance exam- 
inations as indicated above. 

The College of Dentistry will receive no student who is not 
present within 10 days after the opening day of the session in each 
year, or in case of necessary delay by reason of illness, properly 



'For a definition of the term "unit," see page 89. 



Requirements for Graduation 297 

certified by the attending physician, within 20 days after the open- 
ing day. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Persons who are qualified for admission to this college, and who 
have studied dentistry in other schools for at least one year, may 
be admitted to advanced standing after satisfying the faculty that 
they have completed an amount of work equivalent to that which 
is exacted by this college in the respective classes. 

Students who have had one or more years in the College of 
Medicine, or in other medical colleges of equal rank, are allowed 
credit toward graduation for so much of the required course in 
dentistry as was included in their medical course. But they must 
be registered for full time. 

Graduates of the University with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science, who have taken courses in biology and 
chemistry in the University, can secure advanced standing in the 
course in dentistry, if they have done full work in the science sub- 
jects required in the dental curriculum. 

Graduates of recognized medical colleges may secure advanced 
credit for work, and one year of time toward graduation, and may 
be excused from lectures and examinations in general anatomy, 
chemistry, histology, pathology, and physiology, but are required to 
take lectures and examinations in dental subjects. 

LENGTH OF COURSE 

The courses are graded and cover three years of college work. 
The teaching of one year is not repeated, and the course is pro- 
gressive, the several classes having separate laboratories and at no 
time taking lectures or demonstrations together. 

If, for any cause, a regular student desires to extend his studies 
over a period of four or more years, a course of study will be spe- 
cially arranged for him. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery will be conferred on 
students who shall have completed the course of instruction, at- 
tended the required time, and passed satisfactory final examinations. 
To be eligible for the degree, the student must be twenty-one years 



298 The College of Dentistry 

of age, must possess a good moral character, and must have paid 
all fees. 

The monthly report of attendance, and the standing of stu- 
dents in quizzes, recitations, laboratory work, and infirmary 
practise, both operative and prosthetic, are considered in making 
up the rating of final examinations. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dem- 
onstrations, and laboratory work. The time of the student is 
about equally divided between laboratory and clinical work on the 
one hand, and lectures and recitations on the other. 

Students are admitted to the laboratories from the beginning 
of the first year. The laboratory work is closely correlated with 
the lectures and clinical studies. 

In the clinical work, methods both of investigation and of 
reasoning are carefully and systematically taught. Diagnosis, prog- 
nosis, and indications for treatment receive no less attention than 
methods of construction and the technic of procedures. 

SUMMARY OF COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Materia Medica. — One lecture a week 

Anatomy. — Two lectures a week; dissection of the median half 
of the human body 

Physiology. — To the nervous system. One lecture a week 

Histology. — One lecture and two hours of laboratory work a 
week 

Chemistry. — Lectures and laboratory, six hours a week 

Operative Technics. — Four half days a week 

Prosthetic Technics. — Three half days a week (laboratory) 

Dental History. — Ten lectures 

Dental Anatomy. — Fifteen lectures 

Junior Year 
Anatomy. — Two lectures a week; dissection of the median half 
of the human body 

Physiology. — The nervous system. One lecture a week 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — One lecture a week 
General Pathology. — One lecture a week 



Summary of Course 299 

Chemistry. — Three hours of laboratory a week 
Histology, General and Dental. — One lecture and two hours of 
laboratory a week 

Prosthetic Dentistry. — One lecture and two half days of lab- 
oratory a week; infirmary practise 
Orthodontia. — One lecture a week 
Orthodontia Technics. — One-half day a week 
Operative Dentistry. — Two lectures a week; infirmary practise 
Comparative Anatomy. — Ten lectures 

Senior Year 

Dental Pathology and Therapeutics. — Two lectures a week 
Oral Surgery. — One lecture and two hours of clinic a week 
Orthodontia. — One lecture and four hours of clinic a week 
Dental Jurisprudence and Ethics. — Ten lectures 
Prosthetic Dentistry. — One lecture a week; infirmary practise 
Operative Dentistry. — Two lectures a week; infirmary practise 
Bacteriology. — One lecture a week; laboratory 
General Anesthesia and Physical Diagnosis. — Ten lectures 
Neurology. — Eight lectures 

Porcelain Work. — One lecture and one-half day of laboratory 
a week 

FEES 

For a statement of the fees, see page 150. 

Fees are not returned to students who are suspended or ex- 
pelled or to those who are absent for any cause except illness. 
Payments should be made in currency or in Chicago exchange 
drawn to the order of the Secretary of the College of Dentistry. 

Fees are payable in advance. Students unable to meet this re- 
quirement must make satisfactory arrangements with the Dean 
or Secretary at the beginning of the course. 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

For further information relating to the College of Dentistry, 
address : 

The Dean of the College op Dentistry 
Harrison and Honore Streets, Chicago, Illinois 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



For the faculty of the School of Pharmacy, see page 51. 

HISTORY 

The School of Pharmacy was originally the Chicago College 
of Pharmacy and was incorporated under that name September 5, 
1859. Prior to that time there were but three schools of phar- 
macy in the country, and these were located in the eastern states. 

While the primary object of the institution was to provide in- 
struction in the science and art of pharmacy, other functions were 
developed. Thus, a code of ethics was early adopted by the mem- 
bers; successful efforts were made to bring about better relations 
between pharmacists and physicians; the pioneer pharmaceutical 
library was established; and for eighteen years beginning with 1868 
a monthly journal, The Pharmacist — the first of its kind in the 
West — was published. 

In October, 1859, the first course of lectures was instituted, 
occupying three evenings a week for a period of six months. Of 
the first class, but two students were graduated in 1861. The war 
caused a suspension of the teaching, and the school was not re- 
opened until 1870. The great fire of 1871 destroyed the equip- 
ment, but pharmacists throughout Europe and America extended 
help to the institution, furnishing a library and an outfit of ap- 
paratus, which became the nucleus of the present equipment. In 
1872 the instruction was resumed for the second time and has 
since continued without interruption. 

In 1880 the members and graduates of the College took an 
active part in the formation of the Illinois Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, which in the following year secured the passage of the 
pharmacy law. 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the College 
was signalized by the removal of the College to a larger building 
at 465 State street. Up to this time instruction had been given 
mainly by means of lectures, laboratory work being entirely op- 
tional. Laboratory courses in pharmacy, chemistry, and vegetable 

300 



Equipment 301 

histology were now made obligatory. A laboratory devoted en- 
tirely to prescription compounding was established in 1892. 

The College was formally united with the University May i, 
1896, becoming the technical School of Pharmacy of the University 
of Illinois. In the management of the School, the Trustees and offi- 
cers have the assistance of an advisory board of pharmacists, 
elected by the registered pharmacists of the State through the Illi- 
nois Pharmaceutical Association. 

LOCATION 

The School of Pharmacy occupies the four upper floors in a 
building located at Michigan Boulevard and Twelfth Street. The 
building is a substantial brick structure, five stories in height, with 
a frontage of fifty feet on Michigan Avenue and one hundred 
seventy feet on Twelfth Street. 

A half block east of the building is the Illinois Central Depot; 
and one block west are the Cottage Grove Avenue, Indiana Avenue, 
and Twelfth Street surface lines, and the Twelfth Street Station 
of the South Side Elevated Railroad. 

On Michigan Avenue, immediately south of the School, are to be 
found some of the best low-priced boarding and rooming places 
in the city. Satisfactory accommodations may be readily secured 
within a short distance of the School. 

EQUIPMENT 

The east end of the building is occupied by lecture halls, of 
which there are three, arranged one above the other and having a 
seating capacity of from one hundred fifty to three hundred per- 
sons. 

The laboratories are six in number, including one each for 
qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, special work in chem- 
istry, microscopy, manufacturing pharmacy, and dispensing. The 
total capacity of these laboratories is sufficient for the accommo- 
dation of 348 students, working at one time. 

The laboratories are supplied with compound microscopes, an- 
alytical balances, and special apparatus, and with collections of 
crude drugs, medicinal plants, chemicals, and pharmaceutical pro- 
ducts. 

The library contains about two thousand volumes, including, in 
addition to the usual works of reference, many rare books. Com- 



302 The School of Pharmacy 

plete files of the leading pharmaceutical journals are an important 
feature. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For the Degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 

In the course leading to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 
the instruction is so arranged as to require the attendance of each 
student on three days each week and from twenty to twenty-one 
hours weekly during two annual sessions of thirty weeks each. 
This arrangement is advantageous to drug clerks who desire to 
spend a part of their time in drug stores while attending school, 
thereby adding to their practical experience and at the same time 
earning a part or all of their living expenses. 

The subjects taught are chemistry, general, pharmaceutical, 
and analytical ; pharmacy, theoretical, manufacturing, and dispens- 
ing; botany; physiology; and materia medica. 

For the Degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist 

To meet the demand for special training on the part of stu- 
dents who desire to pursue more extended courses in pharmaceuti- 
cal chemistry, applied chemistry, and bacteriologj', or to prepare 
themselves for positions under the Food and Drugs Act, this 
School offers a course leading to the degree of Pharmaceutical 
Chemist. It comprises two annual sessions of thirty-six weeks 
each, with instruction on five or six days each week, amounting to 
about thirty-three hours weekly, or a total of 2,300 hours in the 
entire course. 

This course is partially concurrent with the shorter course and 
includes all the didactic instruction given in the latter. It con- 
sists largely of laboratory practise. In addition to the subjects 
mentioned above it embraces organic analysis and proximate as- 
says, new remedies, analysis of urine, food and sanitary analysis, 
bacteriology, and applied microscopy. 

The system of teaching includes lectures, illustrations, demon- 
strations, recitations, written and oral examinations, and indi- 
vidual practise and personal instruction in the various laboratories, 
much time being devoted to this important part of the student's 
work. 

ADMISSION 
The regular session opens September 21, 1914. The shorter 



State Registration 303 

course ends April 29, 1915; the longer course closes June 11, 

1915. 

Applicants for admission to the course leading to the degree of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist must be at least seventeen years of age and 
must be graduates of accredited high schools or furnish evidence of 
a preliminary education equivalent thereto. 

Applicants for admission to the course leading to the degree of 
Graduate in Pharmacy must be at least seventeen years of age and 
must have completed two years' work in an accredited high school 
or the full educational equivalent. 

Admission as special students, not candidates for a degree, is 
restricted to registered apprentices, assistants, or pharmacists, not 
less than twenty-one years of age. 

Students who have pursued courses of study in other colleges 
of pharmacy will be given credit for such portions of their work 
as are equivalent to the work required by this college. 

GRADUATION 

In conformity with the usual custom of pharmaceutical schools, 
drug store experience is not made a requirement for the degree of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist. Students who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the course will be awarded the degree upon the recommenda- 
tion of the faculty. 

For the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy this School has al- 
ways required practical drug store experience. The actual time 
of attendance at the School, amounting to fourteen months, is 
credited as part of the four years of practical experience required 
for the degree. Candidates must have attained the age of twenty- 
one years and have satisfactorily finished the work leading to the 
degree. Students who have successfully met the scholarship re- 
quirement, but are lacking in age or in practical experience, will 
receive a certificate and will be awarded the diploma when the re- 
quirements of age and experience are satisfied. 

Persons competent to fulfill the general requirements of ad- 
mission to the University may be granted credits upon other Uni- 
versity courses for equivalent work completed at the School of 
Pharmacy. 

STATE REGISTRATION 

To become a registered pharmacist in Illinois, it is necessary to 
pass an examination before the State Board of Pharmacy, no 
diplomas being recognized. 



304 The School of Pharmacy 

The diploma of this School is, however, accepted in lieu of ex- 
amination for registration in several states and territories; and 
in other states, including New York and Pennsylvania, where 
graduation prerequisite laws are in force, this School is among 
the schools recognized, and its diploma admits to the examina- 
tion. 

The amendments to the Illinois Pharmacy Law, in eflFect July 
I, 1907, give credit, as a part of the "practical experience in com- 
pounding drugs" required by the law, for the actual time of at- 
tendance at a recognized school of pharmacy but not to exceed two 
years for registered pharmacist or one year for registered assist- 
ant pharmacist. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

For a statement of the fees, see page 150. Fees are payable 
in advance. Students unable to meet this requirement must make 
satisfactory arrangements with the Actuary at the beginning of the 
course. 

Board and Lodging. — Good board and lodging, within a short 
distance of the School, can be had for from five to six dollars 
per week. This expense may be somewhat reduced by two or 
more students rooming together. The Actuary keeps a list of 
suitable boarding and rooming places, with their rates. 

Selection of Seats. — Seats in the lecture halls and desks in the 
laboratories will be assigned to students by the Actuary, in the 
order of enrollment. To enroll, junior students will fill out the 
matriculation blank and forward it to the Actuary, together with 
credentials for admission and the matriculation fee of five dollars; 
senior students will make a payment on tuition account of five 
dollars. It is of advantage to students to matriculate early. 

Opportunities for Employment. — The Actuary keeps a regis- 
ter of students desiring employment and of pharmacists wishing 
to employ students. Students desiring employment are invited to 
correspond with him. 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Further information may be found in the special announcement 
of this school, which may be obtained from the Actuary, School 
OF Pharmacy, Michigan Avenue and Twelfth Street, Chicago. 



PART III 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



EXPLANATION 

The arrangement of subjects in the following Description of 
Courses is alphabetical. The connections of allied departments 
are indicated by cross references. 

Following the description of each course of instruction will be 
found the requirements, if any, for admission to that particular 
course. The sequence indicated by these prerequisites must be fol- 
lowed. For instance, under Art and Design 5, Painting, the prere- 
quisites given are Art and Design i, 2, and 3. These three courses 
must be completed before Course 5 may be taken. 

If a course not required for graduation is selected by fewer 
than five students it may be withdrawn for the semester. 

Graduate courses are numbered upward from 100. 

Credit is reckoned in semester hours, or simply hours. An hour 
is one class period a week for one semester, or the equivalent in 
laboratory, shop, or drawing room. Graduate work is not recorded 
in credit hours, nor do the credit hours of undergraduate courses 
apply to graduate students enrolled in them. 

The semester, and the number of hours each semester for which 
the course counts, are shown after each course, thus: I, II; (2). 
The Roman figures indicate semesters; the Arabic numerals in pa- 
renthesis indicate hours of credit for each semester for under- 
graduates. The omission of a course for the current year is indi- 
cated by enclosing the entire description of such a course in brack- 
ets. 

307 



3o8 Agronomy 

ACCOUNTANCY 
(See Economics.) 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 

Fred Henry Rankin, Superintendent and Assistant to the Dean, 

with rank of Assistant Professor 
Aretas Wilbur Nolan, M.S., Assistant Professor 
Albert Woodward Jamison, M.S., Associate 
Augusta Dillman Evans, A.B., Assistant 
Joseph Harvey Checkley, B.S., Assistant 
William Pitt Miller, B.S., Assistant 

I. Principles and Methods of High School Agriculture. — 
Features of agricultural science and practise best adapted to high 
school conditions; the best order and methods for their presenta- 
tion ; suiting course and instruction to the needs of the school com- 
munity; what laboratory work shall be given; what apparatus may 
be used; what field work is practical. Practise teaching provided 
through cooperation with the local high school. //; (5). 

Assistant Professor Noi^an 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in agriculture. 

3. Agricultural Extension Teachings. — Extension enterprises 
and the way in which they may be of service to the people; farm- 
ers' institutes; agricultural extension schools; farmers' clubs and 
cooperative work in rural communities. //; (i). 

Assistant Professor Rankin, Mr. Jamison 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Extension 4. 

4. Country Life Problems. — Problems of the farm ; duties of 
citizenship; social, economic, and educational work in rural com- 
munities. Lectures. Required of all first-year students. /, //; (J^). 

Professor Davenport and other members of the faculty 

AGRICULTURE 

(See Agricultural Extension, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, 
Dairy Husbandry, Horticulture, and Veterinary Science.) 

AGRONOMY 

♦Cyril George Hopkins, Ph.D., Professor, Agronomy 
Louie Henrie Smith, Ph.D., Professor, Plant Breeding 
Jeremlah George Mosier, B.S., Professor, Soil Physics 
James Harvey Pettit, Ph.D., Professor, Soil Fertility 

•On leave. 



Agronomy 309 

Leonard Hegnauer, B.S., Professor, Crop Production 
Ora Stanley Fisher, B.S., Assistant Professor, Soil Fertility 
Frederick Charles Bauer, B.S., Associate, Soil Fertility 
Albert Lemuel Whiting, Ph.D., Associate, Soil Fertility 
Axel Ferdinand Gustafson, M.S., Associate, Soil Physics 
Harold Wilson Stewart, B.S., Associate, Soil Physics 
William Leonidas Burlison, M.S., Associate, Crop Production 
Earl Archibald White, M.S., Associate, Farm Mechanics 
Ira Wilmer Dickerson, B.S., Associate, Farm Mechanics 
Karl John Theodore Ekblavv, B.S., Associate, Farm Mechanics 
Elmer Tryon Ebersol, A.B., B.S., Instructor, Crop Production 
Chester Otis Reed, B.S., Instructor, Farm Mechanics 
Marvin Edward Jahr, A.B., Instructor, Farm Mechanics 
Forrest Addison Fisher, B.S., Instructor, Soil Physics 
Howard John Snider, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Harry Charles Gilkerson, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Harrison Fred Theodore Fahrnkopf, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Warren Rippey Schoonover, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Arthur Floyd Heck, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Orr Milton Allyn, B.S., Assistant, Crop Production 
Edward Harvey Walworth, B.S., Assistant, Crop Production 

courses for undergraduates 

Crops : Agronomy 7, 8, 22, 25 
Soils: Agronomy 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 23 

Farm Mechanics and Buildings : Agronomj'- i, 2, 3, 4, 17, 19, 20, 
26, 27. 

1. Drainage. — Drainage and its surveying operations. Chain- 
ing, mapping, leveling, designing, setting grade stakes, laying tile. 
Lectures and laboratory first half semester; field work second half 
semester. //; (3). Mr. Jahr 

2. Field Machinery. — Physics, including work, horse-power, 
resolution of forces, simple machines. Whiffletrees and hitches. 
Construction, principles of operation, adjustment, purchase, and 
care of implements for soil, seed, and feed preparation, and for 
seeding, cultivating, harvesting, and handling farm crops. Lec- 
tures and laboratory work including practise in troubles, adjust- 
ments, testing, and detailed study of field machines. /; (3). 

Mr. Reed 

3. Farm Power Machinery. — Amount of power required for 
farm operations and its distribution as affected by season, crop 
system, size of farm ; sources of farm power, including the horse 



310 Agronomy 

as a motor, windmills, waterpower, steam engine, hot air engines, 
electric motors, — their theory, operation, and economy; internal 
combustion engines and tractors, — their theory, operation, and econ- 
omy, with special attention to magnetos and ignition ; methods of 
applying power to field operations. Lectures and laboratory work. 
(Alternating with Mechanical Engineering 48 and 49 if desired.) 
//; (3). Mr. DicKERsoN 

4. Farm Buildings.. — Arrangement, design, construction, and 
cost ; machinery sheds ; granaries ; corn cribs ; chicken houses ; 
swine houses ; barns ; dwelling houses. Drafting of buildings ; lec- 
tures; assigned readings. /; (5). Mr. Ekblaw 

7. Advanced Farm Crops. — Origin, history, development, and 
value; botanical relations; structure and requirement of seed for 
best development; preparation of the seed bed; seeding; cultiva- 
tion, tillage, and inter-tillage; harvesting; time of maturity for 
various uses; rotations, or succession of crops; systematic farm- 
ing, distribution of labor, cost of production, consumption of prod- 
ucts, residues, by-products; marketing; market conditions; losses 
in and cost of storage ; the general utility of each crop, its place 
in a system of farming, or a rotation ; special attention to Illinois 
conditions. Class, reference, laboratory, and field work. //; (5). 

Professor Hegnauer 
Prerequisite: Agronomy 25. 

8. Field Experiments. — Testing varieties of corn, oats, wheat, 
potatoes, and other farm crops; methods of planting corn, seeding 
grains, grasses, and other forage crops ; culture of corn, potatoes, 
and sugar beets ; practise in treating oats and wheat for smut, and 
potatoes for scab, and studying the effect upon the crops ; combating 
cinch bugs and other injurious insects. Other practical experi- 
ments may be arranged with the instructor. II, and summer vaca- 
tion; (2-5). Professor Hegnauer 

Prerequisite: Agronomy 25 and 7. 

9. Soil Physics and Management. — Origin of soil material; 
methods of formation ; mechanical composition and classification ; 
moisture; texture as affecting capillarity, osmosis, diffusion, tem- 
perature, aeration, and as affected by plowing, harrowing, culti- 
vating, rolling, and cropping; wasting by washing; fall or spring 
plowing and drainage as affecting moisture, temperature, and root 
development; real and apparent specific gravity, porosity, water 
holding capacity, and capillary power; the physical effects of differ- 



i 



Agronomy 311 

ent systems of rotation and of continuous cropping with various 
crops. Lectures; laboratory. /; (5). 

Professor Mosier, Mr. Gustafson, Mr. Stewart, Mr. Fisher 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2 and 3, one unit in entrance physics, 

and one year of university work. Regular students are urged to 

take Chemistry 13a previous to this course, others consult in- 
structor. 

10. Special Work in Soil Physics. — Physical properties of 
special soils; centrifugal analysis of such soils; field observation of 
the effects of discing, harrowing, and rolling; time and depths of 
cultivation ; soil moisture and temperature ; effects of washing of 
soils; methods of prevention. / or //; (2-5). 

Professor Mosier, Mr. Gustafson, Mr. Stewart, Mr. Fisher 

Prerequisite: Agronomy 9. 

11. Soil Biology. — Activities of infusoria, fungi, algae, and 
bacteria in soils from the standpoint of soil fertility; fermentation 
of crop residues and green and farm manures and its effect upon 
insoluble plant food; fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, its trans- 
formations, use, and possible losses. Lectures; laboratory. //; 
(3). Professor Pettit, Dr. Whiting 

Prerequisite: Agronomy 12; Botanj' 5. 

12. Soil Fertility, Fertilizers, Rotations. — The influence of 
fertility upon the yield of various crops ; effect of different crops 
upon the soil aad upon succeeding crops ; different rotations ; ul- 
timate effect of different systems of farming upon fertility and 
productivity; manures and fertilizers, their composition and value; 
soils cropped continuously with different crops and with a series 
of crops ; the fertility of soils of different types or classes from 
different sections of Illinois. Lectures; laboratory. //; (5). 
Professors Hopkins, Pettit, Assistant Professor Fisher, Mr. 

Bauer 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 13a; Agronomy 9. 

13. Investigation of the Fertility of Special Soils. — Soils in 
which the student is particularly interested. Determination of the 
nature and quantity of the elements of fertility; effect upon va- 
rious crops of different fertilizers added to the soils, as determined 
by pot cultures, and by plot experiments ; systematic study of sim- 
ilar work of experiment stations and experimenters. /, //; (2-5). 

Professor Hopkins, Professor Pettit, Dr. Whiting 
Prerequisite: Agronomy 12. 



312 Agronomy 

i6. German Agricultural Readings. — Special attention to soils 
and crops. The current numbers of German journals of agricul- 
tural science used as texts. //; (2). 

Professor Hopkins^ Professor Hegnauer 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in German; Agronomy 12. 

17. Harvesting Machinery. — Expert work on grain binders, 
corn binders, mowers, hay rakes, loaders, and stackers. (For stu- 
dents preparing to do expert work on these machines in the field. 
Before registering in this course students are requested to consult 
instructor regarding requirements for successful experting.) II; 
(3). Mr. Reed 

18. Investigation and Thesis. — I, II; (5-10). 

Professors Hopkins, Mosier, Smith, Pettit, Hegnauer 

19. Research Work in Farm Mechanics. — (Consult instruc- 
tor regarding time and requirements.) 

Mr. White, Mr. Dickerson, Mr. Ekblaw, Mr. Jahr, Mr. Reed 

20. Concrete Construction for Agricultural Purposes. — 
Materials ; mixing and using ; simple comparative tests ; general 
specifications and estimates for walks, posts, tanks, floors, and 
foundations. //; (2). Mr. Ekblaw 

22. Plant Breeding. — The improvement by breeding of field 
crops, including the grains, grasses, and legumes; selection; results 
obtained by various investigators. Lectures; assigned readings; 
demonstrations; laboratory. //; (2). Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: Botany i; Chemistry 13a; Agronomy 25. 

23. Plant Food Supplies. — The world's supply of plant food 
materials; utilization and conservation. //; (i). Professor Pettit 

Prerequisite: Agronomy 12. 

25. Farm Crops. — Plant growth; structure; habits and require- 
ments; preparation of the seed bed; seed selection for productive- 
ness; storing; care of stored grain to prevent deterioration in vi- 
tality, or loss in market requirements ; grading and fanning of 
grain as a means of improvement; market grades of grain and 
grain judging; examination of grains for purity; testing for vital- 
ity ; weeds ; identification, methods of distribution, eradication, con- 
trol; diseases of farm crops and methods of prevention, / or II; 

(4). 

Professor Hegnauer, Mr. Burlison, Mr. Walworth, Mr. 

Ebersol 

26. Farm Mechanics and Equipment. — Elements of useful 
farm practise, agricultural mechanics, and farm equipment ; rope- 



Agronomy 313 

tying and splicing, soldering, babbitting, pipe-cutting and fitting ; 
principles of draft in farm mechanics; efficiency of machines; 
methods of power transmission ; installation and operation of sys- 
tems of water supply; plumbing, sewage disposal, heating, lighting, 
ventilating; power plants for the farm and for the house. / or /// 
(3). Mr. White 

27. Drainage Design. — Designing tile drainage systems from 
level note data and contour maps; estimating sizes, amounts, and 
cost of tile, and cost of systems complete; designing outlet open 
ditch systems for drainage districts, estimating sizes and costs; 
drainage district laws; preparing bids on contract jobs; advanced 
field work. /; (1-5). Mr. Jahr 

Prerequisite: Agronomy i, or C. E. 21 or 22. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Students who wish to do their major work in agronomy must 
have had the major courses offered in that subject to undergrad- 
uates in the College of Agriculture of the University of Illinois, 
or the equivalent. While every one seeking a doctor's degree with 
agronomy as a major will be required to have a good knowledge 
of the whole field of agronomy, each student is expected to be 
especially prepared in some one of the following divisions of the 
field ; soil fertility, plant breeding, soil physics, crop production, and 
soil biolog>'. 

Students who are taking their major work in other departments 
and choose agronomy as a minor must have had previously the 
work in chemistry, botany, and other fundamental sciences pre- 
scribed in the undergraduate courses for students of agronomy in* 
the College of Agriculture, or the equivalent. 

[loi. Soil Investigation. — Systems of soil investigation;, 
sources of error and methods of control ; interpretation of re- 
sults. Once a week; II. Not given, 1913-14. Professor Hopkins]- 

[103. Soil History. — Different systems of agricultural practise- 
and their ultimate effect upon the soil. Once a week; II. Not 
given, 1913-14. Professor Hopkins]i 

112. Plant Breeding. — A detailed study of experiments at this 
station; methods and results reported from other states and from 
foreign countries. Once a week; I, II. Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: Botany i; Chemistry 13a. 

118. Investigation. — Professors Hopkins, Mosier, Smith* 
Pettit, Dr. Whiting 



314 Animal Husbandry 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
(Including Farm Management) 

Herbert Windsor Mumforjd, B.S., Professor, Animal Husbandry 
Harry Sands Grindley, D.Sc, Professor, Animal Nutrition 
♦Lx)uis Dixon Hall, M.S., Assistant Professor, Animal Husbandry 
Walter Castella Coffey, M.S., Professor, Sheep Husbandry 
Henry Perly Rusk, M.S., Assistant Professor, Cattle Husbandry 
James Lloyd Edmonds, B.S., Assistant Professor, Horse Hus- 
bandry 
John A Detlefsen, D.Sc, Assistant Professor, Genetics 
Daniel Otis Barto, B.S., Associate, Poultry Husbandry 
Walter Frederick Handschin, B.S., Associate, Animal Husbandry 
Walter Edward Joseph, Ph.D., Associate, Animal Husbandry 
Sleeter Bull, M.S., Associate, Animal Nutrition 
William Herschel Smith, M.S., Instructor, Animal Husbandry 
Virgil Augustus Place, B.S., Instructor, Animal Husbandry 
Francis Marion Simpson, B.S., Instructor, Animal Husbandry 
Wilbur Jerome Carmichael, B.S., Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
John Jonathan Yoke, Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
John Richard Wells, B.S., Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
Charles Ivan Newlin, B.S., Assistant, Animal Husbandry 

courses for undergraduates 

Beef Cattle: Animal Husbandry iia, lib 

Breeding, Feeding, Management, and Marketing: Animal Hus- 
bandry 6, 28, 29, 30, 32; Farm Management i. 

General Judging: Animal Husbandry la, 2a, 4a, 5, iia, 22 

Genetics : Animal Husbandry 30 

Horses : Animal Husbandry 4a, 4b, 17 

Meat: Animal Husbandry 10, 24 

Nutrition: Animal Husbandry 7, 31 

Poultry: Animal Husbandry 23 

Sheep : Animal Husbandry la, ib, 25, 27 

Swine : Animal Husbandry 2a, 2b, 26 

Note. — Students registered in advanced courses such as 22, 28, 
29, and 32, will be required to participate in a tour of inspection of 
representative markets, farms, herds, flocks, and studs. 

la. Sheep: Breeds and Market Classes. — Breeds extensively 
used for mutton and wool production; type, characteristics, and 

•On leave. 



Animal Husbandry 315 

adaptability; market classes and grades of sheep and wool. Lec- 
tures; judging. /; (2). Professor Coffey, Mr. Place 
Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5 or its equivalent. 

lb. Sheep : Breeding, Feeding, and Management. — Pure bred 
and grade flocks : feeding, housing, and shepherding. Lectures ; 
reference readings. /; (3). Professor Coffey, Mr. Place 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5 and 6 or their equivalents. 

It is advisable to take la and ib simultaneously. 

2a. Swine: Breeds and Market Classes. — History of the 
leading breeds : type, characteristics, and adaptability ; market 
classes and grades; market reports. Lectures; judging. //; (2). 

Mr. Carmichael 

Prerequisite : Animal Husbandry 5 or its equivalent. 

2b. Swine Husbandry. — Swine raising from the standpoint of 
market requirements and of economic production; breeding, hous- 
ing, care, and feeding of swine for breeding purposes. //; (3). 

Mr. Carmichael 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5 and 6, or their equivalents. 

It is advisable to take 2a and 2b simultaneously. 

4a. Breeds of Horses and Market Classes of Horses and 
Mules. — History of the leading breeds; type, characteristics, and 
adaptability; market classes, grades, and requirements. Lectures; 
judging. //; (2). Assistant Professor Edmonds, Mr. Yoke 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5, or its equivalent. 

4b. Breeding, Feeding, and Management of Horses. — Meth- 
ods : care of stallions, mares, and foals ; of work horses and drivers 
at labor and idle ; fattening horses for market. Lectures ; assigned 
readings. //; (3). Assistant Professor Edmonds, Mr. Yoke. 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5 and 6, or their equivalents. 

It is advisable to take 4a and 4b simultaneously. 

5. Fundamentals of Live Stock Judging. — The names and lo- 
cation of external parts of the various kinds of live stock, the use 
of the score card, comparative judging as a method, breed identifi- 
cation, and types of farm animals. Required in freshman year. 
I or //; (3). Professor Coffey and members of the department 

6. Principles of Feeding and Breeding. — Classification, digesti- 
bility, and functions of feed nutrients ; classification and feeding 
values of feed stuffs; feed requirements and calculation of balanced 
rations for farm animals. 



3i6 Animal Husbandry 

Evolution of domesticated animals ; history of systematic breed- 
ing and improvement; unit characters; range of variability; effects 
of selection ; systems of breeding. Required in sophomore year. 
^/ (3)- Feeding: Dr. Joseph, Mr. Bull, Mr. Newlin. 
Breeding: Mr. Handschin, Mr. Smith. 

7. Principles of Animal Nutrition. — Composition and fuel 
value of feeding stuffs; organic and inorganic food stuffs; digestion, 
absorption, and metabolism ; elimination of metabolic products ; co- 
efficients of digestibility and nutritive value of feeding stuffs. /; 
(3). Professor Grindley, Dr. Joseph, Mr. Bull, Mr. Mitchell 

Prerequisite : Animal husbandry 5 (or course formerly known 
as Animal Husbandry 21) ; Chemistry 13a. 

9. Investigation and Thesis. — / or //; (5-10). 

10. Meat. — Farm butchering, curing, and care of meats ; yield, 
quality and values of meat and by-products, as related to breeding, 
feeding, and health of animals; classes, grades, and cuts of meat 
in wholesale and retail markets. //; (3). Assistant Professor Hall 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5 and 6, or their equivalents. 

iia. Beef Cattle. — Breeds and market classes; history of the 
leading breeds ; beef type from the standpoint of the butcher, the 
feeder, and the breeder; classification and value of each grade ac- 
cording to current market reports. Judging; lectures; quizzes; as- 
signed readings. /; (2). Assistant Professor Rusk, Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite : Animal Husbandry 5 or its equivalent. 

lib. Beef Production. — Breeding and management of pure bred 
herds; breeding for market; combined beef and milk production; 
economic factors in cattle feeding; influence of age, grade, breed, 
•condition, and sex; equipment; pork and manure as by-products of 
beef production. Lectures; quizzes; assigned readings (text book). 
/; (3). Assistant Professor Rusk, Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite : Animal Husbandry 5 and 6, or their equivalents. 

It is advisable to take iia and lib simultaneously. 

15. — Dairy Cattle. — (See Dairy Husbandry 2 and 16.) 

[17. Education and Driving of the Horse. — Mental qualities, 
peculiarities, and limitations of the horse; education and training 
for labor or the road; correct driving; responsibilities of the driver; 
courtesies of the highway. Lectures; readings; practise. //; (2). 
Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Edmonds 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 4a and 4b; three semesters' 
work in the University or its equivalent.] 



Animal Husbandry 317 

22. Advanced Stock Judging. — Animal conformation, quality, 
and condition with reference to market and show yard requirements ; 
the selection of horses, beef cattle, sheep, and swine, for feed lot, 
market, and exhibition; judging at live stock shows. /; (3). 
Professor Mumford and instructors in charge of prerequisite courses 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry la, 2a, 4a, iia, or their equiv- 
alents. See note, page 314. 

23. Poultry: Types, Breeds, and Varieties. — Exhibiting and 
judging; principles of breeding; poultry houses and equipment; 
feeding, hatching, and brooding; market eggs and poultry; crate- 
fattening and dressing; diseases and their treatment. //; (5). 

Mr. Barto 
Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5, or its equivalent. 

[24. Meat. — Influence of type, condition, age, sex, and feeds up- 
on the yield and market grade of meat products. //; (2-5). 

Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Hall 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 10, and la or 2a or iia, three 
years' work in the University, or its equivalent] 

[25. Wool. — Factors affecting quality, quantity, strength, and 
condition of wool. //; (2-5). Offered in alternate years, begin- 
ning second semester, 1915. Professor Coffey 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry la, ib; three years work in 
the University, or its equivalent.] 

[26. Swine Husbandry. — Special problems in swine production. 
II; (2-5). Not given, 1913-14. Mr. Carmichael 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 2a, 2b; three years' work in 
the University, or its equivalent] 

27. Sheep Husbandry. — Factors determining the importance of 
the industry in leading sheep growing countries, particularly differ- 
ent parts of the United States. //; (2-5). Offered in alternate 
years, beginning second semester, 1914. Professor Coffey 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry la, ib; three years' work in 
the University, or its equivalent. 

28. Advanced History of Breeds of Live Stock. — Horses, beef 
cattle, sheep, and swine. Methods of great breeders; performances 
and pedigrees of famous animals ; breed type as exemplified in the 
University and other herds. Lectures ; assigned readings ; problems. 
I,' (3-5)- Professor Mumford and other members of the department 



3i8 Animal Husbandry 

Breeds offered, 1913-14 

Beef cattle Herefords, Galloways 

Horses Shires, American Saddlers 

Swine Poland Chinas, Chester Whites 

Sheep Rambouillets, Oxford Downs 

Breeds offered, 1914-15 

Beef cattle Shorthorns, Aberdeen Angus 

Horses Percherons, Standard breds 

Swine Berkshires, Duroc Jerseys 

Sheep Shropshires, Southdowns 

Prerequisite: "a" and "b" courses in class of live stock elected. 
See note, page 314. 

29. Systems of Live Stock Farming. — Management in live 
stock farming. Climate, soil, topography, location with reference 
to markets; the supply of land, labor, capital, and managing ability 
as factors in influencing the choice and adaptation of the various 
systems of live stock production. Planning of farms for mixed and 
live stock systems. //; (2). Mr. Handschin 

Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 5 and 6, and 6 hours credit 
from lb, 2b, 4b, or lib. Farm Management i. See note page 314. 

30. Genetics. — Heredity; variation; Mendel's and Galton's 
Laws ; dominance and segregation ; gametic coupling and spurious 
allelomorphism; correlation; mutation theory; inheritance of ac- 
quired characters; prenatal influence; pure lines, selection, variabil- 
ity; modification of unit-factors. Practical application to breeding. 
Lectures; laboratory. //; (5). Assistant Professor Detlefsen 

Prerequisite : Two years of university work, including ten hours 
in biology. 

31. Principles of Animal Nutrition. — (Continuation of course 
7). Carbohydrate, fat, protein, and mineral metabolism. The in- 
come and expenditure of matter and energy. Protein, mineral, and 
energy requirements for maintenance, growth, and production. Lec- 
ture; recitations; laboratory. /, //; (2-5). 

Professor Grindley, Dr. Joseph, Mr. Bull 
Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 7. 

32. Marketing Live Stock. — Markets and methods of market- 
ing live stock and their products. Advertising and sale of surplus 
pedigreed live stock. //; (2). Professor Mumford, Mr. Simpson 

Prerequisite: Two years of university work. See note, page 
314. (At least 4 credits in Animal Husbandry courses la, 2a, 4a 
and iia.) 



Animal Husbandry 319 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Students entering graduate work in Animal Husbandry should 
have had a thoro training in the fundamental principles of the 
subject either in connection with or in addition to an agricultural 
course of study substantially equivalent to that offered in this Uni- 
versity. 

See courses 7, 22, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, in under- 
graduate list, which are also open to graduate students. 

103. Live Stock Experimentation. — Objects, methods, and the 
sources of error in experimental work dealing with the feeding, 
breeding and management of farm animals. Live stock experiments 
at this and other experiment stations. I, II: Once a week; (Yi to 
lYi units). Professor Davenport 

no. Animal Nutrition. — The most recent scientific publica- 
tions relating to the chemistry and physiology of the nutrition of the 
lower animals. The chemical and physiological changes and pro- 
cesses involved in the activities of animal life. Lectures ; confer- 
ences; assigned readings; /, //: three times a week; (i unit). 

Professor Grindley, Dr. Joseph 

111. Animal Nutrition. — Methods employed in the examina- 
tion and analysis of feeding stuffs ; also animal substances including 
flesh, fat, bone, urine, feces, and manufactured animal products. 
Lectures; conferences; assigned readings; laboratory; I, II: Two 
to five times a week; (i to 2 units). Professor Grindley 

112. I nvestigation. — 

(a) Economic factors involved in the various phases of meat 

production. 

(b) Systems of live stock farming. 

(c) The valuation of pedigrees. 

(d) Animal Nutrition. A research course in Animal Nutri- 

tion including digestion and metabolism experiments 
and biochemical studies connected with the nutrition of 
farm animals. 
(a), (b), and (c), I, II: once a week; (i to 2 units). Under the 
direction of Professor Mumford 

(d), I, II: daily; (i to 2 units). Under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Grindley, Dr. Joseph 

116. Seminar. — Subject for 1913-1914: Food requirements for 
growth and the fattening of farm animals. /, //: (y^ unit). 

Members of the Staff 



320 Architecture 

117. Genetics. — The more important genetic experiments; the 
biological and mathematical methods employed; the validity of the 
conclusions. Lectures; conferences; assigned readings; laboratory 
problems. I, II; (i to 2 units). Assistant Professor Detlefsen 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

I. Elementary Farm Management. — The factors of produc- 
tion in the farm business ; systems of farming, their distribution, and 
adaptation ; farm organization ; the distribution of capital invested ; 
planning of the farm ; farm administration or operation ; planning of 
work; handling of labor; developing management efficiency. Lec- 
tures; quiz. //; (3). Mr. Handschin 

Prerequisite: Three semesters of required work; Economics i 
or 2. 

It is also very important that the student have credit or be regis- 
tered in Accountancy 11 and Agronomy 12. 

ARCHITECTURE 

Loring Harvey Provine, B.S., A.E., Professor 
Nathan Clifford Ricker, D.Arch., Professor 

♦Newton Alonzo Wells, M.P., Professor, Architectural Decor- 
ation 

Percy Ash, B.S., C.E., Assistant Professor, Architectural Design 

William C Titcomb, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of Archi- 
tecture 

Charles Richard Clark, B.S., Associate, Architectural Con- 
struction 

Robert Taylor Jones, B.S., Instructor 

Allen Holmes Kimball, M.S., Instructor, Architectural Design 
Joseph Mitchell Kellogg, M.Arch., Instructor, Architectural 
Design 

Frederick Kitson Cowley, Instructor 
Samuel Chatwood Burton, Instructor 
James Hutchinson Forsythe, M.Arch., Instructor 
Angelo Benedetto Marino Corrubia, B.S., M.S., Instructor 
Harry Young Carson, B.S., Assistant, Architectural Engineer- 
ing 

Winifred Fehrenkamp, B.L.S., Librarian 



*0n leave. 



Architecture 321 

4. Building Sanitation. — Plumbing, trap ventilation, removal 
of wastes; construction of water closets; drains, and systems of wa- 
ter supply ; sewage disposal ; water supply and fixtures in dwellings. 
(For architectural engineers.) Cosgrove's Principles and Practise of 
Plumbing. Recitations; lectures; designs for special problems. I; 
(2). Mr. Clark 

Prerequisite: Registration in Physics 6a, 6b; Architecture 43, 44. 

5. Graphic Statics. — (For architectural engineers.) Similar 
to 45 and 46. One lecture and nine hours drawing per week. II; 
(4). Mr. Clark, Mr. Kimball 

Prerequisite: Architecture 43, 44; Theoretical and Applied Me- 
chanics 8. 

6. History of Architecture. — From the Egyptian period to 
modern times; effects of political, economic, and local conditions; 
influence of materials, climate, structural systems; architecture of 
the various countries and periods; evolution of architectural forms. 
Illustrated lectures; quizzes. (For architectural engineers.) /, //; 
(4). Professor Ricker 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in architecture or archi- 
tectural engineering. 

8. Architectural Drawing. — Perspective ; shades and shad- 
ows; conventional rendering; relations of plans, elevations, and sec- 
tions to each other; elementary architectural composition. (For 
architectural engineers.) Nine hours drawing per week. II; (3). 

Mr. Kimball 

Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing i. Architecture 20. 

10. Estimating. — Methods and practise of estimating building 
costs. (For architectural engineers.) //; (i). 

Professor Provine, Mr. Clark 

11. Seminar. — Assigned topics in History of Architecture; re- 
view of books; abstracts of current technical journals and other pub- 
lications. I,II; {i). Professor Ricker 

Prerequisite : Registration in Architecture 6. 

13, 14, 15, 16. History of Architecture. — Covers approximately 
the same ground as Architecture 6. (For architects.) Sophomore 
I, II; Junior I, II; (2). Professor Ricker 

Prerequisite: Architecture 31, 32. 



322 Architecture 

15a. Design. — (Architectural design for architectural engineers.) 
Order and plan problems. Nine hours drawing per week. II; (3). 
Assistant Professor Titcomb, Mr. Kellogg, Mr. Corrubia 

Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing i, 2; Architecture 
20, 8. 

19. Architectural Engineering. — Advanced graphic statics ap- 
plied to the analysis of metalic roofs of wide span ; roof trusses of 
curved or unusual form and those supported by abutments and joint- 
ed, spherical, and conical trussed domes ; the stone arch, vault, and 
dome, and of the Gothic system of vaults and buttresses; the 
strength of walls, dams, retaining walls, and large chimneys; the 
effect of moving loads on girders ; construction and details of steel 
skeleton buildings. Problems in design for specified cases. Ricker's 
Notes on Architectural Engineering. Nine hours drawing per week. 
I, II; (3). Professor Provine, Mr. Clark 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 6, 7, 8, 9; Ar- 
chitecture 43, 44, 5. 

20. Architectural and Freehand Drawing. — Freehand draw- 
ing from the cast; principles of architecture; architectural elements; 
walls, moldings, doors, windows, the Orders, etc. Lectures and 
sketching. (For architectural engineers.) Two lectures and seven 
hours drawing per week. I; (3). Mr. Kimball 

23, 24. — Freehand Drawing. — Charcoal drawing from the cast. 
Six hours drawing per week. I, II; (2). 

Professor Wells^ Mr. Cowley 
Prerequisite: Architecture 32. 

25, 26. Freehand Drawing. — Charcoal, pen, pencil, and water 
color drawing from the cast and from still life. Out-of-door 
sketching. Six hours drawing per week. I, II; (2). 

Professor Wells, Mr. Cowley 

Prerequisite: Architecture 24. 

27, 28. Freehand Drawing. — Water color drawing; original 
decorative composition; out-of-door sketching. Six hours drawing 
per week. I, II; (2). Professor Wells, Mr. Burton 

Prerequisite: Architecture 26. 

30. Advanced Architectural Engineering. — The working out 
of an extended problem in design or construction. I, (i) ; //, (3). 

Professor Provine, Mr. Clark 
Prerequisite: Full senior standing. 

31. Architectural and Freehand Drawing. — Practise with 
instruments, pen, pencil, and brush; lettering; shades and shadows; 



Architecture 323 

perspective. Charcoal drawing from the cast One lecture and 
eleven hours drawing per week. I; (4). 

Mr. FoRSYTHE, Mr. Cowley 

Prerequisite: Registration in G. E. D. 2. 

Z2. Architectural and Freehand Drawing. — Elements of 
architecture ; walls, moldings, doors, windows, the Orders, vaults, 
roofs, stairs. Wash rendering, stereotomy, charcoal drawing from 
the cast. Lectures and sketching. One lecture and eleven hours of 
drawing per week. II; (4). 

Mr. Forsythe, Mr. Cowley 

Prerequisite: Architecture 31. 

33, 34. Design. — (Elementary). Rendered order problems and 
sketch problems involving simple composition ; library research in 
elements of composition. Nine hours drafting room per week. 

Lii; (3). 

Assistant Professor Titcomb, Mr. Kellogg, Mr. Corrubia 

Prerequisite: Architecture 31, z^. 

34a, Architectural Engineering Seminar. — Current litera- 
ture; written reports and discussions. /; (i). Professor PRov^NE 

35, 36. Design. — (Intermediate). Rendered plan problems and 
sketch problems ; library research in plan and interior elements. 
Fifteen hours drafting room per week. I, II; (5). 

Assistant Professor Titcomb, Mr. Kellogg, Mr. Corrubia 

Prerequisite : Architecture 33, 34. 

Z7. Design. — (Advanced). Extended problems in original de- 
sign. Twenty-one hours drafting room per week. I; (7). 

Assistant Professor Ash 

Prerequisite: Architecture 35, Z^. 

38. Advanced Design or Thesis. — The working out of an ex- 
tended original problem in design or construction. Twenty-one 
hours drafting room per week. I, II; (7). Assistant Professor Ash 

Prerequisite: Architecture 37. 

43. Working Drawings. — The growth, cutting, seasoning, 
working, and finishing of woods ; structural and decorative prop- 
erties ; detailing at large scale various parts : floors, walls, roofs, 
doors, windows, cornices, stairs, wainscoating, cabinet-work, in- 
terior finish; preparation of working drawings. Kidder's Building 
Construction, Part II. Two lectures and four hours drawing per 
week. I; (3). Mr. R. T. Jones 

Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing 2; Architecture 31, 
32. 



324 Architecture 

44. Working Drawings. — Foundations of stone, brick, con- 
crete, and piles ; materials employed in stone masonry ; their uses, 
defects, qualities, and modes of preparation ; kinds of masonry and 
external finish; tools for stone cutting and their use; brick mason- 
ry, its materials and bonds ; terra-cotta design, manufacture, and 
use; detailing of columns, beams, girders, and footings; joints and 
connections. Preparation of working drawings. Kidder's Build- 
ing Construction and Superintendence. Part I. Two lectures and 
four hours drawing per week. II; (3). Mr. R. T. Jones 

Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing 2; Architecture 31, 

32. 

45. Graphic Statics. — Elements of graphic statics and their 
application in the analysis of trussed roofs, steel and masonry 
arches, domes. The graphical representation of reactions, bending 
moments, shear and deflection in beams. (For architects.) Ricker's 
Notes on Graphic Statics. One lecture and six hours drawing per 
week. I; (3). Mr. Clark, Mr. Kimball 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 14, 15, 16. 

46. Structures. — Design of wooden and steel roofs ; deter- 
mination of section of members; design of joints; mill and steel 
skeleton construction. One lecture and three hours drawing per 
week. II; (3). Mr. Clark, Mr. Kimball 

Prerequisite: Architecture 45. 

55. Building Sanitation. — (For architects similar to Archi- 
tecture 4). /; (i). Mr. Clark 
Prerequisite: Physics 6a, 6b; Architecture 43, 44. 

59. Domestic Architecture. — (Given in connection with 
Household Science 2.) Lectures ; criticism. 

Assistant Professor Ash, Mr. Clark, Mr. R. T. Jones 

60. Special Lectures. — Lectures on Estimating (For archi- 
tects.) One lecture per week. I, II; (i). 

In charge of Professor Provine 

65, 66. Theory of Architecture. — Influence of function on 
architectural form; theory of architectural composition in plan and 
elevation ; problem analysis. Lectures ; research ; exercises. I, 11; 
(i). Assistant Professor Titcomb 

Prerequisite: Architecture 33, 34. 

67. Theory of Form and Color. — Principles underlying pleas- 
ing arrangements of form and color; rhythm and sequence; har- 



Art and Design 325 

mony and contrast ; proportion and balance. Lectures ; exercises. 
/; (2). Professor Wells, Mr. Burton 

Prerequisite: Architecture 25, 26, 35, 36. 

68. Specifications. — The general and special clauses of specifi- 
cations and their arrangement; methods of classifying material to 
facilitate writing specifications. Practise in writing several sets; 
relations of the architect, owner, and builder; office organization; 
building ordinances; professional ethics. //; (3). 

Professor Provine, Mr. Clark 

Prerequisite: First three years of the courses in Architecture 
or Architectural Engineering. 

courses for graduates 

Entrance upon graduate work in architecture presupposes the 
full undergraduate course in that subject. Semi-weekly confer- 
ences are held and additional instruction given in all courses as 
may be required. 

loi. Architectural Construction. — Design of special struc- 
tures. Arrange hours; I, II. Professors Ricker and Provine 

102. Sanitation of Buildings. — The planning of sanitation, 
warming, and ventilation, for buildings of importance. Arrange 
hours; I, II. Professor Ricker, Mr. Clark 

103. Advanced Architectural Graphics. — Advanced work in 
graphic statics, stereotomy, perspective, water color, and free-hand 
drawing. Arrange hours; I or II. Professors Ricker, Provine 

104. Architectural Design. — Advanced architectural design. 
Arrange hours; I or II. Assistant Professor Ash 

105. Architectural Practise. — Contracts, specifications, and 
office methods; architectural jurisprudence. Arrange hours; I or II. 

Professors Ricker, Provine 

106. Advanced Architectural History. — Special research in 
architectural history. Arrange hours; I or II. 

Professor Ricker, Assistant Professor Ash 

ART AND DESIGN 

Edward John Lake, B.S., Assistant Professor 
Charles Fabens Kelley, A.B., Associate 
Mary Minerva Wetmore, Instructor 
Charles Earl Bradbury, B.P., Instructor 

I. Free-Hand Drawing. — The principles of perspective; prac- 
tise in drawing. I, II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Lake, Mr. Bradbury 



326 Astronomy 

2. Light and Shade. — Shaded drawing in monochrome. //; 
(2). Mr. Bradbury 

Prerequisite: Art and Design i. 

3. Antique Drawing. — Practise in drawing; study of artistic 
anatomy. I, II; (2). Mr. Bradbury 

Prerequisite: Art and Design i. 

4. Water Color Painting. — Still-life; flowers; landscapes. 
A J^! (3). Miss Wetmore 

Prerequisite : Art and Design i, 2. 

5. Drawing from Life. — Posed model in costume. /, //; (2). 

Miss Wetmore 
Prerequisite: Art and Design i, 2, 3. 

6. Portrait in Oil Color. — Figure and portrait in costume. 
I, II; (2). Miss Wetmore 

Prerequisite: Art and Design i, 2. 

7. Oil Painting. — Still-life; flowers; landscape. I, II; (3). 

Miss Wetmore 
Prerequisite: Art and Design i, 2. 

8. Modeling. — Antique and figure; plaster casting. I, II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Lake 
Prerequisite : Art and Design i. 

10. Sketching in Monochrome. — General practise in pen and 
pencil. //; (i). Assistant Professor Lake 

Prerequisite : Art and Design i. 

11. Composition. — Pictorial design. //; (i). Mr. Kelley 

12. Design. — Theory and practise. I, II; (2). Mr. Kelley 
Prerequisite : Art and Design i. 

13. Design. — History and practise. I, II; (3). Mr. Kelley 
Prerequisite : Art and Design i, 12. 

14. Design. — Advanced practise. I, II; (3). Mr. Kelley 
Prerequisite: Art and Design i, 12, 13. 

19. History of the Fine Arts. — I, II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Lake 
Prerequisite: One year of college work. 

ASTRONOMY 

Joel Stebbins, Ph.D., Professor 
Frank Walker Reed, Ph.D., Instructor 
John David Bond, A.B., Research Assistant 

Instruction in astronomy is arranged both for general students 
and for those who desire to take up the science from its technical 



Astronomy 327 

side. Advanced students are given every opportunity to become 
familiar with the use of modern astronomical instruments. The 
equipment of the department is contained in the Astronomical 
Observatory. The principal instruments are a 12-inch refracting 
telescope by Warner and Swazey, and Brashear, a 30-inch short 
focus reflector by Brashear, and a 3-inch transit and zenith tele- 
scope. There are also two smaller equatorials, two Riefler clocks, 
and a considerable amount of minor apparatus such as chrono- 
meters, transits, sextants, spectroscopes, photometer, photographic 
outfit, and calculating machines. The astronomical library com- 
prises about 1,500 volumes, and includes the important astronomical 
periodicals. 

Students without mathematical training may elect course i. 
Course 4 is for beginners, but requires a knowledge of trigonom- 
etry. Other courses should be taken in the order: 3, 6, 15, 14, 7. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

I. Elementary Astronomy. — Lectures; recitations; one even- 
ing a week at the observatory. (For beginners; mathematics not 
required.) /; (3). Professor Stebbins, Dr. Reed 

3. General Astronomy for Engineers. — Descriptive astron- 
omy; required with course 6. //; (3). Professor Stebbins 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7 or 8. 

4. General Astronomy. — Lectures; recitations; two evenings 
a week at the observatory. //; (5). Dr. Reed 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 4. 

6. Practical Astronomy. — Rough and accurate determinations 
of latitude, azimuth, and time, especially with the ordinary sur- 
veyor's transit; the art of computing. //; (2). 

Professor Stebbins 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 7 or 8. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Theoretical Astronomy. — Celestial mechanics; theory of 
orbits; perturbations; canonical transformations. I, II; (3). 

Dr. Reed 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8 or 7 and 9. 

9. Celestial Mechanics. — Properties of canonical systems of 
differential equations ; integration by series ; periodic and asymp- 
totic solutions; integral invariants. /, //; (3). Dr. Reed 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 16; Astronomy 7. 



328 Botany 

14. Observational Astronomy. — The working methods of an 
astronomical observatory; individual problems. //; (3). 

Professor Stebbins 
Prerequisite: Astronomy 15. 

15. Geodetic Astronomy. — The sextant, transit, and zenith tele- 
scope; methods similar to those of the United States Coast Survey. 
/; (3). Professor Stebbins 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7 or 8. 

course for graduates 

loi. Seminar and Thesis. — Three times a week, both semes- 
ters, (i unit). Professor Stebbins 

BACTERIOLOGY 
(See Botany 5, 6, 8, 18, 19, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107.) 

BANKING (See Economics.) 

BIOLOGY 
(See Botany, Entomology, Physiology, and Zoology.) 

BOTANY 
(Including Bacteriology) 

William Trelease, D.Sc, LL.D., Professor 

Thomas Jonathan Burrill, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor, Emeritus 

Charles Frederick Hottes, Ph.D., Professor 

♦Frank Lincoln Stevens, Ph.D., Professor, Plant Pathology 

Otto Rahn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Bacteriology 

Stella Mary Hague, Ph.D., Instructor 

Walter Byron McDougall, Ph.D., Instructor 

John Hamilton Whitten, A.M., Assistant 

Rosalie Mary Parr, A.M., Assistant 

Reed O'Shea Brigham, B.S., Assistant 

Clyde Ross Newell, M.S., Assistant 

fBRONSON Barlow, M.S., Research Assistant 

Ernest Michael Rudolph Lam key, A.B., Assistant 

Lawrence Vreeland Burton, B.S., Assistant 

John Marvin LeCato, A.B., Assistant 

Harry Dwight Waggoner, A.B., Assistant 

Samuel Hawthorne Scherfee, A.B., Graduate Assistant 



•Commencing Feb. 1, 1914. 
tResigned Nov. 1, 1913. 



Botany 329 

Courses numbered i to 19 inclusive are primarily for under- 
graduates; those numbered loi to 106 inclusive are for graduates 
only. The undergraduate work may be roughly classified in four 
somewhat distinctive lines, viz : i, anatomy and physiology 
(courses i, 3, 7, 9, 12, 14) ; 2, morphology and taxonomy (courses 
2, 4, 4a, 16 and 17) ; 3, bacteriology (courses 5, 6, 8, 18, 19.) ; 4, 
pathology, (Course 7). Course 11 is an introductory one. Courses 
2, 4, 12, form together a general introduction to the science and may 
be elected by those who propose to go no farther or with equal pro- 
priety by those who are to pursue subsequently the more specialized 
work. 

1. Morphology and Physiology of the Flowering Plant. — 
General course, primarily for students in agriculture; / or II; (5). 
(Not acceptable for major credit in botany in the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences). Professor Hottes, Dr. McDougall, Mr. 
Whitten, Miss Parr, Mr. Brigham, Mr. Lam key, Mr. Scherfee, 
Mr. Waggoner, Mr. LeCato 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i. 

2. Morphology. — The principal plant groups, beginning with 
the lower (thallophytes), by selected types. First semester: gen- 
eral survey of the plant world ; second semester : seed plants (sper- 
matophytes). Each semester's work is credited separately as 2a 
and 2b. I,II;(s). Dr. Hague 

Prerequisite : Entrance credit in botany, or Botany 11 (for 2b, 
Botany 11 or 2a). 

3. Cytology and Physiology. — First semester: cytology and 
histology, with special attention to technique. Second semester: 
influences of external stimuli on growth and movement. Lectures ; 
laboratory; assigned reading. (Extends through the year, but the 
work of each semester is credited separately as 3a and 3b.) I, II; 
(S). Professor Hottes 

Prerequisite: Botany 12. 

4. Taxonomy of Spermatophytes. — Identification and classi- 
fication of flowering plants. Lectures; assigned reading; labora- 
tory; field excursions. /; (5). Dr. Hague 

Prerequisite: Entrance credit in botany, or Botany 11. 

4a. Taxonomy of Cultivated Plants. — Morphology, identi- 
fication, and classification of commonly cultivated plants. Labo- 
ratory work with complementary lectures and reading. Primarily 
for students in the College of Agriculture. Professor Trelease 

Prerequisite: One semester of botany or its equivalent. 



330 Botany 

5. Bacteriology. — General principles; methods of procedure; 
selected forms. Lectures; recitations; laboratory work. / or II; 
(5). (Course given in the first semester is repeated in the second.) 

Assistant Professor Rahn, Mr. Newell 
Prerequisite: Chemistry i; one year's university work, includ- 
ing one semester in botany or zoology. 

6. Bacteriology for Sanitary Engineers. — Bacteriological 
methods; water analysis and sewage. /, last seven weeks; (2). 

Assistant Professor Rahn, Mr. Newell 

7. Plant Pathology. — First semester: the more important dis- 
eases of cultivated plants, their causes, and methods of prevention; 
second semester: methods of investigation and control. (Each 
semester's work credited separately as 7a and 7b.) /, //; (5)- 

Professor Stevens 
Prerequisite: Botany 12; 2 or 4. 

8. Applied Bacteriology. — Decay of organic matter in nature; 
water bacteriology; sewage bacteriology; food bacteriology; path- 
ological bacteriology. //; (5). Assistant Professor Rahn 

Prerequisite: Botany $. 

9. Cytology and Physiology, Advanced Course. — Special lab- 
oratory problems in cytology and physiology. Critical discussions 
of current literature; reports on research work. /, //; (2-5). 

Professor Hottes 
Prerequisite: Two years' work in botany, including Botany 3. 

10. Current Literature. — Reports and discussions upon as- 
signed topics and results of research work. (For advanced and 
graduate students.) I, II; (i). 

11. Introductory Course. — Flowering plants, their structure 
and activities. Lectures; laboratory; field observations; text. I; 

(5). 

Professor Hottes, Dr. McDougall, Mr. Written, Miss Parr, 

Mr. Lam key, Mr. Waggoner 

12. Physiology. — The growth of the plant members and their 
response to stimuli. //; (5). Professor Hottes and assistants 

Prerequisite: Botany 11. 

13. Photography. — Practise in the photography of plants in 
field and laboratory ; production of prints for reproduction ; photo- 
micrography. //; (2). Professor Hottes 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in botany, senior standing. 



Botany 331 

14. Heredity and Origin of Species. — The plant cell; the 
physiology of its different constituents and the parts these play in 
the process of fertilization ; various theories of heredity and of 
species formation. Lectures; demonstrations; laboratory. /; (3). 

Professor Hottes 

Prerequisite: One year's work in the University; one semester 
in botany or zoology. 

16. Taxonomy of Special Groups. — Laboratory and herbarium 
work; assigned reading. (The course extends through the year, 
but the work of each semester is credited separately as i6a and 
i6b.) I, II; (5). Professor Stevens, Dr. Hague 

Prerequisite: Botany 4. 

17. Taxonomic and Descriptive Practise. — Monographic treat- 
ment of selected natural or ecological groups of higher plants, with 
thesis. Laboratory and field work; assigned reading; seminar con- 
ferences. /, //; (3). Professor Trelease 

Prerequisite : ID hours of botany and junior standing. 

18. Journal Meeting. — Required of all students specializing in 
bacteriology. /, //; (i). Assistant Professor Rahn 

Prerequisite: Botany 5. 

19. Bacteriology. — Elementary course arranged for graduate 
students in science, /, //; (5). Assistant Professor Rahn 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 2, and 3. 

26. Medical Bacteriology. — II; (5). Dr. Beard 

Prerequisite : The consent of the instructor. 

courses for graduates 

After at least one year of approved botanical work graduates 
may elect any of the courses 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, or 17, for minor 
credit and any of the courses 3, 7, 8, 9, with assigned additions for 
major credit towards an advanced degree. 

The following are open only to graduates of liberal botanical 
training and may, upon approval, be elected for minor or major 
work. 

loi. Cytology. — The influence of external agents on the cell. 
Special subjects for investigation assigned upon consultation. Re- 
ports ; discussions of current literature and research results. Twice 
a week; I, II; {i or 2 units). Professor Hottes 

102. Physiology. — The effects of external stimuli on growth 
and movement. Special subjects for investigation assigned upon 
consultation. Reports; discussions of current literature and re- 
search results. Twice a week; I, II; (i or 2 units). 

Professor Hottes 



332 Ceramics 

103. Bacteriology. — Morphologic and physiological variation 
due to treatment; the number, validity, and relationship of spe- 
cies ; special saprophytic or parasitic kinds of bacteria, and meth- 
ods of favoring or combating their activities. Twice a week; I; 
(j unit). Assistant Professor Rahn 

104. Mycology. — Selected groups of fungi. Individual assign- 
ments of subjects and problems. Field and laboratory. Twice a 
week; I, II; (i Unit). Professor Stevens 

105. Bacteriology. — Variability of species; characters; muta- 
tions; standard and biometrical classification. Twice a week; I, II; 
(i unit). Assistant Professor Rahn 

106. Vegetable Pathology. — Diseases of plants and disease 
agents. Special subjects assigned upon consultation. Tzvice a iveek; 
I, II; (j unit). Professor Stevens, Assistant Professor Rahn 

107. Bacteriology Research. — Research in physiology of bac- 
teria, and food bacteriology. Reports and discussions of current 
literature and research results. Twice a week; I, II; (i or 2 units). 

Assistant Professor Rahn 

CERAMICS 

Ray Thomas Stull, E.M., Acting Director 
Ralph Kent Hursh, B.S., Instructor 
Barney S Radcliffe, M.S., Instructor 
Arthur Edwards Williams, B.S., Assistant 
Charles Claflin Rand, B.S., Assistant 

The courses offered by the department of ceramics are designed 
to give a technical knowledge of the composition and properties 
of raw materials used in the manufacture of clay wares, cements, 
and glasses, and of the physical and chemical changes which they 
undergo during manufacture; manual skill in the manipulation of 
these materials ; and such knowledge of machines and the applica- 
tions of power as will enable the student to acquire familiarity with 
the construction and operation of a manufacturing plant; to un- 
derstand the peculiarities of the materials with which he is to 
deal; and to install such machinery and introduce such methods of 
manufacture as will improve the quality and reduce the cost of 
the wares. 

For the more technical work the department occupies a build- 
ing especially designed for its needs. The lecture rooms, labora- 
tories, kiln and furnace building, drawing rooms, and library are 
well equipped. 



Ceramics 333 

The relations of the department with the clay working in- 
terests of the State are such that investigation is as much a part 
of its work as is instruction. Consequently, studies of both a 
purely scientific and a practical nature are continually in progress. 
Advanced students are permitted to take part in these investigations 
under the direction of the instructors. Seniors and graduate stu- 
dents are expected to conduct investigations of their own in some 
line of work in which they are especially interested. (For outlines 
of courses see pages 179 and 180. 

1. Classification and Physical Testing of Clays. — The 
properties of clays and other ceramic materials; the identification 
of the varieties met in practical work. Lectures; laboratory. /; 
(3). Mr. HuRSH 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2, 3. 

2. Winning and Preparation of Clays. — Commercial meth- 
ods. /; (3). Mr. Radcliffe 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 5b. 

3. Industrial Calculations. — The designing and operation of 
furnaces, kilns, and dryers; temperature measurements; ceramic 
stochiometry. /; (3). Mr. Hursch 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8; Chemistry 5b; Physics i and 3. 

4. Drying and Burning. — Methods of dr>-ing and burning clay 
wares; types of construction of industrial kiln plants; chemical and 
physical processes involved. /; (4). Mr. Stull 

Prerequisite: Ceramics i, 3. 

5. Body Making. — Composition of all classes of ceramic wares ; 
physical and chemical changes produced by the blending of the 
various ceramic materials ; machinery and processes employed in 
shaping the various products. Lectures; laboratory. II; (5). 

Mr. Stull, Mr. Radcliffe 
Prerequisite: Ceramics 3. 

6. Glazes. — The production of glazes and enamels ; limits of 
composition ; classification ; properties and defects common to 
each class ; the effect of variation in composition ; modes of appli- 
cation. Lectures; laboratory. /; (5). Mr. Stull 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 3, 4, 5. 

8. Principles of Glass Manufacture. — The raw materials 
preparation, compounding, melting, and shaping of glass; chemical 
principles involved in the manufacture and decoration of the differ- 
ent types of vitreous silicates. Lectures. //; (3). Mr. Stull 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 3, 6. 



334 Ceramics 

g. Ceramic Construction. — Plans, specifications, and estimates 
of ceramic construction. //; (5). Mr. Stull, Mr. Hursh 

Prerequisite: G. E. D. 2; Ceramics 3, 4. 

10. Cements. — Limes, cements, plaster, sand-lime, brick, and 
other cementing materials; composition; reactions; methods of 
manufacture and testing. Lectures. /; (3). Mr. Hursh 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 3. 

11. Thesis. — II; (5). Mr. Stull, Mr. Hursh 

12. Designing and Shaping. — Technical designing and shaping 
from the standpoint of the manufacturer; die construction; laying 
out of work; templates; master and working molds; pressing; 
casting; jiggering. //; (3). Mr. Radcliffe 

Prerequisite: Ceramics i or 2. 

13. Cement Laboratory. — The preparation of cementing sub- 
stances; properties; typical reactions involved in the manufacture 
and use of lime, lime-sand products, pozzuolane, Sorel cement, 
natural and Portland cement; the behavior of the hardened pro- 
ducts under the influence of the various agencies to which they 
are subjected in use. /; (3). Mr. Hursh 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 10. 

14. Continuation of Course 13. — The production of water 
proof and sea water resisting cements ; cement colloids ; poly- 
chrome pigments for fresco decoration ; cement colors ; cold water 
paints. //; (3). Mr. Hursh 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 13. 

15. The Preparation of Glass Silicates. — Soda-lime; potash- 
lime ; lead, barium, and zinc silicates ; boro silicates ; properties of 
the fused and solidified glasses; practical problems of the glass in- 
dustry. /; (3). Mr. Stull 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 8. 

16. Continuation of Course 15. — Opaque, colored, and optical 
glasses; the enameling of metals; cast iron; sheet iron; copper. 
//; (3). Mr. Stull 

Prerequisite: Ceramics 15. 

courses for graduates 

Courses open to graduates of courses other than ceramics to be 
taken as minors : Ceramics 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 14. 

104. The Technology of Glass. — Fusion curves of glassy sili- 
cates; limiting compositions; solubility of the oxides in glasses; 



Chemistry 335 

devitrification; annealing; optical properties; solubility of glass; 
viscosity ; thermal expansion ; pyro-chemical volume changes ; re- 
action of coloring oxides ; cooling curves ; flashing ; interaction be- 
tween metal surfaces and glasses; oxidation and reduction. Five 
times a week; I, II; (i unit). Mr. Stull 

CHEMISTRY 

William Albert Noyes, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor and Director 

Samuel Wilson Paur, M.S., Professor 

Harry Sands Grindley, D.Sc, Professor 

Edward Bartow, Ph.D., Professor 

Clarence William Balke, Ph.D., Professor 

Edward Wight Washburn, Ph.D., Professor 

David Ford McFarland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

George McPhail Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Clarence George Derick, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Henry Charles Paul Weber, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Duncan Arthur MacInnes, Ph.D., Instructor 

George Denton Beal, Ph.D., Instructor 

B Smith PIopkins, Ph.D., Instructor 

Lambert Thorp, Ph.D., Instructor 

Charles George MacArthur, A.M., Instructor 

Stuart Jeffrey Bates, Ph.D., Instructor 

Henry John Broderson, Ph.D., Instructor 

Leslie Denis Smith, Ph.D., Instructor 

Charles Henry Hecker, Ph.D., Instructor 

Bronislav Roman Honovski, Ph.D., Research Assistant 

George Wallace Sears, M.S., Assistant 

Harvey Peach Corson, M.S., Assistant 

Oliver Kamm, M.S., Assistant 

Charles Kay Hewes, B.S., Assistant 

Bert Stover Davisson, A.B., Assistant 

Edgar Wallace Engle, B.S., Assistant 

John William Read, M.S., Assistant 

Gerrit John VanZoeren, A.B., Assistant 

Thomas Ernest Layng, A.M., Assistant 

Chester Harmon Allen, A.B.. Assistant 

Ernest Atkins Wildman, B.S., Assistant 

Raymond Washington Hess, A.B., Assistant 

Scott Champlin Taylor, B.S., Assistant 

Harry Fletcher Lewis, M.S., Assistant 



336 Chemistry 

Lawrence Fleming Foster, A.B., Assistant 

♦Paul Anders, Assistant, Glass Blowing 

Karl Adolph Clark, A.M., Graduate Assistant 

Robert Earl Baker, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Everett Harvey Taylor, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Juanita Elizabeth Darrah, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Clarence Scroll, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Howard DeWitt Valentine, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Henry Joseph Weiland, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Ross Earlby Gilmore, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Duane Taylor Englis, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Ernest Edward Charlton, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Steward Dent Marquis, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Ralph Waldo Tippet, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Theodore Rally Ball, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Herbert Melville Carter, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Edward Wichers, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Harry Cleveland Kremmers, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

William Asbury Manuel, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

The Department of Chemistry is organized under nine divisions 
as follows : 

Elementary and Inorganic Chemistry 

Qualitative Analysis 

Quantitative Analysis, including Agricultural and Food Analysis 

Organic Chemistry 

Physiological Chemistry 

Animal Nutrition 

Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry 

Industrial Chemistry, including Metallurgy, Gas Analysis, and 
Assaying 

Water Chemistry 

Each of these divisions is equipped with rooms and apparatus 
for elementary, advanced, and graduate work. The nature of the 
work is apparent from an examination of the courses described 
below. 

Students taking chemistry at the University are advised to give 
at least one year to the subject, and this should include Chemistry 
I or I a, 2, and 3. Those continuing in the second year should take 
Chemistry 5a and 5b, 5c or 13a. In the third year Chemistry 14 or 
9, 9a, and 9b, or 9c, 31, and 33 should be taken. With these, more 
special courses may be taken if desired, but, in general, students are 



•Beginning February 1, 1914. 



Chemistry 337 

not advised to take the special courses unless they have had the 
fundamental v^ork represented by the selection given above. Stu- 
dents who desire a training for professional work in chemistry, 
either as teachers or in its industrial applications, will naturally take 
the chemical course or the course in chemical engineering. 

Students who find it impossible to take more than one semes- 
ter's work are requested to register for Chemistry i or la in the 
second semester rather than in the first 

1. Inorganic Chemistry. — The non-metallic elements. Noyes's 
Text-book of Chemistry. I or II; (5). 

Professor Noyes, Professor Balke, Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Hecker 

la. Inorganic Chemistry. — Lectures; recitations; laboratory. 
/ or II; (4). 

Professor Noyes, Professor Balke, Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Hecker 
Prerequisite: One year of entrance chemistry. 

lb. Inorganic Chemistry. — Inorganic chemistry. Lectures; 
recitations; laboratory. (For students in engineering.) / or II; 
(4). Professor Noyes, Professor Balke, Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Hecker 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. — A continuation of Chemistry i. The 
metallic elements ; their classification, compounds, and chemical 
properties. Lectures; assigned text. Noyes's Textbook of Chem- 
istry. I or II; (2). 

Professor Noyes, Professor Balke, Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Hecker 
Prerequisite: Chemistry i ; registration in Chemistry 3. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. — Recitations; laboratory. / or II; 
(3). Assistant Professor Weber, Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Hecker 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i; registration in Chemistry 2. 

4. Qualitative Analysis and the Chemistry of the Metal- 
lic Elements. — Class and laboratory work. (For students in en- 
gineering.) /; (4). Assistant Professor Weber 

Prerequisite: Chemistry la or ib. 

5a. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric and 
volumetric analysis ; stoichometrical relations and the application 
of the fundamental laws of chemistry to quantitative analysis. Lec- 
tures; recitations; laboratory. Talbot's Quantitative Chemical 
Analysis. (Medical students are given special problems in the 
latter part of the course.) I, II; (5). 

Assistant Professor Smith, Dr. Beal, Dr. Bates 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 2, 3. 

5b. Quantitative Analysis. — Continuation of 5a. Methods; 
the analysis of silicates, metallic compounds, and alloys ; advanced 



338 Chemistry 

qualitative analysis for students in the courses in chemistry and 
chemical engineering. Lectures ; laboratory. Treadwell-Hall : 
Analytical Chemistry, Vol. II. //; (5). 

Assistant Professor Smith, Dr. Bates 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a. 

SO. Food Analysis. — Quantitative organic analysis, with spe- 
cial reference to the examination of food and drug products : al- 
cohols, carbohydrates, fats and oils, animal and vegetable foods, 
nitrogenous bodies, preservatives, and colors. Sherman's Organic 
Analysis; "Bulletin 107, rev., U. S. Bureau of Chemistry." II; 
(3 to 5). Dr. Beal 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a or 13a; 9 or 14. 

6*. Chemical Technology. — Technological chemistry as illus- 
trated in those industries having a chemical basis for their prin- 
cipal operations and processes; trade journals. Lectures; recita- 
tions. Rogers and Aubert's Industrial Chemistry. II; (2). 

Assistant Professor McFarland 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a. 

7*. Metallurgy. — General metallurgy; metallurgy of iron and 
steel ; metallurgy of the non-ferrous metals. Lectures ; assigned 
reading; recitations. Fulton's Principles of Metallurgy; Stough- 
ton's Iron and Steel. I; (3). Assistant Professor McFarland 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 5a. 

8. Iron and Steel Analysis. — Analyses of all the constituents 
by both rapid, or technical, and standard methods. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Smith 
Prerequisite : Chemistry 5b. 

9. Organic Chemistry. — The characteristics of the more typ- 
ical and simple organic compounds; the important classes of 
derivatives of carbon. (For students of the medical preparatory 
course and others desiring a short course.) //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Derick 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3. 

9a. Organic Synthesis and Ultimate Analysis. — Ultimate 

organic analysis; typical organic compounds. Laboratory. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Derick, Dr. Thorp, Mr. Kamm 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3; registration in Chemistry 14, or 

equivalent. 



'Certain inspection trips will be arranged in connection with courses 
6 and 7. Students registered in these courses should take into consideration 
the expense involved, which will approximate $15.00 for each course. 



Chemistry 339 

9b. Organic Synthesis and Qualitative Organic Analysis. 
— Continuation of 9a, to accompany Chemistry 14. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Derick, Dr. Thorp, Mr. Kamm 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 9a; registration in Chemistry 14, or 
equivalent 

9c. Organic Synthesis. — Typical organic compounds. Labo- 
ratory. (For students in the medical preparatory and household 
science courses and others desiring a brief course.) //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Derick, Dr. Thorp, Mr. Kamm 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3; registration in Chemistry 9, or 
equivalent. 

loa. Water Chemistry. — The history, sources, contamination, 
and standards of purity of potable waters and waters for indus- 
trial purposes. Lectures; practise in analytical methods. //; (3). 

Professor Bartow 

lob. (A modification of loa to meet the requirements of stu- 
dents in sanitar\' engineering, registered in connection with Chem- 
istry 2 and 3.) //; (2J/2). Professor Bartow 

II. Research. — Thesis embodying a thoro review of the litera- 
ture of the subject; account of work done in the laboratory. The 
subject should be determined upon and reading begun in the junior 
year. A minimum of five semester hours is required. (Required 
for seniors.) I, II; (5)- 

Professors Noyes, Parr, Bartow, Balke, Washburn, Assistant 
Professors McFarland, Smith, Derick, Weber, Dr. Mac- 
Innes, Dr. Beal, Dr. Hopkins, Dr. Thorp, Dr. Bates, Dr. 
Broderson, Dr. Smith, Dr. Hecker, Mr. MacArthur 

13a. Agricultural Analysis. — Gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis; analysis of fertilizers and milk. Talbot's Quantitative 
Chemical Analysis. (For students in agriculture.) / or II; (5). 

Assistant Professor Smith, Dr. Beal, Dr. Bates 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2, 3. 

13b. Advanced Agricultural Analysis. — Applied quantitative 
analysis. The analysis of fungicides, limestone, phosphate rock, 
fuel, and water; determination of the alkali metals; special meth- 
ods of agricultural analysis. Treadwell-Hall, Analytical Chemis- 
try, Vol. n. (For students who wish to specialize in agricultural 
chemistry or agricultural experiments.) //; (5). Dr. Beal 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a or 13a. 



340 Chemistry 

14. Organic Chemistry. — Lectures; recitations. Noyes's Or- 
ganic Chemistry. I, II; (3). Professor Noyes 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a; should be accompanied by Chem- 
istry 9a and 9b. 

15. Physiological Chemistry. — Enzymes; carbohydrates; sali- 
vary digestion ; gastric digestion ; fats ; pancreatic-digestion ; intes- 
tinal digestion; bile; putrefaction products; feces; blood; milk; 
epithelial and connective tissues ; muscular tissue ; nervous tissue ; 
urine. Qualitative and quantitative work on gastric juice, blood, 
urine, and milk; the clinical aspects of these topics treated thor- 
oly for the prospective students of medicine. Lectures ; demon- 
strations ; conferences ; practical work ; assigned reading. Ham- 
marsten's Text Book of Physiological Chemistry; Hawk's Prac- 
tical Physiological Chemistry. (Open to graduates and undergrad- 
uates.) /; (5). Mr. MacArthur 

Prerequisite: Two years' work in chemistry. 

15a, Problems of Physiological Chemistry. — Colloids; animal 
oxidations; osmosis; absorption; selective activity of cells; meta- 
bolism ; activities of gastro-intestinal tract ; enzymes ; inorganic nu- 
trition. (Intended especially for medical students.) Lectures; 
demonstrations; conferences. //; (2). Mr. MacArthltr 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 15. 

16. Chemistry for Engineers. — The proximate analysis of 
coal; determination of calorific power; technical analysis of fur- 
nace gases; examination of boiler waters; lubricating oils. (For 
mechanical engineers.) //; (3). Professor Parr, Dr. Broderson 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i. 

17. Teachers' Course. — The methods of teaching elementary 
chemistry. /; (i). Professor Balke 

21. Qualitative Organic Analysis. — Systematic methods for 
identification of pure organic compounds and mixtures. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Derick, Mr. Kamm 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 9a, 9b. 

22. Animal Chemistry (Animal Nutrition). — The chemical 
composition of animal products and feeding stuffs. Lectures; con- 
ferences; assigned reading; laboratory. / or II; (5). 

Professor Grindley 
Prerequisite : Two years' work in chemistry. 

27. Qualitative Analysis of the Rare Elements. — The rare 
elements and their compounds; identification and separation of the 



Chemistry 341 

elements; formation, solubilities, and chemical reactions of their 
salts. Assigned reading; laboratory. //; (3). Professor Balke 
Prerequisite: Two years' work in chemistry. 

31. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — Some of the more im- 
portant principles and methods of physical chemistry and electro- 
chemistry; numerous problems. Lectures; recitations. //; (3). 

Professor Washburn, Dr. Smith 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 2, 3; Physics i or 2a; Mathemat- 
ics 8a. 

23. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — Molecular weight of 
gases and solutions ; chemical equilibrium ; the electrical con- 
ductivity of solutions and the attendant phenomena within the 
solution; thermochemistry. (Laboratory to accompany course 31.) 
//; (2). Dr. MacInnes, Dr. Smith 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a; Physics 2b or 3. 

35. Electrochemistry. — (A continuation of Chemistry 31. See 
also Chemistry 102b.) Applications to industrial processes. Lec- 
tures, recitations, laboratory, Allmand's Applied Electrochemistry. 
J; (3 or 5). Dr. MacInnes 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 31, ^Z- 

61. Industrial Chemical Laboratory. — The preparation and 
purification of chemical products from raw materials on a scale 
sufficient to afford data for determining the economy of the pro- 
cesses employed. Typical forms of chemical machinery such as 
filter presses, vacuum pan, centrifugal separators, steam jacketed 
kettles, etc. ; reports and estimates upon apparatus and plant for 
the production of some particular product on a commercial scale. 
(Should be accompanied by either Chemistry 6 or 109.) //; (2). 

Assistant Professor McFarland, Dr. Broderson 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a and 14. 

65. Technical Gas and Fuel Analysis. — Examination of 
gases, gas mixtures, flue gases, and fuels ; determination of ca- 
lorific values; calculation of efficiencies. /; (2). 

Professor Parr, Dr. Broderson 
Prerequisite : Chemistry 5a. 

66. Technology of Gases. — The manufacture, constituents, and 
uses of the various forms of gaseous fuel ; calorimetry ; photo- 
metry ; the more exact methods of analysis. Lectures ; reading ; 
reports; laboratory. //; (i). Professor Parr 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 65. 



342 Chemistry 

68a. Analysis of Glasses and Glazes. — (For students in 
ceramics.) Special problems connected with the pottery industry. 
/; (3). Assistant Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5b. 

68b. Cement Chemistry. — (For students in ceramics.) The 
analysis of cements; cement materials; pottery bodies. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Smith 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 5b. 

69. Metallurgical Laboratory and Assaying. — The fire assay 
of gold, silver, lead, and copper ores, mattes, and bullion ; special 
experiments illustrating the underlying metallurgical principles; 
fluxes, slags, and charge calculations ; practise in the use of coal, oil, 
and gas furnaces, and in the measurement of high temperatures. 
Fulton's Manual of Fire Assaying. I; (2). 

Assistant Professor McFarland 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a; Geology 5. 

70. Advanced Assaying and Ore Testing. — The assay of ores 
of platinum, tin, copper; bullion assay; free milling, amalgama- 
tion, and cyaniding tests. (A continuation of Chemistry 69.) //; 
(2). Assistant Professor McFarland 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 69. 

71. Advanced Methods of Metallurgical Analysis. — Com- 
parison of selected methods for analyses of ores, alloys, and metal- 
lurgical products. Laboratory. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor McFarland 
Prerequisite : Chemistry 5b. 

72. Paints, Oils, Turpentines, Varnishes, and Protective 
Coverings for Wood and Metals. — Lectures and laboratory. / or 
II; (2 or 5). Professor Parr 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5b, 14. 

73. Asphalt, Tar, and Oil Residues. — Their sources, charac- 
teristics, composition, and examination ; binders, dust preventa- 
tives, etc., used in road construction. (For students in highway 
engineering.) //; (2). Professor Parr 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3 or 4. 

76. Calorimetry of Fuels. — Methods for determining the heat 
values of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels. (An advanced course.) 
/, //; (1-3). Professor Parr 



Chemistry 343 

77. Composition and Classification of Coal. — Classification, 
changes in composition, weathering, spontaneous combustion, for- 
mation of mine gases. Lectures; assigned reading. //; (i). 

Professor Parr 

78. Metallography. — Constitution and microstructure of metals 
and alloys and the relations between their properties chemical and 
mechanical treatment, and structure. Lectures; re' xing and labo- 
ratory. //; (2). Assistant Professor McFarlaxd 

92 and 93. Journal Meeting. — (For juniors, seniors, and grad- 
uates.) I, II; (i). All members of the teaching staff in the chem- 
ical department. For Juniors, Assistant Professor Derick 

For Seniors, Assistant Professor McFarland 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Graduate students whose major subject is in some department 
other than chemistry, before taking graduate work for credit in 
this department, must have had the equivalent of 15 university cred- 
its in chemistry, and the work covered must have included satisfac- 
tory work in general chemistry and in qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. Such students are advised to take Chemistrj- 31, 33, (or 
102, 102a), 5b, 5c, 14, 9a and 9b. Courses of a more special na- 
ture will not, as a rule, be accepted for graduate work unless pre- 
ceded by one of the above courses. 

For students in agriculture, (Themistry 5a and 13a will not be 
accepted for graduate credit. 

Graduate students who are candidates for an advanced degree 
in chemistry must have had the equivalent of 30 university credits 
in chemistry, and this must include satisfactory courses in general 
chemistry, qualitative and quantitative analysis, physical chemis- 
try, and organic chemistry. They should have had courses in math- 
ematics, including analj'tical geometry, and, if possible, the calcu- 
lus. Before receiving the degree of Doctor of Philosophy such 
students are expected to complete work equivalent to courses 31, 
33 (or 102 and 102a), 14, 9a. 9b, loi, and iii. They are advised 
to take at least brief courses in gas analysis, iron and steel analysis, 
water analysis, assaying, and chemical technology'. 

For students in chemistry, 5a, 13a, 9, and 9c will not be accepted 
for graduate credit and 9a, 9b, 14, 31 and 33 will be accepted only 
from students entering the Graduate School with the equivalent of 
30 university credits in chemistry. 



344 Chemistry 

loi. History of Chemistry. — Lectures. Pattison Muir's 
History of Chemical Theories and Laws, and assigned reading. 
Twice a week; I ; (y2 unit). Assistant Professor Smith 

[102. Advanced Physical Chemistry. — This course with 102a, 
covers a period of two years. The subject is treated from the stand- 
point of Avoj. dro's Principle and T her 7no dynamics. The primary 
purpose is to dv./elop power to handle successfully a physico-chemi- 
cal problem rather than merely to impart a knowledge of the pheno- 
mena and the principles involved. Lectures and Seminar. Nemst's 
Theoretische Chemie, 7th edition. Twice a week; I, II ; (Y^. unit). 
Not given in 1913-1914. Professor Washburn 

Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 2; Physics i, 3; Mathematics 8a or 
7 and 9. An elementary knowledge of organic and physical chemis- 
try is desirable.] 

102a. Advanced Physical Chemistry. — Chemical equilibrium ; 
the Phase Rule; certain portions of thermochemistry; photochem- 
istry; the thermodynamics of electrochemistry. (A continuation of 
102, with which it alternates.) Nernst's Theoretische Chemie. 
Twice a week; I, II; (Y^ unit). Professor Washburn 

Prerequisite: The same as course 102. 

102b. Advanced Electrochemistry. — The modern theories of 
solution and the principles of thermodynamics in their application 
to the problems of electrochemistry; electrolytic conductivity and 
transference; electro-motive force; the energy principles underlying 
the transformation of chemical and electrical energy ; the recent 
advances in the electrolysis of fused electrolytes and the applica- 
tions of electricity to gaseous reactions at high temperature. Le- 
Blanc's Electrochemistry. Three times a week; II; (i unit). 

Dr. MacInnes 
(Open to undergraduates having the necessary preparation.) 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 31, 33; Mathematics 8a or 7 and 9. 

102c. — Advanced Physical and Electrochemistry. — The appli- 
cations of physico-chemical methods to special problems. Labor- 
atory. Twice a week; I; (}i unit). 

Professor Washburn, Dr. MacInnes 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 31, 33; registration in Chemistry 102b, 
or completion of Chemistry 102, 102a, or 102b; Mathematics 8a or 7 
and 9. 

I02d. Electrochemistry. — Theoretical and applied electrochem- 



Chemistry 345 

istry, with emphasis on the technical side of the subject. (For stu- 
dents of electrical engineering.) Once a week; I, II; (^2 unit). 

Dr. MacInnes 

I02e. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. — Subject for 
1913-14 : Free Energy and the Nemst Heat Theorem. Pollizer's Die 
Berechnung Chemischer Affinitaten nacJi dent Nernstschen Warme- 
theorem. Once a week; I; (y2 unit). Professor Washburn' 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 102 or 102a. 

103. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. — Descriptive inorganic 
chemistry ; the rarer elements ; the periodic system. Lectures, with 
or without laboratory. Two to five times a week; I, II ; (yz to i]4- 
units). Professor Balke 

103a. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. — Special topics. Lec- 
tures, with or without laboratory. One to five times a week; II; (y2 
to lyi units). Assistant Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5b, 9a, 9b, 14, 31, 33. 

103b. Spectal Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. — Subject for 
1913-1914: The Investigations and Theories of Werner. Werner, 
Neuere Anchauungen auf dem Gehiete der Anorganischen Chemie; 
assigned reading from later publications. Lectures and seminar. 
Twice a week; I; (}i unit). Assistant Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 9a, 9b, 14. 

103c. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. — Seminar. Sub- 
ject for 1913-14: The Determination of Atomic Weights. Twice a 
week; II; (yi unit). Professor Balke 

103d. Advanced Qualitative Analysis. — Methods of separat- 
ing qualitative reagents ; reactions of some of the less common ele- 
ments. Designed especially for those intending to teach qualitative- 
chemistry. Lectures, with or without laboratory. One to three 
times a week; I ; (Yz to 1 unit). Assistant Professor Weber: 

[104. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — Seminar. Kekule's link- 
ing theory, sterochemistry, stearic hindrance, molecular rearrange- 
ments, tautomerism, condensation, carbohydrates, ureids. Special 
attention to the application of modem physical chemistry- to the- 
study of organic problems, especially the application of chemical 
kinetics to tautomerism and to the typical reactions of organic chem- 
istry, and the application of physical properties to the determination! 
of chemical structure. Lectures; discussions. Twice a week ; I, II. 
Not given in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Derick] 



34^ Chemistry 

104a. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — (Continuation of 104, 
with which it alternates.) Twice a week; I, II. 

Assistant Professor Derick 

104b. Advanced Quantitative Organic Analysis. — The quan- 
titative chemistry of the proteins, alkaloids, glucosides, volatile oils, 
and other constituents of animal and vegetable tissues. Plant an- 
alysis. Toxicological analysis. Concludes with a study of the gen- 
eral methods, chemical and physical, of organic analysis. Lectures 
and seminar. May be accompanied by laboratory work on a select- 
ed group of compounds. Twice a week; I, II; (j^ unit). Dr. Beal 

104c. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. — Seminar. Sub- 
ject 1913-14: The Organic Chemistry of Nitrogen, Sidgwick. Once 
a week; II. Assistant Professor Derick, Dr. Thorp 

105. Advanced Physiological Chemistry. — Selected portions of 
physiological chemistry not covered by Chemistry 15. Two times 
a week; II; (}i unit). Mr. MacArthur 

105a. Advanced Physiological Chemistry. — Special investiga- 
tions. Laboratory. One to five times a week; II; (1/2 to 1% units). 

Mr. MacArthur 

105b. Advanced Physiological Chemistry. — Recent contribu- 
tions of importance in the field of physiological chemistry. Two 
times a week; I, II; (^ unit). Mr. MacArthur 

106. Animal Chemistry (Animal Nutrition.) — The recent 
advances in the chemistry of nutrition of the lower animals ; the 
chemistry of the functional products ; the flesh, fat, milk, and wool 
of the more common domesticated animals. Lectures ; conferences ; 
assigned reading; laboratory. Five times a week; I, II; (1% units). 

Professor Grindley 
Prerequisite: Two years* work in chemistry 

107. Calorimetry. — Standards and methods. One to three 
times a week; I, II; (^2 to i unit). Professor Parr 

108. Advanced Metallography. — Advanced studies in constitu- 
tion and microstructure of metals and alloys ; the relations between 
their properties, chemical and mechanical treatment, and stnicture. 
Assigned reading and laboratory. Twice a week; II; (^ unit). 

Assistant Professor McFarland 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 7. 



Civil Engineering 347 

109. Advanced Industrial Chemistry. — Seminar. Some of the 
more important chemical industries; the development and chemical 
control of processes. Twice a week; I, II; (^ unit). 

Assistant Professor McFarland 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 6, 9, 14, 21 or equivalent. 

no. Water Supplies. — The sources of contamination of water 
supplies and the purification of water for potable or technical use. 
One to five times a week; I, II; (Yi to lyi units). 

Professor Bartow 

III. Research. — A thesis will usually be required of students 
taking the Master's degree and will always be required of students 
taking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. (For a description of 
undergraduate work leading to a thesis, see Chemistry II.) Work 
may be taken in the following subjects : 

Physical and Electrochemistry 

Professor Washburn, Dr. MacInnes 
Inorganic Chemistry 

Professor Balke, Assistant Professors Smith, Weber 
Analytical Chemistry Assistant Professor Smith 

Food Chemistry Dr. Beal 

Organic Chemistry 

Professor Noyes, Assistant Professor Derick, Dr. Thorp 
Water Chemistry Professor Bartow 

Animal Chemistry (Animal Nutrition) Professor Grindley 
Physiological Chemistry Mr. MacArthur 

Industrial Chemistry 

Professor Parr, Assistant Professor McFarland 

Besides the formal courses, outlined above, regular scientific 
meetings are held by the colloquiums of industrial, physical and in- 
organic, and physiological and organic chemistry; by the Chemical 
Club ; by Phi Lambda Upsilon, and by the University of Illinois Sec- 
tion of the American Chemical Society. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Ira Osborn Baker, C.E., D.Eng., Professor 
Allen Boyer McDaniel, B.S., Assistant Professor 
John Ira Parcel, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor 
James Elmo Smith, C.E., Assistant Professor 
Wilbur M Wilson, M.M.E., Assistant Professor 
Carroll Carson Wiley, C.E., Associate 



348 Civil Engineering 

Neal Bryant Garver, C.E., Associate 

George Wellington Pickles, Jr., C.E., Instructor 

William Horace Rayner, C.E., Instructor 

Raymond Earl Davis, B.S., Instructor 

Benjamin Lester Bowling, Assistant in Cement Laboratory 

Guy G. Mills, B.S., Instructor 

I. Roads and Pavements. — Improvement of country highways; 
means of securing it ; construction of earth, gravel, and both water- 
bound and bituminous macadam roads ; methods of construction, 
cost, durability, and desirability of the various kinds of pavement ; 
grades ; cross-sections ; assessment of cost ; maintenance and clean- 
ing. Baker's Roads and Pavements. II; (2). Mr. Wiley 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 4; General Engineering Drawing i, 
2 ; Civil Engineering 21, 22, 23. 

4. Railroad Surveying. — The principles of economic location 
and the construction of railways; railway appliances and mainten- 
ance-of-way practise. Field practise : Preliminary and location 
surveys of a line of railroad of sufficient length to secure familiarity 
with the methods of actual practise. Each student makes a com- 
plete set of notes, maps, profiles, calculations, and estimates. Field 
Manual for Railroad Engineers. I; (5). 

Assistant Professor Smith, Mr. Wiley 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 21, 22, 23. 

4a. Railroad Surveying. — The first eleven weeks of course 4, 
for students in municipal and sanitary engineering. /; (3). 

Sr. Masonry Construction. — Baker's Masonry Construction. 
I; (4). Professor Baker, Assistant Professor McDaniel 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 7, 8, 9, 10; 
Civil Engineering 20. 

5/. Cement Laboratory Practise. — Standard tests for hydraulic 
cement. /; (i). Assistant Professor McDaniel 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 7, 8, 9, 10; 
Civil Engineering 20; registration in Civil Engineering 5r. 

6a. Theory of Reinforced Concrete. — The principles of rein- 
forced concrete beams, columns, slabs, etc. Tumeaure and Maurer's 
Principles of Reinforced Concrete. I; (i). 

Assistant Professor Parcel 

6b. Masonry and Reinforced Concrete Design. — The design of 



Civil Engineering 349 

masonry structures ; reinforced-concrete beams, columns, slabs; 
arches, dams, retaining walls. //; (2). 

Assistant Professors McDaniel, Smith 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 5. 

6c. Theory and Design of Reinforced Concrete. — A brief 
course in Civil Engineering 6a and 6b for students in architectural 
engineering, municipal and sanitary engineering, and railway civil 
engineering. //; (2). Assistant Professor Parcel, Mr, Garver 

Prerequisite: Full senior standing. 

10. Surveying. — U. S. public land surveys; principles of re-es- 
tablishing corners. Use of transit in finding distances, areas, and 
in laying out buildings ; use of the level in finding profiles and con- 
tours. (For students in architecture, architectural engineering, 
electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering.) Pence and 
Ketchum's Surveying Manual; II; (2). 

Mr. Pickles, Mr. Wiley, Mr. Schwartz 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 4; General Engineering Drawing i, 
2; Physics I, 3. 

12. Bridge Analysis. — The computation of the stresses in the 
various forms of bridge trusses, by algebraic and graphic methods, 
under different conditions of loading. Dufour's Bridge Engineer- 
ing, Part One. I; (2). Assistant Professor Parcel, Mr. Garver 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 7, 8, 9, 10; 
and for civil engineering students. Civil Engineering 20, and for ar- 
chitectural engineering students, Architecture 5, or 45. 

13. Bridge Details. — Inspection of a highway bridge ; computa- 
tion of weight and critical investigation of a highway bridge from 
detailed shop-drawings ; detailed estimate of cost ; standard details 
for bridges. /; (2). Assistant Professor Wilson, Mr. Garver 

Prerequisite: Registration in Civil Engineering 12. 

14. Bridge Design. — Individual design of a railroad plate girder 
and a truss span, with sections proportioned and details worked out, 
and a complete set of drawings. Dufour's Bridge Engineering, 
Part One. II; (5), Assistant Professor Wilson, Mr. Garver 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 12, 13. 

14a. Bridge Design. — Part of Course 14 above, for railway civil 
engineering students. //; (2). Assistant Professor Wilson 

14b. Building Design. — Design of steel-frame office buildings; 
estimate of cost. (For architectural engineering students.) //; 
(2). Assistant Professor Wilson 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 12, 13. 



350 Civil Engineering 

15, Advanced Bridge Analysis. — A brief introduction to the 
theory of continuous, draw, cantilever, suspension, and metal-arch 
bridges. Merriman and Jacoby's Roofs and Bridges, Part Four. 
II; (2). Assistant Professor Parcel 

16. Engineering Contracts and Specifications. — The Izw of 
contract ; examples of general and technical clauses used in engi- 
neering specifications. Johnson's Engineering Contracts and Speci- 
fications. II; (2). Assistant Professor McDaniel 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 5, 12, 13; Municipal and Sani- 
tary Engineering 2, 3. 

20. Graphic Statics. — Elements of graphic statics ; determina- 
tion of stresses in roof and bridge trusses and in the braced bent. 
Malcolm's Elements of Graphic Statics. II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Smith, Mr. Garver 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2, 4, 6; Theoretical and Applied Me- 
chanics 7, 8, 9, 10; General Engineering Drawing i, 2, 

21. Surveying. — The theory, use, and adjustment of the com- 
pass, level, and transit. Field work; the determination of distances 
by pacing and with the chain and tape ; the determination of areas 
with the compass, transit, and plane table; profile leveling. Plotting 
from field notes. The U. S. land survey methods, and court deci- 
sions relating to the re-establishment of corners, boundaries, parti- 
tion of land, interpretation of deeds, and in city and farm surveying. 
Breed and Hosmer's Principles and Practise of Surveying, Vol. I ; 
Pence and Ketchum's Surveying Manual. I; (5). 

Mr. Pickles, Mr. Rayner, Mr. Davis 

Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing i, 2; Mathematics 4. 

22. Topographic Surveying. — The theory and use of the stadia, 
plane table, sextant, and other instruments used in making a topo- 
graphic survey ; methods ; topographic drawing ; a complete to- 
pographic survey based on a system of trinngulation including the 
calculations, and platting and completing the map ; precise measure- 
ment of bases and angles. Astronomical determination of latitude, 
longitude, and the meridian. Breed and Hasmer's Principles and 
Practise of Surveying, Vol. I ; Pence and Ketchum's Surveying 
Manual. II; (4). Mr. Pickels, Mr. Rayner, Mr. Davis 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 21 ; General Engineering Draw- 
ing 1,2; Mathematics 4. 



CizHl Engineering 351 

23. Railroad Curves. — The geometry of the circle as applied 
to railroad curves ; the methods of locating curves in the field. 
Pickels and Wiley's Text-book of Railroad Surveying. II; (1). 

Mr. Pickels, Mr. Rayner, Mr. Davis 
Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 21, 22; General Engineering 
Drav^ring i, 2; Mathematics 4. Taken with C. E. 22. 

24. Metal Structures. — The design and calculation of stresses 
in mill and steel-skeleton buildings. /; (i). 

Assistant Professor Wilson 
Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 12, 13, 20. 

25. Seminar. — Reading and discussion of papers. Each student 
presents one major and two minor papers upon assigned topics, and 
participates in the discussion of other papers. //; (i). 

Professor Baker 
Prerequisite: Full senior standing in Civil Engineering. 

30. Thesis. — First semester : preliminary work, with weekly 
conferences. Second semester : specified hours for work and con- 
ferences. I; (i) ; //; (2). Instructor assigned by Professor Baker 

Prerequisite: Full senior standing in Civil Engineering. 

courses for graduates 

Entrance upon graduate work in civil engineering presupposes 
the full undergraduate course in that subject. 

106. Reinforced-Concrete Design. — The materials, design, 
forms, and erection of reinforced-concrete structures. Three times 
a week; I or II. Assistant Professor McDaniel 

107. Bridge Engineering. — Theorems of Castigliano ; Max- 
well's reciprocal theorem ; virtual velocities ; deflections ; camber ; 
redundant members ; special graphic methods ; secondary- systems ; 
impact ; general flexure ; specifications ; design of tension and com- 
pression members ; details of construction ; manufacturing methods 
and costs; bridge erection. Three times a week; I, II. 

Assistant Professor Parcel 

124. Steel Building Construction. — The design of the steel 
skeleton of buildings for various purposes. Conferences, problems, 
and inspection of construction work in progress. Three times a 
week; I or II. Assistant Professor Wilson 



352 The Classics 

THE CLASSICS 

Herbert Jewett Barton, A.M., Professor, Chairman 
Charles Melville Moss, Ph.D., Professor 
William Abbott Oldfather, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
Arthur Stanley Pease, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
Howard Vernon Canter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Majors 

A major in the classics consists of 30 hours in Greek and Latin, 
of which at least 12 shall be in the secondary language, and the 
remaining hours in the primary language. Only those courses may 
count toward the major in the classics which count toward a major 
in Latin and Greek respectively. 

A major in Greek consists of 24 hours, not including Greek i, 
17, 18, 19. 

A major in Latin consists of 24 hours, not including Latin 12. 
Latin i may be counted for half credit only. 

Honors 

For honors in Greek the major shall be the ordinary one of 24 
hours, as defined above; the minors shall be Latin and one other 
foreign language, or history, or philosophy, or English literature. 
Neither minor shall consist of less than 9 hours, and the two to- 
gether must aggregate not less than 24 hours. No course may be 
counted toward these minors which is not counted toward a major 
by the department concerned. 

For honors in Latin the major shall consist of 24 hours and 
shall include Latin 14 and 16 ; the minors shall be at least one other 
foreign language, preferably Greek, and one of the following : Eng- 
lish literature, a modern language, history, or philosophy, with the 
same conditions as in the case of Greek. 

GREEK 

courses for undergraduates 

The courses in translation naturally follow one another in this 
sequence: i, 3, 4, 5 (7), 6 (8). Courses i, 3, and 4 are intended 
for students who cannot present Greek for entrance to the Univer- 
sity, but who desire to commence the study of the language. Course 
2 may be taken after Course i and Course 14 after Courses 5 or 7. 



The Classics 353 

Nos. 16, 17, 18, and 19 are open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; 
No. 20 to those who have completed one year in History or in Clas- 
sics. 

1. Grammar and Reader. — Attic forms; reading of simple 
prose. Second semester, Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I; /, //; (4). 

Associate Professor Oldfather 

2. New Testament Greek. — Reading of selections; lectures on 
Canon and Text. I, II; (2). Professor Moss 

Prerequisite : Greek i. 

3. Second Year Greek. — Xenophon, Anabasis , Books II-IV. 
Grammatical drill. /; (3). Assistant Professor Canter 

Prerequisite : Greek i. 

4. Second Year Greek. — Homer. Six books of the Iliad. II; 
(3). Assistant Professor Canter 

Prerequisite: Greek 3. 

[5. Herodotus. — Selections, including portions of Books VI- 
VIII. Greek lyric poets. //; (3). Not given, 1913-14. 

Professor Moss 

Prerequisite: Greek 4] 

[6. Thucydides. — Books VI-VH. The Sicilian Expedition. I; 
(3). Not given in 1913-14. Associate Professor Pease 

Prerequisite : Greek 4.] 

7. Greek Drama. — Three plays from the great dram.atists; 
history of the drama and theatrical antiquities. //; (3). 

Professor Moss 
Prerequisite : Greek 4. 

8. Plato. — Selected dialogues, including the Apology and the 
Phaedo. I; (3). Associate Professor Pease 

Prerequisite: Greek 4. 

14. Advanced Greek Prose Composition. — II; (i). 

Professor Moss 
Prerequisite : Greek 5 and 6, or 7 and 8. 

GREEK life AND LITERATURE IN ENGLISH 

(Courses 16-20 presuppose no knowledge of Greek and are 
open to all students except freshmen.) 

16. The Private and Public Life of the Greeks. — Lectures 
illustrated by photographs and slides; prescribed readings. /; (i). 

Professor Moss 

17. Greek Poetry in Translations. — /; (2). Professor Moss 



354 The Classics 

i8. Greek Prose in Translations. — /; (2). Professor Moss 

19. Greek Drama in Translations. — //; (2), Professor Moss 

20. History of Greece. — /; (3). (This course is described by 
the department of history as History 5.) 

Associate Professor Oldfather 
Prerequisite : One course in history or the classics. 

courses for graduates 

[103. Principles of Comparative Grammar. — Three times a 
week; I. (i unit). (The same as Latin loi). Not given in 1913-14 

Assistant Professor Canter] 
[104. Homer and the Homeric Question. — Lectures and read- 
ing in alternate hours. The whole of the Iliad and a large portion 
of the Odyssey will be read; of this about twelve books in class. 
Introduction to the methods of historical and literary criticism. 
Twice a week; I, II. (i unit). Not given in 1913-14. 

Associate Professor Oldfather] 

105. Plato and Aristotle. — Selections from the political and 
ethical writings. The Republic of Plato and the Ethics and Politics 
of Aristotle. Twice a week. I, II; (i unit). 

Associate Professor Oldfather 

106. Greek Drama. — One play of each of the great dramatists; 
the biography of the author, his relation to the development of dra- 
matic art, and the history of Greek literature. Certain plays as- 
signed for private reading. Reports upon prescribed topics. Twice 
a week; I, II; (i unit). Professor Moss 

[107. Greek Oratory. — One or more speeches of each of sev- 
eral orators; the style, place in the canon, and relation to their 
times of one or two authors; problems in the Athenian constitution 
and legal practise assigned for individual study and reports. Twice 
a week. I, II; {i unit). Not given in 1913-14. Professor Moss] 

LATIN 
first-year courses 

1. Ovid and Virgil. — Selections from the Atnores, Her aides, 
and Metamorphoses and the Aeneid. I, II; (4). 

Associate Professor Pease, Assistant Professor Canter 
Prerequisite: Three entrance units in Latin. 

2. LivY, Plautus, and Terence. — Selections from Livy; the 
Rudens of Plautus; the Phormio of Terence. /, //; (4). 

Professor Barton 
Prerequisite: Four entrance units in Latin. 



The Classics 355 

SECOND-YEAR COURSES 

3. Sallust and Cicero. — Selections from the Jugurthine War; 
De Senectute. I; (3). Assistant Professor Canter 

Prerequisite: Latin 2. 

4. Catullus and Horace. — Selections from the lyrics of Catul- 
lus and the Odes of Horace. //; (3)- Professor Barton 

Prerequisite : Latin 2. 

5. Latin Composition. — Grammatical drill; practise in the sim- 
pler forms of expression. /, //; (i). Assistant Professor Canteb 

Prerequisite: Latin i or its equivalent. 

ROMAN LIFE AND LITERATURE IN ENGLISH 

(Courses 12 and 13 presuppose no knowledge of Latin; open to 
all students except freshmen.) 

12. Virgil and Horace in English Translations. — /; (2). 

Professor Barton 

13. Roman Life. — The family; amusements; education; mor- 
als; society; monuments. Lectures, illustrated by photographs and 
slides. //; (i). Professor Barton 

19. Roman History. — //; (3). (This course is described by 
the department of history as History 6.) 

Assistant Professor Canter 
Prerequisite : One course in history or the classics. 

courses for advanced undergraduates 

[7. Horace and Juvenal. — Selections from the Satires and 
Epistles of Horace; selected Satires of Juvenal. /; (3). Not given 
in 1913-14. Associate Professor Pease 

Prerequisite : 12 hours' credit in Latin.] 

8. TAaTUS.— The Annals, books I-VL /; (3). 

Associate Professor Pease 
Prerequisite : 12 hours' credit in Latin. 

9. Teachers' Course. — The purpose and methods of prepara- 
tory Latin instruction; the teacher's preparation. //; (2). 

Professor Barton 
Prerequisite : 18 hours' credit in Latin. A portion of this re- 
quirement may be waived for those who have taught Latin. 



356 The Classics 

10. Latin Composition. — The leading principles ; imitation of 
assigned models. /; (2). Professor Barton 

Prerequisite : 12 hours' credit in Latin, including Latin 5 or its 
equivalent. 

22. Late Latin. — Rapid reading of selections from the Latin 
writers from Minucius Felix to Cassiodorus. //; (2). 

Associate Professor Pease 

Prerequisite : This course is open to seniors and graduates who 
have had two years of college Latin or who otherwise satisfy the 
instructor of their ability to do the work required. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

[14. Seneca. — Selections from his letters and tragedies. //; (3). 
Not given in 1913-14. Professor Barton 

Prerequisite: 18 hours' credit in Latin.] 

16. Martial and Suetonius. — Selections; lectures on literary 
history. //; (3). Associate Professor Oldfather 

Prerequisite: 18 hours* in Latin. 

COURSES for graduates 

Students desiring to take graduate work in Latin should have 
had at least three years of college Latin in addition to the Latin 
presented to meet entrance requirements. 

[loi. Principles of Comparative Grammar. — (The same as 
Greek 103). Three times a week; I. Not given in 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Canter] 

102. Roman Oratory. — Twice a week; II; (J^ unit). 

Assistant Professor Canter 

103. Cicero. — De Natura Deorum and De Divinatione. Twice a 
week; I. (H unit). Associate Professor Pease 

104. Palaeography. — Twice a week; I; (^ unit). 

Associate Professor Pease 

[105. Latin Poetry. — TTvice a week; II; (J^ unit). Not given 

in 1913-14. Associate Professor Pease] 

106. Latin Comedy. — Twice a week; I; (Yi unit). 

Associate Professor Oldfather 

107. Epigraphy. — Twice a week; II; ('J^ unit). 

Associate Professor Pease 

108. Tacitus. — The Histories. Twice a week; I; (Yz unit). 

Professor Barton 



Dairy Husbandry 357 

109. Virgil. — Twice a week; II; (J^ unit). 

Associate Professor Pease 
no. Seminar. — Once a week; I, II; (^/i unit). 
Associate Professor Oldfather, Associate Professor Pease, and 
other members of the department. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 
(See Economics and Accountancy.) 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Harry Alexis Harding, Ph.D., Professor, Dairy Bacteriology 
WiLBLTi John Fraser, M.S., Professor, Dairy Husbandry 
Martin John Prucha, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Dairy Bacter- 
iology 
♦Nelson William Hepbltin, M.S., Assistant Professor, Dairy Man- 
ufactures 
LeRoy Lang, M.S., Associate, Dairy Manufactures 
Royden Earl Brand, M.S., Associate, Dairy Husbandry 
Horatio Newton Parker, Instructor, Milk Distribution 
William Truman Crandall, M.S., Associate, Milk Production 
Harrison August Ruehe, B.S., Instructor, Dairy Manufactures 
Ray Stillman Hulce, M.S., Instructor, Milk Production 
Oliver Arnold Keller, B.S., Assistant, Dairy Manufactures 
William Wodin Yapp, B.S., Assistant, Dairy Husbandry * 

Harry Montgomery Weeter, A.B., Assistant, Dairy Husbandry 

courses for undergraduates 

I. Milk Testing. — Official testing; inspectors' methods; tests 
for purity and adulteration; lactometer; acid tests; tests for pre- 
servatives ; butter analysis ; moisture, salt and fat tests. Lectures ; 
assigned readings; laboratory practise. (Alternates with Dairy 
Husbandry 16 if desired.) /; (3). Mr. Lang, Mr. Ruehe 

7. Butter Making and Factory Management. — Cream receiv- 
ing and ripening; pasteurization; use of commercial starters; churn- 
ing, salting, working, and marketing of butter; butter scoring; sep- 
arators ; special problems for the manufacture of butter ; private 
and co-operative management of creameries ; centralizers' systems ; 
creamery accounting and business methods ; refrigerating ; ice cream 
making ; location and planning of creamery buildings. Lectures ; 
assigned readings; laboratory practise. //; (5). 

Mr. Lang, Mr. Ruehe 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandrj' i. 

•On leave. 



358 Dairy Husbandry 

19. Farm Dairying. — Systems of creaming milk; the care and 
use of the hand separator ; the various makes of machines ; farm 
butter-making ; ripening cream ; churning, working, and marketing 
butter on the farm. /; (2). Mr. Lang 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry i. 

22. Cheese Making. — Ripening and setting milk; cutting, cook- 
ing, and dipping curd; cheddaring, milling, matting, and salting 
curds; pressing and curing cheese; the different varieties of cheese; 
practise in making more common varieties. /; (3). Mr. Ruehe 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry i. 

8. City Milk Supply. — Producing and marketing clean milk 
for public consumption ; sanitation of the dairy barn and milk house ; 
scoring and inspection of dairies; standardization, bottling, trans- 
portation, and delivery of milk; communicable disease; value of 
milk as a food; milk beverages; certified milk; milk commissions; 
legal regulations of cities and states. (Alternates with Dairy Hus- 
bandry II if desired.) //; (3). Mr. Parker 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry i. 

II. Dairy Bacteriology. — The relation of bacteria to the dairy 
industry; changes commonly effected in milk by bacteria; market 
milk; inspected milk; certified milk; pasteurized milk; bacteria 
characteristic of different groups; bacteria producing milk of un- 
usual character; preserved milks; butter; oleomargarine; cheese. 
(Alternates with Dairy Husbandry 8 if desired.) //; (3). 

Professor Harding, Mr. Parker 

Prerequisite : Botany 5 or 12. 

3. Elements of Dairy Husbandry. — The dairy herd, dairy san- 
itation, milk testing, milk products. Required of all freshmen in 
the general course in Agriculture. Lectures; demonstrations. / or 
II; (i). Mr. Hulce and various members of the department 

2. Dairy Cattle. — Dairy type and its relation to milk and but- 
ter fat production; origin and history of breeds, their character- 
istics, type and adaptability to the various markets and climatic con- 
ditions ; prominent families and individuals in principal breeds ; 
herd improvement; selection of animals on performance, breeding, 
and physical conformation ; grading up by use of superior sires. 
Lectures; recitations; judging. /; (4). Mr. Crandall 

16. Feeding Dairy Cattle. — Compounding rations for dairy 
cows; preparation of feeds; study of station feeding tests; effect 
of feeds on milk products; calf raising, feeding and general care; 



X 



Drawing, General Engineering 359 

barn arrangement, with reference to storage and feeding ; types of 
mangers ; silos, location and types. Opportunity will be given to 
study the feeding of the University dairy herds as well as the types 
of silos in use. (Alternates with Dairy Husbandry i if desired.) 
/; (3). Mr. HuLCE 

17. Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds. — The origin and history 
of dairy breeds; history of prominent families and noted individ- 
uals, their characteristics and producing abilities ; pedigree work 
with special emphasis upon performance records; advanced registry 
systems; problems peculiar to the breeder of pure-bred dairy cat- 
tle. The student may specialize in the particular breed in which he 
is interested. Lectures; assigned readings; seminar work. //; (2). 

Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 2 and 16. Mr. Crandall 

21. Systems of Dairy Farming. — Relation of the cow and the 
herd to profits; how to establish and perpetuate a dairy herd of 
the highest efficiency; economy of crops and rations on a dairy 
farm ; systems of cropping ; the organization of a dairy farm ; loca- 
tion and arrangement of buildings and lots ; farm accounts, rec- 
ords, and inventories ; markets ; care and disposal of milk at the 
greatest profit. //; (5). Professor Fraser, Mr. Brand 

Prerequisite : Dairy Husbandry 2 and 16. 

courses for graduates 

loi. Economic Milk Production. — Differences in the efficiency 
of dairy cows, cause and effect of the same, and the relation this 
bears to successful dairy farming. Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). 

Professor Fraser 

102. Research. — The investigations in progress in the dairy 
herds of the state. /, //; (i unit). Professor Fraser 

103. Research. — Dairy feeding problems. I, II; (i unit). 

Professor Fraser 

DRAWING, GENERAL ENGINEERING 

Harvey Willard Miller, M.E., Assistant Professor 

Robert Kent Steward, C.E., Associate 

pRANas Marion Porter, M.S., Associate 

Harold Ordway Rugg, C.E., Instructor 

Harvey Herbert Jordan, B.S., Instructor 

RuFUS Crane, A.B., B.S., Instructor 

*RoBiN Beach, B.S., Instructor 

Walter Stephen Nelson, Half-time Assistant 



•Second Semester. 



360 Economics 

1. Elements of Drafting. — Lettering ; isometric oblique and 
perspective drawing ; orthographic projection ; machine sketching ; 
working drawings. Lettering : mechanical styles and the making 
of name plates and titles for mechanical drawings. Mechanical 
drawing: 12 plates from copy, with tracings of each, and 6 plates 
from models, with tracings of each. Dimensioned sketches from 
parts of standard machines, followed by complete working draw- 
ings. Tracings duplicated in blue-print form. Time sketches of 
the equipment in the shops and laboratories; Miller & Steward's 
Plate Specifications. I; (4). 

Assistant Professor Miller and department staff 

2. Descriptive Geometry. — The point, line, and plane ; the prop- 
erties of surfaces; intersections and developments. (For architects, 
perspective instead of intersections and developments.) Practical 
problems. Recitations precede the work in the drawing room at 
each period. Three drawing room plates, 2 hours each, 5 problems 
per plate, and 2 home plates, 5 problems each, constitute each 
week's work. Miller's Descriptive Geometry, Forter's Plates. II ; (4). 

Assistant Professor Miller and department staff 

Prerequisite: Solid geometry, college algebra, plane trigonom- 
etry. 

21. Advanced Descriptive Geometry. — Review of course 2; the 
cylinder, cone, convolute and warped surface; intersections of these 
surfaces in pairs, and by planes; planes tangent; developable sur- 
faces and those approximately developable ; doubly curved surfaces 
and complex surfaces of revolution; practical applications and 
methods. //; (2). Mr. Porter 

Prerequisite : G. E. D. i, 2. 

ECONOMICS 

(Including Accountancy) 
(See also History, Political Science, and Sociology.) 

David Kinley, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor 

Maurice Henry Robinson, Ph.D., Professor 

Ernest Ritson Dewsnup, A.M., Professor 

Ernest Ludlow Bogart, Ph.D., Professor 

George Enfield Frazer, A.B., LL.B., Professor 

William Arthur Chase, LL.B., C.P.A., Lecturer, in charge of 

work in Accountancy 
Nathan Austin Weston, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 



Economics 361 

Simon Litman, Dr.Jur.Pub.etRer.Cam., Assistant Professor 

John Giffin Thompson, Ph.D., Instructor 

Charles Manfred Thompson, Ph.D., Instructor 

Hiram Thompson Scovill, A.B., Instructor 

Charles Leslie Stewart, A.M., Instructor 

Roger Frank Little, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer, Business Law 
Alva LeRoy Prickett, A.B., Assistant 

The department of economics includes general economics, eco- 
nomic history, finance, commerce, commercial law, industr>% railway 
administration, and accountancy. The courses in commercial law 
and accountancy may not be counted towards a major in economics. 

Courses 7, 22, and 26, English Economic Historj-, the Economic 
History of the United States, and Economic Resources, are open to 
freshmen without previous requirement, but not more than six 
hours of these courses may be counted towards a major in eco- 
nomics. Courses numbered loi and above are open to graduate 
students only. 

Courses 4a, 4b, 5, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 21, 29, 30, 41, 42, 
43, and 45 are open to graduates and advanced undergraduates. 

Honors 

For honors in economics, at least thirteen of the twenty- four 
hours required in the major subject shall be in courses requiring 
Economics i as a prerequisite. 

One of the minors shall be selected from the following sub- 
jects: history, political science, sociolog>', and accountancy. The 
other minor shall be selected with the approval of the department. 

courses for undergraduates 

1. Principles of Economics. — I; (5). 

Assistant Professor Weston and others 
Prerequisite: At least thirty hours of university work. 

2. Principles of Economics. — Section A open to junior and 
senior engineering students only; section C open to junior and 
senior agricultural students only. I, II; (2). 

Professor Robinson, Professor Dewsnup, Professor Bogart, 
Dr. J. G. Thompson 

3. Money and Banking. — The history and theory of money, 
credit, and banking. //; (3). Assistant Professor Weston 

Prerequisite: Economics i. 



362 Economics 

[4a. Financial History of the United States to the Civil 
War. — Colonial and federal finance, including currency, banking, 
tariff and fiscal questions. Not given in 1913-14. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Weston 

Prerequisite: Economics 3 and senior standing.] 

4b. Financial History of the United States Since i860.— 
The finances of the Civil War and Reconstruction period; recent 
development of both public and private finance with special refer- 
ence to business conditions. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Weston 

Prerequisite: Economics 3 and senior standing. 

5. Public Finance. — Public expenditures; financial adminis- 
tration; taxation; public debts. /; (3). Professor Bogart 

Prerequisite: Economics i and 3. Students who have had 6 
hours in history and Political Science i and who present a state- 
ment from the department of political science showing that they 
are taking political science as a major, may be admitted without 
Economics 3. 

6. Business Organization. — Business enterprises and their 
organization : Characteristics and relative advantages of individual 
proprietorship, partnership, and corporation. Organization for 
operating 'purposes and the effect of the organization on business 
and technical efficiency. The organization and work of commer- 
cial and industrial associations. //; (2). Professor Robinson 

Prerequisite: Economics i, and 3 either preceding or concur- 
rent. Open to students of business administration only. 

7. English Economic History. — The industrial development 
of England; the manorial system; the gilds; the commercial pol- 
icy and expansion of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; 
the industrial and manufacturing growth of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. /; (3). 

Professor Bogart 

8. The Money Market. — Dealings in money and credit; the 
functions of money broker and banker; the concentration of finan- 
cial dealings at such centers as New York and London; interna- 
tional payments and the determination of rates of foreign ex- 
change; the seasonal demands for money; causes of fluctuation in 
rates of discount; monetary panics and crises; investments; the 



Economics 363 

financial aspects of dealings on the stock and produce exchanges. 
//; (2), Assistant Professor Weston 

Prerequisite: Economics 9. Open to students of business ad- 
ministration only. 

9. Practical Banking. — Banking practise in the United States. 
/; (2). Assistant Professor Weston 

Prerequisite: Economics 3; senior standing. Open to students 
of business administration only. 

10. Corporation Management and Finance. — The growth of 
corporations ; their causes and forms ; the promotion, financier- 
ing, incorporation and capitalization of corporate consolidations ; 
their organization and securities ; position and relation of stock- 
holders and directors, analysis of reports, stock speculation, rela- 
tions of industrial corporations to international competition, re- 
ceiverships and reorganizations; social and political effects. /; (3). 

Professor Robinson 
Prerequisite: Economics I and 3. 

11. Industrial Consolidation. — The development of indus- 
trial consolidation; the growth of monopoly, monopoly prices 
and methods, the ability of trusts to effect prices, wages, interest 
and profits; and the proposed plans for controlling trusts. //; 
(3). Professor Robinson 

Prerequisite : Economics 10. 

12. Labor Problems, — The condition and claims of labor and 
the principles underlying them. /; (3). Professor Kinley 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing and Economics I 
and 3. Students who have had 6 hours in history and Sociology 
I and who present a statement from the department of sociology 
showing that they are taking sociology as a major, may be ad- 
mitted without Economics 3. 

13. Economic De\tlopment of Europe Since the Industrial 
Revolution. — The economic history of France, Germany and 
England since the period of the industrial revolution. //; (3). 

Professor Bogart 
Prerequisite: At least sixty hours of university work, includ- 
ing Economics i and 3. Students who present a statement from 
the department of history showing that they are taking history as 
a major, may be admitted without Economics 3. 

14. Agricultural Cooperation. — The organization, financing, 
and management of cooperative associations for the promotion of 



364 Economics 

various branches of farming. Open to junior and senior stu- 
dents of agriculture only. //; (2). Mr. Stewart 
Prerequisite: Economics 2. 

15. Rural Credit. — The credit and banking needs of farmers 
and rural communities generally ; the ways and means of supplying 
them. Open to junior and senior students of agriculture only. 
/; (2). Mr. Stewart 

Prerequisite: Economics 2. 

16. Economic Problems. — Section A: Railway problems ; taxa- 
tion of corporations ; the labor question. Section C : Special topics 
relating to agriculture. A open to students of engineering only; 
C open to students of agriculture only. //; Sec. A (2) ; Sec. C (3). 

Professor Robinson, Professor Bogart, Dr. J. G. Thompson 
Prerequisite: Economics 2. 

17. Economic History of Agriculture. — General character- 
istics of agriculture and its development as an industry in various 
countries at various times. Land tenure and landed property. 
Large, medium, and small farms or estates. Economic conditions 
and results of extensive and intensive culture. Agricultural credit 
and markets. Agricultural labor. State of the agricultural class. 
Organization in agriculture. Relation of agriculture to other in- 
dustries. Relation of the state to agriculture. General aspects 
of farm organization and management. II; (2). 

Dr. J. G. Thompson 

Prerequisite: Economics i and 3 and senior standing. Seniors in 

the College of Agriculture who have had Economics i or 2 may 

be admitted to the course by special permission of the instructor. 

18. Senior Seminar. — Investigation in economics, commerce, 
and industry; the preparation of theses. Business students and 
others making economics a major should take this course. /, //; 
(4-8 for the year). Professor Robinson 

[21. Socialism and Economic Reform. — The important social- 
istic theories. Not given in 1913-14. //; (3). Professor Kinley 

Prerequisite: Economics i and 12.] 

22. The Economic History of the United States. — The ex- 
plorations and settlements that led to the colonization of this con- 
tinent; the growth of industry, agriculture, commerce, transporta- 
tion, and labor from the simple, isolated agricultural communities 
of the colonies to the complex industrial and commercial society of 
today. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. //; (3). 

Professor Bogart 



Economics 365 

23. Elementary Law. — The law of contracts, leases, landed 

property, etc. Open to junior and senior students of agriculture 

only. //; (3). Mr. Little 

Prerequisite: Economics 2. 

25. Commercial Law. — Contracts; negotiable instruments; ag- 
ency; partnerships; business corporations; sales of personal prop- 
erty ; bailments and carriers ; guaranty and suretyship ; insurance. 
The course may not be counted towards a major in economics. I, 
II; (2). Mr. Chase 

Prerequisite: At least sixty hours of university credit including 
Economics i and Accountancy i. 

For Statistics, see Mathematics 23, 31, and 129. 

26. Economic Resources. — Environmental influences affecting 
commercial and industrial development ; the more important pro- 
ducts and industries of different countries ; the extent and distribu- 
tion of the resources and the industrial and commercial activities of 
the United States. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. I; 
(3). Assistant Professor Litman 

27. Modern Industries. — The rav/ materials of commerce ; their 
geographical distribution and their economic significance ; the lead- 
ing industries engaged in the utilization of these materials; the 
sources of power; the investment of capital; the emplo\Tnent of men 
and of machinery; the progressive stages of production; the distri- 
bution of finished commodities. Open to freshmen and sophomores 
only. //; (3). Assistant Professor Litman 

Prerequisite: Economics 26, or an approved high school course 
in commercial geography. 

[28. Mechanism and Technique of Domestic Commerce. — 
Buying and selling in internal trade ; forms of wholesale and retail 
trade organizations ; markets, fairs, auctions, stock and produce ex- 
changes ; department, mail-order, and cooperative stores ; commer- 
cial travelers; commercial competition; theory and practise of mod- 
ern advertising; mercantile credit. /; (3). Not given in 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Litman 

Prerequisite : Economics i, 3 and 26 or 27.] 

29, Foreign Commerce and Commercial Politics. — Problems 
arising in connection with international trade relations, and various 
attempts to solve them; changes in theories and in policies; eco- 
nomic systems (mercantile, free-trade, protective) ; classes of cus- 



366 Economics 

toms tariffs; commercial treaties; promotion of shipping; institu- 
tions for furthering export trade (commercial museums, consular 
service.) /; (3). Assistant Professor Litman 

Prerequisite : Economics i, 3 and 26 or 27. 

30. Tariff and Customs Regulations of the United States. — 
The history of tariff legislation in the United States; the present 
tariff system ; the organization and work of the custom house ; entry 
of goods. //; (3). Assistant Professor Litman 

Prerequisite: Economics 29. 

[31. Organization of Foreign Commerce. — Exporting and im- 
porting; means of communication and of transportation; the ship- 
ping business; duties of consuls. //; (3). Not given in 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Litman 

Prerequisite: Economics 28.] 

[33. Economics of Insurance. — The historical development of 
insurance; its economic aspects. /; (2). Not given in 1913-14. 
Prerequisite: Economics i and 3.] 

34. Property Insurance. — Fire, marine, title, and credit insur- 
ance and corporate suretyship, etc. Their technical characteristics 
and economic effects. /; (2). Professor Robinson 

Prerequisite: Economics i and 3. 

41. Railway Transportation. — Railway transportation in the 
United States, with passing reference to conditions abroad. Intro- 
duction ; growth and present extent of the railway system ; the re- 
lation of waterway and interurban competition to railway develop- 
ment; the railway corporation and its financial aspects; the man- 
agement of a railway; railway combinations; the theory and prac- 
tise of rate-making; relations with state and federal governments; 
the relation of European railways to the state. /; (3). 

Professor Dewsnup 
Prerequisite: Economics i and 3; for engineers. Economics 2. 

42. Railway Rates; their Construction and Regulation. — 
Rate structure of the United States; the policy of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission as shown by its decisions ; the relation of 
such policy to the various theories of rate making. //; (3). 

Professor Dewsnup 
Prerequisite: Economics 41. 

43. The Theory and Practise of Railway Traffic Adminis- 
tration. — The organization and methods of traffic management ; 



Economics 367 

problems connected therewith. Registration in the second semester 
is permitted only to those who obtain credit in the first semester. 
/, //; (2). Professor Dewsnup 

Prerequisite: Economics i and 3. Open to students of Busi- 
ness Administration only. 

[45. Railway Operation and Its Problems. — Organization of 
the operating department ; economic problems of maintenance of 
way, and of motive power and equipment ; the purchase of materials 
and their distribution ; train movement ; yard and terminal services. 
Registration in the second semester is permitted only to those who 
obtain credit in the work of the first semester. Open to students of 
Business Administration only. I, II; (2). Not given in 1913-14. 

Professor Dewsnup 

Prerequisite : Economics i and 3.] 

courses for graduates 

Every student entering upon graduate work in economics must 
have had a thoro course in the principles of the science and 
should also have studied some special part of the field of economics, 
such as public finance or money and banking. 

The department of economics includes general economics, eco- 
nomic history, finance, commerce, and industry. 

Complete sets of all the important French, German, English, and 
American economic and financial journals are on hand ; ninety peri- 
odicals, foreign and domestic, in economics, finance, commerce, in- 
dustry, statistics, etc., are currently received. The library is es- 
pecially strong in railroad literature, economic history, labor, finance, 
and general theory. 

[loi. Economic Theory. — Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). Not 
given in 1913-14. Professor Kinley] 

[102. Advanced General Economics. — Twice a week; I, II: 
(i unit). Not given in 1913-14. Professor Kinley] 

103. Railway Administration. — Investigation, report, and dis- 
cussion of topics relating to current railway management. The 
course is primarily intended for candidates for the degree of A. M. 
in Railway Administration. Once a week.' I, II ; (Yz unit). 

Professor Dewsnup 

104. Foreign and Colonial Commerce of the United States. — 
The foreign commerce of the United States as shown in govern- 
ment publications. Twice a week; II; (i unit). 

Assistant Professor Litman 



368 Accountancy 

105. Public Finance. — The history and theory of public reve- 
nue and expenditure. Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). 

Professor Bogart 

106. Railway Policy. — A: History of railway development in 
the United States. B : History of railway development in foreign 
countries, particularly in western Europe. C: The state and the 
railway. The cycle of topics requires three years for the completion 
of the course. The topic in 1913-14 is A. Once a week; I, II ; ^J^ 
unit). Professor Dewsnup 

[107. The Corporation in Economic Evolution. — Once a week; 
I, II; ^J4 unit). Not given in 1913-14. Professor Robinson] 

109. Theory of Industrial Consolidations. — The nature of in- 
dustrial consolidations; the conditions and causes responsible for 
their development and their effects upon the production and distribu- 
tion of wealth. Once a week; I, II; (Y^ unit). Professor Robinson 

118. Seminar. — /, //. Professor Kinley and others 

120. History of Economic Thought. — Twice a week; I; (i 
unit). Dr. Thompson 

[122, Advanced Economic History of the United States. — 
Twice a week; I, II. Not given in 1913-14. Professor Bogart] 

ACCOUNTANCY 

(See also Economics.) 

Note. — The only courses in accountancy open to students not 

registered in business administration are i, 8, 9, 10, and 11. The 

courses in accountancy may not be counted towards a major in 

economics. 

1. Elementary and Intermediate Accounting. — The technique 
of accounts as covered by the ordinary rules of bookkeeping; the 
application of those rules to the science of accountancy. If elected 
this course must be taken throughout the year in order to secure 
credit. /, //; (3). Mr. Chase, Mr. Scovill 

Prerequisite: Thirty hours of university credit and registration 
in Economics i. 

2. Advanced Accounting and Auditing. — The technique of 
bookkeeping as applied in accounting in its more advanced stage. 
If elected this course must be taken throughout the year in order 
to secure credit. I, II; (3). Mr. Chase, Mr. Scovill 

Prerequisite: Accountancy l. Open to students of business 
administration only. 

3. Accounting Problems and Auditing. — Modern business or- 
ganization such as partnership, corporation, and cost accounting; 



Education 369 

municipal accounting and the accounting of the amalgamation of 
companies; auditing. If elected this course must be taken through- 
out the year in order to secure credit. I, II; (3). Mr. Chase 
Prerequisite: Accountancy 2. Open to students of business 
administration only. 

8. Elementary Governmental Accounting. — Use of govern- 
mental reports; governmental accounting. /; (2). 

Professor Frazer 
Prerequisite: Accountancy I and either concurrent registra- 
tion or previous credit in Economics 5. 

9. Institutional Accounting. — Functional organization; per- 
sonnel ; budgetary control ; purchasing ; store-keeping ; perpetual in- 
ventories //; (2). Professor Frazer 

Prerequisite: Accountancy i, and eight hours in economics, 
political science, or sociology. 

10. Shop Management and Cost Keeping. — Types of indus- 
tries ; the labor distribution ; the materials used. The best types 
of records suitable for each kind of industry are discussed, and the 
work is presented from the standpoint of the engineer and shop 
manager. //; (2). Mr. Scovill 

Prerequisite: Open only to engineering students who have 
had Economics i or 2. 

11. Farm Accounting. — The best practical system of keeping 
farm accounts; the designing of accounting systems for different 
kinds of farm operations and for different kinds of farming. /; 
(2). Mr Scovill 

Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior students of agriculture 
only. 

EDUCATION 

William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D., Professor 
Louis Delta Coffman, Ph.D., Professor 
Charles Hughes Johnston, Ph.D., Professor 
Horace Adelbert Hollister, A.M., Professor 
Lewis Flint Anderson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
Wilford Stanton Miller, A.M., Assistant and Secretary 
Charles LeRoy Harlan, A.B., Assistant 
Alfred Laurence Hall-Quest, A.M., Assistant 

The courses of the department fall into two general divisions : 
courses primarily for professional training and courses more sped- 



370 Education 

fically designed for general culture. The first division includes 
courses i, 4, 6, 9, 10, 11, 15, 18, and 20; the second division, courses 
2, S, 12, 13, and 16. Students majoring in education will be re- 
quired to take at least three hours in psychology in addition to the 
requirements in education. Courses i and 5 in psychology are 
especially recommended. 

Honors 

Candidates for honors in education must offer : 

1. A minimum of 18 hours in education and 6 hours in psy- 
chology. Teachers' courses, not to exceed 3 hours in all, offered by 
other departments of the University, may, with the approval of the 
department of education, be counted as part of this requirement. 

2. Minors in either (i) psychology (at least 9 hours exclusive 
of the 6 hours counted toward the major) and one subject selected 
from those that are usually taught in secondary schools, or (2) any 
two related subjects commonly taught in secondary schools. No 
course may be counted toward the minimum requirement for 
minors which may not be counted toward the major requirement 
in such subjects. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

1. Introduction to Education. — The processes of education 
traced back to the basic principles of biology, psychology, and 
sociology which explain and justify them. (Preceded by a brief 
sketch of the public school system.) I, II; (3). Professor Bagley 

Prerequisite: Two years of university work. 

2. History of Education. — The development of educational 
theory and practise in their relation to the history of civilization. 
//; (5). Assistant Professor Anderson 

Prerequisite: Two years of university work. 

16. Social Education. — The school as a social factor in its 
relation to the home, the church, and the state ; relation of education 
to child labor, vocation, and crime; educational extension. //; (3). 

Professor Coffman 

Prerequisite : Two years of university work. 

intermediate courses 

10. Observation and the Technique of Teaching. — System- 
atic observation of classroom work in neighboring high schools; 



Educatian 371 

weekly conferences for the discussion of observations; two lectures 
each week upon the technique of teaching; preparation by students 
of plans illustrating types of school exercises. I, II; (3). 

Professor Bagley 

Prerequisite: Education i. 

15. School Hygiene. — The hygienic aspects of school architec- 
ture and equipment; the hygiene of posture, exercise, and fatigue, 
and of reading and writing; the bearing of hygienic principles upon 
the course of study, the daily program, and other details of admin- 
istration and teaching. //; (3). Professor Bagley 

Prerequisite: Education I. 

advanced courses for undergraduates and graduates 

4. Problems of Educational Administration. — The interpreta- 
tion of present tendencies as exemplified in the school systems of 
typical cities and states, and in recent educational experiments in 
administration, discipline, methods, and subject-matter. /; (3). 

Professor Coffman 

Prerequisite: Education i, 2. 

5a. Comparative Education. — Elementary education in the 
United States, England, Germany, and France. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Anderson 
Prerequisite: Education i, 2. 

6. Principles of Secondary Education. — The function of the 
secondary school in a system of education. /; (3). 

Professor Johnston 

7. Social Administration of the Modern American High 
School. — The social problems of secondary education. //; (3). 

Professor Johnston 
Prerequisite: Education I. 

12. History of American Education. — /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Anderson 
Prerequisite: Education 2. 

13a. Educational Classics. — The sources of the history of 
education; the educational writings of Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, 
Montaigne, Milton, Locke, Rousseau. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Anderson 

Prerequisite: Education 2. 



372 Education 

13b. Educational Classics. — (Continuation of 13a.) The edu- 
cational theories of Pestalozzi, Herbart, Froebel, Herbert Spencer, 
and others. //; (3). Assistant Professor Anderson 

Prerequisite: Education 2. 

18. Method in Educational Research. — The statistical 
method applied to educational investigation. I; (2). 

Professor Coffman 
Prerequisite: Education i. 

2oa. Theory of Supervision. — The problems of supervision; 
the supervisor's functions in training and improving teachers. 
(Open only to graduate students and to seniors who are either 
graduates of normal schools or experienced teachers, or who are 
preparing for the work of supervision in special subjects, such as 
household science, manual training, and physical training.) //; (3). 

Professor Coffman 

Prerequisite: Education i. 

2ob. Theory and Practise of School Supervision. — Course 20a 
with two periods each week devoted to the observation and criti- 
cism of teaching in elementary and high schools. //; (5). 

Professor Coffman 

25. Educational Psychology. — II; (3). Professor Bagley 

27. High School Curricula. — Secondary studies, their func- 
tions and values. //; (3). Professor Johnston 
Prerequisite: Education i and 6. 

41. Vocational Education. — Institutions and methods of voca- 
tional and industrial education. /; (2). Professor Johnston 
Prerequisite: Education i and 16. 

courses for graduates 

Graduate students who are taking their, major work in education 
must have had as a prerequisite for such study Education i, 2, and 
10 and at least one elementary course in psychology. Work in the 
biological sciences, in philosophy, and in psychology is also recom- 
mended. 

108. History of Industrial and Vocational Education. — 
Industry and industrial training in Egypt, Greece, Rome ; industry 
and industrial training in the Middle Ages; the industrial revolu- 
tion and its effect upon education; recent tendencies in the de- 



Electrical Engineering 373 

velopment of agricultural and industrial high schools, agricultural 
colleges, monotechnic schools, continuation schools. Twice a week; 
II; (/ unit). Assistant Professor Anderson 

105. Seminar in the History of Education. — /, //; arrange 
hours and unit values. Assistant Professor Anderson 

106. Seminar in Secondary Education. — /, //; arrange hours 
and unit values. Professor Johnston 

112. Principles of Educaton. — The organization of public edu- 
cation in the United States and other countries, the aims of educa- 
tion; a brief resume of the principles of teaching. (Designed for 
the general student and not open for credit to students who have 
elected education as a major subject.) Twice a week; I; (1/2 unit.) 

Professor Bagley 

119. The Elementary Curriculum. — The functions and values 
of elementary school subjects ; practical exercises in the construc- 
tion of school curricula. (Designed especially for superintendents 
and principals.) Three times a week; II. (i unit). 

Professor Coffman 

125. Seminar in Educational Psychology. — Two times a 
week. II; (i unit). Professor Bagley 

114. Higher Education. — Problems of organization, adminis- 
tration, and teaching in colleges and universities. /; arrange hours 
and unit values. Professor Johnston 

Departmental Conference. — Bi-weekly I, II. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Morgan Brooks, Ph.B., M. E., Professor 

Ellery Burton Paine^ M.S., E.E., Associate Professor, Acting 
Head of Department 

Edward Hardenbergh Waldo, A.B., M.S., M.E., Assistant Pro- 
fessor 

John Myron Bryant, M.S., E.E., Assistant Professor 

Philip Sheridan Biegler, B.S., Associate 

Leonard Vaughan James, M.S., E.E., Associate 

Ira William Fisk, M.S., Associate 

♦Frank Carlton Loring, A.M., Instructor 

Abner Richard Knight, M.E., Instructor 

^Charles Ruby Moore, B.S., Instructor 

1. Electrical Engineering. — Electrical machinery: selection, 

installation and operation ; distribution of power ; motor applica- 



•Resigned, December, 1913. 
tSecond Semester. 



374 Electrical Engineering 

tions. (For municipal and sanitary engineers.) //; (2). 

Professor Brooks 
Prerequisite: Physics I, 3; junior standing. 

3. Dynamo Electrical Machinery. — Laws of electric and 
magnetic circuits ; construction and operation of direct current 
generators and motors. /; (3). 

Associate Professor Paine, Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. 
James, Mr. Fisk, Mr Knight. 

Prerequisite: Physics I, 3; Mathematics 9. 

5. Alternating Currents. — A mathematical and graphical 
treatment of the principles of periodic currents; theory of the 
simple phenomena in transmission lines and transformers. //; (4). 

Associate Professor Paine, Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. 
James, Mr. Fisk. 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 3. 

6. Alternating Currents. — (For mechanical engineers.) /; 
(2). Professor Brooks 

Prerequisite: Electrical engineering 3 or 16. 

9. Lighting. — Electric lamps and other illuminants, and their 
effective use; interior wiring; methods of electrical distribution. 

(For architects.) //; (i). Professor Brooks 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

13. Seminar. — Electrical railroading; illumination; telegraphy; 
telephony; storage batteries; electric metallurgy. /, //; (i). 

Associate Professor Paine 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

14. Alternating Currents. — Alternating-current transformers 
and generators. /; (4). 

Associate Professor Paine, Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr 

James, Mr Fisk 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 5. 

16. Dynamo-Electric Machinery. — Direct-current generators; 
motors; distribution circuits; storage batteries. Laboratory prac- 
tise. (For mechanical engineers.) //; (4). 

Professor Brooks, Mr. Moore, Mr. Knight 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; Mathematics 9. 



Electrical Engineering 375 

17. Advanced Alternating Currents. — S>Tichronous, induction, 
and commutator alternating current motors; rotarj- converters; dis- 
tributed inductance and capacity; transient phenomena. //; (4). 
Associate Professor Paine, Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. 

James, Mr. Fisk 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 14, 24. 

20. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — The construction of 
special apparatus or other work approved by the department. (Elec- 
tive for juniors and seniors.) /, II; (i to 3). 

Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. Loring, Mr. Moore 

22. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — Direct current labor- 
atory accompanying Electrical Engineering 3. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. Biegler, Mr. Knight 
Prerequisite: Registration in Electrical Engineering 3. 

23. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — Determination of the 
flux and E. M. F. waves of alternators. Alternating current cir- 
cuits, instruments. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. Beigler 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 3, 22; registration in Elec- 
trical Engineering 5. 

24. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — Advanced direct and 
alternating current testing. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. Moore 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 23; registration in Elec- 
trical Engineering 14. 

27. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — Advanced alternat- 
ing current testing. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Bryant, Mr. IMoore 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 24; registration in Elec- 
trical Engineering 17. 

28. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — Testing of dynamos 
and motors. /; (i). Mr. Biegler 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering i. 

29. Electrical Engineering Laboratory.— Alternating current 
operation and testing. (For students in mechanical engineering.) 
//; (2). Mr.. Moore 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 6. 



376 Engineering 

32. Electrical Design. — Calculation and design of electro- 
magnets and of dynamos, direct and alternating, and of transform- 
ers. /; (2). Assistant Professor Waldo, Mr. Knight 

Prerequisite. Electrical Engineering 5; registration in Electrical 
Engineering 14. 

34. Electrical Design. — Calculation of induction motors and 
converters. Problems in power plant design. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Waldo, Mr. Knight 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 14. 

35. Thesis. — First semester, preliminary reading and investi- 
gation; second semester, completion. Subjects must be chosen and 
approved before the first Monday in November. //; (3). 

courses for graduates 

Entrance upon graduate work in electrical engineering presup- 
poses the full undergraduate course in that subject. 

loi. Advanced Course in Alternating Currents. — The theory 
of Transient Phenomena; polyphase circuits; alternating current 
measuring apparatus. Twice a week; I, II ; (lYz units). 

Associate Professor Paine 

103. Electrical Design. — The development of plans for an 
electrical machine or apparatus of specified character; or for the 
arrangement of an electrical plant ; or for the installation of such 
machinery or apparatus. Twice a week; II; (i unit). 

Assistant Professor Waldo 

104. Telegraphy and Telephony. — Once a week; I, II; (i 
unit). Professor Brooks, Associate Professor Paine 

105. Electrical Engineering Research. — An experimental in- 
vestigation of some electrical phenomena, or tests of some electrical 
machine, or of a plant of such machines. Twice a week; I, II; 
(i to 3 units). Assistant Professor Bryant 

106. Illumination. — Once a week; I, II; (i unit). 

Professor Brooks, Assistant Professor Bryant 

ENGINEERING 

(See Architecture, Civil Engineering, Drawing, Electrical 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Mechanics, Mining 
Engineering, Municipal and Sanitary Engineering, Physics, 
Railway Civil Engineering, Railway Electrical Engineering, 
and Railway Mechanical Engineering.) 



The English Language and Literature 2>77 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

(Including Rhetoric) 

Daniel Kilham Dodge, Ph.D., Professor 

Thomas Arkle Clark, B.L., Professor, Rhetoric 

Stuart Pratt Sherman, Ph.D., Professor 

Raymond MacDonald Alden, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman 

Edward Fulton, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

Edward Chauncey Baldwin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Harry Gilbert Paul, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Franklin William Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Secretary 

Harrie Stuart Vedder Jones, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Thacher Howland Guild, A.M., Associate 

Jacob Zeitlin, Ph.D., Associate 

Charles Henry Woolbert, A.M., Associate 

Martha Jackson Kyle, A.M., Instructor 

Herbert LeSourd Creek, Ph.D., Instructor 

Clarence Valentine Boyer, Ph.D., Instructor 

Arthur Jerrold Tieje, Ph.D., Instructor 

John Clark Jordan, A.M., Instructor 

Gertrude Schoepperle, Ph.D., Instructor 

George Frisbie Whicher, A.M., Instructor 

Clarissa Rinaker, Ph.D., Instructor 

Easley Stephen Jones, A.M., Instructor 

Mervin James Curl, A.M., Instructor 

Roger Sherman Loomis, A.M., B.Litt, Tutor 

Sada Annis Harbarger, A.m., Assistant 

Marion Charlotte Landee, Assistant 

Ruth Kelso, A.M., Assistant 

Alta Gwinn, A.M., Assistant 

Walter Albert Buchen, A.M., Assistant 

Lew R Sarett, A.B., Assistant 

Emerson Grant Sutcliffe, A.B., Assistant 

Thomas Gregory Goodwin, A.B., Assistant 

Harrison McJohnston, A.B., Assistant 

Thomas Blaine Stanley, A.B., Assistant 

Raymond Ephraim Dixon, A.M., Assistant 

Major 

A student making English a major must take 24 hours in English 
in addition to Rhetoric i and the first semester of English i or 10. 



^yS The English Language and Literature 

Of these 24 hours, at least 12 must be in English literature, and at 
least 3 in composition. Of the total 24 hours, at least 6 must be 
taken in advanced courses. 

Honors 

Candidates for honors in English must offer : 

1. Work in English amounting to 24 hours in addition to Rhet- 
oric I and the first semester of English i or 10. 

2. At least 6 hours in advanced courses, which may be in either 
English literature or English composition. 

3. A minimum of 15 hours in English literature in addition to 
the first semester of English 10, and a minimum of 6 hours in Eng- 
lish composition in addition to Rhetoric i. 

4. Work aggregating 24 hours in tv^o minor subjects, which 
must be in two foreign languages or in one foreign language and 
either history or philosophy. French i and German i and 3 may 
not be counted toward the fulfillment of the minor requirements. 

A. LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE 

ELEMENTARY COURSES 

1. Survey of English Literature. — (Credit is not given for 
either semester separately, nor for the course in addition to course 
10 or course 20. Only one semesters' work is credited toward a 
major in English. Seniors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sci- 
ences may receive but half credit.) /, //; (4). 
Professor Sherman, Assistant Professor Baldwin, Associate Pro- 
fessor Fulton, Dr. Boyer, Dr. Creek, Mr. Jordan, Dr. Tieje, 

Mr. Whicher, Dr. Schoepperle, Dr. Rinaker 

Prerequisite: A year's college work. 

10. Introduction to Literature. — A (First semester), The 
Forms of Prose Literature; B (Second Semester), The Forms of 
Poetry. (This course is intended only for those who expect to in- 
clude a considerable amount of literature, in English or some other 
language, in their curriculum. Credit is not given for the course in 
addition to course i or course 20. Only one semester's work is 
credited toward a major in English. Seniors in the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences may receive but half credit. Credit is not 
given for the first semester separately.) /, //; (3). 
Professor Alden, Assistant Professor Paul, Dr. Zeitlin, Miss 

Kyle, Mr. Loomis 

Prerequisite: The minimum entrance requirements in English. 



The English Language and Literature 379 

16. American Literature. — (Credit is not given for either sem- 
ester separately.) /, //; (2). Assistant Professor Paul 

Prerequisite: English i or 10. 

17. The English Language. — Some account of its history, with 
special reference to the characteristics and usage of modem Eng- 
lish. /; (3). Associate Professor Fulton 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric i. 

20. The Chief English Writers. — (This course is offered only 
for those whose program admits of but one semester's work in Eng- 
lish, and who therefore may not register for course i. It is not ac- 
cepted, like course i, as a prerequisite for more advanced courses. 
Credit is not given for the course in addition to course i or course 
10. Seniors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may re- 
ceive but half credit.) / or II; (4). 

Professor Alden, Professor Dodge, Dr. Boyer, Dr. Creek, Dr. 
Tieje, Mr. Buchen 

Prerequisite: A year's college work. 

23. Introduction to Shakespeare. — / or II ; (3). 

Professor Sherman, Mr. Guild 
Prerequisite: English i or 10. 

intermediate courses 

Prerequisite: Eleven hours of English literature, or eight hours 
of English literature and eight hours of a foreign language. 

19. Literary Study of the Bible. — Hebrew literature as an ex- 
pression of the life of the race that produced it ; the debt, both 
ethical and artistic, of modem life to ancient Hebrew thought. 
(Either semester may be taken separately.) I, II; (3). 

Assistant Professor Baldwin 

24. English Literature of the Victorian Period. — //; (3). 

Miss Kyle 

29. English Literature from 1557 to 1688, Exclusive of the 

Drama. — /; (3). Assistant Professor Baldwin 

31. English Literature from 1688 to 1789. — II; (3). 

Assistant Professor Paul 

32. The Greater English Critics of the 19TH Century. — //; 
(3). Associate Professor Fulton 

33. English Literature from 1789 to 1837. — /; (3). 

Dr. Zeitlin 



380 The English Language and Literature 

ADVANCED COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

Prerequisite: Sixteen hours of English literature. These courses, 
however, are open to any junior or senior with the approval of the 
instructor concerned. 

3. The Poetry of Milton. — Origins, forms, artistic and ethical 
values; Milton's place in English literary history. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Baldwin 

4. English Versification. — Theory of English rhythm and 
metre; history of the development of the forms of English verse. 
/; (3). Professor Alden 

5. Shakespeare. — Intensive study of a few plays, with special 
emphasis on Hamlet. II; (3). Professor Dodge 

7. Chaucer and his Contemporaries. — (The first semester, 
dealing with Chaucer exclusively, may be taken for separate credit) 
A ^^j (3). Assistant Professor Jones 

8. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). — Grammar; prose; short 
poems; Beowulf. (The first semester may be taken separately.) 
L IJ : (3). Professor Dodge 

14. Studies in the History of Journalism. — /, //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Scott 

15. Teachers' Course. — Methods of teaching English literature 
and composition in the high school. (This course is not credited 
toward advanced degrees, or toward a major in English. Either 
semester may be taken separately.) I, II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Paul 

18. Modern English Grammar. — The structure of the sentence 
and its anaylsis into the parts of speech; the common grammatical 
categories; the peculiarities of English syntax. //; (3). 

Dr. Zeitlin 

35. The English Drama (Exclusive of Shakespeare). — 
A (first semester) : from the beginning to 1600. B (second semester) : 
from 1600 to 1700. (Either semester may be taken for separate 
credit.) /, //; (3). Professor Dodge, Professor Sherman 

38. The Arthurian Tradition in England. — Primitive ele- 
ments; the historical Arthur; Celtic, French, and Italian influences; 
the tradition in England from the early romances to Arnold. //; 
(3). Dr. Schoepperle 

[39, Introduction to the Literature of the Middle Ages. — 
European culture from the fourth century; the relation of English 
and continental literature to the fourteenth century. /; (3). Not 
given in 1913-14. Dr. Creek] 



The English Language and Literature 381 

45. The Development of the Modern Drama. — Dramatic 
tendencies in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, both in 
England and on the Continent. Representative readings ; lectures 
from the standpoint of comparative literature. I, II; (2). 

Mr. Guild and others 

courses for graduates 

Students who enter upon graduate work with English as their 
major subject are expected to give evidence of ability to write well, 
and of a considerable acquaintance with English literature. Their 
progress in the field of English will depend, however, in great 
measure upon the breadth and thoroness of their training as under- 
graduates in the following closely allied subjects : the Classics, the 
modern languages, history, and philosophy. 

A reading knowledge of French and German is from the begin- 
ning highly desirable ; after the first year it is indispensable. 

The Degree of Master of Arts in English. In addition to com- 
plying with the general rules of the Graduate School, candidates 
for the degree of Master of Arts in English must comply with the 
following rules of the department of English: (i) they must 
choose a portion of their work from the group of courses described 
as "for graduates'" ; (2) must offer an elementary course in Anglo- 
Saxon; and (3) must take, besides the regular semester examina- 
tions in all their courses, a general examination, oral or written as 
the department may prescribe, which shall be a final test of the can- 
didate's fitness and ability. 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English. Candidates for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English may expect to be 
examined on the entire field of the English language and literature. 
They are urged, furthermore, to acquaint themselves as fully as 
possible with the history of the philosophy of the period in which 
their main interest lies, and with the foreign language and literature 
most closely related to English in that period, 

loi. Research in Special Periods. — Competent graduate stu- 
dents are encouraged to seek the advice and assistance of the de- 
partment of English and to submit to the department plans for 
study in the language or literature of the periods mentioned below. 

A. Anglo-Saxon language and literature. 

Professor Dodge, Dr. Zeitlin 

B. Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. 

Assistant Professor Jones 



382 The English Language and Literature 

C. Sixteenth Century. Professor Alden, Professor Dodge 

D. Seventeenth Century. 

Professor Alden, Assistant Professor Baldwin 

E. Eighteenth Century. 

Professor Sherman, Assistant Professor Paul 

F. Nineteenth Century. 

Professor Sherman, Associate Professor Fulton 

104. Seminar in Lyrical Poetry. — Subject : The Religious Lyric 
in the 17th Century. Twice a week; II; (i unit). Professor Alden 

105. Shakespeare's Sonnets. — The text and the problems in- 
volved in its interpretation. Twice a week; I ; (i unit). 

Professor Alden 

106. English Literary Criticism. — (A. i6th and 17th centur- 
ies. Omitted in 1913-14.) B. i8th century. Twice a week; I, II; 
(j unit). Associate Professor Fulton 

109. German and Scandinavian Influences on English Lit- 
erature OF the Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries. — Twice 
a week; I; (/ unit). Professor Dodge 

no. Old English (Anglo-Saxon) Poetry. — Twice a week; I, 
II; (i unit). Professor Dodge 

[113. Historical Prose Syntax. — The forces, native and for- 
eign, at work in the development of English prose style as far as it 
relates to sentence structure. Twice a week; I, II. Not given, 
1913-14. Dr. Zeitlin] 

[126. English Ballads and Metrical Romances. — Twice a 
week, I, II. Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Jones] 

127. Middle English. — Critical reading of Middle English texts. 
Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Jones 

136. The Transition from the Seventeenth to the Eight- 
eenth Century; the Rise of Classicism.— rwtc^ a week; I, II; 
(7 unit). Assistant Professor Paul 

[137. Nineteenth Century Prose Writers. — Tzvice a zveek; 
I, II. Not given, 1913-14. Professor Sherman] 

138. The Romantic Movement in England. — Tzvice a week; 
I, II; (i unit). Professor Sherman] 

[150. Old Irish. — Selections from the glosses and from the 
Tain bo Cualnge; lectures on Old and Middle Irish literature. Not 
given, 1913-14. Dr. Schoepperle] 



The English Language and Literature 383 

B. RHETORIC 

ELEMENTARY COURSES 

I. *Rhetoric and Themes. — Required for students in the Col- 
leges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Agriculture. 

/, //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Scott (in charge), Associate Professor Ful- 
ton, Assistant Professor Jones, Mr. Guild, Dr. Zeitlin, Dr. 
Boyer, Dr. Creek, Dr. Tieje, Mr. Jordan, Dr. Schoepperle, 
Mr. Whicher, Dr. Rinaker, Mr. E. S. Jones, Mr. Curl, Mr. 
Warnock, Mr. Buchen, Miss Harbarger, Miss Kelso, Miss 
GwiNN, Mr. SuTCLiFFE, Mr. Goodwin, Mr. Sarett, Mr. Mc- 
Johnston, Mr. Stanley, Mr. Dixon 

Prerequisite : The minimum entrance requirements in English. 

For the benefit of those whose course is irregular, a limited num- 
ber of sections in each semester take up the work of the other sem- 
ester. The course is not counted toward a major in English. 

7. Public Speaking. — Reading aloud, with occasional memory 
work. Lectures; class exercises; individual instruction. /, //; (2). 

Mr. WooLBERT, Mr. Sarett, Miss Landee 
• Prerequisite: Rhetoric i. 

INTERMEDIATE COURSES 

3. English Composition. — Short themes, with an occasional long 
theme. / or II; (3). Professor Clark, Dr. Zeitlin, Miss Kyle 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric i. 

4. Argumentation and Debate. — Practise in oral and written 
argumentation; brief-making; tests of evidence and reasoning; 
sources of material ; extemporaneous presentation of arguments in 
class debates. (Credit is given separately for the first semester, 
which is devoted more particularly to written work.) /, //; (3). 

Mr. Woolbert 

5. The Forms of Public Address. — Extempore speaking; formal 
public speaking ; discussion of current events ; parliamentary proce- 
dure. /, //; (2). Mr. Woolbert 



•Students who show by examination a proficiency in composition sufficient 
to qualify them for the second semester's work in Rhetoric 1 may be excused 
from the first semester's work. The examination for those desirous of meeting 
this qualification will be given at 7 p. m., September 21. 

Students who show in the first two weeks that they are not prepared to 
do composition work of collegiate grade will be assigned to a special course 
parallel to the first semester of Rhetoric 1, but involving additional work. 



384 The English Language and Literature 

6. Narrative Composition. — Practise in short story writing. (In- 
tended for those who have some aptitude for literary work.) I; 
(3). Mr. Guild 

Prerequisite : Two years of college work and the consent of the 
instructor. 

ID Business Writing. — General business correspondence, exclu- 
sive of the sales letter ; practise in incidental writing, summaries, etc. 
Lectures, and discussions of the practise of the student in applying 
the principles presented in the course. (In the second semester 
open only to those taking a business course, except by special per- 
mission. Not counted toward a major in English.) / or II; (2). 

Professor Clark, Mr. McJohnston 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric i. 

12. Newspaper Writing. — News writing; interviewing and re- 
porting ; news correspondence ; news form ; news value ; typography ; 
proof reading. /, //; (2). Mr. Buchen 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric i. 

19. Agricultural News Writing. — Class exercises; lectures; 
assignments in gathering and preparing material for agricultural pa- 
pers. //; (3). Assistant Professor Scott 

Prerequisite : Junior or senior standing in the College of Agri- 
culture. Rhetoric i. ' 

20. Expository Composition. — Weekly themes, based on Steeves 
and Ristine's Representative Essays in Modern Thought. (Open 
only to a limited number of students, and only on recommendation. 
Credit is not given for this course in addition to course 6). /; (3). 

Dr. TiEjE 
Prerequisite: Rhetoric 3. 

21. Sales Correspondence. — The economic and psychological 
principles underlying successful sales letter writing; planning the 
letter sales campaign ; the form of the follow-up letter ; analysis 
of markets, etc. /; (2). Mr. McJohnston 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric 10. Open to students in business ad- 
ministration only. 

22. Summarizing and Abstracting. — Summarizing, briefing, and 
making reports ; abstracts of correspondence on file ; summarizing 
of commercial and economic data. //; (2). Mr. McJohnston 

Prerequisite : Rhetoric 10. Open to students in business admin- 
istration only. 



Entomology 385 

25. Senior Conferences on Written Work. — Each senior will 
present to the instructor all the written papers presented during the 
year in his different courses for review and criticism by the in- 
structor. Rewriting of such papers may be required if, in the opin- 
ion of the instructor, they are open to serious criticism. [Required 
of all seniors in the Courses in Business Administration.] /, //; (i). 

Mr. McJohnston 

ADVANCED COXJRSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

8. Interpretive Reading. — (This course is intended for ad- 
vanced students, particularly intending teachers. Credit is given 
only to students registered also in some advanced course in litera- 
ture, such as English 3, 4, 5, or 15. While open to graduate stu- 
dents, the course is not credited toward advanced degrees.) //; 
(i). Mr. Guild 

15. Advanced Newspaper Writing. — The larger problems in re- 
porting; application of principles of history, economics, and polit- 
ical science to current public events; editing; editorial writing. I, 
II; (3). Assistant Professor Scott 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric 12 or the consent of the instructor. 

17. Advanced Composition. — Practise writing, with special em- 
phasis on the study of structure; criticism of current periodical lit- 
erature; the developing of material for reports, magazine articles, 
etc. (Open to a limited number of students, and only on recom- 
mendation.) II; (3). Mr. Guild 

Prerequisite: Two years of college work. 

ENTOMOLOGY 
(See also Botany, Physiology, and Zoology.) 

Stephen Alfred Forbes, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor 

Alexander Dyer MacGillivray, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

Justus Watson Folsom, D.Sc, Assistant Professor 

♦Hugh Glasgow, Ph.D., Instructor 

tRoBERT Douglas Glasgow, Ph.D., Instructor 

Alvah Peterson, A.M., Assistant 

Entomology as taught at the University is distinctly differentiated 
from the work in zoology. Students preparing for service as eco- 
nomic entomologists should take as many of the courses offered as 
possible, including especially 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 14, and 108. Those pre- 



•Resigned, November 30, 1913. 
tFrom December 1, 1913. 



386 Entomology 

paring for the teaching of zoology should take either 2 and 4, or 3 
and 4, or all three of these courses. 

1. Elementary Entomology. — Lectures ; laboratory ; field work. 
(Open to all students.) I, II; (2). Assistant Professor Folsom 

2. General Entomology. — Field entomology ; morphological and 
physiological entomology ; the collection and preservation of speci- 
mens ; laboratory studies of typical insects ; the recognition of adap- 
tive structures and their utilities. (This course and course 3 form 
a year's work, covering the whole field. Either may be taken inde- 
pendently of the other.) /; (5). 

Associate Professor MacGillivray, Assistant Professor Folsom 
Prerequisite: Entomology i, or 4, or equivalent. 

3. General Entomology. — The classification and determination 
of insects ; the study of life histories in the insectary and by field 
observation ; the collection of information with respect to the ecolog- 
ical relations of insects. //; (5). Assistant Professor Folsom 

Prerequisite : Entomology i or 4, or equivalent. 

4. Introduction to Economic Entomology. — Lectures; field 
work; laboratory. Section A for students of agriculture. /; first 
half; (2J/2). Section B, for students of horticulture. //; second 
half; (2^/^). Assistant Professor Folsom 

5. Introduction to Research. — Preparation for thesis work. Li- 
brary, language, manuscript, and advanced laboratory work on as- 
signed topics. (A three-hour course for one semester is required 
as a preparation for entomological thesis work.) / or II; (3 to 5). 

Professor Forbes, Associate Professor MacGillivray, Assistant 

Professor Folsom 
Prerequisite : Entomology 2, 3. 

6. Thesis Investigation. — Subjects selected during the junior 
year. Three hours a day given to investigation, under the super- 
vision of an instructor, during the senior year. /, //; (5). 

Associate Professor MacGillivray, Assistant Professor Folsom 

7. Systematic Entomology. — The external anatomy of insects; 
the terminology of the parts ; identification of specimens represent- 
ing as many as possible of the major groups. / or II; (5). 

Associate Professor MacGillivray 
Prerequisite: Entomology 2. 

8. Advanced Economic Entomology. — Assigned problems. Field 
laboratory, insectary, library, and manuscript work, with practise in 
the special operations of economic entomology. (Intended primarily 



Entomology 387 

to prepare students for service as entomologists in experiment sta- 
tions and other state and government positions. Agronomy 7 and 
Horticulture i, 2, and 3 should also be taken as a part of this prep- 
aration.) /, //; (3). 

Professor Forbes, Assistant Professor Folsom 
Prerequisite: Entomology 4, 2, 3. 

9. Advanced Systematic Entomology. — The identification of 
the characters upon which genera and species are based. / or II ; 
(5). Associate Professor MacGilli\tiay 

Prerequisite: Entomology 2, 7. 

10. Taxonomy of Immature Insects. — /; (5). 

Associate Professor MacGillivray 
Prerequisite : Entomology i or 4, 2, 7. 

11. Classification of the Coccidae. — Methods of preparing 
scale insects for study, the identification of genera and species, and 
discussion of their morphology, metamorphosis, and phylogeny. //; 
(5). Associate Professor MacGillivray 

Prerequisite : Entomology i or 4, 2, 7. 

12. Seminar. — Reports and discussion upon assigned topics ; 
presentation and discussion of contents of recent entomological pub- 
lications, and of results of personal research. /^ //; (i). 

Prerequisite : One year of entomological work. 

13. Medical Entomology. — Insects and the transmission of dis- 
ease; methods of controlling such insects and preventing the 
disease due to them. (Primarily for advanced students preparing 
for medicine.) / or II; (3). 

Prerequisite : Zoology 3, or its equivalent in microscopical tech- 
nique. 

14. Advanced Economic Entomology. — Personal work under 
direction on assigned problems in economic entomology, intended to 
prepare advanced students for immediate service as state and gov- 
ernment entomologists. Advantage will be taken of the operations 
and practical problems of the State Entomologist's office so far as 
available. / or II, and six weeks of summer vacation. 

Prerequisite: Courses in elementary and advanced economic en- 
tomology, and in systematic entomology. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The prerequisite for graduate work in entomology is one year's 
work in biological courses, including an equivalent of either Zoology 
I or Entomology i or 4. Entrance upon major work in entomology 
requires the equivalent of Entomology 2 and 3. 



388 Geology 

Graduate students who have had at least one year of college 
work in biological courses may take for graduate credit any of the 
preceding courses except i, 4, and 6. The following courses are 
open to graduate students only: 

102. Research in the Morphology and Embryology of In- 
sects. Twice a week. I, If; {i or 2 units). 

Assistant Professor Folsom 

103. Research in Faunistic and Ecological Entomology. — 
Once or twice a week; I, II; (j or 2 units). Professor Forbes 

108. Research in Economic Entomology. — Once or twice a 
week; I, II; (i or 2 units). Professor Forbes 

109. Research in Systematic Entomology. — Twice a week; 
I, II; (/ or 2 units). Associate Professor MacGillivray 

THE FINE ARTS 

(See Art and Design and Music. Attention is called also to the 

courses in esthetics oflFered by the departments of philosophy, 

education, architecture, and household science.) 

FLORICULTURE , 
(See Horticulture.) 

FRENCH 
(See Romance Languages and Literature.) 

GEOLOGY 
(Including Mineralogy, Paleontology and Physical Geography.) 

Charles Wesley Rolfe, M.S., Professor 
William Shirley Bayley, Ph.D., Professor 
Thomas Edmund Savage, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
John Lyon Rich, Ph.D., Instructor 
David Grosh Thompson, A.B., Assistant 
Frank Leslie Fleener, A.B., Assistant 
George William Heitkamp, A.B., Assistant 
Clarence Samuel Ross, A.B., Assistant 

This department occupies a suite of twenty-seven rooms on the 
first and second floors of the Natural History building, equipped 
with apparatus and illustrative material including maps, charts, 



Geology 389 

projection apparatus, field and laboratory instruments for surveying 
and mapping, and collections in mineralogy, petrography, and paleon- 
tology (especially in the fossil forms which occur in the Mississippi 
Valley). 

The offices and laboratories of the State Geological Survey ad- 
join those of the department, and a portion of the instructors are 
also engaged in work for the Survey, while others are cooperating 
with the United States Geological Survey, thus giving advanced stu- 
dents the advantages which are to be gained from close contact 
with practical work. 

To students who are especially interested in geology the de- 
partment offers three lines of work, and recommends that the 
courses be taken in the order indicated below. 

Mineralogy, Petrography, Economic Geology. — For those who 
care particularly for minerals and rocks, their identification, origin, 
and transformation, the origin, characteristics, and classification of 
ores, and the economic qualities of non-metallic minerals, it is rec- 
ommended that the following courses be taken in the order given : 
Geology 19, i, la, 5, 5a, 6, 7, 16, 15, 2. 

Stratigraphy, Paleontology. — If the student cares more for the 
history of rocks, the order in which they were laid down, the condi- 
tions which gave them their peculiarities, and the evolution of living 
forms as shown by the succession of fossils, the following order of 
courses is suggested : 19, i, la, 9, 16, 5, 18, 20, 22, 15, 4. 

Physiographic Geology, Physical Geography. — If his interest 
lies more in the earth's surface, the origin of its topographic forms, 
the agencies which are transforming them, and the influence of these 
upon the welfare of plants, animals, and man, the following courses 
are advised, in order: 19, 23, 14, 10, 5, la, 11, 8, 20, 17, 24, 4. These 
courses will be of special interest to prospective teachers of phys- 
iography. 

The attention of students who can devote but one or two semes- 
ters to the subject is directed to the following courses : For en- 
gineers, 3, 5, 13, 15; for agriculturists, 12, 14, 8, 11; for students in 
commerce, 3, or 23, 14, 8; for students in literature and science, 3, i, 
23, la, 10, 14, 8, II, 22. 

courses for undergraduates 

I. Dynamic and Structltral Geology. — The agents and pro- 
cesses involved in the development of the earth's present features. 
Lectures; laboratory. /; (5). Professor Rolfe, Mr. Fleener 

Prerequisite : Chemistry i or an equivalent. 



390 Geology 

la. Historical Geology. — The evolution of the earth and its 
life. Lectures; laboratory work, consisting largely of a study of a 
few of the more characteristic fossils from the various horizons. 
(Continuing course I and introducing courses 9 and 16.) //; (5). 

Assistant Professor Savage, Mr. Thompson 

Prerequisite : Geology i, 3, or 23. 

2. Economic Geology. — The origin and manner of occurrence of 
minerals and rocks of economic importance, especially those found 
in North America. Lectures; laboratory. //; (3). 

Professor Bayley 
Prerequisite: Geology 5; i and la, or 3. 

3. General Geology. — Mineralogy; dynamic, historic, and eco- 
nomic geology; minerals; rocks; contour maps; fossils. Recita- 
tions; laboratory. (For students who wish to devote but one sem- 
ester to geology.) / or II; (5). Daily, with occasional trips on 
Saturday. Professor Rolfe, Mr. Fleener 

4. Thesis Course. — Field or laboratory problems; complete re- 
ports under the direction of an instructor; maps, sections, and fig- 
ures based on observations. //; (5). 

5. Mineralogy. — Petrography and economic geology; the most 
common ores and minerals of scientific importance; crystallography; 
the characteristics of about 125 of the most important minerals ; blow 
pipe analysis. Lectures; laboratory. /; (5). 

Professor Bayley, Mr. Ross 
Prerequisite: Chemistry i, 2, 3. 

5a. Determinative Mineralogy. — Laboratory: the determina^ 
tion of minerals. Lectures : the characteristics, origin, and trans- 
formation of minerals. //; (3). Professor Bayley, Mr. Ross 

Prerequisite : Geology 5. 

6. Physical and Optical Mineralogy. — Petrography; physical 
and optical properties of minerals ; the practical use of polarized 
light in identifying the rock-forming materials. /; (3). 

Professor Bayley 
Prerequisite : Geology 5. 

7. Petrography, — Rocks ; their types ; origin ; classification ; the 
types studied with hand specimen and thin section. Lectures ; lab- 
oratory. //; (3). Professor Bayley 

Prerequisite: Geology 6. 

8. Geography of Europe. — The continent of Europe; physi- 
ographic features, climate, and natural resources ; the influence of 



Geology 391 

physical conditions on present and historical development. //; (3). 

Dr. Rich, Mr. Heitkamp 
Prerequisite: Geology 23, or i or 3 with 14. 

9. Paleontology. — Invertebrae fossils ; their classification and 
relationships; identification of the fossils; the literature of the sub- 
ject. Lectures; laboratory. /; (5). 

Assistant Professor Savage, Mr. Thompson 

Prerequisite: Geology la; recommended: i year of botany or 
zoology. 

ID. Influences of Geographic Environment. — The influence of 
geographic factors such as topography, climate, location, on the 
activities and habits of man — on his mode of life, his industries 
or means of gaining a livelihood, modes of communication ; the 
bearing of these factors on historical movements and on the devel- 
opment and policies of nations. II; (3). 

Dr. Rich, Mr. Heitkamp 

Prerequisite: Geology 23, or i, or 3. 

11. Geography of North America. — The continent of North 
America; physiography, climate, resources, peoples, and economic 
geography; the bearings of physiographic and climatic factors 
on present and past development. /; (3). Dr. Rich, Mr. Heitkamp 

Prerequisite : Geology 23, or i or 3 with 14. 

12. Geology of Soils. — The origin of the various classes of 
soils; mineral compositions; physical characteristics; transforma- 
tions. (Particularly valuable to students of agriculture and all 
those who are especially interested in plant growth.) //; (5). 

Professor Rolfe, Mr. Fleener 
Prerequisite : Chemistry i or an equivalent. 

13. Engineering Geology. — (Planned especially to meet the 
needs of engineering students; open only to students in engineer- 
ing and ceramics.) Lectures; laboratory. //; (5). 

Professor Bayley, Mr. Ross 

14. Meteorology. — The heating and cooling, pressure, circula- 
tion, and moisture of the atmosphere ; storms, and storm and 
weather forecasting; rainfall, climate. (Course 14 should be taken 
by all those who intend to do more than the most elementary work 
in geography, and, with course 8, should be taken with Economics 
26 by students of commerce.) Professor Rolfe, Mr. Heitkamp 

15. Structural Geology. — The arrangement of the rocks which 



392 Geology 

form the earth's crust and their distribution on its surface; moun- 
tains; faults; folds; other diastrophic phenomena. /; (3). 

Professor Bayley 
Prerequisite : Geology la. 

16. Stratigraphy. — Classifications; rock formations; methods 
and criteria employed in correlation of the characteristic inverte- 
brate faunas of the successive geologic formations and their distri- 
bution ; the use of these in the interpretation of stratigraphy. //; 
(5). Assistant Professor Savage 

Prerequisite : Geology 9. 

[17. G)NTiNENTAL EvoLUTioN. — The development of continents; 
the distribution of the strata of the successive geological systems; 
the character and variations of the sediments in each period with 
their faunas; the distribution of lands and seas, and their relative 
altitude in geologic ages. /; (5). Not given, 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Savage 

Prerequisite : Geology la or 11.] 

[18. Mesozoic and Tertiary Paleontology. — The mesozoic and 
tertiary invertebrate fossil forms; the evolution of vertebrates dur- 
ing the same periods. (For students specializing in botany or 
zoology.) //; (5). Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Savage 

Prerequisite : Geology la, 9; or 10 credits in botany or zoology.] 

[19. Field Geology — Introductory Course. — Field trip of two 
weeks, introductory to the courses in general geology and physio- 
graphy. Including points in Indiana, Ohio, and the Wyandotte or 
Mammoth Cave, to illustrate the marked difference between the 
physiographic features of youthful and mature topography and 
of glaciated and non-glaciated areas; collection of fossils from 
the different rock exposures; their use in determining the age 
of strata. (Expenses about $35.00.) Credit given on comple- 
tion of a semester course in geology and on submission of written 
report on the observations and collections made during the trip. 
/; (2). Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Savage] 

20. Field Geology. — The field determination of physical features 
and rock formations, with mapping and description, of a selected 
area. (A short field course.) Assistant Professor Savage 

23. Physiography. — The earth's surface: its salient features, 
their origin, modification, and interrelationships ; agencies and pro- 
cesses of change; meteorology; oceanography. (A general intro- 



Geology 393 

ductory course in physiography; should precede all further work 
in geography or physiography.) /; (5). Dr. Rich, Mr. Heitkamp 

21. Geology of Coal. — The origin of coal ; age, distribution and 
stratigraphy of the coal deposits of North America, with special 
emphasis on the Illinois or Eastern Interior basin. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Savage 
Prerequisite: Geolog>' 13 or an equivalent. 

22. Organic Evolution. — The evolution of plant and animal 
forms as indicated by the fossil record. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Savage 
Prerequisite: Geology la, or one semester of zoology or botany. 

24. Geomorphology. — Earth features and the influence of cli- 
matic conditions, character and attitude of the rocks, and diastrophic 
movements on surface forms. (An introduction to the literature of 
physiography; should be taken by all who intend to teach or to 
specialize in geography or geology.) //; (5). Dr. Rich 

Prerequisite : Geology i or 3 or 23. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The first prerequisite for graduate work in Geology is the equiva- 
lent of the complete undergraduate offerings in that branch of the 
subject in which specialization is desired. Those who wish to spe- 
cialize in paleontology should have, in addition, at least an ele- 
mentary knowledge of systematic zoology ; those who wish physical 
geography should have a knowledge of general physics and chem- 
istry; and those who expect to pursue work in petrography and 
economic geology should be well grounded in general physics, in- 
organic chemistry and the elements of physical chemistry. All 
graduate students should be sufficiently acquainted with German 
and French to be able to read the journals printed in these lan- 
guages. 

loi. Advanced Crystallography. Methods used in measur- 
ing, prospecting, and calculating crystal forms in, and determining 
the physical properties of crystalized bodies. Three to five times 
a week; I, II; (i unit). Professor Bayley 

102. Petrography. — The igneous and fragmental rocks; identi- 
fication of types, classification, and relationships. Lectures ; labora- 
tory. Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). Professor Bayley 

103. Schists. — The crystalline schists and other metamorphic 
rocks ; processes of metamorphism. Lectures ; laborator\-. Twice a 
week; I, II; (i unit). Professor Bayley 



394 Germanic Languages and Literature 

105. Invertebrate Paleontology. — A group of invertebrate fos- 
sils, or the fossils of a special geological system; their geographic 
distribution and geological range with reference to stratigraphy. 
Largely individual work. One to three times a week; I, II; (i 
unit). Assistant Professor Savage 

106. Areal and Stratigraphic Geology. — The geology and 
paleontology of a selected area in Illinois. A carefully prepared re- 
port on the geology of the region, based on the data collected in the 
field, is required. One to three times a week; I, II; (i to 2 units). 

Assistant Professor Savage 

107. Areal and Structural Geology. — Individual work on 
some area exhibiting important structural or economic features. 
Once a week; I, II; (i to 2 units). Professor Bayley 

124. Advanced Physiography. — Individual work on field prob- 
lems ; literature of physiography and geomorphology. One to three 
times a week; I, II; (i unit). Dr. Rich 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 
(Including Scandinavian) 

Julius Goebel, Ph.D., Professor 

Otto Eduard Lessing^ Ph.D., Professor 

George Tobias Flom, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Scandinavian 

George Henry Meyer, A.M., Assistant Professor 

Neil Con well Brooks^ Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

♦Leonard Bloomfield, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Charles Marshall Poor,^ Ph.D., Instructor 

Charles Aj.lyn Williams, Ph.D., Instructor 

Armin Hajaman Roller, Ph.D., Instructor 

Philip Stephan Barto, Ph.D., Instructor 

Alexander Green, Ph.D., Instructor 

Felix Emil Held, A.M., Assistant 

Adolph Eduard Zucker, A.M., Assistant 

George Washington Spindler, A.M., Assistant 

GERMAN 

Honors 

Candidates for honors in German must offer: 

I. A minor of at least 12 hours in some other language ; if this 
be English it must be exclusive of English i and work in rhetoric; 
if it be French or Spanish it must be exclusive of the first year's 
work. 

*0n leave. 



Germanic Languages and Literature 395 

2. A minor of at least 12 hours in any one of the other 
humanities, provided that the courses chosen contribute in a reas- 
onable degree to the student's knowledge of European civilization. 
In order to be sure that the work offered will be accepted as ful- 
filling this general purpose, students are urged to consult with the 
department in planning their work in their minor subjects. 

3. A general knowledge of European history, such as is gained 
from History i, or an equivalent course. 

4. An acceptable thesis ; it may be one written in connection 
with some course. 

FIRST- YEAR COURSES 

1. Elementary Course. — Grammar and easy reading. /; (4). 
Assistant Professor Meyer^ Assistant Professor Brooks, Dr. 

Poor, Dr. Williams, Dr. Barto, Dr. Green, Mr. Zucker, Mr. 
Spindler 

2. Narrative and Descriptive Prose. — Grammar and reading. 
/; (4). , Dr. KoLLER, Mr. Zucker, Mr. Spindler 

Prerequisite: One year of high school German or German S i. 

3. Narrative and Descriptive Prose. — Grammar and reading. 
(Continuation of German i.) //; (4). 

Assistant Professor Meyer, Assistant Professor Brooks, Dr. 

Poor, Dr. Koller, Dr. Barto, Dr. Green, Mr. Zucker, Mr. 

Spindler. 
Prerequisite: German i. 

second-year courses 

4. Descriptive and Historical Prose. — Selections from stan- 
dard prose writers; sight reading; prose composition. /; (4). 

Dr. Poor, Dr. Williams, Dr. Koller, Dr. Barto, Dr. Green, Mr. 
Held, Mr. Zucker, Mr. Spindler 

Prerequisite: German i and 3, or one year of high school Ger- 
man and German 2, or two years of high school German. 

Note. — Three sections of German 4 will be offered in the second 
semester for those taking German 2 the first semester. 

5. Introduction to the Classics. — Schiller's Jungfrau von 
Orleans; Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea; or others of the classics. 
Prose composition. (Two sections of German 5 will be offered 
in the first semester.) //; (4). 

Dr. Poor, Dr. Williams, Dr. Koller, Dr. Barto, Dr. Green, Mr. 

Held 
Prerequisite: German 4, or three years of high school German. 



39^ Germanic Languages and Literature 

6. Scientific Prose. — The rapid reading of works of a general 
scientific character. //; (4). Dr. Koller, Dr. Barto, Mr. Held 

Prerequisite: German 4. 

THIRD- YEAR COURSES 

Not more than ten hours of these courses may be counted 
towards a major without the approval of the head of the depart- 
ment. 

7. Modern Fiction. — (Intended primarily for students who take 
German 5 in the first semester; not open to those who have had 
any work more advanced than German 5.) Two sections. II; (3). 

Dr. Williams, Dr. Green 
Prerequisite : German 5, or equivalent. 

10. Introductory Goethe Course. — Reading of works illustrat- 
ing different periods in Goethe's development : Gois von Berlichin- 
gen; Egmont; Iphigenie auf Tauris; selections from Dichtung und 
Wahrheit. II; (3). 

Assistant Professor Meyer, Assistant Professor Brooks 
Prerequisite: German 14, or 24, or 16. 

14. Introductory Schiller Course. — Reading of works illus- 
trating different periods in Schiller's development : Lyrics and bal- 
lads; Kdbale und Liehe; Braut von Messina. I; (3). 

Assistant Professor Brooks 
Prerequisite: German 5 or its equivalent. 

16. Elementary Prose Composition. — Two sections. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Brooks, Dr. Williams, Mr. Held 
Prerequisite : German 5, or equivalent. 

Note. — One section of German 16 is offered in the second semes- 
ter. 

17. Intermediate Prose Composition. — (Two sections.) II; 
(3). Dr. Williams, Mr. Held 

Prerequisite: German 16. 

24. Modern Drama. — Rapid reading of dramas by Grillparzer, 
Hebbel, Wildenbruch, and others. /; (3). Dr. Poor 

Prerequisite: German 5 or its equivalent. 

28. German Lyrics. — First semester: The chief lyric poets of 
the classical period. Second semester: The chief lyric poets of the 
nineteenth century. The form, development, and different types of 
the lyric. (Each semester may be taken separately, altho stu- 
dents are not advised to take the second without the first. Not 
open to freshmen.) /, //; (2). Assistant Professor Meyer 

Prerequisite: For first semester, German 5 or equivalent; for 
second semester, German 14, or 16, or 24, or first semester of 28. 



Germanic Languages and Literature 397 

PRIMARILY FOURTH-YEAR COURSES 

8. Schiller. — The life of Schiller; Wallenstein and other selec- 
tions. //; (3). Professor Lessing 
Prerequisite : Three years of German. 

9a. Goethe's Faust. — The Faust legend and early Faust books 
and plays; the genesis of Goethe's Faust; reading of both parts. 
I, II; (2). Professor Goebel 

[9b. Goethe and Schiller. — Interpretation of Goethe's poems. 
Goethe's Tasso; Schiller's Ueber naive und sentimentalische Dich- 
iung. I, II; (2). Not given, 1913-14. Professor Goebel] 

II. German Literature After the Reformation. — Lectures; 
recitations; reports on assigned collateral reading. //; (3). 

Professor Lessing 

Prerequisite: German 26. 

25. Teacher's Course. — Discussion of methods ; examination 
of text-books. (Open to seniors and special students who have 20 
hours' credit in German.) //; (2). Assistant Professor Brooks 

Prerequisite: First semester of German 29 or equivalent; com- 
pletion of or registration in Education i or equivalent. 

26. German Literature Before the Reformation. — Lectures; 
recitations; reports on assigned reading. /; (3). 

Professor Lessing 
Prerequisite : German 10, or 24, or 28. 

[27. Lessing. — The life of Lessing; Nathan der Weise; Emilia 
Galotti, and other selections. Not given, 1913-14. /; (3). 

Professor Lessing 
Prerequisite: Three years of German.] 

29. Advanced Prose Composition. — Themes on Germany and 
German life, based on suitable reading, discussed in German. I, II ; 
(3). Dr. Koller 

Prerequisite : German 17. 

30. Thesis Course. — (Intended primarily for candidates for 
honors in German, but open to other seniors.) /, //; (i or 2). 

Professor Cjoebel, Professor Lessing, Assistant Professor 
Meyer, Assistant Professor Brooks 

31. Middle High German. — /; (2). Professor (joebel 
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; at least three years 

of German. 

32. History of German Civilization. — Readings ; lectures ; dis- 
cussions. /; (3). Professor Lessing 

Prerequisite: Three years of German. 



39^ Germanic Languages and Literature 

Courses 9, 11, 29, and 31 are especially recommended to all can- 
didates for graduate scholarships in German ; these same courses, 
together with Course 25, are recommended to seniors who expect 
to teach German. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Students desiring to take German as a major are expected to 
have finished successfully a four years' course of undergraduate 
work in German, corresponding to the four years* course in Ger- 
man at this University. They are expected to be familiar with the 
principal works of the writers of the classical and modern periods 
of German literature, to show a general knowledge of the history 
of German literature, and to be able to follow lectures in the Ger- 
man language. 

Of collateral subjects, a reading knowledge of Latin and French 
is required. It is desirable that candidates for the degree of Ph.D. 
have some knowledge of Greek. All students are expected to have 
had a course in German history. 

loi. Seminar in Germanic Philology. — The Life and Works 
of Friedrich Holderlin. Training in original research; results of 
value may be published in the Journal of English and Germanic 
Philology. Once a week; I, II; (j unit). Professor Goebel 

103. Introduction to the Historical Study of the Germanic 
Languages. — History of German Philology; comparative grammar 
of the Old Germanic dialects. Lectures; discussions of special 
topics. Twice a week; II; (j unit). Professor Goebel 

104. Gothic. — Grammar and literature. Twice a week; I; (i 
unit). Professor Goebel 

105. Old High German. — Grammar and interpretation of the 
oldest literary documents. Three times a week; II; (i unit). 

Dr. Green 

[109. Goethe's and Schiller's Philosophy. — Twice a week; 
I, II. Not given, 1913-14. Professor Goebel] 

no. Early German Drama. — German drama up to the Refor- 
mation; medieval religious drama; Shrovetide plays; beginnings of 
the humanistic drama. Twice a week; I; (i unit). 

Assistant Professor Brooks 

113. German Literature of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Centuries. — Survey of the literature on the back-ground of the gen- 
eral history of the time; Luther and the reformation; master- 



Germanic Languages and Literature 399 

singers and folksong; the reformation drama; Hans Sachs; Brant; 
Fischart; the chap books, the English comedians. Twice a week; 
II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Brooks 

115. History of German Literature from Goethe's Death to 
THE Present Time. — Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). 

Professor Lessing 

[116. Medieval German Literature with Reference to the 
Political, Religious, and Social History. — Research. Twice a 
week; I. Not given, 1913-14. Professor Lessing] 

117. History of German Literature During the Eighteenth 
Century. Twice a week; I, II. (i unit). Professor Goebel 

[118. The German Drama Since Schiller. — Research. Twice 
a week; I, II; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14. 

Professor Lessing] 

119. The German Novel. — Research. Twice a week; I, II; 
(i unit). Professor Lessing 

121. Walther von der Vogelweide. — Lectures and interpreta- 
tions. Twice a week; II; (i unit). Professor Goebel 

SCANDINAVIAN 

undergraduate courses, not open to freshmen 

[i. Elementary Norwegian. — Grammar, reading, and introduc- 
tion to the literature. I, II; (3). Not given in 1913-1914. 

Associate Professor Flom] 

[2. Elementary Swedish. — Grammar and reading of easy- 
prose ; Selma Lagerlof's En Herrgardssdgen, and Runeberg's Fanrik 
Stals S'dgner. I ; (2). Not given in 1913-14. 

Associate Professor Flom] 

3. Advanced Norwegian. — Ibsen's Brand, Peer Gynt, and 
Bjomson's Arnljot Gelline. Critical study. //; (2). 

Associate Professor Flom 
Prerequisite: Course i or the equivalent. 

[4. EsAiAS Tegner. — Tegner's Frithjofs Saga; genesis, develop- 
ment, and influence. Lectures on Swedish romanticism and "The 
Gothic School." //; (2). Not given in 1913-14. 

Associate Professor Flom] 

[5. Henrik Ibsen. — Lectures and interpretation of selected 
works. Early influences; development of Ibsen's view of life. //; 
(2). Not given in 1913-14. Associate Professor Flom] 



400 Germanic Languages and Literature 

6. Ibsen's Social Dramas. — Lectures; interpretation of four of 
the social dramas; Ibsen's technique. Archer's translation is used. 
//; (2). Associate Professor Flom 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

12. Norse Mythology. — Primitive religion ; the religious belief 
of the Norseman in pre-christian times; interpretation of the prin- 
cipal myths; theogony, cosmogony, and the myth of the end of the 
world. /; (2). Associate Professor Flom 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

advanced course for undergraduates and graduates 
[11. Survey of the History of the Swedish Language and 
Literature. — Lectures. Not given in 1913-14. 

Associate Professor Flom] 

courses for graduates 

Preparation for graduate work in the Scandinavian languages 
or literature must include a reading knowledge of one of the Scan- 
dinavian languages and systematic work in the undergraduate courses 
in Scandinavian or their equivalent. Any graduate student in lan- 
guage may, however, be admitted to the purely philological courses. 

loi. Old Norse, — Introduction to the language as a member of 
the Germanic group. Reading of the Volsungasaga with selections 
from the King's Sagas. I, II; (i unit). Associate Professor Flom 

102. Old Danish. — Introduction to the language. Bertelsen's 
Grammar and Reader. Twice a week; I ; (i unit). 

Associate Professor Flom 

[103. Old Swedish. — Introduction to the language. Noreen's 
Altschwedische Grammatik and Lesehuch. (i unit). Not given, 
19x3-14. Associate Professor Flom] 

no. Advanced Old Norse. — Mythical lays of the Elder Edda. 
Twice a week; I; (i unit). Associate Professor Flom 

[130. The Runic Inscriptions. — Lectures on the runes and in- 
terpretation of the Germanic and Scandinavian inscriptions; Ger- 
manic grammar. Twice a week; II; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14. 

Associate Professor Flom] 

150. Research. — Special problems. Twice a week; I ; (i unit). 

Associate Professor Flom 

GREEK 
(See Classics.) 



History 401 

HISTORY 

EvARTS BouTELL Greene, Ph.D., Professor 
Clarence Walworth Alvord, Ph.D., Professor 
Laurence Marcellus Larson, Ph.D., Professor 
Albert Howe Lybyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
William Spence Robertson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
Frederic Duncalf, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
Solon Justus Buck., Ph.D., Associate 
Arthur Charles Cole, Ph.D., Instructor 
Elizabeth Parnham Brush, A.M., Assistant 

Students who expect to teach history or to make that subject 
a major are advised to take History i during their freshman year. 
For the sophomore year History 3, 11, and 23 are recommended. 
During the junior and senior years students may select courses from 
groups B and C, in accordance with their individual tastes and in- 
terests. For those who expect to teach in secondary schools some 
work in ancient history is desirable. (History 5 and 6). 

The importance of thoro linguistic training is also empha- 
sized, especially in Latin, French, and German. 



H 



onors 



Candidates for honors in history must offer : 

1. Not less than 24 hours in this subject, including History i and 
3, at least 3 hours of English history, and at least 6 hours in Group 
C. 

2. Two minor subjects aggregating at least 24 hours, approved 
by the department, including in each case some advanced work. The 
minors must be selected from the following list: Economics; po- 
litical science ; philosophy, including a course in logic and one in the 
history of philosophy (one course in education or psychology may 
be accepted as a part of the requirement in philosophy.) ; English 
literature ; the classics. Economics or political science must be 
offered as one of the minor subjects. The ability to read simple 
prose in one foreign language is ordinarily expected of candidates 
in history, and students who have pursued the study of Romance 
languages or Germanic languages so far as to include courses in the 
history of literature may count one of these subjects as a minor. 



402 History 

A. COURSES OPEN TO FRESHMEN 

(Seniors taking these courses may receive half credit only.) 

I. Continental European History. — Europe from the fourth 
century to the present time. (The work of neither semester may 
be taken separately without special permission.) /, //; (4). 

Associate Professor Lybyer, Assistant Professor Duncalf, Miss 
Brush 

II. History of England to 1589. — This course may be com- 
bined with English economic history, (Economics 7), or Continental 
European history (History i). //; (3). Professor Larson 

B. undergraduate courses not open to freshmen 

3. History of the United States. — First Semester: The 
Colonial era ; the Revolution ; genesis of the federal constitution. 
Second semester: The United States under the constitution. (The 
work of either semester may be taken separately.) /, //; (3). 

Professor Greene, Assistant Professor Robertson, Dr. Cole 

Prerequisite: One year of college work. 

*5. History of Greece. — /; (3). Associate Professor Oldfather 
*6. History of Rome. — //; (3). Assistant Professor Canter 
[7. The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era. — /; (3). Not 
given, 1913-14. 

Prerequisite: History i.] 

17. The History of Illinois. — The political, economic, and so- 
cial development of a typical commonwealth in the Middle West, 
considered in its relation to the general course of American history. 
II; (2). Dr. Buck 

Prerequisite: History 3 or junior standing in any college of the 
University. 

18. The Teaching of History. — Preparation of students for 
the practical problems of historical teaching in secondary schools. 

//; (2). 

Professor Larson, Dr. Cole, and other members of the department 
Prerequisite: History i, 3 or their equivalent; senior standing. 

23. History of Modern England. — (A continuation of History 
II, following the same general plan; but emphasizing the colonial 
and imperial phases of English history.) /; (3). Dr. Cole 

Prerequisite : History i or 11. 



•Courses 5 and 6 are also listed as Greek 20 and Latin 19 respectively. 



History 403 

29. The Fak East. — The contact of Western Christendom with 
the Far East from the Portuguese establishments of the sixteenth 
century to the Chinese Revolution of 191 1, with special reference to 
China and Japan. //; (2). Professor Greene 

Prerequisite: For students majoring in history, economics, or 
political science, at least junior standing; for all others, junior 
standing including one year of college work in history. 

C. COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND QUALIFIED UNDERGRADUATES 

(At least junior standing required. The ability to use French 
and German is desirable in all of these courses and is essential in 
some of them.) 

4. The Constitutional History of England. — First semester: 
institutional origins; second semester: modem constitutional prac- 
tise. (For students who wish to specialize in English history, po- 
litical science, or law.) /, //; (3). Professor Larson 

Prerequisite : One year of college history. 

8. English Civilization in the Middle Ages. — The religious, 
economic, and intellectual development of medieval society. II; 
(2). Professor Larson 

Prerequisite: History i. 

9. European Society in the Later Middle Ages and the 
Renaissance. — The transition from medieval to modem ideals. 
(Continuation of course 19; either may be taken separately.) II; 
(3). Assistant Professor Duncalf 

Prerequisite: History i. 

10. The Development of American Society in the Eight- 
eenth Century. — An introduction to the study of the American 
Revolution. II; (4). Professor Greene 

Prerequisite: Historj' 3. 

[12. History of Germany. — Settlement; eastern expansion; de- 
velopment of German cities; the Reformation; rise and development 
of Brandenburg-Prussia since 1640; /, //; (2). Not given, 1913- 
14.] 

14. The Making of the Federal Constitution. — The events 
from 1783 to 1789 which resulted in the framing and ratification of 
the federal constitution of 1787; the contemporary arguments for 
and against the ratification of the Constitution. //; (3). 

Professor Greene 

Prerequisite : History 3 or Political Science i and 3. 



404 History 

15. The Civil War and the Reconstruction in the United 
States. — //; (3), Dr. Cole 

Prerequisite: History 3. 

16. The History of the Exploration and Colonization of 
the West. — First semester: The Mississippi Valley from the earliest 
European explorations to the close of the War of 1812; second sent- 
ister: the Mississippi Valley since 1815, and the progress of western 
expansion to the Pacific. (The second semester may be taken sep- 
arately.) /, //; (2). Professor Alvord 

Prerequisite: History 3. 

19. Medieval Society with Special Reference to Continental 
Europe in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. — This course 
may be advantageously combined with History 8, (English Civiliza- 
tion in the Middle Ages). /; (2). Assistant Professor Duncalf 

Prerequisite: History i. 

20. Europe from the Period of the Napoleonic Empire to 
the Present Time. — Political movements and the development of 
civilization as the historical basis for an understanding of contempo- 
rary European life. First semester: The nineteenth century to the 
formation of the German Empire in 1871 ; Second semester: Europe 
since 1871. (Either semester may be taken separately.) I, II ; (3). 

Associate Professor Lybyer 
Prerequisite: At least one year of college work in history or po- 
litical science, and at least junior standing. 

21. The History of the United States Since the Civil 
War. — Historical introduction to contemporary American politics. 
/; (3). Assistant Professor Robertson 

Prerequisite: History 3. 

26. The History of the Latin-American Colonies. — The po- 
litical, economic, social, and intellectual life of Spain during the 
period of discovery; the exploration, settlement, and civilization of 
Spanish-America and the Philippines ; the exploration and coloniza- 
tion of Brazil. /; (3). Assistant Professor Robertson 

Prequisite: History i or 3. 

2y. The History of Latin-America from the Wars of Inde- 
pendence to the Present Time. — The national history of the lead- 
ing Latin-American states ; political parties ; existing governments ; 
relations with Europe and the United States. The old regime in 
Texas, Mexico, and California. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Robertson 

Prerequisite: History 3. 



History 405 

28. Thesis. — (For candidates for honors and for other seniors 
who wish special training in investigation.) /, //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Robertson and other members of the de- 
partment 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

A student entering upon graduate work should have had at least 
the equivalent of the introductory college courses in European and 
American history-. All students of history should have a reading 
knowledge of German and French; for medieval histor>^ some 
knowledge of Latin is indispensable, and in certain fields of -Amer- 
ican history Spanish is needed. 

Graduate courses in history at the University of Illinois are of 
three kinds; i. Instruction in methodology, historiography, and 
bibliography. This work (in course 103) is required of all gradu- 
ate students in history during their first year. 2. Seminar courses 
for the study of special fields with a view primarily to training in the 
methods of historical criticism and research. 3. Courses for infor- 
mation and guidance in general reading. 

Opportunities for research are offered in the following fields: 
Medieval history; English history with emphasis upon medieval in- 
stitutions ; modern European history with special reference to the 
nineteenth century; American history' with special reference to in- 
stitutions, colonial society, western development, and the period of 
sectional conflict, 1820-65; the history of Latin America. 

Illinois Survey. — Students of historj^ have an opportunity to 
pursue research in western history in connection with the Illinois 
Survey, an organization for the purpose of carr\ing on systematic 
studies in the history of Illinois. 

Attention is also called to the fact that the University of Illinois 
has for some time cooperated with the Trustees of the State His- 
torical Library in the gathering and editing of historical documents. 
As a result of this relation instructors and graduate students in the 
department have contributed to the publications of these state or- 
ganizations and have been given useful training in the study of 
printed and manuscript material. 

The History Club, consisting of instructors and graduate stu- 
dents in the department, meets once a month. The program is de- 
voted to reviews of current progress in historical work and infor- 
mal discussion of historical topics. 

loi. Seminar in American History. — Bibliography; practise 



4o6 Horticulture 

in the solution of typical problems ; reports on the progress of indi- 
vidual investigations by instructors and students. Two hours, once 
a week; I, II* Professor Greene and others 

Students interested in the investigation of particular topics, 
whether with a view to writing theses or otherwise, may register in 
this course and will be advised by members of the department as 
follows : 

On American history before 1789 and problems of church and 
state. Professor Greene 

On American history after 1789 and Latin-American history, 
* Assistant Professor Robertson, Dr. Cole 

On the history of the West. Professor Alvord, Dr. Buck 

102. Studies in English History. — Twice a week; I, II. 

Professor Larson 

103. Historical Bibliography and Criticism. — Selected prob- 
lems in various fields. Required of all candidates for an advanced 
degree in history who do not present evidence of similar training 
elsewhere. Twice a week; I, II. 

Associate Professor Lybyer and others 

104. Research in European History. — Competent students will 
be guided in the investigation of topics in medieval and modern 
history. I, II. 

Associate Professor Lyber, Assistant Professor Duncalf 

105. The History of Western Expansion, 1763-1818. — Prob- 
lems in the interpretation of western history. Lectures and read- 
ings. Once a week; I, II. Professor Alvord 

III. Spanish-American Relations. — The relations of the 
Latin-American States with Europe and the United States. Select- 
ed topics. Once a week; I, II. Assistant Professor Robertson 

HORTICULTURE 

Joseph Cullen Blair, M.S., Professor, Pomology 
John William Lloyd, M.S., Professor, Olericulture 
Charles Spencer Crandall, M.S., Professor, Pomology 
Charles Mulford Robinson, A.M., Professor, Civic Design 
Herman Bernard Dorner, M.S., Assistant Professor, Floriculture 
Bethel Stewart Pickett, M.S., Assistant Professor, Pomology 



•The unit values of graduate courses in history are fixed upon registra- 
tion, after conference with the instructors in charge of the courses. 



Horticulture 407 

WiLHELM Miller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Landscape Horticul- 
ture 
Ralph Rodney Root, M.L.A,, Assistant Professor, Landscape 

Gardening 
Ernest Winfield Bailey, M.S., Associate, Pomology 
Oscar S Watkins, B.S., Associate, Horticultural Chemistry 
Charles Elmer Durst, M.S., Associate, Olericulture 
*Arno Herbert Nehrling, Associate, Floriculture 
Simeon James Bole, A. M., Associate, Pomology 
John Joseph Gardner, B.S., Instructor, Pomology 

Lawrence Earl Foglesonc, B.S., Instructor, Landscape Horticul- 

ture 
Horace Whittier Peaslee, B. Arch., Instructor, Landscape Design 

Frank A Gushing Smith, B.S., Instructor, Landscape Design 

Gharles Bovett Sayre, B.S., Instructor, Olericulture 

Robert William Hoffman, B.S., Instructor, Landscape Gardening 

.\rthur Samuel Golby, B.S., Assistant, Pomology 

Franz August Aust, M.S., Assistant, Landscape Design 

Gharles Christian Rees, Assistant, Pathology 

courses for undergraduates 

Floriculture: Horticulture 4, 15a, 15b, 19a, 19b, 30, 31, 32, 35 

Forestry : Horticulture 9 

General Horticulture: Horticulture la, ib, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12 

Landscape Gardening : Horticulture loa, lob, 23a, 23b, 24a, 24b. 
25a, 25b, 26a, 26b, 27a, 27b, 28, 29a, 29b, 36, 37a, 37b, 38 

Olericulture : Horticulture 3, 20, 34 

Pomology: Horticulture 2, 8, 17, 18, ZZ 

la. Elements of Horticulture. — Fruit growing, vegetable 
gardening and ornamental planting, with special reference to the 
farm home. (Required of all freshmen in the general course in 
Agriculture.) Text-book work; assigned readings; practical exer- 
cises. /; (2). Professor Lloyd, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Bole, Mr. Golby 

lb. Elements of Horticultutre. — (Continuation of la. Re- 
quired of all freshmen in the general course in Agriculture.) //; 
(2). Professor Lloyd, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Bole, Mr. Colby 

2. Small Fruits and Grapes. — The strawberry, raspberry, 
blackberry, dewberry, currant, gooseberry, grape. History ; extent 



•Resigned February 1, 1914. 



4o8 Horticulture 

of cultivation ; soil ; location ; fertilizers ; propagation ; planting ; 
tillage ; pruning ; insect enemies ; diseases ; varieties ; harvesting ; 
marketing. Lectures; reference readings. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Pickett, Mr. Bole 
Prerequisite: Horticulture la and ib or their equivalents, 5. 

3. Vegetable Gardening. — Cultural requirements of each of the 
common vegetables. Lectures ; text book ; one practical exercise a 
week. //; (3). Professor Lloyd, Mr. Durst, Mr. Sayre 

Prerequisite: Horticulture la and ib or their equivalents. 

4. Plant Houses. — Construction, cost, and maintenance ; heat- 
ing; ventilating. /; (3). Assistant Professor Dorner 

5. Plant Propagation. — Grafts; buds; layers; cuttings; seeds. 
Lectures; laboratory; quizzes. //; (5). 

Assistant Professor Dorner 

6. Nursery Methods. — Some details of nursery management 
and their relation to horticulture in general. Lectures ; reference 
readings. //; (2). Assistant Professor Pickett, Mr. Bailey 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 5; Entomology 4. 

7. Spraying. — Materials, appliances, and methods employed in 
combating insects and fungous diseases. Lectures ; reference read- 
ings; laboratory; field v^^ork. //; (3). 

Professor Lloyd, Mr. Watkins 
Prerequisite: Horticulture la and ib or their equivalents; 
Chemistry i ; Entomology 4. 

8. Orcharding. — Pomaceous, drupaceous, and nut fruits ; man- 
agement of large commercial orchards; harvesting; grading; pack- 
ing; storing; marketing. /; (5). 

Professor Crandall, Assistant Professor Pickett, Mr, Bailey 
Prerequisite: Horticulture la and ib or their equivalents, 5; 
Botany i ; Entomology 4. 

[9. Forestry. — Forest trees ; uses ; distribution ; artificial pro- 
duction ; relations of forest and climate ; forestry legislation and 
economy. //; (2). Not given, 1913-14. 

Prerequisite: Botany i, or an equivalent.] 

loa. Landscape Gardening (Introductory Course). — Lectures; 
reference reading; plant studies. Two lectures and three hours 
drawing or field trip. .(Open to all students.) /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Hoffman 



Horticulture 409 

lob. Landscape Design (Elementary Course). — Drafting ; field 
trips ; assigned readings ; reports ; occasional lectures. Nine hours' 
drafting per week. / or //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite : One year of college work. 

11. Cultivated Plants. — The relationship and classification of 
certain economic and ornamental plants of the temperate zone ; 
identification of species ; examination of living plants and herbarium 
specimens. Lectures; assigned readings. /; (2). 

Professor Blair, Professor Crandall 
Prerequisite : Botany 2. 

12. Evolution of Horticultural Plants. — History, botanical 
classification, and geographical distribution of cultivated plants ; 
modification under culture ; theoretical causes and observed factors 
that influence variation, particularly food supply, climate, and cross- 
fertilization. /; (3). Professor Crandall 

Prerequisite: Two years of university work, including Horti- 
culture 8 and Botany 2. 

15a. Plant Growing. — Preparation of soils for greenhouse 
crops; fertilizers; potting and shifting plants; watering. Lectures; 
practical greenhouse work. //; (5). 

Assistant Professor Dorner 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 5; Botany i, 

15b. Commercial Crops. — Greenhouse plants and cut flowers 
for wholesale and retail markets ; the care and marketing of the 
crops. Lectures; greenhouse work. I; (5). 

Assistant Professor Dorner, Mr. Nehrling 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 15a. 

17. Commercial Fruit Culture. — Practical work in houses and" 
fruit plantations. (For students specializing in horticulture.) I ,- 
(5). Professor Crandall, Assistant Professor Pickett, Mr. Bailey 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 2, 8. 

18. Experimental Horticulture. — Methods and difficulties in' 
horticultural investigations ; the planning of experiments ; recording 
and interpretation of results. (For advanced students preparing 
for experiment station work.) //; (5). 

Professor Blair, Assistant Professor Pickett, Mr. Watkins 
Prerequisite: Twenty hours' work in horticulture. 

19a. Amateur Floriculture. — Window gardening; growing of 
flowers upon the home grounds; containers; potting soils; fertir- 



410 Horticulture 

Hzers; preparation and planting of flower beds; propagation and 
culture of plants suitable for window and garden. /; (i). 

Mr. Nehrling 

19b. Amateur Floriculture. — (Continuation of 19a.) //; (i). 

Assistant Professor Dorner 

20. Market Gardening. — Growing and handling vegetables for 
market. Practical exercises; reference readings. //; (3). 

Professor Lloyd, Mr. Durst, Mr. Sayre 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 3. 

22. Special Investigation and Thesis. — I, II; (5-10). 

23a. Landscape Design (Second Course). — Problems in land- 
scape design, such as country estates, playgrounds, small parks, 
based on topographic surveys taken in the vicinity of the university. 
Nine hours' drafting. / or //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Peaslee 

Prerequisite: Architecture 33. 

23b. Landscape Design. — (Continuation of 23a.) Nine hours' 
drafting. / or //; (3). Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Peaslee 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 23a. 

24a. Trees and Shrubs. — Plant material important to landscape 
gardening; landscape value of each plant with respect to adapta- 
bility to the soil and situation and the use of the plant in design. 
Two lectures; one field trip. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Hoffman 

24b. Trees and Shrubs. — (Continuation of 24a.) Two lec- 
tures; one field trip. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Hoffman 

Prerequisite : Horticulture 24a. 

25a. Advanced Landscape Design. — The larger problems in 
landscape design such as country parks, cemeteries, country estates. 
Nine hours drafting. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite : Horticulture 23b. 

25b. Advanced Landscape Design. — Real estate subdivisions and 
a complete set of plans, including a sketch plan, general plan, re- 
port, detailed study of architectural features, grading plans, planting 
plans, set of specifications, and estimate of cost. Nine hours' draft- 
ing. //; (3). 

Professor Robinson, Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 25a. 



Horticulture 411 

26a. Planting Design. — Planting plans, based on the design 
problems in courses lob, 23a and 23b. One conference and six 
hours' drafting. //; (3). Assistant Professor Root 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 23a, 24b. 

26b. Planting Design. — Planting plans, based on the design 
problems in course 25. One conference and six hours' drafting. 
/; (3). Assistant Professor Root 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 26a. 

27a. Landscape Practise. — Interpretation of topographic maps 
and their relation to landscape design ; calculation of cut and fill ; 
quantities of material; preparation of grading plans and working 
drawings. One lecture and six hours' drafting. /; (3), 

Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 22; Horticulture lob. 

27b. Landscape Practise. — Construction; specifications and re- 
ports ; engineering drawings based on the problems in courses 25 
and 37. One lecture and six hours' drafting. //; (3). Mr. Smith 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 27a. 

28. Exotics. — Temporary decorative plants used in landscape 
gardening. Lectures; planting plans; field trips. //; (i). 

Assistant Professor Root. 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 23b, 24b. 

29a. Garden Design. — The garden in its relation to the house ; 
architectural harmony, utilization, topographic conditions, and plant- 
ing for architectural or horticultural emphasis. Eight hours draft- 
ing and one lecture. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root^ Mr. Peaslee 

Prerequisite : Architecture 32. 

29b. Garden Design. — The designing of public gardens and 
open spaces and their relation to garden design. Eight hours draft- 
ing; one lecture. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Root 

Prerequisite : Horticulture 29a. 

30. Decorative and Bedding Plants. — Tropical and subtropical 
plants used in decorative work in the conservatory; tender plants 
used in out-door bedding: Lectures; practical greenhouse work. 
//; (5)- Assistant Professor Dorner 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 15a. 



412 Horticulture 

31. Garden Flowers. — The propagation and growing of annuals^ 
herbaceous perennials, bulbs, and shrubs for cut flowers and orna- 
mental plantings. /; (3). Assistant Professor Dorner 

Prerequisite : Horticulture 5 ; Botany i. 

32. Floral Decoration. — Cut flowers and plants in decorative 
work; arrangement of flowers in baskets, designs and bouquets; 
table decoration; house decoration, (For students in floriculture.) 
//; (3). Assistant Professor Dorner 

33. Systematic Pomology. — Description, nomenclature, and 
classification of native and subtropical fruits ; critical descriptions 
and identification with special reference to relationships and classi- 
fications of varieties; judging and displaying fruits. /; (2). 

Mr. Bailey 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 8. 

34. Vegetables Under Glass. — Practical training in the forcing 
of vegetables. /; (3). Professor Lloyd, Mr. Durst, Mr. Sayre 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 3, isa. 

35. Private Conservatory Work. — Types of plants for large 
conservatories; arrangement; care. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Dorner 
Prerequisite: Horticulture iSa, 4. 

36. Development of Landscape Gardening. — History of land- 
scape gardening from Egyptian to modem times ; survey of litera- 
ture. Lectures ; reference readings ; library sketches ; reports. //; 
(2). Assistant Professor Root 

37a. Civic Design. — The problem of town remodeling; remedial 
problems in town planning. Lectures; field trips; reports. /; (2). 

Professor Robinson, Assistant Professor Root 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 23b. 

37b. Civic Design. — Principles of town extension; preventative 
and preservative aspects of town planning. Lectures ; reference 
readings; and text book. //; (3). 

Professor Robinson, Assistant Professor Root 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 37a. 

38. Field Practise in Landscape Gardening. — Practise in car- 
rying out landscape plans in the field. Lectures ; field work ; re- 
ports. / or //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Root, Mr. Smith, Mr. Hoffman 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 23b, 24b. 



Household Science 413 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

At least two years of collegiate work in horticulture and allied 
subjects and specific preparation for the chosen topics are required 
for entrance upon major work in this department. 

102. Pomology. — Individual problems in the adaption, propaga- 
•tion, cultivation, or pruning of small fruits. Conferences. //; (y2 

to I unit). Professor Grand all 

103. Olericulture. — Individual problems in the structure, cul- 
tural requirements, and improvement of vegetables. Conferences. 
I, II; (l to 2 units each semester; a student working part time and 
extending his study for the master's degree over two years may 
register for Yz to i unit for each of the four semesters). 

Professor Lloyd 
108. Pomology. — Individual problems in the relationship, adap- 
tion, improvement, propagation, cultivation, pruning, protection, 
preservation, or marketing of orchard fruits. Conferences, I, II ; 
(l to 2 units each semester; a student working part time and extend- 
ing his study for the master's degree over two years may register 
for Y2 to I unit for each of the four semesters). 

Professor Blair, Professor Crandall 

[109. Forestry. — Problems in general forestry and investigation 
of forest growths. Not given, 1913-14.] 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

Isabel Bevier, Ph.M., Professor and Director 

Nellie Esther Goldthwaite, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Helena Maud Pincomb, B.S., Associate 

Nina Belle Grigler, B.S., Associate 

Cora Emeline Gray, M.S., Associate 

Ruth Wheeler, Ph.D., Associate 

Lurene Seymour, Ph.B., B.S., Associate 

Maude Edna Parsons, A.B., Instructor and Director of Lunch 

Room. 
Georgia Elizabeth Fleming, B.S., Instructor 
Grace Esther Stevens, A.B., Instructor 
Florence Harrison, B.S., Instructor 

FOOD 

I. Selection and Preparation of Food. — The nature and use 
of foods, their chemical composition, and the changes effected by 
heat, cold, or fermentation ; the principles of selection, illustrated by 



414 Household Science 

marketing expeditions; processes of the manufacture of foods; 
combinations of different kinds. //; (3). 

Miss Crigler, Miss Pincomb, Miss Stevens, Miss Harrison 
Prerequisite: Entrance credit in Physics; Chemistry i. 

6. Economic Uses of Food. — (Continuation of i.) The econom- 
ics of the food question; uses and applications of preservatives, 
/; (3). Miss Crigler, Miss Pincomb, Miss Stevens 

Prerequisite : Household Science i. 

14. Problems in the Preparation and Service of Food. — (Con- 
tinuation of courses i and 6). Preparation and service of meals for 
a family; cost and dietetic values; the preparation of food in quan- 
tities; individual problems in the manipulation of food materials. 
I J II; (3). Miss Gray, Miss Harrison 

Prerequisite: Plousehold Science i, 6; Chemistry i, 2, 3, and 
the consent of the instructor. 

5. Dietetics. — The principles of diet; the relation of food to 
health ; influence of age, sex, and occupation on diet ; the construc- 
tion of dietaries ; dietetic treatment of certain diseases. Laborator>\ 
//; (3). Assistant Professor Goldthwaite 

Prerequisite: Household Science i, 6; Physiology 4; Chemistry 
I, 2, 3. 

4. Food and Nutrition. — Application of the principles of pure 
science to the physiological, chemical, or bacteriological problems of 
food and nutrition. Individual investigation. I, (5). 

Assistant Professor Goldthwaite 

Prerequisite: Botany 5; Chemistry i, 2, 3, 13a, 0, 9c, five hours 
in botany or zoology; Household Science i, 5, 6. 

18. Lunch Room Management. — History of the movement to 
feed school children ; practise in lunch room management. Open to 
seniors. I, II; (3). Miss Parsons 

Prerequisite: Household Science i, 5, 6 and 14; Economics i 
or 2. 

the house 

2. Home Archictecture and Sanitation. — Situation, sur- 
roundings, and construction of the house; hygiene of the homte ; 
heating, lighting, ventilating, water supply, and drainage. Lectures 
on house planning and sanitary plumbing, fixtures and internal 
drainage; exercise in making skeleton plans. /; (2), 

Professor Bevier, Professor White, Assistant Professor Ash^ 
Miss Pincomb, Mr. Clark, Miss Fleming 



Household Science 415 

3. Elementary Home Decoration. — (Continuation of course 
2.) Evolution of the house; homes of primitive peoples; theory of 
color and its application in home decoration; evolution of the home; 
furnishings from a sanitary and artistic standpoint. //; (2). '^ 

Professor Bevier, Miss Fleming 

Prerequisite: Art and Design 12; Household Science 2. 

10, Household Management. — Expenditure of the income; or- 
ganization of the household ; care of the house and family ; home 
nursing; domestic service problem. Laboratory work in practise 
apartment. //; (2). Miss Gray 

Prerequisite: Household Science i, 2, 6; Economics i or 2 ; 
junior standing. 

TEXTILES 

7. Textiles. — Development of primitive industries ; production 
of fibers used in textile manufacture; practise in judging cloth and 
in weaving. I, II; (2). Miss Seymour 

12 Household Art and Clothing. — (Continuation of course 
7). Materials suitable for various uses in home and in clothing; 
texture, qualit>', design in relation to form ; color in relation to en- 
vironment and personality; hygienic properties and cost. //; (3). 

Miss Seymour, Miss Fleming 

Prerequisite: Household Science 7; Art and Design i, 12; 30 
hours of university work. 

17. Problems in the Study of Textiles. — ^The quality of ma- 
terial; microscopic and chemical analysis of fabrics; movements 
related to the textile industry. Lectures; laborator>'. //; (3). 

Miss Seymour 

Prerequisite: Household Science 7, 12; Chemistry i, 2, 3. 

courses for teachers 

11. *Teachers' Course, — The best methods of presenting the 
work, and its correlation with other subjects. Practise in planning 
such courses, and some opportunity for presenting them. (For the 
prospective supervisor of the subject, or for the teacher in the 
graded schools) //; (3). Professor Bevier, Miss Pincomb 

Prerequisite: Household Science i, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 12, and 13; 
laboratory work in sewing, Saturday morning, first semester; 
senior standing. 



'Students regularly registered in course 11 may have instruction in mil- 
linery, without credit, on Saturday morning from 9:00 to 11:00. 



4i6 Household Science 

13. History of Home Economics. — Origin and development of 
home economics; the work in different types of institutions; the 
planning of courses for these types. /; (i). Professor Bevier 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

9. Seminar. — Different phases of home economics ; individual 
problems. //; (3). Professor Bevier, Miss Wheeler 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

ECONOMICS OF THE FAMILY 

15. Economics of the Family Group. — The economic relations 
of the family as a whole and as individuals. Retail market ; sources 
of income, social and industrial conditions affecting it ; child labor ; 
economic position of women. /; (3). Miss Gray 

Prerequisite: Household Science 3, 6, 10, 12. 

16. Problems in the Economics of the Family Group. — In- 
dividual work in the senior seminar in economics. I, II; (2-4). 

Professor Kinley 
Prerequisite: Household Science 15. 

courses for graduates 

Students who wish to do graduate work in household science 
will find it to their advantage to specialize in either the scientific 
or the economic phases of the subject. In either case they should 
be able to offer an equivalent for twenty-four hours of household 
science given in the University of Illinois, with a minimum of two 
years of chemistry, including organic chemistry, a year of biological 
science, and a year of either economics or sociology. 

loi. Home Economics. — The origin and development of 
home economics ; industrial, educational, and sociological aspects. 
Twice a week; I, II ; (i unit). Professor Bevier 

102. Special Investigations. — Problems in the application of 
the principles of bacteriology, chemistry, and physiology to the 
ordinary processes used in preparation of food ; problems in nutri- 
tion. Twice a week; I, II; (2 utiits). 
Professor Bevier, Assistant Professor Goldthwaite, Miss Wheeler 

ITALIAN 
(See Romance Languages and Literature.) 

JOURNALISM 

(See Rhetoric 12, 15, 17, 19, under The English Language and 
Literature) 



Lazu 417 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING 
(See Horticulture.) 

LATIN 
(See Classics.) 

LAW 

Oliver Albert Harker, A.M., LL.D., Professor, Dean 
Frederick Green, A.M. LL.B., Professor 
Edward Harris Decker, A.B., LL.B., Professor 
John Norton Pomeroy, A.M., LL.B., Professor 
Chester Garfield Vernier, A.B., J.D., Professor 
William Green Hale, B.S., LL.B., Professor, Secretary 
Warren Hobart Pillsbury, B.L., J.D., Instructor 

1. Contracts. — Willistons Cases; selected Illinois cases. (First 
year. Open to students in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with six hours' 
credit.) /; (5) : //; (3). Professor Decker 

2. Torts. — Ames & Smith's Cases. (First year. Open to stu- 
dents in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with credit.) /, //; (3). 

Professor Hale 

3. Real Property. — Gray's Cases, Vols. I and II. (First year. 
Open to students in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with credit.) //; (3). 

Mr. Pillsbury 

4. Common Law Pleading. — (First year. Open to students in 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, with credit.) //; (3). Professor Harker 

4a. Illinois Procedure. — (Third year.) /; (3). 

Professor Harker 

5. Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure. — Mikell's Cases. 
(First year. Open to students in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with 
credit.) /; (4). Professor Green 

6. Personal Property. — Gray's Cases, Vol. I. (First year). 
Open to students in Liberal Arts and Sciences, with credit.) /; (2). 

Professor Vernier 

7. Domestic Relations. — Woodruff's Cases on Domestic Rela- 
tions (2nd ed.) (First year.) //; (2). Professor Vernier 

8. Evidence. — Thayer's Cases. (Second year.) /; (5). 

Professor Hale 



4i8 Lazv 

9. Sales. — Williston's Cases (2nd ed.) (Elective, second or 
third year.) //; (3). Professor Hale 

ID. Real Property. — Gray's Cases, Vols. II and III. (Second 
year.) //; (4). Mr. Pillsbury 

11. Agency. — Wamhaugh's Cases. (Second year.) /; (3). 

Professor Vernier 

12. Equity. — Ames' Cases. (Second year.) /; (3): //; (2). 

Professor Pomeroy 

[13. Damages. — Beale's Cases, (2nd ed.) (Elective, second or 
third year.) Not given, 1913-14. //; (2). Professor Decker] 

14. Carriers. — Green's Cases. (Elective, second or third year.) 
//; (3). Professor Green 

15. Bills and Notes. — Huff cut's Cases ( Cols on' s Ed.) (Third 
year.) /; (3). Professor Vernier 

16. Trusts. — Ames' Cases. (Elective, third year.) //; (3). 

Professor Vernier 

17. Private Corporations. — Canfield & .Wormser's Cases. 
(Third year.) //; (4). Professor Green 

18. Wills. — Gray's Cases. (Second year.) /; (2). 

Professor Pomeroy 

19. Partnership. — Mechem's Cases (2nd ed.) (Third year.) /; 
(2). Professor Hale 

20. Equity Pleading. — Thompson's Cases on Equity Pleading; 
Selected Illinois Cases. (Second year.) //; (2). 

Professor Harker 

21. Suretyship. — Ames' Cases. (Third year.) //; (3). 

Professor Decker 

22. Constitutional Law (a). — Hall's Cases. (Third year.) 
/; (3). Professor Green 

23. Mortgages and Recording Acts. — Wyman's Cases on 
Mortgages and part of Vol. VI of Gray's Cases on Property. 
(Elective, third year.) /; (2). Professor Pomeroy 

24. Municipal Corporations. — Macey's Cases on Municipal Cor- 
porations. (Elective, third year.) /; (2). Professor Pomeroy 

25. Bankruptcy. — Williston's Cases. (Elective, third year.) 
//; (2). Professor Decker 

26. Moot Court. — (Second year.) I, II; (2). 

Professor Harker 



Library Science 419 

27. Future Interests in Property. — Gray's Cases, Vol. V. 
(Elective, second or tliird year. Given in 1913-14 and in alternate 
years.) //; (2). Professor Vernier 

28. Insurance. — Wamhaugh's Cases. (Elective, second or 
third year. Given in 1913-14 and in alternate years.) /; (2). 

Professor Green 

[29. Conveyancing. — Gray's Cases on Property, Vol. Ill and 
part of Vol. VI (2nd ed.) (Elective, second or third year.) Not 
given, 1913-14; given in 1914-15 and in alternate years. /; (2).] 

30. Public International Law. — Lawrence's Principles and 
Scott's Cases. (Elective, second or third year.) /; (3). 

Professor GaIineb 

31. Cx)NFLiCT OF Laws. — Beak's Shorter Selection of Cases on 
Conflict of Laws. (Elective, third year.) Given in 191 3- 14 and in 
alternate years. //; (2). Professor Vernier 

[32. QuASi-CoNTRACTS. — Woodruff's Cases. (Elective, second 
or third year. Not given, 1913-14; given in 1914-15 and in alternate 
years.) //; (2). Professor Vernier] 

[23. Constitutional Law (b). — Hall's Cases. Not given, 1913- 
14, //; (2). Professor Green] 

[34. Public Service Cx)mpanies. — Wyman's Cases (2nd ed.) 
(Elective, second or third year.) Not given, 1913-14; given in 
1914-15 and in alternate years. II; (2). Professor Green] 

LIBR.\RY SCIENCE 

Phineas Lawrence Windsor, Ph.B., Director 
Frances Simpson, M.L., B.L.S., Assistant Director, Assistant Pro- 
fessor 
Florence Rising Curtis, A.B., B.L.S., Associate 
Ernest James Reece, Ph.B., Instructor 
Ethel Bond, A.B., B.L.S., Instructor 
Edna Lyman Scott, Special Lecturer 
Catharine Oaks, A.B., B.L.S., Reviser 

Special Departmental Lecturers 

Francis Keese Wynkoop Drury, A.M., B.L.S., Lecturer, Order 

Work 
Philip Sanford Goulding, A.B., Lecturer, Cataloging 
Jacob Hodnefield, A.M., Lecturer, Exchanges 
Emma Felsenthal, Ph.B., fe.L.S., Lecturer, General Reference 



420 Library Science 

Alice Sarah Johnson, A.B., B.L.S., Lecturer, General Reference 

Emma Reed Jutton, B.L.S., Lecturer, Loans 

Adah Patton, B.L.S., Lecturer, Cataloging 

Margaret Hutchins, A.B., B.L.S., Lecturer, General Reference 

♦John Boynton Kaiser, A.B., B.L.S., Lecturer, Departmental Prob- 
lems, Economics and Sociology 

Ola M Wyeth, A.B., B.L.S. , Lecturer, Departmental Problems, 
Modern Languages 

Mary Torrance, A.B., B.L.S., Lecturer, Departmental Problems, 
Classics 

Marian Leatherman, A.B., Lecturer, Departmental Problems, 
History and Political Science 

Sabra Elizabeth Stevens, A.B., Lecturer, Library Problems 

Jennie Adah Craig, A.B., B.L.S., Lecturer, Departmental Problems, 
English 

Margaret Herdman, A.B., Lecturer, Departmental Problems, Edu- 
cation, Philosophy, and Psychology 

Charles Edwin Janvrin, Ph.B., B.L.S., Lecturer, Departmental 
Problems, Natural History 

Winifred Fehrenkamp, B.L.S., Lecturer, Library Problems 

Eleanor G Karsten, Ph.B., Lecturer, Library Problems 

2. Reference Work. — Methods of research; the use of refer- 
ence books ; practical work in the reference department of the Uni- 
versity library. /, //; (3). Assistant Professor Simpson 

3. Selection of Books. — Principles of selection for libraries of 
different types ; standard lists, critical periodicals, and other aids ; 
practise in writing book annotations. /, //; (2). 

Miss Felsenthal 

4. Practise Work, — Four hours a week of practical work in 
the various departments of the University library. To be taken with 
Library 2, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21. /, //; (2). Mr. Reece 

6. Subject Bibliography. — Selection of books in special sub- 
jects ; treatment of the literature and bibliography of each. Lec- 
tures given by professors in the respective departments of the 
University. /, //; (2). Director Windsor and others 

[7. History of Libraries. — The foundation, development, and 
resources of the leading libraries of Europe and the United States. 
Given in alternate years, not given in 1913-14. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Simpson] 



* Resigned, February 1, 1914. 



Library Science 421 

8. Advanced Reference. — Transactions of learned societies; 
special periodicals and government publications; indexes and other 
works of value to a large reference department. /; (2). 

Assistant Professor Simpson 
Prerequisite : Library 2. 

9. Bookmaking. — History of the early forms of books ; the in- 
vention and spread of printing; book illustration; book-binding. 
Given in 1914 and in alternate years. //; (2). Director Windsor 

10. Practise Work. — Eight hours a week ; a continuation of 
Library 4, supplemented by one month of work as a member of the 
staff of an assigned public library. /, //; (4). Miss Curtis 

12. General Reference. — Classification and arrangement of 
books in the University library ; the card catalogs ; the more gen- 
erally used reference books. (Intended for freshmen and sopho- 
mores in the University, rather than for students registered in Li- 
brary School.) Repeated each semester. / or II; (2). 

Miss HuTCHiNS, Miss Felsenthal, Miss Johnson 

13. Public Documents. — 13a. — Production and acquisition of 
Federal documents ; their treatment and use as reference books. 
13b. — American state and municipal documents ; publications of for- 
eign governments. (Second semester elective to students who have 
completed 13a.) I, II; (2). Mr. Reece 

15. Seminar in Library Economy. — Special problems; library 
economy publications. /, //;^(2). Mr. Reece and others 

16. Order Accession, and Shelf Work. — Order department 
records and routine ; book-buying ; publishers and discounts ; copy- 
right ; serials and continuations ; gifts ; exchanges ; duplicates ; the 
accession book and its substitutes ; the shelf list and its uses ; the 
care of pamphlets, clippings, and maps. 7; (2). Miss Curtis 

17. Classification. — Principles of book classification; the 
Dewey Decimal Classification; the Cutter Expansion Classification; 
book numbers. /; (3). Miss Bond 

18. Cataloging. — Dictionary cataloging; assignment of subject 
headings; classed cataloging; sixty hours of cataloging for the 
University library. I; (3). Miss Bond 

19. Trade Bibliography. — Books and periodicals used as tools 
of the book trade of America, England, Germany, and France. II; 
(i). Mr. Reece 



422 Library Science 

20. Loan Department. — Records connected with the loan of 
books; representative loan systems; rules, regulations, and prac- 
tises. //; (i). Miss JuTTON 

21. Printing, Binding, and Indexing. — Printing: Printing for 
libraries; practise in preparing copy and in reading proof; visits to 
print shops. Binding: Materials and methods of book-binding; 
bindings suitable for library use ; visits to binderies ; practise in 
preparing books for the bindery and in making necessary records ; 
practise in the repair of books. Indexing : Indexes ; the form of 
citation ; the choice and arrangements of headings ; kind of type ; 
practise in the indexing of books and magazines. //; (2). 

Director Windsor, Miss Curtis, Mrs. Karsten 

22. Library Extension. — Method ; library associations ; library 
schools ; library commissions ; township and county library systems ; 
traveling libraries; home libraries; other agencies. //; (3). 

Miss Curtis 

23. Library Administration and Current Library Literature. 
— Current library periodicals, bulletins, reports, catalogs, and read- 
ing lists; the organization, reorganization, and administration of 
small libraries; the planning and equipment of reading rooms and 
small library buildings; library accounts and business forms. I, II; 
(i). Miss Curtis 

24. Selection of Books. — English translations of representative 
works of French, German, Spanish, Italian and Russian novelists 
of the 19th century; examination of about forty newly published 
books sent each month to the School for inspection. I, II; (2). 

Assistant Librarian Drury 

25. Advanced Classification and Cataloging. — The principal 
systems of book classification; rules for cataloging books. //; (i). 

Miss Bond 
Prerequisite: Library 17, 18. 

26. Library Administration. — Advanced order work; library 
organization; library architecture; legislative and municipal refer- 
ence work ; library work with children ; lectures on special topics 
by visiting librarians, members of the faculty, and the library staff. 

Lii;(3). 

Miss Curtis, Assistant Librarian Drury, Mrs. Scon, Mr. Reece, 
Mr. Kaiser and others 

27. Bibliographical Institutions. — Organization and work of 
societies and institutions of America and Europe interested in the 



Mathematics 423 

production of bibliographical material ; cooperative undertakings ; 
international bibliography. /; (i). Miss Patton 

28. Practise Work. — (Students may elect special practise work 
in certain departments of the University library.) //; (i to 4). 

Director Windsor 

MATHEMATICS 

Edgar Jerome Townsend, Ph.D., Professor 

Samuel Walker Shattuck, C.E., LL.D., Professor, Emeritus 

George Abram Miller, Ph.D., Professor 

Hexry Lewis Rietz, Ph.D., Professor 

Charles Hirschel Sisam, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

James B\'rnie Shaw, D.Sc, Assistant Professor 

Arnold Emch, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Arthlti Robert Crathorne, Ph.D., Associate 

Robert Lacy Borger, Ph.D., Associate 

Ernest Barnes Lytle, Ph.D., Associate 

GusTAF Eric Wahlin, Ph.D., Associate 

Ellis Bagley Stouffer. Ph.D., Instructor 

Aubrey John Kempner, Ph.D., Instructor 

William Wells Denton, Ph.D., Instructor 

Edward Wilson Chittenden, Ph.D., Instructor 

Josephine Elizabeth Burns, Ph.D., Instructor 

Sidney Archie Rowland, A.B., Assistant 

Clarence Mark Hebbert, B.S., Assistant 

Guy Watson Smith, M.S., Assistant 

Henry Charles Zeis, A.B,, Assistant 

George Rutledge, A.M., Research Assistant 

The courses offered by the department are arranged to meet the 
needs of three classes of students: (i) those who wish to elect 
the subject as an element in a general education ; (2) those who 
will have occasion to make use of mathem.atics in cognate subjects, 
and (3) those who wish to specialize in mathematics. Those who 
select mathematics as a major subject should take Mathematics 2, 
4, and 6 in the freshman year; Mathematics 7, 9, and 10 in the 
sophomore year, and Mathematics 16, 18, and 19 in the junior 
year. In the senior year tlie selection may be made from the courses 
open to graduates and undergraduates as seems desirable. Students 
specializing in mathematics are advised to take work also in some 
line of applied mathematics. 



424 Mathematics 

The mathematical library, consisting of about 3,000 volumes, is 
adequate for advanced work and research. The leading mathe- 
matical journals are received currently. The department also has in 
its possession a collection of models and computing machines, which 
are valuable in instruction and research. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

2. College Algebra. — /; (3), (Three sections repeat the work 
in the second semester.) 

Professor Miller, Professor Rietz, Assistant Professor Sisam, 
Assistant Professor Shaw^, Assistant Professor Emch, Dr. 
Crathorne, Dr. Borger, Dr. Lytle, Dr. Wahlin, Dr. Stouf- 
fer, Dr. Kempner, Dr. Denton, Dr. Chittenden, Dr. Burns, 
Mr. Rowland, Mr. Hebbert, Mr. Smith, Mr. Zeis 

Prerequisite: Entrance algebra, ij^ units; plane geometry. 

3. Spherical Trigonometry. — //; (2). Dr. Crathorne 
Prerequisite: Solid and spherical geometry. Mathematics 4. 

4. Plane Trigonometry. — /; (2). (Three sections repeat the 
work in the second semester.) 

Professor Miller, Professor Rietz, Assistant Professor Sisam, 
Assistant Professor Shaw, Assistant Professor Emch, Dr. 
Crathorne, Dr. Borger, Dr. Lytle, Dr. Wahlin, Dr. Stouf- 
fer, Dr. Kempner, Dr. Denton, Dr. Chittenden, Dr. Burns, 
Mr. Rowland, Mr. Hebbert, Mr, Smith, Mr. Zeis 

Prerequisite: Entrance algebra, ij/^ units; plane geometry. 

5. Teachers' Course. — Secondary algebra and geometry; their 
educational values ; position in course ; methods of teaching ; corre- 
lation ; comparison of American methods with those of foreign 
countries ; order of topics ; most important topics ; text-books ; lit- 
erature. Lectures; discussions; reports. /; (2). Dr. Lytle 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

6. Analytic Geometry. — Plane and solid analytic geometry. 

//; (5). 

Professor Miller, Professor Rietz, Assistant Professor Sisam, 
Assistant Professor Shaw, Assistant Professor Emch, Dr. 
Crathorne, Dr. Borger, Dr. Lytle, Dr. Wahlin, Dr. Stouf- 
fer. Dr. Kempner, Dr. Denton, Dr. Chittenden, Dr. Burns, 
Mr. Rowland, Mr. Hebbert, Mr. Smith, Mr. Zeis 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 2, 4. 



Mathematics 425 

7, 9. Differential and Integral Calculus. — The principles of 
the differential and integral calculus developed and applied to func- 
tions of one and of several variables. (Section A is an honor sec- 
tion and may be selected by those specializing in mathematics or 
having an average grade of 90 in freshman mathematics.) /; (5) ; 

//; (3). 

Professor Rietz, Assistant Professor Sisam, Assistant Professor 
Shaw, Assistant Professor Emch, Dr. Crathorne, Dr. Bor- 
GER, Dr. Lytle, Dr. Wahlin, Dr. Stouffer, Dr. Kempner, 
Dr. Denton, Dr. Chittenden, Dr. Burns 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 6. 

9a. Differential and Integral Calculus. — (Second Course.) 
The definite (single and multiple) integral with exercises in the 
formulation of problems arising in applied mathematics ; line, sur- 
face, and volume integrals; the theorems of Stokes and Green; par- 
tial differentiation; exact differentials with applications of the con- 
ditions for exactness ; elements of differential questions ; approxi- 
mate quadature and integration of differential equations. / or 11; 
(2). 

Assistant Professor Emch, Dr. Crathorne, Dr. Lytle, Dr. 
Stouffer 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7, 9. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus. — (For students in 
chemistry and chemical engineering.) /; (5). 

Professor Miller, Mr. Smith 
Prerequisite : Mathematics 6. 

18. Constructive Geometry. — Development and training of 
space perception ; properties of lines, planes, and the simpler sur- 
faces of the second order studied by various methods of parallel 
and central projection; graphical interpretation of the processes 
of analytic geometry; analytic discussion of the methods of de- 
scriptive geometry. /; (3). Assistant Professor Emch 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 6. 

courses for graduates and advanced undergraduates 

10. Theory of Equations and Determinants. — Some of the 
fundamental properties of an algebraic equation in one unknown ; 
the solutions of systems of simultaneous equations ; theory of a sys- 
tem of linear equations; some fundamental properties of determi- 
nants. //; (3). Professor Miller 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 6. 



426 Mathematics 

i6. Differential Equations. — General linear equations with 
constant coefficients; special forms of differential equations of 
higher order; integration in series. /; (3). Professor Townsend 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8 or 9. 

19. Solid Analytic Geometry. — Equations of the plane and 
the right line in space ; the more general properties of surfaces of 
the second degree; the classification and special properties of 
quadrics ; a brief introduction to the theory of surfaces in general. 
//; (3). Assistant Professor Sisam 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8 (or 7), 10. 

[20. Calculus of Variations. — Those elements of the science 
that are most needed in the study of the higher subjects of mathe- 
matical astronomy and physics. //; (3). Not given, 1913-14. 

Dr. Crathorne 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 16.] 

21. Method of Least Squares. — Law of probability and error; 
adjustment of observation ; precision of observation ; independent 
and conditional observations. /; (2). Professor Stebbins 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8 or 7. 

22. Partial Differential Equations. — Integration and deter- 
mination of the integration constants of such partial differential 
equations as arise in the study of such subjects as the flow of heat, 
the vibration of strings, plates, and electricity. //; (2). 

Professor Townsend 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

23. Averages and the Mathematics of Investment. — Mean- 
ing, use, and abuse of different kinds of averages ; relation of the 
theory of probability to averages ; application of the elements of 
probability to annuities, insurance, and various branches of science ; 
loans and investments ; practical problems in the evaluation of in- 
vestment securities. //; (3). Professor Rietz 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2; junior standing. 

[24. Functions of a Complex Variable. — I, II; (3). Not 
given, 1913-14. Professor Townsend 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7, 9, 16.] 

27, Projective Geometry. — Fundamental concepts; anharmonic 
ratio; projective pencils and ranges; projective transformations and 
groups ; theory of conies and quadric surfaces ; pencils and ranges 



Mathematics 427 

of conies ; quadratic transformations and projective theory of cti-. 
bics ; applications in mechanics. I, II; (3). Dr. Crathorne 

Prerequisite : Senior standing in mathematics. 

[31. Actuarial Theory. — Application of probability to life con- 
tingencies ; mortality tables ; fire insurance ; premiums for various 
t>'pes of insurance. /; (3). Not given, 1913-14. Professor Rietz 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8, 2S-] 

[32. History of Mathematics. — Historical development of the 
elementary subjects; rise and growth of the higher mathem.atics 
chiefly in the nineteenth century ; biography of the persons most 
influential in this development. Lectures; reports on assigned read- 
ing. //; (2). Not given, 1913-14. Dr. Lytle 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in mathematics.] 

33. Modern Algebra. — Theory of matrices ; system of linear 
equations ; bilinear and quadratic forms ; properties of polynom- 
inals; algebraic invariants; elementarj^ divisors. /, //; (3). 

Dr. Borger 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 9, 10. 

40. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. — The general 
concepts of higher mathematics in their bearing on elementary 
mathematics. //; (2). Dr. Lytle 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in mathematics. 

COLTiSES FOR GRADUATES 

100. Seminar and Thesis. — Three times a week; I, II; (i or 2 
units). 

Professor Townsend, Professor Miller, Professor Rietz, As- 
sistant Professor Sisam, Assistant Professor Shaw, Assist- 
ant Professor Emch 

loi. Functions of Real Variables. — The theory of functions 
of real variables; the theory of assemblages. Three times a week; 
I, II; (i unit). Professor Townsend 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

[104. Expansions in Fundamental Functions. — Theory of 
integral equations ; methods of expansion of arbitrary functions in 
terms of the characteristic functions of a given nucleus ; applica- 
tions of Green's functions. Potential functions, Fourier series, se- 
ries of Legendrians, of Bessel functions, and others ; differential 
equations of physics under given boundary conditions ; the inver- 
sion of definite integrals. Three times a week, I, II; {i unit). 
Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Shaw] 



428 Mathematics 

[no. Elliptic Functions. — Elliptic functions applied to geom- 
etry and mechanics; the elliptic modular functions. Three times a 
week; I, II; (j uiiit). Not given, 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Emch 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 24.] 

III. AuTOMORPHic Functions. — First semester: The group- 
theoretic side of the theory. Second semester: Function-theoretic 
developments and applications. Three times a week; I, II ; (i unit). 

Assistant Professor Emch 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 24 and preferably 27 and no. 

[113. Theory OF Linear Differential Equations. — Three times 
a week; I, II; (i unit). Not given in 1913-14. Dr. Crathorne 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 24,] 

[120. Elementary Theory of Groups. — Groups in arithmetic, 
geometry, and trigonometry; those which can be represented with a 
small number of letters ; the abstract group theory ; the Galois theory 
of equations. Three times a week; I, II ; (2 unit). Not given in 
1913-14. Professor Miller] 

121. Theory of Groups. — Three times a week; I, II; (i unit). 

Professor Miller 
Prerequisite : Methematics 120. 

124. Theory of Numbers. — Congruences; Kronecker's modular 
systems; quadratic residues; quadratic forms; algebraic numbers. 
Three times a week; I, II; (i unit). Dr. Wahlin 

129. Theory of Statistics. — General methods of statistical in- 
vestigation ; application of the theory of probability to statistical 
data; fitting curves to observation; interpolation; theory of errors; 
mathematical theory of variability and correlation ; application of 
principles developed to problems in economics, sociology, and biolo- 
gy. Three times a zveek; I, II; (i unit). Professor Rietz 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8. 

130. Invariants and Higher Plane Curves. — General theory 
of algebraic curves ; application of the theory of invariants to higher 
plane curves; curves of the third and fourth order. Three times a 
week; I, II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Sisam 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 16, 27. 

[131. Algebraic Surfaces. — Application of homogeneous co- fl 

ordinates and the theory of invariants to geometry of three dimen- 
sions; general theory of surfaces; special properties of surfaces of 



Mechanical Engineering 429 

the third and fourth order. Three times a week; I, II; (i unit). 
Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Sisam 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 19.] 

[135. Metric Differential Geometry. — Applications of the cal- 
culus to the general theory of curves and surfaces based primarily 
on the use of Cartesian co-ordinates ; relation of the theory of sur- 
faces to the theory of invariants of a pair of quadratic differential 
forms. Three times a week; I, II; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Sisam 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 16.] 

141. Vector Methods. — Principles of the algebras of quatern- 
ions, space analysis, and dyadics, development of theorems of dif- 
ferentiation and integration, applications to rational mechanics, 
elasticity, hydrodynamics, electrodynamics. Three times a week; 
I, II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Shaw 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

[142. General Algebra. — Theory of linear associative algebra 
or hypercomplex numbers, with particular study of the systems use- 
ful for the geometry and physics of A'^ dimensions. Applications to 
relativity theories, and to general differential and integral invariants. 
Theory of linear operators and functional equations ; applications 
to general analysis, integro-differential equations, infinite systems. 
General theory of operators; applications to general invariant 
theories. Three times a week; I, II; (i unit). Not given in 
1913-14. Assistant Professor Shaw] 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Charles Russ Richards, M.M.E., Professor 

George Alfred Goodenough, M.E., Professor, Thermodynamics 

Bruce Willet Benedict, B.S., Director, Shop Laboratories 

Lewis Allen Harding, M.E., Professor, Experimental Mechanical 
Engineering 

Oscar Adolph Leutwiler, M.E., Assistant Professor, Machine De- 
sign 

Arthur Cutts Willard, B.S., Assistant Professor, Heating and 
Ventilation 

John Adlum Dent, M.E., Associate 

Harry Frederick Godeke, B.S., Instructor 

Herbert Seton Eames, B.S., Instructor 

Arthur Boquer Domonoske, M.S., Instructor, Machine Design 



430 Mechanical Engineering 

Harry William Waterfall, B.S., Instructor, Machine Design 

FREDERICK Calkins Torrance, M.E., Instructor 

John Nicholas Vedder, A.M., Assistant, Engineering Experiment 

Station 
Alonzo Plumsted Kratz^ M.S., Assistant, Engineering Experiment 

Station 
David Leonard Scroggin, Instructor, Machine Work 
Edgar Thomas Lanham, Instructor, Forge Work 
Robert Edwin Kennedy^ Instructor, Foundry Work 
Gustave Adolph Gross, Instructor, Pattern Making 
GusTAV Howard Radebaugh, Instructor, Machine Work 
Joseph Culpepper Pendleton, Instructor, Foundry Work 
James Merion Duncan, Assistant, Pattern Making 
Peter Joseph Rebman, Assistant, Forge Work 
John Alexander Frisk, Assistant and Mechanician 

3. Power Measurement. — The apparatus used in engine and 
boiler tests — scales, thermometers, indicators, brakes and dynamom- 
eters, gauges, calorimeters ; methods of calibrating and using such 
apparatus; tests for horse-power of steam engines, pumps, and gas 
engines. Reports. /; (2). 

Professor Harding, Mr. Godeke, Mr. Eames, Mr. Torrance 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 16, Mathematics 9. 

4. Elements of Machine Design. — Design of machine ele- 
ments : Bolts, keys, journals, bearings, couplings ; forms of gear 
teeth; spur and bevel gears. /; (2). Mr. Waterfall 

Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing i, 2. 

5. Mechanism (Kinematics of Machinery). — Typical mechan- 
isms and mechanical movements; kinematic principles involved in 
laying out such mechanisms; the methods of Reuleaux; parallel 
motions; quick return motions; valve gears; epicyclic trains. /; 
(3). Mr. Dent 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 
7. 

6. Heat Engines. — The steam engine; steam turbine; gas en- 
gine; air compressor; refrigerating machine. Mixtures of gases; 
combustion of gaseous fuels. (A continuation of course 7.) 
/, //; (2). Professor Richards, Professor Goodenough 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 7. 

7. Thermodynamics. — The transformation of heat into work; 
the second law and its connection with irreversible processes; the 



Mechanical Engineering 431 

properties of heat media, the perfect gases, saturated and super- 
heated vapors; the flow of fluids. //; (3). 

Professor Goodenough, Mr. Dent 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 9a; Theoretical and Applied Me- 
chanics 8. 

8. Mechanics of Machinery. — Friction in machine parts; use- 
ful application of friction as in friction clutches and brakes ; trans- 
mission of power by ropes and belting; brakes, clutches, and dyna- 
mometers; hoisting machinery; hoisting in mines; elevators and 
cranes. /; (3). Assistant Professor Leutwiler, Mr. Dent 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 9, 11; Me- 
chanical Engineering 5, ;. 

9. Machine Design. — Theory of machine design, with applica- 
tions ; investigation of actual machine similar to the one to be de- 
signed; design of machinery subjected to heavy and variable 
stresses: Punches, shears, presses, riveters, and cranes. I, II; (3). 

Assistant Professor Leutwiler, Mr. Domoxoske, Mr. Waterfall 
Prerequisite: Theoretical and Apphed Mechanics 8, 9; Mechan- 
ical Engineering 4, 5. 

11. Steam Engines and Boilers. — The construction, operation, 
and care of boilers and engines ; elementary thermodynamics ; the 
indicator and indicator diagrams; steam engine performance. (For 
students in civil, architectural, and municipal engineering.) //; (3). 

Mr. Dent, Mr. Godeke, Mr. Waterfall 
Prerequisite: Physics I. 

12. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. — Experiments on 
engines, turbines, gas engines, pumps, boilers, injectors, air com- 
pressors, hoisting appliances, heating apparatus, and the refrigerat- 
ing machines. Tests of power plants in the vicinity. /; (3). 

Professor Harding, Mr. Godeke, Mr. Eames, Mr. Torrance 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 3, 7. 

13. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. — The testing and 
calibration of instruments and apparatus ; use of the indicator ; cal- 
culation of horse-power and steam consumption; reading of indica- 
tor diagrams; valve setting. (For students in electrical engineer- 

ing.) //; (3). 

Professor Harding, Mr. Godeke, Mr. Eames, Mr. Torrance 

14. Design of Power Plants. — Design, with estimates and 
specifications, of some form of power plant. //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Leutwiler, Mr. Godeke, Mr. Domonoske 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 12. 



432 Mechanical Engineering 

15. Thermodynamics and Heat Engines. — (A synopsis of 
courses 6 and 7, for students in electrical engineering.) /, //; (3). 

Professor Goodenough, Mr. Dent, Mr. Eames, Mr. Vedder 
Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 11 or 16 or 23. 

16. Steam Engineering. — Engines, boilers, pumps, condensers, 
and other steam machinery. //; (3). 

Professor Harding, Mr. Dent, Mr. Eames 
Prerequisite: Physics i, 3. 

19. Seminar. — Papers on subjects relating to current engineer- 
ing practise; the indexing of current engineering literature. Each 
student subscribes for a technical journal. Open to seniors only, 
/, //; (i). Professor Harding 

23, Steam Engineering. — (A synopsis of courses 11 and 16, for 
students in electrical engineering,) /; (2), 

Professor Goodenough, Mr, Dent, Mr, Eames, Mr. Vedder 

24, Machine Design and Mechanism, — The design of simple 
machine elements : keys, couplings, gears ; the principles of mechan- 
ism, (For students in electrical engineering.) /; (3). 

Mr. Domonoske, Mr. Waterfall 
Prerequisite: General Engineering Drawing i, 2, 

27. Advanced Laboratory Practise. — Special research work in 
the mechanical engineering laboratory. Open to seniors only. Time 
and credits will be arranged by consultation. Professor Harding 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 12. 

29, Seminar for Juniors, — Technical publications; the presen- 
tation of abstracts of important articles on engineering topics. 
Methods of classification ; filing systems for clippings, catalogs, and 
drawings. //; (i). Professor Richards 

Prerequisite: Rhetoric i. 

31, Transmission of Power, — The transmission of power by 
shafting, belts, ropes, cables, water, compressed air, steam, and gas, 
/; (2), Professor Richards 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 7, 8. 

32, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, — Heating and venti- 
lation. Calibration of instruments, tests of various heating systems, 
experiments on fans and blowers. /; (i). 

Assistant Professor Willard, Mr. Godeke, Mr. Torrance 
3:^. Thesis. — Investigation of special subject and preparation of 
thesis embodying a review of the literature of the subject, the re- 
sults of investigation, and a discussion of those results. Weekly 



Mechanical Engineering 433 

reports during the second semester. (Required of seniors.) //; 

(3). 

Professor Richards, Professor Goodenough, Director Benedict, 

Professor Harding, Assistant Professor Leutvviler, Assist- 
ant Professor Willard 

35. Mine Machinery. — Air compressors, pumps, gas engines, 
and other machinery used in mining. (For students in mining en- 
gineering.) //; (2). Mr, Dent 

36. Industrial Plant Design. — Theory and practise in the de- 
sign and equipment of industrial plants. Design of buildings, heat- 
ing, ventilation, lighting, power generation and transmission, dr>'- 
ing processes, etc. //; (3). Professor Harding 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 11, Mechani- 
cal Engineering 9. 

38. Heating and Ventilation. — The theory and practise of 
warming and ventilating buildings ; systems of heating, including hot 
air, hot water and steam; central or district heating plants; require- 
ments for good ventilation ; air washing and humidifying plants ; 
fans; etc. (Primarily for students in architecture and architectural 
engineering.) /; (2 or 3), Assistant Professor Willard 

Prerequisite : Physics 2a and 2b or Physics i and 3. 

39. Heating and Ventilation. — (Advanced course, primarily 
for students in mechanical engineering.) //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Willard 
Prerequisite: Physics i and 3; Mechanical Engineering 7 and 16. 

41. Shop Practise. — Pattern work (18 weeks) — Hand and ma- 
chine methods in the production of useful patterns. 

Foundry work (9 weeks) — Modern foundry practise, including 
bench, floor, and machine moulding; all branches of core making; 
operation of cupola and brass furnace; casting of iron, brass, and 
alloys. 

Forge work (9 weeks) — Hand and power forging and welding 
of metals, heat treatment of carbon and high speed steels in mod- 
ern, gas, electric, and cyanide furnaces; case carbonizing. /, //; 

(3). 

Director Benedict, Mr. Gross, Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Lanham, Mr. 

Duncan, Mr. Pendleton, Mr. Rebman 

42. Machine Shop Practise. — Modem machine shop manufac- 
turing methods ; machine operation ; training in shop management ; 
organization ; production methods ; despatching work ; ordering. 



434 Mechanical Engineering 

storing, and routing materials; tim^ studies; shop accounting; in- 
spection and all activities of the machine department of a manufac- 
turing plant. /; (3) : //; (2). 

Director Benedict, Mr. Scroggin, Mr. Radebaugh 

48. Forge Work for Agricultural Students. — Forging and 
welding; tempering tools; pointing and hardening cultivator shovels, 
plow shares, ^t^ hours a week, either half of I or II ; (i). 

Mr. Lanham, Mr. Rebman 

49. Wood Work for Agricultural Students. — Carpentry for 
the farmer: use of tools; layout and construction of building joints; 
repairs to buildings and equipment. Six hours a week, either half 
of I or II; (i). Mr. Gross, Mr. Duncan 

[90. Science of Management. — Historical review of industrial 
development ; modem industrial tendencies ; principles of organiza- 
tion; selection and compensation of labor; application of science to 
industrial problems; practical shop systems of management; pro- 
duction; etc. I, II; (3). Not given, 1913-14. Director Benedict 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 41, 42.] 

COURSES for graduates 

Entrance upon graduate work in mechanical engineering presup- 
poses the full undergraduate course in that subject. 

106. Heat Motors. — The advanced theory of the internal com- 
bustion motor, and of the steam turbine. The general principles and 
methods of refrigeration. Twice a week; II; (i unit). 

Professor Goodenough 

107. Thermodynamics. — The general principles of thermody- 
namics and their application to the solution of physical and engi- 
neering problems. Twice a week; I; (i unit). 

Professor Goodenough 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 7 or an equivalent. 

109. Machine Design. — The general principles of rational de- 
sign ; the application of mechanics of materials. Individual prob- 
lems. Twice a week; I or //; (7 unit). 

Assistant Professor Leutwiler 

112, Laboratory Investigation. — Special investigations of 
problems relating to combustion of fuel ; boiler economy ; steam en- 
gines and turbines ; gas engines and producers ; properties of explo- 
sive mixtures ; mechanical refrigeration. Original work. Three 
times a week; I, II; (ij^ units). 

Professor Richards and assistants 



Mechanics, Theoretical and Applied 435 

114. Dynamics of Machinery. — Advanced problems. Balanc- 
ing; \vhirling and vibration of shafts; theory of governors; fly 
wheels; force and mass reduction; stresses in rotating masses. 
Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). Professor Goodenough 

MECHANICS, THEORETICAL AND APPLIED 

Arthur Newell Talbot, C.E., Professor, Municipal and Sanitary 
Engineering ; in charge of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 
Herbert Fisher Moore, M.M.E., Assistant Professor 
Melvin Lorenius Enger, C.E., Assistant Professor 
Virgil R Fleming, B.S., Associate 
Clarence Eugene Noerenberg, A.B., A.E., Instructor 
Fred B Seely, B.S., Instructor 
George Paul Boomsliter, B.S., Instructor 
Harrison Frederick Gonnerman, B.S., Instructor 
Newton Edward Ensign, A.B., B.S., Instructor 

m 

Harry Gardner, M.S., Instructor 
Alex Vallance, M.E., Instructor 

6. Engineering Materials. — The properties and requirements 
for materials used in engineering construction, the effect of methods 
of manufacture upon the quality of the material, and the specifica- 
tions and standard tests used to secure acceptable grades of material. 
Lectures and assigned reading. /; (i). 

Professor Talbot, Assistant Professor Moore 
Prerequisite: Registration in Theoretical and Applied Mechan- 
ics 9. 

7, 8. Analytical Mechanics. — The mechanics of engineering 
rather than that of astronomy and physics : Fundamental concepts ; 
equilibrium and motion ; engineering problems ; statement of condi- 
tions and use of data. (The work begins in the second semester; 
in the first semester of the following year it is given concurrently 
with Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 9.) Maurer's Technical 
Mechanics. II; (3); I; (2V2). 

Assistant Professor Moore, Assistant Professor Enger, Mr. 

Fleming, Mr. Noerenberg, Mr. Boomsliter, Mr. Seely, Mr. 

Ensign, Mr. Gonnerman, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Vallance 
Prerequisite : For 7, Mathematics 7, registration in ;Mathematics 
9; for 8, Mathematics 9; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 7. 



436 Mechanics, Theoretical and Applied 

9. Resistance of Materials. — The mechanics of materials; 
experiments and investigations in the materials laboratory; prob- 
lems in ordinary engineering practise ; the quality and requirements 
for structural materials. Merriman's Mechanics of Materials. 
Laboratory weekly. I; (31/2). 

Assistant Professor Moore, Assistant Professor Enger, Mr. 
Fleming, Mr. Noerenberg, Mr. Boomsliter, Mr. Seely, Mr. 
Ensign, Mr. Gonnerman, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Vallance 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 9; Theoretical and Applied Mechan- 
ics 7; registration in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 8. 

10. Hydraulics. — The pressure and the flow of water and its 
utilization as motive power; observation and measurement of pres- 
sure, velocity, and flow; power and efficiency; determination of ex- 
perimental coefficients. Hoskins' Hydraulics. Laboratory weekly; 

II; (3). 

Assistant Professor Moore, Assistant Professor Enger, Mr, 
Fleming, Mr. Seely, Mr. Gonnerman, Mr. Gardner, Mr. 
Vallance 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 9; Theoretical and Applied Mechan- 
ics 8. 

11. Analytical Mechanics. — Advanced kinetics; problems and 
applications. (An extension of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 
7 and 8, for mechanical engineers.) //; (3). Mr. Seely 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 9; Theoretical and Applied Mechan- 
ics 8. 

14. Elements of Mechanics. — Kinematics, kinetics, and statics. 
(For architects and others who have not taken the calculus.) Mor- 
ley's Mechanics for Engineers. II; (4). 

Mr. Noerenberg, Mr. Boomsliter, Mr. Gardner 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2, 4. 

15, 16. Strength of Materials. — Graphical methods of deter- 
mining the elastic curve of beams ; centroids and moments of in- 
ertia of areas; reinforced concrete beams and columns; properties 
and tests of engineering materials. (For students in architecture 
and others without the prerequisites required for Theoretical and 
Applied Mechanics 9.) Murdock's Strength of Materials. Labora- 
tory every other week; I, II; (3). 

Mr. Noerenberg, Mr. Boomsliter, Mr. Seely, Mr. Vallance. 

Prerequisite : Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 14. 



Military Science 437 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Entrance upon graduate work in theoretical and applied mechan- 
ics presupposes a full undergraduate course in that subject. 

loi. Analytical Mechanics. — Methods of treatment and at- 
tack; the more complex problems and applications; critical and 
comparative study of texts. Twice a week; I; (j unit). 

Assistant Professor Moore 

102. Resistance of Materials. — Properties of materials used in 
engineering construction and the methods of determining these pro- 
perties ; analysis and investigation in mechanics of materials ; the 
effect of form of member in a structure or machine ; the method of 
application of forces; comparative study of texts. Twice a week; 
II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Moore 

103. Hydraulics and Hydraulic Engineering. — The laws of 
hydraulics and their application to engineering problems; hydraulic 
power and its development ; design and investigation. Twice a week; 
II; (i unit). Professor Talbot 

104. Experimental Work in the Laboratory of Applied Me- 
chanics. — Investigation in the materials testing laboratory on ma- 
terials and on their action as used in machines and structures ; ex- 
periments in the hydraulic laboratory with pumps, motors, and meas- 
uring devices, and the investigation of the laws of hydraulics, the 
development of power, and the study of various hydraulic problems. 
Twice a week; I, II; (y2 to 2 units). 

Professor Talbot, Assistant Professor Moore 

105. Experimental and Analytical Work in Reinforced Con- 
crete. — Research : interpretation of available experimental results 
and their application to the design of structures; principles of con- 
struction ; typical reinforced concrete structures. Twice a week. 
I, II; (1^2 units or more). Professor Talbot 

METEOROLOGY 
(See under Geology.) 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

Frank Daniel Webster, Major 20th U. S. Infantn,-, Professor and 
Commandant 

Frederick William Post, ist Sergeant, U. S. A., retired, Adminis- 
trative Assistant 

Clifford Harper Westcott, Assistant 



438 Mining Engineering 

Edwin Chester Prouty, Assistant 
Herbert Edward Howes, Assistant 
Harold Paul Ousley, Assistant 
Edwards Hall Berry, Assistant 
Frederick John Giehler, Assistant 
Paul Cobb Rich, Assistant 
Charles R Velzy, Assistant 

*i. Theoretical Instruction. — Infantry Drill Regulations. For 
all male students. //; (i). 

Mr. Westcott, Mr. Prouty, Mr. Howes, Mr. Ousley, Mr. Berry 

*2. Practical Instruction. — Infantry. — School of the soldier; 
company and battalion ; regimental ceremonies. Artillery. — School 
of the cannoneer and battery dismounted. Freshman and sopho- 
more years. I, II; (i). Professor Webster 

3. Theoretical Instruction. — For sophomores : Drill Regula- 
tions and military administration. For juniors : Field Service Regu- 
lations. For seniors : Field Engineering. This course is obliga- 
tory upon commissioned officers and sergeants, recommended to 
corporals, and open to others. I, II. Professor Webster 

Authorized Text-Books. — United States Drill Regulations; 
United States Army Regulations; Field Service Regulations, United 
States Army; Guard Manual; Small Aryns Firing Regulations. 

MINERALOGY 
(See Geology 5, 5a, 6, 7.) 

MINING ENGINEERING 

Harry Harkness Stoek, B.S., E.M., Professor 
Elmer Allen Holbrook, B.S., Assistant Professor 
Stephen Osgood Andros, A.B., B.S., E.M., Associate 
Lewis Emanuel Young, B.S., E.M., Instructor 

1. Elementary Mining Principles. — The general processes of 
mining engineering; terminology. Lectures; trips of inspection. 
/; (i). Professor Stoek, Assistant Professor Holbrook 

2. Earth and Rock Excavation. — Explosives; blasting; drill- 
ing ; boring ; tunneling ; shaft sinking ; coal cutting ; timbering ; pros- 
pecting. //; (3). Mr. Young 

Prerequisite: Chemistry la or ib. 



•Freshmen and sophomores are required to drill one and one-half hours 
each week until March 15; after that date, three hours each week. Freshmen 
attend recitations one hour a week in the second semester. Assignments to 
classes and companies are made by the Commandant of Cadets according to 
circumstances. 



Alining Engineering 439 

3. Mining Methods. — Mining and timbering of bedded, vein, 
and placer deposits. /; (2). Professor Stoek, Mr. Andros 

Prerequisite: Mining Engineering 2. 

3a. Mining Principles. — Terminology-; explosives; blasting; 
drilling; tunneling; shaft-sinking; mining and timbering of flat de- 
posits. (For students in ceramics and ceramic engineering.) /; (2). 

Mr. Young 

Prerequisite: Chemistry la or ib. 

4. Mine Surveying. — The application of general surveying 
methods to mine work; the description and use of instruments em- 
ployed underground and in connecting surface and underground 
surveys; the platting and use of mine maps; mineral land survey- 
ing; the theory and use of solar attachments; determination of the 
meridian; theory and use of stadia; application of topographic and 
railroad surveying to mining conditions; estimation and prospecting 
of mineral deposits. //; (4). Mr. Young 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 21. 

5. Mine Ventilation. — Mine gases; safety lamps; mine venti- 
lation ; mine lighting ; explosions in mines ; mine fires ; rescue work ; 
first aid. //; (3). Professor Stoek, Mr. Andros 

Prerequisite : Chemistry la or ib. 

6. Mechanical Engineering of Mines. — Hoisting : ropes, cages, 
hoisting engines, and other appliances. Haulage : the different sys- 
tems used underground and on the surface ; the methods of loading 
and unloading; mine stables; transportation of workmen. Signal- 
ing. Drainage of mines: mine dams, mine pumps. /; (3). 

Mr. Young 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 16, 11, or 35. 

7. Mine Administration, Organization, and Mining Law. — 
Mining companies. Trade agreements — relations between employ- 
ers and employees. Transportation and marketing. The general 
mining laws of the several states, with particular attention to those 
of Illinois. //; (2). Professor Stoek 

8. Mine Plant. — General layout ; design ; estimates for con- 
struction; specifications for mining and metallurgical plants. //; (2) 

Assistant Professor Holbrooe 
Prerequisite: Mining 12. 

9. Preparation of Coal and Ores. — Coal washing: history, ap- 
plication, principles, processes, and machines used in the prepara- 



'440 Mining Engineering 

tion and washing of anthracite and bituminous coal; American and 
foreign practise; principles and machines used in breaking, pulver- 
izing, and concentrating ores and mineral products. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Hoi^rook 
Prerequisite: Chemistry la or ib, 2 and 3, Physics i and 3. 

10. Mining Laboratory. — Different coals, and their availability 
for washing; complete commercial tests, using small commercial 
machines wherever possible ; design of flow sheets ; analysis of pro- 
ducts; briquetting of fuels; concentration tests on a lead, zinc, or 
iron ore; amalgamation and cyanidation of a gold ore. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Holbrook 
Prerequisite: Mining Engineering 9. 

11. Thesis. — Individual investigation of a special mining sub- 
ject; preparation of thesis giving review of the literature on the 
subject, the results of experimental work, and a general discussion 
of the subject. //; (3). 

12. Mine Design. — General theory of framed structures; de- 
sign of mine structures of wood, steel, and masonry. Tipple ar- 
rangements ; rock houses ; ore bins ; general surface plant ; design 
and dredging of mining and metallurgical plant. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Holbrook 
Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 20. 

13. Utilization of Fuels. — The manufacture, handling, and 
utilization of wood, charcoal, peat, lignite, bituminous and anthracite 
coal, petroleum, natural and artificial gas, and refractories in mining 
and metallurgical practise. //; (2). Assistant Professor Holbrook 

14. Mining Problems. — Review of mining literature; reports. 
//; (i). Professor Stoek 

COURSES for graduates 

Entrance upon graduate work in mining engineering presup- 
poses a full undergraduate course in that subject. 

loi. Advanced Mining Methods. — Coal and ore fields of the 
United States; methods and economics of mining: utilization, mar- 
keting, storage, and transportation of coal and ores. Tzvice a week; 
I, II; (i unit). Professor Stoek 

102. Advanced Preparation of Coal and Ores. — Detailed in- 
vestigation and discussion of settling ratios, laws of crushing, sort- 
ing vs. sizing, etc. ; specific mill and washing problems. Twice a 
week; I, II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Holbrook 



Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 441 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

(See English Language and Literature, Germanic Languages 
AND Literature, and Romance Languages and Literatltie. ) 

MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Arthur Newell Talbot, C.E., Professor 

Melvin Lorenius Enger, B.S., C.E.,. Assistant Professor, The- 
oretical and Applied Mechanics 
Paul Hansen, B.S., Associate 
Harold Eaton Babbitt, B.S., Instructor 

2. Water Supply Engineering. — Source of supply; hydraulics 
of wells ; stream flow ; impounding and storage reservoirs ; conduits 
and pipe lines; pumps and pumping machinery; stand-pipes and 
elevated tanks ; the distribution system ; tests and standards of pur- 
ity of potable water. Designing weekly. Tumeaure and Rus- 
sell's Public Water Supplies. I ; (4). 

Assistant Professor Enger, Mr. Babbitt 
Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 9, 10; Chem- 
istry I ; Mechanical Engineering 11. 

3. Sewerage. — The design and methods of construction of sew- 
erage systems: Sanitar>- necessity of sev/erage; water carriage sys- 
tems, both separate and combined ; surveys and general plans ; hy- 
draulics of sewers; house sewage and its removal; relation of rain- 
fall to storm water flow ; determination of size and capacity of sew- 
ers; forms and strength of sewer appurtenances; modem methods 
of sewage disposal; estimates and specifications. Designing weekly. 
Fohvell's Sewerage; II; (3). 

Assistant Professor Enger, Mr. Babbitt 
Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 9, 10; Chem- 
istry' I ; Municipal and Sanitarj' Engineering 2. 

6a, b. Water Purification, Sewage Disposal, and Generah. 
Sanitation. — Impurities in water supplies and methods and pro- 
cesses of their removal; the modem methods of sewage disposal by- 
filtration, chemical precipitation, irrigation ; representative purifica- 
tion plants ; garbage collection and disposal ; sanitar>' restrictions and 
regulations and general sanitation. Lectures ; seminar work ; draft- 
^S- I J (3) ; II i (2). Professor Talbot, Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Hansen 

Prerequisite: Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 2, 3, 5a: 
Chemistry i, 3, lob. 



442 Music 

7. Water Supply Engineering. — (Similar to Municipal and 
Sanitary Engineering 2, for students in sanitary science.) Design- 
ing weekly. Turneaure and Russell's Public Water Supplies. I ; 
(4)- Mr. Babbitt 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 5, 12, 10; 
Chemistry 3. 

8. Sewerage. — (Similar to Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 
3, for students in sanitary science.) Designing weekly. Fol well's 
Sewerage. II; (3). Mr. Babbitt 

9. Hydraulic Design and Construction. — The design and 
methods of construction of reservoirs, dams, conduits, and water- 
ways; hydraulic engineering problems. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Enger 

30. Thesis. — Investigation or design of an engineering problem. 

Required of seniors. //; (2). Professor Talbot, Mr. Babbitt 

courses for graduates 
Entrance upon graduate work in municipal and sanitary engineer- 
ing presupposes a full undergraduate course in that subject. 

102. Water Supply Engineering. — Sources and requirements 
of water supply ; general water-works construction ; pumps and 
pumping ; design of reservoirs and elevated tanks ; water-works 
operation and the valuation of plants. One to three times a week; 
I or //; (i unit). Professor Talbot 

103. Sewerage. — General sewerage design and construction ; 
sewerage systems; hydraulics of sewers; and a study of run-off. 
Once or twice a week; II; (i unit). Professor Talbot 

106. Water Purification, Sewage Disposal and General 
Sanitation. — The design, consti*uction, and operation of water pur- 
ification plants and of sewage disposal works; the study of exist- 
ing plants ; comparison of results and cost of con'struction and op- 
eration ; experimental work on water filters and septic tanks ; gar- 
bage disposal; general sanitation. Once a week; II; (Yi unit). 

Professor Talbot 

MUSIC 

/Charles Henry Mills, Mus.D., F.R.C.O., F.A.G.O., Director, 

Professor of Music 
^ George Foss Schwartz, A.M., Mus.B., Assistant Professor, 

Theory and History of Music 
y Constance Barlow-Smith, Assistant Professor, Sight-Singing, Ear 

Training, Public School Music 



J 



Music 443 

X Henri Jacobus van den Berg, Instructor, Piano 

y^ Albert Austin Harding, Instructor, Wind Instruments, Director 

of the Band 
^ Florence Mary Kirkup, Instructor, Voice 
^ Edna Almeda Treat, Mus.B., Instructor, Piano 
/Edson Wilfred Morphy, Instructor, Violin 
/Lowell Leslie Townsend, A.M., Instructor, Piano 
Heber Dignam Nasmyth, Instructor, Voice 
Anna Viola Simon, Instructor, Voice 

History and Theory 

1. History of ]\Iusic. — The development of music; the rise of 
polyphony and dramatic music; the origin and progress of the ora- 
torio ; the evolution of instruments and instrumental forms ; the 
lives of composers. Lectures; assigned collateral readings. I, II; 
(2). Assistant Professor Schwartz 

2. Harmony.—/, //; (2), Assistant Professor Schwartz 

3. Advanced Harmony. — /, //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Schwartz 

4. Counterpoint, Canon, and Fugue. — I, II; (3). 

Professor Mills 

5.* General Theory, Free Composition. — /, //; (2). 

Professor Mills, Assistant Professor Schwartz 
Sa. Acoustics.— 7, //; (i). Professor Mills 

Piano' 
Professor Mills, Mr. van den Berg, Miss Treat, Mr. Townsend 

6a, 6b, 6c. Preparatory Course: Three Years. — Special at- 
tention is given to the formation of a correct touch and technique, 
and to intelligence in interpretation. In the examination at the 
conclusion of the course students are required to play : Simple 
scales and arpeggios at fairly rapid tempo ; scales in double octaves- 
at a moderate speed; Bach, little preludes and fugues; Czemy, Op. 
229; an early sonata of Haydn. /, //; (no collegiate credit). 

7. First Year. Development of technique; scales and arpeg- 
gios in various forms; Wolff, Octave Studies; Czemy, Op. 229, 
Bks. 3, 4; Cramer-Bulow, Etudes; Bach, Two-part inventions; 
sonatas of Haydn and Mozart; earlier sonatas of Beethoven; 



^Music 5, I, may be taken with Course 4, //, if desired. 

'Since it is undesirable and impossible to establish a set course for all 
students, the course outline given above must be taken only as indicating the 
general scope of the work required of each student. 



444 Music 

Mendelssohn, Songs Without Words; compositions (smaller 
works) of Schubert, Raff, Grieg, McDowell, Chaminade, Moszkow- 
ski, and others. I, II; (6). 

7a. One Year. — The first year's work in piano taken as a 
minor by senior collegiate students majoring in voice or violin. 

/, //; (2). 

8. Second Year. — Development of technique ; scales in double 
thirds; Tausig-Ehrlich, Daily Studies, Bk. I; Pacher, Octave 
Studies; Czerny, Op. 740, Bks. i, 4; Bach, Three-Part Inventions; 
Cramer-Bulow, Etudes, continued; Bach, selections from French 
and English Suites; sonatas and other compositions of Scarlatti, 
Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Lacombe, McDow- 
ell. I, II; (6). 

9. Third Year. Development of technique ; scales in double 
sixths; Tausig-Ehrlich, Daily Studies, Bk. I, continued; Kullak, 
Octave Studies, Bk. II; Bach, Welltempered Clavichord ; Clementi- 
Tausig, Gradus ad Parnassum; sonatas and concertos by Mozart, 
Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Hiller; selections from works of Chopin, 
Schubert, Moszkowski, Brahms, Schumann, Beethoven, Rubinstein, 
Liszt, Debussy, and Reger. I, II; (6). 

10.* Fourth Year: Daily Studies, Tausig-Ehrlich, Bk. II and 
Brahms ; Octave Studies, Chovan, Sinding, and others ; Etudes, 
Chopin, Alkan, Liszt, Godowsky, and Rubinstein. Selections and 
concertos by Brahms, Liszt, Rubinstein, Beethoven, Chopin, Schu- 
mann, McDowell, and other modem composers. I, II; (6). 

Voice' 
Mr. Nasmyth, Miss Kirkup, Miss Simon 

iia, lib, lie. Preparatory Course: Three years. The funda- 
mental principles of voice culture, viz., correct breathing and the 
proper placing of the voice. In the examination at the conclusion 
of the course students are required to sing: Simple scales and ar- 
peggios; studies selected from Concone, Sieber, Panofka, and 
Panseron ; songs selected from Schubert, Schumann, and Mendels- 
sohn. I, II; (no collegiate credit). 



^Students who major in piano and who are taking Music 10 are required 
to take Music 28. 

^Since it is undesirable and impossible to establish a set course for all 
students, the course outline given above must be taken only as indicating the 
general scope of the work required of each student. 



Music 445 

12. First Year. Fundamental principles of Tone Production; 
simple exercises for breath control ; vocalises by Concone or 
Castelli, to aid in artistic phrasing, r\thm, and accent; songs by- 
English and American composers ; Lieder by Franz and Schubert, 
for enunciation, and interpretation. Vocal hygiene, and physiology' 
of the vocal organs. /, II; (6). 

1 2a. The first year's work in voice taken as a minor by senior 
collegiate students majoring in piano or violin. /, //; (2). 

13. Second Year. Tone production (continued), breath con- 
trol, scales, and arpeggios for flexibility, poise and sustained tone; 
English, Italian, and German diction ; vocalises by Garcia ; Con- 
cone and Castelli (continued); vocal hygiene; sacred and secular 
songs and ballads selected from English and American composers; 
classical German Lieder, from Jensen, Meyer-Helmund, Franz, 
Schubert, and Schumann. /, //; (6). 

14. Third Year. Advanced exercises for tone production, and 
breath control in public singing ; vocalises continued ; vocal hy- 
giene ; simple arias from oratorios and operas. Advanced songs 
in English, French, German, and Italian. Lieder selected from 
Mendelssohn, Brahms, Grieg, Dvorak, Schubert, Schumann, Hugo, 
Wolff, and Richard Strauss. /, //; (6). 

15.^ Fourth Year. Preparation for graduation; deportment; 
diction, interpretation, public recital, the advanced lieder, oratorio, 
and operatic arias classical and modem. I, II; (6). 

Violin' 
Mr. MoRPHY 

i6a. Preparatory Course: First Year. — Methods: Gruen- 
berg. Elementary Violin Lessons; Sevcik, Op. 6, No. i, 2, 3; Sevcik. 
Op. I, No. I to 12. Etudes: F. Hermann, Op. 20, No. i; Wohlfahrt, 
Op. 45, No. i; R. Hofmann, Op. 2^, Book i. Compositions: Oskar 
Rieding. Romance G Major; Rieding, Polonaise; Carl Busch, 
Polonaise A Major; Sitt, Romance Op. 26, No. 3; Beethoven, 
Sonata, Op. 17. I, II; (no credit). 



^Students who major in voice and who are taking Music 15 are required 
to take Music 28. 

-Since it is undesirable and impossible to establish a set course for all 
students, the course outline given above must be taken only as indicating the 
general scope of the work required of each student. 

Each year, before registration, students are requested to have their instru- 
ments inspected by a reliable repairer. 



44^ Music 

i6b. Preparatory Course: Second Year. — Methods: Gruen- 
berg, Foundation Exercises, No. i to 80; Sevcik, Op. i, No. 20, 21, 
22. Etudes: Kayser, Op. 20, Book i; Wohlfahrt, Op. 34; Alard. 
Op. 10, Book I. Compositions: Album of Twenty-five Pieces by 
Lehmann ; Seitz, Concertino, No. 2, G Major; Concertino, No. 5, 
D Major; Huber, Concertino, No. 4, G. Major. I, II; (no credit). 

i6c. Preparatory Course: Third Year. — Methods. Gruenberg, 
Foundation Exercises, No. 81 to 117; Schradieck, Scales; Sev- 
cik. Op. I, No. 13 to 19. Etudes: Kayser, Op. 20, Book 2; Dont, 
Op. 37, Exercises preparatory to Krcutser ; Wohlfahrt, Op. 74, Book 
2. Compositions: Seitz, Concertino, No. i, D Major; No. 3, G. 
Minor; No. 4, D Major; Seybold, Polonaise, Op. 100; Allen, 
Polonaise, Op. 7; Jensen, Romance D Major; Lachner, Taren- 
tella, Op. 93, No. 2; Schubert, Sonatines, Op. 137. I, II; (no credit). 

17. First Year. — Technical Problems: David Violin School, 
Part II, Exercises 64 to 93; Gruenberg, Foundation Exercises, No. 
118 to 159; Schradieck, Violin Technics No. i to 14. Etudes: 
Kreutzer, Forty-two Etudes, including No. 20; E, Herrmann, Dou- 
ble-stopping Exercises, Book i; Sevcik, Preparatory Double-stop- 
ping Exercises, Op 9. Compositions: Mozart, Sonatas (selected) ; 
Accolaj'', Concerto, No. i, A Minor; Dvorak, Sonatine, Op. 100; 
Gossic, Gavotte; Herbert, Cansonetta, Op. 12, No. 4; Beethoven, 
Menuetto, No. 2, G Major, I, II; (6). 

17a. One year. — The first year's work as a minor subject by 
senior collegiate students majoring in piano or voice. /, //; (2). 

18. Second Year. — Problems: David, Violin School, Part II; 
Sevcik, Op. I, Part III; Gruenberg, Foundation Exercises, No. 160 
to 176; Singer, Exercises for developing independence of fingers. 
Etudes: Continuation of Kreutzer, Etudes; Libon, Caprices Op. 15; 
Alard, Ten Etudes brillantes. Op. 16. Compositions: Beethoven. 
Sonates (selected) ; Bruch, Kol Nidrei, Op. 47; Drdla, Souvenir; 
Svendsen, Romance Op. 26; D. van Goens, Scherzo, Op. J2, No. 2; 
Schubert-Remenyi, Serenade; Francois Schubert, The Bee. Op. 13, 

No. 9; L II; (6). 

19. Third Year. — Problems: David, Violin School, Part II; 
Sevcik, Op. 8, Shifting Exercises; Sevcik, Op. 2 and 3, Forty Varia- 
tions for the Bow; Gruenberg, Foundation Exercises No. 181 to 200. 
Etudes: Kreutzer Etudes from No. 30 to 40; Rodes, 24 Caprices; 
Fiorillo, 36 Caprices; Sevcik, Op. i. Part IV; Rovelli, 12 Caprices. 
Compositions: Bach, Concerto No. i, A Minor; No. 2, E Major; 



Music 447 

Beethoven, Romances Op. 40 and ^0; Ch. de Beriot, Scene de 
ballet, Op. 100; Concerto, Op. 104, No. 9; Corelli, La Folia Varia- 
tions; Mozart, Concerto E flat Major; Hauser, Hungarian Rhap- 
sody Op. 43. I, II; (6). 

20.* Fourth Year. — Problems: Sauret, Technical Studies Op. 
36; Sevcik, Op. I, Special Technical Problems; Sevcik. Op. 2, Ex- 
ercises in Bowing. Etudes: Gavinies, 24 Matinees; Paganini, 
24 Caprices Op. i; Tartini, Art of Bowing; Vieuxtemps, Six 
Studies, Op. 16. Compositions: Gade, Sonate, Op. 21; Sjoegren 
Sonate, Op. 24; Rode, Concerto No. 7; Bruch, Concerto Op. 26; 
Rust, Sonate No. i; Spohr, Concerto Op. 47, No. 8; Wieniawski, 
Polonaise, Op. 21; Mendelssohn, Concerto E Minor. I, II; (6). 

Violoncello' 
Assistant Professor Schwartz 

31a, 31b, 31C. Preparatory Course: Three years. At the con- 
clusion of the course the student will be examined upon the fol- 
lowing: DeSwert, Cello Method; Klengel, Technical Studies; 
Litolff, Volkslieder Album, two parts; Marx Markus,, Op. 40; char- 
acteristic pieces. I, II; (no collegiate credit). 

32. First Year. — Dotzanert, Selected Studies; Furino, Polo- 
naise; Golterman, Nocturnes; Kengel, Concertino. Op. y. I, II; 
(6). 

ZZ- Second Year. — Lee Studies : Op. 31, No. i; Romberg, Op. 
42, 46, 65; Golterman, Concerto in G. I, II; (6). 

34. Third Year. — Lee Studies : Op. 31. No. 2; Golterman, Con- 
certo in D; Klengel, Concertstiick in D. I, II; (7). 

Public School Music 
Assistant Professor Constance Barlow-Smith 

23a. Ear Training, First Year. — Two hours a week; re- 
quired of all music students. I, II; (no credit). 

23b. Ear Training, Second Year. — Two hours a week; re- 
quired of students in the Course in Music in the sophomore year, 
and of students in the course in Public School Music. /, //; (i). 



'Students who major in violin and are taking Music 20 are required to 
take Music 28. 

^Since it is undesirable and impossible to establish a set course for all 
students, the course outline given above must be taken only as indicating the 
general scope of the work required of each student. 



448 Philosophy 

24a. Sight Singing, First Year. — Two hours a week; re- 
quired of students in the Course in Music in the sophomore year, 
and of students in the Course in Public School Music. I, II; (no 
credit). 

24b. Sight Singing, Second Year. — Two hours a week; re- 
quired of students in the Course in Music in the junior year, and 
of students in the Course in Public School Music. /, //; (i). 

25. Methods of Teaching. — Elements of theory, eye and ear 
training, the limitations of the child-voice, selection of material, 
pedagogical presentations, appreciation work for the high school 
(Offered primarily for students who desire to teach music suc- 
cessfully in the public schools.) /, //; (4). 

Band, Orchestra, and Ensemble Work 

21. University Orchestra. — Two-hour rehearsal once a week. 
I, II; (i). Professor Mills 

22. University Choral Society, — One-hour rehearsal once a 
week. /, //; (yi). Professor Mills 

26. Band Instruments. — Wind instruments in band, orches- 
tra, or solo work. /, //; (no credit). Mr. Harding 

27. Ensemble Class. — Trios, quartets, and quintets by class- 
ical and modern composers. (Open to all students who are suffi- 
ciently advanced to undertake the course profitably.) 1, II; no 
credit. 

28. Recital. — Required of all students majoring in a practical 
subject. /, (2); //, (3). 

PALEONTOLOGY 
(See Geology la, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21.) 

PHILOLOGY 

(See Classics, English Language and Literature, Germanic 
Languages and Literature, and Romance Languages 

and Literature.) 

PHILOSOPHY 
(See also Psychology and Education.) 

Arthur Hill Daniels, Ph.D., Professor 
Boyd Henry Bode, Ph.D.. Professor 



Philosophy 449 

Queen Lois Shepherd, Ph.D., Instructor 
Denton Loring Geyer, A.M., Assistant 

Honors 
Candidates for honors in philosophy must offer : 

1. In the major subject, 24 hours, 6 of which must be in 
psychology. 

2. Minors in either : psychology (at least 6 hours in addition 
to the amount of psychology required for the major) and any one 
other subject listed below; or any two subjects from the same 
group— 

(a) Economics; history, political science; education; sociology'. 

(b) English; French; German; Greek; Latin. 

(c) Botany; chemistry; mathematics; physics; zoology. 

No course in any subject of the above groups may be counted 
for the minor requirement if it is excluded from the major require- 
ment of its respective department. 

Students who make philosophy a major should take at least one 
year of psychology. With the exception of i and 10, no course in 
philosophy may be taken before the completion of two years of 
university work. 

1. Logic. — The principles of reasoning; detection of fallacies; 
evidence. /; (3). Professor Bode, Dr. Shepherd 

Prerequisite: One year of university work. 

lb. Logic. — (The same as i.) //; (3). 

Professor Bode, Dr. Shepherd 

2. Introduction to Philosophy. — The relation of philosophy to 
modern science; problems of philosophy; representative forms of 
philosophic theory. //; (3). Professor Bode 

9. Political and Social Ethics. — Moral principles applied to 
political and social relations. /; (2). Professor Daniels 

[10. The Philosophic Thought of the Nineteenth Century 
as Reflected in English Literature. — Wordsworth; Carlyle; 
Emerson; Tennyson; Browning; Arnold. /; (2). Not given, 
1913-14. Professor Bode] 

advanced courses for undergraduates and graduates 

3. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. — The development of 
speculative thought; Greek philosophers; the medieval period. I; 
(3)- Professor Daniels 

Prerequisite : Three hours in philosophy. 



450 Philosophy 

4. History of Modern Philosophy. — Problems and conceptions 
in philosophy from Descartes to the present time. Selections from 
the masterpieces of this period. //; (3). Professor Daniels 

Prerequisite: Three hours in philosophy. 

7. Ethics. — The beginnings and growth of morality; leading 
conceptions of moral theory ; .typical social and economic prob- 
lems of the present. //; (3). Professor Daniels 

Prerequisite: Three hours in philosophy. 

8. Esthetics. — The appreciation of art and nature; place of 
such appreciation in life; primitive arts and appreciation; modifica- 
tions of the esthetic (such as the sublime and the ugly) ; the fine 
arts. /; (3). 

Prerequisite: An elementary course in philosophy or psychol- 
ogy. 

II. Philosophy of Religion. — The philosophical interpretation 
of religious consciousness ; various religious concepts : God ; reve- 
lation ; inspiration, dogma ; faith ; prayer ; immortality ; evil ; mo- 
rality and religion. //; (2). Professor Daniels 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; six hours in psy- 
chology, philosophy, or both. 

15. The British Philosophers of the Eighteenth Century. — 
Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. /; (3). Professor Bode 

Prerequisite : Philosophy 2 or 3 or 4. 

16. American Philosophy. — //; (3), Professor Bode 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 15. 

17. Advanced Logic. — /, (3). Dr. Shepherd 
Prerequisite: Philosophy i. 

18. Logical Theory in its Bearing on Philosophical Prob- 
lems. — //; (3). Dr. Shepherd 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 17. 

19. The Development of Religious Thought in the Eight- 
eenth AND Nineteenth Centuries. — /; (3). Dr. Shepherd 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 2 or 3 or 4. 

courses for graduates 

loi. The Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. — Twice a 
week; I; (i unit). Professor Daniels 

102. Seminar. — Contemporary Philosophy. — The Philosophy 
of Bergson. Twice a week. I, II; (/ unit). Professor Bode 



J 



Physical Training 451 

103. Seminar: Ethical Theory. — Twice a week; I, II; (i 
unit). Professor Daniels 

[104. The Philosophy of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. — 
Twice a week; I; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14. 

Professor Daniels] 

[105. The Philosophy of Kant and Schopenhauer. — Tzvice 
a week; II; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14- Professor Daniels] 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

FOR MEN 

George A Huff, Director 

Harry Lovering Gill, Instructor, Track 

Roy Newton Fargo, B.S., Instructor and Director of the Men's 

Gymnasium 
Edward John Manley, Instructor, Swim'mi>ig 
Ira Thompson Carrithers, A.B., Instructor, Intra-Mural Athletics 
Henry Eugene Pengilly, Instructor, Fencing 
Ralph Jones, Assistant 

1. Gymnasium Practise. — Two hours' gymnasium drill each 
week. (Required of freshmen.) /, //; (i); arrange time. 

Mr. Fargo 
la. Personal Hygiene. — Six lectures. Required in conjunc- 
tion with Physical Training i. /. Dean Clark 

2. Gymnasium Practise, — Two hours each week in advanced 
heavy apparatus work. /, II ; arrange time. Mr. Fargo 

FOR women 

Gertrltde Evelyn Moulton, A.B., Director 

Verna Brooks, A.B., Instructor 

Anna Lue Hughitt, Assistant 

Dorothy Ruth Shoemaker, A.B., Assistant 

Marion Charlotte Landee, Assistant 

Rosa-Lee Gaut^ Mus.B., Assistant 

7. Practise. — Class work ; individual experimentation in per- 
sonal hygiene; individual corrective work; games. Required of 
freshmen. I, II; (i). 

Miss Moulton, Miss Brooks, Miss Hughitt, Miss Shoemaker, 
Miss Landee 

8. Practise. — (Continuation of 7. Second year, elective). /, 
//; (i). Miss Brooks, Miss Hughitt, Miss Shoemaker 



452 Physics 

g. Hygiene. — Required of freshmen. /; (i). 

Assistant Dean Kyle 

10. Teachers' Course. — Third year. Theory, one hour; prac- 
tise in the gymnasium and in the public playgrounds. I, II. 

Miss MouLTON, Miss Brooks 

11. Teachers' Course. — Fourth year. Theory, one hour; prac- 
tise in the gymnasium. /, //. Miss Hughitt 

PHYSICS 

Albert Pruden Carman, D.Sc, Professor 

Charles Tobias Knipp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Floyd Rowe Watson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

William Frederick Schulz, E.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Jakob Kunz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Mathematical Physics 

Elmer Howard Williams, Ph.D., Associate 

Glenn Alfred Shook, A.B., Instructor 

Orrin Harold Smith, A.M., Assistant 

Lloyd Theodore Jones, A.M., Assistant 

Oscar Alan Randolph, M.S., Assistant 

Earle Horace Warner, A.B., Assistant 

Sebastian Karrar, A.M., Assistant 

William Harry Bair, B.S., Assistant 

Jonas Bernard Nathanson, A.M., Assistant 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

I. General Physics. — Lectures with class-room demonstra- 
tions; recitations; written exercises. (For sophomores in engi- 
neering, mathematics, physics, and chemistry.) /; (3), //; (2). 

Professor Carman, Assistant Professor Schulz, Mr. Shook, 

Mr. Smith, Mr. Jones, Mr. Warner, Mr. Bair 
Prerequisite: Freshman mathematics; registration in Physics 3. 

3. Physical Measurements. — Laboratory experiments ; quizzes 
in connection with Physics i. I, II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Schulz, Mr. Shook, Mr. Smith, Mr. Jones, 

Mr. Warner, Mr. Bair 

Prerequisite : Registration in Physics i or credit for the same. 

2a. General Physics. — Lectures, with class-room demonstra- 



Physics 453 

tions; recitations. (For students in courses in arts and science.) 

/. //; (2/2). 

Assistant Professor Watson, Dr. Williams, Mr. Karrar 
Prerequisite: Completion of or registration in trigonometry 
(Mathematics 3 or 4) ; registration in Physics 2b. 

2b. Introductory Laboratory Physics. — Physical measure- 
ments. I, II; (2^). Dr. Williams, Mr. Karrar 
Prerequisite : Registration in Physics 2a. 

6a. General Physics. — Lectures, with class-room demonstra- 
tions; recitations. (For students in architecture.) /, //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Watson, Dr. Williams, Mr. Karrar 

Prerequisite: Trigonometry (Mathematics 3 or 4) ; registration 
in Physics 6b. 

6b. Introductory Laboratory Physics. — Physical measure- 
ments. /, //; (2H). Dr. Williams, Mr. Karrar 

Prerequisite: Registration in Physics 6a. 

15. Electricity and Magnetism. — Two recitations or lectures 
weekly, using Brooks and Poyser's Electricity and Magnetism; one 
laboratory exercise weekly. /; (3). Assistant Professor Knipp 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b. 

16. Heat. — /; (3). Assistant Professor Watson 
Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b. 

17. Light. — Recitations; laboratory. Edser's Light. II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Schulz 
Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b. 

18. Teachers' Course. — / or //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Watson 
Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b. 

advanced courses for graduates and undergraduates 

4. Electrical and IMagnetic Measurements. — Exact electri- 
cal and magnetic measurements with accompanying theory. Labo- 
ratory exercises; discussions; recitations. I, II; (2). 

Assistant Professor Knipp, Mr. Randolph, Mr. Nathanson 
Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b; Mathematics 7, 9. 

14. Mechanics and Advanced General Physics. — Theoretical 
physics involving the calculus. Dynamics, with a brief introduc- 
tion to thermodynamics. /; (3). Professor Carman 

Prerequisite: A course in general physics, such as Physics 2a 
and 2b, or i and 3, and a course in calculus. 



454 Physics 

2oa. Light. — Special phenomena ; modern theories ; readings 
in texts of Drude, Wood, and Preston. Lectures; recitations. / 
or //; (2). Assistant Professor Schulz 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b; Mathematics 7, 9; or 8a. 

2ob. Light. — Light measurements. Laboratory. I or II ; (2 
to 5). Assistant Professor Schulz 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b; Physics 17 desired. 

[21, Recent Advances in Physical Science. — Lectures illus- 
trated by experiments. //; (i). Not given, 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Knipp] 

23. Sound. — //; (2). Assistant Professor Watson 

25. Heat. — //; (2). Assistant Professor Watson 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; or 2a, 2b; Physics 16 advised. 

[29. Electrical Oscillations. — Oscillating currents of both 
low and high frequencies, with particular attention in the second 
semester to the theory of wave telegraphy and telephony. /, II; 
(3). Not given, 1913-14. Professor Carman 

Prerequisite: Physics i, 3; Mathematics 7, 9.] 

30a. Introduction to Theoretical Electricity. — Electrical 
phenomena discussed with calculus methods. Lectures; recita- 
tions; occasional demonstrations. Foster and Porter's Electricity 
and Magnetism; II; (3). Assistant Professor Knipp 

30b. Electricity and Magnetism. — Electrical measurements; 
self and mutual induction; standardization and calibration work; 
electrical discharge through gases. / or //; (2 to 5). 

Assistant Professor Knipp, Dr. Williams 

31. Special Problems in Advanced Physical Measurements. — 
(2 or 3). 

Professor Carman, Assistant Professors Knipp, Watson, and 
Schulz, Dr. Williams 

courses for graduates 

The prerequisite for graduate work in physics is a college 
course in general physics with a year's laboratory course in intro- 
ductory physical measurements. The student who is to do major 
work in physics should also have had additional courses in physics 
or teaching experience, unless the training in his minor subjects, 
mathematics or chemistry, has been strong and complete. He 
should also have a knowledge of French and German sufficient 
to use references in these languages. The courses named below 



Physics 455 

are those open for candidates for the Master's or Doctor's de- 
gree. A large part of the last year's work of the candidate for 
the Doctor's degree is investigational, along either the experimen- 
tal or the theoretical side of physics. In addition to these major 
graduate courses, the courses in elementary dynamics, heat, light, 
electrical measurements, and introductory electrical theory, are ar- 
ranged with certain additions for graduate credit. The "interme- 
diate" courses on heat, light, and electricity and magnetism may 
be offered by students making a minor in physics. 

[i2i. Recent Advances in Physical Science. — Lectures illus- 
trated by experiments on the more recent developments of physics. 
Written reports giving an original discussion of one or more of 
the topics discussed during the semester. Not given, 1913-14. 
Once a week; I ; (y2 unit). Assistant Professor Knipp] 

123. Sound. — Lectures and recitations. Raj-leigh's Sound, Auer- 
bach's Akustik and Barton's Sound are used as reference texts. 
Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Watson 

124. Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. — Laboratory 
problems with readings and discussions on the electrical conductiv- 
it}"- of gases, ions and ionisation, the effect of a magnetic field, the 
motion of ions, spark discharge, cathode rays, Roentgen rays, 
canal or positive rays, and related phenomena of radioactivity. 
Three times a week; I, II; (2 to 2 units). 

Assistant Professor Knipp 

126. Physics Colloquium. — Weekly meetings of the instruc- 
tors and advanced students of the department for the presenta- 
tion and discussion of papers on current problems in Physics. 
Many of these papers are on investigations in progress in the labo- 
ratory and experimental demonstrations are used. Attendance on 
this colloquium is expected of all the graduate students tho it is 
not registered except in the cases of those making special reports 
on original investigations. Once a week; I, II; (]4 io V2 unit). 

127. Electron Theory. — Seminar. The theories of the consti- 
tution of the atom, and the phenomena of the emission and absorp- 
tion spectra. (Of especial interest to students in advanced chem- 
istry.) Twice a week; II; (>4 to i unit). 

Assistant Professor Kunz 

131. Investigation of Special Problems. — Advanced labora- 
tory or design and calculation. A problem worked out with the 



456 Physics 

advice and direction of the instructor. Two to four times a week; 
I, II; {i to 2 units). 

Professor Carman, Assistant Professors Knipp, Watson, 
ScHULZ and Kunz, and Dr. Williams 

132. Mathematical Physics. — Special phases in theoretical 
physics. 

(a) Dynamics. — First part: dynamics of a material system,, 
determination of the center of gravity, moment of inertia and po- 
tential, potential theory, with applications in celectial mechanics. 
Second part: the principle of least action. Lagrange's equations,, 
the theory of the top and its applications. The fundamental 
equations of elasticity, hydrodynamics, of the electromagnetic field 
and the second principle of thermodynamics for reversible pro- 
cesses deduced from the principle of least action. Three times a 
week; I, II; (i to 1^/2 units). Assistant Professor Kunz 

[(b) Electrodynamics. — Lectures; collateral reading. Prob- 
lems from Jean's Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Mag- 
netism; the potential theory: spherical harmonics, conjugate 
functions, and some theorems of the vector analysis; capacities, 
coefficients of self, and mutual induction ; theory of absolute 
electrical measurements and the condenser discharge with its ap- 
plication in wireless telegraphy; Maxwell's theory with some appli- 
cations in optics, such as the optical properties of metals ; modern 
modifications of Maxwell's theory: the theory of relativity and the 
electromagnetic emission theory of light. (Continued in the fol- 
lowing year in course I32d. Not given, 1913-14.) 

Assistant Professor Kunz] 

[ (c) Thermodynamics. — Fundamental principles with applica- 
tions to physical and chemical phenomena. Lectures ; recitations. 
Three times a week; I, II. Not given, 1913-14. 

Assistant Professor Kunz] 

(d) Theory of Electrical Oscillations and Cylindrical 
Harmonics. — The conduction of heat and electricity through cyl- 
inders and cables leads to the introduction of cylindrical har- 
monies of real arguments. Their mathematical properties will be 
studied. Electrical oscillations along parallel wires, the vibrations 
from a Wertz oscillator and from antenna, the resonance phe- 
nomena between sending and receiving stations, the propagation of 
electrical waves over the surface of the earth and their absorption 
will be studied in the first part of the course. Cylindrical and 



Physiology 457 

spherical harmonies will then be used for the solution of special 
problems, such as the resistance and self induction of wires. Ap- 
plications of cylindrical harmonies will finally be made for phe- 
nomena in optics and radiation of light and heat. Four times a 
week; I, II; (i to 2 units). Assistant Professor Kunz 

133. Seminar. — Three or five times a week; /, //; (i to j 
units). 

Professor Carman, Assistant Professors Knipp, Watson, 
ScHULZ, Kunz 

PHYSIOLOGY 

William Edward Bltige, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
Joseph Howard Beard, A.M., M.D., Instructor 
Alma Jessie Neill, A.B., Assistant 

Of the courses outlined below, i and 2 are designed primarily 
for medical students, or for those intending to specialize in his- 
tolog\' or physiology; course 4 is for students desiring a course 
in general physiology; courses 3, 5 may be taken by seniors in the 
medical course, and course 103 by graduate students. 

The laboratory is equipped for the pursuance of research in- 
volving the use of apparatus necessary for physiological, histolog- 
ical, bacteriological, and chemical work. 

1. Histology. — Fundamental mammalian tissues; microscopic 
anatomy of the organs. Lectures and laboratory. (Full medical 
credit in histology.) /; (5). Assistant Professor Burge, Dr. Beard 

Prerequisite: Physics 2a; Chemistry i, 2, 3, 5a, 9, 9c; Zoology 
2, 3- 

2. Experimental Physiology. — Physiology of nerve and mus- 
cle ; circulation ; respiration ; secretion ; digestion ; metabolism. 
Lectures and laboratory. (Full medical credit in physiolog\'.) //; 
(10). Assistant Professor Burge, Dr. Beard, Miss Neill 

Prerequisite: The same as for Physiology i. 

3. Undergraduate Thesis. — (For undergraduates who wish a 
thesis course.) 

4. General Physiology, Chemical and Experimental. — Lec- 
ture demonstrations; recitations; laboratory work. /; (5). 

Assistant Professor Burge, Dr. Beard, Miss Neill 
Prerequisite: Chemistry i; Zoology i. 

5. Special Physiology. — (For advanced students who wish to 
take up a special line of work not specified in one of the other 



458 Political Science 

courses and not involving the preparation of a thesis.) Labora- 
tory; conferences. I, II; (3 hours or more). 

Assistant Professor Burge, Dr. Beaed 
Prerequisite: The consent of the head of the department. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

103. Research. — Once a week; I, II; (i to 2 units). 

Assistant Professor Burge, Dr. Beard 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(See also Economics, History, and Sociology.) 

James Wilford Garner, Ph.D., Professor 
♦John Archibald Fairlie, Ph.D., Professor 
Walter Fairleigh Dodd, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
John Mabry Mathew^s, Ph.D., Associate 
Alfred Chester Hanford, A.M., Assistant 
Russell McCulloch Storey, A.M., Assistant 

Honors 
For honors in political science : 

1. The major of 24 hours in political science may, with the 
consent of the department, include courses in constitutional his- 
tory (History 4 and 14), political philosophy (Philosophy 5), or 
not exceeding 6 hours in law. 

2. One minor must be history, in which courses must be offered 
aggregating not less than 12 hours. The other minor may be 
economics, sociology, or philosophy, aggregating not less than 9 
hours. 

3. A reading knowledge of one modern language is advised. 

courses for undergraduates 

Courses i and 3 are intended to furnish a general survey of 
the field of national, state, and local government in the United 
States, and should be taken by all students who expect to special- 
ize in political science. 

I. American National Government. — Historical development, 
organization, powers, limitations, and practical working of the na- 
tional government in the United States. /; (3). 

Professor Garner, Dr. Mathews, Mr. Hanford 

Prerequisite: Thirty hours of university work, 

3. State and Local Government. — Powers, obligations, and 



*0n leave, second semester. 



Political Science 459 

rights of the states, in the Federal Union ; formation and admis- 
sion of states ; development of state constitutions ; organization of 
state and local government; political methods. (A continuation of 
course i; may be taken independently). //; (3). 

Professor Garner, Dr. Mathews, Mr. Hanford 
Prerequisite: Thirty hours of university work. 

16. Government of Illinois. — Constitutional development; or- 
ganization and administration of state and local government; the 
legislature; the executive; the judiciary; state officers and in- 
stitutions; county, town, and municipal government. //; (2). 

Professor Garner, Assistant Professor Dodd, Dr. Mathews 

Prerequisite: Thirty hours of university work, 

ADVANCED COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

(At least junior standing required) 

4. Municipal Government. — The growth of cities; municipal 
organization and functions in the United States ; the mayor and 
council ; commission governm.ent ; police, light, and water supply ; 
city planning ; urban transportation ; municipal ownership and reg- 
ulation of public utilities ; charities ; education. Lectures ; assigned 
readings; reports. /; (3). Professor Fairlie 

Prerequisite: One course in political science or Economics i. 

5. Constitutional Law of the United States. — The judicial 
interpretation of the constitution of the United States; judicial 
power to declare laws unconstitutional ; separation of governmental 
powers ; relation between state and national governments ; funda- 
mental rights under the constitution (due process of law, con- 
tract) ; territories and dependencies ; national powers with respect 
to taxation, commerce; jurisdiction of United States courts. /; (4). 

Assistant Professor Dodd 
Prerequisite: Political Science i. 

6. International Law. — The development of the law of na- 
tions ; its nature, source, and present status ; the equality of 
states ; the doctrine of intervention ; the laws of war and peace ; the 
rights and duties of neutrals ; the arbitration movement. Lectures ; 
assigned readings; reports. /; (3). Professor Garner 

Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing, or junior standing 
with 6 hours of history, 5 hours of political science. 

7. American Diplomacy. — Genesis and present organization of 
the Department of State; the diplomatic service; the treaty-making 
power; the methods and traditional principles of the foreign pol- 



460 Political Science 

icy of the United States ; historical review of the principal diplo- 
matic controversies between the United States and foreign powers 
from the foundation of the government to the present time ; the 
rise of the United States to the position of a world power. //; (3). 
Given in 1913-14 and in alternate years, alternating with Course 18. 

Dr. Mathews 
Prerequisite: Junior standing and Political Science i or His- 
tory .3- 

9. Principles of Jurisprudence. — The nature of law; histor- 
ical development of Roman and English legal systems ; English 
common law in the United States ; sources of law and relation be- 
tween statutes and judicial decisions; brief discussion of the va- 
rious branches of law (crime, tort, contract) and their relation to 
one another. /; (3). Assistant Professor Dodd 

Prerequisite: Course i or its equivalent; junior standing. 

10. Administrative Law in the United States. — Separation 
of governmental powers and delegation of legislative power ; fed- 
eral and state administrative organizations; powers of administra- 
tive officers; methods of enforcing governmental commands; 
remedies of the individual against unlawful action of public offi- 
cials (civil suit, criminal action, mandamus, injunction). //; (3). 

Assistant Professor Dodd 
Prerequisite: Course 5 and at least junior standing. 

11. Constitutional Aspects of Social and Industrial Prob- 
lems. — The police power for the protection of the public safety, 
health, and welfare : constitutional limitations upon legislation con- 
cerning the public health and safety, the control of public service 
corporations and combinations of capital, and labor legislation. 
II; (3). Assistant Professor Dodd 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and at least 5 hours in political 
science; Political Science 5, or Economics 12 recommended. 

[12. National Administration. — Administrative powers of the 
President and Congress ; executive departments and administrative 
services of the national government; judicial administration and 
the relation of the courts to the executive authorities. Not given, 
1913-14. //; (3). Professor Fairlie 

Prerequisite: Political Science i.] 

13. State Administration in the United States. — The ad- 
ministrative position of the governor, and the organization of the 
state administrative departments ; state administrative disintegra- 



Political Science 461 

tion and the influence of the diffusion of executive power upon the 
enforcement of state law ; organization and powers of state boards, 
commissions, and quasi-judicial tribunals; tendencies toward cen- 
tralization in the administration of taxation, education, and other 
state functions; methods of control over state administrative offi- 
cers. /; (3). Dr. Mathews 
Prerequisite: Political Science 3 or its equivalent. 

14. Political Parties and Methods. — Development of polit- 
ical parties; party organization and methods in the United States 
and Great Britain; recent legislation on primary elections and 
corrupt practises, I; (2). Professor Fairlie 

Prerequisite: One course in political science. 

[18. World Politics. — The main currents of international pol- 
itics in Europe since the Treaty of Berlin ; the balance of power, 
the mutual relations and present grouping of the principal Euro- 
pean states, and the extension of their interests in the Near and 
Far East; the colonial expansion of the United States since the 
Spanish War, and the present position of the United States as a 
world power. //; (3). Dr. Mathews 

Prerequisite: Junior standing and History i ; History 20 recom- 
mended.] 

21. British GtOVernment. — Political institutions in the United 
Kingdom and the British possessions: the Crown; the Cabinet; the 
House of Commons ; the House of Lords ; the party system ; the 
courts of law ; local government ; government in the Crown Colo- 
nies and the self-governing colonies ; recent developments and 
proposed changes. (Open to graduate students and to seniors 
who have had six hours in political science.) /; (3). 

Professor Fairlie 

22. Continental European Governments. — The national po- 
litical systems of France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, and 
Switzerland ; constitutional beginnings ; political organizations ; 
methods of legislation and administration ; constitutional guaran- 
ties for the protection of individual rights. (Open to graduate 
students and seniors who have had six hours in political science ; 
History 20 recommended.) //; (3). Professor Garner 

28. Problems of Contemporary Politics. — Some larger ques- 
tions of present day politics, domestic and foreign : the initiative 
and the referendum ; proportional representation ; state socialism ; 
universal suffrage; electoral reform; local self-government; judi- 



462 Psychology 

cial reform, parliamentary government, the Monroe Doctrine. Re- 
ports by individual members of the class and general discussion. 
//; (2). Professor Garner 

Prerequisite : Senior or graduate standing. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

loi. History of Political Theories. — Development and his- 
tory of ancient, medieval, and modern political thought; political 
theories of Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mon- 
tesquieu, and others ; evolution of American political ideas. Given 
in 1913-14 and in alternate years, alternating with Course 102. 
Twice a week ; (i unit). Professor Garner 

[102. The Nature of the State, — The principles, methods, and 
relations of political science ; the origin, nature, forms, and func- 
tions of the state ; sovereignty and liberty ; citizenship and nation- 
ality ; constitutions ; principles of political organization. Given 
every other year, alternating with Course loi. Not given, 1913-14. 
Twice a week; I ; (i unit). Professor Garner] 

103. Seminar in Political Science and Public Law. — Special 
problems ; reports ; discussions and criticism. The research work 
of candidates who are writing theses is under the direction of some 
instructor, to whom they report frequently. Once a week; I, II. 

[104. Municipal Administration. — Municipal organization 
and functions in the United States and Europe : the relations be- 
tween city and state; local organization; political methods and 
reform movements ; police and health administration ; public works ; 
municipal ownership ; public regulation of public utilities. The 
topics vary from year to year. Lectures ; reading ; special reports. 
Not given, 1913-14. Three times a week; II; (i^A units). 

Professor Fairlie] 

105. Special Topics in Constitutional Law of the United 
States. — Subject for 1913-14: Judicial Power over Legislation. 
Twice a week; II; (j unit). Assistant Professor Dodd 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Madison Bentley, Ph.D., Professor 

Arthur Howard Sutherland, Ph.D., Associate ' 

Christian Alban Ruckmich, Ph.D., Instructor 

Thomas Franklin Vance, Ph.D., Assistant 



Psychology 463 

The departmental laboratories occupy 23 rooms. They make 
provision for (i) research, (2) undergraduate instruction in drill- 
courses, (3) demonstrations in the lecture-room, (4) the testing 
of mental capacity and of mental defect, and (5) the study of the 
animal mind. The laboratory contains standard equipment and 
such special pieces as apparatus for spectroscopical problems, for 
chronoscopic methods, and for studies in memory and association. 
Special provision is made for optical and acoustical experiments. 
There are five dark-rooms, installations for electric and pneumatic 
intercommunication between rooms, supplies of alternating and di- 
rect current, gas, and compressed air. Special requirements of in- 
vestigational studies are met either within the laboratory's shop or 
by requisition upon the American and European makers of ap- 
paratus. The departmental library contains files of foreign and 
American journals. It includes a working collection for experi- 
mental and historical studies. A conference-room is provided for 
the use of advanced students. 

Honors 

Candidates for honors in psycholog}'- must offer : 

1. A major group of 24 semester hours. This group is to 
be made up from courses announced in psycholog>'- ; except that 
6 hours within the group may be chosen from one or more of 
the following subjects: Philosophy i, 2, 4; Physics i, 2a, 2b, 3; 
Zoology I, 3, 13, 13a ; Animal Husbandry 30. At least 6 of the 
hours in psychology must be taken in laboratory courses. 

2. Two minor groups. These groups are to be selected from 
subjects which are related to psychology, such as physiology, edu- 
cation, zoology, neurolog}', philosophy, genetics, sociolog>', and 
physics. The constitution of each of the minor groups will be de- 
termined by consultation with the department of psychology'. Each 
group must contain at least nine semester hours, and both groups 
at least twenty-four hours. 

The more elementary courses are designed to contribute to the 
general cultivation of undergraduate students, to illustrate scien- 
tific method at large, and to lay the foundations of the mental 
sciences. The intermediate courses are in part informative and 
in part cultural. Their primary aim is to set forth the facts and 
the laws of mind. The conduct of research looks first toward the 
extension of the field of psychology. The more advanced instruc- 
tion does not overlook, however, the needs of senior and graduate 
students whose chief interest lies in related disciplines. 



464 Psychology 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Introduction to Psychology. — The standpoint and the meth- 
ods of psychology ; the simple processes, attention and percep- 
tion. Emotive and volitional complexes; association, memory, ac- 
tion and thought. Lectures; sectional meetings. /; (3). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Sutherland, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 
Prerequisite : One year of university work. 

2. General Psychology. — Mental inheritance, habit, custom, 
and fashion ; the relations of psychology to the biological and so- 
cial sciences ; comparative and genetic psychology, and the psychol- 
ogy of the abnormal ; applications of psychology to the arts and 
professions. //; (3). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Sutherland, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 
Prerequisite: Psychology i. 

3. Laboratory Practise. — Scientific method; classical experi- 
ments in the fields of sensation, affection, attention, and action. 
(Introductory to the pursuit of special problems and to psycholog- 
ical research.) / or II; (2). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 

4. Laboratory Practise (Intermediate.) — Experiments in mem- 
ory, association, learning, and thought. A part of the term may be 
devoted either to the material methods of psychophysics or to the 
solution of a small qualitative problem. / or //; (2). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 

courses for undergraduates and graduates 

5. Comparative Psychology. — Mind in the various animal 
forms ; the psychological implications of the bionomic doctrine of 
descent ; a comparison of human and animal minds ; criticism of 
current literature. (Recommended to students who intend to do 
advanced work either in animal psychology or in the study of be- 
havior.) Laboratory exercises. /; (2). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 
Prerequisite: Psychology i. 

6. G)MPARATivE Psychology : Advanced Laboratory. — Individ- 
ual studies in animal psychology. //; (2-4). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 
Prerequisite: Psychology i and 5. 

7. The Image and Imagination. — Methods of studying the 



Psychology 465 

image and the imaginative functions; types of imagery. Lectures; 
reading; demonstrations. /; (2). Dr. Sutherland 

Prerequisite: Psychology i and 2. 

8. Memory and Association. — Recollection, recognition, re- 
production ; forms of the associative consciousness ; experimental 
methods. Demonstrations; lectures; practise. //; (2). 

Dr. Sutherland 

Prerequisite : Psychology i and 2. 

10. German Reading. — Translation into English of H. Ebbing- 
haus : Abriss der Psychologie. I; (i). Professor Bentley 

11. Studies in Mental Development. — Observation and de- 
scription, at first-hand, of developmental changes in mind ; literature 
of skill and efficiency. /; (3). Dr. Sutherland 

Prerequisite: Psychology i and 2. 

12. Minor Problems (Advanced Laboratory). — The formu- 
lation of methods suitable to new problems, and the conduct of small 
investigations. At the discretion of the department, studies in the 
current literature or the presentation of essays upon historical sub- 
jects may be substituted for laboratory problems. I, II; (2-5). 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Sutherland, Dr. Ruckmich, Dr. Vance 
Prerequisite : Psychology i, 2, 3. 

15. The Psychological Basis of Music. — An elementary 
course. Summ.ary of experimental and theoretical literature on the 
origin of music, harmony, melody, rhjthm, consonance, tonal qual- 
ity; psychology of musical appreciation and performance. /, II; 
(2). Dr. Ruckmich 

17. The History of Psychology. — The rise and development, in 
recent times, of the science of psychology. Lectures and reading. 
//; (2). Dr. Sutherland 

Prerequisite: Psychology i, 2, and one other course. 

courses for graduates 

103. — Research. — Advanced problems; theses offered for grad- 
uate degrees. I, II. 

Professor Bentley, Dr. Sutherland, Dr. Ruckmich 

105. — Seminar. — Weekly meetings for the discussion of cur- 
rent topics considered in their historical setting. I, II. 

Professor Bentlf.y 



466 Raihvay Engineering 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
(See Rhetoric under English Language and Literature.) 

RAILWAY ENGINEERING 

♦William Freeman Myrick Goss, M.S., D.Eng., Director, Pro- 
fessor 

Edward Charles Schmidt, M.E., Professor 

John McBeath Snodgrass, B.S., Assistant Professor, Railway Me- 
chanical Engineering 

Alonzo Morris Buck, M.E., Assistant Professor, Railway Electrical 
Engineering 

Arthur Francis Comstock, C.E.^ Associate, Railway Civil Engi- 
neering 

Robert Browder Keller, B.S., First Assistant, Engineering Experi- 
ment Station 

Harold Houghton Dunn, B.S., Assistant, Engineering Experiment 
Station 

Railway Civil Engineering — Courses 31-50. 
Railway Electrical Engineering — Courses 61-65. 
Railway Mechanical Engineering — Courses 1-30. 

railway mechanical engineering 

1. Locomotives. — The mechanics of the locomotive ; problems re- 
lating to its operation ; the engine and valve mechanism ; counter- 
balancing; the determination of tractive effort; tonnage rating prob- 
lems; the development of types. (The course is co-ordinated with 
courses 2 and 8.) /; (2). Professor Schmidt 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 9; Mechanical 
Engineering 3, 15, 16. 

2. Locomotive Design. — Calculations and designs of engine and 
boiler details; current standards and proportions. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Snodgrass 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 3, 4, 5, 15, 16; Theoretical 
and Applied Mechanics 9; registration in Railway Engineering i. 

3. Shops and Auxiliary Equipment. — The design and equip- 
ment of railway shops and roundhouses ; their management and or- 
ganization, supplemented by shop visits; water purifying plants and 
pumping stations; air-brake equipment. //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Snodgrass 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 3, 4; Chemistry ib or la. 

•On leave. 



Raihvay Engineering 467 

4. Locomotive Performance. — Locomotive boiler and engine 
performance; the influence upon performance of combustion rate, 
steam pressure, speed, cut-off and other valve relations, compound- 
ing, and superheating. /; (2). Assistant Professor Snodgrass 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 8; Mechanical 
Engineering 3, 4, 5, 15, 16. 

7. Advanced Design. — Problems in locomotive and car design. 
//; (3). Professor Schmidt, Assistant Professor Snodgrass 

Prerequisite: Railway Engineering 2. 

8. Dynamometer Car Tests. — Investigation of train resistance 
and locomotive tractive effort, by the use of the raihvay test car. 
Discussion and exemplification of the application of the results to 
the determination of tonnage ratings. /; (2). Mr. Keller 

Prerequisite: Open to seniors in raihvay courses only. 

10. Seminar. — Discussion of current topics and review of rail- 
way journals. Assigned topics and reports. /, //; (i). 

Professor Schmidt, Assistant Professor Buck, Assistant Pro- 
fessor Snodgrass, Mr. Com stock 
Prerequisite: Open to seniors in railway courses only. 

11. Railway Tests. — Train resistance on steam roads and work 
with the electric test car. (For students in other departments of 
the College of Engineering.) //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Snodgrass, Assistant Professor Buck, 

Mr. Kjxler 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 3; Electrical Engineer- 
ing 6. 

30. Thesis. — Independent solution of some problem or investi- 
gation of some subject. The thesis may consist of a design or of an 
original experimental investigation, or it may be the analysis and 
discussion of data already in existence. II; (3). 

Professor Schmidt, Assistant Professor Snodgrass, Assistant 
Professor Buck, Mr. Com stock 

railway civil engineering 

31. Railway Yards and Terminals. — The theory and practise 
of the proper location of frogs and switches; the design of yards 
to insure efficiency of operation; the details of track construction. 
//; (3). Mr. Com stock 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 4. 



468 Railway Engineering 

32. Railway Structures. — The details of railway structures; 
problems in original design. //; (2). Mr. ComstocK 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 4 and 5. 

33. Economic Theory of Railway Location. — The influence of 
location upon the net earning power of a line of railway. /; (4). 

Mr. Com stock 
Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 4 ; Theoretical and Applied Me- 
chanics 7, 8. 

35. Railway SiGNALiNa — Block signaling on single and double 
track lines; interlocking systems for terminals; details of con- 
struction and of operation. /; (i). Mr. Comstock 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 4. 

50. Seminar. — Discussion of current topics ; review of railway 
journals; assigned topics and reports. I, II; (i). 

Professor Schmidt, Assistant Professor Snodgrass, Assistant 
Professor Buck, Mr. Comstock 

RAILWAY electrical ENGINEERING 

61. Traction. — Electric railway equipment and practise. The 
work of the course is exemplified by the use of the electric test car 
owned by the department. (For students other than those in rail- 
way electrical engineering.) II; (3). Assistant Professor Buck 

Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 8; Electrical 
Engineering 16, 6; or 3, 24. 

63. Railway Laboratory and Road Tests. — Electrical labora- 
tory problems and electric car and dynamometer car tests to deter- 
mine train resistance and power consumption for electric cars and 
steam trains. //; (3). Assistant Professor Buck 

Prerequisite: Railway Engineering 64; Electrical Engineering 
24. 

64. Electric Railway Practise. — The types of electric railway 
systems and apparatus ; the engineering problems met with in pre- 
liminary road location, in the selection of electrical equipment, and 
in its operation and maintenance. /; (3). 

Assistant Professor Buck 
Prerequisite: Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 8; Electrical 
Engineering 5 and 24. 

65. Electric Railway Practise. — The problem of steam road 
electrification. II; (3). Assistant Professor Buck 

Prerequisite: Railway Engineering 64. 



Romance Languages and Literature 469 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Entrance upon graduate work in railway engineering presupposes 
the full undergraduate course in that subject. 

102, Locomotive Design. — Modem practise concerning steam 
pressure, compounding, superheating. Professor Schmidt 

106. Locomotive Operation. — Determination of train resistance 
and locomotive tractive effort; application of these and other mat- 
ters in the establishment of tonnage ratings. Professor Schmidt 

108. Electric Railway Practise. — The design, selection, opera- 
tion, and maintenance of electric railway equipment ; central sta- 
tion, sub-station, rolling stock, and line equipment. 

Assistant Professor Buck 

no. Railway Location. — The effects of the location of a rail- 
way upon its earning capacity; the engineering and economic prob- 
lems met with in original location, as well as in the relocation and 
reduction of grades of existing lines. Mr. Comstock 

RHETORIC 

(See English.) 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE* 

Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph.D., Professor 

fDAViD HoBART Carnahan, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

John Driscoll Fitz-Gerald, II., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Jean-Baptiste Beck, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

IDavid Simon Blondheim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

Arthur Romeyn Seymour, Ph.D., Associate 

Leslie Morton Turner, D. de I'Universite, Associate 

Olin Harris Moore, Ph.D., Instructor 

John Raymond Shulters, A.M., Assistant 

Thor Griffith Wesenberg, A.M., Assistant 
Conrad Joseph Eppels, Assistant 

Charles Serophin Carry, B.es L., Assistant 

Louis Allen, A.B., Assistant 



*The department is administered by the following committee: Dean 
Kendric C. Babcock, Chairman, Professor Thomas E. Oliver, Assistant Pro- 
fessor John D. Fitz-Gerald. 

tOn leave. 



470 Romance Languages and Literature 

FRENCH 

Honors 

Candidates for honors in French must offer : 

1. A major in French. 

2. One minor of at least 12 hours in Latin. This is to be in 
addition to three years of high school Latin. 

3. One minor of at least 10 hours in one of the following sub- 
jects : German, excluding German i and 3 ; Spanish, excluding 
Spanish i; Italian; English literature, excluding English i; history; 
philosophy. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Course. — Grammar; pronunciation; reading of 
simple modern authors; composition; conversation. I, U; (4). 

Dr. Moore, Dr. Turner, Mr. Shulters, Mr. Eppels, Mr. Carry, 
Mr. Allen 

2. Modern Prose, Poetry, and Drama. — Rapid reading of mod- 
em authors; advanced syntax and composition. /, //; (4). 

Professor Oliver, Dr. Moore, Dr. Turner, Mr. Wesenberg 
Prerequisite: French i. 

2a. Second-Year Conversation. — Mainly classroom work. 
(Does not count toward a major in French.) I, //; (i). 

Mr. Eppels 

Prerequisite: French i, with a grade of at least 85; registration 
in French 2. 

3. Intermediate Prose Composition and Conversation. — Con- 
ducted entirely in French, giving facility in idiomatic expression in 
writing and speaking. Reading; themes; talks upon France and 
French life. I, H; (2). Mr. Carry 

Prerequisite: French 2. 

Note: This course is required of those who expect the recom- 
mendation of the department to teach French. 

4. Advanced Composition. — A continuation of French 3 with 
special emphasis upon advanced syntax. I, //; (2). 

Assistant Professor Beck 
Prerequisite: French 3. 

9. Masterpieces of Romance Literatures in English Trans- 
lations. — Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Cervantes, Rabelais, Men- 



Romance Languages and Literature 471 

taigne, Moliere, and other writers. (This course may not be count- 
ed toward a major in French.) I, II; (2). Dr. Turner 
Prerequisite: Two years of university work. 

22. Modern Novel and Drama. — The novel and drama in 
France from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the pres- 
ent time. Lectures; reports on collateral reading. I, II; (3). 

Dr. Turner 
Prerequisite: French 2. 

25. Course for Teachers. — The various methods of teaching 
French in this country and abroad; actual contact with class-room 
problems. /; (2). 

Dr. Seymour and other members of the department 

Prerequisite: Twenty- four hours' credit in French. 

28. Senior Thesis. — Intended primarily for candidates for hon- 
ors in French, but open to other seniors. I, II; (i). 

The various members of the department 

ADVANCED COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

[10. General Survey of French Literature. — Special periods 
and authors. The main currents of French literature from the be- 
ginning to the present time. I, II; (3). Not given, 1913-14. 

Associate Professor Carnahan 

Prerequisite: French 22 or 24.] 

23. Modern French Poetry. — Declamation and interpretation 
of French poetry from Rousseau to the present time; recitations 
and prosodical analyses of the different categories of such poems. 
Conducted in French. I, II; (3). Assistant Professor Beck 

Prerequisite: Twenty hours' credit in French and the consent of 
the instructor. 

24. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. — The greater 
masterpieces of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in France. 
Lll^iz)' Professor Oliver 

Prerequisite: French 2. 

[26. French Literary CRiTiasM. — History of criticism in an- 
tiquity and in the Italian Renaissance; the principal French critics; 
the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries in connection with the 
development of classicism and romanticism. I, II; (2). Not given, 

1913-14- 

Assistant Professor Blondheim 
Prerequisite: Three years of French, and senior standing] 



472 Romance Languages and Literature 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

Before entering upon the study of the Romance languages for 
an advanced degree, the candidate should have had a total of at 
least thirty hours of college work in these languages. Eighteen of 
these hours must be in one of the three languages, French, Italian, 
or Spanish, but no candidate will be received who has not had at 
least twelve hours of French. In addition a candidate should have 
good training in Latin, and be able to read ordinary German prose. 

102. Old French Readings. — Reading and interpretation of 
representative masterpieces in Old French literature with emphasis 
upon Old French syntax. Collateral reading will include other 
masterpieces and selected chapters in the history of Old French 
literature. For such students as may desire it, the collateral work 
may consist of the elements of Old French phonology and mor- 
phology. Twice a week; I, IJ^ i (i unit). Professor Oliver 

[103. Old French, Phonology and Morphology. — Develop- 
ment of Old French from Vulgar Latin. Twice a week; I, II; (i 
unit). Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Blondheim] 

[108. Vulgar Latin and Medieval Latin. — The development 
of the Latin language from the earliest times to the Carolingian 
epoch. Study of medieval paleography. Twice a week; I ; (i unit). 
Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Beck] 

[109. History of French Literature in the Middle Ages, 
FROM the Carolingian Epoch to Guillaume de Machault. — Read- 
ing of texts. Reports on problems concerning the general culture 
and civilization of the Middle Ages. Twice a week; II; (i unit). 
Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Beck] 

no. Introduction to the Historical Study of the Romance 
Languages, Especially of Old Provencal. — Phonology, morpholo- 
gy, syntax, and paleography. Tivice a week; I; (i unit). 

Assistant Professor Beck 

111. History of Old Provencal Literature. — Its origin and its 
influence on the other Romanic literature ; the poetry of the trou- 
badours ; reading of the texts from photographic reproductions and 
from printed materials with a view to preparing critical editions of 
such texts. Twice a week; II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Beck 

112. Introduction to Romance Philology. — Phonology. Spe- 
cial emphasis upon the problems which confront the teacher of 
French, Italian, and Spanish. Once a week; I, II; (]/2 unit). 

Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald 



Romance Languages and Literature 473 

[113. Introduction to Romance Philology. — Morpholog}'. Con- 
tinuation of Course 112. Once a week; I, II; (i unit.) Not given, 
1913-14. Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald] 

125. Seminar. Research and thesis work in the field of Ro- 
mance languages. I, II ; (2 units). 

The various members of the department 

ITALIAN 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Colhse. — Grammar; composition; conversa- 
tion; reading of simple modern authors. I, II; (3). Dr. Moore 

Prerequisite: One year of university work in French, Spanish, 
or Latin. 

2. Italian Literatltie. — First semester: Rapid reading from 
the works of the Italian writers of the nineteenth century. Second 
semester: Dante; Petrarch; Boccaccio. I, II; (2). Dr. Moore 

Prerequisite: Itahan i. 

SPANISH 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Course. — Grammar; pronunciation; easy read- 
ing; composition; conversation. /, //; (4). 

Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald, Dr. Seymouti, Mr. Wesenberg 

2. Conversation and Composition. — Conversation; composi- 
tion; reading of modern prose. The vocabulary' of everyday life is 
emphasized. Commercial correspondence. I, II; (3). 

Dr. Seymour 
Prerequisite: Spanish i. 

3. General Introduction to Spanish Literatltie. — Rapid 
reading of selected works of representative modern authors, and 
of the more important writers of the seventeenth century. I, II; 
(2). Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald 

Prerequisite: Spanish i. 

4. Advanced Conversation and Composition. — Commercial 
correspondence; reading of commercial Spanish. (Conducted in 
Spanish.) /, //; (2). Dr. Seymour 

Prerequisite : Spanish 2. 



474 Sociology 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

II. The Spanish Drama of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. — Earlier dramatists; representative plays of Lope de 
Vega, Calderon, Ruiz de Alarcon and Triso de Molina. Reports on 
additional plays read outside of class. /, //; (2). Dr. Seymour 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3. 

15. General Survey of Spanish Literature. — //; (2). 

Dr. Seymour 
Prerequisite: Spanish 3. 

courses for graduates 

[121. Oldest Monuments of the Spanish Language. — His- 
torical grammar and paleography. Once a week; I, II; ('^ unit.j 
Not given, 1913-14. Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald] 

[122. Old Spanish, Origins of Spanish Poetry. — El poema del 
Cid and Berceo. Not given in 1913-14. Once a week; I, II; 0/2 
unit). Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald] 

126. The Novela of the Golden Age. — Political and social 
conditions in Spain from 1560 to 1700; various kinds of prose 
fiction produced in this period, with special attention to Don 
Quixote and the Novelas Exemplares of Cervantes. Twice a week; 
I, II; (i unit). Assistant Professor Fitz-Gerald 

SCANDINAVIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 
(See Germanic Languages and Literature) 

THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 
(See Economics, History, Political Science, and Sociology.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Edward Cary Hayes, Ph.D., Professor 
Arthur James Todd, Ph.D., Associate 

Honors 

For honors in sociology twenty-four hours in the major subject 
are required, including Sociology i, 3, 8, and 9. 

The mfnor subjects may be selected, with the approval of this 
department, from the following : history, economics, political science, 
philosophy, and psychology. 



Sociology 475 

C»URSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

I. The Principles of Sociology. — The nature of such social 
realities as customs, institutions, organizations, social classes, and 
castes; changes to which the social realities are subject, and their 
causes ; the effects of geographic conditions, of the forms and dis- 
tribution of property, of inherited and acquired traits of the pop- 
ulation upon society and the effects of prevalent social activities 
upon each other; the method and the degree in which societ>- molds 
the lives of its members; order; progress. /; (3). 

Professor Hayes 

Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

7. The Social Problems of the Rural Community. — II; (2). 

Professor Hayes 
Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

advanced courses for undergraduates and graduates 

3. Social Evolution. — Modes of social activity among people 
at different stages of progress: savage, barbarous, and civilized; 
family organization, practical arts, economic wants and institutions, 
origins of government and law, codes of morality, religions ; induc- 
tions from such facts, as to the theory of social evolution and the 
method of progress. //; (3). Professor Hayes 

Prerequisite: Sociology i. 

[6. The Social Problems of the Urban Community. — //; 
(3>. Not given 1913-14. Professor Hayes 

Prerequisite : Senior standing and Sociology i.] 

8. General Charities. — Evolution of modern organized philan- 
thropy, public and private ; causes and prevention of poverty ; or- 
ganization and management of charitable institutions. /; (3). 

Dr. Todd 

Prerequisite : Junior standing and Sociology i or Economics i. 

9. Criminology. — Nature, causes, and treatment of the crim- 
inal ; evolution of modern methods of criminal procedure and 
penology; recent experiments and tendencies. //; (3). Dr. Todd 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

10. Population. — Theories and policies of population ; Malthus' 
Principle and its critics ; problems in population of the United 
States; immigration, race-mixture, conditions affecting public 



476 Sociology 

health, death-rate, birth-rate, "race-suicide", marriage, divorce ; se- 
lective influences at woTk on the "Population type". /; (3). 

Dr. Todd 
Prerequisite: Senior standing and Sociology i or Economics i. 

11. Principles of Sociology. — Fundamental principles and main 
teachings of sociology, derived from a minute analysis and classi- 
fication of the elements that make up the life of a people, types of 
change to which they are subject, and causes by w^hich they are 
affected. /; (3). Professor Hayes 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

12. The Labor Problem. — The same as Economics 12. 
Prerequisite: Economics i, 3; students who are taking sociology 

as a major and have had 6 hours in history, and Sociology i, may 
be admitted without Economics 3. 

15. The Family. — Evolution of the family and marriage; edu- 
cation, moral, and political significance of the family at different 
stages of social development. I, II; (3). Dr. Todd 

Prerequisite: Primarily for graduates, but approved seniors 
who have had Sociology i or equivalent may be admitted; reading 
knowledge of F>ench or German desirable. 

21. Socialism and Social Reform. — The same as Economics 21. 

Prerequisite: Economics i, 3; students who are taking sociology 
as a major and have had 6 hours in history, and Sociology i, may 
be admitted without Economics 3. 

26. Social Education. — Education as a factor in social pro- 
gress; present day educational policy and organization in the Hght 
of theoretical and applied sociology. //; (3). Dr. Todd 

Prerequisite: Senior standing, and Sociology i or Psychology I 
or equivalent. 

courses for graduates 

Preparation for graduate work in sociology must include at 
least the equivalent of twelve semester hours in the social sciences, 
of which at least three must be in sociology, and three in the prin- 
ciples of economics. The remainder may be in any combination of 
these two subjects, or of history and political science. 

The graduate courses in this department are of two classes. 
Those of the first class deal with the principles of general sociol- 
ogy; these principles relate to the essential nature of customs, in- 
stitutions, and other forms of social activity, the correlations be- 
tween them, the types of causes by which they are affected, and the 



Veterinary Science 477 

method by which they are evolved, all of which apply equally to the 
forms of social activity whether they are employed in the service of 
economic, political, or other purposes. The courses of the second 
class treat, in the light of the principles of general sociology, the 
practical social problems of the present 

The library has most of the standard works in general sociology 
by American, English, and European authorities, a large collection 
of books on various sociological problems, and an extensive list of 
periodicals. Special attention is given to ethnographic and anthro- 
pologic materials. 

[loi. Sociological Method. — The method of advancing the sci- 
ence of sociology; adaptability to sociological investigation of cer- 
tain methods described in Pearson's Grammar of Science, Wundt's 
Methodenlehre, zweite abtheilung, Seignobos' La Methode Histo- 
rique Appliquee aux Sciences Sociales. Bernheim's Historische 
Methode, Spencer's Study of Sociology, and Giddings' Inductive 
Sociology. Three times a week; I ; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14. 

Professor Hayes] 

102. The Development of Sociology. — Readings in the works 
of writers who have contributed most to the development of soci- 
ology; discussion; supplementary lectures. Once a week; I, II; 
(i unit). Professor Hayes 

150. Seminar — Once a week; I, II; (i to 2 units.) 

Professor Hayes 

SPANISH 
(See Romance Languages and Literature.) 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Donald McIntosh, V.S., Professor 

[2. Veterinary Materia Medica. — All the agents used for the 
cure of disease and injury, and for the preservation of health among 
domestic animals. Lectures ; text-books, inspection of specimens 
of drugs. I, II; (5). Not given in 1913-14. 

Professor McIntosh] 

4. Anatomy, Physiology, and Diseases of Domestic Animals. 
— The organs of mastication, digestion, respiration ; circulation, and 
lymphatic system; the urinary organs; the skin. /; (5). 

Professor McIntosh 



478 Zoology 

5. Anatomy, Physiology, and Diseases of Domestic Animals. 
— The nervous system, bones, joints, feet, eye, and generative or- 
gans ; epizootic and contagious diseases ; catarrhal fever ; pyemia ; 
septicaemia; rheumatism; tuberculosis; fistula of the withers; poll- 
evil; wounds; internal parasites. //; (5). Professor McIntosh 

6, Clinic. — The free clinic is held every Saturday morning from 
ten to twelve o'clock. Animals are brought to be examined, operat- 
ed upon, and prescribed for. This class is of signal benefit to the 
student as he has the opportunity of seeing the cases and of assist- 
ing in the work. /, //; (i). Professor McIntosh 

Prerequisite: Registration in Veterinary Science 4 and 5. 

ZOOLOGY 

Henry Baldwin Ward, Ph.D., Professor 

John Sterling Kingsley, D.Sc, Professor 

Frank Smith, A.M., Professor 

Charles Zeleny, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

Charles Christopher Adams, Ph.D., Associate 

Harley Jones VanCleave, Ph.D., Instructor 

Ernest Carroll Faust, A.B., Research Assistant 

Bessie Rose Green, A.M., Assistant 

Ralph Harlan Linkins, A.B., Assistant 

Harry Virl Heimburger, A.B., Assistant 

Horace Wesley Stunkard, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Margaret Vara Cobb, A.M., Graduate Assistant 

Gertrude Amelia Johnson, M.S., Graduate Assistant 

Homer Eldon Chenoweth, A.B., Graduate Assistant 

Grace Adaline Wells, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Henry Gustav May, B.S., Graduate Assistant 

Courses i and 2 constitute a general survey of the subject, ex- 
tending through the entire year, and form the best introduction to 
later work in zoology. In the second year, a student may choose as 
line of work either morphological, experimental, ecological, faun- 
istic, or systematic courses. The courses on microscopical technique 
(3), heredity and evolution (5), and current literature (20) are of 
especial value for all students. Medical students should take 
courses 3 and 6 in the second year. Those preparing to teach 
zoology in the high school will find field zoology (16, 17) and 
ecology (9) of especial value, and should not overlook the impor- 
tance of a course in general entomology. 

The equipment of the department includes the usual apparatus, 



Zoology 479 

microscopes, microtomes, paraffin baths, demonstration material, 
glass ware, and reagents. The various special laboratories are 
equipped with special apparatus and demonstration material in ac- 
cordance with their particular needs. Provision is made for meet- 
ing such special demands as may arise in connection with individual 
work. 

In addition to the equipment of the department itself, the Uni- 
versity Museum contains additional material in the form of series 
of mounted vertebrates, of Ziegler embryological models, and of 
alcoholic specimens in all groups; these are utilized as needed for 
either teaching or research. The collections and libran,- of the Illi- 
nois State Laboratory of Natural History, dealing especially with 
fresh-water biology, are freely accessible to advanced students. The 
private library and collections of the head of the department, in- 
cluding especially material on invertebrate morphology and on para- 
sitism, are shelved in the research laboratory and available for use 
by all graduate students in zoology. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. General Zoology. — Animal biology; general principles of 
structure ; function and inter-relation of animal forms ; origin and 
development of animal life ; the simpler and best-established gener- 
alizations in zoological theory-. Lectures; laboratory-; quiz work. 

Lor II; (5). 

Professor Ward, Associate Professor Zeleny^ Dr. Adams, Dr. 

VanCleave, and assistants 

2. Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. — Classifi- 
cation of the Chordata; the early stages of vertebrate embr\-ology; 
structure of vertebrate tissues ; systems of organs considered in re- 
spect to their anatomy, function, ontogeny, and evolution in the 
vertebrate series; anatomical studies of selected types of the Chor- 
data. Lectures; laboratory-; quiz work. //; (5). 

Professor Kingsley 

Prerequisite : Zoology i. 

5. Heredity and Evolution. — (a) The facts of heredity and 
present views regarding them, (b) The proofs of organic evolu- 
tion with a discussion of the probable factors involved in the pro- 
cess. Lectures; demonstrations; assigned reading. //; (2). 

Associate Professor Zeleny 

Prerequisite: One year of university work. 

16. Field Ornithology. — The birds of the vicinity. Identifi- 
cation ; food relations ; seasonal distribution ; migration activities. 



480 Zoology 

(Students are advised to provide themselves with opera or field 
glasses.) Field work; lectures. //; (2). Professor Smith 

[19. Advanced Ornithology. — (Continuation of 16.) Difficult 
groups of birds; economic and technical literature. /, //; (2 to 5). 
Not given, 1913-14. Professor Smith 

Prerequisite : Zoology 16 or equivalent.] 

courses for graduates and undergraduates 

3. Microscopical Technique and General Vertebrate Embry- 
ology. — Theory and practise of microscopical technique ; vertebrate 
embryos in early stages of development ; methods of fixation, em- 
bedding, section cutting, staining, and mounting; preparation of 
embryological material for use in introductory embryology. Lec- 
tures; laboratory. /; (3). Professor Kingsley 

Prerequisite : Zoology i, 2. 

6. Vertebrate Organogeny. — Development of the organs of 
the vertebrate body. Lectures; assigned readings in a text-book of 
vertebrate embryology; laboratory studies on embryos of the chick, 
dogfish, Amblystoma, and pig. (A continuation of course 3; for 
medical students and others.) //; (3). Professor Kingsley 

Prerequisite : Zoology i, 2, 3. 

9. Animal Ecology. — The relation of animals to their natural 
environment ; processes of change in environment and their influ- 
ence upon animal life ; the local fauna and the conditions under 
which it lives; methods of observation, making notes, and collec- 
tions. Insects, mollusks, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes. Field 
work; laboratory; assigned reading; reports. //; (5). 

Dr. Adams 

Prerequisite : One year of zoology or two years of university 
work, including Zoology i. 

II. Principles of Zoogeography. — The geographic distribution 
of animals, particularly the faunas of North America and of Illi- 
nois; the fauna in its relation to the complete environment (climate, 
physiography, geology, vegetation) and from the standpoint of its 
origin and its dynamic relations. Lectures ; laboratory work on 
maps; field excursions. /; (3 or 5). Dr. Adams 

Prerequisite : As in Zoology 9. 

13. Experimental Embryology and Regeneration. — The fac- 
tors concerned in individual development. Lectures; demonstra- 
tions. /; (2). Associate Professor Zeleny 

Prerequisite: Three years of university work, including one year 
in zoological courses. 



Zoology 481 

13a. Experimental Embryology and Regeneration. — (Labora- 
tory.) — Individual work on definite problems. /, //; (i to 5). 

Associate Professor Zeleny 

Prerequisite: Three years of university work, including one 
year in zoological courses. 

15. Variation and Heredity. — The factors of organic evolu- 
tion; the principles of animal breeding; eugenics. Lectures and 
demonstrations. //; (2). Associate Professor Zeleny 

Prerequisite: Three years of university work, including one 
year in zoological courses. 

15a. Variation and Heredity. — (Laborator>-.) — Individual 
work on definite problems. /, //; (i to 5). 

Associate Professor Zeleny 

Prerequisite: Three years of university work, including one 
year in zoological courses. 

17. Field Zoology. — Collection, preser\'ation, and identification 
of common representatives of the lower vertebrates and of the var- 
ious groups of land and fresh-water invertebrates (excluding in- 
sects) in the vicinity; identification work on living and preserved 
material from some of the larger rivers and lakes ; observations on 
the habits and life histories of selected forms. Field and laboratory 
work; assigned reading. /; (4). Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: One year of zoology and senior standing. 

18. Advanced Field Zoology. — More restricted problems in con- 
nection with the local fauna ; taxonomic or distributional problems. 
(A continuation of course 17.) //; (3 to 5). Professor Smith 

Prerequisite: Zoology 17. 

22. Morphology of Vertebrates. — The skeleton and the brain, 
the cranial nerves, and the eye and ear. Lectures ; laboratory work ; 
dissection of a series of types. I, II; (4). Professor Kingsley 

Prerequisite: Zoology i, 2, 3, and 6. 

29. Advanced Animal Ecology. — Special problems in ecology, 
distribution, and faunas, with reference to the interpretation of the 
relation between animals and their environments. Conferences ; 
laboratory; field work. I, II; (2 to 5). Dr. Adams 

Prerequisite: Two years of university work, including Zoology 
I and 9 or II. 

21. Introduction to Zoological Research. — Investigation of 
topics, usually repeating the work of earlier investigators; the mor- 



482 Zoology 

phology, life history, or reciprocal relations of invertebrate forms. 
Laboratory; conferences; assigned reading. I, II; (2 to 5). 

Professor Ward 
Prerequisite : One year in zoological courses. 

20. Current Literature. — Meetings of the instructors and ad- 
vanced students of the department for the presentation and discus- 
sion of the results of recent zoological investigation. (Open to all 
students of zoology; should be taken by those intending to graduate 
with a thesis.) /, //; (i). Associate Professor Zeleny 

Prerequisite: Three years of university work, including one year 
in zoology. 

8. Thesis Investigation. — Individual work on assigned topics. 

/, //; (5). 

Professor Ward, Professor Smith, Professor Kingsley, Asso- 
ciate Professor Zeleny, Dr. Adams 
Prerequisite : Two years in zoological courses. 

courses for graduates 

Two years of undergraduate work in zoology are ordinarily pre- 
supposed for entering upon graduate study in the department. 
When the work is chosen for a minor the courses listed for gradu- 
ates and undergraduates, to be acceptable, must be preceded by at 
least one full year's undergraduate work in zoology. Work done 
at other institutions will be valued on conference with the head of 
the department. 

102. Selected Topics from Vertebrate Morphology. — Lectures 
and required reading on the origin of vertebrates, the segmentation 
of the head, the morphology of special systems, etc. Twice a week; 
I; (j unit). Professor Kingsley 

[107. Parasitology. — Structure and life history of animal para- 
sites; their relations to disease; origin and biological significance of 
parasitism. Conferences ; assigned readings ; demonstrations. 
Twice a week; I, II; (i unit). Not given, 1913-14; given in 1914-15 
and in alternate years. Professor Ward] 

113. Experimental Zoology. — Assigned problems in experi- 
mental embryology; regeneration, variation, and heredity. Two to 
five times a week; I, II; (i to 2 units). Associate Professor Zeleny 

117. Faunistic Zoology. — Problems in taxonomy, distribution, 
and ecology; field work, conference, and lectures. This work is 
favored by a natural history survey of the State now in progress at 



Zoology 483 

the University; students have the advantage of the collections, li- 
brary, apparatus, and operations of this survey, Twice a week; /, 
//; (i unit). Professor Smith, Dr. Adams 

121. Individual Research Courses. — 

(a) Zoological problems. Professor Ward 

(b) Faunistic and systematic zoology. Professor Smith 

(c) Animal Ecology and Zoogeography. Dr. Adams 

(d) Vertebrate morphology. Professor Kingsley 

(e) Experimental Zoology. Associate Professor Zeleny 
127. Theories of Animal Phylogeny. — Relations of various 

groups of animals; significance of so-called intermediate forms; 
study of invertebrate larval forms and of theories of descent based 
on them. Lectures; assigned readings; laboratory. Twice a week; 
I, II; (i unit). Given in 1913-14 and in alternate years. 

Professor Ward 



i 



4 



PART IV 
AUXILIARY SCIENTIFIC BUREAUS 



THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERI- 
MENT STATION 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

STAFF 

Eugene Davenport, M.Agr., LL.D., Director 
♦Cyril George Hopkins, Ph.D., Vice-Director 
Stephen Alfred Forbes, Ph.D., Consulting Entomologist 
Donald McIntosh, V.S., Consulting Veterinarian 
Henry Lewis Rietz, Ph.D., Statistician 

Burt Eardley Powell, Ph.D., Editor, Agricultural Press Bul- 
letins 
Anna Cushman Glover, Assistant Secretary 

In Agronomy 

♦Cyril George Hopkins, Ph.D., Chief, Agronomy and Chemistry 
Jeremiah George Mosier, B.S., Chief, Soil Physics 
Louie Henrie Smith, Ph.D., Chief, Plant Breeding 
James Harvey Pettit, Ph.D., Chief, Soil Fertility 
Leonard Hegnauer, B.S., Chief, Crop Production 
Ora Stanley Fisher, B.S., Assistant Chief, Soil Fertility 

♦William George Eckhardt, B.S., Associate, Soil Fertility 
Axel Ferdinand Gustafson, M.S., Associate, Soil Physics 
Ernest Van Alstine, B.S., Associate, Chemistry 
Joseph Paul Aumer, B.S., Associate, Chemistry 
Clarence Chester Logan, B.S., Associate, Soils Extension 
Jay Boardman Park, M.S., Associate, Plant Breeding 
Sidney Viel Holt, B.S., Associate, Soil Physics 
Harold Wilson Stewart, B.S., Associate, Soil Physics 
Henry Clyde Wheeler, B.S., Associate, Soil Physics 
John Ezra Whitchurch, B.S., Associate, Soil Fertility 
Ezekiel Edward Hoskins, B.S., Associate, Soil Fertility 
William Leonidos Burlison, M.S., Associate, Crop Production 
Ward Hanson Sachs, B.S., Associate, Chemistry 
Walter Byron Gernert, Ph.D., Associate, Plant Breeding 
Albert Lemuel Whiting, Ph.D., Associate, Soil Biology 



•On leave. 

487 



488 The Agricultural Experiment Station 

Frederick Charles Bauer, B.S., Associate, Soil Fertility 
Frederick Martin William Wascher, B.S., First Assistant , Soil 

Physics 
Forrest Addison Fisher, B.S., First Assistant, Soil Physics 
Frank William Garrett, B.S., First Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Wilbur Roy Leighty, B.S., First Assistant, Chemistry 
Gertrude Neiderman, B.S., Assistant, Chemistry 
Orr Milton Allyn, B.S., Assistant, Crop Production 
Robert William Dickenson, B.S., Assistant, Soil Physics 
Leo Ross Binding, B.S., Assistant, Chemistry 
Harrison Fred Theodore Fahrnkopf^ B.S., Assistant, Soil Fer- 
tility 
George Edward Gentle, B.S., Assistattt, Soil Physics 
Harry Charles Gilkerson, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Edward Harvey Walworth, B.S., Assistant, Crop Production 
Arthur Floyd Heck, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Howard John Snider, B.S., Assistant, Soil Fertility 
Arthur Maxwell Brunson, B.S., Assistant, Chemistry 
Warren Rippey Schoonover, B.S., Assistaiit, Soil Biology 
Clinton B Clevenger, B.S., Assistant, Chemistry 
Orland I Ellis, B.S., Assistant, Soil Physics 

In Animal Husbandry 

Herbert Windsor Mumford, B.S., Chief 
Harry Sands Grindley, D.Sc, Chief, Animal Nutrition 
Walter Castella Coffey, M.S., Chief, Sheep Husbandry 
♦Louis Dixon Hall, M.S., Assistant Chief, Animal Husbandry 
John A Detlefsen, D.Sc, Assistant Chief, Genetics 
Henry Perly Rusk, M.S.A., Assistant Chief, Beef Cattle 
James Lloyd Edmonds, B.S., Assistant Chief, Horse Husbandry 
Arthur Donaldson Emmett, A.M., Assistant Chief, Animal Nu- 
trition 
Harold Hanson Mitchell, B.S., Associate, Chemistry 
Walter Edward Joseph, Ph.D., Associate, Animal Husbandry 
Sleeter Bull, M.S., Associate, Animal Nutrition 
Walter Frederick Handschin, B.S., Associate, Animal Hus- 
bandry 
William Herschel Smith, M.S., First Assistant, Animal Hus- 
bandry 
Virgil Augustus Place, B.S., First Assistant, Animal Husbandry 

*0n leave. 



The Agricultural Experiment Station 489 

Francis Marion Simpson, B.S., First Assistant, Animal Hus- 
bandry 
John Jonathan Yoke, Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
Wilbur Jerome Carmichael, B.S., Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
John Richard Wells, B.S., Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
Charles Ivan Newlin, B.S., Assistant, Animal Husbandry 
Elmer Roberts, B.S., Assistant, Genetics 
Leonora Perry, Editorial Assistant 

In Dairy Husbandry 

Harry Alexis Harding, Ph.D., Chief 
Wilbur John Fraser, M.S., Chief, Dairy Farming 
♦Nelson William Hepburn, M.S., Assistant Chief, Dairy Manu- 
factures 
Martin John Prucha, Ph.D., Assistant Chief, Dairy Bac- 
teriology 
RoYDEN Earl Brand, M.S., Associate, Dairy Husbandry 
Harry AIoxtgomery Weeters, Assistant, Dairy Husbandry 
Horatio Newton Parker, First Assistant, Milk Distribution 
Jesse IMelangthon Barnhart, M.S., First Assistant, Chemistry 
LeRoy Lang, M.S., Associate, Dairy Manufactures 
William Truman Crandall, M.S., Associate, Milk Production 
Ray Stillman Hulce, B.S.A., First Assistant, Milk Production 
Oliver Arnold Keller, B.S., Assistant, Dairy Manufactures 
Harrison August Ruehe, B.S., First Assistant, Dairy Manufac- 
tures 
Frank Ash more Pearson, B.S., Assistant, Dairy Husbandry 
Ernest McChesney Clark, B.S., Assistant, Dairy Husbandry 

In Horticulture 

Joseph Cullen Blair, M.S. A., Chief 

Charles Spencer Crandall, M.S., Chief, Plant Breeding 

John William Lloyd, M.S.A., Chief, Olericulture 

Herman Bernard Dorner, M.S., Assistant Chief, Floriculture 

Bethel Stewart Pickett, M.S., Assistant Chief, Pomology 

Oscar S Watkins, B.S., Associate, Horticultural Chemistry 

Ernest Winfield Bailey, M. S., Associate, Plant Breeding 

fARNO Herbert Nehrling, Associate, Floriculture 

Warren Albert Ruth, A.M., Associate, Horticultural Chemistry 

Charles Elmer Durst, B.S., Associate, Olericulture 

Simeon James Bole, A.M., Associate, Pomology 

Thomas Bregger, B.S., First Assistant, Plant Breeding 



*0n leave. 

fResigned, February 1, 1914. 



490 The Agricultural Experiment Station 

Alfred Joseph Gunderson, B.S., First Assistant, Pomology 
Fred Weaver Muncie, A.B., First Assistant, Floriculture 
Charles Bovett Sayre, B.S., First Assistant, Olericulture 
Charles Christian Rees, A.B., Assistant, Horticulture 
George Leo Peltier, A.M., Assistant, Floricultural Pathology 
John Joseph Gardner, B.S., Assistant, Pomology 
James Hutchinson, Assistant, Floriculture 
Julia Alberta Harper, A.B., Editorial Assistant 

By an act approved March 2, 1887, the national government 
appropriated $15,000 per annum to each state for the purpose of 
establishing and maintaining, in connection with the colleges found- 
ed upon the congressional act of 1862, agricultural experiment sta- 
tions, "to aid in acquiring and diffusing among the people of the 
United States useful and practical information on subjects connect- 
ed with agriculture, and to promote scientific investigation and ex- 
periment respecting the principles and applications of agricultural 
science." Under this provision the Agricultural Experiment Station 
for Illinois was founded in 1888 and placed under the direction of 
the Trustees of the University; a part of the University farm, 
with buildings, was assigned for its use. 

The federal grants to the Station have been supplemented by 
State appropriations, until its revenues have become larger than 
those of any other similar institution in the world. 

Investigations are conducted in the growing and marketing of 
orchard fruits, the methods of production of meats and of dairy 
goods, the principles of animal breeding and of nutrition, and the 
improvement and the economic production of crops. All the prin- 
cipal types of soil of the State are being studied in the laboratory 
under glass and in the field. A soil survey is in progress which 
when finished will map and describe the soil of every farm of the 
State down to an area of ten acres. Between forty and fifty fields 
and orchards are operated in various portions of the State for the 
study of local problems, and assistants are constantly on the road 
for the conduct of experiments or to give instruction to producer 
or consumer. The results of investigation are published in bulletins, 
which are issued in editions of 40,000 and distributed free of 
charge. 

Much of this work is of interest to students, especially of gradu- 
ate grade, and it is freely available for this purpose, so far as is 
consistent with the interests of the Station. 



THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT 

STATION 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

STAFF 

♦William Freeman Myrick Goss^ M.S., D.Eng., Director 

Charles Russ Richards, M.M.E., Acting Director 

Alfred Knight Chittenden, Ph.B., M.F., Assistant to the Director 

and Lecturer on Timber and Timber Resources 
The Heads of the Departments of the College of Engineering 

Special Investigators 

Herbert Fisher Moore, M.M.E., Assistant Professor in the Depart- 
ment of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Duff Andrew Abrams, C.E., Associate in the Department of The- 
oretical and Applied Mechanics 

Davh) Ford McFarland, A.M., M.S., Ph.D., First Assistant in the 
Department of Chemistry 

Willis Appleford Slater, M.S., C.E., First Assistant in the Depart- 
ment of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Robert Browder Keller, B.S., First Assistant in the Department of 
Railway Engineering 

Trygve D Yensen, M.S., E.E., Assistant in the Department of 
Electrical Engineering 

John Nicholas Vedder, A.M., Assistant in the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering 

Harold Houghton Dunn, M.S., Assistant in the Department of 
Railway Engineering 

Alonzo Plumsted Kratz, M.S., Assistant in the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering 

Research Fellows 

Harry Fielding Hadley, A.M., Chemistry 

Rudolph McDermet, B.S., Electrical Engineering 

George Alfred Maney, C.E., Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

*On leave. 

491 



492 The Engineering Experiment Station 

Howard Rice Thomas, C.E., Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Walter Jacob Wohlenberg, B.S., Mechanical Engineering 

Jefferson Hall Belt, B.S., Electrical Engineering 

Julian Montgomery, C.E,, Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Merle Louis Nebel, B.S., Mining Engineering 

Robert Bedford Pogue, B.M.E., Railway Engineering 

The Engineering Experiment Station was established by action 
of the Board of Trustees, December 8, 1903. Its puposes are the 
stimulation and elevation of engineering education, and the study of 
problems of special importance to professional engineers and to the 
manufacturing, railway, mining, and industrial interests of the State 
and the country. The practical nature of the investigations and 
their adaptation to present-day needs are assured by means of 
conferences with committees of the leaders of the State's industrial 
activities. 

The control of the Station is vested in the heads of the several 
departments of the College of Engineering. These constitute the 
Station Satff, and, with the Director, determine the character and 
extent of the investigations to be undertaken. 

Up to the present time, sixty-eight bulletins of value to engi- 
neering science have been published. The experiments have re- 
lated chiefly to tests of high-speed tool steels; the resistance of 
tubes to collapse; the holding power of railroad spikes; the effect 
of scale on heat transmission ; roof trusses ; base and bearing plates 
in columns and beams; stresses in chain links; extensions of the 
Dewey decimal system of classification; tests of electric lamps; 
lighting country homes by private electric plants; street lighting; 
high steam pressures in locomotive service ; rate of formation of 
carbon monoxide in gas producers; fuel tests; the weathering of 
coal and the spontaneous combustion of coal; thermal conductivity 
of fireclay; heat transmissions; freight train resistance; tests of a 
suction gas producer ; tests of concrete ; reinforced concrete beams 
and columns ; tests of cast-iron and reinforced concrete culvert pipe ; 
tests of brick columns and terra cotta block columns ; tests of timber 
beams; tests of built-up columns under load; tests to determine 
the resistance to flow through locomotive water columns; tests of 
nickel-steel riveted joints; strength of rolled zinc; inductance of 
coils; mechanical stresses in transmission lines; starting currents 
of transformers; superheated steam in locomotive service; a new 
analysis of the cylinder performance of reciprocating engines; 



The Engineering Experiment Station 493 

effects of cold weather upon train resistance and tonnage rating; 
coking of coal at low temperatures ; characteristics and limitations 
of the series transformer; electron theory of magnetism; entropy- 
temperature and transmission diagrams for air; tests of reinforced 
concrete buildings under load ; the steam consumption of locomotive 
engines from indicator diagrams ; properties of saturated and super- 
heated ammonia vapor; reinforced concrete wall footings and col- 
umn footings; and strength of I-beams in flexure. 



THE STATE LABORATORY OF 
NATURAL HISTORY 



Edmund Janes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

STAFF 

Stephen Alfred Forbes, Ph.D., LL.D., Director 

Charles Arthur Hart, Systematic Entomologist 

Mary Jane Snyder, Secretary 

Robert Earl Richardson, A.M., Assistant in charge of Biological 

Station 
Charles Edwin Janvrin, Ph.B., B.L.S., Librarian 

In 1885 the General Assembly passed an act transferring the 
State Laboratory of Natural History from the Illinois State Normal 
University to the University of Illinois. This laboratory was 
created for the purpose of making a natural history survey of the 
State, the results of which should be published in a series of bul- 
letins and reports ; and for the allied purpose of furnishing speci- 
mens illustrative of the flora and fauna of the State to the public 
schools and to the State museum. For these purposes direct appro- 
priations are made by the legislature from session to session. Ma- 
terial of all classes has been collected in all parts of the State, field 
observations and experiments have been conducted, extending over 
many years, and twelve volumes have been published in the form 
of bulletins and final reports. 

The most important problem upon which the work of the survey 
is at present concentrated is the effect of drainage operations, sew- 
age contaminations, and other results of industrial occupancy upon 
the general system of life in our principal rivers. 



494 



THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST'S 

OFFICE 



STAFF 



Stephen Alfred Forbes, Ph.D., LL.D., State Entomologist 
Charle