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4 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1895 



BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 
1896. 



To His Honor Josiah (^i incv. 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
submit their Forty-fourth Annual Report, for the year end- 
ing January 31, 1896. 

The reports of the Trustees have usually given at length 
and in detail the required information as to the condition of 
this department ; but the recent report of the Librarian, 
hereto appended, is so full and complete, exhibiting so fully 
the condition of every department of the Library, and show- 
ing so comprehensively whatever pertains to its administra- 
tion, that any extended account by the Trustees at this time 
would be largely a repetition of what the Librarian has said ; 
and they beg leave to make his report a part of their own. 
They think, however, that a brief synopsis of some of hift 
important remarks and comments may not be improperly 
made for emphasis and the benefit of those who may not 
be able to give his report the careful examination it deserves. 

It will be remembered ^hat the removal from the old 
Library was completed in March last, so that the new Library 
was then opened to the public for the first time. During 
many weeks thereafter for obvious reasons much friction 
occurred in the administration of certain departments. 
Things were new and not sufficiently fitted and adjusted 
for successful work. Some delay in distribution occurred, 
and changes which only experience could suggest were 
required to meet the demands of the new conditions. The 
needed corrections, however, were soon made, so that before 
the summer closed all the details of our system were so im- 
proved as to work harmoniously and with reasonable success. 
We may expect that experience and the recommendations and 
suggestions of the Examining Committees from time to time 
will enable us to make further improvements, so that the 
public may enjoy the benefits of this great educational insti- 
tution as fully and freely as possible. 



2 City Docujniknt \o. 18. 

Tlio Lil)rai'i:in shows, as e\ icUiiice of the public appre- 
ciation of tho Library, tliat the miuiber of persons holding 
registration cards on 1st of January, 1895, was 29,971, on 
the Hist of January, 1896, ;U,842, an increase of 4,871. 

The circulation of books for home use and reference use 
in the old building during October, November, and December, 
1894, was 170,054; that for the same months in 1895 was 
190,780, an increase of 20,720. The general character 
of the books used justifies the belief that the reading was 
salutary and profitable. 

In the old Lil)rary the nunil)er of persons reading at one 
time could not exceed' 200. In the new Library it com- 
monly exceeds 700. At one time by actual count there were 
550 readers of books, and 178 of newspapers. 

It was stated by the trustees at the laying of the corner- 
stone of the present Library building that they proposed to 
make acconnnodations for 500 readers. Many thought we 
should never have that number, or not for a long time, but 
Bates Hall and other reading rooms which will accommodate 
a much larger number now^ "hardly suffice" to meet the re- 
quirements. 

The Periodical lloom and Children's Koom are both over- 
crowded. 

These facts show that the Public Library created for 
the advancement of knowledge among the people is accom- 
plishing its purpose. 

During the last year 30,611 volumes were added to 
our collection. Of these 15,582 were gifts from friends of 
the Library. Included in the latter were 5,108 volumes do- 
nated to the West End Branch, collected and purchased b}^ 
the Woman's Education Association from funds raised by 
private subscription, to be known as the " Lowell collection," 
in memory of the eminent and beloved clergyman who for 
more than half a century was pastor of the West Church. 

Among these gift books are 408 relating to Italian art 
and letters, formerly belonging to the late Mr. Charles C. 
Perkins, long known in Boston for his {esthetic culture, and 
presented by Mrs. Perkins ; 159 volumes of the Delphin and 
Variorum classics and 15 volumes of the Oratores Attici, the 
gift of Mrs. John Lowell; 39 volumes of the sacred writings 
of the Buddhists ; 8 volumes of the new and beautiful edition 



Library Department. 3 

of the works of St. Thomas Aquinas, the gift of his Holiness 
Pope Leo XIII. ; 52 volumes illustrating the history of tex- 
tile manufactures at Lowell, the gift of Mr. James L. Little. 

We may remark, as part of the year's work, that 
52,744 volumes were catalogued, and 92,993 cards placed 
in the card catalogue. 

9,898 books were bound in the Library in addition to 
7,198 bound outside, besides a vast amount of repairing 
done inside. 

$24,918.24 was expended in the purchase of books 
from the city appropriation in 1895, of which $10,000 were 
spent for books for the Branches. From the Trust Funds 
the amount sp^ent for books was $(),632.78. 

The w^hole number of volumes now constituting the 
Library is 628,297, of which 158,423 are in the Branches. 

We would invite attention to the new arrangement by 
which visitors are now allowed, without the intervention of an 
attendant, freely to take down and use about 15,000 volumes : 
0,000 in Bates Hall; 5,800 in the Patent Library, and 
3,000 in the Children's Room. In the old Library the visitor 
was allowed direct access to about 300 volumes only in Bates 
Hall reading-room besides those in the Patent Library. 
Now merely registering his name and address one may take 
down and use without a card or call-slip or any formality 
91,540 volumes on the Special Libraries floor. 

The completion of the West End Branch w^as an im- 
})ortant event in the history of the Public Library. For 
many years there w^as an earnest demand by the residents of 
the vicinity for the establishment of a Branch Library to be 
located in the old West Church building, which had ceased 
to be used for church purposes. Last year the property was 
purchased by tlie city, and an appropriation made to fit it for 
a Branch Library. As it was expected that this extensive 
building would also accommodate those who w^ere using the 
North End Branch Librar}', the latter was discontinued in 
June last. The West Church Branch has accommodations for 
250 readers, and already a library of 8,600 books and 80 
current periodicals. Of these books, as has been stated, 
about 5,000 were a gift from the friends of this Branch. 
We have reason to believe that it will show in the future a 



4 City Document No. 18. 

record of groat usefiilnoss, as that i)orti()n of our citizen* 
for whoso use it was established already show by their call 
for ])ooks, and thoir attendance at its rcadinii-room, a hiah 
aj)i)rociati()n ot its value. 

The Examining Comniittoe of 1S94 have truly said in 
thoir report, "The Public Tjibrary is not one of a single 
department, as of law, medicine, or local literature : it has 
become nearly universal in its scope and contents." 

The value of our Library is not merely in the number 
of its books, but in their character. In this respect it will 
compare favorably with all others. 

Hence we are entitled to believe that the Boston Public 
Library is not only to be ranked among the great libraries 
of the world by reason of its size, but because of its useful- 
ness as an instrument of education. 

One of its public-spirited founders predicted that " it 
w^ould become an object of pride to the citizens, and every one 
would feel it an honor to do something for it." Mr. Joshua 
Bates, its earliest as well as its greatest benefactor, believed 
that "in a liberal comnninity like Boston there w^ould be no 
want of friends for it." These predictions have been fully 
realized. Every city government reflecting the sentiments 
of the people has made liberal appropriations for its support, 
exhibiting the same interest in its success as in that of the 
schools, l)elieving that, like the latter, the Library is to be 
regarded as an important instrument of popular education. 

It may not be improper to observe, that when Mr. 
Bates made his first munificent donation of fifty thousand 
dollars for the jnirchase of books, he imposed thereon two 
conditions : lirst, that the Library building should be an 
" ornament to the city ; " second, that it should be " perfectly 
free to all." 

There can be no doubt that the condition touching the 
building has lieen faithfully performed, since it is generally 
conceded that this edifice, although plain and simple in 
character, is a beautiful specimen of classic architecture, and 
in the highest sense "an ornament to Boston." There can 
be no question as to the fulfilment of the second condition. 

In the early part of the year a commission consisting of 
Messrs. Henry Parkman, John D. W. Joy, and Charles H. 
Cole was appointed by the Mayor to examine into the city 
finances, and report to him. The methods, conditions, and 
needs of the Lil^rary Department came within the scope of 
this inquiry. The commission made personal inspection of 
the Library, and -in addition invited a written statement of 
its financial condition and needs. Such a statement was 
furnished in detail (under date of May 21st). After such 



Library Department. 5 

investigation and representation the commission embodied in 
their report to the Mayor the foUowing passage concerning 
the Library Department : 

" Library Department : Expenses in 1885, 
$117,558.00; in 1894, $175,477.09. Increase, 50 
per cent. 

" This period comes down to the opening of the 
new Library, and the increase is due to the increased 
use of the' main Library, the opening of branch 
libraries, the increase in the delivery system, and the 
increased number of employes occasioned thereby. 

"In addition to the city appropriation, the Li- 
brary has the benefit of an income of about $10,000 
from various trust funds. 

" The city having now provided a new building, 
it must be' apparent that the Library Department 
cannot be maintained in its present system, to say 
nothing about any increase of usefulness, without a 
large increase in annual expenditure. 

"A careful estimate by the Trustees places this 
expenditure for the next fcAV years at $230,000 per 
annum. 

"This increase is accounted for chiefly by the 
large increase in the necessary number of employes, 
involving an additional yearly expenditure of over 
132,000." The increase in the expense of lighting, 
heating, and cleaning so large a building must 
necessarily be large, and when it is remembered that 
the new "^building requires 1,460 tons of coal per 
annum against 200 tons in the old building, that the 
new building contains 4,312,000 cubic feet against 
1,947,000 cubic feet in the old, and has 51,030 square 
feet of area open to the public against 7,126 square 
feet in the old, these increases in expense would 
seem necessary. 

" Large as they are, the city finds it difficult, if not 
impossible, to meet them at the present limited rate 
of taxation, and it must be remembered in this as in 
other similar cases, that if the citizens desire such 
increased expenditures they must be ready to pay 
for them by increased taxation. 

" The Library must be carried on in a business- 
like way, or even the increase suggested will not be 
sufficient." 

When the Public Library building on Boylston Street 
was opened for public use, September 17, 1858, it had 



6 City Docump:nt No. IS. 

70,851 hooks, and there were no hranches or delivery sta- 
tions. Since then Koxbury, Brighton, Charlcstown, and 
Dorchester, each having a library, have been annexed, 
and the jiopulation of the city has increased from 175,000 
to 49r),0()0. 

The growtli of the T^ibrary in the meantime has been 
so rapid that we believe its magnitude and the extent 
of its work, considered purely as a business matter, is not 
generally understood. 

Its ('528,297 volumes exceed in number those of any 
other library in the United States except the Congressional 
Librar3^ Taking into account the large number of these 
volumes which are scarce, and many of which it would be 
difHcult, if not impossible, to duplicate, it may fairly be 
said that thev represent a money value of more than |2,- 
000,000. 

The city paid for a portion of the land on which the 
Central Library building in Copley Square stands $203,025, 
and the remainder, of 39,000 feet, worth at least $250,000, 
was given to the city by the Commonwealth. 

The appropriations for the construction of the Lil)rary 
building have amounted to $2,450,000. 

The city paid for the West Church property $55,000, and 
$30,000 has been expended in fitting the same for library 
purposes. 

$44,000 has been appropriated for the furnishing of the 
new Library building. 

The real estate owned by the city and used for Branches 
is of considerable value. The trust funds held by the city 
for the benefit of the Library amount to $201,38''7.69. It 
may safely be said that the property belonging to the city 
and in the management of the Library Department repre- 
sents a money value of at least $0,000,000. 

The nine Branch Libraries and thirteen Delivery Stations 
of the Library are distributed over a territory extending 
from Charlestown and East Boston to Dorchester, West 
Roxbury, and Brighton, an area of nearly forty square miles. 

The number of employes required for the care of the 
property of the Lil)rary and the care and distril)ution of its 
books is 197 in the week-day service, and 51 more in the 
evening and Sunday service, exclusive of about twenty- 
five employed by the hour for the lower grade of janitor 
work. 

The management of the Library, in its purely busi- 
ness aspect, requires the proper disbursement in very small 
amounts of at least a quarter of a million dollars annually, 
or more than $20,000 every thirty days. 



Library Department. 7 

This business must not only be so conducted that no 
money shall be wasted or lost, but that the pulilic may re- 
ceive from the expenditures the utmost possible benefit 
in the use of the Library. 

It is impossible that a Board of five Trustees, necessarily 
occupied with other pursuits, should be able to exercise 
more than a general supervision over the details of these 
extensive affairs, and although the Board holds weekly 
meetings of at least tw^o hours each, and the members give 
much other time to the work of the Library, the responsi- 
l)ility for the proper administration of the I^ibrary in all its 
various departments must rest practically upon the Libra- 
rian, to whom the success or faikirc of the Library to meet 
the just wants of the pul)lic must really be due. The selec- 
tion of a competent Librarian is the most difficult and 
important duty of the Trustees. 

The task of obtaining a competent and experienced Libra- 
rian was so difficult that after the resignation of Mr. 
Dwight in April, 1894, the Trustees were unable satis- 
factorily to fill the position until February, 1895. 

At that time Mr. Herbert Putnam, the present Librarian, 
was appointed. His experience in Library management had 
l)een somewhat extensive, and his recommendations were of 
the highest character. He has proved to be most compe- 
tent and faithful in the discharge of his duties, which have 
been unusually difficult and trying by reason of the change 
of the Central Library to the new building, fitting up the 
West Church Branch, and other matters incident to the gen- 
eral administration of the affairs of the Library ; and he has 
also served since April 16, 1895, as the Clerk of the Corpo- 
ration, an office which involves no inconsiderable labor. 

The Trustees desire to express their appreciation of his 
services, and to say that to him and to heads of depart- 
ments and other employes of the Library, who have earnestly 
cooperated with him, any success which the Library may 
have had in meeting the just requirements of the public 
during the past year is largely due. 

The city ordinance requires the Trustees to " annually 
appoint an Examining Committee of not less than five per- 
sons, not members of said Board, who, together with one 
of the said Board as chairman, shall examine said Library, 
and make to said Board a report of its condition." 

The committee appointed by the Trustees to examine the 
Library during the past year consist of John E. Hudson, 
Eichard J. Barry, Edward H. Clement, Hasket Derby, 
Sidney Everett, George M, Garland, Saumel S. Green, 
Charles E. Hellier, Heloise Hersey, Emma Hutchins, Mary 



8 City Document No. 18. 

]\r()ris()n, John J. ()"( ';illa<ih;in, Aziiriah Smith, and Calel) 
n. Tillino-hast. 

'I'ho 'rrustccs Joined with this committee their president, 
Frederick O. Prince, as chairman. But in order that the 
action of the Examininii' Committee might l)e entirely inde- 
pendent of tlie Board, they were rec [nested l)v the President 
of the Board to choose their own chairman for the conduct 
of their delil)ei"ati()ns. Their report, which is hereto 
appended, shows that they have given great care to the per- 
formance of their duties, and the Trustees desire to express 
their appreciation of the value of the services of the com- 
mittee. Their observations as to the Central Library build- 
ing and its arrangements conform to the experience of the 
Trustees in its use. So far as is practicable, and within the 
means furnished them by the city, the Trustees will en- 
deavor to profit by all the suggestions of the committee. 

It may not be improper for the Board to say, however, 
that while it is possible by the expenditure of the necessary 
funds to extend the Library service and its benefits to an 
almost indefinite extent, the extent to which this may prac- 
tically be done is necessarily limited to the capacity of the 
city to tax its citizens and property-holders for that purpose. 
How far municipal taxation may properly go for Library 
purposes is a question which rests with the Mayor and the 
City Council, and, in the language of the Finance Commis- 
sion, appointed by His Honor the Mayor, during the last 
year, it " must be remembered in this, as in other similar 
cases, that if the citizens desire such increased expenditures 
they must be ready to pay for them by increased taxation." 

The Trustees note and agree with the suggestion of the 
Examining Committee, that there is " urgent need for more 
Delivery Stations," and also that " more money should he 
spent on the Branches." 

The tables annexed to the Librarian's report show the 
cost of maintaining Branches and Delivery Stations during 
the twelve years from 1884 to 1895 inclusive, and also the 
amount expended during that period for each Branch for 
salaries, books, and miscellaneous expenditures. They also 
show the appropriations for current expenses of the Library 
as a whole from 1886 to 1896. 

From these it appears that in the year 1886-7 the por- 
tion of the annual appropriation spent upon Branch Libraries 
was about 30 per cent., that in 1887-8 it was al)Out 33 per 
cent., in 1888-9 about 31 per cent., in 1889-90 about 26 per 
cent., in 1890-91 about 27 J per cent., in 1891-2 (9 months) 
about 27| per cent., in 1892-3 about 25f per cent., in 
1893-4 about 26 per cent., in 1894-5 about 25 per cent., 
in 1895-6 about 22J per cent. 



( )n J). 8 after the name "Caleb B. Tillin<;hast;" read "Barrett Wendell. 



The Trustees desire to express their appreciation of the 
interest which the INIayor and the City Council have shown 
during the year in the welfare of the Library Depart- 
ment. They have met all the suggestions which the Trustees 
have made as to the needs of the Library to the extent of 
their ability within the statutory limitations of taxation by 
the city, and the Trustees will endeavor so to conduct the 
affairs of the Library as to justify a continuance of the 
cordial cooperation of the Mayor and City Council in all 
that may be found necessary to secure the widest benefit to 
the citizens from the administration of the Library and its 
Branches. 

Fkederick O. Prince, 

J*resident. 

JosiAH H. Benton, Jr. 

Henry P. Bowditch. 

Samuel Carr. 

James De Normandie. 

Adopted March 27, 189G. 

Attest: 

Herbert Putnam, 

Clerk. 



})end('nt of the Board, they were reciucsted by the Tresident 
of the Board to choose their own chairman for tlie coiKhict 
of their delil)erations. Th(Mr re})ort, wliich is hereto 
appended, shows that they have oiven great care to the per- 
formance of their duties, and the Trustees desire to express 
their appreciation of the vahie of the services of the com- 
mittee. Their ohservations as to the Central Lil)rary build- 
ing and its arrangements conform to the experience of the 
Trustees in its use. So far as is practicable, and within the 
nieans furnished them by the city, the Trustees will en- 
deavor to profit by all the suggestions of the committee. 

It may not 1)6 improper for the Board to say, however, 
that while it is possil)le by the expenditure of the necessary 
funds to extend the Library service and its benefits to an 
almost indefinite extent, the extent to which this may prac- 
tically be done is necessarily limited to the capacity of the 
city to tax its citizens and property-holders for that purpose. 
How far municipal taxation may properly go for Library 
purposes is a question which rests with the Mayor and the 
City Council, and, in the language of the Finance Commis- 
sion, appointed by His Honor the Maj'or, during the last 
year, it " must be remembered in this, as in other similar 
cases, that if the citizens desire such increased expenditures 
they must be ready to pay for them by increased taxation." 

The Trustees note and agree with the suggestion of the 
Examining Committee, that there is " urgent need for more 
Delivery Stations," and also that " more money should be 
spent on the Branches." 

The tables annexed to the Librarian's report show the 
cost of maintaining Branches and Delivery Stations during 
the twelve years from 1884 to 1895 inclusive, and also the 
amount expended during that period for each Branch for 
salaries, books, and miscellaneous expenditures. They also 
show the appropriations for current expenses of the Library 
as a whole from 1886 to 1896. 

From these it appears that in the year 1886-7 the por- 
tion of the annual appropriation spent upon Branch Libraries 
was about 30 per cent., that in 1887-8 it was about 33 per 
cent., in 1888-9 about 31 per cent., in 1889-90 about 26 per 
cent., in 1890-91 about 27^ per cent., in 1891-2 (9 months) 
about 27| per cent., in 1892-3 about 25| per cent., in 
1893-4 about 26 per cent., in 1894-5 about 25 per cent., 
in 1895-6 about 22 J pev cent. 



Library Department. \) 

These figures need no comment : but if more money is 
to be spent on the Branches, as seems imperatively neces- 
sary, the appropriation for the Library Department must be 
increased, or special approi)riations must be made for the 
Branches. 

The Trustees desire to express their appreciation of the 
interest which the Mayor and the City Council have shown 
during the year in the welfare of the Library Depart- 
ment. They have met all the suggestions which the Trustees 
have made as to the needs of the Library to the extent of 
their ability within the statutory limitations of taxation by 
the city, and the Trustees will endeavor so to conduct the 
affaii's of the Library as to justify a continuance of the 
cordial cooperation of the INIayor and City Council in all 
that may be found necessary to secure the widest benefit to 
the citizens from the administration of the Library and its 
Branches. 

Frederick C). Prince, 
P/ 

JosiAH H. Benton, Jr. 

Henry P. Bowditch. 

Samuel Carr. 

James De Norm an die. 

Adopted March 27, 1896. 

Attest : 

Herhert Putnam, 

Clerk. 



10 City Document No. 18. 

RESOLITTIONS ON RETIREMENT OF 

samuel a. b. abbott. 

In Board of Tuustres. 
June 4, ISOf). 

Mr. Samuel A. B. Abbott having resigned as a member 
of the Board of Trustees of Ihe Public Library of the City of 
Boston, after the long service of nearly sixteen years, during 
eight of Avhicli he served as President of the Corporation, 
it is 

Resolved, By the Board, that during all this time, as the 
record shows, he was the constant friend of the Library and 
the earnest advocate of every measure which in his judgment 
would promote its interests and satisfy the demands of the 
citizens by whose bounty it was maintained, in the belief 
that the dissemination of knowledge would be a conservative 
force for the perpetuity of our free institutions. To this end 
Mr. Abbott worked faithfully and well, and his services should 
be recognized and appreciated. 

Resolved, also. That he has especial claim upon the grati- 
tude of the citizens for the active and prominent part he 
took in the construction of the new Library building during 
the many years required for the work. He gave thereto, at 
the cost of much valuable time, his unremitting attention, 
and although his associates on the Board shared his interest 
in the great work and at all times cooperated with him, it 
cannot be denied that Mr. Abbott is entitled to the largest 
share of the credit now generally accorded to the Trustees 
for their services in erecting this magnificent edifice for the 
benefit of a community noted in all its annals foT the love of 
learning. Pcdmam qui meruit ferat. 

Resolved, That the freedom of the alcoves with the cus- 
tomary privileges be accorded to Mr. Abbott. 



LiBRAKY DErARTMENT. 11 

RESOLUTIONS ON RETIREMENT OF 

william r. richards. 

In Board of Trustees. 
June 4, 1-895. 

Resolved, That the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston desire to express and record their api)recia- 
tion of the lono- and faithful services of William R. Richards 
as a member of this Board on his retirement therefrom. 

He was appointed thereto soon after the work of the new 
Library was commenced. The Legislature havino- given to 
the Trustees full and exclusive power to erect such a build- 
ing as in their judgment would best satisfy the demands of 
the institution, the trust thus reposed in them was arduous 
and grave, requiring a large amount of study and labor for 
its successful execution. 

Mr. Richards was deeply interested in the work, and hav- 
ing excellent judgment and taste rendered most valuable 
assistance in its prosecution. During the many years 
required for the construction of the great building, he gave 
to it a vast amount of valuable time, and showed a constant 
and watchful solicitude that it should fully meet the require- 
ments of the Library, and satisfy the just expectations of 
the City Government and the people. 

Besolved, That the services of Mr. Richards were not 
Ihnited to the construction of the new Library. Always 
interested in the success of this great instrument of popular 
education, and ever anxious that it should well accomplish 
the object of its organization, he gave to its administration 
and the economy of its affairs, wise counsel, valuable sug- 
gestions, and a careful and constant attention, which contrib- 
uted largely to the prosperity ifc has attained. 

Resolved, That his unvarying courtesy to his associates 
on the Board made their meetings and intercourse pleasant, 
so that they regard his retirement as a loss to themselves as 
well as to the Library. 

Resolved, That the freedom of the alcoves with the cus- 
tomary privileges be accorded to Mr. Richards. 



12 City Document No. 18. 



LTBKARIAN'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees: 

I have the honor to submit my report for the year 1895. 

The statistical year of the Library, as well as its fiscal 
year, had formerl}^ ended on April oO. Beginninir with 
1885 it was changed so as to end on December 31. Begin- 
ning with 1891-92 the fiscal year, in conformity with that 
of the other city departments, was made to terminate on 
January 31. On January 3, 189G, the Trustees voted that 
the statistical year should hereafter conform to the fiscal 
year; and as the year 1895 — owing to the closing of the 
Library during a certain period — was, as far as statistics 
were concerned, a broken one, that the change should be 
made at once. The present report, therefore, covers the 
period from January 1, 1895, to January 31, 1896; except 
that the financial statement, as heretofore, covers the period 
of the city appropriation, — February 1, 1 895, to January 31, 
1896. As I did not take office until February 11, 1895, my 
personal knowledge of the matters referred to in this report 
is confined to such as have occurred since that date. 

The transfer of books from the old building to the new 
had proceeded without interruption of the ordinary use of 
the Library until January 17. Then the Lower Hall „ was 
closed to the public. A week later the entire Central 
Library was closed, and (except as open for inspection for 
the week beginning February 1, 1895) remained so until 
the opening of the new building, on March 11. In the 
meantime, though the Branch Libraries remained open, no 
books could be drawn from the Central Library through 
them or through the Delivery Stations. The circulation for 
the greater part of this period represents, therefore, merely 
the circulation of books from the collections permanently 
located in the branches. On March 4 the delivery service 
from the Central Library was resumed. 

The electric-light plant at the new building could not be 
operated regularly until June 1, and from that date until 
October 15 its operation had frequently to be suspended, 
owing to alterations. The expense of purchased light was 
so great that from March 11 till April 15 the Central 
Library was closed at 6 P.M. To economize in service as 
well as light the Library was, from June 14 till October 19, 
inclusive, closed at 9 P.M. ; and the Coat Room was closed 
entirely from June 10 until September 24. The elevator 
was not run until October 2. 



Library Department. 13 

The Newspaper Reading Eoora was not opened until 
May 3 ; the Special Libraries floor not until November 4. 
Except as indicated above, the Central Library has, since 
March 11, 1895, been open in all its departments from 9 A.M. 
till 10 P.M. on week-days, and from 2 till 10 P.M. on 
Sundays. On legal holidays — April 19, May 30, June 17, 
July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas — it was 
closed, and on August 27, the day of the Knights Templar 
parade, it was closed (except for inspection) from 9 A.M. 
till 6 P.M. The Branches have been kept open as here- 
tofore, except that from June 1 until August 31 they were 
closed at 6 P.M. (Saturdays at 8 P.M.), as against 7 P.M. 
and 8 P.M. respectively in the previous year. 

I submit annual reports from the Custodian of each of the 
Branches, and from the several heads of departments at the 
Central Library, including the Chief Engineer, head of 
Bindery, and head of Printing Department. 

Finance. 

The Auditor's statement (Appendix I. of this report) 
shows fully the receipts and disbursements of this depart- 
ment during the fiscal year. The general appropriation for 
the year asked for by the Trustees in December, 1894, was 
$215,000, of which $121,500 was for salaries. The appro- 
priation made was $175,000. 

The expenditures chargeable to the general appropriation 
(including $6,241.12 on the "moving" account, covered 
by the balance of a special appropriation) have been $203,- 
535.83, of which $115,444.79 was for salaries (including 
the printing, bindery, and repair departments). As early as 
April last it became apparent that, at the then rate of ex- 
penditure, the expenditures for the year would exceed the 
appropriation ($175,000) by some $20,000. In view of this 
the purchase of books was for a time suspended, the Library 
was ordered to be closed at 9 P.M., the Coat Room was 
wholly closed ; the services of certain employes were dis- 
pensed with and the salaries of others (in the janitor's 
department) reduced ; the reduction in the pay-roll effected 
by these latter measures amounting to $68 a week, the 
equivalent of $3,700 a year. The omission to appoint an 
Assistant Librarian after the resignation of Louis F. Gray, 
the Executive Officer, effected a further saving of some $1,700 
during the balance (3f the year. On August 10, 1895, the 
Mayor authorized the Trustees to expend the sum of $18,000 
in addition to the original appropriation, stating that ho 
would provide this sum in December or January. By an 



14 City Documknt No. 18. 

order ai)j)rov(>(l XovcinluT 1<S, 18135, the City Council 
directed that nioiieys representing receipts fronj tines and 
sales of Library imhiications turned in to the City Collector 
durin<i' the current year should be added to the a})})ropriation 
for this department, to be ex})ended in the purchase of 
books. The amount thus turned in was $14, 217. (51. There 
appeared, therefore, to ])e ayaila])le for the general ])urposes 
of the Library (including the purchase of books) $207,217.01 ; 
and the expenditures of the latter part of the year were 
phmned and niad(> u])on the assumption that this sum would 
be provided without drawing upon any of the funds set aside 
for special uses. Of the sum of $18,000 authorized August 
10th, $17,757.72 was provided; but of this only $11,000 
was provided from outside sources, the balance being made 
up by the transfer of $4,097.64 from the special apj)ropria- 
tion^for the West End Branch and of $2,660.08 from the 
proceeds of the loan (approved January 4, 1896) of $44,000 
for furnishing the new building. This latter transfer was 
made on the theory of reiml)ursing in part to the general 
appropriation the amount which it had lieen drawn upon for 
such furnishing during the year (the total of such amount hav- 
ing been $5,284.36). The transfer of the special appropria- 
tion for the West End Branch was presumably made on the 
assumption that the special appropriation of $30,000 for 
remodelling and furnishing the West Church i)remises 
would suffice for the purpose. That appropriation is, how- 
ever, more than exhausted by expenditures to date and 
outstanding contracts, the repairs necessary having proved 
far more radical than anticipated. There will remain some 
$1,500 of tinal finishing and furniture which would have 
been paid for from the West End Branch appropriation, but 
will now have to come out of the rentals from the old Library 
building (accordino-to the order of the City Council approved 
February 18, 189^). At the time — December 21, 1895 
— the Trustees submitted to the Mayor their estimates for 
the 1896 appropriation they had received no notice of 
this transfer. 

The income of the Trust Funds for books, by reason of 
chanofe of investment in city of Boston bonds, has fallen 
from"$10,012 in 1893 to $8,692 in 1895. An addition in' 
the way of endowment for the purchase of l)ooks is the fund 
of $500 given 1)y Caleb ^Y . Loring in behalf of the children 
and grandchildren of the late Charles Greely Loring, to be 
known as the Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund ; and 
the income expended for books for the West End Branch. 

The amount expended from Trust Funds during the year 
was $6,632.78, as against $3,946.68 in 1894; the amount 



Library Department. 15 

expended for books from the city appropriations has been 
$20,590.08, plus $4,551.27 now payable out of funds abroad, 
or $25,141.35 in all, as against $23,141.53 in 1894. ^ This 
is independent of the purchases of books for the West End 
Branch from funds (some $5,000) raised by private sul)- 
scription. 

The Auditor's statement shows that on Feliruary 1, 1896, 
the financial condition of the Library was as follows : 

I. Cash on hand : 

Interest on deposits . . . . $1,184 38 

Balance receipts from rental of old 

Library building .... 1,664 65 

Balance receipts from fines and sales of 

Library' publications . . . none. 

II. Trust funds : 

(1) Balance in hands of City Treas- 

urer $10,328 19 

(2) Balance on dei)()sit in London . 7,641 63 



Total $17,969 82 

Less Bills in hand . . $540 25 

Outstanding orders . . 2,726 07 

Necessary reserve for con- 
tinuations . . . 4,000 00 

7,266 32 



Balance available . . . $10,703 50 

of which, however, $3,688.21 is income of the Charlotte 
Harris Fund, restricted to the purchase for the Charlestown 
Branch of books published prior to 1850. 

(3) Todd Newspaper Gift : 

Balance of 1895 instalment . $776 25 
1896 instalment re- 
ceived . . . 2,000 00 



Total $2,776 25 



1 The amount ^iven in the report for 1S94 is $14,345.23, This, however, appears 
to have meant "bills paid," and not to have indicated the final assitjnment of items 
on those bills as between City Funds and Trust Funds. The amount from Trust 
Funds in 1894 was given as $12,733.98. 



16 City Document No. 18. 

in. Special appropriation tor purcliaso of J)ooks, under 
order of November 1<S, 181)"): 
Balance on deposit in London . . $G,()00 00 

Less bills in hand and orders outstand- 
ing (excluding the February 1st 
requisition, $1,7(57.22) . ". . 4,551 27 



Balance $1,448 73 



IV. Building appropriation, new Library building : 

Balance in hands of City Treasurer . $131»,l)8o 17 
Less contracts outstanding . . . 134,730 82 



Balance $5,252 35 

Against this are claims amounting to over $8,000, which 
may be provided for by transfer from the special appropria- 
tion for furnishing, so far as necessary. 

V. Special appropriation for furnishing new Library ])uild- 
ing : 
Authorized January 4, 189G . . $44,000 00 

Transferred to 1895 appropriation . 2,660 08 



Balance $41,339 92 



VI. West End Branch appropriation : 

Balance December 1, 1895 . . $4,097 64 

Transferred to general appropriation for 

maintenance "in 1895 . . . 4,097 64 

VII. West Church appropriation for remodelling and fur- 

nishing : 
Authorized April 22, 1895 . . $30,000 

Expended to January 31, 

1896 .... $18,018 44 
Contracts outstanding . 11,329 36 
Orders outstanding and 

architects' commission . 652 20 

30,000 

Further present orders outstanding 

aggregate . . . . . $143 57 

The Januar}^ pay-rolls (excluding that for the week end- 
ing January 30) were paid out of the 1895 appropriation. 
Other bills allowed in January to the amount of $4,490.43 
enter into the February 1st requisition, and must come out 



Library Department. 17 

of the general appropriation for 18!)G. The estimate sub- 
mitted of the appropriation desirable for 1896 was $235,000, 
with the statement that $225,000 was needed for mere con- 
tinuance of existing departments. 

The gross expenditures for maintenance during the year 
(omitting the moving account and items charged to the 
special appropriations for the West End Branch) was 
$177,861.27. Included in such expenditure for 1895 is, 
however, furniture, to the amount of $7,108.34, and equip- 
ment for the Printing Department amounting to about 
$5,300. Deducting these two items (as for "permanent 
improvements"), the gross expenditure for maintenance in 
1895 would stand at $165,452.93. The total of such expen- 
diture during 1894 was $132,774.94. 

On analysis the increase, except so far as accounted for by 
the addition to the pay-roll of a Librarian's salary, would be 
found to be due to the following causes : 

1. The greater cubical area of the new building. The 
old building contained 1,947,000 cubic feet; the new con- 
tains 4,312,000 cubic feet. Less than 200 tons of coal, at a 
cost of less than $1,000, sufficed to heat the old building; in 
1894 (a partial year) 1,192 tons were used for the new l>uild- 
ing, at a cost of $4,752.87. 

The expenditure for electric light in 1895 was $4,185.82 
as against $2,785.64 for 1894; but the penalty for demur- 
rage on the engines will ofl'set this. 

2. The greater floor area of the rooms open to the pub- 
lic. In the old building 7,126 square feet; in the new, 
50,384 square feet. Cost of cleaning, 1894, $1,664.12; 
1895, $3,870.55. 

3. The increase in the engineer and janitor force, due to 
the elaborate lighting, heating, ventilating, and power plant 
at the new Ijuilding. Besides the 3 boilers, 2 electric-light 
engines with a capacity of 3,200 lights, there are 2 large 
ventilating fans, an elevator, a coat room, book motors, and 
an intricate pneumatic tube system, the whole system to be 
operated from 6 A.M. till 10.15 P.M., and 6| days a week. 
Add a necessary special repair department with painter and 
marble washer. In 1894, 4 persons sufficed for the engineer 
and janitor department, whose pay aggregated but $3,440.80 
per annum. The present pay-roll in the new comprises 16 
employes, whose aggregate pay would reach the sum of 
$13,850.72 per annum. 

4. The increased number of employes required for the 
work of issue of books, due to the fact that while the 
450,000 volumes in the old building were compacted into 
a space capable of containing Init that number, in the new 



18 City Document No. 1?S. 

buil(lin<i tliey arc spread over an area ca])ablG of containing 
three times that number; the distribution of the colkK;tion 
into stacks Avhich do not directly interc(mununicate, so that 
an independent service is required for each ; the adoption of 
a mechanism for transmission of the books, which, though 
meeting the problem of the hirge area to be traversed, involves 
a multiplication of posts to be tilled, so that the readers' call- 
slip which formerly passed through the hands of three 
attendants is now handled by at least eight. The two Issue 
Dei)artments in the old building required 20 attendants; 
the Issue Department in the new building (including the 
Children's Department) requires 43 attendants. 

5. The addition of new departments; as, the News- 
paper Reading Room and Special Libraries floor. This 
latter alone requires 9 attendants at an aggregate salary of 
over $5,000 per annum. 

6. The extension of the Library hours from 9 P.M. till 
10 P.M. 

7. The opening on Sundays of departments hitherto 
closed. In the old building B.-ites Hall alone was open ; in 
the new, every de|>artment with which the public come in 
contact is from 2 P.M. open on Sundays as on other days. 
This includes the Issue Department — books being issued for 
home use on Sundays as on other days. 

The consequent expense of the Sunday and evening ser- 
vice in 1895 was $11,130.60 as against $6,714.76 in the old 
Imilding. The total number of employes (excluding the 
Sunday and evening service, which comprises 51 persons, 
working part time and paid by the hour) January 1, 1894, 
was 167. On January 31, 1896, it is 197 (139 nt the Cen- 
tral Library, 58 at the Branches). 

A summary of such of the above items as may readily be 
computed would be as follows : 





1894. 


1895. 


Increase, 


Librarian . 


none 


$5,000 00 


$5,000 00 


Fuel (Central only) . 


$1,000 00 


4,752 87 


3,752 87 


Cleaning . 


1,664 12 


3,870 55 


2,206 43 


Engineer, Janitor, and 








Repair Department . 


3,440 80 


12,324 83 


8,<S84 03 


Issue Depai tment 


7,483 84 


12,683 48 


5,199 64 


New departments (day 








service) . 


about 5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Sunday and Evening 








service . 


6,714 76 


11,130 61 


4,415 85 


Total increase 


$34,458 82 



Library Department. 19 

Buildings and Equipment. 
Central Library. 

The augmented accommodations furnished by the new 
building over the old may be summarized as follows : 

Shelving for al)out 1,500,000 volumes, as against less than 
450,000 vokimes in the old building. 

Facilities for direct access by readers to nearly 200,000 
volumes, as against less than 6,000 volumes (inchiding Patent 
Room) in the old building, 

A total seating capacitj^ of nearly 900 readers, as against 
250 in the old building. 

Entirely new departments for the public in the Newspaper 
Reading Room, Children's Reading Room, and Special 
Libraries floor. 

Ampler equipment in the General Reading Room, Period- 
ical Reading Room, and Patent Room. 

Of the administration departments, the Catalogue and 
Bindery have gained larger and better-lighted rooms. The 
Branch work begun in the small room designed for it soon 
had to expand into one of the lower stack rooms, shelvino- 
being removed to clear space for it. 

The lack of funds with which to complete the furnishing of 
the building caused the postjjonement, for a time, of the pur- 
chase of a case for new books, of a registration desk, of cer- 
tain electric-light fixtures, of screens for the Barton-Ticknor 
Room, of tables for the Delivery Room and Children's Reading 
Room, and of various other articles. Where practicable, 
furniture from the old building has been made to serve. 
But many needs continued unmet until far into the year. 
The bound volumes of newspapers, some 3,300 in number, 
even yet remain piled on the floor of certain rooms in the 
west wing. 

So much as may be available of the special appropriation, 
made January 4, 1896, of $44,000 for furnishing will be 
applied towards remedying these inconveniences. 

Since January, 1895, important sections of the mural dec- 
oraJ;ionhave been completed and placed: the Venetian Lobby 
by Mr. Joseph Lindon Smith (a fresco) ; five sections of 
Mr. Abbey's frieze, "The Holy Grail;" about one-half (as 
originally contracted for) of Mr. Sargent's ]^aintings, " The 
Triumph of Religion," and the largest of the panels by M. 
Puvis de Chavannes. There remain yet to be delivered, 
l)esides the balance of the paintings by Mr. Abl)ey and Mr. 
Sargent, eight panels by M. Puvis de Chavannes, and the 
decoration for the ceiling of the Patent Room by Mr. John 
Elliott, arranged for by private contribution. Of work con- 



^0 City Documknt No. 18. 

tractod for by the Trustoos there reniiiin undelivered, also, 
the bronze doors by Mr. Daniel C. French and the group 
for the outside pedestals by Mr. Augustus St. Gaudens. 
Kegotiations had been begun for a panel from Mr. Whistler, 
but were discontinued last s])ring. 

The ceiling of the Delivery Room was painted over in blue 
and purple in the expectation that it would be enriched with 
gold, in su})port of Mr. Ablx^y's frieze. The building appro- 
priation being nearly exhausted, the sum ( $o,000) neces- 
sary to such iinish could not l)e spared, and the ceiling still 
remains incom})]ete. A notal)le contribution towards the 
adornment of the new building has l^een the sul)scription by 
private citizens of Boston of the sum ($15,000) necessary 
to the completion of Mr. Sargent's design for the upper cor- 
ridor. Further gifts have been : a bronze statue of Sir 
Harry Yane, by MacMonnies (given by Dr. Charles G. 
Weld and others) ; a marl)le copy of the Venus de' Medici 
(given by Mrs. John EUerton Lodge) ; a Imst by Rich- 
ard S. Greenough of William W. Greenough, for twenty-two 
years President of the Board of Trustees (given by Mrs. 
Greenough) : two ideal busts of Christ and of Lucifer, l)y 
Horatio Greenough (given by the sculptor's children). 

Branches. 

The Branches at Charlestown, East Boston, and Dorchester 
and the Reading Room at West Roxljury have been re- 
painted, and received needed minor repairs and fittings. At 
Dorchester a large room directly above the one already 
occupied has been added, nearly doubling the shelving, and 
providing, in addition, a Children's Reading Room. At 
WestRoxbury, also, a room has been added of a size to shelve 
over one-half of the books, and clear space in the main room 
for readers. Not counting the services of our own carpen- 
ter and painter, about $1,200 has been spent in such 
improvements (including furniture) for the Branches. 

The three Delivery Stations of the new type established 
this year (see under "Circulation"), in each case brought 
into the service of the Lilnvary a room devoted to its patrons. 

The North End Branch Reading Room on Hanover 
Street was discontinued on June 30, but in its place 
there will be opened, on February 3, the West End Branch, 
with 8,600 books, 80 current periodicals, and acconuuoda- 
tions (if necessary) for 250 readers. The remodelling of 
the West Church for this Branch should, according to con- 
tract, have been completed by November 1, 1895; but 
unexpected w^eaknesses developed in the building, some 



Library Department. 21 

work done had to he done over again, and these causes, 
added to the dehiys ordinary in contract work, postponed 
the final completion of the undertaking until the heginning 
of the new Library year. 

The Matta})an Reading Room had formerly been sup- 
ported by an association of residents of the vicinity (the 
Public Library contributing merely the $250 per annum to 
constitute it a Delivery Station). In May last the Trustees 
assumed the entire expense of maintaining it — appropriating 
toward it $500 of the rental from the old Library building. 
Of this sum $454. 27 has already been expended. On January 
16, 1896, a Delivery Station was opened at 202 A Harrison 
Avenue in connection with the Ellis Memorial Free Reading 
Room (a private enterprise). The College Settlement at 
Denison Plouse has given 261 volumes of books for the 
young, to be placed there and circulated. In addition 200 
volumes have been placed there on deposit from the Central 
Library. The regular daily delivery service is also main- 
tained. The call for cards, as well as books, shows that 
this station is likely to reach a section of the community not 
heretofore reached. It is in charge of an employe of this 
Library. 

Books. 

The number of volumes in Central Library and Branches 
on Decembers!, 1894, according to last year's report, was 
610,375, of which 457,740 were in the Central Library. In 
spite of the fact that from April 9 to June 25, 1895, the 
purchase of books was suspended, the total accessions of the 
year have been 30,611 volumes.' This includes purchases, 
gifts, and exchanges, and 6,522 volumes added to the West 
End Branch. These accessions have been distributed as 
follows : 

Central . 15,064 

Duplicate Room . . . , . . . 960 

Brighton ........ 744 

Charlestown ....... 905 

Dorchester 818 

East Boston 855 

Jamaica Plain . . . . . . . 812 

Lower Mills 85 

Mattapan ........ 73 

Mt. Bowdoin 74 

North Brighton 74 

Roxbury 1,065 

South Boston 1,033 



22 City D(^cument No. 18. 

South End (UO 

West End , . . . (5,522 

West Roxbuiy . . . . ' . . . ()2() 

Harrison Avenue . . . . . . 261 



;u),(;ii 



The "accessions" represent books received and assigned. 
They inckide some 5,000 volumes still at the Central Li- 
brary, but to go to the Branches. The number of volumes 
actually shelved, less those condemned and withdrawn, is 
given in Appendix IJI. as 18,434, of which 11,821 are in 
the Central Library, 313 in the Duplicate Room, and (),561 
are in the various Branches. 15,582 books and pamphlets 
have been gifts. The more notable of these gifts are 5,528 
volumes for the AVest End Branch, to be known as the 
" Lowell Collection " (the greater part of these having been 
selected and purchased l)y a committee of the Woman's 
Education Association with funds raised from private sub- 
scription) ; from Thomas Gaffield, Esq., 37 volumes, com- 
prising old and rare editions in fine bindings (including the 
first edition 4th title-page of "Paradise Lost"), a copy 
of the " Imitation " of a Kempis in two volumes, rich with 
miniatures, printed for the Paris Exposition of 1855, and 
the original MSS. of Everett's Fourth of July oration of 
1860, and of Sumner's eulogy on Lincoln, delivered June 
1, 1865 (together with a set of proofs of the same with 
corrections by Sumner) ; from James L. Little, Esq., a set, 
in 52 volumes, of the pattern-books of the Pacific Mills, 
illustrating in effect the history of textile manufacture at 
Lowell from 1867 to 1883 ; from Mrs. C. C. Perkins, 408 
volumes and many pamphlets (relating chieiiy to the litera- 
ture and art of Italy) from the library of the late C. C. 
Perkins; from Mrs. John Lowell, 159 volumes of the 
Deljihin and Variorum Classics, 15 volumes of the Oratores 
Attici, and a volume of manuscript lectures by William 
Sullivan, never printed; from the King of Siam, 39 volumes 
of the Sacred Writings of the Soutiiern Buddhists ; from 
Denison House, 261 l)ooks for the young, placed at Station 
P; from the estate of Dr. H. C. Perkins, a collection 
of 176 volumes of medical works; from Hon. Josiah 
Quincy, 21 scrap-books made by various members of the 
Quincy family, 9 volumes of orations by Josiah Quincy, 11 
miscellaneous volumes; and from his Holiness Leo XIIL, 
the works of St. Thomas Acjuinas, in 8 folio volumes, 
published at Rome, 1882-95. Of curious historical interest 
is the gift from Thomas Smythe, Esq., of various docu- 



Library Department. 23 

ments and a MS. statement concerning the Province Lands 
controversy. 

A notable gift, also, is the original MS. of the " El 
Castigo sin Venganza," by Lope de Vega. This was the 
property of the late Georije Ticknor, and is given by his 
daughter. Miss Anna E. Ticknor. 

The purchases of the year have included complete sets of 
the publications of the Surrey and Essex Archaeological 
Societies, Jahrbuch der Kunsthistorischen Sammlungen d. 
AUerhochsten Kaiserhauses, Risley's Tribes and Castes of 
Bengal, and Davis and Thurnham's Crania Britannica. The 
emphasis of the year has been, however, (1) upon the re- 
placement of books worn out and condemned, (2) upon the 
multiplication of copies of books in great demand (even 
expensive works, such as Jones' Grammar of Ornament), or 
needed for the Bates Hall collection as well as for circula- 
tion, (3) upon the supply to the Branches and Branch 
Reading Rooms of needed reference-books, (4) upon the 
supply to the Branches as well as to the Central of a clean 
collection of books for young readers. The replacement of 
condemned books and multiplication of copies of books 
in demand must still go on. The purchase of reference- 
books has been not merely to strengthen the collection in 
the Branches proper, but to sup]>ly reference-books to the 
Reading Rooms which had not before possessed any. A list 
was made of titles which were deemed to represent the 
minimum of a reference collection. This list was supplied 
in full to each Branch and Reading Room, omitting only in 
the case of each Branch such books as were already in it, or 
covered in its case by equivalent books on the same subject. 
This undertaking involved the purchase of some seventy- 
four titles, at a cost of $3,614.50. 

For the collection of books for the young a list was com- 
piled of 944 titles, which it was hoped to purchase in full 
for each Branch as well as for the Central Library, the pur- 
pose being to number these collections uniformly, and print 
one list that would answer thioughout. The design was fur- 
ther to have each of these collections placed on open shelves, 
where they might be handled by the children without for- 
mality. The list, therefore, while mainly of books written 
for young readers, included a considerable numl)er of books 
not specifically so written. These were interspersed by 
way of suggestion, in the hope of attracting towards a wider 
and perhaps higher range of interest. 

This undertaking, if fully carried out, would involve the 
purchase of some 13,000 volumes. Of these, about 6,500 
volumes have thus far been bought. 



24 City Document No. l.s. 

Of tlio total oxpcnditure ($2r>,141.3f)) for books chari^eable 
against 181);") city ai)})ropriations, about $10,000 will have 
been paid for books for the Branches. Of this, $(),882.49 has 
actiiall}^ been spent in bills paid. In 1894, out of a total 
such expenditure of $28, 141. .58, $3,707.99 was for books 
for the Branches. The Branches have also received an addi- 
tional contribution in the gift to the West End Branch of 
some $"),000 worth of new books freshly selected. The in- 
crease in the number of volumes added to the Branches is 
not in the ratio of the increased expenditure, for the reason 
that in 1895 so much of the outlay was for reference-books 
far more costly per volume than the purchases of 1894. 

The number of volumes in each Branch, January 31, 1896, 
as reported by the Custodian, is given in Appendix V. to 
this Report. 

The report of the Shelf Department shows that, taking as 
a basis the statistics of former years, the number of volumes 
in the Central Library January 31, 1896, should be 472,591. 
In the examination of the shelves, just completed (in which 
the shelf lists were checked up, volume by volume), the 
number actually accounted for fell 2,717 short of this. The 
last such examination was in 1893. Between January 1, 
1894, and January 31, 1896, therefore, these 2,717 volumes 
have become "missing." This period takes in the period of 
removal from the old to the new l)uilding. Of the 2,717 
volumes, 1,828 were from the old Lower Hall. It is a re- 
markable fact that only 63 were from the present refer- 
ence collection of over 6,000 volumes in the Bates Hall 
Reading Room, and of these, only one book (Perkins' Italian 
Sculptors) costly to replace. The entire 63 may be replaced 
for less than $100, but five-ninlhs of the salary of an addi- 
tional "runner" for this period, and but one-half of one per 
cent, of the total value of this collection. Nor does "miss- 
ing" mean "lost." The reading of the shelves extends over 
several months, and entire precision is not possible in it. In 
previous years about 40 per cent, of the books reported as 
"missing" have subsequently been found. No such per- 
centage may be hoped of the 2,717 volumes now unaccounted 
for. 

The number of volumes in the Branches (actually shelved) 
is 158,423; in Central and Branches together (excluding 
the 2,717 volumes "missing" from Central), January 3, 
1896, 628,297. 

Binding. 

During the year 9,898 volumes have been bound in the 
Library Bindery, as against 9,016 in the preceding year. 



Library Department. 25 

1,602 were books containing plates which required " guards." 
The work of the Bindery included also the repair of 2,315 
volumes, and a mass of smaller miscellaneous w^ork — such 
as the mounting of maps, the making of portfolios, and of 
temporary covers for serials. 

The outside contract work has, as heretofore, comprised the 
binding of Branch books, and the lighter class of cheap bind- 
ing for the Central (old Lower Hall books). 7,198 volumes 
have been thus bound by contract, at a total cost of 
$1,941.55. 

Catalogues. 

The report of the Chief of the Catalogue Department 
shows that the number of volumes catalogued during the 
thirteen months was 52,744 ; cards placed in the general card 
catalogues, 92,998. His report also shows such cataloguing 
work at and for the several Branches. 

The composition of the catalogue cards has for some weeks 
been done with the linotype. A list of current serials has 
also l)een set up upon this machine. Of the Allen A. Brown 
Musical Library all of the miscellaneous portion — that is, 
biography, criticism, etc. — has been catalogued, and the col- 
lections of vocal music, songs, etc., are nearly finished. 

Progress has been made on the Political Economy Cata- 
logue. Material collected by Mr. E. M. Bacon for a list of 
publications relating to the city of Boston has been revised 
and is ready to be arranged for the printer. Mr. Bacon has 
been engaged also upon a classification of certain MSS. in the 
Chamberlain collection. 

A part of the collection of maps (including those given by 
the U.S. Hydrographic Office in 1889, the early American 
maps, and many others in sheets) have been classified and 
catalogued under direction of Mr. Carret, of the Shelf 
Department. 

A card catalogue of the works on the arts placed on the 
Special Libraries floor is in process, under the direction of 
Mr. Fleischner, Custodian of that floor. Mr. Fleischner has 
also compiled and posted handy lists of authorities for the 
use of students attending the Lowell Lectures, and for those 
interested in other lectures and courses of reading. 

Of printed catalogues there have been issued Finding Lists 
of new books for the Charlestown, Jamaica Plain, and South 
Boston Branches, a complete classified Finding List in 141 
pages of the 8,601 volumes for the West End Branch, and 
five numbers of the Bulletin (the numbers for July and Octo- 
ber being issued as a double number). These five contain : 

1. The Historical Fiction List for the following coun- 
tries : Switzerland and the Netherlands, Scandinavia, Den- 



26 CiTV Document No. 18. 

mark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia, Poland, Eastern 
Empire, Turkey, Servia, Spain, and Portugal. 

2. The titles of books on Koads. 

3. The titles of books on Corea, China, and Jai)an. 

4. Titles of books by and relating to Goethe. 

5. Catalogue of the Thayer Library. 

6. Catalogue of books in the Russian language. 

7. Works of fiction in the German language, with trans- 
lations. 

8. Works of fiction in the English language added to the 
Library since July, 1893, the time of the publication of the 
Fiction Catalogue. 

9. The titles of books recently added to the Library (in 
the January, 189G, number). 

10. Reproductions of views and buildings of Boston. 

A catalogue of the Thayer Collection (5,269 volumes) has 
been reprinted from the Bulletin. 



Registration. 

The statistics of registration in the Library for any given 
year should answer the following questions : 

1. How many persons, male and female, adults and 
minors, were entitled to draw books for home use at the 
beginning of the year? 

2. How many of these have allowed their privileges to 
lapse ? 

3. How many new persons, male and female, adults and 
minors, have applied for cards during the year? 

4. How many " live " cards there are outstanding at the 
end of the year ? 

5. The geographical distribution by wards or districts of 
card-holders in each of the above cases. 

6. So far as practicable, the occupation of the card- 
holders. 

The statistics for 1894 (Appendix VII. of Annual Report) 
answered none of these questions. The tables stated simply 
the ''Registration" for eight ^ months of 1894 as 25,443. 
But the term " Registration " appears to have covered sev- 
eral transactions now distinguished. As we now define it, 
it is a granted application for a card by one who has never 
held a card. Such an application from one who has held a 
card which has expired at a time so remote that he is com- 
pelled to sign anew we call a " Reregist ration." A granted 
application for the renewal of a recently expired card where 

^ This " eight" appears to have been a misprint for " nine." 



Library Department. 27 

no new signature is required we call a "Renewal;" while 
the issue of a new card in place of one lost or filled up with 
entries we call a " Replacement," 

The statistics of " Registration " for 1894 appear to have 
included, at least in part, not merely registrations proper, but 
reregistrations, renewals, and replacements. If such was 
the case the figures evidently did not indicate the number of 
new persons applying for cards (the life of a card being 
but one year, renewals are as frequent as new applications) ; 
and the}'^ did not profess to show the number of " live " 
cards outstanding at any one time. 

1 regret that our statistics for 1895 cannot show a material 
improvement upon this. The year had well advanced be- 
fore an understanding could be arrived at, distinctions im- 
pressed, and uniformity secured. \\'hat was called a new 
registration had begun January 1, 1895; «.e., each person 
thereafter presenting a card was given a number in a new 
series begun with 1. But the requirement of a new signa- 
ture was not enforced until May. The Branches issued 
cards independent of the Central ; so that there was one 
series for the Central and another for each of the Branches. 
Cards issued in duplicate of lost cards were for a time 'given 
independent numbers. Statistics of age were not kept ; 
statistics of sex could be picked out only from an examina- 
tion of the entire mass of record slips. 

The statistics for the past year cannot therefore be re- 
garded as precise even as to what they attempt to cover. 
As they stand they show the number of persons holding 
"live" cards on January 31, 1896, to be 34,842, as against 
29,971 persons who held such cards January 1, 1895; an 
increase of 4,871. 

By vote of the Trustees, beginning January 1, 1896, the 
life of a borrower's card is to be two years instead of one. 
To secure unity all cards issued beginning January 1 are 
to be issued as from the Central Library, and there is to be 
but one series of numbers in place of ten. Some 23,000 
blank cards numbered ahead have been distributed among 
the Branches to provide for the renewal of cards issued by 
them in 1895. 

Use of the Library. 

When the new building opened — March 11, 1895 — the 
books were on the shelves and presumably ready for distri- 
bution. During the first few weeks, however, the attempt 
to distribute them in quick response to demand was l)y no 
means a success. Among the embarrassments were these : 

1. The cards in the card catalogue had been punched for 



28 City Document No. 18. 

the rods. In numherloss cases portions of the shelf mnnhers 
had been imiu'licd out, so that the wrong numbers were 
handed in i)y the reader. 

2. The call-slips (h'opjx'd from the pouches and became 
lost in the pneumatic tul)es. Sometimes the ]iouches them- 
selves became choked in the tul)e8 through a flaw in the tube 
or over-haste of the attendant. 

8. The book railway often broke down, sometimes 
through lack of adjustment or over-haste of the atten(hint. 

4. Books were inconveniently located. Parts of a set 
Avhich should have been together under one number were in 
diHerent phices under diti'erent numbers. Shelves had been 
shortened, and the surplus books, cast adrift, placed some- 
times above, sometimes beh)W, sometimes beyond, their 
fellows numerically. 

5. The books most in demand (fiction and the balance of 
the Lower Hall) were all placed in stack 4. This brought three- 
fourths of the pressure upon three of the eighteen carriers, 
two- thirds of it upon one of the eighteen carriers. The 
system of book railway with elevators required for speediest 
delivery that, taking the six stacks as a unit, the books should 
be shelved not horizontally but vertically in pro{)ortion to 
demand. 

6. Books were mis{)laced ; the majority of the . stack 
attendants being untrained, and the physical fatigue of 
"running" upon the granolithic floors being excessive. 

7. Readers omitted to place their names or number of 
their tables on their call-slips, or failed to be at their tables 
when their names were called. 

More or less of such delays still continue. A record of 
those investigated from October 1, 1895, through January 31, 
1896, shoAvs 296 due to the fault of attendants, 6,544 due to 
the fault of readers, and 535 unaccounted for. The normal 
time for the issue of a book is not, however, over eight or 
ten minutes. 

In the old building there were two distinct departments of 
issue: Bates Hall and Lower Hall. Li the new, these two 
have been consolidated. The Lower Hall as an independent 
division of the Lil)rary has ceased to exist. The Lower 
Hall books were placed in stack 4 ; but such of them as are 
not English prose fiction will shortly have been relocated in 
appropriate classes in the other stacks. 

In many resjiects the arrangement of the books proved 
provisional. The treatment of surplus volumes from a 
shortened shelf had to be made uniform, and fragments of 
sets brought together. The Bates Hall reference collection 
was in many respects experimental and has had to be 



Library Department. 29 

■changed from time to time. Tlie inconvenience to adult 
readers of a multitude of children pressing upon the general 
issue desk, together with the interest of the children them- 
selves, led to the transfer of some 3,000 vokimes of books 
for the young to a separate Children's Room. The experience 
of a few weeks showed that to transport the large cabinet 
books by means of the book elevators through the tube-room 
for use in Bates Hall involved difficulty, delay, and peril to 
the books themselves ; so that the transfer of the entire 
department of architecture, fine art, technical arts, and music 
from the stack to the Special Libraries floor became a matter 
of necessity, irrespective of the interest of the student of 
those subjects which it undoubtedly advanced. 

/.• Reference Use. 

In the old building, although the bulk of the Library was 
visible to the eye, the only portions to which the visitor was 
allowed direct access were some 300 volumes of reference- 
books in the Bates Hall Reading Room, and the 5,500 
volumes of the Patent Library. In the new building three- 
fourths of the entire collection have been withdrawn from 
sight and placed in the stack rooms, but the remaining one- 
fourth has been lirought forward to the very hand of the 
reader. AVithout the intervention of an attendant he may 
inspect, take down and read (as he would in his own home) 
some 6,000 volumes in Bates Hall, some 5,800 volumes in 
the Patent Library, and some 3,000 volumes in the Children's 
Room. With only such formality as is involved in registering 
his name and address he may directly inspect and (without 
a carcl or call-slip) have taken down and read some 91,540 
volumes on the Special Lil)raries floor. In the old building, 
if he wished a periodical he had to make out a slip for it. 
Here he finds some 700 periodicals on the very tables where 
he may handle them without inquiry or formality, and 700 
more which may be had without a call-slip. In addition he 
finds the Newspaper Reading Room, with 263 daily, semi- 
weekly, and weekl}^ newspapers (182 American, 81 foreign), 
where he is equally exempt from inquiry or formality. 

It was to be expected that this immense augmentation of 
privilege would to a degree oftset to the public the some- 
what remote location of the new building from the centre of 
the city. But the actual use of the new privileges has out- 
run all expectation. To abandon formality is to abandon 
statistic. The only record kept of the reference use of the 
books in the new l)uilding is the record of the books from 
the stacks called for on green slips for use in the Reading 



30 City Document No. 18. 

Room. Even this record (871,048 volumes for the year) 
compares not unfavoral)ly with the reference use in 18!)4 in 
the old l)uil(lin<>: — 444,9011 volumes from the two Halls. 
The use of the 100,333 volumes for which no slips are neces- 
sary cannot even be guessed. Except in the case of the 
Newspaper Room, not even the number of readers has been 
recorded. But this may be said : that whereas 200 readers 
at a time would have been the maximum in the old building 
it is the minimum here ; and that at certain hours of every 
day there Jire no less than 600 readers at a time using books 
or i)oriodi(als on the premises. Actuiil count at certain 
hours has shown this as follows : 

Bates Hall 275 

Special Libraries ....... 18 

Patent Koom ........ 5 

Periodical Room 179 

Newspa})er Room ....... 103 

Children's Room . . . . . . .148 

728 

and the number in the Newspaper Room has risen as high as 
178 y)ersons at a time. 

The Periodical Rocmi is already overcrowded, as is the 
Children's Room. The Bates Hall Reading Room barely 
suffices. All this use has been both serious and orderly. 
The loss of but 63 volumes (assuming them lost) from the 
6,000 volumes in Bates Hall, and these books of trilling 
value, seems the amplest justification of the freedom ac- 
corded. From the Genealogical section (the most used of 
any) not a single volume is missing. 

The system of informal use, without call-slip, has been 
extended to the Branches also. Their periodicals are now 
on the tables, and a portion of their books are in open cases. 
In their case, therefore, statistic of reference use has been 
wholly abandcmed. The chief justification for such abandon- 
ment is that to keep the statistic means to inconvenience the 
public. 

II: Home Use. 

At the opening of the new building there were outstand- 
ing in the hands of borrowers some 3,500 volumes. The 
cii-culation for home use from the Central Library direct was 
251,561 volumes, as against 261,717 in 1894. A much 
greater falling off was to have been expected, on account of 
the less' central location of the new building and its superior 



Library Department. 31 

attractions for reference use. The home and reference use 
together, in the old building, during October, November, and 
December, 1894, as comi)ared with the total home and 
recorded reference use in the new, is as follows : 

1895. 
1894. (Recorded only) 

October 59,700 65,240 

November 53,459 58,583 

December 56,895 66,957 

showing an increase in 1895. 

The [)eriod covered in 1895 (though nominally thirteen 
months) is, by reason of the partial closing of the Library 
from January'' 17 to March 10, 1895, and the entire closing 
from January 24 to March 10, 1895, two weeks less than Ihat 
covered in 1894. On the other hand, the Sunday issue, 
which in 1894 aggregated no more than 3,016 volumes, from 
October 1, 1895","to January 31, 1896, alone reached 22,866 
volumes. 

The issue of books from the Central Library through 
the Branches aggregated 5,689 volumes as against 6,033 
volumes in 1894; through the Delivery Stations, 22,244 vol- 
umes as against 25,595, 1894; through both, 27,933 vol- 
umes. The issue of books direct from the Branches 
(including those issued through dependent Delivery Sta- 
tions) was 567,827. The aggregate issue for home use 
from the entire Library was 847,321 volumes, as compared 
with 832,113 in 1894. Appendix VII. shows the annual 
circulation of and through each Branch and Delivery Station 
during the past six years. 

Besides the Central Issue desk, there are now two other 
points in the Central Library at wdiich books may be drawn for 
home use : in the Children's Room (the books shelved there 
only) and on the Special Libraries floor (primarily, the 
books shelved there, but, in case of need, any book in the 
stacks as w^ell). The issue from the Children's Room has 
been 28,342 volumes. That from the Special Libraries now 
averages about 105 volumes daily. 

Formerly it was the practice to give a classified statement 
of circulation. This has not been done of late years, nor 
under present conditions does it seem practicable ; for the 
books, not being precisely classified on the shelves, their 
shelf numbers as given on the call-slips are no certain index 
of their character. 

Of the half million volumes at the Central Library, per- 
haps a hundred thousand are starred, i.e., restricted from 
circulation. At least one-half of these are either one-starred 
or three- starred. These are not absolutely restricted, but 



32 City Document No. 18. 

may be issued in the disen^lion of corttiin desigiiatcKl 
officials. Two stars — though the less iini)osiiig symhol — 
had indicated books absolutely restricted, yet had been 
applied to du})licates, and to books merely costly, as well as 
to books restricted by the terms of irift or purchase. In 
})ractice, the three-starred book could be issued almost as 
freely as the one-starred. There was danoer in so profuse 
a use of the stars, in the fact that the ])ul)lic, oljserving- the 
symbols so commonly waived, would cease to be impressed 
by them altogether. By vote of October 22, iSDo, the Trus- 
tees therefore determined as follows : 

1. That one star shall denote 1)ooks restricted from circu- 
lation, and issued only upon permit of the Librarian or offi- 
cer in charge ; that books shall be so restricted as being 
reference-l)ooks (dictionaries, cyclopedias, etc.), bound 
serials, and books restricted because of their rarity or char- 
acter as respects morality. 

2. Two stars shall denote books 'prohibited from circu- 
lation, and shall l)e applied to books so prohibited by the 
terms of the gift or purchase, and to such other books as may 
properly be so prohibited on account of their excessive rarity. 

3. The use of three stars shall be discontinued in the 
case of future accessions. 

4. Pamphlets, duplicates, genealogy, local history, and 
folk lore not to be restricted as such. 

The collection placed in the Bates Hall Reading Room, 
though containing many books not individually restricted, 
was for a time, as a whole, reserved for reference use. As 
duplicates are purchased for circulation of the books most in 
demand, it may be considered so. But, in the meantime, 
the decision has been modified to the extent of occasionally 
permitting certain volumes to go out for a limited period. 

Each of the nine Delivery Stations in existence at the 
beginning of the year was no more than a desk in a shop, 
W'hose proprietor undertook to send in the application for 
books, and deliver the books, wdien received. For this ser- 
vice he was paid a fixed compensation of $250 per annum. 
The Blue Hill Avenue Station being relocated, a new system 
was undertaken in regard to it. The proprietor of the shop 
agreed to furnish a separate room (lighted and heated) for 
it, and to receive for this and her services a compensation 
based on the number of volumes circulated per month. The 
room was equipped by the Lil)rary with a desk, a table, 
chairs, and a case for books. A few hundred volumes were 
placed on deposit, to be drawn direct from the station, and 
the daily delivery from the Central continued as before. 

This plan was so successful that on a change of proprie- 



LinKAKY Department. 33 

tors of the store at Allston it was adopted there. The 
feature of a temporary deposit of books especially to serve 
disappointed applicants for books from the Central is 
being gradually introduced at all of the stations. 135 
volumes were placed at the Tyler Street Vacation School 
last summer, and 2') volumes recently with Ladder Com- 
pany 17. The total of such deposits has been 1,115 volumes. 
Such enterprises, however, require a multiplication of copies 
of popular books such as can be brought about but gradually 
with our availaiile funds. 

Only one new Delivery Station has been established, — 
that opened January 16, 1896, at the Ellis Memorial Free 
Reading Room at 202 A Harrison Avenue. The delivery from 
the Central to the Branches had been by local express. 
Beginning June 1, 1895, a team in the sole service of the 
Library was engaged at a fixed sum, — $25 per week. This 
has covered an inner circuit, consisting of the South End, 
North End, Charlestown, East Boston, South Boston, and 
Roxbury Branches, and Crescent Avenue, Blue Hill Avenue, 
and Harrison Avenue Stations. Its cost is but a fraction 
(five per cent.) in excess of the express, and the service more 
effective. A special wagon is furnished, built expressly for 
the purpose, and lettered " Boston Public Library." The 
compensation includes the services of a driver and two 
horses. 

Sjjecial'Uses. 

In connection with the Art Department (fine and indus- 
trial), now upon the Special Libraries floor, a systematic 
attempt is being made both to attract readers, and by intel- 
ligent exposition of the material to convert readers into 
students. Besides the lists of authorities drawn up in con- 
nection with the more notable lecture courses, the books 
themselves most valuable by way of illustration are displayed. 
A considerable number of classes have already come, under 
conduct of teachers who wish to secure and exhibit illustra- 
tions of the subjects treated in course. 

The ordinary art students, the architectural student and 
draughtsman, come in increasing number. Tracing (except 
of colored plates) is permitted with the interposition of a 
gelatine pad, which the Library furnishes. 

Cooperation avith the Schools. 

Conferences have been held between committees repre- 
senting the School Committee and the Library Trustees as 
to possible further cooperation between the Public Library 
and the schools. In the meantime, the Library has under- 



34 City Document No. 18. 

taken the issue to every teacher giving instruction in any 
institution in the city of Boston of a special card which 
entitles the holder to have out six books at a time and retain 
them four weeks. Since June 1, is*.),"*, (DU of these cartls 
have been issued. 

Service. 

There has been lost to the service William L. Day, who 
died on February 21, 1895. He had been in charge of the 
evening service in the old Lower Hall. He was taken ill 
before work at the new building began, so that I had not an 
opjiortunity of knowing him personally. But the reputation 
that he left among his associates was that of a most conscien- 
tious official. 

On March 2(1, Louis F. Gray, the Executive Officer and 
Clerk of the Cor[)oration, presented to the' Trustees his 
resignation. Mr. Gray had been in the service of the Library 
in various capacities for fifteen years. He was granted a 
three months' leave of absence without loss of pay. On 
April 16, his resignation was accepted, and the title of the 
office changed from that of Executive Officer to that of As- 
sistant Librarian. The Librarian was elected Clerk of the 
Corporation, and has served in that capacity during the 
balance of the year. No Assistant Librarian has as yet been 
appointed. 

Ill health, due to the excessive strain of preparing for the 
removal of the books to the new building, obliged Mr. Car- 
ret, Chief of the Shelf Department, to ask for a leave of 
absence. He was absent on such leave for two months, 
beginning March 11. 

The onh^ appointment from outside the force to any but 
subordinate positions in the force was the appointment of 
Margaret D. McGuftey to the conduct of the Issue Depart- 
ment. It is upon this department that has fallen the chief 
burden of the mechanism for the distribution of books. 

From the Shelf Department, Otto Fleischner has been 
transferred to the custodianship of the Special Libraries 
floor ; and from the Catalogue Department, Francis W. Lee 
has been transferred to the charge of the Printing Depart- 
ment. 

In former years there had been in the Library a system of 
graded service, each grade having a minimum salary with 
progressive increase up to a maximum. On March 26, 1895, 
the Trustees adopted a new scheme of somewhat like nature, 
but more elaborate, and with the additional provision (previ- 
oush' determined upon) that both appointment to the service 
and promotion from grade to grade within the service should 



Library Department. 35 

be by "examination." A somewhat detailed statement as 
to this system (as with certain revisions, now in force), and 
a list of present employes as graded thereunder, is appended 
to this report. Appended also are samples of the examina- 
tion papers given at the examinations held during the past 
year. At the beginning of the year there were on file, nearly 
a thousand applications for employment in the library. A 
printed form was sent to each applicant, with notice that 
unless filled out and filed, his application w^ould be con- 
sidered withdrawn. The numl)er thus formally filed 
amounted to 442, as follows : 

For grade B 97 

For grade C 119 

For grades D and E 157 

Miscellaneous ....... 69 

442 

There have been held 7 general and 4 special examina- 
tions. At these 351 applicants appeared, of whom 125 
were male, 226 female. Such pass-marks as were assigned 
were pass-marks only in the special sense explained in the 
statement appended. They represented not a rating by an 
absolute standard, but the indication of an intelligence which 
was deemed a reasonable preliminary to a further test, if, in 
view of the positions to be filled and the other apparent 
capacities of the applicant, such further test should seem 
desirable. As so understood, 103 of the 351 applicants 
maybe stated to have "passed" (30 others passing certain 
sections of the papers). 66 (31 male, 35 female) received 
appointments, some, however, taking positions in a lower 
grade than that for which, so far as the written exami- 
nations were concerned, they had qualified. 34 of the 
66 appointees were to Grade E, "runners." Some whose 
papers failed to pass them for the higher grade for which 
they tried were counted as " passed " for some lower grade. 
In the case of the lowest grade — Grade E — the pass-marks 
originally fixed failed to turn out a sufiicient number of can- 
didates for the vacancies to be filled ; and recourse had to 
be had to some lower in the scale. This is the grade of 
runners paid at $3.50 per week. In no case has this been 
necessary in the higher grades. The examinations thus far 
held, though open to the employes, were successful chiefly in 
testing applicants from without : and the appointments above 
mentioned do not include appointments by promotion (after 
examination). An examination for promotion, to be a fair 
test, must apparently be specially devised for each department. 



:]{i City Docu.mknt No. is. 

Tho adoption of the system of examinations has created 
])oth hope and despondency : hope in the minds of the 
yonnger employes, more fresh from school or college, and 
despondency in employes who lack an academic training, 
or Avhose academic knowledge has layjsed from disnse. A 
longer experience of the system will tend to an adjustnumt 
of these exjiectations as it becomes apparent that capacity 
for the ])articnlar work to be done, as tested in actual service, 
is to have its full recognition ; and that while the examina- 
tion of applicants from without the force must necessarily 
be along academic lines, such a test is even in their case but 
preliminary, and must be supplemented by proof of capacity 
for the particular w^ork to be done as tested in actual service. 

As will be seen by the reports of the Chief of the Issue 
Department and the Custodian of the Special Libraries floor, 
there is going on week by week in those departments a 
process of deliberate education, which, though directed 
specially towards the training necessary to the work of the 
Library, is arousing an interest and ambition which may 
prove more far-reaching. 

The Appendices I. -VII. give such statistics as could prac- 
tical)ly be compiled with reference to Finance, to the extent 
of the Library and its use during the year. Appendix X. 
gives a schedule of the Library service ; Appendix XIV., a 
list of the newspapers on file in the Newspaper Eoom. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 
February 1, 189G. 



Library Department. 



37 



REPORT OF 



THE EXAMINING 

FOR 1^95. 



COMMITTEE 



To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemex : The Exaininini^ Committee was called to- 
gether for organization October 25, 1895, by the chairman 
of the Board of Trustees. John E. Hudson was chosen 
chairman, and Miss Mary Morison secretary. By direction 
of the general committee, the chairman appointed the usual 
sub-committees on " Catalogue," " Branches," " Finance," and 
"Administration," and added thereto a fifth, on "Books." 
The titles of the two coumiittees on " Catalogue " and on 
" Branches " were modified or enlarged, more fully to ex- 
press their functions, to " Catalogues, Bulletins, and Find- 
ing Lists," and "Branches, and other modes of distribution." 
These sub-committees were made up as follows, viz. : 



Books. 

Barrett Wendell, Chairman. 
George M. Garland. 
E. hT Clement. 

Branches, and other modes of 
distribution. 

Sanuiel S. Green, Chairman. 
Mary Morison. 
Richard J. Barry. 



Catalogues, Bulletins, and 
Finding Lists. 

Caleb B. Tillinghast, 

Chairman. 
Enmia Hutchins. 
Azariah Smith. 



Finance. 

I Charles E. Hellier, 

I Chairman. 

I Sidney Everett. 

I John J. O'Callaohan. 



Administration. 

John E. Hudson, Chairman. 
Heloise Hersey. 
HasUet Derby. 
Caleb B. Tillinghast. 
Samuel S. Green. 



The reports of the sub-committees have been received 
and considered by the full committee, who beg to report : 

The completion of the new Library building in Copley 
Square, begun in 1887, and the removal thither from 



38 City Document No. 18. 

the Boylston-stroot huildinu', in of course the most consider- 
able event in the history ol" the year under exainination, and 
an event that has in a marked degree attracted i)uhlic atten- 
tion to the Lil)rary . It is to be hoped that this public interest 
nia}^ continue, and the Trustees are strongly urged to encour- 
age it in all proper ways. Possibly a publication of the 
extent and the variety of the various collections, and the 
aims and purposes of tlie Library, judiciously distributed, 
would do much to enlist intelligent cooperation on the part 
of the citizens. 

As to the building itself, the committee shares fully in 
what it believes to be the general public sense of satisfaction 
at the completion of the most considerable public edifice in 
the city of Boston and the most important public library 
building in the United States, 

That on the removal to it of the great collections of books 
and the extensive machinery of management of the Library 
it should be found that the new building was at once in all 
its details exactly fitted for its purposes was not perhaps to 
be expected, and so far as these changes in detail concern 
the comfort and convenience of the Librarian and his assist- 
ants in doing their work, they fall fairly enough within the 
general discharge of the Librarian's duties, and may be left 
with him to work out. But it is not yet clear that the 
delivery room should not be on the first floor. But how 
best so extensive a change and the necessary accompanying- 
changes shall be made, it is not easy to say out of hand. 
A year's experience in the working of the Library in its new 
quarters, and of the Librarian's ol)servation thereon, will be 
necessary before attempting to solve the difficulty. 

But for the immediate comfort of the present users of the 
Library, there are one or two suggestions to be made which 
need not wait. 

Your committee has particularly interested itself in regard 
to the ventilation of the different portions of the Library 
building. Its various parts have been visited a number of 
times, both when it was known that the smallest numl)er of 
the public would l)e present, and on days when it was certain 
that the rooms would be relatively crowded. The afternoon 
of Sunday may be taken as a good example of the latter 
state of things. 

The air in the passageways and corridors was found, with 
a single exception, to be fresh and })ure. The periodi- 
cal room, if much crowded, was apt to be somewhat close. 
This was also true of the delivery room, unless the windows 
were open, and the air without in motion. Bates Hall was 
found at every visit to be remarkably well ventilated, on 



Library Department. 39 

no single occasion was any closeness experienced, even hy 
one standing in the small gallery above the door. The 
worst air in the building was found in the corridor where the 
Sargent pictures are exposed, especially on Sunday after- 
noons. Here the atmosphere was often intolerably close and 
vitiated. 

The building, as a whole, is intended to be ventilated by 
means of a system that does away with the necessity of ad- 
mitting air through the windows, thus escaping the annoyance 
and injurious etlects of dust. A large fan in the basement 
aids the introduction of air from without. This air is passed 
through filtering bags' of large size, previous to its admission. 
It circuhites through the building and is withdrawn l\y means 
of exhaust shafts, which in their turn are connected with 
another large fan, situated at the top of the building. 

Were the diflerent parts of this system to work both con- 
stantly and harmoniously, it is proliable that the ventilation 
would be well-nigh perfect, and criticism unnecessary. But 
as now applied it fails in various particulars. 

First. The large fan in the basement, which provides for 
the admission of air, is not run after 3.30 P.M. in winter. 
So much of the power of the engine is then needed for the 
electric lighting that a sufficient amount is not available for 
the fan, and its power has to be withdrawn. 

Second. The exhaust shafts are not in all cases sufficient. 
This is especially true of the periodical and delivery rooms. 
In the former we are assured an existing spare flue can be 
utilized through one of the north closets of Bates Hall. In 
the latter there is but a single exhaust outlet of relatively 
small proportions. The original intention was to open two 
additional flues in this room, but the space allotted to them 
was covered by the decorations. Air has consequently to be 
t^ken from without through the open windows, and when 
vitiated to be gotten rid of in the .same manner. 

Third. No exhaust flue now extends directly to the gal- 
lery where the Sargent pictures are exhibited. The bad air 
from the rest of the ])uilding naturally rises to this place, and 
its proper ventilation is most important. It is possi))le to 
connect it with the exhaust fan. 

The remedy for all this seems simple. Provide small ad- 
ditional engine and dynamo for the lower fan, and run it as 
long as the building is open, in the evening as well as by day. 
Extend the exhaust flue to- the periodical room, and open the 
two additional ones needed in the delivery room. Connect 
the Sargent galler}' directly with the exhaust fan. 

Our attention has 1)ecn attracted to the lights in the news- 
paper room. Here there is room for very serious criticism. 



40 City Document No. 1>>. 

These liuhts ooiisist in part of upright KJ-candlo lamps, 
imsliaded, strmio- around the walls, diM'using their illumina- 
tion in all directions, instead of directly doAvnward on the 
pa})ers where it is most needed, and partly in a series of 
lamps of the same power, enclosed in long, narrow, metallic 
boxes, shedding light directly downwards, it is true, but dif- 
fusing it very im})erfectly. Depending from the ceiling are 
two chandeliers. 

We would suggest that the excellent lamps of Bates Hall 
be introduced in this room in sufficient numbers, and the 
present lamps discarded. And we think it will be found 
that, on the whole, the 24-candle lamps, "frosted," atford 
a softer and pleasanter light than the 16-candle enclosed in 
plain glass. These lamps should be set in the semi-transpar- 
ent shades of porcelain, green without and white within, 
which shield the eye of the reader from the direct rays of the 
electric light, and yet ditiuse them over so large a surface. 

Some plan should be devised for relieving the readers in 
the magazine room from the noise the engines, which are set 
just beneath that room, make when running. 

The disturbance caused to readers by the influx of visitors, 
attracted solely by the mural paintings, should warn the 
Trustees of the extreme caution that should be employed in 
extending the decoration of the walls to rooms occupied by 
readers. 

Not unnaturally, the attention tliat during its progress has 
been given to the construction of the Library building has 
turned attention more or less from the Library itself, and 
matters in that regard have fallen somewhat behind. It is 
exceedingly important that they should be taken in hand, 
and that the Library be brought forward to the lines of the 
present best thought on the subject of library management 
as soon as may be. 

In regard to the buying of books — and here, of what books 
shall be bought, — that is, the function which the Library 
undertakes to discharge, — the seeing that the public who 
are entitled to use the books have prompt and intelligible 
information as to what books they may find, the making- 
adequate provision forgiving people this knowledge and the 
readiest possible access to the books — the committee make 
these suggestions : 

1. That in their opinion a clear distinction should be 
made between funds devoted to the purchase of special 
books, i.e., curious and rare books, or books useful only to 
scholars and investigators, and those devoted to the purchase 
of popular books, under which term they would include 
books useful and interesting to the general public. 



Library Department. 41 

According to the statement in the Keport of the Trustees 
for 1894, the Library derives from its trust funds an in- 
come of about 19,000. Of this, 

$1,200 is specifically required to be spent for maintenance ; 
()80 is specifically required to be spent for Charlestown 
Branch ; 
4 is specifically required to be spent for South Boston. 



11,884 



The remainder, which may roughly be called $7,000, 
seems freely at the disposal of the Trustees for the purchase 
of books, except for the following conditions : 

(Bowditch) Mathematics, etc $350 

(Ticknor) Spanish IGO 

(Green) American history ..... 95 

(Franklin) Political economy .... 40 

$645 

A balance of at least $(),250 seems left for the purchase of 
books unrestricted. 

In the opinion of the committee this income of the trust 
funds should generally be devoted to the purchase of special 
books ; and the funds derived year by year from grants of 
the city government should be wholly devoted to the pur- 
chase of books which in the broadest sense of the w^ord 
may be called popular; i.e., of use and interest to the gen- 
eral public. Under the latter head would come books of 
reference, standard literature, treatises of such nature as to 
be comprehensible to intelligent laymen in the subject con- 
cerned, etc. Under the former head would come highly 
technical treatises, such, for example, as special Avorks in 
law or medicine, divinity, or science, rare and curious 
editions of works substantially accessible in cheaper form, 
and in general all boalvs the possession of which may be 
regarded as a distinction. 

It is obvious that from time to time opportunities for the 
]3urchase of special books may arise which clearly demand 
far more money than the trust funds supply, such oppor- 
tunities as were availed of when the Barton collection was 
bought, and when valuable books were bought from the 
collection of the late Mr, Barlow. In the opinion of the 
committee, however, such contingencies should never be 
met, even in part, by drawing on the regular city grants ; 



42 City Document No. l.s. 

hut should always l)o made wholly the suhject rithor of a 
special eity iinmt, of private gift, or of ])uhlic suhscrii)tioii. 

The committee would add an expressiou of ()))inion that 
one result which might reasonably follow from (lefinite and 
openly stated adherence to the policy they recommend might 
he increase of trust funds at the hands of citizens interested 
in sjiecial subjects, and thus assured that only by enlightened 
endowment can special subjects be kept up in an institution 
so various in its functions as the Public Library. 

2. That in their opinion the present state of the Pu))lic 
Library, considered in relation to other large collections of 
books in this neighborhood, renders it highly desiral)]e that the 
Trustees shall, at their earliest convenience, decide upon some 
definitely announced policy as to what special subjects shall be 
kept up by the Public Lil)rary and what shall be disregarded. 
To make any single library totally comprehensive is mani- 
festl}' impossible. Meanwhile the number of endowed and 
otherwise established libraries in the neighborhood of Boston, 
all of which are virtually accessible to properly qualified stu- 
dents and investigators, is such as to make probal)le, l)y 
means of cooperation and mutual understanding, the ultimate 
presence in this region of an indefinitely comprehensive sys- 
tem which shall render all manner of special study possible. 
In connection with this matter, the committee addressed to 
the Librarian the following questions : 

a. What sjiecial collections are in the Public Library? 

h. What others are in the neighl)orhood ? 

c. By what means may these collections be made mutually 
available ? 

His comprehensive and interesting reply the committee 
append to this report, with their fullest approval. That 
needless reduplication of special material in any neighbor- 
hood is a serious waste of resources seems obvious. The 
committee would recommend this subject to the Trustees as 
one of prime importance. 

From this recommendation it naturally follows that in the 
opinion of the committee the acquisition or even the accept- 
ance of any special matter of a kind not already in posses- 
sion of the Public Library should always be a matter of 
peculiarly grave consideration. For example, in the opin- 
ion of the committee it would be in any case injudicious to 
add to the Library such a collection of eccentric and unusual 
works on philology, etc., as was made by the late Prince 
Lucien Bonaparte ; while, should either the city or private 
benefactors be disposed to contribute so very large a sum as 
is demanded, the collection of rare and curious early printed 
books lately offered for sale by the Messrs. Sotlieran, of Lon- 



LiBRAHv Department. 43 

don, raio;ht add greatly to the distinction and the interest, 
though hardly to the practically useful value, of the Public 
Library. 

3. That in their opinion the chief function of the Pul)lic 
Library is that which, in this report, they have generally 
designated as popular; viz., the placing at the disposal of 
the general public of books which, in the broadest sense, the 
general public may find either useful or wholesomely inter- 
esting. Under the former head, — useful, — the committee 
would include all. general standard books of reference, and 
whatever, in any subject, may give accurate information to 
readers not engaged in highly specialized investigation. 
Under the latter head, — interesting, — the committee would 
include all ])ooks read for the pleasure of reading them. 

Books of the former class — useful — will generally be in 
less demand than the books of the latter. Often costly and 
bulky, they are obviously of a kind which are generally more 
conveniently useful in easily accessible collections than in 
free circulation. In the opinion of the committee, at least 
one copy of all such books in possession of the Public 
Library should regularly be kept at the Central Library, to 
be consulted on the spot. Duplicate copies for outside cir- 
culation should be provided in accordance with actual 
demand. In accordance with actual demand, too, perma- 
nently deposited copies of such books should regularly be 
kept at branches of the Library, to which branches duplicate 
copies for outside circulation may conveniently be sent, for 
any length of time, from the Central Library, as they may 
be called for. In any event, it is obvious that at least one 
copy of each of such books should be kept as a permanent 
part of the main collection. 

In the opinion of the committee, the convenient collection 
in given spots of such useful books is the chief function of 
the branches; it would follow that any considerable exten- 
sion of the present system of branches would seem, in view 
of its expense and of the present accessibility of both 
branches and Central Li])rai'y, a doul)tful policy. 

Books of the second class among those designated as popu- 
lar — interesting books — present, perhaps, the most vital 
problem of all. The Library certainly has no more impor- 
tant function than that of providing with wholesome reading 
for leisure hours such residents of Boston as may be disposed 
or persuaded thus to occupy their leisure. In the opinion 
of the committee, definite policies might well 1)e adopted 
concerning both the purchase of such books and their circu- 
lation. 

In the matter of purchase, the chief question appears to 



44 CiTV Document No. 18. 

bo whether it is wiser to buy ii few c()i)ies of niiuiy works, or 
more eopies of feAver works chosen with more cure. In the 
opinion of the eonnnittee the hitter course is prefera])le. 
Books bonaht as interesting for o(uiera I circuhition should be 
scrutinized as carefidly as possible, and, once apjH'Oved, 
should be provided in as many copies as demand, considered 
in relation to resources, may require. Among such books, 
however, it is obvious that many, admirable for this purpose, 
are of small, if any, permanent value. The committee woidd 
suggest, then, that books purchased for popular circulation 
be classified for at least one year, and perhai)s two years, 
apart from the permanent collections of the Lil^rary, and 
be added to the permanent collections only after a second 
scrutiny. 

In the matter of circulation, the eonnnittee is of opinion 
that the more frequently the actual books in question can be 
brought to the notice of the reading public, the better. The 
impersonality of titles even in the best catalogues is not stim- 
ulating to interest not already active. The presence of even 
a small collection of books, on the other hand, often proves 
stinuilating to interest not before consciously alive. The 
experience of ordinary book-clubs, that of the Boston Athe- 
naeum where all shelves are accessible to propiietors, and the 
use of the reserved books in Bates Hall and of the juvenile 
books selected for children's reading in the Central Library, 
combine to convince the committee that the admirable new 
system lately devised by the Librarian of delivery stations at 
which occasional deposits of popular books are kept on shelves 
instantly accessible to the public is of the highest value, and 
should he indefinitely extended, as demand occurs. At one of 
these stations, the committee are informed, where the deposit 
of books is less than three hundred, nearly eighty have been 
taken out in one day. For purposes of popular circulation, 
the system of accessible delivery stations seems immeasurably 
superior to the multiplication of stations so fixed and costly 
as regular branches. Anything like the expense of a new 
branch might reasonably be expected to do indefinitely in- 
creased w^ork if devoted to multiplication of delivery stations. 

In the opinion of the committee, too, such stations, as 
well as the branches, might conveniently be advertised more 
conspicuously than at present. If at all railway stations, at 
all stations of the electric cars, at all branch post-offices, and 
at all school-houses, a conspicuous notice might be posted 
stating where the nearest branch or delivery station of the 
Puljlic Library may be found, a decided increase in the use 
and efficiency of such branches and stations might be con- 
fidently expected. 



LiimARY Department. 45 

The committee would express their cordial satisfaction 
with the manner in whicli the Library is at present managed. 
What suggestions they make are wholly in view of such in- 
evitable considerations as the rapid growth and extension of 
the library system make important for the future. 

As to the best methods of rendering the contents of the 
Library accessible to those who visit it, and of bringing these 
most effectively to the attention of the people at large — 

The general card catalogue upon the dictionary plan of 
authors, titles, and subjects in one alphabet ap|)ears to be as 
well adapted for its purpose as any that has yet been devised. 
It seems desirable to incorporate in it what is known as the 
" Lower Hall " catalogue of fiction, so that this catalogue 
shall be a complete index to the contents of the entire library. 
The committee suggest that this be done at as early a date 
as is consistent with the other work of the catalogue depart- 
ment. The committee invite inmiediate attention to the 
printed catalogue of the Roxbury Branch for the books in 
the Library before 1876, the few remaining copies of which 
are so worn as to be very imperfectly avaihible, and they 
recommend the early addition of its contents to the card cata- 
logue which begins with 1876. 

The special subject lists have proved, of great value, espe- 
cially to students, and their pul)lication should be continued 
within the limits of a wise discretion as to subjects and 
expense. The committee suggest that these lists be made 
more generall}^ available within the Library by the placing 
of distinctively bound copies of them upon the tables within 
easy reach of every reader. 

The later Bulletins issued have been mainly devoted to 
lists of books in the Library upon special topics — a depart- 
ure from the original purpose of the Bulletin, which was to 
publish occasional lists of the new books added to the 
Library. It seems to the committee desirable to discontinue 
the present Bulletin, and substitute for it a weekly classified 
list of new additions. This should include short titles with 
little bibliographical detail, and wherever necessary and 
practicable the addition of a line indicating the character and 
scope of the book. 

It appears from the limited sale of the Bulletin in the 
past, though placed at a merely nominal price, that it reaches 
but a small number of people, and that no information about 
the books which interest them reaches the large mass of 
people who do not visit the Library. It is thought that the 
free distribution of the lists of new1)ooks through the schools 
might be serviceable, and that an experiment in this direc- 
tion might wisely l)e tried. 



46 City Document No. 18. 

In order to increase tlie popular use of the Library, the 
conunittee advise the publication, from time to time, or at 
regular intervals, of articles in the daily or Sunday news- 
pai)ers, relatino- to the additions made to the Library, and 
to the popular sources of information it conttiins upon the 
subjects which, for the time beino-, are upi)ermost in the 
public mind, the ])ur})ose being' to suggest attractive and 
useful books to that portion of the i)ublic which seldom visits 
the Library, and stimulate the reading of useful and instruc- 
tive books of a popular and interesting character. Such 
information in the columns of a nevvs][)aper would also serve 
the broader purpose of suggestive aid to many other libraries 
in the Commonwealth. 

There are at present nine l)ranches and thirteen delivery 
stations. 

It is a cardinal principle in library economy that books 
should be l^rought as near as possible to users. The branches 
and delivery stations should therefore be kept in a flourish- 
ing condition. This should be attended to, even if the only 
way of keeping them so is to diminish temporarily expendi- 
tures at the Central Library for the benelit of special and 
general students. 

No new branches are needed now, but there is urgent need 
for more delivery stations. 

It appears that 23,919 fewer volumes were given out for 
home use from the eight liranches, then and now in operation, 
in 1894 than in 1890" It also appears that at six of the eight 
branches a smaller number of persons have registered for the 
purpose of taking out cards than five years ago. 

Another fact that appears is that the branches have not 
been fully in touch with the Central Lil)rary. Not only is 
it seen that 224 fewer volumes belonging to the Central 
Library were used in the eight branches in 1894 than in 1890, 
but also that in the case of six of these the average number of 
volumes sent daily to them in 1894 was less than three to the 
branch which called for the largest number, and in two branches 
less than one volume. The daily average of the number of 
volumes sent to the other two branches was in one case four 
or five and in the other five or six. 

But it appears that while there has been a great increase in 
the amount of money spent during the last ten years on the 
Central Library, and that while the population of the suburbs 
has been growing rapidly in that period, the sum expended 
on the eight branches in 1894-5 is nearly $3,000 smaller than 
that spent for their benefit in 1884-5. 

The committee believes that more money should be spent 
on the branches. 



Library Department. 47 

1. A largely increased and continuous su]:>ply of new 
popular books is imperatively needed. 

2. It would be well to enlarge the work of transferring 
from the Central Library to branches, and from one branch 
to another, books which have ceased, comparatively speak- 
ing, to aflbrd entertainment in their present positions. 

3. It is desirable to allow readers to go to more and more 
of the shelves to pick out books to take home. The ideal 
plan would be to transfer books little used to the Central 
Library, to rearrange the shelving so as to make supervision 
easy and inexpensive, and then let the public rummage 
among nearly all of the books of the Library. 

4. More illustrated, humorous, and other attractive papers 
and magazines should be supplied. Periodicals should be 
providecl which treat of the principles and applications of 
electricity and other natural forces. 

5. Rooms enough should be provided to satisfy the wants 
of children, and to make it possible for grown persons to be 
comfortable while reading, without being in too great prox- 
imity to large numbers of children. The committee was 
troubled when it learned that less than one-third of the adult 
users of the branch reading-rooms are men. These do not 
seem to have been so arranged as to attract that class of 
readers. 

6. More suitable accommodations should be secured for 
the branch library in East Boston. 

7. The South End Branch is so near the Central Library 
that it would seem well to change its character so as to make 
it more like a deliv^ery station. Keep there permanently 
books needed by the scholars in the day and evening schools 
in the building. Also place there a small collection of mis- 
cellaneous books and periodicals, changing the former from 
time to time. 

8. The committee was glad to learn that a good col- 
lection of fresh reference-books of the character of diction- 
aries and encyclopaedias is to be placed in every branch 
library. 

9. The main reliance for the successful working of a 
branch or delivery station must be upon the librarian and 
her assistants. 

Aptitude for library work should be assured in the case of 
the heads and assistants in branches, even if the assurance 
should involve a much greater expenditure than is made at 
present. 

10. There should be a closer connection between the 
Central Library and the branches and delivery stations. 

(«) Means should be adopted to give greatly increased 



48 City Document No. is. 

infonuiition in both of the lallcr r('S|)('ctin<i' tlio booUs in tho 
Central Library. 

{b) Tlic custodians ot" the brandies shouUl visit the ( -cn- 
tral Jjibrary often, to inspect improved methods adopted 
there. They should use the aid of the officers and l)()oks 
in the Central Li))rnry in answering- the questions of in- 
quirers. 

(c) There should Ix; a telephone in every branch and 
delivery station. 

(d) There should be an accomplished person at the Cen- 
tral Library whose business it would be to communicate with 
the officers of the branches and delivery stations, and help 
them in every way. 

11. Some of the reading-rooms should be kept open later 
in the evening than at present, and the ex])eriment of keep- 
ing a portion of them open during a part of Sunday should 
be tried under improved conditions. 

12. Care should be taken that the attendants are not 
overworked. 

13. The experiments recently made by the Librarian with 
the purpose of adding to the circulation of the delivery sta- 
tions have been very successful. 

The committee approves heartily of the plan for bringing 
about a close connection between the Public Library and the 
public schools, which has been presented to its members by 
the Librarian, and which, it is understood, meets with the 
approval of the Superintendent of Schools, the School 
Committee, and the Trustees and Librarian of the Public 
Library. 

Experience in several other places has shown which por- 
tions of the work of libraries in connection with schools 
belongs to the School Committee and which to the Library. 

It seems to the committee that the results of experience 
have been availed of and incorporated in the plan presented 
it for examination. 

While it is probable that special students will seek the 
special collections on the third floor of the new building in 
Copley Square, the large numl)er of readers who frequent 
Bates Hall show the general demand for a public reading- 
room. There are at present in Bates Hall some six or seven 
thousand volumes, a larger number, it is said, .than have 
ever heretofore been thrown open to the access of the public 
without the intervention of an attendant. But that number 
of volumes is wholly insufficient for a suitably equipped 
reading-room. The great reading-room of the British 
Museum, the exemplar of all such rooms, has about eighty 
thousand volumes on its shelves. At least three or four 



Library Department. 49 

times the number of volumes now in Bates Hall would be 
needed liefore the room could fairly be called a readintr- 
room, fitted for serious readina-, that is, and study. But it 
ajjpearsto be extremely doubtful if Bates Hall, either in its 
capacity or its adaptability thereto, can be made into such a 
suitable reading'-room, and it may be necessary to look for 
a place for such a room in some extension of the building 
yet to be made. 

The children's room should be the most important place 
in the city for the trainino; of those readers without whom 
the Library is a mere ornament, or at best a convenience 
for scholars, instead of the nursery of good citizenship 
which it was meant to be. In the opinion of your commit- 
tee, no time should be lost in filling the shelves of this room 
with books, and in providing the most adequate guidance for 
their use. Advantage should be taken of the newly awak- 
ened interest in the Library building which is now bringing 
many children to it from curiosity, and they should be lured 
by every legitimate device to stay there for reading. All 
the books which the room can hold are not too many to [)ut 
within reach of the children's hands. The most helpful and 
inspiring attendant in the Library is none too valuable to 
find her post in this room. In every way known to modern 
educators the room should be made attractive. Large maps, 
a fine modern globe, and some good pictures, especially 
those of great Americans like Jefferson and Lincoln, ought 
to be found in the children's room. The juvenile magazines 
should also be accessible there, and there should be several 
copies of the better ones. The placards which mark the 
room as belonging to " The Young," a phrase ol)jectionable 
to many children, should come down, and in their place 
should be posted carefully prepared lists of books accessible 
on the various subjects. If an occasional talk about books 
could be given by some competent person to the children 
who should chance to gather in the room on a given Satur- 
day afternoon, still further results might be accomplished. 
No one who goes to this room with an intelligent observation 
can fail to be convinced that within its walls there remains 
for solution the most imi)ortant ]iroblem concerning the re- 
lation of the Libr.iry to the life of the city. 

With the removal, which it is understood is in contempla- 
tion, of the collection of books on patents to special libraries, 
perhaps a room may be found suitable for use for lectures or 
talks on the art of using books. 

The existence of the Library itself of course bears sufficient 
testimony to the general belief in supplying the material for 
reading, but it has not perhaps been sufficiently seen that the 



50 ("iTV DOCUMIONT No. IS. 

buyiiiii" and housini)- and lending of hooks is but part of the 
function of the Library : it must encourage and teach the 
use of them : it shoukl set before itself clearly that one of its 
pur[)oses, and that not the least, should be the cultivation of 
the reading habit. 

The opportunity of current events which have arrested 
the general attention should ])e seized for instruction in 
teaching what helps to their right apprehension may l)e had 
from l)0()lvs ; short and clear bibliographical notes, and clear 
expositions of the ]>ibliography and literature upon such 
subjects, should be given from time to time as occasion 
offers. 

The general experience of the committee in its examina- 
tion shows that the administration of afiairs is well and firmly 
in hand, and is dealing with the Library problems in the 
light of the latest experience and views, while not only from 
their own experience but from such experience of others as 
has been repeated to them, there is nothing but praise for 
the courtesy and gracious helpfulness which one receives at 
the hands of all attendants. 

It is suggested that the Trustees consider whether it will 
not be more economical to have the printing and binding 
needed by the Library done off the premises, and whether it 
may not in other ways be of advantage to avail themselves 
of the larger resources of independent printing-offices and 
binderies. 

On financial questions the conmiittee beg to say : 

1 . That in their opinion the policy of the Trustees pursued 
this year in requesting from the city government separate 
appropriations for books and for maintenance is thoroughly 
wise, and should be regularly maintained. 

2. Legislation Suggested. — Chapter 114 of the Statutes 
of 1878 provides that the Library corporation, which consists 
of the Trustees, shall have authority to take and hold real 
and personal estate to an amount not exceeding one million 
dollars ($1,000,000), wdiich may be given, granted, be- 
queathed, or devised to it and accepted hj the Trustees for 
the benefit of the Public Library of the City of Boston or 
any branch lil)rary or any purpose connected therewith. 
The Auditor's Report for the fiscal year of 1894 and 1895 
shows that at the present time the Public Library funds 
vested in the corporation amount to $210,648.22. In addi- 
tion to these funds, the corporation has received numerous 
gifts of books which are now of large value. With the 
completion of the new building and the great interest shown 
in the same by the citizens, it is to be hoped and expected 
that a considerable number of bequests will be made by in- 



Library Department. 51 

dividuals, who realize the vahie to the comraunity of such 
a ]il>raiy in its midst, and who will give liberally either for 
the oeneral use of the Library or for some special purpose 
connected therewith. We suggest that the Legislature be 
asked to increase the amount of property which the Library 
corporation shall have authority to take and to hold to five 
millions of dollars, and that the citizens be advised through 
the public prints of this increase, in order that it may be 
generally understood that the corporation is empowered to 
take such gifts, and that it desires to have the same. The 
mtitter of suitable memorials in honor of donors to the 
Lil>rary is also worthy of consideration. 

3. The Arumal Appropriation. — The proper administra- 
tion of the new building will require an increased appropriation 
from year to year in order to accomplish the best results and 
for the economical use and maintenance of the property and 
the books. Moreover, for several years a number of thou- 
sands of dollars will be required to make the changes which 
will be found, with active use of the new building, to be 
required. To meet this special need, and also the perma- 
nent increase from year to year, we make the two following 
suggestions, the adoption of both of which we earnestly 
urge. They are made after a careful investigation of the 
needs of the Library, and a comparison with the expense of 
other institutions of similar character and size. When the 
size of the new building, the number of people who use it 
daily, the number of employes required to maintain and 
operate it are considered, the amount of money required 
annually seems extremely small. 

First Suggestion. — It must be evident to every one who 
has given the matter careful thought that a great Public 
Library, whether intended for a scholar's library, such as the 
British Museum, or a great circulating library for the citi- 
zens of a community of over a million people, all of whom, 
under chapter 222 of the Statutes of 1880, have free access 
to the Library, cannot be economically and advantageously 
maintained under the requirements and limitations heretofore 
applied to the annual appropriation. At present the city 
government appropriates a certain fixed amount for the 
Library Department, and if at the end of the fiscal year any 
balance of the appropriation remains unex})ended, the same 
is returned to the City Treasurer, and cannot be held for the 
benefit of the Library the following year, in addition to the 
appropriation. The Library has now reached a stage of de- 
velopment when it should buy books when and where it can 
do so to the greatest advantage. There are occasional sales 
of large and valuable collections in diiferent parts of the world 



52 City Docitment No. 1<S. 

at Avliic'h the Library should be represented, and its funds 
should l)e so arrani>ed that it can take advant.ige of such 
o])i)ortunitics. To do this, the Lil)rary from now on should 
have an annual a]ii)roi)riati()n sufficiently definite so that the 
Trustees can rely ujjon a reasonably certain sum from year 
to year, Avhich Avill increase in about the same ratio as the 
poi)ulation which it serves ; and the unexpended balance of 
any one year should be at the disposal of the Trustees, and 
should not be returned as nn unexpended balance, or deducted 
from the nppropriation for the f'ollowino; year. The new build- 
ingwill doubtless serve the purposes for which it is intended 
for many years. There will be no unusual expenses for 
niiiintcnance from year to year, and this department is one, 
therefore, in which a departure from the established custom 
of mukinir an appropriation of a varying amount each year 
could well be made. 

The committee recommends that the city government be 
asked to :i])propiiate a definite proportion of the total income 
availal)le for the department expenditures for the Library De- 
partment, and to provide that of this amount twenty-five 
thousand dollars at least shall be set apart for the purchase 
of books and p.'nn])hlets. It is l^elieved that when once this 
mode of appropriation for the Library Department is inau- 
gurated, it will continue, and the result will be that as the 
population of the community and the consequent needs of 
the Library increase, the appropriation will increase in about 
the same ratio. This committee also recommends that the 
unexpended surplus of any appropriation at the end of a 
year be held to the credit of the department for the purpose 
of buying books, and not be returned as an unexpended 
balance, or deducted from the appropriation for the follow- 
ing year. 

iSecohd Si(r/r/cstio7i. — To meet the additional expense 
which will need to be incurred for some years in ada])ting 
the present building to the uses required of it, this committee 
recommends that the Trustees, instead of selling the old 
Library l)uil(ling at the present time, lease the same for the 
time limited by Chapter 68 of the Statutes of 1889, which 
provides that the TrUvStees shall hold the property, or shall 
sell the same on or before the maturity of the loan therein 
authorized. This commitlee is informed by the City 
Auditor that this time will expire in about five years. At 
the present time the old Library building cannot he sold to 
achantage, but at the exj)irati()n of five years, with the com- 
pletion of the new hotel on the corner of Tremont and Boyl- 
ston Streets, the subway in operation, and possibly the 



Library Department. 53 

contemplated new station at Park Square under way, the 
propert}^ would ])ring a much larger amount than at present, 

Kespectfully submitted, 

By order of the Committee, 
(Signed) John E. Hudson, Chairman. 

Charles E. Hellier, 

Chairman Sub-CommiUee on Finance. 
C. B. TiLLINGHAST, 

Chairman of Committee o?i Catalogues, Bulletins, and 
Finding Lists. 

Barrett Wendell, 

Chairman of Sub-Committee on Books. 
Samuel Swett Green, 

Chairman of the Committee on Branches and other 
Instruments of Distribution. 

Mr. Putnam's Letter to Prof. Wendell. 

December 12, 1895. 
Prof. Barrett Wendell, Chairman, Sub- Committee on 
Books . 

My dear Mr. Wendell : In response to the three 
questions of which you left me a memorandum : 

I enclose a memorandum drawn up l)y Mr. Whitney at my 
suggestion. A copy of the "Handbook for Readers" to 
which he refers is, I think, in your hands, as also the latest 
Bulletin. These would cover pretty fairly your first ques- 
tion as to what special collections w^e have in the Public 
Library. There are certain departments of this Library, 
however, which, though not classed as special collections, are 
yet notably strong in the interest of special inquirers : the 
Patent Department, for instance ; the U. S. Documents. 

The Harvard University Bulletin of May, 1892, to the 
article in which Mr, Whitney refers and which answers to a 
certain extent your second question as to what special collec- 
tions are in other Libraries closely accessible, I will send to 
you by messenger. Mr. Lane, who com])iled the " Notes," 
states that he finds them to have been incomplete : in the 
case with the Athenaeum, for instance, omitting the very large 
collection of International Law. 

As to your third question, what particular methods of 
interchange seem feasible, the problem seems to me to 
divide itself chronologically as follows : 

1, That each Library shouhl furnish to each of the others 
the completest possible information of what it already con- 
tains, and of the methods of access thereto. 



54 City Document No. 18. 

2. That the Libraries as a group sliall come to an under- 
standing as to what class of material each shall make pecul- 
iarly its speciahy. 

3. That each Library shall notify each of tlic others of 
the more notable purchases proposed by it. 

4. That the libraries shall come to a mutual agreement 
as to the facilities to be afibrded by each to inquirers referred 
to it by the others, and, as part of the same agreement, an 
understanding as to what material each is willing to lend to 
the others on temporary deposit, and as to how this is to be 
transmitted, and on what conditions it is to be used. 

Division third is a sim})le one, as it requires simply a form 
of postal notice which will, I think, be adopted by at least 
two of the Libraries in this vicinity very shortly. The 
question in division first is a question largely of catalogues 
and of cataloguing. There will, I believe, be possible in 
the future cooperative undertakings in cataloguing which 
will render much more clear the resources of the special col- 
lections of the Libraries in this vicinity. With its own 
printing equipment, the Boston Public Library will hereafter 
be able to undertake much more varied enterprises in cata- 
loguing than have hitherto been afibrded. 

An agreement as to mutual comity in the use of the books 
may be reached, and with very little trouble. 

The more formidable part of the problem is the differentia- 
tion ; the constituency in each Library being duplicated, to a 
certain extent, in the constituency of each of the others. 
Abstractly, for instance, it should seem that the collection 
of genealogical matter in the Library of the New England 
Historic-Genealogical Societj^ should render unnecessary the 
purchase of any but the more general works for the Boston 
Public Lilirary ; but our inquirers in this line are so many 
and so persistent, that it would be impossible for us to con- 
fine ourselves to the general works, as the genealogical section 
in the Bates Hall reference collection is used more than any 
other material in the reading-room. ' Nor could we limit our 
purchases to general works on the subject without a vehement 
protest from a very large body of readers who would certainly 
not be content to be referred to Beacon Hill, even though we 
could assure them of a courteous welcome when they reached 
there. 

Faithfully yours, 

(Signed) Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 



Library Department. 55 



Mr. Whitney's Memorandum. 

Boston Public Library, 
Catalogue Department, December 6, 1895. 
To the Librarian : 

The readiest method of obtaining information in regard to 
the distinctive features of this and neighboring Libraries is 
found in the "Harvard University Bulletin," May, 1892, in 
an article entitled " Notes on Special Collections to be found 
in the Public Libraries of the United States," by W. C. 
Lane and C. K. Bolton. Here are given characterizations 
of twenty-eight Libraries in Boston and Cambridge. While 
these descriptions are brief, and necessarily very incomplete, 
they are helpful and invite further investigation. 

I have had occasion recently to examine the manuscript 
catalogues of a few of these Libraries, and have been im- 
pressed with their wide range and diversity. Many are col- 
lections on special subjects, as, for instance, the Herbarium 
Library of the Botanical Garden at Cambridge and the Boston 
Natural History Society Library, and readers at the Boston 
Public Library not finding the books needed would naturally 
turn to these special collections. 

The Boston Public Library. 

Additional information in regard to the Boston Public 
Library is to be found in the " Handbook for Readers," 9th 
edition. Pages 333-348 contain an ac(;ount of the special col- 
lections given to the Library, with mention of the catalogues 
printed in book form. Pages 28-262 contain an index to the 
many book lists and bibliographical notes published in the 
Bulletin and elsewhere during the past thirty years. By 
these an approximate idea may be obtained of the contents 
of the Library. A later index is in Vol. 9 of the Bulletin. 
On page 2 of the cover of the latest Bulletin the titles of all 
our special catalogues are given. 

It is doubtless true that there has been less cooperation 
among the Libraries of Boston and Cambridge than is desir- 
able, and this for two reasons : 

1. Most of these are proprietary Libraries, or belong to 
institutions or learned societies, to which the public cannot 
easily have access. 

2. Few, if any, have printed catalogues brought up to 
date, which an outsider could use. 

There is preparing at this Library a new edition of the list 
of serial publications now taken in the principal Libraries of 



56 City Document No. 1(S. 

Boston and Cambridge, which -svill be a (•()iiti'il)u(ion tcnvards 
making- these Libraries nmtutUly heljirui. 

It" each Library could place in sight of its readers the 
printed catalogues and bulletins of the other institutions it 
would be a heli). Our own Library has made a special point 
of this, and the Bulletins of Harvard College and Catalogues 
of the Boston Athenanim and State Library, and other helps, 
are within the reach of all, 

I think that there is a friendly feeling between all of these 
Libraries and a desire for cooperation. The Harvard College 
Library is certainly most generous in its offers of aid to out- 
siders. So, too, our own Library would be. 

Perhaps a published statement might give expression to 
this good feeling, and encourage in readers the belief that the 
words over the doorway of this Library, " Free to all," are 
true, in a sense, of all the other Libraries. Cards might be 
given by the librarians commending students to the con- 
sideration of other librarians, or asking for them access to 
the books needed. 

Very respectfully, 
(Signed) James L. Whitney, 

Gl lief of Catalogue Department. 



appe:ndices 



1895. 



LIST OF APPENDICES. 



I. Financial Statement. 
II. Extent of the Library bt Years. 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, including Branches, 

Accessions, Located. 

IV. Classification : Central Library. 
v. Classification : Branches. 

VI. Registration. 

VII. Circulation. 

VIII. Trustees for Forty-four Years. 

IX. Examining Committees for Forty-four Years. 
X. Library Service (March 16, 1896), including Sunday and 

Evening Schedule. 
XI. System of Civil Service. 
XII. By-Laws Adopted December 3, 1895. 

XIII. List of Newspapers (March, 1896). 

XIV. Correspondence. 

XV. Givers, and Amount of Gifts. 



Library Department. 59 



APPENDIX I. 



FINANCE. 



Boston Public Library, 
Auditing Department, February 1, 1896. 
To the Trustees : 

Gentlemen : The undersigned herewith presents a statement 
of the receipts and expenditures of the Library Department for 
the linancial year commencing February 1, 1895, and ending 
January 31, 1896 ; also a statement concerning the Trust and 
other funds, statements covering special appropriations, and a 
statement of expenditures on account of the Branches for the 
twelve years ending 1895-6. 

Eespectfully, 

A. A. Nichols, 

Auditor. 
Receipts. 
Unexpended balance of the appropriation for mov- 
ing 16,241 12 

City appropriation, 1895-96 . . f 175,000 00 
Fines and sales of catalogues : 

Balance from 1894-95, |10,656 70 
During the year . . 3,560 91 

14,217 61 

Balance of West End Branch appro- 
priation 4,097 64 

Transfer from city surplus fund . 11,000 00 

Transfer from appropriation for Li- 
brary Building, furnishing . . 2,660 08 



Income from Trust Funds : 
In hands of City Treas- 
urer, Feb. 1, 1895 . f 82 69 
During the year . 10,245 50 



206,975 33 
$213,216 45 



In hands of J. S. Mor- 
gan & Co., Feb. 1, 
1895 . . . $16,963 05 

Interest on deposit, to 

Feb. 1, 1896 . . 126 37 



10,328 19 



17,089 42 



Carried forward, $27,417 61 $213,216 45 



60 



City Document No. 18. 



Broufjht fonvard, 

In hainls of Baring Bros. & Co., 
London, Feb. 1, 1895 
Rents froni Old Library Building . 
Donations : 

From W. C. Todd, un- 
expended Feb. 1, 
1895 . . . $2,000 00 

From W. C. Todd, 

during the year . 2,000 00 

From Woman's Edu- 
cation Association . $383 51 

From Andrew C. Wheel- 
wright ... 100 00 

Exchange account : lost books, sales 

of duplicates, etc 

Interest on bank deposit . 



$27,417 61 1213,216 45 

72 75 
3,101 98 



4,000 00 



483 51 



580 90 
1,184 38 



The expenditures have been as follows : 
General Library accounts, including the cost of 

maintaining the Branches : 
Binding: 



36,841 13 

$250,057 58 



Stock .... 


$2,406 14 




Contract work . 


1,941 55 




Salaries 


10,626 87 








$14,974 m 


Books : 






City appropriation . $20,590 08 




Income from Trust 






Funds . 


6,632 78 








27,222 86 


Periodicals 




5,307 49 


Expense, miscellaneous 




4,920 28 


Expense, cleaning 




3,870 55 


Fuel 




6,136 87 


Furniture and fixtures 




7,108 34 


Gas .... 




1,729 76 


Printing and. stock . 


$6,312 92 




Salaries 


485 00 




Catalogues 


4,295 98 


11,093 90 
3,195 85 


Stationery and Library su 


pplies 


Salaries 




103,047 76 


Transportation, including 


postage . 


530 53 


Transportation between ( 


ventral Li- 




brary and Branches 




3,285 43 


Rents, Branch Libraries 


and Read- 




iug-Rooms 




6,175 48 



Carried forward, 



$198,599 QQ $250,057 58 



Library Department. 61 

Brought forward, $198,599 66 $250,057 58 

Repairs : 

Stock and contract 

work . . . $1,987 29 
Salaries . . . 2,699 00 

4,686 29 



Electric lighting and power . . 4,758 42 

Eent of Deliveries, including Custo- 
dian's services .... 2,347 25 

Moving expenses .... 6,341 12 

Subscriptions to news- 
papers . . . $1,223 75 

Periodicals for West End 

Branch ... 67 50 

Odd numbers of periodi- 
cals .... 80 

West End Branch : 
Furniture . $217 67 
Printing . 664 46 
Fuel . . 55 20 

937 33 



Mattapan Reading-Room 
Rent . . $110 00 
Books and 

periodicals, 302 28 
Salary . . 37 44 
Incidentals . 4 55 



454 27 



2,683 65 



219.416 39 

Balance on hand January 31, 1896 . . . $30,(i41 d 9 

The balance is made up of the following items, viz. : 
Cash belonging to Trust Funds in hands of City 

Treasurer February 1, 1896 $10,328 19 

Cash on deposit in London : 

Trust funds $7,645 88 

City money 6,000 00 



Cash on deposit with TsTew England Trust Co. : 

Rents from Old Library Building, $1,664 65 

Unexpended of Todd donation . 2,776 25 
Unexpended of A. C. Wheelwright 

donation 32 50 

Woman's Education Association . 383 51 
Exchange account : lost books, etc., 580 10 
Interest on bank deposit to Feb- 
ruary 1, 1896 .... 1,184 38 
Unexpended of the transfer to 

Mattapan Reading-Room . 45 73 



13,645 88 



6,667 12 
$30,641 19 



62 



City Document No. 18. 



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Library Department. 



67 



$364 00 
255 43 
455 52 


$1,074 95 

$529 32 

403 80 

1 50 




$364 00 

78 65 

600 70 

$1,043 35 










$28 00 
71 30 
14 21 


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$4,266 27 
7,772 96 
0,820 12 
4,147 06 
3,231 89 
3,717 44 
3,351 84 
3,449 35 


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68 



City Document No. 18. 



! 


$36,756 93 

( 1,082 80 
) (6mo8.) 

868 74 

732 50 

320 34 

438 18 

1,190 89 

1.004 67 


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Library Department. 



69 



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70 



City Document No. 18. 



LIBRARY BUILDING, DARTMOUTH STREET. 

From July 1, 1887, to January 31, 1896. 



John T. Scully 

Woodbury & Leighton, 1st contract 

Woodbury & Leighton, 'Id contract 

R. C. Fisher & Co 

R. Guastavino 

Lindemann T. C. R. T. Co 

Batterson, See & Eisele 

Post & McCord, 1st contract 

Post & McCord, 2d contract 

David Mcintosh, Ist contract 

David Mcintosh, 2d contract 

Bowker, Torrey & Co 

IraG.Hersey 

Snead & Co., Iron Works 

Norcross Bros 

General Electric Co 

Isaac N. Tucker ^ 

M. T. Davidson 

Aug. St. Gaudens 

Archer & Pancoast 

John S. Sargent 

E. A. Abbey 

P. de Chavannes 

Bethlehem Iron Works 

Freight on electrical machine (Knight & Son) 

Siemens & Halske 

I. P. Morris Co 

W. J. McPherson 

N.E.Tel, and Tel. Co 

D. C. French 

E. E. Garnsey 

E. D. Leavitt 

Furniture 

Carried forward 



Amount 

Contracted 

for. 



$7,714 44 
313,596 79 
7.^6,233 87 
48,784 40 
85,544 04 
35,209 54 
57,273 00 
43,662 43 
50,900 00 
48,716 81 
20,823 00 
110,459 00 
90,705 70 
76,419 75 
52,857 00 
21,209 30 

8,952 43 

3,894 00 
50,000 00 
15,122 80 
15,000 00 
15,000 00 
49,428 74 

1,617 40 

78 10 

14,000 00 

17,170 00 

5,158 91 

997 12 

25,000 00 

1,500 00 



Amount 
Certified 
and Paid. 



$7,714 
313,596 
756,233 
48,784 
85,544 
35,209 
I 57,273 
43,662 
50,900 
48,716 
20,823 
110,459 
90,705 
76,419 
52,857 
21,209 
8,952 
3,894 
3,000 
15,122 
7,500 
9,500 
17,428 
1,617 
78 
14,000 



5,158 
997 



1,500 
6,028 

26,107 



Balance 
Uncertified. 



,500 00 
1,500 00 
:,000 00 



$2,075,726 08 



Library Department. 



71 



LIBRARY BUILDING, DARTMOUTH 8TREKT.— Concluded. 



Contracts. 


Amount 

Contracted 

for. 


Amount 
CeriiHed 
and Paid. 


Balance 
Uncertified. 


Brought forward 

Construction . 


$2,075,726 08 1 $1,940,995 26 
50,387 77 50,387 77 


$134,730 82 




64,581 66 64,581 66 
97,624 72 i 97,624 72 
5,027 25 5,027 25 




Architect's commission of 5 per cent 

Architect's commission of 7^ per cent 






$2,363,602 54 $2,228,871 72 


$134,730 82 



Appropriation $2,368,854 89 

Payments 2,228,871 72 

Balance uncertified , 



$139,983 17 
134,730 82 



3,252 35 



West Church, remodelling and furnishing : 




City appropriation 


. 


. 


130.000 00 


The payments have been 


as follows : 






Contractors : 








J. J. Flynn . 


$12,640 00 






A. A. Sanborn (heating 








and ventilating) 


1,120 00 






Smith & Forbes (plumb- 








ing) .... 


400 00 






Lord Electric Co. 


250 00 






Architects, A. S. Jennev, 








F. T. A. Fox . 


613 12 










115.023 12 




Salaries 




1,958 01 




Furniture 


. 


763 00 




Incidentals . 




274 31 










18,018 44 



Unexpended balance, February 1, 1896 . 

West End Branch Library : 

Balance of city appropriation .... 
Payments : 
. Salaries $266 11 

Incidentals 61 00 


fill. 981 56 
$327 11 

$327 11 




Library Building, furnishing : 

City appropriation .... 
Amount transferred to General Library appro- 
priation ... 

Balance, February 1, 1896 .... 


$44,000 00 

2,660 08 

$41,339 92 



72 



City Document No. 18. 



TRANSFEllS — (From Rents of Old Libuauy Building). 



Date. 


Object. 


Amount, 


Expenditures, 
1895-96. 


Balances 
Unexpended. 


May-, 1895 . . . 
Janmiry 31,1896. 


Mattapan Reading Room . 
West End Branch .... 


$500 00 
937 33 


$454 27 
937 33 


$45 73 






$1,437 33 


$1,391 60 


$45 73 



LONDON ACCOUNTS. 



J. S. Morgan & Co. . 
Baring Bros. & Co . 



Balances 
from 1894-95 



£ s. a. 

3,478 2 3 



Remittances, 

1895-96. 



£ .1. 0. 
1,251 19 



£1,251 19 



Total 
Credits. 



£ s. d. 
4,730 1 S 



Expenditures, 
1895-96. 



£ s. d. 
1,952 17 8 



Balances 
Unexpended. 



£ s. d. 

2,777 3 7 





LIBRARY TRUST 


FUNDS. — INVESTED IN CITY 


OF BOSTON BONDS. 


GiraB. 




When delivered. 


No. of Bond. 


When due. 


-p^ 


Provisions. 


Bate 


,.0.000 00 
^0,000 00 
( 10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
6,000 00 
4,000 00 
4,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 


March. 1853 
April, 1861 
April, 1853 
May, 1860 
August, 1877 
Deceniljur, 1873 
April, 1879 
April, 1879 
August, 1S50 
June, 1863 


8,104 
362 

8,105 
281 

2,579 

2,960 
2,068 
8,106 
1,224 
( 3,714 


April, 1913 
Jan'y, 1906 
April, 1913 
July. 1905 
Oct., 1897 
Jan'y, 1924 
April. 1899 
Oct., 1920 
April, 1913 
Jan'y, 1914 
Oct., 1900 ) 


»2,()00 

1 ,,» 

600 
600 
200 
200 
160 

1 •: 




3 Abbott Lawrence 

* Charloite Harris 

6 Henry L. Pierce 

6 Mary P. Townsend 

7 George Tioknor 

8 Jobn P. Bigelow 

9 Franklin Club 


( " To the maintenance of a free public library." 
("Purcliase of hooks." 

Books having a permanent value. 

Books for Charlestown branch, published before 1850. 

" Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 

Books Ave years old in some one edition. 

Books in Spanish and Portuguese live years old in some one edition. 

Purchase of books. 

Books of permanent value, preferably " books on government and 


11 South Boshin 

13 Joseph Schoiaeici 

14 Thomas B. Harris 

15 Daniel Treadwell 

16 Edward Lawrence 

17 J. Ingereoll Bowditoh .... 
„g j OhariesGreelyLoringj 


100 00 
60,000 00 
11,800 00 
1,000 00 
2,000 00 

1,400 00 

1,000 00 

350 00 

I. 500 00 

10,000 00 
600 00 


September, 1879 
December, 1883 
July, 1890 
April, 1884 

1 October, .885 

November, 1889 
July, 1892 
1894 
. January, 1896 
May, 1886 

January, 1890 


5,696 

6,300 

1,244 

( 1,.382 

1 1,486 

1 1;754 

2,452 

I 9,381 

I,S83 

1,816 


July. 1919 
Oct., 1913 1 
July. 1920 
April. 1914 
April, 1916 
Oct.. 1917 
Nov. 16,1919 
Oct.. 1921 
Oct.. 19 23 
Jan., 1916 
April. 1916 

Jan'y, 1920 


4 

2,000 

472 

40 

1 

!• 271 
1 

i 

20 

360 


For benefil of South Boston branch. 
To be used for books of permanent value. 

For benefit of Charlestown branch. 

To be expended by the Trustees in such manner as they may deem for 
the best interest of the Library. 

" To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they [the 
Trustees] may choose to the purchase of special booksof reference to be 
kept and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said Public Library." 

For " the purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathe- 
maticB and astronomy," to be added to the Bowditch collection. 
















$197,850 00 








$8,692 



MEMORANDA. 

(1) Joshua Bates, born near BoatoD, 178S, died in London, as the head of the house of Baring Brothers & Co., 1864. In addition to this fund, he gave $50,000 worth of hooks to the Library. 

(2) The flum of $10,000 was a zifl in Mr. Phillips' lifetime. The other «20,lH)0 was bequeathed by his will, dated 2Sth oCSeptember, 1849. He died 29th of July, IStf), uged 8l'. 

(3) Mr. Lawrence died in August, 1855, and this sum was a bequest. 

(4) The bequest of Charlotte Harris to the Charlestown branch. With it her private library was also given. 

(5) The donation of Mayor Pierce, previous to hia retirement from office. The principal or interest may be expended as is deemed best. 

(7) This bequest acconJpanie'd the teVamentary gifi of his Spanish and Portuguese library. It required that $1,000. at least, shall be spenl^very five years for twemy-flve years, for the addition of 

(9) Given by the Trustees" f the FranltlinClub."under the aufiiority given them at the dissolution of that literary association. 



STOCKS AND CASH OTHER THAN CITY BONDS HELD BY TREADWELL FUND, PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Sharbb. 


Par Value 
8&. 


as received 
from Trustee. 


Total as 
received from 




income. 


Remarks. 


16 B.&A.R.R.Co 

6 B. & Prov. R.R. Co 

9 Fitchburg R.R. Co 

1 VI. & Mass. R.R. Co 


$100 00 


$179 00 
179 50 


$2,685 00 
1,077 00 
1.062 00 


/ $5,686 00 
Less 88 00 


♦ $128 00 
60 00 




April 5, 1887. The certificates of 9 shares of F. R.R. exchanged for. 
eertifleate of 12 shares preferred stock in same corporation, par value 
$100. Total, $1,200. 

Less paid May 10, 1886, to City Collector, per order of Board of 
Trustees of Public Library. 




100 00 






$5,497 00 

100 00 
37 69 





















♦Includea income on the o 



Library Department. 73 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

BiGELOw Fund. — This is a donation made by the late John P. Bigelow, 
in August, 1850, Avlien Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated to the purchase of books 
for the increase of tlie Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . .^LOOO 00 

Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for the 
time being. 

Bates Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Josuda Bates, of 
London, in March, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . -S^CnoO 00 

" The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, expended in 
the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as may be 
found most needful and most useful." Payable to the Mayor of the City for 
the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fond. — This is the bequest of J. Ingeksoll Bowditch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bond $10,OnO 00 



The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the purchase 
of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Jonathan Phillips, 
of Boston, April, 18o3. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . .$10.(^00 00 



The interest on this Fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of books 
for said Library. 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman, in his will, dated 20th September, 
1849. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $20.000 00 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of a 
Free Public Library. 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the time 
being. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Abbott 
Lawrence, of Boston. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the purchase 
of books for the said Library having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Edward 
Lawrence, of Charlestown. The following clause from his will explains its 
purpose : 



74 City Document No. 18. 

" To liold and apply the income, and so much of tlie principal as they may 
clioose, to the purcliase of special books of referentje to be kept and used 
only at ihe Charle.stown branch of said Public Library." 

Invested in one Citv of Boston Four j)er cent. Bond, due April 

1, I'JIC) . . ' .SoOO 00 

PiKRCE Fund. — This is a donation made by IIknry L. Pierce, Mayor of 
the Citv, November 2i), 1873, and accepted by the City Council, Decemhcjr 
27. 1873. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $5,000 00 

TowNSEND F'uND. — Tliis is a don'xtion from William Minot and William 
Minot, .Tr., executors of the will of Mary P. Townsend, of Boston, at whose 
disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust, for such charitable 
and jiublic institutions as tiiey may think meritorious. Said executors ac- 
cordingly selected the Public Library of the City of Boston as one of such 
institutions, and attached the following conditions to the legacy: "The 
income only shall, in each and every year, be expended in the purchase of 
books for the use of the Library; each of which books shall have been pub- 
lished in some one edition at least five years at the time it may be so 
purchased." 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent. Bond, for . . $4,000 00 

TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of Boston, 
he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four thousand 
volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After the receipt of 
said sum, the city is required to spend not less than one thousand dollars in 
every five years during the twenty-five years next succeeding {i.e., the 
income of four thousand dollars, at the rate of five per cent, per annum), in 
the purchase of books in the Spanish and Portuguese languages and litera- 
ture. At the end of twenty-five years the income of the said sum is to be 
expended annually in the purchase of books of permanent value, either in 
the Spanish or Portuttuese language, or in such other languages as may be 
deemed expedient by those having charge of the Library. These books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessil)le for reference or 
study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the Library building. If 
these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trust and conditions 
faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts, and money are to be given to the 
President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this contribu- 
tion, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished hi-r right to retain dur- 
ing her life the books and manuscripts, and placed them under the control of 
the city, the City Council having previously accepted the bequests in accord- 
ance with the terms and conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public 
Library received said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $4,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund. — This is a donation made in June, 1803, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the 
association, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French, and J. 
Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a manner as to them 
should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on the Public Library, 
attaching to it the following conditions : '• In trust that the income, but the 
income only, shall, year by year, be expended in the purchase of books of 
permanent value for the use of the free Public Lilirarj- of the city, and, as far 
as practicable, of such a character as to be of special interest to young men." 



Library Department. 75 

The Trustees expressed a preference for books relative to Government and 
Political economy. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . SI .000 00 

Treadwell Fund. — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambritlge, late Runiford Professor in Harvard College, who died February 
27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, lejiacies, 
etc., in trust to his executors, to liold during the life of his wife for her 
benefit, and after her decease to divide the residue then remaining in the 
hands of the trustees, as therein provided, and convey one-fifth part thereof 
to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 

Tlie City Council accepted said bequest and authorized the Trustees of 
the Public Library to receive the same, and to invest it in the City of Boston 
Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such 
manner as they may deem for the best interests of tlie Library. 

Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent. Bonds . . $5, .550 00 

" " " Three and one-half per cent.Bonds, L400 00 

16 shares B. & A. R.R. Co. stock, par value -$100 each, 1,G00 00 

" 6 shares B. & P. K.R. Co. stock, par value .$100 each, 600 00 

12 shares Kitchburg R.R. Co. stock, par value $100 each, l,20i) 00 

1 share Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co. stock, pnr value .$100 each, 100 00 

" 18 shares Cambridge Lyceum Stock, par value $20 each, 300 00 

.$10,810 00 



Charlotte Harris Fond. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following e.xtract from her will : 

" I give to the Charlestowu Public Library $10,000, to be invested on in- 
terest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books published 
before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own private library, and 
tlie portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." Bequest accepted by City 
Council, July 31, 1877. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $1,000 00 

ScholfieldFond. —Bequest of the late Arthur Scholfield, who died in 
New York, January 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs during 
their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of permanent value. 
The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 18, 1889, and by his will be- 
queathed to the City of Boston the-sum of $11,800, which represents the 
income of said fund, received by him up to the time of his death, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. Invested in 

One City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . . . $50,000 00 

" . . . . 11,800 00 



$61,800 00 



Green Fund. — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the in 
come of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating to 
American history. Invested in 

Two City of Boston Five per cent. Bonds, for . . . . $1,500 00 
One City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . . 5oO 00 

$2,000 00 



City Document No. 18. 



South Boston Bijanch LiiiUAUY Trust Fund. — Donation of a citizen 
of Somli Bo^tol), tlie income of wliicli is to be expended for the benefit of tiie 
S<JUth Hoston Brancli Library. 



Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . 



•SI 00 GO 



Kecapitulation of Public Libraky Trust Funds. 



SeholtieUl bequests 

Biites donation . 

Piiillips bequest 

Bowditc!) bequest 

Phillips donation 

Charlotte Harris bequest 

Abbott Lawrence bequest 

Treadwell bequest 

Pierce donation 

Townsend bequest 

Ticknor bequest 

Green donations 

Biuelow donation 

Thomas B. Harris bequest 

Franklin Club donation 

Edward Lawrence bequest 

South Boston Branch Library '1 



.$fiL800 00 

50,000 00 

20,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,0(10 00 

10 000 00 

10,818 09 

5,000 00 

4.000 00 

4,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 GO 

100 OG 



Invested funds 



.$201,213 09 



Library Department. 



77 



APPENDIX II. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 





YEARS. 


il 

11 

Ha 


1 


1852-53 


S,688 


a 


1853-54 


16,221 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


14 


1865-66 


130;678 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 





Years. 


II 
13 

Ha 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


25 


1576-77 


312,010 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 



31 


1882-5 


32 


1883-5 


33 


1884-S 


34 


1885 


35 


1886 


36 


1887 


37 


1888 


38 


1889 


39 


1890 


40 


1891 


41 


1892 


42 


1893 


43 


1894 


44 


1895 



422,116 
438,594 
453,947 
460,993 
479,421 
492,956 
505,872 
520,508 
536,027 
556,283 
576,237 
597,152 
610,375 
628,297 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, .JANUARY 31, 1896, 
ACCORDING TO LOCATION. 



Central Library 
Duplicate-room 



Fellowes Athenseum 



City part 



^a 



Total, Roxbury branch. 



East 1 
South Boston , . 
Charlestown . . , 
Brighton .... 
Dorchester . . . . 
South End ... 
Jamaica Plain . . 
West Roxbury . 
West End ... 
Lower Mills . . . 
Mattapan . . . , 
Mt. Bowdoin . . , 
North Brighton . 
Harrison Avenue 



124 
455 
075 
583 
241 
849 
131 
976 
1,419 
85 
73 
74 
82 
261 



City Document No. 1(S. 
APPENDIX III. 



NET INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 
Located January 1, 1895 — January 31, 189G. 



■ 


















^ 






00 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Bates Hall 

Lower Hall 


9,879 

806 


1,543 


9,733 

874 


11,857 
710 


13,518 
I's 50 


15,306 
I's 23 


16,499 
818 


20,493 
loss 455 


32,491 
746 


i 11,821 


Duplicate room .... 


loss 59 


443 


I's 52 


330 


419 


2,355 


I's 9,143 


loss 542 


I's 8,056 


313 


East Boston branch . 


036 


158 


170 


63 


58 


59 


5 


48 


126 


112 


South Boston branch . 


303 


310 


284 


159 


115 


200 


51 


55 


401 


loss 289 


Roxbury branch . . . 


362 


262 


280 


199 


146 


308 


loss 352 


147 


382 


48 


Fellowcs Albeureum . 


4,748 


358 


390 


397 


361 


438 


2S9 


318 


318 


407 


Charlestown branch . 


680 


443 


145 


I's 70 


233 


421 


22 


339 


300 


loss 16 


Brighton branch . . . 


186 


146 


46 


130 


91 


167 


98 


23 


292 


107 


Dorchester branch . . 


.590 


546 


423 


309 


269 


222 


209 


134 


358 


loss 73 


Jamaica Plain branch . 


355 


417 


335 


294 


1.50 


214 


112 


221 


329 


273 


South End branch . . 


loss 26 


204 


260 


248 


187 


365 


loss 67 


26 


276 


138 


West Roxbury branch, 
* North End branch . . 




05 


20 


6 


10 












295 


9 


8 


4 


12 


224 


84 


75 


63 


I's 1,861 


North Brighton Read- 














8 


- 
























1,897 


6 5"''' 


Lower Mills Reading- 


















85 


Maltapau Reading- 
room 










. 








73 


Mt. Bowdoin Reading- 




















Harrison-avenne Read- 













261 


^ 




















Total 


"l8,428 


13,535 


12,916 


14,636 


15,519 


•20,256 


8,633 


20,915 


29,927 


**] 8,695 



Deducted, 

condemned, 

transferred, 

or lost. 



Central Library 
Duplicate-room 
Branches . . . 



Net gain in detail as above. 



* Collection transferred to West End branch. 
** A comparison of figures aiven in the reports of 1894 and 1895 of number of volumes in branches 
will show a discrepancy of 773 volumes in the net gain. This is accounted for by the custodian of 
the br.inch as due to the fact that the present figures represeut an attempt to correct errors which 
have accnnuil.itod during several years past. 



Library Department. 



7i» 



ACCESSIONS, January 1, 1895, to January 31, 1896. 



Central Library 
Duplicate-room 
East Boston . . 
South Boston . 
Roxbury . . . 
Charlestowu 
Brighton . . 
Dorchester . . 
South End . . 
Jamaica Plain . 
West End . . . 
West Roxbury 
North Brighton 
Mt. Bowdoin . 
Maltapan . . . 
liOwer Mills 
Harrison avenue 



855 
,033 
,065 
905 
744 
818 
640 
812 
i,522 
626 



Condemned or 
missing. 



''*3,144 
647 
267 
1 1,030 
431 
.393 



Not gain. 



11,920 
313 
588 
3 
634 
512 
570 
339 
552 
766 
6,522 
626 
74 
74 
73 
85 
261 



* Includes between 5,000 and 6,000 volumes purchased for branches which have not 
yet been irhelved. 

** Includes 2,717 volumes entered as missing .since the shulf- reading of 1S93. 
t Includes some transferred to Central Library. 



80 



City Document No. 18. 



i 


1 


^ 






1 

to 


|Lr 


to 


i 


5 


Tl 


g 


i 


« 


o 

■ 1 


g 


? 


1 




i 


1 1 s 1 1 1 s 1 g s s i 1 1 s 1 






s 

00 




















i 


« «=. -l <= =>. «-.- •* Ci. » 

-tl O ^ M to CO OT 




















1 


1 1 1 1 1 p 1 1 




















i 


1 1 1 1 1 1 ' S 






















i 

00 


1 a S i 1 1 S S 

T* o •* (n" o" co" i-l 






















i 

00 


o_ en i-<_ oo_ t» i- 5< « 






















00 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






















00 


§ g i Tl 1 § i 1 

CO- CO- of (M- O- CO 






















00 
























i 














i 






















i 


















l 

1 




> 




l 

^ 


1 


' t 

^ 


> 


< 


^ 
1 


1 




< 


c 

1 

< 


j: 


> 

> 

J 

ii 


a 


2 

c 

' 1 


j 

! 

i 

; 



APPENDIX IV. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY CLASSIFICATIONS. 

books located only,) 



EXPLANATION.— ClasB III. Includes general hlBtory, etc., when embracing 
ClasB IV. Includes the collected works of American writers, and what of j 
ClaBses v., VI., VII., and VIII. have the same scope for the respective 
idcB also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the Scandinavian nal 
ClasB XIV. includes political Bcieoce and ethics, applied and unapplied, 
'" nry and naval arts, agricultural dor 



jtimes termed "polygraphy. 
has for America. Class Vn 



Class XIX. includes 



Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

Class XXVII. cootains the former " Lower Hall " collection, which has a different 

* Framed. 

Note. — The dates given in the speci 

The totals given above are based upo 






CLASSES. 




Sfecui. Librabies. 




1 




1858 


isei 


1866 


1871 


1873 


1875 


188U 


1880 




1890 


1894 


1894 


1894 


1877 


189S 


1869 

r 




J.&, 


1 


ll 


Islj 

18 

138 
36 
46 
16 

48 
31 
52 
53 

30 

38 
63 


Total in 
Central 

1896. 

11,632 
12,793 
57,318 
39,229 
21,619 
10,449 
16,187 
9,104 
2,753 
12,221 
20,977 
31,067 
17,662 

6,897 
19,485 
13,216 
17,364 
12,079 


If 


322 
615 

1,090 
858 
620 
326 

1,423 

329 
732 
3,493 
1,360 
307 
98 

136 
13 
30 


5 

114 
7 
2 
8 

1 

6 

683 

32 

1 


I 

278 

21 
88 
31 

26 

4,168 

250 
381 
120 
63 

36 
14 


ll 


$ 


P 


$ 


|i 


ill 


ll 

<1 


ii 


ll 


|i 


1 = 






40 
417 
346 
2,330 
2,044 
619 
188 
602 
436 
131 
569 
742 
707 
982 
168 

740 
387 
606 
600 
1,436 


249 

60 
11 

1,387 

147 

6 

15 

3,829 

6 

13 
6 


690 
135 
812 
3,204 
2,474 
337 
254 

200 
225 
471 
248 

: 

48 
16 
43 
84 

3,229 


31 
424 
388 
2,468 
670 
184 

23 
64 
61 
63 
248 
66 

31 

2 

89 

400 


























2,35» 
13,204 
14,116 


II. 

m. 

IV. 
VI. 




10 

460 


76 


789 
4,095 
408 








































American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite literature . . . . 


.» 








669 


316 




















50,344 


g ry, 


. . . '. 1 1 




















^' 




















U.341 
17.400 
11,268 
7.294 
12,871 
28,294 


vni. 
rs. 

X. 

XI. 

xn. 


hi J' 


1 
3 




299 






























































Oriental history, geography, biography, travel, and literature 


28 




















29 


14 
















4,405 
















































19,327 
10,841 
6,103 
19,62T 
13,554 


XV. 
XVI. 


J ■'' '^d 


101 




2,819 
















p iiu" 1 




















Medical science'' 


4 
























xvm. 




























19 
























XX 














. . . . 










1-218 


XXI 








6,990 








129 






20.983 






■■■J 


80 


















xxm 




- 




46 




24 

1 


43 










•150 






































3,369 

S40 

6.806 

38,644 


XXV. 


kef 






540 

6,806 
































Transactions 


112 


2,248 




























. . . . 
















































38,544 


































6,990 
















14,966 




6,077 


13,820 


2,045 


6,149 


13,627 


6,384 






6,733 


679 


2,819 


.150 


J- 


318 


129 


4^^ 


38,844 


468-95 

















Library Department. 



81 



APPENDIX V. 



CLASSIFICATION. 



Branch Libraries, January 31, 1896, as reported by Custodians of 
Branches. 



Reference-books 



Genealogy and Her- 
aldry 



Biography 
History . 



Fine Arts. Archaeo- 
logy 



Geography. Travels . 

Language 

Literature 

Medicine. Hygiene . 

Natural Science . . . 

Philosophy. Ethics. 
Education 



Religion. Theology . 

Sociology 

Lay 

Useful and Industrial 
Arts 



Amusements. Games. 
Sports 



Fiction 

Books for the young 
Unclassified .... 
Harris Collection , 



25 
1,055 



74 

662 

100 

3,085 

77 



•218 

32 

4,058 
724 



Roxbury. 



118 

50 
1,238 
1,524 

62 

897 

340 

3,629 

77 
271 



5,400 
1,251 



^< 



2,327 
1,567 

466 
2,246 

478 
5,962 



1,318 
196 
117 

121 

65 

1,024 

25 



132 
3,565 
3,091 

528 
3,143 

818 
9,591 

157 

971 

955 

1,896 

294 

157 



271 
6,424 
1,276 



4,616 

474 

3,000 

500 

1,454 

425 

658 



25 
4,543 
1,502 



341 

44 
1,016 
1,276 

12 

775 

3 

5 
930 

431 

905 

1,189 

9 

100 

50 

3,984 

900 

1,675 



1,519 
1,167 



1,650 
1,068 

110 

1,251 

37 

1,342 

128 



5,149 
1 1,452 |1,: 



47 

4,281 

834 

*1,302 



394 

7 
1,146 

784 

171 

628 
106 
975 
61 
419 



202 
5 



907 
*283 



12,124; 13,455 16,720 17,776 34,495 29,575 15,583 



15,241 12,849 



82 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX VI. 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT, 
January 1, 1>SI)5-January 31, 1896. 

The first registration, 1854-58, had 17,006 names ; the second, 
1859-67, had 52,829 names ; the third, 1868-April 30, 1886, had 
227,581 names; the fourth. May 1, 1886-March 31, 1894, 
had 124,396 names ; the fifth, April 1, 1894-December 31, 1894, 
had 25,443 names. 

Kegistrations, including old and new names, lost and filled 
cards replaced, expired cards renewed, during each year, for the 
five years prior to 1895 : 



1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 



14,175 
11,502 
11,707 
11,029 
29,971 



Average, 15,677. 



*" ^ .re 

55-5 1» 



Central 11,61 

Brighton . . . , 

Charleatown 1 2,133 

Dorchester 2,221 

East Boston 1,967 

Jamaica Plain 2,668 

Roxbury 3,015 

Bouth Boston 3,139 

South End 2,548 



29,971 



January 1, 1895, to Janttabt 31, 1896. 



2,264 
1,844 
2,432 
2.282 
3,043 
2,588 
1,794 



25,126 



11,143 
205 



781 
1,295 
1,684 



19,488 
1,245 
3,285 
2,691 
3,417 
3,108 
4,570 
4,503 
2,572 



2,468 

296 
1,117 

773 
1,226 

602 
1,265 
1,8J5 

475 



44,867 10,037 



17,020 
949 
2,168 
1,918 
2,191 
2,506 



Live cards, February 1. 1896 34,842 

Live cards, January 1, 1S95 29,971 



Library Department. 



83 



APPENDIX VIL 



CIRCULATION. 





Central 
Home 


Library. 

Use. 


Branches. — Home Use. 




1894. 


1895. 


1894. 


1895. 


From Central 


261,717 


251,561 






Through Branches & 
Delivery Stations: 










East Boston . . 


732 


844 


60,300 


66,386 


South Boston . . 


262 


430 


95,413 


97,104 


- Roxbury .... 


454 


710 


90,946 


94,073 


Charlestown . . 


583 


509 


59,295 


59,930 


Brighton .... 


219 


129 


*20,666 


*23,637 


Dorchester . . . 


608 


601 


*S1,981 


*56,097 


South End , . . 


' 


1,209 


86,662 


89,219 


Jamaica Plain . 


1,479 


1,257 


*46,772 


♦49,704 


Lower Mills . . 


872 


942 


4,099 from Dor. 


3,716 from Dor. 


Mattapan. . . . 


4,330 


4,013 






Mt. Bowdoin . . 


2,219 


2,449 






Neponset .... 


93 


66 


4,822 from Dor. 


4,382 from Dor. 


North End . . . 


952 


( 337 
iemos. 






Roslindale . . . 


2,698 


1,583 


3,972 from J. P. 


4,826 from J. P. 


West Roxbury , 


1,056 


1,021 


( 10,110 

I 1,108 from J. P. 


I 9,982 

I 1,690 from J. P. 


AUston 


2,139 


1,398 


75 from Bri. 


752 from Bri. 


Ashmont .... 


2,606 


1,919 


2,547 from Dor. 


1,734 from Dor. 


Dorchester Sta'n 


2,135 


2,522 






Bird Street . . . 


1,465 


1,411 






"Rlnp TTill A vp 


2,922 


784 




I 4,109 from Deposit. 


Crescent Ave. . 


1,398 






No. Brighton . . 


240 


351 










50 




( 486 from Denosit. 






1 (Imo.) 




293,345 


279,494 


538,768 


567,827 



1 Includes solely the home une of books. Statistics given in former years included as 
well, reference use both of books and of periodicals. 

*8ee also number sent to Delivery Stations from this Branch. 



84 



City Document No. 18. 





CIKCULATION. — Concluded. 
Summary. 










ToTAi. Issues. 




1894. 


1895. 




293,345 
60,300 
95,413 
90,946 

59,295 
20,741 
63,449 
86,662 
51,852 
10,110 


279,494 
66,386 
97,104 
94,073 
59 930 










Brighton . . . . 


24,389 


Dorchester 


65,929 








56,220 




9,982 


Blue Hill Avenue . .... 


\ ,y^^ ^ 


Station P ....... 




,/*'^^ 






\ (Imo.) 




832,113 


847,321 





Library Department. 



85 



CIRCULATION OF BRANCHES AND DELIVERY STATIONS, 
1890-1895. 



Received from 
Branch. 



Books 

Received from 

Central. 



East Boston. 



South Boston. 



Charlestown. 



374 
337 



575 
498 
461 
470 
454 
710 

197 

214 
286 
347 



914 

724 



71,468 
58,663 

54,476 
60.200 



97,720 
83,106 
81,713 
82,249 
95,413 
97,104 

97,913 
76,949 
85,565 
81,574 
90,946 
94,073 

65,779 
58,174 
52,713 
53,659 



62,848 
65,335 
62,928 
59,234 
63,449 
65,929 



86 City Document No. 18. 

CIRCULATION OF BRANCHES AND DELIVERY BTATIONS.— Continued. 





Books 

Received from 

Bninch. 


Books 

Received from 

Uentrai. 


Home Use. 


1S90 . . 


Brighton. 




126 
87 
137 
179 
219 
129 

1,652 
1,542 
1,684 
1,633 
1,696 
1,209 

1,287 
899 
559 
1,298 
1,479 
1,257 

202 
38 
132 
450 

872 
942 

60 
25 
1,151 
3,797 
4,330 
4,013 


16,847 
16,466 
18,655 


1891 




1892 




1893 




1894 




20,741 
24.389 

87 ''66 


1895 




1890. . 


South End. 




1891 




83 0''6 


1892 




80,118 
79,615 

86,662 






1894 




1895 . . 




1890. . 


Jamaica Plain. 




52,336 
48,819 
44,031 
45 59Q 


1891 




1892 




1893 





1894 




51,852 
56 ''20 


1895 




1890 . . 


Lower Mills. 


6,241 
5,543 
5,811 
5,395 
4,099 
3,716 

4,542 
3,833 
2,491 




1891 




1892 




1893 




1894 




1895 




1890 . . 


Mattapan. 




1891 




1892 










1894 






1895 .... 















Library Department, 87 

CIRCULATION^ OF BRANCHES AND DELIVERY STATIONa. — Continued. 



Boobs 

Received from 

Branch. 



Books 

Received from 

Central. 



Dome Use. 



Mount Bowdoin. 



1894 









Neponset. 


3,942 


1891 


3,612 

2,783 


1892 

1893 


1894 ... 


4,822 






NoBTH End. 
1890 












1893 




1894 








ROSLINDALE. 

1890 


4,342 








3,018 




3,433 


1894 . 


3,972 
4,826 




West Roxburt. 
1890 


1,279 


1892 

1893 


1,030 
1,189 
1,108 
1,690 


1894 







3,044 
2,131 
2,219 
2,449 

10 
19 



735 
719 
952 
337 



3,021 
2,277 
2,133 
3,443 
2,698 
1,583 

326 

421 

472 

1,168 

1,056 

1,021 



6,953 
10,110 
9,982 



88 City Document No. 18. 

CIRCULATION OF BRANCHES AND DELIVERY STATIONS.— Con^nwed. 



Books 

Received from 

Brauch. 



Books 

Received from 

Central. 



Home Use. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 



DOBCHESTEE STATION. 



1891. 
1892. 
1893 . 
1894. 
1895. 



Bird Steeet. 



Blue Hill Avenue. 



1893. 
1894, 
1895, 



Harvaed Steeet. 

1892 (seven months) 

1893 (eight months) 



6,828 
4,395 
2,965 
2,360 
2,139 



3,698 


42 


4,050 


131 


3,084 


1,258 


2,547 


2,606 


1,734 


1,919 



2,962 
1,962 
2,056 
2,135 
2,522 



2,658 
2,509 
1,465 
1.411 



800 
2,290 
2,922 
2,784 

900 
593 



From deposit, 
4,109 (6 mo.) 



Library Department. 89 

CIRCULATION OF BRANCHES AND DELIVERY STATIONS.— Conc/wded. 





Books 

Received from 

Branch. 


Books 

Received from 

Central. 


Home Use. 


Cbescent Avenub. 




697 
1,118 
1,868 
1,398 

315 
304 
240 
351 

50 




1893 






1894 . 






1895 . ... 






North Brighton. 






1893 






1894 






1895 ... 






Station P. 




From deposit, 
486 (1 month). 







90 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX VIII. 



TRUSTEES FOR FORTY-FOUR YEARS. 

The Honorable Edward Everett was President of the J>oard 
from 1852 to 1804 ; the late George Ticknor in 1865 ; William W. 
Greenongh, Esq., from 1866 to April, 1888 ; from May 7, 1888, 
to May 12, 1888, Prof. Henry W. Haynes; Samuel A. B. Ab- 
bott, Esq., May 12, 1888, to April 30, 1895 ; Hon. F. 0. Prince 
since October S, 1895. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that for 
1853 made what is called the first annual report. It consisted of 
one alderman and one common councilman, and five citizens at 
large, till 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of 
one alderman, two common councilmen, and six citizens at large, 
two of whom retired, unless reelected, each year, while the mem- 
bers from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 the 
organization of the Board was changed to include one alderman, 
one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 1807 ; and in 
1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the repre- 
sentation of the city government upon the Board, by an alderman 
and a councilman, was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, 
consisting of five citizens at large. 



Citizens at large in small capitals. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-95. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852-1857. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Benton, Josiah H., .jr., 1894-95. 
BiGELOw, John P., 1852-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry I., 1865-68. 
Bowditch, Henry P., 1894-95. 
Bradley. John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvls D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. C. J., 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Carr, Samuel, 1895. 
Chase, George B., 1876-85. 
Clark, John M., 18,55-56. 
Clark, John T., 187.S-78. 
Clarke, .Tamks Freeman, 1878-88. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864-66. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
DeNormandie, James, 1895. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
Dickinson, M. F., jr., 1871-72. 



Drake, Henry A., 1863-64. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55 ; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1875-79. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William W., 1856-88. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1880-95. 
HiLLARD, George S., 1872-75; 

1876-77. 
Howes, Osborne, jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Pntrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, .James, 1852. 
Lee, John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis. Winslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 



Library Department. 



91 



Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1S83-84. 
MoHTOH, Kllis W.. 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, .Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen li., 1870-71. 
O'Brien Hugh. 1879-^2. 
Pease, Frederick. 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin. 1.S76-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Pierce, Phineas, 1^X8-94. 
Prince, Frederick 0., 1888-95. 
Putnam, George, 1868-77. 
Reed, Samson. 1852-53. 
Richards, William R , 1889-95. 
Sanger, George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Phillip H., 1859-60. 



Seaver. Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey N., 1878-79. 
Shurtleff, Nathaniel B.. 1852-6 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 185.i-5ii; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
Tn knor. George, 1852-66. 
Tvler, John S.. l«63-64; 1866-67. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn. Frederick L , 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 
Whitmore, William H , 1882-K3. 
Whitmore. William H., 1885-88. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson ElishaT.. 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNsoK, Justin, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



92 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX IX. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR FORTY-FOUR YEARS. 

Tlie following gentlemen have served on the Examining Com- 
mittees for the years given. The names in italics are those of 
trustees who have acted as chairmen of the vai'ious committees. 
The thirty-fourth year was from May 1 to December lil, 1885, a 
period of eight months, for which no Examining Committee was 
appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., ]S70. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 18S0, 1894. 
Adams, Brooks, 1894. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 18G0. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Andrews, Augustus, 1892, 1893. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, G , 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bancroft, Robert H., 1894. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Barry, Rev. Richard J., 1895. 
Baitlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beeeher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1S90, 1891. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D , 1857. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, John G., M.D., 1883, 1891. 
Blake, Mrs. Mary E., 1894. 
Bodflsh, Rev. Joshua P., 1879, 1891. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowdiich. Henry I , M D., 1865. 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, 1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 186.J. 
Brimmer, Hon Martin. 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Rev Phillips, 1871. 
Brown, Allen A., 1894. 
Browne, Alex. Porter, 1891. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 



Buckingham, C. E., M D., 1872. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, jr., 1869. 
Carr, Samuel, 1894. 
Carruth. Herbert S., 1892. 
Chadwick, James R., M.D.., 1877. 
Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen, 1894. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheever, David W., MD., 1894. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapp, William W.,jr.. 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, Z)Z>., 1877. 
Clarke., James Freeman, D D., 1882. 
Clement, Edward H., 1894, 1895. 
Coale, George O. G., 1892, 1893. 
Collar, William C, 1874. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S , 1872. 
Curtis, Thomas B., M.D., 1874. 
Cushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Sam.uel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Derby, Basket, M.D., 1895. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 
Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 18(;9. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Jos T., D.D., 1880. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M D., 1880. 
Eastburn. Manton, D D., 1863. 
Eaton, William S.. 1887. 
Edes, Henry H., 1886. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871. 



Library Department. 



93 



Ellis, George E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, jr., 1878. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 
Everett, Sidney, 1895. 
Farlow, John "W., M.D., 1892, 1893. 
Field. Walbridge A., 18GG. 
Fields, -James T., 1872. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 
Fitz, Walter Scott, 1894. 
Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F . 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost. Oliver, 1854. 
Frothingham, Ridiard, 1876. 
Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D.^ 

188L^ 
Gannett, Ezra S., B.B.., 1855. 
Garland, George M., M.D., 1895. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D.., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., M.D , 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, jr., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M D., 1868. 
Green. Samuel S., 1895. 
Greenough, William W.. 1858, 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grinnell, Rev. C. E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., 1^58. 
Hale, 3frs. George S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Hale, Philip, 1893. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 18.S5. 
Hayes. Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haijnes, Henry IF., 1881, 1884. 
Hay ward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John, jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 18:)3. 
Hellier, Charles E., 1895. 
Herford. Brooke, D D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., D.D., 1888, 

1889. 
Hersey, Miss Heloise, 1895. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard M., 3f.D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., 31 D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., jr., 1882. 
Romans, Charles D., 3f.D., 1867. 
Homans, Mrs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886, 1S87. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard James M , 1891. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hudson, John E., 1895. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880, 1893, 

1894. 



Hutcbins, 3Iiss Emma, 1895. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Irwin, Miss Agnes, 1894. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, 31. D., 1869. 
Jeffries, William A., 1893. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., I).D., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, 3Iiss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James. 1855. 
Lee, 3Iiss Alice, 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lewis, We.'ilon. 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hni. F. W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, JVof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, I8611. 
Lowell, .Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Edward J., ls85. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., 31. D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Metcalf, Rev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis. 1866. 
Morison. MssMary, 1892, 1893, 1895. 
Morrill, Charles J., 18s5. 
Morse, John T., jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., jr.. 1878. 
3forton, Hon. Ellis If., 1871. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 
Neale, Rollin H., D.D., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879. 
O'Callaghan, John J., 1895. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
Otis, G. A.. 1860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benj. H., 1876. 
Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parkraan, Henry, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885, 1890, 1.S91. 
Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hon. Henrv L., 1891. 
Pingree, 7)/i.^s Lalia B., 1894. 
Prescott, William H., LL.D., 1853. 
Prince, Hon. F 0., 1888, 1889, 1890. 

1891, 1892, 1893, 1895. 



94 



City Document No. 18. 



Put nam, Georf/e, I) /)., 1870. 
Putnam. //o".'Jol)n P., 18G5. 
Randall. Charli-s M., M.D., 1884. 
Kk'i". lion Mi'xandpr II., 18(50. 
Hobbins, KUiott, M.D., 1893. 
Ro'iors, Prof. William B., 18G1. 
Rollins, J. Winjrate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 18fi3. 
Runkle, Prof. J. I)., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 
Sampson, <). H., 1892, 1893. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Sbepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888 

1889. 
Sherwin. Mrs. Thomas, 1893, 1894. 
Shvrtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith. .Azariah, 1895. 
Smith, Charles C. 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Smith. Miss Minna. 1892. 
Sowdon, A J. C, 1892, 1893. 
Sprague, Charles .!., 1859. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C Ellery, M D., 1888. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson. Hon. J Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1801. 
vStone, Col. Henry 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Storv, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Teele, JohnO., 1886. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 18.15. 
Thayer, George A , 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, B. F., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 



Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, Gtorqe. 1853, 1854, 1855, 

18.59, 1863, 1866. 
Tillinghast, Caleb B., 1895. 
Tobey, lion. Edward S., 18()2. 
Todd, William C, 1894. 
Twombly, Rev. A. S., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Wales. George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H, 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D , 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Warner. Hermann J , 1867. 
Warren, J/on. Charles H., 1859. 
Wi.rren, J. Collins, MB., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Weissbein, Louis, 1893. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wendell, Prof Barrett, 1895. 
Wharton, William F , 1886. 
Whipple. Ed win P , 1869.' 
Whiimore, William. H , 1887. 
Whitnerj, Daniel //., 18i;2. 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman. Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williams, Harold, M.D., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin. 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854. 
Winthrop, Robert C, jr., 1887. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Goold, 1888, 

1889. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



Library Department. 



95 



APPENDIX X. 



SCHEDULE OF LIBRARY SERVICE. 

Note. — This has been brought down to March 16, 1896. The order followed 
rank in grades, and (2) alphabelically within each grade. 



(I) by 



Central Library . 
Branches and Reading Room, 



Summary. 

. 139 

58 

197 
*51 



Males 75 
" 13 



Evening Service . 
. Extra assistance is employed at the Branches 



Females 



64 
45 

109 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Putnam, Hecbert 
Nichols, Adelaide A, 
Russell, Charles G. 
Deery, D. Jean 
Learned, Lucie A. . 
Weed, Percy L. 
Mooney, George V. . 
Cellarius, Theodore W. 

Jenkins, Mary A. . 





Entered. 


Grade. 


. 1895 


Librarian. 




1868 


Auditor. 




1895 


B. Special 




1891 


C. " 




1891 


C. '' 




1895 


C. '' 




1889 


D. " 




1892 


D. 



1877 



CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 



Whitney, James L. . 
Swift, Lindsay 
Hunt, Edward B. . 
Burnell, Carrie 
Chevalier, Samuel A. 
Rollins, Mary H. 
Seaver, Mrs. "Lillian F. 
Binswanger, Clara . 
Butler, Edward K., Jr. 
Cutler, Dora L. 
Gould, Ida W. . 
Rice, Edwin F. 
Sanders, Nathaniel S. H. 
Brennan, T. Frank . 
Dolan, Charles T. . 



1869 


Chief. 


1878 


Editor. 


1883 
1881 


A. Special. 
A. 


1894 


A. 


1886 


A. 


1888 


A. 


1892 


B. 


1896 


B. 


1887 


B. 


1884 


B. 


1885 


B. 


1896 


B. 


1890 
1894 


D. Special 
D. 



[■rving from three to seven eveningB a week each. The total number of positions at any 



96 



City Document No. 18. 



ORDEIUNO DEPARTMENT. 





Entered. 


Grade. 


Macurdy, Theodosia E. 


. 1889 


Chief. 


Browne, Alice . 


. 1883 


B. Special. 


Coolidge, Marie 


. 1893 


B. 


Fnnsdorff, Emily 0. 


. 1894 


B. 


Goddard, INIrs. Frances H 


. 1892 


B. 


McGrath, IMary A. . 


. 1868 


B. 


Keleher, Alice A. 


. 1891 


D. Special. 


McFarland, Thomas A. 


. 1891 


D. " 


Johnston, Fred S. . 


. 1894, 


D. 


SHE 


LF DEPARTMENT. 




Garret, Jose Francisco 


. 1875 


Chief. 


Roffe, William G. T. 


. 1881 


B. Special. 


Locke, John F. 


. 1895 


B. 


Connor, George H. . 


. 1891 


C. Special 


Richmond, Bertha P. 


. 1896 


C. 


Eberhart, John 


. 1894 


D. Special. 


Shaughnessy, Joseph M. 


. 1893 
BATES HALL. 


D. 


Knapp, Arthur M. . 


. 1875 


Cust6dian. 


Blaisdell, Frank C. . 


. 1876 


A. Special. 


Doyle, Agnes C. 


. 1885 


B. 


Buckley, Pierce E. . 


. 1891 


C. 


Plunkett, Albert J. . 


. 1895 


D. 


Hardy, Charles A. . 

SPE 


. 1896 
CIAL LIBRARIES. 


E. 


Fleischner, Otto 


. 1891 


Custodian. 


Tiffany, Edward 


. 1878 


A. 


Hall, Belle S. . 


. 1895 


B. 


Hitchcock, Grace A. 


. 1895 


B. 


Cassidy, Margaret L. 


. 1895 


D. Special. 


Ward, Joseph W. . 


. 1891 


D. " 


England, George A. 


. 1,^96 


D. 


Kelly, Charlotte H. 


. 1895 


D. 


Leonard, Michael F. 


. 1895 


D. 


Mclsaacs, Frederick J. 

PE 


. 1896 
RIODICAL ROOM. 


E. 


Poree, Caroline E. . 


. 1859 


C. 


Ford, Mary E. . 

NE 


. 1895 
WSPAPER ROOM. 


D. 


Serex, Frederic 


. 1895 


C. 


ISSl 


JE DEPARTMENT. 




McGuffey, Margaret D. 


. 1895 


Chief. 


Leavitt, Luella K. . 


. 1895 


B. 



I^rlliKARY DePARTxMENT. 



97 





Entered. 




Grade. 


Sheridan, Mary C. . 


. 1881 


C. 


Special. 


Desmond, Louise L. 


. 1895 


c. 




Porrest, Gertrude E. 


. 1895 


c. 




Morse, Maud M. 


. 1877 


c. 




Richards, Florence F. 


. 1876 


c. 




Shumway, Marion H. 


. 1895 


c. 




Barry, Edward F. . 


. 1890 


D. 


Special. 


Cufflin, M. Florence 


. 1892 


D. 


" 


Dowling, S. Jennie . 


. 1895 


D. 


Ci 


Heimaini, Otto A. . 


. 1890 


D. 




McCarthy, Michael, Jr. . 


. 1892 


D. 


li 


McCausland, Bradley A. . 


. 1895 


D. 


ii 


Murphy, Annie G. . 


. 1888 


D. 


«' 


Eoett, Louis W. 


. 1895 


D. 


ii. 


Shipman, Paul C. 


. 1895 


D. 


ii 


Alley, Gertrude E. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Bertram, Lucy I. 


. 1895 


D. 




Caiger, Eliza F. A. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Connolly, Nelly L. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Cunniff, Nellie F. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Daly, Margaret C. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Ethier, Lillian E. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Glovei', John H. 


. 1895 


D. 




Gorman, John E. 


. 1895 


D. 




Lucid, John F. 


. 1893 


D. 




Maier, Joseph A. 


. 1892 


D. 




McCarthy, Marion A. 


. 1895 


D. 




McQuarrie, Annie C. 


. 1894 


D. 




O'Brien, Margaret F. 


. 1891 


D. 




Olson, Alphild 


. 3895 


D. 




Olson, Bertha A. 


. 1895 


D. 




Et-ynolds, Mary A. . 


. 1894 


D. 




Eoett, Harry W. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Wiechmann, Katherine A. 


. 1895 


D, 




AVilliams, Grace 


. 1895 


D. 




Zaugg, Joanna 


. 1895 


D. 




Zaugg, Otto E. 


. 1895 


D. 




Fillebrown, Emily F. 


. 1895 


E. 




Kiernan, Letitia M. 


. 1895 


E. 




Lucid, Joseph A. 


. 1895 


E. 




Owen, Marion L. 


. 1896 


E. 




REGISTKATIC 


)N DEPAKTMENT. 




Keenan, John J. 


. 1885 


B 


Special. 


Murray, Ella K. 


. 1886 


C. 




Shelton, Richard B. 


. 1895 


D. 


Special. 


Horrigan, Ellen M . 

PRINTING 


. 1895 
DEPARTMENT. 


D. 






Entered. 


Position. 


Lee, Francis W. 


. 1894 


Chief. 


Geyer, Willfried H. 


. 1896 


Pressman. 


Manix, Ellen C. 


. 1895 


Compositor. 



98 City Document No. 18 




BINDERY. 




Entered. 


Position. 


Ryder, T. Frank .... 1883 


Foreman. 


Collins, Dennis J. . 






1887 


Finisher. 


Heyer, William H. 






1891 


Forwarder. 


Hoefi'ner, George . 






1891 


11 


Ivory, John W. 






1893 


" 


Lofstrom, Konrad A. 






1892 


<< 


Murphy, John Y. 






1883 


a 


Hemstedt, William P. 






1883 


Pressman. 


Bowen, Mrs. Sarah E. 






1876 


Sewer. 


Kiley, Margaret J. . 






1889 


" 


Moriarty, Mary G. 






1875 


a 


Nolen, Sarah 






1891 


a 


Potts, Ellen E. 






1892 


'< 


Sonle, Ellen E. 






1891 


a 


ENGINEERS' AND JANITORS' DEPARTMENT. 


Niederaner, Henry . . . 1894 


Chief Engineer. 


McCready, Alexander 


. 1895 


Engineer. 


Malone, John P. 




. 1895 


" 


O'Neill, Harry 




. 1896 


u 


Zittel, George, Jr. . 




. 1891 


" 


Herland, Nils J. 




. 1895 


Fireman. 


Moran, John A. 




. 1894 


a 


Powers, Henry W. . 




. 1890 


Charge of book- 
elevators. 


Eochford, Nicholas J. 




. 1890 


Carpenter. 


Williams, John L. . 




. 1886 


Janitor. 


Kilmnrry, William . 




. 1894 


Assistant Janitor 


McCarty, Dennis 




. 1887 


Night Watcliman 


Eallon, John . 




. 1895 


Painter. 


Hanna, William T. . 




. 1895 


Marble-polisher. 


Goode, Robert . 




. 1895 


Elevator-boy. 


Whistnant, William B. 




. 1895 


Coat-room attend 










ant. 



EVENING AND SUNDAY SERVICE. 
Bates Hall. 

Officer in Charge. Hours. 

Chevalier, Samuel A. See Delivery Department . 8 

Fleischner, Otto. See Special Libraries ... 8 

Hunt, Edward B 8 

Swift, Lindsay • ■ 8 

Assistant. 

Roffe, William G. T . .16 

AValsh, William A. See Fine Arts .... 16 

Central Desk. 

Buckley, Pierce E 12 

Williams, David L 20 

Care of Reference Books. 

Heimann, Albert E 32 



Library Department. 99 

Cave of Lower Tube. Hours. 

Heimann, Otto A. See Care of slips .... 9 

Lucid, John F 16 

Eunner. 

Plunkett, Albert J 16 

Tenny, Kobert. See Delivery Service Kunner . . 9 
Delivery Service and Lower Hall Catalogue. 

Officer in Charge. 

Blaisdell, Frank C 20 

Chevalier, Samuel A. See Bates Hall ... 12 

Receiver of Books. 

Blaisdell, Fred W 25 

Deliverer of Books. 

Eeardon, John H. . . . . . . . 25 

Care of Indicator. 

Clarke, William S. See Runner . . . .25 

Care of Slips. 

Heimann, Otto A. See Bates Hall, Lower Tube . 7 

Hughes, John A. . . • 18 

Care of Tubes. 

Hannigan, Walter T 25 

Care of Carriers. 

Hannigan, Frank J 25 

Runners. 

Beck ford, Fred A 25 

Campbell, Charles D 9 

Carney, Robert J. 16 

Clarke, William S. See Indicatoi' .... 7 

Currier, Ulysses S. Gr 16 

Ford, Daniel J 32 

Glover, John H 16 

Gorman, John E. ....... 16 

Martin, D. Clifford 25 

McBain, Victor R 9 

Pitts, James A 9 

Roett, Harry W 9 

Shaughnessy, Joseph M 9 

Tenny, Robert M. See Bates Hall Runner . . 16 

Trueman, ISTelson G. ....... 25 

Weller, Waldo W 9 

Zaugg, Otto 9 

Special Libraries Floor. 

In Charge. 

Fleischner, Otto. See Bates Hall, in charge . . 5 
Barton Library. 

In charge. 

Lee, Francis W. ........ 20 

Tiffany, Edward 12 

Fine Arts Department. 

Walsh, William A. See Bates Hall Assistant . . 14^ 

Weed, Percy L. . . . . . ,. . .14^ 



100 



City Document No. 18. 



Assistant. 

McFarland, Tlioinas A. 
Ward, Josepli W. ... 

Second Assistant. 

Leonard, JNIicliael F. . 

Ward, John A 

Periodical Room. 

Conuers, John F 

Kegistration Desk. 

Fallon, William E 

Patp:nt Room and Juvenile Library. 
In Charge. 

Hemstedt, William P. . 
Mooney, George Y. . . . 
Assistant. 

Tyrode, Maurice P. 0. 
Newspaper Room. 
Attendant. 

Brennan, T. Frank 
Connor, George H. . . . 
Replacement of Books. 

Barry, Edward F 

McCarthy, Michael, Jr. . 



Hours. 

32 

25 



20 
12 

25 



16 
16 

12i 



EAST BOSTON BRANCH. 



Godbold, Sarah C. 
Flanders, Emma W. 
Wing, Alice M. . 
Bickford, Lillian A. 
Hosea, George H. 



Entered. 

1871 

1888 
1872 
1891 
1873 



Position. 

Custodian. 

C. 

C. 

D. 

Janitor. 



Averill, Gertrude. 
Brackett, Marion W. 
McDouoall, Ellen M. 



Extras. 



1891 
1891 



SOUTH BOSTON BRANCH. 



Bullard, K. Josephine 
Eaton, Ellen A. . 
Sampson, Idalene L 
Orcutt, Alice B, . 
Parker, Helena L. 
Baker, Joseph 



1883 
1872 
1877 
1884 
1887 
1872 



Custodian. 

C. 

C. 

D. 

D. 

Janitor. 



Sumner, Alice 
Bryce, Jean 



Extras. 



1895 
1895 



Library Department. 



101 





ROXBURY BRANCH. 












Entered. 


Position. 


Bell, Helen M. . 






1878 


Custodian 


Berry, Elizabeth C. 






1877 


C. 


Puffer, Dorotliy . 






1878 


C. 


Grigcfs, Sarah W. 






1884 


D. 


Lynch, Gertrude A. 






1894 


D. 


Monahan, William 




Extras. 


1883 


Janitor. 


Bollig, Emma 






1888 




Bracy, Lillian A. 






1895 




CHARLESTOWN BRANCH. 




Cartee, Elizabeth F. 






1880 


Custodian 


Livermore, Mrs. Susar 


lE. 




1885 


C. 


O'Neill, Margaret M. 






1892 


D. 


Eeagen, Elizabeth R. 






1895 


D. 


Rogan, Katherine S. 






1896 


E. 


Smith. Thomas E. 






1874 


Janitor. 



Extra. 



BRIGHTON BRANCH. 



McLaughlin, Ellen. 

Conley, Ellen F. . 
Dale, M. Florence 
Brock, James M. 



DORCHESTER BRANCH 

Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T. 
Griffith, Mary E, 
Donovan, Mary G. 
Hufton, Ellen E. . 
Meffen, Margaret 
Davenport, Edward 



1891 


C. 


1895 


E. 


1878 


Janitor. 


1873 


Custodian 


1884 


C. 


1891 


D. 


1896 


E. 


1892 


E. 


1874 


Janitor. 



Hale, Arthur M 



Extra. 



1895 



SOUTH 

Sheridan, Margaret A. 
McGrath, Amelia F. . 
Lynch, Emma F. 
Meehan, Margaret F. . 
Mulloney, William J. . 



Lynch, John B. 



END 



BRANCH. 




. 1875 


Custodian 


. 1887 


C. 


. 1885 


D. 


. 1891 


D. 


. 1889 


D. 



Extra. 



1895 



U)2 



City Document No. 18. 



JAMAICA PLAIN 



Swain, Marv P. . 
Riley, Nellie F. . 
Albert, Katie F. . 
Johnson, Timothy 



Barton, Henry C. E. 
Felton. Robert G. A. 



BRANCH. 




Entered. 


Position. 


. 1877 


Custodian 


. 1878 


C. 


. 1883 


D. 


. 1877 


Janitor. 



Extras. 



WEST END 


BRANCH 






Davis, Mrs. Eliza R 1877 


Custodian 


Barton, Margaret S. 






1885 


C. 


Forbes, George W. 






1896 


C. 


McKirdy, Alice E. 






1896 


C. 


Mooney, Katherine G. 






1885 


C. 


Wendte, Frederika 






1895 


c. 


Riley, Mary E. . . . 






1891 


D. 


Kiley, Mary E. . . . 






1896 


E. 


Porter, Frank C. . 






1896 


E. 


Rossiter, John 






1896 


Janitor. 



Morse, Carrie L. 
Carroll, Joseph 



WEST ROXBURY BRANCH. 



1890 D. Special. 
1894 Janitor. 



DELIVERY STATIONS AND READING ROOMS. 

The Branches are also Delivery Stations. 
Station. Attendants. Grade. 

A. Lower Mills Reading Room Hill, M. AcUlie D. Special. 

B. Roslindale Delivery Station Kimniel, Wilhelmina & 

Emily. 

C. West Roxbury Branch Morse, Carrie L I). Special. 

Carroll, Joseph Janitor. 

D. Mattapan Reading Room Capewell, Mrs. Emma 

G D. Special . 

E. Neponset Delivery Station Savil, Susan. 

F. Mount Bowdoin Reading Room. . . .Fairbrother, Mrs. Eliza- 

beth G D. Special. 

G. Allston Delivery Station Sampson & Padelfnrd. 

H. Ashmont Delivery Station Weymouth, Clara E. 

J. Dorchester StationDelivery Station. Sexton, Mrs. Annie M. 
K. Bird-Street Delivery Station Hoare, Mrs. Esther. 

L. North Brighton Reading lioom. . . .Mukloon, Katherine F. . .D. 

M. Crescent-Avenue Delivery Station .Alexander, George H. 

N. Blue Hill-Avenue Delivery Station. Aiken, Mrs. Emilie S. 

P. Harrison-Avenue Reading Room. . .Keenan. Matthew. ...... .D. Special. 

Q. Dudley-Street Delivery Station. . . .Bird, Mrs. Thomas H. 



Library Department. 103 



APPENDIX XI. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Notice to Applicants for Employment. 

Applications must be made upon the printed blanks furnished 
by the Library. Examinations for applicants Avill be held from 
time to time as the needs of the service may require. Each aj)- 
plicant will be notified of the examination to be held next after 
the filing of his application. 

The examinations are not strictly competitive. Other capaci- 
ties being equal, preference will be given to persons attaining the 
highest mark ; but in making selections from among those who 
have taken the examination, other elements of fitness for the par- 
ticular positions to be filled will be taken into account. 

The purpose of the examination being, not to test the intelli- 
gence of the applicants by an absolute standard, but rather to 
range the applicants according to the relative intelligence dis- 
played by them, no absolute pass-mark is fixed ; nor is any cer- 
tificate or diploma given, but candidates will, if they desire, be 
informed of their relative rank among those Avho have taken 
examinations for the same grade. 

The examination, moreover, is regarded as a preliminary test 
merely. It must be followed by a test of capacity in actual 
service during a probationary period. And all appointments to 
the service, even where carrying pay, are provisional and con- 
ditioned upon proof of capacity for the particular positions to be 
filled as shoW'U in actual service. 

The entire Library service (excepting the Engineer, Janitor, 
and Printing Departments and the Bindery ; and the Sunday and 
Evening service which is paid by the hour) is divided into grades. 
Each grade begins with a minimum salary and progresses to a 
maximum. The maximum reached, no further increase is possi- 
ble except by promotion to a higher grade. Such promotion osp 
is based upon an examination, combined, however, with certificate 
of capacity from the head of department in which the employe 
has served. 

The ordinary grades are supposed to provide for positions 
wdiere academic knowledge is necessary ; the special grades for 
those positions where special capacities (as knowledge of type- 
writing, executive ability, etc.) are more particularly required. 

The grades are as follows : 

1st year, 2d year, 3d year, 4th year, 

per week. per week. per week. per week. 



Grade E . 


. $3 50 


f 4 00 


$4 50 


" D. 


. 5 00 


6 00 


7 00 


'•' D (for runners) 


. 5 00 


5 50 





104 City Document No. l-s. 



Grade C . 



A. 

D Special 

C 

B 

A 



.^. j~..., — ^ M year, 4th year, 

per week. per week. per week. per week. 

$7 50 f 8 50 $9 .'^0 f 10 50 

11 00 12 00 13 00 14 00 
IC. 50 17 50 18 50 19 50 

7 00 8 00 9 00 10 00 

12 00 13 00 13 50 
14 00 15 50 17 50 

23 50 25 50 27 50 ;51 00 



It is expected that vacancies in Grade A will be tilled by pro- 
motion from Grade B after examination. 

Persons who have entered the Library service as runners in 
Grade E and are certiiied by the head of the department to have 
performed satisfactorily the duties of Grade E and to have ac- 
quired a knowledge of location requi&ite for Grade D, may upon 
recommendation of the Librarian, at the end of six months from 
the date when they entered the service, be promoted to Grade D. 

The qualifications for the various general grades, so far as the 
requirements of the general examination are concerned, are as 
follows : 

Grade A. 

Knowledge of Foreign Languages. 
General History and Literature. 
Library Science. 
Experience in this Library. 

Grade B. 

Knowledge of at least two Foreign Languages. 
General History and Literature. 
Library Science. 

Grade C. 

Equivalent of High School Education. 
Knowledge of one Foreign Language. 

Grade D. 

Equivalent of Grammar School Education. 
Knowledge of location and system in this Library. 

Grade E. 
Equivalent of Grammar School Education. 

Applicants for positions in the higher grades must satisfy the 
examiners of their ability to pass the examinations for all the 
grades below that for which they make application. 

To the above general qualifi.cations must be added in each^ case 
such special qualifications as may be requisite for the j^articular 
positions to be filled. 

Herbert Putnam, 

Librariari. 
Febbuart, 1890. 



Library Department. 105 



APPLICATION. 

I hereby make application to be examined for a position in 
Grade of the Public Library service of the City of Boston. 

As part of my application I declare tlie answers to the following 
questions to be true and in my own handwriting. 

Each question must be answered or the blank will be returned. 

1. Are you married or single ? 

2. Where do you reside and what is your post-oifice address ? 
(Give town or city, including street and number.) 

3. How long have you been a resident of said city or town ? 
4.' What is the date and place of your birth ? 

o. What is your father's and mother's full name ? Give name 
whether living or dead. 

6. Have you ever been examined for the public service in any 
state or city ? -If so, when, where, for what branch and grade of 
the service, and with what result. 

7. Are you iu good health ? Have you any mental or physical 
incapacity of which you are aware ? 

8. What is your present occupation and what has been your 
past occupation? Give places and dates of employment as near 
as you can. 

9. In what schools, academy, or college were you educated ? 
Give the name and length of course in each. 

10. Have you any experience or do you possess any special 
qualifications, such as a knowledge of book-keeping, stenogi-aphy, 
typewriting, foreign languages, or a familiarity with other branch 
or branches of knowledge, which in yoiir opinion would be useful 
in the service of the Public Library, and not included among the 
requirements for the grade in which you are an applicant ? 

[Signature] 

Boston, , 189 

When filled out, fold thrice and return to the Liharian of Public 
Lihrary. Enclose any recommendations you desire to submit. 



106 City Document No. IS, 

SPECIMEN EXAMINATION PAPERS. 

Septkmbkr. 1895. 
Grade A. 

Time allowed — two hours. 

The candidate is reminded that handwriting and neatness of 
his paper will receive due consideration. 

Languages. 

A choice is given of a short selection in Greek, Latin, German, 
French, Italian, Spanish. Four of these must be taken. Any 
other language may be offered as an equivalent for one of the 
above. 

LiBRAKY Science. 

1. In the selection of foreign books mention five literary or 

critical reviews on which dependence may be placed. 

2. Where might you expect to find the bibliographical facts 

necessary to catalogue an anonymous French book pub- 
lished previous to 1830 ? previous to 1750 ? 

3. Name a few of the really indispensable bibliographical 

works for library use, covering general literature ; mention 
one covering English literature ; one covering Americana. 

4. In drawing up a list for purchase of desirable periodicals 

and transactions of societies for a large library, how would 
you inform yourself as to prices and relative value of such 
publications ? 

5. Name the first twenty necessary books which should prop- 

erly form the nucleus of a small reference library. 

6. Give what in your own opinion are the main divisions of 

human knowledge — do not attempt to subdivide them 
into classes. 

General History and Literature. 

Name suitable books for a fairly well extended course in 
American Constitutional and Political History from 1789 to 1820. 
Name some of the best works on English Constitutional History. 

What was the Trent affair; the Geneva arbitration ; the Prag- 
matic Sanction ; tlie Council of Nice ? 

What do you understand in brief by the Eastern question ? 

What is the significance of the partition of Central Africa — 
and among what powers ? 

How would you assist a reader to the statistics of the amount 
of cotton and wool grown in the year during last year ? 

Where would you look for the Book of Enoch in a catalogue ? 

In w^hat book or books might one find a satisfactory account of 
the Girondists ; the Jacobins ; the Jacobites ? 

Contrast Larousse's Grand Dictionnaire and the Encyclopaedia 
Britannica. 

Mention one elementary book for the ''' general reader " on the 
practice of law ; on business forms. 



Library Department. 107 

Name a trustworthy statistical almanac ; a book of events and 
dates. 

State your opinion about placing before the readers in a Public 
Library any of the following : 

Nordau's "Degeneration;" "The Heavenly Twins;" "Tom 
Jones;" Mrs. South worth's novels; Alger's books for boys. 

Paper for Grade "B." 

October 30, 1895. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The candidate will understand that the general condition of his 
paper as to neatness, spelling, and handwriting will be one of the 
tests of his merit. 

Two Hours allowed. 

History and General Information. 

Answer any seven of these ten questions. 

1. State Avith brevity the characteristics which distinguished 

the Plymouth Colony from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

2. What event is connected with the island of St. Helena ; 

Louisburg in Cape Breton ; Charleston, S.C., harbor ; 
Alexandria, Egypt ; Avignon, France ? 

3. What was the Holy Roman Empire, and when did it termi- 

nate ? 

4. Why did France lend its aid to the Colonies in the Revolu- 

tion, and what event directly led to this action ? 

5. What are the three functions of Government in the United 

States, and what check does each exercise upon the 
others ? 

6. Explain the meaning of the expression "Home Rule;" 

" Fin de Siecle ; " " Jingoism ; " " Monroe doctrine ; " 
" Latin America." 

7. What do you understand by a majority and a plurality in 

an election ? What is a quorum ? Explain briefly the 
meaning of " Referendum " and " Initiative." 

8. How are United States Senators and Representatives 

chosen ? 

9. What is a Trust ; a Monopoly ? 

10. Write out the full meaning of the abbreviations A.R.A., 
LL.D., D.D., D.M.D., i.e., e.g., H.M.S., K.C.B., Ph.D. 

Literature and Library Science. 

Answer any seven of these ten questions. 

1. What is aesthetic criticism ? 

2. Name the author and title of the work in which each of the 

following characters appear : Fagin ; Marquis of Steyne ; 
Jean Valjean ; Marguerite; Ophelia; Olivia; Sancho 
Panza; Brunhild; Telemachus. 

3. Name any two writers of fiction who describe Southern life ; 

Western life ; New York City life ; New England life. 



108 City Document No. 18. 

4. Name one American writer in the Seventeentli century ; two 
in the Eighteenth century, and five in the present 
century. 

"). Wliat is Foik-lore ; Archfeology; Treliistoric Archaeology ? 

(i. Name a work of the imagination dealing with French life ; 
with English life ; slavery ; war or social oppression. 

7. creation any pamphlet or ephemeral writing which pro- 

duced a remarkable effect in its day. 

8. In a library of general literature enumerate the ten main 

classes into which you would first arrange the books. 
Use your own judgment and do not feel bound by plans 
with which you may be conversant. 
0. Under what main divisions of your scheme would you place 
Folk-lore ; Sloyd ; Ethnology ; Anthropology ; Astron- 
omy ; the Woman question ? 
10. What, briefly, do you understand by pure literature or belle.s- 
lettres ? What is applied literature ? 



Paper for Grade " C." 

January 1.'8, 1896. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBEAKY. 

The candidate will understand that the general condition of 
his paper as to neatness, spelling, and handwriting will be one of 
the tests of his merit. Write name in full and address at head 
of paper. 

Two Hours (tUoived. 
Geography anp History. 

1. Name some of the rivers most important to commerce in the 

United States. Through and past what States does the 
Mississippi river run ? 

2. Account in each case for the commercial importance of Chi- 

cago, London, New York. 
.3. Where are Cleveland, Louisville, Detroit, Caraccas, Sierra 
Leone, the Riviera, Cyprus, Stockholm, Buda-Pesth, Berne, 
the Orinoco river ? 

4. Describe a feasible course for the circumnavigation of the 

globe, mentioning all bodies of water traversed. 

5. What was the cause of the War of 1812 ? Of the Mexican 

war ? 

6. Describe two famous naval battles of any age. 

7. Mention in chronological order the political parties in the 

United States which have in turn controlled affairs from 
1789 to the present. 

8. Describe briefly the difference between the Pilgrims and the 

Puritans. 

9. What was the French Revolution ? Give dates, and tell in 

a few words what causes produced it. 



Library Department. 109 

10. Into what main divisions may the races of mankind be 
divided ? AVhat does the Indo-Germanic family inchide ? 
Of what family are the Poles ; the Hungarians ? Is there 
any distinction ethnically between the Chinese and Japan- 
ese ? if so, what ? 

Literature and General Information. 

1. What is a Troubadour ; a Meistersinger ? Name the present 

Poet Laureate. 

2. What is a Bibliography ; a Vademecum ; a Concordance ; a 

Digest ? 
.3. What do you understand by the phrase " blank verse ? " 
Name an English author who used it. 

4. What is an Oration ; a Eulogy; an Elegy ; an Historical 

novel ? Name some noted author in each of these classes. 

5. Of what persons are the following the pseudonyms : Mark 

Twain, George Eliot, Currer Bell, Jean Paul ? Why are 

pseudonyms used ? 
(>. What famous work did each of the following persons write : 

Darwin, Victor Hugo, Cervantes, Madame de Stael, 

Goethe, George Bancroft, Tennyson, Benjamin Franklin ? 
7. What is the difference between a University and a College ? 

What is Secondary Education ? University Extension ? 
. 8. What was the Brook Farm Community ? Mention the 

names of any persons connected with it. 
9. Define the expression Panslavism ; Jacquerie ; Fetish ; 

Totem ; Chauvinism. 

10. Tell what you know of the origin of Penny postage ; the 

Electric telegraph ; the Submarine cable ; the discovery 
of Anaesthetics. 

11. Why is piracy now practically extinct ? 

January 28, 1896. 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

SELECTIONS FOR TRANSLATION IN GRADES "B» AND " C." 

Candidates for Grade "B " must pass in two languages, prefer- 
ably French and German. Candidates for Grade " C " must pass 
in one language. Candidates, however, may state, if they wish, 
their proficiency in other languages. 

One Hour allowed. 
French. 

C'etait une singuliere figure que celle du marchand : un crane 
immense, poli comme un genou, entoure d'une maigre aureole de 
cheveux blancs que faisait ressortir ])lus vivement le ton saumon- 
clair de la peau, lui donnait un faux air de bonhomie pati'iarcale, 
coi-i-igee, du reste, par le scintillement de deux petits yeux jaunes 
qui tremblotaient dans leur orbite comme deux louis d'or sur du 
vif-argent. La courbure du nez avait une silhouette aquiline qui 



110 City Document No. 18. 

rappeliiit le typo oriental on juif. Ses mains, maigres, fluettes, 
veinees, pleines de nerfs en saillie ooranie les cordes d'un manohe 
a violon, ongloes de griffes semblables a celles qui terminent les 
ailes niembraneuses des chauves-souris, avaient nn moxivement 
d'oscillation senile, inquietant k voir : inais ces mains agitees de 
tics iievreux devenaient plus fermes que des tenailles d'acier ou 
des pinces de homard des qu'elles soulevaient quelque objet 
precieux, une coupe d'onyx, un verre de Venise ou un plateau de 
crista! de liolieme ; ee vieux drOle avait un air si profondement 
rabbinique et cabalistique qu'on I'eut bi'ule sur la mine, il y a 
trois siecles. 

German. 

,, Ganz richtig/' gab der Kapitan zuriick. „ Hier sind sie. Mit 
der Eisenbahn konnen wir nicht gelien, da der Advokaten- 
schreiber ohne Zweifel am Bahnhofe auf der Lauer stelit. Wir 
miissen also auf anderem Wege fort, und zwar mit eigenem 
Fuhrwerk — aber wo, zum Teufel, das her bekommen ? — Wir 
bekommen es vom Bruder der Wirtin, welcher einen Wagen und 
ein Pferd besitzt, die er uus mietweise, iiberlasst. Diese Equi- 
page filhrt raorgen friih an das Ende von Eosemary-Lane. Icli 
will meiner Frau und meiner Xiclite die Sclionheiten der Umge- 
gend zeigen. Ein grosser Korb, natiirlich f iir Esswaren bestimmt, 
zeigt noch deutlicher unsere Absieht. Sie vermummen sich mit 
einem Shawl, Hut und Schleier von Mrs. AVragge ; und fort 
geht's zu einer Landpartie auf einen Tag — Sie und ich auf dem 
Vordersitz, Mrs. Wragge und der Korb riickwarts. — Abgethan 
so weit. — Was begiunen wir dann ? Wir fahren auf die erste 
Station nachst York, nordlich, siidlich oder ostlich — alles einerlei 
— nirgend lauert ein Schreiber auf Sie. Dort bleiben Sie unter 
dem Schutze von Mrs. Wragge, wir offnen den Korb, der anstatt 
Champagner und juuge Hiihner Ihre unentbehrlichsten Sachen 
f iir die Nacht enthalt; Sie nehmen dieselben an sich — und ich 
fahre in Begleitung des Korbes wieder nach York zuriick. Hier 
zu Hause angelangt suche ich das zuriickgelassene Gepack zusam- 
men und schicke zur Wirtin hinunter. , Die Dam en sind von 
dem und dem Orte so entziickt, dass sie sich dort langer aufzu- 
halten wiinschen. Bitte, nehmen Sie den ganzen Wochenzins an 
Stelle achttagiger Kiindigung. Adieu.' — Schaut der Spion auf 
dem Bahnhofe nach mir aus ? Keine Idee. Ich lose ihm vor 
der Nase mein Billet und folge Ihuen mit dem Gepack auf ihrer 
Route. Wo ist eine Spur von unserer Abreise ? Ich sehe 
keine. — Wir lassen die Behorden herrlich sitzen." 



Italian. 

La mattina che partii dall' Aja, la seconda volta che vi fui, 
alcuni del raiei pin cari amici m' accompagnarono alia stazione 
della strada ferrata. II tempo era piovoso. Quando fummo 
nella sala dei viaggiatori, pochi moment! prima che partisse il 
treno, ringraziai i miei buoni ospiti delle gentili accoglienze che 
m' avevan fatte, e poiche sapevo che forse non li avrei mia piii 
riveduti, non potei a meno di esprimere la mia gratitudine con 



LiBRAijY Department. Ill 

parole affettuose e melanconiche, cli' essi ascoltarono in silenzio. 
Uno solo 111' interruppe per raccomandarmi che mi guardassi 
dair umidita. " Venga qualcuno di loro in Italia," io continuai; 
" non foss' altro che per darmi 1' occasione di mostrargli la mia 
liconoscenza. Mi facciano questa promessa perclie io possa 
partire col cuore un po' consolato. Non parto se qnalcuno non 
mi dice che verra in Italia." Si guardarono in viso, e uno rispose 
a lior di labbra : " Forse." Un altro mi diede il consiglio di non 
far mai cambiare 1' oro francese nelle botteghe. In quel momento 
suono il campanello della partenza. 

Spanish. 

Su esposa, que era andaluza, habia muerto en edad muy tem- 
prana, dejandole un solo hijo, que desde el nacer demostro 
hallarse privado en absoluto del mas precioso de los sentidos. 
Esto fue la pena mas aguda que amargd los dias del buen padre. 
I Que le importaba allegar riqueza y ver que la fortuna favorecia 
sus intereses y sonrei'a en su casa ? ^ Para quien era esto ? 
Para quien no podia ver ni las gordas vacas, ni las praderas 
risuenas, ni las repletas trojes, ni la huerta cargada de frutas. 
D. Francisco hubiera dado sus ojos a su hijo, quedandose el ciego 
el resto de sus dias, si esta especie de generosidades fuesen prac- 
ticables en el mundo que conocemos ; pero como no Io son, no 
podia D. Francisco dar realidad al noble sentimiento de su 
corazdn, sino proporcionando al desgraciado joven todo cuanto 
pudiera hacerle agradable la oscuridad en que vivia. Para el 
eran todos los cuidados y los infinitos mimos y delicadezas cuyo 
secreto pertenece a las madres, y algunas veces a los padres, 
cuando faltan aquellas. Jannis contrariaba a su hijo en nada 
i\\\Q fuera para su consnelo y entretenimiento en los li'mites de Io 
honesto y moral. 

Latin. 

Primores Patrum, sive culpa sive infelicitate imperatorum tarn 
ignominiosa clades accepta esset, censuere, 'Non exspectandum 
•justum tempus comitiorum, sed extemplo novos tribunos militum 
' creandos esse, qui Kalendis Octobribus magistratum occiperent.' 
In quam sententiam quum pedibus iretur, ceteri tribuni militum 
nihil contradicere. At enimvero Sergius Virginiusque, propter 
quos poenitere magistratuum ejus anni senatum apparebat, primo 
deprecari ignominiam, delude intercedere senatus consulto : 
negare, ' se ante Idus Decembres, solennem ineundis magistra- 
' tibus diem, honore abituros esse.' Inter haec tribuni plebis, 
quum in Concordia hominum secundisque rebus civitatis inviti 
silentium tenuissent, feroces repente minari tribunis militum, 
'nisi in auctoritate senatus essent, se in vincula eos duci jussu- 
' ros esse.'" Tum C. Servilius Ahala tribunus militum : ' Quod ad 
' vos attinet, tribuni plebis, minasque vestras, nae ego libenter 
'experirer, quam non plus in his juris, quam in vobis animi, 
' esset. Sed nefas est tendere adversus auctoritatem senatus. 
' Proinde et vos desinite inter nostra certamina locum injuriae 
' quaerere : et collegae ai;t facient, quod censet senatus, aut, si 
' pertinacius tendent, dictatorem extemplo dicam, qui eos abire 
• raagistratu cogat.' 



112 City Documknt No. 18. 



(lUKKK. 



'EnetSr) Toivvv inoLijaaTo tyju elp^viqv r) 770X19, ivravOa 
7raA.tr (XK€^acr0e tl tj^cov eKdTepo<; upoeiXeTO irpaTTeiv ' 
KoX yap eK tovtcov etcrecrde tl<; rjv 6 <J>tXtV77a> iravra 
crvvayo}VLl,6p,evo<^, /cat rt? 6 irpaTTcov virep vfjicou kol to 
TV TToXet crvix(f)€pov t;Y)TCtiv. iyo) [xep toivvv eypayfja ^ov- 
Xevcov aTTOTrXelv ttjv Ta^LCTTrjv Toy's TrpeafieL^ inl tov<; 
roTTov?, iv ot? av oVra ^ikiTnrov TrvvOdvcuvTac, koI tov<; 
opKov^ OLTroXaix/SciveLv' ovtol oe ovoe ypdxjjavTO'i ijxov 
TavTa TTOLelv rjOek-qaav. tl 8e tovt' 'qSvvaTo, d) dvSpe<i 
' ABrjvaloL ; iyd OLod^o). ^iXiTnra) jxev rjv crvfjiffiepov a? 
irXelaTOv tov jaera^v ^povov yeviaSai tcov opKojv, vpA,v 
8' w? ikd^iCTTOv. Sta tl; otl v^et? fxkv ovk d(j)' ^9 
oi/jtocrare ly/xepa? fxovovy a\k d(f) 7^9 rjXirLO'aTe ttjv 
elpijvrjv eaeaduL, 7rdcra<^ i^eXvcraTt ra9 7rapaaKeva<; Ta9 
TOV TToXefjLov, 6 8e TovTo e'/c 77ai^T09 TOV -)(p6vov fxdkLaTa 
iirpayixaTeveTO, vofjLL(,cov, oirep r;v dkrjdeq, ocra Trjq 
77dXect)9 npoXd^oL npo tov tov<; opKov<? diro^ovvaL, irdvTa 
TovTa ySe^at&J9 e^eiv ovSeva yap ttjv elprjvqv XvaeLv 

TOVTCOV €V€Ka. 

Paper for Grade " E." 

OCTOBEK 30, 1895. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The candidate will imdevstand that the general condition of 
his paper as to neatness, spelling, and handwriting will be one 
of the tests of his merit. 

T1V0 Hours allowed. 
Arithmetic. 

1. A type-writer is paid at the rate of 60 cents for 1,000 words. 

How much will she earn in copying 355 pagers, allowing 
150 words to the page ? 

2. How many yards of cloth, a yard wide, will it take to cover 

a box which is 3 ft. wide, 5 ft. 3 in. long, and 36 inches 
high? 

3. If $130 be paid for a watch and chain, and the cost of the 

watch be three-fifths more than the cost of the chain, whab 
would be the cost of each ? 

4. A pupil who attended school 08 days during a term was 

mai'ked 85 per cent, for attendance. How many days was 
he absent ? 



Library Department. 113 



Geography and History. 

1. Name the capital of Massachusetts, Khode Island, Connecti- 

cut, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, South Carolina. 
Name the principal city of each of these States, if it 
happens not to be the capital. 

2. From what part of the world do the principal crops of wheat, 

rice, tea, cocoa, come ? What country or countries pro- 
duce wool, cotton, coal ? 

3. Why has the United States a small army and Germany a 

large one ? What country in Europe has no navy ? 

4. Who is the present Mayor of Boston ? Governor of Massa- 

chusetts ? President of the United States ? Premier of 

England ? Who in each case preceded the present in- 
cumbent ? 

5. Name three generals on each side in the American Civil 

War. 

6. What service did Benjamin Franklin render his country ? 

Alexander Hamilton? Robert Fulton? The Duke of 
Wellington ? 

7. Name the Sovereigns of England from James II. to the 

present in chronological order. 

8. Does slavery exist in the world to-day ; if so, Avhere ? 

Literature and General, Information. 

1. If you enjoy the reading of novels, tell why, and also mention 

five favorite novels. If you do not, tell why, and men- 
tion five favorite books of any sort. 

2. Name a living dramatist, novelist, historian, poet. 

3. Who is the author of " Much ado about nothing; " "Twice- 

told tales ; " " Uncle Tom's cabin ; " " Courtship of Miles 
Standish ; " "Don Quixote ? " 

4. Name the Boston daily newspapers; a few leading American 

magazines. 

5. Name a popular history of the United States ; a biography 

of some distinguished American (giving author) ; a recent 
novel of merit ; a poem which commemorates some event 
in history. 

6. Ten lines from dictation. 

7. Enumerate ten objects of interest which you have observed 

in or near tlie new Boston Public Library ; if you are not 
familiar with the building enumerate any ten note- 
worthy objects in Boston. 



114 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX XII 



BY-LAWS OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. Adoptkd Deoemkkr 3, 1895. 

Article I. 

OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

Section 1. The Officers of the Corporation shall be a Presi- 
dent, Vice-President, and Clerk, who shall be chosen by ballot at 
the annual meeting on the first Monday of May in each year ; 
but if any vacancy shall occur by the death, resignation, inability 
to act, or other cause, of any of said officers such vacancy may be 
filled by the Trustees at any special meeting called for the pur- 
pose, and the notices thereof shall state the objects of the 
meeting. 

Section 2. The President shall preside at all meetings of the 
Corporation, sign all pay-rolls and all requisitions upon the City 
Treasurer, and all drafts or checks upon funds on deposit in Lon- 
don in payment for purchases made by the Trustees. 

Section 3. In the absence or disability of the President the 
Vice-President shall perform all the duties of the President. 

Section 4. The Clerk shall be sworn to the faithful perform- 
ance of his duties, shall attend all meetings of the Corporation, 
keep a full record of its proceedings, and shall be the custodian 
of all its records and papers. 



Article II. 

MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION. 

Section 1. The annual meeting of the Corporation shall be 
held on the first Monday of May in each year. 

There shall be regular meetings of the Corporation every Fri- 
day at four o'clock in the afternoon. 

Special meetings shall be called by the Clerk whenever directed 
by the President in Avriting, or requested in writing by two 
Trustees. 

Section 2. Written notice of all special meetings shall be sent 
by mail post-paid to each Trustee at least three days before the 
meeting. 

Section 3. All meetings of the Corporation shall be held in 
tlie Trustees' Room at the Central Library, unless otherwise 
ordered by vote of the Corporation at a previous meeting. 

Section 4. Three Trustees shall constitute a quorum to do 
business. 



Library Department. 115 



Article III. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

Sectioist 1. The order of business at the regular meetings of 
the Trustees other than the annual meeting shall be as follows : 

1. Reading of the record of proceedings of the previous 

meeting. 

2. Business required by law or by ordinance, and commu- 

nications from the City Government or any branch 
thereof. 

3. Unfinished business. 

4. Librarian's report. 

5. Reports of committees, correspondence. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

Article IV. 

LIBRARY OFFICERS. 

Section 1. The officers of the Library shall be : 

The Librarian. 

The Assistant Librarian. 

The Auditor. 

The Chief Cataloguer. 

The Chief of the Shelf Department. 

The Custodian of Bates Hall. 

The Chief of the Ordering Department. 

The Chief of the Delivery Department. 

The Chief Engineer. 

OF the LIBRARIAN. 

Section 2. The Librarian shall, under the Trustees, have the 
general charge, management, and control of the Library and its 
branches, and of all persons employed therein, and shall have 
the custody of all property, real and personal, owned by or under 
the control of the Corporation, for which no other provision is 
made. 

At each regular weekly meeting the Librarian shall make a 
written report to the Trustees containing his recommendations 
for the purchase of books and supplies and for any changes in ser- 
vice or in the work of the Library. 

He shall also at the first regular meeting in each month report 
in writing to the Trustees the general condition of the Library, 
and include in this report the reports for the previous month 
made to him by the heads of the various departments, the Auditor 
and the Assistants in charge of branches. 

OF THE ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN. 

Section 3. The Assistant Librarian shall, under the Libra- 
rian, have charge of the details of the administration of the 



lU) City Document No. 18. 

Libraiy and its branches, and in the absence or disability of 
the Librarian shall exercise the powers and perl'oriu tlie duties 
of that officer. 

OF THE AUDITOK. 

Section 4. The Auditor shall examine and audit all bills and 
accounts due from the Library, keep a record of receipts from 
tines and from the sales of catalogues and other sources, and 
prepare the pay-rolls, and all requisitions upon the City Auditor. 

The Auditor shall also keep books of account showing accu- 
rately all expenditures of the city appropriation, tlie income of 
each of the trust funds and expenditure thereof; and at the first 
regular meeting of tlie Trustees in each month shall make a re- 
port showing the receipts and expenses of the Library for the 
previous month and for the current year, and its financial condi- 
tion. She shall submit also monthly, for allowance with other 
bills presented, a statement, with vouchers, of sums expended by 
her for postage, expressage, cleaning, bills for books whose total 
in each case does not exceed ten dollars, and other bills which 
she is required to pay in cash out of the Library moneys in her 
hands. 

All bills and accounts audited by the Avulitor, if then approved 
by the Librarian, shall be presented to the Trustees for allowance 
at the meeting next preceding the twentieth day of each and 
every month, but in case of special exigency bills may be pre- 
sented for allowance at other meetings of the Trustees. 

or THE CHIEF CATALOGUER. 

Section 5. The Chief Cataloguer shall have charge of the 
Catalogue Department and of the persons employed therein, and 
of the various catalogues. 

OF THE CHIEF OF THE SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

Section 6. The Chief of the Shelf Department shall have 
charge of the persons employed in his department, and of all 
matters relating to the location and condition, and the prepara- 
tion for binding, of books and periodicals, and shall, at least 
once a year, make a careful examination of the books, and report 
in writing the number and condition thereof to the Librarian, 
who shall lay the same before the Trustees. 

OF THE CUSTODIAN OF BATES HALL. 

Section 7. The Custodian of Bates Hall shall be charged 
with the supervision of the service in that Hall, and the preser- 
vation of order and quiet therein. 

OF THE chief OF THE ORDERING DEPARTMENT. 

Section 8. The Chief of the Ordering Department shall have 
charge of all matters relating to the ordering and receiving of 
books voted to be purchased, and the control of all persons em- 
ployed in that department. 



Library Department. 117 



OF THE CHIEF OF THE DELIVERY DEPARTMENT. 

Section 9. The Chief of the Delivery Department shall have 
charge of all matters relating to the issue and reception of books 
issued for home use and the issue and reception of books for use 
in Bates Hall, and control of all persons assigned to the Delivery 
Department. 

OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Section 10. The Chief Engineer shall, under the Librarian 
have charge of all persons employed in the engineer, janitor, and 
repair departments of the Central Library building ; shall super- 
intend the work of the repair department, and have the general 
custody of the Central Library building. 

Article V. 
OF the library service. 

Section 1. All persons employed in the Library shall be at 
their posts promptly every morning when the Library opens, and 
remain there during the hours of their regular duty. 

Section 2. All persons regularly employed in the Library, 
except persons employed in the Engineer's or Janitor's depart- 
ments, or in the bindery, shall be entitled to a vacation at the 
rate of twenty-four days for each year in the service, exclusive of 
legal holidays and of the weekly half-holiday allowed by the city 
ordinance, to be arranged by the Librarian. No allowance shall 
be made for absence from duty except as above provided. 

Section 3. The President or Librarian shall have power to 
suspend, with loss of pay, any person in the Library service until 
the first succeeding meeting of the Corporation. 

Section 4. No book or other publication shall be received at 
the Library or any of its branches for show or distribution ; nor 
shall any subscription paper for any purpose whatsoever be placed 
therein, except by the vote of the Corporation. 

Section 5. Officers and heads of departments shall enforce 
these rules, and all persons employed in the Library service must 
report at once any breach of them that may come to their notice. 

Section 6. Any violation or neglect of the rules prescribed 
by the Corporation will be cause for dismissal. 

Section 7. Each officer shall perform his duties under the 
general direction of the Librarian, and all officers of the Library 
are expected to afford all possible assistance to persons using the 
Library or its branches. 

Article VI. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Section 1. Semi-annually, or oftener if expedient, exami- 
nations shall be held under the direction of the Librarian, for ad- 
mission, by promotion or otherwise, to all grades of employment 
in the Public Library, except the positions of Librarian, Assistant 
Librarian, Auditor, Chief Cataloguer, Chief of Shelf Department. 



118 City Document No. 18. 

Custodian of Bates Hall, Chief of Ordering Department, Chief of 
Delivery Department, Chief Engineer, and Head of Bindery. 

From the list of those persons who have successfully passed 
the examinations of the grade in which they seek employment, 
appointments shall be made by the Trustees upon nomination by 
tlie Librarian in consultation with the head of the department in 
which the appointment is to be made. 

Article VII. 

All previous By-Laws are hereby repealed, and these By-Laws 
may be amended by vote of a majority of the Trustees at any 
meeting of the Corporation, the notice for which shall state that 
amendments will be proposed. 



LiMKARY Department. 



119 



APPENDIX XIII. 



NEWSPAPERS IN THE NEWSPAPER READING-ROOM, 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Alaska. 




Sitka .... 


. Alaskan. 


Algeria. 




Algiers 


. Akhbar. 


Argentine Repiihlic. 




Buenos Ayres . 


. Nacion. 


Australia. 




Sydney 


. Sydney Morning Herald. 


Austria. 




Lemberg . 


. Dziennik Polski. 


Pesth 


. Pester Lloyd. 


Trieste 


. Mercurio Triestino. 




Nea 'Yifiepa. 


Prague 


. Narodni Listy. 


Vienna 


. Neiie Freie Presse. 


Belgium. 




Brussels 


. Independance Beige. 




Le Peuple. 


Brazil. 




Rio de Janeiro . 


Jornal do Commercio. 




Rio News. 


Canada. 




British Columbia. 




Vancouver 


. Daily News- Advertiser. 


Victoria . 


. British Columbia Cornmercial 




Journal. 


Manitoba. 




Winnipeg 


. Manitoba Free Press. 


New Brunswick. 




St. John 


. St. John Daily Sun. 


Nova Scotia. 




Halifax . 


. Halifax Herald. {Gift.) 




Morning Chronicle. 


Ontario. 




Hamilton 


. Hamilton Spectator. 


Ottawa . 


. Ottawa Citizen. 


Toronto . 


. Daily Mail and Empire. 


Quebec. 




Montreal 


. Montreal Daily Star. 


Quebec . 


. Quebec Morning Chronicle. 


Waterloo 


. Journal de Waterloo. 


Cape Colony. 




Cape Town 


. Cape Argus. 



120 



City Document No. 18. 



Chile. 

Santiago . 

ValiJaraiso 
China. 

Shanghai . 
Costa Rica. 

San Jose 
Cuba. 

Havana 

Denmark. 

Copenhagen 



Egypt. 

Alexandria 

Jerusalem . 
France. 

Havre 

Paris . 



Diario Oficial de la llopiiblica de 

Chile. {Gift) 
Mercurio. 

North China Herald. 

El Heraldo de Costa Ivioa. 

Diario de la Marina. 
La Discusion. 

Aftenposten. 

Berlingske politiske og Aver- 
tissements-Tidende. 

Egyptian G-azette. 
Habazeleth. 

Journal du Havre. 

Daily Messenger, formerlij 
Galignani's Messenger. 

Figaro. 

Journal des Debats. 

Messenger de Paris. 

New York Herald. Paris edi- 
tion. 

Ternps. 



Germany. 




Berlin 


Berliner Tageblatt. 




Soziale Praxis. 




Vorwarts. 


Cologne 


Kolnisehe Zeitung. 


Frankfurt . 


Frankfurter Zeitung. 


Hamburg . 


Hamburger Nachrichten. 


Munich 


Allgemeine Zeitung. 


Strasburg . 


Journal d' Alsace. 


Great Britain. 




England. 




Birmingham . 


Birmingham Post. 


Liverpool 


Liverpool Journal of Com- 




merce. 




Liverpool Mercury. 


London . 


Clarion. 




Daily Chronicle. 




Daily Telegraph. 




Era. 




Financial News. 




Hentchak (in Armenian) 




{Gift) 




Labour Leader. 




London Gazette. 




London News. 



Library Department. 



121 



Great Britain. 




England. 




London . 


. London Standard. 




Times. 




World. 


Manchester . 


. Manchester Guardian. 


Scotland. 




Edinburgh 


. ' . Weekly Scotsman. 


Glasgow 


. Glasgow Herald. 


Greece. 




Athens 


• 'A/C/907ro\(9. 




Katpoi. (Gift:) 


Guatemala. 




Guatemala 

Unllnrtfl 


. Diario de Centro America. 


sioitanci. 

Amsterdam 


. Amsterdamsche Courant. 


India. 




Bombay 


. Bombay Gazette. 


Ireland. 




Dublin 


. Irish Nation. 



Italy. 



Irish Weekly Independent. 
United Ireland. 
Weekly Freeman. 



Genoa 


. Corriere Mercantile. 


Rome 


. 11 Diritto. 




11 Fanf ulla. 




L'ltalie (in French). 


Milan 


. 11 Secolo. 


Jamaica. 




Kingston . 


. The Weekly Gleaner. 


Japan. 




Yokohama 


. Japan Weekly Mail. 


Mexico. 




Mexico 


. Mexican Herald. (Gift.) 




El Siglo. 




El Tiempo. 


Newfoundland. 




"St. Johns . 


. ' . Evening Telegram. 


Norway. 




Christiania 


. Morgenbladet. 


Peru. 




Iquique 


. La Patria. 


Porto Rico. 




San Juan . 


. Boletin Mercantil de Puerto 




Rico. 


Portugal. 




Lisbon 


. Jornal do Commercio. 


Russia. 




Tiflis . 


. Artsakankh. {Gift.) 


Odessa 


. Odesskiya jSTovosti. 


St. Petersburg . 


N"ovoe Vremya. 



122 



City Document No. 18. 



Jiusski. 

St. Petersburg 

INIoscow 
Sandivicli Islands. 

Honolulu . 
Spain. 

Madrid 
Sweden. 

Stockholm . 

Gothenburg 



Switzer'land. 

Geneva 

Lausanne . 

Zurich 
Turkey, in Europe. 

Constantinople . 

Armenia 
Turkey, in Asia. 

Smyrna 
United States of Columhia. 

Panama 
Venezuela. 

Caracas 



.lournal de St. Petersbourg. 
Kusskiya Vyedomosti. 

Hawaiian Gazette. 

El Imparcial. 

Aftonbladet. 

Goteborgs Handels och Sjofarts- 
Tidning. 

Journal de Geneve. 
Gazette de Lausanne. 
Neue Ziircher-Zeitung. 

Levant Herald. 
Arevelk (in Armenian). 

Les Affiches Smyrn^ennes. 

Panama Star and Herald. 

El Tiempo. 
Correo de Caracas. 



United 
Alabama. 

Birmingham 
Arizona. 

Nogales 
Arkansas. 

Little Rock 
California. 

El Cajon . 

Hayward . 

Los Angeles 

Oakland 

San Erancisco . 



Colorado. 

Colorado Springs 

Denver 
Connecticut. 

Hartford . 

New Haven 



States of America. 

. Birmingham State Herald. 

. Oasis. {Gift) 

Arkansas Gazette. 

. El Cajon Valley News. {Gift.) 

. Amigo dos Catholicos. {Gift.) 

. Herald. 

. Saturday Press. {Gift.) 

. Argonaut. 

Bulletin. {Gift.) 

Commercial Herald and Market 
Review. Weekly. 

Examiner. 

San Francisco Chronicle. 

San Francisco Daily Report. 
{Gift.) 

. Weekly Gazette. {Gift.) 
. Denver Republican. 

Hartford Courant. 
. New Haven Register. {Gift.) 



Library Department. 



123 



Delaware. 




Wilmington 


Evening Journal. 




Morning News. (Gift.) 


District of Columbia. 




Washington 


. Evening Star. 




Washington Post. 


Florida. 




Jacksonville 


. Florida Times-Union. 


Georgia. 




Atlanta . 


. Atlanta Constitution. 


Illinois. 




Chicago 


. Chicago Inter-Ocean. 



Indiana. 

Fort Wayne 
Indianapolis 



Iowa. 

Burlington 

Davenport . 
Kansas. 

Topeka 
Kentucky. 

Louisville . 

Louisiana. 

New Orleans 

Maine. 

Augusta 
Bangor 
Lewiston 
Portland . 



Maryland. 

Baltimore 

Massachusetts. 
Beverly 
Boston 



Chicago Journal of Commerce. 
Chicago Times-Herald. {Gift.) 
Chicago Tribune. 
Occident. {Gift.) 

Fort Wayne Sentinel. {Gift.) 
American Nonconformist. 

(Gift.) 
Indianapolis Journal. 

Burlington Hawk-Eye. 
Iowa Churchman. (Gift.) 

Topeka Capital. 

Courier Journal. 
Louisville Commercial. 

Daily Picayune. 
Times Democrat. 

Daily Kennebec Journal. 
Bangor Commercial. 
Lewiston Evening Journal. 
Daily Eastern Argus. 
Portland Evening Express. 
{Gift.) 

Baltimore American. 
Sun. 

Beverly Citizen. 
American Citizen. {Gift.) 
Argus. (Swedish.) {Gift.) 
Banner of Light. {Gift.) 
Boston Budget. {Gift.) 
Boston Commercial. {Gift.) 
Boston Commonwealth. {Gift.) 
Boston Courier. {Gift.) 
Boston Daily Advertiser. 
{Gift.) 



124 



City Document No. 18. 



MassacMtsetts. 
Boston 



Brockton . 
Cambridge . 
Fall River . 
Fitchburg . 
Framingham 
Gloucester . 
Groton 
Haverhill . 
Lawrence . 
Lowell 
Lynn . 
Marlboro . 
New Bedford 
Newburyport 
Pittsfield . 
Salem 



Boston Daily Globe. {Gift.) 
Boston Daily Standard. (Gift.) 
lioston Evening Record. (Gift.) 
Boston Evening Transcript. 

(Gift.) 
Boston Herald. (Gift.) 
Boston Ideas. (Gift.) 
Boston Journal. (Gift.) 
Boston Post. (Gift.) 
Boston Telegraph. (Gift.) 
Boston Times. (Gift.) 
Boston Traveler. (Gift.) 
Boston AVeekly Transcript. 
British American Citizen. 
Christian Leader. 
Christian Register. 
Commercial ]3ulletin. 
Congregationalist. 
East Boston Argus Advocate. 

(Gift.) 
Freiheit. (Gift). 
Herald of the Coming One. 
Massachusetts Ploughman. 
New England Farmer. 
New England Staaten Zeitung. 

(Gift.) 
Osterns Weckoblad. (Gift.) 
Pilot. 
Repiiblic. 
Saturday Evening Gazette. 

(Gift) 
Skandinavia. (Gift.) 
Watchman. 
Woman's JournaL 
Woman's Voice. (Gift.) 
Zion's Herald. 
Brockton Times. 
Cambridge Press. (Gift.) 
Fall River Daily Globe. 
Fitchburg Sentinel. (Gift.) 
Framingham Star. (Gift.) 
Cape Ann Breeze. 
Groton Landmark. (Gift.) 
Haverhill Evening Gazette. 
Lawrence Daily American. 
Lowell Daily Courier. 
Daily Evening Item. 
Marlboro Times. (Gift.) 
Evening Standard. 
Newburyport Morning Herald. 
Berkshire Evening Eagle. 
Salem Daily Gazette. (Gift.) 



Library Department. 



125 



Massachusetts. 
Springfield . 



Taunton 
Worcester . 



Michigan. 

Detroit 
Minnesota. 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 



St. Paul . 
Mississipjn. 

Vicksburg . 
Missouri. 

Chillicothe . 

Kansas City 

St. Louis . 

Montana. 

Helena 
Nebraska. 

Omaha 
Nebraska. 

Lincoln 
Nevada. 

Virginia City 
New Hampshire. 

Concord 

Manchester 

Portsmouth 
Neil) Jersey. 

Lake wood 

Trenton 

New Mexico. 
Santa ¥6 . 

Nexo York. 
Albany 
Brooklyn . 
Buffalo 
New York 



Citoyen Franco- American. 

{Gift) 
Springfield Republican. 
Taunton Daily Gazette. 
Arbetaren. {Gift.) 
Arbetarens Van. {Gift.) 
Worcester Daily Spy, 

Detroit Free Press. 

Duluth Evening Herald. 
Minneapolis Journal. 
Progress. {Gift.) 
Representative. {Gift) 
Saturday Spectator. {Gift.) 
Sunday Times, {^^ift.) 
Daily Pioneer Press. 

Daily Commercial Herald. 

Missouri World. {Gift.) 
Kansas City Journal. 
Kansas City Times. {Gift.) 
St. Louis Globe Democrat. 
St. Louis Republic. 

Helena Independent. 

Omaha Daily Bee. 

Nebraska Independent. {Gift.) 

Virginia Evening Chronicle. 

Concord Evening Monitor. 
Manchester Union. 
Portsmou-th Times. 

Lakewood Times and Journal. 

{Gift) 
Trenton Times. 

Santa Fe Daily New Mexican. 

Argus. 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 

Buffalo Express. 

American Catholic News. {Gift.) 

^KT\a.vrL<i. 

Belletristisches Journal. 

Catholic Review. {Gift.) 

Commercial Advertiser. 



121) 



City Document No. 18. 



New York. 



New York . 


. Courrier des 6tats-Unis. 




Eco d'ltalia. 




Evening Post. 




Home Journal. 




Independent. 




Irish American. 




Irish World. 




Judische Zeitung. 




N.Y. Herald. 




N.Y. Journal of Commerce. 




N.Y. Maritime Register. 




N.Y. Times. 




N.Y. Tribune. 




New Yorker Staats-Zeitung. 




New Yorker Volkszeitung. 




People. {Gift.) 




Rural New Yorker. 




Sun. 




World. 


Eochester 


. Rochester Post Express. 


Troy 


. Troy Daily Times. 


North Carolina. 




Wilmington 


. Morning Star. 


North Dakota. 




Fargo 


. Daily Argus. 


Ohio. 




Cincinnati 


. American Israelite. 




Cincinnati Commercial Gazette 




Cincinnati Enquirer. 




Cincinnati Price Current. 


Cleveland . 


. Cleveland Citizen. {Gift.) 




Cleveland Leader. 


Oregon. 




Portland . 


. Morning Oregonian. 


Pennsylvania. 




Philadelphia 


. American. {Gift.) 




Christian Recorder. {Gift.) 




Philadelphia Record. {Gift.) 




Public Ledger. 


Pittsburg . 


. Pittsburg Dispatch. 


Wilkes-Barre . 


. Wilkes-Barre Times. {Gift.) 


Rhode Island. 




Providence 


. Providence Daily Journal. 




Triangle. {Gift.) 


South Carolina. 




Charlestown 


. News and Courier. 


South Dakota. 




Sioux Falls 


. Morning Argus Leader. 


Tennessee. 




Memphis . 


. Commercial Appeal. 


Nashville . 


. Nashville Banner. (Gift.) 



Library Department 



127 



Texas. 




Galveston 


. Galveston Daily News. 


Utah. 




Salt Lake City . 


. Salt Lake Tribune. 


Vermont. 




Burlingtou 


. Burlington Daily Free Press. 


Eutland . 


. Eutland Daily Herald. 


Virginia. 




Eichmond 


Eichmond Dispatch. 


Washington. 




Seattle 


. Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 


Spokane . 


Spokesman-Eeview. (Gift.) 


West Virginia. 




Wheeling 


. Wheeling Eegister. 


Wisconsin. 




Milwaukee 


. Amerikanische Turnzeitung 




(Gift.) 




Milwaukee Sentinel. 


Superior . 


. Superior Leader. (Gift.) 


Wyoming. 




Laramie 


. Cheyenne Sun. 



12.S City Document No. IS. 



APPENDIX XrV. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Boston, January 12, 1895. 
To the Trustees of the Boston Pahllc Library: 

Gentlemen : As the surviving executor and trustee of tlie 
estate of Miss Dorothea Lynde Dix, and in accordance witli her 
wishes, I respectfully present to you certain papers and articles 
of value belonging to the estate of this distinguished Boston 
woman who has done so much for the education and benefit of her 
suffering fellow men and women throughout this and other lands. 
These papers consist of her memorials to different Legislatures 
for the building of the first Public State Insane Asylums in this 
country, together with resolutions passed by them ; badges of 
Free Hospital Service worn by her during the War of the Rebel- 
lion ; medals presented to her in Russia and elsewhere ; papers 
relating to the Life Boat Saving Service, and to other work of 
the greatest interest in Canada, England, and other parts of 
Europe ; with many autograph letters of public interest, and 
early copies of her own books. Also I shall be glad to present a 
suitable case to hold them. It is needless for me to add any 
information concerning her life work. Her biographer. Rev. 
Francis Tiffany, has given this in his memoirs of her. 

I shall be most happy to explain more fully the character of 
this gift if you wish me to. 

Believe me, 

Most respectfully yours, 

H. A. Lamb, 

27 Kilby St., Room 12. 

To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen : In the possession of Mr. James L. Little, of 
Brookline, are sixteen (16) books which contain all the original 
painted designs from which the entire printed product of the 
Pacific Mills of Lawrence, Mass., was manufactured during the 
years 1867 to 1883 inclusive. Thirteen (13) books of patterns 
showing the fabrics (calicoes, cretonnes, lawns, and fancy goods) 
as finished for the market, and seventeen (17) other books of 
patterns showing the various colors and styles of plain and 
figured dyed goods as finished for the market. My brother now 
authorizes me to offer these books (52 in number) to the Library, 
reserving only a right of withdrav.^al in some very remote 
contingency. 

These books are practically a pictorial history of a great textile 
industry for sixteen (16) years, and it is the hope of my brother 
and myself that the gift may stimulate other gifts, and that these 



Library Department. 129 

books may form a nucleus, round which may gather in time a 
history of the growth of the textile industry in America, which 
may be of inestimable value for the use and inspiration of students 
of textile manufacturing. 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) John" Mason Little. 
Boston, May 16, 1895. 



Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, June 27, 1895. 
To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library/ : 

Gentlemen : On the 30th of April your honorable board voted 
that the Avork of Mr. Sargent, already in position in the upper 
staircase hall of the Library building, demonstrates most clearly, 
in the interest of the Library, and of the city at large, of having 
the whole decoration completed by the same hand, and that you 
regretted that you had no funds at your disposition which could 
be used for this purpose. 

It gives me great pleasure to inform you that the necessary 
amount has been raised by public subscription, in testimony of 
the general appreciation of Mr. Sargent's Avork, and of the strong 
desire that his conception for the decoration of the hall should 
be fully carried out. 

Messrs. S. D. Warren, Augustus Hemenway, and Edward AV. 
Hooper have been appointed trustees of this fund. Upon receiv- 
ing your assurance that the hall in question will be reserved for 
Mr. Sargent until his work there is completed, they will proceed 
to make a contract with him for the execution of that portion of 
his design which he is not already under engagement to do for 
you, and this will be offered as a gift to the Library in the name 
of the subscribers, whom I have the honor to represent. 
Very respectfully yours, 

(Signed) Edwakd Robinson. 

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted and 
directed to be extended upon the records, and a copy thereof 
transmitted to Mr. Robinson : 

^^ Resolved, That the Trustees have learned with cordial satis- 
faction that the necessary sum has been subscribed for the com- 
pletion of the series of paintings by John S. Sargent, Esq., for 
the upper staircase hall of the Library building. 

"That the Trustees extend sincere acknowledgment to those 
who have thus by their generosity provided for the completion 
of a design of such importance, not merely to the architectural 
beauty of the Library building, but to the cause of decorative art 
in America. 

^^ Resolved, That the upper staircase hall, so far as its decoration 
has not already been contracted for, be reserved for such deco- 
ration by Mr. Sargent in accordance with the contract to be made 
with him by the Trustees of the Fund." 



180 City Document No. 18. 

Woman's Education Association, 

Boston, September 3, 1895. 
To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen : The Woman's Education Association, believing 
that the establishment of a branch of the Public Library in the 
West Church on Cambridg-e street would do much to promote the 
better education of the people of that part of the city, resolved, 
in the si)ring of 1894, to do all in its power to procure the purchase 
of the church by the city for library uses. The following action 
was therefore taken at the regular meeting, held April 26, 1894 : 

"Fofec^^That if the West Church is bought by the city for a 
Branch Library, the Association pledges itself to raise a sum of 
money sufficient to purchase three to four thousand books, which 
books, being carefully selected by its Committee on Libraries, 
shall be presented to the city as a gift from this Association." 

A copy of this vote, with the reasons therefor, was given to the 
Mayor, and by him sent to the Council, and the church Avas sub- 
sequently bought. 

The Association now fulfils its pledge, and presents to you 
for the West Church Branch Library, between five and six thou- 
sand volumes. Of these, about twenty-six hundred were received 
by direct gift. Between three and four hundred more volumes, 
which were given to the Association for the Branch, seemed to 
the committee in charge to be more suited to the Central Library, 
and so are given to you, without any restriction as to where they 
shall be placed. The remainder of the books were purchased 
with money given for this purpose, and have been carefully 
selected by the committee, with a view to the special needs of the 
people likely to frequent this Branch. The sum of five hundred 
dollars, for which a check is enclosed, is giveir by the family of 
the late Charles. Greely Loring, as a memorial fund, from the in- 
come of which books are to be bought for the Branch. The 
enclosed letter from Mr. William C. Loring explains this matter 
more fully. 

All these gifts, both of money and books, come to the Library 
through the Association, chiefly from three sources : from the 
family of the Kev. Charles Lowell, the well-known minister of 
the West Church, from 1806 to 1861 ; from persons formerly con- 
nected with the West parish, or their descendants ; and, finally, 
from persons directly or indirectly connected with the Woman's 
Education Association. About one hundred and twenty-five 
vokimes were kindly given by Boston j)ublishers. 

In order to perpetuate in some degree the good work done for 
so many years by Rev. Charles Lowell, the Association respect- 
fully requests that the books now given may be known as the 
Lowell Collection. 

Trusting that the old church may be in the future, as in the 
past, a centre of good work and inspiration for the community. 
We remain, for the Association, 

Respectfully yours, 
(Signed) Alice Freeman Palmer, President. 
Mary Morison, Secretary. 



I 



Library Department, 131 

To the Trustees of the Public Library : 

Gentlemen" : I send to you, through the Woman's Education 
Association, the sum of one thousand dollars, — live hundred 
dollars for the immediate purchase of books, and live hundred for 
a permanent fund for that purpose. 

This contribution is made by the children and grandchildren 
of Charles Greely Loring, who during his lifetime was connected 
with the West Church, and for many years the superintendent of 
its Sunday School. 

To him principally is due the open space in front of the church. 
He not only was active in raising the funds necessary for its pur- 
chase, but insisted that the ground purchased should be kept 
open for the church and public. 

Wishing to perpetuate his memory with that of the church, and 
as a prominent and patriotic citizen of the city in which he Avas 
born and lived during his whole life, his descendants make this 
contribution for the benefit of the public. 

(Signed) Caleb William Loring. 
February 18, 1895. 

54 Allen St., November 4, 1895. 
To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston : 

Gentlemen : In my youthful days I was a lover of books, and 
it was one of my chief jjleasures to attend a book auction and 
purchase with my spare pennies some humble volume to add to 
my small library. In later years my accessions became of more 
value. 

To the pleasures of collecting and of possession, I added the joy 
of showing them to other book-lovers and of listening to their 
appreciative words. A few days ago I enjoyed this pleasure 
with your accomplished Librarian, Mr. Putnam. He expressed 
his satisfaction in seeing some of my most valued books and 
manuscripts, of which you have no duplicates in the Public Li- 
brary. As I had contemplated a gift of these volumes to your 
shelves at some time, at my request Mr. Putnam removed them on 
the same day to their new home. 

I need not tell you how much I have enjoyed for many years in 
gathering and possessing a useful and interesting library in my 
home at the AVest End. 

But I assure you, gentlemen, that I have enjoyed more than 
ever the thought that these gems of my collection will now be 
placed in a finer setting, and will be enjoyed for generations to 
come in your new and magnificent building which is itself a gem 
of American architecture. 

That they may here do much more good to the young and old 
of my native city than they could possibly do in my home is my 
motive in asking your acceptance of my gift as Trustees of the 
Public Library. 

Yours truly, 

(Signed) Thomas Gaefield, 



132 City Documknt No. IS. 



S Mount Vernon Place, 

Boston, November 16, 1895. 

To the Trustees of the Boston Public Libra ft/ : 

Gentlemen : I am instructed by Mrs. Joliii Ellertoii Lodge 
to offer to you for the Public Library her marble copy of the 
Venus de' Medici, now in her home, 31 Beacon street. The 
statue was brought from Florence in 1837 by her father, Mr. 
Henry Cabot, and was made in the studio of Mr. Greenough. 

Mrs. Lodge will be glad to have you come and see the statue 
at any time you will appoint most convenient for you. If after 
consideration you conclude to accept the statue for the Library, 
Mrs. Lodge will deliver it to any one duly authorized by you to 
receive it. 

With great respect, I have the honor to be 

Most truly and respectfully, 
Yours, 
(Signed) George Abbott James. 

41 Marlborough Street, Boston, 
December 10, 1895. 

To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to offer to the Boston Public 
Library a very valuable autograph of Lope de Vega, with the un- 
derstanding that it is to be placed with the special "Ticknor 
Library," and among the more precious volumes of that collec- 
tion, subject to the rules governing it. 

During Mr. Ticknor's life this volume was always kept by him 
in his collection of autographs ; and it was, therefore, not thought 
of when the Spanish and Portuguese books were transferred to 
the Public Library, — which, as you may remember, was done 
several years before required by Mr. Ticknor's will, — nor was it 
considered to be a part of the Library. 

I now feel, however, that the place for this manuscript of the 
play by Lope de Vega, " El Castigo sin Venganza," will find its ap- 
propriate place in the Ticknor Library under your care. It is a 
Holograph, and is mentioned in my father's History of Spanish 
Literature. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very truly yours, 
(Signed) Anna Eliot Ticknor. 



r^ruRARY Department. 



133 



APPENDIX XV. 



GIFTS, JANUARY 1, 1895, TO JANUARY ;U, 1896. 



Givers . 
Volumes 
Numbers 



Abbey, Edwin A., Gloucestershire, Eng 

Abbott, Samuel A. B. . . . . .15 photos 

Academia Nacional de Medicina, Lima, Peru . 
Acadeinie (L') Royale des Sciences de Lisbonne, Lisbon, 
Portugal . . . . . . 

Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Academy of Science of St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. 

Actors' Fund of the U.S. of America, JVew York City 

Adams, Prof. John Quincy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Aguilar Free Library, New York City .... 

Alabama Canebrake Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Uniontown, Ala 

Alabama Geological Survey, University, Ala. . 

Allen, Gardiner, W. ........ 

Almy, Francis, Buffalo, N.Y. 

American, The, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences .... 

American Academy of Political and Social Science, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. ........ 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 

American Architect and Building News Co. 

American Art Association, A"ew York City 

American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Salem, Mass 

American Association for the Advancement of Physical 
Education, New Haven, Conn 

American Baptist Home Mission Society, Neiv York City. 

American Bar Association, Baltimore, Md. 

American Bible Society, New York City .... 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. 

American Book Company, New York City 

American Carpet and Upholstery Trades Publishing Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa . 

American Catholic News, New York City .... 

American Citizen 

American Colonization Society, Washington, D.C. . 

American Congregational Association .... 

American Forestry Association, Washington, D.C. . 

American Home Missionary Society, New York City 

American Homes Publishing Co., Knoxville, E^i/. 

American Institute of Architects, Providence, R.L . 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, New York 
City 

American Institute of Homoeopathy, New York City 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City. 

American Laryngological Association, New York City 

American Library Association 

American New Church Tract and Publication Society, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

American Nonconformist, Indianapolis, Ind. . 



Vols. 

1 

116 

2 



1,433 

15,690 
12,363 

. I No. 



184 



City Documknt No. 18. 



American Otological Society, New Bedford, Mass. . 

American Peace Society 

American Philatelic Association, Neu> York City 

American Philosophical Society, I'hiladetphia, Pa. . 

American Physicians and Surgeons, Congress of. New 
Haven, Conn. . 

American Society for the Extension of University Teach- 
ing, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 

American Surgical Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

American Swedenborgian Printing and Publishing Society, 
New York City ........ 

American Type Founders' Company, New York City 

American Water Works Association, New York City 

Amerikanisclie Turnzeitung, Milwaukee, Wis. . 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachu- 
setts 

Anderson, Prof. Karl 

Andover, Mass, Town of ...... . 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Mass. 

Andrew, JJon. John F. . . ... . . 

Anonymous ......... 

Appleton, William S. 

Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Arabol Manufacturing Co., New York City 

Arbefaren Publishing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Archaeological Institute of America, New York City . 

Argentine Kepublic, General Department of Immigration, 
Buenos Aires ......... 

Argus (Swedish) ........ 

Armour Institute, Chicago, III. ...... 

Armstrong, Mrs. Mary Stuart, Chicago, III. 

Arnold, F. E., Braintree, Mass 

Arnold, Howard P 

Art Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Association of American Physicians, Albany, N.Y. . 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Astor Library, New York City ...... 

Atkinson, C. F 

Atkinson, Edward ........ 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. . . . . . 

Atwood, Capt. John ........ 

Avery, Mr. and Mrs. S. P., and Trustees of Columbia Col- 
lege, New York City 

Ayer, William C, Union Village, Ohio . . . . 

Bibcock, J. W., M.B., Columbia, S.C 

Babcock, James F 

Bahcock & Wilcox Company, New York City . 

Baillie's Institution Free Library, Glasgoiv, Scotland 

Balch, Edwin Swift, Philadelphia, Pa 

Ball, William T. W 

Bancroft, Hon. Edgar, Chicago, III 

Bangor, Me., City Clerk 

Bangor Public Library, Bangor, Me. . . . . 

Bangs, Outram 

B:\x\k, C\\a.T\Qs'E., M.D., Portland, Me 

Banner of Light ........ 

Barber, Edwin Atlee, West Chester, Pa 

Barber, Rev. H. H., Meadville, Pa 

Barker Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Barnard College. New York City 

Barnard Memorial 



Vols. 

1 

1 
2 



147 
1 
1 
1 

1 



1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
145 
4 
1 
1 

1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
?, 
12 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 



Library Department. 



135 



Eng. 



Batsford, B. T., London, Eng. . 

Biittersea Public Libraries, London, 

Baxter, Sylvester 

Belj.ime, A. L., Paris, France ...... 

Beluit College, Beloit, Wis 

Benevolent Fraternity of Churches 

Bent, vSiiniuel Arthur 

Benton, J. H., ./y 

Berkshire Historical Society, Pitfsjield, Mass. . 

Betts, Mrs. Maria, Tiinlridge Wells, Eng. 

Beverly Citizen, Beverly, Mass. 

Biblioteca Nacional, Santiago, Civile 

Bibliotlieek tier Rijks-Universiteit te LeiJen, Leiden, 
Holland .......... 

Bibliotheque de I'Academie Eoyaie des Sciences, Stock- 
holm, Sweden ......... 

Bibliotiieque de I'Universite Imperiale, St. Petersburg, 
Russia . . . . . . 

Bibliotheque de I'Universite d'Utrecht, Utrecht, Holland. 

Bibliotheque Sainte-Genevieve, Paris, France . 

Bigelow & Co., Messrs. ....... 

Bigger, Rev. J. H., Hoosac Tunnel, Mass. 

Binswanger, Miss C. ....... . 

Birkenhead Free Public Libraries, Birkenhead, Eng. 

Birmingham, Eng., Free Libraries Committee . 

Bisbee, Prof. Marvin D., Hanover, N.H. . . . . 

Bishop, Seth Scott, J/. Z?., CAica^-o, /// 

Blagden, Rev. Silliraan ....... 

Blaisdell, Frank C 

Blaiichard, Miss Margaret ....... 

Bland, Thomas A., J/.Z) 

Blatchford, E. W., Chicago, III 

Blinn, Henry C, East Canterbury, N.H 

Bliss. Rev. W. D. P 

Blodgett, A. N., J/. Z) 

Bolton Public Free Library, Bolton, Eng 

Bolton, Charles K., Brookline, Mass. . . . . 

Bolton, Prof. Henry C, Ph.D., New York City 

Bolton, Mrs. Sarah K. , Brookline, Mass 

Bonaparte, Prince Roland, Paris, France .... 

Boston, Board of Aldermen ...... 

Board of Commissioners of Department of Parks. 

Board of Health 

• Board of Police ....... 

Board of Registrars of Voters ..... 

City Arcliitect 68 plates 

City Auditor ........ 

City Clerk 

Oily Council 

City Engineer ........ 

City Hospital 

City Messenger ....... 

Ciiy Registry Department ..... 

City Trea>urer ....... 

Executive De|)artment ...... 

School Committee ....... 

Superintendent of Streets ..... 

Boston Art Club 

Boston Associated Board of Trade 

Boston Associated Charities 

Boston Athletic Association 
Boston Budget . 
Boston Camera Club . 



51 newspapers 



1 

1 


' 


1 
1 


. 


23 




3 




73 




4 


2 




1 


1 




2 




24G 


3 


30 




1 




8 




12 


67 


2 




2 






12 


9 




61 


(J'J 



136 



City Document No. 18. 



Lit 



D 



Boston City Missionary Society . 

Boston Commercial 

Boston Commonwcaltli 

Boston Diiily Advertiser 

Boston Daily Globe . 

Boston Daily Herald . 

Boston Daily .Journal . 

Boston Daily I'ost 

Boston Daily Standard 

Boston Daily Traveler 

Boston Evening Transcript 

Boston Ideas .... 

Boston Industrial Home 

Boston Library Society 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts 

Boston North Baptist Association, West Ne%vton, Mass. 

Boston North End Mission 

Boston Protective Department . 

Boston Provident Association . 

Boston Public Latin School 

Boston Society of Natural History 

Boston Telegraph 

Boston Times .... 

Boston University 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association 

Boston Young Men's Christian Union 

Bostonian Society .... 

Botume, Miss Elizabeth H., Port Royal, 

Bourmot, ,J. G., C.M.G., LL.D., D 

Ottawa, Canada .... 
Bourke, Copt. John G., Fort Ethan Allen 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.D. 
Bowditch, Miss Olivia Y, . 
Bowdoin College Library. Brunswick, Me 
Bowen, Miss Lillian .... 
Bowen, Seranus .... 
Bowes, James L., Liverpool, Eng. . 
Bowles, J. M 

Bradford, Martin L 

Bradlee, Rev. C. D., Brookline, Mass. 

Brewer, David H 

Bridge House Estates Committee of the Cl 
City of London, Eng. 

Brighton Pui)lic Library, Brighton, Eng. 

Briggs, F. M., M.D 

Brinton, Daniel G., A.M., M.D., LL.D., Media, Pa. 

British and Foreign Bible Society, London, Eng. 

British Museum, London, Eng. .... 

Brockton Public Library, Brockton, Mass. 

Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn. 

Brookline Historical Publication Society, Brookline, Mass 

Brookline Public Library, Brookline, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Department of Parks 

Brooklyn, TV. r., Health Department 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 

Brooklyn Ethical Association, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N.Y. . 

Brophy, T. C 

Brosnahan, Rev. T., S..T. 

Brower. Hon. J. V., St. Paul, Minn. . . 1 chart 

Brown University, Providence, R.L 

Brown, Allen A. . . . 



Vols. 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
6 
2 



1 portrait 
manuscripts 



205 
104 



443 news[)apers 
rporation of the 



95 



Library Department. 



137 



Eng. 



Brown, Francis H., M.D. . 
Browne, Miss Alice .... 
Brownell Car Company, St. Louts, Mo. 
Browneli, T. F., A'ew York Ciiy 
Bruslifield, Tliomas N., M.D., Devonshire 
Bryant, Henry C, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bryant, Setli 

Buell, Charles E., Plainfield, N.J. . 

Buff & Berger 

Buffalo Evening News Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Buffalo Library, Buffalo, N. Y. . 
Builders' Iron Foundry, Providence, R.I. . 

Bunker, Alfred 

Burdick, Allen 

Burgess, Clinton B 

Burrage, Rev. Henry S., Portland, Me. 

Burton, C. M., Detroit, Mich 

Busey, Samuel C, M.D., LL.D., Washington, D.C. 
Bustillo-Lirola, Dr. Antonio, Havana, Cuba 
Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, R.I. 

Cable, Wheeler 

Cad bury, Richard, Philadelphia, Pa. 
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, Cal 
California Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley, Cal 
California Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Sacra 

mento, Cal. ........ 

California Midwinter International Exhibition, Executive 

Committee, San Francisco, Cal 

California State Library, Sacramento, Cal. 
California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento, Cal. . 
California State Normal School, Chico, Cal. 

Cambridge, Mass., City Clerk 

Cambridge, Mass., Overseers of the Poor . 
Cambridge Press, Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge Public Library, Camhridge, Mass. . 
Cambridge Public Free Library, Cambridge, Eng. . 
Cambridge School Committee, Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge School for Girls, Cambridge, Mass. 

Campbell, Frank, London, Eng 

Campbell, W., Toronto, Canada .... 
Canada, Department of Agriculture, Archives Branch 

Ottawa, Canada ....... 

Canada, Department of Agriculture, Division of Statistics 

Ottawa, Canada 

Canada, Geological Survey, Ottawa, Canada . 

Canada, Library of Parliament, Ottawa, Canada 

Canada, Minister of Education, Toronto, Canada 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal, Canada 

Canfield, Thomas H. . . 

Carles, C, M.D., Buenos Aires, S.A. 

Carnegie Free Library, Alleghany, Pa. 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Carolsteld, Dr. Hans Schnorr von, Munich, Germany 
Carpenter, Prof. Frederic Ives, Chicago, III. . 

Carret, J. F 

Casgrain, Abbe H. R., Quebec, Canada 
Cash, Mrs. Emma D. ... 

Castilian Club 

Castor, Messrs. T. H., & Co. 

Catholic Review, New York City 

Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 



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138 



City Document No. 1(S. 



IHass 



CJiaddock, riiarkvs G.. J/./)., Si. Louis, Mo. 

Chiuiwick, Jiimcs U., M.D. 

Cliiimhorlilin, I/on. Melleri, Chelsea, Mass. 

Cliiimller, Horace P. . 

Chantller, Hon. W. E., Washington, D.C. 

Channiiifr, Walter, M.D., Brookline, Mass. 

Chase, Miss C. L. N., North Cambridge, Mass 

Chauvelin, Marquis dc, I'aris, France 

Cliavcs, Capt. Francisco Alfonjso, San Miquel, Azo 

Chelsea, Mass., City of .... . 

Chevalier, S. A. 

Chicago, III., Board of Education 
Chicago Herald Co., Chicago, III. 
Chicago Literary Club, Chicago, 111. 
Chicago Public I..ibrary, Chicago, 111. 
Children's Aid Society, New York City 

Children's Hospital 

Christian Recorder, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Church Home for Orphan and Destitute Children 

Cigar Maker's International Union of America . 

Cincinnati Ctiamber of Commerce, Cincinnati, Ohic 

Cincinnati Public Library, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Citizen Printing and Publishing Co., Tucson, Arizo 

Citoyen, Franco- American, Springfield, Mass. . 

Civic Federation of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

Civil Service Reform Association, New rork City 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass. 

Clark, Benjamin C 

Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, Northampton, 

Clarke, Miss E. Mabel 

Clarke, Miss Lillian F 

Clayton, H. H 

Clerkenwell Public Library, London, Eng. 
Cleveland Citizen, Cleveland, Ohio . 
Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland, Ohio 

Coale, George O. G 

Cobden Club, Shortlands, Kent, Eng. 
Coelho, Jose Ramos, Lisbon, Portugal 
Cola, Jehangier D., New York City . 
Colby University, Waterville, Me. 
Colby, Frederic T., Afracombe, Eng. 
Cole, George Watson, Jersey City, N.J. . 
College of St. Francis Xavier. New York City . 
Colles, George W., Jr., Hohoken, N.J. 

Collins, F. S 

Collins, Holdridge 0., Los Angeles, Cal. . 
Colorado Scientific Society, Denver, Col. 
Columbia College, New York Ci^ . 
Columbia Incandescent Lamp Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Columbian Lodge ...... 

Comee, F. R 

Conant, H., Pawtvcket, R.I 

Concord Free Public Library, Concord, Mass. . 
Concord, N.ff., City Council .... 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven 

Conn 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven 

Conn. ........ 

Connecticut, Board of Education, Hartford, Conn. 
Connecticut, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Hartford, 
Connecticut. General Assembly, Hartford, Conn. 
CouTiecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn. 
Connecticut, Public Library Commission, New B 

Conn. ........ 



Conn 



itam, 



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11 

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139 



c. 



Connecticut, Secretary of State, Hartford, Conn. 
Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Conn. 
Conner, P. S. P., Philadelphia,' Pa. 
Continental Iron Works, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 

Cool<e, John P 

Copeland & Day 

Cornell University, /</iaca, TV. r. 

Aurricultural Experiment Station 

Cot»reavp, A., London, Eng. 
Council Bluffs. Iowa, Free Public Library 
Courtnay, William A., Innisfallen, Newry, S. 
Crane, Aaron M. . . . . . 

Crane, Prof. T. F., Ithaca. N.Y. 

Creifihton University, Omaha, Neb. . 

Criado y Dimiinguez, Juan P., Madrid, Spain 

Crocker, Hon. George G 

Crocker, Uriel H 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 

Cross, Rt. Hon. Viscount, London, Eng. . 

Cuervo, Angel, Paris, France . 

Curry, //on. J. L.M., LL.D., Washington, D. 

Curtis, Charles B., Jr., Groton, ilass. 

Gushing, Tbomas, .4.. »/. .... 

Gust, Robert Needham, M.D., London, Eng. 

Cutler School, New Fork City . 

Cutter, Alirani E. . . ' . 

Cutting. Prof. S. W., Chicago, III. . 

Dall, Prof. Wm. Healey, Washington, B.C. 

Dalton, Joseph G 

Dana, Richard H 

■ Daniels, George H., New York City . 
Dante Society, Cambridge, Mass. 
Dartmouth College, I/anover, N.H. . 

Davenport. B. F., M.D 

Daves, Graham, New Bern, N.C. 
Davis, Andrew McF., Cambridge, Mass. . 
Davis, Charles E., Jr. .... 
Davis, Mrs. Simon ..... 
Dawson, Sir J. William, LL.D., F.R.S., F. 

treat, Canada, ..... 

Dayton Pul)lic Library, Dayton, Ohio 
De Costa, B. F., New York City 
Dedham, Mass., Town Clerk 
De Goije, Prof. M. J., Liede, Pays-Bas . 
De Kalb, Pi of. Courtenay, New York City 
Denison House ...... 

Denison Scientific Association, Granville, Ohi> 

Denkinger, J. F., M.D 

Denney, Henry G. . . . . . 

Denver Public Library, Denver, Col. 
Detroit Public Library, Detroit, Mich. 
Deuerlich'sclie Buchhandlung, Goltingen. Ger 
Deutsclie Gesellschaft der Stadt New York, 

City 

Dole, Nathan Haskell .... 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the P 

tant Episcopal Church, New York City . 
Donald, Rev. E. Winchester, D.D. . 

Dorr, Mrs. 

Dotterer, Henry S., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Douglass, Prof. A. E., Flagstaff, Ariz. . 
Dover Historical Society, Dover, N.H. 
Dover Public Library, Dover, N.H.. 



G.S., 



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140 



City Document No. 18. 



r. 



Science, 



'III la 



newspapers 



Pa. 



Dresser, Miss A. G 

Dresser, Horatio W. .... 
Drew Tlieoloi-ical Seminary, Madison, JV. 
Drew, Benjamin, J'/ymoiiiJi, Mass. 
Drexel Institute of Art, Industry, and 

delphia, Pa. ..... 

Driver, S. W., M.D., Cambridge, Mass. 
Du Buy, Jean, M.D., New Haven, Conn. 
Dudley, L. Edwin .... 

Dulles, Rev. Joseph H., Princeton, Mass. 

Eager, George H 

Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Eastman, Charles R., M.D., Cambridge, Mass.. 
Eaton, Rev. A. W. li.. New York City 
East Boston Argus ..... 

Edes, H. H 555 

Edes, 3Iiss S. A. M 

Edinburgii Public Library, Edinburgh, Scot/and 
El Cajon Valley News, JEl Cajon, Cai. 

Eldridge, Daniel 

Eliot, Miss .Mary B., Providence, R.I. 

Elliot, Sterling 

Emerson, James, WilUmansett, Mass. 
Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia 
Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 

Ernst, Carl W 

Ernst, George A. O 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass. . 
Eustis George D., Brookline, Mass. . 
Everett, Bon. William, Washington, D.C. 
Fairbanks, Calvin, Caryvitle, Mass. . 
Fairfield County Historical Society, Bridgeport 
Fall River Public Library, Fall River, Mass 

Faxon, Charles E 

Ficken, Hon. John F., Charleston, S.C. 
Field Columbian iVluseum, Chicago, III. 
Field, Osgood, N^ew York City . 

Field, Richard M 

Filmer, John, New York City . 
Fiorini, Prof. Matteo, Bologna, Italy 
Fisher, Sydney G., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fitchburg, Mass., City Clerk 
Fitchburg Railroad Company 
Fitchburg Sentinel, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass. . 
Filz, 3Iiss Louise, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Fitzgerald, Desmond, Brookline, Mass. 
Fleischner, Otto .... 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 
Fletcher, Daniel Cooledge, Ayer, Mass. 
Flores, Antonio, Paris, France 
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Floye, William J 

Floyer, E. A., M.A.R.S., Cairo, Egypt 

Fobes, Walter K 

Folsom, A. A., Brookline, Mass. 

Forbes, J. M 

Ford, William E 

Forsyth, Walter G., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

France, Ministere de I'Agriculiure, Paris, France 

France, Ministere de I'lndustrie, Paris, France 

France, Ministere de I'Instruction Publique et des Beaux 

Arts, Paris, France 



Lake 



Conn 



City 



Fla 



Library Department. 



141 



France, Ministere du Commerce, de I'lndustrie, des Postes 
et des Telegraphes, Paris, France .... 

France, Ministere du Commerce, de I'lndustrie et des Col- 
onies, Paris, France 

Francis & Newton, Messrs., New York City 

Franklin Reformatory Home for Inebriates, Philadelphia, 
Pa 

Fraser Institute, Montreal, Canada ..... 

Frazer, Dr. Persifor, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Freiheit 

Freiherrlich Carl von Rothschild'sche offentliche Biblio- 
thek, Frankfurt-am- Main, Germany .... 

Frencli, A. D. Weld 6 maps 

French, J. D. W 

Fretwell, John 

Freund. Harry E., New York Citij ..... 

Freuiid's Musical Weekly, New York City 

Friends' Free Library and Reading Room, Germantown, 
Pa 

Frinsdorff, Miss Emily O. 

Furraan, Alfred A., Clifton, N.J. 

Furness, Rev. W. H., D.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gaffield, Thomas ........ 

G?L\e,h\Y.., Concord, NH 

Garceau, Edgar, M.D. 

Gardner, Rev. Frederick ....... 

Garrison, F. J. . 

Garrison, Wendell Phillips, New York City 

Gatschet, Albert S., Washington, B.C. . . . . 

Gay, Julius, Farmington, Conn. 

Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

General Association and General Conference of Conn., 
Hartford, Conn. ........ 

General Association of the Congregational and Presby- 
terian Churches of New Hampshire, IJollis, Nil. . 

General Conference of Congregational Churches and 
Maine Missionary Society, Gorham, Me. 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, New York 
City 

General Theological Library 

General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the United States, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Geographical Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Georgetown College, West Washington, D.C. . 

Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, Atlanta, Ga. . 

Gerasinms, Wicketas 

Germania Publishing Company ...... 

Gerould, H., M.D., Cleveland, Ohio .... 

Gilbert, G. K., and F. P. Gulliver, Rochester, N.Y. . 

Gilbert, M. J., St. Louis, Mo 

Gilman, Gorham D. ....... . 

Gilnian, Rev. N. P 

Gladden, Rev. Washington, Columbus, Ohio 

Globe Review, Oakland, Cat. ...... 

Globe Stationer}' and Printing Company, New York City. 

Gloucester, Mass., City of ...... 

Gloversville Free Library, Gloversville, N.Y. . 

Goddard, Miss Matilda 

Good Government, Washington, D.C. 

Goodwin, Daniel, Chicago, III. ..... 

Goodyear, Miss Anna F. ...... . 

Gore, Charles, M.A., London, Eng 

Goubareff, D. N., Beaulieu-sur- Mer, France 



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City Document No. 18. 



Gould, Gcorjie M., A.^f., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gould, Miss Ida 

Gould, S. C , Manchester, N.H. 

Graham, Doujjlas, M.D 

Grand Army of the Republic, Dept. of Mass. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Board of Kducation 

Grand Hapids, Mich., Public Library 

Grant, Messrs. R., & Son, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Graves, Mrs. Catherine M., Portland, Conn. 

Gray, Rev. Andrew, D.D. 

Gray, Samuel ...... 

Gray, \V. R., London, Eng. 
Great Britain, Dept. of Science and Art, Londo 
Great Britain, India Office, London, Eng. 
Great Britain, Patent Office, London, Eng. 
Green, Milbrev, M.D. . . . 

Green, S. A.,'m.D 

Green, S. S., Worcester, Mass. 
Greenoujjh, Richard S., Rome, Italy 
Greenwood, Charles Curtis, Needham, Mass. 

Gregjj, John R 

Grolier Club, New York City 
Grossherzoglich Badische Ruprecht-Karls 

Heidelberg, Germany .... 
Groton Landmark, Groton, Mass. 
Groton Scliool, Groton, Mass. . 
Guild & Lord, Jifessrs. .... 

Guthrie, William D., New York City 
Hackett, E. A. K. , Fort Wayne, Indiana . 

Hale, Rev. E. E 

Hale, Rev. W. B., Middleborough, Mass. . 

Hail, Miss Belle 

Halsey, Edmund D., 3forristown, N.J. 
Hamilton Bank, New York City 
Hamilton College Library, Clinton, N. Y. . 
Hamilton Public Library, Hamilton, Ont. 
ILandelskammer, Leipzig, Germany 
Harlem Library, New York C\ty 
Harmonic Social Club, New York City 
Harper Brotiiers, Messrs., New York City 
Harrop & Wallace, Messrs., Columbus, Ohio 
Hart, Charles H., New York City . 
Hartford Hospital and Old People's Home, 

Conn 

Hartford Public High School, Hartford, Conn 
Hertford Public Library, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Seminary Press, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn 
Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass. . 
Harvard Law Scliool Association, Council of 
Harvard Medical Alumni Association 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 

Astronomical Observatory . 

Library .... 

Museum of Comparative Zoology 

Harvard University, Class of 1891 

Hassam, John T., ^4. J/ 

Hastings, H. L 

Hatch, Azel F., A.B., Chicago, III. . 
Hawes, Miss Charlotte . . . , 

Hawes, Gilbert R., New York City 
Haynes, Rev. E. M., D.D., Rutland, Vt. , 
Hazen, Rev. Henry A., D.D., Auburndale, 



Eng. 



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Hartford 



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Hearn, George A., New York City 
Henry, Frederick P., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Herscliel, Clemens, New York City . 
Hiersemanii. Karl W., Leipzig, Ger. 

Higginson, Henry Lee 

Hill, 1). G., Dedham, Mass 

Hingliain, Mass., St;liool Committee . 
Hirotsu, Tonionbu, Cambridge, Mass. 
Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati 

- Ohio 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa 

Hoadly, Charles J., LL.D., Hartford, Conn. 

Hoar, Samuel, Concord, Mass. .... 

Hohhs, Cliarles E., Somervi/le, Mass. 

Hodge, Frederick VV., Washington, B.C. . 

Hodgkins, W. H., Somerville, Mass. . 

Hoepli, U., Milan, Italy ..... 

Hollis, Mrs. E. A 

HoUister, Mrs. Ovando James, Denver, Col. 
Holmes, Rayard, B.S., 31. D., Chicago, III. 
Holstein Friesian Association of America, Braitlebor 
Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass. 
Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites, St. Louis, Mo. 
Home for Aged Colored Women 

Home for Aged Men 

Home for tlie Friendless, New Haven, Conn. 

Home Market Club 

Home for Inebriates Association, London, Eng. 
Hooker, Edward, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 

Hope. Owen O 

Hotchkin, Rev. S. F., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Howard Association, London, Eng. . 

Howard Memorial Library, N'eiv Orleans, La. . 

Howard, Albert Waldo 

Howell, f/on. Eugene, Carson City, Nev. . 

Howes, P. E. .' 

Howland, A. M., Dana Ana, New Mexico . 

Howland, Daniel Webster 

Howson, Hubert, New York City 

Huling, Ray Greene, Cambridge, Mass. 

Hume, lion. Harrison, Augusta, Me. . 

Humphreys, Arthur L., London, Eng. 

Hunt, E. B 



Huntington, Archer M., New York City 
Hutchins, C. L., Concord, Mass. 
Illinois, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, lit. 
Illinois, Office of the Insurance Superintendent, Sp 

fitld. 111 

lUinois, State Board of Health, Springfield, 111. 
Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield, 111. 
Imperial University, Tokyo, Japan . 
India, Government Astronomer, Madras, India 
India, Government Printing Office, Calcutta, India 
Indian Rights Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station, LafayetU 
Indiana, Bureau of Statistics, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Industrial Aid Society 

Industrial Development Company, New York City 

Ingalls, Herbert 

Ingalls, Capt. James M., Fort Monroe, Va. 
Institute of Jamaica, Kingston, -Jamaica . 
Instituto Geografico Argentiiio, Buenos Aires, S.A. 
Institution of Civil Engineers, London, Eng. . 



ring 



Ind 



144 



City Document No. 18. 



IntcniiUional Association of Firo Kngincers, Wyoming, 
Ohio ' . 

International Committee of Youn^ Men's Ciiristian Associ- 
ations, New York City ....... 

International Young Men's Christian Association, Spring- 
field, Mass 

Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington, D.C. 

Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station, Ames, Iowa . 

Iowa Geological Survey, Des Moines, Iowa 

Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Iowa State Historical Society, Iowa City, Iowa 

Iowa State Library, Des Moines, Iowa .... 

Ironmonger. Publishers of, London, I'ng. 

Italy, His Majesty Humbert, King of .... 

Italy, Ministero dell' Interno, Direzione della Sanita pub- 
blica, Borne, Italy ........ 

Laboratori Scientifici della Direzione di 

Sanita 

Ministero di Agricultura, Industria, Commercio . 

Jamaica Plain Indian Association 

James, Pro/. Edmund J., Fh. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

James, F. Huberty 

Jaques, Mrs. Florence W. 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D 

Jenkins, E. Kendall, Salem, Mass. ..... 

Jenks, Henry F., Canton, Mass. ... 1 map 

Jersey City Free Public Library, Jersey City, N.J. . 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

Johns, H. W., Manufacturing Company, New Fork City . 

Johnson, Edward F., Woburn, Mass. .... 

Johnston, W. J., New York City 

Joint Counties Asylum, Carmarthen, Wales 

Judkins, T. C, San Francisco, Cal. ..... 

Jury Company ......... 

Kaiserlich-Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna, 
Austria .......... 

Kaiserliches Patentamt, Berlin, Germany 

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kan. 

Kansas, Board of llailroad Commissioners, Topeka, Kan. 

Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Mo 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas 

Kaunas, Vincent 

Kellner, Rev. M. L., M.A., Cambridge, Mass. . 

Kellogg, Warren F 

Kelton, D wight' H., LL.D., Montpelier, Vt. . . . 

Kent, Miss Ella, Cambridge, Mass., ... 7 maps 

Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky. 

Kindergarten for the Blind ...... 

Kirkpatrick, George E., Fhiladelphia, Fa. 

Kittredge Company, New York City 

Knapp, Arthur Mason 4 maps 

Knapp, George B 

Knowles, Edward R., LL.D., Worcester, Mass. 

Koehler, Prof. S. K 

Koenigliche bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 
Munich, Germany ....... 

Koenigliche Sammlungen fiir Kunst und Wissenchaft, 
Dresden, Germany ....... 

Koengliche Universitiits-Bibliothek, Gbttingen, Ger- 
many 

Kongelige Bibliothek, Copenhagen, Denmark . 

Kongliga Universitetet, Upsala, Sweden . . . • 

Kuntz, Dr. Otto, Leipzig, Germany .... 



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Ladd & Hunt, Messrs. .... 

LRfranoe, C. L. J., Quebec, Canada . 
Lakew'ood Times and Journal, Lakeicood, N.J. 
Lamb, James H. ..... 

Lancaster, Mass., Town Library 

Lancaster, Frank H., New York City 

Land and River Injprovement Company, West 

Wis. . . 

Lane, John 

Lansr, Prof. Henry R., New Haven, Conn. 
Lanier, Mrs. Charles, New York City 
Lanigan, Rev. James A., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Larsson, Gustaf 

Lathers, Richard, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Lawrence General Hospital, Lawrence, Mass. 
Lawrence Public Library, Lawrence, Mass. 
League of Americnn Wheelmen, 

Illinois Division, Chicago, 111. . 

Kentucky Division, Louisville, Ky. . 

Maine Division, Portland, Me. . 

Maryland Division, Baltimore, Md. . 

Minnesota Division, Minneapolis, Minri. 

New Jersey Division, Elizabeth, N.J. 

Ohio Division, Chillicothe, Ohio 

Pennsylvania Division, Philadelphia, Pa 

Rhode Island Division, Providence, R.I. 

Vermont Division, Burlington, Vt. . 

Lee, Francis Watts 

Leeds, LJng., Free Public Library 

Lefflngwell, Albert, M.D., Cambridge, Mass. . 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. . 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Palo Alto, 

Lenox Library, New York City 

Leo XIII., His Holiness Pope, Rome, Italy 

Leupp, Francis E., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lexington, Mass., Town Clerk . 

Leyton Local Board Public Library, Jjeyton, Eng. 

Leyton Urban District Council Public Library 

Eng 

Library Association of Portland, Portland, Oregon 
Library Bureau ....... 

Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa 
Library of Congress, Washington, DC. . 
Lick Observatory, Mt. Hamilton, Cal. 
Little, J. L. & J. M , Brookline, Mass. 
Liverpool, Eng., Free Public Library, Museut 

Walker Art Gallery 

Lockhart, Arthur J., Hampden Corners, Me. 
London Chamber of Arbitration, London, Eng. 
London, Eng., Corporation of the City of. 
Lopez, Dr. Enrique, Havana, Cuba . 

Lord, Mrs. Mary A 

Lord & Thoinas, Messrs., Chicago, III. 

Los Angeles Public Lihrarj', Los Angeles, Cal. . 

Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton 



Cal. 



La. 



Low, Lyman Haynes, New York City 

Lowell, Miss Anna C. ....". 

Lowry, Rev. S. C, M. A., North Holm wood, Dorking 

Lyman, Benjamin Smith, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lyman, Mrs. Theodore, Brookline, Mass. 

Lynn Public Library, Lynn, Mass. . 

MacCauly, Clay, Tokyo, .Japan 



Leytc 



Ro 



Eng 



Is. 

I 
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1 

8 


No. 
11 




2y 




14 


1 
1 

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14() 



City Document No. 1H. 



McCook, Prof. J. J., Hartford, Conn. 
McDonald, lion. John, Austin, Texas 
Mac'ullar, Paikor & Co., Messrs. 

Macuriiy, lUiss T. E. 

Macy, Niss Henrietta G., Venice, Italy 
Majiuire, Hon. .lames G., Washington, D.C. 
Mainionides Free Library, New York City 
Maine Central Hailroiul Company, Portland, Me. 
Maine Historical Society, J'ottland, Me. . 
Maine Industrial School for Girls, Ilallowell, Me. 
Maine Society of the Sons of American Revolution 

land. Me 

Maine State College & Agricultural Experiment 

Orono, Me 

Maine State Library, Augusta, Me. ... 
Maiden Public Library, Maiden, Mass. 
Manchester City Library, Manchester, N.H. 
Manchester Public Free Libraries, Manchester, Eng 
Manly, Charles, M.D., South Denver, Col. 
Mann, Rev. Charles H., Orange, N.J. 

Mansfield, Miss S. L. 

Manuscript Exchange, Cleveland, Ohio 

Marblehead, Mass., School Committee 

Marine Lodge, No. 96. I.O.O.F., Provincetown, 

Marlboro', Mass., Public Library 

Marlboro' Times, Marlboro', Mass. . 

Marsh, Bon. Henry A., Worce.<iter, Mass. . 

Martin, John Biddulph, London, Eng, 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, College 



Port- 



Stati 



Mass 



Park, 



Md. 



Mason, Lewis P., M.D., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Massachusetts Attorney-General 

Board of Gas & Electric Light Commissioners 

Board of Railroad Comniisi.ioners . 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor 

Commissioner ot Public Records . 

Free Public Library Commission . 

Highway Commission • . . . 

Secretary of the Commonwealth . 

State Board of Arbitration and Conciliation 

State Board of Health .... 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity 

State Library 

State Normal School, Worcester, Mass. . 

Tax Commission 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass 

Experiment Station . 



Meteorological Observatory 



Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy . 
Massachusetts Council of Deliberation 
Massachusetts General Ho>pital 
Massachusetts Historical Society 
Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 
Massachusetts Infant Asylum .... 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Massachusetts Medical Society .... 
Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Park ("ommission . 
Massachusetts School for Feeble-Minded. Waliham 
Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture 
Massachusetts Public Reservations, Trustees of 



Mass. 



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1 
1 
I 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 



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Library Department. 



147 



j Vols. 

Massachusetts Universalist Convention, Sornerville, Mass. \ 2 

Master Car Builders' Association., Chicago, III. . . 1 

Matthews, Brander, New York City 166 

Mattliews, Hon. Nathan, Jr 124 

JMaynard, Prof. C. J., Newtonville, Mass. ... 8 

Mayo, Rev. A.J) 140 

Means, James | 1 

Medford, Mass., City Auditor ...... I ;^ 

Meehan & Sons, Mess7-s., Germantown, Pa. . . . | 2 

Meigs, J. V. . . . . . . . . . I 2 

Meissonier, Mme. Veuve, Paris, France .... j 1 

Mekeel Stamp and Publishing Co., 5^. Z/07«s, J/o. . . .12 

Melbourne University, Melbourne, Australia . . . , 1 

Melrose Public Library, Melrose, Mass. .... i I 

Melrose, Charles K., San Francisco, Cal. . . . i 1 

Menzes, Joaquin de, New Bedford, Mass. ... 

Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. . \ 1 

Mercantile Library of New York, New York City . . 1 

Merriam, J. W., Iquique, Chile ..... lo 

Mexican Central Railway Company .....' I 

Mexican Pul)lishing Company, City of Mexico ... 1 

Mexico, Observatorio Meteorologico Central, Mexico . 1 

Miami University, Oxford, Ohio ..... 1 

Michigan, Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, 

Lansing, Mich 1 

Micliigan Central Railroad Company, New York City . 2 

Michigan Mining School, Houghton, Mich. . . . ] 

Michigan State Library, Lansing, Mich. .... 32 
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the U.S., Oliio 

Commandery, Cincinnati, Ohio ..... 

Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce, Milwaukee, Wis. . 1 

Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. ... 5 

Minneapolis Bar Association, Minneapolis, Minn. . . 1 
Minneapolis Board of Park Commissioners, Minneapolis, 

Minn 1 

Minneapolis Public Library, Minneapolis, 3Iinn. . . 2 
Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Anthony 

Park, Minn j 1 

Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, Min- ' 

neapolis, Minn. ........ 2 

Minnesota Historical Society, St Paul, Minn. . 

Minnesota Itaska State Park, St. Paul, Minn. . 1 chart o 

Minnesota Weather Service, Minneapolis, Minn. . . 2 
Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbia, 3Io. 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo. ... 1 

Missouri World, Chillicothe, Mo. ..... 1 

Modern Language Association of America, Baltimore, Md. 1 
Montana, Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry, 

Helena, Mont. ........ \ 

Morison, George S., Chicago, III. ..... '^ 

Morning News, Wilmington, Del. ..... 1 

Morris, I. P., Co., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 1 

Morse, Prof. Edward S., Salem, Mass 2 

Mother Mary Joseph, Baltimore, Md. .... 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Trustees of, Cambridge, Mass. . • 1 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. . . . o 

Mullett, Rev. A. E 42 

Municipal League of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. . 1 

Murray, William ........ ! 

Museo de La Plata, Buenos Aires, S.A 12 

Myer, Isaac, New York City 1 

Naliant Public Library, Nahant, Mass 2 

Nance, W. V., May-Benny, West Virginia . 3 maps ' 



148 



City Document No. IK. 



National Academy of Science, Washington, D.O. 
National Association of Fire Engineers, Wyoming, Ohio 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers . 
National Board of Trade, /'/n7rt(ie/y?/(m, /'a. 
National Conference of Charities and Correction, St. Paul 
Minn. ......... 

National Life Insurance Company, Montpelier, Vt. 

National Municipal League, Philadelphia, Pa. 

National Plant Coni))any, Dayton, Ohio 

National Science Club for Women, Washington, D.C. 

Natural History Society of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Navy Records Society, London, Eng. 

Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln, Neb 

Nebraska Historical Society, Lincoln, Neb. 

Nebraska Independent, Lincoln, Neb. 

New Bedford, Mass., Free Public Library 

New Brunswick Natural History Society, St. John, N.B 

New Cliurch Board of Publication, New York City . 

New England Association of Colleges and Preparatory 

Schools, Cambridge, Mass 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association 
New England Historic Genealogical Society 
New England Hospital for Women and Children 

New England Staaten-Zeitung 

New England Water Works Association, Brookline, Mass 

New England Weather Service 

New England Women's Club 

New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, N.H. . 
New Hampshire, Secretary of State, Concord, Nil. . 
New Hamiishire State Library, Concord, N.H. . 
New Hampshire State Medical Society, Concord, N.H. 
New Haven, Conn., Free Public Library . 
New Haven Register, New Haven, Conn. . 
New Jersey, Adjutant-General, Trenton, N.J. . 
New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, New Bruns 
wick, N.J. ........ 

New Jersey, Board of Education, Trenton, N.J. 

New Jersey, Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industry 

Trenton, N.J. 

New Jersey, College of, Princeton, N.J. . 

New Jersey Geolosical Survey, Trenton, N.J. . 4 maps 

New Jersey State Library, Trenton, N.J. . 

New South Wales, Government Board for International 

Exchanges, Sydney, N.S.W 

New South Wales, Railway Commissioners, Sydney 

N.S.W. 

New York Academy of Science, New York City 

New York Aqueduct Commission, New York City 

New York Baptist Union for Ministerial Education 

Rochester, N.Y. 

New York Board of Aldermen, New York City . 

New York Board of General Managers of the Exhibit of 

the State of New York at World's Columbian Expositio 
New York Civil Service Commission, Albany, N. Y. . 
New York Colored Home and Hospital, New York City 
New York P'armers, New York City .... 
New York Free Circulating Library, New York City 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, New 

York City 

New York Historical Society, New York City . 
New York Life Insurance Company, New York City 
New York Opiithalmic and Aural Institute, New York City 
New York Society Library, New York City 



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New York State ChRmber of Commerce, New York City. 

Cliarities Aid Ass'n, New York City . 

Insurance Department, Albany, N. Y. . 

Library, Albany, N.Y. 

Medical Society, Albany, N. Y. . 

Reservation at Niasiara, New York City 

Tenement House Committee, Albany, N. Y. 

New York Statistical Society, New York City . 

Newark, N.J., City Clerk 

Newark Free Pul)lic Library, Newark, N.J. 

Newberry Library, Chicago, III 

Newburyport Public Library, Newhuryport, Mass. . 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, Public Library Commit- 
tee 

Newfoundland, Colonial Secretary, St. Johns, Newfound- 
land 

Newman, Thomas G., Chicago, III 

News Publishing Company, Wilmington, Del. . 

Newton, Mass., City Clerk . 

Newton, Mass., City Engineer 

Newton Free Library, Newton, Mass. .... 

Nickerson, Sereno D. 

Nichols, Miss A. A 

Nobili, A 

Norcross, Mrs 

Norcross, Messrs. O. & G. H 

Norris, & Oliver, Drs., Philadelphia, Pa. 

North, S. N. D 

North Adams Public Library, North Adams, Mass. . 

North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh, 
N.C 

North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
Raleigh, N.C. 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, Northampton, Mass. 

Northampton, Mass., Public Library Committee 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. .... 

Norton, Carol, New York City 

Norton, Jacob 

Norwegische Commission d. Europjiischen Gradmessung, 
Christiania, Norway ....... 

Norwell, J/ass., Town Treasurer 

Nova Scotia Historical Society, Halifax. N.S. . 

Nova Scotia Library Commissioners, Halifax, N.S. 

Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Halifax, N.S. 

Noyes, Isaac P. , Washington, D.C 

Oasis Publishing Company, Nozales, Ariz. 

Oberlin College, Oberiin, Ohio 

Oliservatorio Meteorologico Central de Mexico, Mexico 

Oficina Meteorologica Argentina, Cordova, A.R. . . 

O'Gorman, Joseph A. 

Ohio Agricultural F>xperiment Station, Wooster, Ohio 

Ohio, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Columbus, Ohio 

Ohio, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio . 

Ohio, Department of State, Columbus, Ohio 

Ohio State Arclueological Society, Columbu.<:, Ohio . 

Old South Studies in History, Directors of . . . 

Olney, Ifon. Frank F., Providence, R.I. 

Oliver, Mrs. Edward B., Newton Centre, Mass. 12 portraits 

Olsson, F. A., Cambridge, Muss 

Ontario Department of Agriculture, Toronto, Canada 

Onturio Agricultural College, Experiment Station, Guetph, 
Ont . . 



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City Document No. 18. 



Orcsion Asjrieultiiral Experiment Station, Corvallis, Ore 
Ostorliout Free Library, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Otis, E.Uvard ()., M.D 

Owens Colleire, Manchester, Eng. 

Paine, Lucius K. ...... 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester, Mass. 
Paneoast, Prof Ilonry S. Germantoivn, Pa. 

Panin, I., Grafton, Mass 

Papanti, L., CamhiiSge, Mass. . . 

Passaic, N.J., Free Public Library . 

Patersnn, N.-L, FVee Public Library . 

Paul, Trench, Triibner & Co., Ke<?an, London, Eng 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. ... 

Peck, Geo. Gottsberger, New York City . 

Peck, Geo. R., Chicago, III. . . 

Pennfiel, Dr. Antonio, City of Mexico 

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia 

Pa.' 

Pennsylvania Committee on Lunacy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pennsylvania Prison Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pennsylvania State Library. Harrishurg, Pa. . 
Peoj)le's Party Ward and City Committee 

Peoria Public Library, Peoria, III 

Perkins Institution and Mass. School for tlie Blind . 

Perkins, Mrs. Charles C 

Perkins, Henry C, Estate of, Newhuryport, Mass. . 
Perkiomen Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Perrin, Miss Jeanne .... 135 newspapers 

Perry, Thomas S. .••••■ - 
Perry, Rt. Rev. Wm. Stevens, D.D., Davenport, Iowa. 

Pettengill, H. J 

Pettingill & Co., Messrs 

Peyster, General die, Tivoli, Duchess Co., N.Y. 

Phelps, Miss Fanny L 

Philadelphia City Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Philadelphia Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia 

Pa 

Philadelphia Public Library, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pinladelphia Record, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Phillips Exeter Academy, ^a;e!!e»-, iV^.//. ... 
Philological and Archffiological Societies, Philadelphia, 

Pa 

Pliilosophical Society of Glasgovr, Glasgow, Scotland 
Phonographic Institute Co., Cincinnati, Ohio . 
Physio-Medical College of Imliana, Indianapolis, Ind. . 

Pierce, lion. Edward L., Milton, Mass 

Pierce, il/e^srs. S. S., & Co 

V\eTson, Frederick !•■, Ellsworth, Conn 

Pinksohn, M 

Pitts, .John L., Guernsey, Channel Islands 

Plaiiisong and Mediaeval Music Society, London, Eng. . 

Piatt, Franklin, Philadelphia, Pa 

Plymouth, Eng., County Borough of . . . . 

Fo\am\, W\\hi\m C, Providence, R.I 

Pollock, Charles .... 19 photographs 

Porter, Rev. Edward G 

Portland, Maine, City Auditor 

Portland Evening Express Pub. Co., Portland. Me. . 
Portland Sccielv of Natural History, Portland, Me. . 



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176 



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151 



Portland, Oregon, Library Association .... 

Post, Alfred A., Helena, Montana 

Potts, William J., Camden, N.J. 

Pozzoli, Inp;. Daniele, Crema, Italy . . . . . 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. T. 

Prince Manufacturing Co., New York City 

Prince, C Leeson, Sussex, Eng. 

Prince, Hon. F. O. 

Proijress, Minneapolis, Minn. ...... 

Prospect Union, Camhridgeport, Mass. .... 

Protestant Episcopal Ciiurch in the Diocese of Long 
Island, Brooklyn. N.Y. 

Providence, R.I., City Auditor 

Providence, R.I., City Messenger ..... 

Providence, R.I., Eecord Commissioners .... 

Providence Atliengeum, Providence, R.l. .... 

Providence Public Library, Providence, R.l. . 

Pullman Palace Car Company, Chicago, III. 

Putnam Nail Company 

Putnam, Miss Alice M., Danvers, Mass 

Putnam, Eben, Salem, Mass. ...... 

Putnam, Herbert ........ 

Putnam's Sons, Messrs. G. P.. Neiv York City . 

Quaritch, Bernard, London, Eng. ..... 

Quebec, Canada, City Treasurer 

Queensland Patent Office, Brisbane, Australia 

Quincy, ///., Free Public Library 

Quincy, Mass., City Hospital ...... 

Quincy, Hon. Josiah P. ...... . 

liadcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass. .... 

Kand, Rev. Edward A., Watertown, Mass. 

Rand, Hon. Edward T. ...... . 

Real Academia de la Historia, Madrid, Sjjain . 

Real Estate Exchange and Auction Board 

Reale Istituto Lombardo di Science e Lettere, Milan, Italy. 

Redwood Library, Newport, R.I. 

Reed, J. R. '. . . 

Reeve, J. C, M.D., Dayton, Ohio ..... 

Reich, O. . . . . ... 

Representative, The, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Reusch, Dr. Hans, Christiania, Norway .... 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N.Y.. 

Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station, Kingston, 
R.I. 

Rhode Island, Board of State Charities and Correction, 
Providence, R.l 

Rhode Island, Bureau of Industrial Statistics, Providence, 
R.L 

Rhode Island, Commissioner of Public Scliools, Provi- 
dence. R.L 

Rhode Island Congregational Conference, Providence, R.L 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, H.I. . 

Rhode Island State Board of Health, Providence, R.I. 

Rice, Edwin F 1 photograph 

Richmond Free Public Library, Surrey, Eng. . 

Richmond, Olney H 

Richter, Messrs. G. IL, & Co 

Riehle Brothers Testing Maciiine Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa 

Ring, Thomas F 

Rochester Academy of Sciences, Rochester, NY. 

Rochester Theological Seminary, Rochester, N.Y.. 

Rodocanachi, J. M 42 photographs 



152 



City Document No. 18. 



Rodwaye, Cheralier Alfred J. . 

Rogers, Gorliam 

Rood, Mrs. Rowland 

Rosa Sonnenschein Company, (Jliicago, III. 
Rosenatier, Nicholas ...... 

Rosenuarten. .Joseph G., Fhiladclphia, Pn. 

Ross, Mrs. M. I) 

Ross, William L 

Rosse, IrvinsjC.,^..!/., jV./>., F.R.G.S., Washington 

Rowell, B. W 

Roxbury Charitable Society .... 

Roxbury Latin School 

Royal Geograjdiical Society, Loiidoji, Eng. 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, Eng. 

Royal Scottish Society of Arts, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canada 

Sabbath School Teachers' Convention 

Sadler, Ralph, London, Eng. .... 

St. Andrew's Society of the State of New York, Neiv 

City 

St. George's Public Library, London, Eng. 

St. Johnsbury, Vermont, Athenaeum 

St. Joseph, Missouri, Free Public Library 

St. Leonard, Parish of, Commissioners for Public 

ries and Museums, London, Eng. . 
St. Louis Free Public Library, St. Louis, Mo. . 
St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, St. Louis, 
St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Martin-in-the-Field, Parish of, Commissioners for 

lie Lil)raries, London, Eng. .... 
St. Paul Public Library, St. Paul, Minn. . 

Salem, Mass., City Clerk 

Salem Gazette Co., Salem, Mass. 
Salem Public Library, Salem, Mass. 
Salisbury, Prof. RoUin D., Chicago, III. . 
Salisbury, I/on. Stephen, Worcester, Mass. 

Salter, Miss Edith A 

Sampson, F. A., Sedalia, Mo 

San Francisco, Cal., Free Public Library . 

San Francisco Daily Report, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sanborn, Alvan F 

Sanford, Prof. Edward T., A.M., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Sargent, Prof. Charles S., Brookline, Mass. 
Saturday Evening Gazette .... 

Saturday Spectator, Minneapolis, Minn. . 
Sawyer Free Library, Gloucester, Miss. . 
Schools of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 

adelphia. Pa. 

Scientific Association, Meriden, Conn. 
ScoUay, Mrs. Annie H. L., Para dise Valley , Pa. 
Scott, Prof. F. N., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Scranton Public Library, Scranton, Pa. . 
Scrihner's Sons, Messrs. Charles, New York City 
Scudder, Prof. S. H., Cambridge. Mass. . 
Scudder's Sons, Messrs. J. M. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Seaver, Edwin P 

Selian, A. B 

Shambaugh, Benjamin F., A.M., Iowa City, Iowa 

Shea, Mr 

Sheffield, England, Free Public Libraries and Muse 

Sheldon, I'rof. Henry C. . 

Shepard, C Sidney, New Haven, N. Y. 

Shoe and Leather Reporter .... 



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1 medal 



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State of Iowa 



Mass. 

as. . 



Siam, His Majestv, King of, Bangkok, Stain 
Siiversniitli, J., Chicago, III. 
Sinnickson, Robert, Salem, N..J. 
Skandinaviii, Worcester, Mass. 
Slafter, Rev. Edmund T., D.D. 

Small, Hi-rbert 

Smith, Charles 

Smith, Prof. Eugene A., Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Smith, Theodore Clarke, A.M., Madison, Wis 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, B.C. 

Smyth, J. Thomas 

Sociedad de Fomento Fabril, Santiago, Chile 

Sociedad de Geografia y Estadistica de la Republica Mex 

icana, Mexico .... 
Sociedad Nacional de Agricultura, Santiago, Chile 
Sociedad Nacional de Mineria, Santiago, Chile 
Society for the Study of Inebriety, London, Eng. 
Society of American Florists 
Society of Arts, London, Eng. . 
Society of Colonial Wars . 
Society of St. Vincent de Paul . 
Society of the Cincinnati, Garden City, N. 
Society of the Sons of the Revolution ii 

wealth of Massacliusetts 
Society of tlie Sons of the Revolution in the 

Davenport, Iowa . 
Soctety of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of Mi 

souri, Beihany, Mo. 
Socnety to Encourage Studies at Home 
Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Chelsea 
Somerville Public Library, Somerville, Ma. 
South Australia, Woods and Forest Department, Adelaide 

S. Avs 

South Kensington Museum, London, Eng 
South Sliields, Eng., County Borough of, 

and Museum 

Southbridiie, Mass , Town of 
Spatula Pul)lishing Company 
Spokesman Review Publishing Company, 
Sprange, Walter, Beach Bluff, Mass. 
Springfiekl City Library Association, Spr 
Sproull, Lyman, Cripple Creek, Col. 
Squibb, E. R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Standish, Dr. Myles .... 
Staton, James W., Brooksville, Ky. . 

Staumer, Peter 

Stearns, G. T 

Stechert, Gustav E., New York City 

Stephenson, Mrs. R 

Stevens, Benjamin F. . 

Stevens, Hon. Everett J., Maiden, Mass. 

Stevens, Monroe .... 

Stirling's and Glasgow Public Library, Glasgoiv, Scotland 

Stone, Don .A., Burlington, Vt. 

Stone, Edwin A. .... 

Stone, Frederick D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station, Middleton, Conn 

Stratton, Henry W. . 

Strout, J. C, Washington, D.C. 

Suffolk Registry of Deeds . 

Sunderland, Rev. J. T. 

Superior Leader, Superior, Wis. 

Supple, Bernard F. . 



Public Library 



Spokane, Wash 
g fie Id, Mass. 



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City Document No. 18. 



Sveriges Offentliga Hibliotek, Stoclcholm, Sweden 

Swilt, Lindsay . . . . . . .11 cliarts 

Swift, Mrs. Sarah A 

Swiizerianil. Bureau Federal des Assurances, Heme, 
Sivilzerland ......... 

Switzerland, Bureau Federal Officiel de Statistique, Berne, 
Swilzer/and ......... 

Switzerland, Offizielles Verkelirsbureau, Lucerne, Switzer- 
land 

Sydney, New South Wales, Free Public Library 

Tabor Academy, Marion, Mass. ..... 

Tappan, Miss Mary S., JJrookh'ne, Mass. .... 

Tatnian, Cliarles T., LL.B , Worcester, Mass. . 

Taunton Public Library, Taunton, Mass 

Technique, Board of Editors ...... 

Texas Agricultural E.xperiment Station, College Station, 
Texas 

Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass. ..... 

Thayer, Prof. James Bradley, LL.D., Cambridge, Mass. 

Thomas Crane Public Library, Quincy, Mass. . 

Thirteenth Massaciiusetts Regiment ..... 

Tliompson, Rev. A. C. ....... 

Tliwaites, Reuben G., Madison, Wis. .... 

Ticknor, Miss Anna E 

Tiffany, Edward 

Tilton, Miss J. Flora 

Tokyo Library, Tokyo, Japan 

Toronto Public Library, Toronto, Ont 

Townsend, George A., Gaplnnd, Md. .... 

Townsend, Martin Ingham, Troy. N.Y. . 

Traubel, Horace L., Camden, N.J. 

Travfissos, Manuel Ferreira, S. Miguel, Azores 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn 

Truman, .Joseph M., Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tu^:VQr,^Y\\\\s,G., M.D., Albany, N.Y. . . . . 

Tufis College, Somerville, Mass 

Tufts Library, Weymouth, Mass 

Tiilane University of Louisiana, New Orleans, La. . 

Tuley, Henry E., M.D., Louisville, Ky 

Turner, Rev Cliarles W., Huntington, N.Y. . 

Tuttle, E. C, Townsend, Mass 

Tuttle, .L H., Dedham, Mass 

Union Theological Seminary, New York City . 

Unitarian Sunday School Society ..... 

United States Army, Chief of Engineers, Washington, 
D.C. . . ' 

United States Civil Service Commission, Washington, 
B.C. 

Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries 

Court of Claims ....... 

Department of Agriculture . . .62 maps 

Bureau of Animal Industry 

Division of Agricultural Soils 

Division of Agrostology . . . . 

Division of Botany 

Division of Chemistry .... 

Division of Crop and Weather Statistics . 

Division of P^ntomology .... 

Division of Forestry ..... 

Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy . 

Division of Records ..... 

Division of Statistics ..... 

Division of Vegetable Pathology 



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United States Department of Agriculture, Farmers' Bulletin. 

Lilirary .... 

Office of Experiment Stations 

Office of Koad Inquiry 

Section of Foreign Markets 

Weather Bureau 



Department of Interior . 

Bureau of Education . 

Census Office 

Geoloiiical Survey 

Patent Office 

Department of Labor 
Department of the Navy 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 

Hydrugraphic Office 

Office of Naval Intelligence 



Department of State 

Bureau of American Republics 

Bureau of Rolls and Library 

Bureau of Statistics . 

Fur Seal Arbitration . 

Department of tlie Treasury . 

Board of Supervising Inspectors 

Vessels . 
Bureau of Navigation 

Bureau of Statistics 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 

Life Saving Service . 

Marine Hospital Service 

Department of War 

Library 

Ordnance Office . 

Surgeon-General's Office 

War Records Office 



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Interstate Commerce Commission . 

Military Academy, West Point, iV. F. 

—• National Museum, Washington, D.C. 

Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md. . 

Naval Observatory, Washinqton, D.C. 

Nautical Almanac Office 

Postmaster-General 

Standard Steamship Owners', Builders', and Under- 
writers' Association, New York City 

Superintendent of Documents 

Universalist General Convention, Manchester, N.fl. 

Universalist Sabbath School Union, Chelsea, Mass. 

Universite de Lille, Lille, France 

Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada 

Universities' Settlements Association, London, Eng 

University College, F'ree Public Libraries and Natural 

History Museum, Nottingham, Eng. 
University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 
University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. 
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Aus. 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
University of Oregon, E-iigene, Ore. . 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 
University of Rochester, Rochester, N.V. . 
University of the State of New York, Albany, N. Y. 



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University of Toronto and University College, Toronto, 

Out 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis 

Upliam, William P., NewtonviUe, Mass 

Uruguay, Bureau d'ficlianges Internationaux ile Publica- 
tions, Montevideo, Uruguay .... 

Oficina de Deposito Heparto y Canje de Publica- 

ciones. Montevideo, Uruguay .... 

Usher, Edward P. ....... . 

Utah Agricultural Experiment Station, Logan, Utah 

Utica Public Library, Z/iftca, iV.r. 

Utica, A^. F., Public Schools 

Utica State Hospital, Utica, iV. Y. 

Valdenebro y Cisneros, Jose Maria de, Seville, Spain 

Van Anderson, Miss Helen 

Van Dyke, Rev. Henry, D.D., New York City 

Van Name, Addison, New Haven, Conn 

Vass, Rev. L. C, A.M., D D., Savannah, Ga. 
Vermilye, Rev. A. G., D.D., Englewood, N.J. . 
Vermont State Library, Montpelier, Vt. .... 
Vermont State Medical Society, Burlington, Vt. 
Victoria Street Society for Protection of Animals from 

Vivisection, London, Eng. ...... 

Victoria Public Libraries, Museums, and National Gallery, 

Melbourne, Aus. . 
Victoria University Library, Toronto, Ont. 

Vincent Memorial Hospital 

Volta Bureau, Washington, D.C 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wahl, William H., Philadelphia. Pa 

Walker, E. C, LCS., Lahore, British India . 

Walton, J. P., Muscatine, Iowa ..... 

Ward, The Misses 

Ward, Clarence S 

Ware, Messrs. William, & Co. ...... 

Waring, George E., Jr., New York City .... 

Watchman Publishing Company ..... 

Waters, Miss Elizat)eth A., Sonierville, Mass. 1 picture 
Watertown Free Public Library, Waiertown, Mass. . 

Webb, W. Seward, New York City 

Weekly Gazette, Colorado Springs, Col 

Wellman, Rev. J. W., Maiden, Mass 

Wenhani, Mass., Town of . 

Wenham, Mass., School Committee ..... 
Werner & Co., Messrs., Chicago, III. .... 

Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. . . 

West End Street Railway Company 

West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, Morgan- 

town, W. Va 

Westchester County Historical Society, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Westermann, Messrs. B., & Co., New York City 
Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio 
Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 
Westervelt, Messrs. A. B. & W. T., New York City . 

Wheelock, F. F., Brookline, Mass 

Wheelwright, Edmund M. 

Wheelwright, N. W., Penzance, Eng 

Wiiipple. Geo. C., Newton Centre, Mass. . . . . 

Whitconib, Charles W 

White, Cliarles A., iras/itHg^i^o?;, Z>.C. . . . . 
Whiteley, John, Shirley, Mass. 



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Whitman, Edmund A 

Wluting, Prof. Harold, Ph.D., Berkeley, Cal. . 
Whitney, Rev. Elbert W., Milford, Mass. 

Whitney, Pro/. Henry M., ^e/oz^, Wis 

Whitney, James L. ....... . 

Whittaker, Thomas, New York City 

Wisjht, C. H., Neiv York City 

Wilbur, Earl M., Portland, Ore 

Wilkes-Barre Times, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

Willard, Ashton R 

William and Mary, College of, Williamsburg, Va. . 

Williams, Henry 

Williams, J. Bertrand, Cambridge, Mass. .... 

Williston Seminary, Uasthampton, Mass. 

Wilmington Institute, Wilmington, Del. .... 

Winchester, Mass., Town of 

Winchester, Ma.is., Town Library 

Winsor, Justin, Cambridge, Mass. ..... 

Winter, Noel, Mew York City 

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Wisconsin, Commissioners of Labor, Census and Indus- 

■ trial Statistics, Modison, Mass. ..... 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis. . 
Wisconsin Superintendent of Public Instruction, Madison, 
Wis 

Winthrop Public Library, Winthrop, Mass. 

Woburn Public Library, Woburn, Mass. .... 

Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society . 

Woman's Education Association ..... 

Woman's Education Association, Through (See Supple- 
ment) 

Woman's Educational and Industrial Union 

Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, iVei^ 
York City 

Woman's Voice 

Wood, Henry 

Wood, Joseph, Portland, Me. . . . . .^ . 

Wood, Rev. Nathan E 

Wood, Thomas Winter, London, Eng 

Woodbridge, Miss Lucy A 

Worcester, Mass., Free Public Library .... 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass. . 

Worcester, Rev. Wni., Philadelphia, Pa. . . . . 

Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station, Lararnie, 
Wyoming ......... 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn. . . . . . 

Library 

Observatory ........ 

Yearly Meeting of Friends, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Young Men's Christian Association, New York City 

Young Men's Christian Associations of North America, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Young Men's Mercantile Library Association, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

Zeballos, Dr. Don Estanislao S., Washington, D.C. 

Zober, Mathias 

Zoophily, Publishers of, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Vols. 
1 
1 

20 
1 

28 
2 
1 
1 
1 

18 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
1 



1 
10 

4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

5,258 

1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

7 
1 
1 



158 



City Document No. 18. 



SUPPLEMENT. 

Donors of books, and money for the pwrcliase of books, for the West End 
Branch. Transmitted through the Woman's Education Association. 







Vol«. 


Bemis, }f,ss F. E. 




52 


Blake, Mrs. George Baty 






!);? 


Blanchard, 3fiss Sarah H. . 






(■.2 


Boardman, J/>s. W. 1). 






10 


Buck, Miss Elenor 


. 




GO 


Chandler, Miss A. G. . 






10 


Clarke, Messrs. W. B., & Co. 


. 




12 


Denny, Miss 






37 


Dwisht, Eihnund .... 






1,080 


Fields, Mrs. James T. . 






13 


Heath, 3Irs. D. C. . • . 






9 


Houghton, Mifflin, & Co., Messrs. 






GO 


Hudson, Mrs. John E 






36 


Little, Brown, & Co., Messrs. 






50 


Lowell, Miss A. C, Estate of 






629 


Lowell, Miss Lucy 






68 


Lowell, Percival .... 






4 


Morison, Miss Mary 






15 


Reed, Miss Helen L. . 






3 


Roberts Brothers, Messrs. 






20 


Tappan, Miss M. S. 






149 


Wainwright, Miss R. . . . 






21 


Unknown 




90 


DONORS 


F MONEY. 




Amory, Miss A. C. 


Lowell, Mrs. George G. 




Bartol, Rev. C. A. 


Lowell, Miss Georgina. 




Blake, Mrs. G. B. 


Lowell, Miss Mary Anne 




Bullard, W. S. 


Lowell, Miss R. R. 




Burnett, Mrs. Edward. 


Lyman, Arthur T. 




Clapp, Mrs. Wm. W. 


Mason, Miss Ellen F. 




Clarke, Mrs. E. C. 


Mason, Miss Ida M. 




Crocker, Miss Sarah H. 


Morse, Mrs. S. T. 




Curtis, Mrs. G. S. 


Newell, George A. 




Gushing, Miss F. M. 


Paige, Mrs. John C. 




Davis, Mrs. Sarah Shaw. 


Paine, Mrs. C. J. 




Ellis, Miss Lucy. 


Peabody, Mrs. 0. W. 




Endicott, Miss Clara T. 


Phillips, Mrs. John C. 




Endicott, Mrs. William, 3d, 


Procter, Mrs. Abby Sha 


w. 


Faulkner, Mrs. Charles. 


Putnam, Miss G. L. 




Faulkner, Miss Fannie M. 


Putnam, Mrs. George. 




Fitz, Mrs. W. S. 


Robbins, Mrs. Royal E. 




Folsom, Miss Amy. 


Rogers, Miss A. P. 




Forbush, Miss. 


Shattuck, Dr. F. C. 




Frothingham, Miss Ellen. 


Shaw, Miss Adela. 




Gaffield, Thomas. 


Shaw, Henry S. 




Goodwin, Miss Eliza. 


Sprague, Mrs. F. P. 




Hemenwav, Mrs. Augustus. 


Thayer, Mrs. N., Jr. 




Hubbard, 'i)/?-s. Eliot. 


Wadsworth, Mrs. A. F. 




Jackson, Mrs. C. C. 


Ware. Miss Mary L. 




Kimball, Mrs. D. P. 


Wheelwrigiit, Andrew C 




Lodge, Mrs. John E. 


Wheelwright, Messrs. 


Kdward and 


Loring, Charles Greely, Family of. 


Henry C. 




Lowell, Miss A. C. 


Whitney, Mrs. Henry M 




Lowell, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. 


Wolcott, Mrs. J. Huntin 


gton. 


Lowell, Charles. 


Several anonymous 







BOSTON ™B^l\aiMUI||| 



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