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Full text of "Annual Report"

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I 




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1 



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3,-r 



OA.N-A.DA.. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



or THS 



iISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOB THB 



FISCAL YEAR 1880-81 



ON THB WORKS UNDBE HIS OONTEOL. 



IK AOOORDANOB WITH THB PROVISIONS OF THB ACT THIRTT-nBST 
tOTOBIA, CHAPTER TWBLTB, SBOTIOX NINETEEN, AS AIIBNDBD BY 
THB ACT FORTT-SBOOND VICTORIA, CHAPTBR SBVBN. 



PEINTBD BT ORDER OP PARLIAMENT, 




OTTAWA: 
BT MACLBAN, BOGBB ft 00^ WELLINGTON ffTBBBT. 

18 82,. 



PUBLIC Li /.Kn a/ j 



ASTOk,L£%. 
'. ILDEN I Ot 

19ox 






TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAOS 

INTBODUCTION xii 

PUBLIC WOBKS OP CANADA xii 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS:— 

Ottawa — ^Parliament Gronndi , xiii 

do ParliameDt Buildings. xiii 

do Departmental Buildings xiv 

do Eastern Block xiv 

do Western Block xiv 

do New Supreme Court xiv 

do fiideau jSall • xv 

do Geological Museum • xv 

do Drill Shed* xv 

Hamilton— Post Office... xv 

Kingston — Military College xv 

do Penitentiary xvi 

do Post Office, &o xvi 

Brantford— Post Office, &o xvi 

Windsor — Post Office, &c.. * xvi 

St. Catharines — Post Office, 4c xvi 

BxLLiviLLi— Post Office, &o xvii 

Quebec — Kent and St Louis Gates xvii 

do Fortifications xvii 

do Citadel xvii 

do Terrace Extension xvii 

do Marine Hospital xvii 

do Custom House....- xvii 

do Cartridge Factory xviii 

do Laboratory, &c xviii 

do L4vis Forts xviii 

do Champlain Street Bock xviii 

Montreal — Inland Revenue Offices , xviii 

do St Vincent de Paul Penitentiary xviii 

Three Rivers— Old Barracks ^.. xix 

5t. John's— Post Office, Custom House, 4c xix 



iv ' [1881] 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS— Cbnfinuud. 

Gbobsb Islb — QnarantiDe Station. xix 

DoBOHSSTsa — General Penitentiary for the Maritime Provinoes xlx: 

St. John — Custom Houbo six 

do Post Office 



Fredbbioton— Post Office : 

Halifax — €rovemment House xx 

LxTNENBUBQ— Marine Hospital xs 

Chablottbtown — Government House xx 

WiNNiPEO — Parliament Buildings and Lieutenant Gk>vemor's Besidence xk 

do Immigrant Hospital xxi 

HABBOES AND RIVEfiS:— 
Pbinob Edw^bd Island : 

Colville Bay xxi 

St. Peter's Bay xxi 

Wood Island. xxi 

Powoal xxii 

Hillsborough Biver. xxii 

Nine Mile Creek xxii 

Grapaud xxii 

Malpdque xxii 

Tignish xxii 

Miminigash... xxiii 

NoTA Scotia: 

Maio-A-Dieu xxiii 

Cow Ba7 xxiii 

Little Glace Bay xxiii 

Gabarus ,. xxiii 

Indian Islands Beach xxiii 

Petit de Grat xxiii 

Port Hood xxiy 

Burying Island, Caoso Harbor xxiv 

Arisaig xxiy 

Merigonish xxiv 

New Glasgow xxiv 

Picton Island xxir 

Biver John xxiv 

Tatamagouche xxiv 

Partridge Island Biver. xxv 

Windsor xxv 

Brooklyn xxv 




[1881] 



PAO» 

HABBOBS AND RIVERS— Confintifti 

Kxw Brunswick : 

Annapolis ; zxv^ 

Meteghan xzv 

Bttthorst. XXV 

Grand Anse ....• zxvi 

Shippe^n 1 zzvi 

Horse Shoo Shoal, Hiramichi zxvi 

Richibacto xxvi 

Bnctoacbe ^.... xxvi 

Point da Cbftne xxvi 

Sackville xxvi 

St, John Harbor. xxvi 

Oromocto , xxvii 

River St. John xxvii 

QvsBXo : 

Etangda Nord xxvii 

New Carlisle xxvii 

Carleton xxvii 

Eeconmains • xxvii 

FiBh DaroH, Tadousac. .'..... xxviii 

Anse St. Jean. xxviii 

St Alphonse de Bagotville xxviii 

River Saguenay xxviii 

Chicontimi. xxviii 

River da Loup (en has) .• xxviii 

River Quelle xxviii 

Cap a TAigle xxviii 

Las Eboalements xxix 

Isle aux Coudres xxix 

St Thomas, Montmagny xxix 

Grosse Isle. xxix 

Ste. Famille xxix 

St. Jean d'Orleans ... xxix 

St Laurent xxix 

Chenal du Moine xxix 

River Richelieu xxx 

Berthier (en Jiauf) xxx 

River L*As&omption xxx 

Beauharnois xxx 

The Cedars xxx 

River H la Graisse (Rigaud) xxx 

River du Nord xxx 

Salmon River xxx 

OVTABIO: 

Hawkesbury xxxi 

Gananoque xxxi 

Cobourg xxxi 

Toronto xxxi 

Rondeau xxxi 



Tl 



fl881] 



PAGK 

HARBOES AND RIVERS— Clmftiiii«t 

Ontario— Oonhntied. 

Port Albert xxxi 

Kincardine xxxi 

Inverharon xxxii 

Big Bay xxxii 

Owen Sound , xxxii 

Meaford xxxii 

CoUingwood xxxii 

Little Current •, xxxii 

Des Joachims Bridge xxxii 

SURVEYS AND EXAMINATIONS xxxii 

DREDGING xxxiii 

PUBLIC WORKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA xxxiv 

SLIDES AND BOOMS xxxv 

River Saguenay xxxv 

do St. Maurice.. xxxv 

Ottawa District .r. xxxvi 

River Ottawa xxxvii 

do Gatineau xxxviii 

do Madawaska..:. xxxix 

do Goulonge. xxxiz 

Black River xl 

River Petewawa xl 

do Du Moine xli 

Navigation op the Rfvxb Trent xlii, xliii, xliv, xlv 

TELEGRAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE:— 

British Columbia xlv 

Gulf of St. Lawrence xlv 

North Shore of the St. Lawrence xlvi 

Nova Scotia — Bay of Pundy xlvi 

Signal Sxbviox xlvii 

Telxphonxs ••••. ."t xlvii 

QUEBEC HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS xlvii 

GRAVING DOCK AT ST. JOSEPH DE LEVIS xlvii 

OPERATIONS OP THE LIFTING BARGE, HARBOR OP QUEBEC xlviii 

DEEPENING OP THE CHANNEL BETWEEN QUEBEC AND 

MONTREAL xlviii 



i 



[18811 vii 

FAQB 

BOADS... „ xlix 

PUBCHASBS, SALES AND LEASES xlix 

ABBITEATIONS « xlix 

BKEAEWATEBS ON THE GASPE COAST xlix 

OPENING AND CLOSING OF NAVIGATION xlix 

STAFF OP THE DBPABTMBNT 1 



TABLE OF APPENDICES. 



r 



PAQB 

JLppendix No. 1. Statement of expenditure duriDg fiscal year 3 

'< 2. Tables of distances 9 

'< < 3. Beport on Pablio Buildings, by Thomas S. Scott, Chief Architect. 19 

'* 4. Beport on Heating &o., Public Buildings, by J. B. Arnold!, 

Mechanical Engineer • 27 

" 6. Beport on Harbors and Bivers, Dredging and Surveys, by 

H. P. Perley, Chief Jfingineer 28 

" 6. Beport on Works, British Columbia, by Hon. T. W. Trutch.... 59 

" 7. Beport on Slide, Booms, &c., Bivor Saguenay, by H. P. Perley, 

Chief Engineer, and J. Bosa, Superintendent 79 

** 8. Beport on Slides, Booms, &c., Biver St. Maurice, by Charles 

Lajoie, Superintendent 81 

*' 9. Beport on Biver Ottawa Works, by G. P. Brophy, Super- 
intendent 82 

" 10. Beport on Telegraph lines and Signal Service, by P. N. 

Gisbome, Superintendent 88 

** 11. Letter from the Montreal Board of Trade on the Gulf Tele- ' 
graphic System • 105 

*^ 12. Letters from Hon. P. Portin, M.P., on the Telegraph and Signal 
Service System in the Gulf of St. Lawrence; on theUnited 
States Signal Service ; and on the Norwegian Telegraph 
System; with letters from Agents of Marine Insurance 
dompanies; from the Consul-General of Sweden and 
Norway, and others on the Gulf Telegraph System 106 

" 13. Beport of the Quebec Harbor Commissioners, on the Biver 

St Charles improTements; and Graving dock at Levis... 122 

*^ 14. Beport of the operations of the Lifting Barge, Quebec Harbor, 

by the Quebec Harbor Commissioners 12d 

*' 15. Beport on the deepening of the Channel, between Quebec and 

Montreal, by the Montreal Harbor Commissioners 135 

'' 16. Beport of the Montreal Harbor Commissioners on Lake and 

Biver between Montreal and Quebec • 138 

** 17. Beport on Biver Saguenay improvements below Chiooutimi, 

by J. Bosa, Superintendent 140 

'' 18. Beport on the Temiscouata Boad, by H. P. Perley, Chief 

Engineer, and B. Marquis ••• 141 



[1881] 



PAGE 

Appendix No. 19. Eeport on Slides and Booms, Newcastle District, by T. D. 143 
Belcher, Superintendent... 

" 20. Statement of property purchased during fiscal year 148 

" 21. Statement of claims Bubmitted to the Official Arbitrators. 151 

" 22. Letter from Hon. P. Portin, M.P.,on Breakwaters on the coast 

of Gasp* 163 

" 23. Copies of Resolutions passed by Levis, Quebec and Montreal 
Boards of Trade in favor of extending the telegraphic 
system to Pointe des Monts 157 

** 24. Statement of the openini^ and closing of Navigation in various 

Harbors of the Dominion 160 

*' 25. List of Ministers, Deputy Ministers, Secrotarie8,Chief Engineers 

and Chief Architects, 1867 to 1881 162 



T-Ai 




fl 



CANADA. 



REPOUT 



OP THE 



MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED 30th JUNE, 1881. 



7-B 



r 



To His Excellency the Right Honorable Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, Marquis 
of Lome, one of Her Majesty's Most HonTrable Privy Council, Knight of the Most 
Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and Knight Grand Crozs of the Most 
DistinguisJied Order of Saint Michael and Saint George. Governor General of 
Canada and r»c6 Admiral of the same. 

Mat it Plsasb Tour Excbllinoy : 

I bavo the honor to submit the Annaal Beport of tbo Department of Pablie 
Works for the fiscal year 1880-81, 

The Baildiugs and Works under the control of the Department are : — 
PtJBLic Buildings. 
Harbors and Rivers. 
Drbdqino. 
Slidbs and Booms. 
Telbgraphs. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



OTTAWA. 

PARLIAMENT GRpUNDS. 

These grounds have been kept in good condition. 

A contract has been awarded for the construction of a new green-house, measur- 
ing 68 by 19 feet) and adjoining that already in use. 

Trees have been planted and a boulevard laid out in front of the Parliament 
Grounds on Wellington street. 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS. 

The Senate and (Commons Chambers have been painted and ornamented. A pari 

oftbese works was rendered necessary by the incipient conflagration mentioned in 

oy preceding Report. (Appendix 3, page 19.) 
7— bJ 



r 



xiv [1881] 

DBPAETMENTAL BUILDINGS. 

WESTERN BLOCK. 

The four new rooms required for the Post Office Department, and mentioned in 
iDj last Beport, have been completed. 

The windows of the large hall of the same Department have been enlarged, so as 
^o give more light. (Appendix 3, page 19.) 

EASTERN BLOCK. 

The large fire-proof vault for the Finance Department has been completed ; the 
vault was mentioned in my last Beporl. 

A portion of the cut stone masonry of the main tower having begun to give way, 
it was necessary to replace it. This had to be done by day's work, it being impoe- 
sible to estimate its extent without removing the stones one by one. (Appendix 3, 
page 19.) 

NEW SUPREME COURT. 

' The Government having decided to close the workshop©, situated on the Parlia- 
ment grounds at the corner of Bank and Wellington streets, tenders were called for, 
for their conversion into a Supremo Court, and a gallery for the reception of pictures 
presented to the Goveimment by the Royal Canadian Academy. 

The place now occupied by the Supreme Court will be again used for the pur- 
pose for which it was originally intended j that is to say, it will form an addition to 
the Library of Parliament, and will at the same time afford a good reading room for 
membora of the House of Commons. 

The external appearance of the workshop building will be but slightly modified 
by the addition of gable windows to light the court room; an entrance will also bo 
made on Bank street. 

In the interior, the ground floor will comprise the following apartments: — 
pictuie gallery, 36 by 20 feet, with an entrance both to tlfe gallery and the court on 
Bank street; six rooms for the judge?, with private entrance on Bank street; offices, 
vault, lavatory, &c. 

On the first floor ; picture gallery, 36 by 20 feet ; barristers' room, barristers* 
library; court room, 48 by 36 feet, and 24 feet high, with a vaulted ceiling ; judges' 
library, judges' consultation hall, and waiting room. 

Part of the drying house which was in the workshop yard will be converted into 
a laboratory and a gallery of photometric apparatus for the Department of Marine and 



[1881J XV 

Fidienes. The works necessary to carry this out are iacluied in the contract. 
(Appendix 3, page 20.) 

RIDEAU HALL. 

Ordinary repairs have been made, and much painting has been done in Ihe 
interior of the principal building. 

The construction of a new slide has been commenced in the skating rink, and of 
a gallery in the tennis couK. These works will be finished before the autumn. 
(Appendix 3, page 20.) 

OEOLOQIOAL MUSEUM. 

The works given out for the alteration of this building have been completed to 
the satisfaction of the Department. 

A portion of the rear of the building has been converted into a residence for the 
ctretaker. 

The glass cases, shelves, &c. are being prepared; this is being done partly by 
contract and partly by day's work under the superintendence of the Clerk of Works* 
tsapartof the fittings brought from Montreal had to bo utilized. (Appendix 3, 
page 20.) 

DRILL SHED. 

The contract for the fitting up of the drill halls, band rooms, museum, &c., has 
been executed. 

The floors of the large drill hall, and of the artillery arsenal have been laid. 
(Appendix 3, page 20.) 



HAMILTON. 



POST OFFICE. 



It 18 proposed to erect a building which will contain the Post Office and the ^ 
olBoes of the Customs and the Inland Bevenue. For this purpose the Department 
bas acquired a site on King and John streets, and an adjacent lot having a frontage on 
tie principal street. (Appendix 3, page 21.) 



KINGSTON. 



MILITABT OOLLSOS. 



Up to the present time the water required in the various College buildings was 
carted. 



xv\ [18811 

It has been decided to construct an oater room, 30 by 26 feet, in which will be 
placed a boiler and pump, by which the water necessary for domestic use and for fire 
protection will be brought from Xavy Bay. The service pipes have already been 
laid. A contract was awarded for these works. (Appendix 3, page 21.) 

PENITENTIARY. 

Metal roofs have been placed on the blacksmith's shop and on the southern 
workshop . 

A breakwater, 200 by 30 feet, has been constructed, forming a basin 100 by lOO 
/cot, where vessels may be laden and dibcharged. 

The ceiling of the Catholic chapel has been renewed. 

A building, 150 by 20 feet, has been constructed for the storage of lumber. 
\ Appendix 3, page 21.) 

POST OFFICE. 

A new partition, with look boxes and a circular partition for general deliverjr 
have been constructed ; changes have been made in the roistered letter office. All 
these works have been done by contract. (Appendix 3, page 21.) 



BRANTFORD. 



POST OFFICE, ETC. 

The work given out by contract in connection with this building has been 
finished, and the Post Office and offices of the Customs and Inland Revenue have been 
installed in it. (Appendix 3, page 21.) 



WINDSOR. 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

This building is completely finished, and the Post Office and offices of the Customs 
and Inland Revenue have been installed in it. (Appendix 3, page 21.) 

ST. CATHERINES. 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

The Grovernment has acquired a site in a central position upon which a building 
will be erected in which will be contained the Post Office and the offices of the 
Customs and of the Inland Revenue. (Appendix 3, page 22.) 



[1881] xvil 

BELLEVILLE. 



POST OFPICB, ETC. 

The GoTernment has acquired a site in a central position upon which a 
baildiDg will be erected in which will be contained the Post Office and the offices of 
the Coatoms and the Inland Revenue. The plans are ready. (Appendix 3, page 32.) 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 



QUEBEC. 



KENT AND ST. LOUIS GATES. 



The work on these gates is finished, with the exception of the pointing, which 
vas postponed on account of the frost. (Appendix 3, page 22.) 



PORTIPIOATIONS. 



Extensive repairs to the fortifications have been made daring this, and will be 
lootinued during the coming year. (Appendix 3, page 22.) 



CITADEL. 



The tin roofing of the Officers quarters has been replaced by a roofing of 
galvanised iron. Several changes and necessary repairs in the interior have been 
made. (Appendix 3, page 22.) 



TEBRACE EXTENSION. 



The construction of walls and piers under the Terrace has been continued. 
(Appendix 3, page 22.) 



M.\RINE HOSPITAL. 



Extensive repairs have been made to this building, including among others the 
coDStraction of new drains, which was absolutely necessary; the floors have also 
been renewed. (Appendix 3, page 22.) 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 



The work of constructing attic rooms beneath the roof of the building, to serve 
for a lodging for the caretaker and for store-rooms, is being proceeded with* 
(Appeiidix 3, page 22.) 



xTiii [188^1 

CARTRIDQE FACTORY. 

Part of the building known as the " Artillery Barracks" has been converted into 
a cartridge factory. (Appendix 3, page 23.) 

LABORATORY, KTC. 

The Government has caused to be prepared plans, which have been approved by 
the military authorities, for changes in and additions to the present laboratory, which 
is situated on the Plains of Abraham and adjoining the Citadel. 

A Hito has also been selected and plans prepared for a new group of de- 
tached buildings which will bo surrounded by a suitable fence and bo situated 
between the Laboratory and Tower No. 1. (Appendix 3, page 23.) 

LEVIS PORTS. 

Plans for general repairs to these forts have been prepared in the Department. 
(Appendix 3, page 230 

CUAMPLAIN STREET ROCK. 

The dangerous condition of the rock which overhangs Ghamplain street, below 
the Citadel, has obliged the Government to purchase the houses situated on the north 
side of the street, and to demolish them for the purpose of constructing a retaining 
wall. This work is in course of construction. (Appendix 3, page 23.) 



MONTREAL. 



INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 



Plans for an addition to the rear of this building, on Custom House square, have 
been prepared. (Appendix 3, page 23.) 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL PENITENTIARY. 

A new wing, 126 by 46 feet, has been erected on the north side ; this will contai n 
132 cells; it is hoped that the work will bo completed in the spring of 1882. 

Water has been introduced into the residences of the ofiScers of the institotion, 
and supplied to three hydrants outside of the boundary wall. 



General repairs have been made. (Appendix 3, page 23.) 



k 



[1881] xix 

THREE RIVERS. 



OLD BARRACKS. 



The plans of the modifications and repairs necessary for the conversion ot thi» 
baiMing into Government offices have been prepared. (Appendix 3, page 23.) 



ST. JOHN'S. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 

The Post Office is now installed in this building. 

Tenders have been invited for the furnishing and fitting of the Custom Uouse* 
(Appendix 3, page 24.) 



GROSSE ISLE. 



QUARANTINE STATION, 

A contract has been entered into for the erection of a hospital which wilt 
aecommodato eighty invalids. The hospital will be situated on the eastern extremity 
of the Tsland. (Appendix 3, page 24.) 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK, 



DORCHESTER. 

GENERAL PENITENTIARY FOR THE MARITIME PROVINCES. 

A contract has been entered into for the erection of fifteen semi-detached 
bnildiogs; these will provide lodgings for the officera and will contain the hospital, 
the bakery, the laundry, the workshops, the icehouse and the cellars ; a contract has 
ftlaobecn entered into for the erection of a wing which will contain 200 cells. 

The water supply for the Penitentiary proper, and for use in case of fire, is com- 
pletely organized. The fencing, the sentry-boxes and the guard-room are finished. 
(Appendix 3, page 24.) 

ST. JOHN. 

CUSTOM UOUSE. 

This building is almost finished, and is occupied. (Appendix 3, page 24.) 



3CZ [1881] 

POST OFFIOK. 

This bailding is almost finished, and is occupied. (Appendix S, page 24.) 



FEBDBRICTOX. 

I 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

This building is finished and occupiod. (Appendix 3, page 25.) 



PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA, 



HALIFAX. 



QOVERNMENT HOUSE. 



Tenders have been invited for the renewing of the roof of this building. (Appen- 
dix 3, page 25.) 

LUNENBURG. 



MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This building is finished and occupied. (Appendix 3, page 25.) 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 



GOVERNMENT HOUSE AT CHARLOTTBTOWN. 

Tenders have been invited for the painting of this building and the renewing of 
the roof. (Appendix 3, page 25.) 

PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 



PARLIAHICNT BUILDING AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNORS RESIDENCE. 

CoDtracts have boon awarded for the erection of these two buildings, which will 
bo of brick obtained on the spot, with a facing of white brick and cut stono. The 



^ 



[1881] Mi 

Itiittn style of arohitectnre has been adopted, modified so as to meot the exigencies 
of Um climate. (Appendix 3, pages 25, 26.) 

I&IMIQRANT HOSPITAL. 

A contract has been awarded for the erection of this building. (Appendix 3, 
page 26.) 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS AT NEW WESTMINSTER. 



Hie Department has c&usod plans to be prepared for these bailding.««, in which 
wHl be contained the Post Office, the Telegraph, Savings Bank, Inland Kevenae and 
Ooitoms Offices, and those of the Indian Department. (Appendix 3, page 26.) 



VICTORIA. 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

A contract has been awarded for the reconstruction of the front of this bailding 
^ for general repairs. (Appendix 3, page 26.) 



HARBORS AND RIVERS. 



PBINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 

COLVILLB BAY. 

Fifteen miles from the eastern point of Prince Edward Island and the eastern 
'mniDiia of the Government railway. 

The works on the breakwater was finished in the month of May last. (Appendix 
5, page 23.) 

ST. PETER'S BAT. 

On the north shore of the island, forty-three miles west of the eastern point. 

The works at the breakwater and on the beach were finished at the end of the 
jetr. (Appendix 5, page 28.) 

WOOD ISLAND. 

In the County of Qaeen's, at the soathern extremity of the island. 



Mii , [1881] 

The amount voted by Parliament, at its last session, has been expended in pro- 
longing by 124 feet the breakwater constructed in 1878-79. (Appendix 5, page 2? .) 

rOWNAL. 

At the head of Pownal Bay, in the County of Queen's. 

The dredge "Prince Edward " has been employed to open a passage from tho 
public wharf to the main channel, and to form a basin to the east of the wharf. The 
passage and basin have a depth of nine feet of water at low tide. (Appendix 5,f>ng'o 
28.) 

HILLSBOROUGH RIVER. 

Opposite Charlottotown is tho confluence of tho Elliott, York and llillsborouLrh 
Rivers. 

The Hillsborough Eiver is navigable fifteen miles above Charlottotown. But at 
Carr's Point there was a small shoal which has been removed, tho work having been 
done by the dredge " Prince Arthur." (Appendix 5, page 29.) 

NINE MILE CREEK. 

At the entrance of IIiil*!>borough Bay. 

The dredge "Prince Edward'* was employed to open a passoge between deep 
water and the bay, as far as the public wharf, to admit of the entering of vessels at 
low tide. (Appendix 5, page 29.) 

CRAPAUD. 

A small harbor at the entrance of the Brocklesby River. 

On the 23i*d of May last the channel commenced in 1874-75 was continued by the 
dredge " Prince Edward" as far as the loading wharf at the village. (Appendix 5> 
page 29.) 

MALPEQUB. 

Forty miles from West Capo and 90 miles from East Bay on the northern head 
of the Island. 

Sheet piling has been placed at the extremity of the breakwater, and a breastwork 
of piles, brush and htone.. upon a depression of the Royalty Sands, so as to prevent the 
sea from breakin*; through bolwoon the mainland and the breakwater. (Appendix 
5, page 29.) 

TIQXISH. 

Near the northern extremity of the Island. 

The southern breakwater has been repaired and sheet piling placed at the two 
ends. (Appendix 5, page 29.) 



[1881] Mill 

MIMINIQASH. 

Oq the woAtern coast of the Island. 

The breakwater to the north of the ** Ban " having been injured by a Htorm, it 
ku been repaired. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 



MAIN-A-DIEU. 

A small harbor of refuge in the County of Cape Breton. 

A breakwater which will be 250 feet long is being constructed. (Appendix 5^ 
ptge29.) 

cow BAY. 

Thirty miles southeast of Sydney, C.B. 

Considerable repairs and additions have been made to the breakwater at this 
place. (Appendix 5, page 30.) 

LITTLE QLACB BAY. 

On the eastern coast of Cape Breton. 

The deepcniog of the harbor here situated was continued until the 15th August, 
1880, the dredge " St. Lawi-onco'* being used for the purpose. (Appendix 5, page 
30.) 

GABARUS. 

A small cove on the south shore of Gabarus Bay, Cape Breton. 

Last year the work of enlarging and deepening, begun in 1873, was continued, 
to allow of the passage of fishing boats. (Appendix 6, page 30.) 

INDIAN ISLANDS BEACH. 

Those islands are situated on the north side o(Eix^i Bay, which is a continuation 
of Bras d'Or, Cape Breton. They are connected by beaches, the longest of which is 
one mile in length and forms an excellent harbor. A passage has been made 
throQgh this beach for fishing boats. (Appendix 5, page 30.) 

PETIT DE OaAT. 

Iflle Madame, County of Eichmond, C.B. 

This is a passage from the Atlantic into St. Peter's Bay and is intersected by a 
ttrong beach, through which a channel has been partially opened for fishing boats* 
The grant voted has been absorbod by these works. (Appendix 5, page 30.) 



m 



xxiv [1881J 

POBT HOOD. 

On tho west coast of Capo Breton. 

The wbarf constracted by the Local Government prior to 1867 is very macbft 
exposed and had suffered greatly from storms. The grant voted has been expended 
in making repaira. (Appendix 5, page 30.) 

BURYINQ INLAND, OANSO HAHBOUB. 

This island, which the old Acadians called " I'Isle des Morts," at one ti mo- 
afforded shelter against south-west winds ; but it was gradually worn away by the^ 
sea until it became a mere shoal. 

The Department have replaced it by a breakwater 280 feet in length, whioh 
affords to vessels the same shelter formerly afforded by the island. (Appendix 5^ 
page 31.) 

ABISAIO. 

On the south shore of Northumberland Straits. 

$200 has been expended in repairing the breakwater constructed many years ago 
at this point by the Local Government. (Appendix 5, page 31.) 

HBRIQONISH. 

The harbor of Merigonish is eight miles to the east of Pictou harbor. 

In April last a wharf 160 feet in length was finished at French Bivor. (Appen> 
dix 5, page 3 1.) 

?IXW GLASGOW. 

On the East River, eight miles above the harbor of Pictou. 
The channel opposite the shipyards has been deepened and improved. (Appen* 
dix 5, page 31.) 

PICTOU ISLAND. 

Eight miles from the entrance to Pictou harbor. 

Part of the grant voted has been expended in repairing the wharf at the lower 
extremity of the Island. (Appendix 5, page 31.; 

RIVEB JOHN. 

It falls into John Bay 12 miles to the north of the Harbour of Pictou. 

Work has been continued at the opening up of the channel through the bar at 
the mouth of the nver. (Appendix 5, page 31.) 

TATAMAGOUCHE. 

The Eiver Tatamagouche falls into the bay of that name on Northumberland 
Strait. 



[1881J zzT 

A channel has been opened through the flats as far as Patterson's Wharf, and 
the dbannel of the west branch of the river has been improved as far as Campbell's 
Mllh. (Appendix 5, page 31.) 

PABTaiDGE ISLAND BIVKR. 

In the County of Cumberland, N.S. 

The i¥ork of straightening and improving the channel of this river has been 
continaed. (Appendix 6, page 32.) 

WINDSOR. 

In the County of Hants, 45 miles ^N.W. of Halifax. 

On the 15th August, 1880, the works mentioned in last year's Beport were com- 
pleted (removal of mud bank off the railway wharf), and also a 150 feet passige for 
TesseU drawing fifteen feet of water. (Appendix 5, page 32.) 

BROOKLYN. 

At the head of Liverpool Bay, County of Queen's. 

The Department has here built a breakwater which forms a port of refuge ; 
temporary repairs have been made on the slope of this breakwater, which faces the 
river. (Appendix 5, page 32.) 

ANNAPOLIS. 

Shire Town of the County of Annapolis. 

With the amount placed at its disposal the Department has effected the removal 
of the reef situated south of the wharf (Appendix 5, page 32.) 

METEQHAN. 

Heteghan Cove is situated 30 miles north of Yarmouth. 

The breakwater begun in 1874 has been finished. (Appendix 5, page 32.) 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 



BATHURST. 

The Port of Bathurst is 3 miles long and 2 miles wide, and is remarkably safe. 

The chief channel is obtructed by three sand banks, from which 13,027 cubic 
yards were removed during the season of 1880, by means of the dredge "Canada.*' 
(Appendix 5, page 32.) 



«vi [1881] 

GRAND ANSE. 

A small bay oq tho south Ride of the Bay of Chaloars. 

A Bum of $195.89 has been expeudcd in repairing the flooring of the break 
vrater. (Appendix 5, page 32.) 

SUIPPEOAN. 

The grant has been expended in repairing the dam act^oss the West Cove, which 
had been injured by a storm on the 2l8t October, 1879. (Appendix 5, page 33.) 

HORSESHOE SHOAL, MIRAMIOHE. 

At the entrance of the Miramichi by the Gulf of St Lawrence. 

During the season of 1880, 15,837 cubic yard:* of material were removed from 
this shoal by the dredge "St Lawrence." The work is to be continued for two 
seasons more. (Appendix 5, page 33.) 

RlCHiBUCTO. 

40 miles north of Shediac. 

The breakwater has been repaired. (Appendix 5, page 33.) 

BDCTOUCUE. 

At the mouth of the river of that name. 

By means of the dredge " Canada," 5,445 cubic yards of mud, cluj and shells 
have been removed. (Appendix 5. page 33.) 

POINT DU CUENE. 

Terminus of the railway, on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

The work of repairing the railway wharf was begun. At the close of the fiscal 
year the work was far advanced. (Appendix 5, page 33.) 1 

SACKVILLE. 

At the head of the Bay of Fundy. 

During the autumn of 1880 the necessary works for strengthening a strip of 
swamp known as ** Bam Pasture Neck," which might have filled up the Harbor of 
Sackville, were completed. (Appendix 5, page 33.) 

HARBOR OF ST. JOHN. 

At the end of the year 1880 the breakwater at the entrance of the harbor, 
which was damaged by the great storm of 1878, underwent repairs. (Appendix 5, 
page 33.) 



[1881] xxvii 

OBOMOCTO. 

The Oromocto shoals, in the Eiver St. John, were a great obstacle to navigation. 

The Provincial Crovernment expended, prior to 18(>7, large sums of money in deepen- 
ing the channel through them, and since that time the Dominion Government haS' 
ctrried on the work. 

In 1878-79 a sheer dam was commenced, in order to divert the current on these 
aboals, and in 1880 an addition of 600 feet was made to it. At the close of the fiscal 
jttar this work was almost finished. (Appendix 5, page 34.) 

BIVEB ST. JOHN. 

The work connected with the improvements at Bed fiapid, on the Tobique and 
on the St. John River proper, was continued. (Appendix 6, page 34.) 



QUEBEC. 



ETANQ DU NOBD. 

At the western extremity of "Grindstone Island," one of the Magdalen Islands. 

In consequence of the time required for procuring the necessary timber, it was 
not until the close of the year that the work of constructing a breakwater, 450 feet in 
lengthy for the protection of fishing boats, could be commenced. (Appendix 5, page 
34.) 

NBW 0ABLI8LB. 

Capital town of the County of Bonaventure, north of the Bay of Chaleurs. 

The work of constructing a wharf at this place could not be commenced until 
the Ist June, 1881. (Appendix 5, page 34.) 

OABLBTON. 

In the county of Bonaventure, on the north shore of the Bay of Chaleurs. 

At its last Session, Parliament voted a further sum for continuing the work on the 
pier at this point. (Appendix 5, page 34.) 

BSOOUMAINS. 

In the County of Saguenay, 24 miles from Tadousac and 68 from MuiTay Bay. 

At the entrance of the channel over 200 rocks, varying from 3 to 15 tons in 
weight, have been removed, and schooners can now pass without difficulty. (Appen- 
dix 5, page 34.) 
7—0 



jordii [18811 

FISH-DAtfS, TADOU8A0. 

Tadousac is the capital town of the County of Saguenay. 

There is here a flsh-breeding establishment, several of the fish passes of which 
have been raided and repaired. (A^>endix 5, page 35.) 

ANSB ST. JEAN. 

Twenty-foar miles from the mouth of the Saguenay Biver. 

The grant voted by Parliament has been expended in completing the pier began 
in 18*76, by the Local Government, and which is now 366 feet in length. (Appendix 
5, page 35.) 

ST. ALPHONSB DE BAOOTVILLl. 

At the head of Ha I Ha! Bay. 

The head of the pier at this place has been strengthened. A few years ago the 
part next the river was burnt; it has been temporarily repaired, but will have to be 
rebuilt. (Appendix 5, page 35.) 

RIVER SAQUENAY. 

In the course of the year rookfi have been removed from the channel below 
Chicoutimi, thus facilitating the passage of vessels up to that locality. (Appendix 
5, page 36.) 

OmOOUTIMI. 

This town is situated at the head of navigation on the Sagttenay. 

An extension has been made to the pier, thus facilitating the loading of vessels 
during the period of freshets. (Appendix 5, page 35.) 

RIVER DU LOUP (en bos) 
108 miles fh>m Quebec, on the south shore of the St Lawrence. 

The pier has undergone repairs. (Appendix 5, page 35 ) 

RIVER OUELLE. 

'75 miles from Quebec, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence. 

The pier has undergone the repairs mentioned in the report of last year, (Ap- 
pendix 6, page 35.) 

GAP 1 l'aiolb. 

On the north shore of the St. Lawrence, 3 miles from Murray Bay. 

At the close of the year one-half of the pier begun, under contract, by parties 
representing the municipality, the latter guaranteeing $3,000 for the work, wais oov- 
4»tructed. (Appendix 5, page 36.) 



[1881] xxix 

LB8 EBOULEMBNTS. 

Sizly-nine miles fh>in Qaebec on the north shore of the St Lawrence. 

The pier at this place has undergone various repairs. (Appendix 5, page 36.) 

ISLE AUX COUDBBS. 

Twelve miles from Baie St. Paul, on the north shore of tiie St. Lawrence. 

In^e month of November last, aboat one-third of a pier, 163 feet in length, had 
baeo built at this place, the municipality furnishing $4,000 for the work, and the 
Go?emmeDt a like sum. (Appendix 5, page 36.) 

ST. THOMAS DE MONTMAQNT. 

Thirty miles from Qaebec, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence. 

The work mentioned in the Beport of last year has been completed. (Appendix 
5, page 36.) 

QBOSSB ISLE. 

This islan(^s situated 29 miles from Quebec, on the St Lawrence. 

The amount voted has been expended in raising and repairing the wharf at the 
Qmorantine station. The work was still going on at the close of the fiseal year. 
* (Appendix 5, page 36.) 

SAINTE FAMILLE. 

On the Island of Orleans, 17 miles fVom Quebec. 

The work on the blocks and the removal of the boulders in the vicinity of the 
wharf was continued. A further vote will be necessary in order to connect the 
blocks with the shore. (Appendix 5, page 36.) 

ST. JEAN, ISLAND OF ORLEANS. 

On thd Island of Orleans, 20 miles fh>m Qaebec, 

In the month of November last, the woric of repairing the pier, rendered 
oecessary by the action of the ice, was finished. (Appendix 5, page 36.) 

SAINT LAURENT. 

On the Island of Orleans, 15 miles from Qaebec. 

The wharf has undergone various repairs, (Appendix 6, page 37.) 

PUKOINE CHANNEL. 

One of the channels of the River St. Lawrence, about 3 miles from Sorel, 

Two piers have been constructed in order to hold back the ice at the break-up 
m the spring. (Appendix 5, page 31 . ) 



ixx [1881J 

RIOHELIEU RIVER. 

Falls into the St. Lawrence, 45 miles from Montreal. 

The work of deepening has been carried on at St. Ours, St. Denis, Beloeil and 
the entrance of the Chambly Canal. (Appendix 5, page 37.) 

BSRTHiER (jsn haut.) 

On the north shore of the St. Lawreuce, 45 miles from Montreal. 

The grant voted has been expended in deepening, on the Vanasse, Church and 
li^v^ae Shoals, in order to enable vessels to reach the wharf at Berthier. (Appendix 
5, page 37.) 

RIVER l'ASSOMPTION. 

Near the village of Eepentigny. 

Dredging has been done here in order to deepen the channel, which is navigable 
only for vessels of light draught. (Appendix 5, page 37.) 

BEAUHARNOIS. 

Chief town of the county of that name, 20 miles above Montreal, on the soutb 
shore of Lake St. Louis. 

Dredging was carried on here fh)m the 26th May to the 30th June. (Appendix: 
5, page 37.; 

THE CEDARS. 

On the north shore of the St. Lawrence, 30 miles from Montreal. 

At the end of the fiscal year, the construction of a wharf was begun for the 
convenience of steamers navigating the St. Lawrence. (Appendix 5, page 37.) 

RIVER A LA QRAISSE (RIOAUD.) 

It falls into the Ottawa at a point 15 miles from Bigaud. 

The work of dredging has been continued, but is not yet finished, (Appendix 
5, page 37.) 

RIVER DD NORD. 

It falls into the Ottawa at the head of the Lake of Two Mountains. 

At the rapids a number of boulders have been removed, giving a channel of 58 
feet wide and ^ feet deep, at low water. (Appendix 5, page 38.) 

SALMON RIVER. 

This river falls into the Ottawa from the north. The work of dredging has been 
continued in order to secure a depth of 6 feet at low water. (Appendix 5, page 38.} 



[1881] xxxi 

ONTAEIO. 

HAWKBSBURY. 

In the County of Prescott on the south shore of the Ottawa River. 

Dredging has been executed in order to deepen and csomplete the channel begun 
war Grant's Point and extending to the wharves of the village. (Appendix 5, 
P«ge38.) 

OANANOQUB. 

On the north shore of the St. Lawrence, 18 miles below Kingston. 

A small sum has been expended in deepening the Grananoque River. (Appendix 
5, page 38.) 

COBOURQ. 

On Lake Ontario, 72 miles east of Toronto. 

One-half of an arm, 150 feet in length, in extension of the western pier, has been 
ttmslructecL (Appendix 5, page 38.) 

TOEONTO. 

The work of dredging the entrance to the harbor has been continued and 
44,623 cubic yards of sand and clay have been removed. (Appendix 5, page 38.) 

RONDEAU. 

A harbor of refuge on Lake Erie, 140 miles west of Port Colborne. 

In order to repair the breaches made in the sand beach on the west side of the 
«&tnmce to the harbour, a contract was entered into with Messrs. F. B. McNamee 
ft Co., for the construction of 2,000 feet of pile protection work, and at the close of 
the year one-third of the work had been done. (Appendix 5, page 38.) 

PORT ALBERT. 

On the east coast of Lake Karon, about nine miles from Goderich. 

The basin has been enlarged, and, by means of the dredge "Challenge," 18,706 
cnbic yards of different material removed. (Appendix 5, page .^9.) 

KINCARDINE. 

The harbor of Kincardine is an artificial basin, situated thirty-one miles north 
of Goderich. 

Messrs. Conlon & Canan have completed the execution of their contract for the 
removal fVom the' entrance to the harbor of the detritus brought in from Lake 
Huron and for restoring it to its normal depth, (Appendix 5, page 39.) 



xxxu [1881] 

IlVySEHUBON. 

On Lake Huron, seven miles from Kincardine. 

The pier has undergone slight repairs. (Appendix 5, page 39.) 

Bia BAT. 

On Geoi^an Ba^, some fifteen miles from Owen Sound Harbor. 
The pier has been extended 11*7 feet. (Appendix 5, page 39.) 

OWBN SOUND. 

At the mouth of the Siver Sydenham, on Greorgian Bay. 

The work of improving the channel leading to this harbor has been continued,. 
(Appendix 5, page 39.) 

MEAFORD. 

On Georgian Bay, eighteen miles from Collingwood. 

The local authorities having enlarged the harbor in 1880, the dredge 
^* CSis^lenge" has been engaged in deepening the new basin. (Appendix 6, pa^39.) 

OOLLINOWOOD. 

On Greorgian Bay, in the County of Simcoe. 

The work ot deepening the entrance channel, the necessity of which was shown 
in the Beport of 1878-79, has been continued. (Appendix 5, page 40.) 

LITTLE OURBENT. 

Little Current is the passage between Cloche and Great Manitoulin Islands. 

The navigation was rendered difficult by rocks impeding the passage. The 
grant voted has been expended in removing the rocks and in deepening the channel; 
but the work will have to be continued. (Appendix 5, page 40.) 

DES JOACHIMS BRIDaE. 

The proposed bridge over these rapids, will connect the County of Pontiao, P.Q., 
with the County of Renfrew, Ontario. 

The Government of Ontario, which is to cx)ii tribute towards this work, having 
delayed its approval of the plans, the work had not been commenced at the close of 
the fiscal year. (Appendix 5, page 40.) 

SURVEYS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

During the fiscal year surveys and examinations were made at various localities 
in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario. 
Seports of these operations have, with a few exceptions, been forwarded to the 
Department. (Appendix 5, page 40.) 



[1881] zxxiiM 



DEEDGING. 
Tte dredgiBg plant owned by the Department is as follows : — 

IN THB MABITIMB PBOVINOIS. 

The hopper dredge " St. Lawrence." 
" «' " Canada." 

The dipper dredge " New Dominion," and 10 scows. 
" " " Cape Breton," 1 « 

« " « Prince Edward," 3 " 

" " " George McKenzie," 3 " 

IN THB PBOVINOB OF QUIBBO. 

The dipper dredge ^'Qneen of Canada," with 2 scows and 1 lifter. 

" •* " Kipissing," and 2 scows. 

The steam tog <' Dennis." 

IN o^TTAaio. 

The dipper dredge '' Challenge" and 3 scows. 
The steam tug <*Tradeaa." 

IN BRITISH OOLUMBIA. 

An elevator dredge and 4 scows. 
The steam tug^« Georgie." 



The dredges were employed during the fiscal year, in the following localities :— - 

The " St Lawrence," at Little Glace Bay, N.S., at the Horse Shoo Shoal, at th» 
eDtrance to Miramichi, N.S., and East River, N.S. 

The dredge removed a total of 41,330 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5,. 
ptge41.) 

The " Canada," at River du Loup (en has,) Bathurst, N.B., Pictou, N.S., and 
Boetonche N.B, 

It removed a total of 24,570 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, page 42.) 

The dredge '' New Dominion " was not used this year. The machinery is in 
good order, but the hull must be renewed. (Appendix 5, page 42.) 

The " Cape Bieton " was employed at River John, N.S., New Glasgow, NA^ 
tad Tatamagouche, N.S. 

It removed a total of 43,120 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, page 42.) 

The "Prince Edward'* was employed at Pownal, Nine Mile Creek, Carr'a 
Point, and Crapaud. 



Kxxiv [1881] 

It removed 46,355 cubic yai-d:* of material. (Appendix 5, page 43.) 

The " Greorge McKenzie " was employed at St. Peter's Canal, O.B., Port Hawkes- 
bury, Ragged Point, N.S., and Mabou, C.B. 

It removed a total of 24,730 cubic yards of material. 

The assignee of the works of St. Peter's Canal paid to the Department the snixi 
oi $13,778.23, for the use of this dredge. (Appendix 6, page 43. J 

Dredge No. 1 was lent by the Department of Railways and Canals and employed 
on the River L'Assomption, the Richelieu River, and the Chambly Canal, P.Q. 

It removed a total of 34,340 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, page 43.) 

The " Queen of Canada " was employed at River 4 la Graisse, Grant's Point 
^Salmon River, and Beauharnois. 

Ii removed a total of 33,785 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, page 44.> 

The **Nipissing" was employed at Berthier (enhaut) and at the close of the 
fiscal year had removed a total of 21,524 cubic yards of material on the Vanasse, 
Church, and Levesque Shoals. (Appendix 5, page 44 ) 

The " Challenge " was employed at Meaford and Port Albert. 

In the first of these places it removed 39,02'^ cubic yards, and in the second, 
18,706 cubic yards of stone, clay, sand and gravel. 

The plant will need various repairs. (Appendix 5, page 45.) 



PUBLIC WORKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
During the past fiscal year the works necessary for the improvement of the 
navigation of the River Naas were commenced, consisting of the removal of tranks 
of trees and other obstacles. The channel of the Fraser River was also deepened by 
dredging. 

The surveys necessary before the commencement of the works for the improve- 
ment of the navigation of the River Skeena were completed. 

Mr. Tiedmann, Architect, was instructed by the Government to make the surveys 
and prepare the plans necessary for the construction of a Customs wharf at Victoria. 

The contract awarded to Mr. Spence for the removal of the " Beaver Rook,** in 
Victoria Harbor has been withdrawn from him, and the Department is having the 
work continued under the superintendence of Mr. Thomas Reece. An expenditure of 
about $750 will now suffice to give a depth over the whole of that reef of 12 feet S 
inches of water. 

The repairs to the Post Office were finished, partly under a contract entered into 
with the Department and partly by day's work. The expenditure was kept within 
the limits of the amount voted. (Appendix 6, pages 59-78.) 



[1881] XXXV 

SLIDES AND BOOMa 

Hie Government Slidet^ were constructed to facilitate the floating of timber in 
^vhere nature ofiered obstacles to navigation. 



The districts where the cutting of timber is carried on, and where the Groveni- 
it has caused works to be constructed, are situated on the Rivers Saguenay, St. 
MMrice, Ottawa and Trent, on Georgian Bay and on some tributary rivers. 



&IVEB SAQUBNAT. 



The works on this river consist of one slide 5,840 feet in length, with a boom of 
1,344 feet, and dams, piers and balkhead. The slide was constructed to avoid the 
Ib between Lake St. John and the Hiver Saguenay. 



The works extend over a distance of about 60 miles and are constructed on La 
Petite IWcharge, the lesser of the two overflowing streams from Lake St. John. 
Tbey were commenced in 1856 and completed in 1860. 

Of the slide 570 feet have been re-constructed, and to 4,390 feet considerable 
repairs have been made. 

In addition various other repairs have been made and works of maintenance 
done. (Appendix 7, page 79.) 

RITER ST. MAURIOS. 

The slides and booms on this river and the Vermilion, one of its tributaries, are 
met in the order following : — 

SUtioDg. Distance from Three Riyen. 

Booms at mouth of river. , miles. 

Grds Falls 16 " 

Shawene^an Palls !. 23 " 

Grand' Mdre Falls 29 *• 

Little Piles Falls 31i " 

La Tuque Falls 100 ** 

PlamondonBddy 106 " 

Kiver Vermilion : — 

Mouth of river 116 " 

Lx)qaois Falls 121 " 

The water was very low last spring in the River St. Maurice and its tributaries, 
and of 300,000 logs got out during last year, only 60,000 could be brought down. 

The pay of the staff and the cost of maintenance amounted to $l4,699.14during 
the year. 

A sum of $5,431.14 was placed at the disposal of the Supei*intendent to meet 
ooilay for repairs. Of that grant a sum of $283.32 remains available. 



xxxvi [1881] 

The several works were not Beriously dami^ed last Bpring. (Appendix 8, jfSLge 
81.) 

THE OTTAWA DISTRIOT. 

For the descent of timber in this district the Government works are situated oa 
the following rivers : — 

On the Ottawa .'. 11 stations. 

«« Gatineau 1 " 

•* Madawaska. 15 " 

" Coulonge 2 " 

" Black 1 « 

" Petewawa. ^ 31 " 

" EiverduMoine 12 " 

The following is a table of distances from Ste. Anne's Lock at the outlet of ^#^ 
Biver Ottawa to the mouths of its principal tributaries ; also to the stations where 
slides or other works have been constructed. 

Places. DiiUoce from 8t6. Aano. 

Carillon , 27 miles. 

Grenville 40 " 

Nation Biver 63 " 

Biver du Lidvre 79 " 

** Gatineau 96 " 

Chaudidre Falls 98 " 

Little Chaudidre 100 « 

Bemous 102 " 

Lake Beschdnes 105 " 

Biver Quio 129 '* 

Chats Station 131 " 

Head of Chats 134 « 

Biver Mississippi , 134 '' 

" Madawaska 136 ** 

« Bonnechdre 148 " 

LesChenaux 152 " 

Portage-du-Port 156 " 

Mountain Station 161 ** 

Calumet 163 " 

Biver Coulonge 184 " 

" Black 193 " 

" Snake 204 ' 

" Petewawa 218 " 

Des Joachims 236 « 



i 



[ISBIJ zzvii 

PUc68. Difltanoe from Ste. Anne. 

Biverda Hoine 244 miles. 

Bocher Capitaine 253 " 

DeuxRividres 266 " 

Biver Mattawan 286 " 

" Antoine 293 " 

" Beauchftne 315 « 

« Poro-Bpio 326 " 

« Grand Opemiconne 333 ** 

" Keepawa 349 " 

" Montreal 355 « 

Port Temiscamingue 367 " 

Biver Ottertail 381 " 

" Blanche 386 « 

*' dee Quinze 389 " 



RIVER OTTAWA, 
list of slide and boom atatioos on the River Ottawa. 

The distances given are measured on the latest maps, following the channel^bj 
wUeh lumber is floated down the river, 

iff*«n«. »f ca^4:^«. Distance from month ot 

Names of Stations. q^^^^ ^^ g^^^ ^^^. 

!• Carillon 27 miles. 

«•<*•""»"• {^.fX^^tSL} »» " 

3. Chaudidre (Little) 100 " 

4. Remous 102 « 

5. Deech^nes Rapids 104f " 

6. Chats Stotion 131 " 

1. Head ofChats 134 «* 

8. Chenaux 152 '* 

9. Portage-duPort 156 " 

10. Mountain 161 •* 

11. Calumet 163 " 

12. Joachims Rapids 249 « 

13. Rocher Capitaine 253 " 

The works of these thirteen stations consist of: — 

2,000 lineal feet of canal. 

4,234 " " slides. 

29,855 " « booms. 

9 



xxxviii [1881] 



8,665 lineal foot of damn. 

406 " " bulkheads. 
1,981 " " bridges. 
52 piers. 
4 slide-keepers' hooses. 
3 storehoases. 

The following works were ezecated daring the fiscal year ended 30th Jane last. 

Considerable repairs were made to the slides and booms at Hall and the 
Ohaudidre. The wood work and the cables of Union Bridge received two coats of 
paint 

At fiocher Capitaine the damage done to the booms and piers by the high water 
in the spring was repaired. 

At the Chats slides, genei'al repairs. 

At the Chenauz station the booms, which the pressure of the timber had con- 
siderably injured, were strengthened. 

At the Calumet station the works suffered considerably and the foundations had 
to be strengthened. 

At the Mountain station considerable repairs were made. 

At the Joachims station the flooring and piers were repaired. 

At the Portage-du-Port station the guide boom was renewed. (Appendix 9, 
pages 83 and 84.) 



RIVER GATDIEAU. 

The Biver Gatineau flows from the north, and discharges into the Ottawa at a 
point about 96 miles above the junction of that river with the St Lawrence at Sto. 
Anne, and 2 miles below the City of Ottawa. The length of the Gatineau is about 
400 miles, and it drains an area of about 9,u00 square miles. 

The Government works are all situated at one station, about a mile from ita con- 
fluence with the Ottawa. They consist of: — 

3,071 lineal feet of canal. 
4,133 " " booms." 
150 " " bridge. 
10 piers. 

1 boom.men*s house. 
1 storehouse. 



[1881] zxxix 

A fence has been built between the GrovemmeDt property near the pond and 
thftt belonging to the fieverend Oblata Fathers. 

The pier of the bridge over the new canal has been strengthened and the booms 
anchored. (Appendix 9, page 84.) 



RIVER MADAWASKA. 

The Biver Madawaska is 240 miles long. It waters an area of about 4,100 square 
miles and discharges into the River Ottawa 136 miles above Ste. Anne. 

Xdst of the slide and boom stations on the Madawaska, numbered fh>m the mouth 
of the river upwards : — 

1. Mouth of river. 9. High Palls. 

2. Amprior. 10. Ragged Chute. 

3. Flat Rapids. 11. Boniface Rapids. 

4. Bulmer*8 Island: 12. Duck Island. 
6. Burnstown. 13. Bailey's Chute. 

6. Long Rapids. 14. Chain Rapids. 

7. Springtown. 15. Opeongo Creek. 

8. Calabogie Lake. 

The works at these stations consist of: — 

1,750 lineal feet of slides. 
18,179 " " booms. 
4,080 " ** dams. 
182 " " bridges. 

43 piers. 
1 storehouse. 

The channels through which the timber passes have been widened and deepened. 



RIVER COULONGB. 

The river waters an area of 1,800 square miles, and its len^h is 160 miles. I 
discharges into the River Ottawa, 184 miles above Ste. Anne, on the north shore. 

The following is a list of the Government works on the river : — 

Boom at mouth 300 feet long and 1 support pier. 

Booms at Remain's rafting ground . 400 '' 3 " 

Boomsat head of High Falls' Slide... 1,848 << 6 '< 

Singlestick Slide 2,900 *< 



[1881] 



In the moDtfa of May, 1880, the High Falls slide was considerably damaged. 
Repairs were then made provisionally, and these were completed last wintei'- 
^Appendix 9, page 84.) 

BLACK RIVER 

This river empties into the Ottawa at a point 193 miles above Ste. Anne. Ita 
length is 128 miles, and the area which is watered by it is about 1,120 square miles. 

The works consist of: 

1,139 lineal feet of single stick boom. 
S13 " slide. 

346 " glance pier. 

135 " flat dam. 

The slide which, having a very sharp decline, is greatly damaged by the timber 
which passes over it with very great rapidity, was repaired. (Appendix 9, page 84») 



RIVER PBTEWAWA. 

The length of the Petewawa is about 138 miles, and the area of the territorjr 
watered by it is 2,200 square miles. 

It flows from the south and discharges into the Ottawa, 219 miles above Ste. 
Anne. Seven miles from its mouth it separates into two branches. On these seven 
miles there are fire stations ; on the north branch 19 stations. All the works on the 
south branch were abandoned in accordance with the Order in Council, dated 2'7th 
July, 1871. 

List of the slides and booms on this river, in the order in which they occur from 
the mouth upwards : — 

1. Mouth of the River. 

2. Firet Chute. 

3. Second Chute. 

4. Third Chute. 

5. Bois Dm\ 

NORTH BRANCH. 



L Half Mile Rapid. 

2, Croaked Chute, 

3, Betweeia High Falls and Lake 

Traverne (a «lide and series of 
dami» and booms*) 



4. Thompson's Rapids. 

5. Lake ^Traverse Slides. 

6. Sawyer's Rapids. 

7. Meno Rapids. 

8. Below Trout Lake. 



[1881] xli 

9. Strong Eddy. 16. Head of Long Sanlt 

10. Cedar Islands. 17. Between Long Sanlt and Cedar 

11. Foot of Devil's Chute. Lake (south shore.) 

12. Devil's Chute. 18. Between Long Sault and Cedar 

13. Elbow of Sapids. Lake (north shore.) 

14. Foot of Long Sault. 19. Cedar Lake. 

15. Middle of Long Sault. 

The works at these 24 stations are as follows : — 

ON THS MAIN RITEB. 

2,963 lineal feet of slides. 
8,469 '* ** booms, 

2,077 " " dams. 

10 piers. 

ON THE NORTH BRANCH. 

1,080 lineal feet of slides. 
2,671 " " booms. 

1,131 " •' dams. 

23 piers. 

Daring the year the boom piers at the mouth of the river were strengthened 
«») repaired. 

The slide at Bois Dur Station was repaired. 

Considerable repairs were made to the works situated between Crooked Chute 
sod Cedar Lake. (Appendix 9, page 84.) 



BIVER DU MOINB. 

The length of this river is about 120 mites, and it waters to the north an area of 
iboot 1,600 square miles. It flows into the River Ottawa at a point about 256 miles 
Above 8te. Anne. 

The works on this river are : a pier and a boom at the mouth, a single stick slide 

lod a seriea of dams from the mouth upwards. These works may be detailed as 

fcUow;— 

4,000 lineal feet of slides, 

800 " " booms, 

1,324 " , " dams, and 

6 piers. 

Bepairs have been made to the long sHde at High Falls and to the dams at 
%BQ*g Chutes Nob. 1 and 2. (Appendix 9, page 84.) 



xlii [1881] 

TEBNT RIVER NAVIGATION. 

The booms, piei*8 and slides and all such portions of the works as are connected 
with the lumbering operations on the River Trent at Chisholm's Rapids, Ranney'e 
Falls, Middle Falls, and Crook's Rapids, were transferred to a company formed pur- 
posely for the management and maintenance of those works, with the right ol 
levying tolls thereon, at the rate of five shillings per crib, at each of the slides, 
except at Chisholm's and at Crook's Rapids, where the works constructed do not 
facilitate the descent of timber. 

This rate was altered by an Order in Council, on the 8th of December, 1866, 
fixing the tolls to be levied at Ranney's Falls, Middle Falls, and Heely's Falls, at one 
cent for each log of 13 foot in length, and a proportionate sum on pieces of greater 
length ; and one dollar on each crib of square timber. 

The company i re not liable for the renewal of the works, in case of their failure 
from decay of materials, or their desti-uction by fire, flood or any other cause. It is 
their duty to keep an exact account of all the moneys collected by them, and to 
transmit the same to the Minister of Public Works, as provided by the Orders in 
Council passed on the subject 

The extraordinary repairs which from time to time were required have been 
executed at the expense of the Grovemment, as also new works at localities other 
than those mentioned. 

The following table gives the distances of navigable and unnavigable reaches : — 

Narigable. Unnayigable. 

Prom Trenton, Bay of Quints, to Nine Mile Rapids 9 

" Nine Mile Rapids to Percy Landing 19^ 

" Percy's Landing to Heely's Falls Dam 14J 

•' Heely's Falls Dam to Peterboro 51| 

" Peterboro to Lakefield 9J . 

" Lakefield to Burleigh 12 

'' Burleigh Rapids 1 

" Burleigh Rapids to Buckhorn Rapids 7 

" Buckhorn Rapids I 

" Buckhorn Dam to Lindsay 36^ 

126^ * 34| 
" Lindsay to Port Perry at the head of Lake Scugog. 28f 

165Jr 34| 

Total distance, Bay of Quints to Port Perry 190 miles. 

Passing to Fenelon Falls the distance from Buckhorn Dam 

toFenelon is 31^ 



[1881] 

i 

llielbllowing is a list of the works now io use : — 

CMshoMs Rapids. 

The works here consist of a oanal aod lock, a dam and 
slide 

Percy Landing. 
A retainiDg boom for saw logs here 

Camphellford. 
6aide booms 

MidOUi Falls. 
The works consist of 4 dams and 2 slides 

, Crow Bay. 
A retaining boom 

Heely's Falls. 
A dam and one slide are in operation here 

Crook's BapidSf Bastings. 
The works consist of a lock, dam and slide for timber 

Whitlow's Rapids. 

These works, situated below Peterboro, consist of a lock, 
dam and canal 

Little Lake. 
These works consist of three piers and a boom 

Burleigh. 
Timber slides 

Buckhom Rapids. 
This dam is important, in keeping to v high level the water 
of the lakes west of it as far as Bobcaygeon, includ- 
ing Lakes Pigeon, Ball, Buckhom and Chemong. 
The dam is effective 

Bobcafgeon. 

There are two dams here with oanal, lock and slide. 

The dams keep up the water to the same level as far 

as Fenelon Falls, and to the reach as far as Lindsay 

Lock - 

Fenekm FaMs. 

A large slide and booms « • 

7— D 



xliii 



Distance from Trenton 
in miles. 



16i 

28| 

37| 
38 

42| 

924 

U 
US 



12& 



140} 
a56| 



xliv [1881] 

' ^ 

In accordance with the terms of the Act 47 Vic, Chap 7, the cabals and locks- 
in the District of Newcastle are now under the control of the Department of Eailway* 
and Canals ; whereas the slides, dams and booms remain under the control of the 
Department of Public Works, 

The following repairs have been effected at the various stations : — 
At Fenelon Falls the planking of the slide has been renewed. 

The following repairs are now necessary : — 

1. Baising by three layers the walls of the slide. 2. Prolonging the range of 
piers, upwards beyond the slides, to a distance sufficient to guide with certainty the 
logs into the entrance of the slide. 

A commencement has been made towaixis removing the obstructions in the 
Scugog fiiver, and a lighthouse has been erected at its mouth. 

At Lindsay, on the Scugog Biver, a fish-leap has been built at the request of 
the Department of Marine and Fisheriea. 

At Bobcaygeon, it is a matter of urgent necessity to remove the obstructions 
found in the river at those points where it intersects the canal, inasmuch as the ten 
or twelve steamboats running on Sturgeon Lake find it difficult to enter the canal. 

At Buckhorn the slide is in want of repairs in various dii^ecUons, and the time 
has come for renewing the boom. 

At Burleigh, the dam, the slide, and the waste-weir required considerable repairs. 

At Lakefield, the channel has been cleaned out, by the employment of a lifting 
barge, and in this way a depth of water of 4 feet 8 inches has been obtained. The 
slide at this station belongs to private pai ties and is very badly kept up, to the injury of 
the public 

Peterborough js situate 52 miles from Heely's Falls, and on this stretch six 
steamboats are constantly running. Above the falls is one series of rapids as &r as 
Lakefield, and on these rapids there are sawmills whose refuse is filling up the 
above mentioned navigable section. This abuse has given nse to complaints for 
several years past, and the resident engineer has received instructions to make a 
report on the subject. 

At Little Lake, the boom and piers have undergone some repairs. Little Lake 
is situate one mile from Peterborough, and the saw-mill refuse will finally choke it 
up if a dredge is not sent to dig out a channel. 

At Whitlaw'sBapids, a new waste-weir has been built and certain repairs efiected 
at the request of the signers of the petition No. 84,294, addressed to this Department. 
The obstructions^or banks known as " Yankee Bonnet,'* '< Dangerfield,*' and ** Bobin- 



[1881] xlv 

son's XbIbihI," have been removed. Thanks to this work there are now four more 
ioches of water on the sill of the lock at Whitlaw's Bapids. 

At Hastings, the Department has had bailt a cofferdam on Flat Bock, raised 600 
cnhic yards of stone from the bed of the river, cleaned out the channel below the 
locks, and repaired the slide. 

At Heely's Palls the slide requires considerable repairs. It has not been 
rtpaired for many years. 

The resident engineer recommends that the Department should undertake the 
necessary repairs at '* Middle Palls," and " Chisholm's fiapids," two stations loo much 
B^leoted by the Trent Slides Committee. (Appendix 19, pages 143-147.) 



TELBGBAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Since the 1st January, 1881, the Government has been in possession of 430 miles 
of telegraphic lines and of 16 knotsof sub-marine cables purchased from the " Western 
Union Telegraph Company." This purchase has given a three-fold advantage ; — Istf^ 
The Government has no longer to pay the subsidy of $4,000 to the Company, nor the 
anntial sum of $2,600 for the maintenance of the line which traverses Washington 
Territory, nor, lastly, a sum of nearly $6,000 per annum for the maintenance and 
npairs of the six sub-marine cables vid St. Juan Island. 

2nd. The same Company pays $1,200 per annum for services rendered at the 
Belay Station of New Westminster, and collects all the receipts at the Victoria Station, 
representing about $1,000 per annum. 

3rd. The Grovemment and the public profit by a reduction of about $5,000 on the 
charge for despatches. 

In British Columbia there are now about 6*76 miles of telegraphic lines and 3G 
knots of double sub-marine cables. (Appendix 10, page 88.) 

The 'receipts from these lines and cables which in 1878-79 amounted to only 
15,320, will, in 1881-82, probably roach $18,000 or $20,000. (Appendix 10, page 88.) 

GULF OF ST. LAWBSNCS. 

The sub-marine cables between the Island of Anticosti and the Coast of Gasp^^ 
aod the Magdalen Islands and Cape Breton have worked very well. The Bird Rook 
cable has three times suffered damage and been repaired, and a very stout cable ia 
kept in reserve for any injury which may henceforth arise. 



Tlvi . [1881J 

During the year a line of 214 miles on the Island of Antioosti has been eom-{ 
pleted, a line of 84 miles on the Magdalen Islands, and further a cable of 9 miles in 
lengthy between fitang-du-Nord and House Harbor. All these works have cost 12^v 
per cent, less than the estimated expenditure. (Appendix 10, page 89.) 

The Honorable Mr. Fortin, who asked for the creation of this telegraphic systena^ 
suggests that it should be extended on the north shore as far as Forteau Bay, in the^ 
Straits of Belle Isle, or rather as far as Pointe Amour, situate on the east side of the 
bay, and upon which is a lighthouse and alarm whistle. This recommendation is 
suggested by the fact that steamships and sailing vessels which fluent the Biver St» 
Lawrence all pass through the Straits of Belle Isle. Forteau Bay, which is always 
accessible, will also be included in the telegraphic system of Canada and the United 
States which will be an inestimable benefit for the fishing boats which frequent 
the desolate north shore. Moreover, since steam vessels make the passage from 
Hoville, in Ireland, to Forteau Bay in five days, this would consequently be the 
shortest way to transmit to Canada, by steamship, the news from Europe, which would 
give an incontestible superiority to the Canadian lines, and would be of enormous 
advantage to our fishing stations. 

The Honorable Mr. Fortin fbrther recommends that the telegraphic system be 
extended to the sboi*es of our great lakes by means of telegraph and signal statioos. 
These recommendations are warmly supported by the representatives of the principal 
Marine Assurance Companies, by the Boards of Trade of Montreal, Quebec and L^vis, 
by General Hazen, Director General of the Signal Service in the army of the United 
States and by the Consul for Sweden and Norway at Qaebec. Norway and Sweden 
possess a similar system very complete in its organization. (Appendices 10, page 89 ; 
11, page 105 ; 12, pages 106-121, and 23, page 157.) 

NOBTH 6H0RS, RIVBB ST. LAWBSNGE. 

Bale St Paul has been connected with Chicoutimi by a telegraphic line 92 miles 

long, and^Murray Bay with Mille Vaches by a line of 84 miles. The Saguenay river is 

Grossed by a cable of special construction, being one knot in length. (Appendix 10, 
page 89.) 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

The telegraphic lines in operation on the coasts of Nova Scotia now make up a 
length of 339 miles. (Appendix 10, page 89.) 

BAT OF PITNDT. 

The submarine cable between Grand Manan and Campobello has been repaired. 
It had been cut a mile from the shore, probably by the anchor of some vessel The 
cable which unites Campobello to Eastport, and which corrosion or contact with rocks 
containing veins of copper had damaged, has been repaired. Lastly, a line 24 milee 
in length has been constructed on the Island. 



[1881J riv» 

SIGNAL SBRYICB. 

Tiro Tery simple semaphores have been erected, the one on the Brandy Pots and 
&• other St Siver du Loup (en hoi). They are visible at a distance of fh>m seven to 
e^t nautical miles. In this way the problem of how to establish communication by 
meaos of signals between the lighthouses on the islands in sight of the eastern coast 
of Hova Scotia and the telegraph stations erected between Canso hnd Hali&z, has 
solved. 



The code of signals mentioned in the Report of last year has been sent to 
twenty stations in the River and Gulf of St. Lawrence. (Appendix 10, page 89.) 



TSLIPHONES. 



It will soon be possible to employ the telephone with its most recent improve- 
thrcmghout the public service. (Appendix 10, page 90«) 



QUEBEC HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS. 

The sum paid to the contractors for these works, Messrs. Peters, Moore k 
Wright, has now reached $653,621 .69. 

During the last fiscal year the piling and crib-work, as well as the concreting of 
the wet dock wall have been done. The masonry has been finished up to the level 
^ the superstructure, and the dredges have raised 200,000 cubic yards of material 
from the channels of the tidal basin. 

About the middle of October, 1881, the 1,600 foot wharf was completed, only 
17 months have been occapied in workirig at this enormous structure. The first 
porUon of this great work has been almost perfected. (Appendix 13, pages 122^ 
124) 



GRAVING DOCK AT ST. JOSEPH DE LEVIS. 

Parliament voted $500,000 for the construction of this dock. This sum has been 
<:xpeTM]ed, saving a balance of $62,393.08. Nothing more remains to be done except 
tiie extra works at the ontiy, considered necessary, and the placing in position of the 
boilers and the travelling caisson. 

In the Besident Engineer's Eeport will be found the particulars of the work 
done and the sums paid out during the last fiscal year. (Appendix 13, pages 124 and 
126.) 



ilviu [1881] 

OPBEATIONS OF THE LIFTING BARGE, HARBOR OF QUEBEC. 

On the 24th May the barge resumed work. It proceeded in the first place to 
the shoal called "Fly Bank," in order to continue the lifting of rocks impeding navi- 
gation. It has raised 96 rocks, representing a total weight of 19 tons. Adding these 
figures to the number and weight of the rocks lifted during the past year, from the 
same place, there results a total of 610 rocks, representing a weight of 1,957 tons. 

The services of the barge have been twice required, in order to assist vessels 
which could not weigh their anchors. In both these instances it was ascer- 
tained that these vessels had dropped anchor upon a nest of chains and anchors, 
which must be raised in order to prevent similar accidents. 

A similar nest has been found Dear the western point of the Island of Orleans. 
As in the past, bits of copper have been found attached to the surface .of the rocks 
when raised, which is an additional proof that vessels have touched these rocks. 

The Harbour Commissioners recommend that the Government should obtain a 
vote of twelve thousand dollars ($12,000) in order to repair the barge, and continue 
these clearing out operations energetically. (Appendix 14, pages 129-131.) 



DEEPENING CHANNEL BETWEEN QUEBEC AND MONTREAL. 

By the Act 36 Vic, chap. 60 (1873),and by Order in CouncilSlst May, 1873, the 
Montreal Harbor Commission was authorized to carry out Uiis work. The ship 
channel is being dredged in order to give it a depth of 25 feet. The places where 
the heaviest work has been done are : — Cape Charles and Cape Roche, where rock 
dredging is engaged in ; Point Champlain, on Lake St. Peter ; Contrecceur and 
Montreal, where the dredging is in earth and mud. The gross amount of dredging 
everywhere represents a total of 1,220,937 cubic yards for the last fiscal year. 

The accounts for expenditure made by the Harbor Commission for all these 
works are only made up on the 31st December of each year. (Appendix 15, pages 
135-137.) 

At the request of this Department, the Montreal Harbor Commissioners have 
had prepared by the Engineer in Chief a Report showing the present condition of 
the ship channel between Montreal and Quebec, the probable cost of completing the 
works which remain unfinished, and the state in which the fieet of dredges, the 
<lredging plant, the workshops, &c., are now to be found. (Appendix 16, pages 
138-139. 



[1881] xli3 

ROADS. 



Daring the fiscal year the culverts and bridges of the Temisconata Boad were 
renewed and repairs effected on various portions of this road. This highway, 67 
miles in length, reaches from Biver-du-Loup, on the River St Lawrence, as far a& 
the boandary line between the Provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec, and serves 
» a direct outlet for the country lying between Woodstock, N.R, and Biver-du- 
Loupy on the Biver St. Lawrence. The traffic over this route is considerable, especi- 
ally during the winter. (Appendix 18, page 141.) 



PUBCHASES, SALBS AND LEASES. 

Appendix 20 (pages 148-150) contains a statement of the sales and purchaser 
made by the Department during the last fiscal year, and a statement of the leases 
entered into with various individuals. 



ABBITBATIONS. 

During the fiscal year two claims only were referred to the official arbitrators. 
(Appendix 21, pages 151-152.) 

BBEAKWATEBS ON THE GASP^ COAST. 

The Honorable Dr. Fortin recommends the construction of breakwaters at 
firioua points on the coast of Gasp^, with the view of facilitating the working of our 
sea fiaheries and so increasing their production. (Appendix 22, page 153.) 



OPENING AND CLOSING OF NAVIGATION. 

Appendix 24 (pages 160-161) gives the dates of the dosing of navigation at the 
kiost imp<niant ports of the Dominion, and shows the depth ^of water at low tide at 
tk)6e porta. 



1 [1881] 

THE DBPARTMHNTAL STAFF. 

Appendix No. 25 (page 162) gives a list of persons who filled, in the Depart 
ment, from the 1st Jaly, 1867, to the 30th June, 1881, the offices of Minister, Depat^ 
JGnister, Seoretary, Chief Engineer, and Chief Architeot. 

Bespeotftilly submitted. 



HBCTOB L. LANGBVIN, 

Minister of PubKc Works. 



Ottawa, 17th January, 1882. 



DOMINION OF CANADA. 



HEPORT 



OF THI 



MINISTEE OF PUBLIC WORKS 



f OK TBI 



FISCAL TEAR ENDED 30th JUNE, 188t. 



APPENDICES. 



7-1 



a 



APPENDIX No. I. 



^ATBMBNT showiog the amount Expended by the Department of f ablic Works 
IX>miDion of Canada, during Fiscal Year ended 30th June, 1881. 



NameofWoik. 



PtniLIO BUILDUGS. 



OtnenJlj.. 



Nova Seoiia, 



HftHfkx DomiQion Building 

do Penitentiaiy 

do Qaarantine Station (Lawlor's Island)., 

Ltmenburg Marine Hospital .... 

Pictoa Costom House 

^Tdnej Ooarantine Hospital 

tannoQtn Quarantine Station 



Prince Edward Itland. 



Cbariottetown Dominion Building., 
do Marine Hospital 



Aeta Brumwiek. 



Chatham Custom House -;. 

Dorchester Penitentiary 

Fredericton Magazine 

do Post Office 

Partridge Island Marine Hospital.. 
St. John Custom House 

do Penitentiary 

do Post Office 

do do (old) 

do Sarings Bank 

Woodatock Post Office 



Quebse. 

GroMe Isle Qaarantine Station.. 
Montreal Custom House.. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Examining Warehouse 

Immigrant Sheds 

Inland Reyenne Offices 

Post Office 

Public Buildings 

Quebec Artillery Barracks 

do Citadel (repairs to roof) 

do **Cliff" 

Citadel Buildings 

Custom House 

DriUShed 

Durham Terrace Extension 

Marine Hospital 

Military Bn&dings 

Port Office 

Public Buildings 

Weighta and MeMores Offitet.. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Con- 
stmction. 



$ cU. 

14,966 31 

363 37 



327 70 
2,883 30 



30 60 



1,800 00 



73,274 17 



6,070 64 
1,372 50 

58,416 77 



47,477 71 



2,896 72 
4,636 00 



2,554 13 



676 79 



1,649 74 
'*26,m"64 



14,101 50 
2,038 90 



Repairs. 



$ ets. 



637 20 
410 60 
463 86 



1,076 22 
20 00 

1,424 47 



628 63 
"isS 79 



1,321 16 
30*25 



5,389 68 
2,214 82 

76 00 

3 94 

3,100 60 

38 76 



2,831 00 



7,146 01 

698 26 

32 00 



163 00 
901 00 
4,767 92 
336 00 
316 30 I 



Staff 
and Main- 
tenance. 



$ Ct8. 



Total. 



$ Ct8. 


14,966 31 


900 57 


410 60 


791 56 


2,883 30 


1,076 22 


30 60 


20 00 


1,424 47 


1,800 00 


628 63 


73,274 17 


133 79 


6,070 64 


1,372 50 


58,416 77 


1,321 16 


47,477 71 


30 26 


2,89iS 72 


4,636 00 


2,654 13 


5,389 58 


2,214 82 


75 00 


680 73 


3,100 60 


38 76 


1,649 74 


2,831 00 


26,727 64 


7,146 01 


1,326 13 


32 00 


14,101 50 


2,201 90 


901 00 


4,767 92 


336 00 


316 30 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 1— Continued. 



Name of Work. 



Con- 
ftrnction. 



Repain. 



Staff 
and Main- 
tenance. 



PcBLic HviLui^QB—Continued, 
Quebec. 



Quebec and L6vis Fortificationfl... 

Sberbrooke Post Utfice, etc 

St. Helen's Island Magazine 

St. John's Post Office, *c 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary. 

Three Rivers Custom House 

do Old Barracks 



Ontario. 



Belleville Public Buildings. 
Brantford Post Office, Ac . 



Guelpb Custom House, Ac. 
Hamilton Custom House.... 



do I'ost Office . 
Kingston Custom House. 



do FortiHcations . 

do Military College 

do Penitentiary 

do Post Olbce 

do Public Buildings 

London Custom House 

do Post Office 

Niagara iiarrack Buildings 

Ottawa Drill Shed 

do Geological Museum 

do Post Office 

do Public Buildings 

do do Gas 

do do Grounds 

do do Heating , 

do do Removal of snow.. 

do do Water 

do Supreme Court 

Port Robinson Inland Revenue Offices 

Prescott, Fort Wellington Barracks 

Rideau Hall 

do Fuel and light 

St Catharines Post Office 

Toronto Custom House 

do Drill Shed 

do Examining Warehouse 

do Immigrant Sheds 

do Post Office 

do Public Buildings 

Windsor Post Office 



Manitoba. 



$ CtB. 



39,814 70 
8,588 76 



3,774 23 
15,437 45 



3,138 34 



6,637 31 
10,657 94 



26 19 



6,706 24 

6,016 41 

14,109 11 



3,442 73 
39,240 61 

6,042 06 
12,231 86 



7 63 



6)090 35 



19,622 61 



Fort Osborne Barracks 

Manitoba Public Buildings «. 

Stoney Mountain Penitentiaiy 

Winnipeg, Clerk of Works and Architect's Office. 



do Custom House, &c. 

do Immigrant Shed and Hospital. , 

do Lieut -Governor's Residence... 

do Parliament Building k^v*-" 

• Rental. 



10,314 72 



7,461 61 

746 79 

2,643 93 



$ cU. 



110 50 



225 99 



375 60 
298 68 
74T 32 
635 26 
2^2 34 



657 68 
122 20 
449 15 

1,612 80 
913 20 

1,727 28 



200 ai 
72,740 02 



69 53 

446 50 

16,439 60 



935 53 
124 15 
1,434 61 
135 00 
974 92 
191 69 



190 00 

45 00 

1,090 66 

498 25 
1,182 65 



•4,000 00 



$ Ct8. 



17,763 00 
3,998 06 

36,038 25 

921 22 

9,000 00 



9,012 10 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 1-^ConUnued. 



Nftine of Work. 



North' Wstt Ttrritoriet, 
Btttidbrd Buildings 



BritUh Columbia. 

.Vew Westminster Custom House. . 

do Penitentiarj 

VktorU Costom Hoass 

do Post Office 

do Public Buildings 



Hakbobs axo Brbakwatbrs. 
Atva Seotia, 



Aooapolis Harbor 

AriMig Pier 

Barring Island, Canso Harbor 

Vow Bar Breakwater 

IHgbj Pier 

Oabarus 

Indian Island Beach 

lofonish Sooth 

Lirernool (Brooklyn) Breakwater.. 

Main^Dleo Breakwater 

Merigomish Pier 

Hetaghan Breakwater 

Oik Point (now Kingsport) 

Partridge Island Rifer 

Petit de Grat 

PictOQ Island 

Port Hood Pier 



Princs Edward Man J. 



ColTille Baj (Souris) 

Mal^ue Breakwater 

Miounigash Breakwater 

Xew London Breakwater ... 
8t Peter's Bay Breakwater. 

Tignish Harbour 

Wood Islands 



Xiw Bruniwiek. 



Grande Ansc 

Pointe du Chdne Breakwater . 

Eicfaibacto Harbor 

Bocher Bay 

SaekriUe Harbor 

Shippegan Harbor 

St John Harbor 

do Rirer 

Tobkiiie Hirer 



Con- 
structfon. 



$ cts. 



11,678 16 



5,678 90 

13 50 

9,540 37 



750 00 



5,000 00 
17,780 36 



1,100 00 
1,096 45 



66 10 

1,065 60 

37 79 



2,000 00 

1,007 30 

745 49 

3,000 00 



12,948 39 

1,400 00 

998 77 



2,195 35 

2.997 03 

35 ai 



273 21 
1,200 00 



750 00 
2,000 00 
2,222 78 
4,099 14 
1,000 00 



Repairs. 



$ cU. 



34 62 



27 82 
27 32 
20 00 



Staff 
and Main- 
tenance. 



$ cts. 



200 00 



75 09 

188 57 

75 00 



608 00 
263 84 



1 50 



57 10 



195 89 



10 00 



Tota 



$ cti. 



11,678 16 



34 62 
6,678 90 

41 33 
9,567 69 

20 00 



750 00 


200 00 


5,000 00 


17,855 46 


188 67 


1,176 00 


1,096 46 


608 00 


263 84 


66 10 


1,065 60 


37 79 


1 60 


2,000 00 


1,007 30 


745 49 


3,000 00 


12,948 39 


1,400 00 


998 77 


67 10 


2,195 36 


2,997 03 


3(^21 


196 89 


273 21 


1,200 00 


10 00 


760 00 


2,000 00 


2,222 78 


4,099 14 


1,000 00 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 1-Cmtinued. 



Name of Work. 



Habbobb and BhMJJLWATKhB^CatUinuid. 
Maritime Propineet. 



Harbors and Rirers generallj. 
Quebec, 



AnseSt. Jean Pier 

Baffotville 

Bale St. Paul 

Bertbier(tfn haut) Rirer 

Cap k I'Ai^lo Pier 

Carleton Pier 

Cedars Pier 

Chenal du Moinc Pier 

Chicoutimi Pier 

Eboalements Pier 

Escouinains, removal of boulders 

Etang du Nord, Magdalen Islands 

Grosse Isle Harbor 

Harbors, Ac, generally 

Isle aux Coudres Pier 

L'IsletPier 

Montreal Harbor 

Piers below Quebec 

Piers and Booms, Beloeil 

Quebec Harbor 

Rividre du Lidrre 

Riri^re du Loup Pier 

Riviere Quelle Pier 

River St. Lawrence 

do removal of chains and anchors. 

St. Dominique Pier 

Ste. FamillePier 

St. Jcan-Port-Joli Pier 

St Jean (Isle d'Orleans) Pier 

St Laurent do do 

St Thomas (Montmaffny) do 

Tadousac Fisb-batching Dams 



Ontario. 



Biff Bay, Lake Huron 

CoDourg Harbor 

Collingwood Harbor 

Des Joachims Rapids Bridge 

Harbours, Ac, generally 

Kincardine Harbor 

Little Currrent, Lake Huron 

Morpeth Harbor 

Otonabee River 

Owen Sound Harbor 

Port Albert Harbor, Lake Huron . 

Bondeau Harbor 

Toronto Harbor 

Trent Rirer 



Manitoba, 



AMiniboine Rirer . 



Con- 
•tmction. 



$ cts. 



1,500 07 
3,897 70 



3,000 00 
1,653 25 
1,137 91 



1,927 97 
1,999 91 



1,189 80 
1,165 11 
6,645 U 



1,683 50 



3,604 98 



268 39 



1,925 99 
2,365 56 



3,639 35 
582 14 



500 00 
4,301 06 
7,990 00 

750 69 
4,336 90 
6,009 25 
4,816 22 

421 80 
1,105 86 
6,929 98 
2,480 96 
5,069 96 
7,188 56 
1,897 43 



19 00 



Repairs. 



$ cts. 



7,993 03 



13 00 



1,047 39 
*1,6*28'69 



Staff 
and Main- 
tenance. 



$ cts. 



1,349 09 



50 82 

146 00 

3,078 04 

52 00 

46 50 



82 05 



1,341 63 
2,444 09 



7,885 84 



465 16 
10 00 
470 93 
456 82 
104 52 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 1— Continued. 



Name of Work. 



Habbobs and BRtiAKyrjLTEBB^C<meluded. 



Britith Columbia. 



Cowiduui Rirer 

FuMT Rirer ' 

Htrbon, ike, genendlj . 

Nttf Rirer 

Tidoria Harbor 



Dun>OB Ybbsilb. 



Dt»dge% repain 

Dndging^ porchase of plant.. 



Dbidoimo. 
XiiitiiM ProTinoet $42,000 00 



Qoebeo— 

Beaohamois 

BerUner (en haut) 

Generally 

Laprairie BiTer. 

L'AMomption 

Ottawa RiTer (Galomet) 
RiTidre k la Graisee (Ri- 

gand) 

BiTidre dn Nord 

do Bicheliea 

do Sagnenaj (Chi- 

cootimi) 

do Salmon cNorth 
Shore Ottawa 
River) 



$870 5S 
1,189 67 
2,377 64 
91 70 
1,700 36 
296 62 

1,692 90 

926 81 

3,439 41 

3,327 95 



746 16 



Oitario- 

Gaoanoqne 

Gtnerallj 

Qoderich 

Hawketborr 

Meaford 

Penetangnishene. . 

British OolombiiH* 

Fraeer Rirer. 

GtBerallj 



16,559 77 



245 17 
2,167 03 
1,330 00 
1,005 67 
1,882 61 

999 82 



7,323 28 
222 00 



7,630 30 



7,545 28 



SlIOBS AMD BOOMB. 



Stfoeaar District Works 

aMaanoe do 

Ottawa do 

Ifewcastle do 

Binr Rieheliev (maintenance of bnojs).. 



Oon- 
stmction. 



$ cts. 



670 00 
312 25 



610 59 
939 61 



16,221 67 



73,735 35 



6,677 33 



Repairs. 



$ cts. 



72 00 



14,097 67 



6,210 39 
3,831 27 



Staff 
and llain- 
tenance. 



$ cts. 



853 68 

14,993 41 

19,086 06 

529 00 

893 75 



Totel. 



$ cts. 



670 00 
312 25 
72 00 
610 59 
939 61 



14,097 67 
15,221 57 



73,796 36 



7,064 67 

25,503 01 

19,086 06 

529 00 

398 76 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 1— Concluded. 



Name af Work. 



Slides and BoouB-^Coneluded, 

Ottawa Rirer Slidei f2,153 08 

Gatineau do 

Madawaska do 

Gonlonge do 

Black do 

Petewawa do 

Dumoine do * 

Soath Nation 

Ottawa Sospeniion Bridge 



361 38 
1,994 26 
2,427 10 

382 86 
2,861 22 
1,127 46 

122 19 
35 32 



Con- 
struction. 



$ ctt. 
1,019 68 



Roads and Bridgbs. 

Isle anx Noix (Roadway and Bridging). 
Temisconata Road 



MisoiLLAinouf. 



Arbltrationi 

Belief of Fishermen, East Ooast Labrador.. 
Snrreji 



TlLlORAPH LmiB. 

Land and Cable Telegraph Lines, Lower St. Law< 

rence 

Telegraph Lines, Bale St Paul to Chicoutimi, kc. 

do Maritime Provinces » 

do British Columbia 

do Prince Edward Island, subsidy. . 
Agent and contingencies, B.C ^ 



ToUls.. 



WOBKS AUTHORISID BT SpBCIAL AOTS OF 

Pabliambrt. 

St Lawrence Ri^er (deepening between Quebec and 

Montreal) 

Quebec Harbor Improvements 

L6yis Graying Dock 

Esquimau do B.C 



Totals 

Grand Totals . 



468 02 



838 67 



Repairs. 



$ eta 



11,464 86 



176,343 30 

12,940 61 

4,030 00 

53,765 71 



1,014,391 47 



Nil. 
202,000 00 
175.000 00 
9,891 00 



386,891 00 



1,401,282 47 



1,100 43 



208,368 86 



Staff 
and Miun- 
tenance. 



$ cts. 



383 49 



4,162 31 

437 24 

24,228 95 



29,801 83 
1,946 66 
1,690 90 

175,327 96 



208,358 85 



175,327 96 



ToUl. 



$ cts. 

1,019 66 
383 49 



11,922 87 



838 67 
1,100 43 



4,162 31 

437 24 

24,228 95 



175,343 30 

12,040 61 

4,030 00 

83,067 54 

1,946 66 

1,690 90 



1,398,078 21 



Nil. 
202,000 00 
175,000 00 
9,891 00 



386,891 00 



1,784,969 28 



DlPARTMBfVT OF PUBLIO WoBKS, 

Ottawa, 18tb Noveiwber, 1881. 



O. DIONNB, 

AceoimtMnt 



[1881] 



APPENDIX Na 2. 



TABLE OF DISTANCES. 

ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATION. 

mOX STRAITS OF BELLE-ILB TO DULUTII, AT nSAD OF LAKI SUPSBIOR, BY WATER. — A. 



From 



To 



Sections 

of 

Navigation. 



^^tnits of Belle-lie 

C«pe Whittle 

WwtLijcbt, Anticosti 

Father Point. 

^UmoQskl 

^c^^ 

•fie Verte (opp. 8agnenay) 

Quebec 

Tbrte Rivers 

Montreal^ 

Lacfaine 

Btaoharaois 

Ste. C*cile 

Cornwall 

Dldkinson's Landing 

?«rran'8 Point 

^pper end Croyle's Island . 

^^iamsburg 

Hapid Plat 

Point Iroqaois Village 

Pretqa'Ue , 

Point Cardinal 

Oilops Rapids 

Prwcott 

Kingston 

Port Dalhonsie 

PortColborne 

Amberstburgh , 

Windsor 

Foot of St. Mary's Island... 

Sftmia 

?oot of St Joseph's Island. 

SaaltSt Mary 

Head of Sault St Mary 

Point anx Pins 



Cape Whittle 

West Light, Anticoati 

Father Point 

Rimouski 

Bic 

Islo Verte 

Quebec. 

Three Rivers 

Montreal 

Lachine , 

Beauharnois 

Ste. C6cile , 

Cornwall 

Dickinson's Landing , 

Farran's Point 

Upper end of Croyle's Island 
Williamsburg or Morris 

burgh 

Rapid Plat 

Pomt Iroquois Village 

Upper end Prcsqu'Ilc 

Point Cardinal, Edwards 

burgh 

Head of Galops Rapids 

Prescott , 

Kingston 

Port Dalhonsie , 

Port Colbome 

Amherstbnrgh 

Windsor , 

Foot of St Mary's Island 

Sarnia .'. 

Foot of St Joseph's Island... 

Foot of Sault St Mary 

Head of Sault St Mary 

Point aux Pins ..... 

Duluth 



Oulf of St. Lawrence... 

do 
River St Lawrence.... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do to Tidewater 

do 

Lachine Canal 

Lake St Louis 

Beauharnois Canal 

Lake St. Francis 

Cornwall Canal 

River St Lawrence 

Farran's Point Canal .. 



Statute Miles- 



Inter- 
mediate. 



River St Lnwrencc... 

Rapid Plat CannI 

River St Lawrence... 
Point Iroquois Cunul., 

Junction Canal , 

Galops Canal 

River St. Lawrence . .. 
do 

Lake Ontario 

Welland Canal 

Lake Erie 

River Detroit 

Lake St Clair 

River St Clair , 

Lake Huron 

River St Mary 

Sault St Mary Canal.. 

River 8t. Mary 

Lake Superior 



240 

201 

203 

6 

12 

39 

126 
74 
86 

16 
II; 
32 
11. 
5 

i 

lOj 
4 

3 

I* 

170 

27 
232 

18 

25 

33 
270 

47 

1 

7 

390 



Total 
to Straits 

of 
Belle-Ile. 



240 
441 
643 
649 
661 
700 
826 
900 
986 
994^ 
1,009} 
1,021 



1,071 

1,0SU 
1,085} 
1,000 
1,09:} 



1,095| 
1,097 
1,106 
1,164 
1,334 
1,361 
1,693 
1,611 
1,636 
1,669 
J, 939 
1,986 
1,987 
1,794 
2,384 



Of the 2,384 miles from the Straits of Belle-Ile to the Head of Lake Superior, 71} miles are 
artificial navigation, and 2,312} open navigation. 

Straits of Belle He to Liverpool, 1,942 geographical, or 2,234 statute miles. 
The total fall from Lake Superior to Tidewater is about 600 feet. 



10 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No, 2''0(mtinued. 



QUKBBC TO LIVERPOOL, Vtd BTftAITS OF BELLE-ILE AND ICALIN HEAD, NORTH OF IRELAND. — B. 



From 



Quebec 

Saflii€ii«T 

Father Point 

West end of Antioosti . 
Cape Whittle 



Bell«-Ile 

Malin Head . 



To 



Sagnenay 

Father Point 

Lighthouse, west end Anticosti... 
Cape Whittle, Labrador Coast.... 
Belle-Ile Lighthousei east en 

trance of Straits 

Malin Head, North of Ireland 

Liverpool 



Section 8 
of Navigation. 



River St. Lawrence.. 

do 

do 
Gulf of Su Lawrence 

do 

Atlantic Ocean 

do and Irish Sea 



Total from Quebec to Liverpool, viA Belle-IIe and Malin Head, North of Ireland... 



Geographi- 
cal Miles. 



106 

63 

176 

175 

209 

1,750 

192 



2,661 



Statute 
MUes. 



122 

202 
201 

240 

2,013 

221 



3^oeo 



HEAD 0¥ LAKE J<UPKR10B TO LIVERPOOL, Vtd BTRAITS OF BELLE-ILR AND NORTH OF IRELAND. — (' 



Sections of Navigation. 


t.?ffi- 


Statot<j 
Miles. 


Head of Lake Superior, at Fond duLac, to Quebec...... , 


1,355 
2,661 


1 558 


Quebec to Liverpool, vii Straits of Belle-Ile and North of Ireland 


3,06<.> 






Total from head of Lake Superior to Liverpool, vi& Belle-He and Malin Head, 
North of Ireland 


4,016 


4,618 




N.B. — Route v0 Straits of Belle-He shorter than vid Cape Race 


168 


182 







Straits of Belle-He, 80 miles long by 14 average breadth. 



[1881] 



11 



APPENDIX No. 2.'^C<mtinued. 



(JCBBEC TO LIVKBPOOL, viA <UPK BACK AND MALIK HEAD, NORTH OF IBBLAND. — D. 



From 



Quebec 

fjier Point......... ....!.... 

lilB. 

Cap Ste. Anne des Moots 

Cip de U Madeleine 

FfiM Point 

CipdcBRoBiers 

Ci^St Pierre deMiquelon 

CoeRace 

lUiDHead 



To 



SagaenftT 

Father Point 

M6ti8 Point 

Cap Ste. Anne des Monts.... 

Cap de la Madeleine 

Fame Point 

Cap des Rosiers 

Cap St Pierre de Miqaelon., 

Cape Race , 

MalinHead 

Liverpool 



Sections 
of Navigation. 



Geographi- 
cal Miles. 



River St Lawrence. . i 
do ..| 

do ..| 

do 
do 
do 
do 
Gulf of St Lawrence 

Atlantic Ocean.. 

do do 

do and Irish Sea 

Total from Quebec to Liverpool, viH Cape Race and Malin Head, North of Ireland 



106 
63 
22 
71 
46 
29 
25 

343 

133 
1,800 

192 



2,819 



Statute 
Miles. 



122 
61 
25 
82 
53 
33 
29 
394 
152 

2,ove 

221 



3,242 



HEAD OK LAKE BUPSBIOR TO LIVEBPOOL, vi& CAPB RACK AJ<D NORTH OF IRELAND. — E. 



Sections of Navigation. 


Geographi- 
cal Miles. 


Statute 
Miles. 


^'eidofLake Superior, at Fond du Lac, to Quebec 


1,365 
2,819 


1,553 


'^^bec to Liverpool, vid Cape Race and North of Ireland 


3,242 






Total from head of Lake Superior to Liverpool, viA Cape Race and Malin Head, 
Korth of Ireland , , 


4,174 


4,800 






J^-B.— Route viA Cane Race lonsrer than vi& Straits of Belle-IIe 


168 


182 







7-2i 



12 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 2.^Contime(L 



LAKE KAVIGATIOX. — F. 



Statute Miles. 



Names of Lakes, 

and of 

Kivers connecting the same. 



Snpcrior 

St. Mary's River 

Michigan 

Green Bay 

Mackinaw Straits ■! 

iieorgian Bay 

Huron 

St. Clair River 

.St Clair Lake 

UiTcr Detroit 

Lake Erie , 

Niagara River 

Lake Ontario 

Lake St Francis 

Lake St Louis 

Lake St Peter :... . 

iJiver St Lawrence, connecting Lakes 
Ix'twfccn Kingston and Three Rivers 



Greatest 
Length. 



300 
65 

345 

100 
60] 
Not added 
below. ;J 

130 

270 
33 
25 
25 

250 
35 

190 
33 
15 
30 

186 



Greatest 
Breadth. 



Total length of Lake Xavigation . 2,172 

I 
do do .1 1,773 



160 

4 

84 

25 

20 

55 
105 



25 
3 

60 
3 

52 
5 



1^ 



80 
1 

58 
18 

10 

40 
70 



20 
I 

38 
1 

40 
4 
5 
7 



Depth in 
Feet 






60 



200 



900 
50 
27 
37 

204 

"eoo" 

80 
G8 
40 



Inclusive of Iliver portions. 
F]xclusive of River portions . 



900 

30 

1,000 

500 

40 

500 

450 

35 

15 

29 

90 

30 

412 

36 

30 

8 

20 



Area, 
Square 
Miles. 



32,000 



22,400 
2,000 



23,000 
360 



10,000 



6,700 

LH2 

75 

200 



ft 

* 4> 






96,867 



Feet 

6O0 

582 
580 

580 

580 

678 

578 



672 



564 



234 

141 

58 





rilOM i'ltlNCK ARTIIt a LAMUNG (lAKK SUPKKIOU) TU FORT GAllKY (WIXNIPEO), BY THE DAW.^OX HOrTB. — G 



1 . 1 I . II I ,". ' . .. ■■ 



Statute Miles. 



Inter- 
mediate. 



ToUl. 



I'rince Arthur's Landing to Shebandowan 

Lake Skebandowan to North-West Angle 

N'orth-West Angle to Fort Garry (Winnipeg) , 



45 

312 

95 



The steamboat voyage from Collingwood to Prmce Arthur's Landing is 532 miles. 



45 
357 
452 



r 



[1881] 



la 



APPENDIX No. 2.'---Cmtu.ueL 

Distance to Liverpool, from Halifax (Nova Scotia), St. John (Now Brunswick), 
Portland (State of Maine), and Quebec, as measured on Colton's Map 
of 1861.— H. 

Halifax to Liverpool, vid Cape Clear. 



FROM 


TO 


Sections of XavigatioQ. 


DiSTANCK IV 

Miles. 


Geogra- 
phical. 


Statute. 


HtHfai, Nova Scotia 

Cape Clear 


Cape Clear.*. 

Liverpool 


Across Atlantic to S.W. end of Ireland. 
Ud St. Georcre's Channel 


2,200 
330 


2,530 
380 




Total 






2,630 


2,9)0 







St. John to Liverpool, vid Cape Clear. 



St Jdio, Kew Branawick.. 



Cxpe Sable.. 
Cipe Clear.. 



Cape Sable.. 

Gape Clear.. 
Liverpool.... 



Across Bay of Fundy to S.W. end of 

Nova Scotia. 
Across Atlantic to S.W. end of Ireland. 
Up St George's Channel 



Total.. 



180 

2,310 
330 



2,820 



207 

2,656 
380 



3,243 



Portland to Liverpool, 


Vid Cape Sable and Cape Clear. 






Portland, State of Maine.... 
Ctpe Sable 


Gape Sable 

Gape Glear 

Liverpool 


Across Bay of Fundy to S.W. end of 

Nova Scotia. 
Across Atlantic to S. W. end of Ireland... 
Up St. George's Channel 


210 

2; 310 

330 


242 
2,656 


<'ape Clear 


380 




Total 






2,860 


3,278 









Quebec to Liverpool, vid Cape Race and North of Ireland. 



Qoebec 


Gape Race 

Malin Head 

Liverpool 


River and Gulf of St. Lawrence to S.W. 
Point of Newfoundland 


827 

1,800 
192 


i»5I 


^twRace 


Across Atlantic to North end of Ireland. 
Down North Channel 

Total 


2,070 


MaliaHcad 


221 








2,819 


3,242 








Quebec to Liverpool, vid Straits of BclIe-TIe and Malin Head, North of 
Ireland ..•••••••....• ..« .•••••... ..«. . 


2,661 


3,060 





For farther details, see pages 9, 10 and 11 of Appendix. 



u 



[1881] 



APPENDIX No. 2.— Continued. 



Table op Distances from the Principal Seaports in North America, to Liverpool, 
Havi'e, Havana and Rio Janeiro. — I. 



Geographical MileB. 

n u i^T ^ ^.1 f Fi4 BoUo-Ile 2,649 

Quebec to Liverpool. | ,. Cape Bace 2,808 

TT««. i " Belle-Ile 2,810 

Havre.... | ,, Cape Bace 2,939 

Havana 2,891 

Rio Janeiro 5,546 

Boston to Liverpool 2,895 

Havre 2,993 

Havana 1,530 

Rio Janeiro 4,935 

New York to Liverpool...... 3,095 

Havre 3.228 

Havana 1,240 

Rio Janeiro 4,885 

Philadelphia to Liverpool 3,275 

Havre 3,358 

Banava 1,190 

Rio Janeiro 4,990 

Baltimore to Liverpool 3,450 

Havre 3,543 

Ilanava 1,160 

Rio Janeiro 5,000 

Richmond to Liverpool 3,380 

Havre , 3,473 

Havana 1,090 

Rio Janeiro 4,930 

NowOrlean&to Liverpool 4,780 

Havre 4,833 

Havana 595 

Rio Janeiro 5,315 



*^ 



[1881] 



16 



APPENDIX No. 2.— Continued. 

Table or Distances from Qaebec to Labrador along North Shore of the 

St. Lawrence. — J. 



FROM 



T () 



\>aebec 

'kaaport 

UoQtmorencj Falls 

S^n^ €rardien 

<'b4teaa Richer 

^tc Anne dc Beaupr6 

"^t Joachim , 

St Tite des Caps 

r^tPaal'sBay 

Us Eboolementa 

SLlrte^e 

Pointc k Pic 

Narray Bay 

*'Api I'Aiglc 

M^Fidele 

."^t. Simeon • 

I'ortan Pereil 

I^oiote aa Bouleau 

Ferry Anse da Portage (across 
mouth of River Sagaenay) . ... 

Anscil'Eaa 

TadoQsac 

!-« Pctit^s Bergeronnes. .. 

Escoomaios 

Mille Vaches 

Portoeof 

^oltan Cocboo 

Het de Jeremie 

Betshiamits.... 

Pointe auz Outardes 

Hftoikuagan 

Rirer Godboat 

Pointe des Monts 

Trinity 

Ilet Cariboo 

Bate des Kani 

Jftznbon 

Rirer Sle. Marguerite 

iiept Isles 

Rirer Moisy 

River k la Troitc 

^^nnoran 

Pjgoa 

River an Bouleau , 

River Matemek 

River Cbaloupe 

River Shaldrac 

River Toonerre 

Portage da Loap-Maria . .. 

River Magpie 

River St. Jean 

Ungae Pointe 

Post* de Mmgan 

Pointe anx Esquimaax 

KAtftsknan 

Tshikaaka 

Mecatina , 

^ne Esp^rance 



Beauport 

Montmorency Falls 

Ange Gardien 

Ch&teaa Richer 

Ste. Anne de Beaupr6 

St Joachim 

St Tite des Caps 

St Paul's Bay 

Les Eboalements 

St Irente 

Pointe ti Pic...'. 

Murray Bay 

Capiil'Aigle 

St Fiddle 

St Sim6on or Black River.. 

PortauPersil 

Pointe au Bouleau 

Anse du Portage 



Anse JiTEau 

Tadousac 

Les Petites Bergeronnes. 

Escoumains 

Mille Vaches 

Portneuf 

Sault au Cochon 

Ilet de JMmiQ 

Botshiamits 

Pointe auz Outardes 

Manikuagan 

River Godbout 

Pointe des Monts 

TrinitS , 

Ilet Caribou 

Baie des Kani 

Jambon 

River Ste. Marguerite 

Sept Isles 

River Moisy 

River k la Truite 

Cormoran 

Pigou 

River au Bouleau..: 

River Matemok 

River Chaloupe 

River Shaldrac 

River Tonnerre 

Portage du Loup-Marin . 

River Magpie 

River St Jean 

Longue Pointe 

PoBte de Mingan 

Pointe aux Esquimaux 

Nataskuan 

Tshikaska 

Mecatma 

Bonne Esp^rance 

Blanc Sablon 



*-§& 



13 



3 

4 
3 
6 
6 
5 
9 

24 
9 
9 
9 
3 
3 
6 

10 
8 
9 
5 

1 
1 
9 
9 

18 
9 
7 

18 

12 
15 
27 
12 
7 

H 
22 

8 
12 
12 
19 

8 

8 

7 

7 

7 

8 

7 

7 

8 

7 

7 

9 

6 
18 
64 
18 
75 
99 
24 



31 



Rbuahks. 



3 Provincial Highway. 

7 do 

10 do 

16 do 

22 do 

27 I do 

36 ! do 

60 I do 

69 , do 

78 ' d<i 

87 ! do 

90 I do 

93 I d«. 

99 • do 

109 • do 

117 ; do 

126 do 

131 . do 



132 

133 

142 

151 

169 

178 

185 

203 

210. 

222} 

237i 

264i 

276i 

283i 

291* 

313 

321 

333 

345 

364 

372 

380 

387 

39& 

401 

409 

416 

423 

431 

438 

445 

454 

459 

477 

541 

559 

634 

733 

757 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Beach used. — 2 portages. 

do 
Track req. through forest. 
Beach used. 

do 
Track req. through forest 
do do 

do do 

Beach used, 
do 
do 

Track req. through forest 
do do 

do do 

Beach used, 
do 
do 
do 
Fine Beach, short port ige. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
• do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Boundary of Labrador, 

Canada. 



16 



[1S81] 



APPENDIX No. 2.-^C(mtinued. 

Population of various Settlements between Tadoasac and Labrador, on the North 

Shore of the St Lawrence. — ^K. 



Naus of Place. 



Tadousac Not obtained. 



Kscoumains . 

Mille Vaches 

Portneuf 

Kault au Cocbon 

Jlet de JMmie 

Betsbiamits > 

Pointe aux Outardcs 

Manikuagan 

River Gem bout 

Pointe des Moots 

Trimt6 

Uivi^re Sto Marguerite. . 

Sept Isles 

Riviere Moisy 

Riviere k la Truite 

(^ormoran < 

Pigou 

RiTidre aa Booleau 

Riyer Matemek 

River Obaloupe 

River Sbaldrake 

River Tonnerre 

Riviere du Loup-Marin . , 

River Magpie 

River St Jean 

Longue Pointe 

Poste de Mingan 

Pointe anx Esquimaux.. 

Nataskusn 

Mecatina 

Bonne Esperance 



Population. 



1864. 



Number 
of Families 



do 
do 



40 



I 



100 to 120 



3 

15 to 20 

:\ 

3 

2 

30 to 40 

15 to 20 



3 

6 

12 to 15 

12 to 15 

100 to 120 

75 

44 

Not obtained. 

do 



Census of 1871. 



Number 
of Persons. 



765 



Census of 1881 . 



Number 
of Persons 



1,542 



1,023 
1,796 


520 

1,115 






552 









86 




106 • 


243 








191 
336 




241 














































560 
862 
3.%8 
280 
266 


l',775 

480 
410 
341 



NOTE.- 

places. 



■Population of settlements given in Census of 1S71 and Census of 1881 include interTO^dI.i>, 



r 



[18811 



II 



APPENDIX No. 2— Continued. 
DiSTANCBS— New Boad— Quebec to Lake St. John. — ^L. 




Quebec 

BoiBidaiy Port. 

1st Cunp, Lacbance (Stoneham). 

2nd do N06I 

^ do Lac des Roches. 

4th do Lake Jacques C artier. 

Sth do Pikauba 

«tb do Ittdard 

*th do Rividre Upika 

tth do do Pika 

^ do do aox Ecorces... 

linh do Lake Belle Riviere.... 

Jit JerOme 



Boundary Post 

Ist Camp, Lachaace (Stoneham) 

2nd do N06I 

3rd do Lac des Roches 

4th do Lake Jacques Cartier 

5th do Pikauba 

Gth do B6dard 

7th do Rividre Upika 

8th do do l^ika...: 

9th do do aux Ecorces 

10th do Lake Belle Rividre 

St J6r6me, at lower end of Lake 

St. John, on south side 

I 

Chicoutimi 



18 

8 
11} 

9 
14 
13 
12 
12 
lOA 

n 

lOj 
14 



50 



23 

34i 

43J 

57t 

70l 

S2k 

94} 

104} 

115} 

136 

HO 



3U1] passes three times a week. Winter and Summer. 
Time : 20 hours, Quebec to Lake Jacques Cartier (per mail). 
do 28 hours, Lake Jacques Cartier to St J^rOme (per mail). 

Total 48 hours, Quebec to Lake St John (per mail). 

Total distance 140 miles, Quebec to Lake St John. 



GiEAT Circle or Air Line Distances in Geosjraphical Milee, as per Map of tho 
DominioD of Canada. Published by order of the Hon. the Minister of the 
Iiitcrior, the Ist November, 187^— M. 



FROM 



TO 



MiLK9. 



Vokohsna (Japan) 
do 
do 

^ Francisco 

^ do 

Bwrard Inlet 

Port Simpson 

St.Johii(N'fld) 

do 

Montreal , 

do 

do 

BeHelilc 

Cape Race 

do 

Wliland 

iuCr::::::::::: 

PorUand 

Boitott 

^twYork 



Port Simpson 

Port Moody^ (Burrard Inlet) 

San Francisco 

New York 

Montreal 

do 

do 

Cape Clear 

Tory Island 

Quebec (River St. Lawrence) 

Cape Race {vid St Paul) 

Belle Isle 

Torj Island 

do 

Cape Clear 

Liverpool 

do 

Cape Race 

do 

do 

do 



3,865 

4,374 

4,470 

2,228 

2,202 

1,992 

2,194 

1,670 

1,69.^ 

145. 

1,013 

892- 

1,657 

1,73^ 

1,708 

240 

310 

470 

767 

sm 

1,01Q 



18 



[1581] 




L1881] 1» 



APPENDIX No. 3. 



REPOirr OF THE CHIKF ARCHITECT. 



Department op Public Works, 
(So. 17431.) Ottawa, 17th September, 1881. 

Sib,— I have llie honor to report as follows upon the new works and general 
repairs executed in oonneetion with the '^ Public Buildinj^s *' under the control of the 
Department^ during the fiscal yotxv ending 30th Jane, 1881. 

THOMAS S. SCOTT, 

Chief Architect, 
y. XL KvNis, Esq., 

Secretary, JJepartmont of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



PBOVINCE OF ONTARIO. 
OTTAWA. 

PARLUMENT GROUNDS, &C. 

These have been kept in good order. 

Additional accommodation being found necessary for the propagation of plants 
and flowers for the grounds, a contract has been entered into with Messrs. Yeale and 
Adams, Ottawa, for the erection of a glass house 68 feet x 19 feet, to be erected 
adjoining the present one. 

The frontage to Parliament Grounds on Wellington street has been boulevarded 
and shade trees planted. 

PARLIAMENT BUILDING. 

The enlaigementof gallery for reporters in Commons Chamber mentioned in my 
Ia»t report has been completed. 

The Commons and Senate Chambers have been painted and decorated by Mr. 
McKay, Painter and Decorator, Ottawa ; portion of this work was necessitated by 
the fire which occurred in roof of Commons Chamber in the fall of 1879. 

Drawings prepared by and work done under the superintendence of this Depart- 
ment. 

WESTERN BLOCK DEPARTMENTAL BUILDING. 

The four additional rooms mentioned in my last report as required by Post Office 
I>epartment in basement of extension have been completed by the contractor, Mr. P. 
Toms, Ottawa. 

An enlargement of the windows for the better lighting of large room on ground 
J^oor occupied by Post Office Department, has been carried out by the contractor, Mr. 
W. Palen, Ottawa. 

Drawings prepared by and work done under the superintendence of this Depart- 
ment. 

EASTERN BLOCK DEPARTMENTAL BUILDING. 

The large fire proof vault for Department of Finance mentioned in my last 
J'eport has been satisfactorily completed by the contractor, Mr. F. Toms, Ottawa. 



20 [1881] 



Portion of tho out stoDo work to main towor shewing bigns of decay it has been 
decided to remove and renew same by day work, it being impopsible to decide on 
tho extent of the work required unless by removal of stone by stone. 

Work done under tho superintendence of this Department. 

NEW SUPREME COURT. 

It havinj^ been decided to close- the Government workshop* situate on the 
Parliament Grounds, at the corner of Bank and Wellington streets, tenders have 
been asked for for the convei*sion of same into Supreme Court, and galleries for the 
reception of pictures donated to the Government by the Boyal Canadian Academy. 

The present Supreme Court room in the Parliament Building will now be 
used as an adjunct to the Parliament Library as originally intended. 

The external appearance of tho old workshops building will be very slightiy 
altered except by putting in gable windows to light the Court room on first floor, and 
by forming entrances on Bank street. 

The ground floor will contain picture gallery 30 x 20 feet, with entrance for 
public to picture gallery and Court from Bank street; six rooms for use of Judges 
with private entrance from Bank street, Registrar's office, Clerk's office, Precis 
Writer's office, spare office, vault, water closets, lavatories, etc. 

* The first floor will contain pi ctuie gallery 36 x 20 feet, Barrister's room, Barrister'n 
library. Court Boom 48 x 36 feet and 24 feet high with vaulted ceiling, Judges, 
library. Judges consulting room, and waiting room. 

The conversion of portion of drying shed in workshops yard into a laboratory 
and photometric galleiy for Department of Marine and i^isherios, will be included 
in the above contract. 

Plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 

RIDEAU HALL. 

The usual and necessary repairs to buildings generally have been made, and n 
large amount of painting, &c., to interior of main building has been executed by Mr. 
Wm. Howe, Ottawa. A new toboggan slide, additional room to curling rink, and tho 
erection of a gallery in tennis court have been commenced and will be completed 
before fall. 

Drawings prepared by and work done under the superintendence of this Depart- 
ment. 

GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The contract work on this building has been satisfactorily completed by the 
contractor, Mr. Askwith, Ottawa. 

A portion of the rear buildings has been fitted up as a residence for caretaker. 

The show-cases, counters and fittings are in course of preparation under contract 
by Mr. Askwith and Mr. Burns, and part by day work under superintendence of tho 
Clerk of Works, the latter being found necessary owing to tho utilization of portion of 
the old fittings removed fi'om Montreal. 

Drawings prepared by and work done under tho superintendence of this Depart- 
ment. 

DRILL SHED. 

The coDtrnct for fittings to armories, band room^, museum Ac, awarded Messrs. 
Veate and Adiim^, Ottawa, has been completed by them. 

Tbe floor of drill hall and gun shed has been planked. Contractor, Mr. Clemow, 
Ottawa. 

Gas has boon intixxiuced throughout the building. Contractor, Mr. Eocbo, 
Ottawa. 

An amoani has been placed in Estimates for latrines, winter sashes, footpaths^ 
kc.f which will be completed by the ensuing fall. 

Drawings prepared and work done under the superintendence of this Depart- 
ment. 



[18811 21 



HAMILTON. 

POST OFFICE, AC. 

It boin^ consideroi des'iablo to conti'alizo the various Govornmont ofHcos in this 
Citj, a site has been secured with a frontage on King street of 94 feet 4 inches, and 
cm John street of 137 feet, and an adjoining lot with a frontage on Main street of 28 
feet 11 inches by 136 feet 10 inches deep. 

It is proposed to erect buildings on this site for Post Office, Customs and Inland 
Keveone Department. 

KINGSTON, 

MILIT.VRY COLLEGE. 

Water for use at several of the College buildings being heretofore only obtainable 
bj means of water carts, it has been decided to erect a detached boiler and pump 
boose 30 feet by 26 feet, with residence for engineer over the same, and to pump 
water from Navy Bay in close proximity to the lake for domestic and fire purposes, 
the service pipes being already laid. Contract for the erection of the building has 
been entered into with Mr. John Waddell, contractor, Kingston. 

Drawings prepared by the Department. Local Architects, Messrs. Power and 
Son. 

* PENITENTIARY. 

The blacksmith shop has been re-roofed with metal. 

The roof of south workshop has been strengthened and re-roofed with metal. 

Breakwater 200 feet long by 30 feet wide has been constructed formins^ a basin 
100 z 100 feet for the use of vessels loading and unloading. Ceiling of Catholic chapel 
bag been renewed. 

Building 150 feet by 20 feet for storage of lumber has been erected. 

Mr. John Bowes of this Department, Superintending Architect. 

rOST OFFICE. 

New screen to public lobby with lock boxes, general delivery circle and altera- 
tions to Registered fetter office have been made under contract by Mr.Thos. Overend, 
contractor, Kingston. 

Drawings prepared by this Department. Local Architects, Messrs. Power aid 

Son. 

BRAXTFORD. 

POST OFFICE. 

The contract work on this building is now completed ami Customs and Inland 
^enuo offices occupied. 

Contractor for fittings, Mr. John Graham. 

Contractor for heating apparatus, Mr. W. L. Appley, Ottawa. 

Local Architect, Mr. John Henry. 

Drawings prepared by this Department. 

WINDSOR. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

This building is now completed and occupied. 

Contractor for building, Mr. F. Toms, Ottawa. 

Contractors for fittings, Messrs. Bailey and Walker. 

Contractors for heating apparatus, Messrs. Bennett and Wright, Toronto. 

Local Architect, Mr. W. Scott. 



^ 



22 [1881] 

ST. X3ATHARINES. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVSNUS OFFICES. 

A site for this building has been securod in' a central situation, with a froatag'C 
of 80 feet on Queen street and 154 feet on King street. 

Plans for the proposed bailding are now in course of prepamtion by Mr. R. C. 
Windeyer, Architect, Toi-onto. 

BELLEVILLE. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

A site for this building has been secured in a centml situation with a frontage 
of 103 feet on Bridge street, and 116 feet on Pinnacle street. Plans for the proposed 
building are now in course of preparation by Mr. B. C. Windeyer, Architect, 
Toronto. 

PPtOVINCE OF QUEBEC. 

QUEBEC* 

KENT AND ST. LOUIS GATES. 

Work on those gates is now completed, with the oxcept^n of pointing which 
was delayed on account of frost. 
Contractor, Mr. H. J. Beemer. 
Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

QUEBEC FORTIFICATIONS. 

Extensive repairs to the fortification walls arc in progress in sections under the 
immediate supervision of the Department and under contracts with the following 
contractors, viz : Messrs. Owen Kelly, C. Jobin, W. J. Piton, IL Hatch, Joseph 
Mathieu, Thos. Pampalon and John O'Leary. 

Further extensive works have been arranged for execution during the ensuing 
fiscal year. 

CITADEL. 

The tin roofing to ofticcrs quarters has been remove«l and i*oofs recovered with 
galvanized iron. 

Sundry necessary internal alterations and repairs have been executed. 

DURHAM TERRACE EXTENSION. 

Additional portions of this work, viz : the building of walls and piers under 
terrace has been proceeded with under contract by Messrs. Pampalon & O'Loary, 
under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

Considei'able repairs have been made to' this building including new draioa/je 
which was urgently required, and further repairs and renewal of flooring will bo 
required which will be executed after the close of navigation this fall. 

(/ontractor, Auguste Laberge, Quebec. 

Works done under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

CUSTOM nous a. 

The space in roof of this building is now being converted into attic rooms for 
caretaker and storage purposes, under contract, by Mr. O'Leary, Quebec, under the 
immediate superintendence of this Department. 



[1881] , 2a 



POST OFFICE. 



The lot adjoining Post Office belonging to the Government, known as the Motz. 
property, is being graded and retaining walls baiit next streets and steps. Contractor^ 
Ur. B. Hatch, Qaebec. 

Work done under the immediate saperintendence of this Department. 

CABTaiDGB FACTORY. 

Portion of buildings known as Artillery Barracks are being converted into 
Cvtridge Factory, under contract with Mr. H. Hatch and Mr. Matniou, contractoi-s^ 
Qoebec, under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

LABORATORY AND FDLMINATE MIXING BUILDINGS. 

Drawings have been prepared by this Department, and approved of by Military 
Aotkorities for additional ouildings and alterations to the present Laboratory Build- 
iogi situate on the plains adjoining the Citadel. A site has also been selected, and plans 
prepared fornew group of detached buildings surrounded by suitable fencing and 
situate between Laboratory Buildings and Martello Tower No. L Tenders for those^ 
buildings will be asked for at an early date. 

LEVIS PORTS. 

Plans and specification have been prepared by this Department for general i*epair» 
lo these forts. Tenders will be asked lor at an early date. 

CHAMPLAIN STREET CLIFF. 

The dangerous state of the cliff on Champlain Street below the Citadel necessitated 
the purchase by the Government of the houses on the north side of the street and their 
demolition for the purpose of building a retaining wall. 

This work is now in progress under contract by Mr. H. Hatch, contractor, Quebec, 
ander the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

• MONTBEAL. 

INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

Plans, &c., for an extension in reai* of this building on Custom House Square^ 
have been prepared, and tenders will be asked for at an early date. 
Local Architect, Mr. A. Baza, Montreal. 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL PENITENTIARY. 

A new north wing 126 feet by 46 feet 6 inches, and containing 132 cells, has 
been erected and will, it is expected, be finished and ready for occupation by tho 
^pring of 1882. 

A large quantity of cut stone has been prepared for the new dining hall. 

Water has been laid on to the oflScore dwellings, and to three fire hydrants oitisida 
the boundary walls. 

General repairs have been made to the main building. Superintending Archit<3Ct, 
Mr. John Bowes. 

THEEE ElVERS. 

OLD BARRACKS. 

Plans, &c., for alterations and repairs to this building for tho purpose of convert- 
ing same into Government offices have been prepared by Ihe local Architect Mr. O. 
I, Hamel, and tenders will bo asked for at an early date. 



24 , [1881] 



ST. JOHN'S. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM H0U8B, AC. 

The Post Office portion of the bailding is now occupied. Tenders will be asked 
tor at an early date lor hot water heating apparatus, and for lurniturc and fixtures 
tor Customs Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. A. C. Hutchison, Montreal. 

GROSSE ISLE. 

QUARANTINE STATION. 

Contract for the erection of an hospital' to contain eighty patients, has been 
entered into with Mr. Askwith, contractor, Ottawa, and it is expected the bailding 
will be completed by the fall of 1881. 

The building will be located at the east end of the Island, and will be erected of 
brick with external hollow walls and shingled roofs. On the ground floor will be 
two wards 60 x 25 feet for twenty patient^( each, and rooms K>r surgeon, nnrBos, 
waiting room, kitchen, stores, pantiy, living room and convalescents day room ; and 
on the first floor, two wards as on gi-ound floor, three bed-ixx>ms for staff, nui*8es room, 
•day-room and rooms for linen, stores, &c. 

Drawings, &c., prepared by and work executed ander the immediate superin- 
tendence of this Department. 

PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 
DORCHESTER. 

QENEBAL PENITENTIARY FOR MARITIME PROVINCES. 

Contract for the erection of 15 semidetached houses for oflicers, bake-hoase, 
hospital, laundry, workshops, ice-house and root-houses has been awarded to Mr. A. 
E. Killam, Moncton. Worlcs ai'c now in progress and will it is expected be fully 
completed by the fall of 1881. 

(Contract for the erection of additional coil-wing 16(5 feet by 49 feet, to contain 
200 cells, also a detached boiler-house, has been awai*ded to Messrs. T. McManus & 
Sons, of Memramcook, and works are now in progress. 

The water supply to penitentiary proper and to the necessary fire hydrants, 
^Iso the boundary fence, guards lookouts, and guard-house are completed. 

Drawings prepared by this Department. Superintending Architect, Mr. W. Mor- 
gan Smith, St. John. 

ST. JOHN CUSTOM HOUSE. 

Works on this building are now nearly completed and building occupied. 

The steam heating has been completed and hydraulic hoist, footpaths around 
building, and internal fittings are now being completed. Mr. Appley, Ottawa, 
contractor for heating. Mr. John McGourty, St, John, contractor for footpaths. 
A. Christin and Co. St. John, contractors for fittings. 

Allan Brothers, St. John, contractors for time ball apparatus. 

The space at west end of building has yet to be enclosed and the necessary side 
walks, &c.. made on streets around building. 

Conti'actoi's for building, Messrs. Williams, Anderson, and Williams, St. John. 
Superintending Architects, Messrs. McKean & Fairweather, St. John. 

POST OFFICE. 

Work on this building is now nearly completed and building occupied. 
The steam heating, footpaths, hydraulic hoist and internal fittings are completed. 
Contractors for heating, Messrs. McAvity and Son, St. John. For footpaths, /. T. 



[1881] 



McGee, St John. For internal fittings, Mr. Thos. Fitzgibbon, St. John. For hydrau- 
lie hoist, Mr. Fensom, Toronto. 

Contractors for build in£f, Messrs* Jones, Booth, and Doddridge. Superintend iiig 
Architect^ Mr. W. Morgan Smith, St. John. 

FSEDERICTON. 

POST OFFICE, &C. 

This building is now completed and occupied. Grounds around building have 



been fenced, graded and approaches made. 

Contractor for internal fittings, Mr. Joshua Limerick, Fredoricton. 

Contractors for building, Messrs. Snow & Scoullar. Drawings prepared by this 
Department.^ Superintending Architect, Mr. D. E. Dunham, St. John. 

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 
HALIFAX. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

Tenders will be asked for at an early date for renewing the roof covering of this 
Ixiilding. 

LUNENBURG. 

BIABINE HOSPITAL. 

This bnilding is now completed and occupied. 

Contractors, Messrs. Eli Hopps & John Mitchell. Clerk of works, Mr. Solomon 
Horash. 

Drawings and specifications prepared by this Department. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 
CHAELOTTBTOWN. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

Tenders will be asked for at an early date for the cleaning and painting of this 
Iwilding and for the renewal of roof covering. 

PEOVINCE OF MANITOBA. 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR'S RESIDENCE. 

Contract for the erection of Parliament Buildings has been awarded to Messrs. 
J. k P. Lyons & Co., contractors, Ottawa, and for Lieutenant Governor's residence 
to Meeers. Bowles & Williams, contractors, Winnipeg. 

Both buildings will be erected of local brick, the external walls being built hoi low 
with icings of white brick and cut stone dressings and mansard roofs covered with 
shingles and galvanized iron. The style of architecture adopted is Italian, modified 
to suit the requirementa of the climate. 

The central portion of Parliament Building 86 feet bv 44 feet and one wing 57 
feet by 50 feet is at present only intended to be built; hereafter another wing of 
similar size can be erected as requirements necessitate. 

The building will be four stories in height including basement, the floor of latter 
beiDg however only 4 feet below the level of ground. The basement will contain 
boiler house, fuel room, store room, seven offices, vault, six water closets, lavatories 
and urinals. The ground Hoot will contain seven offices and the Legislative cham- 
ber^ 40 feet by 40 feet, and 32 feet high with a gallery for the public three seats 
<lQcp along the sides and one end. 



26 [1881] 

The firat and second floors will each contain nine offices with a vault on first floor 
only. Total number of offices, thirty-two, all of good ^ze and well lighted. 

The residence for Lieutenant Governor will be 60 fieet by 60 fee^ and four storiee 
in height and will contain in basement, kitchen, scullery, still room, cellar, 
pantry, larder, furnace and fuel room. The ground floor will contain dining room^ 
di awing room, breakfast room and library, all communicating with each other by 
folding doors and forming a suite of rooms 96 feet long by 20 feet wide, a serving 
room is provided adjoining the dining room with hoist from kitchen in basement. 
Business office for Lieutenant Governor is also provided on this floor. The first floor 
will contain six bed rooms, two dressing rooms, bath room, water closet and store 
closet. The attic floor is divided into nine bed rooms, Ibur only of which will under 
present contract be finished. 

Drawings and specifications prepared by this Department. Resident Architect, 
Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 

IMMIGRANT BUILDINGS. 

(Contract for these buildings as described in my last i^eport was awarded to Messrs. 
Bowles & Sutherland, Winnipeg. 

Since work was commenced a two story addition 75 feet x 29 feet has been added 
to the building, giving extra sleeping and day accommodation. 

Drawings and specifications prepared by this Department. 

Resident Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 

STONY MOUNTAIN PBNITENTIART. 

Portion of this building has been provided with steam heating apparatus by Mr. 
J. Bertrand, contractor; the remaining portion will be tendered for this fall. 

Plans have been prepared by this Department for various necessary out buildings 
including guards quailors, stabling, &c., and work is being executed by convict labor 
under competent instructors. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

NEW WESTMINSTER PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Plans have been prepared by this Department and tenders will be asked for at an 
early date for a building to accommodate Post Office, Telegraph, Savings Bank, Inland 
Revenue, Customs, and Indian Deparimeuts. 

VICTORIA. 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

Contract for the rebuilding of front to this building and general repairs and alter- 
ations has been awarded to Messrs. Smith & Clarke, Victoria. 
Local Architect, Mr. H. 0. Tiedman, Victoria. 

GENERAL. 

The several public buildings throughout the Dominion not herein particularly 
mentioned have been kept in good repair and condition, some having required large, 
and othei*s smaller repairs, difficult to particularize, but involving a large amount of 
superintendence and attention. 

I have the honor to bo, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



THOMAS S. SCOTT, 

Chief Architect. 



M^ 



[IS81] 27 



APPENDIX No. 4- 



BBPOST OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

(No. 458). 

Ottawa, 4ih November, 1881. 

Sib, — I have the honor to report that during the fiscal year 1880-81, no new 
vorks were undertaken in oonnection with the heating, ventilation, gas, water and 
bell servicee in the Parliament Building, Departmental fiuildings, Kideeu Hall, or 
Ottawa Post Office, the apparatus in these respective buildings being in efficient 
eondition aad requiring nothing beyond oixlinary maintenance. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

Jno. E. ARNOLDI, 
f. fl. Ennis, Esq., Secretary, Mechanical Engineer^ 

Department of Public Works. 



»-3J 



28 [1881] 



APPENDIX No. 5. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 

No. 9264. 

Department op Public Works. 

Otfawa, 4th November, 1881. 

Sir, —I have the honor to report on the Harbor works and surveys of the last fiscal 
year. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY F. PERLEY, 

Chief Engineer. 
F. H. BsNis, Esq., 

Secretary, Public Works Department. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 

COLVILLB BAY. 

Colville Bay is situated about 15 railed from the Eastern Pointof Prince Ed wai-d 
Island, and is the eastern terminus of the Government Railway. 

The works of raising and strengthening a portion of the breakwater at this place 
were brought to a conclusion in May last. 

ST. PETER*8 BAY. 

On the north shore of the Island about 43 railos to the westwai-d from East 
Point. 

The contract for raising the bi*eak water and constructing a beach protection of 
piles, brush and stone, 800 feet in length, was completed at the close of the year. 

WOOD ISLANDS. 

In Queen's County, the most southern point of the Island. 

The Local Gt)vernment has constructed a breakwater 2,250 feet in length on the 
eastern side of the Harbor at a cost of about $13,000. 

In 1878-79 the amount appropriated by Parliament was expended in the con- 
nLruiruon of a btvukwiiiur, -J50 feet in length, on the western side of the harbor, and a 
Authtii' umouut ^uted at ihu last session of Parliament has been expended in extend- 
ing tbitt work, 124 tVit^t, aUIcIi was finally completed in September last. 

POWNAL. 

r^wfial, Queen's Co., i«* situated at the head of Pownal Bay, about 8 miles south 
eaat from Cbarbttetown. 

The work done at thiri locality by the Dredge " Prince Edward " consisted in 
ai&g a passage i,2l>Q it^et in length and 56 feet wide from the end of the public 



[1881J » 



wharf towards the main channel, and a basin on the eastern iside of the wharf 90 feet 
wide and 250 feet in length, the wnole having 9 feet of water at low tide. 

HILLSBOROUGH RIVER. 

Opposite Charlottetown, the Elliot, the York and the Hillsboroagh Elvers meet 
and empty through one common channel into Hillsborough Bay. 

The Hillsborough empties from the eastward and is navigable to Mount Stewart 
15 miles above Charlottetown, but was obstructed by a snrall shoal off Carr's Point, 
on which the "Prince Edward" worked between the 11th October and 16th 
November, removing 12,165 cubic yards of sand and silt. 

NINE MILE GREEK. 

Nine Mile Creek, Queen's Co., is situated just within the enti*ance and on the 
western side of Hillsborough Bay. 

Between the 21st August and 1 Uh October 1880, the "Prince Edward" was 
engaged in opening a passage from deep water in the Bay to the public wharf, to 
admit the approach of vessels at low tide. 

CRAPAUD. 

Crapaud, Queen's County, is a small harbor at the mouth of the Brockclsby River 
toth2 westward of Hillsborough Bay. 

The channel canying deep water up to the loading wharves at the village was 
commenced during the fiscal year 1874-75. On 23rd May last, the " Prince Edward '^ 
again resumed work in completing it to the wharves, and was so engaged at the close 
of the fiscal year. 

MALPEQUE. 

Malpeque is 90 miles from East Point and 40 miles from West Cape on the 
northern shore of the Island. 

The outer end of the bteakwater for a length of 100 feet has been strengthened by 
aheet piling ; and a breastwork of piles, brush and stone has been constructed across a 
k>w part of the Royalty Sands to prevent the sea from breaking through between the 
main-land and the breakwater. 

TIONISH. 

Tignish, Prince County, is situated near the northern exti^omity of the Island. 
The southern breakwater has been repaired, and its outer end, and the block at 
the seaward end of the northern breakwater have been sheet-piled. 

MIMINIOASH. 

Miminigash is situated on the western coast of the Island, 15 miles south-west- 
wardly from North Cape. 

The breakwater on the northern side of the " Eun " was damaged during a 
Btorm. 

It has been thoroughly repaired, and the more exposed part sheet-piled. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

MAIN-A-niEU. 

Is a small harbor in Cape Breton County, lying inside of Scattarie Island, which 
is auch frequented by coasting vessels as a harbor of refuge. 

A breakwater 250 feet in length is now in course of construction, with a view of 



30 [1881] 



improving the nbolter and shutting off the heavy ground swell formed during 
easterly storms. 

cow BAT. 

Cow Bay is about 30 miles south east of Sydney, C.B. 

Very extensive repaii's and additions have been made to the breakwater at this 
place. 

Lying as it does in the mouth of the Buy and exposed to easterly storms from 
the Atlantic, it will, until a beach has fully formed on its seaward side, be exposed 
to damage, and require constant care and attention to preserve it in a state of 
usefulness. 

LITTLE GLACE BAT. 

Little Glace Bay is situated on the eastern coast of Cape Breton, about midway 
between Low Point and Cape Percy. The harbor is at the mouth of a small stream 
emptying into the Atlantic, and has been constructed and maintained by the Little 
Glace Bay Mining Company for the shipment of coal from Ihoir mines. 

Further work of deepening the entrance to this harbor was prosecuted by the 
dredge " St. Lawrence " up to the 15th August, 1880. 

GABARUS. 

Gabarus is a small inlet on the southern side of Gabarus Bay, 10 miles to the 
westward of Louisburg, C.B. 

In 1873 the enti*ance to this inlet was deepened to permit the passage of fishing 
boats. 

Dnnng the past year this inlet has been enlarged and deepened, and farther work 
<lone on the entrance. 

INDIAN ISLANPS BEACH. 

These islands are situated on the northern side of East Bay, a branch of the 
Bras d'Or, Cape Breton. 

The two outer or most southern of these islands are joined to each other and 
the main land by beaches of sand and gravel, the longest of which is a mile in 
extent, and forms an excellent harbor opening to the eastward. 

A passage has been partially opened through this beach for the accommodation 
of fishing craft seeking shelter or passing to and from the fishing grounds. 

PETIT BE GRAT. 

Petit de Grat, He Madame, Bichmond County, C.B., is a passage from the 
Atlantic separated from St. Peter's Bay on the north by a stony beach. 

The amount appropriated has been expended in partially opening a channel 
through this beach to admit of the passage of boats from Arichat and the southern 
«hore of He Madame into fishing grounds in St. Peter's Bay. 

PORT HOOD 

Is situated on the western coast of Cape Breton, about 23 miles north of the 
northern entrance of the Gut of Canso, 43 miles south east from East Point, Prince 
Edward Island, and 23 miles north east from Cape George, Antigonish County, 
Nova Scotia. 

This pier was built by the Local Government prior to 1867. It stands in an 
exposed position and has suffered severely from storms and the ravages of the Teredo 
NavaUs so much fo that it sustained damage during the &11 of 1879. 

Such repairs have been effected as the amount of the appropriation would 
permit* 



[1881] 31 



BUBTINO ISLAND, CAN80 HABBOB. 

CaDBO Harbor is at the extreme eastern end of the Province (Main-land) and 
joathward of the entrance to the Gut of Ganso. 

This harbor from its natural situation has become a rendez-vous and harbor of 
refiige for American and Provincial fishing vessels. Lying off the harbor, and forming 
in past years a natural protection against south-easterly storms is, or properly was, 
Bwyiog Island. It was many acres in extent, and m the early history ©f Acadia 
▼M a public burying ground, but year by year the sea gradually washed it away 
until it had become a source of danger to vessels entering. 

The works undertaken by the Department consist in the construction of a break- 
witer 280 feet in length for the purpose of affoinling the same protection as the 
island did when of its original size. 

ABISAia 

In Ant igonish County, is on the southern shore of the Suttits of Northumberland, 
about 15 miles westwardly fi-om Cape George. 

The sum of $200 has been expended in repairing the breakwater at this place, 
boilt many years ago by the Local Government. 

MEBIOOMISH. 

The Barbor of Merigomish is situated about 8 miles to the eastward of Pictoa 
Stfbor, and its entrance is between King Head and Merigomish Point. 
A pier 150 feet in length at French Kiver was completed in April last. 

NEW QLASOOW. 

New Glasgow is situated on the East Eiver of Pictou, 8 miles above the Harbor 
of Pictou. 

The dredge " Cape Breton '* was employed during August, 1880, and May and 
June, 1881, in deepening and improving the channel of the river opposite the ship- 
yards above the highway bridge and in front of the town. 

PICTOU ISLAND. 

This island lies 8 miles north-eastwardly from the entrance to Pictou Harbor. 
A portion of the amount appropriated has been expended in placing the pier 
near the lower end of the island in a state of repaii*. 

BIVEB JOHN. 

The River John empties into John Bay at the southeastern corner of Amet 
Sound, Northumberland Straits, about 12 miles northwai-dly of the entrance to Pictou 
Harbor. 

The work of opening a channel through the bar at the entrance to the river 
was in progress on the 1st July, 1880, and was continued by the dredge "Capo 
Breton" until the 5th of August, up to which date a further quantity of 5,090 cubic 
yardft of fine sand was remove. 

TATAMAGOUCHS. 

The Tatamagouche River, Colchester County, empties into the south-west comer 
ofTatamagouche Bay, Straits of Northumberland. 

The work done by the "Capo Breton " consisted in opening a channel through 
the " Flats*' up to Patterson's wharf, and in deepening and improving the channel of 
^e Western Branch of the river up to Campbell's Mills. 



32 [1881] 



PARTRIDOB ISLAND RIVER. 

In Cumberland County, N.S. 

The straightening and improving of the channel of this river was continued up 
to 30th October last, at which date a further amount of 1,330 cubic yards had been 
removed from Mullin's Point, and 6,510 cubic yards, from Shannon's Point, making tt 
total of 7,840 cubic yards of mud, sand and saw-dust. 

As stated in the report of last year, this work was done by hand and during the 
periods of low tide. 

WINDSOR, 

Windsor, Hants County, is situated on the western side of the River Avon, 45 
miles N.W. of Halifax. 

The removal of a bank of mud in front of the railway wharf was alluded to in 
the report of last year, and the reasons for its removal therein stated. 

Tne work authorized was brought to a close on the 15th August 1880, and a berth 
of 160 feet in length for vessels drawing 16 feet of water was completed. 

BROOKLYN. 

Brooklyn is situated at the head of, and on the eastern side of Liverpool Bay^ 
Queen's County. 

Here the department have constructed a breakwater forming a harbor of refuge^ 
and some temporary repairs were made during the year to the seaward slope. 

ANNAPOLIS. 

Annapolis is the shire town of Annapolis County and is situated at the head oC 
Annapolis Basin. 

The partial removal of a reef of rocks to the southward of the railway wharf^ 
dangerous to vessels entering or leaving at low tide, has been effected with the amoant 
placed at the disposal of the Department. 

METEGHAN. 

Meteghan Cove, Digby County, is situated on the east coast of St. Mary's Bay, 30 
miles north of Yarmouth. 

The breakwater at this place was commenced in 1874, and the work done during 
the past year consisted in the construction of an additional length of 50 feet to the 
spur at its outer end, thus finally completing the structure. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

BATHURST. 

Bathurst Harbor is an extensive and well sheltered basin about 3 miles iik 
length and 2 in width which is nearly all dry at low water, excepting the channels of 
the Nepisiguit and other streams which unite below the Town of Bathurst forming 
the main channel. 

This channel is obstructed by the " Seal Bar " and " Ballast Bar " and at the 
entrance to the harbor at a mile outside of Alston Point the " Second Bar " exists. 

Much work has been done on these bars by the dredge '^ Canada " to obtain |12 
feet at low water, and between the 28th July and 10th November, 1880, 13,027 cubic^ 
yards of sand were removed from the " Seal " and " Ballast" Bars. 

GRAND ANSE. 

Grand Anse, Gloucester County, is a small bay on the south shore of the Bale 
dcs Chaleurs, about half way between Shippegan Sound and Bathurst Harbor. 



[1881] 33 



The sum of $195.89 wis expended ia repairing the flooring of the breakwater at 
this place. 

SHIPPEOAN. 

Shippegan is situated at the entrance to Baie desChaleurs in GlouccBtor County, 
70 miles eastwardly from Bathurst. The harbor lies between Shippegan Island and 
the main-land, and the works constinicted some years ago are at the southern ou- 
tianoe. 

The appropriation was expended in raising and repairing the dam aerods the 
East Gully, which was damaged during the gale of the 2l8t October, 1879, when the 
tide rose fully 4 feet above the highest point known, and 2 feet over the top of the 
dam. 

HORSE SHOE SHOAL, MIRAMICHI. 

The Horse Shoe Shoal lies directly within the entrance of the Miramichi from 
the Gulf of St. Lawrence, between Fox and Portage Islands. 

It has for many years been a serious obstruction to vessels, and the opening of a 
channel will give a direct passage with an ample depth of water. 

The dredffe " St. Lawrenoe^' operated on this snoal fVom the 30th August until 
the 30th October, 1880, removing a further quantity of 16,837 cubic yards of material. 

It will require the use of this dredge for two full seasons to thoroughly complete 
this work, 

RICHIBUCTO. 

£ichibQCto is 40 miles north of Shediac, on the Straits of Northumberland. 

The sand beach at the inner end of the breakwater continuing to wear away 
under the action of the sea, necessitated the construction of further works for its 
protection. What has been done will not, however, accomplish the full amount of 
protection required. 

BUCTOUCHB. 

The Harbor of Buctouche is at the mouth of the Burtouche Rivor, Kent County, 

The dredge '* Canada" operated between the 28ih May and 30th June last on the 

bar obstructing the entrance to the harbor to obtain a depth of 16 foot at low water, 

and up to the last date mentioned had removed 5,445 cubic yards of mussel mud, clay 

tad shells. 

POINT DU OHiNB. 

Point du Chdne, Westmorland County, is the terminus of the Intercolonial 
Sailway in New Brunswick on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

The railway wharf is 1,850 feet in length and was built in 1857-58, aiul added to 
in 1871-72. For the protection of the outer end a breakwater was constructed during 
1876-76, and a contract has been entered into for an extension of the same for a 
finther length of 600 feet. At the close of the fiscal year the work was well in hand. 

SACKVILLB. 

^ In Westmorland County, at the head of the Bay of Fund^'-, 40 miles from 

XoBCtOD. 

Further works for strengthening a narrow strip of marsh, known as the ** Eam 
Pasture Neck " were completed during the fall of 1880. 

These works were necessary to prevent an alteration in the course ol the Tan- 
tramarBiver, and the destruction of the present harbor of Sackville, to which there 
i« a l»*aDch of the Intercolonial Eailway. 

ST. JOHN HARBOR. 

Some needed repairs were made at the close of 1880 on the breakwater at the 
entrance to the harfcr. 



34 [18811 

Plfins have been prepared for a i*econstruction of that part of the work carried 
away by the great gale of 1878, 

OEOMOCTO. 

The Ororaocto Shoaltn, in the Eiver St. John, 10 miles below Fredericton, are the 
principal obstruction to the navigation of the river by deep laden vessels during the 
periods of low water. For many years prior to 1861, the Provincial Grovernment 
expended large amounts in deepening the channel, and since that date the Dominion 
has continued the work, but without any permanent results. 

During 1878-79 a sheer-dam 1,600 feet in length was constructed for the purpose 
ofcoutining and deflecting the current over the shoals; and daring 1880 a further 
length of 600 feet of work was placed under contract in continuation of this dam 
to clotio the passage between Thatch Island and the main-land. At the close of the 
tiscal yeai* this work was nearly completed. 

BIVEB ST. JOQN. 

The further impi*ovoment of the Tobique at the Red Rapids and the Narrows was 
proceeded with during the low stage of water in that river. 

On the main river the tow-paths were repaired, and some works for deflectiDg 
the current executed. Below the Grand Falls a number of boulders were removed from 
the channel. 

QUEBEC. 

ETANQ DU NORD 

Is at the western extremity of Grindstone Island, one of the Magdalen Islands in 
the Gulf St, Lawrence. 

For the protection of vessels and boats engaged in fishing in the Gulf, the construc- 
tion of a breakwater 450 feet in length was only commenced at the close of the year. 
This Wiis due to the fact that the timber had to be procured on the main-land during 
the winter and shipped as soon after the opening of navigation as it was possible to 
obtain vessels. 

NBW CARLISLE. 

New Carlisle, the capital town of the County of Bona venture, is on the northern 
side of .the Baie des Chaleurs. 

The construction of a pier at this place was not commenced until the 1st of June, 
1881, aod consequently only a reference can be made thereto. Delay in the commen- 
cement of the work was owing to the non-acquirement of the site. 

CARLETON. 

In Bonaventure County, is on the north shore of Baie des Chaleurs, 36 miles from 
Campbellton. 

The amount appropriated was expended in the commencement of a landing 
pier at this place, towards the completion of which the locality offered twenty-five 
hundred dollars. A further sum was approj^riated at the last session of Parliament 
for this work. 

ESOOUMAINS. 

In the County of Saguenay, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, 24 mile» 
from Tadousac and 68 from Murray Bay. 

From the channel entrance to the harbor over 200 boulders, varying from 3 to 
15 tons in weight, have been removed, and schooners can now enter and leave at half 
tide with case and safety. 



r 



[1881] 35 



FISH DAM9, TADOUaAC. 

Tadousac, the Capital Towq of the County of Saguenay, is situated at the east 
aide of the entrance of the Biver Saguenay, and is 130 miles below Qneboc. 

At tbis point a fish-breeding establishment is in operation, and several dams on 
the stream iu connection therewith wore partially raised and repaired. 

ANSE ST. JEAN. 

On the south-western shore of the Eiver Saguenay, 24 miles from its mouth. 

The pier at this place was commenced in 1876 under an appropriation made by 
'the Local Groeernment, which was expended in the consti'uction of a block in 1 feet 
at low water. 

The amount voted by Parliament was expended in completing works necessary 
for connecting this block with the shore, the total length of the pier now being 366 
feet 

ST. ALPHONSE DB BAGOTVILLB. 

At the head of Ha I Ha! Bay, on the south-west shore of the Eiver Saguenay, 
^ miles from its moutb. 

The head of this pier has been strengthened by driving a close row of piling 
around the outer face and sides. Some few years ago a part of the inshore portion was 
homed down to low-water mark, and connection with the shore is maintained by a 
temporary structure which will require to be removed and the work rebuilt. 

RIVER SAOUENAT. 

During the year, the work of removal of bouldei*« and rock from the channel 
of the river below Chicoutimi, was carried on when the lowness of the water offered 
facilities. 

The removal of these obstructions has increased the depth of water, thus per- 
mitting vessels to reach Chicoutimi earlier in the tide than it was possible to do 
heretofore. 

CHICOUTIMI. 

The Town of Chicoutimi is situated on the southern side of the Saguenay Eiver, 
75 miles from its mouth, and at the head of navigation. 

The head of the pier was lengthened on the up sti^eam side by the construction 
of a block 40 feet in length, thus adding to the facilities for shipment of freight, and 
the safety of vessels during the periods of freshets. 

BIVER DV LOUP (EN BAS). 

108 miles below Quebec, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence. 

A further length of 212 feet of this pier wan raised during the summer and fall 
of 1830 and floored and ballasted, leaving a length of 216 feet still to be raised to a 
height of 3 feet 6 in. to complete the whole of the pier to the new level. 

New sheathing and fenders are required and the iron straps on the coraera will 
bave to be replaced. 

The dredging referred to in the last report was brought to a close on 23i'd July, 
1880. 

RITER OUELLB. 

River Quelle is 75 miles below Quebec, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence. 
It having been found that the outer face of the pier at this place had received 
serious damage by ice during the preceding winter, extensive repaii's were made. 
The necessity for this was relerred to m the report of last year. 



36 fl881] 



CAP X l'aiqls. 

Is situated on the north shore of the Eivor St. Lawrence, in the County of 
Charlevoix, 3 miles from Murray Bay. 

At this place a pier 279 feet in length was commenced under a contract with 
persona representing the municipality, which had guaranteed the ptiyment of S3,000 
towards the construction of the work. At the close of the fiscal year one half of tho 
undertaking had been completed. 

LES SB0ULEMENT8. 

In the County of Charlevoix, is on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, 69 miles 
below Quebec. 

This pier is one of the number built on the lower St. Lawrence prior to 1867. 
It was found necessary to effect certain repairs in November last to maintain it 
during the winter, and against the action of tae ice in the spring. 

These repairs were finally completed during the present year. 

IL£ AVX COUDRES. 

Is 12 miles from Bay St. Paul on the north shore of the River St. Lawrence, in 
the County of Charlevoix. 

In November last a contract was entered into with a large number of the 
residents of lie aux Coudres on behalf of the municipality, whicb had guaranteed to 
furnish the sumof $4,000, to supplement a like amount voted by Parliament, for the 
construction of a landing pier 163 feet in length, which on 30th June last was about 
one third completed. 

# ST. THOMAS, MOXTMAONT. 

On the south shore of the St. Lawrence, 30 miles below Quebec. 

The amount appropriated was expendo I in counecting the isolated block on the 
western side ot the basin referred to in the report of laat year, with the shore, thus 
completing the work. 

GROSSE ISLE. 

Gropse Isle is an island in the River St. Lawrence 29 miles below Quebec and 
opposite tho village of St. Thomas, Montmn^nj. 

The amoufit appropriated was expen«l* d in raising and repairing the e;istem 
landing piur in connection with the Quaramh^^ Station, and in extending it to 10 feet 
at low water. The work was still in progie ^6 at the close of the fiscal year. 

8TB. FAMILLB. 

On the Island of Orleans, IT miles below Quebec. 

During the year, the block built in IfeiU \va» extended a distance of 30 feet to 8J 
feet at halt tide ; in building two blocks >hoioward8; in raising the portion huilt in 
1879 to th<^ height of the new work ; and in the removal of bould^irs from the river 
which obstructed the approach to the whjn f. A further expenditure will be mude to 
complete the connection of these blocks with the shore. 

BT. JEAN D'ORLEANS. 

On the Island of Orleans, 20 miles below Quebec. 

Owing to the action of ice during the preceding winter, the outer corners and 
end of this pier received considerable damage. 

The necessary repairs by sheathing, fendering&c , were completed in November 
last. 



[1881] 3T 



ST. LAUiJtENT. 

On the southern ahoro of the Island of Orleans, 15 miles below Qiieboe. 
The outer corners of this pier have been sheathed, and fenders and hidders 
piACcd on the sides. About 100 feet of the roadway has been renewed. 

CIIENAL DU MOINE. 

This is one of the channels of the Eiver St. Lawrence about 3 miles below Sorel. 

Here, in former years great damage has been done during the breaking up of the 
ice in the spring which has swept over tlie farms causing much loss of propeily. 

Two piers have been built as an experiment, for the purpose of arresting and 
breaking up the ice as it flowed on to the land. They were completed in Alarch last, 
bot owing to the low stage of water at the time the St. Lawrence broke up in the 
spring, the ice passed away by the usual channels. 

RIVER RICUBLIEU. 

The Hichelieu empties into the St. Lawrence on its southern side at Sorel, 45 
miles below Montreal. 

The channel was deepened below the Lock at St. Ours. Obstructions were 
removed above the Lock. The entrance to the w^iarves at St. Denis improved, the 
channel cleared at Belceil^ and a depth oi 8 feel obtained at low water at the entrance 
to the Chambly Caoal. 

BKRTHIER (EN HAUT). 

On the north shore of the Eiver St. Lawrence, 45 miles N. E. of Montreal, and 
dlmoe^t opposite Sorel at the mouth of the Kichelieu. 

The amount appropriated was expended in deepening to 9 feet below the usual 
low-water mark over the Vanasse, Church, and Levesque Shoals in the Berthier Kivcr? 
10 admit of vessels coming to the wharves at Berthier. 

RIVIERE L'ASSoMPTION 

Is a River in Quebec which discharges above the village of Kepentigny, where 
the anited watei*8 of the Rivers Jesus and Des Prairies enter the St. Lawrence. 

A dredge in the service of the Department was engaged up to 14th August 1880 
in deepening the channel of this river, which is navigable only for vcjjscIs of light 
draa^ht. 

BEAUnARNOlS. 

The Chief Town of the County of Beauharnois is situated on the southern side of 
Lake St. Louis, River St. Lawrence, 20 miles above Montreal. 

A Departmental dredge worked at this place from the 26th May until the 30th 
Jane last deepening to 9 feet at low water in front of the wharves, and in the channel 
leading thereto from the main river. 

THE CEDARS. 

A post village in the County of Soulanges, on the northern shore of the St. Law- 
rence, 30 miles above Montreal. 

During the winter of 1880-81 the timber for a landing pier for the convenience 
of steamers plying on the St. Lawrence, was obtained, but the work of construction 
was only commenced at the close of the fiscal year. 

RIVIERE X LA ORAISSB (RIQAUD.) 

Tbie river empties into the Ottawa on its southern side, about 15 miles above 
Vaiulreuii. 



38 [1881] 

The dteJging of the channel was continued daring the months of July, October 
and November to obmin 6 feet at low water. A large amount of work still remaius. 
to be done to complete this depth up to the Village of Rigaud. 

RIVIERE DU NORD, 

This river enters Iho Ottawa on its northerri^side at the head of the Lake of Two 
' Mountains. 

A number of boulders have been removed from the channel of the river at a 
point called the Eapids, about half a mile below the Village of St. Andrews, leaving 
a channel 58 feet wide with 4 J feet at low water. 

SALMON BIVEft. 

This river empties into the Ottawa on its northern side. 

Dredging was prosecuted between the 2l8t September and 21st October 1880, to 
obtain 6 iect at low water. 

ONTARIO. 

IIAWKESBURY. 

Hawkesbury, in the County of Prescott, is on the southern side of the Ottawa. 

The dredge " Queen of Canada *' was engaged from 29th July to 20th September 
1880, in deepening and completing a channel already commenced, from near Grant's 
Point on the Ottawa to the village wharves, and giving a depth of 6 feet at low water. 

OANANOQUB. 

Is on the northern shore of the St. Lawrence, 18 miles below Kingston. 
A small amount was expended in deepening a portion of the mouth of the Gano- 
noque River, to admit of the entrance of a larger class of vessels for grain freights. 

COBOURG. 

Is situated on Lake Ontario, 72 miles east of Toronto. 

An amount having been appropriated, a contract was entered into for the 
construction of an arm in a south-easterly direction 150 feet in length from the 
western pier. 

At the close of the fiscal year one half of the work had been completed. 

TORONTO. 

Dredging the western entrance to the harbor was procee<led with fi*om 11th 
August until the 24th November, 1880, at which time 27,023 cubic yards of sand und 
clay had been removed. 

Prior to resuming the work in May last, it was found that the enti*ance had 
narrowed by the extension, during the winter, of the shoal from Hanlan*s Point 
northward, and the dredge was engaged in the removal of the material deposited, 
and in further widening the entrance, and at the close of the fipcal year had removed 
17,600 cubic yai-dg, making a total of 44,623 cubic yards. 

RONDBAU. 

A harbor of refuge on Lake Erie, 140 miles west of Port Colborne the southern 
entrance of the Welland Canal. 

Breaches having been made through the sand beach on the western side of the 
entrance to the harbor, a contract was entered into with Messrs. F. B. McNamee k 



[1881] 39- 



Co. for the construction of 2,000 feet of pile protection work, and at the close of the 
year one third of the work had been executed. 

PORT ALBERT. 

Port Albert is situated on the eastern shore of Lake Huron, about 9 miles north 
«if Goderich and at the mouth of Nine Mile Creek, where a small pier has been 
coDstrocted at the joint cost of the Municipality and the Dominion. 

For the extension of the basin for shipping purposes, a row of close piling 300 
feet in length has been driven from the eastern corner of the pier eastwai-dly, and a 
Nttin with 10 feet water has been formed by the removal of 18,706 cubic yards of 
material by the Departmental dredge " Challenge." 

KINCARDINE. 

The harbor of Kincardine is an artificial basin formed at the raoulh of the lliver 
PeueUmgore, 31 miles to the northward of Goderich. 

Under a contract existing with Messrs. Conlon & Canan, the entrance to the 
harbor, which had become reduced in depth by detritus brought in from Lake Huron,. 
WIS restored to its normal depth, and the contract terminated. 

IXVERHURON. 

Inverhui-on is on Lake Huron, 7 miles north of Kincardine. 

A small amount was expended in i*enewing 300 feet of the covering of the pier 
at this place, and replacing 200 feet of tlie waling, which had been destroyed by wear 
and tear. 

BIO BAT. 

Big Bay is situated on Georgian Bay, in the Township of Keppel, about 15 miles 
north of Owen Sound Harbor. 

During the year the sum of $1,121*41 was expended in extending the pier 
a distance of 117 feet into 11^ feet of water, of which amount the appropriation of 
♦500 formed a part, the balance having been provided by the municipal authorities , 
of the Township of North Keppel. 

OWEN SOUND. 

The harbor of Owen Sound has been formed in the mouth of the River Syden- 
ham, which empties into the head of Owen Sound, an arm of Georgian Bay on its 
western side. 

The improvements undertaken at this harbor consist of the construction of two 
pArallel rows of pile work, 200 feet apart, extending from the shore a distance of 600 
feet, together with about 1000 feet of bank protection, and the dredging of the chan- 
nel of the JRiver Sydenham from the upper end of the steamboat wharf to its mouth, 
»od from thence to 14 feet at low water, a total distance of 5,000 feet. 

Towards the construction of these works, the Town of Owen Sound has contri- 
buted the sum of $13,000, and at the close of the fiscal year one third of the work 
bad been completed. 

MEAFORD 

Is situated on Georgian Bay, 18 miles to the westward of Collingwoofl and 20 to 
the eastward of Owen Sound. The harbor is formed by break watei*s extending from 
the shore, that on the western side having an arm 200 feet in length tamed in an 
tt^iterly direction. 

Daring the summer of 1880, the Local Authorities, for the enlui*gement of the 
harbor, close-piled the western side of an innor basin over which there was but a 



40 [1881] 

small depth of water. On the Ist July 1880 tho dredge " Challenge*' commenced 
the doopeninn^ of this basin to 11 feet, and continued until the 4th of October, having 
removed 3i^6-2 cubic yaixis ot clay and gravel, and a large number of boulders, 

COLLINOWOOD. 

CoUingwood Harbor i8 situated on Nottawasaga Bay on tho southern shore of 
Georgian Bay, and is tho terminus of the Northern, Hamilton and North Wci>tern 
Railway. 

The neccfcisity for deepening the entrance to this harbor to 14 feet has been 
stated in the Departmental Eejiort for 1878-7i^, at page 37 of tho Appendix. 

The work done up to the close of the fiscal year was towards toe completion of 
tho channel referred to therein, and amounted to tho removal, by the use of a dredge 
alone, of 22.790 cubic yaixis of hard pan, clay and boulders, at an average cost of 43 
cents per cubic yai-d. 

LITTLE CURRENT. 

Little Current is the passage between Cloche and Great Manitoulin Islands, about 
140 miles from Collingwood, and is on the direct route from Colling wood to Sault 
Ste. Marie. 

Owing to the existence of a rocky ledge, the navigable channel was much 
narrowed and intricate of navigation, so much so that deeply laden vessels were 
obliged to make the outside passage through Lake Huron, which in the full of tho year 
is attended with danger. 

The amount appropriated has been expended in the improvement of this clnanncl 
by the removal of boulders and tho ledge itself, with explosives, which has given a 
certain measure of relief, but a further amount is necessary to complete the works 
undertaken. 

DES JOACHIMS BRIDGE. 

This i)i*oposcd bridge will cross the Eiver Ottawa, at the J^ Joachims Rapids, 
between the Counties of Pontiac, Quebec, and North Benfrew, Ontario. 

At the close of the fiscal year its construction had not been commenced, owing 
to a delay in the approval of the plans by tht> Grovernmont of Ontario. 

8URVBT8 AND EXAMINATIONS. 

During the year, surveys and examinations were made at tho underraeutioned 

have been 



localities, and with a few exceptions. 


plans, reports and 


estimates 


forwarded. 






Cascumpec Harbor, 


Prince Co., P. 


B. I. 


Siimmerside, 


do 


do 


West Cape, 
French Kivor, 


do 


do 


Queen^s Co., 


do . 


Rustico Harbor, 


do 


do 


lie Madame, 


Richmond Co., 


N.S. 


Petit de Grat, 


do 


do 


Great Village River, 


Colchester Co., 


do 


Windsor, 


Hants Co., 


do 


Cape St. Mary, 


Digby Co., 


do 


Petite Rividre, 


Lunenburg Co., 


do 


Poit Medway Islands. 


do 


do 


Port Mouton, 


Queen's Co., 


do 


Coflan'a Island, 


do 


do 


Kagle Head, 


do 


do 


Jones Harbor, 


Shelbume Co., 


do 


Jordan River, 


do 


do 



[188l] 



4t 





Louis Head Harbor, 


Shelbnrne Co., 


N. S, 






Port L'Hebert ' 


do 


do 






Cocagne, 


Kent Co,, 


N.B. 






Charlo, 


Restigouche Co., 


do 






FrtDutforin, 


St. John Harbor, 


do 






Quaco, 


St. John Co., 


do 






St. Andrews, 


Charlotte Co., 


do 






Anse du Portage, 


Saguenay Co., Quebec. 






L'Anse a I'Eau, 


do 


do 






Lake St. John, 


Chicoutirai Co., 


do 






Matane, 


Rimouski Co., 


do 






Baie St. Paul, 


Charlevoix Co., 


do 






Cap a TAiglo, 


do 


do 






It^le aux Coudrea, 


do 


do 






Les EcureuiU, 


Portneuf Co., 


do 






St. Pierre le:^ Bocquetn, 


Nitolet Co , 


do 






St. Ours, 


Richelieu Co., 


do 






St. Denis, 


St. HyacintheCo., 


do 






Si. Hilaire, 


Rouville Co., 


do 






Missisquoi Bay, 
River Yamaska, 


Mi^isiequoi Co , 


do 








do 






River St. Francis, 




do 






River St. Louis, 


Beanharnois Co., 


do 






Cedars, 


Soulanges Co., 


do 






St. Zotique, 


do 


•do 


^ 




Lake Temi^camingue, 


River Ottawa, 








Des Joachims Br dge, 


do 








Portsmouth Harbor, 


Frontenac Co., Ontario. 






Belleville, 


Hastings Co., 


do 






River Moira, 


do 


do 






Presqu'lle to Bay of Quints, Prince Ed. Co., 


do 






Whitby, 


< )ntarjo Co., 


do 






Pigeou Bay, 


Essex Co., 


do 






Peleo Island, 


do 


do 






River Thames, 




do 






Point Edward, River St 


. Clair, Lambton Co 


.,do 






Groderich, 


Huron Co., 


do 






Kincaidine, 


Bruce Co., 


do 






Southampton, 


do 


do 






Wiarton, 


do 


d6 






Meaford. 


Grey Co., 


do 






Collingwood, 


Simcoe Co., 


do 






Little Current, 


Algoraa Co., 


do 




^ 


Neebish Rapids, 


do 


do 






River Kaministiouia, 
Prince Arthur's Landing, 


do 


do 






do 


do 






Courtenay River, 




B. C. 






DREDGING. 








The ** St. 


Laurence.'' 







On ist July, 1880, this dredge was operating at Little Glace Bay, Capo Breton 
^©epening and improving the entrance to the harbor, continuing there until 15th 
A^igust, at which date 10,587 cubic yards of clay, mud, stone, &c., had been 
Amoved, making a total of 13,:^87 cubic yards. 

On 30th August, work was resumed on the channel through the Horse Shoe 
7—4 



42 [1881 1 



Shoal, at the entrance to the Miramichi, N.B., and earned on until 30th October, 
ropulting in the removal of 15,838 cubic yards of 8and, clay and stone. 

Work on the Kast River, Pictou, N.S., began on the 9th November, and closed 
on the '.25th when the weather had become unfit for work. The material removed 
amounted to 4,900 cubic yaitls. 

This dredge was placed on the slip at Pictou for general repairs. The hull veaa 
strengthened by placing a heavy belting of timber and angle irons ai*oand it, the engine 
and toiler, and machinery wore thoroughly over-hauled and placed in working oi^er. 

On 3rd May last, the dredge was taken off the slip, and proceeded to the Horse 
Shoe Shoal, arriving on the 18th, but owing to stormy weather, was unable to com- 
mence work until the 26th, continuing until the 30th June, having removed up to 
that time 10,005 cubic yards of sand, clay and stone. 

The total ammnt dredged during the year amounts to 41,330 cubic yards. 

For work dono during the previous year for private dredging, and mentioned in 
the lust repoi't (App. p. 28,) the sum of $325.00 was received and placed to the credit 
of the Receiver General. 

The « Canadar 

At the commencement of the year this dredge was engaged at River du Loup 
(en ba8)y Quebec, in deepening along the western front of the wharf, and remained 
until the 22nd July, removing 2,318 cubic yards of mud, clay and stone, and a total 
of 2,588 cubic yards 

On 28th July, work was resumed on the Seal and Ballast bars, Bathurst Harbor, 
N.B., and continued until 10th November, removing 13,#27 cubic yards of sand. 

A riving in the harbor of Pictou, N. S., on the 16th November, work was 
commenced at the Intercolonial Railway wharf. Pictou Landing, and carried on until 
the 24th, 450 cubic yards of s^nd and mud having been removed. 

Thin dredge was laid up in Pictou Harbor during the winter, and the repairs 
found to bo necessary to the vessel and machinery were executed. 

On 2t)th April last, the season's work was commenced at the coaling wharves. 
Middle River, Pictou, and continued until 20th May, removing 3,3 50 cubic yaixis of 
mud, stone, and gravel. 

Arriving at Buctouche, Kent County, N. B., work was commenced on the bar 
obstructing the entrance to that harbor on the 28th &(ay, and up to the close of the 
year, 5,445 cubic yai-ds of mussel mud, clay and shells, were removed. 

During the year this dredge removed a total of 24,570 cubic yards of materials 
of various kinds. 

The " New Dominion:* 

This dredge was not piaced in commission during the fiscal year. The machinei^ 
is in fair order, a new hull is needed, as the present one from age and decay is unsa^ 
for use. 

The ''Cape Breton:' 

This dredge was engaged on the bar at the entrance to the River John, Pictoa 
County, N.S., at the commencement of the year, and remained there until the 5th 
August, up to which date 5,090 cubic yards of fine sand had been removed. 

On the 12th August, work was commenced at New Glasgow, Pictou County, N.S., 
in deepening the channel of the East River, opposite the ship yards above the high- 
way bridge, and on the 27th it was completed, 5,345 cubic yards of sand and gravel 
having been removed. 

Arriving at Tatamagoache, Colchester County, N.S., the work of improving and 
deepening the river was commenced on the 1st of September, and continued until th« 
15th November, when work for the season ceased, and the dredge and scows were 
removed to winter quarters in River John. The work done at Tatamagouohe consisted 
in opening a channel through the flats up to Patterson's wharf, and in deepening and 
improving the channel of the western branch of the river up to Campbell's MillSi 
j-emoving 17,130 cubic yards of mud, sand and gravel. 



[1881] 43 



DuriDg the winter repairs were executed on the dredge and scows. 

Od the 23rd May, 18bl, this dredge was taken -to New Glasgow, and resumed the 
work oi improving ihe channel of the East River, aod up to the 30th June, had 
removed a mrther quantity of gravel amounting to 15,555 cubic yiurds. 

The total number of cubic yards of material removed during the year amounts to 
43,120 cabic yai-ds. 

Two of the scows attached to this dredge are unfit for work and not worth 
repairing. 

The " Prince Edward^ 

On the Ist July 1880, this dredge was working at Pownal, Queen's County, P.B.I., 
in opening a passage for vessels from the main channel to the public wharf, and 
reouiined until it was completed on the 14th August, when a further quantity of 
11,430 on bio yards of clay and mud had been removed, making a total at tnis place of 
23,610 cubic yards. 

From Pownal, this dredge was removed to Nine Mile Creek in the same County, 
▼here the work of opening a passage fi*om deep water to the public wharf waa 
commenced on the 2 1st Augurst, and continued until the 1 1th October, 9,750 cubic yards 
of day, gravel and stone having been removed. 

At the last mentioned date the plant was taken to Carr's Point, on the Hills- 
borough River and placed at work improving the channel at that place, removing up 
to the 16th November, 12,165 cubic yards of sand and silt. Up to the 20th, 750 cubic 
yards of mud, sand and silt were removed from the river opposite Hiekey's wharf, and 
ai at that date the river closed, the dredge and scows wei-e frozen in, and remained 
there ontil the 12th of May last. 

Oo the 2ird May, work wai^ resumed at Crapaud, Queen*s County, and continued 
antil the BOth June, at which time 12,240 cubic yards of sand, mud, and sandstone in 
ledge, hud been removed, making a total of 46,355 cubic yards during the year. 

The " George McKenzie:' 

At the commencement of the year this dredge was working under an engagement 
▼ith the Assignee of the contractor for the enlargement of the St. Peter's Canal, Cape 
Breton, and continued until the 2nd December, when the whole of the dredging was 
completed, and a turther quantity of 23,562 cubic yai*dsof very tough clay, mud, stones 
aod boulders were removed. 

At the last mentioned date this dredge and scows were taken to Port Hawkes- 
hmty in the Straits of Canso, and placed on the slip at that place, on which they 
remained during winter, and received necessary repairs. 

On the 23rd May, the plant was towed to feagged Pond, Guysboro County, .N.S., 
and on arrival it was found that, owing to the great changes in the channel which had 
taken place during the preceding winter and spring, it would be useless to attempt 
making any improvement— orders were therefore given to proceed to Mabou, Inver- 
neea Connty, Cape Breton, where work was commenced on the 2nd June, in opening 
a channel to 14 feet through the shoai off the entrance to the harbor, and at the close 
of the year, having experienced much unfavorable weather, only 1,168 cubic yards of 
clay, etone and sand were removed. 

The total quantity of work done by this dredge during the year amounts to 
24,730 cubic yards. 

The sum of 913,778.23 was received fi-om Mr. J. T. Kennedy, assignee, for the use 
of this dredge and scows, and for tug service at the St. Peter's Canal. 

Dredge ''No. I.*' 

The use of this dredge and scows was obtained from the Department of Bail- 
ways and Canals, and on the 1st July 1880, they were employed in oeepening through 
in the River I'Assomption, L'Assomption County, Quebec, to 6 feet at low water 
7 — 4i 



and continued to the 14th August, having removed up to that date 11,720 cubic yardd 
of clay and sand. 

Between the 16th August, and 3rd September, this dredge was engaged in deepen- 
ing to 6 feet at low water, the approaches from the main channel of the River Biohe* 
lieu to the wharves at St. Denis. 

From the 4th to the 15th September, the work of removing obstructions in the 
channel of the Richelieu, at Beloeil Bridge, amounting to 1,060 cubic yards was acconi> 
plished. 

The completion of the work at St, Denis, occupied from the 16th September 
until the 6th October, at which time a total of 13,180 cubic yards of clay and stones 
had been removed. 

Prom the 7th to the 30th October, the lower entrance to St Ours lock was 
deepened to 9 feet at low water, and an obstruction above the upper entrance removed, 
the total dredging amounting to 5,240 cubic yards of clay and earth. 

The entrance to the Chambly Canal was deepened between the 1st and 20th 
November, to 8 feet at low water by the removal of 3,140 cubic yaMsofclay and 
sand. 

The total quantity dredged during the season amounts to 34,340 cubic yards. 

This dredge has been handed back to the Department of Railways and Canals. 

" The Queen of Cmadar 

At the commencement of the fiscal year this dredge was engaged in deepening 
the channel of the Riviei*e a la Graisse, Rigaud, Quebec, and remained until the 20th 
of July, when it was taken to deepen the entrance to Calumet Bay, on the northern 
side of the Ottawa, to 6 feet at low water to permit the entrance of the steamer plying 
to Hawkesbury in connection with the Q. M. O. & O. Railway. This work was com- 
pleted on the 28th July, by the removal of 1,375 cubic yards of clay. 

Between the 29th July and 20th September, the deepening and completing to 6 feet 
at lew water of a channel already commenced from near Grant's Point on the Ottawa, 
to the village of Hawkesbury, Ontario, was carried on, and 13,800 cubic yai-ds of 
clay, sand and stones removed. 

From the 21st September to the 21st October dredging to the extent of 7,*715 
cubic yards of clay and sand was prosecuted at Salmon River a small branch of the 
Ottawa, emptying from the northern side, to obtain 6 feet at low water. 

Work on the Riviere a la Graisse was resumed on the 25th October and continued 
until the 6th November, up to which daie 4,575 cubic yards of clay and stone had 
been removed during the year. 

This dredge and scows were wintered in Tate's Dry Dock, Montreal, where they 
received thorough repair. 

The work of the season of 1S81 commenced on the 26thMay atBeauharnois^ 
Quebec, in dredging to 9 feet at low water, deepening in front of the wharves, and 
also the channel leading thereto from the main river. This work was in progress on the 
30th June last, up to which date 6,260 cubic yards of clay had been removed. 

The total work of this dredge during the year amounts to 33,785 cubic yai'ds. . 

The " NipiBsing:' 

This dredge with the tug, ** Dennis," and two large dump scows were purchased 
in July, 1880, and after being put in working oi-der, was placed at Borthier en haut on 
the 1st August, following, to open a channel to 9 foot at low water through the 
Vanasse, Church, and Levesque Shoals which exist in one of the channels of the St. 
Lawrence, called the Borthier river. Work ceased on the 10th of November, when 
the plant was taken to Montreal, and wintered in Tate's Dry Dock. On the 2nd June^ 
1881, work was resumed at Borthier and continued until the clo&o of the fiscal year, 
the quantity removed to that time being 21,524 cubic yards of clay, and a very fino 
description of sand which was found to be very difficult to retain in the scows. 



[1881] 45 



The " Challenger 

On the Isl J«jy, 1880,[thi8 dredge and ite attendant tug "Trudeau *' and scowb 
were at Meaford, Georgian Bay, and continuod there until the 4th October, in opening 
an inner basin to 11 feet at low water for the protection of which the municipalitj 
had defrayed the coat. 

The materials removed were clay, gravel, and a large quantity of boulders, 
tmoanting in the whole to 39,022 cubic yards. 

This dredge and plant wintered at Sarnia and was taken on the 9th of May last 
U> Goderich for work at Port Albert, but owing to the want of shelter at that place 
and the prevalence of stormy weather, work was not commenced until the 18th, and 
eootinued up to the 30th June ult. in opening up the head of the harbor to 10 feet 
atiow water, and placing a portion of the dredged materials behind the close pile 
work constructed by the Department. The quantity dredged amounted to 18,706 
cubic yards, and consisted of clay, gravel and siinU. 

DREDGING PLAXT. 
The dredging plant belonging to the Department is as follows. 

IN THE MARITIME PROVIN0E8. 

The steam hopper dredge — " St. Lawrence." 
" " — " Canada." 

The dipper dredge — "New Dominion," and 10 scows. 
" " — " Cape Breton," 7 " 

" '' — " Pnnce Edwaixi," 3 " 

«• —" George McKenzie," 3 " 

IN QUEBEC. 

The dipper dredge "Queen of Canada," 2 scows and 1 stone-lifter. 

" " *' Nipissing " and 2 scows. 

The steam tug " Dennis." 

IN ONTARIO. 

The dipper dredge "Challenge" and 3 scows. 
The steam tug '• Trudoau." 

IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

An elevator dredge and 4 scows. 
The steam tug " Georgia," 

With reference to this plant it may be stated that, with the exception of the 
*New Dominion" and a few scows, it is in good order and condition. The state of 
tlie hull of the " New Dominion " has been previously referred to. One .of the 
BcowB attached to the " Prince Edward" was condemned during the year and sold 
U public aaction. 

Two of the scows with the " Cape Breton " have become useless and should be 
broken up, and the iron work used in the construction of new ones, which are much 
needed. 

A scow attached to the *• Challenge " should be condemned and replaced by 
Mother. Bepairs will be req»Mred to the hull and machinery of the tug " Trudeau." 



46 



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7,506 
3,132 

464 
1,102 


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[1881] 



Details of Drodgiag in the Maritime Provinces, and at Riviort 



Dredge. 




T./wali«v 






Prkimtv 




Nbw Brunswick. 




vyvuuvj. 


Quantity. 


Cost. 


Total 
Cost 


"New Dominion". 


Not in con 

Riviere du 
Batburst . 
BuctoQche 
Railway ^ 
(^oal Wha 

River Johi 
New Glasi 
Tatamago 

Pownal ... 
Nine Mile 
Hillsborou 
Crapaud.. 

Horse Sho 
Little Gla 
East Rivei 

St. Peter's 
Mabou 


Dmission ... 




• 


cub. yds. 


$ cts. 


$ eta 


"Canada" 


Loup 




Temiscouata, Que.. 

Glon<'«*stpr- V. I 














13,027 
5,445 


3,898 05 
1,629 24 










Kei 
Pic 


at, N.B 






rharf 




tAu. N.S. .. 








rves 




do 

Pictou, N.S. .. 

do 
Colchester, N.J 

Queen's, P.E.I 
do 
do 
do 

North'berland, 

Cape Rrfttnn. N 












1 










5,527 2< 


•' Cape Breton " ... 






arow 






1 






Qche 




^ ... 


! 




** Prince Edward " 

















Creek 








gh River... 








•* 
















*' St. Lawrence"... 


e Shoal 




N.B. 

s 


25,843 


6,080 72 






ce Bay 












Pic 


ton, N.S. ... 












Canal 










"* 6,080 a 


**Geo. HcKenzie". 


Richmond, N.S 
Invemeflfl. N.S 


















...... .. 


By hand 


Windsor . 






Hai 


Its, N.S 






























44,315 




11,608 01 








Dredge. 


Niw Brunswick. 


Nova Scotia. 


P. E. ISLAJTD. 


Quantity. 


Cost. 


Quantity. 


Cost. 


QuanUty. 


Cost. 


'* New Dominion" (not in com- 
mission) 


cub. yds. 


$ cts. 


cub. yds. 


$ ct«. 


cub. yds. 


$ cts. 


" Canada " 


18,472 


5,527 29 


3,780 
43,120 


1,131 03 
8,366 69 






*' Cape Breton " 




^ 


'^Prmce Edward" 
"St Lawrence".... 








46,335 


9,298 53 




25,843 


6,080 72 


15,487 

24,730 

3,300 


3,644 20 

9,912 72 

560 25 


"Geo. McKenzie" . 
Rj hand 

































44,315 


11,608 01 


90,417 


23,621 89 


46,336 


9,298 53 



[188 1] 



57 



da Loop (en bos), Quebec, during tho Year ended 30th June, 1881. 



XoTA Scotia. 




P. E. Island. 


Ql'EBEC. 




Quan- 
- tity 
by each 

Dredge. 


Total 


tity. 


Cost 


Total 
Cost. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Cost. 


Total 
Cost 


Quan- 
tity. 


Cost 


Total 
Cost 


Cost 


c. yds. 


$ ctsi. 

1 


$ cts. 


c. yds. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


c. yds. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


c. yds. 


$ eta. 
777 84 








- • 






2,318 


693 44 








. 








































450| 134 64 




















3,3301 ddft -^ 




















5.0f«0 




1,131 03 












693 44 


24,570 


7,351 76 


987 63 




20,900 


4.055 29 
3,323 77 








1 i 








17.130 








....^ 1 












8,366 69 


11,430 

9,750 

12,915 

12,240 


2,293 78 
1,956 63 
2,591 79 
2,456 33 


•••■%••• 






43,120 


ft ^A ^1 




































1 















1 














* 




9,298 53 








46,335 


^08 ^i^ 






% 




10,587 


2,491 23 
1,152 97 




















4.900 






















3,644 20 














41,330 


9,724 92 


23.562 


9,451 22 
468 50 


1,168 






















9,919 72 
560 25 














24,730 
3,300 


9,919 72 
560 25 


.^300 
























90,417 




23,621 89 


46,335 




9,298 63 


2,318 




693 44 


183,385 


45,999 71 










Quebec . 


Total 
Quantity. 


Cost of 
Dredging. 


Cost 
ol'Huperin- 
tendence. 


Total Cost 


Cost per 
Cubic Yard. 


Quantity. | Cost. 


nib. yds. $ ets. 


cub. yds. 


$ cts 

777 84 
6,790 60 
7,727 54 
8,587 97 
8.982 02 
9,161 94 

560 25 


$ cts. 


$ ots. 

777 84 
7,351 76 
8,366 69 
9,298 53 
9,724 92 
9,919 72 

560 25 


cents. 


2,318 


693 44 


24,750 
43,120 
46,335 
41,330 
24,730 
3,300 


561 16 
639 15 
710 66 
742 90 
757 78 


29-922 
19*403 


._ 




20-068 






23*530 






40112 






16*977 


** 








2,318 


693 44 


183,385 


42,588 16 


3,411 55 


45,999 71 


25-008 



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flSSl] 59 



APPENDIX No. 6. 



REPORT OX PUBLIC WORKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, BY HON. 
J. W. TRUTCH, C.M.G. 



No. 19306. 

Victoria, B.C., 18th November, 1881. 

Sib,— In obedience toujour directions to me hy Departmental letter No. 3983 of 
the 24th September last, I now have the honor to lay before you the enclosed state- 
ment of Public Works carried on under my charge in this Province, during the fiscal 
Tearende*! :^Oth June last. 

This statement has been prepared iti accordance, as nearly as has been found 
wacticable, with the instructions contained in Departmental letter No. 3.^50 of 7Lh 
September, 1880 ; but the special circumstances attending the initiation and execu- 
tion of some of the works referred to have precluded a literal compliance with all the 
requirements therein prescribed. 

I have omitted all mention of telegraph works in this statement as you will, of 
couree, receive a full report thereon from the proper source of information on that 
serrice, the General Superintendent of Telegraph and Signal Services ; and I therefore 
wed only refer to my letters of 23rd May and 27th June, in which I have commu- 
nicated to you such observations on this subject as I have felt it incumbent on me to 
present for your consideration. 

The only new works actually undertaken during the last fiscal year under the 
Public Works Department in British Columbia, with the exception of those con- 
wcted with the telegraph service, were Ist, the improvement of the navigation of 
Nias River by removal of snags ; and 2nd, the deepening of the channel of Eraser 
Biver, hy dredging at Woodward's Slough. 

The first of these works has been carried on under the immediate supervision of 
iir. H. E. Croasdaile, whose reports on the progress of the work as far »s at present 
executed, have been forwarded to you in my seveml letters of 3rd August and 18th 
Becember, 1880, and ultimate reports of to-day's date. 

As to the dredging work in Fraser River, a full report was conveyed to you in 
mj letter of 28th December last, since which date and up to the present time the dredge 
Teasels have remained laid up in the Coquitlem River about four miles above New- 
Westminster. 

In relation to the proposed improvement of the channel of the Skeena River I 
have also placed you in possession of all the information I can fnmish through my 
letter to you of 16th May last. 

Nothing was done last year towards the construction of the contemplated 
Custom House Wharf at Victoria beyond a survey of the locality and the prepara- 
tion of plans, specifications and estimates for the work by Mr. Tiedemann, on which 
I report in my letter to you of 8th January last, and handed in to the Department 
at Ottawa on my arrival there in February. 

My several letters to you of 17th May, 28th June and Ifith September last have 
commonicated so fully all the facts, and my views thereon, as to the work of the 
removal of ** Beaver Rock," Victoria Harbor, that I have no fui'ther remarks to lay 
before you on this subject, which I could hope would be of any practical value. 

The only other public work in the Pi*ovince to which I have to allude, (as I 
nppofle it unnecessary to comment upon the few -small items of repairs of Public 
7.-5f 



60 [1881] 



Buildings generally which were executed during last fiscal year to an aggre^te 
amount of cost of only $191.53), is that of the repairs and alterations to the Post 
Office Building which were done mainly by contract approved by you, and partly 
by days work, the whole expenditure having, however, been kept within the prescribed 
limit authorized for the work. 

The stability and suitableness of this building have been greatly increased by 
the work so done during the last fiscal year, and will be still more completely 
perfected when the additional work now being executed on the building has beea 
carried out. 

1 have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 



JOSEPH W. TEUTCH. 



The Hon. Sir Hector L. Langkvin, K.C.M.G., C.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa, Canada. 



[1881J 



61 



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62 [1881] 

, NAAS EIVER IMPROVEMENT. 
No. Tose. 

Victoria, B.C., 3rd August, 1880. 

Sib, — I have the honor to enclose for your information copies of a letter to me 
fromCapt Croasdaile and of my i-eply of this day's date. 

I trust you may C9ncur in the approval I have conveyed to Captain Croasdaile of 
his suggestions as to the manner of executing the proposed work of removing snags 
fi-om the Naas Biver. 

Be pleased to instruct me as to the refund applied for by Captain Croasdaile of 
the sum of seventy-five dollars (S75.00) expended by him this spring. 

I have telegi*aphed to you to-day for the funds necessary to meet CaptaiD 
Croasdaile expenditui'es on this work to the amount of the sum appropriated for the 
purpose, viz : $1,000.00. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. 

The Hon. Hectob L. Lanqevin, C. B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa, Canada. 

Naas River Fishery, 9th July, 1880. 

Sib, — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt, on the 6th of this month, of 
your communication dated the 5th June, and 1 de«ire to express my acknowledgment 
of the confidence placed in me by being authorized to expend, in clearing the river 
of snagH, the $1,000.00 voted for that purpose. 

In reply to your wish for information as to the most judicious way of carrying 
on the work, I beg to state that the river at present is too high for operations, but it 
generally falls considerably in August, and towaixis the end of that month or the 
beginning of September work could be advantagtiously commenced. 

I think it would be advisable to do the work by day labor and under my own 
supervision, for this reason : that excepting those in my employment there are only 
two or three white men on the river who are workingmen, and they are without 
scows or other necessary means lor the work ; and I would also suggest that a portion 
of the money only be expended this autumn and the remainder next spring, unless 
favorable weather should occur this year, when the work might be completed. 

The implements and other appliances required will be : g^ppling irons, chains, 
windlass, blocks and tackles, etc., and two scows. The grappling irons I would 
propose making up here at my blacksmith's shop, the iron for which and some blocks 
and chains will have to be purchased in Victoria. The scows and other appliances I 
have here for the use of which I would charge a reasonable price. I would hope to 
get about ten miles of the lower channel cleared. 

Bequesting that you will be good enough to inform me if you approve of my 
suggestions, and also if I should give orders on you for payment of such supplies as I 
shaU have to get from Victona, 

I have the honor to remain. Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

HENRY B. CROASDAILE. 

P.S. — ^This spring T had a small number of snags removed, the value of the 
work being about $75.00.1 trust I may be refunded this amount on producing vouchers. 

The Hon. J. W. Trutch, Victoria, B.C. 



[18S1] i]?. 



Victoria, B. C, 3rd AuguMt, 1880. 

Sib, — Referring to yom* letter of Ihe 9tli uUimo, which reached me yesterday, I 
b^ to state that your proposal to have the work of clearing snags out of the ]Naas 
Krer carried out by day labour under your personal supervision is approved, and 
joa 9ve requested to uadertake this work accordingly in the manner and on the terms 
iuggcsted in yoar letter. 

I have telegraphed to the Minister of Public Works for the funds to bo expended 
on this work, the amount of which, as you were before apprised, is absolutely restnctod 
to one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) which sum is to cover all expenditure for labor, 
materials, tools, superintendence and otherwise connected with the work. 

As soon as I am placed in a position to do so by the necessary funds being placed 
to my credit here, 1 shall be ready to honor your orders for payments within the 
limits above stat^, provided all such payments are accompanied by duly receipted 
voudiers and pay rolls, blank forms for which are sent you herewith. 

I will submit for the consideration of the Honorable the Minister your applica- 
tion to have refunded to you the sum of seventy-five dollars ($75.00) expended by 
jou this spring in removing snags from the Naas Biver, 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



Hurt E. Cboasdaile, Esq. 
Naas Eiver, B. C. 



No. 10532. 



JOSEPH W. TEUTCH. 



Victoria, B.C., I8th December, 1880. 

Sib, — I have the honor to transmit to you herewith, copy of a letter to me datoi 
the 29th ultimo, but which has only reached me to-day, from Captain Croasdaile, 
conveying the information in relation to the Naas Eiver which wan called for by your 
instructions to me by Departmental letter No. 2865 of the 3rd August last, together 
with a copy of the Admiralty Chart of Naas Eiver, on which Capt. Croasdaile has 
indicated by distinguishing colore, (1) the portions of the river from which the snags 
have been cleared or partially cleared under his superintendence, (2) thotje where 
such work has yet to done, and (3) the shoal parts of the channel which require 
to be dredged and buoyed. 

I visitcJ Naas Eiver in 1869 and again in 1872, but my opportunities of inspect- 
ing the channel of the river on those occasions wer^ very restricted and my observa- 
tions only cursoiy. I do not feel myself warranted therefore, especially after so long 
A period, in making any remarks or suggestions on the proposed impi*ovement of the 
navigation of this river, 

I may, however, observe that Capt. Croasdaile appears to have taken considerable 
trouble in ascertaining the facts, as to the depth of water, and the nature of the 
impediments in the channel, and to have cai*efully studied the best means of improv- 
ing the river both with a view to its navigation, and to its facilities for increased 
catch offish ; and that I feel confident that under his supervision the money appro- 
priated for this purpose will continue to be advantageously expended. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient sei'vant, 

JOSEPH W. TEUTCH. 
The Hon. Hector L. Lanobvin, C. B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa, Canada, 



€4 [1S81] 



Victoria, B.C., 29th Nov., 1880. 

SiB,~In reply to tho letter of your Secretary, requesting me to furnish yoa witl 
particulars of iho work to be done in improving the navigation of the Naas River 
and the benefits to be derived therefrom, I bog to state as follows: — 

The nature of the improvements to navigation possible to be earned out with 
the amount ($1,000.00) of tho vote passed, is the removal of snags from the channel ol 
the river ; as to deepen it on the bars by dredging would be beyond accomplishmenl 
for the sum at present applicable. 

The channel of the river has a great many snags in it, some of a large size and 
deeply embedded in the sand and mud and several feet below the surface of the water, 
which renders them dangerous for a steamer. These snags have been accumulating 
for many years, and when the old ones are once cleared away it will be comparatively 
easy to keep the channel clear in the future. 

I think that the channel can be oleai*ed for some ten or t twelve miles sufficiently 
for all practical purposes for the amount voted, possibly for a little less, and, should 
the latter prove the case, I would suggest that any surplus left should be applied to 
buoying the river at the shortest places. The benefits to be derived are twofold. In 
the tii*st place it will be much safer for coasting steamers to run up the river; and as 
there is a largo fishery some twelve miles from the mouth, besides a steam saw mill, 
and several trading posts, it will bo greatly to the advantage of the residents on the 
Naas that steamboat communication should bo facilitated. 

Secondly, clearing the river of snags will tend to largely increase the 3'iold 
of salmon fro^i the river ; as these obtructions greatly interfere with drift-net fish- 
ing, and as salmon curing is the principal industry of that district, a direct benefit 
will be derived. 

I be^ to hand herewith a chart of the river showing the channel, the part where 
snagging has already been carried on and the bars where I would advise buoys being 
placed, should a portion of the vote remain unexpended after removing the snags. I 
may mention that the soundings marked are only correct during dead low water in 
winter, when the sources of the river are nearly all frozen up. About April the river 
commences to rise, and from that month until October or November the river is very 
much deeper, steamei*s— one a gunboat — having ascended it some 15 miles. 

I have, &c., 

HKNRY E. CROASDAILE. 

To Hon. J. W. Trutch, 

Victoria, C.B. 



Victoria, B. C, 18th November, 1881. 
No. 19420. 

Sir,— Referring to my last letter to you of tho 18th December last, on the 
subject of the improvement of Naas Eiver, b7 therenoval of sn^ags from the channel, 
I have now the honour to enclose for your information, copies of further reports on 
this work, dated respectively 3rd June last, and 18th instant, from Mr. H. E. Croas- 
daile, under whose superintendence this improvement has been carried on, giving an 
account of the work up to the present time. 

I regret that I am unable to furnish you with any information on this work^ 
beyond that afforded by Mr. Croasdaile*s reports. I may add, however, that I should 
think it would be judicious if the Department, having undertaken this work and 
expended thereon the sum of $1,000, would appropriate the further sum of $500, as 
suggested by Mr. Croasdaile, on faith of the assurance he gives that for this outlay 



[1881] 66 

the channel of the Naas Eivcr would bo certainly cleared of sna^s and the navigation 
Ttmdered free of ritik from such impediments. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TEUTCH. 

The Honourable 

Sir Hbctor L. Langbvin, K. C. M. G., C. B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa, 
Canada. 

Naas River, B. C, 3rd June, 1881. 

Sir, — I have the honour to inform you, that I have had the work of clearing 
this river of snags, and marking the channel in places with buoys, carried on during 
portions of the last two months when the weather permitted. I should have had more 
woA done, but that there was no one here competent or willing to act as foreman 
jR^evSooB to the time of work commencing. 

The navigation of the river has been very much improved, and the steamer 
Orappler, has this season been twice up it to a distance of thirteen or fourteen miles 
from the mouth, it being the first time a coasting steamer having anything like 
her draught of water has ascended the river. 

There is still much work to be done to get the channel properly cleared, and I 
y^otare to hope you will use your influence and recommend that at least the residue 
<^the vote passed for this river should be expended upon it this autumn. 

I have had ten buoys laid down at the two most difficult crossings of the river 
and have two mushroom anchors still on hand, so that I can replace any of those 
buoys if necessary. I have also chain, hemp rope, two pairs of grappling tongs and 
one anchor in charge ; a portion of the chain purchased last year I have used in 
anchoring the buoys. I am sending down vouchers for the work done, anl have the 
tonor to request that payment may be made to Mr. M. T. Johnson on my behalf. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



The Hon. J. W. Tbutch, 

Agent of the Dominion Government, 
British Columbia. 



HENRY E. CEOASDAILE. 



Victoria, B.C., 18th November, 1881. 



SiE, — In reply to your letter of the 16th inst. I have the honor to report for 
your information that since my last letter of 3rd June, little work has been done 
towards improving the navigation of the Naas river; the grant of money for that 
purpose having been almost entirely expended up to that date. 1 had, however, 
aome more snags raised and removed and the buoys watched. Several of the-^o latter 
had to be altered, as the channel of the river changed at one of the crossing-^. Several 
also were removed from their positions by strong winds and tides ; and the anchor 
ofone has been so embedded by a channel filling up, that it will bo impossible to 
raise it- I have sent instructions to the river to have all the buoys taken on shore 
for the winter, as the drift ice would otherwise carry them away. The anchors luvsed 
for buoying the channel were only 200 lbs. weight, of the mushroom pattern. These 
I find are not sufficiently heavy to stand the strong current of the river. On the 
whole the navigation of the river has been greatly benefited by the small Govern- 



«6 [1681] 



ment aid granted. For the firat time Id its history the ordinary coasting steamerc 
have been making trips up it for some 14 miles from April to October, and haveoolj 
touched snags on one or two occasions. If the Government would make another faprant 
of, say $500, the channel might be perfectly cleared of these dangers to navigation ; 
and a small yearly allowance of, say $100, would suffice to place the buoys in the 
Kpring of each year, keep them in order and position, and i-emove them for safe 
keeping each autumn. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



HENRY E. CROASDAILE. 



Hon. J. W. Thutch, C.M.G., 

Victoria, B. C. 



SKEENA BIVER IMPROVEMENT. 

:No. 14366. 

VioToaiA, B. C, 16th May, 1881. 

Sir, — I have the honor to transmit to you herewith, with reference to my letter 
of the 6th January last, a copy of a letter and accompan^ng plan from Mr. J. B. 
White to whom Mr. J. H. Turner referred my letter to him asking for a report on 
the obstructions to the navigation of the Skeena River. 

It is 60 long since I visited the Skeena River, that lam unable to offer an inde- 
pendent opinion on this matter of improving the channel of this river ; and the 
distance from Victoria to the Skeena is so considerable that I can hardly hope to 
have an opportunity of revisiting. 

I can only, therefore, suggest that should you conclude to appropriate any money 
for the removal of the snags and other obstructions from the channel of this river, 
the expenditure of the sum appropriated may be entrusted to some person resident 
on the spot, as has been done in the case of the work now proceeding at Naas Biver 
under Mr. Croasdaile. 

I have no doubt that the judicious expenditure at Skeena River of a similar sum 
to that appropriated for the work at the Naas would be productive of very material 
benefit to the navigation of the river and to the fishing interest there. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient eervant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. 
The Hon. H. L. Langbvin, C.B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 

Inverness, B.C., 4th March, 1881. 

Sir,- -In reply to yours of 22nd October, 1880, to M. J.H. Tumor, which was sent 
me by that gentleman to answer, I beg to enclose a rough sketch of that part of the 
Skeena River which most requires improvement, and to call your attention to the 
marks in red ink which note the locality of the obstructions to navigation. The said 
obstructions consist of huge trees which have fi*om time to time been deposited in 
the bed of the channel of the river, disoerniblo at low but generally covered at high 
water mark, thereby making it exiremely dangerous to steamboats travelling up and 
down the river. In addition to the peril of navigation those obstructions greatly 



[1881] 6T 



nterd the work and vastly increase the expense of the salmon fishing, which is now 
an oiUhli^hed industry npon this nver, by snagging the nets which causes a great 
kMB of time to the canneries, and often a partial if not total loss of their valuable ne1». 
In reply to your query " What would be the probable cost of the proposed improve- 
seats, and of the benefits to be derived thereupon,'^ I bog to say that the benefits to 
be derived would be twofold ; fii*st, lessening the danger of navigation in the river, and 
•eoondly the vast assistance it would render to the canneries in the prosecution of 
tbeir industry. I may here state that during the past four years the canneries 
themselv^ have been to gi*eat expense in removing some of the obstructions. 

With regard to the probable cost of the proposed work it would be very difficult 
to estimate, but I think that fifteen hundred dollarB judiciously expended would clear 
away the most prominent obstructions that are in the river, vide enclosed estimate. 

I have the honor, &c., 

J. E. WHITE. 
HoH. JositPH W. Tbutch, 
Victoria, B.C. 

Memo of sundries required for clearing Skeena river of obstructions to navigation. 

1 large scow cost, say $300 00 

1 crab winch " 150 00 

1 pair 8 feet claws " • 15 00 

1 coil 6-inch rope " 30 00 

1 anchor 250 lbs. " 30 00 

1 *• 150 " « 20 00 

2 boats " 100 00 

Wages 6 men @ $50 each for 3 months 900 00 

Wages for one man @ $100 for 3 months 300 00 

1 coil 3 inch rope 15 00 

$1,860 00 



CUSTOM HOUSE WHARF, VICTORIA, B. C. 
No. 11095. 

Victoria, B. C, 8th January, 1881. 

Sir, — I much regret that your instructions to me by Departmental letter No. 
2,8€5, of 3rd August, should be still unfulfilled as regards the informaciou required 
in relation to (1) The Custom House Wharf at Victoria ; 02) Murdei-er's Bar, Fraser 
Siver; (3) The Black Canon, Thompaoa Eiver, and (4) The Mouth of Skeena River. 

Mr. Tiederoann has made a survey of the Government lots on which the CSistom 
House at Victoria stands, and of the adjoining property, and has made profiles 
thereof, including soundings of the harbor and borings of the bottom extending to 
the outer limit of the proposed wharf. He is now engaged on a design for the wharf, 
»nd in framing estimates of the cost thereof. I fully expected to have received these 
plana and designs in time to forward them,with my observations thereon, by this mail. 

Mr. Hamlin, of the Engineering Staff of the Canadian Pacific Railway, has 
naado a survey of the Black Canon of the Thompson, as also of Murderer's Bar, in 
the Fraser, near which latter point he is now encamped, and I am expecting to 
feceive from him sketches of bolh those localities with such information as he has 
been able to obtain on the spot, regarding these two impediments to steamboat navi- 
gation, and his suggestions for their removal or amelioration. 

The very severe and stormy weather we have had lately has no doubt rendered 
it impracticable to do any office work in camp, and delayed Mr. Hamlin's completioa 



[1881] 



of these plans and reports. Immediately on receiving Mr. Hamlin's reports I should 
transmit them to yoa, and append such information and opinion as I can offer for 
your consideratioij regarding the contemplated works at the two points just named* 
I confidently anticipate that I shall be in a position to forward to you reports on 
the abov^e three subjects within the ensuing week or ten days, but I have no prospect 
of being able to obtain at present any sketch of Skeena Mouth, or reliable information 
as to the impediments to its navigation alluded to in your directions to me. Mr. J. 
H. Turner, to whom you directed me to apply, has, however, protnised to supply a 
chart and report on this locality in the early spring. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. 
The Hon. Hector L. Langbvin, C.B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa, Canada. 



No. 11981. 

Ottawa, 23rd February, 1881. 

Sir — With reference to my letter to you of the 8th ultimo, I beg to lay betore 
you the enclosed copy of a report from Mr. Tiodemann and accompanying plans and 
designs for a wharf and landing stage opposite the Custom House at Victoria, British 
Columbia. 

Should it be considered desirable to undertake the construction of this work, I 
beg to recommend that the plan first suggested by Mr. Tiedemann in his i*eport now 
forwarded, or some modification thereof, be adopted, so as to provide a permanent 
structure, as far at least f*6 the foundation is concerned, and that the sum of ^teen 
thousand dollars be appropriated for this purpose. 

The formation of the bottom of the harbor at the site of the proj>osed wharf is 
well adapted for the construction of a crib foundation,whilst screw piles would in my 
opinion be entirely out of place under the conditions there existing. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant. 



JOSEPH W. TKUTCH* 



The Hon. Hector L. Lanobvin, C.B., 

Minister of Public Works. 



EBMOYAL OF " BEAVER BOCK,'' VICTOKIA HARBOR 

No. 143'70- 

Victoria, B.C., 17th May, 1881. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report that upon the authority conveyed to me by 
telegraphic message dated 16th ultimo, I have determined Mr. Spence's contract for 
the removal of the ** Beaver Rock," in Victoria Harbor, and have taken possession of 
the works and of the vessels, machinery and materials thereon ; and further, that I 
have taken steps to continue and complete the work in question by workmen employed 
directly by Government under Mr. Spence as foreman. 

I enclose copies of my correspondence with Mr. Spence on this subject. 



[1881] 69 



As far as I can now ascertain, an expenditaro of about fifteen bund: el dollars 
(11,500) will be I'equired to effect the removal of the amount of rock still remriining 
10 be taken from the harbor bottom to fulfil the specification on which Mr. Spence's 
c(m tract was based. 

I beg, therefore, to ask authority to expend on this work the sum. of $1,500, 
being $500 more than the limit of expenditure prescribed in the telegram above 
qiH)ted. 

Hie work wilLprobably not be completed before the 1st July. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCn. 
The Hon. H. L. Lanqevin, C.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa. 

Victoria, B.C., 13 th May, 1881. 

Sib, — ^Under the terms and conditions of your agreement with the Public Works 
Department of Canada, for the removal of ** Beaver Eock," I notify you on behalf of 
the Honorable the Minister of Public Works, that your said agreement is hereby 
determined, and that it is my intention to take possession forthwith of the works 
executed under that agreement, and of all the vessels, machinery, tools and materials 
DOW upon or employed about the works, and to use the same in the completion of the 
work contracted lor by you, by the labor of workmen to be employed by the Govern- 
ment aodor my direction. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TEUTCH. 
Thomas Spknce, Esq., 

Victoria, B.C. , 

Victoria, B.C., 14th May, 1881. 

Sir, — Your contract with the Department of Public Works of Canada, having 
been determined, as you were notified yesterday, and possession of the works and of 
the plant and materials thereon having been taken this day. by me on behalf of the 
Honorable the Minister of Public Works, 1 now appoint you foreman of this work for 
the Dominion Government, and place you in charge of the said works and of the 
plant and materials thereon as the property of the Public Works Department. 

You are hereby instructed to direct the continuance forthwith of the removal of 
Use ^' JBeaver Bock " so as to complete as soon as possible the work specified in your 
Aaki contract, using the said plant and materials for that purpose, and employing 
fioch workmen as are rcqxusite to secure the speediest and most economical accom- 
plishment practicable of the said work. 

Your salary whilst engaged on the above service will be at the rate of $120 a 
oionth, all wa^es of the workmen employed by you to be at the usual rate payable 
ibr such work; viz: — for engineer $3.25 per day, blacksmiths $3.25, divers and 
miners $3, and ordinary laborers $2 per day, without board allowaooes. All wages 
will be paid at this office weekly on presentation of a pay list for the same duly 
certiBed by you. 

You will obtain authority from this office by approved requisition for any 
supplies or materials you may find necessary for the accomplishment of the work. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. 
Thohas Spskcs, Esq., 

Victoria, B.C. 



W [1881] 



Victoria, B.C., 14th May, 1881. 



Sir, — I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this date appointing 
me to take charge for the Dominion Government of the work of removing the 
" Beaver Eock,** and I beg to express my acceptance of that appointment and to 
assure yoa " that I will Ube my oost eudeavora to cairy the work to compJetiou 
speedily. I have to mention to you that on the assurance you gave me. three weeks 
since that the Government would take over and complete this work under my 
direction as foreman, 1 have employed men and carried on thAwork during the 
interval, and beg to hand you herewith a pay list of the amounts of wages severally 
due on this account, which I trust you will be able to pay to-day as the men have 
been working for the past fortnight entirely relying on my assurance, made to them 
depending on your woi'd to me, that they would be paid by the Government. 



I remain, Sir, 

Your obedient sei'vant, 



The Hon. J. W. Trutoii, 

Dominion Government Agent, 
Victoria, B.C. 



No. 15401. 



T. SPENCE. 



Victoria, B. C, 28th June, 1881. 



Sir,— Since the date, ITth ultimo, of my last letter to you in relation to the 
removal of " Beaver Eock," Victoria Harbor, this work has been progi-essing slowly; 
and an aggregate amount of about $1,000 has been expended thereon since T took 
over the work, as reported in my letter just referredHo. 

I regret to state that Mr. Spence, the contractor for this work, died suddenly on 
the 4th inst. ; another foreman, Mr. Thomas Preoce, was thereupon engaged in hin 
place. 

I have caused a careful survey of the rock to be made by Mr. F. C. Gamble, 
Assistant Engineer, who is now attached to this office, and I enclose for your consider- 
ation copy of his report and accompanying plan. 

These documents show that a very considerable amount of rock, about 350 cubic 
yards, still remains to be removed, to give a depth of 14 feet ordinary low water over 
this part of the harbor, as provided for by the original contract with Mr. Spence. 

The amount of work to be done to fulfil thisrequirementis very largely in excess 
of the estimate furnished to me by Mr. Spence, on which I chiefly relied in stating to 
you in ray letter of I7th ultimo, before referred to, that — " as far as I can now 
ascertain an expediture of about fifteen hundred dollars will be required to effect the 
removal of the amount of rock still remaining, etc." 

Under these circumstances I find it necessary to apply to you for instructions as 
to the further steps to be taken in this matter. 

The rock is now in such condition that a further expenditure of about $760 will 
suffice to give a depth over its whole surface of 12 ft. 6 in. ordinary low water, and 
this can be eflfected at that cost, with the machinery and plant now in use, in about 
six weeks from this date. 

But to increase the depth to 14 feet ordinaiy low water will require the removal 
of from 6 to 18 inches in depth of rock over an extent of about 10,000 square feet, a» 
shown by Mr. Gamblers survey. 

I concur with the view expressed in Mr. Gamble's report that it will suffice for 
all practical purposes, for the present at all events, if a minimum depth of 12 feet ^ 
inches ordinary low water be attained over the rock. 



[issi] :r 



Bat if it bo decided to complete tlio removal of the rock down to the depth of 14 
feet ordinary low water, I woul(i advise that the aeeompliwhraent of so conniderablo a 
work be let to contract instead of bein^ carried out by day.s labor. 

I think it right to state further that from information ^iven to me b}' the late 
Mr.Spence and others, there appears t> have been very ^^e^ious error in estimating 
the cubic contents of the rock to bo remove I under Mr. Spence's contract. 

A very much larger amount of rock has already been removed than was supposed 
to be incloded in his contract ; and upon this consideration and in view of the decease 
of the contractor, and of the fact that I am satisfied that a much lai-ger sum than the 
entire contract price has been expended by the contractor upon the work during the 
lOQg period of nearly six years he has been engaged on it, L think it would be 
t'xpedicQt to pay over to the contractor's assignees the balance of the contract price 
that may remain unexpended when the rock has been excavated so as to give a depth 
of 12 feet 6 inches over Its whole area at ordinary low water ; and that the removal 
of the further 1 foot 6 inches in depth of the rock should be undertaken as a fresh 
coQtractin connection with the removal of the other rocks in Victoria Harbor, such as 
•^ Dredger Bock " and " Tuzo Rock," which obstruct navigation, with new machinery 
sod appliances, as the plant in use at present is almost worn out and liable to endanger 
the lives of those employed on the work. 

1 have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TBUTCH. 

l^e Honorable 

Sir HscToa L. Langevin, K.C.M.ix., C.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa. 

Public Works Department, 

Victoria, B.C., 23rd June, 1881. 

Sm, — In compliance with your instructions I made a survey of the ** Beaver 
Rock," in Victoria Harbor with the view of ascertaining the amount of rock to be 
excavated, I beg to submit the following report . 

I find after having plotted the work and taken out the quantities, that there 
remains to be ezcavatod 352 cubic vards of rock before water over the site of the 
rock is the required depth, viz: 14 feet below ordinary low water (or 3.7 on the tide 
j^otge Hudson's Bay Company's wharf). This rock is spread over an area of about 
10,WO square feet more or less, and varies in depth from 2-2 feet to zero. 

The soundings and measurements were taken with the greatest care and exactness, 
UMJ may be relied upon as nearly correct as it is possible to get them. 

I am led to believe that it will take at least twelve months to take out this rock, 
lor the following reasons : (1) the extreme hardness of the rock ; (2) the rock being 
full of seams and much broken by former blasting, many shots are lost ; (3) the 
ceceasarily slow progress of such shallow excavation ; (4) the dilapidated and worn 
out condition of tne plant; (5) the caisson or diving bell being only 9 feet in diameter 
at the bottom, only two men can work in it co advantage at one time; (6) the rock 
Then blasted has to be lifted in a basket from the bottom piled in a scow and taken 
to the shore, a distance of 650 feet the nearest point, and there unloaded only at high 
^ter, as the bottom of the harbor surrounding the rock is on a level with the pro- 
posed depth called for by the original contract to which the rock is to be excavated, 
i^amely, 14 feet below ordinary low water. 

I venture to suggest that, considering the expensive nature of the work and that 
'^begnm due on the original contract is hardly sufficient to complete it ; and that the 
«ztreme depth of water at ordinary low water at the entrance of the harbor is only 
U feet, the required depth be reduced to 12 feet below ordinary low water. If this 



72 [18811 



18 allowed 1 have no doubt the work could be completed in two months, perhaps, 
even less. 

I beg to remain 

Your obedient servant, 

F. C, GAMBLE, 

Assistant Engineer. 
The Hon. J. W. Trutch, C.M.G., 

Dominion Government Agent, British Columbia, 

No. 17557. 

Victoria, B. C, 16th September, 1881. 

Sir, — In reference to ray letter to you of the 28th June and telegram of 19th 
August last, I have the honor to report that the removal of the ** Beaver Bock ' * to a 
depth of 12 ft. Gin. below ordinary low water having been accomplished on the 24th 
August last, I caused the caisson, barges and piling to be removed on that day u> h 
remote part of the harbor of Victoria where they are now secured. 

The expenditure on this work since it was taken over fix)m the contractor has 
amounted to $J,732.02, a very considerable portion of which has been incurred in 
renewing the tackle and repairing the plant generally. Deducting this amount from 
the balance of the contract price remaining unpaid, viz. : $5,228.15 (as appears from 
Mr. Pearse's report to you of 12th January, 1880,* the correctness of which balance 
I have no reason to doubt, although 1 am unable to verify it from any recoi-ds in this 
office that nave come to my notice) a balance of $2,496.13 is left still due upon the 
contract. 

This balance is applied for by Mr. Oppenheimer, the assignee of the late Mr. 
Spencc, the contractor. 

I shall be glad to receive your directions 88 to the payment of the balance 
remaining due upon this contract, as also as to the disposal to be made of the vessels, 
machinery and other gear used on the work, the value of which is estimated at aboal 
« 1,000.00. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. THUTGH. 
The Hon. Sir Hector L. Lanoevin, K.C.M:.G.,C.B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



ALTP]RATIONS POST OFFICE, VICTORIA. 
No. 8884. 

Victoria, B. C, 19th October, 1880. 

Sir, — I am directed by Mr. Trutch to acknowledge the receipt of your letterj 
No. 3,433 of 4th SeptembBr, and to forwai-d herewith a copy of^ Mr. Tiedemannl 
Report on the Post Office Building. ] 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

K. S. ROBBDCK, 

Secretary. 
S. Chaplkau, Esq., Secretary, 

Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



•Published in Anonal Report, 1880. Appendix 13. 



[1881J 13 



ViOTORiA, 7th August, 1880. 

SiBy — ^I have the honor to report that I have examined the Post Office building, 
and found serious omissions and faulty construction, independent of the defects of 
the front wdl, which should be made good in conjunction with the erection of the 
new front wall. 

The proposed improvements would make the building fit for Public Offices and 
(H^Tent fature repairs. 

1. The roof of the building is too flat for our rainy winters and very leaky, 
tho parapet walls forming a box to keep the casual snow in the winter. 

2. The floor in the upper story sunk in the centre about three inches throng^h 
the great weight of the chimney, haeing a very weak support. The fireplace in said 
diimDey is badly constructed, in fact dangerous for the safety of the building, 

.3. The telegraph office requires a chimney flue, and fire place 

4. The plaster work throughout the building is very bad, caused by the general 
^kiakage of the wood-work and settlements of the walls. 

5. There is no anchorage provided to bind rear and front walls together (the 
joists running parallel with said walls.) 

6. There is no ventilation provided between upper and lower story and roof. 

7. The stair is weak in its construction, consequently not very well adapted 
for public use. 

8. The direct water supply from the main is insufficient. 

9. There is a great disproportion between the two stories; the upper one is too 

10. The two conductors arc too short. 

11. A new sidewalk is required. 

12. The alterations of the latrines is kept in abeyance to the possible ohanges of 
the partition walls of the back rooms in the upper story, lo give direct communica- 
tion with such latrines. 

13. My impression is, that the foundation of the front wall is good and will be 
entirely protected by the sidewalk ; but to prevent the springing of the floor in the 
Post Office, additional brick piers with girdere placed under the joists may bo 
required. 

Hero I must remark that the present building is not erected on its proper 
street line, that the same stands 4 feet b* inches back from it. The width of Gov- 
ernment street is 7'» feet, accordingly the centre stones are placed by the City Sur- 
veyor under the supervision of the City Survey Commission. 

ESTIMATS OF THE NBW WALLS AND PROPOSED ALTERATIONS. 

Foundation is left in abeyance. 

STONEWORK. 

Plinth in granite $ 495.00 

Sandstone front 3,558.00 

$4,053.00 

BRIOKWORK. 

Bricks, cement, labor and alterations 1,686.10 

PLASTERWORK. 

3,658 yards @ 37^ cts. per yard 8l,371.'75 

Cornices 420 running feet @ 50 cts. per foot, 

and mitre 262.60 

Coves 431 running feet @ 25 cts. per foot... 107.75 

20 centre pieces @ $6.00 per piece 120.00 

1,862.00 

7—6 



W [1881] 



CAaPINTBBWOBir. 



Flooring, 15,334 feet @ $20 per M t 306.68 

Joist, raflerp, &o., 13,688 feet @ tlO per M. 136.88 

Labor, hauIiDg, &c 213.00 

Wainscotting 548.00 



JOINiaWORK. 

Inside bliDds $ 154.00 

Doors 98.00 

Windows, &c., Ac 475.00 



1,204.56 



727.00 



STAia. 

Alteration of stair 50.00 50.00 

PLUMBERWORK. 

Eoof, pipes, &c., 4c 750.00 750.00 

SIDEWALK. 

1,080 square feet @ 37^ cts. per foot 405.00 405,00 

Contingencies 500.00 500.00 

Sum total $11,237.00 

SPECIFICATION OP THE DIFFERENT ALTERATIONS. 

Boof, 

Joists 2" X 12" placed 16 in. centres, having 3 rows of cross bridging. Rafters 
2'' X 12 in. placed 32 in. centres braced and supported as shown. For the sheathing 
use the boards of the old roof. 

Skylight 4x8 feet, the frame to be made of 1 J x 2 in. white pine, having in the 
centre a ventilator of galvanized iron. The well-hole to have moulded panels. Cover 
the frame with ground glass of 21 ounces weight. 

Cistern. Make the same with 1^ in. lumber and 5x7 feet outside measurement, 
gained and countergained with white lead and well spiked together. The cistern to 
have double sides, l^ttom and top, with a space of 4 in. between. The space to be filled 
up with dry saw-dust. In order to get at the same provide and make a larger man-hole 
than the present existing one in the old roof. 

Floors. 'The ground floor to have 2" x 4" in. tongued and grooved boards. The 
upper story floor to be made of 1 x 5 t. & g. flooring, to be laid perfectly level on top 
of the old floor. AH flooring closely driven and laid in courses, joints and by wood 
neatly dressed off at the completion of the work. Every ten feet or thereabouts cat 
across the old floor a 2 in. groove or joist, as the case may be, for the circulation of 
air. Extend the partition walls in the upper story to a height of 14 feet. 

Anclwrs. Every ten feet, or thereabouts, wooden anchor-plates 2 x 4 in. to be 
lot in 6 joists dovetailed into the last and anchored into the front wall with 1^ x 2iD. 
iron bars, fastened to the top of the wooden anchor. The rear wall to have the same 
anchor, but the part passing th>*ough the wall is round having at the end screwthreads 
to receive plates and nuts. 

Alteration of stair. Extend the platform 6 feet in width and raise the same to the 
level of the window-sill, and move the lower part of the stair forward and strengthen 
the same with 3 x 8 in rough carriages, &c., &c. Fur out the closet below stair to 



ri881] 75 

die width of seven feet and make an arch aoross the passage way ; provide a 3 feet 
ash with two lights for said closet. 

Wainscotting. All rooms up and down stair to have a wainscotting level with 
the window-sills having a 2 in. cap with moulding anderneath. The panels and 
skirting to have raised moulding. The halls np and down stair to have a 5 feet wains- 
cotting made of 4 in. wide rustic and 2 in. cap with moulding. All the old sound 
skirting to be used again. Provide 3 wooden mantelpieces each not to exceed 15 
dollars. 

Masonry. 

Prepare the parapet wails for the reception of joists and rafters, make the same 
ferel with the top of the sheathing to receive the stone cappings. 

Chimney. Take down the chimney in the Indian Department Office and rebuild 
Uie same on top of the chimney in the Savings Bank Office below, with two fire 
places each having a 16 in. grate. Get it in every respect complete. In the telegraph 
office cut out of the stonewall a flue and fireplace 8 in. deep ; the fire-place to have 
a 12 in. grate, &c., in every respect complete. 

Ventilation. Cut out 4 z8 in. wide openings in the rear wall in distances of about 
10 feet apart, between the first story ceiling and second story flr>oring and for the 
roof. Provide and fix neat grating into the same. Drill holes for the reception of 
aothors. 

Plasterwork. 

Kemovo all plaster work up and down stairs. The laths to bo thoroughly cleaned 
and washed, any defective place repaired. For the new works use narrow laths. 
The Savings Bank and three front rooms upstairs to have a cornice of 36 in. girt. 
The halls and passage to have a quarter circle cornice with a moulding underneath. 
Put np 20 centre pieces (perforated) $6.00 each. All walls and ceilings to have 3 
coat work, two good coats of brown mortar throughly haired, third or finishing coat 
to be of plaster Paris, 

Flumberwork. 

Line the cistern with No. 10 zinc properly stayed and soldered. Lay on from 
the main of the City Water Works water to the cistern with a J in. supply pipe of 
galvanized iron having a ball-cock, &o., with a 2 in. overflow pipe complete. The 
supply to be taken from the cistern throughout the building, except hosebib on front 
which has to be taken direct from the main. The supply pipe to be taken under the 
ground floor up the corner behind the plaster to the roof, the pipe is then to be covered 
with a 6 in. board screwed to the battens. 

Cover the roof with the best Morfer IX Charcoal Leaded tin with standing double 
grooved seams well soldered. Provide each sheet of tin with 3 cleats well nailed to 
the roof sheathing. Extend the two conductors to the ground, the elbows reaching 
to the drain. The gutter to be made of galvanized iron, securely fastened to the 
roof. Put up 8 in. flashings around chimney stacks. For the new wall provide two 
Hin conductors, the elbows reaching to the top of the sidewalk. 

Sidewalk. 

Tbe foundation to consist of large angular stones bedded in sand firmly driven 
together. The cavities of the stones are filled up with cement concrete. The top to 
receive ^ in. thick layer of cement mixed with a small quantity of clean sharp sand. 
Leave arched passages for the gas and water pipes. 

At the request of the Post Office Inspector, J\ir. B. Wallace, I increased the size 
of the main entrance door from 4 to 6 feet in width (4 folds) which alteration neces- 
sitates a different arrangement of the upper story window. 

By making use of tne parapet walls I raised the upper story two feet, which 
addition gives better proportion and appearance to the building. 
7-6i 



M flS81] 



The steps, plinth, including window sills of the new wall are to be put up in 
granite. 

The three projections of the front wall to be faced with Newcastle sandstone 
of a bluish uniform color, or marble, laid in cement. The backing and the other parts 
of the front wall are to be erectod with haixl burnt bricks, of a dark cherry red color 
laid in cement mortar. The outer face of the two recesses to receive a half an inch 
thick coat of cement of a uniform tint. 

All the cornices, jambs to be throughout solid. 

This arrangement will secure to the building durability and lightness. 

The temporary wall, if required, is to be made of 4" x 4*' in scantling lined with 
tongued and grooved inch flooring. 

All tinwurk to receive two coats of oil paint. 

1 am, Sir, 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. 0. TIEDBMANN, Architect. 
The Hon. J. W. Teutcu, ' 

Dominion Government Agent &c., &c. 



No. 9820: 

Victoria, B. C, 19th November, 1880. 

Sib, — I beg to submit for your information copies of letters to me from the Clerk 
of the Municipal Council of Victoria and from the legal adviser of the Corporation 
respectively, in relation to the frontline of the Government lot on which the Post 
Office building stands, and of my response addressed to His Worship the Mayor, 
after due investigation of the facts, as laid before me by Mr. Tiedemann, Architect in 
charge of the alterations to the building in question, and consultation with the Legal 
Adviser of the Dominion Government hero. I have not received any acknowledg- 
ment of my letter to the Mayor, nor have I heard anything more on the subject from 
the municipal authorities. 

I have deferred reporting to you on this matter in expectation of receiving some 
further communication regarding it; but now think it adviHuble to make you 
acquainted with the facts above stated, without further delay. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. 
Hon. Hector L. Lanoevin, C.B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 

City Hall, Victorla, B.C., 18th October, 1880. 

Sir, — I am directed by His Worship the Mayor to inform you that the contrac- 
tors for the work on the Post Office building are encroaching upon the line of Govern- 
ment street, in this city, and to request, that, you cause the woik to be stopped at 
once, in order to prevent litigation in the matter. 

Under Section 5 of the Act entitled *' City of Victoria Official Map Act, 1880 " 
the Corporation are in a position to give you the proper line of the street, and will 
do so on your application to that effect. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOS. RUSSELL. 
Hon. Joseph W. Trutch, 

Dominion Crovernment Agent. 



[1881J n 



Victoria, 22nd October, 1880. 

Sm,— I am instructed by the Corporation of the (Jity of Yietoria to call tlie 
atl6Dtionof the Government, through you, to the fact that the foundation of the 
Pbst Office building now in course of erection, is being so constructed as to extend 
the edifice beyond the line of the other buildings, and several feet into Government 
street the principal highway of the city. 

Notice of the enci*oachment has been given by the Corporation, but the architect 
and bnildcrs notwithstanding persist in the course complained of, the former asserting 
that the limits of the Government allotments are not being transcended, but that the 
street lines are wrong and trespass upon the Government lots. 

Be that as it may the present lines are those by which all other buildings have 
been erected, and are regulated by statute; and if for the sake of uniformity only, the 
Corporation consider that the Post Office should be confined to the same line as the 
other buildings, and that a lasting impediment shniuld not be allowed to be placed in 
a leading thoroughfare, simply because it is contended that through a mistake there 
existed a right to so obstruct the same. 

But the contention of the architect is far from correct, the fact being that the 
boilding in question is being projected many feet beyond the limits of the Govern- 
ment property ; and the Corporation is not prepared to jwimit, even if a survey 
§hoald prove the Unas to be wrong, and the Government lots extend into the street, 
that the Crown would thereby have any right to deprive the public of any portion of 
a highway prescribed and dedicated to their use. 

The Corporation strongly protests against the invasion of public rights to which 
I have drawn your attention. Every facility for an adjustment will be afforded by 
the Corporation, and I have to request that you will cause work to bo *»topped ponding 
soeh adjustment. 

Your obedient servant, 

THEODOIU'] DAVIE. 
Hon. J. W. Trutch, 

Agent General, Dominion Government. 



Victoria, B.C., 23rd October, 1880. 

Sir, — Upon the question of representation conveyed in a letter addressed to me 
on the 18th instant by Mr. Thomas Euseell, under Your Worship's direction, to the 
effect that the contractors for the Post Office building are encroaching upon the line 
of Government street, I beg to state that I have referred Mr, Kusseirs letter, together 
with a communication on the same subject subsequently received by me from Mr. 
Theodore Davie, to the leg'al adviser of the Dominion Government in this Province, 
and have also conferred thereupon with Mr. H. O. Tiedemann the architect in charge 
of the alterations of the Post Office building now under contract. 

I have the honor to inform you in reply to your representations on this matter 
that I am advised — 

1st. That the front wall of the Post Office building is now being erected 
identically on the same line at its springing from the level of the sidewalk as that of 
the front wall of the Post Office building which Ijas lately been taken down. 

2nd. That this front line of the building now being erected is four (4) feet 
within the front line of the lot belonging to the Dominion Government originally 
laid out as the Official plan of Victoria, and staked out upon the ground by the then 
Surveyor General Mr. Pemberton — that is to say, that it is four feet further westward 
from the centre line of Government street. 

3rd, That the front wall of the old wooden Post Office building stood upon this 
front line of the lot as originally la 11 out on the official map of Victoria and staked 
out on the ground, that is to say, the front wall of the old Post Office building was 



t8 [1881] 

foar (4) feet nearer the oentre of Grovernment street than the front wall of the Poet 
Office building now being erected is. 

4th. That the front wall of the Post Office bailding now beiog erected stands 
exactly on a direct straight line drawn between the corner of the British Colambia 
Bank bailding at the northwest corner of Bastion street and Government street, and 
the comer of the Adelphi Saloon bailding at the southwest corner of Yates street and 
Government street. 

5th. But is tour (4) feet inside of, -that is to say, further from the centre of 
Government street than, — a direct straight line drawn between the comer of 
Rickman's store at the northwest corner of Fort street, and Government street and 
the corner of Jeffrey's building at northwest corner of Yates street and Government 
street. 

6th. And iurther, that the Dominion have the right to occupy and use this groand, 
should they desire to do so (which, as I am advised, they do not) to the full extent of 
the lot on Government street owned by them, viz. : —to the extent of four (4) feet 
nearer the centre of Government street than the line of the front wall of the Post 
Office building now being erected thereon. 



I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



J. W. TRDTCH. 



His Worship 

J. H. TURNBB, 

Mayor of Victoria. 



[1881] ^ 



APPENDIX No. 7. 

SLIDE, BOOMS, &c.— SAGUENAY DISTEICT. 



So. 19713. 

Chikf Engineer's Office, 

Ottawa, 16th December, 1881. 

Sib, — Herewith I traDsmit a report by Mr. Bosa on the works, &o., performed 
in cooDezion with the slide, &c., at Lake St. John, Biver Saguenay, daring the fiscal 
year ended 30th June, 1881. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY F. PERLEY, 

Chief Engineer. 
P. H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Pablic Works Department. 



Quebec, 1st December, 1881. 

SiB, — J have the honor to transmit the following report on the works, etc., 
performed in connection with the slide, etc., at Lake St John, Biver Sagaenay, 
during the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1881. 

570 feet of slide have been rebuilt 

150 feet of boom, 28 inches in width and 10 inches in thickness, with iron bolts, 
chains, &c. 

Repairs were made to the slide for a length of 4,390 feet ; and also to the bulk- 
head of the slide and to the adjacent dam, No. 7. 

In mv report for the fiscal year 1879-80, 1 asked $6,500 to rebuild 1,000 feet of 
slide, and $2,500 for repairs remaining to be made to the portion of the slide ; 
moreover, $3,500 to rebuilt the bulkhead and the dam No. 7. These last two sums 
not having been granted, we were obliged to take from the $G,500 authorized an 
amount stmcient to make the iudispensible repairs to the slide, and to strengthen the 
bulkhead and dam No. 7, which would have been carried away. 

The repairs having cost $3,141, only $3,359 was left to rebuilt a portion of the 
slide. 

The expenditure on the different works made during the fiscal year 1880-81, is 
ae follows : 



80 [1881] 

t 

To rebuild 570 feet of slide (about $6 per foot) $3,331 00 

For repairs on 4,390 feet of tbe oldslide 2,982 00 

To makiug 150 feet of boom, 28 inches in width and 10 

inches in thickness, with iron bolts, chains, &c Ill 69 

For repairs to and strcnthoning of the bulkhead, and to 

dam No. 1 47 00 

«6,4'n 69 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant 

JOSEPH EOS A. 

HeNRT F. PlRLBT, Esq., 

Chief Engineer, Department Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



[1881] . 81 



APPENDIX No. a 

SLIDES AND BOOMS— ST. MAURICE DISTRICT. 



No. 15702. 

Office of the SaPBRiNTENDENT, 

St. Maurice Works, 

Three Rivers, 24th July, 1881. 

Sib,— I have the honor to submit, for the information of the Minister of Publio 
Works, my report on the works placed under my superintendence, for the year ended 
30th Jnne last; r , / 

The water was so low last spring in the River St. Maurice and its tributaries,, 
tiiat the floating of timber was enected with great difficulty. Not more than sixty 
tbonsand (60,000) logs reached their destination in due season ; ail the rest lie scat- 
tered along the river, and a considerable amount of labor will be required to float 
them again and bring them to their destination in the course of the summer. Some 
300,000 logs were made last winter. 

The cost of the staff and the expenditure for carrying on the works for the past 
year amounted to $14,669.14. 

With a view to repairing as far as possible the injuries done to the slides, booms, 
piers, 4c., &c., by use or accidents, a sum of $5,481.14 was placed at my disposal for 
that purpose. 

The repairs effected at the various stations were as follows : — 

Station No. 1. Mouth op the St. Maurice. 

Bemoved 4,500 yds. of earth from the channel between the islands of St. Chris- 
tophe and Caron. 

4,182 feet of boom, 5 feet wide, platikod with 3-inch deals. 
700 feet of boom, 6 feet wide, planked with 3-inch deals. 
Raising pier No. 12, 12 feet. 
30,15 '* 
** mooring pier 8 feet. 

Station No. 2. Cap aux Corneilles. 

Baising pier No. 18. 
Placing 2 posts in pier No. 12. 
" 2 ** '' No. 13. 

2 ** " No. 15. 

Station No. 3. Shaweneoan 

Oris Falls. 
Bepairing the Booms. 

Shawenegan Bay, 

4 piers 11x11x15 feet on the shoals. 
162 feet of boom 12 x 13 inches. 



«2 [1881] 



Patting 16 yards of stone into the wharf on which the house is built, 
fiepainng the wharf at Grand Bemous. 
Placing platforms on piers Nos. 3 and 5. 

Above ShawcMgan Falls. 

Flooring 99 feet of slide in birch of 5 x 12 inches, 
liaising a pier above the falls 12 feet, 
fiepairing the great dam at the head of the falls. 
300 feet of new boom 4 feet wide. 
73 feet of new boom 12 x 13 inches. 

Station No. 4. GaAND-MiRE. 

800 feet of new boom 4 feet in width. 

All this work has been effected for $5,197.82, leaving a balance of $283.32 
remaining from the grant. 

The slides and booms have suffered from no serious accident during the past 
spring's season. 

Respectfully submitting the above, 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

CHARLES LAJOIE, 
Superintendent 8t. Maurice Works. 
F. H. Ennis, Esq,, Secretary, 

Department of Pablic Works, 
Ottawa. 



[1881] 88 



APPENDIX No. 9. 



SLIDES AND BOOMS— OTTAWA DISTRICT. 

No. 17878. 

Ottawa, 30th July, 1881. 

Sir,— I havo the honor to submit the following Report on the state of the works 
under ray charge, on the Ottawa River and its tributaries, for the fiscal year ended 
30th Jane last. 

Daring the season of 1880 the pitch of water had been at a fair average height 
for ranniDg timber, and the rivers kept well up until late in the Fall, so that little 
difficolty was experienced in getting logs to the mills and square timber to market, 
tzoept in some isolated cases where it was deemed advisable to lay up arrivals from 
the more remote limits, instead of forcing the drives and incurring unnecessary 
expense in endeavoring to pass the lower stations when the water had reached its 
lowest stage. 

After the slides and booms had been closed, a thorough examination of the 
works was made and certain foundations repaired, which could only be reached when 
the waters had subsided ; and the following repairs were executed during the winter 
of 1880-81 and early spring months. 

ON THE OTTAWA MAIN BIVER. 

The slide bottoms and booms at the Cfiaudiere and HuU stations, were extensively 
repaired and strengthened, and new stop-logs provided where required, and the slide- 
master's house repaired and painted. The wood work and cables of the Union 
^spension Bridge were scraped and received two coats of paint ; the i*oadway 
tpproacbes repaired and macadamized and the Toll house overhauled by painting 
cUtting, &c. 

At Rocher Capitaine^ the uppermost station on the Ottawa, the piers and booms 
▼faich had been considerably damaged by the high water in spring, were partially 
lebnilt and certain boulders removed from the foot of the slide channel. 

At the Chats slide, certain portions of the pine and hardwood planking bad to be 
reaewed, and worn out side timbers in the piers and booms replaced by substituting 
new materials. 

At the Chenaux Station, the booms which at times are greatly strained by a 
pressure of logs during high water, had to be strengthened by placing additional 
linchor piers with buoys, while the floating platform was added to and improved. 

At the Calumet Station, where the works are subjected to great wear and tear by 
the passage of logs and timber through intricate channels, the foundations had to be 
^strengthened by additional stone-filling, and the booms and side piers had a lining of 
timber and plank inserted to make good the worn out parts. 

At the Mountain Station where the friction of passing cribs had been the means 
of catting into the side piers of the slide, a large quantity of debris had to be removed 
which was replaced by timber and plank properly spiked and bolted and carefully 
atone-filied. The head works also received attention, and the stop-logs and hoisting 
apparatus were put in an efficient state. 

At the Joachim sUde, the planking and its bearings had to be adjusted and the 
damaged materials replaced by new white pine ; it was also necessary to load the side 
piers of the slide with extra stone filling and to face up the exposed portions of the 
works that had been weakened by heavy traffic for a term of years. 



84 [1881] 

At Portage da Fort slide, the guide boom at the head had become unserviceable ; 
it was originally of three ply timbers bolted and covered with plonk on top, and its 
renewal was a matter of necessity. 

The following repairs were executed on the 

TRIBUTARIES OF THE OTTAWA. 

Duvioine River. — The long slide at High Falls was partially replanked and iho 
foundations of the side piers under-pinned, and straightened, and the dams at Kyan'e 
Chutes, Nos. 1 and 2, carefully stanched, repaired and made secure. 

Petewawa River, — The slide at Bois dur Station was repaired, and had its side 
piers well braced up. The boom piere at the mouth of the stream which had been 
considerably wrecked by constant use for 2*J years, were extensively repaired and 
strengthened— as were also the works on the upper reaches of the Petewaw;^ 
extending from Crooked Chute to Cedar Lake, upwards of thirty miles, where danw 
were stanched, booms added to and strengthened and piers topped and stone-filled. 

South Nation River, — ^The pier above the bulkhead of the slide, which had been 
damaged by the shoving of ice was re-topped and straightened, and the two-ply guido 
boom at the head put in working order. 

Gatineau River, — The pier of the bridge over the upper or new canal, where it 
had been undermined, was supported by the insertion of cedar timbers and stone 
filling ; and two anchor piers and a float had to be supplied for the working of tho 
booms. 

Madawaska River, — At Bagged Chute, the easterly side of the river and the 
channel for the passage of timber were deepened and widened by the excavation oi 
rock from the river bed and a portion of the necessary side dams commenced ; these 
will be pushed on towards completion when the water falls, to be in readiness for next 
season's work. 

The Arnprior slide piers and the booms at the mouth of the river had to bo 
strengthened by placing white pine timber and hardwood planking in these structurcdi, 
where symptoms of weakness occasioned by decay and ordinary wear, had manifested 
themselves. The side or wing dams at Bailey's Chute were repaired in their substruc- 
tures and covering plank provided where found necessary. 

Couhnge River,— ^h^ High Falls slide during the month of May, 1880, wa* 
seriously damaged by a large break in the works; temporary repaira were executed 
at that time, and last winter the gap was closed by rebuilding about 200 feet in length 
of the Hlide from the foundations where the superstructure was upwards of 40 feet high. 

Black River, — The slide here, from its abrupt pitch at the lower end, causes tbo 
water tox)as8 with great velocity, consequently timber and saw logs are shot through 
with 8UCU force as to wear into and dig out the hardwood shingling forming the 
bottom, in a comparatively short time. A very considerable quantity of this had to be 
renewed. White pine timber and planking had to be used to put in proper order the 
entrance guido boom, while chains to keep in position the supfiort staj's of the timbers 
at the gaps, had to be provided. 

TnB WORKS CHAROEABLE TO CONSTRUCTION COnsistcd of : — 

At the Gatineau Station : A fence built between the Government lands, near the 
Pond, and the ]»roperty of theOblats Fathers, adjoining. 

Riviire du Lievre, — Certain reefs and boulders blasted and removed from the bed 
of the stream at Little and Long Eapids, with the view of improving the navigation 
for boats and barges. This work was vigorously carried on until the Fall rains 
raised the river to flood height, when operations had to be suspended until next season 
of low water. 

The breaking up of the ice on the upper streams took place at rather a later 
date than usual, so that the raftsmen were somewhat delayed in starting their 
"drives" last spring; and as the freshet w,as a gradual one without excessive local 
rains to aid in filling the creeks, it was with some difficulty that timber and logs could 



[18811 85 



be floated down the tributaries, and I am glad to say that the works under my charge 
received no greater damage than had been anticipated and which may be expected 
more or less every spring. At some of the lower stations, a good deal of inconve- 
nieocewas experienced from bodies of driftwood lodging on the slide aprons and in 
the entrance channel and outlets. Such debris, consisting of roots and trunks of trees 
^, frequently after high water, acoumulates in the lumbermen's retaining booms^ 
and, on being sent adrill by their employees in largo quantities at a time, it is with 
difficQlty that the slide men and their assistants can keep the timber channels unob- 
stracted on such occasions. 

As the upper Ottawa country which was formerly a dense forest, becomes cleared 
tbroQgh the operations of the lumbermen and settlers and the ravages of bush fires, 
there is gradually an earlier breaking up of the ice and melting of the snow in 
spriog; and one of the consequences is that the rivers and streams more rapidly 
attain flood height, and after draining the surplus water subside as suddenly as they 
had risen. The slide works on the Ottawa were designed, for the most part, about 
30 or 40 years ago, when a different state of things existed — the timber then being 
boated in such a manner as to keep well up with the floods — but, now that the lower 
limits have been pretty much stripped of the bulk of the most valuable timber, 
supplies have largely to be drawn from the remote berths at the head waters of the 
Temificamingue and Kippewa regions. Timber from these quarters arrives at the 
lower stations when the water is very low and often cannot reach market until the 
following season. I am of opinion that this difficulty miffht in some measure be over- 
come by the construction of^ retaining or reservoir dams oelow Lake Temiscamingue, 
with the view of keeping back and having under control portions of the north west 
waters, which could oe discharged later in the season, at such times as would be most 
beneficial to the lumbermen driving and sweeping the river, which they can only 
accomplish under existing circumstances at great expense, if at all, when the 
water has reached its lowest stages. 

I am glad to say that the depression affecting the lumber trade has all but passed 
over, and business activity characterizes the staple trade of the Ottawa Valley in all 
it^ branches. The manufacture of square timber and the out put of saw logs next 
winter, are likely to be conducted on an extensive scale and promise the best results 
to all cngogedin these indastrial pursuits. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

GEO. P. BROPHY, 
Superintendent 0. R. Works. 
F. H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



86 



[1881] 



Statimknt of Expenditure for Bepairs and Construction of Works on the 


Name of 


Work. 


Province. 


County. 


Ohaudiere slide 


Ontario 


Carleton (City of Ottawa; 
do 


Ghata do 


do 


Jo&chim do «• ..............•«....»•»• 


Quebec 


Pontiac 


High Falls slidOi Dutnoine River 


do 


do 


Rocher Capitaine, Chenaux, Chaudicre and Calu- 
met slides and booms and Union Susp. bridge.... 

Bois Dur slide, Petewawa River 


Ontario and Quebec 

Ontario .t 


Pontiac, Renfrew, S.R., 

Carleton and Ottawa.., 

Renfrew. N.R 


Slide near Plantaffcnet. South Nation River 


do 


Prescott , 


Canal bridsre nicr. Gatineau River 


Quebec 


Ottawa 


Slide master's bonsei Chaudiere Station 


Ontario 


Carleton (City of OtUwa] 
Renfrew. S.R j 


RafiTisred Chute. Madawaska River 


do 


Soutn Chaudiere slide. Ottawa River 


do 


Carleton (City of OtUwal 
Pontiac 


Bigh Falls slide, Coulonge River.... 

Anchor niers and float. Gatineau River 


Quebec 


do 


Ottawa ] 


Boom and niers at mouth of Petewawa River 


Ontario 


Renfrew. N.R J 


Ottawa and Petewawa River works 


Ontario and Quebec 

Ontario 


Pontiac & Renfrew. N R 


Works from Crooked Chute to Cedar Lake, Petew.'wa 
MnnntRin slide Ottawa River......... 


Renfrew. N.R - .J 


Quebec 


PoDtlftC -J 


Joachim slide and Chenaux boom, Ottawa River 

Portacre do Port slide. Ottawa River 


Quebec and Ontario 

Ontario 


Pontiac & Renfrew, S.R 
Renfrew. N R 


Arnnrior slide Madawaska River 


do 


Renfrew S R 


Hiffh Palls slide. Black River 


Quebec 


Pontiac 


Unoer Petewawa River works .... 


Ontario 


Renfrew. N.R 


BaAv's Chute dams, etc . Madawaska River.. 


do 


Renfrew. S R 


Boom near Plantagenet, South Nation River 

Slide and dams. Dumoine River 


do 


Prescott 


Quebec 


Pontiac 


Union Susnension Bridflre annroaches 


Quebec and Ontario 

Quebec 


Ottawa and Carleton . 


Fence near Pond at boom, Gatineau River 


Ottawa; 


Improvement of navigation of River du Li^vre 

Total 


do 


do 













Ottawa, 30tb July, 1881. 



[1881] 



8T- 



Otttwi Siver and tributaries for the fiscal year ended 30th Jnne 1881. 



expenditure. 


Expenditure 
authorized. 


Expenditure or 
LUbUities in- 
curred from 30th 
Jnne 1880, to 
l8t July 1881. 


Amount 

required on 

let July 1881, 

for completion. 


Remarks. 


5iiiber. 


Date. 




9th June 1879.... 


$ Ct8. 

12,500 00 

12,600 00 

334 00 

65 00 

4300 00 


$ Ct0. 

r 31 79 

37 60 

28 92 

114 00 

1,153 93 

286 09 

27 33 

[ 40 29 

r 49 95 

1,593 61 
443 37 

2,427 10 
265 25 
678 04 
177 10 

1.703 95 

670 40 

553 33 

160 72 

158 93 

382 85 

183 14 

116 06 

94 86 

t 1,013 46 

333 77 

55 84 

3,559 10 


$ cto 


Repairs. 










do 


49,S99 




do 
do 


j 




do 




10th Nov. 1880... 

17th July 1880... 
2l8t August 1880 
17th Sept. 1880.. 




do 
do 






do 






do 






do 






do 






do 
do 






do 
do 


4,479 




do 







do 




do 


' 


do 


* 


do 




do 
do 




do 






do 


2»632 




do 


3,187 
3,791 




Construction. 




do 








16,340 68 

















D. SCOTT, 
Accountant, 0. R. Works. 



88 [1881] 



APPENDIX No. 10. 



REPORT ON TELEGRAPH LINES AND SIGNAL SERVICE. 
No. 10267. 

TELXaBAPH AND SlQNAL SEaVICK, 

Ottawa, 30th Novembar, 1881. 
Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report upon the above service:— 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Since let January, 1881, the Government have been in possession of the 430 
miles of land lines and 16 knots of submarine cable purchased from the Western 
Union Telegraph Ck)mpany tor the sum of S24,000. 

The economical result of the above purchase and of the working arrangements 
entered into with the Company has been an important one. 

In the first place, the Grovcrnmcnt have been relieved from the payment of 
$4,000 per annum subsidy to the Company, and also from an annual expenditure 
of $2,500 for the maintenance of the land line through Washington Territory, 
between Seattle and the boundary line of British Columbia near Matsqui, plits the 
great cost of repairing and renewing the six submarine cables upon the abandoned 
route vi'd San Juan li^land; equivalent to $6,000 per annum. 

Secondly, the Western Union Telegraph Company now pay to the Government a 
subsidy of $1,200 for services rendered at the New Westminster repeating station, 
and the Government have furthermore acquired the total revenue collected on account 
of Victoria Station, its present value being about $6,000 per annum. 

Thiixlly, both the Government and the public have benefited by a considerable 
reduction in tariff rates upon messages ; the total saving to the country, trom such 
course, being not less than $5,000 per annum in addition to the economies already 
enumerated. 

During the fiscal year the land lines between Victoria and Nanaimo, 72 miles, and 
between Yale and Hamilton's 250 miles, have been thoroughly repaired, and much 
adjacent brush and timber cut down. New land lines have been erected between 
Nanaimo and Departure Bay, 3^ miles ; between Nanaimo, Yaldes Island, 
Point Grey and New Westminster, 42 miles ; and a second wire has been placed upon 
the poles between New Westminster and Matsqui, 36 miles. New cables have also 
been laid between Nanaimo and Giibriola Island, 1 knot ; between Yaldes Island and 
Point Grey, 20 knots ; with two cables across the Fraser River, each being nearly J a 
knot in length. 

.Furthermore, the old cables upon the San Juan Island route have been raised, 
repaired and stored in a new tank-house, and the cable barge, " Electron " has been 
built and fitted with adeauate machinery for the service. 

The revenue has also increased more than three fold since the service was 
reorganized, and the lines put in order, viz : from $5,320 during '78-79 to 
probably $18,000 to $20,000, for '81-82, at the same time the annual cost of main- 
tenance has been greatly reduced. 

The total mileage of land lines and cables in British Columbia is now about 676 
miles, plus 36 miles of duplicate linew-ire. 



[1881] 89 

Crulf of St, Lawrence. 

The sobmarine cables between Aniicosti and the coast of Gasp^, and between the 
Magdalen ItilandA and Cape Breton, have worked satisfactorily and without inter- 
ruption eince they wore submerged during October, IbSO. The Bii-d Kock cable has 
been three times damaged and twice repaired close in shore at the Bird Rock j but 
spare 50 yard sections of very heavy cable, weighing 24 tons to the mile, have 
siiM^e been provided for repairing purposes, and it is anticipated that when pat in order 
next spring, communication can be satisfactorily maintained with that very impor- 
tant lighl-house station. 

Dnnng the present year the land lines upon the Island of Antieosti, 214 miles in 
length, have been completed and are now in successful operation. The land lines upon 
the Magdalen Islands, 84 miles in length, plus a new line and shoi*t cable 9 miles in 
length between Etang-duNord Village and House Harbor have also been operated. 

The cost of the foregoing land lines, complete with instrumentn and in working 
wxier, has been : — 

Upon Anticosti about $165 per mile. 
" Magdalens •' 130 " 
and the cost of the cables laid, about $1,100 per knot. 

The whole of the above work has been accomplished at \ lens cost than the 
original estimate. 

Nova Scotia. 

The land line between Canso and Dartmouth, near Halifax, 208 miles, and between 
Low Point and Lin^an, Cape Breton, 5 miles, has been operated, and a now line 126 
miles in length between North Sydney and Meat Cove vid Baddeck, Cape Breton, in 
eonnection with the Magdalen Island system, has been constructed and operated ; the 
Bubmarine cable under Big Bras D*Or entrance working uninterruptedly. 

North Shore y River St. Lawrence. 

Land lines have been constructed between Bay St. Paul and Chicoutimi, 92 miles, 
and between Murray Bay and Mille Vaches, 84 miles, the River Saguenay having been 
croeeed by means of a novel submarine cable, 1 knot in length. .This cable is armoured 
with 12 No. 16 wires of phosphor bronze, the first manufactured from this durable 
material. . 

Bay^of Fundy, 

The submarine cable between Grand Manan and Campobello was intentionally 
cot, prohably by some vessers crew whose anchor had fouled it, one mile from shore, 
and the cable between Campobello and Kastport was also damaged from rapid corro- 
don where the outer wires had apparently been in contact with small seams of 
copper in the rocky bottom of the strait. Both were repaired and the Island land 
lin^, 24 miles in length, having been erected, the whole are now in successful ope- 
ration. 

Signal Service. 

A pair of simple semaphores have been erected (at about one third of the cost of 
the less effective arm semaphores now in use upon the coasts of France,) upon the 
Brandy Pots Island and at Ilividre du Loup, River St. Lawrence. These signals are 
distinctly visible at a distance of from 7 to 8 nautical miles and have thus solved 
the problem of communication between the light-houses upon the Islands on the 
East Coast of Nova Scotia and the Tolegmpb Stations established between Canso and 
Halifax, for ship signalling purposes. Meanwhile flag code signals have been sup- 
plied to twenty stations near the River and Gulf of St. Lawrence. 
7—7 



W [1881] 



Telephones 

Still await perfection of recent improvements and the necessary grant of money 
for their adoption throughout the public service. 

In conclusion I have the honour herewith to submit maps and plans with a snp- 
plemenlary report in detail of all important matters connected with the service. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by 

Your most obedient servant, 

F. N. GISBORNB, 

Superintendent. 
To the Honorable 

The Minister of Public Works. 



HISTORICAL. 
The Grulf of St Lawrence. 

During the Parliamentary Session of 18T9, a grant of $15,000 per annum was 
TOted for the purpose of establi.shing telegraphic connection with the Island of 
Anticosti and the Magdalen Islands and Bird Rock. Such grant was, however, found 
to be insufficient to induce any company to undertake to lay, construct and maintain 
the submarine cables and land lines necessary for the service; but during the 
session of 1880, the above grant was capitalized by a vote of $200,000, for construction 
only. A contract was then entered into with the *' India Rubber, Gutta Percha and 
Telegraph Works Company, Limited " of London, England, to furnish and lay the 
cables, between the coast of Gaspe and Anticosti, between Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, 
and the Magdalen Islands and between Grosse He and the Bird Rock, Magdalen 
Islands. 

These cables were duly laid under the superintendence of Mr. F. N. Gisborne, 
during October, 1880, and the land lines were completed under a contract entered into 
with Messrs. Bertrand & Kennedy, Province of Quebec, during October 1881. 

The total cost of the above service, includ'ng the unanticipated construction of 
a land line through Cape Breton, at an expense of $14,465, and also including the 
cost of fitting up the SS. "Newtield" with tanks and cable-laying machinery at a 
<50st of $20,000, ;?/w5 $15;000 paid to the Department of Marine and Fisheries for 
the use of said vessel, and about $5,000 for general expenses, is $196,875. 

Bay of Fundy. 

The submarine cables between Grand Manan and Campobello and between the 
latter Island and Eastport, State of Maine, were also charged to the aforesaid grant 
of $200,000. Their cost, iDcluding the land line connections, being $12,925. 

ThoE^e cnblo« were laid by Mr» F. N. Gisborne, dui*ing November 1880. Mr. T. 
M« HubiuHon, of Bt, John, N«B., being the contractor for the land lines. 

Cape Breton. 

The '' Anglo American Cable Company " which owns exclusive privileges for 
landing cable on Prince Edwaid Island, naving refused to permit the landing of the 
Magdalen Jdand Cable, on Prince Edward Island, unless the Government wonW 
acknowledge their monopoly, it necessitated the adoption of the Cape Breton route. 
This land line was therefore erected for the Govemment at cost price, by the. 
Dominion Toiogruph Company, and was completed dnring'January, 1881, at an outlay 
«f|].%915. 



ri88i] «i 



The North Share of the St. Latorence, 

The Government, havini^ determined to connect Quebec with the entrance to 
the Straito of Belle I^le, finally en ered into a contract with the Montreal Telegraph 
Company to extend their lines eastward from Murray Bay, (with a branch between 
Bay St. raul and Chicoutimi) to Mille Vachos, during the year 1881, with a view to 
its gradual prolongation eastward as hereafter determined upon by Parliament. Tho 
foregoing section was completed by the submergence of a nubmarine cable armored 
with phosphor bronze wires, (the first so consiructed) by Mr. F. N. Gisborne, 24tU 
Nov., 1K81, the total cost to date being $25,130. 

Alt antic coast. 

By a cash payment of $16,000, to the Dominion Telegraph Company, they con- 
structed and agreed U) maintain, a ^hore route telegraph line 208 miles in length 
between Canso and Halifax. This lino was erected in connection with the signal 
stations to be establi.-^hed upon the adjacent Islands, and upon which light-houses have 
been erected b}' the Department of M.arine aiid Fi^herie^. 

N.B. Tho Montreal Telcifraph (Company received a similar sum for erecting the 
€oast telegraph lines of Ga^p^ in connection with the signal service. 

British Columbia. 

Accordini;: to the terms of Co nfeJ oration, in 1872 the Dominion Government 
^eed to maintain ihe syc^tem of telegraphy then in exij-tence within the Province of 
Britihh Columbia. The Local Government had previou-ly leased the lines constructed 
between thobonndai y hue near Matisqui toNew West minster and also to (^uesnelle, from 
the Western Utiion 'lelograph Company, the terms being: — 1st. That the Local Gov- 
ernment should cifcHtivcly maintain and operate the land lines and also ^he 16 miles of 
submarine cables beweon Vancouver Island and Washington Territory vid St. Juan 
Island; 2ndly. That the Local Government bhould maintain and operate the land lines 
between the La Connor and the boundary line near Malsqui, through Washington 
Territory ; 3rdly. That the Wentern Ut»ion Telegiaph Company should operate and be 
entitled to the recei[>tsof the Victoria Telegraph Station, and finally, that the Govern- 
ment should pay tho company a subsidy of $4,000 per annum. 

During tho latter part of 1879, Mr. Gisborne was sent to British Columbia, for 
the purpose of reorganizing the service and to negotiate terras with the company for 
anew agreement tho result being, that at the close of 1880, the Government pur 
chased the Company's telegraph system in British Columbia, for the sum of $24,000 
and otherwise etfecled economies equivalent to the sum of over $25,000 per annum. 

Miscellaneous. 

1, A short line of telegraph has been erected, 5 miles in length, between the 
signal station at Low Point and Lingan, Cape Breton, at a cost of $562. 

2. Another short line (14 miles) between the lighthouse and signal station at 
Cape Ray and Port-au Basque, Newfoundland, is to be erected by the Anglo-American 
Cable Company to whom the Government are to pay $250 per annum in compensa- 
tion for construction and maintenance. 

Signal Service. 

Signal stations have been established at the light-houses upon the aouth shore 
of the St. Lawrence, Anticosti and the Magdalen Islands, Province of Quebec, and 
Ca|)e Breton, Province of Nova Scotia, at a cost of about $3,000; and Semaphores, 
the invention of Mr. Gisborne, have been erected at Kiviere-du-Loup and the Brandy 
Pots Island at a cost of about $1,800. These signals being clearly visible at ten miles 
distance renders it easy, and at small cost, to place the light-house signal stations 
upon outlying Islands, in communication with the telegraph offices already established 
Qpon the coast of Canada. 
7— 7J 



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[1881] 



SIGNAL SERVICE, 




2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22: 

23 
24 
26 



L'Islet 

Rivi6re da Loup 

Brandy Pols 

Rimouski , 

Father Point Lighthouse 

Little Metis Lighthouse 

Matane Lighthouse 

CapeChatte Lighthouse 

Martin River Lifl^hthouse 

Cape Magdalen Lighthouse 

Fame Point Lighthouse 

Cape Rosier Lighthouse 

Cape Despair Lighthouse 

Pointe Maquereau Lighthouse '. 

West Point Lighthouse 

South West Point Lighthouse 

South Point Lighthouse 

Heath Point Lighthouse, East end of. 

Amherst Island Lighthouse 

Grosse Isle 

Bird Rocks Lighthouse 

Meat CoTe, near Cape St. Lawrence, the 
Landing place of Magd'n Islands cable 

Low Point Lighthouse , 

Cape Ray Lighthouse 

Pomte Lepreaux • 



Flags 

Semaphore.. 

do 
Flags 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

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do 





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below 


Location. 


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approxi- 




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43 


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do 


413 



do 
Magdalen Islands, 
do 
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Cape Breton 

do 

Newfoundland .. 
New Brunswick. 



4» 

480 

551 



The International Code of Signals is in use at the above stations. 

Cost of construction $4,000 00 

Cost of maintenance, including fishery r p^.,;^^ ;„ t?'„»:.«„*^o 

bulletins and telegrams 5,000 00 | ^XTss. ^^^'°^^ 



RECAPITULATION. 

Total length of land lines in operation .... l,769j statute miles. I f„^i.,j:„„Ji4^;i^„«ri.^j 

do lo 13 submarine cables 15^ nautical - I ^"nl«°£l fn £f^^^ 

do cost value of the 8 systems $362^650 00 \ if 1^2 MO 7™ t 

do do of annual maintenance, about. 48.000 00 aLr^JH.^^ accoani 

do amount of revenue, about 22,255 00 J 8»gna* service. 

N.B.— The total deficit for the whole service, viz., 125,745 for 1881-82, will be about ong-ha4f o(iht 
nett deficit for British Columbia alone during 1878-79: the names of passing vessels, fishery bulletini 
and meteorological reports being transmitted free of charge over Government lines. * 

F. N. GISBORNE, 
30th November, 1881. Superintendent. 

P.S.— For my report upon the Telegranh and Signal Service of Manitoba and the North West 
Territory, vide Department of Railways and Canals. 

F. N G. 



LI 881] 106 



APPENDIX No. II. 



LETTER FROM THE MONTREAL BOARD OP TRADE ON THE GULP 
TELEGRAPHIC SYSTEM. 



Ko. 19372. 

Office Board of Tbade, 

Montreal, 2od December, 1S81. 

SiR,^SiDco the close of the shippinc^ seasoD, the Council of this Board has had its 
attention drawn to a number of particulars which afford further proof of the value of 
the extension of the Teleginphic system to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Islands, 
inasmach as the scheme heiufr carried out by the Grovernment has already Jed to the 
eavingoflive and property by making it possible to render immediate (usistance to 
etranded or wrecked vessels. The importance of the project has, moreover, been 
made doubly valuable, inasmuch as by its instrumentality, efficient aid and succour 
was rendered very recently to distressed and famishing people on the Island of Anti- 
«06tj. There can hardly be a doubt but that the weather and fishery bulletins which 
bave been i-wued during a considerable part of the past sotison, have been of great 
^mcQ to the Gulf fishing interests of Canada. 

The Council has watched with a great deal of interest, the progress that has 
i»cen made from year to year since the project was initiated ; and I am very respect- 
Tally to communicate to you its earnest hope that the work of extension will continue 
to be vigorously prosecuted, and especially that the North Shore Line may be conti- 
Doed to the eastward and along the straits of Belle Isle to Point Amour in Forteau 
Bay, for the substantial reason that such an extension would prepare the way for 
establishing a calling station during the season of navigation for steamships coming 
to. or goinff from, the St. Lawrence River. 

I am therefore desired to sollicit your consideration of what is herein submitted, 
and your decision in favor of the groat maritime interest that would be promoted 
thereby. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

WM. J. PATTERSON, 

Secretary. 

Hon. Sir Hector L. Lanoevin, K.C.M.G., C.B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa.' 



?-8 



106 [1881] 



APPENDIX No. 12 



LETTEES FEOM HON. P. FORTIN, M.P., ON THE TELEGRAPH AND 
SIGNAL SERVICE SYSTEM IN THE GULF OP St. LAWRENCE; OX 
THE UNITED STATES SIGNAL SERVICE ; AND ON THE NORWEGIAN 
TELEGRAPH SYSTEM. 



THE GULP SYSTEM. 
(Translation.) 

Ottawa, 28tli November, 1881. 
No. 19591. 

Sir, — In the early part of the month of May, 1875, six large steamers carrying 
over one thousand persons and valuable cargoes in addition, were considerably 
delayed, some of them for several weeks, in their course through the gulf of St. Law- 
rence. They were of course the vanguard of the fleet of steamers which enter our 
ports of Quebec and Montreal every year. 

Great anxiety resulted in Canada, in the United States and in Europe, as may 
well be fancied. There were no means of communication whatsoever with the coasts 
or islands near which these vessels might be. Had they foundered on the high seas ? 
Had they been driven ashore by the ice ? Or were they simply detained by an im- 
passable ice barrier, at the entrance of the gulf ? No one knew, no one could know. 

The idea of a telegraphic system for our coasts and the islands of the gulf, was 
mooted in consequence of the commotion caused in maritime circles bv fears for the 
safety of those vessels. I must add that it then became evident that a powerful 
auxiliary was needed for the navigation of the St. Lawrence. The press received 
the suggestion with favor, and the ship-owners and seamen gave it their best support, 
for they saw that it was a new means of developing the navigation of that magni- 
ficent river. 

In 1876, a committee of the House of Commons, after an examination of tho 
proposed system of telegraphs, its advantages and probable cost, i-eported strongly 
in favor of the establishment of the system. 

The Government soon took the matter in hand, for public opinion evidently 
demanded it ; and in 1879, a sum of $35,000 was voted by Parliament, of which 
i^OfiOO was for a coast line between Halifax and Canso. The remaining $15,000 
was to be an annual permanent grant oflPered in order to induce capitalists to construct 
and work the telegraphic system of the Magdalen Inlands and Anticosti. 

But the attempt did not succeed, for the undertaking seemed to be a hazardous 
one, though it was not so in reality. 

In the following year, 1880, $10,000 of the grant of $15,000 was capitalized at 
6 per cent, which gave ($200,000) two hundred thousand dollars ; and so soon as 
that amount had been voted by Parliament, the Department of Public Works began 
the work in earnest. A special service was organized in that Department, called 
" The Telegraph and Signal Service," and it was placed under the superintendence 
of Mr. P. N. Gisbonie, whose acquirements and skill in all matters relating to land 
or marine telegraphy are well known. 

I have recurred to these facts in this letter for the purpose of shewing that it 
was only after ^vq years of work and enquiry that the idea of coast telegraphs as an 
adjunct to the navigation of the gulf and river St. Lawrence was put in execution. 



[1881] lOT 

Since then the work of oonstrnctin^ the land lines and laying the electric cables 
htt been carried on with reasonable rapidity. The work has been well and economically 
done, and the materials used are of the best quality. The Magdalen Islands and 
Aotioosti systems estimated at ($200,000) two handred thousand dollars, have cost 
io fact only ($180,000) one hundred and eighty thousand dollars, and with the 
balance most useful coast lines have been constructed in Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick, besides among others the system of Grand Manan Island. 

I give below a statment for which I am indebted to the kindness of Mr. 
Gisborne, showing the lines in operation and the number of miles of land tele> 
grapb in operation and the number of miles of submarine cable laid. 

I. 

MAGDALEN ISLANDS AND OAPB BRETON SYSTEM. 

The system consists of: — 

83^ miles of line on Magdalen Islands. 

54^% miles of electric cable between Magdalen Inlands and Cape Breton, and the 
Hoe from Meat Cove to Sydney 113} miles, to which must be added 13 for the Bad> 
deck line, making a total of 126} miles. 

There are (9) nine stations in operation on the Magdalen Islands and in Cape 
Breton. 

ir. 

Tor Island op Anticostl 

This system consists of the following : — 
Line from Gaspd Basin to Anse a Fougdre, 28 miles. * 

Electric cable between Anse k Fougdre and the Island of Anticosti^ 44 miles ^ 
Line on the Island of Anticosti, 213f. 

There are (7) seven telegraph stations, ' of which four are also signal Bta> 
tions, in full operation on the Island of Anticosti. 

iir. 

north shore of the river and gulf of ST. LAWRBNOB. 

This system includes the following : 

A line between Bay St. Paul and Chicoutimi ; this is a branch line for the 
Saguenay navigation. 

The principal line starts from Malbaie (Murray Bay). It was commenced last 
jcar and, ihis fall, reached the village of Mille Yachos. 

A cable one mile in length was laid across the Saguenay. 

Line from Murray Bay to Mille Vaches, 86 miles. 

There are (8) eight stations in operation. 

IV. 

COAST LINE PROM HALIFAX TO CANSO, N,S. 

This system consists of a line erected along the coast, which will hereafter be 
placed in communication with the lighthouses erected on the Islands bordering the 
coast, by means of semaphores. 

Length, 210 miles. 

There are (17) seventeen stations in operation. 
7-8i 



108 [1881J 



ORAND MANAN ISLAND SYSTEM. 

This system consists of a line crossing the island at its greatest width, a length 
of28J miles, with a cable 9^/^^ miles connecting the island with the main-land 
opposite. 

There are (fi) six stations in operation. 

This gives for the Province of Quebec : 
502J miles of land line, 
74 ** electric cable. 

For the Province of Nova Scotia: 
361J miles of land line, 
36 *• electric cable. 

For the Province of New Branswick: 
28J miles of land line, 
^iW *' electric cable. 

Total. 

Telegraph lines on land, 895^ miles. 
Sabmanne electric cables, 119 ** 
Total number of Stations, 47. 



GULF OF ST. LA.WRENCE. 



PROPOSED LINES. 



t 



The Magdalen Islands and Aniicosti systems being completed and in full opera- 
tion, we must deal with the line on the north shore. 

At first it was considered impossible to reach the Strait of BollelHle, in view of 
the apparent difficulty of such an undertaking, at certain points on the coast. But, 
in 1878, after further examination, the idea of extending the line to Forteau Bay, in 
the Strait of Belle-Isle, was mooted and received with favor by the press and the 
public. The more the matter is looked into the more it becomes evident that, in- 
asmuch as the whole of the steam fleet and many sailing vessels have adopted the 
Strait of Belle-Isle as the moat direct and shortest route from the Atlantic to Quebec 
and Montreal, they should be afforded facilities in the form of telegraphic communica- 
tion with the coast?, harbors and bays of that Strait. 

Now at the present moment, these coasts which are almost uninhabited, and 

. which are sterile and afford no resource except the fisheries, are still entirely without 

communication either by postal service or by telegraph, with the rest of the country. 

And if an accident happens to a vessel on these coasts there are no means whatever of 

promptly making known her dangerous position and of summoning help in time. 

The interests of commerce then, urgently call for the extension of the telegraph 
lino on the north shore as far as Forteau Bay, or rather to Point Amour J(which is 
cast of that bay and where there is a lighthouse and fog-whistle) to meet the requi- 
rements of navigation. 

But we shall gain something more by the opening of this line, for when we have 
a telegraph station at Point Amour lighthouse, which will then be in constant 
connection with Canada, the United States, and in fact the whole world, it will bo 
possible to land at Forteau Bay, which is easy of access at all times during the season 
of navigation, despatches, lists of passengers, private messages, &c.. &c., after a run of 
^vc days only from Moville, Ireland. This would then be the most rapid route for 
the tmnsmission of news from Europe to America by stoamer, and in that respect it 
would confer an undoubted superiority on Canada. It would be in a sense a realization 
'»eatly desired five-day journey between Europe and America. 



(;i881] 109 

As a matter of fact tho sea voyage can only be said to last so long as you aj-e on 
the wide seas and as it were cut off from the world and utterly unable to com- 
mooicato with the land, that is to say, during the ocean voyage between Moville and 
Forteaa. Once that port made, vessels would once more be in communication with 
tho whole world by means of the telegraph. What is still more, between Fortoau 
aad Quebec other means of communication would bo available, viz: — 

1st The telegraph stations and signal stations of the Island of Anticosti, nine in 
namber ; 

2nd The stations on tho south shore of tho St. Lawrence from Gaspe to (Ju^bcc, 
Dumbering ten, bein^j a total of nineteen. 

It seems to me that this is a national work, that it forms part of the system of 
coast telegraphs, which should be put in operation as soon as possible if we desire to 
keep pace with our neighbours or compete with them successfully in tho important 
matter of the carrying trade betw^een Europe and America. 

But I have been looking at tho project under one of its aspects only. See what 
useful and profitable service this telegraph line would render to the vast and well 
kuown fisheries of Labrador and to vessels in distress on those remote and isolated 
coasts. 

KORTH SHORE TBLEGRAPU LINE CONSIDERED AS AN AUXILIARY TO THE FISHERIES. 

The Government has been (and I think still is) neg)tiating with the Montreal 
Telegraph Company for the extension of this line next spring from Millo Vaches to 
Point des Monts. 

Moreover, as there are no maritime fisheries or very few in this locality, tho 
remarks I am about to make on the Labrador fisheries will apply only to the eoa^t 
line extending from Point des 3Ionts to Anse aux Blancs Sablons, the eastern limit 
of Canada, and Forteau is only twelve miles further east than Blaucs Sablons. 

I shall divide the coast into two .parts : — The first extends from Point des Monts 
to Esquimaux Point, the latter point being an incorporated village with over fiftecu 
hundred inhabitants, all fishermen. 

Extent of coast, 190 geographical miles. 

r^umbor of harbors and fishing stations 25 

** fishing schooners 44 

" fishing boats 445 

*' men employed in the fisheries 2,113 

The secord part extends from Esquimaux'Point to Anse aux Blancs Sablons, tiio 
eastern limit of Canada, and thence to Forteau Bay, which is only 12 miles further. 

Extent of coast in geographical miles.... 290 

Number of barbel's and fishing stations 25 

" fishing 6choonei*s 22 

'* " boats 298 

" men employoi in tho fisheries 820 

Value of products of the various fisheries of this coast in 1830, $1,401,283.95. — 
One million four hundred and one thousand two hundre i and eighty-eight dollar.^, 
ninety -five cents. 

I take the following from tho report, \^<i), of tho offieor in cbargo of the 
expedition for the protection of tho fishoii«.M in tho Gulf of St. Lawrence, Dr. 
Wakeham. 

In the chapter headed **CoJ,'* pago Tl> of his report, tho Doctor say.-!, 
speaking of the north shore : — 

" This fishery has been one of unusual abundance. Tho season was far advanced 
" before the fishing began, bat there secraod to bo no limit to the quantity offish. 
" The various fishing establishments were taxed to the utmost to handle the fish, and 
" in some cases there was a scarcity of salt for curing purposes. Had we had 
" telegraphic communication with the north shore, as I trnst wo will have before 



110 [1881] 



'^ very long, many of our south shore fishermen would have abandoned the fishing on 
^' the south shore and taken themselves and appliances across to the north shore 
^^ where the fishing was so good. 

'' There must have been at least 500 schooners cod-fishing off St. Angustino and 
Bonne Esp^rance Divisions.'' 

Dr. Wakeham estimates at 175,000 cwts., the qaantitj of cod taken by these 
schooners, most of which belong to the Maritime Provinces. 

Thus Dr. Wakeham does noft hesitate to assert that with a telegraph line on the 
noi*th shore, the south shore fishermen who for whole months took hardly anything, 
mi^ht have been notified by means of the electric telegraph to go to the north shore, 
a distance of only one day's sail, there to gather an abundant harvest, in the vast 
field cultivated by the hands of Providence itself, without the help of man, and take 
their share of the rich and varied yield of cod, herring and every species of smaller 
fish upon which the former prey, which furnish an article of food so wholesome and 
bO easily shipped to foreign countries. 

But this is not all. On the eastern part of this coast, that is to say, from 
Esf[uimaux Point to Anse aux Blancs Sablons, the fishing schooners go from harbor 
to harbor, from fishing post to fishing post, seeking for cod and herring, but they 
are as it were groping in the dark, and when they are in one harbor they do not 
know what is taking place on the rest of the coast. Thoy are simply " trying thoir 
luck." 

Some times they succeed. But have I not, myself, during the sixteen years that 
1 commanded the sei'vice for the protection of the fisheries in the Gulf of St. Law- 
rence, many a time seen from twenty-five to fifty schooners anchored for weeks in 
«ome harjjor waiting for cud or herrring ? But the shoals of fish had struck the coast 
elsewhere, and while in neighboring harbors, great takes were being made, these vessels 
were wailing their chance, not knowing, and quite unable to know, what was taking 
place at other points of the coast on either side. of them. The unfoi*tunate fishermen 
were meantime a prey to depression and weariness during those days of enforced 
idlenesp, which destroyed their brightest hopes. 

But the telegraph would completely alter the face of things in these waters, 
since the fishermen whether residents of the coasts or belonging to schooners 
frequenting them yearly for the purpose of fishing, would know on what part of the 
<!oa:its, near what harbour, the shoals offish abound and where the bait run in. In 
iiihort they would follow the trail of the fish as the hunter follows game on land. 

I may say, moreover, that all who are well acquainted with the north shore and 
the coast of Labrador are firmly convinced of the utility or rather the necessity, of ft 
telegraphic line on this coast. 

Now with regard to the erection of this line, I leave it to those who are skilled in 
such matters to say whether we can or cannot reach Forteau all the way by means of 
lines erected on land along the coast. I may say, however, that between Esquimaux' 
Point and Forteau there are many serious difficulties in the way of erecting a line of 
the kind, on account of the islands and rocks bordering the coast; at some points the 
islands extend as far out as twelve miles from the shore, Kow, telegraph or signal 
stations can only bo of use when located on the islands in the offing, where the 
harbors used by the fishermen are located. 

Within the last few years great improvements have been made in sub-marine 
cables, and the cost has been much reduced, so that submarine lines might be u^odfor 
a great portion of this telegraphic system. From Point des Moms to Esquimaux 
Point there can be no serious difficulty whatever in the way of erecting a land 
telegraph the whole way along the coast, so that telegraph and signal stations can 
be placed at all the chief harbors and fishing stations. 

Between Esquimaux Point and Forteau, if submarine electric cables hare io 
be used, as will probably be the case, the cables may be submerged along the coast, 
in many places inside the outer islands and rocks and be made to connect one 
important harbor or fishing place with another. 



[1881] 111 



As the result of my own study of the matter, of the information I have gathered 
aodof my experience derived from sixteen years of cruising on this coast, I would 
point oat the following as the harbors or fishing stations where the submarine cables 
sboaid touch and where there should be telegraph or signal stations : 

Miles. 

1. Esquimaux Point 

2. Nataskuan (the Barbor) 65 

3. Coacoachou 1 65 

4. Little Mecatina 48 

5. Great Mecatina • 18 

b*. LaTabatidre 5 

7. St. Augustin 25 

8. Bonne Esp^rance 36 

9. Bradore Bay 15 

10. Anse aux Biancs Sablons 8 

11. Bay of Forteau 12 

297 

12. A station at Nataskuan Point connected with the Ilarbour 

of Nataskuan. 

SHORT DESCaiPTION OF THE SEVERAL H VRBORS ABOVE MENTIONED. 

1. Esquimaux Point is an excellent harbor, capable of sheltering two hundred 
or more vessels of any tonnage. The village has over 1500 inhabitant8, all fishermen, 
owning twenty- three (23) schooners and a large number of fishing boats, all 
tmployed in catching seal, cod and herring in the (julf of St. Lawrence. 

2. The Harbor of Nataskuan is capable of affording perfect shelter to 200 
fifihing schooners. There is also an anchorage for vessels of the largest tonnage. 

Along the Nataskuan Coast, in the vicinity, and on the banks in the offing, cod 
is always to be found in abundance. Nataskuan has always been considered one of 
tbe best fishing grounds of the whole north shore. It is in consequence resorted to 
etch year by a large number of fishing schooners, chiefly from the Maritime 
Provioces. 

There are several fishing establishments in the harbor, and the population consists 
offlome fifteen families. At a distance of three miles towai*ds the south, is the well 
inown Nataskuan river, one of the most productive salmon rivere of the north shore. 

3. Coacoachou, at the entrance of the river of that name, is one of the best 
iarbors on this coast It is capable of sheltering a whole fleet of large vessels. It is 
^itaatcd a few miles west of Cape Whittle, which is at the entrance of the Strait of 
Bell© Isle. Though there are no important fisheries in the vicinity of this harbor, 
*till it would be an advantage to connect it with the telegraphic sybtera, for it might 
Jeryeas a port of refuge for the large steamers navigating those waters in case of 
their being disabled. 

4. Little Mecatina Island has two good harbors for fishing-schooners, and there are 
^ood cod-fishing grounds in the vicinity. Moreover, it stands high out of the sea and 
M visible from a long distance, and vej^sels navigating the strait may require to run in 
there for shelter. 

5. Great Mecatina is also a lofty inland easily identified from a distance off, and 
m its vicinity is the harbor of Bay des Moutons, one of the best and most frequented 
*jf the whole coast. 

A large number of schooners from the Province of Quebec and the Maritime 
Provinces resort to it every year, and the fishing banks of the vicinity are excellent 
aad easy of access. Bait is also, generally speaking, abundant. 

6. LaTabatidre (Fish Harbor) is one of the best seal fishing grounds of the 
^holo coast. It is also inhabited by several families. 

7. St. Augustin consists of a group of islands lying off the mouth of the river of 



112 [1881] 



that Dame, and not less than twelve miles from the main land. It has always been 
an important centre for the seal, salmon, cod and herring fisheries. There are seven! 
good and well known harbors in this group of islands. 

8. Bonne Esperance is one of the best known and most frequented harbors ot' 
the coast, like Bay des Saumons, whose waters flow into it. It lies off the mouth of 
the river St. Paul or Quitzaqoi, a river of considerable magnitude and renowned a^ i 
talmon river ever since the diFCOvery of Canada. 

In former days large numbers of Esquimaux and Indians lived on this part of the 
Labrador coast, and when Jacques Cartier visited it for the first time, the French 
had already a stone fort erected and mounted with cannon to meet their assaQlti 
This fort had been built at the head of a large bay, which was then called the 
** Port de Brest." It is now " Old Fort Bay," and is situated a few miles to the west of 
the St. Paul Eiver. 

The cod fisheries of Bonne Esperance and Buie des Saumons are aboat the moot 
productive on the north shore. 

9. Bradore Bay has long been celebrated for its seal, herring and cod fisheriof. 
The Spaniards had large fishing establishments here, before the French entered these 
waters. 

Bradore has always been an important centre. There are here two harbors far 
vessels of every class. A large number of fishing vessels resort to this locality every 
year for the cod and herring fisheries, the latter being the well-known Labrador 
herring. In the vicinity of Bradore, at Anse des Dunes, I have seen as many as m 
hundred (600) barrels of hennng taken in one haul with a seine. 

10. Anse aux Blancs Sablons is a celebrated and well known locality. 

There are several large fishing establishments there, and it is the yearly retjort 
of some two or three hundred fishing schooners attracted by its cod and herring 
fisheries, which are generally speaking most productive. 

Blancs Sablons Bay is sheltered by two islands, He ^ Bois and He Verte. At thi* 
place, I have often seen boats manned by two men only, take as many as two thoa- 
*and cod and even more in a single day. A large number of fishing schooners 
gather in this harbor every year. 

The eastern boundary line of Canada, is at the head of this bay near the monih 
of a small nver. Beyond is Labrador, under the jurisdiction of Newfoundland. 

11. Forteau Bay is one of the finest on the whole coast, it oifers great facilities 
for the cod and herring fisheries. There are a number of residents engaged in fishing 
and hunting. The largest vessels can run in here at all limes, day or night, while 
the navigation is open in the Strait of Belle-Isle. There is a good anchorage and good 
shelter from all winds. On the east side is Point Amour, on which stands one of the 
finest lighthouses in America. It is a lofty tower built ot stone, brick and cement, 
furnished with a Fresnel dioptric light, which is visible from the other side of thd 
strait, a distance of over 15 miles. It is also furnished with a steam whistle for the 
guidance of vessels in foggy weather. 

This is the point I recommend as the terminus of the North Shore telegraphic 
line. 

Before concluding I would point out that the whole network of sub-mai-ine cable<» 
starting from Esquimaux Point and extending towards Forteau, and in its conree 
connecting all the harbors and fishing stations I have enumerated, can nearly every- 
where, bo submerged inside the outer islands, and will therefore be sheltered from the 
ice which sometimes grounds on the coast. 

It may not be out of place to mention here that on the 30th Juno, 1862, when oa 
board the "Napoleon III," I found an iceberg agi*oundat the entrance of Forteau Ba>% 
where it lay for over a month, in twenty-five fathoms of water. It stood at least 
seventy (70) feet above the water. His total height was therefore two hundred and 
twenty feet, I climbed the iceberg with four of my crew. 

The telegraphic systems above mentioned on the island of Anticosti,the Magdalen 
Island and Grand Manan Island, were commenced, completed and put in operation 
under yonr r.'lmin'.stration. To you, sir, also should fall the honor of completing, by 



[1881J iia 



the extension of the north shore line to Forteau, tho coast telegraphic system of the 
^nlf of St Lawrence, which will be of such vast service to shipping, to trade and to 
the Meries of Canada. Yoa will doubtless have no difficulty in obtaining from 
Piriitment the means for prosecuting energetically the work of construction already 
be^Q on this north shore line, so that it may roach Forteau within a few years. 

I cannot conclude without calling your attention to a number of short telegraphic 
lines which should be erected in order to connect several important points on the sea 
coietsof the Provinces with the telegraphic system of Canada. 

I woald mention specially : 

1. A lino about 16 miles in length to connect tho east point of Prince liiwai'd 
Island with the telegraphic 9ystem of that island. 

2. A line one tenth of a mile in length to connect Cape North Lighthouse on 
tbftt island with the same system. 

3. A line of 20 miles in length to connect the lighthouse at Point Escuminae, 
the gonthorn point of Miramichi Bay, with the telegraphic system of New-Brunswick. 

4. Another line of about lf> miles in length to connect the extreme eastern 
point of Cape Sable Island with the port of Barrington, Nova Scotia. 

COAST LINE TELEQRAPns IN THE UPPER LAKES. 

I have not spoken as yet of the great laken, that unbroken chain of inland seas, 
which enables us to penetrate to the heart of the continent of North America, as a 
field to which the system of coast telegraphs might be applied with advantage. 

It is not that I am unwilling to admit their usefulness for our inland navigation, 
bat it is hardly two years since the Government began tho erection of coast telegraph 
lines, and it seemed to me to be proper that the coasts of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 
our great commercial highway, should receive before all othei*8, the benetit of this 
powerful agont which annihilates time and distance. But now that the telegraphic 
sjstems of the Gulf of St. Lawrence have been in good part constructed, and we are 
in hopes of seeing the whole completed within a few years, it is natural that public 
attention should be directed towards the great lakes, the inland and not leabt 
important portion of the great highway of the St. Lawrence. 

Canada holds the north shore of the following great lakes : Erie, Ontario, Huron, 
and Superior. Now the following is the approximate length of the Canadian coa>t 
of each of these lakes, in English miles: 

Lake Ontario 250 miles. 

»' Erie 290 *' 

'' Huron, including Georgian Bay 620 *' 

" Superior 400 " 



Total 1,560 miles. 

I must say that I have not as yet fully informed myself as to the real require- 
ments of navigation on these lakes, as to coast telegraphs, but I can at least recom- 
mend what is most urgent and necessary, namely, telegraphic lines starting from 
the lighthouses erected on the most prominent points and their connection with tho 
nearest telegraph line, thus placing these lighthouses, which would all serve as points 
of observation, in permanent connection with the telegraphic system of Canada. 

I would mention specially Long Point, Rondeau Point, and Point Peleo in Luke 
Erie; Salmon Point on Lake Cntario, <!tc., &c. 

Once the system of coast telegraphs is put in operation on the shores of the 
lakes, the signal system will follow of itself and in a short time tho whole lake fleet 
mil at last adopt the international code of signals. Thus vessel owners on the one 
hand will be enabled to follow their vessels from point to point, and trfie vessels 
themselves will be enabled to call promptly for all needed assistance in case of accident, 
groanding, &c , Ac. 

I append to this letter a testimonial in favor of the coast telegraph system and 



114 [1881] 



its fuilher extension along the north coast of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, signed by aB 
the agents of Maritime Insurance Companies at Montreal, and two others, one Iroa 
J. B. F. Painchand, Collector of Castoms of the Magdalen Islands, and the othe 
fh)m Messrs. Bitchie & Co., relating to services rendered to shipping by tho telegraph 
system of the Magdalen Islands. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. FORTIX. 
To the Honorable 

sir Hector L. Lanoevin, K.C.M.G., C.B., 
Minister of Public Works. 



Montreal, 16th November 1881. 

Dear Sir, — In reply to your enquiry as to my opinion as an under¥rriter (rf 
ships and cargoes, of tho value of the Government Gulf Telegraph System, and 
especially of the news of the SS *'ljartington" lately wrecked on Anticostl whick 
i*eached here promptly : 

I beg to say on my own behalf as well as others interested in our navi^tion 
that this Gulf System of telegraphy is of ine^^timable value to the commerce of th# 
r»ountry, it is impossible that any other opinion could be formed of it/ the wisdom of 
the Government is conspicuously shown in the construction of these lines, and no time 
should be lost in extending them along the North Shore to Belle-Isle either on land or 
by short submarine stretches. 

I bog to say that I have seen several of my fellow underwriters and others anrf 
their names signed below endorse my views of the value of these linos. 

M. H. GAULT, Agt. HEERIMAN & EOSS, 

Brit. America, Assu. Co. Managers, B.M. Underwriters. 

THEODOEE HAET & Sons.. HENEY STEWAET, Mainne Underwnter 
for Commercial Mutual Ins. Co., of KY. for Eoyal Canadian Insurance Co. 

and Union Ins. Co., of Philadelphia. J. H. EOUTH & Co., Agts., 
JACKSON EAE, Agt. Western Assurance Co. 

International Marine Ins. Co., Cinn. J. F. NOTT & Co., Agts., 
PEECEVAL TIBBS, Agt. The Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Eoliance Marino Ins. Co., Limited, of HENEY CHAPMAN, Agts. 

Liverpool. Lloyd's Underwriting k Agency As- 

sociation, London. 
F. W. Uenshaw, Esq., President, 

Montreal Board of Trado. 



(Translation.) 

Magdalen Islands, Amherst Harbor, 

Vtd PicTou, 7th December, 1881. 

Sir, — In the intore-^t of the telegraphic lines established on these islands, I have 
the honor to send you the enclosed letter just received from tho important mercantile 
house of D. & J. Ritchie & Co., of Newcastle, N.B., showing the service rendered to 
them by the line, when their vessel, the " Jardine Bros.," went ashore in September, 
on these islands. The same was the case with the ship *' Governor;" and if I was 
enabled to transmit the message to the master and give him the instruction reoeivod 
it was th^inks to the telegraph line. With the help of good counsel, these vessels 
whose safety was imperilled, were enabled to escape from difficulties which might 
have been fatal, and as shewn by the letter, the " Jardine Bros," and " The Grovernor " 
were floated without serious damage. 



[1881] 116 



Yon are at liberty, Sir, to make use of this letter and even to pablit^h it, if you 
consider it osefhl to do so, in the interests of the telegraph, which it is now evident 
we coald not do without. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

J. B. F. PAINCHAUD, 

Collector of Customs. 

Bod. p. Fobtin, M.P. 

Newcastle, N.B., 28th November, 1881. 

DiAR Sir, — Wo write you at present to state that we desire to bear you our 
tftitimony to the very great value we attach to the cable and telegraph lines estab- 
lished and connected with your islands, and which in our opinion is likely to prove 
» great boon to shipping interests generally and especially of the Dominion. We 
bve to acknowledge the very material benefit we have received from the said com- 
nanicitiou on the occasion of the stranding of our vessel the " Jardine Brothers " on 
tbeMagdalens in September last. Owing to the established line we were enabled to 
get immediate advice from our captain and could at once communicate with him and 
wndsach instructions which, together with the assistance rencferec?, probably saved 
•aid ship from becoming a wreck, but which in this case was floated without any 
•erioM damage or expense attending. The writer bad the opportunity of being on the 
spot at the time and had the satisfaction of seeing the ship proceed on her voyage 
frum England to Newcastle, N.B. There is no doubt that the established telegraph 
iines connecting with your islands is of the highest importance to all ship owners 
ind others who may be similarly circumstanced as ourselves, and you are at liberty 
t'^ publish the above if you wish. 

Wo remain, dear sir, 

Yours truly, 

D. k J. KITCIIIE & CO. 
^- B. P. Painchaud, Esq. 
Collector of Customs, 

Magdalem Islands. 



UNITED STATES SIGNAL SERVICE. 

Ottawa, 28th November, 1881. 

Sir,— 1 think it my duty to lay before you the following letter which General 
Hazen, Chief of the United States Signal Service, did me the honor of sending to me 
11 the month of August last. 

After merely glancing at the chart which accompanies it one can form an idea 
of the magnificent signal system which exists in the United States. 

In Canada we are progressing in the same direction. Let us endeavor to be 
'ieir rivals and even their superiors if such is possible in increasing the extent and 
^iHciency of such works, which have as their object the succoring of our fellow men, 
^ the leasening the losses to those engaged in navigation ; occurring through 
^ipwreckfj. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. FORTIN. 
^•icHon. Sir Hector L. L-Inoevin, K.C.,M.G.,C.B. 
Minister of Public Works. 



116 [1881] 



LETTER FROM QENSRAL HASEN, OF THE U. S. ARMY, CHIEF DIRECTOR OF THE SIGNAL 

SERVICE OF THAT COUNTRY. 

I 

On March 3, 1873, Congress authorized the establishment of signal servw 
stations at lighthouses and life-saving stations on the lakes and sea coast, and madi 
provision for connecting the same with telegraph lines or cables. 

Since that date lines have been built from Sandy Hook, New Jersey, Boath along 
the coa^t to Cape May, New Jersey; from Delaware Breakwater, Dalawaro to Chin- 
coteaqui, Va. ; from Norfolk, Va. vid Cape Henry, Va., Kitty Hawk, Capo Hattemii 
Capo Lookout and Wilmington to Smith 7ille, N.C., the total distance is about 511 
miles. 

In order to connect these with the office of the Chief Signal Officer, wire? m 
leased fi^om the Western Union Telegraph Co., viz: — from Cape May, N.J., nrf 
Philadelphia, Pa., Baltimore, Md., and Washington, D.C., to Norfolk, Va., and froa 
Delaware Breakwater, Del., to Philadelphia, Pa. 

The following have been built and are operated by the signal service, bat am 
merely connected with the Western Union Telegraph Company, viz: — from Narra- 

fansett Pier vid Point Judith to Block Island, R.I., and from Eockport to Thatcher* 
sland, Mass. All are operated on the Morse system. 

The following are the stations where meteorological obsei-vations are taken aod 
cautionary signals displayed on the above, viz: — Thatcher*8 Island, Mass; Point 
Judith, New Shoreham and South East Light, Block Island, R.I.; Sandy Hooit, 
Barnegat, Atlantic City and Cape May, N.J.; Delaware Breakwater, Del.; Chinco- 
teaqui, Noi^olk and Cape Heniy, Va.; Kitty Hawk, Hatteras, Poi-tsmouth, Fort 
Macon, Wilmington and Smithville, N.C. Eepair stations are located at Manasqatt 
and Little Egg Harbor (Life Saving Station No. 23), N.J.; Ocean City, Md.; Uh 
Saving Station No. 6, (near False Cape), Cape Lookout, New Eiver and Sloop Point, 
N.C. From Cape Henry to Kitty Hawk, there is a second line which connects ti» 
eleven intermecfiate Life Saving Stations with them by telephone, thus bringing tb* 
two branches of the Government service (Treasury trnd War) into united relatioa? 
to each other. 

The stations on the coastline are fully equipped with meteorological instramefits 
for observation and signal apparatus for communicating with vessels passing or in 
distress. The practical result of the system is, fitst, to warn passing vessels <rf 
approaching storms, so they may seek shelter ; second^ in case of veasels being in de- 
tress to quickly summon the aid of the Life Saving Crews and the Wrecking Co. and 
to notify interested parties ; tkird^ Hatteras is a valuable station for fii-st feeling ih9 
effect of a hurricane approaching the coast from the south and south east. 

During the building of the Cape Henry-Kitty Hawk section a vessel having a 
cargo of tea was stranded. The aid of the Norfolk Wrecking Co. was at once sum- 
moned. Both the vessel and cargo were saved, in advance of a severe storm which 
swept the coast. The value of the cargo was more than three times the cost of that 
section. 

In case of vessels in distress temporary stations are opened abreast the same on 
the beach for the purpose of giving such personal assistance as may be possible, and 
for transmitting all information without any delay by wire to this office, to Wreck- 
ing Companies, Boards of Tirade, Chambers of Commerce, &c. 

It was found necessary to introduce into the lines drawn on accompanying map, 
twenty-seven lengths of submarine cable, to cross inlets which are navigable to small 
craft, and where on account of the low banks and the necessities of navigation, a 
suspended wire could not be used. The total length of those cables is eighteen mile?, 
the shortest single length is thirteen yards, the longest forty-five hundr^ and eightj*- 
one yaixls. 

Thatcher's and Block Islands on the New England coast are connected with the 
shore by cables which are respectively twenty-six hundred and forty yai-ds, and tea 
miles in length. 

The average cost of building the line, the labor having been done by troop"*. i^ 



[1881] 117 



tseveotj dollars por mile. The averAgo eo9t of establishing the stations is one 

icdred (100) dollars per station ; the yearly average cost of maintaining station is 

(reehaiKired (300) dollars; yearly average cost of maintaining line is thirty-six 

siidrad and foar ^3,604) dollars for a total of about five hundred and forty (540) 

lilea This is exclasive of pay of troops and operators. 

Ka rent is paid at Life-Saving'Stations. 

All signal servicemen are instructed in telegraphy, and the seacoasi lines are 
§M on the Moi*se System, excepting the telephone line from Cape Henry to 
litty Hawk. 

The accompanying Chart shows all U. S. lines operated by the signal service. 
411 other signal service stations of observations, &c., than those on the sea coast tele- 
frmpli lines are in telegraphic communication with this office through tho lines of the 
JfTcstern Union (principally) and other telegraph companies. 



THE NORWEGIAN TELEGRAPHIC SYSTEM. 
(Translation.) 

Ottawa, 28th November, 1881. 

Sir, — The task which I have imposed upon myself, and which I have the honor to 
king before your notice, would bo incomplete if I did not send yon the following short 
■o^'ce upon the telegraphic system of Norway. A country which in respect to its 
dimate, tho industrial occupations engaged in there, the fisheries, the timber trade, 
Hm extent of water communication, the coasting trade, the configuration of its sea 
*W8t9, much resemjbles our Maritime Provinces and the Province of Quebec. 

Norway has a sea coast of over 1500 nautical miles in extent, measured in a 
^rect line, but by following the indentation of its bays and fiords, some of which are 
iO miles in depth, the figure of 2,000 miles, at least, is reached. 

This coast line fairly bristles with points, capes, &c., girt about with rocks and 
tAlinds, some of which are forty miles in the offing. All these taken together go to 
Make tho coast navigation of Norway very dangerous. 

AH the prominent points on these coasts whether parts of the mainland, of an 
faland, orofa rock, are united by telegraph wire;* or cables forming part of the 
Telegraphic System of Norway, 

1 What study, what work of genius I may say, was required to conceive and carry 
0Dt such a system, and to keep it constantly in thorough working order, it is almost 
impossible to express. 
I As the work of seamen it is one worthy of the descendants of the Norsemen. 

I cannot state in what year this telegraphic system was perfected, but the 
bllowing extract from a report of the English Vice-Consul at Christiania would make 
it appear that in 1866, the greater part of the system was already in operation. 

£jirart from the report of the Vice Consul General of Her Majesty at Christian' a upon 
the cod and herring fishery in Norway^ for the year 1866 : 

'• That part of the population directly or indirectly interested in the fisheries 
Dumbors about 150,000, and the number of fishermen regularly employe! at the 
present time is 60,000. 

" These latter in their boats come and go along the coasts, according to the reports 
irhich reach them as to the signs or prognostics, for example the a|)pearance of the 
ilraw-herring, sea birds, whales, &c., &c., and formerly, before they had the telegraph 
vire to procure speedy infoimation for them, the impossibility in their position of 
rerifying the correctness of the reports, and the great distances they had to traverse 
lo reach the neighborhood of the fishing banks, were the causes of numberless 
diBappointments and deceptions, and often the catch was not as great as it might 
kave Deen owing to the lack of hands to take the fish. All this has greatly changed 
since, especially as concerns the herring fishery. 



118 [1881] 



<' There are telegraph stations already coDstructedy and others are in ooar«e «i 
erection at the principal points along the coast, and the inspectors reqaire thu 
directions should be every day posted up at each of the stations upon the appeankiKi» 
and position of the banks, and Uiey keep up a constant communication with all the 
stations in operation. 

** Field telegraphs are always ready to connect with the main line, and in th» 
way the slightest movements of the banks of fish are attentively watched and 
promptly signalled, and it is a curious sight to see the sudden exodus of thousands 
of fishermen, with their accompanying train of buyers, salters, &c., ^v^iih their 
equipage of boats, barrels and apparatus pushing forward towards a distant spot si 
the summons of the telegraph wire. The men seem to extol highly this important 
assistant, and in the cases where the success of the fishing is owing to its interveiK 
tion they call their fish telegraphic herringp. The inspectors post up every 
morning in the various stations a statement of the quantity of fish taken the day 
befoi^, and at the same time they quote the price per barrel and they carry on thi^ 
duty until after the spawninsr season, which is easily ascertained by the water 
assuming the colour of the milt. 

"This fishery lasts for three months, but the profitable fishing oaly lasts six 
weeks or ab out that, during which they take from ten thousand up to twenty thousand 
tons each week. 

"The advantages which the telegraph will probably secure are incalculable, far 
it will not be confined to rendering greater the produce of the cod and herring 
fishermen, but will permit the inhabitants scatterea here and there along the ooast 
and the banks of the great Fiord, to gather at places determined upon, daring othec 
seasons of the year, and to give close attention to other fisheries less important but 
very numerous in this country, and especially the summer herring fishery, a very 
fat fish and highly esteemed, which, for its delicacy of flavor and its size, rirais 
successfully the Dutch and Northern herring." 

The short description which follows displays, on one hand, the numberless diffi- 
culties which require to be overcome to carry out a similar work, and on the other 
hand the extent and perfection of the works which ensures a perfect action throogb- 
out the whole system, even to the most retired parts of Norway, as far as the 70th 
degree and 35 minutes of north latitude, that is to say, fourteen hundred (1,400) 
geographical miles further north than Quebec. 

DESCRIPTION. 

This system may be divided into three classes : 

The first includes the telegraphic lines of the interior, of which the most im- 
portant are found between the capital Christiania and Trondhjen, about 300 miles in 
length. In the second place there are the railway lines about 500 miles. In the 
thira place the sea or coast lines, nearly 2,000 miles in length. 

Commencing at the boundary line of Sweden, the coast line telegraphic system, 
composed at times of several lines, and again of a single line, makes the circuit o^^ 
the fiord at the bottom of which Christiania is built ; then it reaches the coast, hj 
proceeding in a westerly direction, at the Bay called Skager Back, which separate* 
Norway from Denmark, as far as Stravanger, on the Atlantic— the North Sea— 
having a length of 370 miles. 

A submarine cable of 15 miles in length crosses the entrance of a great fiord aod 
the line proceeds from Skudesnoes to Bergen, one of the great sea porto of Norway, a 
distance of 100 miles. 

Within this circuit two large islands are connected with the mainland by sub- 
marine cables, 15 miles and 12 miles long respectively. These islands are Uteirc 
and Eovoer. 

Brandesund, an island situate thirty miles further to the north, is also connected 
by a submarine cable with the mainland line. 

From Bergen, the telegraphic line nins along the coast, sometimes cros^^ing the 



[1881] 11» 



noDthB of fiords by meaDs of Biibmarine cables, at other times going roand them, 
md it reaches Christiansand after a coarse of about 300 miles. 

On the route it crosses over some fifteen fiords hj means of cables of from 1 to 3 
Biles in length. 

Several islands and rooks which occupy important positions on this part of the 
eoist are joined to the principal line by cables varying from two to ten miles in 
kDgtb. 

Eighty miles farther on the line passes into Trondhjen, a sea port situate on 
one of Uie largest fiords in all Norway. 

Aboot 330 miles further to the north, the line reaches Lodingen, an important 
Mport on a large fiord which lies on the 68th parallel of north latitude. 

In this circuit there are several branch lines, each from 20 to 40 miles in length,, 
vhicfa connect islands, rocks, ports or places with the main line. 

At Lodingen, we find ourselves opposite to the famous group of the Lofoden 
iitiods, aboat 180 miles in length, especially notable for its cod and herring fisheries. 

A system of land lines and sub-marine cables, about 200 miles in length, connects 

fi the islands of this group with one another as well as all the ports, harbors and 
hing localities where the fishing boats betake themselves, and the whole are joined 
to Lodingen. 

We have already reached a point which is about twelve hundred (1,200) nautical 
Biles more northerly than Qaebec. But the coast line tele^> raph system of Norway does 
•otend here, it continues to girdle the coast as far as Hammerfest, which we know ta 
b the most northerly sea-poi't in the world. Then it proceeds across Laponie up to 
vitiihi afew miles of the famous North Cape, the most northerly portion of the main- 
bod of Europe. It is in north latitude 70 degrees, 30 minutes, — fourteen hundred 
Bd ten (1410) miles further north than Quebec, and eleven hundred and forty 
(1140) miles than Forteau Bay in the Straits of Belle-Isle. - 

in ail there are about 2,bil0 miles of telegraphic lines of all kinds. Some sixty 
Mb-marine cables of from 1 to 20 miles in length, form connecting links in this 
7fltem. * 

There are on the coast lines more than 130 telegraph and signal stations, of 
vkich 15 are upon the Lofoden islands. 

CONCLUDING STATEMENT. 

The telegraph offices may be placed in several categories : — 
There are offices, of the permanent service. 
" ofthe full day. 
** " of limited service. 

" " open during the winter, that is during the fishing season only. 

" " attached to railways. 

Such, in a few words, is what a nation, of an especially maritime character, 

living a population of 1,760,000 and a territory 121,000 square miles in extent, (two- 

liidg the size ofthe Province of Ontario), has done in aid of its shipping, and its 

bheries. 

It seems to me to have set an example, well worth following by such a country 
isCaoada, which possesses such an extent of sea coast and fisheries so varied and so 
aportant. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Four obedient servant, 

P. FORTIN. 
rte Honorable 

SfR Hector L. Langevin, K.C.M.G.,C.B. 

Minister of Public Works. 



120 [1881] 

translation.) 



Ottawa, 8lh December, 1881. 



Sir, ' Tbo coast-lino telegraphic system of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the 
^hoi'es of the Maritime Provinces, has already been made use of for purposes of gre»t 
consequence to the mercantile navy, the commerce and the fisheries of Canada. Eat 
there is still another not previously mentioned which is of no less importance. 

Many forej^^ and homo vessels set out every year, in ballast, from foreign port* 
and often very distant ones in order to enter our waters seeking for cargoes of timber, 
especially at Montreal, Qaebcc, Miramichi, St. John, and other ports of less import- 
ance. 

The larger proportion of them arrive in the Gulf without knowing where Ihej 
can procure freight. 

Some of the vessels stop at Sydney, C.B , others go to Gaspe, while others agaio 
proceed toother ports ; fi*om these places they announce their arrival to their ageDt 
seeking cargoes K>r them. 

And often, of course, they are obliged to go to other ports where freight is more 
easily obtained and more profitable. %ut in this case they are obliged to enter two 
harbors, and consequently pay double pilotage fee<t and other charges ; they also run 
more or less danger of losing their sailors by desertion, and they lose their time. 

The coast line telegraph can remedy this, in many cases, in a veiy simple wav, 
which, besides, is already in use in other countries. 

This will be done with the aid of the coast line telegraph stations, of which the 
Government owns nearly forty on the shores and islands of the Gulf of St. Iiawrenc«. 

The manner of accomplishing it will be as follows :— The government will give 
notice in advance, at the custom houses of the principal maritime countries of the 
world, that the row service is in operation at such and such telegraph and signal 
stations, the names of which would be given in the notice. 

The ship owners who send the vessels to Canada, in ballast, to obtain cargoes of 
timber there, would give instructions to their Captains to stop opposite one of these 
signal stations, when they have entered the Gulf of St. Lawrence, to lie to at a reason- 
able distance, to signal the names of their vessels by means of the International code 
of flags, and to enquire for any despatches there may be for them at the station. &> 
soon as the vessels are despatched, the shipowners write by the quickest route to agents, 
who transact this kind of business, in the Ports of Quebec, Miramichi, St. John or 
elsewhere, to look for freight for such and such vessels. The letter reaches its destia- 
ation long before the vessels, which are sailing vessels of oi*dinary speed. 

The Agent soon finds profitable freights, and hastens to make this fact known to 
the Superintendent of Government 8ignals,who sends a telegraphic despatch containing 
everything connected with the freighting vessel, to all the Government signil 
and telegraph stations, in operation in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

Soon after this these vessels enter the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and they direct their 
courses to the stations most convenient for them according to the winds they hare 
had and the time made, then each vessel will go and lie to opposite one of these statioo?, 
and spell out its name by means of signal-flags, as I have mentioned before. 

The signalman examines his journal and discovers that he has received a short 
time previous a message with instructions to convoy it by means of signals to the 
vessel, whose number they have given him, as found in the official list of vessels, 
appended to the book containing the national code, and he immediately communicatee 
this message by means of the code signals, and by this message he has told the vessel 
to proceed to a certain port where a cargo of timber awaits it. 

The vessel ban o;ily to bear off, fill its sails, and gain as quickly as possible the 
port indicated. 

And this is done without the vessel being obliged to put into any intermediate 

Coit, without casting the anchor, without incurring any expense. And in order to 
ring this new sei-vice into perfect operation at once, the Government need incur do 
expense. It has only to have it published throughout all maritime countries. 



[1831] 121 



The SuperintendeDts and the operators of oar telegraph and sigDal stations will 
he aUe, without any difficulty, to put this new service into practical effect, after 
merdj a few days study and trial. 

I beg that you will kindly take this matter into consideration at your oon- 
TOBieoce. 

If you decide upon putting it into operation, allow me to remark that it will be 
teoessary to organise it in the month of January at latest, in order that it may be 
jadrertised in time and may be of use to the fleet which will vinit the waters of the 
Gulf of St. Lawrence next spring. 

This service will be useful to the timber trade, inasmuch as it will assist in some 
degree in facilitating the means of transport of our timber to Europe and more espe- 
iMj to England. 

P. A. Schwartz, Esquire, the distinguished Consul-General of Sweden and Norway 
at Qoebec, who has had a great experience in maritime atfairs and shipping concerns, 
las kindly appreciated the projective system in a letter dated the 10th December^ 
1831, which I enclose. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 
I Your obedient servant, 

i P. FOETIN. 

iTh« Honorable 

3m HxoTOB L. Lanoivin, E.C.M.G., G.B. 

Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



I BoTAL Swedish and Norwegian Consulate, 

Quebec, 10th December, 1881. 

DlAB Sib, — In reply to your letter of yesterday, I have no hesitation in saying, 
lut such a system for signalling as you propose, would not only give the facilities 
fOQ mention to vessels coming out seeking, in the manner you mention, but would 
iho enable an owner residing in England, or on the other side, to keep the disposal 
4f ^e .vessel for a much longer time in his own hands, giving him the choice of either 
Barket. 

Tours truly, 

P. A. SCHWARTZ. 
Ion. P. FoBTOf, M. P. 

House of Commons, 

Ottawa, Ont. 



7-9 



122 [1881] 



APPENDIX No. I3. 



QUEBEC HAEBOR IMPROVEMENTS— BIVBR ST. CHAJSLBS AND 
GRAYING DOCK AT LEVIS. 



No. 17989. 

Harbor Commissionbbs Offiob, 

QuBBBO, 17th October, 1881. 

Sir, — In conformity with the request contained in your letter of the 23rd alti 
the receipt of which has already been acknowledged, I have the honor to trans 
yoa herewith, our Resident Engineer's Report on the Harbor Improvements at 
River St. Charles, and also a report from same on the Graving Dock, at LeviS| I 
for the fiscal year ended the 30th Jane last. 

Each Report u accompanied with a statement containing the usual informal 
that I have been in the habit of conveying yearly to your Department since the wo 
above mentioned have been under contract. 

I have the honor to be. 
Sir, 
Your most obedient sei'vant, 

A. H. VERRET, 
Secretary Treasurer. 
P. H. Bnnis, Esq., 

Secretary, Public Works Department, 
Ottawa. 



REPORT ON THE HARBOR EXTENSION AND DOCK WORKS IN Tj 
RIVER ST. CHARLES, QUEBEC, NOW NAMED "THE PRDfCB 
LOUISE EMBANKMENT AND DOCKS ":- | 

Rbsibbnt Enqinbbr's Offiob, 

QuBBBo Harbor Works, 

nth October, 1881. 

Sir, — In compliance with the insti'uctions of the Hon. the Minister of P»iU 
Works dated Ottawa, 24th September, 1881, I have the honor to report. 

The contract awarded for the above works in the River St Charles to the oa 
tractors, Messrs. Peters, Moore & Wright, was for a bulk sum of $629,296.31, for worl 
therein specified, forming the first section of the original scheme for a Tidal Basin W 
Wet Dock. 

This contract was accompanied by bills of quantities and schedules of rates i 
order that all needful changes might be made in the form of the works, and «W3 
omissions and deductions or additions as these might involve determined |?ro rata* 



[1881J 128 



Under these conditions certain materials had farther to be supplied by the con- 
tnetors, viz : for clay, and broken stone for concrete, amoaLting to $41,755.31, and 
an altematiye extra for a masonry or stone face to the embanlmient on the south 
side, in lieu of timber, amounting to $21,974.90, neither of which was included in the 
bnlksum. 

LasUy, to enable large yessels '' to reeye " into the channel and afford further 
accommodation in the tidal basin, 250,000 cubic yards of supplementanr dredging 
wereproyided for under the contract^ forming another additional item of $62,500. 

The works, with all the changes thathaye been made, including all altera- 
tioDS^ omissions and additions now or nearly complete, and forming what may be 
termed the present contract so far as can be positiyely determined, will cost $682,- 
79199, yiz: $673,459.16, vide synopsis annexed to the report of last year plus 
a sum of $9,332.83, for contingencies and extras. 

Bat this statement supposes the entire works included in the contract complete. 
It is the intention of the Commissioners to omit the roadway as proyided for in the 
present contract trom the works to be done, and also the pitched slope forming the 
Jonoyon with the made ground and foreshore at the Gas Wiiarf end ofthe works and 
to complete them under an altered specification with the second section ofthe works, 
indnding the cross wall and caisson entrance to the Wet Dock. 

This will reduce the total expenditure here given of $682,791.99, as required ta 
Complete the contract by the following amounts : 

1. Stone for roadway and pitching slope $20,000 00 

\ 2. Labor in forming roadway 8,829 80 

3. do " pitching slope 340 50 



then 



$29,170 30 
The total amount of expenditure under this contract as thus shewn will 

1. Contract sum of estimated expenditure $682,791 99 

2. Seduction as per statement aooye 29,170 30 



Total $653,621 69 

The work executed during the last fiscal year included the completion of the 
piling and crib work ofthe substructure and concreting of the Wet Dock wall, the 
|eonstmction of the masonry of the superstructure to coping leyel, concreting, backing 
^d filling for 1200 feet, together with 200,000 cubic yards of dredging in the channel 
Vays and tidal basin. 

\ The working season opened this year on May the 7th. The fiscal year ended 
the 30th of June, so that the summary given above was chiefly accomplished during 
the former half of the fiscal year, that is to say, between July the 1st and November 
the 15th, 1880, when the working season closed. 

At the date of this report the quay wall may be considered to be completed, its 
entire length being 3,550 feet. Allowing for reduction in time for the close season of 
winter, this wall may be said to have been built in the short space of 17 working 
' months, in a tide way with no protection by cofferdam and only depending on 
the period between fall and rise of the tide for the completion of the greater portion 
k>f the work. 

r The dredges have removed nearly 100,000 cubic yards of excavation, which have 
'all been deposited in the embankment in terms of the contract 

The mooring posts for the northern face of the embankment are all permanentiy 
'-placed in position as well as those for the quay wall for 2,480 feet from the ballast 
'wharf, west. 

The remaining bollards and filling behind the wall will be completed by the end 
7— 9i 



124 [1881] 



of the season, leaving nothing bat such dedactiona as may be needful from th» 
contract for work unexecuted to finish the first section of this most important and 
▼aluable public work, 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

WOODFORD PILKINGTON, 

Berident Engineer. 
A. H- Verret, Esq., 

Secretary Treasurer. 



EBPORT ON THE GRAVING DOCK WORKS AT ST. JOSEPH DB LBTli 

Resident Enoinber's Office, 

Quebec Harbor Works, 

12th October, 1881. 

Sir, — Following the instructions of the Hon. the Minister of Public Work^ 
dated Ottawa, 24th September, 1881, I have to report on the graving dock now is 
course of construction at Point Levis for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1881. 

The total contract sum under contracts so far accepted for the graving dock it 
St. Joseph de Levis fully equipped, including the builder's contract, machinerj, 
caisson, &c., complete amounts to $398,820.18. 

To this has to be added engineering expenses $21,243.68, and sundries $17,432.12, 
making a total of $437,606.92, after allowing for a deduction of $6,158.22, being the 
difference in cost according to the schedule of rates between the circular head is 
now adopted and the second entrance at head. 

But to this sum of $437,606.92, has still to be added the cost of 3 boilers, fittiif 
up and placing the caisson in position, further engineering charges and the extras to 
.entrance works as recently ordered and approved by Government. 

The amount voted by Parliament for the construction of this dock was fSOO-jOOl, 
of which there remains a balance of $62,393.08, available for these purposes. 

The distribution of this balance would be proximately made as follows : 

1. Extra works at entrance $30,000 00 

2. Boilers 4,500 00 

3. Fixing up and fitting caisson... '. 5,000 00 

4 Balance of engineering and supervision 15,000 00 

5. Contingencies and sundries 7,893 08 

Total $62,393 08 

The total expenditure to the 30th of June amounts to $237,941.60, leaving an 
unappropriated balance of $262,058.40 at that date. 

The works executed during the last fiscal year include the cofferdam, bringing the 
east and west wing walls to coping level, the completion of the upper end or nefui of 
the dock excavation down to grade, trenching for the arterial drains and concreting 
to the under surface of the dock floor for a length of 210 feet. 

During the previous year the cofferdam was commenced, the wing walls nearly 
completed, 30,000 cubic yards of excavation in the dock pit were removed and the 

freater part of the ashlar work for the dock proper cut, and 45,000 cubic yards 
elivered by the North Shore Railway. 

The travelling caisson was completed in England by Messrs. Wigham, Biohard- 
son & Co., of Newcastle, and shipped to Quebec, where it was received in good order 
and placed under shedding for protection during winter, I'eady for completion when 
the works are sufficiently advanced. 



[1881] 125 



Ihe pom ping machinery under contract with Messrs. Carrier, Lain6 & Co., is 
kkMking satisfactory progress. 

The work yet remaining to be done includes the fbrther complete excavation of 
e dock pit and entrance works, the construction of the nudn pumps and drainage 
ell with discharging culverts, the completion of the masonry of the dock and ens^ne 
caiasoQ chamber and entrance culverts, and the fixing in place of the boilers, 
inery, caisson, pumps, engines and gearing. 

The masonry completed at the head of the dock and for 180 feet in length of the 
|ide walls, altars, stairs and timber slides give eveir indication that the graving 
lock when finished will be a success, fulfilling all the needful conditions for the 
cepair of largo ocean going steamers, so long felt to be necessary in the port of Quebec. 

I have the honor to be. 
Sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

WOODFORD PILKINQTON, 
Besidmt Engineer. 

K Ymbmmt, Eeq., 
Secretaiy Ti^urer. 



L 



\ 



VHE NEW \ K.v 






HE Mr ■ 
;]BLl^ 






[1881 J 12»"r 



APPENDIX No. 14. 



REPOET BESPBCTING OPEBATIONS OP LIFTING BkBGE. 

k 19531. 

Harbour Commissioner's Offioi, 

QuEBEO, 10th December, 188L 

Sir, — ^I have the honor to transmit you herewith my report on the operations of 
II liitting Barge for the present year. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. H. VBERBT, 

Sec.'Treaa. 
I H. Ennis, Esq., Secretary, 

Public Works Department, 
I Ottawa. 



Harbour Commissioners' Office, 

Quebec, 10th December, 1881. 

. Sir, — ^I have the honor to report as follows on the operations of the Lifting 
uge for the working season of the present year. 

, The Barge left her winter quartera on the 30th April and was brought to the 
NRmissioners' Wharf for the purpose of being rigged and repaired. 

The Barge was on that day pfaced under the command of her former master, 
wio Claade Gigudre. The other officers, comprising two mates, a chief engineer 
W assistant, were re-engaged. The remainder of the crew, composed of fourteen 
^j were placed on board as neeessitated during the progress of the fitting up. 
wber man having been required, was added to the crew during the month of 
my. 

On the morning of the 24th of May, the Barge left the wharf with instructions 
fjrooeed to the Fly Bank, in order to continue the work of clearing the obstmc- 
^ caused by boulders. 

Four days after, an application was made by Mr. E. H. Duval, on behalf of 
^P^in Lochead, to send the barge to the help of the bark " Eveline " whose anchor 
*** fouled. 

. According to the custom hitherto followed, the Barge was dispatched to the 
J^||tance of we bark, and after two days and a-half work, succeeded in raising the 
*J^ction in which the anchor of the " Eveline " was caught. The obstruction 
"^^ a nest containing three large anchors and about one hundred fathoms chain, 
''^ftUo one small anchor with about thirty fathoms chain attached to same, exclu- 

'«of the anchor and chain belonging to the bark which were surrendered to Captain 



Oq the 3lBt of the same month, the barge returned to the Fly Bank in order to 
^^e the work of clearing the obstructions caused by the boulders. She steadily 



180 [1881] 



worked there during the whole of the following noionth, that is to say, tho month 
Jane^ and suoceededin raising ninety-six (96) boulders averaging in size as foUowi 

2 weighing about 8 tons. 
12 " 5 " 

20 " 3 " 

42 " 2 " and 

20 a I a 

By adding to the above the 514 boulders previously secured at the same spot, 
gives a total of 610 boulders, representing an aggregate weight of 1,957 tons disti 
buted in the following manner: 

2 weighing about 50 ton8=100 tons. 



1 




30 




= 30 


<( 


1 




25 




= 25 


i( 


1 




20 




= 20 


(( 


1 




16 




= 16 


(( 


vj 




12 




= 24 


« 


2 




10 




= 20 


U 


;/ 




8 




= 16 


(I 


18 




6 




=108 


u 


n 




fi 




= 86 


it 


94 




4 




=376 


ii 


220 




3 




=6«0 


a 


229 




2 




=468 


ti 


20 




1 




= 20 


It 



and 

Scattered around the boulders, were found a few small pieces of copper whic! 
contribute to establish, as in the previous years, that vessels had touchea many c 
tbem and consequently suffered damage. 

Captain Hansen, master of the Bark " Askur " having reported one of th 
anchors of his vessel fouled at a spot situated about one quarter mile east of th 
breakwater, orders were forwarded to the Captain of the Lifting Barge, to go to he 
assistance, and on the 1st July, the barge wag brought alongside the Dark. 

After a few days work it was discovered that the barge had to deal with a ver 
heavy nest of anchors and chains lying in a depth of thirty fathoms of water, and in i 
tide way running at the rate of four knots to the hour. 

During the progress of the work many of the strongest chains used to secure tbi 
nest were oroken in consequence of its heavy weight, and, it having been clearl] 
ebtablished that the lifting apparatus was showing signs of weakness, it was decide< 
to increase its power by ^ding four of the largest blocks that could be obtained 
which wore rigged with the most powerful ropes and chains. 

With the aid of these new appliances it became evident that the work of lifting 
could now be effected without any risk. After eight weeks of constant work, hal 
of which was night work, the barge was brought to shore in front of the Champlaii 
Market Wharf, were she remained a few days to prepare for the final landing, an^ 
on the evening of the 23rd August, she was safely towed by six powerful tugs iJ 
front of the Custom House where the nest of anchors and chains was snccessfoU] 
landed. 

The work of disentangling the nest was thereupon proceeded with and continuec 
till the whole, comprising 42 anchors and 1,500 fathoms chain, was properly placec 
on the wharf used for that purpose. A piece of oak was found entangled in the nest 

Although the nest secured this year contained a smaller quantity of anchors and 
chains, it is admitted that its weight was not inferior to the weight of the nest raised 
in 1877, the average size of its anchors and chains being far larger. The weighl 
being equal and the depth of water ten fathoms deeper, the work of lifting this year'i 
nest was surrounded with difficulties that were not experienced in 1877. 

During the summer a boatman made an offer to the Commissioners to hook 



r 



[1881] 131 



fceLiftinjs: Barge on a nest of anchors and chains if a suitable remunoralion was 
;ivea hiui. His proposal having been conHidoieU, it wa6 agreed to make him ixu oifer 
f two doliai'S for each anchor and each length of chain respectively contained in the 
le^t, when raised, with the understanding that he would not be paid more than the 
ggregate sura of fifty dollars for his information. This offer having been accepted 
he barge started, the 20th October, for the spot where the supposed nest was to be 
iraod, near the west end of the Island of Orleans, and was on the same day hooked 
t the place designated by the boatman. Only one large anchor with thirty fathoms 
halo was found and subsequently secured. 

The se^^son being too much advanced to make searches, the barge was ordered to 
etarn. The work of dismantling her was immediately commenced and, at the end 
f November, nhe was placed in her winter quartei*s, in the Louise Dock. 

I stated in my report on the operations of 1878 that the Commissioners were 
toder the impression '^ that no more nests of anchors and chains were in existencey 
rthat if such really exist, they were covered with sand and were, as obstructions, 
onfeidered of no more consequence." 

The nest discoveied thib year was located on the spot where searches were made 
9* the Barge in 1878, and it mnst have been at that tiiue covered with sand. All the 
fther searchcH made that year where nests were supposed to exist proved fruitless* 
the discoveiy made this year must be accepted as a warning for the future. 

The work of cleai'ing the obstructions caused by the boulders inside the Ply 
hok having been suspended this year by the discovery of the nest of anchors and 
iiaiDs that has been rumoved, it will be necessary to resume that work next year 
rhich, if not interrupted, cannot be executed in less than three months. It is unne- 
(eesary to mention the importance of that improvement, it having already been 
pged in my previous reports. 

, The CJommissioners do therefore most respectfully request that the Grovernment 
rill farther extend their help towards the clearing of the obstructions in existence in 
|b6 Harbour of Quebec, and they do believe that the sum of twelve thousand dollars, 
112,000,) will be required to meet the expenses for the next working season on 
^ uut of the renewal of the deck of the Barge which is necessitated by its 
iilapidated condition, having leaked during the whole summer. 

The annexed statement shows the particulars that I am in the habit of furnishing 
ojour Department as to tbe cost of the Lifting Barge and her yearly working 
ixpenses from the commencement of her operations in 1875, as also the yearly quan* 
itj of anchors, chains, boulders etc., secured by her during the same period. 

In conclusion it affords me much plea^^ure to state that, in the execution of hi» 
ties at^ master of the barge, Captain Gigudre has given the same satisfaction as 
bretofore. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 
Your most obcdieni servant, 



h 



fhe Honorable 

; Sir Hector L. Lanosvin, K. C. M. G., C, B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



H. VBRiiET, 

Secretary Treasurer. 




k 



[1881] 135. 



APPENDIX No. 15. 



INNXJAIi KBPORT OP THE MONTREAL HARBOR COMMISSIONERS, ON 
THE DEEPENING OF CHANNEL BETWEEN QUEBEC AND MONTREAL. 



Habbob Commissionsbs of montbsal, 
lo. 18M0. Ssobbtabt's Offiob, 

MoNTBXAL, 18th October, 1881. 

Snt, — Referring to your letter of the 26th ult., I beg to hand you herewith copy 
ifthe Chief Engineer's Keport on the dredging operations for deepening the ship 
ifcannel of the River St. Lawrence, between Montreal and Quebec, for the fiscal 
fetr ended the SOth June last. 

As you have already been informed in my letters of the 16th November and 
nth December of last year, it is impossible to answer exactly the questions con- 
tttned in your letter. 

I would state, however, in reply to questions 1 and 2, that the works are carried 
Mt under the terms of the Act 86 vie, cap. 60, and as amended by the 44 Yic, cap. 
I and that a depth of 25 feet at low water will be obtained. 

Queetions 3 and 4. — ^No special expenditure is authorized for any one year, the 
Dommissioners advancing the money, and being repaid by the ^vernment on 
ipplication ; and there are no liabilities, all accounts for supplies and payment of 
v%e8, &c., being settled monthly. 

Question 5. — Amount- available for completion 1st July, 1881. 

Nil. — Expenditure to that date being $1,513,461 or $13,461 in excess of original 
unount of the loan. 

Qaestion 6. — Probable amount required for completion 1st July, 1881. $250,000. 

Question 7. — Revenue each year. No direct revenue. 

The capital cost of the dredging plant included in above expenditure is $533,189, 
iielusive of the value of certain harbour plant previously on hand and now employed 
in the work. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

H. D. WHITNEY, 

Secretary. 

'. H. Ennis, Esq., Secretary, 

Department of Public Works, Ottawa. 



HARBOUR^COMMISSIONERS OP MONTREAL. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 

Montreal, 12th October, 1881. 

Sir, — In compliance with the request of the Secretary of Public Works, I he£^ to 
^ii^i the following report upon the work of deepening the ship channel of the 



136 [1891] 



St. Lawrence between Montreal and Qaebec during the Government fiscal yoai^ 
ended 30th June, 1881. 

The work carried on during the year is the continuation of the deepening 
of the ship channel from 22 feet to a depth of 25 feet at low water, the breadth bein^ 
300 to 325 feet in the straight portions, with enlargements at bends and other neces- 
sary points I 

The places at which the greatest quantities of work have been done are Cap 
Charles and Cap la Roche, where the dredging is in rock ; near Cap Levrard ; at 
Champlain and Champlain Point in Lake St. reter; at Contrecoeur, and at Montreal, 
in all of which places the dredging is of earth. 

The following are the chief details of the year's work. The coat of the dredging' 
at each place is generally taken as that of the previous summer, for the reason that 
the expenditure cannot well be subdivided to the end of the Government fiscal year 
which occurs in the middle of the working season. 

Cap Charles. — Dredging the Ahale and lifting boulders were continued through 
the working season. Bj the close of the fit^oal year over three forths of the area of 
the channel had been deepened to 23 ft. 3 ins. at low water, and 19,278 cubic yards of 
rock and boulders had tieen taken out at an average cost of about sixty cents par 
cubic yard. 

Cap LaRoche. — Dredging shale and lifting boulders were continued through the 
working season with two dredges, and one stone lifting barge. At the beginning of 
the fiscal year the new channel was in use to a depth of 19 fL 6 in. at lowest ebb tides 
with a breadth of 150 feet ; by the 25th of September, it was opened to 200 feet, and 
on the 10th of November, the whole contemplated width of 300 feet was made avail- 
able for navigation. Further deepening is now in progress. During the year ended 
30th June, there were raised 46,522 eubic yards of rock and boulders at an average 
cost of about sixty cents per cubic yard. 

Cap Levrard and vicinity, — In the early part of the fiscal year, a part of the 
channel which remained to be cleared of a number of small clay shoals and boulders 
was traversed by a dredge and completed throughout to 25 feet at lowest water. 
Quantity dredged 8,800 cubic yards o£clay and boulders at an average cost of 54| 
centeper cubic yard. 

Champlain Foint and Champlain. — During midsummer of 1880, the 
necessary to complete the channel to 25 feet at low water was done. Quantity rail 
during the fiscal year 24,675 cubic yards sand, clay, and boulders, at an average cost 
of 28^ cents per cubic yard. 

jTort St. Francis. During spring of 1881, two dredges were employed for a short 
time in cutting away the south points of the Iron and Force shoals. Quantity dredged, 
7,095 cubic yai'ds, hard pan and boulders. 

Lake St. Pc^er.— The work accomplished during the fiscal year was the deepen- 
ing of the three bends at the channel at JSos. 1 and 2 Light Vessels and the White 
Buoy to 25 feet deep, with a breadth of 325 feet to 450 feet, and also the deepening of 
about two miles of straight channel. Total quantity dredged, 774,488 cubic yards of 
soft clay at an average of 3 -f^ cents per cubic yai-d. 

Contrecoeur. — Dredging was continued the greater part of the working season and 
a total quantity of 191,550 cubic yards of clay was raised at an avarage cost of Hi 
cents per cubic yard. 

Fointe Mane. — In the early part of July 1880 a few small points were cleared 
away, which completed the dredging required in the vicinity to 25 feet at low water. 
Quantity dredged, 2,160 cubic yards, costing 31^ cents per cubic yard. 

Cap St. Michel— In the fall of 1880 and spring of 1861 the channel above and 
below the Cape was widened and deepened. Quantity dredged, 104,805 cubic yards 
at a cost of about 23 J cents per cubic yard. 

Varennes, — ^A small shoal containing 3,090 cubic yards was removed. 

Montreal. — The improvement of the main ship channel through the harbour was 
<;ontinued in 1880. Total quantity dredged, 47,471 cubic yards, costing 22^^ cents 
per cubic yard. 



[1S81] 137 



The aggregate quantity of dredging done at ail points during the Govern ment 
fiwal year ended 30th June, was 1,229,937 cubic yards as against 1,063,434 cubic yards 
io the preceding year. 

The expenditure on working account which is made up onlyat the end of each 
Harbour Commissioner's year at 3l8t December, was for theyear ended 31st December 
1880, $147,038, with an aggregate of 1,219,231 cubic yards dredged, as f^ainst 
$143,354 for 1879 with 843,210 cubic yards dredged. 

The floating plant in the work was substantially the Bai][ie as before, and consisted 
of two large and three ordinary elevator dredges for working in earth ; three elevator 
dredges for working in rock ; three spoon drSiges part of the time ; two steam htone=^ 
lifters ; seven screw tugs ; one paddle wheel tug ; five barges used as coal tenders^ 
iDd smiths' shops ; nineteen hopper bottom scows and three flat scows. 

Yours respectfully, 

JOHN KENNEDY, 

Chief Engineer. 
H. D. Whitney, Esq., 
Secretary. 



138 [1881] 



APPENDIX Na i6. 



KBPOET OF MONTBBAL HARBOR COMMISSIONERS ON LAKB ASJ> 
RIVER WORKS BETWEEN MONTREAL AND QUEBEC. 



Harbor Commissioners of Montreal, 
No. 16997. Seorbtart's Office, 

Montreal, 12th September, 1881. 

&R, — Referring to your letter of the 6th ultimo, asking for certain information 
concerning the lake and river works between Montreal and Quebec, I have the honoij 
to transmit herewith copy of a report from the Chief Engineer on the subject, whicU 
the Commissioners hope will be found to contain all the details required. 

I have the honor to be. 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

H. D. WHITNET, 

Secretary. 
F. H. Bnnis, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



HARBOR COMMISSIONERS OF MONTREAL. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 

Montreal, 31st August, 1881. 

Dear Sir, — ^I have to acknowledge the receipt of a letter addressed to yon by the 
Secretary of the Department of Public Works, and dated 6th inst., with your request 
that I should furnish the information required by that part of the letter which asks 
the Harbor Commissioners to report to the Depai*tment the present state of the work 
of deepening the ship channel between Montreal and Quebec; what remains to bedon^ 
to complete it ; the probable cost of the works yet to be executed ; the condition of 
the plant employed or on hand, its present value, and what its probable value will bo 
on the termination of the work; the report also to be accompanied by a list of tho 
plant. 

This information I beg to furnish as follows : — 

1. The present state of the work, and what remains to complete it: — 

Cap, Charles. — The work consists of lifting boulders and dredging a shale rock 
shoal, about Jrd of a mile in length ; all but a small fraction of this is now cut through 
to 300 feet wide, and 22 ft. 10 ins. deep at extreme low water, giving a depth ranging 
from that up to about 35 feet according to the time of year and condition of tide. 

Cap la i^oc^.— Shale rock shoal ^th of a mile, overlaid with boulders. The 
north half, or 150 ft. in width is deepened to 22 ft. at lowest water, and 1,220 feet of 
this is fui*ther deepened to 23 ft. 3 in. Of the south half, about 1,500 feet is down to 
22 ft., and the remaining 3,000 fL to 20 ft. The depth of water at each place will 
vary from the depths given to 12 ft. additional according to the state of tide and 
time of year. 

8t AnrC* Shoal and Cap Levrard-^A series of small detached shoals of clay and 
boulders, through which the channel has been finished to 25 ft. at low water. 



[1881] 139 



Becaneour. — ^The small shoals of hard pan and boulders have been cut away K> 
22^ ft. at low water, and are yet to be deepened to 25 fb. A few places in the traverse 
immediately above, require to have boulders removed. 

Port St Fronds. — The south points of the Iron and Force shoals, of hard clay 

* ind boulders have been almost cut through at a depth oi 25 fL The small remaining 

pieces are yet to be cut through, and the cutting is also to be enlarged to the north. 

Nicolet Traverse. — Some small clay shoals to be cut through to 25 fL at low 
water. 

Lake St Feter.— The soft clay flats fh)m No. 3 Light vessel to No. 2, 11§ milee 
in length, are cut through to 25 ft The remaining portions, about 6^ miles in all, 
are yet to be deepened from their present depth of 22j^ feet to 25 ft. 

Ik de Grace. — ^The channel to be straightened and deepened in several places 
throughout a distance of nearly \ a mile in sand cutting. 

Ue St Ours. — A shoal of stiff clay and sand nearly f of a mile in breadth, has 
been cut through and finished to a depth of 25 ft. at low water. 

Ckmtrecceur Channel. — From the lower end to the Bend a distance of l-j^th miles is 
finished to 25 ft. From the Bend to the Contrecoeur Traverse there are yet about 1} 
miles in soft clay to be deepened from 22^ feet to :&5 feet. 

Fointe Marie. — Several small clay shoals have been cut down to a depth of 25 feet. 

Cap St Michel and lie Delorier. — About one mile of clay shoals have been 
dredged over and finished to a depth of 25 feet. 

Varennes. — The Pouillier Varennes, and the larger clay shoal below, about IJ 
miles in all, have been cut throagh to 25 feet deep at low water. 

Fointe-aux-TremhUs. — ^About J of a mile has been dredged to 22J feet through 
clay and boulders. The remaining portion about 2 miles in length, consisting of clay 
boalders and some shale rock has been dredged to 25 feet deep. 

Montreal — ^The ship channel with exception of a few small places is all deepened 
to 25 feet. 

2. The probable cost of the work yet to be executed will be about $180,000. 

3. The condition of the plant employed or on hand. The plant which all belongs 
to the Harbour Commissioners, is all m good working condition, and \h in actual upe 
on the works. One elevator dredge, one tug, one stone lifter, two barges and some 
acows are old, and the timber of the hulls somewhat decayed, but all the rest of the 
fleet is in excellent order. 

4. The present value of the plant, and its probable value on the termination of 
the work. The value of the plant, made upon the basis of its first cost and subsequent 
4epreciations is at present about (470,000, and its value at the termination oi the 
work may be taken at about seven and a half per cent, less, or say $400,000. 

5. Jjist of plant employed : — 
Eight elevator dredges. 
One side wheel tug. 
Eight screw tugs. 

Two stone lifters. 

Five barges (coal tenders and smiths' shops.) 

Nineteen hopper bottom scows. 

Three flat scows. 

Equipment of shipyard, and machine shop at Sorel, and of floating shops. The 
]»riDcipal items are launching ways, shears, steam engine and boiler, four lathes, 
iron planer, shaping machine, drills, steam hammer, 6 forges, two furnaces, and plate 
bending machine. 

Yours respectfully, 

JOHN KENNEDY, 

Chief Engineer. 
H. D. Whitnet, Esq., 

Secretary, etc. 



140 riB81] 



APPENDIX No. 17. 



KEPORT ON RIVER SAGUBNAY IMPROVEMENT BELOW CHICOUTIMI, 

No. 19736. 

Chief Engineer's Offioi, 

Ottawa, 16th J)eceinber, 188 i 

Sir, — Herewith I traDsrait a report by Mr. Rosa on the works executed by him 
daring the fiscal year 18t0-81, in the improvement of the River Sugaenay below 
Chicoatimi. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



F. H. Ennis, Esq., Secretary, 

Public Works Department. 



HKNRY P. PERLBY, 

Chief Engineer. 



QuEBBO, 1st December, 1881. 

SiR,-^The removal of boiLldei*s and small stones in the channel of the river 
Saguenay during the fiscal year 1880-^1, was commenced on the 5th •f July, 1880, 
after the freshets, and continued to the 5th October ; and from the 20th to 30th June, 
1881. 

The boulders and small stones were removed for a length of about one mile, and 
a width of from two hundred to two hundred and fitty feet. 

Six hundred and twenty-six boulders, making four hundred and seventy Qubie 
yards, or one thousand and fifty-seven tons, were removed and deposited on the shore, 
or in the deep water in holes where there is more than twenty feet at low tide. 

There are still three shoals to be removed in the distance where soundings were 
taken in 1877, and two others above. Some dredging should also be done near Chicou- 
timi wharf, so as to have a depth of 10 feet at low tide. 

The amount expended in the removal of boulders during the fiscal year 
1880-81, is «3,330.18, 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH ROSA, 

Snperintending Engineer, 
HiNRT F. Perlet, Esq., Chief Engineer, 

Department rublic Works, Ottawa. 



^ 



[1881] 141 



APPENDIX No. i8. 



EBPORT ON THE TBMISCOUATA ROAD. 

No. 19716. 

Cnisr Enoinsbr's Oftioe, 

Ottawa, 16th Dec, 1881. 

Sm, — ^Herewith I transmit for the information of the Hon. the Minister a report 
b7Mr. B. Marquis, on the repairs to the Temiscouata Eoad, during the \mt fiscal 
year, and his estimate for works considered as urgent to be executed during 1882-83. 

1. To repair the flooring and hand-railing of the bridge 

across the Green Eiver at the eighth mile t 100 00 

2. To reoonstnict the bridge over the St. Francis River, 

at the 16th mile 1,000 00 

3. To reconstruct the bridge at the 38th mile known as 

Little River bridge 400 00 

4. Repairing the bridge at the 49th mile 100 00 

6. Repairing culverts between the 9th and 41st miles. . . 200 00 

6. Clearing underbrush from sides of road 200 00 

Making a total of $2,000 00 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

^ HENRY P. PERLET. 

Chief Engineer. 
?. H. Enhu, Esq., 

Secretary, Public Works Department. 



FRASsaviLLX, 12th December, 1881. 

Sib, — According to your telegram, dated 6th inst., I have the honor of trans- 
mitting the following report concerning the works executed and now being executed 
mder my direction on the Temiseouata Road during the present year. 

1. I have reconstructed at the 64th and 66th miles, in pine and cedar of first 
qnali^i two bridges known as "Griflin's Bridges" with the following dimensions ; — 

No. 1, length 176 feet, width 18 feet. 

" 2 " 145 " " 18 " 
These two bridges have cost (800. 

2. Reconstruction (actually being executed) of the bridge known as "Cabana 
Bridge" — probable cost $1,800, according to the estimate given in my preceding 
wport. 

As regards the works of 1880, please look at page 113 of the annual report of 
tke Honorable the Minister of Public Works, and after having consulted my dataSf 
of the 14th December of that year, at which date the works were brought to a close, 
you will see that the appropriated sum has been expended for the items mentioned 
in the paragraphs numbered 1 and 2, (construction 1880). 
»— 10 



U2 [1881J 



In accordance with your request I fumiBh a statement of the repairs cooBiden 
418 urgent for the year lo82. 

1. Bepairs to the railings and flooring of a bridge at the 

8th mile, on the Green River ; probable cost $ 100 00 

2. Beconstruction at the 16th mile, of the bridge on the 

8t. Francis River, width of the water 50 feet; pro- 
bable cost y 1,000 00 

3. Reconstruction at the 38th mile, of the bridge known 

as '< Little River Bridge," width of the water 30 

feet; probable cost 400 00 

4. Bepairs at the 49th mile, to a bridge, increasing the 

height of a pier ; cost 100 00 

5. Repairs to a certain number of culverts on an extent 

of 32 miles of road from the 9th to the 4lst miles, 

to cost 200 00 



Total estimates $1,800 (0 

To this please add an additional 8um of $200, being of absolute Decessiiyfi 
clearing the sides of the road from underbrush, on an extent of 20 miles of the sai 
Temiscouata Road, opposite the non-conceded Government lands. 

So, the appropriation to be asked for the year 1882, is $2,000. 

The whole respectfully submitted. 

I remain. 

Tour most humble servant, 

ELZEAR MARQUIS. 
fi£NBT P. Pbrley, Esq., 

Chief Engineer, Ottawa. 



[1881] 143 



APPENDIX Na 19. 



SLIDES AND BOOMS— NEWCASTLE DISTRICT. 



Trent Canal Works, 

Slides and Booms Division, 

Engineer's Office, 
|o. 20076. Peterboro', 23rd December, 1881. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the works under my 
charge, connected with the Department of Public W^rks, for the &cal year ended 
Jane 30th, 1881. 

The works on the Biver Trent and the waters of what was formerly known as 
the '' Newcastle District " are divided into two classes ; those erected exclusively 
fir the improvement of the navigation of the waters of Midland Ontario comprising 
oneclass, and those erected to facilitate the descent of timber, saw logs, &o., the other. 

The works erected by the Government which come under the head of the former 
daes consist of several locks and canals connecting long stretches of navigation upon 
wluch there are at present engaged 18 steamers of various tonnage, the largest being 
ibout 362 tons, with a draught of 4 ft. 10 in. ; these are principally employed in towing 
the products of the forest and the mine, others are engaged in the passenger trade 
and the carriage of grain, &c. 

These works are under the direct control of the Department of Bailways and 
Canals, to which I have already submitted my annual report. 

The works embraced in the latter class consist of slides, dams, booms, and all 
•och works as are necessary to facilitate the descent of timber, &c., down the various 
lapids that occur at the outlets of the several lakes composing the inland navigation 
of Midland Ontario, and in the Biver Trent which flows into the Bay of Quinte, an 
arm ef Lake Ontario, near the head of the Biver St. Lawrence. 

To the works comprised in the latter class this report has chiefly reference, and 
in sabmitting to you, for the information of the Honorable the Minister, a detailed 
description of the various works at the several stations, together with the ropairo 
executed during the past year and those required, I shall be as brief as possible. 

FENSLON FALLS. 

The works at this station consist of a dam 304 ft. in length and 7 fl. high, a slide 
290 ft in length and 33 ft. wide, and a boom 3090 ft. in length, dividing the river into 
two channels, one being for the passage of timber and the other for steamboats. 

The repairs executed during the past year consisted in partially renewing the 
flooring of the slide, which was damaged to such an extent as to impede the passage 
of timber. 

The improvements required consist in renewing the side walls of the slide three 
courses high, and extending the line of piers above the entrance a sufficient distance 
to ensure safety in directing the running of timber into the slide ; as at present it 
sometimes occurs — when a strong gale is blowing — the •* drive " breaks loose and a 
portion is carried over the dam. 
7-lOi 



144 [ISSlj 



The following is the quantity of timber that passed through the slide at tlii 
BtatioD, and on which tolls were collected, during the past year : — 

Saw logs 259,120 

Boom timber (pieces) 4,140 

Square ** " 2,566 

SCUQOO RIVER. 

This is a branch of the main lino of navigable waters in a south-westerly dire 
tion, and upon which there is a traffic of considerable importance carried on in li 
towing of timber, sawn lumber, grain, &c., to the Town of Lindsay, in the Townat 
of Ops, the principal town in the County of Victoria ; and also to Port Perry, at i 
head of Lake Scugog, where there are several mills and manufactories of importao 

This river being altogether under the control of the Government of Canada, \ 
appropriation was granted at the last Session of Parliament for the removal 
"snags" and other obstructions to navigation therefrom; accordingly the work 
being carried out, and, although not yet completed, steamers which before its ooi 
mencement could not pass up Uie river, could, at the close of navigation, do so ^vitbQi 
any difficulty whatever. 

A beacon was constructed at the mouth of the river in Lake Sturgeon to dii 
steamboats, but as yet no lij^ht has been fixed thei*eon ; it is necessary that one shoi 
be supplied as soon as possible. Any of the residents on the lake shore would und^ 
take to attend to it for a reasonable remuneration . 

LINDSAY. 



Kid 



Situate on the fiiver Scugou, nine miles from its outlet into Lake Sturgeon, 
works here consist of a wooden lock 134 ft. by 34 It. by 5 ft. water on the lower i 
sill when Sturgeon Lake is level with the apex of the dam at Bobcaygeon ; and a < 
280 ft. in length, 9 ft. high, 30 ft. base. These works are exclusively for the bene' 
steamboat navigation, and the dam is under the control of the Department oi 
ways and Canals. 

A fish pass was constructed in accordance with the request of the Department 
Marine and Fisherien. 

BOBCATGEON. 

The works here, consisting of a canal 973 ft. in length ; a lock of masonry 1 
by 34 ft. bv 5 ft. water on lower sill ; a dam of truss-work 1,262 ft. in length, 6 fL hi, 
whai'ves, ac, are under the control of the Department of Bail ways and Canals. 

In the river approaching the canal, both from Sturgeon Lake and Pigeon 
there exist serious obstructions to the passage of steamers, which wore exempli 
in a very marked manner this autumn, as steamers and loaded barges whicn w«rt 
able to get through the lock in safety were unable to pass up the river. The wat«r 
was unusually low, which, to a great extent, accounted for the obstacles these "hais' 

? resented, and will continue to present under similar circumstances, unless removaA 
would, therefore, respectfully suggest that as there arc 10 or 12 steamei-s navigatial 
this stretch of water trom Bobcaygeon to Lindsay, an amount be placed in til 
Estimates for the coming year for this j)urposo. ^ 

BUCKnORN. ' 

I 

The works hero consist of a dam 387 ft. in length, 5 ft. high ; a slide 95fl-il 
length and 33 ft. wide, with guide-booms, piers, &c. 

The dam which maintains the waters of Pigeon, Buckhorn and Cheraong Lakes 
at the standard level is under the control of the Department of Railways and Canals. 

The !>lide requires a new set of stop logs and tho bulk-head should bo renewed. 

The boom is being rebuilt. 



[1881J 145 



The quantity of timber, kc.y passed through the slide at this station during the 
Bt year consisted of : — 

Saw logs \ 224,331 

Square timber (pieces) 2,366 

Boom " " 2,316 

BURLEIGH. 

The works at this station, consisting of a dam, slide and waste weir, were erected 
dosiyel J to facilitate the descent of timber. This was'one of the stations overfWhich 
i*' Trent Slides Committee" exercised control; but since that body became dis- 
giiDized the works hare been neglected, and the lumber trade is complaining at 
• required repairs not beine carried out. 

> I have no doubt but that the trade would be agreeable to pay a small toll 
k timber &c. passing through, such as would give a fair rate of interest on the 
tpenditure. 

The qoantity of timber, saw logs, &c,* that passed this station during the past 
ir was as follows : — 

Saw logs 314,331 

I Boom timber (pieces) 3,116 

Sqnare " " 2,600 

LAKBFIXLD. 

On the stretch between this station and Burleigh the channal is in several places 
kitrQcted by boulders which, in accordance with instructions, are being removed ; 
pen the water is level with the apex of of the dam there is only 3 ft. 6 in. of water 
iUiese boulders, consequently it was necessary to place slash boards on the dam to 
It the required depth, 4 ft. 6 in. This proceeding was objected to by the settlers on 
|»Lake Shore, who complained that the slash boards penned bacR the water on 
mr lands ; the removal of these boulders will, to a ^eat extent, do away with the 
^alty, inasmuch as there will be no necessity to place such a deep slash board or 
»cket on the dam. 

The dam, I should state, is private property, and such being the case the manage- 
mt is anything but satisfactory to the public interest and is the subject of constant 
i^nte and contention. 

A '< stone lifter " has been at work up to the close of navigation removing the 
Milders, and an extra depth of 12 in. was obtained, giving a total depth of 4 ft. 8 in. 
Rmded the dam is retained at its present height, which is quite sufficient, the draught 
^ the largest steamer plying on the reach being 4 ft. 6 in. at the i 



I stem when laden. 



PITSRBOBOUOH. 



Situate at the head of the navigable stretch from Heely's Falls, a distance of about 
'ailed, upon which there are constantly engaged six steamei-s, and above which there 
tAcoDtinnous rapid extending to Lakefield and a number of saw-miUs, the refuse from 
rhieh is rapidly filling up the channel leading to the wharves, so as to seriously impede 
be navigation. This has been a subject for complaint for the past number of years, and 
Bveral communications have been addressed to the Department thereon, and, in 
<*ordance with instructions received from the Chief Engineer, Mr. Perley, I am 
■roparing a detailed report for submission. 

IiITTLX LAKE. 

Situate one mile below the town of Peterboro'. The works] hero [consist of a 
'^ree^tick retaining boom and four piers. 



li$ [1881] 

The repairs executed conslBted in building three lop^ourses to two of the mew 
and refilling them partially with stone; consti'uctingone pier, and supplying the ^00% 
with new timber and chains. This lake is ali^ being rapidly filleil op with mil 
refuse and at low water saw-dust banks appear. The steamers of late yoare fi«d it 
almost impossible to make the wharf at tne village of Ashburnham, and on seTenl 
oocasions nave run aground ; it is therefore necessary, in the interest of tiie sieaxtt 
boat navigation, that a dredge should be set to work to make a channel to thia whaif 
and those at Peterboro'. 

WHITLAW'S RAPIDS. 

The works here consist of a lock 134 ft. by 34 ft., of good masoniy with solid 
gates; a wing dam 223 ft. long; a cross dam 160 ft, average height about 9ft., witb 
waste weirs and piei*s and guide booms. An additional waste weir with other improve- 
ments was called for by petition No. 84,294, and in accordance with instractiont 
received from your Department, in No. 3,623, September 10th, 1880, the sluice or 
waste weir was constructed and the other improvements carried out. 

The quantity of timber, &c., that passed this station during the past year 
follows : — 

Saw logs 329,600 

£oom timber (pieces) 2,850 

Square " « 141 

The works at this station are under the control of the Department of E&ilwajt 
and Canals, excepting the guide booms and those works connected with the passage 
of timber, &c. 

OTONABEE RIVSB. 

The obstructions that existed in this river, known as "Yankee Bonnet^* 
"Dangerfield,** and "Bobinson's Island'* have been removed and a flat dam con- 
Btructed at Yankee Bonnet shoal. The result of these improvements is that there k 
four inches more water on these shoals than on the lower mitre sill of the lock it 
Whitlaw's Bapids. 

HASTINGS. 

The works here consist of a canal lock and dam ; and a slide for the passage oC 
timber, with guide booms, piers, &c. The canal lock and dam are under the control 
of the Department of Bailways and Canals. 

The repairs executed under the Department of Pablic Works consisted in — 

Constructing a coffer-dam across the river above the dam, on what is known m 
the " Flat Rock,** so as to diy the works below. 

Excavating 600 cubic yards of rock from the bed of the river, so as to deepeft 
the steamboat channel six inches. 

Bemoving boulders and cleaning the channel below the locks. 

Bepairlng and gravelling the dam and renewing the floorir g, and performing 
general repairs to the slide. 

The benefit of these improvements were felt in a very marked manner tliis 
autumn, as notwithstanding the extreme low water which prevailed all along the 
line, the level of Bice Lake (which is maintained by the dam here) was never known 
to be higher at the season of low water. 

The quantity of timber that passed through the slide at this station during tht 
past year was as follows : — 

Saw logs 89,600 

£oom timber (pieces) 950 

Square •* « 250 

hbblt's falls. 

The works here consist of a dam 488 ft. long, 8 ft. high ; a slide 713 ft. long, S3 ft 
wide, with piers and guide booms. 



[1881J Ut 



The dam maintains the water at a navigable height up to Haating's Locks, and 
imder the control of i^e Department of Railways and Canals. 

The dam was gravelled and rec'eixred temporary repairs 

The slide is badly m need of exter/><ivo repairs, the side walls being in a decayed 
mdition. There has been no ontlay on this work for a number of yr^ars. 

The quantity of timber, &c., passed through the slide dui*ing the past year was : 

Saw logs 114,624 

Soom timber (pieees) •, 630 

Square " ** 200 

Cedar " « 7,000 

Shingle butts 780 

HIBDLS FALLS. 

The works at this station are exclusively for the benefit of the lumber trade. 
liej oonsist of two dams, each 96 ft. long; two slides, one 455 ft. long by 33 ft. wide, 
bb other 60 ft. long by 33 ft. wide ; a wing dam of crib-work 638 ft. long and 8 ft. high, 
ad g^ide booms and piers. 

The repairs required at this station consist of the re-building of the portion of 
Im retaining wall of the basin that was cut away some years ago by order of the 
'Trent Slides Committee,'' as the lumberers are determined now to run the lower 
Bde as in former years. 

The qnantiiy of timber, &c., that passed through the slide at this station was: — 

Saw logs 119,414 

Boom timber (pieces) 1,430 

Square " " 200 

Cedar " " 53,500 

CHISHOLM'S RAPIDS. 

The works at this station, consisting of a canal nearly 3,000 feet in length ; a lock 
f first-class masonry, 133 ft. by 33 ft., with 5 ft water on mitro sills ; a dam 715 ft. 
bug and 6 ft. high, are under the conti*ol of the Department of Railways and Canals. 

There is alno a slide 100 ft. long and 50 ft. wide, with guide boom^, &c. 

The dam, which leaked badly, is undergoing general repairs and being fi^ravelled. 

The works at this station connected with the descent of timber, and also those at 
Kddle Falls and Heely's Palls were, in the year 1855, transferred to a comniitteo of 
lunbermen, who were empowered to collect tolls on timber passing down the river, 
■od to render yearly statements to Government of their receipts and expenditure ; 
bat since that period, several changes having taken place, the committee has become 
^rsanized, and in fact there is no committee now. 

I would, therefore, respectfully urge upon the Department the immediate neces- 
>>ty of taking action in the matter and performing thone duties which were entrusted 
to the old ** Trent Slides Committee." Thin so cal led committee has not expended any 
money of any consequence on the works for the past number of years, and has not 
•^n made an effort to keep the works in a propter state of repair. 

The loll that should be collected on the saw logs that pass through the slides at 
Kiddle Palls and Heely's Falls should more than pay for the annual expenditure • 
'^qmred at these stations. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

THOMAS D. BELCHER, 
^ ' Superintending Engineer. 

^' H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Public Works. 



148 



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APPENDIX No. 21. 



BEPOBT OF THE SEORBTABT OP THE OFFICIAL AEBITEATOES. 



Ottawa, 30th September, 1881. 

BoLj — ^I beg to transmit herewith a statement of the claims referred to and arbi- 
trated or reported npon by the Official Arbitrators in connection with the Department 
of Pnblio Works, dnring the fiscal year ended 30th Jane, 1881. 

I have the honor to be. 
Sir, 
Tour obedient servant, 



CHS. THIBAULT, 

Sec. to the Official Arbitratars. 



?. H* BmnSy Esq^ 

Seoretary, Department of Pablio Works, 
« Ottawa. 



152 



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[1881] 163. 



APPENDIX No. 22. 



BBEAKWATERS ON THE COAST OF GASPfi. 



(Translation.) 
No. 20080. Montreal, 28th December, 1881. 

Sir, — ^In the month of January last, I had the honor of addressing you a letter 
respecting certain breakwaters of which I recommended the construction at several 
points on the coast of Gasp^, in order to facilitate the working of the sea-fisheries^ 
and consequently to increase the produce of the same. 

In that letter, I mention several important facts which seem to me to establish 
in an incontrovertible manner the good effects which would result from these break- 
waters, fiut, unfortunately, my letter came to hand too late to be inserted in your 
ezccdlent report for 1880. 

As this question of breakwaters will probably be brought forward, daring the 
ooming session of Parliament, it would perhaps be a convenient thing that the 
Members of the House of Commons and oi the ^nate, and the general public should 
have before them a document (however short it may be) which treats of the matter, 
and which fUmishes certain information which possesses a degree of importance. 
For these reasons, I beg that you will do me the honor to insert my letter of last 
year in your report for this year. 

The communication in question will interest, 1 think, that portion of our popu» 
lation which resides in the interior of our country, and which is almost completely 
ignorant of the difficult conditions under which our sea-fisheries are carried on. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. FOIiTIN. 
The Honorable 

Sir Hector L. Lanoevin, K.C.M,G., C.B , 

Minister of Public Works. 



Ottawa, January 31, 1881. 
Sir, 

I have already had the honor of drawing your attention frequently to the 
necessity of consti'ucting breakwaters in several of tiie roadsteads on the coast of 
Gaspesia, for the purpose of affording our fishermen necessary facilities for the 
prosecution of their calling — so difficult, so dangerous, and, in general, so unre- 
manerative— with bettor chances of success and to enable them to draw from the sea 
a larger amount, than now, of production for their labor. 

Now, it should not be forgotten that our fishermen are not the only class who 
willbenefit by this increase of wealth, because, just in proportion as the products 
of our fisheries are augmented, the fishermen being the largest consumers, as a 
class, of manufactured goods, as well as of foreign produce, from their increased 
ability to purchase, manufacturers will receive increased orders, and commerce in 



154 [1881] 

general will be largely benefited by this state of things, while the Treasury will 
profit also by the increased amount of custom duties derived from importation. 

But these are not the only reasons which, at this time, prompt me more thaa 
«ver, to insist on the necessity of aiding one of our most important indastries which 
furnishes articles for exportation to an amount of more than six milUw (6,000,000) 
dollars, and which brings also to our domestic trade and* consumption, produce of 
^reat value, of which unfortunately, in this countiy, there is not generally a correet 
appreciation. 

Now, this industry is threatened, although not entirely in its very existence, yet 
to such an extent that if the present state of matters is not changed, instead of being 
prosperous as in bygone years, until lately, it will become languisning, and eventually 
fail in furnishing subsistence to those engaged in its prosecution — a class, as shown 
by vital statistics, which increases with a most remarkable rapidity — and the inevitable 
consequence will be, that our fishermen will have largely to aoandon their native 
ahores, and emigitite to foreign countries. 

And whence this threat ? From the competition of Norwegian fish—- especially 
codfish— in the foreign markets in which Gasn^ fish, until within a few years past, 
held first place, and had sold with facility ana profit 

The abundance of Norwegian fish for the last few years in these markets, in 
which, besides, it arrives at an earlier date than Canadian fish, — ^has caused there an 
important lowering of prices, so that our codfishery, carried on under the like con- 
ditions as heretofore, is not sufficiently productive to yield profits to our fishermen 
and merchants, at the reduced prices. 

I take the liberty of submitting to you the following extracts firom a letter 
which I received from Mr. Henrv N. jDe Veuille, a^ent of the fishing establishment 
of the firm of Chai*les Bobin & Co., on the coast of Gaspesia — the following being 
what he wrote me under date of 6th January, 1881 : — 

" Next summer we are going to retrench and to try to economise still more 
'< than the past season. 

^^ Appertaining to the Pei*ce establishment, we are going to close North Beach 
'< and Anse-au-Beaufils. 

" When I went to Perc4, in 1818, we had 124 boats fishing. Next summer I do 
<< not intend having more than 60 or G5 ; besides this, wo will close Anse-au-Basque 
" at Caraquet. AtCaraquet we will keep only 2 or 3 boats, but we will increase 
" slightly at Shippegan and North Shore. As for advances to drafbmen, we are 
" doinff as usual, but we are reducing dealers a little ; as you may well suppose, we 
'*' will leave off those that remain in debt and keep those that pay. 

^' Should this coming season's transactions not be an improvement on the past, 
there is not much doubt that a fUrther reduction will become imperative. ' 

*' Did I not tell you in Perc4 in 1878, that the Canadian fish merchants wore 
experiencing a competition that would become serious ?" 

It seems to me that the facta above stated by Mr. De Veuille do not require 
comment. 

For, on one hand, the codfishery in Norway, aided and encouraged as it has 
been by all possible means— telegraphs, breakwaters, towboats, etc., etc. — ^yields 
products of an extraordinarv abundance. And, on the othd^ hand, the fish merchants 
of that country, enlightened as they have been by those of their consuls who reside 
in fishing countries, have had for the last few years, their codfish intended for expor- 
tation to warm countries cured after the Gaspd method, instead of making it into 
" stock-fish " as formerly, and it is that kind of codfish taken in such large quantities, 
and consequently sold at low prices, which competes so disastrously with the codfish 
of Canada and Newfoundland in the markets of Brazil Spain, Portugal and Italy. 

I cannot speak extensively in this letter of the codfishories of Norway and their 
immense production, but permit me to say a word of those which are best known— I 
moan the fi>heries of the Lofoten Islands. 

The fishery of the Lofoten Islands— a group on the coast of Norway, 160 miles 



[1881] 165 



in extent, lying between 67° and 69"* 30' N. latitude— viz. : 12'72 ("twelve jhundred 
tod seventy-two) geographical miles farther north than Quebeo, ana 1,290 (twelve 
hundred) miles farther north than the central part of the 6alf of St. Lawrence, . 
yielded 26,500,000 (twen^-six and a half million) codfish, daring the fishing season 
of 1879, employing 26,656 men. Vessels and fishing-boats employed, 6,222. 

In 1878, for the reqairements of that fishery and the nsh trade, 41,709 tele- 
graphic dispatches were sent and received at these Lofoten Islands. In 1879, these 
Igoree most have been still greater. 

Now, we mast acknowledge with regret, that the prodactions of oar fisheries 
have not aoKmented for some years past, and in certain parts they have decreased. 
Bat it woald be necessary for oar fishermen, in order to con^pete successfally with 
the fisheries of other countries, that they shoald aagment the prodaction. Bat can 
they do so? 
Yes I 

And how ? 

By obtaining more facilities, more encoaragement for the different operations, 
all of them difficalt and laborioas, which constitate the art of sea fishing. 
And what do thev principally reqaire ? 
Shelter for their boats. 

Every one knows that on the coast of Gaspesia there is not a single port, with 
the exception of Gasp4 Basin, which, however, is too far inland to be aseful as a 
fishing harbor. 

W ithoat harbors, withoat shelter, these fishermen lose one-third of their time. 
At each high wind or tempest, blowing on shore, they are obliged, after having 
discharged ballast, to hanl their boats on shore. 

And when fine weather has retamed, they are obliged to laanch them. 
And how many boats are either injured or destroyed under these operations, 
which have often to be performed daring one night, when the surf, rolled in by the 
fory ot the gale, threatens destraction alike to the fishermen and their boats ? At 
times, the wind springs ap suddenly, and the sea, in consequence, rises with so much 
rapidity that before the fishermen can come to the rescue, their boats are smashed 
with the sails and outfits lost. 

In the roadstead of Perc4 alone, I believe, that within the last ten years one 
hundred boats have been lost. Yalue—ten thousand dollars ($10,000). 

And when the boats are thus hauled ashore, how many fishing days are lost? 
For the fishermen have to wait antil the return of fine weather, and further until 
the surf has gone down sufficiently to permit the launching of their boats. 

OAen, when they are on the fishing grounds and the catch most abundant, they 
are seen suddenly to raise anchor and scud for the shore, and by so doing, probably, 
lose their beet day's fishing. 

The reason of this movement is because the weather has become threatening 
tDd they fear the approach of a gale from seaward. 

In this case it is imperative that they reach land and have beached their boats 
before the sea has risen and breakers have formed on the shore ; for, if too late in 
making the land, the attempt to beach is certain death to the men and future misery 
to their widows and orphans. 

According to the avowal of all competent men, fishermen who prosecute their 
bosiness on a coast unprovided with shelter from on-shore winds, lose, at least, one- 
third of their time. 

And so, by providing the necessary shelter, on those parts of the coasts of 
Oflspeeia which are opposite to good fishing gi'ounds, the codfishery, with the same 
ontnt, with the same expense of equipment, and with the same number of men as 
BOW employed, will produce fully one-third more than at present. 

This will enable our fishermen and merchants to compete with the Norwegians 
under favorable circumstances. 

The roadsteads in which the first works are projected are those of Percd, Cape 
Ciove, and Grand Pabos. 



lie [1881] 



PrelimiDary sarTOYS have already been made at these places. 

But I would not advise you to have any of these works begun until Mr. Perley 
Chief Engineer of Harbors, has personally visited the places. 

And I offer to accompany him on this tour of inspection (which might tak* 
place when I make my visit to the county of Gasp^), so as to give him myself, aiK 
to get the most competent persons residing at these places, to furnish him wit! 
precise information. 

Once the sites chosen, and the kind of breakwater adopted, the contracts can b 
given, the wood fbr the structures can be drawn from the forest in winter and at tii< 
same time the necessary stone for ballasting the piers can be provided. 

1 do not know at what sum tbe carrying out of these works may be estimated 
but I believe I cannot ask, for this year, less than ten thousand dollars ($10,000), 
for each of the breakwaters named, in all — thirty thousand dollars ($30,000). 

I hope that you will be pleased to put that amount in your Intimates, and U 
have it submitted for the approbation of the Hon. the Privy Council and the Honsef 
of Parliament 

In having these worses executed, which of course I desire to see extended to all 
our sea coasts not possessed of natural harbors, you will confer important benefitc 
on our fishing industry and on our Maritime population, which is no unimportant 
fiiotor in the Confederation. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

P. FOBTDI. 
Ths Hon. H. L. Langxvin, CJB., 

Minister of Public Works. 



[1881] 15T 



APPENDIX No. 23. 



COPIES OP EBSOLUTIONS PASSED BY L^VIS, MONTREAL AND QUEBEC 
BOARDS OP TRADE IN PATOft OP AN EXTENSION OP TBUB 
TELEGRAPHIC SYSTEM TO POINTB DES MONTS. 



MoNTEXAL, 6th Jauaaryy 1882. 

Mt Dbab Sir, — ^The Board of Trade of L^vis has passed resolutions approvlBg 
the extension ot the telegraph line to Porteau, and has sent a petition to me Honu 
^ Minister of Pablic Works based on the said resolutions. 

If the petition has been received, I would suggest that it be published in the 
Annual Report of 1881, together with the petitions of the Boards of Trade of 
Montreal and Quebec. 

Yours truly, 

P. PORTIN. 
F. H. ENins, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Public Works. 



OOPT OF RBSOLUTIONS PASSED BT THE LiVIB BOARD OF TRADB. 

(Translation.) 

No. 14140. 

Office of the L^tis Board of Thade, 

Levis, 18th May, 188L 

Sib, — I haye the honor to transmit the following, a copy of a resolution adopted 
by the Council of the L^vis Board of Trade, at a meeting held on the liTth May, 
instant. 

** Moved by Mr. C. W. Carrier, seconded by Mr. M. Etienne Samson, and 

^' Resolved^ — ^That this Council has learned with pleasure that the Government 
has taken stejps towards the construction of a telegraphic line on the north shore of 
the River St. Lawrence, from Murray Bay to Bersimis, with a branch to 
Chicoutimi ; — 

'< That this Council deems it its duty to point out, that it would be more 
advantageous to the interests of ocean navigation to extend the line at once as far as 
Pointe des Monts, the most important point on the whole north shore, — inasmuch as 
one-half of the vessels, and especially sailing vessels, navigating the river both 
inwards and outwards, pass in sight of the lighthouse erected on that point \ — 

** That moreover, shipwrecks often occur in the bay lying to the east of that 
point, and that in consequence of the difficulty and at times the impossibility of 
communicating with the south coast or with Quebec, the crews and passengers have 
undergone great suffering, and the vessels themselves have been lost, whereas with 
more speedy assistance they would have been saved ; — 

'* That the system of tow-boats established by the citizens of L6vis and Quebeo 
has rendered great services to navigation, and that the tow-boats are stationed on the 
nwtii shore between Pointe des Monts and the Brandy Pots; — 
1—11 



158 [1881] 



" That for tho above reasons this Council recommends that the line be extcrdi 
as far as Pointe des Monts." 

Believe me to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JULIKN CHABOT, 
Chairman of the Livis Board of Trade. 

Hon. Sir H. h. Lanqevin, K.C.M^G,, C.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa. 



MEMORIAL OW THK QUEBEC BOA&D OF TRADE. 

No. 14196. 

QuECEO, 20th May, 1881 

The memorial of the Quebec Board of Trade — Eespectfull v sheweth : — 

That your memorialists, in representing the inte^e^t8 of trade in general, have 
pleasure in noting the recent action of the Government in appropriations for the com 
pletion of telegraphic communication to Chicoutimi and Betsiamis j 

That any effort in the direction of perfecting the comprehensive scheme of tel 
graphic relations along the lower Eiver St. Lawrence and Gulf will doubtlr 
receive favorable consideration at the bands of the Government ; 

That the bay north-eastward from Pointe des Monts rtowads Seven Islands hi 
. been the scene of many marine disasters, aggravated from the fact that no read, 
a<?fli8tance can be had under such circumstances before (as has occurred in man; 
cases) total loss and destraction of shipping has taken place, it being often impossibid 
to commuoieate with tho south shore for aid, especially late in the fall and dariug 
heavy weather ; 

That the continuation of electric connection to Pointe des Monts would ai<i 
materially as a means in procuring such help as would result in lessening destrnctioi 
to shipping and probably loss of life ; and the construction of this work would prov( 
a great boon to the marine community, as well as an auxiliary towaids perfecting 
the safe navigation of the river ; 

Wherefore, your memorialists will ever humbly pray that the Government ma^ 
in its wisdom, see fit to take such measures as may end in the construction of tb^ 
works indicated ; 

And your memorialists will ever pray, &c. 

On behalf of the Council of the Quebec Boai*d of Trade. 

O. MURPHT, 

President. 



P. H. ANDREWS, 

Secretary. 



Hon. H. L. Lanosvin, K.C.M.G., C.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa. 



[1881J 169 

OOPT OF RESOLUTIONS PASSBD BY THS MONTREAL BOARD OF TRADB. 

Ho. 14673. 

Offices Board of Trade, 

Montreal, fcth June, 1881. 

Sib, — ^In aocordance with the action of tho Council of this Boani, at a mee»ini< 
kdd yesterday, I have pleasure in transmitting herewith a copy of resolutions 
adopted nnanimously, having relation to the telegraphic pystem which the Govern- 
ment is po advantageously establishing in tho River and GuH of bt. Lawrence. 

In doing so I am specially to solicit your early consideration of the views 
expressed by the Council in ihe second resolution, and to express the hope that you 
may be pleased to give effect lo it, believinir, as the Council does, that tho extension 
tloDg the north shore, as indicated, will be an invaluable section of the great 
aterprise. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Yonr obedient servant, 

W. J. PATTERSON, 

Secretary, 
Hon. Sir H. L. Lanoevin, K.C.M.G,, C.B., 

' Minister of Public Works, Ottawa. 



COPT OF BESOLUTIOKS ADOPTED AT MEETING OF COUNCIL OF THE MONTREAL BOARD 

OF TRADE, HELD ^TH MAT, 1881. 

" That this Couneil has constantly watched the progress of the. work of intro- 
ducing and constructing the telegraphic system in the River and Gulf of St. Lawrence, 
iacluding its extension to Anticosti, the Magdalen Islands and Bird Rock, and very 
respectfully bogs thus to convey to the Dominion Government its appreciation of the 
very great services rendered to the commeree of Canada in lessening the dangers of 
navigation and reducing the risk of loss of valuable merchandize and ships, as well as 
providing facilities for saving lives and propert'y, hesides the advantages that will be 
derived by those who are engaged in the fisheries, &c ;" 

"That the Council also views with satisfaction the progress now making with 
work on the north shore extension, for that portion of the scheme must inevitably be 
of great service in promotinfij the safety of navigation and the value of fisheries in 
the Gulf, and would earnestly urge upon the Government the obvious advantages 
that must farther accrue from continuing the wires without delay as far in the 
meantime as Pointe des Monts ; and 

"That the Secretary of this Board be instructed to transmit a copy of these 
resolutions to the Hon. Sir Hector L. Langev in, K.C.I! .G., C.B., Minister of Public 
Works, with the request of the Council that he may be pleased to give the suggested 
eitension to Pointe des Monts his early consideration. 



160 



[1881] 



24. 



Statement of the Opening and Clothing of Navigation. 



PROVINCE OF NOVA SOOTIA. 



Name of Port. 



Annapolis .. 

Barring^n.. 

Bridgewater 
Digbjr 

Halifax 

Liverpool .. 

Lockeport... 
Lnnenourff . 
Parrsboro ... 

Pictou 

Shelburne ... 

Sydney 

windflor 

Yarmouth ... 



County. 



Annapolis ... 

Shelburae ... 

Lnnenborg . 
Oigbj 

Halifax 

Queen's.. 

Shelburne ... 
Lunenburg . 
Cumberland 

Pictou 

Shelburne ... 
Cape Breton 

Hants 

Yarmouth ... 






Always open . 



do 



Dec. 18... (March 20. 
Always open 



do 
do 



do 

do : 

do 

Dec. 24...1Apra 16.. 

Always open 

Dec. 30... I April 27.. 

do 27...|Marchl8.. 

Always open 



r 



V Oi 



Feet. 
15 to 20 

12 to 20 

StolO 
18 

20 to 80 

7 

8 
12 



19 

40 to 60 

48 



13 



Remarks. 



In rery severe winters thin ioe fonai 
but screw steamers coold alwaji 
enter. ] 

At anchorage, wharret dry at loi 

water. | 

About 10 feet at end of 8teamboil| 

pier. 
At wharres, 70 to 180 fee\in harbor. 
On bar ; at Brooklyn Breakwater U 

feet. 

At wharves, 20 to 22 feet in harbor. 

Dry in harbor. 

At wharves, 40 feet in haibor. 



Dry. 



* 
4 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Buctouche .. 

Chatham 

Dalhousie ... 

Dorchester.. 

Moncton 

Newcastle. . 
Richibucto.. 
Sackville.... 

Shediac 

St. Andrews 
St John 

St. Stephen . 



Kent 

Northumberland 
Restigouche 

Westmoreland ... 

do 
Northumberland 

Kent 

Westmoreland ... 

do 

Charlotte 

St. J<ahti. 

Oharlotto 



Nov. 


20... 


do 


20... 


do 


30... 


Dec. 


16... 


do 


17... 


Nov. 


22... 


do 


20... 


Dec. 


17... 


Nov. 


22... 



Always open 
do 

do 



Anril 18.. 

do 20.. 

May 2.. 

March 22 . 

do 30.. 
April 19.. 

do 20.. 
March 25. 
April 19.. 



12 

35 to 40 

30 

10 



8 feet on bar. 
In harbor, 18 feet on bar. 
In south channel, 70 feet 
channel. 



30 
12 
4 
12 
14 
24 



InThiarl 



bor, 18 feet on bar. 



1 
J 
A 
I 



In inner harbor. 

At entrance to harbor, 40 feet to Ufl 

feet in harbor. 
30 feet at landing place '< The Ledge," 

4 miles below the town. 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 



Charlotte town 
C*,?icumpec 

Om>rgf:town ... 

Souria.. .». 

Sunimiartlde.*.. 



Queen's 
Pnncer., 

do ... 
Prince. 



Dec. I... 
do 24.„ 


April 20... 
do 4... 


20 
9 


Jm. 3, '81 
Dec. 31... 
Nov. 20... 


do 24... 
do 29,., 
do 14... 


13 
13 
16 



At wharvea, 40 to §0 feet in strti»* 
Od outer bftji 1 1 feet on ianer bir; 

i& fuel to 30 feet in harbor 
At railway wharij 30 f^jetin itiesa* 
do 30 do 



do 



a0to30 do 



-__- 






[1881] 




161 


APPENDIX No. 2^^0(mtinued. 


PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 


TTiine <rf Port. 


County. 


O 

li 


1 

a 

s. 

Q 


Depth of Water 
available At 
low water. 


Remarks. 


EliJCDatimi 

Ubaie 


Chicoutimi 

Charlevoix 

do 


Dec. 6... 

do 16... 
Nov. 24... 
Nov. 27... 

do 21... 

do 20... 
Dec. 3... 
Jan. 15,'81 
Dec. 7... 
Late Dec. 

Nov. 21... 


May 6... 
March 30.. 
EarlvApl. 
April 1... 
do 26... 

do 25... 
do 19... 
do 1... 
do 11... 
Early Apl. 

April 15... 


Feet. 

10 

8 to 14 

over 36 

6tol68 


• 


noalemeiitd 










ffipw Rivers 




17 !At Richelieu and Ontario Navigation 


IpUuer (tn kaufi 


Berthier 


7 to8 
20-5 
10-6 
18 to 24 
17 

7 


Co. '8 Wharf. 


Ecariisie.!..*. 


Bonavcnture 

do 
Riraouski 


22 feet at ordinary low water. 
At end of proposed pier. 

Upper end of new pier, 12 feet old pier, 
6 feet on bar. 


twet 


L'lalet 


r 









feuerillc iHastings 

Cobonrg j Northumberland 

fort Hope Durham 

Toronto Toronto 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



Oikrille 

?on Stanley 

fort Dover 

^rtBorwell 

Il^th 

tfl;^nlle 

wmia 

Goderich 

•in Albert 

faTerburon 

Kincirdine 

^en Sound 

Word 

^rwqu'lle 



Halton .... 

Elgin 

Norfolk... 
Elgin. ... 

Kent 

Essex 

Lambton. 
Huron 

do 

Bruce 

do 

Grey 

do 

do 



Nov. 22.. 

do 25.. 

Dec. 16.. 

do 8.. 

Nov. 25.. 

Dec. 15.. 

do 3.. 

Nov. 14.. 

do 15.. 

Dec 7.. 

do 20.. 

Nov. 26.. 

do 16.. 

do 6.. 

do 14.. 

Dec 2.. 

Nov. 25.. 

Dec 5.. 



April 9... 
do 19... 



do 
do 



9... 
16... 



do 20... 
March 25.. 
April 23... 

do 25... 

do 18... 

do 10... 
March 10.. 
April 25... 

do 20... 



do 

do 

do 

May 



20... 

27... 

24... 

2... 



April 23... 



5 to9 

8 

12 

11-6 to 

16-6 

10 

10 

7 to 8-6 

7-6 to 8 

9 

7 to9 

4 to 40 

10 

6 

20 

9 

9 

10 

12 



At docks, 9 feet in channel. 



At entrance. 

12 feet to 15 feet in the creek. 

11 feet at outer end of dock. 



At entrance. 

At end of pier, 500 feet from shore. 



7—12 



j'a 



1C2 



[1881J 



in 

N 

6 
>< 

5 

W 

Oh 
< 



o 

o 
o 

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£3 
<© -. 

.5 *^ 



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OQ 





CANADA. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



i^ISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR 1881-82 



ON THE WORKS UNDER HIS CONTROL. 



IITTED IN AOCORDANOE WITH TBE PROYISIOKS OF THE ACT THIRTT-FIR8T 
YIOTORIA, CHAPTER TWELVE, SECTION NINETEEN, AS AMENDED BT 
THE ACT PORTT.SBOOND VIOTOBIA, CHAPTER SETBN. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT. 




OTTAWA: 

PRINTED BT MACLEAN, BOGBB & CO., WELLINGTON STREET 

1888. 



r. 



H2456 



'^^ 



: ' \r t ••:: n 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



RTEODUOTION 

DBLIC WORKS OF CANADA -... 

CBUC BUILDIJNGS :— 
Haufax, N. S. — Dominion Building ^.... 

PicTOxr — Marine Hospital ^^.. m 

Charlottstown, P.E.I. — Dominion Building.. «. ••••• . 

DoBCHSSTBB, N.B. — General Penitentiary for the Maritime Provinces. 



St. John — Custom House 

'* New Marine Hospital. 



^ SuBsix— Post Office, Custom HonsCi &e 

WooDSTOOK^-Post Office, Custom House, &c , 

Quebec, P.Q.— Citadel 

" « Fortificatioi 



it 

<f 

(( 
ti 

u 
II 



Wall under Bufferin Terrace. 

Kent and St. Louis Gates 

Cartridge Factory 

Laboratory, &o 

Ghamplaiu Street Elock... 

Custom Hou90 i...,* 

Post-office 

Marine Hospital 

L^vis Ports 



tfoNTREAL — Inland Sevenue Office 

** Barracks, St. Helen's Island. 



Three Bivers— Old Barracks ,. 

St. Vincent db Paul — Penitentiary 

Hull — Post Office and Inland Bevenue Office.. 

Gbc'SE Isle — Quarantaine Station 

St. John's — Post Office, Custom House, &c 

Shbrbrookb— Po.st Office, Custom House, &c.,. 
CmcoDTiMi— Marino Hospital 



•fM. 



Ottawa, Qni.— Parliament Building 

" ** Departmental Building, Eastern Block 

" " Departmental Building, W.estera Block. 

" ." Parliament tiroujjdH - 

" . . ." Monument to Sir George E. Cartier, Bart 

" *f New Supr.eme-CQur.t..».*...MM* .^...^M.t.^MM.i^— 

*" DUP EXCH SBPT *905 



PAGE 

xiii 
xiii 



Xlll 

xiv 
xiv 
xiv 

xiv 

xiv 

XV 

XV 

' XV 
XV 
XV 
XV 

xvi 
xvi 
xvi 
xvi 
xvi 
xvi 
xvi 

xvi 
xvi 

xvii 

xvii 

xvii 

,i 
^vi 

xvii 

xvii 

xviii 

xviii 
xviii 
xviii 
xviii 
xviii 
xviii 



ULB CONG 



IV 



PUBLIC BVILDlNGS^Concluded. 

Ottawa, Ont. — Geological Museum 

" Drill Shed 

" " Rideau Hall 

Cornwall. — Post Office, Custom House, Ac 

Brockvillk.— Post Office, Custom House, &c 

Kingston. — ^Poet Office , 

" PeniteDtiarT 

" Military College 

BsLLiviLLB.— Post Office, Custom House and Inland Serenue Office. 

St. Catabbini's, do do do do 

Hamilton, do do do do 

Stratford, do do do do 

Chatham, do do do do 

Windsor, do do do do 

WiNNiPBO, Man.— Parliament Building 

** " LieutenantGoverner's Residence ..« 

" " Post Office 

" " Immigrant Shedi 

** " Stony Mountain Penitentiary , 

Brandon — Immigrant Station , 

Emerson*— Immigration Agent's Office 

Victoria, B.C.— Post Office 

New Westminster— Penitentiary • 

" Post Office, Custom House, &c 

Nanaimo — ^Post Office, Custom House, &c 

HARBORS AND RIVERS :— 

Prince Edward Island : 

Campbell's Cove 

CoMlleBay 

South River, Murray Harbor 

Pinnette River 

Hillsborough River 

Nine Mile Creek 

Crapaud , 

Grand Rustico 

New London 

Tignlsh 

Jliminigash .^..^.f^.M f«v «••••» ..,>•••;••##• 



PAOI 

xviii 
xii 
xi] 

xij 

xi3 

zi] 
xu 
xi] 

u 

n 

X] 
XI 
XI 
XI 
• XJ 
XX 
XI 

xs 

X3 

xxi 

XX 

xxi 

xxi 



XX] 

xx 

xxii 
xxii 
xxii 

xxii 
xxii 
xxii 
xxii 
xxi 
xxi 



PAGE 

BARBOKS AND RIY EBS-^-Cantinued. 

Nova Scotia : 

MaiD-H^Dieu • •• xxiv 

Cow Bay xxiv 

Port Caledonia xxiv 

Little Glace Bay xxiv 

North Sydney xxiv 

South Ingoniuh xxiv 

Indian IsJandB Beach xxv 

Benacadie ••« xxv 

Mabon xxv 

Port Hood xxv 

Ragged Pond xxv 

Petit de Grat xxv 

Burying Island xxv 

New Glasgow • ••• xxvi 

Biver John zxvi 

T6te-H-ma-gaache • zxvi 

Parrsboro' xxvi 

Hampton zxvi 

Digby xxvi 

Troat Cove xxvi 

Metoghan Biver xxvi 

Cape St. Mary, zzvii 

Tarmouth zxvii 

Brooklyn xxvii 

Voglers Cove. zxvii 

Little Harbor xxvii 

Porter's Lake xxvii 

Niw Brunswick : 

Clifton zzvii 

Shippegan xxvii 

Horse Shoe Shoal xxviii 

BichibuctOQ xxviii 

Buctouohe xxviii 

Cocagne xxviii 

Pointe^a-Chene xxviii 

Qoaco xxviii 

St. John xxviii 

Fort Dnfforin , xxviii 

Harborof St. Andrew's xxix 

River St. John xxix 

River Tobiqne • xxix 

River Madawaska xxix 

pRoviNoi OP Quebec : 

Etang du Nord xx'x 

Perce xxix 

New Carlisle xxix 

Matane xxx 

Trois Pistoles , xxx 

Tadoasac , , x.xx 

Atise da Portage •...•.. xxx 

Ante St. Jean...,, , M......fo ff««» xxj^ 



VI 



PAOI 

HAfiBOES AND EIVBRS— (Swftnued 

Province op QuzBEO^Concluded. 

St. AlphoDsede Bagotville zxx 

Eiver Saguenay xxx 

Grande D^charge....^ xxx 

Eiviere-du-Loup (en bas) xxxi 

Cap k L'Aigle xxxi 

Murray Bay xxxi 

River Oaelle xxxi 

Les Ebouiements xxxi 

He aux Qoudres.. •••, xxxi 

Bay Saint Paul xxxi 

Cmne Island « xxxi 

Grosse Isle xxxi 

Sainte Famille xxxii 

LesEcureuils xxxii 

Eiver Nicolet • xxxii 

Biver Yamaska xxxii 

Eiver Eicheliou xxxii 

Berthier (en haut) xxxii 

Eiver rAssomption xxxii 

Channel between Long Point and Boucherville xxxiii 

Isle aux Noix, • xxxiii 

Laprairie • xxxiii 

Beaubarnois • • xxxiii 

Baoot Hayes Shoal-^Eiver Saint Lawrence c...^ xxxiii 

The. Cedars xxxiii 

St. Placide •••• *■ xxxiii 

Eividre a la Graisse (Eigaud) • xxxi^ 

Eiver duNord ••••••« xxxiv 

Eiver da Lid vre • • xxxiv 

Eiver Gatineaa....« ..••• ..•••,••. .*f« xxxiv 

Province op Ontario : 

Union Suspension Bridge xxxiv 

Eeef below Suspension Bridge^-^Ottawa Eiver •••• xxxiv 

Portsmouth • xxxiv 

Salmon Eiver xxxv 

Belleville xxxv 

Trenton.. • xxxv 

Picton. , xxxv 

Conseoon xxxv 

Cobourg xxxv 

Port Hope xxxv 

Toronto xxxv 

Port Stanley xxxvi 

Goderich xxxvi 

Port Albert xxxvi 

Kincardine xxxvi 

Port Elgin xxxvi 

Southamptoo *. .,.. xxxvi 

Tobermory....^.., , ,. , ^^^\\ 

Bruae Mines....^ xxxvii 

Little Current , xxitvij 

OweQ.Sonnd ....,»*...••# , tMM««M«.t..4*MM ...••/. xxxvii 



vu 



PAQl 

HAEBOES AND BlYEB&-Conchided. 

Province of OsTARio^-Cancluded. 

Thornbiiiy xxxvii 

Collingwood xxxvii 

Province of Manitoba : 

Lake Manitoba ,. xxxvii 

Province of British Columbia. xxxvii 

SURVEYS xxxviii 

DREDGING xxxxiii 

SLIDES AND BOOMS xxxlx 

River Saguenay xxxix 

** St. Maurice xl 

Ottawa District .... xl 

Biver Ottawa xiii 

" Gatineau xliii 

" Madawaska xliii 

" Coulongo xliv 

« Black xliv 

" Petewawa • xlv 

" Da Moiue xlvi 

TRENT RIVER NAVIGATION xlvi 

TELEGRAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE :— 

British Columbia. xlix 

Gulf of St. Lawrence xlix 

Bay of Pandy 1 

The Atlantic Coast 1 

North Shore, River St. Lawrence, — Newfoundland 1 

Signal Service 1 

Manitoba and the North- West Territories 1 

GRAYING DOCK AT ST. JOSEPH DE L^VIS 1 

THE PRmCESS LOUISE WHARF AND DOCKS, RIVER ST. 

CHARLES, HARBOR OF QUEBEC 1 

DEEPENING THE CHANNEL BETWEEN MONTREAL AND 

QUEBEC 1 

PURCHASES AND SALES li 

ARBITRATIONS li 

OPENING AND CLOSING OF NAVIGATION li 

DEPARTMENTAL STAFF. li 



TABLE OF APPENDICES. 



PAOB 

Appendix No. 1. Statement of ezpenditare during fisoal year •••..•«•• 1 

** 2. Tables of distances. 9 

" 3. Eeport on Pablic Buildings, by Thomas Puller, Chief Arohitect. 19 

" 4. fieport on Heating, &c., Publio Buildings, by J. R. Arnold!, 

Mechanical Engineer 30 

" 6. fieport on Harbors and River«^, Dredging and Surveys, by 
H. P. Per ley. Chief Engineer ; with special reports on 
Toronto Harbor, by James B. Eads, C.E. ; on the Overflow 
of Lake Manitoba, by Thov Guorin, C.K.; and on PercA 
Breakwater, by C. F.Boy, O.E 32 

«« 6. Report on Public Works in British Columbia, by Hon. J. W. 

Trutch, C.M.G Ill 

♦* 7. Report on Slide, Booms, Ac, River Saguenay, by H. F. Perley, 

Chief Engineer, and J. Rosa, Superintendent 133 

" 8. Report on Slides and Booms, St. Maurice Disiriit, by Charles 

Lajoie, Superintendent 134 

" 9. Report on Slides and Booms, Ottawa District, by G. B. Brophy, 

Superintendent 136 

** 10. Report.on Slides and Booms, Newcastle District, by Thos. D. 

Bolcher, Superintendent 1 42 

** 11. Report on Telegraph Lines and Signal Service, by F. N. 

Gisborne, Superintendent. .' 147 

*• 12. fieport on Quebec Harbor improvements, nnd Graving Dock 

at Levis, by the Quebec Harbor Commissioners 149 

" 13. Repoitonthe deepening of the Channel between Montreal 

and Quebec, by the Montreal Harbor Commissioners 152 

** 14. Statement of property purchased or Bold, by the Department, 

during the fiscal year 155 

<' 15. Statement of claims submitted to tho Offieiul Aibitrators 156 

«' 16. Statement of the opening and closing of Navigation 158 

•* 17, LiatofMinisters, Deputy Ministers, Secretaries, Chief Engineer© 

and Chief Architects 160 



CANADA. 



REPORT 



OP THB 



MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



FOR TEDS 



FISCAL TEAE ENDED 30th JUNE, 1882. 



10— B 



To Ms Excellency the Bight Hcnarable Sir John Douglas Sutherland CampbeU^ Marquis 
of Lame, one of Her Majesty's Most Honorable Privy Council, Knight of the Most 
Anci&it and Most Noble Order of the Thistle^ and Knight Grand Cross of the Most 
Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor General of 
Canada and Vice Admiral of the same . 

Iai it Pleasb Your Exosllsnot : 

In accordance with the 19ih section of the Act 31 Yictoria, Chapter 12, 1 have 
Ibe honor to sabmit the Annnal Beport of the Department of Public Works, for the 
JMal year ending 30th Jane, 1882. 

It contains an abstract of the operations and a statement of the general ezpendi- 
lore and cost of maintenance, daring the last fiscal year, connected with the yarioos 
|tblic works placed under the control of the Department 






To it is attached a supplement, containing an historical sketch and general 
bimmaries of the operation and expenditure of the Department from 1867 to 1882. 

I In Appendix No. 1, to the Annual Beport, on page 5, will be found, in detail, 
(^ expenditure of the last fiscal year. It is followed by the Annual Beports of the 
Chief Architect, the Chief Engineer and several Agents attached to the Department 
UPablic Works. 

j The Buildings and Works under the control of the Department are :— 
j Public Buildings. 

Ha&bobs and Biykbs. 

D&IDOINQ. 

SiaDSs AND Booms. 

TXLlOnAPHfl. 



PEOVINOB OF NOVA SCOTIA. 
HALIFAX. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

!nie works mentioned in the Beport of last year have been executed, 

(Appendix 3, page 19.) 
10— b| 



XIV [1882] 

PICTOU. 



MABINB HOSPITAL. 



The plans of this boilding aro ready and tenders will shortly be called f< 
(Appendix 3, page 19.) 



PEINOE EDWARD ISLAND. 
CHARLOTTETOWN. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

The repairs mentioned in the Report of last year have been made. (Append! 
3, page 19.) ^ 

PBOVINOE OF NEW BRUNSWICK- 
DORCHESTER. 

OINXRAL PXNITBNTIART FOB THE MARITIME PBOVINOBS. 

Mr. A. E, Killam has executed the contract mentioned in the Report of last yac 

The work undertaken by Messrs. T. McManus & Son, is less advanced than I 
ought to be. 

Work is being done for the purpose of completing the water service^ and ll 
drainage. (Appendix 8, p. 20.) 



ST. JOHN. 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 



The works mentioned in the Report of last year have been completed. (Appendii 
3, p. 20.) 

NEW MARINE HOSPITAL. 

The contraet in course of execution includes the offices and a ward. Aocordii^ 
* to the plan adopted, two other hospital wards may be constructed when they V 
required. 



[1882] XV 

The new hospital is situated on land adjacent to the present Marine Hospital, 
lAioh it will replace. (Appendix 3, p. 20.) 

SUSSEX. 

POST OPFICB, CUSTOM HOUSE, &0. 

A contract has been entered into for the erection of this building, the plans for 
Iduch have been prepared by the Department. (Appendix 3, p. 20.) 



WOODSTOCK. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, &C. 

The Architect oi the Department has been instructed to prepare plans for this 
hsildmg, for the construction of which an appropriation was voted during the last 
heion of Parliament (Appendix 3, p. 20.) 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 
QUEBEC. 

CITADEL. 

General repairs have been made during the course of the year. 

A reception hall has been oonstimcted at the eastern end of the portion reserved 
kffis Excellency the Grovemor General. (Appendix 3, p. 21.) 

QUEBEC FORTIVICATIONS. 

Three sections of the fortification walls have been repaired with the materials 
*^ had flEdlen from them. (Appendix 3, p. 21.) 

WALL UNDER DUFPBRIN TERRACE. 

The works mentioned in connection with this subject in the Report of last year 
*«vebeen eontinued. (Appendix 3, p. 21.) 



{ 



KENT AND ST. LOUIS GATBS. 



T|ie pointing mentioned in the Beport of lakt year has been don^. (Appendix 

p-si.) 



xri [1882] 

OABTEIDGS FACTORY. 

The old " Artillery Barracks " are completely converted into a cartridge fibctcfy^ 
and are occupied as such. (Appendix 3, p. 21.J 

LABORATORY, &C. 

The works mentioned in the Report of 1880-81, have been completed, ai^ift 
heating apparatus is now being constmoted in accordance with plans and deeigw 
fiimished by the Department of Militia and Defence. (Appendix 3, p. 21.) 

OHAMPLAIN STREET ROOK. 

The retaining wall, of which mention is made in the Report of last year, hm 
been completed and it is proposed to prolong it in the direction of Hoontain HIS. 
(Appendix 3, p. 22.) 

OUSTOM HOUSE. 

The attic rooms, of which mention is made in last ye^'s Report, have been ocn^ 
pleted. (Appendix 3, p. 22.) 

POST OITIOB. 

The work of grading and the building of the retaining wall, of which mentiot 
is made in the Report of last year, have been completed. (Appendix 3, p. 22.) 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

The repairs mentioned in the Report of last year have been completed. (Ap- 
pendix 3, p. 22.) 

LEVIS FORTS. 

A contract has been entered into for the constraction of wooden roo& on Forti 
Nos. 2 and 3, to prevent water from penetrating the casemates. (Appendix 3. 
p. 22.) 

MONTREAL. 

INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The work of constmcting the addition to this building, mentioned in the Report 
of last year, is in course of execution. 

Plans for a heating apparatus are being prepared. (Appendix 3, p. 22.) 



ST. HELEN'S ISLAND, MONTREAL. 

BARRAOKS, ETC. 

A contract will be entered into for the repairs of the ban*ack8, magaaine, b» 
^Appendix 3, p. 22.) 



[1882] xvU 

THREE EIVEBS. 

OLD BABRAOKS. 

The works undertaken to convert the'old barracks into Goyemment Offices and 
items and Inland Bevenne Offices are now^ing completed. (Appendix 8, p. 22.) 



ST. VINCENT DB PAUL. 



PBNITINTIABT. 



The eonstmotion of the western wing, containing 132 cells, has been completed, 
f arions repairs have been made to the residences of the Warden and Deputy Warden 
I well as to the guai^ds' hoases. (Appendix 3, p. 23.) 



BULL. 



POST OFFICE AND INLAND BEYXNUX OFFICE. 

The Department has caused plan% to be prepared for the building to be con- 
acted on the lot granted by the Wright Estate and intended to contain the Post 
I and the Inland Bevenue Office. (Appendix 3, p. 23.) 



GROSSE ISLE. 

QVABANTINX STATION. 

The construction of the hospital mentioned in last year's Report has been com* 
pfated. (Appendix 3, p. 23.) 



ST. JOHN'S. 

POST OFFICE^ CUSTOM HOUSE, 40. 

The heating apparatus has been put in and the offices farnished« (Appendix 3, 
p. 23.) 

SHBRBROOKE. 

POST OFFICE, OUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND BEYBNUX OFFICE. 

The building in which these offices will be installed|is in course of erection. (Ap* 
lendix 3, p. 23.) 



XYui [1882] 

CHICOUTIMI. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This building is in course of erection. ' (Appendix 3, p. 24.J 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 
OTTAWA. 

PARLIAHBNT BUILDING. 

The hall temporarily occupied by the Supreme Court has been conyerted into a 
reading room for the House of Commons. The old reading room has been altered 
into a room for the accommodation of newspaper reporters. By lowering the ceiling 
it has also been possible to construct a room overhead for the Sessional Translators 
(Appendix 3, p. 24.) ^ 

DSFABTMENTAL BUILDINGS — EASTERN BLOOK. 

Yarious repairs have been made ,to the interior of this building. (Appendix 
3, p. 24.) 

DEPABTMSNTAL BUILDINGS ^WESTERN BLOOK. 

Various repairs have been made to the interior of this building. (Appendix 
3, p. 24.) 

PARLIAMENT GROUNDS. 

The new green house mentioned in the Report of {last year has been erected. 
(Appendix 3, p. 24.) 

MONUMENT IN MEMORT OF SIR GEORGE E. OARTIER, BART. 

A notice will shortly be published inviting artists to submit models for this 
monument, for the approval of the Dominion Government. (Appendix 3, p. 24.) 

NEW SUPREME COURT, 

This building has been completed and furnished in accordance with the arrange' 
ments stated in the Eeport of last year. (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 

« GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The glass ommt shelves, Ac., have been completed, and a heating appwratw 
has been constructed^ (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 




[1882] xix 

DRILL SHBD. 

A contract has been entered into for the construction of cesspools and of doable 
windows. (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 

RIDEAU HALL. 

Ordinary repairs have been made in the coarse of the year (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 

General improvements and repairs have been made in the beating apparatus of 
the baildings above mentioned (Ottavra.) (Appendix 4, pp. 30-31.) 

CORNWALL. 

POST OPPICB, OUSTOH HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

A lot has been acquired by the Department, on which will be constructed a 
bailding, plans of which are being: prepared, which will provide accommodation for 
the Poet OfSce and the Customs and Inland Revenae OflSces. (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 



BROCKVILLB. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFIOBi 

The arohiteot of the Department has been instructed to prepare plans of the 
building in which these offices are to be installed, and for the erection of which an 
^ypropriation was included in the Estimates for 1881-82. (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 



KINGSTON. 

POST OFFICE. 

The changes pointed out in the Report of last year have been completed. (Ap> 
pendixS, p. 25.) 

PENITENTLABT. 

The north wing of the southern work-shop has been completed. Work is being 
<kme on the apparatus intended to heat the three work-shops and the dining hall. The 
loof of this wing has been repaired, and a wood shed erected. (Appendix 3, p. 25.) 

MILITABT COLLEGE. 

The room mentioned in the Beport of last year has been completed ; and various 
repairs have been made to the barracks, &c. (Appendix 3, p. 26.) 



XX [1882] 

BELLEYILLE. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The buildiDg for the accommodation of these offices is in course of coDstractionfl 
(Appendix 3, p. 26.) 



ST. CATHARIlSrES. 

POST OFFICE, CQ8T0M HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The buildiDg for the accommodation of these offices is in course of constructioiu 
(Appendix 3, p. 26.) 

HAMILTON. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The architect oi the Department has been instructed to prepare plans of a 
building in which will be contained the Post Office, and the Custom House and 
Inland Eevenue offices. (Appendix 3, p. 26.) 

STRATFORD. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The building for the accommodation of these offices is in course of erectioiw 
(Appendix 3, p. 27.) 



CHATHAM. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The Department has purchased the land on which the building is to be erected 
to contain these offices, and it is hoped that it will be commenced this autumn* 
^Appendix 3, p, 27.) 



WINDSOR- 
POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICE. 

The attics have been arranged and ai-e now inhabited by the caretaker ; the 
approachcB to the building have been levelled and the surrounding wall and the side- 
walks have been constructed, (Appendix 3, p. 27.) 



[1882] xxi 

PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 
WINNIPEG. 

PA&LIAMSNT BUILDING. 

The erection of this building is not as far advanced as could be wished ; it is,. 
koweyer, hoped that in the course of the season the masonry of the foundations will 
I be built up to the level of the ground floor. (Appendix 3, p. 27.) 

LIEUTENANT-GOVEBNOR'S RBSmSNOB, 

This building, a description of which is given in the fieport of last year, is in 
eoorse of construction, and will be completed before 1st July, 1883. (Appendix 3^ 

p. 2a) 

POST OFFICE. 

An addition in the rear has been erected, and various improvements have been 
made in the interior of the office. (Appendix 3, pi 28.) 

IMMIGRANT SHED. « 

This building has been constructed in accordance with plans and specifications 
prepared by the Department. (Appendix 3, p. 28.) 

STONY MOUNTAIN PENITENTIARY. 

The heating apparatus will shortly be completed. The outbuildings mentioned in 
last year's JReport, are partly constructed and partly in course of being so. (Appen- 
diz 3, p. 28.) 



BRANDON, 



IMMIGRANT STATION. 



This building has been constructed in accordance with plans and specifications 
prepared by the Department. (Appendix 3, p. 28.) 



EMERSON. 

IMMIGRATION AGENT*S OFFIOE. 

This building has been completed and is occupied. (Appendix 3, p. 28.> 



:aadi [1882] 

PEOVINOE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



VICTORIA. 



POST OFFIOE. 



The front of this buildiDg has been re-built, and general repairs to the interior 
'will be made in the course of the coming fiscal year. (Appendix 3, p. B9,) 



NEW WESTMINSTER. 

PKNITBNTIARY. 

A workshop has been erected near the prison. (Appendix 3, p. 29.) 

POST OFFIOS AND OUSTOM HOUSE. 

The building which is to contain these offices is in course of construction. 
(Appendix 3, p. 29.) 



NANAIMO. 

POST OFFIOBi OUSTOM HOUSS AND INLAND REVBNUS OFFIOE. 

The architect has received instructions to prepare plans for the building in 
which these offices will be installed, and the erection of which will be begun in Hke 
coming fiscal year. (Appendix 3, p. 29.) 



HARBORS AND RIVERS. 
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 

CAMPBELL'S COYS. 

On the north-west coast, about nine miles from East Point. 

A breakwater 300 feet long, constituting a prolongation of that erected by the 
Provincial Government in 1872, has been constructed. The old breakwater has 
been raised to the level of the new part (Appendix 5, p. 32.) 

OOLYILLS BAT. 

Some indispensable repairs have been made to the breakwater mentioned in Itft 
year's Report (Appendix 6, p. 32.) 



L1882] xxiil 

SOUTH RIVER, MURRAY HARBOR. 

Murray Harbor is a lai*ge natural bay situated in the south-eastern part of the 
Coonty of King's, and opening into the Gulf of St, Lawrence. 

The dredge "Prince Edward" has been employed during the season in straight- 
ening the channel and giving it a depth of eight feet of water at low tide. (Appendix 
6, p. 32.) 

PINNSTTE RIVER. 

This falls into the Strait of Northumberland to the east of Point Prim. 

In October and November, 1881, the dredge *• Prince Edward " was employed in 
straighteoing the channel and deepening the basin near the wharf. (Appendix 5,, 
p. 33.) 

HILLSBOROUGH RIVER. 

Opposite Charlottetown. 

In May, 1882, the dredge "Prince Edward" was employed in deepening the^ 
basin near the wharf at Fort Augustus. (Appendix 5, p. 33.) 

NINE MILS ORBlK. 

At the entrance of Hillsborough Bay. 

The dredge " Prince Edward " has been employed in completing the channel 
mentioned in the Seport of last year. (Appendix 5, p. 33.) 

ORAPAUD. 

A small harbor at the mouth of the Brocklesby River. 

On the 8th August, 1881, the channel was completed as far as the wharves of the 
Tillage. (Appendix 6, p. 33.) 

GRAND RUSHOO. 

On the north coast, nearly half-way between North and East Points. 

In the month of December the Department entered into a contract for the con- 
struction of two breakwaters, one 1,200 feet and the other 450 feet in length, which 
will have the eflfect of nanH)wing the entrance of the harbor, and thereby increasing 
the force of the current. (^Appendix 5, p. 33.) 

NEW LONDON. 

On the north coast, aboui nine miles east of Ca^cumpec. 

The part of the breakwater con&tructed by the Local Government before the 
Province entered the Confederation has been repaired and prolonged 93 feet* 
(Appendix 5, p. 33.) 



acriv [1882] 

TIQNISH. 

On the north coast, about eight miles from Noi*th Point. 

A contract has been entered into by the Department for the construction of a 
breastwork to protect the beach and for the re-construction of the end of the 
breakwater. (Appendix 5, p. 33.) 

HIMINIOASH. 

On the western coast of the Island. The facing of the breastwork has been 
renewed. (Appendix 6, p. 33.) 



NOVA SCOTIA. 



MAIN-1-DISU. 

A small harbor in the County of Cape Breton. The construction of the break- 
water mentioned in the report of 1880-81 has been continued. (Appendix 6, p. 34) 

cow BAY. 

Thirty miles south-east of Sydney, C. B. The repairs to the breakwater injured 
by a storm in 1880 have been continued. (Appendix 5, p. 34.) 

PORT CALEDONIA. 

Nineteen miles south of the harbor of Sydney, C. B. 

The dredge "St. Lawrence" was employed in the month of June, 1882, in deep- 
ening the harbor, which will now admit large vessels engaged in the coal trade. 
(Appendix 5, p. 34.) 

LITTLE OLAOE BAT. 

Fourteen miles south of the harbor of Sydney, C. B. 

In the spring of 1881 the dredge ** St Lawrence" was engaged in deepening the 
entrance to the harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 34.) 

NORTH SYDNEY. 

This m the principal port on the east coast of Cape Breton. 

The amount voted by Parliament and the sum supplied by the Sydney Harbor 
Oommlsaloners have been applied to the construction, in part, of a breakwater which 
^Hl prevent the accumulation of sand in the harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 34.) 

SOUTH INOONISH. 

On the eastern coast of Cape Breton, about half way between the harbor of 
Sydney and Cape North, 



• [1882] 



The breakwater on the north side of the entrance to this harbor has been re- 
paired. (Appendix 5, p. 34.) 

INDIAN ISLANDS BBAOH. 

These islands are sitaated in the north part of East Bay, which is a continuance 
of the Bras d*Or, Cape Breton. 

The passage through the beach mentioned in the Report of last year has been 
completed. (Appendix 5, p. 34.) 

BENAOADIE. 

In the County of Cape Breton. 

The necessary works for opening and protecting the entrance to this little har- 
bor have been commenced. (Appendix 5, p. 35.) 

MABOU. 

On the west coast of Cape Breton, 6 miles north of Port Hood, the chief town 
of the county. 

Work has been done towards opening a passage through the shoal which is 
situated at the entrance of the harbor. (Appendix 5, page 35.) 

PORT HOOD. 

On the west coast of Cape Breton. 

Provisional repairs have been made to the pier, which will have to be re-built 
acd flolidly protected by a stone slope. (Appendix 5, page 35.) 

BAQOBD POND. 

In Chedabucto Bay, north sidei 

Efforts were made in vain to open a channel to give access to this little harbor. 
(Appendix 5, page 35.) 

PCTIT DB GBAT. 

In He Madame, County of Bichmond, C. B. 

The channel mentioned in the Beport of last year, haa been completed. 



(Appendix 5, page 35.) 



BUETINC^ ISLAND, 0AN8O HABBOR« 



Canso Harbor is situated at the eastern extremity of Guysborough, and south of 
tii« entrance to the Strait of Canso. 

The breakwater, the building of which was mentioned in the fieport of last year, 
^ greatly improved the Harbor of of Canso. (Appendix 5, page 35.) 



xxvi [1882] 

NEW QLASOOW. 

On Bast Eiver, 8 miles above the Harbor of Piotou. 

The improvements mentioned in the Report of last year, have been completed, 
(Appendix 5, page 35.) 

RIYSR JOHN. 

It falls into John Bay, 12 miles to the north of the Harbor of Pictou. 

The channel work mentioned in last year's Beport was continued. (Appendix 
6, p. 36.) 

T^Ti X-MA-aAUOHS. 

The river T^t^a- ma-Gauche falls into the bay of that name, on the Northumberland 
Strait 

The dredge " Cape Breton " was employed in opening a channel through the 
shoals which obstruct the entrance to the river. (Appendix 5, p. 36.) 

PABRSBORO'. 

In the County of Cumberland. 

Piles were driven at the end of the pier. 

The improvement of the channel of Partridge River was continued* (Appendix 
6, p. 36.) 

HAMPTON. 

In the County of Annapolis. 

A new wharf was built in place of that erected by the Local Government, which 
was in a ruinous condition. (Appendix 5, p. 36.) 

DIQBT. 

\ 

At the western extremity of the basin of Annapolis. 

The wharf constructed by the Local Government prior to Confederation under- 
went various repairs. The steamer which does the mail service between Annapolis 
and St. John, N.B., touches at this wharf. (Appendix 5, p. 36.) 

TROUT COTB. 

On the south coast of the Bay of Fundy. 

Considerable repairs have been made to the breakwater. (Appendix 5, p. 36.) 

METEGHAN RIVER. 

In the County of Bigby. 

The north and south breakwaters underwent sundry repairs. (Appendix 6,p.8^') 



[1882J xxvii 

GAPS ST. MABT. 

On the south shore of the entrance to Bay St. Mary, County of Bigby. 
The wharf underwent various repairs. (Appendix 5, p. 37.) 

YARMOUTH. 

At the western extremity of the peninsula of Nova Scotia. 

The sea wall constructed on the beach in 1874 was repaired. (Appendix 5, 
p. 37.) 

BEOOKLTN. 

At the head of Liverpool Bay, County of Queens. 

The breakwater underwent various repairs. (Appendix 6, p. 37.) 

voqlbr's oovi. 

At the south-western extremity of the County of Lunenburg. 

From the 17th September to the 6th December, 1881, the dredge "Canada" wa» 
•mployed in deepening the channel leading to this harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 37.) 

LITTLI HARBOR. 

In the County of Lunenburg, on the coast of the Atlantic. 

The entrance was deepened, and fishing boats can enter at all times. (Appeidix 
^p.37.) 

porter's lake. 

This is a large sheet of water, 13 miles long, with an average width of one half 
t mile, sepai'ated from the Atlantic by several small islands connected with one 
another by sand bars. 

A passage has been made for fishing boats through one of these sand banka 
(Appendix 5, p. 37.) 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

CLIFTON. 

Fifteen miles east of Bathui^st, on the Bay of Chaleurs. 

The breakwater, damaged during the winter of 1880-81, was repaired. (Appen- 
ds 5, p. 38.) 

SHIPPEQAN. 

At the north-eastern extremity of New Brunswick. 

The dam which closes the eastern gully was repaired and raised. (Appendix 5 

p.38.) 

10— 



xxviii [1882] 

HORSE SHOE SHOAL. 

At the entrance to the Miramichi, by the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

The dredging work mentioned in last year's Report was continued. (Appendix 

5, p. as.) 

BICHIBUCTOU. 

On the west shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, County of Kent. 

The breast wall protecting the beach was lengthened 220 feet. (Appendix 5, p. 
38.) 

BUCTOUCHE. 

Twenty-one miles north of the Harbor of Shediac. 

The dredge " Canada/* was employed in opening a passage through a bank of 
shells which obstructed the entrance of the harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 3^.) 

OOOAQNE, 

This harbour is situated ten miles north of Shediac, on the Strait of Northamber- 
land. 

A landing pier is being built here, on the north side. 

During the month of August, 1881, the dredge "Canada " was employed at the 
entrance of the harbor. (Appendix 6, p. 38.) * 

POINT DU ghAxe, 

The extension of the breakwater which protects the railway wharf, is Almost 
finished. (Appendix 5, p. 38.) 

QUACO. 

Thirty miles to the east of the City ot St. John, in the Bay of Fundy. 

In 1873 a breakwater 300 feet in length was built on the east side of the harbor. 
During the past hscal year a similar work was commenced on the west side of the 
harbor, and on the 30th June last it was almost completed. (Appendix 5, p. 39.) 

ST, JOHN. 

The Department has entered into a contract for rebuilding the breakwater. 

The dredges " Canada " and '* New Dominion " were employed in the port. 
(Appendix 5, p. 39.) 

F9BT nUFVIERIN. 

On Negro Point, at the entrance of the port of St. John. 

A block of crib work has been b^ilt to protect the base of the rook which was 
being undermined by the water. (Appendix 5, p. 39.) 



r 



[1882] xxix 

HARBOR OF ST. ANDRBW's. 

Between Pafisamaquoddy Bay and River St. Croix. 

A contract has been entered into for the construction of a lighthoase on a rock 
at the entrance to the harbor from the west side ; this contract is in course of 
execution. (Appendix 5, p. 39.) 

RIVER ST. JOHN. 

The navigation of this river has been improved by the removal of rocks at 
Tarious points. 

The Oromocto sheer dam has been extended to Thatch Island, and an apron of 
brush and stones constructed in order to protect the outer part of the dam. (Appendix 
5, p. 39.) 

RIVBR TOBIQUE, 

A tributary of the River St. John. 

Bocks have been removed at several points to facilitate the decent of timber 
(Appendix 5, p. 39.) 

RIVER MADAWASKA. 

It takes its rise in Lake Temiscouata and falls into the St. John at Bdmondston. 

Bocks have been removed at various points in this river, in the Province of 
^ew Bninswick and in the Province of Quebec. (Appendix 5, p. 40.) 



QUEBEC. 

ETANQ DU NORD. 

At the western extremity of Grindstone Island, one of the Magdalen Islands. 

The construction of the breakwater mentioned in last year's Beport has beeu 
-continued ; it already affords shelter to fishing boats. (Appendix 5, p< 40.) 

PEROf. 

Chef lieu of the County of Gasp*. 

During the season of 1881, surveys were made and bearings taken in order to 
determine the position and cost of the works required for the protection during 
ftorms of the large fleet of fishing boats frequenting the Gulf of St. Lawrenoe* 
(Appendix 5, p. 40 and pp. 75, 76.) ' 

NEW 0ABLI8LE. 

Chef lieu of the County of Bonaventure, north of the Bay pf Chaleurs. 
A length of 180 feet of breakwater has been built (Appendix 5, .p. 40.) 



[1882] 



MATANS. 

Od the south shore of the St. Lawrence, in the County of Rimouski, 240 miles ! 
below Quebec. 

The wharf which had been damaged by the ice in 1881 has been repaired* 
(Appendix 5, p. 40.) 

TROIS PIBTOLBS. 1 

On the south side of the St. Lawrence, in the County of Temisoouata, 148 zailea , 
below Quebec. / 

The building of a small wharf has been commenced, and a number of rooks 
removed from the harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 40.) i 

TADOUSAO. 

At the mouth of the Saguenay. 

The dams which form the ponds of the fish breeding establishment have been 
rebuilt. (Appendix 6, p. 41.) 

ANSS DU PORTAOl. 

Opposite Tadonsac at the mouth of the Saguenay. 

The construction of a landing has been commenced, in order to facilitate the 
carrying of the mails between Tadousac and the Cove during winter. 

This landing will be finished for the winter of 1882-3. (Appendix 5, p. 41.) 

ANSS 8T. JEAN. 

On the south side of the Saguenay, 24 miles from the mouth. 

Work at the wharf has been continued, and will be carried on again during the 
winter of 1882-3. (Appendix 5, p. 41.) 

ST. ALPHONSE DE BAQOTTILLS. 

At the head of Hal Ha 1 Bay, on the south side of the Saguenay, 66 milee fix>m 
the mouth. 

A length of o78 feet of the wharf burnt a few years ago, has been rebuilt, 
(Appendix 5, p. 41.) 

RITER SAOUENAT. 

The digging work mentioned in last year's Eeport has been continaed^ 
(Appendix 5 J page 4*-'.) 

GRANDE DfOHARQB. 

This is the larger of the two channels by which the waters of Lake St. John 
flow into the Biver Saguenay. 

The wldeniDg of the channel has been undertaken. (Appendix 5, page 42.) 



ri882] zzxf 

RIYliBS DU LOUP (SN BAS). 

On the soath edde of the St. Lawrence, 108 miles fVom Quebec. 

The work of repairing the wharf has been continued. (Appendix 5, p. 42.) 

CAP X l'aiqle. 
On the north side of the St. Lawrence, 3 miles from Murray Bay. 
The wharf was finished at the end of the year 1881. (Appendix 5, p. 42.) 

MURRAY BAT. 

Ninety miles from Quebec, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. 

The wharf has undergone the repair needed, and a store house has been built on 
it. (Appendix 5, p. 43.) 

RIVliRB OUILLl. 

On the south shore of the St. Lawrence, 75 miles from Quebec. 

The grant voted for raising the pier has been expended, bat it is yet too low 
^Appendix 5, p. 43.) 

LE8 SBOULBMBNTB, 

Sixty-nine miles from Quebec, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. 
The wharf has undergone various repairs. (Appendix 5, p. 43.) 

ILS AUX OOUDRBS. 

Twelve miles from Bay St. Paul, County of Charlevoix, on the north side of the 
St Lawrence. 

The wharf mentioned in last year's Beport was finished at the close of the year 
1881. (Appendix 5, p. 43.) 

BAT ST. PAUL. 

Sixty miles from Quebec, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. 

The building of a wharf has been commenced at Pointe Bouge, Cap aux Oor} 
bean. (Appendix 5, p. 43.) 

ORANB ISLAND. 

Thirty-six miles from Quebec, opposite Cap St. Ignace. 

The construction of a pier 171 feet in length, starting from the liirhthouse, has 
been commenced. (Appendix 5, p. 43.) 

QROSSX ISLE. 

Twenty-nine miles from Quebec. 

The eastern pier leading to the quarantine establishment has been extended ^ 
nosed and repaired. (Appendix 5, p. 43.) 



x»rii fl882] 

SAINTS FAHILLB. 

On the north shore of Orleans Island, 17 miles from Quebec. 

Two blocks, constructed in 1879 and 1880, have been connected together, and 
small steamers can now use the wharf. (Appendix 5, p. 44.) 

LES ECUREUILS. 

In the County of Portneuf, on the north shore of the St Lawrenoe, 25 miles 
above Quebeo. 

A small wharf has been constructed at this place. (Appendix 5, p. 44.) 

RIVER NIOOLET. 

Falls into the St. Lawrence from the south, at the lower extremity of Lake St. 
Peter. 

In the month of October, 1881, a contract was made for certain improvements in 
the harbor, but the water was so high last summer, that so far it has been impossible 
to do more than collect the necessary materials on the spot. (Appendix 5, p. 44.) 

nVER TAMASKA. 

It takes its rise in the County of Brome, and after a course of over 90 miles, falls 
into the St Lawrence at the upper extremity of Lake St Peter. 

In the month of August, 1881, a contract was made for the construction of a lift 
lock and a dam at He Gardin. 

When these works shall have been finished and the channel dredged, the river 
will be navigable for vessels of medium tonnage as far as Grosse Boohe Bapids. 

These works are being carried out. (Appendix 5, p. 44.) 

RIOHELIEU RIYER. 

It falls into the St. Lawrence at Sorel, 45 miles from Montreal. 
During the months of July and August, the dredge "Nipissing" was employed 
in deepening the channel near the village of St. Ours. (Appendix 6, p. 44.) 

BEETHIBR (BN HAUT.) 

Nearly oppoeito Sorel, 4B miloa from Montreal. 

On the 5th July, 1881, the work of deepening the channel was completed^ 
{Appendix 5^ p. 44,) 

l'assomption riter. 

Tt falls into the St* Lawrence near the village of Eepentigny. 

Dredging has been done at the mouth of this river. (Appendix 5, p. 44.) 



[1882J xxxiii 



CHANNEL BETWEEN LONG POINT AND BOUOHERYILLE. 

Dredging has been done in the channel of the Bi\rer St Lawrence between these 
two points. (Appendix 5, p. 45.) 

ISLE AUX NOIX. 

In the Bichelieu river, near the southern frontier of the Province of Quebec. 

A bridge spanning a ravine on the road leading to^the island ferry has received 
extensive repairs. (Appendix 5, p. 45.) 

LAPRAIBIE. 

Chief town of the oonntjof that name, 7 miles above Montreal, on the south side 
of the St. Lawrence. 

In the month of May, 1882, dredging was done at the approaches to the wharf. 
(Appendix 5, p. 45.) 

BBAUHABN0I8. 

Chief town of the county of that name, 20 miles above Montreal, on the south 
nde of the St. Lawrence. 

Dredging has been done in the vicinity of the wharf and in the channel leading 
to the main channel of the St Lawrence. (Appendix 5, p. 45.) 

BAOOT HATES SHOAL. — RIVER ST. LAWBSNOB. 

This shoal, 2| miles below the Village of Cedars, County of Soulanges, is an 
obstacle to steam navigation. 

The opening of a new channel 150 feet wide, about 200 feet north of the old 
duuineiy has been undertaken. (Appendix 5, p. 45.) 

THE OEDABS. 

The Village of Cedars is situated on the north side of the St. Lawrence, 30 
niles above MontreaL 

The old wharf has received extensive repairs in place of constructing a newone» 
in accordance with the plan mentioned in last year's Beport. (Appendix 5, p. 45.) 

ST. PLAOIDE. 

In the County of Two Mountains, on the Ottawa *Biver, about 9 miles from St. 
Andrews. 

The work of opening a chttnnel from the wharf at St. Placide to the main channel 
•f the Ottawa has been continued. (Appeadiz 5, p. 46.) 



[1882J 



RIVER 1 LA QRAISSB (RIQAUD). 

It falls into the Ottawa Eiver, 15 miled from Rigand. 

The work of dredging has been continued. (Appendix 5, p. 46.) 

RIVER DU NORD. 

It &lls into the Ottawa Eiver at the head of the Lake of Two Mountains. 
The dredging work has been eontinued. ^Appendix 5, p. 46.) 

RIVER DU LldVRE. 

It falls into the Ottawa 19 miles below the City of Ottawa. 

Dredging work has been done at Little Rapids and at Long Rapids. (Appendix 
5, p. 46.) 

THE OATINEAU. 

The principal tributary of the Ottawa River, into which it falls at a short dis- 
tance from the City of Ottawa. 

The water was so low during the fhll of 1881, that it became necessary to open a 
h annel through the sand banks near the railway bridge, in order to facilitate the 
passage of barges. (Appendix 5, p. 46.) 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



UNION SUSPENSION BRIDOB. 

This bridge connects the cities of Ottawa and Hull. 

In 1881-2 it underwent extensive repairs and the roadway was entirely renewed. 
(Appendix 5, p. 46.) 

BEEF BELOW SUSPENSION BRIDGE — OTTAWA RIVER. 

This reef is at a short distance below the Suspension bridge. 

At low water tb© bed of the reef was removed to a depth of 3 feet below the 
water leveL This is a groat advantage to the navigation of this part of the river. 
(Appendix , p. 47.) 

PORTSMOUTH. 

On'the bay of that name, 2 miles west of Kingston, 
Drodging has beon done in this harbor. (Appendix 6, p. 4*1%) 




[1882] XXXV 

SALMON RIVER. 

It falls into the Bay of Quiat4 at Shannonville, 40^ miles west of Kingston. 

Dredging has been done in the shoals which obstracted the entrance of the river. 
(Appendix 5, p. 47.) 

BBLLEVILLS. 

County town of the County of Hastings, on the Bay of Qaint^, 43 miles west of 
I Kingston. 

I>redging has been done in the harbor, near the east wharf and south of the 
island, as far the western wharves. (Appendix 5, p. 47.) 

TRENTON. 

At the mouth of the Kiver Trent. 

I An old cribwork pier which obstructed the navigation, has been removed from 

the channel of the river. (Appendix 5, p. 47.) 

PIOTON. 

County town of Prince Edward County, on the Bay of Quints. 
Dredging has been done in this harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 47.) 

OONSSOON. 

At the head of Weller's Bay, Lake Ontark), County of Prince Edward. 

Dredging has been done on the shoal which obstructed the entrance to this har- 
bor. (Appendix 5, p. 47.) 

OOBOURG. 

On Lake Ontario, 92 miles west of Kingston. 

Work has been continued on the western wharf, the contract for which was taken 
from the contractor ; a contract was also entered into for the extension of the eastern 
wharf. (Appendix 5, p. 47.) 

PORT HOPS. 

I On the north shore of Lake Ontario, in the County of Durham, 63 miles east of 

j Toronto, 

I Dredging has been done in this harbor, and the work of extending the eastern 

wharf commenced. (Appendix 6, p. 48.) 

TORONTO. 

Dredging has been done at the western entrance of this harbor. 

Daring the summer of 1881, Mr. J. B. Eads, C.E., made an examination and 
«uryey of this harbor, and his Beport will be found after Appendix 6, pp. 77-95. 



xxxTi [1882] 

e- - I- »•- 

PORT STANLEY. 

Torminus of the London and Poi*t Stanley Railway on Lake Erie. 

The works erected heretofore for the protection of the harbor, on the west side 
of the entrance, have been of the greatest benefit 

A channel has been opened from the harbor through Mill Creek. (Appendix 5, 
p. 48.) 

OODERIOH. 

On the east side of Lake Haron, 68 miles from Sarnia. 

In February last the Department contracted for works for the protection of th«r' 
1)each between the north wharf and the breakwater, and for repairs to the south 
wharf. 

Dredging has been done alongside the wharves and breakwater. (Appendix 5, 
p. 48.) 

PORT ALBERT. 

At the mouth of Nine Mile Creek, which falls into Lake Heron, nine mile» 
north of Groderich. 

Dredging has been done in the harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 49.) 

KINOABDINB. 

Thirty -one miles north of Goderich, on Lake Huron. 

Pile protection work, 790 feet in length, is being constructed, under contract^ 
for the protection of the south wharf at the entrance of the harbor ; one-half of the 
work is finished. (Appendix 5, p. 49.) 

POBT ELGIN. 

On Lake Huron 24 miles from Kincardine. 

The Department has contracted for a breakwater, and the necessary dredging 
to form a harbor at this point. (Appendix 5, p. 49.) 

SOUTHAMPTON. 

On Lake Hui'on at the mouth of the Saugeen River. 

The superstructure of the western breakwater has been repaired, and the build- 
ing of a small breakwater, 155 feet in length, opposite the lighthouse has been 
commenced. (Appontiix 5, p. 49. > 

TOBBRMORT. 

A natural harbor on the channel leading from Lake Huron to the Georgian Biy» 

Iron rings and fenders have beon inserted in the face of the rocks surrounding 
ilio harbor, for the mooring and proteetion of vessels. (Appendix 5, p, 49.) 



r 




[1882] xxxvir; 

BRUOS MINES. 

On the north shore of Lake Huron, 45 miles from Saalt St. Marie. 

A channel 14 feet in depth has been opened up to the wharf, and the largest 
■team vessels navigating the lakes can now approach it. (Appendix 5, p. 49.) 

LIPTLB CUBBBNT. 

Between Cloche Island and Great Manitonlin Island. 

A bed of rock, which obstructed the channel, has been partially removed, (Ap* 
pendix 5, p. 49.) 

OWEN SOUND. 

Connly town of Grey, at the mouth of the River Sydenham, on the Georgian Bay. 

I The works mentioned in last year's Beport have been completed. 

The amount voted in the Estimates of 1881-2, has been expended in dredging, 
pnng a depth of 14 feet to this harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 50.) 

THOBNBUBT. 

At the mouth of the Beaver Bi ver on the Georgian Bay. 

The town of Thornbury has voted a sum of $7,000, and Parliament a grant, which 
vill be expended in re-building the old wharf and excavating a basin in the harbor^ 
Ao(mtract has been signed for the work. (Appendix 5, p.l50.) 

COLLINGWOOD. 

In the County of Simcoe, on the south shore of the Georgian Bay. 
I>redging has been continued. (Appendix 5, p. 50 



PBOVmCB OP MANITOBA. 

LAKE MANITOBA. 

During the season of 1881, surveys and examinations have been made in order 
to ascertain the cause of the overflow of Lake Manitoba and the means of preventing^ 
Hfor the future. (Appendix 6, p. 50 and pp. 96-116.) 



BBITISH COLUMBIA. 

The work undertaken for the i-emoval of Beaver Book has been finished and' 
^^i^Bdging has been done in the harbor. (Appendix 5, p. 50, and Appendix 6, pp.. 
Hil32.) 



xxxviii [1882] 



SUEVBTS. 



Daring the fiscal year surveys and examinations have been made in varioaB 
localities in the Provinces of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brons^iricky 
<2aebec and Ontario. Reports of this work, with a few exoeptions, have been for- 
warded to the Department. (Appendix 5, p. 51.) 



DREDGING. 
The Department possesses the following dredging plant : — 

IN THK MARITIME PROyiNOSS. 

The hopper dredge " St. Lawrence.". 

*' ** " Canada." 

The dipper " " New Dominion," and 10 scows. 

" " " Cape Breton/' 7 " 

" " " Prince Edward," 3 " 

" " " George McKenzie,", 3 " 

IN THS PBOVINOS OF QUSBBO. 

The dipper dredge "Queen of Canada," 2 scows and lifting barge« 
" " " "Nipissinft" and 2 " 

" steam tog " Dennis." 

IN ONTARIO. 

The dipper dredge " Challenge," and 3 scows. 
Thetug"Trudeau." 

IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

A hopper dredge and 4 scows. 
The tug " Georgia." 

The Department has contracted with Messrs. D. & A. Campbell for the constrao- 
tion of four scows, three of which will woVk with the dredge ** Prince Edward," and 
one with the dredge " Cape Breton," These scows are now being built at Tete-i- 
ma-Gkiuche. 

The dredges worked at the following places during the fiscal year : — 

The "St. Lawrence" at Horse Shoe Shoal, N.B., and at Sydney, Port Caledonia, 
and Little Glace Bay, C»B. 

It removed a total of 50,313 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 6, p. 62.) 

The "Canada" at Buctouche and Cocagne, N.B., Pictou, N.S., St John, N,B^ 
and Biver St. Mary, County of Guysboro*, N.S. 

It removed a total of 28,080 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, p. 52.) 



[1882] xxxir 

The "New Dominion" at Marble Cove, St. John, N.B., Murray & Bamhiir» 
whar^ near St. John and on the Oromocto Shoals. 

It removed a total of 47,180 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, p. 53.) 
The "Cape Breton," at New Glasgow, River John and River Tete-a-ma-Gauche, 

N.a 

It removed a total of 30,910 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 6, p. 53.) 

The " Prince Edward," at Crapaud, Nine Mile Creek, Pinnette, Fort Augustua 
and South Murray Harbor, P. E.I. 

It removed, in all, 47,325 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, p. 54.) 

The "George McKenzie," at Mabou, N.S., where it removed 12,724 cubic yards 
of mat^ial. (Appendix 5, p. 54.) 

The "Challenge," at Port Albert, Bruce Mines and Goderich, Ont. 

It removed a total of 53,342 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, p. 54.) 

The " Nipissing," at Levesque Shoal, near BeHhier (en haut), on the shoals near 
8t Ours, at Charlemagne, River TAssomption, and St. Plaoide. 

It removed a total of 28,237 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, p. 55.) 

The "Queen of Canada," at Beauhainois, River k la Graisse, Gatineau River and 
Laprairie. 

It removed a total of 53.342 cubic yards of material. (Appendix 5, p. 55.) 

The "Dredger" in the harbor of Victoria, B.C., where it removed 22,356 cubic 
jarde of material. (Appendix 5, p. 56.) 



SLIDES AND BOOMS. 

The Grovernment slides were constructed to facilitate the floating of timber in 
places where nature presents obstructions to navigation. 

The districts where lumbering is carried on and where the Government has con- 
structed works, are situated on the Rivers Saguenay, St. Maurice, Ottawa and Trent, 
and in the Georgian Bay, and on some of their tributaries. 

BIVXB SAOUtNAT. 

The works on this river consist of a slide 5,840 feet long, 1,344 feet of boom» 
bulkheads, piers and dams. The slide was made in order to avoid the rapids located 
ketween Lake St. John and the Saguenay. 



d [1882] 



The works cover a distance of some six miles, and are located in the Petite 
IMchargo, the smaller of the two outlets of Lake St John. These works ^vrere com- 
menced in 1856 and finished in 1860. 

The head of the slide has been re-bailt, as also dam No. 7 and 669 feet of the 
slide, and 2,000 feet of the slide have been repaired. 

'Thirty-eight thousand pieces of timbei passed through the slide during the fiscal 
year 1881-82. (Appendix 7, p. 133.) 

RIVKB ST. BfAURIOB. 

The slides and booms on this river and on the Yermillion, one of ito tributaries, 
are located in the following order : — 

Biver St. Maurice. 

Distance 
Stations. from 

Three Riren. 

Booms at the mouth miles. 

Grds Falls 16 " 

Shawinigan Falls * 20 " 

Grand M^re *• 29 «* 

Little Piles ** 31^ « 

La Tuque ** 100 " 

Plamondcn Eddy 106 " 

VermilUon River. 

Mouth of Biver 116 •* 

Iroquois Falls 121 " 

The height of water has been* very favorable, and over 500,000 logs paaaed 
through the slides. 

The pay of staff and cost of maintenance amounted to $16,579.20 for the year. 

A sum of $2,993 was placed at the disposal of the superintendent to cover tlie 
cost of repairs. Out of this vote, $c03.40 remains available. 

At the mouth of the St. Aiaurice tw;o piers were constructed under oontraot^ mud 
seven more were repaired. These works cost $7,142.00. (Appendix 8, pp. 134-135.) 

OTTAWA DISTRICT. 

The Government works for the floating of timber in this district are located cm 
•the following rivers : — 

On the Ottawa •« 11 atationa. 

" Gatineau 1 " 



[1882] xli 

On the Madawaska 15 stations. 

" Coulonge 2 " 

" Black 1 " 

" Petewawa^ 31 " 

" Dumoine 12 " 

The following is a table of distances from St. Ann's Lock, at the month of the 
Ottawa, to the mouths of the principal tributaries ; also to the stations where there 
ire slides or other works : — 

Places. Diitance from St Aan. 

Canllon 27 miles. 

Grenville 40 " 

Nation Kiver 63 " 

Eiver du Li^vre 19 ** 

" Gatineau 96 " 

Chaudiere Falls 98 " 

Little Chaudidre 100 " 

Remous 102 " 

Lake Desch^nes 105 '* 

River Quio 129 " 

Chats Station.. 131 " 

Head of Chats 134 " 

Biver Mississippi 134 *' 

" Madawaska ^ i:]6 " 

" Bonnechdre 148 " 

LesChenaux 152 " 

Portage^iu Fort 156 " 

Mountain Station 161 " 

Calumet 163 " 

Eiver Coulonge 184 " 

" Black 193 " 

« Snake 204 " 

" Petewawa 218 " 

Des Joachims 236 " 

River du Moine 244 " 

Rocher Capitaine 253 " 

Deux Rividres 266 " 

River Mattawan 286 « 

" Antoine 293 " 

« Beauchdne 315 « 

" Pore-Epic 326 " 

'< Grand Opemiconne 333 " 



xlu [1882] 



EiverKeepawa 349 miles. 



" Montreal 355 

Fort Temiscamingue 367 

River Otlertail 381 

*' Blanche 386 

** des Quinze 389 






it 



RIVBB OTTAWA. 

List of slide and boom stations on the River Ottawa. 

The distances given are measured on the latest maps, following the channel hj 
which lumber is floated down the river. 

N.me. of SUtion.. ''IS^^a^lt'C' 
1. Carillon 27 miles. 

ii.ch..di.r. {^tfS:;'^Si». } » " 

3. Chaudi^re (Little) 100 « 

4. Remous 102 " 

5. Deschdnes 104| *' 

6. Chats Station 131 " 

7. Head of Chats 134 " 

8. Chenaux 152 " 

9. Portage-du-Port 156 " 

10. Mountain 161 " 

11. Calumet 163 " 

12. Joachims Rapids 24'J " 

13. Rocher Capitaine 253 " 

The works at these thirteen stations consist of: — 

2,000 lineal feet of canal. 

4,234 "* " slides. 

29,855 " " booms. 

8,665 " " dams. 

405 '< << bulkheads. 
1,981 " " bridges. 
52 piers. 

4 slide-keepers' houses. 
3 storehouses. 




[1882] xlili 

The foUowiDg works we're exocalod during the fiscal year ended 3Cth June last. 

At SauIt-au-Becollet, general repairs to the piers and slides. 

At Hull, general repairs to the piers and slides. 

At the Chaudidre, repairs to the head of the slides, to the piers and to the booms ; 
the wires and cables of the so*called *' Union Bridge " have been minutely inspected, 
and measures taken to prevent corrosion. 

Considerable repairs had to be executed at the following stations : — The Ghats, 
tho Chenaux, Portage-du-Port, Calumet, Des Joachims and Eocher Capitaine, 
(Appendix 9, page 136). 

aiVSR QATINBAU. 

The Eiver Gatineau flows from the north, and discharges into tho Ottawa at a 
point about 96 miles above the junction of that river with the St. Lawrence at St. 
Ann, and 2 miles below the City of Ottawa. The length of the Gatineau is about 400 
miles, and it drains an area of about 9,000 square miles. 

The Government works are all situated at one station, about a mile from its 
confluence with the Ottawa. They consist of: — 

3,071 lineal feet of canal. 
4,133 " " booms. 
160 " " bridge. 
10 piers. 
1 boom-men*s house. 
1 storehouse. 
Important repairs have been made to tho boom and the piers ; the channel has 
been cleansed, and the fences and bridge repaired. (Appendix 9, page 136«) 

RIVER MADAWASKA. 

The Bivci' Madawaska is 240 miles long. It waters an area of about 4,100 
square miles, and discharges into the Bivcr Ottawa 136 miles above St Ann. 

List of tho slide and boom stations on the Madawaska, numbered from the 
nioath of the river upward : 

1. Mouth of river. 9. High Falls. 

2. Arnprior. 10. Bagged Chute. 

3. Flat Bapids. 11. Boniface Bapids. 

4. Bulmer's Island. 12. Duck Island. 

5. Burnstown, 13, Bailey's Chute. 

6. Long Bapids. 14. Chain Bapids. 

7. Springtown. 15. Opeongo Creek. 

8. Calabogio Lake. 

10-D 



xliv [1882] 

The works at these stations oonsist of :-» 

1,750 lineal feet of slides. 
18,179 " « booms. 
4,080 « " dams. 
182 " " bridges. 
42 piers. 
1 storehouse. 

At Bagged Chute the channel has been dredged and straightened by lifting out 
the rocks which impeded the passage of timber, and the lateral piers and booms 
have been repaired. 

At the High Falls, a little lower down, the booms and the piers have been re- 
paired. At Bailey's Falls new aprons have been placed in the lateral dams. 

At Springtown the boom and piers have been repaired for the season. 

At Chats Lake, at the mouth of the Madawaska, the position of the booms and 
piers has been altered to suit the convenience of the proprietor of a large saw mill 
situated on the lot adjoining the Government booms. (Appendix 5, page 137.) 

RIYIB OOULpHQI. 

This river waters an area of 1,800 square miles, and its length is 160 miles. It 
discharges into the Bivor Ottawa, 184 miles above St Ann, on the north shore. 

The following is a list of the Government works on the river: — 

Boom at mouth 300 feet long and 1 support pier. 

Booms at Bomain's rafting ground 400 « " 3 « " 

Booms at head of High Falls' Slide 1,848 '< " G <• << 

Single Stick Slide 2,900. " « 

The repairs to the slides at High Falls mentioned in the Beport of last year 
have been completed in a permanent manner. (Appendix 5, page 137 ) 

BLACK anrsB. 

This river empties into the Ottawa at a point about 193 miles above St Ano^ 
Its length is 128 miles, and the area which is watered by it is about 1,120 square 
miles on the north shore. 

The works consist of :— 

1|139 lineal feet of single stick boom. 
873 " " slide. 
346 *' " glance pier. 
135 '* *' flat dam. 



[1882] 



xlv 



The Blide. which having a sharp pitch is very greatly damaged by the timber 
which passes through it, and which was detained in it for several days daring the 
last scasoDy has been repaired and strengthened. (Appendix 5, page 137.) 



BIVEB PITXWAWA. 

The length of the Petewava is about 138 miles, and the .area of the territory 
walored by it is 2,200 square miles. 

It flows from the south and discharges into the Ottawa, 219 miles above St. 
Ann. Seven miles from its mouth it separates into two branches. On these seven 
miles there are five stations ; on the north branch 19 stations. All the works on the 
south branch were abandoned in accordance with an Order in Council, dated 2'7th 
Jttly, Wl. 

List of the slides and booms on this river, in the order in which they occur fix>m 
the mouth upwards : — 

1. Mouth of the Biver. 

2. First Chute. 

3. Second Chute. 

4. Third Chute. 

5. Bois Dur. 



1. Half Mile Bapid. 

2. Crooked Chute. 

3. Between High Falls and Lake Tra- 

verse (a slide and series of dams 
and booms.) 
4 Thompson's Bapids. 

5. Lake Traverse Slides. 

6. Sawyer's Bapids. 

7. Meno Bapids. 

8. Below Trout Lake. 

9. Strong Eddy. 
10. Cedar Island. 



North Branch. 

11. Foot of Devil's Chute. 

12. Devil's Chute. 

13. Elbow of Bapids. 

14. Foot of Long Sault 

15. Middle of Long Sault. 

16. Head of Long Sault. 

17. Between Long Sault and Cedar 
Lake (south shore.) 

18. Between Long Sault and Cedar 
Lake (north shore.) 

19. Cedar Lake. 



The works at these 24 stations are as follows : — 

On the Main River. 

2,963 lineal feet of slides. 
8,469 " " booms, 
2,077 ** " dams. 
10 piers. 



xlvi [1882] 

On the North Branch. 

1,080 lineal foot of slidos. 
2,671 " " booms. 

1,131 " " dams. 

23 piors. 

Tho omployoos had to expend much labor in order to stop iho leaks which 
existed in the dams and slides at this station, which have now been in operation 
for twenty-four years. (Appendix 5, page 13T.) 



BIVER DU MOINE. 

The length of this river is about 120 miles, and it waters to tho north an area of 
about 1,600 square miles. It flows into tho River Ottawa at a point about 256 miles 
above Ste. Anne. 

Tho works on this river are : a pier and a boom at the mouth, a single stick slide 
and a series of dams from tho mouth upwaixis. Those works may bo detailed as 
follows : — 

4,000 lineal fcpt of slides, 
800 " " booms, 
1,324 " " damp, and 
6 piorF. 

Repairs have boon made to the long slide and dams at Chuie No. 1. (Appen- 
pix 6, page 13T.; 



TRENT RIVER NAVIGATION. 

The booms, piers and slides and all such portions of the works as are connected 
with the lumbering operations on the River Trent at Chisholm's Rapids, Ranney's 
Falls, Middle Falls, and Crook's Rapids, were transferred to a company formed pur- 
posely for the management and maintenance of those works, with the right of 
levying tolls thereon, at the rate of five shillings per crib, at each of the slides, 
except at Chisholm's and at Crook's Rapids, where tho works constructed do not 
facilitate the descent of timber. 

This rate was altered by an Order in Council, on tho 8th of December. 1866, 
fixing the tolls to be levied at Ranney's Falls, Middle Falls, and Heely's Palls, at one 
cent for each log of 13 feet in length, and a proportionate sum on pieces of greater 
length ; and one dollar on each ci'ib of square timber. 

The Company are not liable for the renewal of tho works, in case of their failure 
from decay of materials, or their destruction by fire, flood or any other cause. It is 



it 
« 
it 



[1882] xlvii 

their duty to koop an exact account of all the moneys collected by them, and to 
transmit the same to the Minister of Public Worlcs, as provided by the Orders in 
Coancil passed on the subject. 

The extraordinary repairs which from time to time wore required have been 
executed at the expense of the Government, as also new works at localities other 
than those mentioned. 

The following table gives the distances of navigable and unnavigable roaches : — 

Navigable. Unnavigable. 

From Trenton, Bay of Quints, to Nine Mile Eapids 9 

Nine Mile Bapids to Percy JLanding 19^ 

Percy's Landing to Heely's Falls Dam 14J 

Heely's Falls Dam to Peterboro OIJ 

" Peterboro to Lakefield 9J 

" Lakefield to Burleigh 12 

<• Burleigh Bapids 1 

•* Burleigh Bapids to Buckhorn Eapids 7 

'' Buokhorn Bapids 1 

<• Buokhora Dam to Lindsay 36^ 

126J 34| 

" Lindsay to Port Perry at the head of Lake Scugog. 28| 

165i 34f 

Total distance, Bay of Quintd to Port Perry 190 miles. 

Passing to Fenelon Falls the distance from Buckhorn Dam 

to Fenelon is 31^ 

The following is a list of the works now in use : — 

ChisholnCs Eapid$» 

Distance from Trenton 
in Miles. 

The works here consist of a canal and lock, a dam and slide... 15^ 

Percy Landing. 
A retaining boom for saw logs here 28} 

Campbellford. 
Guide booms • 34f 

Middle Falls. 

The works consist of 4 dams and 2 slides 37f 

Crow Bay. 
A retaining boom 38 



xlviii 



[1882] 



HetJy's Falls. 

Distance from Trentoa 
in Miles. 

A dam and one slide aro in operation hero 42f 

Crook* s Bapids, Hastings. 
The works consist of a lock, dam, and slide for timber 92f 

WMtlato's Rapids. 

These works, situated below Petcrboro, consist of a lock, 

dam, and canal • 92^ 

Little Lake. 
These works consist of three piers and a boom 94 

Burleigh. 
Timber slides , 116 

Buckhom Bapids. 

This dam is important 'in keeping to a high level the water 
of the lakes west of it as far as Bobcaygeon, including 
Lakes Pigeon, Ball, Buckhorn, and Chemong. The dam 
. is effective 125 

Bobcaygeon. 

There are two dams here with canal, lock, and slide. The 
dams keep up the water to the same level as far as Fene- 
lon Falls, and to the reach as far as Lindsay Lock 140J 

Fenelon Falls. 
A large slide and booms 154} 

In accordance with the terms of the Act 42 Yic, Chap. 7, the canals and locks 
in the District of Newcastle are now under the control of the Department of Bail- 
ways and Canals ; whereas the slides, dams, and booms remain under the control of 
the Department of Fublio Works. 

The following repairs have been effected^at the various stations : — 

At Fenelon Falls, while making temporary repairs, it was ascertained that the 
slide was in a very bad condition, and repairs were initiated which could not be com- 
pleted, as it was not desirable to exceed the credit voted, (Appendix 10, page 143.) ' 

In the Scugog Eiver, a great number of saw-logs sunken in the bed of the river, 
and which impeded navigation, were removed. There is now a depth of five feet at 
low water. (Appendix 10, page 143.) 



[1882] xlix 

At Bobcaygeon the Departmont has removed obstacles hinderiDg navigation 
at the entrance to the canal. (Appendix 10, page 143.) 

At Backhorn, ropau*s are being made to the bead of the slide. (Appendix 10, 
page 143.) 

At Lakefiold the dam and slide require considerable repairs. (Appendix 10, 
page 144.) 

At Peterborough, work is going on for removing the refose and saw-dust from 
the river near the town. (Appendix 10, page 144.) 

At Little Lake it is necessary to renew tbe boom. (Appendix 10, page 141.) 

At Whitlaw's Bapids the guiding boom and the slide planking were repaired. 
(Appendix 10, page 144.) 

At the Eiver Otonabee the refuse and saw-dust have accumulated in such quan- 
titles that it is necessary to remove them in order not to binder the running of the 
steamboats. (Appendix 10, page 145.) 

At Hastings, general repairs to the slide have been effected, and the upper portion 
of the piers has been renewed. It is necessary to have the guiding booms renewed. 
(Appendix 10, page 145.) 

At Heeley's Falls considerable repairs are now being made on the slide, and 
a coffer dam had to be constructed at the head of tbe slide, the planking of which 
has been repaired. (Appendix 10, page 145.) 

At Middle Falls no repairs have been made, but next year they will be indis^ 
ponsablo. (Appendix 10, page 143.) 

At Chisholm's Bapids some repairs to the dam have been made, and the slide 
ia also in need of repairs. (Appendix 10, page 145.) 



TELEGRAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE. 

BRITISH OOLUHBIA. 

The system of telegraph lines in this Province has worked well j interruptions 
bavo been much less frequent and repairs promptly made. The receipts amounted to 
Sl^,414.24 as against $10,514, for the previous year. (Appendix 11, page 14*7.) 

THE aULf OF ST. LAWBENOS. 

All the cables have worked well* with the exception of that of the Bird Bocks 
which will be shortly repaired. (Appendix 11, page 147.) 



[1882] 



BAY OP PUNDY. 

Tho cablo betweon the Grand Maaan Island and Campo Bollo was damaged hy a 
wi'ocked vessel ; but it has been repaired in a satisfactory manner. (Appendix 11, 
page 147.) 

THE ATLANTIC COAST. 

The lino between Canso and Halifax has worked well. (Appendix 11, p. 148 ) 

NORTH SHORE, RIVER ST. LAWRENCE, NEWFOUNDLAND. 

A cable has been laid at the month of the Saguenay, between Portage Bay and 
Water Bay near Tadousac, in order to connect the telegraph lines between Marra^ 
Bay and Mille Vaches, and this cable works well. (Appendix 11, page 148.) 

The land line fourteen miles long between Port au Basque and Cape Ray is 
now in course of construction, (Appendix 11, page 148.) 

SIGNAL SERVICE. 

Twenty-three signal stations have been establislied at the points montionod in 
Appendix 11, page 148. 

MANITOBA AND THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 

By Order in Council the telegraph lines of these regions have been placed under 
the control of the Department of Public Works since the 30th June, 1882, and active 
steps arc being taken to organize the service. (Appendix 11, page 148.) 

GKAVIKG DOCK AT ST. JOSEPH DE LEVIS. 

The extra works considered necessary at the enti*anco and mentioned Iq last 
year's Eeport, have been executed in part. The machinery, boilers, &c., which 
Messrs. Carrier, TJain^ & Co., built in their workshops, have still to be placed in 
position. (Appendix 12, page 149-150.) 

THE PRINCESS LOUISE WHAEF AND DOCKS, EIVEE ST. CHARLES, 

HARBOR OP QUEBEC. 

The second portion of this immense undertaking is completed, and there remains 
to be done the dredging, tho building of a cross-wall and other works which will go 
to make the tidal basin which it is proposed to establish at this place. (Appendix 
12, page 150-151.) 

DEEPENING THE CHANNEL BETWEEN MONTREAL AND QUEBEC. 

By the Act 36 Victoria, chapter 60 (1873), and by Order in Council of 3l8t May, 
18*73, the Harbour Commissioners of Montreal wore empowered to carry out theso 
works. 

The work of dredging the ship channel in order to give it a depth of 25 feet has 
been continued. 



[1882] li 

The places where the most considerable work has been done, are the following : 
C^ Charles, Pouillier Eayer, Cap la Roche, Becancour upper traverse, Port St. 
Francis, Lake St Peter, Isle de Gr&ce, ContreccBur Channel, Cape St. Michel, 
Yarennes, Pointe-aux-Trembles and Montreal. 

The dredging at all points represents a total quantity of 1,453,788 cnhic yards 
for die last fiscal year. 

The accounts of expenditure by the Harbor Oommiasioners are only closed on 
the 31st December of each year. (Appendix 13, pp. 152-154.) 

PURCHASES AND SALES. 

Appendix 14 (p. 155), gives a statement of sales and purchases effected by the 
Department during the last fiscal year. 

ARBITRATIONS. 

During the fiscal year only three claims were referred to the official arbitrators. 
(Appendix 15, pp. 156, 157.) 

OPENING AND CLOSING OP NAVIGATION. 

Appendix 16 (pp. 158, 159,) gives the dates of the closing ol navigation at the 
most important ports of the Dominion, and shows the depth of water at low tide at 
those ports. 

THE DEPARTMENTAL STAFF. 

Appendix 1*7 (page 160,) gives a list of persons who filled, in the Department, from 
IrtJuly, 186'7, to 30th June, 1882, the offices of Minister, Deputy Minister, Secretary, 
Chief Engineer and Chief Architect. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HECTOR L. LANGEVIN, 

Minister of Public Works. 
Ottawa, 20th January, 1883. 



10—1 



I 



DOMINION OF CANADA. 



REPORT 



•OF THX 



MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOB THX 



FISCAL TEAR ENDED 30th JUNE, 1882. 



APPENDICES. 



TABLE OF APPENDICES. 



, * PAGX 

I AppesduE No. 1. Statement of expenditure during fiscal year 1 

I " 2. Tables of distances 9 

" 3. Eeport on Public Buildings, by Thomas Puller, Chief Architect. 19 

*' 4. Eeport on Heating, &c., Public Buildings, by J. R. Amoldi, 

Mechanical Engineer 30 

" 6. Eeport on Harbors and Eivers, Dredging and Surveys, by 

' H. P. Perley, Chief Engineer ; with special reports on 

Toronto Harbor, by James B. Eads, C.E. ; on the Ovei'flow 
I of Lake Manitoba, by Thos. Guerin, C.B.; and on Pe»c6 
! Breakwater, by C. F.Eoy, C.E 32 

** 6. Eeport on Public Works in British Columbia, by Hon, J. W. 
1 Trutch, C.M.G 117 

" 7. Eeport on Slide, Booms, &c., Eiver Saguenay, by H. P. Perley, 

Chief Engineer, and J Eosa, Superintendent 133 

" S, Eep'^rt on SliHc^ a^d Boomf,. St. .Hrr»ri<*c Dintriot, by Charles 

Lajoie, Superintendent 134 

9. Eeport on Slides and Booms, Ottawa District, by G. B. Bropby, 

Superintendent . 136 

" 10. Eeport on Slides and Booms, Newcastle District, by Tbcs. D. 

.Bolcher, Superintendent 142 

" 11. Eeport on Telegiaph Lines and Signal Service, by F, N. 

Gisborne, Superintendent 147 

j " 12. Eeport on Quebec Harbor improvements, and Graving Dock 

at LcyL', by the Q'Jcbcc Harbor Commissioners 149 

*' 13. Eeport on the deepening of the Channel between Montreal 

and Quebec, by the Montreal Harbor Commibsioners 152 

" 14. Statement of property purchased or sold, by the Department, 

daring the fiscal year 165 

'* 15. Statement of claims submitted to the Official ArbitratorF. 156 

" 16. Statement of the opening and closing of Navigation 158 

" 17. ListofMinisters, Deputy Ministers, Secretaries, Chief Engineers 

and Chief Architects 160 



'L_ 



[1882] 



APPENDIX No. I. 



- z.'S 



Statemeht Bbowing the Amount expended by the Department of Public Works of 
Canada, daring Uie Fiscal Year ended 30th June, 1882. 



Name of Work. 



PubIio Buildings. 



Gcneralij.. 



Gonstniction 



$ ots. 
l^Ul 67 



Nova Scotia, 



HAlifkx Dominion Bnildinga » 

I do Drill Shed 

I do Penitentiaiy 

f do Quarantine dtation (Lawloi's Island)... 

Loneoburg Marine Hospital 

\i Ficton Cnstom House „ 

do Marine Hospital 

r S/dn^ Quarantine Hospital 



Prince Edward Itland, 



Cfaarlottetown Dominion Building.. 

do DriUShed 

do Marine Hospital 



New Brunswick. 



Chatham Custom House 

Dorehester Penitentiary 

Fredericton PostOflBce ^ 

St John Oustom House 

do Fort Duflferin, Negro Point 

do Marine Hospital 

Military Buildings 

(Partnd^e Island) Quarantine Station . 

Penitentiarj 

Post OflBce 

Public Buildings 

SavinRS Bank 

Buiaex Post Office, Custom House, kc 

Woodstock do do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Quebec. 

Beaoport Rifle Range ». 

Chicoulimi Manne Hospital 

Dmidee Custom House , 

Groflse Isle Quarantine Station. . 

Bnll Post Office, Ac 

UleauxNoix Forts 

Uris Fortifications 



Carried over., 



1,613 00 
236 82 



68 06 



55,626 70 

3,120 77 

24,823 05 



861 43 
2,000 00 



29,486 62 



1,918 30 
1,680 22 



748 15 



14,421 60 
793 59 



3,831 08 



156,175 96 



10—1 



Repairs. 



Staff and 
Maintenance 



$ cts. 



5,869 47 

2,260 67 

990 12 

50 00 

116 00 

906 19 



.A... 



4,240 82 
26 26 



307 34 



199 98 

942 16 

48 38 



180 00 

1,500 47 

1,839 14 

78 60 

969 82 



893 49 



151 76 



21,657 53 



$ cts. 



Total. 



$ cts. 
14,^7 6J 



6,1^47 
2,26^ 67 

9^ 12 
60 00 

116 00 
" 906 1» 
1,613 00 

236 82 



4,240 82 
26 25 
68 06 



307 34 

65,625 7^ 

3,^0 7^ 

26,765 20 

48 38 

861 4^ 

2,000 06 

180 00 

1,600 47 

31,326 76 

78 60 

969 82 

1,918 3* 

1,680 22 



893 4i 

748 U 

87 81 

14,421 M 

793 59 

161 n 

3,8^1 OS 



177,833 4% 



s 



.[1882] 



APPENDIX Nfo. I.— Continued. 



Name of Work 



Forward - 



CoDttraction 
9ctf 



Xontveal Custom Hoqm . 



do Examining Warehouia ... 

do Immiffimnt Shed 

I do Inland Rerenae OfBcea 

do Hilitary Cemeterj 

do Mnaeum 

do , Poet OtBcc 

^^Nfc'Attnttty Barracks 

do Gartridge Pactorr 

Citadel 

do Cliff 

do Buildings ^ 

Castom House...^ 

Diki^baiiiTei¥4^ Estetiioa.... 

Fortifications 

Marine Hospital.. 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do Post i 

Sherbrooke Immigrant ^bed ..y 

do Post Office, Custom House, Ac. 

8t Helen's Island Military Buildings 

St, John's Post Offiee 

tit. Regis Cnstum House 

8t Vincent de Paul Penitentiary 

Three Rivers Old Barracks 



Military Buildings . 
BtOffloe 



0nt4rm. 



BelleTille Custom House, kc 

do Inland Revenue Office » 

Brantford Post Office, Ac 

Broekrifie Custom House, kc 

Chatham do • 

Cornwall Post Office, kc 

<i«u^ph Custom Uotmtf kc 

Hamilton do 

do Immigrant Shed 

do Post Offii-e, Ac 

Kingston «JUBtom House 

do Fortifications 

do Military College 

do Penitentiary 

do Post Office 

London Custom House 

do Immigrant Shed 

do PostOffice 

jfiagara MiUtory Buildings 

lOttawa Drill Sied 

do Geological Museum 

do Public Buildings ».. 

do do Gas 

do do Grounds 

do do Heatiu)^ 

do do Improving Ventilation . 
do do Removal of Snow 



166,176 96 



4,071 00 
3,447 72 



10,363 87 



S,(HO 07 
13,018 76 

9,746 13 
10,877 61 

6,438 60 

3,674 60 
18^29 U 
18,017 69 



6,806 09 

144 63 

1,636 00 



16,676 16 
6,103 36 



11,849 64 



Carried over 414,026 81 | 164,018 67 



1,086 00 
3,090 00 
8,137 88 
8,333 97 



1,460 00 
37,941 70 



4,660 03 
8,340 63 



337 16 
10,073 12 
24,934 96 



»QQfi OA 



Repairs, 
$ oti. 



31,667 63 



7,347 76 

1,473 43 

676 69 



590 60 

316 40 

3,474 93 



99 74 



3,621 36 
609 66 



4,733 83 
846 60 

1,367 81 
400 00 



Staff and 
Maintenance 

$ ets. 



76 00 
76 00 



211 00 

118 86 

1,399 73 



3 78 



333 96 
669 60 



306 66 

163 30 

9,919 78 



633 66 

1,379 74 

76 00 

317 34 

637 26 



6,778 77 
97,438 68 



19,617 70 

7,640 54 

40,031 99 



503 01 



67,693 24 



[1882] 



APPBNDIX No. 1—Omtinued. 



Name of Work. 



ForwAid. 



Oolario^Ooncladed . 

#ttawft Public Boildingt, Telephonio Sorrico. 
. 4o do Water 

'* Sopreme Oourt 

ffliatldwMd OatUe QnaraQtiiie SUtion 

Pntcou Port Wellingtoo Barracks 

fidMoHaU • 

do Allowance for Fael and Light 

do BemoTal of Snow 

it Catherines Post Office, kc 

81 Thomas do 

Skatford do .^ ^...., 

Xerooto Custom Honse , 

do Examining Warehonse , 

, do Immiffrant Shed 

do Inland Rerenne Office 

■ do Militaiy Buildings - 

do Post Office 

do Public Buildings 

do Receirer Qenerars Office 

ViadsorPost Office, kc .• 



Manitoba. 



kaadon Immigrant Shed 

Inorson Immiffrant Shed 

do Post Office 

ttooer Mountain Penitentiarj 

Wiampeg Architect's Office 

do Assistant ReceiTor General's Office. ., 

Custom House , 

Fort Osborne Barracks 

Immigrant Shed , 

Lieutenant Governor's Residence...... 

Parliament Buildings 

Post Office 



do 
4o 
do 
do 
do 

do 



NarthWut Ttrritoriei. 



lattleford Buildings 

Britith Columbia. 



fclimo Post Office 
Westminster Penitentiarj.. 
^:^ do Post Office... 

fifloria Custom House 

' do Marine Hospital 

' do Post Office. 

d« Public Buildings 

do Barings Bank 



Construction 
9 ots. 



414,026 61 



13,972 17 
1,577 10 



11,687 34 
7,331 37 
7,213 37 



6,704 37 



9,934 20 
1,186 10 



Repairs, 
t eto 



16,829 26 



Carried otot.. 



6)026 00 



13,243 26 
5,666 08 

17,017 90 
7,505 88 



3,025 91 



25 33 

6,781 17 
848 57 



4,430 70 



554,031 69 



164.018 67 



801 92 



399 87 
22,964 58 



2,597 41 

9,646 93 

966 18 

879 78 

24 00 

2,798 34 

161 96 

2 70 

1,229 74 



Staff and 
Maintenance 

$ cts. 



67,693 24 



858 30 
11,433 25 



8,000 00 
425 01 



79 10 
153 67 
583 15 



1,298 20 
1,474 03 



104 36 



60 00 
1,163 00 

157 37 

158 00 
267 52 



211,280 42 



87 909 80 



Total. 
$ etiu 



645,738 52 



858 3» 

11,433 2ft 

14,774 09 

1,577 10 

399 87 

22,254 5t 

8,000 00 

425 01 

11,687 84 

7,331 87 ^ 

7,213 37 

2,597 41 

9,646 98 

966 IS 

879 78 

24 00 

2,798 34 

161 96 

2 70 

7,934 11 



9,934 20 

1,186 19 

79 10 

16,962 98 

583 15 

5,025 00 

1,298 20 

1,474 08 

13,243 26 
5,666 0^ 

17,017 
7,505 



3,025 91 



25 38 

6,885 58 

848 57 

60 09 

1,161 00 

4,588 07 

158 00 

267 52 



853,29191 



[U82] 



APPENDIX No. 1— <7ofi<muftt 



Name of Work. 



Forward 

HABB0UR8 AltD RlVBBB. 

Nova Seotia. 



JJftieea^i© Poud 

Bfer;^DE Islaritlj Causo Harbour.. 

Cl^pe S- Eaty 

C^wBar 

Digby Pier , 

IFatDpftoa..... - 

lidian Islftnd Beuch 

Idgooiah Soiilli 

LlUfp Barbfitir.,,. ..►*., ...., 

Ltrt?rpOol (^Hrooklyn)... 

*tatw>a Hftrbouf 

itntrt-^r-Diea 

JVfieteglian Bri;nk water 

' dtt RJTer.. 

Kjortb Sjdney Harbour 

Furstjoro' Pier ,,.,*. 

PartTidge Island Hiver 

l^ttt de Grat,..», 

Pdrter'B Lake ., 

I*m-t Hood Pier,.,.. 

Rigged Pond 

Trout Cove -* 

Yannoutb 



Prince Edward Island, 



(JAmpbeirs Gove 

Cdl^e Bay, Souris East.. 

]lklp6<}u6 

HimiDLigash . .^ 

ICew London 

KoBtico Harbonr 

8t Peter's Bay 

Tignish , 

Wood Islands 



New Bruntwiek, 

C!ainpobelIo Breakwater (Wilsoo's Beach).. 

Cftfton 

Cocagne 

Jfadawaska Rirer 

Pointe-dn-Chdne , 

Quaco , 

&chibucto 

ohippegan Harbour 

fit. AnarewB 

81 Jotin Harbour : 

. do Kiver , 

do do at Oroinocto 

Tobique Rirer .....,.- 



Construction 
$ cts. 



HARBOtms, &c. f MAliitiiCB Protinobb. ... 
Carried Over..... 



664,031 69 



716 20 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
6,000 00 

700 00 
1,672 37 
1,100 00 
1,600 00 

200 00 
8,927 76 
4,1*-<J 00 
8,63J 12 
2,166 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 



2,600 00 
1,000 00 

200 00 
1,000 00 

600 00 



1,700 00 



7,29ir20 
1,254 09 



1,600 00 



4,649 60 

302 79 

4,327 20 

1,966 62 



207 11 



941 76 


1,037 06 


11,073 69 


1,968 68 


1,0^)0 00 


2,950 29 


72 62 


6,299 66 


3,666 18 


714 68 


1,000 00 




667,669 96 



Repairs. 
$ cts. 



SUffand 
Maintenance 

$ cts. 



211,280 42 



8r,909 80 



49 00 



600 00 



43 00 
60Q oi) 



200 00 



1,607 28 



214|0T9 70 



1,607 !• 



87,909 80 



959,669 4$ 



[1882] 



« 



APPENDIX No. l^-^ionUniaed. 



Name of Work. 



Forward 

H ABSORB AND RiTBRB— Coflttflt^^d. 



»du Portage Slip 

AnseSt. Jeaa Pier 

Bacotrille Pier.. 

BaieSt. Paol Pier 

fiertluer Riyer {en haut) ..., 

Ci^PAigle Pier 

Oari«ton Pier. 

Cedars Pier « 

ClKiiai du Moine Pier ^....^ 

Oldocmtiini Pier 

Ooteaa Landing Pier 

Sboalements Pier 

£taog<4ii-Nord (Magdalen Islands) Pier 

Qroaeelale Harbor- 

Harbors, Ac, generally 

Isle anx Coadres Pier 

We anx Gmes Pier 

U» Bcnreuilfe Pier 

Malbaie Pier 

MatapePier 

itott^efd Harbour 

New Carlisle Pier 

Perc6 Breakwater (Examination and Survey) 

Piers below Quebec 

Piers and Booms, Belcoil « 

Ri?i%re du Li6yre., 

fimdre du Loup Pier 

RiTer Nicolet (Harbor of Refuge) 

Birer Ottawa (Bristol and Portage du Port).... 

iUviire Ouelle Pier 

ititer Ricbelien , 

4o Saguenay below Cbicontimi 

do do (Enlargement Grande D^charge, 
LakefiJt. John) 

do St Lawrence 

do do Removal of Chains and Anchors 

St. Anne's Wharf, Kiver Saguenay 

fit. Dominique Pier 

Sie. i^amille Pier 

8t Jean Port JoliPier « , 

8l Timothee Pier 

8u Zotique Pier 

Tadonsac Pish Dams 

Tfois Pistoles Pier 

Tamaska River 



Ontario, 



Belleville Harbour 

Oeboorg Harbour 

Oolliojgwood Harbour 

Gederich Harbour 

Harbours and Rivers generally.. 

Kincardine Harbour 

Little Current 

Heaford Harbour 



Carried over.* i ^ ^82,210 21 



Construction 
$ cts. 



657,569 96 



584 43 
1,091 73 
2,204 09 
4,742 70 

150 65 
1,293 00 
3,527 40 
2,711 62 



11,747 52 
3,415 19 



2,034 50 
2,636 18 
1,571 13 



1,199 00 
601 25 

4,220 20 
499 43 



711 91 



594 52 
299 00 



799 20 
5,067 42 

6,303 16 

3,691 30 

10,041 11 



4,999 78 



1,070 75 
3,464 32 
3,600 00 
7,008 02 



4,949 63 
8,291 20 
8,566 10 
2,387 06 



3,486 48 
5,183 78 



Repairs. 
$ cts. 



214,079 70 



30 00 

824 30 

8 00 

272 97 



1,597 51 



778 77 



1,696 39 
21 05 



4,360 00 
"3,299 31 



318 94 



128 20 
26 75 



65 35 
11 10 



6,194 43 



10 00 



.233,722 77 



Staff and 
Maintenance 

$ cts. 



87,909 80 



1&4 66 



211 50 
368 76 



88,664 71 



Total. 
$ cts. 



969,569 46 



584 43 
1,09; 72 
2,204 50 
4,742 70 

150 65 

1,29^ 00 

3,527 40 

2,711 62 

30 00 

824 30 
8 06 

272 97 
11,747 5? 
3,416 19 
1,597 61 
2,034 60 
2,636 18 
1,671 13 

778 77 
1,199 00 

^l 26 
4,220 20 

499 43 
1,696 39 

206 71 

711 91 
4,360 00 

594 62 

299 00 
3,510 81 
1,157 96 
6,967 42 

6 303 16 

4,010 24 

10,041 11 

128 20 

26 76 

4,999 78 

65 36 

11 10 

1,070 76 

3,464 32 

3,600 00 

7,008 02 



4,949 63 
8,291 20 
8,566 10 
2,387 06 
6,194 43 
3,486 48 
6,183 78 
10 00 



1,1H602 69 



[1882] 



APPENDIX No. I— Continued. 



Name of Work. 



Forward 

Habbors avd Rims— Coficlikfed. 
Onterto— Cooelndad . 



K«ebl0h Rapids, St Mary's Rivera 

Ottawa Rirer, remoTal of reef below Suspension 

Bridge 

Owen Sound Harbour 



Port Albert 

Port ElKin 

Port Hope 

Port Stanley 

Portsmouth 

Rondeau 

Southampton 

Thombnrj 

Tobermoraj 

Toronto 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

^0 



Lake Huron, 
do 
do 
do 



Manitoba, 



jtfsiniboine Rirer 

Pairford and Partridge Crop River (Examination 

of question of overflow) 

Harbours generallj. 



IfoHh-Wett TerHtoruM, 
Saskatchewan River 



British Columbia. 



Oourtenay River 

Harbours generallj.. 

Naas River 

Tictoria Harbour ... 



Habboubs gkkbballt.. 



Dbbdob Ybssbls. 



Ditdj 
Vew 



Plant 

Dbbdgino. 



Maritime Provinces 46,742 64 

-Quebec— 

Beanharnois $1,386 68 

Gatineau River 1,126 36 

Laprairie 326 73 

L'AsBomption River 1,496 04 

Riviere k la Oralsse (Ri- 

gaud) 1,816 02 

Riviere du Nord 370 74 

Saguenay River (below 

Chicoutimi) 666 43 

St Lawrence Biver 2,212 60 

GeneraUj 9,216 76 

18,616 16 



Carried over ^..... 64,267 79 



(Tonstruction 
$ ets. 



782,216 21 



600 00 

4,933 19 

29,942 67 

1,040 36 

3,180 97 

6,083 14 

600 00 

3,390 40 

6,460 00 

2,669 60 

3,469 98 

349 20 

14,280 49 



160 00 

3,961 43 
223 39 



714 48 



474 66 

642 91 

380 25 

1,786 99 



3,160 00 
3,236 60 



872,724 70 



Repairs, 
t ets. 



233,722 77 



6,083 26 



21,406 91 



261,212 93 



Staff and 
Maintenance 

$ ets. 



88,664 71 



1,194,602 < 



88,664 71 1,222,602 34 



[1882J 



APPENDIX No. 1— Cbnttfwed. 



• 

Name of Work. 


Construction 
$ cts. 


Repairs. 
$ cts. 


Staff and 
Maintenance 

$ cts. 


Total, 
t cts. 


Forwaid- 64,257 79 


872,734 70 

83,876 93 

2,418 50 
5,300 08 


261,212 93 

5,064 21 
9,167 21 


88,664 71 

1,438 58 
17,768 48 
22,103 22 


1,222,002 84 


Ontario- 
Bruce lOneB M.M 1,681 33 

Oonaecon Harbour 3)236 13 

Ck>derich Harbonr 418 00 

Hawkeebnrj (Ottawa 

RtTer) —..... 159 23 

Bondeao Harbonr.......... 3,015 00 

&tmon Rirer 1,068 43 

Picton Harbour....... 468 00 

Generallj 1,311 48 

11,277 60 

Bridah Colnmbia....... 8 341 54 


83,676 93 

8,921 29 

82,285 77 

22,103 22 

435 00 


SuDM AXD Boom. 

•^Sagfoenar District Works. 

flt. Xaance do 


^^tawa do 


-Otuwa Rirer....... 7,657 84 


485 00 
'""VjSlfei 




OatSnoao Rirer 1,128 92 





••■*..... ......... 




■adawaska Rirer 4,398 22 

Ooulonire Rirer ■ 677 73 


4,317 81 


.. 




Black iTirer 587 56 










Pttewawa Rirer 990 53 













Dnmoine Rirer 2il92 05 




Sooth Nation 628 66 









..«.., . 


Manltao Recollet 301 68 










'OttftWA SnanenAioii Bridire^ 18 87 




18,481 76 
3,028 63 


582 60 


18,481 76 




645 10 
157 62 


Hew Gaatle District Works 


4,256 13 
157 62 


*^ Roads and Bbidob8» 

Des Joachims Raoids Bridire ».... 


Portacre dn Port Kridfre 


400 00 





400 00 


Ottawa Union Suspension Bridge 


4,912 80 


4,912 80 
223 30 




223 30 
3,049 15 





''NmKwnata Road **... ........4..... 




3.901 61 
27,060 09 


3,049 15 

3,901 51 
27,060 09 

11,676 63 

4,486 23 

43,356 38 

42,290 58 
7,254 27 
2,195 84 


MXBOILLAXIOUS. 

Jlrkitrations and Awards 




^Snrrers and insnections 






TiLiGBAPH Links. 

Telegraph Extension, Baie St Paul to Ghicoutimi. 
do Lines. Maritime Prorinoes 


11,676 83 
4,486 23 
4,709 51 

33,635 43 








do do British Columbia 




38,646 87 
8,655 15 


Sisnd and Cable Telegraph Lines, Lower St. 

Lawrence. Ac 

'TeleirraDh and Siirnal Serrice flrenerallr 


7,254 27 


Ji sent and Contisencies. British Columoia...... ...... 




2.195 84 








Totals.... 


















•...••.....»••* 


Carried over • •••- 


1,029,296 54 


307,881 36 


311,016 95 


1,648,194 85 



[1882J 



APPENDIX No. I— Concluded. 



Name of Work. 


Construction 

$ CtB. 


Repairs. 
$ cts. 


Staff and 
Maintenance 

$ cts. 


Total. 
$ cts 


Forward 

Works Aothorizid bt Spicial Acts of 
Pabliament. 

St. Lawrence RiTer, deepening between Quebec and 

Ifnntrekl j 


1,029,296 54 

194,000 00 
66,000 00 
50,000 00 
37,769 22 


307,881 86 


)1 1,016 95 


1,548,194 8S 

194,000 00 
55,000 00 
50,000 00 


Oaebee Harbour ImDroTements 






Lerls Graying Dock ^ 

Sisqaimalt Graving Dock, B.O 










37,769 22 








Total • 


336,769 22 


• 




336,769 22 










Grand Totals 


1,366,066 76 


307,881 36 


211,016 95 


1,884,964 or 





O. DIONNE, 

^Accountant, 



Department op Public Works, 

Ottawa, 20th November, 1882. 



IT 




[1882] 



APPENDIX No. 2 



TABLES OP DISTANCES. 

ST. LAWBBNGE NAVIGATION. 
PROM STRAITS OF BSLLB-ISLB TO DULUTH, AT HEAD OF LARS SUPERIOR, BT WATIB. A 



From 



Straits of Belle-Ile 

Cape Whittle 

West Liffht, Anticosti , 

Father Point 

Rimooski 

Bic. 



Isle Yerte (opp. Saguenay) 

Qaebec 

Three Rivers 

VoDtreal 

Lachine 

Beanhamois 

Ste. Cdcile , 

Cornwall 

Dickinson *s Landing , 

Farran's Point , 

Upper end Crojle's Island 



Williamsborg 

Hapid Plat 

Point Iroquois Village . 
Presqn'Ile 



To 



Cape Whittle 

West Light, Anticosti. 

Father Point 

Rimouski 

Bic. 



Point Cardinal 

Galops Rapids 

Prescott 

Kingston 

Port Dalhonsie 

Port Colbome 

Anherstburgh 

Windsor. 

Foot of St. Mary's Island. . 

Samia 

Foot of St Joseph's Island 

SaultSt Mary 

Head of Sault St. Mary.... 
Point aox Pins 



Isle Verto 

Quebec 

Three Rivers 

Montreal 

Lachine 

Beauhamois 

Ste. 06cile 

Cornwall 

Dickiuson' 8 Landing 

Farran's Point 

Upper end of Croyle's Island. 
Williamsburg or Morris- 

burgh 

Rapid Plat 

Point Iroauois Village 

Upper end Presqu'Ile 

Pumt Cardinal} Edwards 

burgh 

Head of Qalops Rapids 

Prescott 

Kingston 

Port Dalhousie 

Port Colborne 

Amherstburgh 

Windsor 

Foot of St Mary*s Island 

Samia 

Foot of St. Joseph's Island... 

Foot of Sault St Mary 

Head ot Sault St Mary 

Point aux Pins 

Duluth 



SUtute Miles. 



Sections 

of 

Kayigation. 



Gulf of St Lawrence 

do 
River St Lawrence 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do to Tidewater, 

do 

Lachine Canal 

Lake ht Louis 

Beaubarnois Canal 

Lake St Francis 

Cornwall Canal 

HiverSt Lawrence. 
Farran's Point Canal 

River St. Lawrence 
Rapid Plat Canal. . 
River St Lawrence 
Point Iroquois Canal, 

Junction Canal 

Galops Canal 

River St. Lawrence, 
do 

Lake Ontario 

Welland Canal... 

Lake Erie 

River Detroit 

Lake St Clair... 
River St Clair... 

Lake Huron 

River St Mary.., 
Sault St. Mary Canal. 
River St Mary.. 
Lake Superior..., 




1,0971 

1,106' 

1,164 

1,334 

1,361 

1,593 

1,611 

1,636 

1,669 

1,9 

1,986 

1,987 

1,994 

2,384 



Of the 2,384 miles from the Straits of Belle-Ile to the Head of Lake Superior, 71} miles are artificial 
navijration, and 2, 312 J open navigation. 

Straits of Belle-He to Liverpool, 1,942 geographical, or 2,234 statute miles. 
The total fall from Lake Superior to Tidewater is about 600 feet 



10—2 



16 



[1882J 



APPENDIX No. 2.-^Continued. 



QCBBCO TO LIVCRPOOL, vi& STRAITri OV RKLLI-ILI AND MALIN HEAD, NORTH OF IRBLAND.— B. 



From 



To 



Sections 
of Nayigation. 



G«offrapbi- 
cal Miles. 



Statate 
Miles. 



m 

61 
202 
201 

240 

2,013 

221 



Quebec 

Sagueoay 

Father Point 

West end of Anticosti.... 
Gape Whittle 



BeUe-Ile 

Malin Head. 



Sagnenaj 

Father Point 

Lighthouse, west end Anticosti ... 
Cape Whittle, Labrador Coast. ... 
Belle-Ile Lighthouse, east entrance 

of Straits 

Malin Head, North of Ireland 

Liyerpool. 



Kiver St Lawrence. 

do 

do 
Gulf of St. Lawrence 

do 
Atlantic Ocean. ... 
do and Irish Sea 



Total from Quebec to LiTerpool, riV3 Belle-Ile and Malin Head, North of Ireland... 



106 
63 

176 

176 

209 

1,760 

192 



2,661 



3,060 



HKAO OF LAEl 817PIIUOR TO LIVIRPOOL, vid STRAIT.*) OF RELLE-ILB AND NORTH OF IRBLAND. — G. 



Sections of Navigation. 


Geographi- 
calMiles. 


Statute 
Miles. 


Head of Lake Snoerior. at Fond du Lac. to Quebec 


1,366 
2,661 


1,668 
3^060 


Quebec to Liverpool, vid Straits of Belle-Ile and North of Ireland 


Total from head of Lake Superior to Lirerpool, vi/i Belle-Ile and Malin Head, 
North of Ireland 


4,016 


4,618 




N.B. — Route vid Straits of Belle-Ile shorter than viA Cape Race 


168 


162 



Straits of Belle-He, 80 miles long by 14 arerage breadth. 



[1882] 



11 



APPENDIX No. 2— Continued. 



QUIBBO TO LITBRPOOLf vid CAPS BACB A5D MALUf HKAD, NORTH OF IRBLA1«D. — D. 



From 



Qii«bec 

Stgoenar 

Father Point 

Metis 

CapSte. Anne des Monts.. 

Gap de la Madeleine 

Fame Point 

Gap des Rosiers 

Gap 8t Pierre de Miquelon 

Cape Race 

MaKnHead 



To 



Riyer St. Lawrence, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Gulf of St. Lawrence 
Atlantic Ocean . . 
do do 

do and Irish Sea 

Total from Quebec to Liyerpool, vid Gape Race and Malin Head, North ot Ireland 



Saguenar 

Father Point 

M6ti8 Point 

Gap Ste. Anne des Monts.... 

Gap de la Madeleine 

Fame Point 

Gap des Rosiers 

Gap St Pierre de Miquelon., 

Gape Race. 

Malin Head 

Liverpool 



Sections 
of Navigation. 



Geographi- 
cal Miles. 



106 
53 
22 
71 
46 
29 
25 

343 

132 
1,800 

192 



2,819 



Statute 
Miles. 



122 
61 
25 
81 
63 
33 
29 

394 

152 
2,070 

221 



3,242 



BIAD OF LAKB 8UFBBI0B TO LITIRPOOL. vid OAPB RACB AND NORTH OF IRELAND. — E. 



Sections of Navigation. 


Geographi- 
calltfiles. 


Statute 
Miles. 


Hfltd of Lake Superior, at Fond du Lac, to Quebec ..... 


1,355 
2,819 


1,558 


Qvebec to Liverpool, vid Gape Race and' North of Ireland 


3,242 






Total from head of Lake Superior to Liverpool, vid Gape Race and Malin Head, 
North of Ireland 


4,174 


4,800 






^'B, — Roote vid Gape Race lonsrer than vid Straits of Belle-Tlf 


158 


182 







10^2J 



12 



[1882] 



APPENDIX No. 2~C<mtinued. 



LAKK NAVIQATIOir.— F. 



Namee of Lakes, 

and of 

Riyers connecting the same. 



Superior 

St Mary's River 

Michigan 

Green Bay 

Mackinaw Straits < 

Georfj^ao Bay 

Huron 

St. riair River 

St. ClnirLjikke 

River Detroit 

Lake Erie 

Niagara River 

Lake Ontario 

Lake St. JTancis 

Lake St. Louis 

Lake St Peter. J 

Hiver St Lawrence, connecting Lakes 
between Kingaton and Three Rivers 



Total length of Lake Navigation 
do do 



Statute Milei. 



Greatest 
Length. 



390 

65 

345 

100 
501 
Not added 
below. J 

130 

270 
33 
26 
25 

250 
35 

190 
33 
15 
30 

186 



2,172 
1,778 



|1 



160 

4 

84 

25 

20 

55 

105 



25 
3 

60 
3 

52 
7 
5 
9 



n 



80 

1 

58 

18 

10 

40 
70 



20 
1 

38 
1 

40 
4 
6 
7 



Depth in 
Feet. 






60 



200 



900 
50 
27 
37 

204 



600 
80 
68 
40 



900 

30 

1,000 

500 

40 

500 

450 

35 

16 

29 

90 

30 

412 

36 

30 

8 

20 



Inclusive of River Portions .. 
Exclusive of River Portions.. 



Area, 
Square 
MUes. 





Feet 


32,000 


609 

582 


22,400 
2,000 


580 





580 




578 


23,000 


578 


360 


573 


10,000 


564 



6,700 

132 

75 

200 



96,867 



I 



I 



234 

141 

58 





TBOM PRINCE ARTHUB'S LANDING (lAKK SCP£UI0R) TO KORT GARRY (WINNIPKG>, BY THl DAWSOV ROUTB.— G- 



SutQte MUes. 



Prince Arthur's Landing to Shebandowan.... 

Lake Shebandowan to North-West Angle 

liorth-West Angle to Fort Garry CWinnipeg) 



The steamboat voyage from Collingwood to Prince Arthur's Landing is 532 miles. 




[1822] 



IS 



APPENDIX No. 2.^Contmue(L 

IhsTAKCE to Liverpool, from Halifax, (Nova Scotia), St John (New Brunswick), 
Portland (State of Maine), and Quebec, as measured on Col ton's Map of 
1861.— H. 

Halifax to Liverpool, vid Cape Clear. 



PROM 


, TO 


Sections of Narigation. 


DlSTAirOK Ul 
UUtEB. 


Geogra- 
phical. 


Statute. 


HaUfax, NoTa Scotia 

Cape Clear 


Oape Clear 

Liverpool 


Across Atlantic to S.W. end of Ireland.. 
Up St George's Channel 


9,200 
330 


2,630 
380 






Total 






2,630 


2,910 







St. John to Liverpool, vid Cape Clear. 



St. John, New Brunswick. 



Oipe Sable.. 
Oape Clear . 



Cape Sable- 
Cape Clear.. 
Liverpool. ... 



Across Bay of Fundy to 8.W. end of 

No<ra Scotia 

Across Atlantic to S.W. end of Ireland.. 
Up St. George's Channel 



Total .•., 



180 

2,310 

330 



2,820 



207 

2,666 

380 



3,2a 



Portland to Liverpool, vtd i 'ape Sable and Cape Clear. 



ForUand, State of Maine... 
Cane Sable 


Cape Sable 

Cape Clear 

Livemool 


Across Bay of Fundy to SW. end of 

Nova Scotia 

Across Atlantic to S.W. end of Ireland ; 
Up St. George's Channel 


210 

2,310 

330 


242 

2,666 

380 


Ci^>e Clear 




rotai.. ....... ......... .•••••••• ....•••«. 






2,860 


3,278 



Quebec to Liverpool, vid C{\pe Race and North of Ireland. 



Quebec. 



Cape Race 
Malin 



Head. 



Cape Race...< 

Malin Head. , 
Liverpool. ... 



River and Gulf of St. Lawrence to S.W. 

Foiut of Newfoundland 

Across Atlantic to North end of Ireland 
Down No'tb Channel 



Total., 



827 

1,800 

182 



2,819 



961 

2,070 

221 



3,242 



Quebec to Liverpool, vid Straits of Belle-Ilo and Malin Head, North of 
Ireland 



2,661 



3,060 



For further details, see pages 10 and 11 of this Appendix. 



14 



[1882] 



APPENDIX No. 2.-^Continued. 



Tabli of DisTANcis from the Principal Seaporta in North America, to Liverpool, 
Havre, Havana and Eio Janeiro. — I. 



Qaebeo 



Boston 



New York 



, Qeogr^hical 

to Liverpool. \ ^^ ^ellelle 2,649 

*^ 1 " CapeEace 2,808 

Havre.... f '^ B^"1^I»« 2,810 

( •* CapeBace 2,939 

Havana 2,891 

Bio Janeiro* : 5^545 

to Liverpool 2,895 

Havre ;, 2,993 

Havana j 53O 

Bio Janeiro •, 4 935 

to Liverpool 3^095 

Havre 3 228 

Havana j 240 

Bio Janeiro , , 4,885 

Philadelphia to Liverpool ;. 3 275 

Havre 3^35g 

Havana 1^190 

Bio Janeiro 4 990 

to Liverpool 3^450 

Havre 3^543 

Havana 1^160 

Bio Janeiro 5 000 

to Liverpool ^ 3,380 

Havre 3^473 

Havana 1^090 

Bio Janeiro 4 930 

ito Liverpool , 4,780 

Havre 4,838 

Havana , 595 

Bio Janeiro 5,315 



Baltimore 



Bicbmond 



New Orleans 1 



[1882] 



IB 



APPENDIX No. 2.—ConHmed. 

Table of Distances from Quebec to Labrador aloDg Xorth Shore of the 

St. Lawrence. — J. 



PROM 



Quebec 

ftMoport 

Kootmorencj Fallfl 

Ange Gftrdien 

Cbfiteau Richer 

Ste Ann* de BeaaprS 

St. Joachim 

St Tite des Gaps 

St Paul's Baj- 

Les Eboalements 

StWnee 

PointeiiPic '. 

Ifurray Bay 

Cap^l'Aigle 

StPidMe 

St Shn^on 

Port au Persil 

Pointeau Boulean 

Fcrrj Anse du Portage (across 
month of RiTer Saguenay)... 

Anse k I'Bau 

TadoQsac 

Les Petitea Bergeronnes. .. 

Escoamains 

Mille Vaches 

Portncuf 

Saolt an Gochon 

Ilet de J^remie 

Betshiamits (orBersimis).. 

Pointe auz Outardes 

Maolknagan 

Kivcr Godbout 

Pointe des Monts 

Trinit6 

HetCaribon 

Baie des Kani 

Jambon 

River Ste. Marguerite , 

Sept Isles .7. 

RiTer Moisy 

River k la Truite 

Connoran 

Pigou 

River au Bouleau 

River Matemek 

River Chaloupe 

River Shaldrac 

River Tonnerre 

Portage du Loup-Marin. ... 

River Magpie 

River St Jean , 

Longue Pointe 

Poste de Mingan 

Pointe aux Esquimaux 

^atasknan 

Tshikaska 

Hecatina , 

Bonne Esp6rance 



TO 



Beauport 

Montmorency Falls 

Anee Qardien 

Chateau Richer 

Ste. Anne de Beaupr6 

St. Joachim 

St Tite des Caps 

St Paul's Bay 

Les Eboulements 

St Ir6n6e 

Pointed Pic 

Murray Bay 

Gap k I'Agle 

St Fiddle 

St. Simeon or Black River.. 

Port au Persil 

Pointe au Bouleau 

Anse du Portage 



Anse Jil'Eau 

Tadousac 

Les Petites Bergeronnes.... 

Escoumains 

Mille Yaches 

Portneuf. . 

Saultau Gochon 

Met de JMmie 

Betshiamits (orBersimis).. 

Pointe aux Outardes 

Manikuagan 

River Godbout 

Pointe des Monts 

Trinit6 

Ilet Garibou 

Baie des Kani. 

Jambon 

River Ste. Marguerite 

Sept Isles 

River Moisy. 

River k la Truite 

Cormoran , 

Pigou 

River au Bouleau 

River Matemek 

River Gh^loupe 

River Shaldrac 

RiverTonnerre 

Portage du Loup-Marin. . .. 

River Magpie 

River St Jean 

Longue Pointe 

Poste de Mingan 

Pointe aux Esquimaux 

Nataskuan 

Tshikaska < 

Mecatina 

Bonne Esp^rance 

Blanc Sablon 



S 
.2 

12 



3 
4 
3 
6 
6 
5 
9 

24 
9 
9 
9 
3 
3 
6 

10 
8 
9 
5 

1 
1 
9 
9 

18 
9 
7 

18 

12 

15 
27 
12 

7 

7} 
22 

8 
12 
12 
19 

8 

8 

7 

7 

7- 

8 

7 
• 7 

8 

7 

7 

9 

5 
18 
64 
18 
75 
99 
24 



^2 



3 

7 

10 

16 

22 

27 

36 

60 

69 

78 

87 

90 

93 

99 

109 

117 

126 

131 

132 
133 

142 

151 

169 

178 

185 

203 

210} 

2224 

237j 

264} 

276} 

2382 

291 

313 

321 

333 

346 

364 

372 

380 

387 

394 

401 

409 

416 

423 

431 

438 

445 

454 

459 

477 

641 

569 

634 

733 

757 



Rbmarks. 



Provincial Highway, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Beach used.— 2 portages. 

do 

Track req. through forest 
Beach used. 

do 
Track req. through forest 
do do 

do do 

Beach used, 
do 
do 

Track req. through forest 
do do 

do do 

Beach used, 
do 
do 
do 
Fine Beach, short portage. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Boundary of Labrador, 

Ganada. 



16 



[1882] 



APPENDIX No. 2.— Continued. 

Population of various Sett lementH hot woon Tadousac and Labrador, on the North 

Shore of the St. Lawrence. — K. 



Nami or Place. 



Tadonsac , 

Escoumains 

Mille Vaches 

Portneuf. 

Sanltau Cochon 

Iletde J6r6mie 

Betahiamita (or Bersimis) 

Pointe aux Outardes 

llaDikuagan 

River Godbout 

Pointe des Monts 

Trinit6 

Rivifere Ste Marguerite.. . 

Sept Isles 

Rividre Moisy 

Riviere &la Tniite. ...•,.... 

Gormoran 

Pigou 

Rivi6re au Bouleau 

River Matemek 

River Chaloupe 

River Shaldrake 

'liver Tonnerre 

Rivi6re da Loup-Marin... 

River Magpie 

River St. Jean 

Longue Pointe 

Poste deMingan 

Pointe aux Esquimaux. ... 

Nataskuan 

Mecatina , 

Bonne Esp^rance 



Population. 



1864. 



Number 
of Families. 



Not obtained. 

do 

do 

40 

2 

1 

100 to 120 

5 

3 

15 to 20 

3 

3 

2 

30 to 40 

15 to 20 

2 

2 

6 

2 

2 

2 

6 

5 

3 

6 

12 to 15 

12 to 15 

100 to 120 

75 

44 

Not obtained. 

do 



Census of 1871. 



Number 
of Persons. 



765 
1,023 



1,790 



552 



191 
336 



660 
862 
358 
280 
266 



Census ot 1881. 



Number 
of Persons. 



I,5i2 

520 

1,115 



243 



241 



1,775 
480 
410 
341 



Note— Population of settlements given in Census of 1871 and Census of 1881 include intermediate 
places. 



[1882J 



ir 



APPENDIX No. 2''Continued. 
DisTANois — ^New Road - Qneb-c to Lake St. John. — L. 



FROM 


TO 


Intermediate 
Mileage. 


Total 
Blileage. 


Quebec 


Boundary PoBt 


1- 
'I' 

14 
13 
12 
12 

\? 
lOj 

14 




Boandary Post 


iBt Camp, Lachance (Stoneham)... . 
2nd do Noel 


23 


1st Camp, Lachance ^Stoneham) .. . 
Snd do Noel 


34j 
43 
67 

7a 

82 

94 

104 

II61 

126 




3rd do Lac dea Roches 




3rd do Lac dea Rochea 


4th do Lake Jacqaes Cartier 

6th do Pikauba 

6th do B6dard « 




4th do Lake Jacqnea Cartier 

5Ui do Pikauba 




6th do B6dard 


7th do Riri^re Unika 




Tth do RiTiireUpika 


8th do do Pika 




8th do do Pika 

9th do do anx Ecorces 


9th do do aux Ecorces 

lOth do Lake Belle Riviere 

St J6r6me, at lower end of Lake 
St. John, on south side 




loth do Lake Belle BiTiftre 


140 








St. J^rftme ^ 


OhicoutlmL 


60 













Mail passes three times a week. Winter and Summer. 
Time : 20 hours, Quebec to Lake Jacques Cartier (per mail), 
do 28 hours. Lake Jaeques Cartier to St. J6rdme (per mail). 

Tota l 48 hours, Quebec to Lake St John (per mail). 

Total distance 140 miles, Quebec to Lake St. John. 



Great Circls or Air Line Dietances in Geopjraphical Miles, as per Map of the 
Doroinlon of Canada. Pablishod by order of the Hon. the Minister of the^ 
Interior, the 1st November, 1878. — M. 




Yokohama (Japan) 
do 
do 

San Francisco 

do 

Bnrrard Inlet 

Port Simpson 

SLJohn(N'fld) 

do 

Montreal 

do 

do 

Beflelsle 

Gape Race 

do 

Tory Island , 

Cape Clear 

flaUfax 

PorUand 

Boston 

Hew York 



Port Simpson 

Port Mo' dj (Burrard Inlet). . 

San Francisco 

New York 

5(ontreal 

do 

do 

Cape Clear 

Tory Island 

guebec (River St. Lawrence), 
ape Race (vid St Paul) 

Belle Isle 

Tory Island 

do 

Cape Clear 

Liyerpool 

do 

Cape Race 

do 

do 

do 



3,866 
4,374 
4,470 
2,228 
2,202 
1,992 
2,194 
1,670 
1,693 
145 

i,oia 

892 

1,657 

1,736 

1,708 

240 

310 

470 

767 

808 

1,010 



18 



[1882] 



ei 



SO 



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ri882] 19 



APPENDIX No. 3. 



EEPORT OP THB CHIEP ARCHITECT. 



DiPARTMiNT OP Public Works, 

<Bef No. 29,126 . ) Ottawa, 30th November, 1882. 

Sib, — I have the honor to report on the various works executed in conneotiom 
"With Public Buildii^ under the control of this Department, during the fiscal year 
«nded 30th June, 1882. 

THOMAS FULLER, 

Chief Architect. 
9, H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary Department of Public Works. 
Ottawa. 



PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

HALIFAX. 

dominion building. 
Works mentioned in last year's, report have been completed. 

PICTOU. 

marine hospital. 

Plans have been prepared for this building and tenders will bo called for at an 
early date. 

The site chosen fronts on Pictou Harbour and the rear abuts on the road to the 
beaches. 

It will be a brick building on a stone foundation, two storios in height, roofed 
with wood. On the gi*ound floor there are to be a dining room, 6Ui*gery, nurses 
rooms and two wards of 4 beds each ; anil on the second floor four bedrooms and a 
•tore room. 

There will be necesfary outbuildings attached. 

Plans, &c, prepared by this Department. 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 
CHARLOTTETOWN. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

Repairs reported on last year are completed. 



20 [1882] 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 
DOKCHESTBR. 

OENSRAL PSNITKNTIAET FOB MARITIMB PROVINOSS. 

Works contracted for by Mr. A, B. Killam, which were alluded to at length in 
report of last year, have been completed. 

The contract works of Messrs T. McManus & Sons have not progressed av 
ftvorably as was expected. 

An extension of the water service to the officers' residences, and also of the 
prison drainage is now in progress. 

ST. JOHN. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

Works treated of in last report are dow completed, viz., footpaths, hoist^ 
boundary wall and furniture. 

NEW MABINE HOSPITAL. 

This building is being erected in the grounds connected with the present Marine 
Hospital, which it is to replace. The work< now under contract embrace the admi- 
nistrative portion and one of the wards only. The administrative portion will have 
a basemeot, two full stories and an attic; while the ward will have a basement and 
two full stories. The walls are of brick resting on stone foundations, and the floors and 
roofe wood ; the roof being covered with blates on slopes and galvanized iron on flats. 

In the basement is a boiler-room, a fuel cellar, a kitchen, a scullery, a larder, a 
pantry, storage, baths, &c. On the ground floor is the waiting room, surgery, con* 
valescei ts' dining and sitting rooms, nurnen rooms and a ward 28 feet by 48 feet ; in the 
second floor are the surgeon's, matron 'h, steward's and nurses' rooms, and a ward nimilar 
to that on ground floor ; the attic will be devoted to bed rooms, &c. 

The arrangement of plan admits of two additional wards being added when 
required. 

Architect, Mr, D. K. Dunham. 

Contractor, Mr. Wm. LawJor. 

% SDSSKX. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE^&C. 

A contract has been entered inio fo. ihin building which is to be situated in the 
Parish of Sussex on the north west si'ie of he main road to Halifax. The baf*ement 
walls are to be stone, and the outside waM- ibove plinth brick, with floors and roof 
of wood. The ground floor will bo o- c ie«l hy the local Post Office, Examining 
Warehouse, Custom House and Weiirhi ?'nd Measures. The first floor by the Inland 
Sevenue. The attic will not be finish* Mt .a pn^ent. firick safes are providedfor thfr 
various offices. 

The general entrance is on the pino a I front. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Deiarfmeni 

Superintending Architect, Mr. G. E. Knirweather. 

Contractor, Mr. Wm. Toms. 

WOODSTOCK. 

POST OFFICE, CU870M HOUSE &C, 

I have been instructed to prepare pi ttis for this building for which an appro* 
priation was made last session. 



[i882] 21 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 
QUEBEC. 

OITADEL. 

General repairs have been executed daring the fiscal year as follows, : — 

King's Bastion. — ^Pointing and repairing walls. 

Diamond Bastion and SaUyport — Rebuilding wall. 

Officers Quarters. — Repairing floors, painting, colouring and roofing. 

Curtain between Mann's and Diamond Bastions, — Renewing facing of wall. 

A reception room for the Governor General has been constructed at the. eastern 
«Dd of His Excellency's quarters on the site of the officer's stables, a portion of the 
vails of which serves as a foundation. The leception room is on the first floor, 
commuuicating with the drawing room of His Excellency quarters; the lower story 
being utilized for cloak rooms, water closets and men's bedrooms. 

Works executed under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

Contractors for repairs, Citadel, Mr. P. Chateauvert, Mr. B. Leonard, Mr. E. 
fioussel, Mr. Gh. Jobin, Mr. H. Hatch, Mr. Z. Yandry, and Mr. G. Langlais. ' 

Contractor for reception room, Mr. W. J. Piton, 

QUSBSC FORTIFICATIONS. 

Sections of the fortification walls (1) between the Citadel and St. Louis Gate; 
(2) between St. Louis and Kent Gates, and (3) the St. Vallier St wall having the 
iscing stone loose and partly fallen have been taken down and rebuilt, using the old 
materials. 

Works carried out under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

Contractor for (1) Mr. A. Lortie, (2) Mr. C. Jobin, and (3) Mr. Owen Kelley. 

WALL UNDER DUFFEBIN TSRBAOS. 

Further addition to works reported on last year have been effected under 
contracts with Mr. Thos. Pampalon and Mr. J. O'Leary. 

Works executed under the immediate superintendence of this Depai*tment. 

KENT AND ST. LOUIS GATES. 

Pointing of walls referred to in last report has been executed. 
Contractor, Mr. H. J. Beemer. 

Plans, &c.y prepared by this Department and works carried [out under its imme- 
diate superintendence. 

OARTBIDQE FAOTORT. 

Works involved in the conversion of the Artillery Barracks into a Cartridge 
&ctory have been cononleted and the buildings are occupied. 

Contractors, Mr. H. Hatch and Mr. Jos. Mathieu for buildings ; and Mr. Antoine 
Bousseau for boiler, engine and heating. 

Works carried out by this Department. 

LABORATOBT AND FULMINATS MIXING BUILDINGS. 

The works treated of in report for 1880-81 have been completed and a heating 
apparatus is being constructed in accordance with a specification and drawings fhr- 
aished by the Department of Militia and Defence. 

Contractors for buildings, Mr. H. Hatch and Mr. N. Piton. 

Contractor for heating apparatus, Mr. Ant Bousseau. 

Works carried out under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 



22 ri882J 



OHAMPLAIN STREET CLIFF. 



The retainiDg wall reported on lant year has been completed and an extension of 
same in the direction of Moantain Hill is contemplated. 
Contractor, Mr. H. Hatch. 
Works carried out under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 



OUBTOM HOUSE. 



Works in conversion of attic into caretaker's appartments and storage rooms^ 
&c., have been completed under the immediate superin tendance of this Department. 
Contractor, Mr. J. O'Leary. 



POST OFFICE. 



Orading and retaining walls treated of in last year's report have been executed, 
under the superintendence of this Department. 



MARINE HOSPITAL. 



B^airs to and renewals of floors and drainage alluded to in report for 1880-81 
have been completed under the superintendence ot this Department. 

LEVIS FORTS. 

• 

Owing to the difficulty experienced in preventing the water from the ramparts^ 
percolating through the coverings of the casemates, a contract for the construction of 
a wooden roof over those at Forts No. 2 and No. 3 has been entered into. 

Plans, &c., nrepared by this Department. 

Contractor, Mr. Nicholas Piton, 

MONTEEAL. 

INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

An extension of this building, on the river front, 26 ft in depth by the wid th o 
the original building is now in progress. 

The stones composing the facade on the square have been carefully taken dowik 
and re-used for the new &ont, and the remaining portions have been carried out in 
accordance with the work already existing. 

Additional accommodation is thus provided on basement ground and first floors^ 
with a readjustment of offices. 

Drawings are being prepared for a warming apparatus. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. Alph. Eaza. 

Contractor, Mr. H. J. Beemer. 

ST. HELEN'S ISLAND, MONTEEAL. 

MILITARY BUILDINGS. 

Bepairs connected with the wooden and the stone buildings, the barracks for 
married soldiers, the range of buildings, quarters of the armourer and powder 
magazinei are about to be placed under contract. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. Alph. Baza. 

THREE EIVEBS. 

OLD BARRACKS. 

The works involved in the conversion of the Old Barracks into a Custom Hoasft- 
jmd Inland Bevenue Office, are now under contract and nearly complete. 



ta 



[1882] 23- 



SaperiDtending Architect, Mr. O. Z. HameK 
Contractors, Messrs Potior and Dassault. 

ST. VINCENT BE PAUL. 

Pbnitbntiaby. 

The western dormitory wing of the prison containing 132 cells is completed, the 
buement walls of the prison dining nail have been built, and the prison yard 
ortended 100 feet westward, and is enclosed by a wooden fence 19^ feet in height. 

The Warden's residence was repaired, repainted, the outside of stone work 
tinted, and on the east side coated with cement A new cooking range and wash 
bamns were provided, and a conservatory 14 ft. z 10 ft. added. 

The Deputy Warden's quarters were repainted, repapered and supplied with a 
Dew kitchen range. 

The guards cottages were repaired, the outside of brick walls coated with cement, 
and the attics counter floored, lathed and plastered. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. John Bowes. 

HULL, 

POST OFFIOS AND INLAND RBVSNUE OFFIOE. 

A site was donated for a new Post Office by the heirs Wright on part of the 
Court Bouse reserve, with a frontage of 125 feet on Main Street oy a depth of 120* 
feet. 

The external walls of the building are to be of stone, the internal walls bnck, 
ami the floors and roof^ of wood. 

The ground floor is to be occupied as a Post Office, a Money Order and Weights 
and Measures offices. The Post Office portion to be one story. On the first floor tkere 
will be three offices with an unfinished attic over. 

Brick safes will be provided on each floor. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

GEOSSB ILE. 

QUARANTINE STATION. 

The hospital reported last year as in course of oonstrnction has been completed. 
Plans, AC., prepared by this Department. 
Contractor, Mr. J. E. Askwith. 

ST. JOHN'S. 

POST OFFIOE, CUSTOM HOUSE, Ac. 

The hot water heating apparatus and the furniture and fixtures mentioned in 
report for 1880-81 have been fhmished. 

Drawings prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. A. C. Hutcheson, Montreal. 

Contractor for heating, Mr. John Howie. 

SHERBKOOKB. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAKD REVENUE OFFICES. 

This building is being constructed on a lot at the comer of Commercial and 
Bank Street and covers an area of 3,560 sq. ft. The external walls are to be of stone, 
•nd roof and floors of wood ; flat of roof to be covered with galvanized iron. In the 



24 [1882] 



basement will be the boiler room and fuel room. The gi-ound floor will be devoted 
of the Post Office, the first floor to the Custom House and Inland Beveaue Offices 
and the attics to the local militia purposes. The ground and first floor entrances are 
on Commercial Street and the attic entrance on Bank Street. 

In the rear is a one story L shaped bride building for an Examining Warehouse 
and a Weights and Measures Office. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. F. X. Brrlinguet. 

Contractor, Messrs Robillard & Murphy. 

CHICOUTIMI. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is being constructed on a plot of land outside and bordering oo the 
town line at the rear oi the College. It will be of brick with a stone basement, and 
a roof ot wood. The administrative portion, which is central, will have two stories 
above the basement, and the tno wards flanking it one story. There will bo accom- 
fnodation for nurses and IJ patients in the wards. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

Contractor, Mr. Wm. Warren. 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 
OTTAWA. 

PABLIAMSNT BUILDING. 

Owing to the Supreme Court having vacated its temporary quarters in this 
building the portion which was occupied by it became available, and was rearranged 
and furnished for the House of Commons Keading room ; the original Reading 
room was rearranged and the ceiling lowered, thus admitting of the erection of attic 
rooms above, the lower flat being for the ur^e of the sessional reporters, and the upper 
for the sessional clerks. The late Judges' rooms were devoted to the special use of 
the Members of the House of Commons during session. 

Drawings prepared by, and work executed under the superintendence of this 
Departotent. 

EASTERN BLOCK DEPAETMBNTAL BUILBINO. 

Portions of the corridors have been painted and trifling repairs have been 
effected to various portions of the building. 

Work done under the superintendence of this Department 

WESTERN BLOCK DEPARTMENTAL BUILDING. 

Painting of corridors and trifling alterations and cleaning of various rooms have 
been effected. 

Work done under the superintendence of this Department. 

PARLLUfENT GROUNDS, &0. 

The additional propagating house reported upon last year has been erected. 
Work carried on under the superintendence of this Department. 
Contractors, Messrs. Yeale and Adams. 

MONUMENT TO THE LATE SIR GEORGE E. OARTIER, BART. 

It is intended at an early date to publicly invite artists to submit models bmA 
pi^oposals in connection with this work for the appi^oval of the Dominion Govern- 
ment. 



[1882] 25 



NIW SX7PRIMB OOURT. 



This bnildiDg has been completed in conformity with report of last year, and the 
coart has been ftimished partly with new and partly with the famitare nsed when in 
the Parliament Hoose. The floyal Canadian Academy collection of pictures 
have been hung in the rooms appi*opriated for the purpose. 

Plans, &a, prepared by this Department. 

Contractors, Messrs. Yeale & Adams. 



GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The fittings, counters and show cases have been completed and a hot waier 
apparatus constructed. 

Drawings &c , prepared by and work executed under the supervision of this 
Department. 

Contractor for heating apparatus, Mr. N. S. Blaisdell. 

DRILL SHED. 

A contract was entered into for the erection of latrines and provision of winter 
sufibes throughout. 

The latrines are placed between the Drill Shed and the eanal and are of brick 
on a stone foundation and roofed with wood. 

Plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 

Contractor, Mr. Wm. Toms. 

RIDEAU HALL. 

Ordinary and essential repairs and renewals have been executed during the 
past year, under the immediate superintendence of this Department. 

CORNWALL. 

POSTAL, CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

A site has been acquired on the comer of Pitt and Second Streets and I have 
been instructed to prepare plans &c., for a building to furnish accommodation for the 
local Postal, Customs and Inland Eevenue services. 

BBOCKVILLE. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

I have received instructions to prepare plans, &c., for this building, an appro- 
priation for the construction of whicn was made in the estimates 1881-82. 

KINGSTON. 

POST OFFICE. 

Works reported on last year, — viz : new screen to public lobby, new delivery 
circle and alteiations to registered letter office have been completed. 
Local Architects, Messrs. Power & Son. 

PENITENTIARY. 

The north wing of the touth workshop has been completed. It contains two 
stories and basement, having walls of stone, floors of stone, supported by iron joists, 
and roof of wood covered with metal. There is a brick smoke stack, 80 feet in height. 

The works in connection with heating the three workshops and the dining hall 
are now in progress. 

10 -.S 



26 [1882J 

The roof of the south workshop has been repaired, and a new capola erected to 
replace that destroyed by fire. 

A wooden storehouse for lumber 190 X 16 feet and 13 feet in height, has been 
constructed outside the boundary wall. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. J. Bowes. 

MILITARY COLLEGE. 

The pump house mentioned in last year's report has been completed and is now 
in use. 

Bepairs and minor alterations have been executed at T^te du Pont Barracks, 
Fort Henry and other military works. 

Superintending Architects, Messrs. Power & Son. 

BELLEVILLE. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

This building which is now in progress will have external walls of brick with 
stone dressings resting on stone foundation, the floors and roof of wood. 

It will consist of a basement, ground, first and attic floors ; the basement for the 
warming apparatus, fuel, &c. ; the around floor for the local Post Office and Weights 
and Measures Office, and the first floor for the Custom House and Inland JRevenue 
Offices. The attic will be unfinished at present. 

The Post Office entrance is to be on Bridge Street, and that of the Customs aod 
Inland Bevenue Offices on Pinnacle Street. 

The frontages on Bridge and Pinnacle Streets are 65 feet and 74 feet respecti- 
vely. 

Brick safes are provided for the several Departments. 

Architect, Mi-. E. B. Windeyer. 

Contractoi's, Messrs. Northcott & Alford. 

ST. CATHARINES. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOMS AND INLAND R£V£NU£ OFFICES. 

This building is now in coui'so of construction at the corner of King and Queen 
streets. It will have brick walls (with stone dressings and portico) renting on stoDO 
foundation, and wooden floors and roof, roof covering to be slate on slopes and galva- 
nized iron on flats. The frontages are 62 feet on Queen street and 64 feet on King 
street. 

There is to be a basement containing heating apparatus, fuel rooms and store 
rooms, a ground floor occupied by the Post Office, a nrst floor devoted to the Custom 
House and Inland Bevenue and an unfinished attic. 

The Post Office entrance is to be on King street and that of the Custom House 
on Queen street. 

Brick safes will be provided for the various departments. 

A detached one story brick building in the rear will be used as an examining 
warehouse and an office for the Inland Bevenue. 

Architect, Mr. E. C. Windeyer. 

Contractor, Mr. Nelson Carter. 

HAMILTON. 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

In accordance with your instructions plans, &c., are now in eourse of prepara- 
tion for a building to accommodate the local Postal, Customs ani Inland Kevenue 
services of the city of Hamilton. 



[1882] 27 

6TEATF0ED. 



POST OFFICE, 



The site is an irregalarly shaped piece of groand at the intersection of Ontario 
«jdBrie Streets. The plan of the building is an irregular polygon covering an area 
of :j,672 sq, feet. 

A contract for the construction was entered into in January, 1880, and the works 
are now in progress. 

The external walls are to be brick with stone dressings, the foundations stone, 
4od the floors, partitions and roof wood ; the roof covering is to be slate on slopes 
and ^vanized iron on flats. 

The^ basement will contain examining warehouse, boiler house, fuel room and 
two offices. The ground floor is to be devoted entirely to the Post Office, the first 
door to the Inland Bevenne and Customs, and the attic rooms for the caretaker, and 
the rest unfinished. 

The chief front which contains the two principal entrances is on Ontario street. 
The centre and both ends of this facade are to be slightly projected, the centre, which 
<^tains the Post Office entrance, being carried up to the roof where it will terminate 
ID a ornamental pediment ; the right hand projection, which is to contain the Customs 
and Inland Eevenue entrances and stairway, will be carried up an additional story 
and a clock arranged for ; the projection on the left being carri^ up a few feet above 
eaves, both turrets terminating in pyramidical roofs. The remaining elevations are 
to be more plainly treated. In the rear a one story brick building will contain two 
rooms, one each for the Weights and Measures, and Gas Inspector's office. 

Plans, &c., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. J. R. Kilburn. 

Contractor, Mr. J. B. Askwith. 

CHATHAM. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM UOUSS AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

A site has been procured for this building on the corner of King and Fourth 
Streets, plans are now in course of preparation and it is expected that a contract 
will be entered into in time to admit of the foundations being laid this autumn. 

WINDSOR. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

The attic story has been divided, finished and occupied by the caretaker of the 
fcfliUing. 

Stone flag footpaths, stone fence walls, grading, &c., have been executed about 
the building. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. Wm. Scott. 

PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 
WINNIPEG. 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINQ. 

Works in connection with this building have not progressed as favorably as was 
^ticipated, but it is eicpected that the foundations will be completed to ground floor 
level this season. 

.Drawings, &c., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. J. P. M. LiKK)nrt. 

Contractors, Messra. J. and P. Lyons & Co. 

10— 3i 



28 [1882] 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR S RESIDENCE. 



This buildiDg of which a complete description was fuiiiishcd in last year*d 
report, is now under contract and the work in progress. 
Plans, &o., prepared by this Department. 
Superintending Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 
Contractors, Messrs. Bowles & Williams. 



POST opnoE. 



Owing to the rapid increase of postal business it was found necessary in order t6 
allow sufficient space for the public in the lobby to make a one story wooden 
addition in rear of the present building. The screen in lobby has been fitted up 
with lock letter boxes and such additional fittings provided as were required for th^ 
easier working of the office. 

IJIMIORANT SUED. 

This depot ie situated 450 yards west of Main Street, on the main line of the 
Canada Pacitic Railway. The buildings are of wood resting on blocks and compnse 
a two story main building, 29 feet by 100, divided transversely by a partition on each 
floor and having a kitchen 18 ft. by 18 ft., alno a luggage room and hospital in twa 
btories 50 ft by 26 ft., two temporary sheds 18 ft. by 100 ft. each, and a cook house 
24 ft. 6 in. by 16 ft 4 inches. 

Plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 

Contractors, Messrs Grant & Gelley. 

STONY MOUNTAIN PENITENTIARY. 

Arrangements are being made for the extension of the heatinsc apparatus^ 

Of the outbuildings, &c., mentioned in last report, three double and two single 
guards-cottages, a school-house, an ice house and a stable have been completed, and 
there is in course of construction one single, and two double cottages, stables, a root 
house, a blacksmith's shop and an implement house. 

All the works constructed, or in course of construction, are executed by convict 
labour assisted by skilled workmen. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 

BRANDON. , 

IMMIGRANT STATION. 

These buiidingH are situated between third and fourth streets on the bank of the 
Assiniboine Eiver. There are constructed of wood and rest on blocks. The main 
building is 100 ft. by 29 feet and is two stories in height, each flat divided by a trans- 
verse partition. There is a kitchen 18 feet x 18 feet attached, also a detached two 
fctory nospital and luggage room 50 feet by 26 feet, with necessary outbuildings. 

Plans and speciflcations prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. J. M. P. Lecourt 

Contractors, Messrs. Grant & Gelley. 

EMEBSON. 

IMMKIRANT AGENTS OFFICI. 

This wooden building has been completed and occupied. 



[1882] 29 

I PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VICTORIA. 

POST OFFICE, ETC. 

The work of restoring the front of the baildiDg, which was alluded to in last 
year's report, has been completed and it is intend^ to re arrange the Post Office 
fitttnffs during the coming year. 

Plans, &c., prepared Dy this Department. 

8aperintenaing Architect, Mr. H. O. Tiedman. 

NEW WESTMINSTER. 

PBJflTENTIART. 

A wooden workshop with stone foundations and brick chimneys has been erected 
near the prison building. 
I It is two stories in height and provides work rooms for carpenters, blacksmiths, 
I shoemakers and tailors. 

I POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE. 

A contract^for the construction of this building was entered into 8th December, 
1881, and the works are now in progress. 

The external walls will be of brick with dressings and foundations of stone. The 
ground floor will be devoted to Post Office, Savings Bank and (Telegraph Office, and 
the second floor to the Custom House. 

Plans prepared by this Department. 

Contractor, Mr. Chas. Hay ward. 

NANAIMO. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

I have been instructed to prepare plans, &c., with a view (o havin:^ this building 
^ced under contract during the present season. 

GENERAL. 

Bepairs and renewals have been executed to buildings, &c., throughout the 
Dominion not specially referred to above. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOS. FULLER, 
Chief Architect, P. \V. 



30 [1882] 



APPENDIX No. 4 



KEPORT OF THE MECnANICAL ENGINEER. 



{Re£, No. 29,435.) Mechanical Engineer's Office, 

Ottawa, 2l8t November 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report as follows in reference to the Public Building?^ 
Ottawa, daring the fiscal year ended the 30th Juno, 1882, viz : — 

PARLIAMENT BUILDING, 

Considerable changes have been made in the heating arrangements with a vie^ 
to moderating the temperature of the rooms and corridors which were always to(^ 
warm, and, while adding comfort to the occupants, the apparatus, as altered, is noiV 
under complete control, and an economy in fuel has also been attained. 

The main members lavatory, etc., in the Commons corridor being found loo 
limited in accommodation, the premises were altered, the accommodation doubled] 
and the apartment renewed throughout. 

This lavatory, the new reporters room, the translators room, and the corridor^ 
generally were improved in ventilation, but, owing in many cases to long ruDi 
of horizontal pipes between remote points and the various ventiduct shafts, tbo 
upward currents are not always as strong as could be desired, and purely mechanical 
means must be here applied as has been done in the Commons Chamber, to attain 
constant interchange ojf air ^ 

The Bailway Committee room had special ventilating arrangements, separate 
from the rest of the building, constructed before last session, which were fouod 
efficient in operation. 

A powerful fan with steam engine attached was placed in a specially armnged 
central apartment in the basement, prior to last session, to collect the odours emaDa- 
ting from the dining rooms, kitchens, and adjoining corridors and apartments of the 
Senate and Commons. 

This fan accomplished the object and also made a very marked improvement in 
the ventilation of otner parts of the building, on the floor above, adjoining the 
stairways, from the restaurants. 

Alterations to the four main ventiducts of the Commons and Senate Chambei^ 
were also made with considerable advantage — there being now a stronger upward 
draught, and no tendency to down currents on gusty days, such as formerly existed. 

Several large iron ventilating caps were placed on other portions of the baildiDg^ 
giving improved draught. 

Tho ii'on pipes and valves of the warming apparatus were placed in the building 
in 1864 and, as a natural consequence, are begining to give out. The renewal of thi» 
work is carried out as occasion presents itself in the most economical manner, and 
the system modernized as the work progresses. This course permits of a ]tirge 
reduction in the quantity of piping used, and consequently an ultimate saving of 
fuel must follow — and in every instance the old material is used where it can safely 
be done. 

The three Cornish steam boilers (^the only ones in the building that are bricked 
in) were stripped during the summer of 1881 and, after careful examination and 
hydraulic test, were found to be almost as good as new after a service of 17 years. 




[1882] 31 

The fi^eneral apparatus of boating, gas, water and electric bells is in good 
working order. 

EAST AND WEST BLOCKS, DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS. 

Beyond extending the beating, water and gas pipes, and electric bell services to 
a few new ofiices that were fitted up in these baildingR, no work was undertaken 
beyond the ordinary running repairs and maintenance of the different apparatus, all 
of which are in good working onier. 

SUPREME COURT BUILDING. 

This building after its alteration from beinff workshops, was fitted up throughout 
with new heating apparatus, water, gas and bell services, the boiler previously used 
for workshop engine being retained lor the heating apparatus. 

RIDEAU HALL. 

The hot air furnaces of this building were carefully examined and repaired 
during the fall of 1881, and with the exception of a couple of cracked castings, which 
were renewed, the apparatus is in efficient condition. 

Beyond ordinary running repairs, no work was executed to the ga?, water and 
bell services^ — which are in good condition. 

OTTAWA POST OFFICE AND CUSTOMS BUILDING. 

The heating, gas and water services of this building remain in good condition. 
A large ventilating pipe carried from the long room over the dock of the roof has 
been found of much benefit. 

GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The new heating apparatus placed in this building was tested last winter and 
gave ample warmth. Electric bells were put up. A special gas pipe from the gas 
works was laid to this building, as it was tound that the day pressure usually turned 
on to the City, was inadequate to the wants of the Laboratory room. 

PARLIAMENT GROUNDS-FLOWER PROPAGATING HOUSE. 

Additional boating apparatus was constructed to warm the new extension of this 
house, which operates in a satisfactory manner. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Jno. R. ARNOLDI, 

Mechanical Engineer. 
F. H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Public Works. 



32 [1882] 



APPENDIX No. 5- 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 

(N<^ 2D643.) 

Chief Engineer's, Office, 

Public Works Department, 

Ottawa, 28th November, 1882. 

Sir, —I have the honor to report on the Harbor Works and Surveys of the last 
fiscal year. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY F. PERLEY, 

Chief Engineer. 

F. H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Public Works. 



f 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 
Campbell's cove 

Is on the north-west coast, about nine miles from East Point. 

In 1812 the Provincial Government built a breakwater 300 fb. long on a reef 
which extends from the western point of the Cove. 

TJndera contract dated January, 1882, an additional length of 300 ft. has been 
constructed, the original work raised two feet and connected with the shore. 

COLVILLB BAY 

On the east coast about 16 miles from East Point. 

The breakwater is situated at Knight's Point, on the eastern side of the Bay. It 
'was originally built by the Local Gt>vernment and extended during 1875-1880 
by the Dominion. The structure stands in deep water and exposed to a very heavy 
sea in southerly storms. During the past year some necessary repairs wero 
made to the old, or first built portion. 

SOUTH RIVER, MURRAY HARBOR. 

South Biver empties into the southern part of Murray Harbor, (so called) » 
large bay in the south eastern part of King's County, opening into the Gulf of St. 
Lawrence. 

Early in June 1882, the work of straightening the channel of this river and 
deepening it to 8 fb. at extreme low water was commenced, and at the close of the 
fiscal year 6,416 cubic yards of sand and mud had been removed by the dredge 
" T>-.--^oe Edward." 



[1882] 33 



PINNETTS. 



The PiDDette Biver empties into the Strait of Northumberland to the east- 
ward of Point Prim on the eastern side of Hillsborough Bay. 

At this place the dredge " Prince Edwaixl *' was engaged during October and 
November 1881 in straightening the channel of the river, and in deepening the 
loading berths at the public wharf, and the approach thereto. 



HILLSBOROUQH RIVER. 



The Bast or Hillsborough River flows from the eastward of Charlotte town, and 
in May 1882, the " dredge "Prince Edward" was engaged in deepening at the 
public wharf at FortJAugustus. 



NINE MILE CREEK. 



Nine Mile Creek, Queen's County, is situated just within the entrance and on 
tbe weaterD side of Hillsborough Bay. 

He dredge "Prince Edward " was engaged from 10th August to 25th October, 
1881, in completing the channel through the flats to the public wharf to which 
reference was made in the report of last year. 



CRAPAUD. 

Crapaud, Queen's County, is a small harbor at the mouth of the Brockelsby 
Biver, which empties into the Strait of Northumberland to the westward of Hills- 
borouKh Bay. 

The channel canying deep water up to the wharves of the Yillage, was com- 
pleted on the 8th of August, 1881, by the dredge " Prince Edward." The total 
quantity of material removed amounted to 75^970 cubic yards at a cost of $19,151.46. 

BUSTICO. 

Grand Bnstico is on the north coast, nearly midway between North and East 
Points. 

In December, 1881, a contract was entered into for the construction of a break- 
water 1,200 ft. in length on the western side, and one of 450 ft. in length on the 
eastern aide of the entrance to the harbor, to reduce its width for the purpose of 
coDcentrating the current and so deepening the water on the bar. 

NEW LONDON 

On the north coast about nine miles east of Cascumpec. 

The portion of the breakwater constructed before Confederation by the Local 
Government at the entrance to this harbor having been damaged during a storm, was 
repaired in the past year, and a length of 93 ft. was rebuilt. 

TIQNISH 

Is on the north coast, about 8 miles from North Point. 

A contract for the construction of a breastwork of piles, brush and stone for the 
protection of the beach and for the rebuilding of the outer part of the northern 
oreakwater was made in December, 1881. At the close of the fiscal year the works 
were nearly finished. 

MIUINIQASH 

Is on the west coast 17 miles from North Point and 20 from West Point. 
The works consist in two piers at the mouth of the " Run." 



34 fl882] 



The work done during 1881-82 consisted in rebuilding the portion of the beach 
protection on the north side, in driving a second row of sheet piling on the south 
side, and in putting in brush and stone for the protection of such parts of the river 
bank as seemed to require it. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

MAIN-X-DIEU. 

A small harbor in Cape Breton County, lying inside of Scattarie Island. 

The work of constructing the breakwater mentioned in the report of 1881 
was actively prosecuted during the year, at the end of which it was seven eighths 
completed. 

cow BAY. 

Thirty miles from Sydney, C* B., to the South East. 

During the winter of 1880 this breakwater was damaged by easterly gale^, and 
the amount appropriated was expended in rebuilding the third buttress fi*om the 
shore end, in replacing ballast, re sheathing a portion of the face on the seaward 
side and re-covering the top. 

This work owing to its exposed position will'necossilate an annual expenditure 
for repairs. 

POKT CALEDONIA. 

Is in Cape Breton Co. and 19 miles to the southward of Sydney Harbor. 

The dredge " St, Lawrence " was engaged during the month of June, 1882, \n 
deepening the harbor at this place to admit of the entrance of a larger class of 
vessels engaged in the coal trade. 

LITTLE 'a LACE BAY. 

' Little Glace Bay, Cape Breton Co., is 14 miles to the southward of Sydney 
Harbor. 

During the Spring of 1881, the dredge " St. Lawrence" operated in deepening 
the entrance to the harbor. 

NORTH SYDNEY. 

Norlh Sydney is the principal harbor on the east coast of Cape Breton. 

The amount appropriated has been expended in connection with a sum furnished 
by the Harbor Commissioners of Sydney in the construction of a portion of a 
breakwater on the north bar for the purpose of preventing the sand forming the bar 
from being washed into the harbor during easterly gales, and to provide a place for 
the deposit of ballast from vessels. 

SOUTH INQONISn. 

In Victoria County, is situated on the eastern side of Cape Breton, about midway 
between Sydru^y Harbor and Cape North. 

A large broach made by the ioe of the previous winter in the pier on the northern 
filde of the entrance was repaired, 

rNCtAN ISLANDS BEACH. 

The Indian Inlands Uo on the north side of East Bay, a branch of the Bras d'Or, 
Cape Breton, 

The works of oponini^ a passage through the beach connecting the islands with 
the shore referred (o in In&t yenr's report have been completed. 



[1882] 35 



BENACADIE. 

Is ID Cape Breton Ck>anty . 

Part of the amount appropriated was expended in procuring materials during 
the past winter, and the works of opening and protecting an entrance to the pond 
are m progress. 

Mx\BOU. 

The Harbor of Mabou, Inverness County, is situated on the western coast of 
Cape-Breton, 6 miles northward of Port Hood, the shiretown. 

The amount appropriated was expended in partly opening a channel through 
the shoal of bai-d clay and stone lying off the entrance to the harbor. 

PORT HOOD. 

Port Hood is on the west coast of Cape Breton Island, 20 miles north-east of the 
Gut of Canso. 

The pier at this place is much exposed to north-easterly gales and the timber 
weakened by the attacks of sea-worms. The northern and western faces of the pier 
have been strengthened by sheet piling and the top repaired where necessary. In 
November last it received serious injury during a storm, a breach 73 feet in length 
having been made through it near the shore and the outer end much damaged. Tem- 
porary repairs have been made and plans submitted for a thorough reconstruction of 
the pier and its protection by heavy stone slopes. 

EAGQED PO^D. 

Is situated on the northern side of Chedabucto Bay, Guysboro' County, 5^ miles 
to the eastward of the entrance to Guvsboro' Harbor. 

An attempt was made to dredge the channel into this pond, the protection works 
for which were constructed in 1879 and 1880, but without success, for owing to the 
very exposed position of the entrance, it was found difficult and unsafe for a dredge 
to remain, as there was no shelter in the event of a storm arising. 

PETIT DE GRAT. 

In He Madame, Richmond Countv, is a passage from the Atlantic into St. Peter's 
Bay. 

The channel through the stony beach closing the northern end of the passage 
and referred to in last year's report, was completed. 

BURYING ISLAND, CANSO. 

Canso Harbor is at the extreme eastern end of Guysboro' County and southward 
of the entrance to the Gut of Canso. 

As reported last year, an island formerly existed off this harbor which afforded 
protection and shelter to vessels. The works undertaken by the Department consisted 
in the construction of a breakwater for the purpose of giving the same protection as 
the island did originally, and its erection has proved of much benefit to the harbor. 

NEW GLASGOW. 

New Glasgow is situated on the East River of Pictou, about 8 miles from the 
harbor proper. 

At the close of the fiscal year 1881, the dredge " Cape Breton " was employed in 
deepening the channel of the East River from the highway bridge to aoove the 
shipyards of JMessrs. Carmichael and McCaul and continued until 13th July of that 
year when the work was completed. 



36 [1882] 



RIVSB JOHN. 

The Biver John, Pictoa County, empties into John Bay at the Bouth-eastern 
corner of Amet Sound, Northumberland Strait, about 12 miles northwardly of the 
entrance to Pictou Harbor. 

Work on the channel through the bar at the entrance to the river was resumed 
on 22nd July 1881 and continucS until Slst October, up to which date the dredge 
** Cape Breton " had removed 18,175 cubic yards of sand and mud. At the latter 
part of May, 1882, a point in the channel of the river off the ship-yard of Mr.^ames 
Kitchen was removed. 

TATAMAQOUCHE. 

The Tatamagouche River, Colchester County, empties into the south-west comer 
of Tatamagouche Bay, Strait of Northumberland. 

During the month of June 1882, the dredge " Cape Breton " opei-ated at the 
mouth of the river in opening a channel through the bar which prevenU the entrance 
of vessels. 

PARRSBORO*, 

In Cumberland County, 
' A small amount was expended in driving some piles at the outer end of the pier. 

The work of improving the channel of Partridge Island River was continued 
through the year, and a further quantity of 9,100 cubic yards of mud, sand and saw- 
dust removed. 

HAMPTON, 

Annapolis County, is situated on the southern shore of the Bay of Fandy, 5 
miles from Bridgetown. 

The old pier built by the Local Government having been found to be useless 
and much out of repair, it was deemed advisable to construct a new one about half a 
mile to the eastwara of the original pier. 

JDIGBY. 

Digby is situated at the western end of Annapolis Basin. 

The work done during the past season consisted in replacing a number of the 
pile bents forming part of the landing pier which had been destroyed by sea-worms^ 
with the necessary caps, braces, &c., and in renewing parts of the flooring. This 
pier was built by the (Government of Nova Scotia prior to Confederation, and it is the . 
point of call for the mail steamer between Annapolid and St John, N.B. 

TROUT COVE. 

Trout Cove is situated on the southern coast of the Bay of Fundy, nearly midway 
between Digby Gut and Petit Passage. 

During the past year extensive repairs were made to the breakwater, 100 feet 
of the older portion of which was carried away by a gale in 1879. 

The original structure was built in 1858 by the inhabitants assisted by a grant 
from the Local Government, and expenditures for its extension and repair were 
made by the Department in 1876 and 1880. 

METEGHAN RIVER. 

Meteghan River, Digby Co., is on the south shore of St Mary's Bay, about 40 
miles from Digby and alx)ut 25 miles from Yarmouth. 



m 



[1882] 37 



The harbor is formed between two breakwaters which were built many years 
ago by the Provincial Government, the older portions of which are much clecayed. 

Paring the past year the following repairs were effected. 

The outer end of the north breakwater was rebuilt for a height of 10 feet, and a 
" break " constructed on the seaward side — ^The top of the south breakwater was rebuilt 
for a length of 280 ft, and for a distance of 420 ft floored with flatted timber six inches 
thick ; a number of sheeting piles were driven and several small but necessary 
repairs were effected. 

OAPB ST. MART. 

In Digby County, on the southern side of the entrance to St. Mary's Bay. 

The pier at this place was built many years ago at the joint expense of the Local 
Government and the inhabitants. 

Owing to age and decay, and the action of sea and ice this structure had become 
moeh dilapidated, and only a part of the repairs necessary to place it in good order 
were executed during the year. 

YARMOUTH. 

Yarmouth is situated at the western extremity of the Peninsula of Nova Scotia. 

During the year repaii^s have been made in the sea wall constructed in 1874 by 
the Department which had been undermined in several places by the action of the 
sea on the gravel beach on which it is built. 

BROOKLYN. 

Is situated at the head of Liverpool Bay, Queen's county. 

Owing to its exposed position and the action of the sea-worm, the breakwater at 
this place was found to be in a precarious state, and a contract was entered into in 
Octooer 1881 for the formation of a stone slope on the outer or seaward side and 
around the end of the breakwater, and for close piling a certain length of the 
inner side, and also repairing the roadway with new planking and ballast. At the 
close of the year the work was completed. 

vogler's cove. 

Vogler's cove is situated in the extreme south-western part of Lunenburg 
County, about 2 miles to the eastward of the boundary between Lunenburg and 
Qoeens. 

The dredge " Canada " operated here from the 17th September until the (Hh 
December 1881, in straightening and deepening the channel leading to the harbor 
to 10 ft at low water. 

LITTLE HARBOR. 

Little Harbor is on the Atlantic Coast of Nova Scotia in Lunenburg Co. 
The entrance has been improved by deepening the water on the bar so that 
fishing boats can now enter at all times of tide. 

porter's lake. 

Porter's Lake i^ a large body of water about 13 miles long with an. 
average width of about half a mile, lying 18 miles cast of Halifax. The southern 
end is separated from the Atlantic by several small islands which are connected by 
beaches of sand &nd shingle. 

A small amount, has been expended in cutting a passage through one of those 
beaches with a view of giving boats access to the lake. 



38 [1882] 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

' CLIFTON. 

Gloucester Co. is on the south shore of the Bale des Chaleurs, 15 miles east of 
Bathurst. 

A Kmall amount has been expended in repairing the damage done to tho break- 
water at this place by the ice during the winter of 1880-81. 

SHIPPEGAN. 

Gloucester Co., is at the extreme north east point of New Brunswick. 

During the past year the dam closing the East Gully was repaired and raised 
two feet higher than before, as it was found that the sea drove the ice over it and 
damaged the top. It has also been strengthened by driving piles 10 feet apart on 
both sides. 

HOBSE SHOE SHOAIi. « 

This shoal is situated at the mouth of the Biver Miramichi, Northumberland 
County, and lies in the direct course of vessels entering or leaving the river. 

Since 1875 dredging has been carried on with the view of opening a channel 150 
feet in width and 20 feet in depth at low water, and during 1881 the di'edge " St. 
Lawrence " operated from the 1st July until the 1st September. It will require two if 
not three seasons further work of this dredge before the channel will be completed. 

RICHIBUCTO. 

Richibucto, Kent Co., is on the west shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

An extension of the breastwork for the protection of the North Beach 220 feet 
in length has been built during the past season, this work being needed to prevent a 
breach being made through the beach to the westward of the breakwater at the 
entrance to the harbor. 

BUCTOUCHE. 

In Kent County, on tho eastern side of Now Brunswick, about 21 miles northward 
from the harbor of Shediac. 

The dredge '^Canada'' was engaged up to 16th August, 1881, in opening a passage 
through a mussel bed obstructing the entrance to the harbor, and in widening too 
channel by the removal of an old wreck. 

COCAGNE. 

Cocagne Harbor is on the east coast of New Brunswick and opens on the Strait 
of Northumberland about 10 miles north of Shediac. 

A landing pier is being constructed under contract on the north side of the 
harbor near the highway bridge, and at the close of the year was about half finished. 

During August, 18bl, the dredge «*Canada" operated at the mouth of the harbor 
with the view of giving an increased depth of water. 

POINT DU CUfiNE. 

Point du Chene, 'Westmorland County, is the Eastern terminus of the New- 
Brunswick Division of the Intercolonial Itailway. 

The contract for the additional length of 600 ft. to the breakwater which 
protects the Railway wharf was nearly completed at the close of the fiscal year. 



[1882] 39 



QUACO. 

Saint Jolin Ck)UDt7, is on the north eido of the Bay of Fundy, about 30 miles east 
oflheCityofSt. John. 

The coDstraction, by conti-aot, of a breakwater 300 feet in length on the west- 
era side of the harbor is in process, and at the close of the year was partly 

completed . 

SAINT JOHN, 

A contract has been entered into for the rebuilding of the portion of the break- 
water at the western entrance to the harbor, which was destroyed during a gale in 
Janoary, 1879. At the close of the fiscal year the works were well under way. 

The dredge *' Canada " operated in the harbor between the 28th December, 
1S81, and the end of March, 1882, in the removal of the ** tail of the bar " extending 
southwardly from Navy Island, which interfered during times of low water with the 
ferry boat plying across the harbor. 

At Marble Gave the dredge •* New Dominion *' worked from 8th July until 
the 20th September, 1881, in opening a channel to the Public Wharf. 

FORT DUFFERIN. 

This fort stands on Negro Point, a promontory composed of clay and gravel, at 
the western entrance of the Harbor of St. John, N. B. Owing to the base of the 
eliff being washed by the sea during high tides, it was undermined, and in March 
1879, a large portion of the bank gave way and fell, partially destroying the battery. 

Daring 1881-82 a crib-work retaining wall was constructed around the foot of 
theclifir, and the glacis of the fort restored. 

ST. ANDREWS HARBOR. 

The town of St. Andrews is situated on the point between Passamaquoddy Bay 
wd the River St. Croix. A contract has been made for the construction of a ** Block 
and Beacon " on a reef at the western entrance of the harbor and the works are 
now in progress. 

ST. JOHN RIVER. 

The workof impl-oving navigation between Eiver de Chute and Bear Island 
has been advanced by the removal of boulders at the following points : 

Hartland, Woodstock, Dibblee's Bar, Eel Biver, Belvisor Bar, Meductic Falls, 
Ix)wer Southampton, Nackawic, Kirk's, Morehouse's, Bear Island and Knapp's Bar. 

Further dredging was done by the " New Dominion " on the Oromocto Shoahj, 
between the 15th October and 5th November, 1881. 

The extension of the sheer-dam at Oromocto to the head of Thatch Island was 
brought to completion in December, 1881. During the Spring of 1882 an aprcn of 
oroBh and stone was placed oh the lower side of the dam, to prevent scour in time of 
'ftthets. 

RIVER TOBigaE 

Is a tributary of the St. John, into which it flows about 24 miles below Grand 
Falls. 

The work done consisted in blasting and removing rock in reefs and boulders at 
"the Narrows," "Upper Red Rapids," "the Oxbow" and *nhe Gulquac," for the 
iDQprorement of the river for the passage of timber, &c. 



40 [1882] 



RIVKB MADAWA8KA. 

Tho Madawaska risos in lake Temiscooata^ and running sonthwardly falls into 
the river St. John at Edmandston, N.B., 239 miles above the city of St. Jobn« 

The sum of $600 was expended on the portion of this river in New Brunswick 
during the summer of 1881, in repairing the tow path, and the removal of boulders 
which obstructed navigation ; and the sum of $100 was expended for the same 
purpose on the Quebec portion of tho river. 

;quebbc. 

ETANO DU NORD. 

Etangdu Nord is at the western end of Grindstone Island, one of the MagdaloD 
group, in ihe Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

The work of constructing a breakwater at Etang du Nord was commenced in 
June, 1881, and during tho fiscal year a length of 226 foet was completed ; and this 
portion has been found to bo of bonefit^in affording shelter to boats and fishing craft. 

PERCt. 

Perc^ the capital of Gaspe County, is situated on the Gulf of St. Lawrence about 
36 miles from Gasp^ Basin. , 

During the season of 1881, an examination was made for the purpose of determin- 
ing the position and cost of works for the protection of the large fleet of fishing croft 
frequenting the Gulf during stormy weather. The report submitted will be found as 
an appendix to this report. 



Is the shire town of the County of Bonaventure, and lies on the northern side of 
the Bale des Chaleurs. 

Owing to the exposed site of the breakwater at this place, only 180 feet of 
work to the level of high tide was put in situ during the working season of 1881. 
There remains a length of about 300 feet still to construct to connect with the shore, 
together with the superstructure over the whole length. 

CABLBTON. 

Carleton, situated in the County of Bonaventure, is on the north shore of tho 
Baie des Chaleurs, and distant from Campbellton, N. B., 36 miles. 

During the year the work of constructing the pier at this place was actively 
prosecuted, and with the sum appropriated for expenditure during 1882-83, it i* 
expected that the work will be brought to completion. 

MATANE. 

Matane, County of Eimouski, is on the southern shore of the St. Lawi*ence, 240 
miles below Quebec. 

During 1819 a pier was commenced at this place, but was only partly compietiKi 
with the amount available. ' 

An examination made in the fall of 1881 showed that much damage bad been 
done by the ice to tho unprotected corners of the crib work piers, and immedltto 
repairs were made. 

TROIS-PI8TOLE8, 

In the county of Temiscouata, is on the southern shore of the St. Lawreoce, U^ 
miles below Queooc. 



i 



[1882] 41 



Dariog the year a small isolated block was constructed off the western side of 
tbe harbor for a landing pier, and many boulders were removed from the harbor 
proper. Farther work will be prosecated to connect this block with the shore, and 
thus made it available as a landing, provision having been made for its cost. 

TADOUSAC. 

Situated at the mouth of the Saguenay, and on the northern side. 
The dams which form the ponds in connection with the Fish Breeding establish- 
ment at Tadousac, were rebuilt during 1881-82, as follows : — * 

Dam No. 1, 40 feet in length and 4 feet in height. 
** 2,200 ** '* 8 " " 

a ;^^ JIQ u it 19 u u 

Over dam No, 4 has been constructed a bridge 150 feet in length by 12 feet in 
width. 

A part of the ponds made by dams No. 3 and 4 have been cleansed. 

Repairs have been made to iho roads and wharfing in connection with the 
establishment. 

ANSB DU PORTAGF. 

Opposite Tadousac, at the mouth of the Biver Saguenay. 

During the year a commencement was made in the construction of a landing at 
Aase du Portage for the purpose of facilitating the transportation of the mails during 
the winter across the Saguenay to and from Tadousac. 

This landing when complete will consist of an inclined plane 90 feet in length 
at the head of which, on a platform, will bo placed a windlass by the means of which 
the mail boat can be drawn up and placed in safety. To prevent the accumulation 
of ice on the slip when the wind is from the N. E. and E. a jetty 180 feet in length 
will be constructed on the eastern side. 

At the close of the year the works were well under way, and would be completed 
to be of service during the winter of 1882-83. 

ANSS ST. JEAN. 

Anse St Jean is 24 miles up the Saguenay on its southern shore. 

The pier at this place is 351 feet in length and 26 ft in breadth up to the 
head which is 50 by 40 ft, and 33 feet in height. At low water spring tides there is 
a depth of 7^ feet at the end of the pier. 

During the fiscal year the upper part of the pier was completed, the head 
sheathed and fenders put in place, and a large quantity of ballast placed in the central 
portion which was nearly empty. 

Further works required to complete this pier will be proceeded with during 
1882.83. 

ST. ALPnONSE DE BAOOTVILLB 

Is at the head of Ha I Ha ! Bay, on the southern shore of the River Saguenay, 
06 miles from its mouth. 

The wharf at St. Alphonse is 444 feet in length and 24 ft. in breadth, the head 
boing 76 ft long and' 52 ft. broad. 

As stated in a previous report the inshore portion of this wharf was burnt some 
years ago. 

During the year just ended, a length of 378 feet was rooonstraoted to a moan 
height of 10 ft, a large portion of the flooring renewed, tiie outside sheathed to a 
mean height of 14 feet, and fenders placed where required. 

10—4 



42 [1882] 



A sum of $3,500 has been granted for tho construction of a block at the outer 
end of tho wharf. 

RIVER 8AGUENAT. 

The work of increasing the depth of the channel through the shoals in the river 
below Ghicoutimi was prosecuted from July to November 1881, and 2350 rocks and 
boulders were removed over a distance of f of a mile and a breadth of 300 feet, and 
placed either on the bank or in deep places in the river where there is not less 
than 20 feet of water at low tide. 

Dredging was commenced in September 1831, the special apparatus devised for 
the purpose having been found to answer very well. 

CHIOOUTIM[. 

Ghicoutimi is situated on the southern shore of the Saguenay, at tho head of 
navigation, and 75 miles from the St. Lawrence. 

The wharf is 282 feet in length and 30 feet in width, with a head 127 feet in 
length parallel with the sti'eam, and 34 feet in breadth. When first constructed there 
was a depth of 10 feet at the end of the wharf at low tide, but, owing to the accumu- 
lation of deposit, this depth has been reduced to 7 feet. 

During the past year heavy repairs wei'O made to the flooring of this pier, a new 
rcight e>hcd was built, and the old shed placed in order. 

LA GRANDE l>fcnARGE, RIVER SAGUENAY. 

La Grande Decharge is the larger of tho two channels through which the waters 
of Lake St. John flow into the Eiver Saguenay. 

Lake St. John receives tbe waters of a number of rivers, and during spring 
freshets it rises generally from 15 to 20 ft above its summer level, and has been 
known to have attained heights of 30 and 35 feet; and, as the lands surrounding tbe 
lake are low, a general flooding takes place annually. 

The outlets, the Gi*ande and Petite Decharge, are comparatively small, the 
discharge through them being far less than the discharge into the lake, and conse- 
quently the level of the lake is slowly reduced, and as a rule the submerged lands 
dry out loo late to bo used for agricultural purposes. 

The work of widening the Grande Decharge at one or two points has been 
undertaken, with the view of increasing its area, and thus permiting a greater flow 
of water during the continuance of fres^hets, and a quicker subsidence of the lake, 

RIVER DU LOUP (EN BAs). 

On the southern side of the St. Lawrence, in the County of Temiscouata, 103 
miles below Quebec. 

With the amount available, the work of raising tho level of the pier at this place 
was carried on during the summer of 1881. 

The sheathing and fenders referred to in the report of last year were put in 
place. 

A shed for freight and passengers was also built during the year. 

CAP X l'aigle. 

In the County of Charlevoix, 3 miles from Murray Bay, on the northern side of 
tbe St. Lawrence. 

The pier at this place constructed under a contract with a number of the 
inhabitants of the locality, wa» finished at the close ^f 1881. 



[1882J 43 



MQRRAT BAY. 

Marray Bay or Malbaio, is on tho northern shore of the St. Lawrence, 90 miles 
Mow Qaebec. 

Daring the past year, a shed was built on the public wharf at this place, and 
€ome necessary repairs made to the wharf itself. 

riviI:re ouelle. 

On the southern shore of the St. Lawrence, 75 miles below^Quebec. 

With the amount appropriated, a commencement was made of raising tho pier at 
tliis place, as it was found to be too low, for, during storms at high water spring tides, 
the waves washed over it, rendering access to the outer end dangerous, and at times 

L£8 EBOULBMBNTS, 

On the northern shore of the St. Lawrence, 69 miles below Quebec. 

During September and October, 1881, a portion of the flooring of the wharf at 
displace was renewed, fenders placed where required, the sheathing completed and 
the comers protected with boiler plate which bad been provided some time ago but 
never placed in position. 

ILB AUX COUDRES, 

In tho CJounty of Charlevoix, 12 miles from Bay St. Paul, on the north side of 
tiie St. Lawrence. 

The landing pier referred to in the report of last year as being constructed by a 
immber of the residents of He anx Coudres on behalf of the municipality, under a 
contract with the Department, was brought to completion at the close of 1881. 

BAY ST. PAUL. 

Bay St. Paul, in the County of Charlevoix, is situated 03 miles below Quebec, 
and on the northern shore of the St. Lawrence. 

Daring the winter of 1881-1882 a large quantity of timber was procured for a 
landing pier at Pointe-Bouge, Cap-aux-Corbeaux, and its construction was commenced 
in May last. 

At the close of the year the work was well in hand. 

ILE AUX ORUES. 

He aux Grues, or Ci^aue Island, is an island in the St. Lawrence, opposite Cap 
St Ignace, 36 miles below Quebec. 

A block to carry a light house was constructed in 18t>2 near the upper end of the 
island, and has been used as a landing for passengers and freight at times of high 
water, access being had from the main land during the period of low water. To 
enable vessels to call and land goods etc., at low tide, a contract was entered into in 
November 1881, for the construction of a pier projecting from the block a distance of 
171 feet into 6 feet at low water. At the close of the year the work was one third 
completed. 

GROSSB ILE, 

Is an Island in the St. Lawrence, 29 miles below Quebec. 

During the year the works in progress of extending, raising, and repairing the 
eastern landing pier, in connection with the Quarantine Establishment, were brought 
to a eoBclusion. 

10-4A 



44 [1882) 



6TB. FAMILLE, 



Ib on the north shore of the Island of Orleans, 17 miles below Qoebeo. 

The isolated blocks built in 1879 and 1880 were connected with the shore daring 
1881, and the pier thus rendered available for the smaller class of steamers and 
vessels which ply below Quebec. 



L£S ECUREUILS. 

Les Ecureuils, in the County of Portneuf, is on the northern shore of the St 
Lawrence, 25 miles ^bove Quebec. 

At this place a small landing pier has been constructed, having. 12 feet at high 
water, spring tides, at its outer end. 

NICOLET. 

The Nicolet empties into the St. Lawrence on its eoutheiii side, at the foot of 
Lake St. Peter. 

A contract was entered into in October, 1831, for the construction 'of works for 
the improvement of the harbor and the entrance thereto, but, owing to the extreme 
height of the water in the St^ Lawrence during the past summer, the work of pile 
driving, etc., was not proceeded with, and therefore at the close of the year nothing 
had been done except the delivery of materials. 

RIVER YAHASKA. 

The Yamaska takes its rise in the County of Brome, and, after a course of over 
90 miles, falls into the St Lawrence at the head of Lake St. Peter. 

During August, 1881, a contract was entered into with Messrs Brecken, Gaherty 
& Davis, for the construction of a lift lock and dam at He k Cardin, If miles below 
the Village of St. Michel, and about 4^ miles fi*om the mouth of the river. 

Bv the construction of these works, and dredging through the shoals below the 
lock, the river will be rendered navigable for vessels of moderate draught, to Bell 
Point or Rapid de la Grosse Boche, a distance of 21 miles. 

At the clofce of the year about one-sixth of the work had been completed. 

RIVER RICHELIEU. 

This river empties into the St Lawrence on its southern side at Sorel, 45 miles 
below Montreal. 

The dredge " Nipissinff " was engaged between 7th July and 27th August 1881, 
in opening a channel to 10 ^et in depth at low water, through two shoals, respectively 
one and three miles below the Village of St Ours. 

BERTHIER EN HAUT. 

Situated on the northern side of the River St Lawrence,^45 miles below Montret', 
and almost opposite Sorel at the mouth of the Richelieu. 

The work of deepening the channel to 9 foot below the usual low water mark 
was brought to a close on the 5th July, 1881. 

RIVliRE l'ASSOMPTION. 

This river discharges into the St. Lawrence, a short distance above the Village 
of Bepentigny. 

At Charlemagne, at the mouth of the river, dredging was carried on between 
27th August and 5th November, 1881, on the boulder shoal off the steamboat wharf, 
and in making a cat to the mill channel, giving 10 feet depth at low water. 



[1882] 45 



LONGUE POINTE TO BOUOUEEVILLE. — RIVER ST. LAWRENCE. 

It having been found that obstructions oxisted in tho channel on the route used 
ty the ferry steamer between Longue Pointe and Boucherville, 6 miles below 
Ibntreal, a dredge was placed at work in May last for the purpose of making 7 feet 
at low water in the St ijawrence, and, at the close of the fiBcal year, it had removed 
10,228 cubic yards of materials. 

ILE AUX NOIX, 

Is an island in the Eiver Richelieu near the Southern boundary of the Province 
of Quebec 

On this island is situated Fort Lennox, built by the British Government many 
years ago as a military post, and transferred to the Province of Canada in 1855. It 
was opened as a Reformatory prison in 1858 and closed in 1862. Access to this fort 
is had by a road from the public highway at the Village of St. Valentin to the river, 
tnd thence by ferry to the island. This road being, it is maintained, the property of 
the Dominion, extensive repairs bad to bo made to the bridge crossing a dry gully, 
which bad become dangerous. 

LAPRAIRIE, 

The chef 'lieu of the County of Laprairie, is situated on the southern shore of tho 
^t Lawrence, 7 miles above Montreal. 

In May, 1882, a dredge was placed at work in deepening to 7 feet at low water 
around the front and sides of tho public wharf, and was so engaged at the close of the 
fiscal year. ^ 

BEAUHARNOIS. 

The chief town of tho County of Beauharnois, on tho southern side of Lake St. 
Louis, River St. Lawrence, and 20 miles above Montreal. 

The dredge " Queen of Canada " remained at Boauharnois until the 20th July, 
1881, and completed the deepening in front of the wharves at that placo, and the 
<^annel therefrom to the main channel of the river. 

BACOT HATES SHOAL.— RIVER ST. LAWRENCE. 

This shoal is an obstruction in the steamboat channel about 2i milos below tho 
Village of Cedars, in the county of boulanges. " 

During the season of 1881 operations were commenced and carried on, in opening 
a new route 150 ft in width, with 8 ft. depth at lowest water, about 200 ft. to the 
northward of that heretofore used. 

Owing to the swiftness of the current, special vessels and machinery had to be 
devised and built for the purpose of lifting and removing the large boulders and 
stones of which the shoal is composed. At tho close of the year about two-thirds of 
this new channel had been completed. 

THE CEDARS. 

The Village of Cedars in the County of Soulango3, is situated on tho northern 
^ank of the St Lawrence, 30 miles above Montreal. 

During the year the landing pier at this place was largely repaired, as it was 
found to be more desirable to do this, than to engage in the construction of a new 
pier, referred to in last year's report. 



46 [1882] 



ST. PLACIDE. 

St. Placido, in the County of Two Mountains, is situated on the River Ottawa 
about 9 miles from St. Andrews. 

In 1879 the work of opening a channel from the main channel of the Ottawa to 
the public whai*f at St. Placide was commenced, and work was resumed in June, 1882, 
for the purpose of completing the same, and at the close of the fiscal year fair progress 
had been made. 

RIVliRB X LA GRAISSE (RIOAUD) 

' This river empties into the Ottawa on its southern side about 15 miles above 
Vaudreuil. 

Work was resumed on 21st July in deepening the channel towards the village 
of Bigaud, and continued until 23rd September, when 15,400 cubic yards of clay were 
removed. 

RIVli^BE DU NORD. 

This river enters the Ottawa on its northern side, at the head of the Lake of 
Two Mountains. 

From 1st August to 6th September, 1831, the work of removing boulders from 
the channel about ^ mile below the Village of St. Andrews was continued, leaving a 
depth of 5 J feet at low water over a width of 70 feet. 

RIVliRB DU Lll:VRE. 

This river empties into the Ottawa on its northern side, 19 miles below the 
City of Ottawa. 

A small expenditure was made during the Summer of 188! in deepening the 
channel of the river at Little Eapids, about 10 miles above the village of Buckingham, 
by blasting a reef which extends across the river at that point; and also in removing 
boulders from the Long Bapids, for the purpose of facilitating the navigation of the 
river by craft engaged in the transportation of phosphates. 

THE GATINEAU. 

This river, one of the principal tributaries of the Ottawa, flows into the latter 
below the City of Ottawa. 

Owing to the extreme lowness of the water in this river dunng the fall of 1881, 
it was necessary to open a passage for barges through the shoals in the channel near 
the railway bridge, which were found to be composed of sand, mingled with sawdust 
and refuse from the mills up the river, and as long as this refuse finds its way int(v 
the river so long will a shoaling of the water take place, and the usefulness of the 
river bo destroyed. 

ONTABIO. 

UNION SUSPENSION BRIDGE. 

This bridge, connecting the Cities of Ottawa and Hull, crosses the Ottawa 
immediately below the Chaudiere Falls. It was constructed in 1844, and in 1861 iron 
was substituted for wood in the floor beams. 

An examination made in 1880 shewed that the roadway of the bridge requii-ed 
extensive repairs, and during 1881-82 the whole of the superstructure, with the 
exception of^the iron floor beams, was renewed, and advantage was taken of the 
opportunity aflEbrded to reduce the suspended weight of the bridge and to increafie 
the strength and stiffness of the road way by marked changes in the quantities of 
materials used and the form of trussing adopted, 



*■ 



[1882] 41 



REMOVAL OP REEF BELOW SUSPENSION BRIDGE. — OTTAWA RIVBR. 

Immediately below the Union Suspension Bridge there existed a small rocky 
island the top of which was removed some years ago to nearly the summer level of 
the water in the Ottawa, and this, daring the seasons of freshet, became a submerged 
reef which was a cause of much hindrance to navigation. 

Poring the extremely low water of 1881, the top of this reef was removed to an 
iverage depth of about 3 feet, which has caused a marked improvement in the navi- 
gation of the channel . 

PORTSMOUTH. 

Portsmouth is situated on a bay of that name 2 miles west from Kingston. 
The appropriation for this harbor was expended in dredging to 13 feet of water 
over a portion of the basin, the material removed being mud and stone, 

SALMON RIVER. 

The Salmon River empties into the Bay of Quints at Shannonville, 40J miles 
westward of Kinirston. 

A dredge was employed in opening a passage through the bar obstructing the 
raoQth of the i*iver, 1700 feet in length and 40 feet in width, to a depth of 8 feet which 
was all that could be made, as operations were stopped by the closing of naviga\.ion. 

BELLXVILLE. 

Belleville which is the capital of the County of Hastings, is situated on the Bay 
of Quints 43 miles west of Kingston. 

The work done in this place was dredging along the pier at the eastern side 
of the harbour, across to the southward of the island, and up to the wharves on the 
western side, the material removed being loose rock, boulders, some earth, stones 
saw-dust, &c. 

TRENTON. 

Trenton, County of Hastings, is at the mouth of the river Trent which empties 
into the Bay of Quints, and is distant 60 miles from Kingston and 12 from Belleville. 

The work at this place consisted in the removal of an old crib- work pier from 
the channel of the river, leaving from 15 to lb feet of water. 

PICTON. 

The capital of the County of Prince Edward is situated on the Bay of Quinte40 
miles west of Kingston and 34 miles from Belleville. 

A few days dredging was done during May, 18B2, to remove some points left 
unfinished in 1879. 

CONSECON. 

At the head of Weller's Bay, Lake Ontario, in the County of Prince Edward. 
During October and November, 1881, dredging was done on the shoal obstructing 
the entrance to Consecon Harbor, affording only a partial relief. 

COBOURQ. 

Cobourg is on Lake Ontario, 92 miles west of Kingston. 

Owing to the failure on the part of the contractor to complete the work of 
extending the western pier it was taken out of his hands by the Department, but 



48 [1882] 



not before it had received much damage during a gale. Last spring work was 
carried on under a foreman, and as the crib-work had settled into the sandy bottom, 
about 9 feet in height had to be built by divei*s — a tedious operation. 

The extension of the Eastern pier was placed under contract in September last, 
but at the close of the fiscal year no work had been done. 

PORT HOPE. 

On the North shore^of Lake Ontario, in the County of Darham, 63 miles east of 
Toronto. 

During the fiscal year 12,442 cubic yards of material wore dredged out of this 
harbor at a cost of 22J cents per cubic yard. 

The construction of au extension of the eastern pier 100 foot in length was 
commenced and was ready to pink at the close of the fiscal year. 

TOUONTO. 

Dredging the western entrance to the harbor was continued until 8th October, 
1881, and 25,570 cubic yards of material were removed, leaving the entrance the 
full width of 300 feet. 

During the summer of 1881, this harbor was examined by James B. Eads Esq. 
C.E. with a view to its improvement and preservation, and his report thereon is 
attached as an appendix hereto. 

PORT STANLEY. 

Port Stanley is the terminus on Lake Erie of the London and Port Stanlev 
Eailroad, and is distant from Port Col borne, at the entrance to the Welland Canal, 
about 85 miles. 

The block at the end of the western pier built in 1876-77 having settled at its 
outer end was rebuilt to its original height for the purpose of placing a lighthouse 
thereon, 

# 

RONDEAU. 

The harbor of Rondeau on Lake Erie is 140 miles west of Port Col borne, tlio 
Southern entrance of the Welland Canal. 

Under their contract Messrs F. B. McNamee & Co., only completed the piling in 
the protection work on the western side of the entrance to the harbor. 

The work so far done has proved to be eminently successful, for not only have 
the breaches through the sand oeach become closed, but the beach itself has formed 
on the lake side for a distance varying from 50 to 100 feet beyond the former line of 
high water. 

A channel was opened from the harbor into and through Mill Creek, 15,485 
yards of mud and clay having been removed at a cost of 18 cts. per cubic yaixi. 

aODBRICH. 

Goderich is situated at the mouth of the River Maitland on the eastern coast of 
Lake Huron ^ 68 miles north of Sarnia. 

It having boon foond that the beach between the northern pier and the break- 
water was being gradually washed away, a contract was entered into in February 
lastibr the construction of works for its preservation^ and also for repairing and 
raising the outer end of the southern pier and rebuilding the portion of the inner 
ond of the northern pier which had been destroyed by the ice. 

From 7th Sopterabcr until the close of navigation in 1881, and from 31st Kay 
until tho close of the fiscal year 1882, the Dredge "Challenge" was engaged in 
dceponin^ along the breakwater and the wharfing inside the harbor, and to 16 feet 
through the ehozil off t ho entrance. 



[1882] « 



POBT ALBJSBT. 

Port Albert is at the mouth of Nine Mile Creok which runs into Lake Huron 9 
miles north of Godeiich. 

The work done in this harbor during the year consisted, first, in dredging 
materials which had washed into the harbor amounting to 4002 cubic yards and, 
second, the placing of 85 feet of pile protection work on its northern side. 

• KINCARDINE. 

XiDcardine is situate at the mouth of the Elver Penetangore which empties into 
Lake Huron, 31 miles north of Goderich. 

A contract was entered into in November 1881, with Messrs Eooklidge and 
McLaren for the construction of 790 feet of pile protection work on the south side of 
the southern pier at the entrance to the harbor. At the close of the year the work 
was one half completed. 

POUT ELGIN. 

In the County of Bruce, on Lake Huron, 4 miles from Southampton and 24 from 
Kiocardina 

For the purpose of aflfoiding shelter and the forniation of a harbor at this place, 
the construction of a breakwater 600 feet in length and necessary dredging was let 
toMessra Sutton and McKnight in November last. At the close of the year about 
one eighth of the work had Men accomplished. 

Towards the construction of this work the Village of Port Elgin has contributed 
15,000. 

SOUTHAMPrON. 

Od Lake Huron, at the mouth of the Biver Saugeen. 

The sum of $2,500 has been expended in restoring a length of 700 feet of the 
eaperstnicture and flooring of the west breakwater, in placing 500 cubic vards of 
rtone on the lake side of Uiis breakwater at its junction with Chantry Island, and in 
tlie construction of a small breakwater 155 feet in length opposite the lighthouse, in 
order to protect the island at that point. 

TOBERMORY. 

The harbor of Tobermory is situate at the extreme northern end of the County 
of Bruce on the channel leading from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay. 

It is a lar^e and safe natural harbor of refuge, and the sum of S250.00 was 
«^n(ied in placing 15 large iron ring bolts and T fenders in the rocky sides of the 
barbor for the purpose of mooring and protecting vessels. 

BRUCE MINES. 

Bruce Mines in the District of Algoma is situated on the northern shore of Lake 
Huron, 45 miles below Sault Ste. Marie. 

The dredge " Challenge " operated between 21st Julv and 5th September, 1881, 
'»! opening a channel with 14 feet of water to the public wharf at this place to enable 
the larger class of steamers now plying on the lakes to call. 

LITTLE CURRENT. 

Little Current is the passage between Cloche Island and the Groat Manitoulin, 
^^ is on tho direct route to Sault Ste. Marie from ports on the Greorgian Bay, and 
<iistant about 140 miles from Collingwood. 



50 fl882] 



Workwas commenced in May and finished in October, 1881, on the rocky ledge 
obstmcting the navigable channel, and 3,752 cubic yards were blasted and rcmov&L 
This rock was deposited between Manitoulin and Spider Islands and has had tho 
effect of reducing the current in tho steamboat channel ; the water which formerly 
flowed between these islands now runs to the north east of Spider Island where tho 
channel is wide and deep. 

About 10,000 yards of rock remain to be removed towards which an appro- 
priation was made at the last session of Parliament. 

OWEN SOUND. 

Owen Sound, the shiretown of the County of Grey, is situated at Uie mouth o 
the Eiver Sydenham, which discharges its watera into Georgian Bay. 

The harbour works referred to in the report of last year were brought to a 
conclusion in November last. 

With the amount placed in tho Supplementary Estimates for expenditure in 
1881-82, the dredging was completed in this harbor to the depth of 14 feet. 

THORNBUaY. 

Thornbury is situated at the mouth of the Beaver River, in the County of Grey 
on Georgian Bay, 13 miles from Collingwood. 

At this place a pier was construct some years ago by the residents of the 
locality, but was allowed to fall out ot repair and to become useless. 

The vote of the session of 1881 having been supplemented by the sum of 
$7,000.00 furnished by the Town of Thornbury, a contract was entered into for tho 
reconstruction of the pier and the dredging a basin 100 feet in width to 10 feel in 
depth on its eastern side, and at the close of the year one fifth of the work was done. 

COLLINGWOOD, 

Is in the County of Simcoo, and situated on Nottawassaga Bu}-, south shore 
of Georgian Bay, 95 miles N.W. from Toronto. 

The work of deepening the entrance to the harbor to 14 feet was prosecoted 
during the year, and 26,800 cubic yards of hardpan and clay were removed at a cost 
of 32 cents per subic yard. 

MANITOBA. 

LAKE MANITOBA. 

During the season of 1881 an examination was made to determine the cause of 
the overflow of Lake Manitoba, and the moans to be taken to prevent it for the 
future. 

A report by Mr. Tho?*. Guerin, C.E., on this subject is appended hereto. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

From tho report of the Hon. J. W. Trutch it is learned that the removal of the 
obstruction in the Harbor of Victoria known as the **.BQaver Kock *' was completea 
on the 22nd August, 1881, and that there is now a depth of 12^ feet at low water 
spring tides over the whole site of the rock. 

Dredging was carried on from 19th January until the end of April 1882, to obtam 
a depth of 14 feet in front of the wharves in Victoria Harbor. , -. 

From Igt May to the end of the fiscal year, the dredge worked on the 6fit on 
Shoal Point at the entrance to the harbor. 



[1882] 



SI 



SUEVEYS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Doriog the year enrveys and examinations wore made at the undermentioned 
loealiticB, and with afew exceptions, plans, reports and estimates have been forwarded. 



South River, Marray Ilarbor, 


Kings Co., 


P. E. I, 


Nail Pond, 


Prince Co., 


do 


Cape Traverse, 


do 


do 


Tracadio, 


Queens Co., 


do 


Belle Creek, 


do 


do 


South West River, New London, 


do 


do 


Annapolis, 


Annapolis Co., 


N.S. 


Parker's Cove, 


do 


do 


Anderson's Cove, 


do 


do 


Port Lome, 


do 


do 


Arisaig, 


AntigonishCo., 


do 


Cow Bay, 


Cape Breton Co., 


do 


Open Pond, 
East Bay, 


do 
do 


do 

da 


Grand Narrows, 


do 


do 


Ramshead River, 


Cumberland Co., 


do 


Port Greville, 


do 


do 


-Bear River, 


Digby Co., 


do 


Meteghan River, 


do 


do 


St. Mary's River, 


Goysboro Co., 


do 


Cheverie, 


Hants Co., 


do 


Hantsport, 


do 


do^ 


Three Fathom Ilarbor, 


Halifax Co., 


do 


Port Hood, 


Inverness Co., 


do 


Petite Riviere, 


Lunenburg Co., 


do 


White Point, 


(Jueens Co., 


do 


Brooklyn, 


do 


do 


Liverpool Bay, 


do 


do 


Campbell's Harbor, 


Richmond Co., 


do 


River Inhabitants, 


do 


do 


Yarmouth, 


Yarmouth Co., 


do 


Shippe^n, 


Gloucester Co., 


N.B. 


River Miramichi, 


Northumberland Co, do 


The Traverse, River Restigouche, 


RostigoucheCo., 


do 


Cross Point to Campbellton, 


do 


do 


St. Michel, 


Bellechasse Co , 


Quebec. 


Port Daniel, 


Bonaventure Co., 


do 


Caplan, 


do 


dQ 


Port-au-Saumon, 


Charlevoix Co., 


dot 


Grande D^charge, Lake St. John, 
Barachois de Malbaie 


Chicoutimi Co., 


do 


Gasp^, 


do 


Perc6, 


do 


do 


St. Francois, 


Island of Orleans, 


do 


St. Jean, Port Joli, 


L'lslet, Co , 


do. 


Pointe aux Trembles, 


Portneuf Co., 


do 


Bacot Hayes Shoal, 


River St. Lawrence, do 


The Traverse, 


do 


do 


River St. Francis, 




do 


Escoumains, 


Saguenay Co., 


do 


Three Rivers, 


St. Maurice Co , 


do 


Upper Riv^r Ottawa, 




da 



52 



fl882] 



River au Sable 


Bruce Co., 


Ontario. 


Wiarton, 


do 


do 


Tobermory 


do 


do 


Southampton, 


do 


do 


Kincardine, 


do 


do 


Newcastle, 


Durham Co., 


do 


Kingsville, 


Essex Co., 


do 


Kingston, 


Fronlenac Co., 


do 


Bayfield, 


Huron Co., 


do 


Goderich, 


do 


do 


Port Albert, 


do 


do 


Sarnia, 


Lambton Co., 


do 


The " Narrows *' between lakes Simcoe and Couchiching, do 


Wellington, 


Prince PMward 


Co., do 


CoUingwood, 
Lake Manitoba, 


Simcoe Co., 


do 




lilanitoba. 


River Assiniboine, 




do 


"Water Hen River, 




do 


River Saskatchewan, 




N. W. T. 


Victoria Harbor, 


DREDGING. 


B.C. 



" The St. Lawrence:' 

At the beginning of the fiscal year this dredge was operating on the Horse Shoj 
Shoal, at the mouth of the River Miramiehi, N.B., remaining until let Septembei 
when she left for Port Caledonia, Capo Bi-eton, having removed 16,800 cubic yard^ 
of sand. Arriving at Port Caledonia on the lOth, only a few days work was done, 
for, owing to the lateness of the season and the exposed position of that harbor, it wa^ 
found that satisfactoiy work could not be accomplished, and in consequence, the dredge 
proceeded to Sydney, C.B., and resumed work on the shoal in the harbor off the 
loading pier of the Cape Breton Coal Company, on the 16th September, remaining 
until the 28th November, when 24,500 cubic yards of gravel, stone, clay and innd| 
had been removed. i 

During the winter of 1881-82 this dredge was quartered at Little Glace Bay, 
where necessary repairs were made, and,on the ITth April last, work was commenced 
in that harbor and continued until the 9th Mav, when the Gulf ice set in 
and jammed on the coast, — 4,375 cubic yards of mud, clay, etc., having been removed- 
On the 29th May work was resumed at Port Caledonia, and at the close of the fiscal 
year the dredge had removed a total of 4,63.8 cubic yards of mud and clay. 

Owing to unfavorable weather much time was lost whilst on the Horse ShoCj 
Shoal, and also at Little Glace Bay and Port Caledonia, where additional difficulty 
was caused by the jamming of the Gulf ice. 

The total quantity dredged during the year amounts to £t0,313 cubic yards, at a 
•cost of 28 r^ cents per cubic yard. 

The sum of $29.50 was received from the Glace Bay Mining Company for old 
rubber valves and iron rivets and the amount placed to the credit of the Honorablo 
the Receiver General, 

« The Canada:' 

On the 1st July, 1831, the Canada was engaged at Buctouche, N.B., opening a 
passage throngh a mussel bed obstructing the entrance to the harbor, and in ^Jq? 
ing the channel by the removal of an old wreck. Up to the 16th Angoflt, lo81i 
7.560 cubic yards of mtid, sand, clay, stones and shells were removed; and, on that 
4liite this di'tiilge went to Cocagne harbor for the purpose of improving the entrance, 




[1882] 53 



remtiniDg until the 31st qnd removing during her stay 1,800 cubic yards of sand and 
t\sy. 

At this date it was found that repairs were required, aud the vessel left for 
Kcton, N.S., where they were executed, and after their completion she sailed for 
Vogler's CJove, Lunenburg County, N.S., where work was commenced on the Itth 
September and continued until 6th December, when it was brought to a close by the 
fonnation of ice, 11,610 cubic yards of mud having been removed. 

On the 28th December operations were commenced on the tail of the Navy 
Islind Bar, in the harbor of St. John, N.B., and continued until the end of March, 
vhen 6,300 cubic yards of clay had been removed. The dredge was then laid up. 

On the 26th May the " Canada " sailed for Halifax, N. S., where after arrival 
fh© went on the Marine slip for painting and repairs. On the 17th June, the work of 
removing an obstruction in the St. Mary's Eiver, between Sherbrooke and Goldenville, 
inspboro' County, N. S., was commenced, and at the close of the fiscal year, 810 
mine yards of gravel, stones and sand, and a number of old trees had been removed, 
it this place dredging could only be done between half-flood and half ebb tide, and 
J)e dredged material had to be taken ten miles to a place of deposit. 

The total quantity of materials removed during the year amounts to 28,080 
:abic yards, at a cost of 33 ^^ cents per cubic yard. 

The snm of S15.80 was received for coal sold from this dredge, and placed to the 
^it of the Honorable the Beceiver General. 

" The New Dominion:' 

On the 8th July, 1881, this dredge commence^d work at Marble Cove, Saint John^ 
^. B., in opening a channel to the public wharf, completing the same on the 20th 
kptember, having removed 29,925 cubic yards of mud and clay, and many old roots 
uid pieces of birch timber. 

Between the 20th September and the 10th October work was done off the 
»^harves of Messrs. Murray & Barnhill, near St. John, and 9,310 cubic yards of rod 
lay removed. On the 16th October work was resumed on the Oromocto Shoals in 
ibe Biver St, John, and continued until the 6th November, resulting in the removal 
>f 7,945 cubic yards of sand. 

After arrival at St. John work on the tail of the Navy Island Bar was attempted, 
bot, owin^ to the decayed state of the hull it was not deemed safe to continue the 
vork, and the dredge was placed in winter quarters. 

I)uring the winter a contract was entered into with Mr. Isaac J. Olive, for the 
Lonstruction of a new hull, and the transference and fitting up of the machinery of 
tbe dredge, and at the close of the year the work was nearing completion. 

The total quantity dredged during the year amounted to 47,180 cubic yards, at 
I cost of 14 ^^ cents per yard. 

For work done by this dredge for Messrs. Murray & Barnhill, the sum of 
1100.00 was received fronv th.it firm and placed to the credit of the Honorable the 
lleceiver General. The birch timber raised at Marble Cove was sold for the sum of 
in.lO, which was also placed to the credit of the Beceiver General. 

Tfie '• Cape Breionr 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, this dredge was en^gcd at New Glasgow, 
Fictou County, N.S., in deepening the channel of the East Kiver from the highway 
tddffe to above the shipyards of Messrs. Carmichael and McCaul. This work was 
(^ai^ed on the 13th July, and 5,410 cubic yai-ds of gravel removed. On the 22nd 
Joly work was commenced in the River John, and continued until the 31st October^ 
when the dredge was laid up for the winter, after having removed 18,1*75 cubic yards 
of sand and mud. 

During the spring of 1882 repairs were made to the dredge and scows, and 
between the 28th and Slst of May last, 455 cubic yards of mud were removed out of 
the channei of the river opposite the ship-yard of Mr. James Kitchen. 



^ 



54 [1882] 



On the 3rd ivLuo oporations for the improvemeot of the^ mouth of the Tatama-j 
gouche Eiver, Colchester CouDty, N.S., were commenced and continued until the! 
30tb June, up to which date 6,870 cubic yai*ds of mud had been removed. ' j 

During the year this dredge removed 30,910 cubic yards of materials, at a cost 
of 30 J cents per yard. 

The '' Frince'Edward:' 

This dredge was engaged at Crapaud, Queen's County, P.E.I., at the commeuce-l 
ment of the fiscal year, and remained there until the 8th August, when the work in 
the channel was finally completed, and 12,990 cubic yards of sand, mud and stone 
removed. I 

From the 10th August to the 25th October, work was proceeded with in! 
completing the channel at Nine Mile Creek through the flats to the public wharf, and 
21,900 cubic yards of mud, clay and sand were removed. 

At Pinnette, dredging was prosecuted between the 26th October and the 16th 
November, and the channel sti*aightened, and the loading berths deepened at the 
public wharf, 3,825 cubic yards of sand and mud having been removed. 

The ** Prince Edward '* wintered at Charlottetown, where some necessary repair* 
were executed. 

"On the 22nd May, 1882, dredging was commenced at Fort Augustus, East Elver, 
Queen's County, in deepening at the public wharf, and up to 30th May, 3,195 cable 
yards of mud and sand were removed. 

On the Ist June, the dredging plant left for South Murray Harbor, King's 
County, where the work of straightening the channel was commenced, and at th« 
close'of the fiscal year 5,415 cubic yards of sand and mud had been removed. - j 

The total quantity removed by this dredge during the year amounted to 47,325 
cubic yardn, at a cost of 19 ^^^^ cents per yard. 

The " Geo McKenzier 

As stated in the last report this dredge was at work at the close of the year at 
Mabou, Inverness County, N.S., engaged in opening a channel to 14 feet at low water 
through a shoal lying off the entrance to the harbor. Owing to the very high winds 
which prevailed during the summer of 1881, and the strong currents and undertow, 
which exist off the coast, it was only possible to work during mild and moderate 
weather, and when the wind was off shore. Work was prosecuted until the 30th 
October, when 12,448 cubic yards of clay, stone, and sand had been removed. 

During the winter repaira were made to the dredge, and the plant was ready for 
work early in the spring, but, owing to the late period to which the ice remaiaeaaod 
the difficulty of procuring tug service as soon as required, work was not reatmed 
until the 19lh June, 188:^, and up to the 30th, a further amount of 276 cubic yards of 
materials were removed. 

The total quantity of work done by this dredge during the year was only 12,724 
cubic yards, at a cost of 68 ^^^ cents per yard, and the smallness of the amamit 
dredged is entirely due to the hard nature of the material operated upon, the expoeri 
position of the locality where the work had to be performed, and the delays caused by 
high winds, etc., for a dredge of the "Geo McKenzie" class, is— from its build and 
<K)nstruction, only capable of working in comparatively smooth water. 

The sum of $4 was received from the sale of an old Jforge, and placed ^to i^^ 
credit of tbe Receiver General. 

The " Challenger 

At the commenoement of the fiscal year this dredge was at Port Albert^ l^ 
Huron, and . remained there until the 19th of July in deepening a portion of tfl« 
harbor to 10 feet, removing 3,422 cubic yards of sand, clay and stones. 



[1S82] 55 



On the 2l8t July work wascommencod at Bruce Mines, in opening a channel 
vith 14 feet water to the public wharf at that place, and continued until the 5th 
September, having removed 22,3B8 cubic yards of clay and mud. 

Dredging was begun at Goderich on the 7th September, in deepening to 13 feet 
ilooF the breakwater and the wharfing inside the harbor, and to 16 feet through the 
tboaloff the entrance, remaining at work until the close of navigation. 

Owing to the delay in repairing the scows attached to this dredge, work was not 
resimied antil the 31st May last, and up to the close of the year, 27,53'J cubic yards of 
gravel, clay, sand and boulders had been removed. 

DuriDg the winter the machinery of the dredge and the tug ** Trudeau *' were 
tboroDghly overhauled and repaired, and the scows in a groat measure rebuilt. 

The work done by this dredge during the year amounted to 53,342 cubic yards, 
and cost IT^th cents per yard. 

l^he *' KipissingJ' 

On the Ist July, 1.S81, this dredge was engaged in deepening the channel 9 feet 
through IjevcFque's Shoal, below the town of Borthier, (en Iiaut)^ Quebec, completing 
the work on the 5th. On the 6th the plant was removed to the River Kicheiien, to 
work on two shoals, respectively one and three miles below the Village of St. Ours, 
to obtain 10 feet at low water. These channels were completed on the 27th August 
by the removal of 9,300 cubic yards of clay, stone and sana. 

At Charlemagne, at the mouth of thelliver L'Assomption, di*edging commenced 
00 the 27th August, and ended on the 5th November, and a depth of 10 feet left 
through the boulder shoal off the steamboat wharf, and in a cut made to the mill 
ehannel, 15,675 cubic yards of boulders, clay and sand having been removed. 

During the winter, this dredge, the tug "Dennis," and the scows were thoroughly 
overhauled and repaired at Ottawa. 

On the 9th June, 1882, the work of extending a channel commenced some years 
ago, from the main channel of the Ottawa to the public wharf at St. Placide, Quebec, 
was begun, and at the close of the year, 3,037 cubic yards of clay were removed, and 
ft depth of 6 feet at low water obtained. 

This di-cdge removed during the year 28,237 cubic yards of stone, clay and sand, 
at a cost of 29^' cents per cubic yard. 

The " Queen of Canada. " 

At the commencement of the year this dred^je was at Boauharnois, Quebec, deep- 
ening to 9 feet in front of the wharves, and in making a cut to tho same depth to the 
main channel of the St, Lawrence. 

On the 21st of July work was resumed in dredging tho channel of tho Riviere k 
la Gratsse, towards the village of Bigaud, to a depth of 7 feet, and cootinuod until 
the 23rd September, when 15,400 cubic yard* of clay were removed. 

On the 27th September, work on the shoals in the channel of the Gatincau, in 
th^ vicinity of the railway bridge was commenced, to obtain a depth of six feet at 
U>w water, and continued until the close of navigation, when 3,700 cubic yards of 
sand, mingled with slabs, saw-dust and mill refuse were removed. 

Extensive repairs were made during the winter to the hull of the dredge and 
the scows ; and the machinery was placed in thorough working order. 

On the 17th May, 1882, this dredge and scows were sent to Laprairie, arriving 
and commencing work at that place on the 29th, in deepening to 7 i^et at low water 
around the front and sides of the public wharf, and at the close of the year 1,725 
cubic yards of hard packed gi*avel had been removed. 

The total quantity of materials removed by this dredge during the year 
amounted to 24,475 cubic yards of hard gravel, clay and sand, costing 333^1- cents per 
yard. 



5G [1882] 



The *^ Dredger*'— British Columbia, 

Tho dredgiDgplant, consistiDg of dredge, tag and scows, remained at Coqaitleni 
River, near New Westminster, until early in January, when they were removed tc 
Victoria Harbor, and commenced work on the 19th January last, in the removal ol 
deposit along the front of the wharves to 14 feet, at low water spring tides, wfaicli 
depth, owing to the presence of rock was not fally obtained. 

On the 1st May, operations were commenced at the entrance to the harbor tc 
obtain a depth of 14 feet at low-water spring tides, through the Spit shoal, which 
extends about 450 feet off Shoal Point, and were in progress at the close of the year. 

The total quantity of materials removed daring the year amounted to 22,356 
cubic yards, at a cost of 48 ^^ cents per yard. 

DREDGING PLANT. 

The dredging plant belonging to the Department is as follows : 

IN THE MAUITIMB PROVINCES. 

The steam hopper dredge — " St. Lawrence " 

" ** •* —"Canada." 

Tho dipper dredge — " New Dominion " and 10 scows. 

»* *» —"Cape Breton" 5 " 

" " —" Pnnce Edward " 3 " 

** " — ''Geo.McKenzie" 3 " 

IN QUSBEO. 

The dipper dredge — ** Queen of Canada," 2 scows and stone lifter. 

*< " — <« Nipissing " 2 scows, and the steam tug " Denni?/ 

IN ONTARIO. 

The dipper dredge — " Challenge, " 2 scows, and the steam tng " Trudeau." 

IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

An elevator dredge ai^d 4 scows. 
The steam tug " Georgia*" 

During the winter of 1881, a new hull was coostructed for the << New Domioion' 
and tho dredging machinery, &c., transferred thereto. Under a contract with Messrs. 
D. acd A. Campbell, four scows are being built at Tatamagouche, three of which arc 
to be attached to the dredge " Prince Edward," the other to the " Cape Breton. " A 
8C0W attached to the *' Challenge " was condemned during the year, and will be 
replaced by another to be constructed during the ensuing winter. 

As will be seen by reference to the details of expenditui*e in connexion with 
the dipper dredges in the Maritime Provinces, a large amount, about one-third of the 
whole, was paid for towage, performed by tugs hired for the purpose. This servito 
would be more satisfactorily rendered and performed, and at a large saving in 
yearly expense, if proper togs were provided by the Department 



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ri882] 



Details of Dredging in the Mantime ProvinceB 



Dredge. 



Locality. 



Couaty. 



Niw Brukswioc. 



Quantity. Cost 



Total Ooit 



' New Dominion ' 



ICarble Cove 

BarnblD and Ifurrays. 
Oromooto Sboali 



"Canada".. 



Buctouche Bar 

Cocagne 

Voglers Cove 

Nary Island, St. John . 
Sherbrooke — . 



St John., 
do ., 
Sunbury.. 



Kent^ 

do 

Lnnenborg.. 

St John 

Guyeboro*... 



C. yds. 

27,986 
9,310 
7,946 

7,560 
1,800 



$ cts. 

4,374 40 
1,360 93 
1,161 38 

3,306 00 
786 90 



$ cti. 



6,696 71 



6,300 



2,764 17 



6,846 07 



" Cape Breton " . 



Prince Edward' 



^St Lawrence"... 



* Geo. McKenzie ' '. 



New Glasgow 

River John 

Tatamagouche » 

Crapaod » 

Nine Mile Creek 

Pinette 

Fort Augnstns, Sast River ... 
Mnrray Harbor, South Kings. 



Horse Shoe Shoid.. 
Port Caledonia..... 

Sydney, O.B 

Little Glace Bay... 

ICabou 



Pictou 

do 

Colchester.. 



Qneens . 

do 

do . 

do . 
Kings.... 



Northumberland . 
Cape Breton 

do 

do 



16,800 



4,884 09 



4,884 09 



By hand., 
do .. 



Partridge Island River.. 
Windsor 



Inverness, C.B.. 



Cumberland . 
Hants 



79,640 



18,626 87 



Dredge. 



*^ New Dominion ' 

"Canada" 

'* Cape Breton "... 
^' Prince Edward ' 
"St Lawrence". 
" Geo. McKenzie ' 



New Brunswick. 



Quantity. 



0. yds. 

47,180 
16,660 



16,800 



79,640 



Cost 



$ ets. 

6,896 Tl 
6,846 07 



4,884 09 



18,626 87 



Nova Sootia. 



Qniuitity. 



C.yds. 



12,420 
30,910 



33,612} 
12,724 

89,666} 



Oost 



$ cts. 



6,429 63 
9,426 17 



9,742 n 
8,766 19 

33,868 71 



[1882] 



73 



for the Yeai- ended 30th Jane, 1882. 



Nova Scotia. 


Prikci Edwaed Islajtd. 


Quantity 
by each 
Dredge. 


Total Cost. 


Quantity. 


Cost. 


Total Cost. 


Quantity. 


Cost. 
$ cts. 


Total Cost 


C. yds. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


0. yds. 


$ cts. 


C. yds. 


$ cts. 































47,180 


6,896 71 










• 





















11,610 


6,075 53 


























810 


354 10 

1,649 80 
6,681 32 
2,095 05 


5,429 63 








28,080 


12,27£f 70 


5,410 
1*^,630 























6,870 


9,426 17 








30,910 


9 426 17 


12,990 

21,900 

3,825 

3,195 

6,415 


2,568 23 

4,329 83 

756 24 

631 «B 

1,070 69 




















..... 




























9,356 67 


47,326 


9,366 67 








4.6371 
24,500 
4,375 

12,724 

10,640 


1,348 20 
7,122 63 
1,271 89 

8,765 19 

2,600 00 
150 00 


























9,742 72 
8,765 19 








60,3121 

12,724 

10,640 


14,626 81 
8,765 19 
2,500 00 














2,650 00 




. 




160 00 














100,2061 




36,f 13 71 


47,325 




9,366 67 


227,171} 


63,997 15 







Piaci Edward Island. 


ToUl 
Quantity. 


Expenditure 
Dredging. 


Superinten- 
dence. 


Total 
Expenditure. 


Cost per . 


QoanUty. 


Cost 


Cubic yard. 


C.yds. 


$ cts. 


C. yds. 

47,180 

28,080 

30,910 

47,325 

50,312} 

12,724 


$ cts. 

6,653 28 
11,664 42 

8,956 79 

8,890 65 
13,898 45 

8,328 73 


$ cts. 

343 43 
611 28 
469 38 
465 92 
728 36 
436 46 


$ cts. 

6,896 71 
12,276 70 

9,426 17 

9,366 67 
14,626 81 

8,766 19 


Cents. 
14*6178 






43-7169 






30-4965 


47,325 


9,366 67 


19-7706 
29-0719 







68*8870 


• >••••. 






47,326 


9,356 57 


216,531} 


68,292 32 


3,064 83 


61,347 15 


28*8317 



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[1882] 75 



PEBC^. 

REPORT ON PROPOSED BREAKWATER. 

Chiif £nginbbr*s Offios 
Ref. No. 3558. Ottawa, 1th February, 1882. 

Snt, — At tbo last session of Parliament the sum of $500 was appropriated for an 
examination and survey at Perc^, Gasp^. I have now to report that tnis duty was 

S^rformed by Mr. Charles P. Roy, C.B., and herewith, for the information of the 
on. the Minister, I transmit his report thereon, together with a copy of the plan 
prepared by him. 

Mr. Roy proposes the construction of three isolated breakwaters having a 
collective length of 1600 ft. so placed as to permit a free entrance to boats and 
vessels, and at the same time to shelter them from all easterly winds, and he places 
the cost of the works so proposed at $60,900. He, however, states that sections 
Nos. 1 and 2 might prove to be sufficient without the construction of No. 3, and if so 
that the sum of $39,000 would be required to defray their cost. 

On examining the details of the estimate furnished b^ Mr. Roy, I find that he 
has omitted the iron required for these works, which of itself is no inconsiderable 
item. 

The designs for the works proposed show breakwaters composed of cribwork 
filled with stone with a deposit or talut of stone around the seawaid sides and ends of 
each, placed at a slope of 2 to 1. 

From the experience gained at the breakwater at Negro Point, St. John Harbor, 
it was found that the stone placed at this slope on its seaward side did not stand the 
effects of the sea, but was washed down to from 4 to 6 to 1, and to maintain aslope tit 
Pero^ where the seas are as heavy, if not heavier than at St. John, it will be necessary 
to place at least three times the quantity of stone calculated as sufficient by Mr. Roy. 

With these additions I make the cost of the proposed works at Perc^ as follows : 

Section No. 1 $38,300 

'' 2 .. 15,650 

" 3 34,850 

Add for superintendence • • 8,200 

Total $97,000 

V I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

HENRY F. PERLEY, 

Chief Engineer. 
F. n. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Department Public Work?. 



{Translation.) 

St. Anne, 20th December, 1881. 

Sir, — For your information and for that of the Hon. the Minister, I have 
the honor to enclose my report upon the construction of a breakwater in PercA Bay 
applied for, for the protection of fishing boats. 

I have^the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

CHAS. F. ROY. 
UsNRT F. Pbbley, Esq., Ottawa. 

10— 6i 



Iti [1882] 



REPOBT. 

BbEAK WATER IN PSRC^ BaY, QuS. 

The constraction of a breakwater in Perc^ Bay is a matter which has been under 
consideration for some years. The extent of the damage of every desci-iption caused 
by storms which are frequent in this region, have been repeatedly pointed out to the 
authorities. 

Perc^ Bay presents an opening of 125^ to winds blowing from the N. N. K and 
veering east and south. Easterly winds are the most common and are those of which 
the effects are most dreaded. 

The object sought to be attained is the creation in the Bay of Pored of an 
adequate and secure shelter by means of sea works for the protection of fishing 
boats, their power of resistance to be sufficient and the cost to be moderate. The 
unfavorable aspect of the ox>a8t, the inequalities of the bottom and the great depth 
of water in certain parts of the bay greatly increase the difficulty of the problem to 
be solved. 

In October last I received instructions to proceed to the spot and continue the 
work begun in 1879, make- further examinations and prepare a final report on the 
subject. Dui'in^ my journey I paid special attention to availing myself to the utmost 
of the information which I drew 'from the most reliable sources and to taking 
advantage of the knowledge and experience of practical residents of the locality. 

From all the examinations made and all the information acquired it appears 
the construction of a breakwater in Perc6 Bay, to be practically useful and sufficiently 
solid will entail a relatively large expenditure. The plan mow submitted for that 
your consideration is with that view. 

This plan comprises the construction of three distinct piers or blocks, having an 
Aggregate length of 1600 feet, placed as shewn thereon. The area sheltered by the 
breakwater so constructed would be easy of access at all times, and would provide 
complete shelter for more than 300 boats, for which there would be room at the 
same time. 

The piers might be constructed in succession, from year to year and in the order 
shewn by the distinguishing numbers. The necessary "timber can be obtained in 
great part from the adjacent forests, and stone for ballast and for the protection of 
the wood-work is obtainable close by. 

There is i*eason to hope that the shelter afforded by the construction of the first 
two piers or blocks would so far suffice as to make the construction of the third 
(No. 3) not indispensable. Confined to these bounds the cost of the work would 
probably amount to $38,824.50. 

Otherwise the entire outlav to be incurred for the completion of the three piers 
or blocks, which form part of the plan submitted, as shewn, and for the protection of 
the woodwork and cribwork from the action of the waves by adequate stone work 
on the outside, cannot be estimated at less than $60,900.00. 

CHAS F. EOY, 
Civil Engineer* 
St. Anne, 20th December, 1881. 



[1882] IT 



EBPORT ON TORONTO HARBOUR, ONTARIO, 
Br James B. Eads, C.E. 



Sib,— I have the honor to submit the following Report upon the Harbour of 
Toronto. 

Before making a personal inspection of the harbour, I expressed the wish that I 
ehoald be furnished with such information relating to it as would be useful in a study 
of the questions upon which my advice was required. In response to this request 1 
have received a compilation of the available records touching .the harbour, entitled: 
^'tfemorandum with accompanying plans and documents relating to the past and 
present state of the Harbour of Toronto," and at the same time I received the follow- 
ing letter : ^ 

^0. 6532, Subj, 13. 

" Department op Public Works, Canada, 

Ottawa, 19th April, 1881. 

" Sir, — The preparation of the information you desired to have relative to the 
Harbour of Toronto prior to the examination you are to makehavinc been completed, 
I now enclose the same in pamphlet form, and am directed by the Honorable the 
Minister to request you to proceed with such examination at your earliest 
^convenience. 

" There are two points which will demand your serious consideration : — 

*' 1st. The western entrance— its proper width and depth, and the means to bo 
adopted to maintain both, as well as to restrain or prevent the growth of the island 
flLoal northwardly and westwardly either by works erected at the entrance or from 
the island, or both. 

" 2d. The eastern entrance,— whether it is desirable that it should remain open ; 
if 80, the means to be adopted for its maintenance to an ample width and to a depth 
^ual to that of the western entrance. If it should be closed, the manner in which 
this should be accomplished and its future maintenance provided for, 

" You will be kind enough to report fully on these points, as well as on all others 
having a bearing on the preservation or improvement of the harbour which may be 
brought to your notice during your examination, such report to be accompanied by 
plans and estimates of the cost, and such suggestions as you may be pleased to make. 

'' Although your attention is called to certain points for investigation, it is the 
wish of the Minister that your report shall be full and comprehensive and embrace 
^very thing which may have a bearing on the object of your enquiry. 

" You will please notify the Chiet Engineer when you propose visiting Toronto. 

" I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant, 

(Signed) " F. H. ENNIS, Secretary." 

The Memorandum and its appendices contain a mass of important information 
upon the subject in hand, which will be found very useful in forming a correct judg- 
ment as to the merits of any system of works which has been or which may be 
suggested for the benefit of the harbour. But as the careful examination of these 
facts in extenso may be inconvenient when this report is under consideration, and as 
they constitute a part of the evidence by which I have been guided, I think it proper 
to append to this report a copy of the Memorandum, as it contains in a compact 
form the gist of the information which is embodied in the entire volume. 

During the latter part of last June, I visited the City of Toronto and met the 
Chief Engineer, Mr. Henry F. Perley, there by appointment. Through his cour- 
teey, I was provided with every facility necessary to enable me to make such an 
inspection of the harbour and its vicinity, as I desired. During my examination I 



W [1882] 



was aocompaDied by the Chief Engineer, and by Mr. Kivas Tally, Engineer of the 
Harboar, and from these gentlemen I obtained, verbally, mach useful information. 
Mr. Tally's knowledge of the harbour is the result of many years of close and .intelli- 
gent observation of its phenomena, while residing in Toronto. During my visit I 
made as thorough an inspection of the harbour as I desired, and fully informed 
myself as to the causes which in my opinion have produced its deterioration. 

As no instrumental survey of the harbour had been made since 1879, and as an 
accurate knowledge of the most recent changes in it was important, not only in arriv- 
ing at a correct solution of the problem, but also in making an accurate estimate of 
the cost of the works needed for its improvement, I requested that another survey 
should be made with especial reference to the changes which had occurred in its two 
entrances, where works of improvement would probably be located. This survey the 
Chief Engineer caused to be made during last July and August, and I have been fur- 
nished with the results. I am therefore in possession of alT of the information requi- 
site for an intelligent and thorough study of the subject. This study I have made and 
I trust that I shall succeed in presenting to the Dominion Government, in as convin- 
cing a light as they are presented to my own mind, the several reasons that have 
induced me to make the recommendations herewith submitted. To aid me iti this 
part of my task, I desire to impress on the memory of the reader, each one of the 
three facts presently named, wnich appear to me to be the most impoilant pheno- 
mena in the consideration of the very novel problem presented by the Harbour of 
Toronto. 

First, There has been for nearly a century a constant growth of the northern 
end of the peninsula in the direction of the Queen's Wharf. 

Second, Although this extension has diminished the width and depth through the 
entrance or throat of the harbor, it has not materially altered the distance which existed 
eixty-three years ago between the water immediately inside of the harbour and that 
near the entrance on the outside of it. 

Third, While the crest of the extremity of the peninsula has advanced about 
1,700 feet to the west in the last sixty-throe years, its submerged face on that side 
has greatly receded, and the deep water of the lake along its western shore has 
proportionately moved to the east, thereby resulting in a much steeper slope on this- 
side of the peninsula, to the depth of at least 18 feet, than it had in 1818. 

These three facts ai-e so important that the proof of each one in order, is here- 
with submitted. 

Inproof of the /frs^ we learn that in 1788, Mr. J. Collins, Deputy Surveyor- 
General, reported the navigable channel for vessels to be 1,500 feet wide and nom 
18 to 20 feet deep. The waters of the lake at the time were as he says very high. 
The survey of Bouchette, 5 years later, shows only 15 feet as the maximum depth and 
a channel 480 yards wide. Much of this difference in the maximum depth and width 
and that reported by Collins, was doubtless due to the different level to which Boa- 
chette referred his measurements. 

In the very interesting and instructive competitive report of Mr. Sandford 
Fleming, C. E., (page 64 ofthe appendix to Memorandum) we find the following 
statement : 

" On comparing the charts of Bouchette, Bayfield, and Bonnycastle, with my own 
from a recent survey Tin 1850) showing the state of the peninsula at the present time, 

wo obtain rodalta as follows: 

" First — That the channel between ten (10) feet water lines was, in 

" 1796, about 480 yards wide, 
" 1828, about 310 yards wide, 
" 1835, about 260 yards wide, 
" 1850, about 120 yards wide." 

SliiB comparison is entitled to much confidence, for the reason that it wtf 
ovidently maae by a careful and intelligent engineer, who had within reach b% 



[1882J 19 



Toronto at that time, the necessary data to determine the difference in the lake 
levels to which these several surveys were referred, and without which information 
no very accurate comparison of these surveys could have been made. 

Prom these comparisons, und fV*om his estimates, Mr. Fleming arrived at the 
conclusion, that the northward growth of the peniQsula reduced the width of the 
ehannelat the rate of from seven to ten yards annually, and that this required a 
deposit of about 11,000 cubic yards each year. The annual growth during the years 
embraced by this comparison is shown to be remarkably constant and regular. 

On the 11th of April of this year, as appears by the chart of comparative 
surveys from 1875 to 1879, inclusive, the width between the Queen's wharf and the 
ten-foot contour line on the peninsula was only about 225 feet, and much of this width 
is, DO doubt, due to dredging. 

The second fact is shown by a comparison of Mr. Fleming's survey of 1850, with 
the most recent one made this year. The 15 feet inside and outside contour-lines on 
the latest survey, me&sured across the end of the peninsula where thoy approached 
each other most nearly, are about 2,400 feet apart. 

In comparing the latest contours with the 15-feet contours of Mr. Fleming, it 
should be ODserved that there are two I5feet soundings on his chart in the bight of 
the outer curve which are not embraced by it. If the curve were drawn through the 
outer one of these, which it might be with equal propriety, the line would be moved 
out about 420 feet. The distance would tben be about 2,200 feet between the two 15- 
feet contours on Mr. Fleming's chart, if measured over the line of least distance be- 
tween the same contours on the survey of 1881 . This line crosses the end of the 
S^ninsula about 1,350 feet from the end of the Queen's wharf. On a line nearer to the 
ueen's wharf the distance between them on Mr. Fleming's chart is only about 1,800 
feet. The lesser distances between these contours on Mr. Fleming's survey are owing 
to the higher datum plane from which the depths were measur^. He says (p. 69, 
Memorandum and Appendix) that his report was ''chiefly founded on a very 
laborious and expensive survey between August, 1849, and the spring of 1850." With 
regard to the datum level, he says : 

" These soundings amount to between two and three thousand, and are redaced 
to an approximate mean level of Lake Ontario, ascertained in conjunction with 
Captain Lefroy from a series of lake levels taken by his direction during several 
years." 

This level is, I believe, about one foot and a half higher than the present datum 
established by the late Captain Hugh Bichardson in 1850. The hydrographic dia- 
gram of Mr. Kivas Tully shows the mean level of the lake during twenty-five years 
ending in 1879 to bare been 18.20 inches above the present datum plane. 

No material difference is observable between the last survey and that made by 
Hr. Fleming thirty years ago in the width of the shoal between the 15-feet contours 
at the locality named, when the discrepancies I have alluded to are duly considered. 
That this distance has not appreciably altered in the last six years admits of no 
question, when the survey of 1875 is compared with that of 1881. 

In still further proof, it is proper to quote the following from the report of 
Mr. William Kingsford, engineer in charge, dated July 7th, 1875, who seems to have 
been a close observer of the changes in the harbor and its entrances. He says (pa^e 
110, Memorandum and Appendix) : "The eastern spit of land which protects the 
barbor is formed of sand, much of which is frequently in motion. It has been 
asserted that, carried away from the original place of deposit, it finds its way into 
the harbour. The examination of last year proves that such is not the case. There 
is DO less depth of water to-day in the inner harbour than is shown on the map of the 
first survey made by Bouchette in 1785." 

The proof of the third fact referred to, will appear by making the following com- 
parison of Bayfield's survey with the survey of Itf 8 1. Draw a line upon each from 
the Kght-house to the centre of tho Queen's wharf, and from points on this lino 



80 [1882] 



measure, perpendicalai*ly to it, the distaDce to the 2, 4, 10, 15, and 18-feet BoandiDga 
shown on Bayfield's chart near the central part of the western face of the peninsula ; 
and compare those depths with the depths at the same places on the chart of 1881. 
First, At a point on the line 4,500 feet from the light-hoose we find it is abont 
1,900 feet to the most southerly one of the two-feet soundings. At this place on the 
survey of 1881, the depth is now 13 feet greater. 

tieconcL At a point on the line 5,G00 feet from the light-house it is 1,500 feet to 
the next two-feet sounding on the Bayfield chart. At this place the depth is now 6 feet 
grealer. * 

TMrd. At a point on the lino on the Bayfield survey 4,000 feet from the light- 
house it is 1,400 ieot to the southern four-feet sounding. The depth here is now 2*7 
leet greater. 

Fourth. At a point on the line 4,300 feet from the light-house it is 1,200 foet to 
the other four-feet sounding. The depth at this place is now 1 J feet greater. 

Fifth. At a point 4,750 feet from the light-house it is 2,000 feet to the ten-feet 
sounding on Bayfield's chart. At this place the depth is now 9 feet greater. The 
ten feet contour here has receded 400 feet 

Sixth, At a point on the line 5,000 feet fi"ora the light-house it is 2,000 feet to 
the fifteen-feet sounding of Captain Bayfield. At the same place the present depth is 
4 feet greater. The fifteeu-foet contour has receded here about 200 feet. 

Seventk At a point on the line 5,200 feet from the light-house it is 2,050 feet to 
the eigh teen-feet sounding on Bayfield's chart. The present depth here is about 2 
feet greater. 

These comparisons are sufficient to show that the five foet contour line about the 
middle of the western face of the peninsula is at very nearly the same place now that 
it was sixty-three years ago, while the contours between five feet and eighteen feet 
have greatly receded. 

A further comparison of Captain Bayfield's survey with that of 1881, will prove 
by similar measurements that the dry crest of the northern end of the peninsula has 
not only advanced to the north, but has likewise advanced to the westward about 
1,700 feet from the end of the sand spit shown on Capt. Bayfield's chart, by which 
the western face of the peninsula above the five-feet contour line has been much 
steepened by a movement precisely the converse of that which has steepened it below 
that depth. The sand which constituted the bottom beyond the present five-feet 
contour line in 1818 out to the depth of eighteen feet, has evidently been transported 
by the action of the waves up to tne northward and on to that part of the weetem 
face of the peninsula which is now above the present five-feet contour. This process 
has greatly steepened the western face of the peninsula without really advancing it 
lakeward. 

If comparisons be made further southward on the face of the peninsula, the 
change wrought by wave action in this direction will be still more marked. For 
instance at a point on the line from the Queen's wharf to the light-house, 2,600 feet 
from the latter, the Bayfield chart shows a depth of but 3 feet on the outer face of 
the shoal at the distance of 2,600 feet. The depth here must now be about nineteen 
feet, as the spot is about 100 feet outside of the otitermost sounding on the chart of 
1881, where a depth of 18.5 feet is- recorded. The depth of three feet is now 1,(M)0 
feet eastward on the survey of 1881. If we assume that the plane to which Captwn 
Bayfield reduced his soundings was eighteen inches higher than the present datum, 
it would still show that the three- feet contour at this locality is 1,550 feet further 
landwaixl than it was in 1818. 

From this and other comparisons which may be made between these two surveys 
it will appear that while the top or dry part of the peninsula at its northern end has 
apparently swung out towards the lake about 1,700 feet westwardly, the submei^ 



• Note.— -This latter two-feet soundinff and others on the 8«rae shoal are shown more diatincUy 
on an enfj^raved chart of Bayfield's surrey pablished "with corrections" in 1863, They are 
8carc<}Iy discernible on the photo-lithograph published with the memorandum. 



L18821 81 



portion of it at the southern end of this face, hast, to the depth of eighteen feet, swung 
ID towards the light-house about the same distance eastwardly. The common centre 
about which these changes seem to have vibrated from east to west, is located near 
the central portion of the western face of the peninsula. The centre about which the 
vertical movement has occurred by which the entire face of the peninsula has been 
steepened, seems to have been at the depth of about five feet, and at a point also near 
the central part of the western face oi the peninsula. In this movement the eigh teen- 
feet contour at the northern end has not materially changed its location, while the 
xero margin of the lake at the other end, immediately west of the lighthouse has 
been almost if not quite as stable. 

The prolongation of the isthmus northwardly and the alteration of its western 
face, are unquestionably due to wave action, and as a proper understanding of the 
phenomena produced by waves is absolutely necessary to enable the reader to form 
an intelligent judgment of the merits of the conclusions arrived at, in regard to the 
causes of the changes which have occurred at the harbour of Toronto, and of the pro- 
bable results of the remedial works herein proposed, I will be pardoned for explaining 
the manner in which the waves affect the eand and other materials composing the 
bottom of seas, lakes, etc. 

A simple illustration of the action of waves on the surface of very deep water can 
be made by tightly stretching a long cord between two points and then striking it 
near ono end. The wave produced oy the blow travels rapidly back and forth along 
the cord from end to end, but the material of which the cord is made simply rises and 
falls without advancing with the wave. So it is with the water where the lake is 
deep. The wave may pass ever so rapidly, but it cannot of itself set up any conti- 
nuous horizontal motion in the water. A bird or a buoy afloat upon it would simply 
rise and fall as the waves passed under it. At the same time it would have a slight 
motion to and fro in the direction the wavesjare travelling but unless impelled by 
the wind or a current in the lake, it would remain in the same locality. The case is 
quite different, however, when the wave reaches water so shoal that the bottom resists 
the sinking of its crest. When this resistance is felt, the water which at that moment 
constitutes the wave, has, as a result of this resistance and of its own momentum, a 
horizontal motion imparted to it. This horizontal impulse becomes still greater as 
the depth lessens. Hence, although the velocity of the wave itself is diminished as it 
reaches shoaler depths, the water through which it passes has aconstantlv increasing 
velocity imparted to it in the direction of the shore, and in the case of big waves it 
becomes so swifl tbat it is driven with great force out upon the beach. 

This translatory motion gives to the waves the power to take up from the sea 
bottom, or to set in motion, the sands, sheila and other materials of which it is coih- 
posed, and to transport them shoreward with more or less force. The quantities 
thus transported depend upon the size of the waves, the formation of the shore upon 
which they exert their force, and the size, gravity and abundance of the material 
acted upon. 

The direction of these translatory currents is determined by the shape of the sea 
bottom. If the shore be precipitous, very little or no stich current will be created ; 
but where the bottom is sloping to the sea, the waves will bo constantly directed 
shorewards, no matter how obliquely they may approach it Hence waves on such 
shores are continually piling up reefs and beaches, and through some of these every 
river must struggle to reach the sea, unless it enters it between bold headlands, and 
is incapable of transporting enough detritus to form a delta at its mouth ; or unless 
some sea current exist eufficiently strong to sweep away the sedimentary matter 
brought down by it. Of course the height of the wave determines the depth at 
whiCn the resistance of the bottom is felt, and at which the horizontal motion of the 
water is first induced. This depth will therefore be the extreme limit at which the 
material of the bottom can be set in motion by the wave. A study of the surveys 
which have been made on the western shore of the isthmus at Toronto satisfies me 
that the waves which roll in upon it arc not large enough to move the sand when 
the water is over 18 feet deep. I can discover no evidence that the bottom has been 



82 [1882] 

disturbed at a greater depth there during eixf-y-throe years ; and the area within 
which the waves are formed that break upon it forbids the belief, that they are large 
enough to affect the bottom at a greater c^pth. The magnitude of a wave does not 
depend so much upon the force of the wind as upon the ** fetch " or distance through 
which it can travel without interruption, and ^the depth of the water on which it 
moves. 

Waves travel much more rapidly in deep than in shallow water. This is 
the cause of the phenomenon called " breakers/' As each wave approaches still 
shallower water, its speed becomes still more retarded, hence the wave behind is 
always moving more rapidly than the one in advance. As it gains upon its pre- 
decessor it gets the benefit of the deeper water of that wave, The result of this is 
that at regularly recurring intei-vals or rhythmic periods, oneof the waves completely 
overtakes the one in front of it, by which it secures for itself a still greater depth and 
maintains the velocity due to that depth. This enables it to travel so rapidly over 
the one is has surmounted, that it outstrips it in the race and consequently falls over 
in front of it, or, as it is termed, " breaks." 

The wave has more ability to carry the sand up on to the beach than it has to 
bring it down again notwithstanding the slope of the shore. This is because the 
ratio of frictional resistance of the shore increases as the depth of the water passing 
over it is diminished, and alsi because the material carried up on to the beach, is 
almost wholly suspended in the water. The interval of time required for the shore* 
ward current to come to rest and for the return current to be started, is sufficient to 
permit the sand to fall to the shore, from which the leas rapid current seaward is 
unable to move it. 

A very important part of the study of our problem is involved in the inquiry as 
to whether the portion of the isthmus now constituting an island is undergoing any 
serious alteration in its size. Is it being added to ? or is it diminishing ? We know 
that its form has been altered to the serious injury of the channel, by the extension 
of the peninsula northward. It is a matter of great importance to know whether 
the material which has been added to the end of the peninsula in the last 63 years 
has been brought from Humber Bay, Scarborough Heights or elsewhere, or whether 
its has been transported from the southwestern portion of the peninsula itself. 

If it has been brought from the eastern shore of the Lake, f I'om Humber Bay or 
Niagara, we must look for an annual contribution of the same kind indefinitely, from 
such foreign source, and this fact would thrust into any plan for the improvement of 
the Western entrance, a very embarrassing element. This material would accu* 
mulate about the entrance to our works, to such an extent as to need annual dredging 
and probably an extension of the necessary piers from time to time. With such a 
prospect I should not hesitate to advise that the western entrance be abandoned and 
that the remedial treatment, although much more expensive, be at once applied to 
the eastern gap. It is, however, only necessary to make an approximate estimate of 
the amount of material which has been removed from the western face of the penin- 
Bula, near Gilbraltar Point, northward and within a distance of about 2,000 feet west- 
ward from Ui^ present m:tigin, to know that the immense quantity of sand which 
i.!ovored the lake bottom over this area in 1818, and which has now been removed by 
wave action, vvas quite t^ufUcient to have transferred the crest of the peninsula, 1700 
feet wos*twai*d in Ibe t*bnllow depths then existing, and to have added to its length 
all of the muieriiit whioU it has received during the last 63 years, without any con- 
tri bill ion from iorei^^u ftourees, 

I have made fiotnc approximate estimates of the quantity of sand which has 
been removed from lhi& area during the last sixty-three years. On the large chart 
accompanying this ref>ort, which is a copy of the survey made by M!r. F. M. Hamel in 
1881j will be found a line drawn from the light-house to the Queen's wharf, with four 
lines at rijs:ht anglai to it. These are designated as " A.B." " CD." « B. F." 
and '^ (r.H/Mn comparing the sections, as nearly as possible with those similarly 
locatoi on Bayflell'a t hni t, I find that south of line " A.B." in the last 63 years there 
have been removed ahont ijix million cubic feet. Between lines " A.B." and " CD,'* 




[1882J 83 

filzteen zniilion two hundred and fifty thousand feet. Between " C. D." and " E. F.'^ 
eighteen million, seven hundred and fifty thousand feet. Between ** E.F." and "G.H."^ 
five million one hundred thousand feet, and north of line '' G. H/' one million, four 
handred thousand cubic feet, making in all, forty-seven million,five hundred thousand 
cubic feet ; or, one million, seven hundred and sixty thousand cubic yards. This 
is at the rate of about twenty-eight thousand cubic yards per annum ; an amount 
imply sufficient to account for the northward growth of the peninsula and likewise 
for the westward advance of the crest of it. The data are not sufficient to enable me 
to determine what amount of it has been deposited to the eastward of the line 
between the Queen's wharf and the light-house, but it is evident from the foregoing 
that no addition from any foreign source has been made to the northern and western 
face of the peninsula since Bayfield's survey. The changes which have occurred on 
the weetem face of it, give substantial assurance of the permanency of the western 
entrance to the harbour, if it be located in accordance with the recommendations 
hereinafter made. 

No grain of sand rests upon any part of the shores of the peninsula, or in the 
channel, that was not brought to its present resting place by a current of water 
which loft it there because it was not able to move it farther. The slope of the shore 
is therefore the result of an equilibrium between the force of the currents which 
sweep over it, and of the opposing force of gravity in the sand. The slope which 
the shore assumes under these different forces is termed in technical parlance, its 
" angle of repose." Owing to the greater mobility of the sand when saturated, this 
angle is flatter or lower on the submerged part of the shore than on the dry reefs or 
beaches. When a broad channel is exposea to storms and is swept by violent waves 
in different directions, the bottom becomes still flatter. Hence tne angle of repose 
assumed, is so low that any natural channel through such deposits on the sea coast, 
mi«8t possess great width if it have any considerable depth in its central part. This 
will be better seen when it is remembered that it is about 1,200 feet from the shore 
line on the westeiii face of the peninsula out to IG feet of water, although this shore 
is under the influence of wave action which is quite favorable for the maintenance of 
a steep angle of repose. A natural channel therefore, if formed of the same materials 
which I assume to be almost wholly of sand, would, if it were possible to have its 
opposite shores swept by similar waves, require to be 2,400 feet wide to maintain a 
central depth of 16 feet. In a narrow and sheltered channel the sand would maintain 
an angle of from four to six horizontal, to one vertical, or about eleven degrees. The 
perimeter of the cro^s section of a channel swept only by currents moving in direc- 
tion parallel to its axis, conforms very nearly to the arc of a circle. 

The ability of a river to carry the detritus with which its water is charged, is 
<lne to the velocity of the current. When it reaches the sea the current subsides, and 
the sediment, before held in suspension, is deposited. The sea waves leach out by 
continual agitation the argilaceous and other lighter portions of these deposits, while 
the sand, gravel and heavier materials are left to dam back the river and form the 
foundations upon which it in turn builds up its bank still further out. Their low 
slopes defy the fury of the waves, and if any littoral Tor shore) current prevails in 
the sea where the river is thusextemiing its banks, this current carries the river 
deposits to the leeward, builds up tnat bank more rapidly than the other and compels 
the discharge finally to flow in almost direct opposition to the prevailing sea current. 
In this way a river will extend its banks out many miles into the sea, its direction 
being determined by the littoral current or by the prevailing winds. The Mississipi 
has thus extended its length about sixty miles out into the Gulf of Mexico beyond 
the present shore lines of the gulf, and its course has been almost directly against 
the direction of the prevailing winds. As the river extends itself into the sea, its 
banks on the mainland are continually being raised by the annual overflows. These 
deposit the heavier materials carried by the current close to the river, while the 
lighter portion, which takes longer to settle, is carried back to the swamp lands. In 
this way many silt bearing streams, the Mississipi, the Ehine, and the JPo, for ins- 



S4 [1882] 

tance, have, as they approach the sea, build up their banks many feet higher than 
the lands on each side of the river. 

The direction which rivers take when their channels are bailt out in the sea, is 
frequently such as to almost completely enclose en tensive bays. After such ^rooes* 
has been carried out to a greater or less distance in the sea, the height of the river on 
the main land becomes so great that a breach finally occurs in the seaward bank 
during some extraordinary flood, and the river then takes the shorter way throngb. 
it to the sea. In such case the channel which it had constructed below the breach is 
abandoned. Being no longer a conduit for the fluvial current, it is filled up by the 
action of the waves, and at the same time the height of its banks is reduced to the 
sea level or below it, and what the river constructed finally becomes the foundation 
of a peninsula, on which every evidence of the fluvial channel above the sarface of 
the sea, is completely obliterated. The Vistula, Adour, and Senegal, are among the 
numerous examples of rivers forming such new outlets to the sea, many miles above 
their former mouths. The long, narrow peninsulas which separate the Frisches Haff 
^nd the Curisches Haff in Eastern Prussia from the Baltic, no doubt had their origin 
in the extensions of the Vistula and Pregel into that sea. 

A peninsula thus formed, having its axis parallel to the prevailing wind?, 
receives constant additions by wave action upon its extremity, which continues to 
<5xtend it, generally, though not always, against the wind. If a constant current of 
the sea sweep along its side in the direction of the end of the peninsula, the accretiona 
thrown up by the waves in storms on the side of it, are gradually transported along 
in calmer weather, toward its extremity. The side is thus kept steeper and pre- 
vented from widening, while the sands thus removed fall to the bottom again in the 
more sluggiah current or eddy, which exists at the end of the peninsula. Here an 
extensive shoal forms during the calmer weather, to be afterwards thrown up on it 
by the force of the waves. The sandy breakwaters which enclose the long series of 
extensive sounds on the coast of Virginia, the Carolinas and Florida, are examples ol 
this kind of peninsula formation. The same process is carried on in tideless seas, 
though not in such vast extent. The Baltic, Mediterranean, Black Sea and the Great 
Lakes present many examples of such phenomena. 

The sea currents almost invariably carry more or less sand along the shores, and 
thus furnish the material for the waves to extend the peninsulas. If the source of 
supply of this material be from any cause exhausted, the growth of the peninsula 
becomes checked. In such case the long, low slope at the end if the peninsula, under 
the influence of the waves, may not only bo thrown up against it and be great! j 
steepened, but the end of the peninsula may be made by such influences to change ita 
direction under the oblique force of the waves, in the manner of the Toronto peninsula. 
An example of a peninsula built out from a headland many miles across a large bay, 
and stopped in its growth when only half way across, may be seen in the Gulf of 
Danzig in the Baltic. 

The longitudinal growth of a peninsula is chocked when it approaches a headland 
of the main shore, by the pulsations which occur in the basin or harbour enclosed by 
it. Where tidal action exists the basin is filled and emptied twice a day ^ through 
the channel between the end of the peninsula and the mainland, and the farther 
encroachment of the peninsula upon this channel* is arrested by the currents which 
sweep through it upon every ebb and flow of the tide. The higher the tide rises, 
and the bigger the basin which is filled and emptied, the greater will be the magnitude 
of the channel thus maintained. When the peninsula nas reduced the width of the 
channel to the size absolutely required for the entrance and exit of the tidal water, 
the channel becomes permanent. 

As the magnitude of a channel thus formed is wholly dependent upon the quantity 
of water which flows through it, it is evident that the quantity must be diminished if 
a breach occurs in the peninsula, as a portion of the water which would otherwise 
servo to maintain the channel and stop the growth of the peninsula is lost through 
the breach. 

NoTi.— The Gulf of Mexico is an excepiioQ to this rale : the tide there rises but once a diy. 



[1882J » 



I think it altogether likely that the Toronto peninsula had its origin in aD 
extension of the Biver Don westwardly from the sonth western point of Ashbridge's 
marsh. It is not necessary to sustain sach hypothesis, that its ancient channel 
should have extended throngh any considerable length of the peninsula. The root of 
the peninsula being thus formed throughout a distance of a few hundi*ed feet, would 
be a sufficient nucleus upon which the waves and the current of the lake would 
concentrate a great part of the sand lying within a few miles of it in water less than 
eighteen feet deep. To do this the easterly gales doubtless contributed a large 
portion of the detritus from the ancient Scarborough Heights. The prevalence of the 
(U)uthwe6ter]y gales will explain the cause of the change of direction which the 
peninsuhi has taken at Gibraltar Point without the Don having ever extended its 
channel through that part of the peninsula. To the wave action resulting from 
easterly storms must he attributed the constant growth of the eastern end of the 
island. This growth will bo seen by a comparison of the last survey with those of 
older date. 

It is not, however, necessary to penetrate the mystery which]enfolds the creation 
of the peninsula. Its continual advancement to the northward conclusively demon- 
strates the fact that the filling and emptying of Toronto harbour under the induenoe 
of the winds, the rise and fall of the lake and the discharge of the Don, have not 
been sufficient to arrest the growth of the peninsula in this direction, and the breach 
atPrivat'a Hotel which occurred about thirty years ago has made the currents 
through the main channel since then, still more impotent to check its northward 
advance. 

It is exceedingly difficult to declare with any certainty what is the greatest 
magnitude of channel that can be maintained permanently through the main entrance 
to uie harbour without dredging, even if the eastern gap were closed. The annual 
rise and fall of the lake is a very slow process as well as a very irregular one and 
produces but little current through this channel. The rise and fall of the water in 
the harbour under the action of the winds and storms is the chief source to which we 
must look for the necessary force of current to maintain the channel. 

With a tidal basin regularly filled and emptied every day, and a permanent 
cross-section of channel as a resultant to ffuide him, the engineer can calculate with 
great accuracy the increased depth which he can secure by the construction of 
parallel works to reduce its natural width ; but at Toronto the facts prove that the 
dimensions of the main channel are not permanent, nor are they wholly 
the results of the currents passing through it but of the incomplete inclosure of the 
barbonr by the peninsula. In other words, the wedtern channel was originally an 
opeo roadstead. The peninsula has been, and is now, gradually converting it into a 
channel of permanent dimensions. If this natural process proceeds, it will reduce its 
dimeosions to those which the tidal action or pulsations of the basin enclosed by it, 
absolutely require for the exit and entrance of the lake water. It will then preserve 
that size with comparative permanence. Such channel, uninfluenced by artificial 
causes, would be shallow and wide, owing to the low angle of repose which the sands 
that form its bed naturally assume. If this process were completed, the engineer 
would know by the natural cross-section of channel permanently established, what 
additional depth could be secured and maintained through the works he would build 
to contract it; because the tidal action will insure the maintenanceof a cross-sectional 
area sufficient for its accommodation, and, if he contracts that area in width, 
the tidal force will recover a portion of it by increasing the depth through the works, 
nntil such area of cross-section is made large enough to establish a new condition of 
equilibrium or permanence, between the force of the current and the resisting forces 
of friction of the bed and the ^avity of the materials of which it is formed. Nothing 
Bhort of some unusual convulsion of nature coull close up the channel between the 
lake and a basin so large as the Toronto Harbour, if but one channel existed. If 
instead of one there were many into the harbour, they would each be shoalor, and 
in such case, a long continuance of a low lake level, would make them a'l unusually 



86 [1882] 



fihallow, aud render them liable to be shut np by wave action which would thus con- 
vert the harbour into a lake. 

We have, however, in the comparatively stable condition of the inferior channel 
through the breltch a reliable basis for the l)elief that a channel of sufficient width and 
depth for the commercial wants of Toronto can be permanently maintained without 
dredging, simply by the currents resulting from the oscillations of the water in the 
harbour, if but one channel be permitted* The channel through this gap has now a 
central depth of about four and a half feet and a surface width' of about nineteen 
hundred feet, when the level of the lake is at zero of the gauge. This is equivalent to 
tt cross-sectional area of nearly four thousand feet or of a channel two hundred feet 
wide and twenty feet of central depth. This channel has been maintained wholly by 
the carreots that pass through it. If the main entrance were completely closed it i8 
safe to assert that it would have been much deeper and proportionately wider. 

If it be supposed that the channel through the breach nas been maintained by a 
curi*ont sweeping through it, and through the western entrance, at the same time and 
in the same direction, that is to say, in through one and out at the other, and not by 
currents induced by the pulsations of the harbour, it is to be answered that saoh a 
current would not nave the velocity of those currents which result from maximnm 
differences of level between the surface of the harbour and that of the lake. A wind 
blowing continuously from the southeast would have the effect of creating a oarrent 
through the gap which would flow out of the western entrance, but the same wind 
would raise the level in Humber Day at the same time and thus check, if it did not 
completely arrest such current. The strongest currents which would flow throngb 
the gap, without establishing a counter under-current would probably be induced by 
winds from the south or southwest. These would elevate the surface in Humber Bay 
to a greater degree than at the gap. Their effect upon the water on the south shore 
of the peninsula would be to create )a current, towards Scarborough Heights, without 
materially affecting the level of the surface at the gap. Storms from the east nndoubt^ 
edly have the effect of creating considerable current tnrough the gap into the harbour. 
I am of opinion, however, that currents thus created through the gap cannot have the 
velocity and scouring power which the under-currents hereafter referred to would 



The currents which are induced by a rapid rise or fall of the lake, will have their 
velocities determined by the slope of suiface through the channel, (or fall per mile,) 
and by the amount of frictional resistance of the bed of the channel. It is evident 
that when an alteration occurs between the surface levels of the lake and the harbour, 
the steepness of the slope through the channel will be increased in proportion as its 
length is diminished. The slope of the surface creates the current and the friotion 
retards it ; hence it is of prime importance that the channel be kept as short as 
possible. When the currents are the result of winds prevailing for several days io a 
direction to fill or empty the harbour an under-current must always exist through 
the channel in an opposite direction to that which is seen on its surface, provided all 
other openings from the lake into the harbour be closed. 

It IS impossible for an east wind to sweep over the harbour for an entire day 
without creating an outward surface current tnrough the proposed channel, supposing 
the breach at Privates Hotel and all communication with Ashbridge'e bay to ha^e 
been clossed. This current will continue to exist so long as the friction of the air sets 
the surface water in the harbour and channel in motion, and it is impossible that the 
water should continue for any considerable length of time to flew out of the harbour 
in the direction of the wiad, without lowering its surface level. A counter current 
of equal intensity will then be created below the surface current in the channel. 
This under-current will be the result of hydrostatic pressure induced by the greater 
height of surface outside of the harbour. 

X should hesitate to advise the consti*uction of a channel of greater dimensions 
than three hundred feet in width and a central depth of eighteen feet below the present 
datum plane, although I am not prepared to say that one of greater size cannot be 
maintained without dredging after it be once completed. 



[1882] 8T 

A cbaDnel oi tho dimensions named can be constructed either at the breach on the 
peninsnla, or at the western entrance to the hai hour, with nearly eqaal assurance of 
ita permanence. The question therefore, as to which locality shall be selected for the 
channel, should be determined mainly by the i*elative advantages which each would 
poeseas for navigation, and the relative cost of each. These are both decidedly in 
mvor of the western location. 

So far as to the safety and ease With which vessels could enter either one of these 
channels during bad weather, there can be no doubt that the preference is most 
decidedly in favor of the western entrance. Owing to its peculiai* position, this 
entrance is completely protected from storms fVom every quarter e^ccept the south- 
west. To connect the deep water on the two sides of the peninsula by the shortest 
route, requires the location of a channel nearly parallel to the direction of these 
storms; therefore vessels arriving in such weather, would be nble to ^ail directly into 
the channel and proceed at once to the harbour. 

I have laid dfown upon the general chart of the hs^rbour, (No. 1), tho linos upon 
which the works that would be required for the impix>voment of the eastern gap 
should be located, if such improvements were deemed more desirable that that of the 
western entianee. These are shown in dotted lines, and will be readily found on the 
map. Where these lines are double, the works would need to be equally as strong 
and costly as the breakwater required on the south side of tho western entrance. In 
addition to the works at the gap, its improvement would necessitate the complete 
closure of the western entrance by a dyke from the Queen s wharf to the end of the 
peninsula, as shown also with dotted lines. , 

On compai'ing the length of these several lines of works with those hereinafter 
recommended, (the location of which is shown in solid lines on the map,) it will be 
seen that the improvement of the eastern gap would require 4,840 linear feet of heavy 
work, including 400 feet of the Queen's wharf dyke, and 6,2z0 linear feet of light 
work ; while the western entrance will require only 2,745 linear feet of heavy work ; 
and only 7,403 linear feet of light work. 

In this comparison it is assumed that 800 feet of the landward end of the break- 
water, and 1,040 feet of the Queen's wharf dyke, will be of light work. Therefore 
:5,095 feet less of heavy work, and 1,123 feet more of light work, will be required to 
improve the western entrance. 

The amount of dredging required to make the eastern channel, would likewise 
be greater than that needed at the western entrance. With such an enormous diffe- 
rence in the extent of the works and because of the other decided advantages in favor 
of the western entrance, I have deemed it unnecessary to prepare detail plans for the 
improvement oi the eastern gap. They would only be useful in determming accura- 
tely the difference in the cost of each entrance. Whereas, if the ea&tern one cost no 
more, I should be unwilling to give it the preference. 

If the channel were located at the gap it would need to be about 700 feet longer 
than the western channel, and the currents through it would therefore be less rapid 
than through the western one under the same conditions of wind and and tide. Hence 
they would not maintain a channel of as great a width and depth as the western one. 
I should not, however, expect to find much difference in them from the injurious 
effect of wave action at their lake entrances, because either one selected for improve- 
ment must first be dredged to the maximum depth required, and as this would be a 
depth at which there would bo little or no disturbance of the bottom at the end of the 
channel by wave action, there need but little fear that either channel would 
require dredging as a retuit of wave be action alone. The lake currents, howcTcr, 
carry more or less sand in suspension, and if this be carried into a channel of greater 
dimensions than the tidal action or pulsations of the harbour demand, they will be 
deposited in it and will gradually diminish its size to that which can be permanently 
maintained by the maximum currents through the channel. 

To attempt to utilize the present western channel would involve the removal of 
a large amount of stone by blasting to obtain a sufficient depth, and would moreover 
require tho channel to bo crooked, in as much as the western end of it would neces- 



[1882] 



sarily have to be corvod to the south west to reach the deep water of the lake. Thus 
located it would require to be very considerably longer than a straight cut across the 
peninsula. This greater length, and its curvature would be very oj^eotionable. The 
greater length would increase the friction of the currents flowing through the 
channel and therefore diminish their velocity* The curvature would diminish their 
velocity still more, by checking the momentum of the water. 

I am confident that a channel 300 feet wide between parallel works, at the w^tero 
end of the harbour, with a central depth of 18 feet below the present zero or datum 
plane, can, when once established by dredging, be afterwanis maintained by the 
natural currents through it, if it be located across the northern end of the peuin&ula 
between the lines, shown in the accompanying chart (No. 1), provided all other 
communication between the lake and the harbour be completely closed. 

I have the honor to submit the following 

EECOMMENDATIONS. 

1. The closure of the Eastern Gap with a dike of sheet piling, protected on Ihe 
sea side against undermining, with brush acd stone. 

2. The construction of a breakwater and the necessary parallel works to protect 
and maintain a channel 300 feet wide and 18 feet deep across the northern end of the 
peninsula, to connect the deep water of the harbour with the deep water of the lake. 

3. The excavation of the necessary depth and width of channel through the 
parallel works, after they shall have been constructed. 

4. Theclosureof the present western channel, afler the new shall have beea 
sufficiently developed to afford equal facilities for commerce, by the construction of a 
dvke from the western end of the Queen's wharf to the northern jetty of the new 
channel. 

5. The closure of all communication between the harbour and Ashbridge*s Bay, 
with a dike of light sheet piling or one of earth, three feet above the present datum 
plane, or zero or the guage. 

All of these works except those necessary to completely separate the harboor 
from Ashbridge's Bay, should be located and constructed in accordance with the 
plans and specifications herewith submitted. The closure of the Eastern Gap, and 
the construction of the breakwater and channel works, should be executed at the 
same time to secure the earliest benefit of the proposed improvement. If this be not 
done, I would then recommend the construction of the cnannel works and break- 
water first, and the closure of the gap while the new channel is being dredged out 
I do not think the diversion of the I>on into Ash bridge's Bay necessary, except as a 
sanitary measure. So far as this would affect the channel and harbour, it is probable 
that the injury which may be done by the small quantity of sediment that the Don 
brings into the harbour, will bo compensated for by the increased current it will give 
through the channel when in flood.. Should it be found a few years after the proposed 
works are completed that its deposits are injuriously affecting the depth of the har- 
bour, it can then be diverted into Ashbridge's Bay, if it shall not have been pre- 
viously done for sanitary rcasors. It is quite probable that the closure of the Eastern 
gap and the growth of the city will soon make such diversion of the Don imperative 
as a means of promoting the public health. 

Plans are not submitted for the dyking to separate Asbbridge's Bay from the 
harbour, because this work will be of a simple character, and comparatively inex- 
pensive. I would recommend that its construction be open to competition, wiih the 
understanding that each bidder submit with his proposal the plan by which he intends 
to execute it, leaving to the Chief Engineer the selection of the best and cheapest 
proposal. This work will be exposed to very little servitude if it be sufficiently 
distant from the shore line of the harbour to be safe from floating ice The greater 
portion of the marsh near the harbour shore is probably already 3 feet above zero, 
thus leaving only the sloughs to be closed. In any event the cost of the necessary 
work here will not probably exceed five thousand dollars. 



It 



[1882] 



If the oloenre of the Baatern gap be executed in accordance with the Bpecifica" 
tions and plans herewith submitted, lam of opinion that a sand beach will be formed 
in front or the dyke before the parts of it exposed to decay will be destroyed, and 
that no expenditure for the maintenance ef the dyke will bo required. The totak 
estimated cost of the works recommended is $260,693.85. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, with great respect, 
Tour obedient serrant, 

JAS. B. BADS. 
St. Louis, Mo., March 4th, 1882. 

Him. Sir H. L. Lanoevin, K.C.M.G.Jp.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Canada. 



MBMOBAKDUM. 



ToBONTo Harbour, Ontario. 

Toronto, formerly York, is situated on the northern shore of Lake Ontario, in* 
lat 43* 38' 10" N., and tong. '79'' 23' 45" W., 333 miles by rail southwest from 
Montreal, 161 miles from Kingston, and 39 miles north by east from Hamilton. ^ 

The harbour is formed inside of the Island, and has its principal entrance from 
the westward. An entrance known as the ' Eastern Gap' has existed for some years, 
but^ owing to its shallowness, is not used by steamers or sailing craft of large aimen- 
siona. At the north-eastern corner the Don empties; and tiie eastern side is bounded 
by marshy lands of many acres in extent, which separate it from Ashbridge's Bay. 

In 1788 this harbour was minutely described by J. Collins, Deputy Surveyor 
General, in a report presented to Lord Dorchester, Governor General, on the Military 
Posts and Harbours on I^kes Ontario, Erie and Huron. Mr. Collins stated it to lie 
*' near two miles in length from the entrauce on the west to the isthmus between it 
and a large morass on the eastward. The breadth of the entrance is about half a 
mile, but the navigable channel for vessels is only about 500 yards, having from 
three to three and a half fathoms water. T.e north or main shore, the whole length 
of the harbour, is a clay bank from twelve to twenty feet high, and gradually rising^ 
behind, apparently good lan4 and fit for settlement. The water is rather shoal near 
the shore, naving out one fathom depth at one hundred yards distance, two fathoms 
at two hundred yards; and when I soanded here the waters of the lake were very 
high." (" Toronto of Old," by Dr. Scadding, p. 16.) 

The first survey of the harbour was made by Bouchette in 1793, and a copy of 
his pla;i is attached hereto. 

In his work on the *' British Dominions in North America," published in 1832, 
Mr. Bouchette describee the harbour of Toronto as follows : — (Vol 1, p. 88.) 

" The harbour of York is nearly circular, and formed by -a very narrow penin- 
sula stretch! Qg from the western extremity of the Township of Scarborough in an 
oblique direction for about si^c miles, and terminating in a curved point nearly oppo- 
site the garrison, thus enclosing a beautifdl basin about a mile and a half in diameter, 
capable of containing a great number of vessels, and at the entrance of which ships 
may remain with safety during the winter. The formation of the peninsula itself is 
extraordinary, being a narrow slip of land, in several places not more than sixty 
yards in breadth, but widening towards its extremity to neai'ly a mile; it is princi- 
pally a bank of sand, h lightly overgrown with grass; the widest part is very 
ouriously intersected by many large ponds that are the continual resorts of large^ 
quantities of wild fowl; a few trees scattered upon it greatly increase the singularity 



L1882] 



of iU appearanoe, it Hm to low that tho wide expanse of Lake Ontario is seen over 
H ; the termioation of the peoinBula is called Gibraltar Point, whore a Uock^hoase 
baa been ereoted. A light-house at the western extremity of the beach has rendered 
the Aooeas to the harboor safely practicable by night. The eastern part of the har- 
bour is bounded by an extensive marsh through which the Biver Don runs before it 
-discharges itself into the babin." 

'< JNo place in either province has made so rapid a progress as York. In the year 
Vl93 the spot on which it stands presented only one solitary Indian wigwam; in the 
•ensuing spring it was selected by Governor Simcoe as^the seat of Government for 
Upper Canada." 

With the growth of the population and the clearinK and cultivation of the aor- 
rounding lands, and notably the disappearance of the Scarborough Heights to the 
eastward, from whence was derived tne materials forming the peninsula, changes 
were soon apparent in the state of the harbour, and the necessity ror its preservation 
^arly engaged the attention of those who were interested in its maintenance and 
improvement. They viewed with alarm the changes which had taken place in the 
-dimensions of the peninsula, and the encroachment of tho shoal from Gibraltar Point 
northward, to the great detriment of the entrance, and so early as 1833, as appean 
by the journals^ Upper Canada Legislatui'e, 1833-34, a select Committee reported on 
•certain reports submitted by Captain fitchardson and Captain (afterwards Sir) B. H. 
Bonnycastle, Boyal Bngineers, on its preservation. CApp p. I, et seq.) 

The Commissioners in their report recommended the construction of a work 
eirtendiog from the island along the top of the shoal to the booy, in a manner to 
continue the island to the brink of the channel opposite the present pier (Queen's 
Wharf), contracting the channel to about 700 feet in width; and also to prevent the 
waters of the Don m>m entering the harbour. C App. p. 2.) 

Captain Biohardson's letter is but an amplinoation of the views of the^Gommis- 
sioners, of which he was one. 

The opinions entertained by Captain (afterwards Sir Biobard) Bonnycastle to 
make the harbour a secure and effeotu^ one for large steamers and deep draught 
vessels were divided by him into three general propositions : — 

lat That of damming up the western estuaries of the Don; 

2nd. The opening a passage through the eastern end of the peninsula ; and 

3rd. The construction of a breakwater from the shore at the westom entrance 
with works over the whole length of the shoal from Gibraltar Point, to confine the 
western entrance. 

Sir Bichard proceeded to debate the first proposition and arrived at the conola- 
aion that it did not signify whether the breaches which the Don had made into tiie 
harbour be closed or not, and believed that the river is useftil in a very slight 
degree. 

With respect to the second proposition he plainly stated that if an opening be 
made through the beach the haroour would be entirely destroyed, and if it be done 
extensive works must be run out into the lake, etc., to arrest and retain the shingle 
which is Cwas) brought by the wasting away of the Scarborouffh Heights from tbe 
eastward, and so to prevent a silting up of the channel so formed ; but he feared that 
a naviffable channel could not be kept clear, aud that vessels would experience much 
difficulty during gales from the east around by the south to the west, in entering 
such a channel, and be summed up with the statement that there could not be any 
harm in making a small canal shut in by flood gates and protected by piers, and that 
under these restrictions no obstacle would be thrown in the way, and that it would 
be very useful for the purposes of trade. 

The third proposition is discussed at length, and the conclusion arrived at was 
that the western entrance should be protected and maintained. 

It appears that no action was in any way taken on this report^ and though tbe 
matter engaged attention, little or no regard was paid to the state of the harbour, 
though a Mr. Boy, C.£«, drew attention to its state in an article published in the 



[18S2] 91 



XmtUy Beview in June, 1841. Search and enquiry have failed to obtain a copy of 
this paper. 

Under date 4th Hay, 1847, Mr. C. S. Gzowski, then an engineer in the senrioe of 
the Department of Public Works, reported that the entrance had narrowed to 250 
feet in width, the bar having increased 280 feet in a northerly direction in seven 
years. (App. p. 17.) 

In 1860, Mr. Sandford Fleming, C.E., read a carefully prepared paper before the 
Canadian Institute, in which he entered fully and minutely into the theory of the 
formation of the peninsula, described the changes which it was constantly undergoing, 
and its great increase in area since Bonchette's survey in 1793, and he debated the 
propositions which had been made and concluded : 

1. That the foundation of the peninsula in its early stages may be attributed to 
the debris of the country traversed by the Don, in conjunction with a drift from an 
ancient promontory at Scarborough. 

2. That the more recent portions were formed by materials from the Scarborough 
Heights. 

3. That the formation is due to the travelling of the sand and gravel, under 
certain action of the waves. 

4. That the harbour was being impaired and its only entrance threatened with 
early destruction by the same cause. 

5. That its preservation may be permanently affected by the construction of 
certain specified works, at well selected points. 

6. That the waters of the Don should be permanently excluded. 

7. That the opening of an eastern passage would be a great accommodation to 
shipping ; might improve the purity of the water in the harbour ; and, if the neoeasary 
works to preserve it were properly executed, would havQ a beneficial effect. 

Early in 1852, Mr. Walter Shanly, C.B., at the request of the Harbour Mastw, 
submitted for the information of the Harbour Commissioners a report on the state of 
the channel and the improvements required. (App. p. 18.) In it be stated that 
from the observations and soundings recorded during twenty years by the Harbour 
Kaster it was ascertained that the oar had advanced northwardly across the entrance 
at the rate of 19 feet yearly, and that the available width of the channel was scarcely 
200 feet 

Mr. Shanly's theory of the formation of the peninsula is that the materials 
forming it were brought from the westward, and that the Don assisted as well, and 
he states that were the operations of Nature left unmolested, future generations 
might walk dry shod across to the outer lighthouse. 

The remedy he proposed was dredging and the construction of crib-work on the 
southern side of the channel to define and maintain its width ; and to divert the Don 
into Ashbridge's Bay. 

Mr. Kivas Tully, C.B., in a letter dated 10th February, 1853, discussed fully the 
need of permanently improving the harbour, alluded to the opening of a passage 
through the peninsula, now known as the Eastern Gap, and suggested its improvement 
frcm an economical point of view — 

1. On account of the saving of time'.to vessels arriving from or departing to the 
eastward, and 

2. The tendency of the current created to maintain an open harbour later in the 
fall and earlier in the spring. 

In the appendix, pase 22, will be found an able review from the journal of the 
Canadian Institute, vol. I, p. 162, of the letters and reports by Messrs. Bonnycastle, 
Shanly, Fleming and Tully. 

In 1850 the harbour was placed in commission. Captain Richardson being 
Harbour Master. This gentleman, in January, 1854, submitted to the Commissioners 
a report on the state and requirements of the harbour, and alluded to the manv 
changes which had taken place over a period of 50 years, and of the necessity which 
then existed for steps being taken toensure the preservation oi the western entrancs 

lO-IJ 



S2 [1882] 



io a navigable state, and to a depth of 14- feet and a width of 400 to 500 feot. Her 
alladud to a breach throui^b the peninsola to the eastward, near Privat'e Hotel,, 
which was then only 140 feet in width. Beference is made to an old chart of about 
1800, on which the western entrance was shown to be aboat 1,455 feet in width from* 
12 feet inshore to 12 feet on the bar, and that the soundings in the channel were 3 and 
3^ fathoms. (App. p. 27.) 

Thi§ report Dore fruit, for the Harbour Commissioners in Harch^ 1854, offered 
premiums for the three best reports on the means to be adopted for the preservation 
and improvement of the harbour, the points to be discussed oeing : — 

1. The effects, present or future, to be produced by the breach (Bastem Grap) 
through the peninsula on the harbour. 

2. If prejudicial, the means to be taken to strengthen the coast against further 
eocroachment. 

3. If beneficial, the proper mode of making it useful, and the cost of doing so.' 

4. The advisability of opening a passage i^tween the harbour and Ashbridge's 
Bay, or an opening from the last into the lake, with an estimate of cost 

These premiums were obtained by Messrs. Hind, Fleming and Tully, and an 
extra premium was awarded to Captain Bichardson for a report submitted by him. 

The reports were published at the expense of the Harbour Commissioners, and 
will be found in the Appendix, p. 30 et seq. They furnish a vast amount of informa- 
tion respecting the harbour, and discuss fully the questions submitted by the Commis- 
sioners. No attempt is made by the writer to condense the views and opinions 
expressed in these different reports, because to do so would necessitate the use of 
extended quotations, which is not within the province of this memorandum. 

No action was taken on any of the su^estions made by the writers of these 
reports as regards the construction of works; but it is gathered from subsequent 
reports by the Harbour Master — Captain Eichardson— that dredging plant was 
obtained and used to keep the western entrance from closing up. 

In 1856 it appears that the available width of the western entrance for deep 
draught vessels was only 260 or 270 feet, although dredging had been carried on for 
some time. At that date 400 feet was considered to bo the least width, and 12 feet 
the least depth, which should be obtained. (App. p. 94.) 

In his report for 1857, the Harbour Master states that many changes had been 
observed in the shape of the island ; and that the point bounding Blockhouse Bay on 
the western side had greatly increased northwardly. He alluded to damage done to 
the peninsula, that the embankment for its preservation was never finished, and did 
not advise its repair. (App. p. 95.) 

From the report of 1868, it is gathered that a breach had beonjeffectcd through 
the peninsula, and that the influx of water into the harbour from the eastward ^as 
deemed to be of great benefit. (App. p. y6.) 

At the end of 1859 the neck of land at the peninsula had ^disappeared, and a 
navigable channel with from 7 to 8 feet of water nad tjjken its place, and now forma- 
tions of sand on ejlher side appeared. (App. p. 98.) 

In the report of 1860 it is stated that the western entmnce having been dredged 
to 400 feet in width, and an average depth of 12 feet, both had been maintained; 
and that the island shoal had extended westwardly and threatened to encroach on the 
channel. The depth in the eastern channel was 6 feet. (App. p. 99.) . 

Capt. Bichardson, in his report for 1861, refers to the opening at the eastern end 
of (he harbour as having been the means of purifying the water in the harbour, and 
of contributing to the health of the city. 

The island shoal had extended further to the westward, and beyond the influence 
of the current deflected and guided by the Queen's Wharf, and the channel had been 
maintained at its width of 400 feet. (App. p. 100.) 

Mr. S. Kcefcr, then Deputy Commissioner of Public Works, in repoiiiing on a 
petition of the Council of the Corporation of the City of Toronto, that a survey of the 
harbour be made "with a view to ascertaining the cause of the dilapidations which 
have ali-eady taken place, and of devising some means of arresting iheir progress," 



[1882] 93 



vefers to the reports of the gentlemen who had in previoas years examined the har- 
boary and statea the results of his own ezaminationy and ndvised that a careful survejr 
should he made under the direction of an able hydraulic engineer, as ** the subject 
requires to be treated both theoretically and practically, with a view to the satisfao- 
tory delineation of the causes which have operated in the formation, but are now 
apparently directed to the destruction of the harbour ; as well as devising some plan 
^er directing them beneficially in future for its preservation and protection. Tho 
-problem not being easy of solution should therefore be committed to the ablest 
hands."* (App. p. 101.) 

No action was taken on this recommendation. 

The Harbour Master, in his report for the year 1862, stated that a bar of sand 
had grown up inside of the eastern entrance over which the water was shoaler than 
in the entrance itself. The " gap " or entrance had increased to half a mile in width, 
and the line of beach had so uur receded that a boiler of a wrecked steamer which 
-formerly was high and dry, was then 100 yards out in the lake and in deep water. 

At the western entrance the island shoal had extended to 300 feet west of the 
then west end of the Queen's Wharf, and had advanced northwardly 40 feet. (App* 
> 103.) 

Daring 1863, following the suggestions of the Harbour Master, the Queen's 
Wharf was extended westwardly 200 feet, and, up to the end of I8d4, a channel 400 
-feet in width, with a depth of 13 feet, had been secured. 

The bar inside ef the Eastern Ckip had been thrown farther into the harbour and 
had only 6 feet of water on it, thus limiting the passage to vessels of light draught, 
<App. p. 106.) 

In his report for 1865, Oaptain Bichardson stated that the Highlands of Scar- 
borouffh, the source from which the materials composing the peninsula and island 
were derived, no longer existed, and therefore a wasting away of the latter was 
^ingon. 

The western entrance maintained its width of 400 feet, and a depth varvin^ 
from 11^ to 14^ feet, according to the height of the water in the lake. The island 
shoal still progressed westwardly, and during 34 years had increased in width 700 
feet, or at the rate of 22 feet annually. ^App. p. 107.) 

Mr. Kivas Tully, Bngineer to the Harbour Board, reported that during 1866, 
the western entrance remained at 400 feet in width, which was due to the extension 
of the Queen's Wharf westwardly (App. 108) ; and, in his report for 1867, again 
referred to the westerly increase of the island shoal, and stated that " the formation 
west of Lighthouse Point had increased during the last few years, and an additional 
tongue or arm " (now Hanlan's Point, see plan showing changes in the harbour 
•during 1874, 1875 and 1879) <' had formed, which trends in a northerly direction 
about 300 yards west of the island, making another bay ; this formation no doubt 
will continue to increase." (App. p. 109^ 

This tongue, or arm, now known as Elanlan's Point, has increased up to 1880 
imtil it now extends northwardly beyond Gibraltar Point, and the shoal from it has 
been pushed forward yearlv until in 1875 it had narrowed the western entrance 
1o a width of 280 feet — see plan herewith. 

In 1876 a report (App. p. 100 et sea) was submitted to the Secretary of the 
Department of Public Works, by Mr. Wm. Kingsford, engineer in charge, who 
entered fully into the state and requirements of the harbour, and advised that tho 
Parliamentary grant of 120,000 should be expended in dredging, as << the jpresent 
approach to Toronto by deep water necessitates an abrupt turn to enter the " Queen's 
Wnarf Channel." In the improvemeot contemplated, easy entrance and egress 
should be secured ; " and that " the increased navigation of the canal system of the 
Dominion points out that the entrance shoald ultimately be 16 feet deep." 

Between 1st July, 1874, and 30th June, 1880, tho sum of $49,120.90 had been 
*The date of this report f boald be 1S63, laatead of lS7i, as printedU 



$4 .[1«82.] 

expended, principally in increosing the width and depth oi the "Queen'0 Wharf' 
Channel." Shortly after dredf^ing was commencen it w^ foand that, to obtain a depth 
of 16 feet at low water, it would bo neocasHry to blast in solid ledge, and to a certain 
extent this was done. No attempt was made to atraighten the abrupt turn, or 
to render the channel any easier for entrance or exit, the object being the opening c^ 
a channel 300 feet in width 111 ith 16 feet of water on the old course. 

Oa the plan of the western entrance herewith will be seen the encroachment 
of the point of the shoal northwardly, and the width of the navigable channel in 
1863, 1875, ISId and 1880. 

A plan of the harbour is attached, showing its state in 1841 (7), and it may be 
compiM^'ed with that showing the changes observed in the eastern and western 
entrances in the years 18*74, 18*75 and 1879. 

At the Session of Parliament of 1880, the aum of $12,500 was appropriated for 
expenditure In this harbour, part of that amount to be expended in dredging ihe 
weetem entrance, which in tbe spring of 1880, had been narrowed to 280 feet by the 
growth of the island shoal northward. 

As the present entrance has been pronounced to be abrupt, and it is ^own that 
to obtain a aepth of 16 feet at low water would necessitate tne removal of it large 
quantity of solid rook at a very great expense, it was judged tiiat — as in former 
years the entrance was some 500 yards in width with deep water, a comparatively 
straight cut might be made through the point of the shoal, and a depth of 16 feet 
obtained without touching the rock. A line of easy entrance fVom 18 feet outside to 
the same depth inside was laid out, and a series of borings made showed that a depth 
of 17 feet below zero of the gauge on the Queen's Wharf could be had without the 
removal of any rook. This line is about 700 feet to the southward of the Queen's 
Wharf, and dredging operationa have been commenced in the removal of the point of 
the shoal northward or this line. The material to be removed is fine sand. — 

It has been deemed desirable to include in the Appendix a letter by Mr. J. G. 
Worts, the Chairman of the Harbour Board (p. 115), and also the petitions to His 
Excellency the Governor General fh>m the Uayor and Corporation of the City of 
Toronto, and the Harbour Commissioners, praying that steps be taken by the Fedeial 
Government to protect the harbour and preserve it for the future (p» 1 17, 6^ seq.) 

As, throughout the whole of the reports published in the Appendix^ constant 
reference is made to the height of water in Lake Ontario, and the effects its variation 
periodically has had upon the changes which have taken place in the peninaulfi, 
BOW island, bounding the harbour on the south, and in the harbour itself, there W 
been attached an article from the ^* Canadian Journal," vol. 2, entitled '* Yariatio(kS 
in the Level of the Lakes," which may not be out qf place in connection with the 
objectof this memorandum. Through the courtesy of Mr. Kivaa Tally, C.B., who 
as Harbour Engineer has an intimate acquaintance with the harbour, and the maoy 
changes which have taken place during very many years, permission has been givea 
to attach a copy of his paper on '< The Fluctuations of Ijake Ontario from H^ year 
1854 to 1878," and of the chart prepared to accompany it. (App. p. 132). 

The writer believes that he has touched upi>n the salient pointa of the reports 
and documents which have been gathered and printed herewith. That it has doqu 
ahown that in early daya, nearly 100 years ago, the width of the western entrance 
was nearly 500 ywls ; that on each succesaive exaiaination this widtii was found to 
bo gradaiillj leBbeniog ; that through natural causes an opening was made throagb 
the peninguk at the eastern end of the harbour, and that a wide and comparatively 
fihallow entrnncd now existA; and that for nearly half a century it has been the 
desire of thoae interested in the welfare of the harbour that steps should be taken to 
ensure its preservation for the future ; that though many reports have been made 
and suggestions and estinoates of cost submitted, none have been adopted nor acted 
upon, even in part; and the same forces of Nature which have apted through put 
jeara are etilt acting nncheoked to the detriment and possiUe destruction of tbe^ 
Itneat harbour on Lue Ontario. 



[1881] 9» 



It may not be amiss here to state that the waters of the Don and the sewage 
ftom the city still empty into the harbour. 

The questions have therefore arisen what course is to be pnrsaed, what is to be 
done to preserve this harbour ; and farther is it necessary or desirable so to improve 
the eastern entrance as to maintain always a navigable depth of 16 feet ; and to con- 
straot sncb works as may be required to restrain the encroachment of the Island 
aboal, and preserve the western entrance at such a width and depth as will give easy 
leoess and exit ? On the proper solution of these questions depends the preservation 
of Toronto Harbour. 

The writer has to acknowledge the assistance he has received from Ur. M» 
Btldwin, the Harbour Master, and Mr. Helliwell, the Deputy Harbour Mast^ i iu 
obtaining many of the reports published herewith ; and his thanks are due to Mr. E» 
TUly, C. B., fin* his repoiia ana paper on the lake levels. 

Bespectfully submitted, 

HINBT F. PBBLEY, 

^Ifkief Engineer. 
Onp Bifonraxa'a OtFioa^ 

DXFABUKUfT OF PUBLXO 'f^OtKB, 

Ai»il 11th, 1881. 
ITon^— The Appendix refttitd te in this Mwpofmidnm is not pnbliihed. 



96 [1882] 



EBPORT ON LAKE MANITOBA OYBEFLGW. 

CmiF BNaiNUR*8 Offiox, 
fief. No. 10,247. Ottawa, 22nd December, 1880. 

Sib,— There is not any information in the Department relative to Lake 
llenitolML 

I note in the letter fi*om the Deputy Minister of the Interior (No. 9,961) that 
daring the past fe^ years the water of this lake have been gradually rising, and ars 
now 4 or 5 fu higher than ever before known. I learn also that a survey was made 
in order to ascertain the nature and extent of the obstacles in the Fairford Biver, the 
outlet into Lake Winnipeg, copies of the plan and section there obtained accom- 
panying the letter. 

Enclosed in this letter is a note that I shall fhmish an estimate of the probable 
cost of the dredging required for the improvement of this river. 

Lake Hanitpba is about 120 miles in length and of an average width of 18 miles, 
#iid I have iearaed flrom the Deputy Mimify^r o^iile Interim that in no part of it eaa 
a greater depth than 25 feet be found. It is an extremely shallow lake naving sandy 
ihores, and advantage has to be taken of the rivers and streans emptying into it to 
AfiTect a landing. 

The Fairford — or,.asi^t is termed on. the plan and section ''PartridireCrop'' 
£iver — has an average wtdth for some distance from its mouth of 400 feet, with 
iMtnks from 7 te 10 feet in height above the present level of the water. According to 
the soundings given on the plan, it appears that a shoal exists in Lake Manitoba 
across its mouth, having 5 feet depth in its shoalest part ; and in a distance of a mile 
from the mouth two shoals are found and a third at 1^ miles still fhrther on. 

As marked on the section these shoals are composed of gravel and boulders. I 
note that the fall in the surface of the river is at the rate of 2f feet per mile, and thii 
is sufficient to cause the very rapid current w&ich exists, a current strong enough to 
acour out any obstraction if composed of a comparatively soft or friable nature. 
As the obstructions which exist are said to be composed of gravel and boulders, I am 
inclined to believe that these materials must be compacted together, and will prova 
to be hard dredging. 

It appears that at the time (lOth Nov. 1880) the survey was made, Lake Manitoba 
was 4 or 5 ft. above its normal level, and the water in its outlet correspondingly high. 
As these soundings show depths of 4} and 6 ft. on the obstructions complained o^it 
follows that when the lake is at its normal level, the water in the Fairford river caa 
•only be a foot or more in depth. 

The average width of so much of the Fairford as is shown on the plan is 400 feel, 
and if the deepening proposed is to be of any benefit, a channel of that width mart 
be cut through the obstructions to give vent to the greatest volume of water saoh a 
narrow channel will convey. It must be borne in mind that the problem to solve ia 
the lowering of an area of at least 1900 souare miles a depth of 4 feet, and maintainiog 
that reduced level for the future ; to do this the widest and deepest channel possible 
to*obtain, must be provided. 



k 



[1882J 9t 



The following is a statement of the ^nantity of dredging to be done in the 
removal of the shoals oolored red in the section herewith, ba^d on a width of 400 feet x 

Channel in Lake Manitoba 93,000 

" "Elver 4 to 82 •. 117,600 

« " 34 to 52 18,000 

" " « 116 to 124 18,900 

Total 247,500 cnb.yds. 

To determine the cost of dredging the quantity thus given, I have assumed that 
Ihe Department will place a dredge with scows and attendant ta^ on Lake Manitoba^ 
■and will continue working for four (4) years, being at the rale of 62,500 cubic yards^ 
measured in the solid, per 5 or 6 working months, per year. 

I place expenses as follows : 

Machinery for spoon dredge t8,000 00 

Delivery at Lake Manitoba 3,000 00 

Hull and fitting up 6,000 00 

Bopes, chains, tools, spare gear 4,000 00 

Three (3) 50 yard scows 3,000 00 

Steam tug complete 10,000 00 

Dredging plant 34,000 00 

Working expenses, dredge and tug 4 years® 18,000 *...^ 32,000 00 

Contingencies, repairs and renewals, &c 6,000 00 

Superintendence. 4 years Q $2,000 8,000 00 

Total $80,000 00 



«nd ^mn = 32 cents per cubic yard, which must be considered a reasonaUa 
price, but not one which a contractor wou^d aieeept |Mr the w^urk in ^^jfestidii, M nol 
any allowance has been made for profit. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant^ 

(Signed) HBNBT P. PBKLBT. 

Chief Engineer • 
F. H. Ennis, Bsq.! Secretary, 

Dept of Public Works. 



ChIIV ENGI!fXSB*8 OfFIOB, 

Sef. No. 21263. Ottawa, 15th February, 1882. 

Sib,— Under date 22nd December, 1880, I submitted a report, No. 1024711 
on the probable cost of dredging the outlet of Lake Manitoba with a view of deepening 
it to such an extent that it would carry off the abnormal quantity of water in the 
lake and maintain the normal level in the future. 

As the Department did LOt possess any information relatiye to this lake, or of 
the country surrounding it, and as the information relative to its outlet, the Fairford 
Biver, contained in No. 9961, was both incomplete and very unsatisfactory, an appro- 
priation was made at the last Session of I^arliament to defray the cost of an 
examination, not only of the lake and its outlet, but to ascertain, if possible, the 
cause or causes why the lake has risen and remains above its normal level, and to 
determine the means to be taken to carry off the surplus water and prevent its. 
rising in the future ; and the probable extent and cost of the works required. 

j^ accordance with the instructions contained in your letter, No. 7478, instructiona 
were given to Mr. Thomas Guerin, O.B., to make the examination, io^ required«^ 



XHBZ] 



This he has done in a inost satisfkotorjr sianin^y and I herewith transmit f>r fhe 
infbrmatioD of Ae Hon. the Minister, the report he has sabmitted. 

From this report it is gathered that Mr. Gnerin saw for himself the effects of 
the rising of the lake, in the flooded condition of the village oi Totogan, situated at 
the junction of the White Mud and Bat Rivers, six miles from the soothem eztremity 
of the lake, and heard the opinions of those who, in dismay at the rising of the waters^ 
were threatening to abandon their farms. 

It will be noted that Mr. (luerin, at the outset, assumed that this overflow was 
due to one of the following causes : — 

1. The siltiog np of the lake by the materials held in suspension and brought 
ky the rivers emf^yuif into it ; 

2. The " barring^ of the outlet, by the movement towards it of the materials 
composing the bottom of the lake ; 

3. The gradual sinking of the lands surrounding the lake ; 

4. That the outlet is unable to carry off the water brought by the rivers which 
flow into the lake. 

During his journey to the outlet, Mr. Guerin became oonviuoed from the soundings 
taken that the lake was not being filled up by any sedimentary deposit, (1), nor that 
the adjacent iand was sinking C3), for if eithm* of these phenomena had occurred, 
instead of deeper soundings which were found, the reverse would have been the case; 
and I may mention that the mouth of the outlet is solid rook and does not show 
any signs of an accumulation fVom the bed of the lake (2). 

For the determination of cause 4, the inflow of water from the White Mud, and 
its branch the Sac Biver, at the doutfaem end of the lake, and the Water Hen, at the 
northern extremity, the only rivers emptying int6 Lake Manitoba, wlis ascertiuned 
to be 20,796 euhie feet per second. 

The off'take capacity of the Eairford River was found to be 14,833 cubic feet per 
second, and, therefore, during the time of high water a quantity of 5,963 cubic net 
per eecodd is left to accumulate in the lake to overflow its borders, or be carried off 
pffi evaporation. 

Here, as Mr. Guerin states, an anomalous state of affairs exists ; tite outlet of 
this lake, iDHtead of being, as is the rule, larger than the united capacities of th» 
streams emptying into it, is smaller than that of one of them, and the consequence 
must be that so long as the " Water Hen " continues to bring down equal quantities 
of water yearly, so long will the lake eontinue to rise, and it can only become reduced 
in depth when the rain and snowfall of any season on the area drained by the *' Water 
Hen ^' are below their usual quantities. 

The Fail-ford Biver empties into Lake St. Martin fh>m which flows the little 
Saskatchewan, which is described by Mr. Guerin as overflowing its banks, expanding 
and contracting alternately, sometimes rapid, sometimes still ; and that its bottom, so 
jbr as it has been examined, consisted of rock or boulders, and hard packed gravel, 
and after a devious course of thirty miles it terminates in Lake Winnipeg. 

Lake St. Martin is snrrounded by a low flat country which is overflowed in a 
similar manner to the shores of Lake Manitoba, and the cause was found in the fact 
that the off-take capacitv of the Little Saskatchewan is 2,347 cubic feet less than the 
discharge through the FaiHord, and that this quantity per second of time, less the 
amount carried off by evaporation, remains to flow over the land. 

Mr. Guerin, assuming that the areas of Lakes Manitoba and St Martin, as gi^en 
1^ Professor Hind, vijs : 1,902 and 316 square miles respectively, are the normal 
conditions of these lakes, has determined tnat the height to which the water has risen 
above its proper height in each is six feet ; and further, from the data obtained, has 
calculated that the area of land submerged in Lake Manitoba is 323 square miles, and 
in Lake St, Martin 765 square mileb, ur 69u,320 acros. 

The remedy for this state of afflft'is :.. -l?-p!y to providi^ additional outlets ttom 
Xakea Manitoba and St Martin, and 4r«norer the surplus water to Lake Winnipegi 
~^hieh from its srest sise would not be raised over two inches in the year ; or as ifi^ 
~ierin states^ the rising of the surfhce of a lake always increases the discharge 



tf 



[1882] •» 



throQgh its ontleti it may be oooeladed that the level of Lake WioDipeg will DOt be 
sensibly affected. 

In my report of December, 1880, No. 10247, 1 sn^gested the deepening of tho 
Pairfbrd Biver by dredging, to increase the discharge from the lake, and stated that 
jkhe material of which the bed of the river was composed mnst be firm, becaose it had 
not Bconred oat under the action of the strong oai^rent flowing over it. This bottom, 
as before stated, Mr. Gnerin found to be rock, aqd therefore, abandoning the idea of 
deepening the river, he proposes the openipg of a new channel from the lake 
10,500 feet in length, joining tiie Fairford ^^iyer at that distiMSoe from its head, where 
it is 9f^ feet lower than the lake. It will be noted that Mr. Ckierin propoiaes th» 
loiwriaog of liake Manitoba 4i feet, and maiutajmiDg it at 1^ feet above its normal level 
for the purpose of flEu^ilitating navi^tion. 

The charactM' of the Little Saskatchewan has been already described, and is of 
iueh nature as not to admit of being improved. To relieve Lake St. Martin Mr. 
Suerin suggests the openrag of a cut to Lake Winnipeg, a distance of 12^ miles of 
such dimensions as will effectually carry off all surplus water and prevent its accu- 
mulation in the ibture. 

The cost of these works is placed as follows : 

From Lake Manitoba to the Fairford Biver $36,000 

From Lake St Martin to Lake Winnip^ 245,000 

Total.., ,,. $281,000 

*i k' '■ ■ 

By the opening of these channels, not only would the waters of these lakes be 
reduced in a few years to their normal leyel, bjit they lyould remain so, and the many 
acres of land now submerged and valueless, would be recovered and become of value 
and fitted for settlement, and not only that, for so long as. the Fairford and the Little 
Saskatchewan remain unchanged, the probabititios ^e that the waters of Manitoba 
and St. Martin will continue to rise, and the area of submerged land to increase in . 
proportion. 

Mr. Ouerin has calculated that 696,320 acres of land are to^lay flooded, and* 
^t, e$timatiQg their average value at $2.00 per acre, their total value will amount 
to $1,39^640, a handsome return for the expenditure of the amount estimated as 
above. 

I cannot conclude this summary of Mr. Guerin's report without bearin|^ testi- 
mony to the able manner in which he has performed the duty assigned to him, and 
for the solution of the problem set before him ; and, although the remedy proposed 
»ay appear to involve the expenditure of a large amount of money, yet the result to. 
be obtained will prove to be of immense and lasting benefit. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Tour obedient Servant, 

HffiNBY-F. PBRLBT, 

Ofdef Bngineat 
F. H« Bn!vis, Bsq., Secretary, 
IJept. of Public Works. 



382456 



>aOO [1882] 



MR gubrhts bbpobt. 

Ottawa, 29th Jannaryi 1882. 

Sib, — ^It has been already stated in the remarks concerning the Biver Assini- 
boine, that in oooseqaence of the flood on that river, last summer, attention was 
directed withoat delay to Lake Manitoba. 

Hie pai^ was accordingly transferred to Totogan, a Tillage situated at the 
junction of White Mud and Kat . riv^ers, and within about 6 miles of the southern 
extremity of the lake. ' ' * 

This village was at that time flooded to so mat an extent that it was with 
difficulty campiDg ground could be found in its vicinity. 

The appearance of the country all round this place was uninviting. All parties 
who were consulted on the subject agreed that the lake had been rising every year for 
-five years. The lake had now spread its waters over the land' as &r as Totogan Village 
and flooded the houses there. The farmers in the vicinity appeared dismayed and 
were threatening to abandon their farms. Seeing a lake of over 1,900 square mUes 
in extent rising more and more every year, and spreading over the land, they naturally 
asked what reason had they for believing that their farms were not going to be irre- 
vocably lost and themselves ruined if they continued to remain in the district. Such 
were the sentiments then expressed by the people. 

To remedy those evils there must be means devised to confine the lake within 
its le^timate boundaries and prevent it from exceeding those boundaries in futore. 
^This IS the problem involved whose solution is here submitted. 

Before seeking a solution to this aaestion the cause of the overflow must be first 
discovered ; and in searching for this there are four possHife causes which prominently 
suggest themselves : — 

1. The lake may rise and overflow its banks in consequence of being filled up by 
the materials held in suspension in the rivers flowing into it 

2. The lake may nse in consequence of its outlet getting barred by the 
movement towards its entrance of the materials composing the bottom. 

8, The land surrounding the lake may be sinxing in consequence of some 
unknown phenomenon thus causing the water to overflow. 

4. The water of the lake may be raised in consequence of an unusually great 
fhll of rain or snow occurring at the heads of those rivers which flow into it ; and 
the outflow at the same time being unable to meet the increased demand on its 
-capacity. 

All or any one at those causes could produce the results observable about the 
lake, and it was therefore necessary to find which of them existed. 

In order to ascertain this information it was necessary to examine the rivers 
flowing into the lake as well as tliose flowing from it» and likewise to ascertain the 
quantity of water taken away from it by evaporation. It was also necessary to fiod 
whether the water of the lake was rising or fiuling for it seemed to rise or fall every 
day several inches in obedience to theairection of the wind. 

Lake Manitoba, according to Pi*ofessor Hind, has an area of 1,902 square miles. 
It is surrounded by a low flat country and consists of two jiarts which are united by 
a strait called *' The Narrows" : the greater portion of the Lake being south cl 
" The Narrows." The onl^ supply to it, besides the rain and snow which fiill on its 
surface are Water Hen Biver which flows into it near its northern extremity, and 
White Mud, and Bat Bivers which flow into it at its southern extremity. 

The outlets from the lake are Fairford Biver and Dog Hung Creek. This latter 
is too insignificant to be fhrther noticed, but the former issues from the lake at a 
place north of " The Narrows " and for the first three miles of its length is a large 
and rapid river with a rocky bottom. It then expands and covers the surrounding 
oountiy for many square miles, giving rise to a dense growth of buUrushes. In this 
^kteut of country is included Partridge Crop Lake, a small body of water clear of 



[18823 ion 

weeds of aoy kind alihoagh a few years ago it was only a morass. Emerging from 
this lake, the river contracts into its normal dimensions for a short distance and 
finally terminates in Lake St. Martin. 

Ijake St Martin, like lake Manitoba has flooded the snrroanding country. It 
had, a few years ago, an area of 316 sanare miles acccntiinff to Professor Hind ; but 
it has lately swollen into much larger dimensions. The only feeder Xo this lake is 
EurfordBiver and its oatlet is the Little Saskatchewan. This latter river overflows- 
its banks expanding and contracting alternately,: sometimes rapid, sometimes still. 
Its bottom as far as it has been surveyed consist tor the most part of rock or boulders 
and hard packed gravel. After a devious course of some 30 miles it terminates in. 
Lske Winnipeg. 

DISOHABOXS or RIVXRS OONinBOTSD WITH LAKE MANITOBA. 

While encamped at Totogan, White Mnd and Bat Bivers were examined. The- 
discharge of the former was ascertained about three miles above the village. Here 
tibere was no visible mark to show that the water of this river had been higher 
daring the previous spring. At the time of examination there was passing in it 1,425 
oibic feet ^r second. It had a width of 185 feet and a maximum depth of 16 feet. 
Bat Biver which unites with White Mud Biver at Totogan was examined about 
Smiles above the junction. The water of this river seemed to have fallen much^ 
siDoe the spring — at the lime -of examination it was only 40 feet wide and there was 
passing in it only 35 cubic feet per second ; althou^ its high water mark showed^ 
that during the previous spring it was 250 feet wide and was discharging 729 cubic 
ftet per second. 

Having placed some gauges at Totogan, camp was removed to the head of 
Pairford Biver which constitutes the outlet of the lake. During this journey sound- 
iogs were taken in the lake, which showed a depth varying from 9 feet near shore to 
15 feet, sometimes 20 feet further outward. 

These soundings convinced those who were accustomed to navigate the lake that 
it was then much deeper than it had been during previous yeai-s ; a fact which was 
ample proof that the lake was not bein^ filled by any sedimentary deposit nor was 
the adjacent land sinking; for if either nad been the case the tendency would be to 
diminish the depth of the lake instead of increasing it. 

The discbarge through Fairford Biver was measured at a suitable place abont 
f of a mile from the lake. It had a width of 359 feet and a maximum depth of 10^ 
feet. There were 14,833 cubic feet of water passing in it per second. There was no 
watermark visible which was higher than the surface of tne water then passing iu 
the river, and it seemed to be charged to ite full capacity ; for in the distance 
between this locality and the lake it was in places overflowing its banks. 

Having inaugurated the work of surveying and sounding this river as well as 
adjacent portion of the lake, some of the party were transferred to the Head of the 
Lske for the purpose of examining Water Hen Biver. 

At the moutn of this river there is a large tract of country covered with water 
and much of it is now producing a dense crop of bullrushes ^and other weeds; the 
river having three onen channels through these weeds. 

About 5 miles above its junction with the lake a suitable place was found for 
examining it. Here the river was 444 feet wide; its maximum depth was 12 feet 
and the quantity of water passing in it was 13,930 cubic feet per second. From a 
watermark visible on its ranks it was ascertained that the river had fallen l^^ feet 
from its highest state during the previous spring. When it was at that stage, the 
quantity of water passing in it amounted to 18,642 cubic feet per second. 

DISCHABQBS FBOM AND INTO THE LAKB. 

When the examinations 'of those rivers were made Water Hen contributed 
13,93U cubic feet per second^ White Mud and Bat Bivers contributed 1,460 cubic feet. 



102 [i«ir[ 



per second, thus makini^ the entire disobarge into tbe lake amoant to 15,390 cubic 
feet per second ; while the only discbarge from it was that through FaitTord river or 
14,833 cubic ieet per second, thus leaving 557 cubic feet per second to accumulate in 
the lake. From these facts it follows that at the time the investigation was made 
the lake had to depend entirely on evaporation to reduce ite l^vel. 

In time of hi|;hest flood, Water Hen Biver discharges 18,642 cubic feet per second 
into the lake. White Mud and Rat Sivers discharge 2;154 cubic jfoet per seoond into 
the lake, thus making a total of 20,7d6 cubic feet per second; while the discihaige 
from the lake could only have been 14,833 cubic feet per second, this bein^ the capa- 
city of Fairford river. It follows there&re that during flie time of high water a 
quantity equal to 5,963 cubic feet per second is left to accumulate in the lake and 
spread over the adjacent land, or be carried off by evaporation. 

Those measurements show an anomalous state of things in connection with 
Lake Manitoba, It has been a generally understood maxim throughout North 
America (I believe) that the capacity of the river which forms the outlet of a lake 
is greater than the united capacities of all the rivers contributing to the lake, ^o 
Bivcr St. Lawrence is an eminent example of this fact. 

In the case of Lake Manitoba, however, the capacity of Water Hen alone 
oxceeJs that of Fairford Biver which forms the outlet of the lake by upvrards of 25 
per cent. The consequence must be, that whenever Water Hen river gete flooded, 
the water of Lake Manitoba must rise, and as the capacity of Fairford river aided by 
evaporation is not sufficient to carry off the surplus water during the time that 
-elapses after Water Hen has passed the point of maximum height, until its next 
rising, the lake will continue to rise more and more everr year until a succession of 
reasons occur when the rain and snow fUl at the water sued forming the source shall 
be comparatively light 

XVAPORAtlON. 

As it appears that evaporation is one of the principal factors in reducing the 
level of the lake, a contrivance was resorted to at the camp at Fairford for ascertain- 
ing the amount of water evaporated each day. 

This contrivance consisted of a cylindrical tin vessel about 3 inches deep and as 
many inches in diameter. It was filled with water and imbedded in another vessel 
containing a mixture of sand and gravel. The depth of the water was taken by a 
scale every mornii^ and evening and registered m a book kept for that purposa 
A copy of this register will be found at Uie end of this report where also will be 
found a copy of the gauge register. 

On looking to the first mentioned register, it will be seen that the loss of water 
each 24 hours gives a mean of 2- 10 of an inch, while the loss during the night time 
alone is only 2- 100 of an inch. 

In winter time the evaporation of water is inappi*eciable while the thermometer 
registers bolow 32^. 

If a piece of ice is measured and weighed and left exposed, it does not diminish 
to ' any appreciable extent in bulk or weight while tne mercury is below 32^. 
Scientists assert that evaporation of water goes on in winter, but I have never 
known or read of any one who has stated what the amount of such evaporation is 
during freezing weather or during a Canadian winter. The register at Lake Manitoba 
during the latter part of the summer shows the mean evaporation to be as low as 
2-100 of an inch during each night, or while the water was not exposed to the sun's 
rays ; and during some nights it appeared to be nothing. Now as the evaporation 
during a winter day cannot be greater than that during a summer night it follows 
that the mean daily loss from evaporation during the cdd months cannot exceed 
2-100 of an inch in the vicinity of Lake Manitoba. Taking a mean between the 
three warmer months and nine colder months there will result *065 inches. 



'\m 



[188S] l«ft 



QOEXFlOlMHt 09 XVAPORATIOlt. 

It must be borne in mind that the vesBel used in oompnting the loss fVoin 
^Taporation was only three inohea deep, and as it is well known that the loss from 
evaporation is greater in a shallow vessel than in a deep one, it follows that the mean 
dally evaporation of Lake Manitoba is not greater than *065inches or *005416 feet 
throaghout the year. This is the coefficient which shall be used for evaporation in 
die present report. 

LAKS ST. MABnN AND ITS Br^BRS. 

Lake St Hartin is surrounded by a low flat coantry, and it could be seen in 
every case during the journey to Little Saskatchewan river where the shore was 
approached, that the old shore line was obliterated by the water overflowing the 
Umd. 

It has been already stated that the only supply to Lake St Martin is Fairford 
Kver, while its outlet is the Little Saskatchewan River. This latter river on 
leaving the lake is very irregular as may be seen on the aooompanying plan ; 
expanding and dividing into branches for the first five miles of its length. At this 
•distance m>m the lake it contracts for a short space into what appears to be its 
normal dimensions and here its discharge was ascertained. Its width was 309 feet, 
itB greatest depth was 16 feet and the quantity of water passing in it was 12,486 
cubic feet per second. 

* Seeing that the discharge into the lake through Fairfbrd Eiver is 14,833 
cubic feet per second, it follows that a quantity equal to 2,347 cubic foot per second 
is left in the lake to flow over the land or be carried off by evaporation. 

HSIOHT or THS SI7BFA0IS OF LAKES MANITOBA AND ST. MARTIN ABOVE THUE 

NORMAL STATE. 

It appears from Professor Hind's report that at the time he made his ozamina. 
tion, 18S!3, Lake Manitoba was confined within boundaries which gave it an area of 
1902 square miles, and Lake St Martin had boundaries limiting its area to 316 
square miles. Those areas shall be accepted here as the normal condition of these 
lakes. 

In Professor Hind's report the difference of level between Lake Manitoba and 
Lake St. Martin is stated to be 15 feet approximatdv. On this subject it is necessary 
to remark that unless the weather was calm and had been calm for some time 
previously, it was difficult to obtain the levels of these lakes otherwise than approxi- 
mately : for their surfaces rise and fall at the shore several inches each day in 
obedience to the direction of the wind. The difference of level between these lakea 
was obtained laU autumn and the result varied by about one foot from that obtained 
by Professor Hind. 

This near coincidence goes to show, that although both lakes have risen several 
feet since the first examination was made by Professor Hind over twenty years ago, 
yet they have risen equally and the surfaces of both lakes are now at eoual elevations 
4ibove their normal conditions. These elevations are investi/^ated in Note A at the 
end of this report where it is shown that the height to which the water has risen 
above its normal state in Lake Manitoba or Lake St. Martin is 6 feet. 

DEPTH or WATER OVER SUBMERGED LANDS. 

Adjacent to the channels of Fairford and Whito Mud rivom where the former 
-descends to nearly the level of Lake St Martin and the latter to the level of Lake 
Manitota, the depth of water varies from 2 to about 4 feet in some places — ^some twi> 



194 [1882] 



hnndred feet removed fVom tlie channel the depth seldom exceeds 2 feet. Adjacent 
to the lake where it overflows the land the same denth of 2 feet is found and then of 
coarse diminishes to sero. So that one foot may ne considered the mean depth of 
water over the submerged land. 

QUAKnTT OF LAND VLOODXD. 

The results obtained fW)m the investigation continued up to this point, can now 
be applied to the determination of the area of Jand flooded by the overflow of Lake 
Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. The investigation determining those areas is cHiven 
in Note B at the end. It will be there seen that the area of land flooded by Lake 
Manitoba is 323 square miles and by Lake St. Martin 765 square miles, or in other 
words, in consequence of the capacity of Fairfbrd Biver not beuyi; sufScient to acoom- 
modafid the increased demand on it when White Mud and Water Hen rivers are 
flooded, Lake Manitoba has overflowed its banks and flooded 323 square miles of 
territory; and in consequence of the capacity of the Little Saskatchewan river not 
being able to accommodate the increased demand on it when Fairford river is at hi^ 
water, La^e St. Martin has overflowed its banks and submerged 765 square miles of 
territory : thus giving a total of 1088 square miles of land under water. 

NATUBB or EXMBDT PB0P08SD. 

The extent of land damaged by the overflow of those lakes being now ascertained 
and the prime cause being known, the question is reduced to the determination -itf 
means by which to redeem those lands as quickly as possible: the work to be as little 
expensive as possible and to be of such a nature as to. debar tor ever a recurrence 
of the present state of things. 

On examining the general map of the country it will appear at once that in 
reducing Lake Manitoba to its original state, there is no other way but to increase- 
the discharge from that Lake into Lake Winnipeg. The discharge from Lake 
Manitoba to Lake St Martin must therefore be increased to a certain determinate 
extent and also that from Lake St. Martin to Lake Winnipeg. 

The channels of the rivers Fairford and the Little Saskatchewan as they appear 
on the plan, forbid the idea of meddling with them to render thorn suitable ior the 
conveyance of any fixed determinate quantity: although the pouitions of thobC rivers 

Kint out the most desirable localities where works to increase the discbarge should 
built. 
When the flood of Water Hen river was at l-j^^ feet above its level of the 5tb 
August (that having been the day on which the examination was made) the quantity 
of land flooded by ^ike Manitoba was found to be 323 square miles and as the area 

2 

of the lake is 1902 square miles then (I902.f 323) 52S0 x .005416 ib the amount of water 



86,400 

evaporated per second. 

If to this be added the amount can'ied off by Fairford river, 14,833 cubic feet 
per second, the sum will be the total amount of water carried off per second from the 
hike. 

Now, as Water Hen, White Mud and Eat rivers when high give a united 
discharge into the lake of 20,796 cubic feet per second there will result 

20'y96--f i&oa + 323) X 5280 I X .00 5416 _ _i^833 = 2076 the quantity by which the water 

S6400 

accumulates per second and spreads over the land, while Water Hen river remains at 
its maximum height. It would therefore seem that besides the discharge through 
Kiirford river an additional dischai^e of 2,075 cubic feet per second should end obtained 
from Lake Manitoba; 

It is not necessaiji however^ to build works giving so large a discharge, for thifl 



[1882] 105 



Btate of things exists only during the short interval of high water. At the time the 
fzamfnation was made, this quantity did not exist, the river having fallen Ifg^ feet 
as has been already shown^ and it appears that the time the river occupied in rising 
to high water mark and falling again to the level it had on the 5thAugn8t was about 
three months. 

The extra quantity poured into the lake during this risingand falling o Water 
Hen Biver would be f the quantity which would be poured into it, if the river during 
the three months had remained at it6 high level (See note C at end) ; hence if axlenote 
the naml>er of seconds in a month, then 2,075 x 3 a X | = 2490a represents the 
entire quantity poured into the lake during the three months in which tne flood was 
rising and falling. This would therefore be the yearly contribution towards raising 
the lake above its level of the 5th August, if the contributing rivers should continue 
to rise to the same heights during succeeding years. 

If works are built which will carry off l,4i80 cubic feet per second, then the 
quantity carried off during a year will be 1,480 X 12 a, and the lake will be diminished 
by a quantity equivalent to 17,760 a — 2,490 a = 15,l70a and its level will be 
lowered by a depth equal to 8^ Inches. 

According to this arrangement, and allowing the rain and snow fall to continue 
M great in the future as they have been in the last five years, and that Lake St. 
Martin be left in its present condition, the flooded land around Lake Manitoba would 
be freed from water in le^s than three years and the lake Wbuld be reduced to its 
normal state in less than five yeai*8. But, if Lake St. Martin be also relieved by an 
increased discharge fi^m it, the land will be redeemed and Lake Manitoba lowered 
siacb sooner as will be seen further on. 

it may be supposed that the equivalent water of the winter snow which falls on 
the lake itself and remains there until spring forms another source of supply and 
must be added to the contributions of the rivers supplying the lake, in order to pbtain 
all the accumulation whose removal must be provided for. But the winter snow on 
the lake does not enter as a factor, for the reason that the snow water has time 
tow off through the outlet before the rivers rise to their fbll heights, and therefore 
those two sources of supply cannot occur at the same time. 

LAKl ST. MABTTN. 

The only supply to Lake St. Martin is Fairford Biver, which fhmishes 14,83S 
eubic feet per second, and its outlet is the Little Saskatchewan, which carries off 
12,486 cubic feet, thus leaving 2,347 cubic feet per second to raise the lake and flood 
the land. As Fairford River was charged to its full capacity when the examination 
was made, there can be no higher flood in it than that which then existed ; it follows 
that there must exist an equality between the contribution from this river on the one 
side and the amounts carried off by the Little Saskatchewan and evaporation on the 
other side. In this case then, there is no extra amount ari8ing from a high water 
level goiuK to increase the lake as in the case of Water Hen River. To redeem all 
the flooded land in one year would require a work competent to carry off 1,162 cubic 
feet per second. This would lower the lake 2^ feet in a year. It would, moreover, 
reduce the lake to its normal state within three yeara, if the increased discharge 
fh>m Lake Manitoba were not in operation. 

K however the works on Lake Manitoba were finished at the same time, or 
before those of Lake St. Martin, then the desired effect on the latter lake would b^ 
retaided while that on the former lake would not be augmented ; but, if the works 
on Lake St. Martin were completed one year before the completion of those of Lake 
Manitoba, the effect on both would be augmented. Thus, if Lake St. Martin were 
reduced 2-^ feet, thedischarffo from Lake Manitoba through the work which other- 
wise would produce 1,480 cubic feet per second, would be now increased to 1,63T 
cubic feet per second, b^ this means reducing its level by eleven inches in one year 
and bringing it withLn its original boundaries in proportionally less time. 

Here a question ariaes as to the desirabili^ of lowering these lakes to their 

10--8 



.106 [1882J 

former levels. If this be done, it can be seen on reference to the sounding ^iveo on 
tlio licoompanying plan, that at the entrance to Fairford River there will oe odIj 
About two feet of water and at the narrows of Lake St. Mai'tin there will be only 
the about same depth. 

Such a depth lb not sufficient to accommodate craft of any respectable size to pac» 
from Lake Winnipeg to Lake Manitoba. It is therefore proposed to lower iheite 
lakes to the amount of 4^ feet, thus leaving 3^ feet as the minimum depth of water 
for navigation. 

PBOPOSXD OUT FBOM LAKB MANITOBA. 

With this end in view a cut is here proposed to be made from Lake Manitoba to 
Station 62 on l^airford River (vide plan). This cut is to be 10,500 feet long and 50 
feet wide at bottom with slopes of one in two. The sill at entrance is to be 54 inchei 
below the present level of the lake. 

As the water of the lake is to be prevented from descending below the propof>ed 
level, it becomes necessary to guard against any undue increase to the dischai^ge 
through this cut from damage to its entrance. With this view the entrance is to be 
protected with a double row of sheet piling and to be paved with masonry for 150 feet 
of itH length. 

It will be capable of discharging 1,480 cubic feet of water per second, and 
although discharging into Fairford River, it cannot much affect the discharge through 
that river from Lake Manitoba. It will raise the water 9^ inches at the point of 
concourse ; but this locality being below the rapids, and 9^ feet below the level of 
Lake Manitoba, the discharge from the lake will not be influenced to any serioos 
extent. 

The cost of this cut is estimated at $36,000. 

PROPOSXD CUT FROM LAKE ST. MARTIN. 

Another cut is proposed to be made from Lake St. Martin, commencing about 
2^ mile<^ south of the head of the Little Saskatchewan River and going direct to 
Lake Winnipeg, as depicted on the plan of reference. 

It will be capable of discharging 1,162 cubic feet per second. It will be 12^ 
miles long and 60 feet wide at bottom; being protected at its entrance similarly to 
that from Lake Manitoba. 

The estimated cost of this work is $245,000. If to this sum be added the cost of 
the work at Lake Manitoba, $36,000, there will result, as the estimated cost of all 
the improvements, the sum of $281,000. 

In consequence of the lateness of the season when the survey was made, there 
was not an opportunity to take a section along either of those projected lines ; tbe 
estimate of the cost is, therefbre, approximate ; but, the country in a plane along 
both routes, a fact which gives an opportunity for obtaining a close appro zioiatioQ oo 
that account 

It is impossible for me to state, with certainty, what the character of all the land 
is, which is flooded. There is very little of it occupied by settlers except at tbe 
southern extremity of Lake Manitoba and a small patch occupied by Indians at Fai^ 
ford village. In each of these cases the land is unexceptionally good. I may state that 
I have sailed m a skiff over unoccupied meadow land, which was covered with soma 
two feet of water in the vicinity of Lake St. Martin where the hay was standing 2^ 
feet above the surface ; the boat making a channel through it. 

Estimating all the flooded land to be worth an average price of $2 per acre, the 
total value would reach the sum of $1^92,640. 

It has already been shown that while the supply at the water shed, which forms 
the source of the contributing rivers, shall continue to be as great as it has been^for 
the last five years. Lake Manitoba must continue to rise for some time to come. 
Tj^A^^ aQoh oiroomstancea the area of the flooded land would continue to inoraase ; 



[1882] lOT 



jind, as there are no meaDS of ascertaining whether the supply of water shall com- 
mence to decline or continue to increase, so there are no means of ascertaining when 
x)r where the flood shall stop if matters are left in their present condition. 

It may be supposed that the conducting of sach an amount of water as the pro- 
posed cut conveys into Lake Winnipeg will be the cause of raising the level of the 
water of that lake, and thus creating in its vicinity all the hardships which are now 
complained of in the vicinity of Lake Manitoba. 

If the proposed cut were made to Lake Winnipeg, then, althoagh all the water 
discharged through it were to remain in that lake, it would not raise its surface two 
inches 9n the year ; but, when the fact is considered that the raising of the surface 
of a lake will always increase the discharge through its outlet, then it may be oon- 
claded that the level of Lake Winnipeg will not be sensibly affected by the proposed 
improyements. 

Those ditches which are here recommended to be cut fh)m Lake Manitoba and 
Lake Bt. Martin will never' require to be repaired ; for the sole oMiect in each case 
heing to convey away a certain amount of water, it follows that aUer this required 
amount shall have passed th^ sill of entrance, it matters not afterwf»*ds how it acts; 
whether it excavates for itself a deeper channel by its action on the bottom, or a 
wider channel by wearing away the sides, the result in either case would only tend 
to aid in accomplishing the object in view. 



NOTE A. 

LAKE MANITOBA. 

On referring to the soundings taken in Lake Manitoba, it will be seen that the 
line A, No. 4, at the head of Fairford Itiver, may be considered the plwbe from which 
the river starts. The section along that line will be, as in the annexed Fi^re No. 1, 
where A, No. 4, represents the sur&ce of the water and is 874 feet long, ^he num- 
bers along this line represent the soundings that were taken, and are 46 Kot apart. 

It can be easily ascertained thht the area of this section is S=7107 scTtfare feet. 
The wetted perimeter is C=S74.84 feet. The Hydraulic depth is H=8h238, and 
the square root of the inclination as the river loaves this line is |/P==.0077096. 

LAKE ST. MARTIN. 

Similarly, the first line of soundings taken at the entrance of the Little Saskat- 
chewan Hiver, as given on plan, may be considered as the line of departure oi that 
river from Lake St. Martin, and is represented in the annexed figure No. 2. The 
length is 1,080 feet and the soundings are as represented by the figures along this 
line, being 67^ feet apart. 

The area of this Section is S'=8235 square feet. The wetted perimeter is 0= 
1080.54. The Hydraulic depth is H'=7.6212 and the square root of inclination ia 
|/P«=-.005781. 

Let X denote the height of water in each of these lakes above its normal state, 
or the depth below the surface lin^ of these sections at which the level of the nor* 
nud state exists. Then, looking at the Fairford section TPHgure No. 1), it appears 
that at the left end the average inclination, for a short distance, of the bed is o feet 
in 92 feet, and at the right jond it is 5 feet in 69 feeU Hence the following propor- 
tions : — 

8 : 92 : : X : V and fi : 69 : : x : V». Wherefore 874— V'— V'=l®*^^ o^ Section 
at depth x=S74— ^l^^' and the area for the depth x will be (874—%*') ^i a^^ ^^ 
area of the Section below the depth x will be 7107— (874— Vo*') ^ 

10--8I 



108 



[1882] 




\f< 




m- 



[1888] 109 



The wotted perimeter being diminished at the ends by about ^^ ft. will be 
€= 874.30- ^-5H?. 

mu ^ . ,. . ..rr 7101 - (874- »|^0 ^ 

The Hydraulic depth is H= — 874 30-ioi2' 

40 

Hence, if Q represent the discharge through Fairford River, the value of Q when th« 
lake is reducea to its normal condition will be ^ " 

Q=96x.0077096 (7107-874- «^') x ^ ^^^'^^ ^^'^^^ "^^'^ ^ 

874.30 -1:215L 

40 

On referring to the Section (fig. No. 2), the average inclination of the bottom 
for a short distance at the left end of this Section is 7f feet in 135 feet, and at tiie 
right end it is 4} feet in 135 feet. Hence the following proportions : — 
135x , , lH6x 

7i : 135 :: x : -=t— and 4J : 135 :: x : -^r— 

The length^of this Section at the depth x will therefore be 
136x 135x*^ 
1080 - -iyi- - -4T- = 1 080 - 48x 

and the wetted perimeter is 1080 - 48x almost exactly. 

The area of the Section for the depth x will be (1080 - 24x) x and the area below 
the depth x, or when the lake is in its mormal state, will be 

81 = 8235 - (1080 - 24x) x. The Hydraulic depth will be ^^^^o80-^48^x ^^ ^ 
Therefore, the discharge through the Little Saskatchewan, when Lake St. Martin is 
in its normal state, will be 

Q^ = 95 X .006781 [8235 - (1080 - 24 x) x) ^»235-(i080-2ix) x 
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 1080-48X 

When Lakes Manitoba and St Martin are in their normal state, the discharge 
through the Little Saskatchewan, together with the evaporation from Lake St Mariia 
most Qoanterbalance the discharge through Fairford River. The evaporation of Lake 
81 Martin, whose area is 316 square miles, is 552 feet per second. If this quantity 
he added to the value of Q^ there will result Q = Q^ -|- 552, or the following equation 
^•rill exist : — 

r7107-(874-5^)x^ * 

[7l07-(874-WOxl| xoi2x 



PO^l I 



874.30-- 



40 



:AWAV - [8235 - (1080^ 24X) x] i^-l^^^) * + 562 

r^The value of x found from this equation is 6 feet ; whence it follows that when 
tte examination was made last autumn the waters of Lakes Manitoba and St« Martin 
vsre 6 feet above the legitimate levels of those lakes. 



110 [1882] 



NOTE B. 

THE AREA OP LAND FLOODED. 

LAKB MANITOBA. 

Water Hen Biver, when At high water, furnishes. 18,642 cubic feet. 
White Mud and Eat Rivers 2,154 " 

Total amount poured into the lake 20,796 '* 

Pairford River carriea off. 14,833 " 

Amount remaining in lake 5,963 '* 

This amount of 5,963 cubic feet per second remains to raise the lake and flow 
over the land or be carried off by evaporation. 

Let z sqr. feet denote the area of land flooded . Then z x 1 = cubical content! 
of all the water over this land! 1902 X 5280 1 > X 6 is the cubical contents of all thd 
water in the lake over its normal state, and as it occupied 5 years in increasing to 

this ataount, there will result, g + 1^02 + 5lgft0l »X6 _ ^^^^ inepease per day, and 

5X3^5 I- J» 

(« + 1902 + 5280 1 *) X .005416 = the amount carried off by evaporation. Henct 

the following equation : '^ + ^^Q^X 5280 1 » X6 ^ (^ + 1902 x'6280 1 *) 006416= 

5 X 365 
0963 X 86400— the number of seconds in a day being 86400. 

The resolution of this equation will give z = 323 square miles. 

LAKE ST. MARTIN. 

Pairford River furnishes. 14,833 cubic feet per second. 

Little Saskatchewan 12,486 " •* 



Amount remaining in lake.... 2,347 



(f (( 



This amount of 2,347 cubic feet per second remains to raise the lake and flood 
the adjacent land, and is partly carried off by evaporation. 

Let Z^ denote the area of land which is flooded by this lake ; then, by pursuing 
the same mode of reasoning as in the case of Lake Manitoba, there will result the 
ibllowing equation : — 

Z^+316x52b0^ '^6 (Z^ +316X5280"^ «).005416=2347X 86400 
5X3t)5 "^ 

The resolution of this Equation gives Z^=765 Square Miles. 



[1882] 



IIT 



NOTE C. 

Let C A 6 B D be a section of Water Hen Biver ; A B the level of water surikce 
on the 5th Angost and C D its level when at high water— Let Q=discharge per 
aecond dt high water, 

D 

T = Time the river took to rise during 
•pring to the level of C D. 

y = An7 intermediate time as when 
level is at m n. 

h = Difference of level between ABA 
CD=ljtt,feet. 

A' = I>iffe 



)]fferenoe of level betweeo ABA 



1 0. 




Now as A is supposed to be descnbed uniformly, it follows that the height h' of 
m n above A B varies as y. It is also evident that the section A B m n varies as the 
height h' and consequently as y. 

Taking into account the flow through the Section A B C D the discharge must 
▼ary as the Section X i/Hvdraalic depth, and as h and h^ may without sensible 
error be considered the hydraulic depths at the levels C D and m n, it follows that 
the discharges at C D and m n will vary as T T^ and y y J. 

Hence if q represent the discharge at level m n. 

™* ♦ <^* 

Q: q ::T*:y*andq= ^ 

The entire discharge during the time dy will be i|_£l and during; the 
time J tj>i 

'Q y , d 7'. This i8^-Z — xf and when y becomes T this becomes QT X|- 



itwillbe f^ 



* 



f 



By following the same mode of reasoning, if T^=the time of falling fVom high 
water to the level A B, wo would get T Q^ X|=the discharge during the time T* ; 
kence Qx(T+Ti)X|=the entire discharge, and as T+T^=: 3 months ;Qx3mo8. X| 
is the quantity. 



112 



[1882] 



EvAPOKATiON or THK WATKB of Lake Manitoba in a Tin veseel placed in the centre 
of another Tin vessel containing a mixture of sand and gravel. 



Day of month. 


Time of day. 


Depth of water in inches. 




h.m. 




July 29th 


6.30 A M 


2.16 




6.30 P M 


1.90 


30lh 


6.35 A M 


1.85 




7.1BPM 


1.68 


31st 


9 05AM 


1.63 




6.40 P M 


1.30 


August 1st 


7.30 A M 


1.25 




7.00 P M 


1.05 


2nd 


7.00 AM 


1.05 




■<.00 P M 


0.85 


3rd 


7.15 A M 


O.hO 




-7.00 P M 


0.75 


4th 


7.00 A M 


0.70 




7,00 P M 


o.go 


6th 


6.45 AM 


0.45 




7.05 P M 


0.25 




7.30 P M 


1.95 Beplenished. 


6th 


7.15 A M 


1.90 




7.45 P M 


1.66 


7th 


8.45 AM 


1.60 




7.20 P M 


1.30 


8th 


7.00 A M 


1.25 




6.05 P M 


1.16 


9tb 


6.15 A M 


1.12 




6.45 PM 


0.82 


10th 


6.30 AM 


0.80 




6.30 P M 


0.50 


11th 


8.00 P M 


2.80 Beplenished. 


12th 


7.00 A M 


2.76 




7.00 P M 


2.52 


13th 


6.30 A M 


2.50 




7.00 P M 


2.30 


14th 


8.00 AM 


2.28 




6.30 P M 


2.16 


16th 


7.00 A M 


2.18 




6.00 P M 


2.80 Beplenished. 


16th 


6.30 A M 


2.78 




6.30 PM 


2.65 


ITth 


6.30 A M 


2.62 




7.00 P M 


2.46 


18 h 


630AM 


2.46 




7.00 P M 


2.20 


19t 


6.30 A M 


a.l6 




7.00 P M 


1.96 


20th 


6.30 AM 


1.92 




7.00 P M 


1.76 


Slat 


8.30 AM 


1.74 




7.00 P M 


1.66 



[1882] 



11* 



Svaporation of the Water. — (Continued.) 



Day of Month. 


Time of Day. 


Depth of Water in Inchee. 








Removed to Little Saskfttohewaa. 




22Dd 


7.00 A M 


1.54 Beplenished. 






7.30 P M 


1.35 




26th 


7.30 AM 


2.68 






6.00 P M 


2.48 




27th 


7.00 A M 


2.48 






6.30 P M 


2.35 




28th 


7.15 A M 


2.34 






6 00 P M 


2.20 




29th 


7.00 A M 


2.20 






7.00 P M 


2.03 




30th 


8.00 A M 


2.04 






5.45 PM 


1.95 




3lBt 


7.30 AM 


1.95 






6.00 P M 


1.78 




September 1st 


8.30 A M 


1.78 






7.00 P M 


1.60 




2nd 


7.30 A M 


1.61 






6.45 P M 


1.50 




Bid 


8.00 AM 


1.52 






5.30 P M 


1.35 




4th 


9.00 AM 


1.35 






5.00 PM 


1.40 




5th 


8.00 A M 


1.43 






6.00 P M 


1.42 




6th 


6.30 A M 


1.42- 






7.00 P M 


1.25 




7th 


7.00 AM 


1.25 






7.00 P M 


1.05 




8th 


8.00 A M 


1.06 






8.00 P M 


0.90 




9th 


7.30 AM 


0.92 






6.30 P M 


0.92 




10th 


8.00 A M 


0.92 






4.30 P M 


2.50 BepleniBhed. 




11th 


7.45 AM 


2.50 






6.0U P M 


2.30 




12th 


8.00 AM 


2.30 






6.30 P M 


2.15 



ii'4~ 



[1S82J 



SioisTBK OF Gaugb at Entrance of Fairford River — Fig. 5 on Q&ag^ having been tH 
' the surface of the water when gange was placed in position. 



Day of Month. 


Heli^t of Water. 


Weather. 




JnlT 28th A M 


6.00 


S. W. Wind. 




29th • 


1 


4.95 


North " 




30th « 


1 


4.85 


North, nearly calm. 




31st « 


4.90 


Calm. 




August 1st " 


6.16 


South wind. 




2nd « 


6.05 


West " 




3rd " 


4.60 


North and cloudy. 




4th " 


4.60 


West wind and dear. 




6th << 


'4.30 


North West wind. 




6th " 


4.50 


South " 




7th « 


1 


6.00 


South « 




8th " 


4.65 


North-West " 




p 


M 


4.60 


North-West " 




9th A 


M 


4.63 


West " 




P M 


4.60 


North wind and dear. 




lOtb A 


M 


4.68 


S. W. " 




P M 


4.70 


South " 




nth A 


M 


4.70 


West " 




P M 


470 


West " 




12th A 


M 


4.U0 


North " 




P M 


4.10 


North " 




13ih A 


M 


4.30 


West " 




P 


M 


4.40 


S. W. " 




14th A 


M 


4.56 


South « 




P 


M 


4.60 


(( <c 




16th A 


M 


4.fi0 


South " 




P 


iS 


4.80 


U it 




16th A 


M 


4.80 ' 


Cloudy. 




P 


M 


4.80 


(( 




17th A 


M 


4.60 


Clear. 




P 


M 


4.60 


(( 




I8tb A 


M 


4.40 






P 


M 


4.40 






19th A 


M 


4.60 


South wind. 




P 


M 


4.60 


Cloudy. 




20th A 


M 


4.40 


North wind. 




P 


M 


4.30 






Augnst 21st A 


M 


4.30 


South wind. 




P M 


4.50 






22nd A 


M 


4.70 






P 


M 


4.60 






23id A 


M 


6.00 


South-West wind. 




P 


H 


4.80 


Cloudy. 




24th A 


M 


4.60 


Clear and calm. 




P 


M 


4.00 






2&th A 


M 


4.60 


Clear and West wind* 




P 


M 


4.60 





r t 



iiiaiii 



id 



Begister of Gauge — Oontinued.) 


DAT or MONTH. 


miOHT or 


WXATHBB. 






WATKR. 






26th A M 


4.40 


North wind. 


' 


PM 


4.30 


Calm. 




21th A U 


4.30 


North wind. 




PM 


4.20 


It <i 




28th AM 


4.40 


Clondy with rain. 




PM 


•4.40 


Clear. 




29th A M 


4.40 


Weet wind. 




PM 


4.30 


Very calm. 




30th AM 


4.20 


North wind and clear. 




PM 


4.10 


North wind. 




3lBt A H 


4.10 


North. Cloudy 




PX 


4.10 


<i i( 




September 1st A M 


4.10 


« « 




PM 


4.10 


u « 




2nd AM 


4.10 


North wind. 




PM 


4.30 


West wind and clear. 




3rd AM 


4.40 


South wind. 




PM 


4.40 


West " 




4th AM 


4.50 


<C (< 




PM 


' 4.40 


North " 




5th AM 


4.60 


West " 




PM 


440 


Very dear. 




6th AM 


4.40 


Calm and dear. 




PM 


4.30 


South wind. 




7th AM « 


4.40 


N.W. " 




PM 


4.40 


Weat " 




8th AM 


4.40 


Very calm. 




PM 


4.50 


West wind. 




9th AM 


4.60 


N.W. « 




PM 


4.60 


West and cloudy. 




lOtb A M 


4.60 


Very clear. 




PM 


4.50 


South wind ; cloudy. 




11th A M 


4.30 


West wind ; cloudy. 




PM 


4.30 


North " 




12th A M 


4.30 


Very calm. 




PM 


4.30 


South wind. 




13th AM 


4.40 


<i (1 




PM 


4.50 


t« (i 




14th AM 


5.50? 


North « 




PM 


4.10 


Very calm. 




ISlh A M 


4.10 


Very calm. 




PM 


4.10 


North wiD<L 




16th A M 


4.10 


Cloudy. 




P M 


4.10 


« 




17th A M 


4.10 


West wind. 




PM 


4.20 


North " 




18th AM 


4.20 


West " (aoudy.) 




PM 


4.10 


Calm ; cloudy, 





11« 



[1882] 



ilcgister of G&uge—Oontinued.) 



DAT OP month: 


HEIQHT OV 


WEATER. 


19th A M 


4.10 


North wind. 


PM 


4.10 


(( (( 


20th A M 


4.30 


North ; raining. 


PM 


4.30 


West wind. 


2lHt A U 


4.30 


S.W. wind. 


PM 


4.«0 




22nd P M 


4.70 

# 





The whole respectfully submitted. 



Hbnbt F. Psrlbt, Esq., 

Chief Engineer of Pablio Works. 



THOS. GUEBIN, 
Engineer in charge of Survej/i. 





[1882] lit 



APPENDIX No. 6. 



BBPORT ON PUBLIC WORKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, BY HON. J. W. 

TRUTCU, O.M.G. 



Bef. No. 29,433. 

YiOTORiA, B.C., iBt November, 1882. 

Sib, — I beg to sabmit for your information the following report upon the Publie^ 
WorkB carried on under my supervision daring the fiscal year ended 30th June last, 
accompanied by a tabular statement thereof. 

1. BBAYEB BOCK. 

This important work was brought to a conclusion on the 22nd August, 1881 
and after a carefbl survey had been made by which it was determined that there 
were no projecting points of rock within 12 feet 6 inches of low water, level spring 
tides. The barges, caisson and other plant were removed and stored. There is now 
a depth of 12 feet 6 inches of water at low water, spring tides, over the whole site of 
the rock. I had the honor of addressing you more fully on this matter in my let- 
ters dated 28th of June ^ and 16th September, 1881, ^ in which I asked your instruc- 
tions as to the depth of water to be obtained, and as to the disposition to be made of 
Ae balance of the contract price as well as of the barges, caisson and other plant 
•mployed on the work, but have not received your directions on the latter point 

2. BULKHBAD AND BSPAIBS TO MABINE HOSPITAL. 

This work consisting of a bulkhead along the foreshore of Yiotoria Harbour in 
trout of the Marine Hospital, with landing stage and steps, together with an exten- 
•ion of the verandah, a new brick tank and sundry minor repairs, was performed by 
Hessrs. Smith & Clark, Contractora of this place, for the sum of $1,163 in a satisfac- 
tory manner. 

3. BBPAIB8 AND ALTBBATIONS TO YIOTOBIA POST OFFIOl. 

The work done on this building has, I believe, put it in as efficient and stable 
Mndition as practicable. This work consisted in altering the internal arrangements 
to accommodate the Savings Bank and Telegraph Office, building new vaults, water- 
^osets and vestibules, and in lengthening the stairway, painting and kalsominiuK the 
inside walls , and rendering with Portland cement mortar the rear and side walls of 
tile main building and vaults, and paving the backyard. This work was performed 
•atisfactorily under contracts--for the greater part — by Messrs. Charles Hayward^ 
i Smith & Clark, Contraotora of this place, the expenditure amounting in the aggre- 
g«te to 14,279.25; 

• la Anaiial Bepert 1M1| Appendix He/^i pages^TO and Ta. 



W8 [1882] 



4 DREDGING AND BSPAIB8 TO DBIDGS TSSSSLS. 

Operations with the object of improving Victoria Eburbor by dredging were 
<x>mmenced on the 19th of January last, after the dredge and other vesseln h^ been 
put in thorough repair — under the direct Buperintendence of Mr. Robert Dexter. 

Acting on representationH made to me by the Boai-d of Trade of this City, that 
the harbor along tbe front of the wharves had to some extent filled in, as to which I 
reported to you by letters of 19th and 25th January * last, I directed the Superinten- 
dent to dredge from a point south of the proposed site of the Custom House whart to 
Johnson Street, lor a width of 50 feet and to a depth giving 14 feet at low water 
spring tides. After dredging in this locality until the end of April, I becainefalfy 
satisfied from personal observation, and from the reports of the Superintendent, tliat 
the harbor had not filled in to any appreciable extent from tidal effects or from 
sewage or street soouriogs, but only from the result of carelessness of persons 
unloading coal. In consideration of this fact and of the high rate of the cost of the 
work, and that it was found impossible to obtain the desired depth of water through- 
out this portion of the harbor on account of rock cropping up in several places^ 
causing frequent injury to the dredge and consequent expense, I decided to disoonti- 
,nue operations here and send the dredge to resume works on the spit off Shoal Point, 
At the entrance to the harbor, which was accordingly done on the 1st of U.ay, and 
this work continued until the close of the fiscal year 1881-82. 

On resuming operations at Shoal Point, the Superintendent was directed to turn 
his attention principally to cutting a channel, to a depth of 14 ft. at oitlinary low water 
spring tides, through the spit which extends about 450 feet from the point Bock 
having been struck in several places in the line of this proposed channel before tbe 
required depth was reached, it was thought advisable to dredge outside, that is, to 
the noithward, of these rocks, and inside of the former site of the old Beacon 6r 
Buoy No. 2, thus affording to large vessels a better sweep when approaching 
'' Dredger Kock." 

I stated more fully my views with reference to the dredging operations, both in 
the Inner Harbor and at Shoal Point in re{)orts to you dated 19th and 25th Januaiy 
and 9th February * last, to which I beg to draw your attention. 

I enclose a statement prepared by Mr F. C. Gramble, Assistant Engineer in mj 
office, showing the work performed by the dredge between the 19tn January and 
30th June and the cost thereof. This statement shows (firstly) the total quantitT of 
material dredged along the whari front, to be about 11,808 cubic yards of stiff blue 
clay, mud, sand and coal at an expenditure of $4,988.88 or at a cost per cubic yard 
of about 42^t8 not including repairs ; and (secondly) the total quantity removed at 
Shoal Point from 1st May to 30th June to be 10,548 cubic yards at an expenditure of 
$2,470.84, or at a cost per cubic yard of about 23^ts not including repairs. Since iht 
,30th June operations have been continued at Sb^Mil Point with stUl more satiafactorj 
results. 

From the foregoing it will appear that fVom the 19th January to the. 30th of 
June the amount expended on dredging was |'7,459.'72 which, together with the 
amount expended on '* Bepairs to Dredge vessels '' viz. $3,372.98 ina£:es a grant total 
expenditure on this service of $1^^,832,70. 

In compliance with your instructioTis, conveyed to me in Departmental letter 
dated 3rd May last — acknowledged 25th May.— I caused a survey to be made of sboal 
Point showing the site of dredging operations. This survey was aocordingly made 
in June and werefore does not show the full result of last year's work. It will cooee- 
quently be necessary in order that the full results of dredging at Shoal Point Jnriog 
1882 may be exhibited that further soundings may be taken on discontinuance a 
dredging operations in January next, by which time the appropriation for dredging 
will have been expended. I propose to send you then a further report on p^is aobject 
with a plan of the locality and cnart of the soundings, 

* See notes following this report. 



[1882] 119 



5 Post Office Building, New- Westminster. 

Mr. Charles Hayward signed the contract for the erection of this building on the 
€ft December last, but owing to the unfavorable season, he was not able to commence 
bnilding until May when he was further delayed pending your decision upon some 
proposed alterations. The progress has therefore not been as rapid as could be 
ueairod, partly owing to the aS>ve circumsUmces and partly to certain difficulties 
ifhich have arisen between Mr. James Kennedy, Superintending Architect (appointed 
in aocordance with instructions contained in the Chief Architect's letter dated 16th 
August, 1881, and telegrams of 9tb, 13th and 22nd March, 1882) and the contractor; 
bat as these difficulties arose subsequently to the close of the last fiscal year, they 
need not be detailed in this report. I shall, however, have the honor of addressing 
you farther on this subject in a sepai*ate repoi-t at an early date. 

6. PBNITENTIAEY W0BKSH0P8, NEW WESTMINSTER. 

The contract for this work was awarded to Messrs. Elliot and Levy of New- 
Westminster, for the sum of $3^59, and was carried out under the supervision of Mr. 
James Kennedy and completed on the 11th March last Extra work costing $31.75 
brought the amount expended up to 93,390.75. 

7. PRNITENTIART FENCE. 

A double fir board fence 12 feet high with codar posts throughout, enclosing 
about 27 acres of the Penitentiary Beserve, has been erected. This work was executed 
by convict labor under the direction of the Warden in a satisfactory manner. The 
expenditure amounted to $2,300. 

8. IMPROVEMENT OOURTNET RIYSR. 

I addressed you fully on the 14th November, 1881, ^ on the attempt made to 
remove snags from this river. 

9. REPAIRS TO VICTORIA BATTERIES. 

The work of repairing two of the Victoria Batteries, viz. those at Finlayson and 
Maoaulay Points, was performed by day's labor after consultation with the Acting 
Deputy Adjutant General, Captain Dupont, who has expressed his satisfkction wit£ 
the works done. I have addressed you more f ally on this subject in a separate report 
ef3l8t October last.* 

10. REPAIRS TO PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Yarious necessary repairs have been effected on the several Public Buildings in 
this Province at an aggregate cost of $486.74 ; but do not seem to call for special 
oiention. 

11. PENITENTIARY, NEW WESTMINSTER. 

m 

This account includes certain repairs to and supplies furnished the Fenitentiarj 
Building amounting to the aggregate sum of $369.50 

* 8ei BOtM fbllowing this report* 



120 [1882] 



12 & 13. NAAS AND SKEBNA RIVERS IMPROysmNTfl. 

Upon the authorization conveyed by letter No. 11,839 .of 28th March, and 
No. 13,749 of 28th July la^t and by telegram of 24th April last, Mr. Oroaadaile and 
Mr. Turner were instructed by me to expend $500 and $1,500, respectively, in 
removing snags from the channels of the Naas and Skeena Bivers as reported by 
my letters to you of 17th April * and letter from my Secretary, Mr. Roebuck to Mr. 
Seoretaiy Ennis of 15th August last.^ I have, however, not received any reports 
from either Mr. Croasdaile or Mr. Turner as to expenditures on these works and 
oonsequently no payments have been made by me on these accounts. 

14. TELBQRAPH 8SRVI0S. 

A report on this service from Mr. J. Wilson, District Superintendent, has been 
Ibrwardod by me, with covering letter of this dav's date, to Mr. F. N. Gisbome, 
Qiief Superintendent, who will doubtless embody the same in his annual report to 
you. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Tou obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTOH. 
The Honorable 

Sir HxoTOR L. Langbvin, K.C.M.G., G.B., 
Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



[1882] 



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[1882] 12a 



NOTES. 

DREDGING AND REPAIRS TO DREDGE VESSELS. 

Bef. No. 20894. 

VioTOBiA, B.C , 19th January, 1882. 

Sib, — Adverting to my letter to yon of 2'7th October last, I have the honour 
to report that pursuant to your instrnctioDs to me by Departmental letter No. 9087 
of 30th September last, the government dredge vessels aua tug steamer *< Georgia " 
bave been brought to Yictoria and the repairs necessary to place them in effectivo 
eondition duly carried out, and that dredging operations in Victoria Harbor were 
eomroeoced this morning. 

It was found on inspection that the tug steamer '< Georgia '* was in so l^ky a 
aUte that she had to be nauled out, a new stempost put on to her and other exten- 
sive repairs made to her hull. 

It is estimated that these repairs will render her efficient for the service she is 
now employed in for about two years longer, but after that period of work, she will 
probably become unfit for further service and will certainly not be worth further 
repairing. 

The whole cost of repairing the tug and dredge which as far as was practicable 
has been done by contract with the lowest tenderers, will however not exceed the 
preecribed amount ($3,400) appropriated for this purpose, including the wages of the 
crew of the dredger who have been engaged since the beginning of November in 
cleaning and repairing the machinery of that vessel. 

Before coming to a conclusion as to the most beneficial manner of employing the 
services of thedr^ger, I thought it desirable to obtain the opinions on this matter 
ef the Board of Trade, the Harbour Master, and the Agent of the Marine and 
Fisheries Department here. 

These fluthorities concur in recommending and urging that the dredge should in 
the first place be set at work in the inner harbor to remove the accumulation of 
deposit which is supposed to have resulted from the sewage of the town, and to 
deepen the channel along tue wharf frontage. 

I have accordingly directed that dredging operations should be commenced in 
front of the site of the proposed Dominion Government wharf, opposite the Custom 
House, and continued along the city front as fhr as may be found advisable. 

I have, however, serious apprehension that in consequence of the distance of the 
locality so proposed to be dredged from the mouth of the harbor, outside of which the 
dredged material has to be dumped and the consequent loss of time to the dredge in 
awaiting the return of the punts and tug, the cost per cubic yard of such dredging 
will be found to be excessive, as compared with that of continuing the dredging of 
the spit off Shoal Point at the mouth of the harbor where the length of towage 
TTould be deminished more than one half. 

It is on this latter work that the dredge has been principally employed hitherto, 
and as it is clearly most essential to the improvement of the harbour that its entrance 
should be straightened and deepened by the removal of this spit, I propose that the 
dredge shall return to this work as soon at all events as that in tne inner harbor 
commenced on this morning has been completed, which shoild not occupy her more 
than two or three months at mo:»t ; and should this latter operation, after working on. 

10— 9i 



it long eoQugh to alTord a prnctical lost, prove too costly to be cotitimted, as I f^ar 
may resuU, 1 propose to dcsibt fronk it, and to m% to work at Shoal Foiotepit 
forthwith. 

Traating this maj receive yonr approval, 

I have the hononr to be. Sir, 

Your obedieDt servant, 



JOSEPH W. TRUTCH, 



The Eorjoarahlo 

Sir Hector L, liAMoxvm, K. 0. M. 6,, V* B., 
ALiniBter of Public Wurkii, 
Ottawa* 



Eef, Ko. 31112. 



ViOToajA, B. C, 25th Januarj, 1882. 



Sir, — With reference to my letter to you cf the 19th instant, reporting that 
dredge ftl'ter having undergone tborough repair had been set to work to deepen th 
inner haibor and whiirf irontage at Tictona, with the uUimnte intenLiun, atler 
tbicj haH been accomplir^bed, of regutntDg the operation ^ on which »be wa^ formerk 
engaged, of removing the bar at Bhoai Point which impedes the entrance of vessel 
of any conHiderablo draught into the harborj I have tlie honoar to represent^ iha: 
m oixier to execute ccDComically this latter worlv, which would probaoiy take tw< 
years to ccmpletej it is obviously nece^iHary, ap ban been mjinted out by Mr. Pearee 
in bis Buecea^iv© jinnuui rt^ports, that provision should be made for carrying il 
condnnoU'-Iy throoghtait tke year. 

The ansatibfkctury rehuhs of the contrary course, which has prevailed for 
most part, in fbrnior years, is so t^ufllciently bhown by ibe statements accoropanyi. 
Mr. Pt arte Eeport of th*: \"hh Janimr}^ 1880, as to render further remark superfluoi 

1 b*^g tbi^refore to rrcommt^nd that, if it be determined to continue drodgiiig 
impmvemenu* in Vit^lona Harbour, proviftion for such continuous work be made bv 
tin appropnaiion of a mm nf not lesft thnn 818,000 per annnm, vik 115,000 for mnning 
^ypenf^e?^ of the dredge and low steamer (being at the rate of tl,250 per monti 
and 13,000 to covi^r repair and tenewal of machinery and plant 

In connection with the dredging of Shoal Puint ap:t,atid in order that the fUlt 
bonetil mi»y be derived theiifioni, it is very desirable that the rock in mid channi 
known as " Dredgtii IWk/' cbuiild be removed* The cost of the removal of 
rock bus buen cati muted by Mr. Pcaree at $ 16,t>25 ; but sufficient datfi to bas^e a cl 
estimate itf the work upon doet» nut appear to have beau |obtained by himp and it 



iree i 
on I 

I 





The codt oi ihijs aurvoy would be piohably not lede than 81»0ti0 inclading ibf 
expense of boring through tlie buperincumbent clay down to the burfaee of tbd 
** Dredger" roek so aft lo a^tiertain the cubic contents of the portion of that rock 
which would have to be removed to givu 1-i feet oi-dinary low water over il. 

1 should bt> glad lo have this sni vuy undertaken this spring, and beg to ask 
your authority tbr buvh woik wiibin the limit of uxperditure above Mtatodj in addition 
to the salary of Mr. Gamble whoso services I propose to employ in charge of it. 

I have al^o to advise that four more punts be built to take the place of thoa 
now in uso which are fast becoming worn out Two of these punts should 1: 
auppHed at once so m to prevent delay of the work in case of acciaent to those do 
in use. 1 propose u> l*uild thowe punts of a somewhat ditlerent model to the preaen 
enesj and erttiinale that ibey Wijuld cost #T50,U0 a piece • 



] 




[)882] , : a25 



I beg to ask yonr authority to have two such punts built forth with^and two mpre 
this summer, and that for the purpose of meeting the cost of these latter two^ the 
sum of $1,500 be ^dded to the appropriation for next year's service in the improve- 
ment of Victoria Harbor. 

The estimate for this service for the year 1882-83 would thus stand as follows : 

Dredging in Victoria Harbor. 

Sunning expenses of dredge and dredge vessels at 

$1,250.00 per month $15,000 00 

Sepairs of dredge and dredge vessels 3,000 00 

Two new punts '. 1,500 00 

Total dredging $19,500 uO 

Bemoval of •* Dredger Bock." 

Mr. Pearse's estimate $16,625 00 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TBUTCH. 

The Honorable Sir Hector L. Lanoevin, K.C.M.G., C.B., 
Minister of Public Works, Ottawa, Canada. 



Rei. No. 21651. 

Victoria, B.C., 9th February, 1882. 

Sib,— In reference to the estimate submitted in my letter to you of the 25th 
ultimo of the amount that will be required to meet the expense of continuing 
dredging operations in Victoria Harbor during the fiscal year 1882-83, I have the 
honour to enclose herewith a statement of the persons employed and wages paid, and 
showing in detail tbo present total monthly expenditareon this work, which amounts 
to $1,19M.90, a month, to which 1 have added in my estimate $51.10 for contingen- 
cies, making $1,.50 a month and $18,000 for th^ yuar's work. 

I am unable to specify particulars as to the expenditure of the sum of $3,000 
proposed by me to be provided to meet necessary repairs and renewals of the plant 
and' machinery. 

Substantial repairs have just been effected, and it may be hoped that the 
expenditure of the whole of this sum may not be found requisite ; — but in a work of 
^s character the machinery is constantly liable to break down, and it is most 
desirable that a fund nhould be available to meet (^uch contingencies. 

I have added to the estimate a separate item of $1,500 for two new punts to be 
built after the 3Mth June next, bringing up my estimate for dredging operations next 
year in Victoria Harbor to $19,500. 

In my letter above referred to of 25th ultimo, I have asked vour authority ta 
have two punts constructed immediately, making four new pants to be provided in all, 
to take the place of those now in use which are fast becoming worn out, and also ta 
have a re-(<urvey made of the harbor at an expense not to exceed $1,000. As these 
contemplated expenditures would, nowever, be in excess of the amount appropriated 



12^ 



[1832] 



for clredginj^ operations in Britiah Columbia this yeai% I await your direction on tilt 
matter befoio incuiTiQj^ any oxponne on thi^ aceouDt ; but should you not eoiiBider ilr 
fldvigable to have tbode latter works andertakon immediately, I would be^ to t^uggot 
that proviHton should be made for ihmr execution after 30th June by the addition 
ike eatim&te tor 1882*83 of the requisite amount to cover them, yk; f2,500« 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TKITT€H- 



an 



The Honorable 

Sir HfioTOE L< L^TrosYm, K.CM.G., C.R 



[1882J 



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[1832] 



Statement showing present 6iirr*ent Miinthl^ Ejcpenliture in crfinectioa with 
Dredging oporaiiofm in YiclJ>t ui Iliii b<»ur, with e^stimato for twelve motithg work 
from Itit Julj, 1882, to ^Olb iutie, 18Sa. 



Nam«. 



Upon Drtdfu *— 

Eobt. Dexter.. 

William Steele..,,..,. 

G«orgft Gardner 

John Odder... .....««., 

Upon Tug ^' Getjrgm " :- 

Willtiina Scott. 

Hobt Wickena , 

UpOQ Dredge t — 

Chag fiepath,.. ....... 

John ItAEDji^y.. ........ 

Nichola* Sviveri...,, 

Wm, Saundera........ 

Ja«, Griffiths 



CapacfCj, 



Sui>criaLCQdeDt.......,.«....i. 

Engineer.. ...................... - 

FiremEiQ ..,....,...., ^^i..^ 

tjlack^mitli ............... ....J. 






Carpenter aod deck-haad. 
do do » 

do do , 

Cook. , 

Oeck-Uaiid........ ....... . , .*„. 



K&te 


of 


Wagci. 


$ oti. 


125 00 


im 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


70 00 


50 00 


40 m 


+0 00 


- 40 00 


40 00 



Provisions (about) per month,,... 

Fuel— Coal, 3ii tons, at $5.25 

Woodr 26 cordi, at |3,00. 



Wator supply, per month. „*.. 

^undi-lft— Luml^er, tiails, iroOj rope, oi1| tallow, cotton wa^te (about) t. 



Actual current monthly e:!tpenditure.,., 
Add— For conlingendes (sajj...,... 



Qiving estimuted expenaes of workio^ dredge in Vi<:torfa H&rboifr for 13 

months from l^t July, 1882| to 3Uth Junu, I8S3.. ..., 

General repalra, ..,..,, 

Two new mud pimta,..**. ,.,.. .. ...*,. 



Total EitJmate for dredging and dredge repaira, Victoria Harbour 
Impro vein outs for 1882-83 ...,,......,..,„„...,. ...*.. .„... *...,...< ... 



Amount. 



$ Ct0. 

125 00 

100 0(1 

50 00 

50 00 

- 50 00 
70 00 

50 00 
40 00 
40 00 
40 00 
40 00 



157 50 
101 40 



l§,00i> 00 
3,000 00 
ItSOO 00 



ToUli. 



I CU. 



€5& I 



200 m 



258 pa 
10 00 
75 Ot) 



.1^ 



1,350 00 



$19^600 00 



JOSEPH W. TRUTCIL 



Yictoriaj B.C., lOth February, 188i, 



[1822] W*' 



IMPBOVEMENT COUBTNBY RIVEE. 



Eef. No. 19319. 

Victoria, B.C., 14th November 1881. 

Sib, — I have thehonoarto report to yoa that in accordance with your instruC'^ 
tiooato me by Department letter Na 8901 of 2l8t September last, I chartered the- 
steamer *' Maude .at $40 a day for the purpose of undertaking the removal of the 
snagB at ih& tnouth ef Conttney Biver, and propeeded in her himself (as I cnld not- 
obtain the services of any other person acquainted with the locality on whom I felt 
rdianee) on the 3rd instant to Nana'imo, and next day to Comox. The 5th and 7th 
iottant wer^ devoted to ascertaining the exact positions of the snags which offei'ed 
the greatest hindrance to navigation, and in attaching to them at low tide chains and 
bq^ys so that the steamer might make fkst to them' at high water. On the 8th, the tide 
being favourable, the steamer entered the channel through the sands in Comox bay, . 
and with much difficulty aod after grou ding frequently, reached the snags and 
attempted to tow them out to sea. Every effort . to effect this, however, proved 
unavailing. The channel is so narrow^ tortuous and shallow (not exceeding in depth 
8 feet at high water according to observations made) and with so strong a current 
from the river setting across the sands, that it was found impracticable to drag the 
snags out to sea. After several renewed efforts during the 8th and :th instant had 
proved unsuccessful, I concluded that further attempts would be futile, and therefore 
left for Victoria, which was reached on the 10th instant. 

I have only to remark thajt: though this attempt to remove the snags at the 
month of the Courtney River with a steamer of 6 .&et draught proved unsuce^ssful, 
it established the fact that the entrance to and departure from this river, are im- 
practicable, even for vessels of such light draught except at the top of exceptionally 
fai^h tides, and in my judgment precludes all ground for renewing such an under- 
taking. 

The expense of this service has been kept within the prescribed sum^ ($500)» 
appropnated for this purpose. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. 

The Honorable 

M Sir HiOTOR L. Langivin K.C.M.G., C.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa, Canada. 



130 



[1882] 



REPAIRS TO TICTORIA BATTERIES. 



R«f. No. 21*24T- 



YlCTOBiA, B.a, 3Ut October, 18S2, 



Sm, —J have the honour to encloiae a copy of a report to mo from Mr, F, C ] 
Oamble, ABwietant Engineer in thi« oMce, upon the work recently carried out imdtir; 
hie immodiate aiiperintendence in repairing and BtreDgLheningthe Yictoria BatteHoi^ , 
and reproaenting that the sum authori?;od to be expended thereon, viz ; $600 did nol j 
safflce to eomplet© all the requi&it© work, but that this might be aooompUshed by %hm 
expenditure of a further sum of $150, whioh Mr. Gamble adTiaea should be appro- 1 
priated for this pui-potie. 

I have oommunicaDed the iubdtanco of Mi*. Gambb's reprt to Oaptain Diipoii(» \ 
Acting Deputy Adjutant General, who has informed me that he will addreed tbt 
Department of Militia and Defenco in support of Mr. Grumble's rooommendatioii, in 
which I also beg to express my concurrence* j 

I have the honor to bo^ Sir, 

Your obedient i^ervant^ 

JOSEPH W. TRUTCH. | 

The Honorable 

Sir Heotoe L, Lanoivih, K.C.M.G,, C-B., 

Minister of Public Worka, Oltavvaj Canada. 



ViOTORU, B* C. 

Sm,— I have the honour to make the foUo,ving report upon certain repairs to Fin* 
layson and Maeaulay Points Batteries, carried out in accordance with your Terbftl 
instructions* 

Public lenders were invitotl for the work but all wero found to exceed tbi | 
amount appropriated, namely, $600, in conaoquenco of which you direotod me tocb 
the work by day'^ labor. 

The repairs to Finlayson's Point Battery c<>nsisted in revetting or ^tockadinjr 
m front of the guns with sawn cedar and around the traverse and along tho side md 
rear pampets with gplit cetjar, cleaning out the drains and putting in a log culvert 
These repairs placed this Battery in as serviceable a condition at it was possible to 
do without exceeding the sum I had sot apart for the purpofeooutof the appropriatioti, 
v\z: $285.00, 

The expenditure of this sum on Finlayson's Point Battery left a balanoa of three 
hundred and sixty-five dollars to be expondod on Macaulay Point Battery, I was in 
hopca that with this sum I would be able to place thifi Battery in as effloient a stata 
as the other, but, in consequence of the limited time at my dit^pOBali thejrroatdemimi 
tor labor, consequent upon the expected arrival of the Governor General, and tbd 
exhorbitant wages demanded, I wm only able lo stockade in front of the gam^ 
around the traverses and along the side parapets^ leaving undone the rear p&r&pati 
4it3d shelter trenehos to the magazine. 



[1882] 131 



To do thiB latter very Decessary work the further sum of S150.00 will be required, 
^hicb, together with the material we have on the grouna, will put the Battery in a 
thoroughly serviceable state. 

I have the honor, etc., 

F. C. GAMBLE, 

As$t. Engineer 

The Hon. J. W. Trutch, C. M. G., 

Dominion Government Agent, 
Victoria. 



N AAS EIVBR IMPROVEMENT. 



Bef. No. 23418. 

Victoria, B. C, 17th April, 1882. 
Sol, 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your instructions by Departmental 
letter No. 11839 of the 28tb ultimo, relative to improving the channel of Naas Biver, 
and to inform you that in accordance therewith, I have made arrangements with 
Mr. Groasdaile to-day to have the requisite work carried out under his personal 
direction within the limit of expenditure prescribed in your instructions,vi2 : S500.00 
and with the proviso that no payments can be made, on this account^ until after the 
Ist of July next. 

I havefthe honor to be. Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 



JOSEPH W. TBUTCH. 



The Honorable 

Sir HscTOR L, Langbyin, K.C.M.6., O.B., 

Minister of Public Works, Ottawa, Canada. 



SKBENA BIVEB IMPROVEMENT. 



Bef. No. 26115. 

Victoria, B. C, 15th August, 1882. 

Sir, — ^I am directed by Mr. Trutch to acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
No.. 13749, of the 28th ultimo, and to state that instructions have au*eady been given 
by Mr. Trutch as authorized by the Honorable the Minister by letter No. 11^9 of 
the 28th March last, and by telegram of the 24th April, repeotively, to Mr. Croasdaile 
to expend $500.00 in continuing the removal of snags from Naas Biver, and to Mr. 
J. H. Turner, for the expenditure of $1,500 00 in removing snags and placing buoys, 
Skena Biver, under his superintendence. 



H 132 


^^^^^^^^^^r ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


^H T Em also to state that Mn Tniteh is about to invite tenders for the removal of 
^H SD^g^, Fia&er Kiver, and hopes to have this work carried oat this autamn wtthio the 

^H limit of expenditure authorised in you t- letter. ^y 


^L 


I have the honor to he, Sir, ^M 
Your obedieot servant, ^M 


^fr 


H. S, ROEBUCK, ■ 


H p. E. 


. EnniSj Esq.f ^1 

Secretarv, ^| 

Dept. Public Works, Ottawa, Canada. ^m 


1 




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[1882J 133 



APPENDIX No. 7. 

SLIDE, BOOMS, ETC.,— SAGTJBNAY DISTBICT. 



Chibp Enqinebb's Offiob, 
fief. No. 29915. Ottawa, 6th December, 1882. 

Sm, — Herewith I transmit a report by Mr. Assistant Engineer Rosa on the 
works, etc., executed in connexion with the slide and booms at Lake St. John, Biver 
Sagaenay, daring the fiscal year ended 30th Jane, 1882. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Yoar obedient servant, 

HBNBY P. PBBLEY. 

Chief Engineer. 



F. H. Ennis, Esq.. Secretary, 

Pablic Works Department. 



Quebec, 18th November, 1882. 

Sib, — I have the honor to report as follows on the works executed during the 
ast fiscal year in connection with the slide and booms at Lake St. John, Biver 
Saguenay. 

The bulkhead of the slide has been reconstructed as well as dam No. 7 which is 
231 feet in length, 28 feet in height, and a mean width of 30 feet on the slope. These 
two works cost $3,500.00. 

A length of 669 feet of slide has been rebuilt, and temporary repairs made on a 
length of 2,000 feet of the old portion, at an outlay of $3,000.00. 

At the close of the year there remained 1,260 feet of slide to be reconstructed, 
and nrobably of this length 900 or 1,000 feet will be finished during the current year. 

17o. 6 dam which was constructed in 1860 should be rebuilt before the rising of 
tiie lake next spring. It is about 128 feet in length, 18 feet in height, and of a mean 
width on the slope of 32 feet. 

During 1881-82, 32,000 logs 12 to 14 feet in length and 6,000 pieces of timber 
from 28 to 30 feet in length, or a total of 38,000 pieces, passed down the slide. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH BOSA, 

Assistant Engineer. 

Hbnbt p. Peelbt, Esq., Chief Engineer, 
Public Works Department, 
Ottawa. 



[1882] 



APPENDIX Na 8. 



SLIJ>ES AND BOOMS—BT, MAUEICE DISTBICT. 



Eet No. 25922. 



OrFICK OF TO I SUPEarNTlNDENT, 

St. Mauhiob Works, 

TnREi: Bivnaa, B-tth July, 18S2. 



StR, — I Imvo th© honor orsubmittiDg to you, for the mformation of the Honombl©^ 
the Minister of Public Worde, my report in reference to the works placed under 
my super! ntoDd on c6, for the year expiring on the 30th of June last 

The height of the water in the St, Maul-ice^ and its tributarie& has been very 
ad^antagoou,H for the floating of timber, and over 500,000 logs have been placed, at an 
early date, inside the boome* The boomw enffered no accidente in spit© of the 
enorniouB pressure they had to bear. 

The cost of carrying out the works amnunte this year, to 116^572.20* The 
increase on last year's expenditure, is due partly to the reason that the floatin*r of 
timber lasted all the summer of 18.il, bringing on heavy expenses at each station ; the 
increase in the salaries and the buying of chains to the amount of several hundred 
dollars, can also account for it, 

A sum of $2,y 93.91 has been placed in my hands to make repaira. 

Thet^e repairs have been effected at the following stations ; 

MOUTH OF THE ST. HAimtCK. 

2^200 ieet of boom planked with ^-inch deals, 

CAP£ OORN^ILLE. 



Repaired pier l^o. 6. 

*' ** of the bridge shed. 

Made a wharf to protect the shed foundation. 



aB£8 FALLS. 



1,500 feet of boom planked with 3<iDoh deals. 
Built a bouse IS x 14 feet, for the use of the men. 



SHAWENEQA!f BAY- 

634 feet of new boom 24 x 13 inches. 



[1882] 13^ 



LS8 HtoRBS. 

418 feet of new boom 24 x 13 inches. 

I have in hand $303.40, balance from the grant placed at my disposal for repairs. 
Contracts have also been awarded to the amount of 17,142.00 for the construction, 
rftwo piers and the repair of seven others, at the mouth of the St. Maurice. 
All those works have been executed. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

CHARLES LAJOIE, 

Superintendent. St, Maurice Works. 



[1882] 



APPENDIX No. 9. 



i\i 



SLIDES AND BOOMS.-OTTAWA DISTRICT. 



Rof. No. 2T601. 



Ottawa Uiveb Works Office, 

Ottawa, Slat July, 18^2. 



up 



SiB,-I ba^e the honor U, «abmil the following report on the works .."der 
c'.ar«e%n the OUawa Rlvor ami tributaries, for the fiscal year ended iOih Jure I 

I>^^.^n?th6fl«a30nof ISai.alow pitch of wator generally prevailed »t ^1 
.tatio^r""VXr th" pring flood« hak run off. the rafts of -1-- jtmbcr and 
;aw log drive., in many cases, m the summer months advanced, had to be laid 
or abandoned until the following spring. „„„i„.^ «„ Bxamination of 

After the businesH of the sea^m had been <=0'?pl<''*^' *? f^^r"^^^^ "' 
foundations of the various slides and Other river works was made, in the low^* 
il the water, and the work of repairs was begun, continued dui-mg the wn. 
.1881-83, and finished only last spring. 

OH XnS MAIN OTTAWA BIVKB. 

The boom piers at &«« att ifefoiiei were repaired and the boom in its cba, 

'"''?KXiorand side piers of the slide at mil were thoroughly owhaaW, 
and such repairs made to the bottom and slide planking aa were required 

At th^ OWflim or South Chamliere Staiion, the bulkheads wer« «-i««d^"?i' f 
«do pie 8 and booms improved and strengtbcued ; decayed timbe.^s l^j^^^^J^^; 
anran structures and sound material eubstiiat«d-and a cloeo inspeotion was m.«le^ 
X wiril and caUsof the Union Susp^ion Bndne and steps promptly taken to gaaM 
against corrojion. ^^^ ^^ be e.ecated on tj.e <>»"«|^^^We F' 

bv wVv of facin- up the «ime. and t*he bottom timbers of the slide were ''enowed • 
^ r^^Jv.„!.« th«v hitd failed through exposure to the heavy tear and wear ot il 
J* X Tt tWsl^Uunt Sion afd the'^ame may be «aid of the neeessary ref». 
wo" sw hichh^K^be dU?at Ibe Ok^eau^ l..om aild the P..(.,e du i;<>'•^ -«— 
7'^mJt Joachim and BocA«r C«i>iWi,e slides, where the foundations of jv or., boU 
tim£«a.Xbolkheadfl of sIide«W the guide and retaining booms were inatoiu^ 

BtrengthcDedi ^ 

The following i-©paii-B were earned out on 

TEiBUTARIKS OF TBI OTTAWA. 

Gatineaa Rwer.-^ho boom and piers near the mouth had ^^^I'^'^^lir , 
and timbere renewod and certain additional .tone fiUmg r\^^, ^^^^f.'^^^^^^^ 
ulearanc^e of rubbbh waa made from the gi>ps and the outlet chanoek and fVom 
Pond'a creek, and the fences and a bridge aoioes the canal repaired* 



i 




[1882] 13T 



Madawaska River, — At Ragged Chute^ the new channel for timber on the easterlj 
side of the river was deepened and straightened by excavating and removing certain 
rocky obstractions, that nad caused moch delay and damage to parsing timber, at 
thiB point ; the side piei"8 and booms were also overhauled and a safer, more extensive 
and reliable system of boomage provided at this place. 

At High FaUSi ^ short distance further down stream, certain renewnlb of 
covering plank had to be effected and the booms and piers strengthened, while at 
CSintes lower down the river, the wing dams were partially sheeted anew. 

At Springtown the retaining boom and piers were prepared for the season's 
bofiinoss, and at the Amprior station the slide was patched, and some alterations were 
made in the position of the retaining boom and piers in the Chais Lake, at the mouth 
of the Madawaska, to meet the requirements of the lumbermen on that stream, as 
well as to present infringement on tne riparian rights of the owners of a very 
extensive and newly erected saw-mill on a river frontage adjacent to the Government 
booms. 

CauUmge River, — A serious break having occurred at the High Falls slide in 
May, 1880, the works, although then repaired, were so much shaken in the region of 
the high bents and crib foundations that constant bracing and strengthening had to 
be resorted to. A large portion of the worn out planking caused by the friction of 
the logs which are shot through the slide with great velocity, had to bo removed and 
replaced by new planks. 

Black River, — The slide at High Falls near the mouth was repaired and 
strengthened and as far as possible put in a state of efficiency ; but with so abrupt a 
pitch at the lower end of the slide and so heavy a body of water thrown in at the 
head, taken in connection with the great jam of timber waiting for passage, it 
happened l&st spring that lumber under these conditions and not having a sufficient 
number of men to take charge of it, was fed without proper check and in a wedge- 
like mass, forced out a portion of the side of the slide and thus caused a few days* 
delay. "The necessary repairs were, however, made with due diligence and the 
remainder of the drive passed in safety. 

Petewawa River — On this stream, the dams and slides were stanched, as much 
leakage had existed, and on the lo.wer reaches, where the works are in places 
showing symptoms of decay, after being in use twenty-four years, patching, to a 
greater extent than was necessary in the earlier historj^ of the works, had to be don© 
by the officers in charge. 

Dumoine River, — The long slide [on this river had its planking repaired ; the 
side piers were underpinned and the series of dams at the upper " ch(ites " had their 
limbers and planking made good, where the action of the ice and water had abraded 
and stripped the more exposed portions of these structures. 

THl WORKS OF CONSTRUCTIONS C0N8ISTSD OF : 

The deepening of portions of the bed of the River du Lievro by blasting a reef at 
Little Bapids about ten miles above Buckingham Village, and removing boulders 
from the channel at Long Rapids, a phort distance below Ili^h Falls. These 
improvements, when certain arrangemontH shall have been made by the lumbermen 
to keep an open pat^satxe through their sawlog boomn situated between the stations 
referred to, — will facilitate the navisjation by small craft on that rea(^h of the Lievre 
between Buckingham and the foot of the Portage road past High F.lls. 

On the Ottawa, a short distance below the Village of Portage du Fort the work 
of removing a sand bar was commenced, but as this can only bo done to advantage, 
with the appliances available, at the season of low water, action had to be deferred 
until a period of the year later than is covered by this report. 

• Immediately below the Union suspension bridge a rocky inland or reef impeded 
the flow of water from the foot of the Great Chaudidre Falls and divided the swift 
current, throwing the northerly branch of it with great force against the line of 

10—10 



tHS 



[1882] 



the 

rly \ 



whiirvufl on the Hull frontage ; and that in th6 ftoutherlj i^hanntjl with a liira resalt 
alon^ the lumber bhij»|rin^ docks forming pm't of ibe city of OtUiw%. During ft very 
€50ti-^i«b^ritble portion of (ho busy if!©a^on of the year, fit the time of high waU»r, it w« 
fgand itni>r0eUcabie tu pbico boats ^nd bargoB in poMtton for the 8bi|.ping of iumber, 
hut yiiice ihe reef was blasted o^\ lai^l fail, there ba» been a niarkikl itnpi-^v^emeot, 
the current heini/ now diree^pd to inid-channol and navigation for rfvercrsiA. uninter- 
ruptod, throu^hom the eoaaon, to mooring places further up f^team than the site of 
th© former ob&truetiori. 

On the South Nution Rirer, near the vilhig© of Plantagenet^ two winijdamH were 
eonstruetcd one on ea<*h side, with the view of eontracting the volume of water and 
rendeiia^ m<*re ea-^^y of aceet^rt the entrance betweijo the boo.B8 at the head of the 
flhoit ijhde recently contitructed. The^e liam-* have had the deaired effe€t on 
descent of the vaiirms kinds of lumber, on that stream. 

liftst t^priug, this trtbuianes and main rivor attained flood height later than a^ua 
but Iht^ pittib of wauT wab mowt favorable for the raftHmon* un allhongh an earl 
start wa^ ant all'ecled the gradual melting of the ^now and ice, and the timely rai 
falls about the honrcep* of the ri vera yielded the t^teady flow of a heavy volume -" 
water for a lengthen id p4>rfod and thus enabled the river drivers to make a '* clean 
Bweep'* and leaoU the main Ottawa with the reasonable expectaiion that tb * 
timber and baw loga would arrive at their destinationa in one cteaaan. 

Of course with bucb large bodi' ti of timber moving at high stages of the wat 
certain breaks ar.d detcntiotiB at the works weie unavoidable, In addition to 
accidi^nt at Biaek Ri\^er, alrciidy referred to^ a break of the foandatioTi timl>erBj m 
and pbinkiiig at the Catuniet slide took place in the month of June ; the i?ervices of 
large i'oive of mi3n were irarae«Jiately brought into requiaitton to execute the repairs, 
sothattbed(?tentioD on that occas^ion did not exceed more than a day or two. 
Minor repairtt were executed at other placei!» during the progroa^ of the dij:Lredj m 
occasion required* 

Thecon&tructioa of a large dam acro»a the Ottawa River at Carillon, to supply 
water to the new canal at thr*t place, wus ihe meanw of flooding out the pier dam* 
which were built by the Uovernment upwaids of twenty years ago. The^e old world 
were platted in the line of the rapida for the purpose of confining the flow of water 10 
ruivigublt) channels to admit of the pansage of timber aiid have been wipt^ out tmdir 
the present tsyatem. A crib elide through this new dam was constructed by the 
Government under the direction of the Department of Railways and Canals, and wm 
opened for the passage of timber early in ilay j but aa already !*« ported in a former 
coramnnicatiorj to your Department, although the running of timber waa all that 
could bo desired when it reached the til id e proper, the approaches to it wero m dan- 
gerous and difficult with the winds in certain dii'ections, that a very considerable 
exlQOHon of the guide booms and supix>rt piers was imperatively required as a safe 
guard against the destruction of life and projierty, I understand this matter is & 
engaging the attention of the proper aulhorities, and that such additional works 
are required for the 6xj>editiourt and safe passage of timber at Carillon sUde, wiU 
cons trusted without unnec^issary delay, 

I ma7 mention that at several statittnson the Ottawa, such as Calumet^ Mmmtain, 
Portage du Fort and Chats, escaped saw-logs fi-om the drives, frequently lodge in ik& 
slide channels and on the apronj^ and besides battering the works, they are often the 
means of wrecking passing cribs of square limber. The break in the Calumet »lid« 
was hirgely due to thi^ cause^ and it seems* as if more slriDgenl measure** will ha^e te 
be adopted to confine the logs to their own proper channels, as the crib elides are 
not adapted ,for their passage, and they yield no revenue in the shape of tolls at 
such slides. 

The slides end other works at Oahmet and Movntain S^tions, after belwe 
thiily and foity years' *^ervice^ are much dilapidated and a renewal of their prinoipil 
parte is urgently i^uired, as well as a thorough overhauling of the Black &V" 



[1882] 13» 



tilde. At the head of the Ghats Bapids, at least three snubbing piers shotild be 
pxmded for the safe mooring of rafts preparatory to the timber being piloted to the 
head of the Chats slide. An r «t'imate of the oost of these works will be transmitted 
in dae time. \ 

All of which is respectfally sabmittedy 

GEO. P. BROPHT, 

Siq>t. Bng^ 0. B. Works 

F. H. Enhis, Esq., 

Secretary of Public Works, Ottawa. 



1©— 10| 



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ri882J 



APPENDIX No. 10. 



SLIDES AND BOOMS— KEWC^TLE DISTEICT* 



Bef. No. 3004L 



Tbent Canal Works^ 

Slidkb and Booms Bitibiok^ 

ETiOINEfiE'fi OfFICB, 

Peterbqrodoh^ Nov, 30 th, 1882, 



SiE, — I have the honor to iubmit my Annual Report on the Slides and Boomft 
diviBion of ih© Trent Navigation S78teni for the tiacal year ended 30th June ISriii, 

The works embraced in thiB division are those connected with the descf^nt of 
timber, and the improvements of the riyen^ leading to the soveral canals though out 
the district. 

The canals, locks, swing bridges and all works connected with the narigatioa 
are onder the control of the Departmetit of Railways and Canale. 

The water on the upper reaches during the past year attained its greatei?t 
height on May nth, and fell ranidly, reaching Ha loweiti level on September l4iii, 
The reading recorded, being the lowest during my experience. Thia f^erimi-ir 
affected the steamboat navigation; but the ** drives'' reached their destinatiojm, 
without an exception. 

The low water was in a great measure due to the maDner in which it 
regulated on the feeders. 

The principal tributaries dowii which timber is brought to the main rivefa 
lakes are as fotlows : 

Gall-River, 
_ Burnt-River, 

~ Squaw River, 

Masmpftaga-River^ 
Crow-River, 

And aa lumhering operations are now carried on so far up on these tributaries 
those operating on them have from time to time to huild smull dams and slides 
get their timber down to the main stream. 

The first two vi^-. G-uU and Burnt Rivers, drain a va.^t area of counti-y, and in thfl 
respective conrHes, there are a number of largo reBeivoina, i^r^nt having an area ( 
over Beven square miles, at the foot of which da ma have liecn constructed In order W 
hold the water in reserve for use in the dry Reason. Were it not for tlios© reaervoir 
dams the clearances effected by settlors and the more extended t.3^stcm ot dratnag^ 
would have the effect of causing extremes in high and low water^ whereas now, ly 
proper and careful management of these higher levels, these levels on the main liao 
jihontd not vary more than fi'om 2 feet to 2 feet 6 in. 




11882] 14S 

i^ The improvemnnts and repairs executed under this i>epartinent, at the res 
pectivo stations aloug the line were as follows, vis : — 

FENILON rALLS. 

The elide was found on executing temporary repairs to be in a very unsafe con- 
dition, all the floor timbers were decayed, and had to be replaced, and in order not to 
exceed the appropriation the planking could not be completed in such a manner as I 
would have desired; this however will be attended to this vear and the side wall 
rebuilt.The following is the quantity of timber that passed through this slide, viz : — 

Saw logs 161,309 

Boom timber, pieces 2,047 

Cedar 999 

SOUGOG RIVSB. 

The improvements on this river corsisted in removing the sunken logs and 
ftnags that obfitructed navigation from the Town of Lindsay to its outlet into Stnrgeoil 
Lake, so as to get a depth of 5 feet water at low water. This was accomplished in 
a satitifactory manner to the great benefit of navigation. Previous to this improve- 
ment the propellers although of small tonnage were constantly meeting with nushaps 
to t]beir screws, and barges laden with lumber frequently ran on snags and sunken 
iogs. 

BOBCAYGEON. 

The works at this station consist of a canal, lock, dams, wharves and swing 
bridge. Thoy are under the control of the Depaitment of Hailwiiys and Canals. 

Obstructions to navigation that occur in the river approaching the canal both 
tbove and below are being removed under the direction of this Department. 

The quantity of timber that passed down the channel was as follows, viz : 

Saw logs 239,158 

Boom timber, pieces 2,203 

Square «* ** 166 

BUCKHORN. 

The works connected with the descent of timber, and under the control of the 
Department, consist ot a slide, boom8 and piers. The bulkhead of slide is being 
renewed, new stop logs were supplied ami a new boom built. 

Improvements to the navigation at this station are about being carried out by 
the Department ol Kailways and Canals, consisting of the constructon of l<»cks, which 
in all probability will necessitate the erection of several boom piers and booms, to 
divide the steamboat channel from the timber channel. 

The quantity of timber passed through this slide consisted of: 

Saw logs 249,158 

Boom timber, pieces 2,703 

BUELEIGH. 

I have described the works at this station in previous reports, and stated that 

fliey were originally erected by a committee of lumbermen, which has now ceased 

exist, and as this is another of the stations at which the Government are about 



IM 



[18821 



©on§tt meting worka fur the extension of inland navigation, for wUtcb tlie contnicfc_ 
b&^ been letj it will be nocessary for the Department to uAeome control of the worl 
cr^rinectoil wiih the ^io^^^^nt of timber (whieh I rec^|>ecifiilly f-u^^ge?t), and tbiij^e xoH 
BtiuiLar to th^ise on other work^ oi n 11 tee descnption on timber, &&., &c^ deBeendl 
the riTen — Sm Annwal Rciwrt for year endt-d June 30th, lb8L 

The quAirtity of timber that paaaed tbrokigb the t^lide hore was m folio wfi^ 

Saw log®.....-* *.....„.. »„ 249J5S 

Boom timber^ pLeeee.. «..».«..,..., ..,«.•, .......t «.... 2,70,} 

Square '' , ,.......,....» .,..,..,..,... IM 

LA.KEFIELD. 

There fa n Aam f^nd BJid© at tbia Hlatlon- The dam relaing the leTel of Kat 
wan no Luke to ti mwigablo height for t^teamertj drawing 4* 6*\ It ia badly m Da 
of eiclf^Ti!^ivo repairs* The -llde also reqfiire?* atlgntionp 

The dam i* prirato property, but negotialiouf* ar<j, I am informed^ being carried 
on wtlh a vi*vw of placing it under Depart m«»nta[ control which if carried oat will 
be a public benefit. 

The lemovat of (be boulders that obalructed the dteamboatchaimel was completed 
and ffiTew geocral i^atinfaction* 

The quufitity of timbor^ &e,, that passed through thly slide, was as follows, m i~~ 

Raw l>gs ,. ,,, 408, mi 

Squtire ttmher,. ,.,, 2,4if7 

Boom " ,,, ....,, a,6tl 

PETERBOROUGH,* 



The banki' of eawduat and wlaba irj the river upproaehing the town and 
which I reported to the Chief Engineer, are being removed. 



apoi 



LITTLE LAKE, 

The works erected here consisted in the construction of a boom pier at south 
«nd of boom, 

Thift wH^ nece!*sary in order to diminish the strain on the snubbing piiats and 
prevent the boom when filleil with logy, fnnn breaking looso. 

The loom requireji to bo renewed, it h nnniife in its presient conditioo, nnd it '- 
necessary to *Mki? ihe precaution previous to permitting &aw l^gs to enler it. to awiii*. 
on a doubft.^ boim outride, &o as give security in c^wse of any accident to thtsold boom. 

Its btorage capacity is about 80,0 JO saw logs. 

WHITLAW*S EAFrDB. 



The guide booms and flooring of alide were repaired and bouldera removed from 
tlie|channt'l approaching the lock. 

The diims, canal and lock are under the control of the Department of liailwayi 
and Canal8. ^ ^ ,^M 

The quantity of timber, &c., that passed through the alide, was as foliows;— 

Saw logs... .,..,.. .-.,.,.. - 2T9,IM 

Boom timber, pieces * .« ..,..».,.* ^,404 

liqttftro '* " .,. .„, 2.401 



[1882] Itf 



OTONABBB BIYSB. 



AocnmulatioDs of saw-dast and slabs have become so great at tho mouth of the 
rirer, as to a great extent impede the passage of steamers. 

It is necessary that they should be removed and active measures taken to pro- 
hibit parties from throwing slabs &c., into the river. *^ 

HASTINas. 

The slide received general repairs, and three boom piers, renewed from low 
water mark to top. The guide booms require renewal. The lock, dam, swing bridge, 
4c., are under the control of the Department of Bailways and Canals. 

The following is the quantity or timber, &c., that passed this station, viz : 

Saw logs 163,590 

Boom timber, pieces 781 

Square " " 2,407 

hislsy'b rALLS. 

The slide is undergoing extensive repairs, for which an appropriation was made 
Jit last session of Parliament, and the guide boom extended 200 feet. 

During the past year, and previous to the running of logs, &c., on examining the 
•lide it was found that the leakage through the platform above the stop log^ was bo 
great that it was absolutely necessary to shut the water off, and in order to do so a 
^oofferdam'' had to be const tucted across the throat, which was attended with a 
great deal of trouble, and the flooring repaired. 

As there was no appropriation for this we had to use a portion of that granted 
ibr other stations. 

The quantity of timber, &o., that passed through this slide, was as follows : 

Saw logs 263,700 

fioom timber, pieces 900 

Square " " 2,407 

MIDDLE rALLS. 

No repairs were executed during the last year. 

The slide and wing wall of basin are in a very unsafe condition, and if allowed 
to go much longer without receiving the necessary repairs, it will take a consider- 
able amount to put them in proper order; whereas by a small expenditure now, it 
would keep them for many years to come in a safe working condition. 

The quantity of timber, &c., that passed through this slide during the past 
•eaaon was as follows : — 

Saw-logs 277,938 

Square timber, pieces 3,731 

Boom timber, " 1,417 

E. Rties •• 22,380 

ohisholm's rapids. 

There are extensive works at this station ; comprising a canal lock, dam, slide^ 
waste weir, guide booms, &c. 

The canal and lock are under the control of the Department of Bail ways and 
Canalfl. 



The dam was repaired and ihd leakage stopped to a great eictent, which it ij 
great boon to the Lmubormca, as it enables theni to ** flood " in tow water. 

The filide which is 100 foot long and 50 feot wide, requires repairs, and DQAdtl 
narrower ; there is do necessity for such a width, arid itpermiU a great wast^ofi 
water. 

ThiB I shall make a detailed report upon for the informattOD of th« Hon, t^J 
Minister, 

The works at 'Middle Falln/ ' Heeler's Falls/ and CbisholTn'e Eapide connected! 
with the descent of timber were many yearu ago transferred u* a committoe of lum^ 
hermen for their management^ and I b«g respectfully to drav. the attention of thtl 
Hon. the Minister to that portion of my last annaal report referring thereto, andj 
ahso to the '^ Chief Engineer's *' report on the same subject, I 

The quantity of timber, itc, that pa§sed through this station dorfng thepttij 
year was as follows, viz : — 

Saw-logs . -..,.., „....<,„»........ 27T|938 

Boom timber, pieces ,-,., /*, l,41t 

Square timber^ " „...„., ...*.• 3,731 

E/R. ties " „, 22,380 

In respeetftilly submitting the above, 

1 have the honor to he, Sir* 

Your obedien t aervant, 

THOMAS D. BELCHER, 

SupennUnding Engineiri 

T. H. Eknis, Ej*q.^ 

Secretary, Department Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



[1S88] 14t 



APPENDIX No. II. 



KBPOET ON TELEGRAPH LINES AND SIGNAL SERVICB. 



TXLSORAPH AND SlONAL SbBVIOB. 

No. 27805. Ottawa, 30th September, 1882. 

Sm, — ^I have the honor to submit the following report upon the above servica^ 
for the fiscal year terminating 30th Jane, 1882. 

BBITISH OOLUMBIA. 

The ezpenditnre npon this system has been t38,'702.37, about one foorth of such 
amount being upon constimotion account; and the revenue paid in to the credit of 
the Receiver General is $18,41 4.1^4, versus $10,544 fbr the previous year, and $5,320 
for 1879^0, when the expenditure was $41,496. 

The construction party, under the management of Mr. Hartley Gisborne, have 
cut down all de&d and threatening timber and brushwood, and thoroughly repaired 
the line between Tale and Deep Greek, a distance of 277 miles. 

Line interruptions from breakage have been much less frequent and more 
quickly repaired, and consequent despatch of business has commanded the confidence 
^ the public, as exemplified by the large increase in tariff receipts. 

OXTLF OF ST. LAWRENCE. 

The Expenditure has been ; 

Upon the Anticosti system $1,575.00 t;ersua Revenue $454.00 
" Magdalen Islands 4,069.00 " " 835,00 

Weather, shipping and fishery reports bing transmitted free of charge. 

All cables have remained in perfect working order excepting at the landing 
point of Bird Rock, since repaired, but not at present in operation, the new 
ught house keepner there not being as yot conversant with the proper management 
of the transmitting instruments. Mr. District Suporintendant LeBourdais awaits an 
opportunity of landing upon the rock to put the cable in operation again. 

BAY OF FUNDY. 

The Expenditure upon the above system has been $1,308.00 versus Revenue 
1665.00. 

The Grand Manan and Campo-Bello Islands cable was damaged by a wreck 
pounding upon it : but it has been satisfactorily repaired. 



148 



[1882] 



ATXiAHTIC COAST, 



Tho Hue betwoeii Causo and Ilalifiix, (woi-kc^d under an agreement witli thelai 
Donuijion Tologmpli Comptiny, without co^t toOovernmont,) has been mjsttntiiifiedln 
effect! vo operntian, 

NORTH SHO&E AND UITBE BT, LAWISMGB. 

A Iiea^y cable has been fluocosp^fully laid across the Saguenay river, and 
ibe CbicotHinii and Mitle Yacbee laod lines have boon e^atiefuctoHly rrjaiDlained 
and ope r& ted und^r contract with tbe Monlroa* Telegraph Co- at a cost to Government 

PCEWPOITNDLANB. 

The 14 mile land line between Port ati Biiaquo and Cape Ray lighthouse, is now 
in CO nrso of construction under contract with the Anglo-American Cabl© Co., and 
^hen completed will entail an annual eo^t t>the Government for interest npon cost, 
i-epairfi and operating, of $250*00 pcir annum. 



-te^ 



ilGNAL eKEYtOl. 



23 Htationa have been establisbod at the following poiotSj at an annual outlay 
$700 at 14 stationH not connected by Govern mont telegraph lines. 



L'Isbt 

Eiver du Loup 
Brandy Pota 
Rimou^ki 

Father Point Lighthouse 
Little Metis ** 

Matane '* 

Cape Chatte ** 



Martin River Lighthouse 
Cape Magdalen " 
Fame Point ^* 

Cape Bossier ** 

Cape Deapatr.., ** 
PointeMaquereau ** 
West Point Anticoati 
South We&t Point " 



South Point Lighthooae. 
Heath Point 
Amherst Island ** 
Gro-^f^o I^le " 

Bird Rocka *' 

Meata>ve, C.B. ^« 
Low Point Lighthouee. 



MANITOBA Ann HO&TH WEST TSEBITOBIES. 

Per Order in Council, tbe telegraph line^ in the above Uistrict hare been tranf- 
ferred in my superin tendency since Juno 30chj 188^, and active mcasuj^eti are novr 
hoing luken to recontitmct them and al.o ii> rcorgiinifio that service* 

In couclublon I may add that the goneiui revenue is impi^viog upon a decreased 
expenditure, 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your mocit obedient servant, 

F, N. GISBORNE, 



F, H, Ennib, EBq.j 

Secretary^ Department of Public Works. 



[2881] 14» 



APPENDIX No. 12 



QUEBEC HARBOK IMPROVEMENTS.— EIVER ST. CHARLES ANI> 
GRAVING DOCK AT LEVIS. 



Harbour Commissionxrb' Offioe, 
Sefl No. 29870. Quibio, 2nd December, 1882. 

Sir, — ^I have the honor to transmit you herewith the Resident Engineer'* 
Beports both on the Graving Dock and the Harbor Improvements for the fis^ year 
•naed on the 30th June last. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Tour most •bedient servant, 

A. H. VBRRBT. 

Secretary-Treasurer^ 

P. H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Pablic Works Department, 
Ottawa. 

REPORT ON THE GRAVING DOCK WORKS AT ST. JOSEPH DE UfiVIS. 



RisiDiNT Enginsbr's Offioe, 

QusBso Harbour Works, 

24th November, 1882. 

Sib, — I have the honor to report on the progress made with the graving dock 
works now on course of construction, at Point Levis, for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1882, in compliance with instructions received for the information of the Honor- 
able the Minister of Public Works. 

The total contract sum for works as yet incomplete but so far accepted for tbe 
graving dock fully equipped, including the builders* contract, machinery, caisson, 
etc., amounts to $39<^,820. i8 ; to this has to be added engineers* expenses and sundries, 
$47,237.9.^, making a total of $44^,058.17, after allowing for a deduction of $«, 168.22, 
being the difference in cost according to the .-chedule of rates between the circular 
Head as now adopted and the second entrance at Head. 

The sum authorized under the Act, 38 Victoria, chapter 56, was $500,000, but a 
farther sum will be required to pay certain incidental charges since accruing and not 
foreseen and estimated for at the date of the above appropriation. 

The total expenditure to the 30th June, 1882, amounts to $329,502.79, leaving a 
balance of $170,497.21 at that date. 



lid 



[1682] 



The works exoouted daring tbe past fii^oal year inclade an extension of the dock 
exeavallon to Iho rear of the intormediato dam across the majn body of the dock find 
the plrtcing of the arterial draiiifl. bottomiug op the concrete anl luyiug dock floor 
A furthiT ditjtant-o of 100 fcot, thereby extending this part of theHtruetare to | rdi. of 
its lengths from the circular head. 

On the outside of tht entrance warka, the fit ling up to the pile heads with clay 
according to inst ructions amounting to 1,500 cubic yaras bad been completed aod the 
oxoavation for the piling and concrete for the piopo^ed addition to the dtructaral 
works proceeded with, and a comraeneement made with tlie pile driving in connec- 
tion with it. These pilos were driven to a depth oJ 65 foet below coping through 
to feet of sand, being work involving a oongiderable amount of patient latior, . 

Tenders for the boilers were call id for in Augnet^ 1881, and the offer of three \ 
suitable ready *m ad e boilers of the be^t quality was accepted from Messrs. Carrier, | 
Lain^ & Co.^ for the sura of $4»500 fixed complete, whereby a great saTing wai 
effected over the cost of strictly new boilers in terms of the specification, 

A second instahnent on account of the contract for the pumping machinery waa 

paid to MesarB. Carrier, Laind&Co,, of 38,000, making a total so far of S16,000 otit of i 
a gross tsum of $32,000 amJ un advance on the boilers of t^pOOO, making a total 
payment of 1 19,000 to this firm for these purposes* 

The work already so far finishes! includes 300 feet of the dock with the wing , 
walls, and entranr^e works, wbile the work remaining to be done includes the con* 
fltruction of the engine hotise and pump wells, with the tiidng of the machinery, 
boilers, &c,> the whole of the materials for which are either now on the ground or in 
the engine workt* of Messrs. Carrier, Lain^ & Co, The caisHon has to he put together 
and tested, this will probably take two months to efiect and the work peooeaary 
should be let in advance by tender. 

1 have the honor to be^ Sir^ 

Your obedient servant, 

WOODFORD PILKINGTON, MICE., 

Eesidmt Engmder. 

A. H. Yeriiet, Esq,, 

Sec, Treasurer. 



QUEBEC HARBOK IMPROVEMENT WORKS. 



PROGRESS REPORT ON THE *' PRINCESS LOUISE EMBANKMENT AND 
DOCKS/' RIVER ST. CHARLES, QUilBEa 



Resiuknt Enqineer's Offick, 

QOEBEC, 24th November, 1882. 

SiB»^Acting on ir.stroctionB received, I have the honor to report on the piiogrefii 
made with the works above det^crtbed connected with the harbor exteoaion tad 
improvementB in the river SU Charles, Quebec, for the information of the Hon, 
tho Minister of Public Worbs for the fiscal year ended June 30th, 1832. 



[i8a2] lii 



The total amount of the original contract and extra works carried out in con- 
nection wilh this firbt section of these works, amounts to the sum of $7I]4,507.49 
fonnd as follows : 

To block sum of original contract $529,296 31 

" *♦ " •' allowed contingencies 25,000 00 

" ** " " supplementary dredging 62,500 00 

" " " " stone face (boucharded) 21,9'74 90 

" " " " northern cribwork. 68,059 53 

" stone and ballast for concrete at contract rates 37,6*76 76 

" additions made by award of arbitrators in excess 

of deductions 47 27 



Placing the total amount of work done at $734,555 76 

Total amonnd paid contractors $616,222 42 

Leaving a balance due of. 11^,333 34 

The entire works comprised in this first section of these designs for harbour 
improvements are complete so far as the mateiials from the dredgings would permit, 
but a considerable quantity of filling still remains to be put into the embankment. 
This dredging and filling work is included in the second section and has been contracted 
for by Messrs. Larkin, Connolly et Co., to be proceeded with and completed during 
Uie season of 1883, together with the closing of the end of the embankment at the 
foreshore near the Gas House Whai*f. 

During the latter part of this fiscal year, nothing was done beyond calling for 
(euderB for dredging and for the dosing of the incomplete space at the end of the 
Wet Dock Wall, contracts for which have since been signed. 

The work still remaining to be done to complete these designs includes the 
execution of these contracts, together with the work involved in connection with the 
Cro68 Wall and Entrance Works for the future Wet Dock by the production of the 
line of Dalhousie street between two walls enclosing an embankment to a junction 
with the Qaa^ Walls of the Wet Dock and Tidal Basin respectively as originally 
proposed, which will probably form the third and last section of these works. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

WOODFOBD PILKINGTON, M.I.C.BI, 

Besident Engineer. 

A. H. Yebbxt, Esq., 

Sec. Treasurer. 



15a 



[1682] 



APPENDIX No. 13. 



ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE MONTREAL HARBOR COKMISStONERS 
THE DKEPENLNG OP CHANNEL rETWP:i':N QUEBEC 
ANll MONTRKAL. 



Olf 



Eel No, 28839. 



HaEBOE C0MMI8BIONERB or MoHTftXAL. 

Secretaht*s Okfick. 

MoNTEEAL, 30Lh October, 1B82, 



Str, — I havo Lhe hotlor, hy directioQ of the Harbor OommisBionerSt to forwjird 
herewltli, for the ioformation of the Honorable the Mitibleir of Fubllo Work;*, copy of 
the Ohiet Euginiier'e Report on tbo dredging oparatiotiH for deopa^iog the sship chan- 
nel botweon Montreal and Quaboc^ for the fi^culyear ended the 30lh June laat. 

As joii have already been informed in preTione commanications under datd of 
the 16 tb November aud 17ih December 138(i— and the 18th October 1881, ii 11 
impoHtiible to ftn,4wcr exactly the question anked. 

I would, however, state aB follow^!, viz ; 

Question (I), Tho grants made by statute and the Acts relatinE theroto aiGCt 
latJttlyl867. 

Amimn—Th& works are carried on under the Acts M Victoria, Cap. GO ; 44 Vic„ 
Gap* 7, and 45 Yic, Cap. 44— whereby a Lolal mm of 81,780,000 was ftutboriaed ta 
be advanced to the Commissionemj to bear interest at 4 jKif cen^ for the purpose ef 
dred^^iug the channel 10 25 feet, at low water. 

Qu^^Uon (2), Number and date of letter authonring any eicponditur« each Iifi43al 
yaar, up to the Ut July 18tl<2. 

Que^thn (3). Kjcpenditnre authorized each year to same date. 

Answer,' No special amount. 

Questio/i (4). ExjKniditure or liubilities incarred ©ach year to Bamo date, 

Anm-er. — ^No Uuhilities, everything is paid for as the work proceeds. 

Qimtion (5). Amount available for completion let July, 1882. 

Answer,— imfli}OM. 

Question (<>). Probiible amount repaired for oompletion let July, 188*. 

Amwer^'-lt isespectod the above amount t^0,000 will practically oompleti tht 
channel to 25 teot. 

QitEstion (7). Heveoue each year. 

Answer* — None. 

Th>? eapifal cost of the dred?fing plant included In above expeodituro is 8534,809, 
ezclu.^ivcof certain Harbor plafit pievioysly on band ^nd now emptoyod in ihm 
work. 

I have tho honor to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient aervaot. 



F, H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa* 



H, D, WHITNEY, 

Hecrttary. 



[1882] 63 



HAEBOUR COMMISSIONERS OPJMONTRBAL. 



Chisf Bnginevr's Office, 

Montreal, 18th October, 1882. 

Sir, — In compIiaDoe with the reqaeatof the Secretarv of Pablic Works, I beg to 
submit the following report npon ihe work of dedpeaing'the ship chaaaei of the St. 
Lawrence between Montreal and Quebec, daring the Government fiscal year ended 
30th Jane, 1882. 

The plaoesat which the greatest quantities of work have been done are at Cap 
Charles and Cap La Roche, where the dredging* is of rock, and in Lake St. Peter^ 
tiie new Contrecoeur channel and Pointe auz Trembles where the dredging is of 
earth. 

The following are the chief details of the year's work. The cost of the dredging 
at each place is generally taken as that of the previous summer, for the reason that 
the expenditure cannot well be sub-divided to the end of the Government fiscal year 
which occurs in the middle of the working season. 

The costs given include all charges and outlay of every kind, except for interest 
and depreciation of plant. 

GAP CHARLES. 

The work of deepening the channel through the shale rock shoal was continued 
to the close of navigation of 1881 and resumed soon after the opening in 1882. By 
the end of the fiscal year the shoal had been practically cut through to 22 feet 3 
inches deep, at low water, but there remained some boulders and loose rock to be 
removed. The quantity of rock and boulders lifted during the jear is 17,695 cubic 
yardsy at an average cost of about 85 cents per yard. 

POUILLISR RATER. 

The channel has been somewhat straightened by the removal of 857 cubic yaitls 
of boulders from the south side of the shoal. 

CAP LA ROCHE. 

Dredging was continued in the rock during the working season by two dredges, 
with frequent assistance from a stone lifter, and by the end of the fiscal year nearly 
the whole shoal had been cut through to 22 feet deep, at low water. Quantity 
dredged, 45,295 cubic yards at an average cost of about 70 cents per cable yard. 

BECANOOUR UPPER TRAVERSE. 

A new line of traverse, further to the north at its upper end and in deeper water 
than the old one, was determined upon, and some boulders and the tops of small 
atoney shoals have been removed to make it available to 25 feet at low water. 
^XkAniiiy of <itones and boulders lifted, 368 cubic yards. 

10-11 



184 



£t89a] 



FOBI^ HT. FaANCIS. 

COBtiDg ll-U p«r cubic year. 

lAKB ST. PBTIB. 

fiBCafye«^h« whole •-J"' -^J'^-^J.-Jh-r'" tX quantity dred/ed during the fiscal 
mile o( p»ni.l i-uMing at N«- 3 l-K^t «h.p. H ^^^.^ ^^^^ 

year, l,(»5«,ti55 cubic j'avda, coating J ^ con i 

IL« D« ORAC«. 
CAP 8T. MIOHBL AKD VABENW«B. 

» 1SW1 and eoring of this year a number of 

•.j^i; sr^t:! o.^i^.t « «... p..' """.o y-d. 

y«aiv Quantiiy ilmlj4«J. ^«''"" ^-i^wu y 4 . 

MOHTRB-M. 

„f t\me,. <ia«nlily droJe*!, "^ ,t."',^'a> j ,, aU polnta daring ll" JS""""'",'. 



lisf^-al year eiiae<i ^" vn - u l.^. « ^ - , . 

Harbour cl^«ii^f '^^.^ ^l^S t '. t^^^^^^^ ^53.738 cubic yards drodgd,» 
Docomber 1881, «l"1.f ^ ^ut I'ls'fai tubic yards dredged. ^ 

«gaimt »1 17.038 f<,i- ia->« ^f '^'^^ ^Ic N^Ub'uu^iaUy the tame as b^f^-** "^^^'^^^^jTr 
Tkn flnaiin'' ulail m ino woiiv ■*>•«> i^^ ' w-ni-kinff m earth *, inree eiuvn 

^'•."„"_ „r.T .Vr«« o.-dii.a.T olovalor dreJgob for sorting , _„ gteam 8tor* 



JOHN KENNEDY, , 



=• ^srerary"M«2:ai Harbour Con,mi.sio«er.. 



[1«2] 



JIfr 



00 

a 





CO 

1 

I 
I 

s 

- o 

.r 

^ JM 

M U 

6 i 

1 

Q 



a 

Q 



a, I 

o 



o 

OB 



■2 

I 













^, 



[1882] 



APPENDIX Na 15^ 



KEPOET OF THE SECEETARY OF THE OFFICIAL ARBITRATOBl 



Ko, 287ia 



Official AAEimATOBfl, CkitADA, 

Ottawa, 26lh October, 1881 



Sm, — 1 beg to trail Bm it b ere with a Btatement of the claims rofetred to sari 
mrbitrated upon bj the Official Arbiustom, in conEection with tbe DitparioieBt •( 
Poblic Worku during the fiscal year ended 3Utb June, lb82. 

I have the honor to be^ Sir^ 

Your obedient Berrant, 

CHS, THLEAULT, 

Secretary ta the Official Arbitratm* 

V. H. Ennis, Esq., 

Secretary, Public Worki Department. 



[1882] 



15/ 



^ 



s 

s 

i 



I 

a 

s . 
■ss 

-•IS 

S 9 

0.2 
2. c 

as 






j5 



S4 

as 



I 






^1 

II 






I 




i? 






f 8 



8 



cT 






Si 



2l 






I 



1 



I 



^ 



O 
t 

S5 



I 



& 

SQ 



I 




I 

I 
I 






I 



^^» TJ-- r ^ 


li«q ^^^^^^ 


^^^He 


1 

APPKf 

Statement of the Ope 


JDIX 


No, 1 6. 

Closfbg of N'arigatloti* 


niog and 




PROYINOE OF irOTA SCOTIA. 


^^M Katne of Fort 


Count J. 


Dote 

ofClosiDg, 

ISgl. 


Date of 

isaa. 




Bem&fkB. 


^^^H AMnanAliH 


AllDAt>Oilij . .......1. 


Always op 

do 

do 

do 
ilo 

do 

do 
do 
■an. 4, ^83 


SH t * * 4*1* 


Feet 
IS to 2D 

12 to ao 

18 

20 to 30 
7 
B 

13 


In tery rtrere winterB thin Ice ft^rfei, 
bqt scHw BteAmetB could alira|^a 
enter. 

At anchorage, wbSrres dtf at Imr 
water. 

About 10 fiBet at and of iiaambafti 


^^H HarringtoQ........ 

^H XHebr 


Shvlburae :*. 

Digby ..,. 

Halifax 






^H Halifax 




pier. 
At w barrel. YO to 180 ft la harbor- 


^^^H T.ivbi-|..-.r\1 


Quecti'^ «** 




On bar. At Brooklju 24 ft ^ 


^^^H T.ni#.iro.Tinw« 


Shelbaroe ......... 




^^M Parrahoro .- 
^m Fieiou...., , 


Lnnenhurg 

Cumberland . 

Pictou...... .*. 








Dry in harbor. 

At wbarvea. 40 fl in harbor. 


Anrll 3A.. ' 


19 
40 to 60 

48 


Hhelburne .... 

Cape Breton 

EmtM. .,....,, 

Yafmoutb *... 


Always open 

Jan G, '82 Mat fl . 




^^H Sjdoej 




^^H Windiiof .......... 


doll, '82 

AlWftTt Ol> 


Mar 21... 


Dry. 


^^H Y*n&i>utli ...»<... 


an. .... ...... 


13 








1 


^^^B PR07INGR OF NRW BHUK6W1CE. 


^H Buctouche 

^^H Obatham 


Kent. 

Konhutiiberladd 

Reati^oiiche., 

WesitDoi tiand ... 

dQ 

ffonbtimberland 

Kent.. 

Weaimoreland ... 
do 

Charlotte, 

St John 

Cbarlotte. '***»**, 


Dec. t... 
Xov. 38... 
i»ee. 3... 

do n.. 
Jan. 6, *m 
Nov. 2.^..* 
Dec. IS... 

da 21... 

(to 3 


May 10... 
do 6... 
do T,.. 

Mar. 32.*, 
April 4... 


12 
35 to«> 

30 
1^ 


8 ft. on bar. 

In harbor. Hi a on Ooree^bov bar. 

f^tiMth cljiuiael 70 jft. nurtli chantU^l- 


^^^H TlBlkmif^tA 


^H Dortheritfi-. 

^^1 MoQCton 

^H N«wcjuitle ....t*... 

^^1 Ricbibarto 

^H SackTilLe, 


Dry. j 
) harbor. l7i ft. on Honaihoe l»r- 


May 6,.. 

April 16... 
May $..* 

en * ...... 


30 
12 
4 
13 
14 
24 


^^1 Shedmr^ ..... 


, 


^^1 St Andrews 

^H St Jobn. 


Always* op* 
do 


In inner harbor. 

At i*ti trance of harbor 6it feet 1ft 


^H &t Slepben........ 




bitrhor 
30 ft. at the Ledge, 4 milei l»elft» 

tbe town. 




^^^P PBOVir^CE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND* 


^H OharlDttetown... 

^M Souritt 

^^H Bmnm e rside 


Queen'i....... ...... 


Dec. 27*.. 
do 3i... 
fTor 28... 


May 6.*. 
do 4.*. 

do e... 


20 
20 
16 


40 to 60 ft in Rtream 


Prince..... 


AtendufrttilwAj wharf. 18 ft 
At railway wharf. 26 to 30 ft « 
harbor, low water, pprvug t«i«s** 





[188^3 



U0 



APPENDIX No. ie-.Cbnfifi««A 



=r 



BBOYINCtt OF QUSBSa 



Name of Port 



Coantj. 









Date 

ofCloslng, 

laSL 


Date of 


Depth of ^ 
avaiUble 
low watei 






Feet 


Nov. 15... 

do 15... 

do 22... 

do 18... 
Dec 1... 
Oct 15... 
Nov. 28... 


April 15... 
c 15... 


Over 36 


Maj 3... 

do ir... 
April 1..: 

May 21.., 
Aprii 10.^ 


18 to 24 

10 
Over 36 

""if"' 


Jan. 2, '82 
Dec 8... 

do 1... 

do 1... 
Nov. 28... 
Dec 25» 
Nov. 23... 


da 11... 
Mar. 28... 
AprH 15... 

do 25... 


20 

8 to 14 

10 


do 22... 
Mar 22... 
April 22... 


6 to 168 
8 

17 



Bemarka. 



Bay St Pan! 

JBerthier(en has). 

*<Jarleton 

Ohicontinii. ...... 

flboalements 

Stang da Nord... 
Matane 



Charlevoix 

MoQtmagny....... 

Bonaven tare ...... 

Chicoatimi 

Charlevoix.. ...... 

GA§p6 

RimooflkL ......... 



Ifootreal 

Morrav Bay 

New Uarliele..... 

Port DanieL 

-<)aebee 

BimoaekL 

Three Raven 



Charlevoix.... 
Boaaveoture.< 
do 



Rimouski. 



Upper end new pier. 12 fU old pier, 

Urtt on bar. 
22 ^ ordinary low water. 

At end of pier. 



L. W, epe. 10 ft 6 in., hi^lf tide. 
At Richelien and Ontario Nmvigation 
Co'sWl^arf. 



PROVINCE OP ONTARIO. 



BellevUle 

Brighton... 

'OoDonrg 

Collingwood..... 
Port Williams... 

Kincardine 

Kinffsville 

Lftue Current .. 

Meaford 

Korpeth 

Napanee 

Newcastle 

-OakviUe 

- Owen Soand 

Tort Albert 

PortBorwell.... 
Port Darlington 

Port Hope 

Port Stanley 

.Shannon viae ... 

Thunder Bay 

Toronto 

Trenton 

Whitby 

Windsor 



Hastings 

NorthmmberliUid 
do 

Simcoe 

Algoma 

Bruce 

Bssex 

Algoma 

Grey 

Kent 

Lennox 

Dorham 

Halton 

Grey 

Huron 

Elgin 

Durham 

nurbftm , 

h. -\ 

Habungs... . 

Algoma , 

Toronto 

Hastings. ... 

Ontario 

Essex 



Dec. 10... 

do 19... 

do 10... 

Nov. 30... 

do 20... 

do 20... 
Jin. 1, '82 

Nov. 28... 

Dec. 2. 



Mar. 10... 

do 27... 
April 10... 

do 18... 

do 27... 
May 1... 
April 1„. 
May 7... 
Mar. 16. 



Open whole winter.... 
Nov. 28... Mar. 27... 
Dec 10... April 1... 



do 



5... 



do 31... 

jNov. 4... 

do 30... 

Pec 8... 

do 5... 

do 15... 

Nov. 25... 
Jan. 15/8-^ 

Dec 19... 

do 6... 

do 7... 



do 17... 
Mar. 20... 
April 15... 

do 1... 
Mar. 25... 
Itfar. 20... 

do 20... 
Anril 1.. 

do 28... 
Feb. 27... 
April 4... 

do 4 



Open whole winter.. 



5 to 9 



8 
12 



9 
7 to 9 



10 
9 
7 
8 

10 

9^ 

6 
7 to 8 

8 
12 
10 

6 



11 to 15 
14 



At docks. 9 ft in channel. 



11 ft at outer end of doo^. 

Harbour fVee of ice nearly all last 
winter. 



At entrance. 



In harbor. 9 ft. on bar. 



PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 



Wiantpeg Selkirk 



Nov. 5... April 19... 6 



160 



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THE NEW YORK PUBLIC UBRA^RT 
teVHESNCa D&PA£T1I0I4T 



T1^ ba«li ttt amimr mm ^t&iimmimmem9 to &■ 









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