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Full text of "Annual report"



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BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
tlBRT^RY 





FORTIETH 



ANNUAL REPOET. 



18 9 1. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 



CITY OF BOSTON 



1891. 



70S*/ 

BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. / 1^ 
1892. ^ 









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ANNUAL REPOKT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CITY OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1891. 



To His Honor Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
have the honor to submit herewith their fortieth annual 
report. 

An ordinance of the city requires that the trustees shall 
annually appoint an examining committee of not less than 
five persons, who, with one of the trustees as chairman, 
shall examine the Library and make to the trustees a report 
upon its condition. 

In obedience to this ordinance, the trustees appointed in 
January, 1891, a committee whose report is submitted here- 
with. 

Mr. Prince, of the trustees, acted as its chairman, but took 
no part in the preparation of the report. 

This committee was constituted so as to fairly represent 
all portions of the community, and it was appointed as early 
as possible in the year in order that the members might have 
ample time and opportunity to examine most thoroughly the 
Library in all its branches and relations. The trustees 
appreciate fully the advantage of such an examination made 
by a disinterested body, which often detects weaknesses 



2 City Documknt No. 28. 

likolv ti) rt^fiipc' tlio iiolifc ot the most careful iuhninistration. 
Tliov have always been ;ireat!y assisted by the suggestions 
and iveoniuiendalions made by the diU'erent examining com- 
mittees. They leel that their thanks and those of the citizens 
at large are (hie to the meml)ers of the pi'esent connnittee for 
the thorough and careful way in which they have performed 
their ditlicult task, and the valual)le time they jjave devoted 
to it. 

The trustees justly feel great satisfaction at the result of 
the committee's examination. They are aware that in the 
administration of so important a trust there must necessarily 
be some things o[)en to a fair criticism. The present report, 
however, tinds that the working of the Library has been 
successful beyond their reasonable hope. The examining 
committee tinds nothing of im})ortance in the condition of the 
Library, which it is its duty to examine, to bring to the 
notice of the trustees as requiring remedy. Its advice in 
regard to future action upon matters which are specially left 
to the discretion of the trustees, while not required by the 
terms of the ordinance under which the committee is ap- 
pointed", will be taken as an evidence of the great interest of 
its members in the welfare of the Librarj^ and will receive 
the careful consideration that the trustees always gladly 
accord to the suggestions of any of their fellow-citizens. 

The trustees deplore the fact that the arduous duties of 
the examining committee did not atibrd the members lei- 
sure or opportunity to point out the deficiencies that must in- 
evitably exist in so large a collection of books, and by their 
advice to assist them to strengthen the Library in depart- 
ments that may be weak. In past years they have received 
great assistance from the reports of examining committees 
made by experts in different subjects : such as those by 
Dr. Harold Williams, of the last year's committee, upon 
medical books; by Mr. John Heard, Jr., of two years 
before, upon the literature of science and technology ; by Dr. 
Horace Howard Furness on the Barton library ; by Mr. 
Thomas Sergeant Perry on French literature ; by Prof. 
William F. Apthorp on music, and by Col. T. W. Higginson 
upon the Parker library. But the trustees recognize how 
difficult it is to examine into so large an institution and to 
ol)tain anything more than a very slight knowledge of its 
workings in the short space of time that the most hard-work- 
ing committee can devote to it in the year at its disposal, 
even if its attention is confined exclusively to the present 
condition and immediate wants of the Library. 

The trustees have always been of the opinion of the commit- 
tee " that it is very desirable that broadsides be placed conspic- 



Library Departmeivt, 3 

uously in the Library, with lists of books in the various arts 
and sciences," and have, therefore, from the foundation of 
the Library to the present, attempted, with more or less 
success, to carry into effect this idea. They agree with the 
committee that a list of books upon the subject of electricity 
as applied to the mechanical arts, could not fail to be of 
interest and service. Some months before the present com- 
mittee was appointed, they began the preparation of such a 
list, which, they are pleased to say, will soon be given to 
the public. 

The new special catalogues of History, biography, and 
travel, and of Historical liction, recommended by the com- 
mittee, have been for a long time in the course of prepara- 
tion, and are now ready for the printer. By a curious 
coincidence, the first portion of the latter catalogue was 
published a short time before the trustees received the com- 
mittee's recommendation. 

The trustees are obliged to the committee for calling to 
their attention the dissatisftiction expressed by the people 
of Koxbury in regard to drawing more than one book at a 
time from the Roxbury branch, which is made up partly of 
books belonging to the city and partly of those belonging to 
the Fellowes Athenaeum. At present the same rules apply 
to that branch that apply to all the branches. The trustees 
will examine the subject carefully, and will correct any in- 
justice that may have been done to the people of Roxbury. 
They regret that the people atfected should not have made 
their dissatisfaction known to them at once. 

The trustees appreciate the kind motive that prompts the 
examining committee to give them all possible "aid in the 
performance of their difficult and complicated task of adapt- 
ing the accommodation of the new building to a great many 
purposes," by submitting to them the report of the sub-com- 
mittee presented by Mr. Browne. Valuable as the report nmy 
be, they are of the oi)inion that it would have been of much 
greater practical use if the sub-committee had conferred with 
them upon the subject before drawing the report. By this 
means the sub-committee would have been able to avoid some 
mistakes as to facts which impair the value of the report, 
and which seem to have misled the whole committee. 

The trustees, recognizing fully the great benefit of the 
patent library for the community, have always made it a 
subject of the most careful attention. In 1889, ]Mr. John 
Heard, Jr., of the examining committee of that year, as 
well as of that of the past year, recommended, in a special 
report, that the patent library be placed in a more con- 
venient room than the one it then occupied on the third floor. 



4 CiTv Document No. 23. 

The trustees;, ufter ciirot'iil considonition ot'this recommenda- 
tion, cleciiled to remove the collection to the room on the tirst 
floor that was then known as the Fine Arts room, and was 
used as a reading-room for women. By this means more 
space and additional conveniences were gained for the use of 
the books. The change has met witli the general and gener- 
ous approval of persons who frequent the room, both by 
reason of its greater accessil)ility and enlarged facilities, 
occupying as it does the only hirge room at the disposal of 
the trustees, and being exceeded in size only by the Bates 
hall and the lower hall. The trustees have given special 
attention to the care of this room, and while the only serious 
complaint that has been received by them is that contained 
in Mr. Browne's report, a great many persons have taken 
pains to express their satisfaction with the arrangement and 
with the attention given to them by the library olficials ; the 
beneficial results of the change are touched upon also in the 
report of the examining committee for 1890. 

These remarks are made in order that the city govern- 
ment may not be misled, as the examining committee ap- 
parently was, by the statements of Mr. Browne, which 
would seem to imply that no proper attention has been paid 
to the convenience of those who use this department, either 
in the present building or in the new building. While the 
trustees recognize the fact that many and great improve- 
ments over the present arrangement can be made when they 
have ample space at their command, they nevertheless de- 
sire to emphasize the fact that, in its present position, the 
patent lil)rary is not neglected, but attbrds great facilities 
for consultation and is of great positive value to the city. No 
further increase in room can be made without depriving the 
women of the only space devoted especially to their accommo- 
dation, and the trustees believe that their claims are entitled 
to as much consideration as those of any other persons. 

The advice in regard to the new building would perhaps 
be of considerable value if it had been founded upon a 
knowledge of such facts as could have been easily ob- 
tained by inquiry of the trustees. It is a mistake to sup- 
pose that the room provided in the new building for the 
patent library is [)ractically no larger than that in the old 
building. The present patent room measures 44 ft. by 27 
and contains about eleven hundred square feet of floor space. 
The main patent room in the new building measures 65 ft. by 
34 and contains about twenty-two hundred square feet. 
Opening from this room is one measuring 40 ft. by 37 ; both 
these rooms are provided with l)road galleries and have a 
connecting room measuring 14 ft. by 40 and amply lighted 



Library Department. 5 

at each end, that can be used for copyinof or other purposes. 
The patent library at present consists of 4,500 volumes ; 
the rooms provided in the new building have an accommoda- 
tion for 70,000 volumes. If it grow beyond this limit, 
rooms above and lielow may be connected with them capa- 
ble of accommodating 1()0^000 volumes, making the whole 
possible expansion of the patent library 230,000 volumes. 

The space which the conmiittee suggests for use as consul- 
tation-rooms and private offices is that which is best adapted 
in the whole building for the public, and the trustees do not 
believe that the citizens would look with favor upon any 
scheme which would devote this valuable space, or indeed 
any space in the building, to private offices for patent law- 
yers. Proper toilet accommodations have 1)een arranged for 
this as well as for all other departments of the Library. 

If the recommendation that experts be consulted in refer- 
ence to the patent department is to be understood as imply- 
ing that expert advice has not been sought and received, the 
committee certainly does a great injustice to the trustees 
who have at all times taken advantage of such expert advice 
as was available. They regret that no inquiry should have 
been made of them touching this matter. In addition to 
such outside advice as is to be had, they have always at 
hand highly-trained library assistants, who are familiar with 
the needs of the department and who are in constant contact 
with those who use it. In discussing all matters connected 
with the new building it should always be borne in mind that 
probably no library on this continent, or, perhaps, in the 
world, has a more highly-trained or efficient staff than that of 
the Boston Public Library. Certainly no persons not fiimiliar 
from long experience with the peculiar needs of this institu- 
tion could on most questions be trusted to give sounder 
advice. 

The recommendation to adopt in the new Bates hall some 
noiseless material instead of marble for the floor is apparently 
based upon the mistaken supposition that access to the desk 
for the delivery of books to borrowers is to be through this 
room. This is by no means the case. The reading-room will 
be used solely by readers, and there will be an entirely 
separate room for the delivery-desk. It may be worthy of 
remark here that a marble floor has lieen used from the begin- 
ning in the large hall of the present building, and, so fi\r as 
is known, there has been no complaint of its "sonority." 

In the judgment of the trustees and of their predecessors, 
who have carefully studied the matter for years past, ample 
accommodations are provided in the new building for the 
readers who are now obliged to use the lower hall. In view 



6 City Document No. 23. 

of the opinion expressed by the committee that this is not 
the case, the trustees have carefully considered this subject 
anew, and their unanimous opinion is that they have made 
no nn'stake. What is now called the "lower hall" in the 
old lil)rary, was established soon after the Lil)rary was 
founded, as a room connected with the main hall of the 
Library where books of a popular character would be more 
easily accessible to the public. For many years there was 
no division of the catalooue of the two rooms, and probably 
there would never have been a division had they not been 
located upon difierent floors. The separation was the result 
of an etlbrt to relieve persons desirini^ books in the lower 
hall from the inconvenience of mounting stairs in order to 
consult the cataloirue which was then in the Bates hall. 

In the new buildino- no such inconvenience will exist ; all 
books in the Library, — which will contain a copy of every 
one now in the lower hall, — will be easily accessible to the 
public. Those who now^ use the lower hall will find ample 
accommodations in the new^ Bates hall, which is designed as 
a general reading-room for the whole people, and not for any 
special class. In other parts of the building there will be 
provided for students desiring to prosecute any particular 
line of research, almost three times as much space as is con- 
tained in the new Bates hall. While it is possible in the new 
building to provide, without alteration of the present plan, 
a room with ample accommodations for the collection in the 
lower hall, with separate and convenient access from the 
street, the trustees do not propose, at present, to set apart 
separate accommodations for that collection. If experience 
show that they are in error, and that the public desire a 
separation of classes, future trustees will be able to provide 
that separation without changing the present arrangement 
of the building. The present trustees, however, are of the 
opinion that the new building is built for the accommodation 
of all the citizens of Boston, without reference to so-called 
"class" or condition; and they are further of the opinion 
that the new Bates hall will not be too good for the users of 
the present lower hall, and that they would be false to 
their trust if they made any regulation which might result 
in an apparent separation of the poorer users of the Library 
from the richer. 

The fears of the examining committee, that there will be 
inadequate room for the delivery of the books, appear to the 
trustees to be without foundation. A room containing 
twenty-one hundred square feet of floor surface has been 
provided, in the most accessible part of the main story, 
solely for the delivery of books. This room is entirely sep- 



Library Department. 7 

arate from the reading-rooms, and no reader will be incom- 
moded by persons applying for books. Outside of ihis 
room five hundred square feet of floor space is reserved 
for the delivery attendants. The delivery-desk is calcu- 
lated to provide for at least four times the present combined 
circulation of the upper and lower halls, and is capable 
of extension to three or four times its present proposed 
length. This subject has been the matter of cai-eful and 
constant consideration by the trustees from the inception 
of the project. 

In regard to the suggestion that the appointment of a 
librarian will relieve the trustees of unusual responsihility, 
they would say, that whether or not a librarian is in charge 
of the building their responsibility remains the same. 
They are given by law the control and management of the 
Library and all its branches, and their responsibility cannot 
be shifted to any other shoulders. 

The wonderful success of the Library has been due to the 
fact that the present trustees and their predecessors in the 
trust have felt the full weight of this responsibility, and 
have at all times refused to delegate any part of it to 
subordinates. 

The trustees have considered the subject of the appoint- 
ment of a librarian with great care. The qualifications for 
a librarian are peculiar, and it is ditficult to find any person 
possessing them. When the trustees are satisfied that 
this position can be filled for the best interests of the 
Library, a librarian or superintendent will be appointed. 

AdMINISTR ATIOX . 

In December, 1889, the present trustees opened Bates 
hall in the evening for the first time, and two months 
later they opened it to the public on Sunday, both for con- 
sultation and for the delivery of books for home use. 

The experiment has. in both cases, proved so eminently 
successful that during the present year they felt justified 
in adopting the same policy at the largest branch lil)rary, 
that at South Boston. If time shows as good relative 
results there as at the central Library, it is hoped that the 
Sunday opening can be extended to the other branches. 

Great benefit to the public has resulted from the increase 
of facilities for the use of the Library, accomplished by the 
removal of the large counter used by the desk attendants, 
and of the little-used desk at the northerly end of Bates 
hall. This change permitted a readjustment of the card- 
catalogue cases, which are now placed in the spaces between 



8 City Dooitoent No. 23. 

the c(^luinns in sik-Ii a manner us to make the alphabet con- 
secutive and at the same time to render the cases easier to 
consult. The space thus trained permitted also the addi- 
tion of many tal)les hy which at least fitty more readers 
are accommodated. The removal of paint from the win- 
dows in the lantern has made the hall more cheerful and has 
greatly reduced the use of artificial liij:ht in the day-time. 

The introduction of electricity has been of great advantage 
in improving both the ventilation and light as well as in pre- 
venting damage to Imoks by the vapors given off by gas. 

In the early part of the present year the apartments used 
by the former janitor became available for the better housing 
of bound newspapers and books ; by this means twenty-five 
hundred square feet of much needed floor space was gained 
for library use. The removal of the newspapers from the 
room between the lower hall and Bates hall floors, and the 
relegating of the work of arranging the periodicals coming 
from the reading-rooms after their first use to the book-de- 
partment, where they are more satisfactorily and expeditiously 
attended to, afforded a commodious place for the duplicate 
books, which for many years had been piled in heaps in a dark 
basement room, where they were rendered practically useless 
for lack of space. These duplicates, amounting to some twelve 
thousand volumes, are now properly shelved, and a list is pre- 
paring by means of which they may be better known and 
disposed of, either by supplying deficiencies in the Library or 
by sale or exchange. 

The large mass of combustible material that was for many 
years permitted to accumulate in the basement has finally 
been removed. The entire fire-extinguishing apparatus, which 
was found utterly unserviceable, has l)een put into good con- 
dition, and an actual test of its efficiency is now made every 
month. These, together with other changes in the arrange- 
ment of the basement, have tended to improve greatly the 
sanitary condition of the building as well as to ensure its 
safety. 

The administration has been in many ways simplified and 
the character of the service rendered more efficient. Great 
and needed improvements have been made to facilitate the 
registration of applicants wishing to become card-holders, and 
to afford relief from some of the formalities, which, although 
once considered indispensable, have been found in practice to 
be unnecessary ; and in general, every effort has been made to 
promote the use of the Library by the people. Long experi- 
ence has shown that the great mass of those who use the 
Library do not abuse the ])rivileges afforded them. The 
trustees have therefore considered it better to reduce to the 



Library Department. 9 

lowest possible limit all obstacles to the freest circulation of 
books, and to run the risk of small and insignificant losses, 
rather than to incommode the public by annoying restrict- 
ions. 

Boxes have been placed in the public halls for the re- 
ception of complaints to the trustees, but the number of 
complaints has of late been noticeably small. The trustees 
desire again to call the attention of the public to these boxes, 
with the assurance that all complaints will be promptly and 
fully considered, and if well-founded, acted upon. 

During the past year very few recommendations for books 
have been received from the public. This is apparently due 
to the fact that, with the increase of the Library, fewer defi- 
ciencies are discovered. 

As the Library has grown in numbers and the hours 
of use have been extended, considerable trouble has been 
occasioned by the misplacement of books. In the [)resent 
building no satisfactory remedy can be applied to this evil, 
but it is believed that with the improved organization which 
is contemplated in the new building, it will practically cease 
to exist. 

The change of the limit of age for users of the Library 
from fourteen to twelve years has had the effect of extending 
the usefulness of the institution, as has also the rule whereby 
inhabitants of the city who are entitled to register are per- 
mitted to borrow books for home use without presenting a 
card upon depositing the value thereof. The Library priv- 
ileges have been extended to officers and enlisted men of the 
United States Army and Navy who may for the time being 
be stationed in Boston or vicinity. 

During the past year two janitors nave performed satis- 
factorily'all the work formerly done by three. The letting 
of the miscellaneous carpentering, etc., l3y contract to one per- 
son, instead of making use of the expensive and unsatisfactory 
method of employing outside mechanics, has saved time and 
money, and fixed the responsibility for the proper perform- 
ance of the many and varied petty pieces of work that are 
constantly needed in and about the central and branch build- 
ings. 

The revision of the registration begun in 1886, which was 
the first in eighteen years, is practically completed and all 
the re-registrations tnade, so that the figures for the past year, 
amounting to 11,502, represent new applicants for cards. 
This number compares favorably with those of the years pre- 
ceding the revision. 

This revision has corrected many abuses and cut off ex- 
crescences and dead wood. It has show^i that numbers of 



10 City Document No. 23. 

people were holdinjij more cards than they were entitled to. 
In one case, which is the type of a irreat many, a person was 
discovered who had rcfjistered Hve separate times and who 
was usino- the live cards thus obtained, — a course manifestly 
calculated to help the circulation, but hardly consistent with 
a due repird for the rights of others. The principle of the 
system used in the examination of the shelves is applied to 
the revision of the registration, so that it goes on continuously 
and is comi)leted in each period of twelve months. By this 
means the great inconvenience to the public by a re-registra- 
tion will in the future be avoided. Abuses such as those 
referred to above are now impossible, and a glance shows 
whether a registration is alive or dead, whereas under the 
old system this could be determined only by a constant 
surveillance of a suspected case, the only clue in any case 
being the surrender of old cards for new ones. 

Binding. 

The question of the binding of books is becoming each 
year more serious. Some time since the trustees effected a 
complete reorganization of the bindery department with a 
view to reducing the cost as well as to improving the quality 
of the work. The result has been so satisfactory that in 
spite of the steady increase of the number of books bound 
and repaired, a saving of some $4,400 a year has been ef- 
fected in salaries alone, and the quality of this binding com- 
pares favorably' with that of former years. A plain, 
serviceable, and uniform style has been adopted for all 
books, while an experiment has been made of binding news- 
papers in cotton duck with a stout loop of the same material 
over the backs by which the heavy volumes can be easily 
handled. 

At the present time a great number of bindings are be- 
coming unserviceable, not so much from rough handling or 
extraordinary wear and tear as from simple disintegration 
caused by age, heat, and noxious gases. In the early days 
of the Library great masses of new books were put upon the 
shelves. The bindings of these books seem to have reached 
the limit of serviceableness almost simultaneously and all 
need attention at once. Within a short time some twenty- 
five hundred of these books have been removed from the 
shelves, and must be bound before they can be used by the 
public. This work must be done in addition to the ordinary 
work of the department. It would be in the interest of 
economjs and of benefit to the public, if means were placed 
at the disposal of the trustees, to enable them to have all the 



Library Department. 



n 



books of the class referred to bound as soon as possible. 
As delay will only increase the number of books needing 
rebinding, as well as the difficulties attending it, the trustees 
respectfully urge the necessity of an extra appropriation of 
$6,000 for this purpose. 

Books. 

Toward the end of the year 1890 the trustees consolidated 
the shelf-department with the ordering- and receiving- 
department. 

By this arrangement they were able to dispense with the 
services of three assistants, two of whom had received a 
salary of $1,000 apiece. The head of the new department 
thus formed has charge of the ordering and care of all the 
books in the library. This change has resulted in greater 
efficiency of service, though the increased duties are per- 
formed by a reduced working force. ^ 

An analysis of the work of this department shows that 
the Library has developed with remarkable evenness during 
the last four years, and that no class of books has been 
neglected. 

The system of recording gifts has been changed. By en- 
try in a single book with an alphabetical index, the hitherto 
complicated methods are simplified, and the names of the 
benefactors of the Library are recorded side by side with a 
description of their gifts. 

Great attention has been paid to the method of buying 
books and periodicals both at home and abroad, and the whole 
system has been placed upon a business basis. It is believed 
that a decided saving has l)een made in this direction and 
that the Library buys its books at the lowest possible prices. 

The cumbersome order-sheets and accession lists are no 
longer used, and in their place a compact order-book has been 
substituted, in which are found all data necessary to trace 
the history of each book from the time it was ordered to the 
present. 

The plan of notifying agents by |)Ostal card of the publi- 
cation of books necessary to complete sets in the Library 
has produced a gratifying promptness in the remittance of 
the desired volumes. 





188$ 


1889 


1800 

15,519 
13,518 


18»1 


Books added to Library 

" " Bates ball 


12,916 
9,686 


14,636 
11,736 


21,783 
15,564 



12 City Document No. 23. 

Within a short time the brancli libraries hav^e l)een pro- 
vided with sets of the hitest edition of A))|)l(;t()ii's Cyclopae- 
dia, with the annual volumes to date and complete indexes. 
These libraries have also been fu'-nished with the latest 
reference-books and a larire selection of volumes issued in 
popidar series, such as the " American Commonwealths," 
"American Statesmen," " p]i)ochs of History," "Stories of 
the Nations," Sir John Lubbock's " Hundred Hooks," so far 
as published, and others. These publications have the ad- 
vantagfe of prosentinj^ information upon the topics treated in 
the most convenient form used l)y the ireneral reader. It is 
thouofht that the addition of this class of books will orreatly 
extend the usefulness of the branch libraries. 

The chai'acter of the books purchased during the past year 
has elicited commendation from many visitors who, by virtue 
of their wide range of learning, are regarded as authorities. 
The best fruits of modern thought have been culled from the 
bibliogra[)iiical lists which are daily examined in the Library 
and the carefully prepared selections are submitted for ap- 
proval to the trustees, who give this most important subject 
their closest attention. 

The trustees hope that during the coming year their 
endeavors to procure from the authorities at Washington a set 
of the United States patents, classitled by subjects, will be 
successful. An accession of this character will add greatly 
to the usefulness of the patent department. 

The annual examination of the Library shelves, previous 
to 18(i9, was effected by closing the Library outright for a 
month. The trustees of that year, acting upon the advice 
of Mr. Winsor, then adopted the present system which en- 
tirely obviates any necessity for closing even for a day. 
The examination is prosecuted continuously throughout 
the year by means of the written shelf-lists, so that 
the circuit of the alcoves is made in twelve months. 
This task is rapidly assuming foi-midable proportions. Each 
year's accessions add greatly to the difficulties and the time 
is not far distant when it will require the constant services 
of one competent person. 

The list of gifts that will be found in the appendix shows 
that the friends of the Library are both numerous and liberal. 
The most noteworthy gift is that of 2,463 volumes received 
in March, by bequest of the late Miss Caroline Coddington 
Thayer. These books were the remainder of her valuable 
and remarkable collection of finely illustrated books, port- 
folios of portraits, and memorials of Theodore Parker, the 
greater part of which had been given by her from time to 
time during her life-time and deposited with the books be- 



Library Department. 13 

queathed by her late sister, Miss Eliza Maiy Thayer, in 
1877, the whole forming the Thayer library. 

From His Excellency, Gen. Porfirio Diaz, President of 
the Republic of Mexico, was received the magnificent work 
" Monumentos del arte Mexicano antiguo," in three large 
folio volumes ; and from the family of the late J. IngersoU 
Bovvditch, Esq., four volumes comprising letters to or from 
his father. Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch, ;relating mainly to the 
translation of Laplace's " Mecanique Celeste." 

The trustees avail themselves gladly of this opportunity 
to express their hearty appreciation of the many proofs of 
good will as manifested by these generous gifts, whether 
prompted by a desire to respond to a request or as a spon- 
taneous outcome of a widespread and deep-rooted interest in 
the welfare of this noble institution. 

Branch Libraries. 

Considerable change has been effected during the past 
year in the organization of the branch libraries, some of 
which are referred to under the subjects of "Circulation" 
and "Catalogue." An inspector of the branch libraries has 
been appointed, whose duty it is to keep the trustees in- 
formed of all matters needing attention. 

Arrangements are being made for the establishment of a 
delivery station and reading-room in the West End, as soon 
as a proper room can be hired. A delivery station on Way- 
land street, near the Bird-street station of the New York & 
New England railroad, in Dorchester, has been opened. 

The North End branch has been removed from the ill- 
lighted and unhealthy room in which it had been located for 
eight years, to a room in the second story of lt)6 Hanover 
street, which receives light from that street as well as from 
Salem street. The removal from a ground-floor location has 
proved advantageous by preventing annoyances from mis- 
chievous boys. The change has given great satisfaction to 
the library attendants and to the public. 

Extensive repairs have been made on the Brighton branch, 
which has been put into thorough order. 

Catalogue. 

During the past year 38,343 volumes and parts of vol 
umes have been catalogued, and 93,089 cards have been 
[)rinted, inscribed, and placed in the various catalogues of 
the Library, an increase over the work of last year of 4,252 
vohimes, and 4,482 cards. 

Four numbers of the bulletin have been published. Be- 



14 City Document No. 23. 

siilos tlu; titles of now hooks iidded to the centnil Library, 
these contain the tbUowinii- ndditionul matter: 

The conekision ot" the Bil)Ho<ira[)hy of the official publica- 
tions of the Continental Congress. 

Lists of books on costume and genealogy ; on Sj)anish and 
Portuguese books ; on Rousseau ; and a catalogue of the 
foreign literature in the lower hall. 

A new catalogue of History, biography, and travel has 
been prei)ared for the lower iiall, and will soon go to press. 

A catalogue of books added to the South Boston branch 
library since 1879 has just been published. 

The librarians have been taught at the central Library to 
compile, prepare for the press, and read the proof of the 
finding lists that have proved so successful. 

The trustees in their last report expressed the opinion 
that the branch librarians should be charged with the duty 
of preparing their catalogues. The experience of the past 
year has shown that they can attend to this duty without in- 
terfering with the other work required of them. They are 
also making an effort to improve their card catalogues and 
to render them more helpful to readers. 

Work of consolidating the titles in the catalogues at the 
various branches has begun and will be carried on as rapidly 
as other duties will permit, with a view to printing them at 
some future time. 

Considerable assistance in the cataloguing of books for 
Bates hall has been received from the branch librarians, who 
have been regularly assigned for instruction at the central 
Library. 

The revision of the card catalogue and the substitution of 
printed cards for the written ones and those in obscure type 
is being pushed as rapidly as possible. 

It has been the policy of the trustees to cause new books 
to be catalogued and placed within the reach of the public 
without delay, leaving the older and less important books 
until opportunity offers. 

The following work is in progress : 

1. Catalogue of works on electricity. 

2. Catalogue of works on architecture. 

3. Catalogue of fiction and l)ooks for the young, to sup- 
plement the lower hall catalogue of 1885. 

4. A new and much enlarged edition of the Historical 
fiction catalogue. The first instalment, America to the 
Revolution, will be found in the bulletin for January, 1892. 

5. Catalogue of the French literature in the Bates hall 
collection. 

6. The portraits of Benjamin Franklin. 



Library Department. 



15 



7. The collection of early American books given by Mrs. 
John A. Lewis will be published this year, accompanied by 
a Mather bibliography. 

8. Catalogue of folk-lore literature. 

This department has been partially reorganized with a 
view to economy and eificiency, and the result has been in 
the main satisfactory, as will be seen by the following sum- 
mary of work from 1888 to 1891 : 





1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


Number of persons emploj'ed 

Books catalogued, volumes 


16 
37,028 


16 
32,337 


15 
34,091 


13 
38,343 



Ten numbers of the bulletin have been printed in the 
same period, eight of them in the last two years, containing 
in addition to the titles of new books the conclusion of the 
index to articles on American local history, a catalogue of 
bibliograi)hies of special subjects, the catalogue of the books 
bought at the sale of Mr. Barlow's library, the Columbus 
letter, and other matters already mentioned. 

The Barton catalogue was published in 1888, and the new 
edition of the Hand-book for readers in 1890. Two finding- 
lists have been printed for each branch library and a supple- 
mentary catalogue for East Boston and South Boston. 

The card catalogue is the true point of contact of the 
public with the organization of the Library, and as a matter 
of course, its condition of serviceability and adaptability is 
a source of constant solicitude to the trustees. Notwith- 
standing its many defects and inherent inconsistencies, it is 
probably the best piece of work of its kind available for 
popular use, and for many years it has been accomplishing 
even more than could have at first been safely predicted 
of it. 

But the large volume of new books steadily flowing in 
necessitates an annual increment of cards, until the vast 
size of this catalogue gives rise to a serious problem, which 
must soon be definitely solved. 

Last year about 45,000 of the 93,000 new cards printed 
were added to what must have been, at a safe estimate, over 
a million already in the over-crowded drawers of the public 
card catalogue in Bates hall. 

The serious objection to this immense collection of cards 
is, after all, not merely its size, but the fact that all sense of 
proportion and relative importance is lost. Under the 



16 City Document No. 23. 

heading Astronomy, for instance, .'i large number of impor- 
tant works will be found arranged among a still greater 
number of those of less consequence on the same subject. 
These minor works are of some value and should certainl}^ 
be preserved, but it is evident that, as the catalogue in- 
creases, the difficulty of ditfcrentiating easily between 
authoritative and less valuable works will become greater 
and that a person consulting this subject will in most cases 
— as not unfrequently hai)pens now — become discouraged. 

It is beyond dispute that almost any form of print is a 
relief from this state of things, and several schemes for 
printing have suggested themselves to the trustees, but none 
is at present settled upon ; for the least alteration in so well 
defined a method as must prevail in a large catalogue in- 
volves serious consideration. 

One plan is to print the titles in each drawer as it stands ; 
in this way at least economy of space is gained. Another 
suggestion is to supply the public as rapidly as possible with 
sensible and untechnical finding-lists, and these undoubtedly 
will be issued to some extent, in any event. 

It could be wished, however, that the public might feel 
inclined to avail itself with more readiness of the printed 
methods already at hand for its relief. The bulletins and 
special catalogues will lighten its burdens considerably, 
if it will look into the merits of such aids. 

Any theory of cataloguing is, to a degree, always upon 
trial. It is by no means certain that the so-called dictionary 
system is the best, for the simple reason that the problem of 
indefinite extension has never yet become a menace. The 
experience of other large libraries is not, however, without 
its value ; and it is safe to say that, to a majority of such 
institutions, an author-catalogue, full and scholarly, is the 
basis upon which all other cataloguing efforts must rest. 
The British museum is now printing its author-catalogue by 
letters, its manuscript catalogue-folios having become no. 
longer practicable. 

This perfection of an author-catalogue does not in the 
least interfere with efforts towards expanding the usefulness 
of a subject-catalogue, but it certainly seems to point in the 
direction of a possible separation of these two distinct lines 
of work. The long-held notion that a dictionary system is 
capable of limitless expansion would seem to be no longer 
tenable. The portion devoted to author-titles must be ex- 
tended if an arrangement in a single alphabet is still to 
prevail. If the British museum, with 2,000,000 books, 
finds an author-catalogue practicable, this Library containing 



Library Department. 17 

about 500,000 books cannot afford to be too radical in its 
departures at present from accepted methods. 

The subject-catalogue, however, is a different matter ; be- 
yond a certain limit — which is fast approaching — the 
larger it is, the less useful it becomes. To overcome its 
manifold objections, several methods are under the con- 
sideration of the trustees. They are fully alive to the diflB- 
culties before the public and themselves in this matter, and 
feel that in this separation of the dictionary card-catalogue 
may lie the solution of a disturbing problem. So impressed 
are they with the necessity of affording some relief that they 
propose during the coming year to make the experiment of 
printing class-lists of certain of the larger subjects repre- 
sented in the catalogue and substituting them for the subject- 
reference cards which may then be removed from the cases. 
The alphabetical author-list will of course remain undis- 
turbed. 

Circulation. 

The trustees are much gratified with the result of their 
inspection of the circulation of the past year, although there 
has been a considerable decrease in the number of books lent 
from the lower hall and branch libraries. This decrease is 
attributable entirely to the failure to provide a low grade of 
books of iiction. In all l)ranches except fiction there has 
been a gratifying increase in the circulation. Some years 
since the trustees began to eliminate from the Library all 
books of fiction of an objectionable character. During the 
past year this policy has been aj)plied more rigorously and 
systematically, with the result expected, in view of the 
experience of past years ; but it is believed that the loss in 
circulation will be temporary. At all events, whether tem- 
porary or otherwise, the trustees do not believe that the 
circulation should be increased by supplying weak or im- 
proper hooks or papers to children. 

The Bates hall collection, which is the great storehouse of 
books of real value, has been more used than in any previous 
year in the history of the library.* 

It is believed that if better accommodations could have 
been afforded for readers, the increase would have been even 
more marked. It is gratifying to observe also that the use 

* Bates hall. 

Avei-age circulation for thirteen years preceding 1888 . . . 163,199 

Smallest circulation in same period (1875) 80,737 

Gieatest circulation in same period (1886) 203,473 

Circulation 1888 228,574 

Circulation 1889 214,097 

Circulation 1890 271,459 

Circulation 1891 290,515 



18 City Document No. 23. 

of the various reading-rooms has increased in spite of the 
removal of some })ai)ers which were supposed to be of a 
popuhir character, but wliich exi)erience had shown to be 
ol))ectionable. 

The trustees have always acted upon the principles laid 
down by the founders of the institution, and have endeavored 
to place before readers healthy and attractive current litera- 
ture, as well as the best literature of all time. Sensational 
and highly-colored novels can be easily bought by those who 
desire nothing else, but it is to be hoped that by furnishing 
books by the best authors, in sufficient quantity and without 
cost, a taste for healthy reading may be encouraged. 

It is a matter of regret that so many of the older books 
are out of print and cannot be replaced when worn out, for 
new books do not take the place of the tried and popular 
favorites. 

Of course a most important mission of the Library is to 
furnish books, on literary, scientific, and industrial subjects, 
that would otherwise be out of the reach of students and 
artisans. This whole subject has been thoroughly discussed 
in previous reports both by the trustees and by the ex- 
amining committees, particularly in that of Mr. E. ,1. 
Holmes, in 1888, and of the Rev. Dr. Herrick, in 1889, in 
which the present policy of the trustees is fully explained 
and approved. 

It would be easy at any time greatly to increase the circu- 
lation by a return to the plan adopted in 1877 and continued 
for fourteen months (covering the period of the greatest 
circulation previous to last year), when books were limited 
to seven days with the privilege of renewal at the end of 
that time, whereby a large number of books were in effect 
counted twice ; or it could be inflated almost without limit 
by augmenting the accessions of fiction and duplicating to a 
great extent the copies of the last new books. The true 
value of a circulation is to be found in the quality, not 
quantity, of the books used, and the trustees believe that the 
increase of the Library during the present year, when judged 
by the number, value, and usefulness both of the books 
added and of those read by the public, is as satisfactory as 
that during any previous year in the history of the institu- 
tion. 

The Service. 

Early in 1889 the service of the Library for the first time 
was systematized and graded and salaries were made to 
attach to the various grades and not to depend upon personal 
considerations. Promotion to a vacancy in any grade is now 



Library Department. 19 

made by advancing the senior in the next lower grade, the 
salaries being made to increase automatically each year 
according to the scheme fixed by the trustees when the sys- 
tem was adopted, the third year's salary in any grade being 
the maximum. That this has been a decided advantage 
both to the trustees and to the employes is obvious. 

The trustees have observed with pleasure the increased 
activity in all departments of the Library and they appre- 
ciate fully the zeal and energy with which their endeavors 
to promote the prosperity of the Library have been seconded 
by all persons in the service. Without this devoted and 
skilful assistance the efforts of the trustees would not have 
been so fruitful of results. 

On the thirteenth of Kebruar}^ last the Library lost, by 
the death of Miss Eliza J. Mack, one of its most faithful 
and trustworthy servants. Miss Mack entered the Library 
as an employe in the lower hall in lb63, and for twenty- 
seven years rendered most valuable and efficient service. 
The trustees desire to record the expression of their sincere 
sorrow for her loss. 

New Building. 

The work upon the new building has been pushed steadily 
forward. Considerable delay has been caused by the post- 
ponement until late in the year of the appropriation for the 
completion of the work, as no contract could be made until 
the money called for by it was actually appropriated by the 
city council. However regrettable this delay may have 
been as deferring the opening of the building to the public, 
the work itself has not suffered from it; on the contrary, the 
ample time afforded for the masonry to dry thoroughly be- 
fore the interior finish is begun, has been a positive benefit. 
The amount of work done and the financial statement for the 
year will appear in the report of the clerk-of-the-works sub- 
mitted herewith. 

The trustees have lately received and placed in the stair- 
case-hall of the new building two sitting lions done in Siena 
marble, the work of Louis St. Gaudens, the gift of the 
Second and of the Twentieth Massachusetts infantry associa- 
tions, in memory of the members of those regiments who 
fell in the civil war. The work of the sculptor is worthy ol 
the regiments whose deeds it commemorates. 

In December, 1890, the trustees, after the careful con- 
sideration of a very thorough detailed estimate made by the 
architects, informed the city council of the sura that in their 
opinion would be required to complete the })uilding. The 
council thereupon empowered the mayor to petition the gen- 



20 City Document No. 28. 

eral court for leave to borrow money for this purpose. 
After a ver}' careful and exhaustive hearing ui)on this peti- 
tion, an act was passed empowering the city to borrow and 
appropriate the needed money outside of the debt limit, and 
after an extended investigation and discussion, the city 
council availed itself of the power thus granted and ai)pr()pri- 
ated one million of dollars. The trustees feel confident that 
this amount will be sutficient to complete the building, in- 
cluding necessary shelving for books. The appropriation 
was based ui)on the most careful estimates, and during the 
long time that has elapsed since they were made, the trus- 
tees have seen no reason to doubt their correctness. 

The general plan of the library building was determined 
upon after a very long and careful consideration by the 
board of trustees, of whom Mr. W. W. Greenough and Dr. 
James Freeman Clarke, were members. This plan has not 
been materially changed, and the trustees believe that the 
public will appreciate its value when the new building is 
ready for use. Certainl}- no two men at that time had 
greater experience in and knowledge of what was required 
than Mr. Greenough and Dr. Clarke, the first of whom had 
been in efiect the manager of the present Library for twenty- 
two years. 

While all libraries of importance both in this country and 
in Euro[)e were carefully studied before the plans were 
made, it must be remembered that the Boston Public Lil)rary 
is unique among the great libraries of the world ; for it com- 
bines a great collectitm of books for study to be used only 
in the building, with a free circulating library open to every 
citizen, underthe freest possible conditions. Great libraries 
like the British museum, Bibliotheque nationale, the Lenox 
and Astor libraries, and others, are for the accommodation 
only of students who wish to consult books within the li- 
brary itself; the Boston Athenaeum and lil)raries of that 
class belong to private proprietors ; the libraries of Congress 
and of Harvard university have but a limited constituency ; 
while the Boston Public Library must at all times be open 
for consultation to every person in the world who desires to 
avail himself of the privileges, and for the purpose of lend- 
ing books for home use to all citizens of Boston without 
distinction. 

There are smaller libraries that have followed in the steps 
of the Boston Public Library, but these were not yet in the 
position to afford great aid in determining the plans for the 
new building. While it was scarcely probable that better 
expert advice than that to be found in the officers of the 



Library Departjient. 21 

library was available, still the trustees and the architects 
made use of all expert advice that could be had. 

After the plans were prepared, but before the building was 
begun, they were exhibited for the inspection of the public 
for more than a month in the Old state-house, where they 
were open to the fullest and freest .criticism. They were 
approved by the general public and by the city council, and, 
so far as the trustees are aware, no serious objection was 
urged against them. 

The first question to be decided was Avhether to place the 
mass of the books in what is technically' called a " stack," 
— that is to pack the greatest number in the smallest space — 
or whether to distribute them through the library in difierent 
rooms. The consensus of opinion at that time seemed to be 
that the stack system was the best for a library of the nature 
of the Boston Public Library. 

The system of distribution in ditferent rooms, while it 
might be practical for a library for reference only, was not 
considered so for a library combining circulation with refer- 
ence. To a limited extent this system was adopted with the 
stack system for the new building, for, while the great grow- 
ing mass of books is to be placed in stacks where they are most 
easy of access for delivery to the public, the many special 
collections of books not given to circulate, such as the Patent 
library, the Ticknor library, the Bowditch mathematical 
library, and others, will be placed in alcoves where they can 
be easily consulted. 

The stack was the subject of very careful study. It was 
at first attempted to find a plan by which it could be lighted 
by natural light. Hundreds of plans were prepared and 
studied, but all were found unsuitable for a building situated 
like the proposed one. The first requisite of the stack must 
be freedom from danger by Hre, internal or external ; but it 
was found impossible to construct such a stack, with neces- 
sary light on all sides, which should be entirely free from 
danger from outside conflagrations. 

As it was deterujined that the lil)rar3' should be kept open 
at night and not closed at sunset (as is the case with most other 
great libraries), artificial light had to be provided for some 
portion of the day in any event. It was therefore accounted 
best not to rely upon natural light alone, but to introduce 
only such as could be done with safety. The stacks will be 
lighted by about ninety windows, which will permit of sun 
and light sufficient for the good of the books, and in parts 
of the day no artificial light Avi 11 be needed in any portion. 
Had it been necessary to rely upon gas for light, there might 



22 City Document No. 23. 

have been serious objections to this plan ; but by the use of 
electricity all the deleterious effects of gas will be avoided. 

Each story of the stack will be entirely separated, so that 
the heat and gases cannot rise to collect and no fire can 
spread . 

Upon further consideration it was decided that a stack 
calculated to hold the large number of books which the rai)id 
increase makes it necessary to provide for, would be too 
extensive for the rapid deliver}^ of books by the present 
system of pages, and that some mechanical device must be 
used to send books to and to receive them from the stack. 
This point being decided, the problem was somewhat simpli- 
fied ; for, with books delivered by machinery, a hundred feet 
of distance more or less will make practically no difference 
in time. The stack, therefore, in its present condition, was 
decided upon. 

The next important question was the delivery of books for 
home-use and for reference, and the present position of the 
delivery-room was determined upon as being the most ac- 
cessible and convenient for the public, as well as being the 
most nearly central position with reference to the stack. 

This waiting-room with the delivery-desk was calculated 
for the accommodation of a much larger number of users 
than will probably ever gather there at one time. It con- 
tains quite as much available floor space as the present entire 
Bates hall, and, if necessary, the delivery-desk can at some 
future time be extended to a length of sixty feet. The 
space provided for the library attendants back of the desk 
itself covers five hundred square feet. 

This delivery-room is effectually separated from every 
room devoted to readers or students, so that persons who 
wish to draw books for home-use will be able to do so with- 
out disturbing a single reader. 

The main reading-room, which will be known as Bates 
hall, was the subject of the most careful study. Considera- 
tions of economy made it necessary to provide one large 
room for the general public, so arranged as to allow proper 
supervision by the smallest number of attendants. Consid- 
erations of heating, light, and ventilation made it necessary 
that this room should be lofty. 

The trustees were greatly influenced also by the feeling 
that the chief room of the building, to which it was to be 
hoped the people would resort for many years for study and 
recreation, should be in every respect suitable for the pur- 
pose for which it was to be used, and while it should be 
convenient, light, and airy, should also be of considerable 
architectural importance. 



Library Department. 23 

The question of liofht throughout the whole building has 
been carefully considered from the beginning, both by the 
architect and by the trustees. Never for a moment has the 
necessity of ample light for every room been lost sight of. 
After a most careful consideration of the matter by the arch- 
itect, who has been aided by other persons having special 
knowledge of the subject, he has lately, as always, assured 
the trustees that every room will have abundant light for the 
purpose to which it is devoted. This they are assured is 
capable of almost exact mathematical demonstration. Care 
has been taken to introduce light as far as possible from the 
upper part of the wall spaces so as to light thoroughly every 
part of the rooms. 

While great care and attention was devoted to the provid- 
ing of suitable accommodations for the public, the working 
departments and the needs of the library staff and attend- 
ants were not forgotten or neglected, and it is believed that 
the building when occupied will be found defective in no 
material particular. 

In short, the building was carefully planned for the special 
work to be done in it, and with special reference to the 
public to be served. In the beginning the architect was in- 
structed as to the needs of the library, and was told that no 
sacrifice of convenience or arrangement would be permitted 
merely for the sake of architectural effect. This rule has 
been rigidly followed. While great latitude for decoration 
was allowed on the exterior of the building and the ap- 
proaches, and in the public vestibules and corridors, in the 
delivery-room and in Bates hall, the other parts of the 
building, while attractive, are severe and simple in form and 
color. 

Economy and efficiency of the administration has been 
carefully studied in all the plans. 

While the trustees have been of the opinion that the build- 
ing should be monumental, and a temple worthy of the 
treasures it contains, and worthy of the citizens of Boston 
who own it, they have never lost sight of the practical side 
of the question, or sacrificed utility to mere architectural 
effect. They believe that utility and architectural effect are 
best attained together. 

Whether the architect has succeeded in producing the best 
possible architectural effect, by so arranging the plan, the 
masses, and the enrichments as to impart to his work interest, 
unity, grandeur, and beauty, is a question upon which, as in 
the case of all important buildings, opinions must of necessity 
differ ; but it may be fairly said the new building will com- 
pare favorably with any contemporary structure. It may 



24 City Document No. 23. 

not be out of place to quote here the words of the former 
president of the Architectural loujxue of America, who is 
rccoirnized as one of the leading architects of the world. 
Mr. Richard Hunt, in his address delivered at the last annual 
meeting of the Architectural league, speaking of the new 
library building, said : 

"The noble edifice . . . is a notable example, a land- 
mark to which future generations will point with pride; an 
enduring proof of the cultivated taste of our time and a 
glorious monument to the well-deserved f-Axne of its designers, 
who, if I mistake not, were appointed by a board of trustees, 
after an unsuccessful competition. 

" How fortunate that this board should have had the moral 
courage to express and stand by its opinion ! 

" The thanks of the community are due to all concerned 
in the erection of such a pile, and their names should be in- 
scribed in some conspicuous place, as a testimonial of the 
gratitude and esteem of their fellow-citizens." 

The trustees know how true an interest is felt by their 
fellow-citizens in every matter that concerns the Public 
Library, and they have sought therefore, at all times, the 
fairest and fullest criticism and endeavored to furnish all 
possible information in regard to every matter connected with 
it ; but they recognize the fact that the most careful report 
must fail to give a full account of all the details of the work 
they have in hand. In view, therefore, of some adverse criti- 
cisms in regard to the plan of the new building that have 
lately come to their notice, which, however, it is but just to 
say, they believe are founded upon insufficient information, 
they would be greatly pleased if your Honor, as the chief 
magistrate of the city, representing the whole body of citi- 
zens, would, with the aid of such expert advisers as may 
have your confidence, make a thorough examination of the 
plans of the building and of all matters connected there- 
with. They believe that the result of their labor will meet 
your approval, but if any mistake should be discovered, 
they will gladly apply such remedy as is possible. 

Samuel A. B. Abbott. 
Henry W. Haynes. 
Frederick O. Prince. 
Phineas Pierce. 
William R. Richards. 
Adopted January 29, 1892. 

Attest : Louis F. Gray, 

Clerk. 



Librae Y Department. 25 



[APPEIVDIX A.] 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 
FOR 1891. 



The examining committee find the library steadily 
growing in extent and influence. In the central library 
the crowded state of the shelves and of the working- rooms 
presents ever-increasing discomforts to the public and to 
the officials in charge, from which relief can be found only 
in the new building, which is steadily advancing to com- 
pletion. 

The difficulties now existing are well met, and the library 
is almost daily crowded by readers and students. In the 
Bates hall the condition of things has been found most sat- 
isfactory ; the service is excellent, and the use of the hall is 
continually growing. On one occasion recently, twelve 
hundred books were given out at the desk in oue day, which 
is at the rate of one hundred an hour, although of course the 
greater demand was in the later hours of the day, when sev- 
eral a minute must have been handed out. 

Indirect but valuable testimony to the satisfactory state 
of this important part of the library is given by the book in 
which the public is invited to write down complaints and 
suggestions. These are almost entirely recommendations of 
new books, questions about volumes that are not at the 
moment upon the shelves, and requests for information upon 
a thousand different subjects, some of them of a most in- 
geniously puzzling kind. The answers are prompt, cour- 
teous, and satisfactory. 

The committee think it very advisable that broadsides be 
placed conspicuously in the library, with a list of the recent 
acquisitions of books on the various arts and sciences most 
directly interesting the public. Such a list, for instance, 
of books upon the subject of electricity as applied to the 
mechanical arts could not fail to be of interest and service. 

They also strongly recommend the preparation of new 
special catalogues, such as those of " History, Biography, and 
Travel," and "" Historical Fiction," those already in existence 
being now incomplete, so long a time having elapsed since 
they were printed. 



26 City Document No. 23. 



The Sub-Committee on the Lower Hall 

tind tlie condition, of course, unchanji^ed, as regards over- 
crowding and ventilation in the lower floor of the Boylston- 
street building ; it is with impatience that they await the 
change to the new library. There is, of course, a great de- 
mand for books of a better class for children, and for books 
popularizing science for readers of all ages. 

The Sub-Committee on Branches 

desire to congratulate the trustees upon the great advantage 
accruing from the appointment of an inspectress of the 
branches, who has once a month consulted with the libra- 
rians, listened to their requests, and reported on the general 
state of affairs coming under her attention. 

It is noted that the branch librarians are cataloguing their 
respective libraries, and it is hoped that this excellent work 
will be hastened as much as possible. The committee de- 
sire to call attention to the great usefulness, to both the 
librarians and to the general public, of the new finding-lists, 
which, to a great extent, fill the place of new catalogues. 
The circulation in the branches has not increased so rapidly 
as might be hoped, and there is a constant complaint of the 
lack of new books; this, the committee feel confident, is a 
want that will be met by the trustees as soon as the ap[)ro- 
priations permit. There is a general desire among the 
librarians for permission to cover, as was formerly done, 
works of fiction and books for the young, these being es- 
pecially liable to become ragged and soiled. 

The committee desire to call the attention of the trustees 
to the dissatisfaction expressed by the people of Roxbury to 
the new rule which makes it impossible to draw one book 
from the branch library and one from the Fellowes Athe- 
naeum at the same time. The books in the Fellowes Athe- 
naeum correspond in character to those in Bates hall, and if 
the choice could be given of taking one volume from the 
Athenaeum and from Bates hall at the same time that they 
take one from the branch, this dissatisfaction would be re- 
moved and the circulation of more serious books would in- 
crease ; this is obviously desirable. The demand for books 
at the South Boston branch is well met. They still rec- 
ommend, as was done last year, a larger number of books 
of the better class for children, and also books of reference 
for children ; for both of these there is a large demand. The 
same call is also heard at the Dorchester branch. 

There is much satisfaction expressed at the South End 



Library Department. 27 

branch with the new police arrangements which have pre- 
vented the disturbances frequent in former years. 

The removal of the North End delivery station and read- 
ing-room from their former unsatisfactory quarters to a large, 
bright room in a central position is a great improvement. 
The circulation has already increased. The sub-committee 
suggest the better lighting of the stairway and hall, and hope 
that soon a branch library will be established in this part of 
the city. 

The sub-committee call the attention of the trustees to 
the need of a delivery station at Jamaica Plain, on or near 
Chestnut avenue, and one at Roxbury, on or near Blue Hill 
avenue and Dudley street, and would recommend that the 
books for these stations be delivered from the Roxbury and 
Jamaica Plain branches. 

The report from the Patent department of the Public 
Library is printed herewith as it was presented by Mr. 
Browne. The examining committee are convinced that it 
is very desirable that all possible aid should be given to the 
trustees in the performance of their difficult and complicated 
task of adapting the accommodations of the new building to 
a great many purposes. For the successful performance of 
this onerous duty nothing is better than a succinct statement 
of what is needed by the public and by experts who know 
by experience what is essential for this work. This paper, 
it is thought, cannot fail to be of assistance. 

Report upon the Patent Department. 

During the past year I have frequently visited and made 
use of the Patent department of the library, and have carefully 
noted its condition and administration, upon which I have to 
submit the following rei)ort : 

The inadequacy, both in plan and arrangement, of the space 
now allotted to this branch of the library has continued, as 
in previous ^ears, to impair its usefulness to an extent which 
can only be fully realized by actual experience. Believing 
this to be, of all the departments of the library, the one 
which might contribute most directly to the practical benefit 
of the community, I feel compelled to speak in detail of its 
defects as now administered, some of them remediable in the 
present building, but all easily avoidable in the new one, by 
proper planning and arrangement. 

The present patent-room contains about eighteen hundred 
square feet, of which nearly one-third is appropriated to 
other uses. The room is lighted by windows at one end 
only, and the light thus obtained is very insuflScient. Arti- 



28 City Document No. 23. 

ficial light must be used in some portions of the room at all 
times. The hooks are arranged against the walls in from 
nine to eleven tiers, extending from the floor. The backs 
of the three lower tiers of books cannot be read without 
stooping, and more than one-half of all the tiers cannot be 
reached by a person standing on the floor, but are accessible 
only by means of step-ladders, always inconvenient and 
often dangerous. The available shelf-room is now practi- 
cally full, although a regular annual increase of a little over 
thirty feet must somehow be provided for. The crowding 
of the shelves has made it necessary to exclude from the 
room many works of reference, which, were it possible, 
should have their place there. 

Considerable temporary relief from the inconveniences 
above noted might be obtained by giving to the Patent 
department the use of the whole of the room where it now 
is, and by putting into the space thus gained a number of 
low stacks which would give additional and accessible shelf- 
room. These stacks might be of a construction adapting 
them for use in the patent room at the new library, and 
their cost be charged- thereto. 

There are other defects of minor importance which might 
be remedied : for instance, some provision should be made 
for receiving hats, coats, and umbrellas ; also the attendant 
in charge should be relieved of his present duties in connec- 
tion with the Lower hall card- catalogue, as he cannot 
properly attend to these and his regular work in the Patent 
library at the same time. 

The space allotted seems insufficient for the library of 
to-day, if anything more than sheer necessity be considered. 
Furthermore, this space should not be all in one large room, 
because the work to be done in the library is of widely 
varying character, the different branches of which cannot 
conveniently be carried on in the same department. A 
properly arranged Patent library is, more than any other 
collection of books, a workshop. There are drawings of 
large size to be not only examined, but duplicated. There 
are specifications to be not only read, but studied and dis- 
cussed. There are also copies of them to be made, which 
work must often be done by women stenographers, and these 
should not be required to carry bulky and heavy volumes 
up and down dangerous step-ladders. There should be 
ample table-room and proper light for the use of draughts- 
men and others. A separate room should be provided 
where consultation and dictation can be carried on without 
disturbing other users of the place, and proper special toilet 
accommodations should be close at hand. 



.Library Department. 29 

1 have had the honor in the past of suggesting to the 
trustees of the library the possibility of establishing and 
maintaining, in connection with the Patent department, a set 
of the United States letters patent classified according to 
their subject-matter. Such a collection, made accessible to 
the public under reasonable regulations, would be of the 
greatest possible value. It would be the only one in the 
country except that of the Patent Office itself, of which it 
should be a duplicate. It would be of the greatest advan- 
tage to all those persons in the community having to do 
with the useful arts, in number almost co-extensive with the 
whole body of our citizens. Its maintenance would require 
additional room, — about as much as that now proposed to 
be allotted to the entire patent collection itself, — but its 
direct value and benefit to the community at large would 
make it as practically^ useful a feature of the great new 
library as any that could be introduced there. 

The Sub-Committee on the New Library Building felt 
that their inquiry was limited to practical questions of ar- 
rangement and working facilities, and in no way included 
architectural or artistic judgment. 

Moved by the report on the Patent library printed above, 
the sub-committee has examined more closely into the pro- 
visions made for this department in the new building. 

That this may be a useful consulting library according to 
modern standards, it should consist of: 

1. The general stack in the consulting room. 

2. The special stack (U.S. patent drawings, see Mr. 
Browne's report) . 

3. Two or more small drafting compartments. 

4. One or more private offices. 

Here, quite as much as in other parts of the library, 
ample light is essential ; the lettering of the figures and 
drawing, which must be read with absolute accuracy, is 
alsvays small and somewhat confusing, being engraved in 
light lines. It is impossible to trace or reproduce such drawings 
with poor accommodations and insufficient light. It is there- 
fore suggested that space be allotted this library in the top 
floor, on the Boylston street-side, beginning at the eastern 
limit of the courtyard, and extending back not less than 
seventy-five feet (to the west), and that additional light be 
provided by means of a skylight in the roof. 

The compartments for drafting and the private offices 
could occupy the space next to the windows looking on the 
courtyard, while the books could cover the north-east and 
west walls of the room. To avoid the inconvenience and 
danger of step-ladders, an iron gallery, wide enough to hold 



30 City Document No. 23. 

a chair, with rails adapted for the support of a book, should 
run along the walls, at a height of about eight feet above 
the floor, a part of the s[)ace l^eneath being taken by the 
special stack. Every book would thus be accessible and in 
good light. 

Before the details of arrangement and of the furniture are 
decided, it is respectfully suggested that experts in this de- 
partment be consulted, and what is true of this need in this 
room is also true of the other special libraries. 

The committee are glad to hear that it is intended to 
place in the library a photograph room. This room, we be- 
lieve, could be made self-supporting. The details of its 
arrangement demand the advice of an expert. 

It has been suggested to this committee to recommend 
for the floor of the great reading-hall the adoption of some 
noiseless material, inasmuch as sonority of a marble floor in 
a stone hall would exaggerate the sounds of footsteps, mov- 
ing chairs, etc., and thus greatly disturb readers, who will be 
assembled in great numbers. 

In the judgment of the committee, ample accommoda- 
tions should be provided in the new building for the readers 
who now use the Lower hall. The committee have grave 
doubts whether this can be done by merging the more popu- 
lar part of the library with the Bates hall, as has been 
proposed. This would involve doubling the number of 
readers using the desk for the delivery and return of books, 
necessarily much to their inconvenience. It seems likely 
that the result of such a union would be to discourage those 
who demand popular books from frequenting the new build- 
ing. This would be a misfortune, and the committee vent- 
ure to hope that the trustees will think it wiser to carry 
on in that building the general scheme of division which has 
worked so acceptably in the present one. 

The committee desire to express the hope that the trus- 
tees will soon feel it possible to appoint a librarian to fill 
the vacancy which has now existed for more than a year. 
Such an appointment would relieve the trustees and officers 
of the library of their present unusual responsibility. 

Anna S. Amory. 
Joshua P. Bodfish. 
Martin Brimmer. 
Alex. Porter Browne. 
John Heard, Jr. 
James M. Hubbard. 
Alice Lee. 

Thomas Sergeant Perry. 
Anna E. Ticknor. 



Library Department. 31 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF WORKS ON THE NEW 
PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING, FOR 1891. 



Contracts. 



Lynch & Woodward, boilers, April 17, 1891 . . $2,869 00 
Walworth Construction and Supply Co., heating 

apparatus, Sept. 14, 1891 $5,153 00 

Albert B. Franklin, radiators, Sept. 14, 1891 . . $6,480 00 
David Mcintosh, plastering ; contract given by unit 

prices; estimated amount, Nov. 23, 1891 . . $20,000 00 

Present Condition of Building. 
Fa9ades and interior masonry walls completed. Granite plat- 
forms about three-fourths finished. Fireproof floors completed. 
Iron roof completed. Tile roof completed with exception of ridges 
and crests. Flat slate roof completed. Interior finish : Stonework 
in Bates Hall and lions in grand staircase have been set. Rough 
interior : part of terra cotta partitions and iron stairs put in ; 
part of cellar floor laid and boilers set ; heating plant is under 
way ; lime for plastering of building has been stacked ; part of 
rough plumbing put in. Bronze ch^neau and copper gutters 
put up. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF WORK UNDER THE 
VARIOUS CONTRACTS, JAN. 31, 1892. 

Contract with John T. Scully, dated May, 1888, for piling : 

Amount of contract ...... $7,714 44 

Payments made to date $7,714 44 

Contract with Woodbury & Leighton, dated Aug. 1, 1888, for 
foundations, cut-granite, brick masonry, and iron-work : 

Total amount contracted for . . . $313,734 84 

Payments made to date . . . 305,344 61 

Reserve on work done .... $2,500 00 
Work not done 5,890 23 

Balance $8,390 23 



^2^ City Document No. 23. 

Contrnct with R. Guastavino, dated June 25, 1889, for fire-proof 
floors (tile areli work) : 

Estimated amount of contract . . $80,105 82 

Payments made to date . . . 75,103 66 

$5,002 16 
Reserve on work done .... $5,002 16 

Balance $5,002 16 



Contract with Woodbury & Leighton, dated July 22, 1889, for 
cut-granite, brick masonry, iron-work, freestone, marble, terra- 
cotta, carpenter work, glazing, partition blocks, and rough plumb- 



Total amount contracted for . . . $706,700 80 

Payments made to date . . . 602,010 76 

Reserve on work done .... $25,000 00 
Work not done 79,690 04 



Balance $104,690 04 



Contract with R. C. Fisher & Co., dated Aug. 21, 1889, for 
marble-work in entrance hall : 

Total amount contracted for . . . $45,274 40 

Payments made to date . . . $44,239 25 

Reserve on work done .... $1,035 15 

Balance $1,035 15 



Contract with Batterson, See, & Eisele, dated Aug. 21, 1889, 
for marble-work in staircase hall : 

Total amount contracted for . . . $57,273 00 

Payments made to date . . . . 11,900 00 

Reserve on work done .... $2,100 00 
Work not done . . . . . 43,273 00 



Balance $45,373 00 



Contract with Post & McCord, dated April 12, 1890, for iron 
roof : 

Total amount contracted for ..... $43,662 43 
Payments made to date . . . • • $43,662 43 



Library Department. 



33 



Contract with Lindemann Terra Cotta Roofing Tile Co., dated 
May 2, 1890, for tile roofing : 



Original contract . 
Net amount deducted . 

Total amount contracted for 
Payments made to date 

Reserve 

Balance . 



$8,233 63 



$35,000 00 
5,424 00 

$29,576 00 
21,342 37 



,233 63 



Contract with Lynch & Woodward, dated April 17, 1891 



Total amount contracted for . 
Payments made to date . 



$2,869 00 
$2,869 00 



General Financial Statement, Jan. 31, 1892. 

Amount of appropriation May 1, 1887 . . . $368,854 89 
Amount of loan authorized by Statute, approved 

March 1, 1889 1,000,000 00 

Amount of loan authorized by Statute, approved May 

11, 1891 1,000,000 00 



Total appropriations 



$2,368,854 



Total amount contracted for 
Total expenditures 
Balance of appropriations 



$1,457,612 76 
$1,213,769 75 
$1,155,085 14 



APPEN^DIXES 



1891 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by years). 

II. Volumes in the Special Collections op Bates Hall. 

III. Increase of the Several Departments. 

IV. Bates Hall Classifications. 
V. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

VI. Circulation. 

VII. Registration of Applicants. 

VIII, Reading. 

IX. Financial Statement. 

X. Library Funds. 

XI. Library Service. 

XII. List of Examining Committees for Forty Years. 

XIII. List op Trustees fob Forty Years. 



Library Department. 



37 



APPENDIX I. 

EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 



Years. 


il 


Years. 


i! 
1' 


Years. 


jl 

1^ 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


34 


1885 


460,993 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


35 


1886 


479,421 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


36 


1887 


492,956 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


37 


1888 


505,872 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


38 


1889 


520,508 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


39 


1890 


536,027 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


40 


1891 


556,283 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 















Note. — Many thousand panophlets have been added, but are not included in the above 
figures. When bound they are regarded and counted as volumes. 

In the various reading-rooms are the current numbers of 887 periodicals. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, Dec. 31, 1891. 



„ . r Bates Hall 

2^ > 

"au ■( Duplicate room 

«£ 

^1^ (.Lower Hall 

Total, Central Library . 

s •§ 1 Fellowes Athenaeum . . , 

.a a ^ 

o^ [City part 

Total, Roxbury Branch 



348,579 
19,007 



East Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South-End ....... 

Jamaica Plain 

West Roxbury delivery 
North-End 



12,675 

27,600 
14,266 
15.560 

3,313 
1,639 



38 



City Document No. 23. 



APPENDIX II. 

VOLUMES IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





H 
» 

H 


s 


« 

1 


'1' 
X 
X) 

H 


IS 

at 




FN 


OB 


« 
XI 
X 


X 
X 


i 


X 


Patent library . . . 


3,066 


3,142 


3,259 


3,382 


3,478 


3,513 


3,641 


3,796 


3,965 


4,097 


4,218 


4,269 


Bowditch library . 


3,15i 


3,224 


3,456 


3,701 


3,854 


3,933 


4,510 


4,706 


4,935 


5,225 


5,348 


5,509 


Parker library . . . 


12.337 


12,363 


13,952 


13,971 


14,024 


14,057 


14,069 


14,077 


14,104 


14,112 


14,114 


14,116 


Prince library . . . 


2,230 


2,274 


2,327 


2,397 


2,510 


2,581 


2,706 


2,775 


2,824 


2,905 


2,935 


2,953 


Ticknor library . . 


5,454 


5,463 


5,507 


5,544 


5,724 


5,731 


5,764 


5,790 


5,877 


5,923 


5,966 


5,981 


Barton library . . . 


14,360 


13,487 


13,610 


13,610 


13,642 


13,652 


13,800 


13,841 


13,755 


13,724 


13,735 


13,740 


Franklin library . . 


202 


240 


292 


357 


378 


382 


382 


403 


416 


427 


446 


465 


Thayer library . . 


. . . 


893 


920 


1,085 


1,123 


1,175 


1,217 


1,280 


1,368 


1,427 


1,500 


1,500 


John A. Lewis lib- 
rary 
























596 



APPENDIX III. 

NET INCKEASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





188.5 
(8 mos.) 


1886 


188T 


1888 


1889 


1890 


18»1 


Bates Hall 


4,882 


9,879 


8,671 


9,733 


11,857 


13,518 


15,306 


Lower Hall 


367 


866 


1,543 


874 


710 


loss 50 


loss 23 


Duplicate-room . . . . 


377 


loss 59 


443 


loss 52 


• 330 


419 


2,355 


East Boston branch . . . 


85 


236 


158 


170 


63 


58 


59 


South Boston branch . . 


112 


303 


310 


284 


159 


115 


200 


Roxbury branch . . . . 


122 


362 


262 


280 


199 


146 


308 


Fellowes Athenaeum . . 


209 


4,748 


358 


390 


397 


361 


438 


Charlestown branch . . 


343 


680 


443 


145 


loss 70 


233 


421 


Brighton branch .... 


64 


186 


146 


46 


130 


91 


1G7 


Dorchester branch . . . 


276 


590 


546 


423 


309 


269 


222 


Jamaica Plain branch . . 


167 


355 


417 


335 


294 


150 


214 


Sonth-End branch . . . 


20 


loss 26 


204 


260 


248 


187 


365 


"West Roxbury branch . 


10 


13 


25 


20 


6 


10 


- 


North-End branch . . . 


12 


295 


9 


8 


4 


12 


224 


Total 


7,046 


18,428 


13,535 


12,916 


14,636 


15,519 


20,256 





Added. 


Deducted, 

condemned, 

transferred 

or lost. 




Bates Hall 


15,340 
2,370 
5,356 


34 

15 

2,761 


f 

•! 2^et gain in detail, as 
above. 




Lower Hall and branches ...... 



APPENDIX IV. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 
(RepreBenting books located only.) 





CLASSES. 




Spiciai. Libbakibb. 




s 




1858 


isei 


1860 


1871 


18,, 


18»IS 


1880 










Total, 
IncludinK 


J 




li 


Total hi 

15 


p 


li 


i 


If 


|i 


$ 


ft 




P 


|i 


illl 


iK£ 


I. 




33 

371 
2,909 
1,555 
648 
241 
452 
260 
106 

956 
1,200 
816 
310 
235 
668 
347 
709 
594 
615 


1 
20 

1 



5 

1 

2 


1,961 
9,503 
10,177 
46,074 
34,448 
17,939 
9,602 
11,687 
7,236 
1,994 
10,154 
24,630 
26,103 
12,338 
6,036 
4,389 
15,656 
10,845 
13,760 
8,319 
9,676 
459 
136 


249 
35 
17 

107 
77 

11 

9 

22 

2 

1,340 

147 

3 

3 

15 

3,308 

5 

13 


322 
615 

1,177 

858 

520 

326 

1,423 

1,181 

95 

390 

788 

3,492 

1,360 

98 
76 
170 

13 


6 
6 

1,268 

131 

7 

2 

8 

196 

1,130 
13 

23 

1 
24 


278 
353 

31 

26 

132 

4,012 

381 
120 
60 
24 

31 

34 


21 
689 
136 
956 
3,201 
2,470 
337 
254 
617 

244 
130 
28 
17 
26 
89 

16 
43 
73 
89 
3,367 














2,549 
11.136 


II 




2 

105 
697 
224 
62 

15 

26 
41 

8 


8 










m. 














American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite Ulerature. . . . 


16 
7 


3,423 

3 

50 


696 






61444 








' 


VI. 










21.609 




Italian history, etc 
















13.602 
9,389 


IX 
























Other history, geography, biography, travel, and literature 




16 














4,637 






xni. 




10 

28 






31.638 
14.039 
6.454 














XV. 


























xvn. 


Medical science 


2 

1 

179 


» 












xvni 


















4 










17.369 


x-x 


Useful arte 
























X\7T 














646 






64 






24 


42 


11 


2 












xxrv. 


Shakespeare '. . . 










3.379 


XXV 








357 






















































14,231 


34 


293,558 


5,609 


14,116 


2,953 


6,981 


13,740 


1,600 


466 


4,260 


596 


4,637 


19.017 











includes general history, 



when embracing several 
I, and what of American 



and collected 
is sometimee 



Explanation. — Class ] 

Class IV, includes the collected works of 
termed polygraphy. 

Classes V., VI., VH., and Vm. have the same scope for the respective countries that Class IV. has for Am 
erica. Class Vni. includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the Scandinavian nations. 

Class XIV. includes political science and ethics, appUed and unapplied, education, phrenology, etc. 



Claas XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 
Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by tbemsclves, so that for purposes of euumeration or learning 
■ ■ " " le to get exact figures upon the subdivisions ; as also upon such 

:., by summing the results of the ranges devoted to them In the 



Note. ■ 



* Includes all books in i 



- 12,108 of them belonging t 



■ The dates given in the special libraries colu 
! Barton library, as originaUy shelved there. 



eyearv 



1 they ■( 



uired by the library 



38 



vo 



Patent 

Bowcli 

Parke 1 

Prince 

TickiK 

Burtoi; 

Frank! 

Thayc 

John 
rary 



Bates 
Lowe 
Dupli 
East] 
South 
Roxbi 
Fello- 
Charl 
Brigh 
Dorcl 
Jama 
South 
West 
Nortl 



Bates 
Dupl 



Library Department. 



39 



APPENDIX V. 



GIFTS, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1891. 



Givers 
Volumes 



1,047 
12,164 



Abbott, S. A. B 

Academia Nacionale de Medicina, Lima, Peru 

Academy of Science, St. Louis, Mo. . 

Actors' Fund of America, New York City 

Adams, i/o«. Charles F., Quincy, 3fass. 

Adams, Mrs. F. A. F., Roxhury, Mass. 

Adams Neryine Asylum 

Adelaide, South Australia, Public Library 

Agassiz, Prof. A., Camhridge, Mass. . 

Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn, Ala 

Alabama Canebrake Agricultural Experiment Station, Uniontow 

Albany Medical College, Alumni Association, Albany, N.Y. 

Allen, J. A., New York City 

Alumni Association of Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass. 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences 

American Antiquarian Society 

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Salem, 
American Bankers' Association, Neiv York City . 
American Bar Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Bell Telephone Company .... 

American Book Company ...... 

American Congregational Association .... 

American Economic Association, Baltimore, Md. 
American Folk Lore Society, Cambridge, Mass. 
American Home Missionary Society, New York City . 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American Peace Society 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Postal Machines Company .... 

American Queen Publishing Company, Bridgeport, Conn. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, Neiv York City . 
American Society of Microscopists, Pittsburg, Pa. 
American Society of Railroad Superintendents . 
American Veterinary College, New York City 
Ames, John N., Chelsea, Mass. ..... 

Andover Theological Seminary Library, Andover, Mass. 

Andre, Mme. F., Paris, France 

Anonymous ......... 

Appalachian Mountain Club ...... 

Appleton, D., & Co., New York City .... 

Appleton, Nathan. . . 81 autographs, 1 woodcut, 5 

Appleton, William S 

Apprentices' Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa 
Apprentices' Library, New York City .... 
Archfeological Institute of America, Chicago, III. 
Argentine Republic, Observatory ..... 
Argentine Republic, Oficina Meteorologica, Buenos Ayres 



Mass 



Volumes. 
186 
2 

1 
2 
2.n 



broadside 



69 



40 City Document No. 23. 

Volumes. 

Arngrinison, F. B 3 

Arnold, Ilovvanl P. ......... . 6 

Arnoux, W. H., JVew York City 1 

Art Club of Philadelphia, Fa 1 

L'Art, Librairie de, Paris, France 1 picture 

Associated Charities of Boston 14 

Association for the Advancement of Women . . . . . 2 

Association Generale des Etudiants de Budapest, Austria ... 1 

Association of American Physicians, P/it7afZe/p/im, Pa. ... 1 

Atkinson, Charles F 23 

Auburn Theological Seminary, Auhurn, N.Y. 2 

Austin, James W. 2 

Babcock & Wilcox Co., New York City 1 

Baer, J., & Co., Frankfurt a M., Germany 1 

Baker, L. C, Philadelphia, Pa . 1 

Baker, W. H 1 

Baker, AYalter, & Co., Dorchester, Mass 1 

Balch, Mrs. J. W 23 maps 56 

Baldwin, Hon. C. C, Cleveland, Ohio 1 

Baldwin, J. M., Ph.D., Toronto, Canada 1 

Baldwin, S. E., New Haven, Conn 1 

Baldwin. W. H 2 

Balfour, David 2 

^■a\\, mc\\o\i\s. Block Island 2 

Ball, W. T. W., Roxbury, Mass 4 

Ballou, Maturin M 1 

Barrows, Henry D., i^os ^«(7eZes, Cal. 1 

Barrows, Mrs. Isabel C 1 

Barton, George A., Harvard University 1 

Battle, K. P., C/m^e/ //i/Z, A".a 1 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., ^oc/iesier, iV". F. 1 

Baxter, Sylvester 2 

Belfast, Maine, Public Library 1 

Bell, Hon. Charles H., Exeter, NH. 3 

Bell, Robert, M.D., Ottawa, Canada ....... 1 

Bell St. Chapel, Providence, R.I. 2 

Bellamy, Edward 1 

Benton, J. H., jr. 1 

Berrv, John N., Millbury, Mass 3 

Besolow, T. S 1 

Bethany Home for Young Women 1 

Biblioteca Nacional, Santiago de Chile ...... 2 

Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Florence, Italy 9 

Bibliotheek der Kijks-Universiteit te Leiden 12 

Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, France 5 

Bicknell, A. P. ... 2 

Birch's Sons, Thomas, Philadelphia, Pa. .;.... 1 

Birmingham, England, Free Library 1 

Bispham, William, New York City 1 

Blaisdell, F. C 1 

Blake, Sir Henry A 1 

Blake, Mrs. S. P. periodicals 

Blinn, H. C, Canterbury, N.H. 1 

Blodgett, A. N., i/.Z) 1 

Boardman, Waldo E., M.D 24 

Bolton, England, Free Public Library 1 

Bolton, Prof. H. C 2 

Boss, H. R., Chicago, III 5 

Boston, Board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners ... 1 

Board of Health 1 

Board of Overseers of the Poor 2 

City Auditor 87 

City Council 15 



Library Department. 41 

Volumes. 
Boston City Hospital 276 

City Messenger 152 

City Treasurer 3 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 1 

Protective Department 1 

Record Commissioners 15 

School Committee 6 

"Water Board 3 

Boston Art Club 3 

Boston Athenajum 1 

Boston Book Company 1 

Boston Children's Aid Society 2 

Boston Dispensary 1 

Boston Journal Company 1 

Boston & Maine R.R 1 

Boston Merchants' Association 1 

Boston Museum 1 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Trustees 2 

Boston North End Mission 1 

Boston Provident Association 6 

Boston Society of Civil Engineers I 

Boston Society of Natural History 2 

Boston University 1 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association 1 

Bourinot, Hon. J. G., Ottawa, Canada ...... 5 

Bowes, James L., Liverpool, England ...... 3 

Bowditch, Family of J. IngersoU 4 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. ....... 1 

Bowthorpe, S. T 2 

Bradlee, Rev. CD.. . newspapers, periodicals, and broadsides 267 

Bradley Fertilizer Company 3 

Bradt & Leland, Chicago, III. ........ 1 

Braintree, Town Clerk 1 

Brayley, A. W 1 

Bridgewater, Mass., State Normal School . . . . . . 1 

Brigham, Edwin H 106 periodicals 1 

Brimmer, Hon. Martin 1 

British Museum, London, England 5 

Britnell, John, Toronto, Canada ........ 1 

Bronson Library Fund Board, Waterhury, Ct 2 

Brookline, Mass., Public Library ....... 1 

Brooklyn, N.Y., Library 2 

Brooks, Francis A 1 

Brooks, Frederick 3 

Brooks, Rev. W. H 3 

Brown, F. H., M.D 176 

Brown, John P 1 broadside 

Brown University, Providence, R.I. 1 

Browne, Miss Alice 1 broadside 23 

Brownless, A. C, Melbourne, Australia 1 

Bruce, Henry 1 

Bryant, J. E., M. A., Toronto, Canada 2 

Brymner, Douglas, Ottau-a, Canada ^ 

Buenos Aires, Direccion General de Estadistica 1 

Buffalo, N.Y., Historical Society 2 

Buffalo, N.Y., Library 1 

Bugbee, James M 1 

Bunker, Clarence A., Cambridge, Mass ^ 

Bunker Hill Monument Association .....•• ' 

Burgess, Clinton B. .......•• • -" 

Burrage, A. C ^ 

Burrage, William C. ......••• • ^ 

Burridge, Rev. B. M., Ashtabula, Ohio ^ 



42 City Document No. 23. 

Volumes. 
Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, R.I. .... 1 

Button, T. C, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England 1 

CixAy, Mrs. v.. T).,ii\\i\ Mrs. G\x\Agcx, NewVork City . . . . 1 

California Academy of Science, San Francisco, Cal 1 

California State Library, Sacramento, Cal 19 

California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento, Cal. .... 1 

Calleja, Camilo, M.D., Valladolid, Spain ...... 2 

Cambridge, Mass., Overseers of the Poor 1 

Cambridge, Mass., Public Library 1 

Campbell, H. H., Steelton, Pa 1 

Canada, Department of Agriculture 19 

Canada, Geological Department, Ottawa 3 

Canfield, Thomas H., Burlington, Vt 2 

Capen, John 1 

Carey, Rev. S. C, Gardiner, Me 1 

Carpenter, Rev. C. C, Andover, Mass 12 

Carret, J. F 3 

Cartee, C. S., Estate of 1 

Carter, James, London, England 2 

Carter, James C, New York City 1 

Castilian Club 7 

Central Vermont R.E 2 

Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen, Chelsea, Mass 7 

Chandler, F. E 106 

Chandler, T. H., theatre programmes 5 

Chapman, Alfred F 2 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co 1 broadside 4 

Charity Organization Society, Neiv York City 

Chase, George B. 

Chase, J. Eastman .......... 

Chauncy Hall School 

Cheever, David W 

Chelsea, Mass., City Clerk 

Chicago, III., Board of Trade 

Chicago, III., Historical Society 1 broadside 

Chicago, ///. , Public Library 16 

Cilley, B..P., Manchester, N.H. 

Cincinnati, 0., Chamber of Commerce 

Cincinnati, 0., Observatory 

Cincinnati, 0., Public Library 

Cjjertsen, Julius, Copenhagen, Denmark 

Clapp, Henry W., Concord, N.H. 

Clark, F. W 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass 

Clarke, Miss Cora H 

Clarke, W.B 

Clarke, W. B., M.D. Minneapolis, Minn 

Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, Northampton, Mass. 

Clarkson, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa. ....... 

Clay, C. M., Whitehall, Ky 

Cleaves, N. Porter 

Clerkenwell Public Library, London, Eng 

Cleveland, 0., Public Library 

Clinton, Town of. Mass 

Cobb, Rev. W. H 

Cobden Club, London, Eng. 

Cohen, Miss., Richmond, Va 10 broadsides 

Colby University Library, Waterville, Me 

CoXe,!:.!^., Washington, D.C 

Collet, C. D., London, Eng broadsides 93 

Columbia College Library, New York City lA 

Columbus, 0., Committee on Public School Library .... 
Commelin, Miss Anna D., ^rooA;/j/n, i\^. F. 



Library Department. 43 

Volumes. 

Commission of Colleges in New England, Providence, R.I. . . 2 

Concord, Mass., Public Library ........ 4 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, A^ew Haven, Ct. . . 1 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Ne^o Haven, Ct. . . 3 

Connecticut Board of Fish Commissioners, New Haven, Ct. . . 1 

Cook, Prof. Albert S., JVew Haven, Ct 1 

Cook, Thomas, & Son, N^ew York City 3 

Coolidge, J. R 56 

Cooper Union, JVeio York City 2 

Cornell University, Ithaca, JV.Y. 1 

Cornell University, Agricultural Experiment Stations .... 22 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, Free Public Library 1 

Counsel, Edward, Somerville, Australia ...... 2 

Courtenay, W. A., Charleston, S.C. . 5 

Crocker, George G 2 

Croes, J. J. R., New York City 1 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. ........ 1 

Cupples, Joseph G 88 

Curry, i/o«. J. L. M., Washington, D.C. 2 

Curtis, 3Irs. Charles P 1 

Curtis, William E 6 

C\i.sX.,B,ohevt'S., M.D., London, England 2 

^ Cutter, Charles A U 

Cutting, Andrew, Consul of Argentine Republic 2 

Da Costa, Charles W., Jacksonville, Fla. ...... 1 

Dalton, Samuel, Adjt.-Gen. of Mass 1 

Dana, R. H 3 

Dana, S. B., West Roxbury ... 84 

Danforth Public Library, Paterson, N.J. 1 

Dargan, Hon. G. W., Charleston, S.C 1 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. 1 

Davenport, Henry 5 

Davis, Horace, San Francisco, Cal 1 

Dayton, Ohio, Public Library 2 

Dean, John Ward 1 

De Costa, Rev. B. F., New York City 2 

Dedham. Mass., Temporary Asylum 1 

Delaware Historical Society, Wilmington, Del 2 

]^enver. Col., Public Library 6 

De Peyster, J. W., Neiv York City 1 

Detroit, Mich., Public Library 1 

Diaz, His Excellency, Porfirio, City of Mexico 3 

Doane, L. G., M.D., New York City 1 

Domestic Monthly Publishers, New York City 2 

Dominguez, Luis L., London, England ...... 1 

Doncaster Borough Free Library, England 1 

Dorchester, Prof. D 1 

Dorr, Miss Caroline, Roxbury, Mass. .... newspapers 

Dorr, George Bucknam .... 26 maps, 14 art journals 81 

Dotterer, Henrr S., Philadelphia, Pa. ...... 1 

Dover, N.H., Public Library 1 

Downs, James P., New York City 1 

Dowse, Miss M. E 32 

Drummond, J. H., Portland, Me. 1 

Dryden, Hon. John, Ontario 24 

Dublin, Ireland, Municipality of 1 

Du Dezert, G. D., Paris, France 1 

Dudley, Dean, Wakefield, Mass 1 

Dutton, Albert 4 

Dyer, Elisha, Providence, R.I. 1 

Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Eastman, 3lrs. Sophia . . . . ■ 1 

Eaton Family Association, New Haven, Ct 1 



44 City Document No. 23. 

Volumes. 

Eddy, 3frs. M. B. G 9 

Elislia Mitchell Scioiitific Society, CArti^e^ //i7/, iV"^.C 1 

Eli/aboth, A^./., Tublic Library 1 

Elliott, Hon. Charles B., Mirmeapolis, Minn 1 

Enebuske, Clacs J 2 

Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, Fa 2 

English High School Association 1 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Mel 2 

Ensign, Charles S 2 

Entomological Society, Washington, B.C. 1 

Esoteric Publishing Company 2 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass 21 photographs 6 

Evans, F. M., Antigua, Leeward Islands 2 

,, Evans, M., London, England ........ 1 

Evarts, Rev. W. W. Haverhill, Mass 1 

Everett, W., Quincy, Mass. 12 

Excelsior Publishing Company, New York City 1 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa 4 

Fall River, Mass., Public Library 3 

Fawcett. Wm., F.L.S., Jamaica, W.I. 3 

Faxon, Charles E 1 

Fewkes, J. W 3 

Fifield, Hon. G. W., Lowell, 3fass 1 

Fiske, G. S 1 

Fitchburg, Mass., City of 1 

Fitchburg R.Il. Company 1 

Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 2 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Floye, W. J 4 

Fliigel, Felix, Leipzig, Germany 10 

Folsom, A. A 2 

Foote, A. R., Washington, D.0 2 

Ford, Paul L., Brooklyn, N.Y. 1 

Ford, W. E 1 

Forstermann, E., Dresden, Ger 1 

Foster, Joseph, U.S.N., Portsmouth, N.H. ...... 3 

France, Ministere de I'lnstruction publique, Paris .... 100 

France, Ministeredes affaires etrangeres 1 

Francisco, M. J., Rutland, Vt. ........ 1 

Frankle, Gen. Jones, Haverhill, Mass. ...... 1 

Frazer, Persifor, Philadelphia., Pa 1 circular 1 

Freeman, John R. . . . . • 2 

Friends' Book Association, Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Friends' Book Store, Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Frothingham, A. L., Baltimore, Md 1 

Furber, Rev. D. S., Newton Centre, Mass 1 

Gaffarel, P., Dijon, France 1 

Gallagher, Rev. William, Easthampton, Mass. ..... 3 

Galvin, George W., M.D 1 

Ganong, W. T., St. John, N.B 1 

Garland, James S., Concord, Mass 1 

Garrison, F. J., West Roxbury, 13 periodicals 185 

Garrison, L. McKim, Cambridge, Mass 2 

Garrison, W. P., New York City 2 

Gay, Julius, Farmington, Ct 1 

General Association of Connecticut, A'ez/' iowfZora . • . . 1 
General Association of New Hampshire, Congregational and Presby- 
terian churches, Hollis, N.H. 1 

General Theological Seminary 1 

Geological and Natural History Survey of Minn., Minneapolis, 

Minn. ............ 2 

Geological Society of London, England 1 

Geological Survey of Georgia, Atlanta, Ga. 1 



Library Department. 45 



Georgetown University, Washington, B.C. 1 

German Society of the City of New York 1 

Gifford, William L. R., A^ew Bedford, Mass 1 

Gill, Augustus H., J/. /> 1 

Gilraan, Nicholas Paine 1 

Glasgow Philosophical Society, Scotland 1 

Gloucester, Mass., City of 2 

Glo vers ville, iV. l""., Public Library 1 

Goddard, 3Iiss Matilda 55 

Godfrey, Frank, Honolulu, H.I. 1 

Gordon, E 1 

Gordon, George A., Somerville, Mass. 1 

Gould, 3fiss Ida W 30 

Gould, S. C. and L. M., 3/awc7iesi!er, iV:^. II 

Graham, Douglas, 31.1) 2 

Grand Commandery of Maine, Portland I 

Grand Rapids, J/Vc/u, Public Library I 

Grant, George B I 

Gray, 3fiss Harriet, Wellesley Hills, Mass 28 

Gray, L. F 2 

Great Britain Patent Office 49 

Great Falls Leader Publishing Company, 3Iontana .... 1 

Green, Millbrey, 31. D I 

Green, S. A., 31. D. . . I circular, 2 broadsides, I newspaper 43 

Green, S. S., Worcester, 3fass 4 

Greenough, W. W. .......... 1 

Gregory, H. E I 

Griffing Iron Company, Jersey City, N.J. 2 

GrifHs, Rev. W. E I 

Griffith, Axtel, & Cady Co., ^o<J2/oA;e, I/ass I 

Griffiths, L. M 1 

Grolier Club, Neiu York City 2 

Guelph Agricultural College, Canada 8 

Guild, Chester . . . • . . newspapers and magazines 256 

Guildhall Library, London, England 3 

Gustin, Henry Arthur, Cambridge, Mass 

Haliburton, R. G. , London, England 

Halifax, England, Public Library 

Hall, Edward W., Waterville, 3Ie 

Hall, Joseph, Hartford, Conn 

Hall's Phonographic College ........ 

Hamburg, Germany, Stadtbibliothek 

Hamilton, Ontario, Public Library 

Handelskammer, Leipzig, Germany 

Harison, W. B., New York City 

Harrison, Frank, Newark, N.J. .....••• 2 

Hart, Hon. Thomas N 2 

Hartford, Ct., Library Association 2 

Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Ct ^ 

Hartwell, E. M. . . . ' I 

Harvard Club of New York City 2 

Harvard College, Cambridge, 3Iass 1 

Harvard College Astronomical Observatory ^ 

Harvard College Museum of Comparative Zoology .... 2 

Harvard Medical School ......••• ^ 

Harvey, A. C ^ 

Haskell, Rev. Augustus M 1 

Hastings, J. K 3 

Hastings, H. L 32 

Hatcher, E. N., Columbus, 1 broadside 

Hayden, John, Dublin, Ireland ^ 

Hazen, Gen. A. D., Washington, B.C. . postage stamps, maps 
Hazen, Rev. H. A. ^ 



46 City Document No. 23. 

Volumes. 

Heden, H. B 1 

Hemenway, Mrs. Mary 2 

Hervey, E. W., New Bedford, Mass 1 

Heydrick, C, FranMin, Pa 1 

Hiersemann, Karl W., Leipzig, Germany 3 

HiEfginson, George 1 

Hiil, Alfred J.. St. Paul, Minn 1 

Hill, Hon. H. A 2 

Hill, Col. H. E., Somerville, Mass 2 

Hill, N. P., Colorado Springs, Col 1 

Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati, 0. . . 1 

Hoar, Hon. George F., Worcester, Mass 6 

Hobart College, Geneva. N.Y. 2 

Hoboken, iV.-7., Free Public Library 1 

Hodges, R. M., M.D 2 

Hodsdon, O. E broadsides, periodicals 10 

Hoepli, Ulrico. Milan, Italy 1 

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, M.D periodicals 183 

Home for Aged Couples ......... 1 

Home for Inebriates Association, London, England .... 1 

Homestead Co5perative Bank ..... 1 broadside 

Hopedale, Mass., Public Library 1 

Horsford, Prof. E. N., Cambridge, Mass 5 

Hovey, W. A 23 

Howard Association, London, England 1 

Howard, George E., Lincoln, Neb 2 

Howell, George R., ^/^)a»2/, -tV.1^ 2 

Hubbard, James M 8 

Hudson, W. M., Hartford, Ct 1 

Huguenot Society of America, New York City 1 

Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Mass. ..... 1 

Hunt, E. B newspapers 6 

lerson, Bev. Henry, London, England 1 

Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, III 1 

Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History, Champaign, III. . . 3 

Indiana Bureau of Statistics, Indianapolis, Ind. .... 1 

Indianapolis, Ind., Public Library 1 

Industrial Aid Society . . . '. 2 

Ingraham, R. C, New Bedford, Mass. 2 

Institute of Jamaica, Kingston, Jam. ....... 1 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England ..... 6 

Iowa Agricultural College, Experiment Station, Ames, Iowa . . i 

Irish Loyal and Patriotic Union, Dublin, Ireland .... 1 

Italy, Ministero dell' Interno, Rome, Italy . ... 21 

Ives, Bray ton. New York City 3 

Jackson, Wm., City Engineer 1 

James, B. W., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Jarvis, Miss M 2 maps 39 

Jay, Hon. John, New York City 2 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D 126 

Jenks, Francis H. 36 magazines 49 

Jersey City, N.J., Free Public Library 5 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. ... . . 27 

Johnson, Edward F 1 

Johnson, Samuel ........... 1 

.Joint Counties Lunatic Asylum, Carmarthen, Wales .... 1 

Jones, Col. Charles C, Augusta, Ga 2 

Jones, Gardner M., <S^a/em, J/ass. .... 9 photographs 

Jones, i/bw. John P., Washington, D.C. 1 

Judson, A. B., Neiv York City 1 

K. K. Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna, Austria .... 4 

Kansas Board of R.R. Commissioners, Topeka 1 

Kansas City Academy of Science 1 



Library Department. 47 

"Volumes. 

Kansas State Agricultural College, Experiment Station, Manhattan, 

Kan. 8 

Kansas State Board of Agriculture, Topeka, Kan 6 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan 3 

Kate Field's Washington 

Keller, MissM.. C, Neiv York City 

Kentucky Geological Survey, Frankfort, Ky 

Kentucky State College Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky. 

King, Rufus, Yonkers, N.Y. 

Kingsley, W. L., New Haven, Ct. 

Kirkpatrick, George E., Philadelphia, Pa 

Knapp, A. M. 1 

Knowles, Edward R 

Knowles, L. F 

Knox, John Jay 

Kongelige Biblioteket, Stockholm 

Krankskopf, J., Philadelphia, Pa 

Lanphear, Rev. 0. T., Beverly, 3fass. 

Lawrence, City of 

Lawrence, J/ass., Public Library ; 

Lawrence, Abbott .... periodicals and newspapers 12 

Leavitt, Mrs. M. C 

Leeds, England, Free Public Library 

Leicester, J/ass., Public Library 

Lenox Library, JVeiv York City 

Leue, Adolph, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Lewis, T. H., St. Paul, Minn * . 2 

Lexington, Town of 1 

Library Company of Philadelphia, Pa. 2 

Lilienthal, 3Irs. A. L., Roxbury, Mass. 3 

Lille, France. Bibliotheque de rUniversite 6 

Lincoln, F. "W portrait 

Linderfelt, K. August, Milwaukee, Wis 

Lintner, J. A. , Albany, N.Y. 

Little, G. T., Brunswick, Me 

Littlejohn, Rt. Rev. Abram N., Garden City, N.Y. . 

Liverpool, England, Free Public Library 

Locke, M. F., Little Rock, Ark. . 

London, England, Corporation of the City of 

Los Angeles, Cal., Public Library 

Lothrop, C. L 

Louisiana State University, Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton 
Rouge. La. ........... 

Lovett, Robert W., 3/./? 

Ludwig Salvator, Archduke of Austria and Tuscany .... 

Lyman, G. H., M.D 

Lyman, Mrs. Theodore, Brookline, Mass. . . .25 periodicals 
Lynn, Mass., School Committee ........ 

MacCalla, Clifford P., ir..4 

Macdonald, Arthur, M.D., Worcester, Mass. 

Macmillan & Bowes, Cambridge, England ...... 

Macurdy, Miss T. E 

Maimonides Library, New York City 

Maine Central Railroad, Portland, Me. 

Maine Free Masons, Grand Chapter, PoHland, Me 

Maine Historical Society, Portland, Me 

Maine Missionary Society, Bangor, Me 

Maine State College, Agricultural Experiment Station, Orono, Me. 

Maiden, City of, Mass. 

Maiden, Mass., Public Library 

Malone, Miss Emily, Dublin, Ireland 

Manchester, England, Free Public Library 

Manchester, England, Geological Society 



48 City Document No. 23. 

VolumcB. 

Marcy, Henry O., M.D 1 

Marvin, John T • . 1 

Marsh, Henry A., Worcester, Mass 4 circulars 

Martin, Joseph G. 1 

Mary hind Agricultural College, Experiment Station, Trince George's 

County 13 

U'Ason/lj.T)., Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 

Mason, W. L., MilwaiiJcee, Wis 2 

Massachusetts, Board of Railroad Commissioners .... 1 
Bureau of Statistics ' ... 24 

Sec. of the Commonwealth 13 

State Auditor 6 

State Board of Agriculture 4 

State Board of Health 7 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity 1 

State Fireman's Association 1 

State Library 1 

State Normal School, Worcester 1 

State Pharmaceutical Association 1 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass 5 

Massachusetts Baptist Missionary Society 1 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics' Association .... 3 

Massachusetts General Hospital ........ 1 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society ....... 3 

Massachusetts Infant Asylum 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 4 

Massachtisetts Medical Society 1 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded 1 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children . 1 

Master Car-builders' Association, Chicago, III 1 

Matthews, Brander, New York City ....... 93 

Matthews, His Honor 'N.,jr. ........ 32 

Matthews, William, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . . . . . • 1 

Maxwell, Wm. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 1 

May, H. A 20 

May, Samuel, Leicester, Mass 1 

Mayo, Rev. A. D. . . . . broadsides and newspapers 82 

McConnell. H. H., Allston, Mass. 1 

McGill College and University, Montreal, Canada .... 2 

McKenzie, Rev. A., Cambridge, 3Iass 1 

Medina, J. T., Santiago de Chile 3 

Mekeel, C. H., Stamp & Publishing Co., ^S";!. ZoMis, Jfo. . . . 1 

Memorial Hall Library, Andover, Mass 1 

Mercantile Library Company of Philadelphia 1 

Mercantile Library, New York City .... 1 photograph 

Mercier, I/oJi. Houore H., Quebec, Canada ...... 2 

Meriden Scientific Association, Meriden, Conn. ..... 1 

Mexican Central Railway Company .....•• 1 

Mexico, Direccion General de Estadistica de la Republica Mexicana 1 

Michigan, Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, Lansing, Mich. 1 

Commissioner of Railoads, Lansing 2 

Military Academy, Orchard Lake, Mich 1 

State Library, Lansing, Mich 14 

Mifflin, J., Philadelphia, Fa 1 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Cincinnati, 

Ohio 5 

Miller, C. G., Chicago, III 1 

Mills, Charles K., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Milwaukee, Wis., Chamber of Commerce ...... 1 

Milwaukee, Wis., Public Library ....... 5 

Minneapolis, Minn., Public Library, ....... ^ 

Minnesota, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Minneapolis .... 1 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul 1 



Library Department. 



49 




Minnisink Valley Historical Society, Port Jervis, N. Y. 
Missionary Conference, London., England . 
Missouri IBureau of Labor Statistics, Jefferson City, Mo 
Mix, C. L., Cambridge, Mass. 
Momerie, Rev. A., London, England . 

Monks, G. H., M.n 

Monroe, Prof. James, Oberlin, Ohio . 
Montt, Pedro, Washington, D.C. . 

Moody, E. S 

Moore, George H., LL.D., New York City 
Moore, Mrs. T. Emily, Brighton, Mass. 
Morse, Edward S., Salem, Mass. 
Morse, Hon. Leopold, Washington, D.C. 
Morse Institute, Natick, Mass. 
Morton, Edwin, Morges, Switzerland . 

Morton, J. W 

Morton, W. J., M.D., New York City . 

Mount Vernon, Mo., Academy 

Mullet, A. E., Charlestoicn, Mass 

Munn & Co., New York City 

Museum of American ArcliEeology, Philadelph 

Museum of Comparative Zoology 

Museum of Fine Arts .... 

Muybridgc, Eadweard, Philadelphia, Pa 
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C. 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Civil Service Reform League, New York City 
National Eclectic Medical Association, Chicago, III. 
National Executive Silver Committee, Washington, D.C 
National Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Evanston, 
Nationalist Club ...... 

Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Neb. 

Neill, Edward D., D.D., St. Paul, Minn. . 

New Bedford, Mass., Board of Trade . 

New Bedford, Mass., Free Public Library . 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 

New England Methodist Historical Society . 

New England Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

New Hampshire Grand Lodge, Knights of Honor, Dover, N. 

New Haven Colonial Historical Society, New Haven, Conn 

New Haven Home for the Friendless, Netu Haven, Conn. 

New Jersey, State of. Agricultural Experiment Station 

New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, New Brunswick 

New Jersey Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Trenton, N.J. 

New Jersey Historical Society ..... 

New South Wales, Department of Charitable Institutions 
New York, State of. Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Albany 

State Bar Association ..... 

State Forest Commissioners, Albany, N'. Y. 

State Library, Albany, N.Y. . 

State Medical Society, Albany, N.Y. 

State Reservation at Niagara. Albany, N. Y. 

New York Academy of Sciences, New York City 
New York Chamber of Commerce, New York City 
New York Charity Organization Society, New York City 
New York City Board of Education .... 
New York Civil Service Commission, Albany 
New York Free Circulating Library, New York City . 
New York Historical Society, New York City 
New York Ophthalmic Institute, New York City . 
New York Society Library, New York City . 
Newark, N.J., Free Public Library .... 



broadside 



///. 



H. 



broa 



dsides 



50 City Document No. 23. 

VolumcM- 

Newberry, Prof. J. S., Xew York City ...... 1 

Newberry Library, Chicago, III 1 

Newburyport, J/«ss., Public Library 1 

Newell, W. W., Cambridge, Mass 1 

Ncwhall, n. F., Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Newton, Mass., City Clerk 2 

Newton, Mass., Free Library 1 

Newton, Win. T., Brookline, Mass 2 

Nicbols, B. W., Jamaica Plain . . newspapers and periodicals 133 

Nichols, Mrs. R. Anne 94 

Nickerson, Sereno D 3 

Nickolson, J. B., Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis 3 maps 282 

North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh, N.C. . . 1 

Northwestern University, Evanston, III. ...... 1 

Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition Committee 1 

Nova Scotia Historical Society, Halifax, N.S 1 

Noyes, E. P., Rowley, Mass 314 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia .... 2 

Ober, F. W., New Fork City 7 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohia 1 

O'Farrell, Charles 4 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbus, 21 

Ohio State Bar Association, Coluinbus, 3 

O'Kane, Joseph 1 

Old Residents' Historical Association, Lowell, Mass 1 

Omaha, Neb., Public Library 1 

Ongania, Ferdinando, Venice, Italy 16 

Ontario Agricultural College, Toronto, Ont. 5 

Otterbein University, Westerville , 6 

Pacific Mills, Lawrence, Mass 1 

Page, James A. periodicals 

Parker, i/Vss Julia 11 

Parks, Leighton 1 

Parnell, John, London, England 3 broadsides 2 

Parsons, George F., San Francisco, Cal. ...... 1 

Partridge, G. F 1 

Paton, Allan Park, Greenock, Scotland ...... 2 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. ....... 1 

Peabody Institute, Peabody, Mass. ....... 1 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Cambridge, Mass. . 3 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia ... 4 
Pennsylvania Geological Survey, Board of Commissioners, Phila- 
delphia ............ 2 

Pennsylvania Medical Society, PTiiladelphia 1 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia . 2 

Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution, Philadelphia . 7 

Pennsylvania State Library, Philadelphia . ' 31» 

Peralta, Jose F. de, M.D., San Jose, Costa Rica 1 

Perkins, A. T 4 

Perkins, W. D., Sacramento, Cal. 1 

Perkins Institution and Mass. School for the Blind .... 1 

Perry, Amos, Providence, R.I. 1 

Perry, Rev. A. L., Williamstown, Mass. ...... 2 

Perry, T. S 32 

Perry, Right Rev. William S., Bavenjyort, la 29 

Phelps, Miss Fannie L. 6 

Philadelphia, Commissioners for the Erection of Public Buildings . 4 

Pliiladelphia City Institute 1 

Philadelpliia College of Pharmacy, Alumni Association ... 2 

Phillips, Miss 94 

Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass 2 

Phonographic Institute, Cincinnati, 0. ...... 5 



Library Department. 51 



Porter, Rev. E. G., Lexington, Mass 

Portland, Me., Public Library 

Portsmouth, England, Borough of, Free Public Library 

Post, A. A 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1 circular 

Prescott, W. P 

Prince, Leeson C, F.R.A.S., Crowhorongh, Sussex, England 

Providence, R.L, Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Providence, /?./., City Clerk 

Providence, R.I., Executive Department ...... 

Providence, ^./., Public Library 

Pullman Palace Car Co., Chicago, III 

Putnam, Miss Alice |l . . 

Quebec Literary and Historical Society ...... 

Queen's College University, Kingston, Canada 

lieale Istituto Lombardo, Milan, Italy ....... 

Redwood Library and Athenaeum, Newport, R.I. . 

Reed, W. A., Brockton, Mass. ........ 

Reeve, J. C, Dayton, 

Regan, William M., MwMeajioZts, J/mra 

Register Publishing Co., Chicago, III 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N.Y. 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. .... 

Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, 

Provid.ence, R.I. .......... 

Richards, Wm. R 

Richardson, W. A. Washington, D.C. 

Richmond, England, Borough of. Free Public Library 

'BX^Xon, 5 ohw, M.D., New York City 

Rigdon, Jonathan 

Rijks-Universiteit te Utrecht, .Hb//«n<i 

Robert, Charles, Paris, France 

Robinson, F. C, Brunswick, Me 

Robinson, H. C. Hartford, Conn 

Robinson, W. J 

Rochester, iV. F., Public Schools Supt. 

Rodman, Alfred 

Roffe, W 

Rogers, E. H., Chelsea, Mass 

Root, Rev. J. P., Providence, R.I. 

Rosenstein, M., M.D 

Rothschildschen, Freiherr C von., Frankfurt a. M., Germany . 

Rowell, B. W 

Rowell, G. P., & Co., New York City 

Roxbury Latin School .......... 

Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, London, England .... 

Royal Society of Canada, Montreal, Canada 

Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland 

Royal Society of South Australia 

Russo-Jewish Committee, London, England 

Rust, N. J 

Sacconi, Giulia, Florence, Italy 

St. Johns, N.F., Colonial Secretary's Office 

St. Joseph, Mo., Free Public Library ....... 

St. Louis, Mo., Mercantile Library Assn. ...... 

St. Louis, Mo., Public Library ........ 

St. Paul, Minn., Public Library ........ 

Salem, Mass., Public Librarv 

Salisbury, Prof. E. E., New' Haven, Ct 

San Francisco, Ca/., Free Public Library 

Sanger, C. R., Concord, Mass 

Savage, E. H 



52 City Document No. 23. 

Voir 

Sawyer, George E. . 

SchiietYcr, E. M., M.D., Baltimore, 3Id 

SehomeKl, Jostpli, Estate of UO 

Sehonhof, Carl 2 

Scott, F. N., Ph.D., Ann Arbor, Mich 

Scripture, E. W., Worcester, Mass 

Scuildor, S. II., Cambridge, Mass 

Sears, Henry C, Roxbm-y, Mass 

Seattle, Washington, Board of Trade 

Seaver, Nathaniel, East Boston 

Service Geograph. de I'Armee, Paris, France ..... 

Sewall, S. E., Estate of 7: 

Shaftsbury College of Elocution, Washington, B.C. . 

Shattuck, H. A., & Co 

Shaw, Edv/in F '■ 

Shaw, Samuel S periodicals and newspapers 20 

Shea, John G., Elizabeth, N.J. 

Shinn, James T., Philadelphia, Pa 

Simms, Joseph, M.D., San Francisco, Cal. ...... ^ 

Sinclair, A. H.,B. A., Toronto. Out 

Skinner, Charles M., Brooklyn, K. Y. 

Skinner, F. 2 photographs 

Slafter, Jiev. Edmund F. . 

Small, Mrs. A. D., Allston, Mass. . . . . i programmes 

Small, J. M., M.D., New York City 

Smith, Charles C 

Smith, Eugene A., TuscoJoosa, Ala maps 

Smithsonian Institution, Wa,shington, B.C. 1 

Societe beige d'Electriciens, Bruxelles 

Society for Psychical Research 

Society for the History of the Germans in Maryland, Balti- 
mo)'e, Md. ............ 

Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents, Netv York City . 

Society tor the Study of Inebriety, London, England .... 

Society of American Florists 

Society of Arts, London, England 

Society of St. Vincent de Paul ........ 

Somers, Alexander, Manchester, England 

Somerset Club newspapers 

Somerville, Mass., Public Library 15 

South Publishing Company, New Yoi~k City 3 

Southbridge, Town of . . . . ' 1 

Southampton, Eng., Public Library 1 

Spader, P. Vanderbilt, Estate of. New Brunswick, N.J. ... 1 

Spain, Cuerpo de Artilleria, Madrid, Spain 1 

Specht, Joseph, St. Louis, 3Io 2 

Spokesman Publishing Co., /SpoA-a?ie, IFas/j. . . newspapers 

Springfield City Library Assn., 3Iass 

Standard Publishing Company 

Staples, Carlton A., Lexington, Mass 

Start, Rev. W. A., Cambridge, 3Iass 

Stephenson, Andrew, Middletown, Ct 

Stepniak, Sergius 

Stevens, Hermon Weed, Dover, N.H. 

Stewart, Hon. Wm. M., Washington, D.C 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.I. 

Stogdon, J. C, London, England. 

Stokes, Thomas I. 

Stover, B.. U., 3LD., Newport, R.L 

Storrs School Agricultural Experiment Station, Storrs, Ct. . 

Stoughton. Town of 

Street Railway Review Publishing Co., Chicago, III 

Strong, Edward A 



Library Department. 53 

Volumes. 

Strout, James C, Washington, D.C. - 3 

Sunderland, Rev. J. T 

Swan, Robert T 

Swansea, Eng., Public Library 

Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. ...... 

Swedeuborg Publishing Assn., Germantowii, Pa. .... 

Swett, C. E. . 

Swift, Lindsay 3 circulars 

Swift, M. I., Ashtahula, 

Swift, Mcllee, New Brunsivick, N.J. .... 2 broadsides 
Sydney, iV^.jS'. ir., Department of Public Instruction .... 

Sydney, N.S. W., Free Public Library 

Sydney, N.S.W., State Children's Relief Department . 

Taft, Charles H., A.B., Cambridge, Mass 

Taunton, Mass., Public Library 

Taylor, Edward W 

Taylor, Prof. J. R 

Technology Architectural Review 

Terry, C. E., Worcester, Mass 

Terry, Rev. Roderick, New York City 

Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station , Texas . 

Thacker, Spink, & Co., Calcutta,, India 

Thayer, Caroline C, Estate of . . portfolios and photographs 2,406 

Thomas Crane Public Library, Qwincy, Mass 2 

Thompson, Rev. A. C - . 2 

Thorpe, Francis Newton, Philadelphia, Pa. 1 

Thorpe, W. G. . 1 broadside 

Thwing, P;-of. Edward P., £roo^-/?/«, iV.r. 

Tillinghast, C. B 

Tiltou, Mrs. William B 

Tokyo, Japan, Library 

Toledo, 0., Public Library 

Tolman, Albert H., Ripon, Wis 

Topeka, Kansas, Public Library 

Toronto, Ontario, Public Library 

Townsend, Thomas S., New York City 

Traddles Company, Cincinnati, 

Tribune Publishing Co., Meadville, Pa. 

Trinity College, Hartford, Ct 

Trinity College, North Carolina ..... - - 

Troup, F. B., Exeter, England 

Tucker, Benjamin R , . . 

Tucker, AV. G., ^^6««2/, iV.F. 

Tuekerman, Frederick 

Tufts College, Medford, Mass 

Tuttle, ^ef. Joseph F., Crawfordsville, Ind 

Tuttle, J. H., Dedham, Mass 

Tyler, W. G., Salem, N.J. 

United States. Attorney General 

Board of Indian Commissioners 

Board on Geographical Names 

Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries 

Court of Claims 

Department of Agriculture ....... 30 

Bureau of Animal Industry ...... 

Division of Chemistry ....... 

Division of Entomology 5 

— Division of Ornithology 2 

Division of Statistics S 

Division of Vegetable Pathology S 

Division of Forestry 1 

Office of Experiment Stations 10 

Weather Bureau . . .120 maps, GO atlas sheets 



54 City Document No. 23. 

Volumes. 

United States. Dcpjirtmcnt of the Interior 78 

Bureau of Education 8 

Bureau of Labor ........ 7 

Census ( )ffice 84 

Geological Survey 48 atlas sheets 13 

Patent Office 30 

Superintendent of Documents ...... 1 

Department of State . ....... 12 

Bureau of the American Republics 5 

Consular Department 12 

.Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. 2 

National Museum 1 

Navy Department 

— — Bureau of Navigation 3 

— Hydrographic OfBce 2 charts 3 

Hydrographic Office branch, ^os^?i . . . 6 charts 

Nautical Almanac Office 3 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, 3fd. ...... 1 

Naval Observatory 3 

Post Office Department 2 

^ Dead Letter Office . 1 

■ Treasury Department I broadside 2 

Bureau of Statistics 11 

Bureau of the Mint 3 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 8 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue 3 

I.ife-Saving Service 1 

Light-House Inspector 2 

Marine Hospital Service 2 

^ Supervising Inspector-General of Steamboats . . . 11 

War Department 32 

Adjutant-General's Office 1 

Chief of Engineers 4 

Ordnance Office . 1 

Signal Office 366 maps 9 

Surgeon General's Office 2 

Univeirsalist Publishing House . 1 

University College, Toronto, Ont. .... 4 circulars 1 

University of California, Berkeley, Cat 19 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111 2 

University of Michigan, ^4?m ^4rJor 1 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 2 

University of Rochester, Library, Rochester, N.Y. ... . 1 

University of Toronto, Ontario 1 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt 1 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. ...... 4 

Universitv of Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station ... 4 

Updike, Daniel Berkeley 32 

Upsala, Kongl. Universitetet ........ 2 

Upson, Irving S., New Brunswicfc, N.J. 1 

Urban, Theodore L., Columhia, Pa 1 

Utah Agricultural College Experiment Station, Logan .... 10 

Van Siclen, George W., New York City 1 

Vassar, John G., Estate of, P'oz/^'/f^ee/'*'*'?) -^" ^- 2 

Veazcy, W. G., Washington, D.C 2 

Veiga, Augusto M. A., 7*i7ri>, /^7-a?»ce 1 

Vermont Association of Boston ........ 1 

A^'ermont State Library, Montjielier, Vt 19 

Viaux, Frederic H 1 

Victoria, Australia, Public Library 7 

Victoria Street Society for the Protection of Animals from Vivisection, 

Lond.on, England . . . . . ... . . 13 

Vinton, Rev. Alexander H., Worcester. Slass 1 



Library Departmeih'. 55 

Volumes. 

Virginia State Library, Richmond, Va. 3 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia, Pa. ... 1 

Waites, Alfred, M''orcester, Mass. ....... 1 

Wales, Thomas B 1 

Wall, Caleb A., Worcester, Mass. 21 

Waltham, Mass., Public Library 2 

Walton, Rev. J. P., Muscatine, Iowa 2 

Ware, William & Co 1 

Warren, Charles E., Jf.Z) 1 

Warren, James W., M.D 130 

Warrington, Eng., Borough of 1 

Washington & Lee University, Lexington, Va 3 

Washingtonian Home 1 

Waterhouse, S., St. Louis, Mo 2 

Watson, N 31 

Weld, Francis M 1 

Wenham, Mass., Town Clerk 2 

Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn 3 

West Brookfield, Town of I 

West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, Morgantown, W. Va. . 13 

Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, 1 

Whitman, G. H., Billerica, Mass. 1 

Whitmore, W. H. 1 engraving 6 

Whitney, J. L 1 broadside 13 

Whitney, S. F., Watertown, 3fas« 1 

Whitney, Prof. W. D., JVew Haven, Conn 1 

Wicks & Phillips, San Franciseo, Cal. 2 

Wigglesworth, Thomas 1,285 

William & Mary, College of, Williamshurg , Va 1 

Williams, Harold, M.D • . . . . 5 

Wilson, H. W 53 

Wilson, Gen. James G., New York City 1 

Wilstack, John A., Lafayette, Ind. ....... 1 

Winchester Home Corporation for Aged Women ..... 1 

Wines, Fred H., Springfield, III 1 

Wingate, C. E. L 2 

Winn, Henry 1 

Winslovr, John, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . . . . . . . 1 

Winsor, Justin ........... 1 

Winthrop, TJie Hon. R. C 1 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis 2 

Woburn , Mass. , Public Library 1 

Wolff, Philip 1 

Wolverhampton, Eng., Free Library ....... 1 

Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society ..... I 

Woman's Medical College of the N.Y. Infirmary, New York City . 1 

Woman's Relief Corps, Dept. of Massachusetts ..... 3 

Wood, C. H. W 1 

Wood, Henry 2 

Wood, Horatio, Lowell, Mass 1 

Woodbury, C. J. H 1 

Woodman, C. H 1 

Worcester, City of 1 

Worcester, Mass., Free Public Library 1 

Worcester, Mass., Polytechnic Institute 1 

World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, III. . . 54 broadsides 9 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 3 

Yale University Observatory, New Haven, Conn. .... 1 

Young Men's Christian Association, Albany, N.Y. . . ■ • 24: 

Young Men's Christian Association, Harvard University ... 1 

Young Men's Christian Association, New York City .... 1 
Young Men's Christian Associations, International Committee, N. Y. 

City 1 

Young Men's Library, Atlanta, Ga 1 



APPENDIX VI. 

CIRCULATION. 





i 

1 

i 


BATI8 Hall. 


LowiB Hall. 


Readino-room. 




East Boston. 




Ybar. 


1 


i 
1 


1 


i 

1 
1 


1 

1^ 


i 

i 


i 
1 


I 


i 


i^ 


i 
1 


1 


1 


i 


t 


1 

f 


t 


"*» 


1,776,494 


64,261 


152,840 


217,101 


716 


1.272 


187,165 


60,452 


247,617 


820 


1,566 


362,845 


1,026 


68,346 


69,367 


127,712 


423 


660 


1890 


1,875,411 


73,955 


301,305 


275,260 


773 


1,607 


181,246 


74,471 


265,771 


841 


1,525 


369,708 


1.038 


71,468 


60,823 


132,291 


436 


759 


isei 


1.812,432 


71,535 


218,980 


290,515 


816 


1,823 


140,459 


33,838 


174,297 


573 


1,103 




1,190 


68,663 


62,349 


121,012 


398 


600 





SoDTB Boston. 


Eoxb™.. 


Cbaelistown. 


Bbiohton. 


Ybab. 


i 


i 




f 


1 


I 


i 




f 


1 


i 


i 




f 




i 


i 




i 


1 

■s 




1 


fl 


1 


t 


n 


i 


1 


S 


^ 


Is 


1 


1 


1 


t 


k 


i 


1 


1 


&1 














W 






►^ 








Hi 


u 




H 


.3 


1889. . . 


109,231 


67,800 


177,031 


586 


849 


90.404 


41,382 


131,786 


436 


758 


62,490 


36.694 


99.084 


328 


540 


17,338 


3,629 


20,967 


69 


196 


1800. . . 


97,740 


74,140 


171,880 


653 


896 


88.919 


38,558 


127,477 


457 


700 


65,779 


43,798 


109.677 


361 


608 


19,420 


2,099 


21,519 


71 


193 


1801. . . 


83,106 


80.374 


163.480 


537 


753 


76.949 


37,412 


114,361 


376 


639 


58.174 


32,500 


90.674 


298 


600 


16.466 


1,883 


18,349 


60 


167 





DORCHKSTER. 


' Sooth End. 


Jamaica Plain. 


North End. 


Lower 


aiLLS. 


Tear. 


i 


1 




1 


1 


i 


i 
1 




1 


1 

s . 


i 


i 




i 


1 


S 


i 


1 

¥■ 


S 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


b 


,1 


1 


1 


Ii 


1 


1 


1 


!^ 


i 


>• 


1 


1 


1889. . . 


70,728 


32,157 


102,886 


345 


605 


77.657 


83.347 


161,004 


633 


826 


47,300 


19.438 


66,738 


221 


463 


33,849 


112 


230 


22.872 


76 


1890. . . 


70,860 


24,388 


05.248 


313 


616 


87,266 


90,963 


178,229 


686 


804 


53,262 


17,585 


70,847 


233 


446 


44,893 


167 


327 


22,711 


76 


1891 . . . 


65,386 


23,295 


88.680 


292 


631 


83.026 


94,809 


177,836 


686 


796 


48,835 


22,331 


71,166 


234 


479 


59,337 


196 


355 


19,057 


63 



.rkingdays in' 1890; the 6 



Library Department. 



57 



APPENDIX VII. 

REGISTRATION. 



The first registration, 1854-58, had 17,066 
names; the second, 1859-67, had 52,829 
names; the third, 1868 to April 30, 1886, 
had 227,581 names. , 



Central Library . . . 
East Boston branch . 
South Boston branch 
Roxbury branch . . . 
Charlestown branch . 
Brighton branch . . 
Dorchester branch . 
South End branch . . 
Jamaica Plain branch 

Totals 



8,997 

1,307 

1,862 

1,372 

630 

323 

1,405 

1,484 

874 



1,117 
1,781 
1,585 
1,623 

365 
1,231 
1,511 

926 



7,752 
877 

1,395 

1,260 
860 
270 
815 

1,040 
705 



1,065 

2,156 

1,769 

762 

277 

1,005 

1,740 

892 



1,436 

1,371 

735 



1,470 

785 



18,254 






14,974 



11,502 



APPENDIX VIII. 

READING. 





Bates Hall. 


Lower Hall 

and 
Branches. 






64.03 


II. History, biography and travel . . . 


48. 

43.85 
4.68 
3.47 


15.27 






IV. Periodicals 


5.78 


V. Miscellaneous 


8.55 






Totals 


100.00 


100.00 







58 City Document No. 23. 



APPENDIX IX. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



General Libraey Accoxtsts. 



Expended, 1891. 



Binding materials f 2,264 64 

books 1,636 23 

Books, City appropriation $26,205 56 

Income from Trust funds . . . 9,842 29 

86,047 85 

Periodicals 4,627 00 

Expense (miscellaneous: water-rates, cleaning, ice., etc.) . 3,486 29 

Fuel 2,909 17 

Furniture, etc 603 02 

Gas 3,457 57 

Printing and cataloguing 7,409 41 

Stationery 1,080 46 

Salaries 81,638 U 

Transportation, postage, etc 2,507 92 

Kents 6,982 51 

Repairs 2.572 88 

Electric lighting 2,329 63 

Total . . . . ■ $159,552 69 



Note. —The cost of maintaining the branches, $45,445.10, makes part of the general items 
of the several appropriations. 
Receipts from fines and sales of catalogues, $3,591.11. 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. — INVESTED IN CITY OF BOSTON BONDS. 



GiflB. 


Atnount. 


When deUvcred. 


No. of Bond. 


When 


due. 


Income. 


Provisions. 




$60,000 00 
I 20,000 00 
i 10,000 00 




1,727 
362 


April, 
Jan'y, 
April, 




t3,000 


To buy " books of permanent value." 
j " To the maintenance of a fjee public library." 
("Purchase of books." 


2 Jonathan Phillips 


April, 1861 
April, 1853 


1906 


3 Abbott Lawrence 


10,000 00 


May, 1860 


281 


July, 


1905 


600 




4 Charlotte Harris 


10,000 00 


August, 1877 


2,679 


Oct., 


1897 


600 


Books for Chariestown branch, published before 1860. 


5 Henry L. Pierce 


6,000 00 


December, 1873 


1,667 


Jan'y, 


1894 


300 


" Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 


6 Mary P. Townsend 


4,000 00 


April, 1879 


2,960 


April, 


1899 


200 


Books five years old in some one edition. 


7 George Ticlinor 


4,000 00 


April, 1879 


2,068 


Oct., 


1920 


160 


Books in Spanish and Portuguese five years old in some one edition. 


8 John P. Bigelow 


1,000 00 


August, 1860 


1,726 


April, 


1894 


60 


Purchase of books. 


9 Franklin Club 


1,000 00 
1 1,600 00 


June, 1863 
November, 1878 


1,224 
j 3.714 


Jan'y, 
Oct., 


1914 
1900 1 


40 
75 


political economy." 


10 Samuel A. Green 












I Books relating to American history. 




I 600 00 


April, 1884 


1,243 


April, 


1914 


20 




U South Boston 




September, 1879 


6,596 


July, 


1919 


i 


For benefit of South Boston branch. 


12 Arthur Scholfleld 


50,000 00 


December, 1883 


1,223 


Oct., 


1913 


2,000 


To be used for books of permanent value. 




11,800 00 


July, 1890 


6,300 


July, 


1920 


472 




14 Thomas B. Harris 


1,000 00 


April. 1884 


1,244 


April, 


1914 


40 


For benefit of Chariestown branch. 


16 Daniel Treadwell 


r 2.000 00 

■! 1,700 00 


joctober. 1886 
J November, 1880 


1,382 
1,486 


April, 1916 
Oct., 1917 
Nov.15,1919 


1 197 
J 


To be expended by the Trustees in such manner as they may deem for 
the best interest if the Library. 


16 Edward Lawrence 

17 J. Ingersoll Bowditch .... 


600 00 
10,000 00 


May, 1886 


1,816 


April, 
Jan'y, 


1916 


360 


" To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they [the 
Trustees] m,-.y choose to the purchase of special books of reference to be 
kept and used only at the Chariestown Branch of said Public Library." 

For " the purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathe- 
matics and astronomy," to be added to the Bowditch collection. 




$196,600 00 










t9,938 





MEMORAJ^-DA. 



Joshua Bates, born near Boston, 1788, died in London, 
The sum of $lu,OlK) was a gift in Mr. Phillips' lifetime. 
Mr. Lawrence died in AuEust, 1855, and this sum was 
The bequest of Charlotte Harris to the Chariestown bri 
The donation of Mayor Pierce, previoun to his retireni 



Tlie other $20,000 v 



e of Barin;i Brothers 



aMr.Bieelowonretiri 
T the authority given tl 



y be expended s 

iat«1.0(Kt,ut . 
s transferred t 



) of books to the Library. 



e Trustees of the Franklin Club, under t 

STOCKS OTHER THAN CITY BONDS HELD BY TREADWELL FUND. PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Shares. 


Par Value 


Value per Share 
from Trustee. 


Total as 
received from 




income. 


Remarks. 


15 B. & A. R.R. Co 


$100 00 


$170 00 


$2,686 00 


^ 


* $128 00 




6 B. & ProT. K.R. Co 


100 00 


179 60 


1,077 00 




60 00 




9 Fitchburg R.B. Co 

1 Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co 


100 00 
100 00 


118 00 
133 00 


1,062 00 


\ $5,585 00 


48 00 
6 00 


April 5, 1887. The certldcates of 9 shares of P. R.R. exchanged for a 
certificate of 12 shares pieferred stock in same corporation, par value 
$100. Total, $1,200. 


18 Cambridge Lyceum 


20 00 


30 00 


540 00 




26 20 










88 00 


Less 88 00 




Less paid May 10, 18S6, to City Collector, per order of Board of 
Trustees of'public Library. 










$5,497 00 


1 B. & A. R.E. Co 


100 00 






100 00 















' Includes Income on the c 



Library Department. 59 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

BiGELOw Fond. — This is a donation made by the late John P. Bigelow, 
in August, 1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated to the purchase of books 
for the increase of the Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond for . . 81,000 00 



Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for the 
time being. 

Bates Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Joshua Bates, of 
London, in March, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond for . . $50,000 00 

" The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, expended in 
the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as may be 
found most needful and most useful." Payable to the Mayor of the City for 
the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fond. — This is the bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bond S10,000 00 



The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the purchase 
of books of permanent value and autliority in mathematics and astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Jonathan Phillips, 
of Boston, in April, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . §10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of books 
for said Library. 

Also, a bequest by the same gentleman, in his will, dated 20th September, 
1849. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $20,000 00 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of a 
Free Public Library. 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the time 
being. 

Abbott Lawrence Fond. — This is the bequest of the late Abbott 
Lawrence, of Boston. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $10£0000 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the purchase 
of books for the said Library, having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrejjce Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Edward 
Lawrence, of Charlestown. The following clause from his will explains its 
purpose : — 



60 City Document No. 23. 

" To lioltl and apply the income, and so nmch of the principal as llicy mnv 
choose, to the purchase of special books of reference, to be kept and used 
only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, due 

April 1, 191G i^r.OO 00 

Pierce Fund. — This is a donation made by Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of 
the city, Nov. 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, Dec. 27, 1873. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $5,000 00 

TowNSEND Fund. — This is a donation from William Minot and William 
Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Marv P. Townsend, of Boston, at whose 
disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust, for such charitable 
and public institutions as they might think meritorious. Said executors ac- 
cordingly selected the Public Library of the City of Boston as one of such 
instituti(ms, and attached the following conditions to the legacy: "The 
income only shall, in each and every year, be expended in the purchase of 
books for the use of the Library ; each of which books shall have been pub- 
lished in some one edition at least five years at the time it may be so 
purchased." 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent. Bond, for . $-1,000 00 

TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of Boston, 
he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four thousand 
volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After the receipt of 
said sum, the city is required to spend not less than one thousand dollars in 
every five years during the twenty-five years next succeeding {i.e., the 
income of four thousand dollars, at the rate of five per cent, per annum), in 
the purchase of books in the Spanish and Portuguese languages and litera- 
ture. At the end of twenty-five years the income of the said sum is to be 
expended annually in the purchase of books of permanent value, either in 
the Spanish or Portuguese language, or in such other languages as may be 
deemed expedient by those having charge of the Library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for reference or 
study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of tlie Library building. If 
these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trusts and conditions 
faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts, and money are to be given to 
the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this contribu- 
tion, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her right to retain dur- 
ing her life the books and manuscripts, and placed them under the control of 
the city, the City Council having previously accepted the bequests in accord- 
ance with the terms and conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public 
Library received said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $1,000 00 



Franklin Club Fund. — This is a donation made in June, 1863, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the 
association, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French, and J. 
Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a manner as to them 
should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on the Public Library, 
attaching to it the following conditions : " In trust that the income, but the 
income only, shall, year by year, be expended in the purchase of books of 
permanent value for the use of the free Public Library of the city, and, as far 
as practicable, of such a character as to be of special interest to young men." 



Library Department. 61 

The Trustees expressed a preference for books relative to Government and 
Political Economy. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $1,000 OO 



Treadwell Fund. — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died Feb. 27, 
1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, legacies, etc., 
in trust to his executors, to hold during the life of his wife for her benefit, 
and after her decease to divide the residue then remaining in the hands of 
the trustees as therein provided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the 
Trustees of tlie Public Library of tiie City of Boston. 

The City Council accepted said bequest and authorized the Trustees of 
the Public Library to receive the same, and to invest it in the City of Boston 
Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such man- 
ner as they may deem for the best interests of the library. 

Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent. Bonds . . f3,70G 00 

" " " Three and one-half per cent. Bonds, 1,400 00 

«' 16 shares B. & A. R.R. Co. Stock, par value $100 each, 1,600 00 

" 6 shares B. & P. R.R. Co. Stock, par value $100 each, 600 00 

•' 9 shares Fitchburg R.R. Co. Stock, par value $I0O each, 900 ) 

" 1 share Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co. Stock, par value $100 each, 100 00 

" 18 shares Cambridge Lyceum Stock, par value $20 each, 360 00 



00 



Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her will : 

" I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be invested on in- 
terest, whicli interest is to be applied to tlie purchase of books published 
before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own private library, and 
the portrait of my grandfather, Ricliard Devens." Bequest accepted by City 
Council, July 31, 1877. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $10,000 00 



Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $1.000 00 



Scholfield Fund. — Bequest of the late Arthur Scholfield, who died 
in New York, Jan. 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs during 
their lives, and then to he used for the purchase of books of permanent value. 
The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died Nov. 18, 1889, and by his will be- 
queathed to the City of Boston the sum of $11,800, which represents the 
income of said fund, received by him up to the time of his death, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. Invested in 

One City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . . . $50,000 00 

" . . . . 11,800 00 



$61,800 00 



Green Fund. — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the in- 
come of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating to Amer- 
ican history. Invested in 



(>2 



City Document No. 23. 



Two CilTT of Boston Five per cent. Bonds, for 
One City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for 



ij 1,-500 00 
500 00 



82,000 00 



South Boston Branch Library Tritst Fund. — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for tiie benefit of the 
South Boston Brancii Library. 



invested in one city of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for 



$100 00 



Recapitulation of Public Library Trust Funds. 



Scholfleld bequests . 

Bates donation 

Phillips bequest 

Bowditch bequest . 

Phillips donation 

Charlotte Harris bequest 

Abbott Lawrence bequest 

Pierce donation 

Townsend bequest . 

Ticknor bequest 

Treadwell bequest . 

Green donations 

Bigelow donation 

Thomas B. Harris bequest 

Franklin Club donation . 

Edward Lawrence bequest 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund 

Invested funds .... 



$G1,800 00 

50,000 00 

20,000 00 

]0,0(JO 00 

10,000 00 

10.000 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

4,000 00 

4,000 00 

8,660 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

100 00 

.$199,060 00 



Library Department. 



63 



APPENDIX XI. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. 



Executive department 

Catalogue department 

Book department 

Bates Hall circulation depart 

ment .... 
Lower Hall circulation depart 

ment .... 
Janitor's department . 
Bindery .... 
East Boston branch . 



South Boston branch. 


7 


Roxbury Branch 


6 


Charlestown branch , 


fi 


Brighton branch 


3 


Dorchester branch 


5 


South-End branch 


5 


Jamaica Plain branch 


4 


North-End branch 


3 


Deliveries .... 


10 


Total 


135 



At some of the branch libraries occasional extra assistance is employed 
when necessary. 

AGENTS. 

Messrs. W. B. Clarke & Co., and Mr. Carl Schoenhof, Boston. 
Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 
Messrs. Kegan Paul, Trench, Triibner & Co., Limited, London. 
Deuerlich'sche Buchbandlung, Gottingen. 



LOCATION OF THE BRANCH LIBRARIES AND DELIVERY 
STATIONS. 

Allston delivery station, 26 Franklin street, Allston. 

Ashmont delivery station, 25 Argyle street. 

Bird-Street delivery station, 6 Wayland street, Dorchester. 

Brighton branch, Holton Library building, Rockland street. 

Charlestown branch, old City Hall, City square, Charlestown. 

Dorchester branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams st. 

Dorchester Station delivery, I Milton avenue. 

East Boston branch, old Lyman School building, Meridian street. 

Jamaica Plain branch, Curtis Hall, Centre street. 

Lower Mills delivery station, Washington street, near River street. 

Mattapan delivery station, River, cor. Oakland street. 

Mount Bowdoin delivery station, Washington, cor. Eldon street. 

Neponset delivery station. Wood's block. 

North End branch, 166 Hanover street. 

Roslindale delivery station, Florence, cor. Ashland street. 

Roxbury branch, 46 Millmont street. 

South Boston branch, 372 West Broadway, cor. E. street. 

South-End branch, English High-School building, Montgomery street. 

West Roxbury delivery station, Centre, near Mt. Vernon street. 



64 



City Document No. 23. 



APPENDIX XII. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR FORTY YEARS. 

The following geutlemen have served on the Examining Com- 
mittees for the years given. The names in italics are those of 
trustees who Iiave acted as chairmen of the various committees. 
The thirty-fourth year was from May 1 to Dee. 31, 1885, a period 
of eight months, for which no Examining Committee was ap- 
pointed. 



Abbott, Hon. .J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, I860. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailev, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M. 1866. 
Bartiett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890, 1891. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Bigelotv, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, John G., J/.Z>., 1883, 1891. 
Bodlish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879, 1891. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1865. 
Bowditch, H. P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, 1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brimmer, Hon. Martin, 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Browne, Alex. Porter, 1891. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C E., M.D., 1872. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, jr., 1869. 
Chadwick James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1S81. 
Clapp , William W., jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 18£2. 



Collar, Wm. C, 1874. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thos. B., M.D., 1874. 
Gushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Dexter, Rev. HenrvM., 1866. 
Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Jos. T., D.D., 1880. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1880. 
Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 
Eaton, William S., 1887. 
Edes, Henry H., 1886. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871. 
Ellis, Geo. E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, jr., 1878. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889 
Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 
Fields, James T., 1872. 
Fitz', Reginald H., 1879. 
Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F., 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1876. 
Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D. 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., M.D., 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, jr., 1877. 
Green. Samuel A., M.D., 1868. 



Library Department. 



{]5 



Greenoitgh. William II'., 1858, 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grinnell, Rev. C. E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., 18o8. 
Hale, Mrs. Georjie S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haijnes, Henrxj IF., 1881, 1884. 
Havward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John, jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E.,Z>.Z?., 1888,1889. 
Hisginson, Thomas W., 1S83. 
Hill, Clement Hugh. 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
HiUard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard, M., 31. D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., 3LD., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver, W., jr. 1882. 
Homans, Charles D., 31. D., 1867. 
Homans, 3Irs. Charles D., 1885, 

188G, 1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, James M., 1891. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, 31. B., 1869. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, 3Iiss Harrietts S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lee, Mi.'<s Alice, 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lewis, Weston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. VV., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Liltle, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, J/on. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., 31. D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Metcalf, Rev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 



Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Mi not, Francis, 1866. 
Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 
Morse, John T., jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., jr., 1878. 
! 3forton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 
Mudtje, Hon. E. R., 1871. 
Neale, Rollin M., B./J., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis. 1880. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
Otis, G. A., 1860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Ben]. 11., 1876. 
Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parkman, Henry, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882. 
Perkins. Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885, 1890, 1891. 
Phillips, John (■;., 1^*82. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hon. Henry L., 1891. 
Prescott, William H., LL.B., 1853. 
Prince, Hon. F. 0., 1888, 1889, 

1890, 1891. 
Putnam, George, D.B., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Randall, Charles L., 31. D., 1884. 
Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Rollins, J. Wingate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, John C., 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H. , 1880. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 
Seaver, EdwinP., 1881. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888, 

1889. 
Shurileff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, 3hs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery. 31. B., 1888. 
Stevens. Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 
St(me, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Storv, Josei)h, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Teele, John O., 1886. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 
Thayer, George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, B. F., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 
Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Tw()n)bly, Rev. A. S.. 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., 31. D., 1865. 



66 



City Document No. 23. 



Vihhoi-t, Ih-v. Geo. II., 1S7;5. 
Wales, Georute W., 187."). 
WiiUoy, Hon. Sanmol II., 18(52. 
Ward, h'cv. Julius II., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., .)/.A, 1875. 
M'are, Darwiu E., 1881. 
Warner, Hermann J., 18G7. 
Warren, Hon. Cliarles II., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Kobert C, 18G7 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 

Whipple, Edwin P., 186!). 

Whitmore, ]yillia7n H., 1887. 



WhHney, Daniel //., 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A., 187:!. 
Wiiihtman, lion. Joseph M., 1859. 
Wiiliams, Harold, M.D., 1888,1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 

Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 

Wirnsor, Justin, 1867. 
Winthrop, lion. Kobert C, 1854. 
Winthrop, Robert C, jr., 1887. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Goold, 1888, 

1889. 
Wright, Hon: Carroll D., 1884. 



Library Department. 



67 



APPENDIX XIII. 

TRUSTEES FOR FORTY YEARS. 

The Honorable Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1852 to 1864 ; the late George Ticknor in 18G5 ; William 
W. Greenough, Esq., from 1866 to April, 1888; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, Esq., since the latter date. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that for 
1853 made what is called the first annual report. It consisted of 
one alderman and one common councilmen, and five citizens at 
large, till 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one 
alderman, two common councihtien, and six citizens at large, two 
of whom retired, unless reelected, each year, while the members 
from the Cit^' Coiuieil were elected yearly. In 1878 the organi- 
zation of the Board was changed to include one alderman, one 
councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 1867; and in 
1885, by the provisions of tlie amended city cliarter, the repre- 
sentation of the cit}' government upon the Board, by an alderman 
and a councilman, was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, 
consistino; of five citizens at laro;e. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-91. 
Allen James B., 1852-53. 
Appletox, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
BiGELOw, John P., 1852-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry I., 1865-68. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. C J., 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George 0., 1870-71. 
Chase, George B., 1877-85. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 
Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, 1878-88. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864-66. 
Coe, Henry F. 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
Dickinson, M. F., jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-64. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Olivier, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1875-79. 



Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William W., 1856-88 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1880-91. 
HiLLARD, George S., 1872-75 ; 1876- 

77. 
Howes, Osborne, jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Ellis W., 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-3. 



68 



City Documknt No. 23. 



Perkins, AVilliam E., 1873-74. 
IVrry, Lyman, 1S:)2. 
PluinnuT, Farnhani, 185f5-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, l.S7()-77. 
Pope, Kicliard. 1877-78. 
Pratt, diaries E., 1880-82. 

PlEUCE, PllINKAS, l«(^8-!)l. 
PkINCE. FUKDEKICK O., 1888-91. 
Pi;tnam, Gkorge, 1868-77. 
Keeil, Sampson, 1852-.53. 
KiciiARUs, William H., 1889-91. 
Sant?er, Georfje P., 18fl0-61. 
Sears, Philip II., lS.-)9-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Siiepard, Harvey N., 1878-79. 
Shuktleff, Nathaniel B., 1852-G8. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 



Story, Josepli, 1855-50; 1805-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
TiuKNOK, George, 1852-00. 
Tvler, Jolin S., 1S03-0-1; 1800-67 
Warren, Geor-;e W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58 
Whipple, Edm'in P., 1808-70. 
Whitniore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitjiore, William II., 1885-88 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1802-03. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, ElishaT., 1801-03. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNsoR, Justin, 1807. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1808-09. 



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