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Full text of "Annual report"

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BOSTOIS! 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




b^ol-S 




FORTY-SIXTH 



ANNUAL EEPORT. 



1897-98. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



FREDERICK O. PRINCE, President. 
Term expires May l, 1898. 



JOSIAH H. BENTON, Jr. 

Term expires May t, 1S99. 



JAMES De NORMANDIE. 

Term expires May 1, 1900. 



HENRY P. BOWDITCH. 

Term expires May 1, 1902. 



SOLOMON LINCOLN. 

Term expires May 1, 1901. 



Librarian and Clerk of the Corporation, 
HERBERT PUTNAM. 



ANNUAL RKPORX 



OF THE TRUSTEES 



Public Library 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1897. 



BOSTON : 
MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE. 

1898. 



•)0^ 



^ 






~?-d G' 0} 



V> O N T E N T S 



Report of Trustees 

Report of Librarian 

Report of Examining Committee 

Appendices : — 



I. 

II. 

III. 

rv. 

V. 
VI. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XIII. 

XIV. 



Financial Statement ..... 

Elxtent of tlie Library by Years 
Net Increase of the several departments, includ- 
ing Branches ...... 

Classification : Central Lilirai-y . . broac 

Classification : Tiranchcs ..... 

Registration ....... 

Circulation ....... 

Trustees for Forty-six Years. — Librarians 
Examining Committees for Forty-six Years 



Lil)rary Service (May 1, 1898), 

and Evening Schedule . 
System of Service 
Correspondence, etc. 
Givers, and Amount of (iifts 
Orders of City Council 



ncluding Sunday 



1 

7 
68 

83 
107 

108 

Iside 

111 

112 

iir, 

118 
120 

12.3 
132 
136 
144 
179 




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LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1898. 



Departments. 



Opened. 



Volumes, 
J.in. 31, 

1898. 



Circulated 

for home 

use, 

1897-1898. 



Central Library, Copley sq. Established May -2, IS.">1.. 

East Boston Brancli, 37 Meridian st 

South Boston Branch, 372 Bi'oadway 

Roxbury Branch, 40 Millmont st 

Charlestowu Branch, City sq 



Brigliton Branch, llolton Lil)rary Buildini;, Hock 
land si ". 



Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams st 

South End Branch, Enj-lisli High Scliool Building, 
Montgomery st 



Jamaica Plain Brancli, Curtis Hall, Centre st 

West Roxbury Brancli, Centre, near Mt. Vernon st 

West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lj'ude st . . 

Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Wasliington, 
near River st 



B. Roslindale Delivery Station, 2o Poplar st. . 

D. Mattapan Reading Room, River, cor. Oak 
land st 



E. Neponset Delivery Station, 49 Walnut st.. . . 

F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Wa#hingt<m. 

cor. Eldon st " 

G. AUston Delivery Station, 14 Franklin st 

H. Ashmont Delivery .Station, 4 Talbot ave. .. 

J. Dorchester Station Delivery Station, 1 Mil- 
ton ave — 



K. Bird Street Delivery Station, 6 Wayland st. 

L. North Brighton Reading Room, oS.") West 
eru ave 



M. Crescent Avenue Delivery Station, 940 
Dorchester ave ." 



N. Blue Hill .Vvenue Delivery Station, '200 I'.liu 
Hill ave 



P. Broadway Extension Delivery Station, 13 
Broadway Extension " 



i). IFphani's Corner Deliverv Station, laVi Du<l 
lev st ■ 



R. Warren Street Delivery Station, 329 AV;ir 
ren st ." 



S. Roxljury Crossing Delivery Station, 1173 
Trem'ont st 

T. Boylston Delivery Station, Lamartine, cor. 
Paul Goi-e st 



Mar. 11, 
Jan. 28, 
May 1, 
July, 
^Jan., 



Man., 
Jan. 25, 

Aug., 
Sept., 
»Jan. G, 
Feb. 1, 

.fune 7, 
Dec. 3, 

Dec. 27, 
Jan. 1, 

Nov. 1, 
Mar. 11, 
July 26, 

Nov. 12, 
Jan. 22, 

May 9, 

June 2;'), 

July 1, 

Jan. 16, 

Mar. l(i, 

May 1, 

Jan. 18, 

Nov. 1, 



1895 
1S71 
1872 

1873 
1S74 

1874 
1875 

1877 
1877 
1880 
1890 

1875 

1878 

1881 

1883 

1886 
1S89 
1890 

1890 
1892 

1892 

1892 

1895 



is: to 

1896 

lsi)(; 

1897 
1897 



528,079 
13,292 
14,799 
.33,551 

29,801 

17,076 
16,815 

14,592 
13,782 
4,153 
10,359 



1,292 



388,489 
02,993 
80,912 
84,691 
57,363 

31,382 
58,105 

82,497 
.57,176 
22,496 

109,017 

4,283 

13,870 



12,180 
9,186 
7,929 

10,447 
146 

3,808 

8,484 

9,770 

26,159 

16,544 

11,090 

17,004 

2,000 



*As a branch. 




CENTRAL LIBRARY, GROUND FLOOR. 




CENTRAL LIBRARY, ENTRESOL A 




CENTRAL LIBRARY, BATES HALL. 



CENTRAL LIBRARY. ENTRESOL B. 



'9 



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J 



CENTRAL LIBRARY, SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 



To His Honor Josiah Quincy, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

The Trustees of the Public Library make the following as 
their report of its condition for the year ending on January 
31,1898: 

For statistics and information relating to the great increase 
in all departments of library work, to the number of books 
and number of readers, to the interest in the Children's room, 
and in the Newspaper room ; to the need of greater facilities 
for administration in the central building and in the branches, 
to the work of printing and binding, and to the co-operation 
with neighbormg libraries, we refer to the full report of the 
Librarian upon each one of these subjects, and we invite par- 
ticular attention to the very complete appendices accompany- 
ing the report. Rather than give any abstract of these, we 
ask every person who wishes to know what the work of a 
great library is, and what opportunities are open to it, to 
make a careful study of them. The following statistics are 
all that need be quoted here : 
The cost of maintaining the Library dur- 
ing the year was • . . . . $259,096 65 
Of this amount the city appro- 
priated . . . $235,000 00 
The trust funds yielded . 10,450 84 

. 245,450 84 



The balance of the cost . . . . ' |1 3,645 81 
was obtained from rents of the old library building, receipts 
from sale of catalogues, fines and miscellaneous gifts. 



2 City Document No. 21. 

Books. — The number of books in all the departments of 
the Library on January 31, 1898, was (398,888, of which 
528,079 were in the Central Library — an increase of 35,129 
over the number on January 31, 1897. 

Use of the Library. — The total number of active cards 
outstanding January 31, 1898, was 64,973, a gain of 19,367 
over those of the previous year. 

During 1897, 1,199,658 books were circulated for home 
use — a gain of 194,639 volumes, or 19^ per cent, over those 
used in 1896. 

It will be seen by the foregoing that the immense home use 
of the books of the Central Library (to which should be 
added those of the branches and reading rooms), the great 
use of the books and other matter in Bates Hall, in the 
Children's room, in the Periodical and Newspaper room, and 
generally throughout the Central building, show that the 
people appreciate the benefits of this great educational insti- 
tution. This anticipated appreciation led to its organization 
and made it an object of constant solicitude on the part of 
the citizens from the beginning. The money required for 
its maintenance has always been readily given, and the Trus- 
tees indulge the hope that whatever is needed ui the future 
to supply its wants will also be granted. 

Eiidoivments. ■ — The popular interest in the Library is fur- 
ther shown by the many endowment donations during the 
year. We gratefully mention that of the Twentieth Ilegiment 
Association of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry of $5,000, 
the income of which is to be expended in the " purchase of 
books of a military and patriotic character ; " that of '*^1,000, 
from the Papyrus Club in memory of John Boyle O'Reill}^, 
the income to be used "for the purchase of books;" that of 
$1,000 from the estate of the late Caleb D. Bradlee, D.D., 
for any library purpose deemed proper by the Trustees. 

]\Ir. William C. Todd, pursuant to his intention expressed 
in his letter of June 16, 1893, paid to us in October last the 
sum of $50,000, the income of which is to be appropriated to 
the purchase of current newspapers, domestic and foreign, 
for the use of all, whether citizens or strangers, who desire 
to read them — a valuable addition to our Library which is 
well appreciated. 

The bequest of the late John C. Paige, whether or not it 
result in a substantial addition to the funds of the Library, is 
noticeable for the wise humanity of its purpose and for the 
generosity of its terms. It is unfettered by condition, but 
accompanied by the expression of a desire that it " shall be 



LiBiiA"EY Department. 3 

used, so far as may, in the judgment of the Trustees, be ex- 
pedient, for the purposes of the Children's Reading-room." The 
Trustees gratefully commend to prospective benefactors of 
this institution the phraseology of the above provision. It 
indicates how a donor, interested in a special department of 
the Library, may direct his gift to the benefit of that depart- 
ment by the expression of a desire which is certam to be 
respected, without imposing an absolute restriction which, 
under later conditions, may nullify the very benefit which he 
purposed, or prevent a larger benefit than he could have 
foreseen. 

Books. — As the selection of books Avhich shall suit the 
tastes and supply the demands of those who use the Library 
requires careful consideration, the difficulty of judicious pur- 
chases of nearly 30,000 books in a year is apparent, and the 
Trustees are pleased to laiow that in the opinion of the Ex- 
amining Committee, expressed in their recent report, the 
work has been fairly successful. They endorsp the policy we 
have adopted of uniting the "four great libraries of Boston 
and Cambridge and the several special libraries of Boston, 
to avoid unnecessary duplication " and " develop certain lines 
of subjects m which each should endeavor to be exhaustive." 
By such action the benefits of all these libraries would be 
enhanced and their usefulness promoted. 

The recommendations of the Committee in this connection 
deserve careful consideration. 

Bihliograpliies. — To the serious student nothing is of 
greater value than a good bibliography of the subject which 
engages his attention ; and the officers of the cataloguing de- 
partment have accordingly always devoted much time and 
study to the preparation of bibliographies and classified lists 
in various departments of literature. The work done in this 
direction during the past year has been peculiarly important 
and varied in its character, as will be seen by reference 
to the Librarian's report. The demand for such publi- 
cations has usually furnished satisfactory evidence of the 
public appreciation of the value of this work, but this year 
one of the most interesting publications of the Library and 
one for which a ready sale was anticipated has remained 
almost uncalled for. This is the List of periodicals, news- 
papers, transactions and other serial publications currently 
received in the libraries of Boston and vicinity. 

Smce this volume enables the reader to ascertain at a 
glance where any given periodical is to be found if taken by 
any one of thirty-six libraries in this neighborhood, it was 



4 City Document No. 21. 

supposed that it would be an indispensable work of reference 
on the table of eveiy student. Yet though offered at the 
nominal price of twenty-five cents, not more than 146 copies 
have been sold. It is difficult to understand this indiffer- 
ence of students to such a valuable aid. 

Use. — Since the Library is properly regarded as the crown 
of the city's educational system, it is with great pleasure 
that the Trustees call attention to the extensive use which 
has been made of its collections by classes and clubs of 
students as recorded in the Librarian's report. It is the 
desire of the Trustees to furnish every facility to teachers 
who thus seek to utilize the material of the Library for the 
purpose of systematic instruction. In this connection should 
also be mentioned the exhibits of library material and of loan 
collections which have been held from time to time durmg 
the year. The enumeration of these exhibits by the Librarian 
shows their varied character and their interesting nature. 
The educational value of such exhibitions would, of course, 
be greatly enhanced by explanations of the material exhibited, 
given by competent lecturers. One such explanatory lecture, 
on the Art of Ancient Greece, which has been already deliv- 
ered, proved so attractive that it had to be repeated in order 
to accommodate all wdio desired to hear it. 

It is obvious that this is a direction in which the work of 
the Library may be extended to tlie great advantage of the 
public. To facilitate the presentation of such subjects to 
large audiences it has been proposed to have lantern slides 
prepared which may, under proper restrictions, be also loaned 
for the illustration of lectures given outside of the Library 
building. The photographic room of the Library affords an 
excellent opportunity for the preparation of such slides with- 
out removing any of the material from the building. 

The classes and audiences thus seeking instruction have been 
accommodated on the Special Librarj^ floor, but this portion 
of the building is very imperfectly adapted to the purpose. 
The need of small class rooms in which instruction can be 
given without interfering with the general readers is seri- 
ously felt, and can be only very inadequately supplied by 
screens or movable partitions in the large halls. The 
Barton-Ticknor room, in which most of the exhibits liave 
been made, contains many of the most j^recious treasures of 
the Library, and, owing to the character of its collections, 
should be reserved for the use of special students. One of 
the fine arts rooms has therefore been recently fitted up as an 
exhibition room but we still lack a hall suitable for the 
accommodation of audiences likely to be drawn to the 



Library Department. 5 

explanatory lectures above alluded to. This embarrassment 
has arisen from the fact that when Mr. Todd's generous gift 
to the Library made it necessary to provide a Newspaper read- 
mg-room, no other space in the building seemed to be avail- 
able for the purpose except that which in the original plau 
had been reserved for a lecture-room. The extensive use 
wdiich is made of the Newspaper-room makes it quite impos- 
sible to think of transferring it to smaller quarters. 

It is evident, therefore, that if tliese high educational func- 
tions of the Library are to be properly developed, additional 
accommodations must be provided. For these purposes as 
well as for the structural changes required for efficient 
administration, as set forth by the Librarian it seems proper 
that funds should be provided in the same way as for the 
original construction of the building. The Trustees appeal 
with confidence to the City Government and to the Legisla- 
ture to provide the means for rendering the Library all that 
the citizens have a right to demand, calling attention to the 
fact that the changes of construction are rendered necessary by 
the fact that the usefulness of the Library has far exceeded 
the most sanguine anticipations. Had the use of the Library 
by the citizens remained within the limits anticipated by those 
who planned the building, its structural defects would not have 
been apparent. In spite of the great cost of the building and 
in spite of the fact that the administration of the Library 
demands a large and an annually increasing appropriation, 
there can be no doul^t that the money thus expended must 
be regarded as a good pecuniary investment for the city. 
To say nothing of the influence of a Library like ours in pre- 
venting idleness, drunkenness and crime, and thus indirectly 
increasing the wealth of the city, it is interesting to note the 
effect which the sumptuous installation of learning has had 
in stimulating the generosity of the community. The gifts 
to the Library since the erection of the present building have 
equalled in value approximately one-twelfth of its entire 
cost. 

In this connection the Trustees would say that tbey find 
it quite necessary to pursue some definite policy in regard to 
accepting works of art for the Library. Before we had a 
building of such architectural merit it was not so important 
to consider the artistic worth of the gifts offered to us, and 
their appropriateness to the atmospliere of the place ; but the 
Trustees feel that now a just responsibility rests upon them 
to exercise great care in the acceptance of such gifts with all 
due regard to the good and generous intentions of the 
donors. 



6 City Document No. 21. 

As works of art eminently suitable for preservation in a 
library may be mentioned: 

1. Portraits, busts and statues of men eminent in litera- 
ture, science and art, of patrons of learning, and of men 
prominent in the history of the country, state or city. 

2. Paintings or engravings illustrative of historical 
events. 

Works of art not belonging to either of the above classes 
should be received onlj^ in association with special libraries, 
or as completing existing art collections. 

Among the most interesting gifts of books may be men- 
tioned the entire libraries of the Browning Society and of 
the Numismatic Society, the latter accompanied by a gift 
of $300, '-for the benefit of the study of numismatics." 
Gifts of this sort are always welcomed by the Trustees, 
especially when unaccompanied by restrictions as to their 
use. The fact that societies are willing to intrust their 
highly specialized collections to the care of the city, although 
their members can receive no special privileges in their use, 
is a gratifying testimon}^ to the confidence felt by the com- 
munity in the careful administration of the Public Library. 

In conclusion, the Trustees desire to call the attention of 
the City Government to the importance of adopting, without 
delay, some definite policy with reference to the treatment of 
Copley square. A public square around which such magnifi- 
cent public and private buildings have been erected should 
certainly be laid out m a manner worthy of its surroundmgs. 
At present the fine architectural features of the square will 
fail to teach the lesson in sestbetics they are so well fitted to 
impart. 

Frederick O. Prince, 

President. 
Solomon Lincoln, 

Vice-President. 
JosiAH H. Benton, Jr., 
Henry P. Bowditch, 
James De Normandie. 

Adopted May 13, 1898, as of February 1, 1898. 
Attest : 

Herbert Putnam, Cleric. 



LiBEARY Department. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees : 

I have the honor to submit my report for the year ending 
January 31, 1898. 

During the year the library system has been augmented by 
the establishment of one new delivery and deposit station. 
The deposit feature has been extended to three of the existing 
delivery stations. Books have been sent on deposit from the 
Central Library to eight additional engine-houses, to two 
grammar-schools, to the House of Reformation at Rainsford 
Island, to the Marcella-street Home in Roxbury ; and from 
branches to the Fleet-street Free Reading-room for Men, and 
the West Roxbury Parental School for Boys. 

The branch system now comprises : 

Ten branches, with large permanent collections of books. 

Five reading-rooms, all of them delivery and deposit 
stations, and one. Station P, having also an independent 
permanent collection of books. 

Twelve delivery stations, all but one having the deposit 
feature. 

Twenty-two engine-houses receiving deposits of books. 

One grammar-school regularly receiving such deposits. 

Six institutions receiving such deposits. 

Total, fifty-seven outlying agencies, as against forty-three 
such in existence February 1, 1897. 

The portion of the library system directly under library 
administration (Central Library, Branches and Stations) is 
exhibited in the map which is submitted as a suggestion for 
the frontispiece to the forty-sixth report. 

The Central Library has been open every day in the year, 
except June 17, July 4, September 1 (Labor Day) and De- 
cember 25. On the other legal holidays (Washington's 
Birthday, Patriots' Day, Memorial Day and Thanksgiving- 
Day) the Central Library was open as on Sundays, that is, 
from 2 until 10 P.M., in all departments directly serving the 
public. Of the branches, the West End has been open on 
Sundays during these same hours throughout the year ; the 
Charlestown, East Boston and South Boston Branches from 
November 7, and the Broadway Extension Reading-room from 
October 10. 



8 City Document No. 21. 

Statistics. — Reports for the statistical year have been sub- 
mitted to me in writmg by the chiefs of the several depart- 
ments. One of these I quote nearly in full, others I quote 
in part, while others I am obliged wholly to omit as extend- 
ing my own report into too great detail for publication. 
Many of the statistics accompanying these reports are of 
interest to one investigating closely the resources and oper- 
ation of the Library; and the collection entire has been 
type-written and, as last year, will be on file for reference. 

FINANCE. 

The Auditor's statement (Appendix I. of this report) 
shows in detail the receipts and disbursements of this depart- 
ment during the 3'ear. 

In the examination of this statement there must be borne 
in mind the double system of accounts necessitated by the 
fact that in addition to the relations which the Trustees as a 
city department sustain with the financial departments at 
City Hall they are charged as a corporation with the custody 
and direct expenditure of certain moneys placed in their 
hands for direct expenditure, and with the custody and final 
expenditure of the income of trust funds, and occaional 
reserve balances of special appropriations for books, turned 
over to them in bulk by the City Treasurer and placed abroad 
for the payment of foreign invoices upon direct draft by them. 
Moneys of the former class have not customarily appeared in 
the books of the City Treasurer, while income of trust funds 
and reserve balances turned over to the Trustees m bulk ap- 
pear in his books as actual disbursements, while standing in 
the books of the Library Auditor merely as credits transferred. 

The financial statements of the Library Auditor must 
agree with those of the City Collector, City Auditor and 
City Treasurer, so far as theu scope is the same ; but they 
must also exhibit certain transactions which do not appear 
in the books of the City Collector, City Auditor or City 
Treasurer. With this necessity in view the form which they 
adopt will, I think, be easily intelligible. 

In the figures quoted by me in my last report (pp. 15-18), 
from the Auditor's exhibit for 1896, there were, it appears, 
several misprints. These were repeated in the report of the 
Trustees (pp. 6-8). If any comparison is to be instituted 
between the accounts of 1896 and the accounts of 1897, not 
the figures given on the above pages of the 1896 report, but 
the figures in the Auditor's exhibit itself, constituting Ap- 
pendix I. of that report, should be referred to. 



Library Department. 9 

Income : General Sources. 

The following figures, drawn from the Auditor's state- 
ment, indicate income from general sources applicable to 
maintenance and purchase of books : — - 

General appropriation for 1897 . . . 1235,000 00 

Miscellaneous income, to wit : receipts from 

fines, sales of library publications, rentals 

of old library building, exchange accounts, 

interest, and balances" from 1896 . . 20,498 24 



1261,498 24 



Expenditures: From General Income. 

General Appropriation. — In addition to the detailed state- 
ment of expenditures for the past year. Appendix I. gives a 
comj)arative exhibit of the expenditures of this with the 
years 1895 and 1896, distributed under the several accounts. 
This shows that the expenditures met by the general appro- 
priation, supplemented by the revenue from the old building 
and receipts from fines and sales, were, in 1897, ^246,541. 79 
as against $231,525.33 in 1896. 

The cost of maintaining the branches and stations is in- 
cluded in the above figures. In 1896 this was $62,785.39; 
in 1897, owing chiefly to a decreased expenditure for books, 
it was $58,282.49. 

Trust Funds. 

Endoiomejits. — The endowments have been increased dur- 
ing the year by the receipt of the following principal sums : 
From the Papyrus Club (J. Boyle O'Reilly 

Fund) 11,000 00 

From the Twentieth Regiment Association 

(Memorial Fund) 5,000 00 

From William C. Todd (Newspaper Fund) . 50,000 00 
From the estate of the late Caleb D. Bradlee 

(bequest) 1,000 00 



$57,000 00 

The total of endowments is now <f267,350, of which all 
save the sum of $1,000, representing the Bradlee bequest, is 
under investment. 

Besides endowments certain sums have been received by 
way of gift for direct expenditure, as follows : 



^775 


03 


300 


00 


26 


00 


1,321 


00 


-12,422 


03 


25 


37 



10 City Document No. 21. 

From Twentieth Regiment Association . 
From Boston Numismatic Society . 
From j\Irs. John A, Lewis . . . . 

From sundry sources for the purchase of pho- 
tograplis ....... 



To wliich add balances February 1, 1897 

$^2,447 40 

the application of which appears in detail in the Auditor's 

exhibit. 

Income. — The income account with trust funds stands as 

follows, including balance, |2,950.10, of Todd Fund as 

hi CO me : 

Balance on hand February 1, 1897. (^See Re- 
port 189(3, p. 75) fl7,051 82 

Additional credit, Todd Fund ... 3 00 

Received, February 1, 1897-January 31, 1898, 13,755 21 



$=30,810 03 



Less over-expenditure of certain funds in pre- 
vious years ...... 246 00 



130,564 03 

Expenditures. — There has been expended 
from income of trust funds for the pur- 
chase of books and newspapers . . . 10,757 80 

From miscellaneous gifts : 

For books 448 03 

For photographs ..... 1,235 79 

For special service ..... 368 00 



112,809 62 



Gross Income and Expendituee. 

Gross Income. — The gross income of the Library from all 
sources, including balances February 1, 1897, except special 
appropriations was as follows : 

General appropriation ..... $235,000 00 
Rentals from old library building . . . 10,874 05 

Receipts from fines and sales of catalogues . 5,624 63 

Carried forward -$251,498 68 



Library Department. 11 

Brought forivard $251,498 68 

Trust funds : income received from City 

Treasurer 113,876 21 

Miscellaneous donations for purchase of books, 
newspapers and photograplis, including bal- 
ance of Todd Fund / . . . . 5,400 50 

Exchange account . ..... 1,088 62 

Interest on bank deposit .... 1,488 25 

London accounts : Balances February 1, 1897, 

as follows : ^ 

Trust funds . . . $14,053 47 

General book funds . . 7,242 96 

Interest on above . . 489 39 

21,785 82 

$295,138 08 
Expenditure. — From general income (as 

above) $246,541 79 

From exchange account .... 52 20 

From trust fund income ^ . $10,757 80 
Less credited to general 

fund on adjustment . 306 96 



10,450 84 
From miscellaneous gifts .... 2,051 82 



$259,096 65 
A nominal balance on February 1, 1898, would appear as 
$36,041.43. This is, however, subject to outstanding obli- 
gations and in part to special restrictions. The available 
balance is but $25,285.16, made up as follows : 
Applicable to general purposes . . . $356 89 

Applicable to newspapers (Todd Fund) . 310 04 

Applicable to photographs .... 85 21 

Applicable to books, as follows: 
Trust funds in- 
come : nominal 
l)alaiice, . . $19,568 94 
Less outstanding 
orders and nec- 
essary reserve for 
continuations . 7,530 40 

$12,038 54 



Carried forward . . . $12,038 54 $752 14 

1 The actu.'il income for the year was but $9,399.21. 

2 Figures from p. 70 of 1896 Report slightly iiiodifled on adjustment. 

3 Including also balance Todd Fund. 



12 



City Document No. 21. 



Bro ug lit fo rward 


. 




112,038 54 


$752 14 


General Funds 


$12,573 


92 






Less outstanding 










orders 


3,535 


91 


9,038 01 












Exchange account . 


. 




1,036 42 




Interest : domestic account . 




1,488 25 




Interest: foreign account 




311 39 




Cash donations : bal 


xnces on 








hand 


• 




620 41 


24,533 02 







$25,285 16 
It is to be observed further that the bulk of the above 
available balance is composed of funds applicable only to the 
purchase of books, and to a great extent of funds which 
must be reserved for the purchase of books of a very special 
character, e.g.^ the Charlotte Harris Fund — balance $4,888.21 
— restricted to the purchase of books published prior to 1850. 



Special Appropriations. 

These with apparent existing balances are the Building 
appropriation (construction of Copley Square building). 
Furnishing appropriation (Copley Square building) and the 
appropriation for Improvement of the Broadway Extension 
Delivery Station. The Auditor's exhibit shows : 
Building Appropriation. — Nominal balance 

uncertified February 1, 1897 . . . $89,481 17 

Expenditures, 1897 .... 

Nominal balance .... 

Against which are contracts amounting to 
And claiuLS amounting to . . . 

Total obligations .... 

Indicatino- a deficit of . 



13,050 


55 


$76,430 


62 


$82,000 
8,685 


00 
61 


$90,685 


61 


$14,254 


99 



Furnish inq Approjjriation. 

ary, 1897 . 
Expenditures, 1897 

Nominal balance 



— Balance Febru- 



$24,539 96 
8,809 35 

$15,730 61 



which with amounts reimbursed from the Building Appro- 



Library Department. 13 

priation, if reimbursed, is likely to be fully exhausted by 
work either already contracted for or projected, and by 
amounts due to the general appropriation. 
Broadway Exfension Improvement. — Appro- 
priation made June, 1897 .... |5,000 00 
Expenditures, 1897 . . . . . 1,010 44 



Balance $3,989 56 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 

Central Library. 

An entirely new hoisting machine for the passenger ele- 
vator has been substituted for the one originally installed and 
found imperfect in operation. The roof of the arcade has 
been relaid with a coating of slate to remedy the leaks which 
had given much concern, causing defacement, if not more 
serious injury. The expense of this was $1,800, of which 
the Library itself bore one-third. This amount, with the 
cost of the new hoisting machine ($1,200), had to be ad- 
vanced out of the genei'al appropriation for 1897. 

A'arious improvements, properly chargeable to construction, 
have been under contemplation during the past year. These 
have included additions to the system of heating and ventila- 
tion ; a service elevator ; a system of intercommunication be- 
tween the stacks ; enlargement of the space for the issue of 
books; adaptation of other space for administrative uses; 
the construction m the Newspaper-room of a gallery or mez- 
zanine floor to accommodate the patent collection, freeing 
the present Patent-room for a Children's room ; the equip- 
ment for immediate use of space on the rear wing and in the 
basement which had been assumed to be unnecessary for use 
for some time to come ; and miscellaneous work about the 
building, including work upon the the terrazzo floors. 

For the most important of the above improvements plans 
have been drawn and estimates secured. The various ap- 
plications for an appropriation of $100,000 with which to 
carry them out have not yet (February 1, 1898) met with 
success. 

In the meantime the only addition to tlie general facilities 
that has been possiljle has been the construction in the base- 
ment of cheap shelving for such of the files of bound news- 
papers as could not find place in the upper room. To render 
this space habitable for this material, steam-pipes had to be 
run through it to offset the natural dampness. 



14 City Document No. 21. 

The attractiveness and serviceability of the Children's 
and Delivery rooms have been added to by chandeliers, and 
of the domed rooms on the upper floor by an adequate array 
of electric lights circlincf the domes. 

As to the worlds of art, which have added to the embel- 
lishment of the rooms at the Central Library, I report in 
detail under " Crifts.'" 

Branches. 

I shall this year append to my report the annual report, 
almost entire, of the Supervisor of Branches, and refer to 
it for a statement explicit as to the condition and equipnient 
of our outlying system, and accurate as to its operation. 

The only special resource for permanent improvements in 
this system has been the special appropriation of $5,000, for 
the Broadway Extension Station. This appropriation was 
not specifically requested by the Library Department ; but 
as it would increase facilities for a work of great moment in 
a district ill provided, it could not well be rejected. The 
station was moved to a larger room, more prominently located, 
and was effectively and attractively equipped with furniture 
and with books. The result has been a greatly increased use 
and the development of an important use of a new character. 

But the special appropriation, being only for "permanent 
improvements," could not be used for rent or service. The 
increase in these has had to be borne by the general 
appropriation, without, however, any corresponding increase 
therein for this purpose. As a result of the special apj)ro- 
priation therefore, and in order to utilize it, we have had to 
throw upon our maintenance account an additional burden 
which each year will reach six or seven hundred dollars. 

Whenever, therefore, an appropriation for " improvements " 
is under consideration, it is to be borne in mind that each 
such increase of facilities calls for an increased outlay in 
maintenance, and this out of funds already overpressed. 

The effort to secure better accommodations for the East 
Boston Branch has contmued and become defined during the 
year. In June last a mass meeting was held under the 
auspices of the East Boston Citizens' Association, at which 
one of the Trustees of the Lil)rary, Mr. Whitney, as Acting 
Librarian, and the Supervisor of Branches, assisted. A com- 
mittee was appointed, with Dr. William H. Ensworth as 
cliairman, Avhich has worked actively ever since in aid of the 
jDroject. Several hearings have been had before the Mayor, 
and petitions representing a large and important public sen- 
timent presented to the City Council. An order for the 



Library Department. 15 

appropriation of f 100,000 for the purchase of land and erec- 
tion and equipment of a ouilding has been mtroduced into 
the City Council, and may this year receive attention. 

Certain other directions, m which permanent improvements 
in the outlying system are desirable if, and when, funds can 
be provided, were mentioned in a communication addressed 
by your Board to the INIayor, which though subsequent to 
the nominal date of this report may fitly be quoted here : 

" The Branch Library at Charles town is inadequately pro- 
vided for in unsuitable rooms over a police station ; that at 
South Boston is in rooms whose rent costs the city $2,500 
per year — the equivalent of 3 per cent, on a prmcipal sum of 
188,000 ; that at the South End is retaining with difficulty 
rooms in the High School building, inadequate in themselves 
and urgently demanded for school uses ; that at West Rox- 
bury is in a building which should be remodelled for its 
accommodation according to the plans prepared by the Public 
Buildings Department at your request, A branch reading- 
room and delivery station is urgently desired in Ward 17, 
and miscellaneous improvements of a mmor character are 
needed at the various other existing branches." 

Various orders introduced into the City Council touching 
this department, and for the most part suggesting improve- 
ments in the outlying system, are quoted in Appendix XIV. 

Works of Art. 

Among the works of art received as gifts and placed dur- 
ing the year have been the following : 

Paintings hy Hoivard Pyle. — Nineteen oil paintings, by 
Howard Pyle, of colonial subjects or episodes in colonial 
history, particulai'ly of scenes in the life of Washington, 
were subscribed for by various citizens of Boston and given 
to the Library in April last. The list of the donors is given 
in full in xVppenclix XHI. These paintings have from their 
historical accuracy a value to the Library auxiliary to its 
main purpose, which might be lacking in an ordinary work of 
art. They have been hung in the Children's room, but have 
as yet neither suitable frames nor escutcheons. 

Franldin. — The bust of Benjamin Franklin, once attributed 
to Horatio Greenough, but by the donor thought to be the 
work of Ceracchi, was given by Mr. Frank Wood of Boston. 

O'Reilly. — The bust of John Boyle O'Reill}^, for which a 
special appropriation was made by the City Council m 1894, 
was ordered last spring of John Donahue. It was received, 
approved by the Art Commission, and accepted befoie the 
end of the year. It lacks still a pedestal, as does the Holmes 



16 City Docxunient No. 21. 

bust, also ordered by the City Council. The need of a pro- 
vision for pedestals in such cases was communicated by your 
Board to the Mayor on February 12 last. 

Powers^ s Cfreek Slave. — A marble copy of the bust of 
Powers's Greek Slave was received as a gift from Mrs. Mar- 
garet S. Otis. It has been aptly placed in the Fine Art 
Department. 

Cabot Portrait. — An excellent portrait of Edward C. 
Cabot, first president of the Boston Society of Architects, has 
been hung in the room occupied by the Department of Archi- 
tecture. It is not a gift, but was received on deposit from 
the society. 

Bronze Poors. — In August last sketches were approved 
by the Board for the bronze doors for the main vestibule, to 
be furnished by Mv. Daniel C. French. 

Bacchante. — The group of dancing nymph and child, offered 
by Mr. Charles F. McKim for the fountain of the courtyard, 
was at his request returned to him in June last. It is now 
placed in the Metropolitan Museum at New York. 

Books. 

Appendices II.-V. give the extent of the Library by years, 
a summary of the contents of the Library on January 31, 
1898, the net mcrease of the several departments during the 
past ten years, and the classification of the material in the 
Central Library and branches on January 31, 1898. 

According to last year's report it appears that the number 
of volumes in the Central Library and branches on January 
31, 1897, was 663,763, of which 492,901 were m the Central 
Library. By the tables appended to this rej^ort it appears 
that on January 31, 1898, the number in all departments is 
698,888, of which 528,079 are in the Central Library. The 
net increase is thus 35,129 volumes. ^ Thirty-five thousand 
one hundred and eighty-two volumes have been added to the 
Central Library; and a net loss, through transfer, of 53 
volumes is chargeable to the branches. A large portion of 
the increase in the central collection, as appears by Appendix 
III., is, however, due to accessions to the Duplicate-room, 
from the branches and elsewhere. 

The total expenditure for books and periodicals during the 
past year was $40,351.62 as againt $40,430.23 in 1896. 
This amount does not include $480.10 paid for books out of 
the special appropriation for Delivery P (Broadway Exten- 
sion) nor $410.29 expended by the Fellowes' Athenseum for 
books for the Roxbury Branch. 

'An error of four volumes carried over from previous reports lias here been corrected. 



LiBRATiY Department. 17 

The expenditure was distributed as follows : 

City money expended for Looks : 
For Central Library (including 

Deposit Collection) . . $20,497 84 
For branches .... 5,303 28 



125,801 12 
Trust funds expended for books : 
For Central Library. . . 8,114 74 



City money expended for periodi- $33,915 86 

cals : 
For Central Library . . . $4,766 87 
For branches .... 1,668 89 

. 6,435 76 



$40,351 62 

As stated in my last report, in a comparison of expendi- 
tures with statistics of additions, the number of accessions 
rather than the number of books actually located, should be 
considered. The accessions during the past year, excludmg 
mere transfers from one department to another, have been as 
follows : 

Volumes. Volumes. Volumes. 

Added by purchase . Library, 18,099 Branches, 6,030 Total, 24,129 
Added by gift . . Library, 8,792 Branches, 210 Total, 9,002 

26,891 6,240 33,131 

Purchases. — Purchases along the ordinary lines have main- 
tained their usual proportions. In addition during the past 
year there have been certain purchases in group which have 
a special significance. 

In a library of this sort, such purchases may find their 
occasion: (1) m the sudden availability of some new fund 
for purchase ; (2) in some special sale bringing to the sur- 
face unusual material ; (3) in the compilation of some bibliog- 
raphy which involves a close investigation of the resources 
of the Library in a particular direction and suggests gaps to 
be filled; (4) in replenishment of the shelves to make good 
some existmg subject catalogue, or (5) in the recommenda- 
tion of some specialist, who in connection wi'th his own use 
of the Library, or perhaps simply out of a generous desire for 
the advancement of the institution, lends his advice as to the 
development of the department as to which he is expert. 

During the past year all of the above influences have con- 
tributed to a rather unusual group of special purchases. 



18 City Document No. 21. 

1. Longfelloiv 3Iemorial Collection. — The Aitz Fund has 
enabled a beginning to be made of the Longfellow Memorial 
collection, through the purchase of about 400 volumes of 
early American literature, principally first editions of the 
poets. It is believed that nearly every American edition of 
the works of Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes and Whittier has 
been secured. The first year of the availability of this fund 
has happily coincided with opportunities particularly favor- 
able m the way of auction sales. 

2. Mexico. — The private sale of the libraiy of the late 
Julio Zarate led to the acquisition of a number of unusual 
books on Mexican history, topography and literature. 

3. Australia and Polynesia. — A special sale catalogue 
induced the purchase of a number of works on the exploration 
and early history of Australia and Polynesia, among them 
Admiral Liitke's "Voyage autour du monde," with its atlas 
of fine plates ; Captain Dillon's account of his adventures 
among the Fiji cannibals, and Yason's " Tongataboo." 

In the selection of material of this class the Library has 
recently had Avithin its direct service expert judgment in the 
association with the force of Mr. John Murdoch. Mv. 
Murdoch's recommendations have induced the purchase of 
a great number of miscellaneous works of early exploration 
on the ground that they embody the only records at first hand 
of racial characteristics and customs of peoples now fast dis- 
appearing. An important accession (this, however, of a 
comparatively recent expedition, but to little known regions) 
has been the report of the Horn Scientific Expedition to 
Central Australia published in 1896, in four volumes. 

4. Anthropology. — The proposed publication by the 
Library (see infra) of the "Bibliography of the geographical 
anthropolog}^ of Europe," compiled by Prof. Wm. Z. Ripley, 
has inducecl the purchase of nearly 300 volumes recom- 
mended by him as necessary to round out the literature of 
the library on this subject. Among them are the following 
important serials : " Archivio per I'antropologia e la 
etnologia," Florence 1871-97 and "Beitriige zur Anthropo- 
logic und Urgeschichte Bayerns," Munich 1877-97. 

5. English Prose Fiction. — Much complaint on the part 
of the public of failure to get works of standard English 
prose fiction listed in the subject catalogue issued in 1893, 
and a decision against the revision of the catalogue, induced 
the purchase of over 4,000 volumes of English prose fiction 
as replacements and additional copies, to replenish the shelves 
and make good the catalogue as it stands. 

The purchase of current English fiction, on the other hand, 
has been as conservative as last year. One hundred and 



Library Department. 19 

s even ty-eiglit titles have been selected out of 587 books read. 
But copies have been multiplied so that the total of volumes 
purchased of this class has reached 2,566, representing an ex- 
penditure of some tf 2,274. 

6. Psycliology. — The purchases have included 150 
volumes recommended to the Library by Prof, \yilliam 
James as the most important contributions to the subject 
within the past two and a half years. 

Slavic. — The purchases of Russian and Polish literature 
in the original have included nearly 400 volumes recom- 
mended by Prof. Leo Wiener and by Mr. Joseph Adam- 
owski. 

Scandinavian. — If there be added to the above the special 
purchase of some 400 volumes of standard Norwegian, 
Swedish and Danish literature, the first large accession of 
its kind, and the various works French, German and Italian 
history and miscellanies, secured upDu recommendation of 
My. Thomas Sergeant Perry and others, it Avill appear, I 
think, that the literature of the continent has had especial 
recognition during the past j^ear. 

Americaii Patents. — A close investigation of our patent 
collection, undertaken last summer, proved United States 
drawings and specifications to the number of 97,938, all prior 
to 1869, to be lacking. The list price of these would be five 
cents (formerly ten cents) per copy. But under a recent act 
of Congress, suggested, I think, by the application of this 
Library for a reduction in price where a large number are 
subscribed for en bloc, the Commissioner was enabled to fix a 
price of one cent per copy. In September last we remitted 
to him the sum of -$1,000 to cover the above 97,938. The 
lacking copies are therefore gradually being suj)plied to us. 

Kelmscott Press. — Among the important accessions by 
purchase during the past year should be mentioned also 
eleven issues of the Kelmscott Press (including the Froissart, 
the Beowulf, the Sir Perecyvelle, and the Historyes of Troye); 
and in connection with them Vallance's notable work on tlie 
"Art of William Morris." Nor should there be overlooked 
among the examples of sumptuous book-making the "Altar 
book," issued by D. B. Updike of Boston. 

Deposit Collection. — The extension of the system of 
deposit stations has involved the selection and purchase 
of a collection of books to be devoted exclusively to this 
service. This collection has gradually grown until it now 
numbers 5,041 volumes. In the enumeration, these books 
are credited to the Central Library ; but as they are used 
solely through the outlying system they should really be 
reckoned as part of the equipment of the latter. 



20 City Document No. 21. 

PhotograijJis. — As to the photographs, which have formed 
a special feature of our purchases during the past year, I 
report in a later paragraph under " Gifts." 

Gifts. 

WorTcs of Art. (See supra.) 

JSndowments. — The endowments of the Libraiy have been 
increased by the following very important contributions : 

April, 1897. — From the Twentieth Regiment Association 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry the sum of ^5,000, the in- 
come to be used "for the purchase of books of a military 
and patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove appro- 
priated as a memorial of the Twentieth Regiment " ; that is 
to say, with the collection to be known as the Twentieth 
Regiment Memorial collection, the exact location of the col- 
lection being subject to possible change. 

A beginnmg has already been made with this collection by 
the purchase of miscellaneous books relating to the Civil 
war. It is proposed as little as possible to duplicate material 
already in the general library. 

May, 1897. — From the Papyrus Club of Boston the sum 
$1,000, to be known as the John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial 
Fund, the income to be used "for the purchase of books." 
With the gift, the Papyrus Club supplies an appropriate 
book-plate, which will be inserted in each of the volumes. 

October, 1897. — From William C. Todd, Esq., of Atkin- 
son, N. H., the sum of 150,000 as an endowment for the 
Newspaper reading room. This gift is made in pursuance 
of the intention communicated by Mr. Todd, June 16, 1893, 
in connection with his proposal to provide, temporarily, each 
year the sum of -12,000 for direct expenditure for this pur- 
pose ; but the offer in its final form, October 21, 1897, was 
addressed, not to the Trustees but the City Government ; 
and it was an offer to pay over to the City of Boston the 
sum of $50,000 on an agreement by the city not merely to 
hold and invest this sum and use the income for the pur- 
chase of current newspapers, but on the further agreement, 
should the income in any year fall below $2,000, that theie 
should be ajDpropriated the amount necessary to make the 
income up to $2,000, for the above purposes. (^See letter of 
gift in appendix.) These conditions were accepted by the 
city government and ensure the application of $2,000 yearly, 
in perpetuum, for the supply of this department. 

November, 1897. — From the estate of the late Caleb D. 
Bradlee, D.D., of Brookline, the sum of $1,000, a bequest 
to the Library without condition or restriction. 



Library Department. 21 

Mention is appropriate here of the bequest contained in 
the will of the late John C. Paige of Boston, the full terms 
of which are given in the appendix. It is a residuary be- 
quest, postponed to a life interest; and its exact amount 
cannot of course now be stated. But its terms are so 
liberal, and yet the suggestion that accompanies it, that it be 
used so* far as practicable for the benefit of the children, is 
of such interest that it should take a foremost place among 
the benefits of the year. Mr. Paige died on May 8, 1897. 
His will is dated January 28, 1897. 

Miscellaneous gifts of money for direct expenditure in 
books have been : 

From the Twentieth Regiment Association, for 
books for the Memorial collection, in addi- 
tion to 8368 for service, the sum of . . 1107 03 

From Mrs. John A. Lewis for two volumes to be 

added to the John A. Lewis collection . . 26 00 

From the Boston Numismatic Society, in connec- 
tion with the society's gift of its libj-ary (see 
iyifra) " for the benefit of the study of numis- 
matics." 300 00 

Photograph Fund. — The usefulness of the Graupner col- 
lection of photographs given to the library last year sug- 
gested how large a service might be effected by a collection 
more widely representative of the various schools of painting, 
and which would include also other departments of art, and 
the more noted monuments of architecture. The advantages 
of direct purchase abroad of such material being obvious, an 
appeal was made to the public of Boston, prior to my departure 
for Europe in May last, for contributions towards such a 
purchase. The response was cordial in terms and consider- 
able in amount. The full list of donors appears in the ap- 
pendix. Two hundred and fifty dollars, as will be noticed, 
was voted by the Boston Society of Architects, an action im- 
plying an indorsement which was in itself of value, and 
$200 came from a class o^ young women pursuing the sys- 
tematic study of the fine arts. There was even a brave little 
contribution from the pupils of a grammar-school class, 
whose enthusiasm had been stirred by the use of the art books, 
and who were determined " to do something." 

The total amount subscribed was -11,321. 

The purchases were made in Italy, of Messrs. Anderson 
at Rome, and Alinari and Brogi at Florence ; in London, of 
Messis. Clarke & Davies, Mansell Ilollyer, and Haufstaengel, 
a Munich firm. What I took with me by way of lists 



22 City Document No. 21. 

were, as regards paintings, affirmative lists of necessary 
examples lacking in the Graupner collection. This list was 
compiled by Mr. Allen A. French of Boston, whose expert 
service in this matter has laid the Library under great obliga- 
tion. As regards sculpture and architecture, it was more 
convenient and sufficiently explicit to take lists of what the 
Library already possessed. The classic and the Tuscan sculp- 
tors were for the most part already reasonably available in 
the works of Brunn & Bode, which, although in book form, 
might temporarily ba utilized. But the important collections 
in the liritish Museum are not included in these, and of 
Italian sculpture, outside of the Tuscan masters, the Library 
had notliing. 

Tlie photographs purchased were unmounted, and for the 
most part silver prints and small in size (8 by 10 inches). 
They included, however, a considerable number of "carbons," 
and a large selection of the fine HoUyer platinotypes of the 
works of Burne-Jones, Watts, Rossetti and others of the 
English Pre-Raphaelite school. They included practically the 
entire Assyrian and Egyptian, Greek and Roman series of 
sculpture in the British Museum, listed in Mansell's Cata- 
logue. The lists compiled by Mr. French were purchased 
entire. They comprised some 1,600 examples of the Italian 
masters in northern, as well as in Italian galleries. 

The total purchases to February 1 out of the $1,321 
subscribed reached 6,765 photographs; $^85. 21 remains still 
on hand to meet outstanding orders. Other orders outstand- 
ing will be met out of library funds otherwise available. 

The work of mounting the photographs has been done at 
the Library by special contract. The expense for the 6,765 
thus far received has been $579, all of which has been met 
by the Library. As fast as they are movinted they are classi- 
fied, numbered and located in the case recently constructed 
for their reception. 

Tlie entire collection of photographs owned by the Library 
and in active use now numbers over 9,000. Auxiliary to 
this collection is the collection gradually forming of process 
reproductions, which coming to us in serial form are mounted 
and made available for classification under subject. The 
serials, without text, that are now dissected for this pur- 
pose include the Matdriaux et documents d'architecture et 
de sculpture (Raguenet), Formenschatz, Blatter fiir Kunst- 
gewerbe. Architecture et sculpture en France, L'art pour 
tons, Portefeuille des arts decoratifs, and Portafoglio delle 
arti decorative in Italia. 

The usefulness of all this material when properly classified 
and conveniently accessible, the service whicli it may ren- 



Library Department. 23 

der to the individual student of the fine arts or industrial 
arts, or of history or institutions, or to the class under trained 
guidance, or as the hasis of occasional exhibits that reach a 
larger general public can be fully appreciated only by close 
observation of such a department in operation day after day. 
The obvious and proved service with even the present collec- 
tion is already so great that we are anxious to enlarge its 
scope. 

What should next be added are: (1) Examples of the 
northern and of tlie Spanish schools of •painting and of 
architecture, and (2) examples of the remains of Greek art 
and architecture now in Greece itself. 

In the meantime the donors to this project, will, it is 
hoped, feel that their contributions have been used to good 
purpose. 

Gifts of Boohs. — The number of givers of books has in- 
creased from 1,545 in 1896, to 1,776 during the past year. 
The full list of givers appears as usual in Appendix XIII. 
But certain of the gifts have been so important in themselves 
and so significant in the interest which they indicate, that I 
insert fuller mention of them here. 

Two notable accessions represent the entire libraries of 
certam Boston societies organized for study in a special direc- 
tion, and amassing a collection of books as incidental to this 
purpose. The one of these is the Boston Browning Society, 
the* other the Numismatic Society. The inducement to the 
transfer of these collections to the Public Library was doubt- 
less the conviction that they would be safe and well cared for 
here and do a service to a larger public without any essential 
deprivation of service to their original owners. This is a 
view which the Library greatly welcomes and trusts may 
generally prevail. It is especially applicable when the col- 
lection in question is highly specialized upon a single subject. 

Some of the important gifts of the year I note here. 
The}^ are arranged alphabetically according to their donors. 

Gifts of Especial Importance, 1897-98. 

Fi'om Michael Anagnos, Esq., Director of the Perkins 
Institution for the Blind, South Boston, twenty-seven vol- 
umes in embossed type, nineteen of which have been recently 
published. These include Don Quixote, Handet, The Mer- 
chant of Venice, and Fiske's War of independence, and sup- 
plement the collection of over 500 volumes for the use of 
tlie blind, a great part of which was placed here through the 
kmdness of Mr. Anagnos. 



24 City Document No. 21. 

From the Boston Browning Society, its library, numbering 
291 volumes, "without conditions further than are implied 
by the expressed wish that it be kept together as a reference 
collection so long as the well-being of the Public Library 
itself permits, and that it be made accessible under the same 
rules that the Public Library maintains in the case of other 
similar collections." (Letter of gift.) This collection is 
notably rich in rare editions of the works of both Robert and 
Elizabeth Browning, and contains, besides these, a large num- 
ber of critical and illustrative works relating wliolly or in 
part to the Brownings. Among the single works of Robert 
Brownmg are the following first editions : Paracelsus, 1835 ; 
Strafford, 1837; Sordello, 1840; Bells and pomegranates, 
Nos. 1-8, 1841-4(5 ; and among those of Elizabeth Brown- 
ing, "The Seraphim, and other j)oems," 1838; "Aurora 
Leigh," 1857, and " Casa Guidi windows," 1851. There is 
also a slender volume bearing the title " Two poems by Eliza- 
beth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning " (first edi- 
tion), London, 1854; some eighteen poems by Browning, set 
to music ; a series of photographs and engravings of the 
Brownings, which is of much interest, and a bronze cast of 
their clasped right hands by Harriet Hosmer. The members 
of the Brownmg Society have expressed their intention of 
enlarging this collection from time to time l_y the gift of the 
additional material which they are constantl}' collecting. 

From the Boston Numismatic Society, through its Secre- 
tary, William S. Appleton, Esq., " its collection of books and 
pamplilets, and also the sum of -^300 for the benefit of the 
study of numismatics, wdth no other conditions." (Letter of 
gift.) The collection numbers sixty bound volumes and 150 
pamphlets, largely general and special histories and catalogues 
of the medals and coins of various countries. Among the 
noteworthy older works may be mentioned " Historische 
Remarques der neuesten Sachen in Europa," 1699-1706, 
in nine volumes, which, gives a general history of the coinage 
of Europe; Tentzel's Monatliche Unterredungen emiger 
guten Freunde von allerhand Biichern, in ten volumes, 
1690-1697, which devotes considerable space to the history 
of numismatics ; Medalische historic der Republyk van Hol- 
land, by Bizot, Amsterdam, 1690 ; and Vaillant's Numismata 
imperatorum Romanorum, Paris, 1694." 

From Allen A. Brown, Esq., 343 volumes for the collection 
of music, consisting of scores, operas and chamber music. 
Among these is an almost complete set of the orchestral 
works of Richard Strauss, and the rare full score of Saint- 
Saens's Samson et Dalila. 



Library Department. 25 

From Heman W. Chaplin, Esq., Dedhani, Mass., 205 vol- 
umes (two gifts) consisting principally of the works of New 
England theologians,* biography and early school books. 

From the Church of the Unity, a set, complete in seven- 
teen volumes, of " Unity pulpit," the sermons preached in 
Boston by Rev. M. J. Savage, D.D. This set, which for- 
merly belonged to the church, was presented to the Library 
for preservation by the Standmg Committee, through Alfred 
Ewer, Treasurer. 

From Miss Lilian Freeman Clarke, Jamaica Plam, Mass., 
125 volumes and 559 pamphlets, comprising many United 
States documents and reports, library publications, theology 
and biography. 

From J. Templeman Coolidge, Esq., an album containing 
the portraits of prominent characters at the time of the 
French Commune of 1870, and fifteen photographs of views 
of Paris after the siege, 1870. 

From Messrs. Copeland and Day, thirty-two volumes of 
their current publications, in continuance of their practice of 
giving to the Library a copy of every book issued by them. 

From the Commission for directing geological and geo- 
graphical investigations in Greenland, at Copenhagen, a 
nearly complete series of " Meddelelser om Gr^nland," a val- 
uable Danish government publication, embodying the results 
of all the Danish scientific researches made in Greenland. 

From Maj. Gen. John Watts de Peyster, Tivoli, New 
York, sixteen volumes of his writings, relating principally to 
the Waterloo campaign. 

From the Imperial University of Dorpat, Russia, fifteen 
dissertations on anthropology and ethnology, given in re- 
sponse to a request by the Library for material to be used in 
the list of books on these subjects, compiled by Prof. W. Z. 
Ripley, and to be published by the Library. 

From the German Patent Office (Kaiserliches Patentamt), 
Berlin, 5,517 numbers of the " Patentschrift," continuing 
the file of German patents, which have been sent gratui- 
tously to this Library by the German Government since 
1892. 

From Dr. D. D. Gilbert, Roxbury, thirty-four volumes, in- 
cluding a biographical dictionary in twelve volumes. Dr. 
Grew's " Cosmologia sacra," and the Laws of Massachusetts, 
folio edition, 1789. 

From Miss Matilda Goddard, a fine copy of Pinion's 
"Egypt" in two folio volumes, and twenty-two volumes of 
" Current and passing events," educational, scientific and 
national, made up of newspaper cuttings. 



28 City Document No. 21. 

From tlie children of the late Dr. Benjamm Apthorp 
Gould of Cambridge, Mass., " without conditions or restric- 
tions," 4,105 volumes, consisting mainl^f of scientific material 
relating to meteorology, astronomy and physics, especially 
concerning the Argentine Republic. Dr. Gould was evi- 
dently the recipient of many monographs on scientific sub- 
jects, the issues of various mstitutions and academies, which 
do not find their way into ordinary channels ; and these form 
a considerable part of the gift, which includes also the 
Annals of the Argentine Scientific Society (Sociedad cien- 
tifica Argentina) in fifty volumes ; the Annals of the 
Meteorological Office of the Argentine Republic (Oficina 
meteorol6gica Argentina) in fifty volumes, and the Meteo- 
rological year-book of the Netherlands (Nederlandsch Meteo- 
rologisch Jaarboek) in twenty volumes. The gift as a whole 
is a distinct reenforcement to the Library, in a depart- 
ment of literature which it is hoped to develop systemati- 
cally. 

From the Commissioner of Patents of Great Britain, 222 
volumes, continuing the set of British patents, which exists 
unbroken upon the liibrary shelves from 1617 to the present 
time. 

From Augustus Hemenway, Esq., a very interesting copy 
of Bergomensis (Jacobus Philippus Foresti) " Nouissime 
historiarum omnium repercussiones," printed m A^enice, 
1502-1506. The book was purchased by Mr. Hemenway as 
a specimen of artistic binding, from a collection on exhibi- 
tion in this city last spring. The binding is a copy or adap- 
tation of one executed by a Dutch artisan for Diane de 
Poitiers and consists of oak boards covered with calf and 
mlaid in colors in a pattern of geometrical design, with a 
monogram, a crown, interlaced crescents and the fleur-de-lis. 

From Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, forty-two vol- 
umes for the Galatea collection, also three manuscri^^t letters 
of George Ticknor to Mr. Stephen Higginson and Mrs. Hig- 
ginson, written from Europe in 1816, 

From His Majesty the Kmg of Italy, two volumes, con- 
tinuing the military campaigns of Prince Eugene (" Cam- 
pagne del Principe Eugenio di Savoia"). 

From the Minister of Agriculture, Industry, and Com- 
merce, Italy, 177 volumes of most important statistical 
reports, relating to the industries, commerce, railroads, edu- 
cation, finance, posts and telegraphs of Italy. These various 
reports consist for the most part of material new to the 
Library, although some continue files which had lapsed for 
many years. They were obtained through the courtesy of 



LiBEAiiY Department. 27 

the Minister of Agriculture in response to a request made 
personally by the Librarian while m Rome. 

From Dr. B. Joy Jeffries, sixty-two volumes, chiefly medi- 
cal works (made up of three gifts), and two hundred and 
fifteen numbers. 

From George B. Knapp, Esq., 103 volumes (2 gifts) of 
history, biography and travel. 

From His Holiness Pope Leo XHI., the nmth volume of 
the folio edition of the works of Saint Thomas Aquinas 
(" OjDera omnia iussu impensaque Leonis XHL, P. M.") of 
which the previous volumes were received in 1895 and 1896. 

From Hugh J. Leonard, Esq., New York City, the edition 
de luxe of his " Handbook of wrestling " published in 
1897. 

From a special donation given by Mrs. John A. Lewis 
there Avas purchased for the Lewis Collection a copy of 
Increase Mather's " Solenm advice to young men, " printed 
in Boston in 1695, also the second ]3art of the "New-Eng- 
land JNIagazine of knoAvledge and pleasure. By various 
authors. Printed and sold by Benjamin Mecom in Boston." 
(1758), and of which the Lewis collection already contained 
Part 1. 

From the Due de Loubat, through George H. Baker, Esq., 
Librarian of Columbia College, " Galerie americaine du 
Mus^e d'ethnographie du Trocad^ro, " by E. T. J. Hamy, 
a magnificent representation on folio plates, with explanatory 
notes, of the American antiquities and ethnology contained in 
the Museum. 

From George R. R. Rivers, Esq., Milton, Mass., 207 vol- 
umes. This gift from Mr. Rivers contains the important set 
of Buffon's " Histoire naturelle," in 111 volumes, in the 
edition of 1798-1808. 

From Richard S. Simonds, Esq., the '^ Gaceta de Madrid," 
a daily newspaper, published at Madrid from 1877-1893, in 
sixty-two bound folio volumes. 

From TheoJore Stanton, Esq., Paris, France, seventeen 
volumes relating to the history of woman, for the Galatea 
collection. Many of these are of especial interest as being 
from the library of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. 

From Dr. Franklin Bache Stephenson, U.S.N., Charles- 
town, 248 volumes of biography, theology, school books, and 
fourteen volumes of D wight's " Journal of music " ; also forty- 
four broadsides and one map. 

From C. A. M. Taber, Esq., of Wakefield, Mass., a Manu- 
script letter-book of John Rowe, 1759-62, containing the 
correspondence of a Boston merchant with his ship-masters. 



28 City Document No. 21. 

From William C. Todd, Esq., of Atkinson, N. H., a file of 
the London "Times" from 1809 to the present day in 232 
volumes. The importance of this gift can hardly be over- 
estimated. It is an acquisition of which the Library may be 
justly proud, and although lacking the first twenty years (the 
" Times " was begun under that name in 1788) the set covers 
the important period of the War of 1812 and the later 
Napoleonic campaigns. The Library was particularly fortu- 
nate in effecting the purchase for ]\Ir. Todd through one of 
its London agents, as the opportunity for obtaining so large a 
file lessens each year, and rarely occurs except, as in this 
case, on the breakmg up of an old institution. 

From Alfred T. Turner, Esq., Treasurer of the City of 
Boston, a valuable collection of between 400 and 500 vol- 
umes of Boston City documents including thirty-two 
volumes of the "Municipal register" between the years 1851 
and 1894. 

The initial purchases of books for the 20th Regiment 
Alcove have been made this year by the Library under the 
direction of the Committee of the 20th Regiment Associa- 
tion. The 205 volumes bought at an outlay of ^407. 03 are 
chiefly regimental histories of troops serving in the civil 
war. 

From Robert Walcott, Esq., Cambridge, Mass., seventy 
volumes of rare classical works, including Fabricius, " Biblio- 
theca Graeca 1721-28," in fourteen volumes, and the follow- 
ing old folios : Estienne (Stephanus) " Thesaurus Grsecae 
linguae ab Henrico Stephano constructus. (Geneva) 1572," 
five vols. ; Hornanus's " Dictionarium Graeco-Latinum. 
Basileae, 1557," and Scapula, " Lexicon-Graeco-Latinum, 
1652." 

From William B. Ware, Esq., thirty-four volumes of 
church music, mainly collections made by Lowell INIason, 
George F. Root, and Loring B. Barnes, and published in 
Boston. 

From ]\[rs. A. C. Wheelwright, fifty-five volumes of 
general English literature, including a few old Boston and 
Cambridge imprints. 

From Messrs. James D. Law, Laurens Maynard, David 
McKay, Harrison S. Morris, Herbert Small, Horace L. Trau- 
bel and Francis H. Williams, a second instalment of books 
and pamplets for the Whitman collection. (The first instal- 
ment was made last 3'ear.) Also a large number of news- 
paper clippings, magazine articles and broadsides relating to 
Whitman from Dr. R. M. Bucke. 

From the Most Reverend Jolui Joseph Williams, Arch- 
bishop of Boston, a set of the " Acta Sanctae Sedis," or Acts 



Library Department. 



29 



of the Holy See, in twenty-eight volumes, published in Rome 
by the Society for Propagating the Faith. This is the official 
publication, issued periodically, containing the decisions, etc., 
of the Congregations and Commissions of the Roman College 
of Cardinals, advising or reporting to the Pope on various 
matters relating to the doctrine and practice of the Roman 
Catholic Church. 

The set is indispensable to the student of Roman Catholic 
doctrine and practice, and the acquisition of it has been 
urgently desired by the Libraiy. This fact having come to 
the attention of the Archbishop he generously ordered this 
set to be purchased, to be specially bound, and to be delivered 
to the Library as a gift from him. 

From Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., Esq., a volume comprising 
the first four parts of the "Suffolk Manorial Families," re- 
lating exclusively to the Winthrops of Groton and families 
allied to tiiem, a publication largely composed of matter 
nowhere else to be found in print. 



Binding. 

The work done by the Library bindery during the past 
year is indicated by the following schedule : 

Vols. 



JJUUiViS UUUHU. Ill JJ. J. J.. UlllLlillg . . 

Large daily newspapers .... 


. o,uxj. 

48 


Branch newspapers . . . . . 


37 


Pamphlets ....... 


2565 


Total 


11,161 


Books repaired ..... 


4,885 


Catalogues and novels stitched in covers 


2,270 


Cards mounted ..... 


1,497 


Maps mounted on cloth . . . . 


886 


Volumes guarded ..... 


1,541 


Volumes interleaved .... 


2 


Portfolios made ..... 


120 


Boxes " 


115 


Blocks " 


620 


Pads " 


11 


Pouches "..... 


57 


Temporary covers made .... 


1,145 


Library publications folded and stitched . 


88,521 


Library publications folded, sewed and cov- 




ered ....... 


13,921 


Photographs and engravings mounted . 


2,941 


Office desks covered .... 


7 



30 City Document No. 21. 

Time on miscellaneons work . . . . 48 J da^js. 

Time cutting and bundling slips and cards . 682 days. 

Books bound for the various branches, received from the 
branch department (included in the number of books bound 
in B. H. binding) : 



Charlestown 


br 


anch 


Vols. 

. 56 


Dorchester branch 


Vols. 

. 28 


East Boston 




a 


6 


Jamaica Plain " 


. 33 


Brighton 




a 


. 115 


South Boston " 


. 32 


South End 
West End 






. 21 
. 53 


Roxbury " * 
West Roxbury " 


' . 88 
. 5 



Total 440 

It is not aj^parent that the reduction in the working day 
in this department (from ten to nine hours) has reduced the 
output. The present force, sixteen hands, is not sufficient, 
however, for the work to be done, and two more assistants 
(one forwarder and one sewer) have been asked for. 

The outside contract work (binding in cheaper form of 
branch books and old Lower Hall books) has comprised the 
binding of 18,929 volumes, as against 8,931 in 1896, at a 
total cost of $8,802.11 ; 7,862 of the above were branch 
books. 

During the year the contract with the outside binder has 
been revised. The material now called for (instead of a 
leather) is Holliston Grade E book cloth; and the authors 
and brief titles are lettered on the backs. Methods of sew- 
ing and other details have at the same time been improved. 
The result now secured is a binding more comely, cleaner 
and more durable. The lettering adds a great convenience. 
The cost is a fraction greater. 

Catalogues. 

As to the work of the Cataloguing Department during the 
year I quote very nearly verbatim the summary contained in 
the report of the Chief Cataloguer. 

Work Done. — 

Number of volumes and parts of volumes cata- 
logued 61,573 

Number of titles for the same . . . 36,032 

These surprising figures need the explanation that they 
stand in part for the large purchases of popular books for 
Stack 4, the branches and deposit stations. As these 



Library Department. 31 

are largely duplicates the work of the cataloguer is reduced 
to the minimum ; 17,861 volumes represent the recata- 
loguing of old books rendered necessary by the receipt of 
new editions, or new copies given particularly for the special 
collections, — all this work tending to the clearing up of the 
card catalogue and bringing it up to the present standard. 
It is cheaper and less laborious to reprint these combined 
titles than to take out the cards from the catalogues and alter 
them. This we owe to the reduction of cost brought about 
by the Linotype. Three thousand two hundred and eighty- 
one volumes of continuations of serials are included, also 
work on the JMusic collection, as hereafter detailed. 

The difference between the number of titles and volumes 
is explained by the duplicates already referred to and by long 
sets of periodicals recently catalogued. For example, m the 
case of the London " Times " lately received one title repre- 
sented 242 volumes. 

The cards placed in the various catalogues at the Central 
Library, as far as it has been found convenient to count them, 
number 93,783. Beginning early in the year the cards for 
the branch libraries were counted at each Ijranch, and they 
are not entered in tiie above enumeration. 

Periodical List. — One of the most interesting publications 
of this department for many years is the list of periodicals, 
newspapers, transactions and other serial publications cur- 
rently received in the pruicipal libraries of Boston and 
vicinity, which was published in INIay. The material fur- 
nished by the thirty-six libraries interested was arranged, 
edited and j)rinted, at this library, in a volume of 152 pages, 
(comprising over 5,600 titles), which has attracted wide 
attention and given a decided impulse to the movement for 
co-operation among librarians. 

The Hiyhei' Education of Women. — Another cooperative 
undertaking has been edited and printed at this Library, bear- 
ing the title Contributions towards a bibliography of the 
higher education of women. This list was compiled by a 
committee of the Association of Collegiate Alumnte and 
edited by Miss Mary H. Rollins of the Cataloguuig Depart- 
ment. Two thousand copies were purchased by the Asso- 
ciation, the balance remaining for distribution by the 
Library. 

Bibliography of Boston. — Still another cooperative under- 
taking is the list of the publications of the Town of Boston, 
which began to appear in the Bulletin of February, 1898. 
Here is collected a record of documents found in the Boston 
Public Library, the Massachusetts State Library, the Boston 



32 City Document No. 21. 

AthenfBum, and the libraries of Harvard University, the 
American Antiquarian Society and the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society. This list was prepared by the Chief Cataloguer 
in part from material furnished at the request of the Library 
by Mr. Edwin M. Bacon. It is intended as the first instal- 
ment of a Bibliography of Boston, for which the titles are 
mostly at hand. 

While the special lists of books published from time to 
time by this Library are valuable as revealing what it has on 
any given subject, they are still more useful in indicating 
what is lacking, to be supplied by purchase or by gifts. 

The Annual List. — This year marks the beginning of a 
new and significant enterprise, namely, the Annual List of 
additions to the Library. This list contains over six thousand 
titles selected from the monthly bulletms from January, 1896, 
to October, 1897, inclusive. 

In adopting the Linotype for the printing of its catalogues, 
it has been the purpose of the Library from the beginning to 
repeat these catalogues in various forms, by using the solid 
lines of types or " slugs " of this machine, retaining them 
for this purpose after their first use. The Annual List is 
attractive and popular, and the experiment has proved a 
success. 

The preparation of this list has been in the hands of the 
Editor of Library Publications, seconded by the Chief of the 
Printing Department. 

The Bulletin. — Under the charge of these same officers the 
Monthly Bulletin has appeared regularly. Besides the titles 
of new books the Bulletin lias contained lists of books on the 
Eastern question since the Turko-Russian war of 1877 and 
1878, and on the Yukon gold fields and Alaska. The latter 
list, which was prepared by J\Ir. Murdoch, proved timely and 
popular, and a second edition was called for. 

The Chamberlain Autographs. — A description of the 
Chamljerlain collection of autographs, now m this Library, 
has been edited by Mr. Swift, from material furnished by 
Mr. Edwin M. Bacon, and was published in April last. 

Other Lists. — A Supplement to the English Prose 
Fiction List of 1893 has been printed; also a new select list 
of books for younger readers. A card catalogue of books 
sent out on deposit has been prepared. 

Science. — Mr. Murdoch's work for the year on catalogues 
of works of science is summed up as follows : 

1. Scientific periodicals .... 1,952 titles 

2. Non-periodical scientific works . . . 1,672 " 



LiBKARY Department. 33 

3. Scientific works in Harvard College Li- 

brary i 244 titles 

4. Scientific works in the Boston Society of 

Natural History 1 13,007 " 

Lists Nos. 1 and 4 are completed. Any additions to these 
lists in future will represent actual new accessions. 

One thousand seven hundred and forty-six titles of List 4 
have been compared with the catalogues of this Library. Of 
these, 443 were found to be in both libraiies, 1,303 in the 
library of the Society only. When the work of examination 
is extended to the other libraries in this vicinity there will 
be at hand the basis of a co-operative movement of great 
importance. 

Tlie G-alatea Collection. — A List of the Galatea collection 
of books relating to tke history of women, given to this 
Library by Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, will be pub- 
lished in the Bulletin for March, 1898. The titles of these 
books have been added to the card catalogues. They num- 
ber 1,066 volumes, counting composite volumes as one. 

Tlie Codman Collection. — The collection of books on land- 
scape gardening, given to this Library by Mr. and INlrs. James 
M. Codman, has been catalogued, and the cards are in the 
hands of the printer. . This collection numbers 691 volumes. 

Historical Fiction. — During tlie year the Historical Fic- 
tion list has been continued by Mrs. Seaver, from material 
collected by her and by the chief of the department. The 
cards for Italy, Greece, ancient and modern, Persia and As- 
syria are ready for revision. 

Neivspapers. — A temj)orary card catalogue of the bound 
volumes of newspapers has been prepared under the super- 
vision of Mr. Blaisdell. 

3IiUtary Library. — The books on the Civil war given 
to this Library by the Twentieth Regiment of Massachusetts 
Infantry, through its committee, have been catalogued b}^ 
Miss Barlow, and considerable work has been done on the 
revision of our own collection of like material. 

^liscellaneous Work. — The transfer of many thousand 
volumes to different shelves in the new Library building has 
thrown much labor on the Catalogue and Shelf Departments. 

The work of clearing the catalogues of the cards for books 
lost or worn out has been continued. Two thousand two 
hundred and sixtv-five cards were taken from the Stack 4 



' Mr. Murdoch has devoted a portion of his time to tlic systematic examination of 
the resources of tlie neigliliorins collections of scientiflc literature, and the actual 
transcription of titles from their catalogues, in order to iivoid unnecessary duplica- 
tion of material in purchases for the Public Library. 



34 City Document No. 21. 

catalogue in the months of February, March and April alone. 
In this task aid has been given by the Issue Department. 

Sjjecial Lihrai'ies. — Duj^licate sets of cards are furnished 
for the collections of books m the Special Libraries' Depart- 
ment. Mr. Fleischner is having the titles in the Thayer col- 
lection cut from the printed catalogues and mounted on cards. 
He has also prepared a selected Mst of books in the Boston 
Public Library recommended for reading in connection with 
the illustrated lectures on historic art given by James Fred- 
erick Hopkins, Director of Drawing m the Boston Public 
Schools. This list was printed m the syllabus of this course 
of lectures. 

^York Begun- — Music. — During the j'ear Mr. Hunt has 
catalogued of the Allen A. BroAvn collection 4,658 volumes 
and 2,157 parts, with a total of 6,333 titles, and has also 
recatalogued 76 volumes with 67 titles. The number of 
volumes catalogued since the beginning is 12,967, with 
12,000 titles ; also 13,045 parts. Since Mr. Brown is con- 
stantly adding to his collection the end recedes as Mr. Hunt 
advances ; but he confidently hopes to finish the cataloguing 
of the collection and to have most, if not all, of the titles in 
the general catalogue, and practically ready to print in book 
form during the present year. 

Cooperative Indexing of Scientific Periodicals. — Arrange- 
ments have been made for the cooperative indexing of cer- 
tain scientific serials by the following libraries : The Boston 
Public Library, the Columbia LTniversity, the Harvard Uni- 
versity Library, the John Crerar Library of Chicago, and the 
New York Public Library. The list at the outset comprises 
some 184 serials not elsewhere indexed. They may be classi- 
fied as follows : 

General (the more important learned societies), 74; Soci- 
ology and Political science, 21 ; Anthropology and Ethnology, 
10; Archaeology, 12; Philology, 15; Oriental studies, 7; 
Geography, 10 ; History, 12 ; Philosophy, 8 ; and the balance 
scattering. Publications devoted exclusively to the natural 
and mathematical sciences have not been included, as they 
will come within the scope of the Royal Society Index, which 
is to begin in 1900. The editing and printing of this Index 
will be under the direction of the Publishing Section of the 
American Library Association. The index entries begin 
with the volume current on January 1, 1898. The results 
come to each of the five cooperating libraries in card form 
(two copies of each card), and are available to other institu- 
tions on payment of a moderate subscription. The first in- 
stalments of copy have been sent to Mr. William C. Lane, the 



Library Department. 35 

editor. Mr. Murdoch is in charge of the indexing to be done 
by this Library. 

Social Reform. — A list of works on certain questions of 
the day, economic and social, compiled by Miss Rollins, is 
partly in type. 

Anthropology and Ethnology. — Professor W. Z. Ripley, 
of the Massachusetts Listitute of Technology, has compiled 
a list of works on the Geographical anthropology of Europe, 
which will be submitted to other scholars for suggestions, 
and, on its final revision by the Library editor, will be pub- 
lished by this Library. 

Library Buildings. — Ten years ago this Library issued a 
list of the pictures and plans of library buildings in this and 
other countries. This was a record of the material collected 
by this Librarj^, and also an index to what had been pub- 
lished in architectural periodicals. This list having j)roved 
of service to those planning libraries, a new and nmch en- 
larged edition has been prepared by the chief of the depart- 
ment. 

Biography. — A list of collected biographies in this Library 
has been undertaken. 

Historical Documetits. — The pamphlet to contain the text 
of the four great historical documents, forming the four 
large tablets in the Chamberlain series, is in the press. 

The Branch Libraries. — Finding lists for all the branches 
were printed during the year, bringing their record of new 
books up to the time when a common shelf-number was given 
to the same books in these different libraries, thus enabling 
all to use the same catalogue. Early in the coming year a 
new joint Finding List of new books can be printed. By a 
new arrangement the past year the cataloguing of books for 
the branches is now done at the Central Library, and not at 
the branches. An author-card is kept l)y the Catalogue 
Department at the Central Library, to which department an 
acknowledgment is returned for books and cards received by 
the branches. The experiment of printing titles instead of 
writing them has proved a success. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

There were issued 1,038 pages of printed matter during 
the past year as against 360 during the preceding. The pub- 
lications issued, as tabulated by the editor, Mr. Swift, are as 
follows : 

Date of Publication. Pages. Edition. Price. 

Aunual List . . January, 1898, 192 3,985 .05 

Chamberlain Pamphlet . April, 1897, 71 2,lo3 Free. 



36 



City Document No. 21. 





Date of Puljlication. 


Pages. 


Edition. 


Price. 


English Fiction Supple 


- 










ment 


October, 


1897, 


48 


2,576 


.05 


Higher Education of 










Women . 


May, 


1897, 


49 


4,000 


.15 








(2,000 to committee.) 


Periodical List 


May, 


1897, 


152 


2,443 


.25 


Rules and Regulations, 


December, 


1897, 










and Jan. 


,1898, 


16 


10,596 


Free. 


Rules for Employees 


February, 


1897, 


16 


200 


1. 1 


Y List (hooks for young 


er 










readers) . 


February, 


1897, 


32 


4,950 


.01 


Yukon Gokl Fields 


Septembei 


•,1897, 


8 


1,065 


Free. 


Branch Finding List : 












Charlestown 


. June, 


1897, 


20 


1,050 




Dorchester 


June, 


1897, 


32 


1,031 




Jamaica Plain . 


June, 


1897, 


24 


1,000 




Brighton . 


. June, 


1897, 


32 


1,041 




East Boston 


August, 


1897, 


24 


1,032 




Roxbury . 


. August, 


1897, 


16 


1,000 




South Boston . 


. August, 


1897, 


24 


1,033 




South p:nd 


August, 


1897, 


24 


1,050 




West End 


August, 


1897, 


8 


1,137 




Monthly Bulletins : 












March, 1897 . 


. 




16 


5,002 




April, 1897 


. 




16 


4,930 




May, 1897 


. 




24 


5,053 




June, 1897 


. 




20 


5,010 




July, 1897 


. 




16 


4,971 




August, 1897 . 


. . 




16 


4,944 




September, 1897 


. 




16 


5,028 




October, 1897 . 


. 




20 


4,960 




November, 1897 


, , 




24 


5,087 




December, 1897 


. 




24 


5,003 




January, 1898 . 






24 


7,518 




February, 1898 


. 




24 


7,500 





The fortune of these publications in use, distribution and 
sale has varied greatly. The Annual List, the Periodical 
List and the jNIonthlj' Bulletins have been distributed free to 
nearly one thousand persons and institutions on our Exchange 
List. Of the Chamberlam Pamphlet 577 copies were so dis- 
tributed, and of the Bibliography of the Higher Education of 
Women, 408 copies ; of the English Fiction Supplement, 309. 
The Monthly Bulletms (distributed free to all applicants) 
meet with ready interest ; and beginning with the January 
(1898) issue the monthly edition was enlarged from 5,000 to 
7,500 copies. Of the publications for which a charge is made 
only the Annual List and the Y List have found ready sale. 



Library Department. 37 

The end of the year finds the edition of the hitter, issued at 
the beginning, very nearly exhausted. The Annual List is 
at the " reserve " point within tliree months of its date of 
issue. But the sale of this has been effected through unusual 
efforts to interest the individual reader. 

The English Fiction supplement, however, the Higher Ed- 
ucation List and the Periodical List, have sold almost not at 
all. The two former were let take the usual course. But in 
the case of the Periodical List a special effort was made. A 
circular, descriptive of the scope of the list and suggestive of 
its value, was sent to every member of the faculties of Har- 
vard University, Boston University, Tufts College, the Mas- 
sachusetts Listitute of Technology and Boston College ; and 
copies for distribution to the librarians of seven other of the 
higher institutions of learning throughout New England. 
This circular contained also a description of other Library pub- 
lications, and a reference to the system of inter-library loans. 
Copies of the Serial List were, by permission, placed for sale 
at Harvard, the Listitute, Boston LTniversity and Tufts 
College. 

The additional suggestion was made (in the circulars) that 
this list represented an undertaking at great labor and con- 
siderable expense, in the interest of the higher learning, and 
that its failure to interest the scholars associated with the 
higher institutions of learning would tend to discourage such 
undertakings hereafter. 

The total sale of the Periodical List has reached to date 
but 146 copies. Of the Higher Education List, but thirty- 
four copies have been sold. Two thousand copies of this were, 
however, subscribed for by the Association of Intercollegiate 
Alumnae. 

And yet the cheapness of paper to-day is such that the 
bare possibility of sale advises the printing of a large first 
edition of such untried publications rather than to risk the 
expense of resetting the forms for a later second run, when 
the presses can ill be spared from other work. 

But it will be noticed that only a portion of the catalogumg 
enterprises of the Library involve publication, with its uncer- 
tainties. The great bulk of the work of the department goes 
to strengthen the card catalogue. This work is less osten- 
tatious. It advertises less the Library abroad. But it is 
certain, it involves no waste, and it is durable. 

The number of publications distributed free of charge by 
this Library during the year has readied 83,2(S2 copies. This 
includes 5,305 copies of Ainuial Reports and 11,24!2 of the 
Rules and Regulations. The total amount realized from sales 
during the year was but ^441.30. 



38 City Document No. 21. 

Prlntting Department. 

As last year the work of tlie Printing Department has 
included a mass of work not implied in the list of ordinary 
library publications. As stated by the Chief of the Printing 
Office: 

" The output of the department continues to include prac- 
tically all of the printed work of the Library (except that 
from intaglio, lithographic and heliotypic plates, the printing 
of which constitutes special trades), amongst which may be 
mentioned : 

"Cards for the Card Catalogue: 3,000 forms, equalling 
15,000 titles as counted by this department, i.e., ' main 
cards,' wliether with one title more or less to the card. Ref- 
erence cards (and other mere duplicates so far as the work of 
this department is concerned, numbering from eight to ten 
for each 'main card'), are not included. It is expected 
that the printing of the cards representing the Allen A. 
Brown Collection of IMusic will considerably increase this 
amount during the coming year. 

" Cards for the Card Catalogues at the branches : Sixty- 
three forms, equalling 544 titles (with reference cards and 
other duplicates amounting to from fifty to sixty to each 
'main card'). 

» Call slips (of eight kinds), 2,290,475. 

" Stationery : Currently consumed stocks of all kinds, 
363,507. 

"Blank books, 117. 

" Circulars, etc., 9,354. 

" Signs, etc., 1,394." 

The equipment of the department has been improved by 
the addition of a one-half-medium Colt's Armory Press. 

The second linotype, taken origmally on lease, was last 
May purchased outright. 

The use of the Imotype for such work as ours is matter 
of general concern to the library profession. At the Inter- 
national Conference of librarians held at London last sum- 
mer there were accordingly exhibited by us examples of the 
work of the machine, Avith a pamphlet compiled by the chief 
of our office, descriptive of our experience with it to that 
^date. Both exhibit and description awakened decided in- 
terest. 

Registraton. 

Appendix VI., as last j^ear, relates to the card-holders in 
the library. The tables classifying the persons holding cards, 
by sex, by age, by occupation and by residence (as between 



LiBRAiiY Department. 39 

the several districts of the city) will be found both interest- 
ing and significant. The statistics as to the distribution of 
card-holders throughout the city are more graphically indi- 
cated in the map to which I have previously referred, which 
has been prepared to show (1) the library system as it stands 
to-day, representing facilities ; and (2) the percentage of 
card-holders to the entire population in each ward, indi- 
cating the relative amount to which the facilities have been 
taken advantage of. The report of the Supervisor of 
Branches contains some comment upon these figures, which 
is worthy of consideration. 

The total number of active ("live") cards outstanding 
January 31, 1898, was 64,973, as against 45,606 outstanding 
February 1, 1897, showing a gain of 19,367 card-holders 
during the year. This means that on January 31, 1898, 42A 
per cent, more persons stood qualified to draw books for 
home use than stood qualified on February 1, 1897. 

The gross number of present active card-holders exceeds, 
I believe, the number i-eported by any public library, except 
the system known as the New Yoik Free Circulating Libra- 
ries. 

During the past year pupils' cards hav^e for the first time 
been issued under Article I., section 2, clause 4, of the Rules 
and Regulations. The provision does not specify a lower 
age limit; but the issue will be confined for the present to 
the ages between ten and twelve (twelve years being the 
minimum for the ordinary card). 

Six additional educational institutions have entered into 
agreements with the Trustees to be responsible for books 
taken for home use by their non-resident students, thus 
making thirty-seven such institutions now on the list. 

Use of the Library. 

I. — Referejice Use. 

As stated in my last annual report (pp. 39-40), full sta- 
tistics of reference use are no longer possible nor attempted. 
The general testimony of the custodians of the various refer- 
ence departments is that the volume of use has perceptibly 
increased. This is true in the Bates Hall Reading-room, in 
the Periodical and Newspaper-rooms, and in general through- 
out the central building. It is also true at the branch libra- 
ries, where the introduction of " open shelves " and the 
display of the periodicals upon the ♦tables have added attract- 
iveness to reference as asamst home use. 



40 City Document No. 21. 

On twelve Sundays of the year an account was taken of 
the persons entering the Central Library building between 2 
o'clock and 6 o'clock, P.M. The smallest number on any 
one day was 1,541 (July 18th) ; the largest was 5,309 
(February 27th, 1898 ; the count began with March 7, 1897, 
and over-ran the fiscal year). The average per Sunday was 
3,560 ; and the total for the twelve Sundays was 42,731. 
Of these 83,543 were adults and 9,188 children. 

A count for a single week has been taken for the week 
encfmg March 5, 1898. It resulted as follows : 

Sim. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Total. 

Adults, 5,«32G 3,9S5 4,145 3,880 3,624 3,5.59 4,788 29,607 
Children, 1,544 402 358 387 334 333 1,099 4,457 



34,064 



Deductions must be made for mere " visitors ; " but the 
proportion of such on week days is not in fact very great. 
The week selected was in a season of heavy use. But an 
inference that, on the average the year round, 30,000 persons 
a week enter the Central Library building, and that of these 
the large majority come to use in some way, the collections in 
the Library would not be unjust. 

Special Libraries. — The activities of the Special Libraries' 
Department have advanced in scope and volume since last 
year. The visits of classes and clubs for the study of mate- 
rial in the Fine Art collections (chiefly photographs) so far 
as recorded have included the 





Times. 


Aggregate of persons. 


Average. 


Boston Art Students' Ass'n, 


18 


360 


20 


Pallas Club, 


22 


352 


16 


Other clubs and classes, 


64 


640 


10 



But the informal use by teachers and pupils (e.^., of the pub- 
lic schools), especially on Saturday, is not recorded. 

The Allen A. Brown Collection of Music was made gen- 
erally accessible, with an attendant in charge, beginning in 
October last. To it were removed the current numbers of 
important musical j^eriodicals. Since the room has been open 
the display on the tables from week to week of scores repre- 
sented in the Symphony and other important concerts has 
added a special interest to students. 

Exhibits have been continued on appropriate occasions ; 
sometimes of material owned by the Library, at other times 
of material sj)ecially loaned for tlie. purpose. Among these 
exhibits have been the following as reported by the Custo- 
dian of the department. These are in addition to periodical 



Library Department. 41 

exhibits of photographs and plates selected out of the Library 
collection and displayed for a week or a fortnight at a time. 

Special exhibitions have been given in the Barton room ; 
i.e , others than the regular exhibitions of photographs, 
which are changed everj^ week, as follows : 

February 14. Kelmscott Press publications. Complete 
set of sixty-five volumes from the Library .collection, and loans 
by Messrs. F. W. French, F. H. Day, F. W. Lee, etc. ; also 
photographs of Kelmscott Manor. 

February 22. Loan collection of Washington portraits, 
loaned by Mr. George R. Barrett. 

March 13. Photographs of buildings on Copley square, 
and plans in connection with the movement for the im- 
provement of the square. 

April 3-19. Industrial arts in connection with Arts and 
Crafts Exhibition. 

Book-plates by Boston artists. Loans by Messrs. H. S. 
Rowe, F. J. Libbie, R. Lichtenstein, and direct contributions 
by living artists. 

Book-bindings. Examples loaned by ]\Irs. John L. Gard- 
ner, and hy Messrs. F. W. French, A. L. HoUings worth, C. 
H. Taylor, Jr., F. H. Day, etc. 

April 22. Loan exhibition by Houghton, INIifflin & Co., 
the Youth's Companion and Prang & Co. Lithographs, prints 
and drawings showing modern methods of illustrating books, 
in connection with the Massachusetts Library Club meeting 
and lectures by Mr. W. S. Scudder and Mr. Louis Prang ; 
and a lecture by Mrs. H. J. Carter on travelling exhibitions 
of pictures. 

June 10. Autographs, views and books in connection 
with the transfer of the Bradford manuscript. 

July 10. Maps and books, views, etc., for Cabot celebration. 

October 4. Portraits, drawings, etc., in celebration of the 
400th anniversary of the birth of Hans Holbein. 

October 15. Original drawings and paintings for book 
illustration by Howard Pyle, E. H. Garrett, Eric Pape, Van 
Muyden, ]\Iyrbach, etc. Loaned by Little, Brown & Co., 
Roberts Bros., and by the artists themselves. 

November 12. H oily er photographs of the English Pre- 
Raphaelite school. 

December 6. Complete set of photographs of the Par- 
thenon frieze and otlier views of the Acropolis of Athens. 

December 20. Photographs of Nativities. 

January 1. American mural decorations. 

But the above list represents but a portion of the service 
to which the collections of the Fine Art Department are 
put. During the past year portfolios of photographs and 



42 City Document No. 21. 

process reproductions (mounted plates of the Klassischer 
Bilderscliatz and Klassischer Sculpturenschatz and other 
cheap series, dissected for the purpose) have been made up 
and sent out to the branches and to certain of the public 
schools, where thej are either displayed for a time on the 
walls, or used to illustrate some subject in art or history, or 
, geography under study at the time. One such portfolio may 
illustrate Venice, another tlie art of Ancient Greece, etc. 
The cost of this material is slight in proportion to the service 
it renders and the enthusiastic interest it awakens ; and the 
field offers tempting opportunities for extension. 

At the Central Library it is increasingly difficult to con- 
trive suitable space for persons coming in groups to consult 
this material. The ordinary use of the several collections on 
the Special Libraries' floor is encroachmg on the rear wing ; 
and unless by a folding partition or similar r?evice a space be 
set off for the use of clubs and classes, they can hardly be 
accommodated without inconvenience to ordmary readers. 
To the need of class-rooms there should be added the need 
of a lecture hall — a room capable of seating an audience 
of from 400 to 600 persons. Already the Library has had 
the tender of competent lecturers who would interest the 
public in much material that could not otherwise or so effec- 
tively be brought to notice. Since the nommal date of this 
report, one such lecture (under the auspices of the Unity 
Art Club) has been given, on the Art of Ancient Greece. 
The audience so outnumbered the capacity of the only, room 
available (the Barton-Ticknor) that the lecture had to be 
repeated. An audience of 500 persons can readily be secured 
for any such occasion. 

It is exceedingly to be hoped, therefore, that in course of 
time a provision may be made for class and special study- 
rooms and for a lecture-hall of reasonable proportions. 

Neiospapei'-room. — The use of the Newspaper-room is as 
large and as nearly continuous as that of almost any other 
single reference department. The number of readers at one 
time now exceeds 200 (on March 28, 1897, e.g.^ at 6 
P.M., it was 225 persons, of whom 189 were reading the 
American papers and 36 the foreign, while in Bates Hall the 
maximum at one time, January 22, 4 P.^NL, was 256) ; and 
the attendance is surprismgly large during hours when the 
other departments are comparatively deserted. At the be- 
ginning of the winter, placards, calling attention to the exist- 
ence of this Reading-room and its resources, were printed and 
distributed to the leading Boston hotels. These notices state 
that the room is free, that there are over 300 newspapers on 



LtbeapvY Department. 43 

file, and append a list of the places represented. These 
placards were generally accepted, and now hang in the lob- 
bies of fifteen hotels. They have doubtless attracted to the 
room many strangers who would otherwise have remained 
ignorant of its existence. 

The number of papers now currently taken is 319. Of 
these 181 are published in America in English ; 20 pub- 
lished here in foreign languages. Thirty-nine are English 
papers, published in England; twelve published in English, 
outside of England and the United States. The remainder, 
sixty-seven, are foreign papers, in foreign languages. 

Children s room. — The service rendered by the Children's 
department at the Central Library is something more than 
the merely kindly and stimulating service of suggesting and 
supplying wholesome general reading. A very considerable 
amount of reference work is carried on in this room and in 
the Patent-room and Bates Hall under the guidance of the 
Custodian of the Children's room. School children havino- 
to2)ics requiring special research conunonly apply to this de- 
j^artment for aid; and the aid given is the more effective 
from the cordial relation already established in the use of the 
miscellaneous collection. The influence of this department 
is not to be reckoned in figures ; but it is apparent to even the 
most casual observer. And in svistaining and extending it, 
the bequest of Mr. John C. Paige, when it comes to be avail- 
able, may achieve a service that falls to few gifts for public uses. 

The department needs more space and greater seclusion. 
The present room, besides being a passageway, is thrust too 
much upon the attention of the mere sight-seers. The re- 
moval of the Patent Collection, as is proposed, to a gallery 
in the Newspaper-room, would at least add to the space for 
children's use and secure a partial seclusion. 

Loss of Books. — The loss of books in the reference de- 
partments continues slight in volume, although in instances 
aggravating in character. The total number of books 
" missing" from the Bates Hall reference shelves (some 8,000 
volumes) on January 31, 1898, is forty-six. The most of these 
are small text-books and hand-manuals. A few are volumes 
from sets. None are costly to replace. INIutilation is occa- 
sionally discovered in more costly works, and is more difficult 
to forgive. A volume is often taken away with intent to 
return it after use ; but nuitilation indicates a deliberate 
intent at final expropriation, and thus more conclusively a 
moral turpitude. It indicates, moreover, a defiance of that 
ordinary regard for the integrity of a book as a book, a rem- 
nant of which is apt to reside in the ordinary l)ook-thief. 



44 City Document No. 21. 

The loss of books from the "open shelves " m the Cn-cu- 
lating departments (the Children's room at the Central 
Library, and the main rooms at the branches) has, however, 
reached several hundred volumes. Many of these books are 
(as we have proved) taken by small children in ignorance of 
the rules, and then witldield in terror of the penalty. But 
the number has come to l)e so large that measures have Ijeen 
adopted at the branches to control more effectively the exits 
from the Delivery room. 

Bates Hall. — There is little special to the year which can 
be reported as to the operation of this department. The use 
grows in volume and in seriousness ; but it cannot be tabu- 
lated. As an indication of the range of inquiry made of the 
officials at this point, the Custodian of the hall and 
the officer at the centre desk have kept a m.emoriinclum of the 
subjects as to which mformation was asked during the past 
few weeks. Although routine and oft-repeated subjects have 
been omitted, the list numbers several hundred topics. From 
it I have selected at random some two score, which I append 
below. The mental agility requisite to cope with such a 
diversity of inquiry in quick succession is indicated by even 
so brief a list. 

Some of the subjects on which information has recently 
been asked at the Boston Public Library: 

A Lantern of the 14th century; Statistics of gas and 
water in large cities ; Statistics of females employed in fac- 
tories ; Coat of arms of Florence ; Motor engines ; Libby 
prison ; Date of eruption of Krakatoa ; Method for the 
cornet ; Toasts ; Egyptian customs ; What Irishmen have 
done for the country ; Feldspar ; Date of the buildmg of the 
Tower of London ; Inventions ; The Stock Exchange ; A 
poem for April and June ; Warships ; Is a territory repre- 
sented in Congress? Ornamental alphabets; Numbsr of 
deserters during Civil war; Art of the 15th century; 
Japanese mythology ; Picture of Traddles ; Origin of num- 
bers ; House furnishing ; Agricultural statistics of Georgia ; 
Plumbing in the Roman towns; Price of a 100-trip ticket 
to Wellesley ; Cultivation of coffee ; Glue and mucilage 
making ; The first Thanksgiving ; Toleration act of Mary- 
land ; Sleep; Government of Ireland; A Turkish Bible in 
German; Fluctuations of cotton in 1895; Account of the 
" Blessing of the Bay " ; Defence of mathematics ; Manu- 
facture of fibre goods ; Dutch painters of 19tli century; 
Chateaux in France ; The Tersanctus ; Emancipation in 
the West Indies ; Pierre de Provence ; Popular election of 
United States senators ; Maya language ; Vestal virgins ; 



LiBEARY Department. 45 

Training of wild animals ; By-laws for a manufacturing cor- 
poration; Physical culture ; Springs; Keligious orders ; The 
alpaca. 

Delaijs. — The delivery of books to readers in Bates Hall 
is not yet as rapid nor as effective as it should be. It is true 
that the readers themselves are guilty of frequent inac- 
curacies which render precision in delivery very difficult. 
Of the mishaps recorded during the past year 747 were 
accounted for by the omission of the reader's name on the 
call-slips ; and 1,973 more by the omission of the table num- 
bers; 405 cases were traced to errors in the Library records, 
imperfection in the mechanism of transmission or carelessness 
on the part of the librar}^ attendants. The fact that in 9,929 
cases the applicants were not to be found at the tables when 
the books were brought may indicate further negligence on 
the part of readers ; but it may also suggest that the delivery 
had been delayed beyond the patience of the applicants. 

That delaj^s do occur beyond those recorded is well known 
to the administration. They cannot be obviated fully until 
increased facilities for issue be provided by the improvements 
on the Blagden street wing, for which plans have been drawn 
and funds requested. These improvements involve among 
other clianges the widening of the " tube-room." through the 
present Librarian's office, a system of intercommunication 
between the stacks ; and a service elevator. Perfection in 
service cannot perhaps be hoped for under a system of 
arrangement which attempts to consolidate the two species of 
demand represented by Home Use and Reference Use. But 
the changes proposed would certamly better present condi- 
tions to the great advantage of each class of readers. 

//. — Home Use. 

Appendix VII. gives the number of books circulated for 
home use during the past year from each department of the 
Library, and compares this with such circulation for the year 
1896. 

From this table it appears that the circulation for home use 
in 1897 compared with that for 1896, is as follows : 

Gain, 
18C6. 1897. 1897. 

Central Library (includijig 
Central Library books 
issued through branches 
and stations) . . 326,254 388,497 62,243 

Branches and stations (di- 
rect issue) . . . 678,765 811,169 132,404 



1,005,019 1,199,666 194,647 



46 City Document No. 21. 

sliowing a gain of nineteen and a half per cent, in this class 
of use. 

In certain departments, however, the gain has been dis- 
proportionate ; in the Children's department at the Central 
Libraiy it has been n'early 30 per. cent. ; 78,005 volumes have 
been issued from this room for home use during tlie past year. 
The circulation of the West End Branch has increased in a 
like ratio, and now exceeds by 30 per cent, the circulation of 
any other branch library. 

Charging System. — By charging systems of the older 
type the borrower was required to write his name and ad- 
dress upon every slip presented by him in apj^lication for a 
book. The more modern systems accept his signature in the 
original registration as sufficient to cover his use of the 
library during the life of his card ; and permit him to 
identify himself upon his applications for books by his card 
number in lieu of his name and address. The older system 
had been continuously in use in this Library until last year. 
Beginning with last June, however, it was discarded for the 
new. A further change was the return to the readers of the 
application slips, which formerly had constituted the record of 
issue. This record is now made by the Issue Desk attend- 
ants upon an independent slip. The slips returned to the 
applicant forin a convenient memorandum of the call-num- 
bers of the books required and may be used over again. 

Unsatisfied Aj^j^lications for Books. — ■ I quote from the 
report of the Chief of the Issue Department : 

" To workers in a large library it is evident that there 
must always be a large shifting mass of books, volumes on 
their way from or to the shelves. To readers it is not always 
clear why books are not available for issue when it cannot be 
said that they are charged out. In the January (1898) report 
for the Issue Department, a full statement was given of the 
results of an investigation of such unsatisfied applications 
made during one month, December 11, 1897, to January 11, 
1898. Reference is made to the statistics in that report. 

'■'■Complaint Slips. — In February, 1897, a form of slip 
was adopted, of which the folio wmg is a copy : 



'Boston Public Libraey. 

' Card holders who, after repeated (say three or more) 
attempts fail to get the l^ooks they call for, will do a service 
by filling out these slips and handing them to one of the 
Library attendants. Use a separate slip for each book. 



LiBEARY Department. 


47 


' I have called without success 


times for 


hook Author 




Title 




Name of Card-holder 


Address 


Date 189 


5 



" These shps were placed in the call-slip boxes and have 
also been handed out to each borrower when definite explana- 
tion of the failure of the application could not be given. 

" From February, 1897, to September 17, 1897, these slips 
were destroyed after each complaint had been investigated, 
and such action taken as seemed feasible. 

" Beginning September 17, 1897, througli January 31, 
these shps have been kept and, from time to time, have been 
submitted to you for inspection. They have then been filed. 
The following is the record from September 17, 1897 to 
February 1, 1898: 

"Account of failure of the borrower to i-eceive his book: 
Charged out on a previous application . .402 

Charged to the bindery . . . . .14 

Missmg, condemned, transferred to other 

numbers . . ' . . . . .121 

Wrong information given by Library . . 1 

jNIistakes on the part of borrowers . . .54 

Unaccountable failures to supply . . .92 

Miscellaneous ...... 2 



Total 686 

"Of these — 

Applications for fiction ..... 338 
"Of these — 

For fiction published within the year . . 76 " 

The work of the Issue Department involved in the recovery 
of books over-detained and in the collection of penalties is by 
no means small in proportions nor slight in difficulty. The 
number of " mail notices " sent out from the Central Library 
in 1897 was 8,023; the number of messenger notices, 737 ; 
the net amount collected (including payments for eighty- 



48 City Document No. 21. 

two volumes lost by the borrowers) was <fi3,001. Onl}^ sixty- 
nine volumes were unrecovered of 388,489 circulated from 
this department for home use. This statistic, it is to be 
remembered, is under a system which requires no guarantor, 
but in effect limits its recourse to the card-holder himself. 

The above work, and other work, incidental to issue, raising 
questions as to the standing of card-holders, requires con- 
stant reference from the Issue to the Registration Depart- 
ments. The departments are at present too remote ; and 
should the funds be available for the improvements planned 
on the Blagden-street wing, a space must, if possible, be con- 
trived for the Registration-desk in a corner of the Delivery 
room. 

Branches and Stations. — As to the work of the branches 
and stations I again refer to the report of the Supervisor, 
appended. 

SERVICE. 

The Library has sustamed a loss during the past year of 
one of its most faithful associates, — Jos^ Francisco Carret, 
who died on December 8, 1897. A record of Mr. Carret's 
twenty-two years of service in the Library would l)e extended 
here had not such a record been published in full and widely 
distributed in the January (1898) Bulletin. 

Resignations have occurred in several of the departments. 
The most important position left vacant in this way is that 
of Supervisor of Branches, JNIr. Wellman having accepted the 
position of librarian over the Public Library of Brookline. 
His work as supervisor has been in a high degree competent, 
energetic and tactful ; and his year and a half of effort has 
resulted in a marked progress towards the organization of 
our outljdng system upon an efficient basis. 

His resignation will take effect from May 30. 

Appointments. — The most important appointments have 
been to the custodianships of the Brighton and the East 
Boston Branches. To the former (after a temporary provi- 
sion) ]\liss Martha N. Hobart (formerly of the Branch Divi- 
sion at the Central Library) has definitely been transferred ; 
and to the latter ]\Iiss Ellen O. Walkley was appointed on 
July 1, 1897, after an open examination for the position held 
on May 4. 

Examinations. — Six general and eleven special examina- 
tions were held during the year. One hundred and fifty-six 
papers were received, sixty-one from male applicants, nmety- 
live from female. 



Library Department. 49 

The total number of appointees to the force have been 
thirty-three, of which fifteen were male, eighteen female, 
classified as follows : 





Central Library. 


Branches. 


Grade B Special, 
" B 


1 

4 


— 


" C Special, 
" C 


2 


1 

2 


" D Special, 
" D 


— 


1 
1 


" E (runners). 


15 


- 


Ungraded, 


4 


2 



26 7 

On April 30, Grade A was, by your vote, divided as 
follows : 

1st year. 2d year. 

Grade A Div. I., |18 50 $19 50 

Grade A Div. II., 21 50 22 50 

On April 16 you voted it the opinion of the Board that 
when funds shall permit the position of Custodian in the 
Branch libraries sliould be regraded in Grade A. 

International Conference of Librarians. — For the purpose 
of attending the International Conference of Librarians at 
London, for certain purchases (including the purchase of 
photographs above described), and for other library business 
1 was absent from Boston from May 6 until July 24 last. 
During this absence the conduct of executive work, except 
as the responsibility was taken directly by the Trustees, fell 
chiefly upon j\lr. Whitney and Mr. Savage. After Mr. 
Whitney's departure in June for the Conference (wliich he 
also attended at your request), that work until my return 
fell almost entirely upon Mr. Savage. The responsibility 
for the conduct of each department within itself was left 
however with its chief. 

That the administration of the Library as a whole moved 
so smoothly is evidence of the interest, efficiency and devo- 
tion of those thus variously responsible. And in general I 
have excellent reason to be grateful for associates who are 
so ready to receive suggestion and so cheerful, so earnest, 
and so competent to carry it out. 

The statistics themselves show that various departments 
— for instance, the Ordering, the Catalogue and Shelf, and 
the Special Libraries — have, during the past year, been called 



50 City Document No. 21, 

upon for wort unusual in volume or in cLaracter or in both ; 
and this all has been undertaken with a cordiality of interest 
that seems only to increase with the new demands. Where 
every responsible official is so zealous to do what he may to 
enlarge and better the service, I hesitate to select out any 
one for special mention. It would be unfair, however, to 
omit a special reference to the service rendered by Mr. Whit- 
ney. In December, 1896, he was Chief of the Catalogue 
Department. On January 1, 1897, he took upon him the 
additional care and responsibility of the Shelf Department. 
And since that time, without increase of salary or of privi- 
leges, he has conducted both these departments. His services 
in recommending books for purchase have taken him outside 
the routine even of these departments and outside of the 
Library day. During m}^ absences from Boston, including the 
major portion of my absence in Europe he has served in 
addition as Acting Librarian. For twenty- eight years he had 
not, I believe, taken more than the regular library vacation 
when in INIay last you requested him to attend the London 
Conference and voted him two months' leave of absence for 
the purpose in addition to the regular library vacation. He 
attended the Conference, but was back at his desk before the 
two months with vacation had expired. Since I took office 
there have been various occasions on which special difficul- 
ties of administration have occurred, — incidental, for instance, 
to a resignation o]' reorganization. In no instance has Mr. 
Whitney failed to assume or to offer to assume additional bur- 
den for the sake of relieving me or of saving expense to the 
Library. 

And I must not fail to express my most hearty gratitude 
to the Trustees as a Board for the consideration with which 
they have treated such recommendations as I have had 
occasion to lay before them from time to time ; and to them 
individually for the attention which during my somewhat 
lengthy absence of last summer they gave to details of 
administration with which in ordmary course they ought not 
properly to be troubled. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 
April 22, 1898, as of February 1, 1898. 




WEST END BRANCH, CAMBRIDGE STREET. 



LlBEARY DePAETMENT. 51 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
BRANCHES AND STATIONS. 



To the Librarian : 

Extent of the Branch System. 

[See Librarian's Report.] 

I append to this report a map showing the location of the 
various brandies and stations. In eacli ward are entered 
figures furnished by the Registration Department showing 
the proportion of card-holdei-s to the population. In con- 
sidering the location of the stations in connection with these 
figures, other factors besides the extent of territory and the 
number of inhabitants must be borne in mind, — such as the 
density of the population, its distribution on avenues of 
communication, its character — whether poor, or foreign or 
intelligent. 

In general the proportion of card-holders to population is 
smallest in the districts to the north and east of the Central 
Library, which contain a large mixture of foreigners ; it is 
largest in the immediate vicinity of the Central Library ; 
grows smaller again to the south, where a poor population ex- 
tends as far as Roxbury ; it increases again at Roxbury, and 
remains large throughout the suburban districts beyond. 

The four districts with the smallest proportion of card- 
holders to population are : The North End (Ward 6), .0392 ; 
East Boston (Wards 1, 2), .065-4 ; Charlestown (Wards 3, 
4, 5), .0709, and South Boston (Wards 13, 14, 15), .0757. 
It is naturally smallest in Ward 6, which has probably the 
largest foreign element. The district is not badly circum- 
stanced as regards library facilities, havmg access to the 
West End Branch, having a delivery of books from the 
Central Library to the Girls' grammar school, and soon to 
have a similar delivery to the Boys' grammar school. 

At East Boston the case is different ; its needs are fully 
borne out by these statistics. With the exception of the 
small area at the North End mentioned above. East Boston 
has the smallest percentage of card-holders to population of 
any similar district in the city. It is noteworthy, also, that 
the ward in which the brancli is situated has a proportion of 
card-liolders but .0509, against .0802 in Ward 1, extending 
some three miles to the north-east. These facts strengthen 



52 City Document No. 21. 

the contention that the branch should be moved northward, 
and emphasize the desirability, pointed out in my last report, 
oi placing a station in the further end of Ward 1. 

In South Boston, similarly, the reading population lies to 
the east of the branch, but as lines of travel to the city pass 
the present location, the situation does not seem especially 
unfortunate. Ward 17 has no library facilities near at hand, 
nor does it lie on avenues of communication leading to them. 
It has a large population, with a proportion of card-holders 
but .0746. Unless the conditions are alleviated by moving 
the South End Branch up town (perhaps to a point near the 
corner of Washington and Northampton streets), in my 
opinion this region should be entitled to the first new station 
established. 

The district of the city to the south and west is reasona- 
bly well provided for since the opening of the Boylston 
Delivery. There is either a branch or station at every im- 
portant centre, and no thickly settled district which is not 
within reach of some agency of the. Library. Owing partly 
to this fact and partly to the intelligence of the population 
the proportion of card-holders is liigh almost everywhere 
south of the Roxbury Branch. In general it grows some- 
what smaller as the districts lie farther from the city, where 
the population, being more scattered, is more difficult to 
serve. It is low in Ward 22, but, as I mentioned above, the 
remedy has been instituted by the establishment of the 
Boylston delivery. 

Ward 19 has no station, but the bulk of the population 
reach the Roxbury Crossing delivery, so that the need is 
less urgent than elsewhere. 

At first sight there seems a superabundance of stations in 
the small district containing the Warren street, Blue Hill 
avenue. Bird street and Upham's Corner deliveries. The 
conditions justifying this number are to be found in a dis- 
tiict thickly settled, with a highly intelligent reading popu- 
lation, located on different lines of travel, so that three of 
these four are among our most used stations. The Bird- 
street Station, it is true, might be discontinued with little 
resulting inconvenience, but the compensation being based 
on circulation it costs very little more to serve the people of 
the region through this station than it would to serve them 
through one of the neighboring deliveries. 

The stations at Neponset, Lower Mills, Mattapan and 
North Brighton are among those showing the smallest circu- 
lation, and the explanation lies in the fact that they lie in 
districts having a sj^arse population and on the outside edges 



Library. Department. 53 

of these districts. Yet for tlie population to be served they 
are conveniently located, and could not well be discontinued. 
To sura up, new stations are, in my opinion, desirable, first 
for Ward 17, then for Ward 1, and in course of time for 
Ward 19. 

Branches and Stations. 

In my last report I describad in detail defects of form, 
method and of record in the management of the outlying- 
departments of the library system, particularly of the deliv- 
ery stations. 

The first part of the year was devoted to reorganizing this 
work. By introducing uniform methods, by defining these 
methods in written instructions and in a printed pamphlet, 
and finally by requiring a strict observance of these rules, 
this part of the work has been brought into smoothly run- 
ning order, and the result has not only produced far greater 
economy of administration, but has contributed towards a 
closer union with the Central Library. 

This latter end has been served also by more frequent com- 
munication. Besides the weekly meetings of the custodians 
of the branches at the Central Library, the assistants at the 
branches and the custodians of the stations have come in 
from time to time, and, on the other hand, I have visited the 
stations monthly, the branches at more frequent intervals. 

Branches. — The most important features of the year at 
the branches have been, viewed from within, — 

Improvement in the service. 

Closer union with the Central Library. 

Reorganization and unification of admmistrative methods. 

While viewed from an outsider's standpoint, the noticeable 
events have been : 

Extension of the open-shelf system. 

Exhibitions of pictures. 

Sunday opening at Charlestown, East Boston and South 
Boston. 

The staff has been strengthened by the addition of Miss 
Walkley and INIiss Hobart as custodians at the East Boston 
and Brighton Branches respectively. 

Besides weekly visits to the Central Lil)rary the custo- 
dians have attended the meetings of the Massachusetts 
Library Club, and have from time to time inspected neigh- 
boring libraries. Such intercourse has spurred them to 
greater activity in many directions, especially observable in 
their efforts to interest and accommodate the public, and 



54 City Document No. 21. 

their endeavors to do better work with the schools. I shoukl 
be ghid to dwell on this point at greater length, for it seems 
to me that there has been in this direction a marked advance 
which is very creditable to the custodians, and fully as 
important as any other feature of the year's work. 

There is also a desire on the part of the subordinate 
employees to increase their efficiency. At Brighton, for 
instance, both assistants have been either studying at home, 
or attending evening school, while practice in penmanship 
has yielded good results. 

Better use of the Central collection is shown (1) by the 
increase of 33 per cent, in the number of volumes issued on 
cards from here through the branches, and especially (2) by 
deposits on special subjects obtamed from the Central Library 
to supplement material at the branches for the use of schools, 
classes, literary clubs, etc. 

The system of records and of administrative methods has 
been reorganized and unified. The details have been reported 
from time to time. A brief summary miglit include the jjro- 
vision of an "accession book" in which are entered all books 
added, whether new purchases, replacements or gifts ; a 
"losses book" for all books discarded, transferred, con- 
demned, unrecovered, missing, etc.; a "circulation" record; 
a new form of shelf-list suitable for a movable sj^stem of 
classification ; uniform, records of " missing " books ; new 
monthly catalogue reports ; forms for reporting and replacing 
condemned books and for reporting books unrecovered from 
the barrower; receipts for supplies; receipts for new books 
sent out ; new rules of payment for lost books ; new bindery 
schedules ; periodical and frequent reports of the receipt and 
distribution of Library publications. 

The introduction of these and otlier innovations has 
involved constant adjustment to new conditions on the part 
of custodians and staff, and my thanks are due for their 
ready acquiescence and adaptability. 

The most important changes have been those looking 
towards a union finding list. It was decided to adopt the 
West End classification because fairly convenient, and already 
in use. Then the whole West End shelf-list was copied as 
the basis of a union shelf-list (which in time, with acces- 
sions, will serve equally well as a subject-card catalogue for 
use at the Central Library), and also to prevent conflict with 
books already classified at the West End Branch. Next 
printed finding-lists were issued for each branch (except 
West Roxbury), covering accessions up to June 1. Since 
that date new books have been classified accorduig to the 



Library Department. 55 

West End scheme, and bear the same numbers at all 
branches. With but few exceptions the same books have 
been bought for all the branches (except West Roxbury), 
so that we now have material ready, and are about to print 
one finding list of accessions since June 1, which shall serve 
equally well for all of the nine larger branches. 

This is the first step towards a union printed catalogue. 
The next will be to ascertain what books are at the branches, 
to supply those desirable where lacking, then to re-classify 
the books on the new scheme. This will furnish material 
for a select finding-list of the important books at all tlie 
branches, but involving, bssides the work of compiling the 
list, great labor in renumbering, cataloguing and listing the 
books at the brandies, it cannot be completed in the near 
future. The enterprise is, however, under way, and I hope 
for the appearance of the section containing " history " early 
in the fall. 

This union printed catalogue will need to be supplemented 
by a complete card catalogue at each branch. Such a cata- 
logue has been perfected this year at Roxbury and at West 
Roxbury. Work towards such a catalogue has also been 
carried forward at East Boston and at Brighton. I hope in 
time to be allowed special assistance to 'complete the card 
catalogues at the other branches. 

The reference books and books for younger readers were 
in general the only books at the branches accessible to the 
public last year. This year the system has been extended, 
and " open " shelves have been provided for books of interest 
to adult readers. Besides fiction, works of solid worth — 
history, biography and travel — have been unearthed from 
the stacks and placed on these shelves, and because of being 
thrust upon the attention, have circulated. In addition, all 
the new books are placed where they may be handled. I 
estimate that, counting both branches and stations, there 
are now on shelves open to the public some 35,000 volumes. 

The loss of books from these shelves last year was detailed 
in the annual report. It has averaged this year forty-two 
volumes for each branch. Most of these volumes are miss- 
ing from the " open " shelves on which are located the books 
for children, and we find that the greater part of the loss 
occurred at the branches in South Boston, Roxbury, and tlie 
West End, where these books were particularly exposed. 
Accordingly arrangements have been made to fence in the 
space about these siielves, so that by placing the exit where 
it may be controlled from the Delivery desk, excessive loss 
may be prevented. 



56 City Document No. 21. 

The " open " shelves made it desirable to have author and 
title stamped on books rebound. In April, therefore, a new 
contract was made with H. M. Plimpton & Co., for binding 
octavos and smaller volumes, in full cloth, with lettering in 
gold. 

Since September, portfolios of reproductions of painting, 
sculpture or architecture, have been sent monthly to the 
branches for exhibition. These pictures are designed mainly 
for use by schools. The object in exhibiting them is partly 
to advertise the pictures, but more to attract people to the 
branches. They are examined by the general visitor, and, 
where there are accommodations, by whole classes from the 
schools. In other cases they are loaned to the schools for 
short periods. The statistics of the use of these portfolios 
will, I am informed, be reported at length by the Custodian 
of the Special Libraries. 

The "Boston Evening Transcript" has proved an attrac- 
tion. It has been received at the branches by gift from the 
publishers since November 1. 

The branches at Charlestown, East Boston, South Boston 
and Brighton, have been advertised by placards posted in 
public places, detailing the location, the hours and the priv- 
ileges offered. • 

The West End Branch has continued open Sundays, as 
heretofore, with a good attendance. The plan has been tried 
of opening also the branches at Charlestown, East Boston 
and South Boston for reference and reading, from 2 to 10 P.M. 
on Sundays, from November 1 to April 30. The experiment 
tried in March and April, 1896, was unsuccessful owing to 
the season. This year the opening was begun November 7. 
No provision was made, and there has been no demand, for 
an issue of books for home use. Consequently only one 
attendant has been necessary, except part of the time at 
South Boston. The cost for attendants is $2.80 per Sunday 
at Charlestown and East Boston, $5.08 at South Boston. 
Two dollars additional is paid in each case to the janitor for 
heating the rooms. Below are figures showing the average 
attendance when the branches were opened in 1896, and 
from last November to January, 1898. 



1896. 




1897-98. 


March and April. 




November to January, 


Readers. 


Adults. 


Readers. Adults. 


Charlestown 91 


21% 


213 28% 


East lioston 




278 8% 


South Boston 101 


30% 


248 3(5% 



The percentage of adults seems very small at East Boston, 
but there is a large attendance here, and at the other branches 



Library Department. 57 

also, of young men from eighteen to twenty-one years of age 
who are not classed as adults. 

A police officer is present at each branch, and the order is 
excellent. 

In general it may be said that the rooms ai"e comfortably 
filled, sometimes crowded, with men and children reading 
quietly for recreation. 

The Broadway Extension Station has been open Sundays 
smce October 10, from 2 to 6 and 7 to 9 P.M., both for read- 
ing and for the issue of books. During the last three months 
the circulation has averaged fifty-three volumes per Sunday, 
while a count shows an average of forty-three readers 
present at some one time in the afternoon, fifty-four readers 
in the evening. This means, the seating capacity being 
about fifty, that the room is practically filled every Sunday. 

Stations. — November 1 a delivery and deposit station 
was opened at Boylston-street Station, making the total num- 
ber of stations seventeen. The deposit system has been 
extended to include stations "A," "D," " K " and " T," leav- 
ing Neponset the only station without a deposit. The reason 
for delay there was uncertainty as to the permanent location 
of the station. The question being settled now, a deposit 
will be sent as soon as practicable. 

The rate of compensation has been reduced, as stations 
have been transferred to new parties, to twelve dollars for 
the first 300 volumes or less circulated per month, and two 
cents for each volume additional so circulated, and on Febru- 
ary 1, 1898, this rate went into effect everywhere. 

The question of controlling the quality of the issue from 
deposits by paying a lower rate for fiction circulated has 
been considered, but the plan is not now practicable. A very 
simple classification of books added to the deposit collection 
was adopted in Jul}^ which will in time make the plan feasible 
if necessary. On the whole, I think we can govern this issue 
by carefully selecting the books sent on deposit. Of the 
books now at tlie stations, less than 65 per cent, are fiction, 
and this includes a large proportion of juvenile books, some 
of which are not fiction. The fiction is largely either current 
or standard ; and while there is a greater demand for it, ex- 
amination of the charging slips shows also a very good 
circulation of books of a more serious character. 

In this connection a great deal can be accomplished by 
suiting the selection of books to the constituency for which 
they are intended. Thus a volume of literary essaj^s which 
will circulate well at Lower jNIills will remain on the slielves 
at Roslindale ; and Darwin's " Origin of Species," which went 



$150 


00 


300 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 



58 City Document No. 21. 

like a novel at Roslinclale, would perhaps not be touched at 
Lower Mills. 

These considerations lead to a comparison of the type of 
station where we pay the proprietor of a store, with that 
where we have our own attendant. 

At these latter stations, children and parents resort to the 
attendants constantly, not only for advice on what to read, 
but for information on all sorts of subjects, ranging from the 
" meaning of the word opaque,'''' and the '• length of one-six- 
teenth of an inch," to "• how to write a letter of introduction." 

The cost of maintenance of a station, with rooms and attend- 
ant devoted solely to our use, may be estunated as follows : 

Service ........ 

Rent ........ 

Transportation . . . . . . 

Miscellaneous ....... 

$1,000 00 

This does not include an allowance for periodicals, while if 
no provision be made for a reading room, the item for rent 
might be cut down. 

Our stations at Roslindale, Upham's Corner, and Warren 
street, which are in charge of storekeepers, cost last year 
$774, $673 and |667 respectively. 

The objections to the type of station devoted to our exclu- 
sive use are (1) somewhat greater cost of maintenance; (2) 
shorter hours. Against these objections may be balanced ; 
(1) more accurate and prompt administration; (2) provision 
for the use of books on the premises ; (3) a decidedly educa- 
tional influence upon the reading of the public. 

Because of this last consideration, and in the light of the 
very satisfactory work now being done at two of our own 
stations, I am becoming strongly convinced that after pro- 
vision for immediate needs by the addition of two new 
delivery stations, further advance should be m the direc- 
tion of converting the larger delivery stations into stations 
devoted to our exclusive use, and administered by our own 
employees. 

Schools. — The Custodians of the branches have made 
especial efforts to accommodate teachers and pupils. AVhen- 
ever notice of the topic under study is sent to the branch, 
the books relating to the subject are set aside for convenient 
use by the pupils. If necessary, the resources of the branch 
are supplemented by books from the Central collection. In 
many cases there is apathy on the part of teachers, so that 



LiBEARY Department. 59 

the Custodians are obliged to take the mitiative. In otlier 
instances the teachere are eager, and in response to then- 
requests some 300 volumes have been sent out in small lots 
relating to special subjects for use at the branches or stations 
by the school children. The teachers sometimes visit the 
branches with their classes ; but hi general prefer to send 
the pupils. 

Twent3Miine volumes have been sent direct for use at 
the Martin grammar school ; and fifty-six volumes from the 
Central Library with sixty-seven from the Brighton Branch 
have been issued on deposit to the Brighton High School. 

So much has been tried in the way of experiment. The 
results show that the privilege is appreciated. The transpor- 
tation is provided by the schools. To extend the system 
would involve some expenditure for service, and a con- 
siderable amount for books. Though we have seldom been 
obliged to refuse sending these deposits for use at the 
branches and stations, we are frequently unable to supply 
the particular books desired. For this purpose I should 
recommend the purchase of a collection of books especially 
selected in connection with the courses of study. 

A delivery twice a week of books, issued on cards, has 
been maintained during the school year in connection with 
the Hancock grammar school for girls at the North End. 

This school perhaps represented as unpromising a field as 
could be chosen for the experiment, the children being largely 
of foreign birth or parentage, and yet the issue during the 
winter months has ranged from 200 to 275 volumes per week. 
The distribution of the books at the school, the discharging 
of the books returned through the school, and the collecting 
of fines, have been attended to by one of the teachers. The 
transportation has been done by our own wagons. 

In April we are to undertake a similar delivery with the 
Eliot grammar school for boys at the North End. Any 
further extension will involve additional assistance in the 
Branch Division, and can hardly be undertaken without 
increased accommodations, especially in the way of book 
elevators. 

Engine-lwuses. — The number of engine-houses receiving 
deposits of twenty-five volumes per month has been increased 
from thirteen to twenty-one. I do not see how more can be 
added without increased resources. An extension of the 
system to include police stations would doubtless be appre- 
ciated. 

Other Places of Deposit. — Besides the Cottage Place and 
North Bennet-street Industrial Schools, the House of 



60 City Document No. 21. 

Reformation at Rainsford Island and the Marcella-street 
Home in Roxbuiy have deposits of books, 150 vohimes, of 
which twenty-five are changed monthly at the former, fifty 
volumes exchanged every two months at the latter. Besides 
these institutions, the Parental School for Boys at West 
Roxbury receives thirty books each month from the branch 
there ; and the Fleet-street Free Reading-room for Men at 
the North End has a small deposit from the West End 
Branch. Other institutions would be glad of similar privi- 
leges, and in this direction also our opportunities are bounded 
only by our resources. 

Service., ^quijwient, etc. — For a full history of each 
branch, I beg leave to refer to the reports of the Custodians 
submitted herewith. I note below certain items regarding 
service, equipment, etc. [The details of this section of the 
report are here omitted.] 

Broadivay Extension Station. — Ou September 1 this sta- 
tion moved to larger rooms at No. 13 Broadway Extension, 
and was fitted with oak furniture, shelving, tables, desks, 
chairs, etc., etc., costing §368.25, and paid for from a special 
appropriation. 

Statistics. 

It remains briefly to review tbe statistics of the year com- 
pared with those of the previous year. 

Books. ■ — Four thousand six hundred and fifty-seven 
volumes of new books have been purchased for the branches 
this year against 14,266 volumes the year before. But the 
bulk of tho3e bought in 1896-97 were either reference books 
or " Y " books, 1 so that the accessions of the past year repre- 
sent, I am informed, a larger selection of general current 
literature than the branches have usually received. A con- 
siderable number of books, besides those published currently^ 
has been purchased also, to fill incomplete series, to contrib- 
ute towards uniformity of the collections, with a view to the 
union catalogue as well as to present needs. 

One hundred and forty-seven volumes have been received 
as gifts to the branches against ninety-eight gifts the year 
previous. This figure, 147, does not include a great many 
books offered for the branches, but either unsuitable, or 
more suitable, for the Central collection. 

One tliousand six hundred and seventy-nine volumes have 
been worn out at the branches against 1,832 volumes the 
3^ear previous. One thousand and sixty volumes have been 
bought as replacements against 1,135 the year before. 

1 Books selected for Younger Readers. (Select list of about twelve hundred 

titles.) 



LiBEARY Department. 61 

Eighty-six volumes have been destroyed because of being 
exposed to contagious disease, while only eighteen volumes 
were so destroyed the year before. This probably does not 
mean that a greater number of books has been exposed, but 
that owing to the reports of cases of contagious disease which 
are now sent daily to every branch and station, a greater 
number of books so exposed has been detected. 

The weeding out of useless books has gone forward, and 
4,235 volumes have been transferred to the Central Library 
against 1,888 volumes m 1896-97. 

Of the books missing from " open " shelves, I have spoken 
above. Forty-five volumes are missing from the closed 
shelves against twenty-four volumes the year before. 

Seven thousand eight hundred and sixty-two volumes have 
been bound by the contract binder against 6,139 volumes the 
year before. The increase is due to the fact that the " Y " 
books purchased new in 1896 and placed on the open shelves 
subject to constant wear, are now coming to need binding ; 
the case is similar with regard to the books of the West End 
Branch which were nearly all new in 1896. More than one- 
fourth of tlie total, or over 2,000 volumes, have been bound 
for the Roxbury Branch. This is due to the fact that this 
branch supplies two stations with books for deposit use, 
which involves constant handling and wear. Custodians and 
assistants have been carefully instructed in methods of bind- 
ing and repairing. I have given personal supervision, and 
can report that the work has been economically administered. 

Circulation. — I submit a table of circulation showing an 
increase at almost Wery branch and station. The gain of 
8 per cent, in the home use issue at the branches is, in my 
opinion, due j^artly to the addition of many attractive books 
the past two years, partly to greater activity of custodians 
and assistants. The gain of over 97 per cent, in the number 
of volumes issued directly from the stations, is probably due 
largely to the extension of the deposit system. The gain of 
88.9 per cent, in the issue from the Central Library through 
the branches and stations may be accounted for partly by 
our efforts to supply the books applied for, by the addition 
of more books, etc., and partly, I think, to closer relations 
between the Centi-al Library and the outlying system. 

The gain in the issue through the entire branch system is 
21 per cent. 

It should be noted that the increase in the circulation of 
the branches means more than would appear on tlie face of 
it, as by the extension of deposits and the establishment 
of new stations nuich of the branch clientage has been 
diverted. 



62 City Document No. 21. 

Though the issue for the year at East Boston shows a 
slight loss, the issue since July.l, when Miss Walkley took 
charge, shows a decided gain over the corresponding period 
last year. The only branch which is running behind is the 
South End, and there, it is fair to assume, the loss, which is 
small, may be due to a larger use of the Central Library by 
persons formerly using the South End Branch. 

Expenditures. — In connection with statistics of circula- 
tion is submitted a table showing an itemized account of the 
expenditures for each branch and station. 

The total amount spent on the branches has been, roughly, 
$6,000 less than the previous year, the decrease being mainly 
in the expenditure for books. 

While the circulation at the stations has nearly doubled, 
the total cost has remained about the same. 

To show the comparative efficiency, I have calculated the 
cost per volume of circulation of each branch and station, 
excluding the item of rent for branches which occurs in only 
two cases, but including the rent of stations and reading- 
rooms. 

It may seem that the high cost per volume of certain of the 
reading-rooms makes against my recommendation to convert 
the larger deliveries into similar stations. It is, however, clue 
to the small population served, and consequent small circula- 
tion at these reading-rooms. At Broadway Extension and 
at Mt. Bowdoin the cost per volume is low, and a high rate 
need not follow a change in the type of the most used 
deliveries. 

For comparison of branches with stations, I have calcu- 
lated the cost per volume of circulation, excluding the cost 
of books and binding, as follows : 

Cost per Volume of Circulation. — Excluding Cost of Boohs 
a7id Binding. 

Branches ..... 
Stations (including reading-rooms) 
Deliveries (excluding reading-rooms) 

At the five reading-rooms the cost per volume of circula- 
tion, owing mainly to the larger issue, has fallen from 15.5 
cents in 1896-97, to 8.3 cents in 1897-98. 

The cost per volume of the issue of books on cards from 
the Central Library through the branches and stations has 
been. 

1894. 1895-96. 1806-97. 1897-98. 

ll.Oc. 11.3c. 11.6c. 8.7c. 



1S96-97. 


1897-98. 


6.7c. 


5.9c. 


7.0c. 


4.8c. 


5.0c. 


3.7c. 



Library Department. 63 

But these estimates, wliich for the sake of comparison with 
former years, inckide one-third the cost of maintenance of the 
reading-rooms charged against this issue from the Central 
Library, are too liberaL A fairer estimate would allow five 
cents per volume for the cost of transportation and two and 
one-half cents per volume for the cost of distribution, giving 
a total of seven and one-half cents per volume. 

Branch Division. — Central Library. 
The Daily Issue. 

Our great aim has been to increase the issue of boolcs on 
cards to the branches and stations, and the first step 
towards this seemed to be to give the borrower a reasonable 
chance of securing a book applied for. We have tried to 
diminish the number of unsuccessful applications (1) by re- 
quiring the custodians to see that slips sent in are properly 
made out; (2) by ascertaining and stamping on the call-slip 
the reason why the book cannot be supplied, and so cutting 
off repeated applications for books missing, reserved for hall 
use, at the bindery, or otherwise unavailable ; (3) by having 
the call-slips stamped by the person handling them in the 
stacks, at the indicator, in the Children's room, etc. ; (4) by 
supplying copies located on other numbers than those asked 
for ; (5 ) by introducing a space on the call-slip in which the 
borrower may request us to supply a substitute if the book 
he applies for is out; (6) by replacing many books pre- 
viously condemned or missing — notably those listed in the 
" Catalogue of English Prose Fiction." 

Two publications, the "Supplement to the Fiction Cata- 
logue " and the " Annual List," have helped towards render- 
ing accessible at the stations information of the books 
contained in the Central Library. 

The issue has increased from 40,694 volumes in 1896-97 
to 56,534 volumes in 1897-98, a gain of 38.9 per cent. 
At the same time the percentage of unsuccessful cards has 
fallen from 57 per cent, to 49.4 per cent., while for the last 
five months of the year the figure was 44.2 per cent. 

Of the books sent, 72 per cent, were fiction, or juvenile; 
35 per cent, of those sent to branches and 82 per cent, of 
those sent to stations being fiction. 

Of the unsuccessful cards 72 per cent, were for fiction, 
including juveniles. Of these unsuccessful applications 48 
per cent, of those from the branches and 86 per cent, of 
those from the stations were for fiction, or juveniles. I am 
unable to submit figures showing the exact proportion of 



64 City Document No. 21. 

these unsuccessful applications which were for eurre^it fiction, 
but I can say in a general way that neglecting the unsuc- 
cessful applications for a half-dozen recent novels of the 
very greatest popularity, the proportion has not been large. 

Deposit Work. 

At the beginning of the year there w^ere twenty-seven 
places to which deposits of books were sent from the Central 
Library ; at the close, forty-two. The statistics of issue have 
been : 

1896-97. 1897-98. 

Deposits sent to stations, etc. . 5,042 vols. 7,244 vols. 
Engine-houses .... 975 " 5,275 " 

Totals .... 6,017 " 12,519 « 

There were out on deposit February 1, 1897, 3,906 vol- 
umes ; February 1, 1898, 5,520 volumes. 

A year ago the deposit collection numbered 3,247 volumes, 
of which about 80 per cent were fiction and juveniles. Dur- 
ing the year 1,794 volumes have been added, considerably 
less than half of which was fiction, making the percentage of 
fiction and juveniles now in the collection 6Q per cent. 
Below is a rough classification. 

Vols. 

Fiction and Juveniles . . . . . . 3,338 

Literature . . . . .■ . . . 123 

Biography ........ 139 

History 470 

Travel ........ 189 

Science, Arts, and Fine Arts .... 231 

Unclassified ....... 551 



Total . . 5,041 

The deposit collection is now nearly large enough to supply 
the miscellaneous collections sent out for circulation at the 
stations. In this way a great saving of time is effected 
in selecting the works sent out. 

The collection is, however, quite inadequate to supply the 
requests for deposits on special subjects to be used at the 
branches, by schools, literary clubs, etc. And this for two 
reasons, because the collection is composed of books suitable 
for general reading, and includes few of the heavier works 
which could not be expected to circulate from the stations ; 
and secondly because practically the whole collection is con- 



Library Department. 65 

tinually out at the places of deposit, and so unavailable for 
this special use. 

On the other hand, it is often felt that where there are but 
one or two copies of a book in the circulating collection here, 
they cannot be spared for two weeks or a month. Frequently 
the works asked for are restricted to hall use, so that for 
the past year we have been greatly embarrassed in our 
attempts to supply these special deposits. I should, there- 
fore, recommend the formation of a special collection to be 
kept here for just this use. 

As we do not yet contemplate sending deposits directly to 
the schools, it would at first be inexpedient to duplicate 
books commonly in the branches. But a collection consist- 
ing perhaps of five hundred titles chosen with reference to 
courses of study in the schools, and advertised by a small 
annotated list sent to the teachers would, I feel sure, meet 
with instant favor, and lead, incidentally, to better use of the 
Library by the schools in general. My plan would contem- 
plate sending these deposits for use only at the branches 
and stations in the beginning, but would undoubtedly lead 
in the end to systematic work directly with the schools. 

With the extension of the deposit system the methods of 
recording books sent out have necessarily been completely 
remodeled. 

The deposits issued monthly to the engine-houses have 
been organized into travelling libraries so as to allow of shift- 
ing the entire twenty-five volumes from one to another with 
the least possible inconvenience. 

The collection of cards recording books sent out on de- 
posit to the stations was bulky, and growmg at the rate of 
twenty feet a year. Consequently it became urgent to sub- 
stitute a system simple, compact and more economical to 
operate. The form of record adopted shows what books are 
at any station at a given time ; what stations a given book has 
already visited, and whether a given station has had a given 
book ; and, finally, the whereabouts of every book m the de- 
posit collection. The transfer from the old system to the 
new involved considerable difficulty and, begun in March, 
was not completed till June. 

Then followed a verification of the books charged to each 
station. This, I understand, was the first general account 
of stock taken since the first deposit was sent out in 1895, 
and, owing to defects in records started experimentally and 
continued by many hands, involved a very great deal of patient, 
pains-taking labor. Twenty-nine volumes were ff)und to 
have disappeared, and were paid for by the Custodians of the 



66 City Document No. 21. 

stations where they were lost, with the exception of fifteen 
missing from our own station at Broadway Extension. 

After the verification of accounts with stations was com- 
pleted, a shelf-reading of the wliole collection was made in 
connection with tlie shelf-list. This was also the first shelf- 
reading since the books were set aside for deposit, and so 
coyers a period of more than one year. 

Of the 5,041 volumes with which a circulation in the 
neighborhood of 160,000 volumes has been maintained the 
past 3'ear, twenty-one could not be accounted for. Of these 
we have no record of ever having issued fifteen, so that there 
is a fair presumption against their ever havmg been in the 
possession of the Branch Division, leaving an undoubted 
loss of but six volumes. 

During the year we have been in the habit of exchanging 
twenty-five volumes monthly with each station. Now that 
the organization of the work is completed, we have begun to 
exchange fifty volumes per month, and so to keep the collec- 
tions on deposit at the stations fresher by the addition of 
more new material. 

Inter-Library Loans. 

The issue of books loaned to other libraries was put in 
charge of the Branch Division on September 3. The statis- 
tics for the year are : . 

Loaned : 

Vols. 

To libraries m Massachusetts . . . . .105 

To libraries outside Massachusetts .... 30 

Total inter-library loans . . . . .135 

Applications denied : 

From libraries in Massachusetts .... 20 
From libraries outside Massachusetts ... 8 

Total applications denied ..... 28 
Borrowed for use at the Boston Public Library : 

From the Boston Athenseum ..... 1 
From Cornell University Library .... 2 

From Harvard College Library . . . .13 

Total borrowed . . . . . . .16 

Twenty-eight applications, or 17 per cent., have been 
denied because the books could not be issued under the limi- 
tations imposed. 



Library Department. 67 

Shipping Division. 

Nineteen branches and stations, the Hancock School, the 
twenty-one engine-houses, and four other places of deposit 
are served by our wagons, while eight branches and stations 
are served by local expresses. These eight stations are so 
scattered and so distant that for the present local expresses 
are cheaper and, arriving and delivering earlier, probably 
give better service than could be obtained from an additional 
Library wagon. 

For miscelluneous bundle work the Merchants' Five-Cent 
Parcel Delivery is employed, which appears to be cheaper 
than would be a tricycle carrier owned by the Library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HiLLER C. WeLLMAN, 

Supervisor of Branches and Stations. 



68 



City Document No. 21. 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 
FOR 1897. 



To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

The following persons were duly appointed members of the 
Examining Committee for the year 1897 : 



Mr. John L. Bates. 
Dr. J. Bapst Blake. 
Prof. Borden P. Bowne. 
Mr. Everett W. Burdett. 
Miss Helen Cheever. 
Mr. Joseph J. Corbett. 
Mr. C. ^y. Ernst. 



Mr. John H. Lee. 
Mr. A. Lawrence Lowell. 
Rev. Fr. John J. McNulty. 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Parker. 
Rev. Leighton Parks. 
Mrs. Sarah H. Williamson. 
Mr. Frank Wood. 



The committee organized by the choice of Mr. Burdett as 
Chairman and Miss Cheever as Secretary. 

Subsequently the following sub-committees were appointed: 



On Administration. 

Mr. Burdett, Chairman. 

Miss Cheever. 

Dr. Parks. 

Fr. McNulty. 

Mr. Bates. 

Mrs. Williamson. 

Mrs. Parker. 

Mr. Lowell. 

Dr. Blake. 

On Branches. 

Miss Cheever, Chairman. 

Professor Bowne. 

Mr. Bates. 

Mrs. Williamson. 

Fr. McNulty. 

Mr. Lee. 

Mr. Corbett. 



On Books. 

Dr. Blake, Chairman. 
Mr. Ernst. 
Mrs. Parker. 

On Finance. 

INIr. Lee, Chairman. 
Mr. Corbett. 
Mr. Wood. 

On Printing and Binding 
Department. 

Mr. Wood, Chairman. 
Mr. Ernst. 

On Catalogues. 

Mr. Lowell, Chairman. 
Dr. Parks. 
Professor Bowne. 



Library Department. 69 

In the appointment of these siib-comraittees every member, 
except the chairman of the general committee was put upon 
two sub-committees, upon the theory that such an arrange- 
ment would acquaint each member with the details of the 
working of the Library better than to serve upon one com- 
mittee only. 

For the purpose of giving the Committee ample time in 
which to make their investigations and report, the Trustees 
notified the members of their appomtment April 20, 1897. 
Notwithstanding this fact, the pressure of other matters upon 
some of the members of the committee made it difficult to 
procure full attendance at meetings, which, with the necessary 
unfamiliarity with the details of library administration on 
the part of most of the members, has made it impracticable to 
submit the report at as early a date as was desired and 
anticipated. 

Numerous meetings of the several sub-committees have 
been held, and preliminary and final reports of these com- 
mittees have been submitted to and considered at meetings 
of the general committee, which unites in submitting the 
following report : 

Administration. 

Fully impressed with the fact stated in the report of our 
immediate predecessors, that " the vital point of the connec- 
tion of the Library with the daily needs of the public, and 
the one that needs to be fashioned and lubricated until the 
highest possible degree of efficiency is reached, is the placing 
of the books called for in the hands of the reader within the 
shortest possible time after the call is indicated," special 
attention has been given to the inquiry as to how far the 
book-delivery service has recently been improved, and how far 
it is capable of further improvement in the near future. 
Winle, without doubt, substantial progress has been made in 
minimizing the time required for the delivery of books after 
they are called for, very much remains to be desired. While 
it must be remembered that the volume of work in the way 
of book-delivery to be done in this Library is so large that no 
system will reduce the time to the point attainable in smaller 
institutions, we yet feel that the difficulty wliicli now exists 
is due chiefly to the structural defects of the delivery system 
in use. Attention was called in the last report to the neces- 
sity of the utmost promptness and expedition on the part of 
those employed in procuring the books applied for and de- 
livering them to applicants. We know of no present reason 



70 City Document No. 21. 

to complain upon this point, but our opinion is that the phys- 
ical difficulties in the present system of book-delivery cannot 
be overcome by any personal diligence of the employees. 
That tliese difficulties are capable of being overco:^ie if the 
proper methods of construction are adopted, was made plain 
by an examination by the Chairman of the Committee of the 
system in use in the new Congressional Library at Washing- 
ton. The book-stacks there are nine stories high, and are all 
directly connected with each other and with the delivery desk 
in the centre of the Librarj^ by a simple but entirely effective 
endless book-railway. The slips for books are sent in to the 
stacks by means of pneumatic pressure, and the noise from 
the use of the pneumatic tubes is not found to be sufficient 
to disturb the readers. Up)on the receipt of the slip, the 
books are immediately placed in a basket on the contmuous 
railway, and are delivered within two or three mmutes from 
the time they are sent for. 

No such promptness of delivery will ever, in our opinion, 
be attainable in the Boston Library until the stacks are con- 
nected with each other and with the delivery desk in a method 
entirely different from that now in use. This might be done 
without changing the method of book-delivery, but by simply 
providing such inter-communication between stacks as would 
dispense with the present necessity of returning every card 
to the delivery desk over the same route it took when it left 
the desk. Any such change, whether to the Washington 
system of inter-communication and delivery or to a simpler 
system of inter-communication only, would undoubtedly in- 
volve large expense, and might still leave something to be 
desired ; but considering the individual and aggregate loss of 
time and patience involved in any unnecessary delay in the 
receipt of books by those applying for them, no reasonable 
expenditure ought to be avoided, if thereby the time of 
delivery could be materially shortened. 

In last year's report the committee endorsed the applica- 
tion to the Legislature for the passage of an act to authorize 
the city to borrow the sum of <i^l 00,000 for the comjDletion 
of the Library building, including the necessary changes to 
facilitate the delivery of books. Nothing came of this appli- 
cation. But certain changes, involving the expenditure of 
upwards of $30,000, will not admit of further delay, if the 
convenience of the public and the reputation of the Library 
are to be considered. Some system of direct inter-communi- 
cation between the stacks — including small elevators to 
expedite book-delivery, one or more service elevators for 
handUng books in bulk, a supplementary system of pneu- 



Library Department. 71 

matic tubes, and, perhaps, a stairway from stack to stack — ■ 
is imperatively demanded. In connection with these changes, 
there must be an enlargement of the present tube-room, where 
the whole work of book-delivery is done, by the addition to 
it of the room now used by the Librarian's Secretary. The 
issue of books has reached a volume entirely disproportionate 
to present facilities. The delivery force is much hampered 
in its work; the issue at times is clogged, and long delays 
sometimes occur, to the extreme inconvenience of the public. 

Application having been made by the Trustees to the City 
Government for an appropriation to cover these expenditures, 
the committee desires to express the opinion that the admin- 
istration of the Library can never be made to meet the 
reasonable demands of the public until such an appropriation 
has been granted, and the suggested changes made. 

The new system of filluig out cards has been a convenience 
to the public, but m itself does not seem to have reduced 
materially the time required for obtaining books. This now 
averages seven or eight minutes, which is too long, and no 
pams should be spared to reduce this time to its lowest limit 
in one way or another. 

If it is impractical to make the radical structural changes 
already suggested, or, at least, to secure the immediate 
enlargement of the Delivery-room by the addition to it of the 
room adjoining it, we think it worth while to suggest, as a 
measure of at least temporary relief, the putting of the de- 
livery-desk, indicator and time-tray into the Delivery-room, 
and moving farther forward the desk already there. The 
space now occupied by the fine-desk could be utilized, if 
required, and that desk transferred to the south-west corner 
of the room. This would give space enough not only for 
the present needs, but for a greater number of attendants, 
in case an increase of force becomes necessary. 

The two windows between the Delivery-room and the 
alcove could be cut down into doors and used for passage. 
It would then be possible to remove the platform in front of 
the present door, so that the moving book-shelf, used to carry 
books into Bates Hall, could be wheeled into the alcove, a 
change that would save the labor and injury of unloading 
the books in the Delivery-room and carryuig them to the rail- 
way in a tray. 

While we are desirous of not being misunderstood as sug- 
gesting these alterations as adeqnate for the future, they 
would cost little, and would temporarily, at any rate, relieve 
the congestion about the entrance to the alcove, and yet 
leave ample space in the Deliverj-room, which is seldom over- 



72 City Document No. 21. 

crowded. We are inclined to the opinion that they would 
not injure the architectural apj^earance of that room, though 
upon this point we would, of course, yield our judgment to 
that of tlie architects and artists who would be consulted 
before any such changes were made. 

The overcrowded condition of the Children's room on 
Saturdays and Sundays, and the fact that there is no quiet 
corner for the many grammar-school children who come to 
study, makes it highly necessary, in our opinion, that a second 
room be devoted to this purpose. We therefore suggest that 
the plan already under discussion, of taking the Patent room 
for a second Children's room, be carried out, and that the 
patent collection be removed to some other room, where the 
necessary quiet can be secured for those who consult its 
volumes. If another suitable room cannot be spared for 
this purpose — as certainly should be done, if possible — a 
gallery or mezzanine-floor could be constructed at one end of 
the Newspaper-room, at comparatively small expense. At 
crowded times tlie children are already allowed to read at the 
tables in the Patent-room ; but, in order to convert it into a 
proper room for their use, the committee recommends that 
more tables and a sufficient number of proper lights be intro- 
duced into it ; that the room be reserved for the use of chil- 
dren desiring to study or do serious reading ; and that a 
sufficient reference library, containing, among other standard 
books for school children, dictionaries, encyclopaedias, gazet- 
teers, maps and atlases, be placed upon the shelves. A sloping 
surface should also be arranged in this room for the j^roper dis- 
play of maps and pictures. At present there is no collection 
of reference-books in the Library for children alone ; and their 
time and the time of the attendants is wasted, and the atten- 
tion of older readers is diverted, by theu' excursions into 
Bates Hal], for the purpose of consulting encycloj)aBdias and 
other books of refeience. 

Another advantage of having a second room for the use of 
children is that the fifteen-minute talks to children upon the 
" Choice of Books," which a majority of our committee con- 
sider a desirable addition to the work of the Children's de- 
partment, could be given in one room, while those readers 
who preferred not to listen could remam in the other. Some 
members of the connnittee, howevei', believe in omitting 
these talks altogether, and giving the children the same 
privilege of quiet which their elders enjoy. 

Two sources of disturbance in the Children's room are the 
registration desk and the entrance to the Newspaper-room, both 
of which cause the constant passing and repassing of many 



LiBKAEY Department. 73 

persons. We suggest that it would be desirable to find a 
new place for the registration desk, and to j)rovide another 
entrance to the Newspaper-room. The Boylston-street 
entrance might be utilized for the latter purpose, and some 
interior communication found or provided between the News- 
p:iper-room and the other portions of the Library. The 
latter should not involve the use of the Children's room or 
any other room where quiet is desirable. 

The last suggestion with regard to this department is easily 
carried out: The Children's room should contain at least one 
clock. Indeed, throughout the building there is a dearth of 
necessary time-pieces. 

Two matters mentioned in the report of the last Examining 
Committee still provoke criticism ; one is the poor lighting of 
the Newspaper-room, which remains as described in the last 
report ; the other is in the provision of towels for use in 
common in the lavatories. While both of these reforms 
would involve additional expense, we feel that they deserve 
attention. 

Branches. 

The committee notes with satisfaction marked improve- 
ment in the conduct of the branches and deposit stations, 
and increase in their circulation of books. 

Of the thirteen delivery stations only one is now without 
a deposit of books. These deposits seem particularly well 
chosen. Regular deposits of books are also made at thirteen 
engine-houses, the Marcella-street Home, the House of 
Reformation, two Industrial Schools and at a Men's Reading- 
room in the North End. Books are regularly delivered at 
the Hancock School, and are shortly to be delivered also at 
the Eliot School, North End. 

In branches and reading-rooms an increased number of 
books placed upon open shelves tempts visitors to read upon 
the premises. The circulation of books in branches has in- 
creased 50,000 during the year, while that of deposit stations 
has almost doubled. The circulation of books from the Cen- 
tral Library through branches and stations has increased 
15,840 during the year; and of the persons who apply thus 
for the books of tlie Central Library, thirteen per cent, more 
are successful than at this time a year ago. 

It is gratifying to note that the use of reference-books in 
all branches and stations l)y school children is rapidly growing. 

Among the improvements we have noted, the following 
deserve special mention : 



74 City Document No. 21. 

Station P on Broadway — thanks to the appropriation of 
last year — now deserves to be called a reading-room. Its 
seats will accommodate forty-five readers; it has 1,700 books 
upon open shelves ; and its circulation of books was 27,483 
during the year. 

The new Station T at Boylston meets a large demand. 

The North End will now be supplied from two giammar 
schools and the Men's readmg-room. 

Card catalogues have been completed at the Roxbury, 
West Roxbury and South End Branches, and work on card 
catalogues is going on at other branches. A new finding-list 
has been issued from each branch. Tlie West End Branch 
leads all the others in its circulation of books, having made a 
gain of 27,483 daring the year. This shows what may be 
accomplished in a branch which is well situated and well 
equipped. 

The service at Brio-hton and East Boston has become more 
effective under the custodians now in ofQce. In East Boston, 
however, little further can be accomplished in the present 
quarters. 

The committee makes the following recommendations, 
which it considers of importance : 

The conditions in East Boston remain unchanged, and the 
need for improvement has become more pressing. We renew 
our reconnnendation of last year, and make it first, namely : 

1. That a special appropriation be granted to relocate and 
properly equip the East Boston Branch. 

2. We renew our recommendation for the removal of the 
South End Branch to Washington street. 

3. We think a new deposit station near Northampton 
street desirable. After this is established, we advise 

4. That the next deposit station be placed in the North 
End. 

5. The Library certainly does not benefit the public by 
offering the opportunity to read in light injurious to sight. 
We find the lighting of several branches insufficient, — 
notably. East Boston, Jamaica Plain, South End, Charlestown, 
West Roxbury, and the lower floor of tlie Roxbury Branch. 
We urge immediate improvement in these conditions. 

The committee finds that the office of Supervisor of 
Branches, which was created a year ago, has amply justified 
itself. The attention to the needs of the branches and 
stations and the careful supervision thus made possible have 
increased the efficiency of these parts of the Library system. 



Library Department. 75 

Books. 

The committee Lelieves that the collection of books at 
present in the Library represents moderately well the tastes 
and needs of the people of Boston and vicinity. 

The committee recognizes the difficulties in the judicious 
purchase of books for a library which already possesses 
500,000 volumes. The principle now in practice should be 
adhered to, and if practicable, extended, — that is, the four 
great libraries of Boston and Cambridge and the several 
special libraries in Boston should avoid unnecessary duplica- 
tion, and should develop certain lines of subjects in wluch 
each should endeavor to be exhaustive. 

Among the special subjects upon which the Boston Library 
should be as complete as possible, the committee mentions 
especially the Literature of Boston and the immediate vicinity 
(the Metropolitan Boston) in every aspect from which this 
locality can be viewed, — commercial, religious, educational, 
geographical, historical, etc., etc. Possibly some relations 
might be established between the Library and the great 
business interests of the city which would render additional 
services to the man of affairs and business. The Library 
should have a copy of every newspaper published in Boston 
up to the time that the city charter was adopted. 

It does not seem advisable that the Library should aim at 
complete collections of the literature of Law, Medicine, etc., 
but should content itself with the recognized text-books and 
authorities on these subjects. 

The present collection of maps is perhaps less complete 
than most other subjects, and should be enlarged. 

Rare and valuable books should, as far as possible, be lim- 
ited to the use of persons who can appreciate and take 
proper care of them, and should never be issued, even for 
hall use, to children unaccompanied by responsible persons. 

The number of books of reference, dictionaries, encyclo- 
paedias, etc., in all principal departments of the Library 
should be increased, if practicable. 

The suggestion is offered, whether it might not l)e well to 
start a card catalogue of desirable books for purchase. Such 
a list might, perhaps, give strength to the policy of the 
Library in pursuing a fixed course through the ephemeral 
pressure now exercised by indiscriminate suggestions from 
all quarters. 

The effort to meet the popular demand in art instruction, 
especially by the purchase of photographs, is highly appre- 
ciated. The Library was never so active, so helpful and so 
comprehensive in this respect as it is to-day. 



76 City Document No. 21. 



Catalogues and Bulletins. 

In the matter of catalogues and bulletins the committee 
has few suggestions to make. The special subject lists, 
which are printed by the Library more and more freely, are 
of high value, and it is a pity that they are not more gen- 
erally used. In spite of constant efforts to bring tliem to 
the attention of the public, some readers, interested in tlie 
subjects which they cover, still use the Library without 
knowing that any such lists exist. They can be found on 
shelves in the Catalogue-room of Bates Hall ; but there is 
notliing to indicate their presence. A sign over the shelves 
would perhaps help to attract attention to them. 

In this connection another suggestion about the special 
lists may be made. Those which deal with subjects of per- 
manent interest gradually lose tlieir value, unless kept up to 
date. This is true, for example, of the lists in Electricity 
and on the Telephone, published in 1892 and 1893. In such 
cases cards witli the titles of later works are often collected, 
but they are kept in the Catalogue Department. Whenever 
this is done, it would be a benefit to the public to have a 
duplicate collection of the cards placed m the Catalogue- 
room in Bates Hall in a special drawer, distinctly marked 
with the name of the subject, so that any one at work on 
the matter may easily find titles that carry the special list 
down to date. 

It is not, perhaps, out of place to point out that although 
a card catalogue is probably the most convenient method 
now .in use of keepmg the titles of books constantly 
arranged in alphabetical order, yet it is, after all, a crude 
and clumsy system. It has several defects. In the first 
place, the time wasted in consulting it is not inconsiderable ; 
for a hundred titles can be run down on a printed page with 
vastly greater rapidity than the same number of cards can 
be turned over. In the second place, it is perishable. The 
catalogue in Bates Hall might be burnt up, and even if the 
duplicate in the room underneath should escape, the expense 
of copying it would be very great. A third, and by far the 
most important, defect in the card catalogue is the fact that 
it can be kept only in one j^lace, and this, with the present 
endeavor to extend the use of the Library as widely as pos- 
sible, is a grave disadvantage. These defects would be 
entirely done away with if the titles of books could be kept in 
such a form that they could be used mechanically for print- 
ing. The most obvious suggestion is that the slugs, made 



Library Department. 77 

by means of the linotype, and from which the cards are now 
printed, should be preserved in alphabetical order. In that 
case the type for the catalogue would be always set up, and 
the printing could be done from time to time at compara- 
tively small expense. The amount of metal required for 
this purpose is, however, so great as to make it impractica- 
ble ; but the Chief of the Printing Department of the 
Library is of opinion that a process for accomplisliing this 
result is likely to be perfected in the near future. If this 
proves to be true, it is to be hoped that the Library will put 
the system into operation, even at a lai'ge initial expense, for 
the value of the catalogue would be vastly increased thereby. 
It could be wholly reprinted in book form every few years, 
and brought down to date by annual supplements and 
monthly bulletins. Copies would, of course, be placed in 
the branches as well as in Bates Hall. Moreover, when the 
system had been generally adopted, a catalogue of every 
important library would be found in every other, and this 
would not only help to save money by avoiding duplication 
of sets of books which are expensive and rarely used, but 
would enable scliolars to get the full benefit of all the collec- 
tions of books throughout the country. 

Printing and Binding Departments. 

After a thorough examination of the system of audit ap- 
plied to the financial operations of the Library, the committee 
of last year reported that it was excellent and comprehen- 
sive, but that it would be advisable, if practicable, to have 
the expenditures in the Binding and Printing Departments 
examined by some disinterested person not connected with 
the Liljrary, — preferably a member of the Examining Com- 
mittee, especially appointed for that i)ur230se, and familiar 
with the market-rates of labor, material and supplies for 
which payments are made. 

This suggestion was adopted by the Trustees, and a thor- 
ough examination of the financial and business operations of 
these departments has been made. Methods of work, cost 
of material, economy of administration, etc., have been 
looked into carefully, with the result that the departments 
in question are found to be in excellent condition. 

The only important defect noted in these departments was 
a lack of system in keeping an account of stock which could 
be easily audited, and would be self-balancing, so that dis- 
crepancies or waste could be instantly detected, if the books 
were properly kept. Such a system should show an account 



78 City Document No. 21. 

of all stock received, and all stock used, and for what used, 
together with the exact amount and kind left on hand at any 
time. 

Up::n the desirability of such a system being suggested to 
the heads of these departments, they approved of the change, 
and took steps to procure the proper books to put it into operar 
tion. Sufficient time has not yet elapsed to judge of the 
measure of success which Avill attend this addition to the 
otherwise satisfactory system of audit in use in the Library 
adminstration, but we have no doubt that it will prove per- 
manently useful and. satisfactory. 

Ix General. 

We assume that the Examining Committee is, as suggested 
by our immediate predecessors, " a portion of the machinery 
to be examined and commented upon," and we are of 
opinion that, as at present constituted, it is not as efficient a 
piece of machinery as it ought to be. Last year's committee 
pointed out the difficulties, which, under existing conditions, 
mmimize the usefulness of its work, but refrained from 
making any suggestion as to the solution of those difficulties. 
We venture to go one step further, by suggesting at least one 
method of securing an improvement. 

Every committee as now appointed is, practically, a new 
committee. While some of its members may have served 
before, it was with no assurance of reappointment. Li the 
discharge of their duties they are under the impression from 
the first that their service is but temporar3% and, for that 
reason, their investigations are likely to be superficial. A 
new member of the committee immediately recognizes the fact 
that he is a tyro or amateur, so to speak, in the subjects sub- 
mitted to his consideration, and is discouraged at the outset 
in any attempt to make himself intelligently acquainted with 
the broad principles and the numerous details of library 
administration. A sense of dependence upon others, espe- 
cially upon the Librarian and heads of departments, for any 
intelligent understanding of the problems presented for con- 
sideration, attaches to the inception and accompanies the 
jjrosecution of the work of the average member of the com- 
mittee. 

One way of remedying this manifest defect in the system 
of outside examination would be to make membership on the 
committee less temporary than it is. If, for example, the 
committee should always consist of fifteen members, each to 
serve for three years, and only five of whom should annually 



Library Department. 79 

retire to make room for five new members, the cliaracter of 
the work of the committee would, in our opinion, be more 
satisfactory to its members, if not to the Trustees and the 
public. 

We also desire to suggest tlie query whether it is ]:)est that 
the repoi't of tlie Examining Committee should always be 
printed in connection with the report of the Trustees. The 
committee's report is to the Trustees and for their benefit ; 
and the object of the report might be as well or better 
accomplished by its submission, in print, to the Trustees, with- 
out the necessity of its subsequent publication in the annual 
report. If the committee's report were not to be made 
public, the committee might be hiclined to sj)eak more freely 
and frankly upon some topics than they otherwise might 
think advisable ; and some matters of real, but perhaps 
temporary, importance might be included, which might not 
be thought to merit a permanent place in the annual report 
of the Trustees. We are aware that the printing of the re- 
port of the EKamining Committee is now required by an 
ordinance of the city ; but this should be repealed or amended, 
if its present requirement is inconsistent with good practice. 
We suggest that the ordinance should leave the printing of 
each report of the Examining Committee discretionary with 
the Trustees. 

In closing this report, we cannot refrain from commending 
the improvement in the administration of this great public 
institution from year to year. The standard of excellence is 
all the time advancing. Repeated visits to tlie Library and 
examinations of its various departments by the individual 
members of the committee have discovered, as a rule, efficient 
administration united with connnendable courtesy. Our 
citizens may well be proud of such an institution, " built by 
the people, and dedicated to the advancement of learning." 

Respectfully submitted. 

For the committee, 
(Signed) Everett W. Burdett, Chairman. 

(Signed) Helen Cheever, Secretary. 

Boston, April 4, 1898. 



APPENDICES 



1897. 



LIST OF APPENDICES. 



I. Financial Statement. 

ir. Extent of the Libkary by Years. 

III. Net Increase of tue Several Departments, Including 

Branches. 

IV. Classification: Central Library. 
V. Classification: Branches. 

VI. Registration. 

VII. Circulation. 

VIII. Trustees for Forty-six Years. Librarians. 

IX. Examining Committees for Forty-six Years. 

X. Library Service (May 1, 1898), including Sunday and 

Evening Schedule, 

XI. System of Service. 

XIL Correspondence, etc. 

XIII. Givers, and amount of Gifts. 

XIV. Orders of City Council. 



LiBiiARY Department. 83 



APPENDIX I. 
Finance. 

Boston Public Library, 
Auditing Department, February 1, 1898. 
To the Trustees: 

Gentlemen : The uiidersignecl herewith presents a statement 
of the receipts and expenditures of tlie Library Department for 
the financial year commencing February 1, 1897, and ending 
January 31, 1898; also a statement concerning the trust and 
other funds, statements covering special appropriations, and a 
statement of expenditures on account of the branches for the 
twelve years ending 1897-98. 

Respectfully, 

A. A. Nichols, 



Auditor. 



Receipts. 



City appropriation, 1897-98 .... $235,000 00 

Rent from old Library Building : 

Balance from 1890-97 . . S2,274 05 

During the year . . . . 8,600 00 

10,874 05 



Fines and sales of catalogues : 

Balance from 1896-97. . . $532 89 
During the year : 

Fines . . . $4,532 28 

Sales . . .441 30 

Lost cards . . 118 16 

5,091 74 



^5,624 63 



Less amount transmitted to J. S. 
Morgan & Co., London. (See 
infra, p. 84) . . . . 4,600 00 



Income from Trust Funds : 

Balance from. 189 6-9 7 . . $12100 

During the year ^ . . . 13,755 21 



1,024 63 



Carried fonoard . . . $13,876 21 $246,898 68 

' The interest due on Trust Funds invested in City of Boston Bonds from July I, 
1896, to January 1, 1897, amounting to $4,Sr)6, was" not V)laced to tlie credit of tlie 
Library Trustees until after January 31, 1897. Tlic income from Trust Funds for the 
year is $y,3i)i).21. 



84 



CiTv Document No. 21. 



Broil gilt forvKird . 
Less amount transmitted to J. S. 
Morgan & Co., London. (See 
infra yi^, 84) . 

London accounts : 

Balance in Lands of J. S. jNIorgan 

& Co., February 1, 1897 : 

Trust Funds income, $13,980 72 

City appropriation . 7,242 96 

Interest . . . 178 00 



$13,876 21 $246,898 68 



9,008 21 



During the 3'ear : 

Trust Funds income. (See supra^ 

p. 84) 

City appropriation. (See sujjra^ 

P- «3) 

Interest ..... 



$21,401 68 



9,008 21 

4,600 00 
311 39 



Balance in hands of Caring Bros. & Co., Feb- 
ruary 1, 1897 
Donations : 

From W. C. Todd, un- 
expended February 
1, 1897. (See Table, 
infra p. 93) . . $2,950 10 

Additional credit . 3 00 

$2,953 10 



From Woman's Education Asso- 
ciation, unexpended February 1, 
1897 .... * 

From Andrew C. Wheelwright, un 
expended February 1, 1897 

From Twentieth Regiment Asso 
ciation .... 

From Boston Numismatic Society 

From Elizabetli Lewis . 

From sundry sources for the pur 
chase of photographs 

Exchange account : lost books, sales 
etc. : 
Balance from 1896-97 
During the j'ear . 

Interest on bank deposit . 

Carried fonoard, . 



4,868 00 



35,321 28 



72 75 



22 27 






I- 

3 10 






)- 

775 03 

300 00 

26 00 






1,321 00 


5,400 


50 


s of duplicates. 


$776 08 
312 54 


1,088 
1,488 


62 
25 


. 


. 


$295,138 


08 



LrBRARY Department. 



Brought forward 



$295,138 08 



Expenditures. 



The expeuditures have been as follows 
General hbrary accounts, including the 

cost of maintaining the branches : 
Salaries : 

General administra- 



tion 


$122,109 68 






Sunday and evening 








force 


. 17,386 11 










$139,495 


79 






Books : 








Cit}' appropri ation , 


125,801 12 






Income from Trust 








Funds 


. 8,114 74 










33,915 


86 






Periodicals 


. 


6,435 


76 


Binding : 








Salaries 


$11,960 65 






Stock . 


. 1,623 17 






Equipment . 


296 53 






Contract work $3,802 


11 






Contract work^ 








(British patent t7,S 
specilicatioiis.) 


75 

, 1 1 SO fi(^ 








• "i: , i O U O U 


18,061 


21 


• 




Printing : 








Salaries 


. 14,651 67 






Stock . 


. 1,337 97 






Equipment . 


. 4,100 97 






Contract work . 


. 1,331 97 










11,422 
1,871 


58 


Furniture and fixtures 




*J O 

42 


Gas 




1,673 


58 


Electric lighting 




1,991 


03 


Expense, miscellaneous 




858 


33 


Expense, cleaning . 




5,424 


92 


Stationery and library 


supplies 


3,973 


98 


Eents : Branch Libraries and Read- 






ing rooms . 


• 


5,215 


00 


Fuef 


. 


9,123 


03 


Repairs : stock and contract work . 


2,507 


58 


Transportation, including postage 


3,086 


36 


Transportation, between Central 






Library, Branches 


and Delivery 






Stations 


• 


3,491 


04 


Delivery Stations, service 


3,990 


85 


Water-rates . 


. 


1,455 


80 


Tele})hone service . 


. 


355 


45 



Carried forioard 



554,349 57 $295,138 08 



86 City Documej^t No. '21. 

Brought foricard . . . $254,349 57 $295,138 08 

Subscriptions to newspapers (Todd 

2,643 06 
17 50 



gift) ..... 




Books (Lewis gift) . 


. 


Exchange account : 




Books and odd numbers 




of periodicals . 


$31 72 


Refunded for books re- 




turned 


20 48 



52 20 

Books and periodicals for West End Branch : 
Woman's Education Association 

and A. C. Wheelwright gift . 23 50 

Photographs ..... 1,235 79 

Twentieth Regiment Association gift : 
Books . . . $407 03 

Special service . . 368 00 



775 03 

$259,096 65 



Balance on hand January 31, 1898 . . $36,041 43 

The balance is made up of the following items, viz. : 
Cash in City Treasury : 

Income from Trust Funds . . $4,868 00 

Rent from old Library Building . 356 89 



Cash on deposit in London : 

In hands of J. S. Morgan &Co. : 
Trust Funds . . $14,628 19 

General funds . 12,573 92 

Interest less commis- 
sion and postage, 311 39 
Photograph fund . 42 21 



15,224 89 



^27,555 71 
In hands of Barino- Bros. . . 72 75 



Cash on deposit with New England 
Trust Co., and on hand : 

Unexpended of donations carried to 
account of 1898-99 : 

Wm. C. Todd .... 

Woman's Education Association . 

Elizabeth Lewis .... 

Boston Numismatic Society . 

Exchange account : lest books, etc. 
Interest on bank deposit 
Photograph fund . 



27,628 46 



1310 04 




1 87 




8 50 




300 00 






620 41 
1,036 42 


. 


, 


1,488 25 


, , 


43 00 



$36,041 43 



Library Department. 



87 



GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Comparative statement for fiscal years enduvj January 31, 1S96, 1897 and 1898. 



Salaries : General administration 

" Sunday and evening force. 

Binding : Salaries 

Stock 

" Contract work 

" Equipment 

Books 

Periodicals 

Furniture and fixtures 

Gas. 



Electric lighting and power 

Water-rates 

Teleplione service 

Expense : Miscellaneous 

" • Cleaning 

Printing: Equipment 

" Stock 

" Contract work 

" Salaries 

Stationery and Idbrary supplies. 
Fuel 



Rents 

Repairs : Stock and contract work 

" Salaries 

Transportation, postage, etc 

Transportation between Central Library and 

Branches 

Rent of deliveries, including Custodians' 

services 



1895-96. 



$93,904 80 

11,130 eo 

10,626 87 
2,406 14 
1,718 54 



18,231 86 
5,307 49 
8,428 84 
1,729 76 
4,758 42 
595 00 
480 11 
3,894 54 
3,870 .55 
5,300 00 
1,012 92 
4,960 44 
485 00 
3,200 40 
6,192 07 
6,285 48 
1,987 29 
2,699 00 
3,769 25 

3,2&5 43 

2,347 25 



$-208,608 05 



1896-97. 



$113,004 21 

17,5.58 07 

11,847 64 

1,504 61 

1,420 72 

488 75 

25,040 32 

6,049 10 

1,195 78 

1,790 90 

1,576 85 

1,374 50 

890 7-2 

1.4:3 76 

4,612 68 

2,774 89 

4,301 64 

1.517 10 

3,761 99 

3,996 26 

6,585 01 

4,884 00 

3,689 24 

2,049 83 

1,969 13 

3,582 25 

3,105 38 



.$231,525 33 



1897-98. 



$119,698 26 

17,386 11 

11,960 65 

1,623 17 

3,802 11 

296 53 

26,486 83 

6,4;« 76 

1,871 42 

1,673 58 

1,991 03 

1,455 80 

355 45 

8.58 33 

5,424 92 

4,100 97 

1,337 97 

1,331 97 

4,651 67 

3,973 98 

9,123 03 

5,215 00 

2,.507 58 

2,411 42 

3,086 36 

3,491 04 

3,990 85 



$246,.541 79 



Note. — Gross expenditure for the year 1895-96 includes payments made from the 
balance of the special appropriation "for "moving expenses, $6,341.12," distributed 
among the appropriate items, and payments from the revenue from the old Library 
Building for the West End and Mattapan Branches. 

The cost of maintaining the branches makes part of tlie general items of the several 
appropriations: 



Cost of Branches, 189.5-96 
Cost of Branches, 1896-97 
Cost of Branches, 1897-98 



$47,997 23 
62,785 39 
5S,282 49 



Amount expended for books is for bills paid out of the city appropriation only. 
The amount expended for books and binding (not included above) paid from trust 
funds and city money in hands of Loudon Ijankers : 



For 189.5-96 
For 1896-97 
For 1897-98 



$9,516 29 
9,590 82 
7,807 78 



City Document No. 21. 



Speciai, Appropkiations. 



ibrary Building, furnishing: 










Balance of city appropriation 


. 


. 


$24,539 


96 


Payments on account: 










Mellish, Bvfield & Co. 


$4,823 


13 






Edward F."Caldwell . 


2,200 


00 






C. H. McKenney & Co. 


. 562 


40 






J. Eastman C'hase 


264 


92 






Koopman & Co. . 


175 


00 






Thomas O'Callaghan & Co. . 


. 151 


33 






Archer & Pancoast Co. 


110 


00 






E. C. Morris Safe Co. 


72 


00 


» 




J. B. Hunter & Co. . 


67 


m 






Geo. E. Crawley . 


58 


85 






Wm. F. Adams & Co. 


54 


50 






James I. Wingate & Co. 


50 


32 






li. H. Hoe & Co. 


48 


75 






Wm. A. Carrie . 


22 


05 






Paine Furniture Co. . 


20 


00 






Richard Codman . 


17 


50 






Sundry small accounts 


. Ill 


54 


8,809 


95 








fJtJ 




115,730 


01 



Branch Library, Broadway Extension, Improvements : 

City appropriation ..... $5,000 00 
Payments on account : 

Books $480 84 

Furniture and fixtures . . 528 10 

Movmg expenses . . . 1 50 



Balance, February 1, 1898 



1,010 44 



$3,989 56 



Library Department. 



89 



LIBRARY BUILDING, DARTMOUTH STREET. 
From July 1, 1SS7, to January 31, 1S97. 



Contracts. 



Amount 

Contracted 

for. 



Amount 
Certiliecl 
and Paid. 



Balance 
Uncertifled. 



John T. Scullj- 

Woodbury & Leightou, 1st contract 

Woodbury & Leighton, 'id contract 

B.C. Fisher & Co 

R. Guastavino 

Lindemann, T. C. R. T. Co 

Batterson, See & Eisele 

Post & McCord, 1st conti-act 

Post & McCord, '2d contract 

David Mcintosh, 1st contract 

David Mcintosh, id contract 

Bowber, Torrey & Co 

Ira G. Hersey 

Snead & Co., Iron Works 

Norcross Bros 

General Electric Co 

Isaac N. Tucker 

JI. T. Davidson 

Augustus St. Gaudens 

Archer & Pancoast Co 

John S. Sargent 

E. A. Abbey 

P. Puvis de Chavanncs 

Bethlehem Iron Works 

Freight on electrical machine (Knight & Son) 

Siemens & ITalske 

I. P. Morris Co 

AV. J. McPherson 

N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 

D. C. French 

E. E. Garnsey 

E. D. Leavitt 

Lake Erie Engineering Works 



Ca rricd font a rd 



$7,714 44 

313,596 7!) 

756,-233 S7 

48,784 40 

So,oU 04 

35,'209 54 

57,273 00 

43,662 43 

50,900 00 

48,716 81 

20,823 00 

110,4.59 00 

90,705 70 

76,419 75 

52,857 00 

21,440 .39 

8,952 43 

3,894 00 

50,000 00 

15,122 80 

15,000 CO 

15,000 00 

48,235 00 

i,(;i7 40 

78 10 

14,000 00 

13,889 86 

5,1.58 91 

997 12 

25,000 no 

2,.500 00 
6,933 92 
1,443 33 



$2,048,163 03 



$7,714 44 

313,.596 79 

750,233 87 

48,784 40 

85,544 04 

35,209 .54 

57,273 00 

43,662 43 

50,900 00 

48,716 81 

20,823 00 

110,4.59 00 

90,705 70 

76,419 75 

52,857 00 

21,440 39 

8,952 43 

3,894 00 

3,000 00 

15,122 80 

7,500 CO 

9,.5O0 00 

48,235 00 

1,617 40 

78 10 

14,000 09 

13,880 86 

.5,1.58 91 

997 12 

3,000 00 

2,500 00 

6,933 92 

1,443 33 



$1,966,163 03 



$47,000 00 

7,500 00 
5,500 00 



22,C00 00 



$82,000 00 



90 



City Documext No. 21. 



LIBRARY BUILDING, DARTMOUTH STR1S,1E,T.— Concluded. 



Contracts. 



Amount 

Contracted 

for. 



Amount 
Certified 
and Paid. 



Balance 
Uucertilied. 



£ roitf/ht forward 

Walworth Construction and Supply Co. 

Siemens & Ilalske 

A. A. Sanborn 

Norcross Bros 

Wm. Lumb & Co 

Henry R. Worthingtou 

C. H. McKenney & Co 

David Mcintosh 

S. D. Hicks & Son 

S . Homer AVoodljridge 

Daniel G. Finnerty 

Furniture 

Construction 

Heating and ventilating 

Incidentals 

A . S. Jenney & T. A. Fox 

Architects' commission of 5 per cent 

Architects' commission of 7J per cent 



$-2,048,163 03 

( 1,975 00 
( 755 66 

4,077 71 

398 00 

597 00 

429 19 

247 00 

255 00 

150 00 

85 00 

53 78 

50 00 

26,107,82 

50,387 77 

70,4.07 06 

66,878 48 

704 80 

97,624 72 

5,027 25 



§2,374,424 27 



$1,966,163 03 

1,975 00 
755 66 

4,077 71 

398 00 

597 00 

429 19 

247 00 

255 00 

150 00 

85 00 

53 78 

50 00 

26,107 82 

50,387 77 

70,457 08 

66,878 48 

704 80 

97,624 72 

5,027 25 



$2,292,424 27 



$82,000 00 



$82,000 00 



Appropriation $2,368,8.54 89 

Payments ^. 2,292,424 27 

$76,430 62 

Balance uncertified $82,000 00 

Claim of JMcKim, Mead & White, architects, for commission 
according to statement June 10, 1895 8,685 61 



Deficit. 



LONDON ACCOUNTS. 



Balances 

from 
1896-97. 



Remit- 
tances, 
1897 98. 



Total 
Credits. 



Expendi- 
tures, 
1897-98. 



Balances 
unex- 
pended. 



J.S.Morgan & Co., 

J. S.Morgan &Co., 
photograph fund, 

J.S.Morgan & Co., 
interest on de- 
posit 



£ s. d. 
4,403 7 



£ s. d. 

2,803 8 6 



Baring Bros. & Co. 



15 



4,418 7 



3,066 14 6 



£ s. d. 
7,206 15 6 

263 6 



15 



,484 1 6 



£ s. d. 
1,609 1 7 

254 12 1 



1,863 13 8 



£ s. d. 

5,597 13 11 

8 13 11 

64 4 1 

15 

5,685 11 11 



LiBEAEY Department. 



91 



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96 



City Document No. 21. 





o 


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101 



552 24 

476 08 
1,108 37 
7,553 08 

673 09 

2,262 91 

677 18 

f 166 34 

1 (llmos.) 
( 88 30 
( (3 mos.) 

47 52 
71 41 




620 88 

393 15 
1,028 91 

7,958 68 

( 401 06 
( (9 mos.) 

1,348 36 

S 379 32 
( (8 mos.) 


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336 25 

463 80 

1,074 95 

( 934 62 
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329 48 

329 48 

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46 40 

326 85 

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Blue Hill Ave., 
Harvard St.... 
Crescent Ave., 
No. Brighton.. 

West End 

Upham's Cor., 
Broadway Ex., 

Warren St 

Rox. Crossing, 
BoylstonSta... 
School-Houses, 
Eng. Houses.. 


c 





102 City Docuimekt No. 21. 

library trust funds. 

BiGEiiOW FcjND. — This is a donation made by the late Jonisr P. 
BiGELOW, in August, 1850, when Mayor of the city. 

Tlie income from this fund is to be aj)prox>riated to the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . 81,000 00 

Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for 
the time being. 

Bates Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Joshua Bates 
of London, in March, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for $50.000 00 

"The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, ex- 
pended in the purchase of such books of permanent value and au- 
thority as may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to 
the Mayor of the city for the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fund. — This is the bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per 
cent. Bond §10 ,000 00 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the pur- 
chase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and 
astronomy. 

Philt^ips Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Jonathan 
Phillips of Boston, April, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $ 10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said library. 

Also a bd.iuest by the same gentleman in his will, dated September 
20, 1849. 
Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $20, 000 00 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of 
a free Public Library. 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the city for the 
time being. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Abbott 
Lawrence of Boston. 
Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the 
purchase of books for the said library, having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Edward 
Lawrence of Charlestown. The following clause from his will ex- 
plains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income, and so much of the principal as tliey 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said Public Library." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $500 00 



Library Department. 103 

Pierce Fund. — This is a donation made by Henry L. Pierce, 
Mayor of the city, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Coun- 
cil, December 27, 1873. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . So, 000 00 

TowNSENB Fund. — This is a donation from William Minot and 
William Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. Townsend, of 
Boston, at whose disposal she left a certain jjortion of her estate in 
trust, for such charitable and public institutions as they may think 
meritorious. Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of 
the City of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the follow- 
ing conditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition at 
least five years at the time it may be so purchased." 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent. Bond, for . $4,000 00 

TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of 
Boston, he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his 
books and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sum, the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent, per annum), in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years, the income of the said sum is to be expended annually 
in the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese language, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the Library. These books, be- 
queathed or purchased, are always to be freely accessible for reference 
or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library building. 
If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trust and con- 
ditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and money are to 
be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her right 
to retain during her life the l)Ooks and manuscripts, and placed them 
under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests, in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said bequests 
on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the care and 
custody of the books and manuscripts. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . |4,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund. — This is a donation made in June, 1863, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of 
the association, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French 
and J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a man- 
ner as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on 
the Public Library, attaching to it the following conditions: "In trust 
that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be expended 
in the purchase of books of permanent value for the use of the free 
Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable, of such a character 
as to be of special interest to young men." The Trustees expressed a 
preference for books relative to Government and Political Economy. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1 ,000 00 



104 City Document No. 21. 

Treadwell Fukd. — By the -will of the late Daniel Tkead-svell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, 
legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the life of his 
wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the residue then 
remaining in the hands of the trustees as therein provided, and con- 
vey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public Library in the 
City of Boston. 

The City Council accepted said bequest, and authorized the Trustees 
of the Public Library to receive the same, and to invest it in the City 
of Boston Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said trus- 
tees, in such manner as they may deem for the hest interests of the 
Library. 

Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent. Bonds, for . •$5,.550 00 
Invested in the City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bonds, for 1,400 00 

Invested in 16 shares B. & A. R.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1,600 00 

Invested in 6 shares B. & P. U.K. Co. stock, par value $100 

each 600 00 

Invested in 12 shares Fitchburg E.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1,200 00 

Invested in 1 share Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co. stock, par value 

§100 each 100 00 



$10,4.50 00 



Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late 
of Boston, the object of which is stated in the following extract from 
her will : 

" I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be invested 
on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books 
published before 18.50. I also give to said Public Library my own pri- 
vate library, and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." 
Bequest accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . -$10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1,000 00 

ScHOLFiELD FuND. — Bequest of the late Arthur ScHOLFiELD, who 
died in New York, January 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain 
heirs during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books 
of permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died "November 
18, 1880, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum of 
$11,800, which represents the income of said fund, received by him up 
to the time of his death, to be added to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $50,000 00 
'I '■'■ «' " " . 11,800 00 

$61,800 00 



Green Fund. —Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green, of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. 

Invested in two City of Boston Five per cent. Bonds, for . $1,500 00 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . 500 00 

$2,000 00 



Library Department. 105 

South Bostox Branch Library Trust Fund. — Donation of a 
citizen of South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $100 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund. — This is a donation 
from the family of Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be 
expended for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $500 00 

Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund. — Received from 
Charles Mead, executor of the estate of Charles Mead, the amount of 
legacy of the late Charles Mead, to constitute the " Charles Mead 
Public Library Trust Fund," for the promotion of the objects of the 
Public Library, in such manner as the government of said library shall 
deem best, and so far as the government shall deem consistent with 
the objects of the library, to be used for the benefit of the South 
Boston Branch Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . |2,500 00 

« 
Abtz Fund. — This is a donation made in ISTovember, 1896, by Miss 
ViCTORiNE Thomas Artz of Chicago, the income " to be employed in 
the purchase of valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse 
or prose, of American and of foreign authors." These books are to 
be known as the " Longfellow Memorial Collection." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

.John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund. — Received from the mem- 
bers of the Papyrus Club, May, 1897. The income thereof is to be ex- 
pended for the purchase of books in memory of their late member, 
John Boyle O'Reilly. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund. — This is a donation made 
in April, 1897, by the Association of Officers of the Twentieth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry. It is to be used for the purchase of books 
of a military and patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove 
appropriated as a memorial of the Twentieth Regiment. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $.5,000 00 

Todd Fund. — This is a gift made in October, 1897, by Wm. C. Todd 
of Xew Hampshire. The income is to be expended annually in pay- 
ment for such current newspapers of this and other countries as the 
board of officers for the time being having charge of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston, shall purchase. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . ■'?50,000 00 

Bequest of Rev. Dr. Caleb D. Bradlee. 
Cash in Treasury $1,000 00 



106 City Documext No. 21. 



Recapitulation of Public Library Trust Funds. 

Scliolfield Fund $01,800 00 

Bates Fund 50,000 00 

Todd Fund 50,000 00 

Phillips Fund 20,000 00 

Phillips Fund 10,000 00 

Bowditch Fund 10,000 00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000 00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 10,000 00 

Treadwell Fund 10,487 69 

Artz Fund 10,000 00 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 5,000 00 

Pierce Fund 5,000 00 

Townsend Fund 4,000 00 

Ticknor Fund 4,000 00 

Charles Mead Fund 2,500 00 

Green Fund 2,000 00 

Bigelow Fund 1,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 1,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund 1,000 00 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

Bradlee Fund • ■ g 1,000 00 

Edward Lawrence Fund 500 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 500 00 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund .... 100 00 

$270,887 69 



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Library Department. 



107 



APPENDIX II. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 





Yeaks. 


Total volumes 
in the Libraries. 




Years. 






Y'EAKS. 


Total volumes 
in the Libraries. 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


34 


1885 


460,993 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


35 


1886 


479,421 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


36 


1887 


492,956 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


37 


1888 


505,872 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


38 


1889 


520,1508 


9 


1860-61 


97,-386 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


39 


1890 


536,027 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 , 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


40 


1891 


556,283 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


41 


1892 


576,237 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


42 


1893 


.597,152 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


43 


1894 


610,375 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


44 


1895 


628,297 


15 


1806-67 


136,080 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


45 
46 


1896-97 
1897-98 


663,768 

698,888 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, JANUARY 31, 1898, 
ACCORDING TO LOCATION. 





515,007 
13,072 




17,076 


Duplicate room 




29,861 










528,079 

18,525 
15,026 


16,815 






13,292 
13,782 










14,799 




South End 

West End 


14,592 
10,359 
4,153 








Lower Mills (Station A) 

Alattapan (Station D) 


88 
98 


>;>^ ["Fellowes Athenaeum 

"5 rt 1 Collection owned by City. 


Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 

North Brighton (Station L) . . . . 
Broadway Ext. (Station 1') 


976 
75 


W Total, Koxbury brancli. 


33,551 


1,292 



108 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX III. 



NET INCKEASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





en 


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Bates Hall 


9,733 

874 
I's 52 


11,857 
710 
330 


13,518 

I's 50 

419 


15,306 
I'S 23 
2,355 


16,499 

818 
I's 9,143 


20,493 

loss 455 
loss 542 


32,491 

746 
I's 8,056 


1 11,821 
313 


20,273 

2,890 






26,579 


Duplicate room 


8,603 


Brigliton branch 


46 


130 


91 


167 


98 


23 


292 


107 


1,217 


276 


Charlestown branch . . 


145 


I's 70 


233 


421 


22 


339 


300 


loss 16 


I's 112 


398 


Dorchester branch . . . 


423 


309 


269 


222 


209 


134 


358 


loss 73 


1,415 


159 


East Boston branch.. 


170 


63 


58 


59 


5 


48 


126 


112 


1,021 


147 


Jamaica Plain branch 


335 


294 


150 


214 


112 


221 


329 


273 


1,277 


374 


iXorth End branch .. 


8 


4 


12 


224 


84 


75 


63 


I's 1,861 






Roxbiiry branch 


280 


199 


146 


308 


loss 352 


147 


382 


48 


1,202 


I's 2,896 


Fellowes AtheuEeum, 


390 


397 


361 


438 


289 


318 


318 


407 


348 


402 


South Boston branch, 


284 


159 


115 


200 


51 


55 


401 


loss 289 


1,509 


loss 69 


South End branch 


260 


248 


187 


365 


loss 67 


26 


276 


138 


1,435 


308 
















1,897 
4 


6,522 
626 


1,555 


385 


W. Roxbury branch. . 

Lower Mills Reading 
room 


20 


6 


10 






33 


185 
















85 
73 


3 

24 




Mattapan Reading 
room ; 
















1 


Mt. Bowdoin Reading 
room 
















74 


932 


loss 30 


North Brigliton Read- 
ing room 










8 






74 


loss 7 




Broadway Extension 
Reading room 
















261 


724 


807 


Total 


12,916 


14,636 


15,519 


20,256 


8,633 


20,915 


29,927 


18,695 


35,698 


35,129 





1 Collection transferred to West End branch. 



LiBEAEY DePAETJIENT. 



109 



APPENDIX III. — Continued. 
Located February 1, 1897, to January 31, 



Located. 



Condemned, 

missinp:, 
transferred. 



Net gain. 



Central Library 

Central Library, Duplicate room 

Brighton branch 

Charlestown branch 

Dorchester branch 

East Boston branch 

Jamaica Plain branch 

Roxbury branch, city collection 

Fellowes Athenajum 

South Boston branch 

South End branch 

West End branch 

We^ Roxbury branch 

Lower Mills Reading room 

Mattapan Reading room 

Mt. Bowdoin Reading room 

North Brighton Reading room 

Broadway Extension Reading room. 



29,185 
8,603 
619 
565 
651 
644 
655 
546 
459 
823 
564 
532 
276 



437 



2,606 



1343 
167 
492 
497 
281 
3,442 
57 
892 
256 
147 
=91 



130 



26,579 

8,603 

276 

398 

159 

147 

374 

loss 2,896 

402 

loss 69 

308 

385 

185 



1 

loss 30 



307 



44,560 



9,431 



.35,129 



1 Includes error of 68 in count last year. 

2 Includes error of 26 in count last year. 



110 



City Document No. 21. 



1 

00 




0- 




1 


ce 


^ 


o- 
in 


CO 

in 


CC 


5! 


05 


CC 


OC 






1 

CO 


CO 

CO 




OS 


— l^ia»Omr-(C^»«05C<C50505rHOrHCO-^ 
C5i-^a^O^^-^»OCC^=D'<*rHCOCOsD(-(COl-tO 






00 


.-tCCC5mtD-^OCOC5«^C5C5C5(MOOO 
COO"-*0&<NCSOOt-rJ1(MO^XuoO 

O CO m" ■m" V2" Co" lO C^ O 






OC 


— 't^«3iriCD100505i— lO 
10_ t- rH O^ 0_ t-;^ -* IN. » ^ 

■* lo ^ CO =0" co" in 


















s5 


lOCDCOOtO-*(M-t<t~ 
CO'Mr^O^CCOOCCi-H 

eo_ CO. -- o_ 0. t-^ ^ CI. CO 
■^jT lo" -^ cc' co" CO co' 






















C3C5COCO^'OL'^OCD 
COOr^tOCO-H-COOCS 

*■;. "'^ 'I "^ ^. •■■:,"* '-'i "^ 
't^ urT -^ (?i' irf co" i-T 




















© 


CDCC-*lffiC01CC0O 
r-i'-S^rHCOCOCO-'tO 
■>! CO__ rH O!. CT t-;^ TP lO. 

^" 10 ^" fff CO i-T 






















05 
00 
OO 


t- 10 ?1 CO ^ t:~ (^ 
0. (M. r- CS^ 33^ I- ■* -T>. 
-*' 10" 'S"" (m" 10' Co" i-h" 






















00 

00 

00 


ioin^-»<t~iaccco 

CO CO C^ t^ •': rH CO 

0. rH_ cr:__ 00 t-. ■* CO 
co" -^ -^ 0^ 10 co" i-T 






















00 

00 


C0C01:~mO-HC0O 

cs t— t- a: -^ CO 

t-. I- t-;^ t-^ » ■* 01. 

CO ^" ■* 01" 10 co" r-T 






















o5 

CO 

00 

1H 


0^-*CO-*COt~OCO 
1> fM CO I- CO 00 '* OT 
^, "i. '"^ *l '*- ^- "^ "* 
CO eo" rri of 10" co" 
























> 
1- 

c 

ai 

p- 


> 

t- 

c 


> 

c- 


c- 
;- 

a 
S 

li- 


I 

•r- 
C 
C 

c 


> 
s. 


> 

I- 

■> c 

c: 


> 

> 


> 

i- 
« 

3. 
< 
s 


> 

1 


> 

1 

c- 

> 

"5 


a 

c 
l> 

o- 

c- 


> 
!- 

a 
s- 

£ 
< 


> 



S 


> 

ci 

5. 
£ 

c; 


> 
c: 

> 

c 


c 
c 

« 
c 
c 

Q. 
(- 
tl 

^ c 
a; 


a 
p 

ej 

"S 

C3 

Ph 

p: 







APPENDIX IV. 
CENTRAL LIBRARY CLASSIFICATIONS. 





CLASSES. 




Special Libraries. 


■3 


c 




I8S8 


1861 


1866 


1869 


1871 


1873 


1875 


1877 


1880 


1889 




1890 


1892 


1894 


1894 


1894 


1896 


1896 


1897 






1 


.J 


iii 


Condemned, 
lost, niiasing 
and trans- 
ferred 
deducted. 


Total in 
General 
library, 
Jan. 31, 
1898. 


it 






1= 


ii 


II 


la 


i 




5" 






1.1 
1" 


a 


ill 


If 


li 

5 




•5 


1 

H 

Is 


•6 
S .S 

.ill 

ill 

s 


1 

li 

ll 




d' s e 


1* 

574 
015 


1 

13 
14 
(!) 
31* 
25 

49 

4 

16 
44 

2 
16 
31 

4 

10 
15 
35 
30 
10 


1,793 
12,574 
13,825 
05,401 
44,4'JO 
23,287 
10,900 
10,717 
9,694 
2,900 
13,763 
22,335 
7,023 
33,000 
19,772 
7,856 
0,881 
20,090 
14,828 
19,081 
13,370 
15,274 


249 
35 
17 

107 

00' 
11 

9 

9 
22 

2 

1,387 

58 

147 

6 

3 
05 

3 

15 

3,969 

9 

13 
6 


322 

015 

047 

1,091 

858 

522 

320 

1,423 

1,181 

95 

329 

732 


6 

5 

43 

833 

114 

2 

8 

197 






21 

090 
135 
SI2 
3,204 
2,474 
337 
254 
617 
200 
225 
471 


15 

31 
424 
385 
2,469 
070 
184 
191 
23 
64 
61 
63 
































II. 
III. 

IV. 
V. 

VI. 


yc"l>.t. '^^' "''_•• 




278 
64 

362 
21 
.58 
31 
20 

132 

4,172 

4 

250 


669 


10 

1 

469 

IS 
8 


75 

270 

4 

1 

1 
1 


8 

866 

4,429 

415 












12 
K, 
218 
197 
98 
9 
32 
8 










14,258 


ograi i an ar> is ory 






















i!79 


695 








31 

1 


407 
i 








American h Story, geogiai hj, blograp y,ti e p ^,^^^^ 












56,170 


English, histoij, etc 


738 
282 
913 
344 
124 
illO 
707 

lis 

1,261 

1,2C9 

176 

307 

619 

1,063 

1,077 

Ii47 

S73 
















t y, 


















11,861 
19,096 


VIII. 


^' 




1 
3 
















1 
1 






GrLk^ Latin a^nd jWIoIo v 


1 
1 
28 


















3 ifluisU an.l Portu^ uese mstor ' and literature 
















7,515 




Oriental history, geography, biography, travel and literature 


1 
5 


















15 


















14 
















4,4:10 




29,683 














, 














7,081 






3,518 

1,300 

307 

98 

170 
136 
13 
30 


183 
14 




381 
121 
63 
24 
6 
32 
63 
30 
14 


245 
130 

28 
17 

89 
48 
10 
43 
84 
93 
3,231 


248 
66 

2 
5 

31 
2 

59 
400 

10 




12 
29 
















1 

274 
34 
















2 






















21,812 






101 






2,819 














11,227 


XVI. 


























7,087 






23 

1 







4 
















39 










20,877 


XVIII. 


















103 








1,5,269 








19 


1 
1 






















23,344 


XX. 




4 














305 
251 








13,S1S 


XXI. 




1 


129 








7,745 




30 








23,917 


XXII. 








60 
















157 


XXllI. 


Kound volumes of manuscripts 


21 




81 




24 
1 




45 




12 












•150 












411 


XXIV. 
































3,232 


XXV. 




19 
8,351 




659 
44,877 




































5.59 


XXVI. 


Stack t'our 


2,154 












































44,877 


XXVII. 


Duplicate room 










































13,072 


13,072 




























































2,606 


441,097 


0,279 


13,848 


2,045 


129 


6,172 


13,491 


6,386 


669 


691 


422 


6,287 


679 


595 


2,819 


7,746 


1150 


1,006 


691 


411 


4,436 


13,072 


528,079 







*" 





?h,««'Iv ?„H^; il. ,nf,.J,5f; ,„'' 'j5''./''"f'?' lustory, etc., when embracinR several countries, and collected worlis of historians. 

r L2L» V VI v,."^" "^ollfftf ,«°'^''^ "' -American wrlteri', and what of American liteialure is sometimes termed "polygrapliy." 

r., "','„\;'y'-i\"-'i'"',Y',",-'""^"'t^",™**'^'>P«'<"'""'''>^si«<=t"« countries that Class IV. has tor America. ^ '^ ^ > 



^:!** iUJ-.'^V";'"* *'*" Uelglum, the Netlierlands', 'swiVzerlan'd7an'd''theYcan'ciina 

I ass XIV. includes political scleuce and ethics, education, etc. 

Class XIX. Includes mecbanics, military and naval art?, agriculture, domestic ari< 



Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the fceneral library. ,. , „i„ i.. .w <-p ,.„i „. ^f«,.fi„n 

Class XXVI. contains the former " Lower Hall " collection, which has a different classification. It Includes 20,4o6 volumes of liction. 

1 Framed. 

NOTE. — The dates given In the special libraries column show the year when these collections were acquired by the Library. 



Library Department. 



Ill 



APPENDIX V. 



CLASSIFIGATIOX. 
Branch Libraries, Januart 31, 1808, as reported by Custodians of Branches. 



ROXBURT. 



"S-flJ 



Reference-books — 

Genealogy and Hei% 
aldry 



Biography 
History 



354 1,690 



Fine Arts, Archa^ol 

ogy 



Geograpliy, Travels, 

Language 

Literature 

Medicine, Hygiene. . 
Natural science 



Philosophy, Ethics, 
Education 



Religion, Theology, 

Sociology 

Law 



Useful and Indus 
trial Arts 



Amusements, GaraeS; 
Sports 



Fiction 

Books for the young. 
Bound periodicals.. 

Unclassified 

Harris Collection . . . 



49 
1,079 
1,390 

32 
814 
15 
1,967 
5 
956 

471 

908 
1,202 

10 

104 

53 

4,519 

1,645 

1,276 

227 



17,076 



30 
2,256 
2,916 

207 
1,334 

311 
4,200 

486 

826 

732 

1,476 

322 

658 

436 

74 
3,002 
1,712 
3,252 

3,941 
2y,«61 



297 

2 

1,.570 
1,270 

228 

1,122 

51 

1,964 

115 

335 

178 
334 

226 
24 



5,299 
2,470 
1,050 



16,815 



301 

26 
1,118 
1,088 

93 
682 
90 
1,883 
79 
85 

62 
337 
162 

14 



64 
4,593 
2,198 

333 



13,292 



283 

5 
1,143 
1,231 

284 

766 

96 

1,253 

84 

312 

148 

134 

116 

31 

185 

50 
4,555 
1,743 
1,363 



13,782 



126 

16 
1,183 
1,224 

194 
698 

69 
1,384 

97 
295 

144 

426 

165 

16 

238 

86 
4,441 
2,250 
1,974 



15,026 



161 

85 
2,425 
2,.S36 

492 
2,158 

164 
3,850 

374 

528 

310 

1,294 

668 

123 

162 

70 

1,029 

43 

2,253 



18,525 



377 

5 
1,257 
1,222 

160 
919 
66 
1,529 
94 
493 

142 

302 
151 
25 

350 

59 
4,380 
1,636 
1,C32 



14,799 



177 

3 
1,673 
1,1.36 

39 
1,289 
43 
1,358 
139 
609 

320 
313 

218 
43 

202 

113 

4,256 

2,276 

385 



14,592 



1,205 
853 

185 
659 
105 
996 
62 
443 

218 

848 

207 

5 

83 

61 

1,542 

1,890 

507 



10,359 



280 

1 

409 
302 

10 

252 

2 

391 

189 

4 

153 

2 



1 

854 
1,201 

102 



4,153 



112 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX VI. 

REGISTRATIOX DEPARTMENT. 

Statistical Report, Fehruary 1, 1S97, to January 31, 1898. 
Former Registrations. 



Date. 



"So. of I^ames. 



First . . 
Second 
Third . 
Fourth 
Fifth.. 



1854-1858 

1859-186T 

1868-April 30, 1886 

May 1, 1886-March 31, 1894 

April 1, 1894-December 31, 1894. 



17,066 

52,829 

227,581 

124,396 

25,443 



Registrations, including old and new names, lost and filled 
cards replaced, expired cards renewed during each year, for 
the five years prior to 1895 : 



1890 


. 14,175 


1891 


. 11,502 


1892 


. 11,707 


1893 


. 11,029 


1894 


. 29,971 



Average, 15,677. 



Live Cards Outstanding. 



Date. 



Number. 



Gain. 



February 1, 1898 . 
February 1, 1897. 
February 1,1897. 
February 1, 1896. 
February 1, 1896 . 
January 1, 1895. 

Total gain . . . 



64,973 
45,606 
45,606 
34,842 
34,842 
29,971 



19,367 

10,764 

4,871 
35,002 



CARDS ISSUED PEBRUAKY 1, 1897 — JANUARY 31, 1S98. 



Ceutriil Lilirary 

Brigliton Branch 

Charlestown Braiuii ... 

Dorchester Branch 

East Boston Branch — 
Jamaica Plaiu Branch . 

Roxbury Branch 

South Boston Branch.. 

SonthEnd Branch 

West End Branch 

West Roxbury Branch. 

Station A 

B 



2,158 
2,445 
2,280 
3,184 
3,.iia 
3,181 
1,(;93 
3,12i; 



ToUls 45,606 



RE-REGISTKATIONS. 



New Registrations 



Renewals. 



Over Under 



Over Under 



31,274 
1,3.->1 
3,197 
3,212 
3,488 
4,00.'i 
4,986 
4,628 
2,4:M 
4,(^7 
186 



28,894 
1,256 
2,S2S 
2,987 
3.124 
3,802 
4, .573 
4.189 
2,210 
4,047 
180 



1,010 
1,000 



4,894 64,973 19,367 15,7' 



1,300 
1,013 



• To whom cards were Riven since January 1, 189.5. Live cards outstanding .January 31, 1898, 64,973; February 1, 1897, 45,606; gain. 19,307 = .42(6. ^ .u i i ..i i 

N. B.— Prior to Februai-y 1, 1897, cards were supplied to Stations A, E and U through the Dorchester Branch, and to the West Itoxbury Branch and Station B through the Jamaica J lain 
Branch, and their statistics are included in the Dorchester and Jamaica Plain reports. 



Library Department. 



113 



CLASSIFICATION OF HOLDERS OF "LIVE CARDS" 
JANUARY 31, 1898. 

By Sex and Occupation. 



Classes. 



Permanent 
residents. 



iNon- 
residents. 



Special 
cards. 



Males. 

Over 21 years of arje. 
Professional classes 



Teachers 

Students 

Business men 

Unemployed 

Laborers 

Under 21 years of age. 



Clerks 

Office and errand boys 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools 
Pupils of Grammar schools 



Pupils of Grammar schools under 12 
years 



Other students. 



2,802 
374 

1,060 

7,0^3 

1,812 

648 

1,291 
6.S7 
376 

863 
8,853 

205 
351 



61 

99 

1,010 

75 

166 



103 



Females. 

Over 21 years of age. 
Professional classes . 



Teachers 

Students 

Business women 

Married 

Single, unemployed 

Under 21 years of age. 



Clerks 

Errand girls 

Unemployed ! 

Pupils of Latin and High schools. 
Pupils of Gramiiiar schools 



Pupils of Grammar schools under 12 
years 



Other students. 



172 
1,518 

480 
3,939 
8,S07 
7,057 

1,424 
190 
949 

1,087 
8,057 

278 
225 



5 
154 

1,055 

53 

28 

450 

82 

23 
6 

2 

23 



Totals . 



61,448 



3,872 



153 



1 Including persons temporarily sojourning in Boston. 

N.B. — Of the 1 ,!")8H teachers' cards issued priorto February 1, 1898, 997 are Jivecards; 

of these, 713 are lield by permanent residents, in addition to their ordinary cards (not 

included in permanent residents' column above), and 284 are held by nonresidents 

(which are included in non-residents' column above). 



lU 



City Document No. 21. 



By Wards. 



No. of 
card- 
holders 



Population 
census of 'y5. 



Percentage 
of card- 
holders. 



No. of 
card- 
holders 



Population 
census of '95. 



Percentage 
of card- 
holders. 



1,686 
1,01)9 
1,107 
673 
1,077 
1,093 
1,742 
4,6-22 
2,648 
7,740 
4,468 
4,900 
1,619 



21,007 
21,588 
13,943 
13,375 
12,986 
27,860 
16,973 
23,130 
23,174 
22,554 
19,930 
21,591 
24,900 



.0802 
.0509 
.0793 
.0503 
.0829 
.0392 
.1026 
.1998 
.1142 
.3433 
.2241 
.2269 
.0650 



14... 


1,884 


15... 


1,241 


16... 


1,560 


17... 


1,577 


18... 


1,940 


19... 


2,128 


20... 


4,079 


21... 


4,283 


22... 


2,733 


23... 


2,705 


24... 


3,547 


25... 


2,822 


Total 


64,973 



19,186 
18,623 
16,320 
21,114 
21,679 
22,372 
21 ,.528 
19,274 
22,289 
18,283 
18,240 
15,001 



.0981 
.0666 
.0955 
.0746 
.0894 
.0951 
.1894 
.2222 
.1226 
.1479 
.1944 
.1881 



496,920 



.1307 



Library Department. 



115 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS, TEACHERS AND PUPILS, 
June 30, 1897. 



General Schools. 


Number 

of 
scbools. 


numbeh of 
Regular Teachers. 


Number 
of pupils 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


at date. 




1 

11 

56 

5-29 

64 


2 

77 
119 


9 
86 
657 
529 
125 


11 
163 
776 
529 
125 


226 




4,101 




34,015 
27,688 
3,705 










Totals 


6tH 


198 


1,406 


1,604 


69,735 






Special schools, 


1 
1 

1 






13 

1 

26 

6 

6 

145 

27 


112 








25 












1,803 
186 


















151 




1-2 

5 






3 082 








577 










Totals 


20 






224 


5,936 








Special teachers (not included aliove), 




21 


76 


97 








Evening Schools, 

October, lS96-March, 1897. 


15 

6 






183 

27 


3 656 








577 










Totals 


21 






210 


4,233 








Grand total 


702 


219 


1,482 


2,135 


79,904 







116 



City Document No. 21. 
APPENDIX YII. 



CIRCULATION". 
Home Use Only. 



Central Library. 

Brighton 

Charlestown — 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Jamaica Plain... 

Roxbiiry 

South Boston 

.South End 

West End 

AVest Roxbury . . 
Station A 

B 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

J 

K 

L 

M 

N 

r 

Q 

R 

S 

T -. 



Carried forward 



Total Circulation. 
Home Use. 



1896-97. 



A. 

326,254 
27,308 
53,555 
57,856 
63.443 
52,2 r9 
83,708 
77,999 
83,767 
81,428 
16,658 



9,730 



5,439 
6,961 
2,649 
7,759 



2,492 
3,218 
10,603 
12,541 
9,287 
9,850 
235 



1,005,019 



1897-98. 



B. 

388,469 
31,382 
57,362 
58,105 
62,993 
57,176 
84,691 
80,912 
82,497 

109,617 
22,496 
4,283 
13,870 
3,193 



12,180 

9,186 

7,929 

10,447 

146 

3,808 

8,484 

9,770 

26,159 

16,544 

14,090 

17,004 

2,600 



1,195,413 



From Central 
through Branches 
and Stations. In- 
cluded in Central 
Library 
Circulation. 



1896-97, 



Included 
in "A." 



285 

688 

690 

864 

1,.573 

533 

852 

1,359 

885 

1,187 

1,678 

2,.584 

4,617 

775 

2,438 

1,491 

2,607 

1,547 

2,516 

1,696 

1,428 

3,228 

1,111 

2,738 

1,308 

6 



1897-98. 



Included 
in"B 



618 
1,046 

818 
1,077 
1,543 

647 

861 
l,8f3 
1,477 
1,898 
1,398 
4,082 
3,559 
1,009 
1,889 
2,883 
1,878 
2,746 
3,298 
1,460 
1,557 
3,853 
1,324 
3,864 
3,533 
1,383 
1,013 



52,597 



From Branches 

through Stations. 

Incliided in Brancli 

Circulation. 



1896-97 



Included 
in "A 



"629 
3 2,752 
" 3,235 

= 3,280 

■•261 
3 1,726 



12,859 



1897-98. 



Included 
in "B." 



' 1,916 

' 2,632 



3 4,255 



*667 
3 1,721 



' 2,071 



13,262 



Library Department. 

APPENDIX \'n.— C07icluded. 



117 





Total Circulation 
Home Use. 


From Central 
through Branches 
aud Stations. In- 
cluded in Central 
Library 
Circulation. 


From Branches 

through Stations. 

Included in Branch 

Circulation. 




1896-97. 


1897-98. 


1896-97. 


1897-98. 


1896-97. 


1897-98. 


Brought forward 


1,005,019 


1,195,413 

1,325 

592 

425 

1,903 


40,C84 


52,597 


12,859 


13,263 






























10 
'975 


3,937 
• 5,275 




Engine-houses 
















Total 


1,005,019 


1,199,658 


41,669 


61,809 


12,859 


13,262 





' No. sent on deposit. No. used on premises not recorded. 
' Included in Jamaica Plain Branch Circulation. 

3 II a Dorchester " " 

4 " " Brighton " " 
* " " Roxbury " " 

1896-97. 1S97-98. 

Central Library 326,2.54 3S8,489 

Branches 678,765 811,169 

Total 1,005,019 1,199,658 



Gain. 

1897-98. 

62,2.35 

132,404 

194,639=18% 



118 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX VIII. 



TRUSTEES FOR FOKTY-SIX YEARS. 

The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 

1852 to 1864; the late George Ticknor in 1865; William W. 
Greenough, Esq., from 1866 to April, 1888; from May 7, 1888, 
to May 12, 1888, Prof. Henry W. Haynes ; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, Esq., May 12, 1888, to AprU 30, 1895; Hon. E. O. 
Prince since October 8, 1895. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that for 

1853 made what is called the first annual report. At first it con- 
sisted of one alderman and one common councilman and five citi- 
zens at large till 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to 
consist of one alderman, two common councilmen and six citizens 
at large, two of whom retired, unless reelected, each year, while 
the members from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 
the organization of the Board was changed to include one alder- 
man, one councilman and five citizens at large, as before 1867; 
and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the city government upon the Board, by an 
alderman and a councilman, was abolished, leaving the Board as 
at present, consisting of five citizens at large. 



Citizens at large in small capitals. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-95. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appletox, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Benton, Josiah H., Jr., 1s94-97. 
BiGELOW, John P., 1852-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry I., 1865-68. 
BoAVDiTCH, Henry P., 1894-97. 
Bradley, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. Coffin Jones, 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Carr, Samuel, 1895-96. 
Chase, George B., 1876-85. 
Clapp, William W., Jr., 1864-66. 
Clark, John M., 185.5-56. 
Clark, JohnT., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, 

1878-88. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
CuETis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 



Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
DeNormandie, James, 189.5-97. 
Dickinson, M. F., Jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-64. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-.58. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1875-79. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William W., 1856-88. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1880-95. 
Hillard, George S., 1872-75; 

1876-77. 
Howes, Osborne, Jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 



Library Department. 



119 



Lee, Jolm H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1897. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Ellls W., 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen K., 1870-71. 
O'Brien. Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Pierce, 'Phineas, 1888-94. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Prince, Frederick O., 1888-97. 
Putnam, George, 1868-77. 
Reed, Samson, 1852-53. 
Richards, William R., 1889-95. 



Sanger, George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Phillip II., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey N., 1878-79. 
Shurtleff, Nathaniel B., 

1852-68. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 1855-56; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
TicKNOR, George, 1852-66. 
Tyler, Johns., 1863-64; 1866-67. 
Walker, Francis A., 1896. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 
Whitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Wiiitmore, William II., 1885-88. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, Elisha T., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNSOR, Justin, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



LIBRARIANS. 
1852 to date. 

(From 1S58 to 1877 the chief executive officer was entitled Superintendeut.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852-December 16, 1874. 
Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-January 9, 186S. 
Winsor, Justin, Svperintendent, February 25, 1868-September 30, 1877. 
Green, Dr. Samuel A., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877- 

September 30, 1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, Librarian, October 1, 1878-Septeraber 30, 1890. 
Dwight, Theodore F.. Librarian, April 13, 1892-April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, Librarian, February 11, 1895. 



120 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX IX. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR FORTY-SIX TEARS. 

The following have served ou the Examining Committees for 
the years given. The names in italics are those of Trustees who 
have acted as chairmen of the various committees. The thirty- 
fourth year was from May 1 to December 31, 1885, a period of 
eight months, for which no Examining Committee was appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. .J. G , 1870 ' 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880, 1894. 
Adams, Brooks 1894. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870 
Amory, 3[iss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Andrews, Augustus, 1892, 1893. 
Appleton, //oh. Nathan, 1854. 
Aptliorj), Wm. F., ISSo. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bancroft, Robert H., 1894. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, .James M., 1866. 
Barry, Her. Richard J., 1895. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Bates, lion. John L , 1896, 1897. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Bev. Edward, 1854. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890, 1891. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden. George W., I).D., 1856. 
Blake, J. Bapst, M.D., 1897. 
Blake, John G., M.D., 1883, 1891. 
Blake, Mrs. Mary E., 1894. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879, 1891. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.l)., 1855. 
BowfUtch, Henry 7., M.B., 1865. 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.l)., 1881. 
Bowditch, J.Ingersoll,LL.i).,1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bowne, I'rof. Borden P., 1896, 1897. 
Bradford, Chai-les F. , 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brimmer. Hon. Martin, 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 



Brown, Allen A., 1894. 
Browne, Alex. Porter, 1891. 
Brow^ne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C. E., M.B., 1872. 
Burdett, Everett W., 1896, 1897. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, Jr., 1869. 
Carr, Samuel, 1894. 
Carruth, Herberts., 1892. 
Chadwick, James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen, 1894. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B. . 1877, 1885. 
Cheever, David W., M.D , 1894. 
Cheever, Miss Helen, 1896, 1897. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapp, IVilliam H'.. Jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, 7>.Z).,1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, B.D., 1882. 
Clement, Edward H., 1894, 1895. 
Coale, George, O. G., 1892, 1893, 
Collar, William C, 1874. 
Corbett, Hon. Joseph J., 1896, 1897. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.B., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thomas B., 3[.B., 1874. 
Gushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G , 1876. 
Derby, Hasket, M.D., 1895, 1896. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 
Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Joseph T.. B.B., 1880. 
Dwight, Johns., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.B., 1880. 



Library Department. 



121 



Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 

Eaton, William S , 1887. 

Edes, Henry H., 1886. 

Eliot, Samuel, LL.B., 1868. 

Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 

Ellis, Calvin, M.B., 1871. 

Ellis, George E., i>.D., 1881. 

Endicott, William, Jr., 1878. 

Ernst Carl W., 1897. 

Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 

Everett, Sidney, 1895. 

Farlow, JohnW., M.D., 1892, 1893. 

Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 

Fields, James T., 1872. 

Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 

Fitz, W alter Scott, 1894. 

Foote, Uev. Henry W., 1864. 

Fowle, William F., 1864. 

Freelaud, Charles W., 1867. 

Frost, Oliver, 1854. 

Frothingham, IRicJiard, 1876. 

Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D., 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Garland, George M., M.D., 1895, 

1896. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., 31. D., 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, LL.D., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., 31. D., 1863. 
Green, Samuel S., 1895. 
Greenouqh, William IT., 18-58, 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grinnell, Charles E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edvrard E., 18.58, 
Hale, 3Irs. George S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Hale, Philip, 1893. 
Haskins, Bev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B , 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haynes, Henry TF., 1881, 1884, 
Hayward, George, 31. D., 1863. 
Heard, John, Jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Hellier, Charles E., 1895. 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., B.B., 1888, 

1889. 
Hersey, 3/j.s,s Heloise E., 1895, 1896. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Qillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. Geort/e iS., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.B , 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., 31. B., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., Jr.,7>L.Z>.,1882. 
Homans, Charles D., M.B., 1867. 



Homans, 3[rs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886, 1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, James M., 1891. 
Hubbard, William J., 18.58. 
Hudson, John E., 1895, 1890. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880, 1893, 

1894. 
Hutchins, 3Iiss Emma, 1895, 1896. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Irwin, 31iss Agnes, 1894. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, 31. B., 1869. 
Jeffries, William A., 1893. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
liinthall, Baxid P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., />.L>., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, Miss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 18.55. 
Lee, 31iss Alice, 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lee, Hon. John H., 1897. 
Lewis, Weston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L,, 1868, 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855, 
Lothrop, Loriug, 1866. 
Lowell, A. Lawrence, 1897. 
^Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., 31. B., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
McNulty, Eev. John J., 1896, 1897. 
Manning, Bev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Bev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Metcalf, Bev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
Morison, jV/ss Mary, 1892, 1893, 1895. 
Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 
Morse, John T., Jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., Jr., 1878. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 
Mudge, Hon E. R., 1871. 
Neale, Rollin H.. B.B., 1853. 
Xoble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
O'Brien, Hon. HiK/lt, 1870. 
O'Callaghan, John J., 1895. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, Ls78. 
Otis, g'. a., 1860. " 
Paddock, Bt. Bev. Benj. II., 1876. 



122 



City Document No. 21. 



Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parker, 2Irs. AVilliam L., 1897. 
Parkman, Henry, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leigliton, 1882, 1896, 

1897. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 188.-), 1890, 1891. 
Phillips, .John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hou. Henry L., 1891. 
Pingree, Miss Lalia B., 1894. 
Prescott, William H., LL.D, 18.5.3. 
Prince, IIon.F.O., 1888, 1889, 1890. 

1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 1896. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. .John P., 1865. 
Kandall, Charles M., M.D., 1884. 
Rice, lion. Alexander H., 1860. 
Eobbins, Elliott, M.D., 1893. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861, 
Rollins, J. Wingate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, .John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 186-3. 
Runkle, Pr<f. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 
Sampson, O. H., 1892, 1893. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey X., 1888, 

1889. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 1893, 1894. 
Shitrtleff. Hon Nalhaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Azariah, 1895, 1896. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886., 
Smith, Miss Minna, 1892. 
Sowdon, A. J. C, 1892, 1893. 
Sprague, Charles J., 18.59. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D., 1888. 
Stevens, Oliver, 18.58. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 



Teele, John O., 1886. 
Thaxter, AdamW., 18.55. 
Thayer, George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1802. 
Thomas, B. F., LL.D., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 
Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, Georqe, LL.D., 1853, 1854, 

18.5.5, 1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tillinghast, Caleb B., 1895, 1896. 
Tobev. //o». Edwards., 1862. 
Todd, William C, 1894. 
Twombly, Rev. A. S., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H , 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Warner, Hermann J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 18.59. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.B., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Itebert C, 1867. 
Weissbein, Loviis, 1893. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wendell, Prof. Barrett, 1895, 1896. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitmore, William H., 1887. 
Whitney, Daniel //., 1862, 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williams, Harold, M.D., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Williamson, Mrs. William C, 1897. 
Wilso)L, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 18.54. 
Winthrop, Robert C, Jr., 1887. 
Wood, Frank, 1897. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, 3Irs. Abba Goold, 1888, 

1889. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D. , 18S4. 



Library Department. 



123 



APPENDIX X. 



SCHEDULE OF LIBRARY SERVICE. 

JSTofe. — This has 1)een liroiijjlit down to "Mnj 1, 1S98. The order followed is (i; by 
rank in grades, and (2) alphabetically, within each grade. 

Summary. 



Central Library . 

Branches and Readiuo- rooms 



154 Males 79 Females 75 
61 " 14 " 47 



215 
Evening and Sunday service. * 57 

Extra assistance is employed at the branches. 



93 



122 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Name. 

Putnam, Herbert 
Savage, Philip IL 
t M coney, George V. 
** Bicknell, Margaret M. 
Deery, D. Jean. 
Learned, Lucie A. . 
Cellarius, Theodore W. 
Nichols, Adelaide A. 
McFarland, Peter V. 



Entered. 


Grade. 


. 1895 


Librarian. 


. 1896 


Librarian's Sec 


. 1889 


B. Special. 


. 1896 


C. " 


. 1891 


C. " 


. 1891 


C. " 


. 1892 


D. 


. 1868 


Auditor. 


. 1896 


D. Runner. 



CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 



Whitney, James L. 
^Swift, Lindsay , 
Chevalier, Samuel A 
Hunt, Edward B. 
Murdoch, John 
Burnell, Carrie 
Rollins, Mary H. 
Seaver, Mrs. Lillian 
Rice, Edwin F. 
Tenney, JMary A. 
Bartlett, Mary R. 
Cutler, Dora L. 
Gould, Ida W. 



, , 


1869 


Chief. 


• 


1878 


A. Special 




1894 


A. 




1883 


A. " 




1896 


A. 




1881 


A. 




1886 


A. 


F. . 


1888 


A. 




1885 


B. Special 




1897 


B. " 




1897 


B. 




. 1887 


B. 




. 1884 


B. 



* Serving from three to seven evenings a week each. The total number of positions 
is 33, evenings; 38, Sundays. 
** Auditor's Assistant, j tJustodiau of Stock Room. ITEditor Library rublications. 



124 



City Document No. 21. 





Entered. 


Grade. 




Hemmings, Anita F. 


. 1897 


B. 




Leavitt, Luella K. . 


. 1895 


B. 




Brennan, T. Frank . 


. 1890 


D. Special. 




Dolan, Charles T. . 


. 1894 


D. 




OEDERING 


DEPARTMENT. 




Macurdy, Theodosia E. 


. 1889 


Chief. 




Browne, Alice . 


. 1883 


B. Special. 




Coolidge, Marie 


. 1893 


B. 




Frinsdorff, Emil}^ 0. 


. 1894 


B. 




Goddard, Mrs. Frances H. 


. 1892 


B. 




McGrath, Mary A. . 


. 1868 


B. 




Keleher, Alice A. . 


. 1891 


D. Special. 




McFarland, Thomas A. . 


. 1891 


D. 




St. Louis, Robert E. 


. 1897 


D. Runner. 




SHELF DEPARTMENT. 




Roffe, William G. T. 


. 1881 


A. Div. 2. 




*Locke, .John F. 


. 1894 


B. 




Richmond, Bertha P. 


. 1895 


B. 




Connor, George H. . 


. 1891 


C. Special. 




Reardon, .John H. 


. 1896 


C. 




Eberhart, .John 


. 1894 


D. " 




Caiger, Eliza F. A. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Lucid, John F. 


. 1893 


D. 




BATES HALL. 






Knapp, Arthur M. . 


. 1875 


Custodian. 




tBlaisdell. Frank C. 


. 1876 


A. Special. 




Doyle, Agnes C. 


. 1885 


B. 




Buckley, Pierce E. . 


. 1891 


C. 




Plunkett, Albert .1. . 


1895 


D. 




Hardy, Charles A. . 


1896 


D. Runner. 




SPECL^L 


LIBRARIES.^ 




Fleischner, Otto 


1891 


Custodian. 




Hitchcock, Grace A. 


1895 


B. Special. 




Hall, Belle S. . 


1895 


B. 




Lewis, Marian L, . 


1897 


B. 




Barlow, Lillis . 


1897 


C. 




Cassidy, Margaret L. 


1895 


1). Special. 




Ward, Joseph W. 


1891 


D. 




Hutchins, Fern aid . 


1896 


D. 




Kelly, Charlotte H. . 


1895 


D. 




Leonard, Michael F. 


1895 


D. 




McKiernan, John L. 


1896 


D. Runner. 




JSmith, Arthur E. F. 


1897 


D. Runner. 





* Engaged for temporary service. 

t Supervisor of Patent and Newspaper Departments. 

I Resigned, to take effect May 31, 1898. 



Library Department. 



125 



PERIODICAL-ROOM 


. 






Entered. 




Grade. 


Wendte, Frederika . 


. 1895 


c. 




Ford, Mary E. A. . 


. 1895 


D. 




Maguinuess, James . 


. 1897 


D. 


Runner. 


NEWSPAPER-ROOM 






Serex, Frederic 


. 1895 


B. 




Keenan, Matthew T. 


. 1896 


D. 


Special. 


ISSUE DEPARTMENT. 




McGuffey, Margaret D. . 


. 1895 


Chief. 


* Sheffield, Mrs. Gertrude P. 


. 1896 


B. 


Special. 


Forrest, Gertrude E. 


. 1895 


B. 


a 


Barry, Edward F. 


. 1890 


C. 


i i 


McCarthy, Michael, Jr. . 


. 1892 


C. 


u 


Sheridan, Mary C. . 


. 1881 


C. 


a 


Desmond, Louise L. 


. 1895 


C. 




Richards, Florence F, 


. 1875 


C. 




Shumway, Marion H. 


. 1895 


C. 




Cufflin, M. Florence 


. 1892 


D. 


Special. 


Cunniff, Nellie L. . 


1895 


D. 




Dowliug, S. Jennie . 


1895 


D. 




McCarthy, Marion A. 


1895 


D. 




Murphy, Annie G. . 


1888 


D. 




Reynolds, Mary A. . 


1894 


D. 




Roett, Louis W. 


1895 


D. 




Bertram, Lucy I. 


1895 


D. 




Connolly, Nelly L. . 


1895 


D. 




Daly, Margaret C. . 


1895 


D. 




Ethier, Lillian E. . . . 


1895 


D. 




Gorman, John E. . 


1895 


D. 




Kiernan, Letitia M. . 


1895 


D. 




Lucid, Joseph A. . 


1895 


D. 




Olson, Alphild .... 


1895 


D. 




Olson, Bertha A. . . . 


1895 


D. 




Wiechmann, Catherine A. 


1895 


D. 




Williams, Grace 


1895 


D. 




Zaugg, Joanna 


1895 


D. 




Zaugg, Otto E. . . . 


1895 


D. 




Barry, Margaret M. . 


1897 


D. 


Runner. 


Cole, Grace" E. 


1897 


D. 




Hagerty, Mary E. . 


1897 


D. 




McKenzie, Kenneth . 


1897 


D. 




McSweeney, M, Agnes 


1897 


D. 




Maier, William C, Jr. 


1S97 


D. 




Mayer, Harry F. . 


1897 


D. 




Shaughnessy, Mary A. 


1897 


D. 




* In chartre of Ju 


VL'uile DeDart 


nent. 





126 



City Document No. 21. 





Entered. 


Grade. 


Stetson, Nina M. . 


1896 


D. Runner. 


Bryce, Jean M. 


1898 


E. 


Campbell, Charles D. 


1898 


E. 


ISSUE DEPARTMENT, BEANCH DIVISION". 


* AVellman, Hiller C. 


1896 


Supervisor of Branches 
aud Delivery Stations. 


t Bourne, Edna L. . 


1897 


B. 


Painter, Florence Mc. M. . 


1897 


B. 


Heimann, Otto A. . 


1890 


C. Special. 


Morse, INIaud M. 


1877 


C. " 


Maier, Joseph A. . 


1892 


D. " 


Conroy, Michael J. . 


1897 


D. Runner, 


REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 


Keen an, John J. 


1885 


B. Special. 


Mnrray, Ella K. 


1886 


C. 


Shelton, Richard B. . 


1895 


D. Special. 


Fillebrown, Emily F. 


1895 


D. 


PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 




Entered. 


Position. 


Lee, Francis W. 


1894 


Chief. 


Geyer, Willfried H. . 


1896 


Pressman. 


Greeley, Carrie P. . 


1896 


Compositor. 


Land, Annie F. 


1896 


a 


Ives, Birdsey F. 

BIN] 


1896 
DERY. 


Feeder. 


Ryder, Frank . 


. 1883 


Foreman. 


Collins, Dennis J. . 


. 1887 


Finisher. 


Brennan, Richard M. 


1898 


Forwarder. 


Fuerst, Alexander . 


. 1896 


a 


Heyer, AVilliam H. . 


. 1891 


a 


Hoeffner, George 


. 1891 


a 


Ivory, John W. 


1893 


i i 


Lofstrom, Konrad A. 


1892 


I i 


Mnrpliy, John F. 


. 1883 


a 


Hemstedt, William P. 


1883 


Pressman. 


Bowen, Mrs. Sarah E. 


1876 


Sewer. 


Doiron, .Joanna 


. 1896 


(( 


Kiley, Margaret J. . 


. 1889 


( ( 


Mori arty, jNIary G. . 


. 1875 


(( 


Nolen, Sarah . 


. 1891 


a 


Potts, Ellen F. 


1892 


n 


Soule, Ellen E. 


. 1891 


ii 



* Resigned, to take effect May 31, 1898. 
t Resigned, to take effect June 18, 1898. 



Library Department. 



127 



engijsteer and janitor department. 





Entered. 


Position. 


Niederaner, Henry . 


1894 


Chief Engineer. 


McCready, Alexander 


1895 


Engineer. 


Malone, John P. . . . 


1895 


Engineer. 


O'Neill, Harry 


1896 


i; 


Zittel, George, Jr. . 


1891 


(( 


Hcrland, Nils J. 


1895 


Fireman. 


Moran, John A. 


1894 


a 


Karlson, Charles W. 


1896 


Book Motors. 


* WillianivS .John L. . 


1886 


Janitor. 


McCarty, Dennis 


1888 


Watchman. 


McGee, Alexander D. 


1896 


Painter. 


Wall, Frank A. 


1897 


Carpenter. 


Hanna, William T. . 


1895 


Marble polisher 


Goode, Robert 


1895 


Elevator. ) 


Cole, AVilliam E. 


1898 


Coat room, j 


EAST BOST 


ON BRANCH. 




Entered. 


Grade. 


Walkley, Ellen 0. . 


1897 


C. Special. 


Brackett, Marian AY. 


1897 


C. 


Wing, Alice M. 


1873 


C. 


Biekford, Lillian A. 


1891 


D. 


Hosea, George H. . 


1873 


Janitor. 


Taylor, Charles F. . 


1897 


( ( 


SOUTH BOS^ 


rON BRANCH. 


Bullard, N. Josephine 


. 1883 


C. Special. 


Eaton, Ellen A. 


. 1873 


C. 


Sampson, Idalene L. 


1878 


c. 


McQuarrie, Annie C. 


. 1894 


D. 


Orcntt, Alice B. 


1887 


D. 


Sumner, Alice F. 


. 1897 


D. 


Baker, Joseph . 


1872 


Janitor. 


ROXBUR^ 


f BRANCH 


. 


Bell, Helen M. 


1878 


C. Special. 


Berry, Elizabeth C. . 


. 1883 


C. 


Puffer, Dorothy 


. 1878 


C. 


Griggs, Sarah W. 


1886 


D. 


Lynch, Gertrude A. 


. 1894 


D. 


Monahan, William . 


. 1883 


Janitor. 



CHARLESTOWN BRANCH. 

Cartee, Elizabeth F. . .1886 C. Special. 

Livermore, Mrs. Susan E. . 1885 C. 

Reagen, Elizabeth R. . .1895 C. 



* Charge of Ijook motors, evenings. 



128 



City Document Xo. 21, 









Entered. 


Grade. 


O'Nein, Margaret M. 


, 


1892 


D. 


Rogan, Katharine S. 




1896 


D. 


Smith, Thomas E. . 




1874 


Janitor. 


BRIGHTON 


BRANCH. 


Hobart, Martha N. . 


, 


1896 


C. Special 


Conley, Ellen F. 


. 


1891 


C. 


Dale, M. Florence . 




1895 


D. 


Brock, James M. 




1878 


Janitor. 


DORCHESTER BRANCH. 


Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T. . 


. 


1873 


C. Special 


Griffith, Mary E. . 




1886 


C. 


Donovan, Mary G. . 




1891 


D. 


Hufton, Nellie E. . 




1896 


D. 


Meffen, Margaret 


. 


1892 


D. 


Davenport, Edward . 


• 


1875 


Janitor. 


SOUTH 


ENE 


) BRANCH. 


Sheridan, Margaret A. 


, 


1875 


C. Special 


McGrath, Amelia F. 


. 


1888 


C. 


Lynch, l^mma F. . 


. 


1885 


D. 


Meehan, Margaret F. 




1893 


D. 


Mulloney, William J, 




1892 


D. 


JAMAICA 


PLAIN BRANCH. 


Swain, Mary P. 


, 


1877 


C. Special. 


Riley, Nellie F. 


. 


1878 


C. 


Albert, Katie F. 




1892 


D. 


Kenney, Thomas W. 




1897 


Janitor. 


WEST 


END 


BRANCH. 


Davis, Mrs. Eliza R. 




1877 


C. Special. 


Barton, Margaret S. 






1885 


C. 


Forbes, George W. . 






1896 


C. 


McKirdy, Alice E. . 






1896 


C. 


Mooney, Katharine G. 






1885 


C. 


Kiley, Mary E. 






1896 


D. 


Riley, Mary E. 






1891 


D. 


Porter, Frank C. 






1896 


D. Runner 


Rossiter, John . 






1896 


Janitor. 


WEST ROXBURY BRANCH. 


Morse, Carrie L. 


. 


1890 


D. Special. 


Woods, Eugene B. . 






1898 


Janitor. 



Library Department. 



129 



DELIVERY STATIONS. 
Station. Custodian. Grade. 

A. L"wer Mills Reading room Hill, M. Addie D, Special. 

B. Roslindale Deliverv Station Davis, William W. 

C. "West Roxbury Brancli See above 

D. Mattapau Reading-room Capewell, Mrs. Emma G.,D. Special. 

E. Neponset Delivery Station Barnes, Charles D. 

F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading-room Fairbrother. Mrs. Eliz.G., D. Special. 

G. AUston Delivery Station Bernard Drug Comjiany. 

H. Ashmont Delivery Station Weymouth, Clara E. 

J. Dorcliester Sta. Delivery Station . .Sexton, Mrs. Annie M. 

K. Bird-st. Delivery Station Morris, Antoinette. 

L. No. Brighton Reading-room Muldoon, Katlierine F. . .D. Special. 

M. Crescent ave, Deliverv Station Johnson, Charles E., & Co. 

N. Blue Hill ave. Delivery Station Riker, Mrs. S. A. 

P. B'way Extension Delivery Station. Ward. Langdon L D. Special. 

Q. Upham's Curner Delivery Station. .Bird, Mrs. Thomas H. 

R. Warren-st. Delivery Station Eaton, Charles T. 

S. Roxbury Crossing Delivery Station. Bollig, Emma D. Special. 

T. Boylston Delivery Station Locke, Joseph B. 



EVENING AND SUNDAY SERVICE. 

6 P.M. TO 10 P.M. Winter Schedule. 
Sundays, 2 to 10 P.M. 
Bates Hall. 

Officers in Charge. 

Chevalier, Samuel A. See Issue Department 

Fleischner, Otto ..... 

Hunt, Edward B. . 

Swift, Lindsay ..... 
Assistants. 

Roffe, William G. T 

Walsh, William A. See Fine Arts . 
Central Desk. 

Buckley, Pierce E. See Issue Department 

Reardon, John H. See Deliverers of Books 

Williams, David L. .... 

Care of Reference Books. 

Heimann, Albert E. . . . . 

Plunkett, Albert J. See Fine Arts Assistants 
Collectors of Slips. 

Pitts, James A. .... . 

Lucid, John F. ..... , 

Runner. 

Beekford, Fred A. . 
Issue Department. 
Officers in Charge. 

Blaisdell, Frank C 

Buckley, Pierce E. 

Chevalier, Samuel A. 
Receiver of Books. 

Blaisdell, Fred W. . 
Deliverers of Books. 

Reardon, John H. 

Clarke, William S. 



See Central Desk 
See Bates Hall 



See Central Desk 
See Indicator. Runners 



Hours. 



10 
10 



15^ 



4 
20 

24 



16 

9 

25 



20 
4 
8 

25 

13 
12 



130 



City Document No. 21. 



See Deliverers of Books. Runuer 
r. See Care of Tubes 



See ludicator 
See Runners 
See Runners 



Care of Indicator. 

Clarke, William S. 

Hannigan, Walter 
Care of Slips. 

Heimaun, Otto A. 

Hughes, John A. 
Care of Tubes. 

Hannigan, Walter 

Hardy, Charles A 

Tenny, Robert M. 
Care of Carriers. 

Hannigan, Frank J. 
Runners. 

Campbell, Charles D. . 

Clarke, William S. See Indicator 

Connors, Timothy J. 

Currier, Ulysses S. G. . 

Doyle, Charles A. . 

Eberhart, .John .... 

Ford, Daniel J. See Desk Attendant 

Glover, John H. . 

Gorman, John PL . 

Hardy, Charles A. See Care of Tubes 

Hemstedt, William P. See Patent room 

Hughes, Thomas F. . . . 

McFarland, Peter V. . . . 

Martin, D. Clifford 

Roett, Louis W. See Fine Arts 

Russell, J. Edward 

Tenny, Robert M. See Care of Tubes 

Weller, Waldo W 

Desk Attendant. 

Ford, Daniel .T. See Runners 



Deliverers of Book 



s. 



Extra Assistant 



Hours. 

13 
12 

7 
18 

13 
6 
6 

25 

16 

7 
2.5 

7 
25 

9 



7 
12 

9 

9 
2.5 

6 
16 
19 
18 

2^ 



Barton Library. 

In Charge. 

Lee, Francis W. 

Tiffany, Edward 
Assistant. 

Smith, Arthur E. 



20 
12 

32 



Fixe Akts Depaktmext. 



In Charge. 

Bourne, Frank A. . 

Walsh, William A. 
Assistants. 

Leonard, Michael F. 

Plunkett, Albert J. 

Ward, Joseph W. . 



See Bates Hall Assistants 



See Reference Books 



20 
12 

9 

H 

191. 

J- — i> 



Library Department. 131 

Extra Assistant. Hours. 

Roett, Louis W. See Runners .... 4 

Periodical Room. 

Connors, John F. . " . . . . . .32 

Registration Desk. 

Fallon, William E 21 1 

Keenan, John J. ....... 3^ 

Patent room and Juvenile Library. 

Attendants. 

Doyle, Agnes C. ....... 6 

Hall, Belle S 8^ 

Owen, Marion L lOf 

Assistant. 

Trueman, Nelson G. . . . . . .32 

Extra Assistant. 

Hemstedt, William P. See Runners ... 4 

Newspaper room. 

Attendants. 

Brennan, T. Frank . . . . . .12 

Connor, George H. . . . . . .16 

Keenan, Matthew T " . 4 

Replacement op Books. 

Barry, Edward F 12^ 

McCarthy, Michael, jr 12^ 



132 City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX XI. 



SYSTEM OF SERVICE. 

As IN Force May 1, 1898. 

The sj'stem of graded sendee with provision for examinations 
as set forth in Article VI. of the By-laws quoted below was 
adopted by the Trustees in April, 1895. Employees then in the 
service were graded thereunder. The application of the system 
to such employees was, however, made with this proviso : that it 
should not of itself entitle any employee to an increase of salary 
nor subject him to a decrease. In many cases, therefore, the 
salaries of present employees do not yet accord precisely with 
the salaries of the grades under which they are classed. But 
increases of salary that may be recommended on the ground that 
the service rendered is entitled to higher pay will be made only 
in accordance with the system. And all promotions, as well as 
new appointments, will be made in accordance with the system. 

Extracts from By-Laws. 

ARTICLE VI., Section 1. — ExaminaUons . Semi-annu- 
ally, or oftener if expedient, examinations shall be held under 
the direction of the Librarian, for admission, b}^ promotion or 
otherwise, to all grades of employment in the Public Library, 
except the positions of Librarian, Assistant Librarian, Libra- 
rian's Secretary, Auditor, Chief Cataloguer, Chief of Shelf 
Depaitment, Custodian of Bates Hall, Chief of Ordering Depart- 
ment, Chief of Issue Department, Supervisor of Branches and 
Stations, Chief Engineer, Chief of Printing Department, and 
Chief of Bindery. 

From the list of those persons who have successfully passed 
the examinations of the grade in which they seek employment, 
appointments shall be made by the Trustees upon nomination by 
the Librarian in consultation with the head of the department in 
which the appointment is to be made. 

ARTICLE v.. Section 2. — Vacations and other Absences. 
All persons regularly employed in the Library, except persons 
employed in the Engineer's or Janitor's departments, or in the 
Bindery, shall be entitled to a vacation at the rate of twenty-four 
days for each year in the service, exclusive of legal hohdays, and 
of the weekly half-holiday allowed by the city ordinance, to be 
arranged by the Librarian. No allowance shall be made for 
absence from duty except as above provided. 



Library Department. 133 

Section 3. The President or Librarian shall have power to 
suspend, with loss of pay, any person in the Librarj' service 
until the first succeeding meeting of the corporation. 

The following notice and application blank are furnished to 
applicants for employment in the librar}^ service : 

Notice to Applicants fok Ejiployment. 

Applications must he made upon the printed blanks furnished 
by the Library. Examinations for applicants will be held from 
time to time as the needs of the service may require. Each 
applicant will be notified of the examination to l>e held next 
after the filing of his application. 

The examinations are not strictly competitive. Other capaci- 
ties being equal, preference will be given to persons attaining the 
highest mark ; but in making selections from among those who 
have taken the examination, other elements of fitness for the par- 
ticular positions to be filled will be taken into account. 

The purpose of the examination being not to test the intelli- 
gence of the applicants by an absolute standard, but rather to 
range the applicants according to the relative intelligence dis- 
played by them, no absolute pass-mark is fixed ; nor is any cer- 
tificate or diploma given, but candidates will, if they desire, be 
informed of their relative rank among those who have taken 
examinations for the same grade. 

The examination, nioreover, is legarded as a preliminary test 
merely. It must be followed by a test of capacity in actual ser- 
vice during a probationary period. And all appointments to the 
service, even where carrying pay, are provisional and conditioned 
upon proof of capacity for the particular positions to be filled as 
shown in actual ser^'ice. 

The entire library service (excepting the Engineer, Janitor, and 
Printing Departments and the Bindery, and the Sunday and Even- 
ing service which is paid by the hour) is divided into grades. 
Each grade begins with a minimum salary and progresses, by an 
annual increase, to a maximum. No such increase, however, 
will be paid, unless the work of the employee has proved satisfac- 
tory to the Trustees. The maximum reached, no further increase 
is possible, except by promotion to a higher grade. Such promo- 
tion also is based upon an examination, combined, however, with 
certificate of capacity from the head of the department in which 
the employee has served. 

The ordinary grades are supposed to provide for positions 
where academic knowledge is necessary ; the special grades for 
those positions where special capacities (as knowledge of type- 
writing, executive abihty, etc.) are more particularly required. 



134 City Document No. 21. 

The grades are as follows : 







1st year, 


2d year, 


3d year, 


4th year« 






per week. 


per w 


eek. 


per week. 


per week- 


Grade 


E 


$3 


50 


$4 00 


$4 50 






D 


5 


00 


6 


00 


7 00 






D (for runners) 5 


00 


5 


50 








C 


7 


50 


8 


50 


9 50 


$10 50 




B 


11 


00 


12 


00 


13 00 


14 00 




A Div. I. . 


18 


50 


19 


50 








ADiv. II. . 


21 


50 


22 


50 








D Special . 


7 


00 


8 


00 


9 00 


10 00 




C 


12 


00 


13 


00 


13 50 






B 


14 


00 


15 


50 


17 50 






A 


23 


50 


25 


50 


27 50 





It is expected that vacancies in Grade A will be filled b}' pro- 
motion from Grade B after examination. 

Persons who have entered the Library service as runners in 
Grade E, and are certified hj the head of the department to have 
performed satisfactorily the duties of Grade E and to have 
acquired a knowledge of location requisite for Grade D, may, 
upon recommendation of the Librarian, at the end of six months 
from the date when the}^ entered the ser^ice, be promoted to 
Grade D. 

The qualifications for the various general grades, so far as the 
requirements of the general examination are concerned, are as 
follows : 

Grade A. 

Knowledge of Foreign Languages. 
General History and Literature. 
Library Science. 
Experience in this Library. 

Grade B. 

Equivalent of College Education. 
Knowledge of at least two Foreign Languages. 
General History and Literature. 
Library Science (if required). 

Grade C. 

Equivalent of High School Education. 
Knowledge of one Foreign Language. 

Grade D. 

Equivalent of Grammar School Education. 
Knowledge of location and system in this Library, 

Grade E. 
Equivalent of Grammar School Education. 



Library Department. 135 

Applicants for positions in the higher grades must satisfy the 
examiners of their ability to pass the examinations for all the 
grades below that for which they make application. 

To the above general qualifications must be added in each case 
such special qualifications as may be requisite for the particular 
positions to be filled. 

Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 

Application Blank. 

I hereby make application to be examined for a position in 
Grade of the Public Library service of the city of Boston. 

As part of mj^ application I declare the answers to the follow- 
ing questions to be true and in my own handwriting. 

Each question must be answered or the blank will be returned. 

1. Are you married or single? 

2. Where do you reside and what is your post-office address? 
(Give town or city, including street and number.) 

3. How long have you been a resident of said cit3'or town? 

4. What is the date and place of your Inrth? 

5. What is your father's and mother's full name? Give 
name, whether li^'ing or dead. 

6. Have you ever been examined for the public service in any 
State or city? If so, when, where, for what branch and grade of 
the service, and with what result? 

7. Are j'ou in good health ? Have you any mental or physical 
incapacity of which you are aware ? 

8. What is your present occupation and what has been your 
past occupation ? Give places and dates of employment as near 
as 3^ou can. 

9. In what schools, acadeni}', or college were you educated? 
Give the name and length of course in each. 

10. Have you any experience, or do you possess any special 
qualifications, such as a knowledge of book-keeping, stenography, 
typewriting, foreign languages, or a famiUarity with other 
branches of knowledge, which, in your opinion, would be useful 
in the service of the Public Library, and not included among the 
requirements for the grade in which you are an applicant ? 



[Signature] 

Boston^ , 189 



When filled out, fold TRRiCE and return to the Lihraria7i of 
Public Library. Enclose any recommendations you desire to 
submit. 



136 City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX XII. 



CORRESPONDENCE, BEQUESTS, ETC. 

Boston, March 15, 1897. 
Herbert Putnam, Esq., 

Librarian., Boston Public Library : 
Dear Sir : Two or tbi-ee weeks ago I spoke to you about 
giviug to the Boston Public Library some books and pamphlets 
from the library of Dr. Gould. They have been taken from the 
shelves and all piled together in one room at 29 Kirkland street, 
Cambridge, and are ready for you to take at any time when you 
will send for them. There are books, pamphlets and a few 
maps. Before you send for them, will you j)lease write to Miss 
S. Z. Preble, 29 Kirkland street, gi^^ng her, say, twenty-four 
hours' notice of the time your men will call, so that she may be 
on hand to point out the books? 

The gift is from Dr. Gould's children to the Boston Public 
Lil)rary, and is made absolutely, without condition or restriction. 
The Library is to do as it sees fit with the books, pamphlets 
and maps. But it would please the givers if a few of the best of 
the l)Ooks — especially if some of the scientific works concerning 
the Argentine Republic — might be marked "From the gift of the 
children of B. A. Gould," and kept by the Library. 
Acknowledgment should be made to 
Alice Bache Gould, '\ 

Mary Quincy Thorndike, ,- Children of B. A. Gould, 
Benjamin A. Gould, ) 

to my care. 

Yours truly, 

(Signed) Albert Thorndike. 



114 Beacon street, Boston, April 29, 1897. 
Herbert Putnam, Esq. 

Dear Sir : Will you kindly present the following communica- 
tion to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library ? 
Yours very truly, 

(Signed) J. T. Coolidge, Jr. 

Boston, April 29, 1897. 
To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

The undersigned present their compliments to the Trustees of 
the Boston Public Lilirary and beg them to accept seventeen 



Library Department. 137 

paintings by Howard Pyle, representing scenes in the life of 
Washington and in colonial times, in order that they may be hung 
and properly cared for in one of 'the rooms of the Library in 
Boston. 

Respectfully, 
Massachusetts Society of the Colonial Dames of America, 
Warren and Prescott Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, Mrs. Huntington Wolcott, Mrs. S. D. 
Warren, Mrs. D. P. Kimball, Misses Mason, Mrs. J. C. 
Phillips, Miss M. A. Bigelow, Mrs. James T. Fields, Mrs 
C. E. C. Waters, Mrs.' C. P. Coffin, Mrs. Roger Wolcott, 
Mrs. G. B. Blake, Mrs. S. Eliot, Miss M. Mixter, D. W. 
Ross, A. Hemenway, J. N Black, John L. Gardner, A. A. 
Carey, Dr. W. S. Bigelow, Dr. A. T. Cabot, Edward 
Wheelwright, W. S. Scudder, G. A. Goddard, E. S. Morse, 
B. I. Gilman, James F. Almy, T. F. Hunt, W. P. Blake, 
J. T. CooUdge, Jr. 



99 Mount Vernon street, Boston, April 30, 1897. 
Herbert Putnam, }Lsq., 

Jjibrarian , J^oston Public JAhranj : 
My dear Sir : Enclosed find my check. No. 4874, for $.5,000, 
to your order, as a payment on account of the Twentieth Regi- 
ment Monument Fund, to be used for the purchase of books of a 
military and patriotic character to l)e placed in the alcove appro- 
priated as a memorial of the Twentieth Regiment. I also enclose 
a receipt for the same, and remain, with great respect. 
Yours, very sincerely, 

.JoHX C. Ropes, 
Treasurer of the Twentieth Regiment Monument Fund. 

Boston, May 6, 1897. 
Herbert Putnam, Esq., 

Librarian Public Library, Poston, 3Iass. : 
My dear Sir : I thank you for your favor of the 1st inst., and 
also for your receipt for $.5,000, received from me as treasurer of 
the Twentieth Regiment Monument Fund. You are quite right in 
supposing that we intend this sum as a fund for investment, the 
income of which is to be used for the care of the alcove and the 
purchase of books of a military and patriotic character. 
With great regard, I am yours very sincerely, 

(Signed) John C. Ropes. 



Cambridge, Mass., April 30, 1897. 
To the Trustees and Librarian of the Poston Public Library : 
Gentlemen : At the last meeting of the Boston Browning- 
Society the following recommendation was presented by the Coun- 
cil, namely : 



138 City Documext No. 21. 

"We recommend that the books (constituting the Library of 
the Browning Society) be immediately placed in the care of 
the Boston Public Library, without conditions, further than are 
implied by the expressed wish that they be kept together as a 
reference collection so long as the well-being of the Public 
Library itself permits, and that they be made fully accessible 
under the same rules that the Public Library maintains in the 
case of other similar collections." 

This recommendation was heartily adopted, and it is now our 
duty and privilege to transfer the books to your care. 

Of the value of this collection you are already aware. We are 
glad to place it where it will be of far larger ser\'ice than it could 
be in the private possession of the society. 

Will you kindly indicate your wishes as to the removal of the 
books to Mrs. .J. Mason INIarean, 46 Brewster street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Respectfully yours, 
Philip S. Moxom, President. 
Emma E. Marean, Librarian. 

Joshua Kendall, Chairman of E,recutive Committee. 
Library Connmittee of the Boston Browning Society. 



Boston, Mass., May 10, 1897. 
To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen : As a committee representing the Papyrus Club 
of Boston, we tender for your acceptance from the members of 
that club as a fund in memory of their late member, John Boyle 
O'Reilly, the sum of Si, 000. 

We ask your acceptance of this fund under the following con- 
ditions : The fund is to be held and invested by you and your 
successors, and the income thereof as the same shall accrue is to 
be expended for the purchase of books for the Boston Public 
Library. There shall be inserted and maintained in* eveiy book 
purchased from the proceeds of this fund, a book-plate of a 
design to be oflfered by us and approved by you, to be printed 
from a plate which we will give with the donation. 

Should the fund at any time, by depreciation or otherwise, 
become impaired from the original sum of $1,000 the income 
therefrom shall accumulate and be added to the principal until 
the original amount of Si, 000 shall be restored. 

We trust that I)}' this permanent memorial, the Papyrus Club may 
testify its appreciation of .John Boyle O'Reilly, whose influence in 
this community was an inspiration in the cause of education, and 
ma}' also advance the public interests which are in your keeping. 
Yours respectfully', 

Benjamin Kimball, 
T. R. Sullivan, 
Geo. F. Babbitt, 
Committee of the Papyrus Club. 



Library Department. 139 

85 Beacon street, Boston, May 11, 1897. 

Deau Mr. Pkixck : As you are one of the Trustees of the 
Public Library, I write to ask you whether there is to l)e an Art 
room there? If so, I wish to present to it a bust of " Powers's 
Greek Slave," if the Trustees will accept it. It rests on a 
pedestal of pink Spanish marble. 

Yours very sincerely, 

(Signed) Margaret S. Otis. 



IBequest of Caleb Davis Bradlee^ D.D.^ late of Brookline; died 
May Z, 1897. Will dated December 26, 1896 ; proved. 
May 19, 1897. 

I give to the City Lilirary, Boston, Mass., one thousand dollars. 

I give, devise and bequeath to Charles U. Cottiug and Samuel 
Bradlee Uoggett, of Boston, Mass., in trust, all the rest of my 
property, real, personal or mixed, which I may now possess or 
ma}' hereafter acquire, and I desire them to invest the same from 
time to time as occasion may require, making as few changes as 
possible in such securities as the}^ may deem best, always having 
more regard for the security than for the income to be derived 
therefrom, and after deducting the necessary expenses for the 
care of the same, to pay over the income thereof, each three 
months, to my wife, Caroline Bradlee, during her life ; and at 
her clecease I hereby order that the trust shall continue, and I 
desire that the interest each three months shall lie paid to my 
daughter, Eliza Williams Bradlee Smith, as long as she shall 
live, and at her death, I desire that the trust shall continue and 
that the interest shall be paid to her child or children during life, 
and at the death of her child or children, the principal and inter- 
est not paid shall be divided equall}' between Tufts College, 
Home for Aged Couples. Roxbury, New England Historic Genea- 
logical Society, City Liln-ary of 13oston, Town Lil)rary of Brook- 
line, Mass., with the exception of my lot at Mount Auburn; that 
lot, in case of the decease of my wife and daughter, I give in 
trust to Mount Auburn Cemetery, desiring that the right of 
burial shall be allowed to ni}' wife, child and grandchild or grand- 
children. 



Request of John C. Paige, late of Boston, died on May 8, 1897. 
Will dated January 28, 1897 ; proved May 27, 1897. 

Sixth. All the rest and residue of the property and estate of 
wliich I may die seized or possessed I give, beqneatli and devise 
to Josiah II. Benton, ,Tr., and William K. (irav, of P>oston, and 



140 City Document No. 21. 

their successors, in trust for the following uses and purposes, 
to wit : 

I. To hold, manage, sell, invest and reinvest in such manner 
as they shall from time to time deem safe and prudent, and to 
pay over to my Mother, Ann L. Paige, from the income and 
principal, if necessar}^ of said property and estate, such sums as 
she may from time to time request, not to exceed the sum of six 
thousand dollars ($6,000) per annum. 

II 

III. After the death of my Mother, Ann L. Paige, I direct 
said Trustees to dispose of the residue and remainder of said 
property and estate then remaining in their hands and not herein- 
above otherwise disposed of, in tlie following manner : 

1-9. inclusive. Bequests aggregating $50,000. 

10. To pay the residue and remainder of said property and 
estate then in their hands not hereinabove otherwise disposed 
of to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, 
the income thereof to be applied to the uses and purposes of that 
corporation, it being my desire that the same shall be used so far 
as may in the judgment of the Trustees be expedient for the pur- 
jDoses of the Children's Reading-room. 



Mayor's Office.. City Hall, Boston, October 26, 1897. 
To the City Council: 

I transmit herewith a letter addressed to me by Mr. William C. 
Todd, offering, upon certain conditions, to give to the city in 
trust the sum of $50,000, the income to be expended for the pur- 
chase of current newspapers, to be placed in the Public Liln-ary. 

I believe that this liberal gift, for such a useful purpose, com- 
ing from a gentleman who is not even a citizen of Boston, should 
be promptly and gratefully accepted, and I recommend the passage 
of the accompanying order, providing for the carrying out of the 
conditions imposed by Mr. Todd. 

Respectfull}^ submitted, 

(Signed) .Josiah Quixcy, Mayor. 

Atkinson, N. H., October 21, 1897. 
Hex. Josiah Quixcy, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Dear Sir : Impressed with the increasing importance and 
influence of newspapers, and the great demand for them by all 
classes of the community, I addressed, .June 16, 1893, while the 
new building was in process of erection, a communication to the 
Trustees of the Public Lil»rary, offering to pay two thousand 
dollars annually for the purchase of newspapers, if the Trustees 
would connect with the Liljrary a newspaper department. My 



Library Department. 141 

proposition was accepted. After three years' experience of its 
operation, the Librarian has assured me of its success, of the 
increasing interest shown in it by citizens and strangers, and of 
its value as a part of the Library. I have been paying two 
thousand dollars annually since its opening, and wish to insure 
that amount permanentl}' for the maintenance of this newspaper 
department of the Library. 

I therefore offer to give to the City of Boston the sum of fifty 
thousand dollars, provided that the City Government requires its 
City^ Treasurer to accept this sum, hold the same in trust, and 
expend the income annually in payment for such current news- 
papers of this and other countries, as the board of officers for 
the time being having charge of the Public Library of the city 
shall purchase, the same to be kept in a suitable room in the build- 
ing in which the Central Public Library is now or may hereafter 
be located, and use no part of said income for the maintenance 
of the department where such newspapers are kept, or for any 
other purpose than the payment for such newspapers, it being my 
desire that the whole of the annual income shall be used solely 
for the purchase of newspapers ; and provided further, that the 
City Government authorizes the Mayor of the city to execute and 
deliver to me an agreement of the city that if the annual income 
from said fund shall in any year be less than two thousand dollars, 
the city will appropriate the necessary amount to make the income 
up to two thousand dollars, to carry out the purposes for which 
this fund is given. 

This gift is subject to the understanding that said board or 
officers shall have the entire discretion as to the length of time 
which the newspapers are to be kept on file, or to be preserved, 
or as to their disposal, and as to the restrictions and regulations 
under which the use of said newspapers shall be enjoyed. 

I am not a citizen of Boston, but legard it as a city of rare 
privileges, and it will certainly be one of them to have free access 
to representative newspapers of the world. It is the metropolis 
of New England, the centre of a large and cultivated population, 
and the attractive resort at all times of strangers from every 
section of the globe, ever anxious to see their home papers. I 
repeat, as I said in my communication of June 16, 1893, that my 
only interest in this matter is the wish to do some good to a great 
many people. 

If this proposal meets your approval, I would ask that you 
submit the matter to the City Council, and request that, it' it 
meets their approval, such steps may be taken as will enable me 
to pay tliis money to the city at once. 
Respectfully, 

(Signed) William C. Todd. 

City of Boston, 
In Board of Aldermen, O*tober 26, 1897. 

Ordered, That the city gratefully accepts the gift of fifty 
thousand (50,000) dollars tendered by William C. Todd, Esquire, 



142 City Document No. 21. 

and agrees to hold the same in accordance with the terms of 
his gift ; 

That the City Treasurer receive said sum, hold the same in 
trust, and expend the income thereof only for the payment of 
such current newspapers of this and other countries as the board 
or ofticers for the time being having charge of the Public Library 
of the city shall purchase, and that His Honor the Mayor execute 
and deliver to said William C. Todd, an agreement of the city 
that, if said income shall in any year be less than two thousand 
(2,000) dollars, the city will appropriate such sum as will make 
the sum to be expended for the purchase of newspapers as afore- 
said two thousand (2,000) dollars; 

That the ])oard or officers for the time being having charge of 
the Public Lil^rary of the city annually expend the sum of two 
thousand (2,000) dollars in the purchase of such current news- 
papers of this and other countries as they shall deem proper, and 
keep the same open to the inspection of the public in a suitable 
room in the Central Public Library Building for such period, and 
under such regulations and restrictions, and subject to such final 
disposal, as they shall deem proper. 

Passed unanimously. Sent down for concurrence. 

October 28 came up concurred unanimousl3\ 

Approved by the Mayor, October 30, 1897. 

A true copy. 

Attest : 

(Signed) John T, Peiest, 

Assistant City Clerk. 



Boston, January 21, 1898. 

Gentlemen : The Boston Numismatic Society, at its annual 
meeting January 14, voted to give to the Public Library of 
Boston its collection of books and pamphlets, and also the sum 
of SoOO for the lienefit of the study of numismatics, with no 
other condition. 

Yours respectfully, 
(Signed) Wji. S. Appleton, 

Secretary of the Boston Numismatic Society. 



Boston, June 29, 1896. 

Dear Mr. Knapp : I would be pleased to present the marble 
bust of Franklin, by Horatio Greenough, to the Boston Public 
Library. If you will send for it you can have it at any time. 

Yours truly, 

(Signed) Frank Wood. 

Boston, January 24, 1898. 
Dear Mr. Putnam : I saw a notice in Saturday's paper that 
the Franklin bust had been accepted ; with a statement that it 



Library Department. 1-13 

was supposed to be by Greenoiioh. I do not think it was by 
Greenough. The party I pnrcliased it from said he obtained 
it from Horatio Greenough, and I have little doubt that his 
brother Alexander Greenough used it as a model for the head of 
the Franklin statue in front of City Hall. I am of the belief 
that it was by Ceracchi, a Corsican sculptor who came to this 
country during Franklin's lifetime and made two busts of him 
studied from life. One was illustrated in the " McC'lure Maga- 
zine " article on Franklin portraits last year. This is, so far as 
I could see, an exact J'ac-simile of that bust. I think it more 
than possible that it is the second bust spoken of in the article, 
which in some way fell into Horatio Greenough's possession. I 
think the matter worth investigating, as, if it is an original Ce- 
racchi bust it is very valuable. It impressed me as the best and 
most characteristic portrait bust of Franklin that I ever saw. 
Yours truly, 

(Signed) Frank Wood. 



144 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX XIIL 



GIFTS. 

See also pp. 2, 6, 9, 10, 15, 16, 20-29 of main body of report. 

Givers 1,776 

Volumes 10,951 

Numbers 16,780 

Photographs, engravings, etc. ..... 939 

Newspaper subscriptions. (Gift of the publishers) . 95 



1. EIndowmexts. 

April, 1897. From the Twentieth Regiment Asso- 
ciation, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the 
sum of $5,000 00 

May, 1897. From the Papj^rus Club of Boston, the 

sum of 1,000 00 

October, 1897. From William C. Todd, Esq., of 

Atkinson, N. H., the sum of 50,000 00 

November, 1897. From the estate of the late Rev. 

Caleb D. Bradlee, of Brookline, the sum of 1,000 00 



2. Works of Art. 

Nineteen oil paintings by Howard P^de, from the following 
donors: J. Templeman Coolidge, Jr., Mass. Society of the 
Colonial Dames of America, Warren and Prescott Chapter of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution, Mrs. .J. Huntington 
Wolcott^ Mrs. S. D. Warren, Mrs. D. P. Kimball, Misses 
Mason, Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Miss M. A. Bigelow, Mrs. James 
T. Fields, Mrs. C. E. C. Waters, Mrs. C. P. Coffin, Mrs. 
Roger Wolcott, Mrs. G. B. Blake, Mrs. S. Eliot, Miss M. 
Mixter, D, W. Ross, A. Hemenway, J. N. Black, John L. 
Gardner, A. A. Carey, Dr. W. S. Bigelow, Dr. A. T. Cabot, 
Edw. Wheelwright, G. A. Goddard, E." S. Morse, B. I. Gilman, 
J. F. Almy, T. F. Hunt, W. P. Blake, W. S. Seudder. 

Bust of Benjamin Franklin, from Frank Wood, Esq., of Boston. 

Bust of John Bo^de O'Reilly, from the City of Boston. 

Copy of the bust of Powers' Greek Slave, from Mrs. Margaret S. 
Otis. 

Portrait of Edward C. Cabot (for deposit), from the Boston 
Society of Architects. 



$407 03 






368 


00 








— 


$775 


03 


. 


, 


26 


00 


, 


, 


300 


00 


. 


. 


1,321 


00 



Library Department. 145 

3. Miscellaneous Gifts op Money. 
From the Twentieth Regiment Asssociation, M.V.I. : 

For books ..... 

For service ..... 

From Mrs. John A. Lewis 

From the Boston Numismatic Society 

Photograph fund .... 

List of donors : Miss Mary S. Ames, G. R. Barrett, ]\[iss Eliza- 
beth H. Bartol, Boston Society of Architects, Mrs. Leroy 
Brown, Miss Ahce F. Carey, Miss Alice S. Cheney, Miss Ma- 
bel P. Cook, A Friend, through Miss M. B. Proctor, Mrs. O. 
B. Frothingham, Mrs. Cx. S. Hale, Harris School, first class, 
Augustus Hemenway, Miss Catherine I. Ireland, Jonathan A. 
Lane, Mrs. M. A. C. Livermore, Mrs. F. G. Macoml)er, Albert 
Matthews, James Means, Miss Susan Minns, Miss Madeline 
Mixter, Miss Harriet J. Morse, Mrs. Susannah R. Norcross, 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Parker, Miss M. B. Proctor, Miss Annette P. 
Rogers, Mrs. Robert Shaw Russell, Mrs. Berthold Schlesinger, 
Mrs. W. T. Sedgwick, JNIiss Emily Sever, Mrs. H. N. SUxter, 
Henry G. Spaulding, Hon. C. F. Sprague, A Subscriber, 
Thursday Fine Arts Club, Edw. R. Tyler,"Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Ware, Miss Mary L. Ware, Henry C. Warren, Mrs. Susan E. 
Warren, Mrs. Henry M. Whitney, Miss M. P. Winsor. 

4. Photographs, Engravings, etc. 

Baxter, Sylvester 10 Photographs. 

Benson, Frank W 7 " 

Boston Numismatic Society . . 2 " 

Brickbuilder Publishing Company . 4 Plates. 

Brown, Dr. Francis H 2 Portraits. 

Brown, S. N 1 Photograph (framed). 

Cartee, Miss Elizabeth F. . . . 1 Engraving " 

Chase, J. Eastman 29 Engravings. 

Chicago Public Library .... 2 Photographs. 

Clarke, Joseph H 308 Engravings. 

Coolidge, J. T., Jr 15 Photographs. 

Conant, William F 1 Engraving (framed). 

Crocker, Miss M. H 1 Engraving (framed) and 

1 Photograph. 

Curtis & Cameron 5 Photographs. 

Dewey, Mrs. M. W 1 Photograph. 

Doyle, Miss Agnes 1 " 

Fleischner, Otto 8 Photographs. 

Forbes, Mrs. John M 80 " (in 2 v.) 

Foster, John R. and Stephen B. . 24 " 

Grroton Public Library ..... 1 Photograph. 
Harvard University Astronomical 

Observatory 2 Photographs. 



146 



City I>ocument No. 21. 



Lick Observatory 19 Photographs. 

May, Henry A. 1 Photograph. 

Monks, Dr. G. H 189 Photographs and 

52 Prints and Engravings. 

Parker, Mrs. W. L 6 Photographs. " 

Pickering Henry G 21 " 

Richards, "William R 

Smith, Joseph L 

U. S. Department of War, En- 
gineers' Department .... 

Whitney, James L 

Wintlier, Charles A. G. 
AVorcester Eree Public Librarv 



10 


( ( 




2 


; 4 




100 


(( 




23 


(( 




1 D 


rawing. 




9 Photogra 


phs 



5. Books, Newspapers and Periodicals. 



Abbott, Dr. W. C, Chicago, III 

Academia Nacional de Medicina, Lima, Peril . 
Acadejuie Imperiale des Sciences, .S(. Petersburg, Piissia 
Academy of Science of St. Louis. St. Loin", ilo. 
Actors' Fund of the U. S. of America, New Yuik Cily 
Adams Academy, Quiwy, Mass. .... 

Adams Nervine Asylum ...... 

Adler, Cyrus, Washington, B.C. .... 

Aguilar Free Library, New York Citij 

Alabama Agricultural Exi^eriment Station, Auburn, Ala 

Alabama Geological Survey, University, Ala. . 

Albany Medical College, Albany, N.Y. 

Alden, William H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alexander, Mrs. Lucia G., Florence, Italy 

Alexander, Sigmund B. ..... . 

Allen, Edward G., ioncZon, i?n^?«7i(Z .... 

Allen, Nathaniel F., West Newti-n, Mass. . 

Allison, Dr. H. E., Matteawan, N.Y. .... 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences . 
American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Neio York Citi/ 
American Academy of Political and Social Science, Phila 

delphia. Pa 

American Angler, New York City .... 
American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 
American Architect and Building News Co. 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Scdem, Mass 

American Baptist Home Mission Society, Neio York City 
American Baptist Missionary Union .... 
American Bar Association, P/z/ZocZe/jj/im, Po. . 
American Bible Society, Neiv York City . 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 
American Carpet & Upholstery Trades, Philadelphia, Pa 
American Catholic Historical Society, Pliiladelphia, Pa 
American Citizen .... 1897-98 subscriptioi 
American Climatological Association, Philn delphia, Pa. 
American Colonization Society, Washington, D.C. . 
American Congregational Association 
American P"'ederation of Labor, IwHanajJolis, Ind. . 
American Fisheries Society, Glens Fulls, N.Y. . 
American Forestry Association, Washington, D.C. . 
American Homes Publishing Co., Knoxville, Tenn. . 
American Institute of Architects, Providence, B.I. 



Vols. 

1 
1 



No 9. 



1 

14 

2 



23 



LiBKARY DePAETMENT. 



147 



American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Xeio York 

City 
American 
American 
American 
American 
American 
American 



Md. 



Institute of Homeopathy, New York City 
Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City. 
Iron and Steel Association, PliihideJphia, I'a. . 
Jewish Historical Society, WnsJdngton, D.C. . 
Laryngological Association, Wasliingfon, D.C., 
Medico-Psychological Association, Baltimore, 



American Museum of Natural History, New York City . 
American New Church Tract and Publication Society, 

Philadelphia, Pa 

American Nonconformist, Indiana i^ol is, hid. 

1897-98 subscription 
American Numisnratic and Archjeological Society of New 

York City 

American Oriental Society, Neio Haven, Conn. 
American Otological Society, New Bedford, Mass. 

American Peace Society 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Purity Alliance, New York City 
American Seamen's Friend Society, New York City 
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 

Animals, New York City 

American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 
American Society of Kailroad Superintendents, Asbury 

Park, New York 

American Surgical Association, Pliiladelplda, Pa 
American Type Founders Co., Mackellar, Smith & Jordan 

Branch, Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 

American Type Founders Co., New England Branch 
American Unitarian Association .... 

American Water Works Association, New York City 
Aniericanische Turnzeitung, Milwaukee, Wis. 

1897-98 subscription 

Ames, George 

Ames, John N., Chelsfa, Mass 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. . . . . . 

Ami, II. M., Ottawa, Canada 

Anagnos, Michael , . . . . 

Anchor Color Manufacturing Co., Neio York City 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
Anderson, Dr. William G., New Haven, Conn. . 
Andover Theological Seminary, Alumni Association, 

^\ndover, Mass, ......... 

Anonymous .......... 

Appleton, William S. ....... . 

Apprentices', Library Company of Philadelphia, Phila- 

delphi'i. Pa. . . 

Arbetarens Viin, Worces'er, Mass. 1897-98 subscription 
Arbo, Major C. O. E., Drammen, Norway . . . . 

Archam, M., Alliens, Greece ...... 

Argus (Swedish) .... 1897-98 subscription 

Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, Tucson, Ariz. 
Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Fayetteville, 

A 



Irk. 

Arlington Mills, Lawrence, Mass. 
Ai-mour Institute of Technology, Chicago, III 
Armstrong, Joseph ..... 
Armstrong, L. K., Spokane, Wash. 

Arnold, Howard P 

Arpke, Jerome C, Franklin, Wis. 



Vols. 



27 
1 

143 



1 

3 

206 
1 



Xos. 
3 



IG 
6 



1 
1 
1 
6 

10 



2 

32 

1 



148 



City Document No. 21. 



Art Club of Philadelphia, PhiladelpJna, Pa. 
Associated Spanish Cuban Press, New York City 
Association of American Anatomists, Washington, B.C. 
Association of American Physicians, Albany, N.Y. 
Atherton, Miss M. L. . 

Atkinson, Edward 

Austin, Mrs. Josephine, Littleton, N.H. . 
Australian Museum, Sydney, New South Wales 

Avery, S. P., Netv York City 

Bacon, William P., New Britain, Conn. 

Baillie's Institution Free Library, Glasgow, Scotland 

Baker, Hon. William C, Providence, R.I. . 

Balch, Thomas W., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Balfour, David 

Bangor Public Library, Bangor, Me 

Bankhead, Jfoji. John H., Washington, B.C. 
Bar Association of the City of New York . 
Barker, Wharton, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Barker Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Barnard, James M., Milton, Mass 

Barney, Br. Charles N 

Barre, Mass., Public Library 

Barrows, Hon. S. J., Washington, B.C. . 

Bartlett, Miss Julia S 

Barton, Rev. William E 

Bates, 3Iiss Katharine L., Wellesley, Mass. 

Bath, England, Mayor 

Batten, Br. John M., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Battersea Public Library, London, England 

Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, N.Y 

Baxter, Capl. John B. M., St. John, New Brunswick 

Baxter, Sylvester, Maiden, Mass 

Beacon, 2 1897-8 subscriptions 

Beal, Hon. Flavins O., Bangor, Me 

Beal, John V., Randolph, Mass 

Bec^, JameaM., Philadelphia, Pa 

Belgium. Ministere de Tlndustrie et du Travail, Brussel 

Bell, John T., Oakland, Cat 

Bellows, Rev. Russell N., New York City . 
Benedict, Pi. D., Neiv York City .... 

Benneson, 3Hs8 C. A., Cambridge, Mass. . 

Bennett College, Chicago, III 

Bent, S. Arthur 

Benton, Josiah H. , Jr. 

Berkshire Baptist Association, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Berle, Rev. A. A., Brighton, Mass 

Bessey, Prof. Charles E., Lincoln, Neb. 
Bibliotheque des Temps Nouveaux, Publishers, Brussels. 
Belgium .......... 

Bidwell, Mrs. Lamson B 

Billerica, 3Iass., Town Clerk 

Billings, Br. John S., New York City 

Bimetallic League, London, England 

Biological Society of Washington, Washington, B.C 

Bird, Charles S. and Sisters, East Walpole, Mass. . 

Bird, Mrs. T. H 

Birmingham, England, Free Libraries Committee , 

Birtwell, Charles W 

Blaisdell, Frank C 

Blake, Hon. Edward, BubUn, Ireland 

Blake, Francis E 

Blanchard, George R. , New York City 



Vols. 
1 
1 

1 

2 



1 

2 
40 



Library Department. 



1-49 



Blinn, Henry C, East Canterbury, JSf.H. 
Blumer, Dr. G. Alder, Utica, N. Y. . 

Boardraan, John H 

Boardman, Samuel L., Augusta, Me. . 

Bocca, Silvio, Rome, Italy, . 

Bolton, Charles K., BrookJine, Mass. 

Bolton, Prof. Henry C, i\reto York City 

Bolton Public Free Library, Bolton, England 

Bond, Laurence . 

Bonnelle, Frank J. 

Borden, Miss C. . 

Bosson, H. P., Reading, Mass. 

Boston. Board of Election Commissioners 

Board of Fire Commissioners 

Board of Health 

Board of Overseers of the Poor 

City Aviditor 

• City Clerk . 

City Hospital . 

City Messenger 

City Treasurer . 

• Institutions Department 

Park Commissioners 

Street Laying-Out Department 

School Committee 

Water Commissioners 

Water Department . 

Boston and Albany Railroad 

Boston Architectural Club . 

Boston Art Club . 

Boston Associated Charities 

Boston Athenjeum 

Boston Book Company 

Boston Browning Society . 

Boston Budget 

Boston Chamber of Commerce 

Boston College 

Boston Commercial 

Boston Courier 

Boston Daily Advertiser 

Boston Daily Globe 

Boston Evening Transcript 

Boston Herald 

Boston Ideas 

Boston Industrial Home 

Boston Journal 

Boston Merchants 



1897- 



2 broadsides 



98 subscription 



1897-98 subscription 
1897-98 subscription 
1897-98 subscription 

2 1897-98 subscriptions 
12 1897-98 subscriptions 

2 1897-98 subscriptions 
1897-98 subscription 



2 1897-98 subscriptions 



Association 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts 
Boston North End Mission 
Boston Numismatic Society 
Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society 
Boston Post ... 2 1897-98 subscriptions 

Boston Protective Department . 
Boston Provident Association 
Boston Saturday Sun . 
Boston Society of Medical Sciences 
Boston Society of Natural History 
Boston Telegraph 
Boston Times .... 

Boston Transit Commission 

Boston Traveler , . . .2 1897-98 subscriptions 
Boston West Baptist Bible School Convention . 



1897-98 subscription 



1897-98 subscription 
1897-98 subscription 



Yole. 



4 
12 



2 
2 

191 
1' 
8 
2 
3 

115 
3 
3 



1 

291 



60 
1 



No8. 
2 



1 

2 
4 
1 
260 
1 



1 

3 

25 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

160 



963 



1 

3 

1 

153 



150 



City Document No. 21. 



Boston Young Men's Christian Association , 3 maps 
Boston Young Men's Christian Union 
Boston Young Women's Christian Association 
Bostonian Society ..... 

Boutwell, Hon. George S 

Bowditch, Prof. Henry P 1 broadside 

Bowdoin College, Brun.sitnck, Me. 

Bowker, R. K., New York Citi/ . 

Brace, Charles L., Neio York City 

Bradford, Enc/laiul. Public Free Libraries 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D. , Brookline, Mas.s. .39 newspapers 

Bradlee, Bev. Caleb D., Family of, lirookline., Mans. 

Braun, Adolphe & Cie., Neiv York City 

Breck, C. E. C, Mi Ito-^, Mass 

Brewster, Prof. Edwin T 

Bridgeport Public Library, Bridgeport, Conn. . 

Brill, E. J., Ley den, Holland 

Brinton, Prof. Daniel G., Media, Penn. 
Briscoe, J. Potter, Nott nyham, Ewjland . 
Bristol Docks Committee, Bristol, Knyl md 
British and Foreign Bible Society, London, England 
British and Foreign Unitarian Association, London, Eng 
British Museum, London, England .... 

Brookline, Mass., Town of 

Brookline Historical Society, Brookline, Mass. 
Brookline Public Library, Brookline, Mass. 
Brooklyn, JV. Y., Board of Education 

C'ivil Service Commission .... 

- — Department of City Works .... 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1897-98 subscrijjtion 
Brooklyn Daily Times, Brooklj n, N. Y. 

1897-98 subscription 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooks, Bev. William H. . . . 

Brophy, Thomas C 

Brosnahan, Bev. Timothy 
Brown, Allen A. .... 

Brown, Charles W. .... 
Brown, Dr. Francis H. . . . 
Brown University, Providence, B.I. . 
Brown University Library, Providence, B.I. 

Browne, Miss Alice, Dedham, Ma^s 

Brussels, Belgium, Bibliotheque Royale de Belgique 
Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mnwr, Pa. 
Biicke, Hr. R. M., Lond"V, Canada. 

1 broadside, newspaper clippings 

Buenos Aires, Arqmtine Republic, Biblioteca Nacioual 

Buffalo Public Library, Buffalo, X.Y. 

Bullard, Miss Mary L. and Sister, Manchester by the Sea 

Mass. ...... 

Bulletin Publishing Co. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 
Bunker Hill Monument Association . 

Burdett, Everett W 

Burgess, Gelett ..... 
Burleigh & Flynt, Augusta, Me. 

Burrage, Charles D 

Burrage, liev. Henry S., Portland, Me. 
Burrage, Br. Walter M. . . . 

Burrell, Percy J 

Busey, Dr. Samuel C, Washington, B.C. 



4 broadsides 



Vols. 
13 



2 

1 

2 

159 



2 
343 



Library Depae,t:mext. 



151 



Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, R.I. 

Butte Free Public Library, Butte, Mont. . 

Cabot, C. E., Chelsea, Muss. ..... 

Cabot, Godfrey L 

Cadieux & Derome, Montreal, Canada 
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, Cul. 
California Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley 
Cal 



California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento, Cal. 
Cambridge, J/ass., Board of Overseers of the Poor 
Cambridge Press, Cambridge, Mass. 

1897-98 subscription 
Cambridge Public Library, Cambridge, 3fass. 
Cambridge School for Young Ladies, Cambridge, Mass., 
Campbell, Frank, London, England . 1 broadside 

Canada. Department of Agriculture, Archives Branch, 
O tawa . . : . 

Dominion Experimental Farms, Ottawa, 

Statistical Division, Ottawa 



Department of the Interior, Ottawa 
Library of Parliament, Ottawa 
GeologicarSurvey, Ot'awa 



4 maps. 



Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal, Canaaa, 
Capell, P. G., Soest, Westphalia, Prussia 
Caproni, P. P. . . . . . 

Carles, Dr. C, Buenos Aires, Argentine Eepublic. 1 map 
Carmarthen Joint Counties Lunatic Asylum, Carmar- 
then, Wales 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, I'a. ..... 

Carret, Jose F., Cambridge, Mass. ..... 

Carrick, Samuel P 

Casey, Mrs. Etta B 

Cash, Mrs. Emma D 

Cash, J. P 

Castilian Club 

Castor, T H. & Co 

Catholic News, Xew York City . 1897-98 subscription 
Catholic Review, New York City 1897-98 subscription 
Catholic University of America, Washinjton, D.C. 
Centvxry Club Library, New York City 
Chadbourue, Br. Arthur P. . . . 

Chadwick, Dr. James R 

Chamberlaio, Hon. Mellen, Chelsea, Mass. 4 broadsides 

Chandler, Horace P 

Chandler, Prof. Seth C, Cambridge, Mass. 
Channing, Dr. Walter, Brookline, Mass. . 
Chaplin, Heman W., Dedham, Mass. . 

Chapman, H. A 

Charity Organization Society, New York City 
Charlton, Fiev. E. C, Gloucester, Mass. 
Chase, Cliarles A., Worcester, Mass. . 

Chase, Miss Edith L 

Chase, Frederick A., Lowell, Mass. . 
Chelsea, J/«.s.s., City of .... 
Fitz Public Liljrary .... 



Chester, Arthur H 

Chevalier, Samuel A. . 

Chicago Architectural Club, Chicago, III. 

Chicago Board of Trade, Chicago, lit. 

Chicago Civil Service Commission, Cliicago, III 

Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, III, . 



1 map 



Vols. 



80 
1 
7 
1 

205 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



Nos. 
1 
1 



1 

12 

(\ 
2 
1 



19 



1 
3 
6 
4 

1 
14 



2 

10 

42 

70 

1 

3 



1 

1 

12 

1 



152 



City Document No. 21. 



Vols. 



and 



Chicago Public Library, Chicar/o, III. . 1 broadside 

Chicago South Park Commissioners, Chicago, III. . 

Chicago Times-Herald, Chicago, III. 1897-98 subscription 

Christ Church Historical Association, Philadelphia, Pa., 

Christian 1897-98 subscription 

Christian Recorder, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1897-98 subscription 

Cliurch Home for Orphan and Destitute Children 

Church of the Pilgrims, Trustees of, Brooklyn, N. I 

Churchill, Miss Lida A. ..... . 

Cincinnati C'hamber of Commerce, Cincinnati, O. 

Cincinnati Public Library, Cincinnati, 0. . 

Citizen's Union, New York City . . .57 broadsides 

City Club of New York, New York City 

Civolari, G., New York City ... 1 newspaper 

Clapp, G-. H., Johannesburg, South African Rejniblic 

Clark, Dr. Charles E., Lynn, 3Iass. . 

Clark, George T 

Clark, J. C. L , Lancaster, 3Iass. 

Clark, Richard U 

Clark, Thomas B 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass. 

Clarke, Augustus P., Cambridge, Mass 

Clarke, Miss Cora H 

Clarke, George K. . . . . 

Clarke, Miss Lilian F. ... 

Clarke School for the Deaf at Northampton, Northamp 
ton. Mass 

Clausen, J. R., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clay Record Publishing Co., Chicago, III 

Clerkenwell Public Libi-ai-y, London, Engl 

Cleveland Board of Education, Cleveland, O. 

Cleveland Citizen, Cleveland, 0. 1897-98 subscription 

Coakley, Timothy W 

Cobb, Henry 

Cochrane, Gen. John, Neio York City 

Cockrell, Hon. F. M., Washington, B.C. 

Coddington, Rev. Herbert G. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

Codman, Russell S. . . . . 

Cohen, Adolph 

Cohn, Albert, Berlin, Germany . 

Colby University, Waterville, Me. 

Coley, Br. William B., Neio York City 

Colgate University Library, Hamilton, N. Y. 

College Club 

College of Charleston, Charleston, S.C. 

College Settlements Association 

Colles, George AV 

Collet, C. D., London, England . 

Colnaghi, Sir Dominic 

Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Colorado State Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Col 

Columbia University, New York City 

Columbia University Library, Nev) York Cify . 

Columbus, Ohio, Public School Library . 

Commercial Club, Cincinnati, 0. . . . . 

Committee on 150th anniversary of Incorporation of 
"The Old South" First Presbyterian Church, Neiv- 
buri/jjort, Mass. ........ 

Commonwealth Institute Association of Christian Sci- 
entists 

Comyns, 3Iiss Mary B., Florence, Italy . • . . 



17 broadsides 



20 
1 
1 
1 



2 
125 



Librae Y Department. 



153 



Vols 



Station 



Concilium Bibliographicum, Ziirich, Switzerland. 

2 broadsides 
Concord Free Public Library, Concord, Mass. . 
Congregational Home Missionary Society, New York City, 
Congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, New 

Haven, Conn 

Connecticut, Secretary of State, Hartford, Conn. 
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New 

Haven, Conn. ......... 

Connecticut General Conference of the Congregational 

Churches, Hartford, Conn. ...... 

Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn. 
Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Conn. 

Conner, Philip S. P., PldladelpJiia, Pa 

Consulado de la Republica Argentina en Boston. 

1 broadside 
Coogler, J. Gordon, Columbia, S.C. . 

Cook, (J. C, Barre, Muss 1 newspaper 

Cook, Thomas & Son ..... 

Cook, Thomas N. 

Cooke, J. P 

Copeland & Day 

Corcos, Rev. Joseph M., Curasao, W> st Indies 
Cordeiro, Dr. F. .J. B., Newport, B.I. 
Cornell University, 7^/i«ca, N.Y. 
Cornell University. Agricultural Experimen 

Mhaca, N.Y. 

Corriere di Boston . . . 1897-98 subscription 

Cosmos Club, Washington, B.C. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, Free Public Library 

Courtenay, Hon. AVilliam A., Newry, S.C. 

Cowing, Walter H 

Crane, John C, West MiUbury, Mass. 
Crawford, Lord, Wigan, England 
Creighton L'niversity, Omaha, Neb. . 
Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. 
Croydon, England, Public Libraries Committee 
Cuckson, Bev. John ..... 
Cudmore, P., Faribault, Mhm. . 
Cundall, Frank, Kingston, Jamaica . 
Cunningham, Prof. G. W., Chicago, III. 
Cupples, J. G., BrooJcline, Mass. 

Gushing, C. C 

Gushing, Harry A., Neio York Citi/ 

Gust, Bev. Robert N., London, England 

Cutler Manufacturing Co., Bochester, N.Y. 

Cutler School, New York City . 

Cyclopaedia Publishing Co. 

Dabney, Prof Richard H., Charlottesville, Va 

Daily Hotel Reporter, Tuesday ed. , Nero York City. 

1897-98 subscription 
Daily Report, San Francisco, CaL, 1897-98 subscription 
Dall, 3/r.s. Caroline H., Washington, D.C. 

Dalton, Adj. Gen. Samuel 

Dame, Dr. Lorin L., Medford, Mass 

Dana, .John C, Denver, Col. ...... 

Danish Biological Station, Copenhagen, Denmark 

Dante Society, Cambridge, Mass. 

Darapsky, Dr. L., Valparaiso, Chili . . . . . 

Darling, George B. ....... . 

Dartmouth Literary Monthly, Hanover, N.H. . 
Darwin, Prof. George H., Cambridge, England, 

1 broadside, 1 manuscript 



1 
1 
32 
1 
1 



Nos. 

3 
2 

8 



15 



154 



City Docume^'t No. 21. 



Daveujiort Academy of Natui-al Sciences, Davenport, la., 

Davis, Andrew McF., Cambridge, Mass. .... 

Davis, Cliarles E., .Jr 

Davis, Gherardi, New York Oily ..... 

Davis, Horace, San Francisco, Cal. ..... 

Davis, Mrs. Simon 

Day, F.red H 

Daymude, .James L. ....... . 

Dayton Public Library, Dayton, 

Dearborn, Mrs. Rebecca W., Estate of, 98 pieces of music, 

Debellis, Joseph N. ....... . 

Dedliam, Mass., Town Clerk 

Dedham Historical Society, Ded/mw?, J/((ss 

De Kalb, Courtenay, Washington, D.C. . 

Delaware College Agricultural Exijeriment Station, 
Newark, N J 

Delmar, Hon. Alexander ....... 

De Menezes, J., Ilayivard, Cal 

Democratic State Committee of Massachusetts 

Denison Scientific Association, Denisou University, Gran- 
ville, O 

Denissen, Bpv. Christian, Detroit, Mich 

Denmark. Commissionen for Ledelsen af de Geologiske 
eg Geographiske Unders0gelser i Gronland, Copen- 
hagen .......... 

Landbrugs Ministeriet, Copenhagen 

De Peyster, Maj. Gen. John W. ..... 

Detroit Public Library, Delroit, Mich. .... 

Deuerlich' sche Buclihandlung, Gottingen, Germany 

Deutsche Gesellschaft der Stadt New York, Nev) York 
City 

Deutscher Wissenschaftlicher Verein zu Santiago, Val- 
paraiso, Chile ......... 

Diario Oficial de la Republica di Chile. 

1897-98 subscrijition 

Dickens, Bev. A. W. , Middlehury , Vt. 

Dimock, Mrs. Henry F., South Coventry, Conn. 

Dixwell, Arthur ........ 

Dodwell, Carlill &: Co., Taconia, Wash. 

Doliber-Goodale Co. ....... 

Domestic and Foi-eign Missionary Society of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church, Neio York City . 

Donald, Robert, London, England .... 

Dor pat Imperial University, Dorpat, Bussia 

Dotterer, Henry S. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Douglas, Thomas IL, Baltimore, Md 

Douglass, Prof. A E., Lowell Observatory, Mexico . 

Dover Public Library, Dover, N.U 

Doyle, Miss Agnes C 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, X.J. 

Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 

Droschak (Armenian), Geneva, Switzerland. 

1897-98 subscrii)tion 

Drouet, Paul L. M., Caen, France 

Drummond, Josiali H., Portland, Me. .... 

Du Chastel, Olivier, Paris, France ..... 

Dummer, .Joseph N"., Byfield, Mass. ..... 

Dunning, Edwin .J. ....... . 

Durel, A., Paris, France ....... 

Dwyer, William ......... 

East Boston Argus- Advocate . 1897-98 subscription 



Vols. 
3 



4 

19 

6 



IG 

16 

2 



2 
13 

1 

2 



Library Derartment. 



Eastern Hydraulic Press Brick Co., PhiladeJphla, Pa 
Eaton, Br. Percival J., Fittslntrg, Pa. 
Eaii Claire Public Library, Eau Claire, Wis. 
Eddy, 3/r-t. Mary B. G., Concord, N.H. 

Edes, Henry H. 

El Cajon Valley News, El Cajon, Cal. 

1S97-9S subscription 

Eldrege, Z. S 

Eldridge, Benjamin P. 

Elliott, Sterling 

Ellis, A. B. . 

Ellis, C. A. & F. R. Comee 

Ellis, George H 

Engineering Association of New South Wales, Sydney, 

New South Wales 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Hid. 

Erdstein, Abraham 

Ernst, George A. O 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass 

Evans, Henry R., WasJnnr/ton, D.C 

Evans, Sir John, London, Eiuiland 

Evans, John Q., Salisbury. Mass 

Evanston, Illinois, Free Public Library . . . . 
Evening Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wis. 

1S97-9S subscription 
Everett, Mass., Public Library . 

Ewer, Alfred 

Fairbanks, M. C. L., Soiithhoro\ Mass. 
Fairfield County Historical Society, Bridgeport 
Fairmount College, Wichita, Kan. 
Fairmouut Park Art Association, Philadelphia 
Falco, Emerico . . . ... 

Farnham, Hon. John E., Maiden, Muss. 
Farnsworth, Moses F., Manfi, Utah . 

Faught, G. N. 

Fausel, Daniel 

Fernald, Br. C. A 2 broadsides 

Ferraris, Maggiorino, Borne, Italy 

Field, Richard M 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, III. 

Fitchburg, Mass., City of . 

Fitchbui-g Public Library, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Fitchburg Railroad Co 

Fitchburg Sentinel, Fitchburg, Mass. 

1897-98 subscription 

Fitz, Frank E 

Fitz, H. G., Peconir, JST.Y. 

Fitz, Br. Reginald H 

Fitzgerald, Mrs. P. F., London, Enghind . . . . 
Flagg, Bev. Edward C, New York City . . . . 

Flattery, M. D , Banville, Ky 

Fleischner, Otto 

Fletcher, Miss Mary E. , Medford, Ma.^s 

Fletcher Free Librai-y, Burlington, ^'t. . . . . 
Florence, Italy, Reale Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di 

Firenze 

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Jacksonville, 

Fla 

Floye, William J. 

Fly nn, W. J., J^rie, iV^.r. 

Fogg, Miss E. M 

Forbes, Ernest B., Urbuna, 111 



Vols. 



Conn. 



Pa. 



1 

17 



155 

Xos. 

2 
1 



10 

12 



156 



City Document No. 21. 



Vols. 



Nos. 



Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 

Ford, William E. 

Forsyth, James B. ....... . 

Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Ind 

Foster, Hon. John W., Washington, B.C. 
Fowler, Hon. Charles X., Washington., B.C. 

Fox, William F., ^//>a»?/, JV^.r. 

France. Ministere de la Marine, Paris .• . . . 
• Ministere de I'lnstruction Publique et des Beaux- 
Arts, Paris 

Ministere du Commerce, de I'lndustrie, des Postes 



1 broadside 
Association, 



et des Telegraphes, Paris 
Francis, Br. V. Mott, Newport, R.I. . 
Franklin and Marshall College, Alumni 

Baltimore, M<1. ...... 

Franklin Typographical Society 

Frazer, Br. Persifor, Philadelphia, Pa 

Fi'ee Ilospital for Women, Brookline, Mass. 

Freiheit, New York City . . 1897-98 subscription 

Freiherrlich Carl von Rothschild'sche ofEentliche Biblio- 

thek, Frankfort- am- Main, Germany . . . . 

French, F. W 

French, Walter H., Tra''7nX'7<o», D.C 

Freund, Harry E., New York City 

Frisbie, Bev. William B 

Frothingham, William P 

Gairdner, George W. and A. G. Harrison, Edmonton, 

Alberta, Canada 

Gallagher, Charles T 1 plate 

Gandolfl, Marquis, London, England . 1 broadside 
Garland, James G., Biddeford, Me. . 
Garrison, Wendell P., New York City 
Gavit, John P., Chicago, 111. 

Geddes, Prof. J., Jr 

Geddes, Tomas E., Valparaiso, Chile 

Geldert, A., Halifax, Nova Scotia 

General Association of Congregational and Presbyterian 

Churches of New Hampshire, Bristid, N.H. . 
General Electric Co., & Westinghouse Electric & Manu- 
facturing Co., Neio York City 
General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, Free 

Library, New York City 

General Society of the Daughters of the Revolution 

New York City ....... 

Gentry, Miss Ruth, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. . 
Geographical Society of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa 

1 chart 
Geological Society of America, Bochester, N. I 
Georgetown University, Washington. B.C. 
Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, Atlanta, Ga 
Gerasimus, Wicketas, Athens, Greece 
Gerhard, William P., New York City 
Germania Publishing Co. .... 

Germantown Telegraph, Germantown, Pa. 

1897-98 subscription 
Germany. Kaiserliches Patentamt, Berlin 
Gibbs, E. D., Somerville, Mass. . 

Gilbert, Br. D. D 

Giles, Alfred E., Hyde Park, Mass. . 

Gilkey, Miss Malina A , Washington, B.C. 

Gilman, Arthur, Cambridge, Mass 

Gilman, Bee. E. W., New York Ciiy . . 1 broadside 



1 

23 



2 

34 

6 



5,517 



LiBEAEY Department. 



157 



Gilman, Theodore, Neio York City . 
Giiard College Library, Philadeliihia, Pa. 
Glasgow University Library, Glasyoio, Scotland 

Gloucester, 3Iass., City of 

Gloversville Free Library, Gloversv'dle, N.Y. . 

Goddard, Miss Matilda 

Goeje, Prof. M. J. De, Leyden, Holland ... 
Gottingen, Germany, Koenigliche Universitiits-Bib 

liothek 

Goodale, Br. J. L 

Goodyear, Miss Anna F 

Gordon, Ernest B 

Gordon, Eev. George A. ..... • 

Gorman, Martin TV., Portland, Ore 

Gould, Dr. Benjamin A., Children of, Cambridge, Mass. . 

Gould, 3Iiss Elizabeth P 

Gould, S. C, Manchester, N.H. 

Grace Church, Syracuse, N.Y. .... 

Graham, Andrew J., New York City .... 
Grand Commandery of Knights Templars of Massachu 

setts and Rhode Island ...... 

Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 

of Massachusetts 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Board of Education 

Grand Rapids Public Schools, Committee on Public 

Library, Grand Bapids, Mich. 
Grant, John, Edinburgh, Scotland 
Gratz College, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Graves, Frank P., Laramie, Wy. 
Graves, Henry C, Somerville, Mass. . 
Gray, liev. Andrew, Somermlle, Mass. 

Gray, Ernest L 

Great Britain. Patent Office, London, England 
Great Round World, Publisher, New York City 
Green, Andrew H., Worcester, Mass. 

Green, Dr. S. A 2 broadsides 

Greene, Henry C. 

Greenwood, Isaac J., New York City 
Griffin, Martini. J., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grolier Club, New York City 
Grosvenor, Prof. Edwin A., Amherst, Mass. 
Guayas, Province of, Ecuador 
Guernsey, R. S., Neiv York City 
Guild, Calvin, Estate of, Dedham, Mass. . 
Guild, Howard R. ..... 

Guild & Lord 

Gulliver, F. P., London, England 

Gunning, Mrs. Mary 

Gunton Institute, New York City 
Hakes, Dr. Harry, Wilkesbarre, Pa . 

Hale, Richard W 

Hale House 

Haley, Mrs. S. C, Brookline, Mass. . 

Halifax Herald, Halifax, N.S. . 1897-98 subscription 

Hall, Prof. Asaph, Cambridge, Mass. 

Hall, Boardman ...... 

Hall, Charles S., Binghampton, N.Y. 

Hall, Prescott F 

Hall, Prof. E. W., Waterville, Me. . 

Hamilton, Morris R., Trenton, N.J. . 

Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, Hampton, 

Va 



2 charts 



Vols. 

1 
1 
1 

24 
1 



2 

13 
1 

4119 
1 



1 

1 

2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
34 
222 
1 
2 
3 
6 

1 



1 

36 
1 
2 



Nos. 



7 
8 

95 



158 



City Document No. 21. 



Hanna, Eon. H. H., Indianapolis^^ Ind. . . . . 

HariJer, Francis P., New York City . . . . . 

Ilarshberger, Prof. John W., Pliiladelphln, Pa. 

Hart, Charles H., Rosemont, Pa. . . . . . 

Hartford Board of Trade, Hartford, Conn. 
Hart, Thomas B., Bogota, United States of Columhia 
Hartford Hospital and Okl People's Home, Hartford, 
Conn. .......... 

Hartford Public Library, Hartford, Conn. . . . . 

Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn. 
Harvard Medical Alumni Association, Cambridge, Mass., 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. . . . . 

Harvard University. Astronomical Observatory 

Bussey Institution ....... 

Dental School 

Law School 

Library . . ■ . . . 235 broadsides 

Museum of Comparative Zoology . . 2 plates 

Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology, 

Harwood, Herbert J., Littleton, Mass. 
Hastings, Frank I., Washington, D.C. 

Hastings, H. L 

Ilaverford College, Haverford, Pa 

Hawaiian Historical Society, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 
Hawaiian Islands, Department of Foreign Affairs. 

Honolulu . ....... 

Hawaiian Legation, WasJdngton, D.C. 
Hawes, 3//sf Rebecca W., Hnhokus, N.J. . 
Hawley Furnace Co. ...... 

Hayes, .Tohn S., Sumerville, Mas>i. 
Hayes, Rutherford P., Columbus, O. . 
Hazen, Bev. Henry A., Auburndale, Mass. 

Heard, Mrs. ,Iohn T 

Heard, Mrs. John T., Jr 

Hegeler, E. C, CIncago, III 

Hemenway, Augustus ..... 

Henderson, Mrs. Eliza E., JVurth Cambridge, Mass. 

Hennequin, Alfred 

Herald of the Coming One . 

Herschel, Clemens, JVeio York City .... 

Heywood, John, London, England .... 

Hiersemann, Karl W., Leipsig, Germany . 

Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentworth, Cambridge, Mass. 

3 manuscripts 

High School Leader, Butte, Mont 

Hildreth, Br. J. L 

Hill, William G., Maiden, Mass. .... 

Hine, C. D. , Hartford^ Conn. ..... 

Hingham, Ma^s., School Committee . ' . 

Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati 



1897-98 subscription 



O. 



Hitchcock, Prof. Edward, Amhenst, 3Iass. 
Hitz, John, Washington, D.C. , 

llixon, H. W 

Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y 

Hodge, Frederick W., Washington, D.C. . . 
Hodges, liev. George, Cambridge, Mass. 
Holden, E. B., New York City . . . . 
nolden. Prof. E. S., Mt. Hanklton, Cal. . 
Holland Society of New York, New York City . 
Home for Aged .Jews of Chicago, Chicago, III. . 
Home for Aged Men 



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qiand 



o?i", Idaho 



Home for the Friendless, New Haven, Conn. 

Home Market Club 

Homes for Inebriates Association, London, En 
Honore, Carlos, Montevideo, Uruguay 
Hood, AVilliam, Los Angeles, Lai. 

Hooper, Arthur 

Horbaczewski, Lucjan, Meriden, Conn. 
Hosnier, James, Hinsdale, Mass. 
Hough, Dr. John S., Trenton, N.J. 
Houghton, Frederick O., Cambridge, 3Iass. 
" Household," Publishers .... 

Howard, A. W 

Howard Memorial Library, New Orleans, La. 
Howell, George R., ^?6fflH?/, A^.F. 
Ilubhe\\,:SliiYk, Buffalo, N.Y. . 
Hucke, Julius, Berlin, Germmny 
Huling, RayG., Cambridge, Mass., 

Humplireys, Richard C 

Hunt, Edward B. ..... 

Hunt, Jonas S., Sudbury. Mass. 

Huntington Avenue Lands, Boston, Trustees of 

Hutchins, Weston F 

Hyde Park, Mass., Town of . . , 

Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, Mosc 

Ide, Harry A 

lies, George, Neto York City 
Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station, Urbana, lU. 
Illinois. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield 
Illinois Office of Railroad and AVarehouse Commission 

Springfield, III. ........ 

Illinois Society for Child Study, Normal, III. . 

Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History, Urbana, III 

Immigration Restriction League .... 

Imperial University, Tokio, Japan .... 

Indian Rights Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Indiana. Board of State Charities, Indian'ipolis 
Indianapolis Public Library, Indianapolis, Ii.d. 
Industrial Aid Society for the Prevention of Pauperism 
Industrial School for Cripi^led and Deformed Children 

Industrial World Co., Chicago, III 

Ingalls, Frank B 9490 newspapers 

Ingram, John K., Dublin, Ireland .... 
Institut International de Bibliographie, Brussels, Bel 

gium .......... 

Institute of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica . 
Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England 
Instituto Geograflco Argentine, Buenos Aires, Argeniim 

Repidjlie 

International Young Men's Christian Association, Spring 

field, Mass. ........ 

Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station, Ames, la. . 

Iowa Geological Survey, Des Moines, la. . 

Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Bapids, la. . 

Irish National Federation of America, New York Cily 

Irwin, Mi.ss Agnes, Cambridge, Mass .... 

Italy, His Majesty Humbert, King of, Rome 

Italy. Ministero della Pubblica Istruziono, B me . 

Ministero di Agricoltura, Industria e Commercio 

Bume ......... 

Ives, Rev. J. S., Stratford, Conn. .... 

Jacobs, Walter ........ 

James, Pro/. Edmund J., Chicago, III. 



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178 

4 



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160 



City Document No. 21. 



James Blackstone Memorial Library, Branford, Conn, . 
Japan. Department of Education, Tukio .... 

Jeffries, Dr. B. Joy 7 maps 

Jenks, Rev. Henry F 

Jernegan, Marcus W., E'Jgartoivn, Mass. .... 

Jersey City Free Public Library, Jersey City, JSf.J. . 
John Crerar Library, Chicago, III. ..... 

John F. Slater Fund, Trustees of, Washington, B.C. 
. Johns Hopkins University, 2?a//?'more, J\/cZ. 
Johnson, Edward F., Woburn, Mass. ..... 

Johnson, Prof. J. B., Washington, B.C 

Johnson, William B 

Jordan, John W., Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 

Joseph Warren Monument Association . . . . 

Journal of Zoophily, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Kaiserlich-Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vi- 
enna, Austria ......... 

Knapp, George B. 34 broadsides 

Kansas. Bureau of Labor and Industry, Topeka 

State Board of Agriculture, Topeka 

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, 



Kan. 




Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka .... 
Kastelic, G. A., Kastelic, Buenaoista, Mexico . 

Kawase, M 

Kellogg, George S., New York City 

Kelsey, Pro/". Francis W., Ann Arbor, Mich. . 
Kelterborn, Louis ........ 

Kendall, H. C 

Kennard, Fred H., Brookline, Mass 

Kennedy, William S., Belmont, Mass. 

50 newspapers, .3 broa'dsides 

Kent, Miss M. R., Chicago, III 

Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington, 

Ky 

Kerntler, Franz, Budapest, Hungary . 
King, Henry F., West Newton, Mass. 
King, Henry M., Providence, k. I. 
Kingman, Bradford, Brookline, Mass. 

Kirkpatrick, C. A 

Kittredge, Prof. George L., Cambridge, Mass. 

Kittredge Co., New York City . 

Klondike Bureau of Information, Citizens Committee, 

Tacoma, Wash 1 newspaper 

Klonower, Oscar, Philadelphia, Pa 

Knapp, Arthur M 

Knowlton Association of America, Albany, N.Y. 

Koehler, S. R 2 broadsides 

Konigliche Sammlungen fiir Kunst und Wissenschaft zu 

Di'esden, Dresden, Germany ...... 

Kopp, Godfrey, Home, Italy ...... 

Ladies' Union Charitable Society, iatorence, Mass. . 

Lagresille, Henri, Par/a, i^rance 

Lakewood Times and Journal, Lakewood, N.J. 

1897-98 subscription 
Lancaster, Mass. , Town Library 
Larapidie, Christian de . . . 
Larisun, C. W., Eingos, N.J. 
Larzelere, Charles F., New York City 
Latch, Edward B., ^cadem?/. Pa. 
Lathers, Col. Richard, New Hochelle, N.Y 
Law, James D., Camden, N.J. . 



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Lawrence, Rt. Rev. William 

Lawrence, Mass.., City of ...... . 

Lawrence General Hospital and Children's Home, Law- 
rence, Mass. ......... 

Lawrence Public Library, Lawrence, Mass. 

Leader, John T., Florence, Italy 

Leader, Bainsfoni Island . . 189T-9S subscription 
League of American AVheelmen, Connecticut Division, 

Brld(jeport, Conn. ........ 

League of American Wheelmen, Massachusetts Division 
League of American Wheelmen, New Jersey Division, 

Trenton, N.J. 

League of American Wheelmen, New York State Division, 

New York City 6 maps 

Lee, 3Hss Ellen ......... 

Lee, Francis W 

Lee, John H. ........ . 

Leeds, Charles H., Stamford, Conn. ..... 

Leeds Free Public Library, Leeds, England 

Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, Museum, Leeds, 

England ....*..... 

Legler, G. H., Giants, Switzerland 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa 

Leipzig, Germany. Handelskammer .... 

Leland Stanford Junior University Library, Palo Alto, 

Col 

Lemcke & Buechner, New York Cily .... 

Leo XIII.. His Holiness Pope, Home, Italy . . . 

Leonard, Hugh F., New York CVy 

Leonard, Miss Mary IL, Rochester, Mass. 

Lewis, C. AV 

Lewis, Mrs. Carvill, London, England .... 

Lewis, Mrs. John A 

Lexington, Mass., Town of 

Leyden, Holland. Bibliotheek der Rijks Universiteit to 

Leiden 

Library Company of Philadelphia, PhVadelphia, Pa. 
Lick Observatory, Mount llamilton, Cal. . 19 plates 

Licking County Teachers' Association, Granville, O. 
Liggett, Mrs. N. W. , Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Lincoln, Francis H. ....... . 

Lincoln, Mrs. R. C. . 

Lincoln, England, Public Library 

Lindsay, Walter M •. . . 

Lippit, Hon. Charles W., Providence, R.I. 

Little, Brown & Co. .....".. 

Littlefield, Rev. Charles A. 

Littlefield, George E. 1 map 

Liverpool, England, Public Libraries, Museums and Art 

Gallery 

Lombard, Josiah L., Truro, Mass 

London Library, London, England . . . . . 
Long Island Bible Society, Islip, L.I. . . . . 
Longley, Alcander, St. Louis, Mo, . . . . . 

Lord's Magazine Co 

Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Loubat, Buc de. New York City ...... 

Loud, John J., Weymouth, Mass. . . 5 broadsides 
Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton Rouge, 

La 

Louisville National Medical College, Louisville, Ky. 
Lovett, Br. Robert W 



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City Document No. 21. 



Lowell, Mass., City of 

Lowell City Library, Loivell, Mass. ..... 

Lund, J. W 

Lyman, Benjamin S., PJiiladelj Ma, Pa 

Lyman, Mrs. Theodore, Brookline, Mass 

Lynn, Mass., Free Public Library 

Lyon, Bev. William H 

M.D., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

McAneny, George, iVew York Cily 

McCleary, Samuel F., Brookline, Mass 

McCollom, I)r. John H 

McCormick Harvesting Machine Co., Chicago, III. . 
McCowen Oral School for Young Deaf Children, Chicago, 

III 

MacCutchen, S. n 1 newspaper 

McGill University, Monireal, Canada .... 

McGuffey, Miss Margaret D. . . .10 broadsides 

Mackay, Charles H 

McKay, David, Philadelphia, Pa 

McKenzie, E. B 

Mackintosh, Miss Sarah B. 

Macmillan Co., New York CUy 

McNamee, John H. H., Cambridge, Mass 

McNellis, Bernard 

Macomber, John K., Bes Moines, la. .... 

Macurdy, Miss T. E 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 

Maine. Forest Commission, Augusta .... 

Maine Genealogical Society, Portland, Me. 

Maine General Conference of Congregational Churches, 

Gray, Me. .......... 

Maine Historical Society, Portland, Me 

Maine State College Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Orono, Me. ......... 

Maine State Library, Augusta, Me 

Maine Statesman, Leiciston, Me. 1897-98 subscription 

Maiden, Mass., City of 

Maiden Public Library, Maiden, 3Iass. .... 
Manchester, England, Public Free Libraries 
Manchester Geological Society, Manchester, England 
Manchester, N.U., Board of Water Commissioners . 
Manchester Historic Association, Manchester, N.H. 

Manhart, Bev. Frank P., Baltimore, Md 

Manhattan East Side Mission, Ntw York City . 
Manhattan Eye & Ear Hospital, New York City ' . 
Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, Winnipeg, 

Manitoba .......... 

M&nly, Prof. JohnM., Providence, li. I. .... 

Mansfield, Rev. Joseph H., Brookline, Mass. 
Marean, Mrs. Emma E., Cambridge, Mass. 

Mariners' House 

Marlboro Times, Marlborough, Mass. 

1897-98 subscription 
Martin, Hon. G. B., Victoria, British Columbia . 1 map 
Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, College 

Park, Md 

Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md. . 
Mason, Dr. L. D. , Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 
Massachusetts. Adjutant General . 

Board of Commissioners of Savings Banks 

Board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners 

Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners . 



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Massachusetts Board of Railroad Commissioners 

Bureau of statistics of Labor 

Commission on Taxation .... 

Free Public Library Commission . 

Metrojiolitan Park Commission 

Metropolitan Sewerage Commission 

Metropolitan Water Board .... 

Nautical Training School .... 

Secretary of the Commonwealth . 1 broadside 

State Board of Agriculture .... 

State Board of Arbitration and Conciliation 

State Board of Health 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity 

State Board on Docks and Terminal Facilities 

State Library ....... 

State Normal School, Westfield, Mass. . 

Tax Commission ...... 

Toi^ograpliical Survey Commission 

Trustees of Public Reservations 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Hatch Experiment 

Station, Amlu^rst, Mass 

Meteorological Observatory, Amherst, Mass. 

Massachusetts Anti- Double-Taxation League . 
Massachusetts Audubon Society for the Protection of 

Birds 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy .... 
Massachusetts Co-operative Bank League 
Massachusetts Council of Deliberation 
Massachusetts Eclectic Medical Society 
Massachusetts Fireproof Stoi-age & Warehouse Co. 
Massachusetts General Hospital .... 

Massachusetts Highway Commission 
Massachusetts Historical Society .... 
Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society .... 
Massachusetts Hospital for Dipsomaniacs and Inebriates, 

FoxboroiKjh, jVrt.s.s. ........ 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology . . 3 maps 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, " Technique," 

Board of 1898 

Massachusetts Medical Society ...... 

Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society ..... 

Massachusetts New Church Union . . . . . 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble Minded, Waverley, 

Mass. .......... 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 

Animals .......... 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 

Children .......... 

Massachusetts State Federation of Clubs, Springfield, 

3/c/ss. 

Massachusetts State Pharmaceutical Association, Worces- 
ter, Mass. .......... 

Massachusetts Universalist Convention .... 

Master Carbuilders' Association, Chicago, III. . 
Matteawan State Hospital, 3/«^feaioan, iV. F. . 

May, Henry A 2 broadsides 

May, 3frs. M. A. S., RocJcbottom, Mass 

May, Rev. Samuel, Leicester, Mass. . . 12 broadsides 
Maynard, C. J., West Newton, Mass 



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City Document No. 21. 



Maynard, Laurens, East Weymouth, Mass, 

Mead, Edwin I) 

Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa. . 

Means, James 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco, Cal. . 

Medford Public Library, McOford, Mans. . 

Medford Historical Society, Medford, Mass, 

Meehan, Thomas, & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Meidiuger, I'rof. H., Karhrnlte, Germcrny . 

Mekeel, C. H., Stamp & Publishing Co., St. Loins, Mo 

Melbourne University, Melbourne, Australia 

Melrose Public Library, Melrose, Mass. 

Mercantile Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ......... 

Mercantile Library of New York, New York City . 

Mercer, Prof. Henry C, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mergenthaler Linotype Co., iVeto York City 

Merriam, J. W., Iquique, Chile 

Metcalf, Albert 

Metcalf, Dr. Henry C, West Neivton, Mass. 

Mexican Herald, City of Mexico. 1897-9S subscription 

Mexico. Direccion General de Estadistica de la Republica 
Mexicana, City of Mexico 

• Ministerio de Fomento, City of Mexico . 

Miami University, Oxford, O 

Michigan. Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, 
Lansing .......... 

Michigan Central Railroad Co., Detroit, Mich. . 

Michigan Experiment Station, Lansing, Mich. , 

Michigan Mining School, Houghton, Mich. 

Michigan State Medical Society, Grand ftcp/Js, Mich. 

Middleborough, J/ass., Town of 

Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt. . . . . 

Middleton, Miss Virginia W., iVashington, D.C. 

Middletou-Wake, Itev. Charles H., Tunbridge Wells, Kent, 
England 

Mifflin, George H 

Military Historical Society of Massachusetts . 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Massachusetts Com- 
mandery .......... 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Ohio Commandery, 
Cincinnati, O. ........ . 

Miller, Br. J., Prescott, Ariz 

Milne, J. M., Worthington, O. ..... . 

Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, Minn. . 

Milwaukee Public Museum, Milwaukee, Wis. . 

Mining Industry Publishing Co., Denver, Col. . 

Minneapolis, Minn., Board of Park Commissioners. 

Minneapolis Public Library, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Minnesota. Chief Fire Warden, St. Paul 

Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Anthony 
Park, Minn. ......... 

Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. ......... 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn. . 

Minot, Prof. C. S., Cambridge, Mass. .... 

Minot, .Joseph G., Byde, Isle of Wight .... 

Mississippi Agricultural Station, Agricultural College, 
Starkville, Miss. ........ 

Missouri. Secretary of State, Jefferson City, Mo. . 

Missouri Agricultural College Experiment Station, Co- 
lumbia, Mo 



Vols. 
3 



13 



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165 



Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Lords, Mo. 
Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, Mo. 
Missouri World, Cliillicothe, Mo. 1897-98 subscription 

Mitchell, hev. W. H 

Mitchell Library, GlKsgotv, Scotland . 
Modei-n Language Association of America, Baltimore 
Mil 



and Industry 



Bozeman 



Mogyorossy, Arcade, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Monroe, Prof. Will S., WestHeld, Muss 
Monson, Rt. Hon. Sir Edmund . 
Montana. Bureau of Agriculture, Labor 

Helena ...... 

Montana Agricultural Experiment Station 

Montgomery, Ward & Co., Chicago, III. 

Moore, Clarence B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Morison, George S., New York City . 

Morning News, Wilmington, Del. 1897-98 subscription 

Morris, Harrison S., Camden, NJ. 

Morse, Prof. A. P., Wellesley, Ma s. . 

Morse, Prof. Edward S., Salem, Mass. 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass. 

Morton, John P. & Co., Loiiismlle, Ky. 

Mott, Prof. L. AV., Cambridge., Mass. . 

Moulton, J. C 

Mt. llolyoke College, Snvth Hadley, Mass 
Moxom, liev. Philip S., Springfield, Mass. 
Mudie^s Select Library, London, England 

Mullett, Rev. E. A 

Munn & Co., New York Citi/ 
Munson, Myron A., New Haven, Conn. 
Murdoch, .John ..... 
Murphy, Rev. Thomas E., Netv York City 

Murray, William 

Musee Social, Paris, France 

Museo de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic 

Musser, T>r. J. H., Philadelphia., Pa 

Nashville Banner, Nashville, Tenn. 1897-&S subscription 

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, B.C. 

National Art Library, London, England 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers , 

National Board of Trade, Philadelphia, Pa. 

National Confereace of Charities and Correction, St 

Paul, Minn. ........ 

National Library of Ireland, Dublin, Deland 

National Prison Association, Allegheny, Penn. 

National Provisioner, Nero York City 

National Purity Association, Chicago, III. . 

National Science Club, Washington, D.C. 

Natural History Society of New Brunswick, St. John, 

N.B 

Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln, Neb., 
Nebraska Independent, Lincoln, Neb. 

1897-98 subscription 
Nelson, William, Paferson, N.J. .... 

Nesmith, James E., Lowell, Mass. .... 
Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station, Reno, Nev. 
Nevada State University and Agricultural and Median 

ical College, Ren>, Nev. ..... 

New Bedford, Mass., City of ... . 

New Bedford, M'iss., Free Public Library 
New Britain Institute, Neio Britain, Conn. 
New Church Board of Publication, New York City 



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City Document No. 21. 



New England Anti-Vivisection Society .... 
New England Committee for Tlieosophical Work 

New England Confectioners' Club 

New England Conservatory of Music ..... 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association 

New England Deaconess Home and Training School 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 

New England Hospital for Women and Children 

New England Society in the City of Brooklyn. Brooklyn, 

N.Y . . 

New England Society in the City of New York, Neio 

York City 

New England Staaten-Zeitung . 1897-98 subscription 
New England Water Works Association, Neicton, Mass. . 
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, Bur- 
ham, N.H 

New Hampshire Board of Library Commissioners, 

Rochester, N.H. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic 

Arts, Durham, N.H. 

New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, N.H. . 
New Hampshire Medical Society, Concord, N.H. 
New Hampshire Society of Colonial Wars, Concord, N.H. 
New Haven, Conn., Free Public Library .... 
New Haven Kegister, New Haven, Conn. 

1897-98 subscription 
New Jersey. Adjutant General, Trenton .... 
Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries, 

Trenton .......... 

Geological Survey, Trenton ..... 

State Library, Trenton 

New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, Neiv 

Jlrunsicick, N.J. ........ 

New Jersey Historical Society, Trenton, N.J. . 

New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station, Las 

Cruces, N.M. 

New York State. Commissioners of Statutory Revision, 

Albany 

Fisheries, Game and Forest Commission, Glens 

Falls 

State Commission in Lunacy, Pathological Insti- 
tute, Nev) York City ....... 

New York Academy of Sciences, Neiv York City 

New York Baptist Union for Ministerial Education, 

Rochester, N.Y. . . . . . . . . 

New York Civil Service Reform Association, Neio York 

City 

New York Farmers, New York City ..... 
New York Free Circu'ating Library, Neio York City 
New York Historical Society, Neiv York City . 
New York Infirmary for Women and Children, New York 

Oity 

New York Life Insurance Company, New York City. 

1 broadside 
New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden 

Foundations, Neio York City 

New York Society Librai'y, New York City 

New York Society of the Order of the Founders and the 

Patriots of America, Neiv York City . . . . 
New York State Chamber of Commerce, New York City, 
New York State Medical Society, AUiaay, N.Y. 
New York University Library, New York City . 



Vols. 



Library Department. 



167 



Newark Free Public Library, Neroark, N.J. 

Newburyport Public Library, Newhuryport^ Mai^s. .. 

Newcastle-Upon-Tyue, England, Public Library 

Newcomb, Charles B. . 

Newfoundland Colonial Secretary, St. John's, Newfuund- 
land 

Newman, Thomas G., Chicago, III. ..... 

Newton, Mass.^ City Engineer ...... 

Newton Free Library, Newton, Mass. .... 

Newton Hospital Corporation, Newton, Mass. . 

Nichols, Mrs. Anne R. ....... 

Nickerson, Sereno D. ....... . 

Nickerson, Stephen W 

Noble .John 

Noon, Richard 

Norcross, O. & G. H 

Norris, Ezra, Camden, N.J. ...... 

North Adams Public Library, North Adamf<, Mass. . 

North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Baleigh, N.C 

North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, Fargo, 
N.D 

Northampton Lunatic Asylum, Northampton, Mass. 

Northampton Public Library, Northampton, Mass. . 

Northwestern University, Eranston, III. .... 

Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition, Chriatiania , Nor- 
way 

Nottingham Free Public Library, Nottingham, England, 

Nova Scotia. Legislative Library Commission, Hali- 
fax 

Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 

Noyes, Isaac P., Waxhington, D. C. . .1 broadside 

Nya Osterns Weckoblad, Worcester, Mass. 

1897-98 subscription 

Oahu College, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 

Oasis, Nogale>t, Ariz. . . 1897-98 subscription 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, O 

Obei'lin College Library, Oberlin, O. . 

Observatorio Meteorologico Magnotico Central de Mexico, 
City of Mexico ......... 

O'Callaghan, Thomas & Co 

Occident, Chicago, III. . . 1897-98 subscription 

O'Farrell, Charles 

Ohio. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Columbus . 

State Library, Columbus ...... 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster, O. 

Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, Colum- 
bus, O. ......... . 

Ohio State Bar Association, Columbus, O. . 

Ojai. Nordhoff, Cal. : . 1897-98 subscription 

Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station, Stillwater, 
Okla 

Olmstead, Dwight II., New York City .... 

Olney, //o»». Richard 

Omaha Public Library, Omaha, Neb 

Ontario. Department of Agriculture, Toronto 

Bureau of Industries, Toronto . 

Ontario Agricultural College, Experiment Station, 
Guelph, Canada ........ 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, CorviUis, Ore. 

Ormerod, Miss Eleanor A., St. Albans, England 

Otis, Dr. Edward O 



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City Document No. 21, 



Vols. 



Owens CoWege, Mail cJiester, Enrjland . . . . 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester, Mass 

Palfrey, John C 

Paris, France. L' Administration Municipale . 

Paris, France, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve . 

Tavker, 3Ilxs Mary S., Salem, Mass 

Parks, Benjamin ........ 

Paisons, Frank 

Parsons, J. K., Lewis Miller and J. F. Steward, Chicarjo, 
III 

Patersou, N.J., Free Public Library 

Paul Jones Club, Portsmouth, N.U 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. ..... 

Pearmain, Sumner B. ....... 

Pearmain & Brooks 

Peck, Hon. E., Bristol, Conn 

Fe6d\e Institute, Ilightstoivn, N.J. . . . . . 

Pember, Mrs. Frederick, Needliam., 3fass., 1 broadside 

Pennsylvania. Committee on Lunacy, PMladelplda 

Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia 

Secretary of the Commonwealth, Harrisburg 

State Library, Harrisburg ..... 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 
Pa 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Pennsylvania Prison Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Eevolution, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 

Pennsylvania State College, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pennsylvania State College Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Centre County, Pa. ....... 

Pennypacker, Hon. Samuel W., Philadelphia, Pa. 

People's Choral Union of New York, New York City 

Peoria Public Library, Peoria, III 

Perce, Warren K., Providence, li.I. ..... 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the 
Blind 

Pernin's Monthly Stenographer, Detroit, Mich. 

Perry, Mrs. Arabella 

Perry, Thomas S 

Perry, lit. Rev. William 8., Davenport, la. 

Pettingill & Co 

Phelps, Hon. Charles, Hartford, Conn 

Phelps, Miss Fannie L 

Philadelphia, Pa., Board of Directors of City Trusts 

Philadelphia, Pa., Free Library 

Philadelphia Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Philadelphia City Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Philadelphia Record, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1897-98 subscription 

Philadelphia Society for Organizing Charity, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ......... 

Philips, G. M., West Chester, Pa 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H. 

Philobiblon Club, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Philosophical Society of Glasgow, Glasgoiv, Scotland 

Phinney, Miss Winifred 

Phonographic Institute Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Physio-Medical College of Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pierce, George W 



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Pierce, John M. . 

Pierce, S. S. & Co 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Provisional Committee of the Chamber 
of Commerce. ......... 

Piatt, Isaac H. , P/n7a'Ze(/;/ita, Pa 

Plumb, Bev. Albert II 

Plymouth, England, Free Public Library . . . . 

Polytechnic Society of Kentucky, Louiaville, Ky. 

Pond, James B., Neio York City . . . . , 

Poole, Miss Fanny H. R. . 

Porter, Hex. Edward G 1 broadside 

Portland, Ore., Library Association . . , . . 

Portland Evening Express, Portland, Me. 

1897-98 subscription 

Portland Public Library, Portland, Me. . . . . 

Portland Society of Natural History, Portland, Me. 

Portsmouth, Enr/land, Free Public Library 

Postal Record, Washington, B.C. 

Potter, Alfred M 

Powell, Aaron M., iVei/J York City . . . . . 

Pratap Marayan Singh, Bahadur of Ayodhya, Allahabad, 
India .......... 

Pratt, Franklin S. & Charles H 

Pratt Institute, Proo/c///n, J\r.l'. 

Preitz, Edmund C, Neto York City 

Present Problems Publishing Co., New York City . 

Preston, William G 

Prime, Temple, Huntington, N.Y. . 

Prince, C. Leeson, Sns.sex, England 

Princeton LTniversity, Princeton, N.J. . . . . 

Progress. Minneapolis, Minn. . 1897-98 subscription 

Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Long 
Island, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Massa- 
chusetts ..... 

Providence, B.I. City Auditor . 

City Messenger 

• Health Department . 

Record Commissioners 

Providence Athenaeum, Providence, B.I. 

Providence Athletic Association, Providence, B.I. The 
Triangle 1897-98 subscription 

Providence Public Library, Providence, B.I. . 

Prowse, G. R. F., Bradford, England . . . . 

Public Ledger, Plriladelphia, Pa. . . . . . 

Pugh, A. II., Cincinnati, O 

Purdue University Agricultural Experiment Station, La- 
fayette, Ind. ......... 

Puzantion, Constantinople . . 1897-98 subscription 

Pynchon, Dr. J. C, Springfield, Mass 

Quaritch, Bernard, London, Endand . . . . 

Queen's College, Belfast, Ireland 

Queensland Patent Office, Brisbane, Queensland 

Quincy, Hon. Josiah P. ...... . 

Quincy, III., Free Public Library 

Quincy, Mass., City Hospital 

Quincy Historical Society, Quincy, Mass. 573 newspapers 

Quincy Patriot, Quincy, Mass. . 1897-98 subscription 

Ramos-Coelho, Jose, Lisbon, Portugal . . . . 

Rand, Col. Arnold A 

Rand, Benjamin, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1 broadside 

Kandell, Rufus, London, England 



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City Document No. 21. 



Rantoul, Robert S., Salem, Mass. 

Hea, George B., Brookli/n, N.Y. 

Eeale Istituto di Studi Superiori Pratici e di Perfeziona- 

niento, Florence, Italy ....... 

Reale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere. Milan, 

Italy 

Recliis, lillisee, Paris, France ...... 

Redwood Library and Athenaeum, J\re«i^)o)'f, i?./. 

Reed, George B. ....,,.. , 

Reeves, Ellis B., P/(oe?ii.rii«7ie, Pa 

Reform Club Sound Currency Committee, New York City, 

Reinbart, J. A., Paterson, N.J. 

Representative. Minneapolis, Minn. 1897-98 subscription 

Republican Club of INIassacbusetts 

Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Conn. .... 

Reynolds Libi-ary, Rochester, NY 

Rhode Island. Adjutant General, P/-o(;tde>ice . 

Board of State Charities and Correction, ProoWeace, 

Commissioner of Industrial Statistics, Prov,idence, 

• State Board of Education, Providence 

State Board of Health, Providtnce 

Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station, Kingsto\ 

E.I. 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, E.I. . 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, R.I. 
Riano, Seuora Emilia Gayangos de, Madrid, Spaui . 

Richards, William R 6 maps 

Richardson, Miss Eliza B 

Richmond Free Public Library, Surrey, England 

Ricker, Hiram & Sons, South Poland, Me. 

Riley, James ......... 

Ring wait, Ralph C, New York City .... 

Ripley, Prof. William Z 

Ritchie, .John, Jr. 

Rivers, George R. R., Milton, Mass. 1 map, 2 newspapers 
Robert, Paul, Paris, France ...... 

Robinson, Edwin A., Gardiner, Me 

Robinson, George A. ....... . 

Robinson, Herman F., New York City . . 1 chart 

Rogers, Gorham 

Rogers, Mrs. William B. ...... . 

Rogers & Donnell, New York City 

Rollins, Miss Mary II. ....... 

Romney, Charles W 

Rosenauer, Nicholas, Newi York City .... 

Rosenthal, Herman, Jr., Melville, L.I. . 

Rotch, A. Lawrence ........ 

Rotch, Dr. Thomas M. . 

Rotch, Mrs. William 

Roth, Edward, Philadelphia, Pa 

Rothschild, Alonzo, Cambridge, Mass. .... 

Roxbury Charitable Society ...... 

Roxbury Latin School ....... 

Roxbury Military Historical Society . . .1 badge 
Royal Arcanum, Supreme Council ..... 

Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, Capetoivn, South 

Africa, .......... 

Royal Observatory, Greenvnch, Enr/land .... 

Royal Scottish Society of Arts, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canadt 

Ruggles, H. S., Wakefield, Mass. . . . 2 charts 

Runk, Mrs. Emma T. B., Lambertville, N.J. 



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Vols. 



1 broadside, 1118 aewspajiers 



Russell, Charles T. 
Russell Miss Lucy E , 

Ryman, F. S 

Rymes, E. C, SomervUle, Mass. ...... 

Philadelphia, Pa., Eastern State Penitentiary . 

Reale Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Florence Firenze, 

Florence, Italy ........ 

Sadler, Ralph, London, England .... 

Sagatoo, Mr. & Mrs. Peter, Sayaning, Mich. 

St. Botolph Club 

St. George's Public Library, London, England . 

St. Giles Public Library, London, England 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis Public Library, .S^. Louis, Mo. . 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Paul Public Library, St. Paul, Minn. . 

St. Petersburg, Russia, Bibliotheque de PUniversite Ini 

periale de St. Petersbourg 

Salem, J/rtss , City of 

Salem Daily Gazette, Snlem, Mass. 1897-98 subscription 
Salena Public Library, Salem, Muss. 

Saltonstall, Richard M 

San Francisco Free Public Library, San Francisco, Cal 

Sanborn, Miss Kate, Metcalf, Mass 

Sanborn, Victor C, La Grange, III. .... 
Santiago, Chile, Biblioteca del Instituto Nacional 
Sargent, Prof. Charles S., Brooklinet Mass. 
Saturday Evening Gazette . . 1897-98 subscription 

Saturday Mail 1897-98 subscription 

Saturday Press, Oakland, Cal. . 1897-98 subscription 
Saturday Spectator, Minneapolis, Minn. 

1897-98 subscription 
Sauveur Summer School of Languages at Amherst College, 

Amherst, Mass. ...... 

Savage, Philip 11. 

Saxe, Edward T., Brookline, Mass. . 
Scandinavian Social Club .... 
Schenck, CajU. A. D., Fort }Varren, Mass. 
Schwab, Prof. .John C, New Haven, Conn. 
Scots' Charitable Society .... 
Scott, Dr. Charles P. G., Radnor, Pa. 
Scott, Foresman & Co., Chicago, III. . 
Scott, Greenwood & Co., London, England 
Scranton Public Library, Scr<(nton, Pa. 
Scudder, Horace E. . . . , . 
Scudder Samuel IL, Cambridge, Mass. 
Seaney, Ora, Fort Wayne, Ind. . 
Seattle Public Library, Seattle, Wash. 

Seaver, Miss Florence 

See, I)r. T. J. J., Flagstaff, Ariz. 
Sellers, Edwin J., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Seth, Miss Celia ...... 

Seth, Martin T 1 impress 

Sewall, J. B. 

Shiifer, Henry, Chelsea, Mass 

Shakespeare Memorial Library, Straff ord-on- Aeon 

England ....... 

Shambaugh, Prof. Benjamin F., loioa City, la 

Shaw Monument Committee 

Sheldon, W. L., St. Loids, Mo. . 

Sheldon, Prof. Winthrop D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sheffield, England, Free Public Libraries and Museum 



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London, Emj 



98 subscription 
98 subscription 



City 



le 



Sheltering Arms, Nexo York City 
Sbepard, Dr. Charles H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Sherwood, George F. T., London, Ewjland 
Shiffler Bridge Company, Pittsbnrr/h, Pa 
Shirley, Rev. Arthur, Old Lyme, Conn. 
Shoreditch Public Libraries and Musems 

land 

Shortt, Prof. Adam, Kingston, Canada 
Sieber, Emil ...... 

Silas Bronson Library, Waterhury, Conn. 
Silver Knight Watchman, Washinyton. 1897 

Simonds, Kichard S 

Skandinavia 1897- 

Small, Herbert ..... 

Smiley, Albert K., Mohonk Lake, N.Y. 

Smith, A. E. & S AV. Stanton, New York 

Smith, Mrs. Charles C. . . . 

Smith, Miss Lucy H., Newton Centre, 3fass 

Smith, Thomas ..... 

Smitlisonian Institution, Washinr/ton, D.C 

Smyth, lion. J. A., Charleston, S.C. . 

Socialist Labor Party .... 

Socialist Labor Party, State Committee 

Sociedad de Fomento Fabril, Santiago, Clii 

Sociedad de Geografia y Estadisticade la RepiiblicaMexi 

cana, City of Mexico ....... 

Sociedad Nacional de Agricultura, Santiago, Chile . 
Society for the Study of Inebriety, London, England 
Society of American Florists ..... 

Society of Arts, London, England .... 

Society of Colonial Wars, Massachusetts . 

Society of Colonial Wars, New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 

Society of Mazanias, Portland, Ore 

Society of St. Vincent de Paul, New York City 

Society to Encourage Studies at Home 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of, Chelsea 

Mass. 

Somerville Public Library, Somervill", Masfi. . 

Sous of the American Revolution, California, San Fran 

Cisco, Cal. ......... 

Sons of the American Revolution, Hawaiian Society 

Washington, D.C 

Sons of the Revolution, California, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Sons of the Revolution, Massachusetts . ■ . 
Sons of the Revolution, Missouri, Bethany, Mo. 
South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, Brook 

ing, S.D. ......... 

South End Industrial School . . 
South Kensington Museum, London, England . 
South Shields, England, Public Library and Museum 
Southbridge Public Library, Southhridge, Mass. 
Southern History Association, Washington, D.C. 

Southworth, George C. S., Salem, O 

Spatula Publishing Co 

Specialty Manufacturing Co. ..... 

Speed, John G., New York City .... 

Spiers, Richard P., London, England 

Spivak, Dr. C. D., Deliver, Col. ..... 

Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. 

1897-98 subscription 
Springfield City Library Association, Springfield, Mass. . 
Standard Publishing Co 



Vols. 
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Stanton, Theodore, Paris, France 

Stanwood, Edward ....,.., 

Stark, James H 

Statute Law Book Co.. Washington, B.C. 
Stearns, Bev. George W., Middleboro\ Mass. 

Stednian, Dr. Henry R 

Steiner, Charles ......... 

Stephenson, Dr. Franklin B. . 44 broadsides, 1 map 

Stetson, George R., Washinr/ton, D.C 

Stetson, W. W., Aiigvsta, Me 

Stevens, B. F., London, EiKjland ..... 

Stevens, C. E., Neiv York City 

Stevens, Munroe, Gloucester, Mass, . . . . . 

Steward, liev. T. G 

Stewart, Charles, t^t. Paul, Mimi. . . . . . 

Stockholm, ISiveden, Kongliga Biblioteket 

Stoddard, James P 

Stoddard, S. R., Glens Falls, N.Y. 

Stoeekel, Mr. & Mrs. Carl, Norfolk, Conn. 

Stone, Wilbur F., Jr., London, Enyland . . . . 

Stoodley, E. M 

Storrs Agricultui'al Experiment Station, Middletown, 

Conn. .......... 

Stratford Public Libraries, London, Emjland . 

Stratton, G. W 

Stratton, Henry W 

Strong, Hon. William L., Nezv York City . . . . 

Stryker, William S., Trenton, N.J. 

Sudbury, Mass., Town of 

Suffolk County Historical Society, Netv York City . 
Sumichrast, Prof. F. C. de, Cambridge, Mass. . 
Sunday Times, Minneapolis, Minn. 1897-98 subscription 
Superior Leader, buperior, 11 "is. 1897-98 subscription 

Swank, James M. , Philadelpliia, Pa. . . . . 

Swift, Lindsay ... 2 broadsides, 7 charts 

Switzerland. Bureau Federal des Assurances, Berne 

■ Bureau Federal Official de Statistique, Berne . 

Sydney, A'.S.Tr., Free Public Library 

Tanaka, L, 'Jokio, Japan ...... 

Tapper, Thomas, Jr 

Taunton Public Library, Taunton, Mass. . 

Taylor, Pr-f. John I'., Andover, Mas-n. 

Technical Society of the Pacific Coast, San Francisco, Cai 

Teggart. Frederick J, Palo Alto, Cal. ... 

Temporary Asylum for Discharged Female Prisoners 

Dedham, Mass. 

Tenhulle, Comte de, Paris, France 

Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station, Knoxville, 

Tenn. .......... 

Terzian, Dikran ...... 3 broadsides 

Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College station, 

Tex 



Texas State Historical Association, Anstin, Tex. 
Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass. 
Thompson, liev. A. C. 
Thomson, Arthur C, Brookline, Mass. 
Throop, Miss Anne, New York City . 
Thurston, Uon. Lorrin A . . . 
Thwing, lirv. Clarence, Fort Wrangel, Alaska 
Tiffany. Edward ...... 

Tileston, Mrs. John B,, Miltoyi, Mass, 
Todd, William C, Atkinson, N.H. 



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Tompkins, Eugene 

Toronto Public Libraiy, Toronto, Canada 
Torrey Botanical Club, New York City 
Towle Manufacturing Co., Neit)buryi)ort, Mass. 
Townsend, Hev. Charles, Orange, N.J. 

Townsend Dr. diaries W 

Traubel, Horace L., Camden, N.J. , 

Trelease, William, St. Louis, Mo 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. .... 

Trueblood, Benjamin F 

Tufts College, Soinerville, Mass 

Tufts College Publishing Association, Somerville, Mass. 

Tufts Library, Weymouth, Mass 

Tulane University of Louisana, Neiv Orleans, La. 

Turner, Alfred T. 

Twentieth Regiment Association, M. V. I. 

Typographical .Journal, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Union League Club of Chicago, Chicago, III. 

Union Steam Ship Co., Southampton, England . 

Union Theological Seminary, Neic York City . 

LTnited States. Civil Service Commission, Washington 

B.C 

Commission of Fish and Fisheries . 

Commission on Boundary between Venezuela and 

British Guiana .... 

Department of Agriculture . . 1 broadside 

C limate and Crop Service . 

Division of Botany 

Division of Chemistry . 

Division of Entomology 

Division of Forestry 

Division of Pomology . 

Division of Publications 

Division of Statistics 

Farmers' Bvilletin . 

Library 

Office of Experiment Stations 

Office of Road Inquiry . 

Section of Foreign Markets . 

Weather Bureau. 5 broadsides, 336 maps 

Department of the Interior 

Board of Indian Commissioners 

Bureau of Education 

Census Office .... 

Geological Survey. 

— — ■ Patent Office 

Department of Labor 

Department of the Navy . 

Bureau of Navigation . 

ilydrographic Office 

Naval War College 

Naval War Records 



31 maps 



Department of State 

Bureau of American Republics 



Department of the Treasury 

Bureau of Navigation . 

Bureau of Statistics 

I5ureau of the Mint 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 

Life Saving Service 

Light-House Board 

Marine Hospital Service 



1 chart 



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United States. Department of War . . .45 maps 

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National 

Park Commission . . . . . 

Engineer Department , 100 photographs 

Lil>rary ..... 

Surgeon-General , 

War Records Office 

Interstate Commerce Commission . 

Library of Congress .... 

Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. 

Naval Institute, Annapolis, Ind. 

Naval Observatory .... 

Nautical Almanac Office 

Superintendent of Documents 

Universalist General Convention 
Universalist Sabbath School Union . 
Universitiit Basel, Basel, Switzerland . 
Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada 
University Club, NewYork City . 
University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Library ...... 

University of California. Phebe Hearst Architectural 

Plan, Trustees of, San Francisco, Cal. 
University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. . 
University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. 
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. 
University of Maine. Natural History 

Orono, Me. ..... 

University of Michigan, General Librar 

Mich 

Graduate School 



y, Ann Arbor. 



Department 



University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb 
University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. . 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Department of Dentistry . 

Free Museum of Science and Art 

University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. 
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 
University of the State of New York. Albany, N.Y. 

New York State Museum, Albany, N.Y. 

State Library, Albany, N.Y 

University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada . 

Library, Toronto, Canada .... 

University of Vermont and State Agricultural College 
Burlington, Vt. . . . . . 

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. , 
Library, Madison, Wis 



University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wy. 
Upsala, Sweden. Kongliga Universitet 
Uruguay. Bureau d'Jilchanges Internationaux de Publica 
tions, Montevideo ....... 

Direccion de Estadistica General, Montevideo . 

Oticina de Deposito, Reparto y Canje, Montevideo 

Utah Agricultiiral Experiment Station, Logan, Utah 

Utica State Hospital, Utica, N.Y 

Valley Forge Commission, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Vanderbilt Southern Historical Society, Nashville, Tenn. 
Van de Weyer, Victor W. B., London, England 

Van Ness, Joseph 

Van Vleck, Balfour H 



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Vaughan, L. N., SomervlUe., Mass. . • . . . 
Venezuela. Ministerio de Fomento, Caracas . 

Venn, Theodore J., Clncaf/o, III. 

Yerniont Academy, St. Juliiisbttrij^Vt. . . . . 
Vermont Agricultural Experiment Station, Burlington, 

Vt 

Vermont State Library, Montpelier, Vt 

Vermont State Medical Society, Burlington, Vt. 
Very, J/i.s'-s Lydia L. A., Salem, Mass. . ' , . 
Victoria Public Library, Perth, Western Australia . 
Victoria, AustraUa,Vvih\\Q, Library, Museums and National 

Art Gallery, Melbourne ....... 

Victoria University, Toronto, Canada .... 

Victory John F., Washington, I).C 

Victor, Dr. Agnes C 

Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society, Vineland, 

N.J 

Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, Blacksburg, Va. 

Volckmar, F., Leipzig, Germany 

Volta, Bureau, Washington, D.C. 

Voss, William, Calcutta, India ...... 

Wabash College Library, Crawfordsville, Ind. . 

Wade, Joseph M. 

Walcott, George H 

Walcott, Robert, Cambridge, Mass 

Walker, Joseph B., Concora, N.H 

Waltham, Mass., City of 

Walton, i>r. George L. 

Walton, Josiah P., Muscatine, la 

Ward & Foxlow, London, England 

Ware, Miss Emma F., Milton, Mass 

Ware, W illiam B 

Warner, John De W., New York City 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 

Warren, I)r. J. Collins 

Washburn, Mrs. C. A. Cambrid'/eport, Mass. 
Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. 

Watchman i^ublishing Co 

Watertown Free Public Library, Watertown, Mass. . 

Webber, Lorenzo, Portland, Mich 

Webster, Henry S 

Wedrowiec, Meriden, Conn. . 1897-98 subscription 

Weekes, Robert D., East Orange, N.J 

Weekly Gazette, Colorado Springs, CoL 

1897-98 subscription 
Welch, Lewis S., New Haven, Conn. . 

Weld, Miss H. M 

Wellcome, Henry S., London, England 
Wellesley College, Wellfsley, Mass. . 
Wells, John N., Washington, B.C. 

Wells & Fargo 

Wells College, Atirora, N.T. 

Wenham, Mass., Town of . 

Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. 

West Chester Library, West Chester, N. Y. 

West End Street Railway . 

West Ham Public Libraries, West Ham, England 

Westerly Public Library, Westerly, R.I. . 

Western Australia Patent Office, Perth, Western Australia 

Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, O 

Weston, Jl/a-s., Town of 

Weysse, Ur. Arthur W 



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1 cliait 



Wheeler, Prof. Benjamin I., Itliani, N.Y. 

Wheelwright, Mrs. A. C 

Wheelwright, Edmund M 

Whipple, G. C., Newton Centre, Masn. 
White, Jfr.s. Caroline E., Philadelphia, Pa. 

White, Jean 

Whiting, John L., & Son .... 

AVhitiug, Miss Lilian 

Whitney, Bev. E. W., Milford, Mas.'<. . 
Whitney, James L. . . . . . 

Whitney, blisses Sarah & Caroline 
Wliymper, Edward, London, KiKjbifd 
Wigan Free Fuhlic liibrary, Wiyai), Eiujland 
Wight, C. II., New York Citi/ 
Wilder, Prof. Burt G., Itlnu-a, N.Y. . 
Wilkes-Barre Times, Wilkesharre, Pa. 

1S97-98 subscription 

Williams, Dr. Charles H 

Williams, Francis H., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Williams, J. H., & Co., Bn^nkii/n, N.Y. . 

Williams, Most Rev. John J 

Williams, John L 

Willis, C. W 

Willis, J. B 

Williston Seminary, Easthamplun, Masx. . 
Wilmington Institute, Wilinim/ton, Bel. 
Wilmington Institute Free Library, Wilmiw/lon, Del 
\Vilson, Edward, New York City .... 

Winchester, Mass., Town of 

Winchester Home Corporation for Aged Women 
Windsor, Thomas, Maneliester, Emjland 
Winship, George P., Promdewce. i?./. 

Winsor, Justin, Cambridge, Mass 

Winthrop, Robert C, Jr 

Winthrop Public Library, Winthrop, Ma.ss. 
Wisconsin. Bureau of Labor & Industrial Statistics, Mad 
uson .......... 

Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station, Madison 

Wis 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission, Milwaukee, Wis 
Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis. . 

Withington, Dr. Charles F 

Woburn, 3/as.s-. , City of 

Woburn Public Library, Wolmrn, Mass. . 1 broadside 
Wolverhampton Free Library Committee, WolverliamjHou, 

England .......... 

Woman's Charity Club 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Pldladelphia, 



Pa. 



Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary for 
Women and Children, Neio York City .... 
Woman's Relief Corps, Department of Massachusetts 

National Convention, J;u/irmf'pofc, /HfL 

Woman's Voice .... 1S07-98 subscription 

Woodbury, C. J. H 

Woodbury, Mrs. Josephine C 

Woods, James H. ........ 

Woodworth, J. B., Cairdiridgc, Mass. ..... 

Worcester, Bev. William \j., J'hilaildphia, Pa. . 
Worcester Academy, Wan-ester, Mass. .... 

Worcester PYee Public; Library, Woree.ster, Ma.'is. 

9 photographs 



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City Document No. 21. 



Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass. 

Wyman, Dr. Walter, Washington, B.C. 

Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station, Lar 



Wy. 



Yale University, New Haven, Conn. . 

— Library, New Haven, Conn. 

Observatory, Nev) Haven, Con)i. 

Yearly Meeting of Friends, Philadelphia, Pa 
Y'oung Churchman Co., 3/ihoaMA-ee, Wis. . 
Y^oung Men's Christian Association, Neiu York City 
Y''oung Men's Christian Associations of North America 
Sprinqfield, 3Iass. ...... 

Zadek, E. O., Mobile, Ala 

Zoological Society of London, London, England 
Zoological Society of Tokio, Tokio, Japan 
Zurich, Switzerland, Stadtbibliothek Ziiricli 



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Library Department. 179 



APPENDIX XIV. 



ORDERS OF CITY COUNCIL. 

The following are the orders passed by the C'ity Government 
during the year ending January 31, 1898, which have been com- 
municated to the Trustees as affecting the Library Department. 
(]\Iere items in appropriation bills are omitted, also various orders 
introduced but not actually passed.) 

City of Boston, 
In Common Council, February 4, 1897. 

Ordered^ That the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston, through His Honor the Mayor, be requested to pro- 
vide, so far as lies in their power, for the enlargement of the 
quarters now occupied by, and the extension of the service ren- 
dered through, the branch or delivery station of the Public 
Library now located on Broadway Extension, in Ward 7. 

Passed. Sent up for concurrence. 

In Board of Aldermen, February 8. 
Concurred. 



A true copy. 
Attest 



(Signed) John T. Priest, 

Assistant City (Jlerk. 



City of Boston, 
In CoMMCfN Council, February 25, 1897. 

Ordered^ That the Trustees of tiie Public Library of the City 
of Boston, through His Honor the Mayor, be requested to estab- 
lish a public reading-room in the vicinity of Dorchester station, 
in Ward 24. 

In Common Council, February 25, 1897. 
Referred to His Honor tlie Mayor. 

(Signed) Joseph A. Conky, 

President. 



City of Boston, 
In Common Council, March 11, 1897. 

Ordered., That the Trustees of the Public Library )te leipiested 
to report, through His Honor the Mayor, to the Council at its 



180 City Docu]vient No. 21. 

next meeting the estimated additional cost of opening the Cen- 
tral Library on Sundays and holidays throughout the year at 
9 A.M. 

In Common Council, Marcli 18, 1897. 

Referred to His Honor the Mayor. 

(Signed) JosErn A. Conry, 

President. 

Under date of March 20, 1897, tlie Trustees voted the follow- 
ing response to the above request : 

Voted, Tliat His Honor the Mayor be informed that while the 
entire additional cost of the undertaking pro^iosed is difficult to 
comprehend in an estimate made in advance, such approximate 
estimate as the Trustees are al)le to give indicates that the cost 
would be something over $7,000 per annum. 



Order passed October 26, 1897, with reference to gift of 
William C. Todd, Esq. See supra, Appendix XII. Corre- 
spondence. 



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