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LIBRARY OS* 

Illinois State 

LABORATORY OF NATURAL HISTORY, 



URBANA, ILLINOIS. 



sy?syr*57S7. .s 



>.£ 




"LIBRARY 

OF THE 
UN1VER5 ITY 
Of ILLINOIS 

NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY 

507 
1 894-/ 95^-/8 9^teot> 

C o D.3 




Field Columbian Museum 

Publication 24 
Report Series. Vol. i, No. 3. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 

TO THE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1896-97 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
October, 1897. 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees, - - - - - 170 

Officers and Committees, - - - 171 

Staff, .-.-.-- -177. 

Income and Maintenance, - - 174 

Memberships, - 174 

Lecture Courses, 174 

Publications, - - - - - - 176 

Library, - - - - 179 

Records, - - - 180 

Inventorying and Labeling, 180 

Accessions, - - - - - - 181 

Exchanges, - - 184 

Expeditions and Field Work, - - - 184 

Installation and Permanent Improvements, - - 190 

Photography and Illustration, - - - 195 

Printing, - - 196 

Admissions, - - - - 196 

Financial Statement, - - - 200 

Accessions, - - - - - 203 

Department of Anthropology, - - - 203 

Department of Botany, - - - 206 

Department of Geology, - - - - 208 

Department of Ornithology, - - 212 

Department of Zoology, - - 214 

The Library, - - - - - - 216 

Articles of Incorporation, - - 243 

Amended By-laws, - - - - 245 

Patrons, Life Members and Honorary Members, - 248 

List of Corporate Members, - - 249 

List of Annual Members, - 251 



170 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

George E. Adam-. Hunting ion W. Jack-on. 

Owen F. Aldis. Arthur B. Jones. 

Edward E. Aver. George Manierre. 

Watson F. Blair. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

William J. Chalmers. Norman B. Ream. 

George R. Davis. Martin A. Rverson. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Edwin Walker. 

Norman Williams. 



Oct. 1897. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



171 



OFFICERS. 

Edward E. Aver. President. 

Martin A. Ryers.on. First Vice President. 
Norman B. Ream, Second Vice-President. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, Chairman Executive Committee. 
George Manierre, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 



Edward E. Aver. 
Owen F. Aldis. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 



Norman B. Ream. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 



Watson F. Blair. 



Norman Williams. 

Huntington W. Jackson. 



COMMITTEE ON BUILDING. 

George E. Adams. 
William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

George R. Davis. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 



172 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 



DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

G. A. Dorse Y, Acting Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
C. F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

O. C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, EXCEPT ORNITHOLOGY. 

D. G. Elliot, Curator. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

C. B. Cory, Curator. 

THE LIBRARY. 
J. Dieserud, Librarian. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1896-1897. 



To the Trustees of the Field Columbian Museum : 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year closing" September 30, 1897. It is difficult to 
summarize in a paragraph an adequate idea of the result of the work. 
It has been uniform, steady and progressive. The physical condi- 
tions of the institution, although very much altered, rearranged and 
improved, show but a small part of the actual labor performed. 
Much of the scientific work has been of a nature that is not 
apparent to the casual observer and is concealed, as a matter of 
fact, from even the more critical visitors. The work in the lab- 
oratories and the constant application of time and study in the 
task of identification, inventorying, cataloguing and labeling have 
pushed these essential features of Museum work distinctly forward 
and brought the detail records of material within useful distance. 
The vast amount of this important labor suddenly devolving upon 
the Museum staff, as it did at the opening of the Museum, would 
have dismayed those less earnest and confident. The work is unin- 
teresting, plodding and tiresome, with nothing that appeals to the 
student and expert or stimulates him to effort. The general appear- 
ance of the Museum has been improved and the outward form of its 
installation has assumed a more symmetrical and effective appearance; 
better harmony of arrangement prevails ; a closer observance of the 
classification is apparent ; weak points have been strengthened and 
strong points emphasized. The steadiness and uniformity of progress 
in all directions presents the most gratifying retrospect. 

Several changes in the personnel of the staff have occurred during 
the year. The Departments of Geology ■ and Economic Geology 
have been united and Mr. Nichols, heretofore Curator of the latter 
Department, has been made Assistant Curator of the Department 
of Geology, of which Mr. Farrington remains the head. The 
Departments of Industrial Arts and of Monographic Collections have 
been abolished and most of the material is transferred to Anthropology. 
Mr. W. H. Holmes, Curator of Anthropology, resigned to accept a 

173 



174 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

similar positioa in the National Museum, and Mr. George A. Dorsey, 
whose range of equipment covers all the divisions of the Depart- 
ment, has been placed in charge as Acting Curator. Mr. S. E. Meek, 
well known for his work on the United States Fish Commission, has 
been appointed Assistant Curator of the Department of Zoology, 
except Ornithology. The office of Librarian and Recorder having 
been divided for the betterment of the service, Mr. J. Dieserud has 
been appointed Librarian and Mr. D. C. Davies, Recorder. 

Income and Maintenance. — By direction of the Executive Com- 
mittee the Director's income and maintenance budget, which hereto- 
fore has covered the calendar year, was made to cover only the 
period between January i, 1897, and September 30, 1897, with 
instructions thereafter to present an estimate of the income and 
expenses of maintenance for each year beginning October 1. The 
nine months' estimate for maintenance from January 1 to September 
30 of this year was $74, 245 ; income from all sources for the same 
period was $49,887. These estimates anticipated a deficit of $24,358, 
which it was believed would result from the operations of the institu- 
tion owing to the increased expenditures provided for in its scientific 
work. The actual income did not vary materially from the estimate, 
due, of course, to the fact that the income is largely a fixed one. The 
actual expenditures, however, were $66,614, showing a gratifying 
saving in the budget of $7,635, so that the net deficit for the nine 
months is $16,723. This, it is of course understood, is with relation 
to maintenance. Additional sums expended by authority of the Exec- 
utive Committee are apparent in the accompanying Financial State- 
ment. 

The Memberships. — The annual memberships for the year have 
decreased slightly, ascribable to the fact that no special effort has 
been made to increase the number. The present list of annual 
members consists of those who have renewed their membership and 
the few who have voluntarily applied for membership. All persons 
who had contributed the sum of $500 or more in cash to the institution 
were elected life members by the Board of Trustees. This included 
those upon whose gift of World's Columbian Exposition stock a divi- 
dend amounting to $500 or more had been paid. Certificates of this 
membership were prepared and issued during the year, and the list of 
these members appears in its proper place in this report. 

Lecture Course. — Two series of lectures have been given since 
the last annual report, illustrated in most cases, and covering an 
unusually wide range of research and travel. The first of these, the 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 175 

Sixth Lecture Course, was rendered more than ordinarily interesting 
and instructive by the contributions of gentlemen of distinguished 
ability in the particular lines of thought reflected in their discourses. 
The Seventh Lecture Course was presented entirely by the Curators 
of the Museum, as is the case with the course now in progress. The 
sixth course given during the months of September and October, 
1896, comprised eight lectures: 

Oct. 3. — " Archeological Explorations in Peru." 

Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Asst. Curator of Anthropology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

Oct. 10. — "A Trip to Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl." 

Prof. O. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

Oct. 17. — "San Domingo." 

Mr. G. K. Cherrie, Asst. Curator of Ornithology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

Oct. 24. — " Egypt and What We Know of Her." 

Dr. J. H. Breasted, Instructor of Egyptology and Semit- 
ics, University of Chicago. 

Oct. 31. — "The Petroleum Industry." 

Dr. D. T. Day, Chief of Division of Mineral Resources, 
U. S. Geological Survey. 

Nov. 7. — "Alaska and Its Inhabitants." 

Prof. George L. Collie, Beloit College, Wis. 

Nov. 14. — "The Economic Geology of the Sea." 

Mr. H. W. Nichols, Curator of Economic Geology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

Nov. 21. — " The Physical Geography of New England.'' 

Dr. H. B. Kummel, Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ography, Lewis Institute. 

The seventh course given during the months of March and April, 

1897: 

March 6. — "The Origin and Uses of Clay." 

Mr. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator, Department of 
Geology. 

March 13. — "Scope and Significance of the Department of Anthro- 
pology." 
Prof. W. H. Holmes, Curator, Department of Anthro- 
pology. 



176 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

March 20. — "The Physical Anthropology in the Field Columbian 
Museum." 
Dr. G. A. Dorse}-, Assistant Curator, Department of 
Anthropology. 

March 27. — "The Silver Cities of Mexico." 

Prof. O. C. Farrington, Curator, Department of Geology. 

April 3. — " The Plateau of Bolivia, The Thibet of the New World." 
Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Assistant Curator, Department of 
Anthropology. 

April 10. — " Travels in Brazil." 

Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Curator, Department of Botany. 

April 17. — "The East African Expedition — London to South of 
Toyo Plain." 
D. G. Elliot, F. R. S. E., Curator, Department of 
Zoology. 

April 24. — "The East African Expedition — Toyo to Ogaden and 
Berbera. 
D. G. Elliot, F. R. S. E., Curator, Department of 
Zoology. 

The attendance was very large at all of these lectures, and in 
several instances numbers were unable to gain admission. The 
capacity of the lecture hall is inadequate and its ventilation very poor. 
There are obvious reasons why these lectures should be continued in 
the Museum Building, but that their sphere of usefulness and their 
educational results are much contracted by reason of the size and 
arrangement of the lecture hall is without doubt. The stereopticon is 
lighted by electricity, and the reflections are much more brilliant and 
distinct than has heretofore been the case. A new reading lamp with 
modern appliances also adds much to the comfort and satisfaction of 
the lecturers. There are on hand, classified by lectures, 1,060 slides 
as follows: 

Total Number Number of Illus- 

of Slides. trated Lectures. 

Anthropology 150 slides 9 

Botany 202 " ' 5 

Geology 308 " 9 

General 107 " 3 

Zoology 293 " 8 

Publications. — The established series of publications have been 
continued, and the issues have appeared at comparatively regular 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 177 

intervals. Below will be found the titles of those issued since 
October 1st last, with the number of pages and illustrations. 

Pub. 14. — Rep. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 2. Annual Report of the Director. 
87 pages, edition 2,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 15. — Bot. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 2. Contribution II. to the Coastal 
and Plain Flora of Yucatan. By C. F. Millspaugh. 
63 pages, edition 1,000, 14 illustrations (13 lithographs, 
one in two colors and one in three colors and one zinc 
etching). 

Pub. 16. — Anthropol. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 1, Pt. 2. Archeological 
Studies Among the Ancient Cities of Mexico. By W. 
H. Holmes. 201 pages, edition 1,500, and 200 copies 
edition de luxe, containing publications No. 8 and No. 
16 in one volume, bound in cloth, 120 illustrations (36 
half tones and 84 zinc etchings). 

Pub. 17. — Ornith. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 2. Catalogue of a Collection of 
Birds Obtained by the Expedition into Somali-Land. 
By D. G.Elliot. 41 pages, edition 1,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 18. — Geol. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 2. Observations on Popocatepetl 
and Ixtaccihuatl. By O. C. Farrington. 54 pages, 
edition 1,000, 16 illustrations (12 haW tones and 4 zinc 
etchings). 

Pub. 19. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 6. List of Mammals from 
Somali-Land obtained by the Museum's East African 
Expedition. By D. G. Elliot. 49 pages. (Combined 
with No. 20). 

Pub. 20.- — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 7. Remarks upon Two Species 
of Deer of the Genus Cervus from the Phillippine 
Archipelago. By D. G. Elliot, One page, edition 
1,000, 24 plates of illustrations (half tones). 

Pub. 21. — Anthropol. Ser., Vol. 11, No. 1. Observations on a 
Collection of Papuan Crania. By George A. Dorsey, 
with notes on Preservation and Decorative Features by 
William H. Holmes. 48 pages, edition 1,000, 24 illus- 
trations (11 half tones and 13 zinc etchings). 

A marked improvement has been made in the handling of the 
mailing list, thereby doing away with the classification cards, the 
geographical list being the only card catalogue necessary in the sys- 
tem. The geographical list is arranged alphabetically, as usual. 



178 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



The addressed cards are numbered consecutively upon the upper left- 
hand corner, while the classification of the address and the series of 
publications it is entitled to are indicated at the right. On the back 
of the card is stamped the date and number of any publication sent, 
and when acknowledgment is received the card is so stamped as 
regards the publication sent and acknowledged. The names are 
printed on the mailing list in classified order, and the number given 
each address is printed with it. In sending out a publication the 
number of that address is typewritten on the acknowledgment before 
it is placed in the publication. The number is quite a time-saver and 
prevents confusion, for if it is returned by the recipient of the publi- 
cation without a name the number alone tells who or what insti- 
tution it is from. This number refers directly to the card desired. 
Again, this number shows what card to credit as having received the 
publication sent, irrespective of whose name is written thereon, for 
sometimes the number on the acknowledgment belongs to an institu- 
tion, yet there is only an individual's name signed, or written so 
indistinctly that it cannot be read. The single card catalogue dis- 
penses with the work of looking up the address and rinding out to 
what class an address belongs. When the back of the card is covered 
with publications a slip of strong white paper is pasted across the top, 
and both sides of the paper are filled, a process that can be repeated as 
often as necessary. In regard to the distribution of the publications, 
the table below shows the number and classes of foreign and domes- 
tic addresses. A comparison is also made with the number distrib- 
uted last year. 

DOMESTIC. 



FOREIGN. 



Official: 



Trustees .... 

Staff 

Corporate Members 
Honorary Members 
Annual Members . 



1895-96 

14 
15 

53 
3 

757 



1896-97 

16 
16 



3 
658 



IV, 



■96 1896-97 



General Addresses: 

Individuals 

Universities, Schools and Colleges 
Academies and Institutions . 
Museums and Gardens .... 

Scientific Societies 

Libraries . 

Government and State Department 
Journals 





263 




161 


56 


101 


3"i 


45 




44 




27 


5 


17 


42 


57 


37 


79 


45 


75 


62 


74 


28 


27 




39 




20 


1 1 


4i 


20 


43 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 179 

domestic. foreign. 

Addresses in Special Sciences: 1895-96 1896-97 1895-96 1896-97 

Anthropology 128 135 81 101 

Botany 123 120 53 75 

Geology 150 152 115 125 

History 56 56 

Industrial Arts 31 27 3 2 

Ornithology 19 19 12 37 

Zoology 93 80 68 71 

The distribution to foreign countries is accomplished through the 
Bureau of International Exchanges of the Smithsonian Institution. 

The fifth edition of the guide is in press and will be ready for 
the public by November 1. 

Library. — The library contains 8,062 books and 7,680 pamph- 
lets, distributed as follows : General Library, 6,341 books and 5,130 
pamphlets ; Department of Geology, 965 books and 2,500 pamphlets ; 
Department of Ornithology, 368 books ; Department of Botany, 216 
books and 50 pamphlets ; Department of Zoology, 172 books. The 
additions during the fiscal year were 787 books and 1,426 pamphlets, 
making a total of 2,213 titles, as against 1,835 for the preceding year. 
This is very satisfactory, considering the fact that only 132 books and 
14 pamphlets have been added by purchase. The additions derived 
from exchanges showed a marked decrease during the first part of the 
present year, reaching the low number of 70 titles for the month of 
March. Some 420 letters were, however, mailed to institutions and 
scientists receiving the publications of the Museum, resulting in the 
establishment of some very valuable exchanges, and making the addi- 
tions average nearly 300 titles per month for the last three months. 
The number of periodicals subscribed to is 40, the number re- 
ceived in exchange or as gift being 52, exclusive of " proceedings and 
transactions of societies. A list of the accessions to the library accom- 
panies this report. The work of cataloguing the resources of the lib- 
rary has progressed steadily. The author catalogue has been kept up 
to date and was carefully revised in order to be utilized in preparing 
the typewritten subject catalogue, of which some 5,000 cards haw 
been written. The shelf list has been kept up to date and cards 
added for some 2,000 pamphlets not previously catalogued. A card 
catalogue of the accumulated duplicates was prepared and has been 
issued as the Second Annual Exchange Catalogue of the Museum. 
Collaboration has been rendered on a Union List of periodicals for 
the libraries of Chicago. It is to be printed in the near future, and 
will be a very valuable aid to the staff of the Museum when wishing 
to consult magazines and other scientific serials not on the shelves of 



180 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

the Museum library. Three installments of the duplicate copy of the 
John Crerar Library catalogue, mentioned in the last report, have 
been received and the cards arranged in alphabetical order. It will be 
of great use to the staff and will prevent the duplicating of expensive 
books already to be found in that library. The permission secured 
from the Chicago Public Library to draw out reference books has 
been quite frequently made use of. The reference books in the Gen- 
eral Library are constantly used b) r the staff, and a marked increase 
has been shown of late in the number of visitors availing themselves 
of the opportunity to consult the books. This is, however, evidently 
chiefly due to the prize essays now in preparation by pupils of the 
Chicago Public schools. 

Records. — The records have been much improved during the past 
year, especially in the introduction of a new index and a new system for 
recording incoming and outgoing material. The historical jackets 
have all been checked and re-arranged, and any confusion of data that 
prevailed at the time of the last report has disappeared. By the sys- 
tem now in operation the expenses of this department have been con- 
siderably reduced, while the service seems to be very satisfactory. 
The amount of material received through the customs has not been 
large, but sufficient to require close attention on the part of the 
Recorder. The officers of the custom house have been very accom- 
modating, and the furnishing of careful instructions to consignors 
and the better knowledge of the requirements at this port on the part 
of regular correspondents have assisted in the dispatch of business of 
this character. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventory and Labeling. — As intimated 
at the introduction of this report, this very important feature of the 
work of the Museum has been pushed with all possible vigor through 
the entire year. All of the departments report gratifying progress in 
this uninteresting but valuable work. In the Department of Anthro- 
pology a great deal of labor has been expended in this particular line 
of duty, more especially in the last four months. There were prac- 
tically no records of this department when the Museum was opened, 
and probably more material has been received by this department 
than by any other, thus constantly demanding the. attention of the 
Curator and his assistants to care for the new work, until at one 
time it looked as if confusion confronted the records of the depart- 
ment. Realizing the prime necessity of putting the records into 
intelligent shape, additional clerical assistance was provided, and 
the work has been earnestly pushed for the better part of this year, 
and especially for the past four months. With the work already in 



Oct. 1897. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



181 



hand, provision for the discharge of which has been made, the de- 
partment may be said to be in satisfactory condition in so far as 
identification, numbering and inventorying are concerned. In the 
Zoological Department a large amount of this work, mostly clerical, 
remains to be done, for the reason that hitherto work has been con- 
fined to the identification and arrangement of material. When 
assistance is provided the work of inventorying may be done rapidly 
and without interruption. The Departments of Botany and of Geology 
have kept pace with the receipt of new material, which is largely all 
that was called for from those departments, because the work was so 
well in hand at the time of the last report. A large amount of new 
labeling has been done in the Ornithological Department. The 
year's work in the Museum on catalogues and inventories is shown 
in detail: 





No. of 
Record Books. 


Total No. 

Entries 

Sept. 30, 1 


of 
to 

S97. 


Entries 

during 
1896-7. 


Total No. of 
Cards Written 


Anthropology, . 


II 


9,089 




None. 


10,000 est. 


Botany, . . . 


U 


20,714 




8,765 


500 est. 


Geology, . . . 


9 


15.445 




1.693 


None. 


Zoology, . . . 


3 


6,948 




900 


6,000 est. 


Ornithology, . 


2 


7fi57 




2,426 


None. 


Library, . . . 


3 


13.373 




2,213 


10,500 


Photography, 


1 


1,809 




812 





Accessions. — The accessions of material have been very gratify- 
ing. All the agencies employed have given excellent returns, and all 
of the departments seem to have shared in the results. In the 
Department of Anthropology, in addition to the results of the Dorsey 
expedition to the northwest, not yet on exhibition, may be mentioned 
the continued contribution of Mr. Allison V. Armour in archeologi- 
cal specimens, including notable sculptures, vessels and ornaments 
in stone and terra cotta, and interesting examples in copper, clay, 
shells, etc. A highly prized addition to the archeology of Europe 
consisted of several hundred Etruscan antiques of earthenware and 
bronze excavated under the supervision of Prof. Frothingham, in 
1895-1896.' This collection includes many rare examples of Etruscan 
art, including a restored funeral couch of bone and ivory, which was 
found some years ago in a tomb at Orvieto. The collection was pur- 
chased for the Museum by Mr. C. L. Hutchinson. Mr. W. M. Petrie, 
of London, has presented the Museum with very interesting examples 
of Egyptian antiquities in terra cotta and stone, including fragments 
of stone vessels, statues, etc. Another very desirable contribution 
to the Department of Anthropology consisted of specimens provided 
by Mr. Clarence B. Moore, of Philadelphia, including vessels, cups, 



1 82 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

shell ornaments, fragments of pottery, earthen vases, etc., from 
Georgia and Florida. Among the purchases for this department 
may be mentioned three lots obtained of Mr. Gustavus Goward, 
consisting of bowls, strainers, cloths, instruments, shells, mats, etc., 
from Samoa ; eighteen casts of trepanned Peruvian skulls, purchased 
of Mr. D. W. Gill, of Washington. There were added to the ethno- 
logical material of this department 161 specimens collected by the 
Museum's African expedition. The accessions in the Department of 
Geology have been obtained chiefly through exchanges with individ- 
uals and institutions. This has been made possible by the careful 
selection of duplicates from material already on hand, and the results 
have been generally satisfactory. Of new material so obtained may 
be mentioned a series of the minerals of Utah, containing fine speci- 
mens of Topaz, Olivenite, Utahite, etc.; a series from Hackberry 
Grove, Iowa, fossils from the Hamilton group; a collection of crys- 
tallized copper from Lake Superior, received from The University of 
Chicago; a number of specimens of lava, serpentine, onyx and build- 
ing stone received from the United States National Museum, and a 
collection of minerals from .the State University of Arkansas. The 
meteorite collection has received notable additions, principally through 
exchange. Specimens of eighteen falls, not before represented, have 
been acquired, as well as large sections of the rare Smith's Mountain 
and Deep Springs farm siderites. A meteorite was obtained from 
Mexico, of which the Museum possesses the entire mass. It is as yet 
undescribed. The total number of falls now represented in this col- 
lection is 198. A valuable collection of local fossils has been received 
from J. W, Beardsley. These were largely collected on the Drainage 
Canal. Several slabs have been given for the marble collection by 
various marble concerns of the country. The collection given by 
the Boston and Colorado Smelting Company illustrates the process 
of smelting gold and silver and copper as practiced in Colorado at the 
Argo smelter, is a valuable addition. A fine series of photographs, 
illustrating mines and mining machinery employed at Real Del 
Monte, Mexico, was received through the kindness of Senor Carlos 
F. Landero. Excellent specimens of Allophane and Indianaite have 
been received from the Louisville, New Albany & Chicago Railroad, 
and the Georgia Railroad has donated various specimens of econ- 
omic products found along its line. The purchase of a Fuess reflect- 
ing goniometer has made possible original crystallographic work, and 
investigations in this line are now being carried on by the Curator. 
In the Department of Ornithology the additions to the collection have 
been largely by expedition and purchase, although a number of valu- 



Oct. 1897. Annum, Report of the Director. 183 

able gifts appear in the list of accessions. The department collected 
in Florida, Texas and southern Illinois nearly 1,000 skins during the 
year. The African expedition contributed 296 specimens from Somali- 
Land and Ogaden. There have been added by purchase from differ- 
ent collectors over 1,300 skins, about equally divided in number 
between North America and Central and South America. In the 
Department of Zoology there have been added since the last report 
193 mammal skins and 22 skeletons, 115 specimens of fishes and 30 
specimens of reptilia, collected by the African expedition. The depart- 
ment has also received by collection for its division of Entomology 
about 6,000 specimens, mostly from Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and 
Florida. By exchange with the Natural History Museums of Paris 
and London some very rare mammals have been obtained' and valu- 
able collections have been presented to the division of Ichthyology 
by the Assistant Curator of the department. The valuable series of 
fishes obtained by the African expedition contained some species 
which were new to science and others very rare. The Museum has 
also purchased a number of very rare mammal skins and two collec 
tions of shells, corals, etc. Ringling Brothers presented the Museum 
with several skins and skeletons, and a large amount of miscellaneous 
material has been added to the possessions of this department from 
various sources. Among the notable collections obtained bv the 
Botanical Department during the past year are Pringle's Mexican 
Plants, Palmer's Durango collection, Nash's and Pollard's Florida 
and Mississippi plants, the Sandberg Idaho collection, Gaumer's 
last Yucatan species, Jenman's British Guiana and Rusby's Orinoco 
collections ; Schlechter's South African species, the complete lichen 
herbarium of Calkins and the important personal herbarium of the 
late Dr. Schott. The herbarium of Dr. Schott, as the mounting and 
distribution proceeds, proves to be of far greater value and interest 
than was at first supposed. Beside the Yucatan plants (some. 960 
numbers collected by him during the years 1884 and 1886, and as yet 
unpublished) are his Panama Canal survey and Mexican boundary 
survey collections, both of the greatest value to botanists and stu- 
dents. The Old World plants in his herbarium also prove of great 
value, being very abundant in the Flora of Eastern and Mediterra- 
nean Europe. The Austro-Hungarian [section contain many series 
of type plants, with manuscript labels, described by Wierzbicki, 
Hoffman, Opiz, Heuffel and other distinguished authorities. The 
Gaumer collections from Yucatan, with Dr. Schott's plants, yield 
over^oo additional species to the Flora, which have been collated in 
manuscript for a third contribution to the Flora of that region, now 
nearly ready for the printer. 



184 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Exchanges. — Since the date of the last report the Museum has 
issued two exchange catalogues, one being a list of duplicate material 
on hand for exchange and the other a list of duplicate books and 
pamphlets. These catalogues have been mailed to a great many 
individuals and to all contemporaneous institutions with a request 
that they be examined with a view to effecting an exchange of speci- 
mens and literature. The results have justified the undertaking. A 
number of profitable exchanges have been completed and corre- 
spondence has been opened that is sure to lead to very good results. 
About fifty exchanges have been made, and probably as many more 
propositions are under consideration. 

Expedition and Field Work. — At the date of the last report the 
African expedition was in the field. Mr. Elliot, the chief of the 
expedition, has already provided a detailed account of this expedi- 
tion, but a brief resume seems to be required in this report. The 
expedition had intended to enter Mashonaland from the Port of 
Veira, but information received that the invasion of settlers and 
the large number of hunting parties had reduced the number of 
wild animals and driven them, in a large measure, from their haunts, 
together with the possibility of trouble with the natives, especially 
the Mashonas, induced the abandonment of this route and turned 
attention to a section of country around Mount Kilimanjaro and the 
country of the Massai. the home of the elephant, the rhinoceros, etc. 
It appeared, however, upon investigation that this country was very 
much disturbed by tribal rebellions, and that the opportunities for 
obtaining large game was lessened by the prevalence of the rinder- 
pest, which scourge had attacked the Massai cattle, buffalo, antelope, 
etc. The extinction of so many species of wild animals by disease, 
to say nothing of the possibility of a conflict with the natives, resulted 
in the abandonment of this route and the selection of Somali-Land 
and the country adjacent to it. Mr. E. Dodson, who had just 
returned with Mr. Donaldson Smith from Lake Rudolph, was added 
to the partv, and on March 27, 1896, passage was taken for Aden, 
which port was reached April 1 3th. Preparations for the continuation 
of the trip were actively commenced, provisions were obtained for 
the men, goods for trading with natives, and the numerous articles 
necessary for the outfit of a large expedition. Horses and mules were 
also purchased at this port. April 20th the party sailed for Berbera, 
on the south coast of the Gulf of Aden, whither the outfit purchased 
in London had already been dispatched. Having purchased a num- 
ber of camels sufficient for a short trip, the expedition took march in 
search of wild asses. After ten days spent in collecting asses and 




O Q 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 185 

gazelles the party returned to Berbera, where an equipment of about 
forty camels was secured, and the journey south was taken up. The 
country was exploited until about the 20th of May, when the expedi- 
tion again returned to Berbera. Here further delay was encountered 
by the difficulty of procuring camels, but on the 25th of May, a 
sufficient number having been obtained, the real expedition to the 
interior was undertaken with Ogaden as the principal objective point. 
In reaching this point, in crossing the Haud, and Silo, and at Adodleh, 
Hargeisa, Niglileh and Gerenouk, sub-expeditions were detached from 
the main body and dispatched in different directions, and the country 
for hundreds of miles was hunted for the game which inhabits it. 
Both the chief of the expedition and his assistants suffered from 
intense heat and great privations, and eventually succumbed to the 
prostrating conditions that surrounded them, but not until they had 
passed four months in that awful country and had obtained a mag- 
nificent collection. They arrived safely at Aden and sailed for Lon- 
don on the first of October. In concluding his report, Mr. Elliot, 
chief of the expedition, says: 

"The collection obtained is very valuable, probably the most 
important, certainly so as regards quadrupeds, ever brought out 
of any country by one expedition, and consists of about two hundred 
mammal skins, three hundred of birds, numerous reptiles, and about 
half a barrel of fish, obtained on the coast and at Aden. Skeletons 
of every species, in certain cases two or three of the same species, 
were preserved, and casts of heads and parts of bodies showing the 
muscles of the large animals were made. These will be beyond price, 
when it is desired to mount the species, exhibiting, as they will, 
every muscle, artery, and in the case of heads, the proper lay of the 
hair and contour of the face. Besides these we have over three 
hundred negatives of the people we met, the scenery of the country 
through which we passed, and the animals, living and dead, which 
we had obtained. These last will be of as great value to the taxider- 
mists in their work, as the casts, and they are both unique assistants, 
such materials never before having been secured. Besides the 
Zoological collection, I procured specimens of native weapons, 
utensils of all kinds, ornaments, and such slight garments as they 
wear, some one hundred and forty objects in all, being a very fair 
representation of the materials in use among the tribes we passed 
through. Although fond of singing and possessing a correct ear for 
music, they have no musical instruments of any kind, not even a war 
drum, and in this respect are apparently peculiar among savage peo- 
ple. It is difficult to estimate the total value of the material secured, 



186 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

so much depends upon the condition of the skins and the rarity of the 
species. In a few years, from the gradual disappearance of the 
large animals, which has been going on in the African continent for a 
considerable period, and already has resulted in the complete extinc- 
tion of some of the finest species, the collection brought to the Field 
Museum will be practically priceless. It is the only proper way 
to secure collections for a Museum, and for what must still be 
accomplished, " 't were well if 'twere done quickly," for the time 
is near at hand when, in certain lines of Zoology, especially in 
the large mammals of the world, it will be forever impossible to 
procure examples. They are certain, most of them, to become as 
extinct as the Mastodon or Dodo are to-day. Of all the existing wild 
creatures, those of the African continent are disappearing the most 
rapidly, and although the Field Museum by its recent acquisitions is 
ahead of all its sister -institutions in the United States as regards the 
large quadrupeds of Africa, yet there are large numbers not vet 
represented." 

On May 12th, Mr. George A. Dorsey, Assistant Curator of Anth- 
ropology, accompanied by Mr. Edward Allen, Photographer of the 
Museum, left Chicago for a four months' trip among the Indians 
of the far West. They visited the following tribes in succession: 
Blackfoot, Kootenay, Flathead, Haida, Tlingit, Tsimshian, Moki 
and Zuni. The special object of the expedition was to secure ethno- 
logical and physical anthropological material for the building of 
groups which would adequately portray the stages of culture and the 
physical characteristics of these tribes. Of some of the tribes visited 
such representation is no- longer possible owing to the great changes 
which have taken place during the recent years from a more intimate 
contact with the white race. Taking this into consideration the expe- 
dition was very successful. Mr. Dorsey reports: " Probably the most 
complete single representation of any one group was that collected on 
the Blood Reserve in Canada. The Bloods are one of the branches 
of the Blackfeet, about the sole surviving remnant of any importance 
of the great Algonkin stock, which, in former times, extended from the 
Atlantic seaboard to the eastern slope of the Rock}' Mountains. The 
collection from the Bloods comprises over three hundred objects 
of ethnographic interest, covering the entire range of their domestic 
and religious life. Of especially great value is the complete para- 
phernalia of one of the rare ceremonial medicine pipes. With this 
were collected costumes, etc., so that it will be possible to represent 
one of the scenes in the transfer of the medicine pipe. Furthermore, 
a larffe amount of osteological material was collected both from the 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 187 

Bloods and the South Piegans, another tribe of the Blackfeet. From 
this it will be possible to make a full and complete representation of 
their physical characteristics. A large number of measurements and 
photographs was also taken. From both the Flathead and Kootenay 
Indians as complete ethnographic collections were secured as was 
possible. The Kootenay collection included a curious full size bark 
canoe, which is sharp at each end, and both ends navigate under 
water, in the manner of a modern man of war. Two complete skele- 
tons, a male and female, were also secured from the Kootenay near 
Bonner's Ferry. These, it is believed, are the only Kootenay skele- 
tons ever secured, owing to the strict watch kept by those Indians 
over their burial grounds. As the Museum was already in posses- 
sion of a very large and comprehensive collection from the tribes 
of the Northwest coast, the attention of the expedition was chiefly 
confined to the filling in of such gaps as existed, and to the 
securing of material necessary to build culture and physical groups. 
In both these respects the expedition was especially successful 
among the Haidas. By visiting several of the abandoned villages 
of the Haidas, on the north shore of Graham's Island of the 
Queen Charlotte group, a large collection of complete skeletons 
of both sexes and of various ages was secured, together with many 
objects of ethnological interest. From the village of Masset addi- 
tional ethnographic material was collected and many measurements 
and photographs were made. Among the latter were several of 
aged persons, showing the former manner of wearing the labret and 
tattooing the hands and feet of the women, and of tattooing the arms, 
feet and breast of the men. From the Tsimshians and Tlingits it is 
almost impossible to secure osteological material, owing to the fact 
that until within the present decade the dead were cremated, while at 
present the dead are buried after the manner of the whites. For 
this reason only a single skeleton could be secured from each tribe. 
That of the Tiingits is of special interest as it is the skeleton of 
a Shaman or Medicine man. The Shamans were not cremated 
owing to the prevalence of a belief that their bodies would not burn. 
The Tsimshian skeleton is that of a chief. By ascending the Skeena 
River to the far inland Tsimshian villages, it was possible to secure a 
large collection of objects representing their domestic life, objects 
which are not usually found in Musuem collections from this region." 
With the addition of this material to that already in the Museum, it 
is confidently believed that the Museum possesses the most complete 
existing representation of the Northwest coast Indians. Among 
the Molds and Zunis, time did not permit of any exploration 



188 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

either in the ruins or abandoned burial grounds, and the expedition 
confined its attention to the collection of objects of ethnographic 
interest. The collection made at the Pueblo of Oraibi of the Mokis 
is quite full and complete. This was possible from the fact that 
Oraibi is, of all the Pueblos of the Southwest, the most primitive 
and least contaminated by white contact. 

In September, Mr. Farrington, Curator of Geology, made a trip 
to the caves of Kentucky and passed some time in collection and 
study. A large amount of material illustrative of cave formation was 
secured and arrangements were made which will probably result in 
securing to the Museum later a unique collection in this line. On the 
same trip the Nashville exposition was visited and a number of 
specimens obtained for "the Museum from exhibitors there. The 
Assistant Curator of Geology spent two weeks in July in the "Boston 
Basin," collecting material illustrative of points of structure and 
dynamic geology and lithology. As he had a previous acquaintance 
with the region the amount of material secured was large and 
valuable. A complete series of specimens illustrative of the forma- 
tion of soil from diabese, a series of veins and dikes, and a collection 
of the acid and basic volcanic rocks of the region were chief among 
the specimens obtained. 

Mr. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany, in the prosecution of his 
efforts to make a collection of the forestry of North America, visited 
during the year, Northern Mississippi, Southern Illinois and Eastern 
West Virginia collecting specimens, gathering data and taking photo- 
graphs in pursuance of a plan in behalf of this division of his depart- 
ment as outlined in the following report to the director: 

"The need in a great commercial center of not only an adequate 
but authentic reference collection exploiting the commercial timbers 
of North America is not only urgent but of the greatest moment to 
business men, railroad systems, builders and contractors, and to 
students and teachers in the central west. To this end this depart- 
ment has undertaken, on a comprehensive scale, the amassing of a 
complete series of monographs that shall adequately represent the 
most essential and educational features of our North American for- 
ests, in which work the Museum is being ably seconded by the 
different railway systems of the country to which such a collection 
appeals with great force. Although the building up of these 
monographs entails a careful and considerate selection of material, 
scientific accuracy in each detail and a large amount of travel and 
association with all branches of lumbering, from the tree-feller in 
the forest, the sawyer in the mill, and the manufacturer in his 







T83H0^ MA3IH3M.' 



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■ ni j.ni rjmrruj?. iii ojiJ orb 'io dqj, 6 ; 3ji) m, 

•rl : v/3!7 Io rnroq srn£a sdi mot | 

iiteih ydt worie '>} baioloo ,sb its en A din '-' to q£m iooVowJ £ f j[n£lq I 

jfb io giisaiba i Lejnainsmo )o eahsa s bn£ ^siooq?. adi lo i 









Pl. IV. Economic Botany. Monographic Installation North American Forest 

Trees. 



The elements comprising each of the monographs in the series are: A glazed 
and framed tray containing a branch, flowers and fruits and a block of wood from 
the same tree ; a photograph of the tree in summer, and the same tree in winter, 
both from the same point of view ; a seven-foot trunk and transverse section ; a 
commercial plank, a two-foot map of North America, colored to show the distri- 
bution of the species, and a series of ornamental cabinet specimens of the wood. 






FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. IV. 




Monograph—North American Forestry. 



igo Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

seven and one-half foot plank of the species, simply planed to show 
the character of the lumber produced. With this is associated a 
"quartered" board exhibiting the character of the wood when sawed 
through the medullary rays. In cases of large genera, like the oaks, 
ashes, pines, etc,, etc., these planks and boards are especially sawn 
from trees selected and blazed when standing with their summer 
characters intact. Most of our American trees exhibit various orna- 
mental forms of woody growth, such as burls, curls, wavy lines, 
bird's-eye figures, blisters, block marks, etc., etc., making valuable 
varieties for fancy cabinet making. Samples of these forms, dressed 
and polished, are shown in Element V. The distribution and pre- 
dominance of each species is represented in shades of color (deepest 
where the tree is most prevalent) upon an outline map of North 
America two feet square. This serves a commercial purpose in indi- 
cating timber growth to prospective timber buyers. A large descrip- 
tive label occupies a prominent place in each set, and in giving the 
principal and subsidiary common names of the species, the botanical 
or universal name, the distribution of the species, the characters of 
the tree and wood, the uses to which the lumber is most often put, 
and statistics showing the physical characters of the species, its 
weight per cubic foot, hardness, resistance, fuel value, etc., etc." 
Several weeks were passed in the forests and timber-growing regions 
of these three sections of the United States, and a great amount 
of material was gathered and provided for. Assistance was gener- 
ously given by the Illinois Central R. R., the West Virginia Cen- 
tral, the Ayer & Lord Tie Company, the Coahoma Lumber Company 
and others, who evinced their interest in this permanent exposition 
by offering material and transportation to assist in completing the 
work. 

The Assistant Curator of Ornithology was on collecting expedi- 
tions along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and in Florida and 
Southern Illinois for about three months in the late winter, and 
collected several hundred skins to be added to the already large col- 
lection of North American birds, to which the Curator of the depart- 
ment is devoting a great deal of energy. 

Installation, Re-Arrangement and Permanent Improvements. — The 
Department of Geology has performed a large amount of work during 
the year in the re-arrangement and classification of material already 
on hand. This has seemed desirable in order to bring the installation 
of some of the halls up to a proper museum standard, and also to 
make available originally acquired material which had not obtained 
proper displav. The improvement resulting from the effort so 




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lo 33i3t)iu v lo vbuj?. 9)/;jtIior>l oJ hi noboalloo orb ^o noido sriT 

ad vi;rn vad) 91 : ;doI t>rb lo nobfiimolni &vr^ hrns San 



■ 

Pl. V. View in Hall Containing Collection of Marbles and Ornamental 

Stones. 





Here are exhibited about 350 specimens of the best known varieties of Amer- 
ican, French, English, Italian, Greek and Norwegian marbles, together with 
serpentines, onyx and granitoid rocks adapted to ornamental uses. So far as 
possible the specimens are in the form of polished slabs of the uniform size of 
10 x 16 inches. The object of the collection is to facilitate study of varieties of 
ornamental stones and give information of the localities where they may be 
obtained. 



■ 




x^* II 




pA 


mJjmi 


AV* ^ 






■■*r—= 


-.-.j.- ' 





Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 191 

expended has been marked, and with the possible exception of two 
halls, the system of installation now exhibited through the depart- 
ment may be considered permanent. To the cases in the Paleonto- 
logical halls, which contain the fossils of the geological period, large 
framed maps showing the distribution'of these rocks in the United 
States have been added, thus giving opportunity for locating the 
forms of the period. The educational value of the systematic mineral 
collection has been increased by neat case labels which give the 
composition and system of crystallization of each species. The col- 
lection illustrating structural geology, has been so largely increased 
that an entire re-arrangement has been necessitated and part of the 
specimens have been transferred to Hall 66. A collection illustrat- 
ing the rocks of the Saarbrucken coal fields has been brought from 
storage and also placed in this hall, together with a series of rocks of 
Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl collected by the Curator in Mexico. 
From the large marble structure formerly shown in Hall 67, slabs of 
uniform size have been cut, so as to illustrate the different varieties 
of marble which they represent. These, together with specimens 
obtained from other sources, have been installed in large, upright and 
well lighted cases in the hall and given a geographical arrangement. 
Thus an extensive collection consisting of about 350 specimens has 
been obtained, which represents the principal varieties of marbles 
from France, England, Italy and the United States, as well as man}' 
varieties of serpentine and onyx. In this form the collection proves 
to be far more instructive and attractive than before. In Hall 68 
the pyramids made up of building stones of irregular sizes have been 
removed and the specimens which they contained have been cut 
to cubes of uniform size. These are now installed in systematic 
order in cases. With these and other additions, the building 
stone collection now includes: granite from sixty-seven, sandstone 
from ninety, and marble from eighty-eight localities, with about 
sixty miscellaneous specimens. In Hall 69 the cases have been 
repainted, — printed labels giving complete information regarding 
each specimen, including its analysis, have been put in place, 
and thorough treatment has been given to each specimen when 
necessary to prevent its decay. The oils in Hall 71, which had 
become discolored through decomposition have, through the gener- 
osity of the Standard Oil Co., been replaced by fresh specimens, 
and some improvements in installment have been made. By careful 
selection and arrangement of material already on hand, a series of 
collections illustrating several different] processes of extraction of 
lead and silver have been put in place in Hall 72 and given a graphic 



192 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

installation, which enables the visitor to study accurately and rapidly 
the different steps of the processes. Similar collections illustrating 
the extraction of copper have been placed in Hall 79. The processes 
so represented include theFriedrichshutte and Lantenthalshiitte proc- 
esses for refining lead and silver ; the blast furnace process for the 
extraction of lead; the Argo, Colorado, smelting process for extracting 
gold, silver and copper : the Friedrichshiitte reverberatory process 
for extracting lead and silver, the blast furnace process for the 
extraction of copper, and the reverberatory furnace or Swansea proc- 
ess for the extraction of copper. In Hall 79 an entire re-arrange- 
ment has been made of the iron, nickel, arsenic and other ores, so 
that now they present a more logical order than heretofore and their 
study is facilitated. The cases in Halls 72 and 79 have been lined and 
painted to give a better background for the specimens and preserve 
them from dust. In Hall 72 the large collection of silver ores made 
by the Curator in Mexico has been installed so that a very satis- 
factory representation of these ores can be seen. The specimens 
of gold and silver alloys, which had tarnished badly, have been 
reburnished, through the kindness of Messrs. Tiffaay & Co., of New 
York. In Hall 72, devoted to the metallurgy of iron, changes 
involving a large amount of time and labor have been made, but the 
improved appearance of the hall amply compensates for the expendi- 
ture. The large, heavy objects having little significance have been 
removed, and their places have been supplied by cased models of 
rolling mills, hot blast stoves, etc., and a case of specimens illustrat- 
ing the manufacture of different grades of pig iron. The large collec- 
tion of test specimens illustrating the tensile strength of various 
grades of iron has been fully and accurately labeled, and the same is 
true of all the objects shown in the hall. In its present form the hall 
attracts much attention and is a place where valuable information 
regarding the metallurgy of iron can be obtained. 

The Curator of the Department of Botany has added to the 
herbarium during the year, six more cases containing about 4,000 
species, and in completing the installation of economic material four 
large cases have been installed on the transept of the west gallery. 
Considerable work has also been performed in caring for the speci- 
mens in the old, and not very desirable cases in different parts of 
the department and in installing, according to the plan described at 
some length elsewhere, that portion of the North American Forestry 
collection already received. A force of workmen has also been engaged 
in the workshop on Jefferson avenue, at different times during the 
year, preparing woods for this collection. 






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Pl. VI. Illustration of Installation Employed for Collections Representing 
Metallurgical Processes. 

The cut shows scheme for illustrating the blast furnace process for smelting 
lead ores. The specimens in the lowest row are samples of the ore, flux and fuel 
employed for the charge. These are fed to the blast furnace as indicated by the 
lines converging to this label. From this- furnace are obtained the various prod- 
ucts represented by specimens at the end of the diverging lines. Further treat- 
ment of the matte is denoted by the line running from it \o the label indicating 
the matte blast furnace. At the end of the lines diverging from this are placed 
specimens of the products obtained by treatment in this furnace. The individual 
specimen labels state the composition, properties, uses, etc., of each substance. 









_ 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL.'VI. 




Case Installation of Metallurgical Process. 

(Bottom of Case.) 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 193 

The installation in the Department of Anthropology has been 
much improved during the year by the addition of a number of ebony 
cases containing the Hutchinson Etruscan material referred to else- 
where, and material obtained by the President of the Museum while 
abroad last winter. The general arrangement of the department, 
with this exception, remains unaltered, although individual cases 
have been changed about more or less, and the installation re-arranged 
and brought to a higher standard in a number of halls, more espe- 
cially in the hall devoted to Egyptology. 

The exhibits in the divisions of Mammalogy and Osteology in 
the department of Zoology have been re-arranged and classified, and 
the cases in the latter division have been painted black inside, show- 
ing their contents to better advantage than before. Much work has 
been accomplished in preserving and mounting insects of many kinds. 
Numerous cocoons have been collected and a small hatchery com- 
menced, which, it is trusted, will bear fruit next spring. The spirit 
formaline in which the specimens of fishes were preserved failed 
under the extreme low temperature which the exhibition halls reached 
at night during the winter, and alcohol has been or is to be substi- 
tuted in all instances and the specimens placed upon upright plaster 
slabs within the jars, thus showing them to better advantage. In the 
west court this department has installed two very notable groups — 
the musk ox and the lesser koodoo. The taxidermy has been nearly 
completed, and the case provided, for a collection of Waller's gazelles. 
The striking manner in which these three rare and interesting groups of 
animals are arranged and posed, the life action and naturalness of 
the picture presented, no less than the scientific fidelity and faithful- 
ness of accessories, stamp them at once as of the very highest 
character of work that can be performed. In the musk-ox group 
seven animals are most attractively disposed upon a field of snow, 
through which a huge rock protrudes, surmounted by a splendid 
male in a commanding attitude. Others of the herd are seeking 
in the snow with hoof and nose for what lichens may be concealed 
beneath. Everything about the group is full of quiet, natural life: 
everything is harmonious and realistic. In the koodoo and the 
gazelle groups the same high character of art is manifest. In the 
former a striking accessory is an ant hill, upon which is perched 
an African owl. The trees and growing things are true to life, and, 
although the area is limited, the impressions of the desert are forc- 
ibly conveyed to the spectator. The gazelle group presents that 
graceful animal in most effective and dramatic grouping, finished in 
every artistic detail, and complete in every requirement of the scien- 



194 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

tist and hunter. x\ttention to the work of Mr. Akeley, the chief Taxid- 
ermist, who, under the direction of the Curator of the department, 
has executed these three groups, cannot be directed too flatteringly. 

In the Department of Ornithology seven handsome groups have 
been added during the year, reflecting a class of work of which the 
Museum may take gratulation and exhibiting the theory of popular 
education, under the rule of scientific accuracy and artistic treatment. 
The groups may be briefly referred to as the Herons, the Robins, 
the Quails, the Hen and Ducklings, the Prairie Chickens, the Fox and 
Owl, and the Ducks and Cat. These are installed in halls 26 and 27, 
provision therefor being made by removing the collections in Oology 
into the alcove of hall 27. The taxidermy of the group referred to is 
exceptionally well done ; the accessories of Mr. Mintorn and Mrs. 
Mogridge are fully up to the standard of these well-known artists, 
while the argument or story of each group as prepared by the Curator 
of the department is interesting and instructive to an unusual degree. 

The taxidermists having been removed to the annex east of the 
main building, the rooms formerly occupied by them at Jefferson 
avenue, are occupied by the Osteologists for macerating, cleaning, 
articulating and mounting. A number of improvements have been 
made in the taxidermist annex, including a cement floor in the 
cleaning room, the erection of partitions, etc. The carpentershop, 
which was located at the east of the building, has been turned over to 
the Department of Ornithology for a work room, and a carpenter- 
shop constructed in an unoccupied part of the boiler house. The 
paintshop, which was also crowded out of its quarters by the require- 
ments of departmental work, has been removed to the building on the 
corner of Fifty-sixth street and Jefferson avenue, where, though 
rather remote from the Museum, the painters have ample accommo- 
dations. The operation of the electric light and heating plants has 
been very economical. With the exception of the ordinary repairs 
and changes, very little labor or material has been required, excepting 
the renewal of the spools in the armature. Repairs on the building 
have been very largely of a nature that could be made from day to 
day, with the force at the command of the superintendent of the build- 
ing. Considerable staff has been replaced with sheet iron, the cornice 
having given the greatest amount of trouble. It is now, however, in 
good condition for the winter. The damage done to the main dome 
during the wind storms at different times during the year induced the 
substitution of thin iron sheets for the glass, the dome being so far 
above the floor of the building that this made no appreciable differ- 



o 




Oct. 1897. Annual Report or the Director. 



195 



ence in the light dispersement. It is the intention to carry out this 
plan of substituting iron for glass in all of the exposed parts of the 
roof where the glass is not essential as a means of conveying light to 
the interior. The figures immediately over the south entrance have 
been removed and the two ornaments on the grounds north of the 
building have been razed. The roof has had a constant and very 
careful inspection and has been kept in such condition that the coming 
winter is regarded with no apprehension whatever. The interior of 
the building has been constantly drawing upon the labor resources of 
the institution. The plaster work not only of the columns but of the 
coves and the cornices requires constant attention. The offices of the 
Director, the Librarian, the Curator of Anthropology, and the Super- 
intendent have all been repaired, repainted and generally renovated 
during the year. The toilet rooms have also been placed in better 
condition. A waiting room has been constructed at the south entrance 
for the accommodation of visitors who desire to send their card to 
some officer of the institution or head of a department. The three 
caravels moored in the south pond have recently received two coats 
of lead and oil, the hatches nailed down, the seams caulked and placed 
in general repair. The boats are now in a very presentable condition. 
A contract has been entered into, with the consent of the Board of 
South Park Commissioners, to install the Viking ship in a permanent 
iron pavilion at the southeast corner of the main building. The 
tracings of all drawings for new installation work, cases, etc., are now 
kept by the Superintendent, and plans and drawings of the buildings 
and the water, gas and steam systems have also been made of per- 
manent record. 

Photography and Illustrations. — This important division of the 
Museum has added measurably to its proportions the past year, and, 
under the direction of the Curator of Botany, who has voluntarily 
taken charge of it, has introduced methods and inaugurated facilities 
that its increasing importance seem to demand. Large cabinets for 
the storage of cuts and electrotypes have been constructed near the 
Botanical Laboratory, and all of the blocks illustrating the different 
publications of the Museum have been inventoried, inscribed and 
stored in intelligent order, whence they may be withdrawn easily from 
time to time, if required. The work in photography was discontinued 
for a part of the year, owing to the absence of the operator on the 
expedition in the Northwest. The work of this division, however, is 
becoming constantly of a higher character, and, as instruments and 
appliances are provided, its scope is enlarged, and the Museum does 



196 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

not need to employ outside agencies in this direction. The follow- 
ing table shows the actual results only of a large series of detailed 
operations : 

Department. 

Anthropology, 

Botany 

Geology, ........ 

Zoology, 

On Expeditions, 



Negatives, 


Prints. 


Lantern Trans- 
parencies. 


HI 


no 


72 


74 


14 


66 


133 


85 


135 


64 


377 


72 


400 







812 586 345 

Printing. — The printing office is one of the busy money-saving 
sections of the institution. The printers have been constantly at 
work, new type and increased facilities have been provided, and the 
section is now prepared to do all the printing of the Museum except 
the publications. The two exchange catalogues were printed in the 
Museum as were all of the lecture announcements, advertising cards, 
large labels, stationery, etc., etc. The following figures show the 
number of impressions in the way of label printing and general jobs: 

Labels. Other Impressions. 

Anthropology I > 976 i3.45o 

Botany, 1,071 8,810 

Geology 2,405 

Graphic Arts, 424 

Industrial Arts, 456 100 

Zoology, 

Director's Office 26,286 

Library, 140 5.935 

Admissions. — The total attendance for the year was about 10,000 
less than the year preceding. The paid attendance shows a decrease; 
the admissions on free days was about the same, while the free admis- 
sions on pay days was 3,000 larger than last year. This increase is 
almost entirely of school children and students. The public school 
authorities have made greater efforts to induce pupils to attend the 
Museum this year, and a great many classes accompanied by their 
teachers have visited the institution for observation and study; but 
probably the greatest factor in the sharp increase in the attendance 
of school children has been the offering by Mr. H. N. Higinbotham, 
of a series of cash prizes for the best written paper by a pupil of the 
public schools of the State, on the Museum and its collections. This 
contest has awakened a very lively interest on the part of the pupils 
of the public schools, more especially, of course, in Chicago where 
the Museum was more accessible. The rules of the contest were 
announced in a circular issued by Mr. Higinbotham, as follows: 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 197 

PRIZES FOR COMPETITIVE ARTICLES UPON THE 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Believing that it will lead to a higher appreciation of the aids which the 
Field Columbian Museum offers for the education of the children and youth in 
our public schools, that it will arouse in their minds a deeper interest in the col- 
lections of the Museum, and that it will collect an interesting and valuable 
amount of descriptive and suggestive literature, I beg to offer to the pupils of 
the public schools of the State of Illinois a series of prizes for papers or essays 
upon the Museum, under the following conditions: 

The prizes offered are as follows: 

One prize of $50.00. One prize of $30.00. Five prizes of $10.00 each. 

One prize of $40.00. Two prizes of $15.00 each. Twenty prizes of $5.00 each. 

Any pupil in regular attendance in any grade or department of the public 
schools of the State of Illinois shall be eligible as a competitor. The scope of the 
essays is indicated by the following suggestions: A general description of the 
Museum, based upon actual visitation thereof; the interior of the buildings, and 
the nature of the materials upon exhibition; the method of installation; any exhib- 
its or collections that may appeal to the individual writer as of peculiar interest 
or value. The article should consider the value of special collections therein 
found, or of the Museum as a whole, as aids to education. The foregoing is 
intended to indicate the range of thought which the essays may present, rather 
than to be a specific synopsis of what must be included in each paper. Each 
essay will contain not less than 2,000 nor more than 3,000 words. It should be 
written, or type-written, upon cap paper, using only one side of each sheet. It 
should be forwarded by mail to F. J. V. Skiff, Director of the Field Columbian 
Museum in Chicago, on or before the first day of October, 1897, as attested by the 
mailing stamp of the post-office in which it is registered, carefully sealed. The 
essay must not be signed, but it should be accompanied in the same envelope by 
a letter in which shall be stated the full name and age of the writer, and the 
designation of the school and grade to which he belongs. These statements must 
be attested in writing by the teacher of the grade, or the principal of the school, 
who should also certify that the essay has been produced in good faith and with- 
out assistance. A committee of three will be selected to award the prizes. The 
essays, as received by the Director of the Museum, will be numbered, and will be 
transmitted to the Committee of Award, who will know them by number only, and 
will not be cognizant of the names of the authors, nor the schools to which they 
may belong. The decisions of the committee will be announced in the press of 
Chicago on the 24th of December, 1897, and, if possible, the prizes will be handed 
to the successful competitors on Christmas Day. But the committee will make no 
award unless, in its opinion, the essay under consideration is fairly entitled thereto 
by reason of its merit, and not for lack of competitors. It must be understood 
that all essays submitted in this competition shall remain in my possession subject 
to such future disposition as I may direct. 

H. X. HIGIXBOTHAM. 

Chicago, May 29, 1897. 



ig8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Chicago, May 24, 1897. 
Hon. H. X. HIGINBOTHAM, Chicago, 111.: 

My Dear Sir : The Board of Education at its last meeting, held May 19, 
1897, approved the proposition which you submitted, offering prizes to the pupils 
in the public schools of Chicago for papers or essays on the Field Columbian 
Museum, for the purpose of arousing in the minds of the pupils a deeper interest 
in the collections in the Museum. It is understood that the essays shall include a 
general description of the Museum, based upon actual visitation; of the interior of 
the building; of the character of the material on exhibition; of the method of 
installation; and such strikingly interesting exhibits or collections as may appeal 
to the individual writer. Also an opinion as to the value of the special collec- 
tions; or of the Museum as a whole as an aid to education. 

The Board has authorized the principals of the schools to distribute circulars 
of information and to make the necessary arrangements in the schools. 

To the Board of Education of the City of Chicago: 

The Committee on School Management reports that they are in receipt of a communication 
from Mr. H. N. Higinbotham, offering the following prizes for the best essays on the " Field 
Museum:'' 

One prize of >5o. 00. One prize of S30.00 Five prizes of $10. 00. 

One prize of >40.oo. Two prizes of S15.00. Twenty prizes of S>oo. 

It being understood that each essay that wins a prize must have merit satisfactory to the 
committee — i. e.. that if only thirty essays were submitted and some of them did not have merit, 
then the whole 5300 would not be subject to distribution. 

The committee recommends the acceptance of the proposition. 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL MANAGEMENT. 
Chicago, May ig. 1897. 

The above is a copy of the order as passed by the Board. 

Yours truly, A. G. LANE. 

Superintendent of Schools. 



Springfield, 111., May 17, 1 
Hon. H. N. Higinbotham, Chicago, 111.: 

Dear Sir : I heartily endorse your plan for the distribution of prizes for 
essays upon the Field Columbian Museum, to be written by pupils in the public 
schools in Illinois, and I hereby commend its objects to the pupils and teachers 
of the State. 

I trust that your offer may receive that hearty response from them which 
your noble generosity and kindly interest in the cause of education so much 
deserve. 

The Field Columbian Museum is a most worthy institution — a fitting monu- 
ment to the liberality and patriotic spirit of its founder. 

A hearty co-operation in your plans for essays on the Museum by the pupils 
of the State will result in making them more familiar with the wealth of its 
scientific treasures, and in inspiring them to a broader knowledge and a higher 
culture. 

Ip behalf of the youth of the State whose advancement you seek to promote, 
permit me to express my heartfelt acknowledgments. 

Respectfully yours, SAMUEL M. INGLIS, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 





#3 -5. 







' 






















^l. IX Economic Botany. Installation in Suite-Cotton and Its Products. 



The elements of this installation comprise : Cotton plants at each period of 
cultivation ; photographs of the fields and factories, and specimens showing the 
result of each process in ginning and converting the seed into oil. Each speci- 
men is mounted upon a glass plate under which is a label describing the process 
producing it, and the use made of each product or by-product. 





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Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 199 

The responses to this invitation have been entirely satisfactory, 
and the committee to decide the result will be appointed and enter 
upon its duties within a few days. Among the visitors to the Museum 
in bodies during the past year may be noted the following: 134 dele- 
gates to Universal Postal Congress; 47 American Institute Mining En- 
gineers; 181 pupils, Class of Zoology, Hyde Park High School; 127 
pupils from City Normal School; 84 pupils and 1 teacher from City 
Normal School, seventh grade; 69 pupils and 1 teacher from Primary 
Normal School; 136 pupils and 1 teacher from Cook County Normal 
School; 119 pupils and 3 teachers from Burroughs School; 72 pupils 
and 1 teacher from Normal Practice Training School; 75 pupils and 
4 teachers from Hyde Park High School; 60 pupils from the Farren 
School; 114 pupils and 2 teachers from West Division High School; 
124 pupils and 6 teachers from J. N. Thorpe School; 59 pupils and 
6 teachers from Helen Heath Settlement School. 

Herewith are submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ance, list of accessions, names of members, etc., etc. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF, 

Director. 



200 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



Financial Statement. 



Receipts and Disbursements 
During the Year Ending September 30, 1897. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1896 $ 1,036.50 

Petty cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1896 739-95 

Dues of Members — 

Corporate S 290.00 

Annual, 5,110.00 5,400.00 

South Park Commissioners, 15,000.00 

A. C. Bartlett (acct. McCormick Fund), 5,000.00 

Sale of sundry articles 289.63 

Interest on investments 39,346.78 

Chicago City R. R. Co 2,250.00 

Interest on Bank Balances 138.14 

Admissions, 5,016.15 

Check Rooms 1,110.15 

Sale of Guides 429.25 

Sale of Securities, ! 35,000.00 

$110,756.55 
Disbursements. 

Salaries, S43.384.28 

Guard Service 11,424.58 

Janitor Service 7,089.32 

Fire Protection — 

Additions to equipment, $ 78 r . 2 5 

Wages of Firemen 2,760.00 

Uniforms and Sundries 7409- 3,615.34 

Heat and Light — 

Additions to plant 3 2 3-74 

Wages of Engineer and Assistants, . . . 2,981.44 

Fuel 3»753-38 

Supplies 71°-^ 7788.84 

Carried forward, $73<3 02 -3° 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 201 

Brought forward, $73,302.36 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters and Roofers $6,077.22 
Materials used— Paints, Oils, Hardware, 

Glass, Lumber, Plaster 1,247.24 8,224.46 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases 3,478.20 

Building Fixtures 190.07 

Sundries, 140.49 3,808.76 

The Library — 

Books and Periodicals Purchased, . . . 883.80 

Binding 110.60 

Sundries 93-03 1,087.43 

Sections of Printing and Photography — 

Printing — Type purchased, 194.18 

Supplies, 7.65 

Photography — Stock purchased, .... 76.48 

Supplies, I59-92 43 8 - 2 3 

Collections and articles purchased, 5-579-73 

Installation Expenses, 3,342.51 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming, . . . 1,662.37 
Stationery, Postage, Telegrams and Tele- 
phone, 1,134.09 

Lecture Course Expenses 57-34 

Publications, 2,597.63 

Expeditions, 1,921.40 

Sundries, 1,648.57 9,021.40 

$104,804.88 

In Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1897, 5,211.72 

Petty Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1897, 739-95 5,951.67 

'$110,756.55 



202 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



Attendance and Receipts for the Year Ending Sept. 30, 1897. 



Attendance. 
Total Attendance, 220,283 

Paid Attendance — 

Adults, 19,625 

Children 1,104 20,729 

Free Admission on pay days- — 

School Children, 6,952 

Students, i,4 2 9 

Teachers, 37 2 

Members — Corporate, .' . 60 

Annual, 532 

Officers' Family, 59 

Special, . 204 9,608 

Admission on Free Days — 

Saturdays, 54,93 8 

Sundays, I35i°° 8 

Highest Attendance on any day (June 20, 1897), 5> IJ 6 

Lowest " " " (March 23, 1897), 8 

Highest Paid" " " (July 5, 1897), 3° 2 

Average Daily Admissions (365 days), 603 

Average Paid Admissions (262 days), 79 



Receipts. 

Guides sold— 1,717 at 25 cents, $ 429.25 

Articles checked— 22,203 at 5 cents 1.110.15 

Admissions 5,016.15 

$6,555-55 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 203 



Accessions. 

From October i, 1896 to September 30, li 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMERICAN TYPE FOUNDERS CO., Chicago, 111. 

1 type form, 1 set key, 1 electrotype, 1 composing stick and make-up 

rule. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V., Chicago, 111. 

2 sculptured collars, 1 sculptured stone, 1 clay pipe — Mexico. 

1 large rattlesnake sculptured in stone, diameter 25 inches — Mexico. 

1 block of sculptured stone from an Aztec Hall — Mexico. 

50 bells, trumpets, shells, beads, vases, etc — Mexico. 

65 archeological specimens, earthen vessels, candle sticks, water bottle, 

mica, metate, copper instruments, clay beads, green stone, stone 

blades, etc — Mexico. 
142 archeological specimens, bells, trumpet, shell ornaments, beads, 

disks, white stone vase, etc — Mexico. 

9 stone and shell beads, 1 copper hawk bell, 1 fragment of bas-relief — 

Chichen-Itza, Yucatan. 
Burial urn, carved stone, earthen jar, terra-cotta masks, potsherds, per- 
sonal ornaments, etc — Chichen-Itza, Yucatan. 
ARVEDSON, G, F., Carpenterville, 111. 

1 quartzite knife, 14^ inches long. 
AYER, E. E., Chicago, 111. 

7 California baskets, 1 Northwest Coast wooden box carved. 
1 flaked implement, 1 green stone pendant. 

1 stone bead, 1 stone implement, 2 ivory handles. 
1 Eskimo drill mouthpiece. 
1 Indian knife sheath. 
BINNER ENGRAVING CO., Chicago, 111. 

8 specimens illustrating the zinc etching process. 
4 pictures in colors printed from half-tones. 

BROWER, J. V., St. Paul, Minn. 

10 flints, 4 potsherds — Kansas River, Kas. 
BURCHARD, E. L., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

1 Souvenir Bulletin, Machinery Hall Day, at World's Columbian Expo- 
sition, composition of which was set on the Linotype machine. 
DAVIS, H., Chicago, 111. 

1 picture of melons made by colortype process. 
DOHMEN, U. A., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

Sample of corrected and uncorrected proof. 
DONEVAN, J. F., Chicago, 111. 

1 large stone resembling a grooved ax — Wain Wisconsin. 
DUC de LOUBAT, New York, N. Y. 

1 Mexican Codex Vatican No. 3773 reproduced photomicrographicallv. 



204 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i, 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by D. G. Elliot, African Expedition: 

161 specimens of Ethnological material — Somaliland, Africa. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

i Obsidian core, i implement, i flake, i fragment — Mexico. 
Collected by E. L. Burchard: 

5 photographs of views in Lithographing Rooms of P. F. Pettibone& Co., 

Chicago, 111. 
3 wood cuts, i half tone with wood finish. 
Collected by E. H. Thompson: 

25 relics of stone, shell and pottery — Chichen-Itza T'ho and Progreso, 

Yucatan. 
469 beads, 67 copper bells, 10 earthen vessels. 

1 stone idol, 1 stone head, 4 Jadeite armlets, etc — Chichen-ltza, Yucatan. 
Collection of Jadeite and other ornaments, (71 specimens and 2 lots). 

2 fragments of idols, 2 hammer-stones, 2 rough flaked stones, 1 cord 

holder — Chichen-Itza, Yucatan. 
1 Alabaster vase (broken), 1 earthen vase, (broken.) 

1 handled vase (broken), 1 lot of skull bones — Chichen Itza, Yucatan. 

2 sculptured stone blocks, 1 earthen vase and cover, 

1 package of sand found with vase, small bits of painted pottery — 

Chichen-Itza, Yucatan. 
Various articles of clay and stone — Chichen-Itza, Yucatan. 
Collected by Miner W. Bruce: 

6 dog skins, 1 skeleton — Alaska. 
Purchases: 

1 wooden figure representing a bear, carved from cedar wood — Haida 
Indians, (purchased from James Deans, Victoria, B. C.) 

59 specimens (3 lots,) bowls, strainers, cloth, tattoo, instruments, shells, 
nuts, etc. — Samoa, (purchased from Gustavus Goward, Chicago, 111.) 

3 plaster casts of feathered serpent-in-relief, (purchased from W. B. Mel- 

ville, Chicago, 111.) 

4 porcelain transparencies, 4 old Germantown pottery, (purchased from 

E. A. Barber, Philadelphia, Pa.) 
18 casts of trepanned skulls — Peru, (purchased from Delancey W. Gill, 

Washington, D. C.) 
17 pieces of anthropometric apparatus, (purchased from R. Mathieu, 

Paris, France). 

I tobacco pipe, 1 witch doctor's rattle, 1 wooden figure, 1 wooden figure 

fetisch, 1 gun case, 1 woven bag, 2 antelope horns, 1 brass collar, 
3 small elephant tusks, 8 iron knives, 2 brass knives, 3 swords. 
1 brass collar — Congo Basin, Africa, (purchased from W. H. Leslie, 
Evanston, 111.) 

II specimens illustrating Japanese color printing — Tokyo, Japan, (pur- 

chased from Ernest W. Clement, Tokyo, Japan). 
1 Blackfoot war bonnet — Blackfoot Reservation, (purchased from R. X. 

Wilson, Macleod, Alberta.) 
Large beam scale, Arabian inscription — Arabia, (purchased by E. E. Aver, 

Chicago, 111.) 

1 Pali book, (purchased from Miss Annie M. Ricketts, Delphi, Indiana). 

26 portraits of famous printers, engravers and etchers, (purchased from 

R. M. Lindsay, Philadelphia, Pa.) 
FLANAGAN & BIEDENWEG, Chicago, 111. 

2 framed specimens of art window glass. 
FOSTORIA GLASS CO., Moundsville, W. Va. 

Tools, and pressed, cut, engraved and etched glass. 
G( >\VARD, GUSTAVUS, Chicago, 111. 

Porcelains, pottery, textiles, etc — Korea and Samoa, (for examination). 

Rejected examination papers from Government Official — Seoul, Korea. 
HARRISON, WM. PRESTON, Chicago, 111. 

Ethnological specimens from various islands in the South Pacific Ocean, 
(loan.) 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 205 

HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin Square, New York, N. V. 
17 wood engravings. 

11 wood engraver's tools, wood blocks, and designs engraved to various 
stages of completeness. 
HELIOTYPE PRINTING CO., Boston, Mass. 

21 pictures showing work done by the Heliotype process. 
HERZBERG, ERNST, Chicago, 111. 

1 book showing hand and plate tooled calf binding, style of the eighteenth 
century — book of common prayer printed in Oxford, England, in 
1760. 
HIGINBOTHAM, H. N., Chicago, 111. 

I flint drill— St. Louis, Mo. 
HUTCHINSON, C. L., Chicago, 111. 

164 pieces of earthenware, 30 pieces of metal articles, 10 lots of metal 
and miscellaneous fragments, 1 vase — Italy. 

II pieces of earthenware, 3 bronze vessels, 1 bed — Rome. 

1 rough stone sarcophagus without a lid. 1 large stone bone or mortar 
with broken lid — Ancient Rome. 
INTERNATIONAL POTTERY CO., Trenton, N. J. 

24 pieces of porcelain, consisting of plates, pitchers, cups, saucers, etc — 
Trenton, N. J. 
JOHNSON, L. K., Wheeler, Ind. 

1 grooved stone ax, 2 corals, 13 arrow points. 
KELLOGG NEWSPAPER CO., A. N., Chicago, 111. 

14 specimens illustrating the stereotyping process. 

4 specimens illustrating the electrotyping process. 
LLOYD & CO., GEORGE E., Chicago, 111. 

6 cuts of electrotyping and electrotyping machinery. 
LONG, TALBOTT, Marshalhown, Iowa. 

1 ox horn with pictorial decoration, (for examination 1. 
MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL, Chicago, 111. 

1 model of grain elevator, (deposit). 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1 large earthenware vessel, 2 small cups in clay, 1 shell pin, 1 lot of small 

shell beads, 1 conch shell vessel, 13 large shell beads — Georgia and 
Florida. 
4 shell vessels, 9 stone fragments, 19 fragments of pottery, lot of shell 
beads, etc — Georgia and Florida, (exchange). 

2 earthen vases, },7 fragments of earthen vases— Georgia, (exchange!. 
MOOREHEAD, W. K. 

46 specimens of ancient Pueblo pottery and stone implements, Southern 

Colorado. 
McILROY, H. M. 

1 cast of large stone pipe, Fort Atkinson, Wis. 
M< MURTRIE, WM, New York, N. Y. 

Samples of wool exhibited at World's Columbian Exposition. 
OHIO VALLEY CHINA CO., Wheeling, W. Ya. 

44 finished and unfinished china-ware, material, moulds, etc. 
ONONDAGA POTTERY CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 

47 pieces of porcelain, consisting of plates, dishes, bowls, jugs, cups, etc. 
OTTOMAN LITHOGRAPHING CO., J., New York, N. Y. 

4 lithograph stones, 5 pieces of tracing paper, 3 engraving points, etc. 
PETRIE, W. M. FLINDERS, London, England. 

39 terra cotta vases, 2 stone vases, 5 stone offerings. 

22 fragments of stone vessels, statues, etc., showing materials used — 
Egypt, (exchange). 
POSTEL, HENRY, Chiapas, Mexico. 

150 collections of antiquities and other articles, — Mexico, (for examina- 
tion). 



206 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

PRANG & CO., L., Boston, Mass. 

23 book lithograph stone, progressive proofs, lithograph ink, etc. 

RINGER & CO., P., Chicago, 111. 

15 books illustrating progressively the different steps in bookbinding. 
ROOKWOOD POTTERY CO., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

7 vases, 2 ewers, 1 loving cup. 

4 samples of Florida and Hanging Rock clay, flint and spar. 
SCHLESINGER, MRS. B. F., Chicago, 111. 

Suit of Japanese armour and bamboo chest for containing it, — Japan. 

SCHLESINGER, B. F., Chicago, 111. 

Scales for weighing silk, — China. 
STEUBENVILLE POTTERY CO., Steubenville, Ohio. 

20-toy toilet set, fruit dishes, pitchers, samples of clay, etc. 

TRAYERS, F. A., Racine, Wis. 

1 human skull from mound, — Illinois, (for examination). 
U. S. WEATHER BUREAU, Auditorium Tower, Chicago, 111. 

2 engraved chalk plates. 

2 stereotyped plates, original copy and printed results. 
WANGANUI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Wanganui, New Zealand. 

4 Maori fish hooks, — New Zealand. 
WEIL, C. H., Chicago, 111. 

1 split stone with iron handle, 1 black earthenware pipe, 

1 black earthenware tablet, — Mexico. 
WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION, from Industrial Art Department. 

Collection of pottery representing the modern industry in Mexico. 

Native carpenters' tools, principally planes, — from Johoe Commission. 

Cocoanut fibre and articles made from the same,— Wilumbula Fibre 

Mills. 
Chinese fiddle and bow. 
WORLD'S COLUxMBIAN EXPOSITION, Department of Archeology and Eth- 
nology. 
1 Assyrian Cuneiform inscribed brick. 
WYMAN BROTHERS, Evanston, 111. 

500 stone, 220 copper, and 2 iron implements, — Wisconsin, (loan). 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E. ( Chicago. 

1 canaigre root. 

% lb. canaigre chips,— Los Angeles, Calif. 
CHAMBERS, MRS. WM. NESBITT, Erzerum, Turkey. 

166 herbarium specimens (114 species), (exchange). 
CALKINS, W. W., Chicago. 

4 vol. collections of Lichens (3 of N. America, 1 of Europe), (deposit). 

COAHONIA LUMBER CO., Earnest P. O., Miss. 

16 planks of various Mississippi timbers— Matteson, Miss. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, for Department of Botany. 

46 specimens of fungi,— Thornton, 111. 

474 specimens of fruits (19 species), Mt. Carmel, 111. 

29 winter twigs (8 species), Mt. Carmel, 111. 

4 samples illustrating the ginning of cotton,— Coahoma, Co., Miss. 

27 specimens showing the ginning of cotton and the extraction ot oil 
from the seed— Clarksdale, Miss. 

445 specimens of logs, log sections, winter twigs, fruits, leaves, etc., illus- 
trative of North American forestry— Mississippi. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 207 

Collected by E. H. Thompson, Merida, Yucatan. 

1 dried plant — Balche — Chichen-Itza, Yucatan. 
Purchases: 

33 bromide enlargements of forest trees, (purchased from James Inglis, 
Chicago, 111.). 

576 herbarium specimens, dried plants, — -Florida, (purchased from Geo. 
V. Xash, Columbia University, New York, N. Y.). 

573 specimens dried plants for herbarium and exchange — Tekax, Xbac, 
Progreso, (purchased from Dr. G. F. Gaumer, Izamal, Mexico). 

160 specimens dried plants (80 species), islands of L. California, (pur- 
chased from A. W. Anthony, San Diego, Cal.). 

314 herbarium specimens (dried plants) — Mexico ; 630 specimens Mexi- 
can plants (210 species) — Mexico (purchased from C. G. Pringle, 
Charlotte, Vermont). 

14. lantern slides of Brazilian scenery, (purchased from T. H. McAlister, 
New York, N. Y.). 

Personal herbarium of Dr. Arthur Schott, (purchased from Mrs. Augusta 
Schott, Washington, D. C). 

290 specimens of dried plants for herbarium, — South Africa, (purchased 
from Prof. Karl Schuman, Berlin, Germany). 

207 specimens of dried plants for herbarium — Mississippi, (purchased 
from Chas. L. Pollard, Washington. D. C). 

189 specimens of dried plants for herbarium — Orinoco, (purchased from 
R. W. Squires, Minneapolis, Minn.). 
FERNO, F. E., Barton, N. Y. 

3 specimens of plants (for examination — to be determined for him). 

IOWA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Ames, Iowa. 

100 herbarium specimens (96 species), (exchange). 
135 herbarium specimens of dried plants, (exchange). 

JEPS< )X. W. L., Berkeley, Calif. 

2 new species of plants, types— California. 

LeMOYXE, F. J., Chicago, 111. 

366 herbarium specimens, (122 species) — South Minnesota. 

LARKIX, MRS. T. J., Chicago, 111. 

1 piece of Carajo or Porcho wood — Fort Baird, Mexico. 

LAXSIXG, O, E., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

3 specimens of fungi — South Park, Chicago, 111. 

MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

82 dried plants, herbarium specimens, (exchange) — New York and West 

Yirginia. 
160 dried plants, herbarium specimens^ (exchange) — Xew York and West 

Yirginia. 
151 dried plants, herbarium specimens, (exchange) — various localities. 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDENS, Columbia University, New York, X.Y. 
41 unmounted photographs, (loan). 
22 herbarium specimens, (17 species of dried plants) — Goyaz, Brazil, 

(exchange), 
39 herbarium specimens, dried plants — British Guiana, (exchange). 
yj~ herbarium specimens, dried plants — Florida, (exchange). 
339 herbarium specimens, dried plants — South America, (exchange). 

RYERSON, MARTIX A., Chicago, 111. 

1120 specimens of lichens, (27 volumes of Xorth America, and 7 volumes 
of European). 
RUMBARGER, J. L. LUMBER CO., Dobbin, W. Va. 

60 specimens of plain and fancy boards. 
SCHUMANN, PROF. KARL, Berlin, Germany. 

1 herbarium specimen, {Etipaterium drepanophllum type) — Cozumel, 
Yucatan. 



208 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

SCHNECK, DR. J., Mt. Carmel, 111. 

g herbarium specimens and fruits of pecan and bur oak — Mt. Carmel, 111. 

5 specimens of fruit of Gymnocladus Canadensis — Mt. Carmel, 111. 

1 photograph of hybrid pecan — Burnett Schoolhouse. 
SMITH, JOHN DONNELL, Baltimore, Md. 

25 herbarium specimens of Euphorbiaceae, (loan for examination). 
STONE, FRANK B., Chicago, 111. 

1 piece yellow bark, oak — N. E. Arkansas, (for examination). 
I . S. NATIONAL HERBARIUM, Washington, D. C. 

1098 herbarium dried plants, (366 species)— Idaho, I exchange). 
ioo herbarium specimens of Euphorbiaceae, (for examination). 
WHITE, MRS. WOOD, Chicago, 111. 

2 large specimens of lichens — Florida. 
WETMORE, O. S., Chicago, 111. 

1 branch of smooth alder, (Alnus serrulata, wild). 

1 branch Ginko, (Salioburya adiantifolia) — Illinois, (for examination). 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, Fayetteville, Ark. 

2 specimens of Sulphur — Sicily, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Azurite — Arizona, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Wulfenite — New Mexico, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Datolite — Italy, (exchange). 
AVER, ED. E., Chicago, 111. 

1 specimen of Rubellite in Lepidolite — San Diego county, Cal. 

1 specimen of Dumortierite, Clip — Arizona. 
BAILEY, S. C. H., Oscawana-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

19 specimens of meteorites, including Parnallee, Mains, Bremerwoode, 
Sigena, Shergotty, Chantonnay, LePressoir, Oynchimura, San Emig- 
dio, Heredia, Haviland, Pittsburg, Lime Creek, Nentmansdorff, Santa 
Rosa, Granada, Mordinovka and Dandapur, (exchange). 
BARBER, M. D-, De Kalb, 111. 

50 specimens of Niagara and Trenton fossils, (17 species), (exchange). 

10 specimens stalagmitic limestone, (exchange). 
BELL, GEORGE, Denver, Colo. 

1 Canon Diablo Meteorite — Canon Diablo, Arizona. 
BEARDSLEY, J. W., Lockport, 111. 

69 specimens Niagara fossils, representing 31 species -Chicago Drain- 
age Canal. 
BOSTON & COLORADO SMELTING CO., Argo, Col... 

14 specimens of mattes and slags, illustrating the process of smelting 
gold, silver and copper. 
BOYER, PROF. J. F.. Fort Bayard, N. M. 

1 specimen of limestone, illustrating water erosion— Shore of Lake 
Michigan, near Fort Sheridan, 111. 
BROUILLETTE, BERNARD, Vincennes, Ind. 

1 specimen of supposed meteorite, (for examination 1. 
HROWN, S. P., Jamesport, Mo. 

5 pieces of Marcasite, (for examination). 

I piece of Calcite, (for examination). 

1 piece of Quartz with black Tourmaline, (for examination). 

1 piece of Serpentine, (for examination). 

7 pieces of Hematite, (for examination) 

12 specimens of Blende and Pyrite in limestone, (for examination). 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 209 

CALDWELL, DR. CHAS., Chicago, 111. 

1 specimen of Marl -Kansas, (for examination). 
CHICAGO, UNIVERSITY OF, Chicago, 111. 

16 specimens of native crystallized copper — Lake Superior, ( exchange 1. 
6 specimens of native silver — Lake Superior, (exchange). 

2 specimens of malachite and azurite — Bisbee, Arizona, (exchange). 
1 specimen of calcite — Guanajuato, (exchange). 

COOPER, W. R., Chicago, 111. 

1 specimen of Marcasite. 

COSMOPOLITAN MAGAZINE, Irvington-on-Hudson, N. V. 

9 photographs of views in Mexico, (loan). 
CRAWFORD, SAM., Chicago, 111. 

2 specimens of rock flour, (for examination). 
CREIGHTON, JOS. H., Lithopolis, Ohio. 

1 fragment of supposed meteorite, (for examination). 
CROSBY, PROF. W. O., Boston Society Natural History, Boston, Mass. 

I diorite nodule and aureole in seam-face Granite — Higham, Mass. 
CRAMER, GEORGE, Denver, Colo. 

1 specimen of native Copper in Cuprite — La Salle Mountains. 
DAY, DR. DAVID T., Washington, D. C. 

1 fossil coral carrying Petroleum, from the Clinton limestone — Buffalo, 

N. Y., (weight 75 grams'). 
1 tube of Crude Petroleum, showing filtering through shale and conse- 
quent bleaching. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSLIM. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

42 specimens, including volcanic rocks, Amygdaloidal, Metaplye, Yeins, 

Prehnite — Brighton, Mass. 
5 lithological specimens — Vicinity of Boston. 

23 specimens illustrating structural and dynamical geology — Vicinity of 
Boston. 
Purchases: 

Reflection Goniometer and darkening attachment, (purchased from R. 

Fuess, Berlin, Germany. 
1 specimen of Hematite concretion, (purchased from E. O. Syphers, 

Milton, Iowa). 
100 specimens of Peruvian fossils — Kansas; 6 specimens of enlarged 
Grinoids — Hooser, Kansas; 1 specimen of sandstone Geode, (pur- 
chased from C. N. Gould, Winfield, Kansas. 
18 photographs (prints) of scenes in Guanajuato, Mexico, (purchased from 
Winfield Scott, Trinidad, Mexico). 

10 specimens of Niagara fossils — Chicago Drainage Canal, (purchased 

from Alex. Rand, Sag Bridge, 111). 
1 crystal of calcite — Joplin, Mo., (purchased from George L. English & 

Co., New York ). 
1 iron meteorite — Los Reyes, Mexico, (purchased from E. O. Matthews, 

Mexico City, Mexico). 
Collection of minerals, flints, corals, etc., (purchased from A. J. Mears, 

Chicago, 111). 

1 slice (112.95 grams) from the Oscuro Mountain Meteorite, Oscuro 

Mountains, N. M., (purchased from R. C. Hills, Denver. Colo). 
4 specimens of quartz concretions — Colossal Cave, Kentucky, 13 speci- 
mens of gypsum incrustation, 14 specimens Stalactites, (purchased 
from W. L. Hazen, Glasgow Junction, Ky). 

2 fossil fishes—Green River, Wyo., (purchased from A. D. Young, Chi- 

cago, 111). 

1 tooth and jawbone of Titanotherium, 1 ammonite, 1 skull and fragment 

of Oreodon, 1 tooth — Bad Lands, S. D., (purchased from Charles H. 
Cutting, Sturgis, 111.). 

2 sections of Smith's Mountain and Deep Springs Farm Siderites, (pur- 

chased from S. C. H. Bailey, Oscawana-on-Hudson, N. Y.). 



210 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

FITCH, A. B., Magdalena, N. M. 

i specimen of Aurichalcite. 
GILL, GEORGE C , Chicago, 111. 

i specimen of Lepidodendron — Beaver Creek, 12 miles from Olympian 
Springs. Ky. 
HATRY, OTTO, Kansas City, Mo. 

20 specimens of fossil Brachiopod and Bryozoa and fossil Gasteropods — 
Kansas City and Wyoming, (exchange). 

2 specimens Marcasite on limestone — Illinois, (exchange). 
HARPER, THOS., Bellevue, Pa. 

12 fossil ferns and calamites, (exchange). 

2 large slabs of slate showing fern and calamite impressions — Peters 

Creek, Washington Co., Pa. 
HARTWELL, GEO. H., Chicago, 111. 

1 fossil Mollusk from the Oolitic Limestone, Bloomington, Ind. 
HELDMAIER, E., Chicago, 111. 

1 four-inch cube of Blue Bedford Stone, from Blue Bedford Stone Co. 

1 four-inch cube of " Raindrop" sandstone, from Portage Entry, Mich. 

3 specimens of Basalt — Chehallis Co., Wash., (for examination). 
HOBBS, JAMES B., Chicago, 111. 

1 specimen of iron ore (Magnetic Iron Sand) — Benton, 111., (for exam- 

ination). 

2 specimens iron ore, consisting of a magnetic iron sand from the sand 

dunes of Benton, 111. 
HOLMES, JOHN R., Joplin, Mo. 

1 specimen of lead, zinc ore, (estimated weight 150 lbs). 
HOLDEN, A. F., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

32 specimens of Utah minerals, including topaz, orpiment, olivenite, 
clinoclasite, linarite, etc., (exchange). 
HOWARD, J. C, Faulkner, Md. 

1 small specimen of vein gypsum, (for examination). 

HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL, Chicago, 111. 

1 specimen of Pseudo meteorite, (for examination). 
KOST, DR. J., Adrian, Mich. 

1 Feloite boulder, (supposed meteorite), (for examination). 
KEAM, THOS. V., Holbrook, Arizona. 

Portion of tooth of Mastodon — Keams Canyon, Ariz., (for examination). 

LAURIE, JOHN, Chicago, 111. 

4 specimens of supposed iron and tin ores— Shore of Lake Michigan, 
Chicago, 111. 

LANDERS, CARLOS F., Pachuca, Mexico. 

14 large photographs of mines and mining machinery of Real del Monte. 

LEWIS, L. C, Belvidere, Boone Co., 111. 

1 specimen of Pseudomorph of Turgite after Pyrite. 
L. N. A. & C. R. R. (" Monon Route "), Chicago, 111. 

3 specimens of porcelain clay, (Indiaciaite & Allophane), from Bedford, 
Lawrence Co., Ind. 

MARBLE HILL QUARRY CO., Marble Hill, Pickens Co., Ga. 

2 specimens marble, (polished slabs) — Marble Hill, Ga. 
MELZER, JOHN, Morton Grove, Cook Co., 111. 

1 specimen of weathered limestone, illustrating jointing and weathering 
— Golf Park, Niles, 111., (for examination). 

MILLSPAUGH, BASIL, Chicago, 111. 

1 fragment of Pyrite concretion in coal. 

MIX, JAMES, 

1 specimen of zinc ore, (blende)— Lion Hills Mine, Marion Co., Ark. 

MUNRO, ALEXANDER, Chicago, 111. 

1 supposed meteorite, (for examination). 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 211 

MURDOCK, M. M., Wichita, Kan. 

2 supposed meteorite specimens, (for examination). 
MCLAUGHLIN, HAROLD M., Mason City, Iowa. 

406 specimens of Devonian fossils, representing 32 distinct species — 

— Hackberry Grove and Mason City, Iowa, (exchange). 
NORCROSS BROTHERS, Boston, Mass. " 

1 specimen of granite from Norcross Bros, quarries at Stony Creek, Conn. 

1 four-inch cube of sandstone from the Kibbie Quarry, East Longmeadow, 
Mass. 

1 four-inch cube of sandstone from the Maynard Quarry, East Long- 

meadow, Mass. 
NAGELVOORT, J. B., Chicago, 111. 

2 specimens of volcanic ashes — Island of Java. 
NELSON, C. N., Bayneville, Sedgwick Co., Kansas. 

1 specimen of supposed meteorite, (for examination). 
PEEK, W. H., Chicago, 111. 

1 specimen of white feldspar from vein Granite — New Hampshire. 
PLATT, REGINALD, Fort Bayard, N. M. 

I specimen erosion form of sandstone. 
RICKERT, ELIZABETH, Madison, Ind. 

1 fragment of supposed meteorite, (for examination). 
SMITH, HARMON B., Jamesport, Mo. 

1 specimen of salts from mineral water, (for examination). 
SPAULDING, GEO. H., National Military Home, Marion, Ind. 

1 fossil bone, (for examination). 
TAYLOR, WM., Rock Creek. Wyo. 

1 piece of mineral soap. 

1 specimen of underlying rock. 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

4 specimens of Lava — Hawaiian Islands, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Stalagmite— Georgia, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Onyx marble — Arizona, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Onyx marble — Lower California, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Apatite — Norway, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Williamsite — Pennsylvania, (exchange). 

4 specimens of Marble — New South Wales, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Serpentine — Maryland, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Pyraxene — New Jersey, (exchange). 

1 specimen of Pyraxene —New Mexico, (exchange). 

6 specimens of building stone — United States, (exchange). 
VERMONT MARBLE CO., Proctor, Vt. 

4 slabs, ox 16 inches, illustrating varieties of Marble. 
WARD, PROF. H. A., Rochester, N. Y. 

1 section of ballinoo— West Australia Meteorite, (exchange). 
WESTGATE, LEWIS G., Evanston, 111. 

1 specimen of hexagonite — Edwards, St. Lawrence Co.,'N. Y. 
WILLIAMS, T. B., Chicago, 111. 

Clay — Reynolds Co., Mo., (for examination). 
WRITT, HENRY, Kidder, Mo. 

1 horn core of fossil Elk — Capron, Boone Co., 111. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

CLARKE'S PYRAMID & FAIRY LIGHT CO., London. England. 

1 copy of the London Times, Nov. 9, 1796, with account of the address 
made by Washington on his resignation from Presidency. 



212 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

PECK, JAMES W., Chicago, 111. 

Copy of the New York Herald oi April 15th, 1865, containing the account 
of Lincoln's assassination. 



DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AVER, E. E., Chicago, 111. 

2 pieces of rail with sleepers and stringers attached and 1 sleeper- 
Egypt. 

BARTLETT, DR. JOHN, Chicago, 111. 

2 copies of the lines of the Egyptian boat. 
1 model illustrating points of construction. 

BLUMER, J. G., Sierra Madra, Cal. 

6 sheets drawings and descriptions of old engines. 

MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL, Chicago, 111. 

1 working model of marine engine (deposit). 



DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated). 

BARNES, MRS. D. L., Chicago, 111. 

89 bird skins, (8 of North America and 81 South America) (for examina- 
tion). 

BOYESEN, I. K., Chicago, 111. 

11 mounted birds — Norway. 

BRANDLER, CHAS., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

2 mounted birds: Porzona Carolina and Butes latissimus — Indiana and 

Wisconsin. 
5 birds in flesh: Gallinago delicata, Porzona Carolina and Bolaurus cen- 

tiginosus — Whiting, Ind. 
1 Zenaidura maceous in flesh— Millers, Ind. 

BRYAN, WM. A., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

1 bird in flesh: Otocoris alfestris praticola — Jackson Park, Chicago, 111. 
9 birds in flesh — 83rd street, Chicago, 111. 
13 birds in flesh — Millers, Ind. 

CHERRIE, GEO. K., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111, 

3 bird skins : Corvus Americano — Iowa and Dakota. 

1 bird skin : Peaiocaltes phasianellus camPestris — Dickinson, N.D. 

CORY, PROF. C. B., Boston, Mass. 

20 bird skins — Florida and California. 
326 bird skins — Various localities. 

DAY, CHAPIN A., Chicago, 111. 

1 hooded merganser in flesh : Lophodytes cucullatus — Dalton, Minn. 

DARRAGH, DR. THOS., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

3 bird skins: Chrysotis albifroits, Mamotus lessoni and Paradisea clirys- 

optora. 
1 mounted guinea fowl : Numida meleagus. 

DOHMEN, U. A., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 
1 screech owl in flesh — Jackson Park, Chicago, 111. 



Oct. 1S97. Annual Report of the Director. 213 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by George K. Cherrie: 

68 bird skins (16 species) — Knoxville, Iowa. 
38 bird skins — Suburbs of Chicago, 111. 
504 bird skins — West coast of Florida. 
299 bird skins — Pulaski County, 111. 

2 bird skins : Oreoxoptes montanus — Corpus Christi, Texas. 
•6 birds— Glen Ellyn, 111. 

3 birds — Hegewish, 111. 

12 bird skins — Lake George, 111., and Millers Station, Ind. 
Collected by I. X. Travis: 

7 mounted birds — Illinois and Indiana. 
Collected by F. M. Woodruff: 

17 bird skins (14 species) — Illinois. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by D. G. Elliot, African Expedition. 

Collection of 296 specimens of birds, 126 species, 2 types — Somaliland and 
Ogaden. 
Purchases: 

73 bird skins representing 25 species and sub species (purchased from R. 

S. Williams, Columbia Falls, Mont.) 
500 bird skins, 227 species and sub-species (purchased from H. K. Coale, 
Chicago, 111.) 

16 bird skins, 1 violet green Cormorant, 1 Western Goshawk, 1 West- 

ern Henslow's Sparrow, 116 bird skins— various points (purchased 
from Chas. K. Worthen, W T arsaw, 111.) 
587 bird skins, representing 282 species and sub-species— Costa Rica, 
C. A. 1 mounted bird, American Goshawk— Northern Wisconsin 
(purchased from George K. Cherrie, Field Columbian Museum, Chi- 
cago, III.), 

17 birds in flesh, quail, prairie chickens and ducks for groups (purchased 

from Alf. Russell & Co., South Water street, Chicago, 111.) 

1 albinistic quail, mounted— Lavinia, Tenn. (purchased from T. D. Ran- 
dall & Co., Chicago, 111.) 

1 hen and 12 ducklings in flesh for group (purchased from John Mill- 
bauch, Glen Ellyn, 111.) 

15 North American bird skins — various localities; 2 snowy heron, mounted; 
1 Nelson's ptarmigan, mounted; 1 spotted owl, 1 snowy owl (pur- 
chased by C. B. Cory). 

1 bird skin, Western Vesper Sparrow— Montana (purchased from E. E. 
Thompson). 

1 mounted willow ptarmigan for snow group (purchased from Charles 
Brandler, Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111.) 

5 birds in flesh, 2 Colinus virgianus, 3 Callipepla squamata (purchased 

from Lepman & Heggie, Chicago, 111.) 
GAULT, B. T., Glen Ellyn, 111. 

1 bird nest Merula migratori a — Glen Ellyn, 111. 
JONES, ARTHUR B., Chicago, 111. 

1 bird skin, Porzona Carolina — near Chicago, 111. 

1 nest (in situ), Passer domesticus — near Chicago, 111. 
KAY, MRS. W. V., Chicago, 111. 

34 mounted birds in 2 cases (on approval for purchase). 
KENKEL, LEWIS, Chicago, 111. 

Nest and 3 eggs of the yellow warbler, Dendroica aestiva. 
MORRISON, GEO. A., Fox Lake, Wis. 

6 sets of 4 eggs each of the black crowned night heron. 

2 nests in situ of the black crowned night heron. 
MEEK, S. E., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

1 bird skin, Western red-tail hawk — Petite Lake, Idaho. 
RYERSON, M. A., Chicago, 111. 

1 mounted widgeon duck — Iowa. 



214 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

DEWEY, H. J., Englewood, 111. 

20 negatives of views in Museum. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM EXPEDITION. 
Made by C. E. Akeley: 

292 negatives; animals, scenery, portraits, groups, camp life, etc. — Somali- 
land. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

55 negatives, forest tree portraits, winter appearance — Mt. Carmel, 111. 

18 negatives, tree portraits and cotton scenes — Mississippi. 

2 negatives of saw mills — Mattison, Miss. 

26 negatives of forest views — West Virginia. 
GRAPHIC PUBLISHING CO., Chicago, 111. 

24 negatives of views in Field Columbian Museum. 
HARTFORD BROTHERS, Chicago, 111. 

9 negatives, interior of Field Columbian Museum. 
SKIFF, F. J. V., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

20 negatives of views in Museum. 

SPECIAL ACCESSIONS. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

DAWSON, N. E. Washington, D. C. 

Early typewriting machine and stand, invented by C. L. Sholes, Milwau- 
kee, Wis., and patented August, 1871. First lot manufactured on this 
patent by Remington & Sons, Ilion, N. Y., in 1873, °f which first lot 
this is one. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchases: 

I Etruscan gold necklace of masks and beads; 30 masks ) T , 

1 Etruscan gold fibula ) ~ ita - ■ 

(Purchased by E. E. Ayer, Chicago, 111.) 
Silver fibula gold bands, 3 flat earrings. 

2 pair (4) encrusted earrings, head and bust of Emperor Caligula — Italy 

(purchased by C. L. Hutchinson, Chicago). 
SMITH, EDWARD J., Chicago, 111. 

9 matrix specimens, 12 uncut, 4 polished, " Cyclops." Inclusion of red 

chalcedony in white chalcedony; found in opalescent rock — Estado 

Hidalgo, Mexico. 
SPAULDING & CO., Chicago, 111. 

1 silver campaign dollar, with inscription. 
THOMPSON, EDWARD H., Merida, Yucatan. 

2 small silver coins. 
WARD, JOHN, Chicago, 111. 

1 Egyptian coin. 
WEARE, P. B., Chicago, 111. 

Nugget of placer gold, valued at $250 — Klondyke. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated, i 

ARKELLS, W. GUY, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

1 fox skin — Arizona. 
AYER, E. E., Chicago, 111. 

1 raccoon. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 215 

BRITISH MUSEUM, London, England. 

1 South American deer — 1 Klipspringer (exchange). 
CHOPE, E. B., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

5,921 beetles, 619 butterflies, 3 bats, 2 lizards (variety of species)— Illinois, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Florida. 

102 land and fresh water shells, 15 species of centipedes. 

198 bees, wasps, etc., 165 grasshoppers and locusts, 355 bugs. 

424 dragon flies, 205 flies (variety of species), from Illinois and Wis- 
consin. 
CORY, C. B., Palm Beach, Fla. 

1 alligator (young). 

1 crocodile (young). 
EDWARDS, PROF.'A. MILNE, Paris Museum, France. 

13 mammal skins (exchange). 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by D. G. Elliot, African Expedition: 

193 mammal skins — Somaliland and Ogaden. 

22 skulls and skeletons. 

115 specimens, 33 species of fishes. 

12 specimens, 7 species lizards; 6 specimens, 6 species snakes; 12 speci- 
mens, 4 species frogs; 1 specimen, 1 species turtle. 
Purchases: 

36 mammal skins — Iowa and Dakota (purchased from Geo. K. Cherrie, 
Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111.). 

1 skin of rhinoceros (purchased from T. W. Franklin, New York). 

12 skins of musk oxen, 2 skeletons of oxen, 4 skins of polar bear — Arctic 
regions, Hudson Bay (purchased from Thos. Luce & Co., New Bed- 
ford, Mass.) 

50 mammal skins, skulls, etc. (purchased from C. E. Akeley, Chicago, 111.) 

400 specimens of shells (78 species), taken mostly within the city limits of 
Chicago (purchased from T. Jansen, Chicago). 

5 fur seal skins, consisting of 1 male, 1 female and 3 young (purchased 
from Prof. C. H. Gilbert, Stanford University, California). 

Buffalo skin and skull (purchased from P. H. Lannan, Salt Lake Citv, 
Utah). 

1 male Grevys zebra skin — Lake Rudolph, Africa; pair of horns of 
the brindled gnu, (purchased from Rowland Ward & Co., London, 
England). 

10 specimens of corals, 2 shells, 1 starfish, 3 rattlesnake rattles (purchased 

from A. J. Mears, Chicago, 111.) 
32 shells from the shores of the Island of Samoa (purchased from Gus- 
tavus Goward, Chicago, 111.) 
FRANKLIN, T. W., New York, N. Y. 

4 musk ox skins, 1 rhinoceros skin (for examination). 
1 rhinoceros skull and 2 leg bones (for examination). 
KAYANAUGH, R. B., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

1 snail, helix hcrmastoma. 
KENKEL, LOUIS, Chicago, 111. 

11 toads, 13 frogs, several cricket frogs. 
3 Racine garter snakes — Chicago, 111. 

LARKIN, T. J., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 

1 horned toad, Phrynosoma (alive)— Fort Bayard, Grant county, N. M. 
LAWRENCE, W. T., Chicago, 111. 

2 shells — near San Diego, Cal. 
MEEK, HIRAM, Hicksville, Ohio. 

3 rattlesnakes, Crotalus horridus. 

MEEK, S. E., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 
50 species of fishes from Mazatlan, Mexico. 
100 species of fishes from the fresh waters of North America. 
50 species of fishes from the Atlantic coast. 
25 species of North American reptiles. 



216 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol i. 

RINGLING BROTHERS, Baraboo, Wis. 

I young chimpanzee (in flesh), Anthropopitrecus troglodytes. 

I skin and skeleton of brindled gnu. 

i skeleton of camel. 

i seal in flesh. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago, 111. 

i Grevy zebra, i brindled gnu. 

I hartebeast, I white-tailed gnu. 
SCHWABACHER, JESSIE M. and LESLIE J., Chicago, 111. 

I porcupine fish skin, Diodon maculatus guenther (deposit). 
TRIGGS, AITCHISON & CO., Chicago, 111. 

i octopus — Pacific coast. 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

103 specimens of fish in alcohol (exchange). 
WALTON, LIEUT. E. S., Graham County, Arizona. 

1 lizard — Graham County, Arizona. 

2 horned toads, 6 lizards, 1 mountain boomer — Fort Bliss, Texas. 
WHITE, MRS. WOOD, Chicago, 111. 

14 marine shells, Picten (dead shells) — Fort McCrea, Pensacola, Fla. 

THE LIBRARY. 

(Accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 
Books, Pamphlets and Serials. 

ADAMS, FRANK D., (the author), Montreal, Canada. 

Report on the geology of a portion of the laurentian area north of the 
Island of Montreal, with 2 pams. 
ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Ala. 

Bulletin, no. 5. 

Iron making in Alabama. 

Report on the Valley Regions of Alabama, parts 1 and 2. 
ALABAMA INDUSTRIAL AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, University, Ala. 

Proceedings, vol. 6, pt. 2, and vol. 7, pt. 1. 
ALDRICH, HON. J. FRANK, Chicago. 

Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 7, (gift). 
AMBROSETTI, JUAN B., (the author), Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Contribucion a la paleoetnologia argentina, with 5 other pams. 
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Worcester, Mass. 

Partial index to the proceedings, 1812-1880. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF INVENTORS AND MANUFACTURERS, 
Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings and addresses, 3rd annual meeting, with papers. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
Salem, Mass. 

Proceedings, vol. 45, 1896. 
AMERICAN MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Transactions, vol. 17, (gift). 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Bulletin, vol. 8. 
AMERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCHEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New 
York City. 

Proceedings, 1893-1896. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 217 

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Papers on the origin and chemical composition of petroleum. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NATURALISTS, Providence, R. I. 

Records, vol. 1, pt. 7. 
AMHERST COLLEGE, Amherst, Mass. 

Set of publications, 53 books and paras. 
ANDERSON INTELLIGENCER, Anderson, S. C. 

Souvenir edition, 1896, (gift). 
AXDOYER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Andover, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
ANDREE, RICHARD, 'Braunschweig, Germany. 

Globus, vols. 70-71. 
ANTHROPOLOGIGAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN & IRELAND, 
London, England. 

Journal, current nos. 
ARCTOWSKI, HENRYK, (the author), Brussels, Belgium. 

La genealogie des sciences. 

Materyaly do bibliografii prac nauknwych Polskich, (gift). 
ARGENTINA. INSTITUTO GEOGRAFICO, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Boletin, vol. 16, nos. 5-8, and vol. 17, nos. 10, 11 and 12. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Ariz. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 

Journal, current nos. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
ATHENS. NATIONAL AND UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Athens, Greece. 

4 publications. 
ATKIXS( )X, GEORGE, (the author), Ithaca, X. Y. 

Bulletin of the Cornell University, vol. 3, no. 1. 

Collection of 19 pams. 
AUCKLAND INSTITUTE AND MUSEUM, Auckland, New Zealand. 

Report, 1896-97. 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sidney, New South Wales. 

Annual report, 1895. 

List of insectivorous birds of New South Wales, by A. J. North. 

Memoirs, vol. 3, pts. 1-3. 
BAILEY, S. C. H., (the author), Oscawana-on-Hudson, X. Y. 

On the mineralogy of New York Island, with 3 other pams. 
BAKER, F. C, (the author), Chicago. 

Critical notes on the muricida?, with 4 other pams. 
BARTON, GEORGE H., (the author), Boston, Mass. 

Glacial origin of channels on drumlins, with 1 other p'am. 
BASCOM, F., (the author), Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Structure, origin and nomenclature of the acid volcanic rocks of South 
Mountain. 

A pre-tertiary nepheline-bearing rock. 
BAUER, MAX, (the author), Marburg, Hesse, Germany. 

Beitrage zur geologie der Seyschellen. 
BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

Catalogue, 15th ed. (2 copies), (gift). 
BECKER, GEORGE F., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Schistosity and slaty cleavage, with 2 other pams. 
BEECHER, C. E., (the author), New Haven, Conn. 

Outline of a natural classification of the trilobites. 

The morphology of triarthrus. 



218 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

BELL, ALEXANDER G., Washington, D. C. 

Report concerning the Mystic Oral School. 
BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wis. 

Catalogue, 49th and 50th, 1895-97. 
BENTON, FRANK, (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The honey bee, (gift). 
BERLINER GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift fur ethnologie, vols. 28 and 29, current nos. 
BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHE GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Notizblatt, nos. 1-8. 
BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR NATTRKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Bericht, 1896-97. 

Neue orthopteren aus dem tropischen Afrika, with 17 pams. 
BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Ethnologisches notizblatt, heft 1. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKAD. DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Berlin, 
Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1895-96, 4 vols. 
BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift des Yereins fur Yolkskunde, current nos. 
BEYER, GEORGE, New Orleans, La. 

Publications of the Louisiana Historical Society, vol. 1, pt. 4. 
BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago. 

Black diamond, current nos. 
BLUMER, J. G., Sierra Madra, Col. 

An outline of the locomotive engine, by Th. West, (gift). 
BLYTT, AXEL, (the author), Christiania, Norway. 

The probable cause of the displacement of beach-lines, with 11 other 
pams. 
BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. LAND RECORDS AND AGRICULTURE, Bom- 
bay, India. 

Annual report, 1895-96. 

Crop experiments, 1895-96. 

Annual report of the Government Experimental Farm, Poona, 1896. 

Reports on the rail and road borne trade, 1895-97. 
BONN. RHEINISCHE-FRIEDRICH-WILHELMS UNTYERSITAT, Bonn, 
Germany. 

Amtliches personal verzeichnis, 1894-96. 

Chronik, 1893-96. 

Index scholarum, 1894-96. 

Yerzeichniss der vorlesungen, 1894-96. 

15 pamphlets. 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 21st, 1896. 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 1895-96. 

Monthly bulletin, current nos. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 2d, 1896. 
BOWKER, R. R., New York City. 

Publications of Societies, July 1, 1890 to June 30, 1895. 
BRANNER, J. C, (the author), Palo Alto, Cal. 

The bauxite deposits of Arkansas, with 6 other pams. 
BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC LIBRAY, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Annual report, 16th. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 219 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. BUREAU OF MINES, Victoria, B. C. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Bulletin, nos. 2 and 3. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. BUREAU OF STATISTICS, Victoria, B. C. 

Annual report of the New Westminster Board of Trade, 1896. 

British Columbian mining record, Diamond jubilee number. 

Insect pests and plant diseases. 

Yucon gold fields, (gift). 
BROADWAY, W. E., Saint George, Grenada. 

Annual report of the Botanical Garden, Grenada, 1895. 

Bulletin, vol. 2, no. 3. 
BROOKLYN LIBRARY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Annual report, 39th. 
BROWN UNIVERSITY, Providence, R. I. 

Address book of the living graduates. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Catalogue, 1896. 
BROWNE, FRANCIS F., Chicago. 

The Dial, current nos. 
BRUHL, GUSTAV, (the author), Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Zwischen Alaska und Feuerland. 

Aztlan-Chicomoztoc. 
BRUXELLES, EXPOSITION INTERNATIONAL, 1897, Brussels, Belgium. 

La section des sciences, (gift/ 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE ROYALE LINNEENNE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-8. 
BUCKING, H., (the author), Strassburg, Germany. 

Neues vorkommen von kalifeldspat, etc. im granit des Fichtelgebirges. 

5 pamphlets. 
BUFFALO LIBRARY, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Annual report, 61st. 
BURCHARD, E. L., Chicago, 111. 

Collection of 38 books and pamphlets, (gift). 
BUSCHAN, G., (the author), Breslau, Germany. 

Einfluss der rasse auf die haafigkeit und die formen der geistes und ner- 
venkrankheiten. 

Korpergewicht. 
BUSSEY INSTITUTION, Boston, Mass. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, pts. 2-5; and vol. 2, pts. 1-5. 
BUTCHERS AND PACKERS MAGAZINE PUB. CO., St. Louis, Mo. 

Butchers and packers magazine, current nos. (gift). 
CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India. 

Report, 1895-97. 

Report of the Botanical Survey of India, 1895-96. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, Cal. 

Proceedings, 2d series, vol. 6; and 3d series, current nos. 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Report, 1892-96. 
CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU, San Francisco, Cal. 

Bulletin, nos. 2,9, 10, 11 and 12. 

Catalogue of the State Museum of California, vols. 1-4. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, Cal. 

Bulletin of the Department of Geology, vol. 2, no. 2. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STA- 
TION, Berkeley, Cal. 

Report of the viticultural work, 1887-93. 

Appendix to viticultural report, 1896. 



220 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

CALVO, J. B., Washington, D. C. 

Los Museos de Filadelfia, (gift). 
CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Annual report, 1895-96. 

Bulletin, vol. 28, nos. 2 and 3; and vol. 30, nos. 1-6. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, England. 

Annual report of the Library syndicate, 1896. 

Annual report, 31st, of the Museums and Lecture Rooms syndicate. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Ottawa, Canada. 

Curious protective features in the voung vertebrates, with 5 other pams. 
CANADA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Annual report, vols. 7 and 8, 1894-95. 

7 loose atlas sheets. 
CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings and transactions, 2d series, vol. 1. 
CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Ontario. 

Proceedings, new series, vol. 1, pts. 1 and 2. 

Transactions, vol. 5, pt. 1. 
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. GEOLOGICAL COMMISSION, Cape Town. 

Annual report, 1896. 
CARLES, C, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Antecedentes administrativos de correos y telegrafos, 1894. 
CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Annual report, 1st, 1896. 

Dedication souvenir of the Carnegie Library. 

Prize essay contest, 1896. 
CARPENTER, GEORGE H., Dublin, Ireland. 

The Irish naturalist, current nos. 
CASE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual register of the Hartford Theological Seminary, 1895-96. 

CENTRAL ART ASSOCIATION, Chicago. 

Arts for America, current nos. (gift). 
CERAMIC MONTHLY PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Ceramic monthly, current nos. 
CHADBOURNE, A. P., (the author), Boston, Mass. 

The spring plumage of the bobolink, with another pam. 
CHERRIE, G. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

Aus der entwickelungs-geschichte der insecten, by A. Tichomirow, with 
4 other pams, (gift). 
CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago. 

Annual report, 39th, 1896. 

Bulletin, no. 2, of the Geological and Natural History Survey. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1888-92 and 94-96. 

Catalogue of the 9th annual exhibition of water-colors, etc., by American 
artists, 1897. 

Catalogue of paintings, studies, sketches and drawings, by John La Farge. 

Exhibition of works by Chicago artists. 

First annual exhibition of the Society of Western Artists. 
CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Report of quarterly meeting, April 20, 1897. 

Report of special meeting, April 29, 1897. 
CHICAGO WORLD'S COLUMBIAN ENPOSITION, Chicago. 

Official catalogue, (gift). 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 

CINCINNATI HOUSE OF REFUGE, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 46th. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 16th, 1896. 

Catalogue of the Spring exhibition of works by American artists, 1897. 

First Annual exhibition of the Society of Western Artists, 1897. 

Water-colors, pastels, etc., exhibited December, 1896. 

Wood-carving, by W. H. Fry. 

CLAUSTHAL. KONIGLICHE BERGAKADEMIE, Clausthal, Hanover, Ger- 
many. 

Program, 1897-98. 

Vorschriften iiber die eingefiihrten priifungen. 
CLAY RECORD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Clay record, current nos. 
COFFEY, GEORGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

Prehistoric cenotaphs, (gift). 
COHEN, E., (the author), Greitswald, Germany. 

Meteoreisen-studien, no. 5, with 3 other pams. 
COLBY UNIVERSITY, Waterville, Maine. 

Catalogue of the Maine Geological Collection. 

Exercises of the laying of the corner stone of Shannon Observatory. 

Measurement of the expansion of metals. 

The basic massive rocks of the Lake Superior region, with 4 other pams. 
COLLIERY ENGINEER CO., Scranton, Pa. 

The colliery engineer, current nos. (gift). 
COLLINGE, WALTER E., Birmingham, England. 

The suprarenal bodies of fishes, with 32 other pams. 
COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fort Collins, 
Colo. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

The technical determination of iron, with 6 other pams. 
C< >LUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Announcements, 1896-97. 

Annual report, 7th, 1896. 

Bulletin, nos. 15-17. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 

Columbia University, 1897. 

Dedication of the new site. 
CONNECTICUT ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New Haven, Conn. 

Transactions, vol. 8 and vol. 9, pt. 1. 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Hew Haven, 
Conn. 

Annual report, 20th. 

Bulletin, no. 124. 
CONOVER, C. H., Chicago. 

Gazette of the United States, vols. 2 and 4. 
CONTINENTAL PUBLISHING CO., New York City. 

Current thought, vol. 1, nos. 1 and 2, (gift). 
CORNELL COLLEGE, Mount Vernon, la. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bulletin of the Cornell University, vol. 3, no. 1. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
CORY, CHARLES B., (the author), Boston, Mass. 

A list of the birds of Florida, with two other pams. 



222 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

COSTA RICA. INSTITUTO FISICO-GEOGRAFICO NACIONAL, San Jose. 

Primitive flora? Costaricensis, pt. 3. 

Herborisations au Costa Rica, with 4 other pams. 
COSTA RICA. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica. 

Antiguedades de Costa Rica, pt. 1. 

Documentos rel. a la participacion de Costa Rica, Expocion de Guata- 
mala, 

Fauna de Costa Rica. 

Flora de Costa Rica. * 

Informe, 1896-97, with 3 other pams. 
CROSBY, W. P., (the author), Boston, Mass. 

Geology of the Boston basin, vol. 1, pt. 2, with 8 other pams. 
CRYSTAL PALACE COMPANY, London, S. E., England. 

Programme, 1896. 

The great triennial Handel festival, 1894. 

Handbook, 1895, (gift). 
CUDMORE, P., (the author), Faribault, Minn. 

The battle of Clontarf and other poems, (gift). 
CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ-JOSEPH-UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, Buko- 
wina. 

Bericht, 1895-96. 

Geschichte und statistik, 1875-95. 

Uebersicht der akademischen behorden, 1897-98. 

Verzeichniss der offentlichen vorlesungen, 1897-98. 
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, N. H. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
DAVENPORT ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Davenport, la. 

Proceedings, vol. 6. 
DAVIS, ALFRED, Chicago. 

Annual report, 17th, of the Chicago Art Institute, (gift). 
DAVIS, W. M., (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 

A speculation in topographical climatology, with 5 other pams. 
DEAN, BASHFORD, (the author), New York City. 

On the larval development of amia calva, with 2 other pams. 
DELAWARE COLLEGE, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Del. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Mich. 

Annual report, I896-97. 

Catalogue of the first annual exhibition of the Society of Western Artists, 
1897. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Mich. 

Annual report, 32d, 1896. 
DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR-UND VOLKERKUNDE 
OSTASIENS, Tokio, Japan. 

Mittheilungen, vol. 6, nos. 57-59 and supplement no. 3. 
DOLLO, LOUIS, Brussels, Belgium. 

Sur la phylogenie des dipneustes. 
DONALDSON, HENRY HERBERT, (the author), Chicago. 

The growth of the brain. 
DRESDEN. K., MINERALOGISCH-GEOLOGISCHES UND PRAHISTOR- 
ISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 

Mittheilungen, no. 12. 
DREW THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Madison, N. J. 

Third printed report. 
DROWXE, C. R., Providence, R. I. 

Plants of Rhode Island, (gift). 
Dl" HOIS, CONSTANCE G., Waterbury, Conn. 

Asa Gray bulletin, current nos. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report ok the Director. 223 

EDINBURGH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

List of additions, 1895. 

List of books relating to botany and forestry in the library. 

Report, 1895. 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Electrical engineering, 1897. 
ELECTRICIAN PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Western electrician, current nos. 
ELLIOT, D. G., Field Columbian Museum. 

New species of fresh water mollusks from South America, with 8 other 
pams., by H. A. Pilsbry, (gift). 
ELLIS, J. B., Newfield, N. J. 

New species of tropical fungi. 

New species of Kansas fungi. 
EMERSON, BENJAMIN K., (the author), Amherst, Mass. 

On the triassic of Massachusetts, with two other pams. 
ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 1st to nth. 

Bulletin, vols. 1, 2 and 3, nos. 1 and 2. 

Collection of finding lists. 

Letters and documents relative to its foundation, etc. 

List of magazines and periodicals in the reading room. 
ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Mass. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Historical collection, vol. 32. 
FAIRCHILD, H. L., Rochester, N. Y. 

Glacial Genesee lakes, with 8 other pams. 
FEWKES, J. WALTER, (the author), Washington. D. C. 

Pacific coast shells from prehistoric Tusayan Pueblos, with 3 other pams. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchase: 

For General Library — 27 vols. 

Department of Anthropology — 26 vols. 

Department of Botany — 16 vols. 

Department of Geology — 46 vols. 

Department of Ornithology — 3 vols. 

Department of Zoology — 28 vols. 
FLETCHER, ALICE C, (the author), Washington, D. C. 

A study of Omaha Indian music. 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lake City, Fla. 

Bulletin, nos. 20-40, (gift). 
FORBES, S. A., Urbana, 111. 

Summer opening of the Biol. Exp. Station, University of Illinois. 

The Illine, vol. 26, no. 8, (gift). 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Forest and stream, rod and gun, current nos. (gift). 
FORSTEMANN, E., (the author), Dresden, Germany. 

Zur entzifferung der Mayahandschriften. 

Die kreuzinschrift von Palenque. 
FRANCE. MINISTERE DE LA MARINE, Paris, France. 

Annuaire de la marine, 1896. 

Bulletin des peches maritimes, vol. 4, nos. 1-10, (gift). 
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, vol. 142, current nos. 
FRIEDLANDER, R. & SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturae novitates, current nos. (3 copies). 
FURBRINGER, MAX, (the author), Jena, Germany. 

Ueber die spino-occipitalen nerven der selachier und hnlocephalen. 



224 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

GAGE, SIMON A., Ithaca, N. Y. 

The Wilder quarter-century book. 

The microscope and microscopical methods, 6th ed., by the donor. 

Collection of 25 pamphlets chiefly by the donor. 
GATSCHET, ALBERT S., Washington, D. C. 

Hissarlik wie es ist, by Boetticher. 

Traite elementaire de physique, by A. Ganot. 

Production of stone, 1893, by W. C. Day. 

A migration legend of the Creek Indians, with 7 other pams., by the donor. 
GAULT, B. T., Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Bulletin, no. 2, of the Ridgeway Ornithological Club. 
GENOVA. MUSEO CIVICO DI STORIA NATURALE, Genova, Italy. 

Annali, series 2, vols. 2-16, 1885-96. 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Bulletin, vol. 8, current nos. 
GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Experiment, Ga. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Ga. 

Administrative report, 1894-96. 
GIESSEN. LUDEWIGS UNIVERSITAT, Giessen, Hesse, Germany. 

Collection of 16 pams. 
GIGLIOLI, ENRICO H., (the author), Firenze, Italy. 

Avifauna italica. 

Primo resoconto dei resultati della inchiesta ornitologica in Italia, 3 vols. 

Annali di agricoltura, 1885. 
GLASGOW. NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland. 

Proceedings and transactions, new series, vols. 1-4. 
GLASS AND POTTERY WORLD CO., Chicago. 

Glass and pottery world, current nos. (gift). 
GOTTINGEN. K. GEOLOGISCHES MUSEUM, Gottingen, Germany. 

Ueber einige fischreste des norddeutschen und bohmischen- 

Devons, with another pam., by Von Koenen. 
GOTTINGEN. K. GEORG-AUGUSTS-UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Germany. 

Amtliches verzeichnis des personals und der studirenden. 

Verzeichnis der vorlesungen, 1897-98. 
GOWARD, GUSTAVUS, Chicago. 

Deliciae naturae selectae, 2 vols. (gift). 
GRAY, HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Mass. 

Contributions, new series, nos. 10 and 11. 

The fruit of tropido-carpum, with 5 other pams. 
GREAT BRITAIN. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London, S. W., England. 

Annual report, 1895-96. 

List of memoirs, maps, etc., issued by the survey. 

Memoirs, decades 1-13. 
GREENE, EDWARD, Washington, D. C. 

Pittonia, vol. 3, pt. 16. 
GUNCKEL, LEWIS W., (the author), Dayton, Ohio. 

The study of American hieroglyphs. 
GURNEY, J. H., (the author), Norwich, England. 

Descriptive catalogue of the raptorial birds in the Norfolk and Norwich 
Museum, pt. 1. 

Official guide to the Norwich Castle Museum. 

Catalogue of the birds of prey. 

8 pamphlets. 
HAARLEM. STAADS-BIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

Verslag von den toestand, 1896. 
HAMILTON ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Journal and proceedings, no. 12, 1895-96. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 225 

HANNOVER. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hanover, Ger- 
many. 

jahresbericht, 40-43, 1890-93. 
HARDWOOD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Hardwood, current nos. (gift). 

HARPER, THOS., Bellevue, Pa. 

Alleghany County, its early history and subsequent development. 
HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual report, 59th. 

Bulletin, vol. 19, no. 3. 
HARTFORD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual register, 1896-97. 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Announcement of courses of instruction in Arts and Sciences, 1896-97. 

Announcement of the Graduate School, 1895-96. 

Harvard University, by F. Bolles. 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Bibliographical contributions, nos. 31, 40, 45 and 51. 
HATCH EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Mass. 

Annual report, 9th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Annual report, 1st, 3rd and 4th. 

Catalogue of the bound books in the Library. 

Binding list of books in the Library. 

Papers, nos. 1-8. 
HAY, O. P., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The structure and mode of development of the vertebral column, (gift). 

HAYNES, HENRY W., (the author), Boston, Mass. 

Some unwarranted assumptions in archaeology, with 3 other pams. 
HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Baden, Ger- 
many. 

Akademische rede von H. Bassermann. 

Catalogue of new accessions. 

System des realkatalogs. 

69 inaugural dissertations. 
HERBIER BOISSIER, Chambesy pres Geneve, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
HITCHCOCK, C. H., (the author), Hanover, N. H. 

Recent progress in ichnology, with 5 other pams, and 5 abstracts. 
HOPKINS, T. C, (the author,) State College, Pa. 

Origin of conglomerates of western Indiana. 
HOVEY, EDMUND, (the author), New York City. 

A relatively acid dyke in the Connecticut triassic area. 
HOWEL, EDWIN E., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The Washington school collections. 

4 pamphlets on meteorites. 
HUARD, V. A., Quebec, Canada. 

Naturaliste canadien, current nos. (gift). 
HUBBARD, GARDINER G., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Geographic progress of civilization, with 4 other pams. 
HUNGARIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Termeszetrajzi ftizetek, current nos. 
ILLINOIS HUMANE SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Annual report, 27th. 

Annual meeting, 20th, of American Humane Association. 

ILLINOIS SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE, Glenwood, 111. 
Annual report, 9th, (gift). 



226 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, 111. 

Statistical report, 1896. 
ILLINOIS STATE LABORATORY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Urbana, 111. 

Biennial report of the Biological Experiment Station, 1895-96. 

Bulletin, vol. 4, articles 12-15, an d vol. 5, articles 1 and 2. 

Contents and index to vol. 3. 
ILLINOIS STATE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, 111. 

Bulletin, nos. 11 and 12. 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, 111. 

Chemical survey of the water supply of Illinois. 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Urbana, 111. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Bloomington, 111. 

Illinois Wesleyan magazine, vol. 1, nos. 1-5, 7, 9 and 10, and vol. 2, nos. 1-5. 
INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 

Indian Museum notes, vols. 1-3 and vol, 4, current nos. 
INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Proceedings, 1894-95. 
INDIANA. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Annual reports, 20th and 21st. 
INLAND PRINTER CO., Chicago. 

Inland printer, vols. 16-18, and vol. 19, current nos. 
INSTITUT DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Comptes rendu des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, vol. 124 and vol. 
125, current nos. 
IOWA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ames, la. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, la. 

Report, vol. 6. 
IOWA HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, la. 

Annals of Iowa, 3rd series: vol. 2, no. 7, (gift). 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, la. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, LABORATORIES OF NATURAL HIS- 
TORY, Iowa City, la. 

Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 1. 
JACK, ROBERT L., (the author), Brisbane, Queensland. 

The submarine leakage of artesian water. 
JEPSON, WILLIS L., Berkeley, Cal. 

Erythea, current nos. 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 21st, 1896. 

Register for 1896-97. 
JONES, A. B., Chicago. 

Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and of the Board of 
Indian Commissioners, 1891-92. 

Annual catalogue of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1892-93 and 

1894-95- . „ 

Annual reports of Lake Superior Mining Co., 1893-95. 

Proceedings of the American Forestry Association, vol. 10, pt. 1. 

Report of the Secretary of Agriculture, 1895. 

Summary of operations of Calumet and Hecla Mining Co., 1892, (gift). 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Topeka, Kansas. 

A brief history of the organization, etc. 
KANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Manhattan, Kansas. 

Bulletin, current nos. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 227 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Manhattan, Kansas. 

Grasses of Kansas, by Hitchcock. 

Erysiphe;e of Kansas, by Walters. 
KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Biennial report, 10th, 1895 96. 

Report, 1897. 
KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kansas. 

Kansas L^niversity quarterly, vol. 1, nos. 1, 2 and 4; vol. 2, nos. 2 and 4; 
vols. 3 and 4; vol. 5, nos. 1 and 2; vol. 6, current nos. 
KAWRAISKY, F. F., (the author), Tiflis, Kaukasus. 

Die lachse des Kaukasus. 
KEARNEY, THOMAS H., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Notes on the flora of southeastern Kentucky, with 6 other pams. 
KELLERMAN, W. A., (the author), Columbus, O. 

New experiments with fungicides for smuts of wheat and oats. 
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, Kv. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
KENTUCKY. INSPECTOR OF MINES, Louisville, Ky. 

Annual report, 1895. 
KENTUCKY. POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY, Louisville, Ky. 

Reports and proceedings of igth annual meeting. 
KEW ROYAL GARDENS, Kew, London. 

Bulletin, nos. 1 13-114. 

KIEL. KUNIGLICHE UNIYERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 

Bericht fiber die verwaltung, 1892-97. 

Yerzeichniss der laufenden periodischen schriften. 
KJOBENHAYN. NATURHISTORISKE FORENING, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Yidenskabelige meddelelser, 1896. 
KNOVYLTON, FRANK H., Washington, D. C. 

Report on coal and lignite of Alaska, etc., by W. H. Dall and others. 

Fossil plants as an aid to geology, with 14 other pams, by the donor. 
KNUDSEN, AUGUSTUS, (the author), San Francisco, Cal. 

Triangular surveys from single stations, (gift). 
KOFOID. C. A., Urbana, 111. 

Biennial report, 1895-96, of the Illinois State Laboratory of Natural His- 
tory. 

Bulletin, vol. 5, article 1 of the Illinois State Laboratory of Natural His- 
tory. 

Report upon the protozoa observed in Lake Michigan, with 1 other pam., 
by the donor. 
KOSIDOWSKI, PAUL, Mexico, Mex. 

Mittheilungen des Deutschen Wissenschaftlichen Vereins in Mexico, vol. 
1, nos. 1-4, (gift). 
KUKENTHAL, W., (the author), Jena, Germany. 

Zur entwickelungsgeschichte des gebisses von manatus. 
KUMMEL, HENRY B., (the author), Chicago. 

The Newark system, New Jersey. 
LACKAWANA INSTITUTE OF HISTORY AND SCIENCE, Scranton, Pa. 

Historical series, nos. 2 and 4. 

Scientific series, no. 5. 
LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, Easton, Pa. 

Catalogue, 1894-95. 
LANCASHIRE SEA-FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England. 

Report, 1895-96, (gift). 
LARKIN, TH„ Field Columbian Museum. 

Guide to the World's Fair Grounds, by J. G. Flinn. 

Index to coins and medals, L T . S. Mint, Philadelphia, by R. A. McClure. 

3 clippings, (gift). 



228 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

LAWRENCE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Lawrence, Kansas. 

Annual report, 25th, 1896. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Courses in mining engineering, 1896. 

Courses in mechanical engineering, etc., 1896. 

History of Lehigh University, by E. M. Hyde. 

Register, 1895-96. 

Citizenship and technical education; address by J. H. Converse. 
LEIPZIG. KONIGLICH SOCHSISCHE GESELLSCHAFT DER WIS., 

Leipzig, Germany. 

Berichte, mathematisch-physische classe, vol. 48 and vol. 49, pts. 1-3. 
LEIPZIG. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany. 

Bericht, 22d-24th, 1894-96. 
LENOX LIBRARY, New York City. 

Annual report, 1st to 25th. 

Contributions to a catalogue, nos. 1-7. 
LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Circular of information, 1897. 

First annual register, 1897. 
LEYDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCH MUSEUM, Leyden, Netherlands. 

Ethnographische musea in Midden — Europa, by J. D. E. Schmelz. 

Lists of accessions, 1894-95. 

Uittreksel van den Directeur, 1894-95. 
LIMA. SOCIDAD GEOGRAFICA, Lima, Peru. 

Boletin, vol. 5, no. 1. 
LLOYD, C. G, Cincinnati, Ofllio. 

Photogravures of American fungi, nos. 11-20. 
LONDON. BOARD OF TRADE, London, S. W. 

Annual report, 35th, of the Inspectors of Fisheries, 1895. 

Annual report, 10th, on sea fisheries, 1805. 
LON DON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal, zoology, vol. 26, nos. 166 and 167. 

Journal, botany, vol. 33, no. 228. 
LONDON. MUSEUM OF PRACTICAL GEOLOGY, London, S. W., England. 

Handbook. 
LONDON. ROYAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, Kensington, London, England. 

Annual report, 16th. 

Inaugural address, 1896-97, by J. W. Judd. 

Prospectus, 1896-97. 
LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY, London, W., England. 

Proceedings, vol. 60, nos. 365-68, and vol. 61, current nos. 
LONDON. SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH, London, W. C, 
England. 

Proceedings, vol. 12, pt. 31, vol. 13, pt. 32. 
LONDON. SOCIETY OF ARTS, London, England, 

Journal, current nos. 
LONDON. ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London England. 

List of vertebrated animals in the gardens. 

Proceedings, current nos. 

Transactions, current nos. 
LOPER, S. WARD, (the author), Middleton, Conn. 

World-making and the glacial period, with another pam. 
LOUBAT, J. F., Paris, France. 

Galerie Americaine du Musee D'Ethnographie du Trocadero, pt. 1. 
LOUISIANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, New Orleans, La. 

Publications, vol. 1, pts. 1-4. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 229 

LOUISIANA STATE LIBRARY, New Orleans, La. 
Biennial reports, 1892-96. 

Mccormick harvesting machine co., Chicago. 

Who invented the reaper?, by R. B. Swift, (gift). 
McGEE, W. J., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The Lafayette formation, with 27 pams. 
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Papers, 12 nos. 
McGUIRE, JOSEPH D., (the author), Ellicott City, Md. 

A study of the primitive methods of drilling. 
MacKELLAR, SMITHS AND JORDAN CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

One hundred years, 1796-1896, (gift). 
MacOWAN, P., Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope. 

Report of the government botanist, 1894-96. 

Reports of the agricultural assistants at Cape Town, with 2 pams. 
MacRITCHIE, DAVID, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

The jubilee book of the Philosophical Institution. 
MADRAS GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
MADRID. REAL ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

Discursos, 1863-94. 

Propiedades elementales relativas a la divisibihdad de los numeros 
enteros, par R. V. Ilia. 
MA1MONIDES FREE LIBRARY, New York City. 

Annual report, 1896. 
MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
MAINE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, Portland, Maine. 

Annual report, 13th. 
MAINE STATE COLLEGE, Orono, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
MANCHESTER CITY LIBRARY, Manchester, N. H. 

Annual report, 1896. 
MARBURG. KONIGLICHE UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

Chronik, vols. 1-20, 1887-96. 

Das universitatsgebaude zu Marburg. 
MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1888-97. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
Plymouth, England. 

Journal, new series, vol. 4, nos. 1-3, and vol. 5, no. 1. 
MARKS, A. J., Toledo, Ohio. 

Archaeologist, vol. 11, nos. 6, n and 12, vol. 2, and vol. 3, nos. 1-9. 

Incidents of travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea and the Holy Land, by J. L. 
Stephens. 

Journal of applied chemistry, vols. 5 and 6. 

Papers of the Archaeological Institute of America, classical series, no. 1. 

Report on Canadian archives, by D. Brymner, 3 vols. 

Scottish geographical magazine, vol. 8. 

Collection of 29 pams. 
MARQUAND ALLAN, Princeton, N. J. 

A text-book of the history of sculpture, by A. Marquand and A. L. Froth- 
ingham, Jr. 

MARSEILLE. FACULTE DES SCIENCES, Marseille, France. 
Annales, vols. 2-7, and vol. 8, nos. 1-4. 
Annales de l'lnstitut Colonial, vols. 1 and 2. 



230 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

MARYLAND INSTITUTE, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 37th-4oth. 
MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Mass. 

Transactions, 1896. 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual catalogue, 1896-97. 

The geology of Pennsylvania, vols. 1 and 2, with atlas. 

Technology quarterly, current nos. 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Calendar, 1897. 
MEXICO. DEUTSCHER WISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Mexico, Mex. 

Mittheilungen, vol. 1, nos. 1-4. 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico, Mex. 

Boletin, nos. 1-6. 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Agricultural College, Mich. 

Annual report, 34th, of the State Board of Agriculture. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
MICHIGAN MILITARY ACADEMY, Orchard Lake, Mich. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 

Circular to parents, 

History without words. 
MICHIGAN MINING SCHOOL, Houghton, Mich. 

Catalogue, 1894-96. 

Prospectus, 1897-98. 
MICHIGAN ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, nos. 1 and 2, (gift). 
MICHIGAN STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Agricultural College P. 
O., Mich. 

Catalogue, 1895-96. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Calendar, 1895-97. 

President's report, 1896. 

The ethical principle, by Marietta Kies. 

The morphology of the carina, by M. E. Holmes. 

The development of the ostrich fern, by D. H. Campbell. 
MICROSCOPICAL PUBLISHING CO., Washington, D. C. 

The Microscope, current nos. 
MILANO. MUSEO CIYTCO DI STORIA NATURALE, Milano, Italy. 

Atti, vol. 36. 
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Annual report, 1st, 4th, 5th, 7th to 14th. 
MINNESOTA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 1, pt. 1. 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, St. Anthony 
Park, Minn. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
MINNESOTA. GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Bulletin, no. 9, pts. 9, 10 and 11. 

Final report, vol. 3, pt. 2. 
MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Paul, Minn. 

Collections, vol. 8, pts. 1 and 2. 
MINNESOTA. STATE AUDITOR AND FOREST COMMISSIONER, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

First annual report of the Chief Fire Warden of Minnesota, 1895, (gift). 
MINNESOTA UNIVERSITY, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 231 

MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Miss. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, Mo. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Mo. 

Annual report, 8ch. 

Botanical observations on the Azores, by W. Trelease. 

Mosses of the Azores and of Madeira, by J. Cardot. 
MISSOURI GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Jefferson City, Mo. 

Reports on areal geology, with atlas sheets, nos. 2-4. 
MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Publications, nos. 12, 13 and 14. 
MISSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES, Rolla, Mo. 

Catalogue, 1895-97. 
MONTANA UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Montana. 

Report, 1896. 

MONTEVIDEO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 
Anales, nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

MONTREAL. NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, 
Canada. 

The Canadian antiquarian, 3d series, vol. 1, no. 1, (gift). 
M( >ORE, CLARENCE B., (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Certain aboriginal mounds of the Georgia coast, (gift). 
M( )RSE, EDWARD S., (the author), Salem, Mass. 

Korean interviews. 

On the so-called bow-pullers of antiquity. 
MOUNT MORRIS COLLEGE, Mount Morris,' 111. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 

MUNCHEN. K. B. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Miinchen, 
Bavaria, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte der mathematisch-physikalischen classe, 1894-95 and 
96, pts. I and 2. 
MUSEO DE LA PLATA, La Plata, Argentine Republic. 
Anales, 10 pts. 
- Revista, vols. 1-6, and vol. 7, pt. 1. 

NADAILLAC, JEAN F. A. du P., (the author), Paris, France. 

Foi et science, with 4 other pams. 
NAPOLI. SOCIETA REALE, Naples, Italy. 

Atti delle Reale Accademia, 2d series, vol. 8. 

Rendiconto, 3rd series, vol. 3, nos. 1-5. 
NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal, Africa. 

Preliminary catalogue of indigenous Natal plants, by j. M. Wood. 

Report, 1894-96. 

Report of the Colonial herbarium, 1894-96. 
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. 

Report, 1896. 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE, Chicago. 

Campaign text-book, (gift). 
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

National geographic magazine, current nos. 
NATURE STUDY PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Birds, current nos. (gift). 
NEBRASKA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Lincoln, Neb. 

Publications, no. 5. 
NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, Neb. 

Bulletin, current nos. 



232 Field Columbian Museum — Reports. Vol. i. 

NEBRASKA STATE LIBRARY, Lincoln, Neb. 

Annual report of Banking Department, 1895. 

Annual report of Nebraska Dairymen's Association, 1890-93. 

Annual report of State Board of Agriculture, 1890-95. 

Annual report of State Horticultural Society, 1890 and 1892-95. 

Biennial report Adjutant General, 1891-94. 

Biennial report of Attorney General, 1889-96. 

Biennial report of Auditor, 1883-96. 

Biennial report of Bureau of Labor, 3d~5th. 

Biennial report of Commissioner of Public Lands, 1881-84 and 1887-96. 

Biennial report of Department of Public Instruction, 1S89-92. 

Biennial report of Nebraska University, 1895-96. 

Biennial report of State Department, 1879-84 and 1889-96. 

Biennial report of Treasury Department, 1890, 1892 and 1896. 

Corporation laws of Nebraska. 

Election laws of Nebraska. 

School laws of Nebraska. 

Life and fire insurance laws. 

Statement of Auditor, 1893 and 1897. 

Report of the State Library, 1881-96. 
NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Neb. 

Calendar, 1896-97. 

Some considerations on the alternation of generations in plants, by C. 
MacMillan. 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. NATUURKUNDIGE YEREENIGING, 
Batavia. 

Natuurkundig tijdschrift voor Nederlandsch-Indie, vols. 2-17, 19-22 and 
24-56. 

Alphabetisch register, vols. 1-50. 

NELSON, AVEN, (the author), Laramie, Wyo. 

First report of the flora of Wyoming. 
NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STA- 
TION, Reno, Nev. 

Annual report, 7th and 8th. 
NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Mass. 

Annual report, 45th. 
NEW BRUNSWICK. NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. John, N. B., 
Canada. 

Bulletin, nos. t,, 14 and 15. 
NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, Boston, 
Mass. 

Proceedings, 1897. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STA- 
TION, Durham, N. H. 

Bulletin, current nos, 
NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE LIBRARY, Concord, N. H. 

Report, 1892-96, 2 vols. 
NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Trenton, N. J. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Report of the Botanical Department, 1896. 
NEW JERSEY FORESTRY ASSOCIATION, Mays Landing, N. J. 

The Forester, current nos. 
NEW JERSEY. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, N. J. 

Annual report, 1896. 
NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY, Trenton, N. J. 

Annual report, 1896. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla 
Park, N. M. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 233 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMEXTOF MIXES AND AGRICULTURE, 
Sydney. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Australian mining standard, Aug. 1896, and Jan. 1897. 

Records of the Geological Survey, vol. 5, pt. 2. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, N. S. Wales. 

Proceedings, vol. 21, pts. 2 and 3. 
NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIEXCES, Columbia College, New York City. 

Annals, vol. 9, nos. 4-12. 

Transactions, vol. 15. 
NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, X. Y. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
XEW YORK BOTAXTCAL GARDEX, New York City. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 2. 
XEW YORK. COMMISSIOXERS OF FISHERIES, GAME ANT) FORESTS, 
Albany, X. Y. 

Annual report, 1st, 1895, (gift). 
XEW YORK. GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AXD TRADESMEN, 
New York City. 

Annual report, mth, 1896. 
XEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Xew York City. 

Cabot and the transmission of English power in Xorth America, by J. 
Winsor. 
XEW YORK. MERCAXTILE LIBRARY. Xew York City. 

Annual report, 76th. 

Bulletin, no. 17. 
XEW YORK. METROPOLITAX MUSEUM OF ART, New York City. 

Annual report, 27th. 
NEW YORK MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Journal, current nos. 
NEW YORK SCIENTIFIC ALLIANCE, New York City. 

Annual directory, 1896. 
NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY, Xew York City. 

Annual report, 1896-97. 
XEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, X. Y. 

Annual report, 1894. 

Annual report, 1894, of the X T ew York State Museum, pts. 1-3. 

State Library bulletin, nos. 3-4. 
NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark, N. J. 

Annual report, 8th. 

Library news, current nos. 

List of art books, etc. 

Special reading list, nos. 7-8. 
XEWARK TECHNICAL SCHOOL, Newark, N. J. 

Handbook of information, 1897. 

Laying of the corner stone of the school. 
XORTH CAROLIXA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEXT STATION, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Annual report, 1894-96, with Bulletin, nos. 94-133. 

Xorth Carolina weather, 1895. 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY, Raleigh, N. C. 

Biennial report, 1895-96. 
NORTHAMPTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Northampton, Mass. 

Annual report, 9th-i3th. 
NOVA SCOTIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Proceedings and transactions, vol. 9, pt. 2. 



234 Field Columbian Museum — Reports. Vol. i. 

OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Bulletin, nos. 9-13, of the Wilson Ornithological Chapter. 

Laboratory bulletin, nos. 4-7. 

The Wilson quarterly, vol. 4, nos. 1-2. 
OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
OHIO STATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Annual report, 12th, 1896. 
OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater, ( >kl. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
I i.MAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Neb. 

Catalogue of English prose fiction. 

Report, 1895. 

7 finding lists. 
ONEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, N. Y. 

Dedication of the Oriskany monument. 

Dedication of the Munson-Williams memorial. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Toronto, Ontario. 

Annual report, 1895, 2 vols. 
ORCUTT, C. R., San Diego, Cal. 

West American scientist, nos. 12, 44, 68-81, inclusive. 
OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Ore. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
OTTAWA FIELD-NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, vol. 10, nos. 10 and 11. 
OTTMAN, J., LITHOGRAPHING CO., New York. 

The story of a picture, (gift) 
OXFORD UNIVERSITY, Oxford, England. 

Annual report, 8th, of the University Museum. 
PALERMO. REALE ORTO BOTANICO, Palermo, Italy. 

Bollettino, vol. 1, nos. 1 and 2, with appendix 1. 
PAMMEL, L. H., (the author), Ames, Iowa. 

Fungus diseases of the sugar beet, with 6 other pams. 
PARIS. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France. 

Journal, nos. 2 and 3. 
PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Bulletin of pharmacy, current nos. 
PEABODY MUSEUM, Cambridge, Mass. 

Memoirs, vol. 1, no. 2. 

Report of the Curator, 1895-96. 
PECK, CHARLES H., Albany, N. Y. 

Annual report of the State Botanist of the State of New York, 1895. 

PEEK, W. H., Chicago. 

The writings of Caleb Atwater, (gift). 
PEET, STEPHEN D., Good Hope, 111. 

American antiquarian and Oriental journal, current nos. 
PENNSYLVANIA. FRONTIER FORTS' COMMISSIONER, Harrisburc, Pa. 

Report, 2 vols. (gift). 
PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania magazine of history and biography, vol. 20 and vol. 21, 
nos. 2 and 3. 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE, State College, Pa. 

The building materials of Pennsylvania, by Thomas C. Hopkins. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 235 

PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, MUSEUM OF ARCHEOLOGY AND 
PALEONTOLOGY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual report of the Curator, 1S90. 

Corean games, by S. Culin. 

Objects used in religious ceremony, by S. Culin. 

Old Babylonian inscriptions, chiefly from Nippur, by H. V. Hilprecht. 

The feather and the wing in early mythology, by S. Y. Stevenson. 

Report of the Board of Managers, 1S93. 

8 pamphlets. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, no. 1. 
PERKINS, G. F., (the author), Burlington, Vt. 

Catalogue of the flora of Vermont, with 10 other pams. 
PERKINS INSTITUTION, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 65th, 1S96. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Proceedings, current vols. 
POLLARD, CHARLES L., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Studies in the flora of the central Gulf Region. 

2 pamphlets. 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Me. 

Annual report, 1896-97. 
PORTLAND SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Portland, Me. 

Proceedings, vol. 2, pt. 4. 
POTTER, J. D., London, England. 

Catalogue of admiralty charts, plans and sailing directions, (gift). 
PRAG. K. K. ■ DEUTSCHE CARL-FERDINANDS— UNIVERSITAT, 
Prag, Bohemia. 

Feierliche installation des rectors, 1894-96. 

Ordnung der vorlesungen, 1896-98. 

Personalienstand, 1896. 
PRAG. MUSEUM DES KONIGREICHES BOHMEN, Prag, Bohemia. 

Fiihrer, 1897. 

Der elbelachs, with 19 pams., by A. Fritsch. 
PRATT INSTITUTE, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Catalogues, 1896-98. 
PRESTO CO., Chicago. 

The Presto, current nos. (gift). 
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, N. J. 

Princeton College bulletin, vol. 8, no. 4. 

The legislation of Congress for the organized territories of the U. S., 1789- 
1895, by Max Ferrand. 
PROVIDENCE ATHENAEUM, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, 61st. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, R. I. 

Monthly bulletin, current nos. 
PURDUE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lafayette, Ind. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Ind. 

Annual catalogue, 1896-97. 

Purdue University monographs, public health series, nos. 1-5. 
QUARITCH, B., London, England. 

Catalogue of admiralty charts, plans and sailing directions, 1896, (gift). 



236 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

QUEENSLAND DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Bulletin, nos. 4 and 5. 
QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Annals, no. 3. 

Annual report, 1895-96. 
QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Proceedings, vol. 12. 
QUEYEDO, SAMUEL A. LAFONE, Paliciao, Catamarca, Argentina. 

Arte de la lengua Toba, by Alonzo Barcena. 

Idioma Mbaya, ed. by the donor. 

Los Indios Matacos y su lengua, by Joaquin Remedi, with another pam. 
RAILWAY LIST CO., Chicago. 

Railway master mechanic, current nos. 
RAILWAY REVIEW PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Railway and engineering review, 1897, (gift). 
RANDALL, T. A. & CO., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Clay worker, current nos. (gift). 
REDWOOD LIBRARY AND ATHEN.EUM, Newport, R. I. 

Annual report, 166th, 1896. 
RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Kingston, 
R. I. 

Annual report, 8th, 1895. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
RICE, WILLIAM N., (the author), Middletown, Conn. 

On the effects of certain poisons on mollusks. 

Science teaching in schools. 
RIES, HEINRICH, (the author), New York City. 

On a granite-diorite from Harrison, N. Y., with 7 other pams. (gift). 
ROLFS, P. H., (the author), Lake City, Fla. 

The seed coats of malvacea?, with another pam. 
ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Annual catalogue, 15th, 1897. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, Colombo, Ceylon, India. 

Journal, vol. 14, no. 47. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, Singapore, S. S. 

Journal, nos. 26-29. 

Publications, nos. 1-3. 
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Fordham, New York City. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
ST. LAURENT COLLEGE, Montreal, Canada. 

Bulletin, nos. 9 and 1 1. 

Catalogue, 1895-96. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, St. Louis, Mo. 

Transactions, current nos. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Catalogue of English prose fiction. 
ST. LOUIS UNTYERSITY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
ST. PAUL PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Paul, Minn. 

Annual report, 15th, 1896. 
SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Mass. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Eighth report of the trustees, 1896. 
SAX FRANCISCO. FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, San Francisco, Cal. 

Report, 1896. 
SAN FRANCISCO. MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, San Francisco, Cal. 

Annual report, 42d, 1807. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, nos, 2-6. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 237 

SCOTLAND. FISHERY BOARD, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Annual report, 14th, pt. 3. 
SELBY, A. D., (the author), Wooster, Ohio. 

Vegetable pathology, with 2 other pains. 
SHIRLEY, JOHN, (the author), Brisbane, Queensland. 

On Baiera bidens, with another paper. 
SHOOTING AND FISHING PUBLISHING CO., New York City. 

Shooting and fishing, current nos. (gift). 
SHUFELDT, R. W., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Taxidermy at the Leyden Museum. 

The photogram, vol. 4, no. 43. 
SIRET, HENRI, (the author), Antwerp, Belgium. 

Les premiers ages du metal dans le sud-est de l'Espagne, (,s<ift ). 
SKIFF, F. J. V., Field Columbian Museum. 

Papers, American Institute of Mining Engineers, 1896-97. 

Officers, members, rules, etc., 1897. 

Outlines of Zufii creation myths, by F. H. Cushing, (gift). 
SMITH, A. M., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Illustrated encyclopedia of gold and silver coins of the world. 

Visitor's guide and history of the U. S. Mint, (gift). 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1894-95. 

Contributions to knowledge, vols. 30-32 and nos. 1032-34. 

Miscellaneous collections, vols. 29-34, 36 and nos. 1031, '35, '37-'39, '7*-'73 
and '75. 

International exchange list, 1897. 

Memoir of George Brown Goode, 1851-96. 

Bulletin of the U. S. National Museum, nos. 47 and 49. 

Proceedings of U. S. National Museum, vol. 18. 

Report of U. S. National Museum, 1894. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA ANTONIO ALZATE, Mexico, Mex. 

Memorias y revista, vols. 1 and 2 and current nos. 
SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Anales, series 2, vols. 4 and 5. 
SOCIEDAD MEXICANA DE GEOGRAFIA Y ESTADISTICA, Mexico, Mex. 

Boletin, 4th series, vols. 1 and 2, and vol. 3, nos. 1-10. 
SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Roma, Italy. 

Bollettino, series 3, vol. 9, and vol. 10, current nos. 

Memorie, vol. 6, pts. 1 and 2. 
Si >UTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope. 

Bibliography of South African Geology, pts. 1 and 2. 

Report, 1896, 
SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Brookings, 
S. D. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Seedless plants of Southern California, by A. J. McClatchie. 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Mass. 

Annual report, 36th. 

Library bulletin, current nos. 

Public school, library and museum, by William Orr, Jr. 
STARR, FREDERICK, (the author), Chicago. 

The little pottery objects of Lake Chapila, Mexico, with another pam. 
STATEN ISLAND NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Staten Island, 
N. Y. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
STATIONARY ENGINEER PUBLISHING CO., Chrcago. 

Stationary engineer, current nos. (gift). 



238 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

STEIERMARK NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Graz, Steier- 
mark. 

Mittheilungen, 1896. 
STEJNEGER, LEONHARD, (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Collection of 76 pams. 
STEVENSON, JOHN J., (the author), New York City. 

Notes on the geology of West Virginia, with 34 other pams. 
STEWARD, J. F., Chicago. 

A brief narrative of the invention of reaping machines, (gift). 
STOCKHOLM. KONGLIGA BIBUOTEK, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Accessions — katalog, vols. 1-10, 1886-95. 
ST( )NE, WITMER, (the author), Philadelphia, Pa, 

The moulting of birds, with 18 other pains. 
STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Conn. 

Annual report, 9th, 1896. 
STRASSBURG. K. UNIVERSITAT-UND LANDES-BIBLIOTHEK, 
Strassburg, Germany. 

42 inaugural dissertations. 
STRETTON, CLEMENT E., Leicester, England. 

The locomotive engine and its development, 5th ed., 1896, by the donor. 

Working time-table, Midland Railway, 1897. 
SYDERE, ARTHUR H., Toronto, Ontario. 

Collection of 55 reports of the various government departments of 
Canada and Ontario. 
TAUNTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Taunton, Mass. 

Annual report, 31st, 1896. 
TELEGRAPHIC HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA, 
Washington, D. C. 

History of the Society. 

Circular, no. I, (gift). 
TEPPER, J. G. O., (the author), Sydney, N. S. Wales. 

The blattariae of Australia and Polynesia, with 5 other pams. 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Austin, Texas. 

Annual report, 9th, 1896. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
THAXTER, ROLAND, (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 

Contribution towards a monograph of the laboulbeniacea-. 
THOULET, J., (the author), Nancy, France. 

Sur le tassement des argiles au sein des eaux. 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Botanical magazine, current nos. 
TORINO. MUSEI DI ZOOL. ED ANAT. COMPARATA DELLA R. 
UNIVERSITA, Torino, Italy. 

Bollettino, vol. 11, 1896, and vol. 12, current nos. 
TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB, New York City. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England. 

Novitates zoological, vol. 4, nos. 1 and 2. 
TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

Hermathena, no. 23. 
TRUE, FREDERICK W., (the author), Washington, I). C. 

A revision of the American moles. 
TUBINGEN. KONIGLICHE UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, 
Germany. 

Tubinger universitiits schriften, 1895-96. 
TV LOR, E. B., (the author), Oxford, England. 

( >n American lot-games, with 4 other pams. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 239 

UNION UNIVERSITY, Schenectady, X. V. 

Annual catalogue, 1896-97. 

Centennial catalogue, 1 795-1895. 
U. S. AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, Washington, L). C. 

Annual report, 12th and 13th, of Bureau of Animal Industry. 

Bibliography of meteorology, 4 vols. 

Contributions from the U. S. National Herbarium, current nos. 

Experiment station record, current nos. 

Insect life, vol. 3, nos. 5, 9, and 10; vol. 4, nos. 3-8 and General index, 
1888-95. 

North American fauna nos. 10 and 12. 

Report of the Secretary, 1896. 

Yearbook, 1896. 

Bulletins and circulars, current nos. 
U. S. AMERICAN REPUBLICS BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Bulletin, nos. 75 and 88. 

Monthly bulletin, current nos. 
U. S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, Washington, D. C. 

Reports, 1852-96, 39 vols. 
I. S. COMMISSION OF FISH AND FISHERIES, Washington, D. C. 

Report, 1895. 

Bulletin, vol. 16. 
U. S. EDUCATION BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Report, 1893-95, 4 vols. 

A. L. A. Library catalogue. 

Notice sur L'Institution National des Sourd-Muets de Paris. 

Preliminary list of American learned and educational societies (4 copies). 

Proceedings of 5th summer meeting of American Association to Pro- 
mote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf. 

Report on the deaf to State Board of Charities, New York. 

Sanitary legislation affecting schools, etc. 
U. S. ETHNOLOGY BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 14th and 15th, 3 vols. 

List of publications of the Bureau. 
U. S. FISH AND FISHERIES COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 

Reports 1893 and 94. (pts. 19 and 20). 
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, nth, 12th, 16th, pt. 1, and 17th, pts. 1-3. 

Bulletin, 87, 127, 130 and 135-148. 

Geological atlas: Chester to San Mateo sheets. 

Mineral products of the U. S., 1887-96. 

Monograph, vols. 15, 16, 17 and 18, with atlas. 

The production of precious stones in 1895, by George F. Kunz. 
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report of the Smithsonian Institution, 1867 and 1877. 

Catalogue of public documents, 53d Congress. 

Fisheries and fishery industries of the U. S., by G. B. Goode, 4 vols. 

Index catalogue of Surgeon-General's Office, vols. 1, 2, 3 and 10. 

Narrative of the North Polar Expedition, V. S. ship Polaris. 

Proceedings of the "Proteus" Court of Inquiry, 1883. 

Reports of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, 6 vols. 

Report of the Greely Expedition, vol. 2. 

Report of the U. S. Fish and Fisheries Commission, 1879-81 and 1884-87. 
U. S. INTERIOR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report of the Commissioner of Patents, 1895. 

Report of the 1 ith Census, 4 vols. 

Report of the U. S. Geological Survey of the Territories, vol. 13 
U. S. STATE DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Commercial relations of the U. S. with foreign countries, 1895-96. 

Review of the world's commerce, 1895-96. 



240 Field Columbian- Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

T. S. STATE DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings of the Fur Seal Arbitration Tribunal, 16 vols. (gift). 
UNDERWOOD, L. M., New York City. 

A preliminary list cf Alabama fungi, bv L. M. Underwood and F. S. Earle. 
UPSALA. KONGLIGA UNIVERSITETS BIBLIOTHEK, Upsala, Sweden. 

Bidrag till kiinnedomen om Sveriges ichthyobdellider. 

Bulletin of the Geological Institution, vol. 2, pt. 2, no. 4. 

Festskrift Wilhelm Liljeborg af Svenska zoologer. 

3 pamphlets. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, Utah. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
YALENTINI, PHILIP, (the author), New York City. 

The pictorial text inscribed on 2 Palenque tablets. 
VAN HISE, CHARLES RICHARD, (the author), Madison, Wis. 

Principles of North American pre- Cambrian geology. 

The pre-cambrian rocks of North-America. 

The pre-cambrian geology of the Lake Superior region. 

9 pamphlets. 
YASSAR BROTHERS INSTITUTE, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Transactions, 1894-96. 
VERMONT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Montpelier, Yt. 

Annual report, 9th. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
YERMONT UNIYERSITY, Burlington, Yt. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
YICTORIA. PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND NATIONAL GALLERY, 
Melbourne. 

Select extra — tropical plants, by F. Von Mueller. 

Systematic arrangement of Australian fungi, by D. McAlpine. 
YICTORIA. ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY, Mel- 
bourne. 

Annual report, 27th~33d, 1890-96. 

Proceedings, vols. 1, 2, and 4. 

1 pamphlet. 
YIGNOLI, TITO, (the author), Milano, Italy. 

Esplicazione progressiva della scienza sperimentale, with another pani. 
(gift). 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, Va. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Pa. 

Annals of mathematics, vol. 11, no. 5, 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 

Publications of the Leander McCormick observatory, vol. 1, no. 7. 

YOLTA BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Circular of information, nos. 1-3. 

Histories of American schools for the deaf, 3 vols. 

List of publications. 
WABASH COLLEGE, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
WADSWORTH, M. E., (the authon, Houghton, Mich. 

The elective system in technological schools. 

The elective system in engineering colleges. 
WASHINGTON ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

American anthropologist, vol. 8, no. 4; vol. 9, no. 2; and current nos. 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
WASHINGTON PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Bulletin, vols. 1-12. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 241 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Catalogue, 1895-97. 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE, Boston, Mass. 

Calendar, 1896-97. 
WELLINGTON ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Wellington, New Zealand. 

Annual report, 10th, nth and 12th. 
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Conn. 

Annual catalogue, 1896-97. 
WEST AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Perth, West Australia. 

Gold mining statistics, 1896. 
WEST AUSTRALIA. FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, Perth, West Australia. 

Report on the forests of Western Australia, 1896. 
WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Morgan- 
town, W. Va. 

Annual report, 9th. 
WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHE HOFMUSEUM. 

Annalen, vol. 7., vol. 8, no. 1, and current nos. 
WIEN. K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Vienna, Austria. 

Inaugurationsbericht, 1890-96. 

Jahrbuch, 1890-94. 

Offentliche vorlesungen, 1891-97. 

Programme der volksthumlichen universitatscurse. 

6 pamphlets. 
WIEN. K. K. UNIVERSITAT, NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER 
YEREIN, Vienna, Australia. 

Mittheilungen, 1896. 
WILLE, N., (the author), Christiania, Norway. 

Orh podnings bastarder, with 8 other pams. 
WILLIAMS, HENRY S., (the author), New Haven, Conn. 

Synopsis of a course of lectures on the elements of historical paleontology. 

11 pamphlets. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 

Report, 1896. 
WILL1STON, S. W., (the author), Lawrence, Kansas. 

On the extremities of tylosaurus, with another pam. 
WINDSOR AND KENFIELD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Brick, current nos. 

Street railway review, current nos. (gift). 
WINNER, WILLARD E., Kansas City, Mo. 

Map of the business portion of Chicago, (gift). 
WISCONSIN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Madison, Wis. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
WISCONSIN NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Occasional papers, vol. 2, nos. 1 and 2. 

Proceedings, 1885-89. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wis. 

Proceedings, 1896. 
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wis. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
WOLF, J. E., (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 

Report on archean geology, with 9 other pams. 
WORCESTER COUNTY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Worcester, Mass. 

Transactions, 189c -97, pt. 1. 
WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Mass. 

Additions, current nos. 

Annual report, 37th, 1895-96. 



242 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
WYOMING HISTORICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY.Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Proceedings and collections, vol. 2. 

The massacre of Wyoming. 

The frontier forts, 2 pams. 

The Palatine or German immigration to New York and Pa. 
WYOMING UNIVERSITY, Laramie, Wyo. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 

Report of the President, 1896. 
YATES, LORENZO G., Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Bulletin, no. 4, of the California State Mining Bureau. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 2, of Santa Barbara Society of Natural History. 

Mollusks of Santa Barbara, with 2 other pams., by the donor. 

18 loose plates. 
ZAVALETA, MANUEL, Buenos Ayres- Argentina. 

Boletin del Instituto Geografico Argentino, vol. 17, nos. 4-6. 

Les populations primitives de la Republique Argentine, by F. Landrin. 

Memoria presentada al Congreso Nacional de 1885 por el Ministro de 
Justicia, (gift). 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 243 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State : 

To all to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting : 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. D. 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and 
in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," ap- 
proved April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a 
copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO,' is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

, , — *—s W. H. HINRICHSEN, 

} ^^^s ) Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir : 

We, the undersigned Citizens of the United States, propose to form a cor- 
poration under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled, 
"An Act Concerning Corporations" approved April 18, 1872, and all acts 
amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby 
state as follows, to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
Archeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence : 



24 + 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil 
G. Hirsch, James \V. Ellsworth. Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, 
John C. Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

{Signed) 
George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Rob- 
ert McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage. Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer 
Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. 
Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. 
Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas 
B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. 
Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. Mc- 
Cagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, 
Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. 
Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. 
Gunther, Geo. R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bul- 
lock, Edwin Walker, Geo. M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, 
William E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, 
N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. 
Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
Cook County. 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary. Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowl- 
edged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and volun- 
tary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

■ G. R. MITCHELL, 
(Seal) Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 245. 



Amended By-laws. 

ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay 
an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of 
election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of 
any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within 
said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground of forfeiture of 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 
First. — Free admittance for himself and family to the Museum on any day. 
Second. — Ten tickets every year admitting the bearer to the Museum on paydays. 
Third. — A copy of every publication of the Museum sold at the entrance door, 

and to the annual reports. 
Fourth. — Invitations to all receptions, lectures or other entertainments which may 

be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The corporate members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of association, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles 
of association shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and 
persons hereafter chosen as corporate members, shall, within ninety days of their 
respective election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or 
more. The failure of any person to make such payments within said time shall, 
at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate 
membership. The annual dues of corporate members shall be five dollars ($5.00) 
after the first year of membership, and no one shall exercise the rights of a 
corporate member until his dues are paid; and a delinquency of six months in the 
payment of annual dues shall be ground for forfeiture of corporate membership. 

Sec. 4, Art. i. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hun- 
dred dollars at any one time, shall upon the unanimous vote of the trustees, 
become a life member. Life members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 4, Art. 2. The respective members of the Board of Trustees now in 
office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall hold office during life. 
Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled by a majority vote of the remain- 
ing members of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees upon recommen- 
dation of the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered 
eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and by 
virtue of their election as patrons shall also be corporate members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary members shall be chosen from among persons who have 
rendered eminent service to science, art or mechanics. They shall be chosen by 



246 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

a vote of the Trustees, and only upon unanimous nomination of the Executive 
Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. In commemoration of the 14th 
day of October honorary members shall not be more than fourteen' in number at 
any one time. 

Sec. 7. All members of whatever class shall be eligible to appointment 
upon committees other than the Executive Committee. 



ARTICLE II. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The respective members of the Board of Trustees now 
in office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall hold office during life. 
Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled by a majority vote of the remain- 
ing members of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. The other officers shall be President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary 
and Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of four persons, who shall be chosen 
by ballot by the Board of Trustees from their own number as early as practicable 
after the annual meeting in each year. The President shall beex officio -a member 
of the Executive Committee, in addition to the other four members. The Secre- 
tary and Treasurer may, or may not, be the same person, and the Secretary may, 
or may not, be a corporate member. 

Any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the Board of Trustees 
bv a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies in any office 
may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees a Committee 
on Finance, a Committee on Property, an Auditing Committee, and a Committee 
on Buddings and Grounds, who shall serve during the pleasure of the Board. 

Sec. 4. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such other duties as the Board of Trustees may from 
time to time devolve upon them. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount 
and with such surety as shall be approved by the Executive Committee, and shall 
disburse the funds of the Museum only in accordance with the directions of the 
Executive Committee, upon the signature and counter-signature of such officers 
as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee shall have full control of the affairs of 
the Museum, under the general supervision of the Board of Trustees. 



ARTICLE III. 

MEETINGS. 

Section 1. In commemoration of the discovery of America by Christopher 
Columbus, the annual meeting of the corporate members shall be held on the 
14th day of October in each year, except when that day falls on a Sunday, and 
then upon the Monday following. At such meetings the corporate members shall 
transact such business as may properly come before the meeting. Special meet- 
ings of the corporate members shall be called at any time by the Secretary upon 



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Siow-smjsri lo tnuoms rnuminim b diiv/ ,yni)dgd bB9di3vo moil idgil io inuorns 

■■> .sbiv/ eadoni ^ iaal £ -jib vadT .ynr/Iada sldBJauibfi abrvoiq oals v9dT 
baDBid iuo'1 .dgid aadoni £ jaal s 38fid dliw ,rigid aarioni \ i93i 3 bnB §noI aadoni 

>dT .aavtada adi iol ftoqque deimul 3?bd aril io lajnaa adi ni aJd^hqu 
as riignal rioua lo 9ib aiaafoBid 9riT .*ia>bi;-id 9[dBJzu{bs 'zdonsX riJiw bafaivoiq 
-ioaqa adT ji avodfi ano sdi ban i owl Joaiaiq ol Hade rioB3 wo!Ib ol 

agmdl b J-^niBgB qoJ 3d) )b bnu Itedc adi ni 9/ooig s ai moiJod ad) )b iaai gnam 
b mtol anarnioaqa 9di baliri ai drjt) 'jdi naif// .avudf, iteria arii moil baqqoib 
ilBmloni ariT .baidgil ^llsups jtb rfoirfw io ansq IIb .bimBivq babia-iuol 
moil nfidi isriini aa-jrihua liadi moil idgil adi lo aiovfil obIb adfila adi 

.9a£o sd3 lo lohaini ad) idgd oJ aaviaa bnB ,22Blg adl 



Pl XII. Details of Adjustable Shelves on Fixed Uprights. 



Supports and cross bars are of the same size. Castings and bars are oxidized. 
Glass shelves ; ebony case. 



Details of Adjustable Swinging Shelf. 



The supports are x /% inch and cross bars % inch gas pipe, finished as desired. 
Castings all in brass. Interference of thin piece of linoleum at center brings 
greatest weight on heaviest roof cross bar. Shelves may be of different widths, 
lengths and elevations. 



Detail of Floor Cases Used for Exhibiting Marbles and Ornamental Stones. 
t 



j These cases have been designed with the view of obtaining the maximum 

a amount of light from overhead lighting, with a minimum amount of frame-work. 

They also provide adjustable shelving. They are 3 feet 7 inches wide, 9 feet 9 
t l inches long and 8 feet 7 inches high, with base 2 feet 2 inches high. Four braced 

uprights in the center of the case furnish support for the shelves. These are 
provided with Jencks' adjustable brackets. The brackets are of such length as 
to allow each shelf to project two inches beyond the one above it. The speci- 
mens rest at the bottom in a groove in the shelf and at the top against a flange 
dropped from the shelf above. When the case is filled the specimens form a 
four-sided pyramid, all parts of which are equally lighted. The inclination of 
the slabs also favors reflection of the light from their surfaces rather than from 
q the glass, and serves to light the interior of the case. 

14 
th 
tr; 
in 



"IELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 




Details of Case Furniture— t ield Columbian M 



Oct. 1897. Annual Report of the Director. 247 

written request of twenty corporate members. In such case thirty days notice by 
mail shall be given to corporate members of the time, place and purpose of such 
meetings. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held upon the 
14th day of October, except when that day falls on a Sunday, and then upon the 
Monday following, and upon the last Monday of January, April and July of each 
year. Special meetings may be called by the President at any time upon reason- 
able notice by mail, and shall be called upon the written request of three Trustees. 
Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum. 



ARTICLE IV. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of 
the Trustees by a two-thirds' vote of all the members present, provided the 
amendment shall have been proposed at the last regular meeting preceding, or 
shall be recommended by the Executive Committee. 



248 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i, 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

CHARLES B. CORY. MARY D. STURGES. 

EDWARD E. AYER. HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM. 

GEORGE M. PULLMAN. 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR. FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF. 

WILLARD A. SMITH. WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN. 



Oct. 1897. 



Annual Rkport of the Director. 



249 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



GEORGE E. ADAMS 

OWEN F. ALOIS 

ALLISON V. ARMOUR 

PHILIP D. ARMOUR 

EDWARD E. AYER 

WM. T. BAKER 

A. C. BARTLETT 

JOHN C. BLACK 

WATSON F. BLAIR 

ELIPHALET W. BLATCHFORD 

THOS. B. BRYAN 

W. I. BUCHANAN 

EBENEZER BUCKINGHAM 

DANIEL H. BURNHAM 

EDWARD B. BUTLER 

JOHN M. CLARK 

W. J. CHALMERS 

H. C. CHATFIELD-TAYLOR 

ANDREW CRAWFORD 

WM. E. CURTIS 

GEORGE R. DAVIS 

SIDNEY C. EASTMAN 

JAMES W. ELLSWORTH 

CHAS. FITZSIMONS 

LYMAN J. GAGE 

HENRY H. GETTY 

FRANK W. GUNSAULUS 

C. F. GUNTHER 

WM. E. HALE 

WM. R. HARPER 

AZEL F. HATCH 

FRANKLIN H. HEAD 

H. N. HIGINBOTHAM 



CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON 

HUNTINGTON W. JACKSON 

ARTHUR B. JONES 

E. G. KEITH 

HERMAN H. KOHLSAAT 

BRYAN LATHROP 

L. Z. LEITER 

E. B. McCAGG 
A. C. McCLURG 
JOHN McCONNELL 

cyrus h. Mccormick 

ANDREW McNALLY 
GEORGE MANIERRE 
JOHN J. MITCHELL 
ROBERT W. PATTERSON 
FERD W. PECK 
ANDREW PETERSON 
P. S. PETERSON 
J. IRVING PEARCE 
GEO. M. PULLMAN 
NORMAN B. REAM 
MARTIN A. RYERSON 
GEO. SCHNEIDER 

F. J. V. SKIFF 
JOSEPH STOCKTON 
BYRON L. SMITH 
WILLARD A. SMITH 
A. A. SPRAGUE 
MELVILLE E. STONE 
EDWIN WALKER 

R. A. WALLER 
JOHN R. WALSH 
NORMAN WILLIAMS 



JAMES W. SCOTT 



DECEASED. 

GEORGE F. BISSELL 



250 



FiKLD Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



LIFE MEMBERS. 

By the payment of five hundred dollars. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, P. D. 

BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWD. B. 

CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WM. J. 
COOPER, FRANK H. 
CRANE, R. T. 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARGO, CHAS. 
FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 

FORMAN, EDWARD 
FULLER, WM. A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. * 
HEALY, P. J. 
HIBBARD, W. G. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. [PORTER 

1SHAM, MRS. KATHARINE 

JOHNSON, FRANK S. [AYER 
JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEITH, ELBRIDGE G. 

KIMBALL, W. W. 

KING, FRANCIS 

KING, JAMES C. 

KIRK, WALTER THOMPSON 



Mccormick, mrs. 
Mccormick, cyrus h. 
Mccormick, harold f. 

McNALLY, ANDREW 
MACKAY, JOHN W. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MITCHELL, J. J. 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 

NEWELL, A. B. 

OGDEN, MRS. FRANCES E. 
ORR, ROBERT M. 

PEARSONS, D. K. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEO. T. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, ROBERT S. 
SEAVERNS, GEORGE A. 
SHERMAN, JOHN B. 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, OTHO S. A. 
STUDEBAKER, CLEM 
STURGES, GEORGE, 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 

WELLING, JOHN C. 
WELLS, M. D. 
WHEELER, GEO. HENRY 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WOLFF, LUDWIG 



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Pl. XIII. Case Label Used with Systematic Mineral Collection. 



Each label gives the group, Dana's number, name, chemical composition, 
both in words and symbols, and system of crystallization of each species in the 
case. The relations of species are thus exhibited and too great crowding of data 
on the specimen label is avoided. 







1) 



.MOIT03J 







— 0£ £ 

1 I £ 

* JS 1 si 

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as 









JOD JAfl3H'M DITAM3T3V2 HTIW 032tj JSaAj 33a3 .IIIX.jR 

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.babiovr, si bd/d uambaqa a] 



jocf 

8JB3 



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O 



a o '-> £ 



Oct. 1897. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



251 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



ABEL, JONATHAN 
ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADLER, DANKMAR 
ALLEN, W. I. 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ALLERTON, MRS. S. W. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, MRS. BARBARA 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 
ARNOLD, J. B. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, ALFRED L. 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BALDWIN, WILLIS M. 
BANE, OSCAR F. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, CHARLES J. 
BARNHART, ARTHUR M. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, JOSIAH C. 
BARTLETT, WILLIAM H. 
BATCHELLER, W. 
BEACH, F. G. 
BEAUYAIS, E. A. 
BECK, CHAS. A. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BEECHER, MRS. JEROME 
BEIDLER, FRANCIS 
BEIFELD, JOSEPH 
BELDEN, J. S. 
BENNETT, THOMAS 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BINGHAM, A. E. 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE Jr. 
BLACKMAN, W. L. 
BLACKSTONE, T. B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY I. 



BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WILLIAM 
BLANCHARD, WILLIAM 
BLISS, SAMUEL E. 
BLODGETT, H. W. 
BOAL, CHAS. T. 
BONFIELD, JOHN 
BONNEY, CHAS. C. 
BOOTH, A. 
BOOTH, H. W. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BORDEN, JAMES U. 
BOTSFORD, HENRY 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BOUTON, N. S. 
BRADLEY, CHAS. FRED'K 
BRADWELL, JAMES B. 
BRAINERD, E. R. 
BRAUN, GEORGE P. 
BREGA, CHAS. W. 
BREMNER, DAVID F. 
BROOKS, JAMES C. 
BROWN, GEO. F. 
BROWN, JOHN H. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, AUGUSTUS H. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
BURLEY, FRANK E. 
BURNET, WM. H. 
BYRAM, A. 

CABLE, R. R. 
CANNELL, S. WILMER 
CARPENTER, A. A. 
CARPENTER, MYRON J. 
CHANDLER, C. C. 
CHANDLER, FRANK R. 
CHAPIN, MRS. M. A. 
CHAPPELL, C. H. 
CLARK, JONATHAN 
CLARKE, CLINTON C. 



252 



Field Columbian" Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



CLIFF, CAPT. JOHN 
CLOUD, JOHN W. 
COBB, S. B. 
COFFIN, C. H. 
COMAN, SEYMOUR 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONKLING, ALLEN 
CONOVER, CHAS. H. 
COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE R. 
COOLIDGE, CHAS. A. 
COONLEY, MRS. JOHN C. 
CORWITH, CHAS. R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
COX, ALFRED J. 
COY, IRUS 

CROSBY, WILLIAM H. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CULVER, MRS. CHAS. E. 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAL, JOHN W., M.I). 
DAMSEL, W. H. 
DARLING, MRS. ADELINE 
DAVIS, LEWIS H. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEAN, THAD. 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DeKOVEN, JOHN 
DELANO, F. A. 
DEMMLER, K. 
DEWEY, DAVID B. 
DICK, A. B. 
DILLMAN, L. M. 
DOANE, |. W. 
DODGE, G. E. P. 
DOWNS, C. S. 
DUDDLESTON, GEORGE 
DUMMER, W. F. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, ELLIOTT 
DURAND, H. C. 
DWIGHT, JOHN H. 

EARN SHAW, E. 
EDMUNDS, ABRAHAM 
EDWARDS, J. A. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, CHAS. 
EWING, WILLIAM G. 



FAIR, R. M. 
FAITHORN, J. X. 
FARGO, CHAS. 
FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FEATHERSTONE, A. 
FELSENTHAL, H. 
FERGUSON, B. F. 
FERGUSON, CHAS. H. 
FISCHER, FREDERICK 
FISH, STUYVESANT 
FISHER, L. G. 
FLANNERY, JOHN L. 
FLERSHEM, LEM. W. 
FLOWER, JAMES M. 
FOREMAN, EDWIN G. 
FOREMAN, OSCAR G. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRANK, MAX [M.D. 

FRANKENTHAL, LESTER E., 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FREER, NATHAN M. 
FREYTAG, MORITZ 
FULGHUM, B. W. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FIRST, CONRAD 

GARTZ, ADOLPH F. 
GANS, SAMUEL 
GATES, J. W. 
GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GIBBS, JAMES S. 
GIFFORD, C. E. 
GIFFORD, I, CUSHMAN 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GORMULLV, R. PHILIP 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHAS. F. 
GREY, WM. L. 
GRIFFIN, T. A. 
GRISWOLD, E. P. 
GROSS. S. F. 
GITON, GEO. MURRAY 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HAMBLETON, C.J. 
HAMILTON, HENRY E. 
HAMILTON, I. K. 
HANECY, ELBRIDGF 



Oct. 1897. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



253 



HANSON, DAVID N. 
HARAHAN, J. T. 
HARBECK, EUGENE 
HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, D. J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HEARD, DWIGHT BANCROFT 
HEATH. ERNEST W. 
HELMER, FRANK A. 
HENNTNG, FRANCIS A., M.D. 
HENRY, GEO. W. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HIBBARD, F. V. S. 
HINES, EDWARD 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, D. R. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WM. 
HOUGHTELING, JAS. L. 
HOWARD, FREDERICK 
HOWLAND, WALTER M. 
HUGH ITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, MRS. B. P. 
HYDE, JAMES NEYINS 

ILIFF, WILLIAM H. 
INGALS, E. FLETCHER 
INGALS, EPHRA1M, M. D. 
INSULL, SAMUEL 
ISHAM, EDWARD S. 

JANES, JOHN J. 
IEFFERY, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JENKINS, T. R. 
JENKINS, WILTON A. 
JOHNSON, I. M. 
I ONES, J. S. 
JUDAH, NOBLE B. 
JUDSON, C. E. 

KAMMERER, F. G. 
KAVANAGH, CHAS. J. 
KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEELER, HARVEY E. 



KEENE, JOSEPH 
KEEP, ALBERT 
KEEP, HENRY 
KEEP, WILLIAM F. 
KENNETT, FRANCIS J. 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KELLOGG, MRS. C. P. 
KELLOGG, JAMES B. 
KENT, THOMAS 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, GEORGE F. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 
KIMBALL, W. W. 
KING, HENRY W. 
KIRCHBERGER, S. H. 
KLEINE, HENRY 
KOEHLER, THOMAS N. 

LAFLIN, ALBERT S. 
LAFLIN, GEORGE H. 
LAFLIN, LYCURGUS 
LAMB, CHAS. A. 
LAMB, FRANK H. 
LANGDON, R. B. 
LARTZ, W. C. C. 
LAWRENCE, EDWARD F. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAV, A. TRACY 
LEACH, THOS. A. 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEGNER. WM. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LEITER, JOSEPH 
LEE, WALTER H. 
LEWIS, JAMES L. 
LEWIS, MRS. WILLIAM G 
LINCOLN, ROBT. T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LLOYD, EVAN 
LOEWENTHAL, B. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LOMBARD, JOSIAH L. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOSS, C. E. 

LOWTHER, THOMAS D. 
LOWV, HAI MAN- 
LY FORD, W. H. 
LYON, THOMAS R. 
LYON, GEORGE M. 
LVTTON, HENRY C. 



254 



Fielh Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



McCREA, W. S. 
McELLIGOTT, THOMAS G. 
McGUIRE, REV. H. 

Mclennan, j. a. 
mcwilliams, lafayette 

MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MAIR, CHARLES A. 
MALLETTE, J. P. 
MANASSE, LOUIS 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MANVEL, MRS. ANNA F. 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MARSHALL, GEORGE E. 
MATTHIESSEN, C. H. 
MAY, FRANK E. 
MAY, HORATIO N. 
MAYER, DAVID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MEAD, \V. L. 
MERRICK, L. C. 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MILLER, ROSWELL 
MILLER, THOMAS 
MILLER, DR. TRUMAN W. 
MILLS, FRANK O. 
MILNOR, LLOYD 
MIXER, C. H. S. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MOORE, SILAS ML 
MORISON, GEORGE S. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MORRIS, NELSON 
MORRIS, IRA 
MORRISSON, IAMES W. 
MORSE, JAY C. 
MOULTON, GEO. M. 
MULLIKEN, CHAS. H. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MUNRO, WILLIAM 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 

NATHAN. ADOLPH 
NELSON, MURRV 



NOLAN, JOHN H. 

NORTON, O. W. 

NO YES, LaVERNE W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
ORTSEIFEN, ADAM 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 
OTIS, GEORGE L. 
OTIS, L. B. 

PALMER, MILTON ]. 
PALMER, PERC1VAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PATTERSON, W. R. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PEASE, JAMES 
PEASLEY, J. C. 
PECK, GEORGE R. 
PECK, CLARENCE I. 
PECK, MRS. MARY K. 
PECK, WALTER L. 
PEEK, W. H. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 
PETERSEN, GEORGE L. 
PETERSON, WILLIAM A. 
PETTIBONE, A. G. 
PIETSCH, C. F. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PLUMMER, JONATHAN W 
POND, IRVING K. 
POPE, MRS. CHAS. B. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, MRS. JULIA F. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 
PRUSSING, EUGENE E. 

QUICK, JOHN H. S. 

RABER, P. W. 
RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
RAYNER, JAMES B. 
REHM, JACOB 
REID, W. H. 
REW, HENRY C. 
REYNOLDS, GEORGE B. 
RIPLEY, E. P. 



Oct. 1897. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



255 



ROBINSON, J. K. 
ROE, CHARLES S. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MAURICE 
ROSENTHAL, OSCAR 
ROSENBERG, JACOB 
RUMSEY, GEORGE D. 
RUXNELLS, J. S. 
RVERSON, MRS. MARTIN 

SCHAFFNER, JOSEPH 

SCHINTZ, THEODORE 

SCHINTZ, THEO. H. 

SCHMIDT, GEORGE A. 

SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 

SCHMITT, ANTHONY 

SCHNEIDER, OTTO C. 

SCHNERING, JULIUS 

SCHWARTZ, G. A. 

SCULL, HENRY 

SEARS, JOSEPH 

SE1PP, MRS. C. 

SEIPP, W. C. 

SELFRIDGE, HARRY G. 

SELLERS, FRANK H. 

SELZ, MORRIS 

SENN, MRS. N. 

SEWELL, BARTON 

SHEDD, JOHN G. 

SHERWOOD, H. M. 

SHIPMAN, DANIEL B. 

SHORTALL, JOHN G. 

SIMMONS, J. J. 

SINGER, A. L. 

SKINNER, THE MISSES 

SMITH, F. B. 

SMITH, FRANK J. 

SMITH, JOHN C. 

SMITH, O. C. 

SMITH, ORSON 

SMITH, ROBERT J. 

SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 

SOMERYILLE, R. 

SOPER, ALEX. C. 

SOPER, JAS. P. 

SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

SPOOR, J. A. 

SOUTHWELL, H. E. 

STANLEY, FRANK W. 

STANTON, W. A. 



STEELE, HENRY B. 
STILES, JOSIAH 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STRAUS, SIMON 
STUART, ROBERT 
SULLIYAN, W. K. 

TAYLOR, SAMUEL G. 
TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TILTON, MRS. L.J. 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 
TREAT, CHAS. P. 
TRIPP, C. E. 
TRUAX, CHARLES 
TRUMBULL, PERRY 
TRUMBULL, JOHN H. 
TRUE)E, A. S. 
TURBIN, LOUIS M., M.D. 
TURNER, E. A. 
TURNER, VOLUNTINE C. 
TYRRELL, JOHN 
TYSON, RUSSELL 

IIHLEIN, EDW'D G. 
UNZICKER, OTTO 

YIERLING, ROBERT 

WACKER, CHAS. H. 
WAIT, HORATIO L. 
WALKER, GEORGE C. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, HENRY H. 
WALKER, WM. B. 
WALKER, W. S. 
WALLER, EDW'D C. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
WATSON, A. D. 
WATSON, WM. J. 
WEBSTER, GEO. H. 
WELLING, JOHN C. 
WELLS, B. R. 
WELLS, M. D. 
WERNER, P. E. 
WHEELER, CHAS. W. 
WHEELER, FRANCIS T. 
WHEELER, G. H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 



256 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



WHITEHOUSE, FRANCIS M. 
WICKES, T. H. 

WILLIAMS, SIMEON B. 
WILLING, MRS. HENRY J. 
WILSON, GEORGE C. 
WILSON, W. M. 
WILSON, E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
WING, DR. ELBERT 
WINK, HENRY 



WINSLOW, Z. R. 

WOLF, FRED. W. 
WOOD, JOHN H. 
WOOD, S. E. 

WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 
WOOSTER, CLARENCE K. 
WRIGHT, THOS. A. 

YERKES, CHARLES T. 
YOUNG, CARYL 



DECEASED. 



LUNT, ORRINGTON STICKNEY, MRS. EDW. S. 

STUDEBAKER, PETER E. 



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■ 



Pl. XIV. Label Stand Used in Department of Geology for Mounting Labels of 

Floor Specimens. 



The stand is designed to provide a light and graceful support by which the 
label can be brought to about the height of the eye, and its reading be facilitated. 
The method of adjustment is given in the detail cut at the left. 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. XIV. 




Label and Stand for Floor Specimen — Department of Geology.