(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"






"Tf^.^ 



$k. 












ANNUAL RBPORT 



OF THE TRUSTEES 



Public Library 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1896. 



BOSTON: 
MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE. 

1897. 



To His Honoe, Josiah Quincy, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In compliance with the ordinance which requires the 
Trustees of the Public Library to make an annual report of 
its condition, they present the following as their forty-fifth 
annual report for the year ending January 31, 1897. 

As the annual return which the Librarian is directed to 
make to the Trustees gives such complete and instructive 
information touching every department of the library, and 
exhibits so fully all the details of its management, they beg 
leave to adopt this return as part of their own report ; other- 
wise, this communication would be largely a repetition of 
what the Librarian has so well stated. 

The Trustees earnestly advise a careful consideration of 
his report, not only by the city government but by all who 
are interested in the success of the library and desire that it 
should fulfil the expectation of its founders, and become a 
great library, not only for general readers, but for students, 
scholars, and scientists. 

A repetition of some portions of his report, however, may 
be desirable. 

The ordinance touching the annual report of the Trustees 
specially directs them to state the '^ condition of the library, 
the number of books added thereto during the year, the re- 
ports of the Cojnmittee for the examination of the library, 
and the total amount of money received from fines and sales." 

Our library system has been greatly enlarged, so that it 
now comprises: 

The Copley Square Central Library and the branch 
libraries at 

Brighton, Roxbury, 

Charlestown, South End, 

Dorchester, South Boston, 

East Boston, West End, 

Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury, 

Mattapan, "] 

Mt. Bowdoin, ! ^^ v r. 

TVT .1 Ti • i,x ^Reading Rooms. 

North Brighton, [ ^ 

Lower Mills, J 



2 City Document No. 18. 

Besides these 14 branches there are 12 delivery stations, 
having- daily interchange with the Central Library. 

Besides these, 13 engine-houses receive each 25 volumes 
every month, and, in addition, deposits are sent to the Cot- 
tage place School, to the North Bennet-street Industrial 
School, and to the Tyler-street Vacation School. 

We would remind the citizens that the Central Library is 
open every day in the year, except on four of the legal holi- 
days, and the West End branch is open every day except on 
all the legal holidays. 

The number of books added to the library during the year 
was 33,468. 

On the 31st of January, 1896, there were in the Central 
Library and branches, 628,297 volumes, of which 469,874 
were in the Central Library. On the 31st of January, 1897, 
the number in all the departments was 663,763, of which 
492,901 were in the Central Library. 

As the Trustees are charged with the duty to " adopt such 
measures as shall extend the benefits of the institution as 
widely as possible," so that the people may acquire the 
"wisdom and knowledge which in the Bill of Rights are 
declared to be necessary for the preservation of their rights 
and liberties," it is most important to know if the citizens 
are using the library as much as they should ; if the love 
and habit of reading increases, and if the books, giving in- 
struction, and diffusing " wisdom and knowledge," as well as 
mere pleasure, are generally read. We may be proud of 
the architectural charms of our library building, and find 
delight in its artistic decorations, but if the institution does 
not accomplish the work for which libraries are designed it 
is not a success. 

It is gratifying to know that there is no doubt in the 
matter. The Librarian's report shows not only great increase 
in the circulation of the books for home use, but great in- 
crease in the number of readers in the Central Library and 
the several branches. It also shows great increase in the use 
of books therein by students, and those engaged in literary 
and scientific work. 



Library Department. 3 

The circulation for home use from the Central Library 
increased from 251,561 in 1895, to 285,560 in 1896 ; 60,175 
volumes were issued from the children's room at the Central 
Library, an increase of many thousand volumes. As no 
record is kept of the hall use of books in the Central Library 
no accurate statement can be made of the number of readers 
there, but it is known to be large ; nor can we state the 
number of volumes taken from the shelves to be read. There 
are over 100,000 books which may be so taken without a 
call slip, and we can safely say that such use is very great. 
At times nearly every seat in Bates Hall is occupied, and 
often nearly 300 readers are seen busy there, with note book 
and pencil. 

The report of the Librarian shows that the number of 
"active" (live) cards outstanding January 31, 1897, is 
45,606, against 34,842 February 1, 1896,— a gain of 10,764 
card-holders during the year, and also that there is a greatly 
increased use of books " on the Fine Arts in connection with 
lectures, classes and topical work generally." 

Our newspaper-room attracts a large and increasing num- 
ber of readers. We have 318 papers; 111 are published 
abroad, 207 in the United States, and 85 in foreign languages. 
On the average, 225 papers are received daily. It is appar- 
ent that such reading is well appreciated by our citizens. 

All these facts show, beyond a doubt, this gratifying result, 
that the use of books increases greatly, and that the habit of 
reading constantly grows. We need have no fear that the 
library is not doing and well doing the work for which it 
was established. 

The Trustees would call attention to an important change 
in the administration of the stations by the extension of the 
" deposit " system. 

Deposits of about 300 volumes are sent to each station, 
placed on shelves accessible to the public, and circulated di- 
rectly from the station. These deposits are changed from 
time to time. This system has resulted in the increase of the 
circulation through stations from about 40,000 books in 
1895-96 to more than 120,000 in 1896-97. Notwithstanding 



4 City Document No. 18. 

tills increased circulation through deposits, the demand for 
Central Library books on cards sent from stations, has not 
decreased. 

The number of books sent out on deposit during the past 
year was 11,962 ; the number at this time on deposit is 3,906. 

The books for deposit use are either withdrawn from the 
Central Library collection, or bought expressly for the 
purpose. Unless the former are duplicates, they must neces- 
sarily sometimes be recalled from deposit at much incon- 
venience and trouble, but it is hoped that we shall ultimately 
have enough " regular deposit " books to meet all demands. 

As reference has been made in previous reports to com- 
plaints of delays in getting books, it is giatifying to know 
that present methods have somewhat obviated the evil. The 
Librarian says the pneumatic tubes and the book railways now 
work with more certainty, and thus relieve a prominent cause 
of delay ; futhermore, the attendants are better trained for 
their work. Without doubt, however, much of the delay re- 
sults from the fault of readers. During the year investiga- 
tion showed that on 505 application slips the name of the 
applicant was omitted ; on 1,163 slips the number of the 
reader's table was omitted. In 7,066 cases, applicants were 
not to be found at the table to which it was requested the 
books should be brought. Still, there are delays which 
should, if possible, be remedied ; but the chief of the Issue 
Department thinks they are largely caused by " certain in- 
conveniences in architecture and classification, and to incom- 
jileteness in the catalogues and shelf-lists, which have not 
been brought to correspond with changes in the shelves." 

The Trustees and the Librarian appreciate the importance 
of reducing all delays to a minimum, and their constant at- 
tention will be given to such improvements as may enable all 
readers to receive promptly their books. 

In May, 1896, a system of inter-library loans was adopted, 
by which certain libraries had the privilege of drawing our 
books for specified uses, with the guaranty for their safe re- 
turn. Rules were made to carry out this system, and during 
the year 63 volumes were loaned to certain libraries of the 
Commonwealth. As care is taken that no loss or damage to 
the books can occur from such loans, and as only such books 
as can be spared without inconvenience to our own readers 
are loaned, the Trustees believe this comity will be generally 
approved. 

Our library is indebted to the Commonwealth for the 
gift of a large part of the valuable land upon which it 



Library Department. 5 

stands ; and if we can requite the obligation by allowing its 
people outside of Boston to enjoy some of our books through 
inter-library loans, without prejudice to our own citizens, and 
without injury to the library, we believe it is proper to do so. 

In order to direct the reading public to sources of infor- 
mation relating to topics of current interest, the Trustees 
have sought to set on foot a plan for the publication in the 
daily papers of short lists of titles which may be profitably 
consulted by persons seeking trustworthy statements about 
subjects which, from time to time, become matters of public 
interest. In this effort the co-operation of several of the 
daily papers has been secured, and it is hoped that, as the 
educational value of the plan becomes more apparent, a 
wider publication of such lists may appear practicable. 

Many donations have been made to the library during the 
year, some of them of great importance. They are fully set 
forth in the Librarian's report. As evidence of the great 
interest of our citizens in the success of the institution, they 
have peculiar value. It is matter for congratulation that 
this interest has extended beyond state lines, and led Miss 
Victorine Thomas Artz, of Chicago, to make the generous 
gift of $10,000 as a fund for the purchase of rare editions 
of classic writers, to be known as the Longfellow Memorial 
Collection. The Trustees indulge the hope that these gifts 
will stimulate other friends of the librar}^ to make like 
benefactions. We need additional endowments; we need 
more means to make this library what it should be, — to 
make it properly represent the culture and intelligence of 
this community. If the citizens could realize how deficient 
it is in many respects, and what is required for the supply 
of these deficiences, it cannot be doubted that the necessary 
means would be forthcoming, either from the City Govern- 
ment, or from the private donations of the public-spkited 
and patriotic. 

The Trustees would remind the friends of the library that 
out of the annual appropriation of $225,000, but $25,000 
could be appropriated to the purchase of books. Adminis- 
trative expenses increase so much that, with an income of 
$250,000, not more than this amount is available for books. 
Now, for a city of half a million of inhabitants, $25,000 a 
year barely suffices for the more popular departments of 
literature. It does not suffice for the multiplication of 
copies of popular books required for so many readers, spread 
over so large an area. The fact that last year 57 per cent 
of the applications through the branches and stations for 



6 CiTV Docu^iKNT No. 18. 

books from the Central Library \A'ere fruitless, indicates the 
present need of such multiplication of copies; to provide 
these, and the necessary additions of current publications, 
$25,000 per year is very inadequate. The moneys needed 
to supply the wants of specialists must be obtained by 
private gifts. If the library is to maintain its reputation as 
one for the scholar and specialist and increase in usefulness, 
it must he further endowed. The total annual income of 
the Trust Funds is less than 19,000, and a large part of this 
is restricted. Nine thousand dollars per year is practically 
exhausted in supplying the most important of the current 
publications to which the city funds will not extend. When, 
therefore, opportunities occur for the purchase of special 
collections which are occasionally put on the market, the 
Trustees are powerless in the matter. We should improve 
such opportunities if we would build up a great reference 
library. 

The Trustees earnestly desire to remove any impression 
which may exist that the library is rich in endowment, or 
that the appropriations from the city can do more than pro- 
vide for the miscellaneous literature of the popular sort. 
The library should have a reserve fund for emergencies. 

The city has erected for the library a noble building ; but 
the moneys it provides for its maintenance must be directed 
to the educational needs of the great mass of citizens. The 
funds required to enable the institution to render the service 
which a great reference library can perform for the higher 
scholarship must be contributed, as we have said, by 
individuals. 

As the Librarian gives in his report a full statement of 
the financial condition of the library, its income and expen- 
ditures, reference thereto will give information in the 
matter; but as many may not closely examine his statement, 
and as it is important that the government and the citizens 
should fully understand what we have received, and what 
we have disbursed in the administration of the library, the 
Trustees repeat in condensed form what has been so minutely 
set forth by him : 

The total income of 1896, from all sources 

was 1272,842 87 



Made up as follows: 
The General Appropriation of that year . -$225,000 00 



Amount carried fonvard . . . $225,000 00 



Library Department. 7 

Amount brought forward, 1225,000 00 

The Trust-Funds income for 1896, and the 
unexpended income previous to 1896, from 
Trust Funds 30,712 20 

,The Miscellaneous income derived during the 
year from fines, sales of library publica- 
tions, rents of Old Library building, and 
receipts, other than those above stated . 17,130 67 



1272,842 87 



The gross expenditures during 1896, includ- 
ing the cost of maintaining the branches, 
reading-rooms and stations were . . 243,366 81 



1243,366 81 



Balance $29,476 06 

These expenditures were made — 
From General Funds . . 1231,525 33 
From Special Funds . . 11,820 32 

From Exchange Account . 21 16 



The above balance of -129,476.06 is largely 

income from Trust Funds, restricted to the 

purchase of books, and not to be used for 

other purposes. 

The amount of such restricted 

income is . . . . $22,929 77 

The Todd Fund, applicable 
only to the purchase of news- 
papers, makes a part of said 
balance. It amounts to . 2,950 10 25,879 87 



Balance of income, applicable to general 

purposes |3,596 19 

The increase of general expenditures in 1896 

over those of 1895 was . . . . 122,917 28 

The increase in the cost of maintaining 

branches, reading-rooms and stations in 

1896 over those of 1895 (included in 

the increase of general expenditures) was $14,788 16 

The largest items of increased expenditures were those 
of Books and Salaries. 

The increase in expenditures for books from city appro- 
priations alone was $7,550.07. 



8 City Document No. 18. 

The increase in salaries is " accounted for in part as con- 
tract increases under the graded system, and in part as 
expenditures for departments of work either newly under- 
taken, or not forming a full year's liability in 1895." 

Special Appropriations. 

The Balance of the Building Appropriation 

February 1, 1806, was . . . . $il39,983 17 
Expenditure in 1896 50,502 00 



Balance 889,481 17 

Against this balance are contract liabilities amounting to 
$92,002.08. 

There are also claims amounting to over $8,000 ; making 
a deficit of $10,521.81, for which there is no present pro- 
vision. 
The balance of the Furnishing Appropriation 

February 1, 1896, was . . . . 141,339 92 
Expenditures in 1896 16,799 96 



Balance $24,539 96 

which is less than will be required for the adequate furnish- 
ing of this building. 

The alterations and repairs on the West Church property 
on Cambridge street were completed during the year, and 
we now have a building well adapted for a branch library. 
It is in every way the most attractive and the most complete 
of all the branches. 

During the year nearly $3,000 have been expended in 
repairs and for furniture at the different branches. 

The Trustees regret to say that a large sum is required 
to put the East Boston branch in proper condition, to repair 
the building in which it is located, and furnish the necessary 
equipment ; that the cost is wholly beyond their means, and 
a special appropriation must be made for the work. East 
Boston is remote from all other library facilities, and the 
demands'of its 42,000 inhabitants for improved library accom- 
modation, for larger rooms, more suitable furniture and better 
books have been so great and so generally recognized, that in 
July last an order was introduced into the City Council for a 
loan of $75,000 to be expended on this branch, but the order 
failed to be enacted. 

In September last the Building Committee of the School 
Board requested the Trustees to remove the South End 



LiBEAKY Department. 9 

Branch from its quarters in the basement of the High School 
building on Montgomery street, as the room was needed for 
school purposes. 

The Trustees, having no funds for the purchase of a 
building elsewhere for this branch, proposed to discontinue 
it, as proximity to the Central Library seemed to make a 
branch in the High School building unnecessary; but a peti- 
tion having been received, signed by several hundred residents 
of the vicinity, protesting against such discontinuance, and 
demanding the retention of the branch where it was, until 
another location could be secured, the Trustees decided to 
take at present no further action in the premises. They 
hope if the South End Branch is to be maintained, the means 
for the purpose will be supplied by the government. 

The Trustees would draw attention to the need of an ap- 
propriation for certain additional work at the Central Library, 
which may be considered as " Construction," and therefore 
properly chargeable to Construction Account. 

One hundred thousand dollars, at least, are needed for 
these purposes. It was not to be expected, when the designs 
of this great library building were made, that everything 
needed for the accommodation of the institution could be 
foreseen and supplied. Experience was required of new and 
developing uses. 

We would refer to some of these unanticipated demands. 

It was found that the heating apparatus was insuificient 
to warm certain parts of the building. This defect could not 
have been foreseen when the plans of the apparatus were 
made, because certain structural peculiarities in the building 
presented conditions affecting the efficiency of the appara- 
tus which could not be taken into account at the outset of 
the plan. 

The scheme for ventilation, notwithstanding the time and 
study given to it by its designer, proved wholly inadequate 
for the desired result, and we were compelled to expend 
largely in improving it. 

The apparatus is not yet what it should be; and further 
moneys are required to perfect it. 

We were obliged to purchase an auxiliary engine and dy- 
namo for heating, lighting and power purposes. New wiring 
for electric lights in the periodical and other rooms was re- 
quired; also, additional fixtures for the delivery room, the 
children's room and other departments. Standard lamps 
were needed for the bookcases in Bates Hall. The cost of 
them was 81,400. 



10 City Dooument No. 18. 

Certain work should be done on the roof phitform and 
other part of the exterior of the building, which is properly 
"construction," and chargeable to Construction Account and 
not to Maintenance. 

Two freight elevators are greatly wanted for the conve- 
nient performance of the \York of the library. 

Certain portions of the building, which have never been 
completed, should be fitted up for administrative purposes. 
A large room over the bound newspaper-room should be pre- 
pared as a duj)licate room, and nearly half the basement fitted 
for storage shelving, and other library accommodations. 

As the room occupied by the patent collection is wanted 
for a reading room, a gallery floor must be put up in the news- 
paper-room for the accommodation of this collection. 

The ceiling of the delivery room has never been finished, 
and, if it is to be made as designed, to correspond with the 
rest of the room, the cost will be large. 

Certain important changes, involving considerable expense 
must be made in some of the administration rooms, especially 
in the branch rooms, where facilities were made for send- 
ing out only about 5,000 volumes a year; but now there 
should be provision for sending out at least 300,000. This 
change would require the remodelling of one of the stack 
floors at much expense. The domed rooms, those occupied 
by the Barton-Ticknor and Fine Art collections, should 
have lights around the domes. 

The convenience of the public would be greatly served by 
a complete system of clocks throughout the building; but 
the Trustees have no funds for such purpose. 

The above are only some of the needs of the library ; 
many more and pressing ones might be named, which daily 
experience shows are made indispensably requisite by the 
growth of the library, the constant increase in numbers of 
those who use it, and the development of new uses. 

None of these or other necessary improvements can be met 
from our annual appropriations, which are barely sufficient 
for maintenance. We should have a further special " Build- 
ing Appropriation." 

Of late, when an item of such work, properly chargeable to 
"Construction," has been so pressing that it cannot be de- 
layed, we have been compelled to borrow for the time the 
means for payment from our Furnishing Appropriation to be 
returned hereafter. 

The Trustees are able to report that the eight panels 
which M. Puvis de Chavannes had engaged to paint for the 



LiBEAKY Department. 11 

decoration of the Staircase Hall, have been finished, as also 
the work of Mr. Garnsey on the ceiling, required for the com- 
pletion of the designs of the great artist. In the judgment 
of those who may be considered experts these mural decora- 
tions are considered a great success, and add largely to the 
aesthetic claims of the building. They are evidently enjoyed 
by the citizens, since large numbers of persons come daily to 
see them. 

Among the gifts to the library during the year 1896 was 
the Macmonnies group, known as the Bacchante, and pre- 
sented by the architect, Mr. McKim, as a decoration for the 
fountain in the centre of the courtyard. Its exhibition has 
led to a discussion of its fitness for that place, and the Trus- 
tees still have the matter under consideration. 

The Committee appointed by the Trustees to examine the 
library during the past year consisted of John L. Bates, 
Borden P. Bowne, Everett W. Burdett, Helen Cheever, 
Joseph J. Corbett, Hasket Derby, George M. Garland, 
Heloise E. Hersey, John E. Hudson, Emma Hutchins, John 
J. McNulty, Leighton Parks, Azariah Smith, Caleb B. 
Tillinghast, and Barrett Wendell. 

Their full report, with its valuable comments and recom- 
mendations, is appended hereto. As the date of their report 
coincides with the date of this, the Trustees will not attempt 
a present discussion of these recommendations, but will con- 
tent themselves with noting here their appreciation of the 
care, interest, and public spirit with which the Committee 
has done its work. 

During the year our esteemed co-Trustee, Gen. Francis A. 
Walker, died. Although he served but a few months, his 
deep interest in the librar}^ his great love of letters, and his 
large experience as an educator, made his oiDinions and sug- 
gestions touching the execution of our trusts most valuable. 

The institution has lost in him a warm friend and advo- 
cate, and the Trustees a useful and pleasant associate. 

Frederick O. Prince, 

President. 
JosiAH H. Benton, Jr. 
Henry P. Bowditch. 
James De Normandie. 
Solomon Lincoln. 

Febnaary 1, 1897. 

Adopted. 
Attest : 

Herbert Putnam, Clerk. 



12 City Docu-ment No. 18. 



RESOLUTIONS ON THE RETIREMENT OF 
SAMUEL CAUR. 

[A Trustee June 24, 1895— April 30, 1896.] 

In Boaed of Trustees, 
June 19, 1896. 

As Mr. Samuel Carr has ceased to be a Trustee of the 
Public Library by reason of the expiration of his term of 
office, his associates on the board desire to express and 
record their appreciation of his valuable services. It is 
therefore 

Resolved^ That Mr. Carr, by his faithful and successful 
discharge of his official duties, is entitled to the gratitude of 
the citizens and the friends of the library. 

Always manifesting deep interest in his trust, he was 
constant in attending our meetings and ready at all times 
to perform his share of the work. To the many important 
matters specially referred to his consideration he gave faith- 
ful attention, exhibiting therein excellent judgment and 
great executive ability. 

His thorough knowledge of business principles and meth- 
ods enabled him to render valuable assistance to the Board, 
and made his work useful and beneficial. 

Resolved, That the Trustees gratefully accord to him the 
freedom of the alcoves, with the customary privileges. 



LlBKAHY DePARTJMEXT. 13 



RESOLUTIONS' ON THE DEATH OF 
FRANCIS A. WALKER. 

[A Trustee May 4, 1896 — January 5, 1897.] 

Ik Board of Trustees, 
January 15, 1897. 

Resolved^ That the Trustees of the Public Library have 
lost in Gen. Francis A. Walker an esteemed and valuable 
associate. Although his term of service was short — being 
less than a year — his deep interest in the library as an 
instrument of public instruction, his ardent love of letters, 
and his great experience as an educator, made at once his 
suggestions and judgment, touching the many questions 
affecting the administration of the important trusts reposed 
in this Board, of great value. 

Being so well equipped for the work, it is most unfortu- 
nate, for the interests of this great public institution, that he 
was not permitted to continue longer as a supervisor. 

General Walker was a very remarkable man, eminent as a 
soldier, an educator, a writer, a lecturer, and a scientist. His 
great interest in public questions, especially those relating to 
economics and finance, his studious habits, his extraordinary 
capacity for work, his contagious enthusiasm in the prosecu- 
tion of whatever he undertook, endeared him to the citizens 
and made his death a public loss. 

His industry and public spirit enabled him to respond to 
constant calls to serve as member and manager of many 
scientific, literary, educational, and other organizations. As 
he was not impeded by weight of years, and apparently pos- 
sessed great physical vigor, there was reason to believe his 
career of usefulness would be long. But it was otherwise 
ordained. 

Multis ille bonis flebilis occidit. 



14 City Document No. 18. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees : 

I have the honor to submit my report for the year 1896. 

By reason of the change in the statistical year 1895, which 
brought it into accord with the fiscal year, the statistics 
given in last year's report represent a period of thirteen 
months. This is to be regarded in comparing the statistics 
given in this report (which embrace the twelve months end- 
ing January 31, 1897) with those given in the report for 
1895. 

Since February 1, 1896, there have been added to the 
operating departments of the library one branch library (the 
West End), and three delivery stations of the deposit type. 
To seven of the existing stations, one branch and two read- 
ing rooms, the deposit feature has been added. This addi- 
tion, with a change in method of compensation, has so 
enlarged the scope of service in the case of these stations as 
to entitle them to be re-classified. West Roxbury, formerly 
classed as a mere delivery station, is now ranked as a branch, 
having a permanent collection of some 4,000 volumes. On 
January 31, 1897, the library system comprises: 

The Central Library, Copley square. 

Two branch libraries (Brighton and West End) in sepa- 
rate buildings, owned by the city, and exclusively devoted to 
library uses. 

Six branch libraries (Charlestown, Dorchester, East Bos- 
ton, Jamaica Plain, South End, and West Roxbury), in city 
buildings in part devoted to other municipal uses. 

One branch library (Roxbury), in a separate building de- 
voted solely to the uses of a Public Library, but in which the 
City Library is the lessee of a private library association. 

One branch library (South Boston), occupying rented 
rooms in a building devoted for the most part to commercial 
uses. 

Four branch reading rooms (Lower Mills, Mattapan, Mt. 
Bowdoin, and North Brighton). 

Ten delivery stations (B, G, H, J, M, N, P, Q, R, S), 
with the "deposit" feature, one of which (Station S) is 
maintained without present expense to the library for rent 
or services of custodian, one of which (Station P) is in a 
rented store, in charge of an employee on the library pay-roll, 



Library Department 15 

and eight of which are in stores, whose proprietors, with one 
exception, give space, heat, light and service for a compen- 
sation based on the number of books circulated by them ; and 
two delivery stations (E and K), of the old type, through 
which cards and books are issued from the Central Library, 
and whose proprietors receive a fixed compensation of $250 
per annum. This method of compensation still applies to 
Station H also, although now a deposit station. 

The delivery system of the library (a daily interchange 
with the Central Library) extends to all of the above 26 
branches, reading rooms, and stations, the transportation 
being effected by the two library teams, save in the case of 
seven, where local expresses are employed. The regular de- 
livery system has since November 15 comprised, further, a 
monthly delivery of a box of books to each of 13 fire com- 
panies, and since January 25, 1897, a deliver}- twice each 
week to the Hancock Grammar School, on Parmenter street. 

The Central Librar}^ has been open every day in the year, 
except June 17, July 4, September 1 (Labor Day), and 
Christmas. On the other legal holidays (Washington's 
Birthday, Patriots' Day, Memorial Day, and Thanksgiving 
Day), the Central Library was open as on Sundays, that is, 
from 2 until 10 P.M., in all departments directly serving 
the public. Of the branches, the West End has been open 
on Sundays during these same hours throughout the year ; 
and the Charlestown, East Boston, and South Boston 
branches between March 15 and April 26, inclusive. 

FINANCE. 

The Auditor's statement (Appendix I. of this report) 
shows fully the receipts and disbursements of this depart- 
ment during the fiscal year. 

Incojme. 

The following figures, drawn from the Auditor's state- 
ment, indicate income applicable to maintenance and pur- 
chase of books : 

General appropriation for 1896 . . . |225,000 00 
Miscellaneous income, including receipts from 
fines, sales of libra rj^ publications, rentals 
of old library building, exchange accounts, 
interest and balance from 1895 . . 17,130 67 

Trust Funds : Income and balances . . 30,712 20 



$272,842 87 



16 City Document No. 18. 

Under Trust Funds above, the^ figures include the Todd 
Fund (balance $2,776.25, income 82,000), for the Newspaper 
Room. The}' include also funds (e.^., the Harris Fund, 
balance $3,688.21, income $300), the income of which is 
restricted to a narrow area of purchase. 

Not, of course, included under Income, are two principal 
sums, representing endowments, which have become avail- 
able during the year. These are : the sum of $10,000, given 
by Miss Victorine T. Artz ; and the sum of $2,500 bequeathed 
by Charles Mead, Esq. The Mead Fund has already been 
invested, and the income to January 31, 1897, is included 
above. The Artz Fund has not yet (February 1, 1897) been 
invested. (Since invested in City of Boston bonds.) 

Expenditures. 

General appropriation : In addition to the detailed 
statement of expenditures for the year 1896, Appendix I. 
gives a comparative exhibit of the expenditures of this and 
of the preceding year distributed under the several accounts. 
This shows that the expenditures met by the general appro- 
priation, supplemented by the revenue from the old building 
and receipts from fines and sales, were : 

In 1896 $281,525 33 

In 1895 208,608 05 



Increase in general expenditures . . $22,917 28 

The cost of maintaining the branches, reading rooms, and 
stations is included in the above. This item was : 

In 1896 $62,785 39 

In 1895 47,997 23 



Increased expenditure for Branches, Reading 

Rooms, and Stations in 1896 over 1895 . $14,788 16 

At the Central Library increases in certain items were 
offset by decreases in others. The items of largest increase 
w^ere books and salaries. The expenditures for books and 
periodicals from city appropriations alone were $7,550.07 
greater in 1896 than in 1895. The increase in salaries is 
accounted for in part as contract increases under the graded 
system, in part as expenditures for departments of work 
either newly undertaken or not forming a full year's liability 
in 1895. 



Library Department. 17 

The above totals are exclusive of — 

Expenditure for books, purchased with income 

of Trust Funds |9,590 82 

Expenditure for newspapers from the Todd 

Fund 1,826 15 

Expenditure for books and periodicals from 

miscellaneous gifts ..... 403 35 



$11,820 32 

The gross expenditures for the year 1896, to be compared 
with the gross income (f 272,842. 87), noted above, were 
therefor : 

General funds 1231,525 33 

Special funds as above ..... 11,820 32 
Exchange account ..... 21 16 



Total expenditures 1243,366 81 

An available balance on February 1, 1897, of $19,346.90 

is made up as follows : 

Applicable to general purposes . . . $3,596 19 

Applicable to newspapers (Todd Fund) . 2,950 10 

Applicable to the purchase of books : 

Nominal balance 
(m a i n 1 y Trust 
Funds) . . $22,929 77 

Less bills in hand and 

outstanding orders, $2,140 95 

Less reserve for con- 
tinuations . . 4,000 00 

Less C. Harris Fund 3,988 21 10,129 16 12,800 61 



$19,346 90 



Special Appropriations. 

Those with existing balances are the Building appropria- 
tion (construction of new Library Building) and Furnishing 
appropriation (new building). The Auditor's Exhibit 
shows : 
Building appropriation : Balance February 1, 

1896 $139,983 17 

Expenditures 1896 50,502 00 



Balance $89,481 17 

Against which are contracts amounting to . $92,002 08 
And claims amounting to over . . . $8,000 00 



18 City Document No. 18. 

The apparent deficit, if not otherwise provided for, must 
be met out of the bahmce of the Furnisliing Appro[)riation 
by reimbursement on account of furnishings hitlierto cliarged 
to the liuilding appropriation. Much work, however, prop- 
erly chaigeable to Construction, still remains to be done. 
The above ligures take account of the amount (-13,280.14) 
deducted from the I. P. Morris contract as a penalty for 
demurrage on the engines. 

Furnishing appropriation : Balance February, 

1896 $41,339 92 

Expenditures 1896 16,799 96 



Balance 124,539 96 

which is likely to be fully exhausted by work either already 
contracted for or j^rojected. 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

To the power plant at the Central Library has been added 
an auxiliary engine of 50 h. p. capacity, directly connected 
with a 40 K. W. dynamo. This carries the entire load from 
6 A.M. until about 4 P.M., when the burden has to be shared 
by one of the large (150 h. p.) engines. This new engine 
thus combining with one of the large engines enables the 
ventilating fans to be run throughout the library day, in- 
stead of as heretofore only until 6 P.M. A change has 
been made from the 220 volt to a 110 volt system through- 
out, and the equalizer necessary with the larger voltage 
abolished. This has necessitated the rewinding of the dyna- 
mos and the substitution of 110-volt for 220-volt motors 
throughout the system. 

To the heating apparatus have been added 2,150 feet of 
radiating surface on the Special libraries floor, and 366 feet 
in the newspaper room and bindery. With these additions, 
there has been no difficulty in keeping at a comfortable tem- 
perature these rooms, part of which during last Avinter were 
at times uninhabitable. 

The following statistics have been so frequently called for 
by other institutions that I include them here. Some of 
them repeat, others correct, certain of the figures given on 
page 17 of the last report: 

Area of land (as given in 1892 report) . 64,844 sq. ft. 
Area of courtyard (approximate) . . 12,075 sq. ft. 



225 


ft. 


228 


ft. 


228 


ft. 


68 


ft. 


22. 


9 ft. 



Library Department. 19 

Outside dimeiiijioiis of building (1892 report) — 

Front on Dartmouth street and rear . 

Front on Boy Is ton street .... 

Front on Blagden street .... 

Height from street level to top of cornice . 

Height from cornice to ridgepole 

Cubical contents (building alone as esti- 
mated Februarjs 1897) (approximate), 3,315,689 cu. ft. 

Floor area : Rooms open to 

the public . . . 51,030 sq. ft. 
Other rooms . . . 59,324 sq. ft. 

Basement (cemented) . 34,399 sq. ft. 

Total floor area . . 144,753 sq. ft. 

Heating : Radiating surface . . . 30,000 sq. ft. 

Lighting : 3,200 sockets for electric lights (wired for 3,500). 

Ventilation: 2 fans: Intake (18 ft. in diameter) and ex- 
haust. 

Boilers: 3 — 100 h. p. each, of which one always in re- 
serve. 

Engines : 2 tandem compound, 150 h. p. each ; 1 Cross 
compound, 50 h. p. 

Dynamos: 2 — 100 K. W. Siemens-Halske, 110 volt; 1—40 
K. W. Siemens-Halske, 110 volt. 



Motors : 1 — 15 h. p. 
1—8 h. p. 

1 — 5 h. p. 
3 — 2 h. p. 

2 — 1 h. p. 



Note. The removal of 
the book railway from the 
special libraries floor puts out 
of use the 6 h. p. motor in- 
stalled for its operation. 



Steam Pumps : 2 boiler feed ; 1 elevator ; 2 fountain ; 1 

low pressure, for ejecting water. 
Air compressor for pneumatic tubes. 
Elevators: 1 passenger, 2,500 lbs. lifting capacity; 7 book 

elevators, operated by one motor. 
Coal consumed: 1896 (approximate), 1,345 tons. 

Daring the year a room near the Newspaper Reading 
Room has been equipped with shelving for bound news- 
papers. The room has a floor area of but 1,160 feet square, 
out of which space must be left for readers. But its height 
admitting of two tiers of cases, shelving has been contrived 
for some 3,000 volumes. The files least used will have to 
find accommodation in the basement : for these, shelving has 
yet to be constructed. The cases above have sliding shelves, 
to save the wear on the volumes in constant use. In the 
basement cases of a simpler type will suffice. 

In the decoration of the building the most important event 
of the year has been the installation in October last, of the 



20 City Documiont No. 18. 

eight panels, by M. P. Puvis de Chavannes, which, at the 
date of the hist report, were yet to be delivered. These 
complete the contract of M. de Chavannes, and with the 
subsequent treatment by Mr. Garnsey of the ceiling of the 
Chavannes lobby, complete the decoration of the staircase 
hall. 

•Works of art given, accepted, and placed during the past 
year have been: (1) The bronze bust of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, by Richard Edwin Brooks. This was ordered by 
the Mayor of Boston, on authority of the City Council, and 
was paid for by the city. (2) The marble bust of John G. 
Whittier, by William Ordway Partridge, the gift of the 
sculptor. (3) A portrait in oils of George Ticknor at the 
age of forty. This is a copy of a portrait by Thomas Sully, 
painted in 1831, and was given by Miss Anna E. Ticknor. 
An interesting memorial, also, of Mr. Ticknor, is the large 
mahogany cabinet-desk used by him. This was given to 
the library by Mr. Ticknor's family after the death of Miss 
Anna E. Ticknor ; and, with the portrait, has been placed in 
the Barton-Ticknor room. 

In the section of the Fine Art Department, devoted to 
architecture, has been placed a memorial tablet to the late 
Eugene Ldtang. It is of bronze, in a setting of marble ; was 
designed by Mr. William E. Chamberlin ; was undertaken, 
designed, and erected under the auspices of the Boston 
Society of Architects, and bears the following inscription : 
" Born at Boulleret, France, in the Province of Berri ; he 
came to Boston in 1871 ; for twenty-two years he taught 
architectural design at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. In grateful memory of this loyal and faithful service 
this tablet is erected by his pupils and friends." 

Permission has been granted to the Society of Architects 
to place in this room, on temporary deposit, a portrait of 
Edward C. Cabot, the first president of the society. 

The Children's Room has become enriched by a collection 
of solar prints, enlarged under the direction, and at the 
expense, of Mr. Arthur Astor Carey, from photographs 
selected by him. They are suggestions for the decoration of 
school-rooms ; and Mr. Carey has placed them on exhibition 
here, for the purpose of showing what may be done at a com- 
paratively small cost to cultivate the artistic sense in school 
children. The cost of each print, framed and unframed, is 
indicated in a catalogue, copies of which may be had at the 
library on application. 

The collection numbers some ninety prints, and comprises 
famous examples of sculpture, the " Venus of Milo," the 



ERRATA. 

Page 20, line 30, /or faithful, read fruitful. 

Page 23, line 2, read 663,763, of which 492,901. 

Page 27, line ^,for Fellows', read Fellowes'. 

Page 35, 8th and 4th lines from the bottom, read 45,606. 

Page 46, last line, omit Appendix X., the by-laws, as re- 
vised to date. 

Page 47, /or XL, XII., XIII., XIV., read X., XI., XII., 
XIII. 



work was to be done. On February 3, 1896, it was thrown 
open to the public as the West End Branch. It is in equip- 
ment the most modern, as it is in general aspect the most 
attractive, of all the branches. In land, building, and equip- 
ment alone (omitting books) it represents an outlay on the 
part of the city of about -196,000. 

Some new furniture and shelving have been added to the 
equipment of nearly all of the branches. At Brighton and 
at South Boston alterations and repairs have been more 
thorough: counters remodelled, new reference cases built, 
and various furnishings and fixtures added. In all, some 
$2,000 has been spent on repairs at branches during the year, 
and over $600 in furniture. This is exclusive of work done 
by our own carpenter. At South Boston the Savings Bank, 
which is our lessor, has retinted the branch rooms, and sup- 
plied certain fixtures asked for. 

The branch at East Boston is more desperately than any 
other in need of repair and equipment ; but the need is so 
radical as to constitute a bar to present action. The rooms 
themselves are but a third of the size they should be ; they 
are in an unsuitable building, and on the wrong floor of that 
building. The furniture is meagre, battered, and ill-adapted 
to its purpose. The books, although not meagre in number, 
are meagre in interest, and, equally with the furniture, bat- 
tered and ill-adapted to their purpose. To attempt to better 
the equipment or the service in the present rooms is but to 
palliate, at expense, conditions that must be dealt with 
radically. East Boston is by itself a city of 42,000 inhabi- 
tants, remote from other library facilities. Those furnished 
by our East Boston Branch should be, at least, the equivalent 
of those represented by the West' End Branch. In July 
last an order was introduced into the City Council for a loan 



painted in 1831, and was given by Miss Anna E. Ticknor. 
An interesting memorial, also, of Mr. Ticknor, is the large 
mahogany cabinet-desk used by him. This was given to 
the library by Mr. Ticknor's family after the death of Miss 
Anna E. Ticknor ; and, with the portrait, has been placed in 
the Barton-Ticknor room. 

In the section of the Fine Art Department, devoted to 
architecture, has been placed a memorial tablet to the late 
Eugene L^tang. It is of bronze, in a setting of marble ; was 
designed by Mr. William E. Chamberlin ; was undertaken, 
designed, and erected under the auspices of the Boston 
Society of Architects, and bears the following inscription : 
" Born at Boulleret, France, in the Province of Berri ; he 
came to Boston in 1871 ; for twenty-two years he taught 
architectural design at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. In grateful memory of this loyal and faithful service 
this tablet is erected by his pupils and friends." 

Permission has been granted to the Society of Architects 
to place in this room, on temporary deposit, a portrait of 
Edward C. Cabot, the first president of the society. 

The Children's Room has become enriched by a collection 
of solar prints, enlarged under the direction, and at the 
expense, of Mr. Arthur Astor Carey, from photographs 
selected by him. They are suggestions for the decoration of 
school-rooms ; and Mr. Carey has placed them on exhibition 
here, for the purpose of showing what may be done at a com- 
paratively small cost to cultivate the artistic sense in school 
children. The cost of each print, framed and unframed, is 
indicated in a catalogue, copies of which may be had at the 
library on application. 

The collection numbers some ninety prints, and comprises 
famous examples of sculpture, the " Venus of Milo," the 



LiBRAEY Department. 21 

" Victory of Samothrace," as well as modern sculptures by 
Fremiet and Barye ; photographs of Grecian and Egyptian 
architecture, of Gothic cathedrals, of Venetian and Moorish 
palaces ; specimens of wood-engraving by Diirer and others ; 
of famous paintings and mural decorations ; and portraits of 
George and Martha Washington ; of Lowell, Lincoln, Frank- 
lin, and other famous Americans. 



Branches. 

The completion in January, 1896, of the alterations and 
repairs upon the West Church property on Cambridge street 
brought to the service of the library a building admirably 
adapted to library uses, in a district where important library 
work was to be done. On February f3, 1896, it was thrown 
open to the public as the West End Branch. It is in equip- 
ment the most modern, as it is in general aspect the most 
attractive, of all the branches. In land, building, and equip- 
ment alone (omitting books) it represents an outlay on the 
part of the city of about 196,000. 

Some new furniture and shelving have been added to the 
equipment of nearly all of the branches. At Brighton and 
at South Boston alterations and repairs have been more 
thorough : counters remodelled, new reference cases built, 
and various furnishings and fixtures added. In all, some 
$2,000 has been spent on repairs at branches during the year, 
and over $600 in furniture. This is exclusive of work done 
by our own carpenter. At South Boston the Savings Bank, 
which is our lessor, has retinted the branch rooms, and sup- 
plied certain fixtures asked for. 

The branch at East Boston is more desperately than any 
other in need of repair and equipment ; but the need is so 
radical as to constitute a bar to present action. The rooms 
themselves are but a third of the size tliey should be ; they 
are in an unsuitable building, and on the wrong floor of that 
building. The furniture is meagre, battered, and ill-adapted 
to its purpose. The books, although not meagre in number, 
are meagre in interest, and, equally with the furniture, bat- 
tered and ill-adapted to their purpose. To attempt to better 
the equipment or the service in the present rooms is but to 
palliate, at expense, conditions that must be dealt with 
radically. East Boston is by itself a city of 42,000 inhabi- 
tants, remote from other library facilities. Those furnished 
by our East Boston Branch should be, at least, tlie equivalent 
of those represented by the West' End Branch. In July 
last an order was introduced into the City Council for a loan 



22 • City Document No. 18. 

of ?ii<75,000 for land and a building for the East I^oston 
liranch. It did not come to enact'i ent. 

In March last an order was passed looking to the purchase 
of a building on West Springfield street for the use of the 
South End Branch, but no action was taken. Assuming the 
purchase to be desirable, the Trustees had not the funds 
and the City Government did not offer to provide them. The 
branch continued in its rooms in the basement of the High 
School building on Montgomery street. In September a re- 
quest was received from the Buildings Committee of the 
School Board that the branch be removed, the room being 
peremptorily needed for school uses. Before final action was 
taken on this request the Trustees received a petition, signed 
by several hundred citizens of the South End, in protest 
against the discontinuance of the branch. The petition 
recognized the proximity of the branch to the Central Library, 
and admitted that some other location might be more de- 
sirable, but was urgent against the vacation of the High 
School rooms until such other location should have been se- 
cured. The Trustees had no funds with which to rent rooms 
for the branch, and on examining the terms of their occupancy 
questioned their right under these circumstances to vacate 
at once the rooms held by them rent free. The matter has 
rested there, save that the need of the space for school uses 
has been urged upon the City Council by the School Com- 
mittee. 

The introduction of the Deposit System into the delivery 
stations has meant the equipment of each station with shelv- 
ing, table, desk, and chairs ; it has involved in effect the 
furnishing in each case of a room some 15 feet square. 
Station P has involved more than this in bringing into ser- 
vice a rented store (37 Broadway Extension), which has 
been entirely furnished and is exclusively maintained by the 
library. 

Books. 

Appendices II-V give the extent of the library by years, 
a summary of the contents of the library on January 31, 
1897, the net increase of the several departments during the 
past 10 years, the actual accessions (as distinguished from 
the books located), and the classification of the material in 
the Central Library and branches on January 31, 1897. 

According to last year's report it appears that the number 
of volumes in the Central Library and branches on January 
31, 1896, was 628,297, of which 469,874 were in the Central 
Library. By the tables appended to this report it appears 



Library Department. 23 

that on January 31, 1897, the number in all departments is 
659,089, of which 488,227 are in the Central Library. 

The total expenditure for books and periodicals during 
the past year was 140,1:30.23, as against -^31,774.13 in 1895. 
This expenditure was distributed as follows: 

City money expended for books : 

For Central .... 113,695 77 
For branches .... 11,692 48 



Trust Funds expended for books : 
B'or Central .... $8,867 44 
For branches . . . . 125 44 


125,388 25 
8,992 88 





134,381 13 
City money expended for periodicals : 
For Central .... |3,964 97 
For branches .... 2,084 13 

6,049 10 



140,430 23 



In a comparison of expenditures with statistics of additions, 
the number of accessions^ rather than the number of books 
actually located, should be considered. The accessions during 
the past year (excluding mere transfers from one department 
of the library to another) have been as follows : 

Volumes. Volumes. Volumes. 

Added by purchase . Central, 14,402 Branches, 9,599 Total, 24,001 
Added by gift . , Central, 8,841 Branches, 626 Total, 9,467 



Total accessions . Central, 23,243 Branches, 10,225 Total, 33,468 

The above figures do not include 8,628 pamphlets not yet 
fully examined. Otherwise pamphlets are included in ac- 
cordance with the practice adopted some years ago of enter- 
ing, cataloguing and binding each pamphlet as a separate 
" volume." 

In accordance also with a previous usage there are included 
as " accessions " the product of 36 volumes of pamphlets which 
have been dissected, and the several pamphlets bound sepa- 
rately. This usage (which has the effect of making material 
already on the shelves appear as a new addition to the 
library) has been discontinued since June, 1896. The pam- 
phlet collections since dissected appear in the tables under the 
" increases " in the way of volumes, but I do not include 
them here as " accessions." 



24 City Document No. 18. 



Gifts. 

Among the gifts of especial interest received during the 
year have been the following : 

From Miss Victorine Thomas Artz, of Chicago, a fund of ten 
thousand dollars (-110,000) ; " the income of this sum to be 
employed in the purchase of valuable rare editions of the 
writings, either in verse or prose, of American and of for- 
eign authors." These books are to be known as the " Long- 
fellow Memorial Collection." 

From the late Charles Mead, of Boston, a legacy of 
twenty-five hundred dollars (s|2,500), "to constitute a trust 
fund, to be designated ' The Charles Mead Trust Fund,' for 
the promotion of the objects of the Public Library ; " to be 
used preferably for the benefit of the South Boston Branch 
Library. 

From Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, of Cambridge, 
the "Galatea Collection of books relating to the History of 
Women." This collection, the first instalment of which was 
received February 11, 1896, now numbers 868 volumes. It 
has been amassed during a period of nearly 50 years, in- 
cluding books in various languages, and many that are rare 
and curious, and represents, so far as known, the only general 
collection of works on the subject in any public library. 
Colonel Higginson desires this to be considered the nucleus 
only of a collection which he hopes to see increased by other 
givers, " who may gradually co-operate in building up a de- 
partment of permanent value." 

From the estate of Mrs. Bessie S. Lockwood, of Cambridge, 
sixteen hundred and forty-three volumes, to be known, in 
memory of her husband, as " The Hiland Lockwood Gift." 
The gift includes, besides a various collection of American 
history and literature, many volumes of bound periodicals, 
newspapers, and public documents. 

From the family of the late George Ticknor, besides the 
large cabinet-desk of mahogany, used by Mr. Ticknor, now 
placed in the Barton Ticknor library, seventy-five volumes, 
mostly in folio, of engravings in the subjects of architecture 
and painting ; also some three hundred and forty-one sup- 
plementary engravings. 

From Mr. and Mrs. James M. Codman, of Brookline, six 
hundred and eleven volumes, forming, with photographs, 
prints, etc., a notable and interesting library of landscape 
architecture ; given " in memory of Henry Sargent Codman 
and Philip Codman, landscape architects," by whom the col- 
lection was made. 



Library Department. 25 

The Graupner Collection of Photographs. — This collection 
given in August, 1896, as a memorial to Miss Harriet H. 
Graupner, of Boston, by her friends, consists of over eleven 
hundred photographs of paintings of the Renaissance period, 
of all schools, with a small collection of representative Italian 
sculptures. The various Italian schools of painting comprise 
about two-thirds of the whole, and are represented by well- 
selected examples of the founders and masters of each school. 
The northern schools comprise good selections from the Van 
Eycks, Memling, Van Dyck, Rubens, Rembrandt, Holbein, 
Diirer, Schongauer, and others. Among pictures of the 
Spanish schools are examples of Murillo, Velasquez, and the 
minor painters. 

From Dr. W. N. Bullard, of Boston, ten volumes of old 
and rare books and manuscripts, including an example (im- 
perfect) of early illumination, probably of the 14th century. 
Three issues of the Venetian press, 1474, 1479, and 1489, 
make a valuable addition to the library's examples of early 
Italian printing. One of these, a " Mamotrectus," 1479, is 
from the press of Nicolas Jen son. 

From Dr. R. M. Bucke, of London, Ontario, thirteen 
volumes of Whitman's works in various editions, the earliest 
of which is the Thayer and Eldridge Boston edition of 
1860-61; ten pieces of manuscript; and seventeen photo- 
graphs and engraved portraits. This is understood to he the 
first instalment of a collection of works by and relating to 
Whitman, to be made primarily by friends of the poet. 

From Allen A. Brown, Esq., 322 volumes for the Brown 
Musical collection. 

From Miss Susan Slavin, East Boston, 132 volumes of 
English, French, Latin, and Spanish literature. 

From Charles F. Atkinson, Esq., Boston, 242 volumes of 
English literature, chiefly travels and the drama. 

From the Commissioner of Patents of Great Britain, 74 
volumes of British Patents. 

From the German Patent Office, Berlin, 5,599 numbers of 
the " Patentschrift." This illustrated work gives a list of 
all the patents issued in the German Empire, and is a valu- 
able addition to our patent collection. 

From the estate of Samuel R. Urbino of Boston, 30 vol- 
umes of French, Spanish, and Italian literature. 

From the Due de Loubat, of Rome, a reproduction of a 
Mexican figure-writing, known as the " Nahua book." The 
original, Vatican codex 3,773, consists of nine pieces of tanned 
deer-skin, folded in forty-eight leaves. 



26 City Document No. 18. 

From Arthur Astor Carey, Esq., Boston, a fine co})y of 
Baiuhy, "Peintures d^coratives du grand foyer de I'Opdra," 
Paris. 

From Robert C. Wintliro[), Esq., a MS. letter of Gov. 
John Winthrop, dated March 29, 1(343. This to be placed 
with the Chamberhiin collection. 

From the heirs of Nathaniel I. Bowditch, two MS. copies 
of the memoir of Nathaniel Bowditch, prefixed to the trans- 
lation of the M^canique Celeste ; and two MS. volumes of 
memorial notices of Nathaniel Bowditch, including copies of 
letters. 

From the Mt. Bowdoin Association, the 893 volumes re- 
maining of the collection placed on deposit by the association 
in our ]\It. Bowdoin Heading Room some years ago. The 
title to these was formally transferred by the association to 
the Trustees on February 27, 1897. 

From Messrs. Curtis & Co., Boston, and Messrs. George 
H. Policy & Co., Boston, sets of the photographs of the new 
Public Library building, made under the direction of these 
firms respectively. 

It seems appropriate to mention also as among the gifts of 
the year the dedication to the equipment of a Military Alcove 
of the balance of the Twentieth Regiment Fund originally 
contributed for the erection of one of the St. Gaudens lions in 
the staircase hall. The exact sum that will be available for 
the purchase of books cannot at this time be stated with pre- 
cision ; it may reach 12,500 to be expended in immediate 
purchases, and a fund of -15,000, of which the income is to 
be used for additions. The initial expenditure will be for 
material relating to the Civil War; and to this end a special 
assistant under the chief cataloguer has been compiling a 
list of such material of importance (as Regimental Histories) 
not duplicating books already in the library. For this work 
of compilation the Committee of the Regiment has assigned 
a sum not exceeding |300 out of the fund. 

Transfers. 

It will be noticed that the tables show a considerable 
number of volumes transferred from the branches to the 
Central Library. The purpose of such transfer is to relieve 
the branches of superfluous material — documents and un- 
suitable titles or superseded editions — to make space for 
books of current interest and practical value. It is our hope 
in this way — by weeding out the " dead " matter, by weav- 
ing in the "live" — to conform the collection at each branch 



Library Department. 27 

to the principle that it shall contain only books in active 
use ; but these, books really useful in their line, convenient 
in edition, and sound and attractive in appearance. 

Additions to Branches. 

Excluding the Fellows' Athenaeum, the branch libraries 
vaiy in size from 4,000 to 30,000 volumes. Hitherto the 
books for each have been bought and catalogued without re- 
gard to the others. The present practice is in the case of 
new accessions to purchase the same title for all ten branches. 
The ten copies of the book are then catalogued at the Cen- 
tral Library as one title (in fact the cataloguing involves 
merely the printing of ten additional copies on smaller sized 
stock of the catalogue card already set up for the Central 
Library) . To this economy should be added ultimately the 
publication of a single Finding List of Accessions that will 
apply to every brancli as the " Y " list of " Selected Books 
for Young Readers " now does. This can be done only when 
a uniform system of notation will assign to the same title the 
same call number at whatever branch the copy be located. 
It makes a strong reason for revising, even at considerable 
present expense, the system of classification and of notation 
throughout the branches ; perhaps for introducing into every 
branch the system in use at the West End. 

In the column of books " condemned, lost, transferred and 
missing "are included all books unaccounted for in the shelf- 
reading of the year 1896. As explained in the last report 
this method of entry takes the extreme view that books not 
found in their places or recorded as elsewhere are to be 
classed as no longer in the library. As a fact the larger 
proportion of such books are but misplaced, and reappear 
later on. Nine hundred and thirty-two volumes entered in 
previous reports as "missing" have been found during the 
past year. The reading of the shelves in the Central Library 
is now especially difficult to conduct with precision, for the 
reasons : (1), that the books are scattered over a large area, 
in collections which are constantly varying as new uses de- 
velop ; (2), that certain shelf-lists (e. cj., those of Stack 4) 
are, through erasures, interlineation, and cancellation, so con- 
fused as to furnish a check-list in itself uncertain ; and (3), 
that pressure of other work upon the shelf-department has 
protracted the reading of the shelves fitfully over a long 
period. When certain of the shelf-lists shall have been re- 
written, and the force of the department shall permit two 
members to be assigned continuously to the duty of reading, 
more definite results may each year be reached. 



28 City Document No. 18. 

Assuming for the moment the figures as they stood Febru- 
ary 1, 1897, to be final, tliey show but 38 volumes missing 
from the Bates Hall reference shelves since the count of last 
year. Considering that these shelves contain over 7,000 
volumes, handled by the public absolutely without formality, 
this number seems small ; and, as last year, the missing titles 
are of books of relatively insignificant value. The other 
" open " shelves in the Central Library are those of the 
Special Libraries' floor, the Patent room and the Children's 
room. Of the 90,000 volumes on the Special Libraries' 
floor, 77 stood unaccounted for in the partial reading Feb- 
ruary 1, 1897; of the 5,000 volumes in the Patent Library 
none; but the "missing" from the Children's room num- 
bered several hundred volumes. Many of these have been 
carried off by children in mere misapprehension of the 
rules, and this may also be asserted of many of the 249 vol- 
umes missing from the Branch libraries since the system of 
"■ open " shelves has been introduced there. But the arrest 
during the year of one adult book thief with 27 library books 
in his possession, and of some six juvenile thieves with 21 
library books in their possession, (nearly all books from the 
Children's room), shows that a percentage of the missing 
volumes must be set down as stolen. Of course, the books 
stolen are of a class easily replaced at no great cost; but 
the total of loss is large enough, I fear, to be quoted to the 
discredit of the system of open shelves. I am entirely un- 
willing to admit that it touches the principle of open shelves. 
Systematic theft by one or two individuals may proceed until 
it involves hundreds of volumes without impeaching the 
honesty of the general public. At the same time it is to be 
hoped that the punishment of the recent offenders may so 
serve as a deterrent that the figures for the coming year will 
not have to be explained in justification of the system. 



Binding. 

During the year 8,145 books and 3,416 pamphlets have 
been bound in the Library Bindery. 1,510 of the books bound 
contained plates which required "guards." The work of the 
Bindery included also 2,417 volumes repaired, 1,739 pam- 
phlets stitched into covers, 472 maps mounted on cloth, 1,199 
covers made for serials, 3,805 cards and 74 photographs 
mounted, together with a mass of smaller miscellaneous work, 
such as portfolios, pouches, blocks, etc.; even eight office 
covered. 



Library Department. 29 

But there has now also been thrown upon the Bindery a 
large amount of work of cutting stock to be used in our 
Printing Department, and of folding and stitching library 
publications issued through it. During the past year 58,424 
copies of library publications have been so folded and 
stitched. This work has required the addition to the Bindery 
force of one forwarder and one sewing woman, and to the 
equipment a new cutting machine of a modern, more power- 
ful and more rapid type than the hand cutters already used. 
This machine, with an electric motor for its operation, has 
been purchased and installed at a cost of 1721.93. 

Upon petition of the Bindery employees the working day 
in the Bindery was reduced from ten to nine hours. The 
change took effect on November 1, and was granted as an 
experiment to continue for one year. The work done is being 
carefully recorded, by way of cornparing the output for a 
year under the nine-hour with that of the previous year 
under the ten-hour system. 

The outside contract work (binding in cheap form of 
branch books and old Lower Hall books) has comprised the 
binding of 8,931 volumes at a total cost of 11,420.72. A 
large amount of minor repairing is done in the stacks by the 
employees of the Issue Department. 

Catalogues. 

The number of volumes catalogued at the Central Library 
during the year has been 50,794, embracing 31,875 titles. 
The number of cards added to the catalogues is reported as 
74,979. But these figures by no means indicate the extent of 
the work, even of the catalogue department, a large part of 
which cannot be tabulated. Of the Allen A. Brown library 
of music, 4,654 volumes, with 4,547 titles, were catalogued in 
1896; also of collections, 4,732 parts, with 4,421 titles. The 
number of volumes catalogued since the work began is 
8,309, representing 7,900 titles; also 10,888 parts. In the 
statistics of cataloguing, " volumes " means separate publica- 
tions. In the case of the Brown library a great number of 
publications (as, songs) are apt to be grouped within one 
cover. In cataloguing these cannot be grouped under a 
single title, but must be entered separately. The work of 
cataloguing this library extends also to an analysis of the 
collections. What this involves may be judged from the fact 
that the nine volumes of Warren's Collection of Catches, 
Glees, etc., involved the cataloguing of over 600 titles. 
Mr. Hunt estimates that this library, which stands in our 



30 City Document No. 18. 

records and iu our acknowledgments as a library of 7,671 
volumes, comprises over 30,000 different publications. Tiie 
work of cataloguing is proceeding as rapidly as is consistent 
with the careful and scholarly labor with which it is being 
conducted. 

Bulletins. (^See infra.') 

The Political Economy Catalogue. — Some 2,000 cards have 
been added to the matter under compilation. Among these 
accessions works on the currency question, as called out by 
the late presidential campaign, are especially numerous. 

Boston.— A list of the documents printed during the time 
when Boston was under town government is ready for the 
printer. The Chief Cataloguer proposes that when in proof 
it be sent to other libraries for additions. The remaining 
portion of the bibliography of Boston has been considerably 
enlarged during the year. 

A list of Historical Fiction relating to Rome was finished 
early in the year. Work is in progress on Italy. It is pro- 
posed to reserve the publication of these until the entire list 
can be issued. 

A Bibliography of the Higher Education of Women., com- 
piled by members of the Association of Collegiate Alumnse 
and under its auspices, is, at the request of the Associa- 
tion, to be published by us, most of the expense of publication 
being met by the purchase by the association of 2,000 copies. 
This list has had to undergo some revision by our cataloguers 
and the addition of recent titles. Seven pages of the forty- 
eight have been put into type. 

Consolidated Periodical List. — An important venture in the 
direction of co-operative bibliography is the list of periodicals, 
newspapers, transactions of societies, and other serial pub- 
lications currently taken by the libraries of Boston and Cam- 
bridge. In the preparation of this list, which has involved 
great labor and detail, the 36 libraries interested have worked 
together ; but the publication is undertaken by this library 
alone. The matter is all in type (or properly in "slugs") 
save an Index, which is nearly ready for the printer. It will 
form a volume of perhaps 125 pages, and include about 
5,400 different serials. We hope that it is merely prelimi- 
nary to a list of all the files of serials in these libraries. 
Such a list, not merely giving the title of each serial, but de- 
scribing with precision the period covered by the file in each 
library, would render an important service. We shall prob- 
ably print such a list of the serials in the Boston Public 
Library, and using it as a basis invite the information that 
will swell it into a list inclusive of all these libraries. 



Library Department. 31 

Another enterprise in co-operative bibliography is the 
'■'■Index to Architectural Illustrations'''' which is being under- 
taken by the Athenseum, the Institute of Technology 
and the Boston Public Library, and in which the libiaries 
of Harvard and of Columbia Universities are likely to join. 
The index will, of course, comprise only material in these 
libraries ; but the material in these five libraries (including 
the Architectural Departments of Harvard and the Listitute 
and the Avery Collection at Columbia) covers a very wide 
range. In Architecture the Index will group under the 
name of each place illustrations of the architecture of that 
place and under the name of each subject (e.g.^ cathedrals, 
opera-houses — even minor subjects, as chancels) illustra- 
tions of the architecture of that subject. At this library, 
for our own use, there are to be indexed sculpture and paint- 
ing as well as architecture. 

This work is being done not by the Catalogue Department 
but by the Fine Art Department under Mr. Fleischner. 
Under his direction also the publications of the Arundel So- 
ciety have been catalogued, and card catalogues with brief 
entries have been made, or are in progress, of the Parker, 
Ticknor and Thayer collections, as also of works on the Fine 
Arts and Useful Arts. The titles are transcripts from the 
cards in the general catalogues, or are cut from the catalogues 
printed in volumes. 

A card catalogue of the current newspapers has been pre- 
pared by Mr. Blaisdell, and he is preparing such a catalogue 
for the Patent Collection. 

Branch Catalogues. — The cataloguing of new accessions 
hitherto done independently at each branch is now done at 
the Central Library, as explained above. A card catalogue 
has been prepared for the West End Branch, and a finding 
list of new books for the Roxbury Branch. At the branches, 
also, however, some 5,000 volumes have been catalogued, in- 
volving the writing of three times that number of cards. 
Some 13,000 cards (10,557 at Roxbury) have been written 
in revision of the branch card catalogues. 

Recommendations fob Books. 

The methods pursued by me in formulating my lists of 
books for purchase were detailed at length in the special 
report submitted by me May 29, 1896. The catalogue depart- 
ment is more than any other called upon to report to me rec- 
ommendations. Periodicals containing book lists or reviews 
(50 or more in number), library catalogues, publishers' cir- 



32 



City D()Cu.mii:nt No. 18. 



culars, booksellers' sale catalogues, and other bibliographical 
publications are assigned to members of this department and 
are examined by them and reported upon. The addition to 
the staff of ]\Ir. John ISIurdoch brings to this work an edu- 
cated judgment in scientific liteiature which has hitherto 
been wanting. Mr. Murdoch entered the service less than 
three months ago, and has not yet, of course, proceeded far 
with his examination of the material in this libraiy and in 
the libraries of this vicinity of which he is to make special 
study with a view to proper differentiation in purchase. 
But, at my request, he has drawn a preliminary memorandum 
of the principles by which, in his opinion, we should be 
guided in our purchases of scientific literature; and this 
memorandum, submitted with the report of the chief cata- 
loguer, I have had manifolded and place in your hands, to- 
gether with certain other of the reports submitted by the 
departments, which are specially deserving of your attention, 
but which I cannot quote at sufficient length in a report in- 
tended for publication. 

The main portion of the report of the chief of the cata- 
logue department appears above, many of his statements as 
to the operations of the department being quoted verbatim. 

Publications. 

On Feb. 7, 1896, the office of editor of library publications 
was created, and Lindsay Swift of the catalogue department 
appointed to it. It ranks as a division of the catalogue de- 
partment, under Mr. Whitney. During the past year the 
following publications have been issued under supervision of 
this editor: 



Date. 




Pages. 


Size. 


Edition. 


Price. 


1896. 




16 

29 

16 
176 

16 


16mo. 

24ino. 

sq. 16mo. 

sq. 16mo. 

sq. 16mo. 

Svo. 

8vo. 


10,000 

4,827 

1,021 

50 

10,443 
5,000 

5,000 




April 

July 


Selected List for Younger Readers, 
Finding List, Roxbury Brancli. . . . 


One cent. 
Free. 


October . . . 

June,1896,) 

to ( 

January, ( 

1897, ) 


Rules and Regulations, Revised. .. 
Monthly Bulletin, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-10, 
(0 f No. 10 an ed ition of 8,000 copies.) 
Monthly Bulletin, Vol. 2, No. 1 


Free. 
Free. 

Free. 



The Monthly Bulletin takes the place of the Quarterl}', 
the last number of which was issued in January, 1896. The 



LiBEARY Department. 33 

Quarterly was issued in an edition of 1,800 copies, and priced 
at 5 cents per copy to residents of Boston, 25 cents per copy 
to non-residents. The Monthly, as appears above, has been 
issued in an edition of 5,000 copies for free distribution, a 
charge of 25 cents per year being made where it is mailed to 
outsiders not on our exchange list. The Monthly Bulletin 
differs, however, from the Quarterly of recent years, in being 
primarily a record of accessions to the Central Library during 
the month preceding its date of issue. The Bulletins of 
the past year have, however, contained the following special 
lists compiled from the general catalogue : 

Bulletin No. 1-4, Transvaal and the Boers. 

Bulletin No. 1-6, Index to Lists in Quarterly Bulletin. 

Bulletin No. 7, Selected list of books on the Currency 
Question. 

Bulletin No. 10, List of English Translations of works of 
Dumas the Elder (of this list 1,000 copies were reprinted, 
also for free distribution). 

These lists, so far as of books, have not attempted to be 
complete bibliographies, but merely selections of titles by way 
of suggestion. (A similar list was prepared for the Boston 
papers of works on the A^enezuelan boundary dispute. This 
was afterwards printed by the library as a broadside.) 

The Monthly Bulletin begins with January, 1896. But the 
first four numbers were issued as one in June, 1896. This 
bulletin, like the other publications mentioned above, has 
been set up upon our linotype machine and printed in the 
Library Printing Department. The " slugs " have been re- 
tained, and are being regrouped as matter for an "annual." 
This will consolidate the monthly issues in one classification. 
But with reference more especially to popular use it will 
omit titles of less active or continuing interest, or of which 
otherwise it is sufficient to have had a publication in the 
Monthly Bulletin. It will, therefore, be designated as an 
"Annual Selected List " of additions to the library rather than 
as an Annual Bulletin. This experiment of consolidation with 
elision and reclassification was a serviceable test of the 
economy of the linotype as applied to library uses. The 
chief of the Printing Department estimates that the propor- 
tion of slugs already cast that could be used as they stand 
as against new composition has been as five to one. 

Publications in the hands of the printer pending February 
1, are : 

The Consolidated Serial List (96 pages, delivered ; com- 
plete to Index). 

The Annual Selected List (more than half done). 



34 City Document No. 18. 

Selected List for Younger Readers — revised edition incor- 
porating 125 additional titles, with some excisions. 

A pamphlet, descriptive of the Chamberlain Autograph 
Collection. This has been in preparation for some montlis 
upon the basis of material submitted by Mr. Edwin M. Ba- 
con, specially emplo3red for the purpose. It will reach about 
100 pages in print. 

Printing Department. 

I submit in full, for your examination, the report of the 
chief of the Printing Department. The equipment of the 
department now comprises 2 Mergenthaler linotype ma- 
cliines, 1 Hoe stop-cylinder press, 1 job press, a proof press, 
slug planing machine, job and body type, cabinets and the 
other usual furnishings of a printing-office. All of the above 
equipment has been bought outright by the library, save 
one of the linotype machines, which was taken on rental 
June last, with option of purchase at the end of one year, 
rent paid being applied. Assuming this bought, the equip- 
ment of the department represents a total investment of 
about <fl3,000. 

The present force of the department comprises, besides the 
chief, two linotype operators, a pressman and a feeder. 

We have not yet statistics of a full year's work with the 
above equipment and force. It is not wise, therefore, to at- 
tempt inferences as to the economy of this system of man- 
aging the library printing as against outside contract and 
ordinary composition. Tlie convenience in our undertakings 
of a plant specially planned for our needs, and installed in 
the library building hardly needs demonstration. Our Print- 
ing Department not merely takes prepared copy and puts it 
through the stages of composition and presswork; it furnishes 
to us an expert printer whose judgment may be called in at 
every stage of prejyaration of copy. This counsel may, and 
does, modify in directions of economy and serviceability the 
publishing enterprises of the library. But considerations of 
this sort may better be deferred for a later report entering 
into the subject in detail with adequate data from experi- 
ence. 

A chief interest of the past year has been the solution of 
certain problems involved in the adaptation of the linotype 
to the uses of specialized cataloguing. Hitherto the machine 
had been used chiefly for newspaper work; we have had to 
impose upon it the task of handling from 30 to 40 languages 
and dialects. This meant the contrivance of nearly 300 



Library Department. 35 

accents and special characters. A type was specially made 
for us by the Mergen thaler Company, from a design 
submitted by Mr. Lee, and the accents have been con- 
trived in large part by the use of diacritical marks, form- 
ing piece accents, which are inserted in a groove upon 
the slug itself, thus avoiding the ill appearance of this 
device as usually employed with type. As this library 
is in effect the pioneer in the use of the linotype for 
this kind of work, these experiments are of a very general 
importance. 

The output of the department now includes all the printed 
work of the librar^^, except that from engraved plates. Dur- 
ing the past year it has included all of the publications 
named above ; a Manual of House Rules, 16 pages, in an 
edition of 500 copies, and the press work on a reprint from 
the Bulletin of the list of works in the Russian lang'uasre. 
But this is but part of its work. Twelve thousand seven 
hundred and sixty-two titles, representing at least 100,000 
cards have been printed for the Card Catalogue ; (the com- 
position of these card entries keeps one linotype busy almost 
continuously) ; about 2,250,000 call slips (of ten kinds), 
600,000 pieces of other currently consumed stationery of 
over 100 varieties, 30,000 circulars, besides blank books, 
signs, notices, etc. 

Registration. 

Appendix VI. relates to the card-holders in this library. 
The first table gives the statistics of registrations in the old 
form. The other tables go much further. Starting with the 
cards outstanding Feb. 1, 1896, classified according to the 
department of the library (Central or Branch) through 
which they were issued, it details the number of Registra- 
tions, New Registrations and Renewals during the year, and 
comparing these with the number of cards expiring by limita- 
tion, deduces the number outstanding Jan. 31, 1897. In 
addition, attempting to fulfil the promise of our last report, 
it classifies by sex, age, and occupation, and by ward, the 
43,345 persons who are active card-holders Jan. 31, 1897, 
It also shows the percentage which the number of card- 
holders in each ward bears to the total population of that 
ward. 

By these tables it appears that the number of active 
("live") cards outstanding Jan. 31, 1897, was 43,345, as 
against 34,842 outstanding Feb. 1, 1896, showing a gain of 
10,764 card-holders during tlie year. This means that on 



36 City Document No. 18. 

J;in. ol, 1897, 30, ^„ per cent more persons stood qualified to 
draw books for home use than stood qualified on Feb. 1, 
1896. 

In proportion to population, Ward 10 furnishes the largest 
percentage of card-holders ; Ward 6 the smallest. The 
census tables are not yet prepared Avhich would enable us to 
compare the proportion of card-holders of the several occu- 
pations with the number of inhabitants engaged in these 
occupations respectively. Possibly our next report may con- 
trive this. The present tables, especially those of distribu- 
tion by ward, may indicate in a measure to what districts 
effort needs most especially to be directed. 

The number of Teachers' Cards issued from September, 
1895 (when this privilege was instituted), to Jan. 31, 1897, 
was 1,213. Of these, 795 are "live" cards on the latter 
date, 629 of the 795 are held by resident teachers ; 166 by 
non-residents (whose qualification, however, is that they 
"give instruction in an institution of learning in the city 
of Boston"). The 1,400 non-resident "students" who 
hold cards are attending Boston schools or colleges {e. ^., 
the Harvard Medical School, Boston University, the Insti- 
tute of Technology), whose authorities have filed a bond of 
indemnity for any loss sustained by the library through 
this use. 

Use of the Library. 

I have had manifolded and submit for your inspection the 
reports in full of the following officials who have the con- 
duct of departments directly serving the public : The Cus- 
todian of Bates Hall, the Custodian of the Special Libraries 
Floor, the Chief of the Issue Department, and the Super- 
visor of Branches and Stations. The last-named official 
took office only on Dec. 1, 1896. His report, however, com- 
prises the work of the year so far as it may be made matter 
of statistics, together with certain general observations upon 
the condition and conduct of our outlying departments as he 
has examined them during the past two months. 

As regards statistics of use, I should repeat the caution 
a4vanced in my last report against an assumption that these 
statistics represent the work of the library. As there 
stated, there are in the Central Library alone over 100,000 
volumes which may be handled without the formality of a 
call-slip. In each Branch and Reading Room, and now in 
almost every Delivery Station, there are hundreds of other 
volumes which are similarly treated. The current periodi- 



Library Department. 37 

cals in the Central and Branch Libraries and Reading Rooms 
are for the most part on open tables, where they also may be 
handled without the intervention of an attendant. 

Of all this use no record is kept. There is a recorded 
hall use, consisting of books issued upon slips from the 
closed stacks. Omitting, however, as they do, the important 
unrecorded use, these figures are so misleading that I have 
directed them to be omitted altogether from the tables. 
These tables indicate, therefore, merely the number of vol- 
umes drawn for "home use" during the year. This is to be 
remembered when a comparison is made between the " circu- 
lation" of this library and the "circulation" of libraries 
which include in their gross returns the number of books and 
of periodicals used in the Reading Rooms. 

In preceding reports mention has been made of delays in- 
cident to the issue of books. That tlie number of these has 
been greatly reduced is due thus far to the efficiency of the 
service in the Issue Department in offsetting inconveniences 
of architectural plan, of equipment, and of classification, and 
imperfections in the present catalogues and shelf-lists. The 
classification is being improved by the relocation of certain 
material, the defects in the catalogues and shelf-lists are gradu- 
ally being remedied (a complete remedy, however, being a 
matter of months still to accomplish). But the inconveniences 
in architectural plan have not yet been dealt with. Until 
inter-communication be contrived between the stacks, addi- 
tional book (and freight) elevators be provided, and the 
space for the work of issue be made really adequate ; or the 
work of issue be sub-divided by the removal of the " home 
use" issue, to some other point, it is impossible to expect 
that delays will be even considerably avoided. Meanwhile, 
the service itself in the department is competent, faithful 
and assiduous. And while delays must still occur, this may 
at least be said : that no reader usmg the forms and remedies 
prescribed need even noiv suffer delays either prolonged or re- 
peated. 

Rearrangement. 

For convenience of administration certain changes are to 
be made in the location of the books in the Central Library. 
The Parker Library will be transferred to Stack 6, from which 
the books much called for may be issued more readily to 
Bates Hall; and all the Federal documents, together with 
those of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the City of 
Boston, are to be grouped on the Special Libraries floor. 



33 City Document No. 18. 

Sundays and Holidays. 

As stated above, the Central Library, which has regularly 
been open on Sundays from 2 till 10 P.M., in all depart 
ments directly serving the public was during the past year 
kept open during the same hours on four of the legal holi- 
days. The experiment has been a marked success, the num- 
ber of readers and of visitors equalling that on Sundays. 
The Sunday use in the new building is partially indicated 
by the average of books issued, — being 1,334 for the eight 
hours, as against an average of 1,780 for the thirteen hours 
of the secular day. The number of readers at any one time 
reaches its maximum on a Sunday afternoon between 3 and 
5 o'clock. The number of visitors had been expected to fall 
off as the new building ceased to be a novelty. But it has 
persisted undiminished. On the one Sunday during the 
past six months on which a count was taken, 5,699 persons 
entered the doorway between 2 and 6 P.M. The average 
number per Sunday during the past two vears cannot have, 
fallen short of 3,000. 

The holiday showing the largest use was Washington's 
Birthday, on which the recorded issue alone was 3,052 
volumes. April 20, May 30, and November 26 stood about 
on a par. 

The only branch open on Sundays throughout the yetir Avas 
the West End. Here, also, the use was ample justification. 

There are three other branches whose location should seem 
similarly to justify expectation of a large Sunday use. These 
are Charlestown, East Boston, and South Boston. An ex- 
periment was accordingly made during seven Sundaj-s of the 
past year. It cannot be said to have been a complete success. 
The number of readers averaged in the case of Charlestown 
90 ; in the case of South Boston 101 per Sunday. The num- 
ber at East Boston (where the record was not so accurately 
kept) was less. Of the total of 634 persons at Charlestown 
264 were children ; of the total of 706 at South Boston 542 
were children. On the other hand, the experiment was un- 
dertaken at a season of the year (March 15 to April 26) 
least promising success; for the natural tendency of spring- 
time is to diminish rather than increase the indoor use of 
books. These branches while fairly located as regards dis- 
trict are unfortunately situated in being in each case upon 
the second floor, where the hospitalities they extend are less 
obvious to passers-by. 

The expense of the undertaking did not exceed $60 per 
Sunday for the three branches. Should our funds permit I 
shall recommend that it be resumed beginning Oct. 1, 1897. 



Library Department. 39 



I. — Reference Use. 

As stated above, this report will not attempt statistics of 
reference use. I must content myself with the general asser- 
tion that this use is steadily enlarging in volume and advanc- 
ing in apparent definiteness of purpose. The custodian of 
Bates Hall calls your attention to what he deems a symptom 
of the latter advance. To look in at this main Reading Room 
and see the large majority of over two hundred readers busy 
with note books is, in fact, to get an impression of serious 
industry. 

The report of the custodian of the Special Libraries shows 
a special development in another direction: the systematic 
and i3remeditated use of books on the Fine Arts in connec- 
tion with lectures, classes and topical work generally. Mr. 
Fleischner, the custodian, invites information in advance of 
subjects to be taken up, and prepares a set of references, or has 
ready to display the particular books needed for illustration. 
His report gives a list of the groups of persons who during 
the past year have availed themselves of this invitation. Li 
many cases the lecture itself is given here on the basis of the 
books displayed. February 6 (a date subsequent to the date 
of this report but which I select as convenient to show recent 
conditions) is a favorable example of a Saturday in this de- 
partment. On this day various members of the course of 
lectures on art being given by Mr. J. F. Hopkins, a class in 
the Boston Art Students' Association, a class in the subject 
of the Renaissance, two classes (from the public schools) 
in Ornament, a club reading on the subject of French Cha- 
teaux, two classes from private schools studying the Art of 
Rome, and one stud3dng the Art of Greece — in all, some 
two hundred and fifty persons made use of the reference 
books, plates, photographs, etc., thus selected and set aside 
for them in connection with subjects of definite inquiry. 

Mr. Fleischner has for some months arranged in the Bar- 
ton-Ticknor room a weekly exhibit of photographs of interest 
not merely to the special student but also to the general 
public. The following programme, arranged for the coming 
few weeks, will indicate the range already deemed feasible 
for such exhibits : 

February 15-29. Issues of the Kelmscott Press. 

February 22. Washington Portraits. 

February 20. Saracenic Art, ] In connection with the 

February 27. Cathedrals, I lectures by Mr. J. F. 

March 6. Renaissance, [ Hopkins, Director of Art 

March 13. Copley square, j in the Public Schools. 



40 City Document No. 18. 

March 20. Florentine Sculptors. 

Mai-cb 27. Florentine Architects. 

April 3. Industrial Arts (in connection with the 

Arts and Crafts Exhibition at Copley Hall). 

In connection with such exhibits the Graupner collection 
has rendered essential and convenient service. In many- 
instances (^e.g. the Kelmscott exhibit and that of the Wash- 
ington portraits) the material in the library has been supple- 
mented by courteous loans from private collections. 

The activities of this department are not confined to books 
upon the Fine Arts. The other use has not, however, ad- 
vanced materially beyond that of the preceding year. The 
use of the Barton-Ticknor, and other special collections, is a 
highly specialized use. So, also, is that of the Allen A. Brown 
Library of music, the resources of which cannot be fully 
exhibited until the completion of the catalogue. In the 
department of the Industrial Arts, however, a developing use 
was expected, similar to that in the Fine Arts. It has not yet 
taken place. We trust that the Arts and Crafts Exhibition 
may stimulate it. And it is to take advantage of such 
interest as this exhibition may arouse that Mr. Fleischner is 
arranging for a special display of material from April 3 to 10. 

Academic Use. 

It is a fact, not perhaps generally appreciated, that to cer- 
tain of the higher institutions of learning in Boston and 
vicinity the Boston Public Library is, in effect, a university 
library. It is such in an auxiliary way even to Harvard Uni- 
versity; and it is such in a very important sense to Boston 
University, the Institute of Technology, and other Boston 
colleges and academies, and even to outside institutions, such 
as Wellesley College. Not that these institutions lack effi- 
cient libraries of their own, but the accessibility of the Boston 
Public Library relieves them from the purchase of much 
specialized material which their funds cannot well afford. 
Even Dartmouth College has recently sent a class of students 
for systematic research in one of our departments. 

Newspaper Reading Room. 

This room now contains 318 newspapers, of which the 
greater part are purchased from the Todd fund — the I'e- 
mainder gifts of the publishers; 111 are papers published 
abroad; 207 are papers published in the United States; 85 



Library Depaktment. 41 

are in languages other than Ei>glish. On the average, 225 
papers are received every day. 

The use of the room is assiduous. The largest number of 
readers noted at any one time has been : reading the Ameri- 
can papers, 139; reading the foreign, 53. The maximum of 
readers in the room at any one time reaches nearly to 200. 
Of the papers taken the following are bound : 
The Boston dailj^ papers and some Boston weekly papers. 



The " New York Tribune." 
The "Chicago Inter-Ocean.' 
The "Atlanta Constitution. 
The " London Times." 
The "London Gazette." 



" Le Figaro," Paris. 
" Allgemeine Zeitung." 
"Kolnische Zeitung." 
The "Japan Weekly Mail." 
The " North China Herald." 



Public Stenographer and Typewriter. 

Early in the ^-ear accommodation was furnished in the 
building to a public stenographer and typewriter, whose 
presence here has been a convenience to the library as well 
as to the public. Apart from her local work, she has been 
called upon to make copies and abstracts for inquirers living 
at a distance. There is now about to be installed in the 
building a Public Pay Station Telephone, which will be in 
her chai'ge. 

IL HOME USE. 

Appendix VII. gives the number of books circulated for 
home use during the past year from each department of the 
library, compares this with such circulation for the year 
1895, and tabulates the circulation of Branches and Delivery 
Stations for the seven years beginning with 1890 and ending 
with 1896. 

From these tables it appears that the circulation for home 
use in 1896 (12 months), compared with that for 1895 (13 
months), is as follows : 

Gain, 
1895. 1896. 1896. 

Central Library (including Cen- 
tral Library books issued 
through Branches and Sta- 
tions) 279,494 326,254 46,760 

Branches and Stations (direct 

issue) 567,827 678,765 110,938 



847,321 1,005,019 157,698 
or eighteen per cent. 



42 City Document No. 18. 

The issue direct from the Central Library increased from 
251,561 in 1895 to 285,500 in 1896. Sixty thousand one 
hundred and seventy-three volumes were issued from the 
Children's Room at the Central Library. A comparison of 
nine months of 1896 with nine months of 1895 shows an 
increase in the issue from this room from 28,342 volumes to 
45,873. 

The increase in the circulation through outlying depart- 
ments is accounted for by the establishment of the West 
End' Branch and of new Delivery Stations and by the addi- 
tion to the stations of the Deposit feature. As stated above, 
all of the stations, save two, now have Central Library books 
(from 300 to 500 volumes each at one time) on deposit, which 
may be drawn direct, without the delay of an application to 
the Central Library. The aggregate of such issue during 
the past year has reached 65,803 volumes. 

An analysis shows that the increase in the circulation of 
the stations has come at the expense of the branches, the 
circulation of which has in every case, save that of Brighton, 
fallen off from 1895. The decrease is, to be sure, in part 
accounted for by the discrepancy in the periods compared 
(the statistics for 1895 being for 13 months). This is not, 
however, sufficient explanation of the decrease of 19,000 
volumes at the South Boston Branch. The Custodian thinks 
that an adequate explanation lies in the increased attractive- 
ness of the branch for reference use on account of the insti- 
tution of open shelves. Similar results are so naturally to 
be expected of improved facilities for reference use, wherever 
instituted, that I am surprised that the circulation from the 
Central Library has increased rather than diminished. 

The increased activity of the stations has been induced 
by the change in compensation of the custodians from a 
fixed sum per annum to a sum dependeJit upon the number 
of volumes handled. The new method makes it their inter- 
est to interest the local constituency, to provide ample and 
attractive accommodations, to advertise these, and to win 
pojDularity for the station by adequate and attentive service. 
The library pays to each custodian upon this relative basis 
more than it did upon the fixed. But it gets more — it gets 
a distinct section of the store — in some cases a room twelve 
to fifteen feet square ; it gets space for shelving and furni- 
ture, and it requires a service in the charging of books, the 
sending of fine notices, etc., such as was not exacted under 
the old system. 

There must not be overlooked, however, one disadvantage 
in the present method. The compensation is based upon 



Library Department. 43 

the number of books circulated without regard to their char- 
acter. The more popuUir the book, the more quickly it may- 
be read and returned for reissue, the greater its profit to the 
custodian. The demand of the custodian in the deposit col- 
lections is therefore an increasing demand for the lighter fic- 
tion. This tendency interferes with one purpose which we had 
had in instituting this system of deposits — to raise the char- 
acter of the reading by rendering locally accessible in these 
collections books of a serious nature which might be examined 
without formality and drawn without delay. 

To pay one rate of compensation for fiction and a higher 
rate for other literature may not prove impossible. 

A more satisfactory solution may prove to be to limit our 
contract with the proprietor of the store to a fixed sum for 
the accommodations provided, and to place in charge of the 
station a library employee on our regular pay-roll. The cost 
of this method would undoubtedly exceed that of the present 
one, unless the hours (now practically the full business day 
and evening) should be so reduced that one attendant, at a 
low salary, could manage the entire issue. 

The Supervisor's report contains an analysis of expendi- 
tures for these outlying departments, and among other figures 
a computation of the relative cost of circulating each volume 
issued by the branches as against the delivery stations. In 
this computation he makes the worst case possible against 
the branches, in assuming that the entire cost of maintenance 
is to be charged against the circulation for home use. Even 
thus, the result is to show that during the past year each vol- 
ume circulated from a branch has cost us iDut 6 7-10 cents as 
against 5 cents for each volume circulated through a station. 
And it must be noted that a branch library performs other 
functions (e.g.^ reference and reading-room use) not taken 
account of in this. On the other hand, it must be remem- 
bered that but two of our branches pay rent for the rooms 
they occupy, while of the cost of the delivery stations a per- 
centage is in each case chargeable as rent. 

The computation goes, however, to disprove the impres- 
sions of recent examining committees that the branches rep- 
resent a greater expenditure for the work done than do the 
stations. In the case of one station it cost the library 22 
cents for each volume circulated during the yeaj- 1895, and 
even 15 cents for each volume circulated during the year 
1896. The increase in the number of volumes circulated has 
steadily reduced the cost per volume during the past three 
years But even at 5 cents, it is 2 cents per volume more 
than the cost to the Chicago Public Library of its outlying 



44 City Document No. 18. 

circnliition. The remedy is not to reduce the facilities for 
issue, but to increase the number of books issued. 

Teachers' Cards. 

Eight thousand and forty-seven volumes from the Cential 
Library have been drawn upon teachers' cards during the 
past year. During the first year of the use of these cards 
(ending Oct. 1, 1896,) the issue upon them from the Central 
and branches together amounted to 8,994 volumes. These 
are classified by subject in the report of the chief of the issue 
department. 

Inter-Libraey Loans. 

The report of the Issue Department shows also 63 books 
loaned to other libraries upon their special application. It 
is for other libraries of Massachusetts that such loans are 
more particularly designed. They have the special claim 
that we owe to the Commonwealth part of the land on 
which this building stands. But it might be said that as the 
Boston Public Library, more nearly than any other, stands for 
New England as a whole in the material it attempts to accu- 
mulate, so it may justly serve New England, as a whole, in so 
far — (1) as this service is one that cannot be performed ex- 
cept by it, and — (2) as this service may be rendered by it 
without inconvenience to the citizens of Boston, at whose 
cost it is maintained. 

In May last a system of blanks was devised for conducting 
these inter-library loans. These blanks are furnished by us 
to such libraries as may be interested. The applicant library 
agrees to be responsible for the care of the book, and to sub- 
mit to a reasonable penalty in case of its loss or mutilation. 
But the whole system is subject to the following limitations : 
(1) the book asked for must be one out of the ordinary course 
— not such as it is the ordinary duty of the applicant library 
to supply; (2) it must be required for purpose of serious 
research ; (3) it must be a book which may, without injury, 
be sent by express ; and (4) it must be a book which may be 
spared, for the time being, without inconvenience to our local 
readers. 

SERVICE. 

The service has sustained several losses by death during 
the past year. On February 18 died Mary E. Brock, Cus- 
todian of the Brighton Branch. She had served the library 
faithfully for twenty-one years. On September 16 died 



Library Department. 45 

Charles G. Russell, assistant in my office. Mr. Russell ,en- 
tered the service on Dec. 4, 1895, so had been with us 
less than a year up to the time of his death. But within 
this short period he had gained thorough respect among his 
associates for good judgment, a manly conscience as to his 
own work, and a considerate regard for that of others. On 
October 19 died Henry W. Powers, who had been in the 
library service since Nov. 12, 1890; at first in the Jan- 
itor Department, later as an engineer in charge of our book 
railways. In Octobej' Sarah C. Godbold, Custodian of the 
East Boston Branch, tendered her resignation, which took 
effect December 1. No custodian has yet been appointed in 
her place. 

The reorganization of certain departments of the work at 
the Central Libiary involved the discontinuance from Jan- 
uary 1 of three employees who had been long in the service: 
Mary A. Jenkins, Caroline E, Poree, and Edward Tiffany. 
The necessity which led to this was a matter of extreme 
regret. 

Other Changes in the Service. 

Mr. Carret, who had never fully recovered from the ill- 
health which obliged him to ask for leave of absence in the 
spring of 1896, last fall requested to be relieved of the con- 
duct of the Shelf Department, and transferred to special 
work. On Jan. 1, 1897, the change was made, and the 
Shelf Department placed temporarily under the supervision 
of Mr. Whitney, Chief of the Catalogue Department. 

Additions to the Force. 

On May 4 (Mrs.) Gertrude P. Sheffield was appointed to 
take charge of the Children's room at the Central Library, 
with general advisory supervision over the literature for 
younger readers in all our departments. On June 23, an open 
examination was held to fill the vacancy in the custodian- 
ship of the Brighton Branch, caused by the death of Miss 
Brock. As a result of the examination, Harriet Rice of 
Brighton was appointed for a probationary term, beginning 
August 1. 

On October 1, Philip H. Savage was appointed Librarian's 
Secretary, this title then being attached to the position for- 
merly held by Mr. Russell. 

On November 16, John Murdoch was appointed for special 
service in connection with our departments of scientific liter- 
ature. Mr. Murdoch's scientific training and his experience 



40 City Document No. 18. 

as libnuian (during a period of five years) of the Smith- 
sonian Institution promise assistance in a direction in which 
expert opinion had been lacking from our force. 

On December 1, Hiller C. Wellman was appointed Su- 
pervisor of Branches and Stations. This office is a newly 
created one. Its purpose is to unify our outlying system, to 
strengthen the collection of books, to improve the equipment, 
and to introduce uniform and more modern methods of ad- 
ministration. Its further fully as important purpose is to bring 
the branches and stations into closer touch with the Central 
Library, and so to improve the system of distribution that 
the books in the Central Library may, in fact, as they are 
now in name, be made to serve the city as a whole. 

Including the five appointments above particularly de- 
scribed, there have been 38 appointments to the service 
during the past year, a large proportion of these to fill vacan- 
cies. They may be classified as follows: 

Central 

Library. Branches. 

Supervisor of Branches .... 1 
Librarian's Secretary . . . . .1 

Grade A, Special . . . . .1 
Grade B . . . . . . .4 

Grade B, Special 3 

Grade C - 1 

Grade C, Special 2 1 

Grade D, Special 1 1 

Grade E 13 1 

r Engineer's, ^ 
Ungraded, < Binding, v Departments . 8 

^ Printing, ) — — 

34 4 



Promotions (e.g., from grade E to grade D) are not in- 
cluded in the above. 

Seven general and six special examinations were held dur- 
ing the year, at which 351 papers were handed in. Of the 
351 applicants, 125 were male and 226 female. 

On February 7, grades B Special and C Special were made 
three-year grades. On February 28, the grade of the branch 
first assistant was altered from D Special to C. 

I may again call attention to the reports of the several 
chiefs of departments, submitted with this. Each contains 
data concerning interesting details upon which I cannot enter 
here. Appendix VIII. gives the list of trustees for 45 years; 
Appendix IX. of examining committees; Appendix X. the by- 



Library Department. 47 

laws, as revised to date; Appendix XL the schedule of library 
service corrected to 1897 ; Appendix XIL statement concern- 
ing the system of graded service ; Appendix XIII. correspond- 
ence relating to gifts; Appendix XIV. the list of gifts and 
givers. 

An institution such as this presents so many aspects of 
service to be rendered that perfection cannot be hoped ; the 
variety of the opportunity multiplies the risks of imperfec- 
tion. In a document intended for the public my inclination 
is always to abstain from commendation of associates who 
may, equally with the chief executive, be presumed to have 
the interest of the service at heart. But I have often occa- 
sion to regret that I cannot share with the public the knowl- 
edge which I gain (as no one else can) of the earnestness, 
conscience, good faith, and high endeavor which enter 
into the work of employees of this library who get general 
credit for no more than the routine performance of routine 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 
Feb. 1, 1897. 



48 



City Document No. 18. 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 
FOR 1896. 



To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen : The Examining Committee was organized 
at a meeting held Oct. 2, 1896, by the choice of John E. 
Hudson as Chairman, and Miss Heloise E. Hersey as Secre- 
tary. The usual sub-committees, made up as follows, were 
appointed : 



Books. 

Barrett Wendell, Chairman. 
George M. Garland. 
Leighton Parks. 

Catalogues^ Bulletins and 
Finding Lists. 

Caleb B. Tillinghast, 

Chairman. 
Emma Hutchins. 
Azariah Smith. 



Branches, and New Modes of 
Distrihution. 

Borden P. Bowne, Chairman. 
Helen Cheever. 
John J. McNulty. 

Finance. 

Everett W. Burdett, 

Chairman. 
Joseph J. Corbett. 
John L. Bates. 



Administration. 

John E. Hudson, Chairman. 
Heloise E. Hersey. 
Hasket Derby. 
Caleb B. Tillinghast. 

The reports of the sub-committees have been received and 
considered by the full committee, who beg to report. 

The vital point of the connection of the library with the 
daily needs of the public, and the one that needs to be fash- 
ioned and lubricated until the highest possible degree of effi- 
ciency is readied, is the placing of the books called for in the 
hands of the reader within the shortest possible time after the 
call is indicated. 

Allowance must always be made for the delays necessitated 
by the erroneous and imperfect filling out of the call-slips, 
for the unreasonable complaints due to the nervous impatience 
of the patron, and for the delays and displacements which can 



Library Department. 49 

never be wholly prevented in a large library where the call 
slip and the book must pass through several hands. Criti- 
cism in this matter can never be wholly eliminated, but every 
complaint should be immediately and carefully investigated, 
not only to soothe the particular case, but to prevent, if pos- 
sible, a similar complaint in the future. 

The paramount reason for such criticism as may be well 
founded may doubtless be traced to the youth and inexperi- 
ence of those employed as runners, and the small compensation 
paid them. Economy at this point involves the most serious 
inconvenience and irritation to the public. Until more money 
can be devoted to it, the greatest resjDonsibility rests upon the 
executive authorities to devise every means to give life and 
sjDirit to this department of the library work. The superin- 
tendent of this force should be alert and decisive, and capable 
of commanding the constant and complete activity of every 
employee. Carelessness or inattention should lead to prompt 
dismissal, and, if possible, some means of reward should be 
devised for those who manifest exceptional promptness, intel- 
ligence and care. The attention of the trustees is called 
especially to this subject as one which affects every patron 
of the library, and to the fact that every second of time saved 
in the delivery of books saves valuable time to the reader, re- 
moves a most frequent cause of complaint, and objectively 
impresses the people with the efficient and business-like 
methods of the administration of the library. 

Occasional intimations to the effect that the ventilation of 
the library is imperfect, more or less frequently found in the 
columns of the daily press, and referred to among the 
public, have again caused the attention of the committee 
to be directed to this subject. And they are bound to say 
that, not only has last year's state of things been greatly 
improved upon, but that the air in all parts of the building- 
has, with a single exception, been found singularly good at 
each visit. In the corridors, the reading, newspaper, and 
delivery rooms, and in Bates Hall, remarkably little close- 
ness has been observed. Even in the little gallery above 
the central entrance to the latter room, no foul air has been 
met with. We are inclined to attribute the criticisms on 
the ventilation to one of two causes ; either the fact that 
on the days complained of the delivery and exhaust fans were 
not in running order, as has occasionally been the case, or else 
the presence of such a throng of visitors as occurs on Sunday 
afternoons. A system of ventilation, sufficient and satisfac- 
tory under ordinary circumstances, would here be apt to prove 
insufficient. 



50 City Document No. 18. 

As in most buildings, the bad air of the library is met 
with at the top. In the upper corridor, between the special 
collections, where the Sargent pictures continue to attract 
multitudes of sightseers, the atmosphere is, especially on 
Sunday, vitiated and oppressive. No ample outlets have 
yet been provided for the escape of foul air. As was stated 
last year, such outlets, connected with the exhaust fan, 
which is so near at hand, would cause a great change to be 
wrought, and remove one of the reproaches of this magnifi- 
cent structure. 

The location of the retiring-rooms for men and women in 
the front lower hall, hard by the main entrance, their con- 
stant use, and, on crowded days, the almost ceaseless open- 
ing and shutting of the doors, is a distinct sanitary evil, only 
to be remedied by placing these offices in the back of the 
building. But one abuse connected with the existing state 
of things admits of a ready correction. We refer to the 
lavatory arrangements. In the men's retiring-room is a 
series of basins for washing, and hanging to the wall behind 
them are two large roller towels. The crowd that, on cer- 
tain daj^s, uses these chambers must be seen to be appre- 
ciated. People await their turn in rows, and for hours 
together there is no abatement in the throng. The basins 
are in much demand, and the towels are perforce changed 
four times a day. There are few more certain methods of 
disseminating disease than a public towel, and the present 
system should be immediately and finally abolished. It would 
be better to wholly dispense with the lavatory than to ex- 
pose its frequenters to the risks they here encounter. Either 
the basins should be removed, or separate towels, not neces- 
sarily of large size, be furnished each individual. No ques- 
tion of expense should be allowed for a moment to stand in 
the way of this reform. 

We are glad to find that lights are to be supplied the 
tables in the lower reading-room, as such are much needed. 
In the Newspaper room a considerable improvement in light- 
ing has been effected by supplying the central stands with 
properly shaded lamps. The tables were already thus pro- 
vided. But the old fixtures around the walls of this room 
should be discarded. Originally introduced for the purpose 
of general illumination, when it was intended to use this as 
a lecture hall, they are entirely unfitted for reading pur- 
poses, being destitute of shades, having their hght in part 
cut off by a projecting flange or collar below the lamp, and 
shining down on the eyes of the reader, who is obliged to 
face them. Proper reading lamps, substituted for these now 



Library Department. 51 

used for a purpose for which they were never intended, 
would worthily complete the equipment of a room that is, in 
other respects, unequalled in kindred institutions. 

The use, and the constantly increasing use, of Bates Hall, 
confirms the committee in the impression expressed in their 
report of last year of the need of a general reading-room in 
addition to the special rooms dedicated to special subjects, or 
particular rooms to particular classes of people. The crowded 
state of Bates Hall and its obvious un suitableness for the 
purposes of such a room, leads the committee to suggest that 
action be taken in the matter. 

There seem to be but two means by which proper space 
for a reading-room can be secured ; one is the purchase of 
adjoining land, the other is the use of the space now devoted 
to a court-yard. The great expense of the former plan makes 
the latter seem the wiser. The committee would accordingly 
recommend that the Trustees proceed at their convenience to 
consider the advisability of the conversion of the court-yard 
into a reading-room. 

During the last year manifest improvements have been 
made in the children's room. More books have been placed 
there, and an attendant is always ready to study and supply 
the wants of the children. Some good pictures have been 
hung on the walls, and the air of cheerful hospitality is 
noticeable. Much, however, still remains to be done. Books 
should be added rapidly till not a vacant place remains on 
the shelves. When new books call for more room, it should 
be obtained by the removal of the volumes which experience 
shows are least used. In no part of the library is it so neces- 
sary that there should be active life and variety. 

It would be practicable that a large table should be loaded 
with books, maps, and pictures, illustrative of subjects of 
current interest. Children learn more quickly than adults 
from suggestion, and no device should be neglected to lead 
them early into the delights of substantial reading. The 
cheap papers and novels spare no pains to attract children, 
and, unless the library is prepared to cope with these foes of 
good taste, it will lose its hold upon many boys and girls at 
the most impressionable age. Especially is it advisable that 
books with many pictures shoulcl be ready to the hand of 
children. Many a book which seems to an adult over the 
head of a twelve-year-old boy will be found intensely inter- 
esting to him when he has once been beguiled by illustra- 
tions into beginning it. For example, books on Cuba, or on 
Constantinople, or on modern Athens, might well be laid 
within reach of the children at the present moment, and, 



52 City Document No. 18. 

even if they were sliglitly injured by the use made of them, 
they would be doing service of a sort to make good citizens. 

The plea may again be entered tliat there should be a fine, 
large modern globe in the children's room, and that a map 
of the United States should be hung in a conspicuous place 
in the room. 

Fifteen-minute talks on books, given by men and women 
who knew how to talk about literature, would be an in- 
valuable adjunct to the work of the children's room, and 
would certainly attract even more children to the library on 
Saturdays. 

In regard to the buying of books, the committee beg to say 
that they think the present management of such matters is 
highly satisfactory. 

The report of the Librarian, concerning the purchase of 
books, submitted to the Trustees on May 29, 1896, which 
they have examined, they heartily approve. They believe 
that, as is therein suggested, it might be to the advantage of 
the library if accredited representatives could, from time to 
time, be sent abroad with the view to making purchases 
which should increase the collections of rare and valuable 
books. They repeat, however, their suggestion of last year, 
that such purchases should be made either from the income 
of invested funds or from special grants. The regular grants 
of the city, they believe, should regularly be devoted and 
confined to the more popular purposes of the library, as de- 
fined in last year's report. 

In view of the possibility of sudden emergencies, such as 
the unexpected opportunity to purchase, at short notice, 
considerable collections which delay might lose, they would 
suggest, in this connection, that a permanent reserve fund 
might be granted by the city, which would sensibly add to 
the resources of the library. 

The committee fully approve a principle which they un- 
derstand lately to have governed the action of the Trustees ; 
namely, that the Public Library should accept no gifts if so 
hampered with conditions as in any way to interfere with 
their use for library purposes, as distinguished from the pur- 
poses of a museum. They are of opinion that, in all policy, 
the Trustees should consider that the Public Library is a 
library mstituted first for the citizens, and secondly for the 
scholars of Boston. Any other purposes should always be 
held subsidiary to these. 

The committee would suggest that the practical value of 
the collections of the United States patents would be greatly 
increased by the purchase of a duplicate set of drawings, 



Librae Y Department. 53 

which might be so arranged as to render the consultation 
of the documents now in the library a far more easy matter 
than at present. This purchase, so obviously useful to citi- 
zens, devoted to mechanical inventions, might properly be 
made the object either of a special grant by the city or of a 
judiciously solicited gift. 

In all its essential features the method of cataloguing now 
employed in the library commends itself to the committee as 
productive of good results for the amount expended for this 
purpose. A more systematic unification of the purchases for 
the branches, which is now in contemplation, together with 
the printed linotype card, will prove of great economic im- 
portance. It will be readily seen that, as copies of the same 
book are placed in each branch, the labor and expense will 
be minimized when a duplicate printed card from the Central 
Library does away entirely with the cost of cataloguing each 
copy separately at every branch in which it is placed. Few 
people probably realize the vast amount of work which is 
accomplished by the cataloguing department, and it is pos- 
sible that still fewer fully realize how comparatively useless 
a large library would speedily become if this department 
were not maintained with the highest degree of promptness 
and efficiency. This demands the highest ability, the ripest 
experience, and most discriminating judgment, a quick sense 
of the scientific relations and the relative values of every 
department of human knowledge, and the most alert and 
efficient executive administration. This department of the 
Boston Public Library is well organized under an accom- 
plished and experienced chief. It does excellent service, but 
there is more work that ought to be done than it can do. 
The allowance for its maintenance should be more generous, 
to the end that its bibliographical field may be extended, and 
that all the details of its work may be kept up to date, and 
fully abreast with the times. 

The committee would repeat with still greater emphasis 
their recommendation of last year, that what was formerly 
known as the " lower-hall " catalogue, or a copy of it, should 
be incorporated in the main catalogue as speedily as possible, 
in order that the searcher who consults it may be sure he has 
before him in one index the key to the entire resources of 
the library. 

Special card catalogues in the different departments of the 
library would be found very useful so far as it is practicable 
to prepare them. In a comparatively new department, like 
that of music, this would involve only the printing of dupli- 
cate cards at a merely nominal expense, and a special card 



r>4 CiTV Document No. 18. 

catalogue in any other department, when once established, 
could be maintained and continued in like manner. 

The monthly bulletin of books added to the library has 
met with a moderate, but growing, degree of success, some- 
thing like three or four thousand copies of each issue having 
been distributed to those who applied for them. It seems 
to the committee that it might be made more generally use- 
ful to those who desire to be guided to some good book to 
read, if two or four pages of each issue should be devoted to 
single-line titles of a good selection of recent books from the 
classes best adapted for general reading. Such a list would 
not be made up entirely of new books, nor would it attempt 
in any degree to exhaust the resources of the library in any 
particular direction. It should not be a stereotyped list. 
Each issue of the bulletin should see many changes in it, and 
books bearing upon topics of the day, of special interest, 
should find a place in it. It should be a live, suggestive, 
stimulating list of books, in which the ordinary reader would 
find some attractive title. The committee are of the opinion 
that it would be profitable to try the experiment of placing 
these bulletins freely upon the reading tables in the library, 
where every visitor would be at liberty to take one, without 
inquiring at the desk, as he is now required to do, and that 
the circulation of the bulletins through the branches and 
schools should be stimulated. If ten thousand copies instead 
of three thousand were circulated they would serve to 
multiply the number of readers, and increase the circulation 
of the best books in the homes of the people. It is also 
suggested that the nominal charge for the admirable list of 
books for the young be abolished, and that these lists be freely 
given to all children who desire them. Any tendency to 
wastefulness could be speedily detected, and checked by a 
little watchfulness on the part of the attendant in charge of 
the room. 

The Newspaper room, with its collection of the daily 
papers of the principal cities of all sections of this country, 
and of the commercial centres of the world, is one of the 
most unique and progressive features of the library. Though 
it is well patronized, its importance is not so widely known 
and recognized as it should be. A public-spirited citizen has 
placed this mine of current information at the disposal of the 
people of Boston, and all who visit its Public Library. It 
has no parallel in the world. It should be made more useful, 
especially to the merchant and the "stranger within our 
gates." Here the visitor from any distant city or any foreign 
land can find the familiar daily paj^er which contains the 



Library Department. 55 

latest news from his home. The committee suggest that a 
list of the daily papers regularly received and on file in this 
room be neatly printed upon a card, with a general invitation 
to the people to visit the Newspaper room freely and consult 
them, and that copies of this card, in frames if practicable, 
be placed in conspicuous positions in all the railroad depots, 
and waiting-rooms in the principal hotels, in the rooms of 
the Chamber of Commerce, and other associations of business 
men, and such other public places as may seem expedient and 
desirable. 

Both branches and stations are in something of a transition 
state at present. Many changes are making, and more are 
proposed. On these matters criticism would be either belated 
or premature. On other points the committee venture the 
following suggestions : 

The condition of the East Boston Branch seems to the 
committee imperatively to demand attention at the earliest 
possible opportunity. This branch is unfortunate (a) in its 
room, which is dull and dingy by day, poorly lighted by 
night, and unattractive and ill-ventilated all the time ; (5) in 
its material equipment, both of books and furniture ; (c) 
in its surroundings, being over a municipal court room and 
opposite a police station ; and (c?) in its location with refer- 
ence to the centre of the population it is meant to serve. 

Meanwhile, the circulation of 63,443 volumes during the 
past year places the branch fourth on the list, and shows the 
eagerness of the demand for books. 

The committee recommend most strongly that a special 
appropriation be granted to re-locate and properly equip this 
branch. This is, in their opinion, the first and most import- 
ant change to be undertaken by the Board of Administration 
with regard to the branches. 

In the case of the South End Branch, the committee rec- 
ommend that a deposit station be maintained in the present 
location in the basement of the English High School build- 
ing, and that the branch be relocated somewhere near the 
Cathedral on Washington street. The branch has not suf- 
fered in circulation from the proximity of the Central Library. 
It ranks third among the branches as measured by circulation, 
and the inhabitants of the district are strenuous against any 
suggestion of its abandonment. 

The re-location and a larger reading-room would greatly 
increase its efficiency. 

The South Boston Branch has attractive quarters, well 
lighted and well arranged. The committee, however, raise 
the question whether the $!2,500 rent would not pay the in- 



")(') City Document No. 18. 

terest on the cost of a building which would oive ampler 
accommodations and possibly be more centrally located. 
Seeing that the Federal Government is also paying a high 
rent for a post-office building, the committee suggest the 
query whether an arrangement might not be made with the 
Federal Government for a joint building which would accom- 
modate both the library and the post-office. This has been 
done elsewhere. 

The committee find the catalogues in need of renewal and 
revision at most of the branches. At the Roxbury Branch 
only three copies of the printed catalogues remain, and of 
these the two allotted for public use are soiled and tattered 
and the card catalogue is incomplete. Such a condition of 
the catalogue seriously interferes with the use of the library. 

In most of the branches, also, the committee find a lack of 
shelf-room, and much of the shelving is so constructed as to 
be difficult to use. Books are put into the shelves with the 
front edge down, so that only the bottom ends appear. TJiis 
leaves altogether too much to the imagination for the best 
use of the libraiy. 

There are also a great many unused books in the branch 
collections, books which are no longer called for, and only 
serve to fill up the shelves. 

This matter of revising the catalogues, of shelving, and 
of unused books seems to the committee to be something 
which should be considered as a whole. The independent 
collections of the Roxbury and Charlestown branches might 
be catalogued by themselves ; and then all the other books, 
both of these and of the other branches, might be treated in 
something like a common scheme. 

In the judgment of the committee, it is desirable, before 
undertaking any revision of the catalogues or revising the 
shelving, to form some more definite policy concerning the 
branches than at present obtains. Owing to the lack of such 
policy, the development of the branches hitherto has been 
somewhat at random. The result is seen in the hetero- 
geneous contents of the catalogues. 

The committee venture suggestions as follows : 

1. A branch should not be an independent library, but 
should be subordinate to the Central Library ; and no work 
should be undertaken by the branch which is already ade- 
quately provided for by the Central Library. 

2. It is not necessary that a branch should be a large 
library. It cannot be this without an unnecessarj^ and costly 
reduplication of books. 



Library Depaetjient. 57 

3. It is desirable that the books in the branch collection 
should be as active as possible. Apart from an ample supply 
of periodicals, both popular and solid, the branch collection 
should consist of: (a), the fundamental works of reference; 
(5), a carefully selected set of juvenile books ; (c), a collec- 
tion of such books as are needed for cooperation with the 
work in the schools, and (c?), a not very numerous collec- 
tion of miscellaneous books for which there is a popular 
demand. Books other than these should be drawn from 
the Central Library, The purchase of new books for the 
branches should be made in accordance with these consid- 
erations. 

4. Provision should be made for withdrawing from 
branches books which are no longer in demand. Li this way 
the branch collection might be kept alive, and less shelving 
would be needed. 

The revision of the existing collections could be done at 
the present time in connection with the necessary prepara- 
tion of new catalogues, so as to be much less expensive than 
at any other period. 

Li connection with the new shelving required, the com- 
mittee call attention to the established principle in library 
theory, that it is desirable that the readers, so far as possible, 
should be allowed free access to the shelves. Many books 
would be taken from the shelves and read which would never 
be ordered from a catalogue. The committee recommend 
that all modifications of shelving be made with this principle 
in view. It is also recommended that in cases where no en- 
largement of the collection of miscellaneous books open to 
the public is at present possible, these collections should be 
frequently changed, and should always contain a good pro- 
portion of the more solid works. 

The affairs of the Charlestown Branch remain in an un- 
settled state, because of the complications arising from the 
Harris fund, and the Harris collection. The transfer of the 
collection to the Central Library would require an enabling 
act by the Legislature, and the attempt to secure such an act 
has failed hitherto, largely, it would seem, because of mis- 
understanding on the part of the opponents. It is not pro- 
posed to alienate the title of the city of Charlestown, nor to 
divert the funds from the use mentioned in the bequest. The 
only thing proposed is to remove the Harris collection to the 
Central Library building. The reasons for doing this are : 

(a) Greater safety. The collection is exposed to great fire 
risk where it is and could hardly be replaced if destroyed. 



58 City Document No. 18. 

(/)) Greater utility. The collection has a scholarly, rather 
than a popular interest, and as such would be most useful in 
connection with the other special collections of the library. 

Supposing the transfer made, the city of Charlestown re- 
tains its title in the collection, and the funds are expended 
for the increase of the collection, as directed in the bequest. 

The people of Charlestown are as free as ever to draw 
works from the collection through the Charlestown Branch. 
The only difference would be that they must wait a few 
hours before the books are delivered. But this would not be 
a great hardship, as the calls for books from the collection do 
not average four a month. The purchase of books is limited 
to those published before 1850; and hence the collection 
can never have any popular interest. For the scholars of 
Charlestown the collection would be more conveniently 
located in the Central Library, where they could then consult 
the other collections also. The Charlestown Branch would 
gain by the removal. A large and greatly needed increase 
of room for popular books would be at once secured. 

On all these accounts, the committee recommend a renewal 
of the request for an enabling act from the Legislature per- 
mitting the transfer of the Harris collection to the Central 
building. 

The desirability of bringing the library into closer connec- 
tion with the public schools has long been apparent. The 
ideal method would be to make the schools delivery and de- 
posit stations. This seems so desirable that the committee 
recommend a special appropriation for this purpose, if need 
be, whenever the Board of Administration ask for it. The 
committee hear with approval of a beginning in this direc- 
tion about to be made at the North End. Owing to the 
character of the population, the library circulation in this 
district is largely of juvenile works ; and the school deposit 
station is peculiarly adapted to this neighborhood. 

But the committee are not satisfied that this meets all the 
claims of the North End. The removal to the West End of 
the branch originally in this section leaves the district with- 
out library accommodations. The committee recommend the 
establishment of a delivery and deposit station in the North 
End, with an adequate reading-room. 

The committee also recommend the deposit of a collection 
of suitable books at Rainsford Island, for the use of the 
House of Reformation for Juvenile Offenders. The present 
custom of sending soiled and tattered volumes, the rubbish of 
the library and the branches, does not tend to reform these 
youths. 



Library Department. 69 

The circulation of books from the Central Library, through 
the branches and delivery stations in 1895, showed a marked 
falling off from that of 189-i. This was largely due to the 
closing of the library to the public during the transfer to 
Copley square. This falling off has disappeared during the 
current year. Nevertheless, the circulation from the Central 
Library through the branches and delivery stations still con- 
tinues very small. 

In the case of the branches there is a large circulation 
from their own collections, but in most of the delivery sta- 
tions there has been, until recently, no deposit of books at 
the station ; and the whole expense of the station has been 
incurred to circulate from one to four books a day. Great 
improvements have been made, especially during the current 
year, but much remains to be done in order to secure an ade- 
quate return for the expense of the circulation. 

Some reasons for the small circulation exist which admit of 
removal. In the first place, the delivery stations have no 
adequate catalogue of the Central Library. Here the remedy 
is manifest. In the next place, not more than fifty per cent 
of the orders received can be filled, owing to the absence of 
the books from the Central Library. There seems to be no 
way of completely meeting this difficulty except by buying 
more copies of popular works. In the case of books dealing 
with special topics some relief may be found in a form of order 
recently adopted, which admits of substituting other works 
on the same topic. 

But the most effective of all the means for increasing the 
popular circulation consists in the admirable plan of the 
Librarian, adopted last year, of keeping deposits of books 
accessible to the public at the delivery stations. Last year 
there was but one deposit station ; this year there are 
thirteen ; and the circulation from these deposits has in- 
creased from 4,595 last year to 75,325 for the current year. 
The circulation from the Central Library on borrowers' cards 
at the delivery stations has increased from 18,774 for 1895, 
to 29,340 for 1896. The circulation of the branches and 
delivery stations for home use for the last three years is 
shown in the folio wingf table : 



60 City Document No. 18. 

Circulation of Branches and Delivery Stations. 





1804. 


1895. 


1896. 


Including West Roxbury and Mt. Bow- 


52.3,2.53 


547,822 

4,595 
15,410 


591,210 


DrUi-enj Stations : 

From deposit .... 


75,325 
12,230 


Books received from branches on bor- 


15,515 






Total circulation of branches and sta- 
tions, from deposits and from their 


5.38,768 


567,827 


678,765 






Belicenj Stations : 

Books received on borrowers' cards 


22,320 

9,. 308 


18,774 
9,159 


29,340 


Branches : 

Books received on borrowers' cards 
from the Central Library .... 


11,354 






Total 


31,628 


27,933 


40,694 







It will be seen from this table (a) that there has been a 
very great increase in the total circulation of branches and 
stations in the last two years; (5) that this increase has been 
largely clue to the deposit stations, and (c) that the increase 
in the circulation of the stations has led to only a relatively 
small decrease of the circulation of the branches. It is also 
clear that the extension of the popular circulation of the 
books of the library should be sought through the increase 
and improvement of the delivery and deposit stations, rather 
than through the enlargement and multiplication of the 
branches. 

These gratifying results constitute the highest praise of 
the wisdom and energy which characterize the Board of Ad- 
ministration. 

The necessities of the Central Library, owing to its change 
of abode, necessarily led for a time to a relative neglect of 



Library Department. 61 

the branches and stations. The large increase also of the 
fixed expenses for the Central Library must tend in the same 
direction, unless met by corresponding increase in the ap- 
propriation. The amount spent on books in branches and 
stations in 1894 was only 83,707. In inaugurating the new 
policy which has led to such happy results, 810,000 were 
spent for the same purpose in 1895, and 812,000 in 1896. 
These sums have been expended mainly in placing full lists 
of reference books and collections of selected reading for the 
young and current literature in the branches, and in the 
purchase of the necessary books for the deposit stations. 

The committee recommend that the Board of Administra- 
tion be granted such appropriation of money as may be needed 
to continue the policy so happily inaugurated. 

An examination of the report of the Auditor of the library 
shows the annual receipts and disbursements to be in the 
neighborhood of $250,000. The income is derived from ap- 
propriations made by the City Government, and from trust 
funds, donations, rents, interest, fines, sales of catalogues, etc. 
The expenditures are made for a great variety of purposes, 
many of them of very small amounts. 

The total income for the year was . . . $272,700 

The expenditures were, approximately . . 245,700 

Besides the money appropriated by the city, and the income 
on trust funds held by the City Treasurer, and the money 
for minor current expenses in the hands of the Auditor of 
the library, there are kept on deposit in London, funds to the 
amount of about $20,000 for the purpose of meeting drafts 
drawn for the purchase of books abroad. 

The first question which occurs concerning a financial de- 
partment so extensive and important is whether it is subject 
to a thorough and comprehensive system of audit. On in- 
vestigation, we ascertained that until a comparatively short 
time ago no system of audit worthy of the name had been in 
practise ; but we are pleased to report that recently a com- 
prehensive and satisfactory method has been formulated and 
is now in use. Not a single expenditure, however trivial, is 
made without the prior authorization of the Board of Trus- 
tees and the written authorization of the President. 

The only suggestion which we have to make in this con- 
nection is that it would be advisable, if practicable, to have 
the expenditures in the binding and printing departments, 
which amount, exclusive of salaries, to a considerable sum, 
examined by some disinterested person not connected with 



62 City Document No. 18. 

the library, — preferably a member of tlie Examining Com- 
mittee, especially appointed for that purpose, and familiar 
with the market rates of labor, material and supplies for 
which the payments are made. While we have no reason to 
suppose that economy and discretion are not practised in 
these departments, we think it would tend to perfect the 
financial methods of the library, otherwise so satisfactory. 

We renew the suggestion of our immediate predecessors 
that the amount of real and personal property authorized to 
be held b}^ the Library Corporation should be increased by 
law. We are not prepared to state just what the amount of 
such property now is, for we are not informed whether the 
city or the Library Corporation has the title to certain 
portions of it ; but the capacity of the Trustees, who consti- 
tute the Corporation, to hold any amount of property which 
they are likely to have or receive should be unquestioned. 
It is reasonable to hope and expect, now that the library has 
been housed in a building of such exceptional fitness and 
beauty, and the usefulness of the collection so largely 
extended, that large donations by will or otherwise may be 
made, and it would be unfortunate in the extreme if it were 
possible that any doubt could be raised as to the legal 
capacity of the Corporation to accept such gifts. 

We suggest that a careful estimate be made of the value 
of the real and personal property now vested in the Trustees, 
and that a bill be then framed and presented to the Legis- 
lature, increasing the amount which may be so held, to such 
an extent as to insure that the library will be in no danger 
of losing any property or funds through legal inability to 
acquire or hold them. 

The building appropriation for the new library is, or when 
all bills are paid will be, exhausted, and a considerable 
additional sum is imperatively necessary to fit the building 
for its intended uses. In a structure so large and so difficult 
to adapt to the best administrative methods, certain changes 
are unavoidable. Besides these, additional heating and 
lighting apparatus have been found indispensable, the venti- 
lating devices have needed improvement, rooms left unfinished 
have been put into use, additional furniture has been needed, 
and other expenditures have been found necessary to com- 
plete and furnish the building. These facts make it desirable 
that a considerable amount be added to that heretofore avail- 
able for the purpose of putting the building into thoroughly 
usable condition, not including, however, the completion of 
important decorations, which may well be left for gradual 
treatment as funds are available for that purpose. 



Library Department. 63 

We therefore endorse the application which has been made 
to the present Legislature by or at the request of the Trustees 
for an act to authorize the city to borrow the additional sum 
of $100,000 for the completion of the building, and for other 
necessary purposes. The necessity for this arises from the 
fact that the large amount which will be realized from the sale 
of the old library building will not be available for library 
purposes. 

The annual appropriation by the City Government for the 
maintenance of the library and the purchase of books must 
necessarily increase from year to year, to correspond with the 
increase in population, and the extension of the use made 
of the library. We think, however, that there should 
always be available a special appropriation of a reasonable 
amount for use solely for the purchase of books in large 
numbers or of considerable value, which are now and then 
put upon the market in this country or abroad, the oppor- 
tunity for the purchase of which is but brief. 

Scarcely anything would more effectually promote the 
financial interests of the library than a thorough agreement 
for cooperation between this and other large libraries in 
the immediate vicinity. It would seem, for example, an 
unnecessary waste of money to duplicate here the legal 
treatises and reports which are available to any citizen in 
the State Library ; and the same is true of books in other 
branches of special knowledge. If, therefore, a thorough and 
cordial system of cooperation could be brought about between 
the Boston Public Library, the Library of Harvard College, 
and the State Library of Massachusetts, not to mention several 
important libraries not open to the general public, but more 
or less accessible to students and specialists, it would mate- 
rially decrease the expenses of the library in accumulating 
books for special departments, and leave funds available for 
more general purposes. 

We would suggest that, in addition to printing in the 
annual reports of the Trustees a list of the names of those 
who contribute books or make gifts or donations of any 
other character to the library, a small but artistic certificate 
of a permanent character be prepared and furnished to all 
such persons in the future, as a token of appreciation of 
their thoughtfulness and generosity, instead of, or in addi- 
tion to, the letter of acknowledgment now employed for that 
purpose. 

In conclusion, the committee beg to say that if it is to be 
assumed that the Examining Committee itself is a portion of 
the machinery to be examined and commented upon, they 



64 City Document No. 18. 

would suggest that very considerable changes are necessary 
in that body to make it a seriously useful help in the admin- 
istration of the library. It consists, and naturally so, of 
busy people ; is appointed late in the year, that is, in the 
busiest season of the year ; and the need of incorporating 
its report in the report of the Trustees to the Mayor shortens 
the time in which it has to work ; all of which things put a 
pressure upon the action of the committee that almost certainly 
results in perfunctory service. It neither has sufficient time 
to study its problems —indeed, there is hardly time to 
apprehend them — nor, from the character of its constitu- 
tion, can it follow out, or observe the working out, of any 
suggestions made by it. 

The committee has no suggestions to make as to the solu- 
tion of the difficult}^ if difficulty it be, but it is content to 
leave the matter, having pointed out what it takes to be an 
essential weakness in the Examining Committee, as it exists 
at present. It is, of course, a matter for the Trustees them- 
selves to determine whether the things shall go on as here- 
tofore, exciting annually an amiable interest in the library 
in the minds of a dozen or more people ; or whether the 
Board of Visitors is to be made more permanent in its shape, 
although the individuals may change (a certain part of the 
individuals composing the committee being renewed each 
year), in which case, perhaps, such a board should not be 
appointed by the Trustees, and directed to report to them ; 
or whether a still greater element of permanence shall be 
given by a considerable increase in the Board of Trustees 
itself, the examining committee being abolished. 

Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Committee, 

John E. Hudson, Chairman. 
Heloise E. Hersey, Secretary. 



APPENDICES. 



1896. 



LIST OF APPENDICES. 



I. Financial Statement. 

II. Extent of the Library by Years. 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, including 

Branches. 

IV. Classification : Central Library. 
V. Classification : Branches. 

VI. Registration. 

VII. Circulation. 

VIII. Trustees for Forty-five Years. 

IX. Examining Committees for Forty-five Years. 

X. Library Service (April 1, 1897), including Sunday and Evening 
Schedule. 

XI. System of Civil Service. 

XII. Correspondence. 

XIII. Givers, and Amount of Gifts. 



Library Department. 



APPENDIX I. 

Finance. 

Boston Public Library, 
Auditing Department, February 1, 1897. 
To the Trustees: 

Gentlemen : The undersigned herewith j^resents a statement 
of the receipts and expenditures of the Library Department for 
the financial year commencing February 1, 1896, and ending 
January 30, 1897 ; also a statement concerning the Trust and 
other funds, statements covering special appropriations, and a 
statement of expenditures on account of the branches for the 
twelve years ending 1896-97. 

Respectfully, 

A. A. Nichols, 



Auditor. 



Receipts. 



City appropriation, 1896-97 $225,000 00 

Rents from old Library Building : 

Balance from 
1895-96, . . $1,664 65 

During the year . 5,749 00 



87,413 65 
Unexpended of the transfer to 

Mattapan reading-room . . 45 73 



Income from Trust Funds : 
In hands of City Treas- 
urer, Feb. 1, 1896, $10,328 19 
During the year . *4,729 66 

115,057 85 
Less amount trans- 
mitted to J. S. 
Morgan & Co. . 14,936 85 

^121 00 

Fines and sales of catalogues: 
In hands of City 

Treasurer . . $4,177 41 



7,459 38 
232,459 38 



Carried foricard $4,177 41 $121 00 $232,459 38 

* The interest due on Trust Funds invested in City Bonds, from July 1, 
1896, to January 1, 1897, amounting to 84,356.00 has not yet been placed to 
the credit of the Library Trustees. The total income from Trust Funds for 
the year is $9,085 66. 



1,872 



68 City Document No. 18. 

Bnmcjht forward $4,177 41 $121 00 $232,459 38 

Less amount trans- 
mitted to J. S. 
Morgan & Co. . 2,304 52 

London accounts : 
In hands of J. S. 

Morgan & Co., 

Feb. 1, 1896 . $13,573 13 
During the year . 17,241 37 
Interest on deposit 

to Jan. 1, 1897 . 178 00 

30,992 50 

In hands of Baring 

Bros. & Co 72 75 

Donations : 

From W. C. Todd, • 

unexpended Feb. 

1, 1896 . . $2,776 25 
During the year . 2,000 00 

4,776 25 

From Woman's Edu- 
cation Association, 

unexpended Feb. 

1, 1896 . . $383 51 

During the year . 12 71 

From Andrew C. Wheelwright, 

unexpended Feb. 1, 1896 . 32 50 

From Miss Victorine T. Artz . 10,000 00 
Exchange account: Lost books, sales 
of duplicates, etc. : 
Balance from 

1895-96 . . $580 10 

During the year . 217 14 

797 24 

Interest on bank deposit . . 1,322 14 



396 22 



The expenditures have been as follows : 
General library accounts, including the cost of 

maintaining the branches : 
Salaries : 

General administra- 
tion . . $113,004 21 
Sunday and evening 

force . . . 17,558 07 

8130,562 28 



50,383 49 

8282,842 87 



Carried fonoard, . . . 0130,562 28 $282,842 



Library Department. 



69 



Brought forward, . 
Books : 

City appropriation . 125,388 25 
Income from Trust 

Funds . . . 8,992 88 



$130,562 28 $282,842 87 








— 


34,381 13 


Periodicals 






6,049 10 


Binding : 








Salaries 


$11,847 61 


Stock . 


1,504 


61 


Equipment 


488 


75 


Contract work . 


1,665 


73 








1 F. (^06 7^ 








xO,0\j\} 1 o 


Printing : 








Salaries 


$3,761 


99 


Stock 


4,301 


64 


Equipment 


2,774 


89 


Contract work . 


1,517 


IC 


12,355 62 
1,108 28 


P"'urniture and fixtures 






Gas . 






1,790 90 


Electric lighting 






1,239 66 


Water-rates . 






1,366 10 


Telephone service . 


. 




390 72 


Expense, miscellaneous 






1,451 26 


Expense, cleaning . 


. 




4,612 68 


Stationery and library su 


pplies 




3,886 46 


Rents: Branch Libraries 


and Read- 




ing-Rooms . 


. 




4,884 00 


Fuel 




. 


6,439 21 


Repairs : 








Stock and contract 






work 


13,648 


74 




Salaries 


2,049 


83 


5,698 57 








Transportation, including postage 




1,969 13 


Transportation between Central 




Library and Branches 


. 




3,562 25 


Rent of Deliveries, including Cus- 




todians' services. . 


. 




.3,101 22 


Subscriptions to news- 








papers (Todd gift), 


$1,826 


15 




Books and periodi- 








cals for West End 








Branch . 


403 


35 




Books and odd num- 








bers of periodicals . 


21 


10 


0.^0 fifi 



Carried forioard, 



8242,605 96 6282,842 87 



City Document No. 18. 



Broaijlit forward^ 






West End Branch : 






Inslallinji^ switpli, etc., 






Lord Electric Co. 


120 


50 


Building fence, F. 






W. Whitcomb . 


20 


00 


Electric lighting 


337 


19 


Fuel . 


145 


80 


Furniture 


87 


50 


Insurance 


22 


50 


Water-rates . 


8 


40 


Library supplies 


109 


80 



8242,605 96 $282,842 



Mattapan Reading- Room 
Books, W. B. Clarke 

and Co. 
■Services of Custo- 
dian, month of 
January, 1896 



$5 00 



4 16 



751 69 



9 16 



243,366 81 



Balance on hand January 31, 1897. 



139,476 06 



The balance is made up of the following items, viz. 
Cash in hands of City Treasurer, 
Feb. 1, 1897, as follows: 
Income from Trust Funds . 
Rents from old Library Build- 
ing 

Fines and sales of catalogues 



$121 00 

2,274 05 
532 89 



Cash on deposit in London : 

Trust Funds . . . . 

General funds . . . . 

Cash on deposit with New England 
Trust Co., and on hand : 

Unexpended of donations carried 
to account of 1897-98: 

W. C. Todd . . . . 

Woman's Education Association . 

A. C. Wheelwright 



Exchange account : Lost books, etc. 
Interest on bank deposit . 
Victorine T. Artz fund 



$14,051 74 
7,422 69 



S2,927 94 



21,474 43 



$2,950 10 

22 27 

3 10 


^ 975 47 


. 


776 08 

1,322 14 

10,000 00 

$39,476 .06 



Library Department. 



GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



A statement coiwparing the expenditures for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 
1896, with the exjjenditures for the present financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897. 



Salaries ; 



General art ministration. . . . 

" Sunday and evening force. 
Binding : Salaries « . . . 

" Stock 

" Contract work 

" Equipment 

Books 

Periodicals 

Furniture and fixtures 

Gas. 



Electric lighting and power 

Water rates 

Telephone service 

Expense: Miscellaneous 

*' Cleaning 

Printing : Equipment 

" StocK 

" Contract work 

" Salaries 

Stationery and Library supplies.. 
Fuel 



Rents 

Repairs : Stock and contract work. 



Transportation : postage, etc 

Transportation between Central Library and branches. 
Rent of deliveries, including Custodians' services 



Moving expenses. 



$91,954 60 

11,130 60 

10,626 87 

2,406 14 

• 1,718 54 



18,231 86 
5,307 49 
7,326 01 
1,729 76 
4,758 42 

595 00 

480 11 
3.845 17 
3,870 55 
5,300 00 
1,012 92 
4,960 44 

485 00 
3,200 40 
6,192 07 
6,285 48 
1,987 29 
2,699 00 

530 53 
3,285 43 
2,347 25 



.$113,004 21 
17,558 07 
11,847 64 
1,504 61 
1,420 72 
4.>;8 75 
25,040 32 
6,049 10 
1,195 78 
1,790 90 
1,576 85 
1,374 50 
390 72 
1,473 76 
4,612 68 
2,774 89 
4,301 64 
1,517 10 
3,761 99 
3,996 26 
6,585 01 
4,^84 00 
3,689 24 
2,049 83 
1,969 13 
3 562 25 
3,105 38 



$231,525 33 



*This sum covers items which were paid out of the balance of the special appro- 
priation for moving expenses, and which would otherwise have been spread among 
the various classes of expenditures above enumerated. 



The cost of maintaining the branches makes part of the general items of the several 
appropriations : 



Cost of branches, 1895-96 
Cost of branches, 1896-97 



$47,917 23 
62,785 39 



Amount expended for books is for bills paid out of the city appropriation only. 
The amount expended for books and binding (not included above) paid from trust 
funds and city money in hands of London bankers : 



For 1895-96 
For 1896-97 



$9,516 29 
9,590 82 



Gross expenditure for the year 1895-96, amounting to S208,608.05, includes payments 
made from the revenue derived from old Library Building for the West End and 
Mattapan branches. 



City Document No. 18. 



West Church, remodelling and furnishin 
Balance of city appropriation . 

Payments : 

Contractors : 

J. J. Flynn 

A. A. Sanborn (heating and ventilat 

ing) 

Robert D. Ireland (electric light 

Mellish, Byfield & Co. (furniture) 

A. D. Hicks & Son . 

Architects, A. S. Jenney and T. A 

Fox .... 
Lord Electric Co. . 
Smith & Forbes (plumbing) 
John White (painting tower) 
Furnishings 
Incidentals 



g: 



• 


• 


$11,981 56 


. 14,777 


28 




. 1,361 


55 




. 1,253 


00 




). 1,123 


50 




940 


00 




'. 598 


85 




383 


84 




307 


30 




148 


70 




969 


77 




174 


69 





Less amount transferred to furni- 
ture, general appropriation . 



$12,038 48 
56 92 



11,981 56 



ibrary Building, furnishing : 






Balance of city appropriation 




$41,339 92 


'ayments on account : 






Mellish, Byfield & Co. . 


$9,462 90 




Ira G. Hersey .... 


1,201 72 




Samuel Hayward 


1,140 00 




Smith & Lovett 


870 00 




Torrey, Bright & Capen Co. . 


825 95 




Koopman & Co. 


660 00 




R. Hoe & Co. . . . : 


235 75 




Foster Brothers 


300 00 




Walworth Mfg. Co. 


145 00 




Irving & Casson . . . 


100 00 




Architects, A. S. Jenney & T. A 






Fox 


274 65 




Richard Codman 


272 59 




Sundry small accounts . 


1,311 40 








16,799 96 



Balance, February 1, 1897 



$24,539 96 



LiBEAEY Department. 



73 



o 


►- o ^ 


^ 


1 


■w 




I m o 




? o .- 


■. <N ^ 




r-l O CD 




5 C 


5 <M »^ 


o ' 


^ 


3 S § 


§ ^ g ^ 1 




















§§ 


§ ^ '^ 


m 


(N 1 


I2 


S. '^ 














'% 


















w 


















is 


§g§g^S!3§S| 


1* 


1 1 1 i g ^ 


1 I S 


elS 


o" aJ" c 


5 -H lO 




01 


IC rH CO r-l 








cj- 


^ 
































s^gsssssgg 


•5.^ 


eg o o j- 


j: 


s ^ § ?? 


gl 


§■ 2- S> ^ 


_ O •* t- t^ CO 






1 




s 












r. 






















o 






o 














■^ . 






o 


































'C? 






g 














ao 






















P 






n 

m 














& 






















<!i 






















. SO 




















V a 






•^ 


c 


rt 


g 






K-S^- . 






o 


c 




t- 




ill? 

illi 






>o 


c 




C 


C-1 








t^ 




p 




C 










o 






c 






osg 




















g§ 


t- 


<N 








C 


If 


-H O 




C' 




!? 


s 




c^ 


■O O 


is 


i 


. ? 






- i 


_ 1 


g 


i " 


li 


g 

5 


^ 










^ 






















c 






























i 






















4 






















„ 












































X 














































































































C 








































i. 


) 


■5 


















c 






















s 




c 
























































i 










r 




s 








^ 






-e 




1 




o -^ 








1 




) 


c 




It 




1 


1 




C 


£ 


1r 




11 




^ 


<S 




1 


° ^ 




g * 




6. 


\i 


' 1 


g 


^ 






1 1 




? 


= 




1 


■ p: 


1 •< 


■^ 




X 


ff 


i^ 




1 


g 


» 1 


-"" •< 




i 


'1 








1 


^ 

C 


i ! 




A 


* 


ffl 


-c 










s 


1 


^ 


C 


^ 


^ 


£ 


II 



ro 
0-" 



.5S 



2 3 



SS 



J! 5 



^S 


a=- 


S"- 


o o 


«^ 


(§« 














c-' 3 




S,7 








S'S 





City Document No. 18. 









:^' ?i 



<M -H 



§ S- 2 



g § 



C3 C5 



g S 



§ 5 £ o 



''I O K S C5 



1 I 

2 ^ 
s ^ 



Library Department. 







§ 








§ 


f2 S 

11 










00 o 

1 s 


§ 

en 
o 




5 




J:; 




§ 


§ s 

1 5^ 


§ 








$18,450 80 
2,776 25 


g 
1 
g 




1 
= 

6 




^ 1 

1 

5 

2' 


1^ 









2* 

O 35 

si 

■5 .H 
9 2 



Tii 



City Document No. 18. 



LIBRARY BUILDING, DARTMOUTH STREET. 
From July 1, 1887, to Jan. 31, 1897. 



Amount 

Contracted 

for. 



Amount 
Certified 
and Paid. 



Balance 
Uncertified. 



John T. Scully 

Woodbury & Leigliton, 1st contract 

Woodbury & Leighton, 2d contract 

R. C. Fisher & Co 

R. Guastavino 

Lindemann, T. C. R. T. Co 

Batterson, See & Eisele 

Post «fe McCord, 1st contract 

Post & McCord , 2d contract 

David Mcintosh, 1st contract 

David Mcintosh, 2d contract 

Bowker, Torrey & Co 

IraG. Hersey 

Snead& Co., Iron Works 

Norcross Bros 

General Electric Co , 

Isaac N. Tucker 

M. T. Davidson 

Augustus St. Gaudens 

Archer & Pancoast 

.John S. Sargent ' 

E. A. Abbey 

P. Puvis de Chavannes 

Bethlehem Iron Works 

Freight on electrical machine (Knigbt & Son), 

Siemens & Halske 

I. P. Morris Co 

W. J. McPherson 

N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 

D. C.French 

E. E. Garnsey 

E. D.Leavitt 

Lake Erie Engineering Works 



$7,714 44 
313,596 79 
756,233 87 
48,784 40 
85,544 04 
35,209 54 
57,273 00 
43,662 43 
50,900 00 
48,716 81 
20,823 00 
110,459 00 
90,705 70 
76,419 75 
52,857 00 
21,209 30 

8,952 43 

3,894 00 
50,000 00 
15,122 80 
15,000 00 
15,000 00 
48,235 00 

1,617 40 

78 10 

14,000 00 

13,889 86 

5,158 91 

997 12 

25,000 00 

2,500 00 



$7,714 44 

313,596 79 

756,233 87 

48,784 40 

85,544 04 

35,209 54 

57,273 00 

43,062 43 

50,900 00 

48,716 81 

20,823 00 

110,459 00 

90,705 70 

76,419 75 

52,857 00 

21,209 30 

8,952 43 

3,894 00 

3,000 00 

15,122 80 

7,500 00 

9,500 00 

48,235 00 

1,617 40 

78 10 

14,000 00 

13,889 86 

5,158 91 

997 12 



2,500 00 
6,028 87 
1,000 00 



7,500 00 
5,500 00 



864 08 
400 00 



Carried forward. 



$2,047,847 64 



$1,961 ,.583 56 



Library Department, 77 

LIBRARY BUILDING, DARTMOUTH S,TB.B^T.— Concluded. 



Contracts. 


Amount 

Contracted 

for. 


Amount 
Certified 
and Paid. 


Balance 
Uncertitied. 




$2,047,847 64 

1,975 00 

4,215 00 

350 00 

398 00 

597 00 

26,107 82 

50.387 77 
70,457 06 

66.388 54 
97,624 72 

5,027 25 


$1,961,583 56 
1,200 00 


$86,264 08 

775 00 

4,215 00 

350 00 

398 00 


Walworth Construction and Supply Co 


Walworth Construction and Supply Co 

A A Sanborn 




Norcross Bros 


597 00 
26,107 82 

50.387 77 
70,457 06 

66.388 54 
97,624 72 

5,027 25 












Heating and ventilating 








Architects' commission of 5 per cent 

Architects' commission of 7i per cent 






$2,371,375 80 


$2,279,373 72 


$92,002 08 



Appropriation. 
Payments 



Balance uncertified. 
Deficit 



.$2,368,854 89 
. 2,279,373 72 



S89,481 17 
92,002 08 



LONDON ACCOUNTS. 





Balances 

from 
1895-96. 


Remit- 
tances, 
1896-87. 


Total 
Credits. 


Expendi- 
tures, 
1896-97. 


Balances 

unex- 
pended. 


J. S. Morgan & ) 

Co., 
Interest on deposit.. ) 

Baring Bros. & Co.. 


£ s. d. 
2,77? 3 7 

15 


£ s. d. 
3,556 14 1 


£ s. d. 
6,333 17 8 

15 


£ s. d. 
1,967 2 


£ s. d. 
4,366 17 6 ) 
36 9 6i 

15 










2,792 3 7 


3,.'j56 14 1 


6,348 17 8 


1,967 2 


4,418 7 



CiTV DonuMKXT No. 18. 





8 




„ 


„ 


<r 


oc 


cr 


^ 


(> 


c 


c 


_ 




o a 


- S 


,4 


s 


s 


« 


rr 


:<■ 


«; 


-!< 


I- 


<= 


c 


I- 


!o - 




05 


g 


i 


i 


1 


1 




1 


^ 


1 1 i 


. 1 


tt.l 


I 1 














c- 


o" 


CO ^ 












in 


& 




^ 


«> 




«^ 


<fe 




■» 


m 




«* 


i 


§ 


^ 


~^ 


S 


!S 




jr 


g 


If 


^ 


ir 


2 


s s s 


> § 


■.(1 


1 


i 


1 


! 




c<- 


S. 


2 i 1 

co" c 


■S 


1 i ^ 




FH 


Vf 




o» 


^ 




<© 


^ 




«fi. 


c& 




^ 


4 

i 




s 


ir- 


M 


? 


?? 


•^ 


g 


§ § 


■^ 


g 


CO 3 c 


> o 


1 1 


§ 


00 




1 


t-" 


i 1 


% 


•1 


i i 2 
a" 


■ 1 


i 


% 


£ 


S 


2 


? 


s 


~^ 


lo 


s s ? 


S 


§ § I 


^ s 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


! 




f 




S i 'i 

CO c 




1 i i 


; 1 


"^ 


ffe 




i& 


m 




«© 


«© 




«;« 


m 




^ 


i 


■a 


t 


£ 


?? 


^ 


g 


ir 


^ 


§ § § 


o 


S3 S S 


\ te 


• 


1 


^ 


g 


i 


i 


t- c 


. s 


i g 1 


i 


1 ^ = 


■ 1 


■ s . 


% 




^" 


J_ 


" 


fe 


n" 


c- 


" a 


S^ 




s 


21 


c 


S 


'§■ 


•* 


§ 


g f 


§ 


^ 12 g 


3 


S 5:; S 


? §5 






3 


2 


i 


° = 


t- 


s ^ i: 


2 


g !2 f 


5 2 








c2 


°i 








CO_ Tt 




. ^. 


03_ CO a 




COo 










c 




CC 


" o 








in 












^ 




S 


_^ 




<» 


s= 




4© 


^ 




€^ 


o 


S 


S ? 


S 


g 


§ £ 


§ 


§ ^ & 


• § 


g s § 


? s 


o 


1 


. i i 


1 


1 1 1 


- 1 


2 i i 


-1 


1 i i 


3 S 


"^ 


% 




€@: 


m 




<c& 


n 




l>? 


a& 




m 


© 


IT 


?^ 


g 


§ 


z 


§ f 


« 


^ ^ 5 


^ 


s g % 


\ g 


i 




















CO 


CO CO - 




3 


S % 


^ 


<: 


s ? 


5 


%■ 


1 1 


. ^_ 


s s s 


5 = 


S 




II 


S 


c 


ll_ 


» 


'^ 


s 


% 




Is 


i 


g 


^ %. 


3 


g § ? 


S 


g g £ 


§ 


^ s § 


5 g 


. 


E: 


s 


S 


§ 


g 


2 g 


o 


•* g g 


§ 


S ?2 S 


s 


s 


£ CO e 


i 


CO t- C£ 


"IS 


1' ? 


1S 


J_ 


5 l>] 

s 


^ 


s 


3 2 


53 


S 


^ § 


1° 


g § ^ 


§ 


S 3 ? 


\ s 




oc 


s 


t 


!§ 


$S 


s z 


§ 


g 1 S 


s 


1 P ^ 


s 


00 


2__ ^ cc 


i 




is 


co" 1- 




* 


- c 


i 


s 




§ s 




^ £ E: 


■lo 


s § g 


^ 


3 S S 


§ 17. 


« 


? 


§ ^ 


S 


i 


s ;? 


§ 


s s ^ 


55 


§ § ? 


. g 




oc 


ir 




Ol 


oa c: 


CO 


ex 


t- r- 


It- 


lO C5 t- 


CO 


s 


i 




Is 


_S_ 




^ 


^ 


- 


"Is 


^: 




_s" 


g 


%. 


t- Tt 


1: 


^ 


g ^ 


|s 


S f; 5 


g 


2 g J: 


■l?3 










r- 00 u- 


^ 


t- c- 












. 1 " 


? 


m" 


^ 


. ^ £ 


•* 


CO 


1 


^- "^ "^ 


= 

't^" 


'"' 


s 






* 


_5= 




«& 


m 




1 «& 


» 






__^ 




>5 






^ 
















i. 


















O 








. 








^ 


























>< 








O 












O 






o 








rt 


















! 


« ■ 






s 








K 








s 


















a 
^ 








X 

o 








1^ 












a 






o 
































w. 
















o 












1 




2c 

c 








1 




I 


^ 


J 
c 




.1 


^ 


e 
1 






b 


1 










a 






>i 


c 






J 






c- 


e 




j 


c 


S 




n 


c 






c 




; 






!? 


1 


t 




S- 


1 


^ 




V 


K 


Is 




1 


1 


^ 





w s 



Library Department. 



r-l O 

(3 eo is 



•5 g 

5 z 



—I <N O 



l- t- I ■»< 



00 o o 

CO IC 00 

"-I <^' ?3 



3 ^ 



I- 






CO »H 



00 ■* lO 



^ . o 

CO C) 



00 IC 



r-. <N Uj 
M 00 iC 



O « CO 



g s ;2: 

o o •* 



"-•MO 



— >c t- 



s s 



CO ^ 



S [^ s s 

<N_ ""l '-'5, 



CO 11 



CO o C-. 



.-> lO -ai 



<M O 



§ s 



s s 



80 



City I^ocumknt No. 18. 



g ?s 






s s 



o o m 

-P lO o 

O Ol CO 

CO ^ tH 



g s 



s g 



s s 



s 
^ ^ 



f2 3 



CO ^ r-1 



g § 



CO .-I 



g s 



O X 



M M H 



LiBEAKY Department. 



81 



;? 


2 


^ 




s 


ro 




i? 


g 


g 








I- 




» 








ir 




^ 


S 


? 


oc 


3 


g 




i 


i 


^ 




i 








o 








g 


Tf 




Tf 




ir; 


































m 








Sf 


* 






S 
















m 








m 






























s 


g 


S 


c^ 


5S 


£ 




c 


§ 


g 




"^ 




?- 




s 








S 


5 


1 


^ 




s 


1 




1 


1 


0- 




£ 

p 




c; 




i 








2 






vf= 










'j= 


*= 


m 


5= 


*" 








«= 




1 «. 








i» 






























cc 


1 o 


i 


c 


c- 


g 




_ 


^ 






^ 




oc 














ir 




(M 


l- 






cq 














o 




TT 






s 


c5 




g 


s 


g 




^ 


S 


t^ 




s 




s 




i 




g 




gi 


<M 


o 






Tl< 


i- 




c- 


CO 


0- 








o- 










« 




* 






Sfi= 




»^ 


* 


& 


*= 


* 




«<i 


^ 


£ 


2J 


i 


? 


i 


g 




? 


§ 


H 




? 




^ 




§ 




<= 




g . 








b- 


o- 






L- 


= 1 






<M 


















g 


s 


S^ 


a 


t- 


i 




? 


c^ 








J- 




S€ 




1 


« 




" 


*i 




» 




€* 


v^ 


i^ 


*= 


^ 








* 


^ 


^ 


^, 


t- 


<r 


u 




c 


lo 


^ 




s 




Tt 




~x~ 




J; 




g 






c- 




IM 






c: 


1 "= 


















1 


i 


i 


^ 


1 


i 




1 




% 




1 




g 




S3 




1 


i i 




» 


s« 




^ 




* 


- % 


% 


!ff 




^ 








_ 1 


!r 


e 


s 


£ 


S 


§ 




? 


g 


5 




? 






















!N 
















c^ 




1 




















=<: 


O 


g 




c? 


o 




^ 


fc^ 


c- 
























S 


€^ 




«. 




€^ 




^ 


^ 


















g 


SJ 


s 


.^ 


g 


s 


§ % 


1: 


3 




e^ 




















I-: 


5 


p 


i 


1 


i 


% 


i 








i 
























-M 






tf? ^ 






























S 


«*= 




sfit 






* 




9E= 


















J 


loo 


C 


^ 




c 


c 


« 


o 


























= 


1 "-^ 


C 




o 


PD v 




























c- 


" 




CO — 


































o^ 


1 •^ 


? 




? 


o5 


gl ^ 


M 




























* 


^ 
































1 




1 








m 
































£ 


'C' 


s 


V- 




o 
































S3 


i 


i 


^ 


% 


g 






1 
1 




























^ 


* 




s 






1 


























IT 


1? 


__^ 


<= 




M 






1 


























c- 


s 


o- 




» 
































^ 


g 


i 




I 


5 


































1^ 


«■ 




S 






























! 


r^ 


s 


!f: 




s 


S 






1 
























i 


^ 


2 


1 




? 


2 






1 




























S 


5= 




* 
































" 






























f" 













oc 


m 








































s 


* 




























































Z 










































c 








B 








a 








O 


















s 

-< 




H 




Z 
> 
< 

h3 




H 
g 




D 

s 








Q 
1 








3 














H 
H 

a 
S 






a 




> 
< 








H 








J 






00 








a 




S 




■< 




&: 








ft 








< 






< 




a 




si 




~ 




> 




■J 






s 


t3 

o 












s 




, 


B 

Qj 

5 


s 


a 


1 


I 


«■ 


•< 


s 









City Document No. 18. 



s 


1 S P 


c- 


ir 




1 1 ! 1 


1 ^ ^ 


S 
^ 






i 






8 ^ S 

i i 1 


s ii i - 


1 










1 






§ § £ 


1 


















5 






t s s 

4& "^ '^ 


CO 


















- 1 






























3S K 
































i 
































© 

1 *" 
































1 i 
































1 
































s 




















1 










i 




















1 












a 

H 

ll 

< c 

II 

1 

El 


H 
a: 

ll 


EC 

1 
O 


7 
1 


1 


' 


Q 

J 

1 




£ 

K 




2 

z 

o 
a 

^1 


1 



1 









Library Department. 



83 







„ 


^ 


o 


n 


3 


g 


« 




^ 


o 


5 


S 


lO 


- 


s 


?. 


jj: ij 




'x. 


5 




CO 


in 










































CO 


o 






tD 






cq 


IC 






00 00 


i 


u 


1 


1 


i 


i 


S 


§ 






1 


o 


?5 


s 


*n 


s 


i 


CO 


^ s 


a 












■*" 
















C'l' 










oo 


^ 


cT 




































4© 






































S 


g 


TT" 


o 


"cT" 


"^ 


^ 


lO 


o,_^ 




o 


-t< 


~ 


o 


t~ 


CO 


o 


-^ IN 












JO 


CO 


°°^ 


t- 


o 


CO 




00 


o 


o 


o 


■>*l X5 




i 














05 


NO 


QO 


(M 




00 


2 






o 


o o 


us 


f: 


S 


Th 


S 


t^ 


-1 


T)( 


§ a s 


JS 


« 


^ 


1 


§ 


s 


a i-i 




'* 


t- 






« 




























-" 


a^ 
















.^ 




















! o 


M 


;§ 


g 


B 


^ 


^ 


s 


s 


§ 


g 


5 


s§ 


s? 


s 


§ 


s 


5 


s § 


^ 


s 




s? 


o 


^ 


s 


s 


m 


g 


i 


g 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


^ 


« o 




0O_ 


2 


7q_ 






o_ 


<N 




CO 




to 




CO 






« 






































« 


co" 


i- 






(M 






























4& 
















¥» 


























~io~~ 


s 


s 










^ 


o 


s 








o 


o 


C3 t- 


^ 


i< 


5 


— ' 


t- 


CO 


s 


s 


O 


•* 


s 


rt 


o 


03 




CO tK 


i 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


i 


i 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


s 


s 

o 


i 


i 


CO 


i § 




n 
















<M 




















" 


m 
















#& 










. 










si 


S? 


-f 


50 


£ 


g 


o 


"^ 


"V" 


"S" 


5 


?3 


2 


?? 


t- 


"^ 


§ 


"~^ 


§ 3 


^ 


o 


i 


i 






30 


o 


t~ 


^ 






00 


C3 


I- 








>0 03 


^N 


s 


s 


o 


1 


o_ 


CO 


3 


■co 


s 


?? 


v^ 


^ 


CO 


s 


S § 




« 


t~ 










co" 


co" 


im" 




















1 '^ 


» 
















«= 




















•j^ 


■* 


~v 


s 


g 


g 


t- 


s 


"¥" 


£ 


f: 


5 


3 


3 


in 


g 


s 


^ 


S 




21 

cs 3 


i 


t- 


s 


1 


1 


fi 


1 


i 


i 


S 


i 


3 


i 


s 


i 


s 


1 


1 




i 0C-, 














<N 




cf 






















-h2. 


1^ 
















* 






















^ 


§s 


3 


§ 


"s" 


~^ 


S 


§ 


u 


"V 


i 


s 


g 


g 


S3 


o 


^ 


^ 


s? 




» 


i 


1 


1 


^ 

^ 


1 


§ 


;^ 


k 


1 


i 


§ 


i 


i 


i 


i 


' i 


1 


§ 




ro* 


o 




-s< 




co" 


co' 


!M 
























^ 


» 
















fe 






















© 


§5 


S 


"¥" 


o 


s 


§ 


g 


s 


^ 


3 


s 


§ 


^ 


s 


i 


^ 










1 


o 


^ 


00 


C5 


? 


s 


?? 


« 


2 


^ 


§ 


s 


s 


CO 


s 


C5 












^ 




o_ 












!M 




r 


01 


?: 






















































OS 


M 


o 












co" 


c-f 


























€& 
















if* 
























s 


3 


s 


§ 


§ 


g 


s 


s 


JJ 


S5 


g 


§ 


5; 


^ 


j= 


s 












00 


§ 




o 




■* 


o 


1^1 


■* 




t- 




cc 




CO 


00 












QC 


g 


(M 


^. 


?2 


o 


g 


^ 


m 


53 


?0 


s 


15 


?5 


E5 


























































t- 










co" 


co" 


























-^ 


* 
















m 
























<e 


?3 


§ 


^ 


s 


S 


~^ 


j; 


s 


s 


S 


~s" 


§ 


g 


?? 


S 














1 


1 


65 


1 


1 


g 


1 


1 


1 


i 


i 


i 


1 


i 


s 












2 


3- 




s- 


■^ 




"* 


« 


^~ 


s 
























_ 


C2 












00 


o 


r- 


O 


s 


t; 


y 


b- 


o 












sr 


-X 


= 




X 


o 




o 


00 


co 


CO 




t- 


o 


X 












cc 


t- 


J^ 


Tf 


o 


2 


(M 


t- 


o 


r)< 


00 


Tf 


i 




2 


CO 












• 


^. 


h 


o 


'■^ 


3 


t 


00 


^- 


S 


s 


?5 


f 




c: 














Tt" 


■* 






































^ 


« 
















efy 
























« 


3 


S 


g 


6? 


^ 


s 


tj- 


s? 


s 


§ 


m 


§ 




S 














1 


i 


?_ 


1 


1 


1 


s 


1 


i 


i 


i 


o 


§ 




?i 
















M 










M 


CO 


CO 


























"^ 


* 
















* 








































s 












e>> 








c 








} 


1 

.a 


1 


s 

1 
1 




1 
1 


1 


1 

t-5 


1 


g 

3 


s 


1 


i: 
1 


1 




< 


1 

i 


.« 
5 

t 


1 





84 



City Document No. IH, 





i 


1 




o 


i 


1 


§11 


CO £ 


1 

1 






1 






1 

1 




us 

C3 


S ^ ^ ^ : 






i 




1 


s § g :5 

s - i S 
* 










i 


S S g ': 

1 § s : 


g : 




i 




4 \ 

s 














1 




i 
















1 




i 
















1 




i 

i 
















8 
1 




i 

i 
















g 




\ 
















1 




i 
















i 
1 






4 

a 

e 

3 


15- 


Q < 






i 1 


il 

5 ^ 







LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. — INVESTED IN CITY OF BOSTON BONDS. 



GIVER. 


Amount. 


When delivered. 


No. of Bond. 


When due. | I 


come. 


Provisions. 




sso.ono 00 

1 20,000 00 
( 10,000 00 


March, IS.'iS 
April, If 01 
April, 1863 


8,104 
352 
8,105 


April, 1913 

.Tan'y, lomi j, 
April, 1913 ) 


S2,000 
1,600 


To buy " books ot \iermanent value." 




j " To the maiutenancc of a free public library." 


2 Jonat mn P 








May, 1860 


281 


July, 1905 




Books having a permanent value. 






August, 18-7 


2,579 


Oct.. 1897 


000 


Books for Charlestown brnncli, published before 1860. 




5,000 00 


December, 1873 
April, 1879 


7,992 
2,960 


Jan'y, 1924 
April, 1899 


200 


" Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 




Books live years old in some one edition. 






April, 1879 


2,068 


Oct., 1920 


100 


Books in Spanish and Portuguese Hve years old in some one edition. 






August, IfoO 
,Tune, 1863 

Kovember, 187S 

April. 1884 










kl- Chib 


1,000 00 

[ 500 00 


1.224 
( 3,714 
I 722 


Jan'y, 1914 
Oct., 1900 1 
April, 1908) 
April, 1914 


40 
20 




10 Saimiel A. Green 


political economy." 
!■ Books relating to American history. 


11 South Boston 


100 00 


September, 1879 


5.590 


July, 1919 


4 


For benefit ot South Boston branch. 


12 Arthur Scholfiel.l 


50,000 00 


December, l!-83 


1.223 


Oct., 1913 


2,oro 


To be used for books ot permanent value. 




U 800 00 


Jnlv, 1890 


0,300 


JnlT, 1920 


472 






1000 00 


April, 1884 
1 October, 1885 


1,244 


April, 1914 




For lienefltof Charlestown branch. 




f 2,000 00 
1 l.TOOOO 


r 1,382 
1,486 


April, 1910 1 
Oct., 1917 1 








1 1,400 00 
1,000 00 


1 November, 1889 




Nov. 15,1919 1 
Oct., 1921 


271 






for Ihe best intereslof the Library. 




1 350 00 


1894 


•2,452 


Oct., 1923 








1. 500 00 


J January, 1896 


1. 9,3S1 


Jan'y, 1916 J 






17 .1. Ingersoll Bowditcb 

,„ I Charles Greely Loring I 

'» 1 Memorial tmul ^1 - ■ 


500 00 

10,000 00 

600 00 


May, 1886 
January, 1890 
January, 1896 


1,383 
1,816 
9,479 


April, 1916 
Jan'y, 19;o 
Jan'y, 1916 


20 
■.iO 


■' To hold and apply the income and so much ot the principal as they 
[the Trustees] may choose to the purchase ot special boots of refer. 

For " the purchase ot books ot permanent value and authority In 
mathematics and astronomy," to be added to the Bowdllch col- 
lection. 

Books tor West End branch. 




2,600 00 










" For the promotion of the ob.iects ot the Public Library in such 
manner as the government of said library shall deem best, and so 
far as the government shall deem consistent with the objects ot the 
library, to be used tor the beneflt ot the South Boston Branch 














«200,350 00 








S8,712 





(1) Joshua Bates, bom near Boston, 1788, died in London, as thehead of tl 

(2) Tlie sum of glO.OUO was a gift In iMr. PhUlit's' Ufetinie. The other SCO.ooo was bequeathi 

(3) Mr. Lawrence died In August. 18&5, and this sum was a bequest. 

U) The bequest of Charlotte Harris to the Charlestown branch. With it her private librar; 

(6> The donation of Mayor Pierce, previous to his retirement from office. The principal 

(6) This fund was received from VVllUam Ninol and William Minot. Jr.. executors of il 



MEMORANDA. 

Baring Brothers & Co.. : 
■■ ed by his will, dated 



books to said library. 



of September, 1849. 

y was also given. 

interest may be expended as fs deemed best. 

'I'ownsend's Will, to whom discretionary pow 

gift of his Spanish and Portuguese library. It required that )?1,000. at least, shall bf 

r. Bigelow on retiring from the mayoralty, and was traosferred by him to this p 
he authority given them at the dissolution of that literary association. 

ig as a memorial fund from the i .= _...-.. v..., ._ ^. .... ■ 

Charles " •"■■•-■• 



le gave gmc 



J five years for twenty-five years for the addition o 



harles Mead Public Library Trust Fund.'' 



3 of which books a 



3 be bought f 



STOCKS AND CASH OTHER THAN CITY BONDS HELD BY TREADWELL FUND, PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Shares. 


Par value 


''t*rre'Jife''r 
from Trustee. 


Total as 

received from 

Trustee. 




income. 


Remarks. 


15 B.&A.R.R.Co 

6 B. & ProT R R Co 


$100 00 
100 00 

100 00 
100 00 


$179 00 
179 50 

118 00 

133 00 


J2,685 00 
1.077 00 
1,062 00 

133 00 
88 00 


$5,585 00 

Less 88 CO 
$5,497 00 

100 00 
37 69 


.$128 00 
60 00 
48 00 

6 00 




9 Fitchburg R R Co 




1 Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co 

Cash 


a certificate of 12 shares preferred stock In same conioratloo, par 
value $100. Total, $1,200. 

Less paid May 10, 1886. to City Collector, per order of Board ot 
Trustees of Public Library. 




100 00 























Vlctorlnc Thomas Artz, " Longfellow Memorial Collection," $10,000, not yet Invested. • Includes Income on the one share below. 



LiBRAKY Department. 85 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

BiGELOw Find. — This is a donation made by the late John P. 
BiGELOW in August, 1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated to the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . ;J1,000 00 

Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library 
for the time being. 

Bates Fuxd. — This is a donation made by the late Joshua Bates, 
of London, in March, 185-3. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . ^50,000 00 

"The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, ex- 
pended in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority 
as may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the Mayor 
of the city for the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fund. — This is the bequest of J. Ingeksoll Bowditch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent. Bond . ." $10,000 ,00 

The vrhole income in each and every year to be expended in the pur- 
chase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and 
astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Jonathan 
Phillips, of Boston, April, 18.5o. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said librarv. 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will, dated September 
20, 1849. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $20,000 00 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a Free Public Library. 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the city for the 
time being. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Abbott 
Lawrence, of Boston. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the 
purchase of books for the said library having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Edward 
Lawrence, of Charlestown. The following clause from his will ex- 
plains its purpose : 



86 City Document No. 18. 

"To hold and apply llie hicoino, and so much of the principal as 
they may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference, to be 
kept and used only at the Charlestowii branch of said Public Library." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, due 

xVpril 1, lOlti ." $.500 00 

Pierce Fund. — This is a donation made by Henry L. Pierce, 
Mayor of the city, November 29, lyTo, and accepted by the City Coun- 
cil, December 27, 1873. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $5,000 00 

TowNSEND Fund. — This is a donation from William Minot and 
William Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. Townsend, 
of Boston, at whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate 
in trust, for such charitable and public institutions as they may- 
think meritorious. Said executors accordingly selected the Public 
Library of the City of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached 
the following conditions to the legacy : " The income only shall, in 
each and every year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use 
of the library ; each of which books shall have been published in 
some one edition at least five years at the time it maybe so purchased." 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent. Bond, for . $4,000 00 

TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of 
Boston, he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his 
books and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sum, the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent, per annum), in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years, the income of the said sum is to be expended annually 
in the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese language, or in such other languages as may be deemed ex- 
pedient by those having charge of the Library. These books, be- 
queathed or purchased, are always to be freely accessible for reference 
or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library build- 
ing. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trust and 
conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts, and money are 
to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, Avidow of the donor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests, in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said bequests 
on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the care and 
custody of the books and manuscripts. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $4,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund. — This is a donation made in June, 1863, by 
a literary association of young men in Boston, who at the dissolution 
of the association authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. 
French, and J. Franklin Keed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such 
a manner as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it 
on the Public Library, attaching to it the following conditions : " In 



Library Department. 



trust that the income, but the income only, shall year by year be ex- 
pended in the purchase of books of permanent value for the use of the 
free Public Library of the city, and, as far as ijractidable, of such a 
character as to be of special interest to young men." The trustees ex- 
pressed a preference for books relative to Grovernment and Political 
economy. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . §1,000 00 

Trkadwell Fund. — By the will of the late Daxiel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Kumford Professor in Harvard College, who died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, 
legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the life of his 
wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the residue then 
remaining in the hands of the trustees, as therein provided, and con- 
vey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
Ciity of Boston. 

The City Council accepted said bequest, and authorized the Trustees 
of the Public Library to receive the same, and to invest it in the City 
of Boston Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said trus- 
tees, in such manner as they may deem for the best interests of the 
library. 

Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent. Bonds, for . $.5,.5.50 00 
" " " Three and one-half per cent. 

Bonds, for 1,400 00 

Invested in 16 shares B. & A. K.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1.600 00 

Invested in 6 shares B. & P. R.R. Co. stock, par value §100 

each 600 00 

Invested in 12 shares Fitchburg R.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1,200 00 

Invested in 1 share Vt. ct Mass. R.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each .... 100 00 



$10,4.50 00 



Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late 
of Boston, the object of which is stated in the following extract from 
her will : 

" I give to the Charlestown Public Libi*ary $10,000, to be invested on 
interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books pub- 
lished before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own private 
library, and the porti-ait of my grandfather, Richard JDevens."' Be- 
quest accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late 
of Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Scholfield Fund. — Bequest of the late Arthur Scholfield. who 
died in Xew York, .January 17. 1888. The interest to be paid to certain 
heirs during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books 
of permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died Xovember 
IS, 1889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum of 
$11,800, which represents the income of said fund, received by him up 
to the time of his death, to be added to the fund given by his brother. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $50,000 00 
' ' " .; .. _ 11.800 00 



$61,800 00 



88 (Hty Document No. 18. 

Grekn Fl'ND. — Donations of Dr. Samikt. A. (Jkkkx of $'2, 000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the pnrchase of l)ooks rehiting 
to American history. 

Invested in two City of Boston Five per cent. Bonds, for . $1,500 00 
one •' Four " Bond, for . 500 00 



$2,000 00 



South Boston Branch Library Trust Fitnd. — Donation of a 
citizen of South Boston, tlie income of which is to be expended for the 
benetlt of the Sonth Boston Branch Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $100 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund. — This is a donation 
from the family of Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to 
be expended for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $500 00 

Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund. — Eeceived from 
Charles Mead, executor of the estate of Charles Mead, the amount of 
legacy of the late Charles Mead, to constitute the " Charles Mead Pub- 
lic Library Trust Fund," for the promotion of the objects of the Pub- 
lic Library, in such manner as the government of said library shall 
deem best, and so far as the government shall deem consistent with the 
objects of the library, to be used for the benefit of the South Boston 
Branch Library. 

Cash in treasury, January 31, 1897 $2,500 00 

From Miss Victorine Thomas Artz, of Chicago, a fund of ten 
thousand dollars, "the income of this sum to be employed in the pur- 
chase of valuable rare editions of the writings, either in verse 
or prose, of American and of foreign authors." These books are to 
be known as the "Longfellow Memorial collection." . . $10,000 00 

Recapitulation of Public Library Trust Funds. 

Scholfield bequests $61,800 00 

Bates donation 50,000 00 

Phillips bequest 20,000 00 

Bowditch bequest 10,000 00 

Phillips donation 10,000 00 

Charlotte Harris bequest 10,000 00 

Abbott Lawrence bequest 10,000 00 

Victorine T. Artz fund 10,000 00 

Treadwell bequest 10,487 69 

Pierce donation 5,000 00 

Townsend bequest 4,000 00 

Ticknor bequest 4,000 00 

Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund .... 2,500 00 

Green donations 2,000 00 

Bigelow donation 1,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris bequest 1,000 00 

Franklin Club donation 1,000 00 

Edward Lawrence bequest 500 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund .... 500 00 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund .... 100 00 

$213,887 69 



Library Department. 
APPENDIX 11. 



89 



EXTENT OF THE LIBKARY BY YEARS. 





Years. 






Yeaes. 


Total volmnes 
In the Libraries. 




Yeaks. 


i 

Ha 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


34 


1885 


460,993 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


35 


1886 


479,421 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


21 


1872-73 


-209,456 


36 


1887 


492,956 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


37 


1888 


505,872 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 , 


38 


1889 


520,508 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


39 


1890 


536.027 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


40 


1891 


556,283 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


41 


1892 


.176,237 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


42 


1893 


597,152 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


43 


1894 


610,375 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


44 


1895 


628,297 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


30 


1881-8 i 


404,221 ' 


45 


189(1-97 


663,703 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, JANUARY 31, 1897, 
ACCORDING TO LOCATION. 



Central Library 

Duplicate-room ... 


488,432 
4,469 


Brighton . . 


10,800 
29,403 


Charlestown 








492,901 






East Boston 


13,145 
13,408 














14,868 






South End 


14,284 








9,974 






3,968 






Lower mils (Station A) 


88 






Mattapan (Station D) 


97 


^'^ ( Fellowes Athenajum 


18,123 


Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 


1,0CG 


■g i i Collection owned by City. 
^ '^ . Tq,tal, Koxbury branch. 


17.922 
36,045 


North Brighton (Station L).. . . 
Broadway Ext. (Station P). . . . 


75 
985 



90 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX III. 



NET INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





1 


i 




i 


1 


i 


i 


i 


i 


I- 

o 

i 


Bates Hall 


8,671 
t,543 


9,733 

874 


11,857 
710 


13,518 
l's50 


15,306 
1*8 23 


16,499 
818 


20,493 


32 491 






Lower Hall 


loss 455 


746 


11,821 


20,273 


Duplicate room 


443 


1'S52 


330 


419 


2,855 


I'S 9,143 


loss 542 


1' 8 8,056 


313 


2,890 


Brighton branch 


146 


46 


130 


91 


167 


98 


23 


292 


107 


1,217 


Charlestown branch.. 


443 


145 


rs70 


233 


421 


22 


339 


300 


loss 16 


loss 112 


Dorchester branch... 


546 


423 


309 


269 


222 


209 


134 


358 


loss 73 


1,415 


East Boston branch.. 


158 


170 


63 


58 


59 


5 


48 


126 


112 


1,021 


JamaicaPlain branch 


417 


335 


294 


150 


214 


112 


221 


329 


273 


1,277 


*North End branch.. 


9 


8 


4 


12 


224 


84 


75 


63 


I'S 1,861 




Roxbury branch 


262 


280 


199 


146 


808 


loss 352 


147 


382 


48 


1,202 


Fellowes Athen£eum. 


358 


390 


39. 


361 


438 


289 


318 


318 


407 


348 


South Boston branch. 


310 


284 


1,59 


115 


200 


51 


55 


401 


loss 289 


1,509 


South End branch... 


204 


260 


248 


187 


365 


loss 67 


26 


276 


138 


1,435 


West End branch.... 
















1,897 


6,522 


1,555 


W. Roxbury branch. . 
Lower Mills Reading- 


25 


20 


6 


10 






33 


4 




loss 8 


















85 
73 
74 


3 


Mattapan Reading- 


















24 


Mt.Bowdoin Reading- 
room 


















932 


N9rth Brighton Read- 












8 






74 




Broaiway Extension 


















261 


724 






















Total 


13,535 


12,916 


14,636 


15,519 


20,256 


8,633 


20,915 


29,927 


18,695 


35 698 







* Collection transferred to West End branch. 



Library Department. 



91 



APPENDIX III. — Continued. 
Located February 1, 1896 — Jakuaey 31, 1897 



Central Library 

Duplicate room 

Brighton branch 

Charlestown branch 

Dorchester branch 

East Boston branch 

Jamaica Plain branch 

Roxbury branch, City collection 

Fellowes AthenaBum 

South Boston branch 

South End branch 

West End branch 

West Roxbury branch 

Lower Mills Reading-room 

Mattapan Reading-room 

Mt. Bowdoin Reading-room 

North Brighton Reading-room 

Broadway Extension Reading-room. 



23,702 
2,890 
1,274 
1,694 
1,656 
1,332 
1,401 
1,770 
433 
2,129 
1,527 
1,629 
1,419 

24 
934 



Condemned 
or missing. 



1,806 
241 
tSll 
124 
568 
85 
620 
92 



Net gain. 



20,273 

1,217 

Loss 112 

1,415 

1,021 

1,277 

1,202 

348 

1,500 

1,435 

1,555 

loss 8 

24 
932 



8,888 



* 1,613 transferred to Central Library. t 82 transferred to Central Library. 

J 192 transferred to Central Library. Includes the collection of boolvS destroyed 
by fire some years ago, which appears not to have been inchuled in the annual tables 
before. 



02 



City Document No. 18. 



i 


IT 


. s t i ii 
«r 3 of c 


- 1 ^ 


1 ' 


S 


s i 




tc 


1 


^ 


1 i 

CO o 


i 


s g i i § i B i i i g i § i 1 2 1 1 

>a -S n a (D n o* ^f -o" CO to 


i 


s i 1 i i i i i S i g i e i 1 i 

■C -O M >) -.3 CO LO !N' -S 






i 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i i ; 
















i 


ll|llpi§ 


















1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 - 


















2 


||||||l| 




















i 


1 1 1 1 1 1 § 1 




















QC 


1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 




















1 


||||||l| 






















ll|lll — 




















1 










1 
1 

X 


^ 1 

F 


1 


t 
Z 

'I 

a. 
< 

1 


> 

I 

1 


1 1 
. i ^ 

II 
11 


' 1 


< 
1 


c 
J 


> 

I 

i 


1 

or 


\ 
'I 


; 



APPENDIX IV. 



CENTRAL LIBRARY CLASSIFICATIONS. 
(Representing books located only.) 





CLASSES. 


Centkal Ull 




Special Libkakies. 




g 




1838 


1861 


isGr. 


XS,I 


isr, 


18~B 


1880 


1889 




1890 


1894 


1.S94 


1894 

h 


1877 


189. 


,809 






Total, 

3S 


■1 


ji 


!r! 


1897. 


II 




if 

fi- 


|i 


„& 


si' 

1= 


si- 
II 


ll 

■J- 


i 


jii 


$ 


|1 


If 


|i 


P 


1 






447 

4,750 

3,G85 

1,095 

245 

707 

2C7 

8!l 

0.50 

704 

733 

1,0S3 


41 
14 
■2 
8 
9 
.•S6 
37 
9 
13 

19 
20 


1,780 
13,224 

2-J,574 
1(1,080 
15,853 
9,357 
2,840 
12,809 
21,0-2 
31,755 
18,634 
7,084 
0,521 
20,093 
13,7.S0 
18,039 


249 
36 

11 

22 

2 

1,387 

3,882 


322 

1,0911 
858 
520 
32C 
1,423 
1,181 
06 
329 
732 
3,518 
1,300 


ll! 

2 

8 
197 

5 
083 


303 
21 
58 
31 
26 
132 
4,107 

250 
30 


136 

3,204 
2,474 
337 
254 
017 
20O 
225 
471 
245 

28 

2- 

84 


2,4.59 

184 
191 

53 
248 
OO 


























2,393 
13,Ca5 
14,64- 
68.0-20 
64,070 
20,788 
11,678 






10 

1 

403 

18 
8 

1 


270 
4 

1 
2 

1 
1 


845 
4,192 
410 






















Ooneral history, biography tr ivcl and ge igrapliy 

American history, gcograi liy liograi hy tra\el an 1 polite litoiatuic 

English history, etc.... 






















079 








009 


321 








y 




































y, 






















"' 


379 

1 

28 




















IX. 






















7,390 
13,519 
29,003 
30,989 






















p g y 






















29 


U 
















4,419 
























' 






















\v 


I..rl5''rLcnce 


101 




2.819 




































0,727 


.WIl, 
-will. 


^ 


^ 
























20 2.16 


























14,118 




! 


50 




























' 




















12,890 


XXI. 


PlneartB 






7,071 








129 


















147 


will 




14 




^ 


43 










•1,50 














XXIV 


Shakespeare 
























3,240 


\\v 


































5411 


XXVI 




2,i)21 


51 
2,785 


58 




































0,905 


XXVII 


Stack 4 


































38,080 


:)8.csn 






























7.071 

















Totals 


22..599 


3,420 


378,797 


0,192 


13,845 


2,045 


0,105 


13,491 


6,385 


582 


... 


5,971 


079 


>,8I9 


_'^ 


009 


129 


4,419 


38,080 


488,432 


_ 







Kxi'LANATioN. — ('laes III. iiidudoft general lii8tory, 
(Jliiss IV. inclu'lps thr> r-ollcrtPiI works of American ' 
Olasnen v.. VI., VII.. and VIll. have the wam 



have the wanie srone for the respective 

INI, Mir N.-ilirii;iii,ls, Swilzerland.anrttheScandln 

HI.' r .Mill I [|iii s, education, phrenology, i 



I baB a different classification. 



NoTK, — The dates given In the special libraries column phow the year when Ihoy wnre acquired \ 
The totals given above are based upon actual count made after the reuioval in January, 1895. 



Lib I ; a i ; y De p a i:tm ent. 



93 



APPENDIX V. 



CLASSIFICATION. 
Branch Libraries, January 31, 1S97, as Reported by Custodians 



Genealogy and Her 
aldrj' 



Biography. 
History 



Fine Arts, Arch;eo- 
logy 



Geography, Travels. . . 

Language 

Literature 

INIedicine, Hygiene. . . . 
Natural Science 



Philosophy, Ethics, 
Education 



Religion, Theology. . 

Sociology 

Law 



Useful and Industrial 
Arts 



Amusements, Games, 
Sports 



Fiction 

Books for the young. . 
Bound periodicals — 

Unclassified 

Harris Collection 



350 

50 
1,025 
1,321 

12 

790 

15 

1,950 



100 

50 
4,.384 
1,700 

12 
1,526 



1,5-20 
3,022 

301 
1,282 

293 
4,643 

474 
3,000 

500 

1,454 

425 



1,775 
1,000 
2,986 



2 
1,532 
1,217 

207 

1,087 

52 

1,944 

120 

328 

194 
365 

278 
24 



5,253 

2,489 

986 



25 
1,063 



44 
331 
155 

14 

81 

61 

4,432 

2,217 

567 



5 
1,101 
1,174 

271 
739 



132 
128 
110 
31 

181 

47 
4,407 
1,797 
1,332 



ROXBURY. 


1 


'6 

1 


1 


1 
1 


a 


57 


160 


395 


166 


463 


40 


85 


5 


3 


7 


1,274 


2,371 


1,220 


1,640 


1,161 


1,187 


2.283 


1,149 


1,083 


805 


62 


476 


140 


118 


171 


840 


2,128 


88P 


1,259 


628 


50 


150 


65 


42 


105 


1,978 


3,820 


1,519 


1,332 


977 


77 


371 


99 


138 


61 


276 


510 


545 


563 


422 


436 


296 


133 


306 


207 


651 


1,281 


316 


298 


842 


500 


661 


230 


. 197 


202 


40 


122 


25 


43 


5 


274 


156 


353 


199 


76 


206 


66 


58 


98 


59 


4,631 


956 


4,267 


4,199 


1,337 


2,323 


25 


1,807 


2,250 


1,972 


3,020 


2,206 


1,653 


350 


474 


17,922 


18,123 


14,868 


14,284 


9,974 



412 
312 

213 

254 



937 
1,121 

72 



94 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX VI. 



STATISTICAL RErORT OF THE REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT, 
February 1, 1896— Jaijuary 31, 1897. 



The first registration, 1854-58, had 17,066 names; the second, 
1859-67, had 52,829 names; the third, 1868-April 30, 1886, had 
227,581 names; the fourth, May 1, 1886-March 31, 1894, 
had 124,396 names ; the fifth, April 1, 1894-December 31, 1894, 
had 25,443 names. 

Registrations, including old and new names, lost and filled 
cards replaced, expired cards renewed, during each year, for the 
five years prior to 1895 : 



1890 




14,175 


1891 




11,502 


1892 




11,707 


1893 




11,029 


1894 


Average, 15,677. 


29,971 



Library Departjsient. 



95 



■pao'Bida.i sp.i«o pain^ 


i 


1 


i 


i 


1 


1 


00 


g 


1 


1 


1 


















10 






in 


CI 


























^. 


^^§ 


■.<vi9p .la^jv 


i;;- 






'^ 










'"' 


■^ 


^ 


























Moj pjt;^ 


s 


-^ 


s 





§ 


3 


1:5 


55 


^ 


S 


1 s 


•mi 


'18 ^n?nni?f 


1 


S 


1 


1 


i 


^ 


i 


§ 


i 


g 


i 




'spreo aAii 


N 




«■ 


<N 


n' 


CO 


CO 


CO 


'^ 


CO 




•(6681 ' 


[8 jaqiiiaogQ 


» 


S 


s? 


s 


s 


i 


s? 


t 


K 




1 


—2681 


'X Aa^naqa J 


"^ 






® 


«i 


«e. 


«i 




s- 


panssi) pajtdxg^ 


2i 




" 


'"' 


'"' 


(N 


^' 


(N 


"^ 








■* 


^ 


i 

CO 


s 


s 


ft 


IS 


^ 


Po 


5§ 


s 


•spjBO JO -ox i^iox 


u 


rH 


'dn" 


^ 




to" 




"i 


'^ 


^■■ 






a5 


i3 >> 


g 


S 


i 


i 


i 


s 


1 


' 


2 


S 


1 


























CO 




2 


S 


>c5^ 


» 




S 




^oi 


Si 


a 


S 


^^ 




S- 








o"S. 


























i 
















S 






S 


1 








^ 


g^ 


^ 


s 




^ 




S- 


"^ 




S 


tj ^ 










































cq 


la 




t- 






CO 




S 


t< i« 


s 






S 


J^ 




U 


Si 




i-j 


s 


>* 






>^s 






















CO 








02;. 


























S 


aSl 


s 





s 


1 


§ 


i 


■$ 


i 


S 


i 


00 

1 


i 




1 


& >. 




. 






















12 


^ 


S^i 


S 


rq 


.0 


^r, 





^ 


2 


2 
































, 


^ 




>;:5 S 






















«o 


"" 


« 




0" 2i. 
























>- 
a; 
< 


i 






























J3 ^ 


t- 


?. 


^ 


g 


g 


i 


CO 


i 




1 


s 


ti 




l5^g 


-H 






















§ 


1 


1 


& S. 
























S £ 


i 


S 


s 


s 


s 


5 


s 


2 


1 


1 


g 










CO 


















10 


Q 






0^^ 
























S 
g 

O! 


































l.§ 


^ 


s 


?5 


§ 


s 


£ 


g 


^ 


t- 


g 


i 








c<^«S 
























tC 




a 


^ >. 
























§ 


Zi 


g 




























s 


s 


s 


;i| 


fs 


S^ 


s 


p? 


55 


zz 


s 
































o 


5 


u< 


^ >^ 


'-' 




















cf 




















•* 


§ 






























t- 


































14 


1 
1 


S53g 
























^4 


2 S 


g 


S 


s 


2 


^■ 


53 


S 


^ 


1 








5i, 
























•968T 


'X ^JBruqa>j 
'spiBD aAiq 


1 


^ 


1 


S 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 
















fl 
















1 


1 


c« 


1 
1 


1^ 


1 

a 


.a 


1 

n 


-s 

^ 

^ 


"= 
£ 


1 










t 


M 





Q 


H 


i-s 


tf 


02 


^ 


^ 





ma 


Ti 


S^ 


fa 


=3-^ 


S 


9,^ 


® 






S's 


t^" 


"« s 


2 


52 

1! 


r^ 


rri^ 




?is 




&^ 


ci 



J3Ph S 



. c3 3 

-go 



96 



City Document No. 18. 



CLxVSyiFICATIOX OF HOLDERS OF "LIVE CARDS 
JANUARY 31, 1897. 

By Sex and Occupation. 



Permanent 
residents. 



* Non- 
residents. 



Special 
cards. 



Males. 

Over 21 years of wje. 

Professional classes 

Teachers 

Students 

Business men 

Unemployed 

Laborers 



Under 21 years of age. 

Clerks 

Office and errand boys 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools. 

Pupils of Grammar schools 

Other students 



Females. 
Over 21 years of age. 

Professional classes 

Teachers 

Students 

Business women — 

Married 

Single, unemployed 



Under 21 years of age. 

Clerks 

Errand girls 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools. 

Pupils of Grammar schools 

Other students 



Totals. 



•2,479 
253 
760 

5.428 

1,288 
534 



283 

685 

6,024 

275 



117 
1,136 

35-2 
2 621 
6,171 
5,085 



3 
103 
675 
20 
12 



* Including persons temporarily sojourning in Boston. 
N.B. — Of the 1,213 teachers' cards issued prior to February 1, 1897, 795 are live 
cards; of these, 629 are held bv permanent residents, in addition to their ordinary 
cards (not included in permanent residents' column above), and 166 are held by non- 
residents (which are included in non-residents' column above). 



Library Department. 



By Wards. 





No. Of 

card 

holders 


Population 
census of '95. 


Percentage 
of card 
holders. 


o 
1 


No. of 

card 

holders 


Population 
census of '95. 


Percentage 
of card 
holders. 


1... 

2... 

3... 

4... 

5... 

6... 

7... 

8... 

9... 
10... 
11... 
12... 


1,145 

726 

928 

562 

819 

630 

1,260 

3,409 

1,891 

5,272 

3,218 

3,412 

1,107 


21,007 
21,588 
13,943 
13,375 

27,860 
16,973 
23,130 
23,174 
22,554 
19,930 
21,591 
24,900 


.0545 
.0336 
.0665 
.0420 
.0630 
.0226 
.0742 
.1499 
.0816 
.2337 
.1614 
.1580 
.0444 


14.. 
15.. 
16.. 
17.. 
18.. 
19.. 
20.. 
21.. 
22.. 
23.. 
24.. 
25.. 


1,471 
978 
1,108 
1,030 
1,181 
1,374 
2,906 
3,122 
1,854 
1,831 
2,387 
1,925 


19,186 
18,623 
16,320 
21,114 
21,679 
22,372 
21,528 
19,274 
22,289 
18,2'83 
18,240 
15,001 


.0525 
.0678 
.0487 
.0544 
.0614 
.1349 
.1349 
.0831 
.1000 
.1308 
.1283' 




Total 


45,606 


496,920 


.0917 



98 



City Document No. 18. 



rUBLIC SCHOOLS, TEACHEES, AND PUPILS. 
January 31, 1897. 



General Schools. 



Normal 

Latin and High. 

Grammar 

Primary 

Kindergartens . 



Totals. 



Number 

of 
schools. 



1 

11 
56 
525 
61 



Number of 
Regulau Teachers. 



Men. Women. Total 



650 
525 
119 



11 

KS 
767 
525 
119 



Number 
of pupils 
at date. 



201 
4,574 
35,886 
27,827 
3,401 



71,940 



Special Schools. 


Number 

of 
schools. 


Number of 
Regular Teachers. 


Average 
number of 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


pupils. 




1 

1 
1 






13 

1 

27 

7 

7 

151 

27 


108 








25 


Evening High : 






2,059 










215 










175 


Evening Elementary 


12 
5 






3,308 


Evening Drawing 






637 












20 






233 


6,527 








Special teacher.^ (not included above). 




21 


75 


96 











LiBKARY Department. 
APPENDIX VII. 



99 



CIRCULATION. 
Home Use Only. 



Central Library. 



From Central 



Through Branches & 
Delivery Stations : 



Brighton 

Charlestown 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

North End (3mos.). 

Roxbury 

South Boston 

South End 

West End 

West Roxbury 

Station A 



Hancock School. 



129 

509 
601 
S44 

1,257 
337 
710 
430 

1,209 



1,021 
942 
1,583 
4,013 
66 
2,449 

1,919 
2,522 
1,411 



2,784 
50 



285 

■ 688 

690 

864 

1,573 

533 

852 
1,359 

885 
1,187 
1,678 
2,5S4 
4,617 

775 
2,438 
1,491 
2,607 
1,517 
2,516 
1,696 
1,428 
3,228 
1,111 

1,308 



*23,637 
59,930 
*56,097 

*49,-704 

94,073 
97,104 
89,219 



l!690 from J. P. 
3,716 from Dor. 
4,820 from J. P. 



4,382 from Dor. 



762 from Bri. 
1,734 from Dor. 



4,109 from deposit. 
486 



*27,047 
53,655 

*50,098 
63,443 

*48,415 

*82,732 
77,999 



16,658 

629 from J. P. 
2,752 from Dor'ter. 

9,730 from deposit. 
3,235 from J. P. 



3,280 fromDor'ter. 

5,439 

6,961 from deposit. 
201 from Brig'n. 
2,649 from deposit. 
1,726 fiom Dor'ter. 
7,759 from deposit. 



2,492 
3,218 
10,603 
12,541 



976 from Rox'y. 
),850 from deposit. 



Central Library. 
Branches 



1895. 


1896. 


Gain, 1896. 


279,494 


326,2.i4 


46,760 


567,827 


678,705 


110,938 



847,321 



1,005,019 



' See also number sent to Delivery Stations from this branch. 



100 



City Document No. ,18. 



APPENDIX Vlir. 



TRUSTEES FOR FORTY-FIVE YEARS. 

The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 

1852 to 1864; the late George Ticknor in 18(55; William W. 
Greenough, Esq., from 1866 to April, 1888; from May 7, 
1888, to May 12, 1888, Prof. Henry W. Haynes ; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, Esq., May 12, 1888, to April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. 
Prince since October 8, 1895. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that for 

1853 made what is called the first annual report. At first it con- 
sisted of one alderman and one common councilman and five citi- 
zens at large till 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to con- 
sist of one alderman, two common councilmen and six citizens at 
large, two of whom retired, unless reelected, each year, while the 
members from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 
the organization of the Board was changed to include one alder- 
man, one councilman and five citizens at large, as before 1867 ; 
and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the city government upon the Board, by an 
alderman and a councilman, was abolished, leaving the Board as 
at present, consisting of five citizens at large. 



Citizens at large in small, capitals. 



Abbott, Samuel A, B., 1879-95. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Benton, Josiah H., Jr., 1894-96. 
BiGELOW, John P., 1852-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry L, 1865-68. 
BoAVDiTCH, Henry P., 1894-96. 
Bradley, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvls D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. Coffin Jones, 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Carr, Samuel, 189.5-96. 
Chase, George B , 1876-85. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 
Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, 

1878-88. 
Clapp, William W., Jr., 1864-66. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 



DeNormandie, James, 1895-96. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
Dickinson, M. F., Jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 186.3-64. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1875-79. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William W., 1856-88. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1880-95. 
HiLLARD, George S., 1872-.75; 

1876-77. 
Howes, Osborne, Jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1804-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-73. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 



Library Department. 



101 



Lee, John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston. 1867-68. 
Lewis, Wkston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Wixslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, Georse W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey,"l883-84. 
Morton, Ellis W., 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen K., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Prince, Fkedebick O.. 1888-96. 
Putnam, Geokge, 1868-77. 
Reed, Samson, 1852-53. 
Richards, William R., 1889-95. 



Sanger, George P., 1860-6). 
Sears, Phillip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey K, 1878-79. 
Shurti>eff, Nathaniel B., 

1852-68. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 1855-56; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
TicKNOR, George, 1852-66. 
Tyler, John S., 1863-64; 1866-67. 
Walker, Francis A., 1890. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 
Whitmore William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H., 1885-88, 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, Elisha T., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNSOR, Justin, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



10: 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX IX. 



EXA-MINIXa COMMITTEES FOR FORTY-FIVE YEARS. 

The following have served on the Examining Committees 
for the years given. The names in italics are those of Trus- 
tees who have acted as chairmen of the various committees. 
The thirty-fourth year was from May 1 to December .31, 1885, a 
period of eight months, for which no Examining Committee was 
appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880, 1894. 
Adams, Brooks, 1894. 
Adams, Nebemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Andrews, Augustus, 1892, 1893. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1801. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bancroft, Robert H., 1894. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Barry, Bev. Richard J., 1895. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Bates, Hon. John L., 1896. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Eev. Edward, 1854. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890, 1891. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1850. 
Blake, John G., M.D., 1883, 1891. 
Blake, 3Irs. Mary E., 1894. 
Bodfish, Rev. .Joshua P., 1879, 1891. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D.., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1805. 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, 1855. 
Bowman. Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bowne, Prof. Borden P.. 1896. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brimmer, Hon. Martin, 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Beo. Phillips, 1871. 
Brown, Allen A., 1894. 



Browne, Alex. Porter, 1891. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C. E., M.D., 1872. 
Burdett, Everett W., 1896. 
Burroughs, Bev. Henry, Jr., 1869. 
Carr, Samuel, 1894. 
Carruth. Herbert S., 1892. 
Chadwick, James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen, 1894. 
Chaney, Bev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheever, David W., M.D., 1894. 
Cheever, Miss Helen, 1896. 
Cheney, 3Irs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapi), mUiam W., Jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.I)., 1882. 
Clement, Edward H., 1894, 1895. 
Coale, George, O. G., 1892, 1893. 
Collar, William C, 1874. 
Corbett, Hon. Joseph J., 1896. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.I)., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thomas B., M.D., 1874. 
Cushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Derby, Hasket, M.D., 1895, 1896. 
Dexter, Bev. Henry M., 1866. 
Dillingham, Bev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Joseph T., D.D., 1880. 
D wight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1880. 
Easlburu, Manton, D.D., 1863. 



Library Department. 



103 



Eaton, "William S., 1887. 
Edes, Henry H., 1886. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D , 1871. 
Ellis, George E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, Jr., 1878. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 
Everett, Sidney, 1895. 
Farlow, John W., M.D., 1892, 1893. 
Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 
Fields, James T., 1872. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 
Filz, Walter Scolt, 1894. 
Foote, Bev., Henry W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F., 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1876. 
Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D., 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra 8., B.J)., 1855. 
Garland, George M., M.I)., 1895, 

1896. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., Jf.Z)., 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, Jr., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1868. 
Green, Samuel S., 1895. 
Greenourjh, William W., 1858, 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grinnell, Rev. C. E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., 1858. 
Hale, Mrs. George S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Hale, Philip, 1893. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Bon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1881, 1884. 
Hay ward, George, M.T)., 1863. 
Heard, John, Jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Hellier, Charles E., 1895. 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., D.B., 1888, 

1889. 
Hersey, Miss Heloise E., 1895, 1896. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Eon. George S., 185.3. 
Hillarcl, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. - 
Holmes, Oliver W., M.D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., Jr., 1882. 
Homans, Charles D., M.D., 1867. 
Homans, 3Irs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886, 1887. 



Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, James M., 1891. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hudson, John E., 1895, 1896. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880, 1893, 

1894. 
Hutchins, Miss Emma, 1895, 1896. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Irwin, Miss Agnes, 1894. 
Jeffries, B. .Joy, M.D., 1869. 
Jeffries, William A., 1893. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, Miss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lee, Miss Alice, 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lewis, IVeston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, Augustvis, 1883. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., M.D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
McNulty, Rev. John J., 1896. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Metcalf, Rev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
Morison, Miss Mary, 1892, 1893, 1895. 
Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 
Morse, John T., Jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., Jr., 1878. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 
Neale, RoUin H., D.D., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
O'Brien, Hon. Hugh, 1879. 
O'Callaghan, John J., 1895. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
Otis, G. A., 1860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benj. H., 1876. 
Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parkman, Henry, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882, 1896. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 



104 



City Document No. 18. 



Perry, Thomas S., 1870. 1882, 1883, 

1884, 188o, 1890, 1891. 
Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hon. Henry L., 1891. 
Pingree, Miss Lalla B., 1894. 
Prescott, AVilliam H., LL.D., 1853. 
Prince, lion. F. O., 1888, 1889, 1890, 

1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 1890. 
Putnam, George, I). I)., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Randall, Charles M., M.D., 1884. 
Rice, lion. Alexander H., 1860. 
Robblns, Elliott, M.D., 1893. 
Rogers, Prof., William B., 1861. 
Rollins, J. Wingate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamins , 1863. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell. Samuel H., 1880. 
Sampson, O. H., 1892, 1893. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888, 

1889. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 1893, 1894. 
Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Azariah. 1895, 1896. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Smith, Miss Minna, 1892. 
Sowdon, A. J. C., 1892, 1893. 
Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D., 1888. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. K, 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Teele, John O., 1886. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 



Thayer, George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, B. F., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 
Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tilliughast, Caleb B., 1895, 1896. 
Tobey, Jirm. Edward S., 1862. 
Todd, William C, 1894. 
Twombly, Bev. A. S., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., M.JD., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Warner, Hermann J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.I)., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Weissbein, Louis, 1893. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wendell, Prof. Barrett. 1895, 1896. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitmore, William H., 1887. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A , 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williams, Harold, M.D., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854. 
Winthrop, Robert C, Jr., 1887. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Goold, 1888, 

1889. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



Library Department. 



105 



APPENDIX X. 



SCHEDULE OF LIBRARY SERVICE. 

i\''o^e.— This has been brought down to April 1, 1S97. The order followed is (1) b 
rank in grades, and (2) alphabetically within each grade. 



Summary, 

Central Library . . . 150 Males 81 
Branches and Reading-Rooms 59 " 14 



Females 



69 
45 



209 95 

Evening and Sunday Service . *51 51 

Extra assistance is employed at the branches. 



114 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Name. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Putnam, Herbert 


. 1895 


Librarian. 


Savage, Philip H. . 
fMooney, George V. 
**Bicknell Margaret M. 


. 1896 
. 1889 
. 1896 


Libr'n's Sec'y. 

B. Special. 

C. « 


Deery, D. Jean . 
Learned, Lucie A. 


. 1891 
. 1891 


C. " 

C. " 


Cellarius, Theodore W. . 


. 1892 


D. 


Nichols, Adelaide A. 


. 1868 


Auditor. 


McFarland, Peter V. 

u 


. 1896 
NASSIGNED. 


D. Runner. 


Xame. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Carret, Jose F. 


. 1875 




Tenney, Mary A. 


. 1897 


B. Special. 


CATALO 


^UE DEPARTMENT. 


Whitney, James L. . 

llSwift, Lindsay 
Hunt, Edward B. 


. 1869 

. 1878 
. 1883 


Chief. 

A. Special. 

A. « 


Burnell, Carrie. 


. 1881 


A. 


Butler, Edward K., Jr. 


. 1896 


A. 


Chevalier, Samuel A. 


. 1894 


A. 


Rollins, Mary H. 
Seaver, Mrs. Lillian F. 


. 1886 
. 1888 


A. 
A. 


Rice, Edwin F. 


. 1885 


B. Special. 



♦Serving from three to seven evenings a week each. The total number of positions 
is 33 evening:* ; 3(! Sundays. 

** Auditor's Assistant, f Custodian of Stock Room. H Editor Library 

Publications. 



106 



City Document No. 18. 





Entered. 


Grade. 


Cutler, Dora L. 


. 1887 


B. 


Gould, Ida W. 


. 1884 


B. 


Leavitt, Luella K. . 


. 1895 


B. 


Brennan, T. Frank . 


. 1890 


D. Special. 


Dolan, Charles T. . 


. 1894 


D. 


*Murdoch, John 


. 1896 


A. Special. 


ORDERING DEPARTMENT. 


Macurdy, Theodosia E. 


. 1889 


Chief. 


Browne, Alice . 


. 1883 


B. Special. 


Coolidge, Marie 


. 1893 


B. 


Frinsdorff, Emily 0. 


. 1894 


B. 


Goddard, Mrs. Frances H. 


. 1892 


B. 


McGrath, Mary A. . 


. 1868 


B. 


Keleher, Alice A. 


. 1891 


D. Special. 


McFarland, Thomas A. 


. 1891 


D. « 


St. Louis, Robert E. . 


. 1897 


E. 


SHELF 


DEPARTMENT. 


Roffe, William G. T. 


. 1881 


B. Special. 


tLocke, John F. 


. 1894 


B. 


Richmond, Bertha P. 


. 1895 


B. 


Connor, George H. . 


. 1891 


C. Special. 


Reardon, John H. 


. 1897 


C. « 


Eberhart, John 


. 1894 


D. « 


Lucid, John F. 


. 1893 
LTES HALL. 


D. Runner. 


Knapp, Arthur M. . 


. 1875 


Custodian. 


tBlaisdell, Frank C. . 


. 1876 


A. Special. 


Doyle, Agnes C. 


. 1885 


B. 


Buckley, Pierce E. . • . 


. 1891 


C. 


Plunkett, Albert J. . 


. 1895 


D. 


Hardy, Charles A. . 


. 1896 


D. Runner. 


SPECl 


AL LIBRARIES. 


Fleischner, Otto 


. 1891 


Custodian. 


Hall, Belle S. . . . 


. 1895 


B. 


Hitchcock, Grace A. 


. 1895 


B. 


Lewis, Marian L. 


. 1897 


B. 


Ward, Joseph W. . 


. 1891 


D. Special. 


Cassidy, Margaret L. 


. 1895 


D. 


Kelly, Charlotte H. . 


. 1895 


D. 


Leonard, Michael F. 


. 1895 


D. 


§Roett, Harry W. . 


. 1895 


D. 


Smith, Arthur E. T. 


. 1897 


E. 



* Temporary assifcnnient. t Engaged for temporary service. 

t Supervisor of Patent and Newspaper Departments. § Qualified 



for D. Special. 



LiBRAKY Department. 



lOi 



Peirce, Florence E. 
Ford, Mary E. A. 
Maguinness, James 



PERIODICAL ROOM. 

Entered. 

. 1896 B. 
. 1895 D. 
. 1897 E. 



Special. 



NEWSPAPER ROOM. 
Serex, Frederic . . .1895 B. 

Keenan, Matthew T. . .1896 D. Special. 

ISSUE DEPARTMENT. 



McGuffey, Margaret D. 
*Sheffield, Mrs. Gertrude P. 
Forrest, Gertrude E. 
Barry, Edward F. 
McCarthy, Michael, Jr, 
Sheridan, Mary C. 
Desmond, Louise L 
Richards, Florence F 
Shumway, Marion H 
Wendte, Frederika 
Cufflin, M. Florence 
Cunniff, Nellie L. 
Dowling, S. Jennie 
McCausland, Bradley 
Murphy, Annie G. 
Reynolds, Mary A. 
Roett, Louis W. 
Shipman, Paul C. 
Bertram, Lucy I. 
Daly, Margaret C. 
Fillebrown, Emily F 
Glover, John H. 
Gorman, John E. 
McCarthy, Marion A 
Wiechmann, Catherine A. 
Alley, Gertrude E. 
Caiger, Eliza F. A. 
Connolly, Nelly L. 
Ethier, Lillian E. 
Hutchins, Fernald 
Kiernan, Letitia M 
Lucid, Joseph A. 
Olson, Alphild 
Olson, Bertha A. 
Williams, Grace 
Zaugg, Joanna 
Zaugg, Otto E. 



1895 


Chief. 


1896 


B. Special. 


1895 


B. " 


1890 


C. " 


1892 


C. " 


1881 


c. « 


1895 


c. 


1875 


c. 


1895 


c. 


1895 


c. 


1892 


D. Special, 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1888 


D. " 


1894 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. 


1895 


D. Runner. 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1896 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. - 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. " 


1895 


D. « 


1895 


D. - 



■In charge of Juvenile Dept. 



108 



City Document No. 18. 







Kntcred. 


Grade. 


McKiernan, John L, 


. 


1896 


E. 


Shaughnessy, Mary A. 


. 


1897 


E. 


Stetson, Nina M. . 




1896 


E. 


ISSUE DEPARTMENT 


BRANCn DIVISION. 


Wellman, Hiller C. . 




1896 


Supervisor of Branches 
and Delivery Stations. 


Ilobart, Martha N. . 




1896 


B. 


Heimann, Otto A. . 




1890 


C. Special. 


Morse, Maud M. 




1877 


C. " 


Maier, Joseph A. 




1892 


D. 


Conroy, Michael J. . 




1897 


E. 


REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 


Keenan, John J. 




1885 


B. Special. 


Murray, Ella K. 




1886 


C. 


Shelton, Richard B. . 




1895 


D. Special. 


Horrigan, M. Ellen . 




1895 


D. 


PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 






Entered. 


Position. 


Lee, Francis W. 




1894 


Chief. 


Geyer, Willfried H. . 




1896 


Pressman. 


Greeley, Carrie P. . 




1896 


Compositor, 


Land, Annie F. 




1896 


(( 


Ives, Birdsey F. 


BINI 


1896 
)ERY. 


Feeder. 


Ryder, Frank . 




1883 


Foreman. 


Collins, Dennis J. 




1887 


Finisher. 


Fuerst, Alexander . 




. 1896 


Forwarder. 


Heyer, William H. . 




1891 


(( 


Hoeffner, George. 




1891 


" 


Ivory, John W. 




1893 


u 


Lofstrom, Konrad A. 




1892 


t< 


Murphy, John F. 




1883 


u 


Hemstedt, William P. 




1883 


Pressman. 


Bowen, Mrs. Sarah E. 




1876 


Sewer. 


Doiron, Joanna 




1896 


(( 


Kilej, Margaret J. . 




1889 


" 


Moriarty, Mary G. . 




. 1875 


" 


Nolen, Sarah 




. 1891 


(( 


Potts, Ellen F. 




. 1892 


a 


Soule, Ellen E. . 




. 1891 


u 



ENGINEER AND JANITOR DEPARTMENT. 

Niederauer, Henry . , . 1894 Chief Engineer. 
McCready, Alexander . . 1895 Engineer. 



Library Department. 



109 





Entered. 


Position. 


Malone, John P. 


1895 


Engineer. 


O'Neill, Harry . 


1896 


u 


Zittel, George, Jr. . 


1891 


(( 


Herland, Nils J. 


1895 


Fireman. 


Moran, John A. 


. 1894 


u 


Karlson, Charles W. 


1896 


Book Motors. 


* Williams, John L. . 


1886 


Janitor. 


Kilmurry, William . 


. 1894 


Assistant Janitor. 


McCarty, Dennis 


. 1888 


Watchman. 


McGee, Alexander D. 


. 1896 


Painter. 


Wall, Frank A. 


. 1897 


Carpenter. 


Hanna, William T. . 


1895 


Marble polisher. 


Goode, Robert 


1895 


Elevator. 
Coat room. 


Whisnant, William B. 


1895 


EAST BOST 


ON BRANCH. 




Entered. 


Grade. 


Flanders, Emma W. 


1888 


c. 


Wing, Alice M. 


1873 


c. 


Bickford, Lillian A. . 


. 1891 


D. 


Hosea, George H. 


1873 


Janitor. 


SOUTH BOSI 


^ON BRANCH. 


BuUard, N. Josephine 


1883 ■ 


C. Special. 


Eaton, Ellen A. 


1873 


C. 


Sampson, Idalene L. 


1878 


c. 


McQuarrie, Annie C. 


1894 


D. 


Orcutt, Alice B. 


1887 


D. 


Parker, Helena L. . 


. 1889 


D. 


Baker, Joseph . 


1872 


Janitor. 


ROXBURTZ 


BRANCH 




Bell, Helen M. 


. 1878 


C. Special. 


Berry, Elizabeth C. . 


. 1883 


C. 


Puffer, Dorothy 


. 1878 


c. 


Griggs, Sarah W. . 


1886 


D. 


Lynch, Gertrude A. 


1894 


D. 


Monahan, William . 


1883 


Janitor. 


CHARLESTO 


WN BRANCH. 


Cartee, Elizabeth F. 


1886 


C. Special. 


Livermore, Mrs. Susan E. 


1885 


C. 


Reagen, Elizabeth R, 


1895 


c. 


O'Neill, Margaret M. 


1892 


D. 


Rogan, Katharine S. 


1896 


D. 


Smith, Thomas E. . 


1874 


Janitor. 



* Cliarge of book motors, evenings. 



no 



City Document No. 18. 



BRIGHTON BRANCH 


[. 




Entered. 


Grade. 


Rice, Harriet 


. 1896 


C. Special. 


Conley, Ellen F. 


. 1891 


C. 


England, George A. . 


. 1896 


C. 


Dale, M. Florence 


. 1895 


D. 


Brock, James M. 


. 1878 


Janitor. 


DORCHESTER BRANCH. 


Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T. . 


. 1873 


C. Special. 


Griffith, Mary E. 


. 1886 


*C. 


Donovan, Mary G. . 


. 1891 


D. 


Hufton, Nellie E. . 


. 1896 


D. 


Meffen, Margaret 


. 1892 


D. 


Davenport, Edward . 


. 1875 


Janitor. 


SOUTH 


END BRANCH. 


Sheridan, Margaret A. 


. 1875 


C, Special. 


McGrath, Amelia F. 


. 1888 


C. 


Lynch, Emma F. 


. 1885 


D. 


Meehan, Margaret F. 


. 1893 


D. 


MuUoney, William J. 


. 1892 


D. 



JAMAICA PLAIN BRANCH. 
Swain, Mary P. . . .1877 C. Special. 

Riley, Nellie F. . . .1878 C. 

Albert, Katie F. . . .1892 D. 
Johnson, Timothy . . . 1876 Janitor. 



WEST END BRANCH. 



Davis, Mrs. Eliza R. 
Barton, Margaret S. 
Forbes, George W. . 
McKirdy, Alice E. . 
Mooney, Katharine G. 
Riley, Mary E. 
Kiley, Mary E. 
Porter, Frank C. 
Rossiter, John . 



. 1877 


C. Special. 


. 1885 


C. 


. 1896 


C. 


. 1896 


c. 


. 1885 


c. 


. 1891 


D. 


. 1896 


D. 


. 1896 


D. Runner. 


. 1896 


Janitor. 



WEST ROXBURY BRANCH. 
Morse, Carrie L. . . .1890 D. Special. 
Carroll, Joseph . . . 1894 Janitor. 



DELIVERY STATIONS. 
Station. Custodian. Grade. 

A. Lower Mills Reading Room Hill, M. Addie D. Special. 

B. Roslindale Delivery Station Davis, William W. 

C. West Roxbury Branch See above 

D. Mattapan Reading Room .Capewell.Mrs. EmmaG.,D. Special. 



Library Department. 



Ill 



station. Custodian. Grade. 

E. Neponset Delivery Station Savil, Susan. 

F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room Fairbrother, Mrs. EHz. G.,D. Special. 

G. Allston Delivery Station Sampson & Padelford. 

H. Aslimont Delivery Station "Weymouth, Clara E. 

J. Dorchester Sta. Delivery Station. .Sexton, Mrs. Annie M. 

K. Bird-st. Delivery Station Hoare, Mrs. Esther G. 

L. No. Brighton Reading Room Muldoon, Katherine F. . .D. Special. 

M. Crescent ave. Delivery Station Johnson, Charles E.,& Co. 

N. Blue Hill ave. Delivery Station. ...Riker, Mrs. S. A. 

P. B'way Extension Delivery Station. Ward, Langdon L. 

Q. Upham's Corner Delivery Station. .Bird, Mrs. Thomas H. 

R. Warren-st. Delivery Station Mowry, Albert D., & Co. 

S. Roxbury Crossing Delivery Station. In Charge Boys' Institute. 



EVENING AND SUNDAY SEKVICE. 
6 P.M. TO 10 P.M. Winter Schedule. 
Sundays, 2 to 10 p.m. 
Bates Hall. 

Officer in Charge. 

Chevalier, Samuel A, See Issue Department 

Fleischner, Otto. See Special- Libraries 

Hunt, Edward B 

Swift, Lindsay .... 

Assistant. 

Roffe, William G. T. 

Walsh, William A. See Fine Arts . 
Central Desk. 

Buckley, Pierce E. . 

Williams, David L. . 
Care of Reference Books. 

Heimann, Albert E. ... 

Care of Lower Tube. 

Pitts, James A. .... 

Lucid, John F. .... 

Runner. 

Beckford, Fred A 

Issue Department. 
Officer in Charge. 

Blaisdell, Frank C 

Chevalier, Samuel A. See Bates Hall 
Receiver of Books. 

Blaisdell, Fred W 

Deliverer of Books. 



See Indicator. Runner . 

See Deliverer of Books. Runner 
See Care of Tubes 



Reardon, John H. 

Clarke, William S. 
Care of Indicator. 

Clarke, William S. 

Hannigan, Walter T 
Care of Slips, 

Heimann, Otto A. . 

Hughes, John A. . 
Care of Tubes. 

Hannigan, Walter T. See Indicator 

Plunkett, Albert J. See Runner 



m 
m 

12 

20 

32 

16 
9 

25 

20 
12 

25 

16 

9 

16 



112 City Document No. 18. 

Care of Carriers. Hours. 

Ilannigan, Frank J, . . . . . . .25 

Runners. 

Campbell, Charles D 25 

Clarke, William S. See Indicator. Deliverer of Books. 7 

Connors, Timothy J. ...... 25 

Currier, Ulj'sses S. G 7 

Doyle, Charles A 25 

Ford, Daniel J. ....... 32 

Glover, John II 16 

Gorman, John E 16 

Hard}', Charles A 16 

Hughes, Thomas F 9 

McFarland, Peter V 9 

Martin, D. Clifford 25 

Plunkett, Albert J. See Care of Tubes ... 7 

Tenny, Robert M 25 

Weller, Waldo W 25 

SPECIAL LIBEAEIES FLOOE. 

In Charge. 

Fleischner, Otto. See Bates Hall .... 5 

Barto:n^ Library. 

In Charge. 

Lee, Francis W 20 

Tiffany, Edward 12 

Assistant. 

Leonard, Michael F. 12|- 

Ward, John A 12| 

Fine Arts Department. 

In Charge. 

Walsh, William A. See Bates Hall Assistant . . 17 

Bourne, Frank A 12 

Assistant. 

McFarland, Thomas A . 12^ 

Ward, Joseph W. . ' 12| 

Periodical Room. 

Connors, John F 32 

Registration Desk. 

Fallon, William E 21^ 

Keenan, John J 3^ 

Patent Room and Juvenile Library, 
Attendant. 

Hemstedt, William P .16 

Mooney, George V. . .• . . . . ,16 



Library Department. 113 

Assistant, Hours. 

Trueman, Nelson G. ...... 25 

Newspaper Room. 
Attendant. 

Brennan, T. Frank 16 

Connor, George H. ....... 16 

Replacement or Books. 

Barry, Edward F 12|^ 

McCarthy, Michael, Jr 12| 



114 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX XT. 



SYSTEM OF SERVICE 

As IX Force February 1, 1897. 

The system of graded service with provision for examinations 
as set forth in Article VI. of the By-laws quoted below was 
adopted by the Trustees in April, 1895. Employees then in the 
service were graded thereunder. The application of the system 
to such employees was, however, made with this proviso, that it 
should not of itself entitle any employee to an increase of salary 
nor subject him to a decrease. In some cases, therefore, the 
salaries of present employees do not yet accord precisely with 
the salaries of the grades under which they are classed. But 
increases of salary that may be recommended on the ground that 
the service rendered is entitled to higher pay will be made only 
in accordance with the scheme. And all promotions, as well as 
new appointments, will be made in accordance with the scheme. 

Extracts From By-Laws. 

ARTICLE v., Section 1. — Examinations. Semi-annu- 
ally, or oftener if expedient, examinations shall be held under 
the direction of the Librarian, for admission, by promotion 
or otherwise, to all grades of employment in the Public 
Library, except the positions of Librarian, Assistant Librarian, 
Librarian's Secretary, Auditor, Chief Cataloguer, Chief of Shelf 
Department, Custodian of Bates Hall, Chief of Ordering 
Department, Chief of Issue Department, Supervisor of Branches 
and Stations, Chief Engineer, Chief of Printing Department, and 
Chief of Bindery. 

From the list of those persons who have successfully passed 
the examinations of the grade in which they seek employment, 
appointments shall be made by the Trustees upon nomination 
by the Librarian in consultation with the head of the department 
in which the appointment is to be made. 

ARTICLE v., Section 2. — Vacations and Other Absences. 
All persons regularly employed in the library, except per- 
sons employed in the Engineer's or Janitor's departments, or 
in the Bindery, shall be entitled to a vacation at the rate of 
twenty-four days for each year in the service, exclusive of 
legal holidays and of the weekly half-holiday allowed by the 
city ordinance, to be arranged by the Librarian, No allowance 
shall be made for absence from duty except as above provided. 



Library Department. 115 

Section" 3. The President or Librarian shall have power to 
suspend, with loss of pay, any person in the library service 
until the first succeeding meeting of the Corporation. 

The following notice and application blank are furnished to 
applicants for employment in the library service. 

Notice to Applicants foe Employment. 

Applications must be made upon the printed blanks furnished 
by the library. Examinations for applicants will be held from 
time to time as the needs of the service may require. Each 
applicant will be notified of the examination to be held next 
after the filing of his application. 

The examinations are not strictly competitive. Other capaci- 
ties being equal, preference will be given to persons attaining 
the highest mark ; but in making selections from among those 
who have taken the examination, other elements of fitness for 
the particular positions to be filled will be taken into account. 

The purpose of the examination being not to test the intelli- 
gence of the applicants by an absolute standard, but rather to 
range the applicants according to the relative intelligence 
displayed by them, no absolute pass-mark is fixed ; nor is any 
certificate or diploma given, but candidates will, if they desire, 
be informed of their relative rank among those who have taken 
examinations for the same grade. 

The examination, moreover, is regarded as a preliminary test 
merely. It must be followed by a lest of capacity in actual 
service during a probationary period. And all appointments to 
the service, even where carrying pay, are provisional and con- 
ditioned upon proof of capacity for the particular positions to be 
filled as shown in actual service. 

The entire library service (excepting the Engineer, Janitor, 
and Printing Departments and the Bindery ; and the Sunday 
and Evening service which is paid by the hour) is divided into 
grades. Each grade begins with a minimum salary and pro- 
gresses to a maximum. The maximum reached, no further 
increase is possible, except by promotion to a higher grade. 
Such promotion also is based upon an examination, combined, 
however, with certificate of capacity from the head of depart- 
ment in which the employee has served. 

The ordinary grades are supposed to provide for positions 
where academic knowledge is necessary ; the special grades for 
those positions where special capacities (as knowledge of type- 
writing, executive ability, etc.) are more particularly required. 

The grades are as follows : 

1st year, 2d year, 3d year, 4th year, 

per week. per week. per week. per week. 

Grade E . . $3 50 U 00 $4 50 
» D , . 5 00 6 00 7 00 
« D (for runners) 5 00 5 50 



llii C'lTV Document No. 18. 

Ist year, 2(1 year, 3d year, 4th year, 

per week. per week. per week. per week. 

Grade C . . 87 50 $S 50 $9 50 $10 50 

u B . . 11 00 12 00 13 00 14 00 

u A . . K) 50 17 50 18 50 19 50 

« D Special 7 00 8 00 9 00 10 00 

u c " . 12 00 13 00 13 50 

4' B " . 14 00 15 50 17 50 

u A " . 23 50 25 50 27 50 

It is expected that vacancies in Grade A will be filled by 
promotion from Grade B after examination. 

Persons who have entered the library service as runners in 
Grade E and are certified by the head of the department to 
have performed satisfactorily the duties of Grade E and to have 
acquired a knowledge of location requisite for Grade D, may, 
upon recommendation of the Librarian, at the end of six months 
from the date when they entered the service, be promoted to 
Grade D. 

The qualifications for the various general grades so far as the 
requirements of the general examination are concerned are as 
follows : 

Grade A. 
Knowledge of Foreign Languages. 
General History and Literature, 
Library Science. 
Experience in this library. 

Grade B. 
Knowledge of at least two Foreign Languages. 
General History and Literature. 
Library Science. 

Grade C. 
Equivalent of High School Education. 
Knowledge of one Foreign Language. 

Grade D. 
Equivalent of Grammar School Education. 
Knowledge of location and system in this Library. 

Grade E. 
Equivalent of Grammar School Education. 

Applicants for positions in the higher grades must satisfy the 
examiners of their ability to pass the examinations for all the 
grades below that for which they make application. 

To the above general qualifications must be added in each 
case such special qualifications as may be requisite for the 
particular positions to be filled. 

Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 



Library Department. 117 



Application Blank. 

I hereby make application to be examined for a position in 
Grade of the Public Library service of the City of Boston. 

As part of my application I declare the answers to the follow- 
ing questions to be true and in my own handwriting. 

Each question must be answered or the blank will be returned. 

1 . Are you married or single ? 

2. "Where do you reside and what is your post-office address? 
(Give town or city, including street and number.) 

3. How long have you been a resident of said city or town ? 

4. What is the date and place of your birth V 

5. What is your fathei-'s and mother's full name? Give 
name, whether living or dead. 

6. Have you ever been examined for the public service in any 
State or city ? If so, when, where, for what branch and grade of 
t^he service, and with what result ? 

7. Are you in good health? Have you any mental or 
physical incapacity cf which you are aware ? 

8. What is your present occupation and what has been your 
past occupation ? Give places and dates of employment as near 
as you can. 

9. In what schools, academy, or college were you educated ? 
Give the name and length of course in each. 

10. Have you any experience, or do you po-sesa any special 
qualifications, such as a knowledge of book-keeping, sten- 
ography, typewriting, foreign languages, or a familiarity with 
other branches of knowledge, which, in your opinion, would be 
useful in the service of the Public Library, and not included' 
among the requirements for the grade in which you are an 
applicant ? 

[Signature] 

Boston, , 189 



When Jillecl out, fold thrice (md return to the Librarian of 
Fuhlic Library. Enclose any recom?nendations you desire to 
submit. 



llx CiTV Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX XII. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

25 Buckingham street, Cambridge, February 11, 189G. 
Herbert Putnam, Esq. 

Dear Sir: I desire to give to the Boston Public Library a 
special collection of books, now amounling to nearly one thou- 
sand, and bearing on the general subject of the History of 
Woman. I would make only the condition that these should be 
placed, at least for the present, in an alcove or alcoves by them- 
selves, in the hope that they may be used freely by students, and 
that other donors may gradually cooperate in building up a 
department of some permanent value. 

It is needless to say that I should not desire to see any 
general separation in any library between works relating to 
men, and works relating to women, as this would be a thing 
absurd and impracticable. But the great changes that have 
gone on within recorded history in the social, industrial and 
educational position of woman, render all this an important 
theme for special study, and a proper basis for a separate depart- 
ment in every large library. It is such a department that I 
desire, with the aid of others, to establish ; and I am very con- 
fident that it will find special students to whom it will be of value. 
Indeed, this has proved to be the case more than once while 
these books have been under my own roof. 

I am not aware that such a department has before been 
created in any public library, though one or two college libra- 
ries in our Western States have been mentioned as beginning on 
similar collections. Several large collections of books written 
by women have been made in Europe ; and among my books 
there are printed catalogues of two of these, both now scattered, 
the Ferri and the Stainforth Libraries. But both these con- 
tained the works of women only — not works about women; 
and the same was the case with the remarkable library of 
women's writings which I visited in the Women's Building at 
Chicago, and most of whose contents are still kept together, 
I believe, in that city. None of these, therefore, were general 
collections like that at which I aim. 

The collection has hitherto borne the name of " The Galatea 
Collection of Books relating to the History of Woman," and is 
roughly catalogued under that appellation ; but I do not in the 
least require that this name should be made permanent, nor do 



LiBEAEY DePARTJMENT. 119 

I make any other condition whatever. I am satisfied that the 
authorities of the Boston Public Library will fully consider the 
suggestions already made, and will, if they accept the gift, carry 
out these suggestions wisely. The books have been in process 
of collection for nearly fifty years, and include a good many 
that are rare and curious. They are in a variety of languages, 
and many of them would now be duplicated with difficulty. 
The question how far they should be used inside the building 
and how far outside must be left wholly to your judgment. 

The bulk of these books can be delivered ere long if they are 
accepted ; but I may wish that some of them may be tempo- 
rarily retained for my own use or that of my family. I desire 
to add that I am influenced in making this gift, such as it is, not 
only by the conviction that it is the best use to be made of the 
collection, but by a warm regard for the Boston Public Library 
itself ; having received from it many favors in years past and 
having as a member of the Legislature taken an active part in 
securing for it the piece of land on which its present building 
stands. 

I am yours very respectfully, 

(Signed) Thomas Wentwoeth Higginson. 



Mt. Bowdoin Library Association, 
Boston, Mass., February 27, 189G. 

To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen: At a meeting of the Mt. Bowdoin Library 
Association held on the 26th day of February, 1896, it was 
unanimously 

" Mesolved, That the books, book-cases and furniture belong- 
ing to this association be presented to the Boston Public Library, 
and that the president and secretary be authorized and re- 
quested to execute the necessa,ry conveyance in the name of the 
association." 

In compliance with this resolution, the Mt. Bowdoin Library 
Association hereby gives and transfers to the Trustees of the 
Boston Public Library its books, comprising upwards of 800 
volumes, its book-cases, desks, tables, chairs, curtains, furniture 
and fixtures, all being in the Mt. Bowdoin reading-room. 

The Mt. Bowdoin Library Association. 

By (Signed) William Bellamy, President. 
(Signed) J. L. Harbour, Secretary. 



41 Marlborough street. May 6, 1896. 
To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen: I wish to offer to the Boston Public Library a 
portrait of my father, to be placed in the room where the Tick- 



IJd City Document No. 18. 

nor Library is kept. It is an excellent copy of a painting, by 
Thomas Sully of Philadelphia, executed in 1831 ; and represents 
]Mr. Ticknor at the age of forty, in the prime of life ; differing, 
therefore, from the portraits at present, more familiar to the 
public, which represent him as an old man of seventy-six. 
Sully's painting shows him as he was during the period when 
he collected the books which form the Ticknor Library of 
Spanish and Portuguese works. 

I will send the painting, which I desire to present to the 
library for your inspection. It i>< by Mr. George Sloane, of this 
city, and I consider it an admirable copy. 

It will need a tablet to be affixed to it, giving name and age 
of the subject, which I will provide later. 

Truly yours, 

Anna Eliot Ticknor. 



September, 22, 1896. 
Hon. Josiah Qimicy, 3Iayor : 

Dear Mr. Quincy : I have been appointed executor of the 
will of Bessie S. Lockwood, of Cambridge, whose husband, 
Hiland Lockwood (who died in September, 1874), was for many 
years a resident of Boston. By her will, she bequeaths to the 
city of Boston her husband's large and valuable library, the 
same to be added to the Boston Public Library. 

At some time, which may be mutually convenient, I shall be 
ready to transfer this library to the proper city official. 

Very truly yours, 
(Signed) Frank O. Squire. 

Terms of Bequest. 

" Fourth. To the city of Boston I bequeath my library, to 
be added to the Public Library. " 



Chicago, November 7, 1896. 
Mr. Herbert Putnam : 



I do not wish to abandon my project of a memorial donation 
to the Boston Public Library, and I submit the following propo- 
sition : 

I will donate the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) to the 
Boston Public Library, the income of this sum to be employed 
in the purchase of valuable rare editions of the writings — either 
in verse or prose — of American and of foreign authors. Origi- 
nal manuscripts may be included in the collection. 

I will not make it a condition that these books and manu- 
scripts shall be cared for as a separate collection, nor will I 
restrict them absolutely from circulation. 



Library Department. 121 

I desire each of the books to have a distinctive book-plate, 
that shall declare them to be a part of the Longfellow Memorial 
Collection. 

Very truly, 

(Signed) Victorixe Thomas Artz. 

The Metropole. 



City of Boston, 
In Common Council, November 19, 1896. 

Ordered., That the City Treasurer be, and he hereby is, 
authorized, in behalf of the city, to accept the legacy of twenty- 
five hundred (2,500) dollars from the estate of the late Cbarles 
Mead of this city, the same to constitute a trust fund to be 
designated " The Charles Mead Trust Fund," for the promotion 
of the objects of the Public Library, in such manner as the 
government of said library shall deem best, and so far as said 
government shall deem it consistent with the objects of the 
library to be used for the benefit of the South Boston Branch 
Library ; and it is further 

Ordered., That the Treasurer invest and reinvest said sum, 
and pay the income thereof for the purpose of the Public 
Library, as designated by the Trustees of the Public Library of 
the city of Boston. 

Passed. Sent up for concurrence. 

In Board of Aldermen, November 23, 1896. 
Concurred. 

Approved by the Mayor, November 25, 1896. 
A true copy. 

Attest : 

(Signed) Johx T. Priest, 

Asst. City Clerk. 



\-2-2 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX Xin. 



GIFTS, JANUARY 31, ISm, TO JANUARY 3], 1897. 
(Books Only.) 

See also llie Kcports of the Trustees iind Librarian, pp. 5,24. 

Givers 1,545 

Volumes 22,185 

Numbers 9,159 



Abbott, Samuel A. B. 

Abbott, Br. W. C, Ruvenswood, Chicago, III. . 
Academia Mexicana de Ciencias Exactas Fisicas 

Naturales, Mexico 

Academia Nacional de Medicina, Lima, Peru . 

Acaderaie Imperiale des Sciences, St. Petersburg, Biissia. 

Academy of Natural Sciences, PMlndelphia, Pa. 

Academy of Science of St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. 

Actors' Fund of the U. S. of America ... 

Adams, Prof. J. Q., PMladfdpMa, Pa. 

Adams Academy, Quincy, 3Inss. .... 

Aguilar Free Library, Neiu York City 

Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auhurn, Alu 

Alabama Geological Survey, University, Ala. . 

Alden, James S., Passaic, N.J. 

Alfred University, Alfred, JSf.Y. 

Allen, Charles E., Cedar Grove, Maine 

Allen, Edward G., London, England .... 

Allen, Rev. G. H., D.D., Cambridge, Mass. 

Allen, Henry F 

Aluminnin AVorld, Pnblisliers of, Neio York City 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences ... 
American Academy of Political and Social Science, Phila 

delphia, Pa 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester. Mass. 
American Anti-Vivisection S.ociety, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Salem, Mass. ........ 

American Baptist Home Mission Society, ISfetc York City 
American Bar Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
American Bible Society, New York City . 
American Catholic News, New York City . 
American Citizen Company ... 

American Climatological Association, Philadelphia, Pa 
American Colonization Society, Washington, D.C. . 
American Conference on International Arbitration, New 

York City 

American Congregational Association 
American Electric Meter Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Forestry Association, Washington, D.C. . 
American Historical Association, Washington, D. C. 
American Homes Publishing Company, Knoxville, Tenn 



Vols. 
1 
1 



9 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
1 
238 
1 
2 



Library Department. 



123 



American Humane Association, Chicago, III. . 

American Humane Association on Vivisection in Amer- 
ica, J^pecial Committee, Providence. B.I. 

American Institute of Architects, Providence, R.I. 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Jewish Historical Society, Washington, D.C. 

American Laryngological Association, Washington, B.C. 

American Millennial Association .... 

American Missionary Association, New York City . 

American New Church Tract and Publication Society 
PhiladelpMa, Pa 

American Nonconformist, Indianapolis, Ind. 

American Otological Society, New Bedford, 3Iass. . 

American Peace Society 

American Philosophical Society, PhiladelpMa, Pa. 

American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, Ky. 

American Society of Civil Engineers, Nino York City 

American Society of Irrigation Engineers, Denver, Col. . 

American Society of Railroad Superintendents, Asbury 
Park, N. Y. 



American Surgical Association, Phila'delphia , Pa. 

American Veterinary College, New York City . 

Amerikanische Turnzeitung, Milwaukee, Wis. . 

Ames, Mrs. Adelbert, Lowell, Mass. . 

Ames, John N., Chelsea, 3Ia.ss 

Amherst College, Amherst, 3[ass. ... 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Mass 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Mass. 

Angell, George T. 

Anonymous 

Apollo Club of Boston 

Appalachian Mountain Club .... 

Appleton, W. S 3 portraits 

Apprentices' I^ibrary Company of Philadelphia, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Arbetaren Publishing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Argentine Republic. Oficina Meteorologica Argentina, 
Buenos Aires, S.A 

Argentine Republic, Consul in Boston . . . . 

Argus (Swedish) 

Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, Tucson, Ari- 
zona 

Arms, Miss Jennie M. 

Arnold Arboretum . 

Arnold, Howard P 

Aron, Joseph, Paris, France 

Art Clvib of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Arundel Society, London, England 

Ashley, Prof. W. J., Cambridge, Mass 

Ashton, J. N 

Association of American Physicians, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Associazione Tipografico-Libraria Italiana, Milan, Italy . 

Atkinson, C. F 

Atwell, C. B., Evanston, III 

Atwood, John, Maiden, Mass 

Aubrey, W. H. S., LL.D., Croydon, England . 

Avery, Hon. Elroy M., Cleveland, Ohio .... 

Bailey, F. H., A.M. 

Baillie's Institution Free Library, Glasgow, Scotland 

Baker, Marcus 



2 
1 

3 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
6 
1 
2 
12 
192 
1 
4 
3 

1 
1 



2 
13 
11 

1 

2 
1 
2 
8 
1 
2 

242 
1 

24 
1 

n 

2 

1 
1 



•2[ 



Crrv DurujsiENT No. 18. 



r.akor, Tlioinas. L<»„hn,, Knuhind 

Ualcli, Tliomas Willing, ridladclphia, Pa. 

Balthvin. Prof. J. M., PriMccton, N.J 

Baldwin, William II 281 pieces music 

Bancroft, R II 

Bangor rublic Library, Bamjor, Me. .... 

Bangs, Outram 

Bannon, .1. W., Company, New York City 

Barker, Wharton, Philadelphia, Pa 

Barnard Memorial 

Barueaud, Charles, Chelsea, Mass 

Barrow-in-Furness, Free Public Library, Lancashire, 

England 

Basel, Switzerland, Universitilts Bibliothek 

Batchellor, Albert S., Littleton, N.H. .... 

Bates College, Lewiston, Me 

Battevsea Public Libi'ary, London, Emjland 

Beal, Hon. Flavins O., Banf/or, 3{e 

Becker, Pro/. George F., n'rts/iin^ion, D.C. 

Belfast Library and Society for Promoting Knowledge, 

Belfast, Ireland 

Bell, Prof. Alexander G., Beinn Breach, Cape Breton, 

N.S 

Benevolent Fraternity of Churches 

Benson, Rev. R. M • • 

Bent, Allen H 

Benton, Josiah H., Jr. 

Berdwell, Arthur T., Springjield, Mass. . 2 pictures 

Berea College, Berea, Kentucky 

Betis, Prof. Victor 

Biblioteca Nacional, -Bitejios J.ires, -S^ 

Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze, Florence, Italy, 
Biblioteca Univer^taria Napoli, Naples, Italy . 
Bibliotheek der Rijks-Universiteit, Leyden, Holland 
Bibliothpque de FUniversite cVJJ trecht, Utrecht, Holland. 
Bibliotheque de I'tTniversite Imperiale, St. Petersburg, 

Russia 

Bibliotheque de I'Universite Royale de Norvege, Chris- 

tiania, Norway 

Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Paris, France . 

Bigger, .J. H., Montville, Mass 

Billings, Dr. John S., New York City . . . . 
Bimetallic League, London, England . . . . 

Bingham. Hon. Henry, Littleton, N.H. . . . . 
Biological Society of Washington, Washington, B.C. 
Birmingham, England, Free Libraries Committee . 
Bishop, Seth Scott, B.S., M.D., LL.D., Chicago, III. 
Blackburn Free Library, Museum and Art Gallery, 

Blackburn, England 

Blackwell, Samuel C, New York City . . . . 

Blaisdell, Frank C 

Blaney, Henry R. 

Blank, S 

Blatt, William M 

Bley, Gustave, Paris, France 

Blinn, Henry C., Canterbury, N.H 

Blodgett, Albert X., M.D 

Blumer, G. Alder, 3/. £), rtzca, A^.F. . . . . 

Boardman, Samuel Lane, Portland, Me 

Bolton Public Free Library, Bolton, England . 

Bolton, C. E., Cleveland, Ohio 

Bolton, Charles K., Brookline, Mass. . , . . 



LiBRAllY DErAETMENT. 



125 



Bolton, Prof. Henry C, Washington, B.C. 
Boston. Board of Election Commissioners 

Board of Health 

Board of Overseers of the Poor .... 

City Assessor 

City Auditor 

City Collector . . . . . 

City Engineer 

City Hospital 

City Messenger 18 Maps 

City Registry Department 

City Treasurer . . , 

School Committee 

Street Laying Out Department . . 

Boston Art Club 

Boston Associated Charities 

Boston Budget 

Boston Chamber of Commerce 

Boston Children's Aid Society 

Boston College 

Boston Commercial . . . . . 

Boston Courier, Publishers of 

Boston Daily Advertiser 

Boston Daily Globe 

Boston Daily Herald 

Boston Daily Journal 

Boston Daily Post 

Boston Daily Traveler 

Boston East Baptist Association, Readiny, Mass. 

Boston Ideas 

Boston Industrial Aid Society 

Boston Industrial Home 

Boston Merchants' Association 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts 

Boston Protective Department 

Boston Provident Association 

Boston Society of Medical Sciences 

Boston Society of Natural History 

Boston Telegraph 

Boston Times 

Boston Transcript Company 

Boston Transit Commission 

Boston University 

Boston Young Mens' Christian Union .... 
Boston Young Women's Christian Association 

Bostonian Society 

Botanical Society of America, St. Louis, Mo. . 

Botume, J. F. 

Bourinot, J. G., C.M.G., LL.D., D.C.L., Lit. D., Ottawa, 

Canada 

Boutwell, Hon. George S 

Bowditch, Prof. Henry P 

Boveditch, Nathaniel I., heirs of 

Bowditch, Dr. Vincent Y 

Bowdoin College Library, BriinsKick, Me. 

Bowen, Seranus, M.D. 

Bowles, J. M 

Bradford, England, Public Free Libraries and Art 

Museum 

Bradlee, Rev. C. D., Brookline, Mass. 192 newspapers 

Braun, A. D. & Co., Nexo York City 

Brecht, Gustave V., St. Louis, Mo 



Vols. 

2 

4 

1 

1 

2 

40 

51 

1 

3 

94 

45 

1 

36 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 



1 
1 

1 
340 



1-26 



Cirv DiH'iTMicNT No. 18. 



Bridgeport, Conn., Public Library . 

Brigham, Charles H 

Briggs, Dr. F. M. 

Brighton Public Library, Brighton. Enf/land . 
Brinton, Dauicl G., A. M , M.D., LL.D., Media, Pa 
British and Foreign Bible Society, London, Enrjland 
British and Foreign Unitarian Association, London, Eng 

land 

British Museum, London, England .... 
Brockton Public Library, Brockton, Muss . 
Bromley Public Library, Bromley, England 
Brookliue Public Library, Brookline, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Department of City Works . 
Brooklyn, N.Y. Superintendent of Public Instruction 
Brooklyn Daily Eagle. JSroo/fi?/n, iV^.F. 
Brooklyn Ethical Association, New York City . 
Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N.Y. . 

Brower, Hon. J. V., St. Paul, Minn 

Brown, Allen A 

Brown, Dr. Francis H. . . . . . . 

Brown, John P., Estate of 

Browne, Miss Alice 

Bucke, Dr. R. M., London, Ontario. Manuscripts and 

photographs 
Buffalo, N. Y. Common Council .... 

Buffalo Historical Society, jBw^aio, J\r.F. 
Buffalo Library, Buffalo, N.Y. . . 
Buffalo Merchants' Exchange, Buffalo, N.Y. . 
Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Buford, Mrs. M. H 

Bullard, Dr. W. N. . . ... 

Bulletin, Publishers of 

Bunker Hill Monument Association .... 

Burnell, Miss Carrie 

Burrage, Henry S., D.D., Portland, Me. . 

Burton, C. M., Detroit, Mich 

Busey, Samuel C, M.D., Washington, D.C. 

Bush, J. Foster, M.D. . 

Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, E.I. 
Cable, George W., Northampton, Mass. ... 

Cabot, Richard C, M.D 

Cadieux & Derome, Montreal, Canada ... 
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, Cal. 
California Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley 

Cal 

California Institution for the Education of the Deaf and 

Dumb, Sacramento, Cal. . 

California State Library, Sacramento, Cal. 
California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento, Cal. . 
California State Normal School, Chico, Cal. 

Callender, Miss C. S 

Cambridge, 3Iass., Board of Overseers of the Poor . 

Cambridge, Mass., City Clerk 

Cambridge, Mass., Park Department 

Cambridge Co-operative Society, Cambridge, Mass. . 

Cambridge Press, Cambridge, Mass 

Cambridge Public Free Library, Cambridge, England 
Cambridge Public Library, Cambridge, Mass. . 
Cambridge School for Young Ladies, Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge University, Museum of Archaeology, Cam 

bridge, England 

Cameron, Hon. J. D., Washington, D.C. . 



Vols. 

1 
1 
1 
1 



322 



119 



10 



10 



LlBExUlY DEPART^rENT. 



127 



Campbell & Zell Company, Baltimore, Md. 

Canada. Department of Agriculture, Archives Branch, 

Ottawa, Canada 

Statistics Division, Ottawa, Canada 

Geological Survey, Ottawa, Canada 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal, Canada . 

Canto, Jose do, S. Miguel, Portugal 

Canton, Mass., Town Treasurer 

Cardella, Prqf. Domenico, Portoperrajo, Italy . 

Carey, Arthur Astor 

Carmarthen Joint Counties Lunatic Asylum, Carmarthen, 

Wales 

Carnegie Free Library, Allecjlieny, Pa 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, Pa. . . . 

Carpenter, Clement, Toledo, Ohio 

Carret, J. F 

Cartee, Miss Elizabeth F 

Casanjes, Dr. C. P., Nutley, N.J. 

Castilian Club 

Castor T. H. & Co 

Catholic Keview. New York City 

Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. . 

Century Company, Neic York City 

Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen, Chelsea, Mass. . 12 maps 
Champion, Mrs. Henry, New Haven, Conn. 

Chandler, Prof. F. W 

Chandler, Horace P 

Chandler, S. C, Cambridge, Mass 

Chaney, Rev. G. L., Cambridge, Mass 

Charleston, <S.C., Cityof 

Chase, Prof. Frank H., New Haven, Conn. 

Chase, L. A. & Co 

Chase, Mrs. William L., Brookline, Mass. 

Cheever, David AV., ^V.D 

Chelsea, Mass., City of 

Chemical Society of Washington, Washington, B.C. 

Chevalier, S. A 

Chicago Board of Trade, Chicago, III 

Chicago Herald Co., Chicago, III 

Chicago Public Library, Chicago, III. .... 

Child, Prof. Francis J., Cambridge, Mass 

Children's Hospital 

'Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute 
China, Glass and Lamps, Publishers of, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Christian, The 

Christian Recorder, Philadelphia, Pa 

Church Home for Orphan and Destitute Children . 

Church Social Union 

Cigar Makers' International Union of America 
Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cincinnati Public Library, Cincinnnti, Ohio 
Citoyen Franco-Americain, Springfield, Mass. 
Clapham Public Library, London, England 

Clark, Charles B., Altoona, Penn 

Clark University Library, Worcester, Mass. 
Clarke, Augustus P., A.M., M.D., Cambridge, Mass. 

Clarke John H 66 maps 

Clarke, Miss M. E 

Clarke, W. B 

Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, Northampton, Mass. 

Claudin, A., Paris, France 

Clay Record Publishing Co., Chicago, III. 



Vols. 
1 



35 



126 



34 



28 



18 



lliS 



City Document No. 18. 



Clorkonwc'll I'ublic Lil)iary, Lon<lon, England . 

Clovolaiid Citizen, CIcrcUtml, Ohio 

Clevi'land rublic Library, Cleveland, Ohio 

Cleveland, Cineinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway 

Co., Cincimiatl, Oltio 

Clifford cV: I.awton, Neiv York City 

Clough, W. P., .S^ Paul, Minn. . .... 

Club of Odd Volumes 

Cobb, Uei: William Henry 

Cobden Club, London, England 

Codman, Mr. and Mrs. James M., Brookline, Mass. 

175 photographs 
Coe, Bev. Edward B., D.B., LL.D., New York City . 
Coelho, Jose Kamos, Lisbon, Portugal .... 

Colby University, M'at<'rr!llr. }fe 

Coles, Dr. J. A., Deerlnnsl. Smtrh Plains, N.J. 

College of Charleston. C'A«//r.s^</(, 5f.C 

College of St Francis Xavier, New York City . 
Collyer, Rev. Robert, D.I)., New York City 

Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 

Colored Home and Hospital, Neio York City . 
Columbia University, Neio York City .... 

Coniey, A. M., Cambridge, Mass 

Commercial Travelers' Club, Springfield, Mass. 
Committee on Memorial of James Sumner 
Concord Free Public Library, Concord, Mass. . 
Congregational Home Missionary Society, New York 

City 

Conkling, Hon. Alfred R., New York City 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New 

Haven, Conn 

Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn. 
Connecticut Society of Sons of the American Revolution, 

Hartford, Conn. 

Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Conn. 

Converse, Parker L.,TFoi>wrn, 3/ass 

Cook, C. F ■ 

Cooke, John P 

Coolidge, John T 

Cooper Union, New York City 

Copeland & Day 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 

Cornell University, Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, Free Public Library 
Courtenay, William A., Jn9].is/a7?en,iVe?«r?/, )S.C. 
Credland,' William R., Manchester, England 

Crocker, Uriel H. 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me 

Croydon, Libraries Committee, Croydon, England . 

Cunningham, Henry W 

Curtice, P. J 

Curtis & Cameron .... 43 photographs 
Cust, Robert Xeedham, LL.D., London, England 

Cutler, Arthur H., New York City 

Cutler Manufacturing Co., JRoc/tesier, iV-y. 

Daily Report, San Francisco, Cal 

Daly, Charles P., LL.D., New York City . . . . 

Damon, Everett F 

Dana, Richard H. 

Danish Biological Station, Copenhagen, Denmark 

Dante Society, Cambridge, Mass. 



Vols. 
1 
1 



7 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 

568 

1 
5 
4 
1 

1 
1 
1 
11 
1 
1 
5 
1 



Library Department, 



129 



York 



Dartmouth Literary Monthly, Hanover, X.H. 
Davies, Thomas A., JS^eiu York City . 

Davis, 2Irs 

Davis, Anclrevr McFarland, Cambridge, Mass. 
Davis, Walter A., Lunenburg, Mass. . 

Daymude, James L 

Dayton Public Library, Dayton, Ohio 

Debellis, James X 

De Costa, Rev. Benjamin F., D.D., JSfeiv York City 
Dedham, Mass., Town Clerk 

Denison House 

De Normandie, Bev. James 
Denver Public Library, Denver, Col. 
Detroit Public Library, Detroit, Mich. 
Deutsche Gesellschaft der Stadt Xew York, 

City 

De Varigny, H., Paris, France . 

Dewey, Prof. Davis R. .... 

Diario Oficial de la Eepiiblica de Chile, Santiago, Chile . 
Dix, Miss Dorothy L., Estate of, manuscripts, medals 

badges, 
Dixwell, Arthur ...... 

Dodge, Charles R., Washington, D.C. 

Dole, Nathan Haskell 

Dolley, Charles S., M.D.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protes^ 

tant Episcopal Church, Xeiv York City . 
Douglas, D. DeForrest, Springfield, Mass. 
Dover Public Library, Dover, X.H. . 
Doyle & Bryan, Akron, Ohio 

Dresser, Horatio W 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N.J. 

Drexel Institute of Art, Science, and Industry, Phi la 

delphia, Pa 

Drummond, Josiah H., Portland, Me. 

Drury College, Springfield, Mo 

Dudley, 3Irs. L. B., Neio York City . 

Dwight, R. H. W 

East Boston Argus Advocate .... 
Eastern Weekly Publishing Co. 
Eastman, Charles R., PH.D., Cambridge, Mass. 
Eau Claire Public Library, Eau Claire, Wis. 
Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris, France 

Edes, Henry H newspapers and 

Edinburgh, Public Library, Edinburgh, Scotland 
Edmunds, Albert J., Philadelphia, Pa. 
El Cajon Valley News, El Cajon, Cal. 
Ellis, Axel . . . . " . 
Ellis, C. A. and F. R. Comee 

Ellis Memorial Club 

Emerson, Edward Waldo., Concord Mass. 
Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia 
English High School Record 
Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 

Ernst, C. W 

Essex, County of, Amesbury, Mass. . 
Essex Institute, Salem, Mass. 
Evans, Harry 'Ridglej,Was:hington, D.C. . 
Everett, Prof. Chaiies C, Cambridge, Mass. 
Everett, Hon. William, Quincy. Mass. 
Fairbrother, George E., St. John, N.B. 
Fairmonnt College, Wichita, Kansas . 



Pa. 



maps 



Vols. 

1 

1 

34 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

154 

13 

36 

1 

1 
1 
4 
1 



1 
2 
2 
1 
907 



180 



CiTv Document No. 18. 



Fall River Public Library, F(tll lUver, Mass. 

Farrand, Prof. Max, Princeton, N.J 

Faulkner, lion. Charles J., W((shington, D.C. . 

Faxon, Ethvin 

Fevnii]d, Prof. 0.'M.,WllUuinstown, Mass. 

Field, 7.'"r. Charles X 

Field. Kichard M 

Field Columbian Museum, Clii(:(((jo, III 

Filmer, John, Nea-' York City 

Fiorini, Prof. Matteo, Bologna, Italy .... 

Fitchburg, Mass., City of 

Fitcliburg Public Library, Fitchburu, Mass. 

Fitchburg Eailroad Company 

Fitz, G. W., M.B., Cambridge, Mass 

Fitz, Miss Loiiise, Neroton Centre, 3Iass 

Fitzgerald, Desmond, M.A.S.C.E 

Fitzhugh, Whitehouse & Swords, Neio York City . 

Fleischner, Otto 

Fletcher, Miss Mary E., Medford Hillside, Mass. 

Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Vt 

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Lake City Fla. 

Floye, William -J 

Floyer, M. E., M.R.A.S., Cairo, Egypt . . 1 chart 

Fobes, Miss Sarah A 

Fock, Gustav, Leipzig, Germany 

Forbes Library. Northampton, Mass. .... 

Ford. William E 

Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wai/ne, Tad 

Foster, John R 

Fowler, Albert E 

France. Ministere de PAgriculture, Paris, France 

Ministere de Commerce, de I'lndustrie, des Postes 

et des Telegi-aphes, Paris, France 

Ministere de la Guerre, Paris, France . 

Ministere de 1' Instruction Publique et des Beaux- 
Arts, Paris, France 

Ministere des Travaux Publics, Paris, France . 



Fraser Institute, Montreal, Canada 

Freiheit, Publishers of, Nenj York City .... 

Freiherrlich Carl von Rothschild'sche offentliche Biblio- 

thek, Fraukfn rt-am-M(i In, Gi-niKiny .... 

Fremerv. James De, Oakland, Cal 

French, '^ A. D. Weld 

French. Charles E 

Friends' Asylum for the Insane, Frankford, Phila., Pa. 
Friends' Free Library and Reading Room, Germantoion, 

Pa 

Friends' Meeting Hovise, Committee of Arrangements of 

Bi-Centennial, Merion, Pa 

Frothingham, Mrs. O. B 

Gaelic League, Dublin, Ireland 

Gaffield, Thomas 

Gallagher, William, South Braintree, Mass. 

Gardner. Bev. F. M 

Garrison, Francis J 

Gay, Mrs. George H 

General Association of Congregational Churches of 

Massachusetts 

General Association of Congregational and Presbyterian 

Chwrahes of y^.H., Lebanon, N.TI 

General Association of Connecticut, Hartford, Conn. 
General Conference of the Congregational Churches of 

Connecticut, Hartford, Conn 



VolB. 

1 
1 

10 
2 

56 
2 
2 



4 
3 

1 

112 

97 



Library Department. 



131 



General Electric Company and Westingliouse Electric 
and Mfg. Company, New York City . . 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, Neio York 
City 

Geographical Club of Philadelphia, Philadephia, P<i. 

Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, Atlanta, Ga. . 

Georgetown University, West Washington, B.C. 

Gerassimus, N., Concord, N.H. 

Germantown Telegraph, Germantown, Phila., Pa. , 

Gibbons, Miss Phebe Earl, Philadephia, Pa. 

Gildehaus, Charles, St. Louis, Mo 

Gillett, Prof. A. L., Hartford, Conn 

Gilman, Alexander W., Brighton, England 

Gilmore, James R 

Gilmore, John A. 

Glasgow University Library, Glasgoio, Scotland 

Glidden, Hon. John M., Newcastle, Me 

Gloucester, 3/ass., City of . . . . . 

Glover, Mrs. William B., Fairfield, Conn 

Gloversville Free Library, Gloversville, N.Y. . 

Goddard, George A. . . . " 

Goddard, Miss Matilda 

Goeje, Prof. M. J. De, Leyden, Holland .... 

Goodenow, Bev. Smith B., Battle Creek, loioa . 

Goodwin, Daniel, Chicago, III 

Goodyear, Miss Anna F 

Goold, Nathan, Portland, Me 

Gordan, Eneas B. 

Gould, Miss Elizabeth Porter 

Gould, Miss Ida W 

Grace, W. J 

Grafton & Coos Bar Association, Littleton, N.H. 

Grand Commandery of Knighte Templar of Massachu- 
setts and Rhode Island 

Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 
Massachusetts 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Board of Education 

Grand Rapids Public Library, Grand Bapids, Mich. 

Grand Rapids Public School Library, Grand Bapids, Mich. 

Graupner, Miss Harriet H. Memorial, 1,056 photographs 

Gray, Samuel 

Great Britain. India Office, London, England . 

Patent OflBce, London, England .... 

Green, Dr. Samuel A 2 plates 

Greene, Dr. Edward M 

Greene, Francis Vinton, New York City .... 

Greene, J acoh L., Hartford, Conn 

Greene, Dr. Reuben 

Greenlaw, Miss Lucy H., Cambridge, Mass. 

Goodale, J. L., A.M., M.D 

Grolier, Club, Neiv York City 

Groton Public Library, Groton, Mass 

Guastavino, R., Neto York City 

Guild & Lord 

Gunning, Mrs 

Gunsaulus, Bev. F. W., D.D., Chicago, III. 

Hale, Albert _ 

Hale, Hon. George S 

Hale. BeK. William Bayard, M.A., Middleboro\ Mass. 

Haliburton. R. G 

Halifax Herald. Publishers, Halifax, N. S. . . . 

Hall, Prof. Asaph, Jr., Ph.D., New Haven, Conn. . 



13: 



ClTV DOC'UMKNT No. 18. 



Hall, J. X., if.D., Binvcr, Col 

Hall, Joseph, Fhiladelpliia, Pa 

Halsey, Edmund D., liockaway, N.J. . . . . 

Ilaniiitou (.'olleg-e, C//H«on, JV. r. 

Ilaudelskaminer, Leipziij, Germany 

Hanson, F. A., 3/.D., East Eddington, Me. 

Harlem Library, Neto York City 

Harrison, W. B., Nen^ York City 

Harrop, H. B., and Louis AVallis, Columhus, Ohio . 
Hartford Hospital and Old People's Home, Hartford, 

Conn. .......••• 

Hartford Public Library, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Tlieolog;ical Seminary, Hartford, Conn. 
Harvard Medical Alumni Association . . . . 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass 

Astronomical Observatory 

Bussey Institution 

Library 

Medical School 

Museum of Comparative Zoology . . . . 

Hassam, John T. 

Hastings, H. L 

Hatten, Thomas W 

Hawley Furnace Company 

Hawaiian Legation, Washington. D.C 

Hazard, Rowland, Peace Bale, B.I. 

Hennequin, Prof. Alfred, Ph.D 

Hentchak, Publishers of, ion^/on, -Eiifif/ajif? 

Hering, Oswald C 

Herschel, Clemens, Netu York City 

Hersey, Prof. Edmund 

Hertz, Wilhelm, Berlin, Germany 

Hey wood, Rev. John H., Louisville, Ky 

Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentworth, Cambridge, Mass. . 

Hill, Mrs. F. xilden, Camden, N.J. 

Hill, Henry Wayland, Jij#o7ci, A". F. 

Hill, Br. William Preston, St. Louis, Mo 

Himes, Bev. William L., Concord, N.H. . . . . 

Hindle, Henry . . . 

Hingham, Mass , School Committee 

Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati, 

Ohio 

Hitz, John, Washington, B.C. 

Hoar, Hon. George F , Worcester, Mass 

Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y. 

Hoboken, N.J., Free Public -Library . . . . 

Hockley, Mrs. James 

Hodge," Frederick W., Washington, B.C 

Hodges, Mrs. R. M 

Hoepli, Ulrico, Milan, Italy 

Hoif, Major John Van Rensselaer, Governor''s Island, 

N.Y 

Holland, C. L 

Holland, M 

Hollister, A G., and C. Green, Mt. Lebanon, N.Y. . 
Holstein-Friesian Association of America, Brattleboro\ 

Vt 

Holy Cross College, Worcester, Ma.^s 

Home for Aged Couples 

Home for Aged Men . • 

Home for Aged Women 

Home for the Friendless, Neio Haven, Conn. 



Vols 

7 



1 
3 
2 

3 

5 
1 
7 
6 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
2 
3 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
976 
1 
1 
1 

♦ 1 

1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
142 
1 

2 
1 



Library Department. 



133 



Homes for Inebriates Association, London, England 
Honore, Charles, Muntevideo, Urwjumj .... 
Hooker, Commander Edward, U.S.N., Brookh/n, N.Y. . 

Hope, George H., Providence, R.I 

Hos^ins, Rev. 'Robert. Ph.D., Newton, Mass. 
Houghton, Hon. Albert C, North Adams, Mass. 

Houghton, Mifflin »& Company 

Household, The 

Howard, Frank G 

Howard Association, London, England .... 
Howard Memorial Library, Neio Orleans, La. . 
Howland, A. M., Shalam, Dona Ana, Neio Mexico . 

Howsou it Howson, New York City 

Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Mass. 
Humphreys, Henry C, Fort tiheridan. 111. 

Humphreys, Richard C 

Hunt, Edward B 

Huntington, Archer M., Neio York City .... 
Huntington, Rev. Wm, R., D.D., New York City 
Hutcheson, David, Wusldngton, D.C- 
Hutchins, Rev. Charles L., Concord^ Mass. 

Hutchins, W. F 

Hutchinson, Charles C, Lowell, Mass. .... 
Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, Moscow, Idaho . 

Illinois. Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Imperial University of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, 

Russia 

Imperial University, Tokyo, Japan 

Indipendente, L', Publishers of, New York City 

India Botanical Survey, Calcutta, India .... 

Indian Rights Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Industrial Record Company 

Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed Children . 

Industrial World, Chicago, III 

Ingalls, Capt. JamesM., Fort Munroe, Va. 

Institute of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England 
Instituto Geografico Argentino, Buenos Aires . 

Insurance Library Association 

International Association of Fire Engineers, Wyoming, 

Ohio 

International Journal of Surgery, Nexo York City . 
International Young Men's Christian Association, 

Springfield, Mass 

Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station, Ames, Iowa. 

Iowa Geological Survey, Des Moines, Iowa 

Iowa Historical Department, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Iowa State Historical Society, Iowa City, lovm. 

Italy, His Majesty Humbert, King of . • . 13 maps 

Italy. Ministero dell' Interno, Direzione Generale dell' 

Amministrazione Civile, Rome, Italy .... 
Direzione della Sanita Pubblica, Rome, 

Italy 



Ministero della Pubblica Istruzione, Rome, Italy . 

Ministero di Agricoltura, Industria e Commercio, 

Rome, Italy 

J. W. Bannon Company, New York City .... 

Jackson Hustler, Jackson, Ky 

Jackson, Miss Marion C. .1 map and o8 drawings 

Jacobs, Walter 

James, Pro/. Edmund J., P/i.Z)., CAicaj/o, J^;. . 

James, Joseph F., M.D.,M. Sc, F.G.i'.A., Hingham, Mass. 



Vols. 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
4 

19 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
6 
6 

1 

2 



134 



City Document No. 18. 



Jameson, Prof. J. Fraiikliu, Providence, R.I- . 
Japan. Dopartmeut of Education, Tokyo, Japan . 

Jotiric's, Dr. B. Joy 9 maps 

Jersey City Free PuMic Ijibrary, Jersey City, N.J. . 

Jewish 'rnviniiii;- Sclidol. C/ticar/o, 111 

Jolin F. Slater Fund, Trustees of, Washington, B.C. 

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md 

Johns Hopkins University. Baltimore, Md. 

Johnson, Edward F., Wohurn, Mass 

Johnson, F. P., Waltham, Mass. 

Johnson, F. W., 3/.D 

Johnson, William B 

Jones, Augustine, A.M., LL.B., Providence, R.I. 
•Joseph, Rev. Mother, Baltimore, Md. .... 

Journal IS^ewspaper Company 

Judson, Br. A. B., New York City 

Julieu, Rev. Matthew C, B.B., New Bedford, Mass. 
Kaiserlich-Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna, 

Austria 

Kaiserlich-Konigliche Hofbibliothek, Vienna, Austria . 
Kaiserliches Patentamt, Berlin, Germany 
Kansas. Adjutant General, Topeka, Kansas . 

■ Board of Railroad Commissioners, Topeka, Kansas, 

State Board of Agriculture, Topeka, Kansas. 

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, 

Kansas 

Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Mo 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. 

Keidel, George C, Baltimore Md 

Keller, W. B., Nero York City 

Kent, Miss M. R., Chicago, III 

Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington, 

Ky 

King, Rev. Henry M., Providence, R.I. .... 

Kingsbury, Isaac F., JVeiof on, Ifass 

Kirkpatrick, C. A., jEvereW, Jfa.s.s 

Kite, Miss Rebecca 

Klonower, Oscar, Philadelphia, Pa 

Knapp, Arthur Mason 

Knapp, George B 

Knapp, William D., Somersworth, N.H. .... 

Knight, George Henry, Lynn, Mass 

Knowles Steam Pump Works, New York City . 
Koenigliche bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 

Munich, Germany . . . . , 
Kokumin-No-Tomo, Publishers of, Tokyo, Japan . 
Kongliga Universitetet, Upsala, Sioeden .... 

Lacroix, Henry 

Ladd, Miss Mary H 

Lakewood Times and Journal, Lakeuwod, N.J. 

Lancaster, Mass., Town Library 

Lane, E. B., 3LB. . . " 

Lane, .Jonathan A 

Lanman, Prof. Charles R., Camhridge, Mass. . 

Latch, Edward B., Philadephia, Pa. 

Law, James D , Camden, N.J. 

Lawrence, Samuel C 

Lawrence, Mass., City of 

Lawrence General Hospital, Lawrence, Mass. . 
Lawrence Free Public Library, Lawrence, Mass. 
Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N.J. 
Leader, John Temple, Florence, Italy .... 



Vols. 
1 
1 
435 
2 
1 
1 
2 
22 
1 
1 
1 
2 



10 



12 
5,599 



LroiiARY Department. 



135 



Leavitt, T. K., Lincoln, Xeb 

Lee. Francis Watts 

Lee, G. Herbert 

Lee, J. M., Neu^ York- City 

Leeds Free Public Library, Leeds, England 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Palo Alto, Cat. 

Leiand University, Neio Orleans, La. 

Lemos, F. I., Hay ward. Gal 

Leslie, A. von W., A.M., Baltimore, Md 

Leslie, Edmund N., iSfcaneaie?e.s, iV-y. . . . . 

IjQVfi^, Rev. A.l^., Montpelier,Vt 

Lexington, Mass., Tovrn of 

Lexington Historical Society, Lexington, Mass. 

Leyton Urban District Council Public Library, Leyton, Eng 

Library Bureau 

Library Company of Philadelphia, PMladelpJiia, Pa. 

Library of Congress, TFas/*m5rio?i. jD.C 

Lick Observatory, Sacramento, Cal 

Lincoln, England, Public Library 

Lincoln House 

Lindsay, Eev. John S. ....... 

Liverpool, England, Public Libraries, Museums and Art 
Gallery 

Lockwood, Mrs. Bessie S., Estate of .... 

London Library Bureau, London, England 

London School of Economics and Political Science, Lon- 
don, England 

Long Island Bible Society, Lslip, L.I. .... 

Longley, Alcander, St. Louis, Mo. ..... 

Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Loubat, Due de, yeui York City 

Loud, John J., Weymouth, Mass 

Louisville ISTational Medical College, Louisville, Ky. 

Lowell, Mass., City Library 

Ludwig Salvator, Archduke of Austria and Tuscany, 
Prague, Bohemia 

Lull, JSTewton, Chicago, III. 

Lyman, Mrs. Theodore, Brookline, Mass. 

Lynn Free Public Library, Lynn, Mass 

M., S. L 

MacCauley, Clay, A.M., Tokyo, Japan .... 

McClurg, A. C. & Co., Chicago, III 

McCormick, Cyrus H., Chicago, III 

McCormick Theological Seminary, Chicago. III. 

McCollom, John H., Jl/.D 

MacDougall, J. M.,Tras/(m5rion, D.C . . . . 

McElroy, Bev. Irving, MA., Waterloo, loioa . 

McGill University, Montreal, Canada .... 

McGufCey, Miss M. D 

McGuinness, Hon. Edwin D., Providence, B.I. 

McKay, Xathaniel, Washington, D.C 

Macknight, S. J 

Macmillan Company, New York City .... 

Macomber, Frank Gai-r 

McPherson, William D., South Framingham, Mass. . 

Macurdy, Miss T. E 

Madras Literary Society, Madras, India .... 

Maine Agricultural Department, Augusta. Me. 

Maine Educational Department, Augusta, Me. 

Maine General Conference of Congregational Churches, 
Gray, Me 

Maine Historical Society, Portland, Me 



Vols. 

1 

12 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
7 
3 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

1 
1,643 

8,678 

. 1 

1 



136 



(iTV l)o( 'u:\rENT No. 18. 



Maine Industrial School for (iirls, llalloivll, Me. 

Maiden, J/rts.s, City of 

Maiden Public Library, Mahhn, Mass 

Maneliester (Jeologieal Society, ManclicHtcr, England 
Manchester, Emjlaml, Public Free Libraries 
Manchester, N.I I., Board of Water Commissioners . 
Manchester, N.IL, City Library .... 

Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, Winnipeg 

Manitoha 

Mann, Eec. Charles H., Orange, N.J. ... 

Marblehead, Mass., School Committee 

Marlboro' Times, Marlboro\ Mass 

Marlboro', Mass., Library Committee 

Marquis & Co., A. N., Chicago, III 

Marsh, Pi'of. A. R., Harvard College, Cainbrldfjeg Mass. 
Maryland, Agricultural Experiment Station, College 

Park, Md 

Massachusetts. Adjutant General .... 

Board of Commissioners of Savings Banks . 

■ Board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners 

Civil Service Commission .... 

Commissioner of Public Records . 

Free Public Library Commission . 

Nautical Training School .... 

Railroad Commission 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 

State Agricultural Experiment Station, Amherst 

State Board of Agriculture .... 

State Board of Arbitration and Conciliation . 

State Board of Health 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity 

State Library 

State Normal School 

Trustees of Public Reservations 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 

Hatch Experiment Station .... 

Meteorological Obsei-vatory .... 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy .... 
Massachusetts General Hospital .... 

Massachusetts Grand Lodge of A. F. & A. Masons . 
Massachusetts Grand R. A. Chapter .... 
Massachusetts Historical Society. Portrait and engraving 
Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . . . . 
Massachusetts Infant Asylum . . . , . 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Massachusetts Medical Society 

Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society .... 
Massachusetts New Church Union .... 

Massachusetts Reform Club 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 

Animals .... .... 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruehy to 

Children . . 

Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revo 

lulion 

Massachusetts Universalist Convention 
Mast, Crowell & Kirkpairick, Springfield, Ohio 
Master Car Builders' Association, Chicago, III. 
Mathews, .Joseph M., M.IJ., Louisville, Ky. 



Library Department. 



137 



Matthews, Prof. Brander, New York City 
May, Henry A. . . ■■ . 
May, Rev. Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mayo, Rev. A. D., Washington., B.C. . 

Means, James 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco, Cal. . 

Medford. J/ass., City of .... 

Medford High School, Medford, Mass. 

Medford Public Library, Sledford, M"ss. . 

Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, Baltimore, 

Md 

Medical Publishing Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Medical Record, New York City .... 

Medical Society of the State of New York, New York 

City 

Medici, Charles de, Nei'j York City 
Mekeel, C. H., Stamp and Publishing Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Melbourne University, Melbourne, Australia 
Melville, Henry, A.M., LL.B., New York City . 
Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mercantile Library of New York, New York City 
Merriman, Rev. Daniel, D.D., Worcester, Mass. 

Merriam, F. W., Iquique, Chile 

Metcalf, Alfred 

Metropolitan Throat Hospital, New York City . 
Mexican Central Railway Company .... 
Mexican Publishing Co., CV7.?/ of 3/^.Tico 
Mexico. Direccion General de Estadistica de la Republic 

Mexicajua, City of Mexico 

Observatorio Meteorologico Central, Mexico . 

Michigan. Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, 

Lansinr/, Mich 

Michigan Central Railroad Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Michigan Mining School, Houghton, Mich. 

Michigan State Library, Lansing, Mich. . 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Ohio Commaudei 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Miller, Dewitt 

Miller, Frederick A., Newton, Mass 

Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Minet, Adolphe, Paris, France 

Minneapolis, Minn., Board of Park Commissioners. 
Minneapolis Public Library, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Anthony 

Park, Minn 

Minnesota Chief Fire Warden, St. Paul, Minn. 
Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbia 

Mo 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo. 
Missouri Geological Survey, Jefferson City, Mo. 

Missouri "World, Chillicothe, Mo 

Mitchell, Edward C, D.D., Nevj Orleans, La. . 

Mixter, Br. and Mrs. S. J 

Mogyorossy, Arcade, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Monks, G. H., M.I) 

Monroe, Prof. W. S., Westfield, Mass. 

Montana Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industr 

Helena, Mont 

Montt, Pedro, Santiago, Chile 

Moore, Prof. Clarence B.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moore, Prof. John 



1 map 



Vols. 

91 

8 



1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
4 

1 

1 

2 

20 

1 

1 

114 

.5 

1 
1 



188 



ClTV I)(>CU>[ENT No. 18. 



maps 



City 



Morning News, Wilniinyton, Del. . ■ . 

Morse, Asa Porter, ('(unbri'liiejiort, Mass. . 

Morse, Prof. Edward .S.. Sdlcin, Mass. 

Morse Institute Library, Natlck, Mass. 

Morton, Major. E. P., Webster, ^fass. 

Mosnian, Nathan, Aubiirndale, Mass. 

Mott, Lewis F., Neto York Oily 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Trustees of, Cambridge, Ma 

Mt. Bowdoin Library Association 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Munson, Myron A., Neio Haven, Conn. 

Murdoch, John 

Murguiondo, Prudencio de, Washington, B.C. 
Murray, David, LL.D., F.S.A., Glasgmv, Scotland 
Murray, Prof. Stuart, Melbourne, Australia 

Murray, William 

Museo Biblioteca de Filipinas, Manila, P.I. 
Museo de La Plata, Buenos Aires ... 2 
Museo Nacional de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires 
Museo y Biblioteca Pedagogicos, Montevideo, Uruguay 
Nacion, La, Publishers of, Buenos Aires . 
Nashville Banner Co., Nashville, Term. 
Nassau Smelting and Refining Works, Nexv York 
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, B.C. 
National Art Library, London, England 
National Board of Trade, Philadelphia, Pa. 
National Council of Women, Philadelphia, Pa. 
National Democratic Committee, Neio York City 
National Life Insurance Company, Montpelier, Vt. 
National Plant Company, Bayton. Ohio . 
National Provisioner, New York City 
National Science Club, Washington, B.C. 
National University, Athens, Greece . 

Nationalist Club 

Natural History Society, St. John, N.B. . 
Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln 
Nebraska Historical Society, Lincoln, Neb. 
Nebraska Independent, Publishers of, Lincoln, Net 
Nebraska Society of the Sons of the American Eevolu 

tion, Omaha, Neb 

New Bedford, Mass., Free Public Library 

New Britain Institute, Neiv Britain, Conn. 

New Church Messenger, Orange, N.J. 

New Church Temperance Society, London, Englan 

New England Anti Vivisection Society 

New England Cotton Manufactures Association 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 

New England Hospital for Women and Children 

New England League of Theosophical Workers 

New England Sabbath Protective League . 

New England Society of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, N. Y 

New England Society of Orange, Orange, N.J. . 

New England Staaten Zeitung .... 

New England Water Works Assn., New London, Cc 

New Hampshire. Secretary of State, Concord, N. 

New Hampshire Bible Society, Concord, N.H. 

New Hampshire Medical Society, Concord, N.H 

New Hampshire State Library, Concord, N.H. 

New Haven, Conn., Free Public Library . 

New Jersey. Adjutant General, Trenton, N.J. 

New Jersey. Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries 

Trenton, N.J 



Nel 



893 



LiBEAEY Department. 



139 



New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, Nev; Bruns- 
wick, N.J. 

New Jersey Geological Survey, Trenton, N.J. . 

New Jersey State Librai*y, Trenton, N.J. . 

New York. City. Board of Aldermen . . . . 

Board of Education 

Department of Street Cleaning . 

State. Chamber of Commerce . . . . 

Civil Service Commission, Albany, N.Y. 

Entomologist, A Ibany, N. Y. 



— Forest Commission, Albany, N.Y. 



New York Academy of Sciences, Neiv York City 

New York Agricultural Experiment Station. Geneva, 
N.Y. . 

New York Baptist Union, for Ministerial Education, 
Rochester. N.Y. 

New York Central and Hudson Eiver Railroad, New York 
City 

New York Colored Home and Hospital, Neiv York City . 

New York Free Circulating Library, New York City 

New York Historical Society, Neiv York City . 

New York Microscopical Society, New York C'ty . 

New York Shakespeare Society, New York City 

New York Society Library, New York City 

New York University, New York City .... 

New York Yacht Club, Neic York City .... 

Newark Free Public Library, Newark, N.J. 

Newfoundland Colonial Secretary, St. John^s, Newfound- 
land 

Newton, Mas!>., City of 

Newton, Mass. City Engineer 

Newton Free Library, Newton, Mass. .... 

Nicholson, James B., Philadelphia, Pa 

Nicholson, Stephen W., ^. J/ 

Norcross, G. H 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis 

Norcross, O. and G. H 

Ncirrenberg, Dr. Constantin, Kiel, Germany 

North, S. N. D 

North Adams Public Library, North Adams, 2[ass. . 

North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh, 
N.C. . . ' 

North End Mission 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, Northampton, Mass. 

Northampton Public Library, Northampton, Mass. . 

Northwest Weather and Crops Co., Minneapolis, Minn. . 

Northwestern University, Evanston, III 

Norwell, Mass., Town of 

Norwich Free Academy, Norwich, Conn 

Nottingham, England. University College, Free Public 
Libraries and Natural History Museum Committees . 

Nottingham Free Public Library, Nottingham, England . 

Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Halifax, N.S. 

Noyes, Isaac P., Washington, D.C 

Nugent & Co., Dublin, Ireland 

Oasis Publishing Co. Nogales, Ariz. . . ■ . 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio 

Obsei-vatorio Nacional Argentino, Cordoba, S.A. 

Occident, Publishers of, Chicago, III. 

O'Farrell, Charles 

O'Gorman, Joseph 

Ohio. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Columbus, Ohio . 



1 

1 

4S 

209 

144 

2 

2 

2 

2 
1 
2 



no 



(rrv DociMKNT No. is. 



Oliio. Di'partinont of Aiirii-iiltnii', ('oluiiihus, Ohio . 

Ohio Aiiriciiltinal Kx])i'iiim'nT Statiou, Wooster, OJiio 

Ohio Stiito Aroha'ologioal ami Historical Society, ('olu)ii- 
?)«>, O/iio 

Ohio State Bar Association, Coliimbii.s, Ohio 

Ohio State Library, Columbus, Ohio 

01(1 Soiitli Society 

01(1 South Work, Directors of 

Olivet College, Kalamazoo, Mich 

Omaha, Neb. Public Library 

Ontario. Department of Agriculture, Toronto, Out. 

Department of Education, Toronto, Ont. 

Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ont. 

Oppenheim, Samuel, Nero York Citu . . . . 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, ('orvalli.'^, Ore. 

Orphan's Bouquet 

Orr, William, Jr., Springfield. Mass 

Osterhout Free Library, Wilkesharre, Pa. 

Otis, Edward O., M.D 

Overman Wheel Co 

Owens College, Manchester, England . . . . 

Pacific Northwest, Publishers of, Portland, Oregon . 

Page, Cyrus A 

Page, Miss E. G., South Hanson, Mass 

Page, Lucius R 

Page, Walter Gilman 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester, Mass 

Paine, Ptobert Treat 

Paint and Clay Club 

Panksztis, Joseph, Plymouth, Penn 

Parsons, Prof. James, A.M. Philadelphia , Pa. . 

Paterson, A". J. Free Public Library 

Paton. Allan Park, Greenock, Scotland . . . . 

Paul, Fulton, Hudson, N. Y. 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Cam- 
bridge, Mass 

Peckham, Prof. George W. and Elizabeth G., Milwaukee, 
Wis 

Pennsylvania. Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, 
Pa. . . . . . 

Department of Internal Affairs, Harrisburg, 

Pa 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadf^lphia, 
Pa 

Pennsylvania Committee on Lunacy, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Pennsylvania Prison Society, Philadelplda, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, Philadel- 
plda, Pa 

Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg, Pa. . 

Pennsylvania State Penitentiary, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

People's Institute in Roxbury 

Peoria Public Librai-y, Peoria, III 

Perkins, Charles C 

Pernin Shorthand and Typewriting School 

Perry, Prof., Arthur Latham, WilUamstoion, Mass . 

Perry, Thomas Sergeant , . . . . 

Perry, Bt. Ber. William Stevens, Davenport, Iowa . 

Perry, Mason & Co 

Petersen, Prof. C. G. J., Copenhagen, Denmark 

Peterson, Ellis . . . . . 

Phelps, Miss Fannie L. 



Vols. 
1 



Library Department. 



141 



Philadelpliia Almshouse aud Hospital, PJuladelphia, Pa., 

Philadelphia Art Club, Philadelphia, Pa 

Philadelphia and Boston Face Brick Company . 

Philadelphia, Board of Directors of. City Trusts, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 

Philadelphia City Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Philadelphia Museums, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia Record, Philadelphia, Pa 

Phillips, E. B 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H. . 

Philosophical Society, Glasgo^v, Scotland .... 

Philosophical Society, ]f7/.s/H';if/io)!, i>.C' 

Physio-Medical College of Indiana, Lidianapolis, Ind 

Picard, Alphonse, et Fils, Paris, France .... 

Pierce & Pierce, Minne((polis, Minn 

Pierce, Clarence E., Paiotucket,B.I. 

Pierce, Edward Lillie, Milton, 3Iass 

Pierce, S. S., & Co 

Pilgrim Society of Plymouth, Plymoutli, Mass. . 

Pinksohn, Moses 

Pioneer Law-Makers' Association of Iowa, Des Moines, . 

Pett & Scott, London, England 

Piatt, Franklin, Philadelphia, Pa 

Plumb, Eev. Albert B., D.D. 

Plymouth, Eng., Free Public Library and IS^ews-Rooms . 

Poland, W. C, Pro?)/(7e)K-e, E, 7. 

Poland Springs Art Gallery, South Poland, Me. 

Polley, George H., & Co 

Polytechnic Society of Kentucky, Louisville, Ky. 

Pond, F. F 

Poole, Miss Louella C. and Andrea Jonsson 

Pope, Ralph W., Nevj York City 

Portland Evening Express Pub. Co., Portland, Me. . 

Portland Public Library, Portland, Me 

Poughkeepsie City Library, Poughkeepsie, N.T. 

Powell, Aaron M., Netu York City 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Prescott, George "W. & Son, Quincy, Mass. 

Trune, Prof. Tem-ple, Hunti7igton, JSf.Y. . . . . 

Prince, C. Leeson, F. P. A. S., F. E. Met. S., Sussex, Eng- 
land 

Progress, Publishers of, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Long 
Island, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Vermont, 
Burlington, Vt 

Providence, i?. 7. City Auditor 

City Messenger 

Health Department 



B.L 



Providence Athenseum, Providence, E.I. . 
Providence Athletic Association, Providence 
Providence Public Library, Providence, E.I. . 
Public Ledger CoinY>?^>ny, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pviblishers' Weekly, Nev} Yo7-k City 

Pulsifer, "William H., Newton Centre. Mass. 

Purdue University Agricultural Experiment Station, La 

fayette, Indiana 

Putnam, Herbert 

Putnam's Sons, G. P 

Puzantion, Publishers of, Constantinople, Turkey. . 
Queensland Patent Office, Brisbane, Australia . 
Quincy, Hon. Josiah 



Vols. Nos. 



14: 



City Docu:ment No. 18. 



Cjuiiu-y, III., rublio Library .... 

Quincy, Maxs., City Hospital .... 

Quincy, Mass., Public Library .... 

Quiucy Historical Society, Quinci/, 3/(^s.<t. . 

Kantoul, Robert S., S((l('in, Muss. 

Eeal Aoademia de Buenas Letras, Barcelona Spain. 

Reale Istituto di Studi Superiori Pratici e di Perfeziona 

lUfiito, Flon-iirt', Italy 

lloale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere, Milan 

Itah/ 

lieolus, Prof. Elis^e, Paris, France 
Hedwood Library and Athenaeum, Newport, ILL 
Pvogister Publishing Company, Neio Haven, Conn. 
Kennert, Dr. Hugo A., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Keprt'sentative, Publishers of, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Itopublican National Convention, Neio York City 
Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Conn. 

Reynolds, Miss 

Reynolds Library, J?oc7i(>.s«e»-,iV.F. 

Rhode Island. Adjutant General, Providence, R.I. 

Board of Education, Providence, R. I. . 

Board of State Charities and Correction, Provi 

dence, R.I. 

State Board of Health, Providence, R.I. 

Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station, Kiwj 

R.I. 



Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, R.I. 
Richards, Lysander S., MarshAeld Hills, Mass. . 
Richmond Free Public Library, Surrey, England 
Ridout, John G., Toronto, Canada 

Ring, Thomas F 

Riotor, Leon, Paris, France .... 

Ripley, W. S.,Jr 

Roberts Brothers 

Robins, Rev. Henry E., D.D., LL.D. Rochester, X.J 
Roca, Dr. Antonio Perez, Lima, Peru 
Rochester Academy of Science, Rochester, N. T. 
Rochester Theological Seminary, Rochester, N.Y. 
Rogers, Edward H., Chelsea, Mass. . 

Rogers, .lohn S 

Rolfe, Prof. W. .J., Cambridge, Mass. . 
Rosenweig & Co., Nei'j York City 

Ross, J. H 

Rowell, B. W 

Roxbury Charitable Society .... 
Royal Astronomical Society, London, England . 
Royal Historical Society, London, England 
Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, Capetovm, 

Africa. 

Royal Observatory, London, England . 

Royal Scottish Society of Arts, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canada . 

Royal Society of Edinbui-gh, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Ruggles, Miss Marguerite 

Russell, Gurdon "W., M.D., Hartford, Conn. 

Russell. Thomas 

Ryder, Frank 

Rydingsvard, Mme. Anna M. von 

Sadler, Ralph, London, England 

St. George's Public Library, London, England . 

St. .Johnsbury Athenaeum, St. Johnabury, Vt. . 



itou 



South 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1.31 

o 

6 
1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
1 
9 
2 
411 



Library Departmext. 



143 



Publ 



C((l 



Md. 



St, Joseph Free Public Library, St. Joseph, Mo. 

St. Laurent, Charles F., Montreal, Canada 

St. Leonard, Parish of. Public Libraries acd Museum 

London, England 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Ass'n, kt. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis Public Library, at. Louis, Mo. . 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. . 

St. Martin-in-the-Fields, and St. Paul, Parishes of. 

Libraries and Museums, London, England 
St. Paul Public Library, St. Paul, Minn. . 

Salem Daily Gazette, Salem, Mass 

Salem Public Library, Salein, Mass. . 

Salisbury, Prof. RollinD., Chicago, III. 

Sanford, Miss Laura G., Erie, Pa. 

San Francisco Free Public Library, San Francisco 

Sanders, X. S. H. 

Sanger, Prof. Charles R., A.M., Ph.D., St. Louis, Mo 
Saturday Evening Gazette . 
Saturday Press, Oakland, Cal. 
Saturday Spectator, Minneapolis, 3[inn. 
Saunders, Miss Marshall . . . . 
Scaife, Walter B., Ph.D., Allegheny, Pa. 
Scandinavian Social Democratic Club 
Scandinavian Society Club of Boston 
Schaeffer, Dr. Edward Morton, Baltimore 
Schenck, Capt. A. D., Fort Adams, E. L . 
Scorgie, J. C, Mt. Auburn, Mass, 

Scott, Miss Christine 

Scranton Public Library, Scranton, Pa. . 

Scudder, Mrs. H. L 

Scudder, John M. & Sons, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Seattle Public Library, Seattle, Washington 
Sebley, Prof. F. J., Cambridge, England . 
Securities Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sedalia Public Schools, Sedalia, Mo. 
Sellers, E. J., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sentinel Printing Company, Fitchburg, Mass. . 
Shambaugh. Benjamin F., A.M. Ph.D. lorva City 
Shaplei£:h. Bertram Lincoln .... 

Shattuck, Dr. F. C 

Shaw, Samuel S. . . . . . . . 

Shawmut Universalist Church . . . 
Sherwood, George F. Tudor, London, England . 

Shimmin, Mrs. C. F 

Shippen, Edward, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Shoe and Leather Reporter .... 

Siebert, Wilbur H. . • . . . . 
Simonds, William E., Hartford, Conn. 
Sinks, Rev. Perry Wayland, Painesville, Ohio . 
Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N. J. . 
Slafter, Rex. Carlos, Dedham, Mass. . 
Slattery, Rev. J. R., Baltimore, Md. . 

Slavin, Miss Susan A 

Slocum, Miss. A. D 

Small, A. D 

Small, Herbert 

Smith, Capt. J. R. LS.C, Lahore, India . 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 

Smyth. .J. Thomas 

Snow, Walter B . 

Snow Steam Pump Works, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Sociedadde Geografia yEstadistica de la Republica Mex- 

icana, Mexico 



loiba 



Vols. 
2 
4 

1 
2 
1 
1 



132 
12 
1 
2 
1 
1.5 
12 



144 



CiTV Document No. 18. 



Socii'diul Gouunitioa do Lima, Lima, Pent 

yoc-iodad Xariomil dr Mincria, Santiago, Chile. 

Society for the I'roinotion of Agricultural Science, La 
Fayette, Ind 

Society for the Study of Inebriety, London, En<iland 

Society of Arts, London, England 

Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York, Nt w 
York City 

Society of the Inner Temple, London, EngUmd 

Society of St. Vincent de Paul, New York City 

Society of Sons of the American Revolution, District of 
Columbia, Washington, I). C 

Society of Sons of the Eevolution of the State of Iowa, 
Davenport, Iowa 

Society of Sous of the Revolution of the State of Mis- 
souri, Bethany, Mo 

Society to Encourage Studies at Home .... 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of, Chelsea, 



Mass. 



Somerville Public Library, Somerville, Mass. . 

Sound Currency Committee, Neto York City 

Sovith Australian Chamber of Manufactures, Adelaide, 

South Australia 

South Shields, England, Public Library and Museum 
Southbridge Public Library, Southhridge, Mass. 

Spanhoofd Company 

Spatula Publishing Company 

Spiers, R. Phene, F.S.A , London, England 

Spivak, C. D., Philadelphia, Pa 

Spokesman Review Pub. Co., 5ipo/c«ne,Trf(s//. . 

Sprague, F. W., Cambridge, Mass 

Springfield City Library Association, Springfield, Mass. 



Stabile, G 



Stadtbibliotliek, Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany . 

Stadtbibliothek, Ziirich, Switzerland 

Standard Publishing Company 

State Mining Journal Publishing Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

Stechert, Gustav E., New York City 

Steiner, Charles 

Stephens, C. A., M.A., M.D., Norway Lake, Me. 

Sterne, Hon. Simon, Neio York City 

Stevens, Benjamin F., London, England .... 

Stock, Elliot, London, England 

Stokes, Anson Phelps, Neio York City .... 
Stone, Miss Ellen, Lexington, Mass. . . .1 medal 

Stone & Kimball, Neiv York City 

Storer, Horatio R., M.D., Newport, Fi.L .... 

Storer, Malcolm, M.D. 

Storey, Moorfield 

Storrs Agricultural Experiment station, Middletoiun, Conn. 

Stowe, Charles E 

Stratton, Charles E 

Strout, .James C, ^Vashington, D.C 

Stuckenberg, Rev. J. H. W., North Cambridge, Mass. 

Sturgis, Frederick, Neio York City 

Suffolk County Probate Court and Court of Insolvency . 

Sumner, Miss 

Sunday Times, Publishers of, Minneapolis, Minn. . 
Superior Leader, Publishers of, Sriperior, Wis. 

Supple. Bernard F. 

Sutro, Hon. Adolph, San Francisco, Cal. .... 
Sutro Library, San Francisco, Cal 



Vols. 
1 
2 



LiBEAEY Department. 



145 



Sveriges OfEeutliga Bibliotek, Stockholm, Sweden 

Swank. James M., Philadelphia, Pa 

Swett, Charles E 

Swift, Hon. George B., Chicago, III 

Swift, Lindsay . . . .75 drawings, 11 charts 

Switzerland, Bureau Federal des Assurances, Berne, Switz- 
erland 

Switzerland, Bureau Federal de Statistique, Berne, Simtz- 
erland 

Sydney, New South Wales, Public Library 

Syracuse Central Library, Syracuse, N.Y. 

Tskber, C. A. M., Wakefield, Mass 

Tanaka, I., Tokyo, Japan 

Tapper, Thomas, Jr 

Taunton Public Library, Taunton, ilass 

Taylor, Prof. .Joseph R 

Teamoh, Eobert T 

Technique, Board of Editors 

Teller, Hon. Henry M., Washington, B.C. . . . . 

Temporary Asylum for Discharged Female Prisoners, 
Bedham, Mass 

Tennessee University, Knoxville, Tenn 

Terzian, Dikran 

Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station, 
Texas 

Thacher, Sherman D., Nordh^ff, Cal 

Thayer, Prof. J. Henry, Cambridge, Mass. 

Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass 

Thirkield, Bev. Wilbur F., South. Atlanta, Ga. . 

Thirteenth Massachusetts Regiment 

Thompson, Bev. A. C, D.B 

Thompson, Leonard, Woburn, Mass 

Thompson, William R., Pittsburg, Pa 

Ticknor, George, Family of . . 341 engravings 

Tileston, Harvey, Pepperell, Mass. . . 1 engraving 

Tillinghast, William H., Cambridge, Mass. 

Tobey, Bev. Rufus B 

Tolman, C. P 

Tompkins, Eugene 

Toppan, Robert Noxon, Cambridge, Mass. 

Toronto Public Library, Toronto, Ontario .... 

Tracy, Edward A., M.D 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. 

Troshag, Publishers of, Vienna, Austria .... 

Tubbs, Hon. Charles, Tioga, Penn 

Tncl^er, 'Lewis & Sons. Albany, N.Y. . . . . 

Tucker, Willis G., M.n., Albany, N.Y. . . . . 

Tufts College, Somerville, Mass. 

Tufts Liihrar J, Wey7nouth, Mass. 

Tulane University, New Orleans, La. .... 

Turner, Mrs. L. A 

Tuttle, Albert 

Tuttle, Julius 

Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, Neio Haven, Conn. 

Tyler, Prof. ^l. C, Ithaca, N.Y 

Typothetaj of Xew York 

United States. Board of Indian Commissioners, Washing- 
ton, B.C 

Board on Geographic Xaraes 

Commission of Fish and Fisheries .... 

Court of Claims 

Department of Agriculture 



14(i 



City Document No. 18. 



United States. Department of Agriculture. Bureau of 

Animal Industry 

Division of Agricultural Soils 

Division of Agrostology 

Division of Botany 

Division of Chemistry . 

Division of Crop and "Weather Service 

Division of Entomology 

Division of Forestry 

Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy 

Division of Pomology . 

Division of Publications 

Division of Statistics . 

Division of Vegetable Pathology 

— Farmers' Bulletin . 

Library 

Office of Experiment Stations 

Office of Road Inquiry . 

Section of Foreign Markets . 

Weather Bureau . 

Department of Interior . 

Bureau of Edvication 

Census Office 

Geological Survey 

Patent Office .... 



Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Department of Xavy 
Bureau of Equipment . 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing 

Hydrographic Office 

Library and Naval War Records 



Department of State 

Bureau of American Republics 

Bureau of Rolls and Libi-ary 

Bureau of Statistics 

Fur Seal Arbitration 



Department of Treasury . 

Bureau of Navigation . 

Bureau of Statistics 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 

Life Saving Service 

Light-House Board 

Marine Hospital Sei'vice 

Department of War . 

Adjutant-General . 

Library .... 

Surgeon-General . 

War Records Office 



Director of the Mint 

Interstate Commerce Commission . 

Military Academy, West Point, N. Y. 

Naval Observatory .... 

Office of Public Printer . 

Post Office Department . 

Superintendent of Documents 

United States Standard Steamship Owners' 

and Underwriters' Ass'n, New York City 
Universalist General Convention 
Universite Laval, Montreal, Canada . 
University Club, New York City 
University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Department of Geology . 

Library 



364 



36 



maps 



maps 



351 charts 



Builders 



Vols. 
1 



Library Department. 



147 



N.T. 



de Publi 



Utah 



University of Chicago, Chicago, III. . 
University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. 
University of Micliigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. . 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 
University of Rochester, Rochester, JSf. Y. 
University of the State of New York, Albany, 

State Library 

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario . 
University of Vermont, Burlington,Vt. 
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 
University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wy. 
Updike, Daniel Berkeley .... 
Urbino, S. R., Estate of ... . 
Uruguay. Bureau d'Echanges Internationaux 

cations, Montevideo, Uruguay . 
Utah Agricultural Experiment Station, Logan 
Utica State Hospital, Utica, N.T. ... 
Utley, Samuel, Worcester, Mass. 
Van Nest, G. Willett, New York City 
Van Nostrand, J. J., Chicago, III. 
Vassar Brothers' Institute, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Vassar College, Po^tgr/^A;eeJ^s^e, iV.F. . 
Vermont. State Board of Agriculture, Burlington, Vt 
Vermont State Library, Montpelier,Vt. 

Viaux, F. H 

Victoria, Public Library, Museums and National 

Gallerj, Melbourne, N.S.W. . 
Victoria University Library, Toronto, Ontario 

Volckmar, F 

.Volk, Douglas, New York City . 
Volta, Buresin, Washington, B.C. . 

Wade, Joseph M. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia 
Walker, Albert H., Hartford, Conn. . 
Walker, Bev. George L., B.D., Hartford, Conn 
Walker, Horace Eaton, Claremont, N.H. . 
Wallace, 2£rs. Emma R., Chicago, III. 

Walsh, William A 

Walton, J. P., Muscatine, Iowa . 
Walton, Joseph, Moorestown, N.J. 

Ward, Miss Ellen M 

Ward, John, New York City 

Ware, William & Co 

Warner, John De Witt, Neio York City 
Wartenegg, Wilhelm von, Vie^ma, Austria, 
Washburn. Prof. F. L., Eugene, Oregon 
Washington Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 
Watchman Publishing Company 
Waterhouse, Prof. S., St. Louis Mo. 
Watertown, Mass., Free Public Library . 
Watson, Miss Helen, Plymouth, Mass. 
Wayland, Mass. Town of ... . 
Webster, Frank Blake, Company, Hyde Park, Mass 
Webster, Hollis, Cambridge, Mass. 
Wedrowiec, Publishers of, Meriden, Conn. 
Weeden, W. B., Providence, B.I. 
Weekly Gazette, Colorado Springs, Col. 
Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. . 



, Pa 



Art 



Vols. 
1 
1 

30 
1 
1 
2 
6 
2 
2 
7 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

30 



148 



City Document No. 18. 



maps 



Wells Momorial Institute . 
Wcmyss, K. J., West Superior, Wis. . 
"\V(>nl'iam, Mass., Town of . 
AVi'sU'vau University, Middletown, Conn. 
Wi'sselhoeft, Miss .... 
Wost End Street Railway Company . 
Westborough Insane Hospital, IFes^&oroMf//?, Mass. 
Westborough Public Library. Westborough, Mass. 
Western Keservo Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio 
Western Union Telegraph Company, New York City 
AVeston, Mass., Town of ... . 
Wheeler, Miss Blanche E., Concord, 3{ass. 
Wheeler, J os('])h, irtfs/nwj/ion, D.C. . 

Wheelwright, Andrew C 

AVheehvright, Edward .... 

Wheelwright, .John T. .... 

AVheildon, W. W., Estate of, Concord, Mass. 
White, Mrs. Caroline E., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Whitney, lion. Edward 'B.,Washin</to7x, B.C. 
Whitney, Prof. Henry M., Beloit, Wis. 
AVhitney, James L. . . ■ 
Whitney, .Josiah Dwight, Beloit, Wis. 
Wilkes-Barre Times, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Willey, George F., Berry Bepot, N.H. 

Williams, Alfred, & Co 

Williams, George H 

Williams, John G., Everett, Mass. 
Williams, Robert S., rt/co, iV.r. 
Williams College, WUIiiiinHtnvn, Mass. 
Williston Seminary, IJu^t/iinnjifon, Mass. . 
Wilmington Institute, Wiliniuyton, Bel. 
Wilson, W. P., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Winchester, Mass., Town of . . . 
Winchester Home Corporation for Aged Women 
Windsor, Thomas, Manchester, England 

Winn, Henry 

Winship, George P., Providence, B.I. 
Winslow, Bev. William C. . 
AVinsor, Justin, Cambridge, Mass. 

AVinthrop, Robert C 1 manuscript 

Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station, Madison, 

Wis 

AA^isconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis. 

AA'isconsin State Library, Madison, Wis. 

AA'ise, AV. Lord, London, England 

AVoburn Public Library, Woburn, Mass. 

AA^oman's Alliance of the Church of the Unity 

AA^oman's Education Association 

AA^oman's Medical College of the New York 

Neio York City 

Woman's A^oice, Publishers of , . 
AA^ood, Bev. AVill C, A.M. .... 
Wood, William & Co., A^eto York City 
AVoolmer-Williams Mfg. Company, London, England 

T bronze medal 
Worcester, Bev. William L., Philadelphia Pa. . 

Worcester, Mass. City of 

AA'orcester, Free Public Librai-y, Worcester, Mass. 
AA'orcester Polytechnic Institute, TForce^fer, Mass. 
Wright, Prof. J. H., Cambridge, Mass. 
Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station, Laramie 

Wyo 




Vols. 
6 
1 
1 



1 

8 
1 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 
123 
2 
28 



16 



Library Departivient. 



149 



Xavier, The, Students of St. Francis Xavier College, Pub- 
lishers of. New York City 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 

Class of 1869 

Library 

Observatory 

Yearly Meeting of Friends, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Young, Archibald, E'Unburgh, Scotland .... 

Y^oung, Bev. Edward jT, D D.,Waltham, 3{ass. 

Young Men's Christian Association, Neio York City 
Young Men's Christian Association of America, Spring- 
field, Ilass. 

Zenith Board, Buluth, Mimi 

Ziegler, Prof. Br. E., Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany 



y< 



=°--"-^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



"S 06314 639 1 



. 1 . -. -.- - 












ic^ 









■^m