(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report, 1876-1877"

J23JY?. 



First and Second R 




Board of Trustees 



Pennsylvania Museum 



School of Industrial Art. 



1876— 7 77. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
Review Priming House, N. \V. comer Fourth and Walnut Streets 

1878. 



First and Second Reports 




Board of Trustees 




OF THE 

Pennsylvania Museum 




SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 




187S— 7 77. 




PHILADELPHIA: 
Review Printing House, N. W. corner Fourth and Walnut Streets. 

1878. 


,j 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport187600penn 




2 CC 



n 

CO <t 



■< _r 

to _i 

< O 

I SI 



OFFICERS FOR 1878. 



PRESIDENT, 

COLEMAN SELLERS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, 

EDWARD T. STEEL. 

VICE-PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 

TREASURER, 

CLARENCE H. CLARK. 

SECRETARY, 

H. DUMONT WAGNER. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

HON. JOHN F. HARTRANFT, 

Governor of the Slate. 

HON. WILLIAM S. STOKLEY, 
Mayor of the City. 

ADAM EVERLY, 

Appointed by State Senate. 

HON. CHARLES R. BUCKALEW, 

Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

R. W. DOWNING, 

Appointed by Select Council. 

EDWARD T. STEEL, 

Appointed by Common Council. 



FAIRMAN ROGERS, 

Appointed by the University of Pennsylvania. 

J. B. KNIGHT, 

Appointed by the Franklin Institute. 

CLARENCE II. CLARK, 

Appointed by the Pennsylvania Academy of Pine Arts. 

F. ODEN HORSTMANN, 

Appointed by the Philad'a School of Design for Wo??ien. 

J. VAUGHAN MERRICK, 

Appointed by the Board of State Centennial Supervisors. 



TRUSTEES ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS: 

To serve for five years. 
W. W. JUSTICE, JOHN R. BAKER, 

WAYNE MacVEAGH, F. R. SIIELTON. 

To serve for four years. 
JOHN SARTAIN, DR. WILLIAM PEPPER, 

COLEMAN SELLERS, JAMES HUNTER. 

To serve for three years. 
JAMES L. CLAGHORN, JOHN C. BROWNE, 

WILLIAM BIGLER, CHAPMAN BIDDLE. 

To serve for two years. 
THOMAS DOLAN, WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, 

SAMUEL WAGNER, Jr., GEORGE W. CHILDS. 

To serve for one year. 
HENRY C. GIBSON, THOMAS COCHRAN, 

WILLIAM H. MERRICK, G. DAWSON COLEMAN. 



COMMITTEES. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

COLEMAN SELLERS, 

EDWARD T. STEEL, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, 

CLARENCE II. CLARK, 

H. DUMONT WAGNER, (Ex officio). 
ADAM EVERLY, WILLIAM II. MERRICK, 

CHAPMAN PIDDLE, J. B. KNIGHT, 

TPIOMAS COCHRAN, J. VAUGIIAN MERRICK, 

SAMUEL WAGNER, Jr., W. W. JUSTICE, 

F. ODEN HORSTMANN, WAYNE MacVEAGH, 

JOHN R. BAKER, F. R. SI I ELTON, 

JOHN C. BROWNE. 

COMMITTEE ON ORNAMENTAI ART. 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, Chairman. 
HENRY C. GIBSON, CLARENCE II. CLARK, 

JOHN C. BROWNE, JOHN R. BAKER. 

COMMITTEE ON THE MECHANIC ARTS. 

J. B. KNIGHT, Chairman. 
J. VAUGHAN MERRICK, G. DAWSON COLEMAN, 

F. ODEN HORSTMANN, THOMAS DOLAN. 

COMMITTEE ON MATERIALS USED IN THE ART INDUSTRIES. 

F. ODEN HORSTMANN, Chairman. 
JAMES HUNTER, THOMAS DOLAN, 

JOHN R. BAKER. 

COMMITTEE ON THE ART LIBRARY. 

SAMUEL WAGNER, Jr., Chairman. 
J. VAUGHAN MERRICK, FAIRMAN ROGERS, 

JOHN C. BROWNE. 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

WILLIAM II. MERRICK, Chairman. 
THOMAS COCHRAN, EDWARD T. STEEL, 

F. R. SHELTON, CLARENCE H. CLARK. 

COMMITTEE ON THE BUILDING. 

THOMAS COCHRAN, Chairman. 

R. W. DOWNING, J. B. KNIGHT, 

ADAM EVERLY. 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTION. 

J. VAUGHAN MERRICK, Chairman. 
JOHN SARTAIN, F. ODEN HORSTMANN, 

J. B. KNIGHT, W. W. JUSTICE. 

COMMITTEE ON LAW. 

CHAPMAN BIDDLE, Chairman. 
SAMUEL WAGNER, Jr., THOMAS COCHRAN, 

WAYNE MacVEAGH. 

COMMITTEE ON AUDIT. 

W. W. JUSTICE, Chairman. 

EDWARD T. STEEL, WILLIAM H. MERRICK, 

THOMAS COCHRAN. 




O 

o 



o 

DC 



1HEP0KT OF THE EOAMB ©F BIgf CTOK8 




In presenting the report for the past year, your Trustees-deem^ 
it desirable that it should be prefaced with a sketch of the his- 
tory of the formative stages of the movement which has resulted 
in the permanent establishment of the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art, in order that the Members and 
the public may be fully informed of the purposes and intention 
of the Institution, and of the motives which led to its organiza- 
tion. So much has been accomplished during the year, all of 
which is the fulfilment of the original plan, that a review of the 
work from its commencement will, no doubt, be of interest, and 
serve to show the growth and present status of the Museum. 

During the summer of 1875, the approach of the Interna- 
tional Exhibition suggested to the minds of several persons 
who had previously been interested in the subject of Industrial 
Art Education, that there would here be presented an unusual 
opportunity of forming a nucleus of works of industrial art, the 
beginning of a collection which, as has been seen in the history 
of similar enterprises, would, if once made, grow of itself, and 
which, in time, could not fail to have a most beneficial influence 
upon the industries of our State and City. An organization was 
effected, and so arranged as to include in the management re- 
presentatives of the leading educational institutions of the City, 
and of the State and City authorities, thus securing the coope- 
ration of all those whose devotion to the public good proved 
their value, and demonstrating the fact that the new Museum 
and School of Industrial Art did not intrude on the work of 
established organizations, of which our citizens are so justly 
proud. 

A charter was granted by the Court of Common Pleas in 
February, 1876, and, in pursuance of the plan adopted, an elec- 



tion of a board of Trustees was held, composed of gentlemen 
representing the most important interests of the State, and, im- 
mediately afterwards an appeal was made to the public for 
means to carry out the scheme proposed. 

A fund was formed, and a Committee of Selection was ap- 
pointed to expend twenty-five thousand dollars at the Inter- 
national Exhibition, which had now opened. This Committee 
were in daily attendance at the Exhibition, and secured the first 
choice of the most interesting objects there displayed, and also 
received many valuable gifts from the Foreign Commissioners 
and Exhibitors, besides forming associations with persons who 
are prominently identified with similar institutions abroad. The 
universal courtesy and appreciative interest with which the 
Committee were received by the Commissioners from Europej 
would make it almost invidious to mention any special names 
in this connection, but the great obligations under which the 
Corporation is placed by the action of P. Cunliffe Owen, C. B., 
and Colonel Sir Henry Bruce Sandford, K. B., of Great Britain, 
to whom we are indebted for the loan of the valuable India 
Collection and the gift of the work exhibited by the South 
Kensington Museum, compels the most public acknowledge- 
ment and sincere gratitude of the Corporation. 

Permission having been granted by the authorities of Memo- 
rial Hall for the Corporation to occupy the building, possession 
was taken after the close of the Exhibition, and the objects 
purchased stored in that building. 

It will thus be seen from this slight sketch, which is really 
but an outline, that the object of the originators of the Museum 
scheme has been steadily kept in view; that at the close of the 
Centennial year there had been established in our midst, un- 
known, perhaps, to many, a comprehensive plan of Art Educa- 
tion, which has already borne fruit, and which needed only the 
same prudent and thoughtful care to develope into a power which 
has already influenced the taste of the public, and stimulated 
our manufacturing industries. Three important steps had been 



taken during that year by the young Museum, — the formation 
of an effective corporate organization, the complete utilization 
of the advantages of the Exhibition, and the occupation of 
Memorial Hall — and these during a condition of financial de- 
pression which discouraged and disabled many existing Insti- 
tutions. To the fact of the great need of such instruction as 
can be afforded only by an Industrial Art Museum and School, 
can be attributed the success of our corporation up to this 
point, together with the strong feeling of public confidence 
shown in its management. 

The loss which the corporation sustained by the death of 
Mr. Theodore Cuyler and Mr. John L. Shoemaker, both of 
whom were among its earliest and most enthusiastic promoters, 
was severely felt, but their wise advice and counsel has left so 
great an impress upon the character of the organization, that 
though called upon to mourn their death, it is a subject of 
great congratulation that the Museum had their cooperation 
while living. 

The description of the rapid growth of the Museum from 
that time until now belongs to the 

REPORT FOR 1877. 

Although the work, thus far, had progressed beyond the ex- 
pectations of its projectors, yet the public generally were not 
aware of its existence, or of the value of what it proposed to 
accomplish. To bring the Museum more prominently to the 
notice of the people, an exhibition of objects purchased by the 
Corporation, and others loaned by citizens, was opened January 
1 6th, in the rooms of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. 
The hearty cooperation of the owners of rare and interesting 
works of industrial art, who generously entrusted them to the 
care of the committee in charge, the appreciation of the visitors 
and the presence of many students and artizans, served to make 
this Exhibition a source of great pleasure and instruction, while 
the purposes of the Corporation were clearly shown to the pub- 



IO 

lie. The number of Visitors from January 16th to March 31st, 
when the exhibition was closed, was as follows : 

Visitors paying cash, ..... 10,708 
Complimentary and Members, . . . 1,971 
Students of the Public Schools, . . . 2,707 



Total, 15,386 



Although this Exhibition was not financially successful, owing 
to the great expense incurred, yet the deficit was more than 
repaid by subscriptions from those whose interest was aroused, 
and who were for the first time made aware of the practical 
character of the Museum scheme. The successful arrangement 
of the collections displayed was in a great measure due to the 
kind assistance of Messrs. William S. Vaux, Joseph A. Clay, 
Edward S. Clark, and Dr. Francis W. Lewis, who also con- 
tributed largely from their private collections. 

During this time, the authorities having in charge Memorial 
Hall, the Board of State Centennial Supervisors, appointed by 
the State, the City Councils, and the Fairmount Park Commis- 
sioners, formed a body of representatives of each, known as 
the Directors of Memorial Hall. With this body this Corpora- 
tion communicated, and a lease or license was signed, giving 
formal possession of Memorial Hall to the Museum, and stipu- 
lating that not more than 25 cents should be charged for en- 
trance fee. If it should be found that this location should not 
prove best for the purposes of the Museum, the Trustees will 
depend upon the liberality of the Members and citizens to pro- 
vide more central quarters in the future. The Centennial Board 
of Finance, with the fairness which distinguished all their 
actions, made over to this Corporation, upon its obtaining legal 
possession of Memorial Hall, a sum of money representing the 
amount necessary to repair the wear and tear during their occu- 
pancy. This sum was placed in the hands of the Chairman of 



II 

the Committee on Building, Mr. John Baird, who devoted his 
personal attention to the renovation of the building, removing 
the partitions in the large saloons, and boarding from the walls. 
While these repairs were in progress, overtures were made by 
the International Exhibition Company, which had purchased 
the Main Exhibition Building, for a cooperation in some way 
between the Museum and that Company. Finally, they pro- 
posed, in consideration of certain rooms being given to them 
to place statuary and pictures in, and all the receipts taken at 
the entrance of Memorial Hall to revert to them, to pay to this 
corporation the sum of $6,000 for one year, in quarterly instal- 
ments, and in case of the Museum being kept open during the 
winter a sum of $2,000 additional. 

An agreement was made to this effect, as it was thought at 
that time that the Company were responsible, and that it was 
best for the interests of the Museum to accept the terms offered 
rather than depend for support upon the entrance fees of such 
persons as might accidently visit the Museum, the communi- 
cation with the street cars being practically cut off by the Main 
Building. It is a subject of great regret to the Trustees to have 
to report that their expectations have been entirely disappointed 
a small fraction only of the amount due having been paid. The 
matter reaching this point, the Solicitors of the Corporation have 
been instructed to bring legal proceedings against them to re- 
cover, if possible, the amount due. 

The agreement having been signed, the Trustees have through- 
out fulfilled, in every respect, the part of the contract for which 
the Museum was responsible, and, in order to accommodate the 
Exhibition Company, every effort was made to open the col- 
lections on the 1 oth of May, 1877. 

The material and show cases were removed from the Aca- 
demy of the Fine Arts at the close of the Exhibition there, and, 
together with the other objects belonging to the Museum 
stored at Memorial Hall, were arranged in time for the opening 
day. The display made at that time was greatly increased by 



12 

the arrival from London of a collection of English Pottery and 
Porcelain, loaned for one year by Messrs. A. B. Daniell & Sons; 
of French Pottery and Glass from Messrs. Londos & Co. ; and 
of Spanish Glass and Pottery, loaned for one year, by Signor 
Riano of Madrid. These loans were all negotiated and arranged 
by Mr. P. Cunliffe Owen, C. B., and with them arrived a col- 
lection of objects of Persian art, purchased for the Museum by 
him. 

After the preliminary arrangements for the opening day, 
attention was given to the systematic distribution and classifi- 
cation of the collections, grouping together, so far as practi- 
cable, objects of similar character, and perfecting the plan of 
labelling, in order that visitors might be informed of the ex- 
act character of each object, and be enabled to study them 
more intelligently. During the summer a collection of Textile 
Fabrics and Embroideries, of great interest to manufac- 
turers, with objects in wrought iron and stoneware from Ger- 
many, being purchases made in Europe, have been received 
and placed in their proper positions in the Museum. A num- 
ber of very valuable articles have also been left as loans, among 
which may be mentioned a collection of the remains of the 
Lake Dwellers, deposited by Dr. F. W. Lewis; a piece of 
Beauvais tapestry by Mr. John McClure; an India carpet, by 
Mr. Ellis Yarnall ; and an original vase by Chantry, owned by 
Mrs. Owen Wister. 

The arrival during October of models, in cork, of Windsor 
Castle and the Tower of London, by Lloyd Hoppin, Esq., was an 
event of special interest. These valuable works were presented 
to the Museum by the following gentlemen: Messrs. George 
W. Childs, A. J. Drexel, J. Vaughan Merrick, James L. Clag- 
horn, Charles W. Trotter, W. H. Merrick, J. Alfred Kay, Fred- 
erick Brown, Joel J. Bailly, Frederick Graeff, Lewis H. Redner 
Evan Randolph, E. W. Clark, Ezra Bowen, F. A. Drexel, Ed- 
win M. Lewis, and others. 

The American Institute of Mining Engineers having made 



13 

application to the Corporation for permission to place in the 
Museum building their collections illustrative \£ Mining- and 
Metallurgy, made at the Centennial Exhibition, s"p^ce was ac 
corded them, and the collections received on loan for an-ind 
nite period. This material is of the greatest interest and value 
as bearing upon one of the most important industries of the 
State, and although not possessing any art character, is quite 
in keeping with two of the departments of the original Museum 
plan, that of the Raw Material collection, and of the collection 
illustrative of the Mechanic Arts. 

The Act of Legislature appropriating money for building 
Memorial Hall, specifies that after the Centennial Exhibition it 
shall remain as a Museum of Industrial Art, and open forever to 
the citizens of the Commonwealth. The Trustees, therefore, 
did not believe that they had the right, under this Act, to close 
the Museum to the public on Sundays, and they are glad to re- 
port that from the date of taking possession the people, and 
especially the working people, whose time is occupied during 
the week, have visited the Museum in large numbers on the 
first day of the week. 

The total number of visitors to the Museum from May ioth, 
1877, to January 1st, 1878, was 147,113, and the total number 
on Sundays, was : 




July, . 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



429 

4,279 
10,295 

3-739 

1,338 

200 

20,280 



The absence of any provisions of the United States tariff ex- 
empting from duty such objects as the Museum has, and is 
likely to import, gave to the Trustees considerable anxiety and 



14 

labor in connection with those objects already purchased, but 
they are pleased to report, that through the courtesy of the 
officials at Washington they have been enabled to enter under 
the provisions of the Warehouse Act the articles purchased, and 
have also received the assurance of the Department that it will 
endorse the passage of a bill, which has been prepared, exempt- 
ing from duty all that has been or may be purchased by the 
Museum. The Trustees urgently request the cooperation of the 
Members in this matter, so that there may be no difficulty in 
the future in importing examples of Industrial Art for the pur- 
poses of study. 

In respect to the attitude of the State authorities to the Mu- 
seum, the Trustees have taken occasion frequently to urge upon 
the attention of the Legislature and Executive, the existence 
and objects of the Museum, as involving a kind of education of 
vital interest to such a Commonwealth as Pennsylvania, and 
they are glad to report that they have met with great encour- 
agement from both. His Excellency Governor Hartranft, in 
his annual message of last year, says as follows : 

" I have heretofore earnestly pointed out the growing neces- 
sity for industrial art education. First, through the public 
schools by the introduction of mechanical and free hand draw- 
ing; secondly, by night schools for adults; and, thirdly, by 
special schools of industrial design for all classes. Museums, 
art galleries, and other public collections are also important 
forces in industrial education. Such institutions in England, 
France, Germany, and other European countries, are regarded 
as an essential element in national progress, and are mostly 
under the patronage of the government. Intelligence is becom- 
ing more and more a most important element in every depart- 
ment of industry. In this respect our educational system is 
wholly deficient. It turns out lawyers, doctors, preachers, and 
professional men in superabundance, while there is a startling 
dearth of intelligent farmers, manufacturers, miners, and me- 
chanics. A few of the States have started forward in the cause 



i5 

of industrial education, by introducing drawing into their public 
schools, and providing museums and schools of design. The 
large and varied industries of Pennsylvania demand a similar 
liberality. The Centennial year has brought us the oppor- 
tunity, and placed the materials for beginning at our disposal. 
The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, 
modeled after the celebrated South Kensington Museum of 
London, has secured Memorial Hall, in which to form an art 
library; special collections, illustrative of industrial processes; 
and a thorough system of instruction in the arts of design as 
applied to manufactures, accompanied by general and technical 
lectures. In this they are about to place the nucleus of a col- 
lection gathered in the rich field of the Centennial Exposition, 
intended to promote the improvement of American industrial 
art. I trust these efforts will not escape your notice. Some 
means ought to be devised to make available the rich collec- 
tion of the Geological Survey. And you will, no doubt, seri- 
ously consider whether, in the case of the Museum and Indus- 
trial School, the State ought not to extend a hand to place 
upon a firm foundation a work of so much public utility." 

In his message for 1878, his Excellency repeats his views 
in even stronger language, as follows : 

" It will, perhaps, be a slow and difficult task to secure the 
cooperation of the present generation of workingmen. But in 
all large cities and towns where that class is principally con- 
gregated, lecture and draughting rooms could be added to the 
night schools, and such instruction given as would interest and 
benefit adults. Everything that will tend to recognize the im- 
portance and dignity of labor; that will excite the pride and 
emulation of the artizan in his work; convince him of the 
interest of the State in his welfare and the welfare of his child- 
ren, and secure the fruits of his industry and thrift, should be 
done; and I am convinced that nothing will contribute so 
much to these results as the establishment of industrial and 
scientific schools and workshops by the side of our present 



i6 

high schools and academies. Finally, the appreciation and 
demand of works of art and skill must keep pace with the 
capacity to create them. Museums, art galleries, and other 
public collections are also important factors in industrial edu- 
cation. Accordingly, I took occasion last year to recommend 
the arrangement, for public exhibition, of the specimens col- 
lected by the Geological Survey, and to suggest that you con- 
sider the advisability of extending State aid to the Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art. The latter institution 
has, during the year, opened free schools of drawing and de- 
sign, and as the State, if it decides to add industrial education 
to the public school system, will need competent teachers in 
these branches, this fact gives it additional claims to the reco?- 
nition of the authorities. I venture to hope that this subject 
will early engage your labors, and that the public school sys- 
tem will receive a symmetrical development corresponding with 
the conditions of a highly industrial age, and the large and 
varied resources of Pennsylvania." 

A bill was prepared by a sub-committee of the Board, and 
presented at the last session of the Legislature, but, with many 
others of like character, was not passed upon. A similar bill 
has been introduced into the present session, asking for an ap- 
propriation of $20,000 for 1878, and a like amount for 1879, 
$5,000 of which is for the annual maintenance of Memorial 
Hall, for the support of which there is no existing fund, and 
$15,000 for the Industrial Art Schools of the Museum. The 
interest of the Members and others is earnestly solicited in this 
matter, in order that the Museum may be so firmly established 
as to be in a measure independent of the support of individuals, 
and placed upon a basis worthy of the object for which it was 
created. 

Having completed the installation of the collections in 
Memorial Hall, the attention of the Board was given to the 
second subject involved in the original scheme of the Museum, 
as expressed in the charter of the Corporation, viz. : " to pro- 



17 

vide means of instruction in Drawing Painting:, Modelling- 
Designing, etc., through practical Schools, Lectures, and other- 
wise." 

At the stated meeting of the Executive Committee held 
August 13th, 1877, the Standing Committee on Instruction 
were requested to submit a plan for the organization of the 
Schools, and a report was presented by that Committee in Oc- 
tober. This report recommended a plan of instruction similar 
in its main features to the one now in operation, and was 
adopted by the Executive Committee, who, at the same time, 
gave to the Committee on Instruction authority to carry it out 
as soon as the means of the Corporation would permit. To 
this end an appeal was issued, setting forth the importance 
of utilizing the valuable collection in the Museum by supple- 
menting what had been done by instruction in the principles 
of the application of Art to Industry, and asking special sub- 
scriptions to the fund for the support of the Schools. The 
Committee felt sufficiently encouraged by the response to 
their appeal, to immediately undertake the organization of the 
scheme. A suitable building, No. 312 North Broad street, was 
selected as the location, and, after a short time, was fitted for the 
use of the School. Advertisement was made that applicants 
of either sex, over fifteen years of age, would be received for 
examination, and notice given that there would be no charge 
for tuition, but that students admitted would provide their own 
stationery and instruments. 

A standard of examination was adopted that required some 
knowledge of the rudiments of drawing on the part of the ap- 
plicant. Out of about two hundred applying, one hundred 
were chosen as being proficient, and where they showed equal 
ability preference was given to those engaged in the Art Indus- 
tries, and to those who desired to gain instruction as a means of 
livelihood. On the 10th of December the examinations began, 
and on the 17th the Schools opened with one hundred students, 
Fifty in the morning and Fifty in the evening classes, that num- 



ber being the maximum that could be accommodated. The 
applications of those who could not be admitted on account of 
want of room, are on file and will be taken up in the order of 
their date and proficiency. The Committee selected Mr. Charles 
M. Burns, Jr., as instructor in the Artistic division of the course, 
and Mr. Philip Pistor in the Scientific branches, with Dr. J. T. 
Rothrock as Lecturer on Botany as applied to Decorative Art, 
a id Mr. George Herzog as Lecturer on Historic Ornament. 

The course consists of instruction in drawing, both with in- 
struments and freehand, the former covering the ground of 
plane and descriptive geometry, and also free perspective, and 
the latter involving manipulation with the pencil, charcoal or 
brush, from study of natural objects, casts, architectural details, 
and objects from the Museum collections as models. A study 
of color, and its application and disposition in design, will be 
taken up as the classes advance, together with the preparation 
of original designs applicable to industrial purposes. 

Without proposing anything novel in the instruction given 
in the Schools, it is intended to insist upon a thorough training 
by means of the course, in order that those taking advantage 
of it may be well grounded in the principles underlying what is 
known as Design, depending upon the individual ability of the 
students to develop into designers, but giving them the founda- 
tion upon which this much desired superstructure may be 
raised. With this view the rules and regulations have been 
composed, strictly and positively placing before the students 
the fact that it depends upon their own efforts as much as upon 
those of the Instructors, whether they succeed or not in the 
future, and so arranged as to prevent the classes being filled 
with incompetent or careless students. 

* "With the beginning of the year a School of Art Needle- 
work was established, a teacher in its various branches hav- 
ing been engaged for two trial months. Although only in 
its infancy, this School has aroused sufficient interest to en- 
courage hopes that it will, at no very distant day, prove a 



* 



Extract from a Report of the Advisory Committee. 



19 

valuable instrument, not only in furthering the aims of the 
Museum by improving the taste of our people, but by pro- 
viding with a means of support many women who are ready 
to accept the needle as their only legitimate weapon in the 
struggle for existence. To these classes are admitted only 
those who look to this Instruction in Art Needlework as an 
aid to future independence, and Six Classes of Eight pupils 
each were at once filled. By a rigid censorship, as well of 
the designs employed in this branch of Art as of the exe- 
cution of the work attempted here, those in charge of this 
School hope to establish its success as a model of its kind." 
To meet the great demand for this kind of instruction among 
persons of means, classes have been formed of pay pupils, so 
arranged as not to interfere with the free tuition afforded 
others unable to bear that expense. The following women have 
kindly consented to act as an advisory committee : 

Mrs. Caspar Wister, Mrs. Thomas A. Scott, Mrs. J. Dundas 
Lippincott, Mrs. Fairman Rogers, Mrs. Thomas Hockley, Mrs. 
Charles Henry Hart, Mrs. F. R. Shelton, Mrs. Atherton Blight, 
Miss Laura T. Merrick, Miss Emilie D. Wagner, and Miss 
Mary Read Fisher. 

The progress of all the classes of the Museum since they 
began, December 17th, has been very satisfactory. The stu- 
dents are attentive, punctual, and painstaking in their work, and 
have already, in several marked cases, shown evidences of 
latent ability. 

It must be understood that the Schools as now arranged are 
but a beginning, which, as time goes on, will be amplified and 
extended. If time is given for the plan to develop, and for the 
new School to make its own experience, there can be no doubt 
that the results will be of great value to the community; but 
those of its friends who have not the patience to wait, but fall 
into the popular error of expecting some immediate results, 
may possibly be discouraged. The Trustees would call the 
attention of those who may hold these views, to the wretched 



20 

character of that so-called ornamental work turned out in the 
quick and easy style, which disfigures so many of our manu- 
factured objects of really good material, and urge upon their 
attention the necessity of some reform, and the fact that it can- 
not be brought about at once. 

The report of the Treasurer will be found annexed, from 
which can be seen the amount of the receipts and expenditures. 
It has been the constant effort of the Trustees to use every 
economy consistent with the requirements of the Museum, and 
they believe that no unnecessaiy expenditures have been 
made. 

To those who have by their means, by their active assistance 
and by their good wishes, aided the work of the Museum, the 
Trustees extend their sincere thanks, and especially to the Press 
of the City, who have so warmly endorsed the scheme from its 
birth, and so greatly aided in making it known to the public. 

With a large and influential membership, with a collection 
unequalled, in many respects, by any in this country, with 
Schools in full operation, the Trustees feel that they have just 
cause to congratulate the Members upon what has been done, 
at the same time reminding them that upon their continued 
interest and that of the public, the future success of the Museum 
depends. 

By order of the Board of Trustees, 

H. DUMONT WAGNER, 

Secretary. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE ART! 
LIBRARY -ARCHIVES 




22 








TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 








February ist, 1876, to November jot/i, 


1877 






Dr. 








To Donations, ........ 






#37>39 2 Go 


" Life Members, ........ 


. 




10,800 00 








9,830 30 


" Annual Members' dues, ...... 


$620 


00 




" Sundry accounts, interest, etc., . . • • 

Transferred to the credit of profit and loss, ... 


3,485 


63 


4, I °5 6 3 






$62,128 53 


Cr. 








By Warrants paid for 








Office expenses, . . ...... 


$1,267 


07 




Expenses of obtaining charter, ..... 




67 


00 




Salaries, ......'..< 




5,71s 43 




Extra labor, ..... . . 




217 


39 




Travelling expenses, ...... 




344 


38 




Freight and express charges, ..... 




625 


60 










00 




Advertising, ....... 




63 


30 




Expanses of Collector, ...... 




717 


15 




Lectures, ....... 




10 


5° 




Loan Exhibition (excess of expenses over receipts), . . . 




593 


s? 




Custom House charges, . . ..... 




401 


08 




Maintenance oS Memorial Hall and installation of collections, . 




4,486 


25 




Art schools, ....... 




3 


00 




Incidental expenses, ...... 

Transferred to the debit of profit and loss, . . 




49 


81 


15,820 83 




. 


By cost of the Museum collections, and other permanent investments 




. 




41,887 48 


By payments on account of temporary loans, . . , 




. 




4,000 00 


Balance on hand November 30, 1877, . , 






' 


420 22 




$62,128 53 



CLARENCE H. CLARK, Treasurer. 



Entries and Vouchers examined and found correct. 



W. W. JUSTICE, 
W. H. MERRICK, 
EDWARD T. STEEL, 
THOMAS COCHRAN, 

Committee. 



Pi 

u 



K 



IS. 

s 

5< 



H 

W 
W 

X 
m 

W 
u 

< 



0^3 



O ON OS 0\ 



O O O O co 
m o O O t-» 



t^ o\ ■**- CT» vO o 



Q 



_ o rt >> "> 






oj <u rt c ^ 



rt T3 >> rt H3 > 



s • g .s g £ a 



2 3 





24 






LIST 


OF SUBSCRIBERS 




To the Fund for Establishing The Pennsylvania Museum and School 


of Industrial Art, to November 30, 1877. 




John Baird, . 


IS, 000 


Joseph Allen, Jr., . 


$100 


George W. Childs, 


5,000 


Chapman Biddle, . 


100 


A. J. Drexel, 


5,000 


Mrs. Chapman Biddle, . 


100 


F. A. Drexel, 


5,000 


Clement Biddle, . 


100 


Henry C. Lea, 


5,000 


Alexander Biddle, 


100 


A. Whitney & Sons, Car Trus 


t 


Miss Annie E. Biddle, . 


100 


stock, .... 


5,000 


W. S. Baker, 


100 


Henry C. Gibson, . 


2,500 


M. Baird, . 


100 


Burnham, Parry, Williams & 




Miss Anna Blanchard, . 


100 


Co., 


1,000 


Miss Maria Blanchard, . 


100 


Miss R. Gibson, . 


1,000 


Miss Harriet Blanchard, 


100 


Walter Garrett, 


1,000 


James L. Claghorn, 


100 


W. E. Garrett, Jr., 


1,000 


J. Raymond Claghorn, . 


100 


Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 


1,000 


John H. Cooper, . . - 


100 


F. Oden Horstmann, 


1,000 


J. E. Caldwell, . 


100 


William P. Pepper, 


1,000 


Mrs. St. George T. Campbell 


100 


Thomas A. Scott, . 


1,000 


Miss Mary Coles, . 


100 


Mrs. Taitt, . 


1,000 


Clarence H. Clark, 


100 


Joseph Wharton, . 


1,000 


J. Hinckley Clark, 


100 


Samuel Welsh, 


1,000 


Ephraim Clark, 


100 


Alexander Brown, 


500 


W. Burton Carver, 


100 


W. W. Justice, 


500 


Joseph Chapman, . 


100 


William Massey, . 


500 


Thomas Cochran, . 


100 


Joseph E. Temple, 


500 


Caleb Cope, . 


100 


William Weightman, 


500 


Henry T. Collins, . 


ICO 


Mrs. Tobias Wagner, . 


500 


A. J. Cassatt, 


ICO 


Thomas Miles, 


350 


J. Dawson Coleman, 


100 


J. Vaughan Merrick, 


280 


F. A. Dick, . 


100 


C. & H. Borie, . . # 


250 


R. J. Dobbins, 


100 


Mrs. Susan R. Barton, . 


200 


Henry Disston, 


100 


Miss Lucy W. Merrick, 


200 


Albert H. Disston, 


100 


Miss Emilie H. Merrick, 


200 


Hamilton Disston, 


100 


Charles Santee, 


200 


Mrs. Henry Duhring, . 


100 

1 


William S. Vaux, . 


150 


Edward L. Fenimore, . 


100 





25 






Stephen 0. Fuguet, 


$100 


George S. Pepper, 


$100 


Henry C. Gibson, . 


100 


Lawrence S. Pepper, 


100 


Frederick Graeff, . 


100 


Joseph Patterson, . 


100 


Miss Elizabeth Garrett, . 


100 


Joseph F. Page, 


100 


Miss Julia Garrett, 


100 


Charles W. Poultney, . 


100 


Mrs. Walter Garrett, 


100 


Moro Phillips, 


100 


Stephen Greene, . 


100 


Jacob Roberts, M. D., . 


100 


Franklin B Go wen, 


100 


William D. Rogers, 


100 


. Samuel Hart, 


100 


C. H. Rogers, 


100 


George W. Hill, . 


100 


Evan Randolph, . 


100 


G. Craig Heberton, 


100 


Coleman Sellers, . 


100 


W. H. Hortsman & Sons, 


IOO 


Charles Spencer, . 


100 


Washington Jones, 


100 


Lindley Smyth, 


100 


John 0. James, 


100 


Edward T. Steel, . 


100 


Edward C. Knight, 


100 


Maxwell Sommerville, . 


100 


Richard A. Lewis, 


100 


V. C. Sweatman, . 


100 


Edwin M. Lewis, . 


100 


Henry Seibert, 


100 


Joseph S. Lovering, 


100 


Thomas Smith, 


100 


Amos R. Little, 


100 


George F. Tyler, . 


100 


William H. Merrick, . 


100 


S. Harvey Thomas, 


100 


Wistar Morris, 


100 


Joseph Allen, 


100 


Frank W. Murphy, 


100 


Gottlieb Vollmer, . 


100 


James Moore, 


100 


James A. Wright, . 


100 


P. P. Morris, 


100 


Charles S. Wurts, M. D., 


100 


Dell Noblitt, Jr., . 


100 


John W. Wright, . 


100 


Charles Norris, 


100 


Samuel S. White, 


100 


John S. Newbold, 


100 


Edward N. Wright, 


100 


Mrs. John S. Newbold, 


100 


Dundas Lippincott, 


5° 


Charles Piatt, 


100 


I. E. Wal raven, 


25 


William Pepper, M. D., 


100 


Harriet R. Willing, 


5 


William P. Pepper, 


100 








Collected on the above subs 


criptions, . 





#57,610 


#43785 


1 Ai 


VNUAL MEMBERS. 




Crawford Arnold, . 


$10 


Frank L. Bodine, 


10 


Washington Atlee, M. D., 


10 


Clarence S. Bement, 


10 


W W. Burnell, M. D., 


10 


Bonet & Cross, 


10 


Alfred G. Baker, . 


10 


John E. Baugh, , . , 


10 


Rachel L. Bodley, 


10 


Edwin P. Baugh, 


10 









26 






Daniel Baugh, 




#10 


G. A. Nicolls, 




$10 


August F. Brecht, 




10 


Mrs. Charles Piatt, 




10 


H. G. Batterson, . 




10 


F. B. Potsdamer, . 




10 


Theodore Cuyler, . 




10 


Thomas Ridgway, 




10 


Miss Fannie Clark, 




10 


J. G. Rosengartcn, 




10 


Elihu Chauncey, . 




10 


Craig D. Ritchie, . 




10 


Edward W. Clark, 




10 


Benjamin Rush, 




10 


James M. Earl, 




10 


Mrs. Benjamin Rush, 




10 


W. P. Ellison, 




10 


Miss Elizabeth Rhoads, 




10 


Galloway & Graff, 




10 


G. W. Rexamer, . 




10 


John S. Gerhard, . 




10 


John Sartain, 




10 


Mrs. John S. Gerhard, 




10 


John L. Shoemaker, . 




10 


H. Lenox Hodge, M.D. 


, 


10 


A. Steinmetz, 




10 


George W. Hancock, 




10 


T. Shaw, 




10 


William Hart, 




10 


F. R. Shelton, 




10 


W. W. Keen, M.D., 




10 


Mrs. F. R. Shelton, 




10 


Henry C. Lea, 




10 


Miss Annie Stevenson, 




10 


Anna J. Lea, 




10 


H. C. Townsend, . 




10 


Morton McMichael, 




10 


Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 




10 


J. Ferdinand Madeira, 




10 


William Thomson, M.D 


, 


10 


Miss Lucy W. Merrick, 




10 


Miss Emilie Wagner, 




10 


Mrs. S. V. Merrick, 




10 


Mrs. Tobias Wagner, 




10 


J. E. Mitchell, 




10 










CE 


NTENNIAL STOCK. 






H. P. McKean, 


5°< 


) Shares. 


Sam. R. Shipley, Prest., 


50 Shares. 


A. E. Borie, 


25< 


) " 


Klemm & Bro., 


25 ' 




B. H. Bartol, . 


IOC 


) " 


William S. Grant, 


25 ' 


, 


Fairman Rogers, 


IOC 


) " 


Lewis Jack, 


10 ' 


' 


James L. Claghorn, . 


IOC 


) " 


S. & F. Child, . 


10 ' 


j 


Cornelius & Sons, 


IOC 


) " 


Misses Lewis, . 


10 ' 


' 


Jacob P. Jones, . 


IOC 


> " 


Samuel B. Thomas, . 


10 ' 




Mrs. Clarence H. Clark, 


8( 




William Brockie, 


10 ' 




Isaac Lea, 


5< 


) " 


Samuel R. Shipley, . 


10 ' 




Iungerich & Smith, . 


5< 


) " 


William P. Henszey, 


10 ' 




George Burnham, 


5< 


) " 


Daniel Neall, . 


5 




H. W. Bartol, . 


5< 


) " 


Mrs. Daniel Neall, . 


5 ' 




Charles Wheeler, 


5< 


) " 


George E. Hoffman, . 


5 ' 




Bowen & Fox, . 


5< 


) " 


E. T. Mockridge, < . 


1 ' 




Edward H. Williams, 


5c 


> " 


John S. Henry, . 


1 ' 





27 

Caroline S. Jack, . i Share. Charles F. Berwind, . i Share. 

Mrs. Alexander Henry, I " Mrs. George Vaux, . I " 

Phebe W. Hoffman, . I " William Moss, M.D., i 

Mrs. S. C. Zantzinger, I " 

1880 Shares. 



The Treasurer has collected from the Centennial Board of Finance $4,407.60 
on this Stock.