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Full text of "Annual Report of the Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind"

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CHILDREN OF THE SILENT NIGHT 

Juanita, who has been at Perkins in the Deaf-Blind Department for eight 
years, has taken a motherly interest in little Barbara, a new pupil this year. 



One Hundred and Seventeenth 
Annual Report 

of 

Perkins Institution 

and 

Massachusetts School 
for the Blind 

Incorporated March 2, 1829 




1948 



Offices of Administration, and Schools 
Watertown 72, Mass. 



THE WORKSHOP THE TREASURER 

549 E. Fourth Street 75 Federal Street 

South Boston 27, Mass. Boston 10. Mass. 



A) 



CONTENTS 

Calendar 4 

History 5 

Past Officers 6 

Officers of the Corporation 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Upper School Staff 9 

Lower School Staff 10 

Members of the Corporation 11 

Proceedings of the Corporation 13 

Report of the Trustees 15 

Report of the Director 17 

Report of the Ophthalmologist 46 

Report of the Physician 47 

Report of the Dentists 48 

Workshop for Adults 50 

Howe Memorial Press 51 

List of Pupils 52 

Acknowledgments 55 

Statement of Accounts . 58 

Contributors to the Deaf-Blind Fund 71 

Form of Bequest 81 



PERKINS CALENDAR 1948 - 49 



September 



October 



November 



December 



January 

February 

March 
April 

May 
June 

September 



13. Staff Meeting „ „ ,t ^• 

14 Pupils return after Summer Vacation 

14*. Stated Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

15. School begins , ^ „ ,, ^ v 

20. Matrons' Meetmg (All Matrons) 

11. Staff Meeting 

12 Executive Committee Meeting 

13* Staff Reception in Director's Residence 

is! Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 

1. Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

S. Staff Meeting 

9 Executive Committee Meeting 

15*. Matrons' Meeting (Girls' Upper School) 

25-28. Thanksgiving Week-end 

12. Christmas Concert 

13. Staff Meeting ,„ , tt c T,^^n 

13. Matrons' Meeting (Boys' Upper School) 
13*. Cottage Christmas Parties 

14. Christmas Concert , . m 4. «» 
14. Stated Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

16. Christmas Concert 

17. Beginning Christmas Vacation 

3. Pupils and Staff return from vacation 
4.' School begins 

10. Staff Meeting 

11 Executive Committee Meeting 

17. Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 
8, Executive Committee Meeting 

14*. Staff Meeting o i, i\ 

21 Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 

22. Washington's Birthday holiday 

8. Stated Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

14. Staff Meeting ,^. , , tt o i, ^n 

21. Matrons' Meeting (Girls' Upper School) 

4. Staff Meeting , 

8. Pupils leave for vacation after classes 
12* Executive Committee Meeting 
18* Pupils return from Easter Vacation 

18. Matrons' Meeting (Boys' Upper School) 

19. School begins 

9. Staff Meeting 
10 Executive Committee Meeting 
16. Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 
30, Memorial Day holiday 

4. Alumnae Day 

11. Alumni Day 

U. iSfed^MeSfng of the Board of Trustees 
16. Graduation Day 

12. Staff Meeting _ , « m 4. ^c 

13. Stated Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

13. Pupils return from vacation 

14. School begins 



PERKINS INSTITUTION 

HISTORY 

IN 1826 Dr. John D. Fisher returned to Boston from Paris resolved to provide for 
the blind of Massachusetts the same care afforded them in France. Enlisting 
the aid of friends, a committee was formed and upon petition to the Legislature 
an Act of Incorporation was granted on March 2, 1829. establishing "The New England 
Asylum for the Blind," the first school in America for those without sight. In 1831 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, just returned from participation in the Greek wars, was 
elected the first director, and in August, 1832, the first classes were held in the house 
of Dr. Howe's father on Pleasant Street. 

During the early years Col. Thomas H. Perkins became interested in the little 
school and gave for its use his large house on Pearl Street. The need for larger quarters 
was soon apparent, and in 1839 the great hotel in South Boston was purchased. This 
purchase was made possible by the assent of Colonel Perkins to the sale of the house 
that he had given to the School. Because of this magnanimous attitude of Colonel 
Perkins the Trustees renamed the school "Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
Asylum for the Blind." This name was changed in 1877 to the present name, "Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind." 

Dr. Howe directed the growing work of Pericins Institution for forty years and 
was succeeded in 1876 by his Greek proteg^ and son-in-law. Michael Anagnos. Mr. 
Anagnos created the Howe Memorial Press for publishing embossed books and for 
the manufacture of appliances for education of the blind. In 1887 he founded the 
Kindergarten in Jamaica Plain, the first school in the world for little blind children. 
After thirty years of leadership Mr. Anagnos died in Rumania in 1906. 

In 1907 the directorship of Perkins Institution feU to Edward E. AUen, head of 
the school for the blind in Philadelphia, where he had just rebuilt the school plant 
on a garden site outside of the city. Coming to Boston, Mr. Allen began plans for 
a new Perkins, and in 1912 the Institution and in 1913 the Kindergarten were housed 
in the beautiful new plant at Watertown. These buildings, situated on an old estate 
of thirty-four acres on the banks of the Charles River, have school and residence 
facilities for nearly three hundred pupils. Dr. Allen retired in 1931. His last ofBcial 
act was to write the one hundredth annual report. Thus for a century Perkins Institu- 
tion had but three directors. 

PURPOSE 

Perkins Institution provides for the visually handicapped youth of New England 
full educational opportunity from Kindergarten through High School. The content 
of instruction corresponds with that offered to seeing boys and girls in the public 
schools. The methods of instruction of necessity differ. Principal differences^ are 
that embossed books take the place of ink print, and studies are taught objectively. 
In the adaptation and invention of means of instructing the blind. Perkins has been 
a pioneer through its century of existence. Much attention is paid to physical and 
manual training and to music. Opportunity is provided for those qualified to pursue 
higher studies or take advanced work in music and vocational fields. 

Boys and girls without sight or with insufficient sight to read ink-print are ad- 
mitted as pupils, if capable of education and in good health. While at the school pupils 
reside in cottages where the teachers also live, and through this association they acquire 
that unconscious tuition which is such an important part of the program of socializa- 
tion. The primary aim of Perkins Institution is to qualify its visually handicapped 
pupils to take contributory places in normal life. New pupils are admitted in September 
and February, and aU pupils must return to their homes for the short vacations at 
Christmas and Easter and for the long vacation in the summer. 



PAST OFFICERS 



PRESIDENTS 



1830-1837, Jonathan Phillips 
1838-1839, Samuel Appleton 
1840-1846, Peter C. Brooks 
1847-1854, Richard Fletcher 
1855-1861, Edward Brooks 
1861-1869, Samuel May 



1870-1871, Martin Brimmer 
1872-1897, Samuel Eliot 
1898-1930, Francis H. Appleton 
1930-1946, Robert H. Hallowell 
1946- Reginald Fitz, M.D. 



1830-1834, 
1835-1846, 
1847-1850, 
1851-1852, 
1852-1866, 
1867-1870, 
1871-1892, 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 

William Calhoun 1893-1896, George Hale 



Thomas H. Perkins 
Edward Brooks 
John D. Fisher 
Stephen Fairbanks 
Joseph Lyman 
John Cummings 



1897-1911, Amory a. Lawrence 
1912-1913, N. P. Hallowell 
1914-1921, George H. Richards 
1922-1929, William L. Richardson 
1930-1946, G. Peabody Gardner 
1946- Ralph Lowell 



1830-1839, Richard Tucker 
1840-1846, Peter R. Dalton 
1847-1861, Thomas B. Wales 
1862-1868, William Claplin 
1869-1872, William Endicott 
1873-1879, Henry Endicott 



TREASURERS 

1881-1902, Edward Jackson 
1903-1904, Patrick T. Jackson 
1904-1916, William Endicott 
1917-1935, Albert Thorndike 
1935-1945, Roger Amory 
1945- John P. Chase 



1880-1881, Patrick T. Jackson 

SECRETARIES AND DIRECTORS 
1831-1876, Samuel Gridley Howe 1907-1931, Edward E. Allen 
1876-1906, Michael Anagnos 1931- 



Gabriel Farrell 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

1948-1949 

PRESIDENT 
Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

VICE-PRESIDENT TREASURER 

Ralph Lowell John P. Chase 

SECRETARY ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Gabriel Farrell Howard Whitmore, Jr. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Mrs. Frederick W, Campbell* Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. 

David Cheever, Jr. Daniel J. Lyne* 

Rev. John J. Connolly* Warren Motley 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Richard Saltonstall 

Reginald Fitz, M.D. Cameron S. Thompson* 

Robert H. Hallowell Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Finance 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President John P. Chase, Treasurer, ^ 

John P. Chase, Treasurer ^* officw 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary Robert H. Hallowell 

ex officio Ralph Lowell 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Richard Saltonstall 
Robert H. Hallowell 
Daniel J. Lyne Warren Motley 

SUB-COMMITTEES 
Appointed by the Executive Committee 
Education Health 

Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

Robert H. Hallowell Cameron S. Thompson 

Rev. John J. Connolly David Cheever, Jr. 

MONTHLY VISITING COMMITTEE 

Whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 

January Warren Motley June Robert H. Hallowell 

February Reginald Fitz, M.D. September Miss R. D. Thorndike 

March Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. October Rev. John J. Connolly 

April David Cheever, Jr. November Daniel J. Lyne 

May Richard Saltonstall December Mrs. R. E. Danielson 

LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE 
Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike, Chairman 
Mrs. Frederick J. Alley Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 

Mrs. Arthur Brooks Mrs. George F. Plimpton 

Miss Ellen T. Bullard Miss Elizabeth Rackemann 

Mrs. David Cheever, Jr. Mrs. Augustus N. Rantoul 

Mrs. Russell Codman Miss Mary D. Rudd 

Lady Emilie Coote Mrs. Richard Saltonstall 

Mrs. Robert M. Faxon Mrs. Henry D. Tudor 

Mrs. E. Sturgis Hinds Mrs. Rudolph Weld 

•Appointed by the Giovemor of the Commonwealth. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DIRECTOR 
GABRIEL FARRELL, B.S., B.D., D.D. 

DIRECTOR-EMERITUS 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, A.B., D.Sc. 

OFFICE 
J. Stephenson Hemphill, B.S., M.B.A., Bursar 
Catherine S. Benson Ethel L Mackenzie 

Secretary to the Director Bookkeeper 

Verna L. Anderson Alice E. Dougher 

Secretary to the Bursar Assistant 

Mrs. Helen C. Grant Jacqueline L. McNally 

Secretary to the Principal Assistant 

Marion A. Woodworth Frank H. Greene! 

Registrar Telephone Operator 

Mrs. Olive W. Putnam, Receptionist"^ 

LIBRARY 

Mary Esther Sawyer, Librarian 
Florence J. Worth, Circulation Mrs. Julia Edelstein, Reference 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Victor G. Balboni, M.D., Attending Physician 

Margaret F. Bishop, R.N., Resident Nurse 

Trygve Gundersen, M.D. Reinhold Ruelberg, D.M.D. 

Joseph M. Clough, M.D. Dentist for the Lower School 

Ophthalmologists Mark D. Elliott, D.D.S. 

Herbert Barry, Jr., M.D. Dentist for the Upper School 

Psychiatrist Frank R. Ober, M.D. 

Allan M. Butler, M.D. Orthopedic Surgeon 

Pediatrician Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Henry R. Viets, M.D. Otologist 

Neurologist Francis R. Dieuaide, M.D. 

Syphilologist 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND RESEARCH 
Samuel P. Hayes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Psychologist 

Frances E. Marshall Mrs. Sin a F. Waterhouse, 

Social Worker A.B., M.A.t 

Mrs. Jane S. Davis, B.S. M. Albertina Eastman, B.S.f 

Psychometrist Speech Correction 

Shirlib L. Smith, R.P.T.T.f Mrs. Joan B. Smith 

Physiotherapist Secretary 

DEPARTMENT OF MAINTENANCE 

Nelson Coon Maurice J. Carroll 

Buildings and Grounds Chief Engineer 

•Employed part time. tVisually handicapped. 

8 



^," 



UPPER SCHOOL STAFF 



Allan W. Sherman, A.B., M.A., Principal 
Alice M. Carpenter, A.B., M.A., D.Ped., Dean of Girls 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND LITERARY DEPARTMENTS 



Florence W. Barbour, A.B. 
MoLLiE Cambridge, A.B. 
John P. Egan, B.S.f 
Gertrude S. Harlow! 
Genevieve M. Haven, A.B., Ed.M. 
Armand J. MiCHAUD, A.B., M.A.f 
Joseph E. Jablonske, B.S.f 

Samuel E. Price, B.S. 

Physical Education 



Christos C. Pappas, B.S. 

Claudia Potter, A.B. 

Clara L. Pratt 

Benjamin F. Smith, A.B., M.A.f 

Elsie H. Simonds, A.B. 

Orin a. Stone, B.S,, B.D., M.A. 

Edw. J. Waterhouse, B.A., M.A. 

Margaret G. Bigelow, B.S. 
Physical Education 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
Paul L. Bauguss 
Mrs. Marjorie A. Carr Louise Seymour 

Edward W. Jenkins, F.T.C.L.f Bernard T. Barbeau, B.A.' 

Mrs. Stella D. Jenkins* 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Winifred G. Ellis, B.A. Mrs. Vesta V. Coon, A.B. 



Susan M. Brooks 
Walter P. Carr 



VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 
Leo V. GiTTZUS, B.S., M.A. 



Sidney B. DuRFEEf 
Pianoforte Tuning 



Frances L. McGaw 
Marion K. Liversidge 

Mrs. Charlene H. Cumberland 
Home Economics 



MATRONS OF COTTAGES 
Mrs. Sarah M. Keith, Eliot Miss Judith G. Silvester, Fisher 

Mrs. Mary L. Hunt, Bridgman Mrs. Pearl Gosling, Brooks 

Miss Laura Tripp, Tompkins Mrs. Nellie E. H. Hamill, May 

Mrs. Janet G. Hancock, Moulton Miss Stella S. Eldridge, Oliver 

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER TRAINING 

Dr. Edward E. Allen 

Lecturer, Graduate School of Education, Harvard University 



Dr. Gabriel Farrell 

Lecturer, Graduate School of 

Education, Harvard University 

♦Employed part time. 



Dr. Samuel P. Hayes 

Consulting Psychologist, American 

Foundation for the Blind 

tVisually handicapped. 



LOWER SCHOOL STAFF 

PRIMARY 
Ethel D. Evans Mrs. Jessie W. Mayshark 

PATRICIA VOGEL, B.S. CAROLINE PETERS 

DERICK V. WILLSON, B.A. ANTHONY ACKEIMAN, A.B.f 

KINDERGARTEN 

Feodore M. Nicholls Susan E. Morse 

Evelyn Kaufman, A.B.f Helena M. DRAKEf 

HARRIET M. PHILLIPSt ^ETTY NYEf 

Nancy C. Jones, B.S. J- Elizabeth Andrews, B.A. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS 
Eleanor W. Thayer, A.B., Music Margaret MiLLER,t Lihraruin 
Mrs Perley C. White, Music Adeline Dale, B.A., Recreation 

BETTY JANE WENZEL, Music MARGARET A. McKENZIE^f^^.^^^^^^ 

Shirley A. Drucker, B.A., M.A., 
Visual Aid 

MATRONS OF COTTAGES 
Miss Marie A. Carter, Potter Mrs. Margaret Luf, Glover 

Mrs. Cora Dole, Assistant Mrs. Laura B. Eldridge, Assistant 

Mrs. Beatrice Wakefield, Anagnos Mrs. F. B. Robison, Bradlee 
Mrs. Beatrice E. Peters, Assistant Mrs. Hilda Collins, Assistant 

DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 

Mrs. N. Maurine Gittzus, Leo F. QuEENANf 

A.B., M.A. Audrey White 

Madge Dolph Dorothy H. Reynolds! 
Mrs. Patricia M. Huddleston, B.S. 

WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 
FRED G. MARSH, Manager Emily V. S. Ramsay, Clerk 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 
Edward J. Waterhouse, B.A., M.A., Manager 
David Abraham, Engineer Mary L. Tully, Clerk 

tVisually handicapped. 
♦Employed part time. 

10 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Allbright, ClifEord. Boston 

Allen, Edwarl E., Cambridge 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Cambridge 

AlleHi Hon. Frank G., Boston 

Allen, Philip R., Walpole 

Allen, Mrs. Philip R., Walpole 

Alley, Mrs. Frederick J.. Boston 

Amory, Robert, Boston 

Amory, Roger, Boston 

Anderson, Rev, Edgar W., Watertown 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz, Brookline 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Brookline 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, Brookline 

BaUantine, Arthur A., New York 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, Beverly 

Bartol, Mrs. John W., Boston 

Barton, George Sumner, Worcester 

Bayne, Mrs. William, 3d, Westwood 

Beach, Rev. David N., New Haven, Conn. 

Beatley, Prof. Ralph, Cambridge 

Belash, Constantine A., Boston 

Belash, Mrs. Constantine A., Boston 

Bird, Miss Ann C, East Walpole 

Bird, Mrs. Francis W., East Walpole 

Blake, Fordyce T., Worcester 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston 

Boyden, Charles, Boston 

Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H., Cambridge 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston 

Brooks, Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brooks, Mrs. Lawence G., West Medford 

Brown, Mrs. Charles R., New Haven, Conn. 

Bullard, Miss Ellen T., Boston 

Bullock, Chandler, Worcester 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Peterboro, N. H. 

Camp, Mrs. Edward C, Watertown 

Carter, Richard B., West Newton 

Carter, Mrs. Richard B., West Newton 

Case, Hon. Norman S., Washington, D. C. 

Case, Mrs. Norman S.. Washington, D. C. 

Cassels, Miss Andree, Boston 

Chase, John P., Boston 

Cheever, David, Jr., Millis 

Choate, Robert B., Boston 

Claus, Henry T.. Wihnington Del. 

Cliflford, John H., New Bedford 

Coffin, Mrs. Rockwell A., Harwichport 

Connolly, Rev. John J., Framingham 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Boston 

Coolidge, William A., Boston 

Getting, Charles E., Boston 

Crapo, Henry H., New Bedford 

Crowninshield, Francis B., Boston 

Cunningham, Edward, Boston 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward, Jr., Boston 

Curtis, Charles P., Jr., Boston 

Curtis, James F., Roslyn, N. Y. 

Curtis, Louis, Boston 

Curtis, Richard C, Boston 

Cutler, George C, Dedham 

Daley, Mrs. Francis J., Somerville 

Danielson, Richard E., Boston 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E., Boston 

Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton 

Denny, Dr. George P., Boston 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston 

Dolan, William G., Boston 

Dowd, Mrs. John F., Roxbury 

Draper, Eben S., Hopedale 

Drury, Theodore F., Weston 

Dutton, Mrs. George D., Walpole 

Eliot, Amory, Boston 



Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Boston 

Endicott, Henry, Boston 

Farrell, Gabriel, Watertown 

Farrell, Mrs. Gabriel, Watertown 

Faxon, Henry H., M. D., Brookline 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Boston 

Fitz, Reginald, M. D., Brookline 

Fitz, Mrs. Reginald, Brookline 

Ford, Lawrence A., Beverly 

Foster, Mrs. Reginald, Boston 

Fox, Miss Edith M., Arlington 

French, Miss M. Eunice, Providence, R. I. 

Frothingham. Mrs. L. A., North Easton 

Fuller, George F., Worcester 

Gage, Miss Mabel C, Worcester 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston 

Gardiner, John H., Brookline 

Gardner, G. Peabody, Brookline 

Gaskill, George A., Worcester 

Gaylord, Emerson C, Chicopee 

Gilbert, Carl J., Needham 

Gilbert, William E.. Springfield 

Gleason, Miss Ellen H., Jamaica Plain 

Grandin, Mrs. Isabella, Boston 

Gray, Francis C, Boston 

Gray, Roland, Boston 

Greenough, Mrs. Henry V., Brookline 

Griswold, Merrill, Boston 

Gundersen, Dr. Trygve, Brookline 

Gundersen, Mrs. Trygve, Brookline 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Brookline 

Hallowell, Richard P., 2d, Boston 

Hallowell, Robert H., Dedham 

Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Dedham 

Hallowell, Robert H., Jr., Dover 

Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Jr., Dover 

Harris, Rev. John U., Framingham 

Hayden, J. Willard, Lexington 

Hayden, Mrs. J. Willard, Lexington 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Milton 

Herter, Christian A., Boston 

Higginson, Francis L., Boston 

Hill, Alfred S., Somerville 

Hinds, Mrs. E. S., Manchester 

Holmes, Dr. Henry W., Cambridge 

Howe, James C, Boston 

Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 3d, Brookline 

Humbert, Miss W. R., Boston 

Hunnewell, Walter, Boston 

Hunt, James R., Jr., Boston 

lasigi. Miss Marie V., Boston 

Jackson, Charles, Jr., Boston 

Jackson, Mrs. James, Westwood 

Jeffries, J. Amory, Boston 

Johnson, Arthur S., Boston 

Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, 2d, Cambridge 

Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Meadville, Pa. 

King, Mrs. James G., Cambridge 

Lamb, Mrs. Horatio A., Boston 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond, Boston 

Latimer, Mrs. G. D., Brookline 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Brookline 

Lawrence, Rev. Frederic C, Brookline 

Lawrence, John S., Boston 

Lawence, Rt. Rev. W. Appleton, Springfield 

Leavitt, Rev. Ashley D., Brookline 

Ley, Harold A., New York 

Lincoln, Mrs. George C, Worcester 

Lovering, Richard S., Jackson Springs, N.C. 

Lovett, Miss Eleanor H., New London, N.H. 

Lowell, James H., Boston 

Lowell, Miss Lucy, Boston 

Lowell, Ralph, Boston 



11 



Lyman, Mrs. Arthur T.. Westwood 

Lyman. Mrs. Ronald T., Boston 

Lyne, Daniel J., Chestnut Hill 

MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore I., West Newton 

Maliotis, Charles, Boston 

Mason, Mrs. Andrew, Brookline 

Mason, Charles E., Jr., Providence, R. I. 

Mayo-Smith, Richmond, Dedham 

McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke 

Merrill, Rev. Boynton, Columbus, Ohio 

Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce, Providence, R.I. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cambridge 

Minot, James J., Boston 

Monks, Rev. G. Gardner, Washington, D.t/. 

Montagu, Mrs. H. B., England 

Morison, Samuel Eliot, Cambridge 

Motley, Edward, Concord 

Motley, Warren, Boston 

Myers, Mrs. John W., Brookline 

Osgood, PhiUips E.. Winter Park, Fla. 

Parker, William A., Boston 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston 

Parkman, Henry, Jr., Boston 

Parkman, Mrs. Henry, Jr., Boston 

Peabody, Harold, Boston ^ 

Perkins, Mrs. Charles B., Jamaica Plain 

Perkins, Rev. Palfrey, Boston 

Pierce, Roger, Milton 

Pool, Mrs. E. A., New York City 

Pratt, George D., Springfield 

Proctor, James H., Boston 

Prouty, Robert M., Hingham 

Prouty, Mrs. Robert M., Hingham 

Putnam, Mrs. Eliot T., Jr.. Dedham 

Putnam, Mrs. George T., Dedham 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston 

Rice, John C, Boston 

Richards, Henry H., Groton 

Richards, John, Concord, N. H. 

Richards, Tudor, Groton 

Richardson, John, Milton 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Milton 

Robinson, George F., Watertown 

Rogers. Mrs. Robert E., Cambridge 

Rogerson, Francis C, Duxbury 



Saltonstall, Hon. Leverett, Chestnut Hill 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, Chestnut HiU 
Saltonstall, Richard, Boston 
Sears, Seth, Brewster 
Shattuck, Henry L., Boston 
Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A., Weston 
Sherrill, Rt. Rev. Henry K., New York City 
Sillen, Rev. Walter. Watertown 
Sims, Mrs. William S., Boston 
Slater, Mrs. H. N., New York 
Snow' Mi-s. William G., Newton Centre 
Stafford, Rev. RusseU H., Hartford, Conn. 
Stinson, Mrs. James, Worcester 
Sturgis, R. Clipston, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Sturgis, S. Warren, Boston 
Sullivan, Mrs. James A., Boston 
Thayer, John E., Milton 
Theopold, Philip H., Dedham 
Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston 
Thompson, Cameron S., Boston 
Thorndike, Albert, Milton 
Thomdike, Benjamin A. G., Dedham 
Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., Boston 
Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield 
Tilden, Miss Alice F., Boston 
Tilden, Miss Edith S., Boston 
Todd, Francis B., New York City 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry D., Cambridge 
Underwood, Herbert S., Winchester 
Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C, P'ttsfield 
Vaughan, Miss Margaret I., Haddonfield, N.J. 
Wadsworth, Eliot, Washington, D. C. 
Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., Boston 
Washburn, Rev. Henry B., Cambridge 
Wendell, William G., West Hartford, Conn. 
Whittall, Matthew P., Worcester 
Wiggins, Mrs. Charles, 2d, Gardiner, Maine 
Wiggins, John, Alden, Pa. 
Wiggins, Mrs. John, Alden, Pa. 
Wilder, Charles P., Worcester 
Wolcott, Roger, Boston 
Wright, George R., Cambridge 
Wright, Miss Lucy, Boston 
Young, B. Loring, Weston 
Zeilinski, John, Holyoke 



12 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL 
MEETING OF THE CORPORATION 



Watertown, Massachusetts 
November 1, 1948 

The Annual Meeting of the Corporation, duly summoned, was 
held today at the Institution, and was called to order by the Presi- 
dent, Dr. Eeginald Fitz, at 3.00 P. M. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved. 

The annual reports of the Trustees and the Director were ac- 
cepted and ordered to be printed, with the addition of other 
matters of general interest to the work. 

The report of the Treasurer was presented, accepted and 
ordered to be printed together with the certificate of the Certified 
Public Accountant. 

It was then 

VOTED : That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by 
the Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed 
by said Board of Trustees, during the last corpor- 
ate year, be and are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

It was further 

VOTED: That the nomination of the Finance Committee and 
the appointment by the Trustees, of Barrow, Wade, 
Guthrie & Company, Certified Public Accountants 
as Auditors of the Accounts of the Institution be 
and are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

The Corporation then proceeded to the choice of officers for 
the ensuing year, and the following persons were unanimously 
elected by ballot: President, Reginald Fitz, M. D.; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Ralph Lowell; Treasurer, John P. Chase; Secretary, Gabriel 
Farrell; Trustees, David Cheever, Jr.; Mrs. Richard E. Danielson; 
Reginald Fitz, M. D.; Robert H. Hallowell; Henry W. Holmes, 
LL.D.; Warren Motley; Richard Saltonstall, and Miss Rosanna D. 
Thorndike, 

The following persons were elected members of the Corpora- 
tion: Mrs. David Cheever, Jr.; Mrs. Russell Codman; Lady Emilie 
Coote; William Endicott, 2nd; Mrs. Robert M. Faxon; Mrs. Frederic 
B. Kellogg, Mrs. George F. Plimpton; Miss Elizabeth Rackemann; 
Mrs. Augustus N. Rantoul; Miss Mary D. Rudd; Mrs. Richard 
Saltonstall; Mrs. Rudolph Weld. 

The Ladies Visiting Committee, formerly the Ladies Visiting 
Committee to the Kindergarten, has been reorganized, under the 

13 



leadership of Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike, and is now a visiting 
committee to the whole school. The new committee has sixteen 
members and the Corporation was glad to welcome this addition to 
its governing boards. 

The Treasurer reported that the recommendations for changes 
in the accounting system, including the set-up of Reserve Funds 
outlined in the report of last year, have been carried out. These 
changes have strengthened the accounting system, and the Reseive 
Accounts are setting up funds which will be helpful in years when 
income is lower than at the present time. The Treasurer stated 
that "every operating economy consistent with efficiency must be 
practiced, for the finances of the Institution must not be allowed 
to become impaired; to do so would jeopardize the freedom of the 
Institution to seek its educational goals." 

The Director briefly outlined some events of the year, speak- 
ing especially of the library reconstruction, the building of the 
two new reading rooms and the changes in the offices. He invited 
the members of the Corporation to visit the library, reading 
rooms and offices and to meet at the end of this inspection m the 
new staff lounge where coffee would be served. 

There being no further business the meeting was then dissolved- 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary 



14 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



November 1, 1948 

ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES the following 
report for the year 1948 is submitted; with it are included 
reports of the Treasurer and the Director. 

The Treasurer's report emphasizes, particularly, the increas- 
ing costs of operation. 

The Director's report outlines, in an interesting fashion, the 
varied activities of the year and illustrates how Perkins has main- 
tained its high standards of instruction to the young people who 
come to the school handicapped by visual deficiencies. 

On the basis of the estimated budget for the coming year, our 
expenses for each pupil will amount to more than $2,000. Perkins 
has always been determined to offer the best possible educational 
opportunities; the time may be approaching, however, when the 
Trustees will be forced to consider whether all of our pupils need 
so elaborate a program as has become established. There may be a 
number of young people within the school, and many more with 
faulty vision outside of the school, who might profit more from a 
simpler curriculum and gain more from an educational system 
which lays greater emphasis on training to meet practical needs 
than our present course offers. This problem has been discussed 
many times in the past and, once again, may deserve reconsidera- 
tion. 

The budget calls for a total expenditure of more than half a 
million dollars. This large figure gives the Trustees grave concern, 
not only because of its size but also because it demands assurance 
that new funds will accrue through which Perkins can continue to 
extend its program. Our endowment in the past has grown largely 
through many small bequests and through a few of most generous 
proportions. Our funds no longer grow as rapidly as they did. 
How soon must the Trustees plan to seek more widely for financial 
support than heretofore has been necessary? 

One of the most significant events of the year was the change 
of plans for the library and for concentrating other important 
facilities within the school's buildings. In last year's report refer- 
ence was made to a special committee appointed to study these 
matters and to their plans for a new building. In the early spring 
the Director ingeniously devised a new method of accomplishing 
the purpose in mind for considerably less than the contemplated 
cost, and with the added advantage of housing all new develop- 
ments within our present main building. In his report he has 
described the details of this; the Trustees wish to express to him 
their appreciation of his happy solution of a problem which proved 
so baffling for a number of years. 

15 



Another interesting development is the reorganization of the 
Ladies Visiting Committee. The Committee was established m 
1887 to help in the work of the kindergarten, then an experimental 
project still in its incipiency. Until recently the Committee has 
rendered valuable help, not only to the administrative staff and 
matrons but also to the pupils of the Lower School. The Second 
World War interfered so much with its operation that the help ot 
a fresh and reviving stimulant seemed needed for its post-war 
rehabilitation. Miss Rosaima D. Thorndike, a Trustee before 
going to France on active service, has rejoined the Board and has 
already reorganized this important committee. It now no longer 
restricts its activities to the kindergaren but has extended its 
interests to cover the whole school and already its help and influ- 
ence are perceptible. The Trustees are deeply grateful to Miss 
Thorndike and her aides. 

With sincere regret the Trustees report the death of one ot 
their members: Mrs. Mabel Knowles Gage, who died at Worcester 
on the sixteenth of May. Mrs. Gage became a Trustee in 1933, 
and was always an active and devoted colleague, playing a positive 
part in deliberations of the Board and also taking an energetic 
and personal interest in all the affairs of the teachers and pupils 
of the school. At their meeting on June 15, the Trustees passed a 
formal memorial in her honor which has been inscribed in our 
vpcords 

During the past year the Corporation has lost, by death, eight 
members : Caspar G. Bacon, Mrs. Maud Howe Elliott, Frederick A. 
Goskins, Malcolm W. Greenough, Arthur D. Hill, Fred F. Partridge, 
Mrs. Bertha A. Vaughan, and Mrs. Thomas A. Watson. Their loss 
is felt keenly. 

Respectfully submitted for the Trustees. 
Reginald Fitz, President 



lb 




ON THE LOWER SCHOOL PLAYGROUND 



IN THE VISUAL AID CLASSROOM 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

November 1, 1948 

T^HE YEAR for which this report is being made, terminating 
•*• August 31, 1948, has been one of routine progress. Nothing 
sensational has taken place. There have been no great incidents, 
nor many unusual activities. The general health of the school has 
been good and the academic program has moved along smoothly 
as planned. In the area of business administration, however, things 
have been at times quite grim. The financial reports will show 
that we have come through the year with a relatively small deficit. 
The one thing that seems appalling at this time is the prospect of 
greater costs next year. The many "events of the year" that this 
report will cover, while routine in nature, and old to many who 
have been here a number of years, are always fresh to the new 
pupils. In retrospect we can say that progress has been made. 

This progress was due to the generous understanding of cur- 
rent problems by the Trustees, the careful planning and economy 
of the department heads and housemothers and the time, patience 
and skill given unsparingly by the teachers, both in classrooms 
and cottages. Men and women of the maintenance and domestic 
departments deserve credit for they have stood by when more 
lucrative work was available elsewhere. Tribute must also be 
paid to pupil leadership both in building morale among fellow 
students and in cooperation with the administration chiefly through 
the student councils. This report of the happenings of the year 
will reflect the contributions which all members of the Perkins 
community have made, both as individuals and as groups and for 
all this the administration is grateful. 

Business Outlook Grim 

Having referred to the business administration of the school 
as the area presenting "grim" problems let us consider them at 
the outset. The Bursar, Mr. Hemphill, in his report used a 
different term for he states: "The fiscal year just ended has been 
an 'historic' one for at least two reasons. Operating costs reached 
a new high, and improvements in both plant and program were 
undertaken in volume beyond our expectation. The high operating 

17 



costs were forced upon us by inflation, and changing conditions in 
the fields of labor and supply. Many improvements in plant and 
equipment were planned but others were forced upon us by the 
weather, changing programs within the school and items of main- 
tenance deferred because of the war. 

"The Board of Trustees at its September, 1947 meeting ap- 
proved a budget of $450,985.00 to cover the operation of the Insti- 
tution and the Kindergarten at Watertown, and the Workshop at 
South Boston. This provided for an increase of $33,477.61 over 
the costs of the year before. The actual expenses for the fiscal 
year 1947-1948 totaled $471,089.57, resulting in a budgetary deficit 
of $10,104.57; a loss, of approximately 2.2%. Although we were 
disappointed to exceed the highest budget in our history, this defi- 
cit was undeniably reasonable considering mounting costs during 

the year. 

"In setting up the budget, the cost-of-living adjustment plan 
which affects non-teaching, live-out personnel, provision was made 
for 45% supplementary compensation. By August 1948 this had 
risen to 64%, which cost the school $7,200 more in salaries than 
had been anticipated. The Trustees acted favorably at the June 
meeting upon a suggestion that teachers' salaries be reconsidered 
The teachers are not included in the cost-of-living plan, and with 
advancing costs and nearly three months when they do not get 
living at the school, it seemed o'nly fair to give them some help. 
A 5% summer bonus was approved and a 10% advance for the 
coming year was authorized. The former added $3600 to the salary 
accounts of the educational department for the year which has 
closed Our conservatively estimated food budget of $52,000 was 
exceeded by $6,800, an advance of 13%. The Cost of Living Index 
for food in the Boston area was fifteen points higher in July 1948 
than in September 1947. . 

"Our largest expense deficit occurred in the account for special 
maintenance, repair and replacement, $22,647 against a budget of 
$10 000 Two major factors contributed to this additional expense. 
The' severe winter with the large amount of snow caused extensive 
damages, calling for gutter replacements at a cost of $8,000 The con- 
crete roof on the coal bunkers had to be rebuilt and repaved at a cost 
of $4 500. Other items of expense on maintenance were the installa- 
tion of new brass piping in Bridgman and Tompkins Cottages at a 
cost of $2,958. This is the beginning of a project which will extend 
throughout the whole school as this piping is over thirty years old. 

18 



"Many projects deferred during the war had to be carried 
through. A new heating plant in the Principal's residence was 
installed and the kitchen in the Chief Engineer's cottage was re- 
novated. The prewar program of decorating in the cottages was 
resumed. Extensive new equipment was provided in the school. A 
small medical type electric refrigerator was installed in the health 
department for the many drugs used today which require refrig- 
eration." 

Academic Outlook Bright 

Academically the year has progressed without the "grim" as- 
pects of the business side, although this area has made its contribu- 
tion to increased costs. The Principal, Mr. Sherman, however, 
reports that: "The most important area in our school program is 
that devoted to the care and teaching of our youngest pupils. In 
the cottage groups from kindergarte^n to the fourth grade our pupils 
receive basic training on which they will pattern their entire lives. 
In classroom work at this level we have always tried to move pupils 
along as their growth and ability warrant. During the year, we did 
away entirely with grade labels and grade divisions in these two 
cottages, and attempted to introduce a more carefully organized 
plan of continuous progress. This plan was not nearly as successful 
as we had hoped it would be, but it is difficult to determine the 
success of such a program on a one-year trial. We should continue 
to carry on this plan for at least another year and try to make it 
work more effectively. 

"At the two other cottages in the Lower School our program 
has continued as it has for several years. The transfer of two 
teachers from the Upper School and the competency gained by 
young teachers through additional years of experience with our 
pupils have produced much more effective teaching at this level. 
We have been fortunate to have a special remedial Braille teacher 
to assist pupils who have been slow in making the adjustment to 
Braille or who need special assistance in improving their Braille 
techniques. Having this teacher has also meant a more rapid 
adjustment to changed school situations for pupils who have come 
to Perkins from public school classes. Opportunity for good shop 
training has been provided for the older boys. For the girls sev- 
eral extra curricular activities are provided by the Girl Scouts. 

"In the Upper School we have continued to offer a very broad 
program of study. Our Upper School pupil population includes 

19 



(1) a majority of regular graded pupils spread from the seventh 
grade level through a post graduate year, (2) a group of ungraded 
pupils for whom a regular school program is inadequate, and (3) 
a number of "out of course pupils" who are pursuing special ob- 
jectives or are seeking adjustment to visual handicaps through a 
school experience. Each year we admit new pupils to the high 
school who do not fit easily into the school program. 

"Over a period of years we have moved away from the tradi- 
tional academic type of program toward a more 'practical' cur- 
riculum. Last year a careful study of the high school courses of 
regularly graded pupils showed that 85.3% were enrolled in non- 
college courses while 14.7% were pursuing the traditional college 
course. Of the former, nineteen were pursuing terminal vocational 
courses, (piano tuning 14.7% and commercial Ediphone transcrip- 
tion 10.7%. Twenty pupils, or 26.6%, were taking a general course 
in which many different objectives were being sought, and twenty- 
five pupils, or 33.3% were taking the practical arts course. An in- 
teresting comparison of these figures was made with a local high 
school and it is explai'ned in the following table: 
COURSE OF Study Perkins Local High School 

General 26.6% 28.6% 

College 14.7% 28.2% 

Practical Arts 33.3% 11.7% 

Pianoforte Tuning 14.7% 

Commercial Course 10.7% 31.5% 

"While still giving a broad program of studies organized 
around a core of general education subject areas required of all 
regularly grading pupils, we are attempting to emphasize those 
courses which will prepare pupils for life situations and give them 
as many 'salable skills' as possible. In general this has been done 
in three ways. In both high and junior high school classes, a divi- 
sion has been made to form small homogeneous groups with which 
we are able to deal more realistically on an interest and ability level 
commensurate with pupil needs and capacities. Secondly, the prac- 
tical arts program has been broadened to include new craft skills, 
home mechanics courses, and more use of machine tools. Thirdly, 
new courses have been added, such as Guidance at the seventh grade 
level, Guidance and Occupations at the ninth grade level, and Ori- 
entation at the senior level. All of these te^d to acquaint pupils 
with the world of work and to help them to meet life situations 

20 



with more 'know-how' and with a better understanding of their 
own abilities and limitations. 

"A so-called 'practical' type of program does not mean a lower- 
ing of academic standards. On the contrary, such a curriculum 
makes possible an upward revision of standards for a greater num- 
ber of pupils. We must continue to introduce, through new courses 
and a reshaping of old ones, more experimental material. Not 
only should this be done in the classroom, but increasing attention 
and study should be given to important areas of learning outside 
of the school building. We must re-study the ways by which we 
are helping our pupils to overcome the fundamental problems of 
blindness, and improve through in-service growth and careful an- 
alysis the potent environmental factors producing good mental 
health and leading our pupils to a more realistic acceptance and un- 
derstanding of their blindness. This is the most practical aspect 
of our entire program and will be achieved only through the loving 
and intelligent care given our pupils by house-mothers and teachers 
working cooperatively in our cottage family plan," 

A Healthy Year 

"On the whole the children have had a healthy year." This 
is the final statement in the report made by Miss Marjorie Potter, 
school nurse, prior to leaving for Germany to undertake work in 
a camp for displaced children under the direction of the American 
Unitarian Association. Her description of the year must be 
amplified, but there have been no unusual accidents nor more ill- 
ness than might be expected with 240 children. An analysis of 
the year's report indicates that most of the illnesses this year were 
classified as upper respiratory infections (143) followed by gastro- 
intestinal upsets (60). There were no epidemics of measles or 
chickenpox as in former years. We did, however, have one case of 
measles, one of German measles, and three of chickenpox. Part 
of this good record may be attributed to the fine services of Miss 
Potter and to the ministrations of Dr. Balboni, school physician. 

During the year the children were taken regularly to the Mass- 
achusetts General Hospital for hospitalization when necessary and 
for periodic check-ups through the several clinics. There were 
three tonsillectomies, one sinus operation and one hernia operation. 
One of the older girls went to the Naval Hospital for plastic sur- 
gery arranged through her family, and one child during vacation 

21 



was in the hospital for an appendectomy. During the early 
part of the year the routine tests were all carried out, each new child 
having a very careful physical examination, and all of the other 
pupils being checked when the need was indicated. Every child 
in the school had a hemoglobin and bloodpressure examination. 
Chest x-rays were taken of all new pupils, teachers and household 
staff by the State Department of Health, the films being furnished 
by the Middlesex Health Association. Urine analysis was made of 
all pupils, and inoculations were given to pupils in the Lower 
School for diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough. Wasserman 
tests were done on all new pupils and Widal tests on all those who 
handled food. 

Perkins is indebted to the Forsyth Dental Infirmary for dental 
work beyond what our school dentists could provide, chiefly in the 
area of extractions. Once again all of the pupils of the Upper 
School were taken to the Forsyth Infirmary for oral prophylactic 
treatments. The study undertaken at Perkins in the Lower School 
by the Tufts Medical School on the effect of Fluorine in arresting 
tooth decay was completed early in October when a number of the 
pupils went to the Tufts Dental College for examination. Dr. Elliott 
came to the school one day a week to care for the dental needs of 
the pupils of the Upper School, while Dr. Ruelberg continued to 
serve the children in the Lower School. This was Dr. Ruelberg's 
fortieth year of service. 

The physiotherapy department seldom is given sufficient credit 
for its share in the program of physical care. Our certified phys- 
iotherapist. Miss Shirlie L. Smith, although visually handicapped 
has proved a very effective worker in this field. In December all 
of the new pupils were examined by Dr. Ober, our orthopedic sur- 
geon, and treatments recommended. Under his direction Miss 
Smith carried out a very intensive program of help for these chil- 
dren and an extensive program of general posture training. In 
March Dr. Ober again examined the children for whom special 
corrective work had been prescribed. This department is fully 
equipped to give mechanotherapy treatments, infra-red treatments 
and massage. Weekly ultra-violet treatments have been given to 
practically all the children and have helped to improve the general 
" health. The official record shows that 3,437 ultra-violet treat- 
ments were given, 1,113 mechanotherapy treatments and 424 infra- 
red treatments. 



22 



A long established part of our program is the work done in 
speech correction. In this field Perkins is fortunate in having 
two very capable and experienced teachers of speech therapy. Mrs. 
Waterhouse, who holds a master's degree, has had wide experience 
in dealing with the speech problems of blind children. She is ably 
assisted in the Lower School by Miss Albertina Eastman, a grad- 
uate of Perkins and Boston University. During the school year, 
under the leadership of those two teachers, forty-six new pupils 
were given the routine speech test, and nineteen were found to be 
in need of speech therapy. The work was continued with forty- 
five children who previously had been receiving treatment. In all, 
sixty children received individual corrective work. 

Intelligence, Achievement, Aptitude 

The psychological department has carried out this year its pro- 
gram of testing under the leadership of Dr. Hayes, our psychol- 
ogist, and Mrs. Davis, psychometrist. Additional help in this de- 
partment was available through the services of a graduate of 
Scripps College, who gave part time to the department and part 
time to the Harvard Course, and two Wellesley seniors who worked 
on testing as a part of their college program. The testing program 
advanced along all four major lines of mental measurement: 

1. Intelligence tests; 2. Achievement tests; 3. Aptitude tests 
and 4. The trying out and adaptation of tests to determine voca- 
tional preferences. 

Individual intelligence tests, were given to all new pupils, 
and retests were administered to others making a total of 127 this 
year. A new form of the Wechsler-Bellevue Test was given to 
thirty-nine pupils. The English adaptation of the Binet Test made 
by Ivy Langan was tried out on a large number of pupils. 

Perkins has made another contribution to the cause of testing 
by embossing Form R of the Metropolitan Achievement Tests. It 
was time to publish a new series, since all ten forms of the Stan- 
ford Achievement test have been used at Perkins and various other 
schools. A trial of the Metropolitan series at Perkins and Over- 
brook gave very satisfactory results, so our plates have been sent 
to the American Printing House for the Blind, with detailed direc- 
tions prepared by Dr. Hayes, to be distributed to other schools. 

The use of aptitude tests for the blind is relatively new, al- 
though previously tried on several occasions. There is, however, 
an increasing demand for these by agents of the rehabilitation 

23 



service when our pupils leave school and apply for placement. Be- 
cause of that, four motor skill tests were tried out in the Upper 
School this year with the assistance of the two seniors from Welles- 
ley. These tests seem to have value and can be helpful in determin- 
ing guidance possibilities and job opportunities. It is interesting 
to note that the results correlate fairly accurately with the judg- 
ments of motor skill made by the Perkins teachers. As a further 
contribution to testing for the adult blind in vocational areas, a 
modified technique for using the Kuder Preference Record was 
developed and tried out in the Upper School. This proved worth 
while and indicative of the special interests of the pupils. The re- 
sults of these tests and a description of the technique used were 
published in the April Outlook for the Blind, and the dot-sheets 
and scoring stencils developed for those without sight were offered 
for sale so that other schools or blind groups may benefit by the 
adaptation of these tests which Perkins has made. 

A study is being made of a group of visually handicapped pre- 
mature babies to see if scales of measurement can be developed 
to determine their rate of growth and mental promise. Mrs. Davis 
visits the homes of these children at ^^^^j^ /f "^^^^ "^f^/ 
observations, in terms of the Maxfleld adaptation of Dolls Vine- 
land Social Maturity Scale. When enough children have been 
becked over a sufficient period of time it is hoped that Perkins ml 
be able to validate this scale and recommend its wide use with the 
group of pre-school children in whom so much interest is centered 
at the present time. 

Contacts With Community 
The School Service Department under Miss Marshall has con- 
tinued its program in an effective way. While Miss Mar^han h^^^ 
bpen kept in the office by duties which will be assumed by a f ulltime 
registrar next year, she has been able to make more home visits than 
L the war years. "During the last sum^mer vacation," she reports, 
''many homes in the northern part of New England w^re visited 
A good deal of the visiting now is done in connection with the sta e 
workers in the several states. Together we often go to homes to 
talk with parents about their children. Through these visits we 
are able to talk over with the parents the ways m which the State 
Divisions of the blind can help their children and what part Per 
Sn can take in these plans. This has helped to clarify our rela- 
^onships, to make the parents feel happier about having their 

24 




AN UPPER SCHOOL CLASS IN BRAILLE 



GENERAL SCIENCE CLASS IN LABORATORY 




children come to Perkins, and to show to what extent they can 
turn to the respective organizations for assistance when they leave 
Perkins." 

Within the school Miss Marshall has helped in dealing with 
individual children who have presented problems beyond the scope 
of the teachers or housemothers. In the more severe cases she has 
been advised and assisted by Dr. Barry, the psychiatrist, who has 
worked during the year with several children who presented acute 
problems. This is now a well-established routine in the school, and 
due to the fact that we have the part time services of a skilled 
psychiatrist and the full time of a psychiatric social worker, we 
are better equipped to deal with emotional disturbances and acute 
psychological problems than ever before. Many of these prob- 
lems are found among young people who have lost their sight more 
recently and whom we are trying not only to adjust to blindness, 
but also instruct in ways of living in a darkened world. 

Miss Marshall reports "we are having more and more corres- 
pondence with and visits from parents of children still too young 
to come to Perkins. Having children who are visually handicapped, 
they are seeking early guidance and learning of opportunities for 
the educational training of their children. We are glad to encour- 
age this relationship with parents and we have made a point of 
inviting them to bring their children to the school during the year 
before they might enter. This has accomplished a great deal in 
preparing the children for school life and lessening the strange- 
ness which sometimes makes the change of environment so hard. 
The whole problem of more effectively serving the pre-school blind 
child and his parents is one that needs more careful study and more 
effective implementation. 

Music Department Notes 
The Music Department had a very successful year and being 
the first under the leadership of Mr. Bauguss deserves special men- 
tion. Having been associated with Perkins for ten years, he is 
familiar with the music life of Perkins and has continued the same 
general type of instruction and activity. Mr. Bauguss has tried, 
however, to enrich the program and to introduce a number of new 
features. One of these was a series of talks at the morning assem- 
blies to build up music appreciation; another to bring to Perkins 
outstanding musicians. Under this plan the pupils and staff mem- 
bers were able to enjoy a performance of the opera "The Marriage 

25 



of Figaro" by the New England Opera Association on October 14; 
Jules Wolfers and his string orchestra on November 15; a concert 
by Al Donahue's Jazz Orchestra on November 25; Robert Brink, 
violinist, on February 27; Frank Gallagher, organist, on March 5; 
Dora Skipps, soprano, a Perkins graduate, on May 7; the English 
Bellringers, who played the Perkins chimes, on May 23 and Louise 
Homer Stires, soprano, on May 25. 

An afternoon of music which the pupils especially enjoyed was 
that of April 2 when Fred Lowery, a talented whistler, came out 
and gave two concerts, one in the Upper School and one in the 
Lower School, assisted by his vocalist, Dorothy Rae. Fred has 
visited the school on former trips to Boston, and the pupils always 
enjoy him because he is a graduate of the Texas School for the 
Blind and demonstrates how successful a visually handicapped 
person can become. At the Upper School concert he asked the 
pupils to select someone to perform for him, and the choice fell 
on Josephine Marrama, a junior who has been doing solo work 
with the Perkins chorus. So impressed was Fred with Josephine's 
ability that he invited her to be his guest at his performance at 
the Hotel Statler on April 9. While there he called upon Josephine 
to sing before the large and interested audience. 

Four large programs were featured by the Music Department 
this year. The first was the traditional group of Christmas Con- 
certs given by both the Upper and Lower School choruses on Sunday 
afternoon, December 14, and the following Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings. These were all given in Dwight Hall, and as in former 
years, large and appreciative audiences enjoyed the program of 
traditional and modern Christmas carols. These were planned and 
directed by Mr. Bauguss, assisted by Mrs. Carr at the organ, and 
Miss Seymour at the piano. The second big feature was the Pops 
Concert presented on three evenings, March 9, 10, and 12, and 
largely planned and directed by Mrs. Carr, with the assistance 
of the other teachers of the Music Department. Although only 
introduced a few years ago, these concerts of popular music are 
building up into a Perkins tradition, and the program this year 
was as delightful as ever. A charge for admission is made, and 
the money raised goes into the Music Fund. 

A third enterprise, an entirely new one, was the participation 
of the Perkins Upper School chorus in the Musical Festival held 
in the Newton High School on Sunday afternoon. May 23. The 



26 



Perkins chorus shared the program with the Newton High School 
chorus and the high school orchestra. The fourth event was also 
new, the presentation of the delightful little operetta "Rumpel- 
stiltzkin" on the evenings of June 3 and 4 by the pupils of the 
Lower School. Uniquely staged and delightfully costumed, these 
presentations were well received by large audiences. It is difficult 
to tell which enjoyed the presentation more, the audiences who 
marveled at our children's ability, or the children themselves, who 
were making their first public appearance. 

Smaller musical groups within the school have been active 
this year. The Girls' Glee Club, which has for many years given 
concerts, continued its activity this year under the direction 
of Mrs. Carr. This group presented pleasing programs before 
schools, church organizations and women's clubs, and is a practical 
example of what Perkins does for its pupils. Along with the music 
programs, the girls invariably give demonstrations of Braille writ- 
ing and reading and other scholastic methods. A newer group is 
the Boys' Glee Club which this year has given programs before 
many organizations. A most interesting trip down the harbor to 
sing at the city home on Long Island in which both clubs partici- 
pated took place on April 11. A third active group this year has 
been the Boys' Orchestra which carried on a program of concerts 
on a professional basis, and gave a series of broadcasts over Station 
WCRB. The training of these groups is part of the Music De- 
partment's program, supplementing the large amount of individual 
teaching given to pupils in harmony, voice and instruments and 
available to all pupils with aptitude in music. 

School Sports 

Another department which is deserving of special mention this 
year is that of physical education. Athletically the School has had 
an active year both on the girls' and boys' side as well as in the 
Lower School. The girls in the Upper School under the able lead- 
ership of Miss Pinkham have had a consistent program of physical 
training and recreational activities. These have included swim- 
ming, walking, dancing and gym work. Throughout the year 
there have been competitions in several fields by the cottage groups, 
culminating in the field day on May 25 when May Cottage was 
winner. This victory was celebrated on June 7 with a banquet 
held in May Cottage with teachers and staff members as waitresses 

27 



and all the girls as guests. In the Lower School a program of play 
activity was carefully planned and conducted by Miss Siebert, and 
much stress was put on good posture with the help of Miss Smith. 

On the boys' side in the Upper School the physical education 
program was directed by Ben Smith, assisted by the house masters. 
In the wrestling season he was also helped by Ben Mottelson, a 
graduate student at Harvard who gave instruction in this sport. 
During the fall months the traditional tournament in football was 
held between the four cottages. This resulted in a tie victory 
between Bridgman and Eliot Cottages and was celebrated by the 
annual football banquet held on November 22 at Moulton Cottage. 
The major sport during the winter term was wrestling. This 
year Perkins had a notable season. Meets were held with Needham, 
Attleboro and Wellesley High Schools, and with Andover, Browne 
and Nichols, Noble and Greenough, Tabor, Milton, St. Marks and 
Exeter Academies. Of these meets Perkins won five and lost five. 
The big event in the wrestling program, however, was the meet 
held in Staunton, Virginia, February 20 and 21 by the Eastern 
Athletic Association of Schools for the Blind. Perkins sent a team 
of nine boys with three masters to Virginia to participate in this 
event with eight other schools for the blind. Perkins won the meet 
with twenty-four points, and it is interesting to note that our boys 
won but one match, whereas every boy scored points in other 
matches, making enough to bring victory. This trip gave oppor- 
tunity for association with boys in other schools for the blind, and 
provided opportunity for our pupils to visit historic places In 
Virginia, in the District of Columbia, and in New York. 

Another meet of the Eastern Athletic Association of Schools 
for the Blind was the culmination of the spring track season. Fol- 
lowing meets with the Watertown High School and other local 
schools, Perkins athletes concentrated on preparation for the Asso- 
ciation meet which was held at Perkins on Saturday, May 15. On 
the day before, seven boys and one master from each of eight 
schools for the blind arrived at Perkins for the week-end. The 
event itself proved to be a notable occasion. Judged and directed 
by professionals, it attracted wide publicity in the local press and 
on the radio. In this event, the Virginia team, host of the previous 
meet where Perkins was victor, won the championship. Perkins 
secured third place. On that evening a banquet was held in Dwight 
Hall for all the Perkins Upper School boys and the many guests. 



28 



This proved to be one of the most delightful events of athletic and 
social history in Perkins. 

On the week-end of November 14, five girls and a teacher from 
Perkins joined with similar groups from five other schools for a 
week-end playday held at Perkins. Over the week-end of May 28, 
five boy scouts accompanied by Mr. Smith joined in a camping 
week-end with scouts of other schools for the blind at the Overbrook 
School in Philadelphia. This interchange of pupil activities and 
visits among our special schools is one that we now want to encour- 
age as it was impossible during the war years. 

Children op the Silent Night 

This has been an active and successful year for the Deaf-Blind 
Department under the leadership of Mrs. Gittzus. We have had 
eight boys and girls under instruction and all of them have made 
adequate progress. This is not as large a number of pupils as 
in earlier years because of the difficulty we are having in securing 
enough trained teachers. There is still a crying need throughout 
the country for the education of more deaf-blind children and every 
effort is being made to find and to train teachers so that this depart- 
ment may more adequately serve these doubly handicapped children. 

This year marked the completion of the education of three of 
the deaf-blind pupils who came to Perkins as little children and 
are now grown up and one who was here for four years. The first 
of these is Leonard Dowdy who was the first pupil to be taught 
wholly by the oral method. Because of his attractiveness and 
promise Leonard has been one of the most interesting pupils that 
this department has ever had. During the sixteen years he has 
been here Leonard has matured into a fine appearing and well- 
mannered young man. While he had not completed sufficient aca- 
demic work to be graduated from high school as "Tad" Chapman 
was in 1935, he has reached the level of his school achievement. 
Now twenty-one years old it was felt that the time had come for 
him to have specific training in skills which v^^ould be the means 
of his livelihood. Arrangements were therefore made for Leonard 
to enter in June, the shop of the Industrial Home for the Blind In 
Brooklyn which is doing notable work in vocational training for 
deaf-blind men. At the Home Leonard was welcomed by Robert 
Smithdas, a deaf -blind graduate of Perkins in 1945, who is living 
at the Industrial Home while attending St. John's University where 
he is on the Dean's List for high scholarship. 

29 



Three girls in the department terminated their work this 
year. The first is Gloria Shipman who, like Leonard, came from 
Missouri. Gloria has been at Perkins eleven years and is now 
twenty years of age. During these years she has developed good 
speech and while achieving a great deal of academic learning, she 
has shown unusual skill in homemaking. Gloria has also developed 
hand skills which can be employed in home industries or in a shel- 
tered shop. She has a well adjusted personality which enables her 
to face life with great cheer and competence. Another is Carmella 
Otero of New Jersey, now twenty-one and quite a contrast to Gloria 
in that she is small of stature and very shy. She has developed 
good speech and has made fine progress academically, but Is not as 
out-going as Gloria. Possessing a demure personality Carmella is 
deeply religious and might well find happiness, if it could be ar- 
ranged, in an institution of her church. The third pupil to termi- 
nate her career here is Janice Gonyea who, when she came to Per- 
kins in 1944, had partial sight but was totally deaf. She had not 
developed speech which was complicated by dental deficiencies. 
While at Perkins these were overcome, speech developed, and 
through operations her sight was restored to a point where she 
is no longer considered a blind child. Her family having moved 
from Massachusetts to New York, arrangements were made for 
her to enter a school for the deaf in that state. In place of these 
four, three new pupils have already been accepted for the coming 
year and it is hoped that more may be added during the year 

In November the annual appeal was sent out to about 11,000 
persons throughout the country. Once again a little calendar was 
sent with the appeal. This had a picture of Juanita, our attractive 
little girl from Colorado, talking with Barbara, a Massachusetts 
child whom we have been helping this year by visits to her home, 
and who will be a pupil of the school this coming year. The re- 
sponse to our appeal was again generous and for that we are 
grateful Fifteen hundred contributors gave a total of 51b,o»y.t>u. 
mile a personal letter of thanks was written to each contributor, 
we want again to convey our appreciation for what they have done 
to continue and to advance the work for our Children of the Silent 
Night. 

Events of the Year 
The routine events of the year to which reference has previ- 
ously been made include many which are not covered by the reports 

30 



of the several school departments. These are of a general nature 
such as the conferences and retreats held over the first week-end 
in October and the first week-end in May by the Protestant and 
Catholic Guilds for the Blind. The Catholic boys went again to 
Campion Hall in Andover on both occasions, while the girls, as In 
previous years, held their retreats at the Cenacle in Brighton. The 
Protestant Guild planned for the girls to go to the Farrington 
Memorial Center in Lincoln, while a new plan was developed for 
the conduct of the boys' conferences in that they were held in the 
Town of Duxbury, with the Episcopal and Congregational churches 
co-operating with services within their buildings, and with the 
boys living in families in the community. These proved very 
happy innovations and the boys enjoyed this opportunity to visit 
in homes. All of the pupils came under the spiritual direction of 
qualified leaders. This does a great deal to enrich their lives and 
to strengthen their faith. We are indebted to the two guilds as 
well as to the Boston Aid for the Blind, who helped Jewish pupils, 
for these services, as well as for the provision made for religious 
instruction on Thursday afternoons throughout the school year. 

Early events of the fall of special interest, were the annual 
reception for the staff held at the Director's house on October 15, 
and the visit to the school on October 28 of Tom Brenaman, who 
delighted the pupils with his line of chatter. The Educational 
Buyers Association, holding their annual fall meeting at M. I. T. 
and Simmons College, came to Perkins on October 29. Mr. Hemphill 
acted as host and the pupils sang. On November 9 girls of the 
Upper School went to the Boston Navy Yard and enjoyed visiting 
"Old Ironsides" and more modern ships of the Navy. On Novem- 
ber 5 a number of pupils attended a presentation of the "Barretts 
of Wimpole Street" by the Winchester Players. During the fall 
months the Community Fund was stressed and practically 100% 
of the staff and pupils of Perkins made a contribution of $858.40. 
Later $410.50 was contributed to the American Red Cross. 

Two annual events in the month of November were the ob- 
servances of Founder's Day in the Lower School and Howe Day 
in the Upper School. At the former held on November 7 tribute 
was paid to Michael Anagnos, second Director of Perkins and 
founder of the kindergarten. A unique program was presented, 
during which the younger children walked in procession to the 
statue of Michael Anagnos in the Lower School quadrangle and 
placed floral offerings at its base, while the rest of the school sang 

31 



the "Founder's Song." The Howe memorial exercises in memory 
of the first Director were observed on his birthday, November 10, 
and followed the traditional pattern of recitations of events in the 
life of Samuel Gridley Howe, by members of the Howe Memorial 
Club with remembrances and appreciation this year by Henry H. 
Richards, grandson of Dr. Howe. 

Thanksgiving was marked by a long week-end when nearly 
all pupils were able to go home. December was spent largely in 
preparing for the Christmas Concerts. There were also the annual 
Christmas parties held on Monday evening, December 15, in all of 
the cottages. The pupils left for the two weeks holiday after the 
Christmas Concert on December 19. The winter term was broken 
this year by a long week-end over Washington's Birthday, which 
coming on Sunday was observed on Monday. Most of the pupils 
went home Friday night, returning in time for school on Tuesday 

morning. 

Many recitals by individuals and groups in the Music Depart- 
ment were given during the winter term. A series of six confer- 
ences was held for the matrons under the leadership of the Direc- 
tor Dr Hayes and Miss Marshall, during which many problems 
were discussed. "The Housemothers' Guide" by Edith M. Stern 
was used as a text for these conferences. Other conferences of 
interest were those this winter by the Department of Personnel 
with the representatives of the several states sending pupils to 
Perkins. In these conferences the future plans and vocational ob- 
jectives of the pupils were discussed. Teas were held on Wednesday 
afternoons for the members of the staff and the Harvard Class at 
the Director's house. 

The spring term is always one of much activity. There were 
recitals by pupils of the Music Department, and eleven one act 
plays, eight of which were in radio form, presented under the 
direction of Miss Claudia Potter. Several groups from outside 
of the school came in to hold meetings at Perkins. On April 27 
the New England Association of Piano Tuners were the guests of 
the Piano Tuning Department under the leadership of Mr. Durfee. 
On May 7, Miss Marshall, our psychiatric social worker, was the 
hostess to the New England branch of the Psychiatric Association 
which held its spring meeting at Perkins. On the afternoon and eve- 
ning of May 24 the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Council of 
Organizations for the Blind was held. A supper was served followed 

32 




MACHINE TOOL WORK IN THE SHOP 



SEWING IN GIRLS' MANUAL TRAINING 




/ 


\ 


) 


'1. 


►i. . 




^. 


M^ 




MACHINE TOOL WORK IN THE SHOP 



SEWING IN GIRLS' MANUAL TRAINING 




by a session at which the speaker was Michael J. Shortley, Head of 
the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation in Washington. On June 2, 
all of the cottages held their annual picnics at various resorts and 
beaches. On several afternoons during the spring term the boys 
were able to attend professional baseball games through the court- 
esy of the Red Sox, while on May 1, Victor Raschi, star pitcher for 
the New York Yankees, whose brother is a student at Perkins came 
to the school and talked to the pupils. 

Graduation and Graduates 

Graduation exercises were held on Tuesday afternoon, June 
15. Dr. Reginald Fitz, President of the Corporation, presided, 
while the commencement address was made by the Rev. John 
Crocker, Litt. D., Headmaster of the Groton School, and the in- 
vocation was given by the Rev. L. Wendell Hughes, Minister of 
the First Unitarian Parish in Watertown. Four girls and three 
boys completed the requirements for graduation and diplomas were 
awarded to them. Manual Training Certificates for proficiency 
in that department were given to Dorothy H. Appleby and Esther 
A. Blanchette. A Commercial Department Certificate was given to 
Jeanne T. Bryan, one of the graduates who, during the summer, 
secured a position as Ediphonist and telephone operator at Sacred 
Heart College in Newton. Certificates of the Tuning Department 
were given to four young men including one of the boys from 
Greece. Nils A. Johanson and Francis E. Devino are building up 
businesses and the latter has organized a successful orchestra. The 
fourth in the department was Miguel Ruiz who came to Perkins 
on a national scholarship from Arizona, and recently reported that 
he is earning $50 a week at tuning in his home state. 

One of the graduates was a young Greek, Panaghiotis Theo- 
doropoulos, who came from Greece in 1946 and in two years was 
able to complete three years of work which won for him a Perkins 
diploma. Two other young men from Greece have also spent two 
years at Perkins, and completed their work in June. Emanuel 
Kaphakis completed the Harvard Course and arrangements have 
been made for him to assume leadership in the School for the 
Blind near Athens. John Papazoglou, a young man of talent who 
studied music, also took the full piano tuning course and received 
a certificate as qualified to service and tune pianos. He is to es- 
tablish a tuning business and give instruction in that field in 



Greece. Two other young blind men came from Greece at the same 
time as the three in Perkins, all under the auspices of the Amer- 
ican Friends of the Blind in Greece, and they spent the two years 
studying agriculture at the Barnes School for the Blind in New 
Hampshire. All five left New York for Greece late in July, and 
they will provide good trained leadership for the work for the blind 
in their homeland. 

Former Perkins graduates have achieved success in the aca- 
demic world according to reports received during the year. On 
June 10 Albert Gayzagian was graduated from Harvard Univer- 
sity, magna cum laude, and elected to membership in Phi Beta 
Kappa. Albert attended Perkins from kindergarten until he was 
transferred to the Watertown High School from which he grad- 
uated. William F. Gallagher, Perkins '43, received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from Holy Cross in June. During the past year 
he was vice-president of the senior class. Edmund E. Berube, Jr., 
Perkins '46, was named to the Council of the class of 1950 at Brown 
University. Evan Rempel, Perkins '47, and now at the University 
of Montana, ranked among the first 100 students in the college of 
3300 students. 

Staff Changes 
There were more staff changes this year than last; seventeen 
resignations and two retirements, most of them taking place at 
the end of the year in June. The largest change was in the field 
of matrons. Two matrons, Mrs. Ruth E. Geer of Fisher Cottage 
in the Girls' Upper School and Miss Ethel M. Goodwin of Bradlee 
Cottage in the Lower School, terminated their work in June after 
serving twenty-one and twenty-five years respectively. They are 
the only two remaining matrons who were in service when the 
present administration began seventeen years ago. Their years 
of devoted service are deeply appreciated. Mrs. Florence B. Rob* 
ison will act as Matron in Bradlee Cottage, and Miss Judith G. Sil- 
vester, for several years connected with the Deaf-Blind Depart- 
ment will assume the matronship of Fisher Cottage, which is to 
be used entirely by that department. Mrs. Margaret Fairweather, 
who has been at Potter Cottage for a year, resigned, and Mrs. 
Janet G. Hancock, who has been Matron of Anagnos since 1936, 
gave up her work in that cottage to assume the matronship of 
Moulton Cottage in the Boys' Upper School, taking the place of 

34 



Mrs. Frieda Jablonske who has resigned. Mrs. Fairweather's place 
will be taken by Miss Marie A. Carter, and Mrs. Beatrice Wakefield 
will succeed Mrs. Hancock. This makes three new matrons in the 
Lower School group. 

Marriage was the reason for the resignations of the following 
group of young women: Miss Marion Hosken and Miss Gertrude 
D. Seibert, teachers in the Lower School; Miss Janet H. Chick and 
Miss Caroline H. Gray in the Girls' Upper School. Other resigna- 
tions included Miss Beverley Havener, assistant in the Bursar's 
office; Miss Beatrice F. Pinkham, teacher of physical education in 
the Girls' Upper School; George Faulkner and Miss Elizabeth C. 
Hart, teachers of music; Miss Mary F. Davies, Miss Linda L. 
Mosher and Miss Bertha Feinberg, teachers in the Lower School; 
and Frank Hilliard, teacher of caning. Miss Marjorie Potter, res- 
ident Nurse, resigned to go overseas to work in a camp for dis- 
placed children under the American Unitarian Association. She 
is now engaged in this work in Germany. Miss Mary H. Ferguson, 
who has completed twenty-seven years of teaching in the Girls' 
Upper School and in recent years headed the Commercial Depart- 
ment, gave up her work under the Perkins Retirement Plan. 

New staff members for the coming year include Miss Margaret 
F. Bishop, graduate of Massachusetts General Hospital Nursing 
School as resident Nurse; Miss Adeline Dale, Jamestown College '42, 
teacher of physical education in the Lower School; Miss Margaret G. 
Bigelow, Bridgewater Teachers' College, '47, teacher of physical ed- 
ucation in the Girls' Upper School; Samuel E. Price, University of 
Massachusetts '48, teacher of physical education and poultry. Boys' 
Upper School; Miss Nancy C. Jones, Wheelock College '48, and Miss 
J. Elizabeth Andrews, Mt. Holyoke '48, Kindergarten teachers; Miss 
Winifred G. Ellis, Mt. Holyoke '13, teacher of commercial subjects; 
Miss Marion K. Liversidge, Modern School of Fashion and 
Design '47, teacher of sewing and practical arts; Bernard P. Bar- 
beau, New England Conservatory of Music '48, voice teacher; Miss 
Betty Jane Wenzel, New England Conservatory of Music '48, 
teacher of music in the Lower School; Maurie Edelstein, Indiana 
University '48, part-time assistant in psychology; Mrs. Julia Edel- 
stein, assistant in the Library; Mrs. Patricia M. Huddleston, West- 
ern Michigan College '48, craft teacher in the Deaf-Blind Depart- 
ment; Miss Audrey White and Miss Dorothy Reynolds, attendants 

35 



in that department, and Miss Jacqueline L. McNally, assistant 
in the business office. Miss Marion A. Woodworth, who has been 
employed in the Library has been transferred to the administra- 
tion offices as Registrar. 

The enrollment of the school as of October 1, 1948 was 243 
compared with 258 a year ago. Last year we were carrying on the 
roll fifteen pupils who had been transferred to schools in their 
home communities. This year there are eight such pupils makmg 
the number in residence 235 compared with 243 last year. This 
shows a drop of eight, but before October closed seven pupils de- 
layed in entering were admitted, bringing the total to 242 or one 
below last year. During the year 46 pupils were added and 54 
were discharged. The reasons for discharge were: graduated — 7; 
completed scholarships — 3 ; completed post-graduate work — 4; 
completed other training — 8; transferred to public schools or 
sight-saving classes — 21; ceased to progress — 7; withdrew vol- 
untarily — 2; withdrew on account of illness — 2. 

The 235 pupils enrolled October 1, 1948 are divided as follows: 
Massachusetts — 129; Maine — 29; New Hampshire — 15 ; Rhode 
Island — 24; Vermont — 14; and from other states — 24. This 
year we have students from three foreign countries — China, Haiti 
and Mexico, and from sixteen states other than New England — 
Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, 
Montana, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania, South Carolina, Tennessee and Washington. 

New Library Facilities 

The last Annual Report and several previous reports cited the 
great need for more space for the Perkins Library, which not only 
serves the school, but is one of the twenty-six distributing libra- 
ries for the books furnished to the adult blind through the Library 
of Congress. This work through the years has grown to such an 
extent, that the available facilities were far from adequate. It 
was thought at the time that there was no way in which more space 
could be provided within the present Howe Building. Studies had 
been made for a new and separate library building, which would 
not only provide space for the books-recorded, embossed and in mk- 
print, but would also give other needed facilities such as a recrea- 
tion center for the staff, rooms for the Harvard Class and Talking 

36 



Book reading, and space for the extension of the Museum and for 
research. 

The plans for a new building had actually been prepared, and 
the Trustees had reached a point of readiness to proceed with con- 
struction, when a new solution for the whole problem was discovered. 
This new plan was approved at the June meeting of the Trustees, 
and authorization given for the necessary construction and changes. 
The work began at the close of the school, and has proceeded through 
the summer vacation. The needed space for the library books was 
ready at the opening of school, although the finishing touches, and 
some of the facilities for other purposes were not fully completed, 
but by the time this report is published they will surely be ready 
and will be fully functioning. 

The space needed to shelve more books was provided by taking 
out the reading tables between stacks in the present library; 
moving the old stacks closer together in the front two-thirds of the 
library, and installing in the rear third a steel balcony. Metal 
stacks on the floor and balcony levels provide space for 25,000 ad- 
ditional volumes. The chief difficulty in making these changes 
was in continuing to serve efficiently our readers outside of the 
school. It would happen that during this time the demand for 
books reached a new high. During the year the circulation of 
books totaled 34,728 volumes of which 26,324 were outside the 
school. This figure divides into 18,802 recorded sets and 7,522 em- 
bossed volumes, showing the rising ascendency of Talking Book 
use. The main library accessioned 309 sets of Talking Books and 
1,116 volumes of embossed books, while the Lower School branch 
library added 312 volumes. The library gave away 441 volumes to 
China, Japan, the Philippines, Jerusalem, Greece and Holland. 

To secure reading space and to get much needed study halls, 
two new rooms are being erected on terraces at the rear of the 
Howe Building. One adjoins the library and the other Dwight 
Hall. These extensions will provide attractive rooms, ninety by 
eighteen feet, with windows on one long side overlooking the river. 
The rooms are adequate to accommodate the boys and the girls of 
the Upper School. Facilities are being installed for Talking Book 
reading and recording. These are still under construction. A 
fuller description will be postponed until the next report. 

Other changes necessary to gain facilities planned for the new 
building have been made in the Howe Building. The Harvard Class 

37 



will occupy the former girls' assembly room. The Board room and 
Director's office, has been furnished as a comfortable lounge for the 
staff members, with an adjoining room equipped with a combina- 
tion gas stove, refrigerator, sink and other facilities for serving 
refreshments. The group of rooms recently used by the Deaf -Blind 
Department has been completely re-designed to provide offices for 
the administrative and educational staff with space for the cen- 
tralization of the files and records. This change has made more 
space available in the corresponding wing on the other side, for the 
business offices, needed because of the transfer of many of the 
business functions from the Treasurer's office in Boston to the office 
of the Bursar in Watertown. In addition, the bookkeeping of the 
Howe Memorial Press and the Workshop will also be centralized 
in Watertown. 

The Deaf-Blind Department classrooms which were in the 
space now appropriated by the offices, are to be in Fisher Cottage, 
where for two or three years the deaf-blind girls have been living. 
The small enrollment in the Girls' Upper School has made it pos- 
sible to assign this whole cottage for the Deaf-Blind Department. 
A study of enrollment indicates that this space can be occupied for 
two or three years. For several years the boys in the Lower School 
outnumbered the girls. When this balance is readjusted, it will 
be necessary to find other quarters for the Deaf-Blind Department 
as the Girls' Upper School will then need all four cottages. It has 
been proposed that when this time comes, the Director's house be 
made the Deaf-Blind center, as it lends itself admirably to that 
purpose, and that a smaller and more modern house be provided for 
the Director and his family. 

The Workshop and The Press 

The Workshop in South Boston has had a good year although 
it was not as active as the year before because fewer mattresses 
were received for re-making. Four thousand and ninety-four 
mattresses were re-made, and one thousand, two hundred and 
ninety-two chairs were re-caned. This gave employment to twenty- 
two blind persons who, under the new plan of adding to piece 
rates, supplementary payments on the basis of the cost-of-living 
index, earned substantial compensation for their work. Mr. Bryan, 
the Manager, was ill for several weeks during the year, but other 
members of the staff carried on the work in an effective way. 

38 



Because of his illness and the fact that he was past the retirement 
age, Mr. Bryan has been led to feel that the time has come for his 
retirement. During the forty years he has been associated with the 
shop, Mr. Bryan has given able leadership to this work and has 
devoted his whole life to the blind. To take up Mr. Bryan's work 
Perkins is fortunate in securing Fred G. Marsh, who brings to 
the position as Manager of the Workshop a wide business experi- 
ence, and a human interest in people. He joined the staff on Aug- 
ust 15, while Mr. Bryan relinquishes his work and goes on retire- 
ment on October 1, 1948. 

In addition to managing the Workshop, Mr. Bryan has been 
the efficient director of the Howe Memorial Press, and is one of the 
world's greatest authorities on technical aspects of Braille. Mr. 
Bryan was the first person to introduce interpoint Braille, and had 
a large part in the transition of stereotyping from foot operated 
machines to the present efficient electrically operated machines. In 
the report of two years ago it was announced that Edward J. Wat- 
erhouse would begin to assume management of the Howe Mem- 
orial Press. During this year he has been in charge of the Appli- 
ance Department, which, as announced in the report of last year, 
was moved from South Boston to new facilities in Watertown. The 
stereotyping and printing operations of the Howe Press have con- 
tinued at South Boston under the direction of Mr. Bryan, and more 
pages were embossed and m.ore printing done than in any previous 
year. During the year 812,261 pages of embossed literature were 
printed. This included nineteen books in sixty volumes for the Li- 
brary of Congress, and the textbooks and music for Perkins and 
other schools. "The Lantern" and other periodicals were also 
embossed in Braille by the Howe Press. 

The chief activity of the Howe Press during this year has been 
the preparation for the production of the Perkins Brailler, the 
newly developed writing device which has been received with great 
favor, and which is awaited by many Braille writers. This Brailler 
has, as was explained in the report of last year, many new features 
never before incorporated in a machine for embossed writing. In 
the tooling and the preparing for the production, Perkins has been 
joined by the American Foundation for the Blind, which has agreed 
to substitute this new Brailler for the writer which it formerly 
produced. Tooling has been unexpectedly difficult and the securing 

39 



of materials has been a factor in delaying the progress. It was 
expected that at the end of this year Braille writers would be m 
production, but now it looks as if they would not be ready until the 
close of the coming year. Mr. Waterhouse had the Braille writer on 
exhibition at the convention of the American Association of Work- 
ers for the Blind in St. Paul, Minnesota in July, and at several 
conferences of home teachers. Wherever it has been demonstrated, 
it has been received with loud acclaim, and when it is finally pro- 
duced it will be with the hope that Perkins has made a great con- 
tribution in this device. ^ 

One of the most interesting activities of the Howe Memorial 
Press is the publishing of what is known as the BraUle Map- 
of-the-Month, initiated in December 1937 by Mr. Waterhouse. 
A map issued in May was the one hundredth map produced in the 
series and to mark that event the Howe Press offered a prize for 
the best essay, open to all blind high school pupils, on the subject 
-What the Braille Map-of-the-Month teaches me." This prize was 
won by Jon van Demark of the eighth grade Braille class in the 
Sheridan High School in Minneapolis. The May Map-of-the-Month 
embossed with dots and lines depicted the countries of western 
Europe and the accompanying text told of the Marshall Plan. 
These maps have been increasingly welcomed as the years go on, 
and the circulation now totals 560 maps a month sent to eighteen 
countries. 

Extending The Horizon 
The Harvard Class continued its usual courses sponsored by 
the Graduate School of Education of Harvard University and con- 
ducted at Perkins. While the class was smaller than it was m pre- 
war years, it showed the very wide representation in its member- 
ship which is growingly characteristic of this group. Of the eight 
members, one-half came from foreign countries: Puerto Rico, 
Greece, Haiti and British Guiana. Of the other four members 
three were young women from Scripps College, California, West- 
minster College, Pennsylvania and the Yale School of Music. The 
fourth member was a teacher in a sight-saving class m the Fall 
River Schools, who came up each week-end for the lectures. A 
voung man employed in the Veterans Administration Office m 
Boston joined the class for the second half year. The usual course 
of lectures, demonstrations and observations of work were carried 

40 




APTITUDE TESTING BEFORE GRADUATION 



THE HARVARD CLASS HAS MEMBERS FROM SOUTH DAKOTA, 
MASSACHUSETTS, NEW YORK, CHINA, NICARAGUA, EGYPT 




out chiefly under the leadership of Dr. Hayes, with the Director 
giving a number of lectures, and Dr. Allen, Director Emeritus, 
giving his usual series of historical talks. Although in his eighty- 
sixth year. Dr. Allen, who founded the course twenty-eight years 
ago, still lectures with vigor and conviction. 

While the Harvard Class is one of the chief mediums of ex- 
tending the horizons of those who live at Perkins, we are also 
fortunate in having many visitors from different countries. This 
year has brought visitors from Africa, Australia, China, Eygpt, 
England, Greece, Palestine, Peru and Sweden. Some come only 
for a day while others stay longer. A few of them speak to the 
school. During the spring our pupils had the advantage of having 
mesages from Dr. Emma Zaludok, Head of the School for the Blind 
in Jerusalem on April 7; from Victor Raul Haya de la Torre, one 
of the great leaders of Peru, who addressed the school on April 28 ; 
from Bishop Haworth of China, who was passing through this 
country on his way to England with a group of Chinese leaders on 
May 7; from Mr. S. W. Hedger, head of the work for the blind in 
Melbourne, Australia, who spent several days at Perkins, and spoke 
to the pupils on May 31. Mrs. Putman, who receives visitors and 
shows them about the school, reports that during the year there 
have been over 800 visitors, including persons from fourteen for- 
eign countries, eleven hospitals, eighteen colleges and schools, and 
that thirty-four clubs have sent groups to visit the school. 

Losses Through Death 

Death has taken a heavy toll among our people this year, al- 
though fortunately there were none among our pupils or active 
staff members. One of our former staff members, Elwyn H. 
Fowler, passed away on July 29. Mr. Fowler was graduated from. 
Perkins in 1889. In 1911 he became head of the Pianoforte Tuning 
Department and retired in 1945. While Mr, Fowler did a fine work 
in training young men, perhaps his greatest contribution to the 
cause of the blind, was his active participation in the "battle of 
the types" which waged for nearly a century in the effoi't to secure 
uniform type. Mr. Fowler played a leading part in the victory 
in 1932, while his late wife also made a notable contribution as 
secretary of the committee. 

Another early graduate who passed away this year was Mrs. 
Mabel Brown Spencer who died on February 12 in the Memorial 

41 



Home, Worcester, founded by the late Mrs. Fowler. Mrs. Spencer 
entered Perkins in 1875, one year before the death of Dr. Howe and 
left certified as a teacher of music in 1883. She was the next to 
the last surviving pupil who knew the first Director. Death of 
another former student was that of Professor Charles H. Amadon, 
who passed away in York, Nebraska on June 6. Professor Amadon 
was graduated from Perkins in 1900 and from the New England 
Conservatory of Music in 1906. For thirty-four years he had been 
the successful and beloved Dean of the Conservatory of Music at 
York College. Many tributes were paid to him by members of the 
college community, and the recreation room in a new dormitory 
under construction is being named in his memory. 

Death deprived Perkins of an active worker through the death 
on May 16 of Mrs. Mabel Knowles Gage of Worcester. Mrs. Gage 
had been a most devoted Trustee of Perkins since 1933, a bene- 
factor and officer of the National Braille Press, and one of the early 
Trustees of the American Foundation for the Blind. Through- 
out her life, Mrs. Gage took a personal and beneficent interest in 
the blind, and was always generous in good works on their behalf. 
Another death which must be reported, was that of Mrs. Maude 
Howe Elliott on March 19. Living to the age of ninety-three, one 
can only rejoice over her long and rich life. Mrs. Elliott was the 
last surviving daughter of the first Director. Samuel Gridley Howe 
and his wife, Julia Ward Howe. Her death breaks the last tie with 
the original generation of the founders of Perkins. Throughout 
her life, Mrs. Elliott retained a close relationship with our school. 
Until advancing years made it impossible, she came year after year 
from her home in Newport to the Howe Memorial Exercises held 
annually at the school. Mrs. Elliott always referred to herself as 
a true child of Perkins, as she was born within the old Institution 
in South Boston, whereas all the other Howe daughters were born 
outside the Institution. 

An event of the year associated with the first Director was the 
observance of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Walter 
G. Fernald School, now located in Waverley, which adjoins Water- 
town. The anniversary exercises were part of the Convention of 
the American Society for Mental Hygiene and the Second Inter- 
national Conference on Mental Hygiene which was being held in 
Boston. Tribute was paid at the exercises to Dr. Samuel Gridley 
Howe, as the Fernald School looks upon him as its Founder. Not 

42 



long after Dr. Howe established Perkins, the first school for the 
blind, and had achieved great success in the education of Laura 
Bridgman, he turned his attention to other unfortunate children. 
Believing that more effective work could be done with the mentally 
retarded or "idiots," as they were called in that day, he gathered 
a small group in the portion of Perkins which was assigned for 
the Director's residence, and began exploring new methods of train- 
ing. In 1847, the legislature recognized the work being done by 
Dr. Howe, and made an appropriation for the building of a separate 
structure not far from Perkins as the home for his new venture. 
Some time later, under the leadership of Dr. Fernald, the large 
and beautiful plant in Waverley was built, and in recognition of 
his constructive leadership the school was given his name. There 
is a certain irony in the fact that the two schools founded by Dr. 
Howe, each the first of its kind, should bear the names of other 
men. Despite this fact, it can truly be said that within these 
schools, and quoting the words of the famous "Battle Hymn" 
wr.'tten by his distinguished wife, "His soul goes marching on." 

Activities of the Director 

The Director has, through the year, continued to serve on the 
several Boards of national organizations for the blind on which 
he represents Perkins. One group in which there has been a 
special interest this year is the American Foundation for Overseas 
Blind, of which he is a director and member of the Executive Com- 
mittee. This Foundation, created to take over the program and 
activities of the American Braille Press for War and Civilian 
Blind in France, maintains a Paris office and staff, and is now en- 
gaged in an extensive program of assisting organizations for the 
blind throughout Europe to reestablish their work. The Director 
was asked to join a small group headed by Helen Keller to visit 
organized work for the blind, beginning in Japan and reaching 
through the Far East, the Near East and down through the Med- 
iterranean. Because of the demands of work here, it was not pos- 
sible to take on this interesting opportunity. Perkins, however, 
continues to carry on a heavy correspondence with workers for the 
blind throughout the world, and in many cases is able to help with 
supplies and with counsel. 

Coming back to local affairs, it may be reported that the Direc- 
tor has acted for a second year as President of the Massachusetts 

43 



Council of Organizations for the Blind. The Council has had 
regular quarterly meetings and acts as a clearing house for the 
many public and private agencies in the Commonwealth. The 
Council this year has been stressing the importance of rehabilita- 
tion work, and has been seeking ways to help the State Division 
of the Blind to enlarge its program in this area. Arthur F. Sulli- 
van, Perkins '05, has been for five years, the Director of the Divi- 
sion of the Blind, and during the summer was appointed by the 
Governor for another five-year term. The Massachusetts legisla- 
ture in May passed a resolution, introduced by Representative 
George Green, a former student of Perkins, setting up a Recess 
Commission to study the program for the blind in this state, and 
to make recommendations if new legislation is found essential. 
Early in the year, the Director prepared the article on Blind- 
ness for the "Encyclopedia of Social Work," and later he wrote the 
lead article for the June issue of the "Outlook for the Blind" which 
was commemorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding 
of the American Foundation for the Blind. This article was on 
"The Foundation and Education." During the winter he wrote 
two chapters of the book, "Blindness in the Modern World" to 
be published by the National Research Council. Quarterly, "The 
Lantern" has been edited and published as it has been now for 
seventeen years. The more recent issues are an improvement over 
the ones during the war, because it is possible to get a better grade 
of paper. The response to "The Lantern" is very gratifying to 
those who prepare it. Perkins' former students and many other 
blind people appreciate greatly, according to their reports, the 
Braille edition. The ink-print edition, which goes to schools and 
workers for the blind throughout the world, and to many other in- 
terested people, also brings a response for which we are most grate- 
ful. An interesting aspect of the appreciation of "The Lantern" 
has been the portions of it which are re-printed in publications 
in our field both in this country and abroad. Mrs. G. Pisart, a 
worker in The Lighthouse in New York City, while traveling in 
France wrote, "I saw a copy of 'The Lantern' at the school in 
Bordeaux. 'What a thrill it gave me!' " 

In October, the Director and Dr. Samuel P. Hayes, Head of 
the Department of Research and Personnel, attended a three-day 
conference on Vocational Guidance for the Blind, called by the 

44 



United States Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, and conducted 
at the University of Michigan by the Department of Social Adjust- 
ment. At this conference, papers on many aspects of the rehabili- 
tation and adjustment of the blind were presented, and will be pub- 
lished later. Dr. Hayes presented a valuable paper on Intelligence 
and Aptitude Testing, and the Director read a paper on "Commun- 
ity and Family Problems." Dr. Hayes' paper has been enlarged to be 
a chapter in the forth-coming book, "Blindness in the Modern 
World." 

Perkins was well represented at the convention of the Amer- 
ican Association of Instructors of the Blind held in Austin, Texas, 
June 21 to 25, 1948. Thirteen staff members made the journey to 
Texas, and a review of the program shows that eleven Perkins peo- 
ple had papers or reports. At the convention, Mr. Francis M. 
Andrews was elected President. Now Superintendent of the Mary- 
land School for the Blind, he was for seventeen years Principal of 
Perkins. 

Preparing the Annual Report is in itself a writing job involv- 
ing some research and providing opportunity for building up good 
public relations. While we must be factual, we want to tell the 
story of the year's happenings in a way that will command interest 
and reward readers for the time spent. Some years there are 
notable events or even dire incidents which give color, but for the 
most part it is the same old story. But that is life, and perhaps 
should be the record of a school stabilized and moving onward for 
one hundred and eighteen years. Our greatest satisfaction in ful- 
filling this writing task is that apparently many people read the 
report, and some even take the time to write and tell us so. 

Gabriel Farrell, Director 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

OPHTHALMOLOGIST'S REPORT 
1947 — 1948 

T~\ URING THE year forty-five new children were examined. 
LJ The following is a classification of causes of blindness found 
in these children: 



Eyh Ball : 
Glaucoma 



Chokoid and Retina: 

Detachment of retina 1 

Retinitis pigmentosa * 

Albuminuria retinitis 1 



Optic Nerve : 



Stkuctukal anomalies : 

Retrolental fibroplasia 5 

Dislocated lens i ■ q 

Buphthahnos ^ Optic nerve atrophy » 

Micro-ophthalmus 1 Retrobulbar neuritis 1 

Congenital amaurosis 2 

Miscellaneous and ill defined: 

Crystalline lens: ^. . j * „j k 

Diagnosis deferred & 

Congenital catai-act o Injury by mortar fire 1 

Sympathetic ophthalmia 1 

T„i„. Glioma |- 

^"**- Metastatic endophthalraia i 



Iritis 

Coloboma 



Uveitis 



Total ■is 



Etiological Classification is as follows: 



Congenital 22 Tumor 

Infectii 

^^^^^y " Prematurity _6 

Total 45 



.... K Brain ° 

I^^^'^t^"^ I Glioma 1 



There were ninety-five clinic visits this year: 

Eye Clinic at Massachusetts Eye Refractions at Massachusetts Eye 

and Ear Infirmary 39 and Ear Infirmary ...^. 3 

Opticians at Massachusetts Eye To Mr. Bennett for plastic eyes 2 

and Ear Infirmary 12 Doctor's office -la 

Macrer and Gougelman for pros- ^ ^ , ok 

thesis 21 Total 95 

Examination of fields at Massa- 
chusetts Eye and Ear Infirmar>' 5 

Dr. Joseph Clough refracted a good many pupils this year 
with the result that tv.-enty-one pupils were fitted to new glasses, 
twenty-one prosthesis were obtained, and twenty-five pairs of 
glasses were repaired. 

The follov.'ing operations have been performed: 

Cataract extraction, O. S 1 Iridectomies S 

Conjunctival flap , 1 Stripping of cornea _1 

Biopsy and removal of glass ball 1 oi + i o 

Enucleation 1 ^°^^' 

46 



Hospital admissions for reasons other than surgery: 

Treatment of conjunctivitis — penicillin therapy 1 

Arrangements have been made for one eye operation during 
the summer. 

The visual-aid classes benefited twenty-three children this year, 
four of whom are now ready for public school sight-saving classes. 

Trygve Gundersen, M. D. 
Joseph M. Clough, M. D. 

PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 

The following is the report of the Medical Department for 
1947 — 1948: 



Operations : 

Appendectomy 1 

Exploration of sinus 1 

Tonsillectomies 3 

Repair of hernia 1 

Removal of cyst 1 

Removal of wart 1 

Incision and drainage 2 

Suturing of scalp laceration .... 3 

Suturing of lip laceration 1 

Communicable Diseases: 

Chicken pox 3 

German Measles 1 

Measles (at home) 1 



Fractures : 
Clavicle 

Tibia 

Toe 

Finger ... 



X-Rays : 

Taken at Massachusetts 
General Hospital 



19 



Chest x-rays by Public Health 

Tuberculosis Clinic G5 

Chest x-rays at Middlesex 

Sanatorium 13 

Hearing Aids Purchased 2 

Intravenous Pylograms 2 

Hospital Admissions fob Reasons 
Other Than Surgery: 

Diagnosis of ovarian cyst 1 

Lobar pneumonia _ 1 

Ether examination to rule out 
x-ray for question of fractured 

nose 1 

Clinic Visits: 

Ear, Nose, and Throat 19 

Arthritic 9 

Skin 2 

Male Medical 5 

Female Medical 4 

Surgical 15 

Hearing Test 1 

South Medical 5 

Genitourinary 4 

AUergy 1 



Each pupil had a physical examination, urinalysis, hemoglobin, 
blood pressure, examination for and removal of wax from the ears, 
and height and weight measurements every three months. 

Widals were done on all food handlers not having had the 
test previously at Perkins Institution. 

This year we immunized every student in the Lower School 
against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus. All new pupils who 
had not been vaccinated were immunized against small pox. 

Wassermann tests were done on all new pupils. 

Sixty-five visits were made to the Massachusetts General 
Hospital to the various specialized medical and surgical clinics 
there. 



47 



Three hospital admissions have been arranged for during the 
summer, two for surgery and one for neurological study. 

The children are to be congratulated on their good health this 
year. There was very little contagion, and most of the days lost 
from school were due to the 143 upper respiratory infections and 
60 gastro-intestinal disturbances suffered during the year. 

Victor Balboni, M. D. 

DENTIST'S REPORT, UPPER SCHOOL 

The following is the report of Dental Operations performed 
for the pupils of the Upper School for the year 1947-1948: 

Amalgam fillings 197 ^■^,^^\. S 

CemeSt fillings 120 Extractions 11 

Synthetic porcdain 63 Pencoronitis . 5 

yfnr. Ox;de-»u''enol 41 Vincents Stomatitis 2 

liver Nltrai^treatments' 149 Orthodontia at Forsyth 2 

Root Canal treatments 12 Office visits d 

All the pupils of the Upper School received oral prophylactic 
treatments at the Forsyth Dental Infirmary, while the deaf-blind 
pupils had their teeth cleaned in the Perkins Dental Clinic. 

Mark D. Elliott, D. D. S. 

DENTIST'S REPORT, LOWER SCHOOL 

During the school year ending June, 1948, the following dental 
operations were performed for the pupils attending the Kinder- 
garten for the Blind. 

Alloy fillings 227 MisceUaneous treatments 37 

Cement fillings 16 Temporary teeth extracted 3I 

Cement & Alloy fiUings 3 Permanent teeth extracted 4 

Synthetic porcelain fillings 18 Upper School emergencies 7 

Silver nitrate treatments 108 dumber of pupils completed 119 

Prophylactic treatments 123 Number of new pupils completed 34 

Number of teeth devitalized 2 Total number of pupils treated .... 126 

Number of treatments for above 11 

Reinhold Ruelberg, D. M. D. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

The Physical Therapy Department has striven to meet the 
orthopedic needs of the students through special mechanotherapy 
treatments, infra-red treatments, and massages. Weekly ultra- 
violet treatments have helped improve and maintain the general 
health of the students. 

48 



This year, with the cooperation of the Physical Education 
teachers of the Lower School and Boys' Upper School, we started 
a general posture training program with the Glover girls and the 
Potter boys. 

This summer George Shola is to have an operation which is 
expected to give him full range of motion of his left elbow. 

Dorothy DeAngelis is to go to the Massachusetts General 
Hospital this summer for a new knee caliper brace for her right leg. 

In December Dr. Ober examined all the new students, and in 
March he examined those who had been having special corrective 
work during the year. 

Summary 



Massachusetts General Hospital Or- 
thopedic Clinic 13 

Massachusetts General Hospital Or- 
thopedic Clinic for pads 28 

Number of arch pads purchased .... 14 

Infantile Clinic 8 

Fracture Clinic 5 



Scoliosis Clinic 1 

Cora Chandler 2 

Ultraviolet treatments 3437 

Infra-red treatments 424 

Massages 332 

Mechanotherapy treatments 1131 

Posture Classes 172 

Shirlie L. Smith 



49 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 

THE RESULTS of the year's operations were disappointing in 
that fewer mattresses were received with a consequent loss 
in sales, and the regular wage adjustments given to offset increases 
in the cost of living made the loss for the year $6,344.06. The 
manager was away a good portion of the year due to illness, but all 
our workers are to be commended for the admirable way in which 
they carried on. Our new manager, Mr. Fred G. Marsh, will soon 
take command, and we hope for him every success in our depart- 
ment. 

The operations in the Howe Press exceeded our expectations, 
as more pages were embossed and more printing done than in any 
previous year. Mr. Waterhouse, manager of the Howe Press, 
writes: "The Appliance Department in Watertown expanded its 
facilities, and in addition to manufacturing the usual devices and 
games, devoted much time to tooling for the Perkins Brailler and 
manufacturing some of its parts. Production schedule is far be- 
hind expectations but it is expected that the first of the 2,000 
machines being built v/ill be assembled late this year." 

The following is a summary of the work done and wages paid 
in the Workshop Department during the fiscal years 1947 and 1948: 

Mattresses rscsived from institutions, etc. 2.413 2,493 

Mattresses received from individuals 2,078 1,637 

Total mattresses received 4,491 4,130 

Mattresses received through the Division of 

the Blind 1,534 1,499 

New horsehair sold, pounds 6,500 5,450 

Customers' hair received, pounds 154,157 147,659 

Mattresses remade 4,657 4,094 

Chairs recaned 1,095 1,292 

Wages paid to seamstresses $ 4,052.20 $ 3,422.35 

Wages paid to mattressmakers 17,001.01 16,054.01 

Wages paid to chaircaners 5,275.57 5,777.02 

Total wages to blind workers $26,328.78 $25,253.38 

Sales for the year $72,635.43 $69,370.77 

Frank C. Bryan 
50 




MAGNIFIER IN PROCESS OF DEVELOPMENT 



BRAILLER IN PROCESS OF PRODUCTION 




HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Work Account for the Year Ending August 31, 1948 

Literature pages EMBOSSia): 

Upper School — books, periodicals, etc 1,887 

Kindergarten — book 108 

Library of Congress — 19 books in 60 volumes 10,212 



Music pages embossed: 

Upper School — 24 vocal pieces 
Kindergarten — 1 vocal piece 



Printing : 



447 
12 12,666 



Literature 464,461 

Music 32,847 

Miscellaneous 314,953 812,261 



Appliances and Games 



Made 
this year 



Distributed 
this year 



Total 
1907 to 1948 



Pocket slates 

Desk slates 

Playing card slates 

Styluses 13,089 

Erasers 

Fiber writing cards 

Clark writing grills 

Aluminum alphabets 

Signature guides 

Pegboards 

Geometry instruments 

Thermometers 

Games : 

Checkers 

Dominoes 

Anagrams 

Puzzle-Peg 

Chess 

Chinese checkers 



Playing cards, packs 



5,652 


2,200 


34,696 


813 


1,014 


36,497 


— 


72 


1,076 


3,089 


5,411 


157,346 


— 


1,203 


12,979 


3,110 


2,001 


31,632 


— 


139 


1,585 


327 


434 


2,827 


430 


155 


1,866 


130 


99 


1,619 


512 


364 


2,466 


— 


16 


782 


884 


275 


7,321 


265 


255 


5,140 


75 


26 


328 


— 


53 


1,108 


26 


22 


189 


— 


43 


867 


280 


394 


4,248 




Frank C. 


Bryan 



51 



LIST OF PUPILS 



UPPER SCHOOL BOYS 



Albee, Carl — Machias, Maine 
Arsnow, George— Fall River, Mass. 
Bizon, Robert— Chicopee, Mass.* 
Blake, George — Rochester, N. H. 
Boyd, Vernon — Lynn, Mass. 
Broadbent, Samuel— Rumford, R. I. 
Brownell, William— Saylesville, R. I. 
Clarke, Richard— Royalston, Mass. 
Conley, Paul— East Dedham, Mass. 
Conroy, John— North Bergen, N. J. 
Cordeiro, Raul— Fall River, Mass. 
Cox, Edward — LoweU, Mass. 
Crocker, Albert — Efowland, Maine 
Curtis, Harold— Belfast, Maine 
DiCaprio, Nicholas — Cleveland, Ohio 
Dostie, Robert — Auburn, Maine 
Eaton, Richard— Watertown, Mass. 
Evensen, Richard — Roslindale, Mass. 
Faragi, John — Saugus, Mass. 
Finnerty, Joseph — East Braintree, Mass. 
Flynn, John — Bangor, Maine 

Fortes, Andrew — Harwich, Mass. 

Fournier, Raymond — Lowell, Mass. 

Gasper, Alfred — Taunton, Mass. 

Germano, Manuel — Bristol, R. I. 

Hawthorne, John — Millis Falls, Mass. 

Higgins, William — Lebanon, N. H. 

Holden, David — Boston, Mass. 

Illingworth, George — Detroit, Mich. 

Kamis, Richard — Mattapan, Mass. 

Keefe, Lawrence — Woonsocket, R. I. 

Larson, John — Savage, Montana 

Leighton, Robert — Scituate, Mass. 

Leotta, Louis — East Boston, Mass. 

Little, Donald — Contoocook, N. H. 



Little, HoUis — Contoocook, N. H. 
Lopresti, Joseph — Chelsea, Mass. 
Lunden, Paul — Brattleboro, Vermont 
Malatesta, Philip — Maiden, Mass. 
McDonald, Francis — Sharon, Mass. 
McDowell, Thomas — Leominster, Mass.* 
McKenne, Thomas — WatertowTi, Mass. 
McNally, Robert — East Providence, R. I. 
Moriarty, Edward — Arlington, Mass. 
Nicholas, Oliver — Lewiston, Maine 
Ordonez, Eduardo — San Luis Potosi, Mexico 
Pereira, Arthur — New Bedford, Mass. 
Peterson, Edmund — AUston, Mass. 
Piraino, James — Gloucester, Mass. 
Raschi, Eugene — Springfield, Mass. 
Rathbun, Robert— West Medford, Mass. 
Raymond, Carl — Jericho, Vermont 
Rogers, Stephen — Medford, Mass. 
Rounds, Newton — Orleans, Vermont 
Routh, Robert— Memphis, Tennessee 
Roy, Laurent — Woonsocket, R. I. 
Salvati, Anthony — Cranston, R. I. 

Sardo, Anton — Springfield, Mass. 

Savage, Charles — Machias, Maine 

Sears, Arthur — Wendell, Mass. 

Silveira, Joseph — Newport, R. I. 

Skinner, Gardner — Danvers, Mass. 

Smith, Charles — Medford, Mass. 

Snow, Charles — Haverhill, Mass. 

Snyder, Edward — Three Rivers, Mass. 

Sorel, Jean — Jacmel, Haiti 

Surette, Howard — East Boston, Mass. 

Vella, Louis — Sovith Boston, Mass. 

White, Paul — Somerville, Mass. 



UPPER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Accorsi, Elizabeth — Franklin, Mass. 
Accorsi, Rachel — Franklin, Mass. 
Barber, Dorothy — Taunton, Mass. 
Berarducci, Joan — Cranston, R. I. 
Birge, Elaine — Leverett, Mass.* 
Bourdon, Natalie — Belmont, Mass. 
Bull, Mary Ethel — Savannah, Georgia 
Carrier, Maxine — Lebanon, N. H.* 
CaseUa, Grace — Waltham, Mass. 
Cayo, Irene — Lewiston, Maine 
Chan, Louise — Canton, China 
Charbonneau, Gloria — Lowell, Mass. 
Cordeau, Helen — Somerville, Mass. 



Corkum, Jacqueline — Boston, Mass. 
Delorey, Elizabeth — Woburn, Mass. 
Doustou, Bernadette — Sherman Station, Me. 
Doyen, Marjorie — South Portland, Maine 
Fabiszewski, Joan — Danvers, Mass.* 
Farnham, Shirley— Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
Faucette, Nancy — Cambridge, Mass. 
Fisher, Ruth — Quincy, Mass. 
Forrest, Maureen — Chicopee, Mass. 
Gauquier, EUen— Kingston, Mass. 
Gerdes, Helen — Portland, Maine 
Gonzales, Rosita— Newark, N. J. 
Greenlaw. Dorothy — Auburn, Maine 



52 



Hansen, Nila — Teton, Idaho 
Kenney, Jeanne — Dorchester, Mass. 
Lifton, Ethel Anne — Kansas City, Missouri 
Liscomb, Janice — Salisbury Cove, Maine 
Macdonald, Hope — Braintree, Mass. 
Marcil, Sylvia — Aldenville, Mass. 
Marrama, Josephine — Roslindale, Mass. 
Maskell, Glendora — Craftsbury, Vermont 
Merrill, Nancy — Dover, N. H. 
Morin, Catherine — West Yarmouth, Mass. 
Nichols, Barbara — Shelbume, Vermont 
Niedzinski, Pauline — Worcester, Mass. 
Pevear, Luella — Hampton, N. H. 
Poole, Jeanne — Bloomfield, N. J. 



Porcaro, Marcelline — Cranston, R. I. 
Porcaro, Helen — Cranston, R. I. 
Porter, Virginia — Lubec, Maine 
Rothermel, Lillian — Providence, R. I. 
Sim, Jane — Peabody, Mass. 
Viscogliosi, Alice — Waltham, Mass. 
Wattrick, Barbara — Boston, Mass. 
Weisenbom, Gladys — Hazleton, Penn. 
Whitney, Barbara — Worcester, Mass. 
Wright, Louise — Waterville, Maine 
Yau, Grace — Canton, China 
Youngblood, Maryjane — Dedham, Mass. 
Younger, Lorraine— Boston, Mass. 



DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 



Hughes, Alan — Cambridge, Mass.* 
Norris, Perry — Birmingham, Ala. 
Mansfield, Pauline — Seattle, Wash. 



Morgan, Juanita — Buena Vista, Col. 
Sicuss, CarmeUa — Boston, Mass.* 
Sutton, Barbara — South Braintree, Mass. 



LOWER SCHOOL BOYS 



Angney, David — Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Appleby, Daniel — Cambridge, Mass. 
Ashby, Dallas — Ayers, Maine 
Bellantoni, Joseph — Belmont, Mass. 
Botola, Cyril — Shelburne, Vermont 
Bourgoine, Arthur — Brunswick, Maine 
Browne, Robert— Freeport, N. Y. 
Caron, Gibert — Bristol, R. I. 
Cassell, Stephen — Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cheever, David — Millis, Mass. 
Cimon, Joseph — Burlington, Vermont 
Coy, Erwin — Durham, Maine 
Fermino, Robert — New Bedford, Mass. 
Garland, Kenneth— Farmington, N. H. 
Gosselin, Louis — Manchester, N. H. 
Guyette, Irving — Providence, R. I. 
Hickey, John — NewtonviUe, Mass. 
Jackson, Thomas — Tuskegee, Ala. 
Johnson, Robert — Lynn, Mass. 
Johnson, Scott — Templeton, Mass. 
Johnson, Stephen — West Lebanon, N. H. 
Kagan, Stanley — Chicopee, Mass. 
Leh, George — Greenfield, Mass. 
Libby, Alvah — Lincoln, Maine 
McCafferty, Hugh — Mexico, Maine 
McEachem, John — Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
McLaughlin, Fred — Wilmington, Mass. 
Manning, John — Wilton, N. H. 
Melican, Walter — Watertown, Mass. 
Miller, Robert — Chester, Mass. 



Morse, Stanley — Boston, Mass. 
Murray, Russell — Burlington, Mass. 
Oliver, Philip — West Townsend, Mass. 
Osbom, James — Plymouth, Mass. 
Pacheco, Francis — Fall River, Mass. 
Pacheco, Joseph — Somerset, Mass. 
Paradise, Maurice — Nashua, N. H. 
Perry, Albert — Hillsgrove, R. I. 
Perry, Donald — Lowell, Mass. 
Phifer, George — Fall River, Mass. 
Pierce, Anthony — Dighton, Mass. 
Pollock, Robert — Providence, R. I. 
Potter, Bernard — South Lubec, Maine 
Randall, Roger — Brockton, Mass. 
Reineke, Allan — Warwick, R. I. 
Reynolds, Carl — Shelburne, Vermont 
Sargent, Richard — White River Jet., Vt. 
Sepiol, Ronald — Wilbraham, Mass. 
Sweet, Douglas — West Swanzey, N. H. 
Tainter, Kenneth — Brooklin, Maine 
Thomas, Russell — Arlington, Mass, 
Thorp, Kenneth — Misquamicut, R. I. 
Tripp, Raymond — West Yarmouth, Maine 
Turner, Robert — Milton, Vermont 
Vassapoli, Joseph — Wobum, Mass. 
Wakefield, Douglas — Lyndonville, Vt. 
Walsh, William — Newton Highlands, Mass. 
White, Lloyd — Rochester, N. H. 
Young, Robert — Auburn, Maine 



53 



LOWER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Ammons, Dorothy — Clinton, N. C. 
Avedisian, Carol — Northbridge, Mass. 
Baker, Amelia— Grand Isle, Vermont 
Bleakney, Brenda — Boston, Mass. 
Boyd, Janet — Chelmsford, Mass. 
Boyer, Jeanne — Florence, Mass. 
Boyle, Maureen — Dracut, Mass. 
Callahan, Louise — SomerviUe, Mass. 
Cardullo, Arthur— Arlington, Mass. 
Clary, Janet — Laurens, S. C. 
Connor, Martha— Winthrop, Mass. 
Daigneault, Aline — ^Worcester, Mass. 
DeAngelis, Dorothy — Providence, R. I. 
Derouin, Barbara — Cranston, Mass. 
Dowling, Patricia — Lawrence, Mass. 
Driben, Joyce — Dorchester, Mass. 
Dunlap, Elizabeth — New Orleans, La. 
Finan, Irene — Providence, R. I. 
Folsom, Margaret — Framingham, Mass. 
Francis, Mary Ann — Providence, R. I. 
Johnson, Lillian— Arlington, Mass. 
Johnson, Natalie— East Templeton, Mass. 
Lareau, Mary Ann — Worcester, Mass. 
LeBlanc, Joan — Framingham, Mass. 
Libby, Virginia — Lincoln, Maine 
Marston, Louise — Newport, B. I. 
Matthews, Lucy — Cambridge, Mass. 
McAuliffe, Barbara — ^Roxbury, Mass. 



McClure, Ann Marie— Millinocket, Maine 
McLaughlin, Rita — No. Wilmington,. Mass. 
McNulty, Rosalind — Dorchester, Mass. 
Mercey, Cynthia — Cambridge, Vermont 
Morse, Nancy— White River Jet., Vt. 
Nemey, Carol Ann— No. Attleboro, Mass. 
Noddin, Carolsm — Ayer, Mass. 
Noddin, Sandra — Ayer, Mass. 
Nyland, Collette — Beverly, Mass. 

Olson, Gloria — Augusta, Maine 

Pacheco, Priscilla — Somerset, Mass. 

Palmer, Shirley — SomerviUe, Mass. 

Phifer, Joy — FaU River, Mass. 

Pinkham, Paula — Maiden, Mass. 

Polselli, Ann Marie— Worcester, Mass. 

Raycraft, Ann Marie — Dover, N. H. 

Reed, Anita — Farmington, N. H. 

Ruby, Nancy — Wakefield, Mass. 

Russell, Patricia — Roxbury, Mass. 

Sabonaitis, Gayle— Worcester, Mass. 

Schmidt, Karen— Webster, Mass. 

Silvia, Barbara — Taunton, Mass. 

Staples, Sandra — Saco, Maine 

Thorsen, Sylvia — Lynn, Mass. 

Walker, Patricia — Gorham, Maine 

Welch, Rosalie — Sherman Mills, Maine 

Wittstruck, Joan — Providence. R. I. 



♦Admitted in October, 1948 



ENROLLMENT BY STATES — OCTOBER 1, 1948 



State 



UPPER SCHOOL LOWER SCHOOL 





M 


Massachusetts 


38 


Maine 


7 


New Hampshire 


4 


New Jersey 


1 


Rhode Island 


8 


Vermont 


3 


Other States 


6 



F 

26 
8 
2 
2 
4 
2 
6 



M 
29 



DEAF-BLIND 
M F 



TOTAL 

129 
29 
15 
3 
24 
14 
21 



67 



235 



54 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



I. Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals, Dramatics, etc. 

To Mr. Aaron Richmond for tickets to recitals. 

To Winchester Players for invitation to students to attend dress 
rehearsals of plays. 

To Mr. E. Percival Coleman for trip to Charlestown Navy Yard 
and entertainment for Upper School girls. 

To Boston Aid to the Blind for invitation to music pupils in the 
Upper School to attend the recital of Miss Ella Goldstein. 

II. Acknowledgments for Talks, Concerts, etc., in our Hall. 

To Mr. Victor H. Vaughan, Mr. Francis M. Andrews, Mrs. Wini- 
fred Hathaway, Dr. Van Antwerp, Dr. Emma Zaludok, Mrs. Warren 
Lothrop, Senor Victor Raul Haya de la Torre, Mr. Victor Raschi, 
Mr. Michael J. Shortley, Miss Kyriaki Nicolaidou, Miss Josephine 
L. Taylor, Bishop Haworth and Mr. S. W. Hedger for talks at Upper 
School Assembly. To Miss Rose M. Kelley for talks to Lower School 
Assembly. 

To Dr. Edward E. Allen, Dr. Herbert Barry, Jr., Mrs. Winifred 
Hathaway, Miss Ethel M. Fredrick, Mr. Frederick Walsh for 
lectures to the Harvard Class. 

To Mr. Harold Schwab for playing organ at Christmas Concert. 

To the late Mr. Tom Breneman for entertaining Upper School 
students and gift of candy. 

To Mr. Boris Goldovsky and his New England Opera Company 
for performance of "The Marriage of Figaro." 

To Mr. Camille Girouard for recital of Baritone Solos. 

To Mr. Cheney Jones for talk at Community Fund Rally. 

To Jules Wolfers and his String Orchestra for concert. 

To Al Donahue and his Band for concert. 

To Mr. Robert Brink for Violin Recital. 

To Mr. David Gallagher for Organ Recital. 

To the Clergy of Watertown for Assembly talks during the 
Lenten Season. 

To the Patriotic Organizations of Watertown for exercises in 
commemoration of Memorial Day. 

To Protestant Guild for the Blind, Catholic Guild for the 
Blind and Boston Aid to the Blind for religious instruction given to 
pupils. 

To Fred Lowery, blind whistler, and his singing partner, Dorothy 
Rae, for concert. 

To Miss Doris Skipp for recital. 

To Mr. E. C. Johnson for showing movies of Present Day Europe. 

To Animal Rescue League for Puppet Show for Lower School. 

III. Acknowledgments for Books and Periodicals. 

Ink Print Periodicals — Alabama Messenger, Ambulado, Arizona 
Cactus, Arkansas Braille News, Blinded Veterans Association Bulletin, 
California Beacon, Colorado Index, Desda Las Sombras, Du Pont Maga- 
zine, Handicapped, International Harvester World, Irradiacion, Ken- 
tucky Colonel, Lantern, Lighthouse News, Los Ciegos, Luces, Maryland 

55 



Oriole. Massachusetts Educational News Ohb Eay OptM^ O^r 
Dumb Animals, Pelham ^^^^.^''^hfttJZr^.^B^^^e^Sc^ool Journal, 

LON, MARY WYMA^CROMBIE NELLIE F^^^^ j^_ ^^^^^^^ 

EDITH ANNA Hemingway, ^f^J^.^ Jl ™hattie Leavitt, Doeis Lee, 

HELEN A KREIDER DOROTHEA KLAWSO^^^^^ ^> ^^^^^ 

EDYTHE LflNE EILEEN M^IEL^^^^ THIBAULT, ROSE WEIN- 

^KRrSlBETH^mc'^^^^^^^^^ ^-ks for the Lower 

SchooL -rarry Book Bazaar, Manchester, 

N J°|Cck'"?S, eS.^ ForSW% R- Caos., Passaic, 

^- 'itii^^^fc:^. *%-™ srAsS?.ors is 

rwJinRE KOY Edwaed Wateehouse for ink print books. 

many copies of hand-transcribed books. 
IV Acknowledgments of Gifts: 

' To Miss May Hallam Burleson and Junior Red Cross for gift 

"^ ' T^Mr' Irving Meredith for talking book machine and records. 

To Mr. Salvine Stauff for Stenotype Machine and beads. 

To Middlesex Health Association for X-Ray films. ^ 

To Dean Foundation for Little Children for gut o. money. 

To Mrs. Henry D. Tudor for gift of bronze plaque of her mother, 
Mrs. John Chipman Gray. „ .,j. 

To Mr. Frank Carnes for pictures of Howe Building. 

To Miss Mary E. Tuttle for piece of embroidery done by Laura 

^"'^?^ DR JACOB A. Cushner and Shawmut Masonic Lodge for gift 
of money; also for party given to boys. „ ,. , j,-..^ Writer 

To MR. Nelson A. Ripley for gift of one English Braille Wiiter 
and one English Braille Shorthand Writer. . , i 

To the GIRLS of the North Leominster Church for book. 

To District Nursing Association for wheelchair. 

To MRS E A. Cole for two complete Braille transcribing sets. 

To Mr Albert L Lodwick for box of Nylon Shroud Lines. 

To Miss Mabel Cummings and Miss Perkins for two looms and 

other materials. „ . ■ j; j n „^a 

To Miss Wilhelmina Humbert for gift of collection of dolls and 
other things for Kindergarten use. 

To Mr. W. B. Summers for gift of cases of thread. 

To Mr. George R. Wright for gift of money. 

To Mr. J. W. Merrill for two Braille typewriters. 



56 



To Mrs. Ethel C. Holmes for large gift of music. 

To Mr. a. L. Gustafson for an electric train set given to Lower 
School. 

To Mr. R. L. McGowen for an electric train set for model rail- 
road project. 

To Dover Church School through Mrs. C. C. Stewart for gift 
of money used for Children of the Lower School. 

To Colonel Henry Hale for gift of money and for taking students 
to visit exhibitions. 

To Mr. Frank Lefferts for box of needle threaders. 

To Mr. Louis C. Sumberg for cases of toothpaste and other medical 
items. 

To Messrs. Alexander Houston and Joseph Baldwin for help 
in our swimming program. 

To Mrs. Margaret McConnell for course in home nursing given 
to seven Upper School girls. 

To Boston Aid to the Blind for check for summer camp program 
for boys, and for providing transportation to and from Boston for one 
of our advanced music students. 

To Camp Allen for summer camp program for girls. 

To Miss Grace Preston French for gift of money. 

To Massachusetts Order op the Rainbow for Girls for gift of 
money used in Social Worker's Fund. 

To Mrs. W. Cornell Appleton for some of our students to attend 
the Newton Morning Musical Choir. 

To Mrs. M. W. Seager and the Daughters of Vermont for Christmas 
gifts to the Vermont children. 

To Mrs. Elizabeth Ferguson and Mrs. Ward Funk for gift of 
money for Christmas presents for children. 

To The Firnabank Club of the First National Bank of Boston 
for gifts of toys and clothing given to pupils at Christmas. 

To Miss Jean Ashley and Waban Union Church for Christmas 
presents for the children. 

To Catholic Guild for the Blind for dollars to be given to 
Catholic pupils at Christmas. 

To Protestant Guild for the Blind for silver dollars to be given 
to Protestant pupils at Christmas. 

To Mrs. James McKay and the Women's Society of Christian 
Service op the East Braintree Methodist Church for the box ot 
toys given to pupils at Christmas. 

To Mrs. Edward M. Dangel for boxes of clothing. 

To Mrs Anthony Kuttbn and Miss Ellen Wallace of the Bos- 
ton Elizabeth Arden Studio for lecture and demonstration to Upper 
School Girls. 

To Medford Girl Scouts, Troop 39 for gift of money. 

To Belmont Girl Scouts for Girl Scout Uniforms. 

To Mrs. F, E. Wharton for tuxedo. 

To Miss V. B. Roache and Melrose Junior Red Cross for wooden 
toys given to children at Christmas. 

To Mr. Donald McKay for gift of piano. 



57 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

To the Trustees of 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 
Boston, Massachusetts 

We have examined the balance sheet as at August 31, 1948 of 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind (not includ- 
ing Howe Memorial Press Fund) and the related statements of Reserve 
Fund for Depreciation, of income and expenses and of income and 
expenses of the Works Department, all for the year ended August 31^ 
1948. We have also examined the balance sheet as at August 31, 1948 
of Howe Memorial Press Fund and the related statement of income 
and expenses for the year then ended. In connection therewith we 
reviewed the accounting procedures of the Institution and the Howe 
Memorial Press Fund and, without making a detailed audit of the 
transactions, have examined or tested accounting records and other 
supporting evidence by methods and to the extent we deemed appropriate. 

We received confirmation from depositaries with respect to the 
investment securities recorded as owned by the Institution and by the 
Howe Memorial Press Fund as at August 31, 1948, audited all changes 
in investments during the year then ended and satisfied ourselves that 
investment income receivable during the year was duly received. 

During the year ended August 31, 1947 the Trustees passed the 
following votes: 

(1) To record on the books of the Institution a new account 
called the Securities Income Reserve Fund. This account is to be used 
to accumulate from September 1, 1947 the excess of income received 
from investments over income allocated each year to the various funds. 
During the fiscal year ended August 31, 1948 such excess amounted to 
$15,812.87. 

(2) To record on the books of the Institution the new account 
called the Undistributed Profit on Investments Sold. This account is 
to be used to accumulate from September 1, 1947 the profits or losses 
realized on sale of any of the Institution's investments. During the 
fiscal year ended August 31, 1948 a profit of $190,882.89 was realized 
on investments sold, which profit was credited to this amount. 

(3) To consolidate the operating accounts of the Institution and 
Kindergarten Departments. This change is reflected in the attached 
statement of income and expenses (Exhibit C). 

As at August 31, 1948 the Trustees voted to charge the deficit for 
the year then ended against the Reserve Fund for Depreciation as 
shown in Exhibit B. 

In our opinion the accompanying financial statements present 
fairly, on the basis indicated above, the position of the Institution and 
of the Howe Memorial Press Fund at August 31, 1948 and the results- 
of their operations for the fiscal year then ended. 

Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co. 

Accountants and Auditors. 

November 1, 1948 

58 



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Exhibit B 
RESERVE FUND FOR DEPRECIATION 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1948 

, ,Q.„ $897,950.ia 

Balance, September 1, 194/ 

Addition: , , , • • i 44,754.5E 
Income added to principal 

$942,704.63 

^^'^'Costrof library extension project ^^^ 20 

(incomplete) ■•. — ^ ' 

Renovation at power house for Howe ^^^ ,^^ 

Press quarters ^ ; I?fi47 85 

Special maintenance and repairs 12,b4^«i> 

Net loss for the year ended ^2 517.22 53,870.04 

August 31, 1948 ' _ 

^.o /-c^ X.-U-4. A\ $888,834.5& 

Balance, August 31, 1948 (Exhibit A) . 

Exhibit C 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1948 

Income: 

Interest and dividends — $310,305.26 

General ^ -^ 13,601.67 

Varnum Fund 1800.00 $325,706.93 

Mortgage notes ' 

Tuition and board — 



Other states 18'720*.00 189,156.00 

Private students ' 



-^rmomvealth^oF Massachusetts $100,880.00 

^■, i.„4.„™ ' ^^ 

1,000.00 

Donations 

Annuities — $ 5,045.91 

Sarah Hunt Howell Trust * '49999 5,545.90 

Other . 

Other sources — « 12,905.94 

Deaf-blind income "^ 4,757.46 

Tuning income '515.37 

Discounts 1314.66 19,493.43 

Miscellaneous ' - 

$540,902.26 

Total income 

Expenses: /i^vhihit T)) .. $459,699.22 

Operating expensas (lL,xhibit U) f ' 

Income added to unexpended income — 21,868.40 

special funds ...■■■ , » - ' ^^ 61945 07 

Income added to principal of funds 3,564.73 

Additions to plant^ ^ 1 /TT^^JviuV+'T^'V fi'344 06 

• Net loss — Works Department (Exhibit E) ^'^^^'"^ 

553,419.48 

Total expenses 

NET (LOSS) FOR THE YEAR ENDED $(12,517.22) 

AUGUST 31, 1948 (Exhibit B) -p^ ' 

60 



Exhibit D 
OPERATING EXPENSES 

For the Year Ended August 31, 1948 

Salaries Supplies Other Total 



Administration $ 25,800.59 $ 3,832.64 $ 4,279.12 $ 83,912,35 



Treasurer's office $ 6,366.43 $ 6,366.43 



Special Departments: 

Library $ 5,757.81 $ 1,007.73 $ 6,765.54 

Health 8,863.35 1,545.14 1,129.67 11,538.16 

Personnel 11,943.19 573.72 12,516.91 



$ 26,564.35 $ 3,126.59 $ 1,129.67 $ 30,820.61 



Education : 

Literary $ 57,589.63 $ 2,803.24 $ 60,392.87 

Manual training 13,598.00 1,245.55 14,843.55 

Music 15,831.60 408.39 16,239.99 

Deaf-blind 9,166.31 105.29 9,271.60 



$ 96,185.54 $ 4,562.47 $100,748.01 



Household : 

Salaries and mis. exp. $ 59,734.94 $ 9,001.31 $ 68,736.25 

Laundry 6,394.39 657.34 7,051.73 

Food 57,946.32 57,946.32 



$ 66,129.33 $ 67,604.97 $133,734.3a 



Maintenance : 

Engineering $ 29,005.31 $ 40,378.04 $ 69,383.35' 

Buildings 13,824.49 4,290.03 18,114.52 

Grounds 12,095.77 1,232.78 13,328.55 

Special 10,000.00 10,000.00 



$ 54,925.57 $ 45,900.85 $10,000.00 $110,826.42 



Other expenses: 

Automobile $ 2,206.96 $ 2,206.96 

Insurance 4,247.36 4,247.36 

Pension retirement plan 14,887.44 14,887.44 

Tuning Department 4,184.26 4,184.26 

Pensions paid 17,612.60 17,612.60 

Loss on bad debts 152.48 152.48 



$43,291.10 $ 43,291.10 



$269,605.38 $125,027.52 $65,066.32 $459,699.22 



Summary 

Operating expenses — Institution $240,724.69 

Operating expenses — Kindergarten 218,974.53 

$459,699.22 
61 



Exhibit B 
WORKS DEPARTMENT 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1948 

^N^°J^^= .. $69,370.77 

Sales * '45587 $ 69,826.64 

Miscellaneous ^ 

expenses: iR 21472 00 

Material used • ? IntLim 

Salaries and wages k wno 

General expense %AQik 

Auto and truck expense l.^^y.DO ^^^(j ^^ 

Loss on bad debts . 

NET (LOSS) FOR THE YEAR (Exhibit C) $(6,344.06) 



62 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
Balance Sheet 
August 31, 1948 

Assets 

Cash 

Investments — Book value 

Accounts receivable: 

Trade $ 1,745.79 

Institution Department 257.70 

American Foundation for the Blind 4,180.78 

Inventories: 

Appliances $ 17,274.76 

Printing 2,852.46 

Stationery 3,497.34 

Embossing 1,333.08 

Machinery and equipment $ 16,564.39 

Less: Reserve for depreciation 1,656.51 

Deferred die expense 

Liabilities 

Accounts payable: 

Institution Department 

Unexpended income — Godfrey M. Hyams Trust gift 

Funds and legacies: 

Special $ 24,839.10 

General 12,290.00 

Surplus : 

Balance, September 1, 1947 $288,947.44 

Deduct : 

Net operating loss for the year ended 

August 31, 1948 (Exhibit G) 10,083.72 

$278,863.72 
Add: 

Profit from sale of investments 33,009.60 

Balance, August 31, 1948 



Exhibit F 



$ 15,691.23' 
293,784.16 



6,184.27 



24,957.64 

14,907.88 

200.00 

$355,725.18 



903.54 
5,819.22 

37,129.10 



311,873.32 
$355,725.18 



63 



Exhibit G 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1948 

S^^S* ,. $ 9,410.76 

Appliances 12,826.21 

Books, etc ________ 

^ , , $ 22,236.97 

Total sales 

COST OF OPERATION AND Maintenance: ^^^^^^^^ 

Embossing 14',094".49 

Printing •••••■• ■ 17 280.57 

Appliances manufactured l',889.90 

Stationery l'831.00 

Library 1,296.63 

Depreciation 4,416.45 

Maintenance •■•■•■•■ '736.26 

Pension retirement plan 33,12 

Loss on bad debts '__ 

$ 50,688.76 



-^«ss; «25 54 

Discounts .-,• * ^\n 33.71 

Miscellaneous receipts °'^' 



50,655.05 
($28,418.08) 



Net (loss) from operations 

Other Income: . <ti7qop;73 

Interest and dividends, general purposes $ ^llff^ 18,805.38 

Interest and dividends, special funds ^'^^^ ___: 

$(9,612.70) 

Other Charges: 300.00 

Pensions paid ^ 171.02 471.02 

Miscellaneous . - — 

Net (loss) for ^^fJ^^^J'^f^^ ($10,083.72) 

August 31, 19A8 (Exhibit F) ^^ ' 



64 



INSTITUTION FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1948 

Special funds: 

Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund .. $ 2,134.23 

Anonymous 102.01 

Charles S, Adams (Christmas Fund) ... 204.03 
Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and 

blind) 4,085.91 

Blind Babies' Project 1,499.45 

Mary Alice Butler (for reading matter 

for the blind) 3,782.82 

Deaf-Blind Fund 121,204.07 

John D. Fisher (education teachers and 

others) 5,342.08 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) .... 5,107.38 

John Goldthwait Fund (charitable) 4,162.01 

Harris Fund (outdoor relief) 27,238.82 

Henry Clay Jackson Fund (for deaf-blind) 85,247.24 
Maria Kemble Oliver Fund (concert 

tickets) 15,322.16 

James Osborn Fund 3,733.52 

Prescott Fund (education teachers and 

others) 21,687.17 

Elizabeth P. Putnam (higher education) 1,021.48 

Richard M. Saltonstall (use Trustees) .... 3,064.42 

A. Shuman Clothing Fund 1,021.48 

Augustine Schurtleff Fund (for deaf, dumb 

and blind) 1,787.58 

Anne E. Stodder (to find employment for 

blind workers) 3,064.42 

Mary J. Straw 510.74 

Thomas Stringer Fund (for deaf-blind) 16,221.27 

Lenna D. Swinerton 467.57 

Julia E. Turner (education of worthy 

needy) 6,506.34 



$334,518.20 



Permanent Funds (income 

George Baird Fund $ 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund .... 

Charlotte Billings Fund 

Frank W. Boles 

Stoddard, Capen Fund 

Jennie M. Colby, 

in memory of 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund 

Stephen Fairbanks 

David H. Fanning 

Helen Osborne Gary 

Harris Fund 

(general purposes) 

Harriet S. Hazeltine Fund 

Benjamin Humphrey 

Prentiss M. Kent 

Sir Charles W. Lindsay 

Kate M. Morse Fund 

Jonathan E. Pecker 

Richard Perkins 

Henry L. Pierce 

Mrs. Manila L. Pitts, 

in memory of 

Frederick W. Prescott 

endowment 



for general purposes) : 

12,895.21 Frank Davison Rust 

18,464.58 Memorial 4,000.00 

40,507.00 Samuel E. Sawyer 2,174.77 

76,329.02 Margaret A. Simpson 968.57 

13,770.00 Caroline A. Slack 10,000.00 

Charles Frederick Smith 

100.00 Fund 8,663.00 

2,000.00 Timothy Smith 2,000.00 

10,000.00 Mary Lowell Stone Fund .... 4,000.00 

5,010.56 George W. Thym Fund 5,054.66 

10,000.00 Alfred T. Turner 1,000.00 

Thomas Upham Fund 4,950.00 

53,333.00 Levina B. Urbino 500.00 

5,000.00 WiUiam Vamum Fund 209,341.99 

25,000.00 Vaughan Fund 10,553.50 

2,500.00 Ann White Vose 12,994.00 

9,008.93 Charles L. Young 5,000.00 

5,000.00 

950.00 641,407.74 
20,000.00 Add: 
20,000.00 Distribution of Surplus 

at August 31. 1947 .... 9,256.71 

5,000.00 ■ 

$650,664.45 

25,338.95 : 

65 



Instituticn Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 



500.00 



Elizabeth B. Allen 

Mora Ambrose, 

in memory of 

James xi. Anderson .... 
James H. Anderson ... 
ChaiiotLe H. Andrews omnnnnn 

Mary Louise Aull ^^I'TAl 

Ellen S. Bacon t'nnn'oo 

Elizabeth B. Bailey 3,000.00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 

Calvin W. Barker 

Lucy B. Barker, 

in memory of 

Marianne E. Bartholomew 

Francis Bartlett 

Elizabeth Howard Bartol .... 

Mary Bartol 

Thompson Baxter 

Samuel Benjamin 

Robert C. Billings 

George Nixon Black 

Susan A. Blaisdell 

Dehon Blake 

Mai-y Blight 

William T. Bolton 

Betsey J. Bowles 

George W. Boyd 

Caroline E. Boyden 

Mary L Brackett „„, icor;" 

J. Putnam Bradlee 294,162.5o 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet .... 23,273.49 

Ellen F. Bragg 8.006.68 

Max Brenner in9?^sfi 

Lucy S. Brewer ^°'Hn"nn 

Florence N. Bridgman 50U.UU 

J Edward Brown 100,000.00 



300.00 

62.25 

28,303.92 

15,169.87 



2,500.00 
1,859.32 

5,953.21 

2,000.00 

2,500.00 

5,000.00 

300.00 

322.50 

250.00 

25,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,832.66 

500.00 

7,220.99 

555.22 

9,798.75 

5,000.00 

1,930.39 

5,263.33 



Maria A. 
T. O. H. 
Abbie Y. 
Annie E. 
Emma C 
Lydia E. 
Ellen G. 



Burnham ... 

P. Burnham 

Burr 

Caldwell 

, Campbell ... 

Carl 

Cary 



10,000.00 
5,000.00 
200.00 
4,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,412.01 
50,000.00 
100.00 
5,000.00 



Katherino F. Casey 

Edward F. Gate 

Robert R. Centro, ,„„„„„« 

in memory of ^S'SS^'n^ 

Fanny Channing M'^r.A. 

Emily D. Chapman 1,000.00 

Marv F. Cheever ^°S'«2 

Ida May Chickering ^'°^^„„ 

Alice M. Clement 30,000.00 

Alice I. Cobb 2,000.00 

Laura Cohen ^ „„Ann 

Ann Eliza Colburn °'""„ S^ 

Susan J. Conant 500.00 

William A. Copeland „J'°°?-°2 

Aiijrnsta E. Corbin ^^A^Afr. 

Jennie L. Cox I'HA^r, 

Louise F. Crane ,^'22n-2S 

W. Murray Crane 10,000.00 

Harriet Otis Cruft ^22on7 

David Cummings 'Z„„„r 

Arthur B. Curtis '^•lll-ll 

Cha<^tine L. Gushing ^"x^^H 

L W. Danforth 2,500.00 

Kate Kimball Danforth 250.00 

Charles L. Davis '^'^^An 

Etta S. Davis °'2„;'„I 

Susan L. Davis 1.500.00 

Joseph Desealzo 1,000.00 

Elsie C. Disher 163,250.07 

John H. Dix ^?'222-^r 

Mary Frances Drown 21,857.2-5 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200.00 



Amelia G. Dyer 

Mary A. Dyer 

Klla I. Eaton 

Mary Agnes Eaton 

Mary E. Eaton 

William Eaton 

David J. Edwards 

Ann J. Ellis 

A. Silver Emerson 

Martha S. Ensign 

Orient H. Eustis 

Eugene Fanning 

Sarah M. Farr 

Mortimer C. Ferris 

Memorial 

Edward A. Fillebrown 

Annie M. Findley 

Anna G. Fish 

Thomas B. Fitzpatrick .... 

John Forrest 

Ann Maria Fosdick 

Nancy H. Fosdick 

Sarah E. Foster 

Mary Helen Freeman 

Cornelia Ann French 

Martha A. French 

Ephraim L. Frothingham .. 

Jessie P. Fuller 

Thomas Gaffleld 

Albert Glover 

Joseph B. Glover 

Marie M. Goggin 

Benjamin H. Goldsmith 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 

Maria W. Goulding 

Charles G. Green 

Amelia Greenbaum 

Imogene C. Gregory 

Mary Louise Greenleaf 

William Guggenheim 

Ellen Page Hall 

Ellen Hammond 

Margaret A. Harty 

Helen P. Harvison 

Hattie S. Hathaway 

Jei-usha F. Hathaway 

Lucy Hathav/ay 

Edward J. and Georgia M. 
Hathorne Fund 

Charles H. Hayden 

John C. Haynes 

Mary E. T. Healy 

Alice Gushing Hersey, 

in memory of 

Joseph H. Heywood 

Ira Hiland 

Stanley B. Hildreth 

George A. Hill 

Lila M. Hodges 

Margaret A. Holden 

Theodore C. Hollander 

Bernard J. Holmburg 

Margaret J. Hourihan 

Charles Sylvester Hutchinson 

Katharine C. Ireson 

Eliza J. Kean 

Marie L. Keith 

Harriet B. Kempster 

Ernestine M. Kettle 

B. Marion Keyes 

Lulu S. Kimball 

Grace W. King 

Lvdia I?. Knowles 

Davis Krol-vn 

Catherine M. Lamson 

James J. Lamson 



40,043.00 

8,375.18 

l,obii.50 

3,660.91 

5,0o0.00 

500.00 

500.00 

1,023.00 

500.00 

2,505.48 

500.00 

50.00 

64,247.43 

1,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

10,583.25 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

14,333.79 

3,937.21 

200.00 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

184.40 

1,825.97 

200.00 

6,685.38 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,864.55 

11,199.68 

6,471.23 

2,332.48 

45,837.70 

500.00 

450.00 

199,189.94 

50.00 

10,037.78 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

4,577.00 

50,017.68 

32,461.01 

1,000.00 

200.00 

3,000.00 

500.00 

3,893.37 

5,000.00 

100.00 

1,000.00 

3,708.32 

3,016.00 

2,000.00 

200.00 

2,156.00 

52,037.62 

59,209.91 

2,000.00 

1,144.13 

9,975.00 

6,350.00 

10,000.00 

100.00 

50.00 

100.00 

6,000.00 

750.00 



66 



Institution Funds (Concl'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 

Susan M. Lane 816.71 

Elizabeth W. Leadbetter .... 2,j3».71 

Jane Leader b, 344.31 

Luella K. Leavitt I,011.o7 

Lewis A. Leland 415.67 



concl. 



Benjamin Levy 

E. E. Linderholm 

William Litchfield 

Mary T. Locke 

Hannah W. Loring 

Adolph S. Lundin 

Susan B. Lyman 

Agnes J. MacNevin 

Mary EUa Mann 

Blanche Osgood Ms,nsfield .. 

Rebecca Marks 

Stephen W. Marston 

Elizabeth S. Martin 

William H. Maynard 

Cora Mclntire 

Charles Merriam 

Mary H. MiUer 

Olga E. Monks 

George Monttjomery 

Martha H. Moras 

Louise C. Moulton Bequest 

Mary A. Muldoon 

Mary T. Murphy 

Sarah Ella Murray 

Sarah M. Nathan 

Joseph F. Noera 

Henry P. Norris 

Mary B. Noyes 

Richard W. Nutter 

Ella Nye 

Harold L. Olmstead 

Emily C. O'Shea 

Sarah Irene Parker 

Wiliam Prentiss Parker .... 
George Francis Parkman .. 

Grace Parkman 

Philip G. Peabody 

Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Ellen F. Perkins 

Edward D. Peters 

Clara F. Pierce 

Clara J. Pitts 

George F. Poland 

Elizabeth B. Porter 

George M. Whidden Porter 

Sarah E. Pratt 

Sarah S. Pratt 

Francis I. Proctor 

Grace E. Reed 

Carrie P. Reid 

Leonard H. Rhodes 

Mabelle H. Rice 

Matilda B. Richardson 

William L. Richardson 

Anne Augusta Robinson .... 

Julia M. Roby 

Robert Rodgers 

John Roome 

Barbara S. Ross 

Henrietta Goodrich Rothwell 

Mary L. Ruggles 

Elizabeth H. Russell 

Josephine Russell 

Marian Russell 

Nancy E. Rust 

William H. Ryan 

Emily E. St. John 

Joseph Schofield 

Sarah E. Seabury 

Edward O. Seccomb 

Richard Black Sewell 

Charles F. Sherman 



500.00 

505. 5G 

7,y51.4S 

a,oul.89 

t*,500.00 

100.00 

4,809.78 

78,1)63.67 

250.00 

1,000.00 

2,640.40 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

22,321.56 

6,SS2.50 

l.OuO.OO 

1,512.50 

2, SCO. 00 

5,140.00 

3.000.00 

7,891.66 

100.00 

10,000.00 

8,000.00 

500.00 

2,000.00 

35,198.52 

915.00 

2,000.00 

50.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

699.41 

2,500.00 

50,000.00 

5,383.78 

1.200.00 

2,000.00 

2,500.00 

500.00 

2,005.56 

2,000.00 

75.00 

5,449.50 

22,700.48 

2,988.34 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,054.25 

679.51 

1,012.77 

s.Yso.oo 

300.00 

50,000.00 

212.20 

500.00 

100.00 

5,787.67 

2,740.35 

500.00 

3,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

2,640.00 

8,023.48 

5,015.00 

2,500.00 

3,116.01 

1,000.00 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 



Robert F. ShurtleflE 


1,432.94 


Carrie Etta Silloway 


6,429.88 


John Simonds 


50.00 


Arthur A. Smith 


10,000.00 


EUen V. Smith 


25,000.00 


Esther W. Smith 


5,000.00 


Sarah F. Smith 


3,000.00 


The Maria Spear Bequest 


for the Blind 


15,000.00 


Henry F. Spencer 


1,000.00 


Charlotte S. Sprague 


13,222.56 


Thomas Sprague 


1,000.00 


AdeUa E. Stannard 


1.631.78 


Cora N. T. Stearns 


53,558.50 


Henry A. Stickney 


2,410.00 


Lucretia J. Stoehr 


2,937.26 


Joseph C. Storey 


122,531.58 


Edward C. Sullivan 


2,000.00 


Sophronia S. Sunbury 


365.19 


Edward Swan 


16,500.00 


Emma B. Swasey 


2,250.00 


Mary F. Swift 


1,391.00 


William Taylor 


893.36 


Minnie L. Thayer 


1,000.00 


Mabel E. Thompson 


8,722.61 


Joanna C. Thompson 


1,000.00 


William Timlin 


7,820.00 


Alice W. Torrey 


71,560.00 


Evelyn Wyman Towle 


5,820.00 


Stephen G. Train 


20,000.00 


Sarah E. Trott 


2.885.86 


Mary Wilson Tucker 


481.11 




10,000.00 


Mfiude C. "Valentine 


1,884.22 


Charles A. Vialle 


1.990.00 


Bernard T. Vierich 


593.06 


Abbie T. Vose 


1,000.00 


Nancie S. Vose 


300.00 


Horace W. Wadleigh 


2,000.00 


Joseph K. Wait 


3,000.00 


Amelia L. Walker 


1.000.00 


Harriet Ware 


1,952.02 


Allena F. Warren 


2.828.33 




4.073.17 


Kleanore C. Webb 


5.314.95 


Charles F. Webber 


30,915.93 


Mary E. Welch 


200.00 


Mary Ann P. Weld 


2,000.00 


Oliver M. Wentworth 


300.00 


Cordelia H. Wheeler 


800.00 


Or>ha J. Wheeler 


3,085.77 


Eliza Orne White 


4,167.67 


Ella Tredich White 


1,000.00 


Porter W. Whitmarsh 


88.247.05 


Ruth E. Whitmarsh 


1,000.00 


Sarah L. Whitmarsh 


2,000.00 


Samuel Brenton Whitney .... 


1,000.00 


Adelia C. Williams 


1,000.00 




3,628.46 


Lucy B. Wilson, 




in memory of 


800.00 


Mehitable C. C. Wilson .... 


543.75 


Nettie R. Winn 


1.000.00 


Esther F. Wright 


6,427.76 


Thomas T. Wyman 


20,000.00 


Fanny Young 


8,000.00 


William B. Young 


1,000.00 


Add, 


$3,032,055.00 


Distribution of Surplus 




at August 31, 1947 .. 


37,097.45 


Deduct : 


3,069,152.45 


Transfer to Plant Capital 


at August 31. 1947 .... 


1,041,695.76 




$2,027,456.69 



67 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1948 

Special funds: -i^yic^A 

Glover Funds for Blind-Deaf Mutes $ 1.445.74 

Ira Hiland (income to W. E R. for life) 1,371.20 

Emeline Morse Lane Fund (books) J'arJ'S 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room Allit 

Dr. Ruey B. Stevens' Charity Fund ^ A'to462 

Lucy H. Stratton (Anagnos Cottage) .... \i,b[)4:.bA 



$26,720.6^ 



Permanent funds (income for general 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund .. $ 27,700.88 

Mary D. Balfour Fund 5,692.47 

William Leonard Benedict, 

Jr., Memorial 1.000.00 

Samuel A. Borden ,. ^'Rftn no 

A. A. C. in Memoriam 500.00 

Helen G. Coburn Hnn"nn 

Charles Wells Cook 5,000.00 

M. Jane WeUington m nnn nn 

Danforth Fund lo'oKn-nO 

Caroline T. Downes^ ^ ol'qoHs 

Charles H. Draper Fund ..^ 23,934.1d 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500.00 
Helen Atkins Edmands 

Memorial ^nnn"n^ 

George R. Emerson I'nnHn 

Mary Eveleth ... 1-000.00 

Eugenia F. Famham Hllnn 

Susan W. Farwell 500.00 

John Foster 5,000.00 

The Luther and Mary 

Gilbert Fund ?'nnnno 

Albert Glover in'nnnm) 

Martha R. Hunt ...^ ^S'qS^-qR 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund .. 9,935.95 



purposes) : 

Charles Lamed lHam 

Elisha T. Loring MOO.Oa 

George F. Parkman nn'nnnnn 

Catherine P. Perkins ^^fto'nS 

Edith Rotch 10,000.00 

Frank Davison Rust 

Memorial ^?'nAnnn 

Caroline O. Seabury ^. 1.000.00 

Phoebe Hill Simpson Fund J-ii°-ll 

Eliza Sturgis Fund Sr'nnnno 

Abby K. Sweetser .^ ■■ 25,000.00 

Hannah R. Sweetser Fund 5,000.00 

Mrs. Harriet Taber Fund .... 62^.81 

Levina B. Urbino 500.00 

The May Rosevar White 

Fund SOO.Oq 

256,823.74 



Add 



Distribution of Surplus 
at August 31, 1947 .. 



95,260.91 
$352,0S4.G5. 



General funds (principal 

Emilie Albee 

Lydia A. Allen 

Michael Anagnos 

Harriet T. Andrew 

Martha B. Angell 

Mrs. William Appleton .... 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 

Ellen M. Baker 

Mary D. Barrett 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 

Sidney Bartlett 

Emma M. Bass 

Sarah E. J. Baxter 

Thompson Baxter 

Robert C. Billings 

Harriet M. Bowman 

Sarah Bradford 

Helen C. Bradlee 

J. Putnam Bradlee 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 

Ellen F. Bragg 

Lucy S. Brev/er 

Sarah Crocker Brewster .... 



and income for general purposes) : 

$ 160.00 Ellen Sophia Brown I'ooo'oo 

748.38 Mary E. Brown r'^t^sS 

3,000.00 Rebecca W. Brown ^ 2 5oOOO 

5 000.00 Harriet Tilden Browne o'goo 00 

34 370.83 Katherine E. Bullard ^.500.00 

18.000.00 Annie E. Caldwell 50O 00 

•500.00 John W. Carter 50a.UU 

2,500.00 Kate. H. Chamberlm 5,715.07 

13 053.48 Adeline M.Chapm 5 OOO 00 

1 000.00 Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000.00 

500.00 Fanny C. Coburn 1 qoo 00 

10,000.00 Charles H. Colburn 1-OOO.OU 

1000.00 Helen Collamore 4s7338 

51847.49 Anna T. Coohdge ^ 'lonoo 

"322.50 Mrs. Edward Cordis 300.00 

10 000 00 Sarah Silver Cox o'ofir^V 

i;oi3.32 Lavonne E Crane 3.365.21 

100.00 S;isan T Crosby .^ JO^;"" 

140,000.00 Margaret K. Cummmgs .... 

194 162 53 Jpmes H. Uanfora 

13',576:i9 Catherine L. Donnison 

8,006.69 '^T°n!;wnes kooUo 

7,811.56 Georsre H ^S'^J^^ g 2S5.00 

500.00 AiT-.anda E. Uwisrnt 

68 



Kindergarten Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 



Lucy A. Dwight 4.000.00 

Hairict H. Ellis 6,074.79 

Mai-y E. Emerson 1,000.00 

Mary B. Emmens 1,000.00 

Arthur F. Estabrook 2,000.00 

Ida F. Estabrook 2,114.00 

Orient H. Eustis 500.00 

Annie Louisa Fay 

Memorial 1,000.00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000.00 

Charlotte M. Fiske 5,000.00 

Ann Maria Fosdick 14,333.79 

Nancy H. Fosdick 3,937.21 

Fanny Foster 378,087.49 

Margaret W. Frothingham 500.00 

EHzabeth W. Gay 7,931.00 

Ellen M. GifFord 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000.00 

Mathilda Goddard 300.00 

Anna L. Gray 1,000.00 

Maria L. Gray 200.00 

Amelia Greenbaum 1,000.00 

Caroline H. Greene 1,000.00 

Mary L. Greenleaf 5.157.75 

Josephine S. Hall 3,000.00 

Allen Haskell 500.00 

Mai-y J. Haskell 8,687.65 

Jennie B. Hatch 1,000.00 

Olive E. Hayden 4,622.45 

Jane H. Hodges 300.00 

Margaret A. Holden 2,360.67 

Marion D. Hollingsworth .. 1,000.00 

Frances H. Hood 100.00 

Abigail W. Howe 1,000.00 

Ezra S. Jackson 688.67 

Caroline E. Jenks 100.00 

EUen M. Jones 500.00 

Hannah W. KendaU 2,515.38 

Cara P. Kimball 10,000.00 

David P. Kimball 5,000.00 

Moses Kimball 1,000.00 

Ann E. Lambert 700.00 

Jean Munroe Le Brun 1,000.00 

Willard H. Lethbridge 28,179.41 

Frances E. Lily 1,000.00 

William Litchfield 6,800.00 

Mai-y Ann Locke 5,874.00 

Robert W. Lord 1,000.00 

Sophia N. Low 1,000.00 

Thomas Mack 1,000.00 

Augustus D. Manson 8,134.00 

Calanthe E. Marsh 18,840.33 

Sarah L. Marsh 1,000.00 

AValdo Marsh 500.00 

Annie B. Mathews 45,086.40 

Rebecca S. Melvin 23,545.55 

Georgina Merrill 4,773.80 

Ira L. Moore 1,349.09 

Louisa Chandler Moulton .... 10,000.00 

Maria Mnrdock 1,000.00 

Mary Abbie Nev/ell 5,903.65 

Francos M. Osgood 1,000.00 

Margaret S. Otis 1,000.00 

Jeannie Warren Paine 1,000.00 

Anna R. Palfrey 50.00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699.41 

Anna Q. T. Parsons 4,019.52 

Helen M. Parsons 500.00 

Caroline E. Peabody 3,403.74 

Elvvard D. Peters 500.00 

Henrv M. Peyser 5,678.25 

Marv J. Phipio 2,000.00 

Caroline S. Pickman 1,000.00 



Katherine C. Pierce 


5,000.00 


Helen A. Porter 


50.00 


Sarah E. Potter, 




Endowment l^und 


425,014.44 


Francis L. Pratt 


100.00 


Mary S. C. Reed 


5,000.00 


Emma Reid 


952.38 


William Ward Rhoades 


7,507.86 




93,025.55 


John M. Rodocanachi 


2,250.00 


Dorothy Roffe 


500.00 


Clara Bates Rogers 


2,000.00 


Rhoda Rogers 


500.00 


Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch .... 


8,500.00 


Rebecca Salisbury 


200.00 


J. Pauline Schenki 


10,955.26 


Joseph Schofield 


3,000.00 




5,000.00 


John W. Shapleigh 


1,000.00 


Esther W. Smith 


5,000.00 


Annie E. Snow 


9,903.27 


Adelaide Standish 


5,000.00 


Elizabeth G. Stuart 


2,000.00 




2,000.00 


Sarah W. Taber 


1,000.00 


Mary L. Talbot 


630.00 


Ann Tower Tarbell 


4,892.85 


Cornelia V. R. Thayer 


10,000.00 


Delia D. Thorndike 


5,000.00 


Ehzabeth L. Tilton 


300.00 


Betsey B. Tolman 


500.00 


Transcript, ten dollar fund 


5,666.95 


Mary Wilson Tucker 


481.11 


Mary B. Turner 


7,582.90 


Royal W. Turner 


24,089.02 


Minnie H. Underbill 


1,000.00 


Charles A. Vialle 


1,990.00 


Rebecca P. Wainwright .... 


1,000.00 


George W. Wales 


5,000.00 


Maria W. Wales 


20,000.00 


Gertrude A. Walker 


178.97 


Mrs. Charles E. Ware 


4,000.00 


Rebecca B. Warren 


5,000.00 


Jennie A. (Shaw) 




Waterhouse 


565.84 


Mary H. Watson 


100.00 


Ralph Watson Memorial .... 


237.92 


Isabella M. Weld 


14.795.06 


Mary Whitehead 


666.00 


Evelyn A. Whitney Fund .... 


4,992.10 


Julia A. Whitney 


100.00 


Sarah W. Whitney 


150.62 


Betsey S. Wilder 


500.00 


Hannah Catherine Wiley .... 


200.00 


Mary W. Wiley 


150.00 




5,000.00 


Almira F. Winslow 


306.80 


Eliza C. Winthrop 


5,041.67 


Harriet F. Wolcott 


5,532.00 




2,056,769.71 


Add: 




Distribution of Surplus 




at August 31, 1947 . 


528,448.72 



2,585,218.43 
Deduct : 

Transfer to Plant Capital 

at August 31, 1947 .. 634,744.69 



$1,950,473.74 



69 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS. AUGUST 31, 1948 

Snecial funds: . . ^. • j 

^ Adeline A. Douglas (printing raised ^ ^^^ ^^ 

characters) • .•••■; :••■■ * ' 

Harriet S. Hazeltine (printing raised ^ ^^^ ^^ 

characters) vv:':. 1,'^'^' ' 

Thomas D. Roche (publication non-sec- ^88334 

tarian books) ■■■■■■ • in'qFi526 

J. Pauline Schenk (printing) •"_-.-"-• lO'^^^'^*^ 
Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund (books, ^^^ ^^ 

maps and charts) ' $24,839.10 

General funds (principal and income for g^^^^^^ ^^000^00 '' 

Beggs Fund .. * I'.OOo'.OO 

Joseph H. Center 10,290.00 

Augusta Wells ____1____ 12,290.00 

$37,129.10 



70 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE DEAF-BLIND FUND 

September 1, 1947 — August 31, 1948 



Abbot, Miss Marion S. Mass. 

Abbott, Mr. Frank W. Mass. 

Abbott, Miss Mary Ohio 

Abbott, Miss Harrietts F. Mass. 

Abbott, Mrs. W. T. 111. 

Abell, Mrs. A. Howard Mass. 

Abraham, Mrs. Herbert N. Y. 

Abramson, Miss Miriam C. Mass. 

Adains, Mrs. Barrett Mass. 

Adams, Miss F. M. Mass. 

Adams, Miss Jessie L. Mass. 

Adams, Mr. and Mrs. John Mass. 

Ailing, Miss Elsie D wight Mass. 
American Legion Auxiliary, 

East Lynn Unit Mass. 

Adams, Miss Kate L. Mass. 

Adier, Miss Cecilia N. Y. 

Adler, Mrs. Jacob N. Y. 

Alker, Miss Harriet Penn. 

Allan, Mr. Paul H. Mass. 

AUbright, Mr. Clifford Mass. 

Allen, Mrs. Arthur D. Ky. 

Ames, Miss Rosella S. Mass. 

Ames, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Ames, Mrs. Winthrop Mass. 

Amory, Mrs. Charles B. Mass. 

Amory, Mrs. Copley, Jr. Mass. 

Amory, Mr. Roger Mass. 

Amory, Mrs. William Mass. 

Amster, Mrs. Morris Ohio 

Andersen, Mrs. George G. Mass. 

Andersen, Mrs. Andreas Mass. 

Anderson, Mrs. Carl Mass. 

Andress, Mrs. J. Mace Mass. 

Andrus, Mrs. G. E. Colo. 

Appleton, Miss Maud E. Mass. 

Argersinger, Mrs. Roy E. Mass. 

Armington, Miss Elisabeth Mass. 

Armstrong, Mrs. Albert C. Mass. 

Arnold, Mrs. Harold Greene Mass. 

Arthur, Misses Susan asd Alice Mass. 

Ashenden, Mr. Richard C. Mass. 

Ashworth, Miss Lilliam F. Mass. 

Atherton, Mr. J. Ballard Hawaii 

Athey, Mrs. C. N. Md. 

Atkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elisha N. Y. 

Atwell, Mr. and Mrs. A. Y. Mass. 

Atwood, Mrs. David E. Mass. 

Atwood, Mr. F. E. Mass. 

Atwood, Mrs. Frank W. Mass. 
Atwood, The Honorable Harry H. Mass. 

Austin, Miss Edith Mass. 

Austin, Mrs. Francis B. Mass. 

Ayer, Mr. Charles F. Mass. 

Ayer, Mi-s. F. Wayland Mass. 

Ayer, Mrs. Frederick Mass. 

Backus, Mrs. Standish Mich. 

Bacon, Mr. Paul V. Mass. 
Badger, Dr. and Mrs. Theodore L. Mass. 

Bailey, Mr. Richard F. R. I. 

Baker, Mrs. Benedict J. Mass. 

Baker, Mrs. Dudley M. Mass. 

Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin O. Mass. 
Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Horatio L. Maine 

Baker, Mrs. Nathaniel Mass. 

Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Ross W. Mass. 

Baker, Dr. Ruth A. Mass. 

Baldwin, Mrs. E. Atkins Mass. 

Ballou, Mr. Cleveland A. Mass. 

Banash, Mr. Ira J. Mass. 

Bancroft, Mr. Guv Mass. 

Bancroft, Mrs. Hugh Mass. 

Banes, Miss Margaret Mass. 
Barbour, Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Mass. 



Vt, 



Barker, Miss Phyllis F. Mass» 

Barlow, Mr. Charles L. Mass. 

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. John P. Mass. 

Barr, Miss Ada M. N. Y. 

Barrett, Miss Florence E. Conn. 

Barry, Mrs. Edward P. Mass. 

Barstow, Miss Marjorie L. Neb. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew Mass. 

Bartol, Mrs. John W. Mass. 

Bartol, Mr. Louis C. Mass. 

Barton, Dr. Basil E. 

Bassett, Mrs. Norman L. 

Bates, Mrs. John 

Battelle, Miss Sarah W. 

Bauer, Miss Rose F. 

Baumgartner, Mrs. E. L. 

Baur, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory P. 

Baxter, Mr. Thomas A. 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam DeFord 

Bean, Mrs. Henry S. 

Bean, Mr. Howard C. 

Beard, Mrs. Anson 

Beard, Mr. Frank A. 

Beaser, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr. 

Beaudreau, Mr. Raoul H. 

Beck, Miss Winifred M. 

Beckhard, Mrs. G. A. 

Behr, Miss Elsa 

Bement, Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. 

Bemis, Mrs. Harry H. 

BeniofT, Mrs. David 

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Benner, Miss Frances Z. T. 

Bennett, Mi-s. Harold 

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Best, Mr, William 

Bevis, Mrs. Vivia Clyde 

Bicknell, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph E. 

Biddle, Dr. and Mrs. Stephen M. 

Bigelow, Mrs. Henry B. 

Bill, Miss Caroline E. 

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Binney, Miss Helen Maude 

Binney, Dr. Horace 

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Bird, Mrs. Francis W. 

Bishop, Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. 

Bishop, Mrs. R. H. 

Bixler, Dr. and Mi-s. Julius Seelye 

Black, Mrs. Taylor 

Blair. Miss Charlotte H. 
Blais, Mrs. J. A. 

Blake, Mr. ^nd Mrs. Benjamin S. 

Blake, Mr. F. T. 

Blake, Mrs. G. B. 

Blandy, Mr. Graham, II 

Blevins, Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. 

Bliss, Miss Carrie C. 

Blix, Miss Katie 

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Boles, Mrs. Faben 

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Bolster, Mrs. Stanley M. 

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Boston Aid to the Blind 

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Bottomley, Mrs. John T. 

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Bov/ditch, Mrs. Henry I. Mass. 

Bowen, Mrs. J. W. R. I. 

Boyd, Dr. Walter W. D. C. 

Boyer, Mrs. William E. Mass. 



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Ohio 
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Mass. 
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N. Y. 
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Cal. 
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Cal. 
Mass. 
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N. Y. 
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lU. 
Conn. 
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Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Boynton, Mrs. D. S. 

Bozyan, Mrs. H. Frank 

Bradford, Mr. and Mrs. George O. 

Bradford, Mrs. Robert F. 

Bradlee, Mrs. Henry G. 

Bradlee, Mrs. Reginald 

Bradlee, Mrs. Thomas S. 

Bradley, Mr. Leland E. 

Bradley, Mrs. Ralph 

Bragdon, Dr. and Mrs. Joseph U 

Braman, Mrs. Samuel N. 

Brayles, Dr. Elizabeth L. -- — 

Breck, Mr. and Mrs. Luther A., Jr. Mass 

Breed. Mrs. Edward F. Mass. 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F. Mass. 

Brewster, Miss Harriet Mass. 

Briggs, Mrs. Edward C. ^■^^■ 

Brigham, Mrs. Grace A. and Family B. I. 

Brockelman, Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Mas.- 

Brockett, Mr. Everett B. 

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Brookings, Mrs. Martha JN. 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H. 

Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. John Lr. 

Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence G. 

Brown, Miss Adelaide J. 

Brown, Mrs. Charles W. 

Brown, Mr. Charles W., Jr. 

Brown, Mrs. Elwin P. 

Brown, Mrs. Emma L. 

Brown, Miss Ethel C. 

Brown, Mrs. George E. 

Brown, Mr. George R. 

Brown, Mrs. George W. 

Brown, Mrs. Hobart W. 

Brown, Mr. J. Frank 

Brown, Miss Margaret L. 

Brown, Mr. William K. 

Browne, Miss Florence M. 

Browne, Dr. William B. 

Bruckhauser, Mrs. William K. 

Bruckman, Mrs. Fred 

Bruerton, Mr. Courtney 

Bruerton, Miss Edith C. 

Bryant, Miss Elizabeth B. 

Bryant, Mrs. Fred S. 

Brvant, Mrs. Wallace E 



Brvant, Mrs. vvauacc j^. . .1 Vf v 

Buell, Mrs. J. M. "In Memoriam N. J. 

Buell, Mr. and Mrs. James A. 

Bull, Reverend Wilbur J. 

BuUard, Miss Ellen 

Bump, Mrs. Archie E. 

Burke, Mrs. Walter Satford 

Burling, Mrs. Edward B. 

Bumham, Miss Mary C. 

Bumham, Miss Nina H. 

Burr, Mr. I. Tucker, Jr. 

Bush, Mr. and Mrs. J. Douglas 

Butler, Mrs. C. S. 

Cabot, Mrs. George B. 
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Cain, Mr. John E. 
Callahan, Mr. Henry J. 
Campbell, Miss Elizabeth 
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Cantabrigia Club, The 
Capron, Mrs. John F. 
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Carey, Mrs. A. G. 
Carbart, Mrs. C. L. 
Carlton. Mr. Charles E. 
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Carter, Mrs. Albert P. 



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Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Richard U. 
Cartland, Miss Marian P. 
Carver, Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. 
Casassa, Miss Rose 
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Caskey, Mrs. Paul D. 
Casselberry, Mrs. Clarence M. 
Castel, Miss Mabel Wing 
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Chadsey, Mrs. Horace M. 
Chalf ant. Miss IsabeUa C. 
Chamberlain, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin U. 
Chamberlain, Dr. Calvin 
Chamberlain, Mrs. George N. 
Chamberlain, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Chamberlin, Miss Louise M. 
Chandler, Mr. and Mrs. John 
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Chapin, Mr. E. Barton 
Chard, Mrs. Walter G. 
Chase, Mr. Alfred E. 
Chase, Miss Alice 
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Chase, Mrs. John McG. 
Chase, Mrs. Rachel A. 
Chase, Mr. Walter B. 
Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 1. 
Chatfield, Miss Alice E. 
Cheever, Dr. David 
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Cheney, Mrs. Benjamin P. 
Chester, Mrs. Harry C. 
Child, Mrs. Harrv W. 
Church, Mrs. Willard 
Claflin, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H., Jr. 
Clark, Mr. Albert, Jr. 
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Clarke, Mi-s. Bertrand Moody 
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Vt. Courtney, Miss Mary L. 
Md. Cousens, Mrs. John A. 
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Conn. Swedish Con'^reeational Church 

Mass. Cowles, Mrs. En"-(=ne 
M^'is. CowIp". Mrs. Wilh'am Lyman 
Mass! Cox. Mr. Charles M. 



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Mass. 
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Maine 

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N. Y. 
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Fla. 
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Cox. Mrs. Luther C. Cal. 

Crehore, Miss Lucy Clarendon Mass. 

Crehore, Mrs. Morton S. Mass. 

Crimmins, Mr. Thomas A. Fla. 

Crocker, Mrs. C. Thomas Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. Charles T. Mass. 

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Crump, Miss Grace L. N. Y. 

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Curtiss, Dr. Miles B. Conn. 

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Cushman, Mrs. James S. N. Y. 

Cutler, Miss Abigail Ann Mass. 

Cutler, Mr. G. Ripley Mass. 

Daitch, Mrs. A. Mass. 

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Dana, Mrs. Harold W. Mass. 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E. Mass, 

Da Prato, Mrs. Antoinette L. Mass. 

Darling, Mrs. Mayo A. Mass. 

Davies, Miss Fannv E. Conn. 

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Davis, Mr and Mrs. Harold T. Mass. 

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Dawson, Mrs. J. Douglas Mass. 

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Dean, Mrs. James Mass. 

Dearborn, Mrs. L. B. Mass. 

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De Koning, Mr. L. Wash. 

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Denny, Miss Emily G. Mass. 

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Dexter, Miss Mary Deane Masc. 

d'Humy, Mr. F. E. N. Y. 

Dickey, Miss Evelyn Mass. 

Dickson, Miss Flora M. N. Y. 

Dickson, Miss Ruth B. Mass. 

Diechmann, Miss Bertha N. Y. 

Dierksen, Mrs. H. H. N. J. 

Dillingham, Mrs. Isaac S. Mass. 

Doane, Miss Jessie N. J. 

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Dodge, Mrs. Edwin S. Mass. 

Doherty, Miss Mary C. Mass. 

Dohrmann, Miss Dorothy A. N. Y. 

Dolan, Mr. William G. Mass. 

Donald, Mrs. Malcolm Mass. 

Donnelly, Mrs. Edward C. Ma.'??. 

Dooley, Mr. Arthur T. Mass. 

Douglass, Miss Josephine Mass. 

Douglass, Mrs. Mabelle F. A. N. H. 

Dourian, Miss Lillian N. Y. 

Dow, Mrs. Winifred M. Mass. 

Dowling, Mr. A. S. N. Y. 

Dowling, Miss Mary W. N. Y. 

Downer, Miss Lisa deForest Fla. 



Draper, Mrs. Edward B. Mass. 

Draper, Mrs. Joseph P. Mass. 

Drey, Dr. Paul N. Y. 

Drinkwater, Mr. Arthur Mass. 

Duddy, Bev. Frank E. Mass.. 

Duest, Mrs. Mark Mass. 
Duit', Mr. and Mrs. J. Robertson Mass. 

Dumaine, Mrs. Frederick C, Jr. Mass. 

Dunlap, Mr. Kirke Mass. 

Durfee, Miss Elizabeth R. N. Y. 

Durfee, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Mass. 

Durfee, Mr. P. S. Mass. 

Durlach, Mrs. Milton I. N. Y. 

Durr, Mrs H. Adele N. Y.. 

Dutton, Mrs. George D. Mass. 

Duvernoy, Mrs. E. F. N. Y. 

Eager, Miss Mabel T. Mass. 

Eastham, Mr. and Mrs. Melville Mass. 

Eaton, Mrs. Charles F., Jr. Mass. 

Eaton, Mrs. Frederick W. Mass. 
Eckfeldt, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Mass. 

Edmands, Mr. Duncan Mass.. 

Edmonds, Mrs. Henry N. N. Y. 

Edmondson, Miss Mary Ray Vt. 

Edsall, Mrs. John T. Mass. 

Edwards, Mr. David F. Mass. 

Edwards^ Mr. Edward B. N. J. 
Edwards, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Mass.. 

Eggers, Mr. William A. OhiO' 

Ehrlich, Mrs. Henry Mass. 

Eiseman, Mrs. Philip Mass. 

Elder, Miss Vera N. Y. 

Eliot, Miss Marian C. Iviass. 

Ellis, Mrs. Edward H. Mass. 

Ellison, Mxs. Eben H. Mass. 

Emerson, Miss Mabel E. Mass. 

Emerson, Mr. William Mass. 

Emerson, Mrs. William Mass. 

Emmons, Mrs. Alfred P. Mass. 

Engelsman^ Mr. Ralph G. N. Y. 

Englis, Mrs. John N. Y. 
Equitable Life Assurance Society N. Y. 

Emmons, Mr. R. N. Y. 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Sr. Mass. 

Endicott, Mrs. Mitchell N. J. 

Erickson, Mr. Joseph A. Mass. 

Ettinger, Mr. Maurice N. Y. 

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Fabens, Miss Caroline H. Mass. 

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FauU, Mr. J. H. Mass. 

Faxon, Mrs. Henry M. Mass. 
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Fav, Mr. Arthur Dudley Mass. 

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Fay, Miss Margaret Lincoln Mass. 

Fegan, Mrs. Fannie H. MasB.- 

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Feldman, Mr. Samuel N. J. 

Felton, Mrs. Winslow B. Mass. 

Fenno, Miss Alice M. Mass. 

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Ferrin, Mrs. F. M. Mass. 

Finberg, Mrs. Chester F. Ma^s. 

Finfrock, Miss Anna L. Ind. 

Finley, Mrs. John, Jr. Mass. 
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Fish, Miss Margaret A. Mass. 



73 



Fisher, Rev. and Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 
risk, Mrs. Otis H. Mass. 

Piske, Mr. and Mrs. Redington Mass. 

Fitch, Mr. Stanley G. H. Mass. 

Fitts, Mr. George H. Mass. 

Flagg, Mrs. Elisha Mass. 

Flood, Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Mass. 

Floyd, Miss Lottie M. N. Y. 

Foley, Mrs. M. J. Mass. 

Folsom, Mr. Grenville W. Mass. 

Folsom, Mrs. Robert M. Mass. 

Forbes, Mr. Edward W. Mass. 

Foreman, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. N. Y. 
Foster, Mr. Benjamin B. Mo. 

Foster, Mrs Charles H. W. Mass. 

Foster, Miss Hilda S. Mass. 

Foster, Mrs. Reginald Mass. 

Fox, Mr. Charles J. Mass. 

Fox, Miss Edith M. Mass. 

Fox, Mrs. Felix Mass, 

Fox, Mrs. Heywood 
Francke, Mrs. H. Gilbert 
Freeman, Mr. Myron S. 
Freeman, Miss Nettie T. 
French, Mrs. E. W. 
French, Miss Ruth H. 
Freund, Mr. Sanford H. E. 
Friend. Miss Eunice A. 
Frost, Mrs. Rufus H. 
Frothingham, Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Frothingham, Miss Eugenia B. 
Frve, Miss Cornelia 
Fuller, Mr. Charles E. 
Fuller, Mrs. Genevieve M. 
Fuller, Mr. Lorin L. 
Fulton, Mr. A. Oram, Jr. 
Furness, Miss Laura 

Gao-e, Miss Mabel Carleton 
Gallagher, Mrs. William W. 
Gallup, Mrs. William A. 
Gardiner, Mr. and Mrs. William T. 
Gardner, Mr. Colin 
•Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. G. Peabody 
Gardner, Mrs. Georcre P. 
Gardner, Mrs. Louis 
Garner, Miss ETima F. 
Garsia, Mrs. Ed^^Ti R. C. 
Garside, Miss Lillian R. 
George, Miss J. 
Gerrish, Mrs. Periey G. 
Gerritson, Miss Maude B. and 
Freshmen of State Teachers 
Collega 
Gerstenbp>-g, Mr. Charles W. 
Gibson, Mrs. KirVland H. 
Gilbert, M^. Da-^us W. 
Gilbert, Miss Helen C. 
Gilbert, Mr. William E. 
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Gilman, Mi=is Gertrude 

Gilman. Miss Louise 

Ginn, Miss Susan J. 

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Given, Mrs. John L. 

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Glidden, Mr. and Mrs. William T. 

Goethals, Mrs. Thomas R. 

Golding, Mrs. Frank H. 

Golding, Mr. and Mrs. T.ouis T. 

Goldman, Mrs. Hel'^n '^ . 

Gooch, Mr. Clairborri W. 

Goodspeed, Mrs. Carl M. 

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Goodwin, Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. 



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IVi--,. 
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■NT Y. 
Mass. 



Gordon, Mrs. Nathan H. 

Corner, Mr. and Mrs. Otto A. 

Gorovitz, Rabbi Aaron 

Gould, Mrs. Marion R. 

Graboys, Mrs. Lewis M. 

Grafton Ladies Benevolent Society 

Graham, Miss Louise 

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Grant, Mrs. W. D. 

Graton, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. 

Gray, Miss Helen I. 

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Gray, Mr. Reginald, Jr. 

Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. W. 

Gray, Mrs. Thomas H., Jr. 

Green, Mr. Edward B. 

Green, Mr. H. P. 

Greene, Mr. Jerome D. 



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Greene*, Mr. and Mrs. William C. M^,es 



Greer, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Gregory, Miss Agnes 
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Gryzmish, Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer C. M?tss. 



Guild, Mrs. Edward M. 
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Gunby, Mrs. Frank M. 
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Hadley, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Haertlein, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 

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Hale, Mrs. Charles A. 

Hale, Mr. Henry 

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Hall, Mrs. Herbert J. 

Hall. Mr. John H. 

Hall, Mrs. Joseph L. 

Hall, Miss Minna B. 

Hall, Mr. Samuel Prescott 

Kallowell, Miss Emily 

HaT.owell, Mr. Jchn W. 

Hallowell, Mrs. R. N. 

Hallowell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. 

Hamann, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund H. 

Hamilton, Mrs. EHn-a^d P. 

TTammond. Miss Elizabeth M. 

Hanks, Mr. G. R. 

Hannauer, Mrs. George 

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Hardon, Mrs. J. P-adford 

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TTarveV, Dr. and Mrs. Ca'— oil S. 

Har'^ood, Mrs. Herbert E. 

Kaseltine, Miss Caroliie M. 

Hastings, Mrs. Merrill G. 

Hatch, Mrs. Arthur W. 

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74 



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Hersee, Mr. David E. Mass. 

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Herter, Hon. Christian A. D. C. 

Hewins, Miss Elizabeth L. Mass. 
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Hight, Mrs. Clarence A. Mass. 

Hill. Dr. Alfred S. Mass. 

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Hodge, Miss Mary Russell Mass. 

Hodges, Mrs. J. C. Mass. 
Hodgkins, Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel G. Mass. 

Hoeber, Mr. Eugene H. N. Y. 

Hoerr, Dr. Stanley O. Ohio 

Holbrook, Mr. Pinckney Mass. 

Holbrook. Mrs. Walter H. Mass. 

Holm, Mrs. E. , N. Y. 

Holmes, Miss Laura P. Mass. 

Holt, Miss Fanny Elizabeth II!. 

Holyoke, Mr. Charles Mass. 

Holzer Family Mass. 

Homans, Mr. William P. Mass. 

Homsey, Mr. Anton E. Mass. 

Hood, Mr. Arthur N. Mass. 

Hooper, Mrs. James R. Mass. 

Hopayell, Mrs. Frederick C. Mass. 

Hopkins, Mr. A. Lawrence Mass. 

Hopkins, Mrs. Bertrand H. Ma="- 

Hopkins, Mrs. Ernest M. N. H. 

Hopkins, Mr. Leon L. Mass. 

Hopper, Miss Marie L. Pa. 

Hornblower, Mrs. Henry "M^ss. 

Hosmer, Mr. Calvin Mass. 

Hosmer, Miss Jennie C. Calif. 
Houf^hton, Mr. and Mrs. Clement S. Mass. 

Hongbton, Mr. Elroy W. Mass. 

Houghton, Mrs. Frederick O. Mass. 
Houghton, Dr. and Mi-s. John D. Mass. 

Houghton, Miss Mabel E. Mass. 

Houghton, Mrs. William M. Mass. 

Howard, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Howe, Mr. James C. Mass. 

Howell, Miss Mary N. Y. 

Howland, Mrs. Frank C. Ohio 

Howlaii''. Mrs. Wi'liipm T). Mass. 
Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot E., Jr. Mass. 

Hubbard, Mr. Paul M. Mass. 



Huckins, Mrs. Stuart Mass. 

Hudnut, Mr. A. C. Ohio 

Hughes, Mrs. L. F. Mass. 

Huiginn, Mrs. Eugene J. V. Mass. 
Humphreys, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mass. 

Hunnewell, Miss Louisa Mass. 

Hunnewell, Miss Frances W. Mass. 

Hunt, Mrs. R. B. Fla. 

Hurd, Mrs. George Newell Mass. 

Hurlbut, Mrs. B. S. Mass. 

Hustis, Mr. J. H., Jr. N. Y. 

Hutchinson, Mr. Sydney E. Pa. 

Hutchings, Mrs. J. Henry Mass.. 

Hutchins, Mrs. Alexander Mass.. 

Hutchins, Mrs. Elizabeth G. Mass. 

Hutchinson, Miss Alice Mass. 

Hutchinson, Miss Hazel I. Mass. 

Hutchinson, Miss Helen S. Conn. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. James A. Mass. 

Hyman, Mr. Abe Mass.^ 

Ingalls, Mr. Frederic Mass. 

Irvin, Mrs. William A. N. Y. 

Isaacs, Mrs. Nathan Mass. 

Jack, Mrs. Edwin E. Mass.- 

Jackson, Miss Annie H. Mass. 

Jackson, Mrs. Charles, Jr. Mass. 

Jackson, Mrs. Henry A. N. Y. 

Jackson, Miss Mary Lee Mass. 

Jandron, Mr. Francis L. Mass. 

Jaoues, Mrs. Francis Mass. 

Jeffares, Mrs. J. N. N. Y. 

Jeffries, Mr. William A. Mass. 

Jenney, Mrs. A. S. N. H. 
Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Pliny, Jr. Mass. 

Johmann, Miss Elizabeth N. Y.. 

Johnson, Mrs. E. C, 2nd Mass. 

Johnson, Mr. Edwin C. Mass. 

Johnson, Miss Emily Conn. 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Harold H. Mass. 

Johnson, Miss Helen S. Mass. 

Johnson, Mr. J. A. Calif. 

Johnson, Mrs. John H. Mass* 

.Tohnson, Mrs. Otis S. Mass. 

Johnson, Mrs. Peer P. Mass. 

Jones, Mr. Chandler W. Mass. 

Jones, Mr. Chenev C. Mass. 

Jones, Mrs. Daniel Fiske Mass. 

Jones, Mrs. Durham Mass. 

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer B. Mass. 

Jones, Mr. .Tames N. Mass. 

Jones, Mr. Lawrence L. Mass. 

Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. Eben Mass. 

Jose, Mrs. Edwin H. Mass. 

Joseph, Mr. Milton E. N. Y.. 

Joslin, Miss Mary R. Mass. 

Jouett, Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Mass. 
Junior Leaorne of the Women's 

Italian Club Mass. 

Kaplan, Mrs. Bemprd Md. 

Kaufman, Mr. Nathin Pa. 

Kavanagh, Mr. E. S. Mass. 

Kaye. Mr. Sidnev Leon Mass. 

Kazan5ian, Dr. and Mrs. V. H. Mass, 

Keatintr, Mrs. Jessii^a A. C. Z. 

Kppne, Mrs. Paul M. Mass. 

K°ifh, Mrs. Georze E. N. Y. 
Kellev, Mr. and Mrs. Stillman F., 2nd 

Ma"'!. 

K^Hogg, Miss Julia R. Vt. 

Kelly, Mrs. Shaun Mass. 

Kendall Boiler and Tank Co. Mass. 

Kenderdine, Mrs. Henry J. Mass. 

Kennard, Mrs. Robert M. P. Mass, 

Kennedy, Mrs. F. L. Mass. 
Kennedy, Mr. and Mrs. Sargent Mass. 
Kent, Mrs. Ira R. 



75 



Ketterle, Miss Elizabeth M. 
KeviUe, Brig. Gen. William J. 
Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred V. 
Kimball, Mrs. Frank W. 
Kimball, Mrs. Frederic Paige 
Kimball, Mr. Morton S. 
KimbaU, Miss Winifred R. 
KimbaU, Mr. Arthur W. 
Kincaid, Mrs. Percy B. 
King, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. 
King, Mrs. James G. 
Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C. 
Kitching, Miss Belle M. 

Kittredge, Mrs. George L. 
Kittredge, Mr. Wheaton 

Klein. Mr. D. Emil 

Klopot, Mr. Abraham 
Knauth, Mrs. Felix W. 

Knight, Mrs. Frederick 

Knight, Rev. and Mrs. Walter u. 

Knott, Miss Agnes G. 

Knowles, Mr. Lucius J. 

Knowlton, Mrs. Harold W. 

Knowlton, Miss Mary B. 

Koch. Mrs. Albert C. 

Koehler, Miss Bertha K. 

Kopelman, Mr. Bernard 

Kopelman, Mr. George _ 

Kress-Samuel H., Foundation 

Kuell. Mrs. David H. F., Jr. 

Kuhns, Dr. John G. 

Kummer, Miss Lucy 



N. y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N.J. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 



LaCroix, Mrs. Morris F. 

Xiamb, Miss Aimee 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond 

Lancaster, Mrs. Joseph F. 

Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. Southworth 

Lang, Mrs. Malcolm 

Lang, Miss Margaret R. 

Lanormann, Mrs. Alfred G. 

Lannefeld, Mr. Walter E. 

Law, Mrs. James McCowan 

Lawrence, Mr. James 

Learned, Mr. and Mrs.. Edmund P. 

Learned, Mrs. George A. 

Leavitt, Dr. Peirce H. 

Lee, Mr. and Mrs. George C., Jr. 

LeFavre, Mr. William O. 

Lehmann, Mrs. J. S. 

Leland, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund F. 

Leland, Mrs. George A., Jr. 

Leland, Miss Luisita A. 

Xenk, Mrs. Walter E. 

Leonard, Mrs. Russell H. 

Leslie, Mrs. J. Saybolt 

Levi, Mrs. Hari-y 

Levi, Mr. Leon 

Xewis, Mr. Frederic T. 

Lewis, Mrs. B. H. 

Lewis, Mrs. George 

Lienau, Mrs. George L. 

Lincoln^ Mr. Edwin C. 

Lindquist, Mr. John 

Linn, Mrs. Cohnan 

Litchfield, Mr. Joshua Q. 

Littlefleld, Miss Ida B. 

Livermore, Mrs. Homer F. 

Litchfield, Mr. Everett S. 

Loder, Dr. Halsey B. 

Loeb, Mrs. W. 

Loeffier, Mrs. H. C. 

Loevy, Mr. Marcus A. Mexico 

Xoew's, E. M. Theatres 

Lombard, Mrs. Percival H. 

Long, Mr. and Mrs. George W. 

Longstreet, Mrs. George H. 

Lord, Mrs. James B. 

Xord, Mrs. W. H. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Loring, Mr. Augustus P., Jr. 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C. 

Lothrop, Mrs. Arthur E. 

Lothrop, Mrs. Warren 

Lovejoy, Mrs. Frederick H. 

Lovejoy, Miss Helen D. 

Lovering, Mrs. Richard S. 

Lovett, Miss Caroline 

Lovett, Miss Louise 

Low, Mr. and Mrs. Seth F. 

Lowell, Miss Lucy 

Lufkin, Mr. Richard H. 

Lund, Mrs. Fred B. 

Lux, Miss Alta M. » _^. rr 

Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 1. 

Lyman, Mrs. Charles P. 

Lyman, Mrs. George H. 

Lyman, Mrs. Harrison F. 

Lyman, Mr. Theodore 

Lynn Assoc, for the Bhnd, Inc. 

Lyons, Mr. J. J. 

MacDonald, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. 
MacGregor, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Mack, Miss Rebecca 
MacKay, Mr. Daniel A. 

MacKenzie, Miss Cora E. 
Mackin, Mrs. Harry I. 
Mackinney, Mrs. P. R. 
MacLeod, Mr. and Mrs. Eldon 
MacPhail, Mrs. Robert B. 
MacPhie, Mrs. E. I. 
McCabe, Joseph P._, Inc- , 
McCosh, Mrs. Winifred M. 
McCreary, Mrs. Lewis S. 
McCurdy, Mr. William E, 
McElwain, Mr. J. F. 
McGarry, Rev. John J. 
McGoodwin, Mrs. Henry 
McHugh, Mr. Edward J. 
N. Y. McHugh, Mr. Thomas J. 
Mass. McHutchison. Mr. /• M. 
N. Y. Mclnerney, Dr. and Mrs. Michael 
Mass. Mclntire, Mr. and Mrs. Allyn B. 
Mass. McKee, Mrs. Frederick W. 
Mass. McKibbin, Miss Emily W. 
Mass. McLeod, Mrs. Archibald 
Mass. McNair, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm F. 
Mass. McPheeters, Mrs. Thomas b. 

Mo. Madden, Mr. M. L. 
Mass. Maddocks, Mr. John A. 
Mass. Magann, Mr. Frank P. 
Mass. Maginnis, Mr. Charles U. 
Mass. Magoon, Mr. Kenneth S. 
Mass. Magoun, Mr. Roger 
N. J. Mailman, Mr. Guy W. 
Mass. Malcolm, Mr. William J. 

Md. Malloch, Mrs. Walter Scott 
Mass. Maltzman. Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Mass. Mandel, Mrs. Richard H. 
Mass. Marden, Mr. Norman L. 
Mass. Marsh, Mrs. Jasper 
Ma=!S. Marston, Mr. Walter M. 
Mass. Martin, Mrs. Leroy H. 
Ma.ss. Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. 
Mass. Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Albert U. 
R. I. Mason, Mrs. Austin B. 
Mass. Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse H. 
Mass. Mason, Mrs. Louis 'P- ^ , ^ _ 
Mass. Masson, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. 
N. Y. Maurice, Mrs. G. H. 

Md. Maury, Mrs. H. L. 
D. F. May, Miss Edith 
Mass. May, Miss Edith H. 
Mass. Mav, Mr. William F. 
Mass. Mavnard, Mrs. George S. 
Mass. Mavo-Smith, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mass. Mazyck. Miss Margnret K. 
Mass. Mead, Mrs. Francis V. 

76 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
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Mass. 



N. C. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Kans. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

Mass. 
M-''ss. 

Ohio 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

N. J. 
Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Dela. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Ivlass. 

r. D. c. 

Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mich. 
Mass. 
Mo. 
Miss. 
Maine 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mn.ss. 
CaMf. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
N. C. 
Mont. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
S. C. 
Mass. 



Meder, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. N. J. 

Melcher, Miss Edith Mass. 

Meltzer, Mrs. Mark C, Jr. M. Y. 

Merian, Mrs. Alfred W. Maine 

Merrill, Mrs. E. D. Mass. 

Merrill, Mrs. Keith Va. 

Merrill, Mrs. Luther M. Mass. 

Merrill, Mrs. Sherburn M. Mass. 

Merrick, Mrs. J. Vaughan, 3rd K. I. 

Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce R. I- 

Merritt, Miss Mildred A. Ta. 

Mesker, Mrs. Frank Mo. 

Metcalf. Mrs. Robert B. Mass. 

Michie, Mrs. H. Stuart Mass. 
Michelson, Mr. and Mrs. David L. Mass. 

Miller, Mrs. Bartlett N. Y. 

Miller, Miss Eleanor Mass. 

Miller, Mr. George E. Mass. 

Miller, Mrs. Tinkham Mass. 

Mills, Mrs. Charles F. Mass. 

Mills, Miss Frances Steele N. Y. 
Minden Paper Gauge Company, Inc. N. Y. 

Minot, James J. Mass. 

Mitchell, Miss Helen C. N. Y. 

Mitchell, Miss Lilian Mass. 

Mixter, Mrs. William Jason Mass. 

Moffitt, Mr. J. K. Calif. 

TVIohr, Mr. Frank J. Pwn. 

Molder, Mrs. J. C. Mass. 

Monday Club, North V/eymouth Mass. 

Monks, Rev. G. Gardner D. C. 

Monks, Dr. and Mrs. John P. Mass. 

Monroe, Mr. Arthur E. Mass. 

Moody, Miss Tulia E. Mass. 

Moon, Mr. Parry Mass. 

Moore, Mr. Carl F. Mass. 

Moore, Mrs. Clifford H. Mass. 

Moore, "Mr. Francis D. Mass. 
Moore, Mr. and Mrs. George W. DC. 

Moore, Mrs. Hugh K. Mass. 

Moore, Miss Isabelle T. Mass. 
Moore, Mr. and Mrs. William R. M«ss. 
Moreland, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Mass. 

Morgan, Prof. Edmund M. Mass. 

Morgan, Mrs. John S. Ma-s. 

Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Weld Mass. 

Morine, Mrs. John P. Mass. 

Morrill, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde G. Mass. 

Morrill, Mr. Leon G. Mass. 

Morris, Mr. and Mrs E. W. P^. 

Morris, Miss H. Pearl Ohio 

Morse, Mrs. Arthur H. Mass. 

Morse, Miss Charlotte G. S. Mass. 

Morse, Mrs. James F. Mass. 

Morse, Miss Jessie G. Mass. 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. John G. Mass. 

Morse, Mr. Philip R. Mass. 

Morton, Mrs. B. H. Mass. 

Morton, Mr. Stanley Mass. 

Moses, Mrs. George Mass. 

Moses, Mr. John C. La. 

Mosher, Mrs. Harris P. Mass. 

Motherwell, M^. J. W. Mass. 

Motley, Mrs. Edward Mass. 

Motley, Mr. Warren Mass. 

Mott, Mrs. Percival Mass. 

Mudge, Mrs. Arthur W. Mass. 

Muller, Dr. Gulli Lindh Mass. 

Munro, Mrs. .John C. Mass. 

Munro, Mr. Willis Mass. 

Murdock, Mrs. Harold Mass. 

Murdcck, Mrs. John Mass. 

Murphy, Mr. Ray Slater N. Y. 

Murray Printinsr Company Mass. 

Murray, Mr. T- Frank Mass. 

Myers, Mrs. Charles H. Mass. 

Nash, Miss Carolyn R. D. C. 

"Nathan, Mr. Joseph B. Mass. 



Nathanson, Mr. Edward A. Mass. 

Neal, Mrs. Ernest B. Mass. 
Neiley, Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey C. Mass. 

Neill, Miss Ruth Mass. 

Newell, Mrs. John Louis Mass. 
New England Baptist Hospital 

Alumnae Association Mass. 

Newhall, Mr. Guy Mass. 

Newman, Mrs. Samuel J. Mass. 

Nevhart, Mr. Adnah Mass. 

Nichols, Mrs. A. A. Mass. 

Nichols, Miss Abbie Mass. 

Nichols, Mrs. Frank C. Mass. 

Nickerson, Mrs. Annie L. Mass. 

Nickerson, Mrs. Henry Mass. 

Niedner, Mrs. William Mass. 

Niles, Miss Marion H. Mass. 

Noble, Mr. and Mrs. K. D. C-ilif. 

Nock, Prof. Arthur D. Mass. 

Norcross, Mrs. William W. Mass. 

Norton, Mrs. D. C. N. H. 

Norton, Miss Elizabeth G. Mass. 

Norton, Mr. Thomas H. Mass. 

Nowell, Mr. and Mrs. James Mass. 

Noyes, Mr. and Mrs. Atherton Mass. 

Noves, Mrs. Harry K. Mass. 

Nutter, Mr. William S. Maine 

Oberist, Mr. Henry C. Mass. 

Odaniel, Mrs. J. Allan , Mass. 

Ogden, Mrs. Hugh W. Mass. 

O'Keefe, Adrian F. Mass. 

O'Keeffe, 'Mr. Lionel H. Mass. 

Oldenberg, Mr. Otto Mass. 

Olmstead, Mrs. John C. Mass. 

Olson, Mr. Eric E. Mass. 

O'NeiL Mr. J. D. Mass. 

Onwood, Mr. and Mrs. Rene Mass. 

Orlandini, Mrs. Vittorio Mass. 

O-r. Mrs. Horace W. Mass. 
Osborne, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Mass. 

Ovcson, Mrs. Raymond H. Mass. 

Packard, Dr. Fabyan Mass. 

Page, Rev. Frederick H. Mass. 

Page, Mrs. J. Harvey Mass. 

Paine, Mr. John A. Mass. 

Paine, Mrs. Richard C. Mass. 

Paine, Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Mass. 

Paine, Mr. Russell S. Mass. 

Palmer, Mrs. Constance Mass. 

Palmer, Mrs. William I. Mass. 

Parker, Mr. Francis T. Mass. 

Parker, Mrs. Robert B. Mass. 

Parmelee, Miss Mary J. N. Y. 

Parsons, Mrs. Ernst M. Mass. 

Patton. Mrs. James E. Mass. 

Paull, Miss Mary Wise. 

Payne, Mrs. Oliver H. N. Y. 
Payson, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Mass. 

Peabody, Miss Amelia Mass. 

Peabody, Mr. Harold Mass. 

Peabody, Miss Margery Mass. 

Pearse, Miss Alice W. Mass. 

Peirce, Miss Charlotte Mass. 

Peirce, Mr. J. Gilbert Mass. 

Peirce, Miss Margaret S. Mass. 

Penfleld, Miss Annie A. Mass. 

Perkins, Mr. Edward N. N. Y. 

Perkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Mass. 

Perrin, Mrs. Badger Conn. 

Perry, Mrs. Carroll Mass. 

Perry, Mr. Frank J. A. Mass. 

Persing, Mrs. L. M. Ohio 

Peters, Mrs. Andrew J. Mass. 

Petitmermet, Mr. Jules P. Mass. 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. Mass. 

Phillips, Mr. Asa E., Jr. Mass. 
Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 



77 



Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. 

Pierce, Mrs. C. Eaton 

Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln W. 

Pierce, Mr. Vassar 

Pieri, Mr. Albert 

Pigeon, Mr. Richard 

Pike, Mrs. Roy 

Pinkos, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Piper, Mrs. Charles 

Pitman, Mrs. Harold 

Pittman, Mr. Henry W., Jr. 

Place, Mr. Winfred A. 

Plimpton, Mrs. Barton F. 

Plimpton, Mrs. George F. 

Pomeroy, Mrs. Katherine H. 

Pond, Mr. Bremer W. 

Poor, Mrs. Alice F. 

Pope, Mrs. Frank J. 

Porter, Mrs. A. Kingsley 

Porter, Mr. Alex 

Porter, Mr. John 

Post, Mr. and Mrs. John R. 

Postley, Mr. W. D. 

Potter, Miss Louise M. 

Powell, Miss Anna L. 

Prescott, Mr. Samuel C. 

Preston, Mr. Jerome 

Proctor, Mrs. Charles A. 

Proctor, Miss Cora R. 

Proctor, Mr. George B. 

Prout, Mrs. Henry B. 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. 

Pruett, Mrs. Harry J. 

Purdy, Mr and Mrs. Orville N. 

Putney, Mrs. Edmonds 

Quick, Mrs. Hermine H. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. J. 
Mass. 
Calif. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
N. J. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Calif. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 

N. Y. 



Rae, Mrs. Benjamin G. Mass. 

Rand, Mrs. Edward K. Mass. 

Rasely, Mr. H. N. Mass. 

Rath, Mrs. Anna C. N. Y. 

Ratshesky, Mrs. Therese A. Mass. 

Redfield, Mrs. Alfred C. Mass. 

Reed, Miss Anna N. Wise. 

Reed, Mr. William H. Mass. 

Rehder. Mr. Alfred Mass. 

Reilly, Miss Mary E. Mass. 

Resor, Mrs. Walter G. Mass. 

Revere, Miss Anna P. Mass. 

Rhodes, TVIrs. D. P. Mass. 

Rice, Mrs. Albert W. Mass. 

Rice, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E. Mass. 

Rice. Dr. and Mrs. George B. Mass. 

Rice', Mr. Harry L. Mass. 

Rice, Mr. John C. Mass. 

R,ichards, Mr. Henry H. Ma^s. 

Richards, Mr. Herbert M. T. H. 

Richards, Mr. John N. H. 

Richards, Miss Sara L. N. Y. 

Richardson, Mr. Charles O. Mass. 

Richardson, Mrs. George W. Mass. 

Richardson, Mrs. John Mass. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr. _ Mass. 
Richardson, Misses Laura and Elizabeth 

Mass. 

Richardson, Miss Ruth K. Mass. 

Richmond, Mr. H. B. Mass. 

Ridley, Mrs. Horace S. Mass. 

Riley, Miss Mabel L. Mass. 

Ripley, Mrs. Davis N. N. Y. 

Ritchie, Miss Marion A. Mass. 

Robbins, Mrs. Chandler Mass. 

Robert, Mrs. Urbain 

Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth D., Jr 

Mass 

Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Harold L. Mass 

Robison, Mrs. Rulon Y. Mass 

Robson, Miss Alice Mass 



Rodgers, Miss Elsie G. 

Roe, Miss Mary T. 

Rogers, Miss Bertha F. 

Rogers, Mr. Dudley P. 

Kcji-^.s, Mrs. Eiiery W. 

Rogers, Mrs. Horatio 

Rogers, Mrs. Leon B. 

Rood, Mrs. Stanley H. 

Rose, Mrs. WiUiam H. 

Ross, Mrs. F. G. 

Rotch, Miss Edith E. 

"Rothwell, Mr. Bernard J. 

Rowland, Dr. William D. 

Rowley, Dr. Francis H. 

Rowley, Mr. and Mrs. H. Esmond 

Rowse, Mrs. Richard E. 

Roy, Mr. James C. 

Rudkin, Mrs. Thomas 

Rugg, Miss Gertrude R. 

Runkle, Mr. and Mrs. John C. 

Ruperti, Mrs. Justus 

Russell, Mrs. Otis T. 

Sabine, Mrs. Stephen W. 

Sachs, Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. 

Sp,ck, Mr. Benjamin 

Saltonstall, Mr. Richard 

Salvage, Mr. Louis H. 

Sameth, Miss Elsa 

Sammet, Mr. and Mrs. G. Victor 

Sampson, Mrs. Mary M. 

Samson, Mrs. E. J. 

Sanborn, Mrs. Ashton R. 

Sanborn. Mr. Frank B. 

Sang, Mrs. Sara A. 

Sarton, Dr. George 

Saunders, Miss Edith St. L. 

Saunders, Miss Elizabeth E. 

Saunders, Mr. Thomas H. 

Sawtelle, Mr. and Mrs. Chester M. 

Sawyer, Miss Caroline A. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Ella Adams 

Sayles, Mrs. Robert W. 

Scaife, Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. 

Schenck, Mr. Garret, Jr. 

Scher, Mr. Morris G. 

Schildmachter, Mrs. O. 

Schirmer, Mrs. Frank A. 

Schmidt, Mrs. Bernard 

Schneider, Miss Elizabeth 

Schnell, Mrs. Julius N. 

Schoenhut, Mrs. George W. 

SchrafPt, Mr. W. E. 

Schrafft, Mrs. Bertha E. 

Schroader^ Miss Anna A. 

Schroeder, Mrs. L. 

Schumacher, Miss Lillie L. 

Schweinfurth. Mr. Charles 

Sears, Miss E. Elizabeth 

Sears, Miss Edith H. 

Sears, Miss Evelyn - 

Sears, Mrs. Richard 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. 

Seaver, Mrs. Albert H. 

Seaver, Mr. Henry L. 

Seavey, Prof. Warren A. 

Sebastian, Mr. W. 

Seccomb, Miss Dorothy B. 

Sedgwick, Mr. Henry D. 

Seltzer, Mrs. John S. 

Shapiro, Mr. Maxwell 

Shattuck, Mr. Henry L. 

Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A. 

Shaw, Mrs. Florence M. 

Shaw, Mr. Harold B. 

Shaw, Mrs. Henry S. 

Shaw, Mr. Robert H. 

Shaw, Mrs. Walter K., Jr. 

Shepai-d, Miss Emily B. 



Pa. 

Ind. 
N. H. 

Mass. 
iviass, 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Fla. 
Mass. 

Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass, 

Nev. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass.' 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 

N. J. 
Mass. 
Penn. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 
N. H. 

Mass. 

Mass. 
Pa. 

N. Y. 

N. J. 

T.lass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 
Pa. 

Mass. 

Mass. 
Ohio 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

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Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 



78 



Shepaid, Mr. Frank R. Masa. 

Shepard, Mr. T. H. Mass. 

Shaiman, Miss Rose Mass. 

Shilliio, Mr. and Mrs. John i'.liisa. 

Sias, Miss Martha G. ivlass. 

Sibley, Miss Emily Mass. 

Sibley, Mrs. Henry C. ica.:3. 

Simon, Mr. Harry Neb. 

Simonds, Mrs. Gifford K. Mass. 

Simonds, Mrs. Harlan K. Mass. 

Simpson, Mrs. Sidney P. Ohio 

Skaller Supply Co. N. Y. 

Slicer, Miss Henrietta W. Md. 
Slichter, Prof, and Mrs. Sumner H. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. N. Y. 

Smith, Mrs. Caroline P. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. Coburn Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Donald W. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. Francis D. Colo. 

Smith, Mrs. J. Archy Fia. 

Smith, Mrs. Louis C. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Lyman B. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Roger D. Mass. 

Smullin, Mr. and Mrs. Louis N. J. 

Smyth, Mrs. Herbert V/. Mass. 

Snow, Mr. Andre Mass. 

Sooy, Mrs. Curtis Pa. 

Soper, Mrs. V/illard B. Mass. 

Spector, Mr. Robert N. Y. 

Speiman, Mrs. Henry M. Ma^s. 

Spencer, Mrs. Guilford L. Irlass. 

Spencer, Mr. Theodore Mass. 

Spink, Miss Ruth H. HI. 

Spore, Mr. L. D. ilabs. 

Sprague, Mrs. O. M. W. Mas;-. 
Squibb, Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Macs. 

Stackpole, Mrs. Pierpont L. Mass. 

Stannard, Miss Rachel H. Mass. 

Stanton, Mrs. H. T. 111. 

Steadman, Mr. Chester C. Mass. 

Stearly, Mrs. Wilson R. N. J. 

Stebbins, Mrs. Roderick Mass. 

Stedfast, Mrs. Albert R. Mass. 

Steele, Mrs. Avery W. Mass. 

Steele, Mrs. F. R. Carnegie Mass. 

Steele, Miss Katherine E. D. C. 

Steele, Mr. Matthew F. N D. 

Stegmaier, Mr. Henry L. Ma^s. 

Stenquist, Mrs. Warner Mass. 

Stephenson, Mrs. Preston T. Mass. 

Stephenson, Mrs. W. R. C. Mass. 

Stevens, Miss Gertrude Mass. 

Stevens, Mr. Sidney Mass. 

Stevenson, Mrs. John Mass. 

Stevenson, Mrs. W. N. Mnss. 
Stifel, Miss Clara W. Va. 

Stone, Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Conn. 

Stone, Mrs. Edward H. Mass. 

Stone, Mrs. Robert G. Maso. 

Stone, Mrs S. M. Mass. 

Stone, Mrs. William Mass. 

Storer, Miss Emily L. Mssr,. 

Straus, Mr, David Ohio 

Strickland, Mrs. Francis L. Mass. 
Strong, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Mass. 

Stuart, Miss Charlotte V. Mass. 

Stuart, Miss Ina M. Mass. 

Stuart, Miss Louise Mass. 
Stuart, Mr. and Mrs. Melville K. Mass. 

Stuart, Mrs. WillouR-hby H., Jr. Mass. 

Studley, Mrs. Robert L. Mass. 

Sturges, Mrs. Rush R. I. 

Stui-gis, Mrs. Edwin A. Mass. 

Sturgisj Miss E. R. Mass. 
Sturgis, Misses Susan B. and Anita Mass. 

Sturgis, Mr. S. Warren Mass. 

Suarez, Mrs. Philip Mass. 

Suder, Mrs. George B. Mass. 

Sullivan, Mr. John B., Jr. Mass. 



Sullivan, R. C. Company Mass. 

Summers, Mrs. Gaston Mass. 

Summers, Mr. Merle G. Mass. 

Suter, Mr. Gottfried Miss. 

Sutton, Mi's. Harry E. Mass. 

Swallow, Mrs. Morton T. Mass. 

Swan, Miss Ethel F. Mass. 

Swanson, Mr. Arthur G. Mass. 

Swartz, Mr. Edward M. Mass. 

Sweeney, Mr. James E. Mass. 

SweetJand, Mr. Ralph Mass. 

Swinaey, Miss Ruth Ore. 

Taber, Mrs. T. T. N. J. 

'ialano, Mrs. Maria Calif. 

TaiOot, Miss Mary E. Mass. 

Tapiey, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert H. Mass. 

Tappan, Mr. Ernest S. Mass. 

Tappan, Mrs. Frederick H. Mass. 
Taroox, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred B. Mass. 

Tarr. Mrs. R. H. N. Y. 

Taylor, Mrs. Grant S. Mass. 

Terry, Mrs. Ruth K. Mass. 

Thayer, Mrs. Frank H. Mass. 
Thayer, Mr. and Mrs. James B. Mass. 

Thayer, Mrs. Warren Mass. 

Thayer, Mr. William H. Mass. 

Thom, Dr. Douglas A. Mass. 

Thomas, Miss Helen Mass. 

Thompson, Miss Helen M. Mass. 
Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Mass. 

Thompson Water Cooler Co. Mass. 

Thompson, Mr. Wayne B. Mass. 

Thurston, Mr. Edward S. Mass. 

Tierney, Mrs. John P. Mass. 
Tilden, Misses Alice F. and Edith S. Mass. 

Titus, Dr. and Mrs. Mass. 

Torbert, Mrs. James R. Mass. 

Tower, Miss Florence E. Mass. 

Tower, Mrs. Oswald Mass. 

Trainer, Mr. H. R. Mass. 

Trediek, Miss Frances M. N. H. 
Trinity Congregational Church 

Sunday School Mass. 
Tripp, Mr. and Mrs. William V., Jr. Mass. 

Tri Sigma Sorority N. J. 

Trumpy, Mr. Randall" H. N. Y. 

Tucker, Mrs. Henry Guild Mass. 

Tucker, Miss Minnie C. N. Y. 

Tucker, Mr. Nathan Mass. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. Sears Ma^s. 

Tudor, Mrs. Henrj' D. Mass. 

Tuttle, Miss M. Elizabeth N. Y. 

Tyler, Mr. Brenton E. Mass. 

TJltsch, Mrs. Emma L. Mass. 

Underwood, Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 
Union Congregational Church Primary 

Department, East Braintree Mass. 



Vanderhoof, Mrs. Nelson B. 
Van Ingen, Miss Anne H. 
Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C. 
Van Vleck, Mr. and Mrs. John H. 
Vaughan, Miss Margaret I. 
Veitch, Mr. Edward A. 
Ver Planck, Mr. Philip 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F. 
Voehl, Miss Marie C. 
Vogel, Mr. and Mrs. Augustus H. 
Voceley, Mrs. W. Roebling 
Volkmann, Mrs. James Howe 
von Kienbusch, Mr. C. O. 
Vose, Mrs. S. Morton 



Waghorne, Mrs. A. C. 

Walcott, Dr. and Mrs. Charlas F. Mass. 

Walker, Mrs. Oakley Mass. 

Wallace, Miss Bessie M. N. Y. 



Mass. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N.J. 
Mass. 

M33S. 

Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 



79 



N. Y. 

Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mich. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

D. C. 
Mass. 

Mass. 
Fla. 

Mass. 

N.J. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Calif. 



Wallace, Miss Eleanor B. 

WaUburg. Mrs. Frances K. 

Waller, Miss Jessie 

Walworth, Miss Harriet E. 

Waples, Mr. S. H. 

Ward, ]Ar. Edgar 

Ward, Miss M. DeC. 

Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Robert S 

Waring, Mrs. Guy 

Warner, Mrs. Sam B. 

Warren, Mrs. Bayard 

Warren, Mr. Bertram E. 

Warren, Mrs. George B. 

Warren, Mr. Rowland S. 

Warren, Mrs. S. L. 

Washburn, Mrs. Mary L. 

Washburn, Miss Ruth W. 

Waterfleld, Mrs. CM. 

Waterman, Dr. and Mrs. George A. F^. 

Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Laurence J. N. a- 

Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. 

Weil, Mr. Jesse 

Wellesley College Service Fund 

Wellman, Miss Mabel T. 

Wells, Miss Amy W. 

Wells, Mr. and Mrs. George B. 

Wells, Mrs. Wellington, Jr. 

Wendell, Mr. Arthur R. 

Wengren, Mr. Elmer L. 

Wessell, Mrs. Alice C. 

West Newton Women's Educational 

Club 
Weston, Mr. Melville F. 
Wetherbee, Miss Lila 
Whealan, Mr. James E. 
Wheelan, Mr. R. B. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Leonard 
Whipple, Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 
White, Miss Gertrude R. Mass. 

White, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus W. Mass. 
White, Mrs. Richardson Mass. 

Whiteman, Rev. and Mrs. John B. Mass. 
Whitmore, Mrs. A. L. Mass. 

Whitney, Mr. and Mrs. C. Handasyde Mass. 
Whitney, Mrs. Geoffrey G. Mass. 

Whitney, Miss Margaret Mass. 

Whitney, Mrs. William T. Mass. 

Whittall, Mr. Matthew P. Mass. 

Whittem, Mr. A. F. Mass. 

Whittemore, Mrs. Theodore P. Mass. 

Whittemore, Dr. W. Stewart Mass. 

Whittpn, Mr. Edmund S. Mass. 

Whitwell, Mrs. Frederick S. Mass. 

Widder, Mr. and Mrs. David V. Mass. 
V/iese, Mr. Robert G. Mass. 



Ky. 

Mass. 
Ind. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. J. 
Maine 
Mass. 

Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
111. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 



Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 
Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Russell B. 
Wight, Mrs. Elsie B. 
Wight, Mrs. Marcus Seymour 
Wightman, Mrs. Hazel V. 
Wilbor, Mr. and Mrs. Rufus L. 
Wiley, Mrs. YL- O- . ,, 
Wilkins, Miss Georgia M. 
Wilkinson, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. 
Willard, Mrs. Frank H. 
Williams, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Williams, Mrs. Holden P. 
Williams, Mrs. John H. 
Williams, Mrs. Moses 
WilliamSi Mr. Roy F. 
Williams, Miss Susan _ 

Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. 
Williamson, Miss Clara R. 
Willing, Mr. James 
Williston, Miss Emily 

Williston, Prof. Samuel 

Wilson, Miss Antoinette 

Wilson, Miss Elizabeth W. 

Wilson, Mrs. Fred A. 

Winkler, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 

Winn, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. 

Winslow, Mrs. Robert 

Winsor, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 

Winsor, Mrs. Frederick 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B. 

Wise, Mrs. Harold W. 

Wisham, Mrs. Clarence H. 

Wislocki, Mrs. George B. 

Wiswall, Mrs. Augustus C. 

Wolf, Mrs. Louis 

Women's Association, Central 
Congregational Church, 
Newtopville 

Women's Rest Tour Association 

Womens Union of the First _ 
Congregational Church, Natick 

Wood, Mrs. C. F. 

Wood, Mrs. Edward S. 

Woodbridge, Mr Benjamin M. 

Wrieht, Mrs. E. Stanley 

Wright, Mr. E. C. 

Wright, Mrs. Edward P. 
Wrieht, Mr. George R. 
Wright, Mrs. Vernon A. 



Mass> 
Mas8> 

Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y, 
Ga. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass.- 
Mass.. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass.. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Ind. 



Mass. 
Mass> 

Mass. 

Ky. 
N. J. 

Ore. 
Mass. 

Ohio 
N. H. 
Mass. 
Minn. 



Yaglou, Mr. and Mrs. Constantin P. T^f^ss. 
Young, Miss Mary E. Mass. 



Zschirpe, Mrs. Minnie E. 



Conn. 



80 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), the same to 

be applied to the general uses and purposes of said corporation 
under the direction of its Board of Trustees ; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being of said corpora- 
tion shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, that certain tract of real estate bounded and described as 
follows : 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 



with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN P. CHASE 

75 Federal Street, Boston 10, Mass. 



.-^/N 




i' r/ ; • p 



:v:'' .; ^^i':{%^M'm, 



•r; 




14 




r- 



^ 



WINTER GLIMPSE OF TOWER 



One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Annual Report 

of 

Perkins Institution 

and 

Massachusetts School 
for the Blind 

Incorporated March 2, 1829 




1949 



Offices of Administration and Schools 
Watertown 72, Mass. 



THE WORKSHOP THE TREASURER 

549 E. Fourth Street 75 Federal Street 

South Boston 27, Mass. Boston 10. Mass. 



CONTENTS 

Calendar 

History 

Past Officers 

Officers of the Corporation 

Officers of Administration 

Upper School Staff . 

Lower School Staff . 

Members of the Corporation 

Proceedings of the Corporation 

Report of the Trustees 

Report of the Director 

Report of the Ophthalmologist 

Report of the Physician 

Report of the Dentists 

Workshop for Adults 

Howe Memorial Press 

List of Pupils . 

Acknowledgments 

Statement of Accounts 

Contributors to the Deaf-Blind Fund 

Form of Bequest .... 



4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

13 

15 

17 

49 

49 

50 

52 

53 

54 

57 

61 

73 

85 



PERKINS CALENDAR 1949 - 1950 



September 


13. 




19. 




20. 




21. 




26. 


October 


10. 




11. 




17. 




19. 


November 


7. 




8. 




14. 




21. 


24-27. 


December 


12. 




13. 




16. 




18. 




19. 




19. 




20. 




20. 


January 


3. 




4. 




9. 




10. 




16. 


February 


13. 




14. 




20. 




22. 


March 


13. 




14. 




20. 




31. 


April 


— 




10. 




11. 




11. 




17. 


May 


8. 




9. 




15. 




30. 


June 


10. 




12. 




13. 




17. 




20. 


September: 


11. 




12. 




12. 




13. 



Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Staff Meeting 

Pupils return after Summer Vacation 

School begins 

Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

Staff Meeting 

Executive Committee Meeting 
Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 
Staff Reception in Director's Residence 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Girls' Upper School) 

Thanksgiving Week-end 

Staff Meeting 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Christmas Concert 

Christmas Concert 

Matrons' Meeting (Boys' Upper School) 

Cottage Christmas Parties 

Christmas Concert 

Christmas vacation begins after concert 

Pupils and staff return from vacation 

School begins 

Staff Meeting 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

Staff Meeting 

Executive Committee Meeting 
Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 
Washington's Birthday holiday 

Staff Meeting 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Matrons' Meeting (Girls' Upper School) 
Pupils leave for vacation after classes 

No Staff Meeting 

Pupils return from Easter vacation 

School begins 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Boys' Upper School) 

Staff Meeting 

Executive Committee Meeting 
Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 
Memorial Day holiday 

Alumnae Day 

Staff Meeting 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Alumni Day 

Graduation Day 

Staff Meeting 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Pupils return from Summer Vacation 
School begins 



PERKINS INSTITUTION 

HISTORY 

IN 1826 Dr. John D. Fisher returned to Boston from Paris resolved to provide for 
the blind of Massachusetts the same care afforded them in France. Enlisting 
the aid of friends, a committee was formed and upon petition to the Legislature 
an Act of Incorporation was granted on March 2, 1829, establishing "The New England 
Asylum for the Blind," the first school in America for those without sight. In 1831 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, just returned from participation in the Greek wars, was 
elected the first director, and in August, 1832, the first classes were held in the house 
of Dr. Howe's father on Pleasant Street. 

During the early years Col. Thomas H. Perkins became interested in the little 
school and gave for its use his large house on Pearl Street. The need for larger quarters 
was soon apparent, and in 1839 the great hotel in South Boston was purchased. This 
purchase was made possible by the assent of Colonel Perkins to the sale of the house 
that he had given to the School. Because of this magnanimous attitude of Colonel 
Perkins the Trustees renamed the school "Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
Asylum for the Blind." This name was changed in 1877 to the present name, "Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind." 

Dr. Howe directed the growing work of Perkins Institution for forty years and 
was succeeded in 1876 by his Greek protege and son-in-law, Michael Anagnos. Mr. 
Anagnos created the Howe Memorial Press for publishing embossed books and for 
the manufacture of appliances for education of the blind. In 1887 he founded the 
Kindergarten in Jamaica Plain, the first school in the world for little blind children. 
After thirty years of leadership Mr. Anagnos died in Rumania in 1906. 

In 1907 the directorship of Perkins Institution fell to Edward E. Allen, head of 
the school for the blind in Philadelphia, where he had just rebuilt the school plant 
on a garden site outside of the city. Coming to Boston, Mr. Allen began plans for 
a new Perkins, and in 1912 the Institution and in 1913 the Kindergarten were housed 
in the beautiful new plant at Watertown. These buildings, situated on an old estate 
of thirty-four acres on the banks of the Charles River, have school and residence 
facilities for nearly three hundred pupils. Dr. Allen retired in 1931. His last official 
act was to write the one hundredth annual report. Thus for a century Perkins Institu- 
tion had but three directors. 

PURPOSE 

Perkins Institution provides for the visually handicapped youth of New England 
full educational opportunity from Kindergarten through High School. The content 
of instruction corresponds with that offered to seeing boys and girls in the public 
schools. The methods of instruction of necessity differ. Principal differences are 
that embossed books take the place of ink print, and studies are taught objectively. 
In the adaptation and invention of means of instructing the blind, Perkins has been 
a pioneer through its century of existence. Much attention is paid to physical and 
manual training and to music. Opportunity is provided for those qualified to pursue 
higher studies or take advanced work in music and vocational fields. 

Boys and girls without sight or with insuflicient sight to read ink-print are ad- 
mitted as pupils, if capable of education and in good health. While at the school pupils 
reside in cottages where the teachers also live, and through this association they acquire 
that unconscious tuition which is such an important part of the program of socializa- 
tion. The primary aim of Perkins Institution is to qualify its visually handicapped 
pupils to take contributory places in normal life. New pupils are admitted in September 
and February, and all pupils must return to their homes for the short vacations at 
Christmas and Easter and for the long vacation in the summer. 



PAST OFFICERS 



PRESIDENTS 



1830-1837, Jonathan Phillips 
1838-1839, Samuel Appleton 
1840-1846, Peter C. Brooks 
1847-1854, Richard Fletcher 
1855-1861, Edward Brooks 
1861-1869, Samuel May 



1870-1871, Martin Brimmer 
1872-1897, Samuel Eliot 
1898-1930, Francis H. Appleton 
1930-1946, Robert H. Hallowell 
1946- Reginald Fitz, M.D. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



1830 
1835 
1847- 
1851 
1852 
1867 
1871 



■1834, 
•1846, 
■1850, 
•1852, 
•1866, 
•1870, 
-1892, 



William Calhoun 
Thomas H. Perkins 
Edward Brooks 
John D. Fisher 
Stephen Fairbanks 
Joseph Lyman 
John Cummings 



1893-1896, George Hale 
1897-1911, Amory a. Lawrence 
1912-1913, N. P. Hallowell 
1914-1921, George H. Richards 
1922-1929, William L. Richardson 
1930-1946, G. Peabody Gardner 
1946- Ralph Lowell 



TREASURERS 



1830-1839, Richard Tucker 
1840-1846, Peter R. Dalton 
1847-1861, Thomas B. Wales 
1862-1868, William Claflin 
1869-1872, William Endicott 
1873-1879, Henry Endicott 
1880-1881, Patrick T. Jackson 



1881-1902, Edward Jackson 
1903-1904, Patrick T. Jackson 
1904-1916, William Endicott 
1917-1935, Albert Thorndike 
1935-1945, Roger Amory 
1945- John P. Chase 



SECRETARIES AND DIRECTORS 
1831-1876, SAMUEL Gridley Howe 1907-1931. Edward E. Allen 
1876-1906, Michael Anagnos 1931- Gabriel Farrell 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

1949-1950 

PRESIDENT 
Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

VICE-PRESIDENT TREASURER 

Ralph Lowell John P. Chase 

SECRETARY ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Gabriel Farrell Howard Whitmore, Jr. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Miss Dorothy L. Book* Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. 

David Cheever, Jr. Daniel J. Lyne* 

Rev. John J. Connolly* Warren Motley 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Paul L. Neal* 

Reginald Fitz, M.D. Richard Saltonstall 

Robert H. Hallowell Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
Executive Finance 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President John P. Chase, Treasurer, 
John P. Chase, Treasurer ex officio 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary Robert H. Hallowell 

ex officio Ralph Lowell 
Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Richard Saltonstall 

Robert H. Hallowell 
Daniel J. Lyne Warren Motley 

SUB-COMMITTEES 

Appointed by the Executive Committee 
Education Health 

Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

Rev. John J. Connolly David Cheever, Jr. 

Robert H. Hallovs^ll Paul L. Neal 

MONTHLY VISITING COMMITTEE 

Whose duty it ia to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each mo-nth. 

January Warren Motley June Robert H. Hallowell 

February Reginald Fitz, M.D. September Miss R. D. Thorndike 

March Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. October Rev. John J. Connolly 

April David Cheever, Jr. November Daniel J. Lyne 

May Richard Saltonstall December Mrs. R. E. Danielson 

LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE 
Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike, Chairman 

Mrs. Frederick J. Alley Mrs. Frederic B. Kellogg 

Mrs. Arthur Brooks Mrs. George F. Plimpton 

Miss Ellen T. Bullard Miss Elizabeth Rackemann 

Mrs. David Cheever, Jr. Mrs. Augustus N. Rantoul 

Mrs. Russell Codman Miss Mary D. Rudd 

Lady Emilie Coote Mrs. Richard Saltonstall 

Mrs. Robert M. Faxon Mrs. Henry D. Tudor 

Mrs. E. Sturgis Hinds Mrs. Rudolph Weld 

♦Appointed by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DIRECTOR 
GABRIEL FARRELL, B.S., B.D., D.D. 

DIRECTOR-EMERITUS 
EDWARD E. ALLEN, A.B., D.Sc. 

OFFICE 
J. Stephenson Hemphill, B.S., M.B.A., Bursar 
Catherine S. Benson Vbrna L. Anderson 

Secretary to the Director Secretary to the Bursar 

Marion A. Woodworth Phyllis E. Gordon 

Registrar Assistant 

Maryjane Youngblood Ethel L. Mackenzie 

Ediphonist Bookkeeper 

Frank H. GREENEf Alice E. Dougher 

Telephone Operator Mrs. Phyllis M. Smith 

Assistants 

LIBRARY 

Nelson Coon, Librarian 

Florence J. Worth, Cataloguer Mrs. Annetta R. Cas-RLe, 

Circulation 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Victor G. Balboni, M.D., Attending Physician 
Margaret F. Bishop, R.N., Resident Nurse 
Valerie C. Payne, R.N., Resident Nurse 
Trygve Gundersen, M.D. Reinhold Ruelberg, D.M.D. 

Ophthalmologist Dentist for the Lower School 

Herbert Barry, Jr., M.D. Mark D. Elliott D.D.S. 

Psychiatrist Dentist for the Upper School 

Allan M. Butler, M.D. Frank R. Ober, M.D. 

PediatHcian Orthopedic Surgeon 

Henry R. Viets, M.D. Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Neurologist Otologist 

Francis R. Dieuaide, M.D. 
Syphilologist 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND RESEARCH 
Samuel P. Hayes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Psychologist 
FRANCES E. Marshall Mrs. Sina P. Waterhouse, 

Social Worker ^'^•'^^'f •' 

T „o rkAiTTo Tl<5 M. ALBERTINA EASTMAN, B.S.f 

^""'piTchoLfrT' ^■'- ^^-^^ ^«--*-- 

Shirlie L. Smith, R.P.T.T.f Helen Brown, B.Ed. 

Physiotherapist Secretary 

•Employed part time. tVisually handicapped. 



UPPER SCHOOL STAFF 

Orin a. Stone, B.S., M.A., Acting Principal 

Alice M. Cakpenter, A.B., M.A., D.Ped., Deem of Girls 

Benjamin F. Smith, A.B., M.A.,t Dean of Boys 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND LITERARY DEPARTMENTS 

MoLLiE Cambridge, A.B. Claudia Potter, A.B. 

Gertrude S. Harlow! Clara L. Pratt 

Genevieve M. Haven, A.B., Ed.M. Elsie H. Simonds, A.B. 

Armand J. MiCHAUD, A.B.. M.A.f Edw. J. Waterhouse, B.A., M.A. 

CHRISTOS C. PAPPAS, B.S. DERICK V. WiLLSON, B.A. 

Edmund J. Jusczyk, B.S. Margaret G. Bigelow, B.S. 

Physical Education Physical Education 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Paul L. Bauguss 
Mrs. Marjorie A. Carr Louise Seymour 

Edward W. Jenkins, F.T.C.L.f Bernard P. Barbeau, B.A.* 

Mrs. Stella D. Jenkins* 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Winifred G. Ellis, B.A. Mrs. Vesta V. Coon, A.B. 

VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

Leo V. GiTTZUS, B.S., M.A. 

Walter P. Carr Frances L. McGaw 

Willlam W. Howat, B.S. Susan M. Brooks 

„ ^ J. Marion K. Liversidge 

Sidney B. DuRFEEf 

Pianoforte Tuning Mrs. Charlene H. Cumberland 

Home Economics 

MATRONS OF COTTAGES 

Mrs. Sarah M. Keith, Eliot Miss Judith G. Silvester, Fisher 

Mrs. Mary L. Hunt, Bridgman Mrs. Pearl Gosling, Brooks 

Mrs. Charles Amadon, Tompkins Mrs. Nellie E. H. Hamill, May 

Miss Fanny Durfee, Moulton Miss Isabel H. Murray, Oliver 

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER TRAINING 

Dr. Gabriel Farrell Dr. Samuel P. Hayes 

Lecturer, Graduate School of Consulting Psychologist, American 

Education, Harvard University Foundation for the Blind 

•Employed part time. fVisuaUy handicapped. 



LOWER SCHOOL STAFF 

Shirley A. Drucker, B.A., M.A., Supervisor- 

PRIMARY 

Anthony Ackerman, A.B.f Caroline Peters 

Patricia Vogel, B.S. Florence W. Barbour, A.B. 

Evelyn Kaufman, A.B.f 

KINDERGARTEN 

Feodorb M. Nicholls Susan E. Morse 

Harriet M. Phillips! Helena M. DRAKEt 

J. Elizabeth Andrews, A.B. Betty NyeI 

Jean Gray, A.B. Linda Mosher, A.B. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS 

Eleanor W. Thayer, A.B., Music Margaret Miller,! Librarian 
Mrs. Perley C. White, Music Adeline Dale, B.A., Recreation 

Betty Jane Wenzel, Music Margaret A. McKenzie,! Crafts 

MATRONS OF COTTAGES 

Miss Marie A. Carter, Potter Mrs. Margaret Luf, Glover 

Miss Grace Barris, Assistant Mrs. Laura B. Eldridge, Assistant 

Mrs. Janet G, Hancock, Anagnos Mrs. F. B. Robison, Bradlee 

Mrs. Florence Storer, Assistant Mrs. Hilda Collins, Assistant 

Miss Helen Neilson, Assistant Miss Ellen C. Rice, Assistant 

DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 

Mrs. N. Maurine Gittzus, A.B., M.A. 
Madge Dolph Leo F. Queen ANf 

Mrs. Patricia M. Huddleston, B.S. Audrey White 
Mrs. Rose M. Vivlan, B.S. Dorothy H. Reynolds! 

MARJORIE a. MclNTOSHf 

WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 
Donald Remick, Manager Emily V. S. Ramsay, Clerk 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Edward J. Waterhouse, B.A., M.A., Manager 
David Abraham, Engineer Mary L. Tully, Clerk 

♦Employed part time. t Visually handicapped. 

10 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



AUbright, Clifford, Boston 

Allen, Edward E., Cambridge 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Cambridge 

Allen, Hon. Frank G., Boston 

Allen, Philip R.. Walpole 

Allen, Mrs. Philip R., Walpole 

Alley, Mrs. Frederick J., Boston 

Amory, Roger, Boston 

Anderson, Rev. Edgar W., Watertown 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Brookline 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, Brookline 

Ballantine, Arthur A., New York 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, Beverly 

Bartol, Mrs. John W., Boston 

Barton, George Sumner, Worcester 

Bayne, Mrs. William, 3d, New York 

Beach, Rev. David N., New Haven, Conn. 

Beatley, Prof. Ralph, Cambridge 

Belash, Constantine A., Boston 

Belash, Mrs. Constantine A., Boston 

Bird, Miss Ann C, East Walpole 

Bird, Mrs. Francis W., East Walpole 

Blake, Fordyce T., Worcester 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston 

Boyden, Charles, Boston 

Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H., Cambridge 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston 

Brooks, Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brooks, Mrs. Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brown, Mrs. Charles R., New Haven, Conn. 

Bullard, Miss Ellen T., Boston 

Bullock, Chandler, Worcester 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Dublin, N. H. 

Camp, Mrs. Edward C, Watertown 

Campbell, Mrs. Frederick W., Milton 

Carter, Richard B., West Newton 

Carter, Mrs. Richard B., West Newton 

Ca-se, Hon. Noman S., Washington, D. C. 

Case, Mrs. Norman S., Washington, D. C. 

Cassels, Miss Andree, Boston 

Chase, John P., Boston 

Cheever, David, Jr., Millis 

Cheever, Mrs. David, Jr., Millis 

Choate, Robert B., Boston 

Claus, Henry T., Wilmington, Del. 

Clifford, John H., New Bedford 

Codman, Mrs. Russell, Boston 

Coffin, Mrs. Rockwell A., Harwichport 

Connolly, Rev. John J., Framingham 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, New York 

Coolidge, William A., Boston 

Coote, Lady Emilie, Boston 

Cotting, Charles E., Boston 

Crapo, Henry H., New Bedford 

Crowinshield, Francis B., Boston 

Cunningham, Edward, Dover 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward, Dover 

Curtis, Charles P., Jr., Boston 

Curtis, James F., Roslyn, N. Y. 

Curtis, Louis, Boston 

Curtis, Richard C, Boston 

Cutler, George C, Dedham 

Daley, Mrs. Francis J., Somerville 

Danielson, Richard E., Boston 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E., Boston 

Day, Mrs. Frank A.. Newton 

Denny, Dr. George P., Boston 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston 

Dolan, William G., Boston 

Dowd, Mi-s. John F., Roxbury 



Draper, Eben S., Hopedale 

Drury, Theodore F., Weston 

Dutton, Mrs. George D., Walpole 

Eliot, Amory, Boston 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Boston 

Endicott, Henry, Boston 

Endicott, William, 2nd, North Andover 

Farrell, Gabriel, Watertown 

Farrell, Mrs. Gabriel, Watertown 

Faxon, Henry H., M. D., Brookline 

Faxon, Mrs. Robert M., North Andover 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Rowley 

Fitz, Reginald, M. D., Brookline 

Fitz, Mrs. Reginald, Brookline 

Ford, Lawrence A., Beverly 

Foster, Mrs. Reginald, Boston 

Fox, Miss Edith M., Arlington 

French, Miss M. Eunice, Providence, R. L 

Frothingham, Mrs. L. A., North Easton 

Fuller, George F., Worcester 

Gage, Miss Mabel C, Worcester 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston 

Gardiner, John H., Brookline 

Gardner, G. Peabody, Brookline 

GaskiU, George A., Worcester 

Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee 

Gilbert, Carl J., Needham 

Gilbert, William E., Springfield 

Gleason, Miss Ellen H., Jamaica Plain 

Grandin, Mrs. Isabella, Boston 

Gray, Francis C, Boston 

Gray, Roland, Boston 

Greenough, Mrs. Henry V., Brookline 

Griswold, Merrill, Boston 

Gundersen, Dr. Trygve, Brookline 

Gundersen, Mrs. Trygve, Brookline 

Hall, Miss Minna B., Brookline 

Hallowell, Richard P., 2d, Boston 

Hallowell, Robert H., Dedham 

Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Dedham 

Hallowell, Robert H., Jr., Dover 

Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Jr., Dover 

Harris, Rev. John U., Framingham 

Hayden, J. Willard, Lexington 

Hayden, Mrs. J. Willard, Lexington 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Milton 

Herter, Christian A., Boston 

Higginson, Francis L., Boston 

Hill, Dr. Alfred S., Somerville 

Hinds, Mrs. E. S. Manchester 

Holmes, Dr. Henry W., Cambridge 

Howe, James C, Boston 

Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 3d, Brookline 

Humbert, Miss W. R., Watertown 

Hunnewell, Walter, Boston 

Hunt, James R., Jr., New York 

lasigi. Miss Marie V., Boston 

Jackson, Charles, Jr., Boston 

Jackson, Mrs. James, Westwood 

Jeffries, J. Amory, Boston 

Johnson, Arthur S., Boston 

Kellogg, Mrs. Frederic B., Cambridge 

Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, 2d, Boston 

Kidder, Mrs. Henry P., Meadville, Pa. 

King, Mrs. James G., Cambridge 

Lamb, Mrs. Horatio A., Boston 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond, Milton 

Latimer, Mrs. G. D., Brookline 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Brookline 

Lawrence, Rev. Frederic C, Brookline 

Lawrence, John S., Boston 



11 



Lawrence, Rt. Rev. W. Appleton, Springfield 

Leavitt, Rev. Ashley D., Brookline 

Ley, Harold A., New York 

Lincoln, Mrs. George C, Worcester 

Lovoring, Richard S., Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Lovett, Miss Eleanor H., New London, N.H. 

Lowell, James H., Boston 

Lowell, Ralph, Boston 

Lyman, Mrs. Arthur T., Westwood 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Waltham 

Lyne, Daniel J., Chestnut Hill 

MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore I., West Newton 

Maliotis, Charles, Boston 

Mason, Mrs. Andrew, Brookline 

Mason, Charles E., Jr., Providence, R. I. 

Mayo-Smith, Richmond, Dedham 

McElwain, R. Franklin, Holyoke 

Merrill, Rev. Boynton, Columbus, Ohio 

Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce, Providence, R. I. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cambridge 

Minot, James J., Boston 

Monks, Rev. G. Gardner, Washington, D. C. 

Montagu, Mrs. H. B., England 

Morison, Samuel Eliot, Boston 

Motley, Warren, Boston 

Myers, Mrs. John W., Brookline 

Osgood, Rev. Phillips E., Orange, N. J. 

Parker, William A., Boston 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston 

Parkman, Henry, Jr., Boston 

Parkman, Mrs. Henry, Jr., Boston 

Peabody, Harold, Boston 

Perkins, Mrs. Charles B., Jamaica Plain 

Perkins, Rev. Palfrey, Boston 

Pew, George L., Portland, Maine 

Pierce, Roger, Milton 

Plimpton, Mrs. George F., Boston 

Pool, Mrs. E. A., New York. N. Y. 

Pratt, George D., Springfield 

Proctor, James H., Ipswich 

Prouty, Robert M., Hingham 

Prouty, Mrs. Robert M., Hingham 

Putnam, Mrs. Eliot T., Jr., Dedham 

Putnam, Mrs. George T., Dedham 

Rackemann, Miss Elizabeth, Boston 

Rantoul, Mrs. Augustus N., Boston 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston 

Richards, Henry H., Groton 

Richards, John, Concord, N. H. 

Richards, Tudor, Groton 

Richardson, John, Milton 



Richardson, Mrs. John, Milton 

Rogers, Mrs. Robert E., Cambridge 

Rogerson, Francis C, Duxbury 

Rudd, Miss Mary D., Boston 

Saltonstall, Hon. Leverett, Dover 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, Dover 

Saltonstall, Richard, Sherborn 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Richard, Sherborn 

Sears, Seth, Brewster 

Shattuck, Henry L., Boston 

Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A., Weston 

Sherrill, Rt. Rev. Henry K., New York, N. Y. 

Sillen, Rev. Walter, Watertown 

Sims, Mrs. William S., Boston 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., New York 

Snow, Mrs. William G., Newton Centre 

Stafford, Rev. Russell H., Hartford, Conn. 

Stinson, Mrs. James, Worcester 

Sturgis, R. Clipston, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Sturgis, S. Warren, Boston 

Sullivan, Mrs. James A., Pride's Crossing 

Thayer, John E., Milton 

Theopold, Philip H., Dedham 

Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston 

Thompson, Cameron S., Boston 

Thorndike, Albert, Milton 

Thorndike, Benjamin A. G., Dedham 

Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D., Boston 

Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield 

Tilden, Miss Alice F., Boston 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Boston 

Todd, Francis B., New York, N. Y. 

Tudor, Mrs. Henry D., Cambridge 

Underwood, Herbert S., Winchester 

Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C, Pittsfield 

Vaughan, Miss Margaret I., Haddonfield.N. J. 

Wadsworth, Eliot, Washington, D. C. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., Boston 

Washburn, Rev. Henry B., Cambridge 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph, Boston 

Wendell, William G., West Hartford, Conn. 

Whittall, Matthew P., Worcester 

Wiggins, Mrs. Charles, 2d, Gardiner, Maine 

Wiggins, John, Alden, Pa. 

Wiggins, Mrs. John, Alden, Pa. 

Wilder, Charles P., Worcester 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston 

Wright, George R., Cambridge 

Wright, Miss Lucy, Wellesley 

Young, B. Loring, Weston 

Zeilinski, John, Holyoke 



12 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL 
MEETING OF THE CORPORATION 

Watertown, Massachusetts 
November 7, 1949 

THE ANNUAL MEETING of the Corporation, duly summoned, 
was held today at the Institution, and was called to order by 
the President, Dr. Reginald Fitz, at 3.00 P. M. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved. 

The annual reports of the Trustees and the Director were 
accepted and ordered to be printed, with the addition of other 
matters of general interest to the work. 

The report of the Treasurer was presented, accepted and ordered 
to be printed together with the certificate of the Certified Public 
Accountant. 

It was then 

VOTED: That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by 
the Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed 
by said Board of Trustees, during the last corporate 
year, be and are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

It was further 

VOTED: That the nomination of the Finance Committee and 
the appointment by the Trustees of Barrow, Wade, 
Guthrie & Company, Certified Public Accountants as 
Auditors of the Accounts of the Institution be and 
are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

The Corporation then proceeded to the choice of officers for the 
ensuing year, and the following persons were unanimously elected 
by ballot: President, Reginald Fitz, M.D.; Vice-President, Ralph 
Lowell; Treasurer, John P. Chase; Secretary, Gabriel Farrell; Trus- 
tees, David Cheever, Jr., Mrs. Richard E. Danielson, Reginald Fitz, 
M.D., Robert H. Hallowell, Henry W. Holmes, LL.D., Warren Motley, 
Richard Saltonstall, and Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike. 

A letter of resignation was received from Mr. Robert Amory, 
and on motion duly made, it was accepted with great regret. The 
name of Mr. George L. Pew of Portland, Maine was proposed for 
membership, and he was duly elected. 

The meeting was held in the girls' study hall, which provided 
opportunity for members of the Corporation to see the new addi- 
tions to the plant which were not completed when they met a year 

13 



ago. New services provided by the larger library facilities were 
described, and included a demonstration of recording books on discs 
for the use of college students, by the librarian. Mr. Waterhouse 
of the Howe Press demonstrated the new Braille Writer which has 
been developed at Perkins and now is in production with distribution 
expected by April 1. This writer has features which makes it the 
most outstanding device of this type that has ever been developed. 

The members of the Corporation were invited to see the exhibit 
of all forms of embossed type which had been set up by the library. 
This material came from our Blindiana Library which is the greatest 
of its kind in the world, and which contains much valuable material. 
Exhibited also were the first four books of the library— those brought 
from Europe by Dr. Howe prior to the opening of the school. 

At the close of the meeting the members were invited to the 
staff lounge where tea would be served. 

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary. 



14 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

November 7, 1949 

THE FOLLOWING REPORT for the year 1949 is submitted on 
behalf of the Board of Trustees. 

During the past year the Corporation has lost five members by 
death: Mrs. Larz Anderson, Miss Lucy Lowell, Messrs. Edward 
Motley, John C, Rice and G. Fred Robinson. Each was sincerely 
interested in the work of the Institution and helped its progress; 
their loss is keenly felt. 

The Treasurer's report, as usual, deserves careful study. Our 
financial plight is no different than that of other schools such as 
ours. Our figures reveal that our present tuition fees pay con- 
siderably less than half our costs. A few years ago, as our expenses 
began to soar, our tuition fees were increased as one means of 
offsetting this; it may be that another increase in tuition fees 
should soon again be effected. 

Our costs of operation have risen steadily for the past several 
years and faster than our income has increased through the addi- 
tion of new funds. The budget for the next year is planned to use 
almost every penny of our anticipated income; this fact gives the 
Trustees grave concern. Our high standards of education must be 
maintained, and our pupils must continue to receive the best 
possible care. On the other hand, all non-essential expenditures 
will have to be curtailed and all reasonable economies must be 
practiced. 

Misfortunes seldom come alone. Another economic problem 
with which the institution soon must cope lies in the ill-health of 
certain of our buildings. In general, the plant has always been 
maintained in good physical trim even in spite of the vicissitudes of 
the war when all possible repairs of any magnitude were postponed. 
Now certain areas are urgently in need of renovation. A well- 
known firm of construction engineers has been engaged to survey 
the Institution and to recommend a rehabilitation program which 
can be carried out over a long-term period. It is safe to predict that 
such a program will be costly; to face it, accurate planning and 
precise analysis of expenses will be required. 

All this means that new capital gifts to Perkins continue to be 
needed as badly as ever. An institution such as ours, and accom- 
plishing so much, is necessarily expensive to operate; the costs in 
every department inevitably reflect the increased costs of living. 

The pleasanter side of last year's progress is well illustrated 
in the Director's report. Our teaching and academic work have 
continued at their usually high levels. The School has been well 
filled with pupils. Their health has been good except for occasional 

15 



and insignificant outbreaks of minor illness. To judge their 
spirit, one has only to review the striking achievements of our 
athletes, to think of the dash with which our actors and actresses 
produced Gilbert and Sullivan's Patience, or to recall the in- 
fectious enthusiasm at Commencement when we were addressed by 
one of our own and very distinguished alumni, the Honorable 
William E. Powers, Perkins 1932, and now Attorney General of 
Rhode Island. . „ .. 

Another satisfactory feature of the record is the realization 
that the Staff of Perkins continues to play a leading role in further- 
ing improvements in the care of all young people, the world over, 
who are handicapped by visual difficulties. The Director's calendar, 
alone, demonstrates this. During the year, among other engage- 
ments he lectured at Columbia University on education of the blind; 
he spoke at the National Society of Rehabilitation at the University 
of Wisconsin; he presided at a meeting in the Library of Congress 
called to discuss new methods of embossing Braille; he read a paper 
"Vocational Education of the Blind in the United States" at the 
Second International Congress on the Education of Maladjusted 
Children at Amsterdam in Holland; and he gave the major address 
at the centennial celebration of the School for the Blind in Jackson- 
ville, Illinois. That Perkins Institution continues to be regarded 
nationally, and even internationally, as one of the world's leading 
centers for education of the blind is gratifying. It means that the 
ideals on which the institution was founded are being upheld and 
that the School continues to be pre-eminent in its field. 

Respectfully submitted for the Trustees, 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President. 



16 




THE NEW STUDY HALL FOR GIRLS 



THE BOYS STUDY HALL FROM OUTSIDE 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

November 7, 1949 

HTHE report for the year closing August 31, 1949, will 
-*■ be presented this year in three sections. First, there will be 
comments on affairs within the school and the annual review of 
events of interest. The second part will be a portion of an address 
made by the Director at the Centennial Celebration of the Illinois 
School for the Blind on June 2, 1949. Here are set forth some of 
the problems confronting educators of the blind and their presenta- 
tion in this form takes the place of the commentary made on events 
beyond Perkins found in previous Annual Reports. Third, there 
will be a report on an International Conference of Workers for the 
Blind from seventeen countries, held at Merton College, Oxford, 
England from August 3 to 13, 1949. 



Outstanding this year have been the new conditions created 
by the library changes outlined in the report of a year ago. The 
most observable change came through the opening after the Christ- 
mas holidays of the two study halls. Readers of last year's report 
will recall that these were erected on two terraces, one paralleling 
the river side of the library, for the boys, and the other, adjacent 
to Dwight Hall, for the girls. The new study halls provide facilities 
which we have never had before — home rooms for all Upper School 
pupils apart from class rooms. To these new halls the boys and 
girls go in free hours between classes and for their scheduled study 
periods at the first part of the morning and in the evening. Both 
pupils and teachers have found an unanticipated gain in the quiet 
and freedom which now prevail in the classrooms during school 
hours. The halls have also facilitated supervision, as one teacher 
may be in charge of each hall, whereas more were required when 
the pupils were scattered over the two floors and the several class 
rooms of the school building. 

At the opening of the school year in September the enlarged 
space facilities within the library were completed. During the 
year the necessary adjustments were worked out. The construction 
of the new balcony in the rear third of the library gave space for 

17 



the shelving of more than 25,000 volumes of embossed and recorded 
books. This should meet our needs for many years under the 
present program, and the probable recording of books in smaller 
mediums than the present discs gives promise that adequate book 
space is now available for an indefinite time. 

Along with the new facilities of the library, there has come 
this year, an increased demand for books both from within the 
school and from outside. Perkins library, as our readers may 
recall, serves, in addition to the school, the adult blind of New 
England, as one of the twenty-six regional libraries distributing 
books provided by the Library of Congress under a federal grant. 
During the past year, circulation totaled 39,071 volumes, of which 
29,529 were outside the school. The latter figure divides into 
21,562 recorded books and 7,967 embossed books. This represents 
an increase of 4,343 volumes over the previous year. During the 
month of August the circulation was more than twice as large as 
a year ago. 

While these statistics show an advance over last year, com- 
parison of them with previous years indicates the trend in reading 
by the blind. Many have been interested in the effect on BraiUe 
reading by the introduction of the Talking Book in 1934. The 
chart printed below shows more clearly than words, what the 
situation is. 



•TALKiNq BOOK 
■ BRaiLLE 




,30 I9J5 i9« '«s '*■» 

1 _-.-Zj I 1 1- 



The interesting fact to be deduced from this chart is that the 
reading of Braille has now reached a stable level, and if one takes 
the greater circulation of Braille magazines into consideration, 
there probably is an upswing. The introduction of the Talking 



18 



Book has proved to be a new and added source of education and 
enjoyment for thousands of blind people who would not have read 

Braille. 

A physical inventory of all books on our several miles of 
shelving reveals that the library now possesses 20,221 volumes of 
ink print in the Teachers' and Blindiana libraries, 64,601 volumes 
of embossed books and 7,344 recorded books in the main library, 
or a total of 92,166 volumes. As Braille books are usually in several 
volumes, the number of titles is 31,000. The total number of readers 
served last year was 1,740, of whom 300 were new during the year. 
An analysis of circulation in relation to the number of readers 
indicates that the average person reads about ten titles a year 
which compares favorably with the national average of fifteen 
books a year read by sighted people for whom reading is much 
easier. 

Another significant change in the library during the year has 
been in leadership. On December 31, 1948, Mary Esther Sawyer, 
who had been in charge of the library for twenty-five years, retired 
from active service. Prior to becoming librarian she was director 
of girls' physical education for ten years. Miss Sawyer's successor 
as librarian is Nelson Coon, who for eighteen years has been super- 
intendent of buildings and grounds. For the past ten years Mr. 
Coon has been in charge of Perkins' unique museum of historic 
and objective material for the instruction of the blind. He has 
organized "Exhibits of the Month" which have attracted nation- 
wide attention and has written many articles pertaining to tactual 
instruction. Mr. Coon has carried into the library many of these 
modern methods of making both museums and libraries, service 
centers rather than depositories. Already a stream of research 
workers from colleges and universities are availing themselves of 
the resources of our Blindiana Library which are unequaled in 
the world. 

One of Mr. Coon's first objectives was the reorganization of 
the material in the Blindiana Library, and in doing this he has 
been ably helped by Miss Etheldred Abbot, an expert in library 
organization, who gave three months of intensive work to this 
project. Now all of the material in that library has been recata- 
logued, re-arranged and made more accessible and workable. Miss 
Florence J. Worth, long at the circulation desk, has also completely 
re-organized the arrangement and classification of the Braille and 
Talking Book sections. With the installing of an Addressograph 

19 



and a new filing system, all orders for books are now sent out on 
the same day as received. To assist with this growing service 
Mrs. Annetta R. Castle, a trained worker from the Lynn Public 
Library, joined the staff on July 1, 1949. 

The circulation of books for the school pupils and the adult 
blind is, however, but a part of the many-sided functions of a 
modem library. The use of Talking Book recordings by the pupils 
has involved the installing and care of more than fifty electronic 
players in the classrooms and in the cottages. Another feature 
of the library during the past six months has been the instituting 
of a definite program for the showing of movies under the direction 
of the library. These movies, largely of an educational nature, 
are greatly enjoyed by the pupils, giving not only entertainment, 
but also a sense of participation in activities which are enjoyed 
by the sighted. While the showing of movies may seem strange 
in a school for the blind, it must be remembered that nearly fifty 
per cent of our pupils have enough sight to see the pictures, and 
for those whose vision is too dim, the talking part of the movie 
carries the story which is often interpreted by a neighbor who can 
see the pictures. 

Academic Activities 

If, as someone has said, "The library is the heart of every 
center of learning," then our academic instruction ought to be 
affected by the enlarged facilities of our library. Academically 
the past year has been one of good progress. Whether this has 
been brought about by the added facilities, better planning of the 
administration, more intense contributions on the part of the 
teachers, or even more earnest efforts by the pupils, need not be 
pressed. The wide range of instruction offered, and the opportu- 
nities to learn provided, are justified by the response which has 
been made and the achievement attained by our pupils. 

While the instructional program of Perkins is deeply rooted 
and firmly established, there is always change in order to keep up 
with fresh concepts and new needs. For two or three years, a 
committee under the leadership of Mr. Sherman, the Principal, has 
been making a study of how to improve the curriculum. The past 
year was the first under the revised course of study worked out 
by the committee. While Perkins is small enough to have individ- 
ually planned programs of study designed to meet the needs of 
each pupil, there are certain core subjects which all pupils must 

20 



take. These cover the basic tools of reading, writing, English, 
social studies, physical education and practical arts. In addition 
to these core subjects each pupil is expected to elect in one or more 
special fields, courses which will give to him or to her the greatest 
opportunities for realizing potential abilities and in securing as 
many salable skills as possible. The first steps in the implementa- 
tion of this new curriculum have been taken during this past year. 
They called for dividing all pupils in the Upper School into two 
groups called Division A and Division B. Those in the A division 
are planning to attend college and must meet the rigid requirements 
demanded for admission, while those in the B group have larger 
latitude and their programs are planned to meet their individual 
needs. A certain amount of manual work is required of all pupils, 
but those in the B group give more time in this area, as it is felt 
they will gain more by this type of training than by too much con- 
centration on academic subjects. The next step in this development 
is the setting up of project activities which will be of benefit to 
those who cannot meet fully, the requirements of academic high 
school work. The objective here will be to develop skills which 
will be of value after school years and on a level at which these 
pupils can succeed. An outline of the course of study is available 
in multigraph form for those who are interested in more details. 

Leadership Changes 

In the academic department, as in the library, a significant 
change has been made in leadership. Allan W. Sherman, who has 
been Principal of Perkins for seven years, resigned late in August, 
to become Director of the Cleveland Society for the Blind. His fine 
work and friendly spirit will be greatly missed by his associates 
and students, but all wish him success in his new undertaking. As 
Mr. Sherman's resignation came just as the new year was opening, 
it was decided to divide his duties among present members of the 
staff. Orin A. Stone, for four years a teacher at Perkins, and for 
nine years prior to that, Principal of the Connecticut School for 
the Blind, will be in charge of curriculum planning, supervision of 
teachers, and generally responsible for the academic program. 
Benjamin F. Smith, for twelve years a teacher at Perkins, will be 
in charge of pupil relations on the boys' side, with his duties cor- 
responding to those carried on by Dr. Alice M. Carpenter on the 
girls' side as dean of girls. Miss Shirley A. Drucker, teacher in 
the Lower School for two years, will have charge of pupil relations 

21 



and general supervision of activities in the Lower School, with Mr. 
Stone responsible for the planning and coordination with the Upper 
School program. 

The Harvard Class, whose members take the courses offered 
by the Graduate School of Education of Harvard University and 
which is conducted at Perkins, was made up this year of eleven 
persons, eight on a full-time basis, and three taking a half year's 
work. The class has a wide geographical representation with per- 
sons from China, Egypt and Nicaragua, and from three states in 
this country. This year will be notable in the long time history 
of the course in that it was the last in which lectures were given 
by Dr. Edward E. Allen, Director Emeritus, who founded this 
course twenty-eight years ago. Advanced age has made it impos- 
sible for Dr. Allen to continue to give the lectures although he 
carried through an almost complete program this past year. To 
give the historical lectures which Dr. Allen has previously presented 
we are fortunate in having secured as visiting lecturer next year, 
Dr. Richard S. French, until January 1, 1949, Superintendent of 
the California School for the Blind and lecturer in educational 
psychology at the University of California. 

Deaf-Blind Interests 

The Deaf -Blind Department operated this year with only seven 
pupils. This small number was due, as we have stated on previous 
occasions, to the difficulty of securing teachers well-trained in both 
the field of the blind and the field of the deaf. Steps were taken 
during the summer to try to overcome this shortage by the con- 
ducting of a course to train teachers of the deaf-blind, at the 
summer school of Michigan State College at Ypsilanti. Here a 
course was given by Mrs. N. Maurine Gittzus, head of the Perkins 
Deaf-Blind Department, in the Horace H. Rackham School of 
Special Education. The Helen Keller Committee for the Deaf-Blind 
of the American Foundation for the Blind shared with Perkins in 
sponsoring this course, and both of these organizations are deeply 
grateful to Dr. Francis E. Lord, head of the Rackham School, for 
his support and the many things he did to make this course possible. 
During the six weeks' course, three deaf-blind children were in 
residence for demonstration purposes, and four persons were en- 
rolled. At the summer school there were also courses for the deaf 
and blind, which supplemented the dual training offered by our 
special course. It can be definitely stated that this course has 

22 



stimulated interest in the education of the deaf-blind in several 
parts of the country, and during the coming year there will be 
classes for the deaf-blind in several schools. 

Once again in November we sent out the annual appeal for 
the deaf-blind with an attractive calendar in blue picturing Juanita 
Morgan, Pauline Mansfield and Barbara Sutton, a new pupil. Be- 
tween eleven and twelve thousand appeal letters were mailed, and 
we were pleased to receive 1687 contributions totaling $18,715.51. 
We are especially grateful for the fine response made this year and 
are thankful to all who have taken a part in this support of our 
CHILDREN OF THE SILENT NIGHT. 

The general health of the school during the year was good 
with a few high fluctuations. During the fall and early winter 
we had only the usual routine cases of illnesses normal to school 
children. In March, however, virus-x struck Perkins with con- 
siderable violence and at one time we had forty-eight children in 
bed from this cause. Until two weeks before the close of school 
we thought we had avoided any of the quarantines for contagious 
diseases which sometimes complicate our classroom attendance and 
living arrangements, but in early June we had five cases of mumps 
in the kindergarten cottages. In these cottages there were forty- 
five children who had not had mumps. If it had been earlier in 
the year, we probably would have followed the modern practice of 
allowing the children to have mumps and get it over with, but the 
time for the closing of school was so near that we permitted parents, 
who wished to do so, to take their boys and girls home. About 
thirty children left three or four days before the closing of school, 
the rest remaining. However, none of those remaining came down 
with the mumps so that the cottages closed on time. 

Appliances and Embossing 

The Howe Memorial Press during this year has completed its 
transition period. In October the processes of printing were trans- 
ferred from South Boston to the new space in the power house at 
Watertown. Two years ago the new machine shop for the making 
of appliances was set up in Watertown. Now all of the facilities 
of the Press, with the exception of a small amount of machinery 
continued at South Boston, are centered at Watertown, where work 
is efficiently going on in the manufacturing of appliances and the 
embossing of books. The chief item in the device area is the con- 
tinued work on the new Brailler. It is hoped that by April the 

23 



Brailler will be available to the many people who have placed orders 
for it. During the year the Library of Congress placed orders 
for and the Press embossed and distributed fifteen titles repre- 
senting thirty-eight volumes. During the year Mr. Waterhouse 
has been interested in new processes of Braille reproduction and in 
the development of other devices which will be helpful to the blind. 
As progress is made in this research, more definite reports will be 
presented, but it is one of the progressive steps being taken by the 
new management under the able leadership of Mr. Waterhouse. 

Workshop Development 
The Workshop at South Boston is another department in the 
process of new leadership and development. On October 1, 1949, 
Frank D. Bryan, who for forty years gave able leadership to the 
Workshop, as well as to the management of the Howe Press, retired. 
Frederick C. March succeeded as manager and carried on the 
administration of the mattress-making department during the 
winter. He, however, resigned in June, and on July 1, Donald 
Eemick, a man of wide experience in the mattress business, was 
engaged as manager. The removal of the Howe Press activities 
from the Workshop and the vacating of the National Braille Press 
a year ago have provided considerable room for expansion, and 
there is every evidence that the coming year will show an enlarged 

program. 

During the past year the mattress department made 391 mat- 
tresses and re-made 3,514 mattresses. Many of these orders came 
from hospitals and institutions. The outstanding order for the 
year was for 355 inner spring mattresses and 374 feather pillows 
for the new Senior House at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. This order came at an opportune time to fill the low ebb 
of work usual during the winter months, and it was completed for 
the opening of the new building in March. For the confidence of 
M.I.T. in giving the Workshop this large order, Perkins is deeply 
grateful and hopes that other colleges and institutions may have 
equal confidence in us, and thereby give our blind workers a larger 
opportunity to exercise their skill as mattress makers. Partly 
because of the M.I.T, order, the Workshop closed its books with a 
profit rather than with a deficit which has been common for many 
years, and reasonably to be expected in a sheltered workshop em- 
ploying handicapped workers. 

The general management of the business affairs of the school 

24 




THE DEAF-BLIND MAKING MERRY 



KINDERGARTNERS HAVING FUN 




^^v:^H 





continued under the leadership of Mr. Hemphill, the Bursar, The 
most significant change in that department during the year was the 
absorption of the duties formerly carried on by Mr. Coon, superin- 
tendent of buildings and grounds. Mr. Hemphill took over the 
direct responsibility of this work and in re-organization of the 
maintenance staff, working foremen were put in charge of the 
several sections. This has proved effective, and under the stimulus 
of new direction the buildings and grounds have been maintained 
in an efficient way. A number of improvements, made possible by 
special appropriations, have been carried out. These are, however, 
the expected requirements for buildings thirty-five years of age, 
where there is, as the years go on, an increasing demand for replace- 
ment and constant repair if good conditions are to prevail. All of 
the men in charge of maintenance, including the engineering depart- 
ment, have been alert to the needs of both buildings and grounds. 
Perkins is fortunate in having such a loyal group of workers eager 
to keep the plant in good condition. 

New Electrical Facilities 

The outstanding improvement in the maintenance department 
has been the complete rebuilding and re-equipment of the electrical 
facilities in the power house under the able leadership of Mr. Carroll, 
chief engineer. The two 50 Kilowatt generators which have pro- 
vided electric power and lighting since the opening of the school 
in 1913, were replaced by two 75 Kilowatt generators. For the 
activating of these generators two heavy duty three cylinder vertical 
unicell engines were installed. This new equipment not only gives 
fifty percent more power, enabling a larger use of electrical equip- 
ment, but it also changes the current from D.C. to A.G. making it 
more available for many of the modern electrical devices. The next 
step in the electrical field is the planning for and the re-equipping 
of classrooms and cottages with better lighting. As a test, the 
boys' manual training room has been equipped with fluorescent light- 
ing which gives illumination meeting the needs of modern standards 
for shop work. In the process of this work the manual training 
room has been re-arranged for a more scientific flow of activities 
in the shop program and an acoustical ceiling has been installed. 
These changes give Perkins one of the best equipped manual training 
rooms to be found in schools for the blind. 

25 



Staff Changes 
While the report for this year up to this point has indicated 
significant changes in leadership in the several departments, the 
year has been notable because of the few changes in the teaching 
staff. At the close of the year three teachers terminated their work 
through resignation and two through retirement. Miss Nancy G. 
Jones, teacher of the Kindergarten and Samuel E. Price, in charge 
of Physical Education on the boys' side, concluded their work after 
one year of service. Joseph E. Jablonske resigned to take up other 
work after nineteen years at Perkins. Miss Ethel D. Evans, who 
for forty years has been a teacher at Perkins, relinquished her work 
under the retirement plan. Miss Evans was one of our outstanding 
teachers. Her unique methods of teaching arithmetic and her 
unusual and interesting ways of combining work activity with 
classroom instruction have attracted national attention and have 
had a marked influence on many boys who came under her instruc- 
tion. Mrs. Jessie W. Mayshark, teacher in the Lower School, had 
to retire because of ill health. During her sixteen years at Perkins 
Mrs. Mayshark became an outstanding specialist in teaching classes 
of slow pupils. She is the author of the chapter on this type of 
work in "What of the Blind," published by the American Foundation 
for the Blind, and also of a children's book describing life at 
Perkins entitled "Wings for Ruth." She has had many articles 
and stories in professional publications. 

Three matrons of cottages terminated their work this year, 
Mrs. Beatrice Wakefield of Anagnos Cottage, Miss Laura Tripp of 
Tompkins and Miss Stella F. Eldridge of Oliver. Mrs. Janet G. 
Hancock, who during the past year was in charge of Moulton Cottage 
in the Boys' Upper School, returned to Anagnos Cottage where she 
had been matron for twelve years. New matrons for the coming 
school year are Miss Fannie Durfee, Moulton Cottage, Mrs. Charles 
Amadon, Tompkins Cottage and Miss Isabel Murray, Oliver 
Cottage. Mrs. George T. Putnam, who since 1934 has been recep- 
tionist, graciously meeting and escorting visitors about the school, 
resigned in June and is greatly missed. Other resignations include 
Mrs. Helen Grant, secretary to the Principal, and Mrs. Joan B. 
Smith, secretary to the social worker, but Mrs. Smith is to work 
part time assisting Mr. Smith, who is Dean of Boys. 

New teachers beginning work in September 1949 are Miss Jean 
Gray, Wheaton College, '49 in the Kindergarten; William W. Howat, 
Fitchburg Teachers College, '49, Manual Training; Edmund J. 

26 



Jusczyk, Springfield College, '49, Physical Education; Derick V. 
Willson, University of Norwich, '48, Harvard, Class '49, Social 
Studies, and Mrs. Rose M. Vivian, who has resumed teaching in 
the Deaf -Blind Department. Miss Valerie C. Payne, Massachusetts 
General Hospital, '47, has been engaged as resident nurse assisting 
Miss Bishop. New secretary to the social worker is Miss Helen 
Brown, and Miss Maryjane Youngblood has been engaged as Edi- 
phonist in the administration office. New workers in the business 
office are Miss Phyllis Gordon and Mrs. Phyllis Smith. 

The Year in Review 

The opening staff meeting took place on Monday evening, Sep- 
tember 13, when the Director introduced the new members of the 
staff and outlined plans for the year. The pupils returned on the 
following day and on Wednesday, September 15, classes were re- 
sumed for the 118th year. Stated meetings throughout the year 
include full staff meetings each month, teachers' meetings held 
weekly, meetings of the matrons, the personnel department, the 
Boys' Council and the Girls' Council each month with the Director. 
These meetings offer opportunity to integrate the whole school 
program, to review progress and to make suggestions helpful to the 
good conduct of the school. To these within the school should be 
added the monthly meetings of the Executive Committee, the 
quarterly meetings of the Trustees and the annual meeting of the 
Corporation held for 1948 on November 1, and for 1949 on No- 
vember 7. 

October events were the retreats and conferences provided by 
the Catholic and Protestant Guilds for the Blind for the pupils of 
the Upper School over the weekend of October 2 and 3; reception 
at the Director's residence for staff members on October 13 and 
the game party of the Alumnae Association for the benefit of the 
Scholarship Fund in Dwight Hall on October 15, A two-piano 
recital by Andrew Heath, Jr., and Karl Kohn, accompanists of the 
Harvard Glee Club, was given in Dwight Hall on the evening of 
October 22, and as closing events, Hallowe'en parties were held 
in the Lower School cottages on October 27 and in the Upper School 
cottages on October 29. 

November events began on the first day by a meeting initiating 
the Red Feather Drive toward which Perkins contributed $740.90, 
and a little later the Red Cross Drive which resulted in a contribu- 
tion of §413.80. On November 5 the colorful program in memory 

27 



of Michael Anagnos was held in the Lower School, while on Novem- 
ber 10 the Howe Memorial exercises were held in the Upper School 
with six members of the Howe family representing third and fourth 
generations being present. On the evening of November 8, a thirty 
piece veterans' orchestra under the direction of Bayard Stone, gave 
a delightful concert. The annual football banquet marking Eliot's 
victory of the season was held in Moulton Cottage on the evening 
of November 9, with the boys of all the cottages present to hear a 
fine address by "Swede" Nelson, former Harvard football coach. 
At the assembly on the morning of November 18, Dale Carnegie 
spoke to the pupils, initiating a sixteen weeks course on public 
speaking offered to juniors, seniors and post graduate students of 
Perkins. The long weekend beginning Thanksgiving Day, when 
practically all the pupils went home, marked the close of this month. 

Christmas Concerts 

December is largely associated with activities of the Music 
Department. The month began with a recital by Mr. Bernard P. 
Barbeau, vocal teacher at Perkins. The cottage Christmas parties 
were held on the evening of Monday, December 13. Three concerts 
were given this year by the Upper and Lower School choruses, all in 
Dwight Hall — Sunday, December 12 in the afternoon, and the 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings following. The program differed 
from previous years in that the musical offerings were grouped 
around three themes. The program was planned and conducted 
by Mr. Paul Bauguss, director of music, with Miss Eleanor W. 
Thayer in charge of the Lower School chorus, Mrs. Marjorie A. Carr, 
organist, and Miss Louise Seymour, pianist. Following the concert 
on Thursday night, school closed for the Christmas holidays. As an 
echo of the concerts, portions of the program were recorded and 
broadcast on Christmas evening between six-thirty and seven o'clock 
over Station WBZ. 

Winter Activities 
The winter term began with the opening of school on Janu- 
ary 4 and continued until the start of the spring vacation on April 8. 
As the term was long, due to the late date of Easter, breaks were 
arranged by long weekends, in the Lower School from February 18 
through February 22, and in the Upper School from March 4 
through March 6. Events during this term will be grouped in 
three categories— athletic, music and general. 

28 



Wrestling is now the major sport at Perkins during the winter 
term, although it is supplemented by the regular schedule of gym- 
nasium classes with sport programs for those not participating in 
wrestling, and with the wide use of the swimming pool by all of 
the pupils. The wrestling season began this year on January 8 
and continued through March 18. On March 4 and 5 the team 
participated in the tournament of the Eastern Athletic Association 
of Schools for the Blind, held at Overbrook. Perkins took third 
place in this tournament which they won last year. Another trip 
of interest was to the New York Institute over the weekend of 
February 6. There was also an interesting trip to Phillips Andover 
Academy on Saturday, January 22. The Student Council at Andover 
invited the Perkins Chorus to sing at assembly. The boys and 
girls of the chorus went by bus with the wrestlers, gave the con- 
cert to approximately 750 boys, cheered the Perkins team and were 
escorted about the Andover campus by the Andover boys. While 
Perkins wrestlers enjoyed these trips and the local competitions, 
the results in terms of victory were not up to hopes. Perkins won 
in the meet with Attleboro High School, tied with Wellesley High 
School, lost to Browne and Nichols, Needham High School, Phillips 
Academy, Noble and Greenough, Tabor Academy, Milton Academy, 
St. Mark's School and the New York Institute. 

The Music Department put in an active winter term preparing 
for two operettas in addition to the regular scheduled classwork 
and the individual instruction given to vocal and instrumental 
students. On Wednesday and Friday evenings, March 30 and 
April 1, the Lower School presented Hansel and Gretel before large 
audiences who were delighted with the performance of the pupils, 
the beauty of the costumes and stage setting and the fine spirit 
shown by the pupils in the public performances. In the Upper 
School the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta Patience was performed 
on the evenings of Thursday and Friday, April 7 and 8, and both 
performances were attended by large and appreciative audiences. 
The presentation of the operetta was a change from the offerings 
of previous years, when pop concerts were featured. This change 
was made to give the pupils a wider experience in musical production 
and to familiarize them with music of this character. 

General events of the winter term were wide and varied rang- 
ing from dances held by the girls on January 22 and February 26, 
and by the boys on March 22, to a delightful staff party held in the 
new teachers' lounge on the evening of February 1. On the 

29 



morning of February 26 the Lower School pupils presented a live 
broadcast over Station WORL, conducted by the M-1 Safety Squad 
program. The school was indebted to the clergy of Watertown for 
their talks in the Upper School assemblies on Thursday mornings 
during the Lenten Season. The new staif lounge was the scene of 
several parties and informal gatherings of staff members. It has 
been appreciated both for these events and also as a place where 
the staff may gather in a friendly way, thus building up a good 
social relationship among our workers. 

Spring Events 
Over the weekend of April 2 and 3, five Perkins' girls took 
part in "Play Day" with other girls from schools for the blind in 
the east, at the New York Institute. At noon on April 25, twenty 
girls were the guests of the Boston Kiwanis Club at the Hotel 
Touraine. This is the annual reunion of the girls who attend Camp 
Allen which is run by the Kiwanis Club. During the previous 
summer twelve girls attended this camp for blind girls at Bedford, 
Nev/ Hampshire. On the evening of April 25 pupils were the guests 
of the Winchester Players at their dress rehearsal of the Gondo- 
liers. On the morning of April 29, the Upper School chorus pre- 
sented a program at the morning assembly of the Watertown High 
School. On April 29 and 80 Perkins boys attended the boy scout 
jamboree, at the Overbrook School in Philadelphia, an annual event 
rotating among the several schools in the East. 

The month of May began with a delightful concert of American 
ballads sung by Burl Ives, on the afternoon of the 5th. The fol- 
lowing weekend the spring conferences and retreats by the Pro- 
testant and Catholic Guilds were held. Other events in the month 
of May included a program for the Educational Buyers Association 
on the 12th. On the afternoon of the 16th the Upper School girls 
had a party for the Lower School girls who were to come to the 
Upper School next year. On the evenings of May 20 and 26 student 
recitals were given. 

Track meets are the chief athletic events during the spring 
term although informal baseball games take a good deal of the 
boys' time during this season, while the girls have their own pro- 
gram of field sports. The track team this season had contests with 
local high schools, resulting in victories over Watertown and 
Belmont and a close loss to Needham. On Saturday, May 14, the 
track team took third place in the annual meet of the Eastern 

30 



Athletic Association of Schools for the Blind at the Connecticut 
School for the Blind in Hartford. The following Saturday, May 21, 
Perkins was host to the track team of the New York Institute, 
when the score was Perkins 41, New York Institute 22. 

First Sight Saving Teacher 

On Saturday, May 14, at the meeting of the Massachusetts 
Sight Conservation Association at the Hotel Kenmore, Boston, 
Miss Helen Smith was presented with a certificate enrolling her 
as an honorary life member of the National Society for the Pre- 
vention of Blindness. This was granted to her as the teacher of 
the first sight saving class in America, which was opened in Boston 
in 1913. Miss Smith, prior to that, had been a teacher at Perkins 
for eight years, and since her retirement has continued to live in 
Watertown. The Director spoke on this occasion and presented 
the greetings and appreciation of Perkins. 

May 27 was a busy day, for on that morning and early after- 
noon, the Helen Keller Committee of the Deaf-Blind of the Amer- 
ican Foundation for the Blind held its spring meeting at Perkins. 
It was attended by members from several parts of the country. In 
the afternoon a demonstration of the work of the deaf-blind was 
presented for the members of the committee and also for the mem- 
bers of the Massachusetts Council of Organizations for the Blind 
which had its spring gathering at four o'clock. This was followed 
by a picnic supper with the annual meeting of the Council held in 
the evening. The speaker at the evening session was Dr. Clarence 
E. O'Connor, member of the Deaf-Blind Committee, and Principal 
of the Lexington School for the Deaf in New York City, who gave 
a very interesting talk on the education of the deaf to the assembled 
leaders in the field of the blind. 

June is always dominated by events leading up to graduation. 
The girls' senior prom was a little ahead of the month, having been 
held on Saturday evening, May 14. The boys' senior prom was 
held on Friday evening, June 3. The Alumnae Association, made 
up of graduates of the Girls' Upper School held its annual reunion 
over the weekend of June 4, while the Alumni Association had 
meetings on June 11, culminating in a banquet on that evening. 
Two outdoor events of interest to the girls were a trip up the 
Charles River in ten cruisers on the evening of June 7, as the 
guests of the Watertown Yacht Club, and a picnic at the Perkins 
pond on June 9, to celebrate the victory of Oliver Cottage in the 

31 



athletic events of the year. On the afternoon of June 13, a bon 
voyage party was held in the staff lounge for Dr. and Mrs. Farrell 
who were sailing for England on June 24. 

Graduation exercises were held on the afternoon of June 16. 
The Commencement address was given by the Hon. William E. 
Powers, who, after graduating from Perkins in 1932, went to 
Boston School of Law. Admitted to the bar, he was appointed 
probate judge of Cumberland County, Rhode Island, and in 1938 
was elected to the Rhode Island legislature. In November, 1948 
he was elected attorney general of the State of Rhode Island. Out 
of his political experience Mr. Powers gave a notable address which 
was greatly appreciated by the graduates and the audience attend- 
ing the exercises. 

Fourteen Graduates 
Diplomas were awarded to fourteen graduates, seven boys and 
seven girls, by Dr. Reginald Fitz, President of the Corporation. 
Certificates were presented to two girls who met the requirements 
for Ediphone work. One of these was granted to Gladys E. 
Weisenborn of Hazleton, Pennsylvania, National Scholarship 
student at Perkins, and the other to Maryjane Youngblood of Ded- 
ham, who returned a year ago to do special work after several 
years of employment. Of the seven girl graduates, three have 
entered college. Mary Ethel Bull is attending Wesleyan College 
in Georgia, Natalie J. Bourdon, Emmanuel College, Boston, and 
Hope M. McDonald, the University of New Hampshire. One of 
the boys, Richard H. Evensen, has been accepted at Harvard where 
he was granted a full tuition scholarship because of his high aca- 
demic standing. Two of the graduates will return to Perkins for 
post-graduate work in special fields, while the others went to their 
homes for job placement according to their interests. 

Boston was this summer the scene of the convention of the 
American Association of Workers for the Blind, made up of those 
who carry on programs in the adult field. Over five hundred dele- 
gates gathered from all parts of the country. The host for the 
Convention was the Massachusetts Council of Organizations for the 
Blind. Francis E. lerardi, who was graduated from Perkins in 
1908, was chairman of the planning committee, and was assisted 
by many people associated with work for the blind in Massachu- 
setts, including staff members at Perkins. On Wednesday morning 
and afternoon many members of the Convention visited Perkins. 

32 




Front row. Klizahelh Ann Delorey ; Ann Lif Ion ; Elizabeth Accorsi Back row: 
Mary Helen Cordeau ; Mary Ethel Bull; Hope M. MacDonald and Natalie Jean 
Bourdon 



CLASS OF 1949 



Front row: Andrew M. Fortes; Richard L. Eaton; Samuel A. Broadbent Back 
row: J. Robert McNally ; John B. Conroy ; Richard H. Evensen and John T. Flynu 




Although the school was not in session the visitors had opportunity 
to see our plant and learn about programs through special exhibits. 
At the closing meeting Mr. lerardi was elected president of this 
national organization. While writing of this honor it might be 
well to add that on October 22, 1948, when the new building of the 
National Braille Press was opened, Mr. lerardi was awarded the 
Migel Medal granted each year by the American Foundation for 
the Blind to a person whom the Foundation feels has made an out- 
standing contribution to our field. 

Present Enrollment 

The enrollment of the school as of November 1, 1949, was 237 
compared with 243 a year ago. During the year 42 pupils completed 
their work and were discharged. The reasons for discharge were — 
graduated 14 ; completed scholarships 2 ; completed other training 3 ; 
transferred to public schools or sight saving classes 13; ceased to 
progress 7; withdrew on account of illness 3. At the opening of 
the school year 36 new pupils were enrolled. 

The 237 pupils enrolled on November 1, 1949 are divided as 
follows: Massachusetts 139; Maine 28; Rhode Island 23; New 
Hampshire 14; Vermont 12; New Jersey 2; and from other states 
19. This year there are students from four foreign countries — 
Argentina, China, Haiti, and Mexico, and from the following states 
outside of New England: Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Missouri, Ohio, and Wash- 
ington. 

Perhaps the most significant fact about the present enrollment 
is the increasing number of children whose blindness is due to 
retrolental fibroplasia. These are children who have visual defects 
due to premature birth. At the present time in the New England 
area there are approximately 250 children who are handicapped 
from this cause. Eight new children in this category were ad- 
mitted this year, bringing the total within the school up to twenty- 
five. These children, blind from this special cause, supplement the 
large number of boys and girls representing the crop of war babies, 
who are now crowding the early grades of seeing schools, and of 
whom a quota will be visually handicapped. While the present 
Perkins enrollment is low, these factors indicate that there will be, 
as the years roll on, another advance in the number of pupils need- 
ing the facilities which Perkins has provided for 118 years. 

33 



II 

The second portion of this report is taken from the address 
entitled "The Exercise of the Benevolent Affections" which the 
Director made at the Centennial Celebration of the Illinois School 
for the Blind. The title is a phrase used by Dr. Samuel Gridley 
Howe in 1842 when pleading for the opening of more schools "not 
for the blind alone, but for the influence they have on the com- 
munity by furnishing occasion for the exercise of the benevolent 
affections." After felicitous remarks about the occasion and the 
local situation, he proceeded to discuss matters of national im- 
portance to the blind, raising the question, "What are some of the 
problems which confront educators of the blind to-day, and which 
face our residential schools?" 

Perhaps the outstanding one is the challenge to the residential 
school itself. There are those who claim that we are relics of the 
past, and that new ways of educating blind children must be found. 
One new way which they advocate is the conduct of Braille classes 
in public school systems. To Illinois that is not a new way, for in 
1900 John B. Curtis opened the first day class for the blind in the 
public schools of Chicago. Next year this state can observe the 
semi-centennial of the opening of this form of education for blind 
children. From that time and from that center, day classes have 
grown until they are now found in the public school systems of 
twenty-three communities in ten states and the District of Coluni- 
bia. They accommodate about six hundred children or approxi- 
mately ten per cent of the nation's educable blind youth. For that 
or even a larger percentage, the day class may well be needed but 
a heavy load remains for the residential schools. And they are 
content to serve blind youth with the same efficiency, or with better 
efficiency, for the next one hundred years or as long as they are 

needed. 

Advocates of the public school classes stress, first of all, that 
they keep the children living within their families, and second, 
that the children remain as an integral part of the communities 
in which their future vocational opportunities lie. These are both 
sound concepts which we are glad to accept, but we are not ready 
to accept the charges that many of our children are frustrated and 
restricted in their opportunity and made, as one writer has stated, 
"primarily blind individuals and secondarily members of the 
greater whole.'* 

In considering the merits of the residential school versus the 

34 



day class, two facts must be born in mind: first, there will always 
be children from isolated communities who must be gathered in 
one central place if they are to obtain schooling, and second, there 
will always be some parents who feel there is value for their chil- 
dren in living during their formative years in the environment of 
a boarding school. Among seeing children this privilege is now 
restricted to those whose parents can afford this expensive type 
of schooling. Should blind children be deprived of similar oppor- 
tunity? 

Definition of Blindness 

Turning from the type of education best suited to blind youth, 
let us consider the young people themselves. Strange as it may 
seem, the first problem which gives us concern is the question 
"Who is blind and who is not blind?" While the widely accepted 
definition of a blind person (one whose vision measures 20/200 or 
less on the Snellen Chart) may be adequate to determine the re- 
cipients of blind assistance or other benefits provided for adults, 
it is not working out satisfactorily as a means of determining 
which visually handicapped children should be in a school for the 
blind and which should not. Beyond that scientifically fixed line 
there is a fringe in both directions. Some pupils who test under 
20/200 are able to use their eyes so effectively that they can profit 
by visual training, whereas others with vision above the line, have 
not developed the ability to use their sight effectively enough to 
be able to profit by it. There is need for a better statement of 
visual qualifications before we can determine with fairness, 
whether a child should attend a school for the blind or be sent to 
a sight-saving class. 

This marginal area of vision around the 20/200 line is calling 
for new methods in the program of education for the blind. Twenty 
years ago we used only tactual methods. All of our pupils read 
and wrote Braille. Now many of them have enough sight to profit 
by visual instruction, and the ophthalmologists tell us that we must 
teach them how to make usable vision really useful. This has 
necessitated the introduction of visual forms of instruction in our 
schools. School room lighting is an important factor. Blackboards 
are becoming necessary. Ink print textbooks in large clear type 
are essential. Pedagogical principles for teaching the partially 
blind are growing up by the hit-or-miss method, whereas we should 
have, and must have, scientific research in this area of instruction 
as our schools enter their second century. 

35 



One of the chief dangers growing out of this situation is the 
tendency on the part of some schools to feel that as long as they 
are to have visual instruction they might as well extend the vision 
range of eligibility to include those who formerly would be con- 
sidered candidates for sight-saving classes. Many consider this 
tendency unfair both to the blind child within the school, and to 
the partially sighted child who is sent to a school for the blind. 
England is solving this problem in a better way. Instead of mixing 
in one school both partially sighted and blind, the English are 
designating some schools for blind children only, and other schools 
formerly used for the blind, as centers for partially seeing pupils. 
One reason why it seemed feasible for us to extend the vision 
range for admission to our schools, was the fact that prior to 
World War II enrollment in our schools was decreasing and we 
had room for the partially sighted. 

You may recall that Stuart Chase, in an article in the 
February 1939 Atlantic Monthly (and summarized in the 
March Reader's Digest) stated that there "were more than 
a million empty desks in our elementary schools this year" and 
predicted, "If present trends continue, by 1960 there will be ten 
million empty desks in our schools and colleges." This situation 
was due to the ebb in the population wave which was passing 
through the schools at that time. Right after World War I, the 
birth rate began to rise, and continued until 1925, when it began 
to decline. In 1939, children representing the peak of that wave, 
had passed through the elementary schools, and were in the upper 
grades and about to enter college. The marked decrease in birth 
rate during the depression was then causing sharp reduction in 
the number of children in the primary grades. On the basis of 
these facts, we felt safe in predicting that the enrollment in schools 
for the blind, where the normal decrease in population was aug- 
mented by the progress made in the reduction of blindness, was 
definitely on the decline, and that we might look forward to pro- 
gressive liquidation. 

That little word "if" in the Stuart Chase article proved his 
saving grace, for the indicated trends did not continue. The old 
pattern reappeared. The aftermath of World War II was a tre- 
mendous increase in birth rate. In an authoritative article appears 
this statement, "In the four years 1941 to 1944, over eleven million 
babies were born, of whom 1.7 million would not have been born 
at the birth rate prevailing in the pre-war year 1939." The peak 

36 



birth rate in this cycle was in 1943. Multitudes of these war 
babies are now entering our primary grades and will ride as a 
wave for the next decade or more through the college years. Since 
1943 the birth rate has gone down, and if unemployment increases, 
we may expect a decrease in the number of babies. 

These statistics have a bearing on the future of all schools, 
and especially of our schools. Schools for the blind had in the past 
an accelerated decrease in potential pupils due to better medical 
care and improved surgical techniques in the field of ophthalmology. 
It is a strange irony of fate that advances in the medical field are 
now proving to be the medium of increased blindness. Our schools 
are now receiving applications for admission from young people 
in their late teens whose blindness has been caused by diabetes. 
Prior to the discovery of insulin they would probably not have 
lived to the teen age. Now they are being kept alive and are 
coming to our schools. 

Increase in Blind Babies 

Another and more alarming increase is revealed in the tremen- 
dous advance in the number of blind babies now being reported 
throughout the country. The Annual Report of the Division of 
the Blind of Illinois states that the number of pre-school blind 
children jumped from sixteen in July 1946 to 100 in July 1948. 
New Jersey reports a four-fold increase from thirty in 1944 to 
123 as of March. 1, 1948. In Massachusetts at the present time, 
we have approximately 250 children of pre-school age who are 
blind. Most of these are children who were born prematurely and 
who through new methods of medical care are now being kept 
alive. According to estimates, as high as twelve percent of these 
premature babies will be visually handicapped. 

This startling increase in the number of blind children in the 
pre-school age group has focused attention upon their problems 
and our responsibility for them. There is great need for construc- 
tive thinking in this area. Above all else, we must avoid the easy 
way, lowering the age of admission, so that these little children 
may be sent to the residential schools. There are many of us who 
feel that this is unwise. Little children should not be taken away 
from the warmth and security of their homes, even if unprece- 
dented effort must be made to give the parents the guidance that 
they so sorely need when confronted with a blind baby. In some 
states this is being accomplished by the employment of trained 

37 



teachers, experts in the pre-school age group, who visit the homes 
to observe the children and to make suggestions for their care. In 
some states, and Illinois is among the first, summer institutes are 
being held, where mothers go with their babies. While the children 
are greatly helped, the primary purpose is to give the mothers the 
best of instruction and an opportunity to compare notes with others 
in similar situations. 

I cannot go into the many aspects of this present and pressing 
problem. I can simply point out its importance and urge that we 
guard against ill-considered methods and involved techniques 
which are often only substitutes for a real solution. While there 
is room for good literature on this group, and much could be writ- 
ten, the fundamental need has been effectively stated by Richard 
Armour in the little poem which reads: 

"Give your child his vitamins, 
Give him lectures on his sins, 
Give him nosedrops if you choose, 
Give him arch-supporting shoes, 
Give him toys that educate. 
Give him chalk and give him slate, 
Give him lessons — music, art — 
Give him books to make him smart... 
Give him all the things above. 
Also, please, a little love." 

There is a temptation, after discussing some of the problems 
in the pre-school area, to go on level by level through our grades 
of instruction. Time, however, will not permit this, and it would 
be presumptuous to try to tell educators of the blind how they 
should conduct their classes from Kindergarten through High 
School. There are well-established and time-honored methods 
which all of our schools employ. I would like, however, before 
closing, to make some comments on another area of training which 
lies beyond the normal program, even as the work with the pre- 
school blind child is prior to the usual setup. 

The area to which I refer is the vocational training of our 
youth. There has been a tendency of late to introduce more and 
more vocational training into our schools. This, I feel, is not in 
accord with the new trends in general education, where more stress 
is being placed upon the fundamentals and educators are decrying 
specialization. 

38 



Opportunities of Rehabilitation 

In our field, a new factor may enable us to give more attention 
to the fundamentals and to make our program more general and 
less specialized. This is the enlargement of opportunities for voca- 
tional training under the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1944, 
making available to the states, Federal money for "Any service 
necessary to render a disabled individual fit to engage in a remu- 
nerative occupation." "Any service" is a broad term, for it includes 
medical and surgical care, hospitalization, prosthetic devices, as 
well as rehabilitative training, either in special schools or "on the 
job," followed by placement service. 

The significance of this new program is that it may deter the 
schools from trying to do what they have not been able to do very 
well — the actual training leading to job placement. State agencies 
for the blind, operating under this law, have facilities far beyond 
what any school can provide. For blind youth to get full advantage 
of these enlarged opportunities, however, there must be complete 
understanding and practical integration of what the school offers 
in fundamental schooling and what rehabilitation can provide in 
specialized training. According to a recent report of the Federal 
Security Agency, in the five years of this Act, 8546 blind men and 
women have been rehabilitated to a point where they can make 
their own living. The opportunities under this Act are not yet 
being fully realized and our schools must make understanding efforts 
to enable our pupils to benefit by it. While we may quote, we can 
hardly endorse, the definition of rehabilitation given by Lloyd 
Greenwood in the April B.V.A. Bulletin: "If you do this for your- 
self, you are exceptional; if an agency does it for you, you are a 
statistic; and if it doesn't happen, you are non-feasible." 

When, at the outset of this address, I told you, that the begin- 
ning of the second century of this school would bring to it many 
problems, it was not my purpose to cite problem after problem until 
you should be discouraged or have a feeling of despair. With the 
problems are opportunities. With the costs are compensations. 
Those schools that are old enough to have started a second century, 
and the others who will join our century club as the years roll on, 
may feel assured that the past years have paid dividends, and that 
the years which lie ahead abound in opportunity for service and 
for satisfaction. The benevolent affections of our fore-fathers 
were never more needed than they are to-day, and we are challenged 

39 



to see that they are exercised to the fullest. In closing I should 
like to cite three areas where these affections should be cultivated 
and stimulated. 

Three Challenges 

I would challenge first of all the leaders in the field of the 
education of the blind, both in the residential schools and in the 
day classes, to be open-minded and alert to the needs of their 
charges. Special education must not drag behind general education. 
New methods must be sought and adequate facilities procured, but 
more than money and methods, buildings and facilities are needed. 
There must be the vision that sees ahead. There must be the 
attitude of mind that finds satisfaction and happiness in making 
our schools all that they ought to be. In doing this there must be 
no smallness in our thinking, no smugness in our accomplishment, 
but an ever-increasing benevolence in our affections towards one 
another. 

Secondly, I should like to throw out a challenge to the blind 
youth of this country. Have they done their part in helping us to 
fulfill our purpose? The finest schools in the world and the most 
intellectual leaders can do little for blind youth unless they have 
within themselves the will to achieve, and to attain the strength 
of character which enables them to overcome the obstacle of re- 
stricted vision. The program for their training is available and 
facilities for their guidance and growth are ample, but blind youth 
must avail itself of this training and of these facilities by exercising 
the benevolent affections within themselves and among themselves. 
Let there be no bickering or attitude of defeat. Rather let there 
be that determination which overcomes obstacles. 

Thirdly, I should like to throw out a challenge to the seeing 
world; first, to accept and to make opportunity for their brothers 
who do not see, and second to realize their responsibility for the 
extent of blindness in this country. The exercise of the benevolent 
affections will do much to open the way in the seeing world for blind 
persons. We would ask that those who have been trained in our 
schools be accepted, not because of their disability but because of 
the abilities which we know they have; and in considering them 
for work that they be judged, not by what they have lost, but by 
what they possess. Education of the community regarding blindness 
is perhaps quite as important as the education of the blind to find 

40 




TYPING IN THE NEW EDIPHONE ROOM 



AT THE BENCHES IN THE WOOD-WORKING SHOP 




their place in the community. But the community must be ready 
to learn and to understand. 

The further aspect of my challenge to the seeing world rests 
on the fact that the first right of a blind person is not to be blind. 
There is a social responsibility for blindness in this country which 
can no longer be evaded. Authorities tell us that from fifty to 
seventy-five percent of blindness is preventable. I shall not take 
the time to point out the tremendous economic saving if this un- 
necessary loss of sight were eliminated, or the reduction that would 
be possible in the special facilities which are now maintained because 
of the 230,000 people who cannot see. Words fail to describe the 
human salvage within our reach. But this fact is beyond dispute — 
needless loss of sight in the community must be prevented. 

Need for Research 

How are we going to accomplish this? There are many ways. 
Perhaps one of the untapped sources is in research into the causes 
of blindness. Research is the order of the day, and our field must 
not ignore its possibilities. Already great advancements have been 
made. Medical schools and hospitals throughout the country are 
working on these problems, but all of them under restricted budgets. 
Perhaps the time has come when a definite effort should be made to 
enlist the support of the Federal Government in financing research 
into the causes of blindness. The present Congress is appropriating 
millions of dollars for research in medical fields. Cancer and heart 
studies are vast enterprises. One bill before Congress is allocating 
$1,780,000 for the treatment of children's teeth. Certainly that 
much money and far more should be available to save our children's 
eyes 

We know that at the end of another century there undoubtedly 
will still be blind people who need our schools and the exercise of 
the benevolent affections. But if our task becomes infinitely smaller, 
our satisfaction will be abundantly greater. Certainly the attain- 
ment of that goal is deserving of our best attention and it should 
be the challenge and the hope that gives us courage as we embark 
on the second century. 

Ill 

Shortly after graduation the Director left for England, prima- 
rily to attend the International Conference of Workers for the 
Blind at Merton College, Oxford, August 3 to 13. During the first 

41 



three weeks of July London was headquarters. As a member of 
the Organizing Committee of the Oxford Conference, there were a 
number of meetings concerned with planning which I had to attend. 
During the week of July 11, I spent three days in Eire, where I 
went to see a deaf-blind child, and to discuss plans for the education 
of the doubly handicapped. Four days of the following week were 
spent in Amsterdam, Holland, attending the Second International 
Congress for the Education of Maladjusted Children. While in 
London I had opportunity to talk over problems of the blind with 
many of the leaders and to observe some of the new and interesting 
developments in that country. 

The gathering in Amsterdam proved to be one of great interest, 
as it was attended by educators in the several fields of disability 
from twenty-nine countries. The United States, however, had few 
representatives, and the program for the blind held a relatively 
small place in the program. At one of the sessions devoted to the 
blind I read a paper on "Vocational Education of the Blind in the 
United States," while papers on other aspects of blindness were 
presented by representatives from Austria, Holland and Switzerland. 
Dr. C. M. Waller Zeper, in charge of three schools for the blind in 
Holland, presided at this session. On one of the days, Dr. Zeper 
took me on a 300 mile drive around Holland, which he had to make 
on business. This afforded a wonderful view of the country and 
opportunity to discuss mutual problems in the field of blindness. 
Dr. Zeper has a good command of English. The Amsterdam con- 
ferences were held in the India Institute, headquarters of the East 
Indian Colonial Empire of the Netherlands, a magnificent center 
with auditoriums, museums, conference rooms and offices. 

The Oxford Conference was held at Merton College, the oldest 
foundation in the university city, and a most interesting place in 
which to meet and live. Members of the conference occupied the 
students' quarters, while the members of the Organizing Committee 
were privileged to live in the apartments of the Fellows. The con- 
ferences were held in the Great Hall where in term time the students 
have their meals and large college meetings are held. This hall, 
dating from the thirteenth century, has mellowed oak paneling, a 
high beamed roof, and portraits of ancient scholars and some of 
the more recent leaders upon the walls on all sides. The dining 
tables run in three long rows and the students sit on benches without 
backs. At the upper end of the hall, on a platform raised a couple 
of steps above the hall level, is the "high table," at which the warden 

42 



and fellows eat. During the ten days of the conference we ate our 
meals in this interesting room, and during the meetings held there 
the organizing committee occupied seats at the "high table." 

Theme and Purpose 

The theme of the conference was "The Place of the Blind in 
the Modern World." Sponsored by the National Institute for the 
Blind with offices in London, and the American Foundation for Over- 
seas Blind with offices in New York and Paris, much preliminary 
work went into the planning of the conference. A questionnaire, 
prepared with great care, was sent to all the countries in Europe 
and North America which were to participate, asking for factual 
information about the blind in the respective countries. This data 
was carefully compiled and printed in French and in English, in 
both ink print and Braille. With this material in hand, it was not 
necessary to go into detail regarding conditions that existed, but 
rather to direct consideration to future plans and desirable objec- 
tives. The purpose of the conference was, after careful examination 
of the material assembled, to set up standards to be used as guides 
and objectives in establishing adequate programs for the adult blind 
in countries throughout the world. 

The procedure of the conference was most interesting and 
unique. No formal papers were read, and there were no advance 
assignments of topics. All of the sessions were discussions open 
and free to all without much preliminary preparation. The Organ- 
izing Committee prepared in advance a series of nine resolutions. 
These covered the areas outlined in the reports from the various 
countries and were as follows: 

Registration, rehabilitation and training, employment, 
economic provision, care of the blind at home, homes for 
the blind, responsibility for the blind, legislation for the 
blind, special facilities for the blind and education of the 
blind. 

At each session one of these resolutions was presented at 
the opening. It was, as the phrase employed indicated, "expounded" 
by one person assigned in advance. After a seconder had had a 
few minutes to endorse the resolution, the whole matter was then 
open for discussion, and discussion there was — friendly, construc- 
tive, seriously and earnestly presented. During this process, the 
three persons whose ideas were most representative of the views 
expressed on the floor were designated as a drafting committee. 

43 



Procedure i^oLLOWED 

Following each general session, these small groups revised 
the original resolutions so that they represented the combined 
thinking of the group, and were put into a form which the com- 
mittee felt would be acceptable to all. This procedure was followed 
throughout the sessions and at the closing meeting the revised 
resolutions were brought in and presented. In practically every 
case they were adopted unanimously, and when the full program 
was presented it was unanimously endorsed. The remarkable thing 
was that this group, with its varying nationalities and personalities 
could come to full agreement on what may be considered a mini- 
mum program of work for the blind. The word "minimum" was 
used because a level, which countries just starting work for the 
blind might be able to attain, had to be set, with the hope that 
many countries would go far beyond these standards even as they 
have in some of the nations represented. 

To illustrate how this procedure worked, let us consider the 
first resolution, which, in the original form, was entitled "Ascer- 
tainment." This, however, was changed to "Registration" because 
that word seemed to have a wider acceptability. Under this reso- 
lution the extent of blindness and a definition of blindness were 
given consideration. Definitions of blindness vary greatly. The 
United States has the only exactly worded definition in ophthalmic 
terms, and some of the other countries were a little bit amused at 
our definiteness. Most of them preferred considerable choice 
involving personal and economic factors. It was recommended, 
however, that steps be taken to establish a standard definition of 
blindness with international scope. 

In regard to the number of blind persons in any country, it 
was very difiicult to get data which was accurate and reliable, 
partly because of the differences cited in regard to definition. 
The countries reporting in the study, however, gave the incidences 
of blindness which varied from 43 per 100,000 in Belgium to 300 
in northern Ireland. It is interesting to observe that England and 
the United States reported the same incidence 175, while the 
Scotch, perhaps being somewhat hardier, reported 166, and for 
reasons not explained, Eire, reported 233. The Teutonic coun- 
tries reported a very low ratio, but they have a more rigid defini- 
tion of blindness than other countries. The Scandinavian countries 
also reported low ratios which may be due to excellent programs, 

44 



and perhaps a higher standard of living and medical care than 
are found in central and southern Europe. 

Observations and Approach 

Space will not permit going into detail in regard to the other 
resolutions. However, several observations are recalled. Perhaps 
the outstanding is that in Europe whatever has been attained in 
the way of welfare of the blind has been secured very largely 
through the blind themselves. Most of the delegates present from 
Europe were blind men who are devoting their lives to the better- 
ment of their fellow sightless. One could not but be impressed 
by the ability and character of these blind leaders. Some of 
them in their own countries were still meeting opposition on the 
part of sighted people to any organized and effective program for 
the blind, somewhat on the old theory that the blind, like the 
poor, are always with us. 

The approach to the attainment of the objectives varied in 
the different countries. Leaders in the war-torn nations seemed 
helpless to succeed on their own, and they proposed many forms 
of Government assistance and subsidy. Leaders from other coun- 
tries, however, were not as keen for Government assistance, and 
there were some who were definitely against such measures as 
remission of taxes and other aspects which would set the blind 
aside as a special class. Their concern was to help the blind to 
cope with their problems as fully participating members of the 
community. Above all, there grew upon us, as the days passed, 
the realization that blindness is a universal experience that can 
be met most successfully through international planning and prac- 
tice. All of us went away feeling that the problems presented by 
blindness are common to all nations, and must be conquered in 
all countries. 

The international aspect of the conference could hardly be 
escaped in a company made up of the representatives of seventeen 
nations. Aspects of nationality, however, soon disappeared as the 
entire group found a common bond in the problem that was being 
considered. This, however, was strictly a European conference, 
with representatives from the United States and Canada partici- 
pating. It was thought inadvisable in the planning to reach over 
into Asia or the Latin American countries, although it is expected 
that these countries will be given opportunity for conference at 
some later time. The international aspect was also strengthened 

45 



by the presence of a representative of the United Nations from 
the Geneva Office, who took an active part in all of the sessions. 
UNESCO was also ably represented by the presence of the friend 
of many, Sir Clutha Mackenzie, and it is with these two organiza- 
tions that the next steps must be taken to implement the program 
which was agreed upon in the conference. To accomplish this, 
a committee was formed to approach the United Nations and 
UNESCO to interest them in the problems of blindness and the 
part they may play in its control, and also to urge them to pre- 
sent to the member nations, these standards which each country 
should make every effort to attain. 

Conference on Education 

One of the interesting developments of the conference was 
the feeling that there should be a similar international gathering, 
the program of which should be devoted to the education of the 
young blind, in contrast to the Oxford Conference, where the 
program considered only the welfare of the adult blind. This led 
to the adding of the ninth resolution to the pre-arranged eight, 
covered in the Report. This resolution states, "To enable blind 
persons to participate fully in the life of the community and to 
contribute to its strength, blind persons, whether children, young 
persons or adults, should be given full opportunity for general 
and vocational education in schools adequately equipped for the 
education of the blind and with fully qualified teachers." 

"The conference puts on record its conviction that every na- 
tional system of education should insure to all blind children 
education according to their interests and aptitudes, at least equal 
to that which they would have received if they had not been blind." 

Among the representatives there were a dozen connected with 
schools for the blind, and this small group had several meetings 
on problems of mutual interest. The outcome of these meetings 
was the formulation of the resolution just quoted and the appoint- 
ment of a committee to inquire into the possibility of an inter- 
national educational meeting with power to convene a conference 
if adequate arrangements can be made. It has been proposed that 
this conference be held in the summer of 1951. The Director of 
Perkins Institution was appointed chairman of this convening com- 
mittee, with other members representing the United Kingdom, 
France, Finland, Austria, Holland and Italy. 

46 



Attending international conferences is an educational experi- 
ence, particularly to Americans who are usually one language 
people. Conducting meetings where several languages are involved 
presents interesting difficulties, but the most interesting aspect 
is the methods by which they are overcome. The two conferences 
I attended this summer are perhaps illustrations, and because they 
were both relatively small, they make one marvel all the more 
as to how great gatherings like the United Nations ever accom- 
plish anything or get anywhere. 

Conference at Amsterdam 

The Amsterdam Conference was a four language conference. 
The program had every statement printed in Dutch, French, German 
and English. Each person took his choice according to his 
linguistic ability. At these meetings there was no organized 
translation nor was there any use of the communication systems 
used in many gatherings. This program, however, was made up 
of prepared papers and the writer of each paper had to submit in 
advance a summary of his paper. These summaries were printed, 
each in four languages, and they were given to those attending 
the conferences. It was interesting to learn when, for example, 
I was listening to a paper in French or German, how much could 
be understood by following the English translation. I did not 
do as well with the Dutch. At the question period there was 
always someone who was able to translate informally questions 
and answers, so that that conference worked out quite satisfactorily 
under that plan. 

The Oxford Conference, was a two language conference. Be- 
cause most Europeans speak fluently three or four languages it 
was possible to conduct the sessions at Oxford in English and 
French. For those who did not understand English, (all but one 
did understand French), one of the long tables in the Great Hall 
was equipped with earphones, and there, all those who wished to 
hear the discussions in French, sat and listened as the English 
presentation was translated simultaneously through a microphone 
placed before the interpreter at the "high table." When the 
speaking was in French, however, the translation had to be by 
paragraphs. The person speaking French would complete a thought, 
and an interpreter would translate it into English. This slowed 
down the proceedings somewhat, but it did give time to think and 
it did take away a good deal of the semblance of haste which 

47 



characterizes our American meetings. Even those who were speak- 
ing in English, which was translated simultaneously, had to speak 
more slowly than normally, with greater clarity, and with particular 
care to avoid phrases which might be difficult to translate. 

The proceedings of the Amsterdam Conference and of the 
Oxford Conference are to be published in both French and English. 
They will be valuable documents pertaining to our field, fully 
covered at the Oxford Conference, and in a smaller way at the 
Congress in Amsterdam which included many disabilities. 

In making this report to the Trustees and the Corporation, I 
want to express my great appreciation of their permission to 
attend and to participate in these conferences, both for the per- 
sonal benefit derived and the happy satisfaction of the wide prestige 
attributed to Perkins. 

Gabriel Farrell, Director 



48 




THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE AT OXFORD 



THE UPPER SCHOOL ASSEMBLY AT PERKINS 




DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

OPHTHALMOLOGIST'S REPORT 

THE FOLLOWING is a classification of the causes of blindness 
found in the forty-nine children examined during the year: 



Structural Anomalies: 

Retrolental Fibroplasia 5 

Dislocated lens 1 

Buphthahnous 4 

Microcornea 2 

Optic Nerve : 

Optic Atrophy 4 

Iris: 

Aniridia 1 

Choroid and Retina: 

Chorioretiritis 2 

Albinism 5 



Retinitis Pigmentosa 3 

Pseudoglioma of retina 1 

Macular Degeneration 2 

Infection : 

Keratitis 2 

Disorganized globe 1 

Congenital Lues 1 

Congenital Defects 1 

Miscellaneous and ill defined: 

Sympathetic ophthalmia 1 

Amblyopia — cause unknown 4 

Congenital Cataracts 6 

Deferred 3 



There were thirty-one visits to the Eye Clinic at the Mass. 
Eye and Ear Infirmary for treatment and consultation. 

There were eighteen visits to Mager and Gougleman for the 
fitting of new prosthesis. 



Hospital Admissions : 

Discission 1 

Needling 1 

Enucleation 4 



Cyclodialysis 1 

Iredectomy 2 

Suturing of detached retina 1 

Trygve Gundersen, M. D. 
Joseph Clough, M. D. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 

The following is the report of the Medical Department for 
1948-1949 : 



Operations : 

Appendectomy 

Tonsillectomies 

Teeth extractions 

Removal of enchondroma . 

Removal of extra toes 

Ligation of patent ductus 
Suturing of scalp wound ... 

Communicable Diseases: 

Mumps 

1 at home 
Meningitis 



Hospital Admissions fob kbasons 
other than surgery: 

Neurological study 

Medical study 

Question of appendicitis 

Pneumonia 



Rheumatic Fever 

Cellulitis 

Infectious Hepatitis 

Meningitis 

Tonsillitis 

Arthritis 



Clinic Visits: Massachusetts 
General Hospital : 

Ear, Nose and Throat 

Arthritic 

Skin 

Medical 

Surgical 

Hearing Tests 

South Medical 

Plastic 

Dental 

Vascular 

Nerve 



6 

4 

9 

12 

10 

3 

7 

2 

4 

1 

11 



49 



Clinic Visits: Othbb Hospitals: Elbow 1 

Hand 1 

Boston Psychopathic 3 Ankle 1 

Children's Hospital 4 

Lahey Clinic 1 X-RAYS : 

Taken at Massachusetts 

Fractures: General Hospital 21 

Wrist ... 1 Chest x-rays by Public 

N^^e ■■ 1 Health Service 306 

Each student had a physical examination, urinalysis, hemo- 
globin and height and weight measurements every three months. 

All new staff members and every student had an x-ray for 
tuberculosis. 

All new students who had not been vaccinated were immunized 
against smallpox, diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus. Wassermann 
tests were done on all new pupils. 

Widals and stool cultures were done on all food handlers not 
having had the test before at Perkins Institution. 

Sixty-nine visits were made to the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and eight visits to other special clinics. 

Although we had the beginning of two epidemics of mumps at 
different times during the year, most of the sickness was due to 
colds, sore throats and intestinal disturbances. In the Spring we 
were unfortunate in having a number of rather severe sore throats, 
with forty-eight children in bed at the peak. 

Victor G. Balboni, M. D. 



DENTIST'S REPORT, UPPER SCHOOL 

The following is the report of Dental Operations performed 
for the pupils of the Upper School for the year 1948-1949 : 

Amalgam fillings 214 Sodium Floride treatments 81 

Cement fillings 131 X-Rays 4a 

Synthetic porcelain 71 Extractions li 

Zinc Oxide-eugenol 34 Pericoronitis b 

Silver Nitrate treatments 153 Vincents Stomatitis ' 

Root Canal treatments 27 Gold Inlays 1 

Vitallium and Acrylic Dentures .... 8 

All the pupils of the Upper School received oral prophylactic 
treatments at the Forsyth Dental Infirmary, while the deaf-blind 
pupils had their teeth cleaned in the Dental Clinic at Perkins 
Institution. 

Mark D. Elliott, D. D. S. 

50 



DENTIST'S REPORT, LOWER SCHOOL 

During the school year, ending June, 1949, the following 
dental operations were performed. 

Alloy fillings 205 Temporary teeth extracted 29 

Cement fiUings 10 Permanent teeth extracted 5 

Cement & Alloy fillings 5 Fluorine treatments 38 

Synthetic porcelain fillings B Upper School emergencies 9 

Silver nitrate treatments 158 Number of pupils completed 109 

Prophylactic treatments 125 Number of new pupils completed 23 

Teeth devitalized 1 Total number of pupils treated .... 118 

Treatments for ahove 4 Miscellaneous treatments 38 

This year nine of the younger children received topical treat- 
ments of two percent fluorine. This treatment is expected to 
reduce cavities in the teeth by about forty percent. Time did not 
permit the treatment to be applied to a larger number. 

Reinhold Ruelberg, D. M. D. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

The Physical Therapy Department, with the cooperation of 
the Physical Education Department, provided weekly posture 
classes for all the children in the Lower School this year. Indi- 
vidual schedules were arranged for those pupils who needed extra 
work or more specialized training. All the students received ultra- 
violet treatments throughout the winter months. This year the 
Physical Therapy Department offered an introductory training 
course in massage as a vocation. There were twenty-two visits 
made to the orthopedic clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospi- 
tal, Eight children were fitted to arch plates and pads. 

Summary 

Ultraviolet treatments 3938 Corrective exercise periods 750 

Infra-red treatments 457 Posture classes 273 

Massages 333 Massage classes 49 

Shirlie L. Smith 



51 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 

THE WORKSHOP is pleased to offer a report for 1949 which 
gives some indication of progress and forecasts continued 
development for the period to follow. We look back on a year of 
increased activity in the various departments, and gratefully ac- 
knowledge the patronage of the many customers, old and new, who 
have made this possible. It has been our privilege to serve, this 
year as in the past, many individuals as well as institutions whose 
loyal support throughout the years has been a contributory factor 
in the successful operation of the Workshop Department. 

Our outstanding order came from Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology for whom we made 355 new inner spring and hair 
mattresses and 374 feather pillows. These were installed in Tech's 
new modern Senior House. The order was especially welcome to 
offset a decline in orders for renovating, due largely to reduced 
promotional effort during the last few years. 

The new management realizes the need for a more compre- 
hensive industrial program in 1950, and is planning accordingly. 
This includes apprentice training, regaining lost ground in mattress 
renovating, greater production of new bedding, in addition to en- 
larging our territorial coverage. This will make available to a 
much larger clientele the very excellent Workshop facilities at our 
disposal. 

So it is with pride and some satisfaction that we view our ac- 
complishments and confidently accept the challenge of the future. 

The following is a summary of the work done and wages paid 
in the Workshop Department during the fiscal years 1948 and 1949 : 

1U8 19U9 

Mattresses received from institutions, etc 2,493 1,993 

Mattresses received from indiviuals 1,637 1,487 

Total mattresses received 4,130 3,480 

Mattresses received through the Division of 

the Blind M99 1,383 

New horsehair sold, pounds 5,450 11,250 

Customers' hair received, pounds 147,659 112,541 

Mattresses remade 4,094 3,514 

New Mattresses made 28 391 

Chairs recaned 1,292 1,641 

Wages paid to blind workers $29,018.88 $29,894.01 

Sales for the year $69,370.77 $87,700.16 

Donald Remick, Manager 
52 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Work Account for the Year Ending August 31, 1949 

Average 
Literature Pages Embossed: 1948/9 1940/9 

Literature pages embossed 6,612 8,223 

Music 655 708 

Total 7,267 8,931 

Printings: 

Literature pages printed 734,422 384,000 

Music pages printed 43,650 59,000 

Miscellaneous 85,976 141,000 

Total 864,048 584,000 



Appliances and Games 



Made Distributed Average 
this year this year 194-0/9 



Pocket slates 

Desk slates 

Styluses 

Erasers 

Fiber writing cards 

Clark writing grills 

Aluminum alphabets 

Signature guides 

Mathematical instruments 

Playing cards, decks 

Games: (Checkers, Dominoes, 
Anagrams, Puzzlepegs, Chess, 
and Chinese Checkers) 



543 


2,054 


1,644 


2,000 


1,226 


1,261 




5,416 


6,348 




1,720 


1,160 


1,387 


2,018 


1,800 




130 


241 




201 


117 


589 


247 


152 


1,003 


168 


197 


288 


395 


377 


183 


553 


716 



Edward J. Waterhouse 



53 



LIST OF PUPILS 



UPPER SCHOOL BOYS 



Albee, Carl — ^Machias, Maine 
Arnold, Norman P., Jr. — Atlanta, Georgia 
Arsnow, George F., Jr.— Fall River, Mass. 
Bizon, Robert — Chicopee, Mass. 
Blake, George E. — Rochester, N. H. 
Boyd, Vernon J. G. — Lynn. Mass. 
Brigham, Frederick P. — Fitchburg, Mass. 
Carney, William — Elizabeth, N. J. 
Clark, Richard E.— Royalston, Mass. 
Conley, Paul— Hyde Park, Mass. 
Cordeiro, Raul Ronald — Fall River, Mass. 
Cox, Edward Paul — Lowell, Mass. 
Crocker, Albert — Howland, Maine. 
Curtis, Harold A.— Belfast, Maine. 
Dolack, William M.— Trenton, N. J. 
Faragi, John — Saugus, Mass. 
Fournier, Raymond A. — Lowell, Mass. 

Gasper, Alfred C. — Taunton, Mass. 

Germano, Manuel — Bristol, Rhode Island 

Hawthorne, John, Jr. — ^Millers Falls, Mass. 

Holden, David — Chelsea, Mass. 

lUingworth, George S. — Detroit, Mich. 

Kagan, Stanley J. — Chicopee, Mass. 

Kamis, Richard P. — ^Mattapan, Mass. 

Keefe, Lawrence — ^Woonsocket, R. I. 

Leotta, Louis, Jr. — East Boston, Mass. 

Little, Donald B.— Contoocook, N. H. 

Little, HoUis A.— Contoocook, N. H. 

Lopresti, Joseph — Chelsea, Mass. 

Lunden, Paul C. — ^Brattleboro, Vermont 

McCafferty, Hugh H. — Mexico, Maine 

McDonald, Francis C. — Sharon, Mass. 



McDowell, Thomas — Leominster, Mass. 
McKenne, Thomas M. — Watertown, Mass. 
Moriarty, Edward — ^Arlington, Mass. 
Morrissey, Francis W. — S. Boston, Mass. 
Nicholas, Oliver, Jr. — Lewiston, Maine 
Ordonez, Eduardo — San Luis Potosi, Mexico 
Osbom, James — Plymouth, Mass. 
Pereira, Arthur — New Bedford, Mass. 
Peterson, Edmund — Brighton, Mass. 
Piraino, James — Gloucester, Mass. 
Randall, Roger, G. — Brockton, Mass. 
Raschi, Eugene G. — Springfield, Mass. 
Rathbun, Robert P. — W. Medford, Mass. 
Raymond, Carl F. — Jericho, Vermont 
Rogers, Stephen J., Jr.— Medford, Mass. 

Rounds, Newton H. — Orleans, Vermont 
Roy, Laurent W. — Woonsocket, R. I. 

Salvati, P. Anthony — Cranston, R. I. 

Sardo, Anton — Palmer, Mass. 

Savage, Charles A. — ^Machias, Maine 

Scoggins, James W.,III— Mayfield, Kentucky 

Sears, Arthur, Jr. — Erving, Mass. 

Silveira, Joseph A. — Newport, R. I. 

Skinner, H. Gardner — Danvers, Mass. 

Snow, Charles R. — Haverhill, Mass. 

Snyder, Edward I. — Three Rivers, Mass. 

Sorel, Jean — Jacmel, Haiti 

Surette, Howard — East Boston, Mass. 

Vasapolli, Joseph — Woburn, Mass. 

Walsh, William — Boston, Mass. 

White, V. Paul— Somerville, Mass. 

Young, Willis — Roxbury, Mass. 



UPPER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Accoi-si, Elizabeth — Franklin, Mass. 
Accorsi, Rachel — Franklin, Mass. 
Ammons, Dorothy F. — Clinton, N. C. 
Baker, Amelia — Grand Isle, Vermont 
Barber, Dorothy J. — ^Taunton, Mass. 
Berarducci, Joan E. — Cranston, R. I. 
Birge, Elaine L. — Leverett, Mass. 
Boyd, Janet — Chelmsford, Mass. 
Casella, Grace L. T.— Waltham, Mass. 
Chan, Louise — Canton, China 
Charbonneau, Gloria E. — Lowell, Mass. 
Corkum, Jacqueline T. — ^Boston, Mass. 
D'lorio, Agatha M.— Worcester, Maas. 
Doustou, Bernadette — Sherman Station, Me. 
Doyen, Marjorie — S. Portland, Maine 



Fisher, Ruth Ann — Waltham, Mass. 
Forrest, Maureen — Chicopee, Mass. 
Gauquier, Ellen — Kingston, Mass. 
Gerdes, Helen — Portland, Maine 
Greenlaw, Dorothy — Auburn, Maine 
Karant, Galine — Buenos Aires, Argentina 
Kenney, Jeanne — Dorchester, Mass. 
Libby, Virginia L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Lifton, E. Anne — Kansas City, Missouri 
Liscomb, Janice C. — Salisbury Cove, Maine 
Matthews, Lucy E. — Cambridge, Mass. 
McClure, Ann Marie — Millinocket, Maine 
McDowell, Theresa — Leominster, Mass. 
Merrill, Nancie V. — ^Dover, N. H. 
Morin, Catherine H. — ^W. Yarmouth, Mass. 



54 



Nichols, Barbara — Shelburne, Vermont 
Niedzinski, Pauline — Worcester, Mass. 
Olson, Gloria M. — ^Augusta, Maine 
Pacheco, Priscilla A. — Somerset, Mass. 
Palmer, Shirley May — Somerville, Mass. 
Pevear, Luella Smith — Hampton, N. H. 
Polselli, Anna Mae — Worcester, Mass. 
Porcaro, Helena R. — Providence, R. I. 
Porcaro, Marcelline — Providence, R. I. 



Porter, Virginia — Lubec, Maine 
Rothermel, Lillian M. — Providence, R. I. 
Silvia, Barbara M. — Taunton, Mass. 
Thomason, Cyril — Richmond, Virginia 
Wattrich, Barbara — Boston, Mass. 
Wright, Louise — Waterville, Maine 
Yau, Grace — Canton, China 
Younger, Lorraine — Boston, Mass. 



DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 



Aldrich, Margaret A. — St. Louis, Missouri 
Bare, Carl John — Niles, Ohio 
Gustafson, Ronald D. — Attleboro, Mass. 
Hughes, Alan Dee — Cambridge, Mass. 
Lawrence, Weston S., Jr. — LyndonviUe, Vt. 



Mansfield, Pauline A. — Seattle, Washington 
Morgan, Juanita A. — Buena Vista, Colorada 
Norris, Perry G. — Birmingham, Alabama 
Sabonaitis, Gayle A. — Worcester, Mass. 
Sutton, Barbara — South Braintree, Mass, 



LOWER SCHOOL BOYS 



Angney, David H. — Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Appleby, Daniel P. — Cambridge, Mass. 
Ashby, Dallas — Ayers, Maine 
BeUantoni, Joseph — Belmont, Maine 
Bittman, George C. — Dorchester, Mass. 
Bourgoin, Arthur — Brunswick, Maine 
Browne, Robert A., Jr. — Freeport, N. Y. 
Brugsch, Henry J. — ^Waban, Mass. 
Callahan, Peter J. — 

White Horse Beach, Mass. 
Carlo, John S. — Worcester, Mass. 
Caron, Gilbert C. — Providence, R. I. 
Cheever, David, III — Millis, Mass. 
Cimon, Joseph C. — Burlington, Vermont 
Cote, Jules D. — Manchester, N. H. 
Coy, Erwin — Durham, Maine 
Crohan, David — Providence, R. I. 
Dennis, Ronald A. — Salem, Mass. 
Fermino, Robert — New Bedford, Mass. 
Gosselin, Louis A. — Manchester, N. H. 
Goumas, Charles — SomerviUe, Mass. 
Guyette, Irving, Jr. — N. Providence, R. I. 
Hickey, John — Newtonville, Mass. 
Jackson, Thomas O. — Tuskegee, Alabama 
Johnson, Robert A. — Lynn, Mass. 
Johnson, Scott — E. Templeton, Mass. 
Johnson, Stephen E. — W. Lebanon, N. H. 
Kolbusz, Frank — Holyoke, Mass. 
Leh, George — Greenfield, Mass. 
Libby, Alvah, J. — Lincoln, Maine 
Manning, John J. — Wilton, N. H. 



McEachern, John N. — Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
McLaughlin, G. Fred — Wilmington, Mass. 
Melican, Walter J., Jr. — Watertown, Mass. 
Miller, Robert J. — Chester, Mass. 
Morse, Stanley D., Jr. — ^Marshfield, Mass. 
Murray, Russell E., Jr., — Burlington, Mass. 
Obome, Clinton J. A. — SomerviUe, Mass. 
Oliver, Philip N. — W. Townsend, Mass. 
Pacheco, Francis — Fall River, Mass. 
Pacheco, Joseph E., Jr. — Somerset, Mass. 
Paradise, Maurice — Nashua, N. H. 
Perry, Albert — HiUsgrove, R. I. 
Perry, Donald J. — Lowell, Mass. 
Phifer, George H., Jr.^Fall River, Mass. 
Pierce, Anthony — Dighton, Mass. 
Pollock, Robert J. — Providence, R. I. 
Reineke, Allan F. — Warwick, R. I. 
Reynolds, Carl A., Jr. — Shelburne, Vermont 
Sepiol, Ronald — Wilbraham, Mass. 
Sweet, Douglas H. — W. Swanzey, N. H. 
Tainter, Kenneth A. — Brooklin, Maine 
Thomas, Russell J. — Arlington, Mass. 
Thorpe, Kenneth D. — Misquamicut, R. I. 
Tripp, Raymond L. — Hyannis, Mass. 
Turner, Robert A. — ^Milton, Vermont 
Wakefield, Douglas — LyndonviUe, Vermont 
Wheelock, North Wm., Jr. — 

Fall River, Mass. 
White, Lloyd O.— Rochester, N. H. 
Wood, Richard H. — Auburndale, Mass. 



55 



LOWER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Avedisian, Carol E.— Northbridge, Mass. 
Batchelder, Judith C. — 

East Weymouth, Mass. 
Bleakney. Brenda S. — Boston, Mass. 
Blizard, Marion Lee— Madison, Maine 
Boyer, Jeanne M.— Florence, Mass. 
Boyle, Maureen A. — Dracut, Mass. 
Callahan, Louise — Billerica, Mass. 
Cardullo, Barbara J.— Arlington, Mass. 
Connor, Martha B.— Winthrop, Mass. 
Cote, Vivian R. — Lawrence, Mass. 
Daigneault, Aline M.— Worcester, Mass. 
DeAngelis, Dorothy — Providence, R. I. 
Derouin, Barbara L. — Cranston, R. I- 
Dowling, Patricia — ^Methuen, Mass. 
Downing, Pauline— Roxbury, Mass. 
Driben, Joyce H.— Dorchester, Mass. 
Dunlap, Elizabeth N.— New Orleans, La. 

Feeley, Joanne L. — Franklin, Mass. 

Finan, Irene — Providence, R. I. 

Folsom, Margaret — Framingham, Mass. 

Francis, Mary Ann— Providence, B. I. 

Grady, Beverly M.— Pittsfield, Mass. 

Gudheim, Carolyn Elaine — 

Winchester, Mass. 

Hanscom, Lola L.— Lincoln, Maine 

Hatch, Judith C— Brookline, Mass. 

Jacob, Pauline — ^Woonsocket, B. I. 

Johnson, Lillian F.— Arlington, Mass. 

Johnson, Natalie— East Templeton, Mass. 

Lareau, Mary Ann— Worcester, Mass. 



Mahoney, Kathleen V.— Peabody, k:ass. 
Marston, Sharon L. — ^Newport, R. I. 
McAuliflfe, Barbara — ^Roxbury, Mass. 
McLaughlin, Rita J. — 

N. Wilmington, Mass. 
McNvilty, Rosalind — Dorchester, Mass. 
Mercey, Cynthia Joy — Cambridge, Vermont 
Mulready. Katharine C. — East Lynn, Mass. 
Nerney, Carol Ann — N. Attleboro, Mass. 
Noddin, Carolyn — ^Ayer, Mass. 

Noddin, Sandra — Ayer, Mass. 

Nyland, Collette— Beverly, Mass. 

Phifer, Joy C. — Fall River, Mass. 

Pinkham, Paula — ^Maiden, Mass. 

Plante, Carolyn Lee — Rochester, N. H. 

Purington, Nancy Ann — 

South China, Maine 

Raycraft, Ann Marie — ^Dover, N. H. 

Reed, Amelia — Farmington, N. H. 

Rice, Nicolina — ^Rutland, Vermont 

Ruby, Nancy — ^Wakefield, Mass. 

Russell, Patricia A. — Boston, Mass. 

Schmidt, Alice Karen— Webster, Mass. 

Staples, Sandra J. — Saco, Maine 

Tashjian, Brenda — South Lincoln, Mass. 

Thoresen, Sylvia Ann — Lynn, Mass. 

Walker, Patricia M. — Poland, Maine 

Welch, Rosalie B. — Mattawamkeag, Maine 

Wittstruck, Joan — ^Newport, R. I. 

Z inner, Judith Ann — ^Medford, Mass. 



ENROLLMENT BY STATES — NOVEMBER 1, 1949 



state 


UPPER 


SCHOOL 


LOWER 


SCHOOL 


DEAF-BLIND 


TOTAL 




M 


F 


M 


F 


M F 




Massachusetts 


40 


23 


34 


38 


2 2 


139 


Maine 


6 


10 


6 


6 




28 


New Hampshire 


3 


2 


6 


3 




14 


New Jersey 


2 













2 


Rhode Island 


5 


4 


7 


7 




23 


Vermont 


3 


2 


4 


2 


1 


12 


Other States 


5 


6 


2 


1 


2 3 


19 



64 



47 



59 



57 



237 



56 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



I. Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals, Dramatics, etc.: 

To Mr. Aaron Richmond for tickets foi- recitals. 

To Winchester Players for invitations to students to attend dress 
rehearsals of plays. 

To P. T. A. OF Lowell School, Watertown, for invitation to some 
girls to attend play. 

To Members of Watertown Yacht Club for taking Upper School 
girls on cruise on Charles River. 

To Mrs. Charles Peabody for tickets for Roland Hayes Concert. 

To Shriners of Aleppo Temple for invitation to Lower School 
pupils to attend Circus. 

II. Acknowledgments for Talks, Concerts, etc., in our Hall: 

To Miss Genevieve Caulfield, Mrs. Herman Rubenovitz, Mr. 
Eric Boulter, Mrs. Reginald Sorensen and Mrs. Winifred Hathaway 
for talks to Upper School Assembly. 

To Dr. Edward E. Allen, Mrs. Winifred Hathaway, Mr. Arthur 
Sullivan, Mr. Frederick Walsh, Miss Ethel Parker and Mrs. 
Carolyn B. Cochran for lectures to Harvard Class. 

To Mr. Andrew Heath and Mr. Karl Kohn for two-piano recital. 

To Veterans Concert Orchestra for concert. 

To Mr. Dale Carnegie for talk. 

To Dr. Marinus James for talk. 

To the Clergy of Watertown for Assembly talks during Lenten 
Season. 

To the Patriotic Organizations of Watertown for exercises in 
commemoration of Memorial Day. 

To the Protestant Guild for the Blind, Catholic Guild for the 
Blind and Boston Aid to the Blind for religious instruction given 
to pupils. 

To Mr. Walter Leavitt of the Shriners' Office and Fez-tive Four 
for entertainment to Lower School Children. 

III. Acknowledgments for Books, Periodicals, and Museum 

Exhibits. 

Ink Print Periodicals 

To Alabama Messenger, Ambulado, Arizona Cactus, Arkansas Braille 
News, Blinded Veterans' Association Bulletin, Children's Friend, Cali- 
fornia Beacon, Colorado Index, Desda Las Sombras, Discovery, Du Pont 
Magazine, Handicapped, International Harvester World, Irradiacion, 
Junior Evangel, Kentucky Colonel, Lantern, Listen, Lighthouse News, 
Los Ciegos, Luces, Maryland Oriole, Massachusetts Educational News, 
The Ohio Ray, The Optimist, Our Dumb Animals, Pelham Progress, 
Red and White, Rocky Mountain Leader, Royer-Greaves Monthly, Saint 
Dunstan's Review, School Journal, Searchlight, Seeing Eye Guide, Seer, 
Sight Giver, Sunday School Monthly, Talking Book Topics, Towers, Utah 
Eagle, Virginia Guide, We, The Blind, Wee Wisdom, Welfare Journal, 
West Virginia Tablet, White Cane. 

57 



To the following persons our thanks for hand-transcribed books 
for the Lower School Library: 

Eleanor L. Barker, Anita M. Barnsley, Stella Bateman, 
Eleanor Cleary, Nellie P. Crowley, Margaret Donnelly,^ Sally 
Herrick, Mary Holbrook, Ruth M. Knight, Bertha Lapierre, Eleanor 
F McFarlane, Bertha Hodgson, Freda Osborne, Julla. S. Patten, 
Jessie F. Pecker, Robert J. Roth, Eltrice B. Smith, Edwin C. Stro- 
hecker, Mary Thornton, Fannie B. Walker, Ruth T. Weeks, Emma 
L. Whittemorb, Ida N. Wilson, Lillian DeTurk Sweigert, Jessie 
DoANE, Edith A. Hemingway. 

To the American Red Cross, Passaic, New Jersey Chapter for 
embossed books. 

To the American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky and sundry of its patrons for talking book copies of Readers 
Digest for distribution. 

To the National Braille Press, Boston, Massachusetts and to 
various Chapters of the American Red Cross for bindmg hand- 
transcribed books. 

To Staff Members for loans and gifts of books to the several 
libraries, and especially to Ethel D. Evans for valuable reference texts. 

To Mrs. Harry J. Heineman for gift of books and paper. 

To Miss Isabelle Bixby Burke for gift of book. 

To Mrs. Warren Lothrop of Cambridge for loan of museum ex- 
hibits and for valuable advice and co-operation. 

To Mrs. Anna Luisa Coomaraswamy for loan of objects for the 
museum on the subject of India. 

IV. Acknowledgments of Gifts: 

To Mr. Cameron S. Thompson for gift of apples. 

To Mr. Cameron S. Thompson and Mr. James V. Toner for gift 
of set of "Favorite Story" Radio programs. 

To Lever Brothers Company for gift of cake mix. 

To Mr. Henry Shaw for gift of knife belonging to Dr. Samuel 
Gridley Howe. 

To Mrs. W. J. Loaring-Clark for Braille Christmas Cards. 

To Mrs. Charles L. Witzeman for picture of Perkins Tower. 

To Mom's Do-Nut Shoppe for boxes of Do-Nuts. 

To Mr. Joe Cifre for boxes of candy at Christmas. 

To Mrs. Paul Garland for gift of Talking Book Machine. 

To Mr. Stanley Porter for gift of piano. 

To Radcliffe College for gift of laundry washing machine. 

To Mr. D. W. Warner for large collection of colored beads for use 
in manual training department. 

To Mr. David Burrows and members of Everett C. Benton Lodge for 
party and gifts given to some pupils. 

To Mr. William Nutter for boys' clothes. 

To Mr. Roscoe Brown for boys' clothes. 
- To Stedfast and Roulston through Mr. Cook for gift of metal 
canes. 

To Blue Lake Packers, Inc. through Willl^-m A. Mann & Sons 
for gift of frozen French fried potatoes. 

To Mr. L. R. Nelson, Taxidermist, for collection of mounted birds. 

To Boston Metropolitan Chapter of Junior Red Cross for Braille 
books and book covers used as reading awards in Lower School. 

58 



To Mr. and Mrs. Randle Haws for flowers. 

To Mrs. George S. Fuller for flowers. 

To Singer Sewing Machine Company through Mr. A. A. Lydecker 
for treadles for our Pottery project. 

To Mrs. Jacob J. Yonkers for gift of household supplies. 

To Mr. William Reichert for clothes, tickets, transportation, 
parties and other kindnesses. 

To Junior Red Cross, Bennington, Vermont Chapter for stuffed 
animals. 

To Junior Red Cross of Cranston, Rhode Island Schools for raised 
pictures. 

To Shawmut Masonic Lodge through Dr. Jacob A. Cushner for 
gift of money. 

To Mrs. Henry Endicott and the Fragment Society for gifts of 
clothing and shoes. 

To Miss Mabel Louise Riley for gift of money. 

To Mrs. O. D. Crockett, Miss Mabelle C. Barker, Miss Mildred 
L. Marsh and Mrs. George A. Pierce for gifts of money to Library 
Fund. 

To Mr. Gunnar Gustavson and First Lutheran Church, Wal- 
tham for party and gift of money to boys at Perkins. 

To Boston Aid to the Blind through Mrs. Benjamin Schweitzer 
for gift of money to Camp Fund. 

To Mr. Theodore D. Shapleigh for gift of money to be used to 
purchase records for new service of providing text books for college 
students. 

To Mrs. Richard Gray for gift of a violin. 

To Mr. F. B. Crowninshield for gift of money. 

To Boston Host Lions Club through Mr. A. William Rowe for 
gift of money. 

To Watertown War Service Committee through Mrs. Bernard 
C. McHUGH for gift of money. 

To Mrs. Russell Codman for gift of money. 

To Protestant Guild for the Blind for silver dollars to be given 
to Protestant pupil at Christmas. 

To Catholic Guild for the Blind for dollars to be given to 
Catholic pupils at Christmas. 

To Mrs. James McElaney and Mrs. F. Caldwell for transporta- 
tion on historical trip in Boston. 

To Mrs. William Lyman Underwood for gift of embossing two 
books, "Wilderness Adventure" and "Wild Brother," in memory of her 
late husband, the author. 

To Madame Lecomte du Nouy for gift of embossing "Human 
Destiny" written by her late husband. 

To Mrs. Harry J. Heineman for gift of evening dress. 

To Mrs. Karl C. Lillie for boxes of clothing. 

To Junior Red Cross, Westchester County, White Plains Chapter 
for dolls and their bedding and clothing for girls in Lower School. 

To Temple Israel Brotherhood Lodge for gift of toys to children 
in the Lower School. 

To Mrs. A. George Kohn for clothing for girls. 

To Mr. Philip Kramer for gift of dress. 

59 



To Massachusetts Order of Rainbow Girls for gift of money to 
be used by Social Worker for students. 

To Daughters of Vermont for Christmas gifts for Vermont stu- 
dents. 

To Daughters of Maine for Christmas gifts for Maine students. 

To Waban Union Church and various members for interest in some 
children of Lower School and social for Upper School Protestant group. 

To Firnabank Club of First National Bank of Boston for 
Christmas gifts to Lower School children. 

To Miss Felicia Kutten and Boston Elizabeth Arden Studio 
for lectures and demonstration for Upper School girls. 

To Miss Rosanna D. Thorndike for series of teas for Upper School 
girls. 

To Mr. David Baird for gifts of money throughout the year for 
Social Worker's fund. 

To National Shawmut Bank, Boston, for gift of Ediphone 
machine. 



60 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

To the Trustees of 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 
Boston, Massachusetts 

We have examined the balance sheet of Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind (not including Howe Memorial 
Press Fund) as of August 31, 1949 and the related statements of Reserve 
Fund for Depreciation, of income and expenses and of income and 
expenses of the Works Department, all for the year then ended. We have 
also examined the balance sheet of Howe Memorial Press Fund as of 
August 31, 1949 and the related statement of income and expenses for 
the year then ended. Our examination was made in accordance with 
generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included such 
tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as 
we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

We received confirmation from depositaries with respect to the 
investment securities recorded as owned by the Institution and by the 
Howe Memorial Press Fund as of August 31, 1949, audited all changes 
in investments during the year then ended and satisfied ourselves that 
investment income receivable during the year was duly received. 

As at August 31, 1949 the Trustees voted to charge the deficit for 
the year then ended ($39,921.18), against the Reserve Fund for Depre- 
ciation (Exhibit B). 

In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present 
fairly the position of the Institution and of the Howe Memorial Press 
Fund at August 31, 1949 and the results of their operations for the 
fiscal year then ended. 

Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co. 
Accountants and Auditors. 

Boston, Massachusetts 
October 24, 1949 



61 






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Exhibit B 
RESERVE FUND FOR DEPRECIATION 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1949 
Balance, September 1, 1948 $888,834.59 

Addition: n^c no 

Income added to principal 4l,U4t).u» 

$929,879.67 

Deductions: . ^„a nr^A -,n 

1948-49 costs of library extension project $74,794.12 

Costs of A.C. power changeover 65,159.82 

Excess of costs of special maintenance and 
repairs over amount charged to current 

operations 3,344.32 

Adjustment of prior year on poultry 

project 185.23 

Net loss for the year ended August 31,1949 39,921.18 183,404.67 

Balance, August 31, 1949 (Exhibit A) $746,475.00 

Exhibit C 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1949 

Income: 

Interest and dividends — 

General $332,029.77 

Varnum Fund 15,250.35 

Mortgage notes 1,800.00 $349,080.12 

Tuition and board — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $101,265.00 

Other states 63,600.00 

Private students 16,080.00 180,945.00 

Donations 2,322.00 

Annuities — 

Sarah Hunt Howell Trust $ 5,137.62 

Other 544.73 5,682.35 

Other sources — 

Tuning income $ 4,866.96 

Discounts 985.62 

Net profit — Works Department 

(Exhibit E) 244.46 

Miscellaneous 300.22 6,397.26 

Total income $544,426.73 

Operating expenses (Exhibit D) $490,066.96 

Net earned income added to unexpended 

income — special funds 8,048.20 

Income added to principal of funds 76,068.28 

Additions to plant 10,164.47 

Total expenses 584,347.91 

NET (LOSS) FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

AUGUST 31, 1949 (Exhibit B) $(39,921.18) 

63 



Exhibit D 
OPERATING EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1949 

Salaries Supplies Other Total 



Administration $ 30,909.86 $ 4,399.25 $ 5,740.65 $ 41,049.76 

Treasurer's office ~ $ 6,691.00 $ 6,691.00 

Special Departments: 

Library $ 7,762.12 $ 1,356.37 $ $ ^'H^il 

Health 7957.20 1,560.70 1,034.95 10,552.85 

?SoSnei :::::::::::::::. 13:810.52 461.48 14,272.00 

$ 29,529.84 $ 3,378.55 $ 1,034.95 $ 33,943.34 

Education: ^ „.„orro 

Literary $ 61,328.99 $ 2,906.54 $ $ JHto'^a 

Manual^raining 13,534.50 918.06 14.452.56 

Music 15,869.40 4d2.48 ^^Hr'^n 

Seaf-blind ..:..■ 9:820.00 425.60 10>245.60 

$100,552.89 $ 4,702.68 $ $105,255.57 



Household: „„ r,-- ^rr 

Salaries and mis. exp. $ 58,784.64 $ 8,067.33 $ $ 66,851.97 

Laundry 6,375.97 „ §52.45 2'^l°il 

Food 



57,534.60 !^''.. ...... .... 57,534.60 



$ 65,160.61 $ 66,454.38 $ $131,614.99 

Maintenance : . „„ . ^ 

Enffineering $ 32,580.94 $ 38,891.22 $ $ '7M72.16 

BSSgs 18618.22 7,189.94 25,808.16 

G?ouids 12710.63 3,367.28 16,077.91 

SpSl .............■.'....'. 10,000.00 10,000.00 

$ 63,909.79 $ 49,448.44 $10,000.00 $123,358.23 

Other Expenses: „^„. 

t^S^ ' :::;::: '== ' ^ISo ' J|S^ 

Son^tirement plan ::::: 16,863.06 16,863.06 

Tuning Department AHAn AillH 

Pensions paid ^^'ofJI? ^^'In ?? 

Loss on bad debts ^11.71 211.71 

$ $..: $48,154.07 $ 48,154.07 



$290,062.99 $128,383.30 $71,620.67 $490,066.96 

Summary 

Operating expenses — Institution $257,011.96 

Operating expenses — Kmdergarten 233,055.00 

$490,066.96 
64 



Exhibit F 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 

Balance Sheet 

August 31, 1949 

Assets 

Cash ^oJH^H2 

Investments — book value 223,156.76 

Accounts receivable: 

Trade $ 2,312.15 

Institution Department 257.70 

American Foundation for the Blind 5,819.30 

8,389.15 
Inventories : 

Appliances $ ■''^'Hq'oq 

Braille writer 11,788.28 

Braille printing 8,599.09 

Machinery and equipment $ 21,518.18 

Less: Reserve for depreciation 3,179.76 

18,338.42 
Deferred expenses 9,337.00 

$338,274.17 



34,501.34 



Liabilities 

Accounts payable: 

Trade $ 383.64 

Institution Department 344.98 

$ 728.62 

Federal income tax withheld 388.40 

Funds and legacies: 

Special $ 24,839.10 

General 12,290.00 



37,129.10 



Surplus : 

Balance, September 1, 1948 $311,873.32 

Deduct : 

Net operating loss for the year 

ended August 31, 1949 (Exhibit G) .... 11,889.90 

$299,983.42 

Add: 

Profit from sale of investments 44.63 



Balance, August 31, 1949 300,028.05 

$338,274.17 

65 



Exhibit G 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1949 
Sales: 

Appliances $ 9,380.76 

Braille printing 13,002.52 

Total sales $ 22,383.28 

Cost of Operation and Maintenance: 

Braille printing $ 16,728.34 

Appliances manufactured 21,632.32 

Library 1,634.25 

Administrative salaries 5,089.01 

Depreciation 1,656.42 

Maintenance 2,199.96 

Braille development expense 450.44 

Insurance 692.10 

Pension retirement plan 860.87 

$ 50,943.71 
Less: 

Discounts $107.34 

Miscellaneous receipts 32.66 140.00 

50,803.71 

Net (loss) from operations ($28,420.43) 

Other Income: 

Interest and dividends, general purposes $ 15,511.54 

Interest and dividends, special funds .... 1,499.65 17,011.19 

($11,409.24) 
Other Charges: 

Pensions paid $ 300.00 

Miscellaneous 180.66 480.66 

Net (loss) for the year ended 

August SI, 1H9 (Exhibit F) .... ($11,889.90) 



Exhibit E 



WORKS DEPARTMENT 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1949 
Income: 

Sales $87,700.16 

Miscellaneous 563.43 $88,263.59 

Expenses: 

Material used $28,399.05 

Salaries and wages 51,693.47 

General expense 6,422.28 

Auto and truck expense 1,444.03 

Loss on bad debts 60.30 88,019.13 



NET PROFIT FOR THE YEAR (Exhibit C) $ 244.46 

66 



INSTITUTION FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1949 

Special Funds: 

Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund .. $ 2,869.09 

Anonjnnous 102.01 

Charles S. Adams (Christmas Fund) 204.03 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and 

blind) 4,085.91 

Blind Babies' Project 633.74 

Mary Alice Butler (for reading matter 

for the blind) 3,782.82 

Deaf-Blind Fund 137,016.42 

John D. Fisher (education teachers and 

others) 5,342.08 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) .... 5,107.38 

John Goldthwait Fund (charitable) 4,162.01 

Harris Fund (outdoor relief) 27,238.82 

Henry Clay Jackson Fund (for deaf -blind) 85,247.24 
Maria Kemble Oliver Fund (concert 

tickets) 15,322.16 

James Osborn Fund 3,920.20 

Prescott Fund (education teachers and 

others) 21,687.17 

Elizabeth P. Putnam (higher education) 1,021.48 

Richard M. Saltonstall (use Trustees) .... 3,064.42 

A. Shuman Clothing Fund 1,021.48 

Augustine Schurtleff Fund (for deaf, dumb 

and blind) 1,787.58 

Anne E. Stodder (to find emplojrment for 

blind workers) 3,064.42 

Mary J. Straw 510.74 

Thomas Stringer Fund (for deaf-blind) 16,221.27 

Lenna D. Swinerton 467.57 

Julia E. Turner (education of worthy 

needy) 6,506.34 



$350,386.38 



Permanent Funds (income for general purposes) : 



George Baird Fund 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund .... 

Charlotte Billings Fund 

Frank W. Boles 

Stoddard, Capen Fund 

Jennie M. Colby, 

in memory of 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund 

Stephen Fairbanks 

David H. Fanning 

Helen Osborne Gary 

Harris Fund 

(general purposes) 

Harriet S. Hazeltine Fund 

Benjamin Humphrey 

Prentiss M. Kent 

Sir Charles W. Lindsay 

Kate M. Morse Fund 

Jonathan E. Pecker 

Richard Perkins 

Henry L. Pierce 

Mrs. Manila L. Pitts, 

in memory of 

Frederick W. Prescott 

endowment 



5,000.00 
25,338.95 



$ 12,895.21 


Frank Davison Rust 




18.926.19 


Memorial 


4,000.00 


40,507.00 


Samuel E. Sawyer 


2,174.77 


76.829.02 


Margaret A. Simpson 


968.67 


13,770.00 


Caroline A. Slack 

Charles Frederick Smith 


10.000.00 


100.00 


Fund 


8,663.00 


2,000.00 


Timothy Smith 


2,000.00 


10,000.00 


Mary Lowell Stone Fund .... 


4,000.00 


5,010.56 


George W. Thym Fund 


6,054.66 


10,000.00 


Alfred T. Turner 


1,000.00 




Thomas TJpham Fund 


4,950.00 


53.333.00 


Levina B. Urbino 


500.00 


5,000.00 


William Varnum Fund 


209.341.99 


25,000.00 


Vaughan Fund 


10.553.60 


2,500.00 


Ann White Vose 


12.994.00 


9,008.93 


Charles L. Young 


5.000.00 


5,000.00 








950.00 




$641,869.36 


20,000.00 


Add: 




20,000.00 


Distribution of Surplus 






at August 31, 1947 .... 


9.256.71 



$651,126.06 



67 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 



Elizabeth B. Allen ... 
Nora Ambrose, 

in memory of 

James H. Anderson 
James H. Anderson 
Charlotte H. Andrews 



500.00 

300.00 

62.25 

28,303.92 

15,169.87 



Mary Louise AuU 261,270.05 

5,000.00 
3,000.00 
2,500.00 
1,859.32 



Ellen S. Bacon 
Elizabeth B. Bailey ... 
Eleanor J. W. Baker 
Calvin W. Barker ... 
Lucy B. Barker, 

in memory of 5,953.21 

Marianne R. Bartholomew 2,000.00 

Francis Bartlett 2,500.00 

Elizabeth Howard Bartol ... 5,000.00 

Mary Bartol 300.00 

Thompson Baxter 322.50 

Samuel Benjamin 250.00 

Robert C. Billings 25,000.00 

George Nixon Black 10,000.00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5,832.66 

Dehon Blake 500.00 

Mary Blight 7,220.99 

William T. Bolton 555.22 

Betsey J. Bowles 9,798.75 

George W. Boyd 5,000.00 

Caroline E. Boyden 1,930.39 

Mary L Brackett 5,263.33 

J. Putnam Bradlee 294,162.53 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet .... 23,273.49 

Ellen F. Bragg 8,006.68 

Max Brenner 200.00 

Lucy S. Brewer 10,215.36 

Florence N. Bridgman 500.00 

J. Edward Brown 100,000.00 

Maria A. Burnham 10,000.00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5,000.00 

Abbie Y. Burr 200.00 

Annie E. Caldwell 4,000.00 

Emma C. CampbeU 1,000.00 

Lydia E. Carl 3,412.01 

Ellen G. Gary 50,000.00 

Katherine F. Casey 100.00 

Edward F. Gate 5,000.00 

Robert R. Centro, 

in memory of 10,000.00 

Fanny Channing 2,000.00 

Emily D. Chapman 1,000.00 

Mary F. Cheever 200.00 

Ida May Chickering 1,052.03 

Alice M. Clement 32,250.00 

Alice L Cobb 2,000.00 

Laura Cohen 87.00 

Ann Eliza Colbum 5,000.00 

Susan J. Conant 500.00 

William A. Copeland 1,000.00 

Augusta E. Corbin 20,644.82 

Jennie L. Cox 1,948.60 

Louise F. Crane 5,000.00 

W. Murray Crane 10,000.00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6,000.00 

David Cummings 7,723.07 

Arthur B. Curtis 1,722.25 

Chastine L. Gushing 500.00 

I. W. Danforth 2,500.00 

Kate Kimball Danforth 250.00 

Charles L. Davis 1,000.00 

Etta S. Davis 8,027.87 

Susan L. Davis 1,500.00 

Joseph Descalzo 1,000.00 

Elsie C. Disher 163,250.07 

John H. Dix 10,000.00 

Marv Frances Drown 21,857.25 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200.00 



Amelia G. Dyer 40,043.00 

Mary A. Dyer 8,375.18 

Ella I. Eaton 1,669.50 

Mary Agnes Eaton 3,660.91 

Mary E. Eaton 5,000.00 

William Eaton 500.00 

David J. Edwards 500.00 

Ann J. Ellis 1,023.00 

A. Silver Emerson 500.00 

Martha S. Ensign 2,505.48 

Orient H. Eustis 500.00 

Eugene Fanning 50.00 

Sarah M. Farr 64,247.43 

Mortimer C. Ferris 

Memorial l.OOQ.OO 

Edward A. Fillebrown 500.00 

Annie M. Findley 500.00 

Anna G. Fish 10,583.25 

Thomas B. Fitzpatrick 1,000.00 

John Forrest 1,000.00 

Ann Maria Fosdick 14,333.79 

Nancy H. Fosdick 3,937.21 

Sarah E. Foster 200.00 

Elwyn Fowler 5,232.75 

Mary Helen Freeman 1,000.00 

Cornelia Ann French 10,000.00 

Martha A. French 164.40 

Ephraim L. Frothingham .... 1,825.97 

Jessie P. Fuller 200.00 

Thomas Gaffield 6,685.38 

Edward L. Geary 2,000.00 

Albert Glover 1,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000.00 

Marie M. Goggin 2,864.55 

Benjamin H. Goldsmith 11,199.68 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6,471.23 

Maria W. Goulding 2,332.48 

Charles G. Green 45,837.70 

Amelia Greenbaum 500.00 

Imogene C. Gregory 450.00 

Mary Louise Greenleaf 199,189.94 

William Guggenheim 50.00 

Ellen Page Hall 10,037.78 

Ellen Hammond 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Harty 5,000.00 

Helen P. Harvison 1,000.00 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500.00 

Jerusha F. Hathaway 5,000.00 

Lucy Hathaway 4,577.00 

Edward J. and Georgia M. 

Hathome Fund 50,017.68 

Charles H. Hayden 32.461.01 

John C. Haynes 1,000.00 

Mary E. T. Healy 200.00 

Ahce Gushing Hersey, 

in memory of 3,000.00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500.00 

Ira HUand 8,898.37 

Stanley B. Hildreth 5,000.00 

George A. Hill 100.00 

Lila M. Hodges l'°*'2"2S 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708.32 

Theodore C. Hollander 3,016.00 

Bernard J. Holmburg 2,000.00 

Margaret J. Hourihan 200.00 

Charles Sylvester Hutchinson 2,156.00 

Katharine C. Ireson 52,037.62 

Hattie M. Jacobs 5,000.00 

William S. Jenney, 

in memory of °"2nn 

Charlotte Johnson ^5rx2 

Annie G. Joyce 250.00 

Eliza J. Kean ^^'^^^Al 

Marie L. Keith 2,?°?-?2 

Harriet B. Kempster l,144.ld 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 



Ernestine M. Kettle 22,981.31 

B. Marion Keyes 6,360.00 

Lulu S. Kimball 10,000.00 

Grace W. King 100.00 

Lydia F. Knowles 50.00 

Davis Krokyn 100.00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6,000.00 

James J. Lamson 750.00 

Susan M. Lane 815.71 

Elizabeth W. Leadbetter .... 2,638.71 

Jane Leader 3,544.31 

Luella K. Leavitt 1,011.67 

Lewis A. Leland 415.67 

Benjamin Levy 500.00 

E. E. Linderholm 505.56 

William Litchfield 7,951.48 

Mary T. Locke 8,361.89 

Hannah W. Loring 9,500.00 

Celia E. Lugene 243.72 

Adolph S. Lundin 100.00 

Susan B. Lyman 4,809.78 

Agnes J. MacNevin 78,968.67 

Mary Ella Mann 250.00 

Blanche Osgood Mansfield .... 1,000.00 

Annie B. Marion 8,000.00 

Rebecca Marks 2,640.40 

Stephen W. Marston 5,000.00 

Elizabeth S. Martin 1,000.00 

William H. Maynard 22,821.56 

Cora Mclntire 6,862.50 

Charles Merriam 1,000.00 

Mary H. Miller 1,512.50 

Olga E. Monks 2,500.00 

George Montgomery 5,140.00 

Martha H. Morss 3,000.00 

Louise C. Moulton Bequest 7,891.65 

Mary A. Muldoon 100.00 

Mary T. Murphy 10,000.00 

Sarah Ella Murray 8,000.00 

Sarah M. Nathan 500.00 

Joseph F. Noera 2,000.00 

Henry P. Norris 35,198.52 

Mary B. Noyes 915.00 

Richard W. Nutter 2,000.00 

Ella Nye 50.00 

Harold L. Olmstead 5,000.00 

Emily C. O'Shea 1,000.00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699.41 

William Prentiss Parker .... 2,500.00 

George Francis Parkman .... 50,000.00 

Grace Parkman 5,383.78 

Philip G. Peabody 1,200.00 

Elizabeth W. Perkins 2,000.00 

Ellen F. Perkins 2,500.00 

Edward D. Peters 500.00 

Clara F. Pierce 2,005.56 

Clara J. Pitts 2,000.00 

Georsce F. Poland 75.00 

Elizabeth B. Porter 5,449.50 

George M. Whidden Porter 22,700.48 

Sarah E. Pratt 2,988.34 

Sarah S. Pratt 5,000.00 

Francis I. Proctor 10,000.00 

Grace E. Reed 5,054.25 

Carrie P. Reid 679.51 

Leonard H. Rhodes 1,012.77 

Mabelle H. Rice 3,750.00 

Matilda B. Richardson 300.00 

William L. Richardson 50,000.00 

Anne Augusta Robinson .... 212.20 

Julia M. Roby 500.00 

Robert Rodgers 100.00 

John Roome 5,787.67 

Barbara S. Ross 2,740.35 

Henrietta Goodrich Rothwell 500.00 



Mary L. Ruggles 

Elizabeth H. Russell 

Josephine Russell 

Marian Russell 

Nancy E. Rust 

William H. Ryan 

Emily E. St. John 

Joseph Schofield 

Sarah E. Seabury 

Edward O. Seccomb 

Richard Black Sewell 

Charles F. Sherman 

Robert F. Shurtleff 

Carrie Etta Silloway 

John Simonds 

Arthur A. Smith 

Ellen V. Smith 

Esther W. Smith 

Sarah F. Smith 

The Maria Spear Bequest 

for the Blind 

Henry F. Spencer 

Charlotte S. Sprague 

Thomas Sprague 

Adella E. Stannard 

Cora N. T. Stearns 

Henry A. Stickney 

Lucretia J. Stoehr 

Joseph C. Storey 

Edward C. Sullivan 

Sophronia S. Sunbury 

Edward Swan 

Emma B. Swasey 

Mary F. Swift 

William Taylor 

Minnie L. Thayer 

Mabel E. Thompson 

Joanna C. Thompson 

William Timlin 

Alice W. Torrey 

Evelyn Wyman Towle 

Stephen G. Train 

Sarah E. Trott 

Mary Wilson Tucker 

George B. Upton 

Maude C. Valentine 

Charles A. Vialle 

Bernard T. Vierich 

Abbie T. Vose 

Nancie S. Vose 

Horace W. Wadleigh 

Joseph K. Wait 

Amelia L. Walker 

Harriet Ware 

AUena F. Warren 

William H. Warren 

Eleanore C. Webb 

Charles F. Webber 

Mary E. Welch 

Mary Ann P. Weld 

Oliver M. Wentworth 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 

Opha J. Wheeler 

Eliza Orne White 

Ella Tredich White 

Porter W. Whitmarsh 

Ruth E. Whitmarsh 

Sarah L. Whitmarsh 

Samuel Brenton Whitney .... 

Adelia C. Williams 

Judson Williams 

Lucy B. Wilson, 

in memory of 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson 

Nettie R. Winn 



3,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

5.000.00 

2,640.00 

8,023.48 

5,015.00 

2,500.00 

3,116.01 

1,000.00 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,432.94 

5,429.88 

50.00 

10,000.00 

25,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,000.00 

13,222.56 

1,000.00 

1,631.78 

53,558.50 

2,410.00 

2,967.26 

122,531.58 

2,000.00 

365.19 

16,500.00 

2,250.00 

1,391.00 

893.36 

1,000.00 

8,722.61 

1,000.00 

7,820.00 

71,560.00 

5,820.00 

20,000.00 

2,885.86 

481.11 

10,000.00 

1,884.22 

1,990.00 

593.06 

1,000.00 

300.00 

2,000.00 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,952.02 

2,828.33 

4,073.17 

5,314.95 

30,915.93 

200.00 

2,000.00 

300.00 

800.00 

3,086.77 

4,318.43 

1,000.00 

88,247.05 

1,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,628.46 

800.00 

543.75 

1,000.00 



69 



Institution Funds (ConcVd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) — concl. 

Samuel C. WiawaU 125.00 Add: 

Minnie S. Woolf 9,259.38 Distribution of Surplus _ „^_ ^. 

Esther F. Wright 6,427.76 at August 31. 1947 .... 37.097.45 

Thomas T. Wyman 20.000.00 MtfiRqcKi? 

Fanny Young 8,000.00 Deduct: , , „, ^ _ .. p.166.965.42 

William B. Young 1.000.00 ^"f ^f^'' ^''^^^^''lo^,^ inn rok 7fi 

at August 31, 1947 .... 1,041,695.76 

$3,129,867.97 1777771771 

$2,125,269.66 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1949 

Special funds: 

Glover Funds for Blind-Deaf Mutes $ 1,445.74 

Ira Hiland (income to W. E. R. for life) 1,371.20 

Emeline Morse Lane Fund (books) 1,371.20 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room 5,485.54 

Dr. Ruey B. Stevens' Charity Fund 7,542.33 

Lucy H. Stratton (Anagnos Cottage) .... 9,504.62 



$26,720.63 



Permanent funds (income for general 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund .... $ 28,393.40 

Mary D. Balfour Fund 5,692.47 

William Leonard Benedict, 

Jr.. Memorial 1,000.00 

Samuel A. Borden 4,675.00 

A. A. C, in Memoriam 500.00 

Helen G. Coburn 9,980.10 

Charles Wells Cook 5.000.00 

M. Jane Wellington 

Danforth Fund 10,000.00 

Caroline T. Downes 12,950.00 

Charles H. Draper Fund .... 23.934.13 

Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 1,500.00 
Helen Atkins Edmands 

Memorial 5,000.00 

George R. Emerson 5,000.00 

Mary Eveleth 1.000.00 

Eugenia F. Farnham 1,015.00 

Susan W. Farwell 500.00 

John Foster 5,000.00 

The Luther and Mary 

Gilbert Fund 8,541.77 

Albert Glover 1.000.00 

Martha R. Hunt 10.000.00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund .... 9.935.95 

General funds (principal and income 

Emilie Albee $ 150.00 

Lydia A. Allen 748.38 

Michael Anagnos 3,000.00 

Harriet T. Andrew 5,000.00 

Martha B. AngeU 34.370.83 

Mrs. William Appleton 18.000.00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500.00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500.00 

Ellen M. Baker 13.053.48 

Mary D. Barrett 1,000.00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500.00 

Sidney Bartlett 10,000.00 

Emma M. Bass 1,000.00 

Sarah E. J. Baxter 51,847.49 

Thompson Baxter 322.50 

Robert C. Billings 10,000.00 

Harriet M. Bowman 1,013.32 

Sarah Bradford 100.00 

Helen C. Bradlee 140.000.00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 194,162.53 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 13,576.19 



purposes) : 

Charles Lamed 5,000.00 

Elisha T. Loring 5,000.00 

George F. Parkman 3,500.00 

Catherine P. Perkins 10,000.00 

Edith Rotch 10,000.00 

Frank Davison Rust 

Memorial 15,600.00 

Caroline O. Seabury 1.000.00 

Phoebe Hill Simpson Fund 3,446.11 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 21,729.62 

Abby K. Sweetser 25,000.00 

Hannah R. Sweetser Fund 6,000.00 

Mrs. Harriet Taber Fund .. €22.81 

Levina B. Urbino 500.00 

The May Rosevar White 

Fund 500.00 



Add: 



$267,516.26 



Distribution of Surplus 
at August 31, 1947 .... 



95,260.91 
$352,777.17 



for general purposes) : 

EUen F. Bragg 8,006.69 

Lucy S. Brewer 7,811.56 

Sarah Crocker Brewster .... 500.00 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1,000.00 

Mary E. Brown 1,000.00 

Rebecca W. Brown 8,977.56 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000.00 

Katherine E. Bullard 2,500.00 

Annie E. Caldwell 5,000.00 

John W. Carter 500.00 

Kate H. Chamberlin 6,716.07 

Adeline M. Chapin 400.00 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000.00 

Fanny C. Cobum 424.06 

Charles H. Colbum 1,000.00 

Helen Collamore 5,000.00 

Anna T. Coolidge 53,873.88 

Mrs. Edward Cordis 300.00 

Sarah Silver Cox 5,000.00 

Lavonne E. Crane 3,365.21 

Susan T. Crosby 100.00 



70 



Kindergarten Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Margaret K. Cummings .... 


5,000.00 


James H. Danford 


1,000.00 


Catherine L. Donnison 






1,000.00 


George H. Downes 


3,000.00 


Amanda E. Dwight 


6,295.00 


Lncy A. Dwight 


4.000.00 


Harriet H. Ellis 


6,074.79 


Mary E. Emerson 


1,000.00 


Mary B. Emmens 


1,000.00 


Arthur F. Estabrook 


2,000.00 


Ida F. Estabrook 


2,114.00 


Orient H. Eustis 


500.00 


Annie Louisa Fay 




Memorial 


1,000.00 


Sarah M. Fay 


15,000.00 


Charlotte M. Fiske 


5,000.00 


Ann Maria Fosdick 


14,333.79 


Nancy H. Fosdick 


3,937,21 




378,087.49 


Margaret W. Frothingham 


500.00 


Elizabeth W. Gay 


7.931.00 


Ellen M. Gifford 


5,000.00 


Joseph B. Glover 


5,000.00 


Mathilda Goddard 


300.00 


Anna L. Gray 


1,000.00 


Maria L. Gray 


200.00 


Amelia Greenbaum 


1,000.00 


Caroline H. Greene 


1,000.00 


Mary L. Greenleaf 


5,157.76 


Josephine S. Hall 


3,000.00 


Allen Haskell 


500.00 


Mary J. HaskeU 


8,687.65 


Jennie B. Hatch 


1,000.00 


Olive E. Hayden 


4,622.45 


Jane H. Hodges 


300.00 


Margaret A. Holden 


2,360.67 


Marion D. HoUingsworth .... 


1,000.00 


Frances H. Hood 


100.00 


Abigail W. Howe 


1,000.00 


Ezra S. Jackson 


688.67 


Caroline E. Jenks 


100.00 


Ellen M. Jones 


600.00 


Hannah W. Kendall 


2,516.38 


Cara P. Kimball 


10,000.00 


David P. Kimball 


5,000.00 


Moses Kimball 


1,000.00 


Ann E. Lambert 


700.00 


Jean Munroe Le Brun 


1.000.00 


WiUard H. Lethbridge 


28,179.41 


Frances E. Lily 


1,000.00 


William Litchfield 


6,800.00 




5,874.00 


Robert W. Lord 


1,000.00 


Sophia N. Low 


1,000.00 


Thomas Mack 


1.000.00 


Augustus D. Manson 


8,134.00 


Calanthe E. Marsh 


18,840.33 


Sarah L. Marsh 


1,000.00 


"Waldo Marsh 


500.00 


Annie B. Mathews 


45,086.40 


Sebecca S. Melvin 


23,545.65 


Georgina Merrill 


4,778.80 


Ira L. Moore 


1,849.09 


Louise Chandler Moulton .... 


10,000.00 




1,000.00 




5,903.65 


Frances M. Osgood 


1,000.00 


Margaret S. Otis 


1,000.00 


Jeannie Warren Paine 


1,000.00 


Anna R. Palfrey 


50.00 


Sarah Irene Parker 


699.41 


Anna Q. T. Parsons 


4,019.52 


Helen M. Parsons 


500.00 


Caroline E. Peabody 


3.403.74 


Elward D. Peters 


500.00 



Henry M. Peyser 


5,678.25 


Mary J. Phipps 


2,000.00 


Caroline S. Pickman 


1,000.00 


Katherine C. Pierce 


5,000.00 


Helen A. Porter 


50.00 


Sarah E. Potter, 




Endowment Fund 


425,014.44 


Francis L. Pratt 


100.00 


Mary S. C. Reed 


5.000.00 


Emma Reid 


952.38 


William Ward Rhoades 


7,507.86 




93.025.55 


John M. Rodocanachi 


2,250.00 


Dorothy Roffe 


500.00 




2,000.00 




500.00 


Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 


8,500.00 


Rebecca Salisbury 


200.00 


J. Pauline Schenki 


10,955.26 


Joseph Schofield 


3,000.00 


Eliza B. Seymour 


5,000.00 


John W. Shapleigh 


1,000.00 


Esther W. Smith 


5.000.0a 




9.903.27 


Adelaide Standish 


5,000.00 


Elizabeth G. Stuart 


2.000.00 


Benjamin Sweetzer 


2,000.00 


Sarah W. Taber 


1.000.00 


Mary L. Talbot 


630.00 


Ann Tower Tarbell 


4.892.85 


Cornelia V. R. Thayer 


10,000.00 


Delia D. Thorndike 


5,000.00 


Elizabeth L. Tilton 


300.00 


Betsey B. Tolman 


500.00 


Transcript, ten dollar fund 


5,666.95 


Mary Wilson Tucker 


481.11 


Mary B. Turner 


7,582.90 


Royal W. Turner 


24,089.02 


Minnie H. Underhill 


1,000.00 


Charles A. Vialle 


1,990.00 


Rebecca P. Wainwright .... 


1,000.00 




5.000.00 


Maria W. Wales 


20,000.00 


Gertrude A. Walker 


178.97 


Mrs. Charles E. Ware 


4,000.00 


Rebecca B. Warren 


5,000.00 


Jennie A. (Shaw) 






565.84 


Mary H. Watson 


100.00 


Ralph Watson Memorial .... 


237.92 


Isabella M. Weld 


14,795.06 


Mary Whitehead 


666.00 


Evelyn A. Whitney Fund .... 


4,992.10 


Julia A. Whitney 


100.00 


Sarah W. Whitney 


150.62 


Betsey S. Wilder 


500.00 


Hannah Catherine Wiley .... 


200.00 


Mary W. Wiley 


150.00 




6,000.00 


Almira F. Winslow 


306.80 


Eliza C. Winthrop 


6,041.67 


Harriet F. Wolcott 


6,532.00 




$2,056,769.71 


Add: 




Distribution of Surplus 




at August 31, 1947 .... 


529.095.43 



$2,585,865.14 
Deduct : 

Transfer to Plant Capital 

at August 31, 1947 .... 634,744.69 

$1,951,120.45 



71 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1949 

Special funds: 

Adeline A. Douglas (printing raised 

characters) y- $ 5,000.00 

Harriet S. Hazeltine (printing raised ot^(^c^^^c^ 

characters) AUUU.uu 

Thomas D. Roche (publication non- 

sectarian books) • -,aqkko« 

J. Pauline Schenk (printing) ••••• lU.y&D.^b 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund (books, _ ^^^ „^ 

maps and charts) 5,000^ 



■General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 

^ Beggs Fund $ 1.000 00 

Joseph H. Center iJi'??noo 

Augusta Wells 10,290.00 



$24,839.10 



12,290.00 
$37,129.10 



72 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE DEAF-BLIND FUND 

September 1, 1948 — August 31, 1949 



Abbott, Mr. Frank W. 
Abbott, Miss Harriette F. 
Abbott, Miss Mary 
Abbott, Mrs. William T. 
Abel], Mrs. A. Howard 
Abramson, Mrs. Daniel 
Adam Hat Stores, Inc. 
Adams, Mrs. Arthur 
Adams, Mrs. Barrett 
Adams. Miss F. M. 
Adams, Miss Jessie L. 
Adams, Mrs. John 
Adams, Miss Kate L. 
Adler, Mrs. Jacob 
Alford, Miss Martha A. 
AUbright, Mr. CliflEord 
Allen, Mrs. Arthur D. 
Allen, Mrs. Arthur M. 
AUen, Miss Hildegarde 
Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. 
Alles, Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. 
Ailing, Miss Elsie Dwight 
Almy, Miss Helen J. 
Ames, Lady 
Ames, Miss Rosella S. 
Ames, Mrs. Winthrop 

Amory, Mrs. Copley, Jr. 

Amory, Mrs. William 

Amster, Mrs. Morris 

Andersen, Mrs. George G. 

Anderson, Mr. Arth«r J. 

Anderson, Mrs. Andreas 

Anderson, Miss Naomi H. 

Andress, Mrs. J. Mace 

Andrus, Mrs. G. E. 

Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. Francis 

Appleton, Miss Maud E. 

Archambault, Mrs. Victor 

Argersinger, Mrs. Roy E. 

Arnold, Mrs. Harold Greene 

Arthur, Misses Susan and Alice 

Ashenden, Mr. Richard C. 

Ashworth, Miss Lillian F. 

Atherton, Mr. J. Ballard 

Athey, Mrs. C. N. 

Atkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elisha 

Atkinson, Mr. John B. 

Atwell, Mr. and Mrs. A. Y. 

Atwood, Mrs. David E. 

Atwood, Mrs. Frank W. 

August, Mr. Lee, Jr. 

Austin, Miss Edith 

Austin, Mrs. Francis B. 

Austin, Mrs. Walter 

Axelrod, Mrs. James J. 

Ayer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 



Babcock, Mr. Courtlandt W. 

Backus, Mrs. Standish 

Bacon, Mr. Paul V. 

Badger, Dr. and Mrs. Theodore L. 

Bagley, Mr. Charles R. 

Baker, Mrs. Dudley M. 

Baker, Miss Elizabeth E. 

Baker, Mrs. Nathaniel 

Baker, Dr. Ruth A. 

Baldwin, Miss Alice H. 

Baldwin, Mrs. E. Atkins 

Banes, Miss Margaret 

Barber, Mrs. Harris 

Barbour, Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. 

Barker, Miss Phyllis F. 

Barlow, Mr. Charles L. 

Barnard, Mrs. William Lambert 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. Barnes, Mr. Charles B. Mass. 

Mass. Barnet, Mrs. Solomon J. Mass. 

Ohio Barnum, Dr. Francis G. Mass. 

111. Barr, Miss Ada M. N. Y. 

Mass. Barrett, Miss Florence E. Conn! 

Mass. Barry, Mrs. John L. 

N. Y. Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 

Mass. Bartol, Mrs. John W. 

Mass. Bartol, Mr. Louis C. 

Mass. Barton, Dr. Basil E. 

Mass. Bassett, Mrs. Norman L. Vt. 

Mass. Battelle, Miss Sarah W. Mass! 

Mass. Bauer, Miss Rose F. N. J. 

N. Y. Baxter, Mrs. Gregory P. Mass! 

Mass. Baxter, Mr. Thomas A. Mass. 

Mass. Beal, Mrs. Boylston A. Mass. 

Ky. Beaudreau, Mrs. Raoul H. Mass. 

Mass. Bean, Mrs. Henry S. Mass. 

Mass. Bean, Mr. Howard C. Mass! 

Mass. Beard, Mr. Frank A. Mass! 

Mass. Beardsley, Mrs. W. H. Vt! 

Mass. Beckhard, Mi's. G. A. Mass! 

Mass. Beckwith, Mrs. Louis I. Mass. 

Mass. Behr, Miss Elsa N. Y. 

Mass. Belcher, Miss Gertrude C. Mass 

N. Y. Belknap, Mr. Waldron P., Jr. 

Mass. Bement, Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. 

Mass. Bemis, Mrs. Harry H. 

Ohio Benjamin, Mrs. Irwin 

Mass. Benner, Miss Frances Z. T. 

Mass. Bennett, Mrs. Harold 

Mass. Benson, Mr. A. Emerson 

Mass. Bentley, Mrs. Ernest Mass. 

Mass. Bessom, Mrs. Frank L. Mass! 

Colo. Bibring, Dr. and Mrs. Edward W. Mass' 

H. Mass. Bicknell, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Mass! 

Mass. Bieringer, Mr. Walter H. Mass! 

Mass. Bill, Miss Caroline E. Mass! 

Mass. Billings, Mrs. Arthur Mass' 

Mass. Binney, Miss EmUy V. Mass! 

Mass. Binney, Miss Helen Maude Mass! 

Mass. Binney, Mrs. Horace Mass" 

Mass. Bird, Mrs. Francis W. Mass' 

T. H. Bishop, Mrs. Frank C. Mass' 

Md. Bishop, Dr. G. N. Mass' 

N. Y. Black, Mrs. Taylor Mass! 

Mass. Blais, Mrs. J. A. Mass! 

Mass. Blake, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Mass! 

Mass. Blake, Mrs. George B., Jr. Mass. 

Mass. Blanchard, Miss Rachel Mass! 

Ohio Blevins, Mrs. Albert H. Mass! 

Mass. Bliss, Miss Carrie C. Mass! 

Mass. Blix, Miss Katie Calif! 

Mass. Blodgett, Mrs. Edward W. Mass! 

Mass. Blood, Miss Ellen F. Mass! 

Mass. Bloomberg, Mrs. Wilfred Mass! 

Bluhm, Mr. Louis N. y! 

Mass. Bolles, Mrs. Chester A. Mass! 

Mich. Bolster, Mrs. Stanley M. Mass! 

Mass. Book Club, The (San Diego) Calif! 

Mass. Bond, Mrs. Harold A. Mass. 

N. H. Borden, Mrs. Richard Mass! 

Mass. Born, Mrs. Donald Mass! 

Ohio Bosson, Mrs. Campbell Mass! 

Mass. Bosworth, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. N. y! 

Mass. Bouve, Dr. and Mr^. Howard A. Mass! 

Mass. Bowden, Mrs. Frederick Mass. 

Mass. Bowditch, Mrs. Henry I. Mass! 

Mass. Bowen, Mrs. J. W. R. i! 

Mass. Bowser, Mrs. Henry R. Mass! 

Mass. Boyd, Mrs. Edward F. Mass! 

Mass. Boyd, Mr. Francis R. Mass! 

Mass. Boyer, Mrs. William E. Mass! 

Bozyan, Mrs. H. Frank Conn! 



78 



Brackett, Mrs. Anthony H. Mass 

Bradford, Mrs. Gamaliel Mass 

Bradlee, Mrs. Henry G. Mass 

Bradlee. Mrs. Reginald Mass 

Bradley, Mrs. Leland E. Mass, 

Bradshaw, Mr. Eugenie F. Mass, 

Brayles, Dr. Elizabeth L. Mass 

Breed, Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Mass 

Bresky, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Mass 

Brewer, Mrs. Charles Mass 
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers 

Local No. 6 Mass 

Bridgewater, Mrs. John Payson Mass 

Briggs, Mrs. Edward C. Mass 

Brigham, Mrs. Clifford M 

Brinley, Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Conn. 

Broekett, Mr. Everett B. N. Y 

Brookins, Mrs. Martha N. Va, 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H. Mass 

Brooks, Mr. Charles F. Mass 

Brooks, Mr. Gorham Mass 

Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Mass 

Brooks, Mrs. Walter D. Mass 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P. M 

Brown, Mrs. George E. Mass 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. George R. Mass 

Brown, Mrs. George N. Y. 

Brown, Mrs. Hobart W. Mass 

Brown, Mr. J. Frank Mass 

Brown, Miss Margaret L. N. Y 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Mass, 

Brown, Mr. Walter J. Mass 

Brown, Mr. WiUiam K. N. Y, 

Browne, Miss Florence M. N. J 

Browne, Dr. WiUiam E. Mass 

Bruerton, Mr. Courtney Mass 

Bruerton, Miss Edith C. Mass 

Bryant, Miss Elizabeth B. Mass 

Bryant, Mr. Lincoln Mass 

Bryant, Mrs. Wallace E. Mass 

Buffum, Mrs. Adelbert E. Mass 

Bullard, Miss Ellen Mass 

Bump, Mrs. Archie E. Mass 

Bumstead, Miss Rosa M. Mass 

Bunce, Mr. Henry L., Jr. Mass 

Burke, Mrs. Roger M. Mass 

Burke, Mrs. Walter Safford Mass 

Burling, Mrs. Edward B. D. C 

Burnes, Mr. Harold W. Mass, 

Bumham, Miss Mary C. Mass 

Burns, The Hon. William A. Mass 

Burr, Mr. I. Tucker, Jr. Mass 

Burrage, Miss Elsie A. Mass 
Burrage, Mr. and Mrs. George D. Mass 

Bush, Mr. and Mrs. J. Douglas Mass 

Cabot, Mrs. Chilton R. Mass 

Cabot, Mrs. George B. Mass 

Cabot, Mr. Godfrey L. Mass 

Cain, Mr. John E. Mass 

Callahan, Mr. Henry J. Mass 

Cameron, Mrs. Daniel Mass 

Cameron, Mrs. Russell R. Mass 

Campbell, Miss Elizabeth Mass 

Campbell, Mrs. L. A. Mass 
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. N. Y 

Campbell, Mrs. Wallace M. Mass 

Campbell-Dover, Mrs. Edina Mass 

Canfield, Mrs. Genevieve W. Mass 

Cannon, Miss Bemice M. Mass 

Cantabrigia Club, The Mass 

Capron, Mrs. John F. Mass, 

Carey, Mrs. A. G. Vt. 

Carhart, Mrs. C. L. Md 

Carleton, Mr. Philip G. Mass 
Carlton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Mass 

Carmalt, Miss Geraldine W. Conn 

Carten, Mrs. John L., Jr. Mass 

Carter, Mrs. Albert P. Mass 



Carter, Mrs. Hubert L. Mass. 

Carter, Mr. Richard B. Mass. 

Carter, Mrs. Winthrop L. N. H. 

Cartland, Miss Marian P. Conn. 

Case, The Hon. Norman S. D. C. 

Caskey, Mrs. Paul D. Mass. 

Casselberry, Mrs. Clarence M. Mass. 

Chadsey, Mrs. Horace M. Mass. 

Chalfant, Miss Isabella C. Pa. 

Chamberlain, Dr. Calvin Calif. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. George N. Mass. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel Mass. 

Chamberlin, Miss Louise M. Mass. 

Chandler, Mrs. John Mass. 

Chapin, Mr. E. Barton Mass. 

Chapin, Miss Stella Mass. 

Chard, Mrs. Walter G. Mass. 

Charron, Mrs. Arthur I. Mass. 

Chase, Mr. Alfred E. Mass. 

Chase, Miss Alice P. Mass. 

Chase, Mr. Arthur Taft Mass. 

Chase, Mrs. John McC. N. Y. 

Chase, Mrs. W. L. Maine 

Chase, Mr. Walter B. Mass. 

Chase, Mrs. Walter I. Mass. 

Chatfield, Miss Alice E. Mass. 

Cheever, Dr. David Mass. 

Cheever, Mrs. R. P. Mass. 

Cheney, Mrs. Benjamin P. Mass. 

Chicetto, Mr. Frank A. Mass. 

Church, Mrs. Willard N. J. 

Claflin, Mrs. Thomas M. Mass. 

Clapp, Mrs. Clift Rogers Mass. 

Clark, Miss Alice Warren Maine 

Clark, Mrs. Cecil W. Mass. 

Clark, Miss Clara M. N. Y. 

Clark, Mr. Henry J. Mass. 

Clarke, Mrs. Joseph Mass. 

Clarke, Mrs. Samuel F. Mass. 

Clifford, Mrs. Walter B. Mass. 

Cline, Mrs. Hyman E. Mass. 
Clowes, Dr. and Mrs. George H. A. Mass. 

Coates, Miss Anna M. Pa. 

Cobb, Mrs. Robert C. Mass. 

Coburn, Miss Louise Mass. 

Codman, Mr. and Mrs. Eliot Conn. 

Coe, Mrs. Jefferson W. Mass. 

Coggshall, Mrs. Harrison H. Mass. 

Cohan, Mrs. B. H. Mass. 

Cole, Mrs. Henry Mass. 

Cole, Miss Ruby H. Mass. 

Cole, Mrs. William Mass. 

Collins, Mr. Charles A. Mass. 

Conant, Mrs. Albert F. Mass. 

Conant, Miss Ella B. Mass. 

Conant, Mrs. James B. Mass. 

Conant, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Mass, 

Conklin, Mrs. Annette P. Que. 

Conroy, Mr. James J. Mass. 

Cook, Mrs. C. J. Mass. 

Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Mass. 

Coolidge, Miss Elsie W. Mass. 

Coolidge, Mr. Joseph Arthur Mass. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Julian L. Mass. 

Cooper, Mrs. Harry D. Mass. 

Corey, Mrs. Eben F. Mass. 

Cornish, Mr. John J. Mass. 

Cotter, Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Mass. 

Cotton, Mrs. Dana M. Mass. 

Coty, Mrs. Woods Mass. 

Courtney, Miss Mary L. N. H. 

Cousens, Mrs. John A. Mass. 

Covenant Brotherhood of the 

Swedish Congregational Church Mass. 

Cowles, Mrs. Eugene Mass. 

Cowles, Mrs. William Lyman Mass. 

Cox, Mrs. Luther C. Calif. 

Crehan, Mr. John J. Mass. 

Crehore, Miss Lucy Clarendon Mass. 



74 



Crehore, Mrs. Morton S. Mass. 

Crimmins, Mr. Thomas A. Fla. 

Cristy, Mrs. Horace Mass. 

Critchley. Miss Rosamund M. Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. C. Thomas Mass. 

Crocker. Mrs. Charles T. Mass. 

Crocker, Rev. and Mrs. John Mass. 

Crosby, Mrs. Stephen vanR. Mass. 

Grossman, Miss Evelyn Mass. 

Crump, Miss Grace L. N. Y. 

Cummings, Miss Jennie Mass. 

Cummins, Miss Isabel Mass. 

Cumner, Mr. Prescott T. Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward Mass. 

Cunningham, Miss Mary Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Guy Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Curran, Mrs. Maurice J. Mass. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greely S. Mass. 

Gushing, Miss Dorothy P. Mass. 

Gushman, Mrs. H. E. Mass. 
Cushman, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Mass. 

Cutler, Miss Abigail Ann Mass. 

Cutler, Mr. G. Ripley Mass. 

Cutler, Mr. Nathaniel R. Mass. 

Cutter, Mrs. Victor M. Mass. 

Dalrymple, Dr. Leolia A. Mass. 

Daly, Miss Helen G. N. Y. 

Dana Hall Service League Mass. 

Dane, Mrs. John, Jr. Mass. 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E. Mass. 

Darling, Mr. and Mrs. Mayo A. Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. A. W. N. Y. 

Davis, Mrs. Edward Kirk Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. Franklin B. Mass. 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. Walter N. Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. William L. Mass. 

Davison, Mrs. A. M. Mich. 

Dawson, Mr. J. Douglas Mass. 

Day, Miss Alice F. Mass. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A. Mass. 

Day, Mrs. W. Taylor Mass. 

Dearborn, Mrs. L. B. Mass. 

Dearing, Mrs. John Lincoln Mass. 

De Bard, Mrs. Davis M. Mass. 

De Koning, Mr. L. Wash. 

De Luca, Mrs. O. N. Y. 

Demarest, Mrs. David Mass. 

de Mille, Mrs. John C. Mass. 

Denny, Miss Emily G. Mass. 
De Normandie, Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. 



Dexter, Miss Mary Deane Mass. 

d'Humy, Mr. F. E. N. Y. 

Dickey, Miss Evelyn Mass. 

Dickinson, Miss Grace I. Mass. 

Dickson, Miss Flora M. N. Y. 

Diechmann, Miss Bertha N. Y. 

Dieffenbach, Mrs. A. C. Mass. 

Diemont, Mr. Hyman Mass. 

Dierksen, Mrs. H. H. N. J. 

Dimick, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Dlott, Mr. Samuel N. H. 

Doane, Miss Jessie N. J. 

Dodd, Mr. and Mrs. Loring H. Mass. 

Doherty, Miss Mary C. Mass. 

Dohrmann, Miss Dorothy A. N. Y. 

Donald, Mrs. Malcolm Mass. 

Donnelly, Mrs. Edward C. Mass. 

Dooley, Mr. Arthur T. Mass. 

Douglass, Miss Josephine Mass. 

Douglass, Mrs. Mabelle F. A. N. H. 

Dourian, Miss Lillian N. Y. 

Dow, Mrs. Dana F. Mass. 

Dow, Mrs. Fred H. Mass. 

Dowling, Mr. A. S. N. Y. 

Dowling, Miss Mary W. N. Y. 



Downer, Miss Lisa deForest Fla. 

Downes, Mr. J. Edward Mass. 

Downing, Miss Helen M. N. Y. 

Dowse, Miss Margaret Mass. 

Drew, Mrs. Pitt F. Mass. 

Drefus, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Mass. 

Drey, Dr. Paul L. N. Y. 

Drinkwater, Mr. Arthur Mass. 

Driver, Mrs. William R. Mass. 

Duest, Mrs. Mark Mass. 
Duff, Mr. and Mrs. J. Robertson Mass. 
Dumaine, Mrs. Frederick C, Jr. Mass. 

Duncan, Miss May C. Mass. 

Duncklee, Mrs. Geo. W. Mass. 

Dunn, Mrs. Edward J. Mass. 

Dunphy, Mrs. Gerald J., N. Y. 
Durand, Dr. and Mrs. Albert C. Maine 

Durfee, Miss Elizabeth R. N. Y. 

Durfee, Mrs. Nathan Mass. 

Durr, Mrs. H. Adele N. Y. 

Dwight, Dr. Richard W. Mass. 

Eastham, Mr. and Mrs. Melville Mass. 
East Lynn Unit, 

American Legion Aux. Mass. 

Eastman, Mr. George H. Mass. 

Eaton, Mrs. Charles F., Jr. Mass. 

Eaton, Mrs. Lewis Frederic Mass. 
Eckfeldt, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Mass. 

Eddy, Mrs. Brewer Mass. 

Edgehill, Mrs. L. U. Mass. 

Edmands, Mr. Duncan Mass. 

Edmonds, Mrs. Henry N. N. Y. 

Edwards, Mr. Dwight Calif. 
Edwards, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Mass. 

Eggers, Mr. William A. Ohio 

Ehrmann, Mr. Herbert B. Mass. 

Eiseman, Mrs. Philip Mass. 
Eisenbrey, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kenton Pa. 

Eisner, Mrs. Jerome N. Y. 

Elder, Miss Vera N. Y. 

Eliot, Miss Marian C. Mass. 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel Mass. 

Elisseef, Mr. Serge Mass. 

Ellis, Mr. Benjamin P. Mass. 

Ellison, Mrs. Eben H. Mass. 

Elsmith, Mrs. Dorothy Mass. 

Ely, Mrs. Grosvenor, Jr. Calif. 

Emerson, Miss Grace R. I. 

Emerson, Miss Mabel E. Mass. 

Emerson, Mrs. William Mass. 

Emmons, Mrs. Alfred P. Mass. 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Sr. Mass. 

Endicott, Mrs. Henry N. J. 

Endicott, Mrs. Mitchell Mass. 

Engel, Miss Sylvia Mass. 

Englis, Mrs. John N. Y. 
Equitable Life Assurance Society N. Y. 

Estabrook, Mrs. R. F. Mass. 

Eustis, Mr. Stanton R. Mass. 

Everett, Miss Emilie Hughes Mass. 

Everett, Miss Florence A. Mo. 

Fabens, Miss Caroline H. Mass. 

Fabyan, Dr. and Mrs. MarshaU Mass. 

Faeth, Mrs. Charles E. Mass. 

Fahnestock, Mrs. Harris Mass. 

Fairbank, Mrs. Murry N. Mass. 

Fairfax, Mrs. Madge C. Mass. 

Falkson, Mr. Harry Mass. 

Farley, Mrs. Mortimer T. Mass. 

Farrington, Mrs. L. E. Mass. 

Faulkner, Mrs. James M. Mass. 

Faull. Mr. J. H. Mass. 
Faxon, Dr. and Mrs. Nathaniel W. Mass. 

Fay, Mr. Arthur Dudley Mass. 

Fay, Miss Margaret Lincoln Mass. 

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Felt, Mrs. B. F. Mass. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C. Mass. 

Fen wick. Miss Bertha N. J. 
Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Mass. 

Ferrin, Mrs. F. M. Mass. 

Ferry, Dr. and Mrs. Ronald M. Mass. 

Finberg, Mrs. Chester F. Mass. 

Findlay, Mr. Francis Mass. 

Finfrock, Miss Anna L. Ind. 

Finley, Mrs. John, Jr. Mass. 

Fish, Miss Margaret A. Mass. 

Fisher. Miss Edith S. Mass. 

Fisk, Mrs. Brenton K. Mass. 

Fisk. Mrs. Otis H. Mass. 

Fiske, Mrs. Grace Mass. 

Fiske, Mr. and Mrs. Redington Mass. 

Fitts, Mr. George H. Mass. 

Flagg, Mrs. Elisha Mass. 

Flagg, Mrs. Francis J. Mass. 

Flint, Mrs. Paul H. Mass. 

Flint, Mrs. Perley G. Mass. 

Floyd, Mrs. Cleaveland Mass. 

Floyd, Miss Lottie M. N. Y. 

Foley, Mrs. M. J. Mass. 

Folsom, Mr. Grenville W. Mass. 

Folsom, Mrs. Robert M. Mass. 

Foote, Mr. and Mrs. John E. F. Mass. 

Forbes, Mr. Edward W. Mass. 

Forbffi, Mrs. Ralph E. Mass. 

Forbes, Mrs. Wm. S. Mass. 

Foreman, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. N. Y. 

Foster, Mr. Benjamin B. Mo. 

Foster, Miss Hilda S. Mass. 

Fowler, Mr. Louis F. Mass. 

Fox, Mr. Charles J. Mass. 

Fox, Miss Edith M. Mass. 

Fox, Mrs. Felix Mass. 

Fox, Mrs. Heywood Mass. 

Francke, Mrs. H. Gilbert Mass. 

Fratus, Mrs. Phyllis Mass. 

Freeman, Mr. Myron S. Mass. 

French, Miss Ruth H. Mass. 

French, Mrs. Stanley G. Mass. 

Freund, Mr. Sanford H. E. N. .Y, 

Friedman, The Misses Mass. 

Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan H. Mass. 

Friend, Miss Eunice A. Mass. 

Frost, Mr. Donald McKay Mass. 

Frothingham, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Mass. 

Frothingham, Miss Eugenia B. Mass. 

Frye, Miss Cornelia Calif. 

Fuller, Mrs. Genevieve M. Mass. 

Fuller, Mr. Lorin L. Mass. 

Fuller, Mrs. Robert G. Mass. 

Fulton, Mr. A. Oram, Jr. Mass. 

Gale, Mrs. John Elbridge Mass. 

Gallagher, Mrs. William W. Mass. 

Gammons, Mrs. C. W. Mass. 

Gammons, Mrs. R. F. Mass. 

Gardner, Mr. Colin Ohio 

Gardner, Mrs. Louis Mass. 

Garside, Miss LUlian R. Mass. 

Gates, Dr. Olive Mass. 

Gerould. Miss Theodora A. N. H. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Perley G. Mass. 

Getchell, Mrs. Arthur V. Mass. 

Gibson, Mrs. Kirkland H. Mass. 

Gilbert, Miss Clara C. Mass. 

Gilbert, Miss Helen C. Mass. 

Gilbert, Mr. William E. Mass. 

Gile, Mr. Albion L. ^^.^• 

Oilman, Miss Gertrude Calif. 

Oilman, Mr. John R. Mass. 

Gladwin, Mrs. Harold S. Calif. 

Glazier, Mr. L. Gordon Mass. 

Gleason, Mrs. Hollis T. Mass. 

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Glidden, Mr. and Mrs. William T. Mass. 

Glueck, Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon Mass. 

Goddard, Mr. and Mrs. Asa E. Mass. 

Goethals, Mrs. Thcanas R. Mass. 

Goldfine, Mrs. Bernard Mass. 

Golding, Mrs. Frank H. Mass. 

Golding, Mr. and Mrs. Louis T. Mass. 

Goldman, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mass. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel A. Mass. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel E. Mass. 

Goodnow, Mrs. William N. Mass. 

Goodsell, Mrs. Alson H. Mass. 

Goodspeed. Mrs. Carl M. Mass. 

Goodstein, David M., Inc. N. Y. 

Goodwin, Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. Mass. 

Gordan, Mrs. John D. N. Y. 

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Corner, Mr. Otto A. Mass. 

Gorowitz, Rabbi Aaron Mass. 

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Graham, Miss Louise Mass. 

Grannis, Mrs. Arthur E. Mass. 
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Graton, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Mass. 

Graves, Mrs. Henry S. Conn. 

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Gray, Mr. Roland Mass. 
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Green, Mr. H. P. Mo. 

Greenbaum, Mr. Joe Mass. 

Greenough, Mrs. Charles W. Mass. 

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Gregory, Miss Agnes Mass. 

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Gryzmish, Mrs. M. C. Ma^. 

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Guild, Mrs. Edward M. Mass. 

Guild, Mr. Lawrence W. Mass. 

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Gulick, Prof. Charles B. N. Y. 

Gunby, Mrs. Frank M. Mass. 

Gunderson, Dr. Trygve ^l;?^* 

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Haertlein, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Mass. 
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Hale, Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 
Hale, Mr. Henry Mass. 
Hall, Miss Anna Mass. 
Hall, Mr. B. T. ,,va. 
HaD, Mrs. George P. Mass. 
Hall, Mrs. Herbert\J. Mms. 
Hall, Mr. John H. Pa- 
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Hall, Miss Margaret Mass. 
Hall, Miss Minna B. Mass. 
Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Mass. 
Hall, Mr. Samuel Prescott D- C. 
Haller, Mr. Julius F. Mass. 
Hallowell, Miss Emily Mass. 
Hallowell, Mr. John W. ,Ohio 
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Halperin, A. E. Co.. Inc. Mass. 
Hamann, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund H. Conn. 

Hamilton, Mrs. Burton E. Mass. 

Hamilton, Mrs. Edward P. Mass. 

Hamlen. Mrs. R. Gushing Mass. 

Hammond. Miss Elizabeth M. Mass. 

Hanks, Mr. G. B. N. J. 

Hannauer, Mrs. George Mass. 

Hansen, Mrs. Alvin H. Mass. 

Hardesty, Miss Letitia P. D- C. 

Harden, Mrs. J. Bradford Mass. 

Harman, Mr. O. S. Ohio 

Harold, Mr. Raymond P. Mass. 

Harrington Mr. George L. Ma^. 

Harris, Mrs. Edward N. Y. 

Harrison, Mr. Elmer J. Mass. 

Hart, Mrs. Ivan Mass. 

Harty, Miss Irene H. Mass. 

Harvard Engraving Co. Mass. 

Harvey, Mr. John L. Mass. 

Harwood, Mrs. Herbert E. Mass. 

Harwood, Mrs. John H. Mass. 

Hascall, Mrs. Henrietta Mass. 

Haseltine, Miss Caroline M. Mass. 

Hastings, Mrs. Merrill G. Mass. 

Hatch, Mrs. Arthur W. Mass. 

Hatch, Mrs. Frederick S. Mass. 

Hatch, Mr. Pascal E. Ill- 

Hathaway, Mrs. Edgar F. Mass. 

Hatheway, Mrs. Conrad P. Mass. 

Hauptmann, Mrs. Selma Mass. 

Hawes, Mrs. Caroline G. Mass. 

Hawes, Miss Mary C. Mass. 

Hawkins, Mr. Charles S. Mass. 

Hawkridge. Mr. Clayton F. Mass. 

Hayden, Miss Ruth D. Mass. 

Hayes, Miss Margaret E. Mass. 

Haynes, Miss Emily M. Mass. 

Haynes-Smith, Mrs. William Mass. 

Hayward, Miss Emily H. Mass. 

Hazard, Mr. and Mrs. Willis H. Mass. 

Hazelton, Miss Helen F. N. H. 

Healey, Miss Jennie M. N. Y. 

Heard, Mr. John Mass. 

Heater, Mr. George L. Ohio 

Hedges, Mrs. Ira M. Mass. 
Heintzelman, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Mass. 

Helburn, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Mass. 

Heller, Mrs. Myron Mass. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus Mass. 

Hemenway, Mrs. Harriet Mass. 

Hemphill, Mrs. Harry H. Pa. 

Henderson, Mrs. R. G. Mass. 

Hendricks, Miss Helen R. N. Y. 

Herman, Mrs. WiUiam Mass. 

Hersee, Mr. David E. Mass. 

Hersee, Mrs. Frederick C. Mass. 

Hersey, Miss Ada H. Mass. 

Herter, Hon. Christian A. D. C. 

Higgins, Mrs. Aldus C. Mass. 

Higginson, Mr. Francis L. Mass. 

Higginson, Miss Susan Mass. 

Hiajhland Contracting Company Mass. 

Hill, Dr. Alfred S. Mass. 

Hill, Miss Virginia Maine 

Hiller, Misses Edna and Emily Calif. 

Hillier, Mr. John A. Mass. 

Hilts, Miss Harriet Conn. 

Hinds, Mrs. E. Sturgis Mass. 

Hinkle, Mr. and Mrs. James G. Mass. 

Hinman, Mr. George W. Mass. 

Hinton, Mrs. Edgar N. Y. 

Hirtzel, Mr. George L. N. J. 

Hodge, Miss Mary Russell Mass. 
Hodgkins, Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel G. Mass. 

Hoeber, Mr. Eugene H. N. Y. 

Holbrook, Mr. Pinckney Mass. 

Holm, Mrs. E. N. Y. 

Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Mass. 



Holmes, Miss Laura P. 
Holt, Miss Fanny Elizabeth 
Holyoke, Mrs. Charles 
Holzer Family 
Hooper, Mrs. James R. 
Hopewell, Mrs. Charles F. 
Hopewell, Mrs. Frederick C. 
Hopkins, Mr. A. Lawrence 
Hopkins, Mrs. Ernest M. 
Hopkins, Dr. and Mrs. John R. 
Hopkins, Mr. Leon L. 
Hopkinson, Mr. Charles 
Horton, Miss Barbara 
Hosmer, Miss Jennie C. 
Houghton, Mrs. Clement S. 
Houghton, Mrs. Frank A. 
Houghton, Mrs. Frederick O. 
Houghton, Dr. and Mrs. John D. 
Houghton, Miss Mabel E. 
Houghton, Mrs. William M. 
Houser, Mr. George C. 
Howard, Mr. Alan F. 
Howard, Mrs. William G. 
Howard, Mrs. William H. 
Howe, Mr. Frederic W., Jr. 
Howe, Mr. Henry S. 
Howe, Mr. James C. 
Howell, Mrs. Mary 
Hower, Mrs. Ralph M. 
Howland, Mrs. Frank C. 
Howland, Mrs. William D. 
Hoyt, Mrs. Franklin K. 
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Hubbard, Mrs. Henry V. 
Hubbard, Mr. Paul M. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Russell S. 
Huckins, Mrs. Stuart 
Hudnut, Mr. A. C. 
Hufnagel, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Hughes, Mrs. H. Maurice 
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Humphreys, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
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Hunnewell, Miss Frances W. 
Hunnewell, Miss Jane B. 
Hunnewell, Miss Louisa 
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Hurd, Mrs. George Newell 
Hurlbut, Mrs. B. S. 
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Hutchinson, Miss Alice 
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Hutchinson, Mrs. James A. 
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Hyde, Miss Louvan W. 
Hyland, Mr. George C. 
Hyman, Mr. Abe 

lasigi, Miss Mary V. 
Ingalls, Mr. Frederic C. 
Inman, Miss Marjorie 
Isaacs, Mrs. Nathan 
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Jack, Mrs. Edwin E. 
Jackson, Mrs. Alton B. 
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Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Pliney, Jr. 
Johanson, Mrs. Herman 
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Johnson, Mr. Edwin C. 
Johnson, Miss Emily 



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Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Harold H. 
Johnson, Miss Helen S. 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. John H. 
Johnson, Mrs. John H. 
Johnson, Mrs. Otis S. 
Johnson, Mrs. Peer P. 
Jones, Mr. Chandler W. 
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Cheney C. 
Jones, Mrs. Daniel Fiske 
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Durham 
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Ehner B. 
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. James N. 
Jones, Mr. Lawrence L. 
Jones, Miss Marjorie 
Jones, Mrs. Paul 
Jones. Mr. William E. 
Joseph, Mr. Milton E. 
Joslin, Miss Mary R- 
Junior League of the Women s 
Italian Club 

Kaplan, Mrs. Celia 
Kaufman, Mr. Nathan 
Kavanagh, Mr. E. S. 
Kaye, Mrs. A. I. 
Kazan jian. Dr. and Mrs. V. a. 
Keating, Miss Jessica A. 
Keith, Mrs. Edward A. 
Keith, Mrs. George E. 
Keiley, Mr. and Mrs. Stillman H., 
Kellogg, Mrs. Caroline J. 
Keliogg, Miss Julia R. 
Keltie, Mr. Ralph J. 
Kendall Boiler and Tank Co. 
Kendall, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. 
Kenderdine, Mrs. Henry J. 
Kennedy, Mrs. F. L. 
Kerr-Blackmer, Mrs. H. 
Ketterle, Miss Elizabeth M. 
Keville, Mr. and Mrs. WiUiana J 
Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred V. 
Kidder, Mrs. H. S. 
Kidder, Mrs. Henry P. 
Kienbusch, Mr. C. C. 
Kimball, Mrs. Frank W. 
KimbaU, Miss Winifred, R. 
Kimbell, Mr. Arthur W. 
Kincaid, Mr. and Mrs. Percy B. 
King. Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. 
King, Mr. and Mrs. William R. 
Kingsley. Mrs. Robert C. 
Kitching, Miss Belle M. 
Kittredge, Mrs. George L. 
Kittredge, Mrs. Wheaton 
Klopot, Mr. Abraham 
Klotz, Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. 
Knauth, Mrs. Felix W. 
Knight. Mrs. Frederick H. 
Knight, Rev. Walter D. 
Knowlton, Mrs. Harold W. 
Knowlton, Miss Mary B. 
Koch, Mrs. Albert C. 
Koon, Mrs. Ray M. 
Kopelman, Mr. Bernard 
Kopehnan, Mr. George 
Kress, Samuel H., Foundation 
Kroto, Mr. Hans J. 
Kuell, Mrs. David H. F.. Jr. 
Kummer, Miss Lucy 



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Lamson, Miss Winnetta 

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Landay, Mr. Martin M. 

Landy, Mrs. Harold A. 



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Leavitt, Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. 

Leeson, Mrs. Robert A. 

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Lenk, Mrs. Walter E. 

Lennox, Mr. Robert W. 

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Leonard, Mrs. Russell H. 

Leslie, Mrs. J. Saybolt 

Leviseur, Mr. Frederick J. 

Levison, Mr. Benjamin 

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Lewis. Mrs. George 

Lienau. Mr. George L. 

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Lincoln, Mr. George L. 

Linden, Mr. Milton 

Lindsey, Miss Anna B. 

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Litchfield, Mr. Everett S. 

Litchfield, Mr. Joshua Q. 

Little, Mr. and Mrs. David B. 

Livermore. Mrs. Homer F. 

Livingstone. Mrs. Charles S. 

Locke. Mr. E. H. 

Lockerbie, Mrs. John 

Lockwood, Mr. and Mrs. Dunbar 

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Loeb, Mrs. W. 

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Lovejoy. Miss Helen D. 

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Lunt. Mrs. Daniel B. 

Lurie. Mrs. R. L. 

Lux. Miss Alta M. 
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Lyman, Mrs. Harrison F. Mass. 

Lyman, Mr. Henry Mass. 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T. Mass. 

Lyman, Mr. Theodore Mass. 

Lynn Association for the Blind Mass. 

Lyon, Mrs. George A. Mass. 

McCIintock, Mrs. Maud P. Mass. 

McCosh, Mrs. Winifred M. Del. 

McCreary, Mrs. Lewis S. Mass. 

McElwain, Mr. J. G. Mass. 

McGarry, Rt. Rev. John J. Mass. 

McGoodwin, Mrs. Henry Mass. 

McHugh, Mr. Edward J. Mass. 

McHugh, Mr. Thomas J, Mass. 

McHutchison, Mrs. J. M. Mass. 

Mclntyre, Mrs. F. W. Mass. 

McKibbin, Miss Emily W. Mass. 

McLeod. Mrs. Archibald Mich. 

McNair, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm P. Mass. 

McPheeters, Mrs. Thomas S. Mo. 

MacDermott, Mr. Charles T. Mass. 

Mack, Miss Rebecca Ohio 

MacKenzie, Miss Cora E. Mass. 

Mackin, Mrs. Harry I. Mass. 

Mackinney, Mrs. P. R. N. J. 

Macomber, Mrs. Harry J. Calif. 

MacPherson, Mr. Warren Mass. 

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Madden, Mr. M. Lester 

Maddocks, Mr. John A. 

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Magoon, Mr. Kenneth S. 

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Mannes, Mr. David 

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LTnion Veterans of Civil War 
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Maury, Mrs. H. L. 
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Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce R. I. 

Merritt, Miss Mildred A. Pa. 

Meserve, Mrs. Harry C. Mass. 

Masker, Mrs. Frank Mo. 



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Messenger, Mrs. George A. 

Metcalf, Mrs. Robert B. 

Meyer, Mrs. Robert 

Michelgon, Mr. David L. 

Michie, Mrs. H. Stuart 

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Midgley, Mr. Malcolm C. 

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Moseley, Mrs. Nicholas 

Mosher, Mrs. Harris P. 

Motherwell, Mr. J. W. 

Motley, Mr. Warren 

Mott, Hrs. Percival 

Moulton, Mrs. Francis S. 

Mountz, Mrs. James T. 

Mudge, Hrs. Arthur W. 

Muller, Dr. GuUi Lindh 

Munro, Mrs. John C. 

Munroe, Mrs. W. M. 

Murdock, Hrs. John 

Murray, Miss Frances C. 

Mvers, Hrs. Charles H. 

Myles, Mrs. Ethel C. 

Nash, Miss Carolyn R. 

Nash, Mrs. Curtis W. 

N'athan, Mr. Joseph B. 

Neagle, Mr. William H. 

Neiley, Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey C. 

Neill, Miss Ruth 

Neilson, Mrs. John P. E. 

Nelson, Dr. and Mrs. N. A. 

Nelson, Mr. and Hrs. William H. 

Newell, Mrs. John 

Newell, Hrs. John Louis 

Newell, Hrs. Lyman C. i 

Newell, Hrs. Wendell B. 

New England Baptist Hospitq 



Alumnae Association 
Newman, Hiss Hinette D. 
Newman, Hrs. Samuel J. 
Neyhart, Hr. Adnah 
Nichols, Hrs. Arthur A. 



( 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
N. C. 
N. Y. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Calif. 
Pa. 
Mass. 



Mass. 



D. C. 

Hass. 



Hass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
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Mass. 
Hass. 



Mass. 

Pa. 

Ohio 



Mass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Conn. 



Mass. 



Hass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Mass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Hass. 
Mass. 
Calif. 

D. C. 

Hass. 
Hass. 
Mass. 
Hass. 
Mass. 
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Md. 
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Mass. 

Mass. 
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Hass. 
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79 



Nichols, Mrs. Austin P. 
Nichols, Mrs. Charles 
Nichols, Mrs. HoUis P. 
Niekerson, Mrs. Annie L. 
Niebuhr, Mr. Arthur 
Nield, Miss R. Louise 
Niles, Miss Marion H. 
Nock, Prof. Arthur D. 
Norcross, Mrs. William W. 
Norfolk Junior Woman's Club 
Northrup, Miss May 
Norton, Mrs. D. C. 
Norton, Miss Elizabeth Gaskell 
Norwich, Mr. and Mi:s. Samuel 
Nowell, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Noyes, Miss Annie Anthony 
Noyes, Mrs. Harry K. 
Nutter, Mr. William S. 

Oberist, Mr. Henry C. 
Odaniel, Mrs. J. Allan 
Ogden, Mrs. Hugh W. 
O'Keeffe, Mr. Adrian F. 
O'Keeffe, Mr. Lionel H. 
Oldenberg, Mr. Otto 
Oliver, Miss Susan L. 
Olmsted, Mrs. John C. 
Orcutt, Mrs. William Dana 
Orlandini, Mrs. Vittorio 
Orr, Mi-s. Horace W. 
Osborne, Mr. Charles D. 
Osgood, Mrs. Edward H. 
Otis, Mi-s. Herbert F. 
Ott, Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. 

Packard, Dr. Fabyan 

Packard, Mrs. George A. 

Paddison, Mrs. Louis F. 

Paddock, Mrs. Brace W. 

Paige, Miss Mildred E. 

Paine, Miss Alice 

Paine, Mrs. Robert G. 

Paine, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Treat 

Paine, Mrs. Stephen 

Faine, Mrs. William D. 

Palme, Miss Jeane W. 

Palmer, Mrs. Constance 

Palmer, Mrs. William I. 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. George S. 

Parker, Mrs. Robert B. 

Parmelee, Mrs. Harry B. 

Parmelee, Miss Mary J. 

Parsons, Mrs. Ernst M. 

Patten, Mr. William N. 

Patton, Mrs. James E. 

Paul, Mrs. Oglesby, Sr. 

Paull, Miss Mary 

Pavenstedt, Dr. Eleanor 

Payne, Mrs. Oliver H. 

Payson, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. 

Peabody, Miss Amelia 

Peabody, Miss Elizabeth R. 

Peabody, Mr. Harold 

Pearse, Miss Alice W. 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 

Peirce, Miss Charlotte 

Peirce, Mr. J. Gilbert 

Pelletier, Mr. Augustin S. 

Penfield, Miss Annie S. 

Pereira, Mrs. Felix 

Perkins, Mr. Edward N. _ 

Perkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott 

Perrin, Mrs. Badger 

Perry, Mrs. Carroll 

Perry, Mr. Frank J. A. 

Persing, Mrs. L. M. 

Peters, Mrs. William Y. 

Peterson, Miss Helga E. 

Petitmermet, Mr. Jules P. 



Mass. Pettingell, Mrs. J. M. 

Mass. Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. 

Mass. Pforzheimer, Mr. Carl H. 

Mass. Phillips, Mr. Asa E., Jr. 

Mass. Phillips, Miss Fanny H. 

Mass. Phillips, Mrs. Marie C. 

Mass. Phillips, Mrs. Philip 

Mass. Pickman, Mr. Dudley L., Jr. 

Mass. Piei-ce, Mrs. Andrew D. 

Mass. Pierce, Mrs. Andrew G. 

Mass. Pierce, Mrs. C. Eaton 

N. H. Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln W. 

Mass. Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. Roger 

Mass. Fieri, Mr. Albert 

Mass. Pigeon, Mr. Richard 

Mass. Pike, Mrs. Roy 

Mass. Piper, Mrs. Charles B. 

Maine Piper, Mrs. Richard F. 

Pitman, Mrs. Harold 

Mass. Place, Miss Winfred A. 

Mass. Platner, Mrs. J. Winthrop 

Mass. Pleadwell, Miss Amy 

Mass. Plimpton, Mrs. George F. 

Mass. Plimpton, Mrs. Harold 

Mass. Pomeroy, Mrs. Katherine H. 

Mass. Pond, Mr. Bremer W. 

Mass. Poor, Mrs. Alice F. 

Mass. Poorvu, Mr. Samuel W. 

Mass. Pope, Mrs. Arthur K. 

Mass. Pope, Mrs. Frank J. 

N. Y. Popsicle Youth Award 

Mass. Porter, Mr. Alex 

Mass. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. 

Mass. Post, Mrs. Allison W. 

Post, Mr. and Mrs. John R. 

Mass. Postley, Mr. W. D. 

Mass. Potter, Miss Louise M. 

Mass. Powell, Miss Anna L. 

Mass. Powell, Mrs. Thomas R. 

Mass. Powers, Dr. Lillian Delger 

Mass. Pratt, Mr. Edwin 

Mass. Pratt, Mrs. L. Mortimer, Jr. 

Mass. Prescott, Miss Clara F. 

Mass. Prescott, Mr. Samuel C. 

Mass. Preston, Mr. Elwyn G. 

N. Y. Preston, Rev. R. G. 

Mass. Prince, Mrs. Arthur D. 

Mass. Proctor, Mrs. Charles A. 

Mass. Proctor, Miss Cora R. 

Mass. Prout, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 

Mass. Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 

N. Y. Pruett, Mrs. Harry J. 

Mass. Punderson, Miss Mary L. 

Mass. Purdy, Mr. and Mrs. Orville 

Mass. Purves, Mrs. John C. 

Mass. Putnam, Dr. Marian C. 

Wis. 

Mass. Quick, Mrs. C. Herbert 

N. Y. Quincy Women's Club Juniors 
Mass. 

Mass. Radnitz, Mrs. F. S. 

Mass. Ramsey, Mr. John E. 

Mass. Ramsey, Mrs. John P. 

Mass. Rand, Mrs. Edward K. 

Mass. Rasely, Mr. H. N. 

Mass. Rath, Mrs. Anna C. 

Mass. Ratshesky, Mrs. Teresa S. 

Mass. Redfield, Mrs. Alfred C. 

Mass. Reece, Mrs. Franklin A. 

Mass. Rees, Mrs. H. Maynard 

N. Y. Reeves, Mr. James F. 

Mass. Regan, Dr. and Mrs. James J. 

Conn. Rehder, Mr. Alfred 

Mass. Revere, Miss Anna P. 

Mass. Rhodes, Mrs. D. P. 

Ohio Rice, Mrs. Albert W. 

Mass. Rice, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E, 

Mass. Rice, Mr. and Mrs. George T. 

Mass. Rice, Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam L. 



Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. J. 
Mass. 
Calif. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Conn. 



Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
N. Y. 



N. Y. 

Mass. 
N. Y. 

Conn. 

Mass. 

Mass. 
N. Y. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 



Mass. 
B. Mass. 

M. Mass. 

Calif. 

Mass. 

Nash Mass. 

Mass. 



Mass. 

N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
D. C. 



80 



Rich, Mrs. Chester F. Mass. 

Richards, Mr. . John N. hI 

Richards, Miss Sara Lippincott N. Y. 
Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Charles O., Mass! 

Richardson, Mrs. George W. Mass. 

Richardson, Mrs. John Mass. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr. Mass! 

Richardson, Miss Laura E. Mass. 

Richardson, Miss Ruth K, Mass. 

Rifkin, Mr. Herman Mass. 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise Mass. 

Rimmer, Mrs. Charles P. Mass. 

Ritchie, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Mass. 

Ritchie, Miss Marion A. Mass. 

Robbins, Mrs. Chandler Mass. 

Robbins, Mrs. Reginald L. Mass. 

Robert, Mrs. Urbain Mass. 

Robinson, Mr. Harold L. Mass. 

Robison, Mrs. Rulon Y. Mass. 

Robson, Miss Alice Mass. 

Rodgers, Miss Elsie G. Pa. 

Roe, Miss Mary T. Ind. 

Rogers, Miss Bertha F. N. H. 

Rogers. Mr. Dudley P. Mass. 

Rogers, Mrs. Ellery W. Mass. 

Rogers, Mrs. Horatio Mass. 

Rogers, Mr. William B. Tenn. 

Rolfe, Mrs. Hayward P. Mass. 

Reed, Mrs. Stanley H. Mass. 

Rose, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Edward Ohio 

Ross, Mrs. F. G. Mass. 

Ross, Mrs. G. A. Johnston T. H. 

Ross, Mr. J. R. N. Y. 

Rotch, Mrs. Charles M. Mass. 

Rotch, Miss Edith E. Mass. 

Rowlett, Mr. Thomas Stewart Mass. 

Rowley, Dr. Francis H. Mass. 

Rowley, Mrs. Leonard W. Mass. 

Roy, Mr. James Charles Mass. 

Rudkin, Mrs. Thomas Mass. 

Rudy, Miss Mary G. Pa. 

Rugg, Miss Gertrude R. Mass. 

Runkle, Mr. John C. Mass. 

Ruperti, Mrs. Justus Fla. 

Russell, Mrs. Otis T. Mass. 

Sabine, Mrs. Stephen W. Mass. 

Sack, Mr. Benjamin N. Y. 

Sacker, Miss Amy M. Mass. 

Salinger, Mr. Edgar Vt. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. R. M. Mass. 

Saltonstall, Mr. Richard Mass. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert N. H. 

Sameth, Miss Elsa Calif. 
Sammet, Mr. and Mrs. G. Victor Mass. 
Samoiloff, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Mass. 

Sampson, Mrs. Robert DeW. Mass. 
Samson, Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Mass. 

Sanborn, Mrs. Ashton Mass. 
Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Mass. 

Sang, Mrs. Sara A. N. Y. 

Sargent, Mr. Henry J. Mass. 

Sarton, Dr. George Mass. 

Saul, Mr. Arthur D. Mass. 

Savery, Mrs. James R. Mass. 

Sawyer, Miss Caroline A. Mass. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Ella Adams Mass. 

Sayles, Mrs. Robert W. Mass. 

Schenck, Mrs. Garret, Jr. Mass. 

Schildmachter, Mrs. O. N. J. 

Schirmer, Mrs. Cyrus T. Mass. 

Sehirmer, Mrs. Frank A. Mass. 

Schmidt, Mrs. Bernard Pa. 

Schneider, Miss Elizabeth Mass. 

Schnell, Mrs. Juliijs N. N. Y. 

Schofield, Mrs. Emma Fall Mass. 

Schrafft, Mrs. Bertha E. Mass. 

Schrafft, Mr. W. E. Mass. 



Schroader, Miss Anna A. Pa. 

Schroeder, Mrs. L. N. Y. 

Schumacher, Miss Lillie L. N. j! 

Schweinfurth, Mr. Charles Mass. 

Scott, Mr. Donald Mass. 

Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. Mass. 

Seal, Miss Mary in<j. 

Seamans, Mrs. Robert C, Jr. Mass, 

Sears, Miss E. Elizabeth Mass. 

Sears, Miss Edith H. Mass. 

Sears, Miss Evelyn Mass. 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Mass. 

Seaver, Mr. Henry Latimer Mass. 

Seavey, Prof. Warren A. Mass. 

Sebastian, Mr. W. Pa. 

Seccomb, Miss Dorothy B. Mass. 

Sedgwick, Mr. Henry D. Mass. 

Seifert, Mr. Joseph I. Mass. 

Seltzer, Mrs. John S. Ohio 

Shain, Dr. Arthur I. Mass. 

Shapiro, Mr. Maxwell Mass 

Shattuck, Mr, Henry L. Mass. 
Shattuck, Mr. and Mrs. Mayo Adams 

Shaw, Mrs. Alice J. Mass! 

Shaw, Miss Florence M. Mass' 

Shaw, Mr. Harold B. Mass! 

Shaw, Mrs. Henry S. Mass. 

Shaw, Mr. Robert H. Mass' 

Shaw, Mrs. Walter K., Jr. Mass. 

Shea, Mr. Brendon Mass. 

Shea, Mrs. Charles A. Mass! 

Shepard, Mrs. Daniel L. Mass! 

Shepard, Miss Emily B. Mass' 

Shepard, Mr. Frank R. Mass' 

Shepard, Mrs. Robert F. R. l! 

Sherman, Miss Rose Mass! 

Shillito, Mr. and Mrs. John Mass' 

Shreve, Mr. Benjamin D. Mass 

Shumway, Mrs. Waldo Mass" 

Shurcliff, Mr. Arthur A. Mass' 

Sibley, Miss Emily Mass! 

Sibley, Mr. Wayne Mass 

Siegel & Goldburt N Y* 

Simonds, Mrs. Gifford K. Mass 

Sims, Mrs. William S. 

Slichter, Prof, and Mrs. Sumner 

Slotnick, Mrs. Julia I. 

Small, Mrs. David M. 

Smelofski, Mrs. John 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles P. 

Smith, Mrs. Clarence R. 

Smith, Mr. Coburn 

Smith, Mr. Donald B. 

Smith, Mrs. Donald W. 

Smith, Mr. Francis D. 

Smith, Dr. and Mrs. George Van 

Smith, Mrs. J. Archy 

Smith, Mr. Louis P. 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Lyman B. 

Smith, Mrs. Orvil W. 

Smith, Mrs. Richard Ilsley 

Smith, Mr. S. L. 

Smith, Mrs. William Austin 

Smith-Petersen, Dr. and Mrs. M, 

SmuUin, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Smyth, Mrs. Herbert Weir 

Sooy, Mrs. Curtis 

Soper, Mrs. Willard B. 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H. 

Soule, Mrs. Leslie 

Spector, Mr. Robert 

Spelman, Mrs. Henry M. 

Spencer, Mrs. Harvey 

Spencer, Mr. Theodore 

Spink, Miss Ruth H. m. 

Spinoza, Mr. Benjamin Mass! 

Spitz, Miss Edna Mass! 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Colo. 
S., Mass. 

Fla. 
Mass. 

Md. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

Pa. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



N, 



81 



Spore, Mr. L. D. Mass 
Squibb, Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Mass 

Stackpole, Mrs. Pierpont L. Mass 

Standley, Miss Carolyn F. Mass. 

Stanwood, Mr. Frederic A. Mass 

Stearly, Mrs. Wilson R. N. J 

Stearns Fund. Inc. Mass 

Stearns, Miss Elizabeth W. Mass 

Stedfast. Mrs. Albert R. Mass 

Steele, Mrs. Albert H. Mass 

Steele, Mrs. F. R. Carnegie Mass 

Steele. Mrs. William M. Del 

Stegmaier. Mr. Henry L. Mass 

Stein, Mrs. Emil N. Y. 

Stenquist. Mrs. Warner Mass 

Stephenson, Mrs. W. R. C. Mass, 

Stern, Mr. Emil N. Y, 

Stevens, Mrs. Brooks, Jr. Mass 

Stevens. Miss Gertrude Mass 

Stevens, Mre. H. N. N. J 

Stevenson, Mrs. William N. Mass 

Steward, Mr. Gilbert L. Mass 

Stewart, Mr. Sidney M. Mass 
Stifel, Miss Clara A. W. Va, 

Stimson, Miss Edith R. Mass 

Stimson, Mrs. Philip M. N. Y. 

Stockemer, Mrs. George A. Mass 

Stockwell, Mrs. William R. N. Y 

Stone, Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Conn 

Stone, Mr. Edward C. Mass 

Stone, Mrs. Edward H. Mass 

Stone, Mrs. Everett P. Mass 

Stone, Mrs. Robert G. Mass 

Stone, Mrs. S. M. Mass 

Stone, Mrs. William Mass, 

Stoneman, David, Estate of Mass 

Storer, Miss Emily L. Mass. 

Storer, Miss Helen L. Mass 

Storer, Mrs. John H. Mass 

Stott. Mrs. Leroy W. Mass 

Straus, Mr. David Ohio 

Strekalovsky. Mrs. Vcevold Mass 

Strong, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Mass 

Stuart, Miss Charlotte V. Mass 
Stuart, Mr. and Mrs. Melville N. Mass 

Stuart, Mrs. Ralph E. Mass 

Stuart, Mrs. W. H., Jr. Mass 

Stuart, Mrs. W. I. Mass 

Studley, Mrs. Robert L. Mass. 

Sturges, Mrs. Rush R. I 

Sturgis, Mrs. Edwin A. Mass 

Sturgis, Miss Lucy C. Mass. 

Sturgis, Mr. S. Warren Mass 
Sturgis, Misses Susan B. and Anita Mass 

Suarez, Mrs. Philip Mass 

Suder, Mrs. George B. Mass 

Sullivan, Miss Helen B. Mass. 

Sullivan, Mrs. P. H. Mass 

Sullivan, R. C, Co. Mass 

Summers, Mrs. Gaston Mass 

Summers, Mr. Merle G. Mass 
Sunday School of the First Parish 

of Concord (Unitarian) Mass 

Sunderland, Mr. Louis Mass 

Sutton, Mrs. Harry E. Mass. 

Swanson, Mrs. Arthur G. Mass 

Swartwout, Mrs. Armstrong Mass 

Swartz, Mr. Edward M. Mass 

Swift, Mrs. Jesse G. Mass 

Swinney, Miss Ruth Ore 

Sylvester. Miss Alice H. Mass, 

Taber. Miss Gertrude S. Mass. 

Taber, Mrs. T. T. N. 

Talano, Mrs. Maria Calif 

Talbot, Miss Mary Eloise Mass. 

Talbot, Mrs. Max Lowell Mass 

Tapley, Mr. Gilbert H. Mass 

Tappan, Mr. Ernest S. Mass 



Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Davis Mass. 

Taylor, Mrs. Edward W. Mass. 

Taylor. Mrs. Frederick B. Mass. 

Taylor. Mrs. Grant S. Mass. 
Tenney. Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Mass. 

Terry, Mrs. Ruth K. Mass. 

Thayer, Mrs. Ernest L. Calif. 

Thayer, Mrs. Frank H. Mass. 

Thayer, Mrs. William G. Mass. 

Thayer, Mr. William H. Fla. 

Thom, Dr. Douglas A. Mass. 

Thomas, Mrs. Alfred Mass. 

Thomas, Mr. John G. W. Mass. 

Thomas, Miss Ruth E. Mass. 

Thompson, Mrs. Charles D. Mass. 

Thompson, Miss Helen M. Mass. 
Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. James H. Calif. 
Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. Richard H., Mass. 

Thompson, Mrs. William L, Mass. 

Thorn, Mr. Roland Mass. 

Thorndike, Miss Rosanna D. Mass. 

Thornton, Mrs. Olive F. Mass. 

Thorp, Miss Alice A. Mass. 

Tibbits, The Misses Mass. 

Tiemey, Mrs. John P. Mass. 
Tilden, Misses Alice F. and Edith S., Mass. 

Tillinghast, Mr. Jos. J. Fla. 

Titus, Dr. and Mrs. Raymond S. Mass. 

Todd, Mr. and Mrs. Eveleth R. Mass. 

Tomb, Mrs. J. M. Mass. 

Torbert, Mrs. James R. Mass. 

Tower, Miss Florence E. Mass. 

Tower, Mr. and Mrs. Oswald Mass. 

Townsend, Mr. W. Howard Mass. 

Tozzer, Mrs. Alfred M. Mass. 

Tracy, Mrs. E. M. Mass. 

Trainer, Mr. H. R. Mass. 

Traylor, Mrs. Mahlon E. Mass. 
Tri Sigma Sorority, Beta Chapter N. J. 
Trinity Congregational Church of 

Lawrence, Sunday School Mass. 
Trumbull, Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Mass. 

Trumpy, Mr. Randall H. N. Y. 

Tucker, Mrs. Henry Guild Mass. 

Tucker, Miss Minne C. N. Y. 

Tucker, Mr. Nathan Mass. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. Sears Mass. 

Tudor, Mrs. Henry D. Mass. 

Tufts, Mrs. Eugene L. Mass. 

Tufts, Mrs. Walter Mass. 

Tuthill, Mrs. C. lU- 

Tuttle, Miss M. Elizabeth N. Y. 

Tyler, Mr. Brenton E. Mass. 

Tyler, Mrs. Samuel Mass. 

Ultsch, Mrs. Emma L. Mass. 

Underwood, Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 
Union Congregational Church, 

East Braintree, Primary Dept. Mass. 

Upham. Miss E. Annie Mass. 

Usen, Mrs. Irving Mass. 

Usher, Mrs. Samuel Mass. 

Vance, Mr. Henry T. Mass. 

Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C. Mass. 

Van Vleck, Mr. John H. Mass. 

Vappi & Co., Inc. Mass. 

Varterisian, Mr. A. Mass. 

Vaughan, Miss Margaret I. N. J. 

Veitch, Mr. Edward A. Mass. 

Ver Planck, Mr. Philip Mass. 

Vickery, Mrs. Herman F. Mass. 

Victorious, Mrs. C. G. N. Y. 

Voehl, Miss Marie C. N- Y. 

Vogel, Mr. and Mrs. August H. Mass. 

Vogeley, Mrs. W. Boebling N. Y. 

Volkman, Mrs. James Howe Mass. 



82 



Wahlberg, Mr. B. L. Mass 

Walcott, Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Mass 

WaUace, Miss Bessie M. N. Y 

Wallace, Miss Eleanor B. N. Y, 

Wallburg, Mrs. Frances K. Mass 

Wallour, Mrs. Charles W. Mass. 

Walpole Women's Club Mass 

Walter, Mr. J. A. Pa, 

Walworth, Mrs. Gardner C. Mass 

Waples, Mr. S. H. Mich 

Ward, Mr. Edgar Mass, 

Ward, Mr. John Mass 

Ward, Miss Mary E. Mass 

Warner, Mrs. Sam B. D. C 

Warren, Mr. Howland S. Mass 

Warren, Mrs. S. L. N. J 

Washburn, Rev. Henry B. Mass, 

Washburn, Mrs. Mary L. 

Washburn, Miss Ruth W. 

Waterman, Mrs. George A. 

Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Laurence J. Mass 

Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Mass 

Webster Women's Club 

Weil, Mrs. Frank L. 

Weil, Mr. Jesse 

Welch, Mr. John B. 

Wellman, Miss Mabel T. 

Wells, Miss Amy W. 

Wells, Mr. and Mrs. George B. 

Wells, Mrs. Wellington, Jr. 

Wendell, Mr. Arthur R. 

Wentworth, Mrs. Henry A. 

WesseU, Mrs. Alice C. 

West, Mrs. Henry S. 

West Newton Women's 

Educational Club 
Weston, Mrs. Robert D. 

Wetherbee, Miss Lila Mass 

Wetherell, Mr. F. A. Mass 

WethereU, Mr. L. H. Mass 

Whealan, Mr. James E. M, 

Wheelan Foundation N. Y, 
Whipple, Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Mass 

White, Mr. Huntington Mass 

White, Mrs. Moses P. Mass 

White, Miss Gertrude R. Mass 

White, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Mass 

Whitehead, Mrs. Alfred M. Mass 
Whiteman, Rev. and Mrs. John B. Mass 

Whitman, Mrs. A. F. Mass 
Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr., Mass, 
Whitney, Mr. and Mrs. C. Handasyde 

Mass 

Whitney, Mrs. Geoffrey G. Mass 

Whitney, Mrs. William T. Mass 

Whittall, Mr. Matthew P. Mass 

Whittem, Mr. A. F. Mass 

Whittemore, Mps. Theodore P. Mass 

WhitweU, Mrs. Frederick S. Mass 

Widder, Mr. David V. Calif, 

Wiese, Mr. Robert G. Mass 

Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Mass 

Wight, Mrs. Edward P. N. H 



Mass 
Fla 



Mass 

N. Y, 

Ky, 

Mass 
Ind, 

N. Y, 
Mass 
Mass 
N. J 
Mass 



Va 

Mass 



Wight, Mrs. Elsie B. Mass. 

Wight, Mrs. Marcus Seymour Mass. 

Wiley, Mrs. W. O. N. Y. 

Wilkes, Mr. F. Howard Mass. 

Wilkins, Miss Georgia M. Ga. 

Willett, Mr. Seymour B. Mass. 

Willi, Mr. George N. Y. 

Williams, Miss Elizabeth A. Mass. 

Williams, Miss Helen R. Mass. 

Williams, Miss Hilda W. Mass. 

WiUiams, Mrs. J. Bertram Mass. 

Williams, Mrs. John H. Mass. 

Williams, Mrs. Oliver E. Mass. 

Williams, Mr. Roy F. Mass. 

Williams, Miss Susan Mass. 

Williamson, Miss Clara R. Mass. 

Williamson, Mr. George M. Mass. 

Willing, Mr. James Mass. 

Williston, Miss Emily Mass. 

Williston, Prof. Samuel Mass. 

Wilson, Miss Antoinette N. Y. 

Wilson, Mrs. Ernest D. Mass. 

Wing, Mrs. Charles S. Mass. 

Winkley, Mrs. WiUiam G. N. H. 

Winn, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Mass. 

Winsor, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Mass. 

Winsor, Mrs. Frank E. Jtlass. 

Winsor, Mrs. Frederick Mass. 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B. Mass. 

Winthrop, Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Mass. 

Wise, Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Mass. 

Wiswall, Mrs. Augustus C. Mass. 

Wolf, Mrs. Louis Ind. 
Woman's Association, 

Central Congregational Church, 

Newton ville Mass. 

Women's Rest Tour Association Mass. 
Women's Union of the First 

Congregational Church, Natick Mass. 

Wood, Mrs. C. F. Ky. 

Wood, Mrs. Edward S. N. J. 

Wood, Mrs. Orrin G. Mass. 

Wright, Mr. E. C. Ohio 

Wright, Mr. George R. Mass. 

Wright, Mrs. Vernon A. Minn. 

Wyman, Mr. Donald Mass. 

Wyner, Mrs. Rudolph H. Mass. 

Yaglou, Mr. and Mrs. Constantin P., Mass. 

Young, Mrs. Thomas R. Mass. 

Young, Dr. Walter H. Mass. 

Zschirpe, Miss Minnie E. Conn. 

In Memory of 

Bicknell, A. F. 
Hawes, Frederick B. 
Low, George Evarts 
Lapham, Mrs. Quimby T. 
Richards, Laura E. 
Wolcott, Caroline 
Zschirpe, August 



83 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly- 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), the same to 

be applied to the general uses and purposes of said corporation 
under the direction of its Board of Trustees ; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being of said corpora- 
tion shall be a suflScient discharge to my executors for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, that certain tract of real estate bounded and described 
as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 



with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trusts. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

JOHN P. CHASE 

75 Federal Street, Boston 10, Mass. 



One Hundred and Nineteenth 
Annual Report 

0/ 

Perkins Institution 

and 

Massachusetts School 
for the Blind 

Incorporated March 2, 1829 




1950 



Offices of Administration and' Schools 
Watertown 72, Mass. 



THE WORKSHOP THE TREASURER 

549 E. Fourth Street 10 Post Office Square 

South Boston 27, Mass. Boston 9, Mass. 



CONTENTS 

Calendar 4 

History 5 

Past Officers 6 

Officers of the Corporation 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Upper School Staff 9 

Lower School Staff . . . 10 

Members of the Corporation 11 

Proceedings of the Corporation 13 

Report of the Trustees 14 

Resolution 1® 

Report of the Director 17 

Report of the Ophthalmologist 47 

Report of the Physician 47 

Report of the Dentists 48 

Workshop for Adults . . . . . . • .50 

Howe Memorial Press 51 

List of Pupils 52 

Acknowledgments 55 

Statement of Accounts 59 

Contributors to the Deaf -Blind Fund . . . . .72 

Form of Bequest 85 



October 



November 



December 



1951 
January 



1950 
September 12. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
25. 

9. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
31. 

6. 

13. 

20. 

21. 

23-26. 

11. 
15. 
17. 
18. 
18. 
19. 
19. 
19. 

2. 

3. 

8. 
15. 
16. 

February 10, 11 
19. 
20. 

12. 
12. 
16. 
20. 
27. 
28. 

9. 
16. 

17. 

14. 
15. 
21. 
30. 

2. 

9. 
11. 
12. 
19. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
18. 



March 



April 



May 



June 



September 



PERKINS CALENDAR 1950-1951 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Staff Meeting 

Pupils return after summer vacation 

School begins 

Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Staff Reception in Director's Residence 

Cottage Hallowe'en Parties 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation 
Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Girls' Upper School) 
Executive Committee Meeting 
Thanksgiving week-end 

Staff Meeting 

Christmas Concert 

Christmas Concert 

Matrons' Meeting (Boys' Upper School) 

Cottage Christmas Parties 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Christmas Concert 

Christmas vacation begins after concert 

Pupils return from vacation 

School begins 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

Executive Committee Meeting 

and 12. — Long week-end 
Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 
Executive Committee Meeting 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Girls' Upper School) 
Pupils leave for vacation after classes 
Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Pupils return from Easter vacation 
School begins 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Boys' Upper School) 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Staff Meeting 

Executive Committee Meeting 
Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 
Memorial Day Holiday 

Alumnae Day 

Alumni Day 

Staff Meeting 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Graduation Day 

Staff Meeting 

Pupils return from summer vacation 

School begins 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 



PERKINS INSTITUTION 

HISTORY 

IN 1826 Dr. John D. Fisher returned to Boston from Paris resolved to provide for 
the blind of Massachusetts the same care afforded them in France. Enlisting 
the aid of friends, a committee was formed and upon petition to the Legislature 
an Act of Incorporation was granted on March 2, 1829, establishing "The New England 
Asylum for the Blind," the first school in America for those without sight. In 1831 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, just returned from participation in the Greek wars, was 
elected the first director, and in August, 1832, the first classes were held in the house 
of Dr. Howe's father on Pleasant Street. 

During the early years Col. Thomas H. Perkins became interested in the little 
school and gave for its use his large house on Pearl Street. The need for larger quarters 
was soon apparent, and in 1839 the great hotel in South Boston was purchased. This 
purchase was made possible by the assent of Colonel Perkins to the sale of the house 
that he had given to the School. Because of this magnanimous attitude of Colonel 
Perkins the Trustees renamed the school "Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
Asylum for the Blind." This name was changed in 1877 to the present name, "Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind." 

Dr. Howe directed the growing work of Perkins Institution for forty years and 
was succeeded in 1876 by his Greek protege and son-in-law, Michael Anagnos. Mr. 
Anagnos created the Howe Memorial Press for publishing embossed books and for 
the manufacture of appliances for education of the blind. In 1887 he founded the 
Kindergarten in Jamaica Plain, the first school in the world for little blind children. 
After thirty years of leadership Mr. Anagnos died in Rumania in 1906. 

In 1907 the directorship of Perkins Institution feU to Edward E. AUen, head of 
the school for the blind in Philadelphia, where he had just rebuilt the school plant 
on a garden site outside of the city. Coming to Boston, Mr. AUen began plans for 
a new Perkins, and in 1912 the Institution and in 1913 the Kindergarten were housed 
in the beautiful new plant at Watertown. These buildings, situated on an old estate 
of thirty-four acres on the banks of the Charles River, have school and residence 
facilities for nearly three hundred pupils. Dr. Allen retired in 1931. His last official 
act was to write the one hundredth annual report. Thus for a century Perkins Institu- 
tion had but three directors. 

PURPOSE 

Perkins Institution provides for the visually handicapped youth of New England 
full educational opportunity from Kindergarten through High School. The content 
of instruction corresponds with that offered to seeing boys and girls in the public 
schools. The methods of instruction of necessity differ. Principal differences are 
that embossed books take the place of ink print, and studies are taught objectively. 
In the adaptation and invention of means of instructing the blind, Perkins has been 
a pioneer through its century of existence. Much attention is paid to physical and 
manual training and to music. Opportunity is provided for those qualified to pursue 
higher studies or take advanced work in music and vocational fields. 

Boys and girls without sight or with insufficient sight to read ink-print are ad- 
mitted as pupils, if capable of education and in good health. While at the school pupils 
reside in cottages where the teachers also live, and through this association they acquire 
that unconscious tuition which is such an important part of the program of socializa- 
tion. The primary aim of Perkins Institution is to qualify its visually handicapped 
pupils to take contributory places in normal life. New pupils are admitted in September 
and February, and all pupils must return to their homes for the short vacations at 
Christmas and Easter and for the long vacation in the summer. 



PAST OFFICERS 



PRESIDENTS 



1830-1837, Jonathan Phillips 
1838-1889, Samuel Appleton 
1840-1846, Peter C. Brooks 
1847-1854, Richard Fletcher 
1855-1861, Edward Brooks 
1861-1869, Samuel May 



1870-1871, Martin Brimmer 
1872-1897, Samuel Eliot 
1898-1930, Francis H. Appleton 
1930-1946, Robert H. Hallowell 
1946- Reginald Fitz, M.D. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



1830-1834, William Calhoun 
1835-1846, Thomas H. Perkins 
1847-1850, Edward Brooks 
1851-1852, John D. Fisher 
1852-1866, Stephen Fairbanks 
1867-1870, Joseph Lyman 
1871-1892, John Cummings 



1893-1896, George Hale 
1897-1911, Amory a. Lawrence 
1912-1913, N. P. Hallowell 
1914-1921, George H. Richards 
1922-1929, WILLLA.M L. Richardson 
1930-1946, G. Peabody Gardner 
1946- Ralph Lowell 



TREASURERS 



1830-1839, Richard Tucker 
1840-1846, Peter R. Dalton 
1847-1861, Thomas B. Wales 
1862-1868, William Claflin 
1869-1872, William Endicott 
1873-1879, Henry Endicott 
1880-1881, Patrick T. Jackson 



1881-1902, Edward Jackson 
1903-1904, Patrick T. Jackson 
1904-1916, William Endicott 
1917-1935, Albert Thorndike 
1935-1945, Roger Amory 
1945-1950, John P. Chase 



1950- 



Ralph B. Williams 



SECRETARIES AND DIRECTORS 



1831-1876, Samuel Gridley Howe 
1876-1906, Michael Anagnos 



1907-1931, Edward E. Allen 
1931- Gabriel Farrell 



I 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

1950-1951 

PRESIDENT 
Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

VICE-PRESIDENT TREASURER 

Ralph Lowell Ralph B. Williams 

I: SECRETARY ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Gabriel Parrell John W. Bryant 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Miss Dorothy L. Book* Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. 

David Cheever, Jr. Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur 

Rev. John J. Connolly* Daniel J. Lyne* 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Warren Motley 

Reginald Fitz, M.D. Paul L. Neal* 

Robert H. Hallowell Richard Saltonstall 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Finance 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President Ralph B. Williams, Treaaurer, 

Ralph B. Willlams, Treasurer ^^ officio 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary, Robert H. Hallowell 

ex officio Ralph Lowell 
Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Richard Saltonstall 

Robert H. Hallowell 
Daniel J. Lyne Warren Motley 

SUB-COMMITTEES 
Appointed by the Executive Committee 
Education Health 

Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

Rev. John J. Connolly David Cheever, Jr. 

Robert H. Hallowell Paul L. Neal 

MONTHLY VISITING COMMITTEE 

Whose duty it ia to visit and inapect the Institution at least onee in each Tnonth. 

January Warren Motley June Robert H. Hallowell 

February Reginald Fitz, M.D. September Mrs. F. J. Leviseur 

March Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. October Rev. John J. Connolly 

April David Cheever, Jr. November Daniel J. Lyne 

May Richard Saltonstall December Mrs. R. E. Danielson 

LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur, Chairman 
Mrs. Frederick J. Alley Mrs. E. Sturgis Hinds 

Mrs. Arthur Brooks Mrs. Frederic B. Kellogg 

Miss Ellen T. Bullard Mrs. George F. Plimpton 

Mrs. Davh) Cheever, Jr. Mrs. George T. Putnam 

Mrs. Russell Codman Miss Elizabeth Rackemann 

Lady Emilib Coote Mrs. Richard Saltonstall 

Mrs. Robert M. Faxon Mrs. Rudolph Weld 

•Appointed by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DIRECTOR 
GABRIEL FARRELL, B.S., B.D., D.D. 



OFFICE 
J. Stephenson Hemphill, B.S., M.B.A., Bursar 



Catherine S. Benson 

Secretary to the Director 

MpvS. Joan B. Smith 

Secretary to the Principal 

Marion A. Woodworth 

Registrar 

Frank H. GREENEf 

Telephone Operator 



Verna L. Anderson 

Secretary to the Bursar 

Phyllis E, Gordon 

Assistant 

Ethel L. Mackenzie 
Bookkeeper 

Alice E. Dougher 

Assistant 



LIBRARY 

Nelson Coon, Librarian 



Florence J. Worth 
Cataloguer 



Mrs. Annetta R, Castle 

Mrs. Charlotte O. Coues, A.B. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Victor G. Balboni, M.D., Attending Physician 

Margaret F. Bishop, R.N., Resident Nurse 

Valerie C. Payne, R.N., Resident Nurse 



Trygve Gundersen, M.D. 

Henry A. Mosher, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists 

Herbert Barry, Jr., M.D. 

Psychiatrist 

Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
Pediatrician 

Henry R. Viets, M.D. 
Neurologist 



Rbinhold Ruelberg, D.M.D. 

Dentist for the Lower School 

Mark D. Elliott, D.D.S. 

Dentist for the Upper School 

Frank R. Ober, M.D. 
Orthopedic Surgeon 

Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 
Otologist 

Francis R. Dieuaide, M.D. 
Syphilologist 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND RESEARCH 
Samuel P. Hayes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Psychologist 



Frances E. Marshall 
Social Worker 

Mrs. Jane S. Davis, B.S. 
Psychometrist 

Shirlie L. Smith, R.P.T.T.f 
Physiotherapist 

•Employed part time. 



Mrs, Sina F. Waterhouse, 

A.B., M.A.t 
M. Albertina Eastman, B.S.f 
Speech Correction 

Patty A. Roche 

Secretary 

tVisually handicapped. 



UPPER SCHOOL STAFF 

Orin a. Stone, B.S., M.A., Acting Principal 

Alice M. Carpenter, A.B., M.A., D.Ped., Dean of Girls 

Benjamin F. Smith, A.B., M.A.f Dean of Boys 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND LITERARY DEPARTMENTS 

Anthony Ackerman, A.B.f Mary Kay Mallers, A.B., M.A.J 

Mollis Cambridge, A.B.f Arm and J. Michaud, A.B., M.A.f 

Carl J. Davis, B.S. Claudia Potter, A.B. 

Gertrude S. HARLOWf Clara L. Pratt 

Vahram Kashmanian, B.S.J Edw. J. Waterhouse, B.A., M.A. 

A. Claude Ellis, B.S. Margaret G. Bigelow, B.S. 

Physical Education Physical Education 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Paul L. Bauguss 
Mrs. Marjorie A. Carr Louise Seymour 

Edward W. Jenkins, F.T.C.L.f Bernard P. Barbeau, B.M., M.M.* 

Mrs. Stella D. Jenkins* L.T.C.L. Harry B. Herforth* 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Winifred G. Ellis, B.A. Mrs. Vesta V. V. Coon, A.B. 

VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

Leo V. GiTTZUS, B.S., M.A. 
Walter P. Carr Frances L. McGaw 

William W. Howat, B.S. Susan M. Brooks 

„ ^ ■ Marion K. Liversidge 

Sidney B. DuRFEEf 

Pianoforte Tuning Mrs. Charlene H. Cumberland 

Home Economics 

MATRONS OF COTTAGES 
Mrs. Sarah M. Keith, Eliot Miss Judith G. Silvester, Fisher 

Mrs. Mary L. Hunt, Bridgman Mrs. Pearl Gosling, Brooks 

Mrs. Belle Sanborn, Moulton Mrs. Edith V. Nickerson, May 

Mrs. Nellie E. H. Hamill, Tompkins Mrs. Lowib H. Bowman, Oliver 

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER TRAINING 

Dr. Gabriel Farrell Dr. Samuel P. Hayes 

Lecturer, Graduate School of Consulting Psychologist, American 

Education, Harvard University Foundation for the Blind 

♦Employed part time tVisuaUy handicapped. {Student Teachers. 



LOWER SCHOOL STAFF 

Shirley A. Druckbr, B.A., M.A., Supervisor 

INTERMEDIATE 

Richard Hull, B.A.fJ Wilma Wichern, B.A. 

Evelyn Kaufman, A.B., M.A.f Florence W. Barbour, A.B. 

Caroline Peters Florentina C. Gonzalez, 

B.A., M.A. 

PRIMARY 

Louise R. Berofels Marjorie A. Lagemann, B.A.J 

Hexena M. DRAKEf Elsie M. Parmbnter 

Harriet M. PniLLiPsf Eunice Wesinbr, B.A.$ 
Betty NYEf 

KINDERGARTEN 

Jean Gray, A.B. Thelma M. Johnsbn, B.A.J 

Felicitas Bbnzigesi, Dip. Ed. Mary B. Banner, B.A. 

Alice Batchelder 

SPECIAL TEACHERS 

Eleanor W. Thayer, A.B., Miisic Margaret Miller,! Librm-ian 
Mrs. Perley C. White, Music Adeline Dale, B.A., Recreation 

Betty Jane Wenzel, Music Margaret A. McKenzie,! Crafts 

MATRONS OF COTTAGES 

Mrs. Sherman Bamford, Potter Mrs. Margaret Luf, Glover 

Miss Grace Barris, Assistant Mrs. Laura B. Eldridge, Assistant 

Mrs. Janet G. Hancock, Anagnos Mrs. Eva K. Plotner, Bradlee 

Mrs. Florence Storbr, Assistant Mrs. Hilda Collins, Assistant 

DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 

Mrs. N. Maurine Gittzus, A.B., M.A. 
Madge Dolph Leo F. QuEENANf 

Beatrice F. Pinkham, B.S. Dorothy H. Reynolds! 

Mrs. Rose M. Vivian, B.S. Marjorie A. MclNTOSHf 

Mary A. McIntosh 

WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 
Donald Remick, Manager Emily V. S. Ramsay, Clerk 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Edward J. Waterhouse, B.A., M.A., Manager 
David Abraham, Engineer Mary L. Tully, Clerk 

•Employed part time tVisually handicapped. JStudent Teachers. 

10 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



AUbright, Clifford, Boston 

Allen, Mrs. Edward E., Cambridge 

Allen, Hon. Frank G., Boston 

Allen, Philip R., Walpole 

Allen, Mrs. Philip R., Walpole 

Alley, Mrs. Frederick J., Boston 

Amory, Roger, Boston 

Anderson, Rev. Edgrar W., Watertown 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Brookline 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, Brookline 

Ballantine, Arthur A., New York 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C. Beverly 

Bartol, Mrs. John W., Boston 

Barton, George Sumner, Worcester 

Bayne, Mrs. William, 3d, New York 

Beach, Rev. David N., New Haven. Conn. 

Beatley, Prof. Ralph, Cambridge 

Belash, Constantine A., Boston 

Bel^h, Mrs. Constantine A., Boston 

Bird, Miss Anna C, East Walpole 

Bird, Mrs. Francis W., East Walpole 

Blake, Fordyce T., Worcester 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston 

Boyden, Charles, Boston 

Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H., Cambridge 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston 

Brooks, Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brooks, Mrs. Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brown. Mrs. Charles R., New Haven. Conn. 

Bullard, Miss Ellen T., Boston 

Bullock. Chandler, Worcester 

Burr. I. Tucker. Jr.. Boston 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H.. Dublin, N. H. 

Camp, Mrs. Edward C, Watertown 

Campbell, Mrs. Frederick W., Milton 

Carter, Richard B., West Newton 

Carter, Mrs. Richard B., West Newton 

Case, Hon. Norman S., Washington, D. C. 

Case. Mrs. Norman S.. Washington. D. C. 

Cassels. Miss Andree, Boston 

Chase, John P., Boston 

Cheever, David, Jr., Millis 

Cheever, Mrs. David, Jr., Millis 

Choate, Robert B., Boston 

Clause, Henry T., Wilmington. Del. 

Clifford, John H., New Bedford 

Codman, Mrs. Russell, Boston 

Coffin, Mrs. Rockwell A., Harwichport 

Connolly, Rev. John J., Framingham 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, New York 

Coolidge, William A., Boston 

Coote, Lady Emilie. Wellesley 

Cotting, Charles B., Boston 

Crapo, Henry H., New Bedford 

Cunningham, Edward, Dover 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward, Dover 

Curtis, Charles P., Jr., Boston 

Curtis, James F., Roslyn, N. Y. 

Curtis, Louis, Boston 

Curtis, Richard C, Boston 

Cutler, George C, Dedham 

Daley. Mrs. Francis J., Somerville 

Danielson, Richard E., Boston 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E.. Boston 

Day. Mrs. Frank A.. Newton 

Denny. Dr. George P.. Boston 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston 

Dolan, William G., Boston 

Dowd, Mrs. John F., Roxbury 

Draper, Eben S., Hopedale 

Drury, Theodore F., Weston 

Dutton, Mrs. George D.. Walpole 



Eliot, Amory, Boston 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Boston 

Endicott, Henry, Boston 

Endicott, William, 2nd, North Andover 

Farrell, Gabriel, Watei-town 

Farrell, Mrs. Gabriel, Watertown 

Faxon, Henry H., M. D., Brookline 

Faxon, Mrs. Robert M.. North Andover 

Fay. Mrs. Dudley B., Boston 

Fenno, Mrs. L. C, Rowley 

Fitz, Reginald, M. D., Brookline 

Fitz, Mrs. Reginald, Brookline 

Ford. Lawrence A., Beverly 

Foster, Mrs. Reginald, Boston 

Fox, Miss Edith M., Arlington 

French, Miss M. Eunice, Providence, R. I. 

Frothingham, Mrs. L. A., North Easton 

FuUer, George F., Worcester 

Gage, Miss Mabel C, Worcester 

Gale, Lyman W., Boston 

Gardiner, John H., Brookline 

Gardner, G. Peabody. Brookline 

Gaskill. George A.. Worcester 

Gaylord. Emerson G., Chicopee 

Gilbert, Carl J., Needham 

Gilbert. William E., Springfield 

Gleason, Miss Ellen H., Jamaica Plain 

Grandin. Mrs. Isabella. Boston 

Gray. Francis C, Boston 

Gray, Roland, Boston 

Greenough, Mib. Henry V., Brookline 

Griswold, Merrill, Boston 

Gundersen, Dr. Trygve. Brookline 

Gundersen. Mrs. Trygve. Brookline 

Hall. Miss Minna B., Brookline 

Hallowell, Richard P., 2nd, Boston 

Hallowell, Robert H., Dedham 

Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Dedham 

Hallowell, Robert H., Jr., Dover 

Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Jr.. Dover 

Harris, Rev. John U., Framingham 

Hayden, J. Willard, Lexington 

Hayden, Mrs. J. Willard, Lexington 

Hemenway, Mrs. Aug\istus, Milton 

Herter, Christian A., Boston 

Higginson, Francis L., Boston 

Hill, Dr. Alfred S., Somerville 

Hinds, Mrs. E. S. Manchester 

Holmes, Dr. Henry W., Cambridge 

Howe, James C, Boston 

Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 3rd. Brookhne 

Humbert, Miss W. R.. Watertown 

Hunnewell. Walter, Boston 

Hunt, James R., Jr., New York 

lasigi. Miss Marie V., Boston 

Jackson, Charles, Jr., Boston 

Jackson, Mrs. James, Westwood 

Jeffries, J. Amory, Boston 

Johnson, Arthur S., Boston 

Kellogg. Mrs. Frederic B., Cambridge 

Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, 2nd, Beverly Farms 

Kidder, Mis. Henry P., Meadville, Pa. 

King, Mrs. James G., Cambridge 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond, Milton 

Latimer, Mrs. G. D., Brookline 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Brookhne 

Lawrence, Rev. Frederic C, Brookline 

Lawrence, John S., Boston _ 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. W. Appleton. Spnnsn d 

Leavitt. Rev. Ashley D., Brookline 

Leviseur. Mrs. Frederick J., Boston 

Ley, Harold A.. New York 

Lincoln, Mrs. George C, Worcester 



11 



i 



Lovering, Richard S., Jackson Springs, N.C. 

Lovett, Mias Eleanor H., New London, N.H. 

Lowell, James H., Boston 

Lowell, Ralph, Boston 

Lyman, Mrs. Arthur T., Westwood 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Waltham 

Lyne, Daniel J., Chestnut Hill 

MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore I., West Newton 

Maliotis, Charles, Boston 

Mason, Mrs. Andrew, Brookline 

Mason, Charles E., Jr., Providence, R. I. 

Merrill, Rev. Boynton, Columbus, Ohio 

Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce, Providence, R.I. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cambridge 

Minot, James J., Boston 

Monks, Rev. G. Gardner, Washington, D.C. 

Montagu, Mrs. H. B., England 

Morison, Samuel Eliot, Boston 

Motley, Warren, Boston 

Myers, Mrs. John W., Brookline 

Nash, Rt. Rev. Norman B., Boston 

Osgood, Rev. Phillips E., Orange, N. J. 

Parker, William A., Boston 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston 

Parkman, Henry, Jr., Boston 

Parkman, Mrs. Henry, Jr., Boston 

Peabody, Harold, Boston 

Perkins, Mrs. Charles B., Jamaica Plain 

Perkins, Rev. Palfrey, Boston 

Pew, George L., Portland, Maine 

Pierce, Roger, Milton 

Plimpton, Mrs. George F., Boston 

Pool. Mrs. E. A., New York, N. Y. 

Pratt, George D., Springfield 

Proctor, James H., Ipswich 

Prouty, Robert M., Hingham 

Prouty, Mrs. Robert M., Hingham 

Putnam, Mrs. Eliot T., Jr., Dedham 

Putnam, Mrs. George T,, Dedham 

Rackemann, Miss Elizabeth, Boston 

Rantoul, Neal, Boston 

Richards, Henry H., Groton 

Richards, John, Concord, N. H. 

Richards, Tudor, Groton 

Richardson, John, Milton 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Milton 

Rogers, Mrs. Robert E., Cambridge 



Rogerson_, Francis C, Duxbury 

Rudd, Miss Mary D., Boston 

Saltonstall, Hon. Leverett, Dover 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, Dover 

Saltonstall, Richard, Sherbom 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Richard, Sherborn 

Sears, Seth, Brewster 

Shattuck, Henry L., Boston 

Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A., Weston 

SherriU, Rt. Rev. Henry K., New York, N.Y. 

Sillen, Rev. Walter, Watertown 

Sims, Mrs. William S., Boston 

Slater, Mrs. H. N., New York 

Snow, Mrs. William G., Nevrton Centre 

Stafford, Rev. Russell H., Hartford, Conn. 

Stinson, Mrs. James, Worcester 

Sturgis, R. Clipston, Portsmouth, N. H, 

Sturgis, S. Warren, Boston 

Sullivan, Mrs. James A., Pride's Crossing 

Thayer, John E., Milton 

Theopold, Philip H., Dedham 

Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston 

Thompson, Cameron S., Boston 

Thomdike, Albert, Milton 

Thorndike, Benjamin A. G., Dedham 

Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield 

Tilden, Miss Alice F., Boston 

Tilden, Miss Edith S., Boston 

Todd", Francis B., New York, N. Y. 

Tudor, Mrs. Henry D., Cambridge 

Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C, Pittsfield 

Vaughan, Miss Margaret I., Haddonfi'd, N.J. 

Wadsworth, Eliot, Washington, D. C. 

Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., Boston 

Washburn, Rev. Henry B., Cambridge 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph, Boston 

Wendell, William G., West Hartford, Conn. 

Whittall, Matthew P., Worcester 

Wiggins, Mrs. Charles, 2nd, Gardiner, Me. 

Wiggins, John, Alden, Pa. 

Wiggins, Mrs. John, Alden, Pa. 

Wilder, Charles P., Worcester 

Wolcott, Roger, Boston 

Wright, George R., Cambridge 

Wright, Miss Lucy, Newtown, Conn. 

Young, B. Loring. Weston 

Zeilinski, John, Holyoke 



12 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL 
MEETING OF THE CORPORATION 

Watertown, Massachusetts 
November 6, 1950 

THE ANNUAL MEETING of the Corporation, duly summoned, 
was held today at the Institution, and was called to order by 
the President, Dr. Reginald Fitz, at 3.00 P. M. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved. 
The annual reports of the Trustees and the Director were 
accepted and ordered to be printed, with the addition of other 
matters of general interest to the work. 

The report of the Treasurer was presented, accepted and or- 
dered to be printed together with the certificate of the Certified 
Public Accountant. 
It was then 

VOTED : That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by 
the Board of Trustees, or by any committee ap- 
pointed by said Board of Trustees, during the last 
corporate year, be and are hereby ratified and con- 
firmed. 
It was further 

VOTED: That the nomination of the Finance Committee and 
the appointment by the Trustees of Barrow, Wade, 
Guthrie & Company, Certified Public Accountants as 
Auditors of the Accounts of the Institution be and 
are hereby ratified and confirmed. 
The Corporation then proceeded to the choice of officers for the 
ensuing year, and the following persons were unanimously elected 
by ballot: President, Reginald Fitz, M.D.; Vice-President, Ralph 
Lowell; Treasurer, Ralph B. Williams; Secretary, Gabriel Farrell; 
Trustees, David Cheever, Jr., Mrs. Richard E. Danielson, Reginald 
Fitz, M.D., Robert H. Hallowell, Henry W. Holmes, LL.D., Mrs. 
Frederick J. Leviseur, Warren Motley, and Richard Saltonstall. 
The following persons were proposed for membership and were 
duly elected: Mr. Robert Amory, Jr., Mr. Ralph B. Williams, Mrs. 
Olin J. Cochran, Miss Elsie H. Simonds, Miss Genevieve M. Haven, 
Miss Mary Esther Sawyer, Mr. John E. Lawrence, Mr. James Law- 
rence, Jr., Mr. John W. Bryant, Miss Amy Lamb, Mr. Samuel 
Cabot, Jr., Mrs. Frank G. Allen, and Miss Marjorie A. Peabody. 
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary. 

13 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

November 6, 1950 

THE ANNUAL REPORT for the academic year 1949-1950 is 
herewith submitted on behalf of the Board of Trustees. 

Five of our teachers retired in June, these five teachers between 
them having contributed more than one hundred and fifty years of 
service to the School. The efficient and sympathetic guidance to its 
pupils on which the reputation of Perkins has rested for many years 
is due in great measure to loyalty and devotion of this character. 
Our junior staff members work under the direction of the heads 
of the several departments. Many of the staff, both junior and 
senior, are career teachers planning to devote their lives to the insti- 
tution. The Trustees, at the outset of this report, wish to express 
their gratefulness to all Perkins teachers, and particularly, this 
year, to Miss Genevieve M. Haven (1912-1950), Mrs. Jessie W. 
Mayshark (1933-1950), Miss Susan E. Morse (1927-1950), Miss 
Feodore M. Nicholls (1915-1950) and Miss Elsie H. Simonds (1908- 
1950). 

Dr. Edward Ellis Allen, our Director Emeritus, died on April 
14th. The Trustees, at their June meeting, adopted a resolution 
which attempted to express their appreciation of his years of 
leadership; this resolution is printed in the Annual Report. Words 
cannot express what he did for the School or the sense of loss 
which the Trustees now feel. 

The year has gone quickly. At present we are in a cycle 
wherein the age of our student population is changing; next year 
there will be few older children and a great increase in the popula- 
tion of younger ones. This necessitates changes in space allotment 
as well as changes in curriculum for which the Director is planning 
most wisely. 

The buildings and grounds have been rehabilitated to a large 
extent and several most urgent repairs have been completed. The 
process of complete rehabilitation of the entire plant is being ac- 
complished gradually and according to a well developed program, 
but the progress already made has been striking. 

The reports of the Treasurer and of the Director bear careful 
study. On the one hand the Treasurer points out our needs for 
new funds and on the other the Director describes the School's 
protean activities. 

Perkins continues to be known, both nationally and interna- 
tionally, as one of the leading schools for young people with visual 
difficulties. During the past year visitors have come to study our 
methods from such distant countries as Siam, the Philippine Islands. 
Guatamala, The Netherlands, France and from schools like our 

14 



own which are closer at hand: North Carolina, Michigan, Iowa, 
Illinois and the State of Washington. That our School is a source 
of aid in so many different regions is gratifying. More than this, 
however, it reveals our responsibility to so maintain the operation 
of the School that it holds its position of leadership in its field of 
work. 

During the past year, besides Dr. Allen, other members of the 
Corporation whom Perkins has lost through death are : Mr. Francis 
B. Crowninshield, Mr. Richmond Mayo-Smith, Honorable Frank G. 
Allen and Mrs. Horatio A. Lamb. 

The Institution will always remain deeply grateful for their 
interest and aid. 

Respectfully submitted for the Trustees, 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President. 



15 



RESOLUTION 

WHEREAS Edward Ellis Allen, D.Sc. passed away on April 
14, 1950 at the age of eighty-eight years, and 

WHEREAS Dr. Allen served Perkins Institution as teacher 
— 1888 to 1900; as Director 1907 to 1931 and as 
Director Emeritus 1931 to 1950, and 

WHEREAS Dr. Allen during his Directorship moved the 
Institution from South Boston and the Kinder- 
garten from Jamaica Plain to the beautiful 
grounds and buildings now occupied at Water- 
town, into the planning of which he incorporated 
his high principles of the education of the blind, 
and 

WHEREAS the status of teachers of the blind in this country 
and abroad was lifted to a high professional 
standard through his inauguration and conduct 
of the courses for training teachers and workers 
for the blind in co-operation with the Graduate 
School of Education of Harvard University, and 

WHEREAS through membership in many organizations for 
the blind, Dr. Allen did much to develop and pro- 
mote programs for the prevention of blindness 
and for the care of those who walk in darkness, 
and 

WHEREAS through his unbounded faith in blind people and 
his friendship with many, he was truly called 
"Friend of the Blind" 
BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Trustees of Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the 
Blind, assembled at this stated meeting on Tues- 
day, June 13, 1950, places on record its sense of 
loss and its feeling of thanksgiving for all that 
Dr. Allen did for Perkins Institution and for the 
blind persons who look to it for help; 
The Trustees also wish to record their deep ap- 
preciation of the devotion of Dr. Allen to the 
Institution which he directed and for the leader- 
ship which he exercised in all avenues of work 
for the blind. 
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that these Resolutions be 
spread upon the minutes of this meeting with a 
copy to be published in the Annual Report of the 
Institution and that copies be sent to surviving 
members of his family. 

16 




EDWARD ELLIS ALLEN 

August 1, 1861— April 14, 1950 

EDUCATION : Newton, Massachusetts ; Germany and Switzer- 
land; graduated Harvard College, cum laude, 1884. TEACHER: 
Royal Normal College for the Blind, London, 1885-1888 ; Perkins 
Institution, 1888-1890. PRINCIPAL: Pennsylvania Institution 
for the Blind, 1890-1907. DIRECTOR: Perkins Institution, 
1907-1931; DIRECTOR EMERITUS: 1931-1950. ORGANIZER 
and LECTURER : The "Harvard Course" in the Education of 
the Blind, 1920-1949. HONORS and AWARDS : Honorary de- 
gree— D.Sc. University of Pennsylvania, 1931; Leslie Dana 
Gold Medal, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, 
1931 ; Gold Medal, Institute of Social Sciences, 1932 ; Shotwell 
Gold Medal, American Association of Workers for the Blind, 
1945. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

THE YEAR COVERED BY THIS REPORT closed academically 
June 20 — fiscally and officially August 31, 1950. The academic 
termination was later than usual because the opening of school 
had been delayed one week by the extensive repair program of the 
previous summer, a pattern being followed this present year for 
the same reason. The normal scheme of opening was followed, 
however — ^the matrons returning on September 11 to engage 
domestics, open the houses and make ready to receive the staff 
members who came back on Monday, September 18. The pupils 
returned the following day and classes were resumed for the 119th 
year on Wednesday, September 20. 

Looking back, the year seems to have been an uneventful and 
uninterrupted period, which is perhaps the best indication of 
efficient, smooth operation. The two most significant aspects were: 
first — the large number of pupils, blind from a new cause, who 
applied for admission in the lower grades at the beginning of the 
year; and second — the small number of resignations among teachers 
at the end of the year, even if we include those who reached 
retiring age. 

While the total number of pupils enrolled last year, averaging 
237, was about the same as the year before, the distribution 
differed. A reduced enrollment over a number of years has resulted 
in a smaller number of pupils in the upper grades. This year 
there was a large increase in the number admitted to the kin- 
dergarten and early grades. These were largely children whose 
blindness is due to premature birth. The significance of this group 
is further emphasized by the fact that at the opening of the pre- 
sent year, September, 1950, fifty-four of these children will be 
admitted. The acceptance of so many new pupils in the early 
grades has necessitated changes in the pattern of our housing and 
the academic program. Because further adaptation will be required 
in the next few years, it might be well to make a statement regard- 
ing this situation. 

The technical name of the visual impairment found in children 
who are born more than two months prematurely and who weigh 
less than three pounds, is Retrolental Fibroplasia. A translation 

17 



of this name describes the cause of impaired vision — a fibrous mesh 
behind the lens. This type of blindness was first diagnosed and 
named by Dr. Theodore L. Terry in 1945. Perkins has from the 
outset been in close contact with the development of assistance for 
these children, having seen and helped with the planning of a 
program for the first child thus diagnosed. Two summer institutes 
held in 1945 and 1946 were planned especially for this group of 
blind babies and their mothers. Thus Perkins was able to meet 
some of the problems of these children at an early age. These 
problems are now being put more directly in our hands as the 
children are coming to school age. 

A significant fact about this form of blindness is that the 
incidence varies in different parts of the country. Here in New 
England approximately 250 children under seven years of age have 
been thus diagnosed. In a few other sections of the country there 
is almost as high a ratio while in some cities with medical facilities 
comparable to Boston the ratio is much smaller. Until this past 
summer, no cases had been reported in England. The number of 
prematurely born children seems to be increasing due to improved 
methods of caring for these babies most of whom, a decade or more 
ago, would not have survived. A recent study of the problem 
indicated that of these premature babies approximately one out of 
twelve is visually handicapped. 

Seeking Cause of Blindness 

Dr. Terry was energetic in securing funds to set up a program 
of research to try to determine the cause and thereby to reduce 
this form of blindness. Under the sponsorship of the Foundation 
for Vision, Inc., founded by Dr. Terry, a research program has been 
conducted since 1946 at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. 
Effective research is also being carried on at several medical centers 
throughout the country. The one encouraging thing about this type 
of blindness is that if research can discover the cause and prevent it, 
there is hope that the numbers of these children will be reduced in 
the future. How soon this may be no one knows, but on several 
occasions the researchers have seemed to be on the verge of the 
hoped-for solution. In the meantime Perkins and other schools for 
the blind are confronted with the immediate task of providing an 
educational program for the retrolentals whose sight is gone and for 
whom there is no hope of recovery. 

18 



While the increase in the number of children blinded by 
Retrolental Fibroplasia will affect the prevailing incidence of 
blindness throughout the country, there is considerable evidence 
that the extent of blindness among children will not exceed the peak 
of former years. As evidence, consider the enrollment at Perkins 
since 1930. In that year there were 275 pupils enrolled. The peak 
at Perkins was reached in 1934 with 276 pupils. In 1939 there 
were 247 and in 1949, 237. The national situation is reflected in 
the range of enrollments in all of the schools for the blind, as 
reported annually by the American Printing House for the Blind. 
In 1930 total enrollment was 5,770. The peak in the national scene 
was 1939 with 6,031 pupils enrolled, with a decline from that figure 
to 5,606 as of January 1, 1950. This last figure may need some 
revision because during the past decade, with a decreasing popula- 
tion in the schools, there has been a tendency to bring into or to 
retain in schools for the blind children not legally blind but who 
come within the classification of partially sighted. The American 
Printing House report for the current year required a separation 
of these groups and the listing only of those who are legally blind. 
This figure was 5,014, a reduction of more than 10% of the en- 
rollment previously cited. 

Fluctuations in Enrollment 

In the next few years the number of admissions undoubtedly 
will increase, due to the influx of retrolentals, but the total picture 
indicated that decrease through prevention should keep ahead of 
the increase. Other factors cause fluctuation in statistics. The 
peak enrollment in all schools in this country came in 1939, 
coinciding with the peak in schools for the blind. The increase in 
births following World War II offset the decline since 1939, resulting 
in the children now crowding the elementary schools. This increase 
is also reflected in the seeming increase of blindness among school 
age children and is supplemented by the number of pupils blinded 
because of prematurity. If the means are found to eliminate this 
cause of blindness, and there is every reason to believe that this 
will come, enrollment in schools for the blind should resume the 
downward trend which made us happy in the decade from 1939 to 
1949. 

Our enrollment as of November 1, 1950 was 247 compared with 
237 a year ago. During the year 49 pupils completed their work 

19 



and were discharged. The reasons for discharge were— graduated 
19 ; completed scholarship 1 ; completed other training 6 ; transferred 
to public schools or sight saving classes 15; ceased to progress 
5; withdrew on account of illness 3. The 247 pupils enrolled on 
November 1, 1950 are divided as follows : Massachusetts 145 ; Maine 
27; New Hampshire 16; Vermont 18; Rhode Island 21 and from 
other states 16. This year there are 4 students from three foreign 
countries— China, Greece and Argentina, and from the following 
states outside of New England : Alabama, Colorado, Louisiana, New 
York, New Jersey, Ohio, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, 
Washington and West Virginia. 

Staff Changes 

Reference was made in last year's report to the resignation as 
of September 1, 1949 of Allan W. Sherman, Principal for seven 
years. At that time Mr. Sherman became Director of the Cleveland 
Society for the Blind, a position which he is filling ably. The previ- 
ous report also indicated the distribution of Mr. Sherman's duties 
among present members of the staff. Beginning in September, 1949, 
Orin A. Stone, for four years a teacher in the Upper School, and 
for nine years prior to that Principal of the Connecticut School for 
the Blind, became Acting Principal and Dean of Faculty, with 
responsibility for curriculum planning, supervision of teachers and 
general charge of the academic program throughout the school. 
Benjamin F. Smith, for twelve years a teacher at Perkins, was 
appointed Dean of Boys, a new position, and took charge of boys' 
activities outside the classroom and the supervision of all mat- 
ters within the cottages and in the playground program. These 
duties correspond largely with those carried by Dr. Alice M. Carpen- 
ter as Dean of Girls. This gave a well-rounded distribution of 
duties in the Upper School and permitted Mr. Smith to have more 
time for personal interest in the boys and opportunity to discuss 
problems with them than Mr. Sherman was able to give because 
of his many other responsibilities. Supervision of the Lower School 
was assigned to Miss Shirley A. Drucker, who had been a teacher 
for two years and who had developed and proved her competence 
to undertake these extra duties. This program has worked out 
happily and is perhaps one of the factors in the routine and smooth 
operation of the school this past year. The plan will be continued 
for the coming year. 

20 



A significant fact regarding staff changes at the close of the 
year was that only twelve persons terminated their work at Perkins, 
of whom five retired under the Retirement Plan inaugurated in 
1932. The five retiring teachers had given to Perkins 152 years 
of teaching service. They are: Miss Elsie H. Simonds, for forty- 
two years teacher and former principal in the Girls' Upper School; 
Miss Genevieve M. Haven, for thirty-eight years teacher of English 
in the Upper School; Miss Feodore F. Nichols, for thirty-one years 
teacher in the Lower School; Miss Susan E. Morse, for twenty- 
four years teacher in the Lower School; and Mrs. Jessie W. May- 
shark, for seventeen years a teacher in the Lower School. Mrs. 
Mayshark retired prior to the stated age, due to ill health. All of 
these women are entitled to the highest commendation for their 
many years of devoted and loyal service to Perkins. 

Retirements and Replacements 
Other teachers who terminated their connection with Perkins 
were: Edward J. Jusczyk, director of Physical Education; Derick 
V. Willson, teacher of Social Studies; and Christos C. Pappas, 
teacher of Science, all in the Upper School. In the Lower School 
Miss J. Elizabeth Andrews, kindergartner resigned; and Miss 
Patricia Vogel, a teacher for five years, left to marry Eduardo 
Ordonez, a young Mexican who had been a student at Perkins for 
five years and was graduated in June. 

In the business office Mrs. Elizabeth North was replaced in 
October by Mrs. Phyllis Smith who resigned in June and was suc- 
ceeded by Miss Marion I. Lamb. Two matrons terminated their 
work in June: Mrs. Charles Amadon, for one year matron of 
Tompkins Cottage and Mrs. F. B. Robison, two years assistant 
matron and two years acting matron of Bradlee Cottage, Miss 
Fanny Durfee, matron of Moulton Cottage, was transferred to the 
new May Cottage unit as assistant matron. 

New staff members for the year beginning September 1950 
are: Felicitas M. Benziger, University of Geneva '49, Alice Batchel- 
der, Briarcliff Jr. College '47, Thelma M. Johnsen, Hillyer College 
'50, in the Kindergarten; Louise R. Bergfels, Newark, N. J. Normal 
School '19, Marjorie A. Lagemann, Oberlin College '50, Eunice 
Werner, Wellesley College '50, Elsie M. Parmenter, Framingham 
Teachers College '26 in the Primary Department; and Wilma 
Wichern, St. Lawrence University '49, Florentina C. Gonzalez, Insti- 
tute National of Secondary Education, Barcelona, Spain '30, Richard 

21 



R. Hull, University of Connecticut '50 in the Intermediate Depart- 
ment. In the Upper School — A. Claude Ellis, Boston University 
'50, Physical Education; Vahram Kashmanian, Boston University 
'50, Social Studies; Carl J. Davis, Clark University '50, Science, 
and Mary Kay Mailers, MacMurray College '50, English. 

An interesting point about these new appointments, especially 
those in the Lower School, is that six of them were selected from 
candidates for the Harvard Class. When, toward the end of the 
year, applications for new pupils in the lower grades increased 
to such an extent that it was found necessary to engage additional 
kindergarten teachers, it seemed only reasonable to give first op- 
portunity to those who had indicated an interest in this special 
field by enrolling in our teacher training program. Therefore, 
as many as possible of the new positions were filled from candidates 
for this course. All of these persons will take the full work of the 
Harvard Course necessary to meet the requirements for credit at 
Harvard. They will not, however, have as large an opportunity 
as former classes for extensive observation and specialized work, 
which has in recent years richly supplemented the required course 
of study and reading. 

The Harvard Class 

This situation regarding the Harvard Class will cause a change 
in the conduct of the course during the coming year. Instead of 
being a full year of extensive study and observation, the program 
will fall in line with what is commonly called "on the job training." 
Three members of the present teaching staflf have enrolled for 
the course this coming year and all new teachers are being 
requested to take as much of the work as possible either for credit 
or as auditors. There have been a large number of applications 
for the Harvard Class for the coming year and it will continue 
to cover a wide geographical area. There will be representatives 
from England, China, Germany, Haiti, India, Iran, Italy and the 
Philippines. 

This year's Harvard Class was one of the best since the war, 
including representatives from Brazil, Mexico, Spain and Switzer- 
land, and a young woman from Germany who arrived January 1 
for a full year of study. The others in the group which totalled 
fifteen were from various parts of the United States. All were college 
graduates and nearly all have undertaken work in schools for the 

22 



blind. One young man in the class transferred to Harvard at the 
end of the first semester to take full time work leading toward a 
Master's degree. Three persons entered the class at the beginning 
of the second semester and will continue through the first half of 
the coming year. 

The Harvard Class this year had the privilege of a series of 
lectures by Dr. Richard S. French, who until January 1, 1949 was 
Principal of the California School for the Blind and lecturer on 
Educational Psychology at the University of California. Dr. French, 
author of one of the outstanding books on the education of the 
blind, From Homer to Helen Keller, was invited to be visiting 
lecturer and was in residence at Perkins during the fall months 
through December. The presence of Dr. and Mrs. French in the 
life of the school was a happy experience. Dr. French, an author- 
ity on Spanish culture, gave for the benefit of the school, three de- 
lightful lectures on Spanish poetry with a number of translations 
which he had made. He also talked to the staif on several occasions 
and to the whole school at morning assemblies. 

Having reviewed the significant points pertaining to the en- 
rollment of pupils, the staff changes and the Harvard Class, it would 
seem appropriate now to mention some of the events in which these 
groups were jointly involved. As previously stated, classes were 
resumed on Wednesday, September 20. The staff had returned on 
Monday, the 18th and on that evening the Director set forth the 
plans projected for the coming year and gave a brief review of 
his activities in Europe during the summer. The remainder of 
September was relatively routine, teachers and pupils adjusting 
to the schedules prepared during the summer. 

f; The Year in Review 

On the weekend of October first and second nearly all the pupils 
went away to the retreats provided by the Catholic Guild and confer- 
ences offered by the Protestant Guild for the Blind. Similar retreats 
and conferences were held in the spring over the weekend of May 
6. These events provide valuable opportunities for our pupils 
to meet and confer with leaders in the religious field and are very 
helpful factors in their spiritual development. Perkins is indebted 
to the organizations which provide these opportunities. The two 
Guilds and the Boston Aid for Blind Inc., for Jewish children, make 
provision for religious instruction which is offered on released time 
every Thursday afternoon during the year from October through 



23 



I 



May. All three organizations are helpful in responding to the 
needs of our pupils which fall within their areas and recognition 
of these services is gratefully expressed. 

Over the weekend of October 14, five girls went to the 
Connecticut School for the annual Girls' Play Day which has become 
an established feature of the eastern schools for the blind. Seven 
schools were represented and our girls had a very pleasant time 
associating with girls from other schools. During the morning of 
October 18, Mr. Robert Brereton, a talented blind pianist, graciously 
came to Perkins to give a recital for our pupils and staff. On 
the evening of October 21, the boys and girls of the Senior Class 
gave an amateur show in Dwight Hall which revealed unexpected 
talents among class members and also provided funds for the 
activities of the Senior Class. The evening of October 31 was 
marked by Halloween spirit which prevailed in all of the cottages 
where appropriate parties were held. 

Student Councils 
Monday evening, October 28, the new members of the Boys' 
Council were initiated in the impressive ceremony which was de- 
veloped under Mr. Sherman and which has had a vital part in 
bringing before the boys the significance of the Council and the 
responsibilites of membership. This service is always held in the 
Chapel, presided over by the Director and attended by all associated 
with the Boys' School. The Council thus initiated, held monthly 
meetings and the Director wants to place on record his great 
appreciation of the fine spirit of the boys this year, the many 
helpful contributions they have made through suggestions at 
meetings and also through leadership and example among the pupils, 
frequently taking in hand boys who needed a little guidance and 
direction. The Girls' Council has also met regularly through the 
year, and its members were equally helpful. One of the special 
features of the Girls' Council, is the appointment of "big sisters" 
for the younger girls coming from the Lower School to help initiate 
them into the requirements of the Upper School. 

November is always marked by Memorial Exercises. Those 
in the Lower School, held this year on the 4th, were in honor of 
Michael Anagnos, founder of the Kindergarten and second Director 
of Perkins. The pupils acted out incidents in the life of Mr. 
Anagnos and closed with the singing of the hymn "Anagnos, Dear 
Founder." At the Upper School, the Howe Memorial Exercises 

24 




SINGING IN THE LOWER SCHOOL 



UPPER SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 




were held on the 9th, paying tribute to the first Director whose 
life was depicted through readings by the students of incidents 
in his career. The Howe family was represented this year by Mr. 
Henry H. Richards, grandson of Dr. Howe, Mrs. Carlton Shaw, 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry Marion Hall and Mrs. Thomas C. Howard. 
Letters were read from several other members of the Howe family. 
These exercises always conclude with the singing of the Battle 
Hymn of the Republic, written by Julia Ward Howe who, in her 
lifetime, graced these occasions as the wife and later the widow 
of the first Director. 

The Upper School girls held a dance on the evening of 
November 12 with an orchestra provided through the kindness of 
Mr. George Ellis of Waltham. At two other girls' dances, on 
January 28 and May 20, the music was provided by orchestras made 
up of Perkins boys; on the first occasion the regular Perkins band 
of older boys and on the second a group of younger boys who were 
specially prepared for the event by Mr. Bauguss. On November 
19 the annual football banquet was held in Tompkins Cottage in 
honor of their victory in the football tournament carried on between 
cottage teams through the fall. The banquet was followed by a 
boys' dance. The speaker at the banquet was Leo Eagen, well- 
known sports commentator. Nearly all of the pupils went home over 
the Thanksgiving weekend. In the Red Feather drive for the 
Community Fund Perkins' staff and pupils contributed $791.58 and 
later $362.55 was raised for the American Red Cross. 

The Christmas Concerts 
December is given over primarily to preparation for the 
Christmas concerts. A fair under the leadership of Miss Helena 
Drake and the officers of the Alumnae Association is becoming an 
annual event in December and many articles are contributed for 
sale. This year $113.80 was realized and added to the Scholarship 
Fund which has been set up by the Alumnae Association and which 
now totals $3177. For the past three years, this scholarship has 
been given to Miss Faye George, Perkins *46, who was graduated 
from Middlebury College in June. For the following year it has 
been granted to Hope MacDonald, who was graduated from Perkins 
in 1949 and is now a sophomore at New Hampshire University. 
Three Christmas concerts were given in Dwight Hall, which was 
filled to capacity on all three occasions. An unusually fine program 
of traditional and modern carols was presented under the able 

25 



leadership of Mr. Bauguss, assisted by Mrs. Carr at the organ 
and Miss Seymour, pianist. Following the concert on Tuesday 
evening, December 20, the pupils went home for the Christmas 
holidays which continued until January 3. 

The winter term was a long one, beginning January 8 and 
closing March 31. A long weekend over Lincoln's Birthday, how- 
ever, proved a welcome respite and more than half of the pupils 
went home. The absence of so many on February 12 necessitated 
a change in the annual presentation of a dollar to each pupil at 
Perkins on that holiday. This money comes from a fund left by 
Stephen Blaisdell, a former student at Perkins, with instructions 
to give a dollar to each pupil on Lincoln's Birthday in commemora- 
tion of the freeing of the slaves, and also a sum of $15 to each 
graduate before July 4th. This year the dollars were presented 
as the pupils were leaving for the weekend which may have given 
them an appropriate significance. 

Morning Assemblies 
During the winter term, speakers at Morning Assemblies on 
Mondays were selected by the pupils from their own numbers ; Mr. 
Stone talked on Wednesdays through the year; and on Tliursdays, 
during the Lenten season, the Clergy of Watertown were the 
speakers. A series of teas in the homes of a number of Cambridge 
people was arranged for groups of Upper School girls by Miss 
Marshall. This year an unusually large number of Scout activities 
in connection with outside troops were directed by Mrs. Davis and 
Miss Liversidge. Miss Potter's groups presented a number of 
amateur dramatic performances and the Music Department held 
the usual series of recitals by special music pupils. An event out 
of the ordinary was the visit to Perkins on February 28 of Vic 
Damone, a talented and popular vocalist. On every Wednesday 
evening throughout the year, a series of moving pictures was of- 
fered in the boys' reading room as arranged by Mr. Coon, the Li- 
brarian. These have proved very popular, especially in the winter 
months. Some very entertaining films as well as educational ones 
such as "Great Expectations" were enjoyed by pupils and staff. 
On three Wednesday evenings in March was a series of educational 
films based on the textbook, "Teaching Techniques" by Shorling, 
which were appreciated by the teachers who attended them after 
the pupils' movies were over. A luncheon given by the Kiwanis 
at the Hotel Touraine, on March 23, was attended by members 

26 



of the staff and all of the girls who went to Camp Allen. This is 
a camp for blind girls and conducted by this Kiwanis Club, and 
to which many present Perkins and former Perkins girls go for 
summer vacations. The camp girls put on a typical camp program, 
and were the recipients of much interest and gifts by members of 
the club. On the following evening, March 24, the annual staff 
party was held in the staff lounge, and a "good time was had by all." 

Meeting for Parents 

Perhaps the outstanding social events of the year were the 
meetings for parents of the Lower School children held on the 
Friday afternoons of March — ^Anagnos Cottage on March 3, Bradlee 
on the 10th, Glover on the 17th and Potter on the 24th. The parents 
came early in the afternoon and visited in the classrooms of their 
respective children, seeing them at work. Following that, teachers 
and parents assembled in the living room of the cottage where 
there was a program of songs by the children, followed by a talk 
by the Director. The Director pointed out some of the special 
features of the school and introduced the specialists who take part 
in the programs of the Lower School, such as speech correction, 
health, psychological work, and so forth. The specialists in each 
department spoke briefly of their work. Tea and refreshments 
were then served in the dining room and the parents and teachers 
were urged to get together to discuss their children. All of the 
meetings were well attended, with some parents coming from as 
far away as Maine and New Hampshire. This was a very auspicious 
beginning for a program of closer contact between the home and 
the school which must be enlarged this coming year. The parents 
who attended were very generous in their expressions of apprecia- 
tion of this opportunity to see the school at work and to talk to 
those who have their children under care while at Perkins. 

The events of the spring term, which opened April 10 reflect 
the policy of the school in trying to give to the pupils opportunity 
for social development outside the school, and for activities which 
might seem to some to be excluded from the blind. On April 16, 
the officers of Temple Israel invited twelve Lower School boys and 
girls to join with them in their annual Father and Son and Mother 
and Daughter dinner, while on the 24th, Temple Israel invited all 
the Potter boys and the Girls' Glee Club to share with them in a 
dinner and evening meeting. On the evenings of April 25, 27 and 
28, the Music Department presented its annual spring concert which 

27 



this year was in the form of a "Pops Revue." The rendering of 
popular songs, built around a plot developed by one of the teachers, 
provided delightful entertainment which was enjoyed by capacity 
houses on the three evenings in Dwight Hall. At these spring con- 
certs an admission charge is made, and the proceeds are used for 
the benefit of the Music Department. 

The May Walk 

Early on the morning of May 1, all of the girls in the Upper 
School, under the leadership of Miss Simonds, joined in the tradi- 
tional May Walk. This group goes about the grounds before break- 
fast observing the developments of spring and carrying out the 
tradition which has been sustained by Miss Simonds over many 
years. The walk this year took especial significance because it will 
be the last under the leadership of Miss Simonds who is retiring 
at the end of the year. Square dancing, popular generally, struck 
Perkins hard this spring, and seven different dances were held by 
boys and girls respectively, and also the staff had dances of this 
type. Bill Dunkle was very generous in coming to call the dances 
bringing with him the musicians. On the afternoon of May 4, a 
special tea was held for the staff, which was not only a pleasant 
occasion for them to get together, but was in the form of a welcome 
home to the Director who had just returned from Iran. On the 
evening of May 5 the Winchester Boy Scouts came to share a 
meeting with our scout troop. Members of the Watertown Kiwanis 
Club acted as fathers for our girl scouts on the evening of May 9, 
at a Father and Daughter Banquet held in the Phillips Congrega- 
tional Church in Watertown. On the 11th the Young People's 
Society of the Old South Church came to Perkins and sponsored two 
parties, one for all the junior high school girls in Dwight Hall, and 
the other for all the senior high school boys in the boys' cottages. 
On the evening of May 13, a number of the girls in the Upper 
School were invited to a dinner and dance as guests of the Belmont 
Rainbow Girls. The members of the girls' Senior Class held their 
senior prom on the evening of May 20 while the boys had their 
prom on June 2. On the afternoon of May 26 the girls' athletic 
program came to a conclusion with a program of field events, and 
the victory of Oliver Cottage was celebrated by a banquet which 
was served in that cottage for all the girls in the Upper School on 
the evening of June 1. 

28 



Saturday afternoon, June 3, our girl scouts hiked to Cedar Hill, 
Waltham, to attend a Girl Scout play day, at which time three of 
our girls received pins for five years of continuous scouting. The 
culminating social event of the spring term occurred on June 8. 
All of the cottage picnics were held on that day. Usually each 
cottage has a separate party, going either to one of the resorts or 
beaches and sometimes having a picnic supper at the fireplace by 
the pond. This year over half of the boys' school elected to go fish- 
ing, and engaged a boat which took them off into Boston Harbor 
for a very pleasant afternoon and evening. The other half of the 
boys' school went to Revere Beach. On the evening of June 12, 
all of the girls above the third grade were the guests of the 
members of the Watertown Yacht Club who took them on a tour 
of the Charles River Basin in their motor boats. This was 
inaugurated last year and it is developing into an annual event 
for which the administration wishes to express appreciation and 
gratitude to the members of the Yacht Club. 

Allen Memorial Service 

The most impressive meeting of the year was held on the 
afternoon of May 22, when a memorial service was held as a 
tribute to the late Edward Ellis Allen, Director Emeritus of Per- 
kins. Dr. Allen passed away on April 14, and his funeral service 
was held in the chapel of the Newton Cemetery on Monday, April 
17. As a large number of his friends, especially in the blind world, 
were unable to attend the funeral service, it seemed appropriate 
to hold a special service in the chapel which bears his name. This 
was planned in connection with the spring meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Council of Organizations for the Blind being held that 
afternoon and evening. The chapel was filled to overflowing with 
members of Dr. Allen's family and many former pupils and asso- 
ciates of Dr. Allen. The service was planned and conducted by the 
Director, with the Perkins chorus rendering appropriate musical 
selections. 

A report of activities should now include special mention of the 
opportunities provided for the girls of the Senior Class by Miss 
Carpenter, Dean of Girls. Miss Carpenter has inaugurated a plan 
of having the senior girls, of whom there were seven this year, 
meet with her early in the year to plan "to do something with the 
members each month." These events included visits to the homes of 
some of the pupils, and also to Miss Carpenter's home for weekends. 

29 



The girls went to Durgin-Park for an interesting meal, to 
the Gardner Museum in January, to a performance of King Lear at 
the Brattle Theatre in Cambridge in March, to which the Junior 
Class was invited. As a culminating event the girls and the boys 
of the Senior Class had an afternoon picnic at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Waterhouse, and as the formal report states, "Everyone had 
a time to be long remembered." 

Mr. Smith, Dean of Boys, has been able also to inaugurate a 
number of new features for developing social interests among the 
boys. During the winter he had a program of Saturday evening 
socials for the junior high school boys, which did a lot to keep the 
boys in the school on Saturday evenings and gave them specific 
training in many social forms which they will find invaluable when 
they leave school. Mr. Smith has also developed extensively, the 
sports program for boys. The annual competitions in several sports 
among the boys of the four cottages continued. Wrestling was the 
main sport activity during the winter months, while baseball was 
introduced during the spring. In order to make the games more 
effective, a fully seeing staff member was made a playing member 
of each team. The staff member was able to focus the team efforts 
of his boys and so control conduct on the field as to realize the best 
character objectives. 

June brings not only graduation, but also the annual meetings 
of the Alumnae Association held on June 3, and that of the Alumni, 
which took place on June 17. In addition to formal business meet- 
ings of these associations and the "reuning" characteristics of 
gatherings of this type, the two meetings this year took on special 
significance, in that tablets honoring members of the staff were 
dedicated. At the meeting of the Alumnae Association, a tablet 
was placed in the new girls' reading room, honoring Miss Elsie H. 
Simonds, for forty-two years principal and teacher of the girls' 
Upper School, who was retiring in June. At the men's meeting 
on the 17th, a similar tablet was unveiled in the reading room on 
the boys' side adjoining the library, in honor of Miss Mary Esther 
Sawyer, former teacher and librarian for thirty-four years, who 
retired on January 1, 1949. 

Graduation Exercises 

Graduation exercises were held on Tuesday, June 20. A pro- 
gram was held at eleven o'clock in the Assembly Hall at the Lower 
School for the nine boys and girls who were moving over to the 

30 



Upper School and many parents attended. After these exercises 
the Lower School pupils went home. The Upper School graduation 
exercises were held at two o'clock in Dwight Hall, with Dr. Reginald 
Fitz, President of the Corporation presiding, and awarding 
Diplomas to the twelve boys and seven girls who made up the 
graduating class. This was one of the largest classes to be gradu- 
ated in recent years, although it was exceeded in numbers by the 
Class of 1938. Two certificates, granted by the Ediphone Com- 
pany, and approved by the Commercial Department of the school, 
were awarded for Ediphone operating proficiency. Manual Training 
certificates were given to four girls, and three boys received Piano 
Tuning certificates. At an earlier assembly six certificates were 
awarded by the American Red Cross for a home nursing course, 
and the swimming section of the Red Cross granted certificates for 
efficiency in swimming to twelve beginners and to four intermedi- 
ates. These were earned through special instruction under Red 
Cross leadership. 

The commencement address was given by Dr. Richard M. 
Gummere, Chairman of the Committee on Admissions of Harvard 
University. The invocation was given by the Rev. Paul B. Myers 
of the Phillips Congregational Church. Following the exercises, 
the annual reception for the members of the Senior Class was held 
in the museum, where opportunity was given to friends to con- 
gratulate them. Refreshments were served in the courtyard of 
the Howe Building, after which all departed for the long summer 
holiday. 

Record should be made of the Perkins graduates who 
completed their college work in June: John C. King, '38, Sweden- 
borgian Theological School, Cambridge; William Gallagher, '44, 
Boston College School of Social Work; Stephen Garabedian, '46, 
Rhode Island State College; Faye George, '46, Middlebury College. 
All completed their work with high distinction. Robert J. Smithdas, 
'46, who is deaf and blind, and who prepared for college at Perkins, 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, from St. John's University, 
Brooklyn. His great achievement was observed with wide acclaim 
by the college authorities and the press generally. He was featured 
on "We the People" in recognition of his high record in college. 
Sabra Oulton, '39, received a special certificate for a two year 
course in agriculture at the University of New Hampshire. Albert 
Gayzagian, who was a student at Perkins through the 6th grade, 

31 



after which he went to Watertown High School, and then to Harvard 
University, was awarded a Master of Arts degree with distinction 
at Harvard, at their graduation exercises. Anthony Cirella, '40, 
received his Master's degree in music at the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Educational Review 

In reviewing the year from the educational point of view, 
Mr. Stone as acting Principal and Dean of Faculty, states : "During 
the past year every endeavor has been made to maintain the high 
academic standard that has for so long been characteristic of 
Perkins. While major emphasis continued to be placed on the 
regular academic schedule, three new developments of the year 
should be mentioned. Perhaps the most significant of the three 
was the revising of the program for the ungraded students and 
slow learners in a course of study geared to their activities, abilities 
and interests." Mr. Stone reports that this course is open to 
all Upper School boys, who are mentally unable to continue academic 
work in a school grade, but are still able to be educated with hand 
skills. "Most of these boys," he continues, "will be unemployable in 
industry, but they may find a neighborhood market for simple hand- 
crafts which can be produced in the home, requiring only a small 
capital outlay and without using expensive machinery. A series 
of activities called 'Projects' was formed. The group is called the 
'Project Class,' and the boys in it are referred to as the 'Project 
Boys.' During the past year the boys have become increasingly 
proficient in the following crafts: mat-making, rug-weaving, braid- 
ing, bead work, leather assembly, tennis racket re-stringing, caning, 
basket-making, metal work, poultry raising and in simple home 
repairs. 

"While this craft work consumes a major part of the pupils' 
time, there are also classes in academic subjects. The pupil is 
taught the simple arithmetic needed for his poultry business or the 
computations necessary for making a profit on his saleable products. 
He learns to read for his own pleasure and to select suitable stories 
for his Talking Book. He learns enough English to write simple 
social and business letters. His social studies are directed toward 
the principles of good citizenship and the interpreting of news 
he hears on the radio. He has a course in elementary science for 
which he has a natural need and interest. He is required to take 
physical education and may take music instruction if he has talent. 

32 




THE CLASS OF 1950 



GRADUATED JUNE 20 




We have every reason to be enthusiastic over this course. The 
ten boys in the class are industrious and eager, and mischief -making 
potential is absorbed in their work. Their limited abilities are 
being developed into useful production and we hope they are being 
made into at least less-dependent citizens." 

Industrial Arts 

The two other developments are in the area of Industrial Arts. 
On the boys' side in the modernized shop, the facilities have been 
regrouped and consolidated to more effective woodworking, metal- 
working and caning areas. The wisdom of these changes in pro- 
gram has been proved during the past year in increased efficiency 
and in greater scope of instruction. On the girls' side, a room has 
been equipped for a course in pottery, taught by Miss McGaw. It 
is equipped with a new electric potter's wheel and other necessary 
facilities. The class, made up of both boys and girls, has, during 
the past year, proved to be exceptionally successful. Not only did 
these students produce useful objects, but they had the advantage 
of an aesthetic experience which is not only valuable in maintain- 
ing morale and in relieving tension, but also enables them to identify 
themselves with a cultural group and to sensitize themselves to 
beauty. 

Report should also be made that during the past year our 
Industrial Arts department was host to the Massachusetts Industrial 
Educational Society, a group of about fifty men, all High School 
and College Manual Arts teachers, who spent an evening examining 
our new shop arrangement and our shop production. They had the 
highest praise for our equipment and program. The boys' shop 
was also visited by a group of seniors and graduate students from 
the Industrial Arts department of the State Teachers College in 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts. During the winter the work of the 
Perkins students in this area was exhibited at the annual convention 
of the Massachusetts Industrial and Educational Society, where they 
received first prize for group exhibits. 

Piano Tuning 

A section within the professional training area, is the Perkins 
Pianoforte Tuning Department. During the past year, under the 
leadership of Mr. Durfee, eight students carried on this form of 
instruction. Three completed their work and are launched on pro- 
fessional careers, which give good promise of remuneration and 

S3 



service. Among those completing their work this year was one of 
the National Scholarship boys, who came from Kentucky to be 
better grounded in repair work. At the end of the year he obtained 
a position as instructor of tuning at the West Virginia School for 
the Blind. In addition to the training of students, the department 
supervises the work that is being done by Perkins trained tuners i» 
servicing all the pianos of the Boston School system. A considerable 
amount of private business comes to the department and former 
tuning students are sent out on a professional basis. Business this 
year was so successful that in addition to the regular compensation, 
a ten percent bonus was distributed among those who did this work 
in order to consume the profits, because Perkins does this entirely 
on a non-profit basis. 

Deaf-Blind Department 
Five new pupils were added to the Deaf-Blind Department at 
the opening of the year, three boys coming from Massachusetts, 
Vermont and Ohio, one girl from Missouri, and a girl who 
has been attending the Lower School, but who was transferred 
to the Deaf-Blind Department because of severe hearing loss. This 
made a group of nine in the department during the year. All 
except two made good progress in academic and social areas. 
The boy from Vermont was returned to his home because of in- 
adequate progress, while the girl from Missouri is not to return 
because of too much hearing. She, however, profited greatly by 
being at Perkins this year. Three of the pupils in the department 
were hard of hearing children rather than deaf children. Hearing 
aids were secured for two of these pupils and acoustical training 
was provided. The department had a very active year both in 
the classroom and in the socializing program for the pupils. All 
of them participated in the parties and dances given by the Upper 
School blind children, and in turn entertained some of the blind 
children in their own cottage. 

The teaching staff was strengthened by the return of Mrs. 
Rose D. Vivian, a former teacher in the department, and one new 
attendant, Miss Marjorie Mcintosh. At the dose of the school 
year, Mrs. William Huddleston, who has been an effective teacher 
for three years, resigned, and Miss Audrey White, attendant, 
terminated her work. For the coming year, Miss Beatrice F. 
Pinkham, a former teacher in the Girls' Upper School, is to 
return to help in the department. Just before school closed, Miss 

34 



Joan Shields came to Perkins from England, having been sent 
here by the National Institute for the Blind in London to receive 
training to set up a program for the doubly handicapped in that 
country. Miss Shields went with Mrs. Gittzus to Ypsilanti, 
Michigan, where Mrs. Gittzus again offered the special course 
for teachers of the deaf-blind at the summer session of the 
Michigan State Teachers College. Miss Shields will be at Perkins 
during the coming year. For six weeks during the fall, Miss 
Virginia Wiehn, teacher of the deaf, took training at Perkins 
before setting up a program for the deaf-blind in the Michigan 
School for the Blind. During the winter the department was 
visited by Mr. Daniel T. Cloud, Superintendent of the Illinois School 
for the Deaf, as that school is planning to set up a department 
for deaf-blind children. 

During the fall the annual appeal for our work with the deaf- 
blind was sent out to about 12,000 persons throughout the country. 
With the letter went again a calendar which has become 
increasingly popular in keeping alive the story of the CHILDREN 
OF THE SILENT NIGHT. The response, we feel, was very 
generous, as 1945 contributions were received, totaling $20,671.50. 
Although a personal letter of thanks was sent to each contributor, 
appreciation for the interest which inspired these many gifts is 
expressed herewith to all who may read this report. While most 
of the contributions come from individuals, many come from 
groups and organizations. Sunday Schools frequently make 
contributions, and organizations of young people are increasing in 
number. Women's clubs and service clubs are also expressing 
interest and for several years a regular contribution has come from 
a labor union of teamsters. 

The Library 
In the report of the library last year, considerable stress was 
put upon the number of volumes and the vast resources that Per- 
kins has in this area. The plans inaugurated by the new Librarian, 
Mr. Nelson Coon, were set forth, and these have been largely im- 
plemented during the past year. Both the library of Braille books 
and the teachers' library in print have been reorganized, and 
obsolete books weeded out. In the Lower School section a consider- 
able change is being made due to the fact that the school is now 
using Grade Two instead of Grade One and a Half. This left the 
library with a surplus quantity of Grade One and a Half books. 

35 



Every effort has been made to dispose of these to the best advan- 
tage, either by sale or gift. Over 700 bundles of books have been 
sent to twenty-five schools and institutions in foreign countries 
which could use English books, and which would benefit by them. 
The report of the circulation outside the school shows that 
7000 more volumes of all kinds of books were distributed 
among blind people in New England than in the previous year, 
and twelve thousand more than two years ago. The project for 
recording books for college students on Soundscriber records 
has been very helpful during the year. A total of twenty books 
for twelve college students, involving three hundred hours of 
reading were produced on more than 600 plastic records. Most of 
this reading was done at Wellesley College, under the supervision 
of Miss Hellen Guggenheimer to whom thanks is due. Miss 
Guggenheimer called into service students majoring in the sub- 
jects of the books to be recorded, thus giving an intelligent and 
understanding interpretation to the reading. Letters of apprecia- 
tion to the students for their help have been ample reward for 
the effort, according to Mr. Coon and the Wellesley girls. The cost 
of equipment was borne through a contribution of the Host Lions 
Club in Boston. 

The second objective set forth last year was the further 
development of the facilities found in the Blindiana Library. In 
this library have been discovered unknown books and papers which 
are of great value to research. During the past year more than 
twenty students have done research in this library, including the 
author of the new and authoritative book on blindness which will 
be published early in 1951. During the summer months a special 
research project for a study of conditions among blind children 
throughout the world is being carried out for the Social Commission 
of the United Nations. One of the valuable items in this library 
is the vast collection of newspaper and magazine clippings. These 
have been repackaged and reshelved and are contained in more 
than 2,000 boxes. Dates of clippings range from 1824 to 1950. 
A good beginning on the analyzing and reclassifying of this 
material was carried on through volunteer help. 

Special Exhibits 
The library has continued to hold its Exhibit of the Month 
for the benefit of pupils, using materials found in the tactual 
museum. In connection with exhibits, the librarian has prepared 

36 



an extensive exhibit of specimens of all forms of printing embossed 
for the blind. Each type is illustrated by an actual page taken 
from a book of the dates when the type was used. These are 
arranged from the first book ever embossed for the blind printed 
in Paris in 1786 up to the Standard English Braille which was 
adopted by the United States and England in 1932. Samples from 
the third book printed for the blind were shown, but Perkins has no 
copy of the second book which was printed in Amsterdam. The 
exhibit falls into the two alignments which waged war for nearly 
a century, and constituted the well known "Battle of the Types." 
It shows vividly the progress from the early linetyx>e to the now 
prevailing dot system. After being on display at Perkins, this 
exhibit was shown in Maine, Rhode Island, Iowa, and Washington, 
D. C. A special Spanish edition was prepared for shipment to 
South America. 

During the past year the library circulated 47,498 volumes. 
This total circulation was divided into 31,103 recorded books, 
15,353 embossed books and 1,042 ink print books. Of the total 
circulation 37,758 volumes were sent to readers throughout New 
England under our arrangements as a distributing library for books 
provided for the adult blind by the Library of Congress. Under 
this service there was an increase in distribution of 8,229 books, 
revealing the growing interest in reading by the blind and the 
increasing problem which the circulation of these books brings to 
Perkins. On the basis of the services that we are rendering, we 
have, during the past year, proposed to the states served, that they 
share in the cost of this distribution in the same way in which 
they now bear the cost of repairs and servicing of Talking Books. 

Budgets and Business 
"Budget increases," the Bursar reports, "may be the trend of 
the times, but that makes them no easier to take. Prices are going 
up for both men and materials and this condition was reflected 
in the new Perkins budget, sharpening the problem of trying to 
discover which is the essential need and which is not. The budget 
approved for the fiscal year, 1949-1950, totaled $511,705, but this 
did not include any allowances for special maintenance. On a 
comparable basis, it was six percent higher than the actual expenses 
of the year before. The closing of the books at the end of the year 
indicated that the total expense was $508,521.76 (still not including 
special maintenance), one-half of one percent below the budget. 

37 



"This was due," the Bursar states, "to the commendable care of the 
heads of the departments in both planning and execution, and their 
fine co-operation, working in the interest of Perkins." 

The special maintenance item which formerly appeared in the 
budget was not included this year, because of the large program 
of repairs undertaken as a result of the survey made the year 
before and to which reference is made in the President's Report 
of this year. The carrying out of this program threw a great deal 
of responsibility upon the department of buildings and grounds, 
as supervised by Mr. Hemphill. Many of the items of work were 
too large to handle with our own maintenance staff, and had to be 
undertaken by contractors. A great deal of work, however, was 
undertaken by our own maintenance men, supplemented by extra 
help. 

The change of Treasurers made additional work in the business 
ofl&ces. Several new accounts, the handling of special funds and 
the distribution of retirement allowances have been transferred 
from the Boston office to the office at the school. At the beginning 
of the year, the Howe Memorial Press accounts were transferred 
to the school office, and these have been well integrated and the 
work assimilated by the bookkeeping staff. During the latter i)art 
of the year, an extensive study of the coverage of our fire and casualty 
insurance was undertaken and is still in progress. As the new year 
opens a study is being made of the advisability of Perkins' entering 
the Social Security plan, now possible through the recent amendment 
of that act by Congress, to include non-profit institutions. All of 
this work and the general supervision of the accounts make us 
grateful for the efficiency and untiring interest of Mr. Hemphill, 
the Bursar. He, in turn, in his report, expresses his appreciation 
of the cheerful willingness and friendship of the men in the main- 
tenance department and of the women in the offices. 

The Massachusetts Study 

The Recess Commission appointed by the Massachusetts authori- 
ties to study matters pertaining to the blind was continued for 
another year. During the winter the committee held several hear- 
ings and the members have made an intensive study of the prob- 
lems of blindness and the situation within the Commonwealth. They 
have visited work for the blind outside of the state, and have held 
two hearings in cities beyond the Boston area. The Director was 
invited to testify at one of the hearings, presenting some aspects 

38 



of the educational situation. Asked about the placement of Massa- 
chusetts pupils, he was requested to make a tabulation of the em- 
ployment status of those who had left within five years. A sum- 
mary of this study may be of interest. 

During the years 1945 to 1949, 120 Massachusetts pupils left 
Perkins. Twenty-seven of these were graduates, while ninety-three 
left for a variety of reasons. Of the total of 120, forty are in 
other schools. Eliminating those in school, it was interesting to 
observe that about one half (thirteen) of the graduates were em- 
ployed, while less than one-third (seventeen) of the non-graduates 
are working. Among the non-graduates, however, were twenty-six 
who had left because they "ceased to progress," and of that number 
thirteen would be classified as unemployable. While this situation 
may be described as "not too bad," it should be better, and it is 
hoped that one of the recommendations of the Recess Commission 
will be the strengthening of the personnel service within the Divi- 
sion of the Blind, where responsibility for placement legally rests. 

In order to give a more comprehensive picture, we secured 
similar data regarding former pupils from outside of Massachusetts, 
and compiled the table below concerning all pupils who have left 
Perkins in the five years 1945-1949. 

Summary op Activities of Pupils who left Perkins 1945-1949 



At School 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Died 

Unknown 

23 23 46 

Non-graduates (195) 

Not 
In Not At now No 

Reason for leaving School Emp'd Emp'd Home Blind Dead Infor. ToM 

Other schools 45 4 3 4 

Completed training 9 15 4 1 

Ceased to Progress 12t 7 3 18 

Withdrew voluntarily 4 9 2 7 

Expelled 12 11 
Moved away 

ni health 11 5 
Deceased 



Graduates (46) 






Bovs: 


Girla: 


Total. 


3 


9 


12 


18 


10 


28 


1 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1 

1 





3 


64 




8 


37 
40 


1 


9 


32 




1 


6 




5 


5 


3 




10 


1 




1 



tin feeble-minded schools, or on waiting lists, 
'Includes nine ^Is married. 



72 38 13 36* 5 5 26 195 

Ing 

39 



Another study pertaining to the vocations of persons trained 
at Perkins is to be found in a thesis written by Miss Dorothy 
Steinert as part of her work at Simmons College School of Social 
Work. Miss Steinert analyzed the records of all the living persons, 
who, after leaving Perkins, went on to higher education. This 
study embraced a total of 68 persons, but only 58 between the ages 
of twenty and sixty, (the normally employable age group) were 
considered. Miss Steinert pointed out that the amount and type 
of higher education which these persons had was extremely varied, 
ranging from one or two years in a specialized vocational school 
to the attainment of an advanced degree in law, osteopathy, or 
social work. Approximately one half of the fifty-eight persons 
attended graduate schools after the completion of their under- 
graduate studies. 

Study of Higher Education 

At the time the study was made, October 1948, forty-eight of 
the fifty-eight persons were employed. The majority were engaged 
in some type of business or professional work. The largest field 
of employment was education, with the majority teaching in resi- 
dential schools for the blind or engaged in some phase of education 
for the adult blind. Only one person was teaching in a seeing 
school. Law was the professional field of ten men, eight of whom 
were totally blind and have established their own law practice. 
Two were members of state legislatures. Only one man who had 
begun the practice of law was unable to finish it. He is now en- 
gaged as a clerical worker. 

The remaining persons in the study group were employed 
in the fields of osteopathy, social work, insurance, public relations, 
retail selling, clerical work and music. There were from one to 
four persons in each of these fields. Only one of the forty-eight 
employed persons found it necessary to secure work in sheltered 
industry. The great majority were engaged in business or pro- 
fessional fields where they competed with sighted workers. 

"It was concluded," Miss Steinert reported, "that for the 
majority of persons under study, their courses in higher education 
did benefit them vocationally. The majority were employed in 
business or professional fields for which some course in higher 
education was essential. Thirty-six of the forty-eight employed 
persons had positions in the general field of their choice. Forty- 
four were self-supporting, half of whom were able to contribute 
to the support of others, and all enjoyed the work they were doing. 

40 




TEACHING HOME-MAKING TO DEAF-BLIND 



TEACHING GEOGRAPHY AND WORLD AFFAIRS 




It is true, however, that many did not have positions which are 
generally open to sighted persons with the same qualifications. 
It would appear that there is still need for individual guidance 
and more consideration of suitable vocations for the college-trained 
blind." 

The National Scene 

Turning to the national scene, Perkins continues to make its 
contribution through leadership and support. Twenty-five staff 
members attended the biennial convention of the American Associa- 
tion of Instructors of the Blind, held at the Overbrook School in 
Philadelphia, June 26 to 30, and nine members appeared on the 
program. The most interesting meeting at the convention was held 
at The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, where a demonstration 
was given of many devices that have been and are in the process of 
being developed for the benefit of the blind. They included stereo- 
typers, magnifiers, reading and guidance devices. The assembling 
of these devices was arranged by Mr. Waterhouse, and the Director 
presided at the meeting. 

Mr. Waterhouse went to Salt Lake City to attend the convention 
of the American Association of Workers for the Blind, as he is secre- 
tary of the section of "Executive Heads of Publishing Houses for 
the Blind" and continued his journey to the West Coast where he 
demonstrated the new Perkins Brailler to several groups of blind 
people. During the year he has been associated with research work 
carried on by the RCA, IBM, The Franklin Institute and the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. He is also a member of the ad- 
visory committee of the Technical Research Department of the 
American Foundation for the Blind. 

Dr. Hayes through the year has continued his studies, evalu- 
ating the many forms of psychological tests for the blind within the 
school and outside of the school. He has served as chairman of the 
National Psychological Research Council for the Blind, which is 
sponsored by the Federal OflEice of Vocational Rehabilitation. The 
council has just completed a very valuable bibliography of unpub- 
lished research on the blind, most of the material being on file in 
university libraries. In addition to revealing what has already been 
done in the field of research for the blind, the council is developing 
an extensive program on a nation-wide basis which gives great 
promise. Dr. Hayes published several articles on mental testing of 
the blind and read a paper on the use of tests in the Educational and 

41 



Vocational Guidance of the Blind at the Convention of the American 
Psychological Association in September at State College, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

National Legislation Jj 

The Director has continued to serve on the Boards of many 
national organizations and acted as chairman of the Committee on 
Legislation of the American Association of Instructors of the Blind. 

In the area of national legislation, the most important action 
was the amending of the Social Security Act. Title X, covering Aid 
to the Blind, has been revised to permit blind persons to earn up to 
fifty dollars a month v^ithout deduction from the financial aid 
given by the State with Federal participation. This is a great 
achievement for which workers for the blind have been striving for 
several years. Other activity pertained to the question of whether 
or not schools for the blind would benefit under several bills intro- 
duced into the Congress to provide Federal aid to schools, but no 
legislation was enacted in this area. The American Printing House 
for the Blind, which is supported by Federal funds, had considerable 
concern during the year, because of an amendment to the appropria- 
tion bill, which would have curtailed its production of large type 
books and a request for a doubling of the appropriation for the 
program of the Printing House because of increased costs. 

The International Front 

In the report of last year, an account was given of the Inter- 
national Conference of Workers for the Blind held at Merton Col- 
lege, Oxford, in August, 1949. Since that time considerable pro- 
gress has been made on the international front and it may be of 
interest to record some of these developments in this year's report. 
Readers of the last report will recall that the conference at Oxford 
was attended by nearly one hundred workers in the field of the 
blind, representing eighteen countries. At that conference a mini- 
mum program of work for the blind was unanimously adopted and 
set forth as a suitable plan for every country which wanted to 
modernize or to initiate a program for the visually handicapped. 
This conference was interested primarily in work on the adult level, 
but at the meeting a group of educators of the blind proposed that 
a similar conference at the level of childhood, be called and a Com- 
mittee was appointed to give consideration to such a gathering, 
possibly in the summer of 1951. 

42 



The findings of the Oxford conference, printed in a pamphlet 
entitled "The Place of the Blind in the Modern World," have been 
widely distributed and favorably received. The program adopted 
and outlined in this publication together with certain recommenda- 
tions for definite projects of work within the field of the blind was 
presented to the United Nations for consideration and approval. 
This report was submitted to Social Commission V at its meeting at 
Lake Success, December, 1949. The steps which have been taken 
since that time will be related to show the progress which has been 
made, as well as to outline the procedure which is followed in getting 
action through the United Nations. The Social Commission which 
is a division of the Social and Economic Conference considered the 
report of the Oxford Conference and gave a favorable reaction to 
several of the proposals, including one to set up in some country a 
demonstration project for the social rehabilitation of the blind. The 
Commission formally requested the Secretary-General to develop a 
program for the blind including a plan for a demonstration center 
for social rehabilitation of the blind, and to report to Social Com- 
mission VI on the progress of the plan, in detail, together with 
estimated costs. The Social Commission also recommended to the 
Economic and Social Commission its consideration of the resolution 
approving the Oxford program as a helpful basis for recommenda- 
tions to governments seeking advice, and to recognize the interest 
of the United Nations in the rehabilitation of the blind. 

United Nations 
Acting on the request of Social Commission V, the Secretary- 
General engaged the Associate Director of the American Foundation 
of the Overseas Blind, and the Director of Perkins, to formulate a 
program of work for the blind, which would include a plan for a 
demonstration project of rehabilitation. Such a program was pre- 
pared, and upon receiving it, the Secretary-General submitted it to 
a meeting of the heads of the allied agencies of UN, UNESCO, 
WHO, ILO and others, at a meeting held in Geneva in March, 1950. 
These organizations all have an interest in work for the blind and 
the purpose of this meeting was to integrate the recommended pro- 
gram into the plans of the agencies so that there would be uni- 
formity and also to assign special aspects to the specialized agencies, 
so that there would be no duplication. This meeting approved the 
plan in principal, and the proposal for a rehabilitation center as 
well as the establishment of a division of the blind within the 
Secretariat. 

43 



The program as revised through these steps was then presented 
at the meeting of Social Commission VI, held in New York in April 
and May, 1950. This Commission was not so favorably disposed 
toward a separate department of the blind as the fifth Commission 
and recommended that a section be set up for the physically handi- 
capped, including the blind. A small appropriation for this purpose 
was recommended. It was also not disposed to press the matter of 
a rehabilitation center. The modified report was then sent to the 
eleventh session of the Economic and Social Council which met in 
Geneva in July. 

The Social and Economic Council, at the Geneva meeting, con- 
sidered the report of the Social Commission, based on the recom- 
mendations of the Geneva meeting and of the Secretariat, and 
recommended the developing of a broad coordinated program of 
rehabilitation of the physically handicapped including the blind. The 
Council requested the Secretary-General to plan, jointly with the 
specialized agencies, a well coordinated program ; to provide services 
under Res. 58 (I) ; to expand present facilities and to provide pros- 
thetic devices; to include in the budget for 1951, funds to employ 
a staff to initiate the program, and finally, to report to Social Com- 
mission VII, the progress made. 

The United Nations' interest in the blind had been developing 
at the same time in another section of the Social Commission — the 
Committee on Social Aspects of the Rehabilitation of Physically 
Handicapped Children, At the first meeting of the Social Commis- 
sion, February, 1947, a resolution was passed calling for studies of 
handicapped children. This was a carry-over from work v/hich had 
previously been done by the League of Nations and had later been 
an activity of UNRRA. The Commission had been charged to make 
a study on "The Welfare and Re-education of Children, physically 
or mentally handicapped or in moral danger." This study was 
approved by the Social and Economic Council at its fourth session 
in March, 1948. Only recently, however, has authorization been 
given to proceed with the study, and that authority was limited to a 
survey of the blind, it being felt that the blind was an appropriate 
group with which to begin. 

International Survey 

Steps are now under way to conduct an international survey of 
conditions among blind children throughout the world. The Social 
Commission has requested the Director of Perkins to act as 

44 



Consultant on this study and to write the report. A questionnaire has 
been sent to different countries and other contacts are being de- 
veloped which will give more detailed information. As a part of 
this study, a person has reviewed all the material in the Perkins 
Blindiana Library, taking country by country, seeking information 
which will meet the requirements set forth in the questionnaire. 
Perkins can well be proud of the valuable material which it has 
within that Library and of the fact that it is now being put to use 
in a world-wide study. 

The Director spent most of the month of April in Iran, where 
he went at the invitation of the Imperial Organization for Social 
Welfare to study the problems of the blind in that country and to 
lay out a program for their education. This trip was arranged by 
the Iran Foundation, Inc. of New York City through consultation 
with His Excellency, the Ambassador of Iran in Washington. Ar- 
rangements were made for the flight to Iran, leaving April 2, and 
returning to New York, April 29. During that time 15,000 miles 
were travelled and stops made in ten foreign countries. 

On the way over, two days were spent in Paris to confer with 
officials of UNESCO. A very pleasant interview was held with 
Senor Torres Bodet, Secretary-General of UNESCO, discussing the 
interests of that organization in the blind, particularly in connection 
with the International Conference of Educators of the Blind for 
which the sponsorship of UNESCO is desired. Conferences were 
also held with Sir Clutha Mackenzie, Consultant on Braille for 
UNESCO, who had just completed a series of international confer- 
ences looking toward the attainment of a world-wide system of 
Braille. Opportunity was given to see the charts of this study and 
to confer with those who are interested in it. Returning, a day was 
spent in Amsterdam at the school in Bussum, where it has been pro- 
posed to have the International Conference of Educators. Dr. 
Zeper, head of the school, was a genial host and was very cordial in 
his desire to hold the conference at his beautiful school fifteen miles 
outside of Amsterdam. 

A Program for Iran 
Upon arriving in Teheran a conference was held with the Coun- 
cil of the Imperial Society at which Princess Achraf, twin sister of 
the Shah, presided. Other conferences were held with Dr. Javad 
Ashtiani, Director of the Imperial Organization, Dr. A. Torab 
Mehra, Medical Director of the Iran Foundation, and other officials 

45 



in the field of education and social welfare. While most of the time 
was spent in Teheran, a pleasant visit was made to Isfahan, the 
former capital of Iran, which is more typical of the Persia of history 
than the modern city of Teheran. The only organized work for the 
blind in Iran is at Isfahan, and is being carried on by the English 
Church Mission. A small school with about twenty-five pupils is 
conducted by Miss Gwen Gasper at the mission. In view of its 
restricted personnel and limited finances, excellent work is being 
done. 

A fifty page report outlining a program of education and other 
facilities for the blind was prepared while in Iran and submitted to 
the Imperial Council. This calls for a ten-year program of educa- 
tion, based largely on the system of schooling which now prevails 
in that country. It also includes provision for the proposed reha- 
bilitation center if Iran is chosen by the United Nations. This pro- 
gram was favorably received and already some of the first recom- 
mendations are being implemented. The Director found this trip 
a most interesting experience and returned with his horizons widened 
and a higher appreciation of the prestige of Perkins which caused 
the authorities in that far-away country to send to this School for 
guidance in planning its program. 

Gabriel Farrell, Director 



46 



T 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

OPHTHALMOLOGIST'S REPORT 

HE FOLLOWING diagnoses were ascribed to the forty-five 
new students examined during the year 1949-1950: 



Retrolental Fibroplasia 11 Macular Degeneration 2 

Buphthalmos 8 Detached Retina (idiopathic) 2 

Microphthalmos 2 Uveitis 2 

Corneal Dystrophy 1 Congenital Cataracts 4 

Optic Atrophy 12 Anophthalmos (cause unknown) .... 1 

Chorioretinitis 2 Sympathetic Ophthalmia 1 

Retinitis Pigmentosa 1 Measles Encephalitis 1 

In addition to the regular visits to Perkins Institution by our 
two ophthalmologists, there were twenty-eight visits to the Eye 
Clinic of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary for consultation 
and twenty-five visits to our ophthalmologists' offices for treatment 
and examination. 

There were twenty-five visits to Mager and Gougleman for the 
fitting of new prosthesis. 

Hospital Admissions : Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Cyclodialysis 3 Chemotherapy 2 

Enucleation 1 Retinal Surgery 1 

Cataract Extraction 6 Iridectomy 1 



Operation for Strabismus 2 



Trygve GUNDERSEN, M. D. 

Henry A. Mosher, M. D. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 

The following is the report of the Medical Department for 
1949-1950 : 

Hospital Admissions: Nerve 13 

Allcrffv X 

Massachusetts General Hospital : Skin 8 

Orthopedic surgery 

Suturing of scalp wound 

Suturing of hand injury 

Abdominal pain 

Appendectomy 

House of Good Samaritan — chorea 

Boston City Hospital— brain tumor .... 

Children's Hospital — brain tumor 

Worcester Hosp. — fractured jaw 

Maine General Hosp. — ^brain tumor .... 

Winchester Hosp. — tonsillectomy 

Beth Israel Hosp. — ^teeth extract 

Robert B. Brigham — arthritis 

Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Question of pituitary tumor 

Sinus Operation 



Ovarian Dysfunction 7 

Children's Medical 5 

Plastic 1 

Nose and Throat 10 

South Medical 7 

Other Hospitals: 

Children's Medical Center 12 

Boston City 1 

X-Rays : 

Taken at MGM 10 

Chest X-Rays by Public Health .... 305 



I 



Diagnostic Tests: 

Electroencephelograms 4 

Clinic Visits — ^Mass. General Hospital: Audiograms 7 



Orthopedic 27 Lumbar Punctures 

47 



Total sickness in cottages was 250, two of which were measles. 
There was one death among the students, Carl Albee, who was at 
home at the time. '' M 

A physical examination was done on every student, also a 
urinalysis, and blood test. All new students who had not previously 
been immunized were given immunization against pertussis, te- 
tanus, and diphtheria. All the students in the lower school who 
needed booster shots against these three diseases were given them. 
The entire upper school was given booster shots of tetanus toxoid. 

The entire staff and all new students had Chest X-rays taken 
by the Portable Unit of the Middlesex Tuberculosis Association. 

The entire year was one of extremely good health among our 

pupils. 

Victor G. Balboni, M. D. 

DENTIST'S KEPORT, UPPER SCHOOL 

The following is the report of Dental Operations performed 
for the pupils of the Upper School for the year 1949-1950 : 

Amalgam fillings 281 Vitallium Removable Bridges 1 

Cement fillings 119 Sodium Florida treatments 49 

Synthetic porcelain 93 X-Rays M 

Zinc Oxide-eugenol 42 Extractions • 

Silver Nitrate treatments 178 Pericoronitis 8 

Root Canal treatments 18 Vincents Infection 6 

Vitallium and Acrylic Dentures 2 

All the pupils of the Upper School received oral prophylactic 
treatments at the Forsyth Dental Infirmary, while the deaf-blind 
pupils had their teeth cleaned in the Dental Clinic at Perkins 
Institution. We are indebted to Dr. Neville Booth, Chief of the 
Exodontia Department of Forsyth Dental Infirmary for his as- 
sistance with the more difiicult extraction cases. 

DENTIST'S REPORT, LOWER SCHOOL 

During the school year, ending June, 1950, the following 
dental operations were performed: 

Alloy fillings 227 Temporary teeth extracted 16 

Cement fillings I' 14 Fluorine treatments 18 

Cement & Alloy fillings 1 Upper School emergencies 7 

Synthetic porcelain fillingB 4 Number of pupils completed ....... 110 

Silver Nitrate treatments 197 Number of new pupils completed .. 31 

Prophylactic treatments 117 Total number of pupils treated 117 

Teeth devitalized 2 Miscellaneous treatments 45 

Treatments for above 7 

Reinhold Ruelberg, D. M. D. 

48 



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i 

.' 1 


1 ^ 


# 


i. 

l' 




^ 





A NEW COURSE — CERAMICS 



OLD SKILLS — HAND AND MACHINE 




PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

This year we discontinued our former program of general 
ultraviolet treatments to the entire student body. The only stu- 
dents who received ultraviolet treatments were those for whom 
they were prescribed by either our Medical Department or a der- 
matologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

All the pupils in the Lower School received special posture 
training in weekly posture classes. Each month the class in the 
Primary and Intermediate Departments which had worked the hard- 
est to maintain good posture was awarded the Good Posture Ban- 
ner for a month. Those pupils in the Lower School who showed 
great improvement in their posture were awarded Posture Pete 
pins. 

A preliminary course in massage was offered to those students 
in the Upper School who were interested in massage as their vo- 
cation. 

Twenty-nine students received special training in corrective 
exercises. There were five appointments made at the Arthritic 
Clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospital for some of our 
students. Eight pupils were fitted to arch supports at the Ortho- 
pedic Clinic at the Massachusets General Hospital. 

Summary 

Ultraviolet treatments 1062 Corrective exercise periods 825 

Infrared treatments 172 Posture classes 811 

Massages 144 Massagre classes 104 

Shirlie L. Smith, R.P.T.T. 



49 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 

THE WORKSHOP has been confronted by the ever increasing 
costs of operation which prevail in all industrial enterprises 
both sheltered and commercial. 

Our yearly statement reflects this condition as well as the 
added expense of a very essential training program undertaken in 
recent months. 

A plan for trainees in the mattress-making department was 
reinstituted and in addition an entirely new scheme for the pro- 
duction of upholstered springs was initiated. The latter project 
is a radical departure from previously accepted occupational pur- 
suits in our field. 

Results of this apprentice set-up have fallen short of expecta- 
tions but it is inadvisable to formulate definite plans for the con- 
tinuance of the project without careful study of the factors in- 
volved in an arrangement of this kind. 

In a forthcoming, detailed report, to the Director and trustees, 
comprehensive suggestions and recommendations will be submitted 
for consideration. j 

The following is a summary of the work done and wages paid 
in the Workshop Department during the fiscal year 1949-50 : 

Mattresses renovated: 

For individuals 1363 

For Division of the Blind 1487 

For other Institutions 687 

Total Mattresses Renovated 3,537 

New Mattresses Made 35 

Pillows Renovated (all kinds) 2,173 

New Pillows Made (all kinds) 87 

Box Springs Renovated 53 

New Box Springs Made 15 

Chairs Recaned 1,518 

Wages Paid to Blind Workers $31,537.46 

Sales $74,921.34 

Donald Remick, Manager 

50 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Work Account for the Year Ending August 31, 1950 

Average 

Literature Pages Embossed: 1949/50 1941/50 

Literature pages embossed 16,825 9,082 

Music 504 688 

Total 17,329 9,770 

Printing: 

Literature pages printed 437,909 389,390 

Music pages printed 44,318 57,532 

Miscellaneous 234,514 150,351 

Total 716,741 597,273 

Made Distributed Average 
Appliances and Games this year this year 19^1/50 

Shorthand writers 24 14 

Pocket slates 1,231 2,421 1,722 

Desk slates 859 1,466 1,282 

Styluses 14,760 6,386 6,352 

Erasers 581 1,102 

Fiber writing cards 2,185 1,732 1,793 

Clark writing grills 158 233 

Aluminum alphabets 146 99 115 

Signature guides 210 158 

Mathematical instruments 232 201 

Playing cards, decks 217 426 382 

Games: (Checkers, Dominoes, 152 552 700 
Puzzle-Pegs, Chess, and Chi- 
nese Checkers) 

Caning Vises 12 4 

Edward J. Waterhouse 

51 



LIST OF PUPILS 



UPPER SCHOOL BOYS 



Arsnow, George F., Jr.— Fall River, Mass. 
Bizon, Robert — Chicopee, Mass. 
Blake, George E. — ^Rochester, N. H. 
Bourgoin, Arthur — Brunswick, Maine 
Boyd, Vernon J. G. — Lynn, Mass. 
Cordeiro, Raul Ronald— Fall River, Mass. 
Cote, Jules D. — ^Manchester, N. H. 
Cox, Edward Paul — LoweU, Mass. 
Coy, Erwin — Lisbon Falls, Maine 
Crocker, Albert Bruce — Howland, Maine 
Faragi, John — Saugus, Mass. 
Fermino, Robert— New Bedford, Mass. 
Foumier, Raymond A. — Lowell, Mass. 
Gasper, Alfred C. — Taunton, Mass. 
Germano, Manuel — Bristol, R. I. 
Guyette, Irving, Jr. — N. Providence, R. I. 
Hawthorne, John, Jr.— Millers Falls, Mass. 
Holden, David — Chelsea, Mass. 
Kagan, Stanley J.— Chicopee, Mass. 
Kamis, Richard P.— Mattapan, Mass. 
Keefe, Lawrence — Woonsocket, R. I. 
Leotta, Louis, Jr. — E. Boston, Mass. 
Little, Donald B. — Contoocook, N. H. 
Lunden, Paul C. — Brattleboro, Vt. 
Lundquist, Jan Arne — Melrose, Mass. 
McCafferty, Hugh H. — Mexico, Maine 
McDonald, Francis C. — Sharon, Mass. 



McDowell, Thomas R. — Leominster, Mass. 
Melican, Walter J., Jr. — Watertown, Mass. 
Morrissette, Emile — Nashua, N. H. 
Morrissey, Francis Wm. — S. Boston, Mass. 
Morse, Stanley D., Jr. — Marshfield, Mass. 
Nicholas, Oliver, Jr. — Lewiston, Maine 
Osborn, James L. — Plymouth, Mass. 
Pereira, Arthur — New Bedford, Mass. 
Piraino, James — Gloucester, Mass. 
Randall, Roger G. — W. Bridgewater, Mass. 
Raschi, Eugene G. — Springfield, Mass. 
Raymond, Carl F. — Jericho, Vermont 
Rathbun, Robert P.— W. Medford, Mass. 
Reynolds, Carl A.. Jr. — Shelbume, Vermont 
Rogers, Stephen J., Jr. — Medford, Mass. 
Roy, Laurent W. — Woonsocket, R. I. 
Sardo, Anton — Palmer, Mass. 
Sears, Arthur, Jr. — Erving, Mass. 
Silveira, Joseph J. — Newport, R. I. 
Skinner, H. Gardner — Danvers, Mass. 
Snow, Charles R. — Haverhill, Mass. 
Snyder, Edward I. — Three Rivers, Mass. 
Sprinkle, Jack Willis — Roanoke, Virginia 
Vasapolli, Joseph — Wobum, Mass. 
Walker, Theodore — Knoxville, Tenn. 
Walsh, William — Boston, Mass. 
Young, Willis — Roxbury, Mass. 



UPPER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Accorsi, Rachel — Franklin, Mass. 
Ammons, Dorothy F. — Clinton, N. C. 
Baker, Amelia — Grand Isle, Vt. 
Barber, Dorothy J. — Taunton, Mass. 
Berarducci, Joan E. — Cranston, R. I. 
Birge, Elaine L. — Leverett, Mass. 
Boyd, Janet— Waltham, Mass. 
Chan, Louise — Canton, China 
Charbonneau, Gloria E. — Lowell, Maes. 
DeAngelis, Dorothy — Providence, R. I. 
D'lorio, Agatha M. — Worcester, Mass. 
Dodge, Carolyn — Warwick Neck, R. I. 
Doustou, Bemadette — Sherman Station, Me. 
Doyen, Marjorie — S. Portland, Maine 
Fisher, Ruth Ann — Waltham, Mass. 
Forrest, Maureen — Chicopee, Mass. 
Gerdes, Helen — Portland, Maine 



Greenlaw, Dorothy — Auburn, Maine 
Johnson, Cleta Marion — Ogdeu, Utah 
Karant, Galine — Buenos Aires, Argentina 
Libby, Virginia L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Liscomb, Janice C. — Salisbury Cove, Maine 
Matthews, Lucy E. — Cambridge, Mass. 
McClure, Ann Marie — ^Millinocket, Maine 
McDowell, Theresa A. — Leominster, Mass. 
Merrill, Nancie V. — Dover, N. H. 
Morin, Catherine H.— W. Yarmouth. Mass. 
Nichols, Barbara — Shelbume, Vermont 
Niedzinski, Pauline — ^Worcester, Mass. 
Olson, Gloria M. — ^Augusta, Maine 
Pacheco, PriscDla A. — Somerset, Mass. 
Palmer, Shirley M. — Somerville, Mass. 
Polselli, Anna Mae — Worcester, Mass. 
Porter, Virginia — ^Lubec, Maine 



52 



Potter, Madine — S. Pomfret, Vt. 
Silvia, Barbara M. — Taunton, Mass. 
Tbomason, Cyril — Richmond, Va. 



Yau, Grace — Canton, China 
Younger, Lorraine — Boston, Mass. 



DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 



Bare, Carl John — Niles, Ohio 
Mansfield, Pauline A. — Seattle, Wash. 
Morgan, Juanita A. — Buena Vista, Col. 
Norria, Perry G. — Birmingham, Ala. 



Prentice, Donald — Dublin, Eire 
Reis, Edward Wiliam — Hillsdale, N. J. 
Sabonaitis, Gayle A. — Worcester, Mass. 
Sutton, Barbara — S. Braintree, Mass. 



LOWER SCHOOL BOYS 



Andrews, Luther W., Jr.— Coventry, R. I. 
Angney, David H. — Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Bailly, Christopher B. — Wollaston, Mass. 
Barresi, Paul Louis — Chelsea, Mass. 
Beaulieu, John — Waterville, Maine 
Bellantoni, Joseph — Belmont, Mass. 
Bittman, George C. — Dorchester, Mass. 
Brooks, Robert — Pawlet, Vermont 
Brovsme, Robert A., Jr. — Freeport, N. Y. 
Brugsch, Henry J. — Waban, Mass. 
Callahan, Peter J. — White Horse Beach, 

Mass. 
Carlo, John Stephen — ^Worcester, Mass. 
Caron, Gilbert C. — Providence, R. I. 
Chapman, Richard B., Jr. — Quincy, Mass. 
Cheever, David III — Millis, Mass. 
Cimon, Joseph C. — Burlington, Vt. 
Crohan, David — Providence, R. I. 
Cunningham, James J. — Dover, N. H. 
Dennis. Ronald A. — Salem, Mass. 
Donovan, John L., Jr. — Laconia, N. H. 
Dyer, Dan Bues, Jr. — ^Manassa, Va. 
Gosselin, Louis A. — ^Manchester, N. H. 
Goumas, Charles — Somerville, Mass. 
Hickey, John — Newtonville, Mass. 
Holdt, Robert A., Jr. — Huntington, W. Va. 
Hopkins, Paul F., Jr.— Pontiac, E. I. 
Jackson, Thomas O. — Tuskegee, Ala. 
Johnson, Robert A. — Lynn, Mass. 
Johnson, Scott — E. Templeton, Mass. 
Johnson, Stephen E. — W. Lebanon, N. H. 
Koehler, Theodore — Fitzwilliam Depot, N.H. 
Kolbusz, Frank — Holyoke, Mass. 
Leh, George — Greenfield, Mass. 
Libby, Alvah L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Macdonald, Donald C. — W. Harwich, Mass. 
Manning, John J. — ^Wilton, N. H. 



McEachern, John N. — Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Menard, Leonard — Pittsfield, Mass. 
Miller, Robert J. — Chester, Mass. 
Murray, Russell E., Jr. — Wobum, Mass. 
Nadeau, Richard — Lewiston, Maine 
O'Brien, Wallace Alan — N. Plymouth, Mass. 
Oborne, Clinton J. A. — Somerville, Mass. 
Oliver, Philip N. — Townsend, Mass. 
Pacheco, Francis — Fall River, Mass. 
Pscheeo, Joseph E., Jr. — Somerset, Mass. 
Paradise, Maurice — Nashua, N. H. 
Perry, Albert — Hillsgrove, R. I. 
Perry, Donald J. — Lowell, Mass. 
Phifer, George H., Jr. — Fall River, Mass. 
Pierce, Anthony — Dighton, Mass. 
Purdy, Leslie J. — Belmont, Mass. 
Reineke, Allan F.— Warwick, R. I. 
Ross, Donald F.— Littleton, N. H. 
Royal, Francis X., Jr. — Watertown, Mass. 
Sanders, John B. — Cohasset, Mass. 
Shelf, Robert Allen— Roxbury, Mass. 
Shiner, Franklin Paul— Montpelier, Vt. 
Skistimas, Paul — ^Mattapan, Mass. 
Smith, Arthur K., Jr.— Attleboro, Mass. 
Sweet, Douglaa H. — ^W. Swanzey, N. H. 
Tainter, Kenneth A. — Brooklin, Maine 
Thomas, Russell J.— Arlington, Mass. 
Thorpe, Kenneth D. — ^Misquamicut, R. I. 
Tripp, Raymond L. — Hyannis, Mass. 
Turner, Robert A. — ^Milton, Vermont 
Uphold, Barry Wayne — Boston, Mass. 
Vulcan, Brant Stuart— New York City 
Wakefield, Douglas — Lyndonville, Vt. 
Washburn, Lawrence W. — Alburg, Vermont 
White, Lloyd O. — Rochester, N. H. 
Whitney, James Lee — Brattleboro, Vt. 
Wood, Richard Howard — Aubumdale, Mass. 



53 



LOWER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Avedisian, Carol E.— Northbridge, Mass. 
Barrows, Joan — Braintree, Mass. 
Bleakney, Brenda S. — Boston, Mass. 
Blizard, Marion Lee — ^Madison, Maine 
Boyer, Jeanne M. — Florence, Mass. 
Boyle, Maureen A. — ^Dracut, Mass. 
Brown, Linda Carol — ^Mansfield, Mass. 
Callahan, Louise — Billerica, Mass. 
Chamberlain, Carolyn E.— Whitman, Mass. 
Connor, Martha B. — ^Winthrop, Mass. 
Cook, Donna-Lee — ^Middleboro, Mass. 
Corey, Sharon — Hodgdon, Maine 
Cote, Vivian Rita— Lawrence, Mass. 
Daigneault, Aline M.— Worcester, Mass. 
Davis, Carol Jean — Warwick, R. I. 
Derouin, Barbara L. — Cranston, R. I. 
Dowling, Patricia — ^Methuen, Mass. 
Downiijg, Pauline — ^Roxbury, Mass. 

Driben, Joyce H. — Dorchester, Mass. 

Dunlap, Elizabeth N.— New Orleans. La. 

Duplessis, Nancy Ann — Clinton, Maine 

Feeley, Joanne L. — Franklin, Mass. 

Finan, Irene — E. Greenwich, R. I. 

Folsom, Margaret — Framingham, Mass. 

Galleshaw, Julia A. — Providence, R. I. 

Geyer, Karen — S. Braintree, Mass. 

Grady, Beverly M. — Pittsfield, Mass. 

Hanscom, Lola L. — Lincoln, Maine 

Harrington, Valerie E. — Providence, B. I. 

Hatch, Judith C. — Needham, Mass. 

Henderson, Jane A. — ^E. Boston, Mass. 

Johnson, Lillian F.— Arlington, Mass. 

Johnson, Natalie— E. Templeton, Mass. 

Jones, Linda Irene — Brandon, Vermont 

Kaplan, Mary Patricia — Boston, Mass. 

Kaufman, Fern — ^Revere, Mass. 

Kelley, Brenda— Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



Lareau, Mary Ann — ^Worcester, Mass. 
Mahoney, Kathleen V. — Peabody, Mass. 
Marston, Sharon L. — Watertown, Mass. 
MeAuliffe, Barbara — Roxbury, Mass. 
McLaughlin, Rita Jean — N. Wilmington, 

Mass. 
Mercey, Cynthia Joy — Cambridge, Vt. 
Morehouse, Pearl — Burlington, Vt. 
Morreo, Diana — Newton, Mass. 
Mulready, Katharine C. — E. Lynn, Mass. 
Nerney, Carol Ann — N. Attleboro, Mass. 
Noddin, Carolyn — ^Ayer, Mass. 
Noddin. Sandra — Ayer, Mass. 
Nyland, Collette — Beverly, Mass. " 

Oliver, Doris E. — Townsend, Mass. 
Page, Nancy Rebecca — Southbridge, Mass. 
Phifer, Joy C. — Fall River, Mass. 
Pinkham, Paula— Maiden, Mass. 
Plante, Carolyn Lee — Rochester, N. H. 
Pownall, Sara Jane — Norwood, Mass. 
Purinton, Nancy Ann — South China, Maine 
Reed, Amelia— Farmington, N. H. 
Reynolds, Linda Ann — Wollaston, Mass. 
Rice, Nicolina — Rutland, Vermont 
Ruby, Nancy — Wakefield, Mass. 
Russell, Patricia Ann — Boston, Mass. 
Schmidt, Alice Karen — Webster, Mass. 
Staples, Sandra J. — Saco, Maine 
Tashjian, Brenda — S. Lincoln, Mass. 
Thoresen, Sylvia Ann — Lynn, Mass. 
Walker, Patricia M. — Poland, Maine 
Washburn, Shirley Ann — Alburg, Vermont 
Welch, Judith M. — S. Braintree, Mass. 
Welch, Rosalie B. — ^Mattawamkeag, Maine 
Whalen, Eileen Ann— Charlestown, Mass. 
Wittstruck, Joan — Newport, R. I. 
Zinner, Judith Ann — Medford, Mass. 



ENROLLMENT BY STATES — NOVEMBER 1, 1950 



state 



UPPER SCHOOL 





M 


F 


Massachusetts 


35 


17 


Maine 


5 


9 


New Hampshire 


4 


1 


New Jersey 








Rhode Island 


6 


3 


Vermont 


3 


3 


Other states 


2 


6 



IWEI 


1 SCHOOL 


DEAF-BLIND 


TOTA 


M 


F 


M 


F 




40 


51 





2 


145 


5 


8 








27 


9 


2 








16 








1 





1 


7 


6 








21 


7 


5 








18 


6 


1 


2 


3 


19 



64 



89 



78 



73 



247 



54 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



I. Acknowledgments for Concerts, Recitals, Dramatics, etc.: 

To Mr. Aaron Richmond for tickets for recitals. 

To Mrs. John W. Myers for making possible, attendance at Wednes- 
day Morning Musicale of a pupil and teacher. 

To Mrs. Ruth Smith for tickets to recital of Rand Smith, Baritone. 

To Winchester Players for invitations to students to attend Dress 
Rehearsals of plays. 

To Members op Watertown Yacht Club for taking Upper School 
girls on cruise on Charles River. 

To Shriners of Aleppo Temple for invitation to Lower School 
pupils to attend Circus. 

To Boston Braves for tickets to games. 

To Boston Red Sox for tickets to games. 

II. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS FOR TALKS, CONCERTS, ETC., IN OUR HALL: 

To MRS Anna L. Coomeraswamy, Dr. Milton T. Stauffer, Mr. 
Egbert N. Peeler, Dr. Takeo Iwahashi and Mr. Kenneth Damren, 
for talks to Upper School Assembly. 

To Dr Franklin M. Foote, Miss Evelyn C. McKay, Miss Ethel 
PARKER, Mr. Fred Walsh, Mr. John J. Buckley, Mr. Francis Ierardi, 
Miss Polly Moor, Dr. Herbert Barry, Jr., and Dr. Milton T. Stauffer, 
for talks to Harvard Class. 

To Mr. Robert Brereton for piano recital. 

To the Clergy of Watertown for Assembly talks during the Lenten 
Season. 

To the Patriotic Organizations of Watertown for exercises m 
commemoration of Memorial Day. 

To the Protestant Guild for the Blind, the Catholic Guild for 
the Blind and the Boston Aid to the Blind for religious instruction 
given to pupils. 

To Mr. Charles Rose for instruction in popular piano music. 

III. acknowledgments for Books, Periodicals, Museum Assistance, 

Periodicals, Ink Print and Braille 

Alabama Messenger, Alabama Brass, Ambulando, Arizona Cactus 
Arkansas Braille News, Blue and White, Braille Courier, Braille Star 
Theosophist, BVA Bulletin, California Beacon, Children's Friends Col- 
orado Index, Catholic Digest, Catholic Review, Christian Record, Come- 
back, Corriere du Ciechi, Desde las Sonibras^ ^'^TfF^^ ^ m^?mI' 
zine. Harvester World, Forward Day by Day, Full Gospel Monthly, 
Florida School Herald, Gospel Trumpet, Home Teacher, Indiana Re- 
corder, John Milton Magazine, Kentucky Colonel, Lantern, Listen, Lignt, 
Le Louis Braille, Lutheran Messenger, Lighthouse News, Los^ ^legos. 
Luces, Maryland Oriole, Maple Branch, Matilda Ziegler Magazine, i he 
Ohio Ray, The Optimist, Our Special, Paradise, Perkins Goat, Pelham 
Progress, Red & White, Rocky Mountain Leader, Royer-Greaves Monthly, 
Saint Dunstan's Review, School Journal, Searchlight, Seeing Eye Guide, 
Seer, Sight Giver, Sunday School Monthly, Talking Book Topics, Think, 
Towers, Unity Daily Word, Utah Eagle, Virginia Guide, We— The Blind, 
Wee Wisdom, Welfare Bulletin, Welfare Reporter, West Virginia Tablet, 
White Cane. 



65 



k 



To the following persons our thanks for hand-transcribed books for 
the Lower School Library: 

William G. Bryan, Gertrude Gallender, V. Kenah Davis, Marion 
L. Eldridge, Madeline E. Jacobs, Anna C. S. Meserve, Mabel I. Rip- 
ley, Mary Storrow, Sylvia P. Weld, Irene Finnegan. 

American Red Cross Chapter in East Orange, N. J., for embossed 
books. 

American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, Ky., and to 
donors through them of talking book copies of the Reader's Digest for 
distribution to our readers. 

National Braille Press, Boston, for binding and various serv- 
ices. 

Sisterhood of Temple Israel, New Rochelle, N. Y., for a braille 
volume. 

Marie C. Phillips of Boston for donation for talking book records. 

Ladies Auxiliary of Rural Letter Carriers Association for sub- 
scription to Reader's Digest. 

Raoul H. Beaudreau of Belmont for a similar contribution. 

Mrs. R. M. Cleveland and Mrs. Mabel Hyde Kittredge for dona- 
tions to Library Fund. 

To the following who have contributed in great measure to the suc- 
cess of the program of transcribing books for college students: 

Metropolitan Chapter op American Red Cross for use of facil- 
ities. 

Mrs. George T. Putnam of Dedham for reading and supervisory 
activities. 

Miss Hellen Guggenheimer of Wellesley for supervision and to 
the many in Boston and Wellesley College who read books for recording. 

To the Volunteer Service Bureau of Boston for active assistance 
in furnishing volunteers for help to the library in various ways, to all 
of those volunteers and especially to — 

Miss Alice E. Aldrich of Framingham for sorting thousands of 
clippings. 

Miss Elsie Parmenter of Needham for checking files of reports. 

To various Staff Members for the loan of books of fiction for 
circulation. 

To Mr. Arnold Grade of Woburn for a box of records of poetry. 

To Mr. Arthur Inman for loan of a collection of Japanese Prints. 

To The Pinkham Press of Boston and Jordan Marsh Co. of Boston 
for loans of materials. 

IV. Acknowledgments op Gifts: 

To Mr. George Binnen and Huntington Club Bowling Alleys 
for candle pins and balls for Girls' Upper School Bowling Alley. 

To Mr. F. B. Crowninshield for gift of money to be used for 
Christmas gifts to pupils. 

To Dr. Richard S. French for gift of money for Christmas Fund. 

To Young People's Fellowship, Church of our Saviour, for gift of 
oranges. 

To Miss Helen Duncklee for gift of money for Christmas gifts. 

To Mr. Frank Lefferts for gifts of threaders. 

To Dr. Alfred E. Banks for gift of his eacrly Braille writers to 
Perkins Museum. 

56 ^ 



To the Shawmut Masonic Lodge through Mr. Myer N. Channen 
for gift of money. 

To Mrs. W. J. Loaring-Clark for Braille Christmas Cards. 

To Miss Bromley and College Avenue Methodist Church Junior 
High age girls for gift of records. 

To Variety Club of New England for gift of candy to pupils at 
Christmas time. 

To Boston Host Lions Club through Mr. A. William Rowe for 
gift of money, used for Kindergarten equipment. 

To Miss Caroline E. McMaster for gift of picture of Canterbury 
Cathedral. 

To Mrs. Henry P. Kidder for gift of money. 

To Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Company through Mr. 
Kenneth Erskine for gift of two large plants and stands. 

To Mrs. James F. Hanna for gift of white kid leather. 

To Miss L. M. Moisan for box of used Christmas cards. 

To Otis Elevator Company through Mr. Todd for two desks for 
Manual Training Department. 

To Woolson House through Mrs. Catherine Keenan for gift of 
chair seating materials. 

To John Irving Shoe Corp. for gift of plastic stripping for Manual 
Training Department. 

To Dr. R. Gray-Smith for gift of large type Royal Typewriter. 

To Grover-Cronin Company for visit of Easter Bunny with Easter 
gifts to children in the Lower School. 

To Milton Girl Scouts who gave a party for Junior High girls. 

To Mrs. Arthur Caruso and Milton GraL Scouts for party for 
boys. 

To Ladies Visiting Committee for Birthday cakes to Lower School 
on Anagnos Day. 

To Mr. Daniel Newcomb for frosting roses for children in Lower 
School on Anagnos Day. 

To Mrs. Frederick J. Lbvisbur, Mrs. Arthur Brooks and their 
committee for afternoon teas in their homes, to Upper School girls. The 
committee members were Mrs. George F. Plimpton, Mrs. Russell 
Codman, Mrs. Arthur Pease, Mrs. Owen Tudor, Mrs. Edward Ben- 
nett, Mrs. Frederick Webster, Mrs. John Fox, Mrs. James Torbert. 

To Mrs. R. B. Edwards for toys. 

To Mrs. William McNeil and her Sunday School Group for 
Christmas gifts. 

To Evening Star Chapter, Protestant Guild for the Blind, 
through Mrs. George Sanders for Christmas gifts. 

To Mrs. Effie Gingras for gift of money for Christmas. 

To Mr. Robert Burke for gift of radio for a boy. 

To Mrs. William Retoy for clothing, Christmas Day dinner and en- 
tertainment. 

To Mrs. Jean Dolan for Christmas gift. 

To Firnabank Club of First National Bank op Boston for 
Christmas gifts to Lower School children. 

To Faith Church, Springfield, for Christmas cards and candy. 
To Mrs. Elsie Duncan for clothing. 

To "Boys in the Shipping Room," R. H. Stearns Company for 
Playskool desk and construction materials. 

57 



To Miss Marilyn Griffith and her Sunday School Class for gift 
of money. 

To Boston Aid to the Blind, Inc., for gift of money to Camp 
Fund, several boxes of clothing, Christmas dollars and gift of money for 
Christmas greetings. 

To Catholic Guild for the Blind for Christmas dollars, Christmas 
vacation money and clothing. 

To Protestant Guild for the Blind for Christmas dollars. 

To Mrs. Mark Elliott and members of Church and Sunday School 
in Carlisle for picnic. 

To Waban Union Church Young People's Group for entertain- 
ments and suppers for pupils, and through Mrs. Wilbur W. Bullen for 
Christmas gifts and clothing. 

To Everett C. Benton Lodge of Masons for children's party. 

To Temple Israel Brotherhood for party to boys and girls. 

To Mr. William Reichert for clothing. 

To Junior Red Cross, White Plains, N. Y., for boxes of toys. 

To Junior Red Cross, Laconia, N. H., for games. 

To Order of Rainbow Girls through Mrs. L. H. Gobrecht for a 
gift of money and candy at Christmas time. 

To NATIONAL Exe<:utive Housekeeper's Association thTough Mrs. 
Maude B. Winchester for gift of money at Christmas time. 

To Unity Club, Uxbridge, through Mrs. Paul Wenzel for Christ- 
mas gifts. 

To Friendship Committee of the Daughters of Vermont through 
Mrs. W. O. Start for Christmas gifts. 

To Wesleyan Service Guild, Morgan Memorial Church of All Na- 
tions for Christmas gifts. 

To Protestant Guild Chapter, Weymouth, through Miss Ruth 
Appleby for Christmas gifts. 

To North Shore Social Circle for the Blind for Christmas party 
to pupils. 

To Wesleyan Guild, Dorchester, through Mrs. Luella Hunt for 
Christmas gifts. 

To Mrs. M. J. Lowenberg for clothing. ; 

To Mrs. Clyde McArdle for Brownie uniform. 

To Mrs. David Minnis for evening gowns. 



58 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

To the Trustees of 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 

Boston, Massachusetts 

We have examined the balance sheet of Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind (not including Howe Memorial 
Press Fund) as of August 31, 1950 and the related statements of Reserve 
Fund for Depreciation, of income and expenditures and of income and 
expenses of the Works Department, all for the year then ended. We 
have also examined the balance sheet of Howe Memorial Press Fund as 
of August 31, 1950 and the related statement of income and expenses 
for the year then ended. Our examinations were made in accordance 
with generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included 
such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures 
as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

We examined all investment securities recorded as owned by the 
Institution and by the Howe Memorial Press Fund as of August 31, 1950 
and held for their respective accounts by the Fiduciary Trust Company. 
We audited all changes in investments during the year then ended and 
satisfied ourselves that investment income receivable during the year 
was duly received. 

As at August 31, 1950 the Trustees voted to charge the deficit for 
the year then ended ($82,196.56) against the Reserve Fund for Depre- 
ciation (Exhibit B), 

In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present 
fairly the position of the Institution and of the Howe Memorial Press 
Fund at August 31, 1950 and the results of their operations for the 
fiscal year then ended. 

Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co. 

Accountants and Auditors. 

Boston, Massachusetts 
October 13, 1950 



69 



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Exhibit B 
RESERVE FUND FOR DEPRECIATION 

For the Year Ended August 31, 1950 

Balance, September 1, 1949 $746,475.00 

Additions: . . , « q« noA 7^^ 

Income added to principal !(> db,uz4./o 

Adjustment of income from 

Charles Tidd Baker Funds— prior years 528.36 3b,55d.ll 

$783,028.11 

Deductions: , , <» ,nooco^ 

Costs of A. C. power change-over — balance $ 10,^25.84 

Boiler replacements ?o f J^'m 

Upper school gym project 12,487.01 

Excess of costs of special maintenance and 
repairs over amount charged to current 

operations 87,640.06 

Net loss for the year ended August 31, 1950 82,196.56 255,095.50 

Balance, August 31, 1950 (Exhibit A) $527,932.61 



61 



Exhibit C 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

For the Year Ended August 31, 1950 

Income: 

Interest and dividends — 

Varnum Fund $ 16,829.92 

All other funds 362,681.31 $379,511.23 



Tuition and board — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $101,790.00 

Other states 57,280.00 

Private students 17,687.50 176,757.50 



Donations 623.98 

Sarah Hunt Howell Trust 5,216.99 

Justin B. and Mary Letitia Perkins 

Memorial Fund 2,571.47 

Other Trusts 606.64 

Other sources — 

Tuning income $ 4,229.96 

Discounts 485.57 

Miscellaneous 3.92 4,719.45 



Contributions for the Director's 

discretionary account 10,683.05 

Total income $580,690.31 

Expenditures: 

Operating expenses (Exhibit D) $530,595.22 

Other expenditures — 

From Director's discretionary account 9,809.63 

From unexpended income — special funds 

for restricted purposes 8,825.09 

Increase in the balance of the Director's 

discretionary account 873.42 

Decrease in unexpended income special funds 

for restricted purposes (1,487.73) 

Income added to principal of funds — 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation $36,024.75 

Securities Income Reserve Fund 62,510.91 

Other Funds 1,673.38 100,209.04 



Additions to plant — out of income 7,350.70 

Net loss— Works Department (Exhibit E) .. 6,711.50 



Total expenditures 662,886.87 

Net (loss) for the year ended August 31, 1950 
— charged to Reserve Fund for Depreciation 
(Exhibit B) $ (82,196.56) 

Note: In addition to maintenance expense included in operating expenses in the above 
statement, a total of $162,673.10, representing expenditures during the year for 
special maintenance and for replacements, was charged to Reserve Fund for 
Depreciation. 

62 



Exhibit D 
OPERATING EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1950 

Salaries Supplies Other Total 



Administration $ 31,676.45 $ 3,800.23 $ 5,459.47 $ 40,936.15 



Treasurer's office $ 833.36 $ $ 5,760.22 $ 6,593.58 



Special Departments: 

Library $ 10,471.49 $ 2,560.22 $ ? 13,031.71 

Health 7,980.75 1,197.81 808.23 9,986.79 

Personnel 13,586.75 685.04 14,271.79 



$ 32,038.99 $ 4,443.07 $ 808.23 $ 37,290.29 



Education : 

Literary $ 61,667.50 $ 2,154.84 $ $ 63,822.34 

Manual training 16,410.00 1,121.59 17,531.59 

Music 16,675.70 630.29 17,305.99 

Deaf-Blind 13,955.00 487.61 14,442.61 



$108,708.20 $ 4,394.33 $ $113,102.53 



Household : 

Salaries and mis. exp. $ 62,862.71 $ 6,852.79 $ $ 69,715.50 

Laundry 6,631.45 728.53 7,359.98 

Food 55,235.68 55,235.68 



$ 69,494.16 $ 62,817.00 $ $132,311.16 



Maintenance: (See Note) 

Engineering $ 32,288.64 $ 44,327.83 $ $ 76,616.47 

Buildings 20,025.04 7,206.35 27,231.39 

Grounds 14,824.82 2,468.97 17,293.79 

Special 27,511.92 27,511.92 



$ 67,138.50 $ 54,003.15 $27,511.92 $148,653.57 



Other expenses: 

Automobile $ $ $ 1,928.25 $ 1,928.25 

Insurance 7,067.11 7,067.11 

Pension retirement 

plan 20,260.85 20,260.85 

Tuning Department 3,915.39 3,915.39 

Pensions paid 18,391.84 18,391.84 

Loss on bad debts 144.50 144.50 



$51,707.94 $ 51,707.94 



$309,889.66 $129,457.78 $91,247.78 $530,595.22 

Summary 

Operating expenses — Institution $273,120.11 

Operating expenses — Kindergarten 257,475.11 



$530,595.22 



Note: In addition to maintenance expense shown above a total of $162,673.10 repre- 
senting expenditures for special maintenance and for replacements was charged 
to Reserve Fund for Depreciation. 

63 



Exhibit F 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
Balance Sheet 
August 31, 1950 

Assets 

„ , $ 66,949.98 

Investments — Book value 193,978.17 

^"'T^L'"""^'''^^^^' $ 2,179.44 

f^tionDepartnient':::::;:::::::::.: 478.48 2,657.92 



Inventories : 

$ 11,757.57 



Appliances ^ oc «ar 

"Rrnillp writer -iiO,oio 



,86 



Bvlme iii^W::::::"'::;-;''-:----'---- 8>3io.i5 48,713.58 

Machinery and equipment ,..^, $ ^^'oiVnl 20 2^0 51 

Less: Reserve for depreciation 5,dll.U/ ^u,^du.oi 

Deferred braille writer expenses 49,864.03 

$382,394.19 



Liabilities 
Accounts payable: ^ 

?„'s«ution Department ;;:::;;;:::;: 6.447.62 $ 8,48o.o8 

1 fiSQ 18 

Advances from customers 4qq*60 

Federal income tax withheld ^^^• 

Funds and legacies: 24,839.10 

^S^''zzzz:z::::z:::zz::zz. 12,290.00 37,129.10 

^''''iTlance, September 1, 1949 $300,028.05 

Deduct: „ ^, j j 

Net operating loss for the year ended 

August 31, 1950 (Exhibit G) 11,590.98 

$288,437.07 

Add: 

Profit from sale of investments 46,225.16 

Balance, August 31, 1950 SBi,662.2S 

$382,394.19 

64 



Exhibit G 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1950 

Sales: 

Appliances $ 8,809.56 

Braille printing 22,143.19 

Total sales $ 30,952.75 

Cost of Operation and Maintenance: 

Braille printing $ 28,641.81 

Appliances manufactured 14,057.23 

Administrative salaries and expenses 6,100.10 

Depreciation 2,151.82 

Maintenance 3,557.02 

Insurance 995.93 

Pension retirement plan 3,200.05 

Loss on bad debts 46.78 



$ 58,750.74 



Less : 

Discounts $ 89.73 

Miscellaneous receipts 682.50 772.23 57,978.51 



Net (loss) from operations 

Other Income: 

Interest and dividends, general purposes 
Interest and dividends, special funds 



Other Charges: 
Pensions paid 



Miscellaneous 







$(27,025.76) 


$ 


14,445.75 
1,499.65 


15,945.40 






$(11,080.36) 


$ 


300.00 
210.62 


510.62 



Net (loss) for the year ended 

August 31, 1950 (Exhibit F) ... $(11,590.98) 



Exhibit E 



WORKS DEPARTMENT 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 

For the Year Ended August 31, 1950 

Income: 

Sales $ 74,921.34 

Miscellaneous 2,198.75 $ 77,120.09 

Expenses : 

Material used $ 19,107.45 

Salaries and wages 57,095.56 

General expense 6,002.98 

Auto and truck expense 1,091.95 

Loss on bad debts 533.65 83,831.59 



NET (LOSS) FOR THE YEAR (Exhibit C) $(6,711.50) 

65 



INSTITUTION FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1950 

William Varnum Fund 

Special Funds: 

Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund .. $ 3,177.01 

Anonymous 102.01 

Charles S. Adams (Christmas Fund) 204.03 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund 19,815.44 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and 

blind) 4,085.91 

Blind Babies' Project 312.29 

Mary Alice Butler (for reading matter 

for the blind) 3,782.82 

Deaf-Blind Fund 155,444.59 

John D. Fisher (education teachers and 

others) 5,442.08 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) .... 5,107.38 

John Goldthwait Fund (charitable) 4,514.79 

Harris Fund (outdoor relief) 27,238.82 

Henry Clay Jackson Fund (for deaf -blind) 85,247.24 
Maria Kemble Oliver Fund (concert 

tickets) 15,322.16 

James Osborn Fund 4,116.21 

Prescott Fund (education teachers and 

others) 21,687.17 

Elizabeth P. Putnam (higher education) 1,021.48 

Richard M. Saltonstall (use Trustees) .... 3,064.42 

A. Shuman Clothing Fund 1,021.48 

Augustine Schurtleff Fund (for deaf, 

dumb and blind) 1,787.58 

Anne E. Stodder (to find employment for 

blind workers) 2,715.35 

Mary J. Straw 510.74 

Thomas Stringer Fund (for deaf -blind) 16,221.27 

Lenna D. Swinerton 467.57 

Julia E. Turner (education of worthy 

needy) 6,506.34 



$209,341.99 



$388,916.18 



Permanent Funds (income for general 

George Baird Fund $ 12,895.21 

Charlotte Billings Fund 40,507.00 

Frank W. Boles 76,329.02 

Stoddard, Capen Fund 13,770.00 

Jennie M. Colby, 

in memory of 100.00 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund 2,000.00 

Stephen Fairbanks 10,000.00 

David H. Fanning 5,010.56 

Ferris Fund 12,215.61 

Helen Osborne Gary 10,000.00 

Harris Fund 

(general purposes) 53,333.00 

Harriet S. Hazeltine Fund 5,000.00 

Benjamin Humphrey 25,000.00 

Prentiss M. Kent 2,500.00 

Sir Charles W. Lindsay 9,008.93 

Kate M. Morse Fund 5,000.00 

Jonathan E. Pecker 950.00 

Richard Perkins 20,000.00 

Henry L. Pierce 20,000.00 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, 

in memory of 5,000.00 

Frederick W. Prescott 

endowment 25,338.95 



purposes) : 

Frank Davison Rust 

Memorial 4,000.00 

Samuel E. Sawyer 2,174.77 

Margaret A. Simpson 968.57 

Caroline A. Slack 10.000.00 

Charles Frederick Smith 

Fund 8,663.00 

Timothy Smith 2,000.00 

Mary Lowell Stone Fund .... 4,000.00 

George W. Thym Fund 5,054.66 

Alfred T. Turner 1,000.00 

Thomas Upham Fund 4,950.00 

Levina B. Urbino 500.00 

Vaughan Fund 10,553.50 

Ann White Vose 12,994.00 

Charles L. Young 5,000.00 

$425,816.78 



Add: 



Distribution of Surplus 
at August 31, 1947 .... 



8,870.34 
$434,687.12 



66 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 



Elizabeth B. Allen % 500.00 

Nora Ambrose, 

in memory of 300.00 

James H. Anderson 62.25 

James H. Anderson 28,303.92 

Charlotte H. Andrews 15,169.87 

Mary Louise Aull 261.270L05 

Ellen S. Bacon 5,000.00 

Elizabeth B. Bailey 3.000.00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500.00 

Calvin W. Barker 1,859.32 

Lucy B. Barker, 

in memory of 5,953.21 

Marianne R. Bartholomew .. 2,000.00 

Francis Bartlett 2,500.00 

Elizabeth Howard Bartol .... 5,000.00 

Mary Bartol 300.00 

Thompson Baxter 322.50 

Samuel Benjamin 250.00 

Robert C. Billings 25,000.00 

George Nixon Black 10,000.00 

Susan A. Blaisdell 5,832.66 

Dehon Blake 500.00 

Mary Blight 7,220.99 

William T. Bolton 555.22 

Betsey J. Bowles 9.798.75 

George W- Boyd 5,000.00 

Caroline E. Boyden 1,930.39 

Mary I. Brackett 5,263.33 

J. Putnam Bradlee 294,162.53 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet .... 23,273.49 

Ellen F. Bragg 8,006.68 

Max Brenner 200.00 

Lucy S. Brewer 10,215.36 

Florence N. Bridgman 500.00 

J. Edward Brown 100.000.00 

Maria A. Burnham 10,000.00 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 5,000.00 

Abbie Y. Burr 200.00 

Annie E. Caldwell 4,000.00 

Emma C. Campbell 1,000.00 

Lydia E. Carl 3,412.01 

Ellen G. Gary 50,000.00 

Katherine F. Casey 100.00 

Edward F. Gate 5,000.00 

Robert R. Centro, 

in memory of 10.000.00 

Fanny Channing 2,000.00 

Emily D. Chapman 1,000.00 

Mary F. Cheever 200.00 

Ida May Chickering 1,052.03 

Alice M. Clement 32,324.03 

Alice I. Cobb 2,000.00 

Laura Cohen 87.00 

Ann Eliza Colburn 5,000.00 

Susan J. Conant 500.00 

William A. Copeland 1,000.00 

Augusta E. Corbin 20,644.82 

Nellie W. Cowles 500.00 

Jennie L. Cox 1,948.60 

Louise F. Crane 5,000.00 

W. Murray Crane 10,000.00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 6.000.00 

David Cummings 7.723.07 

Arthur B. Curtis 1,722.25 

Chastine L. Gushing 500'.00 

I. W. Danforth 2,500.00 

Kate Kimball Danforth 250.00 

Charles L. Davis 1,000.00 

Etta S. Davis 8,027.87 

Susan L. Davis 1,500.00 

Mabel E. Day 10,000.00 

Joseph Descalzo 1,000.00 

Elsie C. Disher 163,250.07 

John H. Dix lO.OOO.OO 

Mary Frances Drown 21,857.25 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200.00 

Amelia G. Dyer 40,043.00 



Mary A. Dyer 8,375.18 

Ella L Eaton 1,669.50 

Mary Agnes Eaton 3,660.91 

Mary E. Eaton 5.000.00 

William Eaton 500.00 

David J. Edwards 500.00 

Ann J. Ellis 1,023.00 

A. Silver Emerson 50<».O0 

Martha S. Ensign 2,505.48 

Orient H. Eustis 500.00 

Eugene Fanning 50.00 

Sarah M. Farr 64,247.43 

Mortimer G. Ferris 

Memorial 1,000.00 

Edward A. Fillebrown 500.00 

Annie M. Findley 500.00 

Anna G. Fish 10,583.25 

Thomas B. Fitzpatrick l.OOO.OO 

John Forrest 1,000.00 

Ann Maria Fosdick 14,333.79 

Nancy H. Fosdick 3,937.21 

Sarah E. Foster 200.00 

Elwyn Fowler 5.232.75 

Mail' Helen Freeman 1,000.00 

Cornelia Ann French 10,000.00 

Martha A. French 164.40 

Ephraim L. Frothingham .. 1,825.97 

Jessie P. Fuller 200.00 

Thomas Gaffield 6,685.38 

Mabel Knowles Gage 5,000.00 

Edward L. Geary 2,000.00 

Albert Glover 1,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 5.0O0.00 

Marie M. Goggin 2.864.55 

Benjamin H. Goldsmith 11.199.68 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6.471.23 

Maria W. Goulding 2.332.48 

Charles G. Green 45,837.70 

Amelia Greenbaum 500.00 

Imogene C. Gregory 450.00 

Mary Louise Greenleaf 199,189.94 

William Guggenheim 50.00 

Ellen Page Hall 10,037.78 

Ellen Hammond 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Harty 5,000.00 

Helen P. Harvison l.OOO.OO 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500.00 

Jerusha F. Hathaway 5,000.00 

Lucy Hathaway 4,577.00 

Edward J. and Georgia M. 

Hathorne Fund &0,017.6S 

Charles H. Hayden 32,461.01 

John C. Haynes 1,000.00 

Mary E. T. Healy 200.00 

Alice Gushing Hersey. 

in memory of 3,000.00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500.00 

Ira Hiland 3,893.37 

Stanley B. Hildreth 5,000.00 

George A. Hill 100.00 

Lila M. Hodges 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708.32 

Theodore C. Hollander 3,016.00 

Bernard J. Holmburg 2,0*0.00 

Alfred G. Hosmer 229.28 

Margaret J. Hourihan 200.00 

Charles Sylvester Hutchinson 2,156.00 

Katharine C. Ireson 52.037.62 

Hattie M. Jacobs 5,000.00 

William S. Jenney, 

in memory of 500.00 

Charlotte Johnson 525.00 

Annie G. Joyce 250.00 

Eliza J. Kean 59,209.91 

Marie L. Keith 2.000.00 

Harriet B. Kempster 1.144.13 

Ernestine M. Kettle 22.981.31 

B. Marion Keyes 6.350.00 



67 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Lulu S. Kimball 


10,000.00 


Grace W. King 


100.00 


Lydia F. Knowles 


50.00 


Davis Krokyn 


100.00 


Catherine M. Lamson 


6,000.00 


James J. Lamson 


750.00 


Susan M. Lane 


815.71 


Elizabeth W. Leadbetter .... 


2,638.71 


Jane Leader 


3,544.31 


Luella K. Leavitt 


1,011.67 


Lewis A. Leland ...^ 


415.67 


Benjamin Levy 


500.00 


E. E. Linderholm 


505.56 


William Litchfield 


7,951.48 


Mary T. Locke 


8,361.89 


Hannah W. Loring 


9,500.00 


Celia E. Lugene 


300.00 


Adolph S. Lundin 


100.00 


Susan B. Lyman 


4,809.78 


Agnes J. MacNevin 


78,968.67 


Mary Ella Mann 


250.00 


Blanche Osgood Mansfield .... 


1,000.00 


Annie B. Marion 


8,745.66 


Rebecca Marks 


2,640.40 


Stephen W. Marston 


5,000.00 


Elizabeth S. Martin 


1,000.00 


William H. Maynard 


22,821.56 


Cora Mclntire 


6,862.50 




1,000.00 


Mary H. Miller 


1,512.50 


Olga E. Monks 


2,500.00 


George Montgomery 


5,140.00 


Martha H. Morss 


3,000.00 


Louise C. Moulton Bequest .. 


7,891.65 


Mary A. Muldoon 


100.00 


Marv T. Murphy 


10,000.00 


Sarah Ella Murray 


8,000.00 


Sarah M. Nathan 


500.00 


Joseph F. Noera 


2,000.00 


Henry P. Norris 


35,198.52 


Annie Anthony Noyes 


100.00 


Mary B. Noyes 


915.00 


Richard W. Nutter 


2,000.00 


Ella Nye 


50.00 


Harold L. Olmstead 


5,000.00 




1,000.00 


Sarah Irene Parker 


699.41 


William Prentiss Parker .... 


2,500.00 


George Francis Parkman .... 


50,000.00 


Grace Parkman 


5,383.78 


Philip G. Peabody 


1,200.00 


Elizabeth W. Perkins 


2,000.00 


Ellen F. Perkins 


2,500.00 


Edward D. Peters 


500.00 


Clara F. Pierce 


2,C05.56 


Clara J. Pitts 


2,000.00 


George F. Poland 


75.00 


Elizabeth B. Porter 


5,449.50 


George M. Whidden Porter 


22,700.48 


Sarah E. Pratt 


2,988.34 


Sarah S. Pratt 


5,oo:.oo 


Francis I. Proctor 


10,000.00 


Grace E. Reed 


5,054.25 


Carrie P. Reid 


679.51 


Leonard H. Rhodes 


1,012.77 


Mabelle H. Rice 


3,750.00 


Matilda B. Richardson 


300.00 


William L. Richardson 


50,000.00 


Anne Augusta Robinson 


212.20 


Julia M. Roby 


500.00 




100.00 


John Roome 


5,787.67 


Barbara S. Ross 


2,740.35 


Henrietta Goodrich Rothwell 


500.00 


Mary L. Ruggles 


3,000.00 


Elizabeth H. Russell 


500.00 


Josephine Russell 


5CO.00 


Marian Russell 


5,000.00 



Nancy E. Rust 

William H. Ryan 

Emily E. St. John 

Louis H. Schlosberg 

Joseph Schofield 

Sarah E. Seabury 

Edward O. Seccomb 

Richard Black Sewell 

Charles F. Sherman 

Robert F. Shurtleff 

Carrie Etta Silloway 

John Simonds 

Arthur A. Smith 

Ellen V. Smith 

Esther W. Smith 

Sarah F. Smith 

The Maria Spear Bequest for 

the Blind 

Henry F. Spencer 

Charlotte S. Spra^ue 

Thomas Sprague 

Adella E. Stannard 

Cora N. T. Stearns 

Henry A. Stickney 

Lucretia J. Stoehr 

Joseph C. Storey 

Edward C. Sullivan 

Sophronia S. Sunbury 

Edward Swan 

Emma B. Swasey 

Mary F. Swift 

William Taylor 

Minnie L. Thayer 

Mabel E. Thompson 

Joanna C. Thompson 

William Timlin 

Alice W. Torrey 

Evelyn Wyman Towle 

Stephen G. Train 

Sarah E. Trott 

Mary Wilson Tucker 

George B. Upton 

Maude C. Valentine 

Charles A. Vialle 

Bernard T. Vierich 

Abbie T. Vose 

Nancie S. Vose 

Horace W. Wadleigh 

Joseph K. Wait 

Amelia L. Walker 

Harriet Ware 

Allena F. Warren 

William H. Warren 

Eleanore C. Webb 

Charles F. Webber 

Mary E. Welch 

Mary Ann P. Weld 

Oliver M. Wentworth 

Cordelia H. Wheeler 

Opha J. Wheeler 

Eliza Orne White 

Ella Tredich White 

Porter W. Whitmarsh 

Ruth E. Whitmarsh 

Sarah L. Whitmarsh 

Samuel Brenton Whitney .... 

Martha A. V/illcomb 

Adelia C. Williams 

Judson Williams 

Lucy B. Wilson, 

in memory of 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson 

Nettie R. Winn 

Samuel C. Wiswall 

Minnie S. Woolf 

Esther F. Wright 

Thomas T. Wyman 

Fanny Young 



2,640.00 

8,023.48 

5,015.00 

100.24 

2,500.00 

3,116.01 

1,000.00 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,432.94 

5.429.88 

50.00 

10,000.00 

25,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,000.00 



68 



Institution Funds (Conel'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) — concl. 

William B. Young 1,000.00 Deduct: 

Transfer to Plant Capital 

at August 31, 1947 .... 1,041,695.76 



Add: 



Distribution of Surplus 
at August 31, 1947 .... 



8,152,188.26 

37,097.45 
3,189,285.71 



$2,147,589.95 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1950 

Special funds: 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund $ 39,926.63 

Glover Funds, for Blind-Deaf Mutes 1,445.74 

Ira Hiland (income to W. E. R. for life) 1,371.20 

Emeline Morse Lane Fund (books) 1,371.20 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room 5,485.54 

Dr. Ruey B. Stevens' Charity Fund 7,542.33 

Lucy H. Stratton (Anagnos Cottage) 9,504.62 



$66,647.26 



Permanent funds (income for general purposes) : 



Mary D. Balfour Fund 

William Leonard Benedict, 

Jr., Memorial 

Samuel A. Borden 

A. A. C, in Memoriam 

Helen G. Coburn 

Charles Wells Cook 

M. Jane Wellington 

Danforth Fund 

Caroline T. Downes 

Charles H. Draper Fund .. 
Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 
Helen Atkins Edmands 

Memorial 

George R. Emerson 

Mary Eveleth 

Eugenia F. Farnham 

Susan W. Farwell 

John Foster 

The Luther and Mary 

Gilbert Fund 

Albert Glover 

Martha R. Hunt 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund . 



$ 5,692.47 

1,000.00 
4,675.00 
500.00 
9,980.10 
5,000.00 

10,000.00 

12,950.00 

23,934.13 

1,500.00 

5,000.00 
5,0OC.O0 
l.COO.OO 
1,015.00 
500.00 
5,000.00 

8,541.77 

l.COO.OO 

10,000.00 

9,935.95 



Charles Lamed 

Elisha T. Loring 

George F. Parkman 

Catherine P. Perkins 

Edith Rotch 

Frank Davison Rust 

Memorial 

Caroline O. Seabury 

Phoebe Hill Simpson Fund 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 

Abby K. Sweetser 

Hannah R. Sweetser Fund .. 
Mrs. Harriet Taber Fund 

Levina B. Urbino 

The May Rosevar White 

Fund 



Add: 



Distribution of Surplus 
at August 31, 1947 .... 



5,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,500.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,600.00 

1,000.00 

3,446.11 

21,729.52 

25,000.00 

5,000.00 

622.81 

500.00 

500.00 

229,122.86 



85,210.31 
$314,333.17 



General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Emilie Albee 

Lydia A. Allen 

Michael Anagnos 

Harriet T. Andrew 

Martha B. AngeE 

Mrs. William Appleton . 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 

Ellen M. Baker 

Mary D. Barrett 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 

Sidney Bartlett 

Emma M. Bass 

Sarah E. J. Baxter 

Thom-pson Baxter 

Robert C. Billings 

Harriet M. Bowman 

Sarah Bradford 

Helen C. Bradlee 

J. Putnam Bradlee 

Charlotte A. Brads treet 



3 
5, 

34, 
18, 

2, 

13, 

1^ 

10 
1 

51. 

10, 

1 

140 

194 

13 



150.00 
748.38 
000.00 
000.00 
370.83 
000.00 
500.00 
5 C 0.00 
053.48 
000.00 
500.00 
OCO.OO 
.000.00 
,847.49 
322.50 

ooo.co 

,013.22 
100.00 

,000.00 
162.53 

,576.19 



Ellen F. Bragg 


8,006.69 


Lucy S. Brewer 


7,811.56 


Sarah Crocker Brewster 


500.00 




1,000.00 




1,000.00 




8,977.55 


Harriet Tilden Browne 


2,000.00 


Katherine E. Bullard 


2,500.00 


Annie E. Caldwell 


5,000.00 


John W. Carter 


500.00 


Kate H. Chamberlin 


5,715.07 


Adeline M. Chapin 


400.00 


Benjamin P. Cheney 


5,000.00 


Fanny C. Coburn 


424.06 


Charles H. Colburn 


1,000.00 


Helen CoUamore 


5,000.00 


Anna T. Coolidge 


53,873.38 


Mrs. Edward Cordis 


300.00 


Sarah Silver Cox 


5,000.00 


Lavonne E. Crane 


3,365.21 


Susan T. Crosby 


100.00 



69 



Kindergarten Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 



Margaret K. Cummings .... 

James H. Danford 

Catherine L. Donnison 

Memorial 

George H. Downes 

Amanda E. Dwight 

Lucy A. Dwight 

Harriet H. ElHs 

Mary E. Emerson 

Mary B. Emmens 

Arthur F. Estabrook 

Ida F. Estabrook 

Orient H. Eustis 

Annie Louisa Fay 

Memorial 

Sarah M. Fay 

Charlotte M. Fiske 

Ann Maria Fosdiek 

Nancy H. Fosdiek 

Fanny Foster 

Margaret W. Frothingham 

Elizabeth W. Gay 

Ellen M. Gifford 

Joseph B. Glover 

Mathilda Goddard 

Anna L. Gray 

Maria L. Gray 

Amelia Greenbaum 

Caroline H. Greene 

Mary L. Greenleaf 

Josephine S. Hall 

Allen Haskell 

Mary J. Haskell 

Jennie B. Hatch 

Olive E. Hayden 

Jane H. Hodges 

Margaret A. Holden 

Marion D. Hollingsworth . 

Frances H. Hood 

Abigail W. Howe 

Ezra S. Jackson 

Caroline E. Jenks 

Caroline M. Jones 

Ellen M. Jones 

Hannah W. Kendall 

Cava P. Kimball 

Diivid P. Kimball 

Mobes Kimball 

Ann E. Lambert 

Jean Munroe Le Brun 

Willard H. Lethbridge 

Frances E. Lily 

"William Litchfield 

Mary Ann Locke 

Robert W. Lord 

Sophia N. Low 

Thomas Mack 

Augvistus D. Manson 

Calanthe E. Marsh 

Sarah L. Marsh 

Waldo Marsh 

Annie B. Mathews 

Rebecca S. Melvin 

Georgina Merrill 

Ira L. Moore 

Louise Chandler Moulton 

Maria Murdock 

Mary Abbie Newell 

Frances M. Osgood 

Margaret S. Otis 

Jeannie Warren Paine 

Anna R. Palfrey 

Sarah Jrene Parker 

Anna Q. T. Parsons 

Helen M. Parsons 

Caroline E. Peabody 

Elward D. Peters 

Henry M. Peyser 



5,000.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 
3,000.00 
6,295.00 
4,000.00 
6,074.79 
l.UOO.OO 
1,000.00 
2,000.00 
2,114.00 
500.00 

1,000.00 

15,000.00 

5,000.00 

14,333.79 

3,937.21 

378,087.49 

500.00 
7,931.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

300.00 
1,000.00 

200.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,157.75 
3,000.00 

500.00 
8,687.65 
1,000.00 
4,622.45 

300.00 
2,360.67 
1,000.00 

100.00 
1,000.00 

688.67 

100.00 
5,000.00 

500.00 

2,515.38 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

700.00 
1,000.00 
28,179.41 
1.000.00 
6,800.00 
5,874.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
8,134.00 
18,840.33 
1,000.00 

500.00 

45,086.40 

23,545.55 

4,773.80 

1,349.09 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

5.903.65 

l,O0«.OO 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

50.00 

699.41 
4,019.52 

500.00 
3,403.74 

500.00 
5,678.25 



Mary J. Phipps 

Caroline S. Pickman 

Katherine C. Pierce 

Helen A. Porter 

Sarah E. Potter, 

Endowment Fund 

Fi-ancis L. Pratt 

Mary S. C. Reed 

Emma Reid 

William Ward Rhoades 

Jane Roberts 

John M. Rodocanachi 

Dorothy Roffe 

Clara Bates Rogers 

Rhoda Rogers 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch 

Rebecca Salisbury 

J. Pauline Schenkl 

Joseph Schofield 

Eliza B. Seymour 

John W. Shapleigh 

Esther W. Smith 

Annie E. Snow 

Adelaide Standish 

Elizabeth G. Stuart 

Benjamin Sweetzer 

Sarah W. Taber 

Mary L. Talbot 

Ann Tower Tarbell 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 

Delia D. Thorndike 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 

Betsey B. Tolman 

Transcript, ten dollar fund 

Mary Wilson Tucker 

Mary B. Turner 

Royal W. Turner 

Minnie H. Underbill 

Charles A. Vialle 

Rebecca P. Wainwright 

George W. Wales 

Maria W. Wales 

Gertrude A. Walker 

Mrs. Charles E. Ware 

Rebecca B. Warren 

Jennie A. (Shaw) 

Waterhouse 

Mary H. Watson 

Ralph Watson Memorial .... 

Isabella M. Weld 

Mary Whitehead 

Evelyn A. Whitney Fund .. 

Julia A. Whitney 

Sarah W. Whitney 

Betsey S. Wilder 

Hannah Catherine Wiley ., 

Mary W. Wiley 

Martha A. Willcomb 

Mary Williams 

Almira F. Winslow 

Eliza C. Winthrop 

Harriet F. Wolcott 



2,000.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

50.C0 

425,014.44 

100.00 
5,000.00 

952.38 

7,507.86 

93,025.55 

2,250.00 

500.00 
2.000.00 

500.00 
8,500.00 

200.00 
10,955.26 
3,000.00 
5.000.00 
1,000.00 
5.000.00 
9,903.2T 
5.000.00 
2.000.00 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 

630.00 

4,892.85 

10.000.00 

5,000.00 

300.00 

500^00 
5,666.95 

481.11 
7,582.90 
24,089.02 
1.000.00 
1,990.00 
1,000.00 
5.000.00 
20.000.00 

178.97 
4.000.00 
5,000.00 

565.84 

lOO.OO 

237.92 

14,795.06 

666.00 

4,992.10 

100.00 

150.62 

500.00 

200.00 

150.00 

5.0O0.00 

5,000.00 

306.80 

5,041.67 

5,532.00 

$2,066,769.71 



Add: 



Distribution of Surplus 
at August 31, 1947 .... 



529,095.43 
$2,595,865.14 



Deduct : 

Transfer to Plant Capital 
at August 31, 1947 .... 



634,744.69 
$1,961,120.45 



70 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1950 

Special funds : 

Adeline A, Douglas (printing raised 

characters) $ 5,000.00 

Harriet S. Hazeltine (printing raised 
characters) 2,000.00 

Thomas D. Roche (publication non- 
sectarian books) 1,883.84 

J. Pauline Schenkl (printing) 10,955.26 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund (books, 
maps and charts) 5,000.00 

$24,839.10 

General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 

Beggs Fund $ 1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center 1,000.00 

Augusta Wells 10,290.00 

12,290.00 

$ 37,129.10 



71 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE DEAF-BLIND FUND 



September 1, 1949 — August 31, 1950 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Fla. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Abbe, Mrs. Mary F. Mass. 

Abbot, Miss Marion S. Mass. 

Abbott, Mr. Frank W. Mass. 

Abbott, Miss Harriette F. Mass. 

Abbott, Miss Mary Ohio 

Abeil, Mrs. A. Howard Mass. 

Abrahams. Ivliss Rosa ^^v' 

Adam Hat Stores, Inc. N. Y. 

Adamowski, Mrs. T. Mass. 

Adams, Mrs. Arthur Mass. 

Adams, Miss F. M. Mass. 

Adams, Mrs. H. A. Ohio 

Adams, Miss Jessie L. Mass. 

Adams, Mrs. John Mass. 

Adams, Miss Kate L. Mass. 

Adams, Mrs. Z. B. Ma^. 

Adler, Miss Cecilia N. Y. 

Adler, Mrs. Jacob JN. i. 

Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Mass. 

Alford, Miss Martha Mass. 

Alker, Miss Harriett D. Pa. 

Allbright, Mr. Clifford 

Allen, Mrs. Arthur M. 

Allen, Miss Hildegarde 

Allen, The Misses 

Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. 

Alles, Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. 

Ailing, Miss Elsie Dwight 

Almy, Miss Helen J. 

Ames, Miss Rosella S. 

Ames, Mrs. Winthrop 

Amory, Mrs. William 

Amster, Mrs. Morris 

Andersen, Mrs. George G. 

Anderson, Mrs. Andreas 

Anderson, Mr. Arthur J. 

Anderson, Mrs. Edward M. 

Andreas, Mrs. J. Mace 

Andrus, Mrs. G. E. 

Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. Francis 

Appleton, Miss Maud E. 

Argersinger, Mrs. Roy E. 

Armington, Miss Elizabeth 

Armstrong, Mrs. Albert C. 

Arnold, Rev. Harold G. 

Arnold, Mrs. Horace L. 

Arnold, Miss Pansy C. 

Arthur, The Misses 

Ascher, Mrs. Fred 

Ashenden, Mr. Richard C. 

Ashworth, Miss Lillian F. 

Atherton, Mr. J. Ballard 

Athey, Mrs. C. N. 

Atkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elisha 

Atkinson, Mr. John B. 

AtwelJ, Mrs. A. Y. 

Atwood, Mrs. David E. 

Atvirood, Mrs. Frank W. 

Austin, Miss Edith 

Austin, Mr. Irving C. 

Austin, Mrs. Walter Mass. 

Axelrod, Mrs. James J. Mass. 

Ayer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Mass. 

Ayer, Mrs. F. Wayland Mass. 

Backus, Mrs. Standish Mich. 

Badger, Mrs. Arthur C. Mass. 

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Bagley, Mr. Charles R. N. H. 

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111. 
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Bakeman, Miss Aimee M. Mass. 

Baker, Mrs. Benedict J. Mass. 

Baker, Mrs. Dudley M. Mass. 

Baker, Mrs. Edward H. Mass. 

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Barrett, Miss Florence E. Conn. 

Barrett, Mr. Francis A. Mass. 

Barron, Mr. Joseph Mass. 

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Barth, Miss Betty Jane Ohio 

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Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew Mass. 

Bartlett, Mrs. N. S. Mass. 

Bartol, Mrs. John W. Mass. 

Barton, Dr. Basil E. Mass. 

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Bassett, Mrs. Norman L. Vt. 

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Bauman. Miss Mary K. Pa. 

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Baxter, Mrs. Gregory P. Mass. 

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Bayley, Mrs. HerberJ S. Mass. 

Beal, Mrs. Boylston A. Mass. 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. DeFord Mass. 

Bean, Mrs. Henry S. Mass. 

Bean, Mr. Howard C. Mass. 

Beard, Mr. Frank A. Mass. 

Beardsley, Mr. H. A. N. Y. 

Beatty, Mrs. Earl A. Mass. 

Beaudreau, Mrs. Raoul H. Mass. 

Beckford, Mrs. Fred A. Mass. 

Beckwith, Mrs. Louis I. Mass. 

Behr, Miss Elsa N. Y. 

Belcher, Miss Gertrude C. Mass. 

Bell, Mrs. Hermon Pratt Mass. 

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Bemis, Mrs. Harry H. Mass. 

Benioff, Mrs. David Calif. 

Benjamin, Mrs. Irwin Mass. 

Benner, Miss Frances Z. T. Mass. 

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Benson, Mr. A. Emerson Mass. 

Benson, Mrs. John W. N. Y. 

Bentinck-Smith, Miss Joan Mass. 

Bentley, Mrs. Ernest Mass. 

Berg, Mrs. A. H. Ohio 

Bessom, Mrs. Frank L. Mass. 

Best, Mr. William N. Y. 

Bicknell, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Mass. 

Biddle, Dr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Mass. 

Bidwell, Mrs. Raymond B. Mass. 



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Bigelow, Mrs. Albert F. 

Bigelow, Miss Eleanor 

Bigelow, Mrs. Henry B. 

Bigelow Junior High School 

Bill, Miss Caroline E. 

Billings, Mrs. Arthur 

Billings, Mrs. Frank E. 

Binney, Miss Emily V. 

Binney, Miss Helen Maude 

Binney, Mrs. Horace 

Birath, Mrs. George C. 

Bird, Mrs. Francis VV. 

Birdsall, Mrs. Paul K. 

Bishop, Mrs. Frank C. 

Bitner, Mr. Laurence S. 

Bixler, Dr. Julius S. 

Black, Mrs. Taylor 

Blackman, Mrs. A. W. 

Blais, Mrs. J. A. 

Blake, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. 

Blake, Mrs. George B., Jr. 

Blandy, Mr. Graham, 2d 

Blevins, Mrs. Albert H. 

Blinder, Mrs. Morris 

Bliss, Miss Carrie C. 

Bliss, Mrs. Earl F. 

Bliss, Mr. Frederick W. 

Blix, Miss Katie 

Blodgett, Mrs. Edward W. 

Bioomberg, Mrs. Wilfred 

Bluhm, Mr. Louis 

Blumberg, Mr. Henry 

Boiles, Mrs. Chester A. 

Bolster, Sallie Stevie and Kitsey 

Bond, Mrs. Harold A. 

Bonsai, Mrs. Stephen 

Book Club, The 

Boone, Mr. Phihp 

Born, Mrs. Donald 

Bosson, Mrs. Campbell 

Boston Aid to the Blind, Inc. 

Bottomley, Mrs. John T. 

Bouve, Dr. Howard A. 

Bovey, Mrs. Martin K. 

Bowditch, Mrs. Henry I. 

Bowen, Mrs. J. W. 

Boyd, Mrs. Edward F. 

Boyd, Mr. Francis R. 

Boyd, Dr. Walter Willard 

Boyer, Mrs. William E. 

Bradlee, Mrs. Reginald 

Bradlee, Mrs. Thomas S. 

Bradley, Mrs. Leland E. 

Bradley, Mrs. Ralph 

Bradley, Mrs. Robert I. 

Bradshaw, Miss Eugenie F. 

Bragdon, Dr. and Mrs. Joseph H. 

Braman, Mrs. Samuel N. 

Breed, Mr. Edward F. 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F. 

Brewer, Mrs. Charles 

Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers 

Local No. 6 
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Bronson, Mrs. W. H. 
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Brooks, Mrs. Laurence G. 
Brooks, Society of Phillips 
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Brown, Mr. and Mrs. George R. 
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Brown, Mrs. Horace A. 
Brown, Mr. J. Frank 
Brown, Mr. James Wright 
Brown, Miss Margaret L. 



Mass. Brown, Miss Martha T. Mass. 

Mass. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Mass. 

Mass. Brown, Mr. William K. N. Y. 

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Mass. Browne, Miss Florence M. N. J. 

Mass. Broyles, Dr. Elizabeth L. Mass. 

Mass. Bruerton, Mr. Courtney Mass. 

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Mass. Bryant, Miss Elizabeth B. Mass. 

Mass. Bryant, Mr. Lincoln Mass. 

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Mass. Buffum, Miss Charlotte Maine 

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Maine Bullock, Estate of Nina Mass. 

Mass. Bump, Mrs. Arctiie E. Mass. 

Mass! Bunker, Mr. C. A. Mass. 

Mass. Burdett, Mrs. E. W. Mass. 

Mass! Burke, Mrs. Murray Mass. 

Mass! Burke, Mrs. Roger M. Mass. 

jj_ y! Burlingame, Mrs. F. A. N. Y. 

Burnes, Mr. Harold W. Mass. 

Burnham, Miss Mary C. Mass. 

Burns, Mrs. James, Jr. Mass. 

Eurr, Mrs. Henry E. Mass. 

Burr, Mr. I. Tucker, Jr. Mass. 

Burr, Mr. John T. Mass. 

Burrage, Mr. and Mrs. George D. Mass. 

Burrage, Miss Margaret C. Mass. 

Burrows, Mrs. James Mass. 

Bush, Mr. and Mrs. J. Douglas Mass. 

Burler, Mrs. Charles S. Mass. 

Byers, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Mass. 

Byng, Mrs. Henry G. Mass. 

Cabot, Mrs. Chilton R. Mass. 

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Cabot, Mr. Godfrey L. Mass. 

Cabot, Mr. and Mrs._ Samuel Mass. 

Cabot, Mr. Samuel, jr. Mass. 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Sr. N. H. 

Cabot, Mrs. Walter M. Mass. 

Cain, Mr. John E. Mass. 

Callahan, Mr. Henry J. Mass. 

Cameron, Mrs. Russell R. Mass. 

Campbell, Mrs. Donald W. Mass. 

Campbell, Miss Elizabeth Mass. 

Campbell, Mr. Floyd D. Mass. 

Campbell, Mrs. L. A. Mass. 
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. N. Y. 

Campbell, Mrs. Wallace M. Mass. 

Canfield, Mrs. Genevieve W. Mass. 

Cantabrigia Club, The Mass. 

Capron, Mre. John F. Mass. 

Carmalt, Miss Geraldine W. Conn. 

Carten. Mrs. John L., Jr. Mass. 

Carter, Mrs. Albert P. Mass. 

Carter, Miss Alice Mass. 

Carter, Mrs. Hubert L. Mass. 

Carter, Mrs. L. H. Mass. 

Carter, Mrs. Winthrop L. N. H. 

Cartland, Miss Marian P. Conn. 

Casassa, Miss Rose Mass. 

Case, The Hon. Norman S. D. C. 

Casey, Mr. Stephen R. Mass. 

Caskey, Mrs. Paul D. Mass. 

Chadsey, Mrs. Horace M. Mass. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. George N. Mass. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel Mass. 

Chamberlin, Miss Louise M. Mass. 

Channing, Mrs. Hayden N. Y. 

Chapin, Mr. E. Barton Mass. 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. Mass. 

Chapman, Mrs. John A. Mass. 

Charron, Mrs. Arthur I. Mass. 

Chase, Mr. Alfred E. Mass. 

Chase, Miss Alice P. Mass. 

Chase, Mr. Arthur Taft Mass! 

Chase, Mrs. Frederick Mass. 

Chase, Mr. Gardner W. Mass. 

Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Mass. 



Mass. 
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Calif. 
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Ma:5s. 
N. Y. 

Ohio 
Mass. 
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Maine 
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Calif. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

R.I. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
D. C. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Va. 
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Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
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Va. 
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Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
N, Y. 



73 



Chase, Mrs. John McC. N. Y. 

Chase, Mrs. Rachel A. Mass. 

Chase, Mrs. W. L. B. Maine 

Chase, Mr. Walter B. Mass. 

Chase, Mrs. Walter L. Mass. 

Cheever, Dr. David Mass 

Cheever, Mrs. R. P. Mass. 

Cheney, Mrs. Benjamin P. Mass. 

Chicetto, Mr. Frank A. ^J^vl' 

Chombeau, Mrs. Bertrand Calif. 

Church, Mrs. Willard N. J. 

Chute, Mrs. Arthur L. Mass. 

Clallin, Mrs. Wm. H., Jr. Mass. 

Clapp, Mrs. Clift Rogers Mass. 

Clark, Miss Alice Warren Maine 

Clark, Rev. and Mrs. Allen W. Mass. 

Clark, Mrs. B. Preston Mass. 

Clark, Mrs. Cecil W. Mass. 

Clark, Mrs. Frank M. Mass. 

Clark, Mr. Harold T. Ohio 

Clark, Mr. Henry J. Mass. 

Clark, Miss Katherine i?"/?' 

Clark, Miss Mary B. D. C. 

Clark, Mr. Peter H. Mass. 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Mass. 

CliflEord, Mrs. Walter B. Mass. 
Clowes, Dr. and Mrs. George H. A. Mass. 

Coates, Miss Anna M. Pa. 

Cobb, Miss Helen M. Mass. 

Coburn, Miss Louise -i??^!!" 

Cochran, Mrs. Olin J. N. H. 

Codman, Mrs. Eliot Conn. 

Codman, Mr. John S. Mass. 

Codman, Mrs. Russell Mass. 

Coe, Mrs. Jefferson W. Mass. 

Coggeshall, Mrs. G. W. Canada 

Coggeshall, Mrs. Harrison H. Mass. 

Cohan, Mrs. B. H. Mass. 

Cohen, Mrs. Joseph H. Mass. 

Cole, Mr. Howard M. Mass. 

Cole, Mrs. William F. Mass. 

Colgate, Miss Mabel H. Mass. 

CoUins, Mr. Charles A. Mass. 

Collinson, Mrs. A. William Mass. 

Colmes, Dr. Abraham Mass. 

Comins, Mrs. Arthur C. Mass. 

Collins, Mr. Charles A. Mass. 

Conant. Mrs. Albert F. Mass. 

Conarit, Miss Ella B. Mass. 
Conant, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Mass. 

Conklin, Mrs. C. H. Mass. 

Conroy, Mr. James J. Mass. 

Cook, Mrs. C. J. Mass. 

Cook, Mrs. John W. Mass. 

Cook, Miss Laura W. Mass. 
Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Mass. 

CooHdge, Miss Elsie W. Mass. 

Coolidge, Mr. Joseph Arthur Mass. 

Coolidge, Mrs. T. Jefferson Mass. 

Cooper, Mrs. Harry D. Mass. 

Coote, Lady Calif. 

Corey, Mrs. Eben F. Mass. 

Cornish, Mr. John J. Mass. 

Correa, Dr. and Mrs. John F. Mass. 

Coty, Mrs. Woods Mass. 

Countway, Miss Sanda Mass. 

Courtney, Miss Mary L. N. H. 

Cousens, Mrs. John A. Mass. 

Co wen, Mrs. Arthur N. Y. 

Cowles, Mrs. Eugene Mass. 

Cowles, Mrs. William Lyman Mass. 

Cox, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Mass. 

Cox, Mrs. Luther C. Calif. 

Crehan, Mr. John J. Mass. 

Crehore, Miss Lucy Clarendon Mass. 

Crehore, Mrs. Morton S. Mass. 

Critchley, Miss Rosamund M. Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. C. Thomas Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. Charles T. Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. Edgar Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. Goodhue Mass. 
Crocker, Rev. and Mrs. John U. Mass. 



Crockett, Mrs. O. D. N. H. 

Crosby, Mrs. Stephen van R. Mass. 

Cross, Mrs. Charles H. Mass. 

Grossman, Miss Evelyn Mass. 

Crump, Miss Grace L. N. Y. 

Cubell, Mr. Samuel Mass. 

Cummings, Miss Jennie Mass. 

Cumner, Mr. Prescott T. Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Alan Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward, Jr. Mass. 

Cunningham, Miss Mary Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Stanley Mass. 

Cunningham, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Curran, Mrs. Maurice J. Mass. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greely S. Mass. 

Curtis, Mr. H. P. Conn. 

Curtis, Mr. Louis Mass. 

Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Mass. 

Gushing, Miss Dorothy P. Mass. 
Gushing, Mr. and Mrs. George M., Jr. 

Mass. 



Cushman, Mrs. Elton G. 

Cushman, Mrs. H. E. Mass. 

Cutler, Miss Abigail Ann Mass. 

Cutler, Mr. G. Ripley Mass. 

Cutler, Mrs. Nathan P. Mass. 

Cutter, Mrs. John Mass. 

Cutter, Mrs. Victor M. Mass. 



Dalrymple, Dr. Leolia A. 

Daly, Mr. Reginald A. Mass. 

Damon, Miss Bertha B. Mass. 

Dana, Mrs. Harold W. Mass. 

Dane, Mrs. Francis S. Mass. 

Dane, Mrs. John, Jr. Mass. 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E. Mass. 

DaPrato, Mrs. A. L. Mass. 

Davidson, Mrs. Archer Mass. 

Davidson, Mr. George T. Mass. 

Davies, Miss Eleanor E. Mass, 

Davies, Miss Ruth Olno 

Davis, Mrs. A. W. N. Y. 

Davis, Mrs. Edward Kirk Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. F. S. Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. Franklin B. Mass. 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Mass. 

Davis, Dr. and Mrs. Lincoln Mass. 

Davis, Miss Lucy Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. William L. Mass. 

Dawson, Mr. J. Douglas Mass. 

Day, Miss Alice F. Mass. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A. Mass. 

Day, Mrs. W. Taylor Mass. 
Dearborn, Mrs. Frederick M., Jr. Mass. 

Dearborn, Mrs. L. B. Mass. 
DeBlois, Mrs. George L. 
De Friez, Mrs. Thaddeus C. 
De Koning, Mr. L. 
Delkescamp, Miss Gladys W. 
De Luca, Mrs. O. 
Demarest, Mrs. David 
de Mille, Mrs. John C. 
Denny, Miss Emily G. 
Denny, Mr. George P. 
Denny, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. P., Jr. 
De Normandie, Dr. and Mrs. Robert 

Dexter, Miss Mary Deane 
d'Humy, Mr. F. E. 
Dickinson, Miss Grace I. 
Dickson, Miss Flora M. 
Dickson, Miss Ruth B. 
Diechmann, Miss Bertha 
Diemont, Mr. Hyman 
Dierksen, Mrs. H. H. 
Dietrick, Miss Louise G. 
Dillingham, Mrs. Isaac S. 
Dimick, Mrs. William H. 
Dlott, Mrs. Samuel 
Doane, Miss Jessie 
Dodd, Mr. and Mrs. Loring H. 
Dogherty, Miss Marian A. 



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Conn. 
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N. Y. 



N. Y. 
Mass. 

N.J. 
Mass. 
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Mass. 
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N.J. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



74 



Doherty, Miss Mary C. Mass. 

Dohrmann, Miss Dorothy A. N. Y. 

Donald, Mrs. Malcolm Mass. 

Donnelly, Mrs. Edward C. Mass. 

Dooley, Mr. Arthur T. Mass. 

Doty, Mr. William H. Mass. 

Douglass, Miss Josephine Mass. 

Dourian, Miss Lillian N. Y. 

Dow, Mrs. Dana F. Mass. 

Dowley, Mrs. Kenneth C. Mass. 

Dowling, Mrs. Alexander S. N. Y. 

Downer, Miss Lisa deForest Fla. 

Downes, Mr. J. Edward Mass. 
Downes, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome I. Mass. 

Doyle, Mr. Timothy F. Mass. 

Draper, Mrs. Edward B. Mass. 

Draper, Mr. and Mrs. James B. Mass. 

Draper, Mrs. Joseph P. Mass. 

Draper, Mrs. Paul A. Mass. 

Drew, Mrs. Pitt F. Mass. 

Drey, Dr. Paul L. N. Y. 

Dreyfus, Mrs. Sydney Mass. 

Drinkwater, Mr. Arthur Mass. 
Duff, Mr. and Mrs. J. Robertson Mass. 

Dufton, Miss Mary P. Mass. 
Dumaine, iBrs. Frederick C, Jr. Mass. 

Duncan, Miss May C. Mass. 

Duncklee, Mrs. Geo. W. Mass. 

Dunphy, Mrs. J. Englebert Mass. 

Durfee, Miss Elizabeth R. N. Y. 

Durfee, Mrs. Nathan Mass. 

Durr, Mrs. R. M. N. Y. 

Eames, Mrs. Burton E. Mass. 

East, Mrs. A. L. Tex. 
Eastham, Mr. and Mrs. MelviUe Mass. 
East Lynn Unit, 

American Legion Aux. Mass. 

Eastman, Mr. George H. Mass. 

Eaton, Mrs. Charles F., Jr. Mass. 

Eaton, Mrs. Frederick W. Mass. 

Eckfeldt, Mr. Roger W. Mass. 

Eddy, Mrs. Brewer Mass. 

Edwards, Mr. Dwight Calif. 
Edwards, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Mass. 

Eggers, Mr. William A. Ohio 

Elder, Miss Vera N. Y. 

Eliot, Miss Marian C. Mass. 

Elliott, Miss Ethel J. Mass. 

Ellis, Mr. Benjamin P. Mass. 

Elms, Miss Florence G. Mass. 

Elsmith, Mrs. Dorothy Mass. 

Emerson, Miss Mabel E. Mass. 

Emerson, Estate of Marian D. N. H. 

Emery, Mrs. Forrest S. Mass. 

Emmons, Mrs. Alfred P. Mass. 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Sr. Mass. 

Endicott, Mrs. Mitchell N. J. 

Englis, Mrs. John N. Y. 
Equitable Life Assurance Society N. Y. 

Erickson, Mr. Joseph A. Mass. 

Estabrook, Mrs. R. F. Mass. 

Ettinger, Mr. Maurice N. Y. 

Eustis, Mr. Stanton R. Mass. 

Everett, Miss Emilie Hughes Mass. 

Fabens, Miss Caroline H. Mass. 

Fabyan, Dr. Marshal Mass. 

Faeth, Mrs. Charles E. Mass. 

Fairbank, Mrs. Murry N. Mass. 

Fairfax, Mrs. Madge C. Mass. 

Falvey, Miss Alice Mass. 

Farley, Mrs. Eliot Mass. 

Farlow, Mr. John S. Mass. 

Faude, Mrs. Paul Mass. 

Faulkner, Mrs. James M. Mass. 

FauU, Mr. J. H. Mass. 

Faunce, Miss Eliza H. Mass. 

Fay, Mr. Arthur Dudley Mass. 

Fay, Mrs. Charles E. Mass. 

Fay, Miss Margaret Lincoln Mass. 

Fay, Mr. and Mrs. Willis W. Mass. 



Fearing, Mrs. George R. Mass. 

Febiger, Mr. William Sellers Mass. 

Fegan. Mrs. Fannie HaU Mass. 

Feldman, Mrs. Moses D. Mass. 

Feldman, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel N. J. 

Felt, Mrs. B. F. Mass. 

Felton, Mrs. Winslow B. Mass. 

Fenn, Rev. and Mrs. Dan H. Mass. 

Fenn, Mrs. T. Legare Mass. 

Fenno, Miss Alice M. Mass. 

Fenno, Miss S. Elizabeth Mass. 

Fenwick, Miss Bertha N. J. 
Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Enoch P. Mass. 
Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Mass. 

Ferrin, Mrs. F. M. Mass. 

Field, Mrs. Mary Mass. 

Finberg, Mrs. Chester F. Mass. 

Findlay, Mr. Francis Mass. 

Fine, Mr. Joseph Mass. 

Finfrock, Miss Anna L. Ind. 

Finney, Mrs. Arthur L. Mass. 
First Parish of Concord, 

Sunday School of the Mass. 

Fish, Miss Margaret A. Mass. 

Fisher, Miss Edith S. Mass. 

Fisk, Mrs. Otis H. Mass. 

Fitch, Miss Mary A. Mass. 

Fitch, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley G. H. Mass. 

Fitts, Mr. George H. Mass. 

Flagg, Mrs. Elisha Mass. 

Flaherty, Miss Anna R. Mass. 

Flather, Mr. and Mrs. Fred'k A. Mass. 

Flint, Mrs. Perley G. Mass. 

Flood, Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Mass. 

Floyd, Miss Lottie M. N. Y. 

Foley, Mrs. M. J. Mass. 

Folsom, Mr. Grenville W. Mass. 

Folsom, Mrs. Robert M. Mass. 

Folsom, Mrs. Rufus Mass. 

Foote, Mr. and Mrs. James G. Mass. 

Foote, Mr. and Mrs. John E. F. Mass. 

Forbes, Mr. Edward W. Mass. 
Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. F. Murray Mass. 

Forbes, Mrs. George Shannon Mass. 

Forbes, Mrs. H. W. Mass. 

Forbes, Mrs. Ralph E. Mass. 

Foster, Mr. Benjamin B. Mo. 

Foster, Miss Hilda S. Mass. 

Fowler, Mr. Louis F. Mass. 

Fox, Mr. Charles J. Mass. 

Fox, Miss Edith M. Mass. 

Fox, Mrs. Felix Mass. 

Fox, Mrs. Heywood Mass. 

Fraim, Mrs. Irving W. Mass. 

Francke, Mrs. H. Gilbert Mass. 

Freeman, Mr. Myron S. Mass. 

Freeman, Miss Nettie T. Mass. 

French, Mrs. Allen Mass. 

French, Miss Ruth H. Mass. 

Freund, Mr. Sanford H. E. N. Y. 

Friedlander, Mrs. Jenny N. Y. 

Friedman, Mrs. Nathan H. Mass. 

Friedman, Mrs. Simon Mass. 

"Friend, A" Mass. 

Friend, Miss Eunice A. Mass. 

Frost, Mr. Donald McKay Mass. 

Frost, Mr. and Mrs. Rufus S. Mass. 

Frothingham, Mrs. Donald Mass. 

Frothingham, Miss Eugenia B. Mass. 

Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon Mass. 

Prye, Miss Cornelia Calif. 

Fuller, Mrs. Genevieve M. Mass. 

Fuller, Mr. Lorin L. Mass. 

Fuller, Mrs. Robert G. Mass. 

Fulton, Mrs. I. Kent Conn. 

Funnell, Dr. Wilfred G. Mass. 

Gale, Mrs. C. E. Mass. 

Gale, Miss Esther H. Mass. 

Gammons, Mrs. C. W. Mass. 

Gardiner, Mrs. Wm. Tudor Mass. 

Gardner, Mr. Colin Ohio 



75 



Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. G. Peabody 
Gardner, Mrs. George P. 
Gardner, Mrs. Louis 
Gargill, Mrs. Samuel L. 
Garsia, Mrs. Edwin R. C. 
Garside, Miss Lillian R. 
Gates, Dr. Olive 
George, Miss J. 
Gerould, Miss Theodora A. 
Gerrish, Mrs. Per ley G. 
Gerrity, Mrs. J. W. 
Gibbs, Miss Laura R. 
Gibbs, Mrs. William F. 
Gibson, Mrs. Kirkland H. 
Gilbert, Miss Clara C. 
Gilbert, Dr. Darius W. 
Gilbert, Miss Helen C. 
Oilman, Miss Gertrude 
Gilmore, Mr. Elbert J. 
Ginsberg, Mrs. Bella A. 
Ginsburg Brothers, Inc. 
Gladwin, Mrs. Harold S. 
Glasheen, Mrs. Joseph F. 
Gleason, Miss Edith C. 
Gleason, Mrs. HoUis T. 
Gleason, Mr. and Mi-s. P. J. 
Gledhili, Mr. and Mrs. J. Norman 
Glidden, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T., Jr. 
Glunts, Mr. James D. 
Goethals, Mrs. Thomas R. 
Golden, Mr. Louis R. 
Gelding, Mrs. Frank H. 
Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel A. 
Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel E. 
Goodhue, Mrs. Charles E., Jr. 
Goodnow, Mrs. William N. 
Goodspeed, Mrs. Carl M. 
Goodstein, David M., Inc. 
Goodwin, Mrs. F. S. 
Goodwin, Mr. Fred M. 
Goodwin, Mrs. H. M. 
Gordan, Mrs. John D. 
Gordon, Mrs. Louis 
Gordon, Mrs. Nathan H. 
Gore, Mr. F. Porter 
Gorham, Mr. Richard M. 
Gormley, Mr. James T. 
Gorner, Mr. Otto A. 
Gorowitz, Rabbi Aaron 
Gould, Mrs. Marion R. 
Grade, Mr. Arnold E. 
Graham, Miss Louise 
"Grandmother, Roger and Beebe" 
Grant, Mrs. Alexander G. 
Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. 
Graton, Mrs. Bowman 
Graton, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. 
Graves, Miss Louise B. 
Gray, Mr. Reginald 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald 
Gray, Mrs. Stephen M. W. 
Gray, Mrs. Thomas H., Jr. 
Green, Mr. George Emery 
Greenbaum, Mr. Joseph 
Greene, Mrs. C. Nichols 
Greenman, Mrs. W. B. 
Giecnough, Mrs. Charles W. 
Greenough, Mrs. Henry V. 
Greer, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Gregory, Miss Agnes 
Grey, Dr. Anna B. 
Griffing. Mrs. Edward J. 
Griggs, Mrs. Clifford 
Gring, Mrs. Paul 
Griswold, Miss Kate 
Gross, Mrs. Robert H. 
Grote, Miss Anna E. 
Gruener, Mrs. Leopold 
Grj'zmish, Mrs. M. C. 
Guest, Mrs. Amy 
Guild, Mrs. Edward M. 
Guilden, Mr. Ira 



Mass. Galick, Prof. Charles B. 

Mass. Gullifer, Dr. and Mrs. W. Harry 

Mass. Guptill, Mrs. Leon C. 

Mass. Gutheim, Mr. Herman E. 

Mass. Gutlon, Mrs. Sidney S. 

Mass. 

Mass. Hackett, Miss Mary E. 

Mass. Haertlein, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 

N. H. Haffenreffer, Mrs. Theodore C. 

Mass. Hale, Mrs. Albert 

Mass. Hale, Mrs. Charles A. 

Mass. Hale, Miss Ellen 

N. Y. Hale, Mr. Henry 

Mass. Hale, Mrs. Richard K. 

Mass. Haley, Miss Anna E. 

Mass. Hall, Miss Anna 

Mass. Hall, Mrs. George P. 

Calif. Hall, Miss GriseUa C. 

Mass. Hall, Mr. Harry A. 

Mass. Hall, Mrs. Herbert J. 

Mass. Hall, Miss Jessie C. T. 

Calif. Hall, Mr. John H. 

Mass. Hall, Mrs. Joseph L. 

Mass. Hall, Miss Margaret 

Mass. Hall, Miss Minna B. 

Mass. Hall, Mr. Samuel Prescott 

Mass. Hall, Mr. William 

Mass. Hall, Mrs. William L. 

Mass. Hallowell, Miss Emily 

Mass. Hallowell, Mr. James Mott 

Mass. Hallowell, Mr. John W. 

Mass. Hallov/ell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. 

Mass. Hallowell, Mrs. Samuel 

Mass. Halm, Mrs. M. 

Mass. Halstead, Mr. Charles A. 

Mass. Hamann, Mr. Edmund H. 

Mass. Hamilton, Mrs. Burton E. 

N. Y. Hamilton, Mrs. Edward P. 

Mass. Hamlen, Mrs. R. Gushing 

Mass. Hamlin, Mrs. B. Nason 

Mass. Ham.mond, Miss Elizabeth M. 

N. Y. Hanks, Mr. G. R. 

Mass. Hannauer, Mrs. George 

Mass. Hansen, Mrs. Alvin H. 

N. Y. Hardesty, Miss Letitia P. 

Mass. Harden, Mrs. J. Bradford 

Mass. Harman, Mr. O. S. 

Mass. Harold, Mr. Raymond P. 

Mass. Harrington, Mr. George L. 

N. Y. Harrington, H. L., Esq. 

Mass. Harris, Mrs. Edward 

Mass. Harris, Rev. John U. 

Conn. Harrison, Mr. Elmer J. 

Mass. Hart, Mrs. Elsa R. 

Mass. Hart, Mrs. Ivan 

Mass. Hartshorne, Mr. and Mrs. 

Mass. Harvard Combined Charities 

Mass. Harvey, Mrs. John L. 

Mass. Harvey, Mrs. Winthrop A. 

Mass. Harwood, Mrs. Herbert E. 

Mass. Hascall, Mrs. Henrietta 

Mass. Hsseltine, Miss Caroline M. 

Mass. Haskell, Mr- Edward A. 

Mass. Hastings, Mrs. Merrill G. 

Mass. Hatch, Mrs. Arthur W. 

N. Y. Hatch, Mrs. Frederick S. 

Mass. Hatch, Mr. Pascal E. 

Mass. Hatch, Mrs. Roger C. 

Mass. Hathaway, Mrs. Edgar F. 

Mass. Hatheway, Mrs. Conrad P. 
Burma Hauptmann, Mrs. Selma 

Mass. Haven, Dr. Anna P. 

Mass. Haven, Mrs. Harry N. 

Mass. Hawes, Mrs. CaroHne G. 

Mass. Hawes, Miss Mary C. 
Calif. Hawkridge, Mr. Clayton F. 

Mass. Hayden, Mrs. Harold B. 

Mass. Hayden, Miss Ruth D. 

Mass. Hayes, Miss Margaret E. 

N. Y. Haynes, Miss Emily M. 

Mass. Haynes-Smith, Mrs. William 
N. Y. Hazelton, Miss Helen F. 

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Mass. 
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Mass. 
Pa. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Pa. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
D. C. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Ohio 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
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Hazen, Miss Charlotte ^^?f 

Heater, Mr. George L. Calif. 

Hebbard, Mrs. Harold B. Mass. 

Hedblom, Mrs. Carl A. Mass. 

Heffernan, Mrs. Ray W. Mass. 

Heller, Mrs. Myron Mass. 

Helm, Dr. and Mrs. MacKinley Mexico 

Homenway, Mrs. Harriet Mass. 

Kemphill, Mrs. Harry H. Pa. 

Henderson, Mrs. R. G. Mass. 

Hendricks, Miss Helen R. N. Y. 

Herr, Mrs. Secor Mass. 

He-see, Mr. David E. Mass. 

Herses, Mrs. Frederick C. Mass. 

Hei-sey, Miss Ada H. Mass. 

Heywood, Mr. Chester D. Mass. 

Hiatt, Miss Phyllis M. Mass. 

Higgins, Mrs. Aldus C. Mass. 

Higgins, Dr. Harold L. Mass. 

Higgins, Mrs. Marion L. Mass. 

Higgins, Mr. Richard R. Mass. 

Higginson, Mr. Francis L. Mass. 

Highland Contracting Company Mass. 

Hildebrant, Miss Beulah S. Fla. 

Hill, Miss Grace M. Vt. 

Hill, Miss Marion Mass. 

Hill, Miss Virginia Maine 

Hiller. Misses Edna and Emily Cahf. 

Hiliiard, Mr. Curtis M. Mass. 

Hills, Mrs. Gerald Y. Mass. 

Hinchman, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Mass. 

Hinds, Mrs. E. Sturgis Mass. 

Hinkle. Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 

Hinkle, Mr. and Mrs. James G. Mass. 

Hinman, Mr. George W. Mass. 

Hinton, Mrs. Edgar N. Y. 

Hirtzel, Mr. George L. N. J. 

Hitchcock, Miss M. Louise Mass. 

Koagiand, Mrs. Mary L. Mass. 

Hoar, Mrs. Sherman Mass. 

Hobart, Mrs. Richard B. Mass. 

Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Mass. 

Hodges, Miss Maud Mass. 
Hodgkins, Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel G. Mass. 

Hoeber, Mr. Eugene H. N. Y. 

Hogsett, Mr. Robert A. Mass. 

Holbrook, Mr. Pinckney Mass. 

Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H. Mass. 

Holland, Mrs. H. Brian Mass. 

Holmes, Mrs. Hector M. Mass. 

Holt, Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. 111. 

Holyoke, Mr. Charles Mass. 

Holzer, Mr. Albert Mass. 

Homans, Mr. William P. Mass. 

Homer, Miss Adelaide Mass. 

Hood, Mr. Arthur N. Mass. 

Hood, Mr. and Mre. Gilbert H., Jr. Mass. 

Hooper, Mrs. James R. Mass. 

Hooton, Dr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Mass. 

Hopewell, Mrs. Charles F. Mass. 

Hopewell, Mrs. Frederick C. Mass. 

Hopkins, Mr. A. Lawrence Mass. 

Hopkins, Mrs. Bertrand H. Mass. 

Hopkins, Dr. and Mrs. John R. Mass. 

Hopkinson, Mr. Charles Mass. 

Hopper, Miss Marie Louise Penna. 

Horton, Miss Barbara Mass. 

Hosmer, Mr. Calvin Mass. 

Hosmer, Miss Jennie C. Calif. 

Hough, Mrs. B. K. Mass. 

Houghton, Mrs. Clement S. Mass. 

Houghton, Mrs. Frederick O. Mass. 

Houghton, Dr. and Mrs. John D. Mass. 

Houghton, Miss Mabel E. Mass. 

Houghton, Mrs. William M. Mass. 

Houser, Mr. George C. Mass. 

Howard, Mrs. William G. Mass. 

Howard, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Howe, Mr. Frederic W., Jr. Mass. 

Howe, Mrs. George E. Mass. 

Howe, Mr. Henry S. Mass. 

Howe, Mr. James C. Mass. 



Hower, Mrs. Ralph M. Mass. 

Howland, Mrs. Frank C. Ohio 

Hov/land, Mrs. Llewellyn Mass. 

Howland, Mrs. Weston Mass. 

Howland, Mrs. William D. Mass. 
Hubbard, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Mass. 
Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. Mass. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Henry V. Mass. 

Hubbard, Mr. Paul M. Mass. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Russell S. Mass. 

Huckins, Mrs. E. W. Mass. 

Huckins, Mrs. Stuart Mass. 

Humphreys, Mr. Walter Mass. 

Hunnewell, Mr. Arnold W. Mass. 

Hunnewell, Mr. Francis Welles Mass. 

Hunnewell, Miss Louisa Mass. 
Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick V. Mass. 

Hunt, Mrs. R. B. Fla. 

Hunter, Mrs. Francis T. Mass. 

Hunting, Miss Clara C. Mass. 

Huntress, Mrs. Herbert C. Mass. 

Hurlbut, Mrs. B. S. Mass. 

Hurley, Dr. William R. N. H. 

Hustis, Mr. J. H., Jr. N. Y. 

Hutchings, Mrs. J. Henry Mass. 

Hutchins, Mr. John G. B. N. Y. 

Hutchinson, Miss Helen S. Conn. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. James A. Mass. 

Hutchinson. Mr. Sj'dney E. Pa. 

Hutton, Mrs. George Mass. 

Hutton, Mrs. Norman Mass. 

Hyland, Mr. George C. Mass. 

Hyman, Mr. Abe Mass. 

Hyneman, Mrs. Louis Mass. 

Hynes, Mr. James J. Mass. 

lasigi. Miss Mary V. Mass. 

Illsley, Mrs. John P. Mass. 

Imper, Mrs. Robert O. Mass. 

Ingalls, Mr. Frederic C. Mass. 

Inman, Miss Marjorie Mass. 

Ireland, Mrs. Ariine D. N. Y. 

Isaacs, Mrs. Nathan Mass. 

Jack, Mrs. Edwin E. Mass. 

Jackson, Mrs. Alton B. N. H. 

Jackson, Miss Annie H. Mass. 

Jackson, Miss Ethel I. Mass. 

Jackson, Mrs. Henry A. N. Y. 

Jackson, Miss Mary Lee Mass. 

James, Mrs. William Mass. 

Jandron, Mr. Francis L. Mass. 

Janes, Mrs. Lewis H. Mass. 

Jeffares, Mrs. J. N. N. Y. 

Jeffrey, Mrs. Edward C. Mass. 

Jenks, Mr. James L., Jr. Mass. 

Jenney. Mrs. A. S. N. H. 

Jeppson, Mrs. Armstrong Mass. 

Jeppson, Mr. George N. Mass. 
Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Pliny, Jr. Mass. 
Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. Mass. 

Johmann, Miss Elizabeth N. Y. 

Johnson, Mr. Arthur W. Mass. 

Johnson, Mr. Edwin C. Mass. 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin G. Mass. 

Johnson, Miss Emily Conn. 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Harold H. Mass. 

Johnson, Mi-s. Harold P. Mass. 

Johnson, Miss Helen S. Mass. 

Johnson, Mrs. John H. Mass. 

Johnson, Mrs. Peer P. Mass. 

Jolles, Mrs. Burton Mass. 

Jones, Mr. Cheney C. Mass. 

Jones, Mrs. Daniel Fiske Mass. 

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Durham Mass. 

Jones, r^r. and Mrs. Elmer B. Mass. 

Jones, Mr. Frederick H. Mass. 

Jones, Mr. J. Howard Mass. 

Jones, Mr. Lawrence L. Mass. 

Jones, Miss Margaret H. Mass. 

Jones, Miss Marjorie N. J. 

Jones, Miss Martha M. Mass. 



77 



Jones, Mrs. Paul Mass. 

Jones, Mr. William E. Mass. 

Joslin, Miss Mary R. Mass. 

Joy, The Misses ^ Mass. 
Junior League of the Women's 

Italian Club Mass. 

Kaplan, Mis. Bernard Md. 

Kaufman, Mr. Nathan Penna. 

Kavanagh, Mr. E. S. Mass. 

Kaye, Mrs. A. I. Mass. 

Kaye, Mr. Sidney Leon Mass. 

Kazanjian, Dr. and Mrs. V. H. Mass. 

Kee, Miss Olive A. Mass. 

Kesne, Mrs. Paul M. Mass. 

Keith, Mrs. George E. N. Y. 
Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. Stillman F., 2d Mass. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Caroline J. Mass. 

Kellogg, Miss Julia B. Vt. 

Kelly, Miss Eleanor E. N. J. 

Kelsey, Dr. Harlan P. Mass. 

Kendall, Boiler and Tank Co. Mass. 

Kenderdine, Mrs. Henry J. Mass. 

Kennard, Mrs. Frederic H. Mass. 

Kennedy, Mrs. Audrey K. Mass. 

Kennedy, Mrs. F. L. Mass. 

Kennedy, Mrs. J. J. Mass. 

Kennedy, Mr. and Mrs. Sargent Mass. 

Kennedy, Mr. Warren A. Mass. 

Kent House, Wheelock College Mass. 

Kerr-Blackmer, Mrs. H. Mass. 

Ketterle, Miss Elizabeth M. N. Y. 

Keyes, Mr. Clarence H. Mass. 

Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred V. Mass. 

Kidder, Mrs. H. S. Mass. 

Kienbusch, Mr. C. C. N. Y. 

Kimball, Mrs. Frank W. Mass. 

Kimball, Mrs. Frederic Paige N. Y. 

Kimball, Mrs. George H. Mass. 

Kimball, Mr. Morton S. Mass. 

Kimbell, Mr. Arthur W. Mass. 

Kincaid, Mr. Percy B. Mass. 

King, Mrs. Frederic L. Mass. 

Kin^, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Mass. 

King, Dr. Merrill J. Mass. 

King, Mrs. Richard B. Mass. 

Kins:, Mrs. William F. Mass. 

Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C. Mass. 

Kitchin, Mrs. Donald W. Mass. 

Kitchin, Miss Eleanor Mass. 

Kitching, Miss Belle M. N. Y. 

Kittredge, Mrs. George L. Mass. 

Kittredge, Mrs. Wheaton Mass. 

Klotz, Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Mass. 

Knauth, Mrs. Felix W. Mass. 

Knight, Rev. Walter D. Mass. 

Knott, Miss Agnes G. N. Y. 

Knott, Mrs. David N. Y. 

Knowlton, Mrs. Harold W. Mass. 

Knowlton, Miss Mary B. Mass. 

Koehler, Miss Bertha K. N. J. 

Kopelman, Mr. Bernard Mass. 

Kopelman, Mr. George Mass. 

Kramer, Mr. Joseph N. Y. 

Kress, Samuel H., Foundation N. Y. 

Kroto, Mr. Hans J. Mass. 

Kuell, Mrs. David H. F., Jr. Mass. 

Kuhns, Dr. John G. Mass. 

Kummer, Miss Lucy Mass. 

Ladies Benevolent Society N. H. 

Lamb, Miss Carrie F. Mass. 

Lamb, Mrs. Horatio Mass. 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond Mass. 

Lamson, Mrs. H. W. Mass. 

Lancaster, Mrs. Southworth Mass. 

Lane. Mr. Arthur W. Mass. 

Lane, Mrs. C. Guy Mass. 

Lane, Mrs. Robert Mass. 

Lang, Miss Margaret R. Mass. 

Langmann, Mrs. Alfred G. N. Y. 

Lanier, Mrs. Henry W. N. Y. 



Laufer, Dr. Maurice W. 

Law, Mrs. James McCowan 

Lawrence, Mr. James 

Lawrence, Mrs. James, Jr. 

Lawson, Mrs. Douglas 

Lawton, Miss Alice M. 

Learned, Mrs. George A. 

Leary, The Hon. Leo H. 

Leavitt, Dr. Peirce H. 

Lee, Mrs. D wight E. 

Lee, Mr. and Mrs. Geo, C, Jr. 

Leeson, Mrs. Robert A. 

Lehmann, Mrs. J. S. 

Leighton, Mrs- James. H. 

Leighton, Miss Margaret E. 

Leland, Mrs. Charles F. 

Leland, Mrs. George A., Jr. 

Leland, Miss Luisita A. 

Lenk, Mrs. Walter E. 

Leslie, Mrs. J. Saybolt 

Levi, Mrs. Harry 

Lewis, Mrs. B. H. 

Lewis, Mr. Clarence I. 

Lewis, Mrs. Donald J. 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Frederic T. 

Lewis, Mrs. George 

Lewis, Mrs. Theodore B. 

Lienau, Mr. George L. 

Lilienfeld, Mrs. Antonie 

Lincoln, Mrs. Daniel W. 

Lincoln, Mr. George L. 

Linden, Mr. Milton 

Linn, Mrs. Cohnan 

Litchfield, Mr. Everett S. 

Litchfield, Mr. Joshua Q. 

Little, Mr. and Mrs. David B. 

Littlefield, Miss Ida B. 

Livermore, Mrs. Homer F. 

Livingstone, Mrs. Charles S. 

Locke, Mrs. Arthur W. 

Locke. Mr. E. H. 

Lockerbie, Mrs. John 

Loder, Dr. Halsey B. 

Lodge, Mrs. Henry Cabot, Jr. 

Loeffler, Mrs. H. C. 

Loeser, Mr. Nathan 

Logan, Mrs. Alexander H. 

Lombard, Mrs. Percival H. 

Long, Mr. and Mrs. George W. 

Longacre, Mrs. Andrew 

Longley, Mr. Arthur S. 

Lord, Mrs. James B. 

Loring, Mr. Augustus P., Jr. 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C. 

Lothrop, Mrs. Arthur E. 

Lothrop, Mrs. Warren 

Lovejoy, Mrs. Frederick H. 

Lovejoy, Miss Helen D. 

Lovely, Miss Kathleen M. 

Lovering, Mrs. Richard S. 

Lovett, Miss Eleanor H. 

Low, Mr. and Mrs. Seth F. 

Lowell, Mr. H. Parker 

Lowell, Mr. Ralph 

Lowell, Mrs. W. Frank 

Luce, Mrs. Dean S. 

Lunt, Mrs. Daniel B. 

Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. 

Lyman, Mrs. Charles P. 

Lyman, Mrs. Harrison F. 

Lyman, Mr. Henry 

Lyman, Mrs. Herbert 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T. 

Lynn Association for the Blind 

Lyon, Mrs. George A. 

McClintock, Mrs. Maud P. 
McCreary, Mrs. Lewis S. 
McElwain. Mr. J. F. 
McGarry, Rt. Rev. John J. 
McGoodwin, Mrs. Henry 
McHugh, Mr. Edward J. 



R. L 

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R.I. 

Mo. 
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N.J, 
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78 



McHugh, Mr. Thomas J. Mass. 

McHutchison, Mrs. J. M. Mass. 

McKee, Mrs. Frederick W. Mass. 

McKibbin, Miss Emily W. Mass. 

McLeod, Mrs. Archibald Mich. 
McNair, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm P. Mass. 

McPheeters, Mrs. Thomas S. Mo. 

MacDermott, Mr. Charles T. Mass. 

Macfarland, Mr. Thomas T. Mass. 

Mack, Miss Rebecca Ohio 

MacKenzie, Miss Cora E. Mass. 

Mackin, Mrs. Harry I. Mass. 

Mackinney, Mrs. P. R. N. J. 

Macomber. Mrs. Harry J. Calif. 

MacPhail, Mrs. Robert B. Mass. 

MacPherson, Mr. Warren Mass. 

MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore I. Mass. 

Madden, Mr. M. Lester Mass. 

Maddocks, Mr. John A. Maine 

Magann, Mr. Frank P. Mass. 

Mager, Mr. F. Robert N. Y. 

Mager, Mr. Georges Mass. 

Maginnis, Mr. Charles D. Mass. 

Magoon, Mr. Kenneth S. Mass. 

Magoun, Mr. Roger Mass. 

Mailman, Mr. Guy W. Mass. 

Main, Mrs. Charles R. Mass. 

Malcolm, Mr. William J. Mass. 

Malloch, Mrs. Walter Scott Calif. 

Malone, Mrs. Dana Mass. 
Maltzman, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Mass. 

Mandel, Mrs. Richard H. N. Y. 

Mannes, Mr. David N. Y. 
Marden, Mr. and Mrs. Norman L. Mass. 

Marsh, Mrs. Jasper Mass. 

Marshall, Mrs. Edwin R. Mass. 

Martin, Mr. Walter L. Mass. 

Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. Mass. 

Mason, Mrs. Austin B. Mass. 

Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse H. Mass. 

Mason, Mrs. Louis B. N. Y. 
Mass. Dept. of Daughters of 

Union Veterans of Civil War Mass. 

Masson, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Mass. 
Maurer, Mrs. Jessica Keating Canal Zone 

May, Miss Edith Mass. 

May, Miss Louise C. Mass. 

May, Mrs. Marcus B. Mass. 

May, Mr. William P. Mass. 

Maynard, Mrs. George S. Mass. 

Maynard, Mr. Robert W. Mass. 

Maynard, Mrs. Zora Y. D. C. 
Mayo-Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Richmond Mass. 

Mayper, Mrs. Lois Rossignol Mass. 

Mazyck, Miss Margaret K. S. C. 

Mead, Mrs. Francis V. Mass. 

Meder, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. N. J. 
Melcher, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Mass. 

Melcher, Miss Edith Mass. 

Meltzer, Mrs. Mark C, Jr. N. Y. 

Menzer, Miss Lily C. N. Y. 

Merian, Mrs. Alfred W. Maine 

Merriam, Miss Teresa L. Mass. 

Merrick, Mrs. J. Vaughan, 3d R. I. 

Merrill, Mrs. E. D. Mass. 

Merrill, Mr. and Mrs. John I. Mass. 

Merrill, Mrs. Keith Va. 

Merrill, Mrs. Luther M. Mass. 

Merrill, Mrs. Sherburn M. Mass. 

Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce R. I. 

Merritt, Miss Mildred A. Pa. 

Mesker, Mrs. Frank Mo. 

Messenger, Mrs. George A. Mass. 

Metcalf, Mrs. Robert B. Mass. 

Metcalfe, Mrs. G. W. Mass. 

Michelson, Mr. David L. Mass. 

Michie, Mrs. H. Stuart Mass. 

Midgley, Mr. Malcolm C. Mass. 

MUler, Mr. Bartlett T. N. Y. 

Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. E. Mass. 

Miller, Mrs. Tinkham Mass. 

Mills, Mrs. Charles F. Mass. 



Minot, Mrs. Henry D. 

Mitchell, Miss Hellen C. 

Mitchell, Miss Lilian 

Mixter, Dr. and Mrs. Chas. G. 

Mixter, Mrs. William Jason 

Moffitt, Mr. J. K. 

Mohr, Mr. Frank J. 

Molter, Mr. Harold 

Monday Club (The) 

Monks, Rev. G. Gardner 

Monks, Dr. and Mrs. John Peabody 

Montague, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace T. 

Montgomery, Mr. George H. 

Montgomery, Mr. Spencer B. 

Moody, Miss Julia E. 

Moody, Mr. William L. 

Moon, Mr. Parry 

Moore, Mrs. Allaert H. 

Moore, Mr. Carl F. 

Moore, Mrs. Edward C. 

Moore, Miss Isabelle T. 

Moreland, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L, 

Morgan, Prof. Edmund M. 

Morgan, Mr. Philip M. 

Morgan, Mrs. Vincent 

Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Weld 

Morison, Dr. Samuel E. 

Morrill, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde G. 

Morris, Mrs. Edward W. 

Morris, Miss H. Pearl 

Morse, Mrs. Arthur H. 

Morse, Mr. Carroll L. 

Morse, Miss Charlotte G. S. 

Morse, Mrs. Harry S. 

Morse, Mrs. James F. 

Morse, Miss Jessie Gwendolen 

Morse, Mr. John G. 

Morse, Miss Ona A. 

Morss, Mr. Noel 

Morss, Mr. Philip 

Morton, Mr. Stanley 

Morton. Mrs. William 

Moseley, Mrs. Nicholas 

Mosher, Mrs. Harris P. 

Motherwell, Mr. J. W. 

Motley, Mr. Warren 

Mott, Mrs. Percival 

Mountz, Mrs. James T. 

Mudge, Mrs. Arthur W. 

Muller, Dr. Gulli Lindh 

Mulligan, Miss Mary S. 

Murray Printing Co., The 

Murray, Miss Frances C. 

Murray, Mr. T. Frank 

Mutch, Miss Margaret F. 

Myrick, Dr. Hannah F. 

Nash, Miss Carolyn R. 
Nathan, Mrs. Alfred B. 
Nathan, Mr. Joseph B. 
Neagle, Mr. William H. 
Neiley, Mr. Geoffrey C. 
Neill, Miss Ruth 
Nelson, Mrs. Carl 
Nelson, Dr. and Mrs. N. A. 
Newell, Mrs. John Louis 
Newell, Mrs. Lyman C. 
Newell, Mrs. Wendell B. 
New England Baptist Hospital 

Alumnae Association 
Newhall, Mr. Guy 
Newman, Miss Minette D. 
Newman, Mrs. Samuel J. 
Neyhart, Mr. Adnah 
Nichols, Mrs. Arthur A. 
Nichols, Mrs. Austin P. 
Nichols, Mrs. Charles 
Nield, Miss R. Louise 
Niles, Mr. Harold L. 
Niles, Miss Marion H. 
Noble, Mr. Leon H. 
Nock, Prof. Arthur D. 



N. Y. 

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Pa. 

111. 
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Mass. 
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N. H. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Itlass. 
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Pa. 
Ohio 
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D. C. 

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Noden, Mr. Elmer A. 

Noonan, Mi". Walter J. 

Norcross, Mrs. William W. 

Norton, Mrs. D. C. 

Norton, Miss Elizabeth Gaskell 

Norwood Baptist Sunday School 

Norwood, Mr. Sidney 

Norwell, Mr. James 

Noyes, Mr. Carleton E. 

Noves, Mrs. Harry K. 

Nutter, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. R. 

Oberist, Mr. Henry C. 
Odaniel, Mrs. J. Allan 
Osden, Mrs. Hugh W. 
Ohl, Mr. Edwin N. 
O'Keeffe. Mr. Adrian F. 
O'Kesfie, Mr. Lionel H. 
Olesou, Mr. Thomas R. 
Oliver, Mrs. E. Lawrence 
Oliver, Miss Susan L. 
Olmsted, Mrs. John C. 
Olsen, Mre. Niels M. 
Onderdonk, Mrs. Albert P. 
Onwood, Mrs. Jane R- 
Orr. Mrs. Horace W. 
Osborn, Mrs. Francis B. 
Osborne, Mr. Charles D. 
Osgood, Mrs. Edward H. 
Overton, Mrs. Bruce 

Packard, Dr. Fabyan 
PagG, Miss Elizabeth D. 
Page, Rev. Frederick H. 
Page, Mrs. Stanley 
Pame, Miss Alice 
Paine, Mrs. Jamss L. 
Paine, Mr. John A. 
Paine, Mrs. Richard C. 
Paine, Mrs. Robert G. 
Paine, Mr. Russell S. 
Paine, Mrs. William D. 
Palmer, Mrs. Constance 
Palmer, Mrs. William I. 
Parker, Mrs. Arthur H. 
Parker, Mr. Francis Tuckerman 
Parker, Mi-s. Robert B. 
Parmelee, Miss Mary J. 
Parsons, Mrs. Ernst M. 
Patterson, Mrs. Robert P. 
Patton, Mrs. James E. 
Paull, Miss Mary 
Pavenstedt, Dr. Eleanor 
Payne, Mrs. Oliver H. 
Payson, Mrs. Samuel C. 
Peabody, Miss Amelia 
Peabody, Miss Elizabeth R. 
Peabody, Mr. Harold 
Peabody, Miss Maj-gery 
Peak, Mr. and Mrs. Howard F. 
Pearse, Miss Alice W. 
Peirce, Miss Charlotte 
Peirce, Mr. J. Gilbert 
Penfield, Miss Annie S. 
Pepin, Mr. Rodolphe E. 
Pepper, Mi-s. Benjamin W. 
Perera, Mr. and Mrs. Gino L. 
Perkins, Dr. Anna Ward 
Perkins, Mr. Edward N. 
Perrin, Mrs. Badger 
Perrine, Mr. and Mrs. Lester 
Perry, Mrs. CarroU 
Perry, Mr. Frank J. A. 
Persing, Mrs. L. M. 
Peters, Mrs. William Y. 
Peterson, Miss Helga E. 
Petitmermet, Mr. Jules P. 
Pettingell, Mrs. J. M. 
Pfaelzer, Mi's. Franklin T. 
Phemister, Miss Grace 
Phillips, Mr. A. V. 
Phillips, Mr. Asa E., Jr. 



Mass. Phillips, Mr. Charles A. 

Mass. Pickman, Mr. Dudley L., Jr. 

Mass. Pierce, Mrs. C. Eaton 

N. H. Pierce, Mr. Edward F. 

Mass. Pierce, Mr. and Mi's. Lincoln W. 

Mass. Pieri, Mr. Albert 

Mich. Pill, Mrs. Louis M. 

Mass. Pinkos, Mrs. Louis 

Mass. Piper, Mrs. Charles B. 

Mass. Piper, Mrs. Richard F. 

N. H. Pisart, Madame F. 

Pitman, Mrs. Harold 
Mass. Plimpton, Mrs. George F. 
Mass. Poling, Dr. and Mrs. Dan'l A. 
Mass. Pomeroy, Mrs. Katherine H. 
Mass. Pond, Mr. Bremer W. 
Mass. Poole, Miss Mary E. 
Mass. Poor, Mrs. Alice F. 
Mass. Pope, Mrs. Frank J. 
Mass. Pope, Miss Isabel 
Mass. Popsicle Youth Award 
Mass. Porter, Mr. Alex 
Mass. Porter, Mr. Harold 
Mass. Porter, Mr. John 
Mass. Post, Mr. and Mrs. John R. 
Mass. Postley, Mr. W. D. 
Mass. Potter, Mrs. Arthur D. 
N. Y. Potter, Miss Louise M. 
Mass. Potter, Mrs. Warwick 
N. Y. Pottier, Mr. Auguste R. 

Pourchet, Miss Eunice 
Mass. Powel, Mrs. T. I. H. 
Mass. Powell, Miss Anna L. 
Mass. Powning, Mrs. M. Allen 
Mass. Pratt, Mr. Edwin 
Mass. Pratt, Mr. and Mrs. Fred'k S. 
Mass. Pratt, Mrs. Kenneth 
Mass. Pratt, Mrs. L. Mortimer, Jr. 

Prescott, Miss Clara F. 

Price, Miss Edith B. 

Prince, Mrs. Arthur D. 

Proctor, Mrs. Charles A. 

Proctor, Miss Cora R. 

Prout, Dr. and Mrs. Curtis 

Prout, Mrs. Henry B. 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. 

Pruett, Mrs. Harry J. 

Public Relations Division 

Purdy, Mr. C. Phillips 

Purves, Mrs. John C. 

Putnam, Mrs. F. Delano 

Putnam, Dr. Marian C. 

Quade, Mr. H. A. 

Rackeman, Miss Elizabeth 

Radnitz, Mrs. F. S. 

Ramseyer, Mrs. C. Theodore 

Rand, Mrs. Edward K. 

Rasely, Mr. H. N. 

Ratchford, Mr. William S. 
Mass. Rath, Mrs. Anna C. 
Mass. Ravreby, Miss Ruth Mae 
Mass. Redfield, Mrs. Alfred C. 
Mass. Reed, Mrs. Elmer A. 
Mass. Rees, Mrs. H. Maynard 
Mass. Reeves, Mr. James F. 
N. Y. Reinel, Mrs. Jennie 
N. Y. Reilly, Miss Mary E. 
Conn. Reubens, Mr. John B. 
Mass. Revere, Miss Anna P. 
Mass. Rheault, Mrs. Charles A. 
Mass. Rice, Mrs. Albert W. 

Ohio Rice, Mr. Frederick E. 
Mass. Rice, Mr. and Mrs. George T. 
Mass. Rice, Mr. William H. 
Mass. Rich, Mrs. Albert H. 
Mass. Rich, Mrs. Chester F. 
Mass. Richards, Mr. John 
Mass. Richardson, Mrs. George W. 
Mass. Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr. 
Mass. Richardson, Miss Laura E. 

80 



Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Wis. 
Mass. 
N. Y. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Richmond, Mr. George Mass. 

Richmond, Mr. H. B. Mass. 

Richmond, Mrs. Ralph S. R. I. 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise Mass. 

Rimmer, Mrs. Charles P. Mass. 
Ritchie, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Mass. 

Ritchie, Miss Marion A. Mass. 

Ritvo, Mrs. Max Mass. 

Robb, Mrs. Russell, Sr. Mass. 

Robbins, Mrs. Chandler Mass. 

Robbins, Miss Eva C. Mass. 

Robbins, Miss M. Elizabeth Mass. 

Robbins, Mrs. Reginald L. Mass. 

Robert, Mrs. Urbain Mass. 
Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight P., Jr. 

Mass. 

Robinson, Mr. Harold L. Mass. 

Robison, Mrs. Rulon Y. Mass. 

Robson, Miss Alice Mass. 

Rockwell, Mr. George H. Mass. 

Rodgers, Miss Elsie G. Pa. 

Roe, Miss Mary T. Ind. 

Rogers, Miss Bertha F. N. H. 

Rogers, Mr. Dudley P. Mass. 

Rogers, Mrs. EUery W. Mass. 

Rogers, Mrs. Horatio Mass. 

Rogers, Mr. William B. Tenn. 

Rood, Mrs. Stanley H. Mass. 

Roof, Miss Antoinette N. H. 

Rose, Mrs. William H. Mass. 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Edward Ohio 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Eugene Mass. 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Louis Mass. 

Ross, Mrs. F. G. Mass. 

Ross, Mrs. Ralph Mass. 

Rotch, Miss Edith E. Mass. 

Rowland, Mrs. B. Allen Mass. 

Rowley, Mr. Charles F. Mass. 

Rowley, Dr. Francis H. Mass. 
Rowley, Mr. and Mrs. H. Esmond Mass. 

Roy, Mr. James Charles Mass. 

Royal, Mrs. EUery E. Mass. 

Ruelberg, Dr. Reinhold Mass. 

Rugg, Miss Gertrude R. Mass. 

Runner, Miss Constance N. J. 

Puperti, Mrs. Justas Fla. 

Russell, Mrs. Otis T. Mass. 

Sabine, Mrs. Stephen W. Mass. 

Sabonaitis, Mrs. Bennie Mass. 

Sack, Mr. Benjamin N. Y. 

Backer, Miss Amy M. Mass. 

Salfner, Mrs. Theo N. J. 

Salinger, Mr. Edgar Vt. 

Saltonstall, Mr. Richard Mass. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert N. H. 

Sameth, Miss Elsa Calif. 

Sammet, Mr. and Mrs. G. Victor Mass. 

Sampson, Mrs. Mary M. Mass. 

Samson, Mrs. Edward J. Mass. 

Sanborn, Mrs. Ashton Mass. 

Sanchez, Mr. Oliverio Cuba 

Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Mass. 

I Sang, Mrs. Sara A. N. Y. 

i Sargent, Mrs. G. Amory Mass. 

I Sargent, Mr. George L. Mass. 
j Sargent, Mr. Henry J. 
! Sarton, Dr. George 

Saul, Mr. Arthur D. Mass. 

Sawyer, Miss Caroline A. Mass. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Ella Adams Mass. 

Saxe, Mr. Myer Mass. 

Sayles, Mrs. Robert W. Mass. 

Schaefer, Mrs. J. J. Mass. 

J Schaye, Mr. Paul Mass. 

! Schenck, Mrs. Garret, Jr. Mass. 

; Schildmachter, Mrs. O. N. J. 

i Schirmer, Mrs. Cyrus T. Mass. 

3 Schmidt, Mrs. Bernard Pa. 

I Schneider, Miss Elizabeth Mass. 

Sehraflft, Mr. W. E. Mass. 

Schroader, Miss Anna A. Pa. 



Schumacher, Miss Lillie L. N. J. 

Schwartzman, Mr. Isadore C. N. J. 

Schweinfurth, Mr. Charles Mass. 

Scott, Miss Alice Mass. 

Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. Mass. 

Scott, Mrs. Sumner W. D. 111. 

Seamans, Mrs. Robert C, Jr. Mass. 

Sears, Miss E. Elizabeth Mass. 

Sears, Miss Edith H. Mass. 

Sears, Miss Evelyn Mass. 

Sears, Mrs. Richard Mass. 

Sears, Mr. Seth Mass. 

Sears, Mr. Thomas E. Mass. 

Seaver, Mrs. Albert H. Mass. 

Seaver, Mr. Henry Latimer Mass. 

Seaver, Miss Minnie S. Mass. 

Seavey, Prof. Warren A. Mass. 

Sebastian, Mr. W. Pa. 

Sedgwick, Mr. Henry D. Mass. 

Seifert, Mr. Joseph I. Mass. 

Seltzer, Mrs. John S. Ohio 

Sewell, Mr. John E. Mass. 
Seymour, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Mass. 

Shapiro, Mr. Maxwell Mass. 

Shattuck, Mrs. E. J. Mass. 

Shattuck, Mr. Henry L. Mass. 

Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A. Mass. 

Shaw, Miss Florence M. Mass. 

Shaw, Mr. Harold B. Mass. 

Shaw, Mrs. Henry S. Mass. 

Shaw, Mrs. Sohier Mass. 

Shaw, Mrs. Walter K., Jr. Mass. 

Shea, Mr. Brendon Mass. 

Shea, Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 

Shepard, Mrs. Daniel L. Mass. 

Shepard, Miss Emily B. Mass. 

Shepard, Mr. Frank R. Mass. 

Shepard, Mrs. Robert F. R. I. 

Shepard, Mr. Thomas H. Mass. 

Sherman, Mrs. Allan W. Ohio 

Sherman, Miss Rose Mass. 

Shillito, Mr. and Mrs. John Mass. 

Shumway, Mrs. Waldo Mass. 

Shurcliflf, Mr. Arthur A. Mass. 

Sias, Miss Martha G. Wash. 

Sibley, Miss Emily Mass. 

Sibley, Mr. Wayne Mass. 

Silberman, Mrs. H. R. Mass. 

Sims, Mrs. William S. Mass. 

Sheer, Miss Henrietta W. Md. 
Slichter, Prof, and Mrs. Sumner H. Mass. 

Slotnick, Mrs. Julia I. Mass. 

Small, Mrs. David M. Mass. 

Smart, Mrs. Raymond A. N. Y. 
Smelofski, Mrs. John and "Mr. Theis" 

N. Y. 

Smith, Miss Alice H. Mass. 

Smith, Miss Betty N. Y. 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. N. Y. 

Smith, Mrs. Caroline Phillips Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles P. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. Coburn Mass. 

Smith, Mr. Donald B. Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Donald W. Mass. 

Smith, Mr. Francis D. Colo. 

Smith, Dr. George Van S. Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. J. Archy Fla. 

Smith, Mrs. Jerome C. Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Leonard H. N. Y. 

Smith, Mrs. Orvil W. Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Richard Usley Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. S. Abbot Mass. 

Smith, Mr. Stuart L. Mass. 

SmuUin, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Mass. 

Smyth, Mrs. Herbert Weir Mass. 

Snow, Mrs. Lyman E. Mass. 

Sooy, Mrs. Curtis Pa. 

Soper, Mrs. Willard B. Mass. 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H. Mass. 

Soule, Mrs. Leslie Mass. 

Southack, Mrs. T. Conn. 

Souther, Mrs. David, Jr. Mass. 



81 



South-worth, Miss Barbara T. N. J. 
Spe<:tor, Mr. Robert N. Y. 
Spelman, Mrs. Henry M. Mass. 
Spink, Mias Ruth H. Ill- 
Spinoza, Mr. Benjamin Mass. 
Spitz, Miss Edna Maas. 
Spooner, Mrs. Henry G. Maine 
Spore, Mr. L. D. Mass. 
Stackpole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis Mass. 
Stanton, Mrs. H. T. Ill- 
Steadman, Mr. Chester C. Mass. 
Stearly, Mrs. Wilson R. N. J. 
Stearns, Miss Elizabeth W. Mass. 
Stebbins, Miss Frances E. Mass. 
Stebbins, Mrs. Roderick Mass. 
Stedfast, Mrs. Albert R. Mass. 
Steele, Mr. and Mrs. F. R. C. Mass. 
Steele, Miss Katherine E. D. C. 
Stegrmaier, Mr. Henry L. Mass. 
Stein, Mrs. Emil N. Y. 
Stephenson, Mrs. W. R. C. Mass. 
Stevens, Mrs. Brooks, Jr. Mass. 
Stevens, Mrs. H. N. N. J. 
Stevens, Mrs. Howell D. Mass. 
Stevens, Mr. Sidney Mass. 
Stevenson, Mrs. William N. Mass. 
Steward, Mr. Gilbert L. Mass. 
Stimson, Mrs. Frederick J. Mass. 
Stockemer, Mr. and Mrs. George A. Mass. 
StockweU, Mrs. William R. N. Y. 
Stone, Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Conn. 
Stone, Mrs. N. Louis Mass. 
Stone, Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Mass. 
Stone, Mrs. S. M. Mass. 
Stone, Mrs. William Mass. 
Stoneman, David, Estate of Mass. 
Stoneman, Mrs. Sidney Maes. 
Storer, Miss Helen L. Mass. 
Stott, Mrs. Leroy W. Mass. 
Straus, Mr. David Ohio 
Strong, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Mass. 
Stuart, Miss Charlotte V. Mass. 
Stuart, Miss Ina M. Mass. 
Stuart, Miss Louise Mass. 
Stuart, Mrs. Melville N. Mass. 
Stuart, Mrs. W. H., Jr. Mass. 
Studley. Mrs. Robert L. Mass. 
Sturges, Mr. Allan H. Mass. 
Sturges, Mrs. Rush R- I. 
Sturgis, Miss Anita Mass. 
Sturgis, Mrs. Edwin A. Mass. 
Sturgis, Miss Lucy C. Mass. 
Sturgis, Miss Mabel Mass. 
Sturgis, Mr. S. Warren Mass. 
Suarez, Mrs. Philip Mass. 
Suder, Mrs. George B. Mass. 
SuUivan. Mr. George R. Mass. 
Sullivan, R. C, Co. Mass. 
Summers, Mrs. Gaston Mass. 
Summers, Mr. Merle G. Mass. 
Sutton, Mrs. Harry E. Mass. 
Sutton, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Mass. 
Swartz, Mr. Edward M. Mass. 
Sweetland, Mr. Ralph Mass. 
Sweigart, Miss Janet Pa. 
Swift, Mrs. Jesse G. Mass. 
Swinney, Miss Ruth Ore. 
Sylvester, Miss Alice H. Mass. 

Taber, Mrs. T. T. N. J. 

Talano, Mrs. Maria CaM. 

Talbot, Miss Mary Eloise Mass. 

Talmage, Mr. E. T. H. N- J. 

Tappan, Mr. Ernest S. Mass. 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Davis Mass. 

Taylor, Mrs. Edward W. Mass. 

Taylor, Mrs. Grant S. Mass. 

Taylor, Mr. Prescott R. Mass. 

Taylor, Mrs. Sanford K. Mass. 

Taylor, Mrs. W. I. Mass. 

Templeton, Mr. Irving R. N. Y. 

Tenney, Mrs. Albert B. Mass. 



Terry, Mrs. Ruth K. Mass. 

Thayer, Mrs. Frank H. Mass. 

Thayer, Mr. and Mrs. Jamee B. Mass. 

Thayer, Mr. John C. Ohio 

Thayer, Mr. William H. Mass. 

Theopold, Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Mass. 

Thomas, Mrs. Alfred Mass. 

Thomas, Mrs. F. N. Mass. 

Thomas, Mr. John G. W. Mass. 

Thomas, Miss Helen Goss Mass. 

Thompson, Mrs. Charles D. Mass. 

Thompson, Miss Helen M. Mass. 
Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Mass. 

Thompson, Mr. Wayne B. Mass. 

Thorn, Mr. Roland Mass. 

Thorp, Miss Alice A. Mass. 

Tierney, Mrs. John P. Mass. 
Tilden, Misses Alice F. and Edith S. Mass. 

Tobias, Mr. F. H. N. Y. 

Tomb, Mrs. J. M. Mass. 

Tomlinson, Mrs. E. C. Mass. 

Torbert, Mrs. James R. Mass. 

Tower, Miss Florence E. Mass. 
Tower, Mr. and Mrs. Oswald 
Towle, Mrs. L. D. 
Townsend, Miss Annie R. 
Townsend, Mr. W. Howard 
Tracy, Mrs. E. M. 
Tracy, Mrs. William E. 
Trainer, Mr. H. R. 
Traylor, Mrs. Mahlon E. 
Tri Sigma Sorority, Beta Chapter 
Trinity Congregational Church of 

Lawrence, Sunday School Mass. 

Trinity Parish Church School Mass. 

Tripp, Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Mass. 

Troutwine, Mrs. Harry Maas. 

Trumpy, Mr. RandaU H. N. Y. 

Tucker, Mrs. Henry Guild Mass. 

Tucker, Miss Minne C. N. Y. 

Tucker, Mr. Nathan Mass. 

Tuckerman, Mrs. Sears Mass. 

Tudor, Mrs. Henry D. Mass. 

Tudor, Mr. Owen Mass. 

Tuttle, Miss M. Elizabeth N. Y. 

Tyler, Mr. Brenton E. Mass. 

Ultsch, Mrs. Emma L. Mass. 

Underwood, Mrs. Charles A. Mass. 
Union Congregational Church, 

East Braintree, Primary Dept. Mass. 

Upham, Miss E. Annie Mass. 

Upton, Mrs. King Mass. 

Usher, Mrs. Samuel Mass. 

Vanderhoof, Mrs. Nelson B. Mass. 

Van Home, Miss Edna B. and 

Althea R. H. Pedlar 
Van Ingen, Miss Anne H. 
Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C. 
Van Norman, Mrs. Frederick D. 
Van Syckel, Mrs. Esther 
Van Vleck, Mr. John H. 
Vappi & Co., Inc. 
Varterisian, Mr. Avedis 
Vary, Miss Leona B. 
Vaughan, Miss Margaret I. 
Veitch, Mr. Edward A. 
Ver Planck, Mr. Philip 
Vickery, Mrs. Herman F. 
Voehl, Miss Marie C. 
Vogel, Mr. and Mrs. Augustus H. 
Vogeley, Mrs. W. Roebling 
Volkman, Mrs. James Howe 

Wadsworth, Mrs. Lewis L. 
Wahlberg, Mr. Bertil L. 
Wald, Mr. Harold 
Waldinger, Mrs. Carl P. 
Wales, Mr. Quincy W. 
Wallace, Miss Bessie M. 



82 



Wallace. Miss Eleanor B. 

Wallburg, Mrs. Frances K. 

Waller, Mrs. F. S. 

Walpole Women's Club 

Walsh, Mr. Fred V. 

Walworth, Miss Harriet E. 

Wambaugh, Mrs. Miles 

Waples, Mr. S. H. 

Ward, Mr. Edgar 

Ward, Mr. John 

Ward, Miss M. DeC. 

Ward, Mr. Robert S. 

Wardwell, Mrs. Sheldon T. 

Ware, Mrs. C. L. 

Warner, Mrs. Nelson M. 

Warner, Mrs. Sam B. 

Warren, Mrs. Bayard 

Warren, Mr. Rowland S. 

Warren, Mrs. S. L. 

Washburn, Rev. Henry B. 

Washburn, Mrs. Mary L. 

Waterman, Mrs. George A. 

Watertown Women's Club 

Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. 

Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Laurence J. 

Webster, Mr. Walter W. 

Weed, Mrs. Charles F. 

Weeden, Mrs. Charles F. 

Weil, Miss Gertrude 

Weil, Mr. Jesse 

Welch, Mr. John B. 

Welch, Mr. William M. 

Wellington, Miss Carrie M. 

Wellman, Miss Mabel T. 

Wells, Mr. George 

Wells, Frances, Joel and Albert, 2d 

Wells, Mrs. Wellington, Jr. 

Wendell, Mr. Arthur R. 

Wentworth, Mrs. Henry A. 

West, Mrs. Henry S. 

West, Miss Lena A. 

West Newton Women's 

Educational Club 
Wetherbee, Miss LDa 
WethereU, Mr. F. A. 
Wetherell, Mr. L. H. 
Weyerhouser, Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. 
Whealan, Mr. James E. 
Wheelan Foundation 
Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard, Jr. 
Wheeler, Mrs. S. B. 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Lawrence 
White, Mrs. Frederick G. 
White, Miss Gertrude R. 
White, Mrs. Harry K. 
White, Mrs. Moses P. 
Whitehead, Mrs. Alfred M. 
Whiteman, Rev. and Mrs. John B. 
Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr. 
Whitmore, Mrs. A. L. 
Whitney, Mr. and Mrs. C. Handasyde 

Whitney, Mrs. Geoffrey G. 
Whitney, Mrs. William T. 
Whittall, Mr. Matthew P. 
Whittem, Mr. A. F. 
Whittemore, Mr. F. L. 
Whittemore, Mr. Harris S. 
Whitwell, Mrs. Frederick S. 
Widder, Mr. David V. 
Widger, Mrs. S. S. 
Wiese, Mr. Robert G. 
Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 
Wiggin, Mrs. Grace P. 



N. Y. 


Wight, Mr. and Mrs, Arthur B. 
Wight, Mrs. Edward P. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


N. H. 


N. Y. 


Wight, Mrs. Elsie B. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wight, Mi-s. Marcus Seymour 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wightman, Mrs. Hazel V. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wilbor, Mrs. Rufus L. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wilder, Mrs. Henry H. 


Mass. 


Tex. 


WUey, Mrs. William O. 


N. Y. 


Mass. 


Wilhelm, Dr. Norbert A. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wilkins, Miss Georgia M. 


Ga. 


Mass. 


Wilkinson, Mrs. Alvin T. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Willard, Mrs. Frank H. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Willett, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour B. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Willi, Mr. George 


N. Y. 


Mass. 


Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Holden P. 


Mass. 


N. H. 


Williams, Mrs. John H. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Williams, Mr. Roy F. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Williams, Miss Susan 


Mass. 


N.J. 


Williamson, Miss Clara B. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Willing, Mr. James 


Mass. 


Mass. 


WOliston, Miss Emily 


Mass. 


Fla. 


Williston, Prof. Samuel 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wilson, Miss Antoinette 


N. Y. 


Mass. 


Wilson, Mrs. Ernest D. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wilson, Mrs. Fred A. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wilson, Mr. Frederick D. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Windom, Miss Florence D. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wing, Mrs. Charles S. 


Mass. 


N. C. 


Winn, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. 


Mass. 


Ky. 


Winsor, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Winsor, Mrs. Frederick 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Winthrop, Miss Clara B. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wise, Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. 


Mass. 


Ind. 


Wise, Mrs. Jonah B. 


N. Y. 


Mass. 


Wiswall, Mrs. Augustus C. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wolf, Mrs. Louis 


Ind. 


Mass. 


Woman's Association, 




N.J. 


Central Congregational Church, 




Mass. 


Newtonville 


Mass. 


Va. 


Women's Union of the First 




Mass. 


Congregational Church, Natick 


Mass. 




Wood, Mrs. C. F. 


Ky. 


Mass. 


Wood, Mrs. Orrin G. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wood, Dr. W. Franklin 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Woodard, Mrs. Mary Rudy 


Pa. 


Mass. 


Woodbridge, Mr. Benjamin M. 


Ore. 


Mass. 


Woods, Mrs. James H. 


Mass. 


111. 


Woodworth, Mr. Alfred S. 


Mass. 


N. Y. 


WooUey, Miss Edith R. 


Conn. 


Mass. 


Wright, Mr. E. C. 


Ohio 


Mass. 


Wright, Mr. Henry H. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wylde, Mrs. Cecil I. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Wyman, Mr. Donald 


Mass. 


Mass. 






Mass. 


Yaglou, Mrs. Constantin P. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Yegmans, Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Young, Mrs. Alan J. 


Mass. 


Mass. 


Young, Mrs. Angus D. 


Mass. 


Mass. 






Mass. 


Zschirpe, Mrs. Minnie E. 


Conn. 


Mass. 


IN MEMORIAM 




Mass. 


Dora Axelrod 




Mass. 


Edith Howland Bacon 




Mass. 


Mrs. Edith Bacon 




Mass. 


Grace Bartlett 




Mass. 


Jimmie Hanflig 




Mass. 


Frederic B. Hawes 




Mass. 


Mrs. Quimby T. Lapbam 




Calif. 


Mrs. G. L. Levy 




Mass. 


Laura E. Richards 




Mass. 


Miss Sullivan 




Mass. 


August Zschirpe 




Mass. 







83 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly- 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), the same to 

be applied to the general uses and purposes of said corporation 
under the direction of its Board of Trustees ; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being of said corpora- 
tion shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, that certain tract of real estate bounded and described 
as follows: 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 



with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trust. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows: 

RALPH B. WILLIAMS 

Fiduciary Trust Co., 10 Post Office Square, Boston 9, Mass. 




THE TOWERS OF PERKINS 



One Hundred and Twentieth 
Annual Report 

of 

Perkins Institution 

and 

Massachusetts School 
for the Blind 

Incorporated March 2, 1829 




1951 



Offices of Administration and Schools 
Watertown 72, Mass* 



THE WORKSHOP THE TREASURER 

549 E. Fourth Street 10 Post Office Square 

South Boston 27, Mass. Boston 9, Mass. 



I 



CONTENTS 

Calendar ^ 

History ^ 

Past Officers . 6 

Officers of the Corporation • 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Upper School Staff 9 

Lower School Staff 1^ 

Members of the Corporation H 

Proceedings of the Corporation 13 

Report of the Trustees • • .14 

Report of the Director 1^ 

Report of the Ophthalmologist . . . • ■ .44 
Report of the Dentists . . . • • • • .44 

Report of the Physician • • .45 

Workshop for Adults . . . • • • • .46 

Howe Memorial Press . . ^^ 

List of Pupils ^^ 

Acknowledgments . . . . ■ • • • .51 

Treasurer's Report • • * -56 

Statement of Accounts ^^ 

Contributors to the Deaf-Blind Fund . . . • .71 
Form of Bequest . , , . • • • • -87 



PERKINS CALENDAR 1951 - 1952 



1951 

September 10. StafF Meeting 

11. Pupils return after summer vacation 

12. School begins 

18. Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 
24. Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

October 8-4. Staff Receptions in Director's Residence 

8. Staff Meeting 

12. Columbus Day Holiday 

15. Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 

16. Executive Committee Meeting 
31. Cottage Hallowe'en Parties 

November 5. Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

9. Directors' Memorial Exercises 
12. Staff Meeting 

19. Matrons' Meeting (Upper School) 

20. Executive Committee Meeting 
22-25. Thanksgiving weekend 

December 10. Staff Meeting 

16. Christmas Concert 

17. Cottage Christmas Parties 

18. Christmas Concert 

18. Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

20. Christmas Concert 

20. Christmas vacation begins after concert 



1952 
'January 



2. 

3. 

7. 
14. 
15. 

February 11. 

18. 

19. 

22. 

22-25. 



Pupils return from vacation 

School begins 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Staff Meeting 

Matrons' Meeting (Lower School) 
Executive Committee Meeting 
Washington's Birthday — Open House 
Long weekend 

March 10. Staff Meeting 

10. Matrons' Meeting (Upper School) 

18. Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

April 4. Pupils leave for vacation after classes 

15. Pupils return from Easter vacation 

15. Executive Committee Meeting 

16. School begins 

May 12. Staff Meeting 

19. Matrons' Meeting (All Matrons) 

20. Executive Committee Meeting 
30. Memorial Day Holiday 

June 7. Alumnae Day 

9. Staff Meeting 

10. Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

14. Alumni Day 

19. Graduation Day 

September 16. Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 



PERKINS INSTITUTION 

HISTORY 

IN 1826 Dr. John D. Fisher returned to Boston from Paris resolved to provide for 
the blind of Massachusetts the same care afforded them in France. Enlisting 
the aid of friends, a committee was formed and upon petition to the Legislature 
an Act of Incorporation was granted on March 2, 1829, establishing "The New England 
Asylum for the Blind," the first school in America for those without sight. In 1831 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, just returned from participation in the Greek wars, was 
elected the first director, and in August, 1832, the firet classes were held in the house 
of Dr. Howe's father on Pleasant Street. 

During the early years Col. Thomas H. Perkins became interested in the little 
school and gave for its use his large house on Pearl Street. The need for larger quarters 
was soon apparent, and in 1839 the great hotel in South Boston was purchased. This 
purchase was made possible by the assent of Colonel Perkins to the sale of the house 
that he had given to the School. Because of this magnanimous attitude of Colonel 
Perkins the Trustees renamed the school "Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
Asylum for the Blind." This name was changed in 1877 to the present name, "Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind." 

Dr. Howe directed the growing work of Perkins Institution for forty years and 
was succeeded in 1876 by his Greek protege and son-in-law, Michael Anagnos. Mr. 
Anagnos created the Howe Memorial Press for publishing embossed books and for 
the manufacture of appliances for education of the blind. In 1887 he founded the 
Kindergarten in Jamaica Plain, the first school in the world for little blind children. 
After thirty years of leadership Mr. Anagnos died in Rumania in 1906. 

In 1907 the directorship of Perkins Institution fell to Edward E. Allen, head of 
the school for the blind in Philadelphia, where he had just rebuilt the school plant 
on a garden site outside of the city. Coming to Boston, Mr. Allen began plans for 
a new Perkins, and in 1912 the Institution and in 1913 the Kindergarten were housed 
in the beautiful new plant at Watertown. These buildings, situated on an old estate 
of thirty-four acres on the banks of the Charles River, have school and residence 
facilities for nearly three hundred pupils. Dr. Allen retired in 1931. He was followed 
by Gabriel Farrell, who retired in 1951. 

PURPOSE 

Perkins Institution provides for the visually handicapped youth of New England 
full educational opportunity from Kindergarten through High School. The content 
of instruction corresponds with that offered to seeing boys and girls in the public 
schools. The methods of instruction of necessity differ. Principal differences are 
that embossed books take the place of ink print, and studies are taught objectively. 
In the adaptation and invention of means of instructing the blind, Perkins has been 
a pioneer through its century of existence. Much attention is paid to physical and 
manual training and to music. Opportunity is provided for those qualified to pursue 
higher studies or take advanced work in music and vocational fields. 

Boys and girls without sight or with insufficient sight to read ink-print are ad- 
mitted as pupils, if capable of education and in good health. While at the school pupils 
reside in cottages where the teachers also live, and through this association they acquire 
that unconscious tuition which is such an important part of the program of socializa- 
tion. The primary aim of Perkins Institution is to qualify its visually handicapped 
pupils to take contributory places in normal life. New pupils are admitted in September 
and February, and all pupils must return to their homes for the short vacations at 
Christmas and Easter and for the long vacation in the summer. 



I 



PAST OFFICERS 



PRESIDENTS 



1830-1837, Jonathan Phillips 
1838-1839, Samuel Appleton 
1840-1846, Peter C. Brooks 
1847-1854, Richard Fletcher 
1855-1861, Edward Brooks 
1861-1869, Samuel May 



1870-1871, Martin Brimmer 
1872-1897, Samuel Eliot 
1898-1930, Francis H. Appleton 
1930-1946, Robert H. Hallowell 
1946- Reginald Fitz, M.D. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



1830 

1835 
1847 
1851 
1852 
1867 
1871 



1830 
1840 
1847 
1862 
1869 
1873 
1880 



-1834, 
-1846, 
-1850, 
-1852, 
-1866, 
■1870, 
-1892, 



■1839, 
■1846, 
-1861, 
-1868, 
-1872, 
-1879, 
-1881, 



William Calhoun 
Thomas H. Perkins 
Edward Brooks 
John D. Fisher 
Stephen Fairbanks 
Joseph Lyman 
John Cummings 



1893-1896, George Hale 
1897-1911, Amory a. Lawrence 
1912-1913, N. P. Hallowell 
1914-1921, George H. Richards 
1922-1929, William L. Richardson 
1930-1946, G. Peabody Gardner 
1946- Ralph Lowell 



TREASURERS 



Richard Tucker 
Peter R. Dalton 
Thomas B. Wales 
William Claflin 
William Endicott 
Henry Endicott 
Patrick T. Jackson 



1881-1902, Edward Jackson 
1903-1904, Patrick T. Jackson 
1904-1916, William Endicott 
1917-1935, Albert Thorndike 
1935-1945, Roger Amory 
1945-1950, John P. Chase 
1950- Ralph B. Williams 



SECRETARIES AND DIRECTORS 



1831-1876, Samuel Gridley Howe 
1876-1906, Michael Anagnos 
1907-1931, Edward E. Allen 



1931-1951, Gabriel Farrell 
1951- Edward J. Waterhouse 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

1951-1952 

PRESIDENT 
Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

VICE-PRESIDENT TREASURER 

Ralph Lowell Ralph B. Williams 

SECRETARY ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Edward J. Waterhouse John W. Bryant 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Miss Dorothy L. Book* Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. 

David Cheever, Jr. Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur 

Rev. John J. Connolly* Michael F. McGrath* 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Warren Motley 

Reginald Fitz, M.D. Paul L. Neal* 

Robert H. Hallowell Richard Saltonstall 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Finance 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President Ralph B. V/illiams, Treasurer, 
Ralph B. Williams, Treasurer ^^ officio 

Edward J. Waterhouse, Secretary, Robert H. Hallowell 

ex officio Ralph Lowell 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Richard Saltonstall 
Robert H. Hallowell 
Daniel J. Lyne Warren Motley 

SUB-COMMITTEES 
Appointed by the Executive Committee 
Education Health 

Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

Rev. John J. Connolly David Cheever, Jr. 

Robert H. Hallowell Paul L. Neal 

MONTHLY VISITING COMMITTEE 

Whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 

January Warren Motley June Robert H. Hallowell 

February Reginald Fitz, M.D. September Mrs. F. J. Leviseur 

March Henry W. Holmes, LL.D. October Rev. John J. Connolly 

April David Cheever, Jr. November Michael F. McGrath 

May Richard Saltonstall December Mrs. R. E. Danielson 

LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur, Chairman 
Mrs. Arthur Brooks Mrs, Frederic B. Kellogg 

Miss Ellen T. Bullard Mrs. George F. Plimpton 

Mrs. David Cheever, Jr. Mrs. George T. Putnam 

Mrs. Russell Codman Miss Elizabeth Rackemann 

Lady Emilie Coote Mrs. Richard Saltonstall 

Mrs. Robert M. Faxon Mrs. Rudolph Weld 

Mrs. E. Sturgis Hinds 

♦Appointed by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



DIRECTOR 
EDWARD J. WATERHOUSE, M.A., Cantah. 

OFFICE 
J. Stephenson Hemphill, B.S., M.B.A., Bursar 



Claire M. Stumcke 

SecretaT^ to the Director 

Mrs. Joan B. Smith 

Secretary to the Principal 

Marion A. Woodworth 
Registrar 

Frank H. GREENEf 

Telephone Operator 



Verna L. Anderson 

Secretary to the Bursar 

Ethel L. Mackenzie 
Bookkeeper 

Alice E. Dougher 
Cecilia E. Shepherd 
Assistants 

Mrs, S. R. Hemphill 
Receptionist 



LIBRARY 
Nelson Coon, Librarian 



Florence J. Worth 
Margaret Miller 
Mrs. Pearl 0. Gosling 



Mrs. Annetta R. Castle 
Mrs. Janet L. Howat 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Victor G. Balboni, M.D., Attending Physician 

Carolyn Brager, R.N., Resident Nurse 

Elizabeth Mann, R.N., Resident Nurse 






Trygve Gundersen, M.D. 

Henry A. Mosher, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists 

Herbert Barry, Jr., M.D. 
Jane A. Hallenbeck, M.D. 
Psychiatrists 

Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
Pediatrician 

Henry R. Viets, M.D. 
Neurologist 



Reinhold Ruelberg, D.M.D. 

Dentist for the Lower School 

Mark D. Elliott, D.D.S. 

Dentist for the Upper School 

Frank R. Ober, M.D. 
Orthopedic Surgeon 

Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 
Otologist 

Francis R. Dieuaide, M.D. 
Syphilologist 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND RESEARCH 
Samuel P. Hayes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Psychologist 
Frances E. Marshall Mrs. Sina F. Waterhouse, 



Social Worker 

Mrs. Jane S. Davis, B.S. 
Psychometrist 

Shirlie L. Smith, R.P.T.T.f 
Physiotherapis t 



A.B., M.A.t 
M. Albertina Eastman, B.S.f 
Speech Correction 

Alicia A. George 
Secretary 



fVisually handicapped 



UPPER SCHOOL STAFF 

Orin a. Stone, B.S., B.D., M.A., M.A. in Ed., Principal 

Alice M. Carpenter, A.B., M.A., D.Ped., Dean of Girls 

Benjamin F. Smith, A.B., M.A.f, Dean of Boys 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND LITERARY DEPARTMENTS 

Anthony Ackerman, A.B.f Gertrude S. HarlowI 

Florence W. Barbour, A.B. Vahram Kashmanian, B.S. 

MoLLiE Cambridge, A.B.f Armand J. Michaud, A.B., M.A.f 

Mrs. Vesta V. Coon, A.B. Claudia Potter, A.B. 

Carl J. Davis, B.S. Clara L. Pratt 

Shirley A. Drucker, B.A., M.A. Mary G. Storrow* 

Charles E. Dunbar, B.S. Ed. Janet Dunwoodie, B.S. Ed. 
Physical Education Physical Education 

« 
MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Paul L. Bauguss, B.M. 
Mrs. Marjorie A. Carr Louise Seymour 

Edward W. Jenkins, F.T.C.L.f Bernard P. Barbeau, B.M., M.M.* 

Mrs. Stella D. Jenkins*, L.T.C.L. 

VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

Leo V. GiTTZUS, B.S., M.A. 

Walter P. Carr Frances L. McGaw 

William W. Howat, B.S. Susan M. Brooks 

Sidney B. DuRFEEf Mrs. Marion K. Mann 

Pianoforte Tuning Mrs. Lenore W. Fenton 
Winifred G. Ellis, B.A. Home Economics 

Commercial 

^' MATRONS OF COTTAGES 

Mrs. Sarah M. Keith, Eliot Mrs. Nellie E. H, Hamill, Tompkins 

Mrs. Mary L. Hunt, Bridgman Mrs. Pearl Gosling, Brooks 
Mrs. Belle Sanborn, Moulton Mrs. Lowie H. Bowman, Fisher 
Miss Judith G. Silvester, Deaf-Blind Cottage 

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER TRAINING 

Dr. Gabriel Farrell Dr. Samuel P. Hayes 

Lecturer, Graduate School of Consulting Psychologist, American 

Education, Harvard University Foundation for the Blind 

♦Employed part time. tVisually handicapped. 



LOWER SCHOOL STAFF 

Orin a. Stone, B.S., B.D., M.A., M.A. in Ed., Prmcipal 
Jean Gray, A.B., Primary and Kindergarten Supervisor 

INTERMEDIATE 

Carroll Blake, B.A., M.A. Caroline Peters 

Richard Hull, B.A.f Lorraine McNamara, B.S. Ed. 

Evelyn Kaufman, A.B., M.A.f Wilma Hull, B.A. 

PRIMARY 

Ruth Bunten, A.B. Marjorie A. Lagemann, B.A. 

Jean Carroll, A.B. Elsie M. Parmenter 

Helena M. Drake-;- Mrs. Jean Scheidenhelm, A.B. 

Harriet M. Phillips, B.S.f Penelope Shoup, B.A. 

KINDERGARTEN 

Mrs. Mary B. Banner, B.A. Mrs. Evelyn Moore 

Mrs. Clotilda A. McGowen Beverly Williams, B.A. 

Mrs. M. Guitelle Sandman, B.A. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS 

Eleanor W. Thayer, A.B., Music Adeline Dale, B.A., Recreation 
Mrs. Perley C. White, Music Margaret A. McKENZiE,t Crafts 

Betty Nye, Remedial Reading William Donald,* Woodwork 

MATRONS OF COTTAGES 

Mrs. Edith V. Nickerson, May Mrs. Elizabeth Wakeford, Oliver 

Mrs. Shearman Bamford, Potter Mrs. Margaret Luf, Glover 

Mrs. Janet G. Hancock, Anagnos Mrs. Louise M. Plummer, Bradlee 

DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 

Mrs. N. Maurine Gittzus, A.B., M.A. 
Madge Dolph Leo F. QueenanI 

Beatrice F. Pinkham, B.S. Dorothy H. Reynolds! 

Mrs. Rose M. Vivian, B.S. Marjorie A. MclNTOSHf 

Fanny Durfee 

WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 
Donald Remick, Manager Emily V. S. Ramsay, Clerk 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Edward J. Waterhouse, M.A., Manager 
David Abraham, Engineer Mary L. Tully, Clerk 

♦Employed part time. tVisually handicapped. 

10 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



AUbright, Clifford, Boston 

Allen, Mrs. Frank G., Boston 

Allen, Philip R., Walpole 

Allen, Mrs. Philip R., Walpole 

Amory, Robert, Jr., Cambridge 

Amory, Roger, Boston 

Angney, D. Harry, Wellesley Hills 

Appleton, Francis Henry, Brookline 

Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, Brookline 

Ballantine, Arthur A., New York 

Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, Beverly 

Bartol, Mrs. John W., Boston 

Barton, George Sumner, Worcester 

Bayne, Mrs. William, 3d, New York 

Beach, Rev. David N., New Haven, Conn. 

Belash, Constantine A., Boston 

Belash, Mrs. Constantine A., Boston 

Bird, Miss Anna C, East Walpole 

Bird, Mrs. Francis W., East Walpole 

Blake, Fordyce T., Worcester 

Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston 

Boyden, Charles, Boston 

Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H., Cambridge 

Brooks, Gorham, Boston 

Brooks, Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brooks, Mrs. Lawrence G., West Medford 

Brown, Mrs. Charles R., New Haven, Conn. 

Brvant, John W., Boston 

Bullard, Miss Ellen T., Boston 

Bullock, Chandler, Worcester 

Burns, Warren, Waban 

Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston 

Cabot, Samuel, Jr., Boston 

Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Dublin, N. H. 

Camp, Mrs. Edward C, Watertown 

Campbell, Mrs. Frederick W., Milton 

Case, Hon. Norman S., Washington, D. C. 

Case, Mrs. Norman S., Washington, D. C. 

Casseis, Miss Andree 

Chase, John P., Boston 

Cheever, David, Jr., MiUis 

Cheevcr, Mrs. David, Jr., Millis 

Choate, Robert B., Boston 

Clause, Henry T., Wilmington, Del. 

Cochran, Mrs. Olin J., N. H. 

Codman, Mrs. Russell, Boston 

Coffin, Mrs. Rockwell A., Harwichport 

Connolly, Rev. John J., Framingham 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Cambridge 

Coolidge, William A., Topsfield 

Coote, Lady Emilie, California 

Cotting, Charles E., Boston 

Crapo, Henry H., New Bedford 

Cunningham, Edward, Dover 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward, Dover 

Curtis, Charles P., Jr., Boston 

Curtis, James F., Roslyn, N. Y. 

Curtis, Louis, Boston 

Cutler, George C, Dedham 

Daley, Mrs. Francis J., Somerville 

Danielson, Richard E., Boston 

Danielson, Mrs. Richard E., Boston 

Day, Mrs. iFrank A., Newton 

Denny, Dr. George P., Boston 

Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston 

Dolan, William G., Boston 

Dowd, Mrs. John F., Roxbury 

Draper, Eben S., Hopedale 

Dniry, Theodore F., Chestnut Hill 

Diitton, Mrs. George D., Walpole 

Eliot, Amory, Boston 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Boston 



Endicott, Henry, Boston 

Endicott, William, 2d, North Andover 

Farrell, Gabriel, Cambridge 

Farrell, Mrs. Gabriel, Cambridge 

Faxon, Henry H., M.D., Brookline 

Faxon, Mrs. Robert M., Quincy 

Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston 

Fenno, Mrs. L. Carteret, Rowley 

Fitz, Reginald, M.D., Brookline 

Fitz, Mrs. Reginald, Brookline 

Ford, Lawrence A., Beverly 

Foster, Mrs. Reginald, Boston 

Fox, Miss Edith M., Arlington 

French, Miss M. Eunice, Providence, R. I. 

Frothingham, Mrs. L. A., Boston 

FviUer, George F., Worcester 

Gage, Miss Mabel C, Worcester 

Gale, Lyman W., Andover 

Gardiner, John H., Brookline 

Gardner, G. Peabody, Brookline 

Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee 

Gilbert, Carl J., Needham 

Gilbert, William E., Springfield 

Gleason, Miss Ellen H., Jamaica Plain 

Grandin, Mrs. Isabella, Boston 
Gray, Francis C, Boston 

Gray, Roland, Boston 
Greenough, Mrs. Henry V., Brookline 
Griswold, Merrill, Boston 
Gundersen, Dr. Trygve, Brookline 
Gundersen, Mrs. Trygve, Brookline 
HalloweU, Richard P., 2d, Boston 
Hallowell, Robert H., Dedham 
HaOowell, Mrs. Robert H., Dedham 
Hallowell, Robert H., Jr., Dover 
Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Jr., Dover 
Harris, Rev. John U., Framingham 
Haven, Miss Genevieve M., Sudbury 
Hayden, J. Willard, Lexington 
Hayden, Mrs. J. Willard, Lexington 
Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Milton 
Herter, Christian A., Boston 
Higginson, Francis L., Boston 
Hinds, Mrs. E. Sturgis, Manchester 
Holmes, Dr. Henry W., Cambridge 
Howe, James C, Boston 
Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 3d, Brookline 
Humbert, Miss W. R., Watertown 
Hunnewell, Walter, Boston 
Hunt, Janies R., Jr., New York 
lasigi. Miss Marie V., Boston 
Jackson, Charles, Jr., Boston 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Westwood 
Jeffries, J. Amory, Boston 
Johnson, Arthur S., Boston 
Kellogg, Mrs. Frederic B., Cambridge 
Keppel, Francis, Cambridge 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred 2d, Devon, Pa. 
King, Mrs. James G., Cambridge 
Lamb, Miss Aimee, Milton 
Lamb, Miss Rosamond, Milton 
Latimer, Mrs. G. D., Brookline 
Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Brookline 
Lawrence, Rev. Frederic C, Brookline 
Lawrence, James, Jr., Brookline 
Lawrence, John E., So. Hamilton 
Lawrence, John S., Manchester 
Lawrence, Rt. Rev. W. A., Springfield 
Leavitt, Rev. Ashley D., Brookline 
Leviseur, Frederick J., Boston 
Leviseur, Mrs. Frederick J., Boston 
Ley, Harold A., New York 
Lincoln, Mrs. George C, Worcester 



11 



Levering, R. S., Jackson Springs,. N. C. 

Lovering, R. S., Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Lovett, Miss Eleanor H., New London, N.H. 

Lowell, James H., Boston 

Lowell, Ralph, Boston 

Lyman, Mrs. Arthur T., Westwood 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Waltham 

Lyne, Daniel J., Chestnut Hill 

McGrath, Michael F. 

MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore I., West Newton 

Maliotis, Charles, Boston 

Mason, Mrs. Andrew, Brookline 

Mason, Charles E., Jr., Newton Centre 

Merrill, Rev. Boynton, Columbus, Ohio 

Merriman, Mrs. E. Bruce, Providence, R.I. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cambridge 

Minot, James J., Boston 

Monks, Rev. G. Gardner, Washington, D.C. 

Montagu, Mrs. H. B., England 

Morison, Samuel Eliot, Boston 

Motley, Warren, Boston 

Myers, Mrs. John W., Brookline 

Nash, Rt. Rev. Norman B., Boston 

Osgood, Rev. Phillips E., Orange, N. J. 

Parker, WiUiam A., Boston 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston 

Parkman, Henry, Jr., Boston 

Parkman, MM. Henry, Jr., Boston 

Peabody, Harold, Boston 

Peabody, Miss Marjorie A., Groton 

Perkins, Mrs. Charles B., Jamaica Plain 

Perkins, Rev. Palfrey, Boston 

Pew, George L., Portland, Maine 

Pierce, Roger, Milton 

Plimpton, Mrs. George F., Boston 

Pool, Mrs. Eugene H., Boston 

Pratt, George D., Springfield 

Proctor, James H., Ipswich 

Prouty, Robert M., Hingham 

Prouty, Mrs. Robert M., Hingham 

Putnam, Mrs. Eliot T., Jr., Dedham 

Putnam, Mrs. George T., Dedham 

Rackemann, Miss Elizabeth, Boston 

Rantoul, Neal,- Boston 

Richards, Henry H., Groton 

Richards, John, Concord, N. H. 

Richards, Tudor, Groton 

Richardson, John, Milton 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Milton 

Rogers, Mrs. Robert E., Cambridge 

Rogerson, Francis C, Duxbury 



Rudd, Miss Mary D., Boston 
Saltonstall, Hon. Leverett, Dover 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, Dover 
Saltonstall, Richard, Sherborn 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Richard, Sherborn 
Sawyer, Miss Mary Esther, Belmont 
Sears, Seth, Brewster 
Shattuck, Henry L., Boston 
Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A., Weston 
SherriU, Rt. Rev. Henry K., New York, N.Y. 
Sillen, Rev. Walter, Watertown 
Simonds, Miss Elsie H., Sudbury 
Sims, Mrs. William S., Boston 
Slater, Mrs. H. N„ New York 
Snow, Mrs. William G., Newton Centre 
Stafford, Rev. Russell H., Hartford, Conn. 
Stinson, Mrs. James, Worcester 
Sturgis, S. Warren, Boston 
Sullivan, Mrs. James A., Beverly 
Thayer, John E., Milton 
Theopold, Philip H., Dedham 
Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston 
Thompson, Cameron S., Boston 
Thorndike, Albert, Milton 
Thorndike, Benjamin A. G., Dedham 
Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield 
Tilden, Miss Alice F., Rockport 
Tilden, Miss Edith S., Rockport 
Todd, Francis B., New York, N. Y. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry D., Cambridge 
Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C, Pittsfield 
Vaughan, Miss Margaret I., Haddonfi'd, N.J. 
Wadsworth, Eliot, Washington, D. C. 
Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., Boston 
Washburn, Rev. Henry B., Cambridge 
Waterhouse, Edward J., Watertown 
Waterhouse, Mrs. Edward J., Watertown 
Weld, Mrs. Rudolph, Boston 
Wendell, William G., West Hartford, Conn. 
Whitmore, Howard, Jr., Boston 
Whittall, Matthew P., Worcester 
Wiggins, Mrs. Charles, 2d, Gardiner, Me. 
Wiggins, John, AMen, Pa. 
Wiggins, Mrs. John, Alden, Pa. 
Wilder, Charles P., Worcester 
Williams Ralph B., Chestnut Hill 
Wolcott, Roger, Boston 
Wright, George R., Cambridge 
Wright, Miss Lucy, Newtown, Conn, 
Young, B. Loring, Weston 
Zeilinski, John, Holyoke 



m 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CORPORATION 

Watertown, Massachusetts 

November 5, 1951 

THE ANNUAL MEETING of the Corporation, duly summoned, 
was held today at the Institution, and was called to order by 
the President, Dr. Regniald Fitz, at 3.15 P. M. 

The proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved 
with the addition of the name of Mr. Howard Whitmore, Jr., which 
had been inadvertently omitted from the list of new members elected 
to membership in the Corporation. 

The annual reports of the Trustees and the Director were 
accepted and ordered to be printed, with the addition of other 
matters of general interest to the work. 

The report of the Treasurer was presented, accepted and 
ordered to be printed together with the certificate of the Certified 
Public Accountant. 
It was then 

VOTED: That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by 
the Board of Trustees, or by any committee ap- 
pointed by said Board of Trustees, during the last 
corporate year be and are hereby ratified and 
confirmed. 
It was further 

VOTED : That the nomination of the Finance Committee and 
the appointment by the Trustees of Peat, Marwick, 
Mitchell and Company, Certified Public Accountants 
as Auditors of the Accounts of the Institution for 
the fiscal year ended August 31st, 1951 be and are 
hereby ratified and confirmed. 
The Corporation then proceeded to the choice of officers for the 
ensuing year, and the following persons were unanimously elected 
by ballot: President, Reginald Fitz, M.D.; Vice-President, Ralph 
Lowell; Treasurer, Ralph B. Williams; Secretary, Edward J. Water- 
house; Trustees, David Cheever, Jr., Mrs. Richard E. Danielson, 
Reginald Fitz, M.D., Robert H. Hallowell, Henry W. Holmes, LL.D., 
Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur, Warren Motley, and Richard Saltonstall. 
The following persons were proposed for membership and were 
duly elected: Mr. Francis Keppel, Mr. Michael F. McGrath, Mr. 
Warren Bums, Mr. D. Harry Angney, Mr. Frederick J. Leviseur, 
Mh Edward J. Waterhouse, and Mrs. Edward J. Waterhouse. 

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gabriel Farrell, Secretary 

m 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

November 5, 1951 

The Annual Report for the academic year 1950-1951 is here- 
with submitted on behalf of the Board of Trustees. This year, 
which represented the twentieth under the directorship of Gabriel 
Farrell, was also the final one of his administration. 

One of Dr. Farrell's first acts after becoming Director, was 
the setting up of a retirement plan for the staff. Under this ar- 
rangement, staff members retire at the age of sixty-five. There is 
a provision in the plan, whereby members of the administration 
and others who do not have direct contact with the students may, 
with the consent of the Trustees, remain in service until the age of 
seventy. Dr. Farrell did not feel that he should make an exception 
of himself, and declined to accept the provision of this clause, which 
would have permitted him to remain in office for some years longer. 
During the fall of 1950, he requested the President to take what- 
ever steps were necessary, to procure a successor. 

The President appointed a sub-committee which made a very 
thorough study of available candidates, both among workers for 
the blind and outside this specialized field. After careful delibera- 
tion, the Executive Committee of the Trustees decided to recommend 
to the full membership, the appointment of Edward J. Waterhouse, 
to succeed Dr. Farrell. At a special meeting of the Board on 
April 17, 1951, this recommendation was unanimously approved. 

Mr. Waterhouse has been on the staff of Perkins Institution, 
except for certain leaves of absence, since 1933. He had previously 
had some experience in the education of the blind in England. He 
has served as cottage master in the Lower and Upper Schools, as a 
teacher of English and mathematics, and before World War II, 
supervised a WPA project engaged in the manufacture of maps and 
models for the blind. Following World War II, he became Manager 
of the Howe Memorial Press. 

Dr. Farrell's services will not be lost immediately to the Insti- 
tution. He will continue to lecture to the Harvard Class and to 
assist the new Director in other ways. He has been appointed to 
the staff of the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Cambridge, where 
he will be in residence and so easily available to Perkins, He will 
retain his membership in national organizations for the blind, 
including the American Foundation for the Blind, of which he is 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees, and during this year he will be 
actively engaged as chairman of the sponsoring committee of the 
International Conference of Educators of Blind Youth, to be held 
in Amsterdam, Holland, during the summer of 1952. 

In his annual report of this year and those for the nineteen years 
which precede it, Dr. Farrell has told the story of his administra- 

14 



tion. In every way, save perhaps financially, the Institution has 
grown in stature. Educational demands change constantly and this 
is particularly true of the years of the depression, the war and the 
postwar period. Perkins has adapted its organization and its 
policies accordingly. Moreover, the three schools which operated 
formerly almost independently, the Lower School, the Girls' Upper 
School and the Boys' Upper School, have largely been integrated 
into an effective unit. 

Undoubtedly the accomplishment by which Dr. Farrell will be 
longest remembered is his establishment of a special department for 
the deaf-blind, the CHILDREN OF THE SILENT NIGHT. While 
Perkins has had at least one deaf-blind pupil enrolled ever since 
1837, when Laura Bridgman came to Boston, the recognition of 
this work as a special field requiring the raising of special funds 
and the training of specialized teachers, grew to fruition during 
Dr. Farrell's early years. The department is now well established 
and is probably the best known in its field. 

During the past year, the employees at the Workshop and at 
the Howe Memorial Press lost a good friend in their former Manager, 
Mr. Frank C, Bryan, who first came to Perkins in the early days of 
Dr. Allen's direction. During the all too short period of his retire- 
ment, he had maintained close contact with both the groups he had 
managed for so long. 

During the past year, the following members of the Corpora- 
tion were lost to us through death : 

Jan. 1951 Dr. A. S. Hill, Somerville 

Jan. 1951 Mr. Richard Gary Curtis, Boston 

Feb. 1951 Rev. Edgar W. Anderson 

May 1951 Mr. R. Clipston Sturgis, Portsmouth, N. H. 

June 1951 Mrs. Frederick J. Alley, Boston 

July 1951 Miss Minna B. Hall, Brookline 

July 1951 Mrs. Henry P. Kidder, Meadville, Pa. 

April & May, 1949 Both Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Carter 
May 1950 John H. Clifford, Esquire, New Bedford 

Mr. Sturgis has left his monument for future generations here, 
as he was the architect of the Watertown plant. The Institution 
will always remain grateful for their interest and aid. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President 



15 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

November 5, 1951 

IN MAKING THIS REPORT for the 120th year of Perkins Insti- 
tution one cannot but be mindful of the fact that it is also the 
twentieth year of this administration. This makes it appropriate 
to incorporate in the report not only the record of the year but 
also a brief review of the events within the field of the blind during 
th€ past score of years. In hardly any other period of time during 
the history of the school or indeed in recorded history of the 
blind have so many portentous moves taken place for the benefit 
of one group of our general population. During this time we have 
had to carry on through the depression of the thirties, the brief 
economic recovery prior to the direful days of World War II, 
with its consequent period of dislocation, followed by the few years 
which seemed like normal only to be upset by the cold war, cul- 
minating in the Korean situation. All of these events made their 
impress on educational and social institutions and thereby make it 
difficult to measure progress by a comparison either of costs or 
facilities during the score of years of this administration. 

The most extraordinary change at Perkins between 1931 and 
1951 has been in its population. This has not been upward, as 
some might consider a sign of progress, nor downward, as a step 
in the reduction of blindness which must always be our ultimate 
goal; rather the number of pupils in our school is found to be 
practically the same this year as it was twenty years ago ; namely. 
261 in 1931 and 256 in 1951. Between these years, however, there 
were wide fluctuations with a high enrollment of 277 in 1933 and 
a low of 234 in 1943. The reason for the upward surge of the past 
few years is the large increase of visual impairment in children 
born prematurely which was presented in considerable detail in 
our last Annual Report. While research into the causes of retro- 
lental fibroplasia has continued we are sorry to have to report that 
no positive factors have been revealed, although progress has been 
made in eliminating suspected negative factors. A recent co- 
ordination of the several groups interested in research in this area 
is perhaps the most helpful aspect at present. 

The significant fact in the change in population at Perkins is 
that our age distribution is almost reversed. A comparison of 

16 




JUST A FEW OF OUR KINDERGARTNERS 




enrollment of the Lower School and the Upper School reveals these 
changes at five year intervals: 







19S1 




1936 




1941 




1946 




1951 




B 


G T 


B 


G T 


B 


G T 


B 


G T 


B 


G T 


Lower 






















School 


60 


57 117 


51 


57 108 


06 


43 109 


74 


55 129 


81 


80 161 


Upper 






















School 


76 


G7 143 


66 


73 139 


63 


67 130 


62 


52 114 


52 


34 86 


Deaf-Blind 


1 


1 


5 


1 6 


4 


6 10 


4 


7 11 


4 


5 9 


Total 


137 


124 261 


122 


131 253 


133 


116 249 


140 


114 254 


137 


119 256 



From these figures it will be observed that in twenty years the 
Lower School has increased from 117 in 1931 to 161 in 1951, while 
the Upper School has decreased from 143 to 86 even though we 
have extended our Upper School from six to seven grades. A more 
striking illustration of the change is made by pointing out that in 
the Kindergarten and the two lowest grades there are now 102 
pupils and in the two highest grades, plus post graduates, there are 
only 18 pupils. Considerably more than one-third of the school is 
in the three lowest classes. It does not take much imagination to 
see how decisively this situation has changed our program in 
regard to space, facilities, equipment, and teaching staff. 

The first big wave in the number of little children applying 
for admission came a year ago. In order to accommodate them 
we had to convert May Cottage, an Upper School girls' house, 
into residence and school for kindergarteners. This so success- 
fully cared for twenty-three pupils that when the second wave 
approached this past summer, Oliver Cottage also in the Girls' 
Upper School was re-equipped for kindergarten use. To accom- 
plish this the Oliver girls were transferred to Fisher Cottage which 
for three years has been occupied by the Deaf-Blind Department, 
which in turn has been moved to the Director's Cottage. The 
latter has been considered too large for a modern family and 
adapts itself adequately to providing living and school facilities 
for from eight to twelve of the younger deaf-blind pupils and the 
necessary staff. The older deaf-blind pupils will live in cottages 
with children of their own age. 

Before going further into changes that have taken place in 
the past two decades let us report the events of the year which 
closed academically on June 19, and fiscally on August 31. On the 
whole, the year was one of the best that we have had under this 
administration. Good health was maintained, a fine spirit pre- 
vailed, and the planned program moved along in a smooth way. 

17 



The chief area of difficulty, as one might expect, was in the 
business affairs. While the maintenance staff carried on effectively, 
the domestic staff was hard to hold and the purchasing of supplies 
was not easy. Great credit is due to Mr. Hemphill and his staff 
for their planning and maintenance. In the administration office 
Mr. Waterhouse, Manager of the Howe Press and teacher of higher 
mathematics, was asked to use his teaching time as administrative 
assistant to the Director because of the Director's commitment 
to undertake a world survey of social conditions among blind 
children for the United Nations. 

Educational Direction 

The educational direction set up a year ago worked so success- 
fully that it was continued, with Mr. Stone serving as Principal 
and with Miss Carpenter and Mr. Smith acting as deans of girls 
and boys respectively. Miss Drucker who began the year as 
Supervisor of the Lower School and Mrs. Blum, who was head of 
the May Cottage group, were both forced to give up their work 
before the year was over. Mrs. Blum left in November because 
her husband, a physician, was called into military service. Miss 
Gray, kindergarten teacher in Bradlee Cottage, was transferred 
to May Cottage to assume charge, while a new teacher, Mrs. Danner, 
filled the vacancy in Bradlee Cottage. Because of ill health 
Miss Drucker carried on in a part-time capacity from the New Year 
until the spring vacation when she had to give up all work. She 
expects to return next year but will teach English in the Upper 
School. In May, Mr. Stone took over active direction of the Lower 

School. 

Because of the increased number of pupils in the Lower School, 
four additional kindergarten teachers were engaged and several 
vacancies had to be filled. In order to make adequate preparations 
for the opening of school under the new program, all of the new 
teachers were asked to report at Perkins a week ahead of normal 
opening. During these days, their programs were explained, equip- 
ment organized, objectives of the school outlined and personal 
conferences held between the supervisors and the individual teachers. 
This proved helpful and enabled the teachers to have everything 
in readiness when the pupils reported on Tuesday, September 19, 
1950, to begin on Wednesday, the full schedule of classes in the 
academic, music, and industrial arts departments. 

18 



Religious education classes began on Thursday, September 28, 
meeting weekly thereafter until June. This work is carried on for 
those pupils who wish to attend (and practically all do), by teachers 
sent in by the Catholic and Protestant Guilds for the Blind. In- 
struction is provided for the Jewish children by Boston Aid for 
the Blind, Inc. These three organizations are helpful in meeting 
the spiritual needs of our children and are always ready to provide 
material aid as needed without regard to the religious affiliations 
of the children. For example, Boston Aid has for many years 
provided funds for camping for all boys wishing that form of 
summer recreation. Retreats and conferences for Upper School 
pupils were held over the weekends of October 7 and May 5 by the 
Catholic and Protestant Guilds. 

October Events 

October featured events for parents and teachers as well as 
pupils. On Columbus Day, the 12th of October, parents were 
invited for informal lunch in the cottages where their children 
lived, followed by tours of the school with pupils escorting their 
parents to places which the boys and girls wanted them to see. 
At three o'clock all gathered in Dwight Hall for a program by the 
chorus and a talk by the Director. Over the weekend of the 13th 
five girls with two teachers went to Baltimore in the school beach 
wagon to join with girls from five other schools for the blind in 
the annual play day held in rotation at each of the several schools 
for the blind on the eastern coast. Sunday was spent visiting 
Washington and the drive home followed on Monday. On Wednes- 
day evening, October 18, the annual staff reception was held at the 
Director's cottage. 

The annual meeting of the Corporation took place on Monday, 
November 6, when the reports of the Trustees, the Treasurer and 
the Director were received and ordered to be printed making up 
the bulk of these annual reports, of which this is the one hundred 
and twentieth. Officers were elected as listed at the beginning of 
this volume and a pleasant tea was enjoyed by the few who 
attended. The annual investiture of the members of the Boys' 
Council was held on November 9. On the tenth of the month high 
honors were paid to the School's first two directors. For the first 
time these dual annual observances took place on the same day 
rather than on the natal days of those commemorated— Michael 

19 



Anagnos, the second director and founder of the kindergarten 
(November 7) and Samuel Gridley Howe, first director (Novem- 
ber 10). This seemed to be a happy plan and gave opportunity 
for many to attend both exercises. The following day being 
Saturday, no classes were held for the Upper School and a long 
weekend home was possible for many pupils and teachers. 

The Victory Banquet, celebrating the winning by Moulton Cot- 
tage of the annual inter-cottage football series, was served at that 
cottage on November 14, with Frank Fallon, radio sports announcer, 
as principal speaker. Parents of Blind Children, now a strong 
and active organization, held its November meeting at Perkins on 
the evening of November 16, with the Director as speaker. Nearly 
the entire school went home over the long Thanksgiving weekend 
from Wednesday noon, November 22, to the following Monday 
morning. In the Red Feather drive for the Community Fund, 
Perkins staff and pupils raised $748 and later contributed $339.45 
to the American Red Cross. 

Christmas 

Although there were a number of social events early in Decem- 
ber, this month is primarily devoted to concentrated preparation 
for the Christmas concerts and the school observances held before 
the great holiday. Three concerts were presented as usual in 
Dwight Hall to capacity audiences, who were most appreciative of 
the program rendered by the Upper School chorus occupying the 
stage and the Children's Choir sitting in the balcony. Due to the 
small size of the Upper School the program was simpler than in 
former years and several favorite selections of past programs gave 
a familiarity which brought forth high praise from those attending. 
The first concert was on Friday evening, the 15th; the second on 
Sunday afternoon, the 17th, and the closing concert on Tuesday 
evening, the 19th. Following the last concert many pupils went 
home with their parents while the remaining students left for home 
the next morning to stay for the long Christmas holiday. 

The Winter Team 

The winter term started on January 3, and because of the 
early date of Easter (March 25) was shorter than usual, the school 
having closed for the spring vacation on March 16. In this period 
many events of interest took place, some of them being repetitive; 

20 



such as, the movies every Wednesday night and the square dances 
for boys and for girls with their partners coming from outside the 
School on every other Thursday night. During this term an unusual 
schedule of speakers was planned for morning assemblies. On 
Mondays the Upper School had the privilege of hearing from staff 
or Harvard Class members who were from England, the Philippines, 
India, Iran, Italy, Spain and Switzerland. On Friday mornings 
the speakers were pupils selected by the Student Councils, most of 
those chosen being post-graduates and seniors. Beginning Febru- 
ary 8, the speakers on Thursdays were the clergy of Watertown, 
who for twenty years have brought messages from their respective 
churches during the Lenten season. 

Single events of interest were: Upper Boys' School Amateur 
Show on January 30; a staff tea on February 5 to greet Dr. and 
Mrs. Farrell who had been away for two weeks; Upper School 
Girls' Junior Prom on February 25; Perkins' participation in the 
"Poll of Popular Music," a Radio Station WHDH broadcast on 
March 2; the Annual Staff Party in the form of a circus in the 
gymnasium on March 6, and a recital by Mr. Barbeau, voice teacher 
at Perkins, on March 9. Mid-year exams were held February 7-10 
and as Lincoln's Birthday fell on Monday a long weekend from 
Friday through Monday was declared, and most of the pupils 
went home. 

Wrestling continued to be the main sport activity for the boys 
during this term and this season was a successful one with a good 
team, well trained by Edward Burlingame, coach, and directed by 
Charles Dunbar who became teacher of physical education January 1 
succeeding Claude Ellis who was called to service in the Army. A 
schedule of ten matches was planned, all with seeing schools except 
the match with the New York Institute for the Blind on February 3, 
in New York which Perkins won 27 to 11. The season culminated 
over the weekend of March 2 when twelve boys with Mr. Dunbar 
and Mr. Smith, Dean of Boys, went to Raleigh, North Carolina, 
to take part in the wrestling tournament of the Eastern Athletic 
Association of Schools for the Blind. Competing with teams from 
eight schools, Perkins won second place. 

Washington's Birthday 

The outstanding event of the winter term was the revival of 
the Public Demonstration of activities of the school on Washing- 
ton's Birthday. This event, which had been an annual occurrence 

21 



for many years, was given up because of transportation difficulties 
during the war. So many requests have been received for this 
opportunity for people to see the school in action on a holiday, that 
plans were made for its revival this year. Demonstrations of school 
activities were conducted by the pupils; special programs were ar- 
ranged and exhibits set up. These were viewed during the after- 
noon by over one thousand persons. 

The spring term, opening March 28, was a long and active one. 
Mention should be made first of the many trips taken in connec- 
tion with the academic program, some of these reaching back into 
the winter term. As part of an English course all pupils studying 
Shakespeare attended a performance of Romeo and Juliet. Visits 
were made by classes in English and History to Sturbridge Village, 
the Wayside Inn, Lexington and Concord (with lunch at the Louisa 
May Alcott House) , the House of Seven Gables, Longfellow's House, 
the Paul Revere House, Old North Church and Faneuil Hall. Social 
Studies classes went to the local Police Courts, the Concord Reforma- 
tory, the State House, the Maparium and the Museum of Science. 
Miss Carpenter continued to take the senior girls, and at times 
the one senior boy of the class, to restaurants of interest and to 
teas at private homes as part of the program of training in the 
social amenities. All students from far away were taken on tours 
of all places of historic interest in the area. 

An event of special interest to senior and junior girls was an 
invitation to attend a dance at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity 
house of Boston University, on April 13. Twenty-two Perkins girls 
attended and reported having a wonderful time. Other events to 
be reported are: a Fashion Show on April 16, when girls in the 
homemaking course modeled dresses which they had made; May 8, 
the Girls' Senior Prom, and June 15, the Boys' Senior Dance. On 
May 23 the girls who had attended Camp Allen were the guests 
of its sponsors, the Boston Kiwanis Club, at the Hotel Touraine. 
Staff teas were held on April 18 and June 12. The Alumnae Asso- 
ciation held its annual meeting on Saturday, June 2, and the Alumni 
Association gathered on June 9. 

The Music Department offered several programs within the 
school, while three groups— the Girls' Glee Club, the Senior and 
the Junior bands, filled a number of outside engagements. The 
annual recital of Junior pupils took place on the evening of May 1, 
with the recital of advanced pupils on May 18. A special recital 
of music pupils of the Lower School was held on the afternoon of 

22 



May 25, with a large audience of parents in attendance. Parents 
of Upper School pupils and members of the Corporation were 
invited to a program presented by the Boys' and Girls' Glee Clubs 
which included an act of "An Up-to-date Grand Opera," by J. F. 
Smith, on Tuesday afternoon, May 29. This followed a presenta- 
tion of the same program on the previous evening, for the annual 
meeting of the Massachusetts Council of Organizations of the Blind, 
in Dwight Hall. The program on Tuesday evening was supplemented 
by a demonstration of work done by the Boys' Practical Arts 
Department and a repetition of the Fashion Show held earlier for 
a school audience. Following this occasion many pupils accom- 
panied their parents home over Memorial Day. 

Sports Program 

There was a very active sports program during this long spring 
term. The track team had a good season in meets with Belmont, 
Needham and Watertown High Schools and a trip to Philadelphia 
over the weekend of May 12 to take part in the spring meet of the 
Athletic Association of Eastern Schools for the Blind. Perkins 
took second place in this event. A new sports feature this year 
was a Field Day in which all Upper School boys took part as 
members of cottage teams. Following the afternoon program there 
was a picnic supper at the pond, after which the pupils beat the 
faculty in a baseball game. A new trophy for this event was 
presented to Bridgman, the winning cottage. For some years the 
girls have had a spring field day between cottage groups and this 
was held this year on June 1. On June 6 a cup similar to that 
given to the boys was awarded to Brooks Cottage at a supper served 
to all Upper School girls at a table set up in the Girls' Close. The 
Lower School, not to be outdone, had a field day of its own on the 
afternoon of May 23, with both boys and girls competing. Once 
again, the girls from the third grade through high school were 
guests of the members of the Watertown Yacht Club for a sail in 
their power boats down the Charles River on the evening of June 4. 

Graduation 

Graduation took place on Tuesday, June 19, with only three 
members of the graduating class. To these three diplomas were 
awarded by Dr. Reginald Fitz, president of the Trustees, and 
certificates were given to three boys for completion of the piano 

23 



tuning course; to two girls for ediphone achievement and to three 
girls for home nursing courses offered by the American Red Cross. 
The Commencement address was given by the Rev. Frederic C. 
Lawrence, rector of St. Paul's Church, Brookline, and former 
president of the Protestant Guild for the Blind. Invocation was 
offered by the Rev. Edson G. Waterhouse of St. John's Methodist 
Church, Watertown, and selections chosen by the Senior Class were 
sung by the Perkins Chorus. Following the exercises a reception 
to the seniors was held in the court of the Howe Building. On the 
same morning exercises marking the promotion of seven boys and 
four girls from the Lower School to the Upper School were held in 
the Lower School Hall. 

Three former Perkins students who had left to attend their 
home high schools were graduated this June: Charline Metcalf 
from the High School in Cranston, Rhode Island; Raymond Grover 
from the Hope High School in Providence, and Edward Moriarty 
from the Arlington High School. Edward has been accepted for 
admission at Harvard, with scholarship aid. Former students who 
were graduated from colleges in June are : Lorraine McNamara, '38, 
Framingham State Teachers College; Norma Farrar, '46, Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire; Priscilla Blakely, '47, Jackson College; 
Lorraine Gaudreau, '47, Syracuse University; Selma L. Tirocchi, 
'44, Marylhurst College in Oregon and Rose Miscio, national scholar, 
1945-1947, New England Conservatory of Music. Harriet M. 
Phillips, former student and now teacher in the Lower School, 
received her B. S. degree from Boston University. 

While the graduating class of this June, made up of two girls 
and one boy, was one of the smallest in recent years, the balance 
was somewhat restored by the class of the previous year, of twelve 
boys and seven girls, which was one of the largest classes in the 
past score of years. A survey of the graduates of the past twenty 
years shows that during that period 230 received diplomas, signi- 
fying the completion of high school. Of these, 126 were boys and 
104 girls. Looking further back in history, we find that the first 
graduating class was in 1878, and the first diplomas were awarded 
in 1880. Our records reveal that from 1878 to 1930 inclusive 
there were 383 graduates. These figures show that a larger pro- 
portion of students are now graduating than did in earlier years. 
Certainly during the past twenty years this may well be attributed 
to the broadening of academic opportunity in contrast with the 
larger stress on vocational training which previously prevailed. 

24 



After Graduation — What? 

Miss Anna G. Fish, secretary to Directors Anagnos and Allen 
and who for the first several years in this administration served 
as registrar, made an analysis of those who had graduated prior 
to 1931. In this study she reported "291 are known to have been 
successful — self-supporting, contributory members of their com- 
munities. In this estimate, the homemaker releasing someone to 
become a breadwinner, is considered to be equally important with 
the latter. Twelve had contributed toward self-support while not 
wholly achieving it; twelve died too early to have achieved suc- 
cess; six have not been successful; eleven are unknown and six 
are invalids. Twenty-four have been socially competent or accept- 
able members of a family, not wholly self-supporting, but not a 
burden in their households. Twenty-one are still studying ; fourteen 
stand out as conspicuous successes and perhaps that list may be 
fairly increased." Miss Fish reported further: "The above figures 
constitute as fair an estimate as can be made allowing for the 
natural ups and downs of life, especially at this time of depression 
when the piano tuners are particularly hard hit. All who are called 
successful have been able to stand on their own feet independent 
of charity." 

Miss Woodworth, the present registrar, who made out the list 
of the 230 graduates since 1931, from the school records, also made 
an extensive study of those who received diplomas. She reports: 
"Seven of this number have died — five boys and two girls. Most 
of the others are employed. Sixty-eight marriages have been re- 
ported and of this number thirty-two have mates with normal 
vision. Twenty-eight girls are home-makers, some married and 
some single. Many of the married girls are still at work outside 
the home. Vocations are often those for which the students pre- 
pared at Perkins — Ediphone, selling, poultry, massage, tuning, 
switchboard operation. Some are employed in factories of different 
sorts. Only fourteen are known to be working in shops for the blind. 

"About sixty have gone on to higher education in college or 
specialized schools. Of this number at least a dozen are still 
studying. Fourteen, including four home teachers, are in work for 
the blind in the United States, Greece and Colombia, South America. 
Two work with the deaf-blind. Seven have given their lives to the 
church — one lay brother, three nuns, two Protestant clergy and one 
girl who has joined a Protestant mission to the Navajo Indians. 
Three are social workers with the sighted. One is a college 

25 



instructor; four are lawyers and several are in insurance. There 
are many musicians both in the classical and popular fields." 

Scholarships 

Three young people who completed a year of special study at 
Perkins in June were holders of National Scholarships. The girl 
in the class came from Utah and enters Brigham College in the fall. 
The two boys both specialized in piano tuning, and being certified 
as qualified tuners, are undertaking work in their respective states 
of West Virginia and Tennessee. The first National Scholarships 
were offered for the school year of 1940-1941. Each year since then 
Perkins has written to all schools for the blind in this country 
offering four scholarships for outstanding graduates of the current 
year. During the ten years thirty-five have benefitted by this 
opportunity for post graduate work. They have come from twenty 
states, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. 

A review of the records of these scholarship holders shows 
that one has died, and that the thirty-four remaining, eighteen 
girls and sixteen boys, are all actively employed. Two are teachers 
of sighted classes; three are Ediphonists; two are engaged in sell- 
ing; ten are in work with the blind (teachers, library workers and 
home teachers) ; two are employed in workshops for the blind; one 
is in radio work; one an entertainer with a band; three girls are 
listed as housewives, while seven are in college or just completing 
college. One of this group was graduated in June with "honors 
with distinction" from the New England Conservatory of Music. 
Perkins is proud of having shared its good facilities for graduate 
work with these thirty-five young people, all of whom have been 
outstanding in character, personality and academic achievement. 

The Teacher Training Program 

Another group which comes to us each year, bringing new 
life and wide interests, is made up of those who take the teacher 
training program offered by the Graduate School of Education of 
Harvard University and conducted at Perkins. This has been a 
notable year with this grcup, partly because it was the largest class 
in history, being made up of twenty-six members, and also as it 
marks the completion of thirty years of service in this field. This 
makes the Harvard Class the oldest and the best established course 
for the training of teachers of the blind. To mark the thirtieth 

26 



anniversary, three persons who gave lectures in the original course 
were invited to speak. On October 20, Dr. Henry W. Holmes, 
Dean Emeritus, Harvard Graduate School of Education, and one 
of the founders of the course, reviewed educational changes in the 
last twenty years. On December 8 and 9, Mrs. Winifred Hathaway, 
formerly Associate Director of the National Society for the Pre- 
vention of Blindness, gave the talks she has given for many years 
on the education of the partially seeing. On January 20, Miss Grace 
S. Harper, retired Executive Director of the New York State 
Commission for the Blind, spoke to the class on developments in 
state programs. The only other surviving person who lectured in 
the original course is Dr. Samuel P. Hayes, now in charge of the 
Harvard Class, who in 1921 served Perkins as consultant in psy- 
chology while he was head of the Department of Psychology at 
Mount Holyoke College. When Dr. Edward E. Allen, founder of 
the course, retired as Director of Perkins in 1931, he carried over 
the work of the Harvard Class and continued to lecture until 
shortly before his death in 1949. 

A careful review of the records of the class shows that the total 
number of students enrolled in the thirty years is exactly 400. At 
least 247 have been or are engaged in work for the blind. 332 
came from 41 states in this country, and the remainder from 29 
foreign countries. To show the world-wide influence of this course 
it may be of interest to point out the following distribution of 
those from outside the United States : North America — 14 ; South 
America — 7; West Indies — 14; Europe — 13; Asia— 15; Africa — 5. 
In many of the regions mentioned they are leaders in education of 
the blind and have been able to carry Perkins' methods to their 
home lands. Many of them write back frequently, each referring 
to his school as "a little Perkins." In this way and through these 
years, Perkins has made a growing impress upon the education of 
the blind in all parts of the world. 

Education of the Deaf-Blind 

While reviewing special groups of students, it might be well 
to include here the report of the Deaf-Blind Department, for this 
department also reaches beyond the normal boundaries of Perkins' 
responsibility, as children come to it from all parts of this country 
and from abroad. This year we had a five-year-old boy from Ireland, 
and for a part of the year, a twelve-year-old girl from Greece. The 

27 



other pupils in the Department came from Massachusetts, Alabama, 
Colorado, Ohio and Washington. Another aspect of our foreign 
contribution during the past year is that there was in training in 
the Deaf-Blind Department Miss Joan Shields from England, who 
at the end of the year returned to set up a new department for the 
deaf -blind in that country. Coming later in the year was Miss 
Nellie Georgiou from Greece, who studied during the spring term, 
continued in summer school, and will continue next year before 
returning to her own country to work with the deaf -blind. During 
this year also we had in residence for training, a teacher from the 
Illinois School for the Deaf, Miss Emily Jacobs, who spent six weeks 
of concentrated study at Perkins, before returning to open a 
deaf-blind department in her school. She attended the summer 
class for training deaf -blind teachers offered at the Michigan State 
Normal School at Ypsilanti, conducted by Mrs. Maurine Gittzus, 
head of the Deaf-Blind Department at Perkins. 

Provision for the education of the deaf-blind at Perkins as 
an organized department of the school was established in 1932, 
so that the class of the incoming year will be the twentieth class. 
Prior to this, ever since Laura Bridgman came in 1837 to be the 
first deaf -blind mute ever to be taught the use of language, Perkins 
has had deaf-blind pupils, including for a period of residence, 
Helen Keller. She was brought here in 1889 by her noted teacher, 
Anne Sullivan Macy, who herself completed her work at Perkins 
in 1886. In the school year 1931-1932 there was one deaf-blind 
pupil, Winthrop Chapman, who came that year from the South 
Dakota School for the Blind. Engaged for the year as his teacher 
was Miss Inez B. Hall, who the following year became the head of 
the Deaf-Blind Department. 

During these nineteen years there have been 47 pupils enrolled 
in the Deaf-Blind Department coming from two foreign countries 
and twenty states. A recent study of this group breaks it down into 
four categories: a. the totally blind and deaf — 17; b. the blind 
and hard of hearing — 4; c. the deaf and partially seeing — 19; 
d. varying degrees of sight and hearing — 7. While the study has 
many interesting aspects, brief comments regarding each of these 
groups will have to suffice for this report. 

Of the seventeen children who were totally without sight and 
hearing, two were graduated from Perkins and one from college; 
one was transferred to another school and three are still at Perkins. 
With the exception of six with whom little progress was made, all 

28 



were carried up to the limit of their academic ability, with special 
stress on vocational skills. Of this group eleven had lost their 
sight and hearing from spinal meningitis, most of them at about 
two years of age. Of the four blind and hard of hearing, three 
received high school diplomas from Perkins, and one is still in the 
school. Two were handicapped at birth, one when six years old and 
the other at five years of age. Of the nineteen deaf and partially 
seeing children none carried on to graduation and only four made 
limited progress. One of these left Perkins this June after being 
here five years and in a day class for the deaf the four previous 
years. Another left to go to her state school for the deaf, but died 
the following year. A young man came to Perkins for one year 
of rehabilitation training from a school for the deaf. The fourth 
is still at Perkins. There may be significance in the fact that nine 
of the total are rubella cases and of them only one has made any 
reasonable progress. This child is still at Perkins and is reaching 
the level of possible achievement. Seventeen of this group were 
impaired at birth, one at two years from vitamin deficiency and one 
at the age of eight from diabetes. Of the seven with varying degrees 
of sight and hearing from various causes, all have made fair or 
good progress, two have qualified for high school diplomas. Five 
of these children were handicapped at birth. 

The Deaf-Blind Appeal 

The financial support of this special Department has been 
greatly strengthened by an annual appeal sent out each year since 
1937. Because children have come to this Department from all 
parts of the country, the appeal has been put on a national basis 
and contributions have been received from many states and several 
foreign countries. The first drive for the benefit of the Deaf-Blind 
was in 1937, when we were observing the centennial of the admis- 
sion of Laura Bridgman to Perkins. The objective that year was 
to realize a considerable capital sum, the income from which was 
to be used for the deaf-blind. For that purpose, in that year, 
$100,895.79 was received. Nearly one-half of this came through a 
contribution setting up the Henry Clay Jackson Fund for the 
Deaf-Blind. The remainder came from 810 contributors from 
thirty-eight states and ten foreign countries. The following year 
the plan was put on a new basis, soliciting annual contributions 
from those interested in maintaining this work. In the school year 

29 



1938-1939, 524 contributions totaling $6,622.53 were received. The 
response to the annual appeal has increased from year to year 
until in the last year, 2,141 contributions totaling $22,686.64 were 
received. The Director and Trustees are very grateful for this 
wide interest in our work for the CHILDREN OF THE SILENT 
NIGHT, and want, in this report to indicate their thanks and deep 
appreciation. 

The Child As An Individual 

The Department of Personnel has carried on its work dealing 
with the problems of individual children over and beyond those 
covered in the normal school program. Mrs. Waterhouse and Miss 
Eastman conducted the work of speech correction, giving routine 
speech tests to sixty-three new pupils, of whom twenty-eight were 
scheduled for speech therapy. There was an unusually large num- 
ber of young children with serious speech difficulties this year and 
this required much individual attention. Miss Shirley Smith, 
physiotherapist, gave corrective exercises to over thirty-six pupils, 
and put in a total of 1082 corrective exercise periods. Considerable 
stress was laid this year on good posture, and thirty-six boys and 
girls in the Lower School were awarded "Posture Pete" pins. A 
contest was held for the best slogan, and the first prize was won by 
Sandra Noddin, whose slogan was "Try your best in work and play 
to have good posture every day." 

The usual program of psychological testing was conducted 
under the direction of Dr. Hayes and Mrs. Davis, assisted by Mr. 
Davis who is also doing graduate work at Harvard University. 
The large battery of tests which have been developed for the blind 
by Dr. Hayes at Perkins, were used in measuring intelligence and 
achievement. As this department is the center for psychological 
work among the blind Dr. Hayes has been called upon for much 
counsel and help throughout the country. He has been active in 
the National Psychological Research Council for the Blind, of 
which he was President last year. With Mrs. Mary K. Bauman, 
he authored a "Manual for the Psychological Examination of the 
Adult Blind," which was published by the Psychological Corporation. 
In the psychiatric area a helpful program was directed by 
Miss Marshall supplemented by visits of Dr. Barry, school psy- 
chiatrist. Early in the year it was learned that a number of the new 
young children seemed to be emotionally disturbed and in order 

30 



I 



to better understand the problems of these children a study of 
seventeen "retrolentals" with a control group of children whose 
blindness was from other causes was undertaken under a special 
grant from the Foundation for Vision. Dr. HoUenbeck who has 
been interested in retrolental children at the Eye and Ear Infirmary 
was engaged to carry on this study, assisted, on a part-time basis 
by another psychiatrist and a part-time psychiatric social worker 
who visited the homes of all of the children. Results of this study 
are being assembled for later publication. 

Perhaps the most important event of this Department was the 
conducting of a Summer Institute for parents of pre-school blind 
children under the direction of Miss Marshall, assisted by Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis. Following the pattern set by the first school of this 
type conducted at Perkins in 1945, seventeen mothers and sixteen 
children lived in the Lower School from June 24 to June 30. An 
interesting aspect of this program was the attendance of some of 
the fathers whose presence gave a greater sense of security to both 
mothers and children. A play school was conducted for the children 
under the direction of Miss Pauline Moor, of the Massachusetts Eye 
and Ear Infirmary and lectures were given by outstanding authori- 
ties in the fields of pediatrics, opthamology, child psychology and 
psychiatry, mental hygiene and nursery school work. 

As indicated at the beginning of this report the area of real 
difficulty is in the business department. Mr. Hemphill reports: 

The Bursar Reports 
"I have the unpleasant task of reporting an overspent budget once 
again. The Trustees approved a budget of $553,730, an increase of 
8.2% over the budget of the previous year. This was to cover the 
routine operation of the school in Watertown, and the workshop 
in South Boston and did not include plans for special maintenance, 
repair or replacement of property, which were considered separately. 
The year ended August 31 with a total expenditure of $575,520.83, 
almost 4% overspent." 

Considering the exigencies of the times this record indicates 
good business administration. The present arrangement for business 
management does not go back twenty years, but was inaugurated in 
March, 1938, when Mr. Hemphill was appointed to the newly created 
office of Bursar. The purpose of creating this office by the Trustees, 
was to relieve the Director of many details of business administra- 
tion and thus give him more time for educational and policy 

31 



matters. In the original plan, Mr. Hemphill was to supervise and 
direct the business affairs of the Institution, plus some guidance 
in the development of the workshop program. Since that time 
many other duties have been assigned to his office, supplemented by 
the tremendous amount of detailed paper work that was required 
during the war through rationing and other governmental pro- 
cedures. 

The work was further increased when Mr. Coon became librarian 
and the responsibilities of the superintendent of buildings and 
grounds were given to the Bursar. The following extracts from 
his report will give some idea of the tremendous amount of work 
that is involved in this section alone, and which has been made even 
more difficult by the problem of securing adequate help not only 
in the maintenance department but chiefly in the household depart- 
ment, where securing cooks, maids and so forth, is an even more 
difficult task. 

"This was our second year of special building maintenance 
under the Macomber Report and we have a lot to show for it. The 
masonry of the Lower School and of the new Director's residence 
were completely repaired. Shortages were threatening in copper, so 
approval was granted in January for the replacement of all remain- 
ing old and worn gutters. Replacing of the worn out hot water 
piping was continued, Fisher, May and Bennett Cottages being 
done this summer to complete this kind of work in the Upper School. 
Our thirty-eight year old clock and bell system had rendered long, 
faithful service but was becoming defective with age and so was 
completely replaced this summer. The maintenance work discussed 
above was all performed by contractors. 

"Three important projects took precedence over the other work 
scheduled for our Maintenance Departments once school had closed 
in June. The former Principal's residence was completely re- 
decorated and repaired for occupancy by our new Director, Mr. 
Waterhouse. The second project was the conversion of Oliver 
Cottage in the Girls' Close for kindergarten use. Project three was 
the conversion of the former Director's residence for the Deaf- 
Blind Department. Almost complete redecorating was necessary 
in preparing classrooms, living quarters, and bedrooms for students 
and staff. A kitchenette was installed on the third floor to make 
an apartment for Mr. and Mrs. Gittzus. The law requires two exits 
so a fire escape was installed between a third floor window and the 
porch roof. The main kitchen and pantries were altered and a new 

32 




PERKINS BRAILLE WRITERS 

OUR FIRST AND OUR LATEST 



THE DAISY BRAILLE 

& POINT WRITER 

1865 

Invented By 

Joel W. Smith 

of Perkins Staff 



THE PERKINS BRAILLER 

1951 

Invented by David Abraham 

of The Howe Press of 

Perkins Institution 




large range and sink were installed to accommodate quantity cooking 
and dish washing. Some delays were unavoidable and the Deaf- 
Blind Cottage was not quite ready for the opening of school, but 
from here on the improvements will be determined by needs which 
develop while the cottage is being used. 

Social Security 

"In December, we had the privilege with other non-profit insti- 
tutions of applying for Old-Age and Survivors Insurance for our 
employees under the Federal Social Security Program. Our em- 
ployees voted almost unanimously for it and so it was installed on 
January 1. This immediately imposed a iy2% tax on our payroll 
which by August 31 totalled $3,769.51. It had not been budgeted 
but it was offset by an almost corresponding reduction in Perkins 
Retirement Plan premiums. By arrangement with Equitable, mem- 
bers of our plan were allowed to withdraw or to adjust their classi- 
fications to premium levels they could afford on top of their OASI 
contributions. Through such changes our Perkins Institution plan 
premiums were reduced $3,033, and we received refunds amounting 

to $2,782.18." 

One of the advantages of entering into the Social Security 
scheme is that it strengthens the retirement provisions for our staff 
members. As indicated in the above paragraph, Perkins does have 
a retirement plan with the Equitable Life Assurance Society. This 
was begun in 1934, and covered first the teaching staff, and later 
was enlarged to include the maintenance staff. The program pro- 
vides reasonably adequate retirement allowances for members of 
the Perkins staff after the year of its inauguration. When the plan 
was introduced, however, it was decided not to make insurance pro- 
vision for years of prior service. As each person has retired since 
that time supplementation for prior service has been made from 
Perkins' funds. This, however, will not be necessary any longer 
because of OASI benefits, and through the two plans Perkins staff 
members are now assured of quite adequate retirement allowances. 

The Perkins Brailler 

The Howe Memorial Press in its report for the year, has the 
good news that the long-awaited Perkins Brailler, is now on the 
assembly line and the writers are being distributed to purchasers 

33 



throughout the country. The final production of these writers has 
been unduly delayed due to difficulty in tooling and in securing 
materials. Those who have received them, however, are writing 
back to state that they are "worth waiting for." While the Howe 
Memorial Press has produced Braille writers for many years and 
was, at the beginning of this administration, the chief source of 
supply throughout the country, it was felt in the early 30's that 
the writers being produced were not satisfactory, in that they did 
not have the precise tooling that a modern device of this type 
requires. Production of the old machines was stopped, and studies 
begun to develop a writer in which Perkins could take pride. 

In the middle 30's Mr. Coon reported that one of his men, 
David Abraham, had considerable skill in machine work and that 
he would be interested in the developing of a Braille writer. Mr. 
Abraham was released from his duties for a summer, to start the 
paper work that led eventually to the production of a pilot model. 
This writer combined new features ; such as, the elimination of the 
overhanging carriage which caused so much inconvenience in the 
old writers, and a unique key action which made it possible to 
produce all dots of absolutely uniform height, regardless of 
uneven pressure. 

The problem of production in quantity was helped when the 
American Foundation for the Blind agreed to discontinue its model 
made by a commercial typewriting company, and to combine with 
Perkins in the costs of tooling. Both the American Foundation and 
Perkins were fortunate in securing financial assistance from two 
foundations, one in New York and one in Boston, totaling $40,000. 
This covered the cost of tooling, making possible the production of 
the first 2,000 machines at the low price of $70.00 each. At this 
time, appreciation should be recorded of the ingenuity and skill of 
Mr. Abraham which made possible the development of this machine, 
and also to Mr. Waterhouse, as manager of the Howe Memorial 
Press, for his guidance of the work during the period of production. 

The Workshop 

While the Workshop reports a relatively good year and is under 
the able management of Mr. Remick producing mattresses and chair 
work of a high quality, there are certain aspects which must soon 
be faced in a realistic manner. Founded in 1840 to demonstrate 
the employability of well-trained blind persons, it has outlived that 

34 



purpose. As a medium of absorbing some of the boys who leave 
Perkins unable to compete in outside industry, it has not in recent 
years been necessary as the last person to make this transition did 
so in 1936. For this type of person, the sheltered shops of the 
state offer more security, although at the expense of less oppor- 
tunity. The high wages now paid in these shops have made it hard 
for the Workshop to secure enough help to enable us to seek more 
business. From the financial side the shop is becoming an increas- 
ingly heavy liability. While the cash deficit listed in the Treasurer's 
Report is $5,278.13 a more realistic accounting including charges 
for supervision, maintenance of equipment, and interest on the 
plant investment brings the actual annual expense to the Institu- 
tion to over $13,000. In view of educational expenses now exceeding 
income, this charge for a project that has outlived its historic pur- 
pose must soon be faced in a realistic manner. 

The Library 

The library reports one of its busiest years, particularly in the 
books both recorded and embossed, which are sent outside of the 
school. Not content with making a comparison of circulation of 
twenty years ago, Mr. Coon has reported finding a statement by Dr. 
Allen, made before a Massachusettts Legislative Committee in 1910, 
that the circulation "without the Institution has now grown to 
take the full time of one librarian," and that "6094 books were sent 
out last year." Forty years later, Mr. Coon reports that "60,000 
books were circulated for the year, and that the services of approxi- 
mately four persons are engaged in this phase of our work." Later 
in his report Mr. Coon states that the actual number of books circu- 
lated during the current year was 53,846, and checking back to 
twenty years ago, we find that the circulation was 21,254 books. 
This, however, was before Talking Books were in use and the 1921 
figure should be compared to 15,249, the number of embossed books 
sent out. 

The Talking Books, since their introduction, have become the 
more popular medium of reading and last year 33,745 volumes were 
distributed to readers in our New England area. On this Mr. Coon 
comments: "We are glad to note in all this that our Braille book 
circulation is maintaining a fairly even level, in spite of the at- 
traction and wide use of Braille magazines, Talking Books and of 

85 



1 



radios. New readers of Talking Books especially are being regis- 
tered by the library at an ever increasing rate, and new books flow 
in almost daily, so that we can generally satisfy our readers with 
desirable titles. Some day in the future increasing demands will 
be made upon our stair for service, but the pressure of the work 
may be reduced by technological developments, just as in the past 
two decades the Talking Book circulation has grown from nothing 
to more than forty thousand volumes per year. 

"During the year considerable progress has been made in the 
re-cataloguing of the teachers' library. There has been an encour- 
aging circulation of recreational reading, by staff members from 
the 'Loan Library' of fiction. Mrs. Castle has been especially help- 
ful in card indexing by titles, books embossed and recorded, for the 
pupils to use in connection with their high school work. While Miss 
Miller, Lower School Librarian, has had a busy year due to the 
transition which is taking place in the replacement of books in 
Grade One and a Half by those of Grade Two, an advantageous by- 
product of this change is that Perkins is sending many of the dis- 
carded books in Grade One and a Half to schools for the blind in 
foreign countries who are only too happy to receive this material. 
One of the newer aspects of work in the library, started twelve years 
ago, is the preparation of exhibits in the tactual museum. During 
the past year the librarian, with the help of Miss McGaw, prepared 
sixteen exhibits, all on the subject of food. This was possible 
through help received from corporations in the food business, and 
was exceedingly helpful in presenting food values and the impor- 
tance of nutrition to the pupils. The Bulletin issued at the end 
of May was No. 100 in this twelve-year series." 

The Educational Program 

Educationally the school has never been more sound nor better 
balanced in its offerings, than at the present time. The reorganiza- 
tion of the Industrial Arts Department described last year, made 
possible by the modernized shop, and the development of project 
groups, has done a great deal to provide practical and worthwhile 
training for those who reach a level of academic achievement. The 
new plan of supervision described previously assures individual at- 
tention and gives adequate guidance to the teachers, especially in 
these days when so many new members of the teaching staff have 

36 



been employed. The attainment of this high level is, however, the 
result of twenty years of development. While Perkins oif ered, at that 
time, what seemed an adequate program of education for its pupils, 
certain methods of 1931 are not in line with modern pedagogy. For 
example, Dr. Allen did not believe in the free use of books by pupils, 
but felt that only the teacher should have a book and impart in- 
formation from it to the pupils. It was not long before this practice 
was set aside and many more books were acquired which the pupils 
were taught to use. This also led to the wide extension of the li- 
brary facilities, including the beautiful new study halls which were 
opened in 1949. 

One of the early steps taken to broaden the scope of the edu- 
cational program was the creation in the Upper School of five 
departments: literary, college preparatory, musical, commercial and 
industrial. These departments allowed the pupils to concentrate 
in the area where their greatest potentialities could be developed. 
From this diversified plan the pendulum swung to rather in- 
tensive academic training and again has swung back to a more 
practical form which prevails at the present time. Another factor 
was the proposal made just before World War 11, to follow the 
recommended procedure of the modern schools of having six grades 
in the elementary school, four in the junior high school and four 
in the senior high school. The War prevented the expansion of 
that plan, but now one year has been added to the Upper School 
curriculum and post graduate opportunities are more organized and 
have attracted students from all parts of the country for the 
specialized training which is offered at that level. 

Under the organization of 1931, the Lower School operated as 
four separate units based on the cottages in which the pupils lived. 
The Boys' and Girls' Upper Schools were entirely separate, the 
girls having nine grades in the elementary program and the boys 
eight. At that time also a teacher on one side was not allowed to 
teach on the other side of the Upper School building and there was 
a rigid wall of segregation between the girls and the boys. Gradu- 
ally it became evident that division of teachers on horizontal lines 
rather than on vertical would provide better organization as experts 
in the various fields could spread their interest over the entire 
upper school body. Merging of the boys' and girls' classes eventually 
came into effect so that now the Upper School operates entirely 
co-educationally. It may also be said without reflection on the 

37 



earnestness of teachers of a previous day, that the present in- 
structors are better equipped and are required to measure up to 
higher standards of education in the areas in which they teach. 
All these have been steps towards the position that has been attained 
and exists at Perkins at the present time. 

'ii 

Enrollment 

Our enrollment as of November 1, 1951 was 256 compared with 
247 a year ago. During the year 45 pupils were discharged. The 
reasons for discharge were : graduated 3 ; completed scholarships 3 ; 
completed other training 10; ill health 2; voluntary withdrawal 6; 
to work 2 ; to other schools 8 ; not yet ready for school 4 ; ceased to 
progress 7. The 256 pupils enrolled November 1, 1951 are divided 
as follows: Massachusetts 165; Maine 23; New Hampshire 13; 
Rhode Island 20 ; Vermont 14 and from other states 19. This year 
there are two students from foreign countries — Argentina and 
Bolivia, and from the following states outside of New England: 
Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New 
York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah, Vir- 
ginia and V/est Virginia. 

In addition to the staff changes to which reference has already 
been made, the following persons resigned at the close of the school 
year : Miss Thelma Johnson, Miss Eunice Werner, Miss Florentina C. 
Gonzalez and Miss Felicitas Benziger, all Lower School Teachers; 
Miss Betty Jane Wenzel of the Music Department; Mrs. Charlene H. 
Cumberland, teacher of Home Economics; Miss Margaret G. Bige- 
low, Physical Education teacher; and Miss Mary K. Mailers, English 
teacher, all in the Upper School, 

Lower School Teachers appointed in September, 1951 were: 
Mrs. Evelyn W. Moore, Mrs. Clotilda A. McGowen, Miss Anna 
Ascarelli, Miss Lorraine M. McNamara, and Miss Jean Carroll. 
New Upper School Teachers were Miss Janet Dunwoodie, teacher of 
Physical Education; Miss Mary Storrow, Special teacher; and Mrs. 
Lenore Fenton, Home Economics teacher and Dietitian. In the 
Health Department the two resident nurses. Miss Margaret F. 
Bishop and Miss Valerie C. Payne, gave up their work in June and 
Miss Carolyn Brager and Miss Elizabeth Mann have taken their 
places. 

The following members of the Harvard Class are also serving 
as student teachers: Miss Penelope Shoup, Miss Ruth Bunten, 

38 



Mrs. Jean Scheidenhelm, and Miss Carroll Biake. Mr. Frank E. 
Howard succeeded Mr. Jones as Master of Potter Cottage. Mrs. 
Louise Plummer succeeded Mrs. Olive E. Lisle as Matron of 
Bradlee Cottage. Miss Patty A. Roche, Secretary to the Social 
Worker, was replaced by Miss Alicia George. Miss Catherine S. 
Benson was succeeded as Secretary to the Director by Miss Claire M. 
Stumcke. Gabriel Farrell retired under the Perkins Retirement 
Plan and Edward J. Waterhouse was elected Director. 

The State Program 

In the last report, reference was made to "a study of matters 
related to the blind" undertaken by a Recess Commission of the 
Massachusetts Legislature. This Commission submitted its report 
early in 1951, and it was discussed at a public hearing of the com- 
mittee on Public Welfare. The Report made a number of recom- 
mendations for the re-organization of the state program, its most 
radical proposal being that the Legislature create the Massachusetts 
Authority for the Blind which would take under its management 
the six workshops now maintained by the Division and extend the 
program to include home industries and sales promotion. It further 
focused attention upon the ineffectiveness of the present sheltered 
shops and pointed out that the vending stand program so effectively 
carried out in other states has not been developed here. The Report 
also stressed the fact that Massachusetts is not availing itself of 
funds that can be secured from the Federal Government for a 
rehabilitation program. 

After the hearing the committee drew up two bills which were 
finally adopted by the Legislature and made law. The chief accom- 
plishment of this legislation is authorization for the re-organization 
of the Division of the Blind by creating five bureaus : 1. Medical 
care; 2. Individual services; 3. Rehabilitation; 4. Industry and 
Shops, and 5. Research. Re-organized on this basis, it is hoped 
that with adequate leadership in these departments a program will 
be developed which will bring back the prestige which Massachusetts 
enjoyed in the field of the blind many years ago, it having been 
the first state to create, in 1907, a Commission for the Blind. The 
new legislation also authorized the transfer of the supervision and 
support of sight-saving classes from the Division of the Blind to 
the Division of Special Education in the Department of Education. 

Definite action regarding the establishment of classes for blind 
children in the public schools as suggested by the committee, was 

39 



not approved. The legislation did, however, authorize the Depart- 
ment of Education to make a survey of blind children, and if it could 
establish proof of need for further educational facilities the Depart- 
ment in co-operation with local school boards, may recommend the 
possible organization of such classes. Another legislative act was 
the amendment of Chapter 64, which authorizes the payment to 
Perkins Institution only for the education of blind children so that 
Massachusetts children may hereafter be sent to other schools at 
state expense. This will make it possible for Massachusetts chil- 
dren to benefit by attendance at specialized schools which are not 
found within the Commonwealth. The legislative permissions 
which concern the education of blind children were not opposed by 
Perkins. We recognize the growing demand on the part of some 
parents for a way to give their children the special education they 
need and yet keep them at home, and we stand ready to help toward 
its attainment. We will, however, stand firm against day classes 
for the blind until assured that they are adequately equipped and 
employ qualified teachers. We are glad for the provision enabling 
some children to attend specialized schools. 

National Legislation 

Turning to the national scene this has been a quiet year in 
legislative matters. A number of bills relating to the blind were 
presented in Congress, but few were of great importance, unless 
HR-4079 is enacted. This bill calls for the creation of a committee 
made up of representatives of the Government, workers for the 
blind and other individuals interested in research and education, 
to make a comprehensive study of the entire field of existing federal, 
state and local activities, relating to the granting of services to the 
blind, including the history and development of such activities. 
Certainly a committee of well chosen persons with this power 
might make a valuable study and reveal some interesting facts. 

Probably in no period of history has any Government ever 
given more consideration to the welfare of the blind and made more 
extensive provisions for their education, care and rehabilitation, 
than has the United States since 1932. Undoubtedly the most 
important provision for blind welfare during the past score of years 
was brought about by the adoption of the Social Security Act of 
1935. Prior to that date, only twenty-six states had commissions 
for the blind and not all of these were administering financial aid. 

40 




HANDCRAFTS FOR FUTURE 
HOME ACTIVITIES 




I 



Title X of the Social Security Act authorized federal grants to 
match state aid to needy persons up to $40 a month, later increased 
to $25 from Federal funds towards a $45 monthly grant. In 1950 
the states were authorized to disregard in computing aid the first 
$50 earned by blind persons. When aid to the blind under Social 
Security began in 1936 only five states participated and the amount 
of money appropriated was relatively small; now all states except 
Nevada, Missouri, and Alaska participate in the plan, Missouri 
having its own plan without Federal Aid. The latest report indi- 
cates the growth of this aid, for in the month of May, 1951, 96,990 
persons received a total of $4,523,461, averaging $46.64 a month. 

Other legislation for the blind on the federal level includes 
the Randolph-Sheppard Act of 1936, authorizing the opening of 
vending stands in public buildings, which has given profitable 
employment to many blind persons, and the Wagner-O'Day Act 
of 1938, requiring the Federal Government to buy at a fair market 
price articles made in workshops for the blind bringing millions of 
dollars of work to these shops. Other laws during the past twenty 
years include the right to mail embossed reading matter at no charge; 
provision for two, a blind person and a guide, to travel on one fare 
on railroads ; permission to take guide dogs on trains and in public 
conveyances, and in 1940 an amendment was attached to the federal 
income tax which permits blind persons to deduct an amount up 
to $500 for special expenses incurred as a result of blindness. 

In the educational area, two pieces of legislation have advanced 
the opportunities for the blind greatly. The Barden-LaFoUette 
Bill, amended in 1943, now makes provision for "Any service 
necessary to render a disabled individual fit to engage in a remunera- 
tive occupation." This makes medical and physical care, prosthetic 
devices, vocational guidance, training and placement in industry 
all available to the blind, as well as to the other handicapped groups. 
All of these facilities are administered on the state level, with 
federal funds matching the state expenditures. The second special 
legislation is in the provision for reading matter for the blind. 
The only federal money available for the blind prior to 1931 was 
$10,000 annually allocated to the American Printing House in 
Louisville to provide textbooks for schools for the blind. This 
amount was increased through the years, until it now totals 
$125,000 a year, and the program has been extended to include the 
manufacture of appliances. Talking Books, text books and records, 
but all restricted to use in schools. 

41 



In 1931 through the Pratt-Smoot Bill, reading matter for the 
adult blind was made available through federal funds. Originally 
this legislation was only for books of embossed type, but more 
recently it has been amended to include the recording of books and 
the purchasing and distribution of Talking Book machines. The 
funds appropriated for these purposes are administered by the 
Library of Congress and now total $1,125,000 annually with books 
for the adult blind being distributed through twenty-six regional 
libraries of which Perkins is one which covers, largely, the New 
England area. 

The International Scene 

On the international front there has been little activity in which 
Perkins has had a part, beyond maintaining its interest and co- 
operation with existent agencies. During the year the Director 
made and completed a survey of social conditions among blind 
children throughout the world for the committee on Handicapped 
Children of the Social Commission of the United Nations. At the 
United Nations, an office for services for the blind has been set up 
by the Social Commission and Mr. Ernst Jorgenson of Denmark 
has come to this country to direct its affairs. Mr. Jorgenson is 
preparing a program for the blind to present at the meeting of the 
Social Commission in October. 

In the previous report mention was made of the International 
Conference for the Adult Blind which was held at Merton College, 
Oxford in 1949. At that time a continuing committee was appointed 
which has developed and created the World Council for the Welfare 
of the Blind, now incorporated under the laws of France, with 
offices in Paris. The first president was Mr. Eagar, the retired 
director of the National Institute for the Blind in England, 
but at the meeting held in July 1951, Col. E. A. Baker of the 
National Institute for the Blind in Canada was elected president. 
At the Oxford meeting a committee was also appointed to convene 
a conference of educators of the blind, with the Director of Perkins 
as the chairman. This Committee has now become the Education 
Committee of the World Council. During the past year, approxi- 
mately $10,000 has been raised for the education conference and 
plans are now being made for it to be held at the School for the 
Blind in Bussum, outside Amsterdam, Holland, July 25 to August 2, 
1952. 

42 



This report as indicated at the start, records not only the 
events of this year but reaches back to recall some of the activities 
which have occurred during the present administration in the past 
twenty years. While there are probably many things left undone, 
the record does show accomplishment and it is the general opinion 
that during the past score of years Perkins has made progress 
both in its inner development and in its far-reaching influence 
throughout the world. The retiring Director is very grateful for 
the privilege of participating in these activities. He appreciates 
and wants to acknowledge the continued help of the Trustees, the 
loyalty and support of the staff as well as the challenge and incentive 
of the many boys and girls who have passed through this school in 
these twenty years. There has also been the inspiration of those 
who have come from all parts of the world for training in this field. 
He knows that the same loyalty and support will be given to his 
successor who, he is confident, will carry on the great tradition 
and will lead the Institution into new fields of service. 

Gabriel Farrell, Director 



43 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

OPHTHALMOLOGIST'S REPORT 

THE FOLLOWING diagnoses were ascribed to the seventy new 
students examined during the year 1950-1951: 

Retrolental Fibroplasia 23 Retinoblastoma 2 

Buphthalmos 6 Glioma 1 

Microphthalmos 2 Amblyopia, cause unknown 2 

Corneal Dystrophy 1 Lesion of Central Visual Pathways 1 

Optic Atrophy 8 Alternating Divergence of 35° 1 

Laceration of Optic Nerve 1 Iridocyclitis, cause unknown 1 

Macular Degeneration 2 Colobomas — Uvea and Retina 2 

Chorioretinitis 2 Deferred 1 

Albinism 1 Congenital Cataracts 10 

Retinitis Pigmentosa 1 

There were thirty-five visits to the Eye Clinic at the Massachu- 
setts Eye and Ear Infirmary for treatment and consultation. 

One visit to Dr. Gundersen's office and six to Dr. Mosher for 
emergency treatment. There were fifteen visits to Mager and 
Gougleman for the fitting of new prosthesis. 

Hospital Admissions : Eye Surgery : 

Iridotomy 1 Cataract Extraction 3 

Cyclodialysis 4 Paracenteses 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

Trygve Gundersen 

DENTIST'S REPORT, LOWER SCHOOL 

During the school year ending June, 1951, the following dental 
operations were performed: 

Alloy fillings 186 Teeth extracted 24 

Cement fillings 3 Miscellaneous treatments 38 

Cement & AUoy fillings 5 Total number of operations 519 

Synthetic porcelain fillings 10 Number of pupils completed 121 

Silver Nitrate treatments 125 Number of new pupils completed 32 

Prophylactic treatments 121 

Teeth devitalized 2 

Treatments for devitalized teeth 7 

Rein HOLD Ruelberg, D. M. D. 

DENTIST'S REPORT, UPPER SCHOOL 

The following is the report of the dental operations performed 
for the pupils of the Upper School during the year 1950-1951 : 

Amalgam fillings 193 Sodium Fluoride treatments 102 

Cement fillings 120 X-rays 73 

Porcelain (Synthetic) 68 Extractions 13 

Zinc Oxide Eugenol 41 Pericoronitis 11 

Silver Nitrate treatments 166 Vincent's Stomatitis 9 

Root Canal treatments 38 Porcelain jackets 4 

Bridges 1 Dentures 1 

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the staff of 
Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children in caring for some of our 
more difficult extraction cases, fillings for some who were eligible 
and oral prophylactic treatments for all the Upper School pupils. 

Mark D. Elliott, D. D. S. 

44 



BOWLING 
APPEALS 
TO ALL 




PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 

A physical examination was done on every student, also a 
urinalysis, and blood test. All new students who had not previously 
been immunized were given immunization against pertussis, tetanus, 
and diphtheria. All the students in the lower school who needed 
booster shots against these three diseases were given them. The 
entire staff had chest x-rays taken by the portable unit of the 
Middlesex Tuberculosis Association and the student body was given 
patch tests; those with positive reactions being x-rayed. 

There were 359 students ill during the school year, twenty-six 
of which were chicken pox and 7 measles. Unfortunately it was 
necessary for the Lower School cottages to be in quarantine for 
almost the entire remainder of the school year after Spring vacation. 

The following is the report of the Medical Department for the 
year 1950-1951: 



Hospital Admissions : 

Massachusetts General Hospital: 
Appendectomy 
Suturing of wrist 
Bronchoscopy and removal of thumb 

tack 
Abdominal pain 
Nephros clerosis 
Pyelonephritis 
Severe epistaxis 
Empyema 

Psychiatric evaluation 
Neurological observation 

Children's Medical Center: 
Ligation of patent ductus 
Craniotomy 

Winchester Hospital: 
Tonsillectomy 

Haynes Memorial Hospital: 

Scarlet Fever 

Mumps meningitis 

Whooping cough 

Middlesex Tuberculosis Sanitorium .... 

Metropolitan State Hospital 



CuNic Visits — Mass. General Hospital: 

Ear, Nose and Throat 10 

Orthopedic 11 

Arthritic 3 

Rheumatic Fever 1 

Skin 5 

Children's Medical 11 

Neurological „ 16 

Ovarian Dysfunction 5 

Fracture 2 

South Medical 5 

Cardiac 2 

Allergy 1 

Dispensary 3 

Speech 1 

Plastic 1 

Urological 3 

Emergency Ward 9 



Clinic Visits — Other Hospitals: 

Children's Medical Center 

Boston Psychopathic 



Communicable Diseases: 

Whooping cough 1 

Scarlet Fever 4 

1 at home 

8 at hospital 

Mumps 7 

Mumps encephalitis 3 

at hospital 

Measles 7 

Chicken pox 26 

2 at home 

Victor G. Balboni, M. D. 



45 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 



4 



The annual report with figures for 1950-1951 demonstrates that 
the industrial department has made definite advances in production 
and sales. The required subsidy for operation is essentially the 
same as last year reflecting the current, steadily mounting costs of 
any project faced with present economic conditions. Confronted 
with the additional problems of the year ahead we must of necessity 
be prepared, constructively and realistically, to formulate plans 
which will alleviate the burden on the Institution. 

Our consistent eighty per cent self-sustaining program indi- 
cates a remarkable position in the field and undoubtedly ranks 
favorably with the best examples of similar enterprises in the 
workshop group. 

The following is a summary of the work done and wages paid 
in the Workshop Department during the fiscal year 1950-1951 : 

MATTRESSES RENOVATED: * 

For individuals 1425 

For Division of the Blind 2023 

For other institutions 397 

Total Mattresses Renovated 3,845 

New Mattresses Made 38 

Pillows Renovated (all kinds) 1,974 

New Pillows Made (all kinds) 530 

Box Springs Renovated 107 

New Box Springs Made 29 

Chairs Recaned 1,388 

Wages Paid to Blind Workers $33,212.14 

Sales $85,328.58 

Donald Remick, Manager 



46 



HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Work Account for the Year Ending August 31, 1951 

Literature Pages Embossed: 1951/2 

Literature pages embossed 20,328 

,, . 258 

Music 

Total 20,526 

Printing: 

Literature pages printed 1,119,429 

Music pages printed ■^^"^'^ 

Miscellaneous ^"^''^^^ 

Total 1'223,405 

Made Distributed 
Appliances and Games fhis year this year 

n 4 

Shorthand writers " 

Pocket slates 2,806 2,635 

Desk slates 504 1,192 

Styluses I'^OO 6,437 

925 

Erasers 

Fiber writing cards 1'^^^ 2,071 

135 

Clark writing grills •,- 

Aluminum alphabets 

. 217 

Signature guides 

227 
Mathematical instruments 

Playing cards, decks 576 640 

Games: (Checkers, Dominoes, Puzzle-Pegs, 

Chess, and Chinese Checkers) 343 235 

7 4 

Caning Vises ' 

Edward J. Waterhouse 
47 



LIST OF PUPILS 



UPPER SCHOOL BOYS 



Arsnow, George F., Jr. — FaD River, Mass. 
Bellantoni, Joseph — Woburn, Mass. 
Bizon, Bobert — Chicopee, Mass. 
Blake, George E. — Rochester, N. H. 
Bourgoin, Arthur A. — Brunswick, Maine 
Boyd, Vernon I. G. — Lynn, Mass. 
Conley, Paul — Boston, Mass. 
Cordeiro, Raul Ronald— Fall River, Mass. 
Cote, Jules D.— Manchester, N. H. 
Coy, Erwin — Lisbon Falls, Maine 
Duffy, Thomas P., Jr. — Waltham, Mass. 
Fennelly, Joseph F. — Wakefield, Mass. 
Fermino, Robert A. — New Bedford, Mass. 
Ferry, William F. — Newport, R. I. 
Fournier, Raymond A. — Lowell, Mass. 
Gasper, Alfred C. — Raynham, Mass. 
Germano, Manuel — Bristol, R. I. 
Guyett, Irvin R., Jr. — N. Providence, R. I. 
Hawthorne, John, Jr. — Millers Falls, Mass. 
Holden, David J. — Chelsea, Mass. 
Johnson, Stephen E. — W. Lebanon, N. H. 
Kagan, Stanley J. — Chicopee, Mass. 
Kamis, Richard P. — ^Mattapan, Mass. 
Keefe, Lawrence — Woonsocket, R. I. 
Koehler, Theodore — Fitzwilliam Depot, N.H. 
Leh, George H. — Greenfield, Mass. 



Leotta, Louis, Jr. — E. Boston, Mass. 
Libby, Alvah L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Little, Donald B. — Contoocook, N. H. 
Lunden, Paul C— Brattleboro, Vt. 
Lundquist, Jan Arne — Melrose, Mass. 
McDonald, Francis C. — S. Weymouth, Mass. 
Melican, Walter J., Jr. — Watertown, Mass. 
Morrissey, Francis W. — S. Boston, Mass. 
Morse, Stanley D., Jr. — Marshfield, Mass. 
Murray, Russell E., Jr. — Burlington, Mass. 
Osborn, James L. — Plymouth, Mass. 
Pereira, Arthur — New Bedford, Mass. 
Phifer, George H., Jr. — Fall River, Mass. 
Piraino, James — Gloucester, Mass. 
Rathbun, Robert P.— W. Medford, Mass. 
Raymond, Carl F. — Cambridge, Vt. 
Reynolds, Carl A. — Burlington, Vt. 
Rogers, Stephen J., Jr. — Medford, Mass. 
Roy, Laurent W. — Woonsocket, R. I. 
Sardo, Anton N. — Palmer, Mass. 
Sears, Arthur C, Jr. — Erving, Mass. 
Skinner, H. Gardner — Danvers, Mass. 
Snow, Charles R.^ — Haverhill, Mass. 
Snyder, Edward I. — Three Rivers, Mass. 
Vasapolli, Joseph — Woburn, Mass. 
Young, Willis — Roxbury, Mass. 



UPPER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Ammons, Dorothy F. — Clinton, N. C. 
Baker, Amelia — Grand Isle, Vt. 
Barber, Dorothy J. — Taunton, Mass. 
Blakely, Priscilla — ^Medford, Mass. 
Brewster, Edna Doris — Lannett, Ala. 
Charbonneau, Gloria E. — Lowell, Mass. 
Daigneault, Aline M. — Worcester, Mass. 
DeAngelis, Dorothy — Providence, R. I. 
Doustou, Bernadette — Sherman Station, Me. 
Doyen, Marjorie — S. Portland, Maine 
Forrest, Maureen — Chicopee, Mass. 
Haight, Mary Louise — Lansing, Mich. 
Hubbard, Doris — Natick, Mass. 
Karant, Galine — Buenos Aires, Argentina 
Liscomb, Janice C. — Salisbury Cove, Maine 
Mangieri, Patricia G. — W. Caldwell, N. J. 
Matthews, Lucy E. — Cambridge, Mass. 



McAuliffe, Barbara — Roxbury, Mass. 
McClure. Ann Marie — Millinocket, Maine 
McDowell, Theresa A.— Leominster, Mass. 
Molla, Rosemarie — Norwell, Mass. 
Morin, Catherine H. — W. Yarmouth, Mass. 
Mszanski, Joan M. — Easthampton, Mass. 
Nichols, Barbara A. — Shelbume, Vt. 
Olson, Gloria M. — Augusta, Maine 
Pacheco, Priscilla A. — Somerset, Mass. 
Palmer, Shirley M. — SomerviUe, Mass. 
Parkinson, Alice — Cedar City, Utah 
PolseUi, Anna Mae — Worcester, Mass. 
Porter, Virginia — Lubec, Maine 
Potter, Madine — S. Pomfret, Vt. 
Rose, Elaine Agnes — Taunton, Mass. 
Russell, Patricia A. — Boston, Mass. 
Silvia, Barbara M. — Buzzards Bay, Mass. 



DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 



Bare, Carl John — Niles, Ohio 
Morgan, Juanita A. — Buena Vista, Col. 
Norris, Perry G. — Birmingham, Ala. 
Noyes, Monica R. — St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Reis, Edward William— Hillsdale, N. J. 



Roberts, Polly R.— Rye, N. Y. 
Sabonaitis, Gayle A. — Worcester, Mass. 
Stark, Jeffrey A. — Mount Joy, Pa. 
Sutton, Barbara — S. Braintree, Mass. 



48 



LOWER SCHOOL BOYS 



Andrews, Luther W.. Jr.— Coventry, R. I. 
Angney, David H— WeUesley Hills, Mass. 
Bailly, Christopher B.— Wollaston, Mass. 
Barresi, Paul L.— Chelsea, Mass. 
Beaulieu, John— Waterville, Maine 
Beauregard, Robert W.— Haverhill, Mass. 
Bittman, George C— Dorchester, Mass. 
BleUer, James P.— Medford, Mass. 
Brown, Charles St. C— Needham, Mass. 
Brugsch, Henry J.— Waban, Mass. 
CaUahan, Peter J.— White Horse Beach, 

Mass. 
Caputo, Paul J.— Westfield, Mass. 
Carlo, John S.— Worcester, Mass. 
Caron, Gilbert C— Bristol, R. I. 
Chapman, Richard B., Jr.— Quincy, Mass. 
Cote, Charles AV., Jr.— Lunenburg, Vt. 
Crohan, David — Providence, R. I. 
Cunningham, James J.— Dover, N. H. 
Dahms, Ralph E.— Portland, Maine 
DeCola, Frank P.— S. Boston, Mass. 
DelFavero, Joseph C— Dorchester, Mass. 
Dennis, Ronald A.— Salem, Mass. 
Donovan, John L., Jr.— Cambridge, Mass. 
Druce, David A. — Salem, Mass. 
Duclos, Roy A.— Pittsfield, Mass. 
Dyer, Dan Bues, Jr. — ^Manassas, Va. 
Gage, Richard E.— Wobum, Mass. 
Gosselin, Louis A. — Manchester, N. H. 
Goumas, Charles — Somerville, Mass. 
Hickey, John — Newtonville, Mass. 
Hodge, Charles S.— Granville, Mass. 
Holdt, Robert Adair, Jr. — Huntington, 

W. Va. 
Hopkins, Paul F., Jr. — Pontiac, R. I. 
Jackson, Thomas O. — Tuskegee, Ala. 
Johnson, Scott — E. Templeton, Mass. 
Macdonald, Donald C. — Dennisport, Mass. 
MacDonald, Roderick J. — Arlington Hgts., 

Mass. 
Main, Robert W.— Kittery, Maine 
Manning, John J. — Wilton, N. H. 



Marotta, Luciano J.— Waltham, Mass. 
McCauley, Richard— Wakefield, Mass. 
McCoy, Robert G.— Maiden, Mass. 
McEachem, John N.— Stoughton. Mass. 
Mclntyre, John A.— N. Quincy, Mass. 
Menard, Leonard— Pittsfield, Mass. 
Miller, Robert J.— Chester, Mass. 
Nadeau, Richard — Lewiston, Maine 
Nelson, Marvin E. — Hubbardston, Mass. 
Oborne. Clinton J. A.— E. Boston, Mass. 
Oliver, Philip N.— Townsend, Mass. 
Pacheco, Francis— Fall River, Mass. 
Pacheco, Joseph E., Jr.— Somerset, Mass. 
Paradise, Maurice — Nashua, N. H. 
Perry, Albert — Hillsgrove, R. I. 
Perry, Donald J.— Lowell, Mass. 
Piche, Wilfred J., Jr. — Cranston, R. I. 
Pierce, Anthony— Dighton, Mass. 
Pinette, J. Arnold— Ft. Kent Mills, Maine 
Reineke, AUan F.— Warwick, R. I. 
Ritchie, G. Wallace— Maiden, Mass. 
Ross, Donald F.— Littleton, N. H. 
Royal, Francis X.— Watertown, Mass. 
Sanders, John B.— Cohasset, Mass. 
Sheff, Robert A.— Roxbury, Mass. 
Shiner, Franklin P.— Montpelier, Vt. 
Skistimas, Paul— Watertown, Mass. 
Smith, A. Kempton— Attleboro, Mass. 
Strobel, Harold M.— Stoneham, Mass. 
Sweet, Douglas H.— Keene, N. H. 
Tainter, Kenneth A., Jr.— Brooklin, Maine 
Thomas, Russell J.— Arlington, Mass. 
Thorp, Kenneth D.— Misquamicut, R.I. 
Tripp, Raymond L. — Hyannis, Mass. 
Turner, Robert A.— Milton, Vt. 
Uphold, Barry W.— Boston, Mass. 
Vulcan, Brant S.— Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Wakefield, Douglas— Lyndonville, Vt. 
Washburn, Lawrence W.— Alburg, Vt. 
White, David H.— Needham, Mass. 
White, Lloyd O.— Rochester, N. H. 
Whitney, James L.— Brattleboro, Vt. 



LOWER SCHOOL GIRLS 



Andem, Janice N.— Charles River, Mass. 
Anderson, Elizabeth J.— Medford, Mass. 
Avedisian, Carol E. — Northbridge, Mass. 
Barrows, Joan — Braintree, Mass. 
Beller Eisner, Constanza— La Paz. Bolivia 
Bleakney, Brenda S. — Boston, Mass. 
Bleiler, Jayne — Medford, Mass. 
Blizard, Marion L. — Madison, Maine 
Blizzard, Mary L. — Arlington, Mass. 
Boyer, Jeanne M. — Florence, Mass. 
Boyle, Maureen A. — Dracut, Mass. 
Brown, Linda Carol — ^Mansfield, Mass. 
Bums, Marlyn A. — Waban, Mass. 
Callahan, Louise — Billerica, Mass. 



Chamberlain, Carolyn E.— Whitman, Mass. 
Connor. Martha B.— Winthrop, Mass. 
Cook, Donna-Lee— Middleboro, Mass. 
Corey, Christine A.— Townsend, Mass. 
Corey, Sharon— Houlton, Maine 
Cote. Vivian R.— Lawrence, Mass. 
Davis, Carol J.— Warwick, R. I. 
Derouin. Barbara L.— Cranston, R. I. 
Dowling, Patricia— Lawrence, Mass. 
Downing, Pauline— Roxbury, Mass. 
Driben, Joyce H.— Brookline, Mass. 
Dunlap, Elizabeth N.— New Orleans, La. 
Duplessis, Nancy A.— Clinton, Maine 
Feeley, Joanne L. — Franklin, Mass. 



49 



Finan, Irene — Greenwich, R. I. 
Folsom, Margaret — Framingham, Mass. 
Galleshaw, Julia A. — Cranston, R. I. 
Geyer, Karen — S. Braintree, Mass. 
Gibson, Virginia E. — Canton, Mass. 
Grady, Beverly M. — Pittsfleld, Mass. 
Hanscom, Lola L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Harrington, Valerie E. — Providence, R. I. 
Hatch, Judith C. — Needham, Mass. 
Henderson, Jane A. — E. Boston, Mass. 
Hoffman, Rosalie — Dorchester, Mass. 
Johnson, Lillian F. — Arlington, Mass. 
Johnson, Natalie — E. Templeton, Mass. 
Kelley, Brenda — -Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Lareau, Mary Ann — Worcester, Mass. 
Luman, Sharlene — N. Quincy, Mass. 
Magnire, Judith A. — Lawrence, Mass. 
Mahoney, Kathleen V. — Peabody, Mass. 
Marston, Sharon L. — Belmont, Mass. 
McLaughlin, Rita J. — N. Wilmington, Mass. 
Mitchell, Constance — White Bear Lake, 

Minn. 
Morreo, Diana — Newton, Mass. 
Mulready, Katharine C. — Lynn, Mass. 
Nerney, Carol A. — N. Attleboro, Mass. 
Noddin, Carolyn — Ayer, Mass. 
Noddin, Sandra — Ayer, Mass. 



Nyland, Collette — Beverly, Mass. 
O'Hara, Marilyn J. — Maiden, Mass. 
Oliver, Doris E. — Townsend, Mass. 
Page, Nancy R. — Southbridge, Mass. 
Perryman, Delores — Boston, Mass. 
Phifer, Joy C. — Fall River, Mass. 
Pinkham, Paula— Maiden, Mass. 
Plante, Carolyn L. — Rochester, N. H. 
PownaU, Sara Jane — Norwood, Mass. 
Purinton, Nancy A. — Weeks Mills, Maine 
Reed, Anita — Farmington, N. H. 
Reynolds, Linda A. — Wollaston, Mass. 
Ruby, Nancy — Wakefield, Mass. 
Schmidt, Alice Karen — Webster, Mass. 
Scott, Marcy Ann — Lombard, 111. 
Silberstein, Annette — Brighton, Mass. 
Staples, Sandra J. — Saco, Maine 
Tashjian, Brenda — S. Lincoln, Mass. 
Thoresen, Sylvia A. — Lynn, Mass. 
Tilson, M. Christine — Stoughton, Mass. 
Washburn, Shirley A. — Alburg, Vt. 
Welch, Judith M. — S. Braintree, Mass. 
Welch, Rosalie B. — Mattawamkeag, Maine 
Whalen, Eileen A. — Charlestown, Mass. 
Wittstruck, Joan — Newport, R. I. 
Zinner, Judith A. — Cambridge, Mass. 



50 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



I. Acknowledgments foe Concerts, Recitals, Dramatics, etc.: 

To Mr. Aaron Richmond for tickets for recitals. 

To Winchester Players for invitations to students to attend dress 
rehearsals of plays. 

To the Mothers' Club of Winchester, Massachusetts, for invita- 
tion to our pupils to hear Charles Laughton give Readings. 

To members of the Watertown Yacht Club for taking Upper 
School girls on cruise on Charles River. 

To Shawmut Lodge of Masons for tickets to Pops Concert. 

To Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, Boston University for dance 
at Fraternity House for Upper School girls. 

To Tri Delt Sorority, Boston University for hospitality at Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon dance. 

To Mrs. Morrell and Belmont Rainbow girls for party to Upper 
School girls. 

To Mrs. Russell Codman for a Tea for four girls. 

To Miss Bromley and Junior High girls for party for our girls. 

To Mr. Baird for tickets for stage production of "Romeo and Juliet" 
for P. G. and senior high school students. 

To KiWANis Club for invitation to Camp Allen reunion at Hotel 
Touraine. 

To Mr. Pollard and American Humane Society for lectures to 
groups visiting Angell Memorial Hospital. 

To Wayside Inn for special invitation to Upper School girls to 
visit "Mary's Little Lamb" School to watch little children dancing. 

To Mr. Joseph Dolben for tickets for Shriners' Circus. 

To Mr. William Reichert for planning entertainments for pupils. 

To Temple Israel Brotherhood for children's party. 

To Mr. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. and Aleppo Temple for invi- 
tation to attend the Shrine Indoor Circus. 

II. Acknowledgments for Talks, Concerts, etc. in our Hall: 

To Miss Georgie Lee Abel, Rev. Nelson Chappel, Mrs. Winifred 
Hathaway, Mr. Fritz M. Hartmann, Miss Helene Hugo, Mr. Alton 
B. Kloss, Prof. Tatsukichi Konagaya, Mrs. O'Keefe, Miss Alice 
Schaeffer, Mrs. Marie Taeschler, Miss Ethel M. Wright for talks 
to Upper School Assembly. 

To Miss Grace Harper, Mrs. Winifred Hathaway, Dr. Henry W. 
Holmes, Mr. Francis Ierardi, Miss Pauline Moor, Miss Ethel Parker, 
Mr. Frederick Walsh for lectures to Harvard Class. 

To the Clergy of Watertown for Assembly talks during the Lenten 
Season. 

To the Patriotic Organizations of Watertown for exercises in 
commemoration of Memorial Day. 

To the Protestant Guild for the Blind, the Catholic Guild for 
the Blind and the Boston Aid to the Blind for religious instruction 
given to pupils. 

51 



III. Acknowledgments for Books, Periodicals, Museum Assistance, 

ETC.: 

Periodicals, Ink Print and Braille 

To Aktine Rays, Alabama Brass, Alabama Messenger, Ambulado 
Entre Los Ciegos L'Ami de I'Aveugle, Arizona Cactus, Arkansas Braille 
News, Blue and White, Braille Courier, Braille Star Theosophist, Cahiers 
Braille, California Beacon, La Canne Blanche, Catholic Digest, Catholic 
Review, Children's Friend, Christian Record, Christian Science Bible 
Lessons, Church Herald, Colorado Index, Comeback, Coming Events in 
Britain, II Corriere dei Ciechi, Deepavali, Desde Las Sombras, Discovery, 
DuPont magazine, Florida School Herald, Forward Day by Day, Full 
Gospel Monthly, Gospel Trumpet, Harvester-World, Home Teacher, 
Illinois Braille Messenger, Illuminator, Indiana Recorder, John Milton 
Magazine, Kentucky Colonel, Lantern, Light, Lighthouse News, Listen, 
Le Louis Braille, Luces, Lutheran Messenger, Maple Branch, Maryland 
Oriole, Matilda Ziegler, Messenger to the Sightless, Moon Magazine, 
National News of the Blind, Optimist, Our Special, Outlook for the 
Blind, Paradise of the Pacific, Parents of Blind Children, Pelham Prog- 
ress, Red and White, Reporter, Rocky Mountain Leader, Royer Greaves 
Monthly, St. Dunstan's Review, School Journal, Searchlight, Seeing Eye 
Guide, Seer, Sight-giver, LeSourd et I'Aveugle, Sunday-school Monthly, 
Think, Touch and Go, Towers, Unity Daily Word, Utah Eagle, Virginia 
Guide, "We the Blind," Wee Wisdom, Weekly News, Welfare Bulletin, 
Welfare Reporter, West Virginia Tablet, White Cane. 

To the following persons and organizations our thanks: 

Rev. D. G. Barnhouse for recorded sermons. 

LiNGUAPHONE INSTITUTE OF NEW YoRK for Linguaphone records. 

Boston and Maine, Jordan Marsh Co., Massachusetts Mutual 
Insurance Company for Centennial Books. 

R. G. Bisaillon for Typhological Research. 

National Braille Press of Boston for Braille volumes transcribed 
by Mrs. Sumner C. Jacobs, Miss Mary Storrow and Miss Sylvia Weld. 

American Red Cross of East Orange, N. J. for volumes tran- 
scribed by Miss Edith Hemingway. 

Miss Ruth Pfeiffer for three books hand-brailled. 

In memory of Mr. Arthur L. Patrick for donations to the Library 
Fund. 

In memory of Mr. William F. Hunt for donations to the Library 
Fund. 

American Printing House for the Blind and others through them 
for copies of Reader's Digest to be sent to adult readers. 

B. M. Schey of New Rochelle, N. Y., for gifts to the permanent 
collections of the Tactual Museum. 

Dr. J. Leslie Johnston of Roslindale for gift of Line-type Bible. 

For aid to the museum in preparing special exhibits during the year 
on the subject of food: Elizabeth Chase Maple Candies, Lyndon, 
Vermont; New England Dairy Council of Boston; Woodland Milk 
Company of Watertown; Adams Fish Company of Boston; Bird & Sons, 
Walpole, Massachusetts; Walter Baker Corp., Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts; Swift & Company, Chicago, Illinois; United Fruit Company, 
New York and Boston; D. & L. Slade Company, Boston; Continental 
Can Company, Everett; Middlesex Beekeepers Association; and any 
others who have aided the project in any way. 

Miss Shushan Yenikomsian of Wellesley College for active man- 
agement, and many students for time given to project to record books 
for college students. 

52 



Mrs. T. H. Rider of Boston for special help in recording books. 

Mrs. Robert Welch of South Braintree, for much volunteer aid in 
typing. 

Miss Etheldred Abbott, Mrs. Helen Henderson, Miss Eunice 
Werner and others who have aided the library in various phases of 
its work. 

Mrs. Hudson Hoagland of Southboro, Massachusetts, for braiiling 
index cards. 

The Bell Ringers of Groton School (Mr. Paul Coste, Director) 
for two afternoons of change-ringing, using the Wheelwright Bells. 

IV. Acknowledgments of Gifts: 

To Mrs. Bold for Phonograph-radio with Braille dial. 

To Gov. Dummer Academy for gift of two tubas and loan of 
several others. 

To Grover Cronin for permanent waves given to five Upper School 
girls, and for Easter Bunny bringing gifts for little children. 

To Dr. Loaring-Clark for package of Braille Christmas cards. 

To Mr. Joseph Cipre and members of Variety Club of New Eng- 
land for boxes of candy for pupils. 

To Lewis-Shepard Company for gift of doughnuts and lollypops. 

To Belmont Girl Scout Council for gift of Girl Scout uniforms. 

To Mrs. Arthur R. Leiby for money to buy recording. 

To Milton Shafran for mattress and springs. 

To Mrs. Lillian M. Fischel for gift of money used to buy tools 
for a deserving young man in tuning department. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Eliott Rogers for gift of Braille Slate and Styli. 

To Mrs. F. A. Batstone for pictures of Helen Keller and Edith 
Thomas. 

To Mrs. Robert G. Wiese for gift of accordion. 

To Mr. Robert M. Robertsce for greeting cards. 

To Mr. Paul V. Powers for gift of forty cases of canned peaches. 

To Mrs, Clifford R. Sanford for greeting cards and paper. 

To the Bostonian Society for a "permanent loan" of oil painting 
of Julia Ward Howe. 

To Mrs. Henry Wheeler for package of greeting cards. 

To Mr. Leon Baker for gift of meat cakes. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Mark D. Elliott for invitation to Lower School 
children to visit their farm. 

To Mrs. Richard Saltonstall for invitation to Lower School 
children to visit her farm. 

To Boston Host Lions Club for large gift of money to be used 
for toys and equipment for new Kindergarten Cottage. 

To Warrendale p. T. A. for gift of money. 

To Mr. Frank Fallon, guest speaker at Football banquet and for 
giving a Sports Radio Broadcast for our boys. 

To Volunteers Service for the Blind for box of Braille Playing 
Cards. 

To American Red Cross for Home Nursing Course. 

To Temple Israel Brotherhood for Father and Son banquet. 

To Mr. Raymond O'Donnell for transportation to Boston Pops 
Concert. 

53 



To Miss Doris Ahkarn for use of recreation facilities at Riverside 
Recreation Grounds for Boys' Upper School picnic. 

To Volunteer Service Bureau for assistance with boys' social 
program. 

To Elizabeth C. Carter for gift of money to Music Department. 
To H. F. Stevenson for gift of money to Music Department. 
To WiLMA Vogel for gift of money to Music Department. 
To Anna E. Hersee for gift of money to Music Department. 
To Middlesex, Essex Pomona Grange for gift of money to Music 
Department. 

To the Protestant Guild for gifts at Christmas time to blind children 
at home, and at School. 

To the Circle of the Protestant Guild for their gifts and cards 
at Christmas and other times to the children. 

To Mrs. Bullen of Waban and the Sunday School at Union Church 
in Waban for interest in individual children for birthday gifts and parties. 

To The Young People's Group at the Union Church in Waban for 
the social evenings for the Upper School Protestant children. 

To the Catholic Guild for the Blind for gifts of clothing and 
personal services to the Catholic Young People. 

To the Jewish Guild for the Blind for Christmas gifts to the 
children and at other times. A contribution to the camp fund in the 
summer. 

To The Shawmut Lodge for gifts of money at Christmas time. 
To Mr. Harold A. Crane of the Manchester Lions Club for a box 
of clothing. 

To Mrs. Felicia Kutten of the Elizabeth Arden Beauty Salon for a 
talk on beauty culture and also Mrs. Kutten for several social oppor- 
tunities for the girls of the Upper School. 

To the Boston Committee for the Blind through Mrs. Dangel and 
Mrs. Berenson, the president, gifts of several boxes of clothing. 

To Miss Rose Saving foL gifts of money. 

To the following for their contribution and interest in the Preschool 
Project: 

Dr. Merrill King Mrs. David Angney 

Dr. Harold Stuart Dr. Samuel P. Hayes 

Dr. Marion Putnam Db. Abigail Elliott 

Mr. John Mungovan 

To the Boston Junior League for an invitation to the Lower School 
for plays. 

To Mrs. Mark Elliot and members of the Church and Sunday 
School in Carlisle for a picnic at Mrs. Elliot's home. 

To The Friendship Committee of the Daughters of Vermont for 
Christmas gifts for the children. 

To Belmont Lodge of Masons for candy for Boys of the Glee Club. 

To Mrs. Gobrecht and Rainbow Girls for gift of money for dances 
and senior activities. 

To Mr. George Wright for taxis to take Baptist girls to church. 

To Old South Church, Boston, Young People, for reception to 
Junior Class. 

To Miss Eunice C. Hearn and Delta Kappa Gamma for candy for 
boys and girls taking part in their program. 

To Sister M. Clarona for gifts to the two Senior girls for gradu- 
ation. 

54 



To Mr. George T. Burke and the boys from Boston College who 
came to girls' dances regularly. 

To Mrs, Wilbur Bullen for gift of radios. 

To Miss Yin Ming Hsu for gift of money through Mrs. Oliver. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Stark for gift of chocolate bars. 

To Mrs. Bertha L. Wight and Evening Star Chapter of Protes- 
tant Guild for the Blind for Christmas gifts for Lower School children. 

To Mr. Myer M. Channen and Shawmut Lodge of Masons for 
money for toys at Christmas time. 

To Mrs. Philip A. Scott and the Billerica Unitarian Alliance 
for toys and stuffed animals for little children. 

To H. F. LiVERMORE Corporation for gift of leather strips. 

To Miss Ruth Latch and the Firnabank Club for gifts for chil- 
dren at Christmas time. 

To Mrs. Olive N. Johnson and Primary Department of Faith 
Church for gifts at Christmas time. 

To Catholic Guild for the Blind and Mother Hafferd for Re- 
treats and help on transportation. 

To Protestant Guild for the Blind for Conferences and help on 
transportation. 

To Mr. James N. White for gift of accordion. 



55 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

THE REPORT of the Treasurer for the year ended August 31, 
1951, is submitted herewith. The accounts of the Corporation 
were audited by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Company and their re- 
port for the year is attached. 

Income from tuition and board of $237,065 exceeded the pre- 
vious year by approximately $60,000, principally because of the 
increase in the annual tuition charge. Investment income assigned 
to the funds was at the rate of bVz % of book value as against a rate 
of 5% in the prior year. The actual income from securities was 
approximately 6^/2% of the book value compared with 6% in the 
1950 fiscal year. Unassigned income of $60,536.68 was added to the 
Securities Income Reserve Fund as against $62,510.91 last year. At 
August 31, 1951, this Reserve amounted to $171,424.09. 

Operating expenses of $561,628 were approximately $31,000 
higher than the previous year and of this amount, about $24,000 
represented increased salary expense. The operating deficit for 
this year, including the net loss sustained by the Work Shop of 
$5,278.13, amounted to $20,509.86 as against a deficit of $82,196.56 
in the prior year. Together with the deficit, charges against the 
Reserve Fund for Depreciation totaled $207,166.30. Among these 
were the balance of expense for boiler replacements of $90,368.82 
and $95,447.11 for special maintenance. The balance of the fund 
on August 31, 1951 was $369,489.95— a net reduction of $158,442.66. 

The operation of the Howe Memorial Press resulted in a loss of 
$31,073.07 as against the prior year's loss of $27,025.76. Income 
from investments of $11,262.86 was substantially lower than the 
$15,945.40 received in the prior year, as a large withdrawal from 
investment funds was necessary to support the increased inventory 
and deferred expenses of the new Braille Writer. The latter is now 
in production and initial shipments have been made. The net loss, 
after investment income, for the present year was $20,410.21 as 
against $11,590.98 in the year ended August 31, 1950. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph B. Williams, Treasurer 



56 



ACCOUNTANTS' REPORT 

To the Trustees of 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
Boston, Massachusetts 

We have examined the balance sheet of Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind (not including Howe Memorial 
Press Fund) as of August 31, 1951 and the related statements of income 
and expenditures and reserve fund for depreciation for the year then 
ended. We have also examined the balance sheet of Howe Memorial 
Press Fund as of August 31, 1951 and the related statement of income 
and expenditures for the year then ended. Our examinations were made 
in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and included 
such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures 
as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

We examined all investment securities recorded as owned by the 
Institution and by the Howe Memorial Press Fund as of August 31, 1951 
and held for their respective accounts by the Fiduciary Trust Company. 
We audited all changes in investments during the year then ended and 
satisfied ourselves that investment income receivable during the year 
was duly received. 

As of August 31, 1951 the Trustees voted to charge the net loss 
($20,509.86) resulting from the Institution's operations for the year 
then ended against the reserve fund for depreciation (Exhibit "C"). 

In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present fairly 
the financial position of the Institution and of the Howe Memorial Press 
Fund at August 31, 1951 and the results of their operations for the year 
then ended. ^ 

Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 

Accountants and Auditors 

Boston, Massachusetts 
October 11, 1951 



57 



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Exhibit B 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1951 

Income: 

Interest and dividends: 

Varnum Fund $ 20,853.25 

All other funds 378,775.35 $399,628.60 



Tuition and board: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $140,327.50 

Other states 75,167.50 

Private students 21,570.00 237,065.00 



Donations 761.00 

Sarah Hunt Howell Trust 5,654.76 

Justin B. and Mary Letitia Perkins 

Memorial Fund 2,899.15 

Other Trusts 794.24 

Income from other sources: 

Library service for the adult blind $ 5,040.00 

Tuning income 4,002.26 

Discounts 708.18 

Miscellaneous 661.66 10,412.10 



Contributions to the Director's 

discretionary account 5,405.28 

Total income $662,620.13 

Expenditures: 

Operating expenses (Schedule 1) $561,628.22 

Other expenditures: 

From Director's discretionary account .... 8,539.42 

From unexpended income — special funds 

for restricted purposes 13,363.67 

Decrease in the balance of the Director's dis- 
cretionary account • (2,108.86) 

Decrease in unexpended income — special 

funds for restricted purposes (5,115.16) 

Income added to principal of funds: 
Reserve fund for 

depreciation $ 24,723.64 

Securities income reserve 

fund 60,536.68 

Other funds 1,869.29 87,129.61 



Additions to plant out of income 14,414.96 

Net loss, Works Department (Schedule 2) .. 5,278.13 683,129.99 

Net loss for the year ended August 31, 1951 — 
charged to Reserve Fund for Depreciation 
(Exhibit C) $ 20,509.86 

Note: In addition to maintenance expense included in the total of operating expenses 
shown above, a total of $186,656.44, representing expenditures during the year 
for special maintenance, repairs and replacements, was charged to Reserve Fund 
for Depreciation (Exhibit C). 

60 



Exhibit C 
STATEMENT OF RESERVE FUND FOR DEPRECIATION 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1951 

Amount at September 1, 1950 $527,932.61 

Additions : 

Income added to principal (Exhibit B) .... $ 24,723.64 
Depreciation provided out of current in- 
come (Schedule 1) 24,000.00 48,723.64 

Total $576,656.25 

Deductions : 

Costs of A. C. power change-over — balance $ 840.51 

Boiler replacements — balance 90,368.82 

Costs of other special maintenance, repairs 

and replacements 95,447.11 

Net loss for the year ended August 31, 1951 

(Exhibit B) 20,509.86 207,166.30 

Amount at August 31, 1951 $369, 489.95 

Exhibit D 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 

Balance Sheet 

As OF August 31, 1951 

Assets 

Cash $ 12,923.50 

Investments, at book value 163,287.67 

Accounts receivable : 

Trade $ 5,500.59 

Institution department 39.80 5,540.39 

Inventories : 

Appliances $13,215.95 

Braille writers 56,956.54 

Braille printing 15,188.64 85,361.13 

Machinery and equipment $ 26,294.44 

Less, Reserve for depreciation 7,865.22 18,429.22 

Deferred braille writer expenses 80,293.55 

$365,835.46 

Liabilities 

Accounts payable, Institution Department $ 1,093.43 

Advances from customers 969.40 

Funds and legacies: 

Special $ 24.839.10 

General 12,290.00 37,129.10 

Surplus : 

Balance, September 1, 1950 $334,662.23 

Deduct: 

Net operating loss for year ended 

August 31, 1951 (Exhibit E) 20,410.21 

$314,252.02 
Add: 

Profit from sale of investments 12,391.51 

Balance, August 31, 1951 326,643.53 

$365,835.46 

61 



Exhibit E 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1951 



Sales: 



Appliances $ 17,925.22 

Braille printing 18,864,17 

Total sales $ 36,789.39 

Cost of Operation and Maintenance: 

Braille printing $ 30,141.42 

Appliances manufactured 21,849.64 

Administrative salaries and expenses 6,234.88 

Depreciation 2,554.15 

Maintenance 2,912.01 

Insurance "'■'^^^'nn 

Pension retirement plan 3,102.00 

Loss on bad debts 45.75 

Social security taxes 664.02 

$ 68,597.30 

Discounts $162.48 

Miscellaneous receipts 572.36 734.84 67,862.46 

Net loss from operations $ 31,073.07 

Other Income: 

Interest and dividends, general purposes $ 9,606.10 

Interest and dividends, special funds 1,366.15 

Miscellaneous 290.61 11,262.86 

$ 19,810.21 

Other charges: 

Pensions $ 300.00 

Miscellaneous ■■..;;"'.:■.■.'..■.■.■. 300.00 600.00 

Net loss for the year ended 

August 31, 1951 $ 20,410.21 



62 



Schedule 1 
OPERATING EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1951 

Salaries Supplies Other Total 

Administration $ 30,862.00 $ 5,012.63 $ 5,230.24 $^^04^ 

Treasurer's office $ 2,499.96 $ 5,420.60 $ 7.920.56 

Special Departments: ^ 14,115.24 

S?^ ;::::::: ^ 'sIS ^ i:m:?6 ^ 684.38 11,129.14 

Personnel 13,662.85 1,216.08 _14£78^ 

$ 33,830.07 $ 5,608.86 $ 684.38 $ 40,123.31 

^^^Uter"ary $ 66,055.33 $ 3,388.59 $ $ 69,443.92 

Ln^af training ... 1.930.00 1,4J5.48 ...... ....... ... | • 

Deaf Blind 14,867.00 659.23 _1!:526^ 

$117,769.83 $ 6,232.60 $ $124,002.43 

^'"f^L & mis. exp. $ 67,072.90 $ 8,996.51 $ 3 76 069.41 

^oS ''.:::::::: ''' 58:681:75 ::::::::::::::.., 58:681.75 

$ 75,827.73 $ 68,768.42 $ $144,596.15 

"""En'^nee^ing $ 38,453.70 $ 40,315.33 $ $ 78,769.03 

Buildings 20,307.70 10,874.31 ^I'lllil 

ground! 14,460.69 2,824.96 n,2Sb.65 

$ 73,222.09 $ 54,014.60 $ $127,236.69 

Depreciation $ $ " $ 24,000.00 $ 24,000.00 

Other expenses: o <6 $ 1,976.94 $ 1,976.94 

Automobile $ ? * 11,811.99 11811.99 

Insurance ±x,oxj..^^ 

Pension retirement 12,847.96 12,847.96 

Loss on bad debts ^^ 25 69.25 

soclS^security taxes :::::::::::: :::::::::: 3,769.51 3,769.51 

$ 52,644.21 $ 52,644.21 

$334,011.68 $139,637.11 $ 87,979.43 $561.628.22 

Summary 
Operating expenses — Institution ^oSn o5fi it 

Operating expenses — Kindergarten 27U,U4b.ig 

$561,628.22 

Note: In addition to maintenance expense shown above a t°*^l «* Jl^^^'^^^-^'J^P/^^^ 
senting expendit^ires during its year for special '"^ "tf'L^^I' J^S*'^. ^"^^ 
replacements, was charged to Reserve Fund for Depreciation (Exhibit C). 

63 



Schedule 2 
WORKS DEPARTMENT 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ended August 31, 1951 



Income: 



Sales $ 85,328.58 

Special funds: 
Anne E. Stodder fund — 

principal and income $2,864.69 

Anonymous fund — principal 

and income 147.92 $ 3,012.61 

Less, amount deferred until 1951-52 .... 1,587.05 1,425.56 

Miscellaneous 803.30 



$ 87,557.44 



Expenses: 



Material used $ 21,465.59 

Salaries and wages 62,288.24 

General expenses 7,110.91 

Auto and truck expense 1,199.58 

Loss on bad debts 149.11 

Taxes— social security 622.14 92,835.57 



Net loss for the year ended August 31, 1951 .... $ 5,278.13 



64 



INSTITUTION FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1951 

William Varnum Fund 

Special Funds: 

Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund $ 3,337.01 

Charles S. Adams (Christmas Fund) 204.03 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund 20,360.36 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and , ^o= ni 

blind) 4,085.91 

Mary Alice Butler (for reading matter „„„„„„ 

for the blind) 3,782.82 

Deaf-Blind Fund 175,033.95 

John D. Fisher (education teachers and 

others) 5,442.08 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) .... 5,107.38 

John Goldthwait Fund (charitable) 4,514.79 

Harris Fund (outdoor relief) 27,238.82 

Henry Clay Jackson Fund (for deaf -blind) 85,247.24 

Maria Kemble Oliver Fund (concert .^ ooo -.^ 

tickets) 15,322.16 

James Osborn Fund 4,342.60 

Prescott Fund (education teachers and 

others) 21,687.17 

Elizabeth P. Putnam (higher education) 1,021.48 

Richard M. Saltonstall (use Trustees) 3,064.42 

A. Shuman Clothing Fund 1,021.48 

Augustine Schurtleff Fund (for deaf, 

dumb and blind) 1,787.58 

Thomas Stringer Fund (for deaf-blind) 16,221.27 

Lenna D. Swinerton 467.57 

Julia E. Turner (education of worthy 

needy) 6,506.34 



$209,341.99 



$405,796.46 



Permanent Funds (income 

George Baird Fund i 

Charlotte Billings Fund 

Frank W. Boles 

Stoddard, Capen Fund 

Jennie M. Colby, 

in memory of 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund 

Stephen Fairbanks 

David H. Fanning 

Ferris Fund 

Helen Osborne Gary 

Harris Fund 

(general purposes) 

Harriet S. Hazeltine Fund 

Benjamin Humphrey 

Prentiss M. Kent 

Sir Charles W. Lindsay 

Kate M. Morse Fund 

Jonathan E. Pecker 

Richard Perkins 

Henry L. Pierce 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, 

in memory of 

Frederick W. Prescott 

endowment 



for general purposes) : 

12,895.21 Frank Davison Rust 

40,507.00 Memorial i'VSi S2 

76,329.02 Samuel E. Sawyer ^'lloll 

13,770.00 Margaret A. Simpson ^^°-^i 

Caroline A. Slack 10,000.00 

100.00 Charles Frederick Smith 

2,000.00 Fund o'nnnnA 

10,000.00 Timothy Smith rXn^«n 

5,010.56 Mary Lowell Stone Fund .... ^Xri" 22 

12,215.61 George W. Thym Fund ,'X«n nn 

10,000.00 Alfred T. Turner rn22nX 

Thomas Upham Fund 4,950.00 

53,333.00 Levina B. Urbino ^?2'22 

5,000.00 Vaughan Fund iS'^n.nn 

25,000.00 Ann White Vose ^?'^^„ „2 

2,500.00 Charles L. Young 5,000.00 

5,000.00 $425,816.78 
950.00 
20,000.00 Add: , c , 4. 
20,000.00 Distribution of Surplus at 

August 31, 1947 8,870.34 

^•OOO.OO $434,687.12 

25,338.95 -■' 

65 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Elizabeth B. Allen $ 500.00 

Nora Ambrose, 

in memory of 300.00 

James H. Anderson 62.25 

James H. Anderson 28,303.92 

Charlotte H. Andrews 15,169.87 

Mary Louise Aull 261,270.05 



Ellen S. Bacon 

Elizabeth B. Bailey 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 

Calvin W. Barker 

Lucy B. Barker, 

in memory of 

Marianne R. Bartholomew 

Francis Bartlett 

Elizabeth Howard Bartol . 

Mary Bartol 

Thompson Baxter 

Samuel Benjamin 

Robert C. Billings 

Helen Bisbee 

George Nixon Black 

Susan A. Blaisdell 

Dehon Blake 

Mary Blight 

William T. Bolton 

Betsey J. Bowles 

George W. Boyd 

Caroline E. Boyden 

Mary I. Brackett 

J. Putnam Bradlee 294,162.53 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 23,273.49 

Ellen F. Bragg 8,006.68 

Max Brenner 200.00 

Lucy S. Brewer 10,215.36 

Florence N. Bridgman 500.00 

J. Edward Brown 100,000.00 



5,000.00 
3,000.00 
2,500.00 
1,859.32 

5,953.21 

2,000.00 

2,500.00 

5,000.00 

300.00 

322.50 

250.00 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,832.66 

500.00 

7,220.99 

555.22 

9,798.75 

6,000.00 

1,930.39 

5,263.33 



Maria A. Burnham 


10,000.00 


T. O. H. P. Burnham 


5,000.00 


Abbie Y. Burr 


200.00 


Annie E. Caldwell 


4,000.00 


Emma C. CampbeD 


1,000.00 


Lydia E. Carl 


3,412.01 


Ehzabeth Hobart Carter 


5,000.00 


EUen G. Cary 


50.000.00 


Katherine F. Casey 


100.00 


Edward F. Gate 


5,000.00 


Robert R. Centro, 




in memory of 


10,000.00 


Fanny Channing 


2,000.00 


Emily D. Chapman 


1,000.00 


Mary F. Cheever 


200.00 


Ida May Chickering 


1,052.03 


Alice M. Clement 


32,324.03 


Mary A. Clement 


767.96 


Alice I. Cobb 


2,000.00 


Laura Cohen 


87.00 


Ann Eliza Colburn 


5,000.00 


Susan J. Conant 


500.00 


William A. Copeland 


1,000.00 


Augusta E. Corbin 


20.644.82 


Nellie W. Cowles 


3,036.99 


Jennie L. Cox 


1,948.60 


Louise F. Crane 


5,000.00 


W. Murray Crane 


10,000.00 


Harriet Otis Cruft 


6,000.00 


David Cummings 


7,723.07 


Arthur B. Curtis 


1,722.25 


Chastine L. Gushing 


500.00 


I. W. Danforth 


2,500.00 


Kate Kimball Danforth 


250.00 


Charles L. Davis 


1,000.00 


Etta S. Davis 


8,027.87 


Susan L. Davis 


1,500.00 


Mabel E. Day 


10,000.00 


Joseph Descalzo 


1,000.00 



Elsie C. Disher 163,250.07 

John H. Dix 10,000.00 

Mary Frances Drown 21,857.25 

Alice J. H. Dwinell 200.00 

Amelia G. Dyer 40,043.00 

Mary A. Dyer 8,375.18 

Ella L Eaton 1,669.50 

Mary Agnes Eaton 3,660.91 

Mary E. Eaton 5,000.00 

William Eaton 500.00 

David J. Edwards 500.00 

Ann J. Ellis 1,023.00 

A. Silver Emerson 500.00 

Martha S. Ensign 2,505.48 

Orient H. Eustis 500.00 

Eugene Fanning 50.00 

Sarah M. Farr 64,247.43 

Mortimer C. Ferris 

Memorial 1,000.00 

Edward A. Fillebrown 500.00 

Annie M. Findley 500.00 

Anna G. Fish 10,583.25 

Thomas B. Fitzpatrick 1,000.00 

John Forrest 1,000.00 

Ann Maria Fosdick 14,333.79 

Nancy H. Fosdick 3,937.21 

Sarah E. Foster 200.00 

Elwyn Fowler 5,232.75 

Mary Helen Freeman 1,000.00 

Cornelia Ann French 10,000.00 

Martha A. French 164.40 

Ephraim L. Frothingham .... 1,825.97 

Jessie P. Fuller 200.00 

Thomas Gaffleld 6,685.38 

Mabel Knowles Gage 5,000.00 

Edward L. Geary 2,000.00 

Albert Glover 1,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 5,000.00 

Marie M. Goggin 2,864.55 

Benjamin H. Goldsmith 11,199.68 

Charlotte L. Goodnow 6,471.23 

Maria W. Goulding 2,332.48 

Charles G. Green 45,837.70 

Amelia Greenbaum 500.00 

Imogene C. Gregory 450.00 

Mary Louise Greenleaf 199,189.94 

William Guggenheim 50.00 

Ellen Page HaU 10,037.78 

Ellen Hammond 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Harty 5,000.00 

Helen P. Harvison 1,000.00 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500.00 

Jerusha F. Hathaway 5,000.00 

Lucy Hathaway 4,577.00 

Edward J. and Georgia M. 

Hathorne Fund 50,017.68 

Charles H. Hayden 34,893.41 

John C. Haynes 1,000.00 

Mary B. T. Healy 200.00 

Alice Gushing Hersey, 

in memory of 3,000.00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500.00 

Ira Hiland 3,893.37 

Stanley B. Hildreth 5.000.00 

George A. Hill 100.00 

Lila M. Hodges 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708.32 

Theodore C. Hollander 3,016.00 

Bernard J. Holmburg 2,000.00 

Alfred G. Hosmer 229.28 

Margaret J. Hourihan 200.00 

Charles Sylvester Hutchinson 2,156.00 

Katharine C. Ireson 52,037.62 

Hattie M. Jacobs 10,693.43 

Lewis B. Jefferds in memory 

of Eva M. Jefferds ,.,. 3,000.00 



66 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



William S. Jenney, 

in memory of 

Charlotte Johnson 

Annie G. Joyce 

Celia Kaplan 

Eliza J. Kean 

Marie L. Keith 

Harriet B. Kempster 

Ernestine M. Kettle 

B. Marion Keyes 

Lulu S. Kimball 

Grace W. King 

Lydia F. Knowles 

Davis Krokyn 

Catherine M. Lamson 

James J. Lamson 

Susan M. Lane 

Elizabeth W. Leadbetter 

Jane Leader 

Luella K. Leavitt 

Lewis A. Leland 

Benjamin Levy 

E. E. Linderholm 

William Litchfield 

Mary T. Locke 

Hannah W. Loring 

Celia E. Lugene 

Adolph S. Lundin 

Susan B. Lyman 

Agnes J. MacNevin 

Mary Ella Mann 

Blanche Osgood Mansfield .... 

Annie B. Marion 

Rebecca Marks 

Stephen W. Marston 

Eizabeth S. Martin 

William H. Maynard 

James C. McDonald 

Cora Mclntire 

Charles Merriam 

Florence B. Merrill 

Mary H. Miller 

Olga E. Monks 

George Montgomery 

Martha H. Morss 

Louise C. Moulton Bequest .. 

Mary A. Muldoon 

Mary T. Murphy 

Sarah Ella Murray 

Sarah M. Nathan 

Joseph F. Noera 

Leonard L. Nones 

Henry P. Norris 

Annie Anthony Noyes 

Mary B. Noyes 

Richard W. Nutter 

EUa Nye 

Harold L. Olmstead 

Emily C. O'Shea 

Sarah Irene Parker 

William Prentiss Parker 

George Francis Parkman .... 

Grace Parkman 

Philip G. Peabody 

Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Ellen F. Perkins 

Edward D. Peters 

Clara F. Pierce 

Clara J. Pitts 

George F. Poland 

Elizabeth B. Porter 

George M. Whidden Porter 

Sarah E. Pratt 

Sarah S. Pratt 

Francis I. Proctor 

Grace E. Reed 



Carrie P. Reid 

500.00 Leonard H. Rhodes 

525.00 Mabelle H. Rice 

250.00 Matilda B. Richardson 

100.00 William L. Richardson 

59,209.91 Anne Augusta Robinson 

2,000.00 Julia M. Roby 

1,144.13 Robert Rodgers 

22.981.31 John Roome 

6,350.00 Barbara S. Ross 

10,000.00 Henrietta Goodrich Rothwell 

100.00 Mary L. Ruggles 

60.00 Elizabeth H. Russell 

100.00 Josephine Russell 

6,000.00 Marian Russell 

750.00 Nancy E. Rust 

815.71 William H. Ryan 

2,638.71 Emily E. St. John 

3,544.31 Louis H. Schlosberg 

1,011.67 Joseph Schofield 

415.67 Sarah E. Seabury 

500.00 Edward O. Seccomb 

505.56 Richard Black Sewell 

7,961.48 Charles F. Sherman 

8,361.89 Robert F. ShurtlefiE 

9,500.00 Carrie Etta Silloway 

300.00 John Simonds 

100.00 Arthur A. Smith 

4,809.78 Ellen V. Smith 

78,968.67 Esther W. Smith 

250.00 Sarah F. Smith 

1,000.00 The Maria Spear Bequest for 

8,745.66 the Blind 

2,640.40 Henry F. Spencer 

6,000.00 CJiarlotte S. Sprague 

1,000.00 Thomas Sprague 

22,821.66 Adella E. Stannard 

1,000.00 Cora N. T. Stearns 

6,862.60 Henry A. Stickney 

1,000.00 Lucretia J. Stoehr 

1,000.00 Joseph C. Storey 

1,512.50 Edward C. SuUivan 

2,500.00 Sophronia S. Sunbury 

5,140.00 Edward Swan 

3,000.00 Emma B. Swasey 

7,891.65 Mary F. Swift 

100.00 Frank R. Taekaberry 

10,000.00 William Taylor 

8,000.00 Minnie L. Thayer 

500.00 Mabel E. Thompson 

2,000.00 Joanna C. Thompson 

395.82 WiUiam Timlin 

35.198.52 Alice W. Torrey 

100.00 Evelyn Wyman Towle 

915.00 Stephen G. Train 

2,000.00 Sarah E. Trott 

50.00 Mary Wilson Tucker 

5,000.00 George B. Upton 

1,000.00 Maude C. Valentine 

699.41 Charles A. Vialle 

2,500.00 Bernard T. Vierich 

50,000.00 Abbie T. Vose 

6,383.78 Nancie S. Vose 

1,200.00 Horace W. Wadleigh 

2,000.00 Joseph K. Wait 

2.500.00 Amelia L. Walker 

600.00 Harriet Ware 

2,006.56 AUena F. Warren 

2,000.00 William H. Warren 

76.00 Eleanore C. Webb 

5,449.60 Charles F. Webber 

20,828.61 Mary E. Welch 

2,988.34 Mary Ann P. Weld 

5,000.00 Oliver M. Wentworth 

10,000.00 Cordelia H. Wheeler 

6,054.25 Opha J. Wheeler 



679.61 

1,012.77 

3.760.00 

300.00 

50.000.00 

212.20 

500.00 

100.00 

5,787.67 

2,740.35 

500.00 

3,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

2,640.00 

8,023.48 

5,015.00 

100.24 

2,600.00 

3,116.01 

1,000.00 

25,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,432.94 

5,429.88 

60.00 

10,000.00 

25,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,000.00 

13,229.23 

1,000.00 

1.631.78 

53,558.50 

2.410.00 

2,967.26 

122,531.58 

2,000.00 

365.19 

16,871.98 

2,260.00 

1,391.00 

2.500.00 

893.36 

1,000.00 

8,722.61 

1.000.00 

7,820.00 

71,660.00 

5,820.00 

20,000.00 

2,885.86 

481.11 

10,000.00 

1,884.22 

1,990.00 

593.06 

1,000.00 

300.00 

2,000.00 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,962.02 

2,828.33 

4,073.17 

6,314.95 

30,916.93 

200.00 

2,000.00 

300.00 

800.00 

3,086.77 



67 



Institution Funds (ConcVd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Eliza Orne White 

Ella Tredich White 

Porter W. Whitmarsh 

Kuth E. Whitmarsh 

Sarah L. Whitmarsh 

Samuel Brenton Whitney 

Martha A. Willcomb 

Adelia C. Williams 

Judson Williams 

Alice M. Willson 

Lucy B. Wilson, 

in memory of 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson .. 

Nettie R. Winn 

Samuel C. Wiswall 

Minnie S. Woolfe 

Esther F. Wright 



4,534.68 
1,000.00 

88,247.05 
1,000.00 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,628.46 

11,526.49 

800.00 

543.75 

1,000.00 

125.00 

9,259.38 

6.427.76 



Thomas T. Wyman 

Fanny Young 

William B. Young . 



Add: 

Distribution of Surplus at 
August 31, 1947 



- concl. 

20,000.00 
8,000.00 
1,000.00 

$3,188,349.58 



37,097.45 



$3,225,447.03 
Deduct : 

Transfer to Plant Capital 

at August 31, 1947 1,041,695.76 

$2,183,751.27 



KINDERGARTEN FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1951 

Special funds: 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund $ 41,024.61 

Glover Funds, for Blind-Deaf Mutes 1,445.74 

Ira Hiland (income to W. E. R. for life) 1,371.20 

Emeline Morse Lane Fund (books) 1,371.20 

Leonard and Jerusha Hyde Room 5,485.54 

Dr. Ruey B. Stevens' Charity Fund 7,542.33 

Lucy H. Stratton (Anagnos Cottage) 9,504.62 



$ 67,745.24 



Permanent funds (income for general purposes) 



Mary D. Balfour Fund 

William Leonard Benedict, 

Jr., Memorial 

Samuel A. Borden 

A. A. C, in Memoriam 

Helen G. Coburn 

Charles Wells Cook 

M. Jane Wellington 

Danforth Fund 

Caroline T. Downes 

Charles H. Draper Fund 
Eliza J. Bell Draper Fund 
Helen Atkins Edmands 

Memorial 

George R. Emerson 

Mary Eveleth 

Eugenia P. Farnham 

Susan W. Farwell 

John Foster 

The Luther and Mary 

Gilbert Fund 

Albert Glover 

Martha R. Hunt 

Mrs. Jerome Jones Fund .... 



$ 5,692.47 

1,000.00 
4,675.00 
500.00 
9,980.10 
5,000.00 

10,600.00 

12,950.00 

23,934.13 

1,500.00 

5,000.00 
5,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,015.00 
500.00 
5,000.00 

8,541.77 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

9,935.95 



Charles Lamed 

Elisha T. Loring 

George F. Parkman 

Catherine P. Perkins 

Edith Rotch 

Frank Davison Rust 

Memorial 

Caroline O. Seabury 

Phoebe Hill Simpson Fund 

Eliza Sturgis Fund 

Abby K. Sweetser 

Hannah R. Sweetser Fund . 
Mrs. Harriet Taber Fund .. 

Levina B. Urbino 

The May Rosevar White 

Fund 



Add: 

Distribution of Surplus at 
August 31, 1947 



5,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,500.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,600.00 

1,000.00 

3,446.11 

21,729.52 

25,000.00 

5,000.00 

622.81 

500.00 

500.00 

$229,122.86 



85,210.31 
$314,333.17 



68 



General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Emilie Albee $ 150.00 

Lydia A. Allen 748.38 

Michael Anagnos 3,000.00 

Harriet T. Andrew 5,000.00 

Martha B. AngeU 34,370.83 

Mrs. William Appleton 18,000.00 

Elizabeth H. Bailey 500.00 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 2,500.00 

Ellen M. Baker 13,053.48 

Mary D. Barrett 1,000.00 

Nancy Bartlett Fund 500.00 

Sidney Bartlett 10,000.00 

Emma M. Bass 1,000.00 

Sarah E. J. Baxter 51,847.49 

Thompson Baxter 322.50 

Robert C. Billings 10,000.00 

Harriet M. Bowman 1,013.22 

Sarah Bradford 100.00 

Helen C. Bradlee 140,000.00 

J. Putnam Bradlee 194,162.53 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 13,576.19 

Ellen F. Bragg 8,006.69 

Lucy S- Brewer 7,811.56 

Sarah Crocker Brewster 500.00 

Ellen Sophia Brown 1,000.00 

Mary E. Brown 1,000.00 

Rebecca W. Brown 8,977.55 

Harriet Tilden Browne 2,000.00 

Katherine E. Bullard 2,500.00 

Annie E. Caldwell 5,000.00 

John W. Carter 500.00 

Kate H. Chamberlin 5,715.07 

Adeline M. Chapin 400.00 

Benjamin P. Cheney 5,000.00 

Fanny C. Coburn 424.06 

Charles H. Colburn 1,000.00 

Helen Collamore 5,000.00 

Anna T. Coolidge 53,873.38 

Mrs. Edward Cordis 300.00 

Sarah Silver Cox 5,000.00 

Lavonne E. Crane 3,365.21 

Susan T. Crosby 100.00 

Margaret K. Cummings .... 5,000.00 

James H. Danford 1,000.00 

Catherine L. Donnison 

Memorial 1,000.00 

George H. Downes 3,000.00 

Amanda E. Dwight 6,295.00 

Lucy A. Dwight 4,000.00 

Harriet H. Ellis 6,074.79 

Mary E. Emerson 1,000.00 

Mary B. Emmens 1,000.00 

Arthur P. Estabrook 2,000.00 

Ida F. Estabrook 2,114.00 

Orient H. Eustis 500.00 

Annie Louisa Fay 

Memorial 1,000.00 

Sarah M. Fay 15,000.00 

Charlotte M. Fiske 5,000.00 

Ann Maria Fosdick 14,333.79 

Nancy H- Fosdick 3,937.21 

Fanny Foster 378.087.49 

Margaret W. Frothingham .. 500.00 

Elizabeth W. Gay 7,931.00 

Ellen M. Giflford 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 5.000.00 

Mathilda Goddard 300.00 

Anna L. Gray 1,000.00 

Maria L. Gray 200.00 

Amelia Greenbaum 1,000.00 

Caroline H. Greene 1,000.00 

Mary L. Greenleaf 5,157.75 

Josephine S. Hall 3,000.00 

Allen Haskell 500.00 

Mary J. Haskell 8,687.65 

Jennie B. Hatch 1,000.00 



Olive E. Hayden 4,622.46 

Jane H. Hodges 300.00 

Margaret A. Holden 2,360.67 

Marion D. HoUingsworth .... 1,000.00 

Frances H. Hood 100.00 

Abigail W. Howe 1,000.00 

Ezra S. Jackson 688.67 

Caroline E. Jenks 100.00 

Caroline M. Jones 5,000.00 

Ellen M. Jones 500.00 

Hannah W. Kendall 2,515.38 

Cara P. KimbaU 10,000.00 

David P. KimbaU 5,000.00 

Moses Kimball 1,000.00 

Ann E. Lambert 700.00 

Jean Munroe Le Brun 1,000.00 

Willard H. Lethbridge 28,179.41 

Frances E. Lily 1,000.00 

William Litchfield 6,800.00 

Mary Ann Locke 5,874.00 

Robert W. Lord 1,000.00 

Sophia N. Low 1,000.00 

Thomas Mack 1,000.00 

Augustus D. Manson 8,134.00 

Calanthe E. Marsh 18,840.33 

Sarah L. Marsh 1,000.00 

Waldo Marsh 500.00 

Annie B. Mathews 45,086.40 

Rebecca S. Melvin 23,545.56 

Georgina Merrill 4,773.80 

Ira L. Moore 1,349.09 

Louise Chandler Moulton .... 10,000.00 

Maria Murdock 1,000.00 

Mary Abbie NeweU 5,903.65 

Frances M. Osgood 1,000.00 

Margaret S. Otis 1,000.00 

Jeannie Warren Paine 1,000.00 

Anna R. Palfrey 50.00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699.41 

Anna Q. T. Parsons 4,019.52 

Helen M. Parsons 500.00 

Caroline E. Peabody 3,403.74 

Elward D. Peters 500.00 

Henry M. Peyser 5,678.25 

Mary J. Phipps 2,000.00 

Caroline S. Pickman 1,000.00 

Katherine C. Pierce 5.000.00 

Helen A. Porter 50.00 

Sarah E. Potter, 

Endowment Fund 425,014.44 

Francis L. Pratt 100.00 

Mary S. C. Reed 5,000.00 

Emma Reid 952.38 

William Ward Rhoades 7.507.86 

Jane Roberts 93.025.55 

John M. Rodocanachi 2.250.00 

Dorothy Rofle 500.00 

Clara Bates Rogers 2,000.00 

Rhoda Rogers 500.00 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Rotch .... 8,500.00 

Rebecca Salisbury 200.00 

J. Pauline Schenkl 10.955.26 

Joseph Schofield 3.000.00 

Eliza B. Seymour 5.000.00 

John W. Shapleigh 1.000.00 

Esther W. Smith 5,000.00 

Annie E. Snow 9,903.27 

Adelaide Standish 5,000.00 

Elizabeth G. Stuart 2,000.00 

Benjamin Sweetzer 2,000.00 

Sarah W. Taber 1.000.00 

Mary L. Talbot 630.00 

Ann Tower Tarbell 4.892.85 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer 10,000.00 

Delia D. Thorndike 5,000.00 

Elizabeth L. Tilton 300.00 



69 



Kindergarten Funds (Cont'd) 
General funds (principal and income for general purposes) 



Betsey B. Tolman 


500.00 


Betsey S. Wilder 500.00 


Transcript, ten dollar fund .. 


5,666.95 


Hannah Catherine Wiley .... 200.00 


Mary Wilson Tucker 


481.11 


Mary W. Wiley 150.00 


Mary B. Turner 


7,582.90 


Martha A. Willcomb 5,000.00 


Royal W. Turner 


24,089.02 


Mary Williams 5,000.00 


Minnie H. Underbill 


1,000.00 


Almira F. Winslow 306.80 


Charles A. Vialle 


1,990.00 


Eliza C. Winthrop 5,041.67 


Rebecca P. Wainwright 

George W. Wales 


1,000.00 
5,000.00 


Harriet F. Wolcott 5,532.00 




Maria W. Wales 


20,000.00 


$2,066,769.71 


Gertrude A. Walker 


178.97 


Add: 


Mrs. Charles E. Ware 


4,000.00 


Distribution of Surplus at 


Rebecca B. Warren 


5,000.00 


August 31, 1947 529,095.43 


Jennie A. (Shaw) 




_ 


Waterhouse 


565.84 


$2,595,865.14 


Mary H. Watson 


100.00 


Deduct : 


Ralph Watson Memorial 


237.92 


Transfer to Plant Capital 


Isabella M. Weld 

Mary Whitehead 


14,795.06 
666.00 


at August 31, 1947 634,744.69 




Evelyn A. Whitney Fund .... 


4,992.10 


$1,961,120.45 


Julia A. Whitney 

Sarah W. Whitney 


100.00 
150.62 







HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1951 

Special funds: 

Adeline A. Douglas (printing raised 

characters) $ 5,000.00 

Harriet S. Hazeltine (printing raised 

characters) 2,000.00 

Thomas D. Roche (publication non- 
sectarian books) 1,883.84 

J. Pauline Schenkl (printing) 10,955.26 

Deacon Stephen Stickney Fund (books, 
maps and charts) 5,000.00 

$ 24,839.10 

General funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 

Beggs Fund $ 1,000.00 

Joseph H, Center 1,000.00 

Augusta Wells 10,290.00 

12,290.00 

$ 37,129.10 



70 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE DEAF-BLIND FUND 



September 1, 1950 — August 31, 1951 



Abbe, Mrs. Mary F. 

Abbot, Miss Marion S. 

Abbott, Mr. Frank W. 

Abbott, Miss Harriette F. 

Abbott, Miss Mary S. 

Abbott, Mrs. William T. 

Abeg, Miss Eda 

Abel, Mrs. Robert 

Adam Hat Stores, Inc. 

Adams, Mrs. Barrett 

Adams, Miss F. M. 

Adams, Mr. James 

Adams, Mrs. John 

Adams, Miss Kate L. 

Adams, Dr. Letitia D. 

Adler, Miss Cecilia 

Adler, Mrs. Jacob 

Alden, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. 

Alexander, Mrs. Benj. R. 

Alexander, Mr. Ralph A. 

AUbright, Mr. Clifford 

Allen, Mrs. Arthur D. 

Allen, Mrs. Arthur M. 

Allen, Miss Hildegarde 

Alles, Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. 

Almy, Mr. Charles 

Almy, Miss Helen J. 

Ames, Lady 

Ames, Miss Rosella S. 

Ames, Mrs. William H. 

Ames, Mrs. Winthrop 

Amory, Mrs. Copley, Jr. 

Amory, Mr. Roger 

Amory, Mrs. William 

Amster, Mrs. Morris 

Andersen, Mrs. George G. 

Anderson, Mrs. Andreas 

Anderson, Mr. Edward A. 

Andress, Mrs. J. Mace 

Andrus, Mrs. G. E. 

Ansin, Mr. Harold 

Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. 

Appleton, Miss Helen 

Appleton, Miss Maud E. 

Argersinger, Mr. Roy E. 

Armstrong, Mrs. Albert C. 

Arnold, Mrs. Harold G. 

Arthur, Miss Susan 

Arvedon, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Ascher, Mr. Fred 

Ashenden, Mr. Richard C. 

Ashworth, Miss Lillian F. 

Atherton, Mr. J. Ballard 

Athey, Mrs. C. N. 

Atkins, Mr. and Mrs. Elisha 

AtweU, Mrs. A. Y. 

Atwood, Mrs. David E. 

Atwood, Mrs. Frank W. 

Austin, Miss Edith 

Averill, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. 

Axelrod, Mrs. S. Mitchell 

Ayer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 

Ayres, Mrs. James 

Babcock, Mr. and Mrs. Sumner H. 
Babson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. 
Backus, Mrs. Standish 
Badger, Mrs. Arthur C. 
Badger, Dr. and Mrs. T. L. 
Bagley, Mr. Charles R. 



Bailey, Mrs. Edward A. 

Baker, Mrs. Benedict J. 

Baker, Mrs. Dudley M. 

Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin O. 

Baker. Mrs. H. W. 

Baker, Mrs. John C. 

Baker, Mrs. Mark 

Baker, Mrs. Nathaniel 

Baker, Mr. Ross W. 

Baker. Dr. Ruth A. 

Baldwin. Mrs. Harvey G. 

Ball, Mr. and Mrs. Elwyn J. 

Ball, Miss Susan L. 

Banash, Mr. Ira J. 

Band, Mr. Milton 

Banes, Miss Margaret 

Barker, Miss Phyllis F. 

Barlow, Mr. Charles L. 

Barber, Mrs. Harris 

Barnard, Mrs. William Lambert 

Barnes, Mr. Harold A. 

Barnet, Mr. John S. 

Barr. Miss Ada M. 

Barrett, Mrs. Anne M. 

Barrett, Miss Florence E. 

Barrett, Mr. Francis A. 

Barrow, Mrs. Robert G. 

Barry, Mrs. Edward P. 

Barry, Mr. Ernest F. 

Barry, Mrs. John Lincoln 

Barry, Mrs. T. Hooker 

Barth, Miss Betty Jane 

Barth. Mr. J. J. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Harriett C. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 

Bartol, Mrs. John W. 

Bartol, Mr. Louis C. 

Barton, Dr. Basil E. 

Barton, Mrs. George E. 

Barton, Mrs. Robert 

Bartow, Mrs. Howard K. 

Bartow, Mrs. Nevett 

Bassett, Mrs. Norman L. 

Bates, Mrs. Maurice E. 

Baumgartner, Mrs. E. L. 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory P. 

Baxter, Mr. Thomas A. 

Bayley, Mrs. Herbert S. 

Beal, Mrs. Boylston A. 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. DeFord 

Beals, Mr. Lawrence W. 

Bean, Mrs. Henry S. 

Bean, Mr. Howard C. 

Bearce, Miss Ruth 

Beard, Mr. Frank A. 

Beaudreau, Mr. Raoul H. 

Beck, Miss Winifred M. 

Becker, Mrs. Carl W. 

Behr, Miss Elsa 

Belcher, Miss Gertrude C. 

Bell, Mrs. Hermon Pratt 

Belmont HiU School Student Council 

Bement, Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. 

Bemis, Mrs. Alan C. 

Bemis, Mrs. Harry H. 

Bemis, Mr. and Mrs. John R. 

Benioff, Mrs. David 

Benjamin, Mrs. Irwin 

Benner, Miss Frances Z. T. 

Bennett, Miss Beatrice 



71 



Bennett, Mrs. Edward H., Jr. 
Bennett, Mrs. Harold 
Benson, Mr. A. Emerson 
Benson, Mrs. John W. 
Bentinck-Smith, Miss Joan 
Bernat, Mr. George A. 
Berry, Mrs. C. Harold 
Bessom, Mrs. Frank L. 
Best, Mr. "William 
Bickford, Miss Susan M. 
Bicknell, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph E. 
Bidwell, Mrs. Baymond B. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Albert F. 
Bigelow, Mr. and Mrs. D. H. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry B. 
Biller, Dr. Saul 
Billings, Mrs. Arthur 
Bilodeau, Mr. Emilie L. R. 
Binney, Miss Emily V. 
Binney, Miss Helen Maude 
Binney, Dr. Horace 
Binney, Mrs. Horace 
Bird, Miss Anna C. 
Bird, Mr. Charles S. 
Bird, Mrs. Charles S. Ill 
Bird, Mrs. Francis W. 
Bird, Mr. John R. 
Birdsall. Mrs. Paul H. 
Bishop, Mrs. Frank C. 
Black, Mrs. S. Bruce 
Black, Mrs. Taylor 
Blais, Mrs. J. A. 
Blake, Mr. and Mrs. George B. 
Blake, Ranny and Martha 
Blanchard, Mrs. Glen E. 
Blanchard, Miss Rachel 

Blandy, Mr. Graham, 2d 

Blevins, Mrs. Albert H. 

Blinder, Mrs. Morris 

Bliss, Mr. Allen D. 

Bliss, Miss Carrie C. 

Bliss, Mrs. Earl F. 

Bliss, Mr. Frederick W. 

Blix, Miss Katie 

Blodgett, Mrs. Edward W. 

Bloomberg, Mrs. Wilfred 

Bluhm, Mr. Louis 

Bolles, Mrs. Chester A. 

Bolton, Mrs. Harold L. 

Bonsai, Mrs. Stephen 

Book Club, The 

Borgatti, Miss Anna F. 

Born, Mrs. Donald 

Bosson, Mrs. Campbell 

Boston Aid to the Blind, Inc. 

BouteUe, Miss Mary E. 

Bouve, Dr. Howard A. 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L. 

Bowditch, Mrs. Henry I. 

Bowen, Mrs. J. W. 

Bowers, Mrs. Idella M. 

Bowles, Mr. Edward L. 

Boyd, Dr. Walter Willard 

Boyer, Mrs. William E. 

Bozyan, Mrs. H. Frank 

Bradford, Mrs. Edward, Sr. 

Bradlee, Mrs. Reginald 

Bradlee, Mrs. Thomas S. 

Bradley, Mrs. Leland E. 

Bradley, Mrs. Ralph 

Bradshaw, Miss Eugenie F. 

Bragdon, Dr. and Mrs. Joseph H. 

Brandegee Charitable Foundation 

Brandt, Mr. Walter R., Jr. 

Breed, Mr. Edward F. 
Breed, Mrs. William B. 
Bremer, Miss Sarah F. 
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers 

Local No. 6 
Briggs, Mrs. Edward C. 



Brinley, Mrs. Godfrey 

Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H. 

Brooks, Miss Florence M. 

Brooks, Gorham. Esq. 

Brooks, Mr. John G. 

Brooks, Mrs. Laurence G. 

Brooks, Society of Phillips 

Brown, Miss Adelaide J. 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P. 

Brown, Mrs. George 

Brown, Mrs. George E. 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. George R. 

Brown, Mrs. Hobart W. 

Brown, Mr. J. Frank 

Brown, Miss Margaret L. 

Brown, Miss Martha T. 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. . 

Brown, Mr. William K. 

Brown, Mrs. William S. 

Browne, Miss Florence M. 

Broyles, Dr. Elizabeth L. 

Bruckhauser, Mr. Wm. K. 

Bruerton, Mr. Courtney 

Bruerton, Miss Edith C. 

Bruggeman, Mr. Lester G. 

Bryant, Mr. and Mrs. John W. 

Bryant, Mr. Lincoln 

Bryant, Mrs. Wallace E. 

Buck, Mr. Paul H. 

Buell, Mr. James A. 

Buff, Mr. H. A. 

Buffum, Miss Charlotte 

Bullock, Estate of Nina 

Bump, Mrs. Archie E. 

Bumstead, Miss Rosa M. 

Bunse, Mr. Henry L., Jr. 

Burdett, Mrs. E. W. 

Burgeoin, Mr. Richard W. 

Burke, Mrs. Roger M. 

Burke, Mrs. Walter S. 

Burling, Mrs. Edward B. 

Burling, Miss Louisa P. 

Burnes, Mr. Harold W. 

Burnham, Mr. Edwin L. 

Burnham, Miss Mary C. 

Burnham, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A., Jr. 

Burr, Mrs. Henry E. 

Burr, Mr. I. Tucker, Jr. 

Burrage, Mr. and Mrs. George D. 

Burrage, Miss Margaret C. 

Burrage, Dr. and Mrs. Walter S. 

Bush, Mr. J. Douglas 

Burler, Mrs. Charles S. 

Butler, Mrs. Charles S. 

Butler, Miss Miriam 

Butler, Mr. William E. 

Butts, Mrs. Frank B. 

Byers, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. 

Cabot, Mrs. George B. 
Cabot, Mr. Godfrey L. 
Cabot, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Sr. 
Cabot, Mrs. Walter M. 
Calkins, Mr. William H. 
Callahan, Mr. Henry J. 
Cameron, Mrs. Russell R. 
Campbell, Mr. Charles R. 
Campbell, Miss Elizabeth 
Campbell, Mr. Floj'd D. 
Campbell, Mrs. F. W. 
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. 
Campbell, Mrs. Wallace M. 
Cannon, Dr. and Mrs. Bradford 
Cantabrigia Club, The 
Capron, Mrs. John F. 
Carbee, Miss Jessica M. 
Carberry, Mrs. C. B. 
Carhart, Mrs. C. L. 

72 



Carlton, Mr. Charles E. 

Carmalt, Miss Geraldine W. 

Carroll, Miss Ellen S. 

Carroll, Mrs. Wm. J. 

Carten, Mrs. John L., Jr. 

Carter, Mrs. Albert P. 

Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert L. 

Carter, Mrs. Winthrop L. 

Cartland, Miss Marian P. 

Casassa, Miss Rose 

Case, Col. and Mrs. Norman S. 

Caskey, Mrs. Paul D. 

Gates, Miss H. Belle 

Central Presbyterian Church School, 

Montclair, N. J. 
Chadsey, Mr. Horace M. 
Chamberlain, Dr. Calvin B. 
Chamberlain Family 
Chamberlain, Mrs. George N. 
Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel 
Chamberlin, Miss Louise M. 
Chandler, Miss Ethel 
Chandler, Mrs. John 
Chandler, Dr. Paul A. 
Chandler, Mrs. Thomas E. 
Chapin, Mr. E. Barton 
Chapman, Mrs. John A. 
Chard, Mrs. Walter G. 
Charron, Mrs. Arthur I. 
Charron, Mrs. Roy C. 
Chase, Mr. Alfred E. 
Chase, Miss Alice P. 
Chase, Mr. Arthur Taft 
Chase, Mrs. Frederick 
Chase, Mr. John P. 
Chase, Mrs. W. L. B. 
Chase, Mr. Walter B. 
Chase, Mrs. Walter I. 
Chase, Mr. William F. 
Cheever, Dr. David 
Cheever, Mr. and Mrs. David, Jr. 
Cheever, Dr. F. Sargent 
Cheever, Miss Helen 
Cheever, Mrs. R. P. 
Chenery, Mrs. Wm. E. 
Cheney, Mrs. Benjamin P. 
Chichetto, Mr. Frank A. 
Church, Mrs. Willard 
Chute, Mrs. Arthur L. 
Claflin, Mrs. Thomas H. 
Claflin, Mrs. Wm. H., Jr. 
Clapp, Mrs. Clift Rogers 
Clark, Miss Alice Warren 
Clark, Miss Alleyne 
Clark, Mrs. Cecil W. 
Clark, Mrs. Gladys M. 
Clark, Mr. Harold T. 
Clark, Mr. Henry J. 
Clark, Miss Katherine 
Clark, Miss Mary B. 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 
Clarke, Mrs. B. M. 
Clarke, Miss Etta 
Clarke, Mrs. Joseph 
Clarke, Mrs. Samuel F. 
Clayton, Mr. and Mrs. C. Comstock 
Clerijent, Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. 
Clifford, Mre. Walter B. 
Clough, Miss Alice S. 
Clawes, Dr. and Mrs. George, Jr. 
Coates, Miss Anna M. 
Cobb, Mr. Sumner C. 
Coburn, Miss Louise 
Cochran, Mrs. Olin J. 
Codman, Mrs. Eliot 
Codman, Mr. John S. 
Codman, Mrs. Russell 
Coffin, Mrs. Rockwell A. 
Coggeshall, Mrs. G. W. 
Coggeshall, Mrs. Harrison H. 



Coggeswell, Dr. George P. 

Cohan, Mrs. B. Harrison 

Cohen, Mrs. Joseph H. 

Cohen, Mrs. Joseph P. 

Colburn, Mr. William A. 

Cole, Mr. Howard M. 

Cole, Mrs. J. Newton 

Cole, Mrs. William F. 

Collester, Mr. Thorley 

Collins, Mr. Charles A. 

Collins, Miss Clarissa W. 

Collinson, Mrs. A. William 

Conant, Mrs. Albert F. 

Conant, Miss Ella B. 

Conant, Mrs. James B. 

Conant, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. 

Condit, Mr. Sears B. 

Conklin, Mrs. Annette P. 

Connick, Mrs. Charles J. 

Conroy, Mr. James J. 

Contratto, Dr. and Mrs. A. W. 

Cook, Mrs. Rufus H. 

Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 

Cooke, Mrs. John W. 

Coolidge, Miss Elsie W. 

Coolidge, Mr. Joseph Arthur 

Coolidge, Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. 

Cooper, Mr. Ford H. 

Cooper, Mrs. Harry D. 

Coote, Lady Emilie 

Connolly, Rev. John J. 

Corey, Mrs. Eben F. 

Corliss, Mr. Howard F. 

Cornish, Mr. John J. 

Correa, Dr. and Mrs. John F. 

Cottle, Mrs. E. C. 

Cotton, Miss May Mildred 

Coty, Mrs. Woods 

Coulson, Mrs. William 

Coulter, Mrs. Roger B. 

Countway, Mr. Francis A. 

Courtney, Miss Mary L. 

Covel, Miss Helen 

Cowen, Mrs. Arthur 

Cowles, Mrs. Eugene 

Cox, Mrs. Gardner 

Ci-ane, Mrs. Winthrop M., Jr. 

Crehan, Mr. John J. 

Crehore, Miss Lucy Clarendon 

Crehore, Mrs. Morton S. 

Creighton, Mrs. Albert M. 

Critchley, Miss Rosamund M. 

Crocker, Mrs. Bigelow 

Crocker, Mre. C. Thomas III 

Crocker, Mrs. Charles T. 

Crocker, Mrs. Douglas 

Crocker, Mrs. Edgar 

Crocker, Mrs. Goodhue 

Crocker, Rev. and Mrs. John U. 

Crooker, Mr. Philip L. 

Crosby, Miss Margaret 

Crosby, Mrs. Stephen van R. 

Cross, Mrs. Charles H. 

Cross, Mrs. Harold 

Grossman, Miss Evelyn 

Grossman, Hon. Ralph W. 

Crump, Miss Grace L. 

Cubell, Mr. Samuel 

Cumner, Mr. Prescott T. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Edward 

Cunningham, Mrs. Guy 

Cunningham, Miss Mary 

Cunningham, Mr. Robert A. 

Cunningham, Mrs. Stanley 

Cunningham, Mrs. William H. 

Curran, Mrs. Maurice J. 

Currier, Mrs. Henry M. 

Curtis, Mrs. Frances G. 

Curtis, Mrs. Greely S. 

Curtis, Mr. Louis 



73 



Gushing, Mr. Joseph 
Cushman, Mrs. Elton G. 
Cushman, Mrs. H. E. 
Cutler, Miss Abigail Ann 
Cutler, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Cutler, Mr. G. Ripley 
Cutler, Mr. Moses 
Cutler, Mrs. Nathan P. 
Cutler, Mr. Robert 
Cutter, Mrs. Victor M. 

Dabney, Mrs. John P. 

Dabney, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas N. 

Damon, Miss Bertha B. 

Damon, Mr. J. Linfield 

Dana HaU Service League 

Dana, Mrs. Harold W. 

Dane, Mrs. Francis S. 

Dane, Mr. Walter A. 

Dangel, Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. 

Danielson, Mi's. Richard E. 

DaPrato, Mrs. A. L. 

Davidson, Mrs. Archer 

Davidson, Mr. George T. 

Davies, Miss Eleanor E. 

Davies, Miss Ruth 

Davis, Mrs. A. W. 

Davis, Mrs. F. S. 

Davis, Mrs. Franklin B. 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. 

Davis, Mrs. William L. 

Davison, Mrs. A. M. 

Davol, Miss Amy 

Dawson, Mr. J. Douglas 

Day, Miss Alice F. 

Day, Mrs. Frank A. 

Day, Mr. Frank A. 

Day, Mrs. W. Taylor 

DeBlois, Dr. Elizabeth B. 

DeBlois, Mrs. George L. 

De Friez, Mi-s. Thaddeus C. 

de Fritsch, Mrs. Hugo 

De Koning, Mr. L. 

Deland, Mrs. Frank S. 

Deikescamp, Miss Gladys W. 

De Luca, Mrs. O. 

Demarest, Mrs. David 

de Mille, Mrs. John C. 

Denghausen, Mrs. Franz 

Dennett, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 

Denny, Miss Emily G. 

Denny, Dr. George P. 

Densmore, Mrs. G. Ellis 

Derry, Mr. Cecil T. 

Descheneux, Mr. Raymond E. 

Dewick, Mr. Frank A. 

Dexter, Miss Mary Deane 

d'Humy, Mr. F. E. 

Dickinson, Mrs. Lawrence S. 

Dickson, Miss Flora M. 

Diechmann, Miss Bertha 

Dierksen, Mrs. H. H. 

Dillingham, Mrs. Isaac S. 

Doane, Miss Jessie 

Dodd, Mr. and Mrs. Loring H. 

Dogherty, Miss Marian A. 

Doherty, Miss Mary C. 

Dohrmann, Miss Dorothy A. 

Dolan, Mr. William G. 

Dolbeare, Mrs. Fred T. 
Donald, Mrs. Malcolm 
Dooley, Mr. Arthur T. 
Douglass, Miss Josephine 
Douglass, Mrs. Mabelle F. A. 
Dourian, Miss Lillian 
Dow, Mrs. Dana F. 
Dowling, Mrs. Alexander S. 
Downer, Miss Lisa deForest 
Downes, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome I. 
Downer, Miss Mary Louise 



Downing, Miss Helen M. 
Doyle, Mr. Robert G. 
Draper, Mrs. Edward B. 
Draper, Mrs. John H., Sr. 
Draper, Mrs. Joseph P. 
Drew, Mrs. Pitt F. 
Drinkwater, Mr. Davis C. 
Driscoll, Mrs. Egbert G. 
Drooker, Mrs. Sydney 
Dudley, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond A. 
Duff, Mr. and Mrs. J. Robertson 
Dumaine, Mrs. Frederick C, Jr. 
Duncklee, Mrs. Geo. W. 
Duncklee, Miss Helen L. 
Dunham, Miss Marjorie H. 
Durand, Dr. and Mrs. Albert C. 
Durfee, Miss Elizabeth R. 
Durr, Mrs. R. M. 

Eager, Miss Mabel T. 

Earle, Mrs. Edv/ard H. 

East, Mrs. A. L. 

Eastham, Mr. and Mrs. Melville 

East Lynn Unit, American Legion Aux. 

Eastman, Mr. George H. 

Eaton, Miss Edith B. 

Eaton, Miss Helen 

Eaton, Mrs. Lewis F. 

Eaton, Mrs. Charles F., Jr. 

Eckfeldt, Mr. Roger W. 

Eddy, Mrs. Brewer 

Edsall, Mrs. John T. 

Edwards, Mr. Dwight 

Edwards, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. 

Eggers, Mr. William A. 

Ehrlich, Mrs. Henry 

Elder, Miss Vera 

Eliot, Miss Marian C. 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel A. 

Elliott, Miss Ethel J. 

Ellison, Mrs. Eben H. 

Ellstrom, Mr. Edwin L. 

Elsmith, Mrs. Dorothy 

Emerson, Miss Mabel E. 

Emerson, Mrs. William 

Emerj', Mrs. Forrest S. 

Emmons, Mrs. Alfred P. 

Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Sr. 

Endicott, Mrs. Mitchell 

Englis, Mrs. John 

Equitable Life Assurance Society Workers 

Erskine, Mrs. Kenneth 

Erickson, Mr. Joseph A. 

Estabrook, Mrs. R. F. 

Eustis, Mr. Stanton R. 

Evans, Mrs. Wilmot R. 

Everett, Miss Emilie Hughes 

Everett, Miss Florence A. 

Faeth, Mrs. Charles E. 
Fahnestock, Mrs. Harris 
Fairbank, Mrs. Murry N. 
Fairfax, Mrs. Madge C. 
Fales, Mrs. Almon L. 
Falkson, Mrs. Arthur B. 
Farnsworth, Dr. K. C. 
Farnsworth, Miss Marion B. 
Farrington, Mrs. Frederick A. 
Faude, Mrs. Paul 
Faulkner, Mrs. James M. 
Faull, Mr. J. H. 
Fay, Mr. Arthur Dudley 
Fay, Miss Margaret Lincoln 
Febiger, Mr. William Sellers 
Feinberg, Mrs. Elihu T. 
Feldman, Mrs. Moses D. 
Feldman, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Felt, Mrs. B. F. 
Felton, Mrs. Winslow B. 



74 



Fenn, Mi-s. T. Legare 

Fenno, Miss Alice M. 

Fenno, Mrs. L. Carteret 

Fenwick, Miss Bertha 

Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Enoch P. 

Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. 

Ferrin, Mrs. F. M. 

Fessenden, Mrs. Robert G. 

Fessenden, Mrs. Russell G. 

Field, Mrs. Henry M. 

Field, Mrs. Mary 

Finberg, Mrs. Chester F. 

Findlay, Mr. Francis 

Finfrock, Miss Anna L. 

Finney, Mrs. Arthur L. 

First Congregational Church Sunday School 

of Gardner 
First Parish of Concord, 

Sunday School of the 
Fisehbein, Dr. Louis 
Fisher, Miss Edith S. 
Fisk, Mrs. Otis Harrison 
Fiske, Mrs. Redington 
Fitch, Miss Mary A. 
Fitts, Mr. George H. 
Fitz, Mrs. Reginald 
Flagg, Mrs. Elisha 
Flagg, Mrs. Walter E. 
Flaherty, Miss Anna R. 
Flather, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. 
Fletcher, Mr. Robert S. 
Flint, Mrs. Perley G. 
Flood, Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. 
Floyd, Mrs. Cleaveland 
Floyd, Miss Lottie M. 
Foley, Mrs. M. J. 
Follansbee, Mr. and Mrs. George L. 
FoUansby, Miss Daisy L. 
Folsom, Mr. Grenville W. 
Folsom, Mrs. Robert M. 
Foote, Mrs. James G. 
Foote, Mr. John E. F. 
Forbes, Mr. Edward W. 
Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. F. Murray 
Forbes, Mrs. George Shannon 
Forbes, Mrs. Ralph E. 
Forbes, Mrs. Waldo E. 
Forbush, Mrs. Walter A. 
Foster, Mr. Benjamin B. 
Foster, Miss Hilda S. 
Fowler, Mr. Louis F. 
Fox, Mr. Charles J. 
Fox, Miss Edith M. 
Fox, Mrs. Felix 
Fraim, Mrs. Irving W. 
Franklin, Mrs. Henry S. 
Francke, Mrs. H. Gilbert 
Fratus, Mrs. Phyllis N. 
French, Mrs. Allen 
French, Mrs. Paul C. 
French, Miss Ruth H. 
Freund, Mr. Sanford H. E. 
Friedlander, Mrs. Jenny 
Friedman, Miss Elsie 
Friedman, Miss Sophie 
"Friend, A" 
Friend, Miss Eunice A. 
Frisbie, Mr. Henry H. 
Frost, Mr. Donald McKay 
Frothingham, Mrs. Donald 
Frothingham, Miss Eugenia B. 
Frothingham, Mr. Francis E. 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Frothingham, Mrs. Theodore 
Frye, Miss Cornelia 
Fuller, Mr. Charles E. 
Fuller, Mrs. Clifford J. 
Fuller Family, The 
Fuller, Mr. Lorin L. 
Fuller, Mrs. Robert G. 



Fulton, Mrs. I. Kent 

Gahan, Mr. James C, Jr. 

Gale, Mrs. C. E. 

Gallagher, Mr. and Mrs. William W. 

Gammons, Mrs. C. W. 

Gammons, Mrs. Roland F. 

Gannon, Mr. Joseph 

Gardner, Mr. Colin 

Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. G. Peabody 

Gardner, Mrs. George P. 

Gardner, Mrs. Louis 

Garel, Miss Annette 

Garrison, Mr. David L. 

Garside, Miss Lillian R. 

Gates, Miss H. L. 

Gemmel, Miss Harriet R. 

George, Miss J. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Perley G. 

Gerstein, Mr. and Mi's. Sumner M. 

Gibbons, Mrs. John F. 

Gibbs, Miss Laura R. 

Gibson, Mr. Frank W., Jr. 

Giese, Mrs. Henry W. 

Gilbert, Miss Clara C. 

Gilbert, Dr. Darius W. 

Gilbert, Miss Helen C. 

Gilfoy, Mrs. A. Victor 

Gillespie, Dr. Luke 

Gilman, Mr. and Mrs. Herman 

Gilman, Mrs. Roger 

Gilman, Miss Gertrude 

Gilmore, Mr. Aubrey G. 

Gilmore, Mr. Elbert J. 

Ginn, Miss Susan J. 

Ginsburg Brothers, Inc. 

Ginzberg, Mrs. A. Murray 

Giroux, Mr. Archibald R. 

Glasheen, Mrs. Joseph F. 

Glazier, Mr. L. Gox'don 

Gleason, Miss Ellen H. 

Gleason, Mrs. Hollis T. 

Gleason, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. 

Glidden, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T., Jr. 

Glunts, Mr. James D. 

Goddard, Mrs. Asa E. 

GoeU, Miss Blanche I. 

Goethals, Mrs. Thomas R. 

Goldman, Mrs. Helen R. 

Goldman, Miss Helen S. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel A. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel E. 

Goodfellow, Miss Charlotte E. 

Goodhue, Mrs. Charles E., Jr. 

Goodnow, Mrs. William N. 

Goodspeed, Mrs. Carl M. 

Goodspeed, Mrs. Fred A. 

Goodstein, David M., Inc. 

Goodwin, Mrs. F. S. 

Goodwin, Mr. Fred M. 

Goodwin, Mrs. H. M. 

Gordan, Mrs. John D. 

Gordon, Mrs. Alan 

Gordon, Miss Elizabeth M. 

Gordon, Miss Mary E. 

Gordon, Mr. Watson M. 

Gordon, Mrs. Louis 

Gordon, Mrs. Nathan H. 

Gorham, Mr. Richard M. 

Gormley, Mr. James T. 

Corner, Mr. Otto A. 

Gould, Mrs. Gardner S. 

Gould, Mrs. Marion R. 

Gove, Mr. Robert A. 

Grabfleld, Dr. and Mrs. G. P. 

Grace Church Sunday School 

Primary Department of Holyoke 
Grace Episcopal Church 

Y. P. F. of Medford 
Grace, Mrs. Francis J. S. 



75 



Graham, Mrs. George M. 
Graham, Miss Louise 
Grannis, Mrs. Arthur E. 
Grant, Mr. Alexander G. 
Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. 
Grant, Mrs. George R., Jr. 
Graton, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. 
Graves, Miss Louise B. 
Gray, Mr. Reginald 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald 
Gray, Mrs. Stephen M. W. 
Gray, Mrs. Thomas H., Jr. 
Green, Mr. George Emery 
Green, H. P. 
Greenbaum, Mr. Joseph 
Greene, Mr. Jerome D. 
Greenman, Mrs. W. B. 
Greenough, Mrs. Charles W. 
Greenough, Miss E. Florence 
Greenough, Mrs. Henry V. 
Greer, Mrs. J. W. 
Gregory, Miss Agnes 
Grenier, Mrs. William 
Grew, Mrs. Edward 
Grew, Mr. John 
Grey, Dr. Anna B. 
Griffing, Mrs. Edward J. 
Griggs, Mrs. Clifford 
Gi'imshaw, Mrs. Eric W. 
Gross, Mrs. Robert H. 
Grote, Miss Anna E. 
Grozier, Mrs. Richard 
Gruener, Mrs. Edward O. 
Gruener, Mrs. Leopold 
Gryzmish, Mrs. M. C. 
Guest, Mrs. Amy 
Guild, Mrs. Edward M. 
Guilden, Mr. Ira 
Guptill, Mrs. Leon C. 
Gutheim, Mr. Herman E. 

Hadley, Mr. George H. 

Hadley, Mrs. May L. 

Haertlein, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 

Haffenreffer, Mrs. Theodore C. 

Haigh, Mrs. James R. 

Hale, Mrs. Albert 

Hale, Mrs. Charles A. 

Hale. Miss Ellen 

Hale, Miss Emily 

Hale, Mr. Henry 

Hale, Mrs. Richard K. 

Hall, Miss Anna 

Hall, Miss Constance H. 

Hall, Mrs. Gardner W. 

Hall, Mrs. George P. 

Hall, Miss Grisella C. 

Hall, Mrs. Henry L. 

Hall, Mrs. Herbert J. 

Hall, Mr. John H. 

HaU, Mr. and Mrs. John M. 

Hall, Mrs. Joseph L. 

Hall, Miss Margaret 

Hall, Miss Minna B. 

Hall, Mr. Samuel Prescott 

Hall, Mrs. William L. 

Haller, Mr. Julius F. 

Hallowell, Miss Emily 

Hallowell, Mr. James Mott 

Hallowell, Mr. John W. 

Hallowell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. 

Halsey, Mrs. Fuller 

Hamann, Mr. Edmund H. 

Hamilton, Mrs. Burton E. 

Hamilton, Mrs. Edward P. 

Hamlen, Mrs. R. Gushing 

Hamlin, Mrs. B. Nason 

Hamlin, Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. 

Hammond, Miss Elizabeth M. 

Hanks. Mr. G. R. 



Hannauer, Mrs. George 
Hansen, Mrs. Alvin H. 
Hanson, Mr. Charles L. 
Hanson, Mrs. Laurence E. 
Hardesty, Miss Letitia P. 
Harden, Mrs. J. Bradford 
Hardy, Mrs. George E. 
Harlow, Miss Thelma R. 
Harman, Mr. O. S. 
Harney, Thomas F. & Sons 
Harold, Mr. Raymond P. 
Harper, Miss Jean 
Harrington, Dr. Francis A. 
Harrington, H. L., Esq. 
Harris, Mrs. Edward 
Harris, Rev. John U. 
Harrison, Mrs. J. H. 
Hart, Mrs. Elsa R. 
Hart, Mrs. Ivan 
Hartshome, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harty, Miss Irene H. 
Harvard Combined Charities 
Harvey, Mr. Elbert A. 
Harvey, Mr. Frederic S. 
Harvey, Mrs. Lashley G. 
Harvey, Mrs. John L. 
Harvey, Mrs. Winthrop A. 
Harwood, Mr. Bartlett 
Harwood, Mrs. Herbert E. 
Hascall, Mrs. Henrietta 
Haseltine, Miss Caroline M. 
Haskell, Mr. Edward A. 
Haskell, Miss Eleanor S. 
Hastingrs, Mrs. Merrill G. 
Hastings, Mr. and Mrs. T. M., Jr. 
Hastings, Mr. William B. 
Hatch, Mrs. Arthur W. 
Hatch, Mrs. Frederick S. 
Hatch, Mr. Pascal E. 
Hathaway, Mrs. Edgar F. 
Hatheway, Mrs. Conrad P. 
Hathon, Mr. William Irving 
Hauptmann, Mrs. Selma 
Haven, Mrs. Harry N. 
Hawes, Mrs. Caroline G. 
Hawes, Mrs. Frederic B. 
Hawes, Miss Mary C. 
Hawkins, Mr. Charles S. 
Hawkridge, Mr. Clayton F. 
Hawley, Mrs. George 
Hayden, Mrs. Harold B. 
Hayden, Miss Ruth D. 
Haydock, Mr. Robert 
Hayes, Miss Margaret E. 
Haynes, Miss Emily M. 
Haynes-Smith, Mrs. William 
Hayward, Mr. Raymond V. 
Hazelton, Miss Helen F. 
Hazen, Miss Charlotte 
Hazen, Mrs. Harold L. 
Heald, Miss Gertrude 
Heater, Mr. George L. 
Hedblom, Mrs. Carl A. 
Hedges, Mrs. Ira M. 
Hedstrom, Mr. Oscar G. 
Heller, Mrs. Myron 
Hemenway, Mrs. Harriet 
Hemphill, Mrs. Harry H. 
Hemphill, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. 
Henderson, Mr. George B. 
Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. K. A. 
Henderson, Mrs. R. G. 
Hendricks, Miss Helen R. 
Herr, Mrs. Secor 
Hersee, Mr. David E. 
Hersey, Miss Ada H. 
Heywood, Mr. Chester D. 
Hiatt, Miss PhyUis M. 
Hickey, Mr. Charles H. 
Hicks, Mrs. Christina C. 



76 



Hicks, Mrs. Lewis W. 

Higgins, Mrs. Aldus C. 

Higgins, Dr. Francis H. 

Higgins, Mr. Richard R. 

Higginson, Mr. Francis L. 

Highland Contracting Company 

Hildebrant, Miss Beulah S. 

Hill, Mrs. Charles J. 

Hill, Miss Grace M. 

Hill, Mr. and Mrs. John W. 

Hill, Miss Marion 

Hill, Miss Virginia 

Hiller, Misses Edna and Emily 

Hilles, Mrs. William S. 

Hilier, Mr. John A. 

Hinchman, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. 

Hinds, Mrs. E. Sturgis 

Hinds, Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. 

Hinkle, Mrs. Charles A. 

Hinman, Mr. George W. 

Hinton, Mrs. Edgar 

Hird, Mrs. F. H. 

Hirtzel, Mr. George L. 

Hoag, Mrs. Charles R. 

Hoagland, Mrs. Mary L. 

Hobbs. Mr. Walter L. 

Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. John C. 

Hodges, Miss Maud 

Hodgkins, Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel G. 

Hodgson, Mrs. Robert R. 

Hoeber, Mr. Eugene H. 

Hogsett, Mr. Robert A. 

Holbrook, Mrs. Donald 

Holbrook, Mr. Pinckney 

Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H. 

Holden, Mr. Charles R. 

Holland, Mrs. H. Brian 

Holmes, Mrs. Edward J. 

Holmes, Mr. Stewart W. 

Holt, Mr. and Mi-s. Harold W. 

Holt, Mr. John West 

Holzer, Mr. Albert 

Homans, Mr. William P. 

Homsey, Mr. Anton E. 

Hood, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert H., Jr. 

Hooper, Mrs. James R. 

Hoover, Mrs. Henry B. 

Hopewell, Mrs. Charles F. 

Hopewell, Mrs. Frederick C. 

Hopkins, Mr. A. Lawrence 

Hopkins, Dr. Ernest M. 

Hopkins, Dr. and Mrs. John R. 

Hopkinson, Mr. Charles 

Hopper, Mr. Henry S. 

Horner, Mrs. Frederic W. 

Horton, Miss Barbara 

Hosmer, Mr. Calvin 

Hosmer, Miss Jennie C. 

Houghton, Mrs. Frank A. 

Houghton, Mrs. Frederick O. 

Houghton, Dr. and Mrs. John D. 

Houghton, Miss Mabel E. 

Houghton, Mrs. William M. 

Houser, Mr. George C. 

Hovey, Mrs. H. W. 

Howard, Mrs. Paul H. 

Howard, Mrs. William G. 

Howard, Mrs. William H. 

Howe, Mrs. C. Warren 

Howe, Mr. Frederic W., Jr. 

Howe, Mr. Henry S. 

Howe, Mr. James C. 

Howe, Mr. Roland D. 

Howell, Mrs. Mary 

Hower, Mrs. Ralph M. 

Howes, Mrs. Kenneth 

Rowland, Mrs. Frank C. 

Howland, Mrs. Llewellyn 

Rowland, Mrs. William D. 

Hoyt, Mrs. Frank M. 



Hoyt, Mr. Russell B. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W. HI 
Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 
Hubbard, Mr. Paul M. 
Hubbard, Mr. Samuel Church 
Hubbell, Mr. DeWltt 
Huckins, Mrs. E. W. 
Huckins, Mrs. Stuart 
Hughes, Mrs. H. Maurice 
Hughes, Mrs. L. F. 
Hirginn, Mrs. Eugene J. V. 
Humphreys, Mr. Walter 
Hunnewell, Mr. Francis Welles 
Hunnewell, Miss Jane D. 
Hunnewell, Miss Louisa 
Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick V. 
Hunt, Mrs. R. B. 
Hunter, Mrs. Francis T. 
Huntress, Mrs. Herbert C. 
Hurd, Mrs. G. Newell 
Hurlbut, Mrs. B. S. 
Hurley, Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Hurlock, Mrs. Horace T. 
Hurley, Dr. William R. 
Husband, Mrs. Richard J. 
Hustis, Mr. J. H., Jr. 
Hutchings, Mrs. J. Henry 
Hutchins, Mr. John G. B. 
Hutchinson, Miss Alice 
Hutchinson, Miss Helen S. 
Hutchinson, Mrs. James A. 
Hutton, Mrs. George 
Hutton, Mrs. Norman 
Hyland, Mr. George C. 
Hyman, Mr. Abe 
Hyneman, Mrs. Louis 
Hynes, Mr. James J. 

lasigi. Miss Mary V. 

Illingworth, Dr. Robert S. 

Illsley, Mrs. John P. 

Imper, Mrs. Robert O. 

Ingalls, Mr. Frederic C. 

Ingraham, Mrs. Edward 

Inman, Miss Marjorie 

Isaacs, Mrs. Nathan 

Italian-American Social Club of Watertown 

Jack, Mrs. Edwin E. 

Jackson, Mrs. Alton B. 

Jackson, Miss Annie H. 

Jackson, Mrs. Delbert L. 

Jackson, Miss Ethel I. 

Jackson, Mrs. Henry A. 

Jackson, Miss Mary Lee 

Jandron, Mr. Francis L. 

Jaques, Mrs. Francis 

Jeffares, Mrs. J. N. 

Jelal, Mr. Jacob 

Jenks, Mr. James L., Jr. 

Jenney, Mrs. A. S. 

Jeppson, Mrs. Armstrong 

Jeppson, Mrs. George N. 

Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Pliny, Jr. 

Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore E. 

Johmann, Miss Elizabeth 

Johnson, Mr. Arthur W. 

Johnson, Mr. Edwin C. 

Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin G. 

Johnson, Miss Emily 

Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Harold H. 

Johnson, Mrs. Harold P. 

Johnson, Miss Helen S. 

Johnson, Mr. J. A. 

Johnson, Mrs. John H. 

Johnson, Mrs. Otis S. 

Johnson, Mrs. Peer P. 

Johnson, Mr. Victor J. 

Jolles, Mrs. Burton 

Jones, Mr. Chandler W, 



77 



Jones. Mr. Cyril H. 

Jones, Mr. Cheney C. 

Jones, Mrs. Daniel Fiske 

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Durham 

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer B. 

Jones, Mr. Howard V. 

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. James N. 

Jones, Mr. Lawrence L. 

Jones, Miss Marjorie 

Jones, Mrs. Paul 

Jones, Mr. WiUiam E. 

Jorey, Miss Alma H. 

Joslin, Dr. and Mrs. Elliott P. 

Joslin, Miss Mary R. 

Jouett, Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. 

Joy, The Misses , t^ i- r^^ v. 

Junior League of the Women s Italian Hub 

Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. Albert S. 

Kaplan, Mrs. Bernard 

Kaufman, Mr. Nathan 

Kaufmann, Mrs. Carl F. 

Kavanagh, Mr. E. S. 

Kaye, Mrs. A. I. 

Kaye, Mr. Sidney Leon 

Kazanjian, Dr. and Mrs. V. H. 

Kee, Miss Olive A. 

Keene, Mrs. Paul M. 

Keese, Miss Ethel M. 

Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. Stillman F., 2d 

Kellogg, Mrs. Frederic B. 

Kellogg, Miss Julia R. 

Kelly, Mrs. Shaun 

Keltie, Mr. Ralph J. 

Kendall, Boiler and Tank Co. 

Kendall, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. 

Kennedy, Mrs. F. L. 

Kennedy, Mr. James B. 

Kennedy, Mrs. J. J. 

Kennedy, Mr. and Mrs. Sargent 

Kent, Mrs. Ira R. 

Kerr-Blackmer, Mrs. H. 

Kessler, Mrs. Marvin 

Kevill, General WiUiam J. 

Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred V. 

Kidder, Mrs. H. S. 

Kienbusch, Mr. C. C. 

Kilburn, Mrs. Warren S. 

Kimball, Mrs. Frank W. 

Kimball, Mrs. Frederic Paige 

Kimball, Miss Hannah M. 

Kimball, Mr. Morton S. 

Kimball, Mr. Paul 

Kimball, Miss Winifred R. 

Kimbell, Mr. Arthur W. 

King, Mrs. Frederic L. 

King, Dr. Merrill J. 

King, Mrs. William F. 

Kingsley, Mrs. Robert C. 

Kinnicutt, Mrs. Roger 

Kitchin, Mrs. Donald W. 

Kitchin, Miss Eleanor 

Kitching, Miss Belle M. 

Kittredge, Mrs. George L. 

Kittredge, Miss Mabel Hyde 

Klapot, Mr. Abraham 

Klotz, Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. 

Knapp, Mrs. S. V. 

Knauth, Mrs. Felix W. 

Knight, Mrs. Frank H. 

Knight, Mrs. Frederick H. 

Knight, Rev. Walter D. 

Knott, Miss Agnes G. 

Knowlton, Mrs. Harold W. 

Koon, Mrs. Ray M. 

Kopelman, Mr. Bernard 
Kopelman, Mr. George 
Kress, Samuel H., Foundation 
Kroto, Mr. Hans J. 

Kuell, Mrs. David H. F., Jr. 



Kuhns, Dr. John G. 
Kummer, Miss Lucy 

Lacy, Mr. Clive W. 

Ladies Benevolent Society 

Lamb, Miss Carrie F. 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond 

Lancaster, Mrs. Southworth 

Landay, Mr. Martin M. 

Landis, Mr. Harold B. 

Lane, Mr. Arthur W. 

Lane, Mrs. C. Guy 

Lane, Miss Doris C. 

Lane, Mrs. J. Phillip 

Lane, Mrs. Robert 

Lang, Mrs. Howard W. 

Lang, Miss Margaret R. 

Lan^mann, Mrs. Alfred G. 

Larkin, Mrs. Frank 

Laufer, Dr. Maurice W. 

Law, Mrs. James McCowan 

Lawrence, Mrs. Harry V. 

Lawrence, Mrs. James, Jr. 

Lawton, Miss Alice M. 

Learned, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund P. 

Learned, Mrs. George A. 

Leavitt, Dr. Peirce H. 

Leavitt, Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. 

Leeson, Mrs. Robert A. 

Lehmann, Mrs. J. S. 

Leland, Mrs. Charles F. 

Leland, Mrs. George A., Jr. 

Lenk, Mrs. Walter E. 

Leonard, Mrs. C. J. 

Leslie, Mrs. J. Saybolt 

Levi, Mrs. Harry 

Levine, Dr. and Mrs. Reevan I. 

Leviseur, Mrs. Frederick J. 

Lewis, Mrs. B. H. 

Lewis, Miss Carolyn M. 

Lewis, Mr. Clarence I. 

Lev/is, Mr. Ellsworth H. 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Frederic T. 

Lewis, Mrs. George 

Lewis, Miss Lillian K. 

Lewis, Miss Marion C. 

Libby, Mr. and Mrs. George A. 

Lieber, Miss Mary 

Lienau, Mr. George L. 

Lilienfeld, Mrs. Antonie 

Lincoln, Mrs. Daniel W. 

Lincoln, Mrs. George C. 

Lincoln, Mr. George L. 

Linden, Mr. Milton 

Lindsay, Mrs. H. B. 

Linn, Mrs. Cohnan 

Litchfield, Mr. Everett S. 

Litchfield, Mr. Joshua Q. 

Little, Mr. and Mrs. David B. 

Little, Mr. Henry B. 

Little, Miss Marion O. 

Littlefield, Miss Ida B. 

Livermore, Mrs. Homer F. 

Livingstone, Mrs. Charles S. 

Locke, Mrs. Arthur W. 

Locke, Mr. E. H. 

Lockerbie, Mrs. John 

Loder, Dr. Halsey B. 

Lodge, Mrs. Henry Cabot, Jr. 

Loeffler, Mrs. H. C. 

Logan, Mr. and Mrs. Waldo 

Lombard, Mrs. Percival H. 

London, Mrs. Jack 

Long, i/i.r. and Mrs. George W. 

Longacre, Mrs. Andrew 

Lord, Mrs. James B. 

Lord, Mrs. W. H. 

Loring, Mr. Augustus P., Jr. 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C. 

Lothrop, Mrs. Arthur E. 

78 



Lothrop, Mr. Warren C. 

Lovejoy, Mrs. Charles F. 

Lovejoy, Mrs. Frederick H. 

Lovejoy, Miss Helen D. 

Loveland, Mr. Winslow H. 

Lovely, Miss Kathleen M. 

Lovering, Mr. Richard S. 

Lovett, Miss Caroline 

Lovett, Miss Eleanor H. 

Low, Mrs. Seth F. 

Lowell, Mr. H. Parker 

Lowell, Mrs. James A. 

Lowell, Mr. Ralph 

Lowell, Mrs. W. Frank 

Lowell, Mrs. Walter E. 

Luce, Mrs. Dean S. 

Lundin, Mr. Edgar G. 

Lunn, Mr. John A. 

Lunt, Mrs. Daniel B. 

Lyman, Mrs. Arthur 

Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. 

Lyman, Mrs. Chc'-les P. 

Lyman, Mrs. George H. 

Lyman, Mrs. Harrison F. 

Lyman, Mrs. Herbert 

Lyman, Dr. and Mi-s. J. Robert 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T. 

Lyman, Mr. Theodore 

Lyon, Mrs. George A. 

Lyons, Mr. J. J. 

Lyons, Mr. Lawrence W. 

Lyons, Mrs. Thomas F. 

Lyttle, Mr. James A. 

McCarthy, Miss Barbara M. 
McClintock, Mrs. Maud P. 
McClure, Mrs. Jay C. 
McCreary, Mrs. Lewis S. 
McCreery, Mrs. Maxwell 
McGarry, Rt. Rev. John J. 
McGoodwin, Mrs. Henry 
McHugh, Mr. Edward J. 
McHugh, Mr. Thomas J. 
McHutchison, Mrs. J. M. 
Mclntire, Mr. AUyn B. 
McKibbin, Miss Emily W. 
McKnight, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 
McLean, Mrs. Bruce 
McLeod, Mrs. Archibald 
McLeod, Mrs. Robert C. 
McMasters, Miss Caroline E. 
McNair, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm P. 
McPheeters, Mrs. Thomas S. 
MacDonald, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. 
Mack, Miss Rebecca 
MacKay, Mr. Daniel A. 
MacKenzie, Miss Cora E. 
Mackenzie, Mrs. Kenneth R. 
Mackin, Mrs. Harry I. 
Mackinney, Mrs. P. R. 
Macomber, Mrs. H. Kirke 
MacPhail, Mrs. Robert B. 
MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore I. 
Madden, Mr. M. Lester 
Maddocks, Mr. John A. 
Magann, Mr. Frank P. 
Mager, Mr. F. Robert 
Mager, Mr. Georges 
Maginnis, Mr. Charles D. 
Magoon, Mr. Kenneth S. 
Magoun, Mr. Roger 
Mailman, Mr. Guy W. 
Main, Mrs. Charles R. 
Malcolm, Mr. William J. 
Mallary, Mr. R. DeWitt 
Malloch, Mrs. Walter Scott 
Maltzman, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Mandel, Mrs. Richard H. 
Mann, Mrs. Leo 
Mansfield, Mrs. Hubbard B. 



Margolis, Mr. Joseph B. 

MarkeU, Mr. William H. 

Marsh, Mrs. Jasper 

Marshall, Miss Bessie C. 

Marshall, Mrs. Edwin R. 

Marshall, Mrs. Thomas W., Jr. 

Marston, Mr. Walter M. 

Martin, Mr. Walter L. 

Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. 

Mason, Mrs. Austin B. 

Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse H. 

Mason, Mrs. Louis B. 

Mass. Dept. of Daughters of Union 

Veterans of Civil War 
Masson, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. 
Mather, Mr. Philip R. 
Maurer, Mrs. Jessica Keating 
Maurice, Miss Ellen P. 
Maury, Mrs. H. L. 
May, Miss Edith 
May, Miss Louise C. 
May, Mrs. Marcus B. 
May, Mr. William F. 
Maynard, Mrs. George S. 
Maynard, Mr. Robert W. 
Maynard, Mrs. Zora Y. 
Mazyck, Miss Margaret K. 
Mead, Mrs. Francis V. 
Means, Mrs. Paul H. 
Meder, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. 
Melcher, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. 
Melcher, Miss Edith 
Meltzer, Miss Dorothy 
Merian, Mrs. Alfred W. 
Merriam, Mrs. Robert C. 
Merriam, Miss Teresa L. 
Merrick, Mrs. J. Vaughan, 3d 
Merrill, Mrs. E. D. 
Merrill, Mr. and Mrs. John I. 
Merrill, Mrs. Keith 
Merrill, Mrs. Sherburn M. 
Merritt, Miss Mildred A. 
Merry, Mr. Robert W. 
Messenger, Mrs. George A. 
Metcalf, Mrs. Robert B. 
Metcalfe, Mrs. G. W. 
Michie, Mrs. H. Stuart 
Midgley, Mr. Malcolm C. 
MiUer, Mr. Bartlett T. 
Miller, Dr. Carroll C. 
Miller, Mrs. Emily 
Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. E. 
Miller, Mrs. Tinkham 
MiUis, Mr. H. A. 
Mills, Mrs. Charles F. 
Miner, Dr. Leroy M. S. 
Miner, Dr. Richard L. 
Minor, Mr. John D. 
Minot, Mrs. Henry D. 
Minot, Mr. James J. 
Mintz, Dr. Samuel C. 
Mitchell, Mr. Ellwyn A. 
Mitchell. Dr. H. S. 
Mitchell, Miss Lilian 
Mixter, Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. 
Mixter, Mrs. William Jason 
Moffitt, Mr. J. K. 
Mohr, Mr. Frank J. 
Moir, Mr. John A. 
Molder, Mrs. Joseph 0. 
Molter, Mr. Harold 
Monday Club (The) 
Monks, Rev. G. Gardner 
Monks, Dr. and Mrs. John Peabody 
Monroe, Mr. Arthur E. 
Montague, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace T. 
Montgomery, Mr. Spencer B. 
Moody, Miss Julia E. 
Moon, Mr. Parry 
Moore, Mrs. Albert H. 



79 



Moore, Mr. Car! F. 

Moore, Mrs. Edward C. 

Moore, Mrs. Elaine 

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence B. 

Mordecai, Mrs. Leonard 

Moreland, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Morgan, Prof. Edmund M. 

Morgan, Mrs. Vincent 

Morgan, Mr. an Mrs. Weld 

Morison, Dr. Samuel E. 

Morningstar, Mr. Otto 

Morrill, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde G. 

Morris, Mr. Arthur 

Morris, Mrs. Edward W. 

Morris, Miss H. Pearl 

Morrissey, Mr. J. R. 

Morse, Mrs. Arthur H. 

Morse, Miss Charlotte G. S. 

Morse, Mrs. James F. 

Morse, Miss Jessie Gwendolen 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. John G. 

Morss, Mr. Noel 

Morss, Mr. Philip 

Morton, Mr. Stanley 

Morton, Mrs. William A. 

Moseley, Mrs. Nicholas 

Moses, Mr. John C. 

Mosher, Mrs. Harris P. 

Motherwell, Mr. J. W. 

Motley, Mr. Warren 

Mountz, Mrs. James T. 

Mudge, Mrs. Arthur W. 

MuUer, Dr. GuUi Lindh 

Mulligan, Miss Mary S. 

Mullin, Mr. M. J. 

Murray Printing Co., The 

Murray, Miss Frances C. 

Murray, Mr. T. Frank 

Murray, Mrs. W. A., Jr. 

Myers, Mrs. Charles H. 

Myrick, Dr. Hannah F. 

Nash, Miss Carolyn R. 
Nathan, Mr. Joseph B. 
Needham, Mrs. R. T. 
Neiley, Mr. Geoffrey C. 
Neilson, Mrs. W. LaCoste 
Neill, Miss Ruth 
Nelson, Dr. and Mrs. N. A. 
Newcomb, Mrs. Charles W. 
Newell, Mr. Clifford E. 
Newell, Mrs. James M. 
Newell, Mrs. John Louis 
Newell, Mrs. Lyman C. 
Newell, Mrs. Wendell B. 
New Englanc" Baptist Hospital 

Alumnae ' ociation 
Newman, M Minette D. 
Newman, Mr Samuel J. 
Newsome, Mi ""aul A. 
Neyhart, Mr. nah 
Nichols, Mrs. thur A. 
Nichols, Mr. , . chur B. 
Nichols, Mrs. Austin P. 
Nichols, Mr. Henry Oilman, Jr. 
Nichols, Mrs. Hollis P. 
Nichols, Mrs. John R. 
Nickerson, Mrs. Clarence B. 
Niehuhr, Mr. Arthur 
Nield, Miss R. Louise 
Niles, Mr. Harold L. 
Niles, Miss Marion H. 
Noble, Mr. Leon H. 
Noble, Mr. and Mrs. M. Arthur 
Nock, Prof. Arthur D. 
Nock, Mrs. Rupert A. 
Noden, Mr. Elmer A. 
Noonan, Mr. Walter J. 
Norcross, Mrs. William W. 
Norris, Dr. Rolf C. 



Norris, Miss Ruth E. 

North Street Union Congregational Church 

School of Medford 
Norton, Mrs. D. C. 
Norton, Miss Elizabeth Gaskell 
Norwich, Mr. Samuel 
Norwood Baptist Sunday School 
Nourse, Miss Annie E. 
Nowell, Mr. James 
Noyes, Mra. Harry K. 
Noyes, Mrs. Waldo 
Nutter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. 
Nutter, Mr. William S. 
Nye, Mrs. H. Willis 

Oakes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. 
Obear, Mr. William W. 
Oestmann, Miss Martha 
Ogden, Mrs. Hugh W. 
O'Keeffe, Mr. Adrian P. 
O'Keeffe, Mr. Lionel H. 
Oldenberg, Mr. Otto 
Oleson, Mr. Thomas R. 
Oliver, Miss Susan L. 
Olmstead, Mrs. John C. 
Olsen, Mrs. Niels M. 
Onderdonk, Mrs. Albert P. 
Onwood, Mrs. Jane R. 
Orcutt, Mrs. William Dana 
Osborn, Mrs. Francis B. 
Osborne, Mr. Charles D, 
Osborne, Mrs. Gordon 
Osgood, Mrs. Edward H. 
Osgood, Mrs. Herman A. 
Ott, Mrs. Richard M. 
Owen, Mrs. Carlton W. 
Owen, Rev. George W. 

Packard, Dr. Fabyan 

Packard, Mrs. George A. 

Paddison, Mrs. Louis F. 

Page, Mrs. Frederick H. 

Paine, Miss Alice 

Paine, Rev. George L. 

Paine, Mrs. James L. 

Paine, Mr. John A. 

Paine, Mr. John H. 

Paine, Mrs. Richard C. 

Paine, Mr. Robert T. 

Paine, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 

Paine, Mrs. William D. 

Palmer, Mrs. Constance 

Palmer, Mrs. Franklin H. 

Palmer, Dr. Mary 

Palmer, Mrs. William I. 

Parker, Mrs. Cortlandt 

Parker, Mr. Francis Tuckerman 

Parker, Rev. G. L. 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Reginald S. 

Parker, Mrs. Robert B. 

Parmelee, Miss Mary J. 

Parsons, Mrs. Ernst M. 

Patten, Mr. William N. 

Patterson, Mrs. Robert P. 

Patton, Mrs. James E. 

Paull, Miss Mary 

Pavlo, Dr. Samuel G. 

Payne, Mrs. B. B. 

Payne, Mrs. Oliver H. 

Payson, Mrs. Samuel C. 

Peabody, Miss Amelia 

Peabody, Miss Elizabeth R. 

Peabody, Mr. Harold 

Peabody, Miss Margery 

Pearse, Miss Alice W. 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 

Peirce, Miss Charlotte 

Peirce, Mr. Herbert R., Jr. 

Peirce, Mr. J. Gilbert 

Penfield, Miss Annie S. 



80 



Pepin, Mr. Rodolphe E. 

i-epper, Mrs. Benjamin W. 

Pereira, Mrs. Felix 

Perkins, Miss Charlotte 

Perkins, Mr. Edward N. 

Perrin, Mrs. Badger 

Perrine, Mr. and Mrs. Lester 

Perry, Mrs. Carroll 

Perry, Mrs. Gardner B. 

Perry, Mrs. Newell A. 

Peters, Mrs. Andrew J. 

Peterson, Miss Helga E. 

Petitmermet, Mr. and Mrs. Jules P. 

Pettingell, Mrs. J. M. 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. 

Phemister, Miss Grace 

Phillips, Mr. A. V. 

Phillips, Mr. Asa E., Jr. 

Phillips, Miss Fanny H. 

Phillips, Mrs. Marie C. 

Phillips, Mr. James D. 

Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 

Pier, Dr. Arthur S., Jr. 

Pierce, Mrs. Andrew D. 

Pierce, Mrs. C. Eaton 

Pierce, Mr. Edward F. 

Pierce, Miss Ellen E. 

Pierce, Mr. Lincoln W. 

Pieri, Mr. Albert 

Pillsbury, Miss Mary M. 

Pinkos, Mrs. Louis 

Pinto, Mr. Edgar B. 

Piper, Mrs. Charles B. 

Pisart, Madame F. 

Pitman, Mrs. Harold 

Plimpton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. 

Plimpton, Mrs. George F. 

Pokross, Mrs. David R. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Katherine H. 
Pond, Mr. Bremer W. 
Ponier, Mrs. Paul D. 
Poor, Mrs. Alice F. 
Pope, Mrs. Arthur K. 

Pope, Mrs. Frank J. 

Pope, Miss Isabel 

Porter, Mr. Alex 

Porter, Mrs. Clinton J. 

Porter, Mr. Harold 

Porter, Mr. Henry W. 

Porter, Mr. John 

Porter, Mrs. John F. 

Porter, Mrs. Laura H. 

Post, Mr. and Mrs. John R. 

Potter, Miss Louise M. 

Powell, Miss Anna L. 

Powell, Mr. and Mrs- E. Burnley 

Powers, Mrs. George H. 

Powers, Mr. Percy E. 

Pratt, Dr. Joseph H. 

Pratt, Mrs. L. Mortimer, Jr. 

Prescott, Miss Isabel 

Prescott, Mr. Samuel C. 

Price, Mr. George R. 

Prince, Mrs. Arthur D. 

Pritzker, Mrs. Bernard H. 

Proctor, Mrs. Charles A. 

Proctor, Miss Cora R. 

Prout, Mrs. Henry B. 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. 

Pruett, Mrs. Harry J. 

Public Relations Division 

Pulsifer, Miss Mary G. 

Punderson, Miss Mary L. 

Purdy, Mr. C. Phillips 

Purdy, Mr. and Mrs. Orville N. 

Purves, Mrs. John C. 

Putnam, Dr. Marian C. 

Quick, Mrs. C. Herbert 
Quincy Women's Club Juniors 



Quinn, Mrs. Helen J. 

Rackeman, Miss Elizabeth 

Rafton, Mr. and Mrs. Harold H. 

Ramseyer, Mrs. C. Theodore 

Rand, Mrs. Edward K. 

Randall, Mrs. Denton W. 

Rasely, Mr. H. N. 

Ratchford, Mr. William S. 

Rath, Mrs. Anna C. 

Ratshesky, Mrs. Theresa S. 

Raytheon Employees' Credit Union 

Ready, Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam A. 

Redfield, Mrs. Alfred C. 

Rees, Mrs. H. Maynard 

Reeves, Mr. James F. 

Regan, Dr. and Mrs. James J. 

Reinauer, Dr. Anna 

ReiUy, Miss Mary E. 

Revere, Miss Anna P. 

Rhodes, Mrs. D. P. 

Rice, Mr. Charles 

Rice, Mr. Frederick E. 

Rice, Mr. Harry L. 

Rice, Mrs. Victor A. 

Rice, Mr. William H. 

Rich, Mrs. Chester F. 

Richards, Miss Anne 

Richards, Mr. John 

Richards, Miss Rosalind 

Richards, Mr. Tudor 

Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. 

Richardson, Mi-s. George W. 

Richardson, Mrs. John, Jr, 

Richmond, Mr. H. B. 

Richmond, Mrs. Ralph S. 

Ridley, Mrs. Horace S. 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise 

Rimmer, Mrs. Charles P. 

Ripley, Mrs. E. Rhodes 

Ripley, Mrs. Harold W. 

Ritchie, Mr. and Mrs. James H. 

Ritchie, Miss Marion A. 

Ritchie, Mrs. William 

Rityo, Dr. and Mrs. Max 

Roback, Dr. Abraham A. 

Robb, Mrs. Russell, Sr. 

Robbins, Miss M. Ehzabeth 

Robbins, Mrs. Reginald L. 

Robbins, Mr. Robert M. 

Robert, Mrs. Urbain 

Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence A. 

Roberts, Miss Lula 

Robertson, Mrs. Kenneth D. 

Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight P., Jr. 

Robinson, Prof. F. N. 

Robinson, Mr. Harold L. 

Robison, Mrs. Rulon Y. 

Robson. Miss Alice 

Rockwell, Mr. George H. 

Rodgers, Miss Elsie G. 

Roe, Miss Mary T. 

Rogers, Miss Anna K. , ., 

Rogers, Miss Bertha F. 

Rogers, Mr. Dudley P. 

Rogers, Mrs. Ellery W. 

Rogers, Mrs. Horatio 

Rogers, Mr. William B. 

Rollins, Mr. and Mrs. Fiske 

Ropes, Miss Alice 

Rood, Mrs. Stanley H. 

Roof, Miss Antoinette 

Rose, Mrs. William H. 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Edward 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Louis 

Ross, Mrs. Edgar W. 

Ross, Mrs. F. G. 

Ross, Mrs. G. A. Johnston 

Ross, Mrs. Ralph A. 

Rotch, Miss Edith E. 



81 



Rowland, Mrs. George R. 
Rowley, Dr. Francis H. 
Rowley, Mr. and Mrs. H. Esmond 
Rowley, Mrs. Leonard W. 
Roy, Mr. James Charles 
Royal, Mrs. Ellery E. 
Rudkin, Mrs. Thomas 
Rueter, Mrs. Ernest 
Rugg, Miss Gertrude R. 
Ruggles, Mr. Carlas, Jr. 
Russell, Mr. Charles T. 
Russell, Miss Hilda F. 
Russell, Mr. Harlow 

Sabine, Mr. Charles W. 

Sabine, Mrs. Stephen W. 

Sachs, Mrs. Paul J. 

Sacker, Miss Amy M. 

Sala, Senorita Rosa 

Sallner, Mrs. Theo 

Salinger, Mr. Edgar 

Saltonstall, Mr. Richard 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert 

Sameth, Miss Elsa 

Sammet, Mr. and Mrs. G. Victor 

Sampson, Mrs. Mary M. 

Sampson, Mrs. Evelyn M. 

Sanborn, Mrs. Ashton 

Sanders, Mrs. H. H. 

Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart 

Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. 

Sang, Mrs. Sara A. 

Sargent, Mrs. G. Amory 

Sargent, Mr. George L. 

Sargent, Mrs. Gooch 

Sargent, Mrs. John 

Sargent, Mrs. Sullivan A., Jr. 

Sarton, Dr. George 

Savage, Mr. Ernest L. 

Savery, Mrs. Mary G. 

Sawin, Mr. William M. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Ella Adams 

Saxe, Charitable Foundation 

Saylra, Mrs. Robert W. 

Sayward, Mrs. Mary P. 

Schaefer, Mrs. J. J. 

Schenck, Mrs. Garret, Jr. 

Schneider, Miss Elizabeth 

Schraflft, Mr. W. E. 

Schroader, Miss Anna A. 

Schroeder, Mrs. L. 

Schumacher, Miss Lillie L. 

Schwartzman, Mr. Isadore C. 

Schweinfurth, Mr. Charles 

Scott. Mrs. Hugh D. 

Scudder, Miss Maude C. 

Seamans, Mrs. Robert C, Jr. 

Sears, Miss E. Elizabeth 

Sears, Miss Edith H. 

Sears, Miss Evelyn 

Sears, Miss Mary 

Sears, Miss May 

Sears, Mr. Seth 

Seaver, Mrs. Albert H. 

Seaver, Mr. Henry Latimer 

Seaver, Miss Minnie S. 

Seavey, Prof. Warren A. 

Sebastian, Mr. W. 

Seder, Mrs. Joseph S. 

Sedgwick, Mr. Henry D. 

Seltzer, Mrs. John S. 

Selverstone, Dr. and Mrs. Bertram 

SewaU, Mrs. Rufus L. 

Sewell, Mrs. John 

Shapiro, Mr. Maxwell 

Sharenson, Dr. and Mrs. Reuben 

Shattuck, Mrs. E. J. 

Shattuck, Mr. Henry L. 

Shattuck, Mr. and Mrs. Mayo A. 

Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A. 



Shaw, Miss Florence M. 

Shaw, Mr. Harold B. 

Shaw, Mrs. Henry S. 

Shaw, Mrs. Hollis H. 

Shaw, Mr. Robert H. 

Shaw, Mrs. Sohier 

Shaw, Mrs. Walter K., Jr. 

Shea, Mrs. Charles A. 

Shepard, Mrs. Daniel L. 

Shepard, Miss Emily B. 

Shepard, Mr. Frank R. 

Shepard, Mrs. Robert F. 

Shepard, Mr. Thomas H. 

Sherman, Mrs. Allan W. 

Sherman, Miss Rose 

Sherwood, Prof. Thomas K. 

Shields, Mrs. M. Lav/rence 

ShiUito, Mr. and Mrs. John 

Shreve, Mr. Benjamin D. 

Shulze, Mr. Emil J. C. 

Shuman, Mrs. Harry B. 

Shumway, Mrs. Waldo 

Shurcliff, Mr. Arthur A. 

Sias, Miss Martha G. 

Sibley, Miss Emily 

Sibley, Mr. Wayne 

Sigourney, Mrs. Henry L. 

Sims, Mrs. William S. 

Slicer, Miss Henrietta W. 

Slichter, Prof, and Mrs. Sumner H. 

Slotnick, Mrs. Julia I. 

Small, Mrs. David M. 

Small, Mrs. S. G. 

Small, Mr. Walter C. 

Smart, Mrs. Raymond A. 

Smelofski, Mrs. John 

Smith, Miss Alice H. 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. 

Smith, Mrs. Caroline Phillips 

Smith, Mrs. Carleton T. 

Smith, Mr. Charles L. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles P. 

Smith, Mr. Cobuim 

Smith, Mrs. Curtis Nye 

Smith, Mrs. Daniel C. 

Smith, Mr. Donald B. 

Smith, Mrs. Donald W. 

Smith, Mr. Francis D. 

Smith, Dr. George Van S. 

Smith, Miss Harriet Burns 

Smith, Mrs. J. Arehy 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Julian J. 

Smith, Mr. Justin E. 

Smith. Mrs. Orvil W. 

Smith, Mrs. Richard Ilsley 

Smith, Mr. Stuart L. 

Smith, Mrs. Sumner 

Smyth, Mrs. Herbert Weir 

Sooy, Mrs. Curtis 

Soper, Mrs. Willard B. 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H. 

Soule, Mrs. Leslie 

Spark, Mrs. Dale M. 

Spector, Mr. Robert 

Spelman, Mrs. Henry M. 

Spiller, Mr. Wilfred A. 

Spink, Miss Ruth H. 

Spinoza. Mr. Benjamin 

Spitz, Miss Edna 

Spooner, Mns. Henry G. 

Spore, Mr. L. D. 

Sprague, Dr. Howard B. 

Sprague, Mrs. O. M. W. 

Squibb, Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. 

Stackpole, Mrs. Pierpont L. 

Standley, Miss Carolyn F. 

Stanley, Mrs. Arthur B. 

Steadman, Mr. Chester C. 

Stearly, Mrs. Wilson R. 

Stearns, Miss Elizabeth W. 



82 



Stebbins, Mrs. Roderick 

Stcdfast, Mrs. Albert R. 

Steele, Mrs. Avery W. 

Steele, Mr. and Mrs. F. R. C. 

Steele, Miss Katherine E. 

Steele, Miss Mabel A. E. 

Stegmaier, Mr. Henry L. 

Stein, Mrs. Emil 

Stenquist, Mrs. Warner 

Stephenson, Mrs. W. R. C. 

Sterling, Mrs. David 

Stevens, Mrs. Howell D. 

Stevens, Miss Julia W. 

Stevens, Miss Lena 

Stevens, Mrs. W. Leonard 

Stevens, Mr. Sidney 

Stevenson, Mrs. William N. 

Stewart, Mrs. Charles A., Jr. 

Stewart, Mr. Gilbert L. 

Stimson, Mrs. Philip M. 

Stockmer, Mr. and Mrs. George A. 

Stockwell, Mrs. William R. 

Stone, Mrs. Edward H. 

Stone, Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. 

Stone, Mrs. S. M. 

Stone, Mrs. William 

Storer, Miss Helen L. 

Stott, Mrs. Leroy W. 

Straus, Mr. David 

Strauss, Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand 

Strekalovsky, Mrs. Vcevold 

Strong, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 

Stuart, Miss Charlotte V. 

Stuart, Mrs. Melville N. 

Stuart, Mrs. Ralph E. 

Stuart, Mrs. W. H., Jr. 

Studley, Mrs. Robert L. 

Sturges, Mr. Allan H. 

Sturges, Mrs. Rush 

Sturgis, Miss Anita 

Sturgis, Mrs. Edwin A. 

Sturgis, Miss Lucy C. 

Sturgis, Miss Mabel 

Sturgis, Mr. S. Warren 

Suarez, Mrs. Philip 

Suder, Mrs. George B. 

Sullivan, R. C, Co. 

Summers, Mrs. Gaston 

Summers, Mr. Merle G. 

Sundberg, Mr. and Mrs. C. John 

Sundberg, Mr. Kermet 

Sunderland, Mr. Louis 

Sutton, Mrs. Harry E. 

Swan, Miss Ethel F. 

Swanson, Mrs. Arthur G. 

Swartz, Mr. Edward M. 

Sweigart, Miss Janet 

Swift, Mrs. Jesse G. 

Swinney, Miss Ruth 

Taber, Mrs. T. T. 
Talano, Mrs. Maria 
Talbot, Miss Mary Eloise 
Talmage, Mr. E. T. H. 
Tappan, Mr. Ernest S. 
Templeton, Mr. Irving R. 
Tenney, Mrs. Albert B. 
Terry, Mrs. Ruth K. 
Thacher, Mr. Thomas C. 
Thayer, Mrs. Charles M. 
Thayer, Mrs. Ernest L. 
Thayer, Mrs. Frank H. 
Thayer, Mr. and Mrs. James B. 
Thayer, Mrs. William G. 
Thomas, Mrs. Alfred 
Thomas, Mrs. F. N. 
Thomas, Mr. John G. W. 
Thomas, Miss Helen Goss 
Thomas, Miss Ruth E. 
Thompson, Miss Emily 



Thompson, Mrs. Everett E. 

Thompson, Miss Helen M. 

Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. James H. 

Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. 

Thompson, Mr. Wayne B. 

Thomson, Mrs. Elizabeth McA. 

Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus 

Thornton, Mrs. Olive F. 

Thoron, Mrs. Ward 

Thorp, Miss Alice A. 

Thurlow, Mrs. Randolph L. 

Thurston, Miss Gertrude A. 

Tierney, Mrs. John P. 

Tilden, Misses Alice F. and Edith S. 

Todd. Miss Ellen G. 

Tomb, Mrs. J. M. 

Torbert, Mrs. James R. 

Toulmin, Mrs. John E. 

Tower, Miss Florence E. 

Tower, Mr. and Mrs. Oswald 

Towne, Mr. Joseph M. 

Townsend, Miss Annie R. 

Townsend, Mr. W. Howard 

Tozzer, Mrs. Alfred M. 

Tracy, Mrs. E. M. 

Tracy, Mrs. William E. 

Traylor, Mrs. Mahlon E. 

Treat, Mrs. George W. 

Tri Sigma Sorority, Beta Chapter 

Tripp, Mr. and Mrs. William V., Jr. 

Troutwine, Mrs. Harry 

Trull, Miss Bertha P. 

Trumpy, Mr. Randall H. 

Tubby, Mrs. Paul B. 

Tucker, Mrs. C. Mason 

Tucker, Mr. Gordon 

Tucker, Miss Minne C. 

Tucker, Mr. Nathan 

Tudor, Mrs. Henry D. 

Tudor, Mr. Owen 

TurnbuU, Mr. Joseph A. 

Tuttle, Mrs. Henry G. 

Tuttle, Miss M. Elizabeth 

Tuttle, Mr. W. Norris 

Tyler, Mr. Brenton E. 

Tyler, Mrs. Samuel 

Ultsch, Mrs. Emma L. 
Underwood, Mrs. Charles A. 
Union Congregational Church, 

East Braintree, Primary Department 
Usen, Mrs. Irving 
Usher, Mrs. Samuel 

Van Home, Miss Edna B. and 

Althea R. H. Pedlar 
Van Ingen, Miss Anne H. 
Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C. 
Van Norman, Mrs. Frederick D. 
Van Syckel, Mrs. Esther 
Van Vleck, Mr. John H. 
Varnum, Mr. Thomas H. 
Varterisian, Mr. Avedis 
Vaughan, Mrs. Frank A. 
Vaughan, Miss Margaret I. 
Ver Planck, Mr. Philip 
Voehl, Miss Marie C. 
Vogel, Mr. and Mrs. Augustus H. 
Vogeley, Mrs. W. Roebling 
Volkman, Mrs. James Howe 
Votaw, Mrs. F. E. 

Wadsworth, Mrs. Lewis L. 
Wahlberg, Mr. Bertil L. 
Wald, Mr. Harold 
Wales, Miss Helen 
Wales, Mr. Ralph H. 
Walker, Mrs. Joseph T. 
Wallace, Miss Bessie M. 
Wallace, Miss Eleanor B. 



83 



Wallburg, Mrs. Frances K. 

Waller. Mrs. Robert P. 

Walpole Women's Club 

Walsh, Mrs. Emma P. 

Walton, Mrs. David 

Wambaugh, Mrs. Miles 

Waples, Mr. S. H. 

Ward, Mrs. Albert A. 

Ward, Mr. Edgar 

Ward, Mr. John 

Ward, Miss M. DeC. 

Ward, Miss Mary E. 

Ward, Mrs. Richard 

Ware, Mrs. C. L. 

Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Langdon 

Warner, Mrs. Sam B. 

Warren, Mrs. Bayard 

Warren, Mr. Bertram E. 

Warren, Mr. Rowland S. 

Warren, Mrs. S. L. 

Washburn, Mrs. Mary L. 

Washburn, Mr. Rodney 

Washburn, Miss Ruth W. 

Watertown Women's Club 

Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. 

Watson, Mrs. W. C. 

Watts, Mrs. E. E., Jr. 

Watts, Mr. H. Guy 

Webb, Mrs. Edwin 

Webb, Mrs. Mary A. 

Webber, Mrs. Paul B. 

Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. 

Webster Women's Club 

Well Foundation, Inc. 

Weil, Miss Gertrude 

Weil. Mr. Jesse 

Welch, Mr. John B. 

Welch, Mr. William M. 

Wellington, Miss Carrie M. 

Wellington, Miss Virginia 

Wellman, Miss Mabel T. 

Wells, Mr. David A. 

Wells, Mr. George 

Wells, Mr. and Mrs. George B. 

Wells, Joel and Albert, 2d 

Wells, Mrs. Wellington, Jr. 

Wendell, Mr. Arthur R. 

Wentworth, Mrs. Henrj' A. 

Wessell, Mrs. Alice C. 

West. Mrs. H. A. 

West, Mrs. Henry S. 

West, Miss Lena A. 

West Newton Women's Educational Club 

Wetherbee, Miss Lila 

Wetherell, Mr. L. H. 

Weyerhouser, Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. 

Whealan, Mr. James E. 

Wheatland, Mrs. Stephen 

Wheelan Foundation 

Wheeler, Mrs. Leonard 

Wheeler. Mrs. S. B. 

Whipple, Mr. Charles A. 

Whipple, Mrs. Fred L. 

Whitcomb. Miss Ethel 

Whitcomb, Mrs. William A. 

White, Mrs. Frederick G. 

White, Miss Gertrude R. 

White, Mrs. Harry K. 

White, Mrs. J. Leverett 

White, Mrs. Moses P. 

White, Mrs. Richardson 

Whitehead, Mrs. Alfred M. 

Whiteman, Mrs. John B. 

Whiting, Miss Louise 

Whitman, Mrs. N. H. 

Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr. 

Whitmore, Mrs. A. L. 

Whitney. Mr. and Mrs. C. Handasyde 

Whitney, Mrs. Geoffrey G. 

Whitney, Mrs. William T. 



Whittall, Mr. Matthew P. ' 

Whittem, Mr. A. F. 

Whittemore. Mr. F. L. 

Whittemore, Mr. Harris S. 

Whittemore, Mrs. Theodore P. 

Whittemore, Mr. Homer F. 

Whitwell, Mrs. Frederick S. 

Widder, Mr. David V. 

Wiese, Mr. Robert G. 

Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 

Wiggin, Mrs. Grace P. 

Wight, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. 

Wight, Mrs. Edward P. 

Wight, Mrs. Marcus Seymour 

Wightman, Mrs. Hazel V. 

Wilbor, Mrs. Rufus L. 

Wilcoxin, Mrs. Alfred W. 

Wilder, Mr. Howard B. 

Wiley, Mr. Linwood C. 

Wiley, Mrs. William O. 

Wilkins, Miss Georgia M. 

Wilkinson, Mrs. Alvin T. 

Wilkinson, Miss Elizabeth S. 

Willard, Mrs. Frank H. 

Willett, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour B. 

Willetts, Mrs. J. Macy 

Willi, Mr. George 

Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold W. 

Williams, Mr. Eugene 

Williams, Miss Hilda W. 

Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Holden P. 

Williams, Mrs. John H. 

Williams, Miss Mary E. 

Williams, Miss Katherine W. 

V/illiams. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph B., Jr. 

Williams. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. 

Williams. Miss Susan 

Williamson, Miss Clara R. 

Willing, Mr. James 

Williston, Miss Emily 

Williston, Prof. Samuel 

Wilson, Miss Antoinette 

Wilson. Mrs. Ernest D. 

Wilson, Mrs. Fred A. 

Wing, Mrs. Charles 

Winkley, Mrs. William G. 

Winn, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. 

Winsor, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 

Winsor, Mrs. Frederick 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B. 

Wise, Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. 

Wiswall, Mrs. Augustus C. 

Wolf, Mrs. Louis 

Woman's Association, Central Congrega- 
tional Church, Newtonville 

Women's Union of the First Congregational 
Church, Natick 

Wood, Mrs. C. F. 

Wood, Mrs. Cornelius A. 

Wood, Mrs. Orrin G. 

Wood, Dr. W. Franklin 

Woodard, Mrs. Mary Rudy 

Woodbridge, Mr. Benjamin M. 

Woods, Mrs. James H. 

Woodward, Mrs. Evan A. 

Woodworth, Mr. Alfred S. 

Woolley, Mrs. Arthur G. 

Wrenn. Mrs. Philip W. 

Wright, Mr. E. C. 

Wright. Mr. George R. 

Wyatt, Mr. Roy E. 

Wylde, Mrs. Cecil I. 

Wyman, Mr. Donald 

Wyzanski, Mrs. Charles E., Jr. 

Yaglou, Mrs. Constantin P. 
Yeomans, Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. 
Young, Mrs. Alan J. 
Young, Mrs. Angus D. 
Zschirpe, Mrs. Minnie E. 



84 



IN MEMORIAM 

Dora Axelrod Frederic B. Hawes 

Edith Rowland Bacon Mrs. Quimby T. Lapham 

Mrs. Edith Bacon Mrs. G. L. Levy 

Grace Bartlett Laura E. Richards 

Jimmie Hanflig Miss Sullivan 

Mrs. Edwin A. Harris August Zscbirpe 



85 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution 
AND Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly 
organized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the sum of dollars ($ ), the same to 

be applied to the general uses and purposes of said corporation 
under the direction of its Board of Trustees ; and I do hereby direct 
that the receipt of the Treasurer for the time being of said corpora- 
tion shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 



I FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Perkins Institution and 
Massachusetts School for the Blind, a corporation duly organ- 
ized and existing under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, that certain tract of real estate bounded and described 
as follows : 

(Here describe the real estate accurately) 



with full power to sell, mortgage and convey the same free of all 
trust. 



NOTICE 

The address of the Treasurer of the corporation is as follows; 

RALPH B. WILLIAMS 

Fiduciary Trust Co., 10 Post Office Square, Boston 9, Mass. 



I 



I 




Fabian Bachrach 



^CM^&^^ ^ijS/xjtJ^ 



One Hundred and Twenty-first 
Annual Report 

of 

Perkins Institution 

and 

Massachusetts School 
for the Blind 

Incorporated March 2, 1829 




1952 



Watertown 72, Massachusetts 











Printed at 

Industrial School for Crippled Children 

Boston, Massachusetts 



CONTENTS 

Calendar " 

History ' 

Officers — 1830 - 1952 9 

Officers of the Corporation — 1952 - 1953 10 

School Officers 12 

Members of the Corporation 16 

Proceedings of the Corporation 19 

Report of the Trustees 20 

Report of the Director 23 

The Perkins Program ^' 

The New England Plan 59 

The Students 62 

List of Pupils . 67 

Some Items from the Calendar 75 

Report of Health Department 78 

Report of the Dentists • '79 

Workshop for Adults 80 

Report of the Bursar °1 

Report of the Treasurer °6 

Statement of Accounts °° 

Form of Bequest 1^-* 



PERKINS CALENDAR 1952 - 1953 



Septemb( 


tr 2. 
8. 




9. 




10. 




11. 




11. 




16. 


October 


4-5. 




8-9. 




11-13. 




21. 


November 3. 




18. 




26-30. 


Decemb 


>r 14. 




15. 




16. 




16. 




17. 




19. 


January 


5. 
6. 




20. 


February 4-6. 
12. 




17. 




20-23. 


March 


17. 




27. 


April 


6. 

7. 




13-15. 




21. 


May 


2-3. 
19. 




22. 




30. 


June 5, 


8, &9. 




6. 




9. 




12. 




13. 




7-14. 



Housemothers return 

Harvard Class and new Staff members arrive 

Remainder of Staff returns 

Pupils return 

School begins 

Executive Committee Meeting to consider the Budget 

Stated meeting of Board of Trustees 

Religious Retreats 

Director's Reception to the Staff 

Columbus Day week-end 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Annual Meeting of Corporation and Directors' Memorial 

Exercises 
Executive Committee Meeting 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Carol Concert 
Lower School Christmas Parties 
Stated meeting of Board of Trustees 
LJpper School Christmas Parties 
Christmas Carol Concert 
Christmas Carol Concert, and Christmas Vacation begins 

Pupils and Staff return 

School begins 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Mid- Year exams 

Open House on Lincoln's Birthday 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Long week-end 

Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Easter Recess begins 

Pupils return 

School begins 

Conference on the Education of the Deaf-Blind 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Religious Retreats for students 

Executive Committee Meeting (preliminary budget for 1953- 
54) 

Open House for High School groups only 

Memorial Day hoUday 

Final Examinations 

Alumnae Day 

Stated meeting of Board of Trustees at Watertown 

Lower School Graduation, 10 a. m.; Upper School Gradua- 
tion, 2 p. M. 

Alumni Day 

Summer Institute for Pre-School Children and their Parents 



Page Six 



PERKINS INSTITUTION 

Our History 

In 1826 a Boston physician, Dr. John D. Fisher, returned home 
from Paris where he had been impressed by the work of the Institut 
Nationale des Jeunes Aveugles, the School which was to become 
famous in later years as the place where Louis Braille was a student 
and teacher and where he devised the system of reading and writing 
for the blind which bears his name. Dr. Fisher formed a committee 
which petitioned the Legislature, and was granted an Act of In- 
corporation on March the second, 1829, establishing "The New 
England Asylum for the Blind," the first school for the blind in 
America to receive a Charter. In 1831, another Boston physician. 
Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, returned from participation in the Greek 
War of Independence, and was chosen to be the first Director of the 
School. In August, 1832, the first classes were held in the house 
of Dr. Howe's father, on Pleasant Street. 

As the pupils soon outgrew their quarters. Colonel Thomas H. 
Perkins, a wealthy Boston merchant who had become interested in 
this venture, gave for its use his large house on Pearl Street. The 
need for still larger quarters soon became apparent, and in 1839 
a great hotel, near the ocean in South Boston, was purchased. This 
was made possible by the assent of Colonel Perkins to the sale of his 
home, and because of this generosity the Trustees renamed the School, 
"Perkins Institution and Massachusetts Asylum for the Blind." This 
name was changed in 1877 to the present name, "Perkins Institution 
and Massachusetts School for the Blind." All these names are some- 
what misleading, as throughout its history Perkins has been a School 
accepting responsibility for educating the blind children of New 
England. 

Dr. Howe directed the growing work of Perkins Institution for 
forty years, during which the young School soon forged ahead of 
its European predecessors in its successful training of blind boys and 
girls to take their places in their own communities. During this time, 
too. Dr. Howe devoted much time to building up the School's endow- 
ment. But perhaps the most famous work of his career was his 
successful training of Laura Bridgman, the first deaf-blind person 
to receive an education. 

Page Seven 



In 1876 Dr. Howe was succeeded by his Greek protege and son- 
in-law, Michael Anagnos. Mr. Anagnos created the Howe Memorial 
Press for embossing books and for making appliances for the blind, 
and in 1877 he founded what was known as the Kindergarten in 
Jamaica Plain, the first school for young blind children in the world. 
He, too, was a most successful raiser of funds for the School endow- 
ment. After thirty years of leadership, Mr. Anagnos died in Rumania 
in 1906. 

In 1907 the Directorship of Perkins Institution passed to Dr. 
Edward E. Allen, then Head of the School for the Blind in Phila- 
delphia which he had just rebuilt. Returning to Boston where he 
was a native. Dr. Allen began plans for moving the two Schools from 
South Boston and Jamaica Plain, and by 1913 the whole Institution 
was operating in the present plant at Watertown. The new School, 
situated on an old estate of thirty-four acres on the banks of the 
Charles River, has teaching and living space for nearly three hundred 
pupils. The children live in small Cottages and the majority of the 
Staff are resident. 

Dr. Allen established the first training courses for teachers of 
blind children in collaboration with Harvard University. He retired 
in 1931, but continued his work in the training of teachers for a 
number of years. 

In 1931, Dr. Gabriel Farrell became the fourth Director. He 
organized the training of our deaf-blind pupils as a special depart- 
ment, and established an endowment fund for these doubly handi- 
capped children. Dr. Farrell retired in 1951, and was succeeded by 
Mr. Edward J. Waterhouse. 



Page Eight 



1830-1837, Jonathan Phillips 
1838-1839, Samuel Appleton 
1840-1846, Peter C. Brooks 
1847-1854, Richard Fletcher 
1855-1861, Edward Brooks 
1861-1869, Samuel May 



OFFICERS 

PRESIDENTS 

1870-1871, Martin Brimmer 
1872-1897, Samuel Eliot 
1898-1930, Francis H. Appleton 
1930-1946, Robert H. Hallowell 
1946- Reginald Fitz, M.D. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



1830-1834, William Calhoun 
1835-1846, Thomas H. Perkins 
1847-1850, Edward Brooks 
1851-1852, John D. Fisher 
1852-1866, Stephen Fairbanks 
1867-1870, Joseph Lyman 
1871-1892, John Cummings 



1893-1896, George Hale 
1897-1911, Amory a. Lawrence 
1912-1913, N. P. Hallowell 
1914-1921, George H. Richards 
1922-1929, William L. Richardson 
1930-1946, G. Peabody Gardner 
1946- Ralph Lowell 



TREASURERS 



1830-1839, Richard Tucker 
1840-1846, Peter R. Dalton 
1847-1861, Thomas B. Wales 
1862-1868, William Claflin 
1869-1872, William Endicott 
1873-1879, Henry Endicott 
1880-1881, Patrick T. Jackson 



1881-1902, Edward Jackson 
1903-1904, Patrick T. Jackson 
1904-1916, William Endicott 
1917-1935, Albert Thorndike 
1935-1945, Roger Amory 
1945-1950, John P. Chase 



1950- 



Ralph B. Williams 



SECRETARIES AND DIRECTORS 
1831-1876, Samuel Gridley Howe 1931-1951, Gabriel Farrell 



1876-1906, Michael Anagnos 
1907-1931, Edward E. Allen 



1951- 



Edward J. Waterhouse 



DIRECTORS EMERITI 
1931-1950, Edward E. Allen 1952- Gabriel Farrell 



Page Nine 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

1952-1953 

PRESIDENT 
Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

VICE-PRESIDENT TREASURER 

Ralph Lowell Ralph B. Williams 

SECRETARY ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Edward J. Waterhouse John W. Bryant 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Miss Dorothy L. Book* Samuel Cabot, Jr. 

David Cheever, Jr. Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur 

Rev. John J. Connolly* Michael F. McGrath* 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Warren Motley 

Reginald Fitz, M.D. Paul L. Neal* 

Robert H. Hallowell Richard Saltonstall 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
Executive Finance 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President Ralph B. Williams, Treasurer, 

Ralph B. Williams, Treasurer ex officio 

Edward J. Waterhouse, Secretary, Robert H. Hallowell 

ex officio Ralph Lowell 
Mrs. Richard E. Danielson Richard Saltonstall 

Rev. John J. Connolly 
Robert H. Hallowell 
Warren Motley 

SUB-COMMITTEES 
Appointed by the Executive Committee 
Education Health 

Rev. John J. Connolly Reginald Fitz, M.D. 

Robert H. Hallowell David Cheever, Jr. 

Paul L. Neal 

MONTHLY VISITING COMMITTEE 

Whose duty it is to visit and inspect the Institution at least once in each month. 

January Warren Motley June Robert H. Hallowell 

February Reginald Fitz, M.D. September Mrs. F. J. Leviseur 

March Samuel Cabot, Jr. October Rev. John J. Connolly 

April David Cheever, Jr. November Michael F. McGrath 

May Richard Saltonstall December Mrs. R. E. Danielson 

LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Frederick J. Leviseur, Chairman 

*Appointed by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 

Page Ten 



I 



SCHOOL OFFICERS 1952-1953 

DIRECTOR 

Edward J. Waterhouse, M.A., Cantab. 
Claire M. Stumcke Doris Hubbard 

Secretary to the Director Ediphonist 

Marion A. Woodworth Mrs. S. R. Hemphill 

Registrar Secretary, Deaf-Blind Fund 

BUSINESS OFFICE 
J. Stephenson Hemphill, B.S., M.B.A., Bursar 
William W. Howat, B.S. Ethel L. MacKenzie 

Maintenance Assistant Bookkeeper 

Verna L. Anderson Alice E. Dougher 

Secretary to the Bursar Cecilia E. Shepherd 

Assistant Bookkeepers 
Ida Piantedosi Frank H. Green 

General Secretary Jeanne T. Bryant 

Telephone Operators 

SOCIAL SERVICE 
Eleanor E. Kelly Alicia A. George 

Social Worker Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICES 
Victor G. Balboni, M.D. Herbert Barry, Jr., M.D. 

Attending Physician Harold M. Wolman, A.B., M.D. 

Psychiatrists 
Carolyn Brager, R.N. Mark D. Elliott, D.D.S. 

Resident Nurse Leif B. Johannessen, D.M.D. 

Dentists 
Elizabeth A. Hale Trygve Gundersen, M.D. 

Resident Nurse Ophthalmologist 

LIBRARY 
Nelson Coon Mrs. Pearl O. Gosling 

Librarian Mrs. Annetta R. Castle 

Florence J. Worth Mrs. Janet L. Howat 

Margaret Miller 

PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES AND RESEARCH 
Samuel P. Hayes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Psychologist 
Mrs. Jane S. Davis, A.B. Carl J. Davis, A.B., M.Ed. 

Psychometrist Guidance Counsellor 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS 
Edward J. Waterhouse, M.A., Manager 
David Abraham Bertha Kasetta 

Engineer Braille Editor 

David J. Abraham, Jr. Mary L. Tully 

Engineering Assistant Clerk 

Page Eleven 



PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE 

Benjamin F. Smith, A.B., M.A. 
Acting Principal and Dean of Boys 

Alice M. Carpenter, A.B., M.A., D.Ped. 
Dean of Girls 

Shirley A. Drucker, B.A., M.A. 
Academic Co-ordinator 

Mrs. Christine Briggs Mrs. Joan Smith 

Secretary Secretary 

FACULTY 1932-3 

Paul L. Bauguss, B.M., M.M. 
Music Director 

Leo V. GiTTZus, B.S., M.A. 
Head of Manual Arts Department 

Mrs. N. Maurine Gittzus, A.B., M.A. 
Fiead of Deaf-Blind Department 

Anthony Ackerman, A.B., English 

Anna M. Ascarelli, B.A., Ungraded Pupils 

Arnold Auch, A.B., Travel 

Mrs. Elizabeth Auch, A.B., Second Grade 

Bernard P. Barbeau, B.M., M.M., Music 

Susan M. Brooks, Weaving 

Ruth Bunten, A.B., Second Grade 

MoLLiE Cambridge, A.B., Mathematics, Latin 

Walter P. Carr, Caning 

Charles E. L. Coombs, B.S.Ed., Science 

Mrs. Vesta V. Coon, A.B., Spanish, Typing 

Mrs. Mary B. Danner, B. A., Kindergarten 

Madge Dolph, Deaf-Blind Department 

William H. Donald, Woodwork 

Charles E. Dunbar, B.S. Ed., Director of Athletics 

Janet Dunwoodie, B.S. Ed., Kindergarten 

Sidney B. Durfee, Pianoforte Tuning 

M. Albertina Eastman, B.S., M.A., Speech Correction 

Winifred G. Ellis, B.A., Commercial 

Mrs. Lenore W. Fenton, Home Economics 

Gertrude S. Harlow, Mathematics, Braille 

Gordon McK. Hayes, A.B., Wrestling 

Richard Hull, B.A., Sixth Grade 

WiLMA A. Hull, B.A., Fourth Grade 

Edward W. Jenkins, F.T.C.L., Music 

Mrs. Stella D. Jenkins, L.T.C.L., Music 

Mrs. Isabel Karus, B.S., Deaf-Blind Department 

Vahram Kashmanian, B.S., Social Studies 

Evelyn Kaufman, A.B., M.A., Third Grade 



Page Twelve 



Elizabeth M. Lennon, A.B., M.A., Second Grade 

Mrs. Marion K. Mann, Sewing 

Frances L. McGaw, Ceramics, Pencil Writing 

Mrs. Clotilda A. McGowen, Kindergarten 

Eileen McNamara, Handwork 

Lorraine McNamara, B.S. Ed., Third Grade 

Armand J. MiCHAUD, A.B., M.A., French, Braille 

Mrs. Evelyn W. Moore, Kindergarten 

Mrs. Joan C. Mordecai, A.B., Dramatics, Speech 

Betty L. Nye, Braille 

Barbara Outhuse, B.S. Ed., Physical Education (Girls) 

Elsie M. Parmenter, Second Grade 

Caroline Peters, Fifth Grade 

Harriet M. Phillips, B.S., First Grade 

Sylvia C. Pigors, B.A., Ungraded Pupils 

Phyllis A. Paulson, B.M., Music 

Clara L. Pratt, Social Studies — Junior High 

Mrs. Jean Scheidenhelm, A.B., First Grade 

Louise Seymour, Music 

Penelope Shoup, B.A., First Grade 

Shirlie L. Smith, R.P.T.T., Physiotherapist 

Mrs. Marjorie A. Snodgrass, B.A., First Grade 

Mary G. Storrow, Braille 

Eleanor W. Thayer, A.B., Music 

Mrs. Rose M. Vivian, B.S. Ed., Deaf-Blind Department 

Mrs. Sina F. Waterhouse, A.B., M.A., Speech Correction 

Mrs. Perley C. White, Music 

Beverly Williams, B.A., Kindergarten 



Page Thirteen 



HOUSEMOTHERS and HOUSE MASTERS 



Oliver Cottage 

Mrs. Elizabeth Wakeford 

Housemother 
Virginia Newhall 

Asst. Housemother 
Janet C. Harrison 

2nd Asst. Housemother 

May Cottage 

Mrs. Edith V. Nickerson 

Housemother 
Mrs. Ruth L. Stow 

Asst. Housemother 
Mrs. Helen L. Lewis 

2nd Asst. Housemother 

Bradlee Cottage 

Mrs. Marion P. Kimball 

Housemother 
Mrs. Odena T. Pierce 

Asst. Housemother 
Joyce M. Skidmore 

2nd Asst. Housemother 

Anagnos Cottage 

Mrs. Mae E. Slayton 

Housemother 
Lucy L Makepeace 

Asst. Housemother 
Priscilla C. Perkins 

2nd Asst. Housemother 

Potter Cottage 

Catherine C. Sinclair 

Housemother 
Mrs. Janet G. Shurtleff 

Asst. Housemother 
Mrs. Gladys Peppard 

2nd Asst. Housemother 

Glover Cottage 

Mrs. Orlando F. Snow 

Housemother 
Mrs. Laura B. Eldridge 
Asst. Housemother 



Brooks Cottage 

Mrs. Ethel McKee Hammond 
Housemother 

Fisher Cottage 

Mrs. Lowie H. Bowman 
Housemother 

Bridgman Cottage 

Mrs. Mary L. Hunt 

Housemother 
Anthony Ackerman 

Master 
Henry C. A. Lambert 

Asst. Master 

Eliot Cottage 

Mrs. Sara M. Keith 

Housemother 
Frank Greene 

Master 
Vahram Kashmanian 

Asst. Master 

Tompkins Cottage 
Mrs. Emma M. Guy 

Housemother 
Charles E. Dunbar 

Master 
Gordon McK. Hayes 

Asst. Master 

Moulton Cottage 

Mrs. Ruby E. Hillman 

Housemother 
Richard Hull 

Master 
Charles E. L. Coombs 

Asst. Master 

Deaf-Blind Cottage 

Judith G. Silvester 

Housemother 
Fanny Durfee 
Marjorie a. McIntosh 
Dorothy H. Reynolds 
Leo F. Queenan 

Attendants 



Page Fourteen 



TEACHER TRAINING 

Edward J. Waterhouse, Lecturer Dr. Samuel P. Hayes 
Graduate School of Education Consulting Psychologist 

Harvard University American Foundation for the Blind 

Dr. Gabriel Farrell, Director Emeritus 



TEACHER- 

Bathshuna Bendersky, Israel 
Patricia L. Carle, B.A., Skidmore 

College 
Nan Corcoran, A.B., Marywood 

College 
Sara P. Denby, A.B., Bates College 
Terry Jane Friedman, B.A., Vassar 

College 
Gordon McK. Hayes, A.B., Boston 

Universty 
Sadako Imamura, B.S., Japan 



TRAINEES 

Sarah E. Knapp^ A.B., Skidmore 

College 
Henry C. A. Lambert, New Zealand 
Nancy A. McKee, B.A., University 

of Vermont 
Olga Marina Padilla, Honduras 
Mrs. Lillie D. Sukhnandan, India 
Nancy Wellman, A.B., Bates 

College 
James Yohannan, B.A., Upsala 

College 



The need for well trained teachers of blind children grows 
rapidly greater each year. 

Interested candidates are invited to enquire about new 
courses offered jointly by Boston University and Perkins Insti- 
tution starting in September, 1953. 

Address enquiries to the Director of Perkins. 



Page Fifteen 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Allbright, Clifford, Boston 
Allen, Mrs. Frank G., Boston 
Allen, Philip R., Walpole 
Allen, Mrs. Philip R., Walpole 
Amory, Robert, Jr., Cambridge 
Amory, Roger, Boston 
Angney, D. Harry, Wellesley Hills 
Appleton, Francjs Henry, Brookline 
Appleton, Mrs. Francis Henry, Brookline 
Ballantine, Arthur A., New York 
Bancroft, Miss Eleanor C, Beverly 
Bartol, Mrs. John W., Boston 
Barton, George Sumner, Worcester 
Bayne, Mrs. William, 3d, New York 
Beach, Rev. David N., New Haven, Conn. 
Belash, Constantine A., Boston 
Belash, Mrs. Constantine A., Boston 
Bird, Miss Anna C, East Walpole 
Bird, Mrs. Francis W., East Walpole 
Blake, Fordyce T., Worcester 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A., Boston 
Boyden, Charles, Boston 
Boyden, Mrs. Charles, Boston 
Brooks, Mrs. Arthur H., Cambridge 
Brooks, Gorham, Boston 
Brooks, Lawrence G., West Medford 
Brooks, Mrs. L. G., West Medford 
Brown, Mrs. C. R., New Haven, Conn. 
Bryant, John W., Boston 
Bullard, Miss Ellen T., Boston 
Bullock, Chandler, Worcester 
Burns, Warren, Waban 
Burr, I. Tucker, Jr., Boston 
Cabot, Mr. and Mrs. S., Jr., Bev. Farms 
Cabot, Mrs. Thomas H., Dublin, N. H. 
Camp, Mrs. Edward C, Watertown 
Campbell, Mrs. Frederick W., Milton 
Casei, Hon. Norman S., Washington, D.C. 
Case, Mrs. Norman S., Washington, D. C. 
Cassels, Miss Andree 
Chase, John P., Boston 
Cheever, David, Jr., Millis 
Cheever, Mrs. David, Jr., Millis 
Choate, Robert B., Boston 
Clause, Henry T., Wilmington, Del. 
Cochran, Mrs. Olin J., N. H. 
Codman, Mrs. Russell, Boston 
Coffin, Mrs. Rockwell A., Harwichport 
Comstock, Mrs. Daniel F., South Lincoln 
Connolly, Rev. John J., Framingham 
Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon, Cambridge 
Coolidge, William A., Topsfield 
Coote, Lady Emilie, California 
Cotting, Charles E., Boston 
Cunningham, Edward, Dover 
Cunningham, Mrs. Edward, Dover 



Curtis, Charles P., Jr., Boston 
Curtis, James F., Roslyn, N. Y. 
Curtis, Louis, Boston 
Cutler, George C, Dedham 
Daley, Mrs. Francis J., Somerville 
Danielson, Richard E., Boston 
Danielson, Mrs. Richard E., Boston 
Day, Mrs. Frank A., Newton 
Denny, Dr. George P., Boston 
Dexter, Miss Harriett, Boston 
Dolan, William G., Boston 
Dowd, Mrs. John F., Roxbury 
Draper, Eben S., Hopedale 
Drury, Theodore F., Chestnut Hill 
Dutton, Mrs. George D., Walpole 
EUot, Amory, Boston 
Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Boston 
Endicott, Henry, Boston 
Endicott, William, 2d, North Andover 
Farrell, Gabriel, Cambridge 
Farrell, Mrs. Gabriel, Cambridge 
Faxon, Henry H., M.D., Brookline 
Faxon, Mrs. Robert M., Quincy 
Fay, Mrs. Dudley B., Boston 
Fitz, Reginald, M.D., Brookline 
Fitz, Mrs. Reginald, Brookline 
Ford, Lawrence A., Beverly 
Fox, Miss Edith M., Arlington 
French, Miss M. E., Providence, R. L 
Frothingham, Mrs. L. A., Boston 
Fuller, George F., Worcester 
Gage, Miss Mabel C, Worcester 
Gale, Lyman W., Andover 
Gardiner, John H., Brookline 
Gardner, G. Peabody, Brookline 
Gaylord, Emerson G., Chicopee 
Gilbert, Carl J., Needham 
Gilbert, William E., Springfield 
Gleason, Miss Ellen H., Jamaica Plain 
Grandin, Mrs. Isabella, Boston 
Gray, Francis C, Boston 
Gray, Roland, Boston 
Greenough, Mrs. Henry V., Brookline 
Griswold, Merrill, Boston 
Gundersen, Dr. Trygve, Brookline 
Gundersen, Mrs. Trygve, Brookline 
Hallowell, Richard P., 2d, Boston 
Hallowell, Robert H., Dedham 
Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Dedham 
Hallowell, Robert H., Jr., Dover 
Hallowell, Mrs. Robert H., Jr., Dover 
Harris, Rev. John U., Framingham 
Haven, Miss Genevieve M., Sudbury 
Hayden, J. Willard, Lexington 
Hayden, Mrs. J. Willard, Lexington 
Hemenway, Mrs. Augustus, Milton 



Page Sixteen 



Herter, Christian A., Boston 

Higginson, Francis L., Boston 

Hinds, Mrs. E. Sturgis, Manchester 

Holmes, Dr. Henry W., Cambridge 

Howe, James C, Boston 

Hubbard, Mrs. Charles W., 3d, Brookline 

Humbert, Miss W. R., Watertown 

Hunnewell, Walter, Boston 

Hunt, James R., Jr., New York 

[asigi, Miss Mane V., Boston 

lerardi, Mr. Francis B., Somerville 

Jackson, Charles, Jr., Boston 

Jackson, Mrs. J-mes, Westwood 

Jeffries, J. Amory, Boston 

Johnson, Arthur S., Boston 

Kellogg, Mrs. Frederic B., Cambridge 

Keppel, Francis, Cambridge 

Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, 2d, Devon, Pa. 

King, Mrs. James G., Cambridge 

Lamb, Miss Aimee, Milton 

Lamb, Miss Rosamond, Milton 

Latimer, Mrs. G. D., Brookline 

Lawrence, Mrs. A. A., Brookline 

Lawrence, Rev. Frederic C, Brookline 

Lawrence, James, Jr., Brookline 

Lawrence, John E., So. Hamilton 

Lawrence, John S., Manchester 

Lawrence, Rt. Rev. W. A., Springfield 

Leavitt, Rev. Ashley D., Brookline 

Leviseur, Frederick J., Boston 

Leviseur, Mrs. Frederick J., Boston 

Ley, Harold A., New York 

Lincoln, Mrs. George C, Worcester 

Lovering, R. S., Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Lovett, Miss E. H., New London, N. H. 

Lowell, James H., Boston 

Lowell, Ralph, Boston 

Lyman, Mrs. Arthur T., Westwood 

Lyman, Mrs. Ronald T., Waltham 

Lyne, Daniel J., Chestnut Hill 

McGrath, Michael F. 

MacPhie, Mrs. Elmore L, West Newton 

Maliotis, Charles, Boston 

Mason, Mrs. Andrew, Brookline 

Mason, Charles E., Jr., Newton Centre 

Merrill, Rev. Boynton, Columbus, Ohio 

Merriman, Mrs. E. B., Providence, R. L 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B., Cambridge 

iMinot, James J., Boston 

Monks, Rev. G. G., Washington, D. C. 

;Mcntagu, Mrs. H. B., England 

Morison, Samuel Eliot, Boston 

Motley, Warren, Boston 

Mutch, Miss Margaret, Waban 

Myers, Mrs. John W., Brookline 

Nash, Rt. Rev. Norman B., Boston 

Osgood, Rev. Phillips E., Orange, N. J. 

Parker, William A., Boston 

Parker, W. Stanley, Boston 

jParkman, Henry, Jr., Boston 

iParkman, Mrs. Henry, Jr., Boston 



Peabody, Harold, Boston 
Peabody, Miss Marjorie A., Groton 
Perkins, Mrs. Charles B., Jamaica Plain 
Perkins, Rev. Palfrey, Boston 
Pew, George L., Portland, Maine 
Pierce, Roger, Milton 
Plimpton, Mrs. George F., Boston 
Pool, Mrs. Eugene H., Boston 
Potter, Miss Claudia, Waltham 
Pratt, George D., Springfield 
Proctor, James H., Ipswich 
Prouty, Robert M., Hingham 
Prouty, Mrs. Robert M., Hingham 
Putnam, Mrs. Eliot T., Jr., Dedham 
Putnam, Mrs. George T., Dedham 
Rackemann, Miss Elizabeth, Boston 
Rantoul, Neal, Boston 
Richards, Henry H., Groton 
Richards, John, Concord, N. H. 
Richards, Tudor, Groton 
Richardson, John, Milton 
Richardson, Mrs. John, Milton 
Rogers, Mrs. Robert E., Cambridge 
Rogerson, Francis C, Duxbury 
Rudd, Miss Mary D., Boston 
Ruelberg, Dr. and Mrs. Reinhold, Chatham 
Saltonstall, Hon. Leverett, Dover 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Leverett, Dover 
Saltonstall, Richard, Sherborn 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Richard, Sherborn 
Sawyer, Miss Mary Esther, Belmont 
Sears, Seth, Brewster 
Shattuck, Henry L., Boston 
Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A., Weston 
Sherrill, Rt. Rev. H. K., New York, N. Y. 
Sillen, Rev. Walter, Watertown 
Simonds, Miss Elsie H., Sudbury 
Sims, Mrs. William S., Boston 
Slater, Mrs. H. N., New York 
Snow, Mrs. William G., Newton Centre 
Stafford, Rev. Russell H., Hartford, Conn. 
Stinson, Mrs. James, Worcester 
Sturgis, S. Warren, Boston 
Sullivan, Mrs. James A., Beverly 
Thayer, John E., Milton 
Theopold, Phihp H., Dedham 
Thomas, Mrs. John B., Boston 
Thompson, Cameron S., Boston 
Thorndike, Albert, Milton 
Thorndike, Benjamin A. G., Dedham 
Tifft, Eliphalet T., Springfield 
Tilden, Miss Alice F., Rockport 
Tilden, Miss Edith S., Rockport 
Todd, Francis B., New York, N. Y. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry D., Cambridge 
Van Norden, Mrs. Grace C, Pittsfield 
Vaughan, Miss M. L, Haddonfield, N. J. 
Wadsworth, Eliot, Washington, D. C. 
Walsh, Mr. Fred V., South Boston 
Washburn, Mrs. Frederick A., Boston 
Washburn, Rev. Henry B., Cambridge 



Page Seventeen 



Waterhouse, Edward J., Watertown Wiggins, Mrs. John, Alden, Pa. 

Waterhouse, Mrs. Edward J., Watertown Wilder, Charles P., Worcester 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph, Boston Williams, Ralph B., Chestnut Hill 

Wendell, Wm. G., West Hartford, Conn. Wolcott, Roger, Boston 

Whitmore, Howard, Jr., Boston Wright, George R., Cambridge 

Whittall, Matthew P., Worcester Wright, Miss Lucy, Newtown, Conn. 

Wiggins, Mrs. C, 2d, Gardiner, Me. Young, B. Loring, Weston 

Wiggins, John, Alden, Pa. Zeilinski, John, Holyoke 



Page Eighteen 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CORPORATION 

Watertown, Massachusetts, November 3, 1952 
The Annual Meeting of the Corporation, duly sumtaoned, was 
held today at the Institution, and was called to order by the Presi- 
dent, Dr. Reginald Fitz, at 3.00 p. m. 

The annual reports of the Trustees and the Director were accepted 
and ordered to be printed, with the addition of other matters of 
general interest to the work. 

The report of the Treasurer was presented, accepted and ordered 
to be printed together with the certificate of the Certified Public 
Accountant. 
It was then 

VOTED: That acts and expenditures, made and authorized by 
the Board of Trustees, or by any committee appointed 
by said Board of Trustees, during the last corporate 
year be and are hereby ratified and confirmed. 
It was further 

VOTED: That the nomination of the Finance Committee and 

the appointment by the Trustees of Peat, Marwick, 

Mitchell and Company, Certified Public Accountants, 

as Auditors of the Accounts of the Institution for the 

fiscal year ended August 31st, 1951 be and are hereby 

ratified and confirmed. 

The Corporation then proceeded to the choice of officers for the 

ensuing year, and the following persons were unanimously elected by 

ballot: President, Reginald Fitz, M.D.; Vice-President, Ralph Lowell; 

Treasurer, Ralph B. Williams; Secretary, Edward J. Waterhouse; 

Trustees, Samuel Cabot, Jr., David Cheever, Jr., Mrs. Richard E. 

Danielson, Reginald Fitz, M.D., Robert H. Hallowell, Mrs. Frederick 

J. Leviseur, Warren Motley, and Richard Saltonstall. 

The following persons were proposed for membership and were 
duly elected: Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Cabot, Jr., Mrs. Daniel F. Com- 
stock, Mr. Francis B. lerardi. Miss Margaret Nutch, Miss Claudia 
Potter, Dr. and Mrs. Reinhold Ruelberg, Mr, Fred V. Walsh. 

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned. 
Those present then attended the annual Directors' Memorial Ex- 
ercises in Dwight Hall followed by tea in the Staff lounge. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Edward J. Waterhouse, Secretary 

Page Nineteen 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

November 3, 1952 

The Annual Report of the academic year 1951-1952 is herewith 
submitted on behalf of the Board of Trustees. This covers the first 
year under Mr. Waterhouse's direction which for several reasons 
was unusually eventful. 

In October, 1951, the Trustees came to the conclusion that the 
South Boston Workshop should be closed the following June. This 
rather painful decision followed a long period of study. The deter- 
mining reasons are to be found in the Bursar's Report. 

Also in October the School was host to a Regional Conference on 
Tests and Measurements for the Blind. Dr. Samuel P. Hayes, our 
School psychologist, planned the program. A full report of the Pro- 
ceedings has been published and widely distributed. 

At the request of the Trustees the Director submitted a new 
salary scale for professional employees. This scale was approved and 
will become effective in three annual steps commencing September, 
1953. This will bring teachers' salaries in line with other comparable 
organizations. Salaries for Maintenance and Clerical employees were 
also adjusted. To finance these increases it has been necessary to 
raise our tuition fees considerably. 

In January, 1952, the Trustees authorized the Director to study 
the problems facing us in the near future through increased enroll- 
ments. This led to the preparation of a New England Plan for the 
Education of Blind Youth which has been the subject of much 
comment since its presentation last spring. This plan is in line with 
current thinking which recognizes the possibilities of educating a 
certain number of blind children in the public schools. 

In May, Mr. Benjamin F. Smith, our Dean of Boys, was appointed 
Acting Principal of the Upper School. Later, by reorganizing some 
of his work, his responsibility was extended to cover all of the School 
except the Kindergarten, which for the present is under the direction 
of Mr. Waterhouse. 

On becoming Director, Mr. Waterhouse and his family moved 
into the house usually occupied by the Principal. The Deaf-Blind 
Department was moved into the former Director's Cottage, providing 
it with more adequate quarters than it had ever enjoyed. During the 

Page Twenty 



spring of 1952 the Trustees decided to build a new Director's Cottage 
so that the Principal's house could revert to its former use. It is 
expected that the new Cottage will be available for occupancy in 
August, 1953. 

In June the Trustees appointed Dr. Gabriel Farrell to be Director 
Emeritus of Perkins Institution. They also authorized the Director 
and Dr. Samuel P. Hayes to represent Perkins at the International 
Conference of Educators of Blind Youth in Bussum, The Nether- 
lands, held July 25 to August 2. 

On February 26, 1952, our Principal, Mr. Orin A. Stone, died 
suddenly from a heart attack. Mr. Stone was respected and loved by 
students and Staff alike. His loss would have been a serious matter 
at any time. Coming during a year of change it was particularly 
grievous. 

We regret to report the deaths of three members of the Cor- 
poration during the School year. They are Mr. Henry H. Crapo, 
Mrs. L. Cartaret Fenno, and Mrs. Reginald Foster. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Reginald Fitz, M.D., President 



Page Twenty-one 





/ 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

This is the one hundred and twenty-first Annual Report of 
Perkins Institution, and the first to be submitted by the fifth Director 
who took office July 1, 1951, at a time when many important changes 
were taking place in the education of the blind. 

Annual Reports frequently contain only the current statistics, 
and a chronological account of the year's happenings, but the be- 
ginning of a new administration seems to provide an appropriate 
occasion for giving a more general account of the School, 

Both in academic and other services, Perkins offers more than 
is generally realized. Space does not permit a detailed account of 
all the courses we offer, or the special techniques used by our Staff. 
Nor can we describe at length the many advantages arising from our 
well planned buildings and beautiful campus. We are contenting 
ourselves with reprinting on pages 47 to 58 an outline of our pro- 
gram prepared by various members of the Staff for a meeting held 
at Perkins last May of people interested in the education of the blind 
youth of New England. Like all other outlines, this one lacks the 
personal touch. The human side of the School may perhaps be 
glimpsed from the pictures of our children and from other parts 
of the Report. 

Our program is, of course, carefully planned to meet the needs 
of blind students. However, we do not wish to think of our boys 
and girls primarily as blind, and not altogether as students, but as 
girls and boys who are parts of families and members of their com- 
munities. They should be accepted as such not only after leaving 
school, but during their childhood. Unless each child proves accept- 
able to seeing people there will be walls of segregation around him 
all the days of his life. 

Our Aim 

Our aim has been frequently described as the educating of blind 
youth to play a contributory part in society. This is indeed a major 
aim, but perhaps in the light of modern educational thinking, it is 
not quite adequate. Handicapped people must not only contribute, 
but for complete success they must feel themselves an integral part 
of their community, with the handicap kept as inconspicuous as 
possible. 

Page Twenty-three 



We all of us wish for our pupils successful, normal lives, and 
while in such lives a contribution to society is an important factor, 
it is not sufficient in itself to counteract the unhappy effects of blind- 
ness. Such effects perhaps can never be eliminated entirely, but the 
boys and girls who realize best that they are normal human beings, 
with just the same claim for affection and respect from their fellows 
as anyone else, but with no more, seem to come closest to happiness 
and to our definition of success. 

This means that our pupils must not only be well trained voca- 
tionally, and socially, but they must be helped to develop fine charac- 
ters, and to acquire a superior understanding both of human nature 
and of their own personalities. As far as possible they must learn 
to accept their limitations with a minimum of bitterness, and a de- 
termination to prevent their handicap from dominating their lives. 
A most important factor in this educational process is, of course, the 
calibre of our Staff, the choice and training of which is undoubtedly 
one of the most serious tasks which falls to the administration to 
perform. 

The Staff 

Among our twenty-four Housemothers and our ninety or more 
other Staff members we find many types of personality and a wide 
variety of backgrounds. However, we all have one aim, to educate 
blind girls and boys as completely as we can. Each one of us has 
to approach his task in his own way. Some can instill a love of 
learning, others can build character; some are good at imparting manual 
or musical skills, others are successful in teaching children how to 
get along with others. Some of us work to build strong bodies, 
others to develop self-confident personalities. All are responsible for 
the family atmosphere in which alone a feeling of security can flourish. 

Our task continually changes as children grow, and as new ones 
come. None of us would claim to be so expert that he succeeds 
with every child under his care. All of us have to be able to 
resist frustration. Each of us in his turn suffers discouragement. 
Each one of us, from time to time, needs a helping hand from someone 
else on the Staff. Most of us feel that our personal satisfactions far 
outweigh the effort needed to achieve them. 

Frequently employees decide that this is not the work they should 
be doing. Our turnover is far too great. The selection of replace- 
ments is a major task. Fortunately we are able to fill most of our 

Pdge Twenty-four 



teaching positions from members of our Teacher Training Course. 
The selection of Housemothers is a particularly difficult and important 
responsibility of the administration. 

The Kindergarten 

For some years our Kindergarten children have been housed in 
Bradlee and Anagnos Cottages. Recently the pressure of numbers 
forced us to take May Cottage, which was originally used by girls 
in the Upper School, and place a Kindergarten group there. This took 
place in September 1950. A further increase caused us to do the 
same with Oliver Cottage in September 1951. At this time we had 
about thirty boys and girls in these two Cottages, and during the 
year the numbers increased to forty-seven. Each Cottage had three 
Housemothers and three Teachers. Of the six teachers, five had had 
experience either in Kindergarten work or in Nursery School. The 
sixth was a member of the Harvard Class who was taking courses at 
the Boston Nursery Training School as well. Three Housemothers 
in May Cottage had been with us at least one year, but the three in 
Oliver were entirely new. The Kindergarten was supervised by 
Miss Jean Gray who had been with us for two or three years and 
who, in spite of youth and limited experience, helped us to establish 
what we feel to be a satisfactory program. 

Behind Oliver Cottage we built a new playground containing 
swings, slides, a merry-go-round, sand-boxes and other equipment. 




Page Twenty-five 



1951-52 STATISTICS 



Kindergarten 

Oliver and May Cottages: three Housemothers and three teachers 
assigned to each. 

Enrollment in September, 1951. May Cottage: twelve boys, seven 
girls. Oliver Cottage: seven boys, ten girls. By June, 1952, the enroll- 
ment was: May Cottage: twelve boys, thirteen girls; Oliver Cottage: 
ten boys, eleven girls. Of these twenty-nine were promoted to the first 
grade, seven were discharged to the public schools, two were transferred 
to other schools for the blind, eight were retained in the Kindergarten. 



Primary Grades (1-3) 

Bradlee and Anagnos Cottages: three Housemothers in each Cot- 
tage. There were five first grade groups, three second grade groups, 
and two third grade groups, with a teacher for each section. 

First grade enrollment: twenty-four boys, sixteen girls. Thirty-one 
were promoted to second grade, one was discharged to the public schools 
and eight were held back in the first grade. 

Enrollment in second grade: ten boys and fifteen girls, of whom 
twenty-two were promoted to the third grade, two were transferred to 
the public schools, and one was held over. 

Enrollment in third grade: seven boys and seven girls, of whom 
thirteen were promoted and one was retained. 



Intermediate Grades (4-6) 

Boys in Potter, girls in Glover. Enrollment: sixteen boys and 
eighteen girls, of whom thirty-one were promoted, two were transferred 
to the public schools, and one was transferred to another school for 
the blind. 



Upper School (7-13) 

Post-graduate and out-of-course, 6; seniors, 10; juniors, 5; sopho- 
mores, 6; freshmen, 14; ninth grade, 16; eighth grade, 9; seventh 
grade, 9; ungraded, 7. 

Statistics of Progress 

Graduated, 10; completed post-graduate program, 3; continuing 
post-graduate programs, 3; promoted to next grade, 53; held over in 
same grade, 6; transferred to public schools, 2; discharged, 5. 



Page Twenty-six 



PERKINS INSTITUTION FOR THF, BLIND 
WATKRTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS 



DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION 
according to 

Etiology of Blindness 



n 



i 



GRADE SE\ CN EIGHT NINE UNGRADED TEN ELEVEN TWELVE THIRTEEN PG SPECIAL 

COURSES 

UPPER SCHOOL 





— 






Legend 

Retrolental Fibroplasia 

Other causes 

of Prenatal Origin 

i All other causes 

Figures as of January 22, 1952 




KINDERGARTEN GRADE ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE 

LOWER SCHOOL 



SIX UNGRADED 



Page Twenty-seven 



The children seemed to make adequate progress physically in spite of 
the epidemics which plagued not only our whole School but most of 
the schools in New England during the winter. Both outdoors and 
indoors their play seemed to be generally happy. Handwork, rhythms, 
and story-telling followed a common Kindergarten pattern. With 
most of the children progress was normal and perhaps above normal. 
For some the year showed that they had too much vision to remain at 
Perkins and they were recommended for the public schools. No one 
made no progress, but a number were held over for a further year 
in the Kindergarten. 

The Cottage Group 

In some ways this arrangement of the Kindergarten is ideal. 
Each Cottage group can be subdivided into small numbers for most 
of the day's program, but the children come together in the large 
playroom for Music and Games and, of course, they eat together in 
the same dining-room. The group is large enough to supply plenty 
of social activity and can be small enough for almost individual at- 
tention. The six adults in each Cottage worked well together to see 
that the School activities and those after school hours were not in 
conflict in any way. We were fortunate in having the services of 
a fine psychiatrist. Dr. Jane Hallenbeck, for most of the year, whose 
advice to the School Staff in the handling of these small children 
was invaluable. Having the Kindergarten children separated from 
the Primary grades allows us to devote considerable attention to their 
particular problems. Having a majority of the parents living com- 
paratively near has helped us to integrate our program with the home. 
We enjoyed excellent co-operation with the parents of this group 
throughout the year. 

Several of the children were day students, and most of the others 
went home every week-end, or frequently. Several of the children 
were repeating Kindergarten. AH of these, however, were able to 
proceed to the first grade at the end of the school year. 

A high percentage of these children were suffering from retro- 
lental fibroplasia. A large proportion of this group are totally blind 
and have been so since birth. They do not have even light perception. 
Our experience with these children leads us to believe that this may be 
a very important factor in their rate of development. 

Some of the children in our Kindergarten group were unhappy 
and disturbed. With some this manifested itself in a withdrawal 
from the group, a listlessness and a lack of interest in life. With a 

Page Twenty-eight 



smaller group we had tantrums and one little boy was so violent that 
he had to be temporarily withdrawn during the fall. One little girl, 
who came to us about mid-year, was also withdrawn because of a 
serious physical condition of the sinuses. 

Primary Grades 

The children in the first three grades lived and had their classes 
in Bradlee and Anagnos Cottages. There were both boys and girls 
in each house which in most respects was carrying out the same kind 
of program. These Cottages were being used for the purpose for 
which they were designed except that there were no Kindergarten 
children. The large living rooms which had been quite suitable for 
Kindergarten activities cannot be used for classrooms for the ad- 
ditional Primary grades which have been added recently, and as a 
result new quarters had to be found in each Cottage for classroom 
activities. 

It was in the Primary grades that the shortage of trained teachers, 
which has been growing more acute since the War, was most apparent 
last year. Several of the teachers had not had classroom experience 
and required a great deal of guidance from the Supervisor. All of 
them responded well to the challenge which faced them. Bradlee 
Cottage life was also complicated by several changes in Housemothers 
which put additional burdens on the resident Staff. 

The children seemed to progress satisfactorily. A normal number 
of promotions came at the end of the year and nobody was dropped 
from School for lack of progress. 

There was an abnormally large amount of sickness in common 
with the rest of New England. 

One of the chief academic developments during the year was the 
introduction, on a fairly large scale, of the Perkins Brailler. This 
braille writer operates with such a light touch that even small children 
can operate it with ease, and it was part of the original idea, when it 
was designed, that it might replace the slate and stylus in the early 
grades. 

There are serious objections to the use of the slate and stylus 
in teaching braille to young beginners because with this equipment 
the child writes from right to left across the page, each letter being 
reversed. Braille is a difficult enough subject for a small child to 
master without having to read from left to right and write from right 
to left. The first few months with the new machines would seem to 
indicate that they will be very helpful to our pupils. 

Page Twenly-nine 



Intermediate Grades 

Grades four, five and six occupied Potter and Glover Cottages 
as always and as our new wave of increasing enrollment had not yet 
seriously affected this part of the School we had no particularly new 
problems. Except in the ungraded group, our Staff was fully ex- 
perienced; nor were there many changes among the Housemothers. 

At the beginning of the year this group came under the super- 
vision of Mr. Orin Stone, and consequently suffered a serious loss 
in his death on February 26, but by that time the year's program was 
moving along so smoothly that it required little supervision for the 
rest of the year. 

In the Intermediate grades we gave the usual achievement tests 
which indicated an average amount of progress. Every graded child 
was promoted at the end of the year. 

Upper School ■■ 

In sharp contrast to the Lower School there were very few Staff 
changes at the beginning of the year. Mrs. Lenore W. Fenton joined 
our Staff as teacher of Home Economics. Miss Janet Dunwoodie 
became teacher of Physical Education in the Girls' Department. It 
was planned that a minimum of changes would take place in the 
Upper School this year and this would have been accomplished had 
it not been for the death of Mr. Stone in February. It was im- 
mediately necessary to assign many of his duties to Mr. Benjamin F. 
Smith, who later in the year was appointed Acting Principal. 

Mr. Smith has a wide experience in the education of the blind, 
both at Perkins and at the Washington State School for the Blind 
in Vancouver, Washington. He has taught in both the Lower and 
Upper Schools, including work with the ungraded groups, headed the 
Boy Scout program, introduced wrestling into the curriculum, directed 
Physical Education for some years, and has been largely responsible 
for our present program of social training. During recent years he 
has been our Dean of Boys, and he continues in this position. 

A new course in Radio was added under the direction of Mr. W. 
W. Howat who, although he began to take charge of Buildings and 
Grounds during the year, continued to fill his teaching assignments. 
In this course are taught the basic fundamentals of radio theory and 
construction, including repair. 

There were no candidates for the Bennett Cottage Course in 
Home Economics, but several girls lived there under Miss Carpenter's 
charge. 

Page Thirty 



The enrollment in the Upper School was extremely small. As 
mentioned elsewhere, Oliver Cottage was transferred to Kinder- 
garten use, but Fisher Cottage, which had been used by the Deaf- 
Blind Department in recent years, was made available for our older 
girls. 

Social Acceptability 

With most blind children the handicap of blindness is less an 
educational handicap and more a social one. As our desire to make 
our pupils socially acceptable, and to give them every opportunity to 
prove their acceptability is reflected in all parts of our program, it is 
inevitable that it should be expressed in various parts of our Annual 
Report. 

All of our Staff members are well aware that it is not sufficient 
to send a child home from School equipped merely with a good Di- 
ploma which represents high grades. There are many other things 
which we can do to prepare children for association with the seeing 
at all age levels and particularly in the Junior and Senior High groups. 




In part, our social program consists of instruction in the social 
graces; in handling food; in carrying on conversation; in being able 
to dance, or to swim or to play games. A person who is competent 
in any of these activities will find the problem of getting along with 
people much easier. The possession of a good voice and the ability 
to play an instrument also help to break down the inevitable barrier 
which exists between members of a minority group and the rest of 
the world. We have frequent dances and other functions to which 
seeing children come, and our children constantly participate in out- 
side activities, in churches, clubs, athletic events, concerts, and so forth. 

The chief responsibility for this side of our program has been 
given to the Deans, but practically all the Staff members co-operate 
in it. It is chiefly because of this that we need to have a large per- 
centage of them living on the grounds. The Staff member who co- 
operates in this program is making a fundamental contribution to the 
welfare of our children. 

As a recognition of this fact, the Director inserted into the new 
salary plan, adopted by the Trustees during the spring, a clause which 
requires all teachers, whether they live in or whether they live out, 
to receive similar pay for similar assignments. This recognizes that 
those who are residential members of our Family contribute by their 
presence and participation in the family life an essential ingredient 
in our work. Our pupils, both now and in the past, owe much to the 
many loyal men and women who have recognized and who are still 
recognizing this fact. 

Mental Health 

The School year started with two part-time psychiatrists on our 
Staff. Dr. Herbert Barry, Jr., and Dr. Jane A. Hallenbeck gave 
us invaluable help with those of our children who had personal 
problems beyond our capacity to diagnose and treat. We have never 
offered intensive psycho- therapy to our pupils. Where this is neces- 
sary it has to be obtained through clinics. However, the psychiatrists' 
diagnoses of our children's problems, and their advice to the Staff 
as to how these should be handled, have been of great value. 

Unfortunately, during the spring Dr. Hallenbeck accompanied 
her husband who was called into the United States Army and trans- 
ferred from the Boston area. 

As there seemed to be a gap between the services offered by our 
psychiatrists and our Staff, and as a most suitable applicant for 
Guidance Counselor was available, Mr. Carl Davis was appointed to 

Petge Thirty-two 




Caroling at Christmas 

jEill this new position. Mr. Davis had been a part-time teacher of 
Science and a Cottage Master while studying for his Master's Degree 
in Chnical Psychology at Harvard. He prepared to begin his new 
duties in September 1952. 

School Administration 

With a new Director taking office certain changes in administra- 
tion were inevitable. Every Director must work out his problems 
in the way best suited to his own peculiar way of thinking. New 
problems existed which had never been faced before, and it seemed 
necessary first of all to see that all parts of the School program 
functioned at maximum efficiency. 

It so happens that the fifth Director has great faith in team work. 
One of his first acts on taking office was to appoint an Advisory Policy 



Page Thirty-three 



Committee. The members were selected by himself and consisted of 
Mr. Stone, Principal; Miss Carpenter, Dean of Girls; Mr. Smith, 
Dean of Boys; and Mr. J. S. Hemphill, Bursar. They were chosen 
not only for their intimate knowledge of all phases of the School's 
activities, but because of their proven ability to function as a team. 

The Director gave this Committee the right to discuss any mat- 
ters affecting the welfare of pupils and Staff. He reserved the right 
to overrule their decisions if he considered it to be necessary, but on 
no occasion did this happen. From the Director's point of view this 
Committee is invaluable. Each of its members makes unique con- 
tributions; no one has dogmatic tendencies, and everyone has accepted 
criticism of his department with good will. Such changes as were 
made during the year were largely the product of this group. It 
should be noted that the Committee was given no responsibility in 
the external affairs of the School, nor did it deal, except on rare occa- 
sions, with problems of individual children. 

The loss of Mr. Stone was keenly felt on this Committee which 
was called upon to help in the solution of the problems caused by 
his death. The way in which it helped the Director to work out 
solutions to these and many other problems was most commendable. 
The Committee met regularly every week and occasionally special 
meetings were held to meet emergencies. 

The problems of individual children had for many years been 
handled by a large group known as the Personnel Department, con- 
sisting of the Director, the Principal, the Deans, the Nurses, Speech 
Therapists, Physiotherapist, Social Worker, Psychologist and Psy- 
chometrist. This large group continued to meet at intervals of about 
a month, but it was unwieldy, and many decisions concerning our boys 
and girls had to be made between meetings and by a small group of 
Staff members. Toward the end of the year it became apparent that 
a much smaller Committee was desirable, able to meet as regularly 
as the Policy Committee, and with a Secretary who would prepare the 
agenda and see that all Personnel records necessary for dealing with a 
problem were on hand. Such a Committee was organized to begin 
functioning in September 1952. 

For the last several years Miss Carpenter has been Dean of the 
Cottages in the Girls' Upper School, with Mr. Smith performing a 
similar function on the Boys' Side. They have had general super- 
vision of Cottage activities, and it is to them that the Housemothers 
have turned for advice and assistance. 

During the year the responsibilities of these Deans were extended 

Page Thirty-four 



to include the Cottages in the Lower School. At first this meant 
little in some Cottages where experienced Housemothers had been 
directing an adequate program for a number of years. However, as 
these were replaced with new Housemothers, the Deans widened their 
activities. Since they are members of the Advisory Policy Committee, 
they are an effective liaison between the Director and the Cottages. 
They are able to see that School policies are carried out in every 
Cottage, and being in daily contact with Cottage problems they can 
recommend policy changes whenever this seems desirable. 

Under the terms of the revised Social Security Act, all employees 
of sixty-five years of age or over, on July 1, 1952, were ehgible for 
pension. In view of this the Trustees approved a policy of retiring 
Housemothers at the age of sixty-five, a policy which hitherto had 
applied only to teachers and other professional workers. Since this 
would have meant a very large turnover if put immediately into effect, 
the Housemothers agreed to remain at their posts until such time as 
suitable replacements were found. When this occurred during the 
School year they have been given a longer notice than is customary. 
For this and other reasons the turnover of Housemothers at the end 
of the year promised to be greater than usual, and the presence of 
experienced Deans was, consequently, of special importance. It should 
be noted that we increased our number of Housemothers by adding 
second Assistants in Bradlee and Anagnos, and by planning to have 
a third Housemother also in Potter Cottage during the year 1952-53, 
This brought our total number of Housemothers up to twenty-four. 

As the School year drew to a close, the Organization Chart re- 
produced in this Report was drawn up as a guide for the Staff. It 
represents conditions as of September 1952. 



Relations With Parents 

Relations with the parents of our children have been growing 
steadily closer of recent years. The chief contact between School and 
home has, of course, been our Social Worker. During the year Miss 
Frances E. Marshall, who had held this post for fifteen years, resigned 
and was replaced by Miss Eleanor E. Kelly, who for a short time 
during Dr. Allen's administration was our Home Visitor. She joined 
our Staff in May so that she might have the benefit of a few months 
actual experience here before assuming full responsibility at the 
end of June. 

Page Thirty-five 




"Hi, Mom! How's Dad?" 

Each year the automobile brings 
a larger group of parents into 
close contact with the School. 
Not only do we now have more 
day pupils than ever before, but 
a considerable percentage of our 
children, particularly in the Lower 
School, are able to go home for 
week-ends. This is a most de- 
sirable development and deserves 
more comment than space permits 
in this report. 

Several years ago, some parents 
of blind children (mostly of pre- 
school age) organized in the Boston area and soon became a large 
and vigorous group. At present almost half of these parents now 
have children of school age, many of them at Perkins, and the rela- 
tions between the School and this group are most cordial. We are 
happy that they have chosen to hold their meetings at the School. 
It should be emphasized that this is an independent group and in no 
way a Parent-Teachers organization of Perkins Institution, though 
in many ways they function in this capacity. 

During the year we invited our own Parents to several Perkins 
affairs, including, of course, our Carol Concerts, and the Open House 
on February 22, when they were invited to have lunch with their 
children in the Cottages. A small group of parents were invited to 
the Director's house during the fall to discuss ways in which the 
parents and School could come closer together. The Director is 
moving rather slowly in this regard, but plans for closer co-operation 
are taking shape. 

For various reasons there was no Summer Institute for Pre- 
School Children and their Parents this year. We hope to organize 
one for the summer of 1953. During the year we set aside a room in 
Bennett Cottage and furnished it with twin beds and a crib for any 
parents with small children who might wish to visit our School. We 
are not advertising any special services as we do not have trained pre- 
school workers on our Staff, but some parents have found it valuable 



Page Thirty-six 



to spend a short time with us to observe our methods with children 
of school age, and to gain such encouragement and inspiration as they 
can from our program. 

During the year we were happy to have Mrs. Dorothea F. 
Forbush, the newly appointed pre-school worker of the Massachu- 
setts Division of the Blind, spend several weeks observing our Kinder- 
garten. Her appointment is a forward step which we most warmly 
welcome. 



The Deaf-Blind Department 

For several years the Deaf-Blind Department had occupied Fisher 
Cottage, but with increased demand for space it was necessary to 
move them elsewhere. The obvious solution was to move them to the 
Cottage formerly occupied by the Directors of Perkins, which was 
made vacant by Dr. Farrell's retirement. Mr. Waterhouse was able 
to occupy the house originally planned for the Principal, because of 
the fortunate fact that Mr. Stone had his own house just near the 
School grounds. 

The new quarters are not entirely satisfactory for our deaf -blind 
program, and the problems caused by carrying out many alterations 
after School was in session were serious. However, the Department 
had a good year. There were no changes in Staff except that Miss 
Fanny Durfee, who had been a Housemother in May Cottage, joined 
the Department as an attendant. There were two new pupils, 
Monica Noyes, six years old, from Vermont; and Jeffrey Stark, five 
years old, from Pennsylvania. Monica made good progress, but 
Jeffrey Stark did not make the progress we hoped and was with- 
drawn at the end of the School year. Perry Norris of Alabama was 
approaching twenty-one years of age at the end of the School year 
and so returned to his home State. He was made an honorary mem- 
ber of the graduating class, and received a special certificate from the 
Board of Trustees. This was the first occasion on which such a 
certificate has been awarded. 



Howe Memorial Press 

Distribution of the Perkins Brailler in quantity got under way 
during this year, by the end of which approximately a thousand ma- 
chines were in use throughout the world. We experienced some 

Page Thirty-seven 



difficulty with the mainspring, but for a new machine breakdowns 
were comparatively rare. We have received many reports of satis- 
faction, and indeed of enthusiasm, for the new Writer from blind 
and sighted users alike, of all ages. During the year we put the 
Unimanual Brailler on the market for one-handed operation. The 
printing of braille material progressed uneventfully. During the year 
our stereotyping equipment was replaced by modern machines de- 
veloped by Mr. David Abraham which, because of their ease of 
operation and freedom from breakdown, helped to increase the output 
of our workers appreciably. This new equipment is now available 
for sale, and we have manufactured several of the new models for 
other organizations. 

Interest increased during the year in the Uformite Process, 
originated by the Volunteer Services for the Blind of Philadelphia. 
We have supplied a number of wringer type printing presses to organi- 
zations in different parts of the world, who have chosen this method 
for reproducing braille inexpensively. 

The South Boston Workshop Closed 

During the spring of 1951, the President of Perkins Institution 
appointed a Committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Paul W. Neal, 
one of our Trustees, to recommend a course of action with regard to 
the Workshop in South Boston. This Committee consisted of several 
Trustees, together with the Bursar and the new Director. During 
the fall they recommended to the full Board of Trustees that the 
Workshop be closed in June of 1952, and this recommendation was 
accepted. Some of the reasons for this action are contained in the 
Bursar's Report, but it seems desirable to speak briefly about the long 
history of this Workshop and of its relations to Perkins Institution. 

A more detailed account of these matters was pubhshed in the 
Lantern for December 1951 by the Bursar. 

Although Perkins Institution was inspired by European prede- 
cessors, it has, in common with other Schools for the Blind in America, 
never accepted that a sheltered Workshop should be part of the 
educational set-up for blind youth. That there is a need for sheltered 
Workshops is not denied, particularly for those who have lost their 
sight in adult life. If the Shop is mainly a training organization 
from which its members pass, on completion of their apprenticeship, 
to employment in industry, then the expenditure on it of School funds 
might well be justified. 

Whether this could have been the case with the Perkins Work- 

Pdge Thirty-eight 




Helen Keller is presented with Perk.ins' Brailler 



shop is open to question, but in practice it never has. Workers who 
have gone to the Workshop have almost invariably stayed there long 
after their maximum skills had been attained. The long services of 
the employees, reported elsewhere by the Bursar, shows how permanent 
employment in our Shop tended to be. 

Fortunately the need for Perkins to run a Workshop is not as 
great as at some times in the past, and for a number of years there 
have been no applicants for employment there. While this is partly 
due to the fact that the State of Massachusetts has established a 
number of Workshops during recent decades, it is also probably true 
that a much smaller number of our students fail to find acceptable 
employment in industry. 

It was a matter of great concern to us during this year to see 
that everything possible was done by publicizing the situation to help 
the employees find other work. Nor was the final step taken until 
we had explored the possibilities of other organizations, either public 
or private, assuming responsibility for our Workshop. 

Our records show that the South Boston Workshop was effectively 
administered, and the subsidies we had to provide from the School 

Page Thirty-nine 



funds were far less than in the vast majority of sheltered Workshops 
for the Blind. 

The difficult task of closing the Shop with a minimum of con- 
fusion and loss was ably directed by the Bursar and Miss Emily 
Ramsay who, on the death of Mr. Remick, became the Workshop's 
last Manager. 

Library and Museum 

The Library continued to serve both our pupils and the adult 
blind of New England with braille and talking-book material. The 
circulation of talking book records grew about ten percent over the 
previous year, while the circulation of braille material remained un- 
changed. Work continued in the Blindiana Library on the organizing 
of the papers of the third Director. During this year also a large 
amount of material in Grade IV2 braille was sent out, mainly from our 
Lower School library, as gifts to schools for the blind in foreign coun- 
tries in co-operation with the American Foundation for Overseas 
Blind and the John Milton Society. These included schools in Israel, 
Ethiopia (two) , Formosa, Haiti, and Jamaica. 

The Librarian is responsible for Museum exhibits. This year the 
practice of having a special exhibit each month was temporarily dis- 
continued while the Staff devoted a good deal of time and attention 
to improving the regular displays of our material. Work was also 
started on reorganizing the Blindiana Museum. 

During the year an unusually large number of exhibits were pre- 
pared for organizations throughout the Country, These included one 
on the life of Dr. Howe, for the Army Medical Library in Washing- 
ton and a historical collection of braille writers for the Library of 
Congress, Other exhibits were prepared on the Development of Em- 
bossed Types for the Blind, and on the History of Communication 
for the Blind, which were exhibited at the Library of Congress in 
Washington; at the New York State School for the Blind in Batavia, 
New York; Public Libraries of Chicago and Cleveland; the Hadley 
Correspondence School at Winnetka; the Teacher Training Course 
at Hampden Institute; the Division of the Blind's exhibit at the State 
Fair in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and the A.A.LB.— A.A,W.B. Joint 
Conventions at Louisville, Kentucky. 

Teacher Training Course 

Our Teacher Training Course met as usual under the direction 
of Dr. Hayes, with Dr, Farrell giving many of the lectures, Mr. 

Page Forty 



Stone contributed during the first half year with lectures on educa- 
tional problems. 

The Course consisted of 14 members, including representatives 
from Greece, Japan, Honduras, Israel, and 6 different States. 

The usual number of outside lecturers participated, including one 
of our Ophthalmologists, Dr. Henry A. Mosher, who gave a series 
of lectures on the eye which were attended by a considerable number 
of our Staff. 




» 



Former members of the Harvard-Perkins Course meet for luncheon 
at the International Conference in Holland. 



Retiring Staff Members 

Under the terms of our Pension Plan three Staff members retired 
in June. These were: Miss Claudia A. Potter who for many years 
had taught Dramatics and Mathematics in the Upper School. Her 
full-length plays presented before the public were an important fea- 
ture of our program for a number of years, being replaced about a 
decade ago by other activities which seemed to offer opportunity to 
a larger number of pupils. Miss Florence A. Barbour had served in 
many capacities, both in the Upper and Lower Schools and in the 
O&ce during 22 years of service. Miss Margaret McKenzie probably 
spent more years at Perkins than any other person, entering the 
Kindergarten in 1891, and transferring to South Boston in 1897. 
She joined the Perkins Staff as a telephone operator, and later as a 
teacher of Handicrafts in the Lower School, serving in both of these 
capacities up until June of 1952. 

At the end of the year Miss Jean Gray, who had been Supervisor 
of our Kindergarten and Primary Departments through the year, left 
to marry Lt. James Edmundson of the U. S. Navy. As mentioned 
elsewhere in this Report, Miss Frances Marshall, who had been our 
Social Worker for a number of years, resigned in June. 

Page Forty-one 



After over forty years of service, Dr. Reinhold Ruelberg retired 
as dentist of the Lower School. He had served through almost the 
entire administration of Dr. Allen, as well as that of Dr. Farrell. 

Also retiring were Mrs. Nellie E. H. Hamil, Housemother of 
Tompkins, and Mrs. Janet G. Hancock, Housemother of Anagnos, 
both of whom had served with us for a long time. 

Because of family needs Mrs. Marjorie A. Carr left us at the 
end of the year. As organist she has accompanied our Chorus for 
many years, both at our morning Chapel exercises and at our Carol 
and other Concerts. She was in charge of our Girls' Glee Club. 

New England Problems 

During the winter it became evident that if our enrollment in- 
creased at the same rate that it has during the last few years, we 
would soon be in a position where we would have to refuse many 
applicants for admission. The Trustees requested the Director to 
give this matter serious thought. Before beginning on his duties in 
the Spring of 1951, the Director had made a tour of a number of 
residential schools for the blind throughout the United States, and 
had also visited a number of public school systems where blind children 
are accepted into regular classes, or into special braille classes. As a 
result of his observations at that time, and after consulting with 
officers of the American Foundation for the Blind, in New York 
City, and with officials of the New Jersey State Commission for the 
Blind, he drew up a New England Plan for the Education of Blind 
Youth, a copy of which appears as Appendix II to this report. 

The question of whether blind children should be educated in 
residential schools or in public schools has unfortunately been the 
source of much heated argument for a number of years. The Director 
hoped that on his travels he would find some objective data on the 
relative success of different educational programs, but was disap- 
pointed in this regard. However, he did find undoubted evidence 
that some visually handicapped children are being well educated in 
public schools. He found that the services offered throughout the 
nation varied from good to bad. The latter seemed to be largely 
the result of poor organization or poorly trained personnel, and ap- 
parently did not represent the aspirations of the people in charge. 

It is an undoubted fact that many Social Workers and Edu- 
cators are strongly opposed to the placement of children, whether 
handicapped or not, in Institutions rather than in their own homes. 

Page Forty-two 



It seems inevitable that attempts must be made in New England to 
educate some blind children in the public schools, and it is the wish 
of our Trustees and Staff to see that whenever this is done children 
are provided with all possible auxiliary services, and that Perkins 
should co-operate in any way possible. We are sure that many blind 
boys and girls can be well served by the public schools. This explains 
the origin of the New England Plan. 

The Plan has been distributed widely, not only in the United 
States but elsewhere, and the comments of Educators have been 
invited. On the whole it has been surprisingly well received. 

In May, representatives of all groups interested in the education 
of the blind in New England, together with educators from New 
Jersey and New York, were invited to discuss the Plan. In an 
all-day session, the Perkins Staff oudined what we attempt to accom- 
plish in our school as a background against what might be accomplished 
in the public schools. During the afternoon various types of educa- 
tion were discussed briefly, and Mr. Robert H. Hallowell, a Trustee 
of Perkins, who was in the Chair, was asked to appoint an Advisory 
Committee consisting of representatives of the States of Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, who 
together with representatives of Perkins Institution, might consider 
further plans. 

On June 11a group representing these organizations met in the 
Director's office and authorized him to draw up plans for the tempo- 
rary financing of the work outlined in the New England Plan. He 
was also invited to send questionnaires to the officials of the different 
States to determine just how far they could go legally in co-operation 
of the type envisaged in the New England Plan. These question- 
naires were sent out as the year came to a close. 

One point should be emphasized. In throwing the resources of 
Perkins Institution back of a program for educating the blind in New 
England pubUc schools, we are not, as some people have supposed, 
siding with those who are strongly opposed to the residential school. 
Undoubtedly, the services offered by residential schools throughout the 
Country vary just as markedly as do the services offered by the public 
schools; but the over-all history of Perkins Institution and many other 
residential schools demonstrate to our satisfaction that they have had 
marked success in educating blind boys and girls. 

The role of the residential school is undoubtedly changing. It 
is our determination to keep Perkins Institution in the forefront of 
such changes. With the fine co-operation of our parents and with 

Page Forty-three 



the State Authorities in the region we serve, there is no reason why 
we should not be able to cope with any difficulties which may arise 
and continue as leaders in our field. 

National Organizations 

During the year, the Director and other members of the Staff 
participated in the activities of a number of National organizations. 
Eighteen Staff members traveled to Louisville at the end of June to 
attend the joint Conventions of the American Association of In- 
structors of the Blind, and the American Association of Workers for 
the Blind. V/hile most of their interest was in the former group, the 
Director and Librarian participated also in the activities of the 
Workers. In spite of extremely hot weather, the Instructors' Con- 
vention accomplished far more work than usual because of the fine 
way in which it was organized into discussion groups. All our Staff 
members who attended were well satisfied with the results. 

In October, the Director as ex-officio Trustee attended the 
Annual Meeting of the American Printing House for the Blind in 
Louisville, Kentucky. This annual occasion affords an opportunity 
for many Superintendents of Schools for the Blind to come together 
and discuss their problems. The Director found this occasion most 
helpful. 

In December the Director and Librarian attended a two-day con- 
ference of the Library of Congress, where the whole program of 
Services for the Blind was discussed. One of the recommendations 
coming out of this Conference was the formation of an Advisory 
Committee to work with the Librarian of Congress on Services for 
the Blind. The Director was appointed as representative of printers 
of braille books to serve on this Advisory Committee during the year 
1952-53. 

The Director also attended the Annual Conference of the Inter- 
national Council for Exceptional Children in Omaha, Nebraska, on 
May 3, where he participated in a Panel Discussion on Training 
Facilities for Teachers of the Blind. 

As usual, the Staff participated in the work of the Massachusetts 
Council of Organizations for the Blind, and was responsible for the 
program at the December Meeting, which discussed the problems 
caused by the closing of the Workshop in South Boston. As usual, 
we were host in May to the Annual Meeting of the Council at the 
School, where a musical program was provided by our pupils. 

Page Forty-four 




Presenting the Resolutions at the Bussum Conference 

L to r ■ J. C. Colligan, U. K.; F. E. Davis, U. S. A.: John Jarvis, Interpreter, 
U K '■ E J. Waterhouse, Secretary; Gabriel Farrell, Chairman; A. D. Van Heel, Secretary, 
Bussum School; E. H. Getliff, Ass't Chairman, U. K. ; Dr. C. M. Waller Zeper, Principal, 
Bussum School; Eino Haakinen, Finland. 

International Conference 

From July 25 to August 2 an International Conference of Edu- 
cators of Blind Youth was held at Bussum, The Netherlands. Perkins 
was represented by Dr. Gabriel Farrell, Director Emeritus (who was 
Chairman of the Conference), by the Director (who was Secretary 
of the Conference) , and by Dr. Samuel P. Hayes (who led the group 
discussion on Tests and Measurements for the Blind). Dr. Farrell 
had been one of the prime organizers of this Conference and had 
worked toward its success for a number of years. It is noteworthy 
that Dr. Hayes was the only American whose attendance was re- 
quested by name. The Organizing Committee stated that they wished 
to have a discussion on mental measurements, but unless Dr. Hayes 
was able to attend they preferred not to have the matter appear on 
the agenda. The Trustees were happy to make arrangements for 
Dr. Hayes to attend. 

From our point of view, one of the most interesting features of 
this Convention was the large number of former members of Perkins 
who were present. Including the three already mentioned, there were 
twelve men and women at the Conference who had either taken the full 
Teacher Training Course, or who had been here to study with us 
for a shorter period. These were representatives from Norway (two) , 
Greece, England, India, Finland, Haiti, The Netherlands, and Egypt. 

The Proceedings of the Conference were recorded on tape, and 
were brought back to Watertown to be transcribed into a printed 
Report. The Resolutions of this Convention were immediately printed 
on our return to America and have been widely distributed. 

The Conference established a permanent organization, electing 
Dr. Farrell Honorary Chairman of the Executive Council and the 
Director an Associate Secretary. 

Page Forty-five 



Spiritual Guidance 

As in the past, we are indebted to the CathoHc, Jewish and Protes- 
tant Guilds for the Blind in supplying us with teachers for our Reli- 
gious Education Classes on Thursday afternoons, and for arranging 
for religious Retreats in the fall and in the spring. As usual our 
children have attended church services in the neighborhood on Sun- 
days and on religious festivals. 

Conclusion ^ 

During the year we lost through death the services of Colin Flagg, 
who had been a Janitor with us for a considerable period of time, and 
Mary Foley who, as Cook at Potter Cottage and elsewhere, had pro- 
vided us with well prepared food for almost two decades. 

The summer vacation at Perkins was not twenty-four hours old 
when tragedy struck our student body. John Hawthorne, Jr., of 
Millers Falls, Massachusetts, drowned while swimming in a pond near 
his home. John would have been a member of the 1953 graduating 
class, and was a fine athlete, being the champion in his weight class 
in the MetropoUtan Wrestling Tournament in 1952. 

In the interest of economy we are not Hsting the names of our 
many friends who have made gifts of money, tickets, services, etc., 
including the 2,169 people who contributed ^25,278 to our Children 
of the Silent Night. These gifts are, however, greatly appreciated. 
They are a vital contribution to our program. 

The Director wishes to express appreciation for the co-operation 
he has received from all members of the Staff during his first year. 
They have accepted such changes as he has found it necessary to make 
with good will and understanding. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward J. Waterhouse 



Page Forty-six 



THE PERKINS PROGRAM 
as outlined by the Staff 

1. Academic Program 

A. Lower School — Miss Evelyn Kaufman, 3rcl Grade 

Teacher 

B. Upper School — Benjamin F. Smith, Principal 

2. Personal Services — Carl J. Davis, Guidance Counselor 

3. Testing Service — Dr. Samuel P. Hayes, Psychologist 

4. Social Program — Miss Alice M. Carpenter, Dean of 

Girls 

5. Vocational Program 

A. Music and 

Piano Tuning — Paul L. Bauguss, Director of Music 

B. Manual Training 

and Ediphone —Leo V. Gittzus, Director of Manual 

Training 

6. Physical Training —Benjamin F. Smith, Principal 

7. Teacher Training —Dr. Samuel P. Hayes, Lecturer, Har- 

vard Graduate School of Education 

THE LOWER SCHOOL ACADEMIC PROGRAM 
AT PERKINS 
7. General objectives: 

A. Mastery of the tool subjects. (Reading, writing, arithme- 
tic, spelling, and language both spoken and written.) 

B. General concepts of social organizations and institutions. 
(Obtained through social studies as history, geography, 
and current events.) 

C. Basic concepts of natural sciences. (Obtained through 
nature study, elementary science, and health.) 

//. Three distinctive features of the Lower School: 

A. Smallness of groups. (Aids in mastering basic skills.) 

B. Remedial program. 

1. Special Braille and remedial teacher. 

12. Special tutoring in the intermediate grades done by 
the classroom teacher. 
C. Class for slow learners. 



I 



Page Forty-seven 



THE UPPER SCHOOL ACADEMIC PROGRAM 
AT PERKINS 

I. Objectives of the Junior High School Program: 

A. Completing the command of fundamental processes begun 
in the Lower School. 

B. Exploration to determine advanced educational and voca- 
tional objectives. 

C. A program of attainable, useful goals for the slow- 
learning blind student. 

//. Objectives of the Senior High School Program: 

A. Classical college course in preparation for college entrance. 
(Regular High School Diploma.) 

B. Liberal arts course with no reference to college entrance. 

(Regular High School Diploma.) 

III. Significant Features of the Academic Program as applied to the 
Education of Blind Students: 

A. Small classes throughout. 

B. A, B, sometimes C divisions where necessary, 

C. Individual remedial Braille for retarded readers and for 
new students untrained in Braille. 

D. Individual tutoring service for those not able, for one rea- 
son or another, to maintain a grade standard. 

E. Reading service, particularly in high school, to bring the 
student collateral print material not found in Braille. 

F. Typewriting as an additional means of communication. 

G. Special attention to pencil writing technique for blind 
students. 

H. A program of visual aid to prepare seeing students for 
public school or to teach individuals with limited vision 
to use the sight they have. 

I. Class in group guidance to impart principles of group 
living and human relations. 

J. Course in occupational information devoted to the special 
needs of blind people. 

K. Individual counseling with special reference to the educa- 
tional, vocational, and social needs of blind students. 

L. Museum and library facilities adapted to use of blind stu- 
dents. 

Page Forty-eight 



PERSONAL SERVICES AT PERKINS 
7. Health 

A. Resident Nurses (2) 

B. Attending Physician 

C. Staff Ophthalmologists (2) 

D. Dental Services 

E. Consultants in special fields of medicine 

//. Physiotherapy 

A. Physiotherapist 

1. Posture correction 

2. Therapy for motor and structural disorders 

777. Social Services 

A. Social Worker, Medical 

1. Home visitation 

2. Maintain contact between student and home 

IV. Guidance 

A. Group 

1. Classroom: educational, vocational, social 

2. Cottage: recreational, social 

B. Individual 

1. Personal adjustment 

2. Educational planning 

3. Occupational information 

4. Vocational planning 

5. Consulting psychiatric service 

C. Testing 

1. Intelligence 

2. Achievement 

3. Interest 

4. Motor skills 

V. Remedial Work 

A. With late entrants (after first grade) in: 

1. Braille reading and writing 

2. Special methods in mathematics 

3. Any other necessary areas 

B. With slow learners and/or students with adjustment 
problems 

VI. Speech Therapy 

A. Diagnosis of all entrants for speech defects 

B. Therapy with individuals or very small groups 

Page Forty-nine 



THE MENTAL TESTING PROGRAM AT PERKINS 

7. Individual intelligence tests: 

A. At entrance. 

1. Younger children — Interim Hayes-Binet 

2. Older children — Wechsler-Bellevue Adult Intel- 

ligence Tests (Verbal) Form I 

B. Retesting after 3-4 years to check on mental development. 

1. Younger children — Children's Wechsler 

2. Older children — Interim Hayes-Binet 

Wechsler-Bellevue Form II 
//. Group tests of school achievement in nine school subjects: 

A. Stanford Achievement Tests Form D-H 

1, Intermediate batteries in Grades 4-6 

2. Advanced batteries in Grades 7-9 

B. Metropolitan Achievement Tests Forms R-V (R-U already 
in braille) 

1. Intermediate batteries in Grades 4-6 

2. Advanced batteries in Grades 7-9 

In the high school we have used the Myers-Ruch High School 
Progress Test forms AM and BM and may use these and others 
again soon. 

III. Individual tests of motor skill and manipulation used in high 
school: 

A. Minnesota Rate of Manipulation Test — Displacing test 
substituted for placing test used with seeing. 

B. Pennsylvsnia Bi-Manual Work Sample — Assembly and 
disassembly tests. 

IV. Interest inventories and personality questionnaires: (group tests) 

A. Ohio Interest Inventory for educational guidance in 
Lower School. (See Outlook '51, 45, 61-68) 

B. Kuder Preference Record for vocational guidance. (See 
Outlook '48, 42, 95-104) 

C. Kuder Preference Record (Personal) Form AH in high 
school, for guidance in social adjustment. 

V. Scholastic Aptitude Tests used with candidates for a college 
course. 

For seven areas listed by Mr. Orin A. Stone, in which the results 
of tests give valuable assistance when used along with all other 
available data, see Report of First Regional Conference on 
Mental Measurements of the Blind, pp. 14-17. 

Page Fifty 



THE TEST-RESEARCH PROGRAM AT PERKINS 

I. Preliminary adaptation of new tests for use with blind. 

77. Trials of content and technique in Perkins and co-operating 
schools. 

777. Statistical treatment of results to determine validity and reliability. 

A. Correlation with other evidences of ability. 

B. Establishment of norms for the blind. 

IV. Publication of results and distribution of test materials to other 
schools and agencies. 

COTTAGE LIFE AND SOCIALIZATION AT PERKINS 

7. Our Aim 

A. To enable the child to be as happy as possible during his 
time here. 

B. To help each individual to develop to the limit of his 
capacity to become socially acceptable. 

77. Cottage Life 

A. The need for a housemother who can make the cottage 
life as much as possible like home. 

B. Teachers living in the cottages to share life with the chil- 
dren. 

C. Living, working, and playing together as a preparation 
for future co-operation in the situation in which the child 
finds himself. 

1. Getting along with other children. 

2. Doing a fair share of household tasks. 

3. Cottage parties in which there is mutual planning 
and participation by children and staff. 

D. Bennett Cottage where small groups of girls live and re- 
ceive special training in homemaking. 

777. Socialization 

A. Lower School 

1. Brownie Activity (One troop is made up of half 
seeing girls and half Perkins girls.) 

2. Scout troops 

3. Parties 

4. Trips 

5. Assembly talks by many people 

Page Fifty-one 



B. Upper School 

1. Dances with seeing boys and girls. 

2. Parties, some of which are especially planned as 
training for future social contacts. 

3. Visits to other schools and to homes. 

4. Athletic meets where social participation with see- 
ing people is helpful. 

5. Theatre trips. 

6. Class Trips. 

7. Parties with other Young People's groups. 



Q^==^ 



THE MUSIC PROGRAM AT PERKINS 

Music Lending Library 

(to those outside Perkins) 

Music Library . . . Music Transcribing 

(Howe Press) 

LOWER SCHOOL 



Kindergarten — Nursery tunes, 
musical games, rhythm bands, 
records, recorders (shepherd 
pipes) . 

Grade I — Singing, musical 
games, rhythm groups, rec- 
ords. 

Grade II — Singing, music games, 
music plays, rhythm games, 
r e c o r ds , recorders, music 
braille. 

Grade III — Chorus, music plays, 
music braille, music apprecia- 
tion. Glee Clubs, piano. 

Grade IV — Chorus, music 
braille, solfeggio, operettas, 
music appreciation. Glee 
Clubs, piano. 



Grade V — Chorus, solfeggio. 
Glee Clubs, operettas, music 
appreciation, instruments, fun 
bands. 



Grade VI — Chorus, solfeggio. 
Glee Clubs, operettas, music 
appreciation, piano, instru- 
ments, fun bands. 



Special Grades — Singing, rhyth- 
mic work, records. 

Attendance at public concerts, 
children's concerts, etc.. Grades 
3-6. 

Special record playing sessions. 



Page Fifty-two 





Music Program 


— (Cont'd) 






UPPER SCHOOL 




Group Activity — 




Private Instruction 


— 


Chorus 




Piano 


Trombone 


Girls' Glee Club 




Organ 


Tuba 


Boys' Glee Club 




Voice 


String Bass 


Girls' Band 




Violin 


Accordion 


Boys' Band 




Saxophone 


Percussion 


Operettas 




Clarinet 


Harmony 


Pops 




Trumpet 


Counterpoint 


School Concerts 


— Concerts 


Music Braille 



for outside organizations 

Certificdte in Piano 
Normal 
Preparation for private teach- 
ing, advanced piano students 
only. 



Attendance at public concerts, 
operas, operettas, Pops, and Bos- 
ton Symphony. 



THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS PROGRAM AT PERKINS 

7. A program for the Elementary school level. 

A. A variety of activities for a variety of student abilities. 

1, Bead work, leather, knitting, sewing, woodwork- 
ing, etc. 

B. Development of finger and hand co-ordination. 

C. Familiarization with materials about them. 

77. A program for the Junior and Senior High school. 

A. All are required to participate in the program in varying 
degrees. 

1. Students exploring the materials, and processes of 
industry. 

2. Specialization and definite goals. 

B. Areas of study: 

1. Boys — woodworking, metalworking, chair repair- 
ing, handcrafts, plastics, home mechanics, ceramics. 

2. Girls — sewing, knitting, weaving, basket making, 
ceramics. 

Page Fifty-three 



Industrial Arts — (Cont'd) 

Objectives: 

1. A production objective: 

a. Develop a better use of the hands, finger ma- 
nipulation, muscle co-ordination, etc. The 
hands to the blind are an important means of 
expression and exploration. 

b. To help students become aware of their needs, 
interests, and abilities in fields of manual and 
industrial work. 

c. Learning the spirit and discipline of work 
which should develop an interest in tools and a 
logical sequence in their use. Here the work 
experience is real and there is a need for a 
definite plan. 

d. To experience individual craftsmanship and 
"mass production," giving the student an un- 
derstanding of industrial methods. 

e. An exploration of information about indus- 
trial work and trades. 

f. The development of sound attitudes toward 
work and acceptable work habits. 

g. The development of "carry-over skills" that 
may be applied to a number of industrial en- 
deavors. This aids the student in becoming 
informed about industries and industrial pro- 
cedures. 

2. Consumption objective: 

a. Developing an interest in the products of in- 
dustry. Everything about us is the result of 
industry. 

b. As a consumer we must acquire interests, 
tastes, standards, knowledge, techniques, and 
habits which will help us choose industrial 
products more intelligently. 

c. To make the consumer more proficient in the 
selection, use, maintenance, repair and dis- 
posal of goods. 



Page Fifty-four 



Industrial Arts — (Cont'd) 

3. A recreation objective: 

a. Helping the student use leisure time intelli- 
gently. 

b. Promoting exploratory experiences which will 
aid in the selection of hobbies. 

c. An exploration of areas in which they may be 
currently interested. 

d. Acquiring a variety of satisfying and ab- 
sorbing leisure pursuits. 

D. Flexibility of a program. 

1. Does the program consider every boy's and girl's 
needs? 

E. Reluctance of public schools to accept blind students in 
their shops. 

TRAINING PROGRAM FOR EDIPHONE OPERATORS 
AT PERKINS 

7. Training for an occupation in the stenographic field. 

A. Selecting a superior student in English, spelling, and vo- 
cabulary. 

B. Depth of training is important. 

1. Must compensate for inability to correct completed 
work. 

2. A good blind ediphonist can compete on equal 
terms with the sighted. 

THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETIC 
PROGRAM AT PERKINS 

/. General objectives of the program: 

A. To promote sound physical health 

B. To promote good posture 

C. To develop mental and physical co-ordination 

D. To develop useful avocational skills 

E. To encourage sound character habits 

11. Significant features of the program as related to the special needs 
of blind students: 

A. Small classes, for more individual attention 

Page Fifty-five 



Physical Education — (Cont'd) 

B. Strong calisthenic program for health and posture 

C. Strong sports program adapted to the use of the bUnd 

D. Apparatus and tumbhng program for emphasis on mental- 
physical co-ordination 

E. Emphasis on sports that can be engaged in with seeing 
people (swimming, skating, bowling, baseball) 

PERKINS TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM 

The Education of the Blind 

These courses are conducted by the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion, Harvard University, with the co-operation of the Massachusetts 
Department of Education, Division of the Blind, and of Perkins 
Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind. The original 
course, founded by the late Dr. Edward E. Allen, former Director of 
Perkins Institution, was given as an extension course in the academic 
years 1920-1925, inclusive, and both courses are now offered as 
regular courses in the Graduate School of Education. 

These courses are announced in the catalogue of the Graduate 
School of Education as Education of the Blind I (Principles and Prob- 
lems) and Education of the Blind 21 (Special Methods and Appren- 
ticeship) . For students who are qualified to do graduate work, they 
may be counted toward the degree of Master of Education, (Ed.M.) 
Course I will cover the following topics, and possibly others, by 
lectures and reading: 

The blind of the past and of today; types of blindness; 
literature on the general subject; what the public should know 
about handicapped people; their recreations, pastimes, and 
diversions; the social and industrial status of the blind; pri- 
vate and public provision for them; the history of their edu- 
cation and of their employment; home teaching of the adult; 
the blind child — before school age; in residential schools; in 
public day schools; and his socialization under those situa- 
tions; school curricula, also means and methods of instruc- 
tion; the evolution of types for finger-reading; libraries of 
embossed books; the human eye and the causes of blindness 
and low vision; progress in preventing blindness; the move- 
ment for the separate teaching of children having low vision; 
borderline pupils; the deaf-blind; psychology of blindness and 
the blind. 

Page Fifty-six 



Teacher Training — (Cont'd) 

/. Purpose: To give blind children the best possible teachers. 

//, Program: 

A. Lectures and reading to give a theoretical and practical 
background — what every teacher should know about the 
blind. 

1. Specialists from outside Perkins: 

a. An ophthalmologist gives a series of lectures 
on the structure, anomalies, and diseases of 
the eye. 

b. A representative from the National Society 
for the Prevention of Blindness discusses con- 
servation and restoration of vision, and pre- 

' vention of blindness. 

c. Members of the Massachusetts Division for 
the Blind describe work with adults. 

2. Specialists inside Perkins: 

a. Discussion and demonstration of speech cor- 
rection. 

b. Discussion and demonstration of the education 
of the deaf -blind. 

c. Discussion and demonstration of intelligence 
testing. 

d. Talks by psychologist, psychiatrist, social 
worker, nurse, and physiotherapist. 

e. Perkins teachers, from all grades and subject 
departments, explain their special methods, ex- 
plain their problems and how they solve them. 

3. Perkins Blindiana Library, and extensive lists of 
references. 

B. Observation and practice teaching under supervision, with 
regular study in a standard text in educational psychology 
and teaching methods against which to check up Perkins 
methods. 

C. Personal acquisition of hand skills, braille and typing, 
with a chance to see how these subjects are taught to blind 
children. 

D. Gradual sympathetic understanding of blind children 
through the experience of living and working with them 
as members of a Perkins cottage family. 

Page Fifty-seven 



Teacher Training — (Cont'd) 

E. Courses in neighboring universities while hving at Per- 
kins—Educational psychology, child psychology, adoles- 
cent psychology, history of education, principles of edu- 
cation, educational methods. Education of exceptional 
children especially recommended. 

7/7. History: 

Since its establishment in 1921, the course has served to 
raise the level of efficiency of teachers already employed, pre- 
pared many new teachers to fill the need for replacement, and sent 
out many good teachers to serve in many American schools, 
besides training in American methods teachers from all over 
the world. 

We feel that no residential school for the blind in America 
has a better trained or more efficient staff. 

Many new teachers must be interested in our work, and 
trained for it, to provide for the great increase in blind children 
seeking an education. 



May, 1952 



Page Fifty-eight 



THE NEW ENGLAND PLAN FOR THE 
EDUCATION OF BLIND YOUTH 

Acting on the premise that Perkins Institution will not be able to 
accommodate all the children seeking admission by September, 1953, 
or September, 1954, at the latest, we propose to submit to the appro- 
priate State Departments of Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hamp- 
shire, Maine, and Rhode Island the following tentative proposals: 

1. The formation of a Five-State New England Council for the 
Education of the Blind with representatives from Perkins 
Institution and the appropriate State Departments of Edu- 
cation or Public Welfare. 

2. The establishment of Braille Classes in certain urban areas, 
and placement of a number of individual blind pupils in the 
public schools. 

Similar programs are functioning with varying degrees of suc- 
cess in widespread parts of the United States. Success is dependent 
largely on the calibre and experience of the staff. It also depends on 
certain auxiliary services; such as, 

a. Provision of braille material and special equipment. 

b. Reader service. 

c. Guide service and/or transportation facilities. 

d. An adequate program of tests; psychological, achievement 
and aptitude, to guarantee satisfactory teaching standards. 

e. An effective social program, either through the extra cur- 
ricular activities of the school, through community organi- 
zations; such as. Girl or Boy Scouts, the ^''Y's/' 4-H, etc., 
or through the home itself. 

f. Supplementary schooling in music, manual training, etc., 
together with tutoring in braille and early training with 
the typewriter. 

g. Particular attention to physical education, posture, etc. 

Page Fifty-nine 



3. Perkins will offer its facilities to: 

a. Train teachers selected by the local communities for braille 
classes, either in the regular teacher-training program or 
in short summer sessions. 

b. Supply supervisors when needed to maintain uniform 
standards and practices throughout the area. 

c. Provide braille material and equipment and co-ordinate 
the activities of transcribing and recording groups supply- 
ing the educational needs of the region. 

d. Carry on or supervise the testing programs. 

e. Assist, if needed, in the formation of volunteer reader 
groups, and the solution of guide and transportation prob- 
lems. 

f . Assist, if needed, in selling the home or community on the 
importance of normal social and athletic activities for 
blind boys and girls and their complete acceptance by their 
contemporaries and elders. 

g. Arrange for instruction in braille, and, if necessary, pro- 
vide for extra training in music, manual arts, typing, etc. 

h. Co-operate with the State Departments in such home- 
visiting services as may seem desirable. 
All these services to be rendered uniformly throughout the re- 
gion under the supervision of the New England Council. 

4. Perkins will establish uniform charges for these services on 
an actual cost basis. 

5. Perkins will co-operate with the five state departments in 
determining the most suitable program for an individual 
child, either in the residential school or elsewhere, transfer- 
ring him from one type of schooling to another as circum- 
stances may direct. 

Although the proposed program is made advisable at this par- 
ticular time by the increased number of blind pupils in the region, it 
should be made clear that it is our belief at Perkins that facilities 
such as those outlined above should be established as soon as trained 
personnel are available, regardless of increases in our enrollment. 

Page Sixty 



It is our philosophy that the educational program should be fitted 
to the child, and not the child to the program. For many (and pos- 
sibly for all blind children at some time in their school careers) the 
residential school is the best solution. In addition to such advantages 
as the special courses and trained personnel, there are opportunities 
for wide-spread competition on an equal footing, and an escape during 
difficult periods of growth from being a conspicuously unique member 
of the group. For many, the security of home, family, and neighbors 
is more important, and these should have an opportunity to be edu- 
cated in the public schools. 

These proposals are planned specifically to establish conditions 
under which the wisest possible choice of a program may be made for 
each child. Only by the fullest knowledge of many factors can an 
intelligent choice be made. These factors include: 

a. An understanding of the child's physique, mentality, per- 
sonality, emotional stability, interests, hopes and fears. 

b. A knowledge of the home and family; economic, moral, 
social, educational, religious, and geographic. 

c. Information about the resources of the community for 
employment, social and athletic experience, etc. 

d. Intimate knowledge of the local school facilities with spe- 
cial tutoring. 

e. Intimate knowledge of the resources of Perkins to meet 
the particular needs of the child at any stage of his growth. 

All these factors are changing, some of them very fast and very 
often. While many workers can be engaged in acquiring this infor- 
mation, unless it is the responsibility of a single agency to correlate it, 
interpret it to the best of its ability and act upon it, the data are of 
small value. We believe that our facilities make us the logical agency 
for this co-ordinating work. It is expected that this plan will start 
on a small scale and grow with the need, with lack of trained personnel 
the most serious hindrance. 



Page Sixty-one 



THE STUDENTS 

It is not, of course, possible to give a detailed account of all of 
our children. No two of them are alike, and it is one of our major 
problems to see that they receive the individual care best suited to 
them. There is always danger that the individual will become for- 
gotten in the group, and our Faculty exercise much care in preventing 
this from happening. Our responsibility, of course, is to see that 
these children develop in the best possible way. Consequently, it is 
when they come to leave us that we perhaps observe them with the 
greatest of interest. This year there were ten members in the gradu- 
ating class, and we are reproducing some extracts from their School 
Histories which appeared in the 1952 edition of Retrospect, the 
student annual. They graduated June 19 and Mr. M. Robert Barnett, 
Executive Director of the American Foundation for the Blind, gave 
the Commencement Address. 
Dorothy Josephine Barboza 
Taunton, Massachusetts 

Dorothy came to Perkins after four years in public school, two of them 
in sight saving class. Her activities have been varied. She is a member 
of the Glee Club, a piano student and has played in several recitals. She 
is president of the Girls' Student Council and has been president for two 
years of the Athletic Association. She has been active in track. She 
has represented Perkins at the annual Play Day. Last winter she won 
recognition for achievement in extempore speaking in the Dale Carnegie 
class. For two years Dorothy has modeled clothes of her own making 
at the Fashion Show. She is interested in switchboard operation and, 
with three years' experience at Perkins, hopes to find work of that type. 

Vernon I. G. Boyd 

Lynn, Massachusetts 

Vernon has devoted much time and effort to the study of music, especially 
voice. He has done a great deal of solo work the last few years in Chapel 
and with the Glee Club on its various engagements. He is a member of 
the Boys' Band. He has participated in all sports and at the 1951 E. A. 
A. B. Wrestling Tournament he won the 138-pound championship. 
During his senior year he has been secretary of the Boys' Student Council. 
For two years he has been a member of the P. A. A. During its first 
year he was social editor of Retrospect and the second year music editor. 
For two summers he had the experience of selling the Boston Record. 
With his Perkins diploma Vernon also receives a Pianoforte Tuning 
Certificate. For the future he would like to go to some mid-western 
college for a change of scene to develop his writing. Armed with his 
tuning certificate, his music and his determination, he should be able to 
realize his dream. 
(Vernon entered Ottawa College, Ottawa, Kansas, in September, 1952.) 

Page Sixty-two 



\ 



Gloria E. Charbonneau 

Lowell, Massachusetts 

Gloria joined this class in September, 1947, after she had completed 
eight grades in a Lowell parochial school. Her life at Perkins has been 
very busy, much of it in service for others. She is a member of the 
Glee Club and did some small solos in the Gilbert and Sullivan pro- 
duction of 195 L She belongs to the Athletic Association. She is espe- 
cially interested in certain branches of manual training — knitting, weav- 
ing and ceramics which she demonstrated at the Open House in 1952. 
Gloria is social editor for the current Retrospect. At Play Day in Phila- 
delphia, October, 1952, she was a Perkins delegate. Her daily trips 
around the offices with wares from the girls' store — always dependable 
and gracious — have been appreciated by the staff. During her senior year 
she assisted the May Cottage house mother certain hours each week. 
Gloria has worked on switchboard for three years and is interested in 
that vocation but she is an ambitious girl and, above all, wants to work, 
even if not at once in her chosen field. 

Richard Kamis 

Stephen Rogers Vernon Boyd 

Anton Sardo Arthur Pereira Lawrence Keefe Joseph Fennelly 

Galine Karantbeiwel Dorothy Barboza Gloria Charbonneau 




Page Sixty-three 



Joseph F. Fennelly 

Wakefield, Massachusetts 

Joe is the newest member of the class. He came to Perkins in January, 
1951, after completing two years in the Somerville High School. He 
entered at once into the life of the school. Shortly after coming here, 
he participated in the annual Amateur Show. He has been active in 
football, baseball and track, and is a member of the P. A. A. In the 
winter of 1952 he won recognition in the Dale Carnegie class for his 
achievement in extempore speaking. Joe is interested in stand operation 
and his striking success as a salesman on February 22 seems to indicate 
that his future is assured. 

Richard Peter Kamis 

Mattapan, Massachusetts 

In September, 1942, Dick started his Perkins career in the fourth grade 
after attending sight saving class. He is a leader. He has been a 
member of the Boys' Student Council for two years and its president his 
senior year. He is active in all sports. He has been captain of the 
Wrestling Team and in the 1952 E. A. A. B. Tournament he was 
champion in the heavyweight class. He is president of the P. A. A. 
He is a member of the Glee Club. For the two years of its existence he 
has written for Retrospect. In the Dale Carnegie class of 1952 he won 
recognition for achievement in extempore speaking. During the summer 
of 1952 he was a counselor in a boys'" camp, a position which he filled most 
successfully. Dick plans on college to prepare himself to be a physical 
education instructor — a work for which he is eminently fitted by his 
versatility in sports and by his personality. 
(Dick entered Springfield College in September, 1952.) 

Galine Karantbeiwel 

Buenos Aires, Argentina 

Galine came to Perkins in October, 1949. Her previous education had 
been by private instruction except for one year in a non-resident school 
for the blind in Buenos Aires. Her chief interests are music and lan- 
guages, with several of which she is conversant. She has played and 
sung at recitals and is a member of the Glee Club. She has taken part 
in an operetta and all three Christmas concerts, no small accomplish- 
ment in view of the fact that English is not her native tongue. For fun 
she likes dancing. After graduation Galine plans to stay on in this 
country and hopes to study at the Juilliard School in New York. Even- 
tually she would like to teach music and languages. 

Lawrence John Keefe 

Woonsocket, Rhode Island 

Lawrence came to Perkins in 1943 after a short time in public school, 
and he has made a very definite place for himself at Perkins. His 
activities have for the most part been in the literary and music depart- 
ments. They include singing with the Glee Club and participating in 

Page Sixty-four 



operettas and pop concerts. He plays the trumpet and performs with the 
group that gives so much pleasure to everyone at Christmastide. He is 
a member of the P. A. A. Lawrence was a regular contributor to the 
Goat and has continued with Retrospect. In the 1952 Dale Carnegie 
class he won recognition for achievement in extempore speaking. During 
the winter term he gave a fine Chapel talk based on his senior essay, 
"Herbert Hoover." Lawrence is interested in insurance as a vocation 
and we wish him all success in his chosen field. 



Arthur Pereira 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 

How often we have been refreshed by Arthur's music as he sang or played. 
His dancing in the operettas is something to remember. But singing and 
saxophone playing are only two of his talents, and he has been busy in 
other spheres of action. He has been on the track team, wrestled for 
five years, played baseball and football and taken swimming. Arthur has 
been a member of the Boys' Student Council for two years, secretary 
of the P. A. A. his senior year. In the Dale Carnegie course he won 
recognition for achievement in extempore speaking. At graduation 
Arthur will receive a Pianoforte Tuning Certificate as well as his 
diploma. He hopes to build a future with his music and his training 
in the tuning and servicing of pianos. Having played with a group of 
entertainers one summer, he is not without experience. Arthur has 
talents that could bring a great deal of pleasure to others. 



Stephen J. Rogers, Jr. 

Medford, Massachusetts 

Stephen's entire education up to this point has been received at Perkins. 
His major interests are literary and he has read the classics and languages 
rather widely. An able Chapel talk during his senior year, "The Uni- 
versality of the Iliad," was evolved from the study of one of his favorite 
subjects. He has been active in all sports and has wrestled for two years 
in the E. A. A. B. Tournament. He has served a year on the Boys' 
Student Council and for two years has belonged to the P. A. A. He 
plays several musical instruments, especially the piano, and is a member 
of the large group whose music gives so much pleasure in the Christmas 
season. He belongs to the Glee Club. Stephen was a Goat contributor 
and has been editor-in-chief of Retrospect since its inception. This ex- 
perience should stand him in good stead as he goes on to higher education. 
Stephen plans on college with graduate work to prepare him for uni- 
versity teaching. 
(Stephen entered Notre Dame University in September, 1952.) 

Page Sixty-five 



Anton Nicholas Sardo 

Palmer, Massachusetts 

Anton had attended pubUc school for three years before coming to 
Perkins. He has been a shining example of a man with a purpose, and 
with several strings to his bow. His sports record includes four years of 
wrestling with three championships; also baseball, football and track. 
He is vice-president of the P. A. A. and a member of the Boys' Student 
Council in his senior year. His singing and dancing in the annual operet- 
tas has been very good. He knows several instruments and plays in the 
band. For achievement as an extempore speaker he won recognition in 
the 1952 Dale Carnegie class. Anton has served very ably for two years 
as circulation manager of Retrospect for which he also does some writing. 
He has studied massage. With his Perkins diploma he receives a Piano- 
forte Tuning Certificate. In the future he would Uke to enter the field 
of popular music as a singer. It seems highly possible that this hope may 
be realized since he has so well prepared himself with means to make a 
living. Anton understands that he must work hard and he faces the task 

gladly. 

(Anton entered the Nylin School of Massage in September, 1952.) 



Square Dances 
are popular with 
our pupils. See- 
ing girls and boys 
come to the school 
to share in the fun. 




Page Sixty-six 



STUDENTS, 1952-53 

UPPER SCHOOL BOYS 

Arsnow, George F., Jr. — Fall River, Mass. 
Bellantoni, Joseph — Belmont, Mass. 
Bizon, Robert — Chicopee, Mass. 
Blake, George E. — Rochester, N. H. 
Bourgoin, Arthur A. — Brunswick, Maine 
Cote, Jules D. — Manchester, N. H. 
Coy, Erwin R. — Lisbon Falls, Maine 
Cushman, Richard W. — S. Woodstock, Vt. 
Duffy, Thomas P., Jr.— Waltham, Mass. 
Evans, Albert A., Jr. — Maiden, Mass. 
Fermino, Robert A. — New Bedford, Mass. 
Ferry, William F. — Newport, R. L 
Gasper, Alfred C. — Taunton, Mass. 
Germano, Manuel — Bristol, R. L 
Guyett, Irvin R., Jr. — N. Providence, R. L 
Johnson, Scott E. — E. Templeton, Mass. 
Kagan, Stanley J. — Chicopee, Mass. 
Koehler, Theodore, Jr. — Fitzwilliam, N. H. 
Leh, George H. — Greenfield, Mass. 
Leotta, Louis, Jr. — E. Boston, Mass. 
Libby, Alvah L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Lunden, Paul C. — Brattleboro, Vt. 
Lundquist, Jan Arne — Melrose, Mass. 
McDonald, Francis C. — S. Weymouth, Mass. 
Melican, Walter J., Jr. — Watertown, Mass. 
Morrissey, Francis Wm. — S. Boston, Mass. 
Morse, Stanley D., Jr. — Marshfield, Mass. 
Murray, Russell E., Jr. — Burlington, Mass. 
Osborn, James L. — Plymouth, Mass. 
Pacheco, Joseph E., Jr. — Somerset, Mass. 
Phifer, George H., Jr. — Fall River, Mass. 
Piraino, James — Gloucester, Mass. 
Rathbun, Robert P.— W. Medford, Mass. 
Raymond, Carl P. — Cambridge, Vt. 
Roy, Laurent W. P. — Woonsocket, R. L 
Skinner, H. Gardner — Danvers, Mass. 
Snow, Charles R. — Haverhill, Mass. 
Snyder, Edward L — Three Rivers, Mass. 
Sweet, Douglas H. — Keene, N. H. 
Vasapolli, Joseph — Woburn, Mass. 
White, Lloyd O.— Rochester, N. H. 



Page Sixty-seven 



UPPER SCHOOL GIRLS 

Avedisian, Carol E. — Northbridge, Mass. 
Baker, Amelia T. — Grand Isle, Vermont 
Bleakney, Brenda S. — Boston, Mass. 
Daigneault, Aline M. — Worcester, Mass. 
Doustou, Bernadette — Sherman Station, Maine 
Doyen, Marjorie — S. Portland, Maine 
Fisher, Ruth Ann — Waltham, Mass. 
Forrest, Maureen — Chicopee, Mass. 
Haight, Mary Louise — Lansing, Michigan 
Johnson, Lillian F. — Arlington, Mass. 
Liscomb, Janice C. — Salisbury Cove, Maine 
Mathews, Lucy E. — Cambridge, Mass. 
McAuliffe, Barbara— Hyde Park, Mass. 
McClure, Ann Marie — MiUinocket, Maine 
McDowell, Theresa A. — Leominster, Mass. 
MoUa, Rosemarie — Norwell, Mass. 
Nichols, Barbara A. — Shelburne, Vermont 
Noddin, Sandra — Ayer, Mass. 
Olson, Gloria M.— Augusta, Maine 
Pacheco, Priscilla A. — Somerset, Mass. 
Palmer, Shirley M. — Somerville, Mass. 
Parkinson, Alice — Cedar City, Utah 
Pinkham, Paula— Maiden, Mass. 
Polselli, Anna May— Worcester, Mass. 
Porter, Virginia — Lubec, Maine 
Reed, Anita — Farmington, N. H. 
Russell, Patricia A. — Boston, Mass. 
Schmidt, A. Karen — Webster, Mass. 
Silvia, Barbara M. — Buzzards Bay, Mass. 
Sinnott, Jacqueline — Marshfield, Mass. 
Tavoukdjian, Marie-Geanne — Beirut, Lebanon 
Wittstruck, Joan — Newport, R. I. 



DEAF-BLIND DEPARTMENT 

Bare, Carl John— Niles, Ohio 
Morgan, Juanita A. — Buena Vista, Col. 
Muns, Scott McDonald — Beaver, Penn. 
Noyes, Monica R. — Barton, Vermont 
Reis, Edward Wm.— Hillsdale, N. J. 
Roberts, Polly R.— Rye, New York 
Sabonaitis, Gayle A. — Worcester, Mass. 
Sutton, Barbara — S. Braintree, Mass. 



Page Sixty-eight 



LOWER SCHOOL BOYS 

Anderson, Ernest J. — Waltham, Mass. 

Andrews, Luther W., Jr. — Greene, R. L 

Angney, David H. — Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Baharian, David H.- — Quincy, Mass. 

Bailly, Christopher B. — Wollaston, Mass. 

Barresi, Paul L. — Chelsea, Mass. 

Beatrice, John — Newtonville, Mass. 

Beaulieu, John — Waterville, Maine 

Beauregard, Robert W. — Haverhill, Mass. 

Bittman, George C. — Dorchester, Mass. 

Bleiler, James P. — Medford, Mass. 

Brown, Charles St. C. — Needham, Mass. 

Brugsch, Henry J. — Waban, Mass. 

Callahan, Peter J. — Manomet, Mass. 

Caputo, Paul J. — Westfield, Mass. 

Carlo, John S. — Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Caron, Gilbert C. — Bristol, R. L 

Cavanaugh, Marshall C. — Dorchester, Mass. 

Chapman, Richard B., Jr. — Quincy, Mass. 

Coski, Stanley J. — Providence, R. L 

Cote, C. William, Jr. — Lunenburg, Vt. 

Crohan, David M. — Providence, R. L 

Cunningham, James J.— Dover, N. H. 

Dahms, Ralph E. — Portland, Maine 

DeCola, Frank P. — S. Boston, Mass. 

DelFavero, Joseph C. — Dorchester, Mass. 

Dennis, Ronald A. — Salem, Mass. 

Donovan, John L., Jr. — Laconia, N. H. 

Durette, Adoladd S. — Laconia, N. H. 

Fox, Eston S., Ill — Norwood, Mass. 

Gage, Richard E. — N. Wilmington, Mass. 

Gosselin, Louis A. — Manchester, N. H. 

Goumas, Charles — Somerville, Mass. 

Hickey, John — Newtonville, Mass. 

Hodge, Charles S. — Granville, Mass. 

Holdt, Robert Adair, Jr. — Huntington, W. Va. 

Hopkins, Paul F., Jr. — Cranston, R. L 

Humphries, Barry P. — Providence, R. L 

Jackson, Thomas O. — Tuskegee, Ala. 

Jakobiec, Thaddeus J., Jr. — Manchester, N. H. 

Lipson, Neil — Newton Centre, Mass. 

Macdonald, Donald C. — Dennisport, Mass. 

MacDonald, Roderick J. — Arlington Hgts., Mass. 

Main, Robert W. — Kittery, Maine 

Manning, John J.— Wilton, N. H. 

Marotta, Luciano J. — Waltham, Mass. 



Page Sixty-nin^ 



McCauIey, Richard— Wakefield, Mass. 
McCaw, Edwin H. — Hanson, Mass. 
McCoy, Robert G.— Maiden, Mass. 
McEachern, John N. — Stoughton, Mass. 
Mclntyre, John A. — N. Quincy, Mass. 
Menard, Leonard J. — Pittsfield, Mass. 
Mendonca, Paul — Fall River, Mass. 
Miller, Robert J. — Chester, Mass. 
Nadeau, Paul A. — Taunton, Mass. 
Nadeau, Richard — Lewiston, Maine 
Nelson, Marvin E. — Hubbardston, Mass. 
Nicholson, William A. — S. Weymouth, Mass. 
Nies, David Martin — Swampscott, Mass. 
Osborne, Clinton J. A. — E. Boston, Mass. 
Oliver, Philip N. — Townsend, Mass. 
Pacheco, Francis — Fall River, Mass. 
Paradise, Maurice — Nashua, N. M. 
Perry, Albert — Hillsgrove, R. I. 
Perry, Donald J. — Lowell, Mass. 
Piche, Wilfred J., Jr.— Cranston, R. L 
Pierce, Anthony — Dighton, Mass. 
Pierce, Gerard — Biddeford, Maine 

Pinette, J. Arnold — Ft. Kent Mills, Maine 

Pleasant, Earl C, Jr. — Indian Orchard, Mass. 

Purdy, Leslie J. — Belmont, Mass. 

Reineke, Allan F.— Warwick, R. L 

Ritchie, G. Wallace— Maiden, Mass. 

Ross, Donald F. — Littleton, N. H. 

Royal, Francis X., Jr. — Watertown, Mass. 

Sanders, John B. — Cohasset, Mass. 

Sheff, Robert A. — Roxbury, Mass. 

Shiner, Franklin P. — Montpelier, Vt. 

Skistimas, Paul — Mattapan, Mass. 

Smith, A. Kempton, Jr. — Attleboro, Mass. 

Strobel, Harold M. — Stoneham, Mass. 

Sullivan, Thomas J. — W. Roxbury, Mass. 

Thomas, Russell J. — Arlington, Mass. 

Thorp, Kenneth D. — Misquamicut, R. L 

Turner, Robert A. — Milton, Vt. 

Uphold, Barry W. — Boston, Mass. 

Wakefield, Dana U. — Lyndonville, Vt. 

Wakefield, Douglas A. — Lyndonville, Vt. 

Washburn, Lawrence W. — Alburg, Vt. 

Welch, Richard J.— N. Weymouth, Mass. 

Wheelock, North Wm., Jr.— Fall River, Mass. 

White, David H.— Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Whitney, James L. — Greenfield, Mass. 

Wiley, Robert W. — Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



Page Seventy 



LOWER SCHOOL GIRLS 

Andem, Janice M. — Charles River, Mass. 
Anderson, Elizabeth J. — Medford, Mass. 
Banda, Dianne M. — Cambridge, Mass. 
Barrows, Joan — Braintree, Mass. 
Beller Eisner, Constanza — La Paz, Bolivia 
Bleiler, Jayne — Medford, Mass. 
Blizard, Marion L. — Madison, Maine 
Boyer, Jeanne M. — Florence, Mass. 
Boyle, Maureen A. — Dracut, Mass. 
Brown, Linda Carol — Mansfield, Mass. 
Burns, Marlyn Avis — Waban, Mass. 
Callahan, Louise — Billerica, Mass. 
Chamberlain, Carolyn E. — Whitman, Mass. 
Connor, Martha B. — Winthrop, Mass. 
Cook, Donna-Lee — Middleboro, Mass. 
Corey, Christine A. — Townsend, Mass. 
Corey, Sharon — Houlton, Maine 
Cote, Vivian Rita — Lawrence, Mass. 
Davis, Carol Jean — Warwick, R. L 
Derouin, Barbara L. — Cranston, R. L 
Dow ling, Patricia — Lawrence, Mass. 
Downing, Pauline — Roxbury, Mass. 
Driben, Joyce H. — Brookline, Mass. 
Duplessis, Nancy A. — Augusta, Maine 
Feeley, Joan L. — Franklin, Mass. 
Finan, Irene F. — E. Greenwich, R. I. 
Folsom, Margaret — Framingham, Mass. 
Galleshaw, Juha A. — Cranston, R. I. 
Geyer, Karen — S. Braintree, Mass. 
Gibson, Virginia E. — Canton, Mass. 
Grady, Beverly M. — Pittsfield, Mass. 
Hanscom, Lola L. — Lincoln, Maine 
Fiarrington, Valerie E. — Providence, R. I. 
Fiatch, Judith Colby — Needham, Mass. 
Fienderson, Jane A. — E. Boston, Mass. 
Hoffman, Rosalie — Dorchester, Mass. 
Hoyt, Frances M. — N. Weymouth, Mass. 
Johnson, Natalie E. — E. Templeton, Mass. 
Kelley, Brenda— Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Klein, Pamela J. — Chicago, III. 
Lareau, Mary Ann — Worcester, Mass. 
Luman, Sharlene — N. Quincy, Mass. 
Mahoney, Kathleen V. — Peabody, Mass. 
McLaughlin, Rita J. — N. Wilmington, Mass. 
Miller, Judith Anne — Brighton, Mass. 
Miller, Susan Jane — Brighton, Mass. 



Page Seventy-one 



Mitchell, Phyllis— E. Boston, Mass. 
Morreo, Diana — Newton, Mass. 
Neill, Charyl M.— Agawam, Mass. 
Nerney, Carol Ann — N. Attleboro, Mass. 
Noddin, Carolyn — Ayer, Mass. 
Nyland, CoUette — Beverly, Mass. 
O'Hara, Marilyn J.— Maiden, Mass. 
Oliver, Doris E. — Townsend, Mass. 
Page, Nancy R. — Southbridge, Mass. 
Phifer, Joy C— Fall River, Mass. 
Plante, Carolyn L.— Rochester, N. H. 
Pownall, Sara Jane — Norwood, Mass. 
Purinton, Nancy A.— Weeks Mills, Maine 
Reynolds, Linda A. — Wollaston, Mass. 
Ruby, Nancy— Wakefield, Mass. 
Scott, Marcy Ann — Lombard, 111. 
Silberstein, Annette — Brighton, Mass. 
Staples, Sandra J. — Saco, Maine 
Tashjian, Brenda — S. Lincoln, Mass. 
Teixeira, Linda C. — Harwich, Mass. 
Thompson, Patricia A. — Fort Devens, Mass. 
Washburn, Shirley A. — Alburg, Vermont 
Welch, Judith M.— S. Braintree, Mass. 
Welch, Rosalie B. — Mattawamkeag, Maine 
Whalen, Eileen A. — Charlestown, Mass. 
Whalen, Linda J.— Milford, N. H. 
Zinner, Judith A. — Natick, Mass. 



Page Seventy-two 



88 


76 


164 


10 


13 


23 


12 


3 


15 


14 


6 


20 


9 


4 


13 



Perkins Institution 

REGISTRATION AS OF NOVEMBER 1, 1952 

Massachusetts 

Maine 10 

New Hampshire 12 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 

NEW ENGLAND 133 102 235 



Alabama 

Colorado 

Illinois 

Michigan 

New Jersey 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Utah 

West Virginia 

OUTSIDE NEW ENGLAND .... 5 6 11 



Bolivia 1 1 

Lebanon Oil 



1 










1 







2 


2 





1 




1 










1 




1 







1 










1 




1 








OVERSEAS 

TOTALS 



NEW ENGLAND 133 102 235 

OUTSIDE NEW ENGLAND 5 6 11 

OVERSEAS 2 2 



138 110 248 



Page Seventy-three 







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SOME ITEMS FROM THE CALENDAR 1951 - 52 

It is impossible to record all the interesting happenings of the 
year. Scarcely a day passes but there is an expedition to a museum, a 
farm or a place of historic interest, or there is a square dance, a per- 
formance of the Glee Club, a concert, or a party either on the campus 
or elsewhere. Some hint of the richness of our program may be found 
in the items listed below. 

September 1951. Housemothers returned on September 4. On Septem- 
ber 5, the newly appointed Advisory Policy Committee met for the first time. 
New Staff members reported to School on Sunday, September 9, in time 
for an evening briefing, followed by a short reception at the Director's house. 
September 10. All the Staff were back for their annual meeting in Chapel. 
Pupils returned on September 11 and School began on the 12th. 

October 1951. October 1, the Upper School Students elected members 
to serve on their Student Councils for the year. October 3 and 4, the 
Director's Reception was held for the first time in the former Principal's 
house and spread out over two evenings because of lack of space. 

October 6-7, the Fall Retreats organized by the Catholic and Protestant 
Guilds for our Upper School pupils. October 8, Boys' Student Council In- 
vestiture. October 12-14, a long week-end for most of the students and 
Staff, with several of our High School girls traveling down to the Over- 
brook School for the Blind in Philadelphia for their Annual Play-Day with 
girls from other Schools. October 17, the winter season of movies got under 
way in the boys' study hall. Movies were shown almost every Wednesday 
from this time until Easter. October 19, Miss Katherine Pickett, a former 
student at Perkins and now a Medical Missionary to the Navajo Indians, 
gave an illustrated talk on her work. October 21, Sunday afternoon, a group 
of parents met at the Director's house to discuss ways in which the parents 
and School might co-operate more closely. October 24, Mr. Morris Frank 
of the Seeing Eye lectured to the older pupils and the Staff and Harvard 
Class on the work of his organization. October 26-27, a Regional Conference 
on Tests and Measurements, attended by representatives of organizations 
from the Northeastern States. Dr. Hayes organized and led the program. 
October 31, the Lower School Cottages had their Hallowe'en parties, the 
Kindergarten ones during the afternoon and the others during the evening. 

November 1951. November 2, the Hallowe'en spirit spread to the 
Upper School. November 5, Annual Meeting of the Corporation. Novem- 
ber 8, a group of pupils gave an Assembly program at Newton Junior High 
School. November 9, Directors' Memorial Exercises in Dwight Hall. For 
years separate exercises for Mr. Michael Anagnos in the Lower School, and 
for Dr. Howe in the Upper School, had been held on their respective birth- 
days in November. On this occasion these two Directors, together with 
Dr. Edward E. Allen, were remembered in joint exercises in which the whole 
School participated. November 22-25, Thanksgiving Recess. November 29, 
Mr. Barbeau, Voice teacher on our Staff, gave a recital in Dwight Hall. 

Page Seventy-jive 




December 1951. December 1, Girls' Dance in Dwight Hall, with 
music supplied by the Perkins Upper School Orchestra. December 10, 
special Christmas exercises held each morning from then on in our Chapel, 
culminating in an assembly for the whole School in Dwight Hall on Decem- 
ber 20. December 16 and 18, public Carol Concerts. December 17, all our 
Cottages had their Christmas parties. December 20, final Christmas Concert 
for parents and the Perkins Family, after which the vacation began. 

January 1952. January 2, pupils returned and on January 3 School 
began once more. During January the Wrestling season got under way, and 
on each Thursday morning until Lent, members of the Upper School Student 
Councils were the Chapel speakers. 

February 1952. In the middle of the month the Mid- Year examinations 
were held. On February 22 we held our annual Open House, attended by a 
large group of parents and friends, and immediately afterwards most of us 
left for a long week-end. On February 28, the Rev. E. G. Waterhouse 
opened our series of Thursday morning talks by clergymen from the Water- 
town churches, which extended until Easter. 

March 1952. March 7 and 8, the Perkins Wrestling Team traveled to 
Baltimore to wrestle in the Eastern Athletic Association for the Blind Annual 
Tournament, and won second place. March 14-15, several mathematic 
teachers attended a Regional Conference of Mathematics at the Overlea 
School for the Blind in Baltimore, Maryland. 

April 1952. April 4, pupils left for the Easter Recess, returning on 
Tuesday, April 15. During April we started our series of Vocational Con- 
ferences with representatives from the different New England States, to 
formulate joint plans for the future of our pupils. 



Page Seventy-six 



May 1952. May 2 was Upper School Amateur Night in Dwight Hall. 
May 3-4, Spring Retreats for Upper School pupils. May 8, reunion luncheon 
for girls who had attended Camp Allen given by the Boston Kiwanis. May 9, 
Intermediate Music Recital. May 10, Girls' Senior Prom. May 16, Perkins 
Chess Club played Cambridge Latin School. May 17, Track Meet of 
Eastern Athletic Association for the Blind at Hartford, Connecticut; and 
our Protestant girls went to Andover for a social week-end. May 21, Tea in 
honor of Miss Marshall, retiring Social Worker. May 23, Advanced Music 
Recital. May 26, the Annual Meeting of Massachusetts Councils of Organi- 
zations for the Blind, followed by a concert in Dwight Hall. May 27, Recep- 
tion for entering teachers. May 29, Memorial Day, School closed for a 
long week-end. 

June 1952. June 4, Girls' Track Meet. June 5, Upper School Boys' 
Field Day. June 6, Watertown Yacht Club took girls on annual trip down 
the river. June 7, Alumnae Annual Reunion. June 8, students and Stalf 
went deep-sea fishing. June 10, Stated Meeting of Board of Trustees at 
Watertown. June 10, Girls' Annual Athletic Banquet. June 11, Lower 
School Cottage Picnics. Final exams were June 12-16. June 13, Boys' 
Senior Prom. June 14, Alumni Annual Reunion. June 16, a large group 
of students and Staif attended the Pops Concert as guests of the Harvard 
Class of 1927. June 19, Graduation Day; School closed for the long vacation. 
June 24, Special Meeting of Executive Committee authorized construction 
of cottage for the Director. 



TWO PERKINS BOYS 

WIN 

FORD INDUSTRIAL PRIZE 




Page Seventy-seven 



REPORT OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

September 9, 1951 — June 19, 1952 

Dr. Balboni 

Cottage Visits (Illness) 236 

Seen in Infirmary (Treatments) ^07 

Immunizations ^^ 

Vaccinations 

Globulin Serum 23 

Physical Exams ^^^ 

Dr. Gundersen — Dr. Mosher 

Eye Exams and Refractions ■••• '^^4 

Dr. Elliott — Dr. Ruelberg 

Dentistry ^^^ 

Dr. Toppan 

Pre-employment Exams ^'■ 

Cottage Illnesses 

Penicillin given to ^^ 

Aureomycin given to ^ 

Throat cultures submitted ^° 

Diagnosis 

Measles (Regular) — 54; (German) — 50 

Mumps }_ 

Ear Infection 27 

Red Throats 25 

Tear Gland Infections ^ 

G. I. Upsets ^4 

Upper Respiratory Virus 55 

Cellulitis ^ 

Injuries— Knee 2, Head 1, Ankle 1, Shoulder 4, Skin 1, Muscular 2 

Tonsillitis -^^ 

Colds (Serious) ^^ 

Fatigue ° 

Treated at Infirmary by Nurses 

Minor Ailments 1266 

Admissions to Hospitals 

Massachusetts Eye & Ear Hospital 23 

Haynes Memorial Hospital ^ 

Children's Hospital 2 

Robert Breck Brigham 3 

Peter Bent Brigham ■'• 

Emergency Ward — Mass. General Hospital 14 

Illness and Hospitalization at Home 

Surgery — (2 — Tonsils & Adenoids; 1 — Appendectomy) 3 

Medical 2 

Ears and Throat ■'• 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carolyn Brager, R. N. 

Page Seventy-eight 



REPORT OF THE UPPER SCHOOL DENTIST 

The following is the report of the dental operations performed 
for the pupils of the Upper School during the year 1951-1952. 

Amalgam fillings 207 X-rays 59 

Cement fillings 112 Extractions 16 

Zinc oxide eugenol 53 Pericoronitis 8 

Synthetic porcelain 60 Vincent's Stomatitis 6 

Silver nitrate treatments 129 Dentures 1 

Root canal treatments 37 Orthodontic cases 1 

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the staff of Forsyth 
Dental Infirmary for Children in caring for some of our more diffi- 
cult extraction cases, fillings for some who were eligible and oral 
prophylactic treatments for all the Upper School pupils. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mark D. Elliott, D.D.S. 



REPORT OF LOWER SCHOOL DENTIST 

The following is a list of operations performed during the 1951-52 
year, and you will note the large number of completed pupils in 
comparison to previous years: 

Alloy fillings 223 

Cement fillings 7 

Cement & Alloy fillings 4 

Synthetic porcelain fillings 12 

Silver nitrate treatments 161 

Prophylactic treatments 140 

Teeth devitalized 3 

Treatments for devitalized teeth 9 

Teeth extracted 20 

Miscellaneous treatments 36 

Upper School emergencies 2 

Total number of operations 617 

Number of pupils completed 140 

Number of new pupils completed 46 

Respectfully submitted, 

Reinhold Ruelberg, D.M.D. 

Page Seventy-nine 



WORKSHOP FOR ADULTS 
Annual Report for Fiscal Year 1951-52 

This has been an eventful year at the Workshop but not a very 
happy one. On October 24, 1951, our Trustees accepted the recom- 
mendation of a subcommittee that the Workshop should be closed 
the following June. On November 4, 1951, Charles Black died, and 
on January 22, 1952, our manager, Donald Remick, died. 

Charles Black was a Perkins graduate who had just completed 
his 45th year as an employee at the Workshop, much of that time 
serving as foreman and worker in the Chair Caning Department. 

Mr. Remick had only been an employee of the Workshop since 
July, 1949, but he had been our friend for many years, both as a 
competitor and supplier. While the future of the Shop was in the 
balance he worked hard to find some way to keep it open even though 
he understood clearly why Perkins could not continue to operate it. 

The decision of the Trustees to close the Shop was based upon 
a number of factors including these three. First, such a Shop cannot 
be run without a subsidy. Second, price competition on mattresses 
and mattress renovating was keeping our rates of pay to mattress 
workers lower than was fair under present living costs. This situation 
discouraged additional blind people from seeking employment in the 
Shop, and if we had endeavored to increase rates of pay, the usual 
Workshop deficits would have been increased far beyond their present 
embarrassing proportion. Third, the State operates workshops offer- 
ing compensation which we could not afford to match. 

Closing a business is an entirely different proposition from keep- 
ing one going and it was a new experience for all of us. Our main 
concern was to close down gradually enough so that we would be sure 
to accommodate all of our customers with current requirements and 
keep all of our workers employed right up to the end. We accom- 
plished this, thanks to the wonderful spirit and effort of all the 
Shop personnel, blind and sighted alike, and to the careful direction 
and confident encouragement of Miss Emily Ramsay on whose 
shoulders the management of the Shop fell after Mr. Remick's death. 
The usual statistical report analyzing our business volume is not 
being presented this year because it would not have any significance. 
We were operating for only ten months and the influences upon our 
activities were far from normal. The operating statement which is 
included at the rear of this book is self-explanatory. Statistics of a 
different sort, however, are of interest. During this last year of the 

Page Eighty 



Workshop existence 19 blind people were employed, 16 men and 3 
women, all in production. There were 8 sighted people, 3 men and 
5 women, of whom five were in production and three in the office. 
Of the 19 blind persons 7 had been employees more than 25 years. 
These had terms of service actually covering 27, 34, 36, 36, 37, 39 
and 42 years. Seven blind persons had been employed between 10 
and 25 years, and five under 10 years. As of July 1 two were over 
65 years of age and immediately eligible for Social Security. Four 
were between the ages of 60 and 65, six between 50 and 60 years 
and seven under 50. As this report is being written, eight of our 
former blind workers have already found new employment, six at 
the Massachusetts Division Broom Shop in Cambridge, one at the 
National Braille Press and one at the Howe Memorial Press. 

There will only be one more Workshop report, to record the 
sale of real estate, equipment and material. Probably it will only be 
a dollars and cents report. The personality of the Workshop disap- 
peared with the leaving of the people whose skills and effort have 
made it a well known Boston institution. 

J. Stephenson Hemphill, Bursar 
September 15, 1952 

REPORT OF THE BURSAR 
For The Fiscal Year 1951-52 

From the standpoint of control this year seems to have been a 
good one because we have seemed to be able to control everything 
except inflation. In September the Trustees approved an operating 
budget of ^610,725.00, which was 6.1% above the actual operating 
expenses of the preceding year. The increase was spread generally 
throughout the budget, more being added through nominal salary 
increases and staff changes than by higher expenses. 

Whereas our budgets usually carry through the year as approved, 
it was necessary to bring before the executive committee, for further 
approval, requests for new equipment and salary changes that could 
not wait for the next fiscal year. In January, our Maintenance 
Departments asked for a review of their job classifications and base 
salaries. A thorough survey was made and, as a result, increases 
were granted to the Buildings and Grounds Departments, Janitors, 
Chauffeur, Watchmen and Storeroom and the budget amended ac- 
cordingly. Finally, in May it was decided to establish the depreciation 

Page Eighty-one 



charge at ^36,000.00 per year instead of ^24,000.00 as previously and 
this change was voted, retroactive to September first. The resulting 
revised budget amounted to ^628,982.00 or 93% over the actual 
expenses of the preceding year. 

The final tally of operating expenses at the end of the fiscal year 
totalled ^634,775.50. We had overspent our revised budget almost 
1%. The Workshop had a deficit of ^12,672.52, unusually large due 
to the exigencies of closing. (See separate report on Workshop for 
Adults.) Otherwise, total operating expenses were less than the 
corresponding budget. The cost of living adjustment was budgeted 
at 80% for non-resident maintenance and office personnel. The 
Bureau of Labor Statistics Index, which we follow, indicated an actual 
adjustment of 17% in September. It increased gradually to 81% in 
March then dropped to 79% and was back to 80% in August. Our 
estimate proved a good one this year. 

Food costs kept rising and exceeded the budget by a small amount. 
Household expenses were pushed over the budget in the process of 
accommodating the increase in student population, the accompanying 
transfers in cottage families and the opening of the Deaf-Blind Cot- 
tage in the former Director's residence. Buildings expenses went over, 
too, through uncertainties in estimating the kinds and amounts of 
materials to be used in our special summer carpentering and painting 

projects. 

Among the extra budgetary expenses. Special Maintenance and 
Repair, or Summer Projects took the lead. This has been the third 
summer of extensive work under the Macomber Report and I am 
happy to say that it is the final big one for some time. 

In all ^110,809.00 was appropriated to cover the cost of our 

large and small Summer Projects. As of August 31st, when the 

books were closed, ^50,907.55 of this has been spent. Several 

^ projects previously approved were still active in a diminishing 

,{1|. way during the year. The Cottage Conversion Project launched 

'^% in 1951 is still in progress with most of the work during the 

past year going into the Deaf-Blind Cottage. 

During the year there were a number of interesting develop- 
ments at Perkins affecting the business affairs of the Institution. 
Outstanding among these was a new salary plan worked out by 
Mr. Waterhouse for teachers. Teaching salaries have long been 
much too low at Perkins as compared with other schools for the 
blind and teaching salaries in general, and 
this situation was one to which he gave early 



■ ,* "'" ■ 
III 




attention. Plan X, which has been approved by the Trustees, estab- 
Ushes a salary range which is comparable to local teaching salaries 
and to rates paid in other residential schools for the blind. Office and 
Library positions were also studied and classified acording to duties 
and levels of responsibility, with salary ranges set comparable to 
those being paid in other local institutions and industry. In all cases, 
the same rate of pay applies whether the employee lives in or out. 
A person who lives in does so for our convenience and is expected 
to give some of his free time and interest to the daily life of the 
school. 

It is our intention to see that Plan X is in full effect for the 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1954. In the meantime, the bud- 
gets becoming effective September 1, 1952 and 1953 will each add 
part of the increase. Since our income from endowments will not 
cover the cost of Plan X and since our tuition is and has been much 
lower than that charged by other boarding schools, for both blind 
and other pupils, an increase in tuition is necessary. 

In December we received a ruling from the Commissioner of 
Internal Revenue at Washington to the effect that the Value of 
Maintenance received by our resident employees is not subject to 
income taxes. The ruling was based on the opinion that it is neces- 
sary for most Perkins' staff members to live in, and it was issued 
with the understanding that our retirement plan would not consider 
the Value of Maintenance as earnings. Even though this meant 
amending our retirement plan it was accepted with much thankfulness 
by all concerned. 

The salary increases for household staff enabled us to attract 
more desirable women, or women with more experience, but it did not 
reduce our turnover. Out of 63 positions including housemothers, 
cooks, maids and laundresses we had a turnover of 34 during the 
school year. This leaves a lot of room for improvement for which 
we believe the best answer is still higher pay. Since our salary levels 
are still far below those paid to women for performing similar work 
in private homes, we are recommending another increase for this 
group in the 1952-53 budget. 

In September we started requiring a pre-employment physical 
examination before accepting new employees in the Maintenance and 
Household Departments and offices. Our accident record has not 
been good and a review of causes indicated that we might eliminate 
some accidents by refusing to employ persons whose health or physical 
condition show a susceptibility to accidents. In order to keep the 

Page Eighty-three 



procedure as impartial as possible we engaged a Watertown physician 
who comes to Perkins at specific times to examine new employees on a 

fee basis. 

There isn't as much being said about Civilian Defense as there 
was last Fall but whatever happens now we have a good start toward 
being ready. During this past year we co-operated with the Water- 
town Civilian Defense authorities, clearing out our tunnels and cre- 
ating well marked and lighted shelters under the cottages. Then we 
worked out an air raid organization around our housemothers as 
wardens, with teachers and others assisting. During the Winter we 
conducted two air raid alerts while students were in their classrooms 
and had the farthest distances to go. The stop watch said that 
every person was in his place within eight minutes. 

This year closes an interesting chapter in my Perkins' experience. 
For four years I have had the responsibility of supervising all of 
the maintenance activities except the Engineering Department, in 
addition to my business duties. Last Spring the Trustees approved 
Mr. Waterhouse's proposal to give me an assistant who will take 
over the direct supervision of these maintenance activities. Naturally, 
I like the idea not only because it will be better for Perkins and 
because it will enable me to renew adequate attention to Perkins' 
business affairs, but because it brings to my department as Mainte- 
nance Assistant Mr. William W. Howat, who has good ideas, a genial 
personality, and a desire to work. The oudook is very good. 

The interesting year I have just reported is sure to be over- 
shadowed by the year ahead. 

J. Stephenson Hemphill, Bursar 



Page Eighty-four 



Report 

of the 

Treasurer 

of 

Perkins 
Institution 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

November 3, 1952 

The report of the Treasurer for the year ended August 31, 1952, 
is submitted herewith. The accounts of the Corporation were audited 
by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Company and their report for the year 
is attached. 

Income from tuition and board of ^250,875 slightly exceeded 
previous year's receipts of ^237,065, Investment income assigned to 
the funds was at the rate of 5/2% of book value, which is the same 
rate as the prior year. The actual income from securities was ap- 
proximately 6%% of the book value compared with 6^/4% in the 1951 
fiscal year. Unassigned income of ^53,380.47 was added to the 
Securities Income Reserve Fund as against ^60,536.68 last year. At 
August 31, 1952, this Reserve amounted to ^224,966.59. 

Operating expenses of ^613,306.34 were approximately ^51,700 
higher than the previous year and of this amount, about ^39,600 
represented increased salary expense. The operations of the Work 
Shop Department terminated in July, 1952, and the net loss for the 
year, including expenses subsequent to the termination of operations, 
was ^12,672.52. Expenses for the year, including the Work Shop 
loss, exceeded income by ^22,612.20 and this amount was charged 
against the Reserve Fund for Depreciation. The excess of expenses 
over income for the prior year was ^20,509.86. All charges against 
the Reserve for Depreciation Fund totalled ^107,982.62 and the 
balance of this fund on August 31, 1952, was ^317,170.57— a net 
reduction of ^52,319.38. 

The operation of the Howe Memorial Press resulted in a loss of 
^79,208.97 as against the prior year's loss of ^31,073.07. A sub- 
stantial part of this deficit is attributable to the expense of the Braille 
Writer, which is being amortized over the first two thousand machines 
sold. Income from investments of .^10,143.69 compares with ^11,262.86 
for the prior year. The net loss, after investment income, for the 
present year was ^69,765.28 as against ^20,410.21 in the year ended 
August 31, 1951. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph B. Williams, Treasurer 



Page Eighty-six 



ACCOUNTANTS' REPORT 

The Trustees 

Perkins Institution and 

Massachusetts School for the Blind 
Boston, Massachusetts 

We have examined the balance sheet of Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 
for the Blind (not including Howe Memorial Press Fund) as of August 31, 1952 and the 
related statements of current fund income and expenditures and reserve fund for deprecia- 
tion for the year then ended. We have also examined the balance sheet of Howe Meniorial 
Press Fund as of August 31, 1952 and the related statement of income and expenditures 
for the year then ended. Our examinations were made in accordance with generally 
accepted auditing standards, and included such tests of the accounting records and such 
other auditing procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

We examined all investment securities recorded as owned by the Institution and by 
the Howe Memorial Press Fund as of August 31, 1952 and held for their respective 
accounts by the Fiduciary Trust Company. We audited all changes in investments during 
the year then ended and satisfied ourselves that investment income receivable during the 
year was received. 

As of August 31, 1952 the Trustees voted to charge the current funds excess of 
expenditures over income for the year then ended (^22,612.20) against the reserve fund 
for depreciation (Exhibit C) . 

In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present fairly the financial 
position of the Institution and of the Howe Memorial Press Fund at August 31, 1952 and 
the results of their operations for the year then ended. 

Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 
Accountants and Auditors 

Boston, Massachusetts 
October 16, 1952 



Page Eighty-seven 



Exhibit A 
BALANCE SHEET 
(Not including Howe Memorial Press Fund) 

August 31, 1952 

ASS ETS 

CURRENT FUNDS 

Cash: 

Operating balance $ 44,263.73 

Director's Discretionary Account 6,785.21 $ 51,048.94 

Accounts Receivable: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 64,120.00 

Other 5,194.04 69,314.04 

Inventories, at cost (Note 1) 24,470.06 

^144,833.04 



TRUST FUNDS 

Tompkins Fund: 

Cash $ 28,072.67 

Securities (Note 2) 1,199,288.48 ^1,227,361.15 

Varnum Fund: 

Cash $- 11,547.45 

Securities (Note 2) 268,832.71 280,380.16 

All Other Funds: 

Cash $ 160,541.05 

Due from current funds 131,708.50 

Securities (Note 2) 6,427,055.44 6,719,304.99 

Cash — Unexpended income for restricted purposes 22,852.88 

^8,249,899.18 



PLANT FUND 

Land and Buildings, Watertown ^1,579,406.75 

Land and Buildings, South Boston 91,000.00 

Machinery, Tools and Equipment 20,827.49 

Furniture and Fixtures 53,794.47 

Music Department 36,892.00 

Library 136,818.89 

Autos and Trucks 11,020.06 



^1,929,759.66 



Notes: (1) Operations of the Works Department were terminated 
in July 1952. It is anticipated that a loss of ap- 
proximately $2,000.00 will be incurred in the liqui- 
dation of the department's inventories. 
(2) Securities are carried at book value which is less 
than market. 

Page Eighty-eight 



Exhibit A 



BALANCE SHEET 
(Not including Howe Memorial Press Fund) 

August 31, 1952 

L IABILITIES 

CURRENT FUNDS 

Accounts Payable: 

Trade ^ 402.31 

Due to Howe Memorial Press Fund 2,236.22 

Amounts withheld from employees 

Director's Discretionary Account (Schedule 3) 

Due to Trust Funds 



^ 2,638.53 

3,700.80 

6,785.21 

131,708.50 



$ 144,833.04 



TRUST FUNDS 

Institution 
Tompkins Fund ^1,228,939.60 



Varnum Fund 

Special Fund 

Permanent Fund 
General Fund .... 



209,341.99 

473,206.17 

469,687.12 

2,216,529.97 



Reserve Fund for Depreciation (Exhibit C) . 

Securities Income Reserve Fund 

Undistributed profit on investments sold, net: 

Tompkins Fund 

Varnum Fund 

All Other Funds 



Unexpended income for restricted purposes 
(Schedule 4) 



Kindergarten 



; 68,873.41 

314,333.17 

1,968,117.97 



Total 

^1,228,939.60 

209,341.99 

542,079.58 

784,020.29 

4,184,647.94 



^597,704.85 ^2,351,324.55 ^6,949,029.40 



(1,578.45) 

71,038.17 

666,420.02 



317,170.57 
224,966.59 



735,879.74 

22,852.88 
;,249,899.18 



PLANT FUND 

Plant Capital: 

Balance at beginning of year 

Additions charged to: 

Current income (Exhibit B) 

Restricted income (Schedule 4) 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation (Exhibit C) 
Net increase in Library 



^1,899,350.19 

23,150.67 
4,207.13 
2,318.91 
732.76 30,409.47 



01,929,759.66 



Page Eighty-nine 



Exhibit B 
STATEMENT OF CURRENT FUNDS INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
Year ended August 31, 1952 

Income: 

Interest and Dividends: , 39 112 57 

Tompkins Fund IsisiLSS 

Varnum Fund ' 

All Other Funds ^373,194.37 

Less allocations to other than 
Permanent and General Funds: 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation $ 19,663.24 

Securities income reserve fund 53,380.47 

Unexpended income for ,, ^>,, ^^x-,^ 

restricted purposes 28,545.92 101,589.63 271,604.74 



Tuition and Board: c/i ■^ 7 41 n nn 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts ^ E ' =nn 

^'^'[^rin.. ': • 250,875.00 

Private students •^' ' 



Transfers from income for restricted purposes: 

Sarah Hunt Howell Trust ?> 5,434.11 

Justin B. and Mary Letitia Perkins Memorial Fund 2,300.00 

Qjj^gj. 22,927.30 30,661.41 



Other Trust income 

Donations 

Income from other sources: 

Library service for the adult blind 

Tuning income 

Discounts 

Miscellaneous 





762,02 




980.00 


$ 7,705.00 




5,364.68 




633.28 




6.75 


13,709.71 



^626,517.33 

Expenditures: 

Operating expenses (Schedule 1) ^613,306.34 

Additions to plant out of income (Exhibit A) 23,150.67 

Net loss of works department (Schedule 2) 12,672.52 649,129.53 

Excess of expenditures over income, charged to Reserve Fund 

for Depreciation (Exhibit C) ^ 22,612.20 

Note: In addition to maintenance expense included in the operating expenses shown above, 
$83,051.51 of maintenance repairs and replacements was charged to Reserve i'uncj 
for Depreciation (Exhibit C). 



Page Ninety 



Exhibit C 
STATEMENT OF RESERVE FUND FOR DEPRECIATION 
Year ended August 31, 1952 

Balance at beginning of year ^369,489.95 

Allocated income of fund (Exhibit B) ^^'^^I'll 

Depreciation charged to operating expenses (Schedule 1) 36,000.00 

^425,153.19 

Deduct: 

Additions to plant (Exhibit A) ?> 2,318.91 

Maintenance repairs and replacements 83,051.51 

Current funds excess of expenditures over income 

(Exhibit B) 22,612.20 107,982.62 

Balance at end of year ^317,170.57 

Exhibit D 
HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 
Balance Sheet 
August 31, 1952 

ASSETS 

Cash ^ 21,183.53 

Securities (Note 1) 144,656.30 

Accounts Receivable: 

Trade ^ 21,530.37 

Due from Perkins Institution, current funds 2,236.22 23,766.59 

Inventories (Note 2) : 

Appliances ^ 17,305.00 

Braille writers 27,875.00 

Braille printing 11.403.58 56,583.58 

Machinery and Equipment 9 27,829.94 

Less Reserve for Depreciation 10,494.67 17,335.27 

Deferred braille writer expenses (Note 3) 49,982.09 

^313,507.36 

LIABILITIES 

Advances from customers ^ 7l3'sa 

Amounts withheld from employees 713.88 

''""ISal'^'''"" ^ 24,839.10 

?Sli ::::;::::::::::::: 12,290.00 37,129.10 

Surplus: 

Balance at beginning of year ^326,643.53 

Deduct: 

Net loss for the year (Exhibit E) $ 69,765.28 

Less profit on sale of securities 17,607.88 52,157.40 274,486.13 

^313,507.36 

Notes: (1) Securities are carried at book value which is less than market. 

(2) Inventories of appliances and braille printing are valued at cost. Inventory 
of braille writers is valued at selling price which is below cost. „.„„„„ 

(3) Deferred braille writer expenses are being amortized over the first 2,000 
machines sold. As of August 31, 1952, 885 machines have been sold. 

Page Ninety-one 



Exhibit E 

HOWE MEMORIAL PRESS FUND 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Year ended August 31, 1952 

Sales: 

Appliances ^ 72,724.87 

Braille printing 22,670.84 

$ 95,395.71 

Costs of Operation and Maintenance: 

Appliances manufactured ^129,372.68 

Braille printing 32,163.59 

Administrative salaries and expenses 3,642.76 

Depreciation 2,629.45 

Maintenance 2,918.02 

Insurance 1,125.17 

Retirement pension plan 3,154.53 

Loss on bad debts 46.47 

Social security taxes 849.66 

$175,902.33 

Less: 

Discounts $ 226.48 

Miscellaneous receipts 1,071.17 1,297.65 174,604.68 

Loss from operations ? 79,208.97 



Other Income: 

Interest and dividends $ 9,860.22 

Transfer from restricted income 283.47 10,143.69 

$69,065.28 

Other Charges: 

Pensions $ 300.00 

Miscellaneous 400.00 700.00 



Net loss $ 69,765.28 



Page Ninety-two 



Schedule 1 
CURRENT FUND OPERATING EXPENSES 

Year ended August 31, 1952 

Salaries Supplies Other Total 



Administration $ 35,740.94 $ 5,417.07 $ 5,960.34 $ 47,118.35 

Treasurer's office 2,916.72 5,054.82 7,971.54 

Special Departments: 

Library 13,154.81 1,916.35 15,071.16 

Health 8,970.00 1,741.31 601.85 11,313.16 

Personnel ■'.,: 14,331.50 755.71 15,087.21 



$ 36,456.31 $ 4,413.37 $ 601.85 ^ 41,471.53 



Education: 

Literary $ 73,723.64 $ 2,812.35 $ $ 76,535.99 

Manual Training 18,590.00 820.30 19,410.30 

Music 17,386.80 715.26 18,102.06 

Deaf-Biind 15,036.18 715.64 15,751.82 



$124,736.62 $ 5,063.55 $ $129,800.17 



Household: 

Salaries and misc. expenses .... $ 79,981.65 $ 9,443.21 $ $ 89,424.86 

Laundry 9,797.96 1,002.33 10,800.29 

Food 63,566.18 63,566.18 



$ 89,779.61 $ 74,011.72 $ $163,791.33 



Maintenance: 

Engineering $ 43,356.19 $ 12,229.24 $ $ 55,585.43 

Buildings 23,728.52 8,109.22 31,837.74 

Grounds 16,869.64 2,567.70 19,437.34 

Fuel 26,311.89 26,311.89 



$ 83,954.35 $ 49,218.05 $ $133,172.40 



Depreciation $ $ ^ 36,000.00 $ 36,000.00 

Other expenses: 

Automobile 

Insurance 

Pension Retirement Plan 

Tuning Department 

Pensions Paid 

Loss on Bad Debts 

Social Security Taxes 



2,391.00 


2,391.00 


8,143.65 


8,143.65 


16,980.92 


16,980.92 


5,011.32 


5,011.32 


14,754.22 


14,754.22 


35.25 


35.25 


6,664.66 


6,664.66 



$ 53,981.02 $ 53,981.02 



$373,584.55 $138,123.76 $101,598.03 $613,306.34 



Page Ninety-three 



Schedule 2 

WORKS DEPARTMENT 

INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Year ended August 31, 1952 

Income: 

Sales ^ 75,128.84 

speciaifund zz.:::: 1.587.05 

Miscellaneous 393.59 

$ 77,109.48 

Operating Expenses: 

Materials used ^ 28,548.15 

Salaries and wages 48,809.79 

General expenses 4,987.84 

Auto and truck expenses 1,409.97 

Loss on Bad Debts 610.72 

Social Security Taxes 703.13 

Travel expenses 8^.83 85,155.43 

Operating loss ^ 8,045.95 

Expenses subsequent to termination of operations: 

Salaries ^ 3,000.38 

General expenses 751.95 

Auto and truck expenses 109.60 

Social Security Taxes 51.77 

Write off of inventory and supplies 712.87 4,626.57 

Net loss (Exhibit B) ^ 12,672.52 

Note: Operations of the Works Department were terminated in July, 1952. 



Page Ninety-jour 



Schedule 3 

STATEMENT OF DIRECTOR'S DISCRETIONARY ACCOUNT 

Year ended August 31, 1952 

Balance at beginning of year i> 3,360.52 

Add: 

Contributions r 6,812.97 

Transfer from special funds (Schedule 4) 1,029.47 

Amounts deposited for certain pupils 610.11 8,452.55 

^11,813.07 

Deduct: 

Expenditures ^ 3,839.07 

Payments to pupils from deposits 1,188.79 5,027.86 

Balance at end of year ^ 6,785.21 



Schedule 4 

STATEMENT OF UNEXPENDED INCOME FOR RESTRICTED PURPOSES 

Year ended August 31, 1952 

Balance at beginning of year ^34,663.04 

Add: 

Allocated income of fund (Exhibit B) 28,545.92 

Gifts for special purposes 2,010.00 

Sarah Hunt Howell Trust 5,434.11 

Justin B. and Mary Letitia Perkins Memorial Fund 3,243.73 

^73,896.80 

Deduct: 

Authorized expenditures ^12,609.77 

Transfers to: 

Plant Fund (Exhibit A) $ 4,207.13 

Current fund (Exhibit B) 30,661.41 

Howe Memorial Press fund 283.47 

Director's discretionary fund 

(Schedule 3) 1,029.47 36,181.48 

Added to principal of fund 2,252.67 51,043.92 



Balance at end of year ^22,852.88 



Page Ninety-five 



INSTITUTION FUNDS, AUGUST 31, 1952 



Tompkins Fund 

William Varnum Fund 

Special Funds: 

Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund $ 3,652.01 

Charles S. Adams (Christmas Fund) 204.03 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund 20,920.27 

Robert C. Billings (for deaf, dumb and blind) 4,085.91 

Mary Alice Butler (for reading matter for the blind) 3,782.82 

Deaf-Blind Fund 195,911.35 

John D. Fisher (education teachers and others) 5,442.08 

Joseph B. Glover (for blind and deaf) 5,107.38 

John Goldthwait Fund (charitable) 4,514.79 

Harris Fund (outdoor relief) 27,238.82 

Parkman B. Haven Fund 50,000.00 

Henry Clay Jackson Fund (for deaf-blind) 85,247.24 

Maria Kemble Oliver Fund (concert tickets) 15,322.16 

Prescott Fund (education teachers and others) 21,687.17 

Elizabeth P. Putnam (higher education) 1,021.48 

Richard M. Saltonstall (use Trustees) 3,064.42 

A. Shuman Clothing Fund 1,021.48 

Augustine Schurtleff Fund (for deaf, dumb and blind) 1,787.58 

Thomas Stringer Fund (for deaf-blind) 16,221.27 

Lenna D. Swinerton 467.57 

Julia E. Turner (education of worthy needy) 6,506.34 



Permanent Funds (income for 

George Baird Fund 

Charlotte Billings Fund 

Frank W. Boles 

Stoddard, Capen Fund 

Jennie M. Colby, 

in memory of 

Ella Newman Curtis Fund .. 

Stephen Fairbanks 

David H. Fanning 

Ferris Fund 

Helen Osborne Gary 

Harris Fund 

(general purposes) 

Harriet S. Hazeltine Fund 

Benjamin Humphrey 

Prentiss M. Kent 

Sir Charles W. Lindsay 

Kate M. Morse Fund 

Albert A. Morton 

Memorial Fund 

Jonathan E. Pecker 

Richard Perkins 

Henry L. Pierce 

Mrs. Marilla L. Pitts, 

in memory of 

Frederick W. Prescott 

endowment 



^1,228,939.60 
209,341.99 





): 


473,206.17 


ineral purposes 




$ 12,895.21 


Frank Davison Rust 




40,507.00 
76,329.02 




$ 4,000.00 


Samuel E. Sawyer 


2,174.77 


13,770.00 


Margaret A. Simpson 


968.57 




Caroline A. Slack 


10,000.00 


100.00 


Charles Frederick Smith 




2,000.00 


Fund 


8,663.00 


10,000.00 


Timothy Smith 


2,000.00 


5,010.56 


Mary Lowell Stone Fund .... 


4,000.00 


12,215.61 


George W. Thym Fund .... 


5,054.66 


10,000.00 


Alfred T. Turner 


1,000.00 




Thomas Upham Fund 


4,950.00 


53,333.00 


Levina B. Urbino 


500.00 


5,000.00 


Vaughan Fund 


10,553.50 


25 000 00 


Ann White Vose 


12,994.00 


2,500.00 


Charles L. Young 


5,000.00 


9,008.93 






5,000.00 


Add: 


^460,816.78 


35,000.00 


Distribution of Surplus at 




950.00 


August 31, 1947 


8,870.34 


20,000.00 






20,000.00 




^469,687.12 


5,000.00 




25,338.95 







Page Ninety-six 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General Funds (principal and income for general purposes) : 

Elizabeth B. Allen ^ 500.00 Cusan J. Conant ... 

Frank G. Allen 1,000.00 William A. Copeland 

Nora Ambrose, 

in memory of 300.00 

James H. Anderson 62.25 

James H. Anderson 28,303.92 

Charlotte H. Andrews 15,169.87 

Mary Louise Aull 261,944.64 



Ellen S. Bacon 

Elizabeth B. Bailey 

Eleanor J. W. Baker 

Calvin W. Barker 

Lucy B. Barker, 

in memory of 

Marianne R. Bartholomew 

Francis Bartlett 

Elizabeth Howard Bartol 

Mary Bartol 

Thompson Baxter 

Samuel Benjamin 

Robert C. Billings 

Helen Bisbee 

George Nixon Black 

Susan A. Blaisdell 

Dehon Blake 

Mary Blight 

William T. Bolton 

Betsey J. Bowles 

George W. Boyd 

Caroline E. Boyden 

Mary L Brackett 



J. Putnam Bradlee 294,162.53 

Charlotte A. Bradstreet 23,273.49 

Ellen F.Bragg 8,006.68 

Max Brenner 200.00 

Lucy S. Brewer 10,215.36 

Florence N. Bridgman 500.00 



J. Edward Brown 100,000.00 

Maria A. Burnham 

T. O. H. P. Burnham 

Abbie Y. Burr 

Annie E. Caldwell 

Emma C. Campbell 

Lydia E. Carl 

Elizabeth Hobart Carter .. 

Ellen G. Cary 

Katherine F. Casey 

Edward F. Cate 

Robert R. Centro, 

in memory of 

Fanny Channing 

Emily D. Chapman 

Mary F. Cheever 

Ida May Chickering 

Alice M. Clement 

Mary A. Clement 

Alice L Cobb 

Laura Cohen 

Ann Eliza Colburn 



Augusta E. Corbin 

Nellie W. Cowles 

Jennie L. Cox 

Louise F. Crane 

W. Murray Crane 

Harriet Otis Cruft 

5,000.00 David Cummings 

3,000.00 Arthur B. Curtis 

2,500.00 Chastine L. Cushing 

1.859.32 L W. Danforth 

Kate Kimball Danforth ... 

5,953.21 Charles L. Davis 

2,000.00 Etta S. Davis 

2.500.00 Susan L. Davis 

5,000.00 Mabel E. Day 

300.00 Joseph Descalzo 

322.50 Elsie C. Disher 

250.00 John H. Dix 

25,000.00 Mary Frances Drown 

2,000.00 Alice J. H. Dwinell 

10,000.00 Amelia G. Dyer 

5,832.66 Mary A. Dyer 

500.00 Ella L Eaton 

7,220.99 Mary Agnes Eaton 

555.22 Mary E. Eaton 

9,798.75 William Eaton 

5,000.00 David J. Edwards 

1,930.39 Ann J. Ellis 

5.263.33 A. Silver Emerson 

Martha S. Ensign 

Orient H. Eustis 

Eugene Fanning 

Sarah M. Farr 

Mortimer C. Ferris 

Memorial 

Edward A. Fillebrown .... 

10,000.00 Annie M. Findley 

5,000.00 Anna G. Fish 

200.00 Thomas B. Fitzpatrick .... 

4,000.00 John Forrest 

1,000.00 Ann Maria Fosdick 

3.412.01 Nancy H. Fosdick 

5,000.00 Sarah E. Foster 

50,000.00 Elwyn Fowler 

100.00 Mary Helen Freeman 

5,000.00 Cornelia Ann French 

Martha A. French 

10,000.00 Ephraim L. Frothingham 

2,000.00 Jessie P. Fuller 

1,000.00 Thomas GafEeld 

200.00 Mabel Knowles Gage 

1,052.03 Edward L. Geary 

32,324.03 Albert Glover 

767.96 Joseph B. Glover 

2,000.00 Marie M. Goggin 

87.00 Benjamin H. Goldsmith .. 
5,000.00 Charlotte L. Goodnow ... 



: 500.00 

1,000.00 

20,644.82 

3,036.99 

1,948.60 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

6,000.00 

7,723.07 

1,722.25 

500.00 

2,500.00 

250.00 

1,000.00 

8,027.87 

1,500.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

163,250.07 

10,000.00 

21,857.25 

200.00 

40,043.00 

8,375.18 

1,669.50 

3,660.91 

5,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

1,023.00 

500.00 

2,505.48 

500.00 

50.00 

64,247.43 

1,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

10,583.25 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

14,333.79 

3,937.21 

200.00 

5,232.75 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

164.40 

1,825.97 

200.00 

6,685.38 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,864.55 

11,199.68 

6,471.23 



Page Ninety-seven 



Institution Funds (Cont'd) 
General Funds (principal and income for general purposes): 

Maria W. Goulding $ 2,332.48 E. E. Linderholm 

Charles G. Green 45,837.70 

Amelia Greenbaum 500.00 

Imogene C. Gregory 450.00 

Mary Louise Greenleaf 199,189.94 



William Guggenheim 50.00 

Ellen Page Hall 10,037.78 

Ellen Hammond 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Harty 5,000.00 

Helen P. Harvison 1,000.00 

Hattie S. Hathaway 500.00 

Jerusha F. Hathaway 5,000.00 

Lucy Hathaway 4,577.00 

Edward J. and Georgia M. 

Hathorne Fund 50,017.68 

William Hayball 500.00 

Charles H. Hayden 34,893.41 

John C. Haynes 1,000.00 

Mary E. T. Healy 200.00 

Alice Gushing Hersey, 

in memory of 3,000.00 

Joseph H. Heywood 500.00 

Ira Hiland 3,893.37 

Stanley B. Hildreth 5,000.00 

George A. Hill 100.00 

AdaF. Hislop 25.00 

Lila M. Hodges 1,000.00 

Margaret A. Holden 3,708.32 

Theodore C. Hollander 3,016.00 

Bernard J. Holmburg 2,000.00 

Alfred G. Hosmer 229.28 

Margaret J. Hourihan 200.00 

Charles Sylvester Hutchinson 2,156.00 

Katharine C. Ireson 52,037.62 

Hattie M. Jacobs 10,693.43 

Lewis B. Jefferds in memory 

of Eva M. Jefferds 5,178.20 

William S. Jenney, 

in memory of 500.00 

Charlotte Johnson 525.00 

Annie G. Joyce 250.00 

Celia Kaplan 100.00 

Eliza J. Kean 59,209.91 

Marie L. Keith 2,000.00 

Harriet B. Kempster 1,144.13 

Ernestine M. Kettle 22,981.31 

B. Marion Keyes 6,350.00 

Lulu S. Kimball 10,000.00 

Grace W. King 100.00 

Lydia F. Knowles 50.00 

Davis Krokyn 100.00 

Catherine M. Lamson 6,000.00 

James J. Lamson 750.00 

Susan M. Lane 815.71 

Elizabeth W. Leadbetter .... 2,638.71 

Jane Leader 3,544.31 

Luella K. Leavitt 1,011.67 

Lewis A. Leland 415.67 

Benjamin Levy 500.00 



^ 505.56 

William Litchfield 7,951.48 

Mary T. Locke 8,361.89 

Hannah W. Loring 9,500.00 

Celia E. Lugene 300.00 

Adolph S. Lundin 100.00 

Susan B. Lyman 4,809.78 

Agnes J. MacNevin 78,968.67 

Mary Ella Mann 250.00 

Blanche Osgood Mansfield 1,000.00 

Annie B. Marion 8,745.66 

Rebecca Marks 2,640.40 

Stephen W. Marston 5,000.00 

Elizabeth S. Martin 1,000.00 

William H. Maynard 22,821.56 

James C. McDonald 1,000.00 

Cora Mclntire 6,862.50 

Charles Merriam 1,000.00 

Florence B. Merrill 1,000.00 

Mary H. Miller 1,512.50 

Olga E. Monks 2,500.00 

George Montgomery 5,140.00 

Martha H. Morss 3,000.00 

Louise C. Moulton Bequest 7,891.65 

Mary A. Muldoon 100.00 

Mary T. Murphy 10,000.00 

Sarah Ella Murray 8,000.00 

Sarah M. Nathan 500.00 

Joseph F. Noera 2,000.00 

Leonard L. Nones 395.82 

Henry P. Norris 35,198.52 

Annie Anthony Noyes 100.00 

Mary B. Noyes 915.00 

Richard W. Nutter 2,000.00 

Ella Nye 50.00 

Harold L. Olmstead 5 ,000.00 

Emily C. O'Shea 1,000.00 

Sarah Irene Parker 699.41 

William Prentiss Parker .... 2,500.00 

George Francis Parkman .... 50,000.00 

Grace Parkman 5,383.78 

Philip G. Peabody 1,200.00 

Elizabeth W. Perkins 2,000.00 

Ellen F. Perkins 2,500.00 

Edward D. Peters 500.00 

Clara F. Pierce 2,005.56 

Clara J. Pitts 2,000.00 

George F. Poland 75.00 

Elizabeth B. Porter 5,449.50 

George M. Whidden Porter 20,828.61 

Sarah E. Pratt 2,988.34 

Sarah S. Pratt 5,000.00 

Francis L Proctor 10,000.00 

Rose Rabinowitz 50.00 

Grace E. Reed 5,054.25 

Carrie P. Reid 679.51 

Leonard H. Rhodes 1,012.77 

Mabelle H. Rice 3,750.00 

Matilda B. Richardson 300.00 



Page Ninety-eight 



Institution Funds (Concl'd) 
General Funds (principal and income for general purposes) — concl'd.: 
William L. Richardson ^ 50,000.00 Mary Wilson Tucker 



Anne Augusta Robinson .... 


212.20 


Julia M. Roby 


500.00 


Robert Rodgers 


100.00 




28,179.08 




5,787