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Full text of "Annual report, 1880"

FIFTH 



j^I<riTTJJLL E/EJFOE.T 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




Pennsylvania Museum 



School of Industrial Art. 



1880. 




PHILADELPHIA. 



1881. 




MH^a^iEani 



FIFTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Pennsylvania Museum 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



1880. 



PHILADELPHIA. 
1881. 



^^ 



\ ' £ 



OFFICERS FOR 1881. 



PRESIDENT, . 

WILLIAM H. MERRICK. 



EDWARD T. 8TEBL, 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

WILLIAM PLATT PKPPKK 



TRKASUREK, 

FREDERICK R. SHELTON. 



SECRETARY, 

DAIvTON DORR. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



The Oovernor of the State. 



The Mayor of the City. 



ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS 

To xervc for five years. 
Thomas Hockley, Chari.es M. Lea, 

Richard A. Lewis, Edwin Greble. 

To seri'e for four years. 
George W. Chii.ds, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, Samuel Wagner, .Ik. 

To serve for three years. 
Henry C. Gibson, Thomas Cochran, 

William H. Merrick, N. Parker Shortriix;!:. 

To serve for hro years. 
W. W. Justice, John R. Baker, 

Wayne MacVeagh, F. R. Shelton. 

To serve for one year. 
Frederic Graff, William Peppeh, jVr. D., 

Coleman Sellers, James Hunter. 



Adam Evkrly, Appointed by the State Senate. 
.1. E. Mitchell, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 
Philip C. Garrett, Appointed by Select Council. 
Edward T. Steel, Appointed by Common Council. 
Fairman Rogers, Appointed by the University of Pennsylvania. 
Isaac Norris, M. D., Appointed by the Franklin Institute. 
.Tames L. Claghorn, Appointed by the Penna. Academy of the Fine Art^s. 
F. O. Horstmann, Appointed by the PhUad'a School of Design for Women. 
Henry M. Phillips, Appointed by the Commi.ssioners of Fairmnunt P((rk. 

(3) 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport188000penn 



THE REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES, 

For the Fiscal Year ending November 30th, 1880. 



During the period included in this report — the fifth year of 
the Museum and the third year of the School — progress has 
been made toward effecting the purpose for which the corpora- 
tion was formed. This purpose, as stated in the charter, "is to 
establish for the State of Pennsylvania, in the City of Philadel- 
phia, a Museum of Art, in all its branches and technical appli- 
cation, and with a special view to the development of the Art 
Industries of the State, to provide instruction in Drawing, 
Painting, Modelling, Designing, et cetera, through practical 
schools, special libraries, lectures and otherwise. The Institu- 
tion to be similar in its general features to the South Kensington 
Museum of London." The progress made may be briefly sum- 
marized as follows : The Museum collections have been added to 
and further arranged, and the School has been, removed to more 
convenient quarters (1 709 Chestnut Street), and placed in charge 
of an experienced teacher as principal. 

At the time the change in the location and discipline of the 
School was under discussion, the question was raised of the de- 
sirability of endeavoring to unite the two departments of the 
institution — the Museum and the School — under one roof in the 
central portion of the city. It was conceded that there would 
be numerous advantages in such an arrangement, especially an 
immediate benefit to the School. But your Trustees were agreed, 

(5) 



6 

regarding the institution as designed to become to Pennsylvania and 
Philadelphia what South Kensington is to England and London, 
that the Museum could not be more appropriately or advanta- 
geously placed than in Memorial Hall. Furthermore, the possi- 
bility had to be considered of experience showing that, in so large a 
city as this, better educational results might be had from several 
schools, like the Chestnut Street School, situated in widely-sepa- 
rated districts, than could be obtained from one school centrally 
located. A permanent location with ample accommodation and 
provision for the safety of the collections is necessary for the 
Museum, while for the school or schools accessibility is the chief 
requisite. Both of these are had by the present arrangement. 

In the spring, Park workmen began the much-needed repairs 
to Memorial Hall, under an appropriation from Councils for that 
purpose. The work was continued until the money was ex- 
hausted, but so much remains to be done that another appropria- 
tion will be necessary next year. If, when this is made, a sum 
is added for the maintenance of the Hall, the institution will be 
relieved of a burden of expense that has seriously hindered its 
progress and you will be enabled to open the Museum free to the 
public* 

Reviewing the history of the corporation from its beginning, 
five years ago, numerous evidences appear to show that the most 
difficult part of the work has been accomplished. The Museum 
has been established and the School begun, and both brought to 
a high degree of excellence, during a period of financial de- 
pression and with the community at large indifferent of their 
success. Now, with returning prosperity, there is awakening 



* Councils passed an appropriation "for the maintenance and repair of 
Memorial Hall, ten thousand (10,000) dollars. Provided that only five thou- 
sand (5,000) dollars of this item shall be expended unless said Hall be thrown 
open to the public." It was so opened, beginning January 1st. 









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an interest in everything pertaining to industrial education — art 
and technical. Museums and art schools are being established 
in the principal cities of the east and west.* Several of the 
great manufacturing interests are establishing special schools for 
their employes. Drawing is beginning to be generally taught 
in the public schools. And all of these influences are so favora- 
ble to the success of an institution of this character that your 
Trustees recommend the present as an opportune time to enlist 
public interest in this institution, believing that it is only neces- 
sary to make its scope and purpose better known throughout the 
city and State to secure hearty co-operation in its support. 

During the year your Board of Trustees has lost by the death 
of Hon. William Bigler and Chapman Biddle, Esquire, two of 
its senior members. Both of these gentlemen were earnest pro- 
moters of the scheme at its inception, and were among those 
named in the charter as Trustees for the first year. 

Following is a statement for the twelve months of the work 
done in the Museum and in the School : 

THE MUSEUM. 

Durino; the fall and winter months much inconvenience was 
experienced from the leaks in the roof and from fragments of 
the decaying zinc ornamentation of the building breaking 
through the glass dome of the rotunda. In stormy weather, the 
employes of the Museum were kept busy using means to pre- 
vent the water from falling on the cases of exhibits. In the 
spring, an appropriaton of $5,000 was made by Councils to the 



* The forthcoming report of the Commissioner of Education for 1879-80 
contains a list of thirty-five institutions of this character, most of them re- 
ceiving State or municipal aid, and several of them liberally endowed by in- 
dividuals. 



Park Commissioners for the repair of the building, and work- 
men were sent, under the direction of the Superintendent of the 
Park, to remove the eagles, the statue of Columbia and other 
decaying ornaments which threatened to fall. Some of the most 
necessary repairs to the roofs and dome were also made, but the 
appropriation was exhausted before the repairs to the dome were 
completed. Sufficient, however, has been done to make the ro- 
tunda available for exhibition purposes, and several new cases 
have been erected there. 

The number of objects on deposit returned to their owners has 
been more than supplied by the new loans received. This plan — 
of receiving art objects on deposit for a certain specified time, can 
be made a very attractive and instructive feature of the Museum, 
if the members will interest themselves in it sufficiently to so- 
licit and contribute loans. Besides the numerous valuable pri- 
vate collections that might be obtained, there are the small 
cabinets and the countless number of single objects here and 
there, from which selections could be made to illustrate periods 
and methods of art workmanship. 

The gifts to General Grant, deposited by Mr. G. W. Childs, 
continue in the custody of the Museum, and prove a never-fail- 
ing attraction to visitors. In September they were sent to 
Chicago, as a loan to the Industrial Exhibition there. Another 
loan from its collections was made by the Museum in February, 
to the Social Art Club. At that time a pair of elaborately orna- 
mented vases of Doulton-ware were exhibited for the first time. 
These vases, selected by Sir Philip Cunliffe Owen, C. B., K. C. 
M. G., were presented to the Museum by four of your Trustees. 

The most important contribution the Museum has received, is 
the collection of objects of industrial art to be donated by Mrs. 
Moore as a memorial of her husband, the late Bloomfield H. 
Moore, Esquire. Upwards of one hundred pieces for this col- 



9 

lection have already been received and others are awaiting deliv- 
ery in the custom-house. One of the suite of north rooms has 
been designated to receive this generous gift, which is always to 
be known as " The Moore Collection of Industrial Art." 

The stained glass window, containing figures symbolizing Art 
and Industry, designed and manufactured as a gift to this insti- 
tution, by W. H. Constable, Esq., of the Cambridge Stained Glass 
Works, England, was received in July. This beautiful example 
of the glass-stainer's art has been placed on the east side of the 
vestibule, opposite the window which was manufactured at the 
above-named works for exhibition at the Centennial. 

The Committee of the American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers, to inspect the collection of mining and metallurgy, made 
their annual visit in December, and expressed themselves well 
satisfied with the arrangement and classification of the specimens. 

There are now on exhibition the following objects belonging 
to the Museum : 

Textiles and embroideries, . . . . . .513 

Lace, ......... 54 

Plaster casts and models, . . . . . .159 

Carving in wood, ivory, cork, etc., .... 71 

Decorated leather work, . . . . . . .11 

Furniture, ........ 7 

Stained glass Avindows, ....... 3 

Metal work, 557 

Enamels, ......... 32 

Pottery and porcelain, 512 

Glass, 96 

Photographs, etchings, drawings, lithographs, etc., . 305 

Lacquer, ......... 36 



Carried forward, ..... 2,356 



10 

Brought forward, ..... 2,356 

Models of vehicles, implements, etc., .... 53 

Illustrative of cameo cutting, ..... 24 

Illustrative of mosaic manufacture, .... 143 

Specimens of the mineral, vegetable and animal products 

of British India, 1,204 



Total, 3,780 

Of these, 2,677 have been catalogued. All are plainly 
labelled. 

In the spring a circular of inquiry was sent to some four 
hundred manufacturers in this city, to ascertain their disposition 
to contribute to an exhibition representative of the local indus- 
trial art of Philadelphia, proposed to be held in Memorial Hall 
during the State fair. But the number of affirmative responses 
was so small that the committee having the subject in charge de- 
cided that it would be unwise for the institution to assume the 
financial risk of the undertaking. Since then, however, per- 
sonal inquiry among manufacturers has shown that the object of 
the proposed exhibition had not been clearly understood, and 
it is probable that another effort would be successful. Certainly, 
one of the chief purposes of a museum of this character is to 
illustrate the progress of local art manufactures as compared 
with foreign production. And if periodical exhibitions of in- 
dustrial art can be given by this institution — as exhibitions of 
fine arts are given by the Academy of the Fine Arts, and of me- 
chanic art by the Franklin Institute — its usefulness to the com- 
munity will be greatly increased. 

The following table shows the admissions to the Hall during 
the year. 



11 





Pay 


mg. 


Tickets. 


■ ^ 

S 

o 


o 
Eh 




Month. 






CO 


CO 

H 

3 


Cash. 


December 1879 

January 1880 

February " 

March " 

April " 

May " 

June " 

July " 

August " 

September '' 

October " 

November.. .. " 


401 
535 

603 
439 
660 
662 
403 
550 
764 
1,451 
777 
384 


19 
29 
23 
22 
25 
31 
29 
29 
37 
44 
31 
11 


25 

53 
68 
48 
72 
62 
33 
52 
56 
125 
35 
19 


5 

4 

10 

3 

3 

14 

13 

17 

10 

9 

3 


1,108* 

25 

15 

3 

8 

322t 

9 

15 

15 

26 

17 

32 


1,558 
646 
719 
515 
768 

1,091 
487 
663 
882 

1,655 
862 
449 


$88 10 
112 15 
121 75 

95 75 
130 80 
135 00 

87 95 

123 50 

■ 163 00 

352 65 

160 55 

82 00 


Total 


7,629 


330 1 648 


93 i 1,595 110,295 


$1,653 20 



SUNDAYS. 





Paying. 


Tickets. 


-as 

£ 
S 


Total. 




Month. 


to 

< 

141 
257 
313 
162 
357 
336 
157 
169 
317 
289 
368 
151 


2? 


s 


3 


Cash. 


December 1879 

January 1880 

February " 

March " 

April " 

May " 

June..., " 

July " 

August " 

September..,. " 

October " 

November .... " 


4 
15 

8 
10 
13 
16 
17 

8 
19 
18 
16 

5 


6 

8 

20 

3 

11 

26 

6 

9 

21 

13 

6 

2 


2 

3 


4 
2 
2 
1 
3 

2 


3 

9 
4 

1 
2 
4 
2 

1 
5 

8 
8 
1 


156 
289 
348 
176 
383 
386 
184 
189 
363 
331 
398 
161 


$21 55 
40 05 
47 75 
25 30 
53 85 
52 00 

25 25 

26 15 
49 45 
57 05 
56 80 
23 15 


Total 


3,017 


149 


131 


19 


48 


3,364 


$478 35 



* Including 1,100 admitted free to view General Grant's gifts, Dec. 17tli. 
f Including 310 admitted free on the occasion of the closing exercises of the 
School, May 22d. 



12 



THE SCHOOL. 

The experience of the two years during which the school had 
been in existence having convinced your Trustees that it was 
doing a good and needed work, and that no effort should be 
spared to increase its usefulness, they have given particular at- 
tention to this branch of the institution. During those two 
years the students had been instructed by two gentlemen — non- 
professional teachers — who had generously given to the work all 
the time and attention that they could spare from their own occupa- 
tions. But early in the fall term of 1879, it was seen that the 
school had progressed so far that the students needed the undi- 
vided attention of a trained instructor as principal. Accord- 
ingly an engagement was made with Mr. L. W. Miller, at that 
time art master of the Normal School of Salem, Mass., and 
instructor of drawing in one of the Boston adult night-schools, 
to take charge of the Museum classes. Mr. Miller moved to 
Philadelphia in the summer to make ready for the re-opening of 
the school in September. A curriculum was prepared provid- 
ing a three years' course of instruction in drawing, painting and 
modelling. It is so arranged that the student, on the completion 
of the first year's work, may choose which of the two studies — 
painting or modelling — he will take during the second year. A 
certificate will be given on the completion of the work of each 
year, and a diploma on the completion of the course. The ses- 
sion began with a diminished number from the last year, but the 
attendance increased so rapidly that before the first month was 
passed the accommodations in the Franklin Institute, which 
were shared with the classes of the latter, proved insufficient for 
both schools. A speedy change of location having thus become 
necessary, the rooms at 1709 Chestnut Street, which the school is 



13 



now occupying, were rented. The removal was made on No- 
vember 8th, and its advantages are ah-eady evident. 

The usual closing exercises of the school year were held in 
the Hall on May 22d. An exhibition of the work of the 
scholars was opened, and speeches were made by the Hon. John 
Welsh, Mr. Charles G. Leland, Mr. C. M. Burns and Dr. A. C. 
Lambdin. The great need for the foundation of a popular sys- 
tem of industrial art education being laid in the public schools 
was ably shown by these speakers, and one pointed out how it 
might be possible, building on this foundation, for the several 
institutions in this city conducting schools of fine, industrial or 
mechanic art, to unite in constructing a scheme of higher educa- 
tion that would fulfill all the requirements of a university of 
the arts. 

Appended is a list of the number of students now in attend- 
ance at the School and their occupations : 



Bricklayer, 

Cabinet makers, 

Carman, 

Carpenters, 

Clerks, 

Designers, 

Engravers, 

Engine turner, 

Lithographers, 

Machinists, . 

Ornamentist, 



Painters, 
Paper-hanger 
Printer, . 
Stone-cutter, 
Students, 
Teachers, . 
Tinsmith, 
TJpliolsterer, 
U. S. Navy, 

Total, 



1 
1 
1 

27 

11 

1 

1 

1 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 

November 30, 1879, to November 30, 1880. 



Dr. 
To balance on hand November 30, 1879, 

Temporary Loans, ..... 

Life Members, ...... 

Donations, ...... 

Interest, ....... 

Maintenance of Schools, (Donations, Tuition, etc.,) 
Annual Members, ..... 

Exhibition at Memorial Hall, 

Transferred to Credit of Profit and Loss, . 



PR. 

By Warrants paid for : 

Office Expenses, . . . • . 

Salaries, . . . . . . 

Freight and Expressage, . . . , 

Printing, ...... 

Advertising, ...... 

Custom-House Expenses, .... 

Maintenance of Art Schools, 

Interest, ....... 

Transferred to Debit of Profit and Loss, 
Additions to Museum and permanent investments. 
Payments on account of Temporary Loans, . 
Maintenance and Repairs of Memorial Hall, 
Balance on hand, November 30, 1880, . 





S509 71 




1,600 00 




900 00 




2,500 CO 


19 95 




. 3,778 50 




1,0G0 00 




. 1,057 45 










$■6,515 90 




$12,025 61 


. 1146 65 




1,370 86 




24 Jl 




208 55 




323 30 




20 15 




. 3,638 22 




9 30 






85,741 14 


1221 19 




. 1,200 00 




4,721 13 




142 15 






$6,284 47 




fl2,025 61 



(14) 



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LIST OF MEMBERS 


Of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, 


November 30, 1880. 


CONTKIBUTING MEMBEES, 


Who have paid at one time tivo hundred dollars or upwards. 


Baird, John Jones, Jacob P. 


Bartol, B. H. Lea, Henry C. 


Barton, Mrs. S. E. Massey, William 


Borie, C. & H. ' Miles, Thomas 


Brown, Alexander McKean, H. P. 


Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. Pepper, William Piatt 


Childs, George W. Phillips, Henry M. 


Clark, Mrs. M. D. M. Ehoads, Miss Elizabeth 


Cornelius & Sons Eogers, Fairman 


Disston & Sons Santee, Charles 


Dolan, Thomas Scott, Thomas A. 


Drexel, A. J. Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 


Drexel, F. A. Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 


Garrett, Walter Temple, Joseph E. 


■ Garrett, W. E., Jr. Wagner, Mrs. T. 


Gibson, Henry C. Weightman, William 


Gibson, Miss E. Welsh, Samuel 


Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. Wharton, Joseph 


Horstmann, F. 0. Whitney, A., & Sons. 


LIFE MEMBEES, 


WIw have paid at one time one hundred dollars. 


Allen, Joseph Bickley, H. W. 


Allen, Joseph, Jr. Bickley, Mrs. H. W. 


Baeder, Adamson & Co. Biddle, Alexander 


Baily, Joel J. Biddle, Miss A. E. 


Baker, John E. Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 


Baker, W. S. Biddle, Clement 


Barclay, E. D. Biddle, Walter L. C. 


Barclay, Mrs. E. D. Blanchard, Miss A. 


Bartol, H. W. Blancliard, Miss H. 


(16) 





1 

17 


Blanchard, Miss M. 


Garrett, Miss J. 


Bowen & Fox 


Garrett, P. C. 


Burnliam, George 


Garrett, Mrs. W. 


Butcher, Henry C. 


Gowen, Franklin B. 


Butclier, Mrs. H. C. 


Graff, Frederic 


Button, Conyers 


Graff, Mrs. Frederic 


Caldwell, J. E. 


Green, Stephen 


Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 


Hagstoy & Thorpe 


Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 


Harrison, A. C. 


Carter, W. T. 


Harrison, Thomas S. 


Carver, W. Burton 


Hart, Samuel 


Cassatt, A. J. 


Heberton, G. Craig 


Catherwood, H. W. 


Hill, George W. 


Chapman, Joseph 


Hockley, Thomas 


Chew, Samuel 


Horstnlann, W. H., & Sons. 


Claghorn, .James L. 


Houston, H. H. 


Claghorn, J. Raymond 


Houston, Mrs. H. H. 


Clark, Clarence H. 


Hughes, John 0. 


Clark, Ephraim • 


Hunter, James & John 


Clark, E. W. 


lungerich & Smith. 


Clark, J. Hinckley 


James, John 0. 


Clayton, John 


Jayne, D., & Sons, 


Clyde, Thomas 


Jones, Washington 


Coates, Benjamin 


Justice, Bateman & Co. 


Coates, Edward H. 


Justice, Miss Cecilia 


Cochran, M. 


Justice, Miss E. B. 


Cochran, Thomas 


Justice, Miss M. C. 


Coffin, Altemus & Co. 


Justice, W. W. 


Coles, Miss Mary 


Justice, Mrs. W. W. 


Collins, H. H. 


Knight, Edward C. 


Cooper, John H. 


Lea, Isaac 


Cope, Caleb 


Lewis, Edwin M. 


Cresson, W. P. 


. Lewis, Henry 


Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 


Lewis, Richard A, 


Dick, F. A. 


Little, Amos R. 


Disston, Albert H. 


Little, Amos R. & Co. 


Disston, Hamilton 


Lovering, Joseph S. 


Dobbins, R. J. 


Lovering, Joseph S., Jr. 


Dobson, John & James 


Mac Veagh, Wayne 


Dolan, Thomas, & Co. 


Merrick, J. Vaughan 


Dougherty, James 


Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 


Dreer, F. J. 


Merrick, William H. 


Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 


Miles, Mrs. M. L. 


Fennimore, Edward L. 


Milliken, James 


Fuguet, Stephen 0. 


Morris, P. Pemberton 


Garrett, Miss E. 


Morris, Wistar 


1 



Murphy, Frank W. 
McCallum, Crease & Sloane. 
Newbold, John S. 
Newbold, Mrs. John S. 
Nobllt, Dell 
Norris, Charles 
Orne, J. F. & E. B. 
Page, Joseph F. 
Patterson, Joseph 
Pepper, George S. 
Pepper, Lawrence S. 
Pepper, William, M. D. 
Phillips, Moro 
Piatt, Charles 
Porter & Coates. 
Poultney, Charles W. 
Provident Trust Company. 
Randolph, Evan 
Randolph & Jenks. 
Roberts, Jacob, M. D. 
Rogers, C H. 
Rogers, W. D. 
Scott, James P. 
Scott, Mrs. James P. 
Scull, D., Jr., & Bro. 
Seibert, Henry 
Sellers, Coleman 
Sharpless, Charles S. 
Shelton, Carlos 



Shelton, F. H. 
Shelton, F. R. 
Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
Sherman, Roger 
Shortridge, JST. Parker 
Smith, Thomas 
Smyth, Lindley 
Solms, S. J. 
Sommerville, Maxwell 
Spencer, Charles 
Steel, E. T. 
Steel, E. T., & Co. 
Strawbridge, J. C. 
Sweatman, V. C. 
Thomas, S. Harvey 
Tyler, George F. 
Vaux, William S. 
Volmer, G. 
Wagner, Samuel 
Warden, W. G. 
Warner, Redwood F. 
Wheeler, Charles 
Whital, Tatem & Co. 
Williams, Edward H. 
Wood, AVilliam, & Co. 
Wright, Edward N. 
Wright, James A. 
Wright, John W. 
Wurtz, Charles Stuart 



ANNUAL MEMBERS, 
' Who have paid ten dollars for 1880. 



Allison, W. C. 
Bailey, Banks & Biddle. 
Baker, Alfred G. 
Banes, C. H. 
Bates, Joseph W. 
Batterson, Rev. H. G. 
Bement, C. S. 
Biddle, Cadwalader 
Bines, S. M. 
Blankenburg, R. 
Blight, Atherton 



Blynn, H. 
Bodine, F. L. 
Bowen, Ezra 
Bower, Henry 
Brown, Alexander 
Bullock, Charles 
Burnham, George 
Caldwell, J. E., & Co. 
Claghorn, C. E. 
Clark, E. W. 
Clark, Miss Fannie 



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19 


Clarke, Edward S. 


Merrick, Miss L. T. 


Clarkson, Samuel 


Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 


Coates, Edward H. 


Mitchell, J. E. • 


Comegys, B. B. 


Mitchell, Wilson 


Corlies, S. Fislier 


Moffly, John W. 


Coxe, Alexander B. 


Morris, Miss L. T. 


Coxe, Eckley B. 


Morris, John T. 


Cramp, C. H. 


Morris, P. Pemberton 


Cummins, D. B. 


Morris, Wistar 


Dickson, Samuel 


McGeorge, William 


Dreka, Louis 


Neall, Daniel 


Earle, James M, 


Neall, Frank L. 


Ellison, W. P. 


Newhall, George M. 


Felton, S. M. 


Pabst, Daniel 


Galloway & Graff 


Price, J. Sergeant 


Garret, P. C. 


Queen, James W., & Co. 


Gillender & Sons 


Eehn, W. L. 


Gntekunst, F. 


Eexsamer, George W. 


Hamilton, W. C. 


Rhoads, Joseph R. 


Hance Bro's & White. 


Ritchie, Craig D. 


Hand, James C. 


Rollins, Edward A. 


Harding, George 


Rosengarten, J. G. 


Hart, William R. 


Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin 


Hippie, Frank K. 


Shelton, Mrs. F. E. 


Hodge, H. Lenox, M. D. 


Shipley, Samuel R. 


Hoopes, Edward 


Smedley, Samuel L. 


Jenks, William H. 


Smith, D. C. W. 


Johnson, Lawrence 


Steel, William G. 


Jones, Jacob P. 


Stevenson, Miss A. 


Keen, Charles B. 


Stokes, 8. E., Jr. 


Keen, John F. 


Strawbridge, J. C. 


Keen, William W., M. D. 


Thackara, Benjamin 


Lennig, Charles 


Townsend, H. C. 


Lewis, A. Nelson 


Townsend, J. B. 


Lewis, Edward 


Wagner, Samuel 


Lewis, Enoch 


Watson, J. V. 


Lewis, Francis W., M. D. 


Wheeler, Charles 


Lewis, John T. 


Willing, Charles 


Lewis, Eobert M. 


Wilson, Joseph M. 


Long, James 


Wood, Mrs. Alan 


Lucas, John 


Wyeth, John, & Brother 


Mackellar, Thomas 


Zantzinger, Mrs. S. C. 


Magee, Horace 




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