(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

^:» >/ 















.^- >*''lsi^^^'^^^ 



ANNUAL RKPORT 



OF THE TRUSTEES 



Public Library 



CITY OF BOSTON 



1898 



BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE 

1899 



CONTENTS 



PAGE. 

Report of Trustees ....... 1 

Report of Librarian ....... 7 

Supplements to Report of Librarian : 

A. Memorandum as to the General Card Catalogue . 47 

B. Considerations as to a Printed Catalogue in Book 

Form 49 

C. Extract from the Report of the Special Libraries, 

Department of Fine Arts ..... 60 

D. Report of the Department of Documents and Statis- 

tics 64 

E. Extract from the Report of the Children's Depart- 

ment . . . . . . . .72 

F. P^xtract from the Report of the Branch Department, 77 

G. Memorial of the death of Arthur Mason Knapp . 86 
Report of the P^xamining Committee .... 88 
Appendices : 

I. Financial Statement ...... 101 

II. Extent of the Library by Years . . . .125 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, includ- 

ing Branches . . . . . .126 

IV. Classification : Central Library . . . broadside 
V. Classification: Branches (omitted 1898-99) . 129 

VI. Registration 130 

VII. Circulation 134 

VIII. Trustees for Forty-seven Years. — Librarians . 136 
IX. Examining Committees for Forty-seven Years . 138 
X. Library Service (March 31, 1899), including 

Sunday and Evening Schedule . . .141 

XI. Graded System of Service . . . . .152 

XII. Correspondence, Bequests, etc. .... 156 
XIII. Givers, and amounts of Gifts . . . .161 

XIV Orders of City Council, and Memorandum of Peti- 
tions, etc. . . . . . . .196 



^0) 
u 

-CD''" 

Z^ 









<^ 



e' 



e^ 



"if 



,§ O 



u 



O I 3 



?:< 



n " ° * 






I ^ 



i®o 



Q. I > 

J z m 



,/ 



y 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY I, 1899. 



Departments. 



Opened. 



"Volumes, 

Jan. 31, 

1899. 



Circulated 
lor home 

use, 
1898-1899. 



Central Library, Copley sq. Establislied May 2, 1854. .. 

East Boston Branch , 37 Meridian st 

South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway 

Rox1)ury Briinch, 46 Millmont st 

Charlestown Branch, City sq 



Brighton Branch, Holton Library Building, Rock 
land st 



Dorchester Brancli, Arcadia, cor. Adams st 

South End Branch, English High Scliool Building, 
Montgomery st " 



Jamaica Plain Branch, Curtis Hall, Centre st 

West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt, Vernon st.. . 
West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde st 



Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington, 
near River st 



B. Roslindale Delivery Station, 25 Poplar st. .. 

D. Mattapan Reading Room, River, cor. Oak- 
Ian d st 



E. Neponset Delivery Station, 49 Walnut st.. 

B\ Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, 
cor. Eldon st 



G. Allston Delivery Station, 14 Franklin st. 
H. Ashmont Delivery Station, 4 Talbot ave.. 



J. Dorchester Station Delivery Station, 1 Mil- 
ton ave " 



K. Bird Street Delivery Station, (j Wayland st, 

L. North Brighton Reading Room, .")6 Mar 
ket st 



M. Crescent Avenue Delivery Station, 940 
Dorchester ave 



N. Blue Hill Avenue Delivery Station, 200 Blue 
Hill ave 



P. Broadway Extension Delivery Station, 13 
Broadway Extension ". 



Q. Upham's Corner Deliver}' Station, 75fi Dud- 
ley st 



R. Warren Street Delivery Station, 329 Wai- 
ren st ." 



S. Roxbury Crossing Delivery Station, 1173 
Tremont st ." 



T. Boylston Delivery Station, Lamartine, <-or 
Paul Gore st 



U. Ward Nine Delivei-y Station, C2 Union 
Park st 



Mar. 11, 
Jan. 28, 
May 1, 
July, 
*Jan., 



*Jan., 
Jan. 25, 

Aug., 
Sept., 
*Jan. 6, 
Feb. 1, 

June 7, 
Dec. 3, 

Dec. 27, 
Jan. 1, 

Nov. 1, 
Mar. 11, 
July 26, 

Nov. 12, 
Jan. 22, 

May 9, 

June 25, 

July 1, 

Jan. 16, 

Mar. 16, 

May 1, 

Jan. 18, 

Nov. 1, 

Dec. 27, 



1895 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 

1874 
1875 

1877 
1877 
1880 
1896 

1875 

1878 

1881 
1883 

1886 
1889 
1890 

1890 
1892 

1892 

1892 

1895 

1896 

1896 

1896 

1897 

1897 

1898 



550,822 
11,814 
14,912 
32,859 
31,950 

13,886 
15,413 

13,909 
12,496 
4,322 
10,825 

88 



422,849 
60,435 
75,407 
86,023 
54,927 

36,217 
55,768 

88,408 
52,225 
22,37() 
115,655 

5,205 
13,501 

2,702 
3,895 

10,236 
9,041 
7,410 

8,886 
3,412 

3,914 

7,0,57 

9,946 

27,718 

15,590 

11,873 

14,6.53 

9,875 

1,300 



* As a branch. 




CENTRAL LIBRARY. GROUND FLOOR. 




NrwiP^PCRS 



CENTRAL LIBRARY, ENTRESOL A. 




CENTRAL LIBRARY, BATES HALL. 



CENTRAL LIBRARY, ENTRESOL B. 



TP.^D D D D D T D D D D^.fl 



n|)iiU^-:|]--l|jl^]-_^fl^ 



Spccial Libraries 







CENTRAL LIBRARY, SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 



To His Honor Josiah Quincy, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

The Trustees of the Public Library present the following 
report of its condition for the year ending January 31, 1899, 
being the forty-seventh annual report. 

They include herewith, as a part of their report, that of 
the Librarian and its accompanying reports, including that 
of Mr. Worthington C. Ford, Chief of the Department of 
Documents and Statistics, together with the report of the 
Examining Committee. These reports contain details of 
which the Trustees in this report present only a partial 
summary. 

An exact account of the receipts and expenditures of the 
Trustees for the past year is found in the reports of the 
Librarian and of the Auditor, but these statements do not 
exhibit in a simple form the income and expenditures which 
may be said strictly to belong to the year. 

1898-1899. 

The cost of maintaining the Library during the year 1898- 
1899 was : 



Salaries . 

Books 

Periodicals 

Newspapers . 

General maintenance 

Of this amount 
The city appropriated 
The trust funds yielded 



162,690 48 

29,035 04 

.5,900 06 

2,146 44 

64,808 02 



$246,855 87 
13,674 11 



$264,580 04 



,529 98 



The balance of the cost 
was obtained from miscellaneous gifts, etc. 



1,050 06 



2 City Document N'o. 21. 

This statement does not include balances of preceding 
years which were subject to charges for outstanding orders 
for books and similar appropriations incurred prior to the 
year covered by this report, but attempts to show in general 
the means at the command of tlie Trustees during the year 
for the maintenance of the Lil)rary, including the purchase 
of books. 

Two sources of mcome, \iz., the rents of the old Library 
building and the proceeds of fines and of the sales of the 
publications of the Library, of which the Library had here- 
tofore received the benefit, were no longer available. By the 
requirements of the appropriation bill of 1898, sums re- 
ceived from these sources were paid into the City Treasury. 
In consequence, the means at the disposal of the Trustees 
for the general purposes of the Library were less by about 
$2,000 than in the preceding year, although the general 
appropriation by the city exceeded that of the preceding 
year by $10,000. 

The preparation of the publications of the Library involves 
a cost of over $4,000 annually, and this expense is paid 
from the general appropriation. The cost of collecting the 
fines due the Library amounts to about $1,500 annually, and 
this cost is also paid from the general appropriation. It 
seems just to the Trustees that the proceeds of the sales and 
of the fmes should both be allowed to the Library, or that the 
expenses incurred by them m these regards should be reim- 
bursed to them and not made a charge upon their general 
resources. 

It has been for some time obvious that it was desirable to 
make certain alterations and improvements in the Library 
Building as originally constructed, not so much by way of 
addition to it as for the purposes of better administration, 
especially with reference to the more rapid delivery of books, 
for better accommodation of readers, and for better ventilar 
tion and general sanitary arrangements. There were no 
funds in the possession of the Trustees available for these 
purposes. Under the authority of an Act of the Legislature 



Library Department. 3 

passed in the session of 1898 and the subsequent action of 
the City Council, a special appropriation of $100,000 was 
provided. This sum, together with portions of some small 
balances of the original appropriations for the construction 
and furnishmg of the building, have been expended durmg 
the past year for the purposes described. The details of the 
work are exhibited in the Librarian's Report. It is substan- 
tially completed, and has greatly improved the convenience 
and healthfulness of the Library, both for the public and 
those employed in it, has added greatly to the efficiency of 
its admmistration, and to a degree in excess of the expense 
incurred. 

The' use of the Librarj^ constantly increases. This m- 
crease is shown in various ways. The number of card 
holders for 1897 was 64,973; for the year 1898 it was 
72,005, showing an increase of 7,032, or nearly 11 per 
cent. The increase of the circulation of books and of 
visitors and readers, both at the Central Library and the 
branches, furnishes additional evidence of such increased 
use. 

This increased use involves additional expense of the ad- 
ministration of the Library and such additional expense the 
Trustees have been able to meet chiefly by diminishing the 
purchases of books. It is upon this item of expenditure 
that the pressure of economy immediately falls. Accord- 
ingly the increase of the Library in volumes purchased has 
been considerably less during the past year than in the pre- 
ceding. In 1897, 33,131 volumes were added to the Library, 
but in 1898 only 25,470 — a number less by 7,661. 

The Trustees find it difficult, with the means at their com- 
mand, to supply the Library and its branches with the popu- 
lar publifliations of the day. It is only from the slender 
income of the Trust Funds that they can procure the rarer 
books needed to maintain the general character of the 
Library as one valuable not merely to supply entertainment, 
but also as one useful to the mechanic, the student and the 
scholar. The Library is greatly in need of means to 



4 City Document No. 21. 

purchase the rare historical material occasionally offered for 
sale, and otherwise not easily to be obtamed, especially that 
relating to the history of Boston and of New England, which 
the Trustees consider it their especial duty to collect. 

The general condition of the books in the Library is good, 
but prudent management calls for the expenditure of a much 
larger sum than the Trustees have at their command for the 
rebinding and repair of many volumes. At least $20,000 
could be wisely expended for these purposes and this sum is 
required by true economy. 

Requests are continually presented to the Trustees for the 
permanent improvement of certain branches, for the establish- 
ment of new delivery stations, and for similar expenditures. 
The means at their command have enabled them to comply 
with but a small portion of these requests. Four additional 
public schools and one branch post office have been made 
deposit stations, and one delivery station has been supplied 
with a deposit collection. These additions represent the 
expansion of the Library system during the past year. 

With respect to the financial position of the Library the 
Trustees report that they have kept their expenditures 
strictly within their means. No expenditure or obligation is 
incurred beyond the limit of such means, and consequently 
there is no deficit at the close of the year. It is, of course, 
obvious that unless these means increase in proportion to the 
use of the Library and the growth of the city it will be im- 
possible to maintain its present rank and usefulness. 

The Trustees have added a new department this year to 
the Library, that of Documents and Statistics. In June, 
1898, the American Statistical Association presented to the 
Library its valuable collection of books and pamphlets 
numbering about 5,000 volumes. These, together with 
the Public Documents and other similar economic and 
sociological material already in the possession of the Library, 
constituted a valuable collection which the Trustees were 
satisfied could be made available for great service to the pub- 
lic. It furnishes the means for investigations tending to 
the improvement of laws, of social conditions and the expan- 
sion of trade. Accordingly, this department was created 
and Mr. Worthington C. Ford was appointed its Chief. Mr. 
Ford was formerly Chief of the Bureau of Statistics of the 
Treasury Department at Washington and brings to the ser- 
vice of the Library the benefit of his large experience. The 
Trustees ask attention to the reports of the Librarian and of 
Mr. Ford, which contain an extended description of the 
value and purposes of the department and an account of 
what it has thus far accomplished. 



LiBRAKY Department. 5 

There has been presented to the city of Boston and de- 
posited in the Library a copy in marble, made by John 
Hutchison, R.S.A., of the bust of Sir Walter Scott now- 
placed in Westminster Abbey by the Committee on the Scott 
Memorial. 

Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson has presented to the Library 
twenty-four wooden blocks engraved by Mr. Stevenson him- 
self, impressions of which were reproduced in the Bonus 
Volume of the Edinburgh Edition of his works. 

Other gifts of interest and value are enumerated in the 
Librarian's report. While the Trustees are of the opmion 
that it is undesirable to make the Library in any sense a 
museum of curiosities, yet there are many objects of art and 
literature which find an appropriate place in it, and are both 
interesting and instructive. Such gifts they welcome. 

They again call attention to the great need of permanent 
endowments for the Library. It is chiefly from such sources 
that the permanent value of the Library can be secured. 

The large inner court of the Library Building possesses 
great architectural beauty, but it is incomplete, and affords 
room for much greater additional natural and artistic decora- 
tion. The open area offers a field for the display of shrubs 
and flowers ; and sculpture and other works of art would 
find most appropriate positions. The Trustees hope that 
some generous giver may recognize here his opportunity. 

The Committee appointed by the Trustees to examine the 
Library during the past year consisted of : 



J. Bapst Blake, M. D. 

Hon. Patrick A. Collins. 

E. Winchester Donald, D.D. 

Mr. C. W. Ernst. 

Mr. Alfred Hemenway. 

Mr. John H. Lee. 

Miss E. E. Mason. 

Mr. James J. Roche. 

Mrs. Sarah H. Williamson. 



Hon. Henry W. Bragg. 
Rev. Arthur T. Connolly. 
Wm. H. Ensworth, M.D. 
Miss Gretchen Field. 
Mr. Thomas Hills. 
Mr. A. Lawrence Lowell. 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Parker. 
Mr. Charles P. Searle. 
Mr. Frank Wood. 



A copy of their report is submitted herewith. 

A detailed account of the work of the Departments of 
Cataloguing, of Publications, and of Prmting, is contained in 
the Librarian's report. The Trustees believe that the publi- 
cations of the Library, especially the Bulletins and Special 
Bibliographical lists, contain much not merely of temporary, 
but of permanent value, and they believe also that the 
mechanical execution of these publications is highly credit- 
able. The account of the work of the Catalogue Department 



6 City Document No. 21. 

reports the progress of the department, and the Trustees 
ask attention to it, as well as to the special reports of the 
Chief of the Department. 

The Library has suffered by the deaths and resignations 
of some of those employed in its service. 

The most conspicuous loss was occasioned by the death 
of Mr. Arthur Mason Knapp, who was twenty-four years in 
its service, and for twenty years the custodian of Bates 
Hall. His experience, ability and fidelity were universally 
acknowledged, and possessed an added charm by reason of 
his agreeable personal traits. 

His successor is Mr. Oscar A. Bierstadt, who brings from 
the Astor Library in New York an experience which should 
well fit him for similar duties here. 

In conclusion, the Trustees report that they believe that, 
with the facilities furnished by the recent expenditures, the 
Library, as a building, meets as well as possible the public 
needs. The graded system of service and appointment now 
for several years established secures fidelity, interest and a 
sense of permanence on the part of those employed. The 
Trustees believe that the Library not merely supplies a val- 
uable school of instruction to those resident within the limits 
of the city, but secures for Boston a wide reputation for a 
liberal and wise public expenditure, of which it may well be 
proud. 

Fkederick O. Prince, 

President. 

Solomon Lincoln, 

Vice-President. 

JosiAH H. Benton, Jr. 

Henry P. Bowditch. 

James De Normandie. 

Adopted May 1, 1899, as of February 1, 1899. 
Attest : 

James De Normandie, (Jlerk Pro Tern. 



Library Department. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees : 

I have the honor to suhmit my report for the year ending 
January 31, 1899. 

The library system has been augmented during the year 
only by the establishment of one additional delivery station 
(Station U, established December 27, 1898). But a new- 
department of work has been created at the Central Library 
(the Department of Documents and Statistics), and the 
scope of existing departments has, in certain cases, been 
enlarged. Four additional schools and one branch post 
office have been made deposit stations. To the only delivery 
station lacking a deposit collection at the beginning of the 
year this feature has now been added. So that the outlying- 
system now comprises : 

Ten branches, with large permanent collections of books. 

Five reading-rooms, all of them also delivery and deposit 
stations, and one. Station P, having also an independent 
permanent collection of books. 

Thirteen delivery stations, all also deposit stations. 

Twenty-two engine-houses and one post ofhce receiving 
books regularly on deposit. 

Four public schools (two high and two grammar) receiving 
deposits. 

One public school — a delivery station. 

Five public institutions receiving deposits. 

A total of sixty-one outlying agencies, as against fifty- 
seven on February 1, 1898. 

The recent alterations at the Central Library building were 
not designed to provide for additional departments of work 
so much as to enlarge the facilities of existing departments. 
They have, nevertheless, secured accommodations for the 
new department of Documents and Statistics ; and in freeing 
the Lecture Hall have reopened opportunity for a service to 
the public not hitherto fairly entered upon by the Library. 

FINANCE. 

In G-eneral. — The Auditor's statement (Appendix I. of 
this report) shows m detail the receipts and expenditures of 
the Library during the year. Included, as heretofore, is a 
comparison of the expenditures from the general appropriar 
tion with those of preceding years. This table begins 



8 City Document No. 21. 

naturally with the year 1895, for with that year, and the re- 
organization of the Library in the new building, a new scale 
of expenditures was entered upon. The comparison is item 
by item, except as certain items have been divided under a 
new classification adopted in consultation with the City 
Auditor during the past jeav. 

The busmess of the Library increases progressively, though 
in irregular progression, from year to year. Tested by one 
statistic alone — the number of card holders (64,973, February 
1, 1898, 72,005, February 1, 1899)— the increase during the 
past year has been 10 per cent. ; taking the departments as 
a whole, and includmg departments (such as the Statistical) 
newly created, an estimate of 10 per cent, as an average in- 
crease in volume of work done would not be excessive. 

The cost of service in 1898 exceeded that in 1897 by over 
$8,000 (an increase of 6 per cent.) ; that of cleaning increased 
$2,000 ; and expenditure for repairs, and for furniture and 
fixtures (requisite in connection with alterations at the 
Central Library and Branches), exceeded that for 1897 by 
some $8,000. 

A reference to the Auditor's statement will show that the 
total expenditure from the city appropriation in 1898 
($246,855.87) was nevertheless practically no greater than 
in 1897 ($246,541.79). 

The estimated cost of maintaining the Library 
during the year as submitted to the City Gov- 
ernment in December, 1897) \<^as . . . $263,401 88 

The amount granted (general ap- 
propriation) was but . , . $245,000 00 

Appropriated later for Statistical 

Department by transfer . . 1,498 98 

Balance from 1897 ... 356 89 

246,855 87 



Discrepancy $16,546 01 

which amount represented estimated expenditure to be avoided 
if the department was to come through the year without a 
deficit. 

The expenditure was avoided, and the department has 
come through the year without a deficit. But it has done so 
only by reducmg the purchase and rebinding of books below 
a proper and economical level, and by omitting purchases of 
fuel, stock and supplies usually made toward the end of the 
fiscal year. The cost of these latter is to draw heavily upon 
the appropriation for 1899 at the yery beginning of the new 



Library Department. 9 

fiscal year. The estimates for 1899 have, therefore, sought to 
provide for arrearage of purchase in several directions, and 
in part for the great arrearage m binding (particularly ex- 
plained below), as well as for necessary increase of the pay- 
roll under the graded service system. 

The total amount requested for 1899 was $287,059. 

The amount appropriated, however, is but 8255,000. 

It is to be observed that two sources of income available 
prior to 1898 were cut off at the beginning of that year. 
One was rentals from the Old Library building, the other 
was receipts from fines and sales of Library publications. 



The rentals yielded in 1895 
" 1896 
" 1897 
" 1898 

The fines and sales in 1895 
" 1896 
" 1897 
" 1898 



$3,101 98 
5,749 00 
8,600 00 

10,000 00 
3,560 91 
4,177 41 
5,091 74 
5,552 32 



The appropriation bill of 1898 provided that all such rev- 
enue of the department should be turned in to the general 
income account of tlie city. It is no longer specially avail- 
able for this department. 

While, therefore, the general appropriation for 1898 ex- 
ceeded that for 1897 by $10,000, the actual income of the 
Library applicable to general purposes was in 1898 (exclud- 
ing balances) nearl}^ ($2,000 less than in 1897. 

The sale of the Old Library estate would in any event put 
an end to revenue from rentals. The receipts from fines and 
from sales represent, however, a continuing contribution by 
the department to the general income of the city. It is to 
be remarked that the gross receipts which the Library is 
required to turn over make no deduction for expense in- 
curred by the Library in collection (of fines) and cost of 
production (of material sold). The cost to the Library of 
collecting $4,800 of fines is over $1,500. The cost of pro- 
ducing the publications sold is far in excess of the gross 
receipts from sale. 

Prior to 1898 receipts from such pett}- income were used 
temporarily to meet petty current exj)enses and book bills 
less than $10, payable by the Library Auditor, an adjustment 
being made monthly. By an order approved March 3, 1898, 
the City Council authorized the transfer to the Library of 
a lump sum of $1,500, to be used for such purposes, the 
amount bemg charged to the appropriation of the department, 



10 City Document No. 21. 

and a final adjustment with tlie appropriation being had 
before the close of the fiscal year. 

The sum of $1,498.98, noted above, was transferred by the 
Mayor from the Reserve Fund to cover the expense for a 
fraction of the year of the Statistical Department, established 
in July, 1898. Two thousand five hundred dollars was 
authorized, but only $1,498.98 proved to be necessary. 

With each year of its development the Library requires 
a larger sum for its maintenance. 

The increase in the aggregate only keeps pace with the 
growth of population of the city,^ and with the increase in the 
volume of work which the department is called upon to do. 
In these respects the Public Library is on no different basis 
from the Public Schools. It also is not a single isolated 
institution within rigid limits, but is a system attempting 
to respond to the needs of a city fast growing in population 
and in needs. It also, by its own ver}^ growth, creates a new 
demand, and the needs to which it responds not merely grow 
in volume, but develop continually in character. It cannot 
remain stationary: if it does not advance and expand it 
must degenerate. 

Permanent Improvements. — A most important contribu- 
tion on the part of the City of Boston was the sum of 
$100,000, to be expended " upon the new Library building 
and the fittings thereof." 

Of the total sum of $100,000, $13,654.85 was required 
for work already done and paid for by advance from the 
original building appropriation. This left $86,345.15 
available for the work undertaken since May, 1898. This 
work, when completed, will have exhausted the entire 
amount. 

Endowme7its. — One further endowment has recently be- 
come effective. This is a gift of a 2^i'incipal sum of 
$2,852.41, contributed by relatives and friends of the late 
Henry Sargent Codman, to form a memorial fund. The 
income will be used in the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening — a designation most appropriate, as the gift 
is to the memory of a landscape architect of achievement 
and great promise. 

With this fund the endowments of the Library aggregate 
but $270,000.- Of this $50,000 is the Todd Newspaper 
Fund. The total of endowments the income of which is 
applicable to the purchase of books is but $220,000. The 

1 The increase as between 1894 and succeeding years is, of course, disproportionate, 
1895 being the lirst year in the new building, and'involving a different scale of activi- 
ties and expenditure. 



LiBEARY Department. 11 

income of this is but a little over $9,000 per year. Under 
necessary reinvestment at lower rates of interest this income 
is steadily diminishing. 

The appropriations granted by the city each year do not 
and can not cover more than the general maintenance expenses 
of the Library and the purchase of the more popular books. 
The reference departments of the Library, the departments 
that are to make it a great reference library for scholars, can 
be built up only by private gift. The sum of $9,000 per 
annum is painfully insufficient. At most it enables the 
Library to keep up with essential current publications. But 
when, from time to time, important special collections are 
thrown upon the market to be competed for, the Library is 
helpless. Its competitors have great emergency funds 
which they can apply at will to just such purposes. It has 
none. Each year it practically exhausts its income in ordi- 
nary expenditure. 

In consequence it has constantly the mortification of ab- 
staining wholly from competition or, if it venture a bid upon 
a few items peculiarly within its province, of being outbid by 
other institutions. 

There is a general impression among the citizens of Bos- 
ton that the general and even development of the Library 
is amply assured by endowment and appropriation. This is 
an error which ought by every means to be corrected. On 
its popular side the Library is developing normally. The 
scholarly side is not developing in proper proportion. On 
this side the Library is relatively losing rank. It will not, 
cannot, regain this rank until the citizens of Boston come 
to its aid with further endowment. 

For convenient reference I summarize here certain portions 
of the Auditor's Exhibit, as (for 1897) on pp. 10-12 of my 
report of last year. 

Gross Income and Expenditure. 

Gross Income. — The gross income of the Library from all 
sources, including balances February 1, 1898, except special 
appropriations, was as follows : 

General appropriation . . . $245,000 GO 

Transfer 1,498 98 

$246,498 98 



Rentals from Old Library building : balance Febru- 
ary 1, 1898 , . . . . . . 356 89 



Carried forward $246,855 87 



12 City Document No, 21. 

Brought forward $246,855 87 

Trust funds : income received from City Treasurer, ^ 16,174 67 
Miscellaneous donations for purchase of books, in- 
cluding balance of Todd Fund . . . . 960 88 

Exchange account . . . . . . 1,371 78 

Interest on bank deposit ..... 1,600 61 

London accounts: balance February 1, 1898, as 
follows : 
Trust funds .... $14,628 19 

G-eneral book funds . . . 12,646 67 

Interest on above . . . 771 57 

28,046 43 



$295,010 24 

Expenditure. — From general income . . . $246,855 87 

From exchange account (money refunded) . . 13 39 

From trust funds income (includes Todd Fund) . 13,674 11 
From general book funds ..... 3,380 14 

From miscellaneous gifts, including balance of 

Todd Fund . \ . . ^ . . . 656 53 



$264,580 04 



A nominal balance on February 1, 1899, would appear as 
$30,430.20. This is, however, subject to outstanding obliga- 
tions, and in part to special restrictions. The available 
balance is but $21,835.40, made up as follows : 

Applicable to photographs ..... $42 21 

Apphcable to books, as follows : 

Trust funds income : nominal bal- 
ance $17,376 38 

Less outstanding orders and neces- 
sary reserve for continuations . 6,101 67 



General book funds . $9,790 47 
Less outstanding or- 
ders . . . 2,493 33 



;il,274 71 



7,297 14 



5,571 85 

Exchange account . . . . 1,358 59 

Interest: domestic account . . 1,600 61 

Cash donations : balances on hand . 262 14 



21,793 19 
^21,835 40 



'■ The actual income collected by liim during the year was but $11,306.67. 



LrBRAEY Department. 13 

It is to be observed further that the bulk of the above 
available balance is composed of funds applicable only to 
the purchase of books, and to a great extent of funds which 
must be reserved for the purchase of books of a very special 
character, e.g.^ the Charlotte Harris Fund — balance 
$3,818,18 — restricted to the purchase of books published 
prior to 1850. 

Special Appropriations. 

Those with apparent existing balances are the Building 
appropriation (construction of Copley Square building). Fur- 
nishing appropriation (Copley Square building), and the 
appropriation for Improvement of the Broadway Extension 
Delivery Station. The Auditor's exhibit shows: 

Huilding Appro^^riation. — Nominal balance uncer- 
tified February 1, 1898 $76,430 62 

New loan (May 27, 1898) 100,000 00 

$176,430 62 
Expenditm-es, 1898 66,314 62 

Nominal balance $110,116 00 

Against which are contracts and out- 
standing orders amounting to . $105,685 24 

And claims amounting to . . 8,085 61 

113,770 85 



Indicating a deficit of . . . . . . $3,654 85 

to be met by application of the balance of the Furnishing 
appropriation so far as necessary. 

Furnishing Appropriation. — Balance February 

1, 1898 $15,730 01 

Expenditures, 1898-99 2,393 80 

Balance February 1, 1899 . • . . $13,336 21 

Against which are contracts outstanding for . . 6,399 87 

Balance $6,936 34 

which is likely to be fully exhausted as above and by work 

already projected. 

Broadway Extension Improvement Appropriation. 

Balance February 1, 1898 .... $3,98956 

Expenditures, 1898-99 532 68 

Balance $3,456 88 



14 City Document No. 21. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 
Central Library. 

It seems well to insert here a brief summary of the altera- 
tions and improvements effected with the special appropria- 
tion granted in May last. 

The only additional space gained has been in the enclosure 
of the Boylston-street driveway. This secured an addition 
of some 33,000 cubic feet to the space available for practical 
active use. But in enabling the current newspapers to be 
removed from the Lecture Hall it freed over 143,000 cubic 
feet of space, which may be available for other uses. 

Adaptation of space to different uses has, however, altered 
considerably the location or boundaries of certain depart- 
ments. The floor plans published in last year's report are 
therefore reproduced in this year's, with the alterations in- 
corporated. 

The work done prior to May, 1898, but chargeable to the 
special appropriation of $100,000, was chiefly upon the heat- 
ing and ventilating system : a third engine, additional radiat- 
ing surface, etc. In July was entered upon the scheme of 
improvement in the system recommended by Prof. S. H. 
Woodbridge, as the result of his examination and tests of the 
preceding winter. The work actually done has considerably 
exceeded the recommendations made by him at that time, 
new necessities developing as the work itself progressed. In 
brief, the more important features have been : the substitu- 
tion of a 10-foot for the 18-foot intake fan in the basement, 
and of an exhaust fan of different design and efficiency for 
that under the roof; the substitution of steam for hot-water 
coils, to raise the temperature of the air drawn in from the 
court-yard to be forced up through the ducts ; the installation 
of special ventilatmg fans in the engine-room (incidentally 
serving to dry out storage space under the platforms), m the 
public lavatories and elsewhere ; more ample provision by 
new or unused ducts for the ventilation of rooms (as the 
periodical room), whose ventilation was clearly inadequate ; 
and, of course, such changes in and additions to the system 
as were necessitated by the recent structural alterations. 

With the additional or improved fans several additional 
electric motors were necessary, including a 20-horse power 
motor for the intake fan. The sanitation of the public lava- 
tories required certain changes in the plumbing. 

Unusually high tides had developed leaks in the main 
ventilating duct under the engine-room. Water forced up 



Library Department. 15 

through these leaks formed stagnant pools from which 
offensive odoi"S were carried up to the main reading-room, 
so that the duct vitiated the very atmosphere it was de- 
signed to puiify. The portion of the duct under the engine- 
room has been lifted out of reach of tide-water, secured by 
solid concrete against possible contact, and reconstructed 
throughout. 

The full result of these various alterations is not yet ap- 
parent, for some of the new apparatus (e.g., the intake fan 
itself) is not yet in operation. But that the essential im- 
provements sought will have been secured there can be no 
doubt. The new intake fan, smaller as it is, at high speed 
discharges through the ducts 60,000 to 75,000 cubic feet of 
air a minute, as against 30,000 to 45,000 cubic feet dis- 
charged by the old. This air is now sufficiently heated to 
contribute positively to the temperature of each room, as 
well as to its ventilation. The ventilation of the public 
lavatories, which had beeji matter of great concern and 
much unsuccessful experiment, is now perfect. And the 
changes throughout appear certain to accomplish the ends 
sought. 

The cost of these (over $12,000) has been so great as to 
diminish materially the amount of the appropriation available 
for the miscellaneous work. The more significant of this 
may be summarized (I omit details and changes — as new 
doorways, etc. — merely incidental) as follows : 

Increase and rearrangement of space for readers and for 
administration, additional machinery and administrative 
equipment and furniture. 

Accommodations for Readers. 

I. Inner Periodical Room. 

The Boylston-street driveway has been enclosed to form 
with the adjacent room, an inner periodical room. 
The present periodical room, on the north-east corner, 
first floor, has been enlarged by the removal of a 
partition, and has become the newspaper room. The 
use of the periodicals and newspapers, which is allied, will 
thus be provided for in three large rooms conveniently en 
suite. The room recently occupied by the newspapers has 
been released for other uses, and the newspapers are now 
in a room directly accessible from the main vestibule, not 
necessitating, as heretofore, the transit of a third of the 
building. 

The readers of periodicals, moreover, will be exempted 
from the jarring of the light and power engines. 



16 City Document No. 21. 

II. Children's Room — Patent Room. 

The present Children's Room has been relieved of the 
registration desk, which has been removed to the Delivery 
Room. The children's department has been augmented by 
the addition of the room adjacent to it, formerly the Patent 
Room. This is to be fitted up as a general reference reading- 
room, with a good reference library, including maps, photo- 
graphs, etc., useful to children in their school work. In the 
gallery of this room will be a kindergarten library for teach- 
ers, augmented from the present collection. 

The collection of drawings and specifications of patents 
has been removed to a room in the west wing, reached from 
the court-yard, and from the Special Libraries' floor. This 
room has been enlarged and provided with galleries, and cor- 
responds to Stacks 4, 5 and 6. Besides the collection of 
patents it will provide in part for the work of the Statistical 
Department, recently established, being directly adjacent to 
the collection of documents on the Special Libraries' floor. 
It has also been connected with the bound volume Newspaper 
Room, containing the most important of the files of newspapers. 

ADMINISTRATIOlSr. 

I. Delivery Room. 

On the Blagden-street side (south wing) the Librarian's 
office, adjacent to the Abbey room, has been tlirown into the 
old tube-room, so called, from which books are issued from 
the stacks. The space for the issue of books has thus been 
doubled. With it the delivery counter has been doubled and 
provides now distinct divisions for the return and for the issue 
of books. The registration desk, formerly in the Children's 
Room, has also been provided for at this point : an essential, 
as its work is intimately connected with that of the Delivery 
Department, and its remoteness from that department hith- 
erto has forced the public to traverse the whole width of the 
building for needs that properly should be treated together. 
The old system of pneumatic tubes, involving fifty-six sta- 
tions m the building, has been overhauled, and new and 
improved terminals substituted. The twenty-eight terminals 
in the Delivery Room, formerly stretching in a line, have 
been grouped in a circle for more convenient operation. In 
addition, an auxiliary system of improved tubes (operating by 
suction, instead of by pressure) has been installed, which 
not merely connects the Delivery Room with each one 
of the six stacks and with the Special Libraries' floor, 
but connects every stack with every other stack, so 
that slips may be sent from stack to stack without 



LiBUARY Depaijtment. 17 

being returned to the Deliveiy Room, An apparatus 
has been ms tailed in the Delivery Room, itself novel 
to librar}" use. This is a " pick-up carrier," so called. 
Its purpose is to transport the various slips between 
four points in the Delivery Room doing business with one 
another, — the issue and return desks, the record trays, 
and the pneumatic terminals. The "■ carrier" is a cable rail- 
wa}- operated by electricity. At fixed points at intervals 
upon the cable are carriers, which, as they reach a station, 
pick up a batch of slips awaiting their arrival, carry them 
forward and deposit them at such succeeding station as ma}^ 
be their destination. The carrier in not a box, but is more 
in the nature of a hand, which clasps the batch of slips by 
closing of the thumb and middle finger, and releases them 
automatically by the opening of these two. 

The automatic precision with whicli this work is cairied on 
is remarkable. The convenience of the apparatus for such 
use is that it keeps the flow of application slips practically 
continuous, whereas, when transferred by hand, they can be 
transferred only in batches, at intervals, to the disadvantage 
of any slip that may be undermost. 

II. Executive and Other Rooms. 

A new set of rooms has been created for the Librarian 
and the Executive Department generally, consisting of an 
ante-room, main office, private office, and a room for records 
and files. This suite of rooms has been connected with the 
Trustees' Room through a lobby formerly open to Blagden 
street, so that the whole series of rooms representing the gen- 
eral administration is now in proper relation en suite. This 
lobby will contain the Chamberlain Collection of autographs. 

The Librarian's office is still, however, very conveniently 
accessible to the public, being reached directly from the 
Delivery Room by a corridor left open on the Blagden-street 
side. 

The new adminstrative offices occupy a ^Jart of Stack 5 on 
the Blagden-street side. Part of Stack 1 and of Stack 2 have 
also been equipped for administrative uses. In Stack 2, 
space has been fitted up for the work of the Branch Division, 
so called. This is the department at the Central Library 
having to do with the responsibility of the general adminis- 
tration of the outlying departments of the Library system, 
which includes the 28 Branches and Delivery Stations, and 
the work connected with the issue of books to 23 engine- 
houses, certain of the reformatory institutions, and various 
schools. This division also deals with the applications from 
these outlying departments for books at the Central Library, 



18 City Document No. 21. 

and the delivery of these books. Within the past four years 
the circulation of books from the Central Library, through 
the outlying departments, has greatly increased. In addition 
to the circulation of books upon specific application, there are 
now also deposit collections to be provided for. The enlarge- 
ment of the old work, together with these new undertakings, 
has necessitated the organization of a considerable depart- 
ment, the head of which is the Supervisor of Branches. The 
space assigned to the work of the Branch Division, when the 
new building was opened, was but 216 sq. ft. ; the space now 
provided for it in Stacks 1 and 2 is 1,766 sq. ft. In Stack 
1 is a shipping-room, where all the books enter, and from 
which they are despatched. It is reached from a window on 
the sidewalk directly accessible to the library wagons. In 
Stack 2 is the provision for the adminstrative and clerical 
work, with shelving for the collection of books drawn upon 
more specially for deposit use. 

The adaptation of portions of Stacks 2 and 5 for adminis- 
trative purposes has necessitated enlargement of the whole 
series of windows on the Blagden-street side, at these levels, 
from 2 ft. 3 in. to 4 ft. 10 in. in width. 

The stacks from the basement to the Special Libraries' 
floor have been connected at the south-westerly corner by a 
staircase. Intercommunication between the stacks has also 
been secured by the auxiliary pneumatic tube system, above 
indicated, and by the electric book-lift, mentioned below. 

The Ordering Department. — This room has been more 
than doubled in size by the addition to it of corridor and 
other space. It has also been greatly improved as to light, 
and forms now a most admirable space for the business of 
securing and receiving books, and preparing them for the 
Catalogue and Shelf Departments. 

On this wing also have been arranged offices for the Chief 
Janitor (formerly in the main vestibule) and for the Custo- 
dian of Stock, so called, the official who has the responsibility 
of purchasing the two hundred odd articles, from pencils to 
towels, in current use, and the duty of distributing them to 
the several departments upon requisition provided by the 
Librarian ; and who has also the custody and distribution of 
library forms and publications. 

Stock Room. — In the basement a large space has been 
fitted up as a stock room for the storage of these articles, 
and of library forms and publications. 

Duplicate Room. — Adjacent to the Stock Room is space 
fitted up with shelving for the Duplicate Room, where dupli- 
cates not needed for Library use may be sorted and arranged 
for exchange, distribution and sale. Additional storage space 



LiBKAKY Department. 19 

has been cleared, and is to be fitted up in the basement on the 
Blagxlen-street wing to the west of the service stairway. 

Two electric elevators have been installed in this wing, one 
a passenger and freight elevator for service, use, with a capac- 
ity of 1,500 lbs., at 150 ft. a minute. This has been installed 
in the centre of the service staircase, which has been more or 
less remodelled for the purpose. The fact that this elevator 
has 12 landings within a lift of 59 ft., indicates the business 
that it will be called upon to do. The second lift is an elec- 
tric book-lift, traversing the stacks and reaching the Special 
Libraries' floor, wiiich carries only small lots of books, and is 
operated by the attendant despatching the load ; that is to 
say, it carries no attendant, but may be called to any point 
and despatched from it by the pressure of a button. When 
being loaded at any point it is automatically exempt from 
call to any other point. 

Editor's Room^ Luncheon Hooms, etc. — In the Entresol 
(A), south side, have been provided an office for the Editor 
of Library Publications, an office for the use (jointly) of the 
Chief of the Issue and of the Chief of the Ordering Depart- 
ments, and luncheon and additional locker-rooms for em- 
ployees of both sexes. 

The alterations above described represent only the main 
features of the work on the building accomplished during the 
past eight months. Details incidental to the main work were, 
of course, many, and in a measure costly. As in the case 
of the heating and ventilating system, the total work actually 
done has exceeded by a hundred per cent, the work originally 
planned. Its total cost has nevertheless been kept within 
the fraction (•'170,000) of the appropriation available for it. 
This has been possible through the ingenuity, skill and 
exceedmg watchfulness of the architects, and through the 
competence, care and exceeding integrity of the general con- 
tractors. For such work as was to be undertaken precise 
specifications were impossible. The architects recommended 
that a competent contractor be selected, without competition, 
and the work done by and under him, by the day, Avith a 
commission upon actual cost. The Mayor, under advice of 
his consulting architect, assented to this. As a result the 
work has not merely been careful, thorough and appropriate, 
but has, I believe, cost the city less by thousands of dollars 
than if carried on in any other way, and it has been done 
with the utmost consideration for tlie convenience of the 
public and of the admmistration. It was so arranged that it 
did not for a single day necessitate absolute cessation of the 
service in any department. 



20 City Document No. 21. 

The very considerable amount of furnitiue and fixtures 
necessary to the equipment of the new or enlarged depart- 
ments has been pr5vided for out of the balance of the Library 
Building Furnishing appropriation. 

Repairs incidental to the alterations, or convenient at the 
time, — including a great deal of painting (catalogue and 
periodical rooms, stacks, corridors, etc.), — have been paid 
for out of the general appi-opriation. Considerable repairs 
reported to be necessary upon the roof have been deferred 
until the coming summer. 

The cleaning of building and books during and since the 
alterations has involved a specially heavy expense, also met 
by the general appropriation. Ever}^ volume of the half- 
million odd in the Central building has, within the past two 
months, been taken down and dusted, and the shelf wiped 
off beneath it. 

The improvements above described do not, indeed, abso- 
lutely perfect the building for present uses. The issue of 
books from the stacks for reference readers, and the issue 
for borrowers, are still together dependent upon one set of 
attendants, one system of mechanism and one channel of 
issue. The books required from the stacks by the reference 
reader in Bates Hall must still be forwarded to him from 
the issue desk by hand, through a public room at times 
crowded with sightseers. And, ample as is the general s^Dace 
provided for readers, and sufficient (for a few years) as is 
the shelving, there is very great need of rooms set off for 
special collections for the use of classes and for specialized 
research. But most embarrassing difiiculties have been over- 
come, and the most pressing needs of the moment have 
been met ; and what has been done will add greatly to the 
comfort of tlie public, and greatly to convenience in admin- 
istration. 

I have treated these alterations at the Central Library 
building somewhat fully — to the necessary condensation of 
tliose portions of my report touching routine — for the very 
reason that they were out of the routine, and formed the 
most significant episode of the year. 

Branches. 

No new structure has been erected for any, of the outlying- 
departments. For certain alterations effected — particularly 
at the Brighton Branch — I refer to the report to me of the Su- 
pervisor of Branches, an extract from which I append to mine. 
' It is obvious that library facilities are distributed very 
unequally throughout the city, and that such as exist are 



LiBKAKv Department. 21 

ill-proportioned to existing needs. One district has the bene- 
fit of a collection of books numbering 35,000 volumes, in an 
independent building, ample, well equipped and attractive ; 
another, with perhaps double the population to be served, 
and more remote from the main collection, has at its disjjosal 
but a third as many books (a third in number — hardly a 
fifth in efficiency), and for accommodations, meagre, ill- 
ventilated, inconvenient and uninviting rooms, in a building 
devoted mainly to other and inconsistent uses, in a neighbor- 
hood tending to demoralize its readers. Such contrasts exist. 
New departments may be established, deficient facilities be 
supplied, only by considerable expenditure and laborious 
effort applied in detail. The effort to improve the material 
facilities and the service in existing departments (as indi- 
cated in the Supervisor's report) is now earnest, and will be 
persistent. But the present deficiencies cannot be supplied 
without a large direct expenditure upon new buildings (in cer- 
tain districts), and alterations, repairs, books and equipment 
in others. The outlying departments cannot be brought to 
reasonable equality or into reasonable relation with the 
Central Library without an expenditure on buildings and 
books of at least |500,000. 

A supreme advantage would be the application of such a 
sum all at once under a general scheme of improvement. 

Works of Art. 
Ghantrey' s Scott. — A copy in marble (by John Hutchi- 
son, R.S.A.) of the bust of Sir Walter Scott, by Chantrey, 
has been received as a gift to the City of Boston from the 
Committee on the Scott Memorial in Westminster Abbey. 
The bust is a duplicate of that placed in Westminster as a 
result of contributions from both sides of the Atlantic. The 
correspondence with reference to it will be found in the 
appendix. It awaits formal presentation to the public before 
receiving a permanent location. 

Books. 

Appendices II.-V. give the extent of the Libi-ary by 
years, a summary of the contents of the Library on January 
31, 1899, the net increase of the several departments during 
the past ten years, and the classification of the material in 
the Central Library i on January 31, 1899. 

According to last year's report, it appears that the number 
of volumes in the Central Library and branches on January 
31, 1898, was 698,888, of which 528,079 were in the Central 

1 Owing to the reclassification of the lirancli libraries, recently begun, but not 
completed, classification of these collections has been omitted in this year's report. 



22 City Documet^t No. 21. 

Library. By the tables appended to this report it appears 
that on January 31, ]899, the number in all departments is 
716,050, of which 550,822 are in the Central Library. The 
net mcrease is thus 17,162 volumes. The net gain to 
the Central Library is 22,743 volumes. The gain to the 
branches by accession is more than offset b}^ considerable 
transfers to the Central Library of worn-out or unserviceable 
material, so that the year leaves outlying departments with 
5,581 volumes less than at its beginning. 

The total expenditure for books and periodicals durmg the 
past year was $34,935.10, as against $40,351.62 in 1897. 
This does not include $1,836.40 expended from the income 
of the Todd Fund for current ncAvspapers; nor $488.53 paid 
for books for Delivery P out of the special appropriation ; 
nor $732.17 expended by the Fellowes Athenaeum for books 
for the Roxbury Branch. 

The expenditure was distributed as follows: 

City money expended for books : 

1S97. 1898. 18l).s. 



For Central Library (in- 




cluding deposit collec- 




tion) . . . $20,497 84 


$13,175 51 


For branches . . 5,303 28 


4,021 82 



$25,801 12 $17,197 33 
Trust funds expended 
for books: 
For Central Library . 8,114 74 11,837 71 



$33,915 86 
City money expended for periodicals : 
For Central Library . $4,766 87 $4,276 66 
For branches . . 1,668 89 1,623 40 



$29,035 04 



;,435 76 



5,900 06 

$34,935 10 

The accessions during the past year (as distinguished 
from the statistic of books actually located, and excluding 
mere transfers from one department to another) have been 
as follows : 

Added by purchase : 

Volumes. Volumes. Volumes. 

Central Library . 10,357 Branches . 7,970 Total . 18,327 

Added by gift : 
Central Library . 6,958 Branches . 185 Total. 7,143 



17,315 8,155 25,470 

As against a total of 33,131 volumes in 1897. 



Library Department. 23 

The library of the American Statistical Association will 
form a considerable accession not included in the above 
figures. It has been omitted, because the portion of it which 
is to be retained for our shelves has not yet been divided off 
exactly from that which is to be used for exchange or other 
purposes. 

Purchases. 

Among the purchases of the year have been the following : 

Americayia. — Hylacomylus. " Cosmographiae introductio 
cum quibusdam geometriae ac astronomiae principiis ad cam 
rem necessariis. Insuper quattuor Americi Vespucij navi- 
gationes." 1507. Colophon. (The suggestion to which 
we owe our national name is found on the reverse of the 
fifteenth leaf.) 

Smith. " The True Ti'avels, Adventures, and Observa- 
tions of Captaine John Smith. Together with a contmua- 
tion of his Generall History of Virginia," etc. London, 
1630. 

Smith. "A Map of Virginia." With a description of 
the countrey (sic), etc. Oxford, 1612. 

Hamor, Ralph. " A True Discourse of the Present 
Estate of Virginia." London, 1615. 

Ptolemfeus. " Geograpliia universalis, vetus et nova, 
complectens Claudii Ptolomtei Alexandrini enarrationis 

libros VIII Basilete apud Henricum Petrum." 

1540. (The first edition of Ptolemy by Sebastian Munster.) 

Howgill, Francis. "The Popish Inquisition newly erected 
in New England." London, 1659. (Contains an account 
of the reception which the Quakers met with in Boston.) 

Reeve, John, and Muggleton, Lodowick. " Joyful News 
from Heaven." London, 1658. 

Lawne, Fowler, Sanders and Bui ward. " The Profane 
Schisme of the Brownistes or Separatists." 1612. 

Also An indenture given and signed by Edward Tyng and 
others to the Company of the Waterworks to lay and main- 
tain a conduit '' in the street now called Conduit Street " 
(Union street), and acknowledged before " Jo. Endecott 
gov." 1656. (This was the beginning of the Boston 
Water Works.) 

Broadsides. — At the Philadelphia sale of the Bancker 
Collection of broadsides the Library had of necessity to 
confine its purchases to those of especially local interest. 
They mclude : 

(1.) Letters from Washington to Gage, and Gage to 
Washington, relative to the cruel treatment of prisoners. 
" Phila., September 29th, 1775." 



24 City Document No. 21. 

(2.) Bombardment and Burning of Falmouth. " An 
Express just arrived from General Washington's Camp at 
Cambridge, Oct. 24, 1775." 

(3.) News of the Battle of Bunker Hill. " New York, 
June 24th, 1775." 

(4.) Account of the death of Lord Percy, April 25, 
1775. 

There may be mentioned also, a highly important historical 
letter describing in detail the Continental and British de- 
fences in and around Boston, by Jesse Lukens, one of the 
Massachusetts Riflemen, to Jonas Shaw, dated Prospect Hill, 
September 15, 1775 ; also a London edition of the Massa- 
chusetts Charter, published in 1692, and " The Laws of 
Maryland made since 1763." Annapolis, 1787. 

Cuba, Porto Rico and the Philippines. — A selected col- 
lection of works relating to the geography, languages and 
history of Cuba, Porto Rico and the Philippines, was pur- 
chased in Leipzig at a cost of 1,300 marks. 

Statistics and Ecoyiomics. — From Amsterdam were ob- 
tained some rather notable files of statistical and economic 
serials, containing among them a complete set of the Dutch 

Economist — " De Economist'" - 1852-1897 ; papers relating 

to economical reform, etc. : " Staatsblad der Vereenigde 
Nederlanden," 1813-1897, a complete set of original editions 
of the Dutch state papers ; ''Staatsblad van Nederlandsch- 
Indie," 1816-1897, the official e<lition of the state papers of 
the Dutch East Indies; and " Verzameling der Consulaire 
berichten en verslagen,'' etc., 1865-1897, the Dutch Con- 
sular reports. 

Maps. — The most important purchase of maps has been 
the collection " Hydrographie fran(jaise," containing the offi- 
cial sea-charts of the French Navy Department, and consisting 
of more than 1,400 maps brought together from 1845-58. 
There were also bought and mounted for the new map 
cabinet, two sets of Stanford's maps of Europe, Asia, Africa, 
Australasia and North and South America, and an additional 
set of United States post-route maps for the same purpose. 
Another purchase bearing on the subject is : 

" Abel Janszoon Tasman's Journal of his discovery of Van 
Dieman's Land and New Zealand in 1642. With photo- 
lithographic fac-similes of the original manuscript . . . and 
fac-similes of original maps. Amsterdam, 1898." 

The geographical serials have been strengthened by the 
purchase of a set of the Italian periodical, "Cosmos," edited 
by G. Coro, and the "-Deutsche geographische Blatter." 



Library Departinient. 25 

Other purchases of interest bought with the Trust funds 
are : Thirty volumes of the Bampton lectures, including the 
first issued in 1780 (the set is now but six volumes ishort); 
the Index to the London Times, and some 700 unmounted 
Photographs which incUide a selection illustrating the French 
school of painting, and Northern Schools in French Galleries, 
Northern Schools in the National Gallery, and in Berlin, 
Munich and Vienna ; late photographs of the Italian school, 
besides Sewall's " Canterbury Pilgrims," and a number of 
Copley prints. 

Reference Books for Children'' s Room. — From the city 
appropriation has been bought a collection of reference books 
for the Children's room, for which the sum of $1,500 was 
allowed. Besides the encyclopa'dias, dictionaries and atlases, 
the collection includes the large illustrated editions of 
Duruy's History of Greece, and of Rome, Guizot's History 
of England, and of France, Rambaud's History of Russia, 
Green's History of the English People, and Winsor's 
Narrative and Critical History of America. The Riverside 
Natural History, R^clus's Earth and Its Inhabitants, the 
whole series of the Story of the Nations, also Longfellow's 
Poems of Places, Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, 
together with the minor reference books, biography, etc., 
make a useful reference library, for which as far as possi- 
ble the books have been procured in strong and attractive 
bindings. 

English Prose Fiction. — Sixteen hundred and thirteen 
volumes of current English prose fiction, representing 180 
titles, were bought and placed in the Central Library, 
Branches and Deposit, at a cost of -11,492. There were 
also bought 1,830 volumes to replace those worn out, and 
1,900 additional copies of books of which the supply was 
not in any way adequate to the demand. Fifteen hundred 
of these were for Deposit use, and included 500 books for 
younger readers, making in all an aggregate of 5,450 volumes 
purchased at a cost of .|5,000 (as against -19,650 in 1897-98). 

French arid German Literature : Replacements. — The 
works of Dumas pere (literally worn out) have been re- 
placed by a complete set in 300 attractively bound volumes 
for circulation. There were also replaced some 400 volumes 
of the more popular French and German authors. 

Purchases under the last three heads, with the duplicate 
copies of books bought for use in connection with the 
schools, about 200 volumes, the necessary replacement of 
worn-out books, the books of the day (including a larger 
proportion than usual of those relating to economics and 



26 City Document No. 21. 

statistics), have been made from the money which could be 
spared from the city appropriation — some -19,000 less than 
the amount spent last year. With lessened resources it 
has been necessary to defer some purchases of fiction, 
especially for the branches. The outlay for current fiction 
this year has been nearly $800 less than last year. While 
the sum total of exjienditure for books and periodicals shows 
a difference of but $5,400 less than last year, the amount 
spent from the city appropriation shows a difference of over 
$9,000 less. The purchases from the Trust funds amount to 
$4,000 more than in 1897-98, and that this was possible is 
due to the fact that $1,500 was drawn from a fund so re- 
stricted as to be seldom available, and that a few thousand 
dollars had accumulated over the annual income. 

Gifts. 

As to Works of Art and Endowment, see supra. 

Gifts of Books. — The number of givers for 1898 is 
greater by some two hundred than in 1897, and greater by 
four hundred than in 1896. The full list of givers appears 
in Appendix XIII. Some of the more important of the gifts 
of books and manuscripts I note here. They are arranged 
alphabetically according to their donors. 

Gifts of Especial Importance, 1898. 

From the American Statistical Association, through its 
Secretary, Davis R. Dewe}^, its library comprising about 5,000 
books and pamphlets. This collection is rich in the issues 
of the statistical departments of foreign governments, and 
of state and municipal administrations. A notable feature 
is also to be found in the many pamphlets on slavery, mis- 
sions, and local institutions of charities and corrections. 
(^See letter of gift.) 

From the Boston Browning Society — for the Browning 
collection — 37 volumes consisting principall}^ of editions of 
the Brownings' Works, and three photographs. 

From Allen A. Brown, Esq., 264 volumes for the Music 
Collection, including fifty volumes of modern operas (French, 
German, Italian), and fifty volumes of choruses for male 
voices. 

From the Canadian government, at the histance of Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier, a full set of the official documents of Canada 
for the last two years, to be continued by the current 
issues. 



Library Department. 27 

From Prof. Francis W. Chandler, Boston, two folio volumes 
of '' Municipal Architecture in Boston. From designs by 
Edmund M. Wheelwright." 1898. 

From the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres, the " Autotype 
fac-similes of three Mappemondes " of the sixteenth century, 
from unique originals drawn at Dieppe in 153'6, 1546 and 
1550: 48 sheets in an imperial portfolio with a quarto volume 
of accompanying text, by C. H. Coote. (Bibliotheca Lindes- 
iana. Collations and notes No. 4.) These celebrated maps 
(1) the Harleian, 1536; (2) Descellier's, 1546; anc\ (3) 
Descellier's, 1550, are highly interesting in connection with 
Canada and the explorations of Cartier and Roberval ; 100 
copies only have been privatel)- printed. 

From the same source has also been received " A cata- 
logue of English broadsides in the library of the Earl of 
Crawford," in a quarto volume, in which are chronologically 
arranged 1,814 English Broadsides covering a period of nearly 
400 years — 1505-1897. 

From jNlessrs. Copeland and Day, eleven volumes — cur- 
rent books of the year published by them. 

From the various departments of the French government 
the Library has received important gifts. Among them are 
nine volumes of the French patents (Brevets d'invention), 
to be continued as issued, from the Minister of Commerce, 
and a set of the "Bulletin de geographic historique et 
descriptive du Comity des travaux historiques et scientifi- 
ques," 1888-98, from the Minister of Public Instruction. 

From the family of the late William Lloyd Garrison, 
through Mr. Francis J. Garrison, the manuscript Letters, 
" relating to the anti-slavery movement in the United States 
during the years 1839-42." This collection continues an 
earlier file covering the years 1830-38, the gift of the Gar- 
rison family in 1894. 

From the German Patent Office, the continuation of the 
*f Patentschriften " in 4,704 numbers. 

From the Committee on Education of the Privy Council, 
of Great Britian 65 volumes of their Reports, completing the 
Library file. 

From the Patent Office of Great Britain, 131 volumes and 
45 numbers. 

From Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, 105 volumes 
for the Galatea Collection (established by Col. Higginson in 
1895) ; and in this connection 12 volumes from De Witt 
Miller, Esq., — all relating to the history of woman. 

From His Majesty the King of Italy, two volumes contin- 
uing the campaigns of Prince Eugene of Savoy (Campagne 
del Principe Eugenio di Savoia). 



28 City Document No. 21, 

Through the generosity of Mrs. John A, Lewis, the follow- 
ing books were bought at the Deane Sale, and added to the 
John A. Lewis Collection : 

Byles, God Glorious in the scenes of the winter. 
Sermon. Boston, 1744. Cotton, An Abstract of the Laws 
of New England. London, 1641. Cotton, The True 
Constitution of a particular visible Church. London, 1642. 
Cotton, A letter of Mr. John Cotton's to Mr. Williams. 
London, 1643. Cotton, Sixteene Questions of Serious and 
Necessary Consequence, propounded unto Mr. John Cotton, 
together with his answers to each question. London, 1644. 
Davenport, J. (Pastor of New Haven), Profession of the 
faith of that Reverend and worthy Divine, Mr. J. D. London. 
1642. Moodey, The Great Sin of Formality in God's 
Worship. (Boston Lecture.) Boston, 1691. Moodey, 
Dialogue, containing Questions and Answers, from Judas' 
Fall, improved. New I^ondon, 1768. New England Primer, 
New York. M. Day. Robinson, A. W., A Justification of 
Separation from the Church of England. 1639. Robinson, 
A. W., A Second Manuduction for AL-. Robinson. 1615. 
Shurtleff, Sermon preach'd at New-Castle in New Hamp- 
shire, January 1, 1726, in Commemoration of the Sufferings, 
etc., of a Company of ]\Luiners shi^D-wreck'd upon Boon 
Island Rock. Boston, 1727. 

From tlie Due de Loubat, Galerie Am^ricaine du Musee 
d'Ethnographie du Trocad^ro, part 2, continuing part 1, 
received in 1897 ; also Ignacio Borunda, Clave general de 
Jeroglificos Americanos. Rome. 1898. 

From the Trustees of the Old South Church, for deposit 
in the Prince Library, a manuscript fragment of the "Annals 
of New England," consisting of nine leaves in the liand- 
writing of Thomas Prince, containing some matter not found 
in the published work. 

From the Royal Scottish Society of Arts, Edinburgh, a 
complete set of the Society's Transactions, the continuation 
to be sent as issued. 

From the U. S. Superintendent of Documents, 189 volumes 
of Government publications. These were selected from a 
list of duplicates sent by the Superintendent, and filled in 
the Library files by so many volumes. 

From the estate of Kate Field, through her literary execu- 
tor Miss Lilian Whiting, a collection of between 700 and 
800 manuscript letters, — the correspondence of Kate Field, 
covering a period of nearly forty years — together with a 
number of photographs, and manuscripts of some of her 
works. Miss Whiting has thoughtfully given a sum of 



Librae Y Department. 



29 



money, to be annually renewed, for the preservation and care 
of this material to be known as the " Kate Field Collection." 
The work is now in process of mounting and indexing the 
manuscripts, and they will eventuall}" be bound in volumes 
similar to those in the Chamberlain Collection. 

From His Excellency Governor Wolcott, the "Abstract of 
the log of the Cristobal Colon from April to July 3, 1898." 

From the estate of Prof. Josiah D. Whitney, of Harvard 
College, fifty books and pamphlets relating to literature, etc., 
and including some early editions of the Latin classics. 

From the Wyclif Society, London, a full set in 21 bound 
volumes of Wyclif 's Latin works. 

Binding. 

The work done by the Library binderj^ during the past 
year is indicated by the following schedule : 



Books bound in Bates Hall binding- 
Large dail}" newspapers ..... 

Branch newspapers ...... 

Pamphlets ....... 

Total 

Books repaired ....... 

Catalogues, novels and periodicals stitched into covers 
Cards mounted and bordered .... 

Maps, charts and broadsides mounted on cloth 
^"olumes guarded 
Portfolios made 



Boxes made 

Blocks made 

Pads made 

Pouches made 

Temporary covers made 

Sign cards leathered and lettered 

Library publications folded, stitched, and trinnned 

Library publications folded, sewed, trimmed and covered 

Photographs and engravings mounted . 

Office desks covered . . . . 

Time on miscellaneous work 

Time cutting and bundling for the Printing Department 

I quote in detail these figures, because they are significant 
of the various unconventional service which a bindery maj^ 
i-ender if well equipped, conveniently at hand, and under 
direct control. As an auxiliary to the Printing Department 
the Library Bindery is indispensable. During the past year 
it has l)een crippled, as have other departments, by illness. 



Vols. 

8,890 
52 
58 

3,905 

12,905 

3,877 
1,545 
2,524 
1,056 
1,570 
154 
76 
602 
6 
15 
855 
10 
124,284 
9,019 
3,392 
2 
42^ days 
48 daj's 



30 City Document No. 21. 

The aggregate volume of work done has, nevertheless, in- 
creased over that for 1897. The number of library publica- 
tions which it has handled (folded, stitched, trimmed, etc.) 
58,424 in 1896, and 102,442 in 1897, rose to 133,304 in 
1898 

In January, 1899, a wire-stitching machine was purchased 
which will handle nmch of the pamphlet work at a saving of 
labor and expense. 

The outside contract work (binding in cheaper form of 
branch books and old Lower Hall books) has comprised the 
binding of 9,024 volumes as against 13,929 in 1897. The 
total cost was 82,460.28. This was greater per volume than 
in 1897, owing to the new specifications which call now for 
neater and more durable material, more thorough sewing and 
the lettering of titles. 

Repair. — The repair of books in the first stages of dilapi- 
dation is the work of special attendants in the Issue and 
Branch departments. It involves each year stitching or 
pasting, or both, of some 3,000 volumes. 

Arrearage. — The output of the Library Bindery, above 
detailed, represents no more than is necessary to cover (1) 
the binding of material received in paper covers, (2) the 
binding of the 1,500 odd current periodicals of the twelve- 
month as made up into quarterly, half-yearly, or yearly 
volumes, and (3) the rebinding of books worn in the current 
use of the year. If the allowance for this latter seem large, 
one need only consider the normal wear and tear incident to 
an aggregate "circulation" and "reference use" of over two 
million bound volumes a year ; and consider further that the 
stress of this use, so far from being distributed evenly, falls 
chiefly upon 150,000, perhaps, of the 700,000 volumes in 
the library system. An estimate of 15,000 of these volumes 
as annually needing rebmding is an allowance of but ten per 
cent, of the portion of the Library in most active use, but 
2i per cent, of the entire collection, and but y-^ of one per 
cent, upon the use. 

In addition to the current work there is, however, a very 
great number of books scattered through the main collection 
whose condition demands the attention of the binder. The 
meagreness of space in the Old Library Building during the 
later years of occupancy, and the meagreness of the appro- 
priations, caused postponement upon these. The handling 
incident to removal and relocation has by no means improved 
their condition, and now there is scarcely a shelf — there is 
certainly not an alcove — in the new building which does 
not contain volumes with at least signatures or plates loose, 



Library Department. 31 

or backs broken. In the aggregate these must number thou- 
sands of volumes. They cannot be denied to the public, 
but their use in their present condition may (and does) result 
in their absolute destruction, or the loss of essential portions, 
necessitating the replacement of the entire volume. Some 
cannot be replaced ; others could be replaced only at great 
cost ; none could be replaced as cheaply as they could be 
rebound. To neglect them now because of the expense of 
rebinding is deliberately to project the far greater expense of 
repurchase. 

With its present force and equipment the Library Bindery 
is so little able to keep up with the current work assigned to 
it that no given volume can be depended upon to come 
through in less than three months (four weeks, rather, being 
a proper maximum). With its present appropriations the 
Library cannot afford to place out to be done by contract 
more than tlie books of the Branch and old Lower Hall col- 
lections, representing the current wear upon the more popular 
departments of literature. 

The great accumulation, therefore, representmg the arrear- 
age of past years, can be provided for only by some extra 
provision ; and the character of the work is such that the 
expedient provision would be to enlarge the force, equip- 
ment, and resources of the Library Bindery. 

This need was called to the attention of the city govern- 
ment in your message trans mittmg your estimates for the 
coming year, " a special expenditure of at least $30,000 " 
being stated as necessary on this account alone. The esti- 
mates tliemselves assumed that of this amount at least 
|!lO,000 should be applied in 1899. 

The appropriation granted does not, of course, cover this 
item. 

Printing. 

The outj)ut of the Printing Dej)artment still includes all 
the printed work of the Library except the Annual Report. 
The figures of output during 1898 of the leading items may 
be summarized as follows : 

Cards for the Card Catalogues — Central Library: 18,114 
titles, as against about 15,000 in 1897. The number of 
cards may be judged from the fact that 120,903 have been 
inserted in the catalogues, as against 93,783 in 1897\ 

Cards for the catalogues at the Branches, 544 titles. 

Stationery, Forms, etc. : currently consumed stocks of all 
kinds, 521,539 pieces (363,507 in 1897). 

Call slips (of six kinds), 2,222,514 pieces. 

Placards, 2,014 (1,394 in 1897). 



32 City Document No. 21. 

Books and pamphlets to the number of 27, embracing 846 
pages, in editions aggregating 129,250 copies. (For a par- 
ticuhir list of these see under "Publications,*' infra.) 

Service. — The force of the department remains as last 
year. 

JPlant. — " In the main the mechanical equipment of the 
department remains unchanged. During the summer the 
room was substantiall}^ floored with hard pine (upon concrete 
foundation) to protect the machinery from the injurious dust 
arising from the former cement floor. UjDon the reerection 
of the plant, which was moved to permit of this, each machine 
not already so equipped was fitted with an independent elec- 
tric motor. This change has j^roved beneficial in preventing 
the mutual interference of the different machines, which had 
before been experienced. The necessary gas and electric 
connections were laid below the new floor, and so arranged 
as to allow of addition to the jilant of a third linotype. The 
room has been connected with the melting furnace in the 
basement by a hand-hoist. A similar hoist is needed to 
connect it with the stock-room in the staircase hall above." 

The addition to the force of a second " feeder " and a 
third linotype operator and to the plant of a third linotype 
machine will deserve early consideration. One of the present 
machines having to be devoted to special work, the remain- 
ing one does not suffice for the card catalogue work ; and the 
titles for the catalogue are delayed beyond the time when 
the new books should and may be ready for the public. 

In the meantime the estimates for 1899 provided for the 
addition to the present machines of certain recent devices 
which would increase their range, flexibility and output. 
But the appropriation granted may not admit of the purchase 
of these. 

Cataloguing. 

I shall offer to be printed as a supplement to this report 
two special reports compiled hy the Chief of the Catalogue 
Department at request : one a memorandum concerning the 
genesis and scope of the general Card Catalogue of the 
Library, the other a memorandum concerning the prac- 
ticability' of a catalogue in book form of the entire library. 
The latter was suggested by a passage in the report of the 
Examining Committee of last year urging the advantages of 
such a catalogue. As such a recommendation is apt to recur 
from time to time, a somewhat detailed statement of the ele- 
ments involved in such an undertaking has been thought 
advisable. 



Library Department. 33 

I condense here the report of the chief cataloguing under- 
takings of the past 3^ear. 

Number of vohimes and parts of vokuiies catalogued . 47,615 

Divided as follows : 
Additions to the Central Library . , 29,271 

Recatalogued in revision work . . . 9,070 

Continuations of serials .... 3,358 
Catalogued for branch libraries . . 5,916 

47,615 



Author titles prepared for the above . . , 32,609 
Cards placed in the various catalogues, 1898 (exclu- 
sive of branches) ...... 120,903 

1897 (including branches for three months) . . 93,783 

1896 (including branches) ..... 74,979 

1895 ii ^ u 82,993 

In addition to the work on the card catalogues the time of 
the department is, of course, occupied largely with the 
preparation of material for the Bulletins, and Special Biblio- 
graphical lists issued by the Library. Of such undertakings 
mentioned in last year's report the following have been 
carried forward into 1898 : The Select List of Books on 
Social Reform ; the Bibliography of the Geographical Anthro- 
pology of Europe ; the List of Pictures and Plans of Library 
Buildings, and the List of Historical Fiction. The status of 
the latter list is as follows: America, and Europe (except- 
mg Rome, Italy and Greece) are in type (225 pages) in 
stereotype plates (having appeared in sections in the Quar- 
terl}^ Bulletins). The titles for Rome, Italy, Greece, Asia, 
Africa, Australasia and the Hawaiian Islands are prepared 
and ready for final revision. (An author index for America, 
Great Britain and Spain, and a Subject Index for America 
and a part of England are prepared, in manuscript.) The re- 
mainder, which includes the Jews and the Bible, is partly 
finished. 

The list should be completed and (if the funds permit) 
printed, during the coming year. 

Besides the work to be inferred from the list of publica- 
tions below, the Catalogue Department has prepared or 
assisted in the preparation of: A new edition of the 
Selected List of Books for Younger Readers (" Y List") ; a 
Bibliography of the Town of Boston (begun in the February, 
1898, Bulletin) ; List of Scandinavian Literature (Bulletin) ; 
List of Polish Literature (Bulletin) ; Memorandum (by Mr. 
Murdoch) as to the Geographical Material in the Library 
(Bulletin) ; a brief list of books upon the Philippines, Cuba 
and the West Indies ; reference lists to be used in connection 
with the Municipal Free Lecture Courses ( " Imperialism," 



34 



City Document No. 21. 



etc.), and others, with the lectures on art given by the 
Supervisor of Drawing in the Public Schools, these latter 
lists being printed by the Supervisor with the syllabus of the 
course. The department was utilized also in the prepara- 
tion of the catalogue of the Library of the Massachusetts 
Hospital Ship "Bay State," the contribution to which by the 
Public Library (irrespective of some contributions of money 
by individual employees) consisted in the selection and pur- 
chase of the books, their preparation for use, including shelf 
lists, and the preparation and printing of the catalogue. 

The Catalogue Department has continued its work upon 
the Maps and the Allen A. Brown (Collection of Music, and 
the transcript of titles of scientific literature in adjacent 
libraries ; and has borne its share in the Co-operative Index 
of Current Scientific serials, mention of which was made on 
page 33 of my last report. 

The Custodian of Bates Hall had, just prior to his death, 
nearly completed a revised edition, covering over 4,000 
titles, of the Genealogies and Town Histories in the Library. 

Publications. 



The publications iss 


ued during the 


year, as 


tabulated by 


the editor, Mr. Swift, are as 


follows : 










Date of Publication. 


Pages. 


Edition. 


Price. 


Annual List . . J 


anuary, 1, 1899 


176 


5,000 


.05 


Four Great Docu- 












ments (Chamber- 












lain) . . . May, 


1898, 


56 


2,000 


Free. 


Branch Finding List, May, 


1898 


16 


5,000 


a 


Galatea Catalogue . ." 


une. 


1898 


40 


1,064 


.15 


Social Eeform . . July, 


1898 


72 


1,500 


.05 


Y List (new edition), July, 


1898 


68 


8,000 


.01 


C o d m a n Collection 












(Landscape Archi- 












tecture.) List on 












Trees and Forestry, January, 1899 


32 


500 


.10 


Monthly Bulletins : 1st of ea 


ch month. 








March, 1898 






.56 


7,500 


Free. 


April, 1898 






24 






i. i 


May, 1898 






56 






u 


June, 1898 






56 






(( 


July, 1898 






28 






i t 


August, 1898 . 






28 






a 


September, 1898 






24 






( I 


October, 1898 . 






32 






I ( 


November, 1898 






36 






( i. 


December, 1898 






24 






i i 


January, 1899 . 






28 






i i 


February, 1899 . 






36 






u 



Library Department. 35 

The character and scope of the publications of the year is 
perhaps sufficiently to be inferred from their titles. So far 
as they indicate a present policy the policy may be sum- 
marized as follows : 

1. To place before the public a description sufficiently 
full for identification, not exhaustive to the point of tedious- 
ness, of the books neivly added to the various departments of 
the Library. To do this at short intervals, in a form reducing 
cost to a minimum. (The Monthly Bulletins of accessions to 
the Central Library; the Finding Lists of accessions to the 
Branches. Free.') 

2. At intervals to regroup such information so as to com- 
pact the sources of information covering longer periods. 
(The Annual List — a consolidation, without recomposition, 
of the Monthly Bulletins of the preceding twelve-month.) 

3. As occasion may suggest, to exhibit the resources of 
the Librar}^ in an entire department of literature, or at least 
its resources upon a particular topic; but with caution to 
avoid such elaboration as might delay the publication of the 
list beyond the useful occasion, or put its cost beyond the 
ordinary reach, or bury the titles of use to the general reader 
beneath those of interest only to the specialist. (Select List 
of Books upon Social Reform; Trees and Forestry; Philip- 
pines, Cuba and Porto Rico ; Art Topics.) Such aids need 
not always consist of lists of books ; they may often advan- 
tageously take the form of a statement suggesting lines or 
methods of research. (Memorandum upon Geographical 
Material.) 

4. (More rarely) to issue a real Bibliography, thorough 
and scholarly, of a subject peculiarly of interest to scholars. 
Especially to undertake such in case (1) the co-operation of 
some specialist may be secured in the " evaluation " of the 
material and (2) the department of literature is one in 
which the Library is strong or takes this occasion to become 
so ; the bibliography becoming thus a subject catalogue. 
(Bibliography of the Geographical Anthropology of Europe — 
made up of material contributed by Prof. Wm. Z. Ripley, 
and reduced to bibliography form and specific application by 
the Library, and printed and to be published by it.) 

(5.) As opijortunity may occur to publish the catalogue 
of some special collection which has recently come to the 
Library by gift. (The Galatea; the Codman Memorial Col- 
lection.) This may well be justified even if the collection 
be not integral as to subject. 

It is to be noticed that in the foregoing list one class of 
publishing enterprise not uncommon, nor untried in this 



36 City Document No. 21. 

Library in former years, fails to be represented ; the repro- 
duction, in fac-simile or otherwise, of unique manuscript 
material of which the Library may have become the owner. 
Whether and how far it is the duty of the Library to aid 
scholarship by the publication of such, — how far its publi- 
cation at all is expedient, — whether the Library should 
itself undertake such jDublication or simply encourage out- 
siders to undertake it ; these are questions of policy that may 
necessitate careful deliberation and comparison of experience. 

Registration. 

Statistics of registration form, as usual. Appendix VI. of 
this report. As last year, the tables show not merely the 
number of card holders in gross, but their classification by 
sex, occupation and district of residence, and an estimate of 
the percentage of card holders in each ward of the city to the 
total population of such ward. 

The interest of such statistics is as by comparison they 
may form an index to the existing relations of the public 
with the Library and to the influence upon these of certain 
forces. 

In the aggregate the number of card holders (64,973 on 
February 1, 1898, 72,005 on January 31, 1899) has in- 
creased during the year by 7,032, or lO-^^-^ per cent. The 
proportion of existing card holders to the total population of 
the city (including minors below 12 years of age not entitled 
to cards) 13 per cent, on February 1, 1898, is now 14^yg- 
per cent. 

As will be seen by the tables, the increase has been dis- 
tributed pretty evenly over the city, except that it has been 
(proportionally) nearly three times as great in Ward 10 as 
in au}^ other ward. 

The classification of the card holders shows a fairly even 
division by sex. This is usual in the United States, but not 
so abroad- At Birmingham in 1895-96 the number of cards 
issued to borrowers was in the proportion of 32 males to 12 
females; in 1896-97 as 28 to 12. 

The classification by occupation reveals only 702 card 
holders who have described themselves as " laborers." This 
is somewhat curiously in contrast with the considerable 
known use by this class of the reading-rooms at the Central 
Library and Branches. It represents, however, what I fancy 
to be a conunon experience in public libraries, both here and 
abroad. At Livea'pool in 1897, for instance, in a total of 
24,353 card holders in the Public Library, only 322 were 



Library Department. 37 

classified as "labourers." The adult laborer is rendered shy 
by conscious clumsiness. He overcomes his dififidence so far 
as to frequent the reading-rooms of a public library (if invit- 
ing and informal) ; but he shrinks from the formalities and 
betrayals incident to application for books for use at home. 
He reads many library books at home, however, or hears 
them read; for sometimes his wife holds a card, and com- 
monly his son or daughter does. The books that interest his 
children are apt to interest him — for though of uneq ual 
ages, the child and the father of the laboring classes in 
America are by no means necessarily far apart in their 
capacity of appreciation. In planning a children's depart- 
ment of a public library one of the contingencies to be fore- 
seen is, therefore, that any particular book may reach beyond 
the child to an adult. 

An essential difficulty in the comparison of statistics of 
card holders in different libraries is caused by the difference 
in the registration period. Inquiry has shown that very few 
libraries can state with precision the number of " active 
cards outstanding." 

The system now in operation here considers this statistic 
of essential importance. The registration period is now to 
coincide with the period of life of a card. A new registra- 
tion will begin February 1, 1899 ; and at every second year 
thereafter either a new reo-istration or a new numerical series. 



Use of the Library. 
/. — Refe7-enee Use. 

I propose to append as supplements to this report state- 
ments somewhat full of the work or of certain of the aspects 
of the work of three particular departments (the Special 
Libraries, the Children's, and the newly organized Statistical 
Department). The reference work of the Library in general 
does not seem to have varied from that of last year suffi- 
ciently to require extensive mention. 

Special Libraries. — The collections now grouped and 
administered under this title comprise now : The Fine Arts, 
the Industrial Arts and jNIusic, the Maps, the Adams, Artz, 
Barton, Bowditch, Codman, Galatea, Gilbert, Hunt, Lewis, 
Prince, with other early Americana, Thayer, Ticknor, 
Twentieth Regiment (military alcove), Whitman — in the 
aggregate about 69,000 volumes. The public documents 
still hold place on this floor, but their custody has been 
transferred to the Statistical Department under Mr. Ford. 



38 City Document No. 21. 

The activity of the Fine Arts Collection has continued in- 
cessant ; and it is upon this division of the work of his 
department that I shall quote at length from the report of 
the custodian. 

Appended to his report is a list of the artists at present 
represented in the collection of photographs ; a list of the? 
books (146 volumes) containing elaborate plates whose con- 
tents have been indexed on cards, so as to become almost as 
accessible as the individual photographs ; and the scheme 
adopted for the classification of the tyjDical examj^les (in 
plates) of the fine arts, architectural detail and of the 
industrial arts which have been secured in part by the dis- 
section of certain serials. The main purpose of the collection 
last named is to offer to the actual worker in the arts and 
crafts practical suggestion from historical example. 

These appendices I omit liere. They will be included 
with other material in a special publication which will form 
a hand-book to the Fine Arts Collection in the Library and 
an aid to its use. 

Tliis is a library and not an art museum. The illustia- 
tions which it may supply of the various arts do not pretend 
in themselves to be works of art. The most of the photo- 
graphs, for instance, are but small silver prints, not the large 
carbons which alone could meet the requirement of an art 
museum. Its purpose in its plates and photographs is more 
particularly to furnish an index to the arts — an index sug- 
gestive to the eye but not necessarily satisfying. It seeks 
to cover the largest possible field. For this reason, the indi- 
vidual item must cost little. It desires to offer the material 
to be handled freely and informall}'- in connection with all 
sorts of inquiry from people not trained to care or dexterit}- 
in its use, and even to extend its use outside the Library 
buildmg. For these reasons each specimen should be small 
in dimension, portable, and replaceable at small expense. 
For such service, therefore, not merely silver prints, but half- 
tone and other process reproductions may be and are utilized. 

As will be seen from the report of the Chief of the De- 
partment, these photographs and plates are being used to an 
increasing extent by classes and schools, and for display (in 
subject groups) in the outlying departments of the Library. 
The demand for such use is eager. At present it can be 
met only meagrely, because, although the collection is nomi- 
nally large, any one subject is perhaps found but once in it. 
With funds with which to multiply copies, portfolios of these 
photographs and prints (in subject groups) might be circu- 
lated throughout the city, in the Branch libraries, in public 



LiBEARY Department. 39 

institutions, in the schools, public and private, at the meet- 
ing places of study clubs, and at lecture halls, in connection 
with lectures having educational purpose. A few hundreds 
of dollars would accomplish much ; a few thousand would 
enable us to create a system^ secondary only in volume to the 
work of the books, and auxiliary to it in service. 

Children'' s Department. — The addition to the space at the 
Central Librar}- hitherto available for this department, of the 
large adjacent room formerly occupied by the patent collec- 
tion, will furnish opportunity for a service as yet not satis- 
factorily accomplished — that in aid of the children's work 
at the schools. For this reason, I have asked the chief of 
the department to incorporate in her report a somewhat full 
statement as to the relations existing between the Library 
and the work of the schools ; and it is this section of her 
report which I select to quote as a supplement to mine. 

The DejyartmeMt of Docuynents and Statistics. — In June 
last the American Statistical Association turned over to us 
the collection of books, pamphlets and serials which it had 
accumulated by gift, purchase and exchange, and which 
formed its " library." The collection as a whole numbered 
about 5,000 books and pamplets. Of these a large part 
duplicates material already here; but this will be available 
for exchange and thus finall}^ represent an accession. Future 
acquisitions by the Association are likewise to be turned over 
to us, so that the collection will continue to have the benefit 
of the purchases of the Association and of its exchange list. 
As our custodian of the collection is corresponding secretary 
of the Association, and thus entitled to use its name and 
prestige in application for material, the future accessions are 
likely to be important. 

The material of statistics (vital, economic, political, social 
and industrial) is of course largely in documents. A statis- 
tical department, therefore, naturally includes the important 
public documents in the Library. But if it is to be set off 
as a department integral in itself, a department equipped for 
semmar work, for instance, it must include as well much 
sociological material of a miscellaneous character. 

Such a department had not existed in this Library, nor 
had the Library paralleled in the domain of economics the 
work for which it had gained reputation in history, general 
literature and the arts. Its collection of public documents, 
though uneven and witli many deficiencies, is, nevertheless, 
a notable one, and with effort might be made a full one ; 
the miscellaneous material which it possesses in the general 
domam of economics is sufhcient to justify an expenditure 



40 City Document No. 21, 

which will render it reasonably complete, and the acquisition 
of the library and of the futnre exchanges of the American 
Statistical Association offered a special opportunity and occa- 
sion. 

It was accordingly decided to organize this new depart- 
ment, which, although for brevity entitled the "Statistical," 
has, in fact, the custody of the documents also, and is to 
bring into useful relation with this material the miscellaneous 
literature of economics and of political and social science. 
Its charge will be to endeavor, by correspondence and other- 
wise, to perfect the collections themselves ; to classify the 
material with reference to the convenience of the particular 
constituency which is to use it (ignoring, if necessary, any 
and all schemes of arrangement, notation and cataloguing 
existing in other departments), and to administer it in the 
aid of inquiry. The department is not to compile statistics. 
Its function is to guide in the use of them. It must know 
the sources, and it must hnow them discriminatingly. In 
perhaps no department of literature is the untrained inquirer 
more helpless. Tlie facts are submerged in documents vast 
in dimension and forbidding in aspect. The practice of 
libraries seldom extends to an analysis in the catalogues of 
the main contents, and the indices are apt to be only to single 
volumes, and on no single scale of proportion. Such facts 
as he finds may after all be no more than incompetent infer- 
ences from insufficient data, or only partial, or later supei- 
seded. 

In any reference department of a library a very small pro- 
portion of the inquiry is for a given book ; the most of it is 
for the best material upon a given subject. But a small pro- 
portion of the inquirers are experts in the subject; a smaller 
proportion still are experts in the use of the Library. If 
familiar with the language of the subject they are still un- 
familiar with the language of the catalogues and other biblio- 
graphic aids. Their demands must be translated ; and they 
may be translated adequately only by one who knows both 
languages, — who has been a practical expert in the subject 
and has become an expert in the meclianism of the librar3^ 

If this is so in general, it must particularly be so in a de- 
partment such as statistics, where a given subject may be 
approached from so many different points of view, where pre- 
tence is easy and voluble and carries no ear marks to dis- 
tinguish it from real authority, and where the aj)parent 
absence of technicality in the vernacular is itself a peril. 

The foregoing considerations explain sufficiently the desire 
of the Library to place in charge of this department a practical 



LiBRAEY DePAKTJVIENT. 41 

statistician ; and its gratification that there could be secured 
for its organization and present conduct one of the first of 
living statisticians. Mr. Ford coming to the Library after 
his experience as Chief of the Bureau of Statistics at Wash- 
ington, brought also a useful knowledge of the most effective 
methods of obtaining the material itself, requiring familiarity 
with official usage and not merely patient, but dexterous 
application, supported by precedents. 

Mr. Ford entered the service of the Library on July 15th. 
His work has, therefore, covered less than seven months. I 
have, however, requested him to include in his report a brief 
statement as to the proper scope and functions of a depart- 
ment such as this. This report I append as a supplement to 
mine. 

II. — Home Use. 

Appendix VII. gives the number of volumes circulated 
for home use during the past year from each department of 
the Librarv, and compares this with such circulation for the 
year 1897." 

The reduction in the number of new books (especially of 
lighter literature) purchased in 1898, the inconvenience of 
application at the Central Library during the several months 
of the alterations (when, though the issue continued it was 
much impeded and delays were excessive) would have 
tended to reduce the circulation. In certain departments it 
was actually, and in others relatively, smaller than in 1897. 
In the aggregate, however, it was greater than in 1897, but 
not by an increase proportional to that of 1897 over 1896. 

Gain. 



Home Use. 


1897. 


1898. 


1898. 


Central Library (including 








Central Library books 








issued through liranches 








and stations) . 


388,489 


422,849 


34,360 


Branches and Stations (di- 








rect issue) 


811,160 


822,993 


11,824 


1 


,199,658 


1,245,842 


46,184 



The insertion of card pockets in the books circulated for 
home use was begun during the past season. It may lead 
ultimately to a change in the charging system to the advan- 
tage both of the borrower and of the record. 

The period during which the penalty on books over de- 
tained was allowed to run had been three months. An 
examination into the usage of other libraries showed that this- 



42 City Docuiniext No. 21, 

period was exceptional in length; the amonnt of the penalty 
appeared to operate unduly against the poorer class of readers 
and in being too great to be collected, to operate also to the 
disadvantage of the Library. On April 29th the period was 
reduced from three months to four weeks. The accumu- 
lated penalties (fines and messenger notices) at the end of 
the former j)eriod amounted on any given book to $3.33 ; at 
the end of the latter to -fl.OO ; the cost of the book (if not 
finall}' returned) being added in either case. 

Branches and Stations. 

Under present conditions and without special expenditure 
the development of the outlying departments of the Library 
can be but gradual and partial. There is none the less 
reason for applying effort at improvement in the many details 
that may be improved without great outlay. If, therefore, 
the report of the Supervisor is chiefly a recital of petty 
changes, — a bit of plumbing here, a new fixture there, — a 
few score more books on open shelves, — an additional attend- 
ant, an enlargement of hours — it is to be remembered that 
sweeping changes not being at present possible, it is only 
upon these petty items that zeal for improvement may be 
expended. 

The regrading of the Custodians of the Branches effected 
at the close of the year implies a higher recognition of their 
present responsibilities and an additional requirement. 

I have felt obliged to omit the greater portion of the Super- 
visor's report, and shall append only a condensation of the 
statistics and certain sections which deal with work of larger 
aspect. 

It will be noted that Mr. Hiller C. Wellman did not retire 
from the Supervisorship until May last ; so that the responsi- 
bility of the present Supervisor, T^Ir. Ward, covers but a frac- 
tion of tlie Library year. 

The most significant of the undertakings of the year has 
been the reclassification of the books ujDon a single system, 
with relative (instead of Jixed) location, and identical nota- 
tion; and the issue of a Finding List of recent accessions 
classified, located and numbered on this system, so that any 
copy of the list is equally a catalogue of these titles at any 
one of the ten branches. The work of reclassification is but 
begun. Hand in hand with it goes the work of weeding out 
the old or unserviceable books and of supplying fresh ones. 

Assume the branches to be completely reorganized in this 
way, — their collections reduced to lowest terms and then 



Library Department. 43 

rebuilt to a common standard, classified alike and catalogued 
in common : and the basis will have been laid for a future 
development which may be simple, uniform and economical. 

Service. 

The Library has suffered serious loss by death. Most 
serious indeed was the loss of Arthur Mason Knapp, for 
twenty-four years in its service, and for the last twenty years 
its chief reference librarian as Custodian of Bates Hall. 
Mr. Knapp's accumulated experience in the work of this 
position, to which he devoted himself with absolute concen- 
tration, stood for an asset of exceeding value. Rather than 
minute here too briefly the record of his career and service, I 
append to be printed the notice published in the Bulletin 
after his death, and passages from the address of the Rev. 
Dr. James De Normandie (who as a member of the Library 
Board spoke with particular knowledge) at the funeral ser- 
vices. 

The war took from the Library two employees, of whom one 
is still in the field, the other — ■ Michael Francis Leonard — 
died in the hospital on his return from Santiago. 

Among the resignations has been that of Hiller C. Well- 
man, Supervisor of Branches. Mr. Wellman came to this 
position from the Athenaeum Library in December, 1896 ; he 
left it to take the office of Librarian of the Brookline Public 
Library in May, 1898. Li the meantime he had devoted 
active, earnest and intelligent service to the reorganization of 
the outlying library system. 

The accessions to the service have brought notable capac- 
ity. Mr. Oscar A. Bierstadt,^ who comes to take the place of 
Mr. Knapp as Custodian of Bates Hall, brings an experience 
of more than twenty j'ears in the Astor Library, the latter 
part of which stood as an experience most nearly akin to that 
of JNIr. Knapp, in a library most nearly akin to the Boston 
Public Library (in this department). 

Mr. Langdon L. Ward, who succeeded Mr. Wellman as 
Supervisor of Branches, was not directly imported into tliat 
position, but was promoted to it because of work (in a sub- 
ordinate department of the Branch system) so excellent as, 
with other obvious qualifications, to promise success in ad- 
ministering larger interests. 

The acquisition of Mr. Worthington C. Ford for the organ- 
ization of the Statistical Department has already been com- 
mented upon. In addition to his special knowledge in the 

1 Mr. Blerstadt does not }jegin liis duties until February 1, IS'Jil. 



44 City Document No. 21. 

domain of statistics, finance and economic science generally,, 
his knowledge of the sources of American historj^ is of value 
to the Library in its purchases of Americana. 

In the ordinary service the usual number of changes has 
occurred. The Library has lost by death or resignation in 
all nineteen persons : it has acquired in all thirtj^-four.i The 
latter figure includes all persons who have entered the ser- 
vice whether or not continued permanently. Of these thirty 
were in office at the end of the year. 

Examinations. — i'ive general and ten special examinationy 
were held during the year. Of the general two were for 
Grade B, one for Grade C, and two for Grade E. Of the 
special, five were of employees qualifying for promotion (to 
Grade B special, one ; Grade C special, two ; Grade C, one ; 
Grade E, one); the remaining five were of outside appli- 
cants (to fill vacancies for which the lists returned by the 
general examinations did not seem adequately to provide). 
Of these latter special examinations one was for Grade B ; 
three were for D special ; one for E. 

In all 236 papers 'were received and considered — of 
which 67 were from male applicants, 169 from female. Of 
the thirty-four persons taken into the service twenty-three 
were male,^eleven female, and the assignment as follows : 

Grades. Central. Branches. 

B 3 1 

D Special 4 

D 5 3 

E 5 1 

Ungraded ^ 8 4 

21 13 

It would be ungracious to make no mention of the volun- 
teer aid that is constantly offered to the Library and some- 
times accepted. The most of it desires to be anonymous, and 
a great deal of it is necessarily so. During the past three 
years one service in particular has been rendered by outsiders, 
which has been of very great usefulness. A conuuittee 
numbering (at any one time) from fifteen to twenty persons 
(all residents of the city, and thus far all women) has under- 
taken to read every work of current fiction (in English), 
under consideration for purchase, and to report to the Libra- 
rian in writing certain information regarding it. The infor- 
mation requested is in chief: is the book suitable for child, or 
for adult? is it historical, or purely romantic? narrative, or 

1 Including appointments to positions not subject to formal examination (Super- 
visor of Branches, Custodian of Bates Hall, etc.). Also janitorial appointments. 



Library Department. 45 

does it deal with some contemporaiy social prol)leni? if his- 
torical, what period of history does it depict ? its merits and 
defects: as to accuracy (if historical), temper (if touching 
social problems), apparent sincerity (if treating religious 
problems), morality and style ; and an outline of the j)lot 
sufficient to render intelligible the information above de- 
scribed. 

Every new work of fiction (in English) is read and thus re- 
ported upon independently by two persons ; if their reports 
disagree, by a third. Tlie labors of the Committee may be 
appreciated from the fact that during the past year (a normal 
one) 548 books were read b}' it, and reported upon in writing. 

These rej^orts are of the greatest service to the administra- 
tion of the Library, and have been made use of by other in- 
stitutions or boards having the responsibility of selecting from 
the mass of current publications, l)ut unable to examine each 
book in detail. And the labors of the Committee would have 
received appreciative mention before this, but that its function 
is so liable to be misunderstood. 

It is not — an outside body, without official responsibility — 
substituted for the administration. It does not select books 
for the Library; it inerely furnishes information by which the 
books ma}^ more efficiently be selected by the Librarian and 
Trustees. It indicates also an opinion whether, on the whole, 
the book is worthy. But this opinion does not finally con- 
trol. It is an element in the decision, but no more. And 
the final decision, for acceptance or rejection, frequently runs 
counter to it. 

The Committee is not a body of experts; it is composed of 
persons selected at large, sufficiently numerous to represent 
at any one time different points of view. Its personnel 
changes constantly, in order that the variety of view may be 
still greater, and that merely methodical and routine judg- 
ment may be avoided. The purpose (so far as it concerns 
the mere opinion desired) being to secure the average instinc- 
tive judgment of the general public, the committee is not 
furnished by the administration with any standards of criti- 
cism ; indeed, its requests for such standards have regularly 
been denied. 

Of the 600 works of current English fiction received 
during the year, less than a third (with necessarj^ duplica- 
tion of copies) could be purchased. That of the 180 pur- 
chased last year it may be said that not one was placed on 
the shelves without having been read and reported upon by 
at least two persons, indicates a service b}^ the Committee 
sufficiently deserving of gratitude. That to the selection of 



46 City Document Xo. 21. 

these 180 titles out of the 548 the Committee contributed in- 
formation of great usefulness, indicates a service of even 
larger measure. I feel that to the members of the Commit- 
tee, and especially to its permanent chairman, Miss Mary 
jNIorison, an appreciation on the part of the Library is due 
which ought not further to be suppressed. 

All the departments have been more or less embarrassed 
during the year by illness, and upon some has fallen the 
special strain mcident to the structural alterations. This 
was, of course, heaviest upon the Issue Department, which 
was for a long period deprived of the full use of the pneu- 
matic tubes and other apparatus, and cutoff from its ordinary 
passageway to the stacks, and was obliged to carry the ordi- 
nary burden of work in a space contracted, noisy, draughty 
and dusty, and confused with carj)enters, masons and painters. 
But there is no department at the Central Library which was 
not in some way or measure inconvenienced. The Ordering 
Department, for instance, was for weeks deprived of its room 
entirely, and crowded into a small, ill-lighted space in the 
Entresol. Even the Catalogue and Shelf Departments, though 
remote from the centre of operations, suffered much embar- 
rassment during their course. The Shelf Department, for 
example, has had the special burden (in addition to its routine 
work) of moving and relocating (without the use of lifts) 
more than 300,000 volumes affected by the changes. 

The strain (especially upon the attendants in the Issue De- 
partment) has been exceedingly severe. That they suffered 
from it I know. But so far as I know they did not (by a 
single peevish expression) let the public suffer from it. Not 
a single complaint came to me that the service was too ardu- 
ous ; not a suggestion that the work ought to be suspended 
even for a single day. I am, however, so wonted to this spirit 
of unselfish earnestness among the employees of the Library, 
and their eagerness to do all in their power to secure the best 
results, that it is only by an effort that I can regard or men- 
tion this recent manifestation of it as significant. 

Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 
Februaky, 1, 1899. 



LiBEARY Department. 47 



SUPPLEMENTS TO THE REPORT OF THE 
LIBRARIAN. 



(A.) 

MEMORANDUM AS TO THE GENERAL CARD CATA- 
LOGUE. 

To the Librarian : 

The Card Catalogue of the Boston Public Library was 
begun in 1871. At that tirue the titles of books under au- 
thors and subjects in the first Catalogue of Bates Hall (the 
Index, 1861) and its First Supplement (1866) and the Prince 
Catalogue were cut from those volumes, pasted on cards and 
made a part of the Public Card Catalogue. The Bulletins 
also, which contained the record of the additions to the Li- 
brary, from September 1, 1867, to 1871, were treated in the 
same manner. The titles in the various Lists for the Lower 
Hall (now Stack 4) were made a part of the Public Card 
Catalogue for that collection. 

From 1871 on, the prmted titles of all books received 
by the Library (including the Ticknor collection) have been 
added day by day to the Card Catalogues. An exception 
was made in the case of the Barton collection, for three rea- 
sons: 1. The collection was kept by itself at a distance 
from Bates Hall, in a room where no attendant was stationed. 
2. The works of great rarity and value in the collection it 
was thought best not to bring forward into prominence. 
Persons entitled to use them could find them through the 
catalogue printed in a volume. 3. On the other hand, the 
works of less value, such as modern editions of Shakespeare, 
were largely duplicated in the general collection, more easily 
attainable, and preferably to be used to the saving of the 
rarer editions. 

The Officers' Catalogue. 

The second Card Catalogue, kept in the Catalogue Room, 
from 1871 on, is in the main a duplicate of the one for the 
use of the public. Its basis was the collection of titles in 
manuscript for books received after the publication of the 
First Supplement to the Bates Hall Index, which titles it was 



48 City Document No. 21. 

intended to use as printers' copy for a Second SuiDiDlement. 
These additions, so far as they covered newly-pnblished 
books and others of especial interest, were printed in the 
Bulletins, and, as alread}' stated, these selected printed titles 
were added to the Public Card Catalogue. 

The Index, the Supplement and the Prince Catalogue were 
not cut and added to the Officers' Catalogue, because at that 
time it was thought that any information needed by the 
Library staff could be found readily in the catalogues in 
printed volumes. 

It may be inferred that after the work mentioned on the 
Public Card Catalogue was finished, readers had at hand a 
fairly representative inventory of the books in this Library. 
This was the case so far as the titles of these books had been 
put into type. The Index and Supplement, however, did not 
contain the titles of all the books in the Library ; pamphlets, 
for example, being generally omitted, and subject entries not 
being given in all cases. ^ 

It was found on using this new conglomerate catalogue 
tliat the titles in small type, cut from the printed catalogues, 
when placed in drawers under a wire were read with diffi- 
culty ; they also suffered from wear and tear. 

With the growth of the Library it was also found that the 
titles as hitherto printed were altogether too brief for useful- 
ness, and that it would be necessary to recatalogue and re- 
print all that represented books received by this Library 
during the first twenty years of its existence. 

It was decided also, for good reasons, to make the Public 
and Officers' Catalogue exactly alike, each ultimately to 
contain a record of all the books added to the Library from 
the beginning. 

This work has gone on steadily for twenty-seven years, the 
cataloguing of former years being brought up to the greatly 
advanced present standard. 

Since moving to the new building a triplicate Card Cata- 
logue has been prepared for the books added to the collec- 
tions in the Special Libraries' Department. From tests 
recently made, I think that only a comparatively small num- 
ber of books in the Library (outside of the Barton collection) 
will fail to be found in some form in the Bates Hall Card 
Catalogue. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James L. Whitney, 

Chief Cataloguer. 

1 Reference is made to an irticle (B) which follows this memorandum. 



Library Department. 49 

(B.) 

CONSIDERATIONS AS TO A PRINTED CATALOGUE 
IN BOOK FORM. 

To the Librarian : 

When the Boston Public Library first occupied the new 
building on Boy Is ton street two independent libraries were 
established there: 1. The collection of popular books in the 
Lower Hall. 2. The more scholarly books in the Bates Hall. 
For the popular department a Finding List was printed in 
1858, which has been followed by Class Lists, in many 
editions, down to a recent date. For the Bates Hall a List 
was published in 1861. The title in both was an "Index to 
the Catalogue," etc., as consisting of brief entries which 
pointed to a card catalogue, or the books themselves, for 
fuller particulars. 

These Indexes, moreover, contained the titles of a selected 
portion only of the Library, but few pamphlets, for example, 
being included, unless written by Boston authors or relating 
to the affairs of Boston ; while subject-entries were not given 
in many cases, particularly where a publication contained 
less than one hundred pages — a poor test, as was then 
allowed, of the value of any production, and particularly 
so in science. 

A First Supplement to this Index, on a like plan, was 
published in 1866, and it was purposed to follow these 
Indexes with supplementary ones, to be gathered together 
at some future time, it was hoped, under one alphabet. 

At this time the Library took a great stride forward, the 
annual additions, which for a few years had averaged 7,500 
volumes, increasing to some 25,000 volumes, including 
special libraries, such as the Prince and Ticknor collections, 
which were given with the understanding that critical and 
scholarly catalogues be published. 

Mr. Justin Winsor, soon after assuming the office of Superin- 
tendent, saw clearly that this great increase was " almost a 
portent of future unavailing efforts to keep up in print with 
the growth of the Library," and that it had become " a 
question of prime importance, with the future so promising 
for continued growth, whether some change in the method 
of presenting the record of our accessions to the public will 
not be absolutely forced upon us." ^ 

In the meantime, as the nearest approach possible to the 
catalogue desired, a Bulletin of new accessions was begun 

1 Annual report, 1871. 



50 City Document No. 21. 

in 1867, which publication, with changes of form, has con- 
tinued until the present time. To this, from time to time, 
have been added catalogues of special subjects in great 
number. 

It is understood that the material supplementary^ to these 
catalogues in printed volumes, which was being collected in 
card form, was intended only for the use of the officers of 
the Library in preparing a new Index volume. Readers were 
obliged to examine many catalogues and bulletins, which 
numbered, in 1871, in both libraries, nearly thirty- — a state 
of thmgs which was felt to be intolerable. 

At this time the foundations were laid of a Card Catalogue, 
intended, under author and subject, to give full entries for 
all the books in the Library. This involved not only the 
cataloguing of the new accessions to the Library, but also 
all the omitted material already alluded to, together with the 
re-cataloguing of some 175,000 volumes. This work of 
preparation and revision has gone on steadily since that 
time, its scope and methods broadening and ramifying with 
the growth and development of the Library. Since the estab- 
lishment of the Card Catalogue it may be roughly estimated 
that 400,000 volumes, pamphlets and parts of volumes, ncAvly 
added to the Central Library, have been catalogued, and, on 
an average, 12,000 volumes a year of older material have 
been revised and recatalogued.^ 

A Printed Volume. 

While this work has more than met the anticipations of its 
projectors and has proved in many respects an ideal catalogue, 
the question has been asked from time to time by those who 
have chafed under its requirements and limitations, whether 
it might not be possible to condense all this material into 
printed volumes, which could be consulted more readily and 
used outside the Library building. 

To this question the reply of the Trustees has been that 
owing to the expense involved and to other grave consider- 
ations, they were not prepared to enter upon an undertaking 
so vast and of so uncertain an issue. At least, until the 
Library should be housed in a new building and all of the 
necessary changes of shelf-position and shelf-numbers had 
been made, a printed catalogue, even if possible, would be an 
unwise project. 

Now that this transfer has been made and the changes men- 
tioned are under way how does the case stand ? What will 
the proposed catalogue involve? 

1 From 1852-1897, 191,472 volumes were recatalogued in tbe work of revision. 



LiBEAEY Department. 51 

I. In the first place the work of revision must be pushed 
with vigor to the end, tlie cataloguers being called off from 
all other special work to receive aid in this undertaking from 
an extra force to be engaged from outside. The cards for 
every book must be copied in abbreviated form, compared 
with each other, and, if not already done, with the cards in 
the Public Catalogue, with the shelf-lists, and with the book 
itself, while the subject headings must be submitted to a rigid 
test as to their correctness and their indication of relationship 
to the headings of cognate subjects. The catalogue of a great 
library is a constant development; to its latest and highest 
requirements all the work of preceding years must be brought. 
Only when the work is perfected can it be given to the printer. 
The time needed for this cannot be estimated, but only guessed 
at from the experience of other large libraries which have 
printed their catalogues. 

II. Supposing that this revision is finished and the card 
catalogue as it stands now is read}^ to print, what then? 

On June 25, 1898, the Card Catalogue measured 12,523 
inches, linear measurement through the thickness of the 
stock. Reckoning eighty cards to an inch these cards num- 
ber 1,001,810. Roughly estimated, from numerous tests 
made, nine-tenths of these cards contain one title each, and 
one-tenth two or more titles. It might be said that there are 
1,200,000 titles (author and subject) in the Public Card Cata- 
logues in the Bates Hall and Delivery Room. This leaves 
out of account many of the titles in the Ticknor and Barton 
Catalogues, which it would be desirable to include in con- 
densed form in a general catalogue of this Library. 

An estimate may be made in another way. There were 
in the Central Librarj^, exclusive of the Duplicate Room, on 
July 1, 1898, about 524,000 volumes, or, deducting special 
collections, say 500,000 volumes. Reckoning two and one- 
half entries for each book (an accepted estimate),^ the num- 
ber of titles to be printed would be 1,250,000.^ 

HI. The question now arises shall the proposed catalogue 
be kept up to date ; that is, shall the titles of books received 
while the work is in progress be added, or shall it include 
only what was in the Library at the time of beginning the 
work ? 

For the past seven years the cards placed in the public 
catalogues in Bates Hall and the Delivery Room have 

1 Tlie Dictionary Catalogue of the Boston Athena'um for the pei'iod from 1872- 
lSi)4 covers 80,(100 bound volumes and 5,000 pamphlets, and is estSmated to contain 
2i)l,840 cards, or nearly three and one-halt cards per title. 

- In this estimate no account is taken of the number of duplicate coi)ies on these 
cards, the number of volumes made up of many pamphlets, or the number of woriis 
in Ion 2- sets. 



52 City Document No. 21. 

averaged 44,857 a year, or about 150 a day. Since the prep- 
aration and printing of these titles in addition to those 
already in the Library would push forward tlie publication of 
the catalogue indefinitely, I will here make only estimates 
on the collection of books as it now stands. 

Time. 

IV. Assuming that these 1,200,000 titles are ready for 
the printer, how much time will be needed to edit them 
through the press ? 

From an examination of numerous catalogues of this and 
other libraries, I judge that tlie number of titles to a page 
would average from forty to fifty, depending on the fulness 
of the titles given and the style of printing. Calling it the 
larger number, the catalogue Avould fill 24,000 pages; if the 
smaller, 30,000 pages. 

The Boston Atheufeum catalogue was printed at the rate 
of 1 + pages a working day ; the catalogue of the Library 
of the Peabody Institute at the rate of less than two pages 
a day ; the Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon- 
General's office, United States Army, at the rate of about 
three and one-third pages a day. Calling the rate of prog- 
ress for the proposed catalogue five pages a day, the time 
needed would be in the one case sixteen years, and in the 
other twenty years. 

The catalogue of the Boston Athenseum, work upon which 
was begun in 1856, was sent to the printer May, 1872. 
January of that year was taken as the limit beyond which 
no book should be added. On its completion, therefore, it 
did not contain the titles of bopks added to the library for 
the preceding ten years. To tlie Index-Catalogue of the 
library of the Surgeon-General's office, and to the catalogue 
of the Peabody Institute, the titles of books and articles 
received during the printing were added, except such as were 
included in the part of the alphabet already in type. 

On the completion of the Index Catalogue enough material 
had collected in the letter A to fill 828 pages, while in the 
main work this letter occupied only 718 pages. In the Pea- 
body Institute catalogue this letter occupies 236 pages in 
the supplement, and only 136 in the main work. This dis- 
proportion would doubtless disappear in the later letters of 
the alphabet, yet it shows that the titles left over on the 
completion of a catalogue may be as numerous when the 
work is delayed to insert matter received during its progress 
through the press as when, receiving no additions, it is put 
through more rapidly. 



Library Department. 53 



Use. 



What will be the value and how great the use of a cata- 
logue which does not contain the titles of books added for 
ten to twenty years previous to its issue? 

On the completion of the Boston Athenseuni catalogue I 
examined the books given to readers at the Boston Public 
Library for some days, and found that seven out of ten had 
been published less than ten years. Of course such a cata- 
logue would have less and less use from year to year. ^ 

By recent tests made hy Mr. Chevalier, of the Catalogue 
Department, it appears that of books taken for Home Use on 
given days 24 per cent, were published before 1883, while 
19 per cent, bore date between 1883 and 1888, and 57 per 
cent, between 1888 and 1898 ; while of books taken for Hall 
Use, 37 per cent, were published before 1883, while 24 per 
cent, were issued between 1883 and 1888, and 39 per cent, 
between 1888 and 1898. On the completion of the proposed 
catalogue for this Library it probably would not contain one- 
fourth of the books called for by readers. 

Extent. 

An opinion as to the number of volumes required for a 
printed catalogue of this Library may be ventured, based on 
the experience of other libraries. Six years ago an estimate 
was made that the titles in the card catalogue of the Upper 
Hall of the old Library building would fill sixteen and one- 
half volumes of the size of the Barton catalogue (Miscel- 
laneous part). This estimate apparently took no account of 
the titles which have long contents, or of the cases where 
more than one title is on a card, and in my opinion it falls 
far short of being correct. 

The Boston Athenaeum catalogue of 92,000 volumes and 
about 36,000 pamphlets is in five volumes with 3,400 pages. 
In the five volumes of the Peabody Institute Library the 
5,000 pages catalogue a collection of perhaps 100,000 volumes. 
The Index-Catalogue at Washington in its sixteen volumes, 
or 16,000 pages, represents a collection somewhat larger, 
minutely analyzed. 

The British Museum catalogue, with author entries only, 
which ajjproaches completion, thus far fills about 110,000 

columns (two to a page, folio size). These columns, if joined 

* 

1 " While the use of the catalogue in print is vastly more convenient than the best in 
manuscript, and while our printed volumes may he of great advantage in other li- 
braries, and to a few students wlio possess them, it is very apparent from observation 
that the great bulk of users of the Bates Hall are in search of the newer books, which 
cannot be found in the printed catalogues. " — J'. Winsor : Superintendent's Report, 
1872. 



54 City Document No. 21. 

to one another, would reach more than seventeen miles, — a 
vivid illustration of the proportions which the catalogue of 
our own Library will soon reach. 

With its half a million volumes and many thousand pamph- 
lets an estimate for the Boston Public Library of a catalogue 
in thirty volumes of a thousand pages each is probably a 
moderate one. 

Cost. 

It would be difficult to estimate the cost of jDreparing a 
catalogue of this Library for the press and printing it. In 
1881 the Examining Committee made a statement, based upon 
estimates furnished them, that the cost would be nearer 
$200,000 than 8100,000. The Catalogue of the Boston 
Athenaeum, in five volumes, is said to have cost nearly 
$100,000.1 Of the Index-Catalogue of the Library of the 
Surgeon-General's office one volume has been issued yearly 
at a cost for the printing and binding alone, and not including 
the cost of preparation, of $12,000 a volume, or $216,000 
for tlie eighteen volumes (first and second series) so far 
issued, in an edition of 1,000 copies. For printing the 
Catalogue of the British Museum, which was begun January, 
1881, an annual grant was assigned which has risen by 
gradual increments to X3,000 a year.^ 

Sale. 

If a price be set upon the catalogue based upon its cost, 
or upon the charge for the catalogues of other libraries, but 
few copies would be sold. Even if a nominal price were 
named, judging from the experience of the Library, the sale 
would probably be quite limited. 

Special Lists. 

As already stated, in place of a new general catalogue in 
a printed volume, the Bulletin was established, which gives 
ready access to the new additions to the Library. 

Moreover, as any subject has come forward into prominence 
or general interest it has been made the occasion for preparing 

'This estimate is only an approximate one. (See the reports of the Treasurer.) 
The Librarian has stated that the cost of printing, paper, binding, etc., was about 
820,000, and tliat for many years there were from two to eight persons preparing tlie 
manuscript for the printer. The compilation of this catalogue was attended with 
peculiar difficulties (see the Preface), and its cost was greater than might be expected 
in similar undertakings. 

2 For the British Museum catalogue the yearly subscription for the parts, which 
began to appear about 18S1, is £3 10s. The selling price of the entire catalogue 
will be £84. The price of the five volumes of the Peabody Institute catalogue is 
S37, and $11.50 for volumes 1-3 of the second series. The Boston Athenreum cata- 
logue is sold for five dollars a volume, and to libraries at twenty dollars for the entire 
work. About 350 copies have been sold. The price for the catalogue of the Library 
of the Surgeon-General's office is $3.50 a volume; for that of the Biblioth^que Naiion- 
ale, fifteen francs a volume. 



Library Depart^nient. 55 

a special catalogue, in which, with the aid offered by sj^ecial- 
ists, the titles of the most helpful and authoritative works 
have been gathered. As an example, there may be cited the 
list of books on social reform, published this year. Such 
lists as these, drawn from the general catalogue, when the 
interest of the public on any particular question or depart- 
ment of literature is ardent, are timely and of service, whereas 
such a topic in a general printed catalogue might at any 
given moment not have been reached or be a dozen years 
behind the time.^ 

Supplements. 

On the completion of this proposed catalogue a million 
cards will probably have accumulated, necessitating the prep- 
aration of the first of many supplements to follow. The 
Library would then be confronted with the state of things 
which led its iirst Superintendent, Mr. Jewett, to affirm that 
" Nothing short of what a Card Catalogue is in plan can ever 
be regarded as entirely satisfactory for a great public library," ^ 
and his successor, Mr. Winsor, to agree with the view of 
European librarians that "printing in a large and rapidly 
growing library is impracticable." ^ 

Printing. 

Nothing has been said in regard to the printer's part in 
the proposed catalogue, for the reason that the other con- 
siderations adduced are the vital ones. With the addition 
of another press and linotype the proposed catalogue could 
be put in type to keep pace with the supply of matter fur- 
nished b}^ the editors. 

With the coming of the linotype there was a suggestion 
that the Avay might be open for a catalogue of the entire 
Library in printed volumes, and moreover that by holding 
the solid lines or "slugs," insertions might be made and the 
catalogue kept up to date. 

In this Library the linotype has been tested in catalogue 
work to the f ollowmg extent : In addition to the printing of 
the titles of accessions for the card catalogue and the special 
catalogues a Monthly Bulletin has been issued, and at the 
end of twenty months about two-thirds of this matter has 
been reprinted, with some changes, from the same slugs, as 

iThe Austrian Library Association, at its meeting held on March 26, of this year, 
decided to abandon the plan for an Austrian General catalogue, owing to lack of 
adequate support, but in its place it voted to publish bulletins devoted to library 
matters. — Library Journal, September, 1S98. 

2xVnnual Report, 1861. 

3 Annual Report, 1872. 



56 City Document No. 21. 

an Annual List.^ Although this is an Author Catalogue, 
arranged simply by classes, and much less intricate than a 
Dictionary Catalogue of authors and subjects, many diffi- 
culties have been met with in its development. If the 
attempt should be made to unite the slugs for this Annual 
List with others for a two-year list or a five-year list, as has 
been proposed, these difficulties would multiply many fold. 
To mention one : to the labor of finding the sbigs and re- 
arranging them there would be added the constantly increasing 
necessity for a new grouping. It would probably be more 
economical to set up the whole list anew. For it is a settled 
principle that work ought to be perfected before it is sent 
to the printer ; all changes and new arrangements after that 
are disastrous. The same principle holds good with the lino- 
type. Editorial work must be done elsewhere than in the 
printer's office, or the linotype room. 

With the linotype as up to this time developed, methods 
whicli hold good for printing such a publication as the 
Annual List would cease to be operative in the case of a 
larger and certainly of a much larger catalogue. The cost 
of arrangement and editing would be out of all proportion to 
the increase of titles. 

The case as it stands is as stated. Should the linotype 
ever through the progress of invention overcome its present 
limitations and effect that which now seems impossible, no 
one will rejoice more than the maker of catalogues. 

Suggestions. 

The Examining Committee for 1886, impressed with the 
requirements of the Catalogue Department, suggested '' that 
$100,000 be secured by public grant, private subscription — 
or by all combined — the income of which should be ex- 
clusively devoted in perpetuity, to the Bates Hall Catalogue." 

With this sum in hand, it would be worth while to con- 
sider whether, if it be impossible to make an elaborate author 
and subject catalogue, some quicker and less expensive 
substitute might not be found. 

Author Catalogue. 
I. An Author Catalogue, that is, one in which entries are 
given only under authors' names, and not, as in a Dictionary 
Catalogue, under subjects also, could be prepared with less 
delay and cost. That of the British Museum has been 
mentioned. The Bibliotheque Nationale has begun the pub- 
lication of such a catalogue, of which the first volume 

> This was followed by a second Annual List, January 1, 1899. 



LiBEARY Department. 57 

contains, in 565 pages, 11,067 titles, or about one-fourth of 
the titles of works of authors whose name begins with the 
letter A.i 

As to the value of an Author Catalogue it should be said 
that however the case may be in the Bibliotheque Nationale, 
or in a University Library, in the Boston Public Library an 
Author Catalogue would be of less value than one under 
subjects. 

One comes to a library to learn one of two things : 
1. Whether a certain book is there; or 2. What the library 
has on a given subject. The first pomt is settled by an 
Author Catalogue, and it is the only one settled except the 
question of the bibliographer, who wishes to learn the exact 
title of an out of the way book. An answer to the second 
question is found in a Subject Catalogue. 

The scholar, familiar with literature, will seek what he 
needs in an Author Catalogue. Even here he will obtain 
more satisfactory results from the Card Catalogue of the 
Library than from its abbreviated reproduction in book form. 
The general inquirer, however, as a rule does not know 
the particular book required, and asks what books are in 
the Library under a given subject. This question cannot 
be answered by an Author Catalogue whether in book form 
or on cards. 

The publication of an Author Catalogue for the benefit of 
all countries may perhaps be justified in the case of the 
British Museum and the Bibliotheque Nationale, as being 
national libraries and containing in the largest gatherings of 
books in the world an approach to a universal collection. 
The library on this side of the Atlantic most nearly approxi- 
mating such a collection ought ultimately to be our own 
National Library. This institution receives copies of every 
book copyrighted in the United States. Even if it should 
not attempt to publish a complete catalogue of its collection 
it is conceivable that an Author Catalogue of at least this 
portion, representing a complete, authoritative description of 
all the issues of the American press, might be of sufficient 
service to bibliography to justify its exj^ense.^ It would have 
the advantage, which Trade Catalogues do not possess, of 
being a full, precise and scholarly description. Such a work, 
however, needs to be issued under the authority of one insti- 
tution only. It does not need to be repeated by other 
libraries. 

1 The Introduction by M. Delisle is interesting, especially section 15. " Raisons qui 
ont fait adopter I'ordre alphab^tique pour le Catalogue." 

2 A Catalogue of Authors was bsgun by tli3 Library of Congress in 1878, but it was 
continued only through the letter C. Its catalogue of the title entries of books and 
other articles entered in the otlice of the Register of Copyright is a publication in the 
direction indicated. 



58 City Document No. 21. 

If each national library would at least undertake such a 
catalogue for the issues of the press of its country, the pub- 
lications of the world would be economically recorded. But 
however proper a work like this might be for a national 
library, with a collection of copyright material presumably 
complete, and with the resources of a nation behind it, the 
Boston Public Library stands in a very different position. It 
is to an extent a scholars' library; it is also a popular library. 
It does not contain, and does not wish to contain, more than 
a fraction of the books published in this country. The 
bibliographical value of its catalogue in print, therefore, 
would be limited accordingly, while the material published 
abroad which it contains, being for the most part duplicated 
in the British Museum and the Bibliotheque Nationale 
together, is adequately recorded at their expense in their 
catalogues. 

So much for the scholarly side, the bibliography pure and 
simple. For the popular service, the Monthly Bulletin and 
special lists, as they are issued from time to time, are ade- 
quate and more to the purpose. 

Classed Lists. 

II. The titles under authors might be grouped under 
classes, as in our Monthly Bulletin and Annual List. Such 
a list of all the books of this Library, however, would need a 
classification so extensive and indexes so minute that the labor 
might quite equal that of finishing the preparation and the 
printing of our Dictionary Catalogue of authors and sub- 
jects. The Annual List is only a selection from the Monthly 
Bulletins, which are themselves only a partial record of the 
books currently received. From the labor expended on this 
list (which is without indexes) one can imagine the time 
needed for the preparation of an indexed list of all the books 
received by this Library for nearly fifty years. 

Selected Subjects. 

III. Some years ago, in the Boylston street building, when 
the pressure for space for the Card Catalogue was a matter of 
concern, a plan was formed to take out certain sections and 
print them separately. While the work done in this direc- 
tion has great value, as approaching the subjects treated from 
a diiferent point of view from our Dictionary Catalogue, and, 
while it also supplements that work, the Library has never 
seen the wisdom of substituting these lists for the fuller 
entries in the Card Catalogue, or breaking up the complete- 
ness and continuity of that great work. Still, some such 
plan may be forced upon us in the future. 



Library Departiment. 59 

Conclusion. 
I have presented the question of a catalogue in a printed 
volume for the Boston Public Library succinctly, and I trust 
fairly, for consideration. 

I think that such an undertaking would be unwise. The 
decision of twenty-six years ago was based on reasons which, 
have gathered strength with the passing of time. 
Respectfully submitted, 

James L. Whitney, 

Chief Cataloguer. 

Postscript. 

The following statements in the " Quarterly Review " 
for October, 1898, in regard to the Book Catalogue of the 
British jSIuseum, supplement the information given in the 
preceding report. It is there stated tliat the complete cata- 
logue will consist of about six hundred volumes, containing on 
an average, 250 columns each. During its progress through 
the press the accessions to the library have exceeded half a 
million titles, only a fraction of which will appear in this 
catalogue. The number of copies available is, about 250^ 
but of these less than one-third has passed into circulation, 
and even of that number about one-half has been given gra- 
tuitousl3% A supplementary catalogue of accessions was 
printed, which a subscriber could obtain for X3 a year in 
addition to his subscription of <£3, 10s., for the principal 
catalogue. But this Accessions Catalogue found scarcely 
any subscribers, and the issue has now been contracted within 
the narrowest possible limits. The writer adds "The present 
situation may be sunnued up in the statement that the Cata- 
logue of the British Museum is almost unknown outside of 
the Reading Room ; that its complete form is found in the 
Reading Room alone ; and that the very few persons who 
have access to it beyond those precincts possess it in a form 
which is so incomplete as well-nigh to frustrate the chief 
reason of its existence." ^ 

In the magazine "Literature," for January 10, 1899, it is 
stated that the officials of the Bibliotheque Nationale have 
been compelled to cease printing their catalogue by reason of 
the great expense involved. When the work was undertaken 
it was estimated that the catalogue would occupy some eighty 
volumes. The first volume cost =£1,600, so that the cost of 
the entire work might be X130,000. 

1 In a circular from the British Museum, dated April 15, 1899, the statement is made 
that a supplement will be published to include the titles, not yet incorporated, of all 
works acquired since the commencement of the printing of the catalogue to the end of 
1899. 



60 City Document No. 21. 

(CO 

EXTRACT FROM THE REPORT OF THE SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES, DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS. 

To the Ziibrarian : 

Five lectures were given during the year: 
In the Barton Library. 

1808. 

February 23. Mrs. Hannah Johnson Carter. On the Art of 

Ancient Egypt. 
March 1. Lecture on Egypt repeated. 

In the Fine Arts Room. 
April 21. Prof. D. O. Lyon of Harvard College. Assyrian 

art, life and history. Illustrated by the 

stereopticon . 

November 30. Mrs. Marie Buckniau, Secretary of the Egypt 

Exploration Fund. Art of Ancient Egypt. 
is«». 

Januar}' 31. Mr. C. Howard Walker. Early Greek architect- 
ure and ornament. 

Photographs, etc., illustrating the lectures were supplied 
by the Library. The lecturer was secured in each case by the 
Unit}^ Art Club. It is very desirable that the large Lecture 
Room be made available for these lectures, as neitlier the 
Barton Library nor the Fine Arts Room is adequate. 

The collection of photographs now numbers 9,870, of pro- 
cess reproductions, 3,509. Of the photographs, 1,696 have 
been added during the year at an expense of $739.63 for 
purchase, and 1)447.68 for mounting. The process pictures 
are classified and catalogued. The work is continuing on the 
photographs, less than 25 per cent, of which remain to be taken 
in hand. There is no doubt that this collection of photographs 
has not only increased the usefulness of the Fine Arts De- 
partment, but has stimulated the study of art among various 
classes in the community. 

The collection of topical examples of objects of industrial 
art, formed after the pattern of collections in the numerous 
industrial museums in Europe, Avith the aid of the informa- 
tion and material gathered by Mr. S. R. Kiihler of the Museum 
of Fine Arts, has been placed in a suitable case, and the 
arrangement of the plates advances. The collection consists 
mainly of plates (each example on a single sheet) from 
periodicals, arranged broadly in classes, such as architectural 
detail, ornament, plastic arts, furniture, etc. As the collec- 
tion develops I intend to subdivide by countries, styles, and 
periods. 



Library Department. 61 

The use of the Allen A. Brown Library has noticeably 
increased since a beginning was made in the printing of the 
catalogue. Nearly 8,000 cards are now printed, and copy is 
ready for the printer which represents at least 60,000 more. 
These it is desirable to hasten, if possible. 

The catalogue of about 4,700 cards, covering analytical 
references to musical works, periodicals, etc., and biographies^ 
has been added during the year. The collection consisting 
of magazine articles, newspaper clippings, etc., was made by 
Mr. Brown, and has been bound up in volumes, over fifty of 
which are now catalogued. By means of this catalogue, in 
which works of importance are indexed as they appear^ 
current information may be found concerning modern music 
and musicians. Progress has been made as well in the col- 
lecting, arranging, and binding of the series of concert pro- 
grammes of the Handel and Haydn, Philharmonic, Mendelss- 
ohn Quintette Club, Musical Fund, Academy of Music, and 
other musical and choral organizations in Boston during the 
past seventy years. 

Through the generosity of Mr. Brown the resources of 
this collection are enlarged systematically by the addition of 
new publications in music and musical literature. The col- 
lection of works for orchestra in full score has been largely 
increased. Worthy of mention among the more important 
additions of the year is a collection of part-songs and larger 
works for whole chorus, bound in fifty-two volumes, and com- 
prising more than 1,200 separate publications. 



Exhibitions in the Fine Arts Department, Central 

Library. 

1898. 

Feb. 8-14 —Venetian school. Photo- 

graphs .... Barton Lil)rary. 

Feb. 14-21 — German and Flemish school. 

Photographs . . . " " 

Feb. 21-28 —Dutch school. Photographs, " "■ 

Feb. 28-Mar. 7 — French school. Photo- 
graphs .... Fine Arts Eoom. 

Mar. 7-14 — English and American 

schools. Photographs . " " " 

Mar. 14-28 — School-room decoration. 

Photographs . . . " " " 

Note. — The above six exhibitions illustrated lectures by Mr. J. F. Hopkins to 
teachers of the public schools. 



62 City Document No. 21. 

Mar. 21-April 1 — Ancient Egypt. Photo- 
graphs, colored plates, 
and books, to illustrate a 
lecture by Mrs. Hannah 
Johnson Carter . . Barton Library. 

M ar . 2-20 — Washi ngton portraits. 

Loaned by Mr. George 
R. Barrett . . . " " 

Mar. 21-April 9 — Decorative paper covers. 
The Walter M. Rowlands 
collection , supplemented 
by contributions from 
other owners . . . " " 

April 7-18 — Madonnas of the old and 

modern schools of paint- 
ing and sculpture . . Fine Arts Room. 

April 15-May 10 — Books and broadsides pur- 
chased at the Ueane and 
Baucker sales . . " '• " 

April 18-May 3 — Assyrian art. Photographs, 
colored plates, and books, 
to illustrate a lecture 
by Prof. D. Ct. Lyon of 
Harvard College . ., " " " 

April 20 — Creek art. Photographs, 

etc., in connection with a 
conference and lecture on 
Greece, by the Unity Art 
Club of Dorchester . Barton Library. 

May 3-17 — Indnstrial arts. Recent ac- 

cessions, plates, etc. . Fine Arts Room. 

May 10-Junel2 — AmericusVespucius. Books, 
maps, portraits, etc., in 
commemoration of the cen- 
tenary . . . . " " " 

May 17-June G — Memorial Day. War photo- 
graphs, colored plates, bat- 
tle flags, brigade flags of 
Massachusetts regiments 
in the battle of Gettys- 
burg. Loaned by Mr. 
Charies B. Brooks , " " " 

June 6-July 12 — English cathedrals, abbeys, 
castles, university build- 
ings, etc. Photographs . " " " 

June 12-July 8 — Battle of Bunker Hill. 
Maps, lu'oadsides, docu- 
ments, portraits, etc. . " " " 

June 20-^ug. 1 — Edward Burne-Jones. Pho- 
tographs of the artist's 



Library Department. 63 

works, to commemorate 

his death on June 17 . Fine Arts Room. 

July 12- Aug. 1 — Japanese architecture and 

costume. Photographs . " " "■ 

July 12-Aug. 19 — Hawaiian Islands. Photo- 
graphs, plates, maps, por- 
traits, etc. Loaned by 
Hon. Gorham U. Gilmau, " " " 

Aug. 1-19 — Recent municipal architect- 

ure of Boston. Plates . " " " 

Aug. 1-Oct. 3 - — The typical American, male 
and female. Photographs 
of statues made from 
measurements by Dr. D. 
A. Sargent . . , u n u 

Aug. 19-30 — "Galerie Amer. du Musee 

d 'ethnographic du Troca- 
dero." Plates. In con- 
nection with the conven- 
tion of the American 
Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science . " " " 

Aug. 30 Oct. 3 — Constantinople; American 
mural decorations ; mural 
decoratijons in the Pan- 
theon, Paris. Photographs, " " " 

Sept. 2-8 — War with Spain. Pictures 

cut from periodicals, etc., " " " 

Oct. 4-17 — Classic architecture in Italy. 

Photographs . . . " " " 

Oct. 17-24 — Assyrian and Babylonian 

antiquities. Photographs. 
In connection with the 
history course in the Bos- 
ton High schools . . " " " 

Oct. 24-Nov. 17 — Portraits from the historic 
schools of painting. Pho- 
tographs . , . " " " 

Oct. 26-NOV.22 — P. Puvis de Chavannes. 
Died Oct. 24. Photo- 
graphs of his work. Cer- 
tain of them loaned by 
Mr. F. P. Vinton and 
Mr. A. H. Munsell , " " " 

Nov. 17-Dec. 5 — Ancient Egypt. Photo- 
graphs and colored plates, 
to illustrate a lecture by 
Mrs. Marie Buckman . " " " 

Dec. 5-15 — English country churches. 

Half-tone pictures . . " " " 



64 City Document No. 21. 

Dee. 15-31 — French chateaux. Photo- 

graphs .... Fine Arts Roonu 

Dee. l!)-ol — Madonnas. Photographs. 

Dee. 3 J -J an. 10, 

181)i». — Paris and Versailles. Pho- 

tographs . . . '' " " 

Dec. 31 .Jan. 10, 

1891). — Great fa9ades of the world. 

Photographs . . . '" " " 

1899. 

Jan. 14-26 — French cathedrals. Photo- 

graphs . . . . " " "■ 

Jan. 27-Feb. 1 — Greek architecture and orna- 
ment. Photographs and 
colored plates, to illustrate 
a lecture by Mr. C . Howard 
Walker . . . . " " " 

Exhibitions at the Branch Libraries and Stations. 

Collections of process reproductions on the subjects in the 
following list were exhibited during the year in the ten Branch 
Libraries, and certain of them in Stations A, D, L, and S : 
Egypt, Greek sculpture, Rome and Pompeii, Italian architecture, 
Italian painting, Florentine school, early Renaissance painters, 
Perugino, Raphael, Michael Angelo, Titian, Madonnas, Venice, 
Renaissance architecture and sculpture, Spain, Spanish archi- 
tecture, Northern architecture, French cathedrals, English cathe- 
drals, EngUsh country churches, Rembrandt, Dutch school, 
Italian views, Germany, Holland, Belgium, School decoration, 
Ci\'il War photographs, and others. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Otto Fleischner. 



(D.) 

REPORT OF CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT OF DOCUMENTS 

AND STATISTICS. 



[ Librarian's Note. — As this department had lieen in existence only eight months, 
and, as its chief worl; had so far been an examination of the collections of the Library, 
the receipt and classillcation of niMierial from the American statistical Association, 
and the initiation of methods of exchange and solicitation, catalonuing, etc., it stemed 
best that the report submitted by the Chief should be a general stateiiieiit of functions. 
The experience of the eight months had shown that his estimate of the character and 
probable large number of inquiries addressed to the department was likely to be 
justified in experience.] 

To the Librarian : 

I have the honor to submit a report from the Statistical 
Department of this Library. As it will cover an activity of 



Library Department. 65 

only six months, and applies to what is practically a new de- 
parture in library administration, the results of which are 
yet to be determined, it will necessarily be brief. 

The general plan of this department was to constitute a 
working laboratory on social topics, where the expert, the 
student and the general reader might find the material they 
desire, and, if necessary, advice and guidance in the use of 
this material. The scheme must, therefore, cover two im- 
portant divisions of each social question : the theory, as 
developed by the leading American and European writers ; 
and the application, as recorded in the investigations of 
government bureaus, corporations, associated charities or 
individuals. If the entire range of sociology as now under- 
stood is to be adequately treated, the department must have 
collections on political economy in its widest sense, on political 
science both in theory and in history, and on statistics, which 
records and generalizes both economics and history. 

The Public Library possesses large and valuable collections 
on economics and history, and an intelligent appreciation of 
this description of writings is clearly evidenced in the selec- 
tion. Indeed, it is in some respects one of the best collections 
of its kind in this country, and it would be difficult to dupli- 
cate it within any reasonable time. This great and solid 
foundation is now being rapidly added to by the purchase of 
current works, and by securing such as are out of print with 
every opportunity offered. 

As to the third division, statistics, which includes all forms 
of state activity, the principal subjects to be covered are : 

Vital statistics. 

Commercial statistics, which comprises the means or agen- 
cies of transportation". 

Labor statistics, which cannot overlook the statistics of 
production, Avhether agricultural or industrial. 

Financial statistics, and all questions of banking, currency 
and taxation. 

State and private penal and charitable institutions. 

It will be necessary to provide the material for a proper 
understanding of these subjects both in general and in detail. 
For the general, reference may be made to the condensed 
statements of economy issued by each of the leading countries 
in the form of handbooks or abstracts. I have received, in 
some cases, full sets of the statistical abstracts of the following 
countries : United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, 
Italy, Belgium, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, Netherlands, 
Japan and India. And even where a country is not named 



66 City Document No. 21. 

in this list the most essential statistics as to commerce, pop- 
ulation, railroads, telegraphs and finance, may be learned from 
some of the abstracts, like that for " foreign countries," 
issued by the British government. 

These abstracts are, however, too condensed to serve the 
purposes of the special student, and a vast and ever increas- 
ing number of official reports must be obtained for his needs. 
In the number and scope of these reports no two countries 
agree. It is safe to say tliat every leading bureau in a gov- 
ernmental department prepares and prmts an annual report, 
which is supplemented by special reports, and by the labors 
of legislative commissions. It is often not enough to have 
the report alone ; tlie debates of the House to which it is 
submitted are useful or essential. In fact, there is hardly 
any limit to the issues of this description, and only unremit- 
ting vigilance will enable the Library to keep abreast with 
them in a manner that will satisfy the demands of its readers. 

In planning to fulfil the high purposes you designed for 
this department I have laid down certain broad lines of 
action that may be briefly summarized : 

1. All census returns, whether of the United States or 
of Asiatic countries, have been sought. Vital statistics have 
been more fully developed than any other branch of statis- 
tical science, and are more frequently called for. 

2. In commerce the detailed annual returns of the four 
leading commercial and industrial nations of the world — 
the United States, the United Kingdom, France and Ger- 
many — hold the first place in importance. Almost as nec- 
essary are those of Russia, Japan, China and British India — 
covering the development of Asiatic trade, now so prominent 
among the world's problems. Canada and South America 
are of great interest commercially to the United States, and 
the trade of colonies and dependencies must prove suggestive 
in studying the future policy and growth in foreign trade of 
the United States. Even Africa, with its failures and suc- 
cesses in colonization, and its internal relations affecting the 
attitude of competing powers to one another, carries lessons 
that cannot be neglected. I have attempted to secure com- 
plete conuuercial returns of the principal nations, and am 
meeting with success. 

This particular branch will attract, and is attracting the 
attention of commercial and manufacturing bodies in this 
region. It is to be regretted that full replies cannot be given 
to every question, but this regret will become less as the col 
lection of commercial statistics increases. Much assistance 
towards completing the wants of the department could be 



LiBEARY Department. 67 

given by commercial bodies, were tliej' to turn over to tbe 
Library any works on connnerce received and not immedi- 
ately needed by tbeir own members. Tlie process of collect- 
ing and completing this will necessarily be a slow one ; but 
the commercial interests of tlie port are of such importance 
that no effort should be spared to keep the records of the 
world's commerce to date and as full as circumstances will 
permit. 

3. The problems of labor have many phases, no one of 
whicli should be passed over lightly. I have recently segre- 
gated the reports of the State Bureaus of labor statistics, and 
of a total issue of more than 300 reports, this department 
possesses all but about thirty ; and even these wants are 
being made good by way of gift and exchanges. In foreign 
countries labor is represented in nearly all administrations, 
and the reports of labor departments or bureaus in Great 
Britain, France, Germany, Ital}^ and Austria are received in 
this Library. This promises to constitute one of the most 
valuable divisions of this department, because of the many 
questions of daily life or state relations discussed in these 
reports. 

To cover only the state reports on labor would be to pass 
over one of the most vital aspects of the labor problem, that 
which is usually described as socialism, but which takes so 
many forms that no one term will cover them. I am making 
a specialty of the proceedings of labor congresses, of socialist 
periodicals, and even of anarchist issues, believing that the 
statement of grievances and formulation of reforms by the 
workingmen themselves will be of future value in history 
and in economics. 

4. The next subject is that of finance, and its importance 
cannot be exaggerated. At a time when all governments are 
facing deficient revenues and rapidly increasing demands on 
their treasuries, the discussion of taxation has come to the 
front and is exercising national as well as local taxing 
powers. The budgets of each great nation, and the legisla- 
tive reports and debates on the budget propositions ; the great 
financial institutions, state and private, and the movements 
in the leading money markets of the world find a place in 
this department for future reference. No questioner has been 
turned away unsatisfied in this line of inquiry, and yet much 
remains to be done towards obtaining the material that is 
pertinent and timely. 

It will not be necessary to dwell upon the value of state 
and local reports on charities and correction. They record 
the results of an exercise of functions on the performance 



68 City Document No. 21. 

of which the very existence of the state depends. Too 
close attention cannot be given to this diseased aspect of 
society, and I have sought for the best products of treatment 
of socials ills at home and abroad. 

In pursuing these objects correspondence has been opened 
with experts and societies in the United States and in foreign 
countries, with a view to securing early notice of what is 
published on the various matters falling within this depart- 
ment. The response has been gratifying, and is proving its 
utility daily. These connections have been facilitated by the 
deposit in the Public Library of the collections of the Ameri- 
can Statistical Association. 

The transfer of these collections was not completed until 
January of this year ; but the books and pamphlets, number- 
ing about 5,000, have been arranged, listed, and will be incor- 
porated into the Library as rapidly as time will permit. 
While there will be some duplication, yet the two collections 
complement one another in a very satisfactory manner. The 
Public Library was strong on economic writings of a general 
character, but weak in the results of economics applied in the 
administration of government ; the Statistical Association 
was strong on this practical side, but almost wanting in theo- 
retical works. Its most remarkable feature was the series of 
issues of foreign governments, long since out of print and 
difficult to obtain. As an example of the disinterested zeal 
of one man — Dr. Edward Jarvis — the collection is notable ; 
as a foundation on which to build for the future, it is a valu- 
al)le accession to the Public Librar}-. 

Exchanges of duplicate material are now being made, and 
the Statistical Collection has been able thus to complete 
many of its deficiencies. 

In recognition of this widening interest in public ques- 
tions, and more especially in the foreign relations of the 
United States, the advantage of prompt service has been rec- 
ognized. The best results will be attained by rather antici- 
pating than following public inquiry. With this in view 
arrangements have been perfected by which the important 
state papers of the leading governments of Europe are sent to 
the Library as soon as published, thus saving six weeks or 
more in the transmitting, by obviating the delay of formal 
orders from this side. German, French, Belgian and English 
bills, reports and debates have been brought under this sys- 
tem, which will be extended to other countries having direct 
or indirect relations with the policy, foreign intercourse or 
commerce of the United States. With the short trial already 
made of this system the results have justified the course 



Library Department. 69 

taken, and must be better appreciated as the facilities offered 
to the public become better known. I may mention that the Li- 
brary, through this means, received early copies of the Treaty 
(Spanish) papers, the British Blue Book and the French 
Yellow Book on the Fashoda incident, and the special Par- 
liamentary reports on water gas, petroleum and local taxa- 
tion, all of which were called for soon after receipt. And 
that the system must prove of advantage as the public be- 
comes more familiar with the facilities offered is sliown by 
the fact of inquiries being made for documents of foreign 
governments, a knowledge of which was gained through cable 
press notices. It was extremely gratifying to be able to 
promise the document " in a few days," a promise that was 
fulfilled through the careful attention of the foreign agents 
of the Library, acting under the general arrangement already 
described. 

In the same line is the method adopted of giving notice to 
the public of the receipt of important or timely documents. 
I have been enabled to publish notices in the Library bulletin 
within ten days after the document listed has reached the 
Library, without interfering with the regular process of the 
catalogue department. I believe that so prompt notice can- 
not but be useful to the public. 

This brings me to the relations such a department must 
bear to the general public. It is not to be denied that there 
has in late years been an increasing attention paid to eco- 
nomic and political studies. This attention has been made 
necessary by the ever mcreasing complexity of our social 
relations, as well among ourselves as with other peoples. 
The universities and high schools have special departments 
for teaching these questions, and the need of a sjDecial >de- 
partment in this Library, to contain the works necessary for 
applying, encouraging and continuing these studies, has been 
impressed upon the Trustees and Librarian. I need hardly 
enumerate the subjects lately coming before this city gov- 
ernment for some settlement : the expenditures and revenues; 
the relations to the city of corporations using the streets ; 
questions of public health and safety ; and the proper statis- 
tical records of municipal activity. In the State, the problem 
of taxation is ever present, with its perplexing difficulties of 
assessments and valuation of real and personal property; 
while the many corporate and state institutions under its 
control, call for an intelligent regulation as well as a high 
degree of practical ability. In national affairs there are also 
matters of finance of extreme importance, and the increasing 
demands of government for power to enter upon new areas 



70 City Document No. 21. 

of state action call for the highest exercise of the intelligence 
and practical faculties. To undertake to deal with such 
problems in ignorance is to invite disaster ; and it is only the 
highest ability that can hope to master their intricacies and 
point out the proper solution. 

To another rising study this department must give support 
and direction — I refer to the study of commercial geography. 
The mere boundaries of a country, the names of its capital 
and leading cities, rivers and mountains, convey no real 
meaning to the child's mind, and much less can they satisfy 
the more matured student. The climate and productions of 
the region, the mineral wealth and the products for home 
consumption or foreign trade, the manufacturing industries 
and the great commercial roads leading to or through it, the 
general habits of the people in food and clothing, and the 
form and supply of labor available — these, are a few of the 
leading topics that present themselves in an attempt to gain 
even a superficial conce])tion of what a country or a region 
implies. The prevailing feverish eagerness to penetrate into 
new and undescribed regions enforces such a study, and in 
the intense competition for colonial dependencies or protec- 
torates, it will be the people having the most intelligent mas- 
tery of needs and resources that will win the highest rewards. 
In Africa, in Asia, and in South America, commerce is being 
pushed as never bek)re, and vast territories, thought a short 
time since to be doomed by climate and unattractiveness to 
lie waste for many generations, are being subdued by labor, 
made accessible by railroads, and subjected to organized ad- 
ministrations designed to develop their possibilities m sur- 
face culture or in mineral wealth. 

A special feature of the department will be the large 
number of collections designed to give what is known of 
these undeveloped regions of the earth, and what is being 
done to make them better known. The proceedings of geo- 
graphical societies are valuable for general descriptions ; the 
accounts of travellers add to these more special information. 
The most valuable sources are, however, the reports of the 
consular service throughout the world, for they are governed 
by certain features tliatmake them highly instructive. They 
are, as a rule, prepared by men trained in commerce ; they 
are designed to picture the actual movements of trade, and 
compiled from year to year offer a consecutive record of the 
transactions at each port where a consular officer may be 
stationed ; they reflect the spirit of the commercial " drmn- 
mer," who seeks to study the wants of the market, and 
examines them in the light of the liome industries and their 



Library Department. 71 

ability to supply what is wanted, in competition with rivals 
for the trade. A consular report is thus a record of the 
actual, and a suggestion for the possible, and usually cast in 
such a form as to illuminate the habits, aptitudes and neces- 
sities of the people at or near the port of commerce. I have 
therefore sought to obtain, and promptly, what is being re- 
ported by the consular services of the respective countries, 
and there are on file the following : American, German, 
British, French, Austrian and Italian. 

To accomplish the best objects certain modifications must 
.be introduced in the library arrangements. The classifica- 
tion adopted for the collections of this department is on the 
decimal plan (Dewey's system), modified by such changes as 
the special nature of the books suggests. After much con- 
sideration this was deemed the best course to pursue, and its 
elasticity commends itself in use. In a general collection, 
where the reader knows what is wanted, the fixed position of 
the shelf, without regard or with little regard to subject 
matter, may have its advantages. But in a special collection, 
where the questions are often vague and usually general, the 
classification by subject becomes almost a necessity. The 
end to be attained is the grouping of the records of one line 
of governmental experience, which may be found promptly, 
consulted easily, and offer facilities for comparing results of 
different peoples and countries. So far as it has been tested, 
the system has proved satisfactory. 

While such classification will be of great assistance to 
both reader and department, special lists will still further 
make the material known and available. Much of the best 
statistical work is published in government reports, or peri- 
odicals, and is easily overlooked in a general survey. Some 
accessible record is needed to refresh the memory or direct 
the attention of the investigator. I have undertaken to pre- 
pare a catalogue of the English Parliamentary Papers for 
recent years, and have in process a catalogue of the United 
States Congressional publications. I hope to carry the idea 
further into practice by noting any important article on a 
social topic in the leading reviews and financial journals, so 
that the inquirer may be provided with the latest and selected 
utterances or records by experts upon his specialty. With- 
out undertakmg to create original research, or to influence 
judgment, every effort will be made to encourage study. 
The highest function of the department must be to have 
ready at hand the material foi- all who may apply. I may 
add that the number of the inquirers is daily increasing, and 
their questions cover a wide range. 



72 City Document No. 21. 

I cannot close without expressing my appreciation of the 
readiness you have shown to make this department useful^ 
and of your courteous and hearty encouragement. Praise is 
also due to my assistant, Mr. Lane, for his untiring zeal and 
his organizing abilities, both of which were needed in intro- 
ducing order and arrangement in the collection of the Statis- 
tical Association. I have been much gratified by the willing 
co-operation of other departments of the Library, even when 
my plans traversed their methods. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WOETHINGTON C. FORD. 



(E.) 

EXTRACT FROM THE REPORT OF THE CHILDREN'S 
DEPARTMENT. 



Co-operation with the Schools. . 

[Libbarian's Note. — While this work is in the experimental stag© 
seems the proper time to point out certain difficulties that have devel- 
oped in its operation. They are, perhaps, due to misunderstanding or 
but partial understanding. But as they are not insurmountable, an 
endeavor must be made to surmount them ; and this must begin with a 
clear appreciation of their nature. 

At my request, therefore, the following report contents itself with 
a statement of the system instituted, omits expatiation upon success- 
ful results, and considers more especially some of the difficulties 
experienced. 

For a further description of existing work with the schools see the 
Report of the Supervisor of Branches, hifra.] 

In May, 1895, an order was passed by the School Com- 
mittee directing the Board of Supervisors to consider plans» 
" A conference was held on the 14th of June of that year, 
between the Trustees of the Public Library and the Board 
of Supervisors. The Librarian, Mr. Putnam, and the Super- 
intendent of Schools, Mr. Seaver, were appointed a commit- 
tee to draw up a report to be submitted on the one hand to 
the Trustees of the Public Library, and on the other hand to 
the Board of Supervisors of the Public Schools." This 
report is to be found in School Document No. 14, 1895. For 
the carrying out of the plans therein contained a special 
appropriation would be necessary, and thus far no such ap- 
propriation has been available. Certain recommendations 
have been adopted, however, by the Library, and are included 
in the following brief account of the accommodations offered 
at the present time to teachers and pupils : 



Library Department. 73 

Teacher's cards, so-called, have been provided, allowing the 
issue o six books for a period of four weeks. 

School children under twelve (the age limit below which 
a regular card is not issued) are allowed privileges. 

Four public schools as well as the Parental School, the 
Cottage Place and North Bennet Street Industrial Schools, 
have books on deposit. The Hancock School has a regular 
semi-weekly exchange of about 100 books. 

Books for topical reference are from time to time reserved 
in the branch libraries, either selected from the branch col- 
lections or sent from the Central Library. This is done 
either on requisition from the teachers or at the initiative of 
the branch custodians. 

A list of books for younger readers, including 1,116 titles, 
has beeir prepared, representing books for general reading 
which may be found on the same shelf number in the Central 
Library and all the branches. This was sent at the time of 
publication to the head masters of all the public schools, 
and is on sale at the nominal price of one cent per copy. 

In the Fine Arts Department much has been done in the 
way of circulating among the schools portfolios of photo- 
graphs, etc., and arranging for meetings, in the department, 
of classes in architecture, painting, ornamentation, and 
drawing. 

In other departments similar offers to reserve topical 
material have been made. On January 11, 1897, a circular 
was addressed by the Librarian to the teachers of the public 
schools, in which he urges them to possess and read the above 
School Document No. 14, 1895, and requests particularly 
that they will " inform the Library systematically of topics 
to be studied, that they will request books to be set aside 
touching such topics, that they will agree that while such 
topics are pending such books shall be reserved instead of 
being issued for home use." The Custodian of the Fine 
Arts Department tells me that he does receive occasional 
requests in accordance with this circular. None such has 
been received in the Children's Room. 

Attention may also be called to the Avant of understanding 
among teachers of the necessary limitations in the use of 
teachers' cards. With the circular above mentioned was 
sent a short letter describing this use, at the close of which 
it is expressly stated that teachers' cards are not to be used to 
draw several copies of the same book ; yet applications are 
frequently made for two, three, and even more copies of a 
given book, which if granted would deprive the Library of 
all its copies for other use. These cards are also frequently 



74 City Document No. 21. 

presented for current fiction and otlier classes of boolcs, in a 
way to indicate an intention to make a purely personal use 
of them. 

It may be asked now what action the schools have taken 
in response to the report of 1895. On page 7 of the report 
is the suggestion that the teacher shall "• submit to the 
Librarian a provisional schedule of the topics to be assigned 
throughout the ensuing year, or such part of it as can be 
planned for at that time." Such a suggestion (like the one 
below) is of course provisional, and perhaps we should not 
have expected any very general action in response to it ; yet 
so far as I am aware, no single schedule of topics has been 
submitted. 

Agam, after calling attention to the desirability of placing 
collections of books on temporary deposit in the schools 
themselves, the report continues : " Were each topic studied 
contemporaneously in all the schools such a deposit would 
be impossible without a multiplication of copies of the books 
needed beyond what could reasonably be afforded, but as great 
latitude is allowed to the various schools as to the order in 
which assigned courses shall be pursued, it should be possible 
for the masters of the schools so to vary the order in which 
topics are taken up, that but a small number of classes shall 
at any one time be engaged upon any one topic." But, 
putting aside the question whether such collections should 
be reserved in the schools themselves or in tlie Library, if 
personal observation may be trusted topics are commonly 
appointed to be investigated at the same time in all the 
schools, without regard to the possibility of providing books. 

This is observed where the topic concerns an anniversary 
such as Washington's birthday. Patriots' day, or the anniver- 
sary of the visit of Lafayette to Boston. There is one difficulty 
to be avoided, however, even here. We cannot render proper 
assistance if the request comes, as has happened, only the day 
before a theme is due. Last fall, at the time of the anniver- 
sary of Lafayette's visit, the call came on Tuesday for material 
on Lafayette for a theme due on the following day. The 
topic, I was told, had been assigned only the day previous. 
A second difftculty lies in the fact that topics are assigned 
which are beyond the comprehension of the pupils, which are 
abstract, and cannot be made matter of precise reference. In 
October, four children came to me who had been told to find 
all they could about " Grasses " in the encyclopaedias, a sub- 
ject one of the most difficult in botany, concerning which all 
the books are extremely technical. " The tariff," " Capital 
punishment," '■' The woman question," are some of the topics 



Library Department. 75 

which have been assigned for compositions or debates, topics 
so comprehensive that the pupil is wholly at sea and bewil- 
dered in his attempt to treat them. 

Furthermore, although the report directed attention to the 
value of the habit among pupils of coming with some regu- 
larity to the Library, and urged the teachers to accompany 
them on the first visit and especially to help them become 
familiar with the use of tlie collection of reference Ijoolcs in 
Bates Hall, I have been disappointed at the small number 
both of pupils and teachers who have been actively interested. 

In the spring of 1898 I visited eight grammar schools, some 
of them several times. I talked with the teachers, made notes 
of books desired, and examined those provided for the schools. 
In accordance with recommendations then made a second 
circular was addressed to the teachers of the Latin, High, and 
grammar schools. I quote from the circular: "■ The facilities 
at the Central Librar}' will be increased and improved. More 
space for the use of pupils and teachers is to be provided. 
The Kindergarten Library for the use of teachers is to be 
enlarged. A special reference library for the use of pupils is 
to be placed in the Children's Room, and so far as possible a 
greater number of books needed by the pupils for reference, 
collateral and supplementary reading is to be supplied. 

''What the books shall be should depend largel}^ upon 
recommendation of the teachers themselves. 

" The Library invites each teacher to send in a list of the 
books that will be of service to teacher and pupil in connec- 
tion with the Avork of the coming school year. ... It 
may be practicable to prepare for the coming year a graded 
list of books for collateral and supplementary reading. Such 
a list for younger readers, as well as a list classified by sub- 
jects, is in contemplation. 

'" In addition to the lists themselves teachers are invited to 
communicate in writing or otherwise, suggestions with 
reference to the conduct of this work either as to books or 
as to service. 

" Teachers need not abstain from these lists or from these 
suggestions simply because the school in which they teach is 
remote from the Central Library. What will be done at the 
Central Librar}^ may furnish a useful example of what may 
be attempted later with the Branches or perhaps through the 
schools themselves." 

One thousand one hundred and fifty copies of this circular 
were sent to the Superintendent of Schools for distribution 
to all the teachers in the Latin, High and grammar schools. 
Replies were received from ten of the some one hundred and 



76 City Document No. 21. 

eighty teachers in the Latin and High schools, from sixteen of ■ 
the some eight hundred and ninety in the grammar schools,, 
in all twenty-six replies. 

The lists were examined and compared with lists of text- 
books and of books for supplementary reading furnished 
the schools, to see what books might properly be supplied by 
the School Committee, and what came within the province 
of the Library to supply. The lists were then compared with 
the Library catalogue to see how far the requests were made 
with a knowledge of the already existing resources of the 
Library. 

In many instances the lists showed ignorance of the Li- 
brary, in otliers a determined effort to multiply copies of a 
useful book. Long lists were made up almost entirely of 
books standing on the list for younger readers, and already 
hberally supplied by the Librar3^ 

As a result, between forty and fifty titles were sent to the 
Librarian and approved by him. From two to six copies of 
each book were bought, some for circulation, some for the 
new children's reference library. While certain of these 
titles were suggested by the teachers, many were the result 
of my personal observation ; and to these as a basis, the 
Librarian has added some 200 more titles to form a children's 
reference library in the second Children's Room about to be 
opened. 

To-day the department, with increased space, a new refer- 
ence library, and with the experience thus far gained, is in a 
better position to assist teachers and pupils than ever before. 
A more active co-operation is all that is asked for. Many of 
the obstacles to effective work would be removed were a 
special appropriation available. But much may be accom- 
plished with the present funds if four things are observed, two 
by the School Committee and Supervisors, and two by the 
teachers : 

I. The School Committee to furnish a more adequate 
supply of the best text-books on the various subjects, so that 
teachers need not apply to the Library for material properly 
to be supplied by the city to the schools themselves. 

II. The Supervisors not to appoint a special topic for 
the majority of schools at the same time. 

III. Teachers to take advantage more generally of the 
Library's ability and willingness to meet requests for re- 
served material, and to locate it temporarily in the branch 
libraries ; a notice to be given of such special requests far 
enough in advance to enable the Library to meet them con- 
veniently. 



LiBEAiiY Department. 77 

IV. Teachers to inform themselves and their pupils more 
fully as to Library resources and Library methods.^ 
Respectfully submitted, 

Gertrude P. Sheffield. 



(F.) 

EXTRACT FROM THE REPORT OF THE BRANCH 
DEPARTMENT. 

Service op the Branches and Stations From The 
Central Library. 

The Daily Issue. — The delivery of books from the Cen- 
tral Library on cards and slips to the branches and stations 
has amounted for the year to 86,541 volumes, an increase 
of 30,007 volumes, or fifty-three per cent., over the number 
for the year ending January 81, 1898. The percentage of 
unsuccessful applications has fallen during the year from 
forty-nine per cent, to forty-one per cent. 

Active extension of the work of the daily issue is limited 
by the capacity of the Branch Division at the Central Library 
a.nd of the library wagons to care for it. The work in the 
Branch Division is concentrated in point of time. Few 
people leave slips or call for books at the branches and sta- 
tions before 1 P.M. The mail has lately been used to 
equalize this pressure at the Central Library. In addition to 
this difficulty of concentration of work, the public suffers 
from not getting its books on the same clay they are applied 
for, since the slips left in the afternoon and evening cannot be 
filled by us till the next morning. The only remedy for the 
evil seems to be a second daily delivery at many of the 
branches and stations, and this would partially solve both 
problems. It would require, however, the employment of a 
messenger and of another wagon during part of the day, 
together with extra service in the Branch Division. I have 
already submitted to you a report on this subject. 

Deposit Work. — There are now f ortj^-eight places to which 
deposits are sent as against forty-two at the close of last 
year. The number of volumes sent out this year was 
18,378; last year, 12,519. The increase is forty-seven per 
cent. 

On January 31, 1898, there were 5,041 volumes in the 
deposit collection, QQ per cent, of them fiction. There have 



78 City Docuimext No. 21. 

been added during the year 2,947 volumes. Since seventy 
volumes have been condemned, withdrawn or transferred to 
the Central collection, the present total is 7,918 volumes, of 
which sixty-three per cent, are fiction and juveniles. 

The deposit collection is a very effective part of the Library 
equipment. The books are shifted constantly from one to 
another of tlie forty-eight places of deposit, and from less 
than 8,000 volumes, there is a circulation of more than 
150,000 per annum. The collection, however, should be 
larger. As a rule not more than twelve per cent, of the 
books are upon the Central Library shelves at one time, and 
many of these are unavailable because of havmg been the 
round of the stations. Precisely at this stage in the life ot 
the collection many volumes are falling for the first time into 
this class of "dead books," not to be sent to any station again 
till two years from their return from it. Fourteen stations 
out of eighteen now change fifty instead of twenty-five vol- 
umes per month, and this exhausts our resources more rapidly. 
It is, of course, not advisable to transfer books in block 
from one station to another, for the stations differ in their 
needs. To give scope for judicious selection in making up 
the deposits, and to enlarge present deposits, several thousand 
volumes more seem needed. 

With regard to the quality of the books of the collection, 
the additions recommended are chiefly such as pass the test 
of permanent value or enduring interest. There is a propor- 
tion of books without much literary merit, which are useful 
as stepping-stones to better reading. If the collection fails at 
all it is most likely to be in attractiveness to the ordinary 
reader, and with this in mind there has been a systematic 
endeavor to avoid respectable dulness. The collection 
receives general approval from the custodians, with the im- 
portant qualification that the demand is for more fiction. 

Work with Schools. — One hundred and two special de- 
posits, with a total of 755 volumes, have been sent to the 
branches and stations this year, chiefly for the use of schools 
and clubs. To systematize this work we have had printed 
a form to be used by teachers in asking for deposits. Copies 
of this form are sent to the neighboring schools by the custo- 
dians, together with a circular letter to the masters. Of the 
number of books reserved at the branches for school use this 
year, no statistics are available. 

Work with schools without the intervention of the branch 
or station has begun to develop into a system. To four 
schools, the Brighton High School, Roxbury High School, 
Charles Sumner School (Grammar) and Rice Training School 



LiBEArvY Department. 79 

(Grammar), deposits have been sent direct. A charging- 
sj^stem, with the use of the regular library card, has been 
adopted, and monthly reports of circulation are sent to us. 
These schools, therefore, are for certain limited uses stations 
of the Library. At the Brighton and the Roxbury High 
Schools, books are exchanged twice a month. The circula- 
tion at the Brighton High School, for a few months only, has 
amounted to 1,108 volumes (home and hall use), and we 
find that the presence at the school of books which may be 
drawn on the regular library card rather stimulates the use 
of the branch than otherwise. 

Since many books could not be spared from the Central 
Library, it became necessary to buy extra copies. Nearly 
300 volumes of these have already been ordered. They form 
a part of the Central collection, but the special stamp "de- 
posit duplicate " indicates that they are at the service of the 
Branch Division for the use of schools. They have been 
selected chiefly from lists of recommendations sent in by 
teachers. In connection with the examination of these lists 
a record has been made of several hundred volumes likely to 
be needed of which there is a copy at our disposal on the 
shelves. Several hundred more books need to be bought. 
The books for the Grammar Schools (ninth grade) can be sup- 
plied generally from the deposit collection. They are of the 
character of those found in the list^ entitled "Books for sup- 
plementary reading " for the Boston public schools, though 
no books actually furnished to a school by the School Com- 
mittee are duplicated by us. The deposit duplicates are in- 
tended chiefly for high schools. In character they are books 
for topical reference. A few examples are given here : 
Rawlinson, Herodotus ; Stubbs, Constitutional history of 
England ; Fustel de Coulanges, the Ancient city ; Dowden, 
Shakespeare, his mind and art; Gosse, Eighteenth Century 
literature ; Lang, Leaf e and Myers, Iliad of Homer ; Darwin, 
Power of movement in plants; Liil)ke, History of art; Clarke, 
Ten great religions. These are books which the scholars can 
use freely in no way so well as by having them sent to the 
school by the Library. 

The extension of this system meets various obstacles. 
There are limitations on our part in the matter of labor, of 
time and of expense. In order to make a few copies of a 
book do for many schools it would be necessary (1) that the 
Librar}^ should know what books are kept in permanence at 
each school ; (2) that the schools should not all take up the 
same subject at the same time ; (3) that they should give 

iln School Document No. 8, 1898. 



80 City Document No. 21. 

due notice of subjects to be taken up. Further, if this direct 
work of the Library with the schools is to become general, a 
method of co-operation must be adopted, as was recommended 
in the report on the co-operation of the Library with the 
schools made by the Librarian and the Superintendent of 
Schools to the conference of the Trustees of the Public 
Library and the Board of Supervisors (1895). 

Unity of administration of a portion of the books used by 
the schools seems to be desirable. A partial inquiry shows 
that with regard to size, character and use, the collections of 
books held by the scliools are diverse. If an agreement for 
co-operation were made and funds were provided, in addition 
to furnishing deposits of books for topical reference and 
general reading, the Library might well administer the col- 
lections now at the schools, outside of the following classes : 
1. Text-books. 2. Books for analysis in the class-room. 3. 
Permanent reference books. 4. Collateral reading of a 
systematically didactic character. This plan would secure 
uniform methods in the use of books, and records of their 
use. It would define the functions of the Library and make 
its work more effective. Such a general extension would 
involve considerable expense in transportation, additional 
service and additional copies of books. 

If no general plan of co-operation is now practicable, a 
limited agreement of the same nature by which in certain 
schools the Library should administer the books described 
above, in addition to those it might furnish, would be a step 
in advance. There is a waste of effort necessarily involved 
in present conditions. 

Branches. 
Reclassification. — The most important change of the year 
has been the reclassification and recataloguing of the branches. 
The collections of books varied in size from 4,000 to 34,000 
volumes, and they varied widely in character. The diversity 
in this latter respect was so great that an examination in one 
department of American history showed almost no books 
that were in all the branches. As a step toward uniformity, 
therefore, we began last June to reclassify the collections 
according to one system. This involved (1) transferring 
unserviceable books to the Central Library ; (2) renumber- 
ing books accordmg to the simple system of the West End 
Branch ; (3) revising the card catalogues, or m some cases 
making new card catalogues. The revision of the catalogues 
has gone on contemporaneously with the reclassification, and 
the result will be complete card catalogues at all the branches, 



Library Depart^eent. 81 

and an accurate union catalogue and shelf list at the Central 
Library. 

The report of what has been actuall}^ accomplished, given 
elsewhere, shows that one branch is -practically completed, 
that in two more Ave can see the end not far distant, and that 
at the others good progress has been made. 

Branch Finding List. — Since Junel, 1897, the accessions 
common to all the branches have been classified according to 
the West End system and in April, 1898, a finding list of these 
books was issued, covering accessions up to April 1. This 
was the first printed finding list or bulletin of all the branches. 
It will be followed by others, and eventually, it is hoped, by 
a comprehensive union finding list. 

Open Shelves. — At Brighton all the shelves have been 
thrown open as far as the reclassification has gone. This 
has involved the remodelling of the interior of the branch, 
which was completed in September last. By the new arrange- 
ment, after passmg the issue desk access is free to all parts 
of the floor. As the progress of the reclassification allowed, 
the alcoves have been thrown open till only one, containing 
a part of the fiction, remains closed. Placards designating 
the classes have been posted, and a notice announcing that 
the shelves are open to all card-holders over sixteen years of 
age. School children under the age of sixteen are admitted 
to certain shelves on application. 

At the Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, South Boston and South 
End branches, where the arrangement of the shelves made it 
possible, the books in history, or history and biography, have 
been removed to a position near the gate, and the alcove 
thrown open to the public. For the branches where this is 
not practicable at present, i^lacards have been prepared an- 
nouncing that card-liolders over sixteen years of age will be 
admitted to the shelves for special purposes on application to 
the attendants. 

Sunday Opening. — An experiment this year has been the 
issue of books on Sunday at Charlestown, East Boston and 
South Boston. Last year these branches were open for ref- 
erence and reading only. The Sunday openmg began on 
November 6, and was advertised by placards and by items in 
the daily papers and local weeklies. The daily averages up to 
February 1 are here given, in comparison with those for the 
same months of last year: 







1897-98. 


1898-99. 




November - 


— January. 


November— January. 




Readers. 


Adults. 


Readers. Adults. Books issued 


Charlestown, 


213 


28% 


299 30% 57 


East Boston, 


278 


8% 


270 20% 33 


South Boston, 


248 


36% 


258 45% 26 



82 City Document No. 21. 

The largest issue of books at Charlestown was 90, at East 
Boston, 62, at South Boston, 46. 

The attendance and the percentage of adults have there- 
fore been good, but the issue of books small. There has 
been, however, a steady gain in this particular at Charlestown 
and East Boston, the average for January being 6Q at 
the former and 39 at the latter. But in any case the 
experiment must be tried longer. I note m this connection 
that the West End Branch and Station P continue to have 
a good circulation on Sunday. As to expense, it costs no 
more to issue a moderate number of books than to furnish 
suitable service on Sunday without this feature, since it has 
been found that two attendants at each branch are desirable 
merely to assist the readers and to preserve order. The 
cost has been '$7.60 or less at each branch, $2 of which is 
paid for heating the rooms. 

Service. — At the weekly meetings of the custodians a 
wide range of topics is discussed, as is shown by the min- 
utes which have been kept. About once a month a meet- 
ing of a special character has been held, as at Brighton to 
inspect the open shelves, or at the Juvenile Room to examine 
the methods. We sometimes have a paper on an appointed 
subject followed by a discussion. 

Books. — Four thousand two hundred and twenty-two vol- 
umes of new books have been Iwuglit for the branches, as 
against 4,657 last year. Very few of these are permanent 
reference books, or books for younger readers. Since last 
June no ucav books have been bought for Charlestown on 
account of the crowded condition of the shelves. 

Periodicals. — An approximate uniformity seems desirable 
in the periodicals furnished to the branches as well as in the 
books. The lists were until recently very diverse in size 
and character. Avoiding sweeping changes, other lists have 
been prepared which are less unequal, and a radical revision 
is proposed after a year of observation. Periodicals of 
narrow scope like the " China Decorator " and the " Phonetic 
Review," and others of small literary merit, have been dropped, 
and such magazines as the " Review of Reviews " have been 
put on all the lists. 

Circulatio7i. — By the table of circulation it appears that 
the total for the branches is 660,171 as against 659,099 for 
the year ending Januar}^ 31, 1898, a gain of less than one 
per cent. There are special conditions which affect the 
circulation at some branches, as at Jamaica Plain which the 
existence of the Boylston Station no doubt injures, or at 
East Boston where the centre of the reading population 



LiBEARY Department. 83 

moves steadily away from the branch. At Charlestown, lack 
of new books must be taken into account. The fact that 
this has been a transition year both as regards the adminis- 
tration of the department and the re-classification is fairly to 
be noted, and perhaps also the general character of the year, 
which has been more favorable to the reading of newspapers 
than of books. 

Delivery Stations and other Agencies. 

Enlargement and Improvement. — One new delivery station 
has been added this year. Station U, on Union Park street 
in Ward 9. It was opened on December 27, with a deposit 
of 400 books. The circulation for January was 1,490 
volumes, 325 of which were drawn from the Central Library. 
This shows that the station meets a need. In fact there is 
no other library agency actually within the limits of Ward 9, 
and the district is densely populated. The establishment of 
the station, was, however, made possible only by the offer 
of rooms by the Archbishop and the clergy of the Cathedral 
of the Holy Cross. In type it is therefore like Station S. 

On April 28, a deposit was sent to Station E at Neponset, 
so that all our stations have now the deposit feature. 

Portfolios of pictures have been sent for the first time this 
year to the three reading-rooms. A, D, and L, and to Station S. 
There is unfortunately no room to display pictures at the 
reading-rooms F and P. 

Seven of the eighteen stations are now in charge of Library 
employees, and meetings of these custodians have been 
begun, with the intention of furnishing an opportunity for 
the discussion of the problems and interests connected with 
their work. 

Sunday Opening. — Two of the stations have been open 
on Sunday since October 1, Station P (Broadway Extension 
Reading-Room), and Station S (Roxbury Crossing), the latter 
for the first time. At both, books have been issued for home 
use. The statistics show that the Broadway Extension Station 
is literally crowded with Sunday readers. Another attendant 
has been added for the evening. The average number of 
books issued has been 54. At Station S there has been a 
steady but smaller attendance and issue. The collection of 
books, however, is not so attractive as at the former station, 
and only one-quarter as large. 

Circulation. — The circulation this year directly from tlie 
stations has been 175,552 volumes as against 163,938 last 
year, a gain of seven per cent. ; but the total circulation of the 
stations, including the institutions, engine-houses and schools, 



84 City Document No. 21. 

264,672 volumes, shows a gain of 23.7 per cent, over tJiat 
pf last year, 

Types of Stations. — There are now three types of stations, 
all having the delivery and deposit features : 1. Reading- 
rooms, with a library employee in charge, and with periodicals 
'<ind reference books. 2. Stations in charge of a library 
employee, but having no periodicals or reference books. 
3. Stations in shops where the proprietor furnishes space, 
light, heat and service. Stations of the second kind may for 
convenience be called service stations, those of the third 
kind, shop stations. Stations S and U are service stations, 
though Station S has two characteristics of a reading-room, 
space for reading tables, and a few periodicals. Eleven of 
our stations are shop stations. 

The ideal would seem to be the reading-room, and next to 
it the service station. The latter tends constantly to develop 
into the former. Station P was not originally a reading- 
room, but has become one, while at Stations S and U the 
recent small donations of books mark a change, as do also 
the enlargement at Station S and the addition of periodicals 
mentioned above. Considerations of expense are the obstacles 
to this natural development. 

But the conmion characteristic of the readhig-room and 
the service station is that each is in charge of a library em- 
ployee, and this is the important feature. It gives both the 
Library and the public the advantage of more intelligent 
service. There is hardly any station where advice and in- 
formation about books is not asked for or where school 
children do not come with questions. It is desirable, there- 
fore, to have in charge a custodian who is imbued with the 
library spirit and is capable of given help to inquii'ers ; w^hile, 
further, if a station is to become one of the intellectual 
centres of its district, a trained custodian is absolutely neces- 
sary. 

The cost of maintenance of this type of station may be 
estimated at about $1,000 per annum if enough is allowed 
for rent to provide a room of moderate size. In the more 
distant suburbs -f 850 might be sufficient. As against this, 
the cost of a shop station with a circulation of over 21,000 
volumes is approximately $643 at the present rate of com- 
pensation. The difference is important in a consideration of 
ways and means, but it does not offset in my opinion the 
additional advantages of a service station. The extra ex- 
pense must, no doubt, prevent action that might otherwise 
be taken ; but service stations might be established as easily 
as shop stations if the rent, light and heat were furnished by 



Library DEPARTiviEisrT. 85 

private individuals or institutions, with a reasonable guarantee 
for continuance. Under such an arrangement for sharing 
the burden of expenses, Stations S and U are carried on. 

Other Agencies. — At the Hancock School, in the North 
End, where there is a delivery of books from the Central 
Library on cards, the circulation for this year has been 6,831 
volumes as against 3,937 for the last year. To the Fleet-street 
Free Reading Room for Men have been sent deposits of books 
every two weeks, from the West End Branch. We have 
sent, as heretofore, monthly deposits to twenty-two engine- 
houses and ladder companies. No more can be served at 
present by the Library wagons. The House of Reformation 
on Rainsford Island, and the Cottage-place and North Ben- 
net-street Industrial Schools have received regular deposits, 
but those to the Marcella-street Home ceased in October 
because of the removal of that institution. In September last 
we began sending large deposits from the Central Library to 
the Parental School for Boys at West Roxbury, in place of 
thirty volumes per month from the West Roxbury Branch, 
the resources of which were insufficient for the needs of the 
school. 

From all the institutions, records of the use of books are 
sent to us each month. The North Bennet-street School 
has sent us the first number of an interesting little magazine 
in manuscript prepared by the pupils. It is called Book Re- 
views^ and contains original accounts of some of the books 
furnished by the Library. In January a deposit of books 
was sent to the Back Bay post-office station for the use of the 
letter-carriers. 

Branch Division. — Central Library. 

Inter-Lihrary Loans. — The number of volumes lent to 
other libraries this year was 22-1: as against 135 last year. 
Twenty-seven applications were denied. Nineteen books 
were borrowed from other libraries. 

Distribution of Periodicals. — A new function of the 
Branch Division is the distribution of periodicals to the 
penal institutions, the pauper institutions, and the insane 
hospitals of the city. The periodicals are those not 
required for binding at the Central Library or the branches. 
The work has been systematized, but statistics must be post- 
poned to another year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Langdon L. Ward, 
Supervisor of Branches and Stations. 



86 City Document No. 21. 



(G.) 

MEMORIAL OF THE DEATH OF ARTHUR MASON 
KNAPP, 1839-1898. 

On Tuesday, December 27, 1898, died Artliur Mason 
Knapp, Custodian of Bates Hall in the Boston Public 
Lil)raiy. 

He was born at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, August 3, 1839, 
the son of Hiram Knapp and Sophronia Brown. During his 
boyhood the family removed to Boston, where he fitted for 
college at the Boston Latin School. He was graduated as 
the first scholar in his class, and entered Harvard College as 
a member of the class of 1863. He held from Harvard the 
degree of A.M. as well as that of A.B. 

After teaching for some years in Phillips Academy, 
Andover, in the Boston Latin School, and in the Brookline 
High School, he entered the service of the Library January 
23, 1875. His first appointment was to the charge of the 
special collections of the Library: from 1878 until his death 
he held the position of Custodian of Bates Hall. 

His knowledge of Shakespeariana and of Elizabethan litera- 
ture was of great value in the preparation of the catalogue 
of the Barton collection. In his position in charge of the 
main reference department of the Library, his special knowl- 
edge of the subject of genealogy and local history, as well as 
a thorough general knowledge of the resources of the Library 
on all subjects, was of the greatest service to an immense 
constituency of readers. To the value of this service, ren- 
dered with exact conscientiousness and singleness of purpose 
in its relation to his colleagues, and with assiduity and per- 
sonal interest towards the readers and students who came to 
him for assistance, the warm appreciation of all those with 
whom he came in contact bears witness. 

Passages from the address of the Rev. Dr. James De Nor- 
mandie at the funeral services, December 30, 1898 : 

The public is most exacting of its servants, and feels that 
all their time and strength and acquisitions belong to it Avith- 
out a moment's delay, without any manifestation of impa- 
tience or weariness. To have been for nearly a quarter of a 
century in such a service is itself a great testimony to one's 
worth, and to have been for twenty years the trusted head of 
one of the leading departments of the Public Library is a 
proof of merit to which words can add very little. 



Library Department. 87 

The accumulated and well-arranged learning of our friend, 
as if it were all in a multitude of familiar drawers, was freely 
given to any inquirer. Many came every day to ask not only 
for books, but to know Avhat books or what essays had been 
written upon every subject recent or ancient, plain or ab- 
struse, that the fertile mind of man has ever thought of — 
and here was one who seemed to remember all ; whose good 
taste and good judgment were ever ready to suggest not only 
books, which is a very little matter, but the best books, which 
is a very important matter touching the higher question of 
life — so that his daily work was to give to hundreds better 
ideals of humon actions, and human character ; making his 
mission one with all those Avho in every form of teaching, in 
journalism, in schools, and in the church, are helping this to 
be a better world. 

What knowledge, what graciousness, what a ready and 
unfailing sympathy, what a sense of humor which so lightens 
the annoj^ances of public station, what a spirit of self-deny- 
ing, what faithfulness marked his daily life. When St. Paul 
would express the highest merit of a steward, he says " it is 
required that a man be found faithful," and when Jesus Christ 
would set a seal of divine favor and divine joy upon a 
man's work he told the beautiful story of one who was faith- 
ful to his talents, his gifts. Servants and stewards of the 
Most High, all of us, our best reward is that we be found faith- 
fuL Only faitliful! In the midst of so much that is unfaith- 
ful, in the midst of so many noisy activities which count for 
nothing and end in nothing, God grant that when our work 
like his is done, there ma}^ be written upon it the promise of 
Jesus, "• thou hast been faithful over a few things, I vvill make 
thee ruler over many things, enter thou into the joy of thy 
* Lord." 



City Document No. 21. 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

FOR 1898. 

To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

Gentlemen, — The following persons were appointed 
members of the Examining Committee for the year 1898 : 



J. Bapst Blake, M.D. 

Hon. Patrick A. Collins. 

E. Wmchester Donald, D.D. 

Mr. C. W. Ernst. 

Mr. Alfred Hemenway. 

Mr. John H. Lee. 

Miss E. F. Mason. 

Mr. James J. Roche. 

Mrs. Sarah H. Williamson. 



Hon. Henry W. Bragg. 
Rev. Arthur T. Connolly. 
Wilham H. Ensworth, M.D. 
Miss Gretchen Field. 
Mr. Thomas Hills. 
Mr. A. Lawrence Low^ell. 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Parker. 
Mr. Charles P. Searle. 
Mr. Frank Wood. 



On June 2, 1898, the committee was organized by the 
choice of Mr. Hemenway as Chairman, and Mrs. Elizabeth F. 
Parker as Secretary. 

The following sub-committees were appointed : 

On Administration. 
Mr. Alfred Hemenway, C%airman. 
Hon. Patrick A. Collins. Rev. E.Winchester Donald, D.D. 
Miss Gretchen Field. Mrs. Elizabeth F. Parker. 

Mr. Charles P. Searle. Mrs. Sarah H. Williamson. 

On Books. 

J. Bapst Blake, M.D., Chairman. 
Mr. C. W. Ernst. Mr. James J. Roche. 

On Catalogues^ Bulletins and Finding Lists. 

Mr. A. Lawrence Lowell, Chairman. 
Mr. William L. Putnam. Miss E. F. Mason. 

On Branches and New Modes of Distribution. 
Hon. Henry W. Bragg, Chairman. 



Mr. Thomas Hills. 



Mr. John H. Lee. 



On Finance. 

William H. Ensworth, M.D., Chairman. 
Rev. Arthur T. Connolly. Mr. Frank Wood. 



Library Department. 89 

The Sub-Committee on Books reports as follows : 

As Chairman of the Sub-Committee on Books I have the 
honor to submit the following report : 

Your committee recalls the recommendations of the pre- 
vious committee and agrees with them. 

They were, substantially, that the three great libraries of 
Metropolitan Boston should not, in either their collections or 
their aims, unnecessarily duplicate one another, and, that the 
Boston Public Library should be particularly strong m books 
upon every subject related to the city of Boston itself. 

Your committee would emphasize particularly the latter of 
the above two recommendations, and would again call atten- 
tion to the fact that there are not sufficient reference books 
in the various rooms ; that the collection of maps and atlases 
is by no means to be compared in completeness with the files 
on most other subjects ; and that the Library is particularly 
weak in guide books of modern years. Your committee 
recommends that these departments be strengthened. 

The Sub-Committee on Catalogues, Bulletins and Finding 
Lists reports as follow^s : 

There are now in the Library the following catalogues : 

1. The Lower Hall card catalogue in the Delivery-room, 
relating chiefly to recent fiction. 

2. The catalogue of the Barton Library in the bound 
volume of cataloefues near the Bates Hall catalogue. 

This is a special librar}^, chiefly relating to dramatic works, 
and containing many Shakespearian editions. 

3. The card catalogue of articles in scientific periodicals 
not only in this library, but in a number of associate libraries. 
This has been recently started, and is kept near the Bates 
Hall catalogue. 

4. The Bates Hall card catalogue which covers the books 
and bound periodicals not in the preceding catalogues, and 
many of the books that are also in the Lower Hall catalogue 
and the Barton catalogue. 

5. Special card catalogues in different rooms, devoted to 
the special class of books kept in that room. 

6. Printed catalogues, in bound volumes, on special sub- 
jects or branches, issued from time to time by the Trustees. 

7. Lists of books on special subjects, which have come 
out in connection with different numbers of the Bulletin. 

8. The Annual List of all books received during the year, 
arranged by subject. 

At first sight it seems as if there must be an unnecessary 
multiplication of catalogues, but to a large extent it will be 
found that they serve different purposes. 



90 City Document No. 21. 

The first five classes of catalogues are intended to enable 
people searching for a book to find it, and also to enable them 
to discover what books are in the Library on any subject. In 
all of these the book will be found, as a rule, under the 
name of the author, under the subject, and often also under 
the title. 

The last three classes of catalogues are intended primarily 
to inform the public what books are to be found in the 
Library, to bring its contents to their notice, thus fostering 
an interest in good reading. 

The Bulletins are distributed free. 

The Annual List of the important books received is sold 
for five cents, and the books are classified by subject, so that 
a person interested in any branch can ascertain quickly what 
new books he ought to read. We cannot too highly commend 
the institution of catalogues of this character. 

The question of extending the Bates Hall catalogue, so as 
to include all the books of the Lower Hall catalogue and of 
the Barton catalogue and special periodical catalogue, so as 
to make the Bates Hall catalogue a complete list of the entire 
Library, has, we understand, been carefully considered by the 
Trustees. While there is much to be gained by this course, 
there are advantages on the other side, and we do not feel 
that the investigation that we have been able to make, neces- 
sarily brief, warrants us in recommending any change in this 
respect. 

We recommend, however, that there be posted conspicu- 
ously in the Delivery Room and the Bates Hall catalogue 
room, in the Reading Room, and perhaps in other conspicuous 
places, a summarized list of all the catalogues open to the 
public, with the class of books contained in each, and the 
place where the catalogues may be consulted; and, incident- 
ally, we think that the sign over the Lower Hall card cata- 
logue in the reading-room should be changed so as to indicate 
that the Bates Hall catalogue is the principal one in the 
Liljrary. 

These changes, we think, will save time in finding books. 

It is becoming more and more important and necessary 
that everything shall be done to improve and complete sub- 
ject catalogues, and we especially commend the course of the 
Trustees in obtaining the assistance of persons specially con- 
versant with the subject in the preparation of some of the 
more recent special lists and bulletins. This course should 
be followed in future wherever possible. A special catalogue, 
made up only by the employees of the Library from the 
Bates Hall catalogue, is much less helpful than one made by 



Library Departiment, 91 

a person who has made a study of the subject, and is familiar 
not only with its bibliography, but with the relative value 
of the different books. It is liable, also, not to displa}^ in 
proper relative importance the full resources of the Library. 

We again recommend for the consideration of the Trustees 
the suggestion made last year — that the card catalogues 
used in making these special catalogues be kept up to date, 
and that duplicates be placed in the Bates Hall catalogue. 
We also suggest that where a subject in the Bates Hall card 
catalogue comprises many titles and is much subdivided, a 
table showmg briefly the arrangement of the divisions be 
placed on the first card. 

In many of the larger subjects treated by the card cata- 
logues, the subdivisions are indicated by larger cards of a 
brown color, Avhich are easily distmguished in glancing along 
the top of a drawer full of cards. This is excellent as far 
as it goes, but we recommend that the system be greatly 
extended, and that all the drawers be subdivided, and, as it 
were, indexed in this way. The saving of time which can 
thus be effected will be very material. 

The special catalogue of articles in scientific periodicals is 
one of the most hopeful signs of the times, for it is an ex- 
periment in co-operative work among a number of large 
libraries. The catalogue itself was mtended to cover peri- 
odicals not included in Poole's and other indices ; at least it 
was intended to do so in certain branches of study. Such 
an experiment is necessaril}^ incomplete at first, and it is to 
be hoped that before long the list will be extended so as to 
include all the good periodicals in any branch of learning 
that is covered at all. This is very far from being the case 
now, and the gaps are numerous and striking. 

In making these suggestions the committee is thoroughly 
sensible of the fact that the Boston Public Library has 
carried the art of cataloguing to a higher point than any 
other library of the size in the world. But this does not 
exclude the possibility of improvement in details. 

The Sub-Committee on Branches and New Modes of Dis- 
tribution reports as follows : 

The report of the Committee on Finance canvasses so 
thoroughly the necessity of suitable buildings for most of the 
Branches, and the impossibility of obtaining appropriations 
for any such improvements, that your committee forbears to 
do more than emphasize the suggestions of that report. 

The rooms occupied by the East Boston Branch are 
entirely inadequate and unsuitable, and almost any change 
would be an improvement. 



92 City Docu^iext No. 21. 

The furniture and appliances are of the cheapest kind ; 
the reading-room which is practically a part of the stack 
room, lias no means of ventilation, and is improperly heated 
and lighted. 

The surroundings are such that young people who are 
expected to resort to the Library are subjected to sights and 
influences which can only prove baneful. 

The Charlestown Branch is the largest branch, and now 
contains over 32,000 volumes, while it has room for only 
25,000 volumes, notwithstanding no new books have been 
added since May 1, 1898. This overcrowded condition 
could be temporarily relieved by the removal to the Central 
Library of some 4,000 volumes comprising the "Harris Col- 
lection," which are seldom, if ever, used, and each year 
become more valuable, as the collection nuist always be com- 
posed of books j^nblished prior to 1850. 

The income of the Harris Fund has accumulated to about 
$4,000, and opportunities to increase the collection are fre- 
quently lost, by reason of lack of space above referred to. 
This would be obviated by the removal of this collection to 
the Central Library, where it would be not only protected 
against loss, but be of actual service to many now debarred 
from its use. Such removal has been heretofore earnestly 
opposed, but we have yet to learn of any ground for such 
opposition, except a vague sentiment, not shared by those 
who have the only right to urge it. 

The whole library is exposed to the danger of fire from 
the adjoining buildings, which are used for stables. This 
risk can be greatly reduced by placing iron or tm shutters 
upon the rear windows at a small expense. 

There should be some means of separating the adult read- 
ing room from that of the juveniles. 

The chairs should be provided with rubber tips to prevent 
the noise which cannot be avoided otherwise. 

There should he periodical racks for the tables, thus avoid- 
ing disorder and preserving the magazines for binding. 

Most of these suggestions are applicable to each of the 
branches, and as the expense to be incurred is small, and the 
benefits to be derived are large, it seems wise economy to 
adopt and complete these improvements at once. 

The West End Branch is the best equipped of all, probably 
because it is the most recent. The marked success in re- 
modellmg this old church for library purposes, suggests the 
propriety of the city securing one of the churches in Charles- 
town for a like experiment. The church on Monument 
square is the most centrally and conveniently located, is now 



. LiBEAEY Depaetjveent. 93 

vacant, and probably could be purchased at a very reasonable 
price, and could at small expense be converted into a light, 
airy and convenient library building. 

An increased use of the branches and consequent relief to 
the Central Library will, we think, be found to follow an 
increase of reading matter and better accommodations for 
their readers ; and if the appropriation at the disposal of the 
Trustees will admit of larger expenditure for these purposes, 
a larger circulation and a larger attendance in branch reading- 
rooms would doubtless result. What seemed the ample 
space of the West End Branch is often crowded and among 
the items of mcreased expense to be first considered should 
be the moderate cost of furnishing a section of its gallery for 
a juvenile department — giving to adults the exclusive use 
of the main floor. An opportunity exists to greatly increase 
the efficiency of the West Roxbury Branch at a small ex- 
pense by adding an unoccupied and now useless room to its 
contracted quarters. In both these cases the need is so ob- 
vious and the first cost so moderate, that nothing but inad- 
equate appropriations that will not admit of adding to the 
cost of administration the compensation of the increase of the 
working force that would be required to manage the larger 
area in use, should postpone the improvements. 

The uniform numbering of the books of all the branches 
which we found in progress is a decided advance over former 
methods. When finished, and every book in any branch 
bears the duplicate number of the same work in any other 
branch, it will be possible to publish a branch library cata- 
logue of works common to all branches, to be supplemented 
by printed cards for the card catalogues of the larger 
collections. 

The delivery stations of the several branches in the out- 
lying districts are widely scattered, their collection of books 
for home reading must of necessity be limited, and it often 
happens that a resident of a district where a station is sit- 
uated who desires a work from the Central Library comes 
from a considerable distance to apply for it, and comes again 
the succeeding day only to find that it has not been received 
at the station. The expenditure of time and energy may 
have been material, but when the object of both visits has 
been accomplished, such expenditure is but the fair share of 
sacrifice and exertion of the student or reader. A house to 
house delivery of books called for, by the teams or messengers 
of the city, would be too expensive to be seriously considered. 
But when time is expended and distance travelled, only to 
ascertain that the book applied for could not be obtained and 



94 City Document No. 21. 

that another trial must be made, more than the fair share of 
work is put upon tlie applicant if a method can be devised 
that will save the waste of what may be valuable time. It 
seems to the committee that, without expense to the depart- 
ment and with but little trouble to the custodians of branches 
or stations, a very simple method will meet the requirements 
of a case where the delivery of a book applied for must for 
any cause be delayed. Postal cards printed in proper form 
for the iilling of blanks could be furnished those in charge of 
library work ; these could be paid for and properly addressed 
by any persons desiring their use, who, when the desired 
volume reached the station, would receive by mail notice of 
the fact of its arrival and that the book applied for awaited 
their call. 

The Committee on Finance reports as follows: 

The committee finds that the system of auditing and pa}?- 
ment of bills is a good one, and that the salaries and expenses 
for the past year have been satisfactory. 

A system of checks has been introduced into the printing 
and binding department that Allows instant detection of any 
loss or waste of material, and points to where such loss has 
occurred. 

The committee recognizes that, in the not distant future, 
the Central Library will have to be enlarged. Although the 
Central Library has been in use but five years the demand 
made upon it has exceeded anticipation, and in some respects 
the building is already inadequate in space. 

The stack room is rapidly being filled. Its total present 
capacity is 500,000 volumes. It contained on January 31, 
1898, 410,007 volumes. The increase by accession the past 
three years was 47,341 volumes. The increase for the year 
1897-98 was 16,344 volumes. With the present ratio of in- 
crease the stack limit will be reached in little more than four 
years. It would seem wise to be prepared to meet the demand 
in advance. 

There are two pieces of property, probably available, in the 
rear of the library, either of which would be ample and each 
has merit. 

The one, facmg on Blagdon street, consists of a block of 
six houses, giving an area of 13,250 sq. ft., which is 
assessed with buildings, for -$153,000. This property is on 
the side with the present stack room. 

The other is the property facing Boylston sti-eet at the 
corner of Exeter street, owned by Harvard L^niversity. It 
contains an area of 33,000 sq. ft., and is assessed with 
building, for $264,000. This latter property already contains 
a building that could be used with advantage by the Library 



LiBKARY Depart:s[ent. 95 

for its more popular side, and thus much relieve the present 
building. 

While this need is not an absolute necessity the present 
year, the committee would recommend its early serious con- 
sideration. 

As to the branches, the Finance Committee confined itself 
to four. While the other branches are well taken care of in 
the matter of buildings, these four, in great contrast to the 
others, are sadly in need of new library buildings. 

First, and by far the most needed in the way of new build- 
ings, is a new branch library building in East Boston. We 
coincide with the report of the Examining Committee for the 
past two years when it says that " this branch is unfortunate 

(a) in its room, which is dull and dingy by day, poorly lighted 
by night and unattractive and ill-ventilated all the time; 

(b) in its material equipment, botli of books and furniture; 

(c) in its surroundings, being over a municipal court-room 
and opposite a police station; and (d) in its location with 
reference to the centre of the population it is meant to 
serve." 

East Boston, by its isolated geographical position, is entitled 
to a well-equipped library, yet it has at present the poorest 
library accommodations of any locality of its size in the State. 

The Charlestown Branch is inadequately provided for in 
unsuitable rooms over a police-station. 

The South Boston Branch is in rooms whose rent is $2,500 
per annum, the equivalent of 3% on a principal of $88,000. 
The city should own its own library buildmg here. 

The South End Branch is in the High School building, 
and must soon vacate to make room for the needs of the 
school. This branch should be located nearer Washington 
street. 

In view of the obvious need in these four districts for new 
buildings, we would recommend that the city government be 
petitioned for an appropriation of $400,000 for the purpose 
of building and equipping these four new buildings. A simi- 
lar appropriation of |500,000 has been recently granted to the 
School Committee for the erection of four new high schools, 
and its wisdom has been approved. It would seem that these 
much-needed educators and adjuncts to the schools, the libra- 
ries, should be similarly favorably considered. 

While the Central Library building has been generously 
considered in the very recent past, the branches have not 
received any consideration bej^ond their routine expenses for 
many years. It would seem that before any large amount is 
again spent on the central building, the much-needed new 
branches should be provided for. 



96 City Document No. 21. 

The various branches present opjDortunities for generously 
disposed persons who wish to benefit their fellow-citizens, 
and at the same time leave a memorial to their efforts, to 
establish a modern library building, in Avhole or in part, this 
building or part of building, to be named for the donor, as is 
Bates Hall or the Ticknor or Barton libraries among the 
various book collections. 

We recommend such disposition to those whose means and 
desires allow such action as an excellent method of benefit- 
ing, for many years to come, their fellow-citizens in the 
locality in whose midst they reside; and to such others who, 
although they may not live in one of these districts, may 
desire to furnish a much-needed benefit to a chosen locality. 
An excellent example has recently been set along the line of 
public benefaction by Mrs. Ahl, of the Back Bay District, 
who bought, furnished and presented to the citj^ of Boston a 
gymnasium in East Boston. 

While it has been a custom among public-spirited citizens 
of means to endow schools and colleges, these very necessary 
adjuncts to education, the libraries, have seldom been remem- 
bered in Boston to the extent of a new building or part of a 
building. 

The Sub-Committee on Administration reports as fol- 
lows : 

The investigations of the committee have confirmed its 
belief in the capacity and faithfulness of the Trustees — and 
that the money expended on the Boston Public Library lias 
been wisely used. Among scholars it has a world-wide repu- 
tation. To strangers, aside from our historic places, it is the 
chief attraction of our city. In the value of its books it far 
exceeds the Library of Congress — and by reason of wise pur- 
chases that value is constantly increasing. The internal 
arrangements of the Library building are far from ideal, but 
the recent changes, not yet completed, at least mitigate obvi- 
ous defects and add to its efficiency. The calls for books 
will be more quickly answered. The time of the reader will 
be saved. 

The Children's Department has been greatly improved. 
Their rights have been secured witliout serious detriment to 
their elders. 

The ventilation of the building has been made better. 

The courtesy of the employees is Avorthy of commendation. 

The condition of the Librarj^ is one of progressive improve- 
ment. 

So long as perfection is unattainable there is always room 
for criticism. But the sentiment which found expression in 



Library Departjseent. 97 

the founding of the Library is still strong, and the faith of 
the people in its future is unfaltering. "No entertainment is 
so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting," says Lady 
Montague. 

"Books," saj-s Cicero, "are the food of 3-outh, the delight 
of old age, the ornament of prosperity, the refuge and com- 
fort of adversity." 

" If the riches of both Indies," says Fenelon, " if the crowns 
of the kingdoms of Europe were laid at my feet, in exchange 
for my love of reading, I would spurn them all." These 
seem extravagant words. They exhaust the language of 
eulogy. But riches and crowns are but adventitious and inci- 
dental possessions. They are only the frame of the picture. 
He who loves to read has a shield against calamity. The 
inequalities of life are hard to bear. But the Public Library 
tolerates no inequality. It dispenses its benefits with an even 
hand. Within its walls all are noble ; there is no peasantry. 
It is a republic and all are sovereigns — there are no subjects. 
To this temple its worshippers should come with clean hands 
and pure thoughts. Books are no longer chained. Emerson 
said that the colleges, while they provide us with libraries, 
furnish no professors of books, and no chair is so much needed. 

The Boston Public Library is open to no such criticism. 
The Librarian is not a mere custodian. To that office belongs 
the higher duty of assisting readers in their use. 

The more a book is read the more valuable it becomes. Of 
all useless things the most useless is an unread book. 

In the time of Queen Anne, INIacaulay tells us that a shop- 
keeper or a farmer who found any pleasure in literature was 
a rarity. To-day a taste for reading is well-nigh universal. 
Over 2,000,000 persons enter the various departments of the 
Library daring the year. So universal is this taste that we 
are apt to forget that it needs direction. Omnivorous read- 
ing is not wise reading. A cultivated is better than an onmiv- 
orous taste. Desultory reading is mental dissipation. It 
does not promote mental growth. We cannot commend too 
highly the courtesy and intelligence of the Librarian and his 
assistants in their wise endeavor to render all possible aid to 
readers of all capacities who come to the Library for " light 
and leading." 

The reports of the respective sub-committees were ac- 
cepted and adopted by the Committee. 

(Signed.) Alfred Hemenway, 

Chairman. 
(Signed.) Elizabeth F. Parkkr, 

Secretary. 



APPENDICES. 



1898. 



LIST OF APPENDICES. 



Page. 
I. Financial Statejient . . . . . .101 

II. Extent oe the Library by Years . . .125 

III. Net Increase of the Several Depart3ients, 

including Branches . . . . .126 

IV. Classification : Central Library . . . 129 
V. Classification: Branches. [Omitted in 1898- 

99] 130 

VI. Eegistration ....... 130 

VII. CiRCLLATION ....... 134 

VIII. Trustees for Forty-seven Years. Librarians, 136 

IX. Examining Committees for Forty-seven Years, 138 

X. Library Service (March 31, 1899), including 

Sunday and Evening Schedule . . . 141 

XI. Graded System of Service .... 152 

XII. Correspondence, Bequests, etc. . . .156 

XIII. Givers, and Amount cf Gifts . . . .161 

XIV. Orders of City Colncil, and Memorandum of 

Petitions, etc. ...... 196 



LiBRAEY Department. 101 



APPENDIX I. 



Finance. 



Boston Public Library, 
Auditing Department, February 1, 1899. 
To the Trustees: 

Gentlemen, — The undersigned herewith presents a statement 
of the receipts and expenditures of the Library Department for 
the financial year commencing February 1, 1898, and ending 
January 31, 1899; also a statement concerning the trust and 
other funds, statements covering special appropriations, and a 
statement of expenditures on account of the branches for the 
twelve years ending 1898-99. 

Respectfully, 

A. A. Nichols, 



Auditor, 



Receipts. 

Balance from 1897-98 . . . $356 89 

Appropriation, 1898-99 . . . 245,000 00 
Transfer hy City Auditor, January 

31, 1899 . ' . . . . 1,498 98 



Income from Trust funds : 

Balance from 1897-98 . . . $4,868 00 

During the j'ear .... 11,306 67 



$246,855 87 



16,174 67 



London accounts : 

Balance in hands of J. S. Morgan 
& Co., February 1, 1898 :' 
Trust funds income $14,628 19 
Cit}' appropria- 
tion, $12,573 92 
Interest, 311 39 

12,885 31 

During the year : 

Interest . . 460 18 

$27,973 68 

Balance in hands of Baring Bros. 

& Co., February 1, 1898^. . 72 75 



28,046 43 



Carried forward . . .... $291,076 97 



102 City Document No. 21. 

Brovght forte ard . . . . . .$291,07697 

Donations : 

From W. C. Todd, unexpended 

February 1, 1898 . . . §310 04 

From Woman's Education Associa- 
tion, unexpended February 1, 

1898 1 87 

From Boston Numismatic Societ}', 300 00 

From Elizabeth Lewis : 
Unexpended Feb- 
ruary 1, 1898 . S8 50 
Duriuo- the year . 200 26 

208 76 



From sundry sources for the pur- 
chase of photographs : 
Unexpended February 1, 1898 . 
From Old South Church Society . 
From Lilian Whiting . 



85 


21 


30 


00 


25 


00 



960 88 



Exchange account : lost l)ooks, sales of duplicates, 
etc. : 
Balance from 1897-98 . . . $1,036 42 

During the j^ear .... 335 36 

1,371 78 

Interest on bank deposit ..... 1,600 61 



$295,010 24 



Expenditures. 

Genei'al liln-ary accounts, including 
the cost of maintaining branches : 
Salaries : 

General administra- 
tion . . .$128,109 74 
Sunday and evening- 
force . . ^ 17,166 98 



;145,276 72 



Books : 

City appropriation . $17,197 33 
Income from Trust 

Funds . . . 11,837 71 

29,035 04 

Periodicals 5,900 06 

Newspapers : 

Income from Todd 

Fund . . . $1,836 40 

Balance from 1897-98, 310 04 



2,146 44 



Carried forward . . . $182,358 26 $295,010 24 



Library Department. 



103 



Brought forioard . 
Binding : 

Salaries . . . $12,607 57 

Stock . . . 1,499 48 
Equipment . . 419 66 

Contract work $2,918 46 
Contract worlv. 



$182,358 26 $295,010 24 



(British patent oaq a a 
specifications. ) ouj '±'± 








- 3,287 90 














17,814 


61 


Printing : 




Salaries . 


$4,806 19 






Stock 


2,601 24 






Equipment 


1,068 02 






Contract work . 


1,547 31 










10,022 


76 






Furniture and fixtures . 




5,931 


74 


Gas .... 




1,825 


14 


Electric lighting . 




1,968 


74 


Cleaning 




7,404 


85 


Small supplies 




2,416 


13 


Stationery . 




2,023 


91 


Rents : Branch Libraries and Read- 






ing-rooms 


. 


5,600 


00 


Fuel .... 


, 


6,789 


78 


Repairs : stock and contract work, 


7,079 


41 


Freights and cartage 


. 


751 


66 


Transportation between Central Li- 






brary, Branches and 


Delivery 






Stations . 




3,573 


17 


Delivery stations, service 




4,030 


40 


Water-rates 




1,718 


60 


Telephone service 




334 


60 


Postage and telegrams . 




1,054 


52 


Typewriting . . . 




261 


83 


Travelhng expenses 




495 


90 


Advertising . 




326 


75 


Examination of accounts 




300 


00 


Insurance . 




135 


00 


Grounds 




2 


40 


Books : E. Lewis gift . 




208 


75 


Books : Old South Church Society 






gift .... 




30 


00 


Books for West End Branch : 






Woman's Education Association 






gift . 


. 


1 


87 


Books : Boston Numismatic Society 






gift . 


• 


62 


87 



Carried forioard 



$264,523 65 $295,010 24 



104 City Document No. 21. 

Brought forward . . . $264,523 65 $295,010 24 

Photographs, subscription gift . 43 00 

Exchange account : 

Refunded for books returned . 13 39 

264,580 04 



Balance $30,430 20 

The balance is made up of the following items, viz. : 
Cash in City Treasury : 

Income from Trust Funds $7,903 26 

Cash on deposit in London : 

In hands of J. S. Morgan & Co. : 

Trust Funds . . $9,473 12 

General Funds . . 9,717 72 

Photograph Fund . 42 21 

$19,233 05 



In hands of Baring Bros. & Co. : 

General Funds .... 72 75 



Cash on deposit with New EngVind 

Trust Co. : 
Unexpended of donations carried 

to account of 1899-1900 : 
Boston Numismatic Society . 
Lilian Whiting .... 
Elizabeth Lewis .... 

Exchange account : lost books, etc. 
Interest on bank deposit 



19,305 80 



1237 13 




25 00 




01 






262 14 
1,358 39 






1,600 61 



$30,430 20 



Library Department. 



105 



GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Comparative statement for fiscal years ending Jaimary 81, 1896, 1897 and 1898. 



1895-96. 



1896-97. 



1897-98. 



Salaries : General administration — 
" Sunday and evening force. 

Binding : Salaries 

Stock 

" Contract work 

" Equipment 

Books 

Periodicals 

Furniture and tixtures 

Gas 



Electric lighting and power 

Water-rates 

Telephone service 

Expense : Miscellaneous 

" Cleaning 

Printing : Equipment 

" stock 

" Contract work 

" Salaries 

Stationery and Library supplies. 
Fuel 



Rents '. 

Repairs : Stock and contract work 

" Salaries 

Transportation, postage, etc 

Transportation between Central Library and 

Branches 

Rent of deliveries, including Custodians' 

services 



§93,904 80 

11,130 60 

10,626 87 

•2,406 14 

1,718 54 



18,231 86 
5,307 49 
8,428 84 
1,729 76 
4,758 42 
595 00 
480 11 
3,894 54 
3,870 55 
5,300 00 
1,012 92 
4,960 44 
485 00 
3,200 40 
6.192 07 
6,285 48 
1,987 29 
2,699 00 
3,769 25 

3,285 43 

2,347 25 



$113,004 21 

17,558 07 

11,847 64 

1,504 61 

1,420 72 

488 75 

25,040 32 

6,049 10 

1,195 78 

1,790 90 

1,.576 85 

1,374 50 

390 72 

1,473 76 

4,612 68 

2,774 89 

4,301 64 

1,517 10 

3,761 99 

3,996 26 

6.585 01 

4,884 00 

3,689 24 

2,049 83 

1,969 13 

3,562 25 

3,105 38 



§119,698 26 

17,386 11 

11,960 65 

1,623 17 

3,802 11 

296 53 

26,486 83 

6,435 76 

1,871 42 

1,673 58 

1,991 03 

1,455 80 

355 45 

858 33 

5,424 92 

4,100 97 

1,337 97 

1,331 97 

4,651 67 

3,973 98 

9,123 03 

5,215 00 

2.507 58 

2,411 42 

3,086 36 

3,491 04 

3,990 85 



$208,608 05 



$231,525 33 



$246,541 79 



KOTE. — Gross expenditure for the year 1895-96 includes payments made from the 
balance of the special appropriation for " moving expenses, $6,341.12," distributed 
among the api)ropriate items, and payments from the revenue from the old Library 
Buiidiug for the West End and Mattapau Branches. 

The cost of maiutaiuiiig the branches makes part of the general items of the several 
appropriations : 



Cost of Branches, 1895-96 
Cost of Branches, 1896-97 
Cost of Branches, 1897-98 



$47,997 23 
62,785 39 
58,282 49 



Amount expended for books is for liills paid out of the city appropriation only. 
The amount expended for books and liinding (not included above) paid from trust 
funds and city money in hands of Loudon bankers: 



For 1895-96 
For 1896-97 
For 1897-98 



$9,516 29 
9,590 82 



106 



City Document No. 21. 



gejSTERAl appropriation. 

Expenditure for fiscal year ending January 31, 1899. 



1898-99. 


$128,109 74 


17,166 98 


12,607 57 


1,499 48 


2,918 46 


419 66 


14,188 45 


5,898 24 


5,931 74 


1.825 14 


1,968 74 


2,416 13 


7,404 85 


1,068 02 


2,601 24 


1,547 31 


4,806 19 


2,023 91 


261 88 


6,789 78 


5,600 00 


7,079 41 


751 66 


3,573 17 


4,030 40 


495 90 


1,054 52 


1,718 60 


334 60 


300 00 


326 75 


135 00 


2 40 


$246,855 87 



Salaries : General administration — 
" Sunday and evening force 

Binding : Salaries 

Stock 

" Contract work , 

" Equipment 

Books 

Periodicals 

Furniture and fixtures 

Gas 



Electric lighting 

* Supplies , 

Cleaning 

Printing: Equipment 

Stock 

" Contract work 
" Salaries 

* Stationery 

Typewriting 

Fuel 



Rents 

Repairs 

Freights and cartage 

Transportation between Centi-al Library and Branches. 

Delivery stations 

Travelling expenses 

Postage and telegrams 

Water-rates 

Telephone service 

Examination of accounts 

Advertising 

Insurance 

Grounds 



The cost of maintaining the branches makes part of the general items of the several 
appropriations : 

Cost of Branches, 1898-99 $59,913 71 

The amount expended for newspapers, books, and binding (not included above) 
paid from trust funds and city money in hands of London bankers : 

For 1898-99 $8,782 84 

The amount expended for books (not included above) paid from 
ti'ust funds in hands of City Treasurer $8,271 41 

* These items cannot be compared with the similar items of the three preceding 
years, because the classification has been changed to agree with that adopted by the 
City Auditor. 



Library Department. 107 

Special Appropriations. 
Library Building, Dartmouth street, balance of 

appropriation, February 1, 1898 . . . $76,430 62 

Appropriation, May 27, 1898 (Chapter 475, Acts 

1898) 100,000 00 

Payments on account of alterations : 

Masonry, Connery <fc Wentworth 

Iron work, Smith & Lovett 

Ventilating system, Lynch & Wood- 
ward ...... 

Electrical work, Public Buildings 
Department .... 

Architects' services, A. S. Jenney 
and T. A. P^ox .... 

Expert service in heating and ven- 
tilating, S. Homer Woodbridge . 

Decorating, Elmer E. Garnsey 

Plumbing, Isaac N. Tucker 

Carriers, Lamson Store Service 
Company ..... 

One hand lift ..... 

Carpentry and small items 

Balance, February 1, 1899 . 

The balance will be required to settle outstanding contracts 
and claims. 

Library Building, furnishing, balance of city appro- 
priation, February 1, 1898 .... $15,730 01 
Payments on account : 

Mellish & Byfield Company 

J. H. Pray, Sons & Co. . 

A. B. & E. L. Shaw, designs for 

furniture 
Foster Brothers 
Sundry small accounts 

2,393 80 







$176,430 


62 


844,291 

6,487 


85 
00 






6,053 


44 






3,541 


03 






1,871 


41 






948 

1,550 

719 


95 
00 
10 






670 
125 

56 


00 
00 

84 


66,314 


62 








$110,116 


00 



. $1,415 


40 


513 


36 


242 


77 


115 


00 


107 


27 



Balance, February 1, 1899 .... $13,336 21 

Branch Library, Broadway Extension, improve- 
ments, balance of appropriation, February 1, 
1898 .' . $3,989 56 

Payments on account : 

Books $457 48 

Periodicals . . . . . 31 05 

Furniture and fixtures . . . 36 65 

Repairs . . . . . . 7 50 

532 68 



Balance, February 1, 1899 .... $3,456 88 



108 



City Document No. 21. 



LONDON ACCOUNTS. 



Balances 

from 
1897-98. 



Interest, 
1897-99. 



Total 
Credits. 



Expendi- 
tures, 
1898-99. 



Balances 

to 

1899-1900. 



J. S. Morgan & Co., 

J. S. Morgan & Co., 
Interest 

J. S. Morgan & Co., 
photograph fund, 

Baring Bros. & Co., 



i.- s. d. 
5,597 13 11 



8 13 11 
15 



f 
159 1 9J 



5,756 15 8 



8 13 11 
15 



4- s. d. 

1,807 3 6 



£• s. d. 
3,949 12 2 



8 13 11 
15 



5,621 7 10 i 159 1 9 5,780 9 7 1,807 3 6 I 3,973 6 1 



Library Department. 



109 



2 


O r-( 


,^ 


xo rj 






CO 


o 






0<N C^OOOCO -MOrt o 


ii 


i3:o COOOCO »> t- I.- 


^^CO OlCOiC -^ 00 ^t 




rH_M_ OT-^ICOT ^ 


U 




o"(« l-''M"!M"rt 








*■ 


to 










g^ 


i?J O t- -H X 




^ t~o mc~=; 




^^ 


« 00 00^ ;o 




OCX) o t-*oo o 




-* M lO ^ "M 




Or- cox ->> O 




■SSE 






^ -^ O O CO 




'OS 


5? M_co ea o 








flS 


«5"(N":oar 








a> . 


O "* 








■^3 


«9. ^1 








« 












(M^Ht-.t^:;30Ci-»#t^.— ccooo 




a;O00CCi0OMO00fflC-OOO 


•-^ iS 


OOlA-^C^OXOrHlOXOOO 


oSS 


eocQiot-ooooi-i xooto->> 


■g-o 


-*t-QOi-(c:iOMeo "r^TO 








to lO CD X ;^ (M i-H 


i^^Si^ 




«■ 


00 


o 


























.2 


o 


" 


























o 


CO 
























S 




























o 


•* 
























p. 


§" 


»" 
■^ 
























o 




c^ 
























u 


^ 


























Ji, 




























^ 




























«!) 




























^. == =s 












t- 






» 


oo 








-J5 




CJ 






•N 


oo 


g-a^S 








» 










o 


o in 








o 










o 


CO (?1 


|||| 








CO 




CO 






OJ 




M o 5P^ 










































OJ fl 






















«•" 






















X 


(M^cnoccooiiit^i-ioO' 






15 


CDOGOOOO-^OQOO'llCO 






OClSOOcnOCOOrHuCXO 






flg 


CC rO IC O 00 O CO I-" GO o 






^_t-_^CC TOOl^lC O^CO CO 
















COlO Vco'lM'r-T 














B5 


^ 






^ 






























c 




























02 


-»J 


























-M 


a> 


























a 




























OJ 


CO 




























03 




























^ 


























a; 


03 


























> 


o 


























o 




























^ 




























ft 


3 


























.5 
























































a 


o 


























o 


CO 


















Qi 






d 


« 


















OJ 






"rt 


















iH 






dl 


to 


fl 














to 






y. 


to" 


o^ 












5!* 




» 




S CO 












= 9 




>^ 


o 


•7? ft 


>^ 








23 






;= 


§2 

m bo 


■o.£ 






II 




-^ 0) CO 
c=^ O 


<2 






.2.S£ 


2 21- 

r- CO >■ +^ 


- 2 
oft 


CO o 

S25 


) 




p^a-c^ g^dafe J sGc 








= £S£gSK^-=.2~§Si= 






1- 


H 


c: 


&■ 


p: 


PC 


^ 


p 


IS 


[i 


f^ 


p: 


c 


h- 





. UO fM iC O lO f-H 

; o X ■* o o: X 



■ — I « CO o «o Ol 



^ r> 00 X X O Ol ' 

pq X .^ 



~ i) 

521 



to to ^ ((_( p 

s-c 5 o o 
a !-. o •" 

be ci .Si oi , 
to = "-"!P^ 

.2 ^ o oj 3 o 



110 



City Document No. 21. 



® H 
O ft 



Q 

&^ 
H 

P 

H 

O 

H 

H 
< 
H 

CA2 



rH CO CC CO 



^ ^ ■*. 



^H 3D CO -r^ t^ O I.' o 

OOt}<00<»C2CO«CO 



-H — I lO lO 



SO) 



o o o 



O w o 



coo 



o o o 



o o o 






ff 






































o 






























■re 










00 


yl 


'M 


i" 


— 






c 




i^ 












»~" 




""SE 




^ 








^* 






— 


^ 






3^ 




^^ 


'^^ 


lO 


TT 


a=? 
















































































































005 


N 


CI5 


































«2 


9if 




































'"rJ 






































« 






























































--^-■> 


^^ 














^ 




O 


— 


— 


o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


o 


^3 


-^ 


— , 


^ 


^ 


^^ 




o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




o 




O 


O 


^ 






^ 


^ 


^ 




C; 








(3 








o 


O 


















































o 
















C' 


o 














































o 




o 
















o 






^ 










































;-l 


€& 


































^ 




































95 


































j' 


» 




































3 


O 


.2" 
n 

o 


0) 

a 

0) 

ci 

s 


o 


s 


c 
o 

00 

a 
o 

cj 


■J 
H 
a 
W) 

o 
a 




3 
3 

a 


a 

a 

o 


c 

c 

p: 

c 


■ £ 

I 1 

!i 


2 
"3 

o 

a. 
d 


M 
S 


"3 

ci 

H 
"3 
'S 
5 




o 

sa 

o 

? 




-; 


^ 


cc 


-*■ 


.-• 


tc 


I 


' 


00 


o 


o' 




: 2 


^ 


^ 


S 


2 


if 



LiBEARY Department. 



Ill 



O O i-H o 



1— I :o as 00 



■g S 



fo o 



S '3 



112 



City Document No. 21. 



, 


i_« 


_ 




lo 


M< Z 




-^ 


[ 


- uO 3 


5 1 -^ 


- 


^ ^ 


4 ^ 


J 1^ 


c» 


— 


^ 




; CO 




- I 




r ic 


r* O = 


CO 


3 


5 -^ C^ 


3 tr- 


C) 


Zi 


;, 


I V 


5 35 




1 -^ c- 


1 o 


o r 


5 If 


-^ 


— 


5 O w 


S CO 


QO 




"9 -^ 


H X 


X I^ c 






•^ 1 CO 






' ^. 


o 


X ./ 






2 X - 


t s_ 








:. 'I, 






^ 


































00 


















CO 


OJ 1 CO 








^1 


«^ 






* 


^ 




4» 


^ 




1* 


%& 




m 


OS 


^ 


o i: 


« 


o o 


1 If 


t- 


X in c^ 


1 1- 


oq i-H -^ 

01 r-l O 


' t— 


o 




J c 




t 


CO o 


1 01 




5 t"- 




1 X 


5 in 




0-- 


CO w 


^ I'S 


•o CO a 


J X 


O CO f-H 1 CO 


in CO If 


S CO 




-^ 


■J ■- 


3 ->< 


<M t 


- l- 






- CO t^ X 


-* -^ ir 


s --s* 


C» 




I 


t- 


CO 


50 X r- 


1 ^ 


-^ --3- 3 


- ^ 


X CO a 


D CO 


00 








































•*" 


CO 




" l~^ 


CO 


O^ 1 CO 


o 








^ 


^ 






«■ 


« 




f» 


<» 




1 4» 


"=& 




iff 


^ 


^ 


X ?: 


' =2 


O X w 


, ^ 


o< o o 1 ^ 


T-l O O 


-J 35 


o 


C5 


CO iT 


-<ji CO c; 


; -^ 




O 3 


-. I- 


in i-i t 


- CO 


1 


,_^ 


O C 


_4 


oo c 


; ^ 


'i 01 


[~ 


Ol X 1 X 


OC CO If 


1 o 


CO 


c; 


!?» C 




o ^ 




5 -M 


M< CO 1- 




o in c 


5 O 


a> 


-/D 


C3 t~ 




^ X a 




-* CO c: 


'- "^^ 


O O) c 


1 «. 


00 












































^ 1-H « 


: 35 










■T in" 


0r 






«^ 


«■ 




^ 


* 




•* 


* 




m 




X 


fj- ir 


l^ 


m ICS CI 


;o 




, ^ 




01 




■^ r-< ^ 


i CD 


^ 




■-fl 


O) 


•^ t" 


l- 


o 


O .). ,- 






5 3 


5 C 


5 O 


1 


'l' 


* 




•■o 


O X -i 


^ OJ 


■-I 00 c 


> o 


t^ in c/ 


3 t^ 


KS 




-1> c 


~p 


-* cs o 




CO If: c 




35 C^ 


5 .- 


; -«< 


05 


X^ 


X :; 






1 X s 


l-~- 




^ c 


; c 


'- ^. 




: c/ 


J O 




00 


C-l" 






-T* 


c^" 


c 


i-T 


co" 


w 


r co" 


of 




■^ 


^ 


«- 






* 


¥f 




^ 


«■ 




«. 


* 




m- 




^ 


^^ 


J- 


_^ 




f. 




5 » 


ip 35 O 




X •« 


B If 


3 t^ 


CO 


X 1- 


CO 


O CO o 


■n 




5 -Tj^ r- 


H in 


X CO c 


5 O 


1 


>o 


— 




a> 


•-H ^H O 


' o 


/^ 


) •* c; 


■ ^ 


CO CO c: 


5 CO 


■* 


CO 


O Sv 








-^ 




i> 35 O 


35 O 


» rj 




CS 


00 


CO :; 


X 


e- 


1, '" 






Ol -* If 




m ■«< I 




« 


































ot 






CO 


CO 


w 


1 r- 
















CO 


'^ 


m 






» 


«. 




* 


«■ 




<fr 


& 




«& 


■* 

A 


C5 


t- <x 


cs 




CO -1 


j_ 


in t- 




in 


O O If 


5 in 


■* 


X 1 




CO 




» 


X t- 


If 




(35 O C 


9 0» 


s 


00 


(X> -u 


Ol 


o y 


^ a 


1-, 


rH O t~ 


CO 


1— ' CO If 


5 CO 


©9 


(M 


00 K 




C! l- 






O) C5 if 


t^ 


O X c 


5 35 


a> 


o 


Oi t- 




c: o c^ 


X 


rH CO 3 


-^ 


IM CO 1- 


t CD_ 


00 


































<N 






CO 


o 




c^ 


» 


CO 






O 






h' co" 


T.^ 


«B. 






^ 


* 




m^ 


* 




m 


«■ 




* 


09 


C5 


CS IT 


CO 


rH O t- 


^ 


o c; 


^ c 


CO 


CO lO 3 


5 t- 


•* 


t^ 


c 


CO 


i-H lO If 


Ol 


CO Ol o 




X rt cx 


3 X 


00 


CO t- 


C5 


O CO -) 


t^ 


-•V 


1 ^ c 


CO 


0! 


D 35 -< 


l< (M 


»1 


X 


rl IT 


o 


X X ir 




X l- 




CO 


O X t- 


t^ 


A 


m 


o c- 


x_ 


CO I- 


- c 


01 






■^ 


CO_ CO 3 


5 01_ 


00 


'^l" 






CO 


CO 




t-^ 


Ci*^ 


o 


CO* 


o 






^ 


^ 


* 






^ 


«& 




^ 


«■ 




«> 


* 




«• 




o 


X i: 


-* 


lO o c 


o 


in If 


Zf 


CO 


X I- 


^ 


; X 






c 


l^ 


C5 X S- 


o 


CO t- 


■^ 


in 


rH rH C 


: « 


1 o 


X 


J, 


'^ 


— . 


CO l- 


c- 


t^ 




^ 




05 


o in c- 


» X 


•M - 






o 


o o c 




O -* I- 




in t~ t- 


- 35 


Oi - 


00 


■* t; 


C5_ 


CO__ I- 






*v "* - 


"^ 


35_ CO 0! 


3 ""l. 


00 35 








im" 


(m" 


Cl- 


co" 


oT 


g. 


in 






CO 


TH 


s 






«. 


«■ 




■» 


* 




m 


s 




«> 


OS 


CO 


o c 


00 


o :o t- 


CO 


C5 -* l- 


o 


Ol X Ci 


5 CD 


X 


m c- 




tO Tjl U- 


o 


CO 3 


o 


35 


in t- 


- a 


3 r-( 


; 1 


c^ 


uj r 


^ 


-^ 00 c^ 


o 


■* M If 


^ 


X -^ a 


^ (M 


O 


^ 








O ^ l- 




If 






M 


CO O CI 


5 il< 


1 OS 


o 


N - 


00 


3S_ ^ f- 


ih 




_ ^ I- 


CO 




3 N 


1 00 


im" 






CO 


of 


ef 


S 






(^ 


co" 


-^ 






•* 


1 ^ 


«= 






* 


* 




¥f 


«. 




^ 


_* 




«©■ 


i 


u^ 


. 


„ 


C-. 


« X :; 


,, 


,. 


-t* y- 


Ol 


,, 


. ,_ 


- 


5 in 


*-< 


"> 


c 


n 


rl O r- 


CO 


-* CO - 


't 


CO CO o 


5 O 




C5 


CTi ^r 


o 


t- 


- OS X 


1^ 


CO t- 




X 


CO CO ^ 


C! 


OS 




CO oc 




ic n 


^ 




CO if 






(M X 


i~ 




CO 


to_ 


CO 'S 


-* 


o_ 3 t- 


^_ 


CO^ -rj* ^ 


01 


co__ in X 


3 0_ 


ao 


^m" 






CO 


co' 


^ 




co" 


o 


co" 


oT 




-*" 


i ^^ 


* 






m^ 


«■ 




* 


* 




^ 


«■ 




m- 


OS 
00 


o 


X 


I^ 


_ 


lO CO o- 


^ 




CO O 


35 


,, 


rH C 


x. 




CJ t- 


-o 


o - 


iT 


o 


O 1> If 


04 


i- 




y 






t- 


-f X 


o 


•* -* c 


C5 


-*> O 3- 


35 


-* (M ^ 


,^ 


00 




X - 


:o 


O I- 










(N 






in 


00 


x_ 


CO ;: 




CO_ l- 




fc 


If 


_ CO 13 




CO__ CO c 




00 


ci" 






co" 


co" 


c- 


1-^ 


Cf 




o. 


t-T 


<n" 




■* 


^* 


4& 






«& 


m 




•^ 


«■ 




«. 


¥f 




^ 


00 
00 


;o 


Ol -^ 


Ol 


y 


. 


c 


o 


X o o 


,_ 


r^ ■* X 


CO 








ot 


C3 — 




-i^ 


in ^ cf 


CO 


O X C 


O) 




X 


^ 




i-O 


o CO a 


X 


-f CO CO 


I^ 


X CO 3 


_l 








oi 




















^ CO C 


05 


ac 






















co_ 


X t- 






oc 
















































CO 




in" 


Ol 






'^ 


* 






sf= 


'f 






* 


* 






» 


^ 




» 




Z ■ 






5 
















Z 












c ; 






H 








>- 








5 












H 






X 








M 




















02 






















H 












; 






^ 








D 








OQ 












M : 






1]] 








?, 








;ij 












H : 






7^ 
















^ 












oc : 


































< 






3 








^^ 








_;; 












'A : 




J_ 


VD 


a 




y 




? 




? 


5 


»■ 




<■- 






a 


■f 






.£ 


y 








-j- 






i 


OC 


c 








^ 








,1^ 


s 






^ 








^ 








— 




















^ 




c; 




z. 






'^ 


z 


^ 






c 






'?. 


5 


>^ 




"3 


C 


y 






'A 


— 


s 




X 


f^ 


\^ 




T. 


f2 


i^ 




M 


fS 


'A 





LiBEAEY Department. 



113 



00 ic a 


^ 




, 


c- 


^, 


,, 


^ 


CD 


,, 


^ 


cc 


-f 


-* 










CO a: r- 


o 


c 


o c^ 


M 


CO 


Ol 


C" 


05 


-^ 


m 


<!3 


Oi 










O CO «c 


^ 


r- <^ 


'^ 


r»5 


!£ 


'^ 




rH 


cc 


IT 


(„ 


2 










CD ■<* 


oc 




o cc 


c^ 


do 




c<- 








C 














(S IS a 


I-- 


t- iO CO 


c» 


^ 


IT 


o- 


00 






cc 


o 


















































(^1 




-ciT 


!M 






CO 


o 






CO 








CO 










» 




«r? 


۩ 




m 


«* 




» 


«» 




«■ 










r- 


■rj 




CO 


^ 


<N 


00 


^ 


r- 


C 


CC 


CO 


m 


t- 


o 


^ 










o- 


IM 


t- 


O) 


cr 


oc 


c 


Ol 


CD 


05 


c- 


CO 


CO 


CO 




& 










,, 


«■! 




-* 


ci; 




,_ 


o> 


05 


CO 


3" 


o 


rH 


CO 


r-i 


CO 












»r: 








c 


CD 


-M 




c^ 




00 


K 


CD 


-* 












^- 




QC 


t-;^ 


cc 


t- 


CD 


o_ 


ci: 


l^ 


CC 


I- 




t- 


X 


t"- 
























'*" 


05 






co" 








CO 










''h 




i» 


» 




«■ 


« 




m 


iff 




m 










in 


CO 


iC 


CO 


CO 


o 


l- 


o 


>o 


s 


^ 


o 


§5 


t- 


CD 


rn 










t^ 




o 


m 


CO 


t- 




CD 


05 


0- 


lO 


05 


05 


•* 










o 


CO 


X 


c^ 


^ 


o 


b- 


02 


^ 


-* 


in 


CO 


03 


-* 


CC 


o 










"^ 


CO 




oi 


o^ 




QO 






CO 


CD 






CO 












o 


o 


c< 


CO 


CO 


S- 


CO 


55 


CO 


6- 


"* 


o 


C 




00 




















































fs 






■*■ 








^" 








•*" 


















m 




«» 


_j& 




» 


۩. 




^ 


۩^ 




m 










o 


o 


05 


OS 


CO 


CO 


ta 


-1* 


CO 


CO 


Od 


■* 


05 


CO 


ip 


Ul 


-^co 


00 


Oi 





o 


o 


00 


00 




o 


tn 




I- 


t- 


CO 


00 


lO 


lO 






t»co 




10 


00 


CO 


^^ 


(N 


^_^ 


,_, 


CD 


o 


1^ 


o 


■* 


I-, 


^ 


CO 


CO 


^5 


C5 


ii 


rH 


cc 


05 


Ci 


•^ 


03 






O 


o 




CO 




CO 


o 




05 


o 




i-H 




00 


00 




IC 


ff5_ 


(M 


00 


t~ 


t-;^ 


OJ 


o 


lO 






l- 


I- 


•^ 




5 


CD^ 








co" 








CO 


cc 






co" 


05 






co" 


£,*• 






» 




» 


4 






^ 


m ' 




m 


^ 




I& 








m^ 


o 


^ 


o 


■^ 


^ 


^_ 


o 


CO 


t~ 


-* 


CO 


03 


t^ 


CD 


o 


CO 


rH 


LO 


Ci 


in 


o 


lO 




CO 


'^ 


o 


o 


^ 


05 




05 


05 


lO 


Ci 




CO 


■* 


CO 




Ci 


<M 


■* 


-^ 


p«, 


I- 


-* 


cc 


C5 


t- 


t- 


^ 


qi 


CO 


o 


Oi 


05 


a 


^1 


a 


Ci 




lO 


00 




CD 


cc 






05 


CD 


CC 




^ 


^ 




CO 




6" 




CD 


(X 


at 


lO 


t-^ 


o 


-^ 


-* 


O 




^ 


CO 




m 


CO 


QO 




ic 




CD 


C-l_ 


















































05 






co" 








CO 








CO 










«a 




«■ 


€& 




1 «. 


a? 






m 


^ 




•» 


9& 




e^ 


,_ 


o 


CO 


_, 


-* 


CO 


o 


^ 


CO 


^ 


00 


05 


tr- 


t- 


>o 


Ci 





-* 


05 


CD 


t- 


00 


(M 


GO 


c» 


CO 




l" 


m 


O 


CO 


CO 


ee 


CO 




t— 










05 


t- 


cs 


00 


CJ 


oo 


,_, 


05 


J<1 


C5 


00 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


■* 


Oi 


X 


01 


Ci 


00 


eJ 


■^ 


iS 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CC 


CO 


OJ 




t— 


CO 


05 


CD 


00 


rj 


in 




^ 




o 




Si 


CO 


CO 






lO 






CD 


05 


o 


Oi 


Cf, 




i- 


















































(N 
















CO 






rH 


05" 








(M 


» 




«■ 


m- 




«©■ 


m 






m 


«. 




«©■ 


_«■ 




«& 


00 


^ 


^ 


o 


CO 


^ 


o 


o 


CO 


t- 


^ 


^ 


f. 


CO 


rH 


rH 





CD 


Oi 


in 


00 


CO 


(M 






o 


cc 




o 


co 


in 


»-* 


05 


00 


»— ' 


Ci 


10 


CD 


>o 




00 


IN 


CO 


o> 


0-1 


rv^ 


CO 


t» 


,_4 


CO 


CO 


05 


-* 


r- 


l-O 


l- 


rH 


a 


in 


in 


ra 






o 


CO 


o- 


o 


lO 


lO 


CO 


CO 




I- 


CD 


<j> 


co 


CO 




CD 


O) 


I' 




t- 


t' 


Ci 


^ 


c- 


o_ 


c<: 


l- 


lO 


3_ 


05 






■*- 


V, 




CO 


























































CO 


ci 














CO 


T- 






05 


^ 




» 


m 




«» 


^ 






m 


m 




^ 


4» 




i» 


t- 


■^ 


m 


o 


Ol 


o. 


K 


t- 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


■* 


•^ 


oo 


10 





05 


f. 


00 


■* 


CO 


t™ 


rH 


Ol 


cc 






O) 


■^ 


CO 


05 


lO 




X 









00 


-* 


^ 


^ 


o 


^^ 


CD 


t— 


^^ 


^ 


•*# 


o 


Ci 


o 




■^ 


CO 


10 


05 





1^ 


V. 






CD 




CC 






^ 






CD 








CO 


05 


in 


Oi 


CO 




(^ 




T(<_ 


CD 


CO 


lO 




iq 


u: 


Oi 


m 


c< 






CD 





05 


0^ 


in 
























































O) 








of 
















05" 


m 




fe 


«• 




m 


€^ 




m 


m 




fe 


_^ 




fff 


o 


■«* 


b- 


^ 


^ 


t— 


CO 


^ 


o 


^ 


CD 


oo 


CO 


lO 


J, 


lO 





CO 


■* 


t- 


s 


-»< 


02 


?— < 


en 


CO 


o 


C5 




00 


-^ 


o 






r-^ 


CO 


10 





CO 




<M 


CD 


&! 


(M 


05 




IC 


00 


CD 


,_l 


05 


rH 


lO 


'^ 


X 


f^ 


CD 


10 




[^ 




05 




CO 


o; 








a 


ff 








t- 


CO 


CO 




00 




05 








00_ 






cz 








s 




CD 


co 


oo 


x_ 








in_ 














































rH 


M 


(M 






~ CO 


05 






CO 








05" 






I-H 


05" 


* 




m 


tf» 




۩ 


^ 




« 


m 




m 


s 




m 


lO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


^ 


s 


_^ 


o 


^ 


00 


03 


00 


lO 


t- 


(, 


Oi 





t- 





^ 


lO 


lO 


ra 


CD 


lO 




t- 


rM 


00 


t- 


t- 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


X 





Ol 


CD 


00 


r-i 


00 


CO 


-* 


■^ 




^ 


1^ 


CO 


in 


co 


05 


-* 


lO 


^ 


-^ 


-*< 


t- 




in 


s 


« 


lO 


CO 


'l' 


c< 




CO 




00 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 




00 


00 


t- 


IC 






cs 


t-;_ 


CO 




CJ 


t-_ 


o: 


'^ 


C5 


CD 


00 


CO 


oc 


o_ 


0: 






in 


















































o- 






CO~ 








CO 








co" 








05" 


«» 




m 


«& 




m 


€n> 




m 


«■ 




» 


_§■ 




<©• 


CI 


o 




o 


o 


o 


CD 


CD 


t- 


05 




CO 


c 


o- 


tn 


rf 







J, 


t- 


CO 


iO 


o 


t- 


00 






•-D 


00 


(N 




05 




co 


tr: 


t^ 






l- 


00 


CO 


-* 


CO 


^ 


IN 


M 


■<*H 


O 


f^ 


O 


o 


r*1 


-H- 




X 


■^ 


CO 


f-^ 


t- 


s 




CD 






05 


t^ 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


\r. 


o 


CO 


-Jl 


05 


00 


\n 


5 


(M 


CO 


t- 


cc 




00 




CO 


ir. 


o: 


t-^ 




cc 


00 


co_ 


a 




0- 


















































c^f 


01 






>* 








CO 








CO 








05 


۩ 




«©■ 


s^ 




«■ 


m 




¥f 


m 




t© 


€©■ 




«©■ 


't 






t- 


c^ 


C3 


CD 


CO 


•^ 


o 


t- 


^ 


ir 


IT 


It- 


tr- 




c 




in 




O 


CD 


05 


a: 


CD 


C5 




CO 


cr 


o- 


l^ 


cr 


Ol 


c- 


io 


5- 




■^ 


in 


CO 




o; 


o 


c 


-* 


*-. 


05 


CO 


,_ 




•* 


T 




^ 





cc 


oc 


t- 


05 




CO 


-p 


o 


^ 


0-. 


CO 




C5 


ir 


o: 


CD 


O 


■r 




00 









00 




CO 






cc 


l- 


CD 






^ 


D- 




CD 




cc 




^ 






QO 
































































CO 


OJ 






-t 










«& 




i» 


«» 




€& 


mf 




(0 


«» 




m 


_^ 




*» 
























g 


















55 

o 






PS 
H 
H 

03 

















< 


















n 
pq 






;4 








M 








-■! 








M 














i 

o 








b 
o 
















« 

































1-5 


















, 




c 




„ 




< 








a 
c 




^ 




a 




„ 




C 

c 




_< 








< 


V 


C 






a 




_c 








a 


J, 




'E 


= 1 


5 


) 


x 


M 


a 






^ 


a 




x 


1 


a 




T 


■^ 


a 




o: 


l^ 


M 


c 


C 


. 




c 


S 


< 


n 


C 


< 


a. 




H 


'^ 


i c 


> 




'^ 


c 


l« 




r 


c 


>< 




"S 


c 


V 




c 


c 


P 




t/ 


! p: 


f' 




!/ 


! PC 


ft 




cr 


P: 


pc 




a 


ec 


f^ 




a 


K 


^ 





Hi 



City Document No. 21. 







o 


lo ^ o; 


O lO CO 00 




Ml 


Ml 




CO 


to 


CD 


CD 




o 


O N 5^1 


O rt CO OS 




o 


O 




M 


Ml 


t^ 


t- 




1 


CO 


I- t^ (M 


CO -H ^ CO 




■■Tl 


Ml 




lO 


IC 


OS 


CO 




<x> 


-* 


to (M ^ 




* CO o cs 




Ml 


Ml 




<N 


!3» 


Ss 


OS 




a> 


■* 




-* 1 35 


^ 


CO 1 oo 






CO 






t^ 


00 






CD 


€& 






^ 


4» 




«■ 




^ 


m 




& 


m 


«• 






fH 
















1 


















H 




CO 


o 


OJ t) 


t^ 


O Its c 


00 




to 


to 




t^ 


t^ 


IC 


~1 




o 


o s 


■» CO 


o e-j r 


-1 CO 




00 


-» 








Ml 


OS 




1 


CO 


Ifl « 


3 C5 


CO t^ L 


■s o 




(?) 


Ol 




Ml 


Ml 


(M 


t- 




t« 




(C u 


s to 


'l- t 




S CO 














CD 


Its 




Ci 






e 


<1 1- 


-^ 




00 




CO 


CO 










at 




IH 


^ 






» 


» 




«© 




» 


«©• 




«&■ 


«©■ 


^ 






0> 


^ 


o c 


■J Ml 


t- iO 


o 




^ 


^ 




t- 


^ 


O 


OS 




o 


lO c 




l-H C3 C 






CO 


CO 




OS 


CS 


Ml 






e 


00 


in 1/ 


s -* 


Ml -"^ Ci 


5 to 




o 


o 




Ml 


Ml 


00 


Ol 




■o 






c 


J to It 


Ml 






(OS 




O 


O 


OS 


»ts 




o 


^ 






cs 


■* c- 




o_ 




CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


lO 


'=1 




00 

1-1 


€» 






■» 


^ 




■» 




» 


^ 




€«■ 


«■ 


m 








o 


o o 


-* 


to 




H O 




Ml 


Ml 




00 


TO 


o 


o 




o 


CO c< 


5 t^ 


cr 


3 


t 


S lO 




CO 


CO 








o 


(3< 




^ 


CO 


•* o 


3 CO 


lO 


« 


3 -M 




O 


o 




00 


CO 


1^ 


^ 




CO 




- to 


o 


c 


I CO 




!N 










t' 






o» 




CI ? 


S CC 


CO 




tl t^ 




CO 


CO 




Ml 


Ml 


CO 


Ml 




00 


^ 






«• 


«■ 




«■ 




«(■ 


■» 




«© 


«■ 


«• 






IH 




































^ 


o 


lO It 


s o 








H ^ 




Its 


lO 




CO 


CO 


l_ 


O 




o 


to 5- 


5 O 








K Ml 




CO 


eo 




00 


00 


OS 


CO 






(M 


CO c 


' !? 






c 


s cs 




CO 


CO 




Oi 


o> 


00 


t^ 




^ 




lO c 










S lO 




lO 


o 




lO 


Its 


CO 






C5 


n 






(< 00 






c< 


S CO 




CO 


CO 




Ml 




CO 






00 


m 






«► 






« 


* I& 




» 


(^ 




m 


«■ 


«- 






1H 








































_; 


^ 


H -"I 


< lO 








; o 


o m 


Its 




o 


o 


o 


G 




o 


CO t- 










[1 Ml 


lO o 


>n 




00 


00 


Its 


O 




g 


c» 


.-1 c> 










H M* 


t- Ml 


^H 




,_( 


^H 


CD 


Its 




CO 


I 




CO 








S CO 


O 00 


CC 






t^ 


(M 


CO 




e> 


c^ 






5 Oi 








S CO 


^ I— 1 






CO 




CO 






QC 


^ 






«■ 






« 


» m 






0^ 




i» 


^ 


^ 






"^ 




































OS 


o 


^ c 


> t- 






^ 


t c-t 


o urs 


lO 




(M 


(31 


o 








o 


<^ 


^ 


K to 






C' 


S CO 


O i-H 






CO 


CO 


oo 








1 


c^ 


to Tj 


h ^1 








H ^H 


O 00 


00 




OS 


OS 


o 








ei 




Its It 


: oi 








H Ml 


(31 to 






CO 


CO 


Ml 








OS 


CO 














3 CO 


■M (M 


cs 




CO 


CO 










00 


m 






«• 






a 


» «. 


tf* 


^ 




» 


» 


«& 














































. --^ 








































o 


t- c 








t- 


- c; 


to >o 








Ml 


o 








o 


>o c~ 


1 t^ 






c 




lO Ml 


o 




c 


O 


lO 








o 


CO c 


s ^^ 








3 to 


1 


Ml 


C) 




t^ 


f. 


00 










lO t£ 


5 OS 








1 OJ 


00 !N 






to 


CO 










s- 


c-» 




e- 


1 its 








1 (S) 


«f ^ 






c^> 


(31 


ih 








» 






<» 






« 


if « 






f^ 




m- 


m 










"* 






































09 


o 


— 1 L' 


; 10 


~ 






H ^ 


o o 


- 


to t- 


CO 


(M 








o 


t- 


C' 




c 






: CO 


O 00 


00 


Mi (?) 


t- 


to 








«^ 


-* 


g ^ 


s ^ 


If 




c 


3 T— 1 


O M- 


Ml 


Its CO 


co 


o 










CO 








O 


O CO 


CO 


Ml CO 


CO 


<M 








0) 


C-J 




c 


J to 


# 


. 




» CO 


.-1 e-1 


CO 


^ cq 


CO 










00 


» 






^ 








m 


m 


4» 






¥f 


S 








r* 






































i 


o 


(M (> 


1 -^ 


c 




c 


5 C3 


O lO 


lO 


o o 


_ 


CO 








o 




■ V 


s o 


c 






3 O 


o to 


CO 


O Ml 


Ml 


CO 








1 

OS 


CO 


CO t- 


^ 


c 




c 


3 O 


O <Tj 


00 


Ml 1-1 


lO 


Ml 








■^ 


Its c 


5 O 


e^ 






O 






CO 


00 Ml 


■M 


s\ 








00 


CO 






5 (- 








< (M 


^ in 


CO 


^ r-t 


(31 










00 


fff 






*» 


# 






4fr 


» 


«» 






^ 


■» 








1-* 






































g 


o 


Its t-- 


CI 


c 




ot 


00 


o t^ 


f. 


o It; 


lO 


tH 








o 


00 >- 


o 


c 




c 


o 


O Ml 


Ml 


O M< 


Ml 










1 


*M 


-^ c 


f^ 


c: 




c 


o 


O CO 


CO 




- CO 


OS 


,^ 








00 




to Ct 


CO 


o- 








CO Ml 


I- 


OS Ml 


CO 


CO 








00 


CO 




a 


s t- 








CO 


i-l C<1 


CO 


m rH 












QO 


«■ 






» 


^ 






» 


m 


«■ 






s 


^ 








1-1 


















~ 




















00 
00 


^ 


o -^ 


.- 


~ 






^, 




OS 


o 


OS o 


OS 


00 








l-H 




CO 


CO 






Ir- 


to 00 


lO 


■M Ml 


o 


eo 








1 


>c 


-* c 


^ 


CT 




G 


es 


OS to 


to 


CD Ml 


o 


CO 








t^ 




to G- 




ci- 




t£ 


OS 


CO o 


Ml 


<03 lO 




Ml 








00 


■* 




Ct 










(SJ 


r-H Ol 


CO 


^ "M 


c^ 










00 


<»■ 






«. 


5 






Vf 


«> 


^ 






«■ 


S 
















































































P-' 














CQ 
























a 








« 














l-l 








!<? 








H 








ti 








& 














ij 








-< 









•A 
















n 
















r 








c 


















!«) 






"a 






s 










CJ 










t-l 
>-! 

CO 








O 






o 










c 








•S 
o 




C 




















o 






^ 








s 




"E 

CD 




;?; 








O 














■g 






o 




p- 








Ph 






















0.1 

•d 








fl 


0. 






d 


0. 






03 






Ol 






a 








ci 








cS 






CC 






tt 


m 




a) 


cS 






2 




c 




.2 


to 


c 




0. 


a 




_c. 


a 




(U 








'E 


^ 


o 




'E 


^ 


w 




'E 


C3 




'E 


<i> 




'E 


44 






_c« 


o 


C 




oi 


o 


p 




« 


P. 




_» 


p- 




B 


o 






c3 


o 


^^ 




'" 


o 


y 







X 




"a 


« 




CIS 


o 






M 




w 


W 




or. 


« 


H 




CC 


K 






CC 


W 






Vj 




p 





Library Department. 



115 



f 


05 


c 


o oc 


CO 


c 


o 


o; 


J, 




t^ 


o 






j_, 


t' 




c 


-* 1- 


o 


tc 


to 


o 


05 












CO 


O) 


a> 


cc 


If 


cr 


to 


t- 


J^ 


p^ 


to 


c:5 


r>3 






05 




■-C 


'^ 


t~ c 




CC 


CO 


to 






o 


a* 






TO 


5 


'^ 


■^ 




»r 




■^ 


-^ 


"<3^ 


^ 




to 






m 




^ 


^ 




^ 


# 


!■ ^ 


«■ 


«» 


^ 


c& 






«© 




«■ 








۩ 




























^ 


o 


~~^ 


in 'J 


03 


Ir- 


t. 


^ 


^ 


■^ 


■^ 






OO 


c<- 


t^ 


c 


■* >- 


lO 


-^ 


"* 


o 


05 


s) 


<N 






o 


c 


o 


00 cc ^ 


lO 


•= 


o 


CO 


^^ 


to 


C^ 






CO 






■^ 






■* 






to 










to 






t- 


-^ 




■^ 






o 








to 


CO 


to 






^ 




^ 


«• 




^ 


# 


¥ m 


« 


m- 


m 


^ 






s 




m- 








m 




























tc 


la 


OD to oc 


^ 


tc 


to 


00 


■^ 


t~- 


oo 






to 


ir 


*"* 


cr 


i-H t- 


CO 


IT 


lO 


00 


I- 




"* 


CO 








f^ 


c-i 


c 


t- -^ 


lO 


tc 


to 


to 


cr 




CO 


o 






CO 








00 .- 


lO 


tc 




CC 




CO 


to 












■^ 


<N 


^ 






o 


-* 


^ 


cr 




^ 


CO 


i> 










^i 


■» 




^ 


* 


>■ ■«■ 


«■ 


^ 


«■ 


«■ 






!©■ 




I& 








m 




























a- 


o 


c 


^ 


to 


J, 


^ 


CO 


c 




J_, 


^ 




~ 








o 


tc 


CO 


<= 


CO cr 


to 


c 


o 


a 




"^ 


to 


o 








s 


a- 


o 


^1 


ir 


t- 


-* 


cr 


CO 


cr 




o- 




— 




to 






CO 


IT 


CO 


C-1 


■r 




o 


CO 






















cc 






0- 


■* 


o 


■^ 


-rf 


o- 










CO 










^ 


m 




r~^ 


* 


¥ ■^ 


■» 


«■ 


& 


«& 






«» 




«f 








m 




























00 


lO 


~~^ 


<= 


<T 


OJ 


^ 


^ 






to 


00 


~ 




CO 


oo 


ir: 


•"• 


c 


n 




03 


OJ 


^1 


■^ 




c:5 


o 


•<*< 


■* 


^ 


,^ 


-* 


oc 




■9 


,_ 


^H 






CO 


05 


c^ 


05 


C35 




(M 


c- 


to 


e- 


CO 




CO 






o 




c^ 


CO 


oJ 


C^ 




to 


(?) 






tr- 






0- 








CO 


CO 




§3 




«» 


«■ 




«■ 


■m 


f s. 


«» 


€» 


«. 


•» 


«■ 


«© 


Ol 


c-l 


c 


00 c 


OO 


c 


o 


to 


t:5 


J, 








o 


ir- 


to 


f-H 


c 


03 C 


03 


c- 


02 




CO 


'S* 


o 




c6 


« 


lO 


^ 


t^ C' 


?1 


If 


lO 


c:5 


Cv 




1^ 


^^ 


to 


to 


£. 


■5 




00 t- 












(ft 






to 




c^ 


cc 


to 






-^ 


00 


o- 




CO 


c- 






cr 




^ > 


§3 




«■ 


*» 




>» 


# 


f ¥■ 


^ 


■» 


«■ 


«■ 






«» 


t- 


t- 


IT 


t- 


_ 


^ 


c 


o 






o 


•^ 


OD 


CO 


CX) 


cc 




(M 


IT 


& 


f-H 


tc 


to 


t^ 








(M 


to 


to 


c: 


t^ 


OC 


c 




^^ 


c 


o 


to 


to 


05 


'M 


CO 


CO 


C 


1 


o- 


oo to 




cr 


CO 






to 


05 


o 


to 


s 




CO 


(N 




-* 


00 




CO 


(M 










»< 


^ 


«© 




«■ 


•» 




«■ 


# 


F ^ 


«■ 


& 


m 


^ 






C) 


o 


ir 


£ 


CO 


o 


c 


o 

CO 


5; 


CO 


















'»+ 


'^l 


^, 


CO to 


to 


tc 


to 


c; 




^ 


















oc 


<i 


to 




(M 










o 
























G1 






to 


(^ 








o 






















«■ 


«■ 




«■ 


* 


(■ «■ 


«■ 


^ 


















c 


« 


C 


(M 




t^ c 


IZ 


to 


^ 


CO 


















tc 


CJ 


c 


^" 


CT- 


o c 


^ 


^ 
























IT 


to 


to 


CO c 


O CO tc 


^ 


o 


o 


















t^ 


C5 




c 






cr 


CO 






o 






















c5 




00 ^ <M 


CO 
























~ 


^ 


«■ 




«■ 




» 


€«► 


s 




















■xj 


to 


C5 I- 


o o to 


to 


























c 


to 


c 


t- C^ 




'TtH 


























o- 


CO 


oc 


CO I- 


CO lO ^ 


02 


























oc 










oo CO r- 


'i' 




























<^^ 








<M O 




CO 




























■le' 


fk 




rn" «» 


^ 






























~ 






«■ 






























ir 


to 




,-( ^ 


J, 






























c 




c^ 


CO r- 


CO 






























e-i 


CO 


[y- 


^ 


CC 


GO 






























c- 




(T 


m ^ 










































CO 
































m 


•fe 




m 






























"^ 


CO 


^ 


o c- 


CO 






























c~ 


CO 


to 


o> 1- 


to 






























t-' 


'^ 


J^ 


CO CO 


f. 


































oc 


■<* o- 


to 
































»o 








































fff 


% 




» 
















































«" 
























>5 
















O 












H 




(4 
























H 








s 

W 




» 










O 
















-< 




H 






H 




!z; 








« 








V5 

O 
H 
CO 

< 




H 




H 




U 






« 




H 








o 

n 

Z 

o 




1 






o 

n 

03 




OD 

33 
O 




H 

s 






03 

a 




W 
cc 






a 




a 


c 


a 


1 




a 


c 




e 


M 


a 




a 


U 


a 





tn P-i W 



116 



City Document No. 21. 





«5 
C5 

cc 

00 


t- CO o o t^ 
t- IC o o .* 

CO C5 OI t^ lO 

S S K =^ S 

* 4& « 


$1,024 47 

$4,300 66 

602 66 
2,439 47 


$7,342 79 

$669 15 

499 12 

1,166 70 


$2,334 97 

$442 13 
164 47 


CO 

s 




00 

00 

1.^ 


$673 09 

$677 18 

$392 00 
83 30 
633 07 


$1,108 37 

$4,622 82 

704 63 
2,225 63 


$7,553 08 

$528 93 

513 06 

1,220 92 


C3 
CO 


: £| 
; ;i;S 




Si 


(9 mos.) 
$401 06 

(8 mos.) 
$379 32 

$371 00 

92 70 

565 21 


$1,028 91 

$4,462 20 

1,236 20 
2,260 28 


$7,958 68 

$183 00 
682 13 
483 23 


s ■ 

CO 

co_ 








us 






$364 00 
255 43 
455 52 


$1,074 95 

(4 mos.) 
$529 32 

403 80 

1 50 


i 
















00 






$364 00 

78 65 

600 70 


lO 

CO 

CO 
























05 
00 






$28 00 
71 30 
14 21 


o 

CO 
























^ 






































00 02 






































1H 

Si 
00 






































00 
00 






































c5 

00 

oo 
cc 






































OC 

oc 

!-• 

00 
00 

1H 








































pi 
a 

K 

o 

IK 

<! 

K 

Pu, 

0) 




CO 
>? 

M 
< 

S 


o 

H 

3 
S 
w 

s 

o 

>^ 

c. 


.2 


a 

53 
p 

M 






z 
w 

H 

on 

a 

1 


M 
o 

o 
PQ 


0) 

a 

0) 

p 




O 

;e 

H 
H 

< 

a 
§ 

« s 

1 

CO 


a 

c 

u 

o 
'u 

<0 

-o 
p 

cc 

o 
o 

p 


c 

P 
X 




6 
g 

m 
O 

« : 
« : 
(- : 
« • 
C3 : 

P3 

(-! : 

§ : 

ci 
CO 


a 
c 
p 







Library Department. 



117 



516 05 
93 25 


1 




o 
-<* 


as 
to 

to 


Ooo t- rH 

eo 






























































































































O 

CO 


OS 
CO 

& 
O 

K 

J) 

O 

. O 

I S 3 
\ ^ I 

^ I 
1 pi 


05 

tc 

& 



ta 
1 

1 >■ 
5 f' 


CO 

^^ 
. O 

^" 1 


a 









118 



City Document No. 21. 



C0G0<X>l'-»OCCiC^O5 



s s; 



Oi 00 CO t- 



C-l CD (M CO 



lO CO CO CO 
Cq t^ CO tJ< 
CO CO 00 CO 



tH CO C-1 



00 CO CO rH 



I- 00 CO 



1-H to CO t-' 
iTi CO lO CO 



t-- CO »0 CO »o 



1— I Cq GO 



r1 (Xi a r~t 



r-< CO 00 



(N lO CO CO OO CO 
O) lO CO CO CO CO 



o 

CO 

(H 

M 

M 

!Z I 
< S 

s 
w 

o 

W 
O 






(M 05 rH 



i-H 5D CD 



00 CO CO I 

i-H OS <M ; 



■* CO CO CO 



I- lO CO 



CO CO C^ CO 



o C2 CIS lo 



(M O 03 03 



CO lO CO O --H CI 05 
i-l CO 00 O ^ "-I Et 



CD CO C-1 CO CO CO 



C) CO CO CO 



I— I CD »-* (M 00 



CO I- C< "O 



t^ CO CO 



05 CO 00 CO 



GO CO CD <» 



IC CD C^ OS CO 



COCOCO!M(NeO(N« 



CO <-! 

OS [^ 

lb IN 

00 <M 



l^ 00 I- 



i-l C2 l~ CO CO i-t 



(?fl C5 CO ^ i^ 

1- o lo rJ CO 

IM t- O "D^ -^^ 

^ im" pf " co" 



lO O^ 1— I 
C-1 (M -* 

rH ;0 CO 



l^ O lO <M 

O t- O 00 



CO 00 CO 



CD CO CD CO 

Ci CD to iTi (M ©^ 



(Ncoiocoi?>ffie^iM 



CD OS r-l 



OS iO C-i 



C^ CO f— I t- t' 
CD CO I— I CO Ol 



CO OS OS OS 
O lO rH i-H 
r* CO CO CO 



CO lO OS rH GO CD 
00 rH OS (M •.* rH 

..CSrHlOrHrHOO,. 

lOioc^oooot^giN 



rH lO 
f GO 
CO CO 



CO CO CO eo 



c^ iO OS eM 

-<t< OS t- (?< 

CO CO CO M 



rH O rH O Hjl 
rH CO l^ CO rH 



CO CO I^J CI (N 



rH CO CO Ol 



CD CD CO •<*< 



rH CD (N rH (N 



CO IM I- CD 



CD CO O^ 



rH 00 CO 



CO CM CO CO CO 



t- 00 C3S -^ 



t^ CO CO CO CO rH 

— l- t-^ CO^ GS^ u^ 

(m" CO CO CO ct 



rH rH OS CO OS CO CO 
CD »C Csl CO l^ CD CM 



OS CM to 



O 00 »0 CO CO OS 

OS CD (M rH CO Hj< 

c^^ CO c* iM (M CO 



OS CO rH 



•^ CO CD rH t^ 
CO CO t- CO CO 



Ip OS 0> OS 



OOrHt^tClOtMOOSCOCO 

'^i-iooooi-iniococo 

OS'*<OC<GOCSCCO^t— 
t^CDOOCOOOS-^tOOSCD 
rHCOrHCOGOCMCOCMO'^ 



Pm 13 :3 



e4 !» « O P3 Q 



S^(§&:S<!«<!QS 



Library Department. 



119 



§ 

§ 


399 61 

1,024 47 

7,342 79 

643 77 

2,334 97 

649 56 

606 60 

516 05 

93 25 

98 10 

\ 49 01 
1 (5 weeks) 


CO 

CO 


552 24 

476 08 
1,108 37 
7,553 08 

673 09 

2,262 91 
R77 18 


166 34 

(11 mos.) 

88 30 

(3 mos.) 

d7 .f>'2 












620 88 

393 15 
1,028 91 

7,958 68 

( 401 06 
1 (9 mos.) 

1,348 36 

\ 379 32 
i (8 mos.) 
















336 25 

463 80 

1,074 95 

j 934 62 
\ (4 mos.) 






















332 07 

329 48 

329 48 

1,043 35 
























361 09 

46 40 
326 85 
113 51 
























202 28 
68 63 
53 58 


o 

CO 

I- 






















































































































































































a 
> 

< 

c. 

s 


I 


a 
> 

< 

t 

I 
t 


C 

c 

1 

p: 
c 


D S 


c 

.E 
C 


> 

c- 

& 

J 

p: 


c 


1 


5 

a: 

c 



PC 


1 
c 

tr 

"c 
c 




5 

a 
b 

c 


1 
c 

D .S 




3 





120 City Document No. 21. 

library trust funds. 

BiGELOw FuND.^ — This is a donation made by the late John P. 
BiGELOW, in August, 18.50, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated to the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for 
the time being. 

Bates Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Joshua Bates 
of London, in March, 18-53. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $50,000 00 

" The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, ex- 
pended in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority 
as may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the Mayor 
of the city for the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fund. — This is the bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. 
Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bond, for $10,000 00 

The vphole income in each and every year to be expended in the pur- 
chase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and 
astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a donation made by the late Jonathan 
Phillips of Boston, in April, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said library. 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will, dated September 
20, 1849. 
Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $20,000 00 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of 
a Free Public Library. 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the city for the time 
being. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Abbott 
Lawrence of Boston. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the 
purchase of books for the said library, having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Edward 
Lawrence of Charlestown. The following clause from his will ex- 
plains its purpose : 

" To hold and apply the income, and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said Public Library." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $500 00 

Pierce Fund. — This is a donation made by Henry L. Pierce, 
Mayor of the city, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Coun- 
cil December 27, 1873. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $5,000 00 



Library Department. 121 

TowNSEND Fund, — This is a donation from William Minot and 
William Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Maky P. Townsend, of 
Boston, at whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in 
trust, for such charitable and public institutions as they may think 
meritorious. Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of 
the City of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the follow- 
ing conditions to the legacy : " The income only shall, in each and every 
year,be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition at 
least five years at the time it may be so purchased." 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent. Bond, for . $4,000 00 

TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor of 
Boston he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his 
books and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sum, the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding {i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent, per annum), in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of twenty- 
five years tlie income of the said sum is to be expended annually in the 
purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Sijanish or Portu- 
guese language, or in such other languages as may be deemed expedient 
by those having charge of the library. These books, bequeathed or 
purchased, are always to be freely accessible for reference or study, 
but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library building. If 
these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trust and condi- 
tions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and money are to be 
given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her right 
to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed them 
under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests, in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said bequests 
on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the care and 
custody of the books and manuscripts. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $4,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund. — This is a donation made in June, 1803, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of 
the association, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French 
and J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a man- 
ner as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on 
the Public Library, attaching to it the following conditions: " In trust 
that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be expended 
in the purchase of books of permanent value for the use of the free 
Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable, of such a character 
as to be of special interest to young men." The Trustees expressed a 
preference for books relative to Government and Political Economy. 

Invested in oae City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for , $1,000 00 

Treadwell Fund. — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, 
of Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of 
debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the life 
of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the residue 
then remaining in the hands of the trustees as therein provided, and 
convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public Library in 
the City of Boston. 



122 City Document No. 21. 

The City Council accepted said bequest, and authorized the Trustees 
of the Public Library to receive the same, and to invest it in the City 
of Boston Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said trus- 
tees, in such manner as they may deem for the best interests of the 
Library. 

Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent. Bonds, for . $5,550 00 
Invested in the City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bonds, for 1,400 00 

Invested in 16 shares 'B. & A. R.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1,600 00 

Invested in 6 shares B. & P. R.R. Co. stock, par value $100 

each 600 00 

Invested in 12 shares Fitchburg R.R. Co. stock, par value 

1100 each 1,200 00 

Invested in 1 share Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 100 00 

$10,450 00 



Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late of 
Boston, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: 

" I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be invested 
on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books 
published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own pri- 
vate library, and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." 
Bequest accepted by City Council. July 31, 1877. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for , $10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Oharlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Scholfield Fund. — Bequest of the late Arthur Scholfield, who 
died in New York, January 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain 
heirs during their lives, and then to be used for the jjurchase of books 
of permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
18, 1889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum of 
$11,800, which represents the income of said fund, received by him up 
to the time of his death, to be added to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $.50,000 00 
" " " " " , 11,600 00 



$61,800 00 



Green Fund. — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green, of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. 

Invested in two City of Boston Five per cent. Bonds, for . $1,500 00 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . 500 00 

$2,000 00 



South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund. — Donation of a 
citizen of South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $100 00 



Library Department. 123 

Charles Greely Loking Memorial Fund. — This is a donation 
from the family of Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to 
be expended for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $500 00 

Charles Mead Public Lirrary Trust Fund. — Received from 
Charles Mead, executor of the estate of Charles Mead, the amount of 
legacy of the late Charles Mead, to constitute the "Charles Mead 
Public Library Trust Fund," for the promotion of the objects of 
the Public Library, in such manner as the government of said library 
shall deem best, and so far as the government shall deem consistent 
with the objects of the library, to be used for the benefit of the South 
Boston Branch Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $2,500 00 

Artz Fund. — This is a donation made in November, 1896, by Miss 
ViCTOKiNE Thomas Artz of Chicago, the income " to be employed in 
the purchase of valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse 
or prose, of American and of foreign authors." These books are to 
be known as the " Longfellow Memorial Collection." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund. — Received from the mem- 
bers of the Papyrus Club, May, 1897. The income thereof is to be ex- 
pended for the purchase of books in memory of their late member, 
John Boyle O'Reilly. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Twentieth REaiMENT Memorial Fund. — This is a donation made 
in April, 1897, by the Association of Officers of the Twentieth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry. It is to be used for the purchase of books 
of a military and patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove appro- 
priated as a memorial of the Twentieth Regiment. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $5,000 00 

Todd Fund. — This is a gift made in October, 1897, by Wm. C. Todd 
of New Hampshire. The income is to be expended annually in pay- 
ment for such current newspapers of this and other countries as the 
board of officers for the time being having charge of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, shall purchase. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . $50,000 00 

Bradlee Fund. — A bequest of the late Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee 
to the Boston Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bond " . . $1,000 00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund. — This is a contribu- 
tion from the friends of the late Henry Sai-gent Codman to be used to 
perpetuate the memory of Mr-. Codman by the jjurchase of books upon 
landscape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book-plate shall be inserted in each one of the volumes purchased, 
identifying it as part of the memorial collection. 

Cash in City Treasury, January 31, 1899 .... $2,852 41 



124 



City Document No. 21. 



Recapituxation op Public Library Trust Funds. 



Scholfield Fund 

Bates Fund 

Todd Fund 

Phillips Fund . 

Phillips Fund . 

Bowditch Fund 

Charlotte Harris Fund 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 

Treadwell Fund 

Artz Fund 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 

Pierce Fund 

Towusend Fund 

Ticknor Fund . 

Charles Mead Fund . 

Green Fund 

Bigelow Fund . 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 

Franklin Club Fund 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund 

Bradlee Fimd . 

Edward Lawrence Fund 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund 

Codman Memorial Fund .... 



$61,800 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

20,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,487 69 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

4,000 00 

4,000 00 

2,500 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 

100 00 

■ 2,852 41 

$273,740 10 









£l-^ llJ 






= o . Sr 






i fi'slS ■§■§§ «- «§• g 



■2^ S 2 .^^ S '2 






f a 



I ? ^: • -^ 






:1s §•= S 



■<^0^<0<^0■<•^>^0^<■<OX•00^^■< 



O Q ^ 



S <l ■< S ■< Q < 



•«! >5 i5 -"I 



i s K I I 

►J £ J ^ H 

S = " ^ S, 

I I I t I 

«! O B S U 



15 a 



2 I 
>* s 

p. « 



?l 










was tr 
at lite 
books 

etts V 


< 


■"a 




<- 




=^^s^ 


ti=C-6 S-i 






II g- 


oral 

Fun 

Ma 
wor 




il 


ss.s| 


i|l|d is 




II 

S8 


il 


to Mr. Bigelow on retiring from th 
nder the authority given them at the 
Lorlng as a memorial fund from th 
the " Charles Mead Public Library 
the " Longfellow Memorial Collect 
of John Boyle O'ReUly. 
as a memorial of the Twentieth Reg 
ccess to representative newspapers 




ondon, as the head of t 
fetlme. The other 820, 
m was a bequest, 
town Erancli. With it 
retirement from office, 
d William Minot. Jr.. 
ift of his Spanish and 




88, died In L 
r. Phillips' U 
and this su 
the Charles 
vious to his 
amMhiotar 
tamentary g 


Trustees of the FrankUn Club, u 
family of the late Charles Greely 
late Charles Mead, to constitute 
orlne Thomas Artz, to constitute 
of the Papyrus Club, in memory 
Twentieth Regiment Association, 
illiam C. Todd, to provide " free a 
f Caleb Davis Bradlee, D.D. 




Bates, born near Boston, 1 
m of gio.ooo was a gift Jn M 
wrence died In August, 18&5 
quesl of Charlotte Harris to 
nation of Mayor Fierce, pre 
nd was received from Willi 
Bquesi accompanied the tes 




;^laf>S|^| 



°hsPhSS SBoSa&3S§ 



1 




ag. 

■a a 

si 

11 

tie 

II 

Ik 

.S . 
ggg 


1 
1 

1 

•s 

o 

g| 

.a 

go 
IJ 






1 
s 


g g S g 






g g 

s « 




g s s 
II" 
i 




s 

lis 

s 


g g g g s 
III g S8 






III 

m 


g S g s 
g g 2 g 








14 


g g § g 

III g 


g 
g 




1 


5' « 
ei > 


S > 






Hi 

< 


1 

£■ 

5 

1 



Library Department. 
APPENDIX 11. 



125 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 














01 OJ 






m Hi 












11 






sU 




Years. 






Years. 


^.2 




Years. 


1-3 
U 


1 


"l852-53 


9,688 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


34 


1885 


460,993 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


35 


1886 


479,421 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


36 


1887 


492,956 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


37 


1888 


505,872 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


38 


1889 


520,508 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


39 


1890 


536,027 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


40 


1891 


556,283 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


41 


1892 


576,237 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


42 


1893 


597,152 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


43 


1894 


610,375 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


44 


1895 


628,297 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


45 


1896-97 


663,768 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


46 


1897-98 


698,888 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


47 


1898-99 


716,050 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 









VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, JANUARY 31, 1899, 
ACCORDING TO LOCATION. 





535,687 
15,135 


Brighton 


13,886 
31,956 












550,822 

19,461 
13,398 


15,413 
11,814 
12,496 
14 912 








Jamaica Plain 




South Boston 




South End 

West End 


13,909 
10,825 
4,322 

88 
98 








Lower Mills (Station A) 

Mattapan (Station D) 


bja f Fellowes Athenseum 

•^ S 1 Collection owned by City. 


Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 

North Brighton (Station L) . . . . 
Broadway Ext. (Station P) . . . . 


992 
76 


W Total, Roxbury branch. 


32,859 


1,582 



126 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX III. 



NET INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





1.^ 


© 


s 

cc 


01 

A 
CC 
rH 


CO 


oc 


us 

cc 

I-C 


i 

oc 


00 

cc 


9> 

1-1 


Bates Hall 


11,857 
710 
330 


13,518 

l's50 

419 


15,306 
1'S23 
2,355 


16,499 

818 

I's 9,143 


20,493 
loss 455 
loss 542 


32,491 

746 

I's8.0i56 


11,821 
313 


20,273 
2,890 


26,579 
8,603 






20,680 


Duplicate room 


2,063 


Brighton branch 


130 


91 


167 


98 


23 


292 


107 


1,217 


276 


I's 3,190 


Charlestown branch . . 


rs70 


233 


421 


22 


339 


300 


loss 16 


I's 112 


398 


2,095 


Dorchester branch . . . 


309 


269 


222 


209 


134 


358 


loss 73 


1,415 


159 


I's 1,402 


East Boston branch. . 


63 


58 


59 


5 


48 


126 


112 


1,021 


147 


I'S 1,478 


Jamaica Plain branch 


294 


150 


214 


112 


221 


329 


273 


1,277 


374 


I'S 1,286 




4 


12 


224 


84 




63 


I'S 1,861 

48 








Roxbury branch 


199 


146 


308 


loss 352 


147 


382 


1,202 


I's 2,896 


I's 1,628 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


397 


361 


438 


289 


318 


318 


407 


348 


402 


936 


South Boston branch 


159 


115 


200 


51 


55 


401 


loss 289 


1,509 


loss 69 


113 


South End branch .... 


248 


187 


365 


loss 67 


26 


276 


138 


1,435 


308 


I'S 683 














1,897 
4 


6,522 
626 


1,555 

loss 8 


385 

185 


466 


W. Roxbury branch . . 
Lower Mills Reading 




6 


10 






33 


169 














85 
73 
74 
74 


3 

24 
932 






Mattapan Reading 














1 
loss 30 




Mt. Bowdoin Reading 














16 


North Brighton Read- 








8 






1 


Broadway Extension 
Reading room 














261 


724 


807 


290 


Total 


14,636 


15,519 


20,256 


8,633 


20,915 


29,927 


18,695 


35,698 


35,129 


17,162 







1 CoUection transferred to West End branch. 



Library Department. 



12T 



APPENDIX III. — Concluded. 
Located February 1, 1898, to January 31, 1899. 



Located. 



Condemned, 

missing, 
transferred. 



Net gain. 



Central Library 

Central Library, Duplicate room 

Brighton branch 

Charlestown branch 

Dorchester branch 

East Boston branch 

Jamaica Plain branch 

Roxbury branch, city collection 

Roxbury branch, Fellowes Athena3um. 

South Boston branch 

South End branch '. . . 

West End branch 

West Roxbury branch 

Lower Mills Reading room 

Mattapan Reading room 

Mt. Bowdoin Reading room 

North Brighton Reading room 

Broadway Extension Reading room . . 



Total 



23,867 

3,764 

523 

2,200 

596 

711 

548 

68 

975 

926 

525 

551 

181 



16 
1 

419 

35,866 



3,187 

1,701 

3,713 

105 

1,998 

2,189 

1,834 

1,691 

39 

813 

1,208 

85 

12 



129 

18,704 



20,680 

2,063 

loss 3,190 

2,095 

loss 1,402 

loss 1,478 

loss 1,286 

loss 1,628 

936 

113 

loss 683 

466 

169 



16 

1 

290 

17,162 



128 



City Document No. 21. 





• 


;^ 


:.05-a<«:-03rHoooo- 


- 5-1 35 35 


05 -* ^>0 00C0(5<-*CO-*O5(mi 




Oi 


^0-^0-^CDCiC5Q 


oo (M <N to 




-•3in C0'*OQ005(?<li?SSi 




Oi 


'ocooooefl-3<omcci-*r-(co 


OO 00 (Df-H to O t 




1 CO CD ITi CO 1 


































ci 






















CD CO CO <M to CO 


»o 








(M t 




^ CO rH 




"* 1 




CO 






























$. 
















1 




Si 


t- 03 00 IC o 


1 rH t-H lO 


5 0» 35 C» 


C5 in o in -* to 














00 b- ''J" ^ I 




5 35 CO I- 




•I (M to 




H ■.»- m 35 a 


!) 35 
















(>4(M»jOrt^lOCOCO-*i- 


1 to 


CO I 


- rH in CO to 


































































cs 


co to CO (N CO CO 


lO 








<M I 






CO CO 














oc 






""• 




•"^ 






































rH^ 




















































s 


^ (M lO lO lO rH (^ 


J in 35 (M 35 35 


35 rH O 1- 


■( CO -^ 
















. a -i 


p -X to 35 00 CIO t- 




to 




H t 


in (? 


1 to CO 














«e 




J_OrHT}4»oCOtO-*i— ICO 


O) to rH CO t- 


1 "■ 


































































at 


lO ^ CO IM to CO 


>n 








(M t 






CO tc 


































































. 


COt~01S05t-00'*05(M05C5 


35 O O in 35 to 














us 


CO t~ (M ^ -* (M I 


CO t- (? 


< C^ 


to 




35 in rH (>> t- 














C5 




-ocoo.-Hcoioeoto-*rtto 


00 35 rH CO to -^ 














CC 




















































iC to CO m to CO 


m 








(N to 




CO to 














" 






'"* 




'"' 








































»-1COC5tCtO'^mcOC5'MCSC5 


C^ ^ O CO 


















-* 




c - 


. -* CC O 


CO CO t~ 


Ol CN to 




X ir 


o 


















ft 


iriGS^ODO^OtOlOCOtO'^rHtO 


CO CO rH CO 


















oc 


tcf tiT co' ^ to* CO* 


in 








cf to" 






















"^ 






rH 




^ 










































t-tOlOtOlOtnOSrHO 






























M 


in — 1 rl C-1 O t- 


C5 CO ?^ (M 






























a 


iO t' T-H o o t- 


;^ -# « CO ^ 


















































































oc 


■^ »o ^ CO to CO 


o 


































1H 






'^ 




*"* 








































ifttotooto-^e^'^r— 
































a« 


C0;Nr^Oi-H;00000-H 
































o 


CO to -H o o t- 


■^ ~ 
























































































CO 


•<* m •<*< CO to CO 


CO 


































'^ 






tH 




""* 






































, 


O O CO CO r- 


O O O CO 




































o^Hiooo-*too3; 


































o 




lo .- 


05 3- 


t- 


_^ ■* lO IT 


































00 




















































-* 


lO ^ (M ir 


co 




































1H 






'"* 












































00 X -^ ^ tc 


m CO o 






































-* .-H CO to CO ^ CO 








































35 3- 


























































































CO 




" lo -* c-1 »r 


CO 




































IH 






■"* 












































l--. 


m c^ 


in c^ 


-* t, ,- 




































05 

oc 






i-l O ^ 


(?) 


(M <N 


































c 


c- 


rt 31 35 t- 


-■*'*' 




















































































CO 


-* 


IT 


■* (M lO CO 






































~ 


















































u- 


^ r* 


1~- lO CO 00 


































CO 




co c 










tc 




































oo 




O r- 


or 


cc 


l- 


5( CO 




















































































00 






'Ji 0- 




c^ 






































1H 




















































cc 


tc 


^_ 


lO c 




CO o 




































cr 


= 


t^ t- c- 


-* 


O CC 


































oc 


t- t- c 


t-; t^ 00 'l' <?] 






















































































00 


Ct- 


W* -^ CJ 


IG 


cii 




































IH 






'"' 












































^ 


-^ CO -^ C<" 


t- O CO 


































»5 

QO 


rl 


<M to I- 


CC 


oc 










































c- 


CO e< 






^ 


00 


































00 


CC 


CO c- 


(?) 




cr 








































1H 












" 
































































, ,-^ 


















































ff 


GO 






































































































"c 


o 


















































> 


t» 




> 






e. 




































> 


^ 


3- 


35 

8 


> 




> 




c 


a 










a 
























;. 








^ 




^■ 




"c 


c 
a 

D OS 

Ph 

tH 










.2 






1 


c- 


i- 




> 

C 


!- 


1 


> 

t- 
r 
;- 

a 
> 


c 

h- 


C" 

1- 


CT 
OC 

> 

C^ 

s- 


00 

ci 

5 


1 

t£ 

< 


e 
& 
c 
s- 
K 

< 


£ 

i- 


£ 

> 


P 

c 

^ "a 

a 

& 

c 

^ c 

c 




(H 




s 

o 
o 
u 

* tn 

P 

cj 

a 


c; 

O 

O 

a 
"3 






c 
a 


c 


; 1 


C. 




c 

>- 


^1 


J 


c 


3 




1 




1 


M 




1 

c: 


S 

o 




2 






t 


f£ 


^ 


fi. 


f 


P 


&: 


t 




c 


t- 


W 


h; 


< 


C 


& 


O 


O 


O 


< 


P? 


pq 


'1 



APPENDIX IV. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY CLASSIFICATIONS. 



=^^^^^^ 


CLASSES. 






Speoial Libraries. 


-. 


1 

1 




1858. 


1S61. 


1866. 


1869. 


1871. 


1878. 


1875. 


1877. 


1880. 


1889. 




1890. 


1892. 


1894. 


1894. 


1894. 


1896. 


1896. 


1897. 












• 


III! 


Jill 




Total in 
general 
library, 
Jan. 31, 
1891). 


¥ 


4 




J 


1 


|| 


P 


i 

n 


II 


5" 


li 










It 


ll 


8" 


i 

1= 


1 

H 




i 


111 


P 


3 

II 

il 
5= 






5M 
487 

3,634 

1,334 
721 
198 

.647 
304 
135 
761 
783 
128 
862 

1,200 
604 
232 
754 

1,017 

1.108 
640 

1,648 






1,801 
13,121 
14,297 
67,740 
46,784 
23,963 
11,147 
17,333 
9,973 
3,087 
14,610 
23,036 
7,151 
33,851 
20,932 
7,217 
8,080 
21,433 
16,834 
20,125 
13,873 
16,883 


249 

36 
17 
107 
77 
60 
11 

9 

9 
22 

2 

1,887 

68 

147 

6 
65 

3 

3 

15 

4,039 

9 

13 
6 


322 

615 

617 

1,092 

868 

622 

326 

1,423 

1,181 

96 

329 

733 


6 

5 

43 

833 

114 

7 

2 

8 

197 






21 
690 
135 
812 
3,204 
2,474 
337 
264 
617 
200 
226 
471 


15 
S3 
424 
385 
2,460 
670 
184 
191 
23 
64 
61 
53 


































2,414 
14,810 
15,727 
75,e!S 
68,115 
28,296 
12,062 
19,763 
12,146 

7.«77 
16,178 

ao,6is 

7,209 






6 

7 
47 
29 
37 

6 
27 
22 

1 
14 
26 


2 
8 
148 
11 
8 
6 
4 
3 

67 




....278 


669 


10 
1 
475 
18 
8 


75 
270 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 


8 

881 
4,746 

425 












12 
106 
246 
197 
104 
9 
45 
8 


1 

31 

1 


1 

2 

603 

6 






1 












64 
363 
21 
68 
31 
26 
132 
4,207 
4 
260 
























679 


668 








11 


329 


36 
1 








English history, biography and geography 












VI. 

vn. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 
XIlo. 
















French history, biography and geograp y. 












4 
1 

1 
















1 
3 


469 

1 
1 
28 
















1 






German history, biog aphy an geogr p y 




















Greek, Latl a p o gy ^ 
























1 
6 






. 












16 
16 










2 










1 


14 














3 


4,648 









Tr n 


























5 
36 
3 
1 
8 
8 
30 
25 
33 


6 
4 

les 

7 
9 
3 
34 
12 
6 


3,622 
1,360 
98 
307 
76 
170 
136 
13 
30 


683 
52 




381 
121 
24 
63 
6 
32 
63 
36 
14 


246 
130 

17 
28 
27 
89 
48 
16 
43 
84 
93 
3,231 


248 

66 
2 
2 
6 

31 
2 

59 
400 

10 




12 

29 






I 










1 
321 




1 
2 
















2 
















6 

243 

6 

16 

































7,666 

11,469 

21,630 

16,275 

24,478 

14,337 

25.666 

158 

434 

3,232 

659 

45,263 

• l.i.l.l'i 






14 
23 

I 
26 

1 

1 
25 

1 


129 








101 






2,819 






36 
39 




















4 
























XVIII. 


















103 












xrx. 






19 
5 


1 

1 






















20 
12 






XX. 




4 














309 
261 











XXI. 










7,874 




30 


1 








XXII. 








50 














\ 


XXIII. 




20 






101 




46 




12 




1 








(160 
















XXIV. 


Shakespeare 






























XXV. 


Books for the blind 








559 
45,263 












































XXVI. 


Stack 4 and Y 


2,704 


1,646 


672 
















































XXVII. 


HiipUcate room 


































1 










16,136 


XXVIII. 


UepoBit collection 










































1 












f2,846 1 2,845 


. 




























































19,183 


2,016 


1,171 


467,093 


6,349 


13,854 


2,047 


129 


6,209 


13,491 


6,388 


669 


698 


422 


6,666 


681 


668 


2,819 


7,S74 


fl60 




624 


4,659 


329 


343 




===zr 




1,184 











EpLANATiox. — Class 111. includes general history, etc., when embracing several countries, and collected works of historians 

»:- ass IV. includes the collected works of American writers, and what of American literature is sometimes termed "polyeranhv " 

f. ,*..,■' '^'•1 '^''•' ""^ '^I^- '"'^^ ">* *""'* scope (or the respective countries that Class IV. has (or America. 

n i! • '""^'I'les also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the Scandinavian nations. 

p, XIV. includes political science and ethics, education, etc. 

^'lass XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 



Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

Class XXVI. contains the former " Lower Hall " collection, which has a different classification. It Includes 26,697 volumes of Action. 

•1,701 taken (by exchange, etc.) from, and 3,764 added to last vear's total of 13,072. , ^ . , ,,. 

tThe Deposit collection is In 9 classes— 1. Children's bocks: -2, ; 3, Fiction; 4, Lileratnie; 6, Biograihy; 6, History; 7, Travel ; 8, Science; 9, Misc. 

( Framed. 

Note. — The dates given In the special libraries column show the year when these c<illecl ions were acquired by the Library. 



Library Department. 129 



APPENDIX \. 

CLASSIFICATION. 

Branch Lihrakies. 

[This table is omitted from this j'ear's report, owing to the 
reclassification now in process and uncompleted in the Branches.] 



130 



City Document No. 21. 
APPENDIX VI. 



REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

Statistical lieport, February 1, 1898, to January 31, 1899. 
Former Registrations. 





Date. 


No. of Names. 


jfirst 


1854-1858 


17,000 

52,829 
227,581 




1859-1807 


Third 


1868-April 30, 1880 


Eoiirth 


May 1, I88e-March 31, 1894 

April 1, 1894-December 31, 1894... 
January 1, 1895-January 31, 1899.. 


124,396 
25,443 
97,509 


Fifth 


Sixth 





Registrations, including old and new names, lost and filled 
cards replaced, expired cards renewed during each year, for 
the five years prior to 1895 : 

1890 .... 14,175 



1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 



11,502 
11,707 
11,029 
29,971 



Average, 16,677. 
Live Cards Outstanding. 



Date. 



Number. 



Gain. 



February 1, 1899. 
February 1, 1898 . 
February 1, 1898. 
February 1, 1897. 
February 1, 1897. 
February 1, 189G. 
February 1. 1890. 
•Jamiary 1, 1895. 



Total uain. 



72,005 
64,973 
04,973 
45,606 
45,606 
34,842 
34,842 
29,971 



7,032 

19,367 

10,764 

4,871 
42,034 



Central Library 

Brighton Itrant'li 

Cbarlcstown Brnncli .... 

Dorchester Branch 

East Boston Branch 

.lamaica Plain Branch . 

Uoxliury Branch 

South Boston Branch.. 

South End Bnmch 

West Eml Branch 

West Uoxlmry Branch. 
Slallou A 



I). 



Totnls ai.Wa 



JS.SSH 
1,25C 



3,124 

3.802 
4,.'iTS 
4,189 
2,210 



CARDS ISSUED FEBnUARY 1, IKS— .JANUARY 31, 1800. 



RE-RKUISTRAT10N8. 



Over Un<ler 



Over Under 



Over Under 



Over : Under 



■4 41 3,i«6 3,M3 4,-|>4 



Over Under 



4,201 
4,2S.-i 

4,8.*7 



33S4 
C,S&4 



1,130 
1.431 

I.0T7 
2,018 
l.t^58 



3I,II>7 2,273 



3,81(1 
3,2.W 






3,036 2,.104 6,42.^ 2,434 07,B01) 25,S04 ' "2,00S I 7.0J2 MO 3,7.V' 



Library Department. 



131 



CLASSIFICATIOlSr OF HOLDERS OF 
JANUARY 31, 1899. 



LIVE CARDS 



By Sex and Occupation. 



Classes. 



Permanent 
residents. 



1 Non- 
residents. 



Special 
cards. 



Males. 

Over 21 years of ar/e. 
Professional classes 



Teachers 

Students 

Business men 

Unemployed 

Laborers 

Under 21 years of age. 



Clerks 

Oflice and errand boys 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools . . 
Pupils of Grammar schools 



Pupils of Grammar schools under 12 
years 



Other students. 



2,916 
497 
1,242 
8,361 
1,932 
702 

1,313 
689 
421 
917 

9,0(il 

287 
468 



102 
121 
1,114 
89 
182 
3 

23 
2 

7 
13 
4 



142 
15 



Females. 

Over 21 years of age. 
Professional classes 



Teachers 

Students 

Business women 

Married 

Single, unemployed 

Under 21 years of age. 
C'lerlis 

Errand girls 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools. 

Pupils of Grammar schools 



Pupils of Grammar schools under 12 
years 



Other students. 



268 
1,704 

718 
4,562 
9,781 
8,207 

l-,537 
453 
1,268 
1,321 
8,406 

342 

370 



45 

179 

1,296 

72 

37 

570 

89 
1 



131 
23 



4,130 



1 Including persons temporarily sojom-ning in Boston. 
N.B. — Of the 1,848 teachers' cards issued priorto February 1, lS99,816are livecards; 
of these, 657 are held b.v permanent residents, in addition to their ordinary cards (not 
included in permanent residents' column above), and 159 are held by non-resident ?i 
(which are included in non-residents' column above). 



132 



City Document No. 21. 

By Wards. 



d 

'A 
•d 

03 


No. Of 
card- 
holders 


Popiilation 
census of '95. 


Percentage 
of card- 
holders. 


6 

1 


No. of 
card- 
holders 


Population 
census of '95. 


Percentage 
of card- 
holders. 


1... 


1,748 


21,007 


.0832 


14... 


2,014 


19,186 


.1049 


•2... 


1,136 


21,588 


.0526 


15... 


1,498 


18,623 


.0804 


3... 


1,256 


13,943 


.0900 


16... 


1,807 


16,320 


.1107 


4... 


859 


13,375 


.0642 


17... 


1,758 


21,114 


.0832 


5... 


1,158 


12,986 


.0891 


18... 


2,293 


21,679 


.1057 


6... 


1,307 


27,860 


.0469 


19... 


2,388 


22,372 


.1067 


7... 


1,8!)5 


16,973 


.1116 


20... 


4,394 


21,528 


.2041 


S... 


4,809 


23,130 


.2079 


21... 


4,618 


19,274 


.2396 


9... 


2,872 


23,174 


.1239 


22... 


3,189 


22,289 


.1430 


10... 


9,079 


22,.554 


.4025 


23... 


2,909 


18,283 


.1591 


11... 


4,839 


19,930 


.2420 


24... 


3,912 


18,240 


.2144 


12... 


5,395 


21,591 


.2498 


25... 


3,108 


15,001 


.2071 


13... 


1,764 


24,900 


.0708 


























Total 


72,005 


496,920 


.1449 



Library Department. 



133 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS, TEACHERS AND PUPILS. 
June 30, 1898. 



General Schools. 


Number 

of 
schools. 


Number of 
Regular Teachers. 


Average" 
number of 

pupils 
belonging. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 




1 

11 

.07 

556 

69 


2 

70 
121 


9 
105 
687 
556 


11 
175 
808 
556 


265 




4,599 


Grammar — 

Primary 

Kindergartens 


36,547 
29,379 
3,988 










Totals 


694 


193 


1,493 


1,686 


74,778 






Special Schools. 


1 

1 
1 




• 


13 
1 

25 

7 
6 
6 


113 








21 










Central 


1,775 










212 










152 










187 














3 




58 


2,460 








Special teachers (not included above), 




20 88 


108 








Evening Schools. 
October, 189T-March, 181)8. 


12 
5 






139 
26 


3,148 








481 












^' 






165 


3,629 











714 


213 ! 1.581 


2,017 


80,867 






1 





134 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX VII. 



CIRCULATION. 
Home Use Only. 



Centi'al Library. 

Brigbton 

Charlestown 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Jamaica Plain . . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston. ... 

South End 

West End 

West Roxbury.. . 
Station A 

B 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

J 

K 

L 

31 

N 

P 

Q 

R 

S 

T 



Total Circulation. 
Home Use. 



1897-98. 



Carried forward. 



A. 

.388,489 
31,382 
57,362 
.58,105 
62,993 
57,176 
84,691 
80,912 
82,497 
109,617 
22,496 

4,283 
13,870 

3,193 



12,180 

9,186 

7,929 

10,447 

146 

3,808 

8,484 

9,770 

26,159 

16,.')44 

14,090 

17,004 

2,600 



1,195,413 



1898-99. 



B. 

422,849 

36,217 

,54,927 

.55,768 

60,435 

.52,225 

8fi,C23 

75,407 

88,408 

115,655 

22,376 

5,205 

13,.501 

2,702 

3,895 

10,236 

9,041 

7,410 

8,886 

3,412 

3,914 

7,057 

9,946 

27,718 

15,.590 

11,873 

14,653 

9,875 



1,235,204 



From Central 

through iiranches 

and Stations. 

lucludett in 

Central Library 

Circulation, 



1897-98. 



Included 
in "A." 



618 
1,046 

818 
1,077 
1,543 

647 

861 
1,883 
1,477 
1,898 
1,398 
4,082 
3,.559 
1,009 
1,889 
2,883 
1,878 
2,746 
3,298 
1,460 
1,557 
3,853 
1,.324 
3,864 
3,533 
1,.3S3 
1,013 



52,597 



1898-99. 



Included 
in "B." 



909 
1,039 

729 
1,693 
1,4,36 

760 

951 
1,388 
1,893 
1,932 
2,008 
6,409 
3,649 
2,090 
2,543 
4,567 
3,667 
3,979 
3,038 
1,862 
2,961 
5,215 
2,208 
5,6,30 
7,743 
2,901 
6,174 



79,374 



From Brandies 
through Stations. 

Included in 
BranchCirculation . 



1897-98, 



Included 
in "A." 



3 1,916 
= 2,632 

3 4,255 

*667 
s 1,721 



■ 2,071 



13,262 



1898-99. 



Included 
in "B." 



S854 
1,022 



3 2,212 



«880 
'■2,063 



1,974 
"4 



9,009 



LiRRARY Department. 



135 



APPENDIX YII. — Concluded. 



Total Circulation. 
Home Use. 



1897-98. 1898-99 



Brought forward 

Station U 

Brighton High School.. . 
Charles Suninev School . 

Cottage Place 

Hou'^e of Reformation. . 
Marcella-street Home . . . 

North Ben net street 

Parental School 

Roxbury High School . . . 

Hancock School 

Engine-houses 



Total. 



1,195,413 



1,3-25 

1,903 

425 

.592 



1,199,658 



1,235,204 
1,300 
1,108 

277 
1,281 
4,515 

398 

464 
1,047 

248 



1,245,842 



P>om Central 

through Branches 

and Stations. 

Included in 

Central Library 

Circulation. 



1897-98. 



52,597 



3,937 
1 5,275 



1898-99. 



79,374 
,336 



6,831 
1 6,300 



61,809 92,841 



From Branches 
through Stations. 

Included in 
BranchCirculation. 



1897-98. 1898-99 



13,262 



13,262 



9,009 



9,009 



1 Number sent on deposit. Number used on premises not recorded. 

2 Included in Jamaica Plain Branch Circulation. 

3 " " Dorchester " " 

4 '1 I' Brighton " " 

5 " " Roxbury " " 

Gain. 
1897-98. 1898-99. 1898-99. 

Central Library 388,489 422,849 34,360 

Branches 811,169 822,993 11,824 

Total 1,199,6.58 1,245,842 46,184 = 



3% 



136 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX VIII, 



TRUSTEES FOR FORTY-SEVEN YEARS. 



The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 

1852 to 1864; the late George Ticknor in 1865; William W. 
Greenough, Esq., from 1866 to April, 1888 ; from May 7, 1888, 
to May" 12, 1888, Prof. Henry W. Haynes ; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, Esq., May 12, 1888, to April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. 
Prince since October 8, 1895. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; that for 

1853 made what is called the first annnal report. At first it con- 
sisted of one alderman and one common councilman and five citi- 
zens at large till 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to 
consist of one alderman, two common councilmen and six citizens 
at large, two of whom retired, unless reelected, each year, while 
the members from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 
the organization of the Board was changed to include one alder- 
man, one councilman and five citizens at large, as before 1867 ; 
and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the city government upon the Board, by an 
alderman and a councilman, was abolished, leaving the Board as 
at present, consisting of five citizens at large appointed by the 
Mayor. 

Citizens at large in small capitals. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-95. 
Allen, James B., 18o2-5:^. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Benton, Josiah H., Jr., 1894-98. 
BiGELOW, John P., 1852-()8. 
BowDiTcir, Henry I., 1865-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry P., 1894-98. 
Bradlee, John T., 18r)9-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-:]. 
Braman, Jai'vis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. Coffin Jones, 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George O,, 1870-71. 
Carr, Samuel, 1895-96. 
Chase, George B., 187(')-85. 
Clapp, AVilliam W., Jr., 1864-6(). 
Clark, John M., 185.5-56. 
Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, J a m e s F r e e m a n, 
1878-88. 



Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
De Normandie, James, 1895-98. 
Dickinson, M. F., Jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-64. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost,()liver, 1854-55; 1856-.58. 
Frotiiingiiam, Richard, 1875-79. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
GREENOUGH,Wn.LIAM W., 1856-88. 
(7uild, Curtis, 187(i-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1880-95. 
HiLLARD, George S., 1872-75; 

187(5-77. 
Howes, Osborne, Jr., 1877-78. 



Library Department. 



137 



Ingalls, Melville E., 1S70-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-05. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 18()7-68. 
Lewis, "Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1897-98. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Ellis W., 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel 13., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Pjekce, Phineas, 1888-94. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1870-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Prince, Frederick O., 1888-98. 



Putnam, Geokge, 1868-77. 
Reed, Samson, 1852-53. 
Richards, William R., 1889-95. 
Sanger, George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Phillip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey jST., 1878-79. 

S H U R T L E F F, NATHANIEL B., 

1852-()8. 
Stebbius, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 185.5-56; 1865-07. 
Thomas, Ben.jamin F., 1877-78. 
TiCKNOR, George, 1852-66. 
Tyler, JohnS., 1863-64; 1866-07. 
Walker, Francis A., 1896. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1808-70. 
Whitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H., 188.5-88. 
Whitney, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1802-03. 
Wilson, Elisha T., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
AViNSOR, Justin, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



LIBRARIANS. 

1852 to date. 
(From 185S to 1877 the chief executive otlicer was entitled Suiieriuteudeut.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852-December 16, 1874. 
Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 
WiNSOR, Justin, Superintendent, February 25, 1868-September 30, 1877. 
Gkeen, Dr. Samuel A., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877- 

September 30, 1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, Librarian, October 1, lS78-September30, 1890. 
Dwight, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892-April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, Librarian, February 11, 1895. 



138 



City Document No. 21. 



APPENDIX IX. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR FOETY-SEVEN YEARS. 

The followiug have served on the Examining Committees for 
the years given. The names in italics are those of Trustees who 
have acted as chairmen of the various committees. The thirt}'^- 
fourth year was from May 1 to December 31, 1885, a period of 
eight months, for which no Examining Committee was appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880, 1894. 
Adams, Brooks, 1894. 
Adams, Nehemiali, D.B.. 1860. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. .John F., 1888. 
Andrews. Augustus, 1892, 1893. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold, Howard P., ]8S1. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas. 1800. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C. 1801. 
Ball, .Joshua D., 1861. 
Bancroft, Robert H.. 1894. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
liaruard. .James M., 1866. 
Barry, Rev. Richard .J., 1895. 
Bartiett, Sidney, 1869. 
Bates, Hon. John L., 1896, 1897. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890. 1891. 
Bigelow. Jacob, M.B., 18.57. 
Blgelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, J. Bapst, J/.D., 1897, 1898. 
Blake. John G., M.B., 1883, 1891. 
Blake, J/r.s. Mary E., 1894. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879, 1891. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.B., 18.55. 
Boivditch, Henry J., 3/.Z)., 1865. 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.B., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll. LL.B., 

1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bowne, Prof. Borden P., 1896, 

1897. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Bragg, Hon. Henry W. , 1898. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 



Brimmer, Hon. Martin, 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Brown, Allen A., 1894. 
Browne, Alex. Porter, 1891. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C. E., M.B., 1872. 
Burdett, Everett W., 1896, 1897. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, Jr., 1869. 
Carr, Samuel, 1894. 
Carruth, Herberts., 1892. 
Chadwick, James R., 3f.B., 1877. 
Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen, 1894. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877. 1885. 
Cheever, David W., M.B., 1894. 
Cheever, Miss Helen, 1896, 1897. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Claj)}), Williain. IF., Jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, B.B., 

1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, B.B., 1882. 
Clement. Edward H., 1894, 1895. 
Coale, George O. G., 1892, 1893. 
Collar, William C, 1874. 
Collins, Hon. Patrick A., 1898. 
Connolly, Rev. Arthur T., 1898. 
Corbett, Hon. Joseph J., 1896, 

1897. 
Cudworth, Warren H., B.B., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Courtis, Thomas B., M.B., 1874. 
Cusliing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Derby, Hasket. M.B., 1895, 1896. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 
I3illingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, I^hilip J., 1888. 



LiBKAiiY Department. 



139 



Donalioe, Patrick, 1869. 
Donald, Rev. E. Winchester, 1898. 
Durant, Henry F., 1803. 
Duryea, Joseph T., B.D., 1880. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1880. 
Eastburn, Manton, D.l)., 1803. 
Eaton, Williams., 1887. 
Ecles, Henry H., 1886. 
Eliot, .Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, 3/.Z>., 1871. 
Ellis, George E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, Jr., 1878. 
Ensworth, William H., i/.Z>., 1898. 
Ernst, Carl W., 1897, 1898. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 
Everett, Sidney, 189rj. 
Farlow, John W., M.D., 1892, 1893. 
Field, Miss Gretchen, 1898. 
Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 
Fields, James T., 1872. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 
Fitz, Walter Scott, 1894. 
Foote, Bev. Henry W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F. , 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1807. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1870. 
Furness, Horace Hovrard, LL.B., 

1882. 
Gannett, EzraS., D.D. 1855. 
Garland, George M., M.D., 1895, 

1890. 
Gay, George H., 187(). 
(iilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., M.B., 1804. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, LL.D., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1808. 
Green, Samuel S., 1895. 
Greenough William W.. 1858, 1874, 

1883, 1880. 
Grinnell, Charles E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. EdAvard E., 1858. 
Hale, Mrs. George S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Hale, Philip, 1893. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haynes, Ilenry IF., 1881, 1884. 
Hay ward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John, Jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Hellier, Charles E., 1895. 
Hemenway, Alfred, 1898. 
Herford, Brooke, i).Z>., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., D.D., 1888, 

1889. 
Hersey, Miss Heloise E., 1895, 1896. 



Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clemont Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hills, Thomas, 1898. 
Hodges, Richard M., jV.Z)., 1870, 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., J/.D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W.. Jr., LL.D., 

1882. 
Homans, Charles D., M.D., 1867. 
Homans, 3frs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886, 1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, James M., 1891. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hudson, JohnE., 1895, 1896. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880, 1893, 

1894. 
Hutchins, Miss Emma, 1895, 1896. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Irwin, 3Iiss Agnes, 1894. 
Jeftries, B. Joy, M.D., 1809. 
Jeffries, William A., 1893. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., Z>.2>., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, Miss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lee, Miss Alice. 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lee, Hon. John H., 1897, 1898. 
Lewis, Weston, 1872. 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1800. 
Lowell, A. Lawrence, 1897, 1898. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H.. M.D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F.. 1890. 
McNulty, Rev. John J., 1890, 1897. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1801. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Miss Ellen F., 1898. 
Mason, Robert M., 1809. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Metcalf, Rei'. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis, 1860. 
Morisou, MiiiS Mary, 1892, 1893, 

1895. 



140 



City Document No. 21. 



Morrill, Charles J.. IsSo. 
Morse, John T., Jr., 1871). 
Morse, Eobeit M., Jr., ISTS. 
Jforion, Hon. Ellis TF., ISTl. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R., LSTl. 
Neale, Rollin H., D.D., IS.");]. 
Xoble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis, ISsO. 
O'Brien, Hon. Hugh, 1879. 
O'Callaghan. John J.. 1895. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
Otis, G. A., 1860. 

Paddock, Bt. Rev. Benj. H., 1876. 
Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parker, Mrs. William L., 1897, 

1898. 
Parkman, Henry, 188-"). 
Parks, Eev. Leigbton, 1882. 1896, 

1897. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885, 1890, 1891. 
Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hon. Henry L., 1891. 
Pingree, lliss Lalia B., 1894. 
Prescott, William H.. LL.D.. 

1853. 
Prince, Hon. F. O., 1888, 1889, 

1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 

1896. 
Piitndm, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Putnam, William L., 1898. 
Randall, Charles M., M.D., 1884. 
Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Robbins, Elliott, M.I)., 1893. 
Roche, James Jeftrey, 1898. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Rollins, J. Wingate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamins., 1863. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 
Sampson, O. H., 1892, 1893. 
Sani/er, Hon. George P., 1860. 
Seai-Ie, Charles P., 1898. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888, 

1889. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 1893, 1894. 
Slmrtlef, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Azariah, 1895, 1896. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, ,"l/rs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Smith, Miss Minna, 1892. 
Sowdon, A. J. C. 1892, 1893. 



Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D., 1888. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Teele, John ()., 1886. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 
Thayer, George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Bev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, B. F., LL.D., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1866. 
Ticknor, Jiiss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, George, LL.D., 1853, 

1854, 18.55. 1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tillinghast, Caleb B., 1895, 1896. 
Tobev. Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Todd, William C. , 1894. 
Twombly, Eev. A. S., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert. Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward,"^ Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.B., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Warner, Hermann J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.B.. 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Weissbein, Louis, 1893. 
Wells. Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wendell, Prof. Barrett, 1895, 1896. 
Wharton, William F.. 1886. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitmore, William H., 1887. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862. 
Whitney. Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1869. 
Williams, Harold, M.D., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Williamson, 3/rs. William C, 1897, 

1898. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854. 
Wiuthrop, Robert C, Jr., 1887. 
Wood, Frank, 1897, 1898. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Goold, 1888, 

1889. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



Library Department. 



141 



APPENDIX X. 



SCHEDULE OF LIBRARY SERVICE. 

Kote. — This has been brought down to M.nrch 31, 1899. The order is (1) by rank in 
grades, and (2) alphabetical, within each grade. 

Summary. 

Central Library . . . 167 Males 88 Females 79 

Branches and Readino- rooms 64 " 15 " 49 



231 



103 



128 



Evening and Sunday service, Central Library, 
Sunday service, Branches, 12. 

Extra assistance is employed at the branches. 



65 



Name. 

Putnam, Herbert 
Savage, Philip H. 
t Mooney, George V. 
Deery, D. Jean. 
Learned, Lucie A. 
Cellarius, Theodore W. 
Hutchins, Fernald 
McFarland, Peter V. 
Nichols, Adelaide A. 
** Bicknell, Margaret M. 



Whitney, James L. 
^Swift, Lindsay 
Chevalier, Samuel A. 
Hunt, Edward B. 
Murdoch, John 
Burnell, Carrie 
Rollins, Mary H. 
Seaver, Mrs. Lillian F. 
Rice, Edwin F. 
Tenney, Mary A. 
Bartlett, Mary R. 
Cutler, Dora L. 
Gould, Ida W. 



[VE DEPARTMENT. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


1895 


Librarian. 




. 1896 


Librarian's Sec 




. 1889 


B. Special. 




. 1891 


B. 




. 1891 


B. 




1892 


D. 




1896 


D. 




1896 


D. 




1868 


Auditor. 




1896 


C. Special. 


n^E DEPARTMENT. 


1869 


Chief. 




1878 


A. Special. 




1894 


A. 




1883 


A. 




1896 


A. 




1881 


A. 




1886 


A. 




1888 


A. 




1885 


B. Special. 




1897 


B. " 




1897 


B. 




1887 


B. 




1884 


B. 



* Serving from three to seven evenings a week each. The total number of positions 
is .S5, evenings; 40, Sundays. 

** Auditor's Assistant." t Custodian of Stock Room. If Editor Library Publica- 
tions. 



142 



City Document No. 21. 



Xanie. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Hemmings, Anita F. . 


. 1897 


B. 


Leuvitt, Luella K. 


. 1895 


B. 


Brennan, T. Frank . 


. 1890 


C. Special. 


Dolau, Charles W. 


. 1894 


D. 


Shaughnessy, John F. 


. 1898 


E. 


ORDERING 


DEPARTMENT 




Maciirdy, Theodosia E. 


. 1889 


Chief. 


Coolidge, Marie 


. 1893 


B. Special. 


SeemuUer, Mary 


. 1899 


B. " 


Frinsdorff, Emily 0. . 


. 1894 


B. 


Goddard, Mrs. Frances H. 


. 1892 


B. 


McGrath, Mary A. . 


. 1868 


B. 


McFarland, Thomas A. 


. 1891 


C. Special. 


Keleher, Alice A. 


. 1891 


D. 


St. Louis, Robert F. . 


. 1897 


D. Runner. 


SHELF DEPARTMENT. 




Roffe, William G. T. 


. 1881 


A. Div. 2. 


Locke, John F. 


. 1894 


B. 


Richmond, Bertha P. . 


. 1895 


B. 


Connor, George H. . 


. 1891 


C. Special. 


Eberhart, John 


1894 


C. " 


Reardon, John H. 


1896 


C. " 


Caiger, Eliza F. A. . 


. 1895 


D. 


Lucid, John F. 


. 1893 


D. 


Shawno, Robert 


. 1898 


D. 


BATES HALL. 




Bierstadt, Oscar A. . 


. 1899 


Custodian. 


t Blaisdell, Frank C. . 


1876 


A. Special. 


Buckley, Pierce E. 


. 1891 


B. 


Doyle, Agues C. 


. 1885 


B. 


Plunkett,"Albert J. . 


1895 


D. Special. 


Hannigan, Frank J. . 


1898 


D. 


Hardy, Charles A. . 


. 1896 


D. 


SPECIAL 


LIBRARIES. 




Fleischner, Otto 


. 1891 


Custodian. 


Hitchcock, Grace A. . 


. 1895 


B. Special. 


Hall, Belle S. . 


. 1895 


B. 


Patten, Mary L. 


1898 


B. 


Whitney, Margaret I). 


. 1898 


B. 


Ward, Joseph W. 


. 1891 


C. Special. 


Cassidy, Margaret L. 


. 1895 


D.' " 


Kelly, Charlotte H. . 


. 1895 


D. 



t In charge of Patent and Newspaper Departments. 



Library Department. 



143 



Xanie. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Smith, Arthur PL F. 


. 1897 


D. 


McKiernan, John L. 


. 1896 


D. Runner 


Maiers, WilHamC, Jr. 


. 1897 


D. 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 
Ford, Worthington C. . . 1898 Chief. 



Lane, Lucius P. 



1898 



B. 



Weudte, Frederika 
Ford, Mary E. A. 
Maguinness, Jaines 



Sercx, Frederic 
Keenan, Matthew T. 



PERIODICAL-EOOM. 

. 1895 C. 

. 1895 D. 

. 1897 D. Runner, 

NEWSPAPER-ROOM. 

. 1895 B. 

. 1896 D. Special. 



ISSUE DEPARTMENT. 



McGuffey, Margaret D. . 
* Sheffield, Mrs. Gertrude P. 
Forrest, Gertrude li. 
Barry, Edward F. . 
Cufflin, M. Florence 
McCarthy, Michael, Jr. . 
Sheridan, Mary C. . 
Desmond, Louise L. 
Richards, Florence F. 
Shumway, Marion H. 
Bertram, Lucy I. 
Cunniff, Nellie L. 
Dowling, S. Jennie . 
McCarthy, Marion A. 
Murphy, Annie G. . 
Reynolds, Mary A. . 
Roett, Louis W. 
Wiechmann, Catherine A. 
Connolly, Nelly L. . 
Daly, Margaret C. . 
Ethier, Lillian E. 
Gorman, John E. . 
Kiernan, Letitia M. 
Lucid, Joseph A. . 
Mayer, Harry F. . 
Olson, Alphild 
Olson, Bertha A. . 
Williams, Grace 



. 1895 


Chief. 


. 1896 


B. Special 


. 1895 


B. " 


. 1890 


C. " 


. 1892 


C. " 


. 1892 


C. " 


. -1881 


C. " 


. 1895 


C. 


. 1875 


C. 


. 1895 


C. 


. 1895 


D. Special 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1888 


D. 


. 1894 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1897 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 


. 1895 


D. 



^ In ch.irge oi Juvenile Department. 



144 



City Document No. 21. 



Name. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Zaugg, Joanna, 


. 1895 


D. 


Zaiigg, Otto K. 


. 1895 


D. 


Barry, Margaret M. 


1897 


D. Runner. 


Bryce, Jean M. 


1898 


D. 


Cole, Grace E. 


1897 


D. 


Hagerty, Mary £. . 


1897 


D. 


Hersey, Edna M, 


1898 


D. 


McKenzie, Kenneth 


1897 


D. 


MeSweeney, M. Agnes . 


1897 


D. " 


Schnlz, Henry A. C. 


1898 


D. 


Shaughnessy, Mary A. 


1897 


D. 


Stetson, Nina M. . 


1896 


D. 


Gorman, Annie L. . 


1899 


E. 


Schnabel, Paul J. 


1898 


E. 


ISSUE DEPARTMENT 


r. BRANCH DIVISION. 


Ward, Langdon L. 


. 1.S96 


Supervisor of Branches 


? ~ 




and Delivery Stations. 


Kueffner, Cecilia W. 


. 1898 


B. 


Painter, Florence McM. . 


. 1897 


B. 


Heimann, Otto A. 


. 1890 


C. Special. 


Morse, Maud M. . 


. 1877 


C. " 


Bollig, Emma . 


. 1898 


c. 


Maier, Joseph A. 


. 1892 


D. Special. 


Brown, Richard 


. 1898 


D. 


Conroy, Michael J . . 


. 1897 


D. Runner. 


REGISTRATION 


f DEPARTMENT. 


Keenan, John J. 


1885 


B. Special. 


Murray, Ella K. 


1886 


C. 


Shelton, Richard B. 


. 1895 


D. Special. 


Fillebrown, Emily F. 


1895 


D. 


PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 




Entered. 


Position. 


Lee, Francis W. 


1894 


Chief. 


Geyer, Willfried H. 


1896 


Pressman. 


Greeley, Carrie P. . 


1896 


Compositor. 


Land, Annie F. 


1896 


1. i 


Ives, Birdsey F. . 


1896 


Feeder. 


BIN] 


DERY. 




Ryder, Frank 


1883 


Foreman. 


Collins, Dennis J. . 


1887 


Finisher. 


Dougan, William J. 


1898 


Forwarder. 


Fuerst, Alexander . 


1896 


it. 


Hoeffner, George 


1891 


a 


Ivory, John W. 


1893 


a 


Lof Strom, Konrad A. 


1892 


i 



Library Department. 



145 



Xaiiie. 


Entered. 


Position. 


Murphy, John F. 


1883 


Forwarder. 


Sullivan, J. Heniy . 


1898 


i 1. 


Hemstedt, William P. 


. 1883 


Pressman. 


Bowen, Mrs. Sarah E. 


1876 


Sewer. 


Doiron, Joanna 


. 1896 


" 


Healey, Margaret . 


1899 


" 


Kiley, Margaret J. . 


. 1889 


( i 


Mori art}', Mary (t. . 


1875 


" 


Nolen, Sarah . 


1891 


" 


Potts, Ellen F. 


. 18'.I2 


" 


Soule, Ellen E. 


IS 91 


( i 


ENGINEER AND JANITOR DEPARTMENT. 


Niederauer, Henry . . ' 


1894 


Chief Engineer. 


McCread}', Alexander 


1895 


Engineer. 


Malone, John P. 


1.S95 


K 


O'Neill, Harry 


1896 


(( 


Zittel, (George, Jr. . 


1891 


i I 


Herland, Nils J. 


1895 


Fireman. 


Moran, John A. 


1894 


i i 


Karlson, Charles W. 


1896 


Book Motors. 


* Williams, John L. 


1886 


Janitor. 


Lawrence, John A. . 


1898 


( ( 


Frye, Henry . 


1898 


a 


McCarty, Dennis 


1888 


Watchman. 


McGee, Alexander D. 


1896 


Painter. 


Wall, Frank A. 


1897 


Carpenter. 


Hanna, William T. . 


1895 


Marble polisher. 


Chavies, Samuel H. 


1899) 
1898 - 


Elevator and 


Cole, William E. . . . 


Coat room 


Thomas, Arthur C. 


1898 ) 


attendants. 


EAST B08I 


ON BRANCH. 


Xame. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Walkley, Ellen 0. . 


1897 


B. Special. 


Braekett, Marian W. 


1897 


C. 


Wing, Alice M. 


1873 


C. 


Bickford, Lillian A. 


1891 


D. 


Hosea, George H. . 


1873 


Janitor. 


Taylor, Charles F. . 


1897 


(( 


SOUTH BOS 


TON BRANCH. 


Bullard, N. Josephine 


1883 


B. Special. 


Eaton, Ellen A. 


1873 


C. 


Sampson, Idalene L. 


1878 


C. 


McQuarrie, Annie C. 


1894 


D. 


Orcutt, Alice B. 


. 1887 


D. 


Sumner, Alice F. . 


1897 


D. 


Baker, Joseph 


1872 


Janitor. 



Charge of book motors, evenings. 



146 



City Document No. 21. 



ROXBURY 



Name. 

Bell, Helen M. 
Berry, Martha L. C. 
Puffer, Dorothy 
Griggs, Sarah W. 
Lynch, Crertrude A. 
Monahan, William 



BRANCH. 

Entered. 

1878 
1883 
1878 
1886 
18i)4 
1883 



Grade. 

B. Special. 

C. 

C. 

D. 

D. 

.Janitor. 



Cartee, Elizabeth F. 
Livermore, Mrs. Susan E 
Keagen, Elizabeth R. 
O'Neill, Margaret M. 
Rogan, Katharine S. 
Smith, Thomas E. . 



CIIARLESTOWN BRANCH. 

1886 B. Special. 

1885 C. 

189.5 C. 

1892 D. 

1896 D. 

1874 Janitor. 



BRIGHTON 



Hobart, ]Martha N. . 
Conley, Pollen E. 
Dale, M. Florence . 
Warren, Edward A. 



BRANCH 

1896 
1891 
1895 
1898 



B. Special. 

C. 

D. 

Janitor. 



Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T 
Griffith, Mary E. . 
Donovan, Mary G. . 
Kellogg, Grace E. . 
Mefteu, Margaret 
Davenport, Edward 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 

1873 B. Special. 

1886 C. 

1891 D. 
1898 D. 

1892 D. 
1875 Janitor. 



SOUTH END BRANCH. 



Sheridan, Margaret A. 
McKirdy, AUce E. . 
Lynch, Emma F. 
Meehan, Margaret F. 
Miilloney, William J. 



1875 
1896 
1885 
1893 
1892 



B. 
C. 
D. 
D. 
D. 



Special. 



Swain, Mary P. 
Riley, Nellie F. 
Albert, Katie F. 
Kenney, Thomas W. 



JAMAICA PLAIN BRANCH. 

. 1877 B. Special, 

. 1.S78 C. 

. 1892 D. 

, l.si)7 Janitor. 



WEST END 



Davis, Mrs. Eliza R. 
Barton, Margaret S. 
Forbes, George W. , 
Mooney, Katharine G. 



BRANCH. 

1877 
1885 



1896 
1885 



Special, 



Library Department. 



147 



Name. 


Entered. 


Grade. 


Kiley, Mary E. 


. 1896 


D. 


Riley, Mary E. 


. 1891 


D. 


Kelly, William D. . 


. 1898 


D. Runn 


Porter, Frank C. . 


. 1896 


D. 


Sullivan, Daniel J. . 


. 1898 


Janitor. 



Morse, Carrie L. 
Henderson, Irene E. 
Woods, Euoene B. , 



WEST ROXBURY BRANCH. 

. 1890 D. Special. 



1898 
1898 



E. 

Janitor, 



DELIVERY STATIONS. 
Station. Custodian. Grade. 

A. Lower Mills Reading-room Hill, M. Addie D. Special. 

B. Roslindale Delivery .Station. . . .Davis, William W. 

C. West Roxbury Branch See above. 

D. Mattapan Reading-room Capewell, Mrs. Emma G., D. Special. 

E. Neponset Delivery Station Barnes, Charles D. 

F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading-room .. .Fairbrother, Mrs. Eliz.G.,D. Special. 

G. Allston Delivery Station Howe, W. A. & Co. 

H. Ashmont Delivery Station .... Weymouth, Clara E. 

.1. Dorchester Sta. Delivery Sta.. . .Sexton, Mrs. Annie M. 

K. Bird-st. Delivery Station Morris, Antoinette. 

L. No. Brighton Reading-room. .. Mnldoon, Katherine F. .D. Special. 

M. Crescent-ave. Delivery Station.. Johnson, Charles E., & Co. 

N. Blue Hill-ave. Delivery Station, Riker, Mrs. S. A. 

■D xji^o„ -c^i-^^o..-^^ T^„i;,r^ „ cj^„ r Stewart, CoraL D. Special. 

r. B way Extension Delivery Sta.. <, ,, t^ • • a • j. ^ -rv 

*' •' [ Myers, Benjamin, Assistant. . ..D. 

Q. Upham's Corner Delivery Sta. .Bird, Mrs. Thomas H: 

R. Warren-st. Delivery Station. . .Woodward, C. E, & Co. 

S. Roxbury-crossing Delivery Sta..Yeaton, E. Christine.. . . D. Special. 

T. Boylston Delivery Station Locke, Joseph B. 

U. Ward 9 Delivery Station McGrath, Amelia F C. 



EVENING AND SUNDAY SERVICE. 

Central Library. 

6 P.M. TO 10 r.M. Winter Schedule. 
Sundays, 2 to lo P.M. 



Bates Hall 



Offlcers in Charge. 

Chevalier, Samuel A. 

Fleischner, Otto 

Hunt, Edward B, . 

Swift, Lindsay 
Assistants. 

Roffe, William G. T. 

Walsh, William A. 
Central Desk. 

Buckley, Pierce E. 

Reardon, John H. 

Williams, David L. 



See Issue Department 



See Fine Arts. 

See Issue Department 
See Deliverers of Books 



Hours. 

4 

8 
10 
10 

H 

15i 



4 
20 



148 City DoouivrENT No. 21. 



Hours. 



Care of Reference Books. 

Heimann, Albert E. ...... 24 

Plunkett, Albert J. See Newspaper room . . 8 

Collectors of Slips. 

McKenzie, Kenneth ...... 9 

Pearson, John A. See Runners .... 7 

Pitts, James A. See Fine Arts Extra Assistants . 9 

Runners. 

Beckford, Fred A. See Cars, Book-case and Runners, 9 

Campbell, Charles D. See Issue Dep't Runners . 3 

Sullivan, Frank T. 10 

Zaugo-, Otto E. See Issue Department Runners . 3 

Issue Department. 

Officers in Charge. 

Blaisdell, Fra^nk C. 20 

Buckley, Pierce E. See Central Desk ... 4 

Chevalier, Samuel A. See Bates Hall ... 8 

Receiver of Books. 

Blaisdell, Fred W. 25 

Deliverers of Books. 

Clarke, William S. See Indicator. Runners . . 12 

Reardon, John H. See Central Desk . . .13 

Care of Indicator. 

Clarke, William S. See Deliverers of Books. Runners, 13 
Hannigan, Walter T. See Care of Tubes . . 12 

Assistants at Indicator. 

Currier, Ulysses S. G. . . . . . . 7 

Gorman, John E. See Tubes and Juvenile Library . 3 
Tenny, Robert M. See Cars and Fine Arts . . 12 

Care of Slips. 

Heimann, Otto A. . . . . . . . 7 

Hughes, John A. ....... 18 

Desk Attendant. 

Ford, Daniel J. See Runners .... 25 

Care of Tubes. 

Gorman, John E. See Assistants at Indicator and 
Juvenile Library ...... 3 

Hannigan, Frank J. . . . . . . 9 

Hannigan, Walter T. See Indicator ... 13 

Care of Carriers. 

Beckford, Fred A. See B. H. Runners, Book-case and 

Issue Department Runners ..... 6^ 

Lucid, John F 9 

Roett, Louis W. See Book-case .... 3^ 

Tenny, Robert M. See Indicator Assistants and 
Fine Arts ........ 6 



Library Department. 



149 



Book-case Atteudauts. 

Beckforcl, Fred A. See B. H. Ruuuers, Carriers 

Glover, John H. See Runners 

Roett, Louis W. See Cars .... 

'St. Louis, Robert E. . . . . . 

Runners. 

Beckford, Fred A. See B. H. Runners, Carriers 
and Boole-case ...... 

Benson, Edwin F. A. 

Campbell, Charles D. See B. H. Ruuuers 

Clarke, William S. See Indicator. Deliverers of Books 

Conners, Timothy J. ..... 

Conroy, Michael .1 . 

Doyle, Charles A. . 

Ford, Daniel J. See Desk Attendant 

Glover, Johu H. See Book-case Attendants . 

Hughes, Thomas F. 

Lucid, Joseph A. . 

McFarland, Peter V 

Mackinnon, Bergan A. See Juvenile Library . 

Maier, Joseph A. . 

Maiers, William C, Jr. ..... 

Mayer, Harry F. ..... . 

Martin, D. Clifford. See Barton Library Assistants 

Pearson, John A. See Collectors of Slips 

Trueman, Nelson G. . 

Weller, Waldo W. See Fine Arts Extra Assistants, 

Zaugg, Otto E. See B. H. Runners 



H 

10 

19 

7 

25 

H 
25 
7 
4 
9 
7 
9 
6 
9 
9 

n 

18 

3 
22 

9 

6^ 



Barton Library. 

In Charge. 

Lee, Francis W. 

Tiffany, Edward . 
Assistants. 

McKiernan, John L. 

Martin, D. Clifford. 

Smith, Arthur E. F. 



See Runners . 
See Fine Arts 



Assistants 



16 

16 

12 

8 

12 



Fine Arts Department. 

In Charge. 

Bourne, Frank A. . 

Walsh, AVilham A. 
Assistants. 

Smith, Arthur E. F, 

Ward, Joseph W. . 
Extra Assistants. 

Pitts, James A. See Collectors of Slips 

Shawno, Robert .... 

Weller, Waldo AV. See Runners 



See Bates Hall Assistants 
vSee Barton Library Assistants, 



20 
12 

12^ 
12i 

8 
12 
12 



150 



City Document No. 21. 



Pekiodical Room. 
Conners, John F. 



Hours. 



32 



Registration Desk. 

Fallon, William E. 
Keenan, .Tohn .J. 

Juvenile Library. 

Attendants. 

Hall, Belle S. 

Kelly, Charlotte H. 

Owen, Marion L. 
Extra Attendants. 

Gorman, .Tohn E. 
Tubes 

Mackinnou, Bergan A 

Russell, J. Edward 

Patent Room. 
Attendants. 

Keenan, Matthew T. 
Serex, Frederic 

Newspaper Room. 

Attendants. 

Brennan, Thomas F. 
Connor, George H. 
Plunkett, Albert J. 

Replacement of Books. 

Barry, Edward F. . 
McCarthy, Michael, Jr, 



See Assistants at Indicator and 



See Runners 



See Care of Reference Books 



2H 



6 

H 
H 



4 
4 

28 



16 
16 



12 

16 
4 



12i 
12i 



SUNDAY SERVICE. 

* Branch Librariefi. 

NOVESIBEK 1 TO MAV 1. 

* With the exception of the West End Brancli, whicli is open Sundajs througliout 
the year; the regular weeli-day attendants serve Sundays, tlieir compensation being 
for seven days per weeli. 

Charlestown Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. 

In Charge. ' Hours. 

Day, John ........ 8 

Harrington, Walter ...... 8 

Janitor. 

Smith, Thomas ....... 8 



Library Dkpartjment. 151 

East Boston Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. Hours. 

In Charge Issue Desk. 

Bussey, George D. . . . . . . . 7 

In Charge Reading Room. 

Hosea, George II. . . . ... . . 8 

Heat .lanitor. 

Taylor, Charles F. . . . . . . . 8 

South Boston Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. 

In Charge. 

Orcutt, Alice B 7 

Janitors. 

Baker, .Joseph ....... 8 

Saunders, Thomas ....... 8 

Station P, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. 

In Charge. 

Herr, Irving . . . . . . ... 6 

Assistant. 

Brown, Richard ....... 2 

Station S, 2 to (5 P.M., 7 to !• P.M. 

In Charge. 

Damon, Helen G. . . . . . . . 6 



152 City Document No. 21 



APPENDIX XL 

SYSTEM OF SERVICE. 

As IN Force March 31, 1899. 

The system of graded service with provision for examinations 
as set forth in Article VI. of the By-laws quoted l)elow was 
adopted by the Trustees in April, 1895. Employees then in the 
service were graded thereunder. The application of the system 
to such employees was, however, made with this proviso : that it 
should not of itself entitle any employee to an increase of salary 
nor subject him to a decrease. In some cases, therefore, the 
salaries of present employees do not yet accord precisel}^ with the 
salaries of the grades under which they are classed. But increases 
of salary that may be recommended on the ground that the ser- 
vice rendered is entitled to higher pay will be made only in 
accordance with the system. And all promotions, as well as new 
appointments, will be made in accordance with the system. 

Extracts from By-Laws. 

ARTICLE VI., Section 1. — Evarnindtlons. Semi-annually, 
or oftener if expedient, examinations shall be held under the 
direction of the Librarian, for admission, b}' promotion or other- 
wise, to all grades of employment in the Public Library, except 
the positions of Librarian, Assistant Librarian, Librarian's 
Secretary, Auditor, Chief Cataloguer, Chief of Shelf Department, 
Custodian of Bates Hall, Chief of Ordering Department, Chief of 
Issue Department, Supervisor of Branches and Stations, Chief 
Engineer, Chief of Printing Department and Chief of Bindery. 

From the list of those persons who have successfully passed the 
examinations of the grade in wliich they seek employment, ap- 
pointments shall be made by the Trustees upon nomination by the 
Lil)rarian in consultation with the head of the department in which 
the appointment is to be made. 

ARTICLE v.. Section 2. — Vacations and other Absences. 
All persons regularly employed in the Library, except persons 
employed in the Engineer's or Janitor's departments, or in the 
Bindery, shall be entitled to a vacation at the rate of twenty-four 
days for each year in the service, exclusive of legal holidays, and 
of the weekly half-holiday allowed by the cit}^ ordinance, to be 
arranged by the Librarian. No allowance shall be made for 
absence from duty except as above provided. 



Library Department. 153 

Section 3. The President or Librarian shall have power to 
suspend, with loss of pay, an}' person in the Library service until 
the first succeeding meeting of the corporation. 

The following notice and application blank are furnished to 
applicants for euiployuient in the Library service : 

Notice to Aptlicants foi; Employment. 

Applications nuist be made upon the printed l)lanks furnished 
by the Library. Examinations for applicants will be held from 
time to time as the needs of the service may require. Each 
applicant will be notified of the examination to be held next 
after the filing of his application. 

The examinations are not strictly competitive. Other capaci- 
ties being equal, preference will be given to persons attaining the 
highest mark ; but in making selections from among those who 
have taken the examination, other elements of fitness for the par- 
ticular positions to be filled will be taken into account. 

The purpose of the examination being not to test the intelli- 
gence of the applicants by an absolute standard, but rather to 
range the applicants according to the relative intelligence dis- 
played by them, no absolute pass-mark is fixed ; nor is any cer- 
tificate or diploma given, but candidates will, if they desire, be 
informed of their relative rank among those who have taken 
examinations for the same grade. 

The examination, moreover, is regarded as a preliminary test, 
merely. It must be followed by a test of capacity iu actual ser- 
vice during a probationary period. And all appointments to the 
service, even where carrying pay, are provisional and conditioned 
upon proof of capacity for the particular positions to be filled as 
shown in actual service. 

The entire Library service (excepting the Engineer, Janitor, 
and Printing Departments and the Bindery, and the Sunday and 
Evening service which is paid by the hour) is divided into grades. 
Each grade begins with a minimum salary and progresses, by an 
annual increase, to a maximum. No such increase, however, will 
be paid unless the work of the employee has proved satisfactory 
to the Trustees. The maximum reached, no further increase is 
possible, except by promotion to a higher grade. Such promotion 
also is based upon an examination, combined, however, with cer- 
tificate of capacity from the head of the department in which the 
employee has served. 

The ordinary grades are supposed to provide for positions 
where academic knowledge is necessary ; the special grades for 
those positions where special capacities (as knowledge of type- 
writing, executive ability, etc.) are more particularly required. 

Applicants for positions in the higher grades must satisfy the 
examiners of their ability to pass the examinations for all the 
grades below that for which they make application. 



154 City Document No. 21. 

To the above general qualifications must be added in each case 
such special qualifications as may be requisite for the particular 
positions to he filled. 

Herbert Putnam, 

lAbrarian. 

Blank for Application. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 
application. 

I lierel)y make application to be examined for a position in 
Grade of the Public Library service of the City of 

Boston. 

As part of my application I declare the answers to the follow- 
ing questions to be true and in my own handwriting. 

Each question must be answered or the blank will be returned. 

1 . Are you married or single ? 

2. Wliere do you reside and what is your post-office address? 
(G-ive town or city, including street and number.) 

3. How long have you been a resident of said cit}^ or town? 

4. Are you a citizen of the United States? 

5. What is the date and place of your birth? 

6. What is your father's and mother's full name? Give name 
whether living or dead. 

7. Have you ever been examined for the pulUic service in 
any State or city? If so, when, where, for what branch and 
grade of the service and with what result? 

8. Are you in good health? Have you any mental or physi- 
cal incapacity of which you are aware? 

9. What is your present occupation and what has been your 
past occupation? Give places and dates of emplo3'ment as near 
as you can. 

10. In what schools, academy or college were you educated? 
Give the name and length of course in each. 

11. Have you any experience or do you possess any special 
qualifications, such as a knowledge of book-keeping, stenog- 
raphy, typewriting, foreign languages or a familiarity with other 
branch or branches of knowledge, which in your opinion would 
be useful in the service of the Public Liljrary, and not included 
among the requirements for the grade in which you are an appli- 
cant ? 

12. What experience in library work have you had? 

13. In what department of this libraiy do you think 3'our 
capacities would be useful? 

[Signature: all names in full.] 
Bost07i^ 189 . 



Library Department. 155 

Any other facts you desire to mentiou : [Certificates and tes- 
timonials may be mentioned, and copies may be enclosed. The 
originals need not, unless called for.] 

Whe?i filled out, fold twice, as indicated, and return to the 
Xiibrarian of the Boston Puhlic L,ihrary. 



156 City Document No. 21, 



APPENDIX XII. 



CORRESPONDENCE, BEQUESTS, ETC. 

Kate Field Collection. 

Boston, April 20, 1898. 
Herbert Pltxam, Esq., 

Librarian. Public Library : 

My Dear Mr. Putnam, — Last autumn you most kiudly ac- 
ceded to my desire to be permitted to give to the Library the 
MSS. and autograph letters, from famous persons, belonging to 
Kate Field ; and I have just now received, by this morning's 
mail, a letter from Mr. T. Sanford Beaty, the executor and the 
chief and residuary legatee of Miss Field, a letter saying : 
' ' It seems to me a most charming idea to so preserve dear Miss 
Field's MSS., and I should certainly advise you to turn them over 
to Mr. Putnam." 

Mr. Beaty has just returned from a long absence ; and while I 
knew he would approve this, I had no right to do so until 1 had 
his official permission. 

That Miss Field's memoiy may be thus "kept green " by a 
"Kate Field Collection'" in the noble Library fulfils the dearest 
wish of my heart. 

Very faithfully yours, 

(Signed) Lilian Whitinc^. 



Library of the American Statistical Association. 

Boston, Mass., June 16, 1898. 

To the Trustees of the Loston Public Library : 

G-ENTLEjrEN, — The American Statistical Association, of which 
General Walker was President for so many years, until the time 
of his death, and of which Colonel Wright is now President, has 
a valuable library of statistical works, especially rich in public 
documents of foreign countries. ... At the last meeting of 
the Association, held in April of this year, the Libraiy Commit- 
tee of the Association was given power to transfer the library to 



Library Department. 157 

the Trustees of the Boston Public Library if they were willing to 
accept the gift, the only condition being that the purely statisti- 
cal portion of the library should be kept together, and that mem- 
bers of the Association should have free access to the shelves of 
this collection. In the wish that this collection be kept together, 
there is no desire, however, to handicap the Public Library in 
any way in the administration of its work. Undoubtedly there 
are many pubUc documents which are duplicates of those in the 
Public Library. If so, those volumes of the Statistical Associa- 
tion should be separated and given to some other institution. 
Other works which are not of a statistical character, which have 
found their way into the Library of our Association, should also 
be separated and shelved according to the general classification 
now in use by the Public Library. 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Davis E. Dewey, 

Secretary. 

I should add that current periodicals and issues received by 
the Association would be given to the Library at stated dates. 



Bust of Sir Walter Scott. 

BoLESiDE, Galashiels, N. B., 21st July, 1898. 

The Sir Walter Scott Memorial. 

Sir, — The United States Ambassador has sent me your letter 
to him of the 6th instant, accepting, on behalf of the City of 
Boston, of the bust of Sir Walter Scott, purchased by the West- 
minster Committee from Mr. Hutchison, R.S.A., Edinburgh, 
with their surplus funds, and intended for the Public Library of 
your city. I shall, accordingly, at once cause the bust to be for- 
warded to the care of Your Honor. I believe that it will be ap- 
preciated, not only as a beautiful work of art, but as affording the 
citizens of Boston the gratification of having amongst them a very 
faithful counterpart of the features of that great genius, whose 
shrine so many of them annually visit. It is a very perfect 
copy of the famous Chantrey Bust in Abbotsford, and is, as you 
are aware, a duplicate of that placed last year in Westminster 
Abbey. I enclose a list of the subscribers to the Westminster 
Bust, which may not be without interest to the Library Trustees. 
have the honor to be, Mr. Mayor, 

Your most obedient servant, 

(Signed) Richard Lees. 



158 City Document No. 21. 



The Hox. Josiah Qlincy, 

Mai/ or of Boston , U. S. America. 

The Westminster Committee on the Sir Walter Scott 
Memorial, Richard Lees, Honorary Secretary: 

Sir, — The Trustees of the Public Library in the City of 
Boston have received from His Honor, Josiah Quincy, Mayor, 
the Bust of Sir Walter Scott, purchased by the Westminster 
Committee from ]Mr. Hutchison, R.S.A., for deposit in this 
Library, 

We are glad to have so faithful a copy of Chantrey's celebrated 
work among our treasures of literatui'e and art, and we are grate- 
ful for the generosity of the subscribers, and still more for the 
siDirit which has prompted the gift. 

We recognize in this act of international courtesy a mark of 
that growing harmony of interests between the two leading pow- 
ers in the civilization of the world, which, if sometimes latent, 
always has been strong beneath all disturbing incidents, and 
which, well directed, may be the assurance of peace and pros- 
perity to the nations of the earth. 

The patrons of this Library will always view with admiration 
the l)ust of this great magician who touched all the incidents of 
history, the customs of the period and the eminent characters of 
the time, bringing them into finished and immortal pictures which 
have put succeeding ages under grateful obligations. 

If Sir Walter's genius was descriptive rather than creative 
there yet runs through all his writings such a loftiness and purity 
of moral sentiment that they have furnished the world with avast 
amount of cheer and hope, and we rejoice to find that this delight 
which he has already provided for three generations shows no de- 
cline in the readers of a great Pul)lic Library to-day. 

With highest respect and esteem, the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston : 

(Signed) Frederick O. Prince, President. 
.losiAH H. Benton, Jr., 
h. p. bow^ditch, 
James De Normandie, 
Solomon Lincoln. 
Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian and Clerk of the Corporation. 

Dated at Boston, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
U.S.A., in the year of our Lord 1898, and of the founding of 
the city, 269. 



Library Department. 159 



Original Blocks of Wood Engravings, Executed by Egbert 
Louis Stevenson. 

Care of Mitchell it Baxter, W. S., Jl South Charlotte Street, 

Edinburgh, Scotland, November 8, 1808. 

Secretary, Boston Library : 

Dear Sir, — Mrs. R. L. Stevenson begs me to write and ask 
you whether the Library would care to receive as a gift a set of 
twenty-four wood engravings (original blocks) executed by her 
husband, the well-known novelist? Fac-siniile impressions of 
these blocks were used in the Bonus Volume of the "Edinburgh 
Edition " of Robert Louis Stevenson's works, and must therefore 
be already known to you. At present the blocks are in the 
possession of Messrs. Constable & Co., the Edinburgh printers, 
who are printing from them a limited number of copies for 
certain subscribers on the understanding that when the work is 
completed the blocks shall be handed to a pul)lic institution which 
shall bind itself that they shall never be used again. Would your 
great Library, therefore, be willing to receive these blocks on this 
pledge of never re2yrocli(cinf/ copies from them.'' The blocks 
are valuable only from the sentiment and association attached 
to them. 

If the Library should be willing to accept them, might 1 ask 
you to write accordingly to Mr. Charles Baxter . . . the 
late Mr. Stevenson's executor — whom I have instructed to send 
you the blocks on the completion of the volume at present in 
Messrs. Constable's hands. Mrs. Stevenson is leaving in a 
week's time for ^Madeira, where she is to spend the winter, and is 
therefore unable to take charge of the matter herself. 

I remain 

Very trulj^ yours, 
(Signed) Lloyd Osbourne. 



Henry Sargent Codman Memorial. 

Brookline, January i', 1899. 

The Trustees of the Boston Puhlic Library : 

Gentlemen, — Under date of May 24, 1897, and January 21, 
1898, your Board has received from Mr. Charles F. McKim com- 
munications with reference to a fund which friends of the late 
Henry Sargent Codman of Brookline propose to turn over to 
the Boston Public Library to be known as the Henry Sargent 
Codman Memorial Fund. 

Mr. McKim addressed you as Trustee of the fund, and under 
date of January 21 he enclosed a check for the amount then on 
hand, $2,852.41. 



160 City Document No. 21. 

He communicated to you the aim of the donors that the fund 
should be used " to perpetuate the memory " of Mr. Codmau 
"■ by keeping alive, maintaining, and from time to time adding to 
the plants, trees, and other foliage, within the Public Library, 
provided this should be acceptable to the Trustees." 

Since the above was written, consideration has induced the 
donors of the fund to believe that it might more effectively be 
utilized in some other way, for instance, particularly by the pur- 
chase of books upon landscape gardening. 

1 am now authorized, acting in behalf of Mr. McKim as well as 
of the various contributors to the fund, to assent to this disposal 
of the fund. And this assent applies both to the amount already 
turned in and to any contributions that may l)e subsequently 
added to it. 

It is the desire of the donors that a special book-plate shall be 
inserted in each one of the volumes purchased from the fund, 
identifying it as part of this memorial collection. 

"N'ery truly yours, 
(Signed) M. R. Sargent. 



Library Department. 



161 



APPENDIX XIII. 



GIFTS. 

See also pp. 5, 10, 21, 23, 2G-2y of main body of report. 

Givers ........ 

Volumes ....... 

Numbers ....... 

Photographs, engravings, etc. 

Newspaper subscriptions. (Gift of tlie publishers) 

1. Endowments. 

January 2, 1899. From tlie friends of the late 
Henry Sargent Codman for the purchase of 
books on landscape gardening, the sum of 



1,946 

11,245 

15,560 

309 

69 



!,852 41 



2, Works of Art. 

From the Committee on the Scott Memorial in '\^'^estminster 
Abbey, a copy in marble (by John Hutchison, R.S.A.) of 
the bust of Sir Walter Scott by Chantrey. 



3. Miscellaneous Gifts of Money. 

From Miss Lilian Whiting, for arranging the Kate 
Field Collection of Manuscript Letters, the sum of 



4. Photographs, Engravings, etc. 



Abbot Memorial Library 
Anonymous . 
Avery, Samuel P. . 
Ball, William T. W. 
Barnard, James M. 
Bayridge Free Library . 
Boston City Hospital 
Boston Browning Society 
Brockton Public Library 
Brown, Dr. Francis H. . 
Bullivant, William M. . 
Carnegie P'ree Library . 
Butte Free Public Library 
Case Memorial Library . 
Chevalier, Samuel A. 
Columbia University 

Coolidge, Baldwin . 
Curtis & Cameron . 
Erie Public Library 



$25 00 



1 Photograph. 
10 Photographs. 

2 Engravings. 

1 Silver Medal. 
1 Photograph. 

1 " 

2 Photographs. 
3 

2 " 

4 Engravings. 

1 Bronze^Medal. 

1 Photograph. 

2 Photographs. 

2 " 

1 Photograph. 
1 Photograph and 
1 Bronze Medal. 

3 Photographs. 

4 " 

3 Illustrations. 



162 



City Document No. 21. 



Everett, Fred E 

Fleiscliner, Otto .... 

Foster, .John R., and Stephen B. . 

Foster, William E. . . . 

Gail Borden Public Librar}^ 

'Green, Dr. Samuel A. . 

Greenough, J. F. . 

Groton Public Library . 

Hamilton Pu1)lic Library 

Hartford Free Library . 

Heaton, A. G. . 

Hubbard Free Library . 

Iconographic Society 

Illinois College, .Tones .Memorial Library 

Indianapolis PuV)lic Library 

James Prendergast Free Lil)rary 

King, George R. . 

Knapp, Arthur Mason . 

Meekin's Library .... 

Monks, Br. George H. . 



New York Public Library 
Omaha Public Librar}' . 
Osterhout Free Library . 
Pasadena Public Library 
Peck Memorial Library . 
Perabo, Ernst .... 
Putnam, Misses Shirley and Brenda 
Richards Library .... 
San P'rancisco Mercantile Library . 
Sargent, Br. Dudley A. 
Small, Maynard & Co. . 

Smith, Miss Sarah S. . 
Stevenson, Mrs. Robert Louis 



Stokes, 3Iiss Caroline P. . . . 

Switzerland. Bureau International des 

Administrations Telegraphiques 
Tufts Library 

United States Naval Academy 
"Warren, Samuel M. 
Watts de Peyster Library 
"VMiitney, James L. 
Winona Fi'ce Public Library . 
Wiuslow, Lieut.- Com. Herbert, U.S.N. 
Winther, Charles A. G. 



1 Photograph. 
LS Photographs. 



1 Photograph. 
1 Engraving. 
4 Drawings. 
1 Engraving. 
4 Photographs. 
1 Photograph. 
1 " 

3 Photographs. 
1 Etching. 

1 Engraving. 

1 Photograph. 

1 

1) Photographs. 

1 Photograph. 

1 '^ 

117 Photographs and 
Engravings, 

2 AVater Colors. 

4 Photograi)hs. 
1 Photograph. 

I 

1 " 

1 " 

2 Photographs. 

1 Drawing (framed). 
1 Photograph. 

5 Photoo'raphs. 

6 ^' 

27 Photographs and 
Prints. 
1 Engraving. 
24 Wooden Blocks, 
engraved by 
Mr. Stevenson. 
1 Engraving 
(framed). 

8 Charts. 

1 Photograph. 

2 Photographs. 
1 Copperplate. 

1 Print. 

13 Photographs. 

2 "" 

1 Photograph. 
1 Enoravino-. 



LiBKAKY Department. 



163 



5. Books, Newspapers and Periodicals. 



Abbott, Rev. Edward, Cambridge^ Mass. 

Abbott, Dr. Samuel W 

Abbott Memorial Library, Dexter, Me. . . 1 plan 
Aberdeen Public Library, Aberdeen, Scotland . 
Academy of Medicine of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, O. 
Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Academy of Science of St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. 
Actors' Fund of the United States of America, New York 

City 

Adadourian, Rev. Haig, Plymouth, Mass. . 

Ai]a,m, F.ohert B., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Adams, Andrew N., Fair IJaven, Vt. . 

Adams, IIoji. Charles Francis, Lincoln, Mass. 

Adams, Charles Francis, Sherborn, Mass. 

Adams, J. L., Neio York City .... 1 map 

Adams Nervine Asylum 

Adler, Simon L., i?ocftesier, iV.F. 

Aguilar Free liibrary, Neio York City . 

Alabama. Department of Agriculture, Montgomery 

Albany Medical College, .4 ^ftoji?/, N.Y. 

Alumni Association ..... 

Alden, Rev. E. J., Chicago, III 

Alden, William H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alden & Harlow, Pittsburgh, Pa. ... 5 plans 

Alexander, De Alva Stanwood, Buffalo, N.Y. 
Alfred University, ^i/recZ, iV.!". .... 

Alkaloidal Clinic, Publishers of, Chicago, III. 

AWen, Edwurd G., London, England . 

Allen, George H. ...... . 

Allen, Hon. William V., Washington, B.C. 
Allison, J)r. H. E., Fishkill-on-Hudson, N.Y. 
Allyn, Mrs. E. G., Dubuque, Iowa . 2 pieces of 
Ambrozovics, Bela, Vienna, Austria . 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences 
American Agriculturist Library, Springfield, Mass. 
American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Salem, Mass. ....... 

American Baptist Home Mission Society, New York City 
American Bible Society, New York City 
American Catholic Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pa 
American Citizen .... 1898-99 subscription 

American Climatological Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Colonization Society, Washington, D.C. 
American Congregational Association .... 

American Druggist Publishing Co., New York City . 
American Geographical Society, New York City . 
American Historical Association, Washington, D.C. 

1 broadside 
American Homes Publishing Co., Knoxville, Tenn. 

1898-99 subscription 
American Institute of Architects, Providence, R.I. 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 
American-Irish Historical Society 
American Jewess Publishing Co., New York City 
American Laryngological Association, Washington, D.C. 
American Library Association ..... 

American Missionary Association, Neiv York City 
American Museum of Natural History, Neu) York City 



Vols. 



Nos. 

58.5 

24 



1 

1.5 

4 



164 



City Document No. 21. 



American New Church Tract and Publication Society, 

Philadelphia, Pa 

American Numismatic and Arcbwological Society, JVeio 

York City 

American Otological Society, New Bedford, Mass. 
American Park and Out-door Art Association 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American School of Correspondence .... 
American Seamen's Friend Society, New York City 
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal* 

Xev^ York City 

American Society of Civil Engineers, Neic York City . 
American Society of Naturalists, Providence, B.I. 
American Society of Eailroad Superintendents. Asbury 

Park, N.J. 

American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools 

for Nurses, A-eir York City .... 
American Statistical Association 
American Surgical Association, PhiladelpJda, Pa. 
American Unitarian Association .... 
American Water Works Association, Neiu York City 
Americanische Turnzeitung, 3Iilwaukee, Wis. 

1898-99 subscription 

Ames, George 

Amherst College, Amherst, 3Iass. .... 

Amherst Student. Editors of, Amlierst, I^Lass. 

Ammon, Br. Otto, Karlsruhe, Baden, Ger)nany . 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Mass. 

Andover Theological Seminary, Alumni Association 

Andover, Mass. ....... 

Andrews, Charles L., Augusta, Me. .... 

Andrian-Werburg, Ferdinand, Freiherr von, 

Austria ........ 

Anonymous ....... 

Apollo Iron & Steel Co., Pittsburg, Pa. . 1 
Apollonio, Miss Mabel S. ..... . 

Appalachian Mountain Club ..... 

Appleton, D. F., Ijtsiolch. Mass. .... 

Appleton, Francis H 

Appleton. William S 

Apprentices' Library Company of Philadelphia, Pltila 

delphia. Pa, 

Arbo, Major C. O. E., Brammen, Norway. 
Argus (Swedish) .... 1898-99 subscription 
Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Fayetteville, Ark 
Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago, 111. 
Armstrong, R. M. ...... 

Arnold, F. E., Braintree, 3fass 

Arnold, Howard P 

Art Club of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Asociacion Salitrera de Propaganda, Iquique, Chile 
Associated Charities of Cambridge, Cambridge, Mass. 
Association of American Medical Colleges, Chicago, III. 
Association of American Physicians, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Astronomical Society of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal 

Atherton, Henry B., Nashua, N.Il 

Atkins, I)r. Francis H. 

Atkinson, Hon. Edward 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga 

Australian Association for the Advancement of Science, 

Sydney, New South Wales 



Vols. 



2 

5,000 
1 



Vienna, 

2 maps 
broadside 



160 



1 

58 

1 



LiBEARY Department. 



165 



map 



Eng- 



Australian Museum, Sydney, Xeiv South Wales , 

Avery, Hon. EIroy M., Cleveland, O. . 

Avery, Samuel P., New York City 

Axon, William E. A., Manchester, England 

Ayer, Prof. Charles C., Boulder, Col. . 

Ayer, Rev. Joseph C, Jr., Nantucket, Mass. 

Bacon, William P., New Britain, Conn. 

Bailey, Andrew J 

Baillie's Institution Free Library, Glasgou\ Scotland 
Baker, Marcus. Washington, B.C. 

Baker, Walter, & Co 

Baker, Hon. William C, Providence, B.I. . 
Baldwin, Prof. J. Mark, Princeton, N.J. . 

Ball, T. R., Baltimore, Md 

Ball, William T. W 

Balmaseda, Francisco J., Havana, Cuba 
Baltimore, Md., Sewerage Commission 
Bangor Public Library, Bangor, Me. . 

Bangs, Outiam 

Barker, Wharton, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Barnard, James M. ..... . 

Barnard Memorial ...... 

Barnes, Dr. Henry J 

Barnes, William A. ..... . 

Barney, Dr. Charles N. 

Barnicoat Fire Association ..... 

Barre, Mass., Town of 

Barrow-in-Furness Free Public Library, Lancashire 

land ......... 

Barrows, Hon. Samuel J., Washington, B.C. 
Barry, Bev. Henry A. ..... . 

Bartlett, Prof. Dana P 

Bassett, F. G., Seymour, Conn. .... 

Batchelder, Dr. F. P 

Bates, AValdron ....... 5 

Batsford, B. T., London, England 

Battersea Public Library, London, England 

Baxter, Sylvester, Maiden, Mass. 

Bayridge Free Library, Bayridge, L.I. . . 1 plan 

Beacon 2 1898-99 subscriptions 

Beddoe, Br. John, Paisley, Scotland . 

Bedford, Augustus 

Jieer, Wi\\\a.m, New Orleans, La. . . 1 newspaper 

Belfast Library, Belfast, Ireland 

Bel], Prof. Alexander Graham, Wasldngton. B.C. 
Belling, Prof. Karl J., Worcester, Maxs. ... 
Benevolent Fraternity of Churches .... 
Bennington Battle Monument and Historical Association, 

Bennington, Vt 

Bent, Allen H 

Benton, Josiah H., Jr 1 map 

Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn. 
Berkshire Baptist Association, Pittsjield, Mas:s. . 
Berle, Bee. Adolph A., Brightini. Slass. 
Berlin, Germany, Koeniglich-Preiissische Friedrich Wil 

helm's Universitat ....... 

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum of Polynesian Ethnology 

and Natural History, Honolulu, Hawaiian Island 
Bertholon, Br. L., Tunis, Africa 
Biagi, Prof. Guido, Florence, Italy 
Bigelow, Mrs. Andrew, SoutJdjoro', Mass. . 
Bimetallic League, Manchester, England 



maps 



Vols. 
22 



119 
1 



12 
3 

1 



1 
10 

2 
1 
1 
1 



Xos. 

23 

4 

1 



1 
10 

6 
1 



1 
57 



166 



City Document No. 21. 



58 



broadsides 



broadside 



3 maps 



Bingham, Hon. Harry, Littleton^ N.H. 

Biological Society of Washington, Wa><hington, B.C. 

Birkenhead Free Public Libraries, Birkenhead, England 

Birmingham, England, Free Libraries Committee 

Blackett, Spencer C, London, England 

Blaisdell, Frank C. . , .' . 

Bliss, Rev. W. D. P., San Gabriel, Cat 

Boardman, Samuel L., Bangor, Me. 

Bogelot, Mme. Isabelle, Paris, France 

Bolles, Br. William P. ... 

Bolton, Charles K. .... 

Bolton, Prof. H. Carrington, Washington, !).(' 

Bolton Public Library, Bolton, England 

Bonney, Charles L., Chicago, III. 

Boston. Assessing Department . 

Board of Election Commissioners 

Board of Health 

Board of Overseers of the Poor 

Board of Police 

Cemeteiy Department 

City Auditor .... 

City Clerk .... 

City Hospital .... 

City Messenger .... 

City Treasurer .... 

Collecting Department 

Department of Municipal Statistics 

Phigineering Department . 

Fire Department 

Institutions Department , 

Law Department 

Park Commissioners 

Penal Institutions Department 

Printing Department 

Public Buildings Department . 

Public Grounds Department 

Registry Department 

School Committee 

Street Laying-Out Department 

Water Department . 

Wire Department 

Boston Art Club . 

Boston Associated Chai-ities . 

Boston Athenfeum 

Boston Browning Society 

Boston Budget 

Boston Chamber of Commerce 

Boston Children's Aid Society 

Boston College 

Boston Courier 

Boston Daily Advertiser 

Boston Daily Globe 

Boston East Baptist Association 

Boston Evening Transcript . 

Boston Fish Bureau 

Boston Floating Hospital 



Boston Herald 

Boston Ideas .... 

Boston Insane Hospital 

Boston Journal 

Boston Medical Society 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts 



1898 



99 subscription 



1898-99 subscription 

1898-99 subscription 

2 1898-99 subscriptions 

Reading, Mass. 

12 1898-99 subscriptions 



2 1898-99 subscriptions 
1898-99 subscription 



2 1898-99 subscriptions 



Vols. 
1 
2 
1 

1 

47 

301 

1 

2 
2 
2 
3 

1 

2 

16 
1 
2 
1 



121 



15 
40 



37 
1 
2 



LlBEAEY DePARTjMENT. 



167 



Vols. 



1898-99 subscription 

1898-99 subscription 

2 1898-99 subscriptions 



Boston Mycological <^ lub, Cambridge, Mass. 

Boston Nortli End Mission 

Boston Parents' Association for Deaf Children . 

Boston Post 2 1898-99 subscriptions 

Boston Protective Department 

Boston Provident Association ...... 

Boston Society of Medical Sciences 

Boston Society of Natural History 

Boston Telegraph .... 

Boston Times .... 

Boston Traveler .... 

Boston University 

Boston Veteran Firemen's Association 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association . 

Boston Young Men's Christian Union . 

Bostoner Anzeiger . . . 1898-99 subscription 

Bostonian Society 

Botanical Society of America, St. Louis, Mo. 

Botume, J. Frank . . . . . 

Boutwell, Hon. George S 

Bowditch, Prof. Henry P 

Bowditch, Miss Olivia Y 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. 

Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Me. . 

Boys' Institute of Industry .... 

Brabrook, E. W., London, England 

Bradbury, Benjamin F. .... 

Bradford, Dr. Edward H 

Bradford, England, Public Free Libraries 

Bradlee, Mrs. Caleb D., Brookline, Ifass. . 

Bradley, Milton, & Co., Springfield, Mass. . 

Brady, Prof. .J. Everett, North((mpton, Mass 

Bramhall, Frank .J., Chicago, III. 

Breck, Joseph, & Sons ..... 

Brent, Rev. Charles H. . 

Brinton, Br. Daniel G., Media, Pa.. . 

Brisco, John Potter, Nottingham, England . 

British and Foreign Bible Society, ioH'7o)!, England 

British and Foreign Unitarian Association, London, Eng- 
land 

Bromley Public Library, Bromley, Kent, England 

Brookline Education Society, Brookline, Mass. . 

Brookline Public Library, Brookline, Mass. 

Brooklyn, ^.!r., Civil Service Commission . 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, N. T. 1898-99 subscription 

Brooklyn Daily Times, Brooklyn, JSf. T. 1898-99 subscription 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn, N. T. . 

Brooklyn Public Library Association, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N . Y. . . . . . 

Brooks, Francis A 

Brooks, Frederick ........ 

Brooks, Bev. William H. ...... . 

Brophy, Thomas C. . . . Newspaper clippings 

Brown, Albert W. . 

Brown, Allen A. ........ . 

Brown, Br. Francis H 1 map 

Brown, John Howard ........ 

Brown University, Providence, R.I. ..... 

Library ......... 

Buckingham, Dr. Edward M. 

Buenos Aires, Argentine RepnMic, Biblioteca del Museo 
Nacional .......... 



22 

27 



1 
1 

3 

11 
1 
1 

1 
3 

13 
1 
3 



268 

18 

1 



Nos. 
5 

10 
2 

1 

7 



302 
1 
1 
1 



303 

3 
6 
3 
3 



1 
1.33 



1 
60 

3 

127 



168 



City Docuiment No. 21. 



Buenos Aires, Argentine Re^niblic, Oficina Meteorologica 
Argentina ......... 

Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, N.T. . 

Buffalo Public Library, iiujaio, iV".F. 

Bulletin Publishing Co., Toronto, Canada . 

Bulloch, Dr. Joseph G. B., Green Bay, Wis. 

Bunker Hill Boys Club 

Bunker Hill Monument Association .... 

Burdett, Everett W 

Burdge. Franklin, New York City .... 

Burr, William H., Washington, D.C 

Burrage, Eev. H. S., Portland, Me 

Burton, C. M., Detroit, Mich 

Bushee, .J. L. 

Business, Publishers of. New York City 

Butler, Charles H., Washington, D.C 

Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, B. T. 

Butte Free Public Library, Butte City, Mont. 

Cabot, Godfrey L. 

Cadieux & Derome, Montreal, Canada 

Caldwell, Augustine, Ipsioich, Mass 

Caldwell, Augustine, and A, W. Dow, Ipswich, Mass. 

Caldwell, Miss M. T 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, Cal, . 

California Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley, Cal 

Cambridge, England, Library Syndicate 

Cambridge, Mass.. Board of Overseers of the Poor 

Park Department ...... 

Cambridge Press, Cambridge, Mass. 1898-99 subscription 

Cambridge Public Library, Cambridge, 3Iass. 

Cambridge University, Cambridge, England, Observatory 

Campbell, Bradford, West Somerville, Mass. 

Canada. Parliament, Ottawa .... 9 maps 

House of Commons, Ottawa .... 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa . 

Archives Branch, Ottav-a 

Central Experimental Farms, Ottawa . 

Statistical Division, Ottawa . 

Department of the Interior, Ottawa . .11 maps 

Geological and Natural History Survey, Montreal 

Government Printing Bureau, Ottawa 

Inland Revenue Department, Laboratory, Ottawa 

Superintendent of Insurance, Oii(v»;a 

Patent Office, Ottawa 

Canadian Military Institute, Toronto, Canada 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal, Canada 

Canton High School Association, Canton, Mass. . 

Cape of Good Hope, Statistical Department, Cape Town, 
South Africa ......... 

Carles, Dr. C, Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic. 2 maps 

Carmarthen Joint Counties Lunatic Asylum, Carmarthen, 
Wales 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa. . . . . 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Carrick, Samuel P. 

Case, A. P., Vernon, N.Y 

Case, Mrs. James B . 

Case Memorial Library, Hartford, Conn 

Casson, HeibertN 

Castilian Club ......... 

Castor, T. H., & Co 

Cathcart, W. 11. , Cleveland, O 



Vols. 



2 
2 
1 
31 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
5 

27 

11 

1 

1 



1 
4 
1 
1 
43 

1 
4 



Library Departiment. 



169 



Catholic News, Nev: York City . 1898-99 subscription 

Catholic Review, Neiv York City . . 1898 subscription 
Catholic University of America, Washington, B.C. 

Caverno, Rev. Charles, Lombard^ III 

Chadwick, Dr. James R 

Chamberlain, George W.. Weymouth. Mass. 
Chamberlayne, Miss Catharine J. . . . . . 

Chandler, Prof. Francis W. 

Chandler, Horace P 

Chandler, fio«. W. E., Tr«.s/iy-»;/^o?i, i).C 

Channing, Dr. Walter ........ 

Channing Home ......... 

Chantre, I)r. Ernest, Lyons, France ..... 

Chapin, I)r. Charles V.. Providence, B.I 

Chapin, Eugene 

Charity Organization Society of the City of New York 
Charlton, John S., Grand Junction. Col. .... 

Chase, Miss Edith L 

Chase, F. E 

Chase, Walter G 

Chelsea, Mass., City of 

Chelsea Gazette, Chelsea, Mass. . 1898-99 subscription 

Chenery, Winthrop L.. Belmont. Mass 

Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D. . . . ... 

Cheney, Dr. Frederick E. . . .... 

Chevalier, Samuel A. . 

Chicago, III., Civil Service Commission .... 

Department of Public Works ..... 

South Park Commissioners ..... 

Chicago Board of Trade, Chicar/o, III. ..... 

Chicago College of Law, Chicago, III 

Chicago Public Library. Chicago, III 

Chicago Times-Herald, Chicago, III. 1898-99 subscription 
Children's Aid Society, Xeiv York City .... 

Children's Hospital 

Chile. Oficina Hidrografica de la Marina, Santiago . 
China, Glass and Lamps. Publisher of, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Choate, Charles F. 

Choate, Hon. Joseph H., Xew York City .... 

Christian 1898-99 subscription 

Christian Recorder, Philadelphia. Pa. 1898-99 subscription 
Christian Science Publishing Society . 
Church, Hon. Alonzo W., Washington, D.C. 
Church Home for Orphans and Destitute Children 

Church Social Union 

Cigar Makers' International Union of America 
Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, Cincinnati. O. 
Cincinnati Public Library. Cincinnati, O. . 
Clapham Public Library. London. Em/land 
Clark, Rev. George T.. We.vt Acton, Mass 
Clark, Richard U., New York City 
Clark, V. A., Chicago. III. . 
Clark, William A. ' . 
Clarke, George K. .... 

Clarke, W. B., Co 

Clarke School for the Deaf, Xorthampton, Ma.ss. 

Clerkenwell Public Library, London, England . 

Cleveland Board of Education, Cleveland, O. 

Cleveland Citizen, Cleveland, O. . 1898-99 subscription 

Cleveland Municipal Association, Cleveland, O. 

Cleveland Public Library. Cleveland. O. 

Clifford & Lawton. Xei'- York City . 



Vols. Nos. 



2 

2 

21 

1 

2 
4 



1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
3 
11 

1 

3 

1 
1 

1 

2 



1 
1 
1 

4 

10 

1 



15 
1 

2 
1 
1 
6 
9 



1 

2 

1 

12 



170 



City Docujnient No. 21. 



oHm.< 



,Col 



Club of Odd Volumes .... 
Cobb, Rev. William H. . . . 

Cocke, Mis.^i Zitella .... 
Codman, Mrs. James M., BrookUne, Mass 
Coffin, Mrs. Eva E., Peterborough, N.H. 
Cogshall, W. A. and E. A. Douglass . 
Colby, James W., Cambridgeport, Mass. 
Colby University, Waterville, Me. 
Coleman, Silas B., Detroit, Mich. 
Colgate University, Hamilton, X. Y. 

College Club 

College of New Jersey, Princeton, N.J. 
College of Physicians and Surgeons 
College Settlements Association . 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts 
Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station, Fort C 
Columbia University, Neio York City . 
Columbus, O., Public School Library . 
Concord Free Public Library, Concord, Mass. 
Concord Public Library, Concord, N.H. 
Congregational Home Missionary Society, New York City 
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Neio Haven 
Conn. ......... 

Connecticut. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Noj-tuich 

Secretary of State, Hartford .... 

State Board of Health, New Haven . 

State Library, Hartford 

Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn. . 
Consolidation Coal Company, Baltimore, Md. 
Consumers' League of Massachusetts .... 
Continental Iron Works, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
Contogonis, Prof. S. D., Woburn, Mass. ... 

Coogler, J. Gordon, Columbia, S.C 

Cook, Thomas N., BrookUne, Mass. .... 

Cooper Union, Neio York City ..... 

Co-operative Union, Long Mitigate, Manchester, England 
Copeland & Day ........ 

Copenhagen, Denmark, Kongelige Bibliothek 

Coriat, Isador H. ....... . 

Cornell University, 7^7mc«, A^.r. .... 

Library ........ 

Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Ithaca, N.Y 
Corriere di Boston .... 1898-99 subscription 

Corthell, E. L., .Ve;^ York City . 
Courrier de Boston .... 1898 subscription 

Courtney, Dr. Joseph W. ..... 

Cowing, Miss Grace G. 

Cox, Hon. William R., Washington. D.C. . 
Crawford and Balcarres, Earl of. Wigan, England 
Crawford, Hon. John L., Tallahassee, Fla. 
Creighton University, Omaha, Neb. 
Criado y Domingues, Juan Pedro, Madrid, Spain 
Crisp, Frederick A., London, England 

Crocker, Miss M. H 

Crosbie, Robert '. 

Crosby, John L., Bara/or, Me. 

Cross, Prof. Charles R. ... 

Crow, Moses R., Neio York City . 

Croydon Public Library, Croydon, England 

Cruikshank, Capt. E., Toronto, Canada 



Vols. 
2 
1 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
4 

1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

1 

10 
1 
1 
1 
3 



1 
16 



Library Department. 



171 



Cruz Roja, Madrid, Sinthi . . 1898-99 subscription 

Cuckson, Rev. John 

Cupples, Joseph G., Brooklinc, Mass. 

Currier, A. H. . _ . . 1 broadside, 2 newspapers 

Currier, Br. C. Gilman, New Yurk City 

Custer, Mrs. Elizabeth 'B.,Neii; York City . 

Cuthberr, Alexander A., Glasgow, Scotland 

Cutler Manufacturing Co., Eochester, N.Y. 

Cutler School, New York City .... 

Cutter, Drs. Ephraim and John A., New York City 

Dachsel, C. A. Paul, Sheboygan, Wis. 

Daily Report, San Francisco, Cal. . 1898 subscription 

Dall, Mrs. Caroline H., Washington, B.C. . 

Daniels, Dr. Edwin A 

Danish Biological Station, Copenhagen, Denmark 

Dante Society, Cambridge, Mass. 

Danvers Historical Society, Danvers, Mass. 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. . 

Dartmouth Literary Monthly, Publishers of, Hanover, N.H. 

Davis, Andrew McF., Cambridge, Mass. 

Davis, F. A., Co., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Davis, James C 

Davis, Simon ....... 

Day, Fred H 

Daymude, James L 1 piece of music 

Dayton Public Library and Museum, Dayton, O 

Deacon, Edward, Bridgeport, Conn. . 

Dean, John Ward ..... 

Deane, George C, Cambridge, Mass. . 212 manuscripts 

Deane, John M., Fall River, Mass. 

Dedham, Mass., Town of . . . 

Delano, Mi.ss Julia, Neio Bedford, Mass. 

Dellenbaugh, F. S., New York City 

Del Mar, Alexander, London, England 

Denison University, Granville, O. 

Detroit Public Library, Detroit, Mich. 

Deuerlich'sche Buchhandlung, GiMingen, Germany . 

Deutsche Gesellschaft der Stadt New Yorli, New York City 

Dexter, Miss Mary, Cincinnati, O. . . . . 

Dickinson, Marquis F., Jr 

Dippold, Prof. George T 

District of Columbia. Committee to Investigate the Cbari 

ties and Reformatory Institutions, Washington 
Doane, Alfred A. ........ . 

Dock, Miss L. L., New York City .... 

Dodge, Thomas H., Worcester, Mass 

Dolan, Rev. Francis X. ...... 

Dole, Nathan Haskell ....... 

Doles, Isaac, Indianapolis, Ind. ..... 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant 

Episcopal Church, New York City .... 

Doncaster Free Library Committee, Doncaster, England 
Donner, Arthur ........ 

Douglas, James, Spuyten Duyvil, N.Y. 
Douglass, Pnf. Andrew E., Flagstaff, Ariz. 
Dresser, Horatio W. . . 
Drew, Mrs. Thomas B., Plymouth, Mass. 
Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N.J. 
Library 



Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry, Philadelphia 
Pa 



Drey, Sylvan, Baltimore, Md. 



Vols. 



18 
C. 
1 
1 
1 



2 
1 
S 
1 
1 
39 



1 

2 

1 
1 
43 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 

1 

02 



Xos- 
1 
I 



117 



172 



City Document No. 21. 



Duffield, J. Davis, PInladelpMn, Pa .... 

Duggan, John, Diinmore, Pa. ..... 

Dumont, Arsene, La Camba, Calvailos, France . 

Dunning, A. W., Newton, Mass 

Dusenberry, Francis L., Chicago, III. .... 
Eanies, Wilberforce, Xew York City .... 
East Boston Argus- Advocate . 1898-99 subscription 

Eastman, Edson C, Concord, N.H. . 
Eaton, Bev. Charles H., New York City 

Eaton, D. S., Muscatine, la. 

Eau Claire Public Library, Eaii Claire, Wis. 

Edinburgh Geological Society, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Egleston, G. S. W., Hereford, England 

Einhorn, Max, Neic York City . .... 

El Cajon Valley Xews, El Cajon, Gal. 1898-99 subscription 

Eliot Ilistorical Society, Eliot, Me 

Elkins, William L., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Elliott, Sterling 

Ellis, George H 

Ellis & Comee 

Emery, George A., Saco, Me 

Emmet, Dr. Thomas A., New York City 
Engineers' Chib of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Engineers' Magazine Co., Publishers of . . . 
Enoch Pratt Free Library, Ihiltiinore, Md. . 
Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Mass. 

liibrary ........ 

Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U.S., Neio York 

City 1 broadside 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass 

Estabrook, Harold K. 

Evans, Sir John, Hemel-Hempstead, England 

Evanston Free Public Library, Evanston, III. 

Evening Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wis., 1898-99 subscription 

Everett, Hon. William, Qiiincy, Mas.^. 

Everett Public Library, Everett, Mass. 

Evert?, William P 

Eyre & Spottiswoode, London, England 
Fairfield County Historical Society, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Fall River Public Library, Fall Biver, Mass. 
Farnham, Hon. .John, Maiden, Mass. 

Fernald, Dr. Charles A 1 broadside 

Fernald, Prof. O. M., Williamstoiun, Mass. 20 newspapers 

Ferree, Barr, New York City 

Field, Bev. George W., Belfast, Me 

Field, John H 

Field, Richard M. 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, III. 
Finlayson, Dr. James, Glasgow, Scotland . 
Fiske, Bev. Daniel T., Newbury port, Mass. 

Fitchburg, Mass., City of 

Fitcbburg Public Library, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Fitchburg Railroad Co. 

Fitchburg Sentinel, Fitchburg, Mass. 1898-99 subscription 

Fitt, A. F., East Northfield, Mass 

Fitz, Miss Louise, Newton Centre, Mass. 

Fitzpatrick, Prof. T. ,1., Lamoni, la 

Flattery, M. Douglas 

Fleischner, Otto 

Fletcher, Dr. Robert, Washington, B.C. . 
Fletcher, Russell & Co.. Warrington, England . 



Vols. 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
12 



1 
1 
36 
1 
1 



Library Department. 



173 



Fletcher Free Library, Burlington. Vt. .... 

Florence, Italy, Consiglio Comuuale 

Reale Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Fireiize 

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Jacksonvillt:'. Flo. 

Flowers, Hiland, New York City 

Floye, AVilliam J. 

Fogg, J/zs.s Ellen M 

Folsom, Albert A. ........ 

Folsoui, Br. Charles F. 

Foote, Allen R., Takoma Park, D.C 

Forbes Library, NortJiamptoti, 3Iii.ss 

Ford, Worthington C 1 autograph letter 

Forest Hills Cemetery, Trustees of 

Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wai/ne. In<l. 1898-99 subscription 

Foster, William E., Providence, B.I. 

Fox, Jabez 

France. Bibliotheque Nationale, P«r/.s .... 

Ministere de la Marine, P(0'/.x 

Ministere de I'lnstruction Publique et des Beaux- 
Arts. Direction de I'Enseignement Superieur, Pari.^ 

Ministere du Commerce, de I'lndustrie, des Postes 

et des Telegraphes, Paris ....... 

Francis, James B., Estate of, through Charles Francis, 

Lowell, Mass. ......... 

Francis, John C, London, Eiojland 

Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa., Alumni 

Association ......... 

Frasei- Institute, Montreal, Canada 

Free Religious Association 

Freedberg, Louis 3 pieces of music 

Freiheit, New York City . . 1898-99 subscription 

Freiherrlich Carl von Rothschild ' sche dffentliche Bibliothek, 

Fra)ikfort-am-Main, Germany ...... 

Freund, Harry E., New York City 

Friends' Book Association of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, 

Pa 

Friends' Bookstore, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Friends' School, Providence, B.I. 

Frost, Dr. Eleanor N., Neu' York City .... 

Fuller, Miss Caroline M 

Fuller, Miss Sarah 2 broadsides 

Gaidzakian, Ber. Ohan ....... 

Gallaher, James E., Cliicago, III. 

Gallegos, Jose, Guatemala, Central America 
Galiinger, Hon. Jacob H., Washington, D.C. 

Galloupe, Charles W., Sr., Beverly, 3Iass 

Galloway, Miss Jane, Glasgow, Scotland .... 
Ganz, Robert, & Co., New York City ..... 
Garrison, Francis J. ....... . 

Garrison, Dr. W. H., Neio York City 

Garrison, Wendell Phillips, Nevj York City . . 

Garrison, Family of the late William Lloyd .... 

Gay, Mrs. Elizabeth G. 

Gay, Ernest L 

Gay, Dr. George W 

Gay, Julius, Farmingto)i, Conn. ...... 

Gay, Richard L 

Geddes, Prof. James, Jr 

General Association of Congregational and Presbyterian 

Churches of New Hampshire, ii/v\sfo?, iV.ff. 
General Association of Connecticut, Hartford, Conn. 



Vols. 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

10 
3 

17 

1 
17 

1 

22 

15 

31 



1 

2 
1 

1 

10 

2 

8 

1 

2 

4 

17 

12 

5 

1 

2 



Nos. 
1 



3 
1 

1 

27 

2 

1 
1 

2 



1 
37 



174 



City Document No. 21. 



General Electric Co., and Westinghouse Electric & Manufac- 
turing Co., Nexo York City 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, Next} York 
City 

General Theological Library 

Geographical Society of Philadelphia, PfuladeJpJiia, Pa. 

Georgetown University, Watihington, B.C. 

Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, Atlanta, Ga. 

Gerasimus, Wicketas, Athens, Greece 

Germantown Telegraph, Germantovm, Pa 

1898-99 subscription 

Germany. Kaiserliches Patentamt, Berlin . 

Gersteiu, I)r. Morris ..... 

Gibran, Kalihl Gibran ..... 

Giles, Alfred E., Hyde Park, Mass. . 

Giles, Arthur, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Gilman, .John S. ..... 

Gilman, Son & Co., Neiu York City 

Gilmore, George C, Manchester, N.H. 

Ginn & Co. 

Glasgow University, Glasgow, Scotland 

Glickson, Joseph ..... 

Gloucester, Mass., City of . 

Gloversville Free Library, Gloversville, N. Y. 

Gliick, Dr. Leopold, Sarajevo, Bosnia. 

Goddard, Miss Matilda .... 

Gottingen, Germany, Koeinglich-Preussische Georg-August 
Universitiits Bibliothek 

Goeje, Prof. M. J. De, Ley den, Holland 

Goldstein, David .... 

Gomel, Charles, Paris, France 

Goodwin, .John S., Chicago, III. 

Goodyear, Miss Anna F. . . . 

Gookl, Nathan, Portland, Me. 

Gordon House 

Gould, Miss Elizabeth P. . . . 

Gould, Howard ..... 253 programmes 

Gould, Miss Ida W 

Grand Commandery of Knights Templars of Massachu 
setts and PJiode Island 

Grand Lodge Knights of Pythias of New Hampshire, Clare 
niont, JV.H. 

Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 
Massachusetts 

Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of 
Massachusetts 

Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grand Kapids, Mich., Public Library . 

Gray, Per. Andrew, Somerville, M((ss. 

Grdy, Edward McQ., Florence, N.M. . 

Gray, John, London, England 

Great Britain. Committee of Council on Education, De- 
partment of Science and Art, Library, London, England, 

Patent Office, London, England .... 

Greely, Gen. A. W., W((shington, D.C. . . . . 

Green, Dr. Charles M 

Green, George W. 

Green, Dr. Samuel A. 



Green, Samuel S., Worcester, Mass. 
Greene, Mrs. Francis B. 
Greene, Henry C. 



244 programmes, 1 plan 

. 28 newspapers 
. 1 manuscript 



Vols. 
14 



3 
20 
1 
2 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

5 

30 



65 

236 

2 

1 

1 

5 

1 

13 

12 



Library Department. 



175 



-99 subscription 



nders, London 



Greenland. Kommissionen for Ledelsen af de Geologiske og 

Geographiske Unders0gelser, Cnpenhagen^ Denmark 
Greenougli, .J. F. . 

Griffin, Appleton P. C, Washington, B.C. 
Grolier Club, New York City 
Grosvenor Public Library, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Groton Public Library, Groton, Mass. . 

Guild & Lord 

Habel, Jean 

Hakes, I)r. Ilarry, Wilkesharre, Pa. . 

Hale, Albert 

Hale, Rev. Edward Everett . 
Hale House Association 

Haliburton, R. G 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Legislative Library 
Halifax Herald, Halifax. Nova Scotia. 1898 
Hall, Hiss Belle S. . . . , 

Hall, Prescott F 

Hall, Walter S., San Francisco, ('al. 
Hamersley, J. Hooker, New York City 
Hampstead Bindery and Guild of Women B 

England 

Haniy, Dr. Ernest T. J. 

Hanna, H. H., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hapgood, Warren 

Harlem Library, New York City . 
Harris Publishing Co., New York City 
Harrison, Hon. Carter H., Chicago, III. 
Hart, Charles H., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Hartford Board of Trade, Hartford, Conn 
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Public Library, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Conn 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance 

Hartford, Conn. ..... 

Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn. 

Hartley House, New York City . 

Harvard Club of New York, Nein York City 

Harvard Crimson, Editors of, Cambridge, Mass. 

Harvard Medical Alumni Association, Cambridge, Mass. 

Harvard University, Cambridge. Mass., Astronomical Ob 

servatory ......... 

Class of 1881 

Class of 1886 

Divinity School ....... 

Law School 

Library 226 broadsides 

Medical School .... 

Museum of Comparative Zoology 

Peabody Museum of American Archi«ology and 

Ethnology ......... 

Publication Office 

Hassam, John T 

Hathaway, Lieut. Samuel, Worcester, Mass. 

Hawaiian Islands. Department of Foreign Affairs, Honolulu 

Hawes, Miss Charlotte W 

Hawkins, Rush C, New York City .... 
Hayden, John J., Dublin, Ireland .... 

Hayes, i?rc. Charles W., PAe«jjs,iV^.r. 

Hays, Dr. I. Minis, Philadelphia, Pa 

Hazen, Bev. Henry A., Auburndale, Mass 



Company 



Vols. 

2 

2 

4 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 



18 
14 



Nos. 



176 



City Document No. 21. 



Lancaster 



broadside 



Heginbottom Free Library, Ashton-uader-Lyn 

England ...... 

Heinzeii, Mrs. Henrietta 

Helena Public Library, Helena, Mont. 

Henderson, Hon. David B., Washington, I) 

Herscbel, Clemens, Xeio York City 

Hewins, Charles A. . . . .1 package of MSS 

Hey wood, .Tobn, Ridgefield, Manchester, England 
Higginson, Mrs. Henry L. ..... . 

Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentwortb, Cambridge, 3Iass. 

Hitdrelh, Arthur 

Hildretb, Dr. J. L., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hill, Aurin F 

Hills, Thomas 

Hingbam, Mass., School Committee 
Hinsdale, Dr. Guy, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Hitchcock, Frank H., Washington, B.C. 

Hitcbcock, 3Iiss Grace A 

Hoar, Alfred W., Monti cello, Minn. 

Hoar, Hon. George F., Washington, B.C. . 

Hobart College, GeHero, iV.F. 

Hoboken Free Public Library, Hoboken, N.J. 

Hodges, Mrs. Richard M 

Hoernle, Adolph ...... 

Holbrook, Miss Florence, Chicago, III. 

Holland, Frederick M., Concord, Mass. 

Holman, Prof. Silas W., Brookline, Mass. . 

Holstein-Friesian Association of America, Brattleboro, Vt 

Home for Aged Colored Women . 

Home for Aged Couples 

Home for Aged Men .... 

Home for Aged Women 

Home Market Club .... 

Homes for Inebriates Association, Rickmanswo 

fordshire, England .... 
Hopkins, James F. . . . . 
Hopkinton Public Library, Hopkinton, Mas 
Horton, Her. Edward A. . . . . 
Hosea, George H. . 

Hosmer, James K., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Hospital Cottages for Children, Baldwinville, Mu 
Hotcbkiu, Per. F. S., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hougbton, Frederick O. . . . . 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co 

Houiton, Me., Town of 

Household, Publisbers of ... . 

Howard, Albert W 

Howard, George H 

Howard Association, London, England 
Howard Memorial Library, New Orleans, La. 

Howes, Br. Pitts E 

Hubbard, Lester C, & Co 

Hudson-Kimberly Publishing Co., Kansas City, Mo 

Huffcut, Prof. Ernest W., Bhara, N.Y. 

Huling, Ray G., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hull Public Libraries, Hill, England . 

Hunt, Albert M., & Co. 

Hunt, Edward R., Bedham, Mass. 

Hunt, Mrs. Edward B., Bedham, Mass. 

Hutchins, Fernald .... 

Hutchinson, Charles C, Lowell, Mass. 

Idaho. Secretary of State, Boise City 



■th, Hert 



Vols. 



1 
1 
5 
1 
4 
105 
1 

1 
1 

1 
3 

1 
4 
1 

47 
1 
1 

12 



broadside 
1 map 



LiBEARY Department. 



177 



Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, Moscow^ Idaho 
Illinois. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Sprinf/fiekl 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops, Chicago 

Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station, ITybana, III. 

Illinois State Dental Society, Springfield^ III. 

Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History, Urhana., III. 

Immigration Restriction League .... 

Imperial University, Tokio^ Japan 

Indian Rights Association, PhiladelphUi., Pa. 

Indiana. Board of State Charities, Indianapolis 

Indiana State Library, Ind!ana2)olis, Ind. . 

Industrial Aid Society for the Prevention of Pauperism 

Industrial World and Iron Worker, Chicago, III. 

Ingalls, Major James M., Fort Monroe, Va. 

Innes & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England 

Institute Geografico Argentino, Buenos Aires, Argentine 

Bepyuhlic ......... 

International Association of Fire Engineers, Wyoming, O. 
International Young Men's Christian Association Training 

School, Springfield, Mass. ..... 

Inventive Age Publishing Company, Washington, B.C, 

Iowa. Bureau of Labor Statistics, iJes Moines . 

Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station, Ames, la. 

Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Rcqnds, la. . 

Irish National Federation of America, New York City 

Island of Cuba Publishing Company, Havana, Cuba . 

Italy, His Majesty Humbert, King of, Rome 

Italy. Ministero dell' Interno, Rome .... 

Direzione della Sanita Pubblica, Rome 

Direzione Generale dell'Amministrazione 



Civile, Rome ....... 

Ministero della Pubblica Istruzione, Rome 



Ives, Rev. J. S., Stratford, Conn 

Jackson Sanatorium, i)«».Nr;7/e, N.Y. 

James, Prof. Edmund J., Chicago, III. 

James Blackstone Memorial Library, Branford, Conn 

Japan. Department of Education, Tokio 

Jeffries, J)r. B. Joy . . . .1 broadside, 3 maps 

Jenks, William J., New York City .... 

Jersey City Free Public Library, Jersey City, N.J. 

Jewish Foster Home and Orphan Asylum, Philadelphia 

Pa . . 

Jewish Training School of Chicago, Chicago, III. 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, III 

John F. Slater Fund, Trustees of, Washington, B.C. . 
Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, Md 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. . 
Johnson, Charles S., Washington, B.C. 
Jordan, Prof. David Starr, Palo Alto, Cal. ... 
Jordan, George Y., and John R. Inscho, Philadelphia, Pa 
Jordan, John W., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 
Joshua Hyde Library, Sturbridge, Mass. 

Julien, Matthew C, Marion, Mass 

Kaim, Maurice ........ 

Kaiserlich-Konigliche Geologische Relchsanstalt, Vienna 

Austria ......... 

Kaiserliche Freie Oekonomische Gesellschaft, St. Peters 

burg, Russia ....... 

Kansas. Board of Railroad Commissioners, Topeka 

State Board of Agriculture, Topeka . 

State Board of Health, Topeka . 



Vols. 



2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
(58 
10 

2 



23 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

1 
1 



Nos. 

7 



3 
3 

3 
7 
2 
1 
11 
2 



174 
12 
13 

1 
10 
1 
1 
1 



178 



City Document No. 21. 



tgton, Ky 



4 maps 



Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kan 
Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan. 
Kansas University, Laiorence, Kan. 
Katzenberger, George A., Greenville, O. 

Kellen, William V 

Kelley, Hermon A., Cleveland, 0. 
Kellogg, George S., Nev) York City . 

Kelly, Miss Charlotte H 

Kelsey, Prof. Francis W., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexi 
Kerntler, Francis, Budapest, Hungary 

Kiley, Daniel J 

Kimball, G. F., Topeka, Kan. 

Kimball, L. Gushing 

Kimball, Mrs. L. Gushing .... 
King, Gen. Horatio C., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Kingsbury, Isaac F., West Neicton, Mass. . 
Kingsley, Prof. .John S., Somerville, Mass. . 
Kinney, Hon. Charles, Columbus, O. . 
Kline, Prof. Linus W., Worcester, Mass. . 

Knapp, Arthur Mason 

Knapp, George B. 

Knowles, Miss Martha A 

Konvalinka, .Joseph G., Long Island, N.Y. 
Ladies' Union Charitable Society, Lawrence, Mass. 
Lafayette Post, No. 140, G. A. E., Department of New York 

New York City 

Laidlaw, Alexander H., Jr., New York City 
Lakewood Times and Journal, Lakeioood, N.J. 

1898-99 subscription 

Lancaster, Mass., Town Library 

Larisun, C. W., Bingos, N.J 

Latch, Edward B., Academy, Pa. 

liSithers, Uichard, New Bochelle, N.Y. . . . . 

Lawrence, Sir Edwin Durning, London, England 
Lawrence, 3Iiss Isabel, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Lawrence, Mass., City of 

Lawrence Free Public Library, Lawrence, Mass. 

Leader, John Temple, Florence, Italy 

Leader, Bainsford Island . . 1898-99 subscription 

League of American Wheelmen, Massachusetts Division 
League of American Wheelmen, Koad Department 

Lee, Francis W 

Leeds Free Public Library, Leeds, England 

Lefcowitch, Morris 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa 

Leipzig, Germany, Handelskammer 

Leipziger, Henry M., New York City 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Palo Alto, Cal. . 
Leslie, Edmund N., <S'A;oneaieZes, iV'.F. . . . . 

Lewis, Mrs. John A 

I^exington, Mass., Town of 

Leyden, Holland, Bibliotheek der Rijks Universiteit te 

Leiden 

Leyton Public Library, Leyton, England . . . . 

Libbey Glass Co., Toledo, O 

Library Association of Washington City, Washington, B.C. 
Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Lincoln, Waldo, Worcester, Mass. 

Lincoln, England, Public Library 

Lincoln House 

Lippincott, J. B., Co., Philadelphia, Pa 



Vols. 



1 
1 

67 

27 

1 

1 

1 



10 
12 



1 

12 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 



Library Department. 



179 



Lippit, Hon. Charles W., Providence, B.I. . . . . 
Liverpool, England, Public Libraries, Museums and Art 

Gallery ......... 

Livi, Dr. Kidolfo, Rome, Italy 

Locke, John F. ....... . 

Locke, Miss Mary S., Wesfioood, Mass. 

Loeffelholz von Colberg, Freiherr Carl, Munich, Germany 

Loomis, Isaac L. ....... . 

Lord, Miss Eleanor L., Baltimore, Md. 

Lord & Thomas, Chicago, III. ..... 

Lorimer, Bev. George C. • . . . . , 

Loring, Augustus P. . . . . . , , 

Loring, Gen. Charles G. ..... . 

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal. . 
Loubat, Due de, Paris, France ..... 

Loud, John J,, Weymouth, Mass. . . 1 broadside 
Louisiana Sugar Experiment Station, Neiv Orleans, La. 
Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton Bouge 

La 



lie, Ky. 



Pa. 



Louisville National Medical College, Lonisv 

Lowell, Augustus 

Lowell, Mass., City of . 

Lowell City Library, Lowell, Mass. 

Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Ariz. . 

Luce, William B., Hingham Centre, Mass 

Lyman, Benjamin S., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lynch, Miss Rebecca .... 

Lynn Free Public Library, iy^n, Mass. 

Lynn Historical Society, Lynn, Mass. , 

Lyon, Bev. William H., Brookline, Mass. 

McCollier, Thomas H. & Co., Philadelphia, 

McCollom, Dr. JohnH. 

McCormack, Rev. Thomas J. 

McDonogh, Edward, McDonogh, Md. . 

McFadden, Col. Orrin, Cedar Grove, Me 

McGill College and University, Montreal, Canada 

McGill University Library, Montreal, Canada 

McGlenen, Edward W. .... 

McGuffey, Miss Margaret D. . . . 

Mclntire, Charles J 

McKay, David, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mackenzie College, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Mackintosh, Miss Sarah B 

McMillan, Hon. James M., Washington, B.C. 
McNulty, Bev. John J. 

ISIacomber, Frank G 

McSherry, Richard M., Baltimore, Md. 
Maddalena, Dr. E., Vienna, Austria . 
^ladras, India, Government Museum . 
Magnus, Maurice, JS'ew York City 
Maguire, Hon. James G., Washington, D.C. 
Maiers, William C, Jr. .... 

Maimonides Free Library, iVeic York City . 
Maine. Bureau of Industrial and Labor Statistics 

State Board of Health 

Maine General Conference of Congregational 



Augusta 



Churches 



Biddeford, Me . 
Maine Historical Society, Portland, Me 
Maine State College Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Orono, Me. 

Maine Statesman, Lexoiston, Me. 1898-99 subscription 



Vols. 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
16 
1 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
21 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
1 



Nos. 

1 
1 



3 

178 
1 

9 

2 



2 

52 

3 

1 

1 



3 
11 

7 

1 
1 

1 

1 



180 



City Document No. 21. 



Maine Wesleyan Seminary and Female College, Kent's Hill., 



Me 



Maiden, 3/ffl.ss., City of 

Maiden Public Library, Maiden, Mo^-s. 

Malieff, Bf. Nicolas, Kazan, Rusxia .... 

Mallory, I)r. Frank B. and Dr. James H. Wright 

Manchester, England, Free Public Libraries 

Manchester, N.II., Board of Water Commissioners 

Manchester City Library, MancJwster, N.H. 

Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, Winnipeg, Mani 

toba .......... 

Manning, Warren H 

Marblehead, Mass., School Committee 

Marburg, Theodore, Baltimore, Md 

Marchand, P. Alfred, Cincinnati, O 

Mark, Prof. 'Edward h., Cambridge, Mass. . 

Mark Skinner Library, Manchester, Vt. 

Marlboro' Times, Marlborough, Mass. 1898-99 subscription 

Marlborough, Mass., Public Library .... 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, College Park 

Md 



Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md. . 
Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md. 
Mason, Dr. Lewis D., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Massachusetts. Adjutant General .... 

Board of Commissioners of Prisons 

Board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners 

Boai'd of Metropolitan Park Commissioners . 

Board of Railroad Commissioners . 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor . 

Commissioner of Public Records 

Free Public Library Commission . 

Nautical Training School 

Secretary of the Commonwealth . 1 broadside 

State Board of Agriculture 

State Board of Arbitration and Conciliat 

State Board of Health . . 

State Board f)f Lunacy and Charity 

State Board of Trade 

Topographical Survey Commission 

Trustees of Public Reservations 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass 
Hatch Experiment Station 

Meteorological Observatory 

Massachusetts Baptist Convention 
Massachusetts Bible Society .... 
Massachusetts Board of Missions . 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy 
Massachusetts Co-operative Bank League 
Massachusetts General Hospital . 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
Massachusetts Humane Society 
Massachusetts Infant Asylum 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Class of 
Massachusetts Medical Society 
Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society 
Massachusetts Prohibition State Committee, 

1898-99 subscription to the New Voice 
Massachusetts Reform Club .... 



Vols. 



40 
1 
1 

2 
1 



Library Department. 



181 



Vols. 



Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 



State Pharmaceutical Association, Worcester, 



Massachusetts School for the Feeble Minded, Waverley, 

Mass. 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 

Animals 
Massachusetts 

Children . 
Massachusetts Society for the University Education of 

Women .......... 

Massachusetts State Board of Trade 

Massachusetts State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, 

Mass. 
Massachusetts 

Mass. 

Massachusetts Universalist Convention .... 
Matiegka, Dr. Jindrich, Prar/ue, Bohemia .... 

Matsuki, Bunkio 

Matteawan State Hospital, 3/ofie(a('a)i, J\". F. . 
Matthews, George E., & Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

May, Henry A 1 broadside 

May, Eev. Joseph, PldladelpJiia, Pa 

Mead, Edwin D 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco, Cal 

Medford Public Library, Medford, Mass 

Medical Society of the District of Columbia, Washington, 

D.C 

Medical Society of the State of New York, Albany, N. Y. . 

Mekeel, I. A., St. Louis, Mo 

Melrose Public Library, Melrose, Mass 

Mercantile Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, 

Pa 

Mercantile Library of New York, Neiu York City. 

Merchants' National Bank, Baltimore, Md 

Mergenthaler Linotype Company, JSfew York City. 

Merriam, F. W., Iquiqne, Chile 

Merrill, Moses ......... 

Mestou, Archibald J., Pitts^field, Mass 

Methodist Book and Publishing House, Toronto, Canada . 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City 

Mexican Central Railway Co. ...... 

Mexican Herald, City of Mexico . 1898-99 subscription 

Mexico. Direccion General de Estadistica de la Repiiblica 

Mexicana, City of Mexico ...... 

Observatorio Meteorologico Central, City of Mexico 

Miami University, Oxford, O 

Michel, Hon. John T., Baton Rouge, La. 

Michigan. Bureau of Labor and State Factory Inspection 

Lansing ......... 

Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, Lansing, Mich 
Michigan Central Railroad Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Michigan State Library, Lansing, Mich. 
Michigan State Medical Society, Grand Bapids, Mich. 
Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Massachusetts Com 

mandery ......... 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Ohio Commandery 

Cincinnati, 0. . 
Miller, Dewitt, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Miller, Prof. Walter, Palo Alto, Cal. 

Millet, J. B., Co 

Mills, Rev. Benjamin Fay 
Mills, Dr. Charles K., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Milwaukee Public Library, 3/;7(';«Hfcee, Wis. 




12 
1 

41 

3 
1 



Xos. 
2 
2 
1 

1 

1 

247 



1 

7 
8 
1 
7 
9 
67 
2 

1 
1 



1 

12 
1 



14 
1 



3 

28 



182 



City Document No. 21. 



Milwaukee Public Museum, Mihoaiikee, Wis. 

Minneapolis, Minn., City of 

Minneapolis, Minn.., Board of Park Commissioners 

Minneapolis Public Library, Minneapolis, Minn. . 

Minnesota. Cbief Fire Warden, St. Paul . 

Secretary of State, St. Paul 

Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Anthony 
Park, Minn 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi. Secretary of State, Jackson 

Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College, Experi 
ment Station, Starkville, Miss. .... 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo. . 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Trust Company 

Mite Society of the Presbyterian Church, Sweden Centre 
N.Y. 

Mixco, Jose C, Guatemala, Central America 

Mogyorossy, Arcade, Philadelphia, Pa. ... 

Monks, Dr. George H 

Monroe, Prof. Will S., Westfield, Mass. 

Montana. Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry 
Helena 

Montgomery, George, Cambridg eport, 3fass. 

Moore, Clarence B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moore, Joseph A. 

Moore, Mrs. M. A., Neioton, Mass. . . .2 charts 

Moreno, Dr. Francisco P., La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tine Bepjublic ....... 

Morgan, Rev. Charles L 

Morning News, Wilmington, Del. 1898-99 subscription 

Morris, John E., Hartford, Conn. 

Morse, Bev. Charles F., St. Johnsbury, Vt. . 

Morse, Lieut. -Col. Charles F., Falmouth, Mass. . 

Morse, Prof. Edward S., Salem, Mass. 

Morse, Mrs. Leopold 

Morse and Rogers School, New York City . 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass. 

Mosher, Warren E., Youngstown, 0. . 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Trustees of, Cambridge, Mass 

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Mowry, William A., Hyde Park, Mass. 

Muir, Henry D., Chicago, III 

Mullett, Bev. Alfred E 

Mumford, James G. ..... . 

Munich, Germany, Koenigliche bayerische Akademie der 
Wissenschaften ....... 

Murdoch, John 

Murphy, D. S. J., Cambridge, Mass. . 

Murray, David, Glasgow, Scotland 

Murray, William 

Mus6e Social, Paris, France .... 

Museo Nacional de Mexico, City of Mexico . 

Music Teachers' National Association, New York City 

Musical Age, Publishers of, Neiv York City 

Musser, Dr. J. H., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Nashville Banner, Nashville, Tenn. 1898-99 subscription 

National and International Department of Scientific Tem- 
perance Instruction in Schools and Colleges 

1899 subscription to the School Physiology Journal 

National Anti-Vivisection Society, London, England . 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Board of Trade, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Vols. 

1 
1 
1 



1 
1 

20 



LiBEAEY Department. 



183 



Vols. 



National Conference of Charities and Correction, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

National Education Association, Washington., B.C. 

National Florence Crittenton Mission, Washington, B.C. 

National Purity Association, Chicago, III. . 

National Single Taxer Co., Minneapolis, Minn. . 

Natural History Society of New Brunswick, St. John 
N.B. ..." 

Natural Science Association of Staten Island, A'eHJ Brighton 
JSf.Y 

Nebraska. Secretary of State, Lincoln 

Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln, Neb. 

Nebraska Independent, Lincoln, Neb. 1898-99 subscription 

Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Neb. 

"Nelson, Charles A., Brookli/n, N.Y 

Nevada. Secretary of State, Carson City . 

Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station, Beno, Nev. 

Nevada State University, Reno, Nev 

New Bedford Free Public Library, New Bedford, Mass. 

New Britain Institute, Neiv Britain, Conn. . 

New Charter, San Francisco, Cal. 1898-98 subscription 

New Church Board of Publication, New York City . 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association 

New England Deaconess Home and Training School . 

New England Historic-Genealogical Society 

New England Hospital for Women and Children . 

New England League of Theosophical Workers . 

New England Peabody Home for Crippled Children, Weston 
Mass. ......... 

New England Staaten Zeitung . 1898-99 subscription 

New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics, Concord 

State Board of Health, Concord 

State Library, Concord, ..... 

New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, Durham 
N.H 

New Hampshire Medical Society, Concord, N.H. 

New Haven, Conn., Free Public Library 

New Haven Register, New Haven, Conn. 

1898-99 subscription 

New Jersey. Adjutant General, Trenton . . . . 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries, Tren- 
ton ......... 

Department of Public Instruction, Trenton 

Geological Survey, Treitton 

Secretary of State, Trenton .... 

State Board of Health, Trenton 

State Library, Trenton ..... 

New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, Neio Bruns 
wick, N.J 

New Mexico. Department of Interior, Santa Fe 

New York City. Board of Electrical Control 

New York State. Board of Health, Albany 

Civil Service Commission, Albany ... 

Fisheries, Game and Forest Commission, Albany 

Secretary of State, Albany .... 

State Charities Aid Association, ^l?5a;i.v . 

State Commission in Lunacy, Pathological Institute. 

Neio York City 

State Historian, Albany .... 

Superintendent of Public Works, Albany . 

New York Academy of Sciences, New York City 

New York Chamber of Commerce, New York City 



Nos. 



1 map 



2 

1 

14 

2 
1 
1 



1 
1 
2 
1 
15 
1 



11 

1 
5 



184 



City Document No. 21. 



New York Civil Service Eeform Association, New York City, 

New York Free Circulating Library, New York City . 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Neio York 
City 

New York Historical Society, New York City 

New York Infirmary for Women and Children, New York 
City 

New York Journal, Publisher of. New York City 

New York Labor News Co., New York City 21 broadsides 

New York Life Insurance Company, New York City . 

New York Microscopical Society, New York 

New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foun- 
dations, Ne^r York City 8 plans 

New York Society Library, New York City 

New York State Hospitals and Pathological Institute, Utica, 
N.Y. 

New York State Reformatory, £■/;»/)•«, iV.F. 

New York Yacht Club, Library Committee, Nein York City^ 

New Zealand. Agent-General, London, England 

Newark Free Public Library, Newark, N.J. 

Newberry Library, CJiicago, III 

Newburyport Public Library, Newhuryport, Mass. 

Newcomb, Mrs. Katharine H 

Newfoundland. Colonial Secretary, St. John''s, Newfound- 
land . 

Newton, 3Tass., City of ....... 

Newton, Mass., City Engineer 

Newton Free Library, Newton, Mas.<<. ..... 

Niagara Falls Public Library, Niagara Falls, N.Y. . 

Niagara Historical Society, Niagara', Ontario 

Nichols, Mrs. R. Anne 

Nickerson, Sereno D 

Nickerson, Stephen 

Niederle, iJr. Lubor, Prague, Bohemia .... 

Nilsson, Hjalmar, and Eric Knutson, Worcester, Mass. 

Nilsson, Priif. Victor, Minneapolis, Minn. .... 

Noa, Frederic M., Geneva, N.Y 

Nobili, Amadeo C. ........ 

North, Franklin H., Neir York City 

North Adams Public Library, North Adams, Mass. . 

North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Iialei(/h, 
N.C ' . 

North Dakota. Department of Agriculture and Labor, Bis- 
marck .......... 

Secretary of State, Bismarck 

North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, Fargo, 
N.D ' . 

Northampton Institute, London, England .... 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, Northampton, Mass. 

Northampton Public Library, Northainpton, Mass. 

Northwestern University, Ei-anston, III. .... 

Northwestern University Library, Eran.^ton, III. 

Norton, Prof. Charles Eliot, Cambridge, 3/as.s'. . 

Norway. Bibliotheque de I'Uuiversite Royale de Norvege, 
Christiania ......... 

Norwich, England, Town Clerk 

Nottingham, England, University College, Free Public 
Libraries, and Natural History Museum Committees 

Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Halifax, Nora Scotia . 

Novello, Ewer & Co., New York City 

Noyes, Isaac P., Washington, D.C. . . 3 broadsides 

Noyes, James Atkins, Cambridge, Mass. .... 



Vols. 



LiBEARY Department. 



185 



Vols. 



Nya Fiiderneslandet . . . 1898-99 subscription 
Nya Osterns Weckoblad, Worcester, Mass. 

1898-99 subscription 
Oahu College, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 
Oasis, Nogales, Ariz. . . . 1898-99 subscription 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, 0. 

Oberlin College Library, Oberlin, O 

Oberlin Theological Seminary, Oberlin, O. . 
O'Connor, James A., Xeir York City 
Ohio. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Colnmbn^ 

Department of Agriculture, Co/fo/(')'f.s 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster, 0. 

Ohio State Arch^ological and Historical Society, C'olum 

bus, O 

Ohio State Bar Association, Norivalk, 0. . . . 
Ojai, Noraiioff, C'al. . . . 1898-99 subscription 

Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station, Stillwater, 

Okla 

Old Residents' Historical Association, Lowell, Mass. . 
Old South Church Society .... 1 manuscript 
Olechnowieza, Dr. Wladyslawa, Cracow, A ustria 
Olmstead, Eiv. Dwight H., New York City 
Olmsted, Frederick Law, Jr., Brookline, Mas.s. . 

Omaha Public Library, Omaha, Neb 

Ontario. Department of Agriculture, Toronto . 
Agricultural College and Experimental 



Farm, Gueliih 

Bureau of Industries, Tor> 



<nto 



Department of Education, Toront< 



4 

1 
60 



16 



Order of the White Rose,North American Branch, 1 broadside 
Oregon. Secretary of State, Salem .... 
Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Corrallis. Or 
Ormerod, 3//.s.s Eleanor A., -S^. Albans, England 
Osgood, ilowa.rd L., Eochester, N.Y. 
Osier, Prof. William, Baltimore, Md. 

Otis, Dr. Edward O 

Outes, Felix F., Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic . 
Owens College, Manchester, England .... 
Osterhout Free Library, Wilkesbarre, Pa. . 

Page, Dr. Charles E 

Page, Walter G 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester, Mass. .... 
Palmer, Mrs. Charles F., Neiu York City 
Paitsists, Victor H., New York City .... 
Paris, France, L'InspecteurdesTravaux Historiques, 1 map 

Prefet de la Seine .... 4 engravings 

Park College Library, Parkville, Mo. . 

Parker, Peter, Framingham, Mass. 

Parkman, Miss Eliza S. ..... 

Parsons, Frank H., Neio York City 
Pasadena Public Library, Pasadena, Cat. 
Paterson, N.J., Free Public Library 
Patterson, Norman, Toronto, Canada . 
Paul, Em., et Fils et Guillemin, Paris, France . 
Paul, Trench, Triibner & Co., London, England . 
Paulding, James K., Neu.^ York City . 
Peabody, Rev. Francis G., Cambridge, Mass. • . 
Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 
Peabody Institute Library, Baltimore, Md. 
Peabody Normal College, Nashville, Tenn. 
Peddie [nstitute, Hightstenmi, N.J. 
Penka, Prof. Karl, Vienna, Austria . 



Nos. 

1 

4 
9 
1 

14 
9 

3 



1 
25 



186 



City Document No. 21. 



Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia^ Pa. 

Pennsylvania Business Men's Republican League, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co., Passenger Department, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ......... 

Pennsylvania State College, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Centre County, Pa 

Pennsylvania State Penitentiary, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Pennypacker, Hon. Samuel W., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Peoria Public Library, Peoria, III 

Perabo, Ernst ... 1 broadside, 1 programme 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 

Perry, Prof. Thomas Sergeant, Toklo, Japan 

Phelps, Miss Fannie L. .... 

Philadelphia, Pa., A. D. Bache Public School, Board of 
Directors ......... 

Board of Directors of City Trusts 

Department of Public Safety .... 

Free Library 

Philadelphia, Pa., First Presbyterian Church 

Philadelphia Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia City Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, Alumni Association 
Philadelphia, Pa 



Vols. 



Scotland 



d 



Philadelphia Law Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia Museums, Philadelphia, Pa 

Philadelphia Record, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1898-99 subscription 

Philips, George Morris, West Chester, Pa. 

Phillips, Leroy 

Phillips, P. Lee, Washington, B.C. 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H. 

Philosophical Publishing Co. 

Philosophical Society of Glasgow, Glasgow, 

Pic, I)r. Josef L., Prague, Bohemia . 

Pickering, Mrs. Henry .... 

Pickering, Henry G. . . . . 

Pierce, George W. .... 

Pierce, Robert M., Chicago, III. . 

Pillsbury, Albert E 

Pitman, Sir Isaac & Sons, London, Englan 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Chamber of Commerce 

Plummer, iJr. Edward M. . 

Plymouth, England, Free Public Library 

Polytechnic Society of Kentucky, Louisville 

Poole, Miss Louella C 

Pope, Br. C. Augusta .... 

Porter, Pev. Edward G. . . . 

Porter, Luther H 

Portland Evening Express, Portland, Me. 

1898-99 subscription 

Portland Public Library, Portland, Me 

Prater, Thomas, Manchester, England . . . . 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y 

Presbyterian Church in the United States, Executive Com- 
mittee of Publication, Richmond, Va. .... 

Presbyterian Church in the United States, General Assem- 
bly 



Ky. 



1 calendar 



2 
20 



2 
13 



lOi 



LiBRAEY Department. 



187 



Preston, William G 

Prince, C. Leeson, Sussex^ England ..... 

Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. ..... 

Progress, Minneapolis, Minn. . 1898-99 subscription 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Long Island, 

Brooklyn, N.Y 

Providence, R.I., City Auditor 

Health Department 

Providence Athenteum, Providence, B.I. .... 
Providence Athletic Association. Providence, R.I. 

1898-99 subscription to The Triangle 
Providence Board of Trade, Providence, E.I. 
Providence Builders' and Traders' Exchange, Providence, 

R.I 

Providence Public Library, Providence, R.I. 
Provident Loan Society of New York, New York City 
Purdue University Agricultural Experiment Station, La 

fayette, Ind. ........ 

Putnam, Herbert 

Putnam, John J., Worcester, Mass 

Putnam, William C, Davenport, la 

Quaritch, Bernard, London, England .... 
Queen's College and University, Kingston, Canada 
Queensland Patent Office, Brisbane, Queensland 

Quincy, Hon. Josiah 

Quincy, Mass., City Hospital ...... 

Quincy Historical Society, Quincy, Mass. 2 newspapers 

Quincy Patriot, Quincy, Mass. . 1898-99 subscription 

Reeve, Br. John C, Dayton, 

Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass 

Ranck, George W., Lexington, Ky 

Reading, England, Free Public Library, Museum and Art 

Gallery 

Real Academia de Bueuas Letras, Barcelona, Spain . 
Reale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere, Milan, Italy 
Redwood Library and Athenaeum, Newport, R.I. 
Reform Club Sound Currency Committee, New York City, 

49 broadsides 

Reilly, Miss Annie 

Reinach, Salomon, Angers, France 

Religious Tract Society, London, England . 

Representative, Minneapolis, Minn. 1898-99 subscription 

Reusch, Dr. Hans, Christiania, Norway . 

Revell, Fleming H., Co., New York City 

Reynolds, James B.,iVew York City .... 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N.Y 

Rhode Island. Adjutant General, Providence . 

Board of State Charities and Correction, Providence 

Bureau of Industrial Statistics, Providence 

Rhode Island, Secretary of State, Providence 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, B.I. 
Rhode Island Society for the Collegiate Education 

Women, Providence, R.I. ...... 

Richards, Prof. Charles R., New York City . 

Richardson, Albert L 4 maps 

Richardson, William A., Estate of, Washington, D.C. 
Richmond Free Public Library; Surrey, England 

Ripley, Prof. William Z 

Ripley, Winfield S., Jr 

Robie, Dr. Solon S 

Robinson, Hon. Charles, Lawrence, Kan. 
Robinson, Henry C, Hartford, Conn. . 



of 



Vols. 

64 

1 



13 



77 
1 

49 
1 
2 



Xos. 
157 



31 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
22 



1 

44 



188 



City Document No. 21. 



Robinson, Tracy 

Roche, James Jeffrey ...... 

Rochester Theological Seminary, Bochester, N. Y. 

Rogers. Edward H., (JheLsed, Mans. 

Ropes, Prof. James H., Cambyidue, Mass. . 

Rose, Hon. James A., Springfield., III. 

Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Rosenauer, Nicolas, New York City . 

Rosenthal, Albert, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Rosenzweig, Gerson, New York City . 

Ross, J?pr. James H 1 broadside 

Rotch, A. Lawrence, Hyde Park, Mass. 
Roxbury Charitable Society .... 
Roxbury Latin School ..... 

Roy, Charles F 

Royal Observatory, Greenwidi, England 

Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, Cape Town, South 

Africa 

Royal Scottish Society of Arts, Edinhurgh, Scotland . 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canada . 

Royal Society of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Royce, Prof. Josiah, Cambridge, Mass. 

Sahut, Felix, Montpellier, France .... 

St. George's Public Library, London, England . 

St. Giles Public Library, London, England . 

St. Joseph Free Public Library, .S7. Joseph, Mo. . 

St. Louis, Mo., Merchants' Exchange .... 

St. Louis Mercantile Library, St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. .... 

St. Martin-in-the-Fields Free Public Library, London, Eng 

land 

St. Mary's Church, Vestry of, Dorchester, Mass. . 

St. Mary's College, Belmont, N.C 

St. Paul Public Library, ,S7. Paul, Minn. 

St. Petersburg, Russia, Bibliotheque de I'Universite Imperi 

ale de St. Petersbourg 

St. Petersburg, Russia, Imperial University 

St. Saviour's Public Library, Southtvark, England 

Salem Public Library, Salem, Mass 

Salisbury, Miss Annie M., Marlborough, Mass. . 

San Francisco Free Public Library, San Francisco, Cal. 

Santiago, Chile, Biblioteca del Instituto Nacional 

Saturday Evening Gazette . . 1898-99 subscription 

Saunders, Miss Marshall .... 

Savage, James F., Lowell, Mass. 

Savage, Philip H. 2 maps 

Scandinavian Social Club 

1898-99 subscription to Arbetaren 

Scarth, W. B., Ottawa, Canada 

Schenck, Capt. Alexander D., Fort Warren, Mass. . 
Schmid, Rev. Hugo, KremnnMer, Austria. 2 book plates 
Scholfield, Socrates, Providence, R.I. . . . . 

Schwalbe, Dr. Gustav A., Strasburg, Germany 

1 broadside 
Scott, Miss Angeline, South Norivalk, Conn. 1 newspaper 
Scott, Hon. Irving M., San Francisco, Cal. 
Scranton Public Library, Scranton, Pa. 

Scudder, Mrs. Harriet L 

Scudder, Samuel H., Cambridge, Mass. 
Seaman, Dr. William H., Washington, D.C. 
Sellers, Edwin J., Philadelphia, Pa. . 



Vols. 
1 



12 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Library Department. 



189 



Sewall, Bev. Frank, Washington, D.C 

Shakespeare Memorial Library, Sfratford-on-Ai-on, Eng- 
land ........... 

Shakspere Society of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shaler, Prof. Nathaniel S., Cambridge, Mass. . 
Shambaugh, Prof. Benjamin F., l)es Moines, la. 

Shattack, George B 

Shaw, Samnel S 

Sheehan, Joseph A 

Sheffield, England, Free Public Libraries and Museum . 
Sheltering Arms, New York City ..... 

Shepard, I)r. Charles H., Brooklyn, N.Y 

Shippen, Bev. Eugene R. . ' 

Shoreditch Public Libraries and Museums, London, Eng- 
land ........... 

Shuey, Edwin L., Dayton, 

Siegel-C'ooper Co., Neio York City 

Silver Knight-Watchman, Washington, D.C. 

1898-99 subscription 

Skandinavia 1898-99 subscription 

Sloyd Training School 

Small, Maynard ct Co 

Smiley, Edward H., Hartford, Conn 

Smith, 3Trs. Charles H. . . .68 pieces of music 
Smith, Prof. C. Michie, 2Iadras, India 

Smith, Charles C. 

Smith, Hon. Isaac T., New York City 
Smith, Prof. Jeremiah, Cambridge, Mass. . 
Smith, Sydney Y., Washington, D.C. 

Smith, Dr. Theobald 

Smith, William II., Peoria, III 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 
Smyth, Hon. J. Adger, Charleston, S.C. . 
Snow, Francis H., Lawrence, Kan. .... 

Snyder, Prof. Monroe B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Socialist Labor Party of Rhode Island, Providence, B.I. 

1 broadside 
Sociedad de Geografiay Estadistica de la Republica Mexi- 
cana, Citi/ of Mexico ...... 

Sociedad Nacional de Agricultura, Santiago, Chile . 
Societe d' Anthropologic de Paris, Paris, France 
Societe de Geographie, Paris, France 
Society for the Study of Inebriety, London, England 
Society of Arts, London, England .... 

Society of Colonial Daughters of the Seventeenth Cen 

tury, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Society of Colonial Wars, Masssachusetts . 
Society of Colonial Wars, Missouri, Bethany, Mo. 
Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, New 
York City ......... 

Society of St. Vincent de Paul 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of, Chelsea 

Mass. , 

Somerville Public Library, Somerville, Mass. . 
Sons of the American Revolution, District of Columbia 
Society, Washington, D.C. ..... 

Sons of the Revolution in the State of New Y'ork, New 

York City 

Sons of the Revolution, Missouri Society, Bethany, Mo. 
Sons of the Revolution, Pennsylvania Society, Philadel 
phia, Pa 



Vols. 
1 



7 



1 
56 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



Nos. 



3 

1 

140 



18 
1 



190 



City Document No. 21. 



Vols. 



South Australia. Woods and Forests Department, Ade- 
laide 

South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, Brook- 
ing, S.I) 

South End House 

South End Industrial School 

South Shields, England, Public Library and Museum 

Southbridge, Mass., Public Library 

Southern Railway Co., Washington, D.C 

Southern Workman, Hampton, Va 

Spatula Publishing Co 

Spear, William G., Quincy, Mass. 

' J*" ^"^; "*~^ 1 broadside, 2 newspapers 

Spofford, C. B., Claremont, N.H 

Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. 1898-99 subscription 

Sprague, Frank W 

Springfield City Library Association, Springfield, Mass. 

1 broadside 

Sproull, Lyman H., Cripple Creek, Col 

Squibb, Drs. Edward R., E. H., and Charles F., Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. 

Stanford, Rev. Arthur W., Kobe, Japan .... 

Stedman, Dr. Henry R 

Stevens, Hazard 

Stillman, James W 

Stimson, John W., Neio Yoi-k City 

Stirling's and Glasgow Public Library, Glasgoio, Scotland, 

Stockholm, Siveden, Kongliga Biblioteket 

Sveriges Offentliga Bibliotek 

Stoeckel, Mr. and Mrs. Carl, Norfolk, Conn. 

Stokes, Miss Caroline P., New York City .... 

Stokes, Thomas T 

Stolz, Eabbi Joseph, Chicago, III 

Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station, Middletoion, 
Conn. 

Street Railway Publishing Co., New York City 

Stuckenberg, Prof. John H. W., Cambridge, Mass. . 

Sturgis, Mrs. Robert S 

Sturtevant, B. F., Co 

Suffolk County, Mass., House of Correction 

Suffolk County Historical Society, Nev3 York City . 

Suffolk Registry of Deeds 

Sumner, Prof. William G., Neto Ilaven, Conn. . 

Sunday Times, Minneapolis, Minn. 1898-99 subscription. 

Superintendent and Foreman, Publishers of . . . 

Superior Leader, Superior, Wis. 1898-99 subscription 

Supple, Bernard F 

Swank, James M., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Swift, Lindsay 

Switzerland. Bureau Federal de Statistique, Berne, 

Bureau Federal des Assurances, Rerne . 

Bureau International des Administrations Tele- 

gi-aphiques 

Sydney, New South Wales, Free Public Library 

Patents Ofiice 

Taber, C. A. M., Wakefield, Mass 

Tanaka, I., Tokio, Japan 

Tapper, Thomas, Jr 

Taunton Public Library, Taunton, Mass 

Tavlor, Col. Charles H 

Taylor, Rev. E. O 

Tebb, William, Surrey, England 



12 
1 



2 

18 
1 



Library Department. 



Teller, Hon. Henry M., Washington, B.C 

Temporary Asylum for Discharged Female Prisoners, 

Dedham, Mass. ........ 

Tennessee University Magazine, Editors, Knoxville, Tenn 

Terzian, Prof. Dikran 

Texas. Secretary of State, Aitstin .... 
Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station 

Tex 

Texas State Historical Association, Austin, Tex. 
Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass. .... 

Thielsch, E. A. . • 

Thirteenth Massachusetts Regiment Association 
Thomas Crane Public Library, Quincy, Mass. . 

Thorndike, Dr. Paul 

Thrift Publishing Co., New York City 

Tiffany, Edward 

Tileston, Mrs. John B. 

Tobey, Rev. Rufus B 

Tompkins, Eugene 

Tonge, Thomas, Denver, Col 

Topinard, Dr. Paul, Paris, France .... 
Toronto Public Library, 2'oro«^o, C'anat?« 
Towle Manufacturing Co., Neicburyjyort, Mass. 
Trades Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Depart 

ment of Publicity, Omaha, Neb 
Trask, William B. 
Traubel, Horace L., Camden, N.J. 
Tribunal!, Milan, Italy . . . 1898 subscription 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. . 
Trowbridge, Francis B., New Haven, Conn 

Tucker, Mrs. F. M 

Tufts College, Somerville, Mass. . 
Library 



Tufts College Publishing Association, Somerrille, Mai^s. 
Tufts Library, Weymouth, Mass. .... 

Tulane University of Louisiana, Neiv Orleans, La. 

Turner, William G. A 

Tweedie, 2Irs. Alec, London, England 

Twentieth Century Club, ...... 

Twentieth Century Club, Tenement House Committee 

Twentieth Regiment Association, M.V.I. 

Tyler, Henry D., New York City ... 1 map 

Union Church 

United Hebrew Charities of the City of New York 
United States. Civil Service Commission, Washington 

D.C 

Commission of Fish and Fisheries 

Department of Agriculture 

Division of Biological Survey 

Division of Agrostology . 

Division of Publications 



1 broadside 



- Division of Statistics 

- Library . 

- Weather Bureau 



8 broadsides, 364 maps 
Department of the Interior ... 1 map 

Board of Indian Commissioners 

Bureau of Education 

Census Office 

• Geological Survey . 

Patent Office 



Department of Labor 



Vols. 
1 



1 
3 

1 

29 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



1 

21 



5 
5 
5 

8 

7 

25 

12 



191 

N08. 

1 
1 

4 

1 

1 



12 
1 



3 

2 

29 

2 

4 

68 

23 



26 
1 
1 



192 



City Document No. 21. 



United States. Department of the Navy 

Bureau of Navigation 

Ilydrographic Oilice 

.Judge- Advocate General 

Naval War Records OflBce 

Office of Naval Intelligence 

Department of State 

Bureau of Rolls and Library 

Bureau of the American Republics 



1 map 



Department of the Treasury 

Bureau of Immigration . 

Bureau of Navigation 

Bureau of Statistics 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 

■ Comptroller of the Currency 

Life Saving Service 

Light-House Board 

Marine Hospital Service 

Department of War . 

Chief of Engineers 

Library .... 

Surgeon-General . 

War Records Office 



6 broadsides 



1 broadsid 



Interstate Commerce Commission 

Library of Congress . 

Military Academy, TT'^es^ Point, N. Y. 

Naval Institiite, Annapolis, Md. 

Naval Observatory . 

Post Office Department . 

Superintendent of Documents 

Universalist General Convention 
Universalist Publishing House . 
Universitilt Basel, Basel, Switzerland 
Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada 
University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Library, Berkeley, Cal. 

University of Chicago, Chicaijo, III. . 

Yerkes Observatory, Chicago, III. 

University of Colorado, Bovlder, Col. 
University of Idaho, 3Ioscuw, Idaho . 
University of Illinois, Urbana, III. 
LTniversity of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. 
University of Michigan. General Librar 

Mich. 

Graduate School, Ann Arbor, Mich 




1 broadside 



University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Department of Archieology and Palaeontology 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Department of Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

■ Free Musevim of Science and Art, Philadelphia 



Pa. 



University of Rochester, Rochester, JSf.Y. . 
University of Tennessee, Knoxrille, Tenn. 
University of the State of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. . 
University of the State of New York, Albany, N.Y. 

State Entomologist, Albany, N.Y. 

State Library, Albany, N.Y. . 

LTniversity of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 
University of Vermont, Burlimjton, Vt. 
University of Virginia, Chnrloftesrille, Va 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 



Vols. 
2 

I 

3 

5 

2 
18 
7 
4 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
15 
2 
2 



1 
1 

400 



10 
1 

13 
6 

3 
1 



Librae Y Department. 



193 



Vols. 



University Library, Mudisun, II^x. .... 

University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wt/. 

University Press, K)ioxvillc, Tenn. .... 

Upsala, Sweden, Kongliga Universitet 

Uruguay. Bureau d'Echanges Internationaux, Moide 

video .......... 

Direccion de Estadistica General, Montevideo 

Oficina de Deposito, Rejiarto y Canje, Montevideo 

Utah Agricultural Exi^eriment Station, Loyau, Utah 
Utreclit, Holland., Bibliotlieque de TUniversite 
Uxbridge, Mass., Thayer Memorial Library 
Valentine, John J., San Fraiicisico, Cal. 
Vance, Mrs. Frank L., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver, Britisli (Johnnbia. 
Van Nostrand Co., New York Citi/ .... 
Vermont Agricultural Ex2)eriment Station, Burlington, Vt 
Vermont State Library, Montpelier, Vt. 
Vermont State Medical Society, Bnrlin<iton, Vt. 

Veeder, Dr. Major A., L(/ons, N.Y 

Venezuela. Legaciou de los Estados I'nidos de Venezuela 

Washington, D.C 

Very, Miss Lydia L. A., Saletn, Mass. . . . ' 
Victoria. Patent Office, Melbourne .... 
Victoria Public Library of Western Australia, Perth 

Western Australia ....... 

Victoria Street Society for the Protection of Animals from 

Vivisection, London, England .... 
Victoria University, Toronto, (Janada 
Vienna, xl«.si?r/«, DepartementfiirStatistik 
Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society, Vineland. 

N.J 

Virginia. Secretary of State, Bichmond ... 
Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, Blacksburg. 

Va , . 

Virginia Historical Society, 2?/c/;woH(Z, Va. 
Volckmar, F., Leipzig, Germany 

1898-99 subscription to Nea Emera 
Volta Bureau, Washington, D.C. 

Wade, Joseph M 

Wadsworth, Br. Marshman E. HougJdon, Mich. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia, Pa 

Walker, David R., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Walker, Edwin C, New York City 

Walker, Horace E., Claremont, N.H. . 

Wallace, Miss Anne, Atlanta, Ga. 

Walsh, Dr. John F., Camden, N.J. . 

Walton, Dr. George L. . 

Walton, Josiah P., Muscatine, la. 

Wanamaker, John, Philadelphia, Pa. 

W^ard, John, New York City .... 

Ware, Arthur L. . 

Ware, William, & Co 

Warner, (?eH. Adouiram .1., Wa.-iliington, D.C. . 
Washburn, Prof. Fredex'ick L., Eugene, Ore. 
Washburn, William D., Jr., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Warren, Samuel M. ..... . 

Washington, D.C, Board of Trustees of Public Schools 
Watertown Free Public Library, Watertoion, Mass. 
Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. 
Washington City Free Library, Washington, D.C. 
Washington University. Department of Civil Engineer 

ing, St. Louis, Mo 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

IHl 



Nos. 
6 
1 
1 
1 

7 



83 



1 
1 
1 
200 
1 
1 



194 



City Document No. 21. 



Watchman Publishing Company 

Wayland, J. A., Girard, Kan. ...... 

Wayland, Mass., Town of 

Wead, Leslie C, Brookline., Mass. 

4 bi'oadsides, 5 maps, 14 newspai)ers 
Weekly Gazette, Colorado Springs, Col. 

1898-99 subscrij^tion 
Weeks, Stephen B., Washington, B.C. 
Weir, Robert S., Montreal, Canada 
Weisbach, I)r. Augustin, Sarajevo, Bosnia 
Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. . 
Wenckebach, Prof. Carla .... 
Wesleyau University, Middletown, Conn. . 
West Church Parish Library 
West Virginia. Chief Mine Inspector, Clturleston, IV. V((, 
Western Australia. Department of Lands and Surveys 

Perth 

Patent Office, Perth 

Western Reserve University, Cleveland, O. 
Westford, Mass., J. V. Fletcher Library . 
Wheeler, P/'O/'. Benjamin Ide, 2f/mca, iV. F. 
Wheeler, Henry M., Worcester, Mass. ... 

Wheelwright, Andrew C 

Wheelwright, Edmund M 

Wheelwright, Edward 

White, ili/.ss Caroline L., A'ew; Haven, Conn. 
Whitefield Public Library, Whltefield, N.II. 
Whiting, Miss Lilian . . , 800 manuscript letters 
Whitman College, Walla Walla, Wash. 

Whitmore, William H 

Whitney, Edward B., New York Citii 
Whitney, Prof. Henry M., Beloit, Wis. 

Whitney, James L 2 newspapers 

Whitney, Prof. Josiah D., Estate of, Cambridge, Mass 

Whitney, William H 

Whittelsey, Charles B., Hartford, Conn. . 

Wigau Free Public Library, Wigan, England . 

Wiggin, James B., Cambridgeport, Mass. . 1 broadside 

Wiggio, Rev. James H 

Wilder, Prof. Burt G., Ithaca, N.Y. . 
Wilkes-Barre Times, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

1898-99 subscription 
Williams, Rev. Edward F., Chicago, III. . ■ 

Williams, George H 

Willis, Dr. John L. M., Eliot, 3Ie. . . 
Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mas^. . 
Wilmington Institute, Wilmington, Bel. . 
Wilson, Louis N"., Worcester, Mass. . 
Wiltse, Henry M., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Winchester, Mass., Town of ... . 
Winchester Home Corporation for Aged Women 

Winn, Hon. Henry 

Winona Free Public Library, Wiiiona, Minn. . 1 plan 
W^inslow, Dr. W. IL, Vineyard Haven, Mass. . 
Winthrop Public Library, Winthrop, Mass. 
Wisconsin. Secretary of State, Madison . 

State Board of Health, Madison 

Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station, Madiso)t 

Wis 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission, Madison, Wis. 
Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis. 
Withington, Br. Charles F 



Vols. 

2 



27 



1 
1 

12 



2 
1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

IT 
2 

11 
1 

11 

1 
1 
1 
19 
20 
1 
1 



2 

13 

1 



LrBKARY Department. 



195 



Wittig, Edward C 

Woburn Public Library, Wohitrn, Mas!^. . 

Wolcott, Governor Koger 

Wolverhampton Free Library Committee, Wolverhamp 

ton, England ........ 

Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society . 
Woman's Board of Missions of the Congregational 

Church 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Pa 



Students' Association 



Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary for 

Women and Children, Neio York City . 
Woman's Relief Corps, Department of Massachusetts 
Woman's Voice .... 1898-99 subscription 
Women's Educational and Industrial Union 
Women's Institute Library, London, England. 1 broadside 
Wood, Allen F., New York City 
Wood, Henry 
Wood Music Co. . 
Woodbridge, S. Homer 
Woodbury, Charles J. H. . 
Woodruff, 'Rei\ C. Eveleigh, Faoersham, Englai 
Woodruff, Thomas T., La Junta, ('ol. 
Worcester, Mass., City of . 
Worcester, Mass., Free Public Library 
Worcester Academy, Worcester, Mass. 
Wright, Isaac A., Kansas City, Mo. . 
Wycliff Society, London, England 
Wyoming. Secretary of State, Cheyenne . 
Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Wy 

Yale University, Nero Haven, Cnnn. . 

Library 

Observatory 



51 



broadsides 



Laramie 



Y^armouth Herald, Publishers of, Yarmouth, Nora Scotia 

Yearly Meeting of Friends, Philadelphia, Pa 

Yersin, Misses M. and J., Neio York City . 

Y^oneyama, U., Tokio, Japan 

Young, Prof. C. Howard, Hartford. Conn. 

Young Men's Christian Associations of North America, 

International Committee, Trustees of, Neio York City, 
Young Men's Christian Association of the Citv of New 

Y^ork 

Zaborowski, Dr. S., Paris, France 
Zaehnsdorf, .Joseph W., London, England 
Zoological Society of Tokio, Tokio, Japan 
Ziirich, Switzerland, Stadtbibliothek 



Vols. 


Nos. 


8 






1 


1 






2 


1 




2 




1 


1 


1 






1 


1 






7 


2 


6 


1 




2 




1 






1 


1 




1 




2 




3 






1 




1 


21 




1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 






1 


1 






1 


1 




1 




1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 






3 




1 


478 


576 



196 City Document No. 21, 



APPENDIX XIV 



ORDERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL AND MEMORANDUM 
OF PETITIONS, ETC. 

The following nre the orders passed l)}^ the City Government 
during the year ending January 31, 18'.)9, which have been com- 
municated to the Trustees as affecting the Library Department : 

City of Boston, 
In Boakd of Aldermen, March 7, 1898. 
Ordered^ That the Trustees of the Public Library be requested 
to include in their estimates of appropriation for the Library 
Department for the current year the sum of fifteen hundred 
(1,500) dollars for the purpose of establishing a reading-room 
and delivery station of the Public Library, in the vicinity of the 
junction of Hampden and Dudley streets, Roxbur3\ 

Passed. Sent down for concurrence. "March 10 came up 
concurred. 
A true copy. 
Attest : 

(Signed) John T. Priest, 

Assistant City Clerk. 



City of Boston, 
In Common Council,, March 24, 1898. 

Ordered., That the Trustees of the Pul)lic Library be authorized 
to draw from the city treasury the sum of fifteen hundred (1,500) 
dollars to be placed in the hands of the Library Auditor for 
meeting petty current expenses, to be accounted for before the 
close of the fiscal year ; the same to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for the Library Department. 

Passed. Sent up for concurrence. 



In Board of Aldermen, March 28. 
Concurred. Approved by the Mayor, March 31, 1898. 
A true copy. 
Attest : 

(Signed) John T. Priest, 

Assistant City ClerJc. 



Library Department. 197 

City of Boston, 
In Common Council, May 19, 189S. 

Ordered^ That the Trustees of the Public Library, through His 
Honor the Mayor, be requested to erect a flag-staff and fly a flag- 
therefrom, in front of the Central Library Building ; the expense 
of the same to be charged to Library' Appropriation. 

Passed. Sent up for concurrence. 



In Board of Aldermen, May 23. 
Concurred. 

The foregoing order was presented to the Mayor, May 24, 
1898, and was not returned by him within ten days thereafter. 
A true coi:)y. 
Attest : 

(Signed) John T. Priest, 

Assistant City Clerk-. 

The following reply of the Librarian, dated June 9, 1898, was 
approved by the Trustees June 10, 1898 : 

June 9, 1898. 
Hon. Josiah Qdincy, 

Mayor : 

Dear Sir, — In behalf of the Trustees I beg to acknowledge 
the receipt of a copy of an order of the City Council as follows : 
(Order as above.) 

With reference to the above I beg to state that there is already, 
and has been for some time past, a flag-staff projectinf/ in front 
of the Library building ; and that a flag has been displayed 
thereon consecutively for weeks past, and was so displayed 
at the time the above order was introduced. 

Very respectfully, 

(Signed) Herbert Putnam, 

Librarian. 



City of Boston, 
In Common Council, December 29. 1898. 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the PubUc Library be requested, 
through His Honor the Mayor, to submit to the Board of Appor- 
tionment in their annual estimates, an additional sum of two 
thousand (2,000) dollars, to be expended for the establishment 



11^8 City Document No. 21. 

of a reading-room in the vicinity of Andrew square, Soutli 
Boston. 

Passed. Sent up for conciUTence. 



In Board of Aldermen, December .31. 
Concurred. 

A true copy. 

Attest : 

(Signed) John T. Priest, 

Assistcmt City Clerk. 



City of Boston, 
In Common Council, January 26, 1899. 

Ordered^ That the Trustees of the Public Library, through His 
Honor the Mayor, be requested to estabhsh a reading-room in 
Ward 13. 

In Common Council, January 26, 1899. 
Referred to His Honor the Mayor. 

(Signed) Daniel J. Kiley, 

President. 



City of Boston, 
In Common Council, January 26, 1899. 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Public Library be requested 
and authorized, through His Honor the Mayor, to establish a 
Public Reading-room in the building formerly the pumping 
station, and now used for ward-room purposes, on Elmwood 
street, Roxbury. 

Frederick W. Klemm, Ward 21. 

In Common Council. January 26, 1899. 
Referred to His Honor the Mayor. 

(Signed) Daniel .1. Kiley, 

President. 



Memoranda . 



Two petitions were received during the 3^ear, one from residents 
praying for a Branch Library at Grove Hall, one from District 
13 Conference of the Associated Charities, for a Reading-room 



Library Depabtjvient. 199 

aud Delivery Station in Ward 17. In addition, conunuuications 
have been received from seven private soiirce.s recomnieudiug the 
establishment of stations in several sections of the city. 

From time to time question has been raised as to the proper 
form of a gift or bequest for the benefit of the Library. The 
following form is therefore appended. The Trustees are a 
corporation, and are entitled to receive and hold bequests. Gifts 
or bequests to the city for the benefit of the Library would of 
course be equally applied to its uses : 

Form of Bequest. 

I give and bequeath unto The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, a corporation created by and existing 
under the laws of the State of Massachusetts, the sum of 
dollars, to be applied for the benefit of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston. 





*V-, 









^: ^' ■■ 






>*;^pc 



'-^- .- 1 






c> 



■l ■» "f"^ 






..^^^ 



i/^'^t^^?5'"^^1