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Full text of "Annual report, 1879"

-< ►— ♦ — 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Pennsylvania Museum 

AND 

School of Industrial Art. 



1879. 



-\ . PHILADELPHIA. 

1880. 



FOURTH 



$^'^'<f?^ 



ANNUAL REPORT f^ 

INSTIT 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Pennsylvania Museum 



School of Industrial Art. 



1879. 



^\ PHILADELPHIA. 

1880. 






PHILADELPHIA : 

Revieisj Printing House, 

N. W. Cor Fourth and Walnut Sts. 



fcjO 






OFFICERS FOR ISSO. 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM H. MERRICK. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

EDWARD T. STEEL, 
WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 

MANAGING DIRECTOR, 

WILLIAM W. JUSTICE. 

TREASURER, 

FREDERICK R. SHELTON. 

SECRETARY, 

DALTON DORR. 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



HON. HENRY M. HOYT, 

Governor of the State, 

HON. WILLIAM S. STOKLEY, 
Mayor of the City. 

ADAM EVERLY, 

Appointed by the State Senate. 

J. E. MITCHELL, 

Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

PHILIP C. GARRETT, 

Appointed by Select Council. 

EDWARD T. STEEL, 

Appointed by Common Council. 



FAIRMAN ROGERS, 

Appointed by the University of Pennsylvania. 

ISAAC NORRIS, M. D., * 

Appointed by the Franklin Institute. 

JAMES L. CLAGHORN, 

Appointed by the Pennsylvafiia Academy of Fine Arts. 

F. O. HORSTMANN, 

Appointed by the Fhilad^a School of Design for Women. 



Appointed by the Board of State Centennial Supervisors. 
Appointed by the Commissioners of Fair?nount Park. 

TRUSTEES ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS: 

To serve for fve years. 
GEORGE W. CHILDS, THOMAS DOLAN, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. SAMUEL Vn^AGNER, Jr., 

To serve for four years. 
HENRY C. GIBSON, THOMAS COCHRAN, 

WILLIAM H. MERRICK, N. PARKER SHORTRIDGE. 

To serve for three years. 
W. W. JUSTICE, JOHN R. BAKER, 

WAYNE MacVEAGH, F. R. SHELTON. 

To serve for t7vo years. 
FREDERIC GRAFF, WILLIAM PEPPER, M. D., 

COLEMAN SELLERS, JAMES HUNTER. 

To serve for one year. 
WILLIAM BIGLER, CHAPMAN BIDDLE. 



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in 2011 with funding from 

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f INSTITUTE. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



This Report is for the fiscal year ending November 30, 
1879. 

Circumstances having delayed the publication of the last 
Annual Report until April, your Trustees determined to in- 
clude therein the transactions of the Corporation from the 
close of the fiscal year to that time. In the present Report, 
therefore, only such reference is made to those events as is 
necessary to make this a complete record of the year. 

THE MUSEUM. 

With the close of the Loan Exhibition in November, 1878, 
and the consequent withdrawal of many of the objects con- 
tributed thereto, the opportunity was afforded of perfecting the 
arrangement and classification of the Museum Collections. A 
Curator was appointed, February i , to accomplish this work. 
During the year the collections have been arranged in a man- 
ner that will admit of the development of each department of 
the Museum without any material change in the general plan. 
While doing this, a registration of all the objects owned by, or 
deposited on loan with the Museum, was begun, preliminary 
to making an inventory and catalogue of the same. Also a 
form of receipt for objects received on loan, defining the re- 
sponsibility of the Museum for their safe keeping, was pre- 
pared as a substitute for the receipts formerly given. 

In response to the invitation by your Trustees to the 
Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia to de- 
posit a collection of coins and medals that would show artistic 
merit, mentioned in the last Report, that Society has made a 



valuable contribution, consisting of selections from its own 
collections, and from those of the American Philosophical 
Society, and of the Library Company of Philadelphia. The 
Society has also obtained contributions from individual col- 
lectors, notably a complete set of Papal Medals from the 
pontificate of Pope Martin V, 141 5, to that of Pope Pius IX, 
1872, inclusive, whicn deserves particular mention on account 
of the fine workmanship of each piece, and the historic interest 
of the series as a whole. 

The collection of American Antiquities, chiefly relics of the 
Mound Builders, deposited by Dr. M. W. Dickeson, has been 
rearranged in the North Vestibule of the Hall. During the 
year this collection has been greatly enlarged, and now fills all 
the space allotted to it. Aside from the archaeological im- 
portance of the objects, they are valuable as illustrating the 
development of the art instinct in a primitive people. 

The most important event of the year, in connection with 
the Museum, was the reception and installation of the collection 
of minerals and metallurgy belonging to the American Insti- 
tute of Mining Engineers, in accordance with the terms of the 
lease of the same to this Corporation for a term of ninety-nine 
years, as related in the last Report. This noble collection was 
formally transferred to your Trustees on March 26th. The 
arrangement of the specimens in the portion of the building 
assigned for their reception was made under the personal 
supervision of Mr. C. A. Young, of the Institute of Mining 
Engineers. On May 31st the collection was opened to the 
public. Its several departments occupy nearly the whole east- 
ern half of the Hall, and furnish to the student of the indus- 
tries represented facilities for study, which, when they be- 
come generally known, must add materially to the reputa- 
tion and usefulness of the Museum. 

Among the other additions to the collections made during 
the year, are the articles bought at the Paris Exposition, speci- 
fied in the last Report ; three specimens of enamelled glass, 



INSTITUTE 




by Brocart, and six pieces of pottery, by Deck, purchased 
from the collection lent to the Museum by Messrs. Londos 
& Co., of London, at the solicitation of Sir Philip Cunliffe 
Owen, C. B., K. C. M. G. The loans to the Museum include 
some interesting fragments of Aztec jewelry, deposited by the 
American Philosophical Society, and numerous examples of 
artistic workmanship in various branches of industry, de- 
posited by individuals. 

Your Trustees are gratified to report that the practice of 
depositing in the Museum art objects on loan for a stated 
period is becoming more general ; and your attention is asked 
to this method of from time to time augmenting the collec- 
tions and thus increasing the interest of the public in the 
Institution, as one that is eminently desirable and ea.sy of 
accomplishment. There are in this city numerous private 
collections of glass, china, lace, metal-work, and objects of 
that character, which, if they were displayed in Memorial 
Hall, in whole or in part, would be highly appreciated by the 
community. And many persons leaving the city for the sum- 
mer, or going abroad for a longer season, store away valuable 
art objects that might with equal or greater safety be placed 
on view in the Hall for the benefit and enjoyment of others. 

It should be remembered that this Museum, while it de- 
pends for support upon that portion of the community who 
are able to visit similar institutions elsewhere, exists for the 
benefit, chiefly, of that vast majority of our citizens, the arti- 
zans and mechanics, for whom it is the only resort of the kind 
accessible. Nor should it be forgotten that the acquaintance 
with what is beautiful in the arts, with Avhat trained working- 
men are accomplishing elsewhere, will stimulate and aid the 
working people of a communit}' in the development of home 
industries, as no other influence will. A noteworthy instance of 
this kind happened at the Hall during the year. A blacksmith 
from Phoenixville, visiting the Museum, was interested in the 
examples of foreign wrought-iron work that he saw there. He 



came again, this time bringing his brother with him, and the 
two men made studies of the several examples on exhibition. 
When they returned home, these self-taught artizans, with 
much patient labor, having to fashion the necessary tools as 
their work progressed, wrought in iron a number of pieces 
similar to, or suggested by those they had seen in the Mu- 
seum. Subsequently, examples were lent them to copy, and 
the replicas which they made were afterwards exhibited here 
and in Chicago and Cincinnati, where they attracted much 
attention. 

The testimonials presented to General Grant during his 
visit to Great Britain, deposited in the Museum by Mr. G. W. 
Childs, have continued to attract many visitors to the Hall. 
In February they were sent to Pittsburg for display in the 
Library Loan Exhibition there, and in August they were sent 
to Cincinnati, together with a large collection of objects repre- 
sentative of the scope and character of the Museum, as a loan 
contribution to the Art Department of the Industrial Exhibi- 
tion in that city. At the skme time a similar collection was 
sent to the Industrial Exposition in Chicago. The extended 
notices which these collections received in the official cata- 
logues and in the local papers, showed the high appreciation 
with which this effort on the part of your Trustees to advance 
the interest in industrial art education was regarded. 

During the year the Library has received additions in the 
valuable collection of scientific works belonging to the Ameri- 
can Institute of Mining Engineers ; in the arrival of the books 
bought in Paris last year,' and by gifts from the Centennial 
Board of Finance of a complete set of Reports of the Centennial 
Exhibition, and from Mr. F. O. Horstmann of a copy of The 
Silk Goods of America. Purchase was made of The Alhambra^ 
by Owen Jones. L Art pom Tons, and The Aft Intetchange 
were subscribed to for the current year. A slip catalogue of 
all the books, periodicals, maps, engravings, photographs, etc., 
in the Library, has been prepared for reference. 



In furtherance of the policy of extending the usefulness of 
the Museum as widely as possible', your Trustees, in May, 
reduced the price of admission to the Hall on Sundays to fif- 
teen cents. At the same time they adopted a plan, proposed 
by the President of the International Exhibition Company, by 
which visitors from the Exhibition to the Hall are given re- 
turn tickets readmitting them to the Main Building. The 
practice of giving Art students and students in scientific 
schools tickets of admission on application, and of admitting 
the pupils of charitable educational institutions, when accom- 
panied by a teacher, without charge, has been continued 
during the year. This is as liberal an arrangement as the 
financial condition of the corporation admits of at present ; 
although your Trustees are desirous, as soon as means for the 
purpose are provided, to open the Hall free to the public, reserv- 
ing only certain days for the use of students, on which days 
visitors will be charged a small admission fee, as at present. 

The following is a tabulated statement of the visitors to the 
Museum each month during the year : 



December 1878 

January 1879 

February " 

March " 

April " 

*May " 

June " 

July " 

August " 

September " 

October " 

November " 



Total 



3 

a 




21 


42 


8 


45 


13 


23 


21 


66 


40 


114 


63 


152 


32 


60 


21 


41 


55 


34 


83 


51 


40 


56 


23 


32 


420 


7^6 



ft 


1 


8 


424 




379 


6 


354 


160a 


806 


43 


777 


544'^ 


1,580 


29 


696 


137^^ 


695 


82^ 


848 


36 


i,S5S 


25 


830 


17 


688 


,087 


9,632 



% 878s 

79 80 
74 55 
132 10 
145 75 
194 45 
117 10 
107 05 
152 00 
314 8S 
141 65 
128 10 



Admissions on Simdays. 



December 1878 

January 1879 

February 

March 

April 

*May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 



Total.... 2 



II 


, 




100 


16 


2 




60 


3 


8 


.... 


82 


13 


10 


3 


207 


21 


7 


8 


180 


27 


3 


5 


236 


19 


12 


7 


269 


8 


6 


I 


162 


3 


9 


6 


216 


10 


4 


5 


402 


20 


10 


10 


353 


10 


5 


9 


304 


61 


" 


57 


2,57. 



?20 65 

10 so 
17 45 
43 45 
35 25 
35 20 
34 00 
21 70 
29 OS 
55 9° 
46 15 
41 25 



* On Sundays after May i8th, 1879, the admissions for adults was reduced to 15 cents. 

a Including 148 invited to witness transfer of the Collections of the American Institute of Min- 
ing Engineers to the Museum- 

b Including 512 invited to the Closing Exercises of the Schools. 
_ c Including 51 Cadet Engineers U. S. N. and 49 members of the National Education Conven- 
tion. 

d Including 63 Teachers and Pupils Burd Orphan Asylum. 



(12) 



13 




THE SCHOOLS. 

Several changes have been made in the Industrial Art 
School during the year. 

In February, the Art Needlework Department was trans- 
ferred to an organization of ladies, and became a separate 
school. This was done the less unwillingly, because your 
Trustees were assured that the effort they had inaugurated, of 
imparting this desirable instruction to women, would not be 
permitted to languish under the new management. That the 
transfer was a judicious one has been proved by the fact that 
the school is now well established and daily growing in public 
favor. 

Another and a radical change was made at the close of the 
spring term. Up to that time, with the exception of a special 
class of pay pupils, the schools had been free. "When they 
opened again in the fall, the special class was continued 
as before, but a tuition fee of ten dollars in the Day 
school and five dollars in the Night school was charged. 
Seventy-five of the one hundred and thirteen students in 
attendance at the end of the spring term returned as pay 
scholars ; a percentage fully justifying the opinion that the 
payment of a moderate fee would not materially lessen the 
number of pupils. 

During the fall term there have been thirty-three students 
in attendance at the Day school and special class, and sev- 
enty-four in the Night school — a total of one hundred and 
seven. 



14 



The following table shows the trades and occupations rep- 
resented : — 



Boxmakers, 








I 


Bricklayers, 








r 


Cabinetmakers, 








I 


Carmen, . 








I 


Carpenters, 








3 


Clerks, . 








lO 


Designers, 








12 


Engravers, 








9 


Farmers, . 








2 


Glass Cutters, 








I 



Machinists, . 
Plumbers, 
Stone Cutters, 
Students, 
Teachers, 
Upholsterers, 
Warpers, 
Wood Carvers, 

Total, . 



2 
2 

4 

35 
19 

I 

2 

107 



On May 31, the closing exercises of the Spring term were 
held in Memorial Hall, with appropriate ceremonies, an au- 
dience of some five hundred persons being present. On that 
day an exhibition of the drawings made by the students was 
opened, which continued during the summer, and attracted 
much attention from visitors to the Museum. It is proposed 
to have similar exhibitions annually hereafter. 

During the month of June, the special class met twice a 
week in the Hall for instruction. At this time the adapt- 
ability of the Hall for school as well as for Museum purposes 
was abundantly proved. 

In the spring, it became evident to the Trustees that, in 
consequence of the uses to which a building recently erected 
in the immediate vicinity of the school was put, they would be 
compelled shortly to abandon the location. Pending the con- 
sideration of this subject, an invitation was received from the 
Board of Managers of the Franklin Institute, inviting this cor- 
poration to remove its schools to the Institute building. No. 15 
South Seventh street. The Board offered the use of their school 
rooms rent free, and engaged to make the alterations neces- 
sary for the accommodation of the scholars. This generous 
offer was accepted by your Trustees, and at the close of the 
spring term the lease of No. 312 North Broad street was given 
up, and the school furniture removed to the Franklin Institute. 
The fall term opened September 29, in the latter building, 



15 

since which time the school rooms have been open daily for 
the use of the scholars. Other generous acts on the part of 
the Board of Managers of the Franklin Institute were, placing 
one of the reading-rooms at the disposal of your Trustees for 
use as an office, and extending to the students the privilege of 
free admission to the library and lectures of the Institute. 

The course of instruction arranged at the formation of the 
schools has not been changed, and the same efficient instruct- 
ors employed in the beginning continue in charge of the 
classes. One of the advanced scholars has been given charge 
of the Junior class in Geometry. 

Arrangements have been made with Professor Rothrock and 
Dr. Keen to continue their courses of lectures, which were at- 
tended with such excellent results- last year. At the request 
of the last named gentleman, both the Academy of the Fine 
Arts and the Academy of the Natural Sciences kindly placed 
at his disposal whatever material in the collections he required 
in illustration of his lectures before the schools. 



During the year the Corporation has lost, by the death of 
Mr. G. Dawson Coleman and Mr. J. B. Knight, the advice and 
assistance of two of its most valued members. The last named 
gentleman was the representative of the Franklin Institute in 
your Board of Trustees, and as such took an active part in all 
measures for promoting the usefulness of the Museum and 
Schools. 

The Corporation now has 37 Contributing, 150 Life Mem- 
bers and 129 Annual Members. Ten Life Members and 105 
Annual Members have been received during the year. These 
additions to the membership, although satisfactory as showing 
an increasing interest in the work of the Corporation, still 
leave the total far short of what it should be. This is especially 
the case with the list of Annual Members, which, in the opinion 
of your Trustees, can, with a little effort on the part of the 
friends of the Corporation, be greatly extended. An annual 



i6 

income of five thousand dollars ought to be secured from 
this source alone. This would allow of the subscriptions of 
Contributing and Life Members being placed to the credit of 
•the Endowment Fund, which is now in contemplation. For 
this fund it is proposed to raise one hundred thousand dol- 
lars, the interest on which sum, with the annual subscriptions, 
it is thought, will be sufficient to provide for the necessary- 
expenses of the Museums and- Schools. Your Trustees feel 
that this effort should be successful, as in the four years of its 
existence the Corporation has proved its usefulness to the 
community. Its Museum stands foremost in the country, and 
its Industrial Art School, already well organized, is doing a 
most important educational work. 




f^ K"^ ow oil 






I I ' I I I I I 



->^ 91 

^3 I'ili 



I I I fl 1 I 







SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT. 




January, 1880. 

The pressing need of a systematic course of instruction in 
drawing in the pubhc schools of Philadelphia has long been 
apparent to all who have studied our public school system. 
It has been the chief difficulty your Trustees have had to 
encounter in their endeavor to carry out the scheme of in- 
struction proposed when the School of Industrial Art was es- 
tablished, because, although most of the applicants for admis- 
sion to the school belong to the mechanic or artizan classes, 
and have been, at one time or another, pupils of the public 
schools, nine-tenths of them have no knowledge whatever 
of drawing, and but a vague idea of its application in the 
industrial arts. Under these circumstances, the educational 
work of the Institution has, so far, necessarily been of the 
most elementary character, and not at all what it was intended 
it should be. With the view to determine just what was 
needed to remedy this defect, your Trustees recently inspected 
che public schools. They found that the Manual of Instruc- 
tion contained a carefully prepared graded course in drawing, 
well adapted to the wants of the scholars ; but when they came 
to observe the manner in which drawing was taught, they 
found that, in the majority of instances, no systematic instruc- 
tion was given, because the teachers themselves knew little or 
nothing of what they were called upon to teach. Neverthe- 
less, it was gratifying to observe how keenly alive the teachers 
were to their deficiencies in this respect. It was learned that 
some of them had organized drawing classes among them- 



i8 

selves, and that others had availed themselves of the opportu- 
nities to study drawing under the instructors employed by 
publishers, when the latter had a new system of drawing 
books to introduce into the public schools. The teachers real- 
ized, however, that such instruction, although often good, could 
not be thorough or lasting, and that what they needed was an 
established permanent school where instruction adapted to the 
requirements of the Manual to teach drawing in the pri- 
mary, secondary and grammar schools, could be had at all 
seasons of the school year and during the hours they were 
not occupied in school work. 

Having proceeded thus far, your Trustees invited the 
Teachers' Institute to appoint a committee to confer with your 
Committee on Instruction, to devise, if possible, some plan by 
which this instruction could be given to the teachers. The 
committee was appointed and a meeting held, at which the 
Teachers' Committee proposed that the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art undertake this work, and ex- 
pressed the belief that if this was done the Institute would 
give the movement their hearty co-operation and support. 

The general features of the plan submitted are : — 

1. The establishment of free scholarships for a certain number of graduates of 
the senior classes in the public schools, to be determined annually by competitive 
examination during the last weel< in June. 

2. The adoption of a course of instruction for teachers in each of the following 
departments of drawing : — 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Design. 

(b) Model and Object Drawing. 

(c) Geometrical and Perspective Drawing. 

(d) A Supplemental or Advanced Course. 

3. The division of the course of instruction in each department into four sec- 
tions or grades, commencing each section in February and September of each year, 
and completing the course for each department in two years. 

4. Such action on the part of your Board of Trustees as will provide for every 
teacher in the public schools a course of instruction, free of charge, in at least one 
of the departments organized, to which every teacher can have access at any time 
and at every stage of advancement in the course, provided such teacher possess 
requisite qualifications or proficiency to pursue the course as specified. 

5. The granting of certificates of proficiency to teachers who shall pass satis- 
factory examination in the course specified for the department in Freehand 
Drawing and Design and either of the other two departments. 



19 

6. Provision for the appointment or election as members of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art of one or more 
members of the Board of Education, and of one or more principals of grammar 
schools from among the five receiving the highest number of votes of the Teachers' 
Insiitute. 

There can be no doubt from the above statement of facts, 
that the teachers, as a body, are anxious to teach drawing in 
the pubhc schools as it should be taught, and that all that is 
wanting to bring this about is to give the teachers the requi- 
site instruction. The Committee from the Teachers' Institute 
ask this Institution to supply this want. It is a task of mag- 
nitude and involves great responsibilities, yet your Trustees are 
of the opinion that it should be undertaken. 

No properly organized effort has been made to have the 
study of drawing given its proper place and attention in our 
public school system, and if the plan proposed above shall 
bring this about, the results will be such that the community 
can hardly fail to give it all the aid and encouragement in 
th ir power. 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 



November joth, iSyS, to November 2 gth, i8yg. 



Dr. 

To balance on hand November 30, 1878, . 
Temporary Loans, 
Life Members, 
Donations, 
Interest, . 
Needlework Classes, 
Maintenance of Schools; Donations tuition, etc.. 
Exhibition at Memorial Hall, 

Mining Engineers; Installing ' .ection at Memorial Ha 
Annual Members, 
Gaurantee Fund of Trustees, .... 

Transferred to Credit of Profit and Loss, 



J162 80 
1,960 82 
4.927 50 
1,666 35 
1,150 00 
1,300 00 
250 00 



^1,159 81 

500 00 

900 00 

5,036 20 



^11.417 37 
^19,013 38 



Cr. 

By Warrants paid for : 
Interest, . 
Office Expenses, 
Salaries, . 

Freight and Expre; ^ Charges, 
Printing, . 
Advertising, 

Commissions on Collections, 
Custom House Charges, 
Needlework Classes, 
Maintenance ot Schools, 
Exhibition at Memorial Hall, 
Mming Engineers' Collection, 

Transferred to Debit of Profit and Loss, 
Additions to Museum and other Permanent Investments, 
Payments on Account of Temporary Loans, . 
Maintenance and Repair of Memorial Hall, . 
Balance on hand November 29, 1879, . 





?io7 50 




173 49 




1,423 09 




381 54 




356 74 




45 2° 




179 00 




173 68 




2,076 64 




3,002 46 




142 19 




1,041 30 


. ^9,102 83 




425 76 




3,500 00 




5,475 08 




509 71 




$19,013 38 






M \o o o 



o « O Tt- 






O, <; 



i-5 

75 fe 



3 w cj S J hJ ^ 



G O 



t/3 «" 

C a! ^ 

ii "S > 

o 'n i5 

PL, d, O 



23 



LIST OF MEMBERS 

Of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, 
November 30, 1879. 




CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS, 

Who have paid at one time tivo hundred dollars or upwards. 



Baird, John 




Jones, Jacob P. 


Bartol, B. H. 




Lea, Henry C. 


Barton, Mrs. S. R. 




Massey, William 


Borie, A. E. 




Miles, Thomas 


Borie, C. & H. 




McKean, H. P. 


Brown, Alexander 




Pepper, William Piatt 


Burnham, Parry, Williams, 


&Co. 


Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 


Childs, George W. 




Rogers, Fairman 


Clark, Mrs. M. D. M. 




Santee, Charles 


Cornelius & Sons 




Scott, Thomas A. 


Dolan, Thomas 




Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 


Drexel, A. J. 




Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 


Drexel, F. A. 




Temple, Joseph E. 


Garrett, Walter 




Wagner, Mrs. T. 


Garrett, W. E., Jr. 




Weightman, William 


Gibson, Henry C. 




Welsh, Samuel 


Gibson, Miss R. 




Wharton, Joseph 


Harrison, Havemeyer & Co 




Whitney, A., & Sons. 


Horstmann, F. 0. 








LIFE 


MEMBERS, 


Who have paid at one time one himdred dollars. 


Allen, Joseph 




James, John 0. 


Allen, Joseph, Jr. 




Jayne, D., & Sons. 


Baeder, Adamson, & Co. 




Jones, Washington 





24 


Baily, Joel J. 


Justice, Bateman & Co. 


Baker, John R. 


Justice, Miss Cecilia 


Baker, W. S. 


Justice, Miss E. B. 


Barclay, R. D. 


Justice, Miss M. C. 


Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 


Justice, W. W. 


Bartol, H. W. 


Justice, Mrs. W. W. 


Bickley, H. W. 


Knight, Edward C. 


Bickley, Mrs. H. W. 


Lea, Isaac 


Biddle, Alexander 


Lewis, Edwin M. 


Biddle, Miss A. E. 


Lewis, Henry 


Biddle, Chapman 


Lewis, Richard A. 


Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 


Little, Amos R. 


Biddle Clement 


Lovering, Joseph S. 


Biddle Walter L. C. 


Lovering, Joseph 8., Jr. 


Blanchard, Miss A. 


Mac Veagh, Wayne 


Blanchard, Miss H. 


Merrick, J. Vaughan 


Blanchard, Miss M. 


Merrick, William H. 


Bowen & Fox 


Miles, Mrs. M. L. 


Burnham, George i 


Milliken, James 


Button, Conyers 


Morris, P. Pemberton 


Caldwell, J. E. 


Morris, Wistar 


Caldwell, J. E., & Co. 


Murphy, Frank W. 


Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 


McCallum, Crease & Sloane. 


Carter, W. T. 


Newbold, John S. 


Carver, W. Burton 


Newbold, Mrs. John S. 


Cassatt, A. J. 


Noblit, Dell 


Catherwood, H. W. 


Norris, Charles 


Chapman, Joseph 


Orne, J. T. & E. B. 


Chew, Samuel 


Page, Joseph F. 


Claghorn, James L. 


Patterson, Joseph 


Claghorn, J. Raymond 


Pepper, George S. 


Clark, Clarence H. 


Pepper, Lawrence S. 


Clark, Ephraim 


Pepper, William, M. D. 


Clavk, J. Hinckley 


Phillips, Moro 


Clayton, John 


Piatt, Charles 


Clyde, Thomas 


Poultney, Charles W. 


Coates, Benjamin 


Porter & Coates. 


Coates, Edward H. 


Provident Trust Company. 


Cochran, Thomas 


Randolph Evan 


Coles, Miss Mary 


Roberts, Jacob, M. D. 


Collins, H. H. 


Rogers, C. H. 


Cooper, John H. 


Rogers, W. D. 


Cope, Caleb 


Scott, James P. 


Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 


Scott, Mrs. James P. 



25 




Dick, F. A. 


Scull, D., Jr., cScBro. 


Dis>-ton, Albeit H. 


Seibert, Henry 


Dission, H ami lion 


Sellers, Coleman 


Dobbins, R. J. 


SRarpless, Charles S. 


Dobson, John & James 


Shelton, F. R. 


Dolan, Thomas, & Co. 


Sherman, Roger 


Duhring, Mrs. Henry 


Shortridge, N. Parker 


Eddystone Manufacturing Company. 


Smyth, Lindley 


Fennimore, Edward L. 


Smith Thomas 


Fuguet, Stephen 0. 


Solms, S. J. 


Garrett, Miss E. 


Sommerville, Maxwell 


Garrett, Miss J. 


Spencer, Charles 


Garrett, P. C. 


Steel, E. T. 


Garrett, Mrs. W. 


Steel, E. T., & Co. 


Gowen, Franklin B. 


Strawbridge J. C. 


Graff, Frederic 


Sweatman, V. C. 


Grafif, Mrs. Frederic 


Thomas, S. Harvey 


Green, Stephen 


Tyler, George F. 


Hagstoy & Thorpe 


Vaux, William S. 


Harrison, Thomas S. 


Volmer, G. 


Hart, Samuel 


Warner, Redwood F. 


Heberton, G. Craig 


Wheeler, Charles 


Hill, George W. 


Williams, Edward H. 


Horstmann, W. H., & Sons. 


Wood, William, & Co. 


Houston, H. H. 


Wright, Edward N. 


Houston, Mrs. H. H. 


Wright, James A. 


Hunter, James & John • 


Wright, John W. 


lungerich & Smith 


Wurtz, Charles Stuart 


ANNUAL MEMBERS, 


Who have paid ten 


dollars for iS'jg. , 


Allison, J. W. 


Jones, Jacob P. 


Allison, T. E. 


Johnson, Lawrence 


Allison, W. C. 


Justice, Henry 


Baeder, C. B. 


Justice, Theodore 


Bailey, Banks, & Biddle. 


Keen, Charles B. 


Baker, Alfred G. 


Keen, William W., M. D. 


Banes, C. H. 


Laing, Henry M. 


Bates, Joseph W. 


Lennig, Charles 


Bateman, James 


Lewis, A. Nelson 





26 


1 


Batterson, Rev. H. G. 


Lewis, Edward 




Baugh, Edwin P. 


Lewis, Enoch 




Baugh, John P. 


Lewis, Francis W., M. D. 




Bement, C. S. 


Lewis, John T. 




Biddle, Cadwalader 


Lewis, Robert M. 




Bines, S. M. 


Long, James 




Black, Wm. K. 


Lucas, John 




Blabon, G. W. 


Mackellar, Thomas 




Blynn, H. 


Magee, Horace 




Bodine, F. L. 


Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 




Boulton, W. G. 


Mitchell, J. E. 




Bowen, Ezra 


Morris, Evan 




Bower, Henry 


Morris, Miss E. T. 




Brown, Alexander 


Morris, Israel 




Browne, John C. 


Morris, John T. 




Burnham, George 


Morris, P. Pemberton 




Butcher, Henry C. 


Morris, Wistar 




Caldwell, J. E., & Co. 


Muhr's, H., Sons. 




Chapman, Joseph 


McGeorge, William 




Claghorn, C. E. 


Neall, Daniel 




Clarke, Edward S. 


Neall, Frank L. 




Clark, E. W. 


Newhall, George M. 




Clark, Miss Fannie 


Norris, Isaac, Jr., M. D. 




Clarkson, vSamuel 


Pabst, Daniel 




Coates, Edward H. 


Price, J. Sergeant 




Collins, Frederick 


Queen, James W., & Co. 




Comegys, B. B. 


Rehn, W. L. 




Conover, David F. 


Rexsamer, George W. 




Corlies, S. Fisher 


Rhoads, Joseph R. 




Coxe, Alexander B. 


Ritchie, Craig D. 




Coxe, Eckley B. 


Rollins, Edward A. 




Cramp, C. H. 


Rosengarten, J. G. 




Cresswell, Samuel J. 


Rowland, Mrs. Benja.min 




Cummins, D. B. 


Shipley, Samuel R. 




Derbyshire, A. J. 


Shoemaker, B. H. 




Dickson, Samuel 


Shoemaker, Robert, Jr. 




Dougherty, James 


" Smedley, Samuel L. 




Downing, R. W. 


Steel, William G. 




Dreka, Louis 


Stevenson, Miss A. 




Earle, James M. 


Stokes, S. E., Jr. 




Ellison, W. P. 


Stotesbury, Thomas P. 




Felton, S. M. 


Strawbridge, J. C. 




Galvin, T. P. 


Thackara, Benjamin 




Gillender & Sons 


Townsend, H. C. 





Gutekunst, F. 
Hamilton, W. C, 
Hance Bro's & White 
Hand, James C. 
Hand, Thomas C. 
Harding George 
Hart, William R. 
Hippie, Frank K. 
Hodge, H. Lenox, M. 1). 
Hoopes, Edward 
Howson, Henry 
Jenks, William H. 



27 



Townsend, J. B. 
Tyler, George F. 
Wagner, Samuel 
Watson, J. V. 
Wheeler, Charles 
Willcox, Mark 
Willing, Charles 
Wilson, Joseph M. 
Winsor, Henry 
Wyelh, John, & Brother 
Zantzinger, Mrs. S. C. 




INSTITUTE i 



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