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Annual Report 

PHILADELPHIA 



1910 






THE GIFT OF 




25- 
A2_ 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF THE 

Department of Public Safety 



AND OF THE 



, CHIEF OF THE 



ELECTRICAL BUREAU 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1910 



ISSUED BY THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, 1911 



PHILADELPHIA 

DUNLAP PRINTING CO.. 1315-29 CHERRY STREET 

191 1 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1910 



3 

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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 

DECEMBER 31, 1910 



Director 
HENRY CLAY. 

Assistant Director, 
JAMES B. SHEEHAN, 

Secretary^ 
THOMAS B. BLYNN. 

Chief Clerk, 
WALTEB S. HOPPEE. 

Chiefs of Bureaus, 
Police— JOHN B. TAYLOR, Superintendent. 

TIMOTHY O'LEARY, Assistant Superintendent. 
FntE— nJAMES C. BAXTER, Jr., Chief Engineer. 
Electbical— JAS. F. McLAUGHLIN. 
City Pbopebty— ALFRED S. EISENHOWER. 
Building Inspection— EDWIN S. CLARK. 
BomcB Inspection— JOHN M. LUKENS. 
CoBBECTiON— WILLIAM A. PATTERSON. 
Elkvatob Inspection- frank FEENEY. 



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TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 



HENRY CLAY, Director 



Philadelpfiia, January, 1, 1911. 

Hon. John E. Reybubn, 

Mayor of the City, of Philadelphia. 

Sib : — In accordance with the Act of Assembly, I have 
the honor to herewith transmit a summary of the opera- 
tions of the Department, of Public Safety, togeliier with 
a report of the Chiefs of the several Bureaus embraced 
therein, for the year ending December 31, 1910. 

The year 1910 was important in achievements as shown 
by the reports of the various Bureau Chiefs. 

The efficient work executed by the Bureaus of Police 
and Fire, the accomplishments in the improved system of 
public lighting by the Electrical Bureau, and^ the close 
attention to business by every Bureau in the Department 
has made Philadelphia the best -lighted and, in all proba- 
bility, the best protected City from crime, danger and 

accident «f any Municipality in the world. 

... • 

Bureau of Police. 

The report of Superintendent Taylor shows 82,017 
arrests by the Bureau of Police, an increase of 1,183 over 
1909. Of these arrests 80,322 were by the uniformed 
police, and 1,695 by the detective service. There were 
38,456 arrests for intoxication and disorderly conduct, an 



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increase of 349. There were 4,242 robberies reported dur- 
ing the year, of which 3,230 were by sneak thieves, 766 
forcible entry, 162 highway robbery, 12 badger game, 73 
flim-flam. The total value of property reported stolen was 
$294,446.16 and the amount of said property recovered 
was $145,555.04. The total value of property of all 
kinds, lost and stolen, recovered fluring the year was 
$654,472.16, of which $152,416.14 was recovered by the 
detective service. 

There were 11,809 houses reported temporarily vacant, 
of which number 39 were entered and robbed of goods 
valued at $15,514.77. Of this amount $4,597.08 was re- 
covered, and 24 thieves were arrested, tea of whom were 
convicted, six acquitted and eight are yet to be tried. 

Of those convicted two received a sentence of Ifr years, 
each, one 5 years and one 2 years and six months in the 
Eastern Penitentiary, two 9 months and one 3 months in 
the County Prison, and one was sent to the Huntingdon 
Reformatory. * 

There was no relaxation in the efforts to prevent unlaw- 
ful gambling and to repress and prevent a public flaunting 
of vice, as will be shown by the following table of arrests 
during the last four years : 

1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. Total* 

Bawdy keepers 174 257 129 129 - 68^ 

Bawdy inmates 431 308 127 111 977 

Gambling keepers.... 54 49 25 54 18^ 

Gambling 1,133 896 667 567 3,063 

Street walkers.. 893 1,063 1,033 791 3,780 

Policy 40 52 31 40 163 

Burglary 139 237 125 102 603 

Pickpockets 208 367 215 218 l,00a 

Larceny 4,594 5,856 4,228 3,903 18,781 

In connection with the arrests for what is known as the 
social vice it is only fair to explain that the prosecution 



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of these offenders has been accompanied by as little pub- 
licity as possible, sensational raids being carefully avoided, 
but the arrests being systematically and persistently made. 
This, together with the system of detainers requiring dis- 
orderly street walkers and other disorderly women to serve 
their full terms in the House of Correction, has gradually 
reduced the. number of violators of the social law, and 
has had a beneficial effect in checking the soliciting on the 
highways. 

I desire also to call your attention to the arrests for 
reported highway robbery. There were 162 highway rob- 
beries reported during the year, and 251 arrests for that 
offense, of which number 248 arrests were made by uni- 
formed police on their beats ; showing a remarkable activ- 
ity and attention to duty when it is considered how large 
'a territory ' some of the patrolmen are required to cover. 
The report on robberies of vacant houses showing only 39 
entries and robberies out of 11,809 such buildings which 
were vacant on an average of about 35 to 40 days during 
the year is remarkable when it is considered that these 
houses are scattered over an area of 129J square miles, 
and that the limited police force of this City has to 
patrol about 1,800 miles of streets and roads, and watch 
about 365,000 buildings, of which over 330,000 are dwell- 
ings. In this connection I desire to urge the absolute 
necessity for an increase of the police force by at least 
500 men. Even then, compared with the City of New 
York, there would be a wide discrepancy as the following 
figures will show : 

Total police force of New York 9,964 

Total police force of Philadelphia, including de- 
tectives, janitrix, clerks, ^tc 3,612 

The New York police force has about 255 detective ser- 
geants, 180 of which are in Manhattan and 75 in 



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Brooklyn. Of the New York police force there is in 
Manhattan a force of 5,525, including 38 captains, 332 
lieutenants, 295 sergeants, 4,738 patrolmen and 81 door- 
men. 

In Brooklyn there are 2,808, including 25 captains, 
173 lieutenants,. 159 sergeants, 2,365 patrolmen and 65 
doormen. There are also 19 inspectors and 25 surgeons 
on the New York force. 

In Philadelphia there is a total force of 3,612, includ- 
ing 2 superintendents, 11 clerks, 5 fire marshals, 31 de- 
tectives, 16 captains, 41 lieutenants, 110 street sergeants, 
131 house sergeants, 64 patrol drivers, 64 patrol officers, 
2,610 patrolmen, 248 sub-patrolmen, 68 City Hall watch- 
men, 23 matrons, 59 janitors and 29 hostlers. But in- 
cluding all rabove in the police force for purpose of 
comparison with the police force of New York we have the 
following fijgures : 

Area Men per 

City. Sq. Miles. Force. Sq. Mile. 

Manhattan 22 5,525 251 

Brooklyn 77 2,808 36 

Philadelphia 129yg 3,612 28 

Manhattan and 

Brooklyn 9ft 8,333 84 

Manhattan, Brook- 
lyn, Bronx 139 9,090 65 

Assistant Superintendent O'Leary's report of the opera- 
tions of the detective service shows that the division 
handled 2,049 complaints and made 1,707 arrests, and 667 
special investigations. There were 3,072 persons missing, 
of whom 2,709 were located. There were 501 horses re- 
ported stolen, of which 485 were recovered. There were 
44 automobiles reported stolen, of which. 42 were re- 
covered. There were 17 motorcycles stolen and all were 
recovered. The Bureau of Identification identified 504 
prisoners. The Division recovered stolen property valued 



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at $44,560.20, a large increase over 1909, owing to the 
perfect system now operating between the Detective Di- 
vision and pawnbrokers, who, by the aid of the new tele- 
phone system, promptly report all suspicious cases of at- 
tempt to pawn stolen goods. 

There is a marked improvement in the discipline and 
Appearance of the policemen in all ];)ranches of the service, 
■due largely to physical exercises, drills and the require- 
ment that all men shall be neat and well uniformed while 
on duty. The Physical Instructor's report shows an 
iiverage attendance of 145 with a total of 11,174. The 
Drillmaster conducted 491 drills with a total attendance 
•of 34,917. 

Chief Surgeon Hubley E. Owen reports 1,439 ex- 
aminations of police, 465 firemen, 31 guards for the 
House of Correction, and 36 private watchmen. He also 
made 4,112 visits to sick and injured patrolmen and fire- 
men, ^n increase of 1,104 over 1909. He recommends 
the purchase of an ambulance for the exclusive use of 
the Department of Public* Safety, which I strongly in- 
•dorse. 

Among the events during the year which called for 
active service by the police the most notable were the 
trolley ear strike, which lasted from February 19th to 
April 17th, the automobile races on October 8th, the an- 
nual review and carnival of the police and firemen on 
October 1st, and the world's championship base ball 
games at Shibe Park. During the railroad strike the 
entire force was on continuous duty and was frequently 
•called on to suppress disorder. While no riot was per- 
mitted to get beyond the control of the police, nor to 
last more than a short period of time, it was necessary to 
make 1,671 arrests. Too high praise cannot be accorded 
the police for their splendid discipline, and alert and 



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i 

tireless attention to duty. Every attempt at riot was 
promptly met and quickly suppressed with a notable free- 
dom from fatalities, and a still more remarkable freedom 
from destruction of property. The most flagrant offenders 
were promptly arrested and convicted, and the disorderly 
elements kept under complete control. Automobiles 
played a prominent part in conveying patrolmen to the 
various points of disorder and three automobile patrol 
wagons which were put in use demonstrated their value 
in the emergency, and have since given efficient service in 
their patrol districts. 

It is estimated that over 500,000 spectators surrounded 
the course of the autoipobile races iii Fairmount Patk^ 
but so well was the course policed that not a single ac- 
cident was reported. 

There were 55,081 communications received and 
answered during the year; an increase of 11,01j6. 

Fire Marshal. 

The report of Fire Marshal Lattimer shows that out 
of 3,778 actual fires during the year there were two 
arrests for arson. There were 238 inspections of places 
where high explosives were stored, 300 inspections for 
gasoline and benzine, 194 inspections of places where 
dynamite was stored, 206 theatre and moving picture in- 
spections, 158 moving picture licenses issued, 138 opera- 
tors licensed. The total receipts from licenses were 
$16,475. 

The expenditures of the Bureau of Police amounted to 
$4,015,065.31, of which $3,796,178.34 was for salaries. 

Four patrolmen were killed in the line of duty during 
the year. The EoU, of Honor consists of : 

James O'Brien, Third District, died from bums re- 



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ceived while extinguishing a fire in a dwelling, February 
4tL 

William "Weiss, Thirty-sixth District, died from in- 
juries received by being struck by a chariot while rescuing 
two children at a circus on February 5th. 

George Bamett, Twenty-first District, shot by a man 
he was arresting on suspicion of burglary, November 28th. 

Morris Guiles, Eighth District, killed by a falling wall 
. while aiding in the rescue of firemen at the Bodine street 
fire, December 22nd. 

Bureau of Fire. 
The report of Chief Baxter shows that there were 804 
box and 3,224 local alarms, or 44 less than in 1909. 
The fire losses were : 

On buildings $697,345 00 

On contends 1,881,974 00 

Total losses .,. 2,597,319 00 

The insurance on the above was: 

On buildings $21,968,825 00 

On contents 19,522,526 00 

* Total insurance 41,491,351 00 

There were 3,778 actual fires, 68 less than in 1909, 
but the losses were $423,471 in excess of those of 1909. 
The high pressure system operated effectively at 30 fires. 

There was an unusual fatality during the year. There 
were 34 deaths, an increase of 19, and 220 accidents, an 
increase of ,25. Of the deaths 13 were caused by falling 
walls at the Bodine street fire, and one by being thrown 
from a hose cart while on the way to a fire. This Roll 
of Honor comprises the following: 

D. Howard, hoseman, thrown from hose cart. 

Bobert Stewart, hoseman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

Charles W. Edelman, hoseman, killed at Bodine street fire. 



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Gustav Wittig", foreman, killed at Bodine street fire, 

Thomas Entwistle, assistant foreman, killed at Bodine street 
fire. 

John F. Kalberger, assistant foreman, killed at Bodine street 
fire. 

William S. McConnell, hoseman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

Samuel W. Park, ladderman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

William Bihlmire, ladderman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

John Collins, ladderman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

John F. Carroll, ladderman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

George M. Matchinsky, ladderman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

Thomas M. Pass, hoseman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

Harry Bertolet, hoseman, killed at Bodine street fire. 

The terrible catastrophe of December 21-22nd, at which 
the above heroes lost their lives, cast a pall upon the com- 
munity which was quickly followed by a generous re- 
sponse to a call for aid for the Firemen's Pension Fund, 
which was threatened with serious depletion. Over 
$100,000 has been raised as a trust fund invested by 
Drexel & Oo. under the immediate care and attention of 
Mr. E. T. Stotesbury, of that firm, who himself generously 
contributed the splendid sum of $26,000. This fund pro- 
vides the pensions for the families of the deceased and. 
subsequently goes to swell the capital of the Firemen's 
Pension Fund. 

The efficiency of the Fire Bureau was increased during 
the year by the addition of a new water tower and a high 
pressure hose cart. Work on the high pressure exten- 
sion in the mill district was also nearly completed and 
there is now a continuous system from Walnut street to 
Allegheny avenue between Fifteenth street and the Dela- 
ware river. A thoroughly equipped pumping station has 
been installed adjoining the old Fairhill reservoir at Sixth 
and Lehigh avenue, which basin has been put in complete 
condition with a storage capacity of 5,000,000 gallons of 
water. The reservoir is supplied from a 30-inch main 



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on Sixth street, running from Lardner's Point Pumping 
Station; and from a 36-incli main on Lehigh avenue^ 
which is supplied from the Queen Lane Pumping Station, 
the combined capacity being not less than 250,000,000 
gallons daily. This basin is in the heart of the mill dis- 
trict and gives a storage supply able to cope with any 
conflagration in the district. Prom previous records of 
fires it can be safely said that the refilling of the basin 
will not exceed 12 times per year, thus making the de- 
mands on the distribution mains very slight. The 
5,000,000 gallons alone will permit the 11 units in the 
power station to operate nearly eight hours on a con- 
flagration, delivering 12,500 gallons of water per minute- 
without refilling the reservoir. Should a longer run have 
to be made, two 18-inch supply pipes, leading into the 
reservoir from the 30-inch and 36.-inch mains on Sixth 
street and on Lehigh avenue, can pour water into the 
reservoir much faster than all the pumps can draw it , 
out The supply from the reservoir fills the high pressure 
system, there being ample head at the reservoir to fill 
and keep the pressure on all mains from Walnut street 
to Allegheny avenue, and at the same time this gravity 
supply will relay any defect that may arise in the George's 
Hill gravity supply, which fills the existing fire main 
supply in the downtown district. With this new pump- 
ing station at the Fairhill Reservoir any accident to the 
pumping station at Delaware avenue and Race street could 
be overcome as the entire high pressure system can be 
worked from either station if necessary. 

On December 31st, the active force of the Bureau con- 
sisted of 968 men, of whom 956 were uniformed and 573 
were hose and laddermen. 



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The apparatus comprised: 

55 steam fire engines. 

54 combination hose wagons and chemical engines. 
3 two-wheel carts. 

1 four-wheel cart. 

2 hose wagons for 3^4 inch hose. 
14 Hayes hook and ladder trucks. 

3 self-raising aerial trucks of 85 feet. 

1 fire boat. 

2 water towers. 

4 Duval water towers for aerial trucks. 
86 6-gallon extinguishers. 

14 fuel wagons. 

2 high-pressure nozzle wagons. 

The reserve apparatus consisted of: 

11 steam fire engines. 

3 two-wheel carts. 
2 four-wheel carts. 

4 Hayes hook and ladder trucks. 

The Chief renews his recommendation for additional 
companies in all of which I heartily concur, as follows : 
Engine Companies: 

Broad and Ellsworth streets. 
Twelfth and Spruce streets. 
Fourth and Noble streets. 
Eleventh and Thompson streets. 
Fifty-fifth and Spruce streets. 
Seventh and Susquehanna avenue. 
Xensington avenue a;nd Tioga street. 
Bustleton pike and Fulmer street. 

Truck Companies: 

Broad and Eace streets. 
Thirteenth and Spring Garden streets. 
Broad and Girard avenue. 
Seventeenth and Montgomery avenue. 
Third and Washln^on avcHiie. 



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The Firemen's Pension Fund paid out during the year 
$101,190.45. The assets on December 31st were 
$400,105.21. 

The Bureau of Fire Escapes issued 201 certificates dur- 
ing the year. 

Bureau of Correction. 

The report of the Superintendent of the House of Cor- 
rection shows a daily average of inmates of 949, as against 
1,057 in 1909. Of this number 758 were males and 191 
females. Four hundred and forty-one inmjtes were en- 
gaged in productive and 508 in non-productive labor. 
The total number of commitments during the year was 
5,817, and the total number in the institution December 
31, 1910, was 1,067. Of these commitments 2,286 were 
for the first offense, and 824 for the second offense. There 
were 100 for the tenth offense, 49 for the twentieth offense, 
12 for the thirtieth offense, 13 for the fortieth, four for 
the fiftieth, one for the sixtieth, one for the seventieth, one 
each for the one hundred and fourth, one hundred and fifth 
and one hundred and sixth offense. There were 4,039 
commitments for vagrancy, 1,092 inebriates, 277 for 
street walking and 398 at own request. There were 4,699 
males and 1,118 females. Owing to the longer terms im- 
posed on street walkers and disorderly characters there 
was a slight. falling off of commitments for those offenses, 
the detainer which I placed against all such commitments 
requiring such inmates to serve the full term thereby 
keeping them off the streets for a longer period of time. 

The financial report shows receipts of $55,274.80^ a 
decrease of $517.65 from the total of 1909. The ex- 
penditures, however, were only $186,325.49, or less than 
those of 1909 by $5,948.09, showing an improvement of 
$5,430.34. Of the receipts $45,690.68 is credited to 



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the sale of gas, $3,362 to the sale of coke, $2,263.26 for 
coal tar, and $3,629 for quarry stone. 

The Superintendent calls attention to the failure of 
Councils to grant appropriations for extensions to the gas- 
plant in the Tacony district, whereby it was impossible 
to keep pace with the increasing demands for service in 
that territory. He urges the necessity for a sufficient ap- 
propriation to meet the growing demands for gas ex- 
tensions which he maintains would be an investment which 
would result in twofold returns. 

In addition to actual receipts the Bureau should be 
credited with ♦work performed for various City ^bureaus, 
which, owing to the rigid economy required during the 
year, would otherwise have been neglected. The value of 
such labor estimated at 50 cents per day per inmate, and 
material furnished the Bureau of Charities at the Muni- , 
cipal Hospital alone, was $2,169.74, that at the Byberry 
Farm amounted to $1,039.65, and at the Anti-toxin stable 
$741.50, making a total for the Bureau of Charities of 
$3,950.89. The Department of Wharves, Docks and Fer- 
ries was aided to the extent of $3,158.94. In addition to 
the above, work was done on the highways and for char- 
itable and church organizations which amounted in value 
to over $5,500. 

The report of the resident physician shows 19 deaths 
during the year, 18 males and one female. In view of the 
debilitated condition of the majority of the inlnates when 
received this is a remarkable showing of the care and 
attention given the inmates, as is also the fact that of 25 
females and eight cocaine fiends received in the hospital all 
were discharged in good condition. During the year, in 
addition to the regular inspections by the grand juries, 
the Institution was inspected by boards of other States and 
counties who highly commended the management. The 



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Directors of the Fayette County Poor Board stated that 
the Philadelphia House of Correction is "the best ar- 
ranged, the best organized and the best conducted it has 
been our privilege to inspect," and Mr. J. C. Armstrong, 
of the Perez Syndicate, New York, said "in my visits 
at home and abroad I have never seen an institution of 
this character that excels this one in its systematic hand- 
ling, and its universal cleanliness, nor where the policy 
of wise jeare for the comforts of its inmates seemed to be 
commensurate with good discipline." 

Electrical Bureau. 

The report of Chief McLaughlin shows unabated prose- 
cution of the work necessary to maintain the high 
standard of excellence which marks the administration of 
the Electrical Bureau. During the year there was com- 
pleted in the central part of the City the most compre- 
hensive ornamental and satisfactory scheme of street 
lighting of any city in the world. No other city in the 
country can approach the completeness and effectiveness 
of the street lighting which has been introduced in this 
City, and which will be greatly extended during 1911. 
There are now in service on the streets of the City 13,285 
electric arc lights maintained by the City, each diffusing 
a light equal in strength to 2,000 candles; these in ad- 
dition to the numerous private incandescent lights on 
buildings and signs, which beautify and aid in the general 
illumination of the highways. All told, these lights give 
an illumination, approximately, of 34,506,000 candle 
power nightly in addition to the light furnished by the in- 
candescent 10 candle power lamps on the electric signs. 

In Berlin there are 1,055 electric arc lamps; Brussels 
has 210 (all extinguished at midnight) ; London has 400 
2 



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open arc lamps of 1,200 candle power each; Paris has 
1,851, of which 1,461 are lighted by private companies 
and the remainder by the City; Vienna has 1,155 arc 
lamps of 1,700 candle power each. In London the cost of 
maintenance of each arc light is $126.50 per year. In 
Philadelphia the cost for 1911 will be $94.6S per light 
per year, the total appropriation for 1911 amounting to 
$1,238,923.15. 

The City also enjoys free lighting as follows: 

Eighty-six lamps by the Girard Estate. 

One hundred and four arc lamps by the various com- 
panies under ordinance of Councils. Three lamps by 
the People's Traction Company and incandescent light- 
ing in the police, patrol and fire houses,, equalling alto- 
gether an outlay of $75,200. 

Added to this should be the sum of $128,323.67 rentals 
from the City ducts, wires, etc., making a grand total 
of $203,523.67. 

Notwithstanding the, increased number of lights the bid 
for lighting for 1911 is practically lower than the con- 
tract price for 1910, the reduction amounting to 5J per 
cent. 

During the year there was an increase of 986 arc 
lamps, almost as many as the entire number in the cities 
of Berlin or Vienna, twice as many as the entire number 
in London, one half of the entire numbe^' in Paris and 50 
per cent, more than London and Brussels combined. 
• The salary requirements of the Bureau were 
$113,734.50 and the receipts $128,323.67, showing a bal- 
ance of $14,589.17. 

Electrical inspections were made in 14 new school 
houses by the request of the Board of Education ; licenses 
were issued to 465 elevator operators who were required 
to take a systematic examination. The Chief of the 



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Bureau participated in the examination of 138 operators 
in moving picture shows, 158 moving picture establish- 
ments were inspected, new telephone boards were installed 
in the Electrical Bureau operating room, equipped for 
57 line and 15 trunk circuits; a complete Keystone tele- 
phone service with pawn shops has been installed, and new 
sixty-watt motor generators were installed in the Fourth, 
Eighth, Ninth, Twelfth, Twenty-third, Twenty-fourth 
and Twenty-fifth District Station Houses. 

Fines amounting to $2,520.97 were paid by the Phila- 
delphia Electric Company for failure of lights to burn. 

There were 440 poles and 28i^ miles of overhead wire 
removed during the year. There are still maintained 
78,690 poles of iron and wood and 19,033 miles of over- 
head wire. There were 27,798 telephone messages trans- 
mitted through the Central Switch Boards. The above 
doe^ not include regular calls for trunk line connections, 
which approximated about 3,000,000 in number. Over 
the police boards there were transmitted 834,799 messages, 
an increase of 72,224 over 1909. The Police Board is 
operated continuously 365 days in the year, day and night, 
and the Chief urges that the mistakes have been so rare 
that they do not deserve mention. 



Becommendations. 

The Chief renews his recommendation for a complete 
rehabilitation of the fire alarm equipment in City Hall^ 
there being no emergency equipment to take care of any 
possible emergency that may arise. 

For the installation of a repair shop, which would cost 
only $5,000. 

Direct connection of all fire houses with the Electrical 
Bureau. 



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The installation of a new system of elevators in the City 
Hall. 

The appointment of five inspectors of the 1862 fire 
signal boxes. 

The appointment of five additional inspectors of wiring 
in moving picture shows and electric street signs. 

The installation of at least 200 new, modem Electrical 
Bureau type patrol boxes. 

The rewiring of City Hall, which is necessary to give 
satisfactory and increased service in the Hall. 

In all of which I concur. 

The Chief renews his recommendation of 1909 for the 
appropriation of $500,000 for a new fire alarm plant as 
follows: 

New fire alarm plant $325,000 

Placing fire houses on independent lines 25,000 

200. fire bazea; . . «.....« 25y00a 

200 remodeled boxes 5,250 

200 patrol boxes 30,000 

Wire cables, etc « . . . . 14,750 

of which I approve. 

Bureau of City Property. 

The report of Chief Eisenhower shows marked activity 
in the prosecution and completion of public works. Dur- 
ing the year the following work was completed: 

Erection of combination Police and Fire Houses at : 

Tenth and Buttonwood streets $94,680 00 

Belgrade and Clearfield streets 70,875 00 

319-325 Race street 126,365 00 

Erection of Police Stations at : 

Willow Grove turnpike. 59,340 00 

1207 Pine street 55,953 00 



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Erection of Fire Houses : 

Eighth and Jefferson streets |46,300 00 

Germantown avenue and Bringhurst street. . 31,350 00 

Additions to Fire Houses: 
Truck No. 5, 752-4 S. Sixteenth street 30,298 00 

Markets : 
New cement pavement Second Street Market . . 2,235 37 

Parks, Squares, eta.: 

Improvement of park at Twenty-second and 

Lehigh avenue 24,500 00 

Improvement of Ross Park 4,500 00 

Improvement of Prospect Park 6,425 00 

Improvement of Seventeenth and Passyunk 

avenue 1,375 00 

Improvement of Eleventh and Tasker streets. 700 00 
Improvement of playgrounds, Fifty-fifth and 

Christian streets 3,100 00 

Erecting lavatory, Fairhill Square 8,000 00 

The work under way included $22,000 for gilding City 
Hall tower ; $249,760 for completion of City Hall ; $650 
for Disston Park; $17,850 for Stinger Park; $19,000 
for Connell Park; $748,000 for League Island Park; 
$26,350 for bath house at Montrose and Darien streets; 
$28,050 for bath house, 732-4 Lombard street. 

The following properties were purchased during the 
year: 

Summer street, east of Fifty-seventh street, 

for bath house $4,S00 00 « 

Paschall avenue, for approach to Gray's Ferry 

bridge 15,000 00 

752-4 S. Sixteenth street, for fire house.... 10,000 00 

Twelfth and Oak lane, for fire house 12,500 00 

The receipts of the Bureau were $68,359.36, of which 
$33,304.08 were rentals^ and $23,710 from venders' 



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licenses. The total warrants drawn amounted to 
$1,^29,715.82. There was a balance merging of 
$22^615.44 and a balance not merging, but carried for- 
ward to 1911, of $831,999.39. 

The bath houses were used by 1,245,321 men; 40,321 
women; 4,444,444 boys, and 193,400 girls, a total of 
5,923,486. There were 102,450 visitors to the City Hall. 
The. Chief renews his recommendations for heated hatha 
for winter use, and the construction of a Public Crema- 
torium to take the place of the one recently destroyed* 
Which I approve. 

Bureau of Building Inspection. 

The falling off in building operations which' affected 
the country generally, extended to Philadelphia, so that 
there was a falling off from the high record of 1909 of 
$5,014,805, or 12 per cent. Notwithstanding this decrease^ 
however, in the building operations, the year 1910 was the 
third highest in the history of the Bureau of Building 
Inspection. During the year there was a falling off of 
operations in New York Oity of 18 per cent. ; in Brooklyn 
41 per cent. ; in San Francisco 19 per cent., and in St. 
Louis, 17 per cent. In this City 8,592 permits, covering 
16,383 building improvements, were issued, with an esti- 
mated value of $37,866,565. Of this number permits were 
issued for 9,143 dwellings to cost $21,527,440, of which 
8,034 were two story dwellings costing $16,010,925, a 
decrease in the number of 700 buildings and a decrease in 
value of $700,305 as compared with 1909. There were 
1,061 three story buildings valued at $5,239,265, an in- 
crease of 44 in number and $266,765 in value. There 
were 45 four story dwellings costing $275,400. All other 
buildings numbered 713 and were valued at $9,314,225* 



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Among the buildings for which permits were issued were 
57 manufactories valued at $1,846,745; 33 tenement 
[houses, $1,156,500; 8 schools, $1,114,390; 25 offices, 
$598,025; 21 churches, $596,,6^§.;.2.05 g^r^ges, $494,185; 
59 stores, $388,225 ; 20 places- of -amusement, $387,700; 
137 stables, $365,060 ; 29 warehouse^; '$319,475 ; 2 apart- 
ment houses, $312,000; ,4^, , ,^\w^Xt^^e . institutions, 
$307,500; 8 railroad stations,- •$277,450; 11 Municipal 
buildings, $252,185; 54 workshops,. $209,810; 6 power 
houses, $122,800; 7 halls, $115,900; 4 hospitals, $96,200; 
3* banks, $77,750; 5 club houses, $57,900; 1 bath house^ 
$15,000. The new buildings erected numbered 9,856, 
representing an investment of $30,841,665. Of this num- 
ber 60 were first class or fire proof; 15, second class ; 9,66?, 
third class, and 112, fourth class. Of the 60 first class 
buildings 28 were reinforced concrete, as were 23 first class 
additions to other buildings. Permits were also issued for 
3,649 alterations, costing $5,927,750, and 2,198 miscellan- 
•eous operations costing $871,160. There were also erected 
250 new fire escapes and 78 signs, for which permits were 
required. 

There were 1,068 buildings inspected for fire escapes^ 
of which 714 were ordered to comply with the law, in ad- 
dition to 920 inspections for the Bureau of Tenement 
House Inspection. The number of complaints received 
and investigated was 1,219, of which number 940 were sus- 
tained and 279 unfounded. 

Thie Inspectors made 65,470 visits to buildings in course 
of 'Construction. 

The Forty-sixth Ward showed the greatest growth durr 
ing the year, with operations amounting to $4,624,020, or 
a little more than 1-9 of the value of all building oper* 
ations in the City/ and • consisted almost exclusively of 
dwelling operations. The Thirty-eighth Ward is second^ 
and the Forty-second Ward third. 



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The six wards in the front rank in dwelling house con- 
struction are as follows: 

Ward. Dwellingg. Value. 

Forty-sixth 1,288 $3,953,550 

Forty-second * 927 2,651»810 

Twenty-second - -. 678 2,427,480 

Thirty-eighth 1,110 2,274,000 

Thirty-fourth 849 1,841,425 

Fortieth 670 1,533,850 

The receipts of the Bureau amounted to $47,250.65 and 
the expenditures were $59,670.99. This is a reduction in 
receipts from 1909 of $2,700, and a saving in expenses of 
$4,900. 

Bureau of Elevator Inspection. 

The report of Chief Feeney shows the need for, and 
benefit of, the Bureau. There were 505 permits issued for 
work on 563 elevators, the permits covering repairs to 174 
freight and to 98 passenger elevators. Two hundred and- 
fifty-two new freight and 39 new passenger elevators were 
installed, at a total cost of over $400,000. This work re- 
quired 1,800 inspections. There were also 13,000 periodi- 
cal inspections, an increase of 1,335 over 1909. Certifi- 
cates were issued for 2,944 elevators, an increase of 712 
over 1909, and the greatest number ever issued in any 
year. There were 550 applicants for elevator operators^ 
licenses, and 465 licenses were issued. 

There were 38 elevators condemned and 25 accidents 
were reported on. These accidents resulted in 14 deaths 
and 16 injuries, of which 2 deaths and 2 injuries were on 
passenger elevators. One half of these accidents were 
caused by contributory negligence. 

The following comparative table of elevator accidents 
shows a decided advantage in favor of Philadelphia : 



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25 

« 

Killed. Injured, TotaL 

New York 56 58 114 

Chicago 20 19 39 

Philadelphia 14 16 30 

•San Francisco 12 21 33 

Boston 13 16 29 

In Boston there are only f the number of elevators that 
there are in Philadelphia, and there was only one less per- 
son injured, while San Francisco, with less than one-half as 
many elevators as Philadelphia and where there is no 
oflScial inspection, there were 3 more injuries than in 
Philadelphia. 

The Chief estimates that there are about 2,000,000 pas- 
sengers carried daily on the elevators in this Oity to safe- 
guard whose lives it is not only important but highly 
necessary to have thorough and unbiased inspection of the 
delicate and high power machinery operating the cars, with 
authority to enforce the laws and, therefore, prevent as 
far as possible accidents and loss of life. Nor should the 
inspection be limited to the ability of the Bureau to pay 
its running expenses any more than should the conduct of 
any other Department charged with the health and safety 
of citizens. ^ 

In view of the marked tendency toward increase in the 
size, speed and loads carried by modem elevators the Chief 
urges the necessity for an efficient computer who shall pass 
upon the carrying capacity of each car, and shall- compute 
safe loads that will enable the Bureau to hold elevator 
builders to the prescribed factors of safety. 

At a salary of $2,000 per year such employee, he urgeSy 
would more than earn his salary from the fees collected for 
the certificates he would issue. The Chief also renews his 
recommendation of an increase in the salaries of the In- 
spectors from $1,000 to $1,500 per annum. 

Notwithstanding the Bureau has been in operation only 
3 



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26 

two years it is already practically self sustaining, the ex- 
penditures being $33,997.25, and the receipts $32,097.89. 

Bureau of Boiler Inspection. 

In his report Chief Lukens calls attention to the ex- 
plosion of a boiler at the Midvale Steel Works caused 
by a cracked casting, and he, therefore, recommends the 
entire elimination of cast iron in boilers carrying high 
pressure. The tendency of boilers is now, he says, for 
higher pressure and large units of power,^ which necessarily 
calls for more rigid inspection, for metals of a higher 
character, and more rigid testing of materials in order to 
safely operate under new conditions. 

He, therefore, renews his recommendations that the 
Bureau of Boiler Inspection be given full authority to 
inspect aU boilers in operation in Philadelphia without 
regard to any inspection made by insurance companies. 
He urges that such inspection in conjunction with the 
inspections of the insurance companies would be a greater 
protection than is at present afforded, as the Bureau would 
then be able to keep all boilers up to a high standard. 

There are 7,589 high pressure boilers in the City, of 
which number 7,099 are in active operation. There were 
305 new boilers installed, and the inspectors condemned 41 
boilers and ordered repairs to 429. 

Out of 733 applicants for engineers' licenses only 353 
obtained the required average, and 380 were rejected. 
Only six complaints were received of violations of the 
Engineer's License Law, of which three were without 
foundation. Two licenses were suspended for 60 days and 
one revoked ; a good showing of general efficiency when it 
is considered that there are 6,022 engineers holding 
licenses. 

With the exception of the smoke caused by locomotives 



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27 

the City is in a very fair condition throngh the enforce- 
ment of the Smoke Ordinance. There were 1,580 in- 
spections during the year, and where the law was being 
violated prosecutions were made through the City Solicitor, 
and in many cases the manufacturers installed expensive 
smoke consumers, which abated the nuisance. The railroad 
locomotives, however, are allowed, under the ordinance of 
Oouncils, five minutes for the emission of 'smoke, and con- 
siderable smoke was emitted,. especially at the round house, 
where many locomotives are prepared for their runs. The 
Pennsylvania Eailroad Company, however, has, at its own 
expense, installed two inspectors at the round houses and 
as a result there has been a vast improvement in conditions 
at those points. 

The Bureau was again self sustaining, the earnings ex- 
ceeding the appropriations for maintenance. 

Employment Agency Division. 

The report of David T. Smith, Deputy in charge of the 
Employment Agency Division, shows an increase of 11 
licenses. 

There are now 125 licenses, the receipts for which 
amounted to $7,350, which leaves a net profit over the 
cost of maintainance of the Division of about $4,000. 

In closing this, my Fourth Annual Report as Director 
of the Department of Public Safety, I herewith express 
my appreciation of the, faithful and loyal support of 
Assistant Director James B. Sheehan, that of Super- 
♦intendent of Police John B. Taylor, and of the Assistant 
Superintendent Timothy O'Leary in every effort which 
has been put forth to obtain satisfactory results; of the 
cheerful, conscientious and creditable performance of duty 



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by my Secretary, Thomas B. Blymi, my Chief Olerk, 
Walter S. Hopper, the entire Office Staff and the various 
Bureau Chiefs. I desire to express to you my appreciation 
of your continued confidence, and to thank you for the 
many courtesies of which I have been the recipient at 
your hands. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY CLAY, 

Director. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



ELECTRICAL BUREAU 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1910 



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^^Thank God every morning when you get up 
that you have something to do that day which 
must be done, whether you like it or not. Being 
forced to work, and forced to do your best, will 
breed in you temperance and self-control, dili- 
gence and strength of will, cheerfulness and 
contentment, and a hundred virtues which the 
idle never know." 

—Electro-Craft, October, 1910. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

ELECTRICAL BUREAU 

FOR THE YEAR 1910 



Philadelphia, February 2J^, 1911. 

Heney Clay, Esq., 

Director, Department of Public Safety. 

Deab Sib: — I beg leave to submit to you my report 
covering the operations of this Bureau for the year 1910. 

Appropriatians. 

The amount of one million seven hundred and forty- 
four thousand one hundred and thirty-two (1,744,182) 
dollars and eighty-eight (88) cents was appropriated and 
transferred to the Bureau during the year. One million 
seven hundred and eight thousand three hundred and 
fortjWhree (1,708,343) dollars and eighty-fbur (84) 
cents were expended; one million two hundred and fifty- 
one thousand four hundred and eighty-seven (1,251,487) 
dollars and seventy-one (71) cents were paid to the 
electric lighting companies for the illumination of the 
highways by electric arc lamps, and for the use of cur- 
rent in the various police, police patrol and fire stations 
and other municipal buildings ; twenty-two thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-two (22,832) dollars and thirty-three 



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(33) cents were transferred to other Bureaus or Depart- 
ments; eight thousand and seventy-one (8,071) dollars 
and seventy-eight (78) cents were merged, and four 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-four (4,884) dollars 
and ninety-three (93) cents were carried over to the books 
of 1911. 

I desire to call your attention to the fact that one 
million two hundred and fiftyH>ne thousand four hundred 
and eighty-seven (1,251,487) dollars and seventy-one 
(71) cents, is charged up to the lighting of the public 
highways of the City, and for the use of current in the 
various police, police patrol and fire stations and other 
municipal buildings; twenty-two thousand eight hundred 
and thirty-two (22,832) dollars and thirty-three (33) 
cents were transferred to other Bureaus or Departments ; 
eight thousand and seventy-one (8,071) dollars and 
seventy-eieht (78) cents were merged, and four thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-four (4,884) dollars and ninety- 
three (93) cents were carried over to the books of 1911, 
making a total of one million two hundred and eighty- 
seven thousand two hundred and seventy-six (1,287,276) 
dollars and seventy-five (75) cents, leaving a balance of 
four hundred and fifty-six thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-six (456,856) dollars and thirteen (13) cents that 
was actually appropriated for the specific use of the Bureau 
during the year. 

Amount of Money Collected and Paid to the City 
Treasurer, During the Year by this Bureau. 

This Bureau dui*ing the year collected and paid to the 
Receiver of Taxes to be deposited with the City Treasurer: 
For taxes, license charges, etc., the sum of.. $128,323 67 
The salary requirements of the Bureau for 

1910 were 113,734 50 

Leaving a balance over and above the salary 

requirements of 14,589 17 



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95 

The financial statement of the Bureau as of December 
31, 1910, follows, which shows that there was an un- 
expended balance including the amount transferred to 
other Bureaus or Departments during the year, namely, 
twenty-two thousand eight hundred and thirty-two 
(22,832) dollars and thirty-three (33) cents of thirty- 
five thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine (35,789) 
dollars and four (4) cents over and above the operating 
expenses of the Bureau during the year.. 



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The above balanee of fourteen thousand five hundred 
and eighty-nine (14,589) dollars and seventeen (17) centa 
in the amount of money collected by this Bureau during 
the year, over and above the salary requirements of the 
Bureau for the year 1910, shows beyond question that this 
Bureau,, as far as salary requirements are concerned, is 
absolutely self-sustaining, and it could be made more so 
with the passage of legislation, either by Act of Assembly 
or Councilmanic action, that will give this Bureau con- 
trol over such matters as should come under its supervision 
and j^urisdiction, and such as other large cities in the 
United States have. 

One of the most important pieces of legislation that 
should be passed is the licensing of electrical contractors 
and making electrical inspections by this Bureau. A bill 
was prepared covering this matter thoroughly and pre- 
sented at the last session of the House of Representatives 
at Harrisburg in 1909, but failed to pass. I sincerely 
trust that this bill will be again presented to the Legis- 
lature, now assembled, and passed. It will be very far* 
reaching in its effects and greatly inure to the benefit of 
every citizen of this municipality. Regulating the sub- 
ject matter of the bill by "fees" for inepections, all the 
salary requirements of the inspectors appointed under this 
bill, if it should pass and be carried into effect, will not 
' cost the City a single dollar, as licenses and inspection 
fees will pay their salaries. 

Rehabilitation of the Fire Alarm Equipment. 

I desire to call your attention again to the absolute 
necessity for the complete rehabilitation of the fire alarm 
plant in this building, plans and specifications of which 
have been drawn up by this Bureau. This is just as 
essential, in my judgment, as anything in connection with 



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89 

the municipality; in fact, in order to get the efficient 
service that you justly demand of this Bureau it is 
absolutely essential, in order to provide this service, to 
have the most modem and efficient apparatus; this we 
have not, but must have. I will reiterate what I said in 
my previous reports in connection with this matter, and 
urge you to seriously consider the complete modernizing 
and rehabilitation of the most important part of this City's 
fire alarm system. When you consider that approximately 
seventy-five (75) per cent, of your police and fire alarm 
wires are overhead, it is a serious condition of affairs for a 
City like this to contemplate. 

Eeoent storms have proved the fallacy of attempting to 
maintain police and fire alarm wires, which cover the most 
important service in connection with the City, ''Overhead,^' 

Arrangements should be immediately made to provide 
the necessary appropriation to gradually, and as rapidly 
as possible, place this entire service underground. The 
great value of this is shown by your police and fire alarm 
service, covering the congested district of the City, taking 
in hotels, apartment houses, theatres and hospitals; they 
have all been placed underground, and during all sorts 
of weather give us absolutely no trouble whatever. The 
amount of money spent for maintenance, covering repairs, 
etc., in connection with the overhead police and fire alarm 
service referred to, if spent upon the installation of 
underground service, would, in a very short time, place 
your wires all underground. 

I also desire to call your attention to the condition of 
the telephone installation in connection with the fire 
stations. This I also referred to in my last report, and 
I cannot resist the temptation to refer to it again in view 
of the importance of the situation in connection with this 
matter. There are as many as eight (8) fire stations on 



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40 

one line. This is an extremely serious and dangerous eon» 
dition of affairs^ and it is physically impossible at times 
to call any particular station while the line is being used 
by any other station or company. 

Each and every fire house should be connected upon a 
direct line with this Bureau,, so that they could be reached 
at any and all times. 

This means the installation of new cables in the various 
parts of the City, and arrangements should be made im- 
mediately to provide the necessary funds to complete the 
installation as it should be. 

In my report to you covering the operations of the 
Bureau for the year 1909 I recommended that a loan of 
five hundred thousand (500,000) dollars be made for the 
purpose of completing a new fire alarm equipment; the 
placing of all your fire houses on separate lines to the 
Electrical Bureau; for new patrol boxes; new fire boxes, 
otc, the loan to be divided as follows : 

New fire alarm plant $325,000 

Placing fire houses on separate and independent 

lines 100,000 

Two hundred fire boxes 25,000 

Two hundred remodeled boxes 5,250 

Two hundred patrol boxes 30,000 

Wire, cable, etc., in connection with the in- 
stallation of the above new plant 14,750 

Making a total of $500,000 

r 

I know of nothing more essential than the installation 
of this new plant, and I beg of you to seriously consider 
this question. I have referred to this matter in every 
report that I have made, and I only hope that we will not 
need an object lesson to prove to City Councils the absolute 
necessity of providing funds for this equipment. 



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Raymond Walsh, 
Electrical Bureau Apprentice. 



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41 



Rewiring of City Hall. 

I again desire to call your attention to the fact that 
notwithstanding repeated demands on the part of the 
undersigned, no appropriation has been made for the re- 
wiring and recabling of this building. I have referred to 
this in every report that I have made, showing the absolute 
necessity of providing funds for this purpose. 

There are many rooms in this building where the cir- 
cuits are overloaded, approximately twenty-five (25) to 
forty (40) per cent ; the result being extremely bad light- 
ing, which can only be remedied by rewiring. 

The wiring throughout the building, covering especially 
the telephone and signal services, is being very rapidly 
modernized by the installation in the floors of enameled 
steel conduits, several thousand feet having been installed 
during the years 1908, 1909 and 1910. 

Free Electric Light Service to the City. 

I desire to call your attention to the following state- 
ment, which is not only interesting but at the same time 
exceedingly instructive, in that it shows just what the 
City of Philadelphia receives through this Bureau abso« 
lutely "free," during the year : 

Furnished "Free" to the City. 

Under ordinances of Councils, by the various 
companies, 104 arc lamps, which, taken at 
the cost of lighting, as per schedule, at 
an average price of $100 per lamp per 
annum $10,400 00 

By the Girard Estate, 86 lamps at $100 each 
per annum 8,600 00* 

By the People's Traction Company, 3 lamps 
at $100 each per annum 300 00 

Making a total of $19,300 00 



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42 

Incandescent lighting furnished "free" to 
police stations, patrol houses and fire 
houses, as per ordinance of Councils $55,900 00 

Making a total of $75,200 00 

In addition to this the Electrical Bureau collected 
during the year 1910: 

For license charges, police signal and tele- 
phone service, rental of ducts in City con- 
duits, rental of wires in City cables, com- 
mission on telephone calls, transmission 
of fire alarms and fire assignments, etc. . . . $128,323 67 

Making a grand total of $203,523 67 

You will perceive that this is an extremely interesting 
and at the same time instructive summary, showing clearly 
to the citizens of this great City just what they are re- 
ceiving in the way of gratuities from the public utilities 
companies through this Bureau annually. 

I referred to this matter in my previous report and I 
believe it is interesting enough to republish, so that those 
interested may know the amount of ^^free" lighting service 
that the City obtains and the reason therefor. 

Inspection of Pvhlic Schools. 

The work in connection with the inspection of the 
various schools has been carried on by this Bureau 
seriously and effectively, and I believe is appreciated by 
the Board of Public Education. 

Inspections have been made of the Public Sdiool 

House* diiring the course of their construction, and final 

inspections, when the £xtures, telephones, bell and clock 

services were completed, were made b-y this "Bureau during 

the year as follows : 

James Madison School, Green and New Market streets. 
John Marshall School^ Sellers and Franklin streets. 



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43 

Hamilton School, Fifty-seventh and Spruce streets. 

James Wilson School, Twelfth and Wharton streets. 

William H. Hunter School, Maschcr and Dauphin streets. 

Henry Burks School's additional wing, Third and Chris- 
tian streets. 

Thomas Durham School, Sixteenth and Lombard streets. 

William Brantly Hanna School, Fifty-eighth and Media 
streets. 

Anthony Wayne School, Twenl^r-eighth and Morris 
streets. 

Thomas May Peirce School, Twenty-third and Cambria 
streets. 

John Barry School, Fifty-ninth and Race streets. 

Grover Cleveland School, Nineteenth and Butler streets. 

William Cramp School, Howard, and Ontario streets. 

In addition to the above an inspection was made by 
this Bureau of the exhaust fan motors in the Girls' High 
School, Seventeenth and Spring Garden streets. 

iJUy Hall Elevators. 

I desire to call your attention to the eondition of the 
elevators in this building, and I have no hesitancy in 
stating that the physical condition of them is positively a 
disgrace to the City of Philadelphia. It is a case of 
constantly patching and making repairs to them. We are 
doing our best in every way possible to keep them in a 
condition of safety so that no accidents may occur. In 
view of the small appropriation made to maintain these 
elevators it is marvelous tTiat no accidents have occurred. 

In view of the fact that these elevators were gradually 
installed from a period prior to the year 1890 up until 
1894, with the exception of the group of four in the north- 
west corner of the building, which were only recently in- 
stalled, and they are now caTrying on an average of 
approximately 35,000 passengers dAily, and have been in 
constant operation from twenty to twenty-five years, 
"they do not owe the City a dollar," and it is time they 
were replaced with modern and up-to-date apparatus. 



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I cannot urge too earnestly the installation of new 
elevators in this building, and the sooner it is done the 
better. 

There are nineteen (19) passenger, one (1) freight, 
two (2) prisoner and one (1) tower elevator, making a 
total of twenty-three (23) elevators in this building. 

I earnestly hope that you will urge Councils to provide 
money enough for the installation of a complete set of 
new and up-to-date elevators. 

Electrical Bureatt. 

Kules and Kegulations Governing the Operation of City 
Hall Elevators. 

1. Elevator starters and operators must report for duty 
promptly at the time assigned to them. 

2. The operators must present a neat and clean appear- 
ance while on duty. 

3. Operators are at all times expected to be polite and 
courteous to the public. 

4. Operators must politely request all passengers to 
face the door on entering, and ask them to call out the 
floors at which they want to alight. 

5. Under no circumstances will an operator using 
intoxicating liquors be permitted to operate an elevator. 
If found under the influence of liquor, he will be sum- 
marily dismissed from the service. 

6. Signals must be answered promptly, and the annun- 
ciator board kept clear, so that when calls are made the 
operator will know from what floor the person is calling. 

7. Under no circumstances must an operator leave his 
car unless excused. 



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8. Unnecessary conversation with passengers and 
starters is positively prohibited, 

9, Under no circumstances will smoking be permitted 
while on duty, 

10. Reading of papers or books during the hours of 
duty will not be permitted in any of the cars. 

11. Elevator starters must take their positions in front 
of the cars, and pay strict attention to the starting of 
same. 

12. Lounging about the comers or holding unnecessary 
conversation with anyone will not be permitted. 

13. Starters when loading and starting the cars must 
call out the number of each car. 

14. Operators must not start the cars, unless upon orders 
from the starter. 

15. Operators on arriving at the first floor must keep 
their doors partly closed until the starter calls out their 
number. 

16. Elevator starters must see that the cars are kept 
moving, and at no time shall all the elevators be at one 
floor. 

17. A strict compliance with the above rules will be 
insisted upon and any infraction of same will be cause 
for suspension 

J. r. Mclaughlin, 

Chief of Electrical Bureau. 
Approved : 

HENRY OLAY, 

Director of Pvhlic Safety. 



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Apprentices. 

For the year 1910 provision was made in the appropria- 
tion by City 'Councils for the appointment of ten (10). 
apprentices in this Bureau. These young men have been 
appointed, most of them being graduates from the Manual 
Training Schools of this City. 

The permanent retention of an apprentice force in this 
Bureau will enable us in the very near future to build 
up a strong technical force that will prove beyond ques- 
tion of great value to the City in connection with the work 
of this Bureau, 

The young men are put through a regular course of 
training covering each and every branch of the service. 
Many of them are now performing excellent service, and 
the intention is, after they have served from two to three 
years, to have a "promotion" examination, thereby in- 
suring true Civil Service among our own employees. 

These young men receive $360 per year during the 
course of instruction; one of them, Albert Mander, has 
been doing such splendid work — in fact, has developed into 
a skilled wireman that a recommendation was made by 
the undersigned to you to promote this young man, which 
was done ; he now receives $2.50 per day and is performing 
the services of a skilled wireman. 

Market Street Subway, 

I again desire to call your attention to the Market 
Street Subway, which I referred to in my last report, re- 
garding the installation of an "emergency service for 
lighting" to provide for any contingency that may arise. 
This is a matter that should be taken up seriously and 
without delay. 



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The Erection and Maintenance of Electric Signs Over 
Sidewalks and Highways of the City, 

Under the ordinance of Councils approved April 12, 
1909, which provides for the erection and maintenance of 
electric signs over the highways of the City of Philadel- 
phia, the Chief of this Bureau was authorized to issue 
permits for the erection of the same. Since the passage 
of this ordinance this Bureau has issued one thousand six 
hundred and ninety-nine (1,699) permits for the erection 
of electric signs of various designs throughout the City, 
the illumination of the signs referred to being made 
through the installation of thousands of electric lamps 
of various voltages and candle power. 

The proper and substantial construction and erection 
of these signs is a matter of great importance to the safety 
and convenience pf all citizens. This Bureau has made 
a thorough inspection of all the electrical signs erected, 
and where the design, the construction, or manner of erec- 
tion of the signs referred to did not meet with the require- 
ments of the Bureau, the permit for the erection of the 
same was withheld until such tinje as the applicant com- 
plied with the rules and regulations of the Bureau 
governing the erection of electric signs, the artistic con- 
struction of the signs and the safety of the general public 
being at all times kept in view and insisted upon in a most 
rigid manner before the issuing of the necessary permits 
would be considered. 

In view of the fact that there are so many of these 
signs constantly being erected and the absolute necessity 
for rigidly inspecting the same, it is absolutely essential 
that we should have a number of inspectors to carry on this 
work. Every sign should be thoroughly inspected and 
reported upon before the current is turned on ; this, un- 
fortunately, at the present time, is not the case, for the 
reason that we have not men enough to cover the territory. 



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ELEOTEICAL BUREAU. 

Depabtment of Public Safety. 

Henby Clay^ J. F. McLaughmn, 

Director Chief of Bureau^ 

Rules and Regulations Governing the Construction and 
Erection of Electric Signs. 

Article I. 
Permits. 
Applications for the erection of electric signs must be 
made to and filed with the Chief of the Electrical Bureau. 
Plans covering the details of construction, method of at- 
tachment, the number of lamps and the location must 
accompany the application. 

Article II. 
Construction. 

All signs must be made of sheet metal not less than No* 
26 gauge, either galvanized, enameled or treated with at 
least three coats of anti-corrosive paint or compound, or 
of other approved non-combustible material. ISo part of 
the sign shall be colored with material that will wash off 
or become streaky or disfigured by the action of the 
weather. This clause does not preclude the use of wood 
in those parts of the sign which do not contain wiring or 
sockets. Box letters or signs must be provided with drain- 
age holes of a size equivalent of one-quarter inch hole for 
each square foot of surface. 

The sign must be supported on a metal frame and 
secured to the building in a strong and substantial manner^ 
and must be sufficiently rigid to withstand wind strains. 



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Signs projecting from the building or side walls must 
be supported on iron brackets or from mast arms and be 
securely stayed. Top lifts should be fastened to the wall 
at least as high above the sign as the sign extends from the 
wall. Proper side guys should be installe^. 

Any sign now located shall be removed when unsafe 
or when ordered to be removed by the Chief of the Elec- 
trical Bureau. 

Ladders when required must be made of iron, firmly . 
secured to the framework of the sign. 

Article III. 
Wiring. 

All wire must be double braided, rubber covered, and 
placed either inside the letters or in approved metal con- 
duit, and the material and method of installation must be 
in accordance with the usual requirements. 

Connections from signs to mains must be in approved 
conduit. The current-carrying parts of sockets and 
receptacles must be of copper. 

Cutouts must be located in a convenient place and pro- 
tected from the weather. 

Article IV. 

Switches and Flashers. 
Time switches, flashers and similar appliances must be 
of an approved design and enclosed in a steel box, or in a 
cabinet lined with fire-resisting material. If a steel box 
is used, the minimum thickness of the steel must be .128 
of an inch (No. 8 R & S. gauge). If a wooden cabinet is 
used, it must be lined with marble or slate at least thrpe- 
eighths (f ) of an inch thick, or with steel not less than .128 
of an inch thick. The box or cabinet must be so constructed 



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that when the switch operates, the blade shall clear the door 
by at least one (1) inch. 

The flasher must be protected and controlled by a cut- 
out and switch located in the mains at the flasher, and each 
circuit wire from the flasher to the letters must be pro- 
tected by a cutout. The circuit feeding the motor which 
operates the flasher must be tapped off the main ahead 
of the flasher cutout, and it must be protected by a cutout, 
and controlled by a knife switch or indicating snap switch 
located at the flasher. 

Ajbticle V. 
Connections. 

Whenever possible, electric signs should be connected to 
separate mains extending to the service, and when the 
load exceeds 1,250 watts they must be so connected. 

The maximum number of lamps which may be con- 
nected to a two-wire circuit or a two-wire branch of a 
three-wire circuit is as follows: 

2 candle power sign lamps 53 

4 candle power sign lamps 33 

4 candle power standard lamps 28 

8 candle power standard lamps 22 

16 candle power standard lamps 12 

Akticle VI. 
Signs on Roofs. 
The bottom of a sign erected on a roof shall not be 
nearer than six (6) inches above the roof. 

Akticle VII. 
Projecting Signs. 
!N"o sign or advertisement shall project beyond the curb 
line. No portion of any sign projecting ^beyond the 



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building line shall be less than nine (9) feet above the 
surface of the sidewalk, nor less than fifteen (15) feet 
if projecting from an alley wall. These restrictions shall 
not be considered as applying to temporary banners 
erected or suspended across streets securely fastened to 
buildings, with the consent of the owners of such build- 
ings, and after the issuance of a permit by the Chief 
of the Electrical Bureau. The lowest part of these tem- 
porary banners shall not be less than twenty-five (25) 
feet above the surface of the street. 

Article VIII. 
Inspection. 
An Inspector of the Electrical Bureau will examine 
the sign after completion, and current shall not be turned 
on until a "Certificate of Inspection" shall have been 
given by the Chief of the Electrical Bureau to the person 
or firm making the application for the permit. 

J. F. McLaughlin, 

Chief of Electrical Bureau, 

Licensing Operators of Passenger Elevators. • 

In pursuance of the ordinance of Councils approved 
April 15, 1908, in which the undersigned was designated 
as Chairman of the Examining Board for Licensing Op- 
erators of Passenger Elevators there were five hundred and 
forty-six (546) applicants, who were examined and passed 
and became eligible to operate passenger elevators, and four 
hundred and sixty-five (465) licenses were issued, on ac- 
count of which four hundred and sixty-five (465) dol- 
lars were collected and paid into the City Treasury. 

The above examinations, together with the one thou- 
sand nine hundred and ninety (1,990) previously re- 



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ported, brings the total number of licensed operators in 
the City up to two thousand four hundred and fifty-five 
(2,455), the total amount paid into the City Treasury 
on account of the sanie being two thousand four hundred 
and fifty-five (2,455) dollars. 

The examinations of these operators have been con- 
ducted in a very thorough and practical manner by the 
Board of Examiners, which consisted of the Chief of the 
Electrical Bureau, the Chief of the Bureau of Building 
Inspection, and the Chief of the Bureau of Boiler In- 
spection, and the examinations referred to have taken con- 
siderable time and have imposed additional duties on the 
Board, they being compelled to give much overtime in 
connection with the qualifying of these men, and the rigid 
inspection to which they are subjected will beyond ques- 
tion redound to the welfare and safety of the public at 
large, who are constantly compelled to use elevators in all 
parts of the City in attending to their various business en- 
gagements. 

Licensing Operators of Moving Picture Machines and 

Buildings, 

The Chief of this Bureau is a member of the Exam- 
ining Board for examining and qualifying operators of 
moving picture machines under the ordinance of Councils 
of February 25, 1908. 

There have been examined and licenses issued to one 
hundred and thirty-five (135) applicants and one hun- 
dred and fifty-eight (158) establishments during the year; 
these, together with the four hundred and sixty-four (464) 
operators previously licensed, bring the total number of 
operators in the City of Philadelphia up to five hundred 
and ninety-nine (599), and the one hundred and fifty- 
eight establishments licensed during the year, together 



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ndth the two hundred and four (204) places previously 
licensed, bring the total number of places or establish- 
ments licensed since the passage of the ordinance up to 
three hundred and sixty-two (362) places. Up to the 
close of 1910 there has been paid into the City Treasury 
on thi^ account the sum of thirty-nine thousand one hun- 
dred and ninety-five (39,195) dollars. 

These licensed operators have been all thoroughly drilled 
•as to their knowledge of the respective machines, and also 
-as to their familiarity with the mechanism of the same, the 
•questions propounded during the different examinations 
l>eing constantly varied in order to prevent any collusion 
between new applicants for licenses and others who have 
successfully passed and been duly licensed. 



ELECTRICAL BUREAU. 

Department of Public Safety. 

Henry Clay, J. F. McLaughlin, 

Director. Chief of Bureau. 

General Rules and Regulations XJoverning the Installation 

of Wiring, Lighting and Apparatus for Picture 

Show Parlors. 

Article I. 

' Plans and specifications covering the details of the in- 
•stallation for electric wiring must be submitted to the 
Chief of the Electrical Bureau for approval. 

Article II. 

AH wires must be run in approved conduits. No other 
method, under any cireumstapces, will be approved. 



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Abtiole III. 

House lighting must be contTolIed from the booths 
entrance and stage (a remote controlled switch is pre^ 
ferred). 

Article IV. 

There must be two separate and distinct services, where 
practicable, feeding from separate street mains, one 
service to be of sufficient capacity to supply current for 
the entire equipment of the house, and the other service 
must be of at least sufficient capacity to supply current 
for all emergency lights. 

Article V. 

Emergency lights are exit lights, and all lights in: 
entrances, lobbies, stairways, corridors and other portions^ 
of the house to which the public have access, and which 
are normally kept lighted during the performance, together 
with suffi<Sient number of lights to light the house. 

Article VI. 

Exit lights and all emergency lights must not have more 
than one set of fuses between same and main distributing 
fuse paijpl. 

Article VII. 

Picture machines must be of an approved type, and 
placed in an enclosure or booth made of suitable fire-^ 
resisting material (detail drawing to be submitted for ap- 
proval), thoroughly ventilated, and large enough for the 
operator to walk freely on either side of or back of the 
machine, at least eight (8) feet by eight (8) feet by 
eight (8) feet. 



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Article VIII. 
All openings in the booth must be arranged so as to be 
entirely closed by doors or shutters constructed of the same 
fire-resisting material as the booth itself. 

ArtioXtE IX. 
Doors must be arranged as to be held closed by spring 
hinges or equivalent approved devices. 

AuTICLiB X. 

Shutters must be arranged so as to be readily closed, and 
when open only held by a light fuse link or with silk 
thread. 

Article XL 

Machines must be operated by hand (motor driven will 
not be permitted). 

Article XII. 
Wiring for picture machines must have a capacity of 
. not less than IsTo. 6 B. & S. gauge, asbestos-covered wire. 

Article XIII. 

A switch controlling the current for the moving picture 
machine must be located within the booth enclosing the 
machine. All cutouts and switches must be located as 
nearly as possible to one point, preferably near the entrance 
to the building. 

Article XIV. 

Rheostats must be placed in the basement and mounted 
on non-combustible, non-absorptive insulating bases, raised 
to a height of at least twelve inches from the floor and 
two feet from the wall, and must be enclosed with a sub- 
stantial met^l guard having a mesh not larger than one 
square inch. This guard to be kept at least one inch 
from the outside frame of the rheostat. 



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Article XV. 

On alternating current circuits the following apparatus 
is recommended for use : Fort Wayne Compensarc, Hall- 
burg Economizer, General Electric Economy Arc, Powers 
Induction Terminal, Roentgen Controller, Zerveller Con- 
troller (latest type only), Mercury Arc Eectifier and 
Motor Generator Set. 

Abticlb XVI. 

On direct current circuits the apparatus used in connec- 
tion with the lamps should be, preferably, a motor gen- 
erator set. If resistance is used, it should be of the grid 
type. 

Article XVII. 

All moving picture machines to be connected on 220 
volts, and where motor generator sets are used the phase 
and voltage end of motor must conform with the general 
rules and regulations of the Philadelphia Electric Com- 
pany (Article 15, page 44, of this company's rules). 

Article XVIII. 

Drop cords will not be permitted, and the orchestra 
lights or portable fixtures must be equipped with approved 
reinforced cord, at least No. 14 gauge. 

Article XIX. 

Red exit lights must be provided over each doorway 
leading to exit proper. Eear exits must have a light on 
the outside as well as the inside. The outside lamp to be 
clear glass. 

Article XX. 

Fan outlets must be installed on a circuit independent 
of the lights. 



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Article XXI. 

Cartridge fuses, type A contact, or Edison plug fuses 
must be used, and all fusea above ten (10) amperes must 
be of cartridge type only, and under no circumstances 
must fuses be bridged by wire or other materials. 

Article XXII. 

Call bell, signal wiring, telephone wiring, etc., must be 
installed in the same manner as the electric light wiring. 

Article XXIII. 

An Inspector of the Electrical Bureau will examine the 
installation upon completion, and current shall not be 
turned on until a "Certificate of Approval" shall have been 
issued by the Chief of the Electrical Bureau. 

J. F. McLaughlin, 

Chief, Electrical Bureau. 



Bell Telephone Switchboards, 

On the Bell Telephone Board in Room 612, City Hall, 
there was inaugurated during the year a new and original 
scheme for handling "emergency" calls coming from the 
various Bell subscribers throughout the City. 

An arrangement was made whereby six special trunk 
circuits were set aside for nothing but incoming emergency 
calls. A red light is used for a signal on each of these 
trunk circuits in our Bell Board. There is a special 
number (Spruce 20) assigned to these trunk circuits, and 
this special number, together with the instructions how to. 
use the same, was given great publicity both through the 
Bell Telephone Directory and through the daily news- 
papers. 



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The scheme was put into active operation on October 
25, 1910, since which time it has undoubtedly proved its 
great usefulness. 

In our Bell Board in Room 612, Oity Hall, there are 
now working 427 line and 100 trunk circuits, being an 
increase of 26 line circuits during the year. 

Bell Telephone Police Board 

On account of the great increase in business on our 
Bell Police Telephone Board in Room 629, City Hall, it 
was necessary to install an entirely new two-position Bell 
Board in place of the one-position board originally placed 
there. 

This new board is of the very latest Dattern. It con- 
sists of two positions, having 15 pairs of cords for each 
position, and is so arranged that one position can be 
used for sending out ^^general'^ messages, if necessary, 
while the other is being used for the regular calls. 

The board is equipped, for 100 line and 15 trunk 
circuits with an ultimate capacity of 200 line and 40 trunk 
circuits. Lamps are used for the signals on all line, trunk 
and cord circuits. It, was installed by the Bell Telephone 
Company under the direct supervision of this Bureau. 
After the preliminary connections had been made the old 
Board was disconnected at 12 o'clock P. M. on August 
13 th, and the new board connected in its place. 

With two positions and the increased number of cord 
circuits we are now enabled to put two operators on th.e 
board and to handle the business a great deal more satis- 
factorily in rush times, which are due to strikes, murders, 
etc., and other public disturbances. 

There are now working in this board 57 line and 15 
trunk circuits, being an increase of 2 line and 5 trunk 
circuits during the year. 



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Keystone telephone Switchboards. 
In our Keystone Telephone Switchboard in Eoom 612, 
Citj Hall, there are now working 327 line and 40 trunk 
circuits. This is an increase of 11 line circuits during 
Hie year. 

Keystone Telephone Police Board. 

In our Keystone Police Telephone Switchboard in 
Room 629, City Hall, there are now working 61 line and 
10 trunk circuits, an increase of 1 line circuit during the 
jear. 

Keystone PawnbroJcers' Board. 

A most important acquisition to our Police Telephone 
room was the installation of the Keystone Pawnbrokers' 
Switchboard. To this board are connected individual cir- 
cuits running to the offices of all pawnbrokers in the City, 
and also circuits to the offices of the officials of the Depart- 
ment of Public Safety, Bureau of Police, and Detective 
Department. 

The board is a two-position board with a total of 120 
line circuits and: 5 special circuits. Lights are used for 
signals on all line, special and cord circuits. In each 
position there are 20 pairs of cords. The battery for this 
board is mounted in a cabinet in Eoom 629. It consists 
of 11 cells of 16 ampere hour capacity. It is charged 
directly from the Keystone Telephone Company's Pace 
Exchange. 

The terminal and cross connecting frame for the Pawn- 
brokers' Board is mounted on the wall in an offset in Eoom 
629. It consists of two vertical strips with the necessary 
punching and fanning strips. 

This board was installed by the Keystone Telephone 
Company, under the direct supervision of this Bureau. 

The necessary negotiations for it were entered into the 



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latter part of 1909, and on January 31, 1910, it was^ 
thrown into service with one hundred and three (103) 
pawnbrokers connected thereto and five (5) special circuit^, 
to the officials of the Department of Public Safety, Bureau 
of Police, and Detective Department. Since that time 
there have been two (2) pawnbrokers' circuits connected 
and three (3) circuits disconnected, leavii;ig a t>atal of 
one hundred and two (102) pawnbrokers' circuits and five 
(5) special circuits now working in the board. When it 
was installed it was so located that it would not be pos- 
sible under any circumstances to make any outside ex-^ 
change connections therewith. 

The great value of this equipment can be better appre- 
ciated when we consider the fact that there have been 
a large number of thieves captured solely by its aid. 

A record of every call made on this board has been kept^ 
and the total number of such calls from January 31, 1910^ 
to and including December 31, 1910, amounted to ap- 
proximately sixteen thousand five hundred (16,500). 

This Pawnbroker Telephone System has been installed 
in this building without the cost of a dollar to the City^ 
the pawnbrokers paying for the service. 

Electrical Bureau Laboratory. 

The work in the Electrical Bureau Laboratory during- 
the year 1910 consisted, as it did in 1909, of making^ 
efficiency and life tests of both carbon and tungsten 
filament incandescent lamps, calibrating direct current 
voltmeters and ammeters, and making insulation, capacity, 
and conductivity tests on all cable purchased by the 
Bureau. 

During the year we made tests on : 

3,000 feet of 15 pair paper insulated cable. 

5,000 feet of 10 pair paper insulated cable. 

28,000 feet of 30 pair paper insulated cable. 



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New Municipal Telephone Switchboard. 
Connected to every Pawnbroker in the City, and directly connected to 

the Police System. 



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55,000 feet of 25 pair paper insuHted cable. 

5,000 feet of 4 conductor rubber insulated cable. 
10,000 feet of single conductor rubber insulated cable. 
5,000 feet of 5 pair rubber insulated cable. 
5,000 feet of flexible mast arm wire, rubber insulated. 
25,000 feet of No. 14 gauge twisted pair wire, rubber 

insulated. 
50,000 feet of No. 18 gauge twisted pair wire, rubber 
insulated. 

This material was all of a very high quality, in accord- 
ance with the high standard adopted in the Electrical 
Bureau specifications. 

Without the aid of our laboratory instruments it would 
have been impossible for us to have kept a check on this, 
important part of the supplies purchased by this Bureau. 

Motor Generator and Dynamotor Sets. 

During the year we installed a sixty (60) watt dyna- 
motor set and eighteen (18) cells of storage battery in the 
new Fourth Police District Station House on Race street 
below Fourth street, and a sixty (60) watt motor generator 
set, together with eighteen (18) cells of storage battery^ 
in each of the following buildings: 

Eighth Police District Station House, Buttonwood street, 
west of Tenth street. 

Ninth Police District Station House, Twentieth and But- 
tonwood streets. 

Twelfth Police District Station House, Eighth street, 
below Jefferson street. 

Twenty-third Police District Station House, Nineteenth 
and Oxford streets. 

Twenfty-fourth Police District Station House, Belgrade 
and Clearfield streets. 

Thirty-fifth Police District Station House, York road and 
Champlost street. 

In each instance the Motor Generator set or the Dyna- 
motor set, with the necessary equipment, was mounted in 
6 



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accordance, with the standard adopted by this Bui'eaii^ 
Each machine was placed on a substantial cement base in 
the battery room, right over it was mounted the slate 
panel board on brackets from the wall, and at the side on 
the wall the shelf containing the storage battery was 
located. 

The standard slate panel board adopted, for this purpose 
contains all the necessary apparatus for making the im- 
provement complete, including retardation coil, lamp re- 
sistances, double pole fused switches, overload and under- 
load circuit breakers, etc. 

In these installations the wiring was all run in iron 
enameled conduits and all work was done in the best man- 
ner possible, so that the completed apparatus makes a 
complete, neat^ durable and efficient acquisition to the 
Police Districts mentioned. 

In the Police Districts referred to these machines have 
replaced fifty-eight (58) cells of Leclanche, and two hun- 
dred and eighty-six (286) cells of Gravity battery. 

We have six (6) more of these motor generator sets on 
hand; the work of installing them is now being carried 
forward as rapidly as possible. 

It is to be hoped that every police district in the City 
will be equipped with Motor Generator and Dynamotor 
sets by the latter part of this year, thus eliminating for- 
ever the old bluestone battery method that has been in 
vogue for years. 

Shearing Registers and Central Office Sets, 

During the year there were installed in the^ineteenth 
Police District Station House, Pine street above Twelfth 
street, and in the Twenty-first District Station House, 
Woodland avenue west of Thirty-second street, new Cen- 
tral Office Sets. These districts already had new Shearing 
Hegisters. 



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Both Shearing Eegisters and Central Office Sets were 
placed in each of the following Police Station Houses : 

Fourth Police District Station House, Bace street, below 

Fourth street. 
Eighth Police District Station House, Buttonwood street, 

west of Tenth street. 
N'inth Police District Station House, Twentieth and But- 
tonwood streets. 
Twelfth Police District Station House, Eighth street, 

below Jefferson street. 
Twenty-third Police District Station House, Nineteenth 

and Oxford streets. 
Twenty-fourth Police District Station House, Belgrade 

and Clearfield streets. 
Thirty-fifth Police District Station House, York road and 

Champlost street. 

These Central Office Sets consist of an oak finished tele- 
phone staild, with the necessary switches, transmitter, 
receiver, hook, and mounting for the Shearing Register 
placed thereon. 

These Central Office Sets were constructed in accordance 
with the Electrical Bureau specifications and drawings and 
with the Shearing Eegisters make a most complete ar- 
rangement. 

Fire Circuits Worked From City Hall Electric Lighting 

Current, 

Throughout the year, whenever possible, we have worked 
twenty-three (23) of our fire circuits from current obtained 
from the Electric Lighting Plant in City Hall. Owing to 
the numerous grounds on the building lighting circuits 
it is becoming more and more hazardous for us to do 
this, consequently we are obliged to keep these fire circuits 
working from the storage battery installation a greater part 
of the time. 

The electric lighting wiring in this building is very 



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64 

old, and, as has been suggested before, should be entirelj 
renewed as soon as possible, so that it will be free front 
all grounds. This would make it a great deal safer for 
use on fire circuits, as well as improving the conditions- 
. for the general lighting of the building. 

Electrical Bureau Exhibit at the Electrical Exhibition. 

At the Electrical Exhibition which was held in the Eirst 
Eegiment Armory, Broad and Callowhill streets, from- 
February 24th to the 26th inclusive, this Bureau was- 
represented by a very prominent exhibit. 

We had there the very latest apparatus as developed 
and used by this Bureau in connection with the Fire Alarm 
and Police Patrol systems, including our new Central 
Station Telephone Stand and Set with the Shearing Keg- 
ister ; our new Combination Fire Water Main Telephone 
and Fire Alarm Post; our new Patrol Boxes, new suc- 
cessive non-interfering' fire box, Advance Signal Bell and 
large gong as used in fire houses; new Motor Generator 
and Storage Battery equipment for station houses along- 
side of a battery rack containing the old gravity batteries,, 
as a comparison, together with various other electrical 
appliances. 

Our booth was beautifully decorated with various 
colored electric lights. Over the center were two sets of 
crossed flags, the National and City colors, made up with 
the proper colored incandescent lamps; between each set 
of flags was a star outlined with red and white incan- 
descent lamps, and under it the words ^'Philadelphia. 
Electrical Bureau^ in white incandescent lamps. 

This Bureau's exhibit attracted a great deal of attention; 
and was universally considered to be one of the most at- 
tractive and most interesting at the show. 



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Washington ave. 
Ellsworth street. 
Federal street. 
Wharton street. 
Reed street. 
Dickinson street. 
Tasker street. 
Morris street. 
Moore street. 
Mifflin street. 
Passyunk avenue. 
Snyder avenue. 
Jackson street. 
Wolf street. 
Ritner street. 
Porter street. 
Shunk street. 



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65 



N on-interfering Two Party Telephone Circuit 

During the year there was developed' by this Bureau a 
new and original scheme for a two party telephone circuit 
so arranged that when one party is using the 'phone the 
other can in no way hear the conversation or interfere 
therewith. 

. It was primarily intended for use in Police Station 
Houses, and an arrangement of this kind is now being in- 
stalled in the Fourth District Police Station House on 
Race street below Fourth street. 

This two. party telephone scheme has been thoroughly 
tried out in our laboratory, and has been found to fulfill 
all the conditions imposed on it most satisfactorily. 

Electrolytic Tests and Surveys. 

During the year the effects of electrolysis on, the water 
mains and cables in the City have been carefully watched 
and numerous tests and surveys have been made. It can 
be unreservedly asserted that at the present time there 
is no other city in the United States, if any in the world, 
that is more free from detrimental effects, due to this 
cause, than is the City of Philadelpliia, 

Ornanvental Lighting in the Central Section of the City. 

This scheme of illumination has been extended this 
year to Broad street, from Spruce street to Vine street and 
around City Hall, with islands of safety at the following 
intersections : 

Broad and Spruce streets. 

Broad and Locust streets. 

Broad and Walnut streets. 

Broad and Chestnut streets. . 

Broad and Arch streets. 



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66 

Broad and Cherry streets. 

Broad and Race streets. 

Broad and Vine streets. 

On Walnut street from Front street to the Schuylkill 
river. 

On Chestnut street from Front street to the Schuylkill 
river. 

On Market street from west of the City Hall to the 
Schuylkill river. 

On Arch street from Front street to Twenty-first street. 

Prior to the installation of these lights it was suggested, 
that as an investment proposition alone it' would be a 
desirable thing for the City ; this has proven to be a fact, 
as the increased assessments along the line of way have 
been such as to cost the City practically nothing, and it 
meets with the approval and commendation of not only the 
citizens of this City but of other cities as well. 

The argument was made, and very properly, by you 
that it would prove one of the best means of police pro- 
tection that you could have in connection with your 
Department; this is undoubtedly true. 

The extension referred to above increases this instal- 
lation to four hundred and sixty (460) of these ornamental 
lamp standards, each of which supports two (2) 
2000 c. p. lamps, making a total of nine hundred and sixty 
(960) lamps. 

It is a matter of pride to know that this whole plan of 
illumination was conceived, worked up and public ^enti' 
ment created therefor by your Department, and great 
credit is attached to the work done, not only by employees 
of this Bureau, but the engineers of the Philadelphia 
Electric Company as well. 

The newspapers of Philadelphia acted as ti unit in 



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Lighting in Central Part of City. 

Operating from Lower Seat. 

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67 

advancing this great improvement, and they . deserve not 
only the thanks of the administration, but of the entire 
community as well. 

Reduction in the Cost for the Lighting of the City High- 
ways with Electric Arc Lamps, 

A very interesting thing and at the same time a great 
source of satisfaction is the reduction in the cost of City 
lighting for the year 1911. The difference in the cost 
for the lighting of the highways between the years 1910 
and 1911, based on the contract price, is approximately 
seventy-three thousand (73,000) dollars: this is a reduc- 
tion- of over five and one-half (5^) per cent, in the cost 
for the lighting of the City highways between the years 
1910 and 1911, and is a considerable saving to the City. 

Public Utility Companies, 

The Public Utility Companies of this City, coming 
under the supervision of this Bureau, have all paid their 
taxes and license charges promptly, and there is the 
greatest feeling of harmony, I am happy to say, existing 
between this Bureau and all the companies. 

General Lighting of the City. 

It is safe to say, to-day, that the City of Philadelphia 
is the best lighted city in the world. Conditions within 
the last three years have improved wonderfully, all of 
which is due principally to the great interest, and activity 
displayed by the attaches of this Bureau, the one. object 
in view in connection with the lighting of the highways 
of this City being always the maintaining of the electric 
lighting service at the highest point of efficiency. The 
employees of this Bureau, as far as they can, are con- 



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68 

stantly inspecting the service, so that should any defective 
or unsatisfactory condition arise in this connection, the 
cause of the trouble is immediately ascertained and the 
service is at once restored to its proper condition 

It is very proper to say that all changes required for 
the benefit of the service are always made at the expense 
of the company, who cheerfully comply with every re- 
quest made by the Bureau to better the lighting con- 
ditions. 

The latter part of the year 1910 showed the comple- 
tion in the central part of the City of the most compre- 
hensive, and at the same time the most ornamental and 
satisfactory, scheme of lighting of any city, not only in this 
country, but in the world. 

Much credit should be given to the officials and engineers 
of the Philadelphia Electric Company for the hearty 
support that they have given the undersigned in con- 
nection with this splendid scheme of illumination. 

1^0 other city in the United States, or even in Europe, 
can approach the completeness and effectiveness of this 
"Street Lighting System" which has been introduced in 
this City, and which it is planned to greatly extend the 
coming year. 

There are now in service, nightly, throughout the City 
of Philadelphia thirteen thousand two hundred and eighty- 
five (13,285) City electric arc lamps, each shedding a 
light equal in strength to 2,000 candles. 

The new lights in the central part of the City have 
attracted widespread attention throughout the entire 
country. 'Not only do they beautify to a great extent the 
streets upon which they have been erected, but they are 
a protection as well to the citizens, shopkeepers and res- 
idences. It is difficult to locate a dark corner in the 
district covered by this installation, and as a result crime 



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69 

has been minimized to a large d(^ree. It is exceedingly 
doubtful if a house-breaker or a hold-up man would dare 
to take a chance with the glare of the newly installed 
lights thrown in full force upon him. 

For the year 1911 the appropriation for the electric 
lighting of the City's highways will total $1,238,923.15. 
This is a sum larger than#that appropriated or appor- 
tioned by any other city in the world of the size of Phila- 
delphia for electric lighting. It represents an outlay of 
77.43 cents a year per capita based on a population of 
1,600,000 persons, which amounts to about 2.1 mills per 
light per night. The average cost for the maintenance 
of the electric lights upon the highways of the City is 
$94.63 per year each. 

All told, the electric lights in this City give out light 
€qual to approximately 34,506,000 candles nightly. In 
addition to this there are thousands of lights in use on 
electric signs, each of 10 candle power, which are being 
constantly increased, and it is safe to say that there are 
now in use on the highways of the City of Philadelphia 
sufficient electric lamps to produce a light equal to about 
35,000,000 candles nightly. 

Compare Philadelphia's electric lighting facilities with 
those of the five large cities in Europe — Paris, London, 
Berlin, Brussels and Vienna. 

Gaslight is the principal illuminating feature in the 
large cities abroad, although they are rapidly recognizing 
the superiority of the electric lighting system in the big 
cities, and are adopting this more modern method. In 
Berlin, there are in use 34,374 gas lamps. The gas 
burners require a new mantle every seven days, and the 
damage to lamps costs considerable a year to repair. 
Last year it required 328,542 common gas mantles; 
215,792 mantles for compressed gas lamps and 19,487 
gas chimneys and globes were used during the year. 



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70 

There have been installed in Berlin 1,055 dectric arc 
lamps. 

Brussels has in service 6,911 gas and 210 electric are 
lamps in the center of the city. They are all extinguished! 
at midnight, 

London has fifty-two (52) streets lighted by electricity 
and six (6) streets lighted by^ high pressure gas; the re- 
mainder of the streets are lighted by low-pressure gas. 

The total number of electric lights in use is four hun- 
dred (400) of the open-arc type, each of which costs 
the municipality one hundred and twenty-six (126) dol- 
lars and fifty (50) cents a year to maintain. In the 
east end of London the electric arc lamps have 1,200- 
candle power each. 

Paris has one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one 
(1,851) electric lights and fifty-six thousand eight hun- 
dred and nineteen (56,819) gas lamps in service- Private 
electric companies supply current for one thousand four 
hundred and sixty-one (1,461) arc lamps and eighty-five 
(85) incandescent electric lights. Municipal plants give- 
electricity for three hundred and ninety (390) arc lamps. 
The municipality depends, to a large extent, for lighting- 
the principal streets on the glare of the lights from shop 
windows. The Champ Elysees, considered the best lighted 
street in Paris, and one of the best in Europe, is "lighted 
up" nightly by two hundred and four (204) gas lantems^ 
and four hundred and eight (408) incandescent bur- 
ners. 

Vienna is lighted largely by gas. It has forty thou- 
sand (40,000) gas lights on three thousand five hundred 
(3,500) lamp posts. The candle power of the gas lamp& 
varies from fourteen (14) in the small streets to one 
hundred and ten (110) in the busy sections of the city» 
Twenty thousand (20,000) gas lights burn all night. 



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71 

There are one thousand one hundred and fifty-five (1,155) 
electric arc lamps in the principal streets of Vienna^ 
and each averages one thousand seven hundred (1,700) 
candle power. The ground glass globe is in use there, 
similar to those now in use on the newly installed lamps 
in the center of this City. 

All of which goes to show that Philadelphia is now^ 
as above 'stated, the best lighted city in the world, and 
it is the intention of the undersigned to use every effort 
to see that this position is always maintained. 

Conduits Laid by Private Corporations. 

The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania has 
added to its system of underground conduits one hun- 
dred and twenty-five thousand two hundred and fifty-three 
(125,253) feet, aggregating three hundred and sixty thou- 
sand nine hundred and fifty-seven (360,957) feet of duct 
during the year. 

The Keystone Telephone Company of Philadelphia 
has added to its system of underground conduits eight 
hundred and seventeen (817) feet, aggregating two thou- 
sand and eighty-eight (2,088) feet of duct during the 
year. 

The Philadelphia Electric Company has added to its 
system of underground conduits thirty-six thoiisand nine 
hundred and sixteen (36,916) feet, aggregating two hun* 
dred and sixteen thousand seven hundred and twenty- 
five (216,725) feet of duct during the year. 

The Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company has added 
to its system of underground conduits two thousand five 
hundred and eleven (2,511) feet, aggregating nine thou- 
sand six hundred and seventy-one (9,671) feet of duct 
during the year. 

The Pneumatic Transit Company has added to its sys- 



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72 

tern of underground conduits ninejteen thousand nine 
liundred and eighty-four (19,984) feet, a^regating fifty- 
four thousand nine hundred and sixty-eight (54,968) 
feet during the year. 

Recapitulation. 

Feet of Feet of 

Conduit. Duct. 

The BeU Telephone Company of Pennsylvania. 125,253 360,957 
The Keystone Telephone Company of Phila^ 

delphia 817 2,088 

The Philadelphia Electric Company 36,916 216,725 

The Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company 2,511 9,671 

The Pneumatic Transit Company , 19,984 54,968 



185,481 644,409 

Total Amount of Conduit and Duct Laid for Electrical 
Purposes hy Electric Light, Telegraph, Telephone 
and Electric Street Railway Companies. 

Tinder the various ordinances of Councils the com- 
panies using the highways for the placing of conduits 
therein make returns of the quantity they laid ; these re- 
turns, together with the amount owned by the City, show 
that there has been placed: 

Feet of Feet of 

Conduit. Duct. 

Underground 6,619,900 54,408,857 

Of which the City owns 502,399 3,657,106 

The amount laid in 1910 being 189,336 659,829 

Conduits Laid and Owned hy the City, 

There were three thousand eight hundred and fifty-five 
{3,855) feet of conduits, aggr^ating fifteen thousand four 
hundred and twenty (15,420) feet of duct laid by this 
Bureau during the year, and seventeen (17) manholes con- 
structed, as follows: 



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Feet of 
[:;onduit. 

389 

223 


Feet or 
Duct. 

1,556^^ 

894 


59 


235 


222 


889* 


212 


84& 


254 
225 


1,018 
900* 


269 
261 
195 


1,076 

1,043^ 

781 


286 
213 


1,144 
852- 


267 
200 


1,069' 
801 


345 
69 


1,378 
275- 


166 


664 



73 

Manholes. 

1 Broad street, below McKean street 

1 Broad street and Snyder avenue 

1 East side Broad street, at Snyder avenue... 

1 Broad street, below Snyder avenue 

1 Northeast cor. Broad and Jackson streets . . 
1 East side Broad street, below Jackson street 

1 Broad and Wolf streets 

1 Broad street, below Wolf street 

1 Broad and Ritner streets ♦ 

1 East side Broad street, below Ritner street . . 

1 Broad and Porter streets 

1 Broad street, below Porter street 

1 Broad and Shunk streets 

1 Broad street, below Shunk street 

1 Broad street and Moyamensing- avenue 

1 Broad and Oregon streets 

1 West side Broad street, below Shunk street . . 

17 3,855 15,420- 

Junction Boxes Placed. 

There were sixty-seven (67) large junction boxes and 
eleven (11) small junction boxes placed in manholes dur- 
ing the year, at the following locations : 

No. of JunctlODi 
Boxes. 

Front and Market streets 1 larg« box 

Broad and CAllowhill streets 1 large box 

Fifteenth and Market streets 1 large box 

Third and Market streets 1 large box. 

Second street and Girard avenue 1 large box 

Twenty-third and Walnut streets 1 large box 

Broad street and Pennsylvania avenue 1 large box 

Broad street and Fairmount avenue 1 large box 

Broad street and Girard avenue 1 large box 

Broad street and Columbia avenue 1 large box 

Broad street and Lehigh avenue 1 large box 

Germantown and Lehigh avenues 1 large box 

Seventh street and Lehigh avenue 1 large box 

Second street and Lehigh avenue 1 large box 

Kensington and Lehigh avenues 1 large box 

Eighth street, from Callowhill street to Lehigh 

avenue 31 large boxe» 



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74 

Na of Janctioa 
Boxes. 

Berks street, from Front street to Germantown 

avenue 8 large boxes 

Susquehanna avenue, from Broad street to Ger- 

mantov^n avenue 7 large boxes 

Kensington avenue, from York street to Lehigh 

avenue 5 large boxes 

Bace street, below Fourth street 1 large box 

Seventh and Chestnut streets 1 small box 

Bldge avenue and Sharswood street 1 small box 

Bidge avenue and Jefferson street 1 small box 

(jermantowrn avenue and Berks street 1 small box 

Germantown avenue and Susquehanna avenue . . 1 small box 

Seventh and Filbert streets 1 small box 

Fifth and Poplar streets 1 small box 

Second street and Girard avenue 1 small box 

Twenty-seventh street and Columbia avenue .... 1 small box 

Front street, below Pine street 1 small box 

Frankford avenue and Buan street 1 small box 

Total 78 



Defective Cable Replaced. 

During the year this Bureau replaced four thousand 
four hundred and two (4,402) feet of defective cable, as 
follows : 

No. of 
Feet. 

Broad street, from Diamond street to Susquehanna avenue.. 600 

Buan street, from Frankford avenue to Fifteenth District, 

No. 4254 Paul street 380 

Front street, from Pine street to manhole south of Pine 

street 250 

Market street, from Third to Fourth street 432 

Fourth street, from Pine to Lombard street 343 

Walnut street, from Sixth street to manhole east of Sixth 

street 270 

Cable pole. Front and Poplar streets 56 

Cable pole. Twenty-second street and South College avenue. 48 

Cable pole, Camac and Race streets 55 

Cable pole, Cedar street and Lehigh avenue 45 

Cable pole, Richmond street and Columbia avenue 100 

Cable pole, Ridge and Allegheny avenues 140 



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75 

No. of 
Feet. 

Cable pole, Forty-ninth and Market streets 145 

Cable pole, Ninth street and Columbia avenue. . ^ 125 

Cable pole. Engine Company No. 36, Frankford avenue, be- 
low Decatur street 95 

Cable pole, at Thirteenth District, No. 4431 Main street, 

Manayunk 200 

Cable pole, at Twenty-seventh District, No. 6834 State road, 

Tacony 168 

Cable pole, at Thirtieth District, Front and Westmoreland 

streets 330 

Cable pole, at Seventeenth District, No. 1210 South Ti^'en- 

tieth street 100 

Cable pole, at Seventeenth District, No. 1210 South Twen- 
tieth street 100 

Clearfield street, from Frankford avenue to Trunk 10, Clear- 
field street, below Frankford avenue 230 

Federal Trust Company, northwest corner Broad and Fed- 
eral streets 70 

Hanayunk National Bank, Main and Levering streets 75 

Patrol Box, Eighth and Kace streets 45 

4,402 

New water main boxes were erected at the following 
locations : 

Front street and Lehigh avenue. 
Front street and Indi<ana avenue. 
Front street and Allegheny avenue. 
Front and Somerset streets. 
Front and Huntingdon streets. 
Front and Cumberland streets. 

New combination water main and fire boxes were erec- 
ted at the following locations: 
Front and Dauphin streets. 
Front and York streets. 

New electric light poles were erected and coj^inected to 
the underground as follows: 

17 on south Broad street, between Passyunk avenue and 
Moyamensing avenue. 
1 at 623 Christian street. 
1 at Broad and Mayfield streets. 



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7a 

Broken fire box posts and shells were replaced as fol- 
lows : 

Seventeenth and Market streets. 
Eighth and Kace streets. 
Fourth and Market streets. 
Frankford and Allegheny avenues. 
Twelfth and Thompson streets. 
Ridge avenue and Parrish streets. 

Broken patrol box posts and shells were replaced as 
follows : 

Eighth and Eace streets. 
Fourth and Market streets. 
Nineteenth and Callowhill streets. 
Reese and Dauphin streets. 

Made the necessary connections for the changing of the 
route of No. 1 alarm and No. 4 fire telephone circuit.. 

The following abandoned cable poles were stripped by 
the Bureau during the year : 

Twenty-third and South streets. 

Old Twelfth District Station House at Tenth and Thompson 
streets. 

Old Thirty-fifth District Station House at Olney. 

Old Nineteenth District Station House at Eighth and Lom- 
bard streets. , * 

Twentieth and Washington avenue. 

The fire signal box at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, 
League Island, was changed from the overhead to the 
underground. 

The police patrol box at the Philadelphia Navy Yard*, 
League Island, was changed from the overhead to the 
underground. 

Rental of Ducts in City Conduits. 

By authority vested in your Department under ordi- 
nance of Councils of April 10, 1893, ducts which were 



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77 

not in use by the City in its conduits and conductors in 
its cables were leased by the year, as follows : 

No. of Feet 
of Duct. 

American Telegraph and Telephone Company 4,870 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 8,449 

Philadelphia, Reading and Pottsville Telegraph Company 15,654 

Postal Telegraph-Cable Company 43,010 

IVestern Union Telegraph Company 9,660 

Total 81,643 

All the above at an annual rental of $7,200. 

Rental of Conductors in City Oohles, 

No. of Feel of 
Conductor. 

American District Telegraph Company 65,064 

United Gas Improvement Company 843,518 

Pneumatic Fire Alarm Telegraph Company 56,534 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 11,088 

Total 967,204 

All the above at an annual rental of $5,790. 

Lighting of the City Highways hy Electric Arc Lamps 
by the Philadelphia Electric Company, 

Thirteen thousand two hundred and eighty-five (13,285) 
electric arc lamps were located on the highways at the 
•close of 1910, as follows : 

No. of Lamps. 

Paid for by appropriations of Councils 13,092 

'Girard avenue bridge, maintained by People's Traction 

Company 3 

Maintained by electric companies (free to the City) .... 104 

JFront street and Delaware avenue, between Vine and 
South street piers, and miscellaneous, maintained 
by Girard Estate (free to the City) 86 

Grand total 13,285 

7 



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78 

There are on underground wires: 

Lamps. 

City cables 856 

Electric Light Company's cables 1,718 

Girard Estate cables 86 

Amounts Deducted from the Bills for the Lighting of 
the Highways Owing to Defective Lamps. 

There were nine thousand two hundred and twenty-two 
(9,222) lamps reported not burning in various parts of 
the City during the year. The following amounts were 
deducted from the bills of the company having the con- 
tract covering the lights referred to: 

Month. No. of Lights. Amount. 

January 2,265 $618 65 

February 650 177 68 

March 169 45 80 

AprU 456 124 OO 

May 471 128 71 

June 360 98 90 

July 322 88 62 

August 475 129 89 

September 930 254 29 

October 729 1^8 76 

November 1,395 382 i2 

December 1^000 273 25 

Totals 9,222 $2,520 97 



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Number of Electric Lights, Poles, Arms, and Length of 
Cable in the City's Underground Service. 






S 
^ 



East side Broad street, from Market street to Mc- 
Kean street 

East side Broad street, from MeEean street to Moya- 
mensing avenue ' 



West side Broad street, south to Moyamensing avenue 

East side Broad street, north to Lehigh avenue 

West side Broad street, north to Susquehanna avenue 

West side Broad street, Lehigh avenue to German- 
town avenue 

Arch street, south side 

Chestnut Street Pier 

Walnut Street Bridge 

Dickinson Square 

Columbia avenue, Broad to Twenty- third street 

Bidge avenue. Ninth to Twenty-third street 

Lehigh avenue, north and south sides 

Spring Garden street, south side 

Green street, south side 

Mount Vernon street, north side 

Wallace street, south side 

Fairmount avenue, south side 

Diamond street, north side 

Market street, north side , 

Locust street, south side 

Christian street, north side 

Federal street, south side 

Second street, west side 

Park avenue, north of Columbia avenue 



Totals. 



47 

13 
59 
65 
51 

23 
18 
19 
21 

8 

19 
52. 
35 
44 
23 
18 
18 
22 
42 
56 
16 
59 
56 
54 

1 

856 



47 

18 
59 
65 
51 

23 
18 
19 
21 
8 
19 
52 
35 
•44 
23 
18 
18 
22 
42 
56 
16 
59 
56 
54 
1 

856 



23,950 

5,000 
31,320 
36,^0 
29,810 

14,220 

9,960' 

2,000- 

5,000 

8,000 

10,000 

27,150 

H,20O 

22,260 

12,200 

9,980 

9,960 

13.200 

21,300 

38,090 

9,100 

82,260 

30,680 

27,150 

500 

468,710 



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Money Paid to the Receiver of Taxes During the Year. 

One hundred and twenty-eight thousand three hun- 
dred and twenty-three (128,323) dollars and sixty-seven 
(67) cents were paid to the Receiver of Taxes to the 
credit of this Bureau during the year 1910, as follows: 

License charges $107,954 50 

Police signal and telephone service 2,600 00 

Rent of ducts in City conduits 7,200 00 

Rent of wires in City cables 5,790 00 

Commission on telephone calls 567 75 

Transmission of iire alarm and fire assignments 500 00 

Miscellaneous 3,711 42 

Total $128,323 67 

Poles and Wires Taken Down by the Bureau. 

There were four hundred and forty (440) poles and 
twenty-eight and a half (28^) miles of wire taken down 
by this Bureau during the year. 

Number of Poles, Mileage of Wire, etc. 

The returns made by the various telegraph, telephone, 
electric light, street and steam railway companies show 
there were overhead on the highways of the City, exclusive 
of those along railroad tracks, thirty-eight thousand eight 
hundred and thirty (38,830) wooden poles, an increase 
of one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine (1,889) 
■over 1909. 

38,830 wooden poles, an increase of 1,889 over 1909. 
'32,583 iron poles in use by electric passenger railway com- 
panies, an increase of 66 over 1909. 
5,839 City poles, wood, a decrease of 176 since 1909. 
. 1,368 City poles, iron, a decrease of 221 since 1909. 
70 Girard Estate poles, iron. 

78,690 



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5,331 miles of wire in aerial cable, an increase of 273 miles 
since 1909. 

6,451 miles of overhead telegraph and telephone wire, a de- 
crease of 790 miles since 1909. 

4,566 miles of electric light wire, an increase of 611 miles 
since 1909. 

1,922 miles of City wire, an increase of 58 miles since 1909. 
763 miles of trolley companies' wire. 



19,033 miles. A total increase of ,150 miles since 1909. 

Number of Alarms of Fire During the Year, 

Eight hundred and four (804) alarms of fire were 
transmitted over the wires during the year, of ^hich seven 
hundred and nineteen 719) were first alarms; thirty- 
eight (38) second alarms; twelve (12) third alarms; four 
(4) fourth alarms; two (2) fifth alarms; one (1) sixth 
alarm; five (5) false alarms, and twenty-three (23) alarms 
were pulled by malicious persons. 

In connection with the receipt of the number of alarms 
received during the year, in addition to the above eight 
hundred and four (804) alarms there were received at 
this office three thousand two hundred and twenty-four 
(3,224) "local" alarms. 

There were also received at this office, over the Pneu- 
matic Fire Alarm Telegraph System, twenty-six (26) 
alarms of fire, twenty-one (21) of which were false alarms. 

Operations of the Municipal Telephone Exchange, Elec- 
trical Bureau, City Hall. 

Twenty-seven thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight 
(27,798) messages were received and transmitted over 
the two (2) telephone switchboards during 1910. 'Two 
hundred and thirty (230) messages were for ambulance ser- 
vice during the year. 

The above does not include the regular calls for trunk 



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line connections, there being approximately three mil- 
lion (3,000,000) of such calls answered through this ex- 
change during 1910. 

Number of Messages Transmitted over the Police Tele- 
phones. 

During the year 1910 there were transmitted over 
the police telephones of the Bureau eight hundred and 
thirty-four thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine 
(834,799) messages, an increase of seventy-two thousand 
two hundred and twenty-four (72,224) messages over 
1909.. 

In connection with the work being done in this police 
telephone exchange, which is a very unique one, I speci- 
fically desire to call your attention to the splendid work 
done during the year in the general municipal telephone 
exchange on the sixth floor of this building. 

It is a great source of satisfaction for me to know that 
all this important work is carried on day and night, 
which means three hundred and sixty-five (365) days and 
nights in the year, with so few mistakes and a minimum 
number of complaints. I sometimes question whether the 
great importance of the work done through both these ex- 
changes is realized, not only by the Department but by 
the members of Councils and the public in general. Recent 
events, fresh in the memory of citizens, have proved be- 
yond question that there is no system like it anywhere. 

I desire to call your attention to the operators in both 
of these exchanges, who, notwithstanding their arduous 
duties, never raise a question when they are asked to work 
any and all hours, always expressing a willingness to 
perform any duty that may be imposed upon them any 
hour of the day or night. • 

• A history of the work performed by these exchanges 



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O 

< 

u 
o 



04 



25 



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is now being prepared by the undersigned, on account of 
the great interest displayed T)y the citizens and technical 
journals and engineers who are familiar with this kind of 
work, not only in this country but in many foreign coun- 
tries. 

The duties in these exchanges have increased to such 
an extent, in connection with the work referred to, that I 
will have to ask you to provide at least three (3) more 
operators to meet the existing requirements. 

Reinforcement of Electric Light Poles, 

There were one hundred and thirty-eight (138) elec- 
tric light poles reinforced by the Bureau during the year. 
These poles were in a very dangerous condition owing to 
their being badly corroded and rusted at the base. The 
total cost of this work approximated one thousand seven 
hundred and ninety-four (1,794) dollars. To have pur- 
chased and erected new poles in these locations would have 
cost the City five thousand seven hundred and twenty- 
seven (5,727) dollars; therefore, it can be readily per- 
ceived that the above improvement resulted in a saving to 
the City of three thousand nine hundred and thirty-three 
(3,933) dollars. The locations of the poles mentioned fol- 
low: 

Christian and Swanson streets. 
Christian and Water streets. 
Christian and Front streets. 
Christian and Howard streets. 
Christian and Passyunk avenue. 
Christian and Seventh streets. 
Christian and Ninth streets. 
Christian and Tenth streets. 
Christian and Warnock streets. 
Christian and Eleventh streets. 
Christian street, west of Eleventh street. 
Christian and Twelfth streets. 
Christian street, west of Twelfth street. 



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Christian and Thirteenth streets. 

Christian and Broad streets. 

Christian and Fifteenth streets. 

Christian and Sixteenth streets. 

Christian and Seventeenth streets. 

Christian street, west of Eighteenth street. 

Christian and Nineteenth streets. 

Christian street, west of Nineteenth street. 

Christian and Twentieth streets. . . 

Christian street, west of Twenty-first street. 

Christian street, west of Twenty-second street. 

Christian street, west of Twenty-third street. 

Christian street, west of Twenty-fourth street. 

Christian and Stillman streets. 

Christian and Tajiey streets. 

Federal street, west of Front street. 

Federal street and Moyamensing avenue. 

Federal and Fourth streets. 

Federal street, west of Fifth street. 

Federal and Marshall streets. 

Federal and Seventh streets. 

Federal street, west of Seventh street. 

Federal and Eighth streets. 

Federal and Ninth streets. 

Federal and Alder streets. 

Federal and Eleventh streets. 

Federal street, west of Eeleventh street. 

Federal street, west of Twelfth street. 

Federal and Fifteenth streets. 

Federal street, west of Fifteenth street. 

Federal street, west of Seventeenth street. 

Federal street, west of Eighteenth street. 

Federal street, west of Nineteenth street. 

Federal street, west of Twenty-fifth street. 

Federal and Twenty-sixth streets. 

Federal street, west of Twenty-sixth street. 

South Broad street, east side. 

South Broad street, south of Spruce street. 

South Broad and Lombard streets. 

South Broad and Webster streets. 

South Broad street, south of McKean street. 

South Broad street and Snyder avenue. 

South Broad street, south of Snyder avenue. 

South Broad and Jackson streets. 

South Broad street and Passyunk avenue. 



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South Broad street, south of Jackson street. 

South Broad and Wolf streets. 

South Broad street, south of Wolf street. 

South Broad and Ritner streets. 

South Broad street, south of Ritner street. 

South Broad and Porter streets. 

South Broad street, south of Porter street. 

South Broad and Shunk streets. 

South Bfoad street and 'Moyamensing avenue. 

South Broad street, south of Shunk street, west side. 

Spring Garden street, west of Eighth street. 

Spring Garden street, west of Ninth street. 

Spring Garden and Tenth streets. 

Spring Garden and Twenty-fourth streets. 

Ridge avenue and Ninth street. 

Ridge avenue and Carlton street. 

Ridge avenue and Wood street. 

Ridge avenue and Callowhill street. 

Ridge avenue and Hamilton street. 

Ridge avenue and Buttonwood street. 

Ridge avenue and Fifteenth street. 

Ridge avenue and Nineteenth street. 



New Electrical Bureau Type Fire Boxes Erected. 

There were one hundred and ten (110) new Elec- 
trical Bureau type fire boxes erected during the year at 
the following locations : 

^^^ Location. Cost. 
2199 Friedberger- Aaron Mfg. Co., Eighteenth and Court- 
land streets, private. 

2493 Delaware and Snyder avenues $68 73: 

2491 West side Juniper street, south of McKean street. . 27 0? 

2489 Ontario and Witte streets 36 74 

2487 Chelten avenue and Laurens street 45 96 

2488 Second Street pike and Tabor road 37 79 

2443 Ridge avenue and Dauphin street 9 71 

2398 Twenty-ninth and Fletcher streets 9 64 

2399 Coral and Adams street 8 52 

2412 Twenty-fifth street and Montgomery avenue 56 02 

2413 Twenty-eighth and Berks streets 40 60 

2414 Edgemont and Somerset streets 40 23 



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Box. Location. OoBt. 

2415 "A" and Ontario streets |26 63 

2416 Hancock and Westmoreland streets 49 51 

2417 Fifth street and Allegheny avenue 11 20 

2418 Front and Tioga streets 33 66 

2419 Fifth and Luzerne streets 9 17 

2421 Fifth and * Westmoreland streets IT 10 

2422 Venango and "K" streets 48 25 

2423 Seventy-second street and Haverf ord avenue 127 59 

2425 Sixty-fourth street and Overbrook avenue 67 54 

2426 Fifty-third street and Wynnefield avenue 101 13 

2427 Fifty-fourth and Arch streets 51 99 

2428 Fifty-sixth street and Wyalusing avenue 25 79 

2429 Fifty-sixth and Master streets 35 31 

2431 Fifty-ninth and Race streets 35 16 

2432 Fifty-ninth street and Girard avenue 15 17 

2433 Sixty-third street and Girard avenue 28 98 

2434 Sixty-first and Arch streets 26 31 

2435 Sixty-second and Media streets 26 20 

2436 Cottman and Claridge streets 16 64 

2437 Rising. Sun lane and Asylum pike 39 45 

2438 Thirtieth and Wharton streets 18 87 

2439 Twenty-fifth and Penrose Ferry road ? 36 

2441 Magazine lane and Pennsylvania Railroad.. 127 33 

2442 Twenty-sixth and Reed streets 20 34 

2443 Twenty-sixth and Tasker streets 21 99 

2445 Twenty-third street and Snyder avenue 112 81 

2446 Nineteenth and Porter streets 9 71 

2447 Twentieth and Wolf streets 21 14 

2448 Thirtieth and Dickinson streets 43 45 

2449 Twentj^-fourth and Morris streets 33 56 

2451 Eighteenth and Butler streets 24 37 

2452 Nineteenth street and Erie avenue 44 31 

2453 Wayne avenue and Dennie street 32 27 

2454 Thirty-second street and Midvale avenue 51 90 

2455 Seventh and Shunk streets 25 46 

2456 Seventh and Ritner streets 6 84 

2457 Sixty-seventh and Elmwood avenue 85 53 

2458 Sixty-first and Elmwood avenue 56 14 

2459 Sixty-eighth street and Buist avenue 11 06 

2461 Fifty-third street and Kingsessing avenue 68 51 

2462 Sixty ^hird street and Gibson avenue 120 10 

2463 Sixty-first street and Greenway avenue 53 06 

2464 Fiftieth street and Warrington avenue 50 01 

2465 Sixtieth street and Woodland avenue 62 62 

2466 Linden street and Torresdale avenue 11 05 



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-^:^^^ Location, Cost. 

2467 Rhawn and Walker streets $87 00 

2468 Meridan and Cottage streets 33 98 

2469 Eleventh and Nedro streets 76 67 

-2471 Fifteenth and Wingohoeking streets 78 86 

2472 York road and Seventieth avenue •. 26 71 

:2473 Sixth street and Hunting Park avenue 140 73 

2474 Sixth and Cayuga streets 33 01 

2475 Memphis and Tioga streets 83 15 

^476 Frankford and Glenwood avenues 36 40 

2477 Thompson and Lefevre streets 10 32 

2478 Emerald and Tioga streets 32 60 

'2479 Fifty-seventh street and Cedar avenue 53 58 

2481 Fifty-seventh and Chestnut streets 10 26 

2482 Thirty-fourth and Walnut streets 15 52 

2483 Forty-sixth and Chestnut streets 10 53 

2484 Sixteenth street and Oregon avenue . 56 04 

2485 Eighth and Lombard streets 175 20 

813 Fourth and Tasker streets 38 65 

2159 Passyunk avenue and Tasker street 9 71 

2284 Third and Federal streets 32 02 

2359 Nixon street, northwest of Umbria street 10 70 

2361 Lyceum avenue and Mitchell street 50 40 

2362 Jamestown and Cresson streets 28 45 

2363 Jamestown and Terrace streets 52 38 

2364 Baynton and Herman streets '. . 45 94 

2365 Rhawn street and Verree road 34 67 

'2366 Germantown avenue and School lane 11 25 

'2367 Archer and Bringhurst streets 61 66 

2368 Anderson and Philellena streets 64 76 

2369 Emlen and Sharpnack streets 62 18 

2375 Gorgas and Anderson streets 96 48 

2376 Willow Grove avenue and Huron street 17 15 

2377 Dyer and Willow streets, Frankford 59 36 

2378 Wayne and Maplewood avenues 54 01 

2379 Germantown avenue and Graver's lane 13 94 

2381 Arrott street and Frankford avenue 13 18 

2382 Melrose and Margaret streets 40 59 

2383 Bustleton pike and Faust street 42 41 

2384 Orchard and Womrath streets « 41 62 

2385 Memphis and Clearfield streets 29 03 

2386 Frankford avenue and Clearfield street 8 52 

2387 Memphis and Somerset streets 29 75 

2388 Cedar and Ann streets 55 33 

2389 Emerald and Wishart streets 34 53 

2391 Jasper and Cambria streets 8 77 



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Box^. Location. OosU 

2392 Eighteenth street and Oregon avenue |67 78 

2393 Twelfth and Shunk streets 87 18 

2486 East Broad street, nocth of Porter street 17 90 

2394 Broad street and Snyder avenue 32 80 

2395 Forty-second and r Spruce streets 24 12 

2396 Forty-third street and Chester avenue 18 76 

2397 Sedgley avenue and Dauphin street 40 25 

2343 Ridge avenue and Dauphin street 31 14 

Total $4,694 17 

During the year the following fire boxes were moved: 

Box. Location. Cost. 
224 From Eighth and Master streets to Tenth and 

Thompson streets $65 17 

1421 From Thirteenth and Chestnut streets to Thir- 
teenth street, north of Chestnut street 44 45 

Total $109 62 



Auxiliary Fire Alarm Boxes Erected During the Year, 

The following Auxiliary Fire Alarm Boxes were erected 
and connected to the City circuits during the year : 

Box. LiOcatlon. Cost.. 

2724 Hess Bright Manufacturing Company, Twenty-first 

street and Fairmount avenue $33 26 

2728 Fretz Kealty Company, Tenth and Diamond streets 13 56 
2726 Tracey Apartment House, Thirty-sixth and Ludlow 

streets 14 28 

2725 WetheriU & Co., Twenty-second street and AHe- 

gheny avenue 15 52 

2729 H. W. Butterworth Sons & Co., York and Cedar 

streets 15 52 

2731 Haines, Jones & Cadbury, No. 1128-1144 Ridge 

avenue 2 26 

2732 Helme & Mcllhenny, No. 1339 Cherry street '. . 15 67 

2734 Thompson's Spa, No. 712 Chestnut street 6 50 

2676 Charles L. Klaud^r Co., Allegheny avenue and "B" 

street 18 70 

2736 Deaf and Dumb Asyhim, Mt. Airy 71 19 

2737 Philadelphia Grain Elevator Co., foot of Cambria 

street, Richmond 2 34 

2738 No. 514-520 Luldow street 18 23: 



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Location. Cost. 



No. ol 
Box. 

2741 Scott A Williams, No. 2079 East Cumberland street |23 39 

2744 J. W. Paxson Company, No. 1044 Beach street 44 09 

2739 Pepper Estate Building, northwest corner Fifth 

and Ludlow streets 16 23 

2745 Harris Building, Nos. 718 and 724 Arch street 4 47 

2735 Sheldrake & Company, Ninth and Tioga streets.. 11 42 



Total $323 63 

I desire to call your attention to the fact in connection 
with the above installations that all the work performed by 
the employees of this Bureau in the way of connecting up 
these boxes to the City circuits is paid for by the Auxiliary 
Fire Alarm Company, the City being put to no expense 
whatever in the matter. 

Bell Telephones. 
During the year the following offices in City Hall were 
•equipped with Bell telephones: 

COBt 

Arc Light Boom, No. 83, City Hall $0 59 

Supreme Court, No. 452, City HaH 73 35 

Board of Education offices, No. 696, City Hall 131 20 

Dynamo Boom, Basement of City Hall 2 01 

Judge Gummey, Room 430, City Hall 5 25 

Prothonotary's Office, City Hall 44 78 

Office of Judge Anderson, Room 540, City Hall 1 17 

Reserve Roll Room, No. 630, City HaU 17 40 

Chief Clerk City Commissioner's Office, City Hall 2 78 

Bureau of Highways and Street Cleaning, Room - 334, 

City Hall 2 38 

Probation Officer, Room 725 City Hall . .' 98 

Clerk of Orphans' Court, Room 413, City Hall 2 14 

Office of Judge Orlady, Room 364, City Hall. 1 51 

Total $285 54 

Bell Telephones. 
Bell telephones were installed at the following locations 
during the year : 

Cost, 
ilesidence of Chief James C. Baxte", Jr., of the Bureau 

of Fire, 918 New Market street $92 35 



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82 13 



90 

CosU 
Office of Magn^strate Campbell, 2839 Kensington avenue % 
Residence of Magistrate Campbell, 2537 £. Somerset l $116 53 

street J 

Residence of Common Councilman George J. Van- 

Houten, 28 South Thirty-fourth street 65 38 

Residence of Magistrate Hogg, 429 Reed street 78 6S 

Residence of Record Clerk of Bureau of Police, 227 

North Fifth street 23 4& 

Office of Magistrate Morris, 2304 Ridge avenue -k 

Residence of Magistrate Morris, 2831 Oxford street, j 
Office of Magistrate Hogg, Callowhill street, east of 

Sixth street 50 45 

Office of Magistrate Harris, 3726 Market street 

Residence of Magistrate Harris, 4204 Chestnut street 151 46- 
Residence of Lineman John MacDonald of the Electri- 
cal Bureau, 2633 North Chadwick s^treet 29 10 

Patriotic Society of Philadelphia, Independence Hall.. 11 54 

Councilman George H. Kelley's residence, 1633 South 

Broad street 85 71 

Motor Cycle Squad, Tenth and Thompson streets 4 26 

Residence of Dr. Braumbaugh, 3324 Walnut street 50 15 

Headquarters of State Constabulary, 1529 Walnut 

street 8 57 

Residence of Detective McFadden, 232 North Camac 

street 28 29 

Residence of Common Councilman Charles E. Connell, 

4602 Kingsessing avenue 84 43 

Mounted Squad Stables 3 41 

City Stables, Tenth and Greenwich streets 110 20 

Residence of Police Surgeon Owen, 406 South Sixteenth 

street 94 

Total $1,077 02 

Cost. 
Bell Telephones were connected on separate lines at 

Captain Duncan's residence in Pairmount Park. . $203 25 

Keystone Telephones. 

During the year the following offices in City Hall were 
equipped with ^^eystone telephones : 

Cost. 

Office of the Prothonotary, City Hall $260 25 

Office of City Treasurer in City Hall 2 33 



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CoBi. 
Bureau of Highways and Street Cleaning, No. 334, 

City Hall |2 38 

Court Common Pleas No. 5, No. 652, City Hall 3 46 

Total $268 42 

Keystone Telephones. 

Keystone telephones were installed at the following loca- 
tions during the year : 

Cost. 

Residence of Captain of Detectives Souder, 3705 Lan- 
caster avenue $31 31 

Residence of Magistrate Campbell, 2537 East Somer-\ 

set street I 114 89 

Office of Magistrate Campbell, 2839 Kensington ave j 

Field Office of High Pressure Pumping Station, 2250 

North Howard street 68 45 

City Stables, Tenth and Greenwich streets 47 56 

Total $262 21 



Telephones Transferred During the Year. 

The following telephones were transferred from one loca- 
tion to another during 1910 : 

Bell Telephones. 

Cost. 

From 1347 Toronto street to 227 North Fourth street. . $71 40 
From Second Regiment Armory to 2110 North Broad 

street 17 08 

From Sixth Regiment Armory to Fifteenth and Arch 

streets 23 04 

From 23 North Juniper street to 25 North Juniper 

street 1 25 

From residence of ex-Captain of Detectives to Captain 

of Detectives residence, No. 3507 Lancaster avenue. 63 35 

From 872 North Fifth street to 329 North Sixth street. 46 67 
From 1927 North Twenty-fifth street to 1425 North 

Broad street 85 71 

From 3516 "K" street to 1817 East Tioga street 18 96 

From 3231 Powelton avenue to 3304 Baring street. ... 24 07 



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Cost. 

From Room 709, City Hall, to Room 712, City Hall |6 26 

From 1845 North Twenty-fifth street to 1927 North 

Twenty-fifth street 37 28 

From 777 North Twenty-seventh street to 823 Leiand 

street 61 72 

From 4135 Westminster avenue to 4611 Cedar avenue. . 151 26 
From 1725 Wood street to Tenth and Thompson 

streets 3 00 

Total $613 05 

Keystone Telephones. 

Cost. 

From 3900 Woodland avenue to 5171 Columbia avenue. $71 46 

From Room 709, City Hall, to Room 702, City Hall 37 56 

From 1845 North Twenty-fifth street to 1927 North 

Twenty-fifth street 4 73 

Three telephones in the offices of the Board of Educa- 
tion to various locations in same ofllces 13 1 20 

Total $24^ 95 



Telephone, Hand Sets Installed. 

The following telephone instruments in City Hall were 
•equipped with hand sets during the year : 

Location. 

:2 in Room 652, City Hall (Judge Martin) 

2 in Room 404, City Hall (Chief Clerk Milligan) 

2 in Room 408, City Hall (President of Select Coun- 
cil) 

2 in Room 648, City Hall (Judge Staake) 

2 in Room 212, City Hall (Chief Clerk, Department of 

Public Works) 9 49 

'2 in Room 214, City Hall (Assistant Director of Pub- 
lic Works) 9 49 

2 in Room 578* City Hall (Assistant City Solicitor 

Scott) 9 55 

1 in Room 221, City Hall (Director Clay's office) 4 50 

■2 in Room 577, City Hall (Chief Clerk to Sheriff) 6 50 



$33 


SI. 

05 


8 


38 


8 


24 


2 


49 



Total $91 66 

An Extension Bell was installed at the Second Regi- 

m.ent Armory, 2110 North Broad street $5 48 



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New Electrical Bureau Type Wall Distribution Boxes and 
Pipe Conduit Installed in City Hall. 

The following rooms in City Hall were equipped with 
New Type Electrical Bureau Distribution Boxes and pipe 
conduit during the year, there being thirty-four (34) 
boxes and 8,500 feet of iron pipe conduit installed: 

Booms 140, 144, 146, 148, 413, 415, 417, 460, 453, 590, 
592, 594, 629, 690, 692, 694, 696, 706A, 708, 715, 717, 
750, 752, 760, 504, 506, 508, 510, 130, 133, 134, 136, 
138, 143, all the above equipment at a cost of.... $829 66 



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Patrol Boxes in Use. 



District. 



Old 
style. 



New 
style. 



Wall. 



Private. 



Total. 



Plrst 

Second 

Third 

Fourth _. 

PIfth 

Sixth „ 

aeventb ,^— „,^. 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 

Thirteenth 

Pourteenth 

Fifteenth 

Sixteenth 

Seventeenth 

Eighteenth 

Nineteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty-flrst 

Twenty-second 

Twenty-third 

Twenty-fourth 

Twenty-flfth 

Twenty-sixth 

Twenty-seventh 

Twenty-eighth 

Twenty-ninth 

Thirtieth 

Thirty-flrst 

Thirty-second 

Thirty-third— 

Thirty-fourth 1. 



18 
25 
14 
4 
5 



6 
2 

10 
10 
1 
7 

12 
6 
6 
2 
8 



15 
17 
19 
19 
14 
17 
19 
21 
21 
14 
19 
27 

3 
15 
10 
13 
18 
29 
20 
14 

5 

9 
81 
16 

6 
12 
14 
19 
21 
11 

9 

8 
10 

4 



16 
18 
21 
20 
20 
21 
19 
21 
23 
14 
19 
27 
23 
44 
26 
22 
23 
29 
21 
15 
10 

9 
33 
27 

9 
23 
29 
20 
30 
23 
15 
10 
10 
18 



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95 



Patrol Boxes in Use — Contiiraed. 



District. 



Old 
style. 



New 
style. 



WaU. 



Pil¥ate. 



Total. 



Thirty-fifth 

Thirty-sixth 

Thirty-seventh—, 

Thirty-eighth 

Thirty-ninth 



Totals., 



168 



14 
14 
17 
5 
16 

585 



31 



21 
18 
24 
10 
16 

809 



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Police Wall Patrol Boxes Erected, 

' 'During the year the following police patrol wall boxes 
were erected : 

District. Location. Cost. • 

Fourteenth District, Mt. Airy and Germantown avenues $36 15 

Thirty-fifth District, Wyoming and Maple avenues. .... 267 46 

Twenty-seventh District, Tulip and Levick streets 13 32 

Sixteenth District, Forty-first street and Parkside ave- 
nue 59 50 

ThiTty-fifth District, Twentieth street and Limekiln 

pike , 13 88 

Thirty-fifth District, Seventh street and Green lane. . . 237 98 

Thirty-fifth District, Sixth street and Olney avenue. ... 71 60 

Thirty-fifth District, Second Street pike and Tabor road 23 56 

Nineteenth District, Sixteenth and Naudain streets .... 67 44 
Twenty-seventh District, in Chemical Engine House 

No. 6 at Bustleton 107 35 

Twenty-seventh District, Willets road, above Academy 

road .* 503 20 

Seventeenth District, Twenty-fifth and Morris streets. . 75 52 
Seventeenth District, Nineteenth and Porter streets.. 14 66 
Seventeenth District, Twenty-second and Snyder avenue 171 35 
Seventeenth District, Twenty-eighth and Morris streets 114 64 
Twenty-fourth District, Bridge Street Wharf, Brides- 
burg 68 60 

Twenty-fourth District, Amber and Silver streets.... 61 31 

Fifteenth District, Harrison and Oakland streets 89 33 

Thirty-second District, Sixty-second street and Gray's 

avenue 80 17 

"Twenty-third District, Sydenham street, north of 

Master street 73 12 

Total $2,150 14 



Booth Patrol Boxes Replaced hy WaU Patrol Boxes. 

Booth Patrol Boxes were replaced by Wall Patrol Boxes 
at the following locations : 

District. Location. Cost. 

Twenty-first District, Forty-fourth and Sansom streets $87 31 

Thirtieth District, Third and Cambria streets 25 03 

^Seventeenth District, Twenty-fifth and Federal streets. 17 07 



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District. Location. Cost. 
.Thirty-first District, Uber street and Susquehanna, ave- 
nue w. . * . V . . $13 30 

Thirty-first District, Twenty-third and Huntingdon 

streets 20 10 

Fifteenth District, Orthodox and Oakland streets ^ 19 08 

Twenty-seventh District, Asylum pike, in front of 

Asylum gate ^ 18 15 

Twenty-seventh District, Torresdale avenue and Ix)ng- 

shore street 24 20 

Thirty-fourth District, Sixteenth and Porter streets. . 17 6& 
Twenty-fourth District, Kensington avenue and Tioga 

street 86 65 

Thirty-sixth District, Sixth and Clearfield streets 18 36 

Thirty-sixth District, Fifth and Cayuga streets 22 04 

Thirty-fifth District, Stenton avenue and Church lane. . 18 99 

Thirty-seventh District, Eighth and MifElin streets.... 13 86 

Fourteenth District, Green and Carpenter streets 19 76 

Fourteenth District, Philadelphia and Beading R. R. 

Depot, Chestnut Hill 350 39 

Second District, Front and Christian streets 199 55 

Total $971 55 

Old Style Patrol Boxes Replaced hy New Electrical 
Bureau Type Wall Patrol Boxes. 

During the year the New Type of Electrical Bureau 
Wall Patrol Boxes were erected at the following locations 
in place of the old style patrol boxes : 

District. Lc cation. Cost. 

Third District, Delaware avenue and Chestnut street. . $193 97 

Third District, Sixth and Chestnut streets 189 6^ 

Third District, Fifth and Walnut streets 161 54 

Third District, Front and Walnut streets 161 54 

Third District, Third street, opposite Dock street 163 34 

Third District, Seventh and Walnut streets 161 54 

Third District, Dock and Walnut streets 182 24 

Third District, Independence Square 252 29 

Fourth District, Delaware avenue and Arch street .... 232 73 

Fourth District, Sixth and Arch streets 224 73 

Fourth District, Chestnut Street Pier 175 81 

Fourth District, Second and Arch streets 175 57 

Fourth Districtj Fifth and Market streets 26 31 



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District. Location. Cost. 

Fourth District, Sixth and Market streets |79 60 

Fourth District, Second and Market streets 26 36 

Fourth District, Seventh and Market streets 26 41 

Fourth District, Delaware avenue and Market streets. 26 41 

Fifth District, Nineteenth and Chestnut streets 87 31 

Fifth District, Ninth and Walnut streets 161 54 

Fifth District, Twenty-first and Wamut streets 161 54 

Sixth District, Eleventh and Arch streets 184 78 

Sixth District, Eighth and Arch streets 30 29 

Sixth District, Tenth and Arch streets 179 25 

Sixth District, Thirteenth and Market streets 77 32 

Sixth District, Eleventh and Market streets 19 61 

Twentieth District, Twentieth and Arch streets 26 44 

Twentieth District, Nineteenth and Market streets 72 52 

Twentieth District, Twenty- third and Market streets. . 41 91 

Twentieth District, Seventeenth and Market streets.. 34 74 

Twentieth District, Twenty-first and Market streets.. 33 68 

Fourth District, Third and Market streets 34 67 

Fourth District, Fourth and Chestnut streets 35 76 

Fifth District, Broad and Sansom streets • 29 52 

Sixth District, Ninth and Market streets 31 35 



Total $3,702 24 

Changes in Locations of Patrol Boxes, 

The following changes in the locations of patrol boxes 
were made during the year : 

Cost. 

From Seventh and Spruce streets to Eighth and Lom- 
bard streets $31 76 

From Perth and Master streets to Tenth and Thomp- 
son streets 11 54 

From Darien and Poplar streets to another pole at 

same location , 12 16 

From Franklin street and Indiana avenue to 608 In- 
diana avenue 8 25 

From Lombard street, east of Twenty-fifth street, to in 
front of car barn at Twenty-fifth and Lombard 
streets 8 47 

From Nineteenth and Passyunk avenue to Twentieth 

street and Passyunk avenue 13 66 

Total $85 84 



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Cables were tested and connected as follows : 

Eighth street, from Girard avenue to GenrLantown ave- 
nue $138 00 



Cables were transferred to new ducts on : 
Trankford avenue, from Huntingdon to Somerset street $204 40 

Electrical Mechanical Gongs were transferred from one 
location to another at 

United Gus Improvement Building, Eighth and Dia- ' 

mond street, from third to second floor $4 10 

District Engineer's gong, from 2217 Race street to 

2118 Summer street 35 66 

Total $39 76 

Electro Mechanical Gong was disconnected at the 

Residence of Assistant Fire Marshal Upton, 46 West 

Washington lane $6 13 

During the year Protector Boards were installed in old 
station houses as follows : 

Thirtieth District, Front and Westmoreland streets. . $466 01 
Seventeenth District, Twenty-first and Federal streets. 357 05 

Total $823 06 

Xew Police Stations were equipped during the year as 
follows : 

District. Iiooatlon. Cost. 

Twelfth District, Eighth and Jefferson streets $106 17 

Thirty-fifth District, Branchtown 1,174 03 

Twenty-fourth District, Belgrade and Clearfield streets 421 54 

Eighth District, Tenth and Buttonwood streets 275 58 

Fourth District, Race street, east of Fourth street 800 89 

Total ..*. $2,778 21 



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New Fire Houses were equipped during the year as fol- 
k)ws: 

Engine Company No. 26, Tenth and Bnttonwood 

streets $16 00 

Engine Company No. 28, Belgrade and Clearfield 

streets 17 50 

Total $33 50 

New Truck Houses were equipped at the following loca- 
tions during the year: 

Truck Company No. 8, Germanitown avenue and Bring- 

hurst street $37 5& 

The following new Patrol District was established : 
Thirty-ninth District, 4212 Bidge avenue $520 00 

The Ninth District Sub-station House at 1725 Wood 

street was disconnected at a cost of $15 06 

An advance signal bell was connected at the residence 

of Dr. DaCosta, 2045 Walnut street, at a cost of. . $30 04 

New Central Station OflSce Sets and Shearing Registers 
were installed in the following Police District Station 
Houses : 

District. Location. Cost. 

Twenty-first District, 3206 Woodland avenue $41 12 

Nineteenth District, Pine street, west of Twelfth 

street 42 06 

Twenty-fourth District, Belgrade and Clearfield 

streets 42 68 

Twenty-third District^ Northwest corner Nineteenth 

and Oxford streets 41 78 

Ninth District, Twentieth and Buttonwood streets.... 41 75 

Eighth District, 1012 Buttonwood street 41 60 

Fourth District, north side of Race street, east of 

Fourth street 43 02 

Total .'. $294 01 



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New Advance Signal Bells were installed in the follow- 
ing Police Stations : 

District. Location. Cost, 

ripst District, 1923 Fitzwater street $21 40' 

Second District, Second street, above Christian street. . 21 37 

Third District, 321 Delancey street 21 37 

Fourth District, Eace street, east of Fourth street. ... 21 50 

Fifth District, 215 South Fifteenth street 21 39 

Sixth District, 23B North Eleventh street 21 49* 

Seventh District, 321 Fadrmount avenue 21 5T 

Eighth District, 1012 Buttonwood street 21 45^ 

Ninth District, Twentieth and Buttonwood streets. ... 21 41 

Tenth District, 1417 North Front street 21 49 

Eleventh District, 615 East Girard avenue 21 37 

Twelfth District, Eighth street, below Jefferson street. 20 90- 

Thirteenth District, 4431 Main street, Manayunk . . . . 21 77 

Fourteenth District, West Haines street, Germantown. 21 45 

Fifteenth District, 4254 Paul street 21 5a 

Sixteenth District, southwest corner Thirty-ninth 

street and Lancaster avenue .* 21 37 

Seventeenth District, 1210 South Twentieth street 21 51 

Nineteenth District, Pine street, west of Twelfth street 21 50 

Twentieth District, 253 North Fifteenth street 21 35 

Twenty-second District, 2700 Park avenue 21 63^ 

Twenty-third District, northwest corner Nineteenth 

and Oxford streets 21 45- 

Twenty-fourth District, southwest corner Belgrade and 

Clearfield streets 21 45 

Twenty-fifth District, 1507 Moyamensing avenue 21 50" 

Twenty-seventh District, 6834 State road, Tacony 21 47 

Twenty-eighth District, 1900 North Twentieth street.. 21 3S 

Twenty-ninth district, 603 North Sixty-first street. ... 21 35 

Thirtieth District, 3300 North Front street 21 3? 

Thirty-first District, Twenty-sixth and York streets. . 21 45 

Thirty-second District, 6438 Woodland avenue 21 53 

Thirty-third District, northwest corner Seventh and 

Carpenter streets 21 50 

Thirty-fourth District, northwest corner Fifteenth 

street and Snyder avenue 2141 

Thirty-fifth District, York road and Champlost street 20 47 

Thirty-sixth District, 3967 Germantown avenue 21 45 

Thirty^seventh District, Fourth street and Snyder ave- 
nue 21 37 

Thirty-eighth District, Thirty-seventh street and 

Woodland avenue • 21 6S 



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District. Location. Cost. 

Thirty-ninth District, 4212 Ridge avenue $21 47 

Fourteenth District, Sub., Chestnut Hill 21 45 

Twenty-seventh District, Sub., Holmesburg 21 50 

Twenty-fourth District, Sub., Bridesburg. * 21 50 

Thirtieth District, Sub,, Koxborough 21 47 

Twenty-first District, 3206 Woodland avenue 21 2t 

Eighteenth District, northwest corner Fourth and 

York streets 21 37 

Twenty-sixth District, Trenton avenue and Dauphin 

street 21 50 



Total $921 05 

Installations, Extensions and Changes Made in Connection 
With the Electric Light Wiring in City Hall, 

The number of incandescent and arc lamps in City Hall 
at the end of the year 1910, together with the locations by 
floors, is as follows : 

. Incan- 

T oV« Sa descent 
Lamps, j^amps. 

Basement 4 1,494 

First floor 90 1,887 

Second floor 33 2,314 

Third floor ". 30 1,035 

Fourth floor .•. 20 2,829 

Pifth floor 32 950 

Sixth floor 41 1,938 

Seventh floor 24 1,130 

Eighth and ninth floors 16 421 

Tower 16 

Clock face 548 

Memorial lamp posts on City Hall pavement 800 

Totals 306 15,346 

Of the above lamps there were five hundred and forty- 
four (544) new incandescent lamps added during the year 
1910, increasing the total number from fourteen thousand 
eight hundred and two (14,802) to fifteen thousand three 
hundred and forty-six (15,346) incandescent lamps. 
■ For the maintenance of the arc lamps during the year 



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103 

there has been used about fifteen thousand (15,000) car- 
"bons, two hundred and twenty (220) dozen inner globes 
«nd forty (40) outer globes, together with repairs and re- 
newals of parts at a cost of five thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-two (5,832) dollars. 

Under the head of maintenance of the incandescent light- 
ing system there has been three thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-three (3,963) jobs taken care of, including new work 
and repairs, such as renewing burnt out lamps, renewing 
fuses, rewiring fixtures, replacing worn out cords, sockets, 
etc., amounting in cost to eight thousand five hundred and 
seventy-three (8,573) dollars and eighty-seven (87) cents. 

The total number of burnt out lamps during the year 
amounted to eight thousand six hundred and seventy-three 
< 8,673). 

There has been used during the year eight hundred and 
twenty-six (826) 50 candle power gem lamps; three hun- 
•dred and sixty-one (361) 100 candle power gem lamps, and 
three hundred and sixfy-six (366) outer globes in the main- 
tenance of the memorial lamp posts, at a total cost of six 
liundred and fifty-seven (657) dollars and sixty-two (62) 
•cents. 

During the year 1910 the City Hall was illuminated a 
nuinber of times, the decorations consisting of outlining 
the building with incandescent lamps, erecting electrically 
illuminated set pieces, and illuminating the statue of Wil- 
liam Penn on top of the tower with searchlights. 

In connection with the electric light plant of City Hall, 
the records show that the daily average load during the 
year 1907 was two thousand three hundred and seventy 
(2,370) amperes. This has increased until in the year 
1910 it has reached the average daily value of 3,320 am- 
peres, which represents an increase of thirty-one per cent. 
<31%). 



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104 

On dark days during the year the maximum load had^ 
reached the total of 6,100 amperes. This load is below the 
normal electrical capacity of the plant, which is 1,000- 
kilowatts, or 8,000 amperes, but the boiler plant has 
been taxed at times to furnish the necessary power for it 
in addition to the other services it supplies. This condition 
of affairs exists on a cold, dark day, when in addition to- 
having the maximum electric light load, we have a heavy 
heating load, and also the regular elevator pump load. In 
such a case the full capacity of the boiler plant is taxed,, 
and if any breakdown occurs in the boiler plant, we are 
obliged to call upon the Electric Light Emergency Service 
to help us out while the repairs to the boilers are being 
made. 

Electrical Installations and Repairs Made to Police, Police 
Patrol, Fire Stations, etc, 

I desire to call your attention to tjie fact that in connec-^ 
tion with the electrical installations of the police, police 
patrol, fire stations, etc., all the fixtures and panel boards 
in connection with these buildings were designed by this 
Bureau, and all the work in connection with the complete 
installation of these stations was done by the employees of 
this Bureau, and I do not hesitate to say that the work per- 
formed by these men in connection with these most im- 
portant installations is of the highest order. 



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wa 


j 


^^ 




^^^^^^■tli n 



New Year's Illumination of City Hall. 



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105 



The electrical installation and equipment of the various 
stations follows : 



Name and Location of Station. 


o 


4* 
2 OQ 


Panel Boards. 


a 

II 

Eh 


3 


J'ourth District Police Station and Pa- 
trol Garage, Race street, below Fourth 
street 


1 124 


205 


fl-ie circuit \ 
.U- 8 circuit J 


4 


12 


Eighth District Police Station and Pa- 
trol Garage, Buttonwood street, west 
of Tenth street 


ll27 


218 


(1-20 circuit) 
tl- 8 circuit i 


4 


12 


Twelfth District Police Station and Pa- 
trol Garage, Eighth street, below Jef- 
ferson street 


jioo 


175 
193 


(1-14 circuit) 
tl-10 circuit; 

(1-18 circuit) 
U-6 circuit; 


4 
4 


11 


Twenty-fourth District Police Station 
and Patrol Garage, southwest corner 
Belgrade and Clearfield streets— 


11 


No. 26 Fire fengine House, Buttonwood 
street, west of Tenth street 


43 
33 


89 
.«7 


1-10 circuit 
1-10 circuit 






No. 28 yire Engine House, Belgrade 
street, south of Clearfield street 1 




No. 2 Fire Truck House, Florist street, 
below Fourth street 


38 


67 


1-10 circuit 






No. 5 Fire Truck House, Sixteenth 
street, below Pitzwater street 


40 


75 


1-10 circuit 






:No. 8 Fire Truck House, 5231 German- 
town avenue 


51 


141 


1- ? circuit 







BIgh Pressure Pumping Station, 
Seventh street and Lehigh avenue 


130 


388 


1-34 circuit 


4 


2 



All the above stations and fire houses went into service 
with the exception of the Fourth District Police Station, 
Fire Truck Houses Nos. 2 and 5, and the High Pressure 
Pumping Station, Seventh street and Lehigh avenue, in 
which the fixture installation has not been completed. 

The basement of the Third District Police Station was 
rewired, and the wires encased in iron conduit. 

The Thirty-fifth District Police Station, Garage and 
Stable was completed in 1908 ; was lamped up and current 
turned on May 3, 1910. Station went into service May 11, 
1910. 



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106 

A new main service waa iewfelHed in the old Twelfth 
District Police Sta^atet House, Tenth and Thompson 
streets, now used by the Motor Cycle Squad. The toilet 
room on the^ second floor and the basement were rewired, 
and two (2) additional lights in the toilet, and six (6) 
additional lights in the basement were installed, all new 
work being done in iron conduit. 

At the House of Correction, Holmesburg, two (2) lights 
in the motor room, and four (4) lights over elevator doors 
were installed. 

This Bureau installed five (5) lights in the Immigra- 
tion Station^ pier 80 South Wharves; also installed eight 
(8) lights :n the oflices on the first floor of pier. 

An 18-inch reflector 35 empere G. E. search light was 
installea by this Bureau in the watch tower at the Eastern 
Penitentiary. 

X new service switch and automatic current breaker was 
installed in the motor house of the bridge over Frankford 
Creek at Bridge street. The controller was completely 
overhauled and put in first-class condition. The apparatus 
is now operating satisfactorily. 

In addition to the above work repairs to all police sta- 
tions, fire houses, bath houses, etc., have been promptly 
mad'.'. 

A regulai inspection of the electrical apparatus carried 
by the various theatrical companies has been made each 
Jl^nday during the year. 

Special attention was paid to the inspection and testing 
of the electrical installation of the new Nixon Theatre, 
Eifty-second and Ludlow streets, and the new Liberty 
Theatre, Columbia avenue, west of Broad street, in both 
of which the electrical work was done under the supervision 
of this Bureau. 

This Bureau installed in the basement of the Girls' High 
School, Seventeenth and Spring Garden streets, a 100 am- 



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107 

pere double throw switch to throw the A. C. to D. C. cur- 
rent on lines on third floor laboratory switchboard. The 
two (2) circuits were installed in the laboratory to feed 
a small motor and receptacles for experimental work. 
Three (3) circuits were run from the laboratory switch- 
board and three (3) plugging receptables were installed in 
class rooms on third floor. We ran a circuit to and installed 
a three-gang plugging receptacle to furnish storage battery 
current to floor sockets in laboratory receptacles marked 
No. 1 — charging — Nos. 2 and 3 discharging. 

Inve7itory. 

Inventory of instruments and fixed property in use, and 
stock of the City under the care of this Bureau : 

498,544 feet of conduit. ♦ 

3,641,686 feet of duct. 

96,972 feet of terra ootta duct in conduit. 
1,510 manholes. 
510 iron signal box posts. 
377 iron patrol box posts. 
63 iron water main box posts. 
140 fire box posts and fire water main telephone boxes and 

equipment. 
185 miles of .telegraph and telephone cable underground. 
5,297 miles of telegraph and telephone conductors under- 
ground. 
75 iron box telephones. 

54 miles of electric light cable underground. 
1,837 junction boxes. 
1,867 miles of overhead wire, 
5,839 wooden poles. 
1,655 iron poles. 
930 mast arms. 
1,474 cells Callaud battery. 
4,18X cella storage battery, 
1400 X^elanche and dry batteries. 

1,862 fire signal boxes, one hundred and seventeen (117) of 
which are private, sixteen (16) on stages of theatres, 
and one huttdlred and eighty-seven (187) auxiliarized 
in private in«tituti<ms. 



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108 

145 keyJess doors on fire signal boxes. 

110 bell magnets for fire signal circuits. 

110 keys on fire signal circuits. 

•906 police patrol signal and telephone boxes, of which five 
hundred and twenty-five (535) are wall, and thirty- 
two (32) are located in banks and other private in- 
stitutions. 

13 special Central Office telephone sets. 
39 police signal and telephone office sets. 

207 police booths. 
1,198 telephones (City), including two hundred and five (205) 

water main instruments and five (5) office sets. 
645 telephones (Bell Com-pany), including eight (8) sets on 

switchboard. 
543 telephones (Keystone Company), including four ^4) 

sets on switchboard. 
126 alarm instruments located in engine houses, depots, etc., 

of which thirty (30) are private. 
S8 bell magnets and keys, connected with fire signal and 

telephone service. 

14 banks of relays, ^ve (5) circuits to a bank. 
2 four-dial manual transmitters. 

1 automatic advance repeater. 
1 fire alarm circuit switchboart, capacity fifty (50) cir- 
cuits. 

1 storage battery switchboard, capacity sixty (60) cir- 
cuits. 

6 inking registers, ten (10) circuits each. 

1 rotary switch, capacity seventy-five (75) circuits. 
' 1 telephone switchboard (Keystone Company), capacity 
four hundred (400) circuits and forty (40) trunks. 

1 telephone switchboard (Bell Company), capacity five 
hundred (500) circuits and one hundred (100) trunks. 

1 police telephone switchboard (Bell Company), capacity 
eighty (80) circuits and fifteen (15) trunks. 

1 police telephone switchboard (Keystone Company), ca- 

pacity, eighty (80) circuits and twenty (20) trunks. 

2 direct connected dynamos for charging storage battery. 

Bell Telephone switchboard. 
4 motor dynamos for telephone switchboard work. 
1 switchboard for fire water main telephone service, ca- 
pacity six (6) circuits. 
850 automatic protectors. 
"850 half ampere fuses in glass tubes. 
S50 heat coils and carbon arresters. 



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109 

211 anvils for testing purposes. 

1 combined protector and cross-connecting frame, capa- 
city four thousand (4,000) wires. 
52 police instruments. 

52 relays on marble bases for police instruments. 
1 laboratory cable testing set for measuring insulation^ 
capacity and conductor resistance, consisting of: 
1 high sensibility galvanometer. 
1 extra ballistic tube for use with same. 

Special lamp and scale. 
1 resistance box, 100,000 ohms. 

1 Ayrton universal shunt. 

Special .3 M. F. condenser with highly insulated! 
infinity plug. 

2 double pole double-throw switches, highly insul- 

ated. 
1 single pole d-ouble-throw switch, highly insulated.. 
1 special double pole double-throw switch. 
1 short circuiting key on pillars. 
1 Kemp's discharge key. 

1 Wheatstone bridge 10 ratio coils, 2 each of 1-10- 
100, 1,000-10,000. 
1 portable insulation and capacity testing set. 

1 portable telescope galvanometer. 

2 fault finders. 

1 bridge for locating faults on power circuits. 

1 dial decade portable testing set. 

1 A. C. voltmeter with card resistance for 20,000 volts. 

1 No. 1 station photometer. 

Standardizing apparatus for direct current anmieters 
and voltmeters consisting of : 

1 jMJtentionmeter. 

1 reg^ulating rheostat. 

1 wall D'Arsonval galvanometer. 

1 volt box. 

1 Weston standard cell. 

1 standard resistance .1 ohm, capacity 15 amperes. 

1 standard resistance .001, capacity 300 amperes. 
1 complete set of Thompson's reflecting galvanometers. 
1 Bunnel galvanometer and Wheatstone bridge. 
1 Bradley galvanometer and rheostat. 
1 Weston direct and alternating current voltmeter. 
6 Weston direct current voltmeters. 
1 Weston direct current milli voltmeter. 



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110 

4 Weston direct current ammeters. 

2 Weston direct current milli aanmeters. ♦ 

1 Weston multiplier for direct current voltmeter. 

2 Weston direct current voltammeters. 

5 dynamos with a capacity of two hundred (200) K.W. 

each. 

7 engines and dynamos, one each on fire boat "Stuart," 
police boats "Ashbridge," "Stokley" and "King," and 
three (3) ice boats with searchlights and all neces- 
sary incandescent lamps, switches, etc. 

4 550-volt — 57 H. P. armored motors for operation of 
Gray's Ferry bridge, together with two (2) control- 
lers, two (2) collector rings, two (2) marble .switch- 
boards, each containing the necessary volt and am- 
meters and automatic circuit breakers, and a 2 H. P. 
direct coupled motor to operate an air whistle. 

1 550-volt — 17 H. P. amw>red motor and controller to op- 

erate drawbridge on Bridge street, crossing Frank- 
ford creek. 

2 direct current dynamotors for furnishing current to 

Fifth District patrol and call bell equipment in the 
station house. 

2 A. C. motor generators for furnishing current to Twen- 
tieth District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 A. C. motor generator for furnishing current to Twenty- 
first District patrol and equipment. 

1 D. C. dynamotor for furnishing current to Nineteenth 
District equipment. 

1 A. C. mot^r generator for furnishing current to' Eighth 
District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 A. C. motor generator for furnishing current to Twelfth 
District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 A. C. motor generator for furnishing current to Thirty- 
fifth District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 A. C. motor generg,tor for furnishing current to Twenty- 
fourth District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 A. C. motor generator for furnishing current to Ninth 
District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 A. C. motor generator for furnishing current to Twenty- 
third District patrol and call bell equipment. 

1 D. C. dynamotor for furnishing current to Fourth Dis- 
trict patrol and call bell equipment. 
Hundreds of push buttons, calls, buzzers, etc. 



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Ill 



Estimated Cost of Instruments and Property of the City 
in Use by the Electrical Bureau. 

5,641,686 feet of creosoted wood duct in conduit $1,092,505 80 

15,420 feet of terra cotta duct in conduit 9,252 00 

96,972 feet of terra cotta duct conduit 5,769 83 

1,510 manholes 105,700 00 

510 iron signal box posts 8,160 00 

377 iron signal box posts 6,182 80 

62 water main box posts 1,016 80 

140 fire box posts and fire water main tele- 
phone boxes and equipment 5,810 00 

75 iron box telephones 3,243 75 

185 miles of telegraph and telephone cable in- 
stalled 291,375 00 

54 miles of electric light cable installed 78,300 00 

39 Police signal and telephone office sets.... 9,750 00 

60 miles of overhead No. 10 copper wire 3,615 00 

1,837 junction boxes 20,666 25 

1,867 miles of overhead wire 115,754 00 

5,839 wooden poles 61,309 50 

1,368 iron poles 41,040 00 

930 mast arms 55,800 00 

1,474 cells of Callaud battery 1,842 50 

4,181 cells of storage battery 4,348 24 

1,574 fire alarm signal boxes 196,750 00 

145 keyless doors 5,800 00 

110 kej'^s on line signal circuits 1,100 00 

110 bell magnets for fire signal circuits 2,750 00 

906 police patrol boxes 135,900 00 

207 police patrol booths 38,295 00 

Central Station apparatus 397 00 

12 special telephone sets 534 00 

.1,188 telephones 5,464 80 

101 gongs 10,756 50 

8.8 bell magnets and keys combined 2,024 00 

50 bell magnets 1,000 Oa 

14 banks of relays, 5 circuits to a bank 2,240 00 

2 4-dial manual transmitters 9,750 00 

1 automatic advance repeater ) 

1 fire alarm circuit switch board ) * 

1 storage battery switchboard 15,100 00 

6 inking registers 6,000 00 



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112 



1 

1 
1 

850 

850 

850 

211 

1 

52 

52 

1 

1 



1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
15 



6 
1 

40 
1 

28 



1 

8 

20 

306 

40,000 

4 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



rotary switch 

switchboard for water main service 

motor dynamo 

automatic protectors ... 1 

one-half (y^) ampere fuses in gflass tubes. . 

heat coils and carbon arresters 

anvils for testing purposes 

cross connecting rack 

police instruments 

relays on marble bases 

Bradley galvanometer and rheostat 

Weston direct and alternating current volt- 
meter 

6 Weston direct current voltmeters 

Weston direct current milli voltmeter .... 

Weston direct current ammeters • . . 

Weston direct milli ammeters 

multiplier for direct current voltmeter. . . . 

Weston direct current voltammeters 

motor generators, including installing 

and switchboards , 

dynamotors * 

Telephone switchboards and equipment... 

main distributing frame 

Testing instruments and laboratory 

typewriters 

Elliott-Fisher billing machine 

steel lockers 

automobile 

memorial lamp posts 

Boundary tablets and seals for memorial 

poles 

Cable for memorial lamp posts 

search light 

search lights and covers 

fan motors 

incandescent arc lamps 

incandescent lamps 

375 H. P. boilers 

375 H. P. boilers 

50 H. P. engine and fan 

50 H. P. engine and fan 

well pump 

well pump 

well pump 



1450 


00 


30 


oa 


50 


00 


2,677 


50 


1,700 


00 


1,487 


50 


1,055 


00 


250 


00 


2,912 


00 


962 


00 


15 


00 


60 


00 


360 


00 


58 


50 


232 


00 


127 


50 


9 


25 


150 


00 


1,875 


00 


180 


00 


70,000 


00 


1,550 


00 


2,565 


50 


600 


00 


165 


oo 


234 


00 


850 00 


25,375 


00 


1,036 


00 


6,243 


75 


311 


00 


2,400 00 


400 


00 


4,590 


00 


6,240 


00 


18,520 


00 


18,520 


00 


3,000 00 


3,000 


00 


175 


00 


300 00 


151 


oo 



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113 

4 boiler feed pumps |1,200 00 

5 Ames engines and Westinghouse dynamos. . 50,000 00 

1 house pump 1,500 00 

1 house pump 2,000 00 

1 switchboard * . . . 10,000 00 

18 vertical hydraulic elevators 121,500 00 

4 vertical hydraulic elevators 30,000 00 

1 direct electric elevator 27,000 00 

and cushion ' 30,750 00 

3 hand-power elevator machines 1,000 00 

1 pressure tank 718 00 

5 pressure tanks 3,500 00 

4 discharge tanks 1,200 00 

5 elevator pumps 23,000 00 

Emergency electric lighting circuit in City 

Hall and equipment 10,000 00 

Wiring in City Hall 50,000 00 

Office furniture 1,000 00 

Miscellaneous supplies 20,000 00 

Total $2,932,738 27 



Recommendations. 

I would also respectfully request, as I did in my last re- 
port, that provisions be made at as early a date as possible 
for the complete rehabilitation of the fire alarm equipment 
in this building. As I stated in my previous report, there 
is no "Emergency Equipment" here of any kind to take 
care of any possible "emergency" that may arise at any 
moment. If the new plant should be installed the old 
equipment that is here now could be "tied in" as an emer- 
gency plant, so that the City would be amply protected at 
all times. 

I would also recommend that arrangements be made at 
an early a date as possible, which I referred to in my last 
report, for the installation of a "Eepair Shop," for the 
purpose of making all necessary and essential repairs to 
the various instruments that come under the supervision 
of this Bureau. It would cost but $5,000 to install this 



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plant, and I earnestly request that you give it your serious 
consideration. 

I would alsoa-equest and earnestly recommend that all 
the fire houses in the City be connected by direct lines to* 
this Bureau. At the present time there are from two to 
eight stations on one line, making it at times physically 
impossible in cases of great emergency to get many of the 
stations referred to ; this is a serious condition of affairs 
and should be modernized without further delay. 

I would also recommend that all City officials who are 
connected with the administration of City affairs be con- 
nected by telephone direct to this Bureau. 

I again desire to call your attention to the great reve- 
nues derived from the collection of premiums by the first in- 
surance companies doing business in this City. This in- 
come covers the collection of premiums written on fire in- 
surance in connection with the various buildings and prop- 
erties within the county line. 

It occurred to the undersigned that, in view of the fact 
that these companies depend for their profits principally 
upon the keeping down or limiting the "fire hazard," which 
fact is due to the great and extensive fire alarm equipment 
of the City of Philadelphia, erected and maintained at 
great expense entirely by the City, in order to help 
maintain this system a certain percentage of every prem- 
ium written in connection with fire insurance in this City 
should be set aside for the purpose of helping to maintain 
this entire equipment. This should be done either by legis- 
lation or by some other means. Many of these companies, 
I understand, are foreign corporations. 

Revision of Salaries of the Electrical Bureau. 

I desire to call your attentioon to the serious condition 
of the Technical Staff of this Bureau. 

Owing to the fact that the technical men of this Bureau 



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are paid nothing more than laborers' wages, it is, of course^ 
natural that they should seek other avenues where their 
services would be more appreciated, and where they will 
receive compensation that their skilled services warrant. 
Every graduate of technical institutions that this Bureau 
has had as part of the force has resigned to take a place 
with private corporations for the reasons above stated. The 
last one, who was an extremely capable engineer, and wha 
was broken into such an extent that he was thoroughly 
familiar with the technical details of the work coming un- 
der the supervision of this Bureau, resigned a short time 
ago to take a place at $1,600 per year as teacher in the 
Trades School of this City. He was on the pay roll of this 
Biireau at $1,100 per year. The resignation of this engi- 
neer leaves this Bureau with practically one man that can 
be classed as a technical man. This Bureau needs today 
badly at least three (3) skilled engineers, who should be 
paid not less than from $1,600 to $2,000 per year each. 
The demands upon this Bureau today for work of a highly 
technical nature are becoming greater and greater, and im- 
mediate arrangements should be made to provide a skilled 
technical force. 

Revision of Positions, 

Permit me to call attention to the positions of manager, 
first assistant manager, and second. assistant manager, the 
titles of which are misnomers. 

I recommend the position of manager be changed to that 
of Superintendent of Underground Construction ; the posi- 
tion of first assistant manager be changed to that of Super- 
intendent of Arc Lighting, and the position of second as- 
sistant manager be changed to that of Superintendent of 
Installation of Instruments in Police and Fire Houses. 
These are their duties, and the titles should be changed to 
conlorm to the same. 



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Installation of New Elevators. 

I desire again to call your attention to the absolute neces- 
sity of the installation of a new system of elevators in this 
building. I have referred to this matter in a number of 
reports I have made. There is nothing more essential than 
transportation between the various floors of this building, 
and the safety of the passengers who ride on these elevators, 
than that to make immediate arrangements for the neces- 
sary appropriation to carry this into effect. 

Inspectors for Fire Alarm Boxes, 

We have installed on the highways of this City covering 
a territory approximately one hundred and twenty-nine 
(129) square miles, one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 
two (1,862) fire signal boxes. Our method of inspection 
today is most imperfect for the reason that with the lim- 
ited inspection force at our disposal it requires approxi- 
mately three (3) months to inspect the fire signal boxes 
referred to. In order to maintain the efficiency of your fire 
signal service it is absolutely essential that weekly inspec- 
tions should be made of every fire signal box in the City 
of Philadelphia. 

I recommend that immediate arrangements be' made to 
provide five (5) inspectors, whose duty it will be to keep 
constant watch and inspection of these signal boxes, so that 
we may know that every one of them is in proper condition 
to be called upon to perform the service for which it was 
installed. This cannot be done at the present time. 

Inspectors for Picture Sliow Parlors and Theatres. 

I also desire to call your attention to* the fact that re- 
peated demands have been made for inspectors for picture 
show parlors and theatres. We have at our disposal only 



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two men to cover this important work, and I sincerely 
liope that we will not need an object lesson before provision 
is made for the inspectors referred to. We should have at 
least five (5) more inspectors to constantly watch these 
places and inspect also, in connection with picture show 
parlors and tKeatres, the condition of electric signs that 
are being constantly erected all over the City. 

I take the liberty of quoting you an editorial published 
in the Electrical Review and Western Electrician, issue of 
February 25, 1911, under the heading, "Fire Hazard of 
F]lectric Signs:" 

Fire Hazard of Electric Signs, 

"In erecting electric signs upon or adjacent to 
buildings, care should be taken to see that no wood- 
work or other inflammable material is sufficiently 
near to the lamps to be unduly heated. Neglect of 
this simple precaution will largely increase the risk 
of fire from this source. Careful attention should also 
be given to the proper support of large signs, espe- 
cially where these are exposed to the wind, and it 
should also be seen to that in case the sign should by 
any means become loosened it would not fall upon the 
street or upon adjacent buildings. Such a contin- 
gency may easily arise from fire originated by other 
sources. Switches should be placed in accessible posi- 
tions, so that power may be cut off whenever desired, 
not only by those in charge of the sign, but firemen 
or others who may have occasion to go on the roof. 

"The necessity for careful attention to these matters 
by those responsible for the construction and those 
interested commercially in electric signs is made all 
the more urgent in view of the campaign which is 
under way among the fire underwriters to limit or 



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possibly suppress the use of electric signs for adver- 
tising purposes. In combating this movement the- 
position of sign users should be impregnable, and this 
will only be the case if they give proper regard to 
those considerations which to the fire insurance com- 
panies and to the City Fire Departments seem im- 
portant." 

Installation of Fire Alarm Signal Boxes and Patrol Boxes. 

We are badly in need of at least two hundred (200) fire 
signal boxes and two hundred (200) modern Electrical 
Bureau type patrol boxes. There are at the present time 
eighty-two (82) of the old-fashioned sheet-iron patrol 
booths in different parts of the City that are falling to 
pieces. It is the desire of the undersigned to remove these 
booths and modernize by the installation of new patrol 
boxes. 

Rewiring of City Hall. * 

I desire to call your attention again to the necessity of 
providing the necessary funds to commence the rewiring of 
City Hall. This is absolutely necessary on account of the 
repeated demands for service in the various rooms in the 
building. 

Placing All Police and Fire Alarm Wires Underground. 

Again I call your attention to the fact that approximately 
seventy-five per cent. (75%) of our police and fire alarm 
wires are overhead. This is serious condition of affairs. 
Every storm that we have causes no end of trouble, and it 
is extremely hard at times to nriaintain this most important 
service. Arrangements should be made this year at least 
to commence the placing of these wires underground. 



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^ Boiler Plant in City Hall. 

In view of the fact that it is necessary at times to cleans 
and repair some of the boilers in the City Hall plant, it is- 
absolutely essential that we should have an increase in the^ 
boiler capacity of this building to the extent of 300 H. P- 
for the purpose of taking care of break downs. 

What has been done by this Bureau during the year 
1910 — in fact, ever since I have had the honor to be its- 
Chief — has been due to the earnest support that you have 
given me at all times, and, believe me, it is appreciated 
more than you can imagine, and it is just such support 
given to heads of Departments and Bureaus that gives thent 
encouragement and spurs them on to greater effort. 

Permit me to extend my thanks to His Honor the Mayor 
for the splendid manner in which he has carefully consid- 
ered matters coming under the supervision of this Bureau ;. 
his support has been all that could be desired. 

I also desire to extend my thanks to the members of Se- 
lect and Common Councils, and to the Presidents of both 
branches. It is a source of great satisfaction to me to know 
that there is such a splendid feeling of harmony existing 
between this Bureau and every member of the legislative^ 
branch of the City Government, and it will be the earnest 
effort of the undersigned to see that this feeling is always 
maintained. I very much appreciate the many visits to 
me during the year by members of both branches of Coun- 
cils and the Presidents of the same at my office, and I be- 
lieve they have been interested in the work that has been 
done and is now under way. 

In conclusion, let me beg of you to earnestly forward all 
the recommendations that I have made, and I again desire 
to extend to you my thanks for the able manner in which 
you have supported me in every humble effort that I have 
made in connection with the work of this important 



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Bureau. You can rest assured that always the best that is 
in me shall be given, not only to maintain, but to increase 
the efficiency of your administration through this Bureau. 
I cannot close my report without an expression of thanks 
to the subordinates of the Bureau for the very hearty and 
splendid manner in which they have supported me in my 
work ; believe me, sir, it has been at times hard, but when 
you are supported and surrounded by enthusiastic em- 
ployees, who are constantly seeing things done, and are 
always willing to look forward to better things in connec- 
tion with the work of the Bureau, it inspires one to greater 
effort. The esprit de corps still continues in this Bureau, 
and the splendid feeling shown by the employees is ad- 
mirable, 

Eespectf uUy submitted, 

J. F. McLaughlin, 

Chief of Bureau. 



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ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THIS BUREAU 

FROM APRIL 1, 1907 TO DECEMBER 31, 1910. 



Under date of October 13, 1910, 1 received a communica- 
tion from you, requesting me to furnish you with a con- 
densed list of the accomplishments of this Bureau from 
April 1, 1907, to December 31, 1910, which I take the 
liberty of making part of my report. 

Accomplishments of the Electrical Bureau During the Ad- 

ministration of the Honorable John E. Reyhurn, 

Mayor, to December 81^ 1910. 

When the undersigned took charge of this Bureau, it was 
found that a number of telegraph companies had not been 
paying their taxes and license charges for approximately 
twenty-four (24) years, being indebted to the City to the 
amount of $97,351.50. Arrangements were immediately 
made to proceed to collect this money from these compa- 
nies ; after many negotiations, a settlement was arrived at 
between all the companies and the City which was satis- 
factory to the City, and "the settlement was authorized by 
Select and Common Councils, the money being collected 
and turned over to the Receiver of Taxes. 

Reorganization of the Bureau. 

The entire Bureau from the "labor roll" up has been 
completely reorganized and placed upon a strictly business 
basis. The office hours are from 8 o'^clock A. M. until 4 
o^clock P. M. Business management, such as you find in 



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private corporations, is applied to every branch of the busi- 
ness done by this Bureau, and you will find among all the 
€mployees a cheerfulness and willingness to comply with 
^very request that is made them in the prosecution of the 
business. I feel that we have proven beyond question that 
£i public office can be operated on a strictly business basis. 

Municipal Telephone Exchange. 

It was also found that this Bureau had one of the most 
^antiquated systems of telephone exchanges that could 
■scarcely be found in ^ country town. Realizing the import- 
:ance of a modern and up-to-date Municipal Exchange, the 
undersigned proceeded to negotiate with the Bell and Key- 
stone Telephone Companies for the installation of what is 
today byond question the most modern municipal telephone 
•exchange in the world. The plans and specifications for 
this exchange were laid down by this Bureau and installed 
under the supervision of the same by the Bell and Key- 
•stone Telephone Companies without any cost whatever to 
the City of Philadelphia. The cost of installing this 
Municipal Exchange was approximatelv $80,000, divided 
hetween both telephone companies. It has been visited by 
thousand of people from various parts of the country and 
many experts familiar with this class of work, and, I be- 
lieve, has been adopted by several American municipalities 
and some foreign cities. It consis'ts of one (1) 4,000 wire 
main terminal and protector frame of absolute fireproof 
construction; two (2) of the most modern telephone switch- 
lx)ards, both Bell and Keystone. The Bell board has a 
<;apacity of five hundred (500) lines, and one hundred 
(100) special trunk lines, running from the Municipal Ex- 
change in this building to the Bell Telephone Company's 
Exchange, for the purpose of taking care of outside calls. 
The Keystone board has a capacity of four hundred (400) 



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lines, with fifty (50) special trunk lines, running from 
this exchange to the Keystone Telephone Company's Ex-. 
change, for the purpose of taking care of outside calls. 

There has also been installed in the same room a com- 
plete storage battery plant, which distributes the necessary 
current for the complete operation of the system throughout 
the City, together with relay racks, modern and up-to-date 
intermediate distributing frames, and a large number of 
repeating coils. The City of Philadelphia has every reason 
to be proud of, as we of the Electrical Bureau are, of this 
modern scheme of intercommunication. 

A Police Telephone Exchange. 

It was also found that telegraphic communications were 
T3eing made through the Department of Public Safety, cov- 
ering the Detective Bureau, Police Department and Police 
Stations by the most unique, and still at the same time the 
Tuost antique method of telegraph that has ever come under 
the notice of the undersigned, viz. : the old system of "dial 
telegraph," which was as §low as molasses in the winter 
time. Arrangements were immediately proceeded with to 
remove this scheme of communicating and to substitute 
therefor what is recognized throughout the country and 
/abroad as the most modern and the most original method 
•of communicating important messages through your Police 
Department that has been installed and operated in any 
city in the world. It consists of the introduction of what 
is "technically" called "Simultaneous Telephony." In- 
stalled in every police district is a police telephone system, 
•each operator taking his messages down from the Central 
Ofiice and transcribing the same on typewriters, keeping 
triplicate copies of each and every message that is sent. 
One message can be sent to a separate district, or a number 
of messages can be sent to all the districts at the same time. 



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To illustrate how perfect and valuable this system is, dur- 
ing the year 1909 there were transmitted over these lines 
seven hundred and sixty-two thousand five hundred and 
seventy-five (762,575) messages, triplicate copies of every 
one of them being kept, the messages averaging all the way 
from ten (10) to two hundred and fifty (250) words with- 
out a solitary mistake being made. This system is operated 
through a separate and distinct exchange in this building, 
called the "Police Telephone Exchange," operated by sworn 
operators. This system was also installed in the building 
here in room 629 without any cost whatever to the City of 
Philadelphia, after much negotiation with both telephone 
companies. The introduction of this system into the police 
district has, beyond question, raise(i the standard of efii- 
ciency of the house sergeants, many of whom today are ex- 
pert typewriters. In this room are located what is techni- 
cally termed a two (2) position common battery, lamp signal 
Bell Telephone switchboard, having a capacity of one hun- 
dred (100) lines, and fifteen (15) special trunks. A two 
(2) position common battery, lamp and drop signal Key- 
stone switchboard, on the Keystone system having a capac- 
ity of eighty (80) lines and ten (10) special trunks. 

In connection with this a two party telephone system 
has also been designed and developed, whereby no one can 
interfere on the line in case a conversation is being carried 
on, making it physically imppssible to hear any conversa- 
tion that may take place between both ends of the line. 
This, I believe, is the only system of absolute secret com- 
munication that has been devised, and will be of incalcu- 
able value in police districts. 

The police telephone room is used exclusively for "police 
business" and nothing else. 



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Pawnbrokers' 'Phones. 

There has also been installed in this room a system that 
the City of Philadelphia originated, and which has proven 
one of the most valuable things that has been done during 
this administration ; I refer to the system by which every 
pawnbroker in the City of Philadelphia is connected 
directly by private line with the police telephone room, at 
no expense to the City — all the expense of the installation, 
maintenance, rental, etc., being born by the pawnbrokers. 
The exchange system has a capacity of one hundred and 
twenty (120) lines. To illustrate the great value of this 
system and what it has been — on the third day after it was 
completed and put in operation there was $16,000 worth 
of valuables recovered by the Detective Bureau by being 
notified by one of the pawnbrokers that there were sus- 
picious characters in his office, he having immediately noti- 
fied the Detective Bureau, who proceeded to his office and 
made a very important capture ; this has occurred a great 
number of times since the installation of the Pawnbrokers'^ 
System, which was completed and "cut into service" on 
January 31, 1910. 

Electrical Bureau Ijoboratory. 

There was installed in the year 1908 a thoroughly 
equipped and up-to-date Electrical Testing Laboratory in 
room 634, City Hall. In this laboratory are the most accu- 
rate instruments for making all kinds of electrical tests 
and measurements. This laboratory has proved of incalcu- 
lable value and assistance, not only to this Bureau and the 
various Departments in the City, but to the students of the 
colleges in this vicinity and of the Manual Training, Trade 
and High Schools. 

To illustrate the value of this laboratory. The first test. 
10 



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made in this laboratory by this Bureatc of a large amotint 
of material that was tmder contract, it was foimd that the 
sanae was not up to the requirements, the result of which 
was that the material was rejected, and the allowance in- 
sisted upon by the undersigned to be made to the City of 
Philadelphia was enough to pay for the entire cost of the 
installation of this laboratory. Tests of every description 
are constantly being made and accurate records kept on file. 

Electrolytic Surveys. 
During 1907 and J908 another very important thing was 
taken up by this Bureau that has proved of great value. I 
refer to a long series of tests in connection with ^^electroly- 
sis" in connection with the water mains throughout the en- 
tire City, every inch of water main in the City of Phila- 
delphia being thoroughly tested, and where found necessary 
were protected by modern methods, and I question whether 
there is a city anywhere that is more free from electrolytic 
action, owing to leaking currents, than the City of Phila- 
'delphia. Tests, are constantly being made and accurate 
records being kept of every one of them. Much assistance 
was given to the undersigned by the Chief of the Bureau 
of Water in connection with this most important matter. 
These tests were made at the request of Director of Public 
Safety Henry Clay, Esq., upon a request made to him by 
the Director of Public Works shortly after the undersigned 
was sworn into office. 

Oenerating Current for Police Stations hy Motor Genera- 
tors and Dynamotors, 
Upon investigation it was found that the various police 
districts were using for the maintenance of their system of 
communication the old. method of blue stone batteries, 
^hich were extremely cumbersome, hard a:nd expensive to 



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maintain, entailing much work upon the house sergeants. 
This Bureau proceeded to design a more modern scheme 
of furnishing the necessary current for operation in con- 
nection with the police districts, the result of which was 
the designing of the dynamotors that are used in the direct 
•current districts of the City, and motor generator sets that 
are used in the alternating current districts of the City. 
This apparatus occupies a space of about two feet square, 
-and the old-fashioned method of blue stone batteries re- 
quired a large room. This modern apparatus is now in- 
stalled in the Fifth Police District, Eighth Police District, 
Twelfth Police District, N^ineteenth Police. District, Twen- 
tieth Police District, Twenty-first Police District, Twenty- 
fourth Police District, and Thirty-fifth Police District, and 
in the latter part of 1911 it is expected that every police 
district in the City of Philadelphia will be equipped with 
this modern apparatus. Each system is in ^^duplicate,'* 
making it physically impossible for the service at any time 
♦to be interfered with, and the introduction of the same 
heing comparatively inexpensive, it costing but approxi- 
mately $50 for each district 

Lectures. 

In 1908 and 1909 there was inagurated a course of Prac- 
tical Instructions and Lectures to the School Boys, which 
has proved of great value, many of the students from the 
Manual Training, Trades and High Schools being in at- 
tendance at no expense whatever to them. This is suscepti- 
ble of great development, and, plans are now being laid by 
the undersigned to enlarge and make more thorough these 
practical talks. The course proved so valuable and inter- 
esting as to attract the attention of the honorable members 
of both Cpmmon and Select Councils, who were good 
•enough to make an appropriation in 1909 for the payment 



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of ten (10) apprentieesr, who were- appeiB**^ »n& are now 
under instructions, doing practical work in the various 
branches coming under the supervision of this Bureau. 

Method of Keeping Accounts. 

There has also been introduced a most complete system 
of not only keeping accounts, but a^ record covering the in- 
stallation of every electric arc light in the City of Phila- 
delphia; also a card index record of all employees of the 
Bureau, and of the various electrical services, both over- 
head and underground, including cables, etc., so that at a 
moment's notice any information desired can be obtained 
through this great index system. 

In combination with this the Bureau has installed a 
modern and up-to-date system of accounting, using double 
(Butry bookkeeping throughout, and the job slip system be- 
ing kept, which includes a record of everything done by 
the employees, no matter how trifling, the same being en- 
tered up, the time required to do the job, the amount of 
material required and the cost of the same, and the name of 
the employee who did the work. 

A monthly balance sheet is furnished regularly to His 
Honor the Mayor, the Director of Public Safety, and the 
Finance Committee of Councils, showing the conditions of 
the various items covered by the appropriation made to this- 
Bureau, and I believe this is the only Bureau in the City 
that makes such a statement. The result of a monthly bal- 
ance sheet like this being furnished to the parties referred 
to shows twelve times a year the exact condition of the 
finances of the Bureau. The value of this method of ac- 
counting that we have in this Bureau, is- diown from the 
fact that this Bureau in striking its last balance sheet of 
the year on December 31st always turns back a surplus 
©ver and above the cost of the operations of the Bureau for 
the year. 



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Balance Sheet as of December SI, 1910. 

After paying all bills for the purchase of supplies, 
labor, etc., this Bureau has turned back into the 

City Treasury the sum of $35,789 04 

and (Department of Supplies) 2,085 52 



making a surplus of $37,874 56 

above all the requirements for the year 1910.* We coiq- 
mence the new year without owing a dollar. 

Salary Requirements. 

The salary requirements of the Bureau for the year 

1910 are $113,734 50 

we have earned 128,323 67 

this is $14,589 17 

above the requirements of the Bureau for all salaries. It 
shows that so far as the salary requirements of this 
Bureau are concerned we are self-sustaining. 

High Pressure Signal System. 

There has also been designed by this Bureau a Combina- 
tion High Pressure Fire Water Main Telephone and Fire 
Box, which is now being installed as rapidly as possible. 
This consists of a system of telephonic communication be- 
tween any one of these boxes and City Hall and the High 
Pressure Pumping Station at Seventh street and Lehigh 
avenue that is now nearing completion. There are now 
one hundred and forty (140) of these signal boxes being 
erected, making it possible for the Chief Engineer, Assist- 
ant Engineers, or any member of the Fire or Police Depart- 
ment 'to talk from one of these signal stations on the curb 
line to any part of the City. 



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Designing the New Scheme of Illumination for the High 
Pressure Pumping Station at Seventh Street and Lehigh 
Avenue. 

There has also been designed by this Bureau in connec- 
tion with the High Pressure Pumping Station a very 
unique scheme of illumination, plans and specifications of 
which have been made by this Bureau. The fixtures in 
connection with this scheme of illumination will be in- 
* stalled by the latter part of this year. I desire to call your 
attention to the fact that all the electrical work in connec- 
tion with this building was done by employees of this 
Bureau, and will bear the closest inspection that can be 
made. 

Electrical Method of Control of the Apparatus at the High 
Pressure Pumping Station, Seventh Street and Lehigh 
Avenue. 

There has been installed in this building a very unique 
and at the same time a very interesting scheme of control- 
ling the apparatus from one central point, each unit being 
controlled by electrically operated motor valves,- the same 
being as near automatic as it is possible to make. This 
entire equipment has been installed under the supervision 
of this Bureau. 

Fire Signal Boxes. 

We have remodeled 100 of the old style fire signal boxes 
at a cost of $28.75 each, as against the cost of $125 each 
for new ones, which shows a saving of $96.25 on each box^ 
making a total saving to the City on this account of $9,625. 
This development commenced in April, 1908, and it alsa 
included the complete redesigning and modernizing of what 
is technically called "the Electrical Bureau Type Patrol 
Box ^nd the Electrical Bureau Type Fire Signal Box." 



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It is found that there is approximately three thoue^and 
(3,000) cells of storage battery in this building for thta 
purpose of operating the fire signal circuits throughout the 
City. Recognizing the fact that this was cumbersome and 
must be modernized, a plan has been arranged and worked . 
out, so that the fire signal system is now being operated 
from the electrical current generated in the ^ower plant in 
this building instead of the storage battery. Arrangements, 
are now being made to complete this system, which will 
eliminate the cost of the maintenance of the three thousand 
(3,000) cells of storage battery referred to. 

Memorial Lamps. 

I desire to call your attention to one of the most interest- 
ing and at the same time one of the most valuable, and, I 
believe, one of the most pleasing accomplishments to the 
citizens of this great City that has been completed by this 
Bureau. I tefer to the designing and the erection of the 
Memorial Lamp Posts, which were placed in position dur- 
ing Founders' Week, in October, 1908, around City Hall, 
where the complete history of our City prior to the con- 
solidation can be found memorialized by a full and com- 
plete description on bronze tablets. 

I desire to say in connection with the erection of these 
Memorial Lamps that the original thought was immedi- 
ately approved by yourself. The suggestion of erecting 
twenty-eight (28) Memorial Lamp Poles around City Hall,, 
each emblematic of one of the original twenty-eight (28) 
districts surrounding the original City of Philadelphia,, 
followed a plan which the Founders' Week Committee had 
of erecting a court of honor in plaster. Knowing your own 
ideas against any temporary improvement, this thought 
was given to you through Henry Clay, Esq., Director De- 
partment of Public Safety, and your directions to me were 
to" immediately plan a design for the respective lamp posts. 



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132 

The carrying of your thought into final arrangements 
was immediately made by this Bureau, and the erection of 
those beautiful lamp standards, so pleasing to the eye, and 
so sentimental in character, is due absolutely to you in in- 
dorsing what will be forever a feature of the City of Phila- 
delphia. 

Knowing your interest in the successful Founders' Week, 
and watching your constant efforts to make it an unpar- 
alleled success in every particular, and knowing also that 
you gave the privilege of bringing to a close the ceremonies 
incident to the 225th anniversary of the founding of the 
City to the Knights Templar of Pennsylvania, I had caused 
to be made with your permission a Knight's Templar de- 
sign, showing the cross and crown in colored lights. At 11 
o'clock on the last day of the celebration, when the Knights 
Templar, in conjunction with yourself and other distin- 
guished visitors, stood in the rain at the north entrance to 
the City Hall and formally brought to a close the week's 
celebration by extinguishing all the lights on the City Hall, 
there appeared in view this set piece, forming in itself a 
fitting climax to the celebration of which you were the 
actual head and most interested worker. 

In connection with the thought of erecting twenty-eight 
(28) lamps I had also caused to be designed a large bronze 
tablet, which was erected on the wall of the corridor outside 
of the Mayor's office, which bore the boundaries of the origi- 
nal City of Philadelphia as laid out by William Penn, viz. : 
From Vine to South streets, and between the two rivers. 
On this tablet should appear by all means the names of the 
officials of the City under that date, 1908. 

This tablet is a memorial to the old City as laid out by 
William Penn, and the twenty-eight lamp posts are memor- 
ials to the twenty-eight (28) districts which were consoli- 
dated with the original City under date of 1854. 



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Indirect Illumination under Galleries of Common Council Chambers. 

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133 

I desire to say further, in connection with the erection 
of these lamp standards, that one of the most pleasing 
things in connection therewith was the christening of these 
poles by school children from the various schools of the 
City. This thought was suggested to the undersigned by 
ULr, William J. Milligan, Chief Clerk Select Council, and 
it appealed to me so strongly that arrangements were im- 
mediately made with the Board of Public Education for 
the purpose of arranging the school children from the 
various sections of the City, represented by the townships 
:and boroughs referred to, to christen the respective poles, 
the ceremonies of which were not only very impressive, 
but extremely instructive as well. They are now here as a 
lasting monument and are much admired by and have 
proven extremely instructive to visitors. 

The illumination of Select and Common Councils' cham- 
bers and the Finance Committee's room was designed and 
•completed by this Bureau. 

This Bureau also, under ordinance of Councils of April 
15, 1908, examines all applicants throughout the City for 
the operation of passenger elevators. 

Moving Picture Show Parlors, 

This Bureau also, under ordinance of Councils of Feb- 
Tuary 25, 1908, examines all operators of moving picture 
machines in connection with the operation of moving pic- 
ture show parlors. 

This Bureau has also assumed charge of the inspection 
of moving picture show parlors, and all places of public 
amusement, including theatres, etc. 

This Bureau has also control of all the electrical installa- 
tions under contract by the municipal departments, such 
AS public school ^uildings, public libraries, electrically oper- 
ated drawbridges, municipal hospital, etc. 



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134 

I would respectfully call your attention to the illumina- 
tion of the William Penn High School for Girls, all of 
which was supervised by this Bureau. 

Electrical Installations in Police Stations. 

The making of plans and specifications for the electric- 
lighting of the various police and fire stations, bathhouses 
and other City buildings are made by this Bureau. They 
were formerly done by contract ; all the work is now done 
by this Bureau, who make the complete installations. The 
list of buildings in which we have erected and installed in-^ 
stallations of this character follows : 

Ninth District Police Station and Gararge. 

Twenty-third District Police Station and Garage. 

Twenty-first District Police Station and Garage. 

Thirty-fifth District Police Station and Garage. ' 

Thirty-sixth District Police Station and Garage. 

Twenty-fourth District Police Station and Garage and Stable.. 

Eighth District Police Station and Garage. 

Fourth District Police Station and Garage. 

Twelfth District Police Station. 

Engine Company No. 31 Fire House. 

Engine Company No. 44 Fire House and Storage House. 

Engine Company No. 55 Fire House. 

Engine Company No. 26 Fire House. 

Engine Company No. 28 Fire House. 

Engine Company No. 32 Fire House. 

Truck No. 8 

Truck No. 2. 

Truck No. 5. 

Bathhouse, Twelfth and Reed streets. 

Bathhouse, Front and Thompson streets. 

Bathhouse, Montrose and Darien streets. . 

Van Stables, Eleventh and Wharton streets. 

New Traffic Squad Stable, Eleventh and Wharton streets. 

High Pressure Pumping .Station, Seventh street and Lehigh avenue^ 

Lighting of the Pergolas on the Parkway. 

Lighting of Walnut Lane Bridge. 

Lighting of Forty-second Street Bridge. 



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Lighting of the City Highways. 

I desire to call your attention to the modem illumination 
of the highways in the central section of the City of Phila- 
delphia. There has been erected during this administra-- 
tion one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine (1,869) 
electric arc lights. 

The new system of illumination covered by the erection 
of the ornamental standards on Market street, Chestnut 
street, Walnut street. Arch street and Broad street includes- 
nine hundred and fifteen (915) electric arc lamps. 

The installation of this scheme of illumination has be- 
yond question comf)letely transformed- the center of the 
City of Philadelphia, and it is absolutely safe to say, with- 
out fear of contradiction, that we have the most modern and 
best lighted city in the world. 

When you consider the vast territory that the great City 
of Philadelphia covers, and the number of lamps that we 
have on the highways, based upon a population of 1,600,000 
persons, the cost of lighting is not great, as it averages but 
eighty-one (81) cents per capita per year per light, and but 
two and 2/10 (2.2) mills per capita per light per night. 

Much has been said by the press and others in connection 
with this scheme of illumination, all of which has been ex- 
tremely favorable, and I know of nothing that has been 
done during this administration that reflects so much credit 
upon it as the introduction of this splendid scheme of illu- 
mination which has been carefully and scientifically worked 
out in every detail. 

Southern Boulevard Lighting* 

Plans and specificp-tions have been completed for the 
proposed illumination of the new Southern Boulevard and 
League Island Park by what is technically known as the 



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^^Series Tungsten System" of lighting. This differs radi- 
cally from the scheme of illumination above referred to, as 
instead of using electric arc lights, incandescent lamps of 
high candle power are to be used mounted upon ornamental 
standards. 

Illuminating the Grounds of the Philadelphia Hospital for 
Contagious Diseases. 

There is now being installed in the grounds of the Phila- 
delphia Hospital for Contagious Diseases, at Second and 
Luzerne streets, at the request of Dr. Joseph S. N^eff, Direc- 
tor of the Department of Public Health and Charities, a 
modern scheme of illumination, plans of which have been 
laid down by this Bureau and the work done by its em- 
ployees. It is expected to have this completed by the end 
of the year. Series Tungsten lighting will be used through- 
out. 

Independence Square, 

Plans and specifications have also been completed for the 
erection, at the request of his Honor the Mayor, of fifty- 
six (56) ornamental lamp standards surrounding Inde- 
pendence Hall and in Independence Park, memorializing 
each and every signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
The model of this standard will be completed within the 
next few days. Had it not been for litigation now pending 
this whole scheme of illumination in connection with Inde- 
pendence Hall would have been opened up on New Year's 
Eve, but under the circumstances it will have to be delayed. 

Rehahilitation of the Fire Alarm Equipment. 

Plans and specifications have been prepared for the com- 
pl'te rehabilitation of the fire alarm equipment in City 
Hall, commonly called Central Office, which is the point 



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137 

oi distribution in this building. These plans cover the 
installation of the most modem apparatus for handling fire 
alarm signals, and also the construction of a room that is 
absolutely fireproof in every particular, in which this equip- 
ment will be maintained. It also means the removal from 
this Bureau of 3,300 cells^f storage battery that have been 
used for years to handle your fire alarm equipment. 

Police and Fire Alarm Wires to he Placed Underground, 

In view of the fact that approximately seventy-five per 
cent. (75%) of the important police and fire alarm wires 
are overhead, plans are well under way preparing for the 
laying of underground ducts and cables for the purpose of 
placing these very important services underground. This 
will minimize many of our troubles due to elemental dis- 
turbances and other causes. There should be no time lost 
in connection with this work. 

Police Patrol and Fire Signal Boxes. 
The City of Philadelphia has had erected throughout the 
various parts of the City sheet-iron booths in connection 
with the police patrol signal boxes on the highways, many 
of which have fallen to pieces. There have been one hun- 
dred and nineteen (119) of these old-fashioned booths re- 
moved and replaced by new Electrical Bureau type patrol 
boxes. There are also twenty-nine (29) of these new patrol 
boxes in course of erection, making a total of one hundred 
hnd forty-eight (148) new Electrical Bureau type patrol 
boxes now upon the highways. 

Electrical Equipment for Police Stations. 
A new police patrol telephone stand to be used by the 
House Sergeants in the various districts has been designed 
by this Bureau, twelve (12) of which have been ordered 



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and received, and three (3) of which are already in opera- 
tion, and the balance will be erected by the latter part of 
December of this year. 

The old chemical registers that have been used for so 
long a time are being rapidly replaced by a new Electrical 
Bureau type shearing register which makes a permanent 
record by cutting into the paper tape instead of transmit- 
ting the same as heretofore under the old chemical registers, 
by which an hour after the call had been made no record 
appeared. This new register operates in connection with 
the new patrol box, and register^ the call permanently that 
the patrolman makes from the patrol box in his district. 
The importance of this can be plainly seen 

A system of intercommunicating telephones in place of 
speaking tubes are being installed in the various police dis- 
tricts, which is very desirable. 

There has also been installed one hundred and fifty-nine 
{159) new Electrical Bureau type fire signal boxes, and 
forty (40) more are now being installed as rapidly as possi- 
ble, making a total of one hundred and ninety-nine (199) 
new Electrical Bureau type fire signal boxes. 

There has also been one hundred of the old antiquated 
type fire signal boxes remodeled to correspond with the new 
Electrical Bureau type, the same having been installed and 
:are now in operation. 

New Police Station Equipment. 
There have been erected in a number of Police Districts 
what are commonly called modern "Protector Boards," dis- 
placing the old equipment. They have been installed and 
connected up with new instruments in the following sta- 
tions : 

Fourth District Station House. 
Eighth District Station House. 
Ninth District Station House. 



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131^ 

Twelfth District Station House. 

Nineteenth District Station House. 

Twenty-first District Station House. 

Twenty-third District Station House. 

Twenty-fourth District Station House. 

Twenty-sixth District Station House. 

Thirty-fifth District Station House. 

Thirty-seventh District Station House. 

Engine Company No. 26. 

Engine Company No. 28. 

Engine Company No, 31. 

Engine Company No. 32. 

Truck No. 2. 

Truck No. 8. , 

South Broad Street Pole Line. 
Investigation made by the undersigned in connection 
with the City's Police and Fire Alarm line of poles on the 
east side of Broad street, from Moyamensing avenue to 
League Island gate (Government avenue) showed the same 
to be in a dilapidated and disgraceful condition. Realizing 
the fact that this Bureau had no money at its disposal to 
rebuild the same and to modernize the equipment by plac- 
ing it underground, which would cost approximately 
$14,500, I proceeded to open negotiations with both the 
Bell and Keystone Telephone Companies, who have modern 
ducts and cables along the line on both the east and west 
sides of Broad street to League Island gate. I finally suc- 
ceeded in having both companies turn over to this Bureau 
the necessary cables and conduits at no expense whatever 
to the City, thereby saving the City of Philadelphia 
$14,500. The old pole line has been removed and the ser- 
vice is now underground in a modern and up-to-date 
manner as above referred to. 

Money Collected, 
During this Administration this Bureau has collected 
and turned in to the City Treasury the sum of four hun- 



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140 

dred and thirty thousand three hundred and thirty 
(430,330) dollars and sixteen (16) cents for taxes, li- 
cense charges, etc. 

In addition to the above the rental of wires in the City 
cables has been increased by Ordinance of Councils of Oc- 
tober 31, 1908, from ten (10) to thirty (30) dollars per 
mile. 

Electric Signs. 

This Bureau has issued one thousand six hundred and 
ninety-nine (1,699) permits for the erection of electric 
signs in various parts of the City, keeping correct records 
as to the number of lamps, candle power of the same, and 
the design of the signs. There are now burning on these 
signs approximately one hundred and fifty thousand 
(150,000) lights, brilliantly illuminating the highways 
in many parts of the City without any cost whatever to the 
municipality. 

Free Lighting. 

In addition to the above, the City of Philadelphia re- 
ceives, at no expense whatever to it, one hundred and nine- 
ty-three (193) electric arc lamps, and the "free" lighting of 
the various police stations, patrol stations and fire houses, 
in the "free territory," as required by ordinance of Coun- 
cils, which, reduced to dollars and cents, means a saving to 
the City of Philadelphia through this Bureau of seventy- 
six thousand one hundred and sixty-five (76,165) dollars 
per year. 

Laying of Ducts and Construction of Manholes Along the 
Northeast Boulevard. 

Terra cotta ducts have been purchased and are now on 
the ground for the purpose of being installed along the 



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141 

Northeast Boulevard, anticipating the lighting of this 
boulevard and the connecting up of the police and fire alarm 
services. 

Removal of Poles and Wires. 

There has been removed by the Western Union -Tele- 
graph Company, after much negotiation between the com- 
pany and this Bureau, their pole line on North Tenth 
street, from Market to Sansom street, that was erected by 
the company during the Centennial Exhibition held in this 
City in the year 1876. These poles and wires were not only 
a menace to the general public, but extremely unsightly; 
they are now removed and the line along this thorough- 
fare has been placed underground. 

Arrangements have been made with the Western Union 
Telegraph Company for the removal of the pole line on 
Sansom street, from Sixth to Sixteenth street. The wires 
and cables that have been maintained on these poles will 
all be removed and placed underground, at the expense of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company, by the latter part 
of this year. 

Purchase of Cables, etc. 

It was found that there was but practically one bidder 
who submitted bids for the cable and wire requirements of 
this Bureau in the annual schedule. Being familiar with 
the prices of these materials, the bids submitted the first 
year of my occupancy as Chief of this Bureau led me to 
believe that a combination in prices existed, and the bids 
were throv^rn out, and, at my request. Councils passed a reso- 
lution under date of February 11, 1908, authorizing me 
to go into the open market and purchase the requirements 
of the Bureau. Plans and specifications were made by this 
Bureau covering these requirements, bids were taken, and 
a large number were submitted — in fact, the largest num- 
11 



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J4? 

ber of bids covering the reguirements of this kind that were 
ever submitted. The result was a saving of approximately 
thirty thousand (30,000) dollars on the requirements of 
this Bureau below the regular schedule prices. 

Cable Shaft. 
Upon investigation, the undersigned found that the very 
important wires and cables covering the police and fire 
:alarm and other City services were mounted on structures 
made of timber in the cable shaft in the northeast corner of 
City Hall, coming from the underground services to the 
T)asement, and from the basement to the timbers referred 
to. This construction was condemned by the Board of Fire 
Underwriters and others as an extremely hazardous condi- 
tion of affairs in connection with these services. Arrange- 
ments were immediately made by the Bureau to modernize 
these very important services, the result being the installa- 
tion and construction of what is termed the most modern 
cable shaft of any municipal building in the world. 
Every cable performing the various services connected 
with the City Government is now mounted on steel hangers, 
all the timber being eliminated, and the services from these 
cables being distributed from floor to floor in this building, 
making it physically impossible for the services to be ever 
interfered with by fire or otherwise. 

Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company. 
It was also found that a company, called the Auxiliary 
Fire Alarm Company, had been connecting up their ser- 
vices to the fire alarm circuits of the City of Philadelphia, 
under an ordinance of Councils dated June 3, 1904, for 
the purpose of attaching their instruments and sending 
:alarms of fire from their subscribers to the City's central 
'OflSice, through which the company received a great revenue 



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143 

at the expense of the City of Philadelphia. A report of 
this condition was made to Henry Clay, Esq., Director of 
the Department of Public Safety, and recommendation 
made to Councils for the passage of an ordinance whereby 
the City of Philadelphia would participate in the profits 
of the business done by this company. This ordinance was 
passed by Councils and approved by his Honor, the Mayor, 
on the fifteenth day of November, 1909, and the one passed 
on June 3, 1904, was repealed. The City now partici- 
pates in the profits of this company to the extent of several 
thousand dollars yearljr. 

Recabling of City Hall. 
Arrangements have also been made for the recabling of 
Oity Hall and modernizing the wiring equipment in every 
way. This is also extremely essential, for the reason that 
many of the circuits in this building are greatly over- 
loaded. 

Incandescent Current Used in City Buildings. 
Under a Commission appointed by his Honor the Mayor 
for the purpose of determining the cost of incandescent 
current furnished to City buildings every year, and of 
which the Chief of this Bureau is a member, a meeting 
^as held of the entire Commission, consisting of three per- 
sons, last February, the result of which was that the price 
of current to be used in City buildings was reduced from 
7^ cents per kilowatt hour to 6 cents per kilowatt hour, 
which means a saving to the City of Philadelphia of sev- 
■eral thousands of dollars per year. 

Removal of Wires. 
During the year 1910 there was removed by the em- 
ployees of this Bureau approximately fifty (50) miles of 
overhead wire and cables that were illegally erected. 



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144 

In addition to this, the City removed one hundred and 
twenty-five (125) miles of wire, which was the property of 
the City. 

There has also been removed by the various companies 
coming under the supervision of this Bureau two thousand 
(2,000) miles of wire and twenty-six hundred (2,600) 
miles of wires in cables from overhead and the same placed 
underground. 

Another very important accomplishment of this Bureau 
was the installing of your police and fire services under- 
ground covering the congested district, viz. : the district 
covering the principal hotels, theatres, hospitals, etc., which 
had been formerly overhead. 

Emergency Calls. 

It was found that the question of making "emergency'' 
calls for police and fire purposes, etc., over the wires of the 
telephone companies was a serious one, the undersigned 
taking the stand that any citizen "had the right to make an 
emergency call" for these particular purposes without any 
cost whatever. After much negotiation with the Bell Tele- 
phone Company, their officers took a broad and liberal view 
of the situation after my explanation of the matter, 
and decided to set aside a number of special trunk 
lines between their exchanges and the Municipal Ex- 
change in this building for the express purpose of handling 
"emergency "calls that would not be interfered with in the 
prosecution of their regular business. It it is now possible 
for citizens to jnake an "emergency" call for police, fire or 
ambulance service without any delay or cost to them by 
simply calling "Spruce 20," as indicated in the catalogue 
of the Bell Telephone Company. The value of this 
agreement can be seen when you realize that it reaches 
approximately two hundred thousand (200,000) sub- 



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145 

scribers, who have the right to use the telephones for the 
purpose of making "emergency" calls at any time without 
cost. 

Elevator Licenses. 

This Bureau has examined and passed upon two thou- 
sand seven hundred and forty-four (2,744) applicants for 
licenses to operate passenger elevators. Those successfully 
passing the examination are so certified to the Director of 
the Department of Public Safety, who issues licenses to 
them, the amount of money turned into the City Treasury 
on this account to date being $2,317. Chief Clark, of the 
Bureau of Building Inspection, and Chief Lukens, of the 
Bureau of Boiler Inspection, are members of this Ex- 
amining Board. 

Moving Picture Parlors. 

This Bureau also examines and passes upon all applica- 
tions for licenses for the operation of moving picture ma- 
chines. We have examined up to date five hundred and 
ninety-four (594) operators, the total amount of money 
turned into the City Treasury on account of the licensing 
of these picture show parlors and operators being thirty- 
seven thousand three hundred and thirty-five (37,335) 
dollars. Fire Marshal Lattimer is a member of this Ex- 
amining Board. The part taken by this Bureau in con- 
nection with the examination above referred to is an im- 
portant one. 

Termin/il or Distribution Boxes Installed in City Hall. 

There has been installed in the various rooms of this 
building a new method of distribution of the various wires 
covering the calling, electric light and telephone services. 
This consists of a very unique terminal or distribution 



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146 

box which was especially designed by this Bureau. From 
these distribution boxes are distributed the various wires of 
the services referred to. 

Steel Tvhing. 

There has also been installed, to operate in conjunction 
with the distribution boxes referred to, 18,000 feet of steel 
tubing, which has been imbedded in the floors and walls of 
the various rooms of this building, thus bringing the equip- 
ment up to modern engineering methods. 

Installation of Modern and Up-to-date Elevators. 

Plans and specifications have also been made for the 
installation of a modern and up-to-date system of elevators 
in City Hall, which is absolutely essential. 

Founders' WeeJc. 

The part this Bureau took in connection with the work 
during Founders' Week I will not comment upon, as it 
speaks for itself. 

Illumination of William Penn Statue. 

One very interesting and successful experiment that was 
made by this Bureau during New Year's Eve of 1907 was 
the illumination of the William Penn Statue on the top of 
this building, which has been favorably commented upon 
by not only the citizens of this great City, but by engineers 
and experts all over the world. 

A permanent plan has been laid down for illuminating 
this statue every night of the week. It only remains for the 
proper appropriation to be made to carry this most inter- 
esting scheme of illumination into effect. 



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New Scheme of Illumination for Carroll Parle, at Fifty- 
eightTi Street and Girard Avenue. 

A new scheme of illumination, technically called the 
"Series Tungsten System/' has been planned by this 
Bureau in connection with the illumination of Carroll 
Park, at Fifty-eighth street and Girard avenue. There will 
be installed twenty (20) ornamental poles, each twelve feet 
high ; on top of each will be a 16-inch white globe, covering 
a 40-watt Series Tungsten lamp. This will give a beautiful 
effect in the park. 

Arrangements will be completed by the latter part of 
this year for a duplication of this system in Durham Park, 
and also in the park at Twentyrsecond and Lehigh avenue. 
This scheme of illumination of the public parks is a very 
unique one, and, at the same time, very inexpensive. 



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148 



List of Bell Telephones. 

Select Council. 

President's residence, 1537 South Fifth street 2 

Chief Clerk's office, 404 City Hall 1 

Chief Clerk's residence, 2138 Fitzwater street 1 

Clerk's office, 406 City Hall 1 

Stenographer's office, 411 City Hall 1 

Eesidenoe of Chairman of Electrical Committee, 1930 North 

Franklin street 2 

Residence of Chairman of Sub-Finance Committee, 3315 North 

Park avenue 

itesidence of Edw. Buchholz, 1937 North Sixth street 

Committee room, 508 City Hall 

Residence of Mr. Ransley, 1120 South Tenth street 

President's office, 408 City Hall 

Residence of Morris Rosenberg, 716 North Franklin street... 
Residence of Henry R. Shoch, 1503 North Sixteenth street.... 
Residence of Sergeant-at-Arms, 1426 Arch street 



Common Council. 

President, 490 City Hall 

Chief Clerk, 492 City Hall 

Chief Clerk's residence, 1841 North Eleventh street 

Residence of Clerk to Highway Committee, 4135 Westminster 

avenue 

Residence of Clerk to Finance Committee, 2139 South Fifteenth 

street 

Residence of Sergeant-at-Arm>3, 2010 Pine street 

Clerks, 495 City Hall 

Chairman Finance Committee, 590 City Hall 

Residence of J. R. C. McAllister, 410 Dickinson street 

Residence of Dr. Morton, 1453 North Tenth street 

Highway and Survey Committee, 497 City Hall 

Committee room, 592 City Hall 

Residence of Dwight D. Fuller, M. D., 208 North Thirty-fourth 

street 

Residence of William E. Finley, 2005 South Fourth street 

Residence of Geo. Van Houten, 28 South Thirty-fourth street. . . 

George H. Kelly's residence, 1633 South Broad street 

Residence of Charles E. Connell, 4602 Kingsessing avenue 



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Mayor s Office. 

Uesidence of Mayor, Nineteenth and Spring Garden streets. » . . 3 

•Secretary, 204 City Hall 1 

•Chief Clerk, 205 City Hall 1 

Eesidence of Chief Clerk, 2053 North Thirteenth street 2 

Residence of Statistician, 600 North Sixty- third street 1 

€lerks, 203 City Hall 1 

Residence of Messenger, 1403 North Mervine street 1 

"Clerks, 204 City Hall 1 

Residence of Secretary, 117 South Thirty-fourth street 1 

"Statistician, 203 City Hall 1 

Department of Wharves, Docks and Ferries. 

Acting Director, Room 555, Bourse 1 

Hooms 552, 553, 554, 590, Bourse 4 

Tine Street Wharf 1 

Department of Public Safety. 

Residence of Director, 918 North Fifth street 2 

Assistant Director, 215 City Hall 1 

Residence of Assistant Director, 831 North Fifth street 2 

"Secretary, 219 City Hall 2 

Residence of Secretary, 5115 Knox street 2 

Ttetectives, 507 City Hall 

Photographer, 734 City Hall 

Photographer, 731 City Hall 

Residence of Veterinary Surgeon, 3020 Chestnut street 

Philadelphia Ball Park, Fifteenth and Huntingdon streets .... 

"Shibe Park, Twenty-first and Lehigh avenue 

^fessenger to Director, 217 City Hall 

Morris Refuge, 1242 Lombard street 

Residence of Secretary, Assistant to Superintendent of Police, 

4669 Franklin street 

Headquarters of State Constabulary, 1529 Walnut street 

Bureau of Police. 

Residence of Superintendent, 3853 Poplar street 2 

Superintendent, 227 City Hall 1 

Audience room, 227 City Hall ^ 1 

Residence of Assistant Superintendent, 121 North Lambert 

street 2 



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150 

Fire Marshal, 362 City Hall 1 

Fire Marshal, 388 City Hall 1 

Reserves roll room, 670 City Hall 1 

City stable^, Tenth and Greenwich streets 1 

Mounted men of van stables. Eleventh and Wharton streets... 1 

Residence of Fire Marshal, 3949 Baltimore avenue 1 

Chief Clerk, 213 City Hall 1 

Residence of Clerk to Superintendent, 811* North Beech wood 

street 1 

Police Captains, 629 City Hall 1 

Residence of Captain of Police, 2431 Carpenter street 1 

Police Surgeon, 950 City Hall 1 

Residence of Police Surgeon, 406 South Sixteenth street 5 

Lieutenant of Reserves, 631 City Hall 1 

Residence of Lieutenant of Reserves, 4113 Cambridge street... 1 

Residence of Chief Clerk, 1845 North Twenty-fifth street 1 

Detective Bureau, 528 City Hall 1 

Detective Bureau, 536 City Hall 1 

Detective Bureau, 539 City Hall 1 

Matron's rooms, 635 City Hall 1 

Reserve roll room, 632 City Hall 1 

City Hall Guards, 342 City Hall 1 

Supply room, 327 City Hall 1 

Supply room, 321 City Hall 1 

Motor Cycle Squad, 120 City Hall 1 

Cell room, 643 City Hall 1 

Central Station hearing room, 625 City Hall 1 

Van stables. Eleventh and Wharton streets 1 

Residence of Captain of Detectives, 3422 Walnut street 1 

Assistant Superintendent of Police, 217 City Hall 1 

Residence of Record Clerk, 227 North Fifth street 1 

Residence of Detective McFadden, 232 North Camac street. ... 1 

Police stations. 

First District Police Station, Twentieth and Fitzwater streets . . 1 
Second District Police Station, Second and Christian streets... 1 
Third District Police Station, Fourth and Delancey streets. ... 1 

Fourth District Police Station, 219 North Fifth street 1 

Fifth District Policy Station, Fifteenth and Locust streets.... 1 
Sixth District Police Station, southeast corner Eleventh and 

Winter streets 1 

Seventh District Police Station, Third and Fairmount avenue. . 2 
Eighth District Police Station, Tenth and Buttonwood streets. . 1 
Ninth District Police Station, Twentieth and Buttonwood streets 1 



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151 

Tenth District Police Station, 1417 North Front street 

Eleventh District Police Station, 615 East Girard avenue 

Twelfth District Police Sta/tion, Eighth and Jefferson streets. . 
Thirteenth District Police Station, 4431 Main street, Manayunk 
Thirteenth District Police Sub-station, 471 Leverington street, 

Roxborough 

Fourteenth District Police Station, Main apd Haines streets, 

Germantown , 

Fourteenth District Police Sub-station, Twenty-seventh and 

Highland avenue, Chestnut Hill 

Fifteenth District Police Station, Paul and Ruan streets 

Sixteenth District Police Station, Thirty-ninth and Lancaster 

avenue 

Seventeenth District Police Station, 1210 South Twentieth 

street , 

Seventeenth District Police Sub-station, Twenty-eighth and 

Ritner streets 

Eighteenth District Police Station, Fourth and York streets . , . 
Nineteenth District Police Station, Twelfth and Pine streets . . 
Twentieth District Police Station, Fifteenth street, below Vine 

street 

Twenty-first District Police Station, 3206 Woodland avenue. . , . 
Twenty-second District Police Station, northwest corner Park 

and Lehigh avenues * 

Twenty-third District Police Station, northwest corner Nine- 

; teenth and Oxford streets 

Twenty-fourth District Police Station, southwest corner Bel- 
grade and Clearfield streets 

Twenty-fourth District Police Sub-station, 4750 Richmond 

I street 

Twenty-fifth District Police Station, 1507 Moyamensing avenue . 
Twenty-sixth District Police Station, southwest corner Trenton 

avenue and Dauphin street 

Twenty-seventh District Police Station, 6834 State road 

Twenty-seventh District Police Sub-station, Holmesburg 

Twenty-eighth District Police Station, northwest corner Twen- 
tieth and Berl^^ streets 

Twenty-n,inth District Police Station, Sixty-first and Thompson 

I streets . • 

Thirtieth. District Police Station, Front and Westmoreland 

, streets 

Thirty-first District Police Station, Twenty-sixth and York 

streets ^ 

Thirty-second District Police Station, ^xty-fifth and Woodland 

avenue 



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152 

Thirty-thir^ District Police Station, northwest corner Seventh 

and Carpenter streets 1 

Thirty-fourth District Police Station, Fifteenth and Snyder ave- 
nue 1 

Thirty-fifth District Police Station, York road and Champlost 

street 1 

Thirty-sixth District Police Station, 3967 Germantown avenue. . 1 
Thirty-seventh District Police Station, Fourth and Snyder ave- 
nue 1 

Thirty-eighth District Police Station, Thirty-seventh and Wood- 
land avenue 1 

Thirty-ninth District Police Station, 4212 Ridge avenue 1 

Delaware Harbor Police Station, Race street wharf 1 

Delaware Harbor Police Station, Washington avenue wharf .... 1 

Delaware Harbor Police Station, Hanover street wharf 1 

Schuylkill Harbor Police Station, Walnut street wharf 1 

Motor Cycle Squad 1 

Bureau of Fire. 

Residence of Superintendent of Repair Shop, 1535 Morris street. 1 
High Pressure, foreman's residence, 3227 North Nineteenth 

street 1 

High Pressure, engineer's residences 3221 Cresson street 1 

High Pressure, engineer's residence, 3232 Cresson street 1 

High Pressure Pumping Station, Delaware avenue and Race 

street 1 

Fire Headquarters, 1326 Race street 1 

Fire Headquarters, 1328 Race street 2 

High Pressure Pumping Station, Seventh street and Lehigh 

avenue » 1 

High Pressure Fire Service System, Engineer's office, 2246 North 

Howard street 1 

Residence of Chief Baxter, 918 New Market street 2 

Electrical Bureau. 

Chief's office, 610 City Hall 1 

Residence of Chief, 1742 Diamond street ' 2 

Manager's office, 616 City Hall 

Residence of Manager, 1534 North Eighth street 

Assistant Manager, 616 City Hall 

Residence of Assistant Manager, 1825 North Croskey street. . . . 

Second Assistant Manager, 620 City Hall 

Residence of Second Assistant Manager, 4412 Sansom street... 



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Electrical Engineer, 616 City Hall 1 

Kesidence of Chief Inspector of Electric Lighting, 5320 Market 

street 1 

Besidence of Chief Operator, 1730 Girard avenue 1 

Stenographers, 616 City Hall 1 

Inspectors, 826A City Hall 1 

Eire Operator, 626 City Hall 1 

Police Operator, 626 City Hall 1 

Telephone room, City Hall 2 

Store room, 720 City Hall 1 

Store house, 1517 Filbert street 1 

Assistant Inspector of Electric Lighting, 1743 South Seventeenth 

street 1 

Besidence of Acting Chief Line Inspector, 2633 North Chadwick 

street 1 

Dynamo room. City Hall * 1 

Police Telephone Operators, 629 City Hall 1 

Assistant Inspector of Electric Lighting, 85 City Hall 1 

Operating room, 612 City Hall 2 

Operating room, 629 City Hall 3 

Laboratory, 634 City Hall 1 

Besidence of Index Clerk, 872 North Fifth street 1 

Arc light room, 85 City Hall 1 

Besidence of Draughtsman, 1902 North Eleventh street 1 

Bureau of City Property. 

Chief's office, 111 City Hall 1 

Besidence of Chief, 1725 North Seventeenth street 1 

Besidence of Superintendent of City Haill, 1515 Brown street. . . 2 

Chief Clerk, 113 City Hall 1 

City Hall Superintendent, 113 City Hall .• 1 

Master Decorator, 68 City Hall 1 

City Forester, 119 City Hall 1 

Architect, 740A City Hall 1 

Plumbing Department, 16 City Hall 1 

Clock Tower, 799 City Hall 1 

Besidence of Assistant Architect, 2618 Montgomery avenue 1 

Office, 115 City Hall 1 

Bufeau of Building Inspection. 

Besidence of Chief, 1612 North Tenth street 1 

Office, 317 City Hall 1 

Office, 319 City Hall , 1 

Office, 321 City Hall 1 



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154 



Bureau of Elevator Inspection. 

Residence of Chief, 2336 South Fifteenth street 1 

Office, 304 City Hall' 1 

Office, 306 City Hall 1 

Office, 308 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Boiler Inspection. 

Chief, 303 City Hall 1 

Clerk, 301 City Hall '. 1 

Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 

IVomeii's Branch, 36 South Eighteenth street 1 

Tennsylvania Branch, 1627 Chestnut street 1 

Patriotic Society of Philadelphia. 
Independence Hall 1 

Department of Public Works. 

Director's office, 218 City Hall 1 

Residence of Director, 6711 Frankford avenue 2 

Assistant Director's office, 214 City Hall 1 

Residence of Assistant Director, 3652 Frankford avenue 1 

'Chief Clerk, 212 City Hall 1 

Official Photographer, 730 City Hall 1 

City Ice Boats. 

752 South Tvrenty-third street 1 

Holmesburg Correction wharf 1 

Bureau of Highways. 

"Chief's office, 230 City Hall 1 

Residence of Chief, 1927 North Twenty-fifth street 2 

Residence of Assistant Chief, 324 Richmond street 2 

Residence of Chief Clerk, 3310 North Fifteenth street 1 

ISighway Supervisors, 736 City Hall 1 

Residence of General Inspector, 1529 South Fourth street 1 

Bureau of Surveys. 

.318 City Hall 1 

412 City Hall 1 

420 City Hall ." 1 

f 



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|55 



610 City Hall 

532 City Hall 

767 City Hall 

Under Walnut Street Bridge 

Hesi^dence of Chief, 4900 Penn street, Frankford 

Eesidence of Assistant Chief Engineer, 5349 Wayne avenue. . . 

Principal Assistant, 416 City Hall 

Assistant Engineer, Sewers, 418 City Hall 

Residence of Superintendent of Bridges, 3920 Girard avenue . . 

Office of Superintendent of Bridges, 532 City Hall 

■Grade Crossing Division, Broad and Huntingdon streets 2 

Department of Supplies. 

310 City Hall 1 

312 City Hall , 2 

Residence of Assistant Director, 912 North Forty-eighth street. 1 

Department of Health and Charities, 

582 City Hall 2 

58^ City Hall 1 

Holmesburg 1 

Eesidence of Superintendent House of Correction, Holmesburg. 1 
Residence of Assistant Resident Physician Philadelphia Hos- 
pital, 3231 Povs^elton avenue 1 

Residence of Director, 1814 South Forty-seventh street 1 

Residence of Chief Clerk to Director, 1966 North Thirty^first 

street : 1 

Solicitor, 578 City Hall ...; ; 1 

Residence of First Assistant, Laboratory Hygiene, 252 North 

Twelfth street 1 

Department, 584 City Hall 2 

Residence of Chief Clerk, 2645 North Thirty-third street 1 

Administration Building New Municipal Hospital, Second and 

Luzerne streets' 1 

Residence of Chief Bureau Ten^jment House Inspection, 1347 
Toronto street 1 

Bureau of Health. 

Chief Medical Inspector, 713 City Hall 1 

Residence of Chief Medical Inspector, 1539 Columbia avenue ... 2 
Residence of Diagnostician and Consultant, 1411 Jefferson street 1 

Milk Inspector, 513 City Hall 1 

Chief Disinfector, 582 City Hall .- 1 



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156 

Chief Inspector af House Drainage, 613 City Hall 1 

Health Officer, 615 City Hall 1 

Nuisance Inspector, 617 City Hall 1 

Meat Inspector, 711 City Hall 1 

Tenement House Inspection, 727 City Hall i 

Registrar, 517 City Hall 1 

Bacteriological Departmentj 715 City Hall 1 

Bacteriological Department, 716 City Hall 1 

Bacteriological Department, 708 City Hall 1 

Clerks, 714 City Hall 1 

Clerks, 716 City Hall 1 

Chief, 710 City Hall 1 

Chief Clerk, 712 City Hall 1 

Civil Service Commission. 

Residence of President, 1631 Walnut street , 2 

Secretary's office, 876A City Hall 3 

Board room, 875 City Hall < Z 

Examining room, 976 City Hall 1 

Board of Public Education. 

292 City Hall 2 

294 City Hall 1 

297 City Hall 1 

390 City Hall 1 

392 City Hall 1 

394 City Hall 1 

690 City Hall 1 

694 City Hall 1 

699 City Hall , 1 

740 City Hall 1 

742 City Hall : 1 

742 City Hall '. ; 1 

746 City Hall 1 

Residence of S<icretary, 3302 North Seventeenth street 1 

Superintendent, private, 695 City Hall 1 

316 City Hall 1 

696 City Hall 4 

Residence of Dr. Brumbaugh 1 

City Controller's Office. 

148 City Hall 1 1 

Residence of Controller, 4205 Chester avenue 2 



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167 



City Solicitors Office. 

476 City Hall 1 

486 City Hall 1 

482 City Hall 1 

474 City Hall • 1 

466 City Hall 1 

464 City Hall 1 

463 City Hall *t 

462 City Hall 1 

488 City Hall 1 

Assistant City Solicitor, 1403 Filbert street 1 

Residence of Assistant City Solicitor, 1334 Spruce street 1 

Department of Receiver of Taxes. 

104 City Hall 1 

110 City Hall 1 

Collector of Delinquent Taxes, 112 City Hall 1 

114 City Hall 1 

Water rents, 196 City Hall 1 

Registration Commission. 

650 City Hall 1 

Revision of Taxes. 

Search Department, 177 City Hall 1 

Eeal Estate Assessors, 181 City Hall 1 

Mercardile Appraisers. 

178A City Hall 1 

171 City Hall 4 

City Treasurer, 

143 City Hall 2 

Recorder of Deeds. 

152 City Hall 1 

154 City Hall 1 

764 City Hall 1 

Register of Wills. 

162A City Hall 1 

164 City Hall 1 

12 



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158 



City Commissioners. 

130 City Hall 3 

E€sidence, 620 South Tenth street 1 

Chief Clerk, City Hall 1 

Sherifs Office. 

467 City Hall 2 

471 City Hall 

475 City Hall 

477 City Hall 

481 City Hall 

Execution Clerk, 481 City Hall 

577 City Hall 

Bureau of Street Cleaning. 

334 City Hall \ 1 

Coroner s Office. 

•604 City Hall 2 

608 City Hall 1 

Eesidence of Coroner, 618 East Girard avenue 1 

Residence of Deputy Coroner, 777 North Twenty-seventh street. 1 

Residence of Deputy Coroner, 3231 Norris street ^.r^ 1 

Eesidence of Coroner's Detective, 2020 West Venango street ... 1 

Residence of Coroner's Detective, 1212 Moore street 1 

The Morgue, 1307 Wood street 1 

Residence of Deputy Coroner, 6343 Race street 1 

Residence of Coroner's Physician, 805 South Twelfth street. ... 1 

JResidence of Chief Clerk, 3630 Unruh street 1 

liesidence of Deputy Coroner, 1809 Reed street 1 

District Attorney's Office. 

660 City Hall 1 

662 City Hall 2 

664 City Hall 2 

666 City Hall 6 

675 City Hall 1 

Residence of Assistant District Attorney, 1710 South Fifteenth 

street 1 

!Residence of Assistant District Attorney, 756 South Tenth 

street 1 



Digitized by 



Go©gle 



159 



Pcurk Commission, 

127 City Hall 4 

English Building, Fairmount Park 1 

Horticultural Hall, Fairmount Park 1 

Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park 1 

Commissioner's office, Belmont, Fairmount Park 2 

•Guard House, Sedgley, Fairmount Park 2 

Guard House, Belmont, Fairmount Park 1 

■Guard House, Woodford, Fairmount Park 1 

Captain of Guards, Ohio Building, Fairmount Park 1 

Courts of Philadelphia, 

231 City Hall 1 

240 City Hall 1 

.248 City Hall 1 

252 City Hall 1 

258 City Hall 1 

267 City Hall ; 1 

452 City Hall, Supreme Court 1 

540 City Hall, Judge Anderson 1 

Prothonotary's office, City Hall 2 

765 City Hall, Probation Officers 1 

364 City Hall, Judge Orlady 1 

277 City Hall 2 

280 City Han 1 

357 City Hall 1 

359 City Hall 1 

361 City Hail 1 

362A City Hall 1 

363 City Hall 1 

365 City Hall 1 

435 City Hall 1 

442 City Hall , 1 

446 City Hall 1 

461 ^ity Hall 1 

58i City Hall ^ . 1 

644 City Hall 1 

«48 City Hall 1 

652 City Hall 1 

«57 City Hall 1 

Eesidence of Judge Magill, northeast corner Tenth street and 

Oak lane 3 

Residence of Judge Bregy, 2033 North Broad street. 1 

Besidenoe of Magistrate Scott, 1442 North Lawrence. :fitreet. ; . 2 



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160 

Residence of Magistrate Gallagher, 155 North Twenty-first 

street 2 

Office of Magistrate Gallagher, 1331 Arch street 1 

Office of Magistrate Carey, 125 South Seventh street 1 

Office of Magistrate Call, 1128 Girard avenue 1 

Court of Common Pleas No. 5, 658 City Hall j, 1 

Court of Common Pleas No. 5, 644 City Hall. 1 

Court of Quarter Sessions No. 1, retiring room, 453 City Hall. . 1 

Court of Judge Magill, 335 City Hall 1 

Office of Magistrate McCleary, 23 North Juniper street 1 

Residence of Magistrate Carey, 323 Pine street 1 

Office of Magistrate Scott, 332 West Girard avenue 1 

Residence of Magistrate Hughes, 2125 South Ninth street 1 

Quarter Sessions, 453 City Hall .^ 1 

Quarter Sessions, 659 City Hall 1 

Quarter Sessions, 676 City Hall. 1 

Quarter Sessions, 677 City Hall 1 

Quarter Sessions, 682 City Hall 1 

Quarter Sessions, 681 City Hall 1 

Office of Magistrate Campbell, 2839 Kensington avenue 1 

Residence of Magistx^te Campbell, 2537 East Somerset street.. 1 

Probation Officer, 765 City Hall jl 

Residence of Magistrate Hogg, 429 Reed street 1 

Residence of Magistrate Morris, 2831 Oxford street 1 

Office of Magistrate Morris, 23 04 Ridge avenue 1 

Office of Magistrate Hogg, Callowbill street, east of Fifth strefet 1 

Office of Magistrate Harris, 3726 Market street 1 

Residence of Magistrate Harris, 4204 Chestnut street • . . . . 1 



Orphans' Court Cleric. 

413 City Hall 1 

427 City Hall 1 

428 City Hall 1 

434 City Hall 2 

Office of Clerk, 413 City Hall 1 

430 City Hall, Judge Gummey 1 

Supreme Court. 

a84 City Hall 2 

456 City Hall. * 1 

458 City HaU 1 

Superior Courts 

a64 City Hall 1 



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161 



Armories, 

Brigade Headquarters, 542 City Hall 

First Regiment Armory, Broad and Callowhill streets 

Second Regiment Armory, Broad and Susquehanna avenue . . . 

Third Regiment Armory, Broad and Wharton streets 

Sixth Regiment Armory, Twentieth and Montgomery avenue. 

City Troop, Twenty-third and Ludlow streets ,...,. 

State F«ncibles, Broad and Race streets. 

Second City Troop, Twenty-third and Chestnut streets 2 

Law Library. 

'GOO City. Hall 1 

Oil Inspectors. 
311 City Hall 1 

Stations Connected Direct to Central Office. 

City of Philadelphia, Osmond tract, Byberry 1 

Henry Clay, 217 City Hall 1 

Children's Hospital, 207 South Twenty-second street 1 

Fred Douglass Hospital, 1612 Lombard street 1 

Howard Hospital, Infirmary for Incurables, Broad and Cath- 
arine streets • 2 

Jewish Hospital, York and Tabor roads 1 

Jefferson Maternity Hospital, Washington square, south of 

Locust street 1 

Jefferson Medical Hospital, 1020 Sansom street 1 

Kensington Hospital, 136 Diamond street 1 

Mayor Reyburn, 204 City Hall 1 

Dr. Neff, 586 City Hall 1 

Orthopaedic Hospital, Seventeenth and Summer streets 1 

Presbyterian Hospital, Thirty-ninth and Filbert streets. . 1 

Samuel P. Rotan, 666 City Hall 1 

Rush Hospital, Thirty-third and Lancaster avenue 1 

St. Agnes Hospital, Broad and Mifflin streets 1 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Seventeenth street and Girard avenue ... 2 

St. Christopher's Hospital, Lawrence and Huntingdon streets. 1 

St. Mary's Hospital, Frankford avenue and Palmer street 2 

Women's College Hospital, Twenty-first street and North Col- 
lege avenue 1 

West Philadelphia Hospital for Women, 4035 Parrish street ... 2 

Women's Southern Homoeopathic Hospital, 724 Spruce street ... 3 



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162 

West Philadelphia Homoeopathic Hospital and Dispensary, 1234 
North Fifty-fourth street $ 

Women's Homoeopathic Hospital, Twentieth street and Susque- 
hanna avenue 

Episcopal Hospital, Front street and Lehigh avenue «... 

Polyclinic Hospital, 1818 Lombard street 

Frankford Hospital, Frankford avenue and Wakeling street. . . . 

Samaritan Hospital, Broad and Ontario streets 

Germantown Hospital, Penn and Chew streets 

Children's Homoeopathic Hospital, Franklin and Thompson 
streets 

Mt. Sinai Hospital, 1429 South Fifth street 

Free hy Ordinance, 

Receiver of Taxes, 102 City Hall 

Bureau of City Property, 115 City Hall 

City Commissioners, 130 City Hall 

City Treasurer, 143 City Hall 

City Controller, 146 City Hall 

Recorder of Deeds, 154 City Hall 

Register of Wills, 162 City Hall 

Board of Revision of Taxes, 180 City Hall 

Mayor's private office, 206 City Hall 

Department of Public Works, 212 City Hall 

Director of Public Safety, private, 221 City Hall 

Superintendent of Police, 227 City Hall 

Bureau of Highways, 232 City Hall 

Bureau of Highways (Superintendent of Bridges), 238 City 

Hall 

Court of Common Pleas No. 1, 246 City Hall 

Court of Common Pleas No. 2, 254 City Hall 

Prothonotary Common Pleas, 266 City Hall 

Court of Common Pleas No. 3, 271 City Hall 

Bureau of Boiler Inspection, 301 City Hall 

Director of Supplies, 310 City Hall 

Bureau of Building Inspection, 313 City Hall 

Bureau of Gas, 332 City Hall 

Bureau of Lighting, 334 City Hall 

Bureau of Street Cleaning, 336 City Hall 

President of Common Council (Rostrum), 400 City Hall 

President of Select Council, 402 City Hall 

Clerks, Select Council, 406 City Hall 

Bureau of Surveys, 412 City Hall 

Orphans' Court, 417 City Hall 



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163 

Court of Common Pleas No. 4, 444 City Hall 

Supreme Court, 454 City Hall 

City Solicitor's office, 478 City Hall 

Clerks, Sheriff's office, 485 City Hall 

Clerks, Common Council, 494 City Hall 

Councils' Finance Committee, 496 City Hall 

Captain of Detectives, 531 City Hall 

Department of Health and Charities, 584 uity Hall 1 

Coroner?s Clerks, 602 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Health, 716 City Hall t 

Court of Conmion Pleas No. 5, 644 City Hall 1 

District Attorney's clerks, 666 City Hall 1 

Court of Quarter- Sessions, 685 City Hall 1 

Board of Education, Superintendent, 694 City Hall. 1 

Bureau of Water, Chief, 793 City HaII 1 

Civil Service, 875 City Hall ' 1 

Philadelphia Yacht Club (courtesy), Essington, Pa... 1 

Electrical Bureau, Chestnut Hill, Police Station 1 

E. W. Pat ton (courtesy). Thirty-second and Chestnut streets. . 1 
Assistant Manag-er Electrical Bureau (courtesy), 1825 North 
Croskey street ■. . 1 

49 

Forty-six free by ordinance and three by courtesy. 
Bureau of Surveys. 

Pirst District, 1701 Snyder avenue. 

Second District, southeast corner Broad and Morris -streets.. 

Fifth District, 521 West Venan^ street. 

Sixth District, 441 West Norris street. 

Seventh District, 1500 Montgomery avenue. 

Eighth District, 4444 Main street, Manayunk. 

Ninth District, School lane and Germantown avenue. 

Tenth District, 4534 Frankford avenue. 

Eleventh District, 4039 Lancaster avenue. 

Twelfth District, 108 South Fortieth street. 

Thirteenth District, 1525 Indiana avenue. 

Fourteenth District, 8031 Frankford avenue. 

Bureau of Highways. 
First District, 3900 Woodland avenue. 
Second District, 1304 Reed street. 
Fourth District, 1034 West Girard avenue. 
Fifth District, 423 West Lehigh avenue. 



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164 

Sixth District, 8031 Fraxikiord avenue. 

Seventh District, 4253 Ridge avenue. 

Eighth District, 5613 Germantown avenue (202 Eaymond Bldg). 

Ninth District, 447 Mint Arcade Building (Commissioner). 

Bureau of Water. 

Third Purveyor's District, Beach street and Susquehanna avenue. 

Wentz Farm Reservoir, Second street pike and Comly street. 

Lehigh Reservoir, Sixth and Somerset streets. 

Oak Lane Reservoir, Fifth street and Medary avenue. * 

Fourth Purveyor's District, Twenty-sixth and Master streets. 

East Park Reservoir, Thirty-third street and Montgomery avenue. 

Storehouse, Thirty-third and Thompson streets. 

Corinthian Reservoir, Tw^enty-second and Parrish streets. 

Spring Garden Street, Upper, Thirty-third and Thompson streets* 

Mr. Fuller, 788 City Hall. 

Bricklayers' shanty. Thirty-third and Thompson streets. 

Storehouse, Thirty-third and Thompson streets. 

Belmont Station, West River Drive and Columbia Bridge. 

Belmont High Service Station, Georges Hill. 

Fairmount Station, Callowhill Street Bridge, Schuylkill. 

Draughting room, 796 City Hall. 

Draughting room, 795 City Hall. 

Chiefs office, 794 City Hall. 

Mr. Lloyd, 792 City Hall. 

Lardner's Point Pumping Station, Delaw^are avenue and Bobbins 

street. 
Torresdale Filters, State road and Pennypack street. • 
Torresdale Filters, Court No. 1. 

Torresdale Pumping Station, State road and Pennypack street. 
Belmont Filters, Belmont avenue and Ford road. 
Queen Lane Reservoir, Thirty-third and Abbotsford avenue. 
Queen Lane Pumping Station, East River Drive and School lane. 
Sixth Purveyor's District, Tow^n Hall, Germantowrn. 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station, Graver's Lane Station, P. and R. 

Railway. 
Mt. Airy Pumping Station, Allen's lane and Mower street. 
Wm. Whitby's residence, 127 East Upsal street, Germantown. 
Mr. Fuller's residence, 3419 Hamilton street. 
Mr. McCrudden, 566 City Hall. 
Mr. Johnson, 190 City Hall. 
Telephone room, 793 City Hall. 
Paymaster, 784 City Hall.' 
Mr. Bryan, 786 City Hall. 



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166 

:Mr. Sperice, 790A City Hall. 

Seventh Purveyor's District, Thirtieth and South streets. 

^r. Young's residence, 682 North ^Thirty-third street. 

l^Ir. G. Whitby, 702 City Hall. 

Mr. Whitby, 702A City Hall. 

:Mr. McNeal, 704 City Hall. 

Mr. Mustin, 704 City Hall. 

Mr, Logan, 701 City Hall. 

Pirst Purveyor's District, Twelfth and Wharton streets. 

Second Purveyor's District, 918 Cherry street. 

Repair shop. Twelfth and Reed streets. 

Roxborough Pumping Station, Shawmont Station. 

Lower Roxborough Reservoir, Dearnley street, below Ridge avenue. 

Fifth Purveyor's District, 530 Leverington avenue, Roxborough. 

TJpper Roxborough Reservoir, Port Royal avenue, below Ridge 

avenue. 
Roxborough High Service Station, Shawmont avenue and Eve 

street. 
^Ir. Charles Lowrie, Purveyor, 2433 North Sixth street. 
Spring Garden Testing Station, Fairmount Park, eastern end 

Girard Avenue Bridge. 



List of KEYSToisrE Telephones ' 

Select Council. 

Residence of President, 1537 South Fifth street 2 

Assistant Clerk, 406 City Hall - . 1 

Stenographer, 411 City Hall 1 

Electrical and School Committee, 508 City Hall 1 

Chairman School Committee, 1937 North Sixth street 1 

Residence of Henry Shoch, 1503 North Sixteenth street 1 

Common Council. 

President, 490 City Hall 1 

Chief Clerk, 492 City Hall 1 

Assistant Clerk, 494 City Hall. 1 

Sergeant-at-Arms, 495 City Hall 1 

Finance Committee, 496 City Hall 1 

Finance Committee, 590 City Hall » 1 

Residence of Clerk of Finance Committee, 2159 South Fifteenth 

street , 1 

Residence of Clerk of Finance Committee, 4135 Westminster 

avenue ^ « 2 



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:168 

Chairman of Finance Committee, 410 DickiBSon street 1 

Higfhway Committee, 488 City Hall 1 

Office of E. B. Gleason, 2033 Chestnut street. ....*. ^ 

Conmiittee room, 592 City Hall 1. 

Mayor. 

Mayor, 206 City Hall 1 

Mayor's residence. Nineteenth and Spring Garden streets 1. 

Mayor's Secretary, 204 City Hall 1 

Clerks, 205 City Hall 1. 

Residence of Mayor's Secretary, 117 South Thirty-fourth street. 1. 
Mayor's Statistician, 203 City Hall 1. 

Department of Public Safety. 

Besidenoe of Director, 918 North J^'ifth street 2" 

Assistant Director, 215 City Hall , L 

Director, 217 City Hall 1 

Residence of Assistant Director, 831 North Fifth street 1 

Secretary, 217 City Hall 1 

Residence of Secretary, 5115 Knox street 1 

Photographer, 734 City Hall 1 

Detectives, 507 City Hall 1 

Chief Clerk, 215 City Hall 1 

Messenger to Director, 217 City Hall 1 

Veterinary Surgeon, 3020 Chestnut street 1 

Assistant Veterinary Surgeon, 3516 "K" street 1 

Bureau of Police. 

Supply room, 321 City Hall 1 

Audience room, 227 City Hall 1 

Residence of Assistant Superintendent, 121 North Lambert 

street 2 

Assistant Superintendent, 215 City Hall '• . . . 1 

Fire Marshal, 362 City Hall 1 

Fire Marshal, 388 City Hall 1 

Residence of Fire Marshal, 3949 Baltimore avenue 2 

Fire Marshal's driver, 1319 South Forty-sixth street 1 

Assistant Fire Marshal, 228 South Fortieth street 1 

Assistant Fire Marshal, 2732 North Hicks street 1 

Assistant Fire Marshal, 225 Camac street 1 

Assistant Fire Marshal, 3126 North Fifteenth street 1 

Chief Clerk's residence, 1845 North Twenty-fifth street 1 

Xhief Clerk, 225 City Hall ^ 1 



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167 

Clerks, 213 City Hall 1 

Chief Surgeon, 950 City Hall 1 

Captain of Detectives, 531 City Hall Z 

Lieutenant of Reserves, 631 City Hall 1 

Detectives, 529 City Hall 2" 

Detectives, 533 City Hall 1 

Detectives, 539 City Hall 1 

Reserves' roll room, 630 City Hall ^. 1 

Cell room, 643 City Hall 1 

Central Station, 621 City Hall 1 

Captain's room, 629 City Hall 1 

Van stables. Eleventh and Wharton streets 1 

504 City Hall 1 

Traffic Squad, court yard, City Hall 1 

Stables, Tenth and Greenwich streets 1 

Residence of Captain of Detectives, 3507 Lancaster avenue.... 1 
First District Police Station, Twentieth and Fitzwater .streets . 1 
Second District Police Station, Second and Christian streets .... 1 
Third District Police Station, Fourth and Delancey streets .... 1 

Fourth District Police Station, 219 North Fifth street 1 

Fifth District Police Station, Fifteenth and Locust street® 1 

Sixth District Police Station, southeast corner Eleventh and 

Winter streets 1 

Seventh District Police Station, Third and Fairmount avenue. . 1 
Eighth District Police Station, Tenth and Buttonwood streets . . 1 
Ninth District Police Station, Twentieth . and Buttonwood 

streets 1 

Tenth District Police Station, 1417 North Front street 1 

Eleventh District Police Station, 615 East Girard avenue. ..... 1: 

Twelfth District Police Station, Eighth and Jefferson streets. . 1 
Thirteenth District Police Station, 4431 Main street, Manayunk 1 
Thirteenth District Police Sub-station, 471 Leverington street. 1 
Fourteenth District Police Station, Main and Haines streets . . 1 
Fourteenth District Police Sub-station, Twenty-seventh street 

and Higfiland avenue 1 

Fifteenth District Police Station, Paul and Ruan streets 1 

Sixteenth District Police Station, Thirty-ninth street and Lan- 
caster avenue t 

Seventeenth District Police Station, 1210 South Twentieth 

street 1 

Seventeenth District Police Sub-station, Twenty-eighth and 

Ritner streets 1 

Eighteenth District Police Station, Fourth and York streets. . . 1 
Nineteenth District Police Station, Twelfth and Pine streets ... 1 



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168 

Twentieth District Police Station, Fifteenth street, below Vine 
street 

Twenty-first District Police Station, Woodland avenue, west of 
Market street 

Twenty-second District Police Station, northwest corner of Park 
and Lehigh avenues i* 

Twenty-third District Police Station, northwest corner of Nine- 
teenth and Oxford streets : 

Twenty-fourth District Police Station, southwest corner Bel- 
grade and Clearfield streets 

Twenty-fourth District Police Sub-station, 4750 Richmond street 

Twenty-fifth District Police Station, 1507 Moyamensing avenue 

Twenty-sixth District Police Station, southwest corner Trenton 
avenue and Dauphin street 

Twenty-seventh District Police Station, 6834 State road 

Twenty-seventh District Police Sub-station, Holmesburg 

Twenty-Eighth District Police Station, northwest corner Twen- 
tieth and Berks streets 

Twenty-ninth District Police Station, Sixty-first and Thompson 
streets 

Thirtieth District police Station, Front and Westmoreland 
streets 

Thirty-first District Police Station, Twenty-sixth and York 
streets 

Thirty-second District Police Station, Sixty-fifth street and 
Woodland avenue 

Thirty-third District Police Station, northwest corner Seventh 
and Carpenter streets 

Thirty-fourth District Police Station, Fifteenth street and 
Snyder avenue 

Thirty-fifth District Police Station, York road and Champlost 
street 

Thirty-sixth District Police Station, 3965 laermantown avenue. . 

Thirty-seventh District Police Station, Fourth street and Sny- 
der avenue « , . 

Thirty-eighth District Police Station, Thirty-seventh street and 
Woodland avenue . . ► 

Thirty-ninth District Police Station, 4212 Ridge avenue 

Delaware Harbor Police Station, Race street wharf >. 

Motor Cycle Squad, Tenth and Thompson streets 

Delaware Harbor Police Station, Washington avenue wharf ... 2 

Delaware Harbor Police Station, Hanover street wharf 2 

Schuylkill Harbor Police Station, Walnut street wharf t 



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169 



Bureau of Fire. 

Chief's residence, 918 New Market street 1 

Assistant Chief's residence, 119 North Woodstock street 1 

Assistant Chief, 2110 Market street 1 

Assistant Engineer's residence, 4907 North Sixth street 1 

Assistant Engineer, southeast corner Sixth and Locust streets. 1 

Fire Headquarters, 1326 Kace street 4 

Puniping Statioil, Delaware avenue and Race street , 1 

Fire Boat Stuart, Race street wharf, Delaware 1 

Chemical Engine No. 6, Bustleton 1 

Engine Company No. 9, Main and Carpenter streets, German- 
town , 1 

Engine Company No. 14, 4516 Frankford avenue 1 

Engine Company No. 19, 29-31, East Chelten avenue, German- 

towrl , , , ^. 1 

Engine Company No. 28, Clearfield and Belgrade streets 1 

Engine Company No. 30, 3546 Germantown avenue 1 

Engine Company No. 31, 2712 Norti Second street 1 

Engine Company No. 33, Richmond street, above Kirkbride 

street, Bridesburg 1 

Engine Company No. 36, Main street, between Decatur and 

Hartel streets 1 

Engine Company No. 37, Twenty-seventh street and Highland 

avenue. Chestnut Hill *, 1 

Engine Company No. 38, Longshore street and State road 1 

Engine Company No. 42, Front and Westmoreland streets... 1 

Engine Company No, 44, 3420 Haverford avenue 1 

Engine Company No. 48, Seventh street, above Carpenter street 1 
Engine Company No. 50, northwest corner Park avenue and 

Cambria street « 1 

Engine Company No. 51, York road and Champlost street.... 1 

Engine Company No. 52, Jackson and Vankirk streets 1 

Engine Company No. 53, Fourth street and Snyder avenue ... 1 
Engine Company No. 54, Sixty- third street and Lancaster ave- 
nue 1 

Engine Company No. 55, Marshall street and Erie s^venue .... 1 
Truck Company No. 8, Seymour street and Germantown ave- 
nue, Germantown 1 

Truck Company No. 10, Clearfield street, below Frankford ave- 
nue t 

Truck Company No. 13, Fiftieth street and Baltimore 'avenue. 1 

Truck Company No. 14, 2936 Ridge avenue 1 

Chemical Engine No. 7, Eighty-second street and Tinicum ave- 
nue 1 



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170 

IJesidence of Acting District Engineer Summers, 1101 Foulk- 

rod street 1 

Office, High Pressure System, 2250 North Howard street 1 

Electrical Bureau. 

Manager, 616 City Hall 

Besidence of Assistant Manager, 1825 North Croskey street. . . . 

Second Assistant Manager, 620 City Hall 

Electrical Engineer, 616 City Hall. 

Stenographers, 616 City Hall 

Inspectors, 826A City Hall 

Draughtsman, 618 City Hall 

Fire Operators, 626 City Hall 

Police Operators, 626 City Hall 

Telephone room, City Hall '. 2 

Police telephone operating room, 629 City Hall 1 

Two sets for emergency service in Police or Fire Stations 2 

Telephone room, 612 City Hall 2 

Police operating room, 629 City Hall 3 

Xinemen*s room, 826B City Hall • 

Foreman of Wiremen, 85 City Hall 

Dynamo room. City Hall 

Lamp room, 83 City Hall , * 

Battery room, 926 City Hall . .' 

Chief Engineer, 81 City Hall 

FJlevator operators, 16 City Hall 

Elevator repairs, 62A City Hall 

Store house, 1517 Filbert street 

Store house, 713 Filbert street 

W^tern Union Telegraph Co., Broad and Chestnut streets... 
Postal Telegraph-Cable Co., Juniper and Chestnut streets 

Bureau of City Property. 

Assistant Superintendent of City Hall, 113 City Hall 

Architect, 825 City Hall 

113 City Hall 

Toremen of Biggers, 743 City Hall 

Foreman of Laborers, 348 City Hall 

Tlumbing shop, 17 City Hall 

Paint Shop, 68 City Hall 

Carpenter's room, 51A City Hall 

East pump room, 23 City Hall 

"West pump room, 69 City Hall 



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171 

Heceiving shop, 151A City Hall 1 

Store room, 128 City Hall 1 

•Clock tower, 799 City Hall ' 1 

Clock face. City Hall 1 

Top of tower. City Hall 1 

Independence Hall, Fifth, Sixth and Chestnut streets 7 

•City Forester, 117 City Hall 1 

-Chief, 111 City Hall 1 

Office, 115 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Building Inspection, 

-Chief, 319 City Hall 1 

Residence of Chief, 1612 North Tenth street 1 

Office, 315 City Hall 1 

Office, 317 City Hall 1 

Office, 321 City Hall 1 

Elevator Inspection. 

Residence of Chief, 2336 South Fifteenth street 1 

304 City Hall 1 

306 City Hall 1 

308 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Lighting. 

Office, 334 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Gas. 

Office, 332 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Boiler Inspection. 

'Chief's residence, 3709 York road 1 

Ohief's office, 303 City Hall 1 

Department of Public WorTcs. 

Director, 214 City Hall 1 . 

Director's residence, 6711 Frankford avenue 1 

Chief Clerk, 212 City Hall 1 

Photographer, 730 City Hall , 1 

Ice Boats. 

•Chestnut street pier, Delaware 1 



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172 



Department of Wharves, Docks and Ferries. 

Boom 552, Bourse Building* : 1 

Boom 553, Bourse Building 1 

Boom 554, Bourse Building* 1 

Boom 555, Bourse Building* 1 

Boom 590, Bourse Building* 1 

Bureau of Highways and Street Cleaning, 

Chief, 230 City Hall 1 

Office, 234 City Hall , 1 

Boom 334, City Hall 1 

Gray's Ferry Bridge, Schuylkill river 1 

Office (S. C), 338 City Hall. . .' 1 

Foreman of Bridges, Residence, 5171 Columbia avenue 1 

Board of Highway Supervisors, 
Chief Draughtsman, 738 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Surveys. 

318 City Hall 1 

410 City Hall 1 

534 City Hall \ 1 

510 City Hall 1 

767 City Hall 1 

First Survey District, 1701 Snyder avenue 1 

Second Survey District, southeast corner Broad and Morris 

streets 1 

Third Survey District, 1215 Filbert street 1 

Fourth Survey District, 724 Spring Garden street 1 

Fifth Survey District, 521 West Venango street 1 

Sixth Survey District, 441 West Norris street 1 

Seventh Survey District, 1500 Montgomery avenue 1 

Eighth Survey District, 4444 Main street, Manayunk 1 

Ninth Survey District, Germantown avenue and School lane .... 1 

Tenth Survey District, 4534 Frankford avehue 1 

Eleventh Survey District, 4039 Lancaster avenue 1 

Twelfth Survey District, 108 South Fortieth street 1 

Thirteenth Survey District, 1525 Indiana avenue 1 

Grade Crossing Division, Broad and Huntingdon streets 2 

Principal Assistant, 416 City Hall j 1 

Assistant Engineer of Sewers, 418 City Hall 1 



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710 City Hall . . . 

793 City Hall 

710A City Hall 

794 City Hall 

702A City Hall 

788 City Hall 

792 City Hall 

Complaint Clerk, 704 City Hall. 

Water rents, 566 City Hall 

Water rents, 568 City Hall 



173 

Bureau of Water, 



Department of Supplies. 

310 City Hall 2 

312 City Hall 2 

Residence of Assistant Director, 921 North Forty-eighth street. 1 

Department of Health and Charities. 

578 City Hall 1 

582 City Hall 2 

Residence of Assistant Director, 1814 South Seventeenth street. 1 

Bureau of Health. 

395A City Hall 1 

3p7 City Hall 1 

395 City Hall 2 

517 City Hall 1 

513 City Hall 1 

712 City Hall 1 

716 City Hall 4 

613 City Hall 1 

617 City Hall .• 1 

7\08 City Hall 1 

714 City Hall 1 

715 City Hall 1 

711 City Hall 1 

727 City Hall 1 

Board of Civil Service. * 

875 City Hall 1 

876 B City Hall , 1 

875 City Hall 1 

876A City Hall 2 

976 City Hall ,. 1 

13 



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174 



Board of Public Education. 

294 City Hall , 2 

290 City Hall *. 1 

390 City Hall 1 

392 City Hall 1 

394 City Hall . . .* 1 

694 City Hall 2 

699 City Hall 1 

690 City Hall 1 

742 City Hall 3 

746 City Hall 2 

Dr. Brumbaugh, 695 City Hall 1 

City Controller. 

148 City Hall 1 

City Solicitor. 

476 City Hall 1 

466 City Hall 1 

462 City Hall 1 

486 City Hall 1 

474 City Hall 1 

482 City Hall 1 

464 City Hall 1 

488 City Hall 1 

Receiver of Taxes. 

110 City Hall 1 

108 City Hall 1 

TV^ater rents, 196 City Hall t 1 

Delinquent taxes, 112 City Hall 1 

Registration Commission. 

•650 City Hall 1 

Board of Revision of Taxes. 

Search Department, 177 City Hall 2 

Eeal Estate Assessors, 181 City Hall 1 

:178A City Hall 1 

Mercantile Appraisers. 

171 City Hall 3 

167 City Hall 1 



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Il5 



City Treasurer. 

143 City Hall 1 

143 City Hall 1 

Recorder of Deeds. 
Deputy Recorder, 154 City Hall 1 

Register of Wills. 

162 City Hall 1 

City Commissioners. 

130 City Hall 1 

130 City Hall 1 

130 City Hall 1 

Ofice of the Sheriff. 

467 City Hall 1 

475 City Hall 1 

471 City Hall 1 

477 City Hall 1 

475 City Hall 1 

477 City Hall 1 

Execution Clerk, 481 City Hall. . . : 1 

Office of the Coroner. 

Residence of Coroner, 618 East Girard avenue 1 

•Office, 604 City Hall 2 

'606 City Hall 1 

The Morgue, Wood street, above Thirteenth street 2 

Deputy Coroner's residence, 1064 Germantown avenue 1 

Deputy Coroner's residence, 925 Wolf street 1 

District Attorney. 

'666 City Hall 1 

662 City Hall 1 

664 City Hall 1 

'607 Mutual Life Building 1 

ParJc Commissioners. 

127 City Hall 3 

Guard House, Red Bridge *...., , 1 

<Juard House, Rittenhouse street 1 

IVissahickon Hall, Fairmount Park ...;..... I 



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176 



Courts of Philadelphia, 

»58 City Hall 1 

240 City Hall 1 

242 City Hall 1 

244 City Hall 1 

267 City Hall 1 

268 City Hall 1 

280 City Hall 1 

363 City Hall 1 

3«5 City Hall 1 

359 City Hall 1 

361 City Hall 1 

a62A City Hall 1 

461 City Hall 1 

565 City Hall 1 

681 City Hall 1 

657 City Hall 1 

652 City Hall 1 

ComHK)!! Pleas No. 5, 644 City Hall , 1 

Judge Barrett's residence, 315 South Seventeenth street 1 

Ofiice of Magistrate Carey, 127 South Seventh street 1 

OiSee of Magistrate Call, 1128 Girard avenue 1 

Judge Martin, private, 651 City Hall 1 

Prothonotary's room, 264 City Hall 2 

Court of Quarter Sessions. 

685 City Hall , 1 

676 City Hall 1 

677 €ity Hall 1 

681 City Hall 1 

Office of Magistrate Campbell, 2839 Kensington avenue 1 

Residence of Magistrate Campbell, 2537 East Somerset street. . 1 

Supreme Court. 

456 City Hall .* 1 

Lam/ Library, 

$00 City Hall 1 

Oil Inspector. 

ail City Hall ' 1 

Free Libraries. 

Wideoer Library^ Girard avenue and Bn>ad street. • 1 



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177 



Reporter $ Room. 
740A City Hall 1 

Hospitals. 

St. Luke's, 4414 North Broad street 

Samaritan, Broad and Ontario streets 

Women's, Twentieth street and Susquehanna avenue 

St. Joseph's, Seventeenth street and Girard avenue 

German, Corinthian and Girard avenues 

Hahneman, Fifteenth and Race streets 

Medico-Chirurgical, Eighteenth and Cherry streets 

Episcopal, Front street and Lehigh avenue 

Children'% Twenty-second and Walnut streets 

Philadelphia, Thirty-fourth and South streets 

Presbyterian, Thirty-ninth and Filbert streets 

University, Thirty-fourth and Spruce streets 

Pennsylvania, Eighth and Spruce streets 

Methodist, Broad and Wolf streets 

St. Agnes', Broad and Mifflin streets 

Jewish, York and Tabor roads 



Stations Paid For by the Electrical Bureau, Connected 
Direct to Central Office. 

Presbyterian Hospital, Thirty-ninth and Filbert streets 

St. Mary's Hospital, Frankf ord avenue and Palmer street 

Jefferson Hospital, 1020 Sansom street 

Howard Hospital, Broad and Catherine streets 

West Philadelphia Hospital for Women, 4035 Parrish street. . . 

8t. Agnes' Hospital, Broad and Mifflin streets 

University Hospital, Thirty-fourth and Spruce streets 

St. Christopher's Hospital, Lawrence and Huntingdon streets. . 

Fred. Douglass Hospital, 1512 Lombard street 

Polyclinic Hospital, 1818 Lombard street 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Seventeenth street and Girard avenue . . . 

Medico-Chirurgical Hospital, Eighteenth and Cherry streets... 

Women's College Hospital, Twenty-second street and North Col- 
lege avenue ' 

Jefferson Maternity Hospital, Seventh street, south of Locust 
street 

Episcopal Hospital, Front street and Lehigh avenue 

Women's Hospital, Twentieth street and Susquehanna avenue. 

Kensington Hospital, 136 Diamond street 



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178 

Children's Homoeopathic Hospital, Franklin and .Thompson 

streets * 1 

Samaritan Hospital, Broad and Ontario streets 1 

St. Luke's Hospital, Broad and Wingohoeking streets 1 

Free Telephones Connected With the Electrical Bureau^ 

President of Select Council, 408 City Hall 

Chief Clerk of Select Council, 404 City Hall 

Rostrum of Common Council, 400 City Hall 

Mayor's retiring room, 204 City Hall 

Director of Public Safety, 217 City Hall 

Superintendent of Police, 227 City Hall 

Chief of the Bureau of Fire, 918 New Market street 

Insurance Patrol No. 1, 516 Arch street T 

Insurance Patrol No. 2, Fifth and Hackley streets 

Chemical Engine No. 5, Fox Chase 

Engine Company No. 1, 1837 South street 

Engine Company No. 2, southwest corner Warnock and Berks 
streets 

Engine Company No. 3, 117 Queen street 

Engine Company No. 4, 1528 Sansom street ^ 

Engine Company No. 5, southeast corner Thirty-seventh and 
Ludlow streets 

Engine Company No. 6, Montgomery avenue, below Girard ave- 
nue 

Engine Company No. 7, Frankford avenue and Ruan street. . . 

Engine Company No. 8, northeast corner Second and Quarry 
streets 

Engine Company No. 10, 808 Morris street 

Engine Company No. 11, southwest comer Alder and South 
streets 

Engine Company No. 12, Main and Centre streets, Manayunk. 

Engine Company No. 13, Parrish street, west of Fifteenth 
street 

Engine Company No. 15, Howard street and Columbia avenue. 

Engine Company No. 16, Forty-fourth street, below Girard 
avenue 

Engine Company No. 17, 253 North Fifteenth street 

Engine Company No. 18, southeast corner Uber and Callow- 
hill streets 

Engine Company No. 20, northwest corner Tenth and Hunter 
streets 

Engine Company No. 21, 826 New Market street 

Engine Company No. 22, 214 Pine street 



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179 

Engine Company No. 23, Seventh street, above Xorris street. . 1 

Engrine Company No. 24, Twentieth and Fedei*al streets 1 

Engine Company No. 25, 1915-17 Adams street 1 

Engine Company No. 26, Tenth and Buttonwood streets 1 

Engine Company No. 27, 2202 Columbia avenue 1 

Engine Company No. 29, 1225 North Fourth street 1 

Engine Company No. 32, southeast corner Sixth and Locust 

streets- 1 

Engine Company No. 34, 1313 North Twenty-seventh street. . . 1 
Engine Company No. 35, Ridge avenue, above Midvale avenue. 1 
Engine Company No. 39, Leverington avenue, west of Ridge 

avenue, Roxborough I 

Engine Company No. 40, Sixty-fifth street and Woodland ave- 
nue 1 

Engine Company No. 41, Sixty-first and Thompson streets.... 1 

Engine Company No. 43, 2110 Market street 1 

Engine Company No. 45, northeast corner Twenty-sixth and 

York streets , 1 

Engine Company No. 46, southeast corner Otsego and Reed 

streets 1 

Engine Company No. 47, 3135 Gray's Ferry* road 1 

Engine Company No. 49, Snyder avenue, west of Fifteenth 

street 1 

Truck Company No. 1, 2132 Fairmount avenue 1 

Truck Company No. 2, Branch street, below Fourth street.... 1 

Truck Company No. 3, 2003 North Second street 1 

Truck Company No. 4, 319 Delanoey street 1 

Truck Company No. 5, Sixteenth street, below Fitzwater street 1 
Truck Company No. 6, northeast corner Haverford avenue and 

Preston street 1 

Truck Company No. 11, Twelfth street, below Wharton street. 1 

Chief of the Electrical Bureau, 610 City Hall 1 

Assistant Manager of the Electrical Bureau, 616 City Hall.... 1 

Bureau of City Property, 115 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Building Inspection, 313 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Boiler Inspection, 301 City Hall L 

Chief Clerk of the Department of Public Works. 212 City Hall. . 1 
Superintendent of Bridges, Highway Bureau, 238 City Hall. ... 1 

Bureau of Surveys, 416 City Hall 1 

Department of Health and Charities, 586 City Hall 1 

Bureau of Health, 712 City Hall 1 

Board of Public Education, 292 City Hall : 1 

City Controller, 146 City Hall 1 

City Solicitor, 476 City Hall 1 

Receiver of Taxes, 102 City Hall 1 



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180 

Board of Revision of Th,xes, 180 City Hall. . . 

City Treasurer, 143 City Hall 

Recorder of Deeds, 154 City Hall 

Register of Wills, 162A City Hall 

City Commissioners, 130 City Hall 

Sheriff's office, 485 City Hall 

Coroner's office, 604 City Hall 

District Attorney, 666 City Hall 

Judge McMichael, 277 City Hall 

Common Pleas No. 2, 258 City Hall 

Common Pleas No. 1, 244 City Hall 

Prothonotary, Common Pleas, 266 City Hall. 

Judge Willson, 442 Ciiy Hall 

CoDMnon Pleas No. 5, 658 City Hall 

Court of Quarter Sessions, 682 City Hall . . . 

Orphans' Court, 415 City Hall 

Supreme Court, 456 City Hall 



Inventory of Electrical Apparatus in the Various 
Police Districts Covered by Your Department. 

In connection with the Electrical Bureau installations in 
your police and fire stations, a complete inventory fol- 
lows : 

First District. 

1 100 ohm advance sig^nal bell and lightning arrest or cutout. 
1 police patrol chemical register. 

1 patrol stand, with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout and key. 

r pony relay and light. 

1 P. D. Bell 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 generator, with 1.000 ohm ringers to call stable 'phone. 

1 1,000 ohm exitension bell on 'phone line to Fifth and Nineteenth 

Districts. • 
1 protector board with : 

16 plush protectors. 

16 bottle fuses. I 



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181 

8 sneak fuses and carbon brick lightning arrestprs. 
8 two point ground switches. 
1 ten push button plate, with buttons connected as follows : 
1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Street Sergeant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the third floor cok)red men's bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the second story front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the second story sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor bedroom, to a bell. 

2 buttons not in service. 

■ 1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to a 

buzzer. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant, to a 

buzzer. 
1 four lever switch arranged to ring all bells and buzzers at one 

time. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 

Batteries, 
"21 bluestone cells on patrol talk wire. 
16 bluestone cells on patrol box wire. 

6 bluestone cells on police instrument local. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on house bells. 

9 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on extra battery. 



Second District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 police patrol chemical register.. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
^ small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 
1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 stable wire connected to stand. 

No. 1 signal. 

No. 13 signal. 

W. B. G. fuses on all wires. 



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182 

1 Bell P. I), 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter^ 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 

2 push buttons : 

1 to front bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to back bedroom, to a bell. 

1 generator with 1,000 ohm ringers. 

Batteries. 
14 blues tone cells on patrol box wire. 
21 bluest one cells on patrol talk wire. 
5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on house bells. 



Third District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 police patrol chemical register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board.. 

1 Bell P. D. !phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter,. 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
12 push buttons : 

1 to Truck No. 4. to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to patrol house, to a bell. 

1 to Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to Street Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to Street Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the roll room, to a buzzer. 

2 push buttons not in use. 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant* 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant. 



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Batteries, 



18 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
8 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Fourth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Shearing police patrol register with relay. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and seven 

two point lever switches. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and lamp. 
1 'phone line to stable on stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to Eiectrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1. Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter^ 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
1 protector board with : 
32 plush protectors. 
32 bottle fuses. 
16 carbon brick lightning arrestors and sneak fuse bases^ 

8 two point lever switches for ground tests. 

1 single pole, single throw knife blade switch to opett 
ground wire. 
1 60 watt motor generator to furnish current to jmtrol service, 

storage battery, annunciators and house bell equipment. 
1 Slate switch board panel with five double pole fused switches^ 

mounted thereon, with necessary impedence and overload 

protectors. 
18 cells B. T. type storage battery. 
9 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second story back, to a buzzer, 

1 to the front room, to a bell. 

1 to the back bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the patrol house, to two bells. 

1 not in service. 



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Fifth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrester cutout. 

1 police patrol chemical register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line on stand to First and Nineteenth Districts, 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
9 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a bell. ' 

1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the men's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second story back bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the third story front bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the third story middle bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the third story back bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the fourth floor, to a bell. 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant's room. 

2 dynamotors, 40 watt. 

3 double throw, double pole, 5 ampere knife blade switches. 
2 single throw, double pole, 5 ampere knife blade switches. 

10 W. B. G. fuse blocks and fuses. 



Sixth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and can- 

non switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact switch. 

1 front and back contact switch. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

1 four lever switch for connecting stand to Eighth and Twen- 
tieth Districts. 



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185 

1 two leveT switch to connect 'phone in Matron^s room to stand* 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 ten push button plate : 

1 to the back room, second floor, to a bell. 

1 to the back room, third floor, to a bell. 

1 to the cell room, to a bell. 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, second floor, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, third floor, to a buzzer. 

2 push buttons not in service. 

1 four lever switcin wired to ring all bells and buzzers. 
1 push button on patrol stand, to a bell in the patrol house. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant. 
1 % set telephone in the Matron's room. 
1 P. D. Bell *phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone *phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head *phone .and breast transmitter, 
connected to Keystone 'phone. 

Batteries. 

24 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
17 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 

6 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

6 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on extra battery. 



Seventh District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test- key;. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to the Eighth District. 

1 generator and 1,000 (Asa ringer. 

1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 



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186 

1 Western Electric double head *phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
1 extension Bell *phone to the Lieutenant. 
•6 push button plate: 

1 to the patrol house. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second story front room, to a bell. 

3 not connected. 
1 push button from the front door to the roll room, to a bell. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout on Nos. 14, 26, 3, 11 and 9 signal. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gronda type, on house bells. 
"16 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
16 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 



Eighth District, 

.1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 shearing register and relay. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and 

seven two point lever switches. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 four lever switch. 

'Phone wires to Seventh, Sixth and Twentieth Districts. 
1 protector board with 28 plush protectors, 28 bottle fuses, 14 

carbon brick lightning arrestors and sneak fuse bases, 6 

two point lever switches for ground test. 
1 60 watt motor generator to furnish current to patrol service, 

storage battery, annunciator and house bell equipment. 
1 slate switchboard panel with five double pole fused switches 

mounted thereon with necessary impedence and overload 

protectors. 
3.8 cells B. T. type storage battery. 
1 generator and JL,000 ohm ringer. 

1 P. D. Bell 'plume to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and transmitter, con- 
nected to the Keystone 'phone. 
r9 push buttons : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Matron, to a bell. 



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187 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second story back room, to a bell. 

1 to the third story front room, to a bell. 

1 to the store room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third story middle room, to a bell. 

1 to the third story back room, to a bell. 

Ninth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

.1 chemical police register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and lamp. 

1 'phone wire to Ninth Sub-station in stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
18 plush protectors and bottle fuses on both sides of the patrol 
box wires and the patrol talk wire. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 
connected with the Keystone 'phone with plug attachment. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone, pay station. 
6 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 
1 to the bedroom, second floor, to a bell. 
1 to the bedroom, second floor, to a bell. 
1 to the cell room, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeants, to 
a buzzer. 

Batteries, 
17 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
31 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
14 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. * 

Tenth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 
lever switch. 



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183 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 
1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key, 
1 lightning arrester, cutout and key, 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 'phone wire to patrol house on stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 P. D. Bell *phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone *phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head *phone and breast transmitter, 
connected to Keystone 'phone. 
Lightning arrestor cutouts on Nos. 3, 5, 9, 11, 14, 17 and 26 
signals. 
12 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeant No. 2, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants' sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cell room. 

1 to the second story back bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the second story front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the third story front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the third story back bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the third story sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeants, to 

a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeants, to a 
buzzer. 

Batteries. 

5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

8 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire^ , 

15 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. I 

Eleventh District. [ 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. ' i 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four | 

lever switch. I 

2 small galvanometers. I 



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I 



189 

i single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to stable on stand. 

1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

Lightning arrestor cutouts on Nos. 3, 7 and 20 signals. 
Loop on No. 5 signal arranged so it can be cut out with 
W. B. G. fuses. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
10 push button plate: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a Buzzer. 

1 to the second story bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the east second story bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the second story sitting room, to a bell. 

1 to the front second story bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the third story sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the west second story bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the cellar. • 

2 not connected. 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant. 

Batteries, 
5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
1 double pole, 15 ampere switch, to cut out fire signal wire, 
for purpose of test. 



Twelfth District, 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 shearing patrol register and relay. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to the patrol house connected to stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

14 



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190 

1 p. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Elect rict double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone with plug attachment. 
1 protector board with: 
28 plush protectors. 
28 bottle fuses. 

14 carbon brick lightning arrestors and sneak fuse bases, 
* 4 two point groun^ test lever switches. 
1 60 watt motor generator to furnish current to patrol service, 
storage battery, annunciators and house bell equipment, 
1 slate switchboard panel with five double pole fused switches 
mounted thereon with necessary impedence and overload 
protectors. 
18 cells B. T. type storage battery. 
9 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, io a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a bell. 

1 to the second floor, to a bell. 

1 to the third floor, to a bell. 

1 to the Special Officers, to a buzzer. 

1 to the basement. 

1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the roll*room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 



Thirteenth District. v 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four; 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 tvv^o contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. ^ 

1 pony relay and buzzer. 

1 'phone line to Sub-station and St. Timothy's Hospital on 

stand. 
1 'phone line to stable on stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 1,000 ohm extension bell. 

1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 



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191 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout on No. 27 signal. 
4 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
12 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
16 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



Thirteenth District SuhStation. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board.. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
1 Kellog 'phone to the Thirteenth District, Main Station. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Fourteenth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

2 chemical police patrol registers. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
4 small galvanometers. 

2 single contact keys. 

2 front and back contact keys. 

2 two contact ground test keys. 

2 lightning arrestors, cutouts and keys, 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to Fourteenth District Sub-station 



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192 

1 'phone line to Thirty-fifth District. 
1 *phone line to stable. 

Telephone jacks on Fourteenth District Sub-station, Thirty- 
fifth District, and stable wires to connect them to the 
patrol stand *phone. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Bell Exchange. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
1 protector board with 48 plush protectors, 48 bottle fuses, 24 
sneak fuses and carbon brick lightning arrestors, and 
seven two point ground test switches. 
1 double pole baby knife blade switch to open ground line. 
1 double pole baby knife blade switch to cut off No. 2 signal 

north. 
1 single blade, double throw baby knife blade switch to cut out 

police wire north. 
1 eight push button plate : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the patrol house, to a bell 
1 to the pool room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 to the second-story front, to a bell. 
1 to the third story front, to a bell. 
1 to the third story front, to a bell. ' 

1 to the cellar, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
6 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on' the house bells. 
27 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
18 bluestone cells on 1 patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on 1 patrol box wire. 



Fourteenth District Sub-Station, Chestnut Hill, 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
.1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Bell Exchange. 



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193 

1 Kellog 'phone to the Fourteenth Bistrict. 

Cutout lightning arrestors on Nos. 2 signal and 4 alarm wires. 
W. B. G. fuses on both sides of Nos. 2 signal and 4 alarm 
wires. Telephone to the Fourteenth Bistrict and police 
instrument wire. 
4 push buttons : - ' 

1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the back bedroom, to a bell. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Fifteenth^ District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell, carbon brick lightning arrestor, 

cutout and fuse. 
1 chemical police and patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and two lights. 

1 'phone wire to stable connected to stand. 

2 double pole, double throw knife blade switches, to transpose 

Birector Stearns' and House of Correction Bell 'phone 
wires. 
1 protector board with 54 plush protectors, 54 bottle fuses, 27 
sneak fuses, carbon brick lightning protectors, 33 two 
point ground test switches, 1 double pole single throw 
knife blade switch. 
1 P. B. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. B. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board* 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter,. 

connected to Keystone 'phone. 
1 twelve push button plate: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a bell. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the hallway, to a bell. 



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194 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the patrol house, wagon, to a bell. 
1 to the patrol house, bedroom, to a bell. 
5 not in service. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant, to a buzzer, in the Houstt 
Sergeant's room. 

Batteries. 

6 Leclanche cells, Gonda tj-pe, on the house bells. 
11 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 



Sixteenth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 
connected to the Keystone 'phone. 
Lightning arrestor cutouts on No. 6 fire 'phone. Xo. 4 signal, 
Xo. 6 signal, Xo. 10 signal, Xo. 2 alarm, Xo. 275 talk 
wire, Presbyterian Hospital 'phone wire, West Philadel- 
phia Survey. 
4 double pole knife blade switches, to cut off loops on wires 

running west. 
1 'phone line to stable connected to stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringers. 
1 eight push button plate : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cell room, to a bell. 

1 to the second floor dormitory, to a bell. 

1 to the third floor dormitory, to a bell. 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



195 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the patrol house, to a bell. 

1 extra push button on the patrol stand, to the bell in the 

patrol house. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
16 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 

2 double pole, 15 ampere knife blade switches, to cut out loops 

on fire signal wires for purposes of test. 



Seventeenth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 protector board with 28 plush protectory, 28 bottle fuses, 14 

sneak fuses and carbon brick lightning arrestors. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 extra four lever switch. 
1 'phone line on stand to patrol stable. 
1 'phone line on stand to Sub-station, 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

connected to the Keystone 'phone. 
€ push buttons : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a. buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the dormitory, to a bell, second floor. 

1 to the dormitory, second floor, to a bell. , 

1 to the cellar, to a bell. ^ ^ 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the house sergeant. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
14 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



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196 



Eighteenth District, 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrester cutout. 
1 chemical patrol register. 

1 patrol stand, transmitter, receiver, *phone hook and four 

lever svvritch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

Lightning arrestor cutouts on Nos. 20, 17, 7 and 11 signals. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Boards 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter,. 

connected with Keystone 'phone with plug attachment. 
6 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 

1 to the Matron's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the patrol house, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
18 bluestone cells on patrol box wire. 
18 bluestone cells on patrol talk wire. 



Nineteenth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout, 

1 shearing police patrol register. 

1 police stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 police patrol main line relay. 
1 slate switchboard panel with 5 fused switches and necessary 

resistances, impedence coils and overload protectors to 

operate patrol service and house bells. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 'phone line on stand to First and Fifth Districts. 



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197 

1 'phone line on stand to stable. 
1 generator and 1,000 oh^ ringers. 
1 1,000 ohm extension bell. 

1 protector board with 32 plush protectors, 32 bottle fuses, 
16 sneak fuses with carbon brick lightning arrestors and 
Ave two point ground test switches. 
10 push buttons mounted on a wooden plate: 
1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the third story front room, to a bell. 
1 to the third story back room, to a bell. 
1 to the third story middle room, to a bell. 
1 to the second story front room, to a buzzer, 
1 to the Sergeants' room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the basement, to a bell. 
1 to the cell room, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 

a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Matron's room to House Sergeant. 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board* 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone with breast transmitter, 

with plug attachment. 
1 60 watt dynomoter for furnishing current to police patrol,, 
police line locals and house bell equipment. 

Batteries. 
18 cells B. T. type storage battery on entire service. 



Tiventieth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 police stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 'phone line on stand to Sixth and Eighth Districts, and to 

the patrol house. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board* 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 



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198 

7 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a bell. . 

1 to the Sergeant, to a bell. 

1 to the Matron, to a bell. 

1 to the second story front room, to a bell. 

1 to the third story front room, to a bell. 

1 to the cell room, to a; buzzer. 

1 to the patrol house, to a bell. 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 

a buzzer. 

2 motor generators, 60 watts. 

3 double pole, double throw, 5 ampere, knife blade switches. 
2 single throw, double pole, 5 ampere, knife blade switches. 

10 W. B. G. fuse blocks and fuses. 



Twenty-first District, 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 shearing police register. 

1 main line patrol relay. , 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and seven 
two point lever switches. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and lamp. 

1 'phone line to stable and Thirty-eighth District. 

1 1,000 ohm generator. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 
with plug attachment. 

1 pi;otector board with 32 plush protectors, 32 bottle fuses, 16 
sneak fuses and carbon brick arrestors. 

5 two point ground switches. 

1 double pole, double throw switch to cut out Woodland ave- 
nue loop on police wire. 

1 double pole, double throw switch to cut out Woodland ave- 
nue loop on No. 6 joker. 

1 double throw switch to cut out Woodland avenue loop on No. 
2 alarm. 

3 lightning cutout arrestors on patrol line. 

1 60 watt motor generator to furnish current to patrol service, 
storage battery and annunciators, and house bell equip- 
ment. 

1 slate switchboard panel with five double pole fused switches 



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199 

mounted thereon, with necessary impedence coil, resist- 
ances and overload protectors for use in connection with 
motor generator and storage battery in patrol and house 
equipment. 
18 cells B. T. type storage battery on patrol and house bells. 
1 push .button, patrol stand to garage. 
1 push button, front door to House Sergeant. 
1 twelve point push button plate : 

1 Lieutenant, sitting room. 

1 Lieutenant, bedroom. 

1 Street Sergeant No. 1. 

1 Street Sergeant No. 2. 

1 Matron 

1 men's sitting room. 

1 men's cell room. 

1 women'te cell room. 

1 drill room. 

1 garage. 

1 front dormitory. 

1 back dormitory. 

And return to annunciator in House Sergeant's room. 

1 from Lieutenant. 

1 from Matron. 

1 from men's cell. 

1 from women's cell. 



Tiventy-second District, 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and carbon brick lightning ar- 

restor, cutout with mica fuse. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, *phone hook and four 

lever switch, 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key, 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and lamp. 

1 four lever switch. 

1 'phone line to stable on stand. 

1 'phone line to Thirty-ninth District Police Station on stand. 

1 'phone line to Lieutenant on* stand. 

1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 



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200 

1 1,000 ohm extension bell. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Boards 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
1 protector board with 50 plush protectors, 50 bottle fuses, 24 
sneak fuses and carbon brick protectors. 
17 two point lever switches for ground tests. 
1 double pole switch to open ground wire. 
1 double pole switch to cut out No. 16 signal north. 
10 push button plate : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cellar,- to a bell. 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeants' sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, third floor, to a bell. ' 

1 to the bedroom, third floor, to a bell. 

1 to the bedroom, second floor, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, second floor, to a buzzer. 

1 not connected. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
15 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 

19 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 

20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



Twenty-third District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 police patrol chemical register. 

1 police stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 protector board with 24 plush protectors, 24 bottle fuses, 12 

carbon brick arrestor s and sneak coils. 
4 two point ground switches. 

3 lightning arrestor cutouts on patrol box wire. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 'phone line to stable on stand. 
1 generator with 1,000 ohm ringer. 

.1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the *31ectrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



201 

"8 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant's bedroom, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Lieutenant's sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 

Batteries, 

6 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



T IV enty- fourth District. 

1 shearing register. 

1 police stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and seven 
two point lever switches. 

1 'phone line on stand to Bridesburg Sub-station. 

1 'phone line to stable on standi 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 AVestern Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 

1 protector board w^ith 36 plush protectors, 36 bottle fuses, 16 
sneak fuses and ground protectors. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell on police wire. 

1 60 watt generator to furnish current to patrol service stor- 
age batteries and annunciators and house bell equipment. 

1 slate switchboard panel with 5 double pole fused switches 
with necessary impedence coil, resistance and overload 
protector for use in connection with motor generator and 
storage battery in patrol and house equipment. 

1 push button to the bedroom, to a bell. 

1 push button to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 
18 cells B. T. type storage battery. 



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202 



Twenty-fourth District Sul>Station, Bridesburg. 

1 police instrument, relay and lightning arrester cutout. 
1 Bell P. Dt 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 

Lightning arrestor cutouts on Nos. 7 and 20 signals. 

W. B. G. fuses on Xo. 380 talk wire. 
1 push button . in the roll room to a bell in the back room, 

second floor. 
1 push button in the roll room to a bell in the first floor hall. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Twenty-fifth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 police stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to the Thirty-seventh District on stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
Lightning arrestors and cutouts on Nos. 13 and 15 signal 
wires. 
1 seven push button brass plate : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Lieutenant's room^ to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the roll room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the colored men's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 



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203 



Batteries. 



4 Leclanche cell§, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
18 Leolanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
11 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



Twenty-sixth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrester cutout. 
■ 1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 'phone line to patrol house on stand. 
1 generator and ^ 1,000 ohm ringer. 
Old style fuses, hard rubber back and under screws and 
washers. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
10 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a bell. 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a bell. 

1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 

1 to No. 1 bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to No. 2 bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the patrol house, to a bell. 

2 not connected. 

1 four drop annunciator ringing from 

1 Dauphin street door. 

2 Trenton avenue door. 

3 Matron's room. . 

4 Sergeant's room. 

1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 



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204 

Batteries. 

5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

7 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 

Twenty-seventh District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cntont. 
1 chemical police jMitrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to patrol house on stand. 

1 four lever switch. 

1 'phone line to Holmesburg Sub-station and Engine No. 36 on 
stand. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
Protectors on Director Stearns' Bell and Keystone 'phone 

line. 
Water Bureau wire and House of Correction wire. 

1 baby knife blade switch on police line to cut out line beyond 
station. 

1 single pole knife blade switch to cut out all above this sta- 
tion on Xo. 9 fire 'phone. 

1 single pole baby knife blade switch to cut out all above this 

station on Xo. 20 signal. 

2 double pole, double throw, 15 ampere knife blade switches to 

Director Stearns' Bell 'phone wire and the House of Cor- 
rection 'phone wire. 
1 protector board with 28 plush protectors, 27 bottle fuses and 
13 sneak fuses, carbon brick protectors. 
12 two point single lever STvitches and 1 single pole baby knife 

blade switch to open ground wire in it. 
6 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a bell. 



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206 

1 to the IJedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 
1 not connected. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
16 bluest one cells on the patrol box wire. 
22 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 

Twenty-seventh District Svh'Station, Holnieshurg. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Boards 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
Lightning arrestor cutouts on No. 20 signal, No. 9 joker and 
'phone to Twenty-seventh District and Engine Company 
No. 36. 
1 Kellog 'phone to Engine Company No. 36 and to the Twenty- 
seventh District Main Station. 
12 plush protectors, 3 not in service. 
15 bottle fuses, 4 not in service. 
4 push button plates: 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 
3 not connected. 

Batteries, 
3 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Twenty-eighth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrester cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two point contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and lamp. 

1 'phone wire to stable on patrol stand. 

15 



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206 

1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double h6ad 'phone and breast transmitter, 

with plug attachment. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout on No. 5 signal. 
10 plush protectors. 
1 bottle fuse. 

6 single lever ground test switches. 
5 push buttons: 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeant, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 

Batteries. 

4 dry cells on house bells. 
21 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
.20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



Twenty-ninth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. * 
"2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 
1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 'phone line on stand to patrol house. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

Porcelain base mica fuses on Nos. 6 and 10 signals, No. 2 

alarm box and talk wire. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
-5 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 



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207 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the mounted men's stable, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
11 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 

19 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
27 bluestone cells on the pa^ol talk wire. 

Thirtieth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor, key and cutout. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 'phone line to stable on stand. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone apd breast transmitter. 

5 push buttons. 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 to the front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the back bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer; 
1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cellar, to a bell. 
1 push button from the cell room to the House Sergeant, to a 

bell. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant, to a 

bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 

a buzzer. 
1 protector board with 32 plush protectors, 32 bottle fuses, 16 
carbon brick lightning protectors and sneak fuse bases, 
and four two point lever switches for ground test. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
22 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 

20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



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208 



Thirty-first District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrester cutout. • 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and 

cannon switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. * 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line on stand to patrol house. 

1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D: 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board, 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter^ 

with plug attachment. 
1 ten push button plate : ^ 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. ^ 

1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second floor bedroom, /to a bell. 

1 to the third floor bedroom, to a bell. 

1 to the cell room, to a bell. 

3 not connected. 
1 push button to the patrol house, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to- 

a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Sergeants to the House Sergeant, to 

a buzzer. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant, to a 
buzzer. 

Batteries. 
5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
14 bluestone cells on the police patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the police patrol talk wire. 

3 double pole, 15 ampere switches to cut out loops on fire 

service wires, for purpose of test. 



Thirty-second District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 



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209 

1 patrol stand, with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 lightning arrestor, key and cutout. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 *phone line to stable on stand. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 single pole switch to open police line. 
1 Bell P. B. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
Carbon brick lightning arrestor cutouts with mica fuses on 
both sides No. 4 signal, Philadelphia Yacht Club 'phone. 
No. 6 joker and No. 345 talk wire, and one side of No. 2 
alarm. 
1 push button and return buzzer to Engine Company No. 40. 
8 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant's bedroom, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Lieutenant's sitting room, to a bell. 
1 to the patrol house, to a bell. 
1 to the front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the back bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the Sergeant No. 1, to a bell. 
1 to the Sergeant No. 2, to a bell. 
1 to the Hostler's room, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to a 

buzzer. 
1 push button from the House Sergeant to the front hall, to a 
bell. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
10 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
18 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 



Thirty'third District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand, with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 
lever switch. 



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210 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 
1 front and back contact key. 
1 two contact ground test key. 
1 pony relay and light. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 'phone line to stable oh stand. 
1 generator with 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. B. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board* 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 
with plug attachment. 
11 push buttons: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second floor locker room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Street Sergeant's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Street Sergeant's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor locker room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor dormitory, to a bell. 

1 to the recreation room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the second floor dormitory, to a bell. 

1 to the Matron, to a bell. 

1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

8 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the extra battery. 
14 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
21 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



Thirty-fourth District, 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning^arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 stable wire on stand. 



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211 

1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 

1 ten push button plate: 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cell room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the third story front room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the third story back room, to a bell. 
1 to the second story front room, to a bell. 
1 to Engine Company No. 49, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 
1 push button to the patrol house, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Matron to the House Sergeant, to a 

buzzer. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to 

a buzzer. 
1 push button from the front door to the House Sergeant, to 
a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
17 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 



Thirty-fifth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line on stand to the Fourteenth District. 
1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 
1 protector board with S8 plush protectors, 28 bottle fuses, 14 

carbon brick lightning arrestors and sneak fuse bases, 4 two 

point ground test lever switches. 
1 60 watt motor generator to furnish current to patrol service,. 

storage batteries, annunciators and house bell equipment. 
1 slate switchboard panel with five double pole fused switches 

mounted thereon with necessary impedence coil, resistance 

and overload protectors. 



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212 

18 cells B. T. type storage battery. 
5 push buttons : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer, 
i to the stable, to a bell. 



Thirty-sixth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 
1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 
1 'phone line on stand to the Thirtieth District. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

with plug attachment. 
1 pony relay and lamp. 
1 1,000 ohm generator. 
1 protector board containing 22 plush protectors, 22 bottle fuses, 

li sneak fuses and carbon brick protectors. 
4 two point ground switches. 
1 double pole, double throw switch to cut out Nos. 16 signal 

north. 
1 single pole, double throw switch on police line to cut out 

York road loop. 
1 12 point push button plate : 

1 Lieutenant's sitting room.' 

1 Lieutenant's bedroom. 

1 Sergeants' bedroom. 

1 Sergeants' sitting room. 

1 Matron's sitting room. 

1 Matron's bedroom. 

1 men's sitting room. 

1 men's cell. room. 

1 women's cell room. 

1 drill room. 

1 garage. 

1 dormitory. 
Keturn on annunciator to House Sergeant: 

From Lieutenant. 



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213 

From Sergeant. 

From Matron. 

From men's cell room. 

Batteries. 

"20 blnestone cells on patrol box wire. 
"20 bluestone cells on patrol talk wire. 
5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on house bells. 



Thirty-seventh District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 'phone line on stand to the Twenty-fifth District. 

1 four lever switch. 

1 'phone line on stand to Engine Company Xo. 53. 

1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 

1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter, 

with plug attachment. 
1 pony relay and lamp. 
7 Western Electric intercommunicating sets of 'phones: 

1 to the House Sergeant's room. 

1 to the Lieutenant's room. 

1 in the men's cell room. 

1 in the drill room. 

1 in the women's cell room. 

1 in the Matron's room. 

1 in the patrol stable. 
14 25 ohm buzzers, connected as impedence coils on the inter- 
communicating system. " 
1 protector board, with 20 plush protectors, 20 bottle fuses, 10 
sneak fuses, carbon brick ground protectors and four sin- 
gle lever, two paint switches, for ground tests. 
1 12 push button plate : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a bell. 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a huzze^. 



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214 

1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants* bedroom, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Matron, to a buzzer. 
1 to the dormitory, to a bell. 
1 to the dormitory, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the cellar, to a buzzer. 
1 to the drill room, to a bell. 
1 to the basement, to a buzzer. 
* 1 to the patrol house, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
10 dry cells on the intercommunicating 'phone talk wire. 

8 dry cells on the interconamunicating *phone bell wire. 



Thirty-eighth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 chemical police patrol register. 

1 patrol stand with transmitter, receiver, 'phone hook and four 

lever switch. 

2 small galvanometers. 
1 single contact key. 

1 front and back contact key. 

1 two contact ground test key. 

1 lightning arrestor, cutout and key. 

1 pony relay and light. 

1 'phone line to patrol house on stand. 

1 generator and 1,000 ohm ringer. 

Lightning arrestor cutouts on No. 6 joker, No. 2 alarm,. 

police wire and fire talk wire. 
Two lever switches on No. 6 joker. No.. 2 alarm, police wire 
and fire talk wire, to cut off loops west on Woodland ave- 
nue. 
1 Bell P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
8 push buttons : 

1 to the Lieutenant, to a buzzer. 
1 to the roll room, to a bell. 
1 to the cell roanr, -to a buzzer. 



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215 

1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 
1 to the colored men*s bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the front bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the middle bedroom, to a bell. 
1 to the back bedroom, to a bell. 
1 push button from the Lieutenant to the House Sergeant, to a 
buzzer. 

Batteries. 

5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 
19 bluestone cells on the police patrol wire. 
24 bluestone cells on the police patrol talk wire. 



Thirty-ninth District. 

1 100 ohm advance signal bell and lightning arrestor cutout. 
1 protector board, with 44 plush protectors, 44 bottle fuses, 22 
carbon brick lightning arrestors and sneak fuses, 10 two 
point lever switches for ground test, 1 single pole baby 
knife blade block switch to open ground wires, one (1) 
single pole baby knife blade switch to cut out No. 27 single 
north. 
1 wall Kellogg 'phone to Twenty-second District Police Station, 
1 P. D. Bell 'phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board. 
1 P. D. Keystone *phone to the Electrical Bureau, Police Board* 
1 Western Electric double head 'phone and breast transmitter. 
5 push buttons: 

1 to the stable, to a bell. 
1 to the bedroom, to a buzzer. 
1 to the J)edroom, to a bell. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 
1 to the Sergeants, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 

20 bluestone cells on the patrol box wire. 
20 bluestone cells on the patrol talk wire. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 1 and Chemical No. 3. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 4^2 inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 s<ingle contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 



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216 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
4 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the District Engineer, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 brass floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Engine Company Xo, 2 and Chemical Xo. ^. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 4 push button plate: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 not in service. 

1 brass floor push button, to ring the bell in the bunk room. 

2 single pole baby knife blade switches on Xo. 14 signal. 
1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Engine Company Xo. S. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 push buttons*: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
The rigging to release the horses rings both bells. 

Batteries. 
4 dry cells to ring house bells. 



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217 



Engine Company No. Jf. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. ♦ 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
The rigging to release the horses rings the bell in the bunk 
room. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No, 5. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 push button to the Foreman, to a, buzzer. 

1 push button to a bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No, 6. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4l^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout, etc. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 



Engine Company No.' 7. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 



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218 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 
5 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman,to a buzzer. 

1 to the District Engineer, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the loft, to a buzzer. 
Brass floor push button rings all buzzers. 

Batteries, 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 8. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

4 push buttons : 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the Foreman's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 not in service. 
1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

The rigging rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
6 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No, 9 and Auxiliary Truck A. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone, 

5 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman of Engine Company, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Foreman of Truck Company, to a buzzer. 

1' to the bunk room, to a bell. 



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219 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the third floor, to a bell. 
The rigging works all bells and buzzers. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, to ring the house bells. 

Engine Company No. 10. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical ^ong. 

1 4^2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. . 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station *phone. 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
^ 1 to the bunk room, to a belj. 

Batteries, 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 11. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker ball. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 4 push button plate: 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the loft, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 12. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 4V2 inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 



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220 

1 lightning arrester cutout. 

1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
Brass floor push button to ring the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
3 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, to ritig the house bells. 



Engine Company No. IS. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4^2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station *phone. 

1 5 push button plate : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
* 1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 to the third story, to a bell. 
1 not connected. * 

Brass floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room, and 
an extra bell in the loft. 

2 plush protectors on Superintendent John M. Sparks* house 

'phone wire. 

Batteries. 
4 Xeclanche cells, Gonda type, to ring the house bells. 



Engine Company No. Uf, and Truck No. 15. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

1 push button to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 

2 dry cells. 



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2fi 



Engine Company No. 15. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4l^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 KeysrtoBe iraH 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 



Engine Company No. 16. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 4V^ inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 push buttons; 

1 to the Foreman, to a buazer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 17. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
14% inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone P. D. *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the bedroom, second story, to a bell. 
1 to the bedroom, third story, to a bell. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 18. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 414 inch umbrellfe- Joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

16 



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222 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
4 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the third floor, to a buzzer. 
1 brass floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
6 Leclanche ceils, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 19. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station *phone. 

1 push button to a bell in the bunk room. 

1 brass floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 20. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
1 push button to a buzzer on the second floor, and a buzzer on 
^ the third floor. 

The riggings ring the buzzers. 

Batteries, 
3 dry cells ring the buzzers. 



Engine Company No. 21. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 4^2 inch umbrella joker bell. 



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223 

1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrester cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
1 floor pu«h button to bell in the bunk room, and a bell in the 
Foreman's room. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 22. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 4 push button plate: 

1 to the yard, to a bell. 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the loft', to a buzzer. 
1 Keystone P. D. 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



^Engine Company No. 23. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4V^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

4 push buttons. 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room* to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



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2U 

Engine Company No^ 2i, 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 
li aingle^ contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the, ^^oreBoan, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 25. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 brass floor pn«|i button rin^s the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries. 

4 dry cells on the ]|,ouse bells. 



Engine Company No. 26. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4V2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact^ key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Kellogg wall *phone to the Eighth District. 



Engine Company No. 27. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
14% inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact, k«y. 



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225 

1 lightning arrester cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Burdau. 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 to the District Engineer, to a buzzer. 
Brass floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 28. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Burtau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 29, Truck No. 7 and Chemical. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

2 4^2 inch umbrella joker bells. 
1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the District Engineer, to a bell. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



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226 



Engine Ctympany No. SO. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4V^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

5 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the District Engineer, to a bell. 

1 to the third floor, to a bell. 

1 not connected. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, qtl the house bells. 



Engine Company No. SI. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 



Engine Company No. S2 and Chemical No. 1. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

2 4*4 inch umbrella joker bells. 
1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the District Engineer, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 to the loft, to a buzzer. 
Brass floor push button rings all bells. 

Batteries, 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



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227 



Engine Company No. 33. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. * 

i single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 



Engine Company No, 8^. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4^2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 36. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4V^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

2 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 36. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 41/^ inch umbrella joker bell. 



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228 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrester -cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 plush protectors. 

1 Kellogg wall 'phone to the Twenty-seventh District, and the 

Twenty-seventh District Sub-station. 

2 double pole knife blade switches on the alarm wire to cut off 

loop running to the Water Company. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
5 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 87. 

1 15 inch electro jnechanieal gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

2 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
The rigging works the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 88. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 



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229 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 
1 to the Bitting room, to a buzzer. 
A floor push button rings the bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 39. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. • 

1 4% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

i lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No, JfO. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

4 ^ush buttons : 

1 to the Thirty-second District, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Foreman, to a bell. 

2 push buttons to the bunk room, to a bell. ^ 

1 push button from the Thirty-second District, to a buzzer. 
Brass floor push button rings all bells. 

% 
Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. Jfl. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 4% inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



1 lightning arrester cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau* 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 



Engine Company No. J^2. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau* 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 



Engine Company No. J^S, Truck No. 9 and Water Tower^ 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

2 4l^ inch umbrella joker bells. 
1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Assistant Chief, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to ring bell in Assistant Chief's room; a bell in the- 

Foreman's room; a bell in the bunk room, and a bell 

in the third story. 
Also worked by the electric light switch. 

Batteries, 

4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Engine ConHpany No. Jflf. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 floor push button, operating: 

Buzzer to Foreman. 

Bell to dormitory. 



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231 

Buzzer to loft. 

Buzzer to sitting room. 

Bell to outbuilding. 

Batteries, ^ 

4 Leclanehe cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. Jf5. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4*4 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

6 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a belL- 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanehe cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. Jf6. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 41/^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone well 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 brass floor push button, to a bell in the bunk room. 

Batteries, 

2 dry cells on bell to bunk room. 



Engine Company No. 1^7. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 private 'phone to Harrison Brothers. 



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232 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 1^8. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries, 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. J^9. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a blizzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
3 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Engine Company No. 50 and Truck No. 12. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
14% inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor cutout. 



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233 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
5 push buttons: 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the Foreman of Engine Company, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Foreman of Truck Company, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor, to a bell. 
1 floor push button rings all the bells and buzzers. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Engine Company No. 51. 
1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 
1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 
1 single contact key. 
1 lightning arrestor key and cutout. 
1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 
1 Bell wall pay station 'phone, 
4 push buttons. 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor, to a bell. 
1 brass floor push* button rings all bells and buzzers. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Engine Company No. 52. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4V^ inch umbrella joker bell, 

1 lightning arrestor key and cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Blectrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

4 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the loft, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



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234 



Engine Company Xo. 53, 

1 15 LDch electro mechanical goii^.< _ 

1 41^ LDch umbrella joker belL 

1 sin^e contact key. 

1 lightning- arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bnrean. 

1 KeU<^ wall 'phone to the Thirty-seTcnth District Police Station. 

1 4 posh button plate: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting^ room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a belL 

1 to the hay loft, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche <?ells^ Gonda type, on the house bellsL 



Engine Comffiny Xo. -54- 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong-. 

1 4»2 inch umbrella joker belL 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Klectrical Bureau. 

1 4 push button plate: 

1 to the Foreman, to a belL 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a belL 

1 to the hay loft, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 drr cells on the house -bells;. 



EnK^ine Corn puny Xo. oo. 



1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 4 '2 inch umbrella joker belL 

1 sing-le ct^ntact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout- 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station "phone. 



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235 

1 floor push operating : 

Buzzer to Foreman. 
Bell to dormitory. 
Buzzer to sitting room. 
Bell to loft. 

Truck No. 1. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 4 push button plate : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the hay loft, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 

Truclc No. 2. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong: 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 P. D. Keystone 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

4 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor, to a buzzer. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

Truck No. S. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 



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S96 



Truck No. 4. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone ta the Electrical Bureau. 

5 push buttons : 

1 to the District Engineer, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the tMrd floor, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 push button from the Third Police District, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Truclc No. 5. 

1 15 inch electro mechan&al gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

3 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bedroom, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
3 dry cells on the house bells. 



Truck No. 6. 

1 15 inch electro mechanieal gong. 

1 41/2 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 



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237 

3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the District Engineer, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
3 Leclanche cells; Gonda type, on the hoiise' bells. 



Truck No. 8. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong; 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall* *phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

4 push buttons : 

1 to the District EJngineer's room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the Foreman, to a. buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

Batteries. 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Truck No. 10. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout.- 

1 Keystone wall.'phoUe to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

3 push buttons : 

1 to the ;Forfehia^n» to a buzzeTr. 
1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 
1 to the bunk room, to a beH. 
Floor push button rings bell in the biink room. 

Batteries. 

4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 

17 



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238 



Truck No. 11.^ 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

4 push buttons : 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell, and to a bell and buzzer, in 
the cellar. 

1 to the third floor, to a buzzer. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Truck No. IS. 

1 15 inch electro mechanical gong. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau./ 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

4 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bed room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

1 to the third floor, to a buzzer, 
1 4 lever switch rings all bells and buzzers. 

Batteries, 
4 Leclanche cells, Gonda type, on the house bells. 



Chemical Engine Company No, B. 

1 4^^ inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

1 cutout lightning arrestor of No. 20 sigpial. 



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239 

2 push buttons: 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 
4 dry cells on the house bells. 



Chemical Engine Company No, 6. 

1 414 inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 single contact key. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

1 Bell wall pay station 'phone. 

1 Kellog wall 'phone to the Twenty-seventh Police District 

Sub-station. 
3 push buttons: 

1 to the Foreman, to a buzzer. 

1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the sitting room, to a buzzer. 

Batteries, 
3 dry cells on the house bells. 



Chemical Engine Company No. 7. 

1 8 inch electro mechanical gong. 

14% inch umbrella joker bell. 

1 lightning arrestor cutout. 

1 Keystone wall 'phone to the Electrical Bureau. 

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1 to the bunk room, to a bell. 

1 to the loft, to a bell. 

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Digitized by Vj OOQ IC 



257 



Synopsis of Wagon Culls during 1910. 



Months. 



a 
o 
S 



a 



a 
a 






S 

e 



I* 
-1 

a 
o 
Q 



1 


a 


g 


^ 


53 




S 


08 


i 


S 



January 

February 

March 

April : 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



2,914 
3,282 
4,100 
4,016 
4,285 
4,020 
4,469 
4,851 
4,209 
3,907 
3,601 
4,010 



1,061 
992 
1,149 
1,170 
1,142 
1,158 
1,318 
1,296 
1,262 
1,114 
1,193 
1,359 



142 

126 

122 

106 

111 

79 

129 

77 

79 

93 

119 

168 



1,258 
1,856 
2,424 
1,781 
1,451 
1,430 
1,448 
1,451 
1,597 
1,660 
1,498 
1,425 



5,370 

6,256 

7,795 

7,078 

6,969 

6,682 

7,364 

7,177 . 

7,147 

6,764 

6.411 

6,962 



47,164 



14,211 



1,351 



19,264 



81,990 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



258 



Summary of Operations of the Fire Alarm Telegraph 
during the year 1910 



Montbl. 






I 



I 



a 

S3 



5 



I 



P 
gg 



11 

la 



January.. 

Pebruflry 

March 

April - - 

May 

Jun^ * 

July 

August—- 

September 

October 

November 

December 



70 
54 
62 
56 
47 
80 
54 
36 
50 



74 
80 

08 
6T 
02 
68 

84 



66 
68 
97 



Totals 



719 



12 



28 



804 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



269 





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260 
Showing the Number of Alarms from each Box during 1910. 



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s 

< 




u 

< 




< 




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g 

< 


I 


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i 


a 

< 




00 


5 




84 


1 


231 




847 




458 


1 


546 


1 


691 




7 




85 


1 


282 




849 




461 


1 


547 


2 


698 




9 




86 


1 


238 




854 




. 462 


2 


554 


1 


694 




12 




89 


1 


284 




858 




468 


1 


556 


1 


699 




18 




91 


2 


286 




861 




465 


2 


558 


1 


718 




14 




92 


2 


287 




862 




468 


1 


559 


4 


716 




15 




98 


8 


289 




868 




469 


2 


562- 


1 


722 




18 




121 




242 




871 




471 


2 


668 


8 


724 




19 




122 




248 




878 




474 


2 


571 


2 


729 




21 




124 




246 




874 




477 


1 


578 


1 


785 




28 




128 




251 




875 




479 


2 


575 


2 


786 




24 




129 




252 




881 




482 


1 


579 


1 


741 




25 




131 




254 




382 




488 


8 


581 


1 


764 




26 




186 




259 




888 




485 


1 


588 


1 


7o€l 




27 




141 




261 




886 




492 


2 


585 


1 


757 




28 




144 




264 




387 




495 


1 


586 


1 


758 




29 




145 




265 




891 




496 


8 


598 


1 


761 




85 




168 




266 




892 




496 


2 


618 


8 


765 




86 




156 




272 




898 




499 


1 


628 


2 


767 




87 




167 




277 




397 




518 


1 


687 


1 


769 




89 




171 




288 




898 




514 


2 


646 


2 


772 




41 




116 




284 




412 




515 


1 


649 


1 


775 




42 




175 




292 




418 




516 


1 


656 


2 


779 




48 




176 




294 




417 




519 


1 


657 


1 


781 




46 




179 




297 




418 




521 


8 


658 


1 


785 




48 


2 


188 




299 


1 


419 




528 


1 


661 


1 


787 




52 


8 


185 




812 


1 1 


421 




525 


1 


664 


2 


791 




58 


2 


187 




817 




424 




581 


2 


665 


1 


794 




54 


1 


191 




818 




427 


2 


582 


1 


667 


1 


799 




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2 


215 




819 


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429 


8 


585 


2 


668 


1 


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57 


1 


218 




821 




481 


2 


586 


2 


669 


3 


816 




58 


1 


221 




825 




488 


1 


587 


4 


676 


2 


819 




69 


1 


228 




826 




484 


2 


539 


1 


677 


1 


822 




78 


2 


224 




881 




442 


5 


541 


1 


678 


1 


829 




76 


1 


225 




842 




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1 


542 


2 


681 


8 


888 




82 


2 


227 




848 




449 


2 


548 


1 


686 


1 


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83 


4 


228 




844 


2 1 


452 


1 


545 


5 


689 


1 


847 


2 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



261 





Showing 


the Number oj^ Alarms, etc. — Continued. 






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1788 




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1827 




2249 


1 


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1217 




1416 


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1882 




2251 


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2581 




876 




1226 




1417 


1 


1664 




1844 




2256 


1 


2586 




«76 




1228 




1418 


1 


1657 




1861 




2257 


1 


2594 




879 




1229 




1419 


1 


1568 




1868 




2264 


1 


2622 




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2 


1559 




1861 




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1 


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886 




1282 




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1 


1579 




1865 




2277 


2 


2634 




«89 




1243 




1428 


1 


1586 




1874 


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2281 


1 


2687 




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1424 


3 


1588 




1912 




2282 


1 


2638 




■808 




1251 




1425 


2 


1591 




1918 




22.S4 


2 


2643 




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1266 




1426 


2 


1592 


2: 


1917 




2285 


1 


2645 




«18 




1266 




1481 


2 


1594 


1 


1922 




2238 


3 


2668 


1 


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1267 




1433 


2 


1596 


2 


1923 




2291 


3 


2669 




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1287 




1434 


1 


1597 


2 


1929 




2355 


1 


2678 




«18 




1289 




1489 


1 


1599 


2 


1935 




2856 


1 


2685 




•921 




1291 




1446 


1 


1617 


1 


1987 




2866 


2 


2698 




»22- 




1296 




1448 


3 


1621 


2 


1945 




2866 


1 


2712 




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1299 


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1449 


2 


1622 


'1 


1952 




1 2882 


1 


2735 




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1812 




1458 


1 


1625 




1957 




2384 


2 


2742 




988 




1815 




1454 


2 


1628 




1965 




2301 


1 


8118 




-989 




1819 




1456 


4 


1652 




1967 




2898 


1 


8135 




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1321 




1458 


1 


1664 




1974 




2399 


2 


3139 




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1826 




1459 


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1657 




2116 




2414 


1 


3143 




1M6 




1831 




1468 


1 


1677 




2127 




2419 


1 


3154 




"951 




1839 




1467 


1 


1686 




2188 




2484 


1 


8164 




-966 




1868 




1476 


1 


1725 




2184 




2487 


2 


8168 




1»67 




1876 




1478 


1 


1761 




2185 




2464 


2 


3174 




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1876 




1483 


2 


1762 




2158 




2476 


1 


8192 




•964 




1879 




1486 


1 


1755 




2168 




2486 


1 


8214 




968 




1887 




1491 


1 


1756 




2164 




2487 


1 


3252 




-969 




1888 




1494 


1 


1759 




2188 




2612 


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8266 




■971 




1891 




1512 


1- 


1761 




2186 




2513 


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3268 




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1517 


1 


1766 




2217 




2519 


8 


3276 




•974 




1894 




1518 


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1767 




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2526 


3 


3286 




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1398 




1625 


1 


1771 




2281 


2 


2588 


1 


8291 




987 




1399 


2 


1531 


2 


1778 




2282 


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2589 


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Digitized by VjOOQiC 



264 



Number of Electric Lights Authorized in Each Ward, To- 
gether With the Number of Free Lights, December 31, 
1909. 



Wards. 



II 



Underground. 



s 



■3 



First _- 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth -■ 

Sixth 

Seventh . 

Eighth 

Ninth - 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 

Thirteenth 

Fourteenth 

Fifteenth 

Sixteenth 

Seventeenth 

Eighteenth 

Nineteenth... 

Twentieth 

Twenty-flrst 

Twenty-second . 

Twenty-third 

Twenty-fourth 

Twenty-flfth ^ 

Twenty-sixth— 

Twenty-seventh ,. 



188 
188 
164 
158 

66 

66 
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82 
102 

84 
128 
140 
144 
186 
218 
156 
144 
318 
478 
381 
310 
419 
835 
374 
200 
276 
242 -. 



34 



10 
12 
35 
46 
14 
16 

15 
49 
184 

8 



30 



70 



11 

1 

1 

190 

253 

145 

314 

828 

189 

4 

8 

7 

9 

34 

12 

16 

1 

40 



196 
221 
190 
162 
256 
829 
801 
431 
476 
287 
148 
148 
166 
244 
886 
176 
169 
819 
513 
439 
310 
419 
835 
406 
200 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



266 



Number of Electric Lights — Continued. 



Wards. 



Twenty-eighth 

Twenty-ninth 

Thirtieth 

Thirty-first 

Thirty-second 

Thirty-third 

Thirty-fourth 

Thirty-fifth 

Thirty-sixth 

Thirty-seventh- 

Thirty-eighth 

Thirty-ninth 

fortieth 

Forty-first 

Forty-second 

Forty-third 

Forty-lourth 

Forty-fifth 

Forty-sixth 

Forty-seventh 

Gray's Ferry Bridge 

CaUowhUl Street Bridge 

Market Street Bridge 

Chestnut Street Bridge 

Wahiut Street Bridge 

Girard Avenue Bridge 

South Street Bridge 

Falls of Schuylkill Bridge 

Penrose Ferry Bridge 



287 
77 
245 
361 
284 
203 
891 
815 
296 
196 
277 
229 
238 
306 
172 
173 
164 
166 
227 
231 



13 



Underground. 



s 

^ 



o 



57 



21 



.a 

o 

a 
O 



12 



s 

o 



180 



351 



206 



817 



298 



306 

172 

177 

164 

166 

227 

231 

12 

18 

4 

4 

21 

4 

12 

. 7 

6 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



266 



Number of EUdric Lights 


—Continued'. 






5 


Underground. 


5 




i 

Wards. 


1 

§ 


1 


'i 

s 

5 


IValnut Lane Bridge 

Porty-sccotid Street Bridge 

Chestnut Street Pier 

Arch Street Pier. - 

Bace Street Pier 


2 
8 


19 
17 


6 


8 
4 

19 
8 

17 




Totals 


10,518 


856 


1,718 





13,082 


GIRARD ESTATE LIGHTS. 
Tront street, from Vine to South street- 
Delaware ave . from Vine to South street 








88 
24 


24 
38 
24 




Tiers and miscellaneous 









Total Girard Estate lights 






86 





80 










PRISE LIGHTS. 
Oheltenham Elec. Light and Power Co.. 
Diamond Electric Company 

Germantown Electric Light Company 

"Manufacturers' Electric Company 

Northern Electric Light and Power Co 

Powelton Electric ComoanF _ - 


5 

9 

5 

2S 

9 

10 

10 

5 

16 

10 


1 


1 
1 


6 
10 

6 

24 
10 
10 
10 

5 
16 
10 

8 




Southern Electric Light and Power Co — 
Suburban Electric Company _ 










"West End Electric Company 

Kensington Electric Company.. - — 











3 




Peoples' Trac. Co. (Girard ave. Bridge). 




Total free lights 


101 


1 


5 




107 


Grand, total 













13,285 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



267 



Number of Miles of Overhead and Underground Wires. 


Overhead wires. 


§ 


§ 

ii 


§2 

^? 

•H «a 
„ 

III 




. 


1^ 


si 

9 


"3 

1 


American IMstrict Telegraph Company 


6.68 


4.08 


165.90 


176.56 


American Telegraph and Telephone Co 




442.12 


4.50 


. 446.62 


Atlantic Refining Company 


4.60 


9.60 


1.00 


16.00 


Auxiliary Fire Alarm Co. of Philad'a. 


1.66 


.94 


.51 


8.01 


Bell Telephone Company _ 





1,291.27 


2,030.88 


3,322.16 


Girard Point Storage Company 


5.00 






5.00 


Harrison Brothers & Company 


2.50 


2.00 


_^, . 


4.56 


Holmesburg, Taconv and Frankford 
Electric Railway Company 




50.55 




60 65 


Holmes Electric Protective Company- 


_ 


25.30 


26.80 


Keystone Telephone Comply 


67.50 


705.16 


163.00 


935.66 


New York News Bureau 


12.60 
3.68 


97.50 
43.90 


4.30 

.81 


114.40 


Pennsylvania Railroad Company 


48.34 


Philadelphia Electric Company 


484.30 


4,130.50 




4,564.80 


Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company 




688.30 




638. ?0 


Philadelphia, Reading and Pottsville 
Telegraph Company 


.2(7 


7.60 


.18 


8.05 


Philadelphia Local Telegraph Co 


12.69 


43.91 


210.47 


267.07 


Pneumatic Plre Alarm Telegraph Co_- 


yw 


.13 


20.00 


21.32 


Postal Telegraph Cable Company — * 


.40 


148.48 


192.92 


336.80 


Roxborough» Chestnut HiU and Nor- 
Tistown Railway Company 




50.20 





50.20 


Southwestern Street Railway Co., 


^ 


25.25 


^ — 


25.?5 


United Gasj Trnprovem^t Company — 


•^5.25 


3.50 




18.76 






Western Union Telegraph Company — 


20.20 


1,745.51 


106.80 


1,872.61 


ipotals 


588.17 


9,435.40 


2,926.57 


12,960.14 






Cltv wires : 








1,881.00 












Tot^l ovprhf^ftd wIrPH 








14,831 14 








1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



268 



Number of Miles of Overhead and Underground Wires. 



Underground wires. 



s 






•IS 



r 



American Telegraph and Telephone 
Company 



BeU Telephone Company 

Edison Electric Light Company 

Girard Estate 

Holmes Electric Protective Company 

Keystone Telephone Company 

New York News Bureau 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 

Philadelphia Electric Company 

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co 

Philadelphia, Reading and PottsviUe 
Telegraph Company 



4,747.00 
348,170.17 



187.07 
16.06 



663.50 
,026.89 



Pneumatic Tire Alarm Telegraph Co. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Company- 
Western Union Telegraph Company- 
City 



53.27 



326.12 

89,639.06 

17.10 

128.78 



8.36 

21.13 

500.90 

2,717.44 

4,602.62 



4,747.00 

348,170.17 

187.07 

16.06 

325.12 

89,639.06 

17.10 

123.78 

663.50 

1,026.89 

8.36 

21.13 

600.90 

2,717.44 

4,555.89 



Total underground wires 



1,936.79 



460,772.68 



452,709.47 



Total overhead and underground 
wires 



467,640.61 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



26« 



Summary of Underground Conduits, 



American Telegraph and Telephone Company. 

Bell Telephone Company 

Olrard Estate 

Keystone Telephone Company 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 

Philadelphia, Reading and Pottsville Tele- 
graph Company 

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company 

Philadelphia Electric Company 

Pneumatic Transit Company 

City 

. Total - - 



2,792,706 

30,179 

1,563,516 

423 

1,301 

1,260,118 

535,709 

99,184 

502,044 



,940,884 
,004,961 
163,957 
,915,388 
8,210 

3,471 

,898,964 

688,865 

304,715 

3,655,686 



20, 



867.59 

2,084.27 

31.05 

2,256.70 

.60 

.65 

3,958.14 

130.46 

57.71 

692.36 



7,049,316 



50,580,121 



9,579.53 



19 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



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