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ANNUAL REPORT^* 



FIEE DEPARTMENT 



YEAR 1904-1905 



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BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE 

1905 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIKE DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE 



YEAR 1904-1905 




BOSTON 
MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE 

1905 



Boston, March 31, 1905. 

His Honor Patrick A. Collins, 

Mayor : 

Sir, — The year covered by this report is from February 
1, 1904, to February 1, 1905. 

During the year the total number of alarms received by 
this department have been 2,651, while the total loss has been 
$2,473,980, and in receiving and transmitting these alarms, 
and similar work of the department, the Fire Alarm branch 
has struck 11,137,692 blows, all of which figures show pretty 
clearly the work performed by the Fire Department. 

Our Roll of Merit contains the names of: 



Nathan L. Hussey 






Engine 23. 


Edward H. Sawyer 






Ladder 4. 


Edward H. Sawyer 






« 4. 


James F. Bailey 






" 17. 


Eugene Rogers . 






« 1. 


Peter Callahan . 






Engine 4. 


Joseph A. Kelley . 






Chemical 1. 


Timothy J. Heffron 






Engine 4. 


James E. Downey . 






" 6. 


Frederick F. Leary 






Ladder 12. 


Florence Donoghue 






Combination 


James J. O'Connor 






Engine 7. 


James F. McMahon 






Combination 



City Document No. 16. 



Martin A. Kenealy 






Engine 7. 


Denis Driscoll . 






» 7. 


William H. Magner 






Ladder 8. 


Thomas J. Muldoon 






Chemical 8. 


Dennis McGee . 






Combination 5 


Joseph P. Hanton . 






Ladder 17. 


Michael "J. Teehan . 






" 17. 


Charles W. Conway 






« 13. 


Michael J. Dacey . 






" 13. 


Patrick E. Keyes . 






District Chief. 



All of whom have distinguished themselves by exception- 
ally good work on occasion ; but the success in putting out 
fires which the department has attained has been owing to 
the perpetual vigilance and uniform zeal of all the officers 
and men without distinction. 

Organization. 

Commissioner, Henry S. Russell; term expires May, 
1907. 

Secretary, Benjamin F. Underhill. 

Chief of Department, William T. Cheswell. 

Assistant Chief, John A. Mullen. 

Second Assistant Chief and Chief of District No. 5, 
Nathan L. Hussey. 

Superintendent of Fire-alarms, Brown S. Flanders. 

Assistant Superintendent of Fire-alarms, Cyrus A. 
George. 

Superintendent of Repair-shop, Henry M. Hawkins. 

Assistant Superintendent of Repair-shop, Eugene M. 
Byington. 

Veterinary Surgeon, George W. Stimpson. 

Medical Examiner, Rufus W. Sprague. 

Purchasing Officer, Charles A. Straw. 

Storekeeper, George R. Williams. 

Foreman of Hose and Harness-shop, Patrick B. 

H ANN ON. 

Master Carpenter, Leonard Murdock. 
Master Painter, David J. Fitzgerald. 
Master Plumber, Vincent B. Buckley. 



Clerks. 

George F. Murphy, Daniel J. Quinn, Michael J. Lafferty, 
James P. Maloney. 



Fire Department. 



Patrick E. Keyes, 
C. H. W. Pope 
Joseph M. Garrity, 
Peter F. McDonough, 
Edwin A. Perkins, 
John Grady, 
Hirarn D. Smith, 
Edward H. Sawyer, 
Willis ton A. Gay lord, 
John F. Ryan, 
William Childs, 



District Chiefs. 
Headquarters, 



Ladder-house 2 

9 

8 

Engine-house 4 

1 

22 

Ladder-house 12 

4 

Engine-house 18 

41 

28 



Force and Pay-roll, February 1, 1905. 



Commissioner . 
Secretary 

Chief of Department 
Assistant Chief 
Second Assistant Chief 
Superintendent of Fire-alarms 
Assistant Superintendent of Fire-alan 
Superintendent of Repair-shop 
Assistant Superintendent of Repair-shop 
Veterinary Surgeon . 
Assistant Veterinary Surgeon 
Medical Examiner 
Purchasing Officer 
Foreman of Hose and Harness-shop 
Storekeeper 
Master Carpenter 
Master Painter 
Bookkeeper 
3 Clerks 

11 District Chiefs . 

54 Captains . 

73 Lieutenants 

45 Engineers 
38 Assistant Engineers 

3 " " 

5 " " 

2 " " 

494 Permanent men 
356 at 
35 at 
43 at 

46 at 
14 at 



£5,000 per 
2,500 
3,500 
2,400 
2,200 
3,200 
2,000 
2,000 
1,800 
2,000 
1,400 
1,100 
1,800 
1,400 
1,200 
1,300 
1,300 
1,650 
1,400 
2,000 
1,600 
1,400 
1,300 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
900 

1,200 

1,100 

1,000 

900 

720 



annum. 



City Document No. 16. 



75 Call-men : 












6 at 


$250 per annum 


69 at . 




. 


200 " 


11 Chiefs' Drivers 




. 


1 75 per day 


2 " " 




. 


2 25 " 


1 Watchman 




. 


1,000 per annum. 


3 Hostlers (average) 




. 


1 95 per day 


1 Horseshoer 




. 


3 00 " 


Fire-alarm Force. 




6 Operators ..... 


$1,600 per annum. 


3 Assistant Operators .... 


1,200 " 


1 Foreman of Construction . 


2,000 " 


17 Telegraphers and Linemen (average), 


3 00 per day 


Bepair-shop Employees 




1 Master Plumber .... 


$1,300 per annum. 


1 Engineer 








3 25 per day 


1 Assistant Engineer 








3 00 " 


1 Painter 








3 75 " 


1 " 










2 50 " 


2 Wheelwrights 










3 25 


3 Machinists 










3 25 " 


1 Machinist 










3 00 " 


1 " 










2 75 " 


2 Blacksmiths 










3 50 


1 Blacksmith 










3 25 " 


3 Blacksmiths' Helpers 






2 50 " 


1 Hose and Harness-repairer 




1 50 " 


3 Laborers (averj 


ige) . 


• 






1 98 



888 total force. 

Fike Districts. 
The city is divided into twelve fire districts, as follows : 

District 1. 
All that part of Boston known as East Boston. 

District 2. 
All that part of Boston formerly known as Charlestown. 

District 3. 

The territory bounded on the north and east by the water 
front, on the south by Summer street, and on the west by 
Washington street and Washington street North. 



Fire Department. 5 

District Jj.. 

The territory bounded on the north by the Charles river, 
on the east by Washington street North and Washington 
street, on the south by Winter, Park, and Beacon streets, 
and on the west by the Charles river and Berkeley street. 

District 5. 

The territory bounded on the north by Beacon, Park, Win- 
ter and Summer streets, on the east by Fort Point channel, 
on the south and west by Broadway, Way, Motte, Castle, and 
Ferdinand streets, Columbus avenue and Berkeley street. 

District 6. 

All that part of Boston known as South Boston, and run- 
ning south as far as Dorset and Locust streets. 

District 7. 

The territory bounded on the north by Berkeley street, 
Columbus avenue, Ferdinand, Castle, Motte, and Way 
streets and Broadway, on the east by Fort Point channel and 
South bay, on the south by Massachusetts avenue, and on the 
west by the Charles river. 

District 8. 

The territory bounded on the north by the Charles river 
and Massachusetts avenue, on the east by Washington street, 
on the south by Atherton and Mozart streets, Chestnut ave- 
nue, Sheridan and Centre streets, Hyde square, Perkins, 
Catalpa, and Castleton streets, across Jamaicaway to the 
Brookline line, and on the west by the Brookline line, Beacon 
and Deerfield streets. 

District 9. 

The territory bounded on the north by Massachusetts ave- 
nue, South bay, Dorset, and Locust streets, on the east by 
Dorchester bay, on the south by Freeport, Hancock, Bowdoin, 
and Quincy streets, Columbia road, and on the west by Seaver 
street, Columbus avenue, and Washington street. 

District 10. 

That part of Dorchester bounded on the north by Seaver 
street, Columbia road, Quincy, Bowdoin, Hancock, and Free- 
port streets, on the east by Dorchester bay, on the south by 
the Neponset river and the Hyde Park line, and on the west 
by Harvard street and Blue Hill avenue. 



City Document No. 16. 



District 11. 



All that part of Boston known as Brighton, and extending 
east as far as Deerfield and Beacon streets. 

District 12. 

All that part of Boston known as West Roxbury, bounded 
on the north by a line from the Brookline line across Jamaica- 
way to Castleton street, through Castleton, Catalpa, and 
Perkins streets, Hyde square, Centre, and Sheridan streets, 
Chestnut avenue, Mozart, and Atherton streets, Columbus 
avenue and Seaver street, and on the east by Blue Hill avenue. 

In all cases where streets are designated as boundaries, the 
centre of the street will be the dividing line. 



Assignment of Districts. 

Each district is placed under the charge of a District 
Chief as follows : 





Chief in Command. 


Companies in Districts. 


District. 


Engines. 


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Patrick E. Keyes 

C H.W.Pope 

Joseph M. Garrity. .. 
Peter F. McDonough, 
Nathan L. Hussey... 
Edwin A. Perkins. .. 


5, 9, 11, 40 

27, 32, 36 

8, 25, 31, 44 

*4, 6, 10 

7, *26, 35 

*1, 2, 15, 38, 39, 43 

3, *22, 33 

13, 14, 37 

12, 21, 23, 24 

16, 17, *18, 19, 20 

29, 34, *41 

*2S, 30, 42, 45 


7 
9 

1 
2 
8 
4 
12 
10 

6 
5 


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*9 

*8 14 

1 

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5, 18 

3, 13, 15 

*12 

*4 

6, 7 

11 

10, 16 


4 
5, 7 

8 

2, 3 

10 

6 

1,11 

9 




2 




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4 


1 


5 




6 


3 


7 


2 


8 


Hiram D. Smith 

Edward H. Sawyer.. 
Williston A. Gaylord, 

John F. Ryan 

William Childs 




9 




10 




11 




12 









* Headquarters of District Chief. 



Fire Department. 7 

The following property is in charge of the Fire Commis- 
sioner : 

Houses. 



Location. 



Number 
of feet 
in lot. 



Assessed 
Valuation 



Occupied by 



Dorchester and Fourth sts. 



Corner of O and Fourth sts. 
Bristol st. and Harrison ave. 
Bulfinch st 



Marion st., East Boston 

Le verett st 

East st 

Salem st 

Paris St., East Boston 

Elver st 

Saratoga and Byron sts., East Boston, 



Dudley st 

Cabot st 

Centre st 

Dorchester ave 

Corner River and Temple sts. 



Meeting House Hill, Dorchester Dis- 
trict 



Harvard st., Dorchester District. 
Norfolk st., " " 

Walnut st., " " 

Columbia road, " " 

Warren ave 

Northampton st 

Corner Warren and Quincysts.. 
Fort Hill sq 



Mason st 

Elm st., Charlestown District 

Centre st., Jamaica Plain 

Chestnut Hill ave., Brighton District, 
Centre St., West Roxbury District. .. 

Bunker Hill St., Charlestown District, 
Corner Boylston and Hereford sts . . . 



8,167 

4,000 
4,000 



1,647 
2,269 
1,893 
2,568 
4,720 
1,886 
10,000 

7,320 
4,832 
5,713 
2,803 
12,736 

9,450 

9,440 
7,663 
9,000 

10,341 
7,500 
3,445 
4,186 
4,175 

5,623 

2,600 

10,377 

14,358 

12,251 

8,188 
5,646 



$25,S00 

16,400 
30,000 
96,000 

9,000 
35,000 
36,400 

22,800 
29,700 
20,000 
38,500 

25,000 
16,000 
14,600 
20,000 
19,200 

17,300 

18,300 
14,200 
17,300 

17,100 

62,500 
11,200 
18,100 
90,200 

113,000 
18,000 
2S,300 
37,200 
25,000 

26,200 
66,000 



Engine 1 and Ladder- 
house 5 on this lot. 

Engine 2. 

Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 

Engine 4, Chemical 1 and 
Tower 1. 

Engine 5. 

Engine 6. 

Engine 7. 

Engine 8. 

Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 

Engine 10. 

Engine 11 and Combina- 
tion 4. 

Engine 12. 

Engine 13. 

Engine 14. 

Engine 15. 

Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 

Engine 17 and Ladder- 
house 7 on this lot. 

Engine 18. 

Engine 19. 

Engine 20 and Combina- 
tion 11. 

Engine 21. 

Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 

Engine 23. 

Engine 24. 

Engine 25, Ladder 8 and 
Ladder 14. 

Engines 26 and 35. 

Engine 27. 

Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 

Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 

Engine 30 and Combina- 
tion 9. 

Engine 32. 

Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 



City Document No. 16. 

Houses. — Concluded. 



Location. 



Number 
of feet 
in lot. 



Assessed 
Valuation. 



Oocupied by 



Western ave., Brighton 

Monument st., Charlestown District, 

Corner Longwood and Brookline 
aves 

Congress st 

Sumner st., East Boston 

Harvard ave., near Cambridge st., 
Brighton District 

AVashington, between Atherton and 
Beethoven sts 

Andrew sq 

Washington, corner Poplar st., Ros- 
lindale 

Church st 

Shawmut ave 

Saratoga st., East Boston 

Bst 

Eustis st 

Friend st 

Dudley st 

Main St., Charlestown 

Tremont st 

Harrison ave 

Pittsburgh st., South Boston 

Dorchester ave., Ashmont 

Fourth st 

Washington st., Dorchester 

Winthrop st 

North Grove st 



4,637 
5,668 

5,231 

4,000 
4,010 

6,112 

3,848 
5,133 

14,729 
3,412 
SS9 
9,300 
1,804 
1,790 
1,676 
3,923 
4,290 
4,311 

2,134 
8,964 
4,875 
3,101 
6,875 
3,000 
3,918 



17,800 
21,000 

14,000 

37,000 
18,000 



Engine 34. 

Engine 36 and Combina- 
tion 5. 

Engine 37 and Combina- 
tion 10. 

Engines 38 and 39. 

Engine 40. 



25,500 Engine 41 and Chemical 6. 



22,900 
20,100 

22,400 

23,600 

5,000 

40,600 

7,800 

7,500 

35,500 

26,000 

16,400 

25,700 

23,000 
35,400 
22,900 
11,000 
21,400 
13,200 
18,000 



Engine 42 and Chemical 5. 

Engine 43 and Combina- 
tion 3. 

Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 

Chemical Engine 2. 

Chemical Engine 4. 

Chemical Engine 7. 

Chemical Engine 8. 

Chemical Engine 10. 

Ladder 1. 

Ladder 4. 

Ladder 9 and Chemical 9. 

Ladder 12 and Chemical 
12. 

Ladder 17. 

Ladder 18 and Tower 3. . 

Combination 1. 

Combination 2. 

Combination 6. 

Combination 7. 

Combination 8. 



Assessed Valuation. 

Fuel-house, Dorchester street, 1,610 feet of land . $3,100 

Fuel-house, Salem street, 417 feet of land . . 3,400 

Fuel-house, Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet of 

land 7,000 

Headquarters building and repair-shop, corner of 

Albany and Bristol streets, 23,679 feet of land, 185,000 

Water Tower No. 2 and "Wrecking Wagon are in 

Headquarters Building. 
Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet 

of land • . . . . 39,500 

Fuel-house, Washington, near Dover street, 1,007 

feet of land 12,100 



Fiee Department. 



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16 



City Document No. 16. 



New Apparatus Purchased during the Year. 

1 First-size Metropolitan engine. 
1 Extra first-size Amoskeag engine. 

1 Combination truck. 

2 Hose wagons. 

2 District Chiefs' wagons. 
6 Engines rebuilt. 

Amount of hose purchased and condemned during the 
year : 



Purchased. 


Condemned. 


Leading cotton, 4,100 feet. 


11,900 feet 


" rubber, 3,900 " 


500 " 


Chemical, 1,000 " 


1,150 " 


Suction, 134 " 


83 " 



Totals, 9,134 " 13,633 " 

Amount of hose in use and in store February 1, 1905 



In Use. 

Leading cotton, 87,447 feet. 

" rubber, 6,600 " 
Chemical, 10,400 " 

Suction, 1,096 " 



In Stoi 


•e. 


11,967 feet 


2,800 


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650 


a 


191 


a 



Totals, 



105,543 " 



15,608 " 



Horses. 



Purchased during the year 








64 


Sold or exchanged . 






55 


Killed for cause 






9 


Died 






2 


Number in the department 






. 386 


Expenditures for the Year. 


Salaries . . $987,839 24 


Repairs of apparatus 








37,396 86 


" " houses 








21,067 48 


New apparatus 








12,523 02 


" hose 








12,406 78 


Repairs of hose 








1,145 40 


Fuel 








40,590 90 


Electric and gas -lighting 








12,506 94 


Printing and stationery 








2,240 66 


Furniture and bedding 








1,804 71 


Small supplies 








9,872 50 


Horses — purchase and ex 


cham 


re 




11,083 05 



Fire Department. 



17 



Horse-hire arid keeping . 

Hay, grain and straw 

Washing .... 

Shoeing ..... 

Harnesses and repairs 

Oils, chemicals, etc. 

Hats, badges and buttons 

Ladders and repairs 

Tools for repair-shop and mechanics 

Extra service .... 

Reservoirs and hydrants 

Contingencies .... 

Pensions .... 

Rent for buildings, telephones, etc. 

Construction and material, fire-alarm branch 

Underground construction 

Salt water fire-service .... 



Income. 

Sale of manure ...... 

Rent ........ 

Damage to property ..... 

Old material • . 

Licenses for the sale of fireworks and gunpowder 

Bath department, steam for Dover-street bath-house, 



$9,053 80 

46,902 64 

3,696 44 

21,001 71 

1,875 29 

3,610 71 

1,318 41 

142 51 

575 87 

1,147 68 

4,810 71 
68,130 84 
7,799 25 
4,318 01 
9,520 25 
1 30 



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28 




434 


46 




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38 




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28 



18 



City Document No. 16. 



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19 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from February 1, 1904, to 
February 1, 1905. 



Alarms, accidental automatic . 
" false 
" out of city 
Ashes hot, in wooden receptacle 
Boiling over of fat or tar 
Bonfires, grass, rubbish, etc. . 
Careless use of lamps, candles, etc 

" " " pipes and cigars in smoking 

Chimneys, soot burning . 

' ' defective 
Clothes too near stove . 
Collapse of building 
Defective flue 

" stovepipe 
" furnace . 
' ' fireplace 
' ' gas -pipe 
Electric motor igniting car 

" wires 
Explosion and ignition of chemicals 
Fireworks 
Friction 
Fumigating . 
Gas, escaping 
" explosion of . 
" jet setting fire 
" stove, careless use of, and explosion 
Kerosene, to light fire . 
Incendiary 

' ' supposed 

Lamp explosion 

" upsetting and breaking 
Light mistaken for fire . 
Lightning 
Matches and rats . 

" " children . 

" careless use of . 
Meat burning on stove . 
Naphtha, careless use of, and ignition 
Oil stove, careless use of and explosion 
Overheated boiler or steam-pipe 

" stove or furnace 

Plastering, drying . 
Plumber's stove upsetting 
Rekindling of ruins 
Set by boys . 



104 
63 
29 
26 
48 
281 
44 
66 
143 
30 
14 
1 
7 
4 
3 
1 
11 
20 
39 
3 
30 
5 
6 
2 
3 
53 
16 
2 
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36 
28 
74 
5 
4 
18 
66 
128 
12 
25 
87 
15 
61 
3 
5 
3 
72 



20 



City Document No. 16. 



Slacking of lime .... 








4 


Smoky chimneys .... 
" stove or furnace . 








36 
68 


Sparks from another fire 
" " boiler 








7 
4' 


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" " engine or locomotive 








32 
45 


" ' k forge 








1 


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IS 


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4 

1 


Spontaneous combustion 








61 


Steam escaping 

Unknown .... 








4 

597 


Water pipes thawing out 
Water-back bursting 








33 

2 


Wood in oven igniting . 








6 


Total 


2,651 


Extinguished by 




Extinguishers ....... 


. 468 


Buckets of water ....... 


297 


Chemical engines 


475 


Hydrant stream ....... 


. 175 


Steamers ........ 


377 


Miscellaneous, brooms, stamping out, and smothering 


185 


Citizens . . . - 


261 


Sprinklers ..... 


• 


• • 


5 



Summary of underground construction in Roxbury and 
West Roxbury, and extension, renewal and repair work done 
for the maintenance and operation of the Fire-alarm system 
for the year ending January 31, 1905 : 



New wire used 

Old wire taken down 

Overhead cable put up 

" " taken down 

Conductors in cable put up 

" " " taken down 

Underground cable used in ducts owned by N. E 

Telephone and Telegraph Co. 
Same used in Fire-alarm ducts, service connec 

tions, etc. (new construction) 
Total underground cable used (new construction), 



. 100,320 


feet 


. 184,800 


u 


4,796 


a 


1,626 


u 


. 26,767 


u 


. 13,612 


it 


. 18,923 


u 


2,958 


(< 


), 21,881 


u 



Fire Department. 



21 



376,616 


feet. 


2,147 


u 


29,036 


i i 


241,318 


i i 


6,065,407 


i i. 


1,934 


i i 


21,434 


s. i 


1,180 


u 


14,869 


k i 




4 






24 






30 






3 



Conductors in same . 

Cable used for repairs 

Conductors in same . 

Total underground cable in use 

Conductors in same . 

Ducts built by this department 

Total ducts owned by city . 

Marine cable used for repairs 

Conductors in same . 

Manholes built . 

Service connections . 

Boxes built over 

New boxes put in service . 

New auxiliary boxes . 

Boxes equipped with keyless doors 

Boxes placed on lamp-posts 

Lamp-posts set ....... 9 

Lamp-posts reset for cause ...... 5 

Cross-arms used ....... 176 

Boxes now in service . . . . . . 667 

The following boxes are private property : 113, 115, 117, 119, 
149, 152, 161, 163, 164, 166, 212, 223, 228, 244, 271, 279, 281, 
283, 297, 299, 342, 422, 433, 434, 442, 443, 445, 446, 447, 448, 
449, 466, 467, 468, 475, 495, 533, 617, 619, 624, 629, 698, 711, 
714, 715, 716, 718, 722, 724, 725, 726, 727, 728, 729, 731, 733, 
734, 735, 736, 737, 738, 739, 741, 742, 744, 745, 746, 755, 758, 
759, 762, 766, 767, 773, 776, 778, 779, 791, 792, 793, 794, 795, 
796, 798, 799, 828, 838, 842, 864, 865, 875, 919, 927, 967, 971, 
974. 

Bell alarms struck in year ending December 31, 1904, 1,580 

Blows struck on bells, gongs and tappers . . 11,137,692 



Alarm Bells. 

The Fire-alarm telegraph is connected with the following 
bells : 



Adams School-house, Sumner street, East Boston, steel, 2,995 
lbs., owned by city. 

Bunker Hill School -house, Charlestown, composition, 2,009 
lbs., owned by city. 

Engine-house No. 16, Temple street, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 4,149 lbs., owned by city. 

Engine-house No. 17, Meeting House Hill, Dorchester, com- 
position, 4,000 lbs., owned by city. 

Engine-house No. 19, Mattapan, Dorchester, composition, 
2,927 lbs., owned by city. 



22 City Document No. 16. 

Engine-house No. 20, Walnut street, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 3,061 lbs., owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 28, West Roxbury, composition, 4,000 lbs., 

owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 29, Brighton, steel, .1,535 lbs., owned by 

city. 
Old Engine-house, Mt. Vernon street, West Roxbury, steel, 

1,000 lbs., owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 34, Brighton, composition, 1,501 lbs., 

owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 41, Allstou, composition, 800 lbs., owned 

by city. Formerly used on house of Engine No. 2. 
Engine-house No. 45, Roslindale, composition, 1,059 lbs., 

owned by city. 
Lewis School-house, Dale street, Roxbury, composition, 

3,104 lbs., owned by city. 
Maverick-street Church, East Boston, composition, 2,000 lbs. 
Princeton-street School-house, East Boston, composition, 

2,470 lbs., owned by city. 
Saratoga-street M. E. Church, East Boston, steel, 1,968 lbs., 

owned by city. 

Bells owned by the city, which have been disconnected 
from service, are located as follows : 

Berkeley Temple, composition, 2,941 lbs. Formerly used on 
Quincy School-house. 

Chapman School-house, steel, 3,109J lbs., taken down and 
stored by Public Buildings Department. 

City Hall, Charlestown, composition, 3,600 lbs. 

Engine-house No. 1, Dorchester street, South Boston, com- 
position, 2,911 lbs. 

Engine-house No. 18, Harvard street, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 3,184 lbs. 

Engine-house, No. 21, Columbia road, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 3,026 lbs. 

Faneuil Hall, steel, 5,816 lbs. 

Ladder-house No. 4, Dudley street, Roxbury, composition, 
3,509 lbs. 

Lawrence School-house, B street, South Boston, steel, 3,400 lbs. 

Lincoln School-house, Broadway, South Boston, composition, 
3,110 lbs. 

Smith-street School-house, Roxbury, composition, 4,083 lbs. 

Ticknor School-house, Dorchester street, Washington Village, 
steel, 2,995 lbs., taken down and stored by School Depart- 
ment. 



Fire Department. 23 

Trinity Church, Trenton street, East Boston, composition, 
1,760 lbs. Formerly used on Castle-street Church. 

Van Nostrand's Brewery, Charlestown, composition, 818 lbs. 
Formerly used on Boylston School-house. 

Warren School-house, Charlestown, composition, 3,000 lbs. 

Winthrop School-house, Charlestown, composition, 3,000 lbs., 
taken down and stored by Public Buildings Department. 

Public Clocks. 

The following public clocks, thirty-five in number, are 
taken care of by the Fire Department: 

City Proper. 

Arlington-street Church. 

Charles-street Church. 

Christ Church, Salem street, owned by city. 

Commercial Wharf. 

Odd Fellows' Hall, Tremont street, owned by city. 

Old South Church, owned by city. 

Old State House, owned by city. 

Park-street Church. 

Suffolk County Jail, owned by city. 

St. Stephen's Church, Clark street, owned by city. 

Shawmut-avenue Church. 

Tremont M. E. Church, owned by city. 

Young Men's Christian Union, owned by city. 

South Boston. 

Gaston School-house, owned by city. 
Lincoln School-house, owned by city. 
Phillips Church, owned by city. 

St. Augustine Church, Dorchester street, owned by city. 
Ticknor School-house, Washington Village, owned by city, 
taken down and stored by School Department. 

East Boston. 

London-street Church, owned by city. 
Lyceum Hal], owned by city. 
Trinity Church, owned by city. 
Orient Heights Church, owned by city. 

Roxbury. 

Winthrop-street Church, owned by city. 

Boston Elevated Railway Car-house, Columbus avenue, 
owned by city. 



24 City Document No. 16. 



Dorchester. 

Baker Memorial (Upham's Corner), owned by city. 
Neponset Church. 

Tileston school (Mattapan), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church (Milton Lower Mills). 

Charlestown. 

Bunker Hill Church. 

City Hall, owned by city. 

High School-house, owned by city. 

Unitarian Church. 

West Roxbury. 

Dr. Strong's Church (South Evangelical), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church, Jamaica Plain, owned by city. 
Congregational Church (Roslindale), owned by city. 

Brighton. 
Bennett School-house, owned by city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin F. Underhill, 

Secretary. 



Note. — Henry S. Russell, Fire Commissioner for over ten 
years, died February 16, 1905. 

Patrick J. Kennedy, Wire Commissioner, was appointed Acting 
Fire Commissioner until permanent appointment was made. 

Benjamin W. "Wells was appointed to the position and took 
office March 20, 1905. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 









YEAR 1905-1906 




BOSTON 
MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE 

1906 



Compliments of 



Benjamin W. Wells. 



FIRE COMMISSIONER. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE 



YEAR 1905-1906 




BOSTON 
MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE 

1906 



2 City Document No. 16. 

Inckease in Days Off. 

In December, 1905, by order of the city government, the 
number of days off allowed to the men was increased from 
one day in eight to one day in five. 

In addition to the permanent appointments, 29 temporary 
men were employed; these men were chosen from the call 
force. The purpose of the temporary appointments being 
that these men could be discharged, if the change in days off 
should not be permanent, or if the appropriation for the fol- 
lowing year should be inadequate to cover the increase of 
cost. The Commissioner did not approve of the change at the 
time made, as no consideration was given to the needs and 
conditions of the department, or any arrangement made, other 
than a temporary one, which would guarantee the further 
financing of the increased cost, estimated at $80,000 per year. 
It not being possible to immediately increase the number of 
engineers, there being no eligible list on the Civil Service of 
this class, the extra time has not been granted them, but an 
allowance of pay has been made equal to the time lost. As 
soon as the department engine school can qualify the neces- 
sary number, they will be granted the time off. 

Inspections. 

A new feature of the work of the year has been the 
inspection and drill of the entire department. Every com- 
pany, with its apparatus, was ordered to the Headquarters 
yard, three or four companies reporting at a time, ladder, 
engine, chemical or tower, for example. A regular fire drill 
was held under the direction of the Chief of Department; 
ladder companies throwing ladders, ventilating, etc., engine 
companies running lines to the top of buildings, playing 
streams, siamesing, etc. Scaling ladders and life nets, etc., 
were used. Every piece of apparatus, numbering 43 engines, 
27 ladder trucks, 10 chemicals, 3 water towers, 2 combination 
wagons and 14 chiefs' wagons were thoroughly inspected, 
and all the equipment, tools and appliances were carefully 
examined. Useless equipment was discarded and all the 
companies supplied with a uniform outfit. Worn out tools, 



Fire Department. 3 

ropes, nets, etc., were replaced with new, and needed additional 
equipment furnished. The fire-boat was also given a thor- 
ough test. 

The Department Veterinary Surgeon made a careful exam- 
ination of all horses and harnesses ; engines were thoroughly 
examined by the Assistant Superintendent of the Repair 
Shop, the expert in charge of this branch of the service. 

These inspections and drills gave the Chief of Depart- 
ment an opportunity to see and judge all his officers and 
men in action under conditions more favorable for observa- 
tion than at a fire, and furthermore, he had an opportunity 
to meet the men in the outlying districts, who seldom come 
under his immediate direction. 

New Apparatus. 

Owing to the fact that the appropriation for the year had 
been made when the present Commissioner took office, and 
he believing that the greatest need for the moment was an 
increase in the force, the purchase of new apparatus was 
practically limited to two engines and two hose wagons, 

Nine thousand six hundred feet of hose was purchased. 

Report of the Committee of Twenty. 

The Committee of Twenty of the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters made a thorough investigation of the Fire 
Department conditions existing in this city. Their exhaust- 
ive report on the whole gave the department credit ; many 
recommendations were made, some already advised by the 
department, and some that were new. In the main their 
conclusions were in accord with the ideas of the department. 

Fire Badges. 
A great number of persons presenting badges of many 
kinds and issues at the fire lines, claiming the right of admis- 
sion, made it impossible for the police to know which badges 
were authorized. A change was, therefore, made and orders 
issued to the police that only persons holding the celluloid 
badge issued by this department or the badge newly designed 
for the press, giving the name of the paper thereon, and fur- 



4 City Document No. 16. 

nished by the department on requisition from the city editors 
and paid for by them, were entitled to entrance. Thus the 
department fully controls the number to be admitted within 
the lines, and the work of the police at fires is greatly 
simplified. 

Theatres. 

I believe that the responsibility and powers of the 
Fire Commissioner in connection with theatre fire risks 
should be greatly increased. At the present time theatres 
are inspected weekly by this department, as regards their fire 
apparatus equipment. Matters pertaining to construction 
and arrangement of exits belong to the Building Depart- 
ment. The Police Department has certain other responsi- 
bilities, and the Mayor is supreme in the issuance of licenses. 

No firemen are detailed to theatres at times of performances, 
and, as far as this department is informed, overcrowding and 
dangerous conditions on the stage are not looked after by 
any one. 

Bell Alarms in Outlying Districts. 

Citizens of West Roxbury, Dorchester and Jamaica Plain 
complained of the many alarms struck on the bells for boxes 
not responded to by the local apparatus. To overcome this 
grievance, switches were installed in the fire houses in those 
sections, and now only alarms on bells are struck, if the com- 
pany responds or is due on the second alarm. This is also 
an improvement, for the reason that the call-men for whose 
benefit the alarms in those sections are given, when hearing 
the bell, know it is for them, and start immediately without 
waiting as before to count the box number. 

Explosives. 

The supervision and regulation of the keeping, handling 
and transportation of all explosives was, in 1904, by a legis- 
lative act, transferred from the Fire Commissioner to the State 
police. This I believe to have been an error, and that the Fire 
Commissioner should have this responsibility. The State 
police have neither the time nor the men to give this proper 
attention. The reason for the change, as far as I know, was 
to make it possible to control the transportation of explosives 
where it passed from one town to another, and was the 
direct result of the Melrose disaster, where explosives in 
transit to that city exploded with fatal effect. Under the 
law, as amended in 1905, the State police may appoint the 
Fire Commissioner to act in their place, and under such 




Fire Department. 5 

arrangements as they may direct. No action has been taken, 
however, by the State police, and this department has volun- 
tarily assumed the task of supervising the loading of all 
explosives brought by water or rail on to teams, the chief of 
the district detailing a man for this purpose and reporting 
daily to the Commissioner every shipment. This department, 
however, has no authority in the premises, and denies any 
responsibility for accidents that may happen, and such super- 
vision as is now exercised is entirely voluntary, and should, 
under the law, be conducted by the State police. Over 
1,300 examinations and reports were made. There should 
be a charge to cover the time of the men detailed for this 
inspection service. Supervision of explosives in transit is 
made only in exceptional cases. The form of report is as 
follows : 

[Form 17.1 
No. 

BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

District No 

Boston 1< 

Explosive No. cases each containing lbs. 

Shipped by 

Consigned to 

Via 

Description of Vehicle 

Owner Driver 

Landed and Loaded Time M . 

Name of Detail Co 

Left Quarters M. 

Returned M. 

Remarks. 



Signed District Chief. 

Change in Districts. 

A change was made in districts 5 and 6 by the addition of 
a slice from the latter to the former, and the headquarters of 
the Chief of District 5 being changed from Mason street, city 
proper, to Pittsburgh street, South Boston. 

The quarters of the Chief of Department and Assistant 
Chief are on Mason street; therefore it was desirable to place 



6 City Document No. 16. 

the District Chief elsewhere, and he now covers a very 
important and growing section of South Boston, separated 
from the city proper by a narrow channel. In this section 
are located many large manufacturing plants, wool storage 
houses and other large storage buildings, freight yards and 
elevators. The headquarters of the South Boston chief is a 
long distance away, whereas the new arrangement of assign- 
ing the district chief to the Pittsburgh-street house brings him 
into the very heart of this new section, and yet not far away 
from the rest of his district. 

Licenses for Fireworks. 

In issuing the licenses for fireworks a provision was 
inserted reading as follows : 

Conditions of License. 

" This license will be forfeited if combustible or inflammable 
matter is kept in this store. 

The entire amount of fireworks that may be kept in any build- 
ing at any one time by reason of this liceuse shall not exceed 
$200 in value, except by special permission. 

Under this license the licensee is forbidden to keep for sale the 
following articles : 

Firecrackers of greater length than six inches ; 

Blank cartridge pistols ; 

Cartridges or fixed ammunition to anyone under seventeen years 
of age ; 

Explosives known as the cane or potash dextrine tablet, or any 
of similar kind or power. 

Fireworks shall not be stored in wagons and handled therefrom 
without first receiving from the Fire Commissioner approval of 
location." 

Every dealer was presented a large card stating the pro- 
visions of the license ; the card to be placed in the window 
and in a conspicuous place in the building. This gave the 
police more effective supervision, and the opportunity to see 
that the law was complied with. 

As a result the sale of toy pistols, cane or potash dextrine 
tablets, or any of similar power, was practically stopped, the 
dealers very willingly co-operating with the department and 
giving up the sale of these dangerous articles. 

Emergency Contractors. 

Arrangements were made with certain large contractors 
in each district to immediately furnish on notice by tele- 
phone men, teams, lifting apparatus and other equipment, 



Fire Department. 7 

which might be needed in the event of a collapsed building 
or other accident of similar nature ; heretofore, there being 
no such arrangement, great delay had ensued in cases of 
need. Now within a very few minutes help can be sum- 
moned to any section of the city. 

Metropolitan Boston. 

Arrangements are being perfected whereby the apparatus 
of cities and towns bordering on the Boston line will, when 
desirable, send and receive assistance on alarms of fire. This 
includes Brookline, Cambridge, Milton, Newton, Somerville, 
Winthrop, Chelsea and Dedham. Cambridge, Somerville 
and Brookline will receive and furnish all alarms, and a 
regular mutual running card will be prepared. The manu- 
facturing section of Cambridge can be quickly covered by 
powerful engines from Boston in the event of a bad fire. 
Cambridge can furnish assistance to the Brighton District 
in three minutes, whereas the home third-alarm apparatus 
takes not less than twenty-five minutes. Brookline and 
Somerville have stations very near the Boston line. 

Arrangements have been made with the railroads, as a 
result of the delay in furnishing help to Brockton, that the 
yard masters have authority to immediately provide a train at 
the nearest loading station in the event of calls for assistance 
from other cities or towns. Blockings have been prepared 
so that the apparatus can be quickly and properly fastened 
to the cars. 

Card System. 

A card system of keeping the records of the men was 
installed, and greatly simplifies the work as well as making 
it possible for the Commissioner and Chief of Department to 
act in cases of promotions, transfers, credits or discipline 
with greater knowledge and care. The cards are as follows : 

Card No. 1. 

(Filled in by member.) 
Name . Badge Number 



Address Height . 

Date appointed Weight 

When born C. S. per cent 

Where born 

Single, Married Remarks 

Previous Occupation. ... 

Date of leaving service. 

Cause 

Assigned Transfers 

Date 

Company 

, Promotions 



City Document No. 16. 



Card No. 2 
Card No. 3 
Card No. 4 
Card No. 5 
Card No. 6 
Card No. 7 

These have been posted back ten years. 



Photograph. 

Remarks. 

Credits. 

Discipline. 

Injuries. 

Sick Leaves. 



The following card was provided the district chiefs to 
record their building inspections. This makes the records 
uniform, and the inspection service more efficient: 



Street and No 

Owner 

Occupant 

Purpose Weight on floors . . 

Stories Material Class 

Size x x Wooden Chutes. 

Heat Light Power 

Explosives Compounds Where kept 

Acids Kind " " 

Stairways Elevators 

Fire Appliances Hatchway 

Fire Escapes Standpipe Connections 

Entrances Sprinkler 

tt, , , „ Automatic Alarm 

Entrance to cellar Watchman. .. Shutters 

Kind of roof Access to roof Partition walls.. 

No. of Employees Male Female Total . 

Condition Fires 

Built Inspected 

Number of Hydrants within 500 feet Inspected by 



Alarms and Losses foe the Year. 

The number of alarms received for the year were as 
follows : 



Bell 
Still 



Total 



1,781 
1,210 

2,991 



The three serious fires of the year were : 

Hoosac Tunnel Docks, February 21 
Leatherbee Lumber Company, June 23 
Dean Building, 54 India street, December 17 



$355,500 
207,000 
100,000 



3 fires were in excess of 
2 " '■« " 

13 " " " 



$100,000 
50,000 
25,000 



Fire Department. 



8 fires were in excess of 


17 


a 


a 


u 


21 


n 


a 


1 1 


126 


a 


t< 


k t 


132 


i i 


a 


c t 


553 


a 


u 


u 


862 


a 


under 




854 


a 


no loss 





Fire losses for the year were 
Insurance 



$15,000 

10,000 

5,000 

1,000 

500 

100 

50 



. 82,071,189 

. 24,898,200 



Recommendations. 

Under present conditions water-front conflagrations are to 
be feared. 

A new fire-boat is most urgently needed. The present 
situation invites disaster, and the department again calls the 
attention of the city government and the Board of Fire 
Underwriters to the danger. 

New apparatus houses should be located in Dorchester and 
the Forest Hills section of West Roxbury. 

A certain section of Dorchester, owing to the rapid build- 
ing up of large wooden apartment and other houses placed 
very near together, presents a serious condition. 

The present combination wagon house on Winthrop street, 
Charlestown, should be remodelled and a large-sized engine 
placed therein to protect the very important Charlestown 
water-front and Navy Yard. 

An engine company should be placed in the house in Pea- 
body square, Ashmont, now occupied by Combination 1, and 
the combination wagon should be shifted to the neighborhood 
of Lauriat avenue. 

A new house should be located in the vicinity of Hay- 
market square. The house of Ladder 1, never fit for the 
occupancy of a company of men, should be condemned, 
and Ladder 1 and a new engine company placed in the new 
quarters. 

The house of Ladder 17 should be enlarged by the addition 
of one story. The present quarters are extremely cramped 
and unsuited for the comfort or convenience of the men. 

A very serviceable addition to the strength of the depart- 
ment would be the location of a chemical engine company on 
Battery street, near Hanover, on the land now vacant belong- 
ing to the Police Department in the rear of Station 8. 

The quarters of Ladder 7 and Engine 17 at Meeting 
House Hill are old and unsuited for the service. The 



10 City Document No. 16. 

School Department desires the space now occupied by these 
houses, and the district would be better protected by the 
removal to a point near Field's Corner. 

The growing sections of Brighton should also be covered 
by the addition of a combination ladder truck. 

Other sections of the city also now need, or will in the 
near future, additional fire protection, but the points men- 
tioned are, at this time, the most important. 

An addition should be built to the veterinary hospital 
for the isolation of new horses and horses affected with con- 
tagious diseases, and also for the storage of a coal wagon for 
the exercising and training of new horses. 

On nearly all in-town apparatus larger bells should be 
placed, the increase in street noises making the present 
equipment insufficient. 

Sixty-eight (68) call men are still employed in the ser- 
vice. These should be replaced by permanent men, as the 
districts in which they serve have grown rapidly and are 
entitled to full protection. 

The use of automobiles for the district chiefs is very desir- 
able, a good, thorough test having been given by the Chief of 
Department, who is provided with one: In some of the out- 
lying districts, the distance to be covered daily by the chief 
in his inspection of quarters is over ten miles, taking a good 
portion of his time and tiring the horse. The prompt arrival 
of the chief at fires is of the greatest importance. 

The salt-water system could be extended to advantage, 
and a pumping station installed to take the place of the fire- 
boat, which is now called upon for this service, and in the 
event of a big fire would be greatly needed elsewhere. 

The placing of the wires underground should be under- 
taken at once in Charlestown, a portion of South Boston and 
East Boston. The City Proper is already so equipped. 

Organization. 

Commissioner, Benjamin W. Wells; term expires May, 1907. 

Secretary, Benjamin F. Underbill. 

Chief of Department, William T. Cheswell. 

Assistant Chief, John A. Mullen. 

Second Assistant Chief and Chief of District 9, Nathan L. 

HUSSET. 

Note. — Henry S. Eussell, Fire Commissioner for over ten years, died 
February 16, 1905. Patrick J. Kennedy, Wire Commissioner, was ap- 
pointed Acting Fire Commissioner until permanent appointment was 
made. Benjamin W. Wells was appointed to the position and took 
office March 20, 1905. 



Fire Department. 



11 



District Chiefs. 



District. 






Headquarters. 


1. 


Patrick E. Keyes .... Ladder House 2 


2. 


Charles H. W. Pope . 






" 9 


3. 
4. 


Joseph M. G-arrity 
Peter F. McDonough 






Engine House 4 


5. 


Daniel F. Seunott * 






Ladder House 1 8 


6. 


Edwin A. Perkins 






Engine House 1 


7. 

8. 


John Grady 
Hiram D. Smith 






" 22 
Ladder House 12 


9. 
10. 


Nathan L. Hussey 
Willis ton A. Gay lord 






" 4 
Engine House 18 


11. 


John F. Ryan 






" 41 


12. 


William Childs . 






28 



Superintendent of Fire Alarms, Brown S. Flanders. 
Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms, Cyrus A. George. 
Superintendent of Repair Shop, Henry M. Hawkins. 
Assistant Superintendent of Repair Shop, Eugene M. Byington. 
Veterinary Surgeon, George W. Stimpson. 
Medical Examiner, Rufus W. Sprague. 
Purchasing Officer, Charles A. Straw. 





Roll of 


Merit. 




Nathan L. Hussey .... Engine 23. 


Edward H. Sawyer 










Ladder 4. 


Edward H. Sawyer 










" 4. 


James F. Bailey . 










" 17. 


Eugene Rogers . 










— 


Peter Callahan . 










Engine 4. 


Joseph A. Kelley 










Chemical 1. 


Timothy J. Heffron 










Engine 4. 


James E. Downey 










" 6. 


Frederick F. Leary 










Ladder 12. 


Florence Donoghue 










Combination 8. 


James J. O'Connor 










Engine 7. 


James F. McMahon 










Combination^. 


Martin A. Kenealy 










Engine 7. 


Denis Driscoll 










" 7. 


William H. Magner 










Ladder 8. 


Thomas J. Muldoon . 










Chemical 8. 


Dennis Magee 










Combination^. 


Joseph P. Hanton 










Ladder 17. 


Michael J. Teehan 










" 17. 


Charles W. Conway 










" 13. 


Michael J. Dacey 










" 13. 


Patrick E. Keyes 










District 1. 



•Promoted May 12, 1905. 



12 



City Document No. 16. 



Members Ketired during the Year. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Company. 


Year. 


Am't. 


Engine 10.. 


April 5, 1905. 


$600 


Engine 5.. 


" 7,1905. 


125 


Engine 17.. 


" 7, 1905. 


125 


Engine 20.. 


May 5, 1905. 


125 


Engine 2.. 


" 15, 1905. 


600 


Engine 34.. 


June 16, 1905. 


600 


Engine 42.. 


" 14, 1905. 


600 


Ladder 10.. 


" 23, 1905. 


125 


Engine 5.. 


July 1, 1905. 


125 


Ladder 23.. 


1, 1905. 


600 


Engine 16.. 


Aug. 25, 1905. 


125 


Engine 1.. 


" 28, 1905. 


800 


Engine 2.. 


Oct. 6, 1905. 


600 


Ladder 7 . . 


" 13, 1905. 


125 


Ladder 25.. 


Nov. 21, 1905. 


600 


Engine 32.. 


Jan. 5, 1906. 


800 


Engine 37-. 


" 19, 1906. 


650 



Calvin C.Wilson 

George S. Smith 

John F. Greenwood. . 

Joseph H. Hoyt 

John A. Mahegan — 

James M. Grace 

Edward B. Sproul — 
Augustus W. Sprague 
John E.Wharton. ... 
Ignatius H. Dooley. . . 

John Hutchinson 

Charles P. Smith 

James D. Fitzgerald. . 

Edmund Fruean 

Joseph MacDonough.. 

George F. Titus 

Michael J. Slattery — 



Assistant Engineer.. 
Call Man 

Hoseman 

Assistant Engineer... 
Call Man 

Ladderman 

Call Man 

Captain 

Hoseman 

Call Man 

Ladderman 

Captain 

Engineer 



Mortality. 

During the- year the department has lost the following 
members by death : 



Name. 


Appointment. 


Rank. 


Date of Death. 


Col. H. S. Russell 


Jan. 

April 


21, 1S95. 
21, 1891. 




Feb. 
March 


16, 1905 


William G. O'Neill.-.. 




23,1905. 


Edward H. Sawyer.... 


Dec. 


1872. 


District Chief, District 9. .. 


April 


5, 1905. 


Ratrick B. Hannon 


Sept. 


1, 1874. 


Foreman, Hose and Har- 


May 


27, 1905. 


Thomas S. Reynolds... 


Aug. 


8. 1892. 




27, 1905. 




April 


28, 1899. 


" Engine 40 


June 


17, 1905. 


Kenneth T. Harvey. . . 


Jan. 


10, 1898. 




July 


7, 1905. 


James L. Crowley 


Jan. 


1879. 
1, 1874. 


Operator, Fire Alarm 


Sept. 


21, 1905. 


Peter Murphy — 


Lieutenant, Ladder 11 


4, 1905. 


Charles A. Trites 


March 


22, 1902. 


Teamster, Fire Alarm 


Nov. 


26, 1905. 









Fire Department. 



13 



Deaths of Retired Members. 



Theodore W. Nelson 
Charles D. Sampson 
George J. Wall . 
Thomas W. Conway 
James E. Burg- 
Francis Swift 
James M. Grace 
Alexander Saunders 
James P. Bowles 
Robert H. Pratt . 



The Commissioner takes this opportunity to compliment 
and. thank the officers and men of the department for the 
good work of the year. Their service has been prompt, 
efficient and willing, and breaches of discipline calling for 
correction by the Commissioner have been comparatively few, 
showing a spirit to be commended and appreciated. 



. Feb. 


15, 


1905 


. March 11, 


1905 


. March 22, 


1905 


. March 22, 


1905 


. May 


10, 


1905 


June 


5, 


1905 


. July 


30, 


1905 


Aug. 


2, 


1905 


. Oct. 


9, 


1905 


Jan. 


10, 


1906 



Force and P^ 


ly-roll, February 1, 1906 




Commissioner . 


$5,000 per annum 


Secretary 




2,500 


it 


Chief of Department 




3,500 


u 


Assistant Chief 




2,400 


it 


Second Assistant Chief 




2,200 


a 


Superintendent of Fire Alarms 


3,200 


it 


Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms 


2,000 


1 t 


Superintendent of Repair Shop 


2,000 


u 


Assistant Superintendent of Repair Shop 


1,800 


a 


Veterinary Surgeon 


2,000 


a 


Assistant Veterinary Surg 


'eon . 


1,400 


i. i 


Medical Examiner . 




1,100 


a 


Purchasing Officer . 




1,800 


u 


Storekeeper 




1,200 


1 1 


Master Carpenter 




1,300 


u 


Master Painter 




1,300 


1 1 


Bookkeeper 




1,650 


u 


3 Clerks 




1,400 


u 


1 1 District Chiefs 




2,000 


(t 


54 Captains . 




1,600 


u 


73 Lieutenants 




1,400 


a 


1 Engineer . 




1,400 


a 


46 Engineers 




1,300 


a 


1 Engineer . 




1,100 


a 


1 Engineer . 




1,000 


a 


40 Assistant Engineers 




1,200 


a 


5 Assistant Engineers 




1,100 


a 


2 Assistant Engineers 




1,000 


a 



14 



City Document No. 16. 



537 Permanent men : 

370 at . 

43 at . 

44 at . 
37 at . 
43 at . 
68 Call-men : 

4 at . 

64 at . 

10 Chief Drivers 

2 " 
2 
1 Watchman 

3 Hostlers (average) 
1 Horseshoer 



Fire-alarm Force 

6 Operators .... 

3 Assistant Operators 
1 Foreman of Construction . 
17 Telegraphers and Linemen (average), 



Repair-shop Employees 



1 Master Plumber 

1 Engineer 

1 Assistant Engineer 

1 Night Fireman 

1 

1 

2 

5 

1 

2 

1 

3 Blacksmiths' Helpers 

1 Hose and Harness-repairer 

1 " " " 

3 Laborers (average) 



Painter 

u 

Wheelwrights 

Machinists 

u 

Blacksmiths 



. $1,200 


per annum 


1,100 


a 


1,000 


u 


900 


i i 


720 


a 


250 


u 


200 


u 


1 

2 


75 per day 
00 " 


2 


25 " 


1,000 


per annum 


1 

3 


95 per day 
00 " 


$1,600 
1,200 


per annum 


2,000 
3 


00 per day 


EES. 

$1,300 
3 
3 


per annum 
25 per day 

00 " 


3 


45 


3 


75 « 


2 


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3 


25 " 


3 


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2 


08 " 



930 total force. 

Fire Districts. 
The city is divided into twelve fire districts as follows 

District 1. 
All that part of Boston known as East Boston. 



Note. — 29 Firemen temporarily employed. 



Fire Department. 15 

District 2. 
All that part of Boston formerly known as Charlestown. 

District 3. 

The territory bounded on the north and east by the water 
front, on the south by Summer street, and on the west by 
Washington street and Washington street North. 

District Jf. 

The territory bounded on the north by the Charles river, 
on the east by Washington street North and Washington 
street, on the south by Winter, Tremont, Boylston, Arling- 
ton, Beacon and Berkeley streets, and on the west by the 
Charles river. 

District 5. 

The territory bounded on the north by Winter and 
Summer streets, Dorchester avenue, Congress street, Fort 
Point channel and the harbor to B street, on the east by B 
street, on the south by First street, across Dorchester avenue 
and Fort Point channel to Broadway Extension, Pleasant 
street, Park square and Boylston street, and on the west by 
Tremont street. 

District 6. 

The territory bounded on the north by Broadway 
Extension across Fort Point channel and Dorchester avenue 
to First street, through First street to B street, on the west 
by B street to harbor line, by harbor line to Locust street, on 
the south by Locust and Dorset streets to the South bay and 
west by South bay to Broadway Extension bridge. 

District 7. 

The territory bounded on the west by the Charles river, 
on the north by Berkeley, Beacon, Arlington and Boylston 
streets, Park square, Pleasant street and Broadway Exten- 
sion, on the east by Fort Point channel and South bay and 
on the south by Massachusetts avenue and the Charles 
river. 

District 8. 

The territory bounded on the north by the Charles river 
and Massachusetts avenue, on the east by Washington street, 



16 City Document No. 16. 

on the south by Atherton and Mozart streets, Chestnut 
avenue, Sheridan and Centre streets, Hyde square, Perkins 
street, South Huntington avenue and Castleton street, across 
Jamaicaway to the Brookline line, and on the west by the 
Brookline line to Cottage Farm bridge. 

District 9. 

The territory bounded on the north by Massachusetts ave- 
nue, South bay, Dorset and Locust streets, on the east by 
Dorchester bay, on the south by Freeport, Hancock, Bowdoin 
and Quincy streets, Columbia road, and on the west by Seaver 
street, Columbus avenue and Washington street. 

District 10. 

That part of Dorchester bounded on the north by Seaver 
street, Columbia road, Quincy, Bowdoin, Hancock and Free- 
port streets, on the east by Dorchester bay, on the south by 
the Neponset river and the Hyde Park line, and on the west 
by Harvard street and Blue Hill avenue. 

District 11. 

All that part of Boston known as Brighton, and extending 
east as far as Cottage Farm bridge. 

District 12. 

All that part of Boston known as West Roxbury, bounded 
on the north by a line from the Brookline line across Jamaica- 
way to Castleton street, through Castleton street, South 
Huntington avenue and Perkins street, Hyde square, Centre 
and Sheridan streets, Chestnut avenue, Mozart and Atherton 
streets, Columbus avenue and Seaver street, and on the east 
by Blue Hill avenue and Harvard street, on the south by 
the Hyde Park and Dedham lines, and on the west by the 
Newton and Brookline lines. 

In all cases where streets are designated as boundaries, the 
centre of the street will be the dividing line. 

Assignment of Districts. 

Each district is placed under the charge of a District 
Chief as follows : 



Fire Department. 



17 





Chief in Command. 


Companies in Districts. 


District. 


Engines. 


CQ 

"To 
|| 
o 




00 

a 
o 

a 

o 

Q 


00* 

Bo 


1 


Patrick E. Keyes 

C. H.W.Pope 


5, 9, 11, 40 

27, 32, 36 

8, 25, 31, 44 

*4, 6, 10 

7, 26, 35, 38, 39 

*1,2, 15,43 

3, *22, 33 

13, 14, 37 

12, 21, 23, 24 

16, 17, *18, 19, 20 

29, 34, * 41 

*28, 30, 42, 45 


7 
9 

1 

8 

2,4 

12 

10 

6 
5 


*2,21 

* 9, 22 

*8, 14 

1,24 

17, *18 

5, 19, 20 

3, 13, 15 

* 12, 26 

*4, 23 

6, 7, 27 

11 

10, 16, 25 


2 

1 




o 




3 


Joseph M. Garrity 

Peter F.McDonough. .. 

Daniel F. Sennott 

Edwin A. Perkins 




4 


1 


5 


3 


6 




7 


2 


8 


Hiram D. Smith 

Nathan L. Hussey 

Williston A. Gaylord.. 




9 




10 




11 




12 


William Childs 









Headquarters of District Chief. 



The following property is in charge of the Fire Commis- 
sioner : 

Houses. 



Location. 



Number 
of feet 
in lot. 



Assessed 
Valuation 



Occupied by 



Dorchester and Fourth sts 

Corner of O and Fourth sts 

Bristol st. and Harrison ave 

Bulflnch st 

Marion st., East Boston 

Leverett st 

Eastst 

Salem st 

Paris St., East Boston 

River st 

Saratoga and Byron sts., East Boston 
Dudley st 



8,167 

4,000 
4,000 
6,098 

1,647 
2,269 
1,893 

2,568 
4,720 
1,886 
10,000 
7,320 



$25,800 

16,400 
30,000 
96,000 

9,000 
35,000 
36,400 
24,100 
29,700 
20,000 
38,500 
25,000 



Engine 1 and Ladder- 
house 5 on this lot. 

Engine 2. 

Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 

Engine 4, Chemical 1 and 
Tower 1. 

Engine 5. 

Engine 6. 

Engine 7. 

Engine 8. 

Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 

Engine 10. 

Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 

Engine 12. 



18 



City Document No. 16. 

Houses. — Continued. 



Location. 



Number 
of feet 
in lot. 



Assessed 
"Valuation. 



Occupied by 



Cabot st 

Centre st 

Dorchester ave 

Corner River and Temple sts 

Meeting House Hill, Dorchester Dis- 
trict 

Harvard st., Dorchester District 

Norfolk st., " " 

Walnut St., " " 

Columbia road, " " 

Warren ave 

Northampton st 

Corner Warren and Quincy sts 

Fort Hill so. 

Mason st 

Elm st., Charlestown District 

Centre st., Jamaica Plain 

Chestnut Hill ave., Brighton District, 

Centre st., WestRoxbury District 

Bunker Hill St., Charlestown District, 

Corner Boylston and Hereford sts.... 

Western ave., Brighton 

Monument st., Charlestown District, 

Corner Longwood and Brookline 
aves 

Congress st 

Sumner st., East Boston 

Harvard ave., near Cambridge St., 
Brighton District 

Washington, between Atherton and 
Beethoven sts '. 

Andrew sq 

Washington, corner Poplar st., Ros- 
lindale ,, 

Church st 

Shawmut ave 

Saratoga St., East Boston 

Bst 

Eustis st 



4,832 
5,713 
2,803 
12,736 

9,450 

9,440 
7,683 
9,000 
10,341 
7,500 
3,445 
4,186 
4,175 

5,623 

2,600 

10,377 

14,358 

12,251 

. 8,188 

5,646 

4,637 

5,668 

5,231 

4,000 
4,010 

6,112 



$16,000 
14,600 
20,000 
19,200 

17,300 

18,300 
14,200 
17,300 
17,100 
62,500 
11,200 
18,100 
92,300 

124,500 
18,000 
28,300 
37,200 
25,000 
26,200 
72,000 
17,800 
21,000 

14,000 
37,000 
18,000 

25,500 



3,848 


22,900 


5,133 


20,100 


14,729 


22,400 


3,412 


23,600 


889 


5,000 


9,300 


40,600 


1,804 


7,800 


1,790 


7,500 



Engine 13. 
Engine 14. 
Engine 15. 
Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 

Engine 17 and Ladder- 
house 7 on this lot. 

Engine 18. 

Engine 19. 

Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 

Engine 21. 

Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 

Engine 23. 

Engine 24. 

Engine 25, Ladder 8 and 
Ladder 14. 

Engines 26 and 35. 

Engine 27. 

Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 

Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 

Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 

Engine 32. 

Engine 33 and Ladder 15 

Engine 34. 

Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 

Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 
Engine 38 and 39. 
Engine 40. 

Engine 41 and Chemical 6. 

Engine 42 and Chemical 5. 
Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 

Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 
Chemical Engine 2. 
Chemical Engine 4. 
Chemical Engine 7. 
Chemical Engine 8. 
Chemical Engine 10. 



Fire Department. 

Houses. — Concluded. 



19 



Location. 



Number 
of feet 
in lot. 



Assessed 
Valuation. 



Occupied by 



Friend st 

Dudley st 

Main St., Charlestown 

Tremont st 

Harrison a ve 

Pittsburgh st., South Boston 
Dorchester ave., Ashmont. . 

Fourth st 

Washington st., Dorchester. 

Winthrop st 

North Grove st 



1,676 
3,923 
4,290 
4,311 

2,134 
8,964 
4,875 
3,101 
6,875 
3,000 
3,918 



$35,500 
26,000 
16,400 
25,700 

22,000 
35,400 
22,900 
11,000 
21,400 
13,200 
18,000 



Ladder 1. 

Ladder 4. 

Ladder 9 and Chemical 9. 

Ladder 12 and Chemical 
12. 

Ladder 17. 

Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 

Combination 1. 

Ladder 19. 

Ladder 23. 

Combination 2. 

Ladder 24. 



Assessed Valuation. 

Fuel-house, Dorchester street, 1,610 feet of land . $3,100 

Fuel-house, Salem street, 417 feet of land . . 3,600 

Fuel-house, Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet of 

land 7,000 

Headquarters building and repair-shop, corner of 

Albany and Bristol streets, 23,679 feet of land . 185,000 
Water Tower No. 2 and Wrecking Wagon are in 

Headquarters Building. 
Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet of 

land 39,500 

Fuel-house, Washington, near Dover street, 1,007 

feet of land 10,500 



20 



City Document No. 16. 



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28 



City Document No. 16. 



New Apparatus Purchased During the Year. 

1 Pope-Waverly electric automobile. 

1 Extra first-size Amoskeag engine. 

2 Extra size rubber tired hose wagons. 

1 Chief of Department wagon. 

2 District Chiefs' wagons. 
2 Engines rebuilt. 

Amount of hose purchased and condemned during the year 



Purchased. 


Condemned. 


Leading cotton, 11,900 feet. 


12,560 feet 


' ' rubber, — 


1,200 " 


Chemical, 1,500 " 


1,300 " 


Suction, 124 " 


123 " 



13,524 " 15,183 " 

Amount of hose in use and in store February 1, 1906 



In Use. 


In Store. 


Leading cotton, 88,907 feet. 


9,905 feet 


" rubber, 7,750 " 


250 " 


Chemical, 10,750 " 


450 " 


Suction, 1,191 " 


163 " 



108,598 



10,768 



Horses. 



Purchased during the year 

Sold or exchanged . 

Killed for cause 

Died . . . 

Retired 

Number in the department 



Expenditures for the Year. 



Salaries . 

Repairs of apparatus 

" " houses 
New apparatus 

" hose 
Repairs of hose 
Fuel 

Electric and gas-lighting 
Printing and stationery 
Furniture and bedding 
Small supplies . 
Horses — purchase and exchange 









57 








29 








16 








6 








7 








385 


$1,013,339 


89 


24,372 


03 


20,889 


29 


8,005 


33 


10,517 


77 


1,367 


67 


39,095 


95 


12,604 


89 


1,980 


97 


3,513 


91 


11,335 


88 




11, 


689 


23 



Fire Department. 



29 



Horse-hire and keeping 

Hay, grain and straw 

Washing ..... 

Shoeing ..... 

Harnesses and repairs * . 

Oils, chemicals, etc. 

Hats, badges and buttons 

Ladders and repairs 

Tools for repair-shop and mechanics 

Extra service .... 

Reservoirs and hydrants . 

Contingencies .... 

Pensions .... 

Rent for buildings, telephones, etc. 

Construction and material, fire-alarm branch 

Underground construction 



Income. 

Sale of manure 

Rent ..... 
Old material .... 
Licenses for the sale of fireworks 
Bath department, steam for Dover- 
house ..... 



$7,892 97 

40,026 36 

3,774 42 

21,962 26 

1,597 22 

3,738 71 

1,452 07 

422 27 

593 56 

794 06 

14 00 

5,542 56 

69,383 20 

10,975 38 

2,353 73 

12,212 43 





$1,341,448 01 




$25 00 




32 00 


. 


651 01 




927 00 


street bath- 




. 


6,636 18 




$8,271 19 



30 



City Document No. 16. 





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31 







Fires 


Extinguished by 








1905. 


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43 


18 


46 


5 


31 


15 


19 






47 
57 


18 
19 


59 
79 


10 

44 


39 
43 


25 

62 


24 
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1 




2 


May 


43 


21 


58 


18 


46 


12 


31 






40 

58 


18 
30 


48 
68 


23 

19 


28 
3S 


11 
8 


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1 




2 




30 


22 


33 


6 


35 


5 


18 


1 




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15 


31 


4 


23 


7 


14 






49 
53 

48 


21 
30 
24 


57 
68 
35 


20 
26 
15 


31 
62 

47 


8 
42 
16 


24 
18 
25 


9, 


November 




December 


- 




36 


25 


48 


10 


31 


13 


22 


3 


Totals 


528 


261 


630 


200 


454 2 


24 : 


259 


12 


Causes of Fires and Alak 


JIS F 


ROM F] 


SBRUARY 


1, 1 


905 


, TO 


Februar 


Y 1 


190€ 










Alarms, accidental automatic . 












109 


" false 




. 










82 


" out of city 




, 










29 


Ashes hot, in wooden receptac 


le 


. 










44 


Automobiles, igniting of 




, 










32 


Boiling over of fat or tar 




. 










29 


Bonfires, grass, rubbish, etc. . 




, 










360 


Careless use of lamps, candles 


etc. 


. 










36 


" " " pipes and cigar.' 


i in s 


tnoking 










57 


Chimneys, soot burning . 




. 










146 


" defective 




, 










34 


Clothes too near stove . 




, 










12 


Defective flue 




, 










5 


" stovepipe 




. 










4 


'' furnace . 




. 










8 


" gas pipe 


. 






. 










13 



32 



City Document No. 16. 



of, and explosion 



Electric motor ignitiug car 

' ' wires 
Explosion and ignition of chemicals 
Fireworks 
Friction 
Fumigating . 
Gas, explosion of . 
" jet setting fire 
" stove, careless use 
Kerosene, to light fire 
Incendiary 

' ' supposed 
Lamp explosion 

" upsetting and breaking 
Light mistaken for fire 
Lightning 

Matches and rats . 
" " children 

u careless use of 
Meat burning on stove 
Naphtha, careless use of, and ignition 
Oil stove, careless use of, and explosion 
Overheated boiler or steam-pipe 

" stove or furnace . 

Plastering, drying . 
Plumber's stove upsetting 
Rekindling of ruins 
Set by boys .... 
Slacking of lime 
Smoky chimneys . 

" stove or furnace . 
Sparks from another fire 

" " boiler 

" " chimney 

" " engine or locomotive 

" " forge 

" " furnace or stove 

" " open grate . 
Spontaneous combustion 
Steam escaping 
Street light .... 
Unknown .... 
"Water pipes thawing out 
Water-back bursting 
"Wood in oven igniting; . 



Total 



2,991 



Fire Department. 33 



Fire Alarm Branch. 

The new construction, extension and repair work done for 
the maintenance and operation of the Fire Alarm branch of 
this department, covering the period from February 1, 1905, 
to February 1, 1906, follows : 

The principal new work done has been underground con- 
struction in the district prescribed by the Commissioner of 
Wires for the year 1905. The districts prescribed were on 
Main street, Charlestown, and along the line of Meridian 
street, from Maverick square to Condor street, East Boston. 

Most of the work in Charlestown having been clone 
previously, in advance of any requirement of the Wire 
Department, it was thought advisable to go outside of the dis- 
trict prescribed in East Boston, consequently all the territory 
west of Meridian street was included in underground con- 
struction for the year. In addition to this, there has been 
considerable underground work done at Grove Hall, 
Dorchester, from the corner of Warren and Devon streets, 
through Warren to Washington street to house of Ladder 
No. 23, also on Washington street, from Erie to Park street. 

The circuits in East Boston are not only much improved 
by the underground construction, but their safety and effi- 
ciency have also been increased greatly by connecting them 
with headquarters through a 37-conductor cable placed in the 
tunnel, thereby abandoning the circuitous overhead construc- 
tion formerly running through Chelsea, which, with several 
marine cables under bridge draws, were a continual menace 
to the efficiency of the service, especially on occasions of 
severe storms. There is, however, an overhead loop still 
remaining, connecting a box and gong in the Chelsea police 
station with the Charlestown bell circuit. The wires form- 
ing this loop have been in use for a long time, and, if the 
apparatus is to be continued in service, should be renewed 
at the earliest practicable moment. The most advisable way 
to accomplish this seems to be to abandon the overhead con- 
struction at this point altogether and place the wires under- 
ground in similar manner to the work already completed. 

In order to effect a redistribution of fire-alarm boxes and 
reduce the number of them connected with circuits now in 
service, two new circuits should be built in Dorchester, one 
in Charlestown and one in Brighton as soon as circumstances 
will permit the work to be done, and, if the bell and gong 
service in East Boston is to be maintained on its present 
basis, a new circuit should be built in that district to operate 
a part of the apparatus now connected with circuit 62. 



34 



City Document No. 16. 



The telephone service, whiclriorms an important auxiliary 
to the fire-alarm system, is to be improved soon by the 
installation of a new up-to-date switchboard at headquarters. 
The board now in use has been in service since the present 
plant was put in commission, May 20, 1895, and has not only 
become less efficient by continual use night and day, but it 
lacks man} 7 modern improvements which the requirements of 
the present service demonstrate to be necessary. Aside from 
this the apparatus equipment is in good condition and is 
doing satisfactory work. The motor-generators that furnish 
current for operating the system have maintained their 
standard of efficiency, and thus far, after nearly eleven years' 
service, have fully justified all expectations held at the time 
of their installation. 

In this connection it is recommended that another rapid 
action transmitter with all modern improvements be pur- 
chased and installed as an auxiliary to the one now in use ; 
this would obviate the necessity of resorting to the manual 
device now held in reserve to be used in the event of the 
present machine becoming disabled from any cause, and 
insure more accuracy and uniformity in the transmission of 
signals than could be obtained by sending them out by hand. 

No serious interruption to the service has been occasioned 
by storms or other causes, and the percentage of local defects 
in the mechanism of the apparatus operated to strike the 
alarms has been exceedingly small, considering the unusually 
large number that have been given within the time covered 
by this report. 

From January 1, 1905, to January 1, 1906, there have been 
1,905 alarms struck by the bells, gongs and tappers, being an 
excess of 272 over the number struck in 1903, the previous 
highest record. 

To give these alarms, together with striking the daily 
meridian blow, school signals and tolling the bells on several 
occasions, it required an approximation of nearly 14,000,000 
blows to be struck by the apparatus employed for that 
purpose. 

Some details of the work done and other statistics per- 
taining to the system are hereto appended : 



New wire used ..... 


. 100,390 feet 


Old wire taken down .... 


. 168,960 " 


Overhead cable put up 


7,658 " 


" " taken down 


2,836 " 


Conductors in cable put up 


51,036 " 


" " " taken down . 


16,862 " 



Fire Department. 



35 



Underground cable used in ducts owned by N. E 
Telephone and Telegraph Company . 

Same used in Fire-alarm ducts, service connec 
tions, etc. (new construction) . 

Same used in East Boston tunnel 

Total underground cable used (new construction) 

Conductors in same . 

Cable used for repairs 

Conductors in same . 

Total underground cable in use . 

Conductors in same . 

Ducts built by this department . 

Total ducts owned by city . 

Manholes built .... 

Service connections . 

Boxes built over 

Auxiliary boxes built over . 

New boxes put in service . 

New auxiliary boxes . 

Boxes equipped with keyless doors 

Boxes placed on lamp-posts 

Lamp-posts set . 

Lamp-posts reset for cause . 

Cross-arms used 

Boxes now in service . 



The following boxes are private property: 113, 115, 117, 119, 
149, 152, 161, 166, 212, 223, 228, 244, 271, 279, 281, 283, 297, 
299, 328, 342, 422, 433, 434, 442, 443, 445, 446, 447, 448, 449, 
466, 467, 468, 475, 495, 533, 617, 619, 624, 629, 698, 711, 714, 
715, 716, 718, 722, 725, 726, 727, 728, 729, 731, 733, 734, 735, 
736, 737, 738, 739, 741, 742, 743, 744, 745, 746, 755, 758, 759, 
762, 766, 767, 773, 776, 778, 779, 791, 792, 793, 794, 795, 798, 
799, 828, 838, 842, 864, 865, 875, 919, 927, 967, 971, 974. 

Bell alarms struck in year ending December 31, 1905, 1905 



20,622 feet. 


5,257 


u 


5,347 


u 


31,226 


u 


532,735 


a 


1,331 


C( 


28,619 


u 


272,544 


(t 


6,598,142 


tt 


4,392 


u 


25,826 


a 




2 


# 


39 


. 


20 


, 


21 


. 


7 


. 


6 


. 


13 




19 


. 


22 




5 


, 


356 


, 


677 



Alarm Bells. 

The Fire-alarm telegraph is connected with the following 
bells : 



Adams School-house, Sumner street, East Boston, steel, 2,995 
lbs., owned by city. 

Bunker Hill School-house, Charlestown, composition, 2,009 
lbs., owned by city. 

Engine-house No. 16, Temple street, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 4,149 lbs., owned by city. 

Engine-house No. 17, Meeting House Hill, Dorchester, com- 
position, 4,000 lbs., owned by city. 



36 City Document No. 16. 

Engine-house No. 19, Mattapan, Dorchester, composition, 

2,927 lbs., owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 20, Walnut street, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 3,061 lbs., owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 28, West Roxbury, composition, 4,000 lbs., 

owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 29, Brighton, steel, 1,535 lbs., owned by 

city. 
Old Engine-house, Mt. Vernon street, West Roxbury, steel, 

1,000 lbs., owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 34, Brighton, composition, 1,501 lbs., 

owned by city. 
Engine-house No. 41, Allston, composition, 800 lbs., owned 

by city. Formerly used on house of Engine No. 2. 
Engine-house No. 45, Roslindale, composition, 1,059 lbs., 

owned by city. 
Maverick-street Church, East Boston, composition, 2,000 lbs. 
Princeton-street School-house, East Boston, composition, 

2,470 lbs., owned by city. 

Bells owned by the city, which have been disconnected 
from service, are located as follows : 

Berkeley Temple, composition, 2,941 lbs. Formerly used on 
Quincy School-house. 

Chapman School-house, steel, 3,109i lbs., taken down and 
stored by Public Buildings Department. 

City Hall, Charlestown, composition, 3,600 lbs. 

Engine-house No. 1, Dorchester street, South Boston, com- 
position, 2,911 lbs. 

Engine-house No. 18, Harvard street, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 3,184 lbs. 

Engine-house No. 21, Columbia road, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 3,026 lbs. 

Faneuil Hall, steel, 5,816 lbs. 

Ladder-house No. 4, Dudley street, Roxbury, composition, 
3,509 lbs. 

Lawrence School-house, B street, South Boston, steel, 3,400 
lbs. 

Lincoln School-house, Broadway, South Boston, composition, 
3,110 lbs. 

Saratoga-street M. E. Church, East Boston, steel, 1,968 lbs. 

Smith-street School-house, Roxbury, composition, 4,083 lbs. 

Ticknor School-house, Dorchester street, Washington Village, 
'steel, 2,995 lbs., taken clown and stored by School Depart- 
ment. 



Fire Department. 37 

Trinity Church, Trenton street, East Boston, composition, 
1,760 lbs. Formerly used on Castle-street Church. 

Van Nostrand's Brewery, Charlestown, composition, 818 lbs. 
Formerly used on Boylston School-house. 

Warren School-house, Charlestown, composition, 3,000 lbs. 

Winthrop School-house, Charlestown, composition, 3,000 lbs., 
taken down and stored by Public Buildings Department. 

Public Clocks. 

The following public clocks, thirty-five in number, are 
taken care of by the Fire Department : 

City Proper. 
Charles-street Church. 

Christ Church, Salem street, owned by city. 
Commercial Wharf. 

Odd Fellows' Hall, Tremont street, owned by city. 
Old South Church, owned by city. 
Old State House, owned by city. 
Suffolk County Jail, owned by city. 
St. Stephen's Church, Clark street, owned by city. 
Shawmut-avenue Church. 
Tremont M. E. Church, owned by city. 
Young Men's Christian Union, owned by city. 

South Boston. 
Gaston School-house, owned by city. 
Lincoln School-house, owned by city. 
Phillips Church, owned by city. 

St. Augustine Church, Dorchester street, owned by city. 
Ticknor School-house, Washington Village, owned by city, 
taken down and stored by School Department. 

East Boston. 
London-street Church, owned by city. 
Lyceum Hall, owne d by city. 
Trinity Church, owned by city. 
Orient Heights Church, owned by city. 

Roxbury. 
Winthrop-street Church, owned by city. 
Boston Elevated Railway Car-house, Columbus avenue, 
owned by city. 



38 City Document jS t o. 16. 

Dorchester. 

Baker Memorial (Upharn's Corner), owned by city. 
Neponset Church. 

Tileston school (Mattapan), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church (Milton Lower Mills). 

Charlestoivn. 

Bunker Hill Church. 

City Hall, owned by city. 

High School-house, owned by city. 

West Roxbury. 

Dr. Strong's Church (South Evangelical), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church, Jamaica Plain, owned by city. 
Congregational Church (Roslindale), owned by city. 

Brighton. 
Bennett School-house, owned by city. 



The Fire Commissioner, as Treasurer of the Boston Fire- 
men's Relief Fund, acknowledges the following contribu- 
tions; these sums were accompanied by letters expressing- 
appreciation for services rendered by the department in 
extinguishing fire on the premises of the contributors : 

From February 1, 1905, to February 1, 1906. 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company . . . 8500 00 
George A. Draper, 297 Commonwealth avenue . 100 00 

Curtis Estate, Boston 100 00 

The receipts from the Annual Department Ball and con- 
tributions constitute the fund from which sick benefits and 
doctors' bills are paid. Destitute members of deceased fire- 
men's families are also given assistance from this fund. 

The Mayor and Fire Commissioner act as trustees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin W. Wells, 

Commissioner. 



DEATH OF 
FIRE COMMISSIONER HENRY S. RUSSELL. 

Resolutions passed at a special meeting of the Board of 
Aldermen, February 17, 1905 : 

Resolved, That the City Council has learned with profound 
regret of the death of Colonel Henry S. Russell, who has so con- 
scientiously and efficiently served the City of Boston as Fire 
Commissioner during the past ten years. 

Colonel Russell first entered the service of the city in 1878, as 
Chairman of Boston's original Police Commission. While his 
service in that office was brief, it was in all respects efficient and 
honorable. As a soldier in the war for the preservation of the 
Union, he won distinction by his gallantry and bravery. As a 
civic officer, he was esteemed for his lofty ideals and for his 
honesty, capacity and integrity. As a citizen, he was highly 
respected for his courtesy and his quiet, unobtrusive generosity. 

Resolved, That the City Council place upon record its deep . 
sense of the loss which the community has sustained through his 
death. 

The resolutions were adopted in concurrence by a unani- 
mous rising vote. 

Extract from " Talk on the Boston Fire Department," by 
Fire Commissioner Benjamin W. Wells, before the Insurance 
Library Association, October 27, 1905 : 

" This brings us up to the appointment of Col. Henry S. Rus- 
sell in 1895, to fill for a few months an unexpired term on the 
old Board, and in July, 1895, to undertake, as the first single 
commissioner, the direction of the department. With full power 
to proceed as he thought best, succeeding conditions that were 
bad, he undertook the creation of a new fire department. A man 
of absolute integrity, with a high ideal of his duty to the public, 
full of enthusiasm, he applied his great energy to the work and 
won out. The public could judge of his work and its results. 
He was rewarded by receiving the confidence of the succeeding 
mayors, until the time that death closed his book of ten years of 
faithful service. He absolutely eliminated politics as a basis for 
appointment, promotion or other form of favor from the depart- 
ment. He made the houses of the department more sanitary, 
cheerful and livable. He raised the standard of the officer and 
the man ; he increased the efficiency of the apparatus and improved 
the methods of fighting fire. The citizens of Boston owed him a 
debt, and he received his payment in the satisfaction of knowing 
that his efforts were appreciated. So in the harness he passed 
away." 



tm^j^^ro) 21 



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