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AMDOTIB-HABVASD TBBOLOOICAL IIBRART 
MDCCCCX 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 
3lft 

of 
HapsEichusetts KUs Society 




ANNUAL REPORT 



PBESENTZD BT 



THE TRUSTEES 



OF THB 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY, 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, 



IN BOSTON, 



MAY 23, 1870 BEIXG THEIR SIITY-HRST ANNIVERSARY. 



BOSTON: 

DBPOSITORY, 16 CORNHILL. i 

PR£M of T. R. MARVIlf & Soif. 

1870. 



• 



,A \^ - . • \' ■ ■ » 



1 4 



/t!, 



V \ . 



« • » • J 



,H37 



OFFICERS 



OF THB 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY, 1870-71. 



P&BSIDEITT. 

Hon. SAMUEL H. WALLEY. 

TICB ntESIDBlTTS. 

Rev. WILLIAM R. NICHOLSON, D. D., Suffolk Cotmty. 
AVILUAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 
CHARLES A. JES8UP, Esq., Hampden County. 
JOHN P. WILLISTON, Esq., Hampshire County. 
WTLLIAM B. WASHBURN, Esq., Franklin County. 
STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 
CHARLES P. WHTTIN, Esq., Worcester County. 
LEE CLAFUN, Esq., Middlesex County. 
CALEB HOLBROOK, Esq., Norfolk County. 
JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 
JOHN H. CLIFFORD, Esq., Bristol County. 
ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Plymouth County. 
JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 
EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

C0BBB8P0KDING 8SCRBTART. 

Ret. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. D. 

KXCOBDnfO BBCBBTART. 

Ret. DANIEL BUTLER. 

* TRBA8X7BBB. 

CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

▲UDITOB. 

THE0PHILU8 R. MARVIN, Esq. 



TRUSTEES. 



Rt. Rer. Mantott Eabtbttbn, D. D. 
Hey. John O. Means, 
Rer. Chandler Robbxni , D. D. 
Rer. Samuel B. Babcock, 
Rer. WiLLARD F. Mallalxeu, 
Rer. Andrew P. Peabodt, D. D. 
Rer. Rollin H. Nbali^ D. D. 
RcT. John DbWxtt, 
John Tapfan» 



Albert Fbabino, 
Jacob Slbepbr, 
Charles T. Russell, 

ThEOPHILUS R. ^LkRYIN, 

Charles W. Pierce, 
Charles Henrt Parker, 
Francis E. Pabkbr, 

ROBEBT C. WiNTHROP, 

Hezekiah T. Chase, Esq's. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
TO WHOM APPLICATIONS ARE TO BE MADE POR BIBLES. 

Rer. John O. Means, Albert Fearing, and Charles Henrt Parker 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY FROM 1809 TO 1870. 



PRESIDENTS. 



Hon. WUliam PhiUips, . . . 
Bev. John Pierce, D. D. . . . 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. . 



1809—27 
1827—49 
1849-M 



Hon. Bichard Fletcher, . 
Hon. Samuel H. Walley, 



18M— 59 
1859 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 



Bcv. John Lathrop, D. D. . . 1809—16 

Bev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. . 1816—28 

Ber. Uenry Ware, D. D. . . 1828—44 

Ber. John Codman, D. D. . . 1844 — 18 

Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. . 1848 — 19 

Bev. Franci* Parkman, D. D. . 1849— 5S 

Bev. N. L. Frothingham, D. D. 1853—61 

Bev. Wm. B. NichoUon, D. D. 1861 

William C. Plunkett, Esq. . . 1862 

Edward South worth, E^q^ . 1862—70 

John P. Willlston, Esq. . . 1862 



William B. Washburn, Esq. 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq. . 

Charles Whitin, Esq 

Lee Claflin, Esq 

Caleb Holbrook, Esq 

James S. Aroory, Esq 

Hon. John H. Clifford, LL. D. . 
Elisha Tucker, Esq. . . .' . 
James B. Crocker, Esq. . . . 
£. S. Moseley, Esq. • • • . 
Charles A. Jesaup, Esq. . • 



1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1863 
1862 
1863 
1862 
1868 
1862 
1870 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES. 

Bcv. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1818—49 

Bev. N. L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849—53 

Bev. George W. Blagdcn, D. D. 1853 



Bev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, 1809 — 13 
Bev. Samuel C. Thacher, . . . 1813—17 
Bev. Charles Lowell, D. D. . . 1817—18 



RECORDING SECRETARIES. 



Bev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Bev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Bcv. Cyrus P. Grosvenor, 
Bev. James D. Knowles, . 
Bev. William Jenks, D. D. 



Samuel H. WaUey, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, 
John Tappan, Esq. . . 



1809—28 
1828—30 
1830—31 
1831—32 
183d-39 



Bcv. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1839—44 

Bev. William M. Sogers, . . 1844—45 

Bev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1815—49 

Bcv. George Bicbards, . . . 1849—52 

Bev. Daniel Butler, . . . 1853 



TREASURERS. 



1809—11 
1811—12 
1812-35 



Henry Edwards, Esq. . . 
George B. Sampson, Esq. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 



1835—49 
1849-62 
1863 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES. 



Bcv. WiUiam E. Channing, D. 
Hon. Jonathan Phillips, . . 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. . . 
Bev. Francis Parkman, D. D. 
Edward Tuckcrman, Esq. . . 
Bev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. 
Bev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. 
Charles Tappan, Esq. . . . 



D. 1809—18 
. 1809—16 
. 1809—15 
. 1815—18 
. 1816—30 
. 1818—30 

D. 1821—35 
. 1830—40 



Bev. F^ncis Parkman, D. D. . 1833—53 

Bev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1835—49 

Henry Edwards, Esq 1810—49 

Bev. George Bichards, . . . 1849—60 

George B. Sampson, Esq. . . 1849—68 

Albert Fearing, Esq 1853 

Bev. John O. Means, .... 1860 

Charles Henry Parker, Esq. . 1862 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



In reviewing tlie events of the past year, we 
are reminded of the great loss which the Society 
has sustained^ in the death of those long and 
usefully connected with its administration. The 
Hon. Richard Fletcher, for five years our 
President, died early in the year. Though not 
officially connected with the Society at the time 
of his death, he ever manifested a kindly inter- 
est in its prosperity, and in his will, left a sub- 
stantial token of his friendliness.* 

Later in the year, the Hon. B^man Lincoln 
was removed by death. For forty years he was 
a member of the Board of Trust, and long held, 
in the National Society, the office of Yice-Presi- 
dent. A lover of all that was good, he was, 
through life, the especial friend of this charity, 
and heartily labored for its advancement. 

The Rev. BaroN Stow, D. D., was next called 
away. He was, for many years, the friend and 
pastor of Mr. Lincoln, and they labored here, as 
in the promotion of kindred works, with one 
spirit and aim. Their connection with the Society 
goes far back towards its beginning, and of their 



early associates they left fewer than they have 
found in the mansions to which we doubt not 
they have been welcomed. 

The Hon. Samuel May, whose recent decease 
is well remembered by us all, was for forty-nine 
years a Trustee, and was at the time of his death, 
the oldest member of the Society, with a single 
exception. The interest in this work which was 
thus early manifested, he retained through a long 
and useful life. Until prevented by the infirmities 
of advanced age, he attended regularly the meet- 
ings of the Trustees, and entered heartily into all 
the measures adopted for the increased influence 
of the Society. 

We are also called to record the death of the 
Hon. Edward Southworth, of West Spring- 
field, one of the Vice-Presidents of the Society 
for Hampden County. In his death every good 
cause mourns the loss of a sincere friend and a 
generous patron. 

This long roU of friends, honored and loved, 
we close with the name of the Rev. N. L. Froth- 
INGHAM, D. D. For twenty-eight years he was 
connected with the Society as Trustee, Corres- 
ponding Secretary, and Vice-President, and the 
conscientious discharge of the duties he assumed 
is gratefully remembered by his associates. 

While we cannot repress a feeling of sadness 
at the departure of so many eminent for their 
usefulness, we gratefully recognize the fact, that 
they were spared beyond the limits usually allot- 
ted to man, and that their men^ory is embalmed 



in the ajQfectiona of the community where their 
days were spent and their life-work performed. 
Being dead they yet speak, reminding us that, 
while the term of our earthly labor at the longest 
is brief, its results will be unending if rightly 
directed to the spiritual interests of man; that 
thus our mortal may put on immortality, and the 
good seed that in weakness we sow, be raised in 
power in souls forever renewed. 

During the year there have been issued from 
the Depository, forty-one thousand five hundred 
and ninety-eight copies of the Scriptures. Of 
this number, fourteen thousand and eighty-one 
were Bibles, sixteen thousand five hundred and 
five were Testaments, five thousand six hundred 
and sixty-seven copies of the Ifew Testament 
and Psalms, and five thousand three hundred {ind 
forty-five smaller portions of the Scriptures. Of 
this number, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight were in various foreign languages. 

The gratuitous issues have amounted to twelve 
thousand two hundred and twenty volumes, cost- 
ing $4,348.22. They have been given to seamen. 
Mission Sabbath schools, city missions, public 
institutions, and public houses and destitute fam- 
ilies in Massachusetts, Maine, !N'ew Hampshire, 
Vermont, in several of the Western States and 
Fayal. 

The work of exploration and supply has been 
4^arried on as in previous years.* The Rev. A. M. 
OsQOOD labored a portion of the year as a col- 
porter in Essex County. He canvassed thirteen 



8 

towns, and completed the work previously begun 
in three others, including the city of Lynn. In 
the performance of this work, he called upon four 
thqusand three hundred and thirty-four families, 
of which one hundred and sixty-one were found 
without the Scriptures, sixty-five of whom were 
supplied by sale or gift, as well as forty-two des- 
titute individuals. Five hundred and twelve 
copies of the Scriptures were sold, and two hun- 
dred and twenty-seven bestowed in charity. 

Dr. C. B. Bean was employed during the year, 
in canvassing the towns of Andover and Methuen, 
in Essex County, and the city of Lowell, and the 
towns of Fitchburg and Wilmington, in Middle- 
sex. As the result of his labors, seven thousand 
five hundred and ninety-one families were visited ; 
twelve hundred and sixty-seven were foimd with- 
out the Scriptures; three hundred and ninety- 
seven were supplied by sale or gift; eleven huif 
dred and thirty-two copies of the Scriptures were 
sold, and five hundred and thirty-five donated. 
Of Lowell, where most of the year was spent, he 
says : ^^ This Bible Mission work needed greatly 
to be done, as nearly a score of years had passed 
away since the previous exploration." He flat- 
tered himself that numbers had, in consequence 
of his labors, been led to procure the Scriptures 
at other places. He had endeavored to avoid 
creating in any mind, a prejudice against the 
Scriptures, and had labored to persuade all to 
possess the Word in the received or some other 
version. Quite worn out with the work, he 



retired, happy in the conviction that his efforts to 
increase the influence of the Scriptures had not 
been in vain. 

The Rev. J. W. Dentox, during the year, has 
canvassed the town of North Brookfield, in Wor- 
cester County, and also the towns of Westfield, 
West Springfield and Agawam, in Hampden. 
He reports having visited twenty-five hundred 
and seventy-one families; found four hundred 
and forty-one destitute of the Scriptures, two 
hundred and ninety-three of which he supplied. 
He sold two hundred and twenty-three copies of 
the Scriptures, and gave away two hundred and 
forty-one. The work in Hampden County was 
performed under the direction of the Hampden 
County Bible Society. 

The Rev. Mr. Slafter has presented the 
claims of the Society to the Episcopal Churches 
in the State, and his appeals have met, as usual, 
a ready and generous response. 

The depository has been maintained as usual, 
from whence the friends of the Bible have drawn 
supplies for the poor, and where, at prices within 
the means of most, the Scriptures can be pro- 
cured. We regard this as an important part of 
our work. As nearly as it can be done, would 
we make the Divine Word like the Divine favor, 
accessible to all, without money and without 
price. 

The income of the Society, including a balance 
at the beginning of the year, of $1,193.89, has 
been $38,059.40. In donations, annual subscrip- 



10 

lions and legacies, $12,163.63. Dividends and 
interest, $8,025.92. Returns for books d6nated, 
$27.50. From sales of books, $16,648.45. In 
addition to the amount received into our treasury, 
there has been sent directly to the American 
Bible Society, from various portions of the State, 
the further sum of $12,745.35, making the whole 
amount raised in Massachusetts, deducting the 
* balance for last year, $49,610.86. The expendi- 
tures have been for books, $26,057.66. For Gen- 
eral Agent, Distributing Agents, Depository 
Agent and Assistant, paper, printing, rent, fuel, 
and incidental expenses, $6,829.04. Donation to 
the American Bible Society, $3,675.88, leaving a 
balance in the treasuiy of $1,496.82. 

The American Bible Society, with which our 
own is connected as an auxiliary, enjoys, we are 
happy to say, its usual prosperity. Its receipts 
during the year, amount to $747,658.69, of which 
$323,457.23 were from legacies and donations. 
One million three hundred and thirty-one thou- 
sand volumes were issued during the year, of 
which number two hundred and ninety-nine thou- 
sand volumes, in more than fifty languages, were 
circulated abroad. Much labor has been per- 
formed, and many Bibles circulated in the South, 
especially among the freedmen, while its work 
has extended over the whole country. Nearly 
half a million of families have been visited, and 
of the forty-four thousand eight hundred found 
destitute, nearly thirty-three thousand were sup- 
plied. The Society is permitted to rejoice in 



11 

enlarged pecuniary means, in a growing circle of 
friends, and in an accessible field that is fast 
extending to the limits of our earth. 

In the present moral aspects of the world, we 
find much to encourage our efforts. The demand 
for the Scriptures throughout nominal Christen- 
dom, steadily increases, while new and important 
openmgs are constantly presenting themselves in 
the regions beyond. In greater numbers than 
ever before, do men shape their beliefs and their 
conduct by the teachings of inspired Truth. As 
the children of Israel, on their way to the prom- 
ised land, gathered round the Mount from whence 
issued divine utterances, so do men, in their exodus 
from spiritual bondage, turn reverently to the 
Word of God, for light on the great questions 
respecting the rights and duties, and destiny of 
man. The labors of Christian Missionaries, and 
the growing friendUness and intercourse of nations 
and raqes, are made the instrument by which 
the knowledge of the true Otod is diffused over 
the world. In all the languages widely spoken, 
the Scriptures are now translated, and the Book 
that for centuries was hidden from the world in 
monasteries, and imprisoned in forgotten tongues, 
released from its long captivity, is now borne, by 
the favoring providence of God, to every land. 
Literally may we say, **Its line has gone out 
through all the earth, and its words to the end of 
the world.'' The revolt against revealed truth, 
that disfigures society here and there, is but as 



12 

the eddy in the flood that sweeps on rejoicing to 
the sea. 

To all who would heartily engage in this work 
still abides the declaration and the promise, 
" Blessed are ye that sow beside all waters." ^^For 
as the rain cometh down, and the snow from 
heaven, and retumeth not thither, but watereth 
the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, 
that it may give seed to the sower and bread to 
the eater; so shall my Word be that goeth forth 
out of my mouth. It shall not return unto me 
void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, 
and it shall prosper m the thing whereto I sent 
it.". 



ANNUAL MEETING/ 



The Sixtt-Fibst Annual Meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Bible Soca:ETY was held at the Rooms of the 
Society, No. 15 Cornhill, on Monday, May 23, 1870, at 
mne o'clock, A. M. The President, Hon. Samubl H. 
Wallet, in Ihe Qudr. 

Prayer was offered by Eev. Mr. Babcock, of Dedham. 

The Minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Chables Henry Pabker, Esq., pre- 
sented his Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Sixty-first Annual Report of the Trustees was pre- 
sented by the Recording Secretary, when it was 

Voted, That the reading of the same be deferred till the public 
meetAg in the afternoon. 

The officers of the Society were elected for the ensuing 
year. 

The Society then adjourned, to attend the public ser- 
vices of the Sixty-first Anniversary at the Mount Vernon 
Church, at three o'clock, P. M. 

Met according to adjournment. 

The Scriptures were read and a prayer was offered by 
Eev. J. W. Turner, of Waverley. 



14 

A hymn was sung, and the Report of the Trastees was 
read and accepted. An Address was then delivered by 
the Rev. Andrew P. Peabody, D. D., Professor in 
Harvard College. 

The pu|;)Iic services were closed by the singing of. the 
doxology, and the benediction by Rev. Dr. Peabody. 



DR. PEABODY'S ADDRESS. 

My Friends : — In my long and varied experience as a writer, 
I have never felt so much embarrassment, as in my preparation 
to appear before you to-day. My embarrassment, too, comes 
from an entirely unwonted cause. I am no stranger to poverty 
of resources, as compared with the demand upon them, — to a 
brain-treasury reduced to the brink of bankruptcy. But the 
oppression is now from excess of wealth. It would be easier, 
in the service to which you have called me, to write a volume 
than a discourse, — to talk for a day than for an hour. 

Were I to enumerate the reasons for circulating the Bible, 
there is no human need or interest in whose behalf the plea 
should not be urged, — no form of philanthropy which would not 
be superseded, were the Bible in the homes, hands and hearts 
of all men, — no craving of man's mental or moral nature which 
the Divine Word would not satisfy. The various societies for 
reform and propagandism at home and abroad, which hold*their 
anniversary this week, are but digging channels that can be 
filled only from the fountain of living water at whose source 
you minister. All the progress of the age and of modem civil- 
ization consists in incorporating in government, finance, com- 
merce, society and domestic life, principles derived from the 
Bible ; and so far as other principles have gained currency, 
they have uniformly led to a retrograde movement. Then as to 
the higher life, the soul's relation to God, and its hope of immor- 
tality, we are constantly reminded, in these days of abounding 
skepticism, of man's entire dependence on the Bible. Even 



15 

pare theism cannot maintain itself apart from the written word, 
but is constantly lapsing into pantheistic vagaries which are the 
mere maudlin poetry of atheism ; while individual immortality, 
in the faith of those who receive it not from the Bibje, is losing 
itself in the idea of re-absorption into the soul of the universe, 
which is but a euphemism for annihilation. 

But from the numberless subjects that throng upon me I 
must select one, and that shall be the Bible as a ]VIanual of 
Morals. 

The Bible, in the first place, alone furnishes scope for the 
primal duty of obedience. Apart from its contents, it is of 
unspeakable benefit to us that we have a Divine directory of 
duty. Obedience to rightful authority is the prime virtue, the 
parent virtue, in itself of transcending worth and merit, and 
containing in itself all possibilities of goodness. It is so in the 
family. The parent has not commenced his child's moral edu- 
cation, till he has taught him to obey. The acts of the child in 
themselves innocent, have no merit, but absolute demerit, if 
performed in proud self-reliance, without deference to the 
wishes and wide of the lawful commands of the parent. But 
obedience feeds the love from which it flows, and gives sweet- 
ness and beauty to the whole of life. 

Orphanhood is for the child a hard lot. Equally hard is it 
for us grown men and women. We need the heart-bonds which 
unite us to the Father in heaven. The very virtues which are 
bom of self-dependence, are unlovely, harsh, cold. But the 
filial obedience which yields itself to a plain ^* Thus saith the 
Lord," vivifies and gladdens the moral nature. In obeying we 
love^ and through love comes the peace that passeth understand- 
ing. I rejoice that '* it is not in man that walketh to direct his 
steps." I would not be the arbiter of my own conduct. The 
very conscience which says I ought, that is, I owe, confesses 
the Divine Creditor to whom I owe what it prompts ; and it is 
an unspeakable joy that I have EUs will so plainly placed before 
me, in precepts which have no double meaning, — so that, though 
my own judgment might often be at fault, and my own appe- 
tites and passions might often seem to me intuitions and princi- 
ples, I can never be mistaken as to what He would have me be 
and do. But without the Bible the best rule that can be given 



16 

is, *' Follow your instincte," and oftener than not they would 
lead us to perdition, as they are now leading unnumbered dupes 
of the theology of self-worship. 

The Bible, in the next place, gives us the only perfect stand- 
ard of duty! Of the ancient moralists there is not one who 
does not fail to recognise some essential virtues, not one jirho 
does not sanction and even commend acknowledged and gross 
immoralities. Plato^from whom, not long ago, a man who 
occupies a pulpit, I will not say a Christian pulpit, openly 
declared (and I doubt not with entire truth) that he had derived 
more than from Jesus Christ — the divine Plato, as he has been 
often called, expressly recommends the murder of weak and 
sickly children, speaks of drunkenness at the feasts of Bacchus 
as eminently proper and respectable, and sanctions some of the 
foulest forms of licentiousness. The moral purity even of 
Socrates is not beyond question, and, whatever his own habits 
may have been, we well know that his zeal for moral reforma- 
tion did not extend to some very flagrant vices in which his 
intimates and admirers only followed, indeed, the customs of 
their time. Seneca, who in some portions of his ethical 
writings gives no little color to the belief that he had studied 
the New Testament without acknowledging it, knows not the 
divine secret of patience and submission under suffering, and 
recommends suicide as the wise man's remedy, — ^a remedy to 
which he himself had final resort. Indeed, among the Stoics, 
who were by far the most virtuous sect of antiquity, suicide was 
deemed worthy of special praise and reverence ; and eminent 
suicides occupy, on their roll of fame, the same position which 
the veneration of Christians assigns to the noble army of mar- 
tyrs. For humility, the early Christian writers were compelled 
literally to pick up words from the dust. No such virtue had 
ever been thought of. The terms, glorified by their application 
to the meek and lowly Jesus, were, till used by him and con- 
cerning him, terms of contempt and obloquy. The marriage 
covenant, whose inviolable sacrcdness lies at the basis of all social 
ethics, when Christ was born, was not regarded as of pernfa- 
nent obligation in any part of the civilized world ; marriage was 
often contracted for the sake of the divorce that ensued, and the 
story of the domestic relations of some of the men who were 



17 

deemed paragons of virtue, such as Cato, Faulus ^milins and 
Cicero, is simply infamous. 

That mere mental culture has no power to create a high moral 
standard, was most abundantly proved in the experience of the 
ancient world ; for in Rome, at the Christian ericas previously 
in A^ens — the very epoch of culmination as to knowledge, 
genius, art and luxury, was marked by a transcending profli- 
gacy of manners and morals. Nor had the ancient religions 
any redeeming power. The Pantheon gave models for every 
form of depravity ; men had made gods afler their own image, 
only worse ; and Milton's Pandemonium is a decent and respect- 
able place as compared with the Olympus of the classics. 

Christian morality — a stage in man's natural development ? 
The very persons who say this know that there is no ground for 
it They know that at the Christian era there was not a single 
hopeful moral phenomenon upon the earth, unless it were that 
deepest darkness which precedes the dawn, or rather that stress 
of helpless need which seemed a dumb, unconscious prayer for 
the intervention of Omnipotent mercy. 

But if Christian morality marked a stage of human progress, 
how is it that mankind have always receded in morality when 
they have professed to advance beyond the Bible ? France, in 
the last century, outgrew the Bible, and the consequence was a 
lower demoralization than that of the heathen world before 
Christ. Even natural affection seemed to be obliterated ; the 
nation was divided into beasts of prey and their victims, and 
there was not virtue enough lefl to hold society togethei*. It is 
a similar experiment which those who have got beyond the 
Bible are willing to try with us. Already have they laid sac- 
rilegious hands on the family, the palladium of all civic and 
social virtue. It cannot have escaped your notice, that loose 
notions as to all subjects connected with marriage, and the rela- 
tion between man and woman, are becoming prevalent, are 
invading the seats of justice, and infecting even our statute- 
books. In this movement the lovers of the Bible have borne no 
part. It has been initiated and conducted wholly by those who 
repudiate the Bible as a standard of morals. 

I learn that it has been gravely argued among certain young 
men who design to be the moral teachers of their generation, 



18 

that, as thej have no authority higher than their own conscious- 
ness, it is desirable that they make trial by experience of the 
various vices. The world has had one eminent preacher of this 
class, and he illustrates, with peculiar pertinence and force, the 
office and use of a divinely revealed standard of morality. I 
refer to the booK of Ecclesiastes. This is the most instructive, 
impressive, touching autobiography ever written. The author 
has tried aU types of pleasure, luxury, vice, and records the 
issue of each trial in that ever-recurring refrain^ '' This, also, is 
vanity and vexation of spirit/' In weary old age there remains 
for him but one experiment, and this brings him to the conclu- 
sion that ought to have been his. starting point: '^Fear God, 
and keep His commandments, for this is the whole of man ; " 
that is, "his supreme interest, hope and joy. This book points 
to the moral use of the Bible. If we live long enough, we shall 
aU find out for ourselves the fundamental truths of morality 
embodied in our Saviour's teachings, and manifested in his life. 
There is no essential difference in the moral beliefs of old men. 
The hoary profligate has learned negatively, by fatal experience, 
precisely what the saint has learned positively, by blessed expe- 
rience ; and the wailing strains of the remorse of the one as he 
sinks to his own place among the workers of iniquity, are in 
perfect accord with the swan-song of the other, as he plumes 
his flight to heaven. Btft without authority in morals, authority 
absolute and divine, youthful lusts and passions will still urge 
men to try the pleasures of sin, to crown themselves with its 
rosebuds, and to leave no flower of its spring ungathered. The 
Bible anticipates experience, supersedes fatal experiment, 
enables the young man to start with the convictions which the 
old man must at all events reach. It places before him life and 
good, death and evil, as conjoined by the Omnipotence that 
holds the stars in their courses. By its precepts he gets under- 
standing, so that he hates before trial every evil and false way. 
It sheds prophetic light on the whole of life, and enforces duty 
by the cumulative powers of the world to come. I doubt the 
possibility of overt and perilous guilt for him who is trained in 
the daily reverqnt reading of the Word of Grod, so long as he 
forsakes not this only sure guide of his youth. 

There is, no doubt, an important sense in which the German 



19 

proverb holds good, '' We know only what we have lived." 
Consciousness, which is the only realizing knowledge, presup« 
poses experience. But there are some things which we are 
willing to take on trust without trial, if we have with regard to 
them perfectly satisfying testimony. We may well dispense 
with a realizing knowledge of vice and sin, if we are assured 
on Divine authority, that sin and penalty, vice and misery, are 
inseparable. 

But there are, on the other hand, experiments which the 
Bible invites and induces us to try, to our supreme and enduring 
benefit. Thus v^ith hot young blood and quick resentment, the 
precepts of forbearance and forgiveness to the uttermost might 
seem pusillanimous, were they not clothed in peerless beauty 
and glory by the long-suffering Son of God, by his toil for the 
thankless and undeserving, by his meek endurance of injury 
and outrage, by his sublime prayer for his murderers. But he 
whom the Saviour has onc^ won to make trial of his method, 
finds it sweet to forbear, blessed to forgive, — is conscious of 
victory by meekness, and of triumph in submission. Thus, also, 
to youthful ambition it seems a hard saying, ^* If any man 
desire to be first, let him be last of all, and servant of all." 
But when the aspirant for ti-ue greatness sees the Lord of men 
and of angels manifesting his lordship by his diligence and low- 
liness as the servant of all, when he takes in the great lesson 
of the washing of the disciples' feet, he essays this same path 
of greatness, is inspired with the holy ambition of spending and 
being spent for his brethren, and learns in his own conscious- 
ness, that he rules by serving, exalts himself by humbling him-, 
self, becomes the greatest by making himself the least. 

Thus is it with many of the precepts of transcendent virtue 
that fell from the lips of Jesus. To a wordly mind they are 
paradoxes, and but for the Saviour's life they would have 
remained paradoxes forever. But their embodiment in him is 
so radiantly beautiful, so resplendently glorious, that he who 
feels the power of the Saviour's spirit, cannot but make trial of 
them, and then they become elements of his own consciousness, 
verified by his experience, forming within him .the Christ whom 
at first he contemplates with distant, adoring love, then grows 
into the image he adores, becomes filled with the spirit which 
he loves. 



20 

I have spoken of the Bible as the perfect moral standard. 
Who can add to the ethics of the New Testament, or take from 
them, or suggest any modification of them ? We can conceive 
of no occasion which they do not meet, of no emergency for 
which they do not suffice. Infidelity dares not openly assail 
them; when honest, it admits their purity and perfectness. 
Nor are they the law for earth and time alone, but for heaven 
and eternity. We can conceive of no stage of advancement in 
the endless future, at which the precepts of the Sermon on the 
Mount shall be less than now the sum of all our duty, or at 
which it will not, as now, be our highest blessedness and honor 
to be among those ^^ who follow the Lamb whithersoever he 
goeth." 

But admitting the perfectness of the Christian ethics, some 
may ask. Why do you circulate the Jewish Scriptures with the 
Christian ? To diverge from our present subject in a single 
sentence, it might be said that the record of antecedent revela- 
tions, typical and anticipative of the Christian, the tracing of 
the Sun of Righteousness from its dim dawn through its red- 
dening twilight to its uprising, and especially the long series of 
types and prophecies centering, verified and fulfilled in Jesus, 
must be of inestimable interest and value to him who believes 
and loves the Gospel and the Saviour. But if we confine our- 
selves to morals alone, how much is there in the Old Testament 
to illustrate and enforce the teachings of the New ! We find, 
substantially, the same moral standard, tone and spirit, lacking 
only the Word made fiesh, the theophany by which divine per- 
fection is exhibited in the form of frail and sufiering humanity. 

Can aught be more manifestly the outflow of infinite purity 
and holiness than the Decalogue ? Those precepts, considered 
as of human authorship, are an outrageous anachronism. That 
they should have sprung from the heart of that barbarous horde 
of fugitive slaves, or from the brain of their chieflain, is a far 
more stupendous miracle than that which the record bids us 
believe. Did they stand alone, without any narrative of attend- 
ant circumstances, I could not help prefixing to them, as the 
historian has, '^ God spake all these words," and the awful 
majesty that accompanied their utterance seems less needed to 
confirm than adapted to enshrine their divinity. Nor do these 



21 

Stand alone. Moses has always been spoken of as a type of 
Christ in his official relation to the covenant-people ; he is much 
more so in the loftiness, purity and tender humanity of the 
ethical precepts promulgated through him, and in the moral 
tone of his law, in which I am constrained to see continually, 
not the nursling of Pharaoh's court, nor the keeper of Jethro's 
sheep, but the wisdom, holiness and love of the eternal God. 

From this standard there is, in the Hebrew Scriptures, no 
retrogression. It is maintained in its integrity by psalmist and 
prophet, in proverb and in song ; and there are numerous pas- 
sages in which the divine law is set forth with a fervor, pathos, 
eloquence, a thoroughness in exposition, a fidelity in rebuke, a 
winning lifelikeness in the portraiture of goodness, with which, 
as mere moralists, we could not consent to dispense, and which 
might well supersede all other evidence that these Scriptures 
were written by holy men as they were moved by the Holy 
Spirit. 

Then what a glorious portrait-gallery is hung up in the earlier 
books of the Bible, of men who wrought the righteousness 
which those books inculcate, — men, who, in times of inferior 
moral culture, and often not free from the coarseness and the 
soil of their rude age, yet so far as they knew the right, pur- 
sued it with a singleness of aim, and a sublime self-consecra- 
tion, in which the Christian sees not only an illustrious example, 
but too often the reflection of his own short-coming and shame ! 
Men these are, whose virtue is not eclipsed, nor the aroma of 
their piety exhaled by the lapse of uncounted ages, or the rev- 
olutions that have passed over their birth-land, but who shine, 
and will shine on in the spiritual firmament, '' like stars, forever 
and ever." Nor ought we to omit our recognition of the moral 
worth of portraits of the opposite description,— of depravity and 
vileness, with the uniform testimony, ** He did evil in the sight 
of the Lord," with the verdict of more than Rhadamanthine 
sternness against every form of guilt, and with those Providen- 
tial retributions, those speedy payments of the wages of sin, 
which seem the forecast shadow of eternity on time. 

Now it is precisely in its moral characteristics, that the per- 
manent worth of the Old Testament must consist. For proph-* 
ecy we have fulfillment ; for rites and ceremonieSi the spiritual 



22 

traths they symbolized ; for transient glimpses of immortality, 
the eternal life made manifest,— the early revelations being not 
done away, but consummated in the later. But moral laws and 
distinctions are eternal and unchangeable. Not one jot or tittle 
of the law can ever fail. No word of God as to essential 
duty, no chapter of human experience that bears the signature 
of his retributive Providence, can become obsolete, or can cease 
to be of avail for our instruction in virtue and holiness. The 
New Testament covers but a narrow and brief segment of man's 
moral history. The Old Testament expounds and illustrates 
the ethics of the New, through untold centuries, and in the rise 
and fall of empires and races. 

Moreover, it is the ethical element that constitutes the unity 
of all God's revelations from the first to the second Adam. 
Their one purpose is the moral redemption and purity of man, 
— a purpose consummated, indeed, only in the blood of Christ 
which ^^ cleanseth from all sin," yet held constantly in view in 
ritual, sacrifice and prophecy. These all point to the Lamb of 
God, anticipate for the faithful the benefits of his reign, and are, 
therefore, essential to the clear and full comprehension of ^' God 
in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself." Therefore is it 
that we circulate the whole Bible, not desiring to part what G^d 
has joined, and believing that the entire history and record of 
his revelations to man cannot but be profitable for '' reproof, 
correction and instruction in righteousness." 

But for man's moral redemption neither the teachings of the 
Old Testament, nor the precepts of the New will suffice. In- 
carnate perfection, in a form which we can love, and can lov- 
ingly obey and follow, is essential. Mere moral teaching has 
but an auxiliary office and a partial efficacy. We know better 
than we are or do. We may know the right, yet pursue the 
wrong. We need motive, constraining motive ; motive is but 
another name for emotion, feeling ; and feeling is personal, and 
needs a personal object to excite and sustain it. Abstract 
moral precepts can never command sacrifice or sufiering for 
their sake. For the Christianity without Christ, which is some- 
times placed before us, for goodness abstract, not incarnate, no 
man would ever have died ; but when Stephen saw Jesus 
standing on the right hand of God, it was sweet to die for him. 



23 

If you will trace aoj good life, or the successive acts of a 
good life to the governiDg motives, you will always find that 
these motives resolve themselves into the personal element, — 
love, loyalty, reverence, or some disposition or affection toward 
a person or persons. Here are two men exposed to like temp- 
tations. One has stood firm ; the other has fallen. Yon will 
find that the safety of the one, when not due to fixed religious 
principle, was due to some hold which virtue had on his affec- 
tions, — ^perhaps to the example of a saintly father, perhaps to 
the memory of a mother or a sister in heaven, perhaps to 
thoughts of a pure and happy home-circle on which he will not 
bring pollution and misery, perhaps to a virtuous friendship of 
which he will not become unworthy. Yet, as we know only too 
well, these human loves, strong though they be, are not impreg- 
nable, cannot resist the fiercest assaults of temptation. But if 
there be one whose principle is beyond bribe, who can hold fast 
his purity and integrity, even '* where Satan's seat is," it is 
because he has found more than father, mother, sister, friend or 
home, in the blessed Jesus, whose word to the trusting, loving 
soul ever is, '^ Though thou pass through the waters, I am with 
thee, and through the floods, they shall not overflow thee." 

The testimony of Christian consciousness in all ages, bears 
witness to the Christ-born and Christward tending character of 
all that gives strength and beauty to the life. The personality, 
the presence, the felt sympathy of Jesus have been might and joy 
to the saints in all generations ; and the more arduous the ser- 
vice, the higher the attainment, with all the clearer note rings 
out with the praise of God, the ascription of blessing, and honor, 
and glory to the Lamb. We crave support and companionship ; 
yet there is in every life-work so much which is peculiar to itself, 
that as regards the sympathy even of the nearest and dearest, 
the true and loyal soul must oflen say, ^^ I have trodden the 
wine-press alone." It is this loneliness, to escape which so 
many turn aside or loiter on the way of duty, that Jesus comes 
in to fill, entering with profound fellow-feeling into the unspeak. 
able portions of our experience, pitying and soothing the groan- 
ings thai cannot be uttered. While we learn from his example, 
as we could from no impersonal precept, the fullness, height, 
depth, inwardness of the divine law, we are enabled, as by no 



24 

Other help, to incarnate that law in oar lives. Duty, else doubt- 
ful and weary task-work, to him who looks to Jesus is illumined 
by his footprints, gladdened by his communion, so that the 
soul's voice is : 

** No, my dear Lord, in following Thee, 
Not in the dark, uncertainly, 

This foot obedient moves ; 
^ is with a Brother and a King, 
Who many to His yoke will bring. 

Who ever lives and loves." 

We, therefore, in circulating the Word of God, are not only 
diffusing the knowledge of the right, — we are at the same time 
proffering to our fellow-men the companionship and sympathy 
which alone can suffice for their moral needs, give them power 
to overcome temptation, defend them against their own appetite, 
passion or indolence, and strengthen them for those emergencies 
of arduous duty which come to all. 

But this statement has by no means exhausted the worth of 
the Bible as a Manual of Morals. Whatever our characters 
may now be, there remains a profound moral need, which none 
feel so keenly as those who might seem the least liable to feel 
it. We know that we have been and are sinners, and none 
know this so well as those who lie the least open to the charge 
from their fellow-men. The craving for forgiveness is a no less 
urgent moral need than is the demand for a perfect standard of 
right, or for an adequate motive to duty. I know well the tone 
of easy confidence that many assume in the flush of health and 
the full tide of prosperity, the trust in one's own goodness, the 
feeling that the Almighty cannot but accept such pure-minded, 
true-hearted, faithful servants as wo have been. There is no 
lack of this self-worship, even in the sanctuary. In one of our 
hymn-books, compiled by a man of eminent piety, I find such a 
stanza as this, which a choir of archangels would not dare to 
sing in the presence of Him of whom it is written, ^^ The 
heavens are not clean in His sight." 

'* Come beautiful, as souls should be ! 
Come beautiful, for God to see ! 
Come holy-fair, come heavenly-bright. 
And give the All-seeing eye delight." 



25 

Not thus do the djing come, least of all those who have 
seemed to their fellow-mortals stainless and perfect, not even 
though the type of their piety be preeminently genial, filial and 
loving. All the imperfections of a lifetime, the little sins 
appreciable only by the micrometer of a sensitive conscience, 
come up to remembrance, and the holy, yet humble of heart, 
because of their profound sense of the perfect purity and holi- 
ness into whose unveiled presence they must enter, are moved 
to put their hands on their mouths, and their mouths in the 
dust, and to cry, Unclean, unclean. From the deathbeds of those 
who had seemed faultlessly excellent, I have been wont to hear 
only words expressive of self-abasement, and of the felt need of 
pardon, as if the pure, white light that streams in from heaven 
on the dying soul, made every mote and speck cast a deep, 
black shadow. 

Nor is this need felt only at the closing hour. Many are the 
seasons of lonely grief, of desolating bereavement or calamity, 
— ^times, too, when, without any apparent cause, the Spirit of 
God opens the inward eye to deep self-searching and clear self- 
knowledge, — when the agonizing cry for forgiveness goes up 
from the soul. The Bible herein manifests its peerless moral 
worth, in that it alone can lead us to the only being who has 
power upon earth to forgive sin. His tenderness aud compas- 
sion for the frail and erring, his intercession for the transgres- 
sors, above all, his death, the just for the unjust, the pardon and 
cleansing that flow in his blood on Calvary, the power and 
mercy of God incarnate for the redemption of man, incarnate, 
too, in him whom we can at once adore as our Lord, and love 
as our brother, — in fine, the living, loving, dying,, ever-living 
Christ, — he it is that is the sinner's only hope, — he it is who 
alone can lift the burden from the soul that knows its own 
wrong and evil, can impart the highest joy of earth, and the 
surest presage of heaven, — the blessedness of him whose 
iniquity is pardoned, whose sin is forgiven. 

This benefit, then, priceless above all others, you are bestow- 
ingi as 7^" ^^^^ ^^^^^ '^® Word of God. In the time of 
intensest need, of despondency and self-reproach ^ when the 
death-shadow creeps stealthily, or suddenly swoops down on 
life in its morning or its midday, your ministry may bring the 



26 . 

sin-stricken spirit to the Pardoner, and call forth at his feet 
those 

'* Blest tears of soul-felt penitence, 
In whose benign, redeeming flow 
Is felt the first, the only sense 

Of guiltless joy that guilt can know." 

I have thus presented the Bible as the only and the all-suffi- 
cient Manual of Morals, first, as giving scope for the cardinal 
virtue and paramount duty of obedience ; secondly, as furnishing 
a perfect standard of right ; thirdly, as afifording in the person 
of Jesus Christ the motive, companionship and help, without 
which it were vain for us to know the right, and, fourthly, as 
the charter of forgiveness, without which even reformation and 
right-doing could not remove the painful consciousness of past 
transgression. 

My friends, I trust that in what I have said, I have spoken 
to the experience of many of you. The Bible has given you 
law, motive, pardon. You know not where else to look for 
them. For you they are incarnate in Jesus alone, and they are 
yours only because you have resorted to the Bible for light, help 
and peace. Remember that your needs are human needs, such 
as are felt by every soul of man. If, then, you deem their 
supply to yourselves worth the price of worlds, give what you • 
most value, — diffuse what you regard as most precious. Let 
the Word of God, through your agency, work its way to an 
ever broader scope of mercy, to an ever fuller array of souls that 
shall have found in it their Redeemer. Sow beside all waters. 
In this charity it is, indeed, less than in others, your privilege 
to watch the growth of the seed, and to trace the blade, the ear, 
the ripened sheaf. But in heaven you will know your own 
sheaves ; nor can you sow in God's field the seed of the king- 
dom, without your blessed share in the ingathering and the 
harvest-joy. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO rrs incorporation. 

July 13, 1809.— The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the 
Committee appointed for that purposie, reported a Plan for 
carrying into effect the object of this Association, which being 
read from the Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, 
and was, with one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows* 
¥iz: — 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments, to be distributed among all persons 
inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of 
the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied 
without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled 
clergymen of every denomination of Christians within the State, 
who shall, in writing, request to be members ; of every person 
who shall subscribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not 
less than two dollars, and who shall remain a member so long as 
he continues the payment of that sum; and of every person, 
who shall subscribe and pay to the Treasurer a sum not less 
than fifty dollars, he remaining a member during life, without 
being obliged to further contributions. 



28 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the 
direction of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the 
organization of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers 
are obtained, notice shall be given by the Committee, and also 
of the time and place of the meeting of the Society. 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treas- 
urer, Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who 
shall continue in office until the Society be incorporated, and 
until successors are chosen in their room ; and they, together 
with eighteen other members to be elected by ballot at the same 
time, of whom six shall be clergymen and twelve shall be lay- 
men, shall form a Board of Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from 
among the members of the Society, a Committee of three 
persons, to continue in office during the pleasure of the Board of 
Trustees, who shall have the management of the fund, and the 
distribution of the books procured with it, subject and according 
to such regulations and directions, as shall from time to time be 
prescribed by the Trustees at any meeting held on public notice 
given as aforesaid ; and the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in 
his hands to the order of the said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes 
aforesaid, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into 
effect the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on 
regular notice given, for the due exercise of all the powers 
granted by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall 
again meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, 
or Recording Secretary, to devise and adopt such further meas- 
ures as may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for 
effecting the intentions of the members. 



29 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the 
Trustees petitioned the General Court, and obtained the 
following 

ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

COMMONWEALTH OF .MASSACHUSETTS. 

In the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act 
to incorporate the Bible Society of MaBsachusetts. 

Whtnca^ the persons hereafler named in this Act, together with 
many other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves 
into a Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contri- 
bution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, 
who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and wlio cannot be con- 
veniently supplied without the aid of others ; and whereas, in order 
that the pious and laudable objects of said Society may he better 
carried into effect, and the charity of said Society more extensively 
diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an Act of Incor- 
poration« 

Sec. 1. Bt it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
iiveSf in General Court assembled, and by authority of the same, That 
William Phillips, Esquire, the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. 
Joseph Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet 
Porter, D. D., the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Bald- 
win, D. D., the Hon. William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. 
Isaac Parker, Hon. Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, 
Esq., Mr. Joseph Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph 
May, and Henry Hill, Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. 
Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. Samuel H. Walley, together with 
those, who have associated, and who may hereaAer associate with them 
for the purposes aforesaid, be, and they hereby are incorporated into 
a Society, by the name of The Bible Societt of Massachusetts* 

Sec 2. Be it further enacted. That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legis- 
lature ; and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and 
the said Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any 
persons disposed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any 
grants or devises of lands and tenements in fee simple, or otherwise, 
and donations, beqliests, and subscriptions of money, or other property, 
to be used and improved for the purposes aforesaid. 



30 

Sec. 3. Be it further enacted, That the said Corporation shall he, 
and hereby are empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that, which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the 
sum of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sec 4. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may sue and be 
sued, in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents 
to prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sec 5. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such 
rules and regulations, as to them shall appear necessary ; provided the 
same be not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Common- 
wealth. 

Sec 6. Be it further enacted, That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
he hereby is authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers 
printed in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting 
of said Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the 
time and place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of 
notifying the same : may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe 
their duty, and may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may 
be determined by the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such 
powers, conformable to the principles of this institution, as shall be 
deemed necessary. — approved by the Governor, February 15, 1810. 



COMIMONWEALTn OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-fiTe. An Act in addition to an Act 
to incorporate the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General 
Court assembled, and by the authorUy of the same, as follows : 

Sec 1. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society or Massachusetts, shall hereafter be known 
by the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that 
name shall have, hold and enjoy all its rights and privileges and be 
subject to all its liabiilties and obligations to the same extent as if its 
name had not been changed. 

Sec 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circu- 
late and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the Eng- 
lish language, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are 
now authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, any thing 
in the Act incorporating the said Society to the contrary notwith- 
standing. — Approved by the Governor, February 27, 1865. 



BY-LAWS. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 1851^ 
the following By-Laws were adopted : — 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act 
of Incorporation, namely, " the raising a fund by voluntary con- 
tribution to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments 
of the version in common use in the churches of New England, 
for distribution among all persons inhabiting within the State 
and elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and 
who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE TI. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of 
Christians in the State, may become a member of this Society 
by signifying his request in writing to that effect, to the Record- 
ing Secretary — who shall keep a record of all persons who shall 
so become members, in a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually, shall thereby become a member of the Society, 
so long as such payment is continued, — and the Treasurer shall 
keep a list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IT. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than 
twenty dollars at one time shall thereby become a meifiber ot 
the Society for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording 
Secretary. 



32 



ARTICLE v. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen 
Vice Presidents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, and eighteen Trustees and an Auditor. The 
President, Vice Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secre- 
taries and Treasurer, shall each be ex-officio members of the 
Board of Trustees, and the Recording Secretary shall be the 
recording officer of that Board. These officers shall all be 
chosen by ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees ; and he, and also the Vice Presidents and Secretaries 
and Treasurer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on 
such officers respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns 
of the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act 
of Incorporation is vested in the Society, and they shall prescribe 
the duties of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation 
of all funds and donations, and generally have and possess all 
the power and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the So- 
ciety. It shall be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, 
to make and lay before the. Society a particular Report of all 
their doings, with all such documents and vouchers as may be 
asked for by any member, and such Report shall be had and 
considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice of 
Trustees, for the year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The Annua] Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the 
Monday preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year, and 
at this meeting it shall be competent to transact any business 
which the Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting 
shall be given by the Recording Secretary at least seven days 
before the holding thereof, by notice published in at least one 
newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by 
the Trustees^ of which notice shall be given in at least three 



33 

newspapers published in Boston, and no business shall be trans- 
acted at such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the 
notice. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Trustees shall hold regular seroi-annual meetings in 
March and September, in each year, and such other special 
meetings as they may direct, or as the President may at any 
time call. Five Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLR XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting af\er their election, annu- 
ally, shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, 
a Committee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE XII^ 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them; the Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of 
all matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the ap- 
pointment of all agents, subject to the approval of the Trustees, ' 
and the defining of their respective duties ; the Committee on 
the Depository shall have the management of all matters con- 
nected with the Society's Depository for the sale of Bibles, — all 
of said Committees, at all times however, to be subject to the 
direction and control of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual 
meeting, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, 
by vote of a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE MEMBERS. 

Each Life Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles 
and Testaments. 

N. B. — The above books will be delivered to members by 
personal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued 
only for the current, not for past years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE, 

BY THE PAYMENT OF TWENTY DOLLARS AND X7FWABDS. 



Abboi Rev. Frederick R., Abmgtcn, 

Abhe, Mri. Frederick R. " 

Abbot, Charlefl H., Lovdl. 

Abbott, ReT. Jacob J., yiirmtmU, Me. 

AbofD, John G., Wakefield. 

Adamf, Elizabeth W., Derrji, JV. H, 

Adama, Frank N., Medway. 

Adama, John Clark, Hopkinton. 

*Adaaii, John Quincy, Qntitey. 

Adams, Nehemiah, D. D., Boston. 

Adams, Stephen, West Medway. 

Adkins, Miu Mary J., South Dttrfield. 

*AIbree, John, Boston, 

^Albro, John A., D. D., Cambridge, 

Albro, Mrs. Elisabeth S., Waiikam. 

Albr0| Miss Annie E. ** 

Alden, Almira S. C, Foxhore*. 

Alden, Russell, Campello, 

Alden, Miss Sarah B., Randolph, 

Alden, Miss Susan, " 

Aldrich, Mrs. Mary B., fFestboro*, 

Allen, Mrs. Cyrus, Franklin. 

Allen, Rot. Nathaniel 6., Boston. 

Allen, Richard H., Braintree. 

Ames, James S., Haverhill, 

Andrews, Artemas F., jSshby, 

Andrews, C. L., Boston. 

Andrews, George W., Danvers. 

Andrews, Stephen, Oloucestsr, 

Andrews, VV. T., Boston, 

Andrews, Thomas E., HoUitton, 

Andrews, Walter H., WhitinsvUle, 

^Apploton, Samuel, Boston, 

*Appleton, William, " 

Archibald, Edward, Methuen, 

Armes, Miss C'laraA., Campello, 

Armsby, Mrs. H. A., Whitinsville. 

Arnold, Susan O., BraitUree, 

At wood, Mrs. Abby, Bergen ^ JV. J, 

Atwood, Mrs. Elisabeth M., ** 

At wood, Edward S., Boston. 

Atwood, John W., Bergen^ JV. J, 

Babcock, Mrs. Nancy, Boston. 

Babcock, R«t. William R., Jamaica Plain. 

Babeon, Misa Maria R., Oloucestor, 

Bachelor, Mrs. Mary A., WkitintvUl$, 



Bacon, Jacob, Oloutester. 

Eacon, Rev. James M., Essex. 

Bacon, Joseph N., Newton. 

Backus, Rev. Joseph W., Thomastonj Cl, 

Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., Dorchester, 

Baker, Francis, Peabody, 

Baker, Susan S., " 

Balmer, William, Jr., Whitinsville, 

Baldwin, Miss Josephine L., Lynn. 

Ball, Miss Elizabeth, Concord, 

Bancroft, Amasa, Gardner. 

Bancroft, Henry L., MilJbnry. 

'^Barber, Martin, Sherhom. 

Barber, Sally C, ** 

Barbour, Rev. William M., Bangor^ Me, 

Barbour, Mrs. Elisa A. " 

*Bardwell, Lieut. Charles 8., Whately. 

Barker, Hiram, Brighton. 

Bardsley, Joseph, Whitinsville. 

Barnard, William F., Marlboro.^ 

•Barnes, William, " 

Barnes, Zilpah, Hennikert JV. H. 

Barrett, Nathan H., Concord, 

Barrett, Miss Rebecca M. ** 

Bartlett, Rev. Edward O., Providence^ R. I, 

Bartlett, Mrs. Eleanor C, Plymouth, 

Bartlett, Thomas, Boston, 

Bassctt, Henry, M'ewlon, 

Bassett, Mrs. Lucretia C, Charlemont. 

Bassett, Sarah E., ^eu>buryport. 

Batcholor, Misa Frances A., Whitinsville, 

Batchelder, John M., Holliston. 

Batchelor, Stephen F., WhUinsviUe, 

Batt. Rev. 'NVilliam J., Leominster. 

Batt, Mrs. Mary D. " 

'^Bayley, Robert, ^etebu r yp o rt, 

Boal, Alexander, Boston, 

Beal, Mrs. Louisa, Cohasset, 

Beals, Isaac N., Campello, 

Etean, Cyrus Beede, Dover^ JV. H. 

*Beane, Rev. Samuel, Jforton, 

Bearse, Isaac, J^atick, 

Bearse, Miss Olive H., CentrevUle. 

Beebe, 4ames M., Boston, . 

Beebe, Mrs. James M. 

*Beebe, Charles E. 



it 



ii 



35 



Beebe, Franeeii Ik, Boston. 

Be«be, Edward P. ** 

Beebe, Emily B. ** 

Beebe, Mary L. ** 

Beecher, Rev. Charlee, Oeorgetovn. 

Beecber, Rev. William H., J^c, Broo^fMd. 

BeldeD, Mr*. Marianne P., WkaUljf. 

Belden, William P., Oardner^ 

Belknap, Miaa Martha M., Framingham, 

Benner, Bomham C, Loieell. 

Benton, Frederiek A., Alswfen. 

Bitcoe, Mn. Arthur G., Hettboro\ 

Blackstone, Mri. Lydia £., Ckesttr, JV. H. 

Blanchard, Miai Frances C, OroUnt* 

BliM, Rev. Charles R., fVakeJiM. 

BUm, Mra. Chailee R. ** 

Blodgett, Benjamin C, ^evton. 

Blodfett, Simeon, Sonth DetrJUld* 

Blood, Cyrof W., fVinekuter. 

BkxMl, Lyman, Qr^Unu 

Bodwell, Rev. Joaeph C, Hartford^ ConM, 

Bodwell, Mra. Catharine, ** 

*Bond, George, Boston. 

Boame, Thomaa B., Fozboro*, 

Boat well, Mra. Hannah H., Brainiree. 

Boweri, Luke K., Boston, 

Bowers, Mn. Cara H. " 

*Brackett, Jamei, Q,iuney. 

Brackett, Lemuel, ** 

*Braman, Rev. Isaac, Otorgeiow%. 

Brandenberg, Oliver C. W., &FraReuco,Cai. 

Brant, Aaron, fVak^etd. 

*Breed, Rev. William J., Raynham. 

Brewer, Cyrus, Dorchester. 

Brewer, Mrs. C. F., Boston, 

Brewer, John R. " 

Briekett, Franklin, Haverhill. 

Briggs, Miaa Catharine Clark, fVenham, 

Briggs, Rev. William T., East Douglas. 

Briggs, Mrs. Abby L., ** 

Brigbam, Mrs. Dexter P., Westboro\ 

Brigbam, Rev. Willaid, fVineheruUm, 

Brock, Robert G., fVhitinsviUe. 

*Bromfield, Elizabeth, Boston. 

*Brooks, Peter C, 

Brooks, Peter C 

Brown, Mrs. Harriet L. 

Brown, Rebecca, IVhitinevilte. 

Brown, Joseph, Oroton. 

Brown, Mra. Mary L., Haverhill, 

Brown, Robert K., fVhitinsvWe. 

Bryant, Solon, " 

Backlin, Simoo 8., Brookline, 

Bnlkley, Mrs. C. F., Plattsburgh, A*. F. 

Bollard, M rs. John, Jr., Medvaf. 

Bnrbeek, Samuel K., East Boston. 

Borge, Lorenxo, Boston, 

Bumliam, Robert W., Eeeex. 



(i 



«{ 



ii 



({ 



C( 



ii 



Burr, Charles C, JIuhumdale. 

Burrafe, J. C, Boston. 

Burrage, Joseph, JirUngton* 

Burrage, Mary C. " 

Burrill, Henry, Jr., East Jibington. 

Bash, Henry J., fVestJUld. 

Bttshby, Sophia W., Peabodf. 

Butler, Rev. Daniel, Boston, 

Butler, Mrs. Jane D. " 

Cady, Rev. Daniel R., Arlington. 

Cady, Mrs. Harriet S. " 

Caldwell, Rev. W. £., ffyannis. 

Camp, George, South IJadley Falls. 

Camp, John, •* 

Capen, Mrs. Charles, Framingham. 

Capron, John W., Uxbndge, 

Capron, Laura A, W. <• 

Capron, William C, " 

Carleton, George H., Haverhill. 

Carpenter, Rev. Carlos C, ChatanoogOj Tenn. 

Carpenter, Catharine E., Fozboro'. 

Carpenter, Daniel, 

Carpenter, Edton, 

Carpenter, Horace, 

Carr, Charles R., WhitinsviUe. 

Car r, John C, ff^est A'ewbury, 

Carrier, Rev. Augustus H.y Minneapolis, Min. 

Carruthers, Rev. William, Danvers. 

Carter, Edward, .4 atf over. 

Carter, Joshua T., H' hitituville. 

Carter, William H., LowelL 

Cary, George C, JV*. Bridgewater. 

Cary, Mrs. Mary D., Fozboro'. 

Case, Mrs. Mary Olive, JVeio York City. 

Caswell, Lemuel E., fVest JVevton. 

Cbamberlin, John, H'hitinsvilU. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel, Westbord*. 

Chandler, Miss Frances £., Jindover. 

Chandler, H. H., Charlestuwn. 

Chapin, Caleb T., M'orthboro\ 

Chapin,John O., Whitinsville. 

Chapin, Josiah L., Latcrsnce, 

Chapin, Marcus, Monson. 

Chapin, Milo, Springfield. 

Chapin, Miss Sarah, H'' hitinsviUe. 

Chapman, George H., fVinchester. 

Chase, Ann Maria, Haverhill. 

Chase, Charles W., «* 

Chase, David B., ffhilinsvUle, 

Chaae, George S., HaverhUL 

Chase, Hesekiah, Lynn. 

Chase, Robert, Haverhill, 

Cheever Ira, Chelsea, 

Child, Miss Anna G., Springfield. 

Child, George H., Springfield, O. 

Child, Miss Lucy, Thetferdy Ft. 

Childs, Carlos, Henniker^ Jf. H. 

Childs, Horace, 



t< 



ChoBU, Diiia, U. D., Slim. 
•Clip, Jum, OorcJtudr. 
Clip, Mil. B«lwcu, Btttn. 

Cl.pp, JobD U « 

Clapp, Siinual, nntsTMif t, 

Clark, Bci>. Edwin] U, JVri; Ann, O. 

ctiik, etbildjD, Eui ^r<iiHr. 

Clotk, Gtcrga, ConrurJ. 
Ctark, Jtmu O., Jinimr. 
Cluk.JuhnL., 
CliikiJoaaUua, WinitiHltr. 
Ctiik, K«>. Jotapb B., A^vhiiiiilll*. 
Clark, JuIIihU Htit Xiwlon. 
Clark, HcT. L.F., If'kiljfrntUi. 
Clatk, Uii. Miraaaa D., £uUii. 
CJaik, MiiBjNfll; Skiri^K. 
CJark, Oliisr B., H\>cka»ir. 
auk, RaT. P. K., M'ol SrHofAM. 
Claik, Ravia R., ITkilimilla. 

ciaik,Kuruan' o.a.,JiHff,if.r. 

CJarka, Mia. Adoliia K., Jli^U|. 
C[uk«, Ker.Doiui, D. D^ fsahia. 
Ctatkc,Fr>ncla, MaBK-kUt 
Ulatka, Ganrts £., Jniuiia I'laJK. 
Cluka, Mia. Sanli U, Auraiu 
Clat; Mri. 6. S., JFarckaai. 
ClHvcJuid WaMo, «M* DaarJIaM. 
ClilTgrd, Wjad B., CMk*i>. 
CJDUgh.JDhnR, Oonind^a. 
Cobb, AodiiM B., AVKlua Cmiar. 
Cobb, Jaiob, .atia^ra. 
Cobb, Bar. U H., SfitglUld, Fl. 



^L'ailnia 



,Cliul«iK. 



Copnall, Etidticiai, Ipi^Uh. 

Colbr, Albait, AulH. 

Colbr, Bacak, Hnnittr, A". H. 



Cook, Aai, A^lDH. 



Cook, Ilanr) 
Cook, Mra. Mini B 
Cook, J SulliTin, J 
Coola,, Mra. Olin 

Coolid|a, Joaspk, £hIi 
Cooliitfs, LaweU, Sk. 
Coelldf *, Nil. Calhiric 



HtJ.! 



Coidla;, Mra. L;dia G., LtKrna. 
Coroitb, Mra. Eliiaballi B., Centrnil!*. 
Cm'}ii,4i>ba, BavrrkilL 









(li, M».BarahF.,AiBl»lu 




»r<.rH,EilanA..Jt<>rT>. 


c. 


»Dd°D, H.a> noboaa &, OUrlaaM 


c, 


t«ndaa, Bi«Dn, •• 


Cro 






Croabr, Nn. ElaauOIL.'• 




.b,,J.<H., £«««.. 


c;rl■bJ,Jlr..Kabe™, 


*C 


iiiok>ba<.k>, Mn. Anna M^ ^<«tr. 






Ci 






iekihaoki, Miaa Maif, CMko. 


c. 




Ct 


i>illi<,Cha<]oi,7fa>Tini 


Uu 


rial, Rar .\lbait 11., Lgin. 


Co 


Ill, Ahoar. Ettl JUreUn. 








Cuj 


bman, Joaaph I., JVbit SraJUraa. 






Cu 


Jar, Her, 9aDutl, limovtr. 




Iti.Chiriti A^ IfaUkami. 




....J. Dana, 








lar,BtapKa«. iriackuiar. 


Co 


lar, Blapha. R " 




lo,Thora«L., S.««T- 


D. 


.., Hear,, P»*^f 


Ua 


moo, AlbaR P., Aiadi'a/. 


DUBDO, Mia. Edward C, OnuBri. 


Daaa, Mia. Edward H., J^WKl.. 




o..aa™u»l,B„i,a. 




a, Cba.l« B., A-aatliH. 


Da 


.,Jobd, 






Da 


i^tl,M.a.BliuB., EuiJTBf-ar. 




iell,Oiia,flM(». 


D. 


ial., Elijah 0.,£.Mjr(J.aV. 


Da 


lab, Mti. Maria. W, " 


Da 


iaia, Mra. WdJia.., " 


Da 


n, Affrad N., .V. mimitgtim. 




ii, Mrtlk U., HntrkilL 


Da 


i..H.nr7L.,Bra^.ri. 


Da 






l.,Jaa.»,A>H«. 


Da 


ia.John.JfaUaia. 



a, Lydia EC, DnaUMa. 



37 



DtTif, Mi«f Mary H., Omcord. 

Davii, Rev. Perloj B., Iffds Park. 

DavM, Tbadd«a« Uriah, Dun0tAbl$, 

DariaoD, George W., ffkUintvilU, 

Dawes, Rev. Ebeoexer, DighUnu 

Day, Robert L., Jfewton. 

Dean. MiM Abbie T.. Faxhon^, 

Den ham, Rev. George* Ckeltea, 

Denham, Mra. Clara D. ** 

Dickermao, Rev. Lyiander, W§pitmUk, 

Dickson, Oliver, 80M§rvUU» 

Diekion, Mrs. Sarah C. " 

Dii, tin. Elijah, Boston, 

Diz, Samuel F., Jfewton. 

Doane, Beman S., CharUstewn. 

Dodd, Rev. Stephen 6., MiddUbonf 

Dodge, Rev. John, Jforik Brool^Uld. 

Dodge, Mrs. Ann S., ^rortk firookfield. 

Dodge, Mrs. J. M. C, Andovtr, 

Doggett, Rev. Thoa., Jfkagora Falls, A*. F. 

Dogiett, Mra. Fraoeee L. " 

Doggett, VVilliaai, " 

*Dorr, John, Boston, 

Dorr, Samnel, ** 

*Dow,Jo«iah, «* 

Dowse, Mrs. Carrie D., Skerbam, 

•Dowse, Edward, Dodkam, 

•Dow»e, Elizabeth R. L., Skorhonu 

Drake, Rev. Ellis R., fVa^land. 

Dudley, P. W., tVkUintvilU. 

Dudley, Mrs. Sarah A. « 

Dunham, Charlee H., ffinekottor. 

Dunham, Mrs. Mary L., " 

Dunlap, Sumner, Soutk DoorJUld, 

Duntoo, UiraoB P., Spoueor, 

Dunn, Edward JL, Boston. 

Durfee, Rev. Chas. Stoddard, ^ewburypori. 

Durgin, James, West ^rovbury, 

•Dutch, M. £Uizabeth, Boston. 

Dwinell, Leonard, MUUmry. 

Dyer, Rev. E. Porter, Skrtie$hury, 

Dyer, Mrs. Maria D., Qlomcutsr. 

Eager, WiJliajn, Boston. 

Eamet, Mra. Naocy, Skorbonu 

Eames, Warren, fTUmington. 

Eastburn, Rt. Rev. Manton, D. D., Boston. 

Eastman, Rev. Loeius R., Jr., SomervUle. 

Eaton, Mrs. Aon £., Waki^/Uld. 

Eaton, EbeUf PramingkaHS. 

Eaton, Edward, Msdway. 

Eaton, Miss Blartha W., Fitckhtrg. 

Eaton, Williana, Boston. 

Eaton, William J., Wutboto\ 

Eddy, Joshua, East MxddUboro\ 

Edwards, Mrs. Frances S., Dodkam, 

Edwards, Fredarick E, A*. Ckslmsford. 

Edwards, Maria F. *< 

Edwards, Nathan B. « 

D 



Edwards, Nathan F., JV. Ckelmtford, 

Edwards, Sibyl R. " 

Edwards, Victor E. « 

Eldred, Lorenzo, Falmoutk. 

•Eliot, Samuel, Boston, 

•Eliot, Samuel A. " 

Elliott, Robert, Qlobe VUlag: 

Ellis, Willard K., E. Msdway. 

EII4, Mrs. Elizabeth W., ObeHin, O. 

Ellsworth, Rev. Alfred A., ffeymoutk. 

Ellsworth, Miss Angelina Grimk^ ^eld 

Cook, Heymoutk, 
•Elwell, Robert, Boston, 
Emerson, Miss Ellen T., Concord, 
Emerson, Jacob, Jr., Metkuon 
Emerson, Mrs. Jacob, " 
Emerson, R. V. C, M'owton. 
Emerson, William, H'sstboro', 
Emery, George F. " 

Emery, Mrs. Harriet, ^rortk ITefmontk, 
Emery, Rev. Joshua, If'efmoutk. 
Emery, Mrs. Mary, Ckatkam. 
Emery, Mrs. Sarah M., M'ewburyport. 
•Everett, Edward, Boston. 
Fairbanks, Ilerschel, IlaoerkiU, 
Fairbanks, Ilerschel P. " 
•Fairbanks, Stephen, Boston 
•Fams worth, Mrs. Abel, Oroton. 
Farnsworth, Ezra, Booton, 
Farr, Alba A., Mstkuon. 
Farwoll, Stephen T., Cambridge. 
Faxon, Miss Rachel A., Brain/res. 
Fay, Mrs. Addison O., Concord. 
Fay, Charlos U., fVkitinsville. 
Fay, Cyrus, fFeslboro\ 
Fay, Josiah C, Jlopkinton. 
Fay, S. T., fVestboro\ 
Fayerweather, Mrs. 8. A., ffssUoro*. 
Fearing, Albeit, Boston. 
Fearing, Mrs. Albert, " 
Felch, Isaac, ^atick. 
Field, John W., Boston. 
Field, Mrs. Amelia C, '* 
Fisher, Miss Eliza, Mtdwajf. 
Fisher, Mrs. Lewis, East Medway. 
Fisher, Milton M., Medway Village. 
Fuher, Samuel T., CanUm. 
Fiske, Daniel T., D. D., J^iobnryport, 
Fiake, George B. HoUiston. 
Fiske, George T., ^ewburyport, 
Fiske, Mary Fidelia, " 
Fitch, John A., Hopkudon. 
•Fitz, Daniel, D. D., Ipowick. 
Fitz, Mrs. Hannah a D. '* 
Fitz, Daniel, Jr. " 

Fitz, Daniel F. " 

Flanders, Joseph, HavtriiiU. 
Fletcher, Ephraim 8., WkUintvillt, 



38 



Fletcher, Mrs. Emma A., JFhitiruville, 

Fletcher, BAri. Emily M. ** 

Fletcher, James, " 

Fletcher, Mrs. L. C. •* 

Fletcher, Lewis C. ** 

Fletcher, Samuel J. " 

Fletcher, Mrs. Hannah C, ManckeHtr, 

Fletcher, Isaac W., Stow, 

Fletcher, Nancy B. " 

Fletcher, Rev. James, Danvera, 

Fletcher, Mrs. Lydia M. " 

Fletcher, Stillman, Winchuitr, 

Fletcher, William, ** 

Flinn, Mrs. Paulona, ** 

Flint, Mrs. Hannah, Peabodf. 

Flint, Levi M., Stoughton. 

Flint, Thomas, BoaUnu 

Floyd, Miss Mary J., Peabody, 

Folger, Allen, Concord f^. H. 

Forbuih, William, fVhitinsville. 

Ford, Rev. George, VertaiUet^ JV. F. 

*Ford, Thomas A., BoBion, 

Ford, Thomas A., JVortA Bridgtwalar. 

Ford, Mrs. Eliza C. " 

Fosdick, Charles, Oroton, 

Fosdick, Frederick, ** 

Fosdick, Rose, " 

*Fosdick, Samuel W." 

Fosdick, Miss Mary, " 

Foster, Rev. Aaron, £. CkarltmonL 

Foster, Rev. Addison P., LototlL 

Foster, Mrs. Hattie D., ** 

Foster, Miss Elisa C, RowUjf, 

Foster, Mrs. Mary, Palmer, 

*Francis, Ebenezer, Boston. 

French, Mrs. Harriet S., Tavntom, 

Frothingham, A. T., Cambridge. 

Furber, Rev. Daniel L., JVeaeton. 

Fullerton, Rev. Bradford M., Palmer, 

Furber, Mrs. Maria B., Aewton, 

Gage, Gawin R., fVobum, 

Gale, Rev. Wakefield, West GranvWe, 

•Gale, Mrs. Wakefield, <« 

Gale, Justin Edwards, ** 

G allot, Nathan, Oroton, 

Galloup, David R., Peabodjf, 

Gammell, Rev. Sereno D., Botford, 

Gardner, Willi© F., Gardner, 

Garrette, Kev. Edmund Y., PUteburg, Pa, 

Garrotte, Mrs. Franzenia W. ** 

Garrette, Flora Gertrude,^ ** 

Garrette, Mary Spring, " 

Garrette, Sarah Arabella, ^z6oro\ 

GiUon,Mrs. Luther, Oroton. 

Gibbs, George L., fVkitinenUe, 

'^Gibbs, Mrs. Mary, Boston, 

Gilbert, Benjamin R. «< 

Giles, Mrs. Elisabeth W., RoekpvrU 



Gilman, Miss Rebecca L, Boston, 

Gleason, Charles A., JVe» Braintree. 

Gleason, Rav. George L., Manchester, 

Goodell, H. Augustus, Ifhitinsville. 

Gordon, Solomon J., Boston, 

Gordon, Mrs. Rebecca, ** 

Gordon, Jeannie, " 

Gott, J. R., Rockport, 

Gough, John B., Bojfiston, 

Gough, Mrs. Mary Elisabeth, Boylston. 

Gourgas, Miss Abby M., Concord. 

Gourgas, Miss Margaret U. " 

Gould, Mrs. & W., Wesiboro\ 

'^Grant, Moses, Boston. 

Grassie, Rev. Thomas G., Metknen. 

•Gray, Francis C, Boston, 

♦Gray, Henry, " 

Gray, Horaee, " 

Gray, John C. " 

Gray, William, East Randolph, 

Greeley, Rev. Edward U., BawrhUl, If,H, 

Greeley, Mrs. Edward H. <* 

Green, Rev. J. S. C, Newton, 

Greene, Rev. Richard G., Springfield, 

Greenwood, Charles H., Gardner. 

Greenwood, Mrs. Sally K., Sherbom. 

•Grew, John, Boston, 

Griggs, Dr. Samuel, Weslboro*, 

Griggs, Mrs. S. Bl " 

Grover, Mrs. Caroline, Foxboro*, 

Gulliver, Lemuel, Charleatown, 

Had ley, Samuel D., SomerviUe, 

Hale, E. J. M., Haverhill, 

Hale, Mrs. E. J. M. <* 

Hall, Mrs. Joseph F., Qroton. 

Ham, Mrs. Catharine K., Winchester, 

Hamilton, Rev. B. F., Jiorik Andover, 

Hamlen, Rev. Goorgo M., Taunton. 

•Hammatt, Mrs. Mary, Boeton, 

Hammond, Rev. W. B., Lenox^ JV*. Y. 

Hammond, Mrs.Louise M. " 

Hardwick, Thomas, Qatncy. 

Hardy, Truman, JVewfritry, O. 

Harrington, Rev. Eli Whitney, JV. Beverly. 

Hartshorn, Edward, Berlin, 

Hartwell, Lottie E., Groton, 

Hastings, Alice, M'etotonville. 

Hastings, Hollis, Frmmingham, 

•Hatch, Benjamin, Eaet Falmouth. 

Haven, George, CampeUo, 

Haven, Rev John, Charlton, 

Hawes, Mrs. A. L., Grafton. 

Hawea, Cynthia, WreMkam, 

Hawes, Julia, " 

Hayes, Rev. Stephen H., & Weymouth. 

Hay ward. Miss Clara, Braintree. 

Hayward, Elias, " 

Hayward, Miss Hattie L., WhitinswOe, 



39 



t< 



if 



Hayward, John, WkitinsvUU, 

Baywanl, PttuI, Jttkbf, 

Hue], Mn. Sarah L., Ohmc—ttr. 

Hailewood, Mn. A. M., yifrtkbridge. 

Headky, Ren P. C, BoiUm. 

HmIj, Rev. Joaeph W., MUiMaUde^ Wit. 

*Heaid, John, IpnaiclL 

Henenway, Miaa Harriet, Chvtotu 

Henahmw, Fraoeia, Bosttm, 

Henahaw, Mn. Sarah W., " 

HerrJek, Rev. William D., A*. JiwthTtL 

Heraey, Jacob, Fox^oro*, 

Heney, Mra. Polly, Hingkam. 

Hewina, Vkn, Annette P., FoxhonP. 

Hewina, Levi R. 

Hewina, Miaa Looiaa E., 

Hewitt, Joeeph, Jfvrtk Bridgtw€t4r. 

Beywood, Martha W., Gardner. 

*Htgfinaoa, Stephen, Jr., BoHon. 

Hildrath, Mra. Mary R., OrUon, 

Hill, Rev. George £., SmzomUU. 

*HiIl, Henry, BtUn. 

HiD, Jothann, Wokmrn. 

HiU, Philip E., Bridgtwattr 

Hilton, Henrietta M., Medwajf, 

Hilton, Rev. John V., Kalamaioo^ MUk. 

Hilton, VViliiam, Bradford. 

Hitelwoeli, G«orfe M., BrimJUld. 

Bobart, Peter, Bttan. 

Hobaon, Miia Priacilla, RowUy. 

Holbrook, Eliaba, £a«C Rmndtlfh. 

Bolbrook, Everett, *< 

HoMea, Mra. Sarah, Ori^ftan, 

Holland, Miaa Sarah E., BtUn. 

Boln, Jacob P., Maldmu 

*Holmea, Abiel, D. D., CMhridg9. 

Bolnea, Miaa Elisabeth A., IWvtiara, TIL 

*Hohnea, Mra. Fanny D., Ifinton. 

Bohnaa, George W., Bridgewater. 

Bolmea, Mite Wealthy A., CmmpOU. 

Bolt, Jamoa A., Jindo99r. 

Bolton, ThiNnaa S., WinchMttr. 

Homer, Cbarlea W., CmmbridgM. 

Hooker, George B., Skerh^m. 

Hooker, Mra. Martha V., BotUm. 

*Hooper, Robert, *< 

Hoppin, Rev. Jamea M., JVVie JTavaa, Ct. 

Hoamer, Miaa Eliza, Cancordm 

BoughtOD, Cephaa, Harvard. 

Hovey, George O., Botion, 

How, Frederick, Damvvri, 

*How, Jamoa, B^tan. 

Howard, Cary, JVbrtJk Bridgn»MUr. 

Boward, David, *< 

Howard, Mrs. Francea H., ** 

Howard, Mra. MatiUa P. *« 

Howard, Rev. Martin S., WUbrakawu 

•Howe, John, JVWa BridgtwaUr. 



Howe, Martha L., Gardner, 

Howea, Mra. Caroline H., CAarlamont. 

Howea, Collina, Chtkam, 

Hoyt, Henry, Botlen. 

Hoyt, Mra. Maria, Framingham, 

Hoyt, Wm. H., B^tUm. 

Hubbard, Mra. Charlei A., Concwrd. 

Hadaon, Samuel, Uzbridg$. 

Hnlbert, Charles, Borten. 

Humphrey, Daniel, AbrtA Wefmoutk. 

Hunt, Mra. Jeruaha B., fVkUinnilU. 

Huntington, Matilda C, Pfobody, 

Hurd, Francis P., M. D., Wak^tld. 

Hutchina, Caroline M., fFuifwrd. 

Hutehina, William E., LovdL 

Hutchina, Maria J. ** 

*Hy8lop, l>avid, BotUn. 

Jackman, Mra. Susan M., Medwajf. 

Jaekaoo, Henry W., Boston. 

Jackaoo, Laura E. L., " 

'^Jackaon, James, ** 

*Jaekaon, Patrick T. " 

JeflViea, Miss Catharine Amory, Bsston. 

Jephaon, Miss C. R., BrocUine. 

Jewett, Henry, PtppereU. 

Johnson, Charlea G., Bradford. 

Johnaon, Mrs. Emma E. ** 

Johnaon, Francis, WinektsUr. 

Johnaon, Peter R., HeUitton. 

Johnaon, Miaa Rebecea, MWtk Andover. 

Johnaon, Mra. S. W., FarmingUmy JV. H. 

Jonea, Augustas T., JWriA Bridgiwaltr, 

Jones, Henry E., HoUiston. 

Joslio, Mra. A. L., Oxford. 

Joy, Mra. Abigail, Boeion. 

Judson, Mra. Mary C, Uzbridg§. 

Keep, N. C, BcHon. 

Keith, Adelbert F., CamfsiZe. 

Keith, Albert, " 

Keith, Arza a *< 

•Keith, Charles, JVorCA BridgtwUtr. 

Keith Edward Everett, Bridgnoater. 

Keith, Preaton B., Camp«I2o. 

Keith, Ziba C. ** 

Kelton, George, Gardner. 

Kempton, Mra. Ellen, Grafton. 

Kendall, Mra. Abel M., Bosten. ^ 

Kendall, Mrs. Mary E., fVineketter. 

•Kendall, William, fFkUinnnlle. 

Kendiiek, John, HavtrkUl. 

Kendrick, Miss Lydia F., Ckatkam. 

Kerr, Robert W., Foxhoro*. 

Kerr, Jane K. " 

Kettelle, Jacob^O., Btton, 

Kilboo, George B., Springfield. 

Kimball, Benjamin, Sd, HaverkUl. 

Kimball, Rev. Caleb, Medway, 

Kimball, Charlea, Iptwiek. 



40 



Kimball, Daniel W., WincJutUr 

Kimball, DaTid, Bradford. 

Kimball, Wallace L. " 

Kimball, Mri. Harriet W., LvytOL 

Kimball, Mrs. Mary B., FaimovAk. 

Kimball, John R., Wobwm, 

KimbaU, Mra. Sylvia, W*$thonP. 

Kinfmao, Miat Eliza, Boston. 

«Kingman, Mil* Sarah, " 

Kingabury, Nathaniel, 

Kingibury, John, Bradford. 

Kingflbary, Rev. John D. ** 

Kittredge, Rev. A. E., JV*ei9 York city, 

•Knowiea, Rev. Jamea D., Boston. 

Knowlton, Rev. Stephen, West Medway. 

Knox. Mn. S., Rock Island^ IlL 

Labarec, Rev. John C, Randolph. 

Lambert, Mita Elisabeth 6., Rowley. 

Lambert, Thoroaa R., D. D., Charlsotoien. 

Lambert, William T., * 

Laroton, Edwin, BoHon. 

Lamion, Mri. Edwin, " 

Lamion, Gardner Swift, " 

Laroipn, Helen, " 

Lamaon, Kate Glidden, " 

*Lane, Anthony, Lancaster. 

Lane, Rev. James P., Jtndovor. 

Lane, Mra. Emma L. ** 

Lane, Rev. John W., JFhalely. 

Lane, Mra. Mary H. " 

Lane, Mary E. ** 

Lane, Richmond J., East jSHngton. 

Langworthy, Rev. Iiaae P., Cksboa. 

Laaell, Josiab, frkUinoviUo. 

Laaaell, Mn. Jennie W. ** 

Lathe, Miis Sarah S., Or^fton. 

Laurie, Inglii, Ovaattmna^ Minneoota. 

^Lawrence, Amos, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rev. Amos E., Housatonic 

Lawrence, Asa, Oroton. 

^Lawrence, Mra. M. A. " 

Lawrence, John, ** 

Lawrence, Curtis, Bradford. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Curtis, ** 

Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy T., FFt/ton, Jtfc. 

Lawton, Mrs. B. C, H'kitinsviUe. 

Laynd, John, " 

Leach, Simeon, East Stonghton. 

Learoyd, Addison P., Danvcro. 

Learoyd, John S. '* 

Leavitt, Abner L., Hingkam. 

Leavitt, Mn. Elisabeth G., Botton, 

Leavitt, Rev. George R., O^mbridgepori. 

Lee, Rev. Samuel H., Oretnfisld. 

*Lced8, Benjamin, BrookliiA, 

w 

Leeds, Benjamin, Boston. 
Loeda, Mra. Anne B. " 
Leeds, Miss Aone 6. " 



i( 



M 



(( 



Leea, Mra. Samuel, Concord. 

Lefavour, laaachar, Btverly. 

Leland, Calvin, Jr., MUiek, 

Leland, Mn. Charlotte A., Sktrbom. 

Leonard, Ellsa, Foxboro*. 

Leonard, Jamea M., Bridgevator. 

Lewia, Reuben, Oroton. 

Lewia, Mra. Suaan P., ** 

Lincoln, Rev. Calvin, Hingkanu 

Lincoln, F. W., Jr., Boston. 

Lincoln, James L. C, SniidsrUnd. 

Lincoln, Noah, Booton. ^ 

Little, Alexander R, AbrtA Middlobort^. 

^Little, Rev. Elbridge O. 

Little, Mrs. Lucia 8., 

Little, Sarah laabel. 

Little, Stuart, WkitinsviHe. 

Little, Waldo F., JTewton Contro. 

Little, William A. " 

Littlefield, Samuel, SomervWB. 

*Livermore, George, CanUhridgt, 

*Locke, Ephraim, Boston. 

Loomia, Rev. Elihu, Littleton. 

Lord, Mias Anna M., Ipswick. 

Lord, Rev. Charles E., Boeton, 

Lord, Edward A., Danvere. 

Lord, John A., Peabody. 

Lojd, Louisa C, Manekester, 

Loring, Mra. Hnnnah W., AlswUm Centre. 

Loud, Arthur J., Boston. 

Loud, Mra. Martha B., Braintree, 

Lovell, Misi Mary B., Medway. 

♦Lowell, Charles, D. D., Boeton. 

Lumb, William, " • 

Lont, Charles F., Winekeeter. 

Lyman, Rev. George, Soutk Jtmkeret. 

Lyman, Samuel T., Huntington. 

Lyon, Miaa Chloe R., Campello. 

Macreading, Rev. Chaa. S., Previdenee, R.I. 

Maltby, Rev. Eraatna, Taunton. 

Mann, Mias Helen L., Qreenfield. 

Manning, Otis, Littleton. 

Manning, Eklward W., ffobum. 

Manning, Walter H., Ut^letan. 

Marble, Mrs. Mary E., Orafton. 

Markham, Mrs. Priacilla V., Wrentkan. 

Marrett, Lorenso, East Cambridge. 

^farah, Elizabeth C, Haverhill 

Marsh, E- J., Leominster. 

Manh, Miaa Julia M., HaverkUL 

'^Maraton, William, Boston. 

Martin, George H., Bridf!eieater. 

Moaoo, Miaa Nellie A., Boylston. 

Mattiaon, William, Wkiiinevine. 

Maynard, Rev. Joahua L., ff'illieUmf FL 

Maynard, Leander, Shrewsbury. 

*McKean, William, Boston, 

McKeeo, Philena, Jtndover, 



41 



McKcen, Phebe, JIndovtr, 
*McLe«n, Bin. Add, Boticm, 
McLean, Ren Joha K^ Framingkam, 
MeLood, Rev. Aoeon, Toj^^Uld, 
Meaoi, ReT. JohD O., Botton, 
Means, Mra. John O. " 
Neant, William 6., Jtndover, 
Marriaoi, Abner H., Ttmpleton. 
Merriam, Homer, Sprimgjidd. 
Menill, Rev. Jamea H., ^ndover. 
Merrill, John K.. MetMutm, 
Merritt, Mra. Mary A., Moutmgut. 
Meieenger, Misa Eliza, FUckhkrg, 
Milb.Bev. Charlea L., Baaion, 
Milla, Mr*. Rebecca B. " 
Millf, MiM Lydia, Peabody, 
Minot, William, Boston, 
Mino^ W^illiam, Jr. *« 
Mizter, Mrs. Fanny L. " 
Mizter, Mn. Mary R., Hardmek. 
Mizter, Airs. 8. C, Roek hland^ IlL 
Mooar, Rev. George, OakUudf CaL 
Moody, Jamcf, fVkUi$uviU». 
Moore, Lewie, Skuron. 
Moon, Joot»pb, Or»Un. 
Moors, Rurus, " 

Moon, Mrt. Rufas, ** 
Moidouf h. Rev. John B., PoriUmiy M$, 
More, Cbarle* H., Br<idford, 
MoroDf , Rev. Thomaa, Ipneick. 
Morley, R«v. Bardis B., Pitt^/ieUL 
Morrison, Daniel T., M*lkm$n. 
Morriaon, Misa Nancy T., RowUf. 
, Morse, Misa Abby P., Emptrim, K*%$mi. 
Morse, Cbarlea N., Miiford, 
Moise, Misa Emily A., Bradford, 
Morse, Henry, M'tAick. 
Morse, RofVis W., Mtkiun, 
Morse, WillUm E., Bradford. 
Moseley, Edward S., JfnckurfforU 
Mosman, Walter B., JimkmmdaU. 
Manger, Rev. Tbeo. T., Frovidew€t R. I. 
Maoger, Mrs. T. T., «« 

Monroe, Miae Mary, Cracertl. 
Murray, Rev. James O., JVne York Ciff. 
Morray, Mrs. Julia R. ** 

Kuon, Rev. Charles, fToOfUtL 
Nssoo, Rev. Elias, BWeriea. 
Needham, Loey M., Jfow BraiMtr§$, 
Needhaai, Mrs. Mary P., Peabodjf. 
Neboo, Jooathan HL, Sftrtisatary. 
Newell, George H., HoUuton. 
*NeweII, Montgomery, Bott0n, 
Newball, Lucy Ann, Stow* 
NewoMo, Miaa Sarah A., fynrick. 
Niehols, Alfred A., ITeaC Jlimaokmrf. 
l^iehols, Jamea R., Hmvarkitt. 
Nichols, 



it 



Niekersofl, Mra. Temple W., ^antuekcL 
Nightingale, Rev. Crawford, Orotom. 
*Norerocs,Josiah, WakrJLdd. 
Norerooe, Mrs. Josiah, ** 
Norton, Rev. Edward, Mvntapu. 
Noarse, B. Alden, Wo»thoro\ 
Noarse, Caroline Josephine, Boston, 
Nonrse, Daniel, IFssC Medwajf, 
Nourse, Susan M., BoUon, 
Noyea, Alva, ^orlk Bridgewatar. 
Noyes, Jacob, jSbington. 
Noyep, Luke B., Soutk Ahiagton. 
Noyes, Rufus S., JV. Bridgtwaisr, 
Oatley, 6. D., WkitinsviUe, 
Odiin, Benjamin/ £x«tsr, JV. H. 
Odlin, Mrs. E. T. " 

Ordway, Aaron L., JVeio York eitjf. 
Ordway, Mias Charlotte, Bradford, 
Ordway, Herbert, " 

Osborne, George F., Peabody 
Osgood, Greorge C, LoweU, 
Osgood, H. B., WkitinsvilU, 
Packard, Rev. D. Temple, Brigkton. 
Packard, Edward C, ^ToHk BridgewaUr. 
Packard, 8. Edwards, S/tringJidd,* 
Packard, S. Franklin, CampsUo. 
Packard, Miss Susie P., <* 
Packard, Zibeon, JIbxngton, 
Page, Abigail L., Jltkinsoa^ JV*. H, 
Paige, George R., JVew SaUm, 
*PaiDe, Mrs. Sarah M., Hoidsn, 
*Paine, Misa Sarah C. " 
Palmer, Rev. Charles Ray, SaZsai . 
^Palmer, Rev. Stephen, M'eedkam, 
Palmer, Squire, Simtk Deerjield. 
Park, John C, Boston. 
Parker, Andrew, OUmeesttr, 
Parker, Daniel, fVkitinsvUIe, 
^Parker, John, Boston, 

Parker, Mrs. Sarah, " 

*Parkman, Francis, D. D. " 
O'Parkman, Samuel, " 

^Parkman, Mrs. Sarah, ** 
Parroenter, Mrs. E. J. G., P^trskann. 
^Parsons, Gorham, Boston. 
•Parsons, William, ** 
Partridge, Clark, Medway. 
Partridge, Joseph, Holliston, 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J., JFut Jfswtom, 
Patrick, Mrs. Martha L. « 

Patten, Mrs. John F., DsrekosUr, 
Patteraon, David H., Mtikusn. 
Paal, Frederick A., LaksvilU, 
Paul, Henry, Mwton. 

•Paul, Mrs. Henry, " 
•Paul, Luther, " 

Paul, Luther, Jr. " 
Paul, Misa Harriet, <* 



•F«kJn>, Jtmei, 
•F>rkiiii, J* IT 



Ij \.,jBriflkl.'v. 
•PsrUni.'Thuiiia iL, Sotlat. 
.PivLoj, tin. Alii(>IJ T^ S«tm. 
Perlar. J<»'<, " 

Pinj , BUh CilhuiiM IL, SJuritrm, 
Ftrir.Jarnci, UuHi'cri. 



Petue, Mill Klin J., niWp'. 


R.llk)><,Mr..H4l7 




IE17, noniCE W., MtittY ViOf*. 


P*iu>,W.IUid,liVzW,>'. 


RiyoionJ, HelenP. BwHii. 


Phillip., Al«.» P., f«M|. 


Riiid, Uiu UiFihi, JSiM ^Kn/in. 


Phillip.. (iK-r-w.. a,-,™* 


DeM], MIn i:ir<.hr>ii <:., IlacrkiU. 


Ph,il,iH.Jon...l,^n,B«l... 


Bni.H«>a,,S.Man,tum. 



Piks, Juha.UD, R..r(t». 


BIchaidi.JiuiF^ OiMpiUi., 


Plu.nb,K».AIlHna, CAiItM. 




Plumb, Jonph Dut, •• 


BichirdMM, Jalu W., JHidM^ 


PIbdmi, Mil. MuihL a, Sqwlt*. 




Plu.™., I.™l, «-»i,i™«.. 


Rnhitd«>a,>h.<fiiDh E., C>»>W. 


P^UB,Jl™.JB«ph. 0™/l«. 




PdUii^!, J<»i'|<l.li, ll^bur^ 


lUch*lteH>,8uBII«, WimtkiMtt. 




•Ilif )iit. Andrew, Jr., Bortm. 


I;jt, 1 JfolJn. 


Bshblni, AoJrow, OrMn. 


Pond, J.ihD^ Ami™. 


Bobblni, ChuJI.., D. 0.. A«c«. 


Pond, -Mrt Ntnojr, Mtdutf. 


•Rul,l„„.,i:.|w..JH 


PmJ, U-,!li™ E., /I>«.IA.». 


Beboru, K.V. Ju»l>, EM Jft^a.y. 


PoQl, S-oluqi™, OUnUHUr. 


BolHru, Mii.Mir/ A. 


Paoi,Juig|>h, Pnbwlf. 


Kobini, Mn. Ilulli, JfdfrcAuMr. 


P»i, »»hu H. " 








Fnlt, Comiliui, JV«4 fTavwEU. 





i((, Oilfin, AMI BridgKC: 

HI, Galea E. " 

III, B*T, Onria H., 7fna 



'.,.„t. B., a.i«r 

If II., Piat«if 



u D., Durttuur. 



43 



RobinwNi, Rev. Reaben T., Wbukttitr. 
•Robioion, Mri. Clara A. •« 
Sockwood, John, Oroton, 
Rockwood, John T., SfringJM^ 
itoekwood, Mia* Polly 8., JisklmmL « 
*Rogen, George, Boston, 
* Bogers, George L., M'eiohtrfporL 
Bogen, Shubael O., Bottmu 
*Rogen, ReT. William M. •< 
Rauell, Sarah J., Framimfkawu 
Ryder, MarietU, Ckatkmm, 
Safford, Rer. George B^ BwUngton, FL 
*Saliibury, Samuel, Bottom. 
Sanford, Mrs. Adeline D.,JVM«cy ViUag: 
Baoford, Edmond I., JVMwof. 
BaBfoid, Henry D., Bridgewater, 
Saoger, Edward G., CamtrUgepori, 
Sargeanl, James C, Oakkom. 
Sargent, Edmond, WoH jtmotbmry, 
*Sargent, Loeius M., BooUm. 
Sargent, Samael O., Mttkuon. 
*8awtell, Mrs. Ephraim, Oretoii. 
Sawyer, George, Oawtpolh, 
Sawyer, Martha B., ** 
Sawyer, Seth C, £. Raniotfk, 
*Seodder, Charles, Booton, 
Seadder, Mrs. Sarah L. ** 
Seagrare, Edward F., UxMdgt. 
Sears, Misa Hannah M., JtokJUUL 
Seaver, A. W., JfortMoro^. 
Seeley, Raymond H., D. D., HavtrkiU, 
Seeley, Mrs. Fanny B. *• 

Selfridge, Thomaa O., BesCeii. 
Shattack, Andrew, OroUm, 
Shattaek, Mrs. Sasan P. *< 
Shaw, Mrs. Hannah, Booton, 
Sheldon, Rev. Lather H.,J'eiM«ter/A,JV.J. 
SbeUon, Mrs. Sarah H. *« 

Shepherd, Thomaa, Winckmter, 
Shiverick, Misa Maiia L., CampMo, 
*ffigoarney, Andrew, Booton, 
Sigonrney, Henry, 
Simooda, A Ivan, 
SkiUings, David N<, Wineh$oUr, 
*SIaek, Ruggjes, BogUn, 

Slafter, Rev. Edmond P. " 
Slafier, Mrs. Edmond F., « 
Sleeper, WiiUan C, M^tkn^n, 
Small, Amoe T., Woat Jimpobmrf, 
Small, Mrs. Fidelia Foiter, MUHnrf, 
Small, Samuel A. ** 

Small, Samuel E. *< 

Small, Mra. Boomer, JWi^toii Cofdrt. 
Smith, Mrs. Ahby F., Concord, 
Smith, Henry P. " 

Smith, Albert W., ffeotbortf, . 
Smith, Ml s. Loey Jane, ** 
Smith, Mrs. Clara J., SmidtrUmi. 



t€ 



M 



Smith, E. B., Wetifiad. 

Smith, Rev. Edward P., JBfoeUyii, A*. F. 

Smith, George P., Booton, 

•Smith, Samuel, '* 

Smith, Joel, ^'Ai/tiMviUf. 

Smith, Jonathan, ^ 

Smith, Warren N. «< 

Smith, Mra. Hattie J., Oloneutor, 

Smith, Mauon M., D. D., JVsiaarJk, Jf. J, 

Smith, Mrs. Matson M. « 

Smith, Norman, Oroton, 

Smith, Mrs. Mary J. " 

Smith, Richard, Ponbodff, 

Smith, Bfra. Charlotte, « 

Smith, Mrs. Sarah, Jindovor, 

Snow, Ambrose, South Ifadlef t^aO^ 

Snow, Mrs. Caroline, ,^ubumdalo. 

Snow, Mrs. Mark, CikatAam. 

Soale, Henry M., SsulA Jtbington, 

Southgate, Charles M., Ifowich, 

Southgate, Rev. Robert, " 

•Southgate, Mrs. Mary Frances, ** 

Southworth, Mrs. Caroline M., M»dwnf. 

Spaulding, Mrs. Charles A., Oroton, 

Spaulding, John, Oroton Junction.* 

Spooner, W. B., Booton. 

Spring, Mrs. Adela C, fFkitinmnUo. 

Stacy, Albert, Concord. 

Stanley, Esra C, Manckeoter. 

Stebbins, Rev. Milan C, SpringJMd. 

Stevena, Mrs. George, LoieeU. 

Stevens, Norman C, AViatoa. 

Stevens, Mrs. E. M. <* 

Stevens, Samuel, Oloueootor. 

•Stoddard, Lewia T., Brooklino, 

Stone, Andrew L., D. D., San FrmteiocOfCcl 

Stone, Mrs. Matilda F. ** 

Stone, Martha A., Jfowton Contr§, 

Storrs, Eunice C. Bromtroo. 

Storrs, Richard S., O. U. ** 

Stowell, Mrs. Abby Hubbard, Conoord. 

Stowell, Cyrus A., Soutk DurjMd, 

Stowell, D. W., WaHkam. 

Suong, Rev. Elnathan E. " 

Strong, Rev. J. C, 31. Ckairloo^MinnonU. 

Strong, Mrs. J. C. •* 

Stodley, Austin, £<u( JShington, 

Studley, Edward A., BoHon, 

Sugden, Miss Mary, Braintr$§, 

Sumner, Rev. Charles B., Monoom, 

Sumner, Mrs. H. H., Fotboro*. 

Swasey, Mra. Frances A., Lfun, 

Swett, Samuel W., Booton. 

Swift, Miaa l^ttie H., Andovtr. 

Switser, Rev. Christopher J., , 

Tail, Mrs. Elizabeth E., WkitinovSll*. 

Taft, Mias Emily A. ** 

Tafty Gottavus E. 



tt 



« 



u 



Taft, Mn. O. E., WkitiHstriUe. 
Tafl, 8. Jeooie, ** 

Taft, J&eob, Oxbridg$, 
Tapley, Gilbert, Datn§n. 
Tappaa, John, BotUn, 
Tarr, William J., OUmestUr. 
Taylor, Mn. Malanta, fFindutUr, 
Teela, Rar. Albert K., Milton. 
Teele, Mrt. Cornelia C. ** 
Temple, Mark M., Reading. 
Teooey, Mri. Marj P., ff^neketttr. 
Terry, Rer. Jamet P., South WtymemUu 
Tbacber, Mrs. Aooa B., Hydt Park. 
Thacber, Min Cali«ta C, JittUhortf. 
Tbacber, John, •< 

Tbacber, Mrs. Suaan C. ^ 

Tbacber, William T., H^de Park. 
Tbacber, Susan B., Portland, Jte. 
*Tbatcber, Mary Ludlow, Middl9boro\ 
Tbayer, Ampaa, JBroiiUrea. 
Tbayer, E. F. E. *« 
Tbayer, Ira, " 

-*Tbayer, Mra Lilla, " 
Tbayer, Rev. J. Henry, J§ndover, 
Tbayer, Mrs. Martba C. ** 
Tbayer, Oliver, " 

*Tbay<#, Mrs. Jane, Boston. 
Tbayer, Robert H., AVw York City, 
. Tbayer, Sarah H., Braintr§e. 
Tboropson, Mrs. Avetick F., Warokanu 
Thompson, Mra. Emily B., Concord. 
Thompson, Everett A., Mfrtk fVobum. 
Thompson, Samuel A. ** 

Thompson, Mrs. Anne Elisa, ** 
Thompaon, George R., ^ortk Bridg§¥>aUr% 
Thompson, Lewis Waldo, Worcester. 
Thompson, Stephen, Wincktstor. 
Thurston, Rev. Richard B., Stanford, CL 
Tinker, Russell, Orafton. 
Tobey, Miss Jennie E., fVkitinsviUe. 
Tolman, Rev. Richard, Tewk^ury, 
Tolmon, Rev. Samuel H., JVtlmington, 
Torrey, Miss Elisabeth L., SoMk Weywioutk. 
Torrey, James, JWrti WsymouUu 
Torrey, Willard, Groion. 
Towne, William B., Brookline. 
Traak, Charles H., Jr., Manekssttr. 
Trask, Mrs. A. H. *« 

Traak, Lizzie EL, Oloucestar. 
Traak, Samuel, Psabody, 
Traak, Samuel P., Danvers. 
Tribou, Samuel, ^ortk Bridgevaier. 
Trowbridge, Mrs. Asa, Brighton, 
Trufant, Harriet Andrews, JibingUm. 
Trufant, Philip P. 
Trufant, Walter Ezrii, 
*Tucker, Rev. Elijah W., LAanon, Ct. 
Tucker, Mrs. Hannah W., Dortkuter. 



u 



«< 



•Tucker, Jesse, MiUem. 

Tucker, Mrs. Mary R. •* 

♦Tucker, Nathan, " 

Tucker, Mrs. Nathan, ** 

Tucker, John A., Dorckestsr. 

Tucker, WUliam, « 

Tucker, William W., Boston. 

Tufts, Charles, Jtndovsr, 

Turner, Miis Alice Montgomery, Ramdol]^. 

Tnttle, Miss Maitba E., Concord. 

Tuttle, Miss Sarah, fVayland. 

Tuttle, Thomas S., Littlston. 

Twicbell, John M., Fitckkurg. 

Tyler, Frank H., Bradford. 

Tyler, Jerome W., Boston. 

•Underbill, Rev. John W., Al jtmkirst. 

Upton, Mrs. Lucy, Ptahody. 

Upton, Moses T., Salem. 

Vose, WiUiam U., FiUkfmrg. 

WAdsworth, Mrs. Lucy, MiUon, 

Wadsworth, William, Boston. 

Wakefield, Miss C, Reading. 

Waldrpn, Rev. Daniel W., East Weymsutk. 

Wales, Erastus, East Randolpk. 

Wales. Min Mary Ann, Boston. 

Walker, Ellen A., East Ahington, 

Walker, Miss Francea A., HavorkiU. 

Walker, Rev. Geo. F., Littie Compton, R, I. 

Walker, John &, East Medway. 

Walker, Mrs. John 8. <^ 

Walker, L<evi, Bridgewatsr. 

Walker, Moses, BaoerkUL 

Walker, Nathaniel, <* 

Walker, Robert G., Boston. 

Walker, William M., East Mington. 

*Walley, Samuel H., Boston 

Walley, Samuel H. <« 

Ward, Artemas, ** 

Ward, Samuel, ** 

Ward, Miss H. L. H., LakeviUe. 

Ward, Rev. James W. " 

Ward, Mrs. Caroline L. " 

Ward, Miss Susan H. " 

Ward, Salem T., Wintikester. 

Warner, John, Jfewton, 

Warner, William, Sontk DeerJUld. 

Warren, George W., Boston. 

•Warren, Mrs. Diantha A., Aymn. 

•Warren, Mrs. Maria, Ctri^floH. 

•Warren, Nehemiah, Stow. 

Warren, Francis W. «* 

Warren, Jonas, ** 

•Warren, Luoinda, *• 

•Warren, William A., H^nckestsr. 

Washburn, William B., Orest^fleld. 

Washburn, Mrs. William B. " 

Waterman, Mrs. Caroline, Or^ftom 

Watkins, Miss Abby A., Oloucester. 



W«rti, Hn. L. CiroliM, Mirik Daw 
W<tM<F, Edwird, SoKamni, Jf^H. 
Wtleb.John.AHCn. 
WaU, JiBH, " 
WtlU, Mr.. Manh* D.. MrtUm>. 
WeUain, Joibiu W., D. D., JWnUii. 
Wnnliil]. Mn. Cithiiiiw.^Hlm. ' 
(VtMwonli. A1h<ti, ;7<t<riiU. 

W^Hltl, Aliijih R., EiiSMtJicin,. 
WlmlBI, Mri>. M. II.. JVi'dO'i^ 
Whiiiwnb, Laoli, Com SaJi^ 
•Whiuamb, EUuIhii, ^mr4. 
*IVl>iicsfnb, RiigbH, Jr. •• 



nnd. Eat lUmdi^ 



Whiu, 

WhftiD, 



Artbai P., . 
ChutoiF. 
CbarlH B. 



Wbilin, Mn. Pilknea a " 



Wbllln, Mr*. Sinh R. 



Wbiinoiii, Annia Miiii, £r>iL 
Wlittaif, rhirlH H., CnaitrUfarart. 
Wbiluri Dor* 6. S.i.t* flrrfu", 
WhltiHj, FiwIeiMb. WuMiKtltr. 
Wbii»r, Haliia 1^ Stam. 
^ihnajr, ItuB B., OfpausUr, 
WbilDaj, bnal, AoHn. 
Wbitoer. Nri. PaiiMlia V., Pitmbn. 
WliiiB>T, Eichtid P., V>>£l*U' 



WfaitMj, Hn. Fi 
Wilbar.JoHph, 



WillluH, R«. C. H. 8.,Ommrd. 
Wllliun, Mn.C. H. 8. " 

Wtlliiow, Bn. Edward F., ffliijaniltt. 
WtEliiai, Hill EMiibaih C, Orsm. 
Willlana, UIh Harj D., OnnJUU. 
Williaau,S.H..»-«J.^i.'. 
WilllaiH, Tbonaa g., AMlmrmA^i. 

WiUia, Lbc; Maiia, " 

Wlbm, Ba*. Tbiwaa, &MfUflb 

Win«.lB)iD(7., LdifpU. 

nUiBsv.C ManriBS.BnwUilM* 



Winiluw 



p, Bobafl C, AMIm. 
Dp.ThomuI. " 



Wood, Hi.. Aliijoli, HV.ifcTO'. 

Wood, Cjioi K., Ow^aar. 

Wood, Blliabalk C, fWt«y. 

Wood, JoHpb W., miliimilU. 

Wood, Mn. E. B. " 

Wood, Ufi. BaiDBal F., Ckslntfari. 

Wood, Mil. Snun, OrMoo. 

Tr«id,T. Dwi|hi, ffmniMUr, 

Wood, Tbaodora & " 

Woodi, HIh Abtile WboaliT, MaUtn 

Woodi, Frank Auitin, Jfo BrliOrtt. 

Woodi, Joaaph Wbtalei, Ami**. 

Woodi, BaaiDal H. 

Woodmid, BboKiar, AtaaUib 

W Dd*«d,JlM*Eni.ly, AiW^adWla. 

Woodwartb ArtemBi B. Lomil. 

WoreatWr, Mtii i^xllio, AH/Uos. 



WjiUB. William O., nttUv/. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



Beoeipti from April 1, 1869, to April 1, 1870. 

BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 

Barnstable, Centreyille, Congregational Church and Society, 
Chatham, Congregational Church and Society, 
Falmouth, First Congregational Church and Society, 

A Friend, 



«i 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Freetown, Congregational Church and Society, . • 
Mansfield, Orthodox Congregational Church and Society, 
Taunton, Trinitarian Congregational Church and Society, 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

Amesbury and Salisbury, Union Evangelical Congregation, 
Andover, North, Cong. Church and Society, (1 l. m.) . 
(< Ballardvale, Union Society, .... 
Bozford, Congregational Church and Sodet y, (1 l. m.) 
East, Cong. Church and Society, • 
West, Cong. Church and Society, • 
Dangers, Centre Cong. Church and Society, . • 
First Congregational Church and Society, 
Maple Street Church, Sabbath School, (3 l. m.) 

<• Church, 

Essex, First Congregational Church and Society, • 
Georgetown, Memorial Church and Society, . 

•• First Congregational Church and Society, 

Oroveland, Congregational Church and Society, • 
Hamilton, Congregational Church and Society, • 
HaTcrhill, Centre, Cong. Church and Society, (2 l. m.) 
** North Church and Society, . . • . 



11 



If 



$24 60 

3 75 

29 64 

2 00 

$59 99 



$2 00 
11 00 
68 00 

$81 00 



$22 00 
31 60 

5 00 
27 50 

3 60 
22 70 

7 08 
24 60 
62 70 
12 82 
18 18 
33 57 
18 65 

9 80 
15 50 
50 00 
52 00 



47 



' Lynn, Boston Street Methodist Episcopal Church, 
** First Congregational Church and Society, 
Lynnfield, South, A Friend, .... 
<* Congregational Church and Society, 
Middleton, Congregational Church and Society, 
Newbury, Congregational Church and Society, 
Newburyport, Bellerille, Cong. Church and Society, 

*< Prospect Street Church and Society, 

Feabody, Congregational Church and Society, 
Rockport, First Congregational Church and Society, 
Rowley, Congregational Church and Society, 
*< Baptist Church, .... 
Salem, South Church and Society, • 

Tabernacle Church, .... 
Crombie Street Church and Society, • 
Saugus, Congregational Church and Society, (1 l. 

«( Centre Church and Society, 
Topsfield, Congregational Church and Society, 
Wenham, Congregational Church and Society, 
West Newbury, Congregational Church and Society, 
Indiyidual Donations, 



It 



tc 



M.) 



FRANKLIN COUNTY BIBLE SOCIETY. 

^ir. Chableb H. McClsixak, Oreenjleld, TV. 

A^hfield, Congregational Church and Society, • 
Buckland, Congregational Church and Society, 
Charlemont, East, Congregational Church and Society, 
Coleraine, Congregational Church and Society, 
Deerfield, South, Congregational Church and Society, 

•• •* Do. Sabbath School, . 

Gill, Congregational Church and Society, 
Greenfield, First Congregational Church and Society, 

•* Second Congregational Church and Society, 

Hawley, East, Congregational Church and Society, 
Shelbume, Congregational Church and Society, • 
Sunderland, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Warwick, Congregational Church and Society, 
Whately, Congregational Church and Society, (bal.forL. m.) 

Deduct paid for Printing, 



$6 


00 


17 46 


1 


00 


2 


00 


14 


10 


6 00 


62 67 


36 


66 


90 


16 


26 00 


11 


66 


1 


66 


106 70 


42 


67 


36 


00 


23 86 


3 


26 


24 


00 


3 


16 


30 00 


31 


76 



9 978 64 



9 43 36 

13 00 
23 10 

9 00 
20 00 
26 84 

14 36 
22 10 
48 09 
10 04 
33 26 
36 36 
13 00 
10 00 

320 48 
6 00 



$316 48 



48 



HAMPDEN COUNTY BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Mr. Charles Maksh, Springfield^ TV. 

Donations, (1 l.m.) 

For Bibles, $ 898 63 



$20 00 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 
Belchertown, Congregational Church and Society, 



$ 20 00 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Acton, Congregational Church and Society, • 
Ashby, Congregational Church and Society, 
Aubumdale, Congregational Church and Society, 
Arlington, Orthodox Congregational Church and Society, 
$46.29; John Field, $50; 

" ]Mr8. J. B. KimbaU, 

Brighton, Evangelical Congregational Church and Society, 
Cambridgeport, Prospect Street Church and Society, 

Concord, Union Bible Society, 

Groton, Union Church, 

•* A Friend, by N. Y. Caryl, .... 
Littleton, Congregational Church and Society, 
Lowell, First Congregational Church and Society, • 

John Street Church and Society, (3 L. m.) 
Kirk Street Church and Society, 
Appleton Street Church and Society, 

•• J.' F. Rogers, 

<* A Friend, (1 L. m. a. b. a.) 
Natick, Congregational Church and Society, (2 l. m. a. b. s.) 
Newton, Centre, A Friend, $2 ; Do. $1 ; 

<* Newtonyille, Congregational Church and Society, 
Sherbom, Ladies' Benevolent Society, (1 l. m.) 
Somerville, Orthodox Cong. Church and Society, (2 l. m.) 
Tewksbury, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Townsend, Congregational Church and Society, . 

** Rev. George H. Morss, . . . . 

Waltham, S. D. Warren, 

Wayland, Evangelical Congregational Church and Society, 
Westford, Congregational Church and Society, 
Weston, M. H. Bigelow, (6 l. m.) .... 
Winchester, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Wobum, Congregational Church and Society, (2 l. m.) 
A Friend, 



n 



(« 



(( 



<( 



$6 00 
12 40 

95 55 

96 29 
1 00 

49 00 

65 38 
110 00 

45 96 
10 00 
14 20 
90 88 

66 29 
177 61 

40 51 
20 00 
30 00 

60 00 
3 00 

78 55 
20 00 

50 00 
20 00 

7 61 

1 00 

200 00 

19 50 

7 70 

160 00 

122 00 

61 00 
10 00 



$ 1,741 43 



49 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Brookline, Harvard Church and Society, (1 l. m.) 

Dedhara, First Congregational Church and Society, 

Foxboro', Congregational Church and Society, 

Franklin, Congregational Church and Society, 

Mfdway, First Congregational Church and Society, (2 l. m.) 

Village Church and Society, (2 l. m.) . 

"West, Congregational Church and Society, (I l. m.) 
Needham, Ilighlandville, Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Sharon, Congregational Church and Society, 
Walpole, Orthodox Congregational Church and Society, 
West Roxbury, South Evangelical Church and Society, 
Weymouth and Braintree, Union Church and Society, . 
Second Congregational Religious Society, . 
East, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Wrentham, First Congregational Church and Society, . 



ti 



<{ 



<« 



n 



. $268 


87 


69 


66 


44 


00 


34 


24 


) 48 


04 


61 


05 


) 31 


00 


5 


02 


18 


00 


21 


00 


69 


85 


65 


31 


40 


19 


40 00 


41 


00 



*t 



<( 



ti 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Abinfjton, First Congregational Church and Society, 

South, Congregational Church and Society, . 
** Miss Mary Whitmarsh, (1 l. m.) 

Evander Reed, 

Campello, Congregational Church and Society, 

East Bridgewater, Congregational Church and Society, 

ningham, ^[cthodist Episcopal Church, 

** Evangelical Congregational Church and Society, 

Lakeville, A Lady, 

Marshfield, First Congregational Church and Society, . 
Middleboro*, First Congregational Church and Society, 
North Bridgewater, Porter Evangelical Church and Society, 
Plymouth, South, Second Congregational Church and Society, 



$ 837 83 



77 81 


14 


70 


20 00 


10 00 


77 


15 


15 


15 


5 


08 


• 9 


00 




50 


15 


35 


22 


41 


38 


10 


11 


00 



$ 316 25 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Boston, Society of Rev. Messrs. Blagden and Mannini;, Old 

South, f 155 00 

Rev. Mr. Bingham, East Boston, . . 41 02 

Rev. Dr. Alden, South Boston, (2 l. m.) 50 83 

Rev. Mr. Murray, Park Street, . . 189 76 

Rev. Dr. Robbins, Second Church, . 158 45 

Bromfiold Methodist Episcopal Church, . . . 2125 

B 



<( 



<» 



it 



40 



Kimball, Daniel W., Winckuttr 

Kimball, David, Bradford. 

Kimbal], Wallace L. " 

Kimball, Mri. Flarriet W., £mo«2L 

Kimball, Mn. Mary B., Falmoutk. 

Kimball, John R., Wobum, 

Kimball, Mn. Sylvia, WssUore^. 

Kingman, Miu Eliza, Boston. 

*Kingman, Miw Sarah, " 

Kingsbury, Nathaniel, 

Kingsbury, John, Bradford. 

Kingsbury, Rev. John D. ** 

Kittredge, Rev. A. E., AV10 Ytirk eitf, 

•Knowles, Rev. Jamee D., Botton. 

Knowltoo, Rev. Stephen, West Medieaf, 

Knox, Mrs. 8., Rock lOand, JIL 

Labaree, Rev. John C, Randolph, 

Lambert, Miss Elisabeth 6., Rowley. 

Lambert, Thomas R., D. D., Ckarlostown. 

Lambert, William T., « 

Lamson, E«lwio, JI9o«t0ii. 

Lamsoo, Mrs. Edwin, " 

Lamson, Gardner Swift, ** 

Lamsyn, Helen, " 

Lamson, Kate Glidden, ** 

*Lane, Anthony, Lancaster, 

Lane, Rov. Jumes P., Jindover, 

Lane, Mrs. Emma L. ** 

Lane, Rev. John VV., JFhatttjf, 

Lano, Mrs. Mary H. 

Lane, Mary E. 

Lane, Richmond J., East jiHngt»n» 

Langworthy, Rev. Isaae P., Chsiseo. 

Laaell, Josiah, WkitinsviUo. 

Lassell, Mrs. Jennie W. ** 

Lathe, Miss Sarah S., Orafton, 

Laurie, Inglis, OtDotofnna, Minntsoia, 

^Lawrence, Amos, Boston, 

Lawrence, Rev. Amos £., Housalonic 

Lawrence, Asa, Oroton, 

^Lawrence, Mrs. M. A. " 

Lawrence, John, ** 

Lawronce, Curtis, Bradford. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Curtis, " 

Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy T., fVilton,M$, 

Lawton, Mrs. B. C, ffkitinsviUe. 

Laynd, John, " 

Leach, Simeon, East SiouglUon. 

Learoyd, Addison P., Danvers. 

Learoyd, John S. ** 

Ijeavitt, Abner L., Hingkanu 

Leavitt, Mrs. Elisabeth G., Boston, 

Leavitt, Ruv. George R., Cumhridgeport 

Lee, Rev. Ssmuol H., Oreenjiold. 

*Leeds, Bcnjnmin, BrooUitA, 

Leeds, Benjamin, Boston. 

Loads, Mrs. Anne B. ** 

Leeds, Miss Anne G. ** 



u 



u 



({ 



cc 



cc 



Leas, Mrs. Samuel, Concord. 

Lefavour, Issaehar, Beverly. 

Leland, Calvin, Jr., /initiek, 

Leland, Mrs. Charlotte A., Sktrhsm. 

Leonard, Ellsa, Foxhoro*. 

Laooard, James M., BridgewaUr, 

Lewis, Reuben, Orolon. 

Lewis, Mrs. Susan P., '* 

Lincoln, Rer. Calvin, Hingkanu 

Lincoln, P. W., Jr., Boston. 

Lincoln, James L. C, SnHderland. 

Lincoln, Noah, Boston, , 

Little, Alexander E., J^rtk MidHskero^. 

*Little, Rev. Elbridge G. 

Little, Mrs. Lucia 8., 

Little, Sarah Isabel, 

Little, Stuart, WkitinsvWe, 

Little, Waldo P., M'swton Centre. 

Little, William A. " 

Littlefield, Samuel, SomervUIe, 

*Livermore, George, Cambridge, 

*Loeke, Ephraim, Boston. 

Loomis, Rev. Elihu, Liuleton, 

Lord, Miss Anna M., fyswiek. 

Lord, Rev. Charles E., Boston, 

Lord, Edward A., Danvers. 

Lord, John A., Peabady. 

Lojd, Louisa C, Manchester. 

Loring, Mrs. Hnnnab W., Mlnoton Centre. 

Loud, Arthur J., Boston. 

Loud, Mrs. Martha B., Braintree, 

Lovell, Misa Mary B., Medway, 

*Lowell, Charles, D. D., Boston. 

Lumb, William, " ' 

Lunt, Charles P., Winckester, 

Lyman, Rev. George, South ^nkerst. 

Lyman, Samuel T., Huntingfon. 

Lyon, Miss Chloe R., Campelle, 

Maereading, Rev. Chas. S., Providence, R.I. 

Maltby, Rev. Erastus, Taunton. 

Mann, Miss Helen L., QreenJUld, 

Manning, Otis, Littleton. 

Manning, Edward W., ffobum. 

Manning, Walter H., Uttlston. , 

Marble, Mrs. Mary E., Orafton. 

Markham, Mrs. Priscilla V., Wrentham. 

Marrett, Lorenso, East Cambridge. 

Marsh, Elizabeth C, Haverhill 

Marsh, E. J., Leominster. 

Marsh, Miss Julia M., Haverhill. 

*Marston, William, Boston. 

Martin, George H., Bridgewater. 

Mason, Miss Nellie A., Boyhton, 

Mattison, William, Whitiruville. 

Maynard, Rev. Joshua L., Williston^ FL 

Maynard, Ijoander, Shrewsbury. 

*McKean, William, Boston, 

McKeao, Philena, jtndover. 



41 



McKeen, Phebe, JIndover, 
*McLean, Mra. Ano, BotUm, 
McLmo, Rev. John K., Pramingkam, 
McLoud, Rev. Anton, Top^/Md. 
Meani, Rev. John O., Boston. 
Meant, Mra. John O. " 
Means, William G., Andovtr, 
MerriaiD, Abner H., T»mfleton, 
Meniam, Homer, Sprvagjieli, 
Merrill, Rev. Jamea H., Jtndover, 
Merrill, John K., Metkuen, 
Merritt, Mra. Mary A., Jtontague. 
Messenger, Miaa Eliza, FUckbmrg, 
Millt.Rev. Charlee L., Boston. 
Milii, Mrs. Rebecca B. ** 
Mills, Miss Lydia, Peabodf, 
Minot, William, Boston, 
Minot, WiUiam, Jr. ^ 
Mizter, Mrs. Fanny Lk " 
Mizter, Mra. Mary R., Hardwkk, 
Mizter, Mra. S. E., Roek Island, IlL 
Mooar, Rev. George, Oakland, Col. 
Moody, James, fVhUiMviU$. 
Moore, Lewis, Sharon. 
Moora, Joseph, OroUm. 
Moors, Rufus, ** 

Moors, Mra. Rufas, •< 
Mordough, Rev. John H., Portland, Mi. 
More, Charles H., Bradford. 
Morong, Rev. Thomas, Jpswick, 
Morley, Rev. Sardis B., Pitt^ld. 
Morrison, Daniel T., Metkusn. 
Morrison, Miss Nancy T., RowUjf. 
, Morse, Miss Abby P., Emporia, Kanaat, 
Morse, Charles N.,JHilford. 
Moise, Misa Emily A., Bradford. 
Morse, Henry, Ifatick. 
Morse, Rafoa W., Mtthnsn, 
Morse, William E., Bradford. 
Moseley, Edward S., H'ewkMryporU 
Mosman, Walter B., Ankumdale, 
Manger, Rev. Theo. T., Providence, R. I. 
Maoger, Mra. T. T., «* 

Munroe, Misa Mary, Concord. 
Murray, Rev. James O., Jfsw York CUf. 
Murray, Mrs. Julia R. ** 

Nason, Rev. Charles, fTsUJUeL 
Nason, Rev. Eliaa, BUlerUct. 
Needham, Lucy H., M'sw BraintrM. 
Needham, Mn. Mary P., Peabodf. 
Nelson, Jonathan H., Skmosbmrif. 
Newell, George H., HoUitton. 
*NeweU, Alontgomery, Boston. 
Newhall, Lucy Ann, Slow. 
Newman, Mias Sarah A., fyswieh, 
Nichols, Alfred A., fVsot Jtmcsbmrf. 
Niehols, Jamea R«, HaverkUL 
Nichols, Moi«i» ** 



Niek«raon, Mra. Temple W., ^^antueket. 
Nightingale, Rev. Crawford, Chroton. 
*Norcroes, Josiah, Wakejle'.d. 
Noreroas, Mra. Josiah, ** 
Norton, Rev. Eklward, Montagiu. 
Nourae, B. Alden, fVssthoro*. 
Nourse, Caroline Josephine, Boston. 
Nourae, Daniel, Wtst Medwaf. 
Nourse, Susan M., Bolton. 
Noyes, Alva, ^ortk Bridgswater. 
Noyes, Jacob, Abingion. 
Noyes, Luke B., South Abington. 
Noyes, Rufus S., A". Bridgeioater. 
Oatley, G. D., fV kitinsviUe. 
Odiin, Benjamin^ £z««r, Jf. H. 
Odiin, Mra. E. T. « 

Ordway, Aaron L., JVeio York eitf. 
Ordway, Miaa Charlotte, Bradford. 
Ordway, Herbert, " 

Osborne, George F., Peabody 
Osgood, George C, LovelL 
Osgood, H. B., Wkitinsville. 
Packard, Rev. D. Temple, BrigkUm. 
Packard, Edward C, ^oHh Bridgaoater. 
Packard, S. Edwards, Springjlsld.* 
Packard, S. Franklin, CampsUo. 
Packard, Miss Susie P., '* 
Packard, Zibeon, Abingion, 
Page, Abigail L., Atkinson, A*. H. 
Paige, George R., JVew SaUm. 
*Paioe, Mrs. Sarah M., Holdsn, 
*Paine, Miss Sarah C. " 
Palmer, Rev. Charles Ray, Salem. 
*PaImer, Rev. Stephen, ,N'e«dham. 
Palmer, Squire, South Deerjitld. 
Park, John C, Boston. 
Parker, Andrew, Oloueester. 
Parker, Daniel, fVkitinsvUle. 
* Parker, John, Boston. 

Parker, Mra. Sarah, " 

*Parkroan, Francis, D. D. " 
*Parkman, Samuel, " 

*Parkman, Mra. Sarah, « 
Parmenter, Mra. £. J. G., Psterskanu 
*Panona, Gorham, Boston, 
*ParsoDS, William, ** 
Partridge, Clark, Mtdufoy. 
Partridge, Joseph, Hollisten. 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J., JFeH AVvtom. 
Patrick, Mra. Martha L. <* 

Patten, Mra. John P., Dareksster. 
Patteraon, Daarid H., Mstkuen, 
Paul, Frederick A., LaksvilU. 
Paul, Henry, JiTewton. 

•Paul, Mra. Henry, ** 
♦Paul, Luther, " 

Paul, Luther, Jr. " 
Paul, Misa Harriet, " 



42 



FaormOD, MiH llmmlh I., LmlL 

PF.:k,Tlcv. L>^vl,l, SnierlaHd. 

Ptiic*. IU>. Bi.ilfutJ K., ifirln,^ 
PwplH, etnoel, .Vaiict. 
Paikifii, UNismin C. FaUig. 
PtrkiiH, E. E., JVMt MUi M an'. 
Perklu, Mn. Eliubatli E. " 



P«ll>T, Juu 
Pnity, Mill 



AbifiU T^ S^n. 



Pntt, Galas, ^f^rt]^ BtUgtwttr. 

PntI, Oalen E. " 

Piau, IU>. dtint* H., Hwvri. 

Plllt, Noltcn, BrmiMlTfL 

Pt»t,Pb.l>..«lr»,>nu 

Fr.l^M».i.I_,^^|f.«(■>n. 

Piau, Philip W. " 

Prltl, ZabfllDD, JfirUt JWAllltn'. 

Pnf, Joho J., iMmO. 

Pnnliu, MlaJalii, Ori/ltn. 

Pnnlia. MiitdI. intMiuFilfi. 

Ffwiica, J»H A. " 



u.Mii, aaiik B., QaiKI- 



Fsllae, UjQiel, ijlmriii. 




raiM, Mi« Elm J FhSbV. 


BukKUn.«>if 




B>},<i<H>c^W JItidrtf FiOf. 


Pmm, Willanl, Fntml. 


lUynuiM, lla]9iiH.,Buftn, 


Pbillipa, Alonu P., l>uM*. 


Raul, Miu HiTihi, £ul ^tiifCxi. 


Pbillil».G«.(aW.,&.WH 


Kaad. UlM OtoIlM Q., JA«r*iU. 


'•rbill.]..,J..Mi.il,„n,i)„u.. 


BhihI, Horua, Sm* .^MuflM. 


Pi„n,|,.,,M,..s.iir, ■■ 


Blu,H>..At«.I..A>«M. 


•Philhi", lViili.iii,A«(uri. 


Hlea, i-.i-.r.i.Jiiyo-d. 


Piot.,T.I, IIcv.l>.„.,|-tV., Or«ri<n<l. 


Rica, Mn. ElinbMh C, Lawmti. 


r-cU„[,^,ll.„rvW-,flMtO., 




•Pieics, Re.. Chirln H^ JTiUtirf- 


Ri«.m«.M.Aug«.«,«-„,4,^... 


Piaieo, liuEl'., tt'htJiunUi. 


Bieb, Bai. Alonio B., Bmrlf. 


Piarea, SjI'i-UirG., IliiuUltr. 


Bich, Rav. A. JidiQii, Halmimtttt. 


•i'rerp.inl, Up Joho. jf.d/ari 


Bkb, Hn. lUnlel L., " 


Pianw Sd.. Wo. lliM.rT,/;M<BL 




Pika, Jukn, D. 1)., AooTlsy. 


RlehnTdi, JinHi P., OmjH^. 


Plnob,!!... Albert a, culm 


Bicbaidion, Banjaaiio P., £>Kn. 


Plu>b,J«ipbDwt, 


BicbardHO. Jolu W., J(.^i»^ 


FlBcnai Mit. Mutba B., Rwliy. 


RioterdKli, l.ulli.'i, fi-^'tittrr. 




Bich..d.»n,.V,..^.,„l, >:.. Cna^ 


Po«B.,Mr,^J«.l.h,0™/l«. 


KicharJior, Bl.pban, H. Meimif. 


P<.Uud,Jwii[.l. (J, H„iBr». 






•Bll,-l,i..\,.J,.-,Jr„B«U.t 


Pw, : . '.<..' JHildn. 


RDbblDl, Aad.a», Or,rf«. 




Bubbipi, Chmdlar, D. a, AaMam. 


Prwd, Mri. NiDDT, MUamf. 


•RoW.,r,,. i:d«>„l[l. 


Pond, IVIlliUB E., «>«.*.■. 


BoWrti, Uar. Jacob, EM JTarinf . 




Bobaiu, Mia. Marj A. " 


P»I,Jul.pb.i'«4«(f. 


Rabana, Mn. Ilial. Mnni^Htita: 


PlK..,KMb.BJi. " 


BobatusD, JaiDxa, Pufc^f . 


Porur. Stirual 8^ WiMt^fUr. 




Pnii, Coioaliu.. A-wa Wtfimlk. 





43 



Robinioa, R«v. R«aben T., WhuhuUr, 

•Robioaon, Mra. Clara A. *« 

Rockwood, John, OreUm. 

Roekwood, John T., SffingMId, 

Roekwood, Mias Polly S., Jtaklmnd. « 

*Ro{en, George, Button, 
* Rogers, George L., JfnohnyporL 

Rogeri, Shubael O., JBoaton. 

•Rogers, Rev. William M. •« 

Rosaell, 8«rah J., Frami^gkawu 

Ryder, Marietu, Chatham, 

Safford, ReT. George B., Bmrlington, FL 

*6alisbary, Bamoel, Bottan. 

Saoford, Mrs. Adeline D.,JVMv«y FiUag§. 

Sanford, Edmund I., Medwof. 

Saoford, Henry D., Bridgewatar, 

Sanger, Edward 6., Camhridgtpori, 

Sergeant, Jamea C, Oakham, 

Sargeni, Edmund, W9H jSm$§htrjf, 

*Sargent, Loeius M., BoHon. 

Sargent, Samuel O., Methuan, 

*8awtell, Mr*. Ephraim, Oretoii. 

Sawyer, George, Oamp§0a, 

Sawyer, Martha B., ** 

Sawyer, Seth C, E. Raniotfh, 

*Sendder, Charlea, Beaton, 

Seodder, Mrs. Sarah L. " 

Saagrare, Edward F^ Uxbridge, 

Sears, Mise Hannah H., JtthJUUL 

Seaver, A. W., JVorcMoro*. 

Seeley, Raymond H., D. D., HatarhiU, 

Seeley, Mrs. Fanny B. *• 

Selfridge, Thomas O., BesCeii. 

Shattock, Andrew, Oretim. 

Shattnek, Mrs. Susan P. " 

Shaw, Mrs. Hannah, Boatan, 

Sheldon, Rev. Luther H., Jam$$hiirghyJ4',J, 

Sheldon, Mrs. Sarah H. •< 

Shepherd, Thomas, Winehmter, 

Shiverick, Miss Maiia L., CampMa, 

^goorney, Andrew, Bottan. 

Sigoorney, Henry, 

Simonds, Alvan, 
, Skillings, David N., Winohttar, 

*Slaek, RoggJee, Boatom, 

Slafler, Rev. Edmund P. <* 

Slafter, Mrs. Edmund F., «< 

Sleeper, William C, M$thnaM, 

Small, Amos T., Wut JSmpobmrf. 

Small, Mrs. Fidelia Foiter, M^lfhmrf, 

Small, Samuel A. <* 

Small, Samuel E. *< 

Small, Mrs. Suonner, JWi^toii Cimflrt. 

Smith, Mrs. Abby F., CanaoHL 

Saiith, Henry F. «* 

Snith, Albert W., Wettbonf. . 

Smith, Mis. Luey Jane, •* 

Smith, Mra. Clara J., Smtdtrkad. 



u 



u 



Smith, E. B., Wettfield. 

Smith, Rev. Edward P., BrooUfn^ A*. F. 

Smith, George P., BoHon, 

•Smith, Samuel, '* 

Smith, Joel, fr&ia'ii#viU#. 

Smith, Jonathan, ** 

Smith, Warren N. ** 

Smith, Mrs. Hattie J., Oloueutar, 

Smith, Matson M., D. D., AVisari, Jf, J, 

Smith, Mrs. Matson M. *< 

Smith, Norman, Oroton, 

Smith, Mra. Mary J. ** 

Smith, Richard, P§abody, 

Smith, Mra. Charlotte, ** 

Smith, Mrs. Sarah, JSndover, 

Snow, Ambrose, South Ifttdlef Folic 

Snow, Mra. Caroline, .^ubumdala. 

Snow, Mrs. Mark, CikatAam. 

Settle, Henry M., SsulA Mington, 

Southgate, Charles M., Iitawich, 

Southgate, Rev. Robert, *< 

•Southgate, Mrs. Mary Frances, ** 

Bouthworth, Mrs. Caroline M., Midway. 

Spaulding, Mra. Charlea A., Oroton, 

Spaoldiog, John, Oroton Junction.* 

Spooner, W. B., BoHon, 

Spring, Mrs. Adela C, fFhitinttUh. 

Stacy, Albert, Concord. 

Stanley, Esra C, Manchester. 

StebbioB, Rev. Milan C, Spring/Uid. 

Stevena, Mra. George, LowelL 

Stevens, Norman C, .Newton, 

Stevens, Mrs. E. M. <* 

Stevens, Samuel, Oloucooter, 

•Stoddard, Lewis T., Breokline, 

Stone, Andrew L., D. D., San FraneitcOfCal 

Stone, Mrs. Matilda F. ** 

Stone, Martha A., M'owton Centre. 

Storrs, Eunice C. Braintrea. 

Storrs, Richard S., D. U. ** 

Stowell, Mrs. Abby Hubbard, Coneord. 

Stowell, Cyrus A., South Deerjitld. 

Stowell, D. W., Waltham. 

Strong, Rev. Elnathan E. *< 

Strong, Re?. J. C, 31. Chaoiee^Minneaata. 

Strong, Mrs. J. C. " " 

Stud ley, Austin, East Jthingtan. 

Stqdley, Edward A., Booton. 

Sugden, Miss Mary, Braintree, 

Suntner, Rev. Charles B., Monoem, 

Sumner, Mrs. H. H., Fezboro*. 

Swasey, Mra. Francea A., Lfnn. 

Swett, Samuel W., Booton. 

Swift, Mias Lottie H., Andovar, 

Switser, Rev. Christopher J., Pravinntiamn. 

Tail, Mra. Elizabeth E., W^tinevOfa, 

Tail, Miss Emily A. 

Taft, Gottavns E. 



(( 



u 



44 



Taft, Mrs. 6. E., WkitinnSOe. 
Tail, 8. Jeooie, ** 

Taft, Jacob, Oxbridg: 
Tapley, Gilbert, Datn§n. 
Tappaa, John, BotUn, 
Tarr, William J., OUmcstUr. 
Taylor, Mri. Malanaa, Wiiuk§aUr, 
Teela, Rav. Albert K^ MUUm. 
Taele, Mn, Cornelia C. ** 
Temple, Mark M., Rtaditig* 
Tenney, Mri. Mary P., W\%cheaUr. 
Terry, Rer. Jamee P., &wtA Wtymcmdu 
Thacher, Mn. Anna B., Hydt Park. 
Thacber, Miia Caliata C, AttUbartf, 
Tbaeher, John, •< 

Thacber, Mrs. Buaan C. ** 

Thacher, William T., H^de Park, 
Thacher, Siuan B., Portland, Jte, 
^Thatcher, Mary Ludlow, Middl$bor9\ 
Thayer, AmMa, Braintre$. 
Thayer, E. F. E. *« 
Thayer, Ira, •« 

♦Thayer, Mra LiUa, *< 
Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, jtndover, 
Thayer, Mn. Martha C. " 
Thayer, Oliver, " 

*Thay<#, Mn. Jane, Bostoiu 
Thayer, Robert IL, AVto York Citf, 
. Thayer, Sarah U., BraiiUree, 
Thompson, Mn. Avetick F., fFaraJkam. 
Thomptoa, Mra. Emily B., Concord, 
Thompson, Everett A., A*orM fVobum, 
Thompson, Samuel A. ** 

Thompson, Mn. Anne Ellxa, ** 
Thompson, George R., /forth BridgeioaUr, 
Thompson, Lewis Waldo, Woreetler, 
Thompson, Stephen, Winchuttr, 
Thunton, Rev. Richard B., Stan^fbrd, Cl 
Tinker, Russell, Qraftan. 
Tobey, Miss Jennie E., H^hiUfumlle, 
Tolman, Rev. Richard, Toiek$bury, 
Tolman, Rev. Samuel H., Wilwdngton, 
Torrey, Miss Elisabeth L., South W$ywuuth. 
Torrey, James, JWrti JVeynunth. 
Torrej, Wlllard, Graton, 
Towne, William B., Brookline, 
Trask, Charles II., Jr., ManehsHtr. 
Trask, Mrs. A. H. *« 

Trask, Lizzie R., OUmcuUur, 
Trask, Samuel, Ptabodf, 
Trask, Samuel P., J)anver», 
Tribou, Samuel, /forth Bridgeitater. 
Trowbridge, Mrs. Asa, Brighton, 
Trnfant, Harriet Andre wi, jSbington, 
Trufant, Philip P. " 

Trnfant, Walter Ezrih " 

*Tucker, Rev. Elijah W., Lebanon^ Ci, 
Tucker, Mrs. Hannah W., Dorthuter. 



•Tucker, Jesse, Milton. 

Tucker, Mn. Mary R. *' 

•Tucker, Nathan, ** 

Tucker, Mn. Nathan, " 

Tucker, John A., Dorchtttr, 

Tucker, William, *< 

Tucker, William W., Botton. 

Tufts, Charles, Jindoter, 

Turner, Miss Alice Montgomery, Randolph, 

Tuttle, Miss Maitha E., Concord. 

Tuttle, Miss Sarah, fVayland, 

Tuttle, Thomas S., Littleton, 

Twichell, John M., FiichHwg. 

Tyler, Frank H., Bradford, 

Tyler, Jerome W., Botton. 

•Underbill, Rev. John W., A". AmktrtU 

Upton, Mn. Lucy, Peabodf. 

Upton, Moses T., Salem, 

Vose, William H., FiUhkurg. 

Wadsworth, Mn. Lucy, MUon, 

Wadsworth, William, Booton, 

Wakefield, Miss C, Reading. 

Waldrpo, Rev. Daniel W., East Weymouth. 

Wales, Erasttts, East Randolph, 

Wales. Miss Mary Ann, Boolon. 

Walker, Ellen A., Eaet Jihington. 

Walker, Miss Francea A., Haverhill 

Walker, Rev. Geo. F., Little Compton^ R. /. 

Walker, John S., Eaet Medmap. 

Walker, Mrs. John 8. << 

Walker, Levi, Bridgewater, 

Walker, Moses, Baverhill, 

Walker, Nathaniel, " 

Walker, Robert G., Boeton, 

Walker, William M., EaH Mington, 

•Walley, Samuel H., Booton 

Waliey, Samuel H. " 

Ward, Artemas, ** 

Ward, Samuel, " 

W^ard, Miss H. L. H., LakeviUe. 

Ward, Rev. James W. " 

Ward, Mrs. Caroline L. " 

Ward, Miss Susan H. " 

Ward, Salem T., mncheetor. 

Warner, John, Ifeu)t»n. 

Warner, William, S^h DeerJUld, 

Warren, George W., Boeton. 

•Warren, Mrs. Diantha A., Lynn. 

•Warren, Mrs. Maria, Ctri^flon, 

•Warren, Nehemiah, Stow, 

Warren, Francis W. «* 

Warren, Jonas, " 

•Warren, Lucinda, ** 

•Warren, William A«, ffinehester. 

Washburn, William B., Qreenjield. 

Washburn, Mrs. William B. " 

Waterman, Mrs. Caroline, Qraftom 

Watkins, Mist Abby A., Qlouceeter. 



45 



Weeks, Hn. L. Caroline, M>rth Dana. 
Webeter, Edward, Botcateetif M:H, 
Welch, John, Sit$t«n. 
Weld, James, '< 
Wells, Mrs. Martha O., Jfortkban^. 
Wellman, Joshua W., D. D., A'ewtM. 
Weodell, Mrs. Catharine, Boston, 
Wentworth, Albert, Hmverkia. 
Weotworth, Lewis, Bridgewatgr. 
West, Peleg D., WkitinniUe. 
Wheeler, Abijah R., EaotModway, 
Wheeler, Mrs. M. B., Medway. 
Wbiteomb, Lewis, East JUmdolph, 
*Whitcorob, Reuben, Harvard, 
*Whiteoinb, Reuben, Jr. ** 
Wbiteomb, Mrs. Abby F. *< 
*Whitcomb, Mrs. Louisa D. " 
Whiteomb, Miss Mary M. « 
White, Aaron L., Modwaf, 
White, Comelioa, Scntk Randol^ 
White, Edmund, East Randolpk 
White, Newton, *' 
^White, James, Boston, 
White, Joel, Uzbridge, 
White, Josiah, Pelere&eet. 
White, Mrs. Mary C, PkUHpHon, 
White, Pbineas A., WhUituviUB, 
White, Thomas, East Randolph, 
Whitin, Arthur P., WhitmsviOiB, 
WhHin, Charles P. *< 

Whitin, Charles £. *< 

Whitin, Mrs. Catharine H. <* 
Whitin, Edward, 
Whitin, James F. 
WhiUn, Mrs. Patience H. *< 
Whitin, Paul, *< 

WhiUn, Mrs. Sarah J. • « 
Whitin, Mrs. Sarah R. « 
Whiting, Lemuel, OroUm, 
Whitman, Charles, LowoU. 
Whitmarsh, Mary, South Jitingi&u, 
Whitmarsh, Miss Mary J. '* 
Whitmore, Annie Maria, Lynn, 
Whitney, Charles H., CambridgtporL 
Whitney, Dora 8., SutUh Groton, 
Whitney, Frederick, Westmutstgr, 
Whitney, Helen J., Stow. 
Whitney, Isaac S., OUnuoster. 
Whitney, Israel, Boston, 
Whitney, Mrs. Permelia V., P$torsham. 
Whitney, Richard D., SpringJlM, 



It 



tc 



Whitney, Mrs. Susanna, Rntla%d. 

*Wigglesworth, Thomas, Bostsn. 

Wilbur, Joseph, Taunton. 

Wild, Daniel, Boston. 

Wilder, liattie W., South Jicton. 

Willcoz, Rev. William H., Roading, 

Williams, Miss Amelia P., Sunderland, 

Williams, Rer. C. H. 8., Concord. 

Williams, Mrs. C. H. 8. *< 

Williams, Rev. Edward F., WhUinsvilU. 

Williams, Miss Elisabeth C, OroVm, 

Williams, Miss Mary D., Orunjisld. 

Williams, 8. H., Fozboro*. 

Williams, Thomas 8., JiubumdaU. 

Willis, Lneeba, Wayland, 

Willis, Lucy Maria, " 

Wilson, Rev. Thomas, Houghton, 

Wing, John C, Lowell. 

Wines, Rev. C Maurice, Broohline . 

Winslow, Pelham, East Jibiugton. 

Winter, David Baker, J^orthbridgs. 

Winthrop, Robert C, Boston. 

♦Winthrop, Thomas L. •* 

Wiswell, Mrs. Lizzie M., Chxtago^ lU. 

Withington, Otis, Brooklin; 

Wolcott, Mrs. Elizabeth, Peabody, 

Woloott, William, '' 

Woodbury, Simon J., Sutton, 

Wood, Mrs. Abijah, WutboroK 

Wood, Cyroi K., Oardnor, 

Wood, Elisabeth C, Fezftere*. 

Wood, Joseph W., WhiHusviBs. 

Wood, Mrs. £. 8. ** 

Wood, Mrs. Samuel F., Chelmsford, 

Wood, Mrs. Susan, Oroton. 

Wood, T. Dwtght, fFestnunstsr, 

Wood, Theodore B. " 

Woods, Miss Abbie Wheeler, Maiden 

Woods, Frank Austin, JVeio Braintre; 

Woods, Joseph Wheeler, Boston, 

Woods, Samuel H. *« 

Woodward, Ebenozer, Jinswton, 

W odward. Miss Emily, Jfewton U, Falls. 

Wood worth, Artemas B., Lowell. 

Worcester, Miss Sollie, Brighton, 

•Worthington, William, Boston. 

Wright, George L., Mitteneague. 

Wyman, Charles, Lancastsr, 

Wyman, Rufiis, Boston. 

Wyman, William G., FUchburg, 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY FROM 1809 TO 1871. 



PRESIDENTS. 



Hon. William Phillips, . . . 
Tier, John Pierce, D. D. . . . 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. . 



1809—27 
1827—49 
1849— M 



Hon. Richard Fletcher, . 
Hon. Samuel H. Walley, 



18M— 99 
1859 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 



Bev. John Lathrop, D. D. . . 1809—16 

Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. . 1816—28 

Rev. Henry Ware, D. D. . . 1828-44 

Rev. John Codman, D. D. . . 1844—48 

Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. . 1818 — 19 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1849—53 

Rev. N. L. (Yothingham, D. D. 1853—61 

Rev. Wm. R. Nicholson, D. D. 1861 

William a Plunkett, Esq. . . 1862 

Edward South worth, Esq. . . 1862—70 

John P. Williston, Esq. . . . 1862 

William B. Washburn, Eiq. . 1862 



Stephen Salisbury, Esq. . 


. 1862 


Charles Whitin, Esq. . . . 


. 1862 


Lee Claflin, Esq 


. 1862—70 


Caleb Holbrook, Esq. . . . 


. 1862 


James S. Amory, Esq. . . . 


. 1862 


Hon. John H. Clifford, LL. D. 


. 1862 


Elisha Tucker, Esq. . . . 


. 1862 


James B. Crocker, Etq. . . 


. 1862 


E. S. Moseley, Esq. . . . 


. 1662 


Charles A. Jcssup, Esq. 


. 1870 


Hon. William Claflin, . . 


. 1871 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, 1809 — 13 
Rev. Samuel C. Thacher, . . . 1813—17 
Rev. Charles Lowell, D. D. . . 1817—18 



Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1818—49 
Rev. N. L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849—53 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1853 



RECORDING SECRETARIES. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor, 
Rev. James D. Knowles, . 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



1809—28 
1828—30 
1830-31 
1831—32 
1832—39 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1839—44 

Rev. William M. Rogers, . . 1814—45 

Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1845 — 49 

Rev. George Richards, . . . 1849—52 

Rev. Daniel Butler, .... 1852 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, 
John Tappan, Esq. . . 



TREASURERS. 



1809—11 
1811—12 
1812—35 



Henr}- Edwards, Esq. . . . 1835 — 49 
George B. Sampson, Esq. . . 1849 — 62 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. . 1862 



EXECUTIVE 

Rev. William E. Channing, D. D. 1809—18 

Hon. Jonathan Phillips, . . . 1809—16 

Stephen Higginson, Esq. . . . 1809 — 15 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1815—18 

Edward Tuckerman, Esq. . . 1816—30 

Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. . 1818—30 

Rev. Beiyamin B. Wisner, D. D. 1821—35 

Charles Tappan, Esq. . . . 18;i0 — 10 



COMMITTEES. 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1832—53 

Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1835—49 

Henry Edwards, Esq 1840—49 

Rev. George Richards, . . . 1849—60 

George R. Sampson, Esq. . . 1849—62 

Albert Fearing, £»q 18.^3 

Rev. John O. Means, .... 1860 

Charles Henr>- Parker, Esq. . 1862 



ANNUAL REPOUT. 



It has ever furnished a subject for thankfulness 
on our annual gatherings, that the Society was 
able to number among its living members some 
of those who were present at its formation. 
Many of those assembled on that occasion had 
indeed passed their meridian, and the inevitable star 
has long been affixed to their names, but among 
them were young men whose love to the work 
then evinced ceased only with their lives. While 
their strength allowed, they graced these occa- 
sions with their presence, and when unable longer 
to do this, their prayers and their aid were not 
wanting, and in a serene and honored old age 
they lived among us to illustrate the value of that 
wisdom, ^^ in whose right hand is length of days 
and in whose left hand are riches and honor.'' 

The Hon. John Tappan, whose death we have 
recently been called to mourn, was for several 
years the sole survivor of the founders of the 
Society. An Assistant Treasurer the second 
year of the Society's existence, its Treasurer for 
the twenty- two years following, subsequently a 
member of its Board of Trust for twenty-nine 
years, a liberal contributor to its funds, an earnest 



6 

helper in its work and in that of kindred associa- 
tions, he has gone in a good old age to receive 
we doubt not the welcome of the good and faithful 
servant. With his death a new chapter in our 
history begins. Other men have labored and we 
have entered into their labors. Be it ours to 
carry on faithfully the work that in life they 
begun, and to learn the lesson impressively taught 
us by their removal, that the longest day is but 
brief, and that to the faithful worker the hour of 
rest and reward is rapidly drawing on. 

During the year there have been issued from 
the Depository, thirty-six thousand five hundred 
and seventy-four copies of the Scriptures. Of 
this number, thirteen thousand and eighty-five 
were Bibles, thirteen thousand four hundred and 
eighty-eight were Testaments, five thousand one 
hundred and eighty-five were Testaments and 
Psalms, and four thousand eight hundi-ed and 
sixteen, smaller portions of the Scriptures. Of 
this number, two thousand two hundred and 
seventy-seven were in various foreign languages. 

The gratuitous issues have amounted to eight 
thousand five hundred and eighty-two, costing 
$3,117.54. They have been given to Seamen, 
Mission Sabbath Schools, City Missions, Public 
Institutions, Freedmen and destitute families in 
Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New 
Jei'sey and various States of the West. 

The work of exploration and supply has been 
carried on less extensively than for the last few 
years, and to this must be attributed our dimin- 



ished issues. The Kev. Mr. Dwight has labored 
for a portion of the year in the northern part of 
Boston and in portions of Charlestown and 
Chelsea. He has visited three thousand nine 
hundred and eight families, made up of Roman 
Catholics and Protestants. One hundred and 
ninety-two copies of the Scriptures were sold and 
two hundred and forty-four copies were given 
away. Our agent has not contented himself with 
simply leaving the Scriptures where opportunity 
has offered, but has endeavored to awaken an 
interest in the Word among those who have 
received it. ^^I have," he says in his report, 
^read the Scriptures and prayed in more than 
four hundred families, Protestant and Catholic, 
and to more than a thousand individuals have I 
been allowed to press the claims of personal 
religion." Of the Protestant families visited, he 
was assured by nearly one-thii'd that they had no 
stated place of worship, and that for years they 
had not enjoyed the visit of a minister or 
missionary. 

For nearly a year a colporter has been employed 
among the French Canadians living in this State. 
He has visited Lowell, Fitchburg, Marlboro' and 
other places where this people reside. Two hun- 
dred and fifteen copies of the Scriptures in the 
French language were distributed by him, mostly 
by sale. It was found upon trial that owing to 
the peculiar condition of this people, the work 
among them, while very useful and faithfully 
performed, was of a character more appropriate 



8 

to a Missionary Society than our own, and it has 
therefore been abandoned. 

The Rev. Mr. Slafter has labored a portion of 
the year among the Episcopal churches of the 
State, and has secured, as in years past, their 
cheerful and generous aid. 

The income of the Society, including a balance 
on hand at the beginning of the year of $1,496.82 
has been $40,973.08. In donations, annual sub- 
scriptions and legacies, $12,315.67. From divi- 
dends and interest, $8,275.15. From the Society 
for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge, 
$5,000. In addition to the amount received into 
our treasury, there has been sent directly to the 
American Bible Society from various portions of 
the State the further sum of $13,050.44, mak- 
ing the whole amount raised in Massachusetts, 
$52,526.70. The expenditures have been for 
books, $16,675.76. Donation to the American 
Bible Society, $3,569.49. For General Agent, 
Distributing Agents, Depository Agent and As- 
sistant, paper, printing, rent, fuel and incidental 
expenses, $5,658.48. Added to investment fund, 
$10,272.86, leaving a balance of $4,796.49. 

The American Bible Society, with receipts 
somewhat diminished, has enjoyed another year 
of prosperity and widely extended usefulness. It 
has circulated more than eleven hundred thousand 
copies of the Scriptures. Of these, one hundred 
and sixty-nine thousand one hundred and seventy- 
nine have been purchased or printed abroad 
in fifty-eight languages and dialects. The work 



9 

of re-supplying the whole country with the Scrip- 
tures has gone vigorously forward. Six hundred 
and forty-four thousand families have been visited 
and more than thirty-eight thousand supplied. 
Over seventy thousand soldiers and sailors and 
freedmen are reported as having been furnished 
with the Scriptures. Its work abroad is wide 
and most hopeful. To thousands among the 
decayed churches of the Orient it furnishes every 
year the long lost Word of Life. In China and 
India and in Catholic Europe, through missiona- 
ries of different names and the three agents and 
forty colporters employed, it holds forth the Word 
of Life. It works in a field that grows wider and 
fairer with every advance of the race. 

In reviewing the work of the Society for the 
year now past, while we cannot withhold the 
expression of regret at the much that has been 
left undone, yet with all thankfulness do we 
record the fact that thousands of copies of the 
Divine Word have through our instrumentality 
gone forth on their divinely appointed mission. 
To not a few of the poor have we been allowed 
to minister the Word of Life. The glorious 
company that live among us in their inspired 
utterances have been introduced to many houses 
hitherto unblest by their presence. The good 
seed has been sown here and there. If perchance 
some of it has dropped by the wayside or among 
the thorns, we are sure that other has fallen upon 
good ground and brought forth the promised 
harvest. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Bible Society was held at the Rooms of the 
Society, No. 15 Cornhill, Boston, on Monday, May 29, 
1871, at nine o'clock, A. M. The President, Hon. 
Samuel H. Walley, in the Chair. 

Prayer was offered by the Rev. John O. Means of 
Boston. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq. , pre- 
sented his Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Sixty-Second Annual Report of the Trustees was 
presented by the Recording Secretary, Rev. Daniel But- 
ler, when, on motion of the Rev. John O. Means, it was 

Voted, That the reading of the same be deferred till the public 
meeting in the afternoon. 

The OflScers of the Society were elected for the ensuing 

year. 

The Society then adjourned to attend the public services 
of the Sixty-Second Anniversary at the Mount Vernon 
Church, at three o'clock, P. M. 



11 

Met according to adjoamment. 

The Scriptures were read and a prayer was oflTered by 
Rev. George Prentice of Boston. 

A hymn was sung and the Report of the Trustees was 
read and accepted. An Address was then delivered by 
Rev. L. Clark Seelye, Professor in Amherst College. 

The public services were closed by the singing of the 
doxology, and the benediction by the Right Rev. Bishop 
Eastburn. 



PROF. SEELYE'S ADDRESS. 

It is said that a Roman emperor once proposed to erect a 
statue to Jesus among the other gods of the Pantheon. Mod- 
ern skepticism would show a similar courtesy. The Bible is no 
longer ridiculed as an inconsistent fiction and shallow fraud. 
Unbelievers now are ready to grant it an honored place by the ^ 
side of the best of ancient books. They admit that its histori- 
cal statements are as trustworthy as those of any old historian. 
Jesus Christ is conceded to be as real as Socrates, and is also 
assigned a place among the great and heroic souls whom the 
world still delights to honor. 

To show their candor and spiritual discernment these skep- 
tics of the nineteenth century eulogize Jesus as, " the most per- 
fect representative of humanity ; — the fairest blossom our spirit- 
ual culture has yet produced." *' Give him a place among our 
gods," they exclaim, *' and accord him equal honors." 

Thus it is that the book, which for nineteen centuries has 
steadily fought its way to such a high pre-eminence, vanquishing 
all its adversaries, until it stands alone without a rival in an- 
cient or modem literature, — the book of books, — is at last ac- 
knowledged by a coterie of pretended literary critics — who 
might well pass for the seven sleepers at Ephesus — to be a re- 
markable literary production ; and the Christ, whose story, as 



12 

recorded io that book, has revolutioaized human history and 
thrilled with unparalleled enthusiasm myriads of souls, is also 
admitted to be — a remarkable personage ! 

Notwithstanding these admissions, — somewhat amusing to 
be sure from the complacent air of intellectual infallibility 
with which they are generally made, — there is still the same 
essential antagonism in this form of unbelief to the book which 
it thus deigns to patronize. It differs from the grosser inOdelity 
of the past, in treating Christianity apparently with greater re- 
spect and conceding greater historical accuracy to the Scrip- 
tares. Not leas however would it abrogate their authority, and 
destroy their influence. All this specious courtesy is but an- 
other attempt to undermine the foundation of our faith ; all 
these fine sounding compliments to human reason, but an- 
other blow at the divinity of Christ ; all this heartless eulogy of 
the Bible and Jesus, but the premises from which to draw a 
stronger conclusion against their claims. For, from these spe- 
cious admissions, that Christianity is the outgrowth of civilization, 
instead of God's unchanging Word, and that Christ is an illus- 
trious example of the dignity of man, instead of the incarnate 
Son of God, these men are ready at once to show, that, as in 
the sciences more correct notions have superseded the puerile 
fancies of the middle ages, so in the diffusion of intelligence 
and advancement of humanity the Bible will be superseded by 
a purer code of morals, and some man will arise even more 
perfect than Christ. 

In the opinion of some that time has already come with refer- 
ence to the Scriptures. Modern science and civilization they 
maintain have reached now a higher eminence than Paul and 
Peter occupied. From this commanding position it is easy to 
make the ground untenable which these sacred writings so long 
have held in honest minds. In fact, as we coma together again 
to celebrate the anniversary of a Society which for many years 
has successfully labored to make the Word of God accessible 
to all men, we are accused of committing as great a folly, as if 
we should attempt to rebuild and fortify some mediaeval strong- 
hold now rendered indefensible by the discoveries in modern 
artillery. 

Has then, Christian friends, this ancient citadel of our 



13 

faith, after withstandiag UDharmed the mad assaalta of genera- 
tioQS, been readered any less impregaable by a new system of 
intellectaal ordnance. Walk about Zion, and go round about 
her, tell the towers thereof, consider her palaces, mark ye well 
her bulwarks ;— can you find that any breach has yet been made 
in her walls? 

It may seem indeed a work of supererogation to show again 
the futility of any attempt to overthrow the truth of God ; still 
I find that these new forces of infidelity, marshaled as they are 
by some of our most noted writers and brilliant orators, seem 
very formidable to some minds and very fascinating to others. 
Old, therefore, as is the theme, and well worn as must be all 
thoughts on such a subject, I can think of nothing on an occa- 
sion like this, better calculated to strengthen our faith in this 
blessed Word, or to quicken our enthusiasm for its diffusion, 
than the inconsistency of these modern efforts to destroy its 
power. 

If the religion of the Bible be the outgrowth of human civil- 
ization, we should naturally expect to find both its origin and 
development dependent on the most cultured minds of the ages. 
A good literature is always of slow growth. It flourishes only 
under the most congenial circumstances. Centuries were neces- 
sary to bring it to any perfection among the ancients, and its 
greatest progress in modern times has been when most deeply 
rooted in the culture of the past. Says Matthew Arnold, ^^ The 
reason why creative epochs in literature are so rare is, because 
for the creation of a master work of literature two powers must 
concur, the power of the moment and the power of the man ; 
and the man is not enough without the moment." History con- 
stantly illustrates the truth of the criticism. Who are the men 
who write the books of world-wide fame ? In what lands do 
they live, and under what influences develop? Homers are 
not found in Africa, nor Miltons among our North American 
Indians. 

Influential writers depend upon congenial atmosphere and 
appropriate nutriment as much, if not more than upon native 
talent. They are found only at periods of great intellectual ac- 
tivity, and among peoples of unusual mental strength. Thou- 
sands of other minds contribute to their growth ; the culture of 

B 



14 

many generations is necessary to inspire their songs and enrich 
their thoughts. The ages and men naturally grow higher only 
as they are engrafted on the wisdom of the past. The culture 
of a classic antiquity, the culture of many generations of pre- 
vious English history were all essential to produce our greatest 
English poet. His great native endowments, marvellous as 
they were, would scarcely have made his influence felt beyond 
the confines of his birth-place, had they not been enriched and 
broadened by the thoughts of so many other minds and peoples. 
Great names cluster in such ages as that of Pericles and Eliza- 
beth, just as great trees grow in California, instead of upon 
our sterile bleak New England hills ; just as great cities grow 
up around commodious harbors, or at the natural centres of 
trade and commerce. 

But the Scriptures present to us a most remarkable, and, in 
fact, the only exception to this rule. They were not composed 
by a literary people, or at a brilliant intellectual era. The four 
Gospels, which are really the corner-stone to all the rest, were 
written by men of very ordinary education. They do not write 
correctly, much less elegantly. They all aim to give the biog- 
raphy of one man, and state very plainly and concisely, without 
any graces of diction or style, his deeds and words. That man 
had if any thing less human education than his biographers. 
He refers to no books except the old Jewish writings. He does 
not mention any of the classics. He was a carpenter, living in 
an out-of-the-way place in an illiterate province. He never 
traveled; he was far from the great centres of thought and 
learning. All his associates were as illiterate and humble as 
himself; and yet the sayings of this man, so imperfectly re- 
corded in four short narratives, by these illiterate biographers, 
raise him in mere intellectual power as far above Plato and 
Aristotle, Shakespeare and Bacon, — as far above the greatest 
human intellects, as Chimborazo or Mount Blanc are above 
ordinary hills. This illiterate carpenter dwarfs our giants. The 
writings of these fishermen put to shame the best culture of the 
ages. What marvel is this, — a book coming to us from the 
misty past of obscure traditions and fabulous tales ; composed 
by men knowing nothing of our intellectual life and of far infe- 
rior culture ; written originally in a language entirely different 



15 

from our own ; still marchiDg with uobeoded head by our 
Chancer, and Spencer, and Shakespeare, and Milton, by all the 
mighty intellects who are our glory and pride, to place itself 
npon the throne, the king of all our books ! Are not Abana 
and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the rivers of 
Israel? 

We find also, that all the other great lives which have swayed 
humanity bear a very clear impress of the times when they 
lived, and the people to whom they belonged ; but here is a life 
recorded which keeps pace with the centuries. Indeed the gen- 
erations of to-day, as those of all these by-gone ages, find him 
still in advance beckoning them forward. You cannot name 
another Hebrew prophet who does not exhibit clearly enough 
the Hebrew characteristics. You cannot point to a single 
noted man among any people, who does not manifest clearly 
enough his nationality. Zoroaster, Confucius, Mohammed, all 
these religious teachers embody strongly enough their national 
traits. Homer was profoundly Greek ; Cicero Roman and 
Shakespeare English. But how marvellously Jesus lifts himself 
above all the narrow, bigoted notions of his countrymen. They 
would confine salvation to the Israelites. He would give it to 
humanity. They struggled and prayed merely for their own 
national aggrandizement. He to make Jew and Grentile alike 
members of one heavenly kingdom. He rises superior to all 
diversities of race and nationality, so that humanity everywhere 
claims him as its own, and in Africa or Europe, in China or 
Hindostan, men find themselves complete in him. 

Now, I say, if such a man as this be but the natural product 
of Jewish culture long before the era of modern civilization 
began, then he falsifies all our intelligence and condemns all our 
systems of education. Then we may also expect to find in 
some remote province of the British Empire — say in Sierra 
Leone or New Zealand — an untutored savage, working out far 
from the influence of books and schools, and in the midst of a 
licentious, low-minded people, a system of ethics superior to any 
moral code the world has known, and exhibiting a philosophic 
insight and far reaching statesmanship greater than our pro- 
foundest thinkers and wisest law-givers have ever attained. 
Nothing becomes too absurd for our belief. History is without 
law, culture without method. 



16 

There is, my friends, no natural outgrowth of civilization in 
such a biography as this. It is opposed to all our laws of 
thought and progress. Neither can the growth of that system 
of religion which the Scriptures teach be satisfactorily ac- 
counted for by the operation of natural causes. It is a strange- 
record this beginning of the Christian church. What from a 
human stand-point more presumptuous, than the confident ex- 
pectations of that little band of fishermen to revolutionize the 
whole current of human thought ; to subdue all governments to 
the kingdom of Christ ; and to bring the world at last to ac- 
knowledge a man condemned and crucified as a criminal to be 
their only Lord and Saviour. Were that man not divine, such 
expectations would surely convict both him and his followers 
either of madness or the most consummate folly. And yet these 
expectations, as all know, history ever since has been .most 
rapidly verifying. These men, without money, without learning, 
without force of arms, with nothing but this Word of God in 
their hands and its spirit in their hearts, did actually revolu- 
tionize human thought ; did subdue the mightiest empires to the 
kingdom of Christ ; did found a chnrch, which has waxed strong 
with the centuries, and is daily extending the Christian faith 
among all peoples on the globe. This progress of Christianity 
is historic, and the most startling fact of history. 

Gibbon in his **■ Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire," 
with great subtlety has endeavored to account for the rapid dif- 
fusion of Christianity by the operations of natural causes, and 
among them lays greatest stress on the extraordinary zeal and 
enthusiasm of the early Christians. 

They were remarkably zealous and enthusiastic. Nothing 
daunted them. Nothing could tempt them to give up tlieir 
faith. They were stoned, they were sawn asunder, they wan- 
dered about in sheep skins, and goat skins, being destitute, 
afflicted, tormented ; but notwithstanding these hardships and 
dangers, their numbers continually increased, and they did not 
cease to teach and to preach concerning their crucified Lord. 
Now there must have been some adequate cause for such pro- 
tracted zeal and enthusiasm. It was irresistible, but could it 
long have been perpetuated had not men felt that it was based 
on divine power ? 



17 

OqIj one other iostance in history can be compared with it ; 
when the fiery Moslems, with sword in hand aud lust ia heart, 
swept like a toraado around the Mediterrauean coasts, and 
threatened all Europe with subjection ; but how natural the 
forces which fed their zeal, and how soon expended the fire 
which inspired their conquests. To-day Moslemism sits amid 
the ashes of her former hopes, waiting for the fiat of Christian 
nations to determine her doom. But Christianity has lost none 
of the flush of youthful vigor. There has been no diminution, 
but a constant increase in the faith of her followers. They 
have often indeed been infected by the contagions to which they 
have been constantly exposed. Wolves in sheep's clothing have 
crept into the fold, and made havoc in the flock. The old spirit 
of pagan intolerance and tyranny has sonietimes succeeded in 
usurping the posts of power in the Christian church ; but again 
aud again has that spirit been subdued by the thousands and 
tens of thousands who would march to stake and scaflbld sooner 
than deny their Lord. There has been a vitality, a recuperative 
power in Christianity, which has successfully withstood the vile 
diseases caught by intercourse with a sinful world. Never has 
it been more manifest than during the past fifty years. 

The simple story of the cross, as it is contained in the Scrip- 
tures, awakens in this day of light and intelligence a zeal and 
enthusiasm not surpassed in any age of the church. It still in- 
spires men of great learning and highest endowments to preach 
it ; still nerves them with a courage no danger can appall ; still 
arms them with an eloquence no learning can resist. Still they 
go forth from home and kindred to preach this word in those 
regions where ancient paganism has been most firmly estab- 
lished ; still, as ever, they are dying like good soldiers on the 
battle-field, rejoicing in having won more glorious victories for 
the cross of Christ. Faith dead ! Christian enthusiasm gone ! 
So men said patriotism was dead at the North, and that love for 
the Union had lost its power, and you well know how when the 
hour of actual trial came, armed hosts sprang up as it were by 
magic, shouting o'er our hiib and valleys,— 

•« We are coming Father Abraham, three hundred thousand more." 

Ah, did men but feel that the kingdom of Christ were in 
equal jeopardy, or that oar great Captain demanded a similar 



18 

service, there would rise to-day a shout like the voice of manj 
waters, belting the earth with its music, — " We are coming 
blessed Jesus, unnumbered millions more " ! What, in fact, bat 
this is the cry daily ascending in so many languages from these 
Christian hosts as they follow their leader Zion-ward. Faith in 
Christ, zeal and enthusiasm for Christ, these are still the strong- 
est, the most irresistible forces in humanity. They character- 
ize the best portion of the world. How then can you consis- 
tently explain the fact that so many men, whom we must admit 
are not credulous but enlightened, are still inspired by this Book 
with a faith for which they are willing to die ? Can it be ac- 
counted for except that it does not rest on the wisdom of man 
but on the power of God. 

And all the other causes which have operated in developing 
the church give just as clear evidences of the divine power of 
the Word on which it r^sts. We are very ready to admit, what 
modern rationalism so proudly claims, that it has helped make 
Christianity what it is to-day. We admit that the perfection of 
the Grecian language, the extension of the Roman empire, gave 
unusual facilities for disseminating the knowledge of Christ. 
Still later the incursions of the Northern barbarians into the 
Roman empire, and its subsequent disruption, gave remarkable 
opportunities for Christianizing those Celtic and Teutonic races, 
out of which the nations of modern Europe have for the most 
part sprung. In a similar way, we ourselves have seeu that 
Hiudostan, the isles of the sea, China and Japan, through the 
natural outworkings of their own history, just when the church 
was ready to send the truth, have been opened for its reception. 

Still further, we are ready to admit, that the church has been 
not only extended, but also reformed, by the same unconscious 
historic processes. The Arabs had little notion of benefitting 
Christianity when they introduced classic learning again to 
Europe. They were its most bitter antagonists, but it was that 
revival of learning, really inaugurated by Arab scholars, which 
occasioned the Reformation ; as Mr. Lerky, in his ^* History of 
Rationalism *' affirms* It was not however, as Mr. Lecky would 
seem to intimate, because a superior rationalism taught Chris- 
tianity better manners, but because that revival of learning gave 
men back the Scriptures which had so long been hidden from 



19 

them. Learniag did not reform the Scriptares ; it simply brought 
them oat of the dust in which they had been buried, and they 
reformed the world. Huss and Luther kuew little of Plato and 
Euripides ; but, thanks to those who did, they were able to 
know the Word of God, and forge from it the thunderbolts 
which hurled anti-Christ from his usurped throne. 

So, as the same writer affirms, the infidelity of the last 
century may have started doubts, which shook the faith of 
Europe to its centre, but the result was to bring men to a 
closer acquaintance with the Scriptures ; and in the age of the 
mo9t noted infidels the world has seen — Hume, Diderot, and 
Voltaire — there commenced such a revival of Christianity as had 
never before been known. Men gained broader and clearer 
conceptions of Christian truth ; love to God and love to man a 
completer sway over human hearts. 

Let these Rationalists beware how freely they admit having 
helped Christianity gain its present triumphs. They have 
helped Christianity, just as each new French army helped to 
swell the psean of German triumphs ; just as France helped 
supply the commissariat of German troops ; as her railways 
transported their munitions of war, as her guns augmented their 
artillery. 

After infidelity has again and again been driven from its 
strongholds by Christian truth ; its leaders vanquished on their 
own vantage ground ; their very names covered with the oppro- 
brium of a civilized world ; it is, to say the least, scarcely to 
the credit of these skeptics of the nineteenth century to cry out 
with vain-glorious boasting, — '•'• We have helped make Chris- 
tianity what it is to-day." Yes, they hav» helped advance the 
system which condemns their unbelief; which refutes their 
theories ; which will destroy their dominion. Do we need any 
stronger proof of their essential inferiority, any clearer evidence 
that there 

*' Standeth God within the shadow, keeping watch above his own." 

And what if Christianity has been reformed and transformed 
in its historical development by the efforts either of its friends 
or foes. It has never yet advanced beyond that Word on which 
it really rests. The Scriptures remain the same. No additions 



20 

have been made to them for eighteen centuries. To them we 
still look for direction in spiritual things, and to their authority 
the great body of Christians still bow as supreme. 

We have yet to discover a moral maxim the Bible does not 
contain, yet to grasp a religious truth which it does not already 
perfectly express. What other book in science, philosophy or 
ethics, has not been superseded in some respects by the progress 
of the system of which it was once the best exponent ? Yet 
this book in the childhood of the race boldly throws down the 
gauntlet at the feet of human reason, defying its attacks at any 
future period of its matured strength. 

We must remember that the Bible does not address itself 
exclusively to the heart, to those emotions which are the same 
in every age. It is not merely a great epic, in which humanity 
must ever find delight. It commits itself to prophecy, and to a 
system of religious truth. It clearly declares dogmas, which 
must forever challenge criticism. 

The centuries pass with their generations of sages and critics. 
The mind of man grows stronger in its grasp of truth, and 
keener in its analysis. Old systems are forced to give place to 
new ; but how triumphantly these old Jewish Scriptures over- 
throw all their antagonists, how calmly they abide, amid all the 
progress of human reforms, and the changes of human history. 
The world still moves on as they foretold ; men and nations still 
receive the rewards and punishments these Scriptures have 
declared. Over yon great city drenched with the blood of its 
slaughtered citizens, so pitiable amid the charred and battered 
ruins of its former greatness, there sound still those words, 
which have been alike the sentence and the epitaph of many 
godless governments ; — For the kingdom that will not serve Thee 
shall perish, yea those nations shall be utterly wasted. 
. Oh how vain seems any panegyric of this divine book by the 
side of these simple facts in its history, and the truths its pages 
contain ! How powerless are words to set forth its triumphs or 
heighten the charm of its statements concerning the ways of 
God with man ! The Book, which for so many generations has 
been the delight and solace of all classes and conditions of men, 
which has taught them how to live and has lifted from death its 
heaviest burden of grief and mystery, is too great to need either 



21 

our arguments or our eulogies. In its blessed work on the 
human heart there must ever be an unchanging and unanswer- 
able proof of its divine origin. While sin lasts, while human 
society lasts, men can never cease to need it. With unchanged 
confidence and enthusiasm, we bid, therefore, this honored 
Society ^' God speed," in its great work of supplying a world 
with the Book, so essential to human welfare and salvation. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 
PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

JuLV 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the 
Committee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for 
carrying into effect the object of this Association, which being 
read from the Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, 
and was, with one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows, 
▼iz: — 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments, to be distributed among all persons 
inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of 
the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied 
without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled 
clergymen of every denomination of Christians within the State, 
who shall, in writing, request to be members ; of every person 
who shall subscribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not 
less than two dollars, and who shall remain a member so long as 
he continues the payment of that sum ; and of every person, 
who shall subscribe and pay to the Treasurer a sum not less 
than fifty dollars, he remaining a member during life, without 
being obliged to further contributions. 



23 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the 
direction of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the 
organization of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers 
are obtained, notice shall be given by the Committee, and also 
of the time and place of the meeting of the Society. 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treas- 
urer, Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who 
shall continue in office until the Society be incorporated, and 
until successors are chosen in their room ; and they, together 
with eighteen other members to be elected by ballot at the same 
time, of whom six shall be clergymen and twelve shall be lay- 
men, shall form a Board of Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from 
among the members of the Society, a Committee of three 
persons, to continue in office during the pleasure of the Board of 
Trustees, who shall have the management of the fund, and the 
distribution of the books procured with it, subject and according 
to such regulations and directions, as shall from time to time be 
prescribed by the Trustees at any meeting held on public notice 
given as aforesaid ; and the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in 
his hands to the order of the said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes 
aforesaid, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into 
effect the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on 
regular notice given, for the due exercise of all the powers 
granted by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall 
again meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, 
or Recording Secretary, to devise and adopt such further meas- 
ures as may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for 
effecting the intentions of the members. 



24 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Consdtation^ the 
Trustees petitioned the General Court, and obtained the 
following 

ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

In the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act 
to Incorporate the Bible Society of Maasachutetts. 

WhertaSf the pertona hereafler named in this Act, together with 
many other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves 
into a Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contri- 
bution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, 
who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be con- 
veniently supplied without the aid of others ; and whereas, in order 
that the pious and laudable objects of said Society may be- better 
carried into effect, and the charity of said Society more extensively 
diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an Act of Incor- 
poration. 

Sec I. Be it therefore enacted h\f the Senate and House of Representa- 
ixveSy in General Court aaaembled, and by authority of the same, That 
William Phillips, Esquire, the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. 
Joseph Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet 
Porter, D. D., the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Bald- 
win, D. D., the Hon. William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. 
Isaac Parker, Hon. Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, 
Esq., Mr. Joseph Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph 
May, and Henry Hill, Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. 
Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. Samuel H. Walley, together with 
those, who have associated, and who may hereafter associate with them 
for the purposes aforesaid, be, and they hereby are incorporated into 
a Society, by the name of The Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Sec 2, Be it further enacted. That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legis- 
lature ; and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and 
the said Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any 
persons disposed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any 
grantsi or devises of lands and tenements in fee simple, or otherwise, 
and donations, bequests, and subscriptions of money, or other property, 
to be used and improved for the purposes aforesaid. 



26 

Skc. 3. Be iifwrthtr tnaded^ That the said Corporation shall be* 
and hereby are empowered to purchase and hold any real estate othe^ 
than that, which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the 
sum of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sec. 4. Bt itfurthtr tnactedy That the said Society may sue and be 
sued, in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents 
to prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

S£c. 5. Be it further enacted^ Tliat the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall see tit, and may make and ebtablish such 
roles and regulations, as to them shall appear necessary ; provided the 
same be not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Common- 
wealth. 

Skc 6. Be it further enacted, That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
he hereby is authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers 
printed in Boston, to appoiut the time and place of the first meeting 
of said Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the 
time and place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of 
notifying the same : may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe 
their duty, and may. vest in the Trustees, tlie number of which may 
be determined by the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, sucn 
powers, conformable to the principles of this institution, as shall be 
deemed necessary. — Jipproved by the Governor, February 15, 1810. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MA«8ACUJ8ETT8. 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-five. An Act in addition to an Act 
to incorporate the Bible Society of Massachusettt. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of JieprtsentativeB, in Generat 
Court a$sentbted, and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Sec. 1. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
Tb£ Bible Societt or Massachusetts, shall hereafter be known 
by the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that 
name shall have, hold and enjoy all its rights and privileges and be 
subject to all its liabiilties and obligations to the same extent as if its 
name had not been changed. 

Sec 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circu- 
late and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the Eng- 
lish language, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are 
now authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, any thing 
in the Act incorporating the said Society to the contrary notwith- 
standing. — Approved by the Governor, February 27, 18(i5. 



BY-LAWS. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 1861^ 
the following By-Laws were adopted : — 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act 
of Incorporation, namely, '* the raising a fund by voluntary con- 
tribution to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments 
of the version in common use in the churches of New England, 
for distribution among all persons inhabiting within the State 
and elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and 
who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of 
Christians in the State, may become a member of this Society 
by signifying his request in writing to that eflfect, to the Record- 
ing Secretary — who shall keep a record of all persons who shall 
80 become members, in a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually, shall thereby become a member of the Society, 
so long as such payment is continued, — and the Treasurer shall 
keep a list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IT. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than 
twenty dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of 
the Society for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording 
Secretary. 



27 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen 
Vice Presidents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, and eighteen Trustees and an Auditor. The 
President, Vice Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secre- 
taries and Treasurer, shall each be ex-officio members of the 
Board of Trustees, and the Recording Secretary shall be the 
recording officer of that Board. These officers shall all be 
chosen by ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees ; and he, and also the Vice Presidents and Secretaries 
and Treasurer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on 
such officers respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns 
of the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act 
of Incorporation is vested in the Society, and they shall prescribe 
the duties of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation 
of all funds and donations, and generally have and possess all 
the power and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the So- 
ciety. It shall be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, 
to make and lay before the Society a particular Report of all 
their doings, with all such documents and vouchers as may be 
asked for by any member, and such Report shall be had and 
considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice of 
Trustees, for the year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the 
Monday preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year, and 
at this meeting it shall be competent to transact any business 
which the Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting 
shall be given by the Recording Secretary at least seven days 
before the holding thereof, by notice published in at least one 
newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE iz. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by 
the Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three 



28 

newspapers published in Boston, and no business shall be trans- 
acted at such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the 
notice. 

ARTICLE z. 

The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in 
March and September, in each year, and such other special 
meetings as they may direct, or as the President may at any 
time call. Five Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting afler their election, annu- 
ally, shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, 
a Committee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE ZII. 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them ; the Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of 
all matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the ap- 
pointment of all agents, subject to the approval of the Trustees, 
and the defining of their respective duties ; the Committee on 
the Depository shall have the management of all matters con- 
nected with the Society's Depository for the sale of Bibles, — all 
of said Committees, at all times however, to be subject to the 
direction and control of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual 
meeting, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, 
by vote of a majority of those present 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE MEMBERS. 

Each Life Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles 
and Testaments. 

N. B. — The above books will be delivered to members by 
personal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued 
only for the current, not for past years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE. 



BT THE PATMBKT OP TWBNTT DOLLABt AXD UFWABDB. 



Abbe, B«T. Frederick R^ BtHon. 

Abbe, Mrs. Prwkf iek R. ^ 

Abbot, CbarlM H., UwM. 

Abbott, K«T. Jftoob J., rmrmnUk^JHe. 

AbofB, Jobn O., IToft^/bU. 

AdaoM, Blixabotb W., Dcrry, Jf, H, 

AdaoM, Frank N., MHwof, 

Adomi, Joho Clork, HofkinUn. 

^hdikWMy Jobn Qniney, Qmncf . 

Ailamt, Nehomiab, D. D., Bultm, 

AiUae, Btophon, Wut M§dwf, 

*Albno, Jobn, Btiam. 

«Albro, Jobn A., 0. IX, C^mkriif, 

Albro, Mn. Elisabetb 8., WaUkam. 

Albro, Miw Annio B. •* 

AldoD, Almira & C, Foxhm^*, 

AMea, Eboooier, Randal fk, 

•AldM, Mn. Ann fC, JZomM^A. 

Alden, Rawoll, OnR^t^tf. 

Aldra, MiM Sarab B., fUni9lfk, 

AUm, MiM Sosao, *< 

Aldrieb, Mrs. Mary B., Wuthtre. 

AIIm, Mra. Cyms, FratMin, 

AlloQ, Rot. Natbaoiel O., Botten, 

Alloo, Rkbard H., BrmintrM. 

Amos, Jamoo 8 , HmvrkilL 

Andrewt, Artemas F., JtMkbf, 

Andrew*, C. L*., BtUn. 

Andrew*, Qoorge W., Danven, 

Andrewt, Btepben, OUmcuUf, 

Andrewt, W. T., BmUm, 

Andrewt, Tbomat E., HoUUtou, 

Andrewt, Waltei H., WkUinavitU, 

Mppltton, Ekmael, J9e«teii. 

•Appletoo, William, ** 

Arehibiild, Edward, JtfttAnt*. 

Armee, Mite flara A, Ckaipetfe. 

Armtby, Mre. H. A., WhittntvilU, 

Arnold, Sotan O., Brmintrte, 

Atwood, Mra. Abby, Bergen^ JV. J, 

Atwuod, Mrt. Elisabeth IH., ** 

Atwood, Edward 8., Bo$ton, 

Atwood, Jobn W., Btrgent JV. J, 

Babooek, Mrt. Nancy, J^Mten. 

Babeoeli, Rev. William R., Jmwtmkm PUin. 

Babtoo, Mian Maria R^ OUmcuUr, 



Baebelor, Mrt. Mary A., IFMttefvifft. 

Bacon, Goorfo W., A*«ietoii. 

Bacon, Jacob, OUmiLeaUr, 

Bacon, Rev. Jamee M., jff«A6f . 

Bacon, Joeepb N., Aineten. 

Backoa, Rev. Joeepb W., 7**e«Mtfeii, Ct 

Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., DmdUtUr. 

Baker, Francis, PsaAedf. 

Baker, Susan &, ** 

Balmer, William, Jr., vrkUinniiU. 

Baldwin, Miss Joeepbioe L., Lgtm. 

Ball, Miss Elixabetb, CWnMrd. 

Bancroft, Amasa, Oardner. 

Bancroft, Henry L., JiiUbmrf, 

* Barber, Martin, SAer^em. 

Barber, Sally C, '« 

Barbour, Rev. William M., Bangor, M§, 

Barbour, Mrs. Elisa A. •« 

*Bardwell, Lieut. Charlee 8., Wkttftf. ' 

Barker, Hiram, BrigkUn. 

Bardsley, Joeepb, fTkitinnOe. 

Barnard, WiUiam P., JVnrlNr*.* 

Barnes, H. H , LowtU, 

*Bames, William, Jitriboro\ 

Barnes, Zilpab, £fsnaiA«r, JV. K 

Barrett, Natban H., CewcsrA 

Barrett, Mite Rebecca M. •* 

Bartlett, Rev. Edward O., Prendmes, M. I 

Barilett, Mrs. Eleanor C., PlfsieiUA. 

Bartlett, Tbomas, Betteii. 

Bassett, Henry, JNTsttlen. 

Bassett, Mrs. Locretia C, CkarismenC 

Bassett, Ssrah E., Alritfrarypoff. 

Batcliellsr, Ears, Abrtt ihvel^sld. 

Batcheller, Mrs. Lutbera C, *• 

Baicbelor, MiM Frances A., WUUugvOU. 

Ratehelder, John M., HoUitton. 

Baubolor, Stephen F., fFkUimniiU, 

Batt. Rev. William J., Leomiiuitr. 

Batt, Mrt. Mary D. *« 

*Bayley, Robert, J>fkwhujf§rt, 

Beal, Alexander, Batton. 

Real, Mrt. Luuiaa, C^kmaMl. 

B^ala, Isaae N., C€mp4Ua. 

Bean, Cyrus Boede, Dover, JV. H, 

•Beaoe, Rot. Baaoel, AbrfM. 



Bhim, HiHOIInB., CinttniEi. 

BHiH.lgingiM.. B-Um. 

B»Im, Frueti I. " 

B«bs, Bdwud P. 
RhU, Esltf B. " 

BhIm, Huf L. « 



Bglluiap, Utai MKrllii H , »-r(aii>(l». 

Bhihm, frailciick A., JOvIc 
BiicH, Mn. Aiihui G., H'nUnn'. 
BIhh, B». TIwidm C, {7i6r.4ji. 
Billin«>,CI»<1«E JV^Hfn. 
BlnikUHIs.Mii. L;<)i> &., dkufff.JV. K 
Btaieliud, HlxTrancu C, ()rM». 
HIIh, ■•t. CkicUi K., WiktUU. 
Blin, HutCktrlHR. 
Bkdiatl, Btnjaoiin C, AVwIn. 



Bonn, Lak* K., Bufam. 
Band, Hn. Can H. " 
Braektt, Ro.Jiniih, CJUrfufMii. 

•Bncliiiii,Jam«, Quuj. 

finniloiiliaifiUliioC. IV af>aiMH»,C«t. 

•BiMd, Hi'. Wllliiai J , JtapOaa. 
Bnwar, C;rB>, O.nlt.iir. 
Bhwif, Hn. U. P., Bum. 
Bnvai, Jokd K. " 

Bi<ai»li. Pni.l.I>n, MiMrUfl. 
Bilfp, MiH ValbviM CKrIi, (Tntam. 
Biipa, B>*. Wlllluq T., Cwt ilfliflu. 
Briu>. Mra. Abb; L., " 

Bllthnni, M>a. IklUiP., IFofklrv'. 

aBnHi.fi.Jri, EJtu'bMli, Aaani. 
•BriHka, P*l*> C, 

Bnwii,lln.H(iri*tL. " 
Bnwn, BiAaew, fPUu 

BmB.Jaapk, Oti(«. 



BurhHk, Samoa] K., SMf«. 
Huinhnm. I(nberi W., Ef«. 



Buinfa, J. C, Bhwii. 
Burnjg, Jaa>|>l>, JlrtUHlfom. 
Bofafa. Hmtj <J. " 

Buiriir, Amoa U., VihrUgt. 
Bnirill, Hboi;. Jf., £u( .1k>f 
Bnk, Hanrr J., WmOWA 
Boahbr, Bopkia W., Ptthtif. 
Sullfli, ftir. Itennl. Aaxin. 



CaUw 


L,K.».M 


.EL,ffr«.i« 


Camp. 


G«r|., S 


•ukHmu^na^ 


C-p, 


aba. 




Cp-a 


»l.,.Chii 




CiTin. 


,J..l.nW 


Dliriit*. 


Cap™ 




W. " 


CpiOD 


Wrirtao 


C. » 




«,0»,i. 








<]»C.,fi«t«. 


i;i.p« 


Uf.Olba 


iJH B., mktt^. 



Ktij, Oeori* C, A". BrUf«a0«r. 
Cair, Mn. Huj »., Pnt^ff. 
Caa, Hn. Huy OIL.d, A>« iork CUf. 
Cunll, LanaalE., fr*.« AVufoii. 



UhanillM, H. H., CI 
Chapin.CiMT.J 
Chapin.JakaO, WitJlinnilff, 
Chapiii,J«.lmhl.,j;..».u>. 
CKap»,M.<d».^,««,. 
Ck.p«.MiJ.,-Ving/*(A 
Uhipin, MiiiSanh, rCjkiiiui 
t'hapman. GwrfBU., f*'na4«i 
ChkM, Abb UaiU, BtwtiMtt. 
Cbaia, Chula* W., •• 



31 



I, ««. 



CImnf, In, Cuitia. 
Ckild, JIlH Aant G., Bfri*tP'^ 
CklM, G«>rt> H., V>*«<*U, O. 
ChiU, MIh Liier, Tkuf^, ^t- 
OUUl, C*lkM, Anmlir, A*. A 



d, U. D., &t«. 



Ckp. Mil. Ri^lwcri, 



Clwk, £lbiiil|e, Ru 
Chrk, <;«.!,., £*.! 
Clirk,Juna.,^i 
Cbrii.Jabi L., 
Clark, Jauthu, Wi 
Cliik. Bn. JoHph I 
Ckr(i,Jallu>L^Hi 
■Cktt, K«. 1. P., WkMrnOU. 
Chrk, Hn. Miiin.li [>., Bul.n. 
Cklk,MiHNtllj.^tr^it. 
Cluk,Olif*iR., if.Ktuur. 
Cluk, Bit. F. K., C»arInw>K. 
Clut, BavH R., »kitunUlt. 
Clwt, Ratal W., D. S. -fltaiiy, JV. r. 
Chrtt, Hn. Atlnliu H., Jli^Bair. 
Cliika, III', burui, D. &., «<»«««. 
Cluk*, rnocll, HtrtrtilL 
Cluk*, 0*»t|ii E., JaiuuM PlOin. 
Cbik*, Hi< Sinli U, flHM. 
CUt, J*Ih. CDaHsy. 



Cllflt.'d, WydiB., Cttfln. 
Claufli. Jado K.. Ctmtridft. 
Cobb, AudKIr B., MeOl 



1.-L.UM11., IKul.t. F., A-iKi™ CtMn. 
L'lwaiiif , Jtubsn, Wimtkuur. 
Cr.n., M,..B.,^F.,Mal«. 
Cwwfur.l, E[|«a A.. B.rrt, 
OcinaiMltll, Hill Rob* 



Crii<b.iiHki, HiH Uuf, CMfM. 

Craik>bink>,liiur|i,A ktUnrnllt. 
C<»n>n(>, Ch*<l», Htmrd. 



Dun, Un. Edvinl H., J>.aitk, 

Dui, CbiflH B^ Brttttma. 

DiM.Jvha, " 

Diiii, J.4II H. » 

Dinnll, Hii. Elin B., KtttMHwtf. 

DmMli, m.J .b B^ EM jIMv^ 
Daaiili, Mra. Hulu W. « 



32 



Daniala, Mn. William, JIMwa^ 

Davii, Alfred N., M WUmingtou, 

DftTit, AWah tL, HmvtrkUL 

Davin, Hanrj L., Br*4fo^ 

Davii, George L., JVbrf A Anio9«r, 

Davif, Janee, Bottom, 

Davia, John, Motknom, 

Davit, Joho, So motvU U, 

Davit, Jothua H. •« 

Davit, Lydia K., l>iiii«(aMe. 

Davit, Mrt. H. A., Jiedmoff. 

Davit, Mitt Marj H., Concord, 

Davit, Rev. Perley B., Hfdt Pork, 

Davit, Ttiaddeut Uriah, DaiutaMe. 

Davitoo, George W., WkUiMnUU, 

Dawei, Rev. Eibeoeaer, Digkten, 

Daj, Robert L., JfotoUn, 

Dean, Mitt Abbie T., Fozhoro\ 

Denham, Rev. George, Beoerlf, 

Deoham, Mrt. Clara D. «* 

Dlekermao, Rev. Lytaader, fFojfmomUL 

Dieluon, Oliver, SomorvUU, 

DiekaoD, Mrt. Sarah C. " 

Dix, Mn. Elijah, Booton. 

Dix, Samuel F., ^Tetototu 

Doane, Heman S., CkmHottown, 

Dodd, Rev. Stephen O., MiddUbonP 

Dodge, Rev. John, ITorik BrookJUUL 

Dodge, Mrt. Ann 8., " 

Dodge, Mn. J. M. C, jfiideetr. 

Doggett, Rev. Thoe., JVIie/cre Fa/<«, If, T, 

Doggett, Mn. Prancet L. " 

Doggeit, Willikro, <* 

*Dorr, John, Booton, 

Dorr, Samuel, ** 

•Dow,Ju«iah, " 

Dowae, Mrt. Carrie D., Skerintm, 

•Dowte, Edward, Dodham, 

•Dowte, Elisabeth R. L., Skorhom, 

Drake, Rev. Ellia R., Ha^'and, 

Dudley, P. W., WkUinoviUo. 

Dudley, Mrt. Sarah A. •* 

Dunham, Charlea H., WinekuUr, 

Dunham, Mn. Mary L., ** 

Donlap, Sumner, Samtk DurJUUL 

Donton, Hiram P., Sytneor, 

Dunn, Edward H., Booton, 

Durfee, Rev. Chat. Stoddard, Jinswhuryfort, 

Durgin, Jamet, fVtot J^owkurf, 

•Dutch, M. Elisabeth, Booton, 

Doiion, Mn. Mary J., ** 

Dwinell, Leonard, MUUmry, 

Dyer, Rev. E. Porter, S/kreitttery, 

Dyer, Mrt. Maria D., OUmetotor, 

Eager, William, Booton. 

Eamea, Mn Nancy, Skorbonu 

Bamet, Warren, WUmingiom. 

Battborn, Rl. Rev. Mantoo, D. D., JBetteii. 



Battraan, Rev. Laeiat R., Jr^, Framingkmm 

Eaton, Mra. Ann B., W»k^/Uld, 

Eaton, Eben» J^Vaaim/iUai. 

Eaton, Edward, Modwjf, 

Eaton, Mitt Martha W., FiUkkurg, 

Eaton, William, BoHom, 

Eaton, William J., fVootkm^, 

Eddy, Joehua, £c«t MtddUhoro\ 

Edwardt, Mn. Prancet 8., Dodkmm. 

Edwardt, Prederick B., Jf, Ckoltmtford. 

Edwardt, Maria P. <* 

Edwardt, Nathan B. •« 

Edwardt, Nathan F. •* 

Edwardt, Sibyl R. « 

Edwardt, Victor E. ** 

Eldied, Lorenso, Falmouth. 

*Eliot, Samuel, Boston, 

•Eliot, Samuel A. ** 

Elliott, Robert, Oloho FiUmf, 

Ellit, WilUrd K., £. Jtftrfwey. 

ElU, Mrt. Elisabeth W., Okorlin, O. 

Elltwoith, Rev. Alfred A., fVefmoutk. 

Elltwortb, Mite Aogeline Grimk* Weld 

Cook, ffeyMoa/A. 
•Elwell, Robert, Boston* 
Emertoo, Mitt Ellen T., Concord, 
Emenon, Jacob, Jr., Motkuon 
Emenon, Mrt. Jacob, ** 
Emertoo, R. V. C, JWietea. 
Emerton, William, Wostkor^, 
Emery, Georgn P. •* 

Emery, Mrt. Harriet, AWU Wopntmtk. 
Ein«ry, Rev. Jothua, ** 

Emery, Mrt. Mary, Ckatknm, 
Emery, Mrt. Sarah Hk.^ Jfowburfport, 
•Everett, Edward, Boston. 
Fairbankt, Henchel, HaoerhilL 
PHirbankt, Hertcbftl P. *< 
•Fairbankt, Stephen, Boston, 
Fairbankt, Timotby R., Jiedtoof, 
•Farnt worth, Mn. Abel, Chotsn, 
Parnt worth, Esra, Booton, 
Farr, Alba A., JVtcAata. 
Farwell, Stephen T., Cnmkridgc 
Faxon, Mitt Rachel A., Brnniroo, 
Fay, Mra. Additon G., Concord. 
Pay, Churloi H., Wkttinsmlto, 
Pay, Cytut, Wostkoro\ 
Fay, Juaiah C, Hapkinton, 
Pay, S. T., fVostkoro' 
Payerweather, Mrt. 8. W., Wostiort^, 
Fearing, Albert, Boston, 
Fearing, Mn. Albert, ** 
Felch, Itaac, JVetic/k. 
Field, John W., Boston, 
Field, Mrt. Amelia C, " 
Field, Joel, Jiittineaqmt, 
Fitber, Mite Elisa, JHodmmg, 



33 



«( 



(* 



(C 



(« 



u 



(C 



Fisher, Mn. Lewif, Eeut Meiva^. 

PMhar, Milton M., Ji§dwf FUlag; 

Fiaher, Samuel T., Ctmttm, 

Fbke, Daniel T., D. D , J^Tnohtrfj^orU 

Fiake, George B. HoUiaton. 

Flake, George T., Jifkwburypart, 

Fiake, Mary Fidelia, ** 

Fiteb, John A., HopidmUn. 

•Fits, Daniel, D. D., Jp§wUk. 

Fits, Mra. Hannah B. D. *• 

Fits, Daniel, Jr. " 

FiU, Daniel P. «* 

FUndert, Joseph, HavtrkilL 

Fletcher, Rphraim 8., /TAtttiUTtKa. 

Fletcher, Mra Emma A. 

Fletcher, Mra. Emily M. 

Fletcher, J a met, 

Fletcher, Mri. L. C. 

Fletcher, l^wia C. 

Fletcher, Samuel J. 

Fletcher, Mra. Hannah C, Mamckuter, 

Fletcher, laaae W., Slow. 

Fletcher, Nancjr B. ** 

Fletcher, Rev. Jamea, Oroton. 

Fletcher, Mra. Lydia M. ** 

Fletcher, Stillman, fyinekutar, 

Fletcher, William, ** 

Flinn, Mra. Paulina, ** 

Flint, Mrs. Hannah, Peabud^. 

Flint, Levi M., Stonghton. 

Flint, Thomaa, Botton, 

Floyd, Miaa Mary J., P—hodf, 

Folger, Allen, Concord, JV. H. 

Forbuih, William, fVkitinsvUle. 

Ford, Rev. George, Fersailiest JV. F. 

*Ford, I'homaa A., Bottom, 

Ford, Thomaa A., AortA Bridgewater. 

Ford, Mra Eliza C. *' 

Foadick, Chnrlea, Oroton. 

Fofldick, Frederick, ** 

•Foadick, Roae, ** 

•Foadick, Samuel W. ** 

Foadick, Mha Mary, *« 

•Potter, Rev. Aaron, £. CAcr/ammiC. 

Potter, Rev. Additon P., Maiden. 

Potter, Mrt. Hattie D., ** 

Foater, Miaa Elisa C, Rowley. 

Potter, Mra. Harriet l>., H'inekendon, 

Foater, Mra. Mary, Palmor. 

•Franeit, Ebeneier, Boston. 

French, Mra. Harriet S., Taunto$i, 

Prothingham, A. T., Cambridgt, 

Pullertnn, Rev. Bradford M., Palmer, 

Purber, Rev. Daniel L., Newton Centre, 

Furber, Mra. Maria B., •« 

Gage, Gawin R., Wolmm. 

Gale, Rev. Wakefield, Eattkampton, 

•Gale, Mra. Wakefield, <« 



Gale, Juttin Edwardt, Eastkawpton. 

Gallot, Nathan, QrHon, 

Galloup, David R., Poabodjf. 

Gammell, Rev. Sereno D., Bor/ord. 

Gardner, Willie P., Gardner, 

Garrette, Rev. Edmund Y., Pi'ttknrg^ Pa. 

Garrette, Mra. Pranxenia W. ** 

Garrette, Flora Gertrude, ** 

Garrette, Mary Spring, ** 

Garrette, Sarah Arabella, Fozboro\ 

Galea, Henry C, CkUopee. 

GilM>n,Mrt. Luther, Oroton. 

Gibba, George L., WkitinniOo, 

•Gibba, Mra. Mary, Booton. 

Gilbert, Benjamin R. ** 

Gilet, Mra. Elisabeth W., Roekfort. 

Gilman, Miaa Rebecca I., Booton. 

Gleaaon, Charlea A., AVv Braintree. 

Gleaaon, Rev. George L., Mnnekttter, 

Goodell, H. Auguatua, fFkilinovilU. 

Gordon, Solomon J., Booton, 

Gordon, Mra. Rebecca, ** 

Gordon, Jeannie, ** 

Gott, J. R., RoekporU 

Gough, John B., Boj^ton, 

Gough, Mra. Mary G. ** 

Gourgaa, Mita Abby M., Concord, 

Gourgaa, Miaa Margaret U. <* 

Gould, Mrt. S. W., tVeotboro*. 

•Grant, Moaea, Boston. 

Graaaie, Rev. Thomaa O., Metknen. 

•Gray, Prancia C, Boston, 

•Gray, Henry, 

Gray, Horace, 

Gray, John C. 

Gray, William, East Randolpk. 

Gieeley, Rev. Edward H., HaterkiU, ^r.H. 

Greeley, Mra. Edward H. ** 

Green, Rev. J. 8. C, Brookline, 

Greene, Rev. Richard G., Spr\ngjteld. 

Greenwood, Chailea H., Oardner, 

Greenwood, Mrt. Sally K., SAarftem. 

Gregory, Rev. Lewia, H^est jf aieaftary. 

•Grew, John, Boston. 

Grigga, Dr. 8amuel, Wsstboro*, 

Griggt, Mra. S. M. •* 

Grover, Mra. Caroline, Foxboro*, 

Gulliver, Lemuel, CkarltslU)wn, 

Hndley, Samuel D., SomsrviUs, 

Hale, E. J. M., HovsrkiU, 

Hale, Mra. E. J. M. " 

Hall, Mrt. Joeeph P., Oroton. 

Ham, Mra. Catharine K., fVinckestsr, 

H«miIton, Rev. B. P., JVbrCA Jindover, 

Hamlen, Rev. George M., Taunton. 

*Hammatt, Mra. Mary, Boston. 

Hammond, Rev. W. B., Lsnox, JV. T, 

Hammood, Bin. Louise M. 






CC 



34 



Hard wick, Thonafl, QHiiuy. 

Hardj, Trumfto, JWiB6«ry, O, 

Harringtoo, Rev. Eli Whitney, A: B^vtrif. 

Hartiborn, Edward, Berlin, 

Hartwell, Lottie £., GrtUn. 

HaakaU, William P., JVbrtk Brool^ld, 

Haatingf, Alice, JVaieCewvtIla. 

Haatiofi, HoUia, Prmminghmm, 

*Hatcb, Benjamin, £mI Faimamtk. 

Hateh, Anna 8., Brui/ord, 

HaTen, George, CamptlU, 

Haven, Hev John, Chariton. 

Hawea, Mri. A. L., QrmfUm. 

Hawea, Cjnlhia, §Fr$ntkawu 

Hawea, Julia, ** 

Hajrei, Rev. Stephen H., Botton. 

Hajward, MiM Clara, Bramtree. 

Hay ward. Eliai, ** 

Hajward, MIm Hatlie L., fVkiiinnUle, 

Hayward, John, fTkiHnMviUe, 

Hayward, Paul, A$kh^. 

Haywood, Mr*. Elisabeth C, Franklin. 

Hasel, Mra. Sarah L., QUmcttttr, 

Haslewood, Mrs. A. M., Maj/nard, 

Headley, Rev. P. C, Botton. 

Healy, Rev. Joeeph W., JV. Orlean§, 

*Heard, John, launch, 

Hemenway, Mlta Harriet, Orvton, 

Heoahaw, Praocia, Boater 

Henahaw, Mra. Sarah W., « 

Herrick, Rev. William D., JV. AmUrtt 

Heraey, Jacob, Fozbaro', 

Heraey, Mra. Polly, Hingkam, 

Hewinf, Mra. Annette P., Foz6oro*. 

•Uewint, Levi R. ** 

Hewina, Miaf Louiaa E., » 

Hewitt, Joeeph, J^ortk Bridgtwat0r. 

Haywood, Martha W., Oeurdner, 

^Higgiofoo, Stephen, Jr., Btton, 

Hildreth, Mn. Mary R., QroUn, 

Hill, Rev. George E., SotUkporty CL 

*HiU, Henry, BotUu. 

Hill, Jotham, Wobum. 

Hill, Philip E., Bridgtwttr. 

Hilton, Henrietta M., Medwajf, 

Hilton, Rev. John V., Kalamaioo, Jiiek. 

Hilton, William, Bradford. 

Hitchcock, George M., BrimJLM, 

Hobart, Peter, Boston. 

Hobton, MiM Pritcilla, HawJey. 

Holbrook, Elliha, EmH Rmndolpk. 

Holbrook, Everett, ** 

Holdeo, Mra. Sarah, Orafton, 

Holland, Miaa Sarah E., BooUn. 

Holm, Jacob P., Jialdon. 

•Holmes, Abiel, D. D., Camkridgt. 

Holmea, Miaa Elizabeth A., Bdvidtro, itt, 

*Uolmea, Mra. Fanny D., AVKen. 



Helmet, George W., Bridgewtter, 

Holmea, Miaf Wealthy A., Camftllo, 

Holt, Jamea A., Amdootr, 

Holton, Thomaa S., WtnckuUr. 

Homer, Charlea W., Cnmhridgt. 

Hooker, George B., Shtrbom, 

Hooker, Mra. Martha V., Bogton, 

♦Hooper, Robert, ** 

Hoppio, Rev. Jamea M., A*«» Ha^tn, Ct, 

Hotmer, Miu Elixa, Concord, 

Houghton, Cephaa, Harvard, 

Hovey, George O., Botton, 

How, Frederick, Dmnnoro, 

*How, Jamea, Botton. 

Howard, Gary, JWrCA BridgowoUr, 

Howard, David, *< 

Howard, Mn. Franeea H., ** 

Howard, Mra. Matilda P. *« 

Howard, Rev. Martin S., WVbraham. 

*Howe, John, Jf&rtk Bridgewmtor. 

Howe, Martha L., Gardner, 

Howe, Samuel A., fFotlboro*. 

Howea, Mra. Caroline H., CkarlowunL 

Howea, Collint, Ckotkawu 

Hoyt, Henry, Botton. 

Hoyt, Mra. Maria, ^aaitiif Aaai. 

Hoyt, Wm. H., Botton. 

Hubbard, Mra. Charlea A., (Uncord. 

Hudaon, Samuel, Uxkridgo, 

Hulbert, Charles, Botton. 

Humphrey, Daniel, M)ortk f9^tjfmtntk. 

Hunt, Mn. Jernsha B., Wkitintmilt. 

Huntington, Matilda C, Pembod^, 

Hurd, Prancit P., M. D., Wmkejiad. 

Hutehinf, Caroline M., Wtatford, 

Hotchins, William E., LowU. 

Hutehioa, Maria J. «* 

*Hy«lop, David, Bottom. 

Jackman, Mn. Suian M., Jiodioa§, 

Jackaon, Miaa Caroline B., Newton. 

Jaekaon, Henry W., Botton. 

Jackaon, Laura E. L., ** 

*Jackaon, Jamet, ** 

•Jaekaon, Patrick T. ** 

Jamefon, Rev.Ephraim O., Salitburf. 

JeflViea, Miit Catharine Amory, Botton, 

Jenkina, Mra. Maria L., JVew Bedford. 

Jephaon, Min C. R., Brooklint. 

Jewett, Henry, PepperoU. 

Johnson, Cbarlei G., Bradford. 

Johnioo, Mra. Emma B. ** 

Johnaon, Franc if, fVincketter, 

JohnMu, Peter R., HoUitton. 

Johnson, Misa Rebecea, MWlk Andoner. 

Johnaon, Mra. S. W., Fnrmington^ JV. H. 

Jooef, Auguitoa T., Ifoiik BridgewUt, 

Jonei, Henry B., Hollitton, 

Joalin, Mra. A. L, Oxford. 



y 



35 



Joy, Mrs. Abigail, BtU%. 
Jadaoo, Mrs. Mary C, Uzkni^, 
JodMMi, Willard, » 

lUith, Adalbert F., C^mpBlU. 

Kaith, Albert, *< 

Kaith, Arsa B. <* 

•Keith, Charlaf, JfoHk Bridgivater, 

Kaith Edward Everett, Bri4g§wmt§r, 

Kaith, Pratton B., C^wifttto, 

Kaith, Ziba C. ** 

Kelly, George Baed, Haverhitt. 

Keitoo, George, Oardaor. 

Kanptoo, Mrs. Ellen, Or^fUn, 

Kendall, Mrs. Abel M., BptUn. 

Kendall, Mrs. Mary E., fVbukuUr, 

•Kendall, William, fFkUifuvUlt. 

Kandriek, John, Hmv9rkUl, 

Keodrick, Min Lydia P., ClUAhawu 

Kerr, Robert W., Fnbon*. 

Kerr, Jane K. ** 

Ketielle, Jacob Q., Bsstaa. 

Kilbon, George B., Sfirmgjield, 

Kimball, Benjamin, Sd, HuvtrkOl, 

Kimball, Rer. Caleb, M§dwy, 

Kimball, Charles, Ipneiek, 

Kimball, Daniel W., mncktUr 

Kimball, David, Bra^vrd. 

Kimball, Wallace L. ** 

Kimball, Mri. Harriet W., LowM. 

Kimball, Mri. Mary B., Falmouth. 

Kimball, John R., fVobum, 

Kimball, Mrs. Sylvia, W§9tkonf, 

Kingman, Miss Elisa, BotUn. 

•Kingman, Miss 8arah, ** 

Kingsbury, Nathaniel, 

Kingsbory, John, Bradford. 

Kingsbury, Rev. John D. ^ 

Kingibury, Katy, " 

Kingsbury, Martha, ** 

Kiitredge, Rev. A. E., Ckieago. 

Kitirodge, C. Brigham, Westboro*, 

•Knuwlei, Rev. Jamei D., Boalcn. 

Knowlton, Rev. Stephen, West Medtoay, 

Knox, Mrs. S., Roek Island^ IlL 

Labaree, Rev. John C, Randolpk, 

Lambert, Miu Elizabeth U., RovUf, 

Lambert, Thomas R., D. D., CAaWestoism. 

Lambert, William T., ** 

Lamion, Eriwin, Boston, 

Lamson, Mrs. Edwin, ** 

Lomion, Gardner Swift, ** 

Lamson, Helen, " 

Lamaon, Kate Glidden, ** 

•Lane, Anthony, Lancostsr. 

Lane, Rev. James P., Bristol, 

Lane, Mrs. Emma L. ** 

Lane, Rev. John W., Wkaldf. 



Lano, Mrs. Mary H. Wkate^f, 

Lane, Mary E. ^ 

Lane, Richmond J., JEasC JlUngton. 

Langworthy, Rev. laaae P., CIslwa. 

Laiell, Joaiah, fVkUinsviUe, 

Lassell, Mrs. Jennie W. " 

Lathe, Miss Sarah S., Orafiem. 

Laurie, Inglis, OwatMiiia, Jtfiaassota. 

•Lawrenee, Amoa, Boston, 

Lawrence, Rev. Amoa £., HousaUmie. 

Lawrence, Asa, Oroton* 

•Lawrenee, Mrs. M. A. ** 

Lawrence, John, ** 

Lawrence, Curtia, Bradford, 

Lawrence, Mrs. Curtis, " 

•Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy T., WUion^M; 

Lawtoo. Mrs. S. C, Wkitinsfoitte, 

Laynd, John, ** 

Leach, Simeon, East Slamgkt&n. 

Learoyd, Addison P., Daavers. 

Learoyd, John S. '* 

Leavitt, Abner L., Hingknm, 

Leavitt, Mrs. Elisabeth G., Boston, 

Leivitt, Rev. George R., Oimbridgeport, 

Lee, Rev. Samuel H., Oresnjlold. 

•Leeds, Benjamin, BrookUno, 

Leeds, Benjamin, Boston. 

Loeda, Mrs. Anne B. ** 

Leeda, Miss Anne G. " 

Leea, Mra. Samuel, Abrf A Billerica. 

Lefavour, laaacbar, Btvorlf. 

Leland, Calvin, Jr., M'mtiek. 

Leiand, Mrs. Charlotte A., Skorkom. 

Leland, Mra. Lois, ** 

Leonard, Elisa, Foxhoro*. 

Leonard, Jaroea M., Bridgewator. 

Lowia, Reuben, Qroton. 

Lewia, Mrs. Suaan P., ** 

Lincoln, Rev. Calvin, Hingkam. 

Lincoln, P. W., Jr., Boston. 

Lincoln, Jamea L. C, Smidsrlmnd. " 

Lincoln, Noah, Boston, 

Little, Alexander E, Welleslejf. 

•Little, Rev. ElbridgeO. " 

Little, Mia. Lucia 8., ** 

Little, Sarah Itabel, *< 

Little, Stuart, WhiiintviUe, 

Little, WHldo P., M'owton Contra. 

Little, William A. «* 

LittleBeld, Samuel, Sowu t v i Uo. 

•Liver more, George, Cnwtkndgo* 

•Locke, Ephraim, Boston. 

Loomia, Rev. Blihu, Littleton, 

Lord, Misa Anna M., Ipswiek. 

Lord, Rev. Charlea R, Boston, 

Lord, Eldward A., Danvers. 

Lord, John A., Peabcdif, 

Lord, Looiaa C, Manckostorm 



36 



Lorinf , Mri. Hannah W., Jftwtcn C$tUr$, 
Load, Arthur J., BoiUn, 
Loud, Mrs. Martha B., BrMitUr^t. 
LOT0II, MiM Mary B., Mtdwmjf. 
*Low0lI, Charlei, D. D., BmI^ii. 
Lamb, William, " 

Luot, Cbarlaa F., Winehuttr. 
Lyman, Bav. George, South Jtwikertt. 
Lyman, Samuel T., HunUngtam 
Lyon, Miaa Chloe R., CcmjM/fe. 
Maereadiog, Rot. Chaa. 8., Prmridtnu^ RJ, 
Maltby, Rev. Eraatat, 7*asat«ii. 
Mann, Miaa Helen L., Or§€nJUli» 
Manning, Otia, LiUl$ton. 
Manning, Edward W^ tFokunu 
Manning, Walur H., IMdtUm. 
Marble, Mra. Mary E., Or^fUn. 
Markham, Mra. Priaeilla V., ffrenthawt. 
Marrett, Lorenso, EaH Cmmbridge, 
Marsh, Elisabeth C, HavtrkUL 
Marth, E. J., LeomiHsUr, 
Marah, Lewia A., Ckieopee. 
Morth, Miaa Julia M., ilmwrkiU. 
*Marston, William, Bottom. 
Martin, George H., Bridgeteater, 
Maaoo, Miaa Nellie A., BoyUton, 
Mattiaon, William, WhiUnovUU. 
Maynard, Rev. Joahna L., WiUitUni^ FL 
Maynard, Leander, Skrem^ury, 
McElroy, Richard B., Medway, 
*McKean, William, Boston. 
McKeeo, Philena, Jtndomor, 
MeKeen, Phebe, ** 
*MeLean, Mri. Ann, Bootom. 
BloLean, Rev. John K., SpringJUld, III. 
McLoud, Rev. Anion, Top^/Uld, 
Meant, Rev. John O., Boston, 
Meant, Mrs. John O. ** 
Meana, William 6., Jindovor, 
Merriam, Abner H., ToutplMon, 
Merriam, Homer, ^riogjle'd. 
Merrill, Rev. Jamei H., Andover, 
Merrill, John K., Mothutn, 
Merritt, Mn Mary A., Montague. 
Mettenger, Mitt Elixa, Fitekburg, 
Milla, Rev. <?hailea L., Jamaica Plain. 
Mill*, Mr«. Rebeeea B. - " 
Milla, Miu Lydia, Peabody, 
Minot, William, Boston. 
Minot, William. Jr. •* 
Mixter, Mra. Fanny L. " 
Mixter, Mrs. Mary R., Hardwiek. 
Mixler, Mra. Q. E., Rock Island, III. 
Mooar, George, D. O., Oakland, Cal. 
Moody, Jaroet, fVkUinsvUlc. 
Moore, Lewis, Skaron. 
Moora, Joaeph, Orvfaa. 
Moon, Rufus, ** 



Moora, Mra. Rufba, Oroton. 
Motdougb, Rev. John H., Portland, Mo. 
More, Cbarlea H., Bradford, 
Morong, Rev. Thomaa, Ips»ick, 
Morley, Rev. Sardia B., PittiJield. 
Morriran, Daniel T., Motkuon. 
Morriaon, Miai Nancy T., JUvlay. 
Morae, Miaa Abby P., Emporiu, Kansas, 
Morte, Cbarlea N., MUford. 
Morte, Miaa Emily A., Bra4f«rd. 
Morra, Henry, MhtUk, 
MoTM, Ruftia W., Motkuon. 
MorM, William E., Bradford. 
Moaeley, Edward S., M'ewkuryport, 
Moaman, Walter B., JtubnmdaU, 
Munger, Rev. Theo. T., Lawrence. 
Monger, Mri. T. T., «* 

Monroe, Miaa Mary, Concord. 
Murray, Rev. Jamea O., ^^ew York Citf, 
Murray, Mra. Julia R. ** 

Naaon, Rev. Charlea, WolfJUoL 
Naaon, Rev. Eliai, BiUerica. 
Needham, Lucy M., ATaw Braintree, 
Need ham, Mri. Mary P., Peabody, 
NelMn, Jonathan H., Skrfmskwry, 
Newell, George H., HoUiston, 
*Newell, Montgomery, Boston. 
Newhall, Lucy Ann, Stow. 
Newman, Miu Sarah A., fpswick. 
Nicbola, Alfred A., West Jimoshury, 
Nieboli, Jamei R., HaverkilL 
Nichula, Joaaph, fVest Ameshury. 
Nichob, Moiea, HaverkilL 
Nickeraon, Mra. Temple W., Jt/kntuckst. 
Nightingale, Rev. Crawford, Oroton. 
*NoreroM, Jotiah, H'ak^e'd. 
Norcroat, Mn. Joaiah, ** 
Norton, Rev. Edward, Montague. 
Nourae, B. Alden, Westboro*. 
Nourae, Caroline Josephine, Boston. 
Noune, Daniel, West Medtoay. 
Nourae, Helen S., Boat^m. 
Nourae, Suaan M., BoUon, 
Noyea, Alva, Aortk Bridgewator. 
Noyea, Jacob, J§bington. 
Noyea, Luke B., Si;h(A Jfbington, 
Noyea, Rufus S., A*. Bridgewatcr. 
Oatley, G. O., ff' kiUnsville. 
Odiin, Benjamin, Exeter, A*. H. 
Odiin, Mn. E. T. " 

Ordway, Aaron l^., A*ei0 York Htf. 
Ordway, Miaa Charlotte, Bradford. 
Ordway, Herbert, <* 

Otborne, Georgn F., Peabodf. 
Osgood, George C, Lowell. 
Osgood, H. B., WkitinoviVe. 
Packard, Rev. D. Temple, Bngkttm, 
Packard, Edward C, Xortk Bridgewaier. 



37 



Paekard, S. Edwards, SfringJlM, 
Packard, 8. Prank liu, CmmftUt. 
Packard, Mim Saaie P., "• 
Packard, Zibeoo, Jlbi9gton, 
Pafa, Abifail L., ^tkinsinif A*. H. 
Paiga, Gaorge R., JWw SaUm. 
•PaiM, Mr«. Sarah M., Holdeu, 
♦Paine, Miv Sarah C. «« 
PaloMr, Rer. Charlea Ray, Salmm, 
*Pdfiier, Rev. Stopheo, ^^t»ikam, . 
Palmar, Sqaira, South D§«rJUUm 
Park, John C, BmUm. 
Parker, Andraw, OiomcetUr, 
Parker, Daniel, fVkitinsviae. 
♦Parker, John, BotUm, 

Parker, Mrs. Sarah, *« 

♦Parkman, Francis, D. D. ** 
*Parkiiian. Samuel, ** 

♦Parkman, Mr*. Sarah, ** 
Parmenter, Mrs. E. J. 6., J9thoL 
♦Persons, Gorham, Boston, 
♦Parsons. William, ** 
Partridge, Clark, JUtdwujf. 
Partridge, Joseph, Hollioton. 
Patrick, ReT. Henry J., fFest Mltwtan, 
Patrick, Mrs. Martha L. ** 

Patten, Mrs John F., Dorektottr, 
Pstterson, David H , Mttktun, 
Panl, Frederick A., Lakevilte. 
Paul, Henry, Newton. 

•Paul, Mrs. Henry, <« 
•Paul, Lather, " 

Paul, Luther, Jr. " 
Paul, Miss Harriet, " 
Paul, Miss Mary, " 
Paul, Mrs. Ruth B., ^edaoey. 
Payton, Miss if asan, Foxboro\ 
Payton, William P., ** 
Pearson, Miu Hannah J., LowoU, 
Pease, George W., SaUm. 
Peck, Rev. David, Smnderland, 
Peckhsin, Hubbard, Petortkam, 
Peiree, Rev. Bradford K., Uarlom, If. T, 
Peoples, Samuel, JVaticA. 
Perkins, Benjamin C, Peabv4f, 
Perkins, E. E , Jfortk Middleboro\ 
Perkins, Mrs. Elisabeth B. " 
Perkins, Jairus H. ** 

Ptorklns, James, Peahadjf, 
•Perkins, James, Dsstow. 
•Perkins, Jame«, Jr. " 
Perkins, Mine Maty A., BrighUnu 
•Perkins, Thomas H., Bnolon, 
Perley, Mrs. Abigail T., Sa/eai. 
Parley, Jacob, <* 

Perry, Miss Catharine H., Skerhom. 
Perry, James, Danoero. 
•PeUrs , Edward U., Bo»t9%, 

D 



Peters, Mrs. Lydia H., Btdin,. 
Pettee, Daniel, Skvmn, 
Peltee, MiMs Eiisa J., Festers*. 
Pettee, Samuel Gardner, SUa/kfea. 
Pettee, Willard, Foxban^. 
Phillips, Alonso P., Feakody. 
Phillips, George W., SamguM, 
•Phillips, Jonathan, Booton, 
Phillips, Mrs. Sally, " 
•Phillips, William, Bo$ton. 
PIckard, Kev. Daniel W., OrovoUnd, 
Pickering, Henry W., Bosroa. 
Pierce, Albeit T., Siougkton, 
•Pieiee, Rev. Charles U., Mitlkurf. 
Pierce, Isaac T., H^kitinoviUo, 
Pierce, Sylvester G., tViiukoster, 
•Pierpont, Rev. John, Jtfsi^eril. 
Pierson, Rev. Wm. Henry, JpswUk, 
Pike, John, D. D., i2oap/«y. 
Plumb, Rev. Albert H., CkoUom, 
Plumb, Joseph Dart, ** 

Plumer, Mrs. Martha H., RowUji, 
Plummer, Israel, WkitiiU9i(U, 
Pogue, Mrs. Joseph, Oraffton, 
Pollard, Joseph G., Woknrn. 
Pollock, Miss Emma A., WkUintviVo. 
Pond. Almira W., Soutk JUoldon. 
Pond, John P., Booton, 
Pund, Mrs. Nancy, Modwjf, 
Pond, William E., JVrtnlkmm, 
Pnol, Solomon, Oloueeotor. 
Poor, Joseph, Peabody, 
Poor, Mathan H. " 
Potter, J. Edwards, AVrtk Broo^ld, 
Porter, Samuel S., tVimekottor. 
Potter, J. iSturgis, M'omton, 
Pratt, Cornelius, Mortk IVoymontk, 
Pratt, Galen, Jfortk BridgowmUr. 
Pratt, Galen E. " 
Pratt, Rev. George H., Horvmrd, 
Pratt, Norton, Braintroo, 
Pratt, Phebo. Skorborn, 
Pratt, Philip W., Mtngton. 
Pratt, Zebuloo, Aertk Mtddlokon*. 
Pray, John J., LowelL 
Prentice, Mias Julia, Ora/Un, 
Prentice, Marvel, fFkitinoviUo. 
Ptentice, James A. ** 
Prentiss, Luke, ** 

•Prescott, William, BooUn. 
•Prince, Rev. J. M., Oourgtiown. 
Prince, Mrs. Sarah B., Quinef. 
Pritehard, William, JVsisftaryport. 
Proctor, Elizabeth O., Peabodjf, 
Proctor, Henry H., Penbvdy, 
Pioctor, Mrs. Lucy A., Oloueostor. 
Proctor, Thornilike, Peakody, 
Puffer, Mrs. Josiah, Harvmrd, 



38 



Putnam, Mrt. Elisabelb T., Orqfton, 

Uoiney, Tbomaa D., DartkuUr, 

auiocy, Mn. J. C. ** 

auincy, TbooiM D., Jr. « 

Randall, Pranklin B., l>0Mr, A; H, 

Randall, Flora Sarah, " 

Randall, Mary Blisabeth, » 

Rankin, J. Bamea, D.D., IVatkingUm, D. C. 

Rankin, Mrt. Mary ** 

Ray, 6«orfa W., Midway Fittag§. 

Raymond, Helen 8., Bottm, 

Read, Mim Martha, EaH JIUngtam. 

Reed, Mitt Garolioe 6., Hmn-hilL 

Reed, Horace, Samik JtHugUn. 

Reed, Miei Seritea, Emat MingUu. 

Reevee, Miie Ellen P., Waylond. 

Rice, Mn, Agnee L., Botttm, 

Rice, Edward, fToflund, 

Rice, Mn. Elisabeth C, Lawrtmct. 

Rico, Mrt. Henry A., Bottom, 

Rice, Mitt M. AngntU, ITealiere*. 

Rich, Rer. Alonso B., IF. Leb€moHf Jf. H, 

Riek, Rev. A. Jodton, Brookjield, 

Rich, Mrt. Harriet L., «' 

Richardt, Mrt. A. AL, Bridgeport, CU 

Riehardt, Jamee P^ CamptlU. ' 

Riehaidaon, Benjamin P., Bottom, 

Richardson, John W., Mtdwmf, 

Riebardtfto, Lother, IfimekoHtr. 

Riehaidaon, Mitt Sarah £., Comeord. 

Riehardton, Stephen, fV, Medmajf, 

Richardton, Somnei, Wi me ktitr, 

Rieker, Edmund, Weot Jimtesbmrf, 

Richer, GeorfeW., ** 

•Ritchie, Andrew, Jr^ Botton, 

Robbint, Andrew, Orotom. 

Robbint, Chandler, D. D., BmCoh. 

•Robbint, Edward H. «• 

Roberta, Rev. Jacob, JtmbumdaU, 

Roberta, Mra. Mary A. ** 

Roberta, Mrt. Roth, Mmekutmr. 

Robertaon, Jamea, Pemkodf, 

Robinaon, Charlea W., JtutmrmdaU, 

Robinaon, H. W., A«rU Bridgowoitr. 

Rubinaon, Rev. Reuben T., fVmckostor. 

•Robinaon, Mta. Clara A. ** 

Rock wood, John, Orottm. 

Rockwood, John T., SfringJMd. 

Rockwood, Miaa Polly 8., AtkUmd, 

•Rofera, George, Bottom, 

Rogera, George L., Ainttorfforf. 

Rogen, Shubeel G., Bottom, 

•Rogera, Rev. William M. *« 

Ruaaell, Sarah J., Frmminghmm, 

Ryder, MarietU, Ckatkmm, 

BafTord. Rev. George B., Bmrlingtomy FL 

•Saliabnry, Samuel, Boaleii. 

Sanford, Mrt. Adeline D,,M§d»mf FUlmgo, 



Saoford, Edmund I., Medwof, 

Sanford, Henry D., Bridgewater, 

Sanger, Edward G., Cam^rtd^cperi. 

Sergeant, Jamea C, Omkkmm, 

Sargent, Edmund, f^ttt Jtmtthmjf, 

•Sargent, Lueiua M., Bottom, 

Sargent, Samuel G., JiotMumu 

•Sawtell, Mra. Ephraim, Orttom, 

Sawyer, George, CmmftUo, 

Sawyer, Martha &, ** 

Sawyer, Seth C, £. Rtmdolfk, 

Scalet, Edward P., J^ietom, 

•Scudder, Cbarlet, Bootom. 

Seudder, Mrt. Sarah L. *« 

Seagrave, Edward F., Uxbridgt. 

Seagrave, Mrt Mary Ann, ** 

Start, Miaa Hannah M., JiohJUld, 

Seaver, A. W., Jfunkboro*, 

Seeley, Raymond H., D. D., HmvarkiU, 

Seeley, Mra. Fanny B. ** 

Selfridge, Tbomaa O., Bottom.' 

Shattock, Andrew, Orotom, 

Shatluek, Mra. Suaan P. " 

Shaw, Mra. Hannah, Bottom. 

Sheldon, Rev. Luther H., Jmmtttmrghf^,J, 

Sheldon, Mra. Sarah H. «< 

Shepherd, Thomaa, H^inckt$ter. 

Shiveriek, Miaa Maria L., Cample. 

•Sigoorney, Andrew, Bttttm, 

Sigourney, Henry, " 

Sikea, Mia. Otia, Conwof, 

Simonda, Alvan, Bottom. 

Skillinga, David N., mmekttfr. 

•Slack, Rugglea, BoUom. 

Slafter, Rev. Edmund F. ** 

Slafter, Mrt. Edmund P., ** 

Sleeper, William C, JUatkmtm. 

Small, Arooa T., Wtt Jimoohtrf, 

Small, Mrt. Fidelia PoiUr, MiOkmrf. 

Small, Samuel A. *« 

Small, Samuel B. " 

Small, Mrt. Sumner, Jfltwtom Cemtf. 

Smith, Mrt. Abby F., Cometrd, 

Smith, Henry F. " 

Smith, Albert W., fFettboroK 

Smith, Mia. Lucy Jane, *< 

Smith, Mra. Clara J., Smmdertmmd, 

Smith, E. B., 9Ve»tMld, 

Smith, Mrs. Francea E D., WhUinvnBM, 

Smith, Rev. Edward P., Brooklym, Jf. F. 

Smith, George P., .ReaCea. 

Smith, Samuel, ** 

Smith, Joel, W kUimttiUo, 

Smith, Jonathan, ** 

Smith, Warren N. «* 

Smith, Mra Hatiie J., Qlwuttttr, 

Smith, Mauon M., D. D., J^t^mrh^ JV. J. 

Smith, Mrt. Mataou AL ** 



39 



Smitli, Norman, OrUaiu 

Smith, Mn. Mary J. ** 

Smith, Riebard, Pembody» 

Smith, Mra. Charlotte, *< 

Smith, Mn. Sarah, Jtudowtr, 

Snow, Ambroae, South Hadtef FaUa, 

Show, Mr*. Carolino, JtubmmdaU. 

Snow, Mn. Mark, Ckallum, 

Boole, Henry M., Sonth JikingUm, 

Soothfate, Charlea M., St. JoAiM^vry, Ft, 

Boothfate, Rev. Robert, Wkitt River, Ft. 

*8oatbfate, Mra. Mary Praneea, ** 

Soathwortb, Mra. Caroline M., Midway, 

Spaoldinf, Mr*. Charlotte A., Orototu 

Bpaoldiof , John, Oroton Jmnetion, 

Bpoooer, W. B., Btton, 

Bprinf, Mrt. Adela C, fFhUiunaig. 

Btaey, Albert, Concord. 

Stanley, E^ra C, Maruketter. 

Stebbina, Rev. Milan C, SpHngJioU, 

Stevens, Mrs. Georfe, LowelL 

*Stevient, Norman C, JfowUm, 

Stevens, Mrs. B. M. ** 

Stevens, Mrs. Benjamin P., Peebodff. 

Stevens, Samael, Oloueooter. 

Bliekney, William H., Draeut 

•Stoddard, Lewis T., BrooUino, 

Stone, Andrew L., D. U., Sam ProneUco,C4iL 

Stone, Mrs. Matilda F. " 

Stone, Martha A., /fovHon C*ntr§, 

Storra, Eunice C. Braintreo, 

Storrs, Richard 8., D. 0. « 

Stowell, Mrs. Abby Hubbard, Cotuord. 

Stowell, Cyrus A., South Dtorjlold, 

Stowell, D . W., Waitkam. 

Strong, Rev. EInathan E. ** 

Strong, Rev. J. C, St. Ckwloo^MinnaoUa, 

Strong, Mrs. J. C. '< ** 

Stodley, Austin, Eaat JlUngton, 

Biudley, Edwsrd A., Booton. 

Sugden, Miss Mary, Braintret, 

Sumner, Rev. Charles B., Monoou, 

Sumner, Mrs. H. H., Foxhoro*. 

Swasey, Mrs. Prances A., Lynn* 

Swett, Samuel W., Bostoit. 

Swift, Miss l^ttie H., JIndofoot* 

Switser, Rev. Christopher J., Previncstown. 

Taft, Mrs. Bliiabeth E., IVkitinnUlt. 

Taft, Miss Emily A. <* 

Taft, Gustavos E. " 

Taft, Mrs. O. e. ** 

Taft, S. Jennie, " 

Taft, Jacob, Utkridge. 

Tapley, Gilbert, Dmmvor*. 

"Tsppan, John, Booton. 

Tarr, William J., Oloueootor. 

Taylor, Mrs. Malansa, fFiuekuttr. 

Teele, Rev. Albert K., MiUou. 



Teele, Mrs. Cornelia C, Milton, 

Temple, Mark M., Bonding. 

Tenny, Mrs. Joanna S., Snnguo, 

Tenney, Mrs. Mary P., mnckuter. 

Terry, Rev. James P., South fFofuumth, 

Thaeher, Mrs. Anna B., Hyde Park. 

Thaeher, Mias Calista C, JtUleherol'. 

Thaeher, John, ** 

Thaeher, Mrs Susan C. « 

Thaeber, William T., Hyde Park. 

Thaeher. Susan B., PortUnd, Me. 

n'hatcber, Mary Ludlow, M%ddUbere\ 

Thtyer, Amasa, Brointrss. 

Thayer, E. P. E. •« 

Thayer, Ira, •« 

^Thayer, Mrs. Lilla, «* 

Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, Jtndever* 

Thayer, Mrs. Martha C. ** 

Thayer, Oliver, ** 

*Thayer, Mrs. Jane, Booton, 

Thayer, Robert H., Akw York City. 

Thayer, Sarah H., Braintree, 

Thayer, William W., Uxhridge, 

Thompson, Mrs. Aveiiek P., IVereknm. 

Thompson, Mrs. Emily B., Coneord. 

Thompson, Everett A., ^fbrth WtAwm. 

Thompson, Samuel A. <* 

Thompson, Mrs. Anne Elisa, ** 

Thompson, George R., AVU Bridgewater, 

Thompson, Lewis Waldo, Worteeter, 

Thompson, Stephen, Wineheeter, 
l^burston, Rev. Richard B., Btaw^d^ CU 

Tinker, Russell, Orafton. 

Tobey, Miss Jennie E., WhitinouiVe. 

Tolman, Rev. Richard, Hamfton^ JV. H, 
Tolman, Rev. Samuel H., Wthnington, 
Torrey,Miss Elisabeth X^^South Weywtemith. 
Torrey, James, Iforth Weywkemth, 
Torre;, Willard, Oroton. 
Towoe, William B., BrooUin^. 
Trask, Charles H., Jr., Mnneheeter. 
Trask, Mrs. A. H. •• 

Trask, Liasle R, OUmeeeter. 
Trask, Samuel, Penbody. 
Trask, Samuel P., Danvere. 
Tribou, Samuel, Jforth Bridgewater, 
Trowbridge, Mrs. Asa, Brighton, 
Trufant, Harriet Andrews, JtbingUm, 
Trufant, Philip P. •* 

Trufant, Waller Esra, *< 

«Tucker, Rev. Elijah W., Lebweau, Ou 
*Tucker, Jesse, Milton, 
Tucker, Mrs. Mary R. •* 
•Tucker, Nathan, »« 

Tucker, Mrs Nathan, ** 
Tucker, Mrs. Hannah W, Dertheeter. 
Tucker, John A, ** 

Tucker, William, <* 



40 



Taeker, William W., Boston. 

Tafia, Charlea, Jtndovtr, 

Tarner, Min Alice Montfomeij, Rmdoipk 

Tnttle, Min Bfaitba E., Concord, 

Tattle, Miaa Sarah, OroveUnd. 

Tattle, Thomaa S., LiuUton. 

Twiehell, John M., FiUkbwrg. 

Tjler, Praok II., Bradford, 

Tyler, Jerome W., BotUn. 

^Uaderhill, Rev. John W., A*. Amkortl. 

Upton, Mrt. Lnej K., Peabodjf, 

Upton, Moeea T., Se/am. 

Voee, William U., FiUkkurg, 

Wadsworth*, Mra. Laej, Milton, 

Wada worth, William, Booton. 

Wakefield, Miw C, Rtoding. 

Waldroo, Bev. Daniel W., Bootan. 

Walea, Erastui, Etui Randolph. 

Walea, Miaa Mary Ann, Boston. 

Walker, Miaa Francei A., Huvorkitl 

Walker, Rer. Geo. P., LitUe OamjiCaii, R. I. 

Walker, John S., Enol Medwnjf. 

Walker, Mra. John 8. " 

Walker, Levi, BridgewoUr, 

Walker, Ellen A. " 

Walker, Moeea, HurerhUL 

Walker, Nathaniel, " 

Wallier, Robert G., Boston. 

Walker, William M., BridgemaUr, 

•Walley, Samnel H., Boston 

Walley, Samuel U. «* 

Ward, Artemai, " 

Ward, Min Lydia, Satonv'dlt, 

Ward, Samuel, Boston. 

Ward, Min H. L. H., LakeoiUe. 

Ward, Rev. Jamea W. " 

Ward, Mra. Caroline L. " 

Ward, Miat Sunn H. " 

Ward, 8aiem T., IVincksstor, 

Warner, John, Newton. 

Warner, William, South Deer/lsU. 

Warren, George W., Boston. 

*Warren, Mri. Diantha A , Lyiim. 

* Warren, Mrs. Maria, Ora/tmu 

^Warren, Nehemiah, Stow, 

Warieo, Francia W. ** 

Warren, Jonaa, " 

*Warren, Loeinda, ** 

•Warren, William A., ffi itchestsr. 

Waahbum, William B., Qrsenfitld. 

Waahburn, Mri. William B. " 

Waterman, Mrs. Caroline, Orafton, 

Wdtkint, Min Abby A., Oloneesttr. 

Weeks, Mra. L. Caroline, ^Torth Dana, 

Webater, Edward, Boseawen, M'iU, 

Welch, Juhn, Boston, 

WeM, Jamea, ** 

Walla, Mrs. Martha D , JVbrfMora** 



Wellman, Jo^hoa W., D. D., Xtwism. 
Wendell, Mrs. Catharine, Boston. 
Wentworth, Albert, HivsrhUl. 
Wentworth, Lewis, Bridgswatsr. 
West, Feleg D., frhitmsviUe. 
Wheeler, Ahijuh R., EaHMsdwm^, 
Wheeler, Mrs. M. B., JHedwof, 
Whiteomb, Lewis, EnH Rmndolph. 
•Whitcomb, Reoben, Hmnard. 
•Whiteomb, Reaben, Jr. ** 
Whiteomb, Mrs Abby F. " 
•Whiteomb, Mrs. Loaisa D. ** 
Whiteomb, Miss Mary M. *« 
While, Aaron L., Modmmy, 
White, Cornell na. South Randolph. 
White, Edmund, East Randolph 
White, Newton, «• 
•White, Jamea, Boston, 
White, Joel, Uxhridgs. 
White, Joaiah, P«(er«Aa«i. 
White, Mra. Mary C, PkUlipslon. 
White, Phineas A., Whitinnmt. 
White, Thomaa, East Randjfph, 
Whitin, Arthur P., WhUinaviUe. 
Whitin, Charlea P. «• 

Whitin, Charles E. " 

Whitin, Mra. Catharine H. <• 
Whitin, Edward, 
Whitin, James P. 
Whitin, Mrs. Patience H. *« 
Whitin, Paul, 
Whitin, Mrs. Sarah J. 
Whitin, Mra. Sarah R. 
Whiting, Lemuel, Grtlon, 
Whitman, Charles, Lowell. 
Whitmarsh, Mary, South Jibington. 
Whitmarsh, Min Mary J. ** 
Whitmore, Annie Maria, Lyam. 
Whitney, (."harlea H., CamhridgeporL 
Whitney, Dora S., Stuth Oroton. 
Whitney, Frederick, Wsstminstor, 
Whitney, Helen J., Stow. 
Whitney, Isaac S., Olouesstsr, 
Whitney, Israel, Boston. 
Whitney, Mrs. Permelia V., Pettrsham, 
Whitney, Richard D., Springjisld, 
Whitney, Mrs. Susanna, Rutland. 
•Wiggles worth, Thomas, Boston. 
Wilbur, Joseph, Taunton. 
Wild, Daniel. Boston, 
Wilder, Hattie W., South Jtcton. 
Willcox, Rev. William H., Rsading. 
Williams, Miss Amelia P., Sunderland. 
William>i, Rev. C. H. S., Concord. 
Williams, Mrs. C. H.S. " 
Williams, Rev. Edward F., fVhitinsvilU 
Williams, Miss Elisabeth C, Groton, 
Williams, Miaa Mary D., OrssiJUld. 



(I 



(C 



ti 



<( 



t< 



41 



William, 8. H^ Faxbaro*, 

Williamf, Thomas 8., JiubarndaU, 

Willis, Laeebo, fTay'and, 

Witlii, Lucy Maria, •* 

WiImhi, R«v. Thomaa, Stougkton. 

Winf , John C, Loteell. 

'Winea, Rev. C.Maariee, Hart/ord, Conn. 

Wioilow, Pelham, E*st Abingtan. 

Wiotar, David Baker, JfortMbriigt. 

Winthrop, Robert C, Bottom. 

^Winthrop, Thomas L. •* 

Wtswell, Mrs. Liazie M., CkicagOj lU. 

Withinfton, Otis, Brookline. 

Woleott, Mrs. Eiisabeih, Pembody. 

Woleott, William, *• 

Woodbury, Simon J., ^Uom. 

Wood, Mrs. Abijah. fVestbi/ro*. 

Wood, Cyrus K., Oardner. 

Wood, Eliaabetb C, Fozboro\ 



Wood, Joseph W., Wkitinaviat. 

Wood, Mrs. E. 8. <* 

Wood, BIrs. Samuel P., Cktlm^ord. 

Wooil, Mrs. Susan, Oroton, 

Wood, T. Dwight, fVtatmiMttr. 

Wood, Theodore 8. " 

Woods, Miss Abbie Wheeler, JVaMea 

Woods, Frank Austin, JVew BrmiiUne. 

Woods, Joseph Wheeler, BosUn, 

Wooils, Samuel H. ** 

Woo«lward, Ebeneier, A*sie(0n. 

Woodward, Miss Emily, JVewlow U, Fall*. 

Wood worth, ArtemHs B., LoweU. 

Worcester, Miss Sallie, Brighton, 

*Worthington, William, Booton. 

Wright, George L., Mittenettque. 

Wyman, Charles, Laneiuttr. 

Wyman, Rufus, Booton 

Wymao, William 6., FtUkburg, . 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



from April 1, 1870, to April 1, 1871. 
BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 

Falmouth, First Congregational Church and Society, 
« Braddock Gifford, .... 

Centrerille, Congregational Church and Society, . 

Wellfleet, Congregational Church and Society, • 
** Methodist Episcopal Church, 
** South Congregational Church and Society, 

West Dennis, Mrs. Collins 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



Attleboro', South 

Freetown, (for ▲. b. s J 

Mansfield, Congregational Church and Society, 



f 18 00 


2 00 


14 16 


16 26 


16 38 


10 00 


1 00 



f 76 78 



f 6 00 

3 68 

11 00 

f 19 63 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

Amesbury Mills, Congregational Church and Society, . f 14 00 

Amesbury and Salisbury, Union Evangelical Church, . • 20 76 

Andover, Chapel Church, 84 89 

*< Ballardvale, Congregational Church and Society, . 6 00 

Bradford, Congregational Church and Society, ... 46 66 

Danrers, Maple Street Sabbath School, (2 l. x.) ... 40 00 

<« Maple Street Church, a Friend, .... 10 00 

Georgetown, Memorial Church, 37 00 

Groreland, Congregational Church and Society, ... 10 26 

Hamilton, Congregational Church and Society, . . . 10 60 
Harerhill, Mrs. Reed to constitute George Reed Kelly a Life 

Member 20 00 

Lawrence, Central Congregational Church, .... 18 46 



43 



Ljimfield, Centre, Orthodox Congregational Church and So- 
ciety, 

Manchester, First Congregational Church and Society, 

MetLuen, First Parish Church, 

Newbury, First Church and Society 

****** ** • 

Newburyport, First Presbyterian Church and Society, (1 

I" «•) • ■ 

** Belleville, Congregational Church and Society, 

i< II II i< II 

Peabody, Congregational Church and Society, (1 l. m.) 
Rockport, Congregational Church and Society, 

Salem, South Church, 

Saugus, Congregational Church and Society, 

Wenham, Additional, 

West Amesbury, Congregational Church and Society, (3 l. m.) 



f 6 65 


33 87 


10 00 


15 25 


7 00 


65 19 


62 25 


51 67 


70 87 


35 00 


68 00 


23 93 


85 


96 00 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Buckland, Congregational Church and Society, (1 l. m.) 
Charlemont, Congregational Church and Society, 
Deerfield, South, Congregational Church Sabbath School, 
OiU, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Greenfield, First Congregational Church and Society, • 
** Second Congregational Church and Society, 

Orange, Congregational Church and Society, . • 

•* A Friend 

Shelbume, Congregational Church and Society, . 

Sunderland, 

Warwick, Congregational Church and Society, 



f 864 03 



f 26 80 


6 12 


28 37 


5 13 


15 71 


38 25 


15 00 


11 00 


45 11 


1 00 


8 00 



f 200 49 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 

Mr. Chablbs Marsh, Sprif%gfMd^ TV. 

Brim field, Mrs. Fitz Henry Warren and daughter, . ^ 6 66 

Massachusetts, *• P. M." 300 06 

Donations, (4 l. m.) 80 06 

On Bible Account, ^ 803 38 



f 386 00 



HAMPSHIRB COUNTY. 
Belchertown, Congregational Church and Society, 



f 12 34 



44 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Acton, A Friend, 

Arlington, Orthodox Congregational Church and Society, 
Ashby, Congregational Church and Society, 
Cambridge, Shepherd Congregational Church and Society, 
Cambridgeport, Prospect Street Church and Society, . 
Charlestown, Winthrop Church and Society, 

*• Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, 

Concord, Union Bible Society, 

Dracut, Central Church Sabbath School, (I l. x.) 
•• West, Congregational Church and Society, 
Grantyille, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Hopkinton, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Littleton, Evangelical Church and Society, . 



t( 



ti 



(t 



«4 



Lowell, Appleton Street Church, .... 

High Street Church, (1 l. x.) . 

John Street Church, (3 l. x.) . 

Kirk Street Church, .... 

Miss Emily Rogers, (l. x. ▲. b. a.) . 
Newton, Eliot Church and Society, 
Newtonville, Congregational Church and Society, 
Pepperell, Congregational Church and Society, . 



tt 



II 



II 



II 



It 



It 



II 



It 



Sherbom, Ladies' Benevolent Society, .... 
Saxonville, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Somerville, East, First Orthodox Church and Society. 
Townsend, Orthodox Congregational Church and Society, 
Wakefield, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Waltham, Trinitarian Congregational Church, 
Wayland, Congregational Church and Society, 
Wellesley, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Wilmington, Fir^t Church and Society, 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Braintree, Miss Rachel A. Faxon, .... 

Dedham. South, Congregational Church and Society, . 

East Randolph, Winthrop Church and Society, . 

FranKlin, Congregational Church and Society, (1 l. x.) 

Med way. Village Church and Society, (2 l. x.) . 
Eaitt, Church and Society, (2 l. x.) 
West, Church and Society, .... 

Milton, First Congregational Church and Society, 



II 



II 



f 1 00 


62 76 


10 97 


100 00 


92 20 


76 40 


37 00 


111 00 


20 00 


12 26 


42 00 


62 78 


3 68 


8 26 


38 46 


42 00 


66 03 


90 00 


30 00 


116 93 


63 08 


16 00 


16 00 


20 00 


19 14 


39 60 


9 00 


26 00 


46 92 


6 76 


19 27 


23 60 


f 1»306 07 


f 6 00 


16 67 


36 00 


49 27 


61 08 


43 27 


27 76 


17 87 



45 



Sharon, Congregational Church and Society, 
Wrentham, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Weymouth, East, Congregational Church and Society, 
North, First Church and Society, 
'* Pilgrim Church and Society, 



«« 



•• 



f 18 


68 


42 


00 


20 


00 


16 70 


12 


65 



f 356 94 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Abington, East, Miss Sarah M. Bailey, (1 l. m.) . 

Congregational Church and Society, . 

Second Church and Society, (1 l. m.) . 
Bridge water, Central Square Church and Society, (1 l 



•t 



tt 



«f 



•I 



t( 



it 



4t 



«•) 



Hingham, Methodist Episcopal Church, (a. b. b.) 
North Bridgewater, Porter Congregational Church and Society, 
Lakeville, Congregational Church and Society, • • 
Middleboro*, First Congregational Church and Society, 



<» 



(I 



(I 



(I 



(I 



Plymouth, Mrs. Jane B. Gordon, (1 l. m.) .... 
South, Second Congregational Church and Society, 



ii 



f 20 


00 


71 


00 


20 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 


5 


60 


36 


41 


12 


00 


26 


36 


25 


13 


20 


00 


6 


62 



f 303 12 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Boston, Old South Church and Society, 

Bromfield Street Church, .... 

Park Street Church and Society, 

Second Church, Rev. Dr. Robbins, 

Mt. Vernon Church and Society, • 

Central Church, 

Dorchester Village Church, .... 

Second Dorchester Church, .... 

South, Phillips Church and Society, 

Highlands, Eliot Church and Society, 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 

First German Methodist Episcopal Church, 

A Friend, 

A Friend, Dorchester, 

Mrs. McLoud, 

A Friend, 

Rev. E. W. Hooker, D. D 

Roswell Gleason, Esq., (2 l. m.) 

S. D. Warren, Esq., 



<i 

•( 

•< 

«« 

<< 

i< 

<« 

t( 

•• 

• • 

•• 

•« 

i* 

«• 

t« 

«< 

«• 



tt 



t( 



f 184 


46 


30 24 


214 


96 


95 


75 


55 


35 


183 


35 


30 


32 


131 


55 


67 


33 


154 


66 


10 


00 


, 15 


00 


6 


00 


4 


60 


1 


02 


1 


00 


5 


00 


40 00 


200 


00 


1 1,430 48 



46 



WORCBSTBR COUNTY. 

Athol, Congregational Church and Society, . 

Brookfield, A Friend, 

•• A Friend 

Charleton, Congregational Church and Society, . • 
Fitchburg, Congregational Church and Society, (3 l. m. ▲. b 
Gardner, Congregational Church and Society, 
Harvard, Congregational Church and Society, 
Lancaster, Congregational Church and Society, . . 
Leominster, Evangelical Church and Society, 



i« 



C( 



(( 



• i 



North Brookfield, Congregational Church and Society, (3 l 
Phillipston, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Royalston, South, Congregational Church and Society, 
Southboro', Pilgrim Bvangelical Church and Society, . 
Spencer, Congregational Church and Society, 

41 4t II II ^ , 

Sturbrldge, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Templeton, Trinitarian Church and Society, 
XJxbridge, Evangelical Congregational Church and Society, 
II 11 11 II 11 (2l 

Warren, Congregational Church and Society, 

** Methodist Bpiscopal Church, .... 
Webster, Congregational Church and Society, 



11 



II 



II 



II 



West Boylston, Congregational Church and Society, • 
" Rev. C. H. Morse, .... 

Whitinsville, Congregational Church and Society, 
** Mrs. Frances E. D. Smith, (1 l. m.) 

Winchendon, North, Congregational Church and Society, 

Worcester, Central Church, 

A Friend, 



II 



8.) 



M.) 



H.) 



f 24 18 
7 60 

10 00 
16 66 

118 60 
60 00 
33 06 

40 46 
39 66 
86 76 
72 62 
16 60 
16 60 
16 60 
43 40 
66 60 
89 02 
16 00 
86 00 
60 00 
27 46 

4 40 

11 16 
20 21 

. 10 86 

2 00 

660 65 

20 00 

37 66 

41 26 
1 00 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 

A Friend in Massachusetts, 

Derry, N. H., Miss Jenette Humphrey, (l. m. a. b. s.) 
East Providence, R. I., Congregational Church and Society, 
New England Methodist Episcopal Conference, . 
Thetford, Vt., First Congregational Church and Society, 
Maine, A Friend, 



« 


1,692 


22 




« 


60 




30 


00 




22 


00 




632 


03 




28 


60 




2 


00 



f 616 13 



47 



COLLECTIONS, 

By Rer. E. F. Slattsb, A^tnt of the Amenean Bible Society, 

Trinity Church, Boston f 1,069 36 

St. Paul's Church, Boston 629 00 

Anonymous, 20 00 

Emmanuel Church, Boston, 729 00 

St. Peter's Church, Salem, 64 81 

All Saints' Church, Worcester, 36 76 

8t. Paul's Church, Brookline, 89 91 

Grace Church, Lawrence, 20 00 

St. James' Church, Amesbury, 10 00 

St. Michael's Church, Marblehead, 61 63 

8t. Paul's Church, Newburyport, 86 00 

St. Andrew's Church, Hanover, (l. m. ▲. b. s.) • . . 63 20 

Christ Church, Boston, 10 00 

St. Paul's Church, Dedham, 43 00 

Church of our Saviour, Longwood, 241 66 

Christ Church, Fitchburg, 40 00 

St. James' Church, Roxbury, 77 72 

St. John's Church, Framingham, 21 27 

Grace Church, Newton, 26 86 

St. John's Church, Jamaica Plain, 160 00 

St. John's Chapel, Cambridge, 40 00 

St. Mary's Church, Newton Lower Falls, .... 43 37 

Christ Church, Waltham 17 77 



LEGACIES. 



f 3,499 19 



Boston, Robert Waterston f 1,600 00 

Westboro', Maria D. Boardman, 60 00 

f 1,660 00 



FORM OF A BEQUEST TO THE SOCIETY. 



I give, devise and bequeath, to the Massachusetts Bible 
Society, incorporated in the year Eighteen hundred and ten, the 
sum of to be applied to the charitable uses 

and purposes of the Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests 
and policy of the Society, should be directed to Rev. Daniel 
Butler, Recording Secretary, 15 Cornhill, Boston. 



Remittances for Books, donations from churches and 
individuals, and orders for Books, should be addressed to 
S. T. Farwell, Agent, 15 Cornhill, Boston. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PBESENTBD BT 



THE TRUSTEES 



OF THB 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY, 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, 



IN BOSTON, 



3IAT 27, 1872, BEING THEm SrXTY-TIIIRD ANNIVERSARY. 



BOSTON: 

DEPOSITORY. 15 CORNHILL. 

PRESS OF T. B. MARVIN & SON, 131 CONGRESS STREET. 

1872. 









\ 



OFFICERS 



OP THB 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY, 1872-3. 



PBESIDBNT. 

Hon. SAMUEL H. WALLEY. 

TICE PRESIDENTS. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. VINTON, D. D.. Suffolk Coijnty. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT. Esq., Berkshire County. 

CHARLES A. JESSUP, Esq., Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

His Excellency WM. B. WASHBURN, LL. D., Franklin Co. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHniN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, LL. D., Middlesex County. 

CALEB HOLBROOK, Esq., Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN H. CLIFFORD, LL. D.. Bristol County. 

ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Pl>Tnouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

COREESPONDINO SECRETARY. 

Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. D. 

RECORDING SECRETARY. 

Rev. DANIEL BUXLER. 

TREASURER. 

CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

AUDITOR. 

THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Esq. 



TRUSTEES. 



Rt. Rev. IkLkNTON Eastburn, D. D. 
Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 
Rev. Chandler Robbins, D. D. 
Rev. Samuel B. Babcock, D. D. 
Rev. Andrew P. Peabody, D. D. 
Rev. RoLLiN H. Neale, D. D. 
Rev. John DeWitt, 
Rev. WiLLARD F. Mallalieu. 
Hon. Albert Fearing, 



Hod. Jacob Sleeper, 
Hon. Charles T. Russell, 
Thbophilus R. Marvin, Eltq. 
Charles W. Pierce, Esq. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 
Hon. Francis E. Pahker, 
Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, 

HbzEKIAH T. CHA9B.^%8q. 

Amos W. Stetson, Esq. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
TO WHOM APPLICATIONS ARE TO BE MADE FOR BIBLES. 

Key. John O. >Ieans, Albert Fearing, and Charles Henry Parxbb, 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY FROM 1809 TO 1872. 



PRESIDENTS. 

Hon. William PhilUps, . . . 1809— S7 I Hon. Richard Fletcher, . 
£eT. John Pierce, D. D. . . . 1827 — 19 I Hon. Samuel H. Walley, 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. . 1849--64 | 



1854— M 
1859 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. . . 
ReT. John T. Kirkland, D. D. . 
Rev. Henry "Ware, D. D. . . 
Rev. John Codman, D. D. . . 
Hon. Simon Oreenleaf, LL. D. . 
Rev. Francif Parkman, D. D. . 
Rev. N. L. Frothingham, D. D. 
Rev. %m. R. Nicholson, D. D. 
William G. Plunkett, Esq. . . 
Edward South worth, Esq. . . 
John P. Williston, Esq. . . . 
Hon. Wm. B. Washburn, LL. D. 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq. . . , 



VICE PRE 

. . 1809—16 
1816— £8 
1828—14 
1844—48 
181^-^9 
1849—58 
1853-61 
1861—72 
1869 
1862—70 
1868-72 
1868 
1868 



SIDENTS. 

Charles Whitin, Emi 1868 

Lee Claflin, Esq 1868—70 

Caleb Holbrook, Esq 1862 

James 8. Araory, Esq 1862 

Hon. John H. Cliflbrd, LL. D. . 1869 

EUsha Tucker, Esq 1868 

James B. Crocker, Esq. . . . 1868 

E. 8. Moseley, Esq 1868 

Charles A. Jcsanp, Esq. • . 1870 

Hon. William Claflin, LL. D. 1871 

Key. Alex. H.Vinton, D.D. . 1878 

Hon. William Hyde, .... 1872 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES. 



Rev. Joseph 8te\'ens Buckminster, 1809—13 
Rev. Samuel C. Thacher, . . . 1813—17 
Rev. Charles LoweU, D. D. . . 1817—18 



Rev. lYancis Parkman, D. D. . 1818—49 
Rev. N. L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849—58 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1853 



RECORDING SECRETARIES. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor, 
Rev. James D. Knowles, . 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



1809—28 
1828—30 
1830—31 
1831—38 
183»-3a 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1839 — 44 

Rev. William M. Rogers, , . 1814—45 

Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1845—49 

Rev. George Richards, . . . 1849—58 

Rev. Daniel Butler 1858 



TREASURERS. 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. . . . 1809—11 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, . . . 1811—12 
John Tappan, Esq 1818—35 

EXECUTIVE 
Rev. William E. Channing, D. D. 1809—18 
Hon. Jonathan PhiUips, . . . 1809—16 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. . . . 1809 — 15 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1815—18 
Edward Tu^erman, Esq. . . 1816—30 
Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. . 1818—30 
Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. D. 1821—35 
Charles Tappan, Esq. ... 1830—40 



Henry Edwards, Esq. . . 


. 1835-49 


George R. Sampson, Esq. 


. . 1849—09 


Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 


. 1868 


COMMITTEES. 




Rev. Fhincis Parkman, D. E 


L . 1838—58 


Rev. George W. Blagden, D. 


D. 1835—49 


Henry Edwards, Esq. . . . 


. 1840—49 


Rev. George Richards, . , 


, . 1S49— 60 


George R. Sampson, Esq. 


. . 1849-68 


Albert Fearing, Esq. . . , 


. . 185S 


Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 


. . 1860 


Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 


. 1868 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Third Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts 
Bible Society, was held at the Booms of the Society, 
No. 15, Comhill, Boston, on Monday, May 27, 1872, at 
nine o'clock, A. M. In the absence of the President and 
Secretary, Eev. John O. Means, D. D., Chairman of 
the Executive Committee, called to order. Hon. Albert 
Fearing was chosen President pro tern., and Hbzekiah 
S. Chase, Esq., Secretary pro tem. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. A. P. Peabody, D. D. 

The Minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq., presented 
his Annual Report, which was accepted, and voted to be 
placed on file. 

• 

The Sixty-Third Annual Report of the Trustees was 
presented by the Chairman of the Executive Committee; 
and it was voted, on motion of Rev. Dr. Peabody, that the 
Committee be instructed to print the Report, with such 
changes and modifications as they may deem expedient. 

Dr. Means, in behalf of the Executive Committee, stated 
that having been authorized by the Trustees to make neces- 
sary arrangements for the public services of the Anniversary, 
they invited Rev. Dr. Z. Eddy, of Chelsea, to preach a 



Sermon before the Society ; and tUht he delivered a Discburse 
on the Universality of the Bible, in Shawmut Church, Sun- 
day Evening, May 26th, whereupon it was voted that the 
thanks of the Society be presented to the Bev. Dr. Eddy for 
his able and eloquent Sermon, and that a copy be requested 
for publication with the Annual Report* 

The Officers of the Society were elected for the ensuing 
year. 

After some remarks as to the importance of the work of 
the Society, and suggestions as to the best mode of carrying 
it on, it was voted to adjourn. 



* The Dif course of Dr. Eddjr U not printed with this Annual Report, 
but wiU be published at a future time. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Trustees of the Massachusetts Bible 
Society, are happy to report to the friends of this 
cause a year of usual prosperity. The^ means 
placed at their disposal have not been large j less, 
indeed, they are compelled to .believe, than fairiy 
expresses the regard felt for this work by the 
friends of truth among us; yet they have been 
such as to furnish a supply for much of the des- 
titution inevitably occurring in our own Common- 
wealth, while the wider field of the world has not 
been forgotten. They gratefully record the fact, 
that, to many of the poor, the Gospel has been 
given, and that the laborers in the various fields 
of philanthropy have been furnished with the 
Book, upon the truths of which, received into the 
heart, they rest their hopes of success. 

A Yice-President of the Society, John Pat- 
son WiLLiSTON, Esq., has recently died. In his 
removal we mourn the loss of one who was a 
lover of every good word, and a generous helper 
in every good work. 

During the year there have been issued from the 
Depository nine thousand nine hundred and 



8 

seventeen copies of the whole Bible, beside thir- 
teen thousand two hundred and four of the New 
Testament, five thousand two hundred and fifty- 
three of the Testament and Psalms, nineteen 
hundred and ninety-six portions of the Testament, 
two thousand and fifty-four of the Book of 
Psalms, and six hundred and twelve of the Book 
of Proverbs: in all, thirty-three thousand and 
thirty-six volumes. Of these, eight thousand 
five hundred and eighty-seven volumes, in the 
English and other languages, have been given 
away t^ seamen, Sunday-schools and missionary 
societies, and to destitute persons in various New 
England States, in the West, the Sandwich 
Islands and Africa. The cost of the gratuitous 
issues has been $2,929.29. 

"We are happy to notice, among our Roman 
Catholic population, a growing interest in the 
possession of the Word of God. This is shown, not 
only by the increased circulation among them of 
the Scriptures in the received version, but also 
by the very large number of Douay Bibles annu- 
ally purchased by them. While this version is 
doubtless inferior to the one commonly used 
among us, it is yet the Word of God, and we 
hail its large and growing circulation as indicat- 
ing the approach of the day when that ancient 
Church, once the depository of Divine Truth, 
shall again return to its light and walk by its 

teaching; 

A colporter has been employed for three 
months among the Canadian French population 



residing in our State. He has visited seven 
hundred and ninety-two families, — five hundred 
and five of them Somanists; sixty liquor stores; 
supplied eleven Protestant and sixty-four Soman 
Catholic. families found destitute; and read por- 
tions of the Scriptures in hundreds of these fam- 
ilies. He reports that, except in rare instances, 
the Roman Catholics who take these volumes, 
preserve them and read them. ^^Some six months 
since,'' he adds, ^ I donated a New Testament to 
an aged Roman Catholic man. Sometime *after^ 
ward, on opening his door, as I revisited him, I 
was not a little surprised and pleased to hear him 
and his wife exclaim, in earnest tones, * Wel- 
come I Welcome I ' I found the Testament lying 
on their table by the side of their prayer-book. He 
informed me that he was very much interested in 
reading the Gospel in his new book. After a 
brief conversation about the preciousness of the 
blessed Bible, and of the way of salvation revealed 
therein, I read a few verses, knelt down and 
prayed with them; for which they heartily 
thanked me. I left them pronouncing benedic- 
tions upon me." 

A colporter has been employed for three 
months also in Plymouth County. In this time 
he has visited the four Bridgewaters, — calling 
upon three thousand two hundred and eighty- 
four families. Thirty-five of these were found 
destitute and supplied. He sold four hundred 
and sixty-two Bibles and Testaments, and thirty 
smaller portions of the Scriptures, and gave away 



10 

one hundred and fourteen copies. The destitu- 
tions reported were among Protestant families. 

The income of the Society the past year, from 
all sources, has been $ 38,192.94. From legacies, 
donations and annual subscriptions, were. received 
$/6,616,12 ; for sales of Bibles and Testaments, 
$11,093.39; from dividends on general funds, 
and on special funds, subject to life annuities, 
$ 6,684.09; balance from previous year, $4,800.24. 
In addition to the sums contributed through our 
treasury, there has been sent from this Common- 
wealth directly to the American Bible Society 
at New York, $ 26,210. Our Secretary labors in 
all parts of the Commonwealth, and it is doubtless 
owing in a measure to his labors that this further 
amount is contributed to the common cause. 

The Treasurer's Report shows in detail the 
expenditures of the Society and its present finan- 
cial condition. The amount paid for Bibles and 
portions of the same, was $15,820.79; specific 
grant to the American Bible Society, $3,392.22: 
gratuitous issues, $2,929.29; salary of Secretary, 
traveling expenses and special grant, $2,664.01; 
salary of Depository Agent, assistant, and col- 
porters, $2,171.39; rent of Depository, taxes, 
insurance, fuel, gas, paper and printing, $541.52; 
freight and transportation, expense of annual 
meeting, reports, &c., &c., $ 366.44. 

It is proper to state, that the Society holds a 
portion of its funds in trust, to pay annuities to 
certain persons, for a certain period. The appar-^ 
ent income from the funds cannot all be used, 



11 

therefore, at present, for the distribution of 
Bibles. Annuities not yet drawn, but liable to be 
called for any time, make the balance in the hands 
of the Treasurer appear larger than is really at 
our disposal for charitable work. To under- 
stand this work, it is necessary, also, to keep in 
mind, that none of the running expenses of the 
Depository, or salaries of agents, are charged upon 
the sale of the Bibles and Testaments : these are 
sold at cost, with no margin of profit; the five 
per cent deduction, made by the Society at New 
York, hardly meeting package and freight to 
Boston. Thus our donations are devoted, not 
only to granting Bibles free of cost to the desti- 
tute, but to cheapening Bibles for those who pay 
for them. This cheapening of the Scriptures 
largely increases the circulation, which it is our 
great purpose to secure. 

The events of every year make more plain the 
fact, that the improvement in the character and 
condition of mankind, anticipated by all, and 
explicitly foretold by Inspiration, is to be large- 
ly effected by the diffusion of the Scriptures. 
Wherever this light penetrates, there is a grow- 
ing disposition to inquire what God hath taught 
on the great subjects of human life and destiny. 
This consummation, so greatly to be desired, the 
circulation of the Bible cannot fail to promote. 
In such well-doing it becomes no one to be 
weary, but to remember, and grow strong while 
remembering, that they are blessed who sow 
beside all waters. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OP THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 
PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the 
Committee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for 
carrying into effect the object of this Association, which being 
read from the Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs,, 
and was, with one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows, 
viz: — 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OP MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments, to be distributed among all persons 
inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of 
the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied 
without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled 
clergymen of every denomination of Christians within the State, 
who shall, in writing, request to be members ; of every person 
who shall subscribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not 
less than two dollars, and who shall remain a member so long as 
he continues the payment of that sum ; and of every person, 
who shall subscribe and pay to the Treasurer a sum not less 
than fifty dollars, he remaining a member during life, without 
being obliged to further contributions. 



13 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the 
direction of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the 
organization of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers 
are obtained, notice shall be given by the Committee, and also 
of the time and place of the meeting of the Society. 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treas- 
urer, Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who 
shall continue in office until the Society be incorporated, and 
until successors are chosen in their room ; and they, together 
with eighteen other members to be elected by ballot at the same 
time, of whom six shall be clergymen and twelve shall be lay- 
men, shall form a Board of Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from 
among the members of the Society, a Committee of 'three 
persons, to continue in office during the pleasure of the Board of 
Trustees, who shall have the management of the fund, and the 
distribution of the books procured with it, subject and according 
to such regulations and directions, as shall from time to time be 
prescribed by the Trustees at any meeting held on public notice 
given as aforesaid ; and the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in 
his hands to the order of the said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes 
aforesaid, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into . 
effect the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, il shali meet, oa 
regular notice given, for the due exercise of aU the powers 
granted by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall 
again meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, 
or Recording Secretary, to devise and adopt such further meas- 
ures as may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for 

effecting the intentions of the members. 

2 



14 

f 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the 
Trustees petitioned the General Court, and obtained the 
following 

ACT OP INCORPORATION. 

COMMONWEALTH OF IIA8BACHUBETTS. 

In the year of our Lord One Thousand Bight Hundred and Ten. An Act 
to incorporate the Bible Society of Masaachusetts. 

WhenoB, the persona hereafter named in this Act, together with 
many other oitizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves 
into a Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contri- 
bution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, 
who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be con- 
veniently supplied without the aid of others ; and whereas, in order 
that the pious and laudable objects of said Society may be better 
carried into effect, and the charity of said Society more extensively 
diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an Act of Incor- 
poration. 

Skc. I. Be it therefore enacted hy the Senate and House of Rtprtaenior 
ttves, in General Court assembled^ and by authoritif of the same, That 
William Phillips, Elsquire, the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. 
Joseph Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet 
Porter, D. D., the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Bald- 
win, D. D., the Hon. William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. 
Isaac Parker, Hon. Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, 
Esq., Idr. Joseph Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph 
May, and He'nry Hill, Elsquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. 
Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. Samuel H. W alley, together with 
those, who have associated, and who may hereafter associate with them 
for the purposes aforesaid, be, and they hereby are incorporated into 
a Society, by the name of The Bible Society or Massachusetts. 

Sec 2. Be U further enacted, That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legis- 
lature ; and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and 
the said Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any 
persons disposed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any 
grants or devises of lands and tenements in fee simple, or otherwise, 
and donations, bequests, and subscriptions of money, or other property, 
to be used and improved for the purposes aforesaid. 



16 

Sbc. 3. Be it further enadedL, That the said Corporation shall be, 
and hereby are empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that, which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the 
sum of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sec. 4. Be it further enacted^ That the said Society may sue and be 
sued, in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents 
to prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sec 5. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such 
roles and regulations, as to them shall appear necessary ; provided the 
same be not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Common- 
wealth. 

Sec. 6. *Be it further enacted. That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
he hereby is authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers 
printed in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting 
of said Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the 
time and place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of 
notifying the same : may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe 
their duty, and may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may 
be determined by the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such 
powers, conformable to the principles of this institution, as shall be 
deemed necessary. — Approved by the Governor, February 15, 1810. 



• COMMONWEALTH OF MA88ACFC8KTT8. 

la the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-flye. An Act in addition to an Aet 
to incorporate the Bible Society of Mauachusetts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in GenercU 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

Sec 1. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts, shall hereafter be known 
by the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that 
name shall have, hold and enjoy all its rights and privileges and be 
subject to all its liabilities and obligations to the dame extent as if its 
name had not been changed. 

Sec 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circu- 
late and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the Eng- 
lish language, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are 
now authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, any thing 
in the Act incorporating the said Society to the contrary notwith- 
standing. — Jipproved by the Governor, February 27, 1865. 



BY-LAWS 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 1851, 
the following By-Laws were adopted : — 

ARTICLE I. 

Thb Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act 
of Incorporation, namely, '* the raising a fund by voluntary con- 
tribution to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments 
of the version in common use in the churches of New England, 
for distribution - among all persons inhabiting within the State 
and elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and 
who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of 
Christians in the State, may become a member of this Society 
by signifying his request in writing to that elfect, to the Record- 
ing Secretary — who shall keep a record of all persons who shall 
80 become members, in a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually, jshall thereby become a member of the Society, 
so long as such payment is continued, — and the Treasurer shall 
keep a list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE lY. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than 
twenty dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of 
the Society for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording 
Secretary. 



17 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen 
Vice Preiiiderits, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secre*' 
tary, Treasurer, and eighteen Trustees and an Auditor. The 
Pre^dent, Vice Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secre- 
taries and Treasurer, shall each be ex-officio members of the 
Board of Trustees, and the Recording Secretary shall be the 
recording officer of that Board. These officers shall all be 
chosen by baJint at the Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees; and he, and also the Vice Presidents and Secretaries 
and Treasurer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on 
such officers respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns 
of the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act 
of Incorpordtion is vested in the Society, and they shall prescribe 
the duties of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation 
of all funds and donations, and generally have and possess all 
the power and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the So^ 
ciety. It shall be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, 
to make and lay before the Society a particular Report of all 
their doings, with all such documents and vouchers as may be 
asked for by any member, and such Report shall be had and 
considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice of 
Trustees, for tlie year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the 
Monday preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year, and 
at this meeting it shall be competent to traqsact any business 
which the Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting 
shall be given by the Recording Secretary at least seven days 
before the holding thereof, by notice published in at least one^ 
newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time bj 
the Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three 



18 

newspapers published in Boston, and no business shall be trans- 
acted at such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the 
notice. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in 
March and September, in each year, and such other special 
meetings as they may direct, or as the President may at any 
time call. Five Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annu- 
ally, shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, 
a Committee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them ; the Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of 
all matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the ap- 
pointment of all agents, subject to the approval of the TruHtees, 
and the defining of their respective duties ; the .Committee on 
the Depository shall have the management of all matters con- 
nected with the Society's Depository for the sale of Bibles, — all 
of said Committees, at all times however, to be subject to the 
direction and control of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual 
meeting, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, 
by vote of a majority of those present 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE MEMBERS. 

Each Life Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles 
'and Testaments. 

N. B. — The above books will be delivered to members by 
personal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued 
only for the current, not for past years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE. 



BT THE PAYMENT OF TWENTY D0LLA&8 AND UPWARDS. 



Abbe* R«r. Frederick R., Botton. 

Abhe, Mrs. Frederick R. '* 

Abbot, Charles H., Lowdl. 

Abbott, Kev. Jacob J., TmrmotUk, Me. 

Abom, John 6., Waktjidd. 

Adami, Elizabeth W., /><rry, JV. H, 

Adams, Frank N., Medioajf. 

Adaras, John Clark, Hopkinton. 

*Adams, John Quincy, Qatncy. 

Adams, Nehemiah, D. D., B9»U%. 

Adams, Stephen, Wui Medway. 

*Albree, John, BotUn, 

«Albro, John A., D. IX, Cumhriig: 

Albro, Mrs. Elizabeth 8., WaUkam, 

AlbrO} MiM Annie E. <* 

Alden, Almira S. C, Foxbort*, 

Alden, Ebeneser, Randolpk, 

*Alden, Mrs. Ann K. ** 

Alden, Rus«ell, CmmpiUo. 

Alden, Miss Sarah B., Rmniolph. 

Alden, Miss Sosan, ** 

Aldrieh, Mrs. Mary B., fFuihort*, 

Allen, Mrs. Cjrrus, Franklin, 

Allen, Rov. Nathaniel G., Botton. 

Allen, Richard H., Braintr^ 

AlTord, Alvin, SkeJbume. 

Ames, James S , Haver kill, 

Andrews, Artemas F., Jitkbjf, 

Andrews, C. L., Boston. 

Andrews, George W., Danvera, 

Andrews, Stephen, OUmeutor, 

Andrews, W. T., Booton, 

Andrews, Thomas E., HoUUtotu 

Andrews, Walter H., Wkiiinnia$, 

*Appletoo, Samuel, Boston, 

*Appleton, William, ** 

Archibald, Edward, Metkuon, 

Armee, Miss Clara A., CampoUo. 

Armsby, Mrs. H. A., WkitintviUe, 

Arnold, Sosan O., Braintree, 

Atwood, Mrs. Abby, Bergen^ JV*. J. 

Atwood, Mra. Elizabeth M., " 

Atwood, Edward 8., Botton, 

Atwood, John W., Bergen, JV*. J, 

Babcock, Mis. Nancy, Botton, 

Babeock, Rev. William R., JaMaicc PUin. 



Babeon, Miss Maria R., QloneuUr. 

Bachelor, Mr«. Mary A., WkitintviUo. 

Bacon, Geor|e W., ^wton, • 

Bacon, Jacob, Olmtetter, 

Bacon, Rer. James M., Jitkby. 

Bacon, Joseph N., JVewlem. 

Backus, Rev. Joneph W., Tkomtuton, Ct. 

Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., Dortkuttr, 

Baker, Francis, Peabody, 

Baker, Susan S., *' 

Bafeom, Lincoln, fFinckendon, 

Baldwin, Mins Josephine L., Lptn, 

Balmer, William, Jr., fVkitintviUe, 

Ball, Miss Elizabeth, Concord, ' 

Bancroft, Amasa, Gardner. 

Bancroft, Henry L., Jitllbmrff. 

* Barber, Martin, Sktrhom 

Barber, Sully C , •* 

Barbour, Rev. William M., Bangor, M«. 

Barbour, Mrs. Eliza A. ** 

*Bardwell, Lieut. Charles S., Wketety. 

Barker, Hiram, Brigkton. 

Bardsley, Joseph, fVkitintmlle. 

Barnard, William F., Marlkoro.* 

Bamei, U. H , Lowell, 

*Barnes, William, MerIboro% 

Barnes, Zilpah, HoHnUter, Jf, H. 

Barrett, Nhthan H., Concert 

Barrett, Miss Rebecca M. *< 

Bartlett, Rev. Edward O., IVorMfaiiM, R. I, 

Bartlett, Mrs. Eleanor C, PlymeiUA. 

Bartlett, Thomas, Boeton, 

Barrows, Sarah M., LakeeWe, 

Bassott, Henry, Jftwlon, 

Basaett, Mrs. Lucretia C, Ckerlemmd, 

Baasett, Sarah E , Jfewbmryport. 

Batehelder, Mrs. Elizabeth H., Peabodjf, 

Ratehelder, John M., HoUiHon, 

Batclieller, Esra, A^rM BrookJLoUL 

Batcheller, Mrs. Luthera C, •< 

Batchelor, Mist Franeei A., WkUintrriOe, 

Batebelor, Stephen F. 

Batt. Rev. William J., Leomintter, 

Batt, Mrs. Mary 0. •< 

*Bayl6y, Robert, Mmb rnj^iL 

B<*al, Akxaader, Beelen, 



(i 



20 



Beal, Mrs. Lnuiia, Cokas*^. 
B^alt, Uuiic N., Campello, 
Bean, Cyrun Beetle, Doetr^ JV. H, 
*Beane, Rev. Samuel, Norton. 
Bearie, Uaac, J^'utick* 
Bearte, Mim Olive II., CentreviUe. 
Beebe, Jaroea M., Boston, 

Beebe, Mrt. Jimea M. " 
•Beebe, Charlea E. ** 

Beebe, Franceii L. " 

Boebe, Edward P. " 

Beebe, Emily B. " 

Bcobfl, Marjr L. *< 

"Beecher, Rev. <.'harlcfl, Oeorgetoitn, 
Beecher, Rev. William II.. Ao. Brookfield. 
Belden, .Mrn. Marianne P,, Whatel^. 
Belden, William P., Gardner. 
Belknap, Mint Martha M., Framingkam, 
Banner, Burnham C, Lowell. 
Benton, Frederick A., Ktwton. 
Biicoe, Mr«. Arthur G., WeAtbord'. 
Bixcue, Rev. Thomua C, UxbrtdgB, 
Billing*, Charles E , Mewt^m. 
Blockiitono, Mrs. Lydia E., Ckesttr^ K. H. 
Blanchard, Miai Francei C, (Proton. 
Blitt, Rev. Charles R., Waktjield. 
Bliii, Mra. Chat let R. '* 

Blod:;ett, Benjamin (^, AVwton. 
Blodgott, Simeon, Soutk DeerJUld, 
Blood, CyruM W., WinckuUr. 
Blood, Lyman, Qroton. 
Bodwell, Rev. Jowcpli C, Hartfardf Conn. 
Bodwcll, Mn. Cathaiino, ** 
•Bond, George, Bogton. 
Booth, Charles E., Ckieapee. 
Bourne, 'I'homa* li., Fujhoro*. 
Boutwell,Mr«. Ilannuh H., Braintree* 
Bowem, Luke K., Boston, 
Bowera, .Mr«. Cura H. '* . 
Bracket, Rev. Juiiiah, Ckarlesiowrt. 
*Br«ckett, Jame«, Qiuacy. 
Brackett, Lemuel, " 
•Braman, Rev. fiaac, Oeorgetown. 
Brandenberg, Oliver C. W., S-FraneUeOyCaL 
Brant, Aaron, flakefield. 
•Breed, Rev. William J., JRayaJkam. 
Brewer, Cyrua, DorektHtr, 
Brewer, Mri. C. F., Boston* 
Brewer, John R. " 

Briekett, Franklin, Haverhill, 
Biiggs, Miaa Catharine Clark, Wenkam, 
Briggi, Rev. William T., £«( Douglas, 
Brigga, Mrt. Abby L., " 

Brigham, Deiter P., fVestboro*. 
Brigham, Mri. Dexter P. ** 
Brigham, Rev. WiHard, fVbukenion. 
Brock, Robert 6., fVhiiinsville, 
•Bronifield, Eliubelh, Boston, 



•Brookn. Peter C, Boston, 

Brooks, Peter C. ** 

Brown, Mri. Harriet L. " 

Brown, Rebecca, fVkitinsviUe, 

Brown, Joseph, Oroton, 

Brown, Mri. Mary L., HaverkUl, 

Brown, Robert K., Wkitinsoillo. 

Bryant, Solon, " 

Bucklin, Simon S., Brooklins. 

Buell, George C, ^ingfitld. 

Bulkley, Mra. C. F., PlatUbnrgk^ X, T, 

Bollard, Mrs. John, Jr., Medwaf. 

Burheck, Samuel K., Bofton. 

Burge, Lorenzo, " 

Burohnm, Robert W., Essex. 

Buir, Chniles C, Juburndals. 

Burruge, J. C, Boston. 

Burrage, Jos'*ph, .Arlington, 

Uurrago, Mury C. ' " 

Burr ill, Amoi C, Uxbridge. 

*Burrill, Henry, Jr., East Jtbington. 

Buih, Henry J., H'sstJUld. 

BuAhby, Sophia W., Peabody, 

Butter, Rev. Daniel, Boston, 

Butler, Mn. Jane D. ** 

Cady, Daniel R., D. D., .Arlington, 

Cady, Mr«. Harriet 8. *« 

Caldwell, Rev. W. E., Hyannis, 

Camp, George, Sontk lladley Fa>l9, 

Camp, John, ** 

Camp, Samuel, SpringfieJd. 

Capen, Mra. Charles, Framingkam, 

Capron, John "W., Uxbridgs, 

Capron, Laura A. W. *• 

Capron, William C. " 

Carleton, George II., HaverkUl, 

Carpenter, Rev. Carlof C, Boston, 

Carpenter, Catharine E., Fexboro^, 

Carpenter, Daniel, 

Carpenter, Edton, 

Carpenter, Horace, 

Carr, Charlea R., Wkitinsville, 

Carr, John C, West J^twbury, 

Carrier, Rev. Aogo«tui H., MnneapoHg,Min, 

Carrutlieri, Rev. William, Danvsro, 

Carter, Edward, ./fntfeoer. 

Carter, Joahua T., WkitinsmUa, 

Carter, William H., Lowell 

Cary, George C, Jf. Bridgeioater, 

Cary, Mrf. Mary D., Fozbenf. 

Caae, Mn. Mary Olive, J\>ie York City. 

Oaswell, Lemuel E., Boston. 

Ijhamberlin, John, ifkitinsvWt. 

Chamberlain, Mra. Samuel, Westhor^, 

Chandler, Miaa Francea E., Andnver, 

Chandler, H. H., Ckarleslawn 

Chapin, Caleb T., Korikboro\ 

Chapin,Jobaa, IFAiftnm/Ie. 



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i< 



u 



21 



Cbapio, Joiiah L., Lawrtne*, 

Chapia, Marcos, Monion. 

Chapin, Milo, Sfringjield, 

Cbapin, Miaa Sarah, WkUinnUU. 

Chapman, Gaorge H., Winckuitr, 

ChaM, Ann Maria, HtmerhiU, 

Chaaa, Charlea W^ «« 

Chaa«, DaTid B^ WkUintviUe, 

ChaM, George S., HtmcrkUL 

Cbaae, Hesaklah, Lptn, 

Chaae, Robert, Huvtrhill, 

Cheever, Ira, Ckeltes, 

Child, Miaa Anna 6., SpringJUli. 

Child, George H., SfringJlMt O, 

Child, MiM Lucy, Thtl/trdj Ft. 

Childi, Carloa, /feaniAer, JV. H, 

Childi, Horace, ** 

Choate, David, M. D., &ii«ai. 

^lap, Jamee, Dorekuter, 

Clap, Mri. Rebecca, Boat0n. 

Clapp, Jamee B. " 

Clapp, John C. " 

Clapp, Samuel, Foxboreugh. 

Clark, Rev. Bdward L,, Jfho JTavem, Ct, 

Clark, BIbridge, E^t Mtdwy, 

Clark, George, Concord, 

Clark, Jnmea G., Amdovor. 

Clark, John L., ** 

Clark, Jonathan, Wineketttr. 

Clark. Rev. Joaeph B., ^lewtonviUe. 

Clark, Juliui L., H'eot Newton, 

*Clark, Rev. L. P., WkitinnOlt, 

Clark, Mn. Miranda D., Booton, 

Clark, Miaa Nelly, Skerborn. 

Clark, Oliver R., fVinek^otor, 

*Clark, Rev. P. IC, Ckarltmotd. 

Clark, Rowae R., WkitinsvUU. 

Clark, Rufufl W., D. D , jStbanf, Jf, T. 

Clarke, Mn. Adelisa H., Med»ajf. 

Clatke, Rev. Dorui, D. D., Booton, 

Clarke, Francis, Haverhill, 

Clarke, George E., Jamcuea Plain. 

Clarke, Mrs. Sarah L., Boot^n, 

Clary, John, Conieay* 

Clary, Mrs. S. a, fTarekam. 

Cleavolnnd, Waldo, Sautk DoerJleU. 

ClifTord, Wyatt B., Ckatkum. 

Clough, John K., Cambridgt. 

Cobb, Andrew B., M'owton, 

Cobb, Jacob, JIbingtom. 

Cobb, Rev. L. H., Springjiad, Ft, 

^obb, Richard, Boston, 

*Codman, Charlea R. ** 

Codman, Mrs. Tatharine, ** 

Coe, Laura C, fVkHintville. 

Coe, Miry A., Eaat Domgftu, 

Coggin, Rev. William S., Boxford, 

Cogswell, Doane, Brmdford. 



Cogswell, Ebeoeser, Jpnoitk, 

Colby, Albert, Bootmu 

Colby, Barak, HoMnikor^ Jf, H, 

Cole, Asa, Wut Medwy. 

Cola, Miss Ella A., Modwaf, * 

Cole, John A., ** 

Conant, Charlea E., ffinckesttr, 

Conant, Jeoaie A., Gardner, 

Conn, Horace, IVobwm, 

Cook, Aaa, Miwton. 

Cook, Henry A., WkUin$vilU, 

Cook, Mra. Maria R., Uxbridg§, 

Cook, J. Sullivan, WkUinsviUB, 

Cooley, Mrs. Olive P., CkarUmottL 

Coolidge, Rev. Amoa H., Lnuttor, 

Coolidge, Joseph, Boston, 

Coolidge, Lowell, Skorbom. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Catharine, ** 

•Copp, Joaeph A., D. D., CfcetsM. 

Copp, Mrs. Pedora P. ** 

Cord ley, Mrs. Lydia G., Laaorenca. 

Corey, Mrs. Mary, Wtttboro"*, 

Cornish, Mrs. Elisabeth B., CentreviX!: 

Corson, John, JIaverkUL 

Couaens, Beulah P., Newton Ctntr§, 

Cowdrey, Robert, Winektoter, 

Crafts, Mrs. Sarah P., JfowUn, 

Crawford, Ellea A., Barro, 

Crittenden, Miss Rebeca S., Cknrlemoid 

Crittenden, Simeon, ** 

Crockett, Mrs. Eliia, HrnvtrkiU. 

Croaby, Wilson, CentrtPiOe, 

Crosby, Mrs Eleanor L. ** 

Crosby, James, Bo^n, 

Croaby, Mra. Rebecca, ** 

'^Cruiokshanks, Mrs. Anna M., Sj^oncor, 

Cruick»hanks, J. DeWitt, Waster GrmreOt 

Cruic^^hanks, Miss Mary 8. <• [Mo. 

Cruickshanks, Miss Mary, CkeUea. 

Croikshanks, George, fVkitinovilU, 

Comings, Charles, Hartmrd, 

Corrier, Rev. Albeit H., Lpin, 

Curtis, Abner, Ernst Abington, 

Coshman, George H., ^flsrtk BridgsWMttr, 

Coshman, Mra. Rachel B. ** 

Coshman, Joseph I., Mots Braintrsi. 

Cutler, Rev. Calvin, Jiubumdalt. 

Cutler, Rev. Samnel, Hanover, 

Cotter, Charlea A., Waltkawt, 

Cotter, J. Dana, •• • 

Cutter, E., M. D., Wobum. 

Cutter, Stephen, IVinckosttr, 

Cotter, Stephen H. *« 

Dakin, Thoroaa L., Sudbmry, 

Dame, Henry, Psmkody, 

Damon, Albert P., Rsmding, 

Damon, Mrs. Edward C, Cvmsord, 

Dana, Mra. Edward H., tpswitk,. 



22 



*Dana, Samoel, Btfitom. 

Dana, Charlaa B., WMtdeji. 

Dana, John, BncklimMm , 

Dine, John H. <* 

Daniell, Mra. EJiia B., JSoat JUMiMy. 

•Daniall, Otia, BmCom. 

Daniali, Elijih B., Etui Mtdwmg, 

DanieU, Mra. Hariaa W. *< 

Danieli, Mra. William, Meivoaf, 

DaTii, AirVed N., U, WilmingUm. 

Davis, Alvah M* HwtrkilU 

Davii, Hear J L., Bradford, 

Davii, George L., Mbrth Ando^er, 

Davii, Jamoa, Bottan, 

Davia, John^Mttknen, 

Davii, John, SmunnlU, 

Davit, Joahoa H. <* 

Davii, Lydia K., DmutaNa. 

Davis, Mra. M. A., Mtdtoap 

Davii, MiM Mary H., Coiuord, 

Davii, Rav. Parley B^ Hf4$ PtH. 

Davii, Thaddeoa Uriah, DunstmUe. 

DaviiOD, Oeorga W., WkUinnilU, 

Dawei, Rev. Ebenaier, Digktan, 

Day, Robert L., ^twton. 

Dean, Min Abbie T., Foxbon*. 

Dean, Clara L., Holhrook, 

Denharo, Rev. George, Beoerlf. 

Denbam, Mrs. Clara D. ** 

Dlckerman, Rev. Lytander, fFeymtutk, 

Dickion, Oliver, CoMtrd. 

Dickson, Mra. Sarak C. " 

Dii, Mra. Elijah, BoHon. 

Dtx, Samuel F., AVtoCaa. 

Doane, Heman 8., CharUttown. 

Dodd, Rev. Stephen G., St. J0A9, A*. B. 

*Dodge, Rev. John, JVartk Brooi^/Utd, 

Dudge, Mri. Ann 8., " 

Dodge, Mri. J. M. C, Jtndovtr. 

Doggett, Rev. Thoi., JiimgarM Falls, JV. T, 

Doggett, Mra. Fraaeei L. " 

I>ofXetti William, " 

Doliber, Mies Sarah Liziie, Marhlekead, 

*Dorr, John, BoHan, 

Dorr, Samuel, ** 

•Dow,Joaiah, " 

Dowae, Mri. Carrie D., Sk€rbom» 

*Dowie, Edward, Dedkawu 

Dowae, Elisabeth R. L., Skerbam, 

Dra^e, Rev. Ellia R., 9Va$land. 

•Dudley, P. W., WkUinnilU, 

Dudley, Mra. Sarah A. ** 

Dunham, Charlea U., ifinehuttr, 

Dunham, Mra. Mary L., ** 

Dunlap, Sumner, South Di$rJUli. 

Dunton, Hiram P., Sfgnctr, 

Dona, Edward H., BoaUtu 

Durfee, Bar, Cbaa. Stoddui, M^ntburfffort, 



C( 



c« 



Dufgin, Jamei, W§9t Mltwkuy, 

•Dutch, M. Elisabeth, Boatm, 

Dnttoo, Mra. Mary J., " 

Dwinell, Leonard, Afi/76iir|f. 

Dyer, Rev. E. Porter, Skrentahmrjf* 

Dyer, Mr*. Maria D., 0/o«e«at«r. 

Eager, Williain, Bast&n, 

Bomea, Mra Nancy, Slun^omm 

Eamei, Warren, fFUmingUn. 

Eattburn, Rl Rev. Maoioa, D. D ^Botfn, 

Eaatman, Rev. Lneiua R., Jr., Framingkam 

Eastman, Mra. Jane C. ** 

Eaton, Mn. Ann E., Wak0Ltld. 

Eaton, Eben» Framimgliawi, 

Eatoo, Edward, jtfitfway. 

Eaton, MiM Martha W., FiUkbwrg, 

Euton, William, Baatam, 

Eatoo, William J., WaaikaT9\ 

Eddy, Joahya, Euai MiddJUbara*, 

Edwards, Mn. Francea 8., Dedkam. 

Edwardi, Frederick B., JV*. Ckalnuford, 

Edwards, Maria F. '* 

Edwards, Nathan B. ** 

Edwarda, Nathan F. 

Edwards, Sibyl R. 

Edwardi, Victor B. 

Eldred, Lorenso, Falmouth. 

•Eliot, Samuel, Boston, 

•Eliot, Samuel A. " 

Elliott, Robert, Oloba FiUaga. 

Ellii, Willard K., £. Jtiedwo^, 

Ells, Mri. Elisabeth W., Obarlin, O. 

Ellswoith, Rev. A A., Waterloo, lowm, 

Bllsworth, Mra. A. O. AV. C., hefmomtk, 

•Elwell, Robert, BtfHon, 

Emerson, Miss Ellen T., Concord, 

Emeraon, Jaeob, Jr., Jiatkuan 

Emerson, Mra. Jacob, ** 

Emerson, R. V. C, JVetftan. 

Emeraon, William, Waatbaro\ 

Emery, George F. ** 

Emery, Mra. Harriet, AWtA Wagmoutk, 

Emery, Rev. Joahua, ** 

Emery, Mra. Mary, Ckttkkm* 

Emery, Mrt. Sarah M., M'afebwryport* 

•Everatt, Edward, Boaton, 

Ewing, Rev. Edward C, EnfMd. 

Fairbanki, Ueracbel, HaoerkiU. 

Fairbanks, HersehnI P. " 

•Fairbanks, Stephen, Boaton. 

Fairbanka, Timothy R., Medvaf, 

•Farnsworth, Mrs. Abel, Qrolon, 

Farnsworth, Esra, BoaUm, 

Farr, Alba A., Metkuan. 

Farwell, Stephen T., Cambridga* 

Faxon. Miss Rachel A., BrauUraa, 

Fay, Mrs. Addison G., Gsacond. 

Fay, Chatba H., frkitinaviilt. 



23 



Pay, Cyiut, Wtthorjd*. 
Taj. Josiah C, Hvpkimlom, 
Fay, 8. P., WtMtboro' 
Fayerweathar, Mra. Santb. A , Wutkmxf, 
FayerwMtlMr, Miaa Sarah W. •« 
Faaring, Albert, B—u%, 
Feariof , Mra. Albert, " 
Feleh, laaae, M)aliclu 
Fiold, Jobo W., Botton, 
Field, Mrt. Amelia C, '* 
Field, Joel, Mittineuf^iM* 
Fither, Miaa lilisa, ATctf ««y. 
Fisber, Mrs. Lewis, Eatt Medtcof, 
FUher, Milton M., M§dmmf VMM 
Fiaber, Samuel T^ Cmnttm. 
Fiske, Daniel T., D. D , JftwhtrjporU 
Fiske, Oeorge B. UoUigtan. 
Fiake, George T., JWttivrypeK. 
Fiike, Mary Fidelia, ■ '* 
Fitcb, Jobn A., HfldmUn. 
^'its, Daniel, D. D., Ip»9iek, 
Fits, Mra. Hannah B. D. ** 
Fits, Daniel, Jr. ** 

Fits, Daniel P. «* 

Flagg, Rufut C, J^'Wtk JSndever, 
Flandera, Joeepb, HactrhtlL 
Fletcher, Rphraim d., fFkitifuwiUi, 

Fletrher, Mrs Emma A. ** 

Fletcher, Mre. Emily M. •• 

Fletoher, Jamea, ** 

Fletcher, Mra. L. C. ** 

Fletcher, Lewis C. 

Fletcher, Samoel J. 

Fletcher, Mrs. Hannah C, M*tuk4H9r, 

Fletcher, Isaac W., Staw. 

Fletcher, Nancy B. ** 

Fletcher, Rev. James, Qrotan. 

Fletcher, Mrs. Lydia M. *« 

Fletcher, StillnMn, tVtukuUr. 

Fletcher, William, •• 

Flinn, Mrs. Paulina, ** 

Flint, Mrs. Hannah, P—Mlf 

Flint, lievi M., StotigMon. 

Flint, Thomoa, Boston, 

Floyd, Misa Mary J., Psmbodf. 

Folger, Allen, Cuiieonf, JV. //. 

Forbnsb, William, Hkitimawai§. 

Ford, Rev. Oeorge, Venailh$, Jf. Y. 

*Ford, I'homas A., Bo*t9%. 

Ford, Thomas A., Jfartk BrUgwmUtr, 

Ford, Mrs Elisaa ** 

Fosdick, Charles, OreUn, 

FoMlick, Frederick, **^ 

*Fosdiek, Rose, ** 

«Fo«diek,SamnelW.*< 

Fosdick, MUs Mary, *< 

^Foster, Rev. Aanm, £. ChmrUwumL 

Foster, Rev. Atfdiaoa P., JHoUm. 



(( 



<i 



ct 



i« 



Foster, Mrs. Hatlie D., MaJde; 
Foster, Miaa Elisa C, Hswief, 
Poster, Mrs. Harriet L., Wmek§mdo9h 
Foster, Mra. Mmry, P^mtr. 
*Fnnels, Ebeneser, Baslen. 
French, Mrs. Harriet 8., 7*ainitaii. 
Frothingham, A. T., CambrUgs, 
Fullerton, Rer. Bradford M., Palmer, 
Furber, Rev. Daniel L., Jftwton Centre* 
Furber, Mrs. Maria B., ** 

Gage, Gawin R., Wi^rtm. 
Gale, Rev. Wakefield, Eaetkamfton, 
*aaie, Mrs. Wakefiitid, 
Gale, Jastln Edwardi, 
Gallot, Nathan, OreCeiu 
Galloup, David R., Peabody, 
Gammell. Rev. 9ereno D., Botfvrd. 
• Gardner, Willie P., Oantner, 
Garrette, Uev. Edmond Y., PUUburg^ Pa. 
Garrette, Mrs. Pransenia W. ** 
Garrette, Flora Oertrade, ** 

Garrette, Mary Spring, ** 

Garratte, Sarah Arabella, Faxbaro*. 
Galea, Henry (7., CUcopee. 
George, Mrs. Ellen K. ** 
GiUon, Mrs. Lather, Oraton. 
Gibbs, George L., WhitinsoiB», 
•Gibba, Mra. Mary, Botten. 
Gilbert, Benjamin R. *• 
Giles, Mrs. Elisabeth W., RbekperL 
Gilman, Miss Rebeeca L, BoHoh. 
Gloaaoo, Cbarlea A , Mfgm Braintree. 
Gleason, Rev. Oeorge L., Mmncketter, 
Gltason, Mrs. Charlotte A. ** 

Guodell, H. AngiMtos, fTkUiiuviUe, 
Gordon, Solomon J., Bteten, 

Gordon, Mrs. Rebecca, ** 

Gordon, Jeannie, ** 

Gott, J. R., ReckperL 

Gough, Herbert D., fforeetter, 

Gough, John B., BoyUUm. 

Gough, Mrs. Mary B. •« 

Gourgas, Miss Abby M., Cmicerd. 

Gourgas, Miss Margaret V. ** 

Gould, Mra. S. W., Wutboro*. 

*Grant, Moses, BeHon, 

Grassie, Rev. Thomas O., M*UtM»m» 

Graves, Mrs. Amanda R., Sttnderlmnd. 

«Gray, Francis C^Boetan. 

*Gray, Henry, " 

Gray, Horace, ** 

Gray, John C. *< 

Gray, William, Hblbrook. 

Gieeley, Rev. Edward H., HaterkUL 

Greeley, Mra. Edward H. ** 

*Greene, Rev. J 8. Copley, Brook'iM, 

Greene, Rev. Ricterd 0., Spr^ngM-d. 

Orceawood, OhailM H., Omrimr, 



24 



Graravrood, Mri. Bally K., 8ktrk0m. 
Gregory, Rar. Lewif, 9fut Jlmethtujf, 
*Grew, John, Btton. 
Grifga, CharlM D., WulkoM\ 
Orlggt, Dr. 8«iniMl, ** 
Origfft, Mra. 8. M. •* 
G rover, Mn. Caroline, Fexlert*. 
GnlliTor, Ltnosl, Chmrlttltnon. 
Hadley, Samuel D., SowurviU^. 
Hale, D. Frank, Ckicopr§. 
Hale, E. J. M., HmotrkUL 
Hale, Mra. £. J. M. <• 
Hall, Mn. Joeepb F., GfreCeii. 
Ham, Mra. Catharine K., WiMkuUr, 
Hambleton, Kev. 8. 1)., fVorcetter, 
H»miltoo, Rav. B. F., Botton. 
Hamlan, Rev. George M., Tatmton. 
*Hamroait, Mra. Mary, BtUn, 
Hammond, Rev. William B., Atmtkntt. 
Hammond, Mrs. Louiee M. ** 
Hard wick, Thomaa, QiiiiMf. 
Hardy, Truman, 7*ikoflijweii, O. 
Hare, Rev. George 8., BoiAon, 
Harrington, Rov. Bli Whitney, JV*. i^gterlf, 
Harlow, Rev. Ruftu K., JUtdwuf. 
Hartshorn, Edward, Btriitu 
Hart well, Lottie E., Ortlan, 
Haikell, William P., AbrtfA Broo^JMd, 
Haatingt, Alice, JftwImnUl^. 
Haatingi, HoUia, Frammgkawk, 
*Hateh, Benjamin, £•«« FiUwunik^ 
Hatch, Anna 8., Bra4Jord. 
Hatch, Wellmao Willay, Atkin§on^ JV. //. 
Hatch, Mri. Carrie L. •« ■ •« 

Haven, George A«, CtimfM»» 
Haven, Rev John, Charlton, 
Hawea, Mra. A. L., QrmfUm. 
Hawea, Cynthia, ITrmUaak 
Hawea, Julia, ** 

Hayden, Alice M., Hvihr^ok, 
Hayea, Rev. Stephen H., Aoaton. 
Hajward, Miia Clara, BraMret, 
Hayward. Eliaa, « 

Hay ward, Miu HatUe L., WkUinnmt. 
Hayward, John, ** 

Hayward, Paul, A§kkf, 
Haywood, Mra. Elisabeth C, FmMin. 
Basel, Mrs. Sarah L*., QUmcuitr, 
Haslewood, Mra. A. M., Mm^nard, 
Headlay, Rev. P. C, BvtUm, 
Healy, Rev. Joaeph W., A*. Orkant, 
*Heard, John, Ipnnek, 
Hemenway, Miaa Harriet, Oroton, 
Henahaw,,Fraooia, Boitvn, 

Henthaw, Mra. Sarah W., «« 
Beoahaw, Laura, ** 

Herriek, K«v. William D., A*. Amh§r»L 
Heisey, Jacob, fesAere'. 



Heraey, Mra. Polly, Hingkan* 

Hewina, Mra. Annette P., Foxhor^* 

*Uewina, Levi R. '* 

Hewina, Miaa Louisa B., ** 

Hewitt, Joseph, Mrih Bridgtwmt§r, 

Heywood, Martha W., Oardmtr, 

*Higginsoo, Stephen, Jr., BotUu. 

Hildratb, Mra. Blary R., Oreten. 

Hill, Rev. George E., Soutkfortt CL 

♦UiU, Henry, Btteu. 

Hill,Jotham, ffohtm. 

HiU. PhiUp E., Bridt$mat§r, 

Hilli, Mrk C. D. •* 

Hilton, Henrietu M., Mtiwaf. 

Hilton, Bev. John V., Ka'awMUMf Mich. 

Hilton, William, Brm4furd, 

Hitchcock, George M., BriwtJLtUU 

Hobvt, Peter, AmCm. 

HobMM, MiM Priscilla, RvwUf. 

*Holbrook, Elitha, Rmat Randolph, 

Holbrook, B. Everett, H^lbraok 

Holden, Mra. Sarah, Or^flam. 

Holland, Miaa Sarah B., BoaUu, 

Holm, Jacob P., JttUdeiu 

*Holmes, Abiel, D. D , Oam^rtd^s. 

Holmes, Miaa Elisabeth A., iBatouUrs, Jtt. 

*Holmot, Mrs. Fanny D., JWrton. 

Hohnaa, George W., Bridgtmater, 

Holmes, Miss Wealthy A., Caaqistta. 

Holt, Jamea A., JIndoctr. 

Holton, Thomaa 8., fVinchMttr. 

Homer, Charlea W., C^mkridgt* 

Hooker, George B., SAsrtem. 

Hooker, Mra. Martha V., BotU*, 

*Hooper, Robert, ** 

Hoppin, Rev. Jamea M., ATsw Aisasa, Ct. 

Hoamer, Miss Elixa, CVnMrtf. 

Houghton, Cephas, Harvard, 

Hovey, George C, Btton, 

How, Frederick, Datntra. 

*How, Jamea, BvsUu. 

Howe, Mra. Uaonah Maria, therbom, 

Howard, Cary, Jfitrth BridgtwaUr, 

Howard, David, " 

Howard, Mrs. U. Frances, ** 

Howard, Mra. Matilda P. *• 

Howard, Rev. Martin 8., Wilbrahawt. 

^Howe, John, /iorlh Bridgewatgr. 

Howe, Martha L., Gardner, 

Howe, Samuel A«, Wtsthmro^, 

Howea, Mn. Caroline U., CkarUwkiU, 

Howes, Collins, CkMhawL 

Hoyt, Henry, BfUn, 

Hoyt, Mrs. Maria, Praminghawu 

Hoyt, Wm. H., Hbstoii. 

Hubbard, Mra.Cbarle8 A., Cvntwd. 

Hubbard, Cyrus M., Sander'and, 

Hndsoo, Sftmual, UzhrUgu 



25 



Holbarl, CbariM, AmCm. 

Humphrey, Dttniel, AVrCA WtywuuUL 

Runt, Mri. Jeru«ha B^ frkUinnUU. 

HootinfUm, Maliida C, PM^y. 

Hard, Praoeb P., M. a, fTmk^/Uld. 

Hntehiat, CaroliM M , fFȤtfmrd, 

Ralehiot, WillUn E., LowtU. 

HutehiM, Mari« J. «« 

♦HjrHofi, David, BtUm, 

Ide, R«v. Jaeub, Jr., MmntJML 

JaekoMa, Mrt. Botan M., Jf«d*cy. 

JaekMD, Mist Carolioa B^ JVewfon. • 

Jackaon, Henrjr W., B^Bton, 

Jaekaon, Laura £. L., ** 

*Jackaon, Jamaa, ** 

*Jaek«on, Patrick T. « 

Jameaoa, Rev.Epbralm O., Medmaf, 

Jaflriet, Mim CatliariiM Aiiiory, B^tnu 

Jenkiaa, Mra. Maria L., A*e« .At^rd. 

Jepliaon, Miaa C. IL, BroMint. 

Jewett, Heary, PtpptrM. 

Jobnaou, Cbarlaa G., Brmd/cri. 

Joboaoa, Mra. Banna E. ** 

JohnaoQ, Praneia, WiacAaaCar. 

Jobnaon, Pater R., HoUiHon, 

Jobaaoo, Miaa Rabaeea, JVWcA Andir9§r, 

Jobnaoa, Mra. S. W., ParmingUm^ JV. H, 

Jooaa, Aof uitui T., Jfotik BriigtmM&r, 

^onaa, Henrjr B., UMitt^n, 

Joalin, Mra. A. L., O^md* 

Joy, Mra. Abigail, B^tUn, 

Judd, Rer. Bnrtii. 

Judd, Mrf. Rebeoea Ann. 

Judaon, Mra. Mary C, Uzhrii§$. 

Jttdton, Willard, ** 

Keep, N. U., Bottom, 

Keith, Adelbert P., Caa^paUe. 

Keith, Albert, « 

Keith, Arsa a «* 

*Keith, Charlea, M^trtk Bridg9W€Ur, 

Keith Edward Everett, BridgtwmUr, 

Keith, Preatoa &, CamptOo, 

Keith, Ziba C. ** 

Kelly, George Reed, ^aaerAiO. 

Kelton, George, 04rdMr, 

Kemptoo, Mra. Ellen, OrttfUn, 

KeadaU, Mra. Abel M., Aaftoa. 

Kendall, Mra. Mary B., IFincAaatar. 

•Kendall, Williaoi, WkitinawaU. 

Kandiick, John, HtattrkiU, 

Kendrick, Miaa Lydia F., CAaOaai. 

Kerr, Robert W., Fnhmrt^, 

Kerr, Jaae K. *< 

Kettelle, Jacob Q., BMUn, 

Kilbon, George H., Sprmgjleld. 

Kimball, Benjamin, 9d, UMWtrkilL 

Kimball, Rev. Caleb, MUwmf, 

Kimball, Cbarlaa, tptmkk. 



Kimball, Daniel W., ITiaeJUaCar. 
Kimball, David, Brm^fwrd, 
Kimball, WalUce L. «« 
Kimball, Mta. Harriet W., LeiaaB. 
Kimball, Mra. Mary B., Falmmttk, 
Kimball, John R., ITa liwa . 
Kimball, Mra. Sylvia, WisUor^, 
Kingman, Miaa Eliia, AaaCea. 
*Kingman, MiH Barah, <« 
Kingabury, Nathaniel, 
Kingabary, Jaba, Brtt4/ML 
Kingabnry, Rev. Joha D. *< 
Kingabnry, Katy, ** 

Kingabury, Martha, <• 

Kiltredge, Rer. A. £., Ckitag; 
Kitirodge, O. Brighum, Wunboro\ 
*Kaowlee, Rev. Jaaiaa Dl, BaKem. 
Knowltoo, Rev. Stephen, H'€$t Jietf««y. 
Knox, Mra. S., itae* Idnd^ IlL 
Labaree, Rev. John C, JlaaialfA. 
Lambert, Miaa Elisabeth O., BrnmUg, 
Lambert, Thomaa R., D. D , Ckmriuttmn. 
Lambert, William T., « 

Lamaon, Edwin, Btu%. 
Lamaon, Mra. Edwia, ** 
Lamaon, Gardner Swift, ** 
Lamaon, Helen, *• 

Lamaon, Kata Glidden, « 
*Lana, Anthony, LmmcMMtr, 
Lane, Rev. Janaa P., BriaioL 
Laae, Mra. EmoM Lb ** 
Lane, Rev. John W., Wkmttlf. 
Lane, Mra. Mary H. •* 
Lane, Mary E. «• 

Lane, Riohmood J., JCaaC ^Maftem. 
Langworthy, Rev. laaae P., Gftabaa. 
Laaell, Joaiab, WhUimtwilU, 
Laaaell, Mra. Janaio W. •« 
Lathe, Miaa Sarah &, Qi^fUm, 
Laorie, Inglia, Owa C aaa a , Jin»a«a«U. 
*Lawrenea, Aaaoa, Seateii. 
.Lawreaoe, Rav. Amoa B., Hmutlamit, 
Lawrence, Aaa, OreCen. 
*Lawiaaee, Mra. M. A. •« 
Lawraoea, Joha, ** 

Lawrence, Cortia, Bra4f(gr4» 
Ijawraoea, Mra. OnrUa, ** 
•Lawrence, Mra. Naaey T., IFUCea, JVa. 
LawtoB, Mri. 8. 0., Wkiikuwm, 
Laynd, Joha, ** 

Leach, BIomoo, £aal Btaaflieii. 
LMroyd, Addiaoo P., JPa aawa . 
Learayd, Jaba & •• 

Leavitt, Abaer L., Hingkmm^ 
Leavitt, Mra. Bliaabath O., BatUm, 
Leavitt, Rev. George R., Oumbriigtgori, 
Lea, Rav. Baaraal a, OrunpU, 
♦Leada, BaiQaarfa, J^eWlafc 



ae 



Lnedi, Benjimiii, BotUu, 

Loed«, Mrs. Anne B. ** 

L6«di, MiM Anne O. <• 

Ltu, Mrs. Sanntl, Abrf A BUUriam. 

Lafavoui, Inubar, Bnwlf. 

L«knd, Calvin, Jr., Aktieft. 

Leland, Mn. Chtrlotte A., SlUrWii. 

Lekod, Mrti Lohi, *• 

Leooard, Elisa, IVsltr*'. 

Leooard, JaiiMf Heary, BriigtWMUri 

Laooard, Jamaa M. • ** 

Lewis, Reoben, OrsCam. 

Lewis, Mrs. Susan F., ** 

Lincoln, Rev. Calvin, Hingkmwu 

Lineoln, P. W., BtUn. 

Lincoln, Janes L. C, SwndtrUMd, 

Lineoln, Ifoali, Bottan, 

Uttlo, Aleaander E , W§U«dtf* 

•Little, Rev. Blbridge 0« " 

Liuk, Mrs. Loela 8., •« 

Little, Sarali Isabel, •• 

Little, fltoart^ Whitm99iU9, 

Little, Waldo P., JWMo* Ctiitra* 

Little, WiUlaoi A^ *« 

LittleAeM, Samtiel, SmsrvtlM. 

•Livermore, Oeorfs, C*mkri4g$, 

•Locke, Bphraim, Btitn. 

LoooBis, Rev. Ellba, CkegUrJMi^ iU, 

Lord, Miss Anna M., J^with. 

Lord, Rev. Charica Ek, Butmu 

Lord, Edward A., I^oaMrt. 

Lord, Jobn A., PMbtdjf, 

Lord, Louisa C, Mmnelusitr^ 

Loring, Mrs. Hnnnah W., ffinaUm Otntn, 

Loud, Arthur J., Bottom, 

Loud, Mrs. Martha B., BrmbHrm. 

Lovell, Miss Mary B., Mtdwmjf. 

•Lowell, Charles, D. D., BmUn. 

Lamb, WilNam, •• 

Lont, Charlaa P., Wiiuh$$Ur. 

Ljman, Rev. Geof|a, Somtk Jiwtkent, 

Lyman, Samuel T., Jlteirtinftsii. • 

Lyon, Miis Cbloe R., Caaipills. 

Maereading, Rev. Chas. S., Frvfndittee, JLL 

Maltby, Rev. Erastni, Tteafam. 

Mann, Miss' fiekn L., OtmnfiM' 

Manning, Otis, LiUlttMu 

Manning, Edward W., ffUm 

Manning, Waltar H., UttkUnu 

Marble, Mrs. Mary E., Onfttm. 

Markbaa, Mrs. Priaeilla V., fTrtnthaM, 

Marrett, Lofmso, Cast (^mkrUg%, 

Marab, Elisabeth C, Hnmrkai 

Marsh, B. J., LMwiiiaCsr. 

BUrsh, Lewis A., CkkofM, 

Mafih, Miaa JoHa M., J7««erAIII. 

•Marston, Winian, BwtUm. 

Martia, Gtoi|« H., Briigiwdtir, 



Mason, MIsa Nellto A., Aof'sAMk 
lAattison, William, WkHtktfnU^ 
Maynard, Rev. Joahna L., FFU/iatea, ru 
Maynanl, Leaader, Shrsjs«6Brf . 
McBlroy, Richard B., Jfstfwaf. 
•MeKeao, William, Basim. 
McKeen, PhileflA, Jtndoptr, 
McKeen, Phebe, *• 
McKensie, Rev. Aleaaoder, Caafrn^rtf* 
MeKensie, Ellen If. ** 

McKensie, Kennett, •* 

•Mckean, Mrs. Ann, BesCsn. 
McLean, Rev. John K., SfringJUIdf SJL 
McLoud, Rev. Anson, 7>pM^sM« 
Means, John O., D. D., Boitkm* 
Means, Mrs. John O. ** 

Mesne, William G., Ani999r» 
Meniam, Abner H., T^mfUtotu 
Merriam, HooMr, Sfring/tld, 
Merrill, Rev. James IL, ^ndower, 
Merrill, John K., Mukum, 
Merrill, Rev. Tinman A., B»mardtUtu 
Merritt,Claii«sa, Comwmf, 
Merritt, Mrs Mary A., Mntmgut, 
Messenger, Miss Blisa, Faekkmrg, 
Mills, Rev. rfaatles L., Jasiaica Plmim. 
Mills, Mrs. Rebwoa B. •« 
Mills, Miss Lydia, Ptabodf, 
Minot, William, Bytton, 
Minot, William, Jr. •« 
Mister, Mrs. Fanny U ** 
Mister, Mrs. Mary R., Herdmkk, 
Milter, Mrs. & E., Roth Mmiti, ilU 
Mooar, George, D. D., Oaklmnd, CmL 
Moody, James, fVhiU»tmU§^ 
Moore, Lewis, Skmran, 
Moore, Idllie, Holhroskm 
Moors, Joseph, Orefeii. 
Moors, Rnfus, ** 

Moors, Mrs. RaAis, OntUn, 
Mordough, Rev. Jobn H., Portland, M§* 
More, Charles H., Bradford, 
Morong, Rev. Thomas, Iptwitk, 
Morley, Rev. Sardis B., PiiitJMd* 
Morrison, Daniel T., AfsUMn. 
Morrison, Miss Nancy T., Asie/ef. 
Morse, Mies Abby P., Emporim, KmrntM, 
Morse, Charlee N., Foxboro\ 
Morse, Miss Emily A., Brm^f^rd, 
Morse, Henry, M^iUu 
Morse, RaAu W., Mttktun. 
Mono, William E, Brmiford. 
Moeeley, Edward S., JUwbmrfporU 
Mosman, Walter B., Amkmrmimlt, 
Manger, Rev. Theo. T., Lmwrencg. 
Manger, Mra. T. T., <« 

Mnnioe, Miis Mary, O w srrf. 
Marray, Rev. Jmms O, AW T$rk ettf. 



27 



Mamy, Mri. Julia R., JVkus Turk eitf. 
Naaoo, Rov. Charlei, WtUJUtt. 
Nuon, Rev EIim, BUleriea. 
Neadhan, Lacie BL, A(i» BruitUrts, 
Ntfedliafn, Mn. Mary P., Pembodf, 
NalMHi, Jonathan H^ S4r«i0«tary« 
Newell, Oeoife H^ Hoftutoti. 
*Ne%rell, Muntsomery, Boston. 
Newball, Lacy Aon, ^w. 
Newman, Mim Sarah A., fytvkh. 
.Niehoh, Alfra-d A., IVut Amuhur^. 
Nieholi, Jamet R., HaverkitL 
Nichuli, Joeeph, ff^e»t Ametharjf, 
Niehob, Mmea, HmterhilU 
Niekeraon, Mra. Tempie W., IfkntMckA. 
Nightiogale, ReT. Crawronl, Qn^mu 
*Norcroia,Jotiah, Wmk^t'i. 
Noreroet, Mra. Jotiah, ** 
Norton, Rev. Edward, Montagiu. 
NoorM, B. Alden, IVtsthoro*. 
NourMi, Caroline Josephine, Boston, 
Noane, Daniel, Wut Msdwaf, 
Noarae, Holen 8., Boatin, 
Noar«e, Stitan M., BiMton, 
Noyea, Alva, ^Torth Bridgswater. 
Noyea, Jacob, Abington. 
Noyea, Lolte B., Ssmth Jtbington, 
Noyea, Rurua S., Jf. Bridgewtsr, 
Oatloy, 6. D , fThitiHsviUe, 
Odiin, Benjamin, Exttert A*, ff, 
Odiin, Mra. B. T. ** 

Ordway, Aaron !«., JWm Tark eitf. 
Ordway, Miaa Charlotte, Bradford. 
Ordway, Herbert, *< 

Oaborne, George F., Peobodff, 
Oafood, Goorge C, LoweV. 
Oagood, H. B., WkitinniVt. 
Paclcard, Rev. D I'emple, Brighton. 
Packard, Edward C, UoHk BridgemtUr, 
Packard, S. Edward*, SpringJloU. 
Packard, 8. Franklin, CompoUo. 
Packard, Miii Sunie P., '* 
Packard, Zibeon, JIbingion, 
Page, Abigail L., Atkhtton, K.ff, 
Paige, George R., JWw Sidom. 
•Paine, Mr«. 8arab M., Holdoiu 
*Paine, Miat Sarah C. ** 
Palmer, Rev. Charlet Ray, Saltm. 
•Palmer, Rev. Stephen, Jfotdkawu 
Palmer, Squire, SoMk DierJttU, 
Park, John <>., Bottom. 
Parker, Andrew, OUmcetter. 
Parker, Daniel, ITkitintviUe. 
•Parker, John, BoHmu 

Parker, Mra. Sarah, ** 

•Parkman, Francii, D. D. «< 
•Parkman. Samuel, ** 

•Parkmao, Mra. Sarah, <• 



Parmenter, Mia. E. J. O^ JitkbL 
•Pariona, Oorhaai, Bmtotu 
•Paraonf. WilUaoi, «« 
Partooa, Rev. R« C, Wor€t«ttr* 
Paraona, John, Jr., 8amgui Centre, 
Partridge, Clark, Medmef, 
Partridge, Joeeph, HoUieten, 
Patrick, Rev. Hearj J., Wtet AkiofMk 
PatriQk, Mra. Martha h, « 

Patten, Mra John F., Doreheeter, 
Patteraon, David H., Motknen, 
Paul, Frederick A., UkeeiUe. 
Paul, Henry, AVvCra 

•Paul, Mri. Henry, ** 
»Paul, Luther, ** 

Paul, Luther, Jr. ** 
Paul, MiM Harriet, «* 
Paul, Miw Mary, " 
Paul, Mra. Ruth B., Medweig. 
Payson, Mim Soaan, Fozbor^. 
Payton, Willikm P., *' 
Pearaon, Mita Hannah J., LowolL 
Peaaa, George W., Sa/em. 
Peck, Rev. David, Semderiamd, 
Peekham, Hubbard, Peter tkem. 
Pciree, Rev. Bradford K., tUarlem, A*. F. 
PeophM, Samuel, ^etick, 
Perkina, Benjamin C, Poehodf, 
Perkins, E. E , Jfortk MiddUkete\ 
Perikins, Mra. Biiiabeth B. «* 
Perkine, Jairus H. <• 

Perkina, Jamea, Peeb^tdf, 
•Perkins, Jamaa, Beeten, 
•Perkins, Jamas, St. ** 
Perkina, Misa Maiy A., Brigklmu 
•Perkina, Thomas H., Boeten, 
Perley, Mn. Abigail T., Salsai. 
Parley, Jacob, ** 

Perry, Mias Catharine H., SkarAam. 
Perry, Jamea, Danvero. 
•Peter*, Edward 1)., Beoten. 
Petera, Mra. Lydia H., Boriin. 
Pettoe, Daniel, Skeren. 
Pottee, Miss Elisa J., Fexbere*. 
Pottee, Samuel Gardner, Stemgkien. 
Pettee, Willard, Foxbortf. 
Phillips, Alonso P., Medwmg. 
Phillip*) George W., Samgne* 
Phillips, Mra. Gw»rg« W. <* 
•Phillipa, Jonathan, Beeten. 
Phillipa, Mra. Sally, •< 
•Phillips, William, BoeUm. 
Pickard, Rev. Danl%l W., Qreedeni, 
Pickering, Heary W., Boeten, 
Pierce, Albert T„ mee.gkten, 
•Piaree, Rav. CbtrlM H., JVittliiry. 
Pierea, laaao T., WMineeitte, 
PImm, Sylvaater O., fF h e ek ee t er, 



28 



^Pierpont, Rsv. John, Jir«4r<mL 

Ptoraon, Rev. Wm. H«Drj, fytwUh, 

Pike, J«bn, D. D., Rowlt^ 

Plomb, Rrr. Albert H., Battou* 

Plomb, JoMph Dmrt, ** 

Plainer, Mra. Martba H^ HowUy, 

Plnamer, Intel, fF%Hins9ilU, 

Pof oe, Un. Joeeph, Chntfttm* 

Pollard, Joeeph G^ fVobwrm. 

Pelloek, Min Enma A., fTAiliMviUc. 

Pomeroy, Fred. L., SunderlmntL 

Pond, Almira W., SmuA JVel^ii. 

Pond, John P^ Btttn. 

Pond, Mn. Nanej, Mtdwrn^, 

Pood, William B., Wrtnlkam, 

Pool, Solorooo, OUweftter, 

Poor, Joeeph, Pealhdf. 

Poor, Nathan H. " 

Porter, J. Edwrarda, JV^rlA BrwtkJUM. 

Porter, Samuel 0., lfiecAMC«r. 

Potter, J. 8f urgii, JVtietoa. 

Pratt, Coroeliui, AVrlA ffefaieiia. 

Pratt, Galon, JVVrtA BridgetomUr. 

Pratt, Galen E. *• 

Pratt, Rot. Georfe H., HarfHord, 

Pratt, Norton, l^r«ia(r««. 

Pratt, Phebe.SAeri.wn. 

Pratt, Philip W., JSbington. 

Pratt, Zebu loo, /forth MiddUUr9\ 

Pray, John J., Lowell. 

Prentice, Miaa Julia, Or^/ten. 

Prentiee, Marvel, fFkiUntviU9. 

Prentice, Jamei A. *' 

Prentin, Luke, ** 

^ProMott, William, HMfen. 

*Prinee, Rot. J. M., Oiorgetomn. 

Prince, Mra Sarah B , Quimcf. 

Pritefaard, William, ^^t1eburyport, 

Proctor, Elisabeth O., Peabodjf. 

Proctor, Heniy K. " 

Proctor, Mn. Lucy A., OtametHtr. 

Proctor, Tborndike, Peaijtfy. 

Puffer, Mra. Joeiah, Harvard* 

Putnam, Mrt. Elisabeth T., Onufton, 

Uuiney, Thoroaa D., Boitan. 

Uuincy, Mra. J. C. *< 

(Ittincy, Thomaa D., Jr. *< 

Randall, Franklin B., Dover^ JV. H, 

Randall, Flora Sarah, *« 

Randall, Mary Eliaabetb, « 

Rankin, J. Bamee, D.D., WfuXingUm^ D, C. 

Rankin, Mra. Mary « 

Ray, Oeoi|0 W., MUmaf VilUmga. 

Raymond, Helen 8., BoaUn, 

Read, Miaa Martha, JEatI AhingUnu 

Reed, Miae Caroline O., ^weHliK. 

Reed, Horaee, 8mUk JiHngUu. 

Reed, Miae Seriaaa, £««^ JtbingUu. 



Reevea, Miie Ellen Pi, Wofflatid. 
Rice, Mri. Agnof L., Bottom. 
Rice, Edward, fVo^'and, 
Rice, Mra. Elisabeth C, Lamme§. 
Rice, Mra. Henry A., Bootom, 
Rice, Mi«e Bf. AofuaU, fFooUoro*. 
Rice, MIm Jenny M. *< 

Rich, Rev. Alonso B», IV, Lebanon^ JV*. //. 
Rich, Rev. A. Judion, Brookjife'd. 
Rich, Mra. Harriet L., ** 
Richards, Mrs. A. M., Bridgeport, CL 
Richards, James P., OmpMo. 
*Richardaon, Benjamin P., BooUiu 
Richardson, John W., Jtedwaf. 
Riehardaoo, Luther, IfmcAesCsr. 
Riehaidson, Miss Sarah £., Concord. 
Richard«un, Stephen, IV, Meditaf. 
Richardson, Sumner, IVinckeolmr, 
Ricker. Edmund, H'ett Jtiaesburjf, 
Ricker, George E., ** 
*Ritchie, Andrew, Jr., BooUn. 
Robbins, Andrew, OreCen. 
Rubbins, Chandler, D. D., Bootom. 
*Robbios, Edwerd H. ** 

Roberts, Rev. Jacob, JtubamdaU* 
RoberU, Mra. Mary A. " 
Roberts, Mra. Ruth, Mancktatar. 
Robertson, James, Ptahi^df. 
Robinson, Charles W., .^n^Knidala. 
Robinson, H. W., Jif^Hk Bridgowotor, 
*Rubin»on, Rev. Reuben T., fVimtkootar, 
•Robinson, Mrs. Clara A. " 
Roekwnod, John, Orotom. 
Rock wood, John T., Springlteld, 
Rock wood. Miss Polly 8., JtoUand, 
*Rogers, George, Booton. 
Rogers, George L., M'twbarfporU 
Rogera, Shubael G., Ba«e«». 

•Rogers, Rev William M. '< 
Russell, Sarsh J., Framutgkam, 
Ryder, Marietta, Chatham. 
Baffurd. Rev. George B., Aarltnflen, FL 
•Salisbury, Samuel, Bootom, 
Sanford, Mra Adeline U^Mtdmaf Fillag; 
Sanford, Edmund 1., Medwajf, 
Sanford, Henry D., Bridgewater. 
Sanger, Edward G., Cam^hridgeport. 
. Sergeant, James C, OahhawL 
Sargent, Edmund, ffoot Jimoobmry, 
•Sargent, Lucia« M., Bootom, 
Sargent, Samuel G., Mothmtm, 
Sawtell, Epbraim, Orotom, 
Sawyer, George, CaaipaUo. 
Sawyer, Martha B., " 
Sawyer, Seth C, Ho'brook. 
Seales, Edward P., A'eieton. 
*Seudder, Charles, Bootom. 
Beoddtr, Mra. Sarah U ** 



29 



Beafrave, fidward P., Uxhriige, 

Seaf fave, Mr* M.iry Ann, ** 

Beara, Mitt Hannah M.^AikplL 

Beaver, A. W.) JVorcAk>ro*t 

Beelay, Raymond H., D. D., HtnmkilU 

Beeley, Mrt. Fanny B. ** 

Belfridse, Tbomai (X, JfaaUn* 

*Shattnek, Andrew, Or^Un. 

Sbattnek, Btn. Satan P. ** 

0haw, Mra. Hannah| BaiCaii. 

Sheldon, Rot. Lather H., Jamukfirgk,K,J, 

fibeUon, Mn. Sarah H. *« 

8hepberd, Thomaa, WinckMUr. 

Shiverick, Mitt Maiia L., CamftiU. 

^Sifourney, Andrew, B«Hon, 

flifonrney, Henry, " 

etket, Mn. Otii, Can way. 

Shnondt, A Ivan, Button* 

Bkiilins«, Djvid N., Wineh$Htr. 

•Slack, Ruf^lea, BotUm. 

eiafter. Rev. Edmund P. " 

Sialler, Mn. Edmund P., ** 

Sleeper, William C», Mttkum. 

Small, Amoa T., Pfeat Jtmuhuj* 

SflBall, Mrt. Fidelia Poiter, MiiOurf. 

Small. Hamoel A. *« 

Small, Samuel E. ** 

Small, Mra. Somner, JVawtom CBmtr$, 

Smith, Mrt. Abby P», Cfiword^ 

Smith, Henry P. " 

•Smith, Albert W., fV9§thor9\ 

Smith, Mit. Lacy Jane, ** 

Smith, Mra. Clara J., Sm^trlmd, 

Smith. E. B., fVesfJUld, 

Smith, Mrt. Franeet B. D., WhttituvWe, 

Smith, ReT. Edward P., A>oo/Uyi», JV. T. 

Smith, Ge«>rge P., BotU%» 

Smith, Samuel, »* 

Smith, Joel, WkUiutwOl^* 

Smith) Jonathan, ** 

Smith, Warren N. «< 

Smith, Mrt Hattie J., Ofoiieeafan 

Smith. Matton M., IX D., A^warft, JVl J. 

Smith, Mr*. Mataon M. ** 

Smith. Norman, GraCoa* 

Smith, Mr*. Mary J. ** 

Smith, Richaid, Pemhody, 

Smith, Mr*. Charlotte, ** 

Smith, Mr*. Sarah, Andovtr, 

Smith, William W., CVnway. 

Smith, Mr*. T. Bertnn. 

Snow, Ambrote, Soaf* Hadlejf FaOt, 

Snow, Mr*. (Caroline, JSMb»mia!g, 

Snow, Mr*. Mark, Ckalhmm, 

Soule, Henry M., 809th Abinflon, 

Southfate, Charlea M., St. JoAfia^sry, Ft, 

Southgate, Rev. Robert, fflut§ River, Ft 

•Sooihfate, Mra. Mary FnneM, *• 



Sonthworth, Mrt. Ctroline M», Jftitfcyk 
Spauldinf, Mra. Charlotte A., Oroton. 
Spaolding, John, CIrotan Jwnetion* 
Spooner, William B., BatUn, 
Spring, Mrt. Adela C, fFhUiiuvaU, 
Stacy, Albert, Conevrd. 
Stanley, Esri C, Matuke^er. 
Slanton, Rev. Geo. P., South Weymntk. 
Stebbina, Rev. Milan C, SpringJlM, 
Stevent, Mr*. George, LowelL 
•Steven*, Norman C, JWiataik 
Stevent, Mra. E. M. ** 
Stevent, Mrt. Benjamin P., Pe»boi$. 
Stevent, Samuel, OlmueHtr, 
Stickney, William H., Draeut 
•Stoddard, Lewia T., Brooklime, 
Stone, Andrew U, D. D., Saa JfycncitcojOtlt 
Stone, Mra. MatiMa P. •' 
Stone, Martha A., JVlnrtam Oxtrtk 
Storra, Enniee C. iBrainlrat. 
'Sturrt, Richard 8., D. D. ** 
Stowell, Mrt. Abby Hobbard, Cvncord. 
Stowell, Cyroa A., South DtmJLM, 
Stowell, D. W., Waltkam. 
Strong, Rev. EInathan G. ** 
Strong, Rev. J. C, St, Chmrlu^Minuenm, 
Strong, Mra. J. C. ** ** 

Sludley, Anttin, Emtt jSHngUm. 
Stadley, Edward A., Boeton, 
Sugden, Miia Mary, Braintr§t, 
Sumner, Rev. Charlea B., Jlfo m t w . 
Sumner, Mrt. H. H., F»xhar»*. 
Swasey, Mra. Fraoeet A., Lfflkm, 
Swett, Samoa I W., Bott9u. 
Swift, Mitt l<ottie H., Audfutr, 
Switaer, Rev. Chrittopher J., Propineat smn, 
Taft, Mrt. Blitabetb E., fnUintvilk, 
Taft, Mitt Emily A. «« 

Taft, Guatavoa E» <* 

Taft, Mrt. G. B. «• 

Taft, S. Jennie, *• 

Taft, Jacob, VtkHAf, 
Tapley, Gilbert, 
•Tappan, John, 
Tarr, William J., O/mwatCtis 
Taylor, Mrt. Malanea, Wiutkuitir, 
Teek, Rev. Albert K., MHt9%, 
Teele, Mrt. Cornelia C, MiHoiu 
Temple, Maik M., lUuding, 
Tenny, Mrt. Joanna 8., SmiguM. 
•Tenney, Mra. Mary P., fVSacAatftri 
Terry, Rev. Jamea P., BntfA JFaymonU* 
Thacber, Mrt. Anna B., H^ Park, 
I'bacber, Mita Callata C, JhtUhar^, 
Thaeher, John, ** 

Thacber, Mra Bmaa O. •* 

Thacber, Wllllui T., J9y^ Par*. 
Thacber, 8«aan B., Pmtlmwif Jh, 



80 



•nmohtt, Mirr Lodkm, J»MMm-. 


Tiitlehan,J*ka M^ FUtUurg. 


Tli.,«r,Ad<»»B.,JMM(. 


T»l.r.Frtolill,»™<ftri 


TtMrw, Clan L. '< 


r,I...J«Dni*W.,SMn. 


n.y«.Amu:BTwaaru. 




Tfc.T«.E.F.E. " 


i;pt»,Mr..L»;K.. P«M,. 


Tl..j.r. In, 


WpM«,M««T Stiim. 


•Th.T«, U». Ull., " 


Vu«., WiiiiKn. H., F,uUi.rg. 


Tk>,.i,Ani>i<H.,AoItr(»t. 


W^imo-ik. u». l.uer, Jr.'Ui. 


Tb4;ar, Bn. J. H*ntT, ^nimr. 


Wukwonb. VV.lli.m. i,B«. 


TI«7«,M,^ll«ll«C. " 


W.tQl!.id.Mi.,C..A(«.<i>(. 


TbiT<r,OI)nr, bm. 




"Tba/ct, JHn. Jino. Bm("ii. 


W.l«, E™.!..., fMbr.„k. 


Tfc.j«, R«fc.n H., J»» T«-» Cilir. 


WtlH,Mi„M^,,Ann,B«l.,^ 




Wilktr, MJH Fhuhh A^ HmwwUtt. 


Tkajii, WtlKin W., UtbrHfi. 


WilUr, Ba*. Cb. P., Liali CwpM, it. /. 


Th^p™. M-.. A".k» F„ »ira.* 


W.\t«.,J,h„B.,E»lM,4m;. 


TbBnpKn, Hn. B»llj B., CpkutA 


W.ili... Ml. J<A. e. " 


ThMipKO, a™r«i A., AbrW »^«. 




Tko..p«..B.n».IA. 


W.lli«. ElIwA. " 


TbonpHi, Hn. Ahh EIIh, " 


Walkir, Huin. HatfkaL 






Thomp-n, L..I. W.Ut, Vntitrm. 


w.ikH,ii,.i»,i ':.,«>««. 








•W.ll.,, s.niMt H., Shim. 


TiiDlDH, B». H*miD B., tTolH*- 


Wuth.j.S<.mu.lH. " 




W..*, A,t«no, 


Tinkrr, RuwIL, On(/(im. 


Ward, MiH Lrdla, SauuiUt. 


Tob.,, Mia J'DoM B., WkiUHMwillt. 


W.nl,B..iM.l.a>M«^ 


TetoM. B.'. Richmrd, HoH^im, »-» 


W..d, Hk.H.L.H,L>bnlDi. 


Toi™«,B".B.«.IH.,t««. 


Wtnl, RcJimnW. " 


T«r™,,»l,n Ehub-ih L.,S«I* ^nr-fnU. 


WiBl,ll«.C.olt«L. ■■ 


Torn/, Jiunei, Airt* IfiyxnU. 


W»I.Hi.,8»..H. " 


Tcinj.Willnnl, AmJoiL 


W.rd.H,l„mT ir„tl,..l^. 


TailB«,Villi>mB.,jH<'/)>r<I.^.K ' 


W.iiWU, lUnr; I. fictltiul. 




WuoM.Jok., »«*... 


Tnik, Mn. A. H. 


W.m.>, Willi..., &-ut I>.»^jltU. 






Truk,8>n..cl, f»M«. 


*W..rm, Mr.. Diinlhi A . !«■■. 


Tn.t,e.m«IF.. Amm. 


•W.iHi, tin. Mirim, OfVtH- 




*Wirr<ii, NelMnkh, Sum. 


Tro»brirlg«, M™. a... Brif *I<... 


W.r.«, F..n.i. W. " 


Ttarinl, H.irlel At<iit*; -tUntlm. 


W„,„.J.»>,.. 


TmrMt, Philip P. 


•W.t«», LHlodi, " 


T™r.«.W.lMrE.r., 




•Tueker, B». Elijih W., £<«•■«, O. 


Wuhb.01, Wili,.n. B., d-.oul.iA 


•TMk«.J«.. JfiU«. 


W«hb«™.«...Wiih.>nTI. 


TaoW, Ur.. U:.rrB. » 


Wgl.inHfi. M<a. ri„o|in», Ortpon. 


•tuckor.Niliiui, ■• 




THko.Hn N.lhin, '■ 


W«ll.. M™. L.C.io!(iw, ,\'brt* Earn. 


T«k.., M... H>Du.b W, D^kuUr. 


W.l.»r. FJ-ird, fl...(n»n. A". U. 


Twk.,.Jrf.oA, 


H'.kh,J»ha,««Mm. 


T.ck«, WUKm, 


W*M,Jig», " 


TKkn, WtUiuD W., Bttltm. 


Willi, Mri. M.itiii b , A)>r«*»««'. 




W.llmin,Jd.hu»W D.a,JV«i™. 




W.Rj.il. M... I',ih.rii», «»<.*. 


Tuik, HI* H.i<hi B., CMW. 


Wwloanb, Altoil, Hmrkia. 


T.HI»,MiHS>nh,an>Hl»i 




Tiltta,Tbi»wB.,Uuta«. 


vmi, p.i.( a. ir*M«^. 



WliHtar, ALiJih R., E MJV 
WxntH, Mn H.B,Mtd»a 

WhIiEHib.OmrL., Wsrcx 



I. Sx«. Willi* in II.. i 



■Whib-Diii^ lUabmn. Minw 
*WKil»mti, ReulM.Jr. 
H'lilIHjnih, Hn. Abbr F. " 
>WKil»>al), Kn. Ualti D. •' 
Wl.Ue<>n>b.HiuU^rrM. - 
WhiMiAaiiM U, MUi't. 
Whita, CiixfIIiu, ^. uts^IK, 
Whiu, EikiiBnil, M-Jbnak. 
Will., Nrwi«, 
•WklU, J.BH. Amm. 
WhlU.Jotl, fttpf^f. 
Whiu, Jo.>aK. PMB^iktm. 
WkUt, M.^ U.if C, eUllif,t. 

WhiM, PhidBu A. jr^iowoUi 

Wbil.,TlMHi.a.,W.ir«it. 

WhhiB, ilnhui P., (HifiiuBili 

WhiUn.CliulMp. " 

WMii>, CIhiIh E. 

Wbliii, Mn. Cuhirine H. <• 

Wbilia, Ed •rim, " 

Wbill>,J.m«P. 

Whiiin, Mil Pilianu U. " 

Whilis, P>ul, 

Wfeiim, tliL Ehiib 1. 



Whilunli,Mi«MBryJ. " 
WhIunH*, A«nw Mui*, l^n. 
Wbhiwr.l'hiilan <!., Ctm^Tidttf^n- 
WhiiMi, Dnr>> e S,Mik aniim. 
Whiiinj. FndHirli, ffuiMiuUr, 

miitH,, ii.b<>> J., SUM. 
vnutMf, Um 



HIiiliH; 






iHIb <;., OrU-m. 
D., Qrntf^'i. 



Wil«»,ac..'niHm 

nv.C Uigriea, H'arVar'i Cpm. 

np. XolMrl -C, BsHn. 









, OUag^, lU. 



WakMt. Hn. Blluknli, Pah^. 
W•■leM^ WiDiMi; 
W«M\.i.<,.S\mev,}..antM<i. 
Woad, Mii.AblJ.h (feiib.TK'. 
Wgod, Crrai K., Gtiiir. 
Wood, eilubmk C, Fnttn'. 
WMd.JiMph W., mubutUU. 
Wood, Hh. E. B. ' ■> 

»l F., CUdtftrJ. 

a, Or>i«. 



)wl|hl. K 



Whnkf. JVatita. 



Wsudi, Mi 

WmkIi, AdiiIi. Friat, M« BrtiUnt. 

di, JoHph WhMlgi, Aifn. 

~Kl.,^.r,,u.l[[. 

Woalwitd, Sbanaiai, AtMai. 
Waadmid, Mil. Emilf, Ma(« f.MK. 
WuodwiHIb, Aitanna B., Idwl. 

ll>» H.llig, £rifkl—. 

«.V!M,m,S,.u%. 



W,ma 



D, WilliiB O., rtUMttrt. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



Beoeipta from AprU 1, 1871, to Aprtl l* 1872. 

Abington, South, A Friend, (I l. m.) $ 20 00 

Acton, Congregational Church and Society, . . • . 6 25 
Andover, North, Trinitarian Congregational Church and Society, 31 65 

Ashby, Second Parish, 10 70 

Ashland, First Congregational Church and Society, • • 80 50 

Ballardvale, Congregational Church and Society, . • 3 00 

Barnstable, Centrerille, Congregational Church and Society* 16 17 

Barre, Methodist Episcopal Church, 6 50 

** ETangelical Congregational Church and Society, • 16 22 

Boston, Old South Church and Society, .... 74 03 

« Bromfleld Street Church, ....*• 12 33 

« Union Church, 113 25 

<« South, Phmips Church 78 05 

« Tremont Street Methodist Episcopal Church (1 l. m.) 53 27 

«< Highlands, Methodist Episcopal Church, . . 14 00 

<• «< First German Methodist Episcopal Church, 15 00 

« A Friend, 5 00 

<• A Friend, 5 00 

** Mrs. McLoud, (paid in silrer,) • . • • 53 

«« A Friend, .... ... 25 

<• A Friend, 1 00 

<« John W. Field, Esq 30 00 

*• Samuel D. Warren, Esq., 200 00 

Boylston, Congregational Church and Society, • . • 14.15 

Bridgewater, North, First Cong. Church and Society • • 50 00 

Brighton, Congregational Church and Society, . • • 45 86 

Brimfleld, Congregational Church and Society, . • • 35 00 

Brookfleld, A Friend, 5 00 

« A Friend, 5 00 

«« A Friend, 5 00 

Buckland, Congregational Church and Society, (1 l. m.) . 27 18 

Cambridge, Shepard Congregational Society, ... 63 78 



33 



) 



Campello, Congregational Church and Society, . 
•Charleatown, Winthrop Church and Society, 
Chatham, Congregational Church and Society, 
Chicopee, Third Church, (1 l. m.) 
Clinton, Congregational Church and Society, 
Cohassett, Methodist Episcopal Church, • 
Concord. Unidn Bible Society, 
Conway, Congregational Church and Society, 
Dedham, Allen Church and Society, . 
Dunstable, Congregational Church and Society,* . 
Duzbury, North West, Union Church and Society, and their 

pastor, RcT. B. Otheman, «... 
Erring, Congregational Church and Society, 
Falmouth, First Congregational Church and Society, 
Fitchburg, Calvinistic Congregational Society, (a. b. § 
Florence, Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Framingham, Plymouth Church, .... 
Franklin, Congregational Church and Society, 
Georgetown, Memorial Church and Society, 

** First Congregational Church and Society 

Gill, Congregational Church and Society, 
Greenfield, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Groveland, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Hadley, Russell Church, . . . . • 
Hampden County, Benevolent Association, . 
Harvard, Evangelical Church and Society, . 
Haverhill, North Church and Society, . 
Hingharo, Methodist Episcopal Church, (a. b. b.) 
Holbrook, Congregational Church and Society, . 

•« E. Everett Holbrook, (4 l. m.) 

Holyoke, Second Church, 

Hopkinton, Congregational Church and Society, . 
Hubbardston, Congregational Church and Society, 

Ipswich, First Church, 

«« South Church. 

Lakeville, Conf?regational Church and Society, • 
Leominster, Evangelical Church and Society, 
Littleton, Congregational Church and Society, 
Longmeadow, Ladies' Benevolent Association, 

Gentlemen's Benevolent Association, 
East, Congregational Church and Society, 
Lowell, Appleton Street Church, • . , • 
John Street Church, .... 

Emily Rogers, ...... 

Manchester, Congregational Church and Society, 
Mansfield, Congregational Church and Society, (balance) 



<« 



«4 



II 



l< 



f 39 80 


34 80 


17 26 


63 00 


46 93 


3 10 


112 00 


139 10 


76 61 


10 00 


6 00 


4 00 


24 26 


119 16 


6 00 


78 26 


19 02 


28 66 


25 86 


6 10 


28 61 


10 50 


12 10 


6 90 


32 91 


109 87 


6 32 


28 40 


148 22 


36 00 


57 46 


8 00 


38 87 


20 86 


27 00 


60 66 


11 70 


33 66 


38 26 


6 00 


26 26 


106 47 


6 00 


29 00 


11 66 



34 



Harblehead, First Cong. Church and Society, (1 l. m.) • f 25 00 

Marlboro', Union Church and Society, . • . . 30 00* 

Med way Village, Church and Society, (2 l. u.) '* • • 41 00 

•< East, First Church and Society, .... 28 2^ 

•< West, Church and Society, 22 64 

Methuen, First Parish Church, 10 00 

Hiddleboro', First Congregational Church and Society, . 46 93 

" North, Congregational Church and Society, • 24 00 

Honson, Congregational Church and Society, • • . 34 69 

«« A. W. Porter, Esq., 160 00 

Newburyport, First Presbyterian Church, .... 49 00 

«* Belleyille, Congregational Church and Society, 80 37 

Peabody, Congregational Church and Society, . . . 61 64 

Pepperell, Congregational Church and Society, ... 10 00 

Plymouth, Church of the Pilgrims, (1 l. m., ▲. b. s.) . . 30 00 

Plympton, Congregational Church and Society, ... 6 26 

Randolph, First Parish, (2 l. m.) . . . • . . 126 00 

Royalston, South, Second Cong. Church and Society, . . 6 60 

Salem, South Church, 76 73 

** Crorabie Street Church 46 16 

Saugus, Centre, Cong. Church and Society, (1 l. m.) . . 36 16 

Saundersville, Congregational Church and Society, . . 12 00 

Saxonville, Edwards Congregational Church and Society, • 20 00 

Shelbume, Congregational Church aftd Society, (1 l. m.) • 30 90 

Sherbom, Ladies' Beneyolent Society, (1 l. m.) . . . 20 00 

Shirley, Congregational Church and Society, ... 8 00 

Shrewsbury, Congregational Church and Society, . . 16 78 

Someryille, Congregational Church and Society, ... 60 24 

South Hadley Falls, Congregational Church and Society, . 68 00 

Springfield, First Church 240 34 

«« Olivet Church, (2 l. m.) 66 39 

** South Church, 40 00 

** Memorial Church, . • ... 36 26 

Stoughton, First Congregational Church and Society, (1 l. m.) 26 66 

Sudbury, Congregational Church and Society, ... 23 60 

Sunderland, Congregational Church and Society, (4 l. m.) . 78 61 

Templeton, Congregational Church and Society, ... 9 18 

Townsend, Orthodox Cong. Church and Society, ... 10 00 

•« Miss C. Wright, 10 00 

Uxbridge, Congregational Church and Society, (4 l. m.) . 96 70 

Wakefield, Congregational Church and Society, . . . . 68 60 

Walpole, Congregational Church and Society, . . . 60 61 

Warwick, Congregational Church and Society, ... 8 76 

Webster, First Congregational Church and Society, . . 36 22 

Wenham, Congregational Church and Society, ... 4 00 

Westboro', Evangelical Cong. Church and Society, . . 86 48 



35 



West Boylston, First Cong. Church and Society, . • f 9 50 

Westfleld, First Churchy , 63 70 

" Second Church, « 63 35 

Westford, Congregational Church and Society, * , . 11 30 

Weymouth, South, Second Cong. Church and Society, • 28 00 

Weymouth and Brain tree, Union Church and Society, . 50 65 

Whately, Congregational Church, (in part) . . . . 10 00 

Whitinsville, Congregational Church and Society, . . 670 75 

Willbraham, Trinitarian Congregational Church, • f 16 18 

Interest on f 200, . 6 60 



Winchendon, North Church and Society, 
Wood's Hole, Braddock Oifford, • 
Worcester, Central Church, • • 

A Friend, (2 l. m .) . 

David Whitcomb, (2 l. m.) 



«i 



•• 



22 78 

30 00 

2 00 

96 18 

50 00 

100 00 

f 5,984 68 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 

A Friend in Massachusetts, to circulate Bibles in Foreign 

Lands, (a. b. s.) • • . • 
A Friend in Massachusetts, .... 
Atkinson, N. H., Key. J. Page, (1 l. m.) . . 
Pittsfield, N. H., John L. Thorndike, (▲. b. s.) 
East Maine Methodist Episcopal Conference, 
New England Methodist Episcopal Conference, 
Harpout, Turkey, by Dr. George C. Raynolds, (▲. B. t.) 
Sandwich Islandc, Kusala, by Rey. B. G. Snow — in gold, $ 53 92 

premium, 5 39 



f 50 00 

25 

20 00 

75 00 

185 76 

783 08 

10 00 



59 31 



f 1,183 40 



COLLECTIONS. 
By Rey. £. F. Slafter, ApmU of th9 American Bibk Soeisfy, 



Trinity Church, Boston, 

B. F. Nourse, 

St. Paul's Church, Boston, 

Emmanuel Church, Boston, 

Christ Church, Boston, 

St. John's Church, East Boston, 

St. Mary's Church, Dorchester, 

St. Paul's Church, Brookline, 

Rey. J. S. Copley Greene, . 

Grace Church, Medford, 



9 1,043 00 

20 00 

584 00 

782 00 

18 00 

12 71 

66 50 

140 40 

75 00 

17 50 



36 



Grace Church, Lawrence, $ 22 20 

St. Andrew's Church, Hanoyer, 86 06 

St. Michael's Church, Marblehead 41 00 

Grace Church, Newton, 36 40 

Grace Church, Salem, 33 00 

St. Luke's Church, Chelsea, 15 00 

St. Paul's Church, Dedham, 69 00 

Calvary Church, Danrers, 10 40 

Church of Our Sayiour, Longwood 286 06 

St. John's Church, Charlestown, ' 36 00 

St. John's Church, Jamaica Plain, 100 00 

St. Thomas's Church, Taunton, 18 66 

St. Peter's Church, Cambridgeport, 11 10 

St. Mary's Church, Newton Lower Falls, .... 38 64 

Trinity Church, Milford, 7 68 



LEGACIES. 

Auburn, Mass., William Craig, (in part) . 

Boston, Mass., Otis DanieU, 

Bastham, Mass., Josiah Lincoln, 

East Randolph, Mass., Elisha N. Holbrook, 

Oxford, Mass., Mary E. Bastow, 



f 3,659 29 



« 


3.100 00 




1,000 00 




183 60 




200 00 




379 36 


t 


26 00 



Thetford, Vt., Dea. Jared Hosford— R. E. Hosford, Executor, 

9 4,887 86 

Annual Subfcriptions, • $ 100 00 

Whole amount acknowledged in the preceeding lists, . . $ 16,716 22 



PORM OF A BEQUEST TO THE SOCIETY. 

I give, devise and bequeath, to the Massachusetts Bible Societt, 
incorporated in the year Eighteen hundred and ten, the sum of 
to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of the Society. 



Lbttb&s relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and policy 
of the Society, should be directed to Rev. Daniel Butleb, Recording 
Secretary, 16 Comhill, Boston. 



Remittances for Books, donations from churches and individuals, 
and orders for Books, should be addressed to S. T. Fabwell, Agent, 
16 Comhill, Boston. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESXHTED BT 



THE TRUSTEES 



OP THX 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLtl SOCIETY, 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON, 



May 2G, 1873, being their Sixty-fourth Anniversary. 



BOSTON: 

DEPOSITORT, 15 CORNHILL. 

PRESS OP T. R MARVIN 4 SON. 

1878. 




/,/■„ ilf, ■s">'. 



Hi, (o ^^ 



OFFICERS OF THE 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 1873-4, 



^xtnititni. 
Hon. SAMUEL H. WALLEY, 

Vicu^^xtnititnts, 

Rbv. ALEXANDER H. VINTON, D.D., Suffolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 

Hon. timothy W. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County., 

His ExcKLLENCY WM. K WASHBURN, LL.D., Franklin County. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, LL.D., Middlesex County. 

CALEB HOLBROOK, Esq., Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN H. CLIFFORD. LL.D., Bristol County. 

ELISHA tucker, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq.. Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

ConesponUtng ^ecretarg. 
Rev GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D.D. 

EecorUtng ^ecretarg. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 



tTreasurrr. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

auUitor. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Esq. 



Crustees. 



Rev. JOHN O. MEANS, D.D. 
Rev. chandler R0BBIN8, D.D. 
Rev. SAMUEL B. BABCOCK. D.D. 
Rev. ANDREW P. PEABODY, D.D. 
Rev. JOHN I)E WITT. 
Rev. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU. 
Rev. PHILLIPS BROOKS. 
Rev. GEORGE F. PENTECOST. 
Bishop ISAAC W. WILEY. 



Hon. ALBERT FEARING. 
Hon. JACOB SLEEPER. 
Hon. CHARLES T. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Esq. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER. Esq. 
HON. ROBERT C. WINTHROP. 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE, Esq. 
AMOS W. STETSON. Esq. 
GEORGE P. DENNY, Esq. 



^xenittbe d^ommitttt. 

TO WHOM APPLICATIONS ARE TO BE MADE FOR BIBLES. 

Rev. John O. Mbanb, Albb&t Fbarino, and Charlbs Hbh&t Parkbb. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY FROM 1809 TO 1873. 



Vrestlimts. 



Hod. William PhiUips 1809—27 

ReT. John Pierce, D.D 1827—49 

Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL.D...1849— 64 



Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL.D...1864— 69 
Hon. Samael H. Walley 1869 



'Bitts^xtntntntn. 



ReT. John Lathrop, D.D 1809—16 

ReT. John T. Kirkland, D.D. .. 1816— 28 

ReT. Henry Ware, D.D 1828—44 

ReT. John Codman, D.D 1844—48 

Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL.D...1848 — 49 
ReT. Francis Parkman, D.D. ..1849—68 
ReT. N. L. Frothingham, D.D.. .1868— 61 
ReT. Wm. R. Nicholson, D.D. .. 1861— 72 

William C. Plunkett, Esq 1862 

Edward Southworth, Esq 1862—70 

John P. Williston, Esq 1862—72 

Hon. Wm. B. Washburn, LL.D..1862 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq 1862 



Charles P. Whitin, Esq 1862 

Lee Clafltn, Esq 1862—70 

Caleb Holbrook, Esq 1862 

James S. Amory, Esq 1862 

Hon. John H. Clifford, LL.D...1862 

Elisha Tucker, Esq 1862 . 

James B. Crocker, Esq 1862 

E. S. Moseley, Esq 1862 

Charles A. Jessup, Esq 1870 

Hon. WUliam Claflin, LL.D....1871 

ReT. Alex. H. VUiton, D.D 1872 

Hon. WUliam Hyde 1872 

Hon. Timothy W. Carter 



Correspoittrtng iiSrcrrtarus. 



ReT. Jos. SteTens Buckminster, 1809 — 18 

ReT. Samuel C. Thacher 1818—17 

ReT. Charles Lowell, D.D 1817—18 



ReT. Francis Parkman, D.D 1818—49 

ReT. N. L. Frothingham, D.D... 1849— 68 
ReT. George W. Blagden, D.D.. .1868 



Urcortrtng ilSecrrtartrs. 



ReT. John Pierce, D.D 1809—28 

ReT. Daniel Sharp, D.D 1828—80 

ReT. Cyrus P. Grosvenor 1880 — 81 

ReT. James D. Knowles 1881—82 

ReT. William Jenks, D.p 1882—89 



ReT. George W. Blagden, D.D.— 1889— 44 

ReT. William M. Rogers 1844—46 

ReT. George W. Blagden, D.D.. .1846— 49 

ReT. George Richards 1849—62 

ReT. Daniel Butler 1862 



Crrasurrrs. 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq 1809—11 

Hon. Peter 0. Thacher 1811—12 

John Tappan, Esq 1812—86 



Henry Edwards, Esq 1836—49 

George R. Sampson, Esq 1849— %2 

Charles Henry Parker, Esq 1862 



Sienittbe 

ReT. William E. Channing, D.D. 1809—18 

Hon. Jonathan Phillips 1809—16 

Stephen Higginson, Esq 1809—16 

ReT. Francis Parkman, D.D....1816— 18 

Edward Tuckerman, Esq 1816—80 

ReT. Henry Ware, jun., DD... 1818— 80 
ReT. Bei\jamin B. Wisner, D.D .1821— 86 
Charles Tappan, Esq 1880—40 



Committers. 

i ReT. Francis Parkman, D.D 1882 — 68 

ReT. George W. Blagden, D.D. . .1886—49 

Henry Edwards, Esq 1840—49 

ReT. George Richards 1849—60 

George R. Sampson, Esq 1849 — 62 

Albert Fearing, Esq 1868 

ReT. John 0. Means, D.D 1860 

Charles Henry Parker, Esq 1862 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Prominent among the events of the year now closed 
is the loss sustained by the Society in the death of 
members honored and useful. 

The vice-president for Hampden County, Mr. Charles 
A. Jessup, died early in the year. A firm believer of 
the Bible, and deeply imbued with its spirit, he heartily 
sustained every enterprise that wisely aimed at the dif- 
fusion of the truth. 

A few months later the Society was called to mourn 
the loss of the Rt. Rev. Manton Eastburn, D.D. Hold- 
ing for many years a prominent position in the 
management of the American Bible Society, he was, 
upon coming to this city, chosen a trustee of our Soci- 
ety, and for nearly thirty years gave to it his wise 
counsels and his ready aid. In his death, true religion 
mourns the loss of one whose talents and learning and 
eminent position were heartily and wholly consecrated 
to the welfare of man and the glory of God. The 
faithful service rendered to this cause during his life 
was fittingly closed by the munificent gift bestowed 
upon it at his death. 

We have also to record the death of the Hon. Stephen 
T. Farwell, who was for twenty-four years the faithful 
depository agent of the Society. Highly esteemed for 



his consistent piety, the faithful friend and guardian of 
the widow and the orphan, he has left to all who knew 
him the memory and the example of an unstained and 
useful life. 

These are the trophies of the truth which it is the 
purpose of this Society to disseminate. In the work 
they performed, and in the rest they have gained, are 
we who remain furnished with increased motives to 
diligence in our allotted task, till the end shall come. 

The Rev. Mr. Slafter has presented the claims of 
this charity to the Episcopal churches in the State ; and 
their response has been, as hitherto, most prompt and 
generous. 

The income of the Society has been $26,184.70. 
From the sale of books, $8,645.83 ; from donations, 
$9,316.84; from legacies, $6,200.30; from dividends 
and interest, $2,081.63. There has also been sent di- 
rectly to the American Bible Society, from different 
parts of the State, the further sum of $16,944.44. The 
expenditures have been for Bibles and Testaments, 
$10,836.74; donations to the American Bible Society, 
$3,606.30 ; salaries of secretary and depository agent 
and assistant and colporters, $4,905.10 ; printing report, 
rent, and taxes, freight, postage, wrapping-paper, fuel, 
light, &c., $1,185.78 ; invested funds, $5,650.07. 

The invested funds of the Society amount to the sum 
of twenty-two thousand dollars. Beyond and beside 
this amount, they hold a fund of some sixty-seven 
thousand dollars, subject to a life annuity of five thou- 
sand dollars a year, at present unavailable, and the 
precise value of which to the Society cannot now be 
accurately estimated. 

A colporter was employed for ten months among the 
French Canadians in Salem, and in various cities and 
towns in the Commonwealth where this class of our 



people is found. Frequent inability to read, indiffer- 
ence to the Scriptures, and an unwillingness to own 
them, render this a peculiarly unpromising field. 
Somewhat less than two hundred copies of the Scrip- 
tures he was able to circulate, largely by sale. Though 
abundant in labors, and very useful as a missionary, his 
work was abandoned, as not coming fairly within the 
province of the Society. 

For a little more than two months, a colporter, the 
Rev. Mr. Dwight, has labored in the northern part of 
the city. He called upon nine hundred and seventy- 
four families, and at eighty-six liquor stores. In sales 
and donations he circulated one hundred and forty-six 
copies of the Scriptures, mostly among the foreign 
population, with many of whom he conversed and 
offered prayer. 

For four months a colporter has been employed in 
the county of Plymouth. In this time he canvassed 
the towns of Middleboro', Lakeville, Hingham, and Hull, 
Hanover, Scituate, and South Scituate, Duxbury, Pem- 
broke, Hanson, and Abington. Sixty-eight families 
destitute of the Scriptures were found, sixty-six of 
whom were supplied. Nine hundred and nine copies 
of the Scriptures were sold, and one hundred and 
ninety-five bestowed in charity. 

There have been issued from the depository twenty- 
six thousand five hundred and seventy-seven volumes. 
Of this number seven thousand seven hundred and 
nineteen were Bibles, nine thousand six hundred and 
eighteen were Testaments ; three thousand seven hun- 
dred and twenty-four copies of the Testament and 
Psalms ; and four thousand four hundred and sixty-four 
smaller portions of the Scriptures. Of the Bibles and 
Testaments one thousand and six were in various 
foreign languages. 



6 

* 

The gratuitous issues have amounted to six thou- 
sand three hundred and eighty-six copies, at a cost of 
$2,900.66. They have been given to seamen, mis- 
sion schools, city missions, public institutions, freedmen, 
destitute families and individuals, in Massachusetts, 
Maine, New Hampshire, and the West. 

A comparison of the figures here given, with those 
contained in previous Reports, will show that the work 
of the Society has materially declined in every depart- 
ment. Fewer books have been sold, and less has been 
done in the way of searching out and supplying the des- 
titution existing in the State. The decrease of our sales 
has largely arisen from the great importation of English 
Bibles, which, in their cheaper varieties, have approxi- 
mated very nearly to our own price. In the fluctua- 
tions of business, it occasionally happens that books can 
be manufactured abroad so as to compete in the market 
with our own, sold at cost, and thus, for the time being, 
business becomes a helper in one department of our 
work. That Bibles are afforded thus cheaply is owing 
to the competition that, on both sides of the water, 
publishers encounter, from the issues of Societies who 
are pledged to furnish books at cost. Another cause 
of our comparatively limited sales is found in the loca- 
tion and character of onr rooms. They are, for many 
persons, difficult of access. They are inconvenient, and, 
in their dingy repulsiveness, contrast most unfavorably 
with places usually devoted to such purposes. The 
necessity of a change has forced itself upon the atten- 
tion of the trustees ; and we confidently expect that a 
more suitable location will ere long be secured. 

But the great cause of the change to which we refer 
is found in the failure of the friends of the Bible to 
fu.nish the means requisite for the proper prosecution 
of this work. Churches not a few, that once rejoiced in 



an annual offering that should fairly express their love 
of the Scriptures, and their desire for their circulation, 
statedly withhold their gifts. Thiey practically rob 
other churches for the supply of their own poor. While 
generous offerings are bestowed upon other. charities, a 
ghastly blank by the side of the Book of Books appar- 
ently expresses their estimate of its value in the con- 
test now waging with the darkness and ignorance of 
our world. 

That this indifference is more than temporary, we 
cannot believe ; and we look hopefully to the time wheji 
the interest once universally felt in this great work 
shall be revived. 

The opinion extensively prevails among English- 
speaking people, that the changes which our language 
has undergone since the present version of the Scrip- 
tures was made, and the great increase of biblical 
knowledge, render a revision of the same very desira- 
ble. Acting under this impression, men, eminent for 
their learning and position in the various churches of 
this country and of England, have associated them- 
selves for this work ; and the hope is entertained that 
our present incomparable version of the Scriptures 
w^ill be further enriched by the spoils gathered from 
centuries of faithful study of the Scriptures in their 
original languages, and from the fuller investigation of 
subjects fitted to throw increasing light upon the 
sacred page. ^ 

The American Bible Society, with receipts somewhat 
diminished, has enjoyed a year of usual prosperity. 
Sixteen thousand and five hundred Bible distributors 
have labored gratuitously during * the year. There 
have been issued for the Bible House nearly a million 
copies of the* Scriptures, in thirty-nine languages, 
while two hundred and seventy thousand copies, in 



10 

sixty languages and dialects, have been sent abroad. 
In Mexico, South America, p,nd Turkey, sixty persons 
have been employed in distributing the Scriptures ; and, 
at numerous missionary stations, continuous labor in 
this work has become necessary. Important transla- 
tions and revisions are now in progress, and it is 
allowed to prosecute its labors in an ever-widening 
field. 

We cannot close this Report without adverting, for 
a moment, to some of the facts which are fitted to 
raise the hopes and* quicken the zeal of every toijer in 
this work. We are happy to know that thousands are 
bearing the Scriptures from house to house in our land, 
and that other thousands, an ever-increasing company, 
are bestowing upon this work their prayers and their 
offerings. The growing demand for the Scriptures 
am9ng nominally Christian nations measures their prog- 
ress towards a pure faith. Missionaries from Protes- 
tant Christendom, scattered over the world, plant by 
the side of all waters the tree whose leaves are for the 
healing of the nations. The ability and the disposition 
to read, the world over, furnishes a call to this work 
which we may not innocently neglect. No one can 
show from the Bible, or the experience of the past, that 
mankind is not as powerfully affected by what it reads 
as by what it hears. We would not imitate the church 
of the dark ages by raising up ministers, and neglect- 
ing the only effective weapons of their warfare. Before 
the wide-opened eye of humanity it is ours to place the 
Word, — the Word that, instinct with the divine Spirit, 
shall change the heart, and restore in man the lost image 
of his Maker. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty.fourth Annual Meeting of the Massiachusetts 
Bible Society was held at the rooms of the Society, No. 16 
Cornhili, on Monday, May 26, at 9 o'clock, a.m., the President, 
Hon. Samuel H. Walley, in the chair. 

The minutes of the last annual meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq., presented 
his Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Sixty-fourth Annual Report of the Trustees was pre- 
sented, and it was 

Votedf That the reading of the same be deferred till the 
public meeting this afternoon. 

The oflBcers of the Society were elected for the ensuing 
year. 

The Society then adjourned to attend the public services of 
the Sixty-fourth Anniversary, at the Mt. Vernon Church, at 3 
.o'clock, P.M. 



Met according to adjournment. 

The Scriptures were read and prayer offered by the Rev. 
Solon Cobb of Medford. 

The Report of the Trustees was read and accepted. 

The Rev. William W. Newton of Brookline then delivered 
the following Address : — 



12 



ADDRESS OF REV. WILLIAM W. NEWTON. 

As I rise, Mr. President, upon this anniversary occasion, to 
add niy testimony as a minister of Christ to the preciousness 
of our Englisli Bible, ray mind turns almost unconsciously to 
that typical picture of the painter Kaulbach, — the ** Era of the 
Reformation." 

• With a prophet's insight and, a poet's soul and a painter's skill, 
he has caught the ti'ue inspiration of that great awakening, and 
has made of Martin Luther, with his upraised Bible, as central 
and conspicuous a figure as Michael Angelo has made of Moses 
clutching the tables of the law in his wrath, when first he beheld 
the upraised symbol of Israel's defiant idolatry. 

Gutenberg with his printing-press ; Columbus with his com- 
pass; Galileo with his telescope; Shakspeare with his matchless 
dramas, — all are grouped round the monk of Wittemberg. The 
giving way of ignorance and superstition in that shock which broke 
up the heavy slumbers of Europe; the new-found drift of the 
world from darkness to light ; the dawning of fresh hope and 
knowledge, — all are vividly portrayed upon the canvas. But it 
is not the man of science or the man of literature, it is not the 
man of mechanics or the man of war, who stands out conspicuous- 
ly as the Hero of that period : it is the man who freed the soul 
from error, the man who, Pr^metheus-like, brought down fire from 
heaven ; it is the man whose eyes were opened, who heard God's 
voice saying to him, as he went climbing upon iiis knees the hard- 
worn steps of the Scala Santa at Rome, " The just shall live by 
faith," — who takes the central place of this epoch. 

Perhaps, sir, to-day some of us might give this central place in* 
the intellectual awaking of that century to the philanthropist, 
the man of science, or the utilitarian inventor; but the genius 
of the painter is right, after all, when he makes all other represen- 
tatives of knowledge move round the man with God's long-buried 
Word in his hand, the man who knew no fear but that of sin, 
the man to whose spiritual consciousness God spake and said, 
** Let there be light, and there was light." 

Of course, sir, we all know that our English Bible had its own 
English ancestors: it was in no sense a transplant from the 



13 

Continent Luther and Calvin translated the Scriptures for the 
people and the churches they represented ; but we of the Anglo- 
Saxon tongue had our Tyndale, our Coverdale, our Cranmer ; we 
had the Bishops' Bible, and the version* which came from the 
. Hampton Conference, — and which has stood the shock of three 
centuries' criticism, — our own King James's Bible. Still, when we 
seek for a typical picture, which by its combijiation will faithfully 
represent a great, wide-spread period like that of the Reformation, 
English and Protestant though we are, we willingly yield the 
palm, and, with the painter, crown Luther as the acknowledged 
Hero of the Reformation. 

By this enthronement, then, of the man with the upraised book 
as the hero of an age of intellectual and scientific marvels, is 
meant the elevation of revealed religion over every other branch 
of knowledge. 

Science, by its induction al processes, nyiy find out many things 
in nature and in art ; but it cannot find out the Almighty to per- 
fection. Nature may tell me^nuch of the goodness and power of 
God ; but it cannot quench sin, or put out the fires of remorse, or 
assure me of my immortality. 

I can find no forgiveness for sin in the summer's noon-day heat 
or in the storm upon the seashore. I can see no such power as 
that of prayer in the unmitigated reign of law about me. There 
is no voice saying, " Cry ! " in the revelation of nature. 

There are inferences to my creattire-hood^ but no call to ray 
sonship, in the fields or on the sea ! And then I go back in thought 
to those two upreared altars outside the guarded gates of Eden ; 
arid there, in those far-off typical offerings of natural and revealed 
religion, I see God's sanction pf that worship built upon the 
remedial idea and upon the fundamental acknowledgment that 
'* Sin lieth at the door." 

Here, then, it is that we find revelation as the fire from heaven 
upon the altar! The cold, unbloody, unaccepted heathen libation 
of Cain, and the blazing sacrifice of Abel, show us from the very 
outset of the race, the divine approval of revelation over natural 
reason. 

It is revelation which, streaming its light and fire from heaven, 
touches the altar where the victim lies ; which accepts the offering 
of humility, and passes by the unstained altar of self:asserting 
pride ! It is revelation which gives us the prophecies and promises 
of God-8 Worti ; which shows us the hand of God in the history of 
the chosen people of Israel ; which makes them God's witnesses 



14 



nn«i the conservators of his trutl^ in the earth. It is revelation 
which prepared for us a Christian church, and then, like some fond 
father, comes at last to lean upon the strong arm of the son whose 
birth and infancy and ^youth he himself so carefully watched and 
trained. To-day it i^ the Christian Church which defends and 
parries the thrusts made through it at revelation. j£!neas-like it 
carries fi'om this burning world, set on fire with sin, both the past 
glory and the future hope of the race. It is revelation which 
gives us our Christian Church and our Christian civilization. 
Yes, it is revelation which makes of hardened, selfish sinners 
self-denying saints, drawing to their lives and characters the 
positive love and admiration of an envious world, that cannot 
attain to such heights of excellence. In short, it is the Word 
made flesh, dwelling among us, full of grace and truth, which 
reveals to us God's thoughts of love, and makes the historic 
Christ and the objective Church one with the first promises of God 
to man, at that far-off period when men heard a voice and felt 
a call, and said it was God revealing iiimself to their souls! 

What, then, is there in this gift of revelation which binds so 
closely the human soul to God, and exalts character in so thorough 
and complete a manner? 

I answer, revelation offers two great gifts, divine enlighten- 
ment and divine zeal ! These are worked into the conscience of 
mankind by the power of the Holy Ghost; and the red glare of 
earth, which hangs about man, is changed into the golden shadows 
of heaven, God's servants, like Cal«b of old, having now another 
spirit. 

I am speaking now of the individual soul, not of the class, not 
of the church universal, not of humanity at large. 

Divine enlightenment, this is the first gift which revelation 
gives us. It endows us with the power of a clear and quick-act- 
*ing conscience ; with a new and fresh range of thoughts of God ; 
with strong, unquenchable religious convictions ; with a belief in 
God and in a hereafter, wliich acts as the governing rudder of our 
whole course of life ; with bright and happy thoughts of God ; 
with a sense of the divine forgiveness of sin ; with the thought of 
Christ's strong, saving love, — all these are elements of that moral 
and spiritual enlightenment which comes from the lamp of revela- 
tion. 

And then follows divine zeal, as the other gift of revelation. 



15 

See what this has done for the CKnrch and for the truth of Christ. 
See in the history of the Church how^ the sublime motives of 
Christianity have ever enlarojod and made vigorous our natural 
stock of entliusiasm. Look at the apostles, drearily fishing on the 
quiet Lake of Galilee ; look at Matthew, wearily transcribing the 
names and taxes of his townsmen ; look at Timothy, Barnabas, 
Apollos, and even Saul of Tarsus. See what a change came 
over the spirit of their lives when they put away their nets, and 
laid aside their pens, and rolled up their parchments, and went 
abroad to do Christ's work. 

They went to do God's will as the angels went upon the morn- 
ing of our Lord's nativity in Bethlehem. Rivers stopped them 
not; mountains kept ihem not back; the burning desert and the 
stormy ocean felt the tread of their o'ermastering feet. In. their" 
hearts was a kindling desire ; in their souls was foreknowlfedg^ 
of life! They travailed in spirit with the message of the gospel, 
and nothing could hold them back. 

Every branch that was bearing fruit was purged by Christ, that 
it might bring forth more fruit. Their natural enthusiasm was 
consumed by their new zeal of its mere naturalness, and a newer, 
richer growth appeared, — the growth of Christian principle. 

Then they counted not their lives dear unto them, that they 
might finish their course with joy. What to them was the heads- 
man's block or the inverted cross, the chain, the fagot, or the 
stake? Their divine enlightenment helped them to realize 
beyond which was dearer to them than the present. Their divine 
zeal impelled them to endure as seeing Him who is invisible. The 
wilfl beasts of the arena, the gladiators of the Coliseum, and the 
tortures of the Mainertine Priso^i, could not check the devotion 
of the apostles until the gods of the ancient world went down 
into the past, like the stars in the western slope of heaven when the 
sun in the east makes the cold gray of the morning blush with 
the promise of advancing day. 

Yes, Mr. President, wherever this revelation has gone with 
the express authority of God, whetner by Jewish parchment or by 
printed book, it has carried with it this twofold gift, — to the under- 
siawling^ e)d\ghtenment ; to the inotwes^ the i^npuhe of Christian 
zeal. Light for the head, and fire for the heart, this has ever 
been the way in which the two-edged sword of tlie Spirit 
has cut. 

This, then, has been the twofold gift of the Word of God to 
man. 



16 

Strangely, too, the history of this book — its story of struggle — 
has been precisely that of the persecuted militant Church. The 
Latin motto, ^^Teneo etTetieor^ — " I'hold and am held," — has in- 
deed been fulfilled in the* history of the Bible. It has nerved men 
in honra of danger to defend it, and h:is ever been protected by the 
strength it has itself supplied. It is the zeal of the Lord of hosts 
which has perfoi-med this standing miracle of the bush burning, 
but not consumed. 

As the Eev. Treadwell Walden, in his admirable book, "Our 
English Bible and its Ancestors," truly says, "It lives among us, 
the venerable relic of a terrrble and stirring age. It came into 
being amid persecution and exile. It was sprinkled with the ashes 
of the stake and the blood of the block. It was trampled under 
foot by one king, but it became the royal diadem of another. It 
was tried as. silver is tried, and as gold refined seven times in the 
fire ; for in seven successive crucibles of intellect, saintliness, and 
scholarship was it gradually purged of its dross. 

" It was commenced in the secret closet of a lone translator, hid- 
defh amid the obscurities of a continental town ; it was finished in 
the open chamber of a congress of scholars in the heart of the 
metropolis of England. 

"At the first in journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils 
of robbers, in perils of its own countrymen, in weariness and pain- 
fulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings oflen, 
in cold and nakedness, it reached repose at last in the courts 
of princes and governors, in the cloisters of universities and . 
cathedrals, and in the hearths ai\d homes of the millions of a 
nation." t 

So, sir, we love and honor the Bible for what it is to us, and for 
all that it has been to our fathers. We love it for the light and the 
'zeal it gives us; we love it for its exceeding great and precious 
promises, and for the* inspiring motives it offers us. All that we 
have and hope for is in this book. It is not to us a mere record 
of the past. It is- not a fetish or a charm which we ignorantly 
worship. We do not adore thfe book in any form of bibliolatry 
or by any transubstantiation of the divinity into the forms of type 
and paper ! The Bible is not to us as a curious specimen of any 
' ,one age of the church alone ! it is the transmitted life and will of 
God into 'the lives and characters of his children in all time: we 
must not think of the Deity as lagging in the march of the ages ; 
as failing to supply humanity with strength fitted for the day of 
action. Grod's mercies, with respect to revelation, are "new every 



17 

morning." To-day the Protestant Anglo-Saxon world in two conti- 
nents, with an ocean rolling between them, is yet one in a sincere 
and honest Christian effort to revise the hitherto untouched King 
James's version, and give us, upon a broad, wise basis, the last re- 
sults of to-day's critical scholarship. The Bible is not a past 
power only, belonging to an age that is gone : it is incarnate in 
the thought and philosophy of each new century of time. Had 
I the time, I should like to show the proof of what I have here 
been saying, mot by quoting the examples of saints and martyrs . 
of the* early Church, but by showing the Bible's gift of enlight- 
enment and zeal to men of all tinle and in every pursuit of 
life. 

The soldier, the statesman, the student, and the theologian have 
drawn their highest inspiration from this shrine of God. 

Cromwell felt the power of its inspiration when his men went 
into battle singing the Psalms of David, when he said it was only 
religion, or fidelity to God, which could overcome the Cavalier's 
sense of honor, or fidelity to the king. Clarkson and Wilberforoe 
in England, and Pastorius and John Woolman and others of the 
retiring, unworldly order of Friends in our own land, felt the power 
of this light of truth in their life-long labors to free the down- 
trodden African race from the chains of the slave-ship and the 
auction-stand. And to-day, sir, in the Church of Rome, we behold 
with our own eyes a strong and radical school of thought-, unwill- 
ing to put a man above the Church, the conscience, and the Scrip, 
tures, denying the dogma of papal infallibility, and refusing to lock * 
the Word of God, and give the- key over to the fickle judgment of 
an erring mortal ! 

But why go abroad to fihd examples of the Bible's inspiration 
to make men firm for the hour of trialj when within our own 
circle we see those whose lives have been made strong by God's 
Word building into those blank interstices of character men take 
for ruins; men who are loyal to the convictions given them by 
God's Word ; men who would not go with modern Balaks, or 
speak what they would have them say, if they were offered by 
them houses full of silver and of gold. As I speak, sir, of these in 
our very midst \Vho through faith were valiant for the truth, there 
comes before my mind the image of one who was the embodiment • 
of character formed upon Bible teaching, and who, since the last 
meeting of this Society has passed away from earth, — the honored 
name of Maictoic Eastburn. Others older and more worthy than 
I have paid their tribute to his life and character; but^ as I think 

3 



18 

of those who have found this Word of God a lamp to their feet and 
a light to their path, I feel that I must pay my tribute of respect 
to my late bishop, who, with faithful Enoch, had this most exalted 
testimony, that he pleased God. 

And now, sir, let us thank our God, upon every remem- 
brance of such names as these, for the record of such lives. Let us 
thank him for our free, unchained Bibles, and our open sanctuaries, 
and let us realize our privileges. Lord Bacon relates, that at Queen 
Elizabeth's coronation, when it was a custom to release prison- 
ers, one of her courtiers besought her with a loud voice that now, 
this good time, there might be four or five principal prisoners re- 
leased : these were the four Evangelists and the apostle St. Paul, 
who had long been shut up in an unknown tongue, as it were in 
prison, so that they could not converse with the common people. 

Let us, then, not detain these blessed prisoners of hope in our 
midst otily ; let us send them about, doing good. 

Let them go abroad, — yes, through all lands, — until that central 
figure of the man with the upraised book be the picture of every 
successive era of time, until the earth shall be filled with the 
knowledge of the Lord, and that prophetic verae of the Christian 
poet be at last fulfilled, -^ 

" Waft, waft, ye winds, His storjr, 

And you, ye waters, roll. 
Till, like a sea of glory. 

It spreads from pole to pole ; 
Till o'er our ransomed nature 

The Lamb for sinners slain, 
Redeemer, King, Creator, 

In blias returns to reign." 



A hymn was sung, after which the Rev. I. G. Bidwell of 
Worcester addressed the asa^mbly^ 




19 



ADDRESS OF REV. I. G. BIDWELL. 

I ESTEEM it an honor, Mr. President, to be in any way identified 
with the work of the American Bible Society, or of the Massachu- 
setts Bible Society, which is the same thing essentially. 

This society is now an everywhere accepted fact. It has passed 
through its preliminary stages of infancy and childhood. Its ex- 
istence and operations are no longer regarded with feelings of 
doubt and uncertainty by good people. It has conquered the 
situation, and is now recognized as one of the great moral and 
Christianizing forces of the age, ■— a co-ordinate instrumentality 
with the missionary and the Sunday-school cause. 

We are not here, if I rightly understand the object of our meet- 
ing, to whistle up new courage, as if our cause were staggering 
under the blows of its enemies. 

We believe that our Bible is the revealed word of God ; we 
believe that the eternal God has pledged himself to the preserva- 
tion and vindication of his own book. We believe, that, in spite 
of all the dust and clatter of modern scepticism and free religiony 
the Bible is stronger to-day than ever before, and is winning its 
way into the confidence and love of men and of nations as never 
before. 

And we come together upon these anniversary occasions to 
stimulate each other, to exchange greetings, to sing a song of joy- 
ful thanksgiving in view of past successes, and go out to new labors, 
refreshed by the thought, that, in the bonds of a common sympathy 
and aim, we are co-workers with God in scattering the leaves of 
the tree of life over the whole earth. 

If I am not mistaken, I have either read or heard that the motto 
of the American Bible Society is, "A copy of the Bible in 'every 
home on this continent!" and that the watchword of the associ- 
ated Bible Societies of the Church is, " A copy of the BiblQ in the 
home and hand of every family in this earth ! " 

I like these broad, cosmopolitan programmes ! I like these cam- 
paigns that map the whole world, and whose lines gird a redeemed 
race. They seem to kindle with the fire and faith of l^is love who 
said, ** Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every 
creature." I like to face the unfaith of these babblipg days with 
the simple theory and plan of th0 gospel, viz., t/^is world oivilized 



20 

and Christianized by the energy and leavening life of the Bible. I 
like to argue the fulfilment of the programme from the results of 
the past ; and I believe that it is our privilege to celebrate our 
annual gatherings in the spirit of jubilee and consummation. 

But, in addition to these jnbilee expressions and views and feel- 
ings, we need to restate and restudy first principles very often. 
Our rejoicing should be intelligent, and our prophecy should be in 
harmony with the fixpd laws of truth and progress. 

Our society watchword is truly sublime : " A copy of the writ- 
ten Word of God in every home in this world." Oh, will that 
purpose ever be realized ? cometh that day indeed when the Bible 
shall be read in every family of our race ? The mechanical and 
financial aspect of these questions is easily solved. The popula- 
tion of the globe is some 1,200,000,000. Giving five as the aver- 
age number of each family, and we have about 240,000,000 of 
families, calling for 240,000,000 copies of the Bible ; and these, at 
twenty-five cents per copy, ask for $60,000,000. This is not an 
impossible sum, in these days when merchant princes and railroad 
kings accumulate $40,000,000 and $60,000,000 in private fortunes. 

The publishing of 240,000,000 copies of the Bible is not an im- 
possibility in these days .of power-presses. The American Bible 
Society publishes 1,000,000, more or less, yearly. If all other condi- 
tions were satisfied but the financial and the mechanical, it would 
be an easy thing to realize this motto within ten years; and if all 
other conditions were satisfied, it would not be many days before 
men who now give one million and two millions to found a hos- 
pital or endow a college would begin to dream about giving 
$50,000,000 to supply this globe with the Bible. 

When other things are ready, there will be no lack of money to 
carry out our programme. There are individual men in England 
and in the United States who are able to put a Bible into every 
home in this world ; and, if the world was ripe for this consum- 
mation, the blessed Holy Ghost would inspire the quick ambition 
to do that work. 

But between us and that high consummation there are many 
difficulties and great labors. Continents are to be opened by the 
slow processes of discovery, and States are to be entered by the 
amenities of arbitration and political treaties. Languages are to 
be learned, translations wrought out, hoary superstitions are to be 
overthrown, the whole temper and constitution of tribes and races 
are to be renetced, I^evertheless, in the face of all these obstacles, 
and with the knowledge of all this hard work, we print this motto 



21 

upon onr banners; and in the name of our God we set up oui 
banners marked with this grand device, " A copy of the Bible in 
every family in this world." But, supposing this motto realized, 
What then ? We have put a copy of the Holy Scriptures into 
each family on the earth. In their own language they can read 
the whole volume, from Genesis to Revelation, just as we read it! 
Now what ? What will this book do in these families ? What 
will it accomplish in these communities? How will it affect these 
individuals? It stands upon the library shelf in the midst of 
twenty other books as large or larger than itself. It lies upon the 
table in company with many other volumes. How does this Bible' 
book differ from its companion book ? What will it do for these 
families and individuals which those other books will not or can 
not do ? Is there some great spell hid in this book ? What is the 
ground of our confidence in it ? What is the corner stone, thought, 
or principle, upon which the American Bible Society rests in its 
work of publishing and scattering the Bible, without note or com- 
merit ^ all over the earth ? 

These questions bring me to the one single thought which I 
desire to state, and, if possible, make emphatic. I have no new 
theme, I have no startling theory, to present ; but, in the love of 
this cause, I would, if possible, freshen up our confidence and 
active interest in that wonderful book, which, in God's plan of 
world-recovery, is twin-born with Jesus Christ. If it is not the 
incarnate^ the flesh and blood wordy it is the written wordy and it is 
the revealer of God to man. 

Let me suggest this sentence as a kind of text for a few addi- 
tional remarks. 

THE SELF-ASSERTING POWER OP THE BIBLE. 

We believe and claim that the Bible is unlike any other book, 
because it connects directly with God and the supernatural world 
in such a way as to demonstrate its own truthfulness to the con- 
science and heart and intellect of any honest and devout reader. 
It explains itself, it proves itself, it asserts itself, without human 
help, and in spite of human opposition ! and, therefore, we think 
if we can place it in the hands of a man or a family, it will be an 
active, vitalizing agency to carry forward its own mission, which is 
the publication of God's will to man. Of course we understand 
the direct agency of the Holy Spirit in connection with the writ- 
ten word ; but I am speaking of the Bible as a hook, — as a single 



22 

specific instramentality with which we are working, and from 
which we are expecting the most marvellous results. 

Here is a small volume, made up of sixty-six sections, or books, 
composed by forty different authors. It sprang from an insignifi- 
cant tribe of Asia. It began to take definite book-form some fifteen 
or sixteen hundred years before the Christian era, and grew into 
completeness, book by book, until, after a growth of sixteen or 
seventeen hundred years, it was finished about one hundred years 
after the Christian era! This strange book, which has such a 
strange history, we claim to be the direct and only official revela- 
tion of God's will to the world. We claim that God communi- 
cated the thoughts of this book to the minds of these men, and 
that they spoke or wrote out these thoughts under the inspiration 
and direction of the Holy Spirit. We claim that the knowledge 
of this book is necessary in order to salvation, and that the gospel 
programme contemplates the placing of this book in the hands 
of every individual of the race, so that he may read it for himself 
and know God and the things which pertain to his own peace. 

And we further claim that these thoughts, when read, studied, 
and meditated upon, have a peculiar and a supernatural influence 
upon the human mind and heart ; that they are instinct with their 
own self-evidencing life, so that to those who read them aright^ 
there results at once the assurance of their own divine authority, 
and that knowledge of God which makes wise unto salvation. 

We believe the testimony which the Bible gives to itself: " The 
entrance of Thy word giveth light, giveth understanding to the 
simple." " The words that I speak unto you, they are spirU, and 
they are /(/e." The Word of God is " quick and powerful, sharper 
than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder 
of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner 
of the thoughts and intents of the heart." It is impossible to find 
words more expressive of the subtle^ pe^ietratifig, and self-assert- 
ing power of the sacred Scriptures. They are essentially different 
from other books. They have vital qualities that Homer and 
Milton and Bacon and Shakspeare and Goethe and Dickens 
have not ! The pulses of the Divine Life throb through these 
words into human hearts, energizing the moral nature, and bring- 
ing man face to face with the whole truth of God, and of the soul, 
and of eternity. These are our claims for the Bible. We make 
them without hesitation and without qualification. In the face of 
all the opposition of these times, in the face of all the new dis- 
coveries, and the new sciences, and the new theologies of this 



23 

• 

age, we occupy the position taken by the Church eighteen hundred 
years ago, and claim that we are abreast with the oldest knowl- 
edge, and with the newest science. 

But our position is challenged. Disbelievers sneer at the old 
book, and say that it is an outgrown composition. How shall we 
defend ourselves ? We may not be able to trace the influence of 
the Bible through the life of nations ; we may not be able to 
discuss the problems of Latin and Greek and Hebrew and Syriao 
and Arabic literature; we may not be able to speak definitely 
about versions and manuscripts, and translations and revisions ; we 
may not be able to explain chronologies, and geological epochs 
and eras, and Egyptian hieroglyphics, and stone implement^ and 
cave bears, and Nile potteries, and lake dwellings, and ape devel- 
opments. What can we do in the din of this rationalistic defi- 
ance ? What can the unlearned Christian do in the clatter of all 
this impudent and exultant opposition ? Is he at the mercy of his 
enemies? or has he a weapon with which to defend himself, and 
cleave a wide path through all his foes? I am happy to answer 
that the unlearned Christian is not weaponless in such disputatious 
times as these. He is thoroughly furnished for defence, in the 
face of the most subtle and cultured antagonisms I He carries 
an Ithuriel spear, which is as potent in Boston as in Utah, in 
college halls as in city sabbath schools or the backwoods; and 
that weapon is the ^ible itself. There is no weapon so sharp and 
strong and penetrating as the Bible itself. The Word of God is 
the sword of the Spirit ; and, when wielded by the arm of faith, it 
is irresistible to its enemies. To-day, as in past years, smoke-be- 
grimed colliers and humble shoemakers and timid housewives 
are equal to the tallest Goliaths of infidelity, through the discipline 
and logic and love which come of prayerful study and knowledge 
of the Holy Scriptures. And this fact contains a lesson which 
D. D.'s and college professors and Christian scientists and Chris- 
tian ministers ought never to forget. 

Our supreme argument for the Bible is the Dible itself ^ in its 
self-attesting power. 

When rationalism declares that the Bible is effete, and just 
about to perish, we ask it to explain the singular power by which 
it has maintained its existence and position in human society and 
in the world for the last eighteen hundred years. Here is a book 
which was written by forty different men, occupying in its compo- 
sition fifteen centuries. Shepherd boys, prime ministers, kings, 
fishermen, Arab sheiks, tent-makers, assisted in writing it. And 



24 

yet this manifold book is a perfect uniti/. It has one thread, one 
story, from beginning to end. It has not been shaken apart ; it 
cannot be. Other books become obsolete in language and lore ; 
but this book is as neiOy eiud/reah^ and forceful in its adaptations 
as ever. It is studied and criticised more closely each year, but 
after such study and criticism, its beatUy and unity and divinity 
are always more evident and convincing. 

Of this book it has been truthfully said, " It is faultless. Ages 
have discovered no flaw in it ; decay's effacing finger has left no 
scar upon it ; all the untiring assaults of its great adversary, all the 
dissolving acids of criticism, philosophy, and unbelief have failed 
to taint its truth, impair its evidence, or dim its lustre. Finding 
an enemy in every human heart ; hated by the world ; a stumbling- 
stone to many, and an offence to all ; assailed by the mythologies, 
philosophies, and religions of the world ; and, when the world 
turned Christian, endangered still more by the subtle favor of its 
votaries ; turned to merchandise, and sold like Joseph by his 
brethren ; dipped, like his vesture, in blood by the Holy Apostolic 
Inquisition ; sadly marred and wounded, even in the house of its 
friends, — 'it has nevertheless triumphed over every assault, and 
worsted every assailant," 

Whence has it such tenacity, such enduring, abounding life ? 
This -miracle of the Bible, abiding forever, while man and man's 
creations are in ceaseless ebb and flow, is of itself the full demon* 
stration of its own divinity, and the full refutation of the cavils 
of infidelity. 

The author of the brilliant but soulless book entitled, "The 
Religion of Humanity," tells us that " The Free-Religious Associ- 
ation has commended the writing of A Bible of Humanity, and 
that friends of the idea have made careful studies towards it," and 
that " Chie scholar has been toiling long in t/ie Dritiah Museum^ 
collecting afid si/ting the materials of which it might be com- 
posed^/ When that book is completed, and brought face to face 
with the Bible, I am not afraid to prophecy that its destruction 
will be more instant, pitiful, and complete than was the destruction 
of the Philistines' Dagon when set up before the divine Shekinalh 
We shall be curious to see the new " Book of the Soul," and 
" Bible of Humanity." 0. W. Holmes's lines u|>on the stability 
of science fit themselves to the Bible with equal force. 



25 



" The ieeble sea-birds, blinded in the Btorms, 
On some tall light-house dash their little forms. 
And the rude granite scatters for their pains 
Those small deposits that were meant for brains ; 
Tct the proud fabric in the morning sun 
Stands all unconscious of the mischief done ; 
Still the red beacon pours its evening rajs 
For the lost pilot with as full a blaze, 
Nay shines, all radiance, o'er the shattered fleet 
Of gulls and boobies brainless at its feet : 
I tell their fate, though courtesy disclaims 
To call our kind by such ungentle names ; 
Yet, if your rashness bid yon vainly dare. 
Think of their doom, ye simple, and beware ! " 



The Bible is one of the standing miracles of literature in the 
simple fact of the intelligibility, the flexibility, the universality, of 
its language^ of its idioms, of its figures. Its thoughts are world- 
thoughts. Its language is a world-language. The Bible is at home 
in ei7ery human language. It can be translated into every 
language and dialect of the race, without losing an essential 
thought. The poorest translation, its rendering into the clumsiest 
vernacular, leaves it still, as it is in the Hebrew or the Greek or 
the English, " quick and powerful, sharper than any two-edged 
sword." This cannot be said of any other book. The Bible has 
been translated already into nearly two hundred different lan- 
guages and dialects; and in all these translations it retains its 
, peculiar characteristics and power ^! The breath of God has taken 
possession of the book, and it has been appointed as the vehicle of 
God's truth to the world. It cannot be killed. It cannot be cor- 
rupted or perverted so as to lose its divinity; for God has pledged 
his own holiness and almightiness to its preservation. '^ It shall 
not return unto me void; it shall prosper in that whereunto I have 
sent it." Poor translations and defective renderings and inten- 
tional corruption would kill any other book; but these cannot kill 
the Bible. Eighteen hundred years of blundering and defective 
criticism have not been able to destroy one jot or tittle of this 
book! It cannot be proved that one single essential thought or 
idea has ever yet been lost from the Bible ! Here is a miracle that 
is worthy the study of sceptical scientists ! Empires perish, islands 
sink, animal races disappear, stars vanish from their orbits ; but not 
one essential iota or punctuation point has been lost out of this 
book, in its numerous translations into hundreds of languages, 

4 



26 

through these thousands of years! The Bible demonstrates its 
own divinity by its own self-asserting power. 

But this is seen most clearly in its influence and impressions 
upon the minds and hearts of individuals. It has a way of assert- 
ing itself in the conscience and in the consciousness of the iitdivid- 
teal. It has a self-asserting power, such as no other book ever had. 
There are 1,200,000,000 of souls upon the earth to-day. These 
1,200,000,000 souls have each their own individuality. The 
Bible is able to come to these varying individuals with 1,200,- 
000,000 peculiar adaptations, exactly suited to the state, culture, 
capacity, moral, intellectual, and spiritual wants, of one and all. 
It can convince them all of sin and righteousness, and a judgment 
to come. It can explain to them the true knowledge of them- 
selves, of God, and of eternity. It can bring them all to their 
knees, inspire the same prayer and confidence and joy in the 
child and the gray-haired man, in the slave and the king, in Bacon, 
Herschell, Webster, aiid the man who sweeps the street-crossings. 

This is what the Bible can do ! This is what it does ! Granted 
these people are all fools or fanatics ! but what means this strange 
power which that book has over men? and what means the 
strange influence which goes out from it, wherever it goes? 
Strauss, or Renan, or R, W. Emerson, cannot deny that there is 
this strange power in this book. They dare not deny the mental 
clearness or the moral sanity and honesty, of Isaac Newton, of 
Michael Faraday, of Sir David Brewster, of Benjamin Silliraan, of 
Chief-Justice Salmon P. Chase. Here, then, is the proof of the 
Bible which all can underetand, — its own self-attesting power to 
the individual. The proof of the warmth of the sunbeam is the 
sunbeam itself. The proof of the Bible is the Bible itself, in its 
influence upon men and its results in society. There are no 
wonders in the physical world that will compare at all with this 
visible, historical, irrefragable wonder of the self^asserting* power 
of the Word of God. It co-essentiates itself with the human 
consciousness, with the spiritual wants; and men and women know 
its truth just as tliey feel the warmth of sunshine or the breath 
of wind. They know its trvith, not from science or history or 
logic, but from its own impression and evidence. 

When devout believers read the Word of God, it proves itself 
to them as they read it ; and, whenever an honest sceptic will 
read it prayerfully, asking God to let him find the light, God 
stands pledged to accompany such reading with the energies of 
the Holy Spirit to the awakening and conversion of skeptics and 
unbelievers. 



27 

I might maltiply instanoes to show the self-assertiug power of 
the Word of God. 

An infidel lawyer was reading the Bible carefully : he came to 
the Ten Commandments and the moral law. " Who gave this 
law to Moses ?'^ he asked; and his infidelity was slain. The Bible 
had proved itself to him. 

Father Hyacinth e says, that, when he was seventeen years old, 
he wandered into the village church one evening, as they were 
chanting the one hundred and thirty-third psalm, ^'Behold how 
good and how pleasant I " A new world of love opened to him ; he 
found God ; the Word had proved itself to him. A poor Hindoo 
woman got hold of the Bible: she read it, and said, " These sacred 
books of the Christians must have been written by a woman, they 
say so many kind things about women. Our sacred books pour 
contempt upon us women, but your books tell our husbands to 
love us ; " and that poor pagan was a Christian. The Bible had 
proved itself to her. It simply asserted the,love side of the gospel, 
and demonstration was complete. But this is personal experience, 
some one says. Personal experience, indeed I So it is, and it is 
the highest kind of proof 

It is experiment, demonstration in the consciousness. I trust we 
have all thus found out the truth and sweetness of the Word of 
God. 

It is upon this principle of the self-asserting power of the Word 
of God that the American Bible Society plants itself; and it is 
because we believe in this principle that we are in a hun'y to 
scatter the Bible, without note or comment^ over the whole earth. 
We have no faith in the Boman Catholic theory, that the Bible 
must first be explained by the Priest and Church, and that it is 
not safe to give it to the common people. We do not underrate 
the visible Church, with its ordinances and living ministry ; but we 
do believe that t?te living Word and the witnessing Spirit are able 
to save and sanctify men without sacraments or church ordi-^ 
nances. It Would be better for the World to lose every visible 
Church organization to-day, than to lose the written Bible. But 
both are necessary ; and God has united and co-ordinated them in 
his wisdom and love. 

The work of the Church is to scatter the Bible in all places. 
The Bible Society is the facile hand which does this work. 

Scatter these sacred books ; make them omnipresent. Scatter 
them in hotels, railroad-depdts steamboat-saloons, prisons, police- 
stations. Scatter them in rum-shopSj brothels, wherever they will 



28 

be received, wherever men are confined, wherever they loange, 
wherever they pass or congregate. Who knows what a passing 
glance at the sacred book, or a chance perusal, may do for sorae 
prodigal son ; what sober thoughts raay be aroused, what memo- 
ries of a father's family altar, or a sainted mother's love ? Multiply 
your colporteurs and Bible-readers and visitors on every side, and 
keep them ever at work. It is God's living Word that they caiTy ; 
and Gk>d himself, in the power and majesty of all his attributes, 
has promised to back up his Word with the energies of his Holy 
Spirit, and magnify the faith of those who are willing to work and 
wait for him. 

" Sow in the morn thy seed, 
At eve hold not thj hand : 
To doubt and fear, give thou no heed. 
Broadcast it o'er the land. 

" Thou knowest not which shall thrive, 
The late or earlj sown ; 
Grace keeps the precious germ alive. 
When and wherever sown." 

The exercises closed with a doxologj and the benediction. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 
PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the Com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for carrying 
into effect the object of this Association ; which^ being read from 
the Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, 
with one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows, viz. : -^ 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments, to be distributed among all persons inhabit- 
ing within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly-settled clergy- 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who 
shall, in writing, request to ^e members ; of every person who 
shall subscribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not less 
than two dollars, and who shall remain a member so long as he 
continues the payment of that sum ; and of every person who 
shall subscribe and pay to the Treasurer a sum not less than fifty 
dollars, he remaining a member during life, without being obliged 
to further contributions. 



30 

3. SubsoriptioDs, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the di- 
rection of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the 
organi2ation of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are 
obtained, notice shall be given by the Committee, and also of the 
time and place of the meeting of the Society. 

4 The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet, and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treasurer* 
Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who shall 
continue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until suc- 
cessors are chosen in their room ; and they, together witU eighteen 
other members to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom 
six shall be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a 
Board of Trustees. 

6. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from 
among the members of the Society, a Committee of three persons, 
to continue in office during the pleasure of the Board of Trustees, 
who shall have the management of the fund) and the distribution 
of the books procured with it, subject and according to such reg* 
nlations and directions as shall from time to time be prescribed by 
the Trustees at any meeting held on public notice given as afore-* 
said ; and the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in his hands to the 
order of the said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the princfples and for the purposes 
aforesaid, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into 
effect the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on 
regular notice given, for the due exercise of all the powers granted 
by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, or Re* 
cording Secretary, to devise and adopt such further measures as 
may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for effecting 
the intentions of the members. 



Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the Trustees 
petitioned the General Court, and obtained the following 



31 
ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MAflSACHUSETTS. 

In the year of our Lord One Thotuiand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of MaaaachuAetU. 

Whereas the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with manj 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a Society 
for the pyrpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be appro- 
priated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in common use 
in the churches in New England, for distribution among all persons inhabit- 
ing within the State and elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of 
others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects of said 
Society may be better carried into effect, and the charity of said Society 
more extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an Act 
of Incorporation. 

Section 1. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Representa' 
then J in General Court assembled^ and by authority of the same. That William 
Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D.D., the Rev. Joseph Eckley, 
D.D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D.D., the Rev. 
Abiel Holmes, D.D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D.D., the Hon. William 
Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. Peter C.Brooks, 
John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph Sewall, Redford Web- 
ster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, Esquires, the Rev. 
John Fierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. Samuel H. Walley, 
together with those who have associated, and who may hereafter associate, 
with them for the purposes aforesaid, be, and they hereby are, incorporated 
into a Society, by the name of The Bible Society op Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted^ That the said William Phillips, and others 
above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body corporate by 
the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legislature, and may 
have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said Society shall be 
capable of taking and receiving from any persons disposed to aid the be- 
nevolent purposes of this institution any grants or devises of lands and 
tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, bequests, and subscrip- 
tions of money, or other property, to be used and improved for the purposes 
aforesaid. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That the said Corporation shall be, and 
hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other than thai 
which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the whole estate, 
real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum of one hundred 
thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted^ That the s^id Society may sue and be sued 
in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to prosecute 
and defend suits with power of substitution. 



32 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted^ That the said Society maj choose a Pres- 
ident, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such other 
officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such rules and 
regulations, as to them shall appear necessary ; provided the same be not 
repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it Junker enacted. That William Phillips, Esq., be, and he 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said Society ; 
at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and place of their 
annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the same ; may 
choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and may vest in the 
Trustees, the number of which may be determined by the said Society, but 
shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable to the principles of this 
institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Approved by the Governor, 
Feb. 15, 1810. 



COMMONWEALTH OP MASSACHUSETTS. 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-flve. An Act In addition to an Act to incor- 
porate the Bible Society of Maasachaaetti. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court 
assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: — 

Section 1. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of The 
Bible Society of Maasachusetts, shall hereafler be known by the 
name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name sball 
have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be sul ject to all its 
liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had not been 
changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate and 
distribute Bibles and Testaments in any otber than the English language, 
in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now authorized by 
law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in common use in the 
churches in New England, any thing in the Act incorporating the said Soii- 
ety to the contrary notwithstanding. — Approved by the Governor, Feb. 27, 
1865. 



BY-LAWS. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 1851, the fol- 
lowing By-Laws were adopted : — 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act 
of Incorporation ; namely, "The raising a fund by voluntary con- 
tribution to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments 
of the version in common use in the churches of New England, 
for distribution among all peraons inhabiting within the State and 
elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who 
cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE n. 

Every regularly-settled clergyman, of any denomination of 
Christians in the State, may become a member of this Society by 
signifying his request in writing to that effect to the Recording 
Secretary, who shall keep a record of all persons who shall so 
become membei*s, in a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, 
so long as such payment is continued ; and the Treasurer shall 
keep a list of all such persons. « 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than 
twenty dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the 
Society for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording Sec- 
retary. 



84 



ABTICLB y. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen Vice- 
Presklents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, Treas- 
urer, and eighteen Trustees and an Auditor. The President, 
Vice-Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secretaries and 
Treasurer, shall each be ex-officio members of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and the Recording Secretary shall be the recording officer of 
that Board. These officers shall all be chosen by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

ABTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees ; and he, and also the Vice-Presidents and Secretaries and 
Treasurer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such 
officers respectively. 

ARTICLE vn. 

The Trustees shall have the manas^ement of all the concerns of 
tbe Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act of 
Incorporation is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the 
duties of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all 
funds and donations, and generally have and possess all the power 
and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the Society. It shall 
be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, to make and lay 
before the Society a particular Report of all their doings, with all 
such documents and vouchers as may be asked for by any member ; 
and such Report shall be had and considered before the Society 
shall proceed to the choice of Trustees for the year then next 
ensuing. 

ARTICLE vin. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the 
Monday preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and 
at this meeting it shall be competent to transact any business 
which the Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall 
' be given by the Recording Secretary at least seven days before the 
holding thereof, by notice published in at least one newspaper in 
Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by 
the Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three news- 



35 

papers published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at 
such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as 
they may direct, or as the President may at any time call. Five 
Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ABTICLS XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually 
shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, a 
Committee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ABTiCLE xn. 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them ; the Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of all 
matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the appoint- 
ment of all agents, subject to the approval of the Trustees, and the 
defining of their respective duties ; the Committee on the Depos- 
itory shall have the management of all matters connected with the 
Society's Depository for the sale of Bibles, — all of said Commit- 
tees at all times, however, to be subject to the direction and control 
of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE xni. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual 
meeting, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose by 
vote of a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE-MEMBERS. 

Each Life-Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles 
and Testaments. 

N.B. — The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order ^ and they can be issued only 
for the currenty net (or past years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE. 

BY THE PAYMENT OF TWENTY DOLLARS AND UPWARDS. 



Abbe. Rev. Frederick R., Boston. 
Abbe, Mrs. B'rederick K., ** 
Abbot, Charles H., LtnreH. 
Abbott, Rev. Jacob J., Tarmouth, Jie. 
Abom, John G., WakefieUU 
Adams, Mrs. Catharine H., ContOay. 
Adams, Elizabeth W., Derry, .V./7. 
Adams, Frank N., Medway, 
Adams, John Clark, Hopkinton, 
*Adams, John Qiilncy, Qvlncy. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., Bontpn, 
Adams, Stephen, West Afedway, 
Adams, William, lirad/urd. 
*Albree, John, Boaton. 
*Albro, John A., D.D., Cambridge. 
Albro, Mrs. Elizabeth H., jraliham, 
Albro, Miss Annie B., ** 

Alden, Almira 8. C, Foxhoro*, 
Alden, Ebenezer. Randolph. 
*Alden, Mrs. Ann K., " 
Alden, Rossell, CampeUo, 
Aldeu, Miss Sarah B., Randolph* 
Alden. Miss Softan, " 

Aldrich, Mrs. Mary B., ITettboro*. 
. Allen, Mrs. Cyrun, Franklin. 
Allen, Rev. Xiithaniol O., Boston. 
Allen, Richard II., BrairUree. 
Alvord, Alvin, ShfWurne. 
Ames, James S., Harerhtlh 
Andrews, Arteman F.. AtM/y. 
Andrews, C. L.. Bosttm. 
Andrews, George W.. Danvtra. 
Andrews, Stephen P., Ghmcester, 
Andrews W. T., Boston. 
Andrews, Thomas E., TloUiston. 
Andrews. Walter II., WhUinaville. 
*Appleton, Samuel, Boston. 
•Appletoii, William, " 
Archibald, Edward. Methuen. 
Armcs, Miss Clara A.. CampeUo. 
Armsby, Mrs. H. A., WhUinsrille. 
Arnold. Susan O., Braintree. 
Atwood, Mrs. Abby, Bergen, X.J. 
Atwood, Mrs. Elizabeth M., *' 
Atwood, E<lward S., Boston. 
Atwood, John W., Bfrgen, X.J. 
Babcock. Mrs. Nancy, Boston. 



Babcock, Mrs. P. W., Sherbom. 

Babcock. R^v. William R., Jamaica Plain. 

Babson, Miss Maria R., Oloticester, 

Bachelor, Mrs. Mary A., IVhitinsville. 

Bacon, George W., Kewton. 

Boconi Jacob, Gloucester. 

*Bacon, Rev. James M., Ashby. 

Bacon. .Toseph N., Netrton. 

Backns, Rev. Joseph W., 77k>fiuu/on, Ci, 

Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., Dorchester. 

Baker, Francis, Peabody. 

Baker, Susan S., " 

Balcom. Lincoln, Wtnchendon, 

Baldwin, Miss Josephine L., Lynn. 

Balmer, William, Jun., WhitinsvUU. 

Ball, Miss Elizabeth, Concord. 

Bancroft, Amasa, Gardner i 

Bancroft, Henry L., Millbury. 

^Barber, Martin, Sherbom. 

Barber, Sally C, " 

Barbour, Rev. William M., Bangor ^ Me, 

Barbour, Mrs. Eliza A., " 

*Bardwell, Lieut. Charles S., Whately. 

Barker, Hiram, Brighton. 

Bardsley, Joseph, WhitinsrHle. 

Barnard, William F., Marlboro*. 

Barnes H. H., LoweU. 

*Bames, W^illiam, Marlboro*. 

Barnes, Zllpah, Henniker, N.ff. 

Barrett, Nathan H., Concord. 

Barrett, Miss Rebecca M., " 

Bartlett, Rev. Edward (>., Providence, R.I. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Eleanor C, Plymouth. 

Bartlett, Thomas, Boston. 

Barrows, Sarah M., Lakeville. 

Bassett, Henry, Newton. 

Bossett, Mrs. Lucretia C. Charlemont. 

BasActt, Sarah E., Xeicburyport. 

Butchelder, Mrs. Elizabeth H., Peabody, 

Batchelder. John M., HolUston. 

Batcheller. Ezra, North Broakjield. 

Batchellcr. Mrs. Luthera C, *' 

Batchelor, Miss Frances A., irhitinsvUle. 

Batchelor, Stephen F., •* 

Batt. Rev. William J., Leominnter. 

♦Bait, Mrs. Mary !>., •' 

•Bayley, Robert, Newburyport. 



37 



ti 



« 



B«al, Alexander, Boston. 

Beal, Mm. Loaisa, Cohattet. 

Reals, Isaac K., Camptllo. 

Bean, Cyrus Beedc, Dover ^ N.ff. 

•Beane, Rev. Samuel, Norton, 

Bearse, Isaac. Natick, 

Bearse, Miss OHve H., CentrevUie. 

Beebe, James M., Boston. 

Beebe, Mrs. James M., '* 

♦Beebe. Charles E., '• 

Beebe, Frances L., *' 

Beebe, Edward P., " 

Beebe, Emily B.. 

Beebe, Mary L., 

Beecher, Rev. Charles. Georgetown, 

Beecher. Rev. WllHimi H., A'o. Brookfield. 

Belden, Mrs. 3fariaDm) P., Whately. 

Belden, William P., Gardner, 

Belknap, Miss Martha M.. Framingkam. 

Benner, Burnhara C, Lowell, 

Benson, Frederick A., Xewton. 

Btscoe, Mrs. Arthur G., ireAtboro\ 

BIscoe, Rev. Thomas C, l/xbridge. 

Billings. Charles E., Xewton. 

Blzby, Mrs. J. P.. Xoncood. 

Blackstonc, Mrs. Lydia E., Chester y A\H, 

Blanchard, Miss Frances C, Groton, 

Bliss, Rev, Charles R., Wak^eld. 

Bliss. Mrs. Charles R., •• 

Blodgett, Benjamin C, Xeioion, 

Blodgett, Simeon, South Deerjteld, 

Blood, Cyrus W., Jfinchester. 

Blood, Lyman, Groton. 

Bodwell, Rev. Joseph C.^ffart/ordt Conn. 

Bod well, Mrs. Catharine, ** 

•Bond, Georsrc, Boston. 

Booth, Charles E., Chieopee. 

B<»urnp, Thomas B., Foxboro*. 

Boutwell, Mrs. Hannah H., Braintree, 

Bowers, Luke K., Boston, 

Bowers, Mrs. Cara H., *• 

Brackett, Rev. Josiah, Charlestown, 

*Brackett. James, Quincy. 

Brackett, Lemuel, " 

•Braman, Rev. Ii«aac, Georgetown. 

Brandenberg,01iverC.W., S. Frandsco^ Cdl. 

Brant. Aaron, Wakefield. 

♦Breed, Rev. William J., Raynham, 

Brewer, Cyrus, Boston. 

Brewer, Mrs. C. F., Boston. 

Brewer, John R., •' 

Brlckett, Franklin, Haverhill. 

Briggs, Miss Catharine Clark, Weiikam. 

Briggs, Rev. William T., East Douglas. 

BriggH, Mrs. Abby L., " 

Brigham, Dexter P., Westboro\ 

Brigham, Mrs. Dexter P., •' 

Brigham. Rev. Wlllard, MTinchendon, 

Brock, Robert G., WhUinsriUe, 

♦Brom field, Eli/nhcth, Boston. 

♦Brooks, Peter C, Boston, 



Brooks,. Peter C, Boston. 

Brown, George M., Bradford, 

Brown, Mrs. Harriet L., Boston. 

Brown, Rebecca, WhitinsriUe, 

Brown, Joseph, Groton. 

Brown, Mrs. Mary L., Ilaverhill. 

Brown, liobcrt K., WhitinscUle, 

Bryant, Solon, •* 

Bucklin, Simon S., Brookline, 

Buell, George C-, Springfield. 

Bulkley, Mrs. C. F., Plattsburgh, N. Y, 

BuUard, Mrs. John, Jan., Afedway, 

Burbeck, Samuel K., Boston. 

Burge, Lorenzo, '• 

Buruham, Robert W., Essex. 

Burr, Charles C., Aubumdale. 

Burrage J. C, Boston, 

Burrage, Joseph, Arlington. 

Burrage, Mary C, " 

Burrill, AmosC, Uxbridge. 

♦Burrill, Henry, Jan., East Abington, 

Bush, Henry J., Westfield. 

Bushby, Sophia W., Peabody, 

Butler, Rev. Daniel, Boston, 

Butler, Mrs. Jane D., •* 

Cady, Daniel R., D.D., Arlington, 

Cady. Mrs. Harriet S., 

Caldwell, Rev. W. E., Hyannis, 

Camp, George, South Hadley Falls, 

Camp, John, 

Camp, S.imuel, Springfield. 

Capen, Mrs. Charles, FranUngham. 

Capron, John W., Uxbridge, 

Capron Laura A. W., ** 

Capron, William C, " 

Carleton, George H., Haverhill. 

Carpenter, Rev. Carlos C, Boston, 

Carpenter, Catharine K., Foxboro*, 

Carpenter, Daniel, 

Carpenter, Edson, 

Carpenter, Horace, ** 

Carr, Charles R., WhUinsville, 

Carr, John C, West Newbury. 

Carrier, Rev. Augustus H., Minneapolis jMin, 

Carruthers, Rev. William, Danvers, 

Carter. Edward, Audover. 

Carter, Joshua T., W hitinsville. 

Carter. William H., LoweU. 

Cary, George C., *V. Britlgewater . 

Cary, Mrs. Mary D., Fox1roro\ 

Case, Mrs. Mary Olive, New York City. 

Caswell, Lemuel E., Boston, 

Cliamberlin, John, WhiiiHsville. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel, Westboro*. 

Chandler, Miss Frances E., Andover. 

Chandler, H. H., Charlestown. 

Chapin, Caleb T., Northboro*. 

Chapin, John O., W hitinsville. 

Chapin, Josiah L., Lawrence. 

Chapin, Marcus. Monson. 

Chapin, Milo, Springfield. 



(« 



t< 



38 



Chapin, Miss Sarah, jrhUinwiUe. 

Chapman, George H., Winchester. 

Chase, Ann Bfarla, Haverhill. 

Chase, Charles W., " 

Chase, David B., WhitintviUe. 

Chase, G^eorge S., HuverhiU, 

Chase, Hezekiah, Lynn. 

Chase, Robert, ITaverhill, 

Chcever, Ira, Chelsea. 

Child, Miss Anna O., Springfield, 

Child, George U., Springfitld, O. 

Child, Miss Lucy, Thetford, Vt, 

Childs, Carlos, ffennikert N.H, 

Cliilds, Horace, ** 

Choate. David, M.D.. Salem, 

*Clap, James, Dorchester. 

Clap, Mrs. Rebecca. Boston, 

Clapp, James U., ^* 

Clapp, John C, ** 

Clapp, Samuel, Foxboro*. 

Clark, Rev. Edward L., New Haven, Conn. 

Clark, Elbridge, Etut Afedway. 

Clark, George, Concord. 

Clark, James G., Andover, 

Clark, John L., " 

Clark, Jonathan, Winahester, 

Clark, Rev. Joseph B., Jamaica Plain. 

Clark, Julius L., IFttt Xewton. 

♦Clark, Rev. L. F., WhUinavUle, 

Clark, Mrs. Miranda D., Boston, 

Clark, Miss Nelly, Sherborn, 

Clark, Oliver R., Winchester. 

•Clark, Rev. P. K., Charlemont. 

Clark, Rowse R., Whitinsrille. 

Clark, Rufus W., D.D., Albany, y. T, 

Clarke, Mrs. Adeliza H., Medway. 

Clarke, Rev. Dorus, D.D., Boston, 

Clarke, Francis, Haverhill, 

Clarke, George E., Jamaica Plain. 

Clarke, Mrs. Sarah L., Boston. 

Clary, John. Conway. 

Clary, Mrs. 8. 8., Wareham. 

Clcaveland, Waldo, South Deerjteld, 

Clifford, Wyatt B., Chatham. 

Clough, John K., Cambridgeport, 

Cobb, Andrew B., S'ewton, 

Cobb, Jacob, Abington, 

Cobb, Rev. L. H., Springfield, Vt. 

•Cobb, Richard, Boston. 

•Codman, Charles R., '* 

Codman, Mrs. Catharine, ** 

Coa, Laura E., WhUinsHUe, 

Coe, Mary A., En$t Dottglas, 

Ooggin, Rev. William 8., Boxford, 

Cogswell, Doane, Bradford. 

Cogswell, Bbenezer, Ipswich. 

Colby, Albert, Boston. 

Colby, Barak, Henniker, y.H. 

Cole, Asa, West Afedway. 

Cole, Miss Ella A., Medway. 

Colo, John A. I 



<» 



Cole, John, West Moreland^ y,Bk 

Conant, Charles E., Winchester. 

Conant, Jennie A., Gardner, 

Conn, Horace, Wobum, 

Cook, Asa, Kewton. 

Cook, Henry A.. WhitinsvUU. 

Cook, Mrs. Maria R., Uxbridge, 

Cook, J. Sullivan, WhitinsviUe. 

Cooley, Mrs. Olive F., Charlemont, 

Coolidge, Rev. Amos H., Leicester, 

Coolidge, Joseph, Boston. 

Coolidge, Lowell, Sherbom. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Catharine, *' 

•Copp, Joseph A., D.D., Chelsea, 

Copp, Mrs. Fedora F., " 

Cordley, Mrs. Lydia Q., Lawrence, 

Corey, Mrs. Mary, Westboro*. 

Cornish, Mrs. Elizabeth B., CenirevUle. 

Corson, John, Haverhill, 

Cousens, Beulah F., Newton Centre, 

Cowdrey, Robert, Winchester. 

Grafts, Mrs. Sarah P., Newton, 

Crawford, Ellen A., Barre, 

Crittenden, Miss Rebecca 8., Charlemont. 

•Crittenden, Simeon, " 

Crockett, Mrs. Eliza, Haverhill, 

Crosby, Wilson, CentreviUe, 

Crosby, Mrs. Eleanor L., ** 

Crosby, James, Boston. 

Crosby, Mrs. Rebecca, " 

•Cruickshanks. Mrs. Anna M., Spencer. 

CruickBhanks,J.DeWitt, Wdbster Groves, Mo, 

Cruickshanks, Miss Mary S., ** 

Cruickshanks, Miss Mary, Chelsea. 

Cruikshanks, George, Whittnsville, 

Cumings, Charles, Harvard. 

Currier, Rev. Albert H., Lynn, 

Curtis, Abner, East Abington. 

Cushman, George H., North BridgewaUr, 

Cashman, Mrs. Rachel B., ** 

Cushman, Joseph I., New Braintree, 

Cntler, Rev. Calvin, AtHbumdale, 

Cutler, Rev. El^ah, Boston, 

Cutler, Rev. Samuel, Hanover, 

Cutter, Charles A., Waliham, 

Cutter, J. Dana, '* 

Cntter, E., M.D., Wobum, 

Cutter, Stephen, Winchester, 

Cutter, Stephen H., '* 

Dakin, Thomas L., Sudbury, 

Dame, Henry, Peabody. 

Damon, Albert P., Beading, 

Damon, Mrs. Edward C, Concord. 

Dana, Mrs. Edward H., Ipswich, 

•Dana, Samuel, Bost*m. 

Dana, Charles B., Wellesley. 

Dane, John, Brookline, 

Dane, John H., ** 

Daniell. Mrs. Eliza B., East Medway, 

•DanicU, Otis, Boston. 

Daniels, El\}ah D., S€Ui Medway* 



39 



Daniels. Miy. Mariam W., Eait Afedway. 

Daniels, Mrs. William. Aftd^oay. 

Davis, Alfred X., N. WUmington, 

Davis, Alvah M.. HnrerhUL 

Davis, Henry L., Bradford. 

Davis, George L., North Andover, 

Davis, James, Boston, 

Davis, John, JIfethuen. 

Davis, John, Somerville. 

Davis, Joshua H., '' 

Davis, Lydia E., Dunstable. 

Davis, Mrs. M. A.. Medway. 

Davis, Miss Mary H., Concord, 

Davis, Rev. Perley B.. Hyde Park. 

Davis, Thaddeus Uriah, Dunstable. 

Davison, (JeorgeW., WhitinsviUe, 

Dawes, Rev. Ebenezer, Dighton, 

Day, Milton B., Bradford. 

Day, Robert L., Newton. 

Dean, Miss Abbie T., Foxboro\ 

Dean, Clara L., Holbrook. 

Denham, Rev. Oeorge, Beverly. 

Denham, Mrs. Clara D., ** 

Dickerroan. Rev. Lysander, Quiiuiy, lU. 

Dickson, Oliver, Concord, 

Dickson, Mrs. Sarah C. *' 

Dlx, Mrs. Elijah, Boston. 

Diz, Samuel F.. Newton. 

Doane, Ueman S., Charlestoum. 

Dodd, Rev Stephen G., St. John, N.B. 

•Dodge, Rev. John, North £roo^/Uld. 

Dodge. Mrs. Ann 8., " 

Dodge, Mrs. J. M. C, Andover. 

Doggctt, Rev. Thos., Niagara FoUm, N. Y. 

Doggett, Mrs. Frances L., 

Doggctt, William, 

Doliber, Miss Sarah Lizzie, Marblehead. 

*Dorr, John, Boston. 

Dorr, Samuel, " 

•Dow, Josiah, '* 

Dowse, Mrs. Carrie D., Sherborn. 

•DowHe, Edward, Dedham. 

Dowse, Elizabeth R. L., Sherborn. 

Drake, Rev. Ellis R., Afiddleboro'. 

♦Dudley, P. W., WhUinsviUe. 

Dudley, Mrs. Sarah A., *' 

Dunham, Charles H., Winchester. 

Dunham, Mrs. Mary L., ** 

Dunlap, Sumner, South Deerfleld. 

Dunton. Hiram P., Spencer. 

Dunn. Edward II., Boston, 

Durfee, Rev. Chas. Stoddard, Newburyport. 

Durgiu, James, West Newbury. 

♦Dutch, M. Elizabeth, Boston. 

Dutton, Mrs. Mary J., •• 

Dwinell, Leonard, Millbury. 

Dyer, Rev. E. Porter, Shrewsbury, 

Dyer, Mrs. Maria D., Gloucester. 

Eager, William, Boston. 

Eames, Mrs. Nancy, Sherborn. 

Eumes, Warrun, Wilmington, 



It 



It 



« 



it 



*Eastbnm, Rt. Rev. Manton, D.D., Boston. 

Eastman, Rev. Lucius R., Jun., Framingluim 

Eastman, Mrs. Jane C, ** 

Eaton, Mrs. Ann E., Wakejleld, 

Eaton, Eben, Framingham, 

Eaton, Edward, Medtoay. 

Eaton, Miss Martha W., FUchburg. 

Eaton, William, Boston, 

Eaton, William J., Westbord*, 

Eddy, Joshua, East jifiddldwro*, 

Edwards, Mrs. Frances S., Dedham, 

Edwards, Frederick B., N. Chelmsford. 

Edwards, Maria F., <* 

Edwards, Nathan B., " 

Edwards, Nathan F., 

Edwards, Sybil R., 

Edwards, Victor E., " 

Eldred. Lorenzo, Falmouth, 

♦Eliot, Samuel, Boston. 

♦Eliot, Samuel A., *• 

Elliott. Robert, Globe llUage, 

Ellis, Willard K., E, Medway, 

BUs. Mrs. Elizabeth W., Obtrlin, O. 

Ellsworth, Rev. A. A., Waterloo, Iowa. 

Ellsworth, Miss A. G. W. C, '* " 

♦El wet I, Robert, Boston. 

Emerson, Annie A., tjancaster, 

Emerson, Miss Ellen T., Concord, 

Emerson, Frances Y., Lancaster. 

Emerson, Jacob, Jun., Methuen. 

Emerson, Mrs. Jacob, " 

Emerson, R. V. C, Newton, 

Emerson, William, Westboro*. 

Emery, George F., " 

Emery, Mrs. Harriet, North Weymouth. 

Emery, Rev. Joshua, " 

Emery, Mrs. Mary, Chatham. 

Emery, Mrs. Sarah ^.,-^Newburypori, 

♦Everett, Edward, Boston, 

Ewing, Rev. Edward C, Enfield, 

Fairbanks, Herschel, Haverhill, 

Fairbanks, Herschel P. *' 

♦Fairbanks, Stephen, Boston. 

Fairbanks, Timothy R., Medway, 

♦Farnsworth. Mrs Abel, Groton, 

Famsworth, Ezra, Boston, 

Farr, Alba A.. Methuen, 

•Farwoll, Stephen T., Cambridge, 

Faxon, Miss Rachel A.. Braintree, 

Fay. Mrs. Addison G., Concord, 

Fay, Charles H., WhUiftsvUle. 

Fay, Cyrus, WesiboroK 

Fay, .Josiah C, Hopkinton. 

Fay. S. A. Westboro\ 

Fay er weather, Mrs. Sarah A., Weslboro*, 

Fearing, Albert, Boston, 

♦Fearing. Mrs. Albert, " 

Fearing, Mrs. Maria A., So. Weymouth, 

Felch, Isaac, Natick. 

Field, John W., Boston. 

Field, Mrs. Amelia C, *' 



Field, Joel, inUlHroQUI, 

Field, Mn. Edirln, XaattnurOle. 
Fliber, Ulu Ellie, Mtdiuif. 
Fleber, Mm. Lewii, £«(( ircdviv. 
Fliher, Ullton U., JfaJioay C(Uiw<. - 
Ftiber Bunuel T., CanUm. 
Ftake. Dinierr U.U . Xenhurnporl. 
Flake, Qeorce B., HMitlo: 
Flike, Oeonte T,, AMiburHXirl. 
71>k*, Maiyi'ldelln, 
FIU.-11. Julin A., riuj,l-i:,!on. 
■Fli., D»nld, D.b. /pwlok. 
Flu. Un. HunahB. D., ■■ 
T1U, Dulel.Jaa., " 

Flu, Dulel F., 

FLavR. Kcv. kuru; C, .VorlA Aildop4r. 
e.Joncpli.Harei" " 



r, Bphrs 



1 B.. JnHUntcVle. 



Pleufaer, 

FleUher, Mm. Emity «., " 

PJeuher. Junei, 

Flewhtr, Mn. L. C, " 

Fletcher. Bimael J., " 

Fletcher, Un. Huiiiah C, UancMttttr. 
Fleteher, Ihu W., Slom. 
Flatabar.Kuief B., '' 
naloher, Rer. Jimea, Oraton. 
FleUher, Hn. Lfdlm U., ■' 
Fletcher, BtUlmui, mncAaitrr. 
Fletcher, Wllllun. 
Flinn.Hn. ruiillnEi, Wabum. 
FItDt. Mr*. Hinnih, Peaiodg. 

FUDt, iMi 11.. SloUffhlOH. 

Flint, ThOTdu, Boilan. 
Floyd, ill.. Miiry J /■n.ftn.lf/. 
FolKOr, Allen, Co«orr(. \\/}. 
Fnrbiuh, Wlllltm. jnUtntHIK. 
tori. Hev. Gwrge. rerHJUei. -V. T. 
*Fl>rd, TbDinae A Smloil. 
Ford, Tbamu A., XorUi Bridgtaater. 
FOld, Un. £ 11 C. 
Focdlsk, Chirlei, Oroton. 
F<wdl«k, Frederick, " 
•Fdidlck Ro>r>. 
■•FM.IIfii.8iiinui-lW„" 
Foidlok.MlMMurr, ■' 
*FMter, K<«. Aaron. E. Charlrmeat, 
Foeler. Rev. Addlnon P., JTuIdn. 
er, Un. Hull 



Foater. Hra 



Foater.lfn. llnrrlelL, WinclitiuliHi. 
p«Wr,lCn. Mary, Palmer. 

Vnoeb, Un. Hwrtel B., Tauuton. 

rrothlDBham. A. T. Cambridgi. 

Fnllenon. Rev. Bradford U.. Palmtr. 

Farber, Riit. Daniel L,. KeietoH Cenlrt. 

Furber. Mr.. Maria B., 

Om". Giwln R., IFoban. 

Uala, Rtt. Wakefield, KmlkampliHi. 



Qaidne 



Willi.' F 



Qarretla, Rer Edmund Y.. PUltburg, 
Qarretta.Mn. FranienU W., " 
O-arrette, Flora Oertrnde, '■ 

QurMtA. Itaty Bprini, " 

OarreiEe, Barah Arabella, Foxboref. 
Oatei, Henry C, Chlcopte. 
George. Un. Ellen K., '■ 

n, iln. Lulher, Grolon. 
Olbbi,Oeor|iDL., iFhUi-uvUlt. 
•Olbbi Mn. Mary BoiUin. 

>, Mra KllialKlb W.' Boctpori. 
A1lniiin,'HluIleb»c«1,,B<ufan. 

ion, CharlM A,. Ne'ia Bralntree. 

ion, Rer. Georgn L.. MmvAatfr. 

■on, Mrt. flharlolKA. 
Ooodell.n AofQilui. mtHmriOt. 
Gordon, blobmon J Botlon. 
Gordon, Mr*. Betweea, " 

tloll. J K, nac-tport. 
Gough, Herbert D., Wirrrttler. 
Gaogh John B., Bouillon. 
Goii|h,Un.UaryE.. " 

d, Mr.. Biir.ih W., Wfltoro'. 
Gourgaa, UIh Abby U., Dnuonl, 
~ uriu.UlM Margaret U.. ■' 



*Gray, Franoli C.. Aaiton. 

Bray. Henry. 

fny, Horaie. " 

Gray, John C, " 

Gray. William, Bolbront. 
~ Bley, Rev. Edward H.. HaotrhUl. 
Greeley, 3In. Edward H., 
•Greene, Rer. J. S. Copley. BrooUin: 
inem. Rev. Richard G.. SprlngjItM. 
Sreenwood.CharlviU., Oardnrr. 
Greenwood, Mr*. Bally K., aiterbom. 
3regory, Ker. Lewli, K'al Aumbur]/. 
•Grew. John, Botiaa. 
Grlgg^ChirlceU., WriUvn)'. 
Grlgft*. I>r.8Binuel, " 
Ortgti, M 



Galll' 



rer, Mn. Carol 






Hall, Hn. JoHiph V.. OriOon. 
Han, Mn. Calharlnr K., mmcliaUr. 
blrlon, ^fv, William J., Worenttr. 



41 



Hamilton, R«t. B. F., BotUm. 

Hamlen, Rev. Oeorgo M., T*mnU>n. 

*Hammatt, Mrs. Mary, Bonton. 

Hammond, Kev. William B., Acushtiet. 

Hammond, Mrs. Louioo M., '* 

Hardwlclc, Tboman, Quincy. 

Hardy. Truman, Thompson, O, 

Hare, Rev. George 8., Boston. 

Harrington, Rev. Eli Whitney, N, Beverly, 

Harlow, Rev. Rufus K., Afedway. 

Hartshorn. Edward, Berlin. 

Hart well, Lottie £., Orbton. 

Haskell, William P., Xorth BrookMd, 

Haakins. Myrick, LakeviUe. 

Hastings. HoUis, Framinghnm. 

*Hatch, Benjamin. East Falmouth, 

Hatch, Anna 8., Bradford. 

Hatch. Wellman Wllley, Atkinson, N,n, 

Hatch, Mrs. Carrie L., " •• 

Haven, George A., Campello. 

Haven, Rev. John, Charlton. 

Hawes, Mrs. A. L., Orafton. 

Hawos, Oynthla, Wrentham, 

Hawes, Julia, ** 

Hayden, Alice M., Holbrook. 

Hayes, Rev. Stephen H., Boston. 

Hay ward, Miss Clara, Braintree. 

Hay ward, Ellas, " 

Hayward, Miss Hattie L., ffhUintviUe, 

Hayward, John, " 

Hayward, Paul, Ashby, 

Haywood, Mrs. Elizabeth O., F)ranklin. 

Hazel, Mrs. Sarah L., OUmcester. 

Hazlewood, Mrs. A M., Storuham. 

Headley, Rev. P. C, Boston. 

Healey, Rev. Joseph W., N. Orleans, La, 

*Heard, John, Ipswich. 

Hemenway, Miss Harriet, Groton. 

Henshaw, Francis, Boston, 

Henshaw, Mrs. Sarah W., " 

Henshaw, Laura, *< 

Honrick, Rev. William D., N. Amherii, 

Hersey, Jacob, Foxboro*. 

Hersey, 31 rs. Polly, Hingham. 

Hewins, Mrs. Annette P., Foxboro^, 

•Hewins, Levi R., " 

Hewins, Miss Louisa B., '* 

Hewitt, Joseph, North Bridgewater. 

Hey wood, Martha W., Gardner, 

^Higginson, Stephen, Jan., Boston. 

HUdreth, Mrs. Mary R., OroUm. 

Hill, Rev. George E., Southportt CI. 

•Hill, Henry, Boston, 

Hill. Jotharo, Wobum, 

Hill, Philip E., Bridgewater, 

Hills. Mrs. C. D., " 

Hilton, Henrietta M., Afedtoap. 

Hilton, Rev. John V., Kalamazoo, Mieh. 

Hilton, William, Bradford, 

Hitchcock, George M., Brin^/Md, 

Hobart, Peter, BoUan. 



*i 



«i 



«« 



Hobton, Mlsa PriseiUa, JRowleif. 

*Holbrook, Elisha, East Sandolpk, 

Holbrook, E. Everett, Holbrook. 

Holbrook, Mrs. Jenny M., ** 

Holden, Mrs. Sarah, Gr<\fU}n. 

Holland, Mrs. Sarah B., Boston. 

Holland, Mary Cecilia, Karih Bridgewater. 

Holm, Jacob P., Maiden. 

^Holmes, Abiel, D.D., Cambridge, 

Holmes, Miss Elizabeth A., Bdvidere, lU. 

*Holmes, Mrs. Fanny D., Norton. 

Holmes. George W., Bridgewater, 

Holmes, Miss Wealthy A., CwH^^eUo, 

Holt, James A., Andover. 

Holton, Thomas S., Wincheeter. 

Homer. Charles W., Cambridge, 

Hooker, George B., Sherhf'rn. 

Hooker, Mrs. Martha V., Boeton. 

•Hooper. Robert, " 

Hoppln, Rev. James M., New Haoen^ CI. 

Hosmcr, Miss Eliza., Concord. 

Houghton, Cephas, Harvard, 

Hovey, George O., Boeton, 

How, Frederick, Damvers. 

•How, James, Boston, 

Howe. Mrs. Hannah Maria, Sherbom, 

Howard, Cary, North Bridgewater. 

Howard, David, 

Howard, Mrs. H. Frances, 

Howard, Mrs. Matilda P., 

Howard, Rev. Martin 8., WUbrdham, 

•Howe, John, North Bridgewater. 

Howe, Martha L., Gardner, 

Howe. Samuel A., Weatbor&. 

Howes, Mrs. Caroline H., Charlemonit, 

Howes, Collins, Chatham. 

Hoyt, Henry, Boston. 

Hoyt, Mrs. Maria, Framingham, 

Hoyt, Wm. H., Boston. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Charles A., Conoord, 

Hubbard. Cyrus M., Sunderland. 

Hudson, Samuel, Uxbridge, 

Hulbcrt. Charles, Boston, 

Humphrey, Daniel, North Wegmouik, 

Hunt, Mrs. Jerusha B., WhttinevilU, 

Huntington, Matilda C, Peabcdg. 

fiurd, Francis P., M.D., Wakefield, 

Hutchins, Caroline M., Wee^fbrd, 

Hutchins, William B., Lowell, 

Hutchins. Maria J., ** 

•Hyslop, David, Boston, 

Ide, Rev. Jacob, Jun., Mansfield. 

Jackman. Mrs. Susan M., Medwag. 

Jackson, Miss Caroline B., Newton, 

Jackson, Henry W., Boeton, 

Jackson, Laura B. L., '* 

•Jackson, James, ** 

•Jackson, PaUlok T., ** 

Jaekson, Walter. Brookline. 

Jameson, Rev. Ephraim O., Eaei Midway. 

JeAries, Mfa« Oatharincr Amory, Boston. 



42 



ii 



t« 



Jeokinf, Mm. Maria L., New Bet^/brd. 
JenDlaon, Rev. Joseph F., Canton, 
JepbsoD, Miss O. R., Brookline. 
Jewett, Henry. PeppereU. 
Johnson, Charles Q., Bradford. 
Johnson, Mrs. Bmma E., ** 
Johnson, Francis, WinchetUr, 
Johnson, P«ter R., HoUUton, 
Johnson, Miss Rebecca, North Andotfer, 
Johnson, Mrs. S. W.» Farmingion^ N.H. 
Jones, Angnstns T., North Bridgewater, 
Jones, Henry B., HoUUton. 
Joslln, Mrs. A. L, Oxford, 
Joy, Mrs. Abigail, Boston, 
Jadd, Rer. BnrUs, ffeitboro^, 
Jadd, Mrs. Rebecca Ann, *' 
Jadson, Mrs. Mary O., Uxbridge, 
Jtidson, WiUard, *• 

Keep, N. 0., Botton, 
Keith, Adelbert F., CampOto. 
Keith, Albert, 
Keith, Arsa B., 

*Keith, Charles, North Bridgetoater. 
Keith, Bdward Bverett, Bridgewater, 
Keith, Preston B., Campello. 
Keith, ZIba C, '* 

Kelly, Oeorge Reed, HaverhiU, 
Kelton, G^rge, Cfardner, 
Kempton, Mrs. Bllen, Orq/lon. 
Kendall, Mrs. Abel M., Boston, 
Kendall, Mrs. Mary E., Winchetter. 
•Kendall, William, JThUinwiUe. 
Kendriok, John, HaverhiU, 
Kendrlok, Mrs. Lydla F., ChatJmm, 

Kerr, Robert W., Foxb^tro*, 

Kerr, Jane K., ** 

Kettelle, Jacob Q., Boston. 

Kilbon, Qeorge B., Springfield. 

Kimball, Benjamin, 2d, HaverhiU, 

Kimball, Rct. Caleb, Medway, 

Kimball, Charles, Iptwich. 

Kimball, Daniel W., Winchester, 

Kimball, David, Bradford, 

Kimball, Wallace L., " 

Kimball, Mrs. Harriet W., LoweiL 

Kimball, Mrs. Mary B., Falmouth, 

Kimball, John R., Wobum. 

Kimball, Mrs. Sylvia, Westboro^, 

Kingman, Miss Eliza, Boston, 

*Kingman, Miss Sarah, " 

Kingsbury, Nathaniel, ** 

Kingsbury, John, Bra/dford, 

Kingsbury, Rev. John D., 

Kingsbury, Katy, 

Kingsbury, Martha, 

Kittredge, Rev. A. E., Chicago. 

Klttredge, C. Brigham, Westboro*, 

*KnowIes, Rev. James D., Boston, 

KnowltOB, Rev. Stephen, New Haven^ Ft. 

Knox, Mrs. 8., Rock Island, III. 

Labaree, Rev. John C, Ramdolph, 



«t 



<t 



«< 



it 



tt 

M 



<• 



II 
II 



Lambert, MiisfBUsabeth 0., Rowlqf, 

Irfunbert, Thomas R., D.D., CharUstown, 

Lambert, William T., 

Lamson, Edwin, Winchester, 

Lamson, Mrs. Edwin, ** 

Lamson, Qardner Swift,** 

Lamson, Helen, ** 

Lamson, Kate Glidden, ** 

*Lane, Anthony, Lancaster, 

Lane, Rev. James P., Bristol, 

Lane, Mrs. Emma L., ** 

Lane Rev. John W., Whatdy, 

Lane, Mrs. Mary H., 

Lane, Mary B., 

Lane, John Eklward, 

Lane, Richmond J., Bast Abington. 

Langworthy, Rev. Isaac P., Chelsea, 

Lasell, Josiah, IptiiinsviUe, 

Lasell, Mrs. Jennie W., ** 

Lathe, Miss Sarah S., Or<n/ton, 

Laurie, Inglis, Owatonnat Minnesota, 

*llawrence, Amos, Boston. 

Lawrence, Rev. Amos E., HousaUmie. 

Lawrence, Asa, Oroton, 

•Lawrence, Mrs. M. A., 

Lawrence, John, 

Lawrence, Curtis, Bradford, 

Lawrence, Mrs. Curtis, ** 

•Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy T.,*iriKoii, lie, 

Lawton, Mrs. S. C, WhUinsviUe, 

Laynd, John, ** 

Leach, Simeon, East Stoughion, 

Learoyd, Addison P., Danvers, 

Learoyd, Jotm S., " 

Leavitt, Abner L., Hingham, 

Leavitt, Mrs. Elizabeth Gh., Boston, 

Leavitt, Rev. George R., Cambridgeport. 

Lee, Rev. Samuel H., Cleveland^ O, 

•Leeds, Benjamin, Brookline 

Leeds, Benjamin, Boston. 

Leeds, Mrs. Anne B., '* 

Leeds, Miss Anne G., ** 

Lees, Mrs. Samuel, North BUlerica, 

Lefiivour, Issachar, Beverly, 

Lelaod, Calvin, Jun., Natick. 

Leland, Mrs. Charlotte A., Sherbom, 

Leland, Mrs. Lois, *' 

Leonard, Eliza, Foxborc?. 

Leonard, James Henry, Bridgewater, 

Leonard, James M. ** 

Lewis, Reuben, Oroton. 

Lewis, Mrs. Susan F., ** 

Lincoln, Rev. Calvin, Hingham, 

Lincoln, F. W., Boston. 

Lincoln, James L. C, Sunderland. 

Lincoln, Noah. Boston, 

Little, Alexander E., WeUesley, 

•Little, Rev. Elbridge G., 

Little, Mrs. Lucia S., 

Little, Sarah Isabel, 

Little, etoart, WhttinsvUle, 



It 



It 



43 



Little, Waldo F., NewUm CeiUre. 

LltUe, William A., ** 

Littlcfield, Samuel, SomerviUe. 

♦Llvermore, (George, Cambridge, 

♦Locke, Ephralm, Boston. 

Looml«, Rev. Elihu, Chesterfield, III* 

Lord, Miss Anna M., Ipswich, 

Lord, Rev. Charles E., Boston, 

Lord, Edward A., Danvers, 

Lord, John A., Peabody. 

*Lord, Looisa O., Manchester, 

Lorlng, Mrs. Hannah W., Newton (Mntre, 

Loud, Arthur J., Boston, 

Loud, Mrs. Martha B., Braintree, 

Lovell, Miss Mary B., Afedway. 

*Lowell, Charles, D.D., Boston, 

Lumb, William, " 

Lnnt^ Charles F., Winchester, 

Lyman, Rev. George, South Amherst, 

Lyman, Samuel T., Huntington. 

Lyon, Miss Chloe R., CampeUo, 

Macreading, Rev. Chas. S., Providence, R.I. 

Maltby, Rev. Erastus, Taunton. 

Mann, Miss Helen L., Greenfieid, 

Manning, Otis, Littleton. 

Manning, Edward W., Wobnm. 

Manning, Walter H., Littleton. 

Marble, Mrs. Mary £., Gr<\/ton. 

Markham, Mrs. Priscilla V., Wrentham. 

Marrett, Lorenzo, Cambridgeport. 

Marsh, Mrs. Abby C, Georgetown. 

Marsh, Eiixabeth C, Haverhill. 

Marsh, E. J., Leominster, 

Marsh, Lewis A., Chicopee, 

Marsh, Miss Julia M., Haverhill, 

*Marston, William, Boston. 

Martin, George H., Bridgewater, 

Mason, Miss Nellie A., Roylston. 

Mattison, William, WhUinsviUe. 

Maynard, Rev. Joshua L., Williston, Vt, 

Maynard, Leander, Shrewsbury, 

McElroy, Richard B., Afedway, 

*McKean, William, Boston.* 

McKeen, Phllena, Andover, 

McKeen, Phebe, " 

McKenzie, Rev. Alexander, Cambridge. 

McKenzle, Ellen H., 

McKenzie, Kennett, 

*McLean, Mrs. Ann, Boston. 

McLean, Rev. John K., Springfield, III. 

McLoud, Rev. Anson, Topsfldd. 

Means, John O., D.D., Boston. 

Means, Mrs. John O., " 

Means, William G., Andover. 

Mvrriam, AbnerH., Templeton, 

Merriam. Homer. Springfield. 

Merrill, Rev. James H., Andover. 

Merrill, John K., Methuen. 

Merrill, Mrs. Harriet H., JFinchendon, 

Merrill, Rov. Truman A., Bemardston. 

Merritt, Clarissa, Conway. 



It 



«( 



Merritt, Mrs. Mary A., Montague, 
Messenger, Miss Eliza, Fitchburg. 
Mills, Rev. Charles L., Jamaica Plain. 
Mills, Mrs. Rebeeca B., *' 

Mills, Miss Lydia, Peabody. 
Minot, William, Boston. 
Minot, WUliara, Jan., " 
Mizter, Mrs. Fanny L., ** 
Mlxter, Mrs. Mary R., Hardwiek, 
Mixter, Mrs. S. E., Rock Island, lU, 
Mooar, George, D.D., Oakland, Cal. 
Moody, James, WhitintviUe. 
Moore, Lewis, Sharon. 
Moore, LllUe, Holbrook. 
Moors, Joseph, Groton. 
Moors, Rufus, " . 
Moors, Mrs. Rnfus, Groton, 
Mordough, Rev. John H., Portland, Me, 
Morse, Charles H., Bradford, 
Morong, Rev. Thomas, Ipswich, 
Morley, Rev. Sardis B., Pittsfidd, 
Morrison, Daniel T., Methuen. 
Morrison, Miss Nancy T., Rowley, 
Morse, Miss Abby P., Emporia, Kaniai, 
Morse, Charles N., Foxboro\ 
Morns, Miss Emily A., Bradford, 
Morse, Henry, Natick, 
Morse, Ruftas W., Methtien. 
Morse, William E., Bradford. 
Moseley, Edward S., Newburyport, 
Mosman, Walter B., AubumdaU. 
Manger, Rev. Theo.T., Lawrence, 
Munger, Mrs. T.T., " 

Munroe, Miss Mary, Concord. 
Murray, Rev. James O., ^ew- York City, 
Murray, Mrs. Julia R., *' 

Nason, Rev. Charles, WeHfieet, 
Nason, Rev. EUas, BUlerica, 
Needhsm, Lucie M., New Braintree, 
Needham, Mrs. Mary P., Peabody, 
Nelson, Jonathan H., Shrewsbury, 
Newell George H., HoUiston, 
*Newell, Montgomery, Boston, 
Newhall, Lacy Ann, Stow, 
Newman, Samuel, Peabody. 
Newman, Miss Sarah A., Ipswich, 
Nichols, Alfk-ed A., }Fest Amesbury, 
Nichols, James R., Haverhill. 
Nichols, Joseph, West Amesbury, 
Nichols, Moses, HaverhiU. 
Nickerson, Mrs. Temple W., Naniuclui, 
Nightingale, Rev. Crawford, Groton, 
Noon, Rev. Samuel H., N. E. Cor^flerenee, 
*Norcro8s, Josiah, WeJe^field. 
Norcross, Mrs. Joslah, ** 
Norton, Rev. Edward, Montague. 
Nourse, B. Alden, Westboro*. 
Nourse, Caroline Josephine, Boston, 
Nourse Daniel, West Medway, 
Nourse, Helen S., Boston. 
Noufse, pusan M., Bolton. 



44 



Noyes, Alv», North Bridgevoattr, 
Noyefl, Jacob, Abington. 
Noyes, Luke B., South Abington, 
Noyei, RuAiB S., N. Bridgewater, 
Oatley, G. D., WhUintviUe, 
OAUn, Benjamin, Exeter^ y,H. 
Odlln, Mn. E. T. « 

Ordway, Aaron L., ^€i»-rorit CUy, 
Ordway HIm Charlotte, Brad/&rd, 
Ordway Herbert, " 

Osborne, George F., Peabody, 
Osgood, G«orge C, Lowell, 
Osgood, U. B., WhUintviUe, 
Packard, Bey. D. Temple, Brighton, 
Packard, Edward C, North BridgewaUr, 
Packard, 8. Edwards, 'Springfield, 
Packard* 8. Franklin, Campello, 
Packard, Miss 8uBle P., " 
Packard, Zlbeon, Abington. 
Pa|(e, Abigail L., Atkineon, N.H, 
Paige George R., New Salem, 
*Palne, Mrs. Sarah M., Holden, 
•Paine, Miss 8arah C, << 

Palmer, Kev. Charles Ray, Salem. 
*Palmer Rev. Stephen, Needham, 
Palmer, Squire, South Deerfield. 
Park, John C, Boeton. 
Parker, Andrew, Gloucester, 
Parker, Daniel, WhUinwille, 
•Parker, John, Boston, 

Paricer, Mrs. Sarah, " 

•Parkman, Francis, D.D., " 
•Parkman, Samael, " 

•Parkman, Mrs. Sarah, " 
Parmenter, Mrs. B. J. G., Athol, 
•Parsons, Gorham, Botton. 
•Parsons, William, *• 
Parsons, Rev. R. C, Worcester, 
Parsons, John, Jun., Saugus Centre, 
Partridge, Clark, Medway. 
Partridge, Joseph, HoUiston. 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J., West Newton, 
Patrick, Mrs. Martha L., '* 
Patten, Mrs. John F., Lynn. 
Patterson, David H., Methuen, 
Paul, Frederick A., Lakeville. 
Paul, Henry, Newton, 

•Paul, Mrs. Henry, »* 
•Paul, Luther, " 

Paul, Luthpf, Jun., ** 
Paul, Miss Harriet, ** 
Paul, Miss Mary. *' 
Paul, Mrs. Ruth B., Medway. 
Payson, Miss Susan, Foxboro\ 
Payson, William P., 
Pearson, Miss Hannah J., Lowell, 
Pease, George W., Salem. 
Peck, Rev. David, Sunderland, 
Peckham. Hubbard, Petersham, 
Pelrce, Rev. Bradford K., Harlem, N. Y, 
Peoples, Samuel, Natick, 



Perkins, Beojamin C, Peabody. 
Perkins, E. E., North Middlebord', 
Perkins, Mrs. Elisabeth E., " 
Perkins, Jalrus H., ** 

Perkins, James, Peabody, 
•Perkins, James, Boston, 
•Perkins, James, jun., " 
Perkins, Miss Mary A., Brighton, 
•Perkins, Thomas H., Boston. 
Perley, Mrs. Abigail T., Salem. 
Pcrley, Jacob, " 

Perry, Miss Catharine H., Sherbom. 
Perry, James, Danvers, 
•Peters, Edward D., Boston, 
Peters, Mrs. Lydla H., Berlin, 
Pettee, Daniel, Sharon, 
Pettee, Miss Eliza J., Foxboro*. 
Pettee, Samuel Gardner, Stottghton. 
Pettee, Willard, Forboro*. 
Phillips, Alonzo P.. Medway, • 
Phillips, George W., Saugus. 
Phillips, Mrs. Geo.W., *• 
•PhilllpB, Jonathan, Boston, 
Phillips, Mrs. Sally, *< 
Phillips, William, Boston. 
Plckard, Rev. Daniel W., Oroveland, 
Pickering, Henry W., Boston, 
Pierce, Albert T., Stoughion. 
•Pierce. Rev. Charles H., MUOmry. 
Pierce, Isaac T. WhitinsviUe. 
Pierce. Sylvester G., Winchester, 
•Plerpont, Rev. John, Medford, 
Pierson, Rev. William Henry, Ipswich, 
Pike, John, D.D., Rowley. 
Plumb, Rev. Albert H., Boston, 
Plumb, Joseph Dart, ** 

Plumer, Mrs. Martha H., Rowley, 
Plommer, Israel, WhitinsviUe, 
Pogue, Mrs. Joseph, Orajlon, 
Pollard, Joseph G., Wobum. 
Pollock, Miss Emma A., WhitinsviUe. 
Pomeroy, Fred. L., Sunderland. 
Pond, Almira W., South Maiden, 
Pond, John P., Boston. 
Fond, Mrs. Nancy, Medway. 
Pond, William E., Wrentham. 
Pool, Solomon, Gloucester. 
Poor, Joseph, Peabody. 
Poor, Nathan H., " 
Porter, J. Edwards. North BrooJ;field, 
Porter, Samuel S., Winchester. 
Potter, J. Sturgis, Newton. 
Pratt, Cornelius, North Weymotith, 
Pratt, David, ** 

Pratt, Galen, North BrUlgewtUer. 
Pratt, Galen E., " 

Pratt, Rev. George H., Harvard. 
Pratt, Norton, Braintree. 
Pratt, Phebe, Sherbom. 
Pratt, Philip W., Abington, 
Pratt, Zebulon, North MiddlOtoro*. 



45 



<( 



i« 



Pray, John J., Lowell. 

Prentice, Miss JnlU, Orafton, 

Prentice, Marvel, WhUin»ville. 

Prentice, James A., 

PrentiBS, Luke, 

•Prescott, William, Boston, 

♦Prince, Rev. J. M., Oeorgetovm, 

Prince, Mrs. Sarah B., Quincy, 

Prltchard, William, Newburyport. 

Proctor, Elizabeth O., PeaJbody. 

Proctor, Henry H., " 

Proctor, Mrs. Lucy A., Oloucetter, 

Proctor, Thorndike, Peabody, 

Puffer, Mrs. Josiah, Harvard. 

Putnam, Mrs. Elizabeth T., OrqfUm, 

Quincy, Thomas D., Boston. 

Quincy. Mrs. J. C, "* 

Quincy, Thomas D.,Jun. " 

Randall, Franklin B., Dover^ N.H. 

Randall, Flora Sarah, '* 

Randall, Mary Elizabeth, ** 

Rankin, J. Eames, D.D., Washington^ D.C. 

Rankin, Mrs. Mary, '* 

Ray, George W., Medway Village. 

Raymond, Helen S., Boston. 

Read, Miss Martha, East AMngton. 

Reed, Mies Caroline Q., Haverhill. 

Roed. Horace, South Abington. 

Reed, Miss Serissa, East Abington. 

Reeves, Miss Ellen P., Wayland, 

Rice, Mrs. Agnes L., Boston. 

Rice, Edward, Wayland. 

Rice, Mrs. Elizabeth C, Lawrence. 

Rice, Mrs. Henry A., Boston, 

Rice, Miss M. Augusta, Wesiboro^. 

Rice, Miss Jenny M., " 

Rich, Rev. Alonzo B., W. Lebanon, N.H. 

Rich, Rev. A. Judson, Broo^field. 

Rich, Mrs. Harriet L., " 

Richards, Mrs. A. M., Bridgeport^ Ct. 

Richards, James F-, Campello. 

♦Richardson, Benjamin P., Boston. 

Richardson, John W., Medway. 

Richardson, Luther, Winchester. 

Richardson, Miss Sarah E., Concord, 

Richardson. Stephen, W. Medway. 

Richardson, Sumner, JFinohester, 

RIcker, Edmund, West Ametbury, 

RIcker, George E., " 

•Ritchie, Andrew, jun., Boston, 

Robbins, Andrew, Groton. 

liobblns, Chandler. D.D., Boston. 

♦Kobblns. Edward H., •• 

Roberts, Rev. Jacob, Auburndale, 

Roberts, Mrs. Mary A., " 

Roberts, Mrs. Ruth, MancJiester. 

Robertson, Jnmes, Peabody. 

Robinson, Charles W., Auburndale. 

Robinson, H. W., North BridgewtUer. 

♦Robinson, Rev. Reuben T., Wincheeter, 

♦Robinson, Mrs. Clara A., 



41 



Rockwood, John. Oroton. 

Rockwood, John T., Springfield, 

Rockwood, Miss Polly S., Ashland. 

♦Rogers, George, Boston. 

Rogers, George L., Newburyport, 

Rogers, Shubael G., Boston, 

♦Rogers, Rev. WiUiam M., " 

Russell, Sarah J., Framinghcun, 

Russell, SamU W., New-England Cof^lurence. 

Ryder, Marietta, Chatham. 

Safford. Rev. George B., Burlington, Vt, 

♦Salisbury. Samuel, Boston. 

Sanford, Mrs. Adeline D., Medway ViUag*, 

Sanford, Edmund I., Medway. 

Sanford, Henry D., Bridgewater. 

Sanger, Edward G., Cambridgepori, 

Sargeant, James C.. Oakham. 

Sargent, Edmund, West Amesbury. 

♦Sargent, Lucius M., Boston. 

Sargent, Samuel G., Methuen. 

SawtcU, Ephraim, Oroton. 

Sawyer, George, Canq»ello. 

Sawyer, Martha B., •* 

Sawyer, Seth C, Holbrook. 

Scales, Edward P., Newton, 

♦Scudder, Charles, Boston, 

Seudder, Mrs. Sarah L., " 

Seagrave, Edward F., Uxbridge. 

Seagrave, Mrs. Mary Ann, " 

Sears, Miss Hannah M., Ashfield. 

Seaver, A. W., Northbo%*o\ 

Seeley, Raymond H., DJ)., HaverMU, 

Seeley, Mra. Fanny B., " 

Selfridgeyr Thomas O., Boston. 

♦Shattuck, Andrew, Oroton. 

Shattuck, Mrs. Susan P., " 

Shaw, Mrs. Hannah. Boston. 

Sheldon, Rev. Luther H., Jamesburgh, N.J. 

SheMon, Mrs. Sarah H., " 

Shepherd, Thomas, Winchester. 

Shirley, Rev. Arthur, Conway. 

Shlverick, Miss Maria L., Campello. 

♦Sigoumey, Andrew, Boston. 

Sigourney, Henry, ** 

Slkes, Mrs. Otis, Conway. 

Simonds, A Ivan, Boston. 

SkiUlngs, David N., Winchester, 

♦Slack, Ruggles, Boston. 

Slafter, Rev. Edmund F., '* 

Slafter, Mrs. Edmund F., '* 

Sleeper, William C, Methuen. 

Small, Amos T., West Amesbury 

Small, Mrs Fidelia Porter, Millbury. 

Small. Samuel A., 

Small, Samuel E., 

Small. Mra. Sumner, Netcton Centre. 

Smith. Mrs. .^bbj P., Concord. 

Smith. Henry F, " 

♦Smith. Albert W., Westboro*. 

Smith, Mrs. Lucy Jane, " 

Smith, ^Crs. Clara J.. Sunderland. 



ti 



II 



46 



Smith, B. B., Wet^^ld. 

Smith, Mrs. Frances B. D., WMHntvUU, 

Smith, Rer. Edward P., Brooklyn^ N.J, 

Smith, George P., Bo9t<m, 

Smith, Samnel, ** 

Smith, Joel, WhUintvUU, 

Smith, Jonathan, ** 

Smith, Warren N., ** 

Smith, Mrs. Hattle J., QUnuietUr. 

Smith, Matson M., D D., Harlfard^ Ct, 

Smith, Hre. Mataon M., *< 

Smith, Norman, Oroton, 

Smith, Mn. Mary J., ** 

Smith, Richard, Peabody, 

Smith, Mrs. Charlotte, ** 

Smith, Mrs. Sarah. Andovtr, 

Smith, William W., Conway. 

Smith, Mrs. T. Berton. 

Snow, Amhrofe. South Hadley FalU. 

Snow, Mrs. Caroline, AubumddU, 

Snow, Mrs. Mark, Chatham. 

Sonle, Henry M., South AbingUm. 

Soathgate, Charles M., St. Johimiburjfy Vt, 

Soathgate, Rev. Robert, Hatiford, Vt. 

*8otitbgati*, Mrs. Mary Frances, ** 

Sonthworih, Mrs. Caroline M., Mtdway, 

S^Muilding, Mrs. Charlotte A., Oroton, 

Spaalding, John, Oroton Junction, 

Spooner, William B., BoxUm, 

Spring, Mrs Adela C, WhiHnatfUU, 

Stacy, Albert, Concord. 

Stanley, Bzra C, Manchester, 

Stanton, Rev. George F., South Weymouth. 

Stebbins, Rev. Milan C, Springfidd, 

Sterens, Mrs. George, Lowell. 

^Stevens, Korman C, Newton, 

Stevens, Mrs. E . M. , * * 

Stevens, Mrs. Benjamin F., Peabody, 

Stevens. Samuel, Oloucetter. 

Stickney. William H., Draeut, 

^Stoddard, Lewis T., Brookline, 

Stone, Andrew L., D.D., San FraneiteOt Cal. 

Stone, Mrs. Matilda F., " 

Stone, Martha A., Newton Centre, 

Storrs, Eanice C, Braintree, , 

Storrs, Richards., D.D.. ** 

Stowell, Mrs. Abby F., Concord. 

Stowell, Cyrus A., South Deer^field, 

Stowell, D. W. . Waltham. 

Strong, Rev. Elnathan E., '* 

Strong, Rev. J. C, Leech Lake^ Minn, 

Strong. Mrs. J. C, " •' " 

Studley, Austin. Eant Abington, 

Studley Edward A.. Boston. 

Sugden, Miss Mary, Braintree. 

Sumner, Rev. Charles B., Moneon. 

Sumner, Mrs. H. H., Foxboro\ 

Bwaxey, Mrs. Frances A*., Lynn, 

Swett, Samuel W., Boaton. 

Swift, Miss Lottie H., Andover. 

SwlUer, Rev. Christopher J . Provincetown. 



n 



<l 



(( 



Taft, Mrs. Blizabeth B., WhUinnfUU, 

Taft, MissBmllyA., ** 

Taft, Gnstevus E., <* 

Taft, Mrs. G. B., *• 

Taft, S. Jennie. ** 

Taft, Jacob, Uxfiridge. 

Tapley, Gilbert, Danvert, 

*Tappan, John, Bo»t<m. 

Tarr, William J., Olouce»ier, 

Taylor, Mrs. Malansa, Winchetter, 

Teele, Rev. Albert K., MUton, 

Teele, Mrs. Cornelia C, ** 

Temple, Mark M., Reading, 

Tenny, Mrs. Joanna 8., SauguM. 

•Tenney, Mrs. Mary P., Winchetter, 

Tenney, Mrs. Apphla 8., Oeorgetown, 

Terrj^ Rev. James P., South Weymouth, 

Thacher, Mrs. Anna B., Hyde Park, 

Thacher Miss Calisto C, AUlAoroK 

Thacher, John, " 

Thacher, Susan B., Portland^ Me, 

Thacher, Mrs. Susan C, " 

Thacher, William T., Hyde Park. 

*Thatcher, Mary Lndlow, Middleboro*. 

Thayer, Addison 8., Medway, 

Thayer, Clara L., " 

Thayer, Amasa, Braintree, 

Thayer, B. F. E., 

Thayer, Ira, 

«Thaycr, Mrs. Lllla, 

Thayer, Annie M., Holbrook. 

Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, Andover, 

Thayer, Mrs. Martha C, " 

Thayer, Oliver, Salem. 

*Tliayer, Mrs. Jane, Boston, 

Thayer, Robert H., New- York City, 

Thayer, Sarah H., Braintree. 

Thayer, William W., Uxbridge. 

Thompson, Mrs. Averlck F., Wareham. 

Thompson, Mrs. Emily B., Concord. 

Thompson, Everett A., North Wobum, 

Thompson, Samuel A., *' 

Thompson, Mrs. Anne Eliza, ** 

Thompson, George R., North Brldgewater, 

Thompson, Lewis Waldo, Wobum. 

Thompson, Rtephen, Winchester. 

Thurston, Rev. Richard B., St€tmford^ Ct. 

Tlmlow, Rev. Heman R., Wolpole. 

Tlmlow, Dana C, '* 

Tinker, Russell, Chrc^lon. 

Tobey, Miss Jennie E., WhitinsviUe. 

Tolman, Rev. Richard. Hampton^ Va, 

Tolman, Rev. Samuel H., Lenox. 

Terrey, Miss Elizabeth L., South Weymouth, 

Torrey, James, North Weynumth, 

Torrey, Willard, Oroton. 

Towne, William B , MUford, N,H, 

Trask, Charles H., Jun., Manchester. 

Trask, Mrs. A. H., " 

Trask, Lizzie 'R.^Oloueesier. 

Trask. Samuel, Peabody. 



47 



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Tratk, BamuelP., Dan/ven. 

TriboQ, Samuel. North Bridgewater. 

Trowbridge, Mrs. Asa, Brighton. 

Trufant, Harriet Andrews, Abktgton. 

Trufant, Philip P., 

Tnifaot, Walter Ezra, 

TTucker, Rev. Elijah W., Lebanofh Ci* 

•Tucker, Jesse, Milton, 

♦Tucker, Mrs. Mary R., " 

•Tucker, Nathan, « 

Tucker, Mrs. Nathan, " 

Tucker, Mrs. Hannah W., Dorchuttr, 

Tucker, John A., " 

Tucker, William, •• 

Tucker, William W., Boston. 

TuAs, Charles, Andover, 

Turner. Miss Alice Montgomery, Banddph. 

Tuttle, Miss Martha E., Concord, 

Tuttle, Miss Sarah, Oroveland, 

Tuttle, Thomas S., Littleton. 

Twichell, John M., Fitchburg. 

Tyler, Frank H., Bradford. 

Tyler, Jerome W., Boston, 

•Underhill, Rev. John W., N. Amherst. 

Upton,-Mrs. Lucy K., Peabody, 

Uptoo, Moses T., Salem, 

Vose, William H., Fitchburg. 

Wadsworth, Mrs. Lacy, Milton. 

Wadsworth, William, Boston. 

Wakefield, Miss C, Beading. 

Waldron, Rev. Daniel W., Boston. 
Wales, Erastus, Holbrook. 
Wales, Miss Mary Ann, Boston. 

Walker, Dean H., Andover. 

Walker, Miss Frances A., HaverhUL 

Walker, Rev. Geo. F., Ashbg. 

Walker, John 8., East Medwag, 

Walker, Mrs. John S., " 

♦Walker, Levi. Bridgewater. 

Walker, Ellen A., ** 

Walker, Moses, HaverhiU. 

Walker, Nathaniel. «* 

Walker, Robert Gh.. Boston. 

Walker, William M., Bridgewater. 

•Walley, Samuel H., Boston. 

Walley, Samuel H., ** 

Ward, Artemas, " 

Ward, Miss Lydia, Saxonville, 

Ward, Samuel, Boston. 

Ward, Miss H. L. H., Lakeville. 

♦Ward, Rev. James W., " 

Ward, Mrs. Caroline L., ** 

Ward, Miss Susan H., *' 

Ward, Salem T., Winchester, 

Warflcld, Henry L., Buokland. 

Warner, John, Kewton. 

Warner, William, South Deerfield, 

Warren, George W , Boston. 

♦Warren, Mrs. Diantha A., Lynn. 

♦Warren, Mrs. Maria, Chraflon. 

♦Warren, Nehemiah, Stow. 



(« 






<« 



Warren, Franolt W., Stew. 
Warren, Jonaa, *^ 

♦Warren, Lucinda, " 
♦Warren, William A., Winchester, 
Washburn, William B., Greenfield. 
Washburn, Mrs William B., '' 
Waterman, Mrs. Caroline, Ontfton. 
Watklns, Miss Abby A., Gloucester. 
Weeks, Mrs. L. Caroline, North Dana. 
Webster, Edward, Boscaiwen, N.H, 
Welch, John, Boston. 
Weld, James, " 
Wells, Mrs. Martha D., Northborc^, 
Wellman, Joshua W., D.D., Newton. 
Wendell, Mrs. Catharine, Boston. 
Wentworth, Albert, ffaverhill. 
Westworth, Lewis, Bridgewater. 
West, Peleg D., WhitinsviUs. 
Wheeler, Ah\jah R., East Medway. 
Wheeler, Mrs. M. B., Medwag. 
Wbltcomb, Oscar L., Worcester. 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Abble B.,** 
Whitcomb, G. Henry, ** 
Whitcomb, Lewis, Holbrook. 
♦Whltoomb, Reuben, Hdrpard. 

♦Whitcomb, Reuben, Jun., 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Abby F., 
•Whitcomb. Mrs. Louisa D., 
Whitcomb, Miss Mary M., 
White, Aaron L., Medwag. 
White Cornelius, Brookville. 
White, Edmund, Holbrook. 
White, Newton, *« 

♦White, James, Boston. 
White, Joel, Uxbridgs. 
White, Josiah, Pttersham, 
White, Mrs. MaryC, Pembroke, N.H, 
White, Phineas A., WhUinsvUle. 
White, Thomas, Holbrook. 
Whitin, Arthur F., WhUinstfUle. 
Whltin, Charles E., 
WhlUn, Charles P., 
Whltin, Mrs. Catharine H.** 
Whltin, Edward, 
Whltin, James F., 
Whitin, Mrs. Patience H.,** 
WhiUn, Paul, " 

Whitin, Mrs. Sarah J., 
Whitin, Mrs. Sarah R., 
Whiting, Lemuel, Groton, 
Whitman, Charles, Lowell. 
Whitmarsh, Mrs. Diantha, 8. Abington. 
Whimarsh, Mary, 
Whitmarsh, Miss Mary J., 
Whitmorc, Annie Maria, Lgnn, 
Whitney, Charles H., Cambridgeport. 
Whitney, Dora S., South Groton. 
Whitney, Frederick, Westminster. 
Whitney, Helen J., Stow, 
Whitney, Isaac S., Gloucester. 
Whitney, Israel, Boeton, 



« 



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M 



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• I 



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t« 



48 



Whitney, Mrs. Permella V., Peiertham, 
Whitney, Richard D., SpringiMd, 
Whitney, Mrs. Sasanna, Rutland, 
*WiggleBworth, Thomas, Boston, 
Wilbur, Joseph, Taunton, 
Wlid, Daniel, Boston. 
Wild, Miss Livia A., South Braintree, 
Wilder Hattie W., South Acton. 
Willeoz, Rev. William H., Reading. 
Williams, Hiss Amelia P., Sunderland, 
Williams, Rev. C. H. S., Concord, 
Williams, Mrs. O. H. 8., *< 
Williams, Rer. Edward F., Whitinsvilie. 
Williams, Miss Elliabeth C, Oroton. 
Williams, Miss Mary D., Greei\^Ui. 
Williams, 8. H., Foxboro\ 
Williams, Thomas 8., Aubumdale. 
Williams, Ephraim, Springfield. 
Willis, Lueeba, Wayland, 
Willis, Lucy Maria, " 
Wilson, Rev. Thomas, Stoughton, 
Wing, John O., Lowell. 
Wines, Rev. C. Maurice, Haritfordf Conn. 
Wlnslow, Pelham, E<ut Abington, 
Winter, David Baker, Korthbridge. 
Winthrop, Robert C, Boston, 
*Winthrop, Thomas L., ** 
WIswell, Mrs. Liazle M., Chicago, IlL 



^Withington, Otis, BrookHne, 
Woloott, Mrs. Elliabeth, Peabodg. 
Wolcott, William, " 

Woodbury, Simon J., Sutton. 
Wood, Mrs. Abtjab, Westboro*. 
Wood, Cyrus K., Gardner. 
Wood. Elizabeth O., Foxhor&. 
Wood, Miss Jane A., OrafUm. 
Wood, Joseph W., Whitinsvilie. 
Wood, Mrs. E. 8., ** 

Wood, Mrs. Samuel F., Cheba^ford. 
Wood, Mrs. Susan, Oroton, 
Wood, T. Dwigfat, Westminster. 
Wood, Theodore S., " 

Woods, Mi«s Abble Wheeler, Maiden. 
Woods, Austin Frank, Xew Braintree, 
Woods, Joseph Wheeler, Boston. 
•Woods, Samuel H., . " 

Woodward, Ebenezer, NeMon. 
Woodward, Miss Emily, Newton U. Falls. 
Woodworth, Artemas B., Lowell. 
Worcester, Miss Saille, Brighton. 
*Worthington, William, Boston, 
Wright, George L., MUteneaque. 
Wyman, Charles, Lancaster. 
Wyman, Rufus, Boston. 
Wyman, William Q., FUchburg. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



Beoeipfes from April 1, 1872, to April 1, 1873. 






«< 



<« 



«« 



(t 



Abington, Second Congregational Ch. 

and Society 

South 

" Mary Whitmarah (I 

L. M.) 

Evander Reed 

Agawam, Feeding Hills Oh. and Soc. 

Andovcr, South Cong. Cli, and Soc. . 

♦• North Trin. Cong. Church. 

'* A friend (1 i*. M.) 

Ashby, Second Parish 

Auburndale, Cong. Church and Soc. . 
Ayer, Cong. Church and Society. . . . 

Barre, Evang. Church aud Soc 

BernardHton, Cong. Ch. and Soc. . . . 

Boston, Old South Church 

*' Park-8t. Church 

S.8. Warren 

First Mariners' Baptist Cb. . 
Mrs. 3fcl.^ud, paid in silver. 

Union Church 

Mrs. Nancy Atkinson 

Bradford, Cong. Church and Soc 

•' Kev. John D. Kingsbury. . 

Braintree, First Church 

'• Livla A. Wlld(lL. M.)... 

" Kachcl A. Faxon 

Buckland, Cong. Church 

Bridgewuter, James M. Leonard (1 

L. M.) 

Brookficld. a friend 

Campello, Orthodox Cong. Church. . 

Canton, Cong. Church 

Chlcopee, 2d Church and Soc 

3d •• •• 

Centreville, Cong. Ch 

Charletnontf Ch. East 

Conway, Cong, Ch 

Concord, Union Bible Soc 

Chelsea, Mrn.N.A. M.Dutch 

Danvers, Maple-st. H.S. (1 L. H.) .. . 

Derry, N.U., Mrs. Plllsbury 

Dunstable, Cong. Church 

Duxbury , North- West Union Soc. . . . 

Falmouth, First Cong. Church 

Fitchburg, Calviuistlc Cong. Church 

(A.B.S.) 

Franklin, Cong. Church and Soc 

Freetown, '• *' *' 

Franklin County Bible Soc 

Georgetown, Memorial Church (1 L. 

M.) 

Georgetown, a friend 

Groton, Union Cong. Church and Soc 

Groveland, •* '* 

Hadley, Russell Church 

Hamstcad, N.Ii., (>)ng. Ch 

Hanover. Mass., First Cong. Ch 

Haverhill, North Church and Soc. . . 
•' West Cong. Ch. and Soc. . 

Hatfield, Cong. Church and Soc 

Harvard, Evang. Church and Soc... 



$15 00 


21 00 


20 00 


20 00 


7 06 


48 00 


36 00 


20 00 


9 25 


71 60 


19 05 


20 57 


1 00 


154 59 


223 63 


200 00 


7 08 


2 08 


5 00 


5 UO 


69 40 


6 00 


44 00 


20 00 


5 00 


9 01 


20 00 


5 00 


52 85 


29 28 


36 03 


40 00 


10 10 


17 00 


47 95 


100 00 


10 00 


20 00 


1 00 


6 75 


2 00 


28 00 


95 37 


16 65 


8 39 


16 75 


37 26 


60 


21 00 


11 00 


19 71 


6 00 


8 00 


60 00 


20 00 


73 75 


16 00 



Holliflton, Cong. Church and Soc. . . . 
Hopkinton, •• •• " .... 

Holbrook, " *• »*.... 

*• E.E. Holbrook 

Hubbardston, Cong. Church 

Lakeville. Cong. Ch. and Soc. (I l.h.) 
Lancaster, Evang. Church ana Soo. . 
Lawrence. Lawrence st. Cong. Ch.. . 
Leominster. Evang. Churcli and 8oo. 
Longmeadow, Ladies' Benevolent So. 
** Gentlemen's Benev. So. 

Littleton, Orthodox Cong 

Ludlow, Cong. Church and Soc 

Lunenburg,'* '• •♦ 

Medway, Village Church (1 l. m.) . . 

*» West. Cong. Church 

" East, First Cong. Church . 
Methuen, John Davis, Ann. Sub .... 

Milbury. Second Cong Church 

Middleboro', First Cong. Church 

*• Central Cong. Church. . 

Newbury port, Belleville Cong. Ch. . 

• * Prospect'St. Ch urch . . 

*' First Presbt. Ch. and 

Soc 

Newtonvllle, Cong. Ch. and Soc 

New>England Conference of Meth- 
odist-Episcopal Church 

North Deer Tsland, Me., Second Ch., 

(A.B.S.) 

Norwood, First Cong. Ch. (1 L. M.). 

Orange, Central Church 

Palmer, Second Church 

Peabody, S. Cong. Church and Soc. . 
Pepperell, Cong Church and Soc... 
Petersham, Orthodox Cong. Church. 

Phillipston, First Cong. Church 

liev. Chas. F. Morse. . . . 
Rowley, Cong. Church and Soc .... 
Roxbury, West, South Evang. Ch. . . 

Salem, South Church and Soc 

** Crombie-st. Cong, Ch . and So. 

Saugus, Cong. Church and Soc 

Sharon, *• • " •♦ 

Saxonville, Edwards Church 

Shelburne, Cong. Church aud Soc. . . 
Shrewsbury, »* " "... 

Shirley. Cong. Church and Soc 

Springfield, Olivet Church (1 i.. M.) 
** Indian Orchard Ch. So. 

" Feeding-Hills Soc 

Spencer, Cong. Church and Soc 

*• '* Sabbath School 

'* For supply of pulpit 

Sudbury, Cong. Cnurch and Soc 

Templeton, •• " *' 

Townsend, " *' , " 

Upton, Ellen M. Gore 

Warwick, Trin. Cong. Church 

Waverley, First Cong. Church 

Westboro' Evang. Church and Soo... 
Westfleid, a friend 



$43 00 


65 70 


34 46 


76 00 


2 86 


20 00 


30 06 


100 00 


48 87 


26 70 


27 60 


626 


16 02 


4 00 


83 66 


40 78 


21 42 


10 00 


33 00 


24 46 


21 40 
90 11 


36 66 


34 00 


41 06 


728 44 


4 00 


20 00 


12 60 


18 26 


61 91 


13 60 


6 01 


26 86 


6 00 


41 80 


24 60 


70 00 


30 00 


32 11 


10 07 


10 60 


19 00 


7 06 


16 80 


42 la 


9 IT 


766 


20 70 


4 86 


25 00 


12 41 


12 67 


6 10 


200 


600 


26 46 


83 66 


26 00 



50 



WeymotiUi, FlrfiOong. Ch. and Soe. 990 84 
** Sonth) Second Cong. Oh. 

(lL.M.) 81 00 

Weymoath.North, Pllffrim Cong. Ch. 24 70 

Wobnrn, Cong. Charon and 8<m:. ... 78 00 
Westmoreland, N.H., John Cole and 

wife (1 L. M.) 20 00 

Weatford, Union Cong. Ch. and Soc. 6 00 

Wellfleet, South, Cong. Charch 6 00 

Wilbn^am, Cong. Church and Soc. . 87 80 



WhltinsTille, Cong. Oh. and Soe. . . * $770 25 

Winchester, Cong. Charch 115 60 

Whately, Cons. Charch 10 00 

Winchendon. North Charch (1 L. M.) 35 00 

Worcester. Central Church 48 35 

" A friend 10 00 

Yarmouth, First Cong. Oh. and Soc. 81 20 

$5,438 89 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 



A IHend in Massaehosetts to circu- 
late the Bible in Foreign Lands, 

A fHend in Boston 5 00 

Eachel A.Faxon 5 00 

▲ Mend in Boston 2 00 



By Daniel Eames, Colporteur $10 53 

uampden Benevolent Association, 

interest on $200 in gold 6 00 

$88 43 



COLLECTIONS, 
By Rev, E. F. SLAFTER, AgeiU of the American Bible Society. 



Boston, Trinity Charch $1,180 00 

** Emmanuel *' 718 00 , 

«• St. Paul's »• ©02 00' 

*• Christ " 10 CO 

Brookllne, St. Paul's Church 257 25 

OwDBbridge, St. John's Chapel 45 00 

Oambrldgeport, St. Peter's Church. . 35 

Chelsea, St. Luke's Church 17 00 

Dorchester. St. Mary's Church 20 00 

Hedham, St. Paul's Church 00 80 

VIramingham, St. John's Church. ... 25 00 

Hanover, St. Andrew's Church 88 84 

tiftwrence, Grace Church 21 68 



Lawrence, St. John's Church $7 03 

Longwood, Church of our Saviour. . 145 00 

Newton Lower Falls, St. Mary's Ch. 46 28 

Roxbury, St. James Church 70 60 

Salem, Grace Church 80 70 

Waltham, Christ's Church 22 00 

Worcester. All-Saint's Church 86 50 

Quinqy, Christ Church 18 04 

Two Friends 50 00 

Bev. Samuel Cutler 20 00 



$8,450 68 



LEGACIES. 



Anbum, firom the estate of William 

Craiff, Inpart $6,000 80 

Boston, m>m the estate of Mrs. 

Harriet W. Strong 100 00 

** fh>m the estate of Miss Lucy 

SpoflTord 80 00 



Holbrook, finom the estate of Elisha 

N. Ilolbrook $200 00 

Whitiiisvllle, ft*om the estate of E. 

W. Fletcher (1 L. M.) 100 00 

$6,520 80 



ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS $270 00 

WHOLE AMOUNT acknowledged In.the preceding lists $15,767 84 



FORM OF A BEQUEST TO THE SOCIETY. 

1 give, devise, and bequeath to the Mabsachubktts Bible Society, Incorporated in the 
yew eighteen hundred and ten, the sum of to be applied to the charitable uses 

' purposes of the Society. 



Lettebs plating to Agencies, or to the general interests and policy of the Society, 
•hould be directed to the Rev. Damxel Butler, Recording Secretary, 15 Comhill, Boston. 



twm Remittances for books, donations fh>m churches and Individuals, and orders for 
books, should be addressed to Rev. Bluah Cutler, Agent, 15 OomhiU, Boston. 



APPENDIX. 



The following communication from the Corresponding Sec 
retary of the Young Men's Christian Association of Boston, 
received too late for our Report, we here insert : — 

To the MaMachosetU Bible Society. 

Dear Brethren, — We cannot value your aid to us too 
highly. The work that the "Boston Young Men's Christian 
Association " is doing is among strangers ; and, in a large number 
of instances, the destitute young men are brought under our influ- 
ence impoverished by dissipation. Many of these are the sons of 
the most devoted and worthy fathers and mothers of the country 
communities of our dear New England and the Provinces. The 
majority of them received a mother's parting advice to use daily 
the Bible, which she had placed in their trunks on leaving these 
sacred and restraining influences for such scenes of temptation as 
every city furnishes. This is manifestly forgotten by them in the 
majority of cases that are brought under our notice. Many throw 
away their Bible as a first step to a career of dissipation, and plunge 
deep into sin of every kind, lose their situation in business, find 
they are " feeding upon the husks ; " and then a thought of home, 
a word by letter fi*om a mother or sister, the very pinohings of 
hunger, or the cordial invitation of some friend, send them to our 
Reading Room or prayer-meetings. 

One of the first inquiries made by us is, Have you a Bible or 
Testament ? We have given to such upwards of 1000 Testaments 
a year for the p2L8iJifteen years, — the gift of your noble Society. 

One young man pulled from his pocket a well-worn Testamenjt 
a few days since, saying, " You gave me that when I was pretty 
badly ofl*, three years and a half ago. I was led to Jesus then, 



52 

through the words and prayers of this Association ; and it has 
been my constant companion ever since." The following letter 
speaks for itself: — 

Boston Highlands, May 31, 1871. 
L. P. Rowland, Secretary. 

Dear Sir^ — I am so glad to send you these few lines, to inform 
you that I have found peace for my troubled mind in the Testa- 
ment you kindly gave me. I find Jesus invites the worst of sin- 
ners to seek pardon and forgiveness through faith in God our 
Father, and his death. I see in the book he was persecuted by 
men, bruised and insulted for our sake. May the Lord of Hosts 
enable me to realize the importance of keeping in my sight and 
mind the value of the blessed teaching of his Word ! I trust I 
shall sow seed for those, who, like mysclfj need to know of Christ. 

I remain yours respectfully, 

F. H. w. 

In a public address in North Bridgewater upon the temptations 
of young men, I referred to the circulation of the Bible and its 
portions by the Bible Society of Massachusetts, and how we 
should rejoice at its free circulation. I received the following a 
few days after : — 

"North Bridgewater, April 25, 187.3. 

"Me. Rowland, — Please use the enclosed money to buy some 
Testaments ; and let me suggest that you give them to young 
persons you know about who would like to learn of Jesus, but are 
too poor to buy one for themselves.'' 

In our daily prayer-meeting on board the United States Receiv- 
ing Ship ** Ohio," we find many of the very best opportunities for 
bestowing a Bible or Testament to be well used and fully appre- 
ciated. The long days and weeks of leisure which these men 
have at their disposal upon a man-of-war, furnish th^ best oppor- 
tunity for useful reading. 

We have to express our deep appreciation of the aid which the 
Society has rendered us, in enabling us thus to give to all a por- 
tion of Gk)d's Word. We hope that our distributions will continue 
to be conducted with such care as to commend it to your approval 
and aid. 

I am faithfully yours, 

L. P. Rowland, Cor. Sec. 



of tho. 



I-IASSACITJSETTS 3I3L:: SOCIZT? 



l?7i 






44 



NoyeSf Alv», North Bridgevoattr, 
Noyea, Jacob, Ahington, 
Noyes, Luke B., South AbingUm, 
Noyea, Rufus S., N. Bridgewater, 
Oatley, O. D., WhUiMviUe, 
Odiln, BeoJamlD, Exeter, y.H. 
Odlln, Mw. E. T. « 

Ordway, Aaron L., New-Tork CUjf. 
Ordway Miss Charlotte, Bradford, 
Ordway Herbert, *• 

Osborne, George P., Peahody. 
Osgood, George C, Lowell, 
Osgood, U.B., WhUinaviUe. 
Packard, Rev. D. Temple, Brighton, 
Packard, Edward C, North BridgewaUr. 
Packard, S. Edwards, 'Springfield, 
Packard* 8. Franklin, CampeUo, 
Packard, Miss Susie P., " 
Packard, Zibeon, Ahington. 
Pa|(e, Abigail L., AtkiMon, N.H. 
Paige George R., New Salem. 
*Palne, Mrs. Sarah M., Holden, 
•Paine, Miss Sarah C, ^ 

Palmer, Kev. Charles Ray, Salem, 
*Palmer Rev. Stephen, Needham, 
Palmer, Squire, South Deerfield. 
Park, John C, Boston, 
Parker, Andrew, Olouceeter, 
Parker, Daniel, Whitineville, 
•Parker, John, Boston, 

Parker, Mrs. Sarah, *' 

•Parkman, Francis, D.D., ** 
•Parkman, Samuel, 
•Parkman, Mrs. Sarah, 
Pannenter, Mrs. B. J. G., Athol, 
•Parsons, Gorham, Boston. 
•Parsons, William, *• 
Partons, Rev. R. C, Worcester. 
Parsons, John, Jun., Saugus Centre, 
Partridge, Clark, Medway. 
Partridge, Joseph, HolUston. 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J., West Newton. 
Patrick, Mrs. Martha L., " 
Patten, Mrs. John F., Lynn. 
Patterson, David H., Methuen, 
Paul, Frederick A., LakevilU, 
Paul, Henry, Newton. 

•Paul, Mrs. Henry, " 
•Paul, Luther, 
Paul, Luther, Jun., 
Paul, Miss Harriet, ** 
Paul, Miss Mary. '* 
Paul, Mrs. Ruth B., Medway. 
Payson, MIm Susan, Foxboro\ 
Payson. William P., " 
Pearson, Miss Hannah J., Lowell. 
Pease, George W., Salem. 
Peck, Rev. David, Sunderland, 
Pockham. Hubbard, Petersham. 
Peirce, Rev. Bradford K., Harlem, N. Y. 
Peoples, Samuel, Natick. 



II 



<i 



II 



II 



Perkins, Beqjamln 0., Peahody, 
Perkins, E. E., North MiddUhortJ^. 
Perkins, Mrs. Elizabeth E., '' 
Perkins, Jairus H., " 

Perkins, James, Peahody, 
•Perkins, James, Boston, 
•Perkins. James, Jun., " 
Perkins, Miss Mary A., Brighton, 
•Perkins, Thomas H., Boston. 
Perley, Mrs. Abigail T., Salem. 
Perley, Jacob, " 

Perry, Miss Catharine H., Sherhom. 
Perry, James, Danvers, 
•Peters, Edward D., Boston, 
Peters, Mrs. Lydla H., Berlin. 
Pettee, Daniel, Sharon. 
Pettee, Miss Eliza J.. Foxboro*. 
Pettee, Samuel Gardner, Stoughton. 
Pettee, Willard, Foxhoro*. 
Phillips, Alonzo P., Medway, 
Phillips, George W., Saugus. 
Phillips, Mrs. Geo.W., »* 
•PhilUpn, Jonathan, Boston. 
Phillips, Mrs. Sally, ** 
Phillips, William, Boston. 
Pickard, Rev. Daniel W., Oroveland, 
Pickering, Henry W., Boston. 
Pierce, Albert T., Stoughton. 
•Pierce, Rev. Charles U., MilUmry, 
Pierce, Isaac T. Whitinsville. 
Pierce, Sylvester G., Winchester, 
•Plerpont, Rev. John, Medford, 
Pierson, Rev. William Henry, Ipswich. 
Pike, John, D.D., Rotoley. 
Plumb, Rev. Albert H,, Boston. 
Plumb, Joseph Dart, ** 

Plumer, Mrs. Martha H., Rowley. 
Plummer, Israel, WhiHnsvUU, 
Pogue, Mrs. Joseph, Or€{/ton, 
Pollard, Joseph G., Wobum. 
Pollock, Miss Emma A., Whitinsville. 
Pomeroy, Fred. L., Sunderland. 
Pond, Almira W., South Maiden. 
Pond, John P., Boston. 
Fond, Mrs. Nancy, Medway. 
Pond, William E., Wrentham. 
Pool. Solomon, Gloucester, 
Poor, Joseph, Peahody. 
Poor, Nathan H., " 
Porter, J. Edwards, North Broolifield. 
Porter, Samuel S., Winchester. 
Potter, J. Sturgis. Netoton. 
Pratt, Cornelius, North Weymouth, 
Pratt, David, " 

Pyatt, Galen, North BrUlgewater. 
Pratt, Galen E., " 

Pratt, Rev. George H., Harvard. 
Pratt, Norton, Braintree. 
Pratt, Phebe, Sherhom. 
Prutt, Philip W., Ahington. 
Pratt, Zebulon, North Middld>oro\ 



ANNUAL REPORT* 



PRESEirrED BT 



THE TRUSTEES 



OP THE 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON, 



May 24, 1875, being their Sixty-Sixth Anniversary. 

WITH 

AN ABSTRACT OF THE UNPUBLISHED REPORT OF THE 
TRUSTEES FOR THE PREVIOUS YEAR. 



BOSTON: 

DEPOSITORY, 15 CORNHILL. 
PRESS OF T. R. MARVIN & SON. 

187 5. 



46 



Smith, B. B., Wet^/Md, 

Bmlth, Mrs. Frmnce* B. D., WhUifUvitte, 

Smith, Rev. Edward P., Brooklffn, N..7. 

Smith, Qeor^e P., BotUm. 

Smith, Samuel, *• 

Smith, Joel, WhUinwOU, 

Smith, Jonathan, ** 

Smith, Warren N., '* 

Smith, Mrs. Hattie J., OUmeetter, 

Smith, Matron M., D D., Har^ord^ Ct, 

Smith, Mrs. Matton M., *< 

Smith, Norman, Oroton, 

Smith, Mrs. Mary J., ** 

Smith, Richard, Peabody, 

Smith, Mrs. Charlotte, ** 

Smith, Mrs. Sarah, Andover, 

Smith, William W., Conway, 

Smith, Mrs. T. Berton. 

Snow, Ambrose. South Hadley Fatlt, 

Snow, Mrs. Caroline. Aubumdale, 

Snow, Mrs. Mark, Chatham. 

Soule, Henry M., South Abington. 

Sonthgate, Charles M., St. Johntbury^ Fl. 

Southgate, Rev. Robert, Hartford, Vt, 

♦Soutbgatf", Mrs. Mary Frances, ** 

Soathworth, Mrs. Caroline M., Mtdioay. 

Sk>aulding, Mrs. Charlotte A., Oroton, 

Spanlding, John, Oroton Junction, 

Spooner, William B., BoHon, 

Spring, Mrs Adela C, WhitinwiOe, 

Stacy, Albert, Concord. 

Stanley, Bzra C, Mancheiter, 

Stanton, Rev. Oeorge F., South Weymouth. 

Stebbins, Rev. Milan C, Springfidd, 

Stevens, Mrs. Oeorge, Lowell. 

*Stevens, Norman C, Newton, 

Stevens, Mrs. E . M. , ' * 

Stevens, Mrs. Benjamin F., Peabody, 

Stevens, Samuel, Olaucetter. 

Sdckney, William H., Dracut, 

•Stoddard, Lewis T., Brookline. 

Stone, Andrew L., D.D., San P^ancUeo, Cat. 

Stone, Mrs. Matilda F. , " 

Stone, Martha A., Newton Centre, 

Btorra, Eunice C, Braintree, , 

Storrs, Richards., D.D., " 

Btowell, Mrs. Abby F., Concord, 

Stowell, Cyrus A., South Deerfietd. 

Stowell, D. W. , Waltham. 

Strong, Rev. Elnathan E., *' 

Strong, Rev. J. C, LeeoA 2>il;e, Minn. 

Strong, Mrs. J. C, '* " ** 

Studley, Austin, East Abington, 

Studley Edward A., Boston. 

Sugden, Miss Mary, Rraintrec. 

Sumner, Rev. Charles B., Monson. 

Sumner. Mrs. n. H., Foxboro\ 

Swazey, Mrs. Frances A., Lynn, 

Swett, Samuel W., Boston. 

Swift, Miss Lottie H., Andover. 

Bwiuer, Rev. Christopher J , Provincetown. 



<t 



i« 



4( 



II 



Taft, Mrs. Blisabeth B., WkUinmfUU, 
Taft, Miss Emily A., ** 

Taft, Oustavus E., 
Taft, Mrs. O. B., 
Taft, S. Jennie, ** 

Taft, Jacob, Uxifiridge. 
Tapley, Gilbert, Danvers, 
•Tappan, John, Boston. 
Tarr, William J., QUmceater, 
Taylor, Mrs. Malansa, Winchester, 
Teele, Rev. Albert K., Milton, 
Teele, Mrs. Cornelia C, '* 
Temple, Mark M., Reading. 
Tenny, Mrs. Joanna S., Saugus. 
•Tenney, Mrs. Mary P., Winchester, 
Tenney, Mrs. Apphia S., Oeorgetown, 
Terry, Rev. James P., South Weymouth. 
Thacher, Mrs. Anna B., Hyde Park, 
Thacher Miss Calista C, Attld>oro», 
Thacher, John, *' 

Thacher, Susan B., Portland^ Me. 
Thacher, Mrs. Susan C, " 
Thacher. William T., Hyde Park. 
^Thatcher, Mary Ludlow, MiddUboro*, 
Thayer, Addison S., Medway, 
Thayer, Clara L., ** 

Thayer, Amasa, Braintree, 
Thayer, E. F. E., 
Thayer, Ira, 
«Thayer, Mrs. Lilla, 
Thayer, Annie M., Holbrook. 
Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, Andover, 

Thayer, Mrs. Martha C, '* 

Thayer, Oliver, Salem. 

•Thayer, Mrs. Jane, Boston. 

Thayer, Robert H., New- York City. 

Thayer, Sarah H., Braintree. 

Thayer, William W., Uxbridge. 

Thompson, Mrs. Averick F., Wareham. 

Thompson, Mrs. Emily B., Concord. 

Thompson, Everett A., North Wobum, 

Thompson, Samuel A., *' 

Thompson, Mrs. Anne Eliza, ** 

Thompson, Oeorge R., North Bridgewater, 

Thompson, Lewis Waldo, Wobum. 

Thompson, Stephen, Winchester. 

Thurston, Rev. Richard B.. Stamford, Ct, 

Timlow, Rev. Heman R., Wolpole. 

Timlow, Dana C, " 

Tinker, Russell, Oraflon. 

Tobey, Miss Jennie E., WhitinsviUe. 

Tolraan, Rev. Richard. Hampton, Va, 

Tolman, Rev. Samuel H., Lenox. 

Terrey, Miss Elizabeth L., South Weymouth. 

Torrey, James, North Weymouth. 

Torrey, Willard, Oroton. 

Towne, William B , MiJford, N,H, 

Trask, Charles H.,Jun., Manchester. 

Trask, Mrs. A. H., ** 

Trask, Lizzie K., Gloucester. 

Trask. Samuel, Peabody. 



47 



14 



<l 



Trukf BamnelP., Danvert, 

Tribou, Samael. North Bridgewaier. 

Trowbridge, Mrs. A«a, Brighton. 

Trufaut, Harriet Andrews, Abington, 

Trufant, Philip P., 

Trufant, Walter Ezra, 

^Tucker, Rev. Elijah W., LebanoUy Ct, 

•Tucker, Jesae, MUton, 

♦Tucker, Mrs. Mary R., " 

•Tucker, Nathan, " 

Tucker, Mrs. Nathan, " 

Tucker, Mrs. Hannah W., DorcheHer, 

Tucker, John A., " 

Tucker, William, •• 

Tucker, William W., Boston. 

Tufts, Charles, Andaver. 

Turner. Miss Alice Montgomery, Banddph. 

Tuttle, Hiss Martha E., Concord, 

Tuttle, Miss Sarah, Oroveland, 

Tuttle, Thomas 8., Littleton. 

Twlchell, John M., FUchburg, 

Tyler, Frank H., Bradford. 

Tyler, Jerome W., Boston, 

♦Underhill, Rev. John W., y, Amhertt. 

Upton,*Mrs. Lucy K., Peabody, 

Upton, Moses T., Salem. 

Vose, William H., litchbftrg. 

Wadsworth, Mrs. Lucy, MUton. 

Wadsworlh, William, Boston. 

Wakefield, Miss C, Reading. 

Waldron, Rev. Daniel W., Boston. 

Walea, Erastus, HoUnrook. 

Wales, Miss Mary Ann, Boston. 

Walker, Dean H., Andover. 

Walker, Miss Frances A., HaverhHk 

Walker, Rev. Geo. F., Ashby. 

Walker, John 8., East Medway, 

Walker, Mrs. John 8., " 

•Walker. Levi, Bridgeuxtter, 

Walker, Ellen A., *• 

Walker, Moses, Haverhill. 

Walker, Nathaniel, ** 

Walker, Robert G., Boston. 

Walker, WUliam M., Bridgewater, 

•Walley, Samael H., Boston. 

Walley, Samuel H., 

Ward, Artemas, 

Ward, Miss Lydia, SaxonviUe, 

Ward, Samuel, Boston. 

Ward, Miss H. L. H., LakevHU. 

♦Ward, Rev. James W., " 

Ward, Mrs. Caroline L., ♦* 

Ward, Miss Susan H., ** 

Ward, Salem T., Winchester. 

Warflcld, Henry L., Buckland, 

Warner, John, Newton. 

Warner, William, South Deerfie^* 

Warren, George W , Boston. 

•Warren, Mrs. Dlantha A., Lynn. 

♦Warren, Mrs. Maria, Orafton. 

♦Warren, Nehemiah, Stow. 



14 



14 



44 
<4 



44 



41 
4« 



14 



Warren, Francis W., Stew. 
Warren, Jonas, 
♦Warren, Lucinda, 
♦Warren, William A., Winchester. 
Washburn, William B., Ortenfield, 
Washburn, Mrs William B., " 
Waterman, Mrs. Caroline, Onufton. 
Watkins, Miss Abby A., Gloucester. 
Weeks, Mrs. L. Caroline, North Dana, 
Webster, Edward, Boscawen^ N.H, 
Welch, John, Boston. 
Weld, James, " 
Wells, Mrs. Martha D., Northbord'. 
Wellman, Joshua W., D.D., Newton, 
Wendell, Mrs. Catharine, Boston. 
Wentworth, Albert, HaverhiU. 
West worth, Lewis, Bridgewater, 
West, Peleg D., Whitinsville. 
Wheeler, Ab^ah R., East Medway, 
Wheeler, Mrs. M. B., Medway. 
Whitcombj Oscar L., Worcester. 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Abbie B.," 
Whitcomb, G. Henry, «* 
Whitcomb, Lewis, Holbrook. 
♦Whitcomb, Reuben, Harvard. 

♦Whitcomb, Reuben, Jan., 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Abby F., 
♦Wliitcomb, Mrs. Louisa D., 
Whitcomb, Miss Mary M., 
White, Aaron L., Medway. 
White Cornelius, BrookviUe, 
White, Edmund, Holbrook. 
White, Newton, " 

•White, James, Boston, 
White, Joel, Uxbridge. 
White, Josiah, Petersham. 
White, Mrs. MaryC, Pembroke^ N.H, 
White, Phlneas A., WhUinsviUe. 
White, Thomas, Holbfook. 
WhiUn, Arthur F.. WhUinsviUe. 
WhiUn, Charles E., 
Whltln, Charles P., 
Whitin. Mrs. Catharine H.** 
Whitin, Edward, " 

Whitin, James F., ** 

Whitin, Mrs. Patience H.,*' 
WhIUn, PauU 
Whitin, Mrs. Sarah J., 
Whitin, Mrs. Sarah R., 
Whiting, Lemuel, Oroton, 
Whitman, Charles, LowtU. 
Whitmarsh, Mrs. Diantha, 8. Abington, 
Whimarsh, Mary, ** 

Whitmarsh, Miss Mary J., ** 

Whitmore, Annie Maria, Lynn. 
Whitney, Charles H., Cambridgeport, 
Whitney, Dora 8., South Oroton. 
Whitney, Frederick, Westminster, 
Whitney, Helen J., Stow, 
Whitney, Isaac 8., Gloucester. 
I Whitney, Israel, Boston. 



41 



« 



44 



44 



14 



OFPICEKS OF THE SOCIETY FROM 1809 TO 1875. 



^restUents. 



Hon. William Phillips 1809—27 

Kev. John Pierce, D.D 1827—49 

Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL.D...1849— 64 



Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL.D.1854— 69 
Hon. Samuel H. Wallev 1869 



Uice«$re8nient8. 



Rer. John Lathrop, D.D 

Rer. John T. Kirkland, D.D... 

Rev. Henry Ware, D.D 

Rev. John Codraan, D.D 

Rer. Simon Greenleaf, LL.D... 
Rev. Francis Parkraan, D.D... 
Rev. N. L. Frothingham, D.D.. 
Rev. Wm R. Nicholson, D.D... 

William C. Plonkett, Esq 

Edward South worth, Esq 

John P. Williston, Esq 

Hon. Wm. B. Washburn, LL.D. 

Stephen Salisbury, Esq 

Charles P. Whitin, E6q 



1809—16 

1816—28 

1828—44 

1844—48 

1848—49 

1849—63 

1868—61 

1861—72 

1862 

1862—70 

1862—72 

1862 

1862 

1862 



Lee Claflin, Esq 1862—70 

Caleb Holbrook, Esq 1862—76 

James S. Amory, Esq 1862 

Hon. John H. Clifford, LL.D 1862 

Elisha Tucker, Esq 1862 

James B. Crocker, Esq. 1862 

E. S. Mo«eley, Esq 1862 

Charles A. Jessup, Esq 1870 — 72 

Hon. William Claflin, LL.D..1871 
Rev. Alex. H. Vinton, D.D..1872 

Hon. WiUUm Hyde 1872 

Hon. Timothy W. Carter..... 1878 
Hon. Milton M. Fisher 1876 



Conesponlitng i^ecrrtarUs. 



Rev. Jos. Stevens Buckmin8ter.l809 — 13 

Rev. Samuel C. Thacher 1818—17 

Rev. Charles Lowell, D.D 1817—18 



Rev. Francis Parkman, D.D..1818 — 19 
Rev. N. L. Frothingham, D.D.1849— 63 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D.D.1868 



HecorUfng Secretaries. 



Rev. John Pierce, D.D 1809—28 

Rev. Daniel Sharp, D.D 1828—30 

Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor 1830—81 

Rev. James D. Knowles 1881 — 32 

Rev. William Jenks, D.D 1832—89 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D.D. 1839— 44 

Rev. William M. Rogers 1844—46 

Rev. (jeorge W. Blagden, D.D. 1846— 49 

Rev. George Richards 1849—62 

Rev. Daniel Butler 1862 



^Treasurers. 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq 1809—11 

Hon. Peter O. Thacher 1811—12 

John Tappan, Esq 1812—36 



Henry E<1 wards, Esq 1836—49 

George R. Sampson, Esq 1849—62 

Charles Henry Parker, Esq... 1862 



Exccutibe 

Rev. William E. Channing, D.D.1809— 18 

Hod. Jonathan Phillips 1809—16 

Stephen Higginson, E«q 1809—16 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D.D. ...1816— 18 

Edward Tuckerman, Esq 1816—30 

Rev. Henry Ware, jun., D.D. ..1818—80 
Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D.D. 1821— 36 
Charles Tappan, .Esq 1830—40 



Committees. 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D.D..1832— 86 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D.D.1835— 49 

Henry Edwards, Esq 1840—49 

Rev. George Richards 1849—60 

George R. Sampson, Esq 1849 — 62 

Albert Fearing, Esq 1868 

Rev. John 0. Means, D.D....1860 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq... 1862 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the Society was held at 
the rooms of the Society, No. 15, Cornhill, on Monday, May 
24, at 10 o'clock, a.m. The President, the Hon. Samuel 
H. Walley, in the chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq., presented 
his Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The report of the Trustees was read and accepted, and it 
was voted to print the same. 

The officers of the Society for the ensuing year were then 
chosen. 

On motion of Rev. Dr. Means, it was — 

Voted^ That the thanks of the Society be presented to the 
Rev. Wm. M. Taylor, D.D. for the sermon delivered before 
the Society last evening, and that he be requested to furnish 
a copy for publication with the Annual Report of the Society. 

Voted^ That an abstract of the Annual Report for 1874 
be published with the Report for the present year. 

Adjourned. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Trustees of the Massachusetts Bible Society 
are happy to report a year of usual prosperity. 
The issue of the Scriptures exceeds that of the pre- 
vious year, while falling slightly below that of two 
years since. It is in substance the repetition of the 
old ende«avor, to gain through the awakened interest 
of the friends of the Bible the means for its difiusion, 
and with these to scatter the good seed of the Word 
through the neglected portion of our own borders, 
and over the wider field of the woild. In the friends 
that have bestowed their sympathy and aid, and in the 
part we have been allowed to take in this great work, 
we see abundant occasion for gratitude, and are fur- 
nished with incentives to renewed labor. 
. Since our last anniversary, a Vice-President of the 
Society, Caleb Holbrook, Esq., of Norfolk Co., has 
been removed by death. He was a good man, an 
implicit believer of inspired truth, and has, we doubt 
n6t, entered upon the rest it reveals. 

During the year there have been issued from the 
Depository, twenty-eight thousand five hundred and 
seventy-five volumes. Nine thousand six hundred 
and eighty were Bibles ; eight thousand four hundred 
and eleven Testaments ; four thousand and twenty- 
one Testaments with the Psalms, and six thousand 
four hundred and sixty-three smaller portions of the 



8 

Scriptures. Of these, twelve hundred and twelve 
were in various foreign languages. 

The gratuitous issues have amounted to seven 
thousand eight hundred and six, at a cost of $3,128.44. 
They have gone to various classes within the State, 
while not a few have been granted in response to 
applications from places beyond our limits. The 
largest class of our beneficiaries have been, as here- 
tofore, the seamen, whose wants have been ascertained 
and supplied through the chaplain at their hospital, 
and the missionaries laboring in their behalf Our 
gifts are thus widely diffused, and over the sea and in 
distant lands are doing their appointed work. At 
home the growing endeavor to bring the young under 
the influence of religious teaching, creates an increas- 
ing demand of the Scriptures for this service, while 
city missionaries and self appointed laborers in the 
great field are ever conveying the gospel to the homes 
that await its coming. 

The Rev. Mr. Dwight, whose labors have been re- 
ferred to in previous Reports, has been employed as a 
colporter in this city for four months and a half In 
this line we learn from his report that he has visited 
over three thousand families. By far the larger part 
of these belonged to our foreign population. To 
forty-six destitute families the Scriptures were sold, 
and were given to three himdred and seventy. The 
books donated were mostly portions of the Bible. 
His time was largely spent among the poor and un- 
cared for, to whom he frequently read and repeated 
the Scriptures as opportunity oflfered. His work was 
mainly that of a Bible-reader, and in the wide field 
afforded him his labors were abundant and hopeful. 

During the past winter the city of Gloucester was 
canvassed by a colporter. Twenty-four hundred and 



9 

seven t^'-seven families were visited ; two hundred and 
eighty-five destitute fauiiUes and individuals were 
supplied, and eight hundred and sixty-eight copies of 
the Scriptures were sold or given away. 

The exploration and supply of the city of Lowell 
was commenced in December. The col porter, Rev. 
Mr. Willey, reports, that up to the close of our year 
he had visited three thousand three hundred and 
ninetv-two families. Of the nine hundred desti- 
tute families one hundred and two were supplied. 
Of these fifty-three were Roman Catholics. Two 
hundred and eighty-two copies of the Scriptures were 
sold, and five hundred and fifty-eight bestowed in 
charity. He refers to the friendliness with which he 
is received by all classes, and especially by the for- 
eign population, and to their general approval of his 
work, even in the instances where as yet they are 
not prepared to avail themselves of his proffered 
kindness. 

Two years ago the friends of the Bible in Franklin 
County commenced the exploration and supply of 
their field. The work has advanced far towards its 
completion, and has been thoroughly performed by 
the voluntary labors of the people. Within a short 
time a county society, auxiliary to the Massachusetts 
Bible Society, has been- formed, and a depository 
established in Greenfield. 

The Episcopal churches in the State have been 
visited by the Rev. Mr. Slafter, as in previous years, 
and with the usual results. 

The receipt.s of the society have been ^38,206.00 ; 
viz., in donations, annual subscriptions, and legacies; 
$12,646.53. Interest on the Durant fund and on 
other property of the Society, $9,770.48. From 
salesof Bibles, $8,789.48. From investment account, 



10 

$5,800. Balance on hand May, 1874, $1,199.51. 
The expenditures have been: for books, $13,285.06; 
for incidental expenses, $1,867.71. Salaries of gen- 
eral agent, distributing agents, depository agent and 
assistant, $4,613.84. Donations to the American 
Bible society, $2,710.58 ; to Thos. W. Durant, annuity, 
$424.84 ; on investment account, $11,091.15 ; balance 
in the Treasury, $3,212.82. 

The property of the Society, including a fund of 
$67,000 and its accumulations, given in 1868 to the 
Society by Thomas W. Durant, subject to an annuity, 
of $9,350 per annum during his life, amounts to 
$123,398.50. 

The American Bible Society, with receipts some- 
what diminished, reports a year of encouraging labor. 
In addition to the work done at the Bible House in 
New York, where in seven foreign languages Bibles 
have been printed, the Scriptures have been pub- 
lished at Constantinople, Beirut, Bremen, St. Peters- 
burg, Foochow, Pekin, Shanghai, and Lucknow. The 
gratuitous work for the year has amounted to $248,- 
792.34, of which sum $69,441.33 in cash were sent 
to foreign fields, and nearly fourteen thousand copies 
of the Scriptures that were printed here. Four hun- 
dred and sixty-four thousand families have been 
visited, and twenty-six thousand destitute families 
supplied. Five hundred and forty-two auxiliaries are 
reported as engaged in supplying their respective 
fields. The expense of the agency employed by the 
society is defrayed from the rentals of the Bible 
House, and no portion of the gifts made to the society 
are used for this purpose. The receipts for the year 
were $577,569.80, of which $106,875.30 were from 
donations, and $126,933.59 from legacies. 

We can but advert to the pleasing evidence afforded 



11 

us of the increasing diflfusion of the Scriptures, and 
of their growing power in the world. Missionary 
labor is steadily unclosing eyes hitherto closed in 
ignorance, and an awakened moral life attests the 
power of the Word. In lands where it has long 
been known it deVfelops a new life. A marked 
feature of the great religious awakening in our 
fatherland is the prominence given to the Scriptures. 
Great numbers have been drawn together to hear 
them read, and in simple language explained. The 
preaching, whose transforming power has been shown 
in the new life of multitudes, has been made up 
largely by the simple statements of divine truth. 
In our own country, an association, covering every 
part of its territory, numbering thousands of every 
age, exists for the systematic study of the Bible. 
Week by week they gather about some selected 
portion of divine truth, and appropriate its discovered 
treasures. While a few among us endeavor to weaken 
the hold which the Bible has upon the mind and 
conscience of the pubHc, the choicest scholarship 
bends reverently and lovingly over. its pages, patiently 
eliminating the verbal errors, which, in the course of 
ages, and its numerous transcriptions, have crept into 
its records. The lands where the Scriptures have 
their origin are carefully explored, and the very 
stones exhumed from the rubbish of ages, bear their 
testimony to the truth of the Word by which we 
stand. Manuscripts, whose date goes nearly back to 
the time of the completion of the Sacred Canon, 
prove the substantial accuracy of the divine records 
as they have come down to us. 

We are happy to notice the printing, in a cheap 
form, of the Douay Bible, under the sanction of the 
Roman Catholic Church, and to know that in this 



12 

form it is* being . extensively circulated. Although 
this version is far inferior to the one in general use^ 
and which by our charter we are authorized to circu- 
late, it nevertheless • contains the Word of God, and 
we rejoice that it is becoming the possession of thou- 
sands hitherto destitute. * 

In the present condition of the world, and in the 
signs of new life that greet us, the words of the Master 
sound the trumpet call to enlarged effort 

Behold a sower went forth to sow ; 

The field is the world ; 

The seed is the Word of God. 



SIXTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Society was held 
at the Rooms of the Revere Bank, on Monday, May 25, 
1874, at 10 o'clock, a.m. The President, Hon. Samuel H. 
Walley, in the chair. 

The minutes of the last A*hnual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Chas. Henby Pabkeb, Esq., presented 
his Annual Report, which was read^nd accepted. 

The Sixty-Fifth Annual Report of the Trustees was read 
and accepted. 

The officers of the Society were then elected for the en- 
suing year. 

The thanks of the Society were voted to the Rev. Phillips 
Brooks, for the sermon delivered by him before the Society 
on the evening previous, and a copy of the same was request- 
ed for publication. (Note. — This request Mr. Brooks felt 
compelled to decline.) • 

Adjourned. 



ABSTRACT OF THE SIXTT-FEPTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Rev. Samuel H. Babcock, D.D., for eleven years a 
Trustee of the Society, has within the year been called away 
by death. He was punctual in attendance upon the meetings 
of the Board, and heartily apjJroved of every measure fitted 
to promote its work. In his death the Society mourns the 
loss of a sincere friend and a valued helper. 

The receipts of the Society have been ^2,704.50 ; from 
the sale of books, $9,911.50; from donations, $9,606.75; 
from legacies, $21,097.12; from dividends and interest, 
$2,089.13. This excess above the ordinary i;eceipts of the 
Society is mainly owing to sfiveral legacies received during 
the year. 

The expenditures have been : for Bibles and Testaments, 
$14,043.29 ; donations to the American Bible Society, $8,406.- 
25; salaries of secretary, depository agent, assistant and 
^ colporters, $4,157.86 ; printing Annual Report, $188.50 ; rent, 
postage, and taxes, $498.47 ; freight, $131 ; fuel, advertising, 
insurance, wrapping paper, &c., $239.79. 

A colporter has been employed for several months in this 
city, and one in a portion of Cambridgeport and East Cam- 
bridge. Their time was largely spent among the foreign 
population, with whom their labors were abundant and useful. 

The Episcopal Churches tn the State have been visited 
during the year by the Rev. Mr. Slafter, and have made 
their accustomed response. 

There have been issued by the Depository, twenty-nine 
thousand one hundred and thirty-three volumes. Of this 
number, ten thousand five hundred and sixty-one were Bibles ; 
nine thousand six hundred and eighty-seven Testaments ; 
three thousand nine hundred and seventy Testaments with the 
Psalms ; and four thousand nine hundred and fifteen smaller 
portions of the Scriptures. The gratuitous issues amount 
to six thousand seven hundred and thirty-one volumes, and 
have cost $2,725.39. 



SERMON, 

BY EEV. WILLIAM M. TAYLOR, D.D. 



Pb. XTiii. 30. 

** The Word of the Lobd is tried. 



»f 



" The Word of the Lord " may mean either a single communica- 
tion made by God to men, or the aggregate of these communications 
in the Sacred Scriptures. In the verse before us it is probable that 
the Psalmist had in his view some special promise which his life's 
experience had verified ; but in the remarks which I wish to make^at 
this time, I shall take the phrase as descriptive of the Bible as a 
whole. The term "tried " denotes generally " put to the test; " but 
here it has involved in it the additional idea that the trial has been 
satisfactorily passed. When some great engineering work is fin- 
ished, a railway viaduct for example, it is subjected to a rigid test 
before it is opened for public traffic ; and when its strength has in 
this way been fully proved, it is said to be " tried.*' Now, David's 
life was, in some sense, such a trial of the Word of God. By his 
struggles, his sorrows, his emergencies, — yea, even by his back- 
slidings, — he had been, so to say, put forth, to test how great a 
strain the promises of God would bear ; and so, at the close of his 
career, he says in this, the even song of his day, " the Word of the 
Lord is tried." " It has stood firm with me in all my trials, and 
despite all my sins, therefore, let no one despair. That which has 
been so firm beneath the weight even of my sinful tread, will sup- 
port any one who trustfully ventures on it for himself." Thus 
interpreted, the verse of my text is an Old Testament parallel to the 
testimony of Paul when he says, "This is a faithful saying, and 
worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world 
to save sinners, of whom I am chief. Howbeit for this cause I 
obtained mercy, that in me first (that is not first in order of 

15 



16 

time, but foremost in respect of g^ilt, a sinner of the first rank), 
Jesus Christ might show forth all long suffering, for a pattern 
to them which should hereafter believe in him to life everlast- 
ing." But I do not dwell on this application of my text. I wish 
rather to bring out before you to-night the fact, that as David's 
experience proved the Word of God to be quick and powerful in 
respect to separate promises or portions of the Scripture, so the his- 
tory of these past eighteen hundred years has subjected the Bible as 
a whole to the test of manifold experiments, the results of which 
, most fully warrant us to say regarding it, " The Word of the Lord 
is tried." The field which is thus opened up for our survey is 
ample enough to afford material for many sermons ; for the present, 
we must content ourselves with the merest outline of its different 
sections. 

I, I observe then, in the first place, that the Word of God has 
been tried by the lapse of time, and has stood that test. This is 
wonderfully true, even in respect to the preservation of the text in 
which it is expressed. No ancient books in the Greek and Roman 
languages have descended to us, with any thing like so near an 
approximation to the form in which they came from their author's 
han'ds as the Bible has. It is true, there are many various readings 
in the different manuscripts ; but, considering the weary labor of 
the copyists, and the number of times the copies have been multi- 
plied, the wonder is that there are not many more differences than 
actually exist. Moreover, the variations which do occur, do not often 
affect the sense, and do not seriously endanger anyone of the funda- 
mental truths of our religion. In one or two cases, they may dimin- 
ish the number of proof-texts in support of a doctrine, but they do not 
shake the doctrine itself. Happily the means of verifying the truth 
of what I now say, has recently been put at the command oven of 
the English scholar by the publication of the Tauchnitz edition of 
the authorized version of the English New Testament, in wliich Tis- 
chendorf, the learned editor, has given at the foot of each page the 
English translation of the various readings in the three oldest Greek 
manuscripts in the world, the Vatican, the Alexandria, and the 
Sinaitic. A year or two ago, during a long railway journe}', I took 
that book with me, as my travelling companion. I- went over it, 
page by page, with the utmost care ; and when I had reached the 
close I laid it down with the deepest conviction that, though a re- 
vision of the Scriptures will be a great gain to the church, we have 
yet in the version which is in our hands substantially the same New 



17 

Testament, in almost every respect, that was in the hands of the 
primitive church. Thus, even in this literal sense, the Word of the 
Lord has stood the test of time. 

But in another way the Word of the Lord has been tried by 
the lapse of centuries, for it contains in it many predictions which 
the course of history has fulfilled. It is a perilous thing for a 
man to undertake to foretell future events ; and it is the more 
perilous the farther away he places the era of the fulfilment, from 
the date at which the prophecy is given. Mental shrewdness 
might, in some cases, forestall what shall be to-morrow, or next 
year, but it is God's alone to declare what shall be in the ages 
that are to come. The wider the span of the arch, the greater is 
the acknowledged skill of the architect; and the farther the ful- 
filment of a prophecy is from the time at which it was uttered, 
the more convincing is the argument that the prophet spoke by 
divine inspiration. Now there are many cases of such fulfilment 
of prophecy in the sacred Scriptures. I might here refer to the 
Messianic portions of the Old Testament, which find their historical 
counterparts in the Gospels and Epistles of the New ; but it may per- 
haps be more satisfactory to turn your attention to a series of pre- 
dictions which are having a portion of their fulfilment in the days 
in which we live. Take, then, the predictions of Moses in the 
twenty-eighth chapter of the Book of Deuteronomy, add to these our 
Lord's own solemn denunciations, warnings, and prophecies, as 
reported in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke ; then compare with 
them the annals of Josephus, and the history of the Jewish people, 
from the destruction of the lioly city down to the present age, and 
what a marvellous correspondence do we see between the two? 
The prophecy is a forecast epitome of the history ; the history is but 
an expansion of the prophecy. For each chapter in the annals of 
that remarkable people you may find an appropriate and descriptive 
heading, in one of the verses of the prophecy ; and as to-day we 
look upon the descendants of Abraham in the midst of us, and 
observe how, mingling among us, they are yet perfectly distinct from 
us, and how they are ready almost at a moment's notice to arise and 

* 

return to that land to which, through all their various vicissitudes, 
their hearts have ever turned with intensest longing, we see before 
us a living evidence of the truth, that this book is from God. Here 
is an arch spanning the whole historic age of the world, with one 
abutment resting on the Mosaic era, and the other reared upon our 
own, while the key-stone is in the words of Jesus Christ himself. 
Who built that arch ? Where shall we find the human skill that 



18 

can thus bridge over well nigh four thousand years ? Must we not 
therefore come to the conclusion, as we gaze upon it, that its architect 
was none otlier than He who reared the majestic dome of the starry 
heavens, and hung the earth itself in space ? Men ridicule and 
despise the Jew, but to me he has an interest that beloi\g3 to no 
other nationality ; and ever, as I pass him on the crowded street, 
and mark his well-known features, I feel myself sent back over the 
long history of his race, and am constrained to say, as I read this 
living volume of the evidences of the Bible, " The Word of the 

LoiiD IS TRIED." 

II. But I observe again, that the Word of the Lord has been tried 
by the progress of science, and has stood that test. In the sacred 
books of India, scientific theories have been so minutely propounded 
and so completely identified with religious revelations that they 
stand or fall together. Hehce the introduction of modern European 
science into the public schools of that land has destroyed the faith 
of educated Hindoos, and made them reject the books which their 
fathers reverenced, while yet they have not been led to accept the 
Word of God. But it has not been thus with the Bible. The ad- 
vancement of scientific knowledge among its readers has not, per- 
manently at least, affected their faith in its religious teachings. 
Occasionally, indeed, it has seemed that this result must of neces- 
sity be prpduced. Thus when Galileo turned his telescope to the 
heavens, and the Copernican astronomy began to be received as 
scientifically accurate, the authorities of tlie papacy fancied that 
they saw in all this the beginnings of antagonism to the Word 
of God, and fulminated their anathemas against the star-eyed 
science. Some, too, from whbm better things might have been ex- 
pected, joined in the malediction which was pronounced against it. 
At length, however, it was seen that it was not the statements of the 
Bible on astronomy that were affected by the new discoveries, but only 
the human interpretations of these statements; and ere long these 
interpretations were adjusted into such harmony with the facts of the 
solar system that all fear was removed, and the Christian could sing, 
only with more fervor and intelligence than ever, the beautiful words, 
" When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon 
and the stars, which thou hast ordained; what is man that thou 
art mindful him ? and the son of man that thou visitest him ? '' 

Given in the language of the common people, the IMble does not 
refer to scientific matters in such a way as to anticipate the dis- 
coveries of philosophers, and so proclaim them before the time; but 



19 

a8 the instance of astronomy has made clear, it speaks of them in 
such a way that its words, rightly interpreted, are found to be always 
abreast of tlie latest achievements of scientific men. At present, 
indeed, the apparent antagonism which was evoked at first by 
astronomy, has again emerged in the case of geology, the antiquity 
of man, the unity of the human race, and other similar subjects; 
but the result in the former issue ought to re-assure all perplexed 
spiritSj and bid them calmly wait until again it shall be demon- 
strated that the Bible is secure. The case stands thus between the 
opposite parties. The scientific man believes in the infallibility of 
nature ; the theologian believes in the infallibility of Scripture, and 
the differences lie not between nature and revelation in themselves 
considered, but between human interpretations of them. The man 
of science interprets the facts of nature in a certain way, and makes 
certain deductions from them, but these interpretations and deduc- 
tions are not infallible ; they are not yet received unquestionably 
and unanimously by scientific men themselves. It is too soon, 
therefore, to speak and act as if their interpretations of nature were 
absolutely correct. Ag.iin, the theologian's interpretations of Scrip- 
ture are by no means infallible. Many which were accepted in 
former days have been disproved ; and of many more it must be 
said that they are still uncertain. For instance, he would be a rash 
man who should assert that he has discovered, with infallible ac- 
curacy, the meaiMUg of the first chapter of Genesis, or who should 
affirm that he can satisfactorily unravel the chronology of the •early 
chapters of that book. The whole question of the interpretation of 
these chapters must still be regarded as sub judice ; and the wise 
course for both parties in this modern debate is to wait with mutual 
respect for each other until God, in his providence, and by his Spirit, 
shall lead to such interpretations of Nature and of Scripture as shall 
make manifest the harmony of both. Let the man of science go on 
with patient perseverance, and let him not take any mischievous 
delight in flinging his theories in a crude form at the Word of God. 
Let the theologian prosectlte his inquiries with diligence and de- 
voutness, and let him give over calling men of science by evil 
names. They seem sometimes to be working against each other; 
but when they have correctly completed their several departments 
of inquiry, it will be found that they have both been working for 
the truth. As, in the tunnel underneath Mont Cenis, the work- 
men began at opposite ends, and approached each other in apparent 
antagonism, only however to meet and congratulate each other 
in the middle over the completion of their glorious undertaking, 



20 

because they were both working on the plan of the same surveyor ; 
so I feel confident it will 3'et be with our theologians and men of 
science. God, the great Architect, is working through them both ; 
and by and by the mountain of difference which severs them from 
each other will be tunnelled through, no more to form a barrier to 
the progress of the candid inquirer. I cannot think, therefore, of 
Theology and Science as if they were to remain in perpetual antag- 
onism. They are elder and younger sister in the one family ; and 
though occasionally they may seem to be at variance and speak 
roughly to each other, let but some deep grief enter into the home, 
or some heavy calamity fall upon the dwelling, and forthwith the 
pride of the younger will be laid aside and the jealous}' of the elder 
will be forgotten, and science will find her place of rest and solace 
on the bosom of theology. The triumphs of the men of science 
are our victories too, for has not Paul said, " all things are 
YOURS " ? We may rest assured that truth in one department can 
never falsify that which has been ascertained to be true in another. 
Hence, from the experience of the past, I have no fear as to the 
future. To-day, again, the Bible is in the crucible. Let us calmly 
wait the issue, and anew it shall be said, this time with more 
meaning and fervor than ever before, *• The Word of the Lord is 

TRIED." 

IIL I remark, in the third place, that the Word of the Lord has 
been "tried by the eftbrts of its enemies, and has stood that test. 
One of the most brilliant of living English essayists has in his 
"Eclipse of Faith "given us a dream which he has called *Hhe 
blank Bible." He indulges in the imagination, that, on a certain 
day, all the Bibles in. existence, and all the quotations from the 
Bible in the works of authors^ became so much blank paper, and in 
a strain of the richest humor, now and then alternated with the 
deepest pathos, he shows how much our literature has been beholden 
to the W^ord of God. It was only a dream ; but if the wishes of some 
men had been granted, or if their efforts had been crowned with 
success, it might have been no dream, but a terrible reality. A 
lieathen emperor, in the pride of his power, declared that he would 
blot the name of Christian out of existence, and he did every thing 
that ingenuity could devise to carry his threat into execution ; but he 
passed away, and the liible and its believers remained. Centuries 
after, corrupt and miscalled Christian ecclesiastics and rulers did all 
that cruelty could think of to destroy the Word of God and those who 
valued it, but in vain ! How marvellously has God taken care of 



21 

' his own book ! I will venture to say, that if one half the zeal which 
has been shown by men to destroy this Bible had been exerted to 
put out of existence the work of any classic author of Greece or 
Rome, it would have been completely successful. What book has 
been so often burned as the Bible ? . By the hands of priests and 
bishops, and, that the ignominy might be more apparent, sometimes 
even by the hand of the common hangman himself, it has been 
thrown into the Are ; but alas ! for all mere human efforts it has 
been the Phoenix of the Eastern fable^ and, rising from its ashes, it 
has flapped its wings in proud defiance of their vain attempts. 
•Sometimes, in literal truth, it has seemed, as if at the very mo- 
ment God had protested against their folly and said to them, 
"Why will ye imagine a vain thing?" An instance of this sort, 
for the truth of which I can avouch, may here be narrated. Some 
twenty-six years ago, while I was attending the Theological Hall at 
Edinburgh, the Rev. Dr. Lindsay of Glasgow, one of my beloved 
professors, went as a delegate from the United Presbyterijin Clmrch 
to attend the Synod of the Evangelical Churches of France. The 
meeting was held in an obscure provincial town, the great majority 
of whose inhabitants were Roman Catholics, who, not relishing the 
assembly of so many Protestants in the midst of them, got up a 
mob, which, obtaining a French Bible, proceeded to the market place 
and burned it with every demonstration of noise and triumph. The 
following morning Dr. Lindsay went out with a French pastor, to 
look upon the scene of the riot ; and, as he turned over the ashes of 
the fire, he observed a small piece of paper, with blackened edges, 
among them. Picking it up, he was curious to see what was printed 
on it ; and, as he looked, he could scarcely read for tears. On the 
one side were these words, " that the trial of your faith, being much 
more precious than pold, though it be tried with fire might be 
found unto praise and honor and glory at the appearing of Jesus 
Christ." And on the other side those, " for all flesh is as grass, and 
all the glory of man as the flower of grass: the grass withereth, and 
the flower thereof falleth away, but ' the Word of the Lord endureth 
forever.'" It was as if God, in the " calm patience " of his divinity, 
thus silently protested against the madness of men, not only for 
their reproof, but also for the encouragement of his saddened people. 
Rea^l the history of the English Bible, with which the names of 
Tyndale and Coverdale are imperishably associated, and you will 
rise from its perusal not only execrating the tyranny and intolerance 
of men, but also adoring the goodness and faithfulness of God, who 
by his watchful care over his own Word did make " the wrath of 
men to praise him, and restrained the remainder thereof." * 



22 

Nor only from the malice of these, as we may call them, its exter- * 
nal enemies, has the Bible been preserved ; it has stood the assaults 
of infidelity directed against the truth of its contents. Like some 
impregnable fortress, in the hollows around wliich you may pick up 
the various missiles which one generation of assailants after another 
have hurled at it, while its hoary walls remain unbroken ; so the 
Word of God has withstood the attacks of manv successive armies of 
infidel objectors. The assailants have gone, the book remains. The 
arguments of the first infidels are now read only in the pages of 
the noble men who stood forth to make reply to them ; and, in more 
recent times, how many leaders have advanced to assail it, with* 
haughty boasting that it would speedily be defeated ! Now it is 
Voltaire, now it is Tom Paine, and now it is David Hume ; now it 
is Strauss, and now it is Kenan ; now a popular demagogue, like 
Bradlaugh, and now a sneering aristocrat, like the Duke of Somer- 
set; but somehow the Bible remains. It keeps its hold on men's 
hearts. It retains its place in the reverence and admiration of the 
best of the people. Again and again, in tlie estimation of its ad- 
versaries, it ought to have been demolished; but it will not die, 
because it partakes of the indestructibility of the God who gave it. 
My brethren, as we think of these recurring attacks on it, we are 
reminded of the motto of the French Protestants, surmounting an 
anvil which is surrounded by blacksmiths,* at whose feet lie many 
broken hammers ; it may be thus translated, — 

'* Hnmmcr away, ye rclwl bands ! 
Your hammers break, God'6 anvil stands." 

"The Woud of tiik Lord is tried." 

IV. But I observe, fourthly, that the Word of the Lord has been 
tried by the experience of its friends, and it has stood that test. 
And here, the difficulty is not what I shall got to say, but what I 
shall select, among the many things that press for utterance. The 
anxious sinner, in the crisis of awakening, when his iniquities stood 
like spectres before him and called for vengeance on his head, has 
tried it and entered through it into joy and peace. The earnest 
believer, steadfastly setting his face heavenward, has tried it, and 
has been led by it to the highest nobleness of cliaracter and the 
sternest integrit}*^ of principle. The desponding saint, walking 
through the valley of shadow, and crying in bitterness of heart, 
" Hath the Lord forgotten to be gracious ! has he cast me off for- 
ever?'' has tried it, and forthwith the lament has changed into a 



23 

song, " Why art thou cast down, my soul ? and why art thou dis- 
quieted within me ? hope thou in God : for I shall yet praise him, 
who is the health of my countenance, and my God." The poor man 
and the indigent, who knows not where to look for bread, and pines 
beneath the pressure of penury, has tried it; and* as he has read of 
Elijah at the brook, and of the manna in the desert, above all, as 
he has followed the footsteps of Him " who had nowhere to lay His 
head," he has been revived, and has gone forward in trust to find 
the help which was already provided for liim. The sick one lan- 
guishing in her chamber, and feeling her very weakness an agony, 
h^ tried it, and forthwith has turned her couch into a pulpit from 
which she preaclied to all around her of the sustaining grace and 
faithfulness of the Lord. The dying man, with eternity in view, has 
pillowed his head on the promises of this blessed Word, and, with the 
light of heaven's own glory on his face, he has fallen asleep in the 
possession of its peace. But what shall I more say ? for the time 
would fail me to tell how often it has been tried by the artisan in 
the workshop, and the merchant at his desk ; by the prisoner in the 
dungeon, and by the martyr at* the stake ; by the sailor in mid- 
ocean on the deck of the burning ship, and b}*^ the miner in the pit 
with the stifling deathdamp creeping up to him, or the narrow 
shaft falling together above him ; by the Christfan general on the 
battle-field, and the wounded soldier in the crowded hospital ; b}' 
the lone traveller in the African desert, and the poor stranger in a 
solitude as drear, treading the crowded streets of the great city. In 
every variety of scene and circumstance and experience, this Word 
has been tested by some believing soul ; and therefore we may surely 
say "The Word of the Lord is tried." 

But not alone in their own rich experience have the people of 
God tried his Word: they have put it to the test, also, by employing 
it as the means of benefiting and blessing the world. What has this 
book accomplished in the hands of our missionaries, and by the 
blessing of^God's Spirit? Go to the islands of the Southern Pacific 
and 3'ou will see. There, before the eyes of this very generation, it 
has been put to the proof; and in the course of little more than 
forty years, a whole community has been elevated, by its instru- 
mentality, from barbarism and idolatry, up to Christianity and civil- 
ization. And, among older communities, those nations lead the van 
whose people best know and love and obey the Word of God. The 
Bible has made Great Britain and America what they are to-day. 
In the diffusion of the Word of God, therefore, lies the hope of the 
world ; and the form which our thanksgiving for our own blessings 



24 

should assume is that of disseminating aifiong others the sacred 
Scriptures to which we owe so much. When, therefore, you are asked 
again to-night, to continue your efforts in behalf of the noble Bible 
Societ}', which is laboring not only in the spread of the Word abroad, 
but in its division at home, let your consecration of yourselves 
be worthy at once of the book, and of the blessings which it has 
brought to you. And if there be any here to whom as yet that 
Bible has been no bene^t, let me beseech them to give heed to it 
now! When the baronet of Abbotsford was dying, he asked Lock- 
hart, his son-in-law, to read to him. " What book shall I read ? '•' 
said Lockhart. " Can you ask ? " replied Sir Walter : " there is but 
one Book." And so Lockhart read to him from the Gospel by John. 
Ah ! friends, there is but one book that can tell you the way of life, 
and light your path for you through the world. That book is in 
your hand. You have been taught to read it. It is at your peril if 
you neglect it. Oh I it is an awful thing to have a Bible. Im- 
proved, it will guide you to heaven. Despised, it will bo the mill- 
stone round your neck to sink you deeper in perdition. Which is 
it to be with you ? 

Within this awful volume lies 

The mystery of mysteries ; 

Happiest they of human race 

To whom God has {^ranted grace, 

To read, to fear, to liope, to pray, 

To lift the latch and ope the way ; • 

But better had they ne'er been bom 

Who read to doubt, or read to scorn. 

Mav God add his blessing ! Amen. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY 
FORMED PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the Com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for carrying into 
effect the object of this Association ; which, being read from the 
Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with 
one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows ; viz., — 

• 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments, to bo distributed among all persons inhabit- 
ing within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others. 

2. The Society shall bo composed of all regularly settled clergy- 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who 
shall, in writing, request to be members; of every person who 
shall subscribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not less 
than two dollars, and who shall remain a member so long as ho 
continues the payment of that sum ; and of every person who shall 
subscribe and pay to the Treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars^ 
he remaining a member during life, without being obliged to further 
contributions. 



26 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the organi- 
zation of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained 
notice shall be given by the Committee, and also of the time and 
place of the meeting of the Society. 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet, and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treasurer, 
Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who shall 
continue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until suc- 
cessors are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen 
other members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom six 
shall be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a Board 
of Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among 
the members of the Society, a Committee of three persons, to con- 
tinue in office during the pleasure of the Board of Trustees, who 
shall have the management of the fund, and the distribution of the 
books procured, with it, subject and according to such regulations 
and directions as shall from time to lime be prescribed by the Trus- 
tees at any meeting held on public notice given as aforesaid ; and 
the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in his hands to the order of the 
said Committee. 

G. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to j 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes 
aforesaid, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into 
effect the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on 
regular notice given, for the due exercise of all the powers granted 
by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, or lie- 
cording Secretary', to devise and adopt such further measures as 
may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for effecting 
the intentions of the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the Trustees 
petitioned the General Court, and obtained the following 



27 

ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

In the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Whereas the persons hereafler named in this Act, together with man/ 
other citizens of this Cdmoionweahh, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund hy vohmtary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in common 
use in the churches in New England, for distribution among all persons in- 
habiting within the State and elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of 
others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects of said 
Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Society more 
.extensively diflused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an Act of 
Incorporation. 

Section 1. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Itepre- 
sentcUivesy in General Court assemhledj and by authority of thf same. That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D.D., the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D.D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Elipbalet Porter, D.D., 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D.D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D.D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., llie Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. Peter 
C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph Sewall, Red 
ford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, Esquires, 
the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. Samuel 
H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who may hereafter 
asiociatc, with them for the purposes aforesaid, be, and they hereby are, 
• incorporated into a Society, by the name of The Bible Society op 
Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted. That the said William Phillips, and others 
above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body corporate by 
the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legislature, and may 
have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said Society shall be 
capable of taking and receiving from any persons disposed to aid the be- 
nevolent purposes of this institution any grants or devises of lands and 
tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, bequests, and sub- 
scriptions of money, or other property, to be used and improved for the 
purposes aforesaid. 

Sect. 3. Be it farther enacted. That the said Corporation shall be, and 
hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other than 
that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the whole 
estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 



28 

Sect. 5. Be it Jurlher enacted^ That the said Society may cboose a Pres- 
ident, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such other 
officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such rules and 
regulations as to them shall appear necessary, provided the same be not 
repugnant to tlie constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted, That William Phillips, Esq., be, and he 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said So- 
ciety ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and place 
of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the same; 
may choose the ofRcers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and may vest 
in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by the said So- 
ciety, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable to the princi- 
ples of thb institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Approved by the 
Governor y Feb. 15, 1810. 



COMMONWEALTH OF M^VSSACHUSKITTS. 

In the jear Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-fire. An Act In addition to an Act to incor- 
porate the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Be it enacted by i\e Senate and House of Representatives^ in General Court 
assembled^ and by the authority of the same, as follows : — 

Section l. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of The 
Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafler be known by the 
name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name shall 
have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to all its 
liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had not been 
changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, and 
distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English language, 
in the same manner and to the same extent as thev are now authorized bv 
law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in common use in 
the churches in New England, any thing in the Act incorporating the said 
Society to the contrary notwithsUnding. — - Approved by the Governor, Feb. 
27, 1865. 



BY-LAWS. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 1851, the fol- 
lowing By-Laws were adopted : — 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act of 
Incorporation ; namely, " The raising a fund by voluntary contribu- 
tion to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches of New England, for dis- 
tribution among all persons inhabiting within the State and else- 
where, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot 
be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLB II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the State, may become a member of this Society by signi- 
fying his request in writing to that effect to the Recording Secretary, 
who shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become members, 
in a book kept for that purpose. 

« 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued ; and the Treasurer shall keep 
a list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE~IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than 
twenty dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the 
Society for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Eecording Secretary 



30 



ARTICLE V. 



The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen Vice- 
Presidents, Corresponding ^ Secretary, Recording Secretary, Treas- 
urer, and eighteen Trustees, and an Auditor. The President, 
Vice-Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secretaries, and 
Treasurer, shall each be ex-officio members of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and the Recording Secretary shall be the recording officer of. 
that Board. These officers shall all be chosen by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Boartl of Trus- 
tees; and he, and also the Vice-Presidents and Secretaries and 
Treasurer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such 
officers respectively. 

ARTICLE VIL 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of 
the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act of 
Incorporation is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the 
duties of all officers, dfrect the collection and appropriation of all 
funds and donations, and generally have and possess all the power 
and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the Society. It shall 
be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, to make and lay 
before the Society a particular Report of all their doings, with all 
such documents and vouchers as may bo asked for by any member ; 
and such Report shall be had and considered before the Society 
shall proceed to the choice of Trustees for the year then next 
ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the 
Monday preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year; and 
at this meeting it shall be competent to transact any business 
which the Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall 
be given by the Recording Secretary at least seven days before the 
holding thereof, by notice published in at least one newspaper in 
Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may^^be called at any time by 
the Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three news- 



81 

papers published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at 
such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as 
they may direct, or as the President may at any time call. Five 
Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually 
shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, a Com- 
mittee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE XIL 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them ; the Committee on Agencies shall have the dirQction of all 
matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the appoint- 
ment of all agents, subject to the approval of the Trustees, and the 
defining of their respective duties; the Comnaittee on the Deposi- 
tory shall have the management of all matters connected with the 
Society's Depository for the sale of Bibles, — all of said Commit- 
tees at all times, however, to be subject to the direction and 
control of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual 
meeting, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose by 
vote of a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE-:\IEMBERS. 

Each Life-Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the D%positor3^, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles 
and Testaments. 

N.B. — The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order; and they can be issued only 
for the current, not for j^'Jst years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE. 

BY THE PAYMENT OF TWENTY DOLLARS AND UPWARDS. 



Abbei Rev. Frederick R., Botton, 
Abbe, Mrs. Frederick R., *• 
Abbot, Charles H., Lowell. 
Abbott, Rev. Jacob J., Yarmouth^ J/e. 
Aborn, John G., Waktfield, 
Adams, Mrs. Catharine II., Conway. 
Adams, Miss ElLta M., WHbrahomi. 
Adams, Elizabeth W., Derry, N.ff. 
Adams, Frank N., Medway, 
Adams, John Clark, Hopkinton. 
*Adams, John Quinoy, Quiney. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., Boston. 
Adams, Stephen, jresi Medtoay. 
Adams, William, Brculford. 
*Aibree, John, Boston. 
♦Albro, John A., D.D., Cambridge. 
Albro, Mrs. Elizabeth S., WaUham. 
Albro, Mi«s Annie E., •* 

Alden, Almira S. C, Foxhoro\ 
Alden, Ebenczer, linndofph. 
*Alden, Mrs. Ann K., ^ 
Alden Russell, Campetto. 
Alden, Miris Sarah B., Randolph. 
Alden, Miss Susan, '* 

Aldrich, Mrs. Mary B., Wettboro*. 
Allen, Mrs. Cyrus, Franklin. 
Allen, Rev. Nathaniel G., Boston. 
Alien, Richard H., Braintree. 
Alvord, Alvin, ^elburne. 
Ames, James S., llaverhiU. 
Andrews, Artemas F., Ashby. 
Andrews, C. L., Boston. 
Andrews, George W., Dangers. 
Andrews, Stephen P., Gloucester. 
Andrews, W. T., Boston, 
Andrews, Thomas E., HoUUton. 
Andrews, Walter H., WhitinsvUle. 
*'Appleton, Samuel, Boston. 
*Appleton, WUliam, " 
Archibald, Edward, Methuen. 
Armes, Miss Clara A , Campello. 
Arms, BIrs. Charles, South Deerfitld. 
Arms, Harriet £. 



«( 



14 



Armsby, Mrs. H. A.', WhUinsvUle, 

Arnold, Susan O., Braintree. 

At wood, Mrs. Abby, Bergen^ N.J. 

Atwood, Mrs. Elizabeth M., Salem, 

Atwood, Edward S., Boston. 

Atwood, John W., Bergen, X.J. 

Avery, Rev. Wm. F., Conway. 

Baboock, Mrs. Nancy, Boston. 

Babcock, Mrs. P. W., Sherbom. 

Babcock, William R., D.D., Jiim/rfea Plain. 

Babson, Miss Maria R., Gloucester. 

Bachelor, Mrs. Mary A., WhitinsvilU. 

Bacou, George W., Neicton. 

Bacon, Jacob, Gloucester. 

*Bacon, Rev. James M., Ashby, 

Bacon, Joseph N., Xewton. 

Backus, Rev. Joseph W., Thomastont Ct. 

Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., Dorchester. 

Baker, iiYancis, Peabody, 

Baker, Susan S., '* 

Balcom, Lincoln, Winchen€lon. 

Baldwin, Miss Josephine L., Lynn. 

Balmer, WiUiam,Jun., WMHnsvUU. 

Ball, Miss Elizabeth, Concord. 

Bancroft, Amosa, Gardner. 

Bancroft, Henry L., Milbury. 

*Barber, Martin, Sherbom. 

Barber, Sally C, •' 

Barbour, William M., D.D., Bangor , Me. 

Barbour, Mrs. Eliza A., " 

*Bardwell, Lieut. Charles S., }rhaMy. 

Barker, Uiram, Brighton. • 

Bardsley, Joseph, WhitinsvUle. 

Barnard, William F., Mafiboro'. 

Barnes, H. II., Lowell. 

♦Barnes, William, Marlboro'. 

Barnes, Zilpah, nenniker, N.II, 

Barrett, Nathan U., Concord. 

Barrett, Miss Rebecca M., " 

Bartlett, Rev. Edward O., PUt^ld, 

Bartlett, Mrs. Eleanor C, Plymouth. 

Bartlett, Thomas, Boston, 

Barrows, Rev. Justin S., N.E, Cot^ference. 



Buimin, Ifn. AdallBe E., S. K. Conf. 
BuTowi, Sarah il lotrriUc. 
Buaett, AbEeJ UridgeirattT. 
Baiietl, Hporr ffaeton. 
BuKIl.Un. LucrelUC. CAorfowni. 
BuHit, iiBfsh K., A'eiribHniport. 
baldielder, U». Eliiatwlb H., Ptaio^. 
BBtchtltler, Joba M , HoOStoa. 
BMClieUer, Eira. jVort* lirovkfleld. 
Batelieller.Mrt. UibcmC, *' 
Batdiolor, M[aa Fnano A., triOlinniUi. 
Balebelor, .Strpbcn F., " 

Ball. U«T. IVUllain J., Ltomintter. 
•Batl.Un.]lH7D., 
•Baylcy, kobett, Ntwbaryport. 
BmI, Aleiander, Jfaiiun. 
Bu],1Irt.TAul>a, -i>Aajie<. 
Bcali, Iiaac ^^, Camptllo, 
Bean, Cyrua Bcede, /Juwr, JT./r. 
•Bcaue, Kcv. liamurl. .Vurton. 

Be«n«, >IJ99 UKve A., Cm(rm'U(. 



Bwlw, Fraiicca L., " 

BeetiF. ):^HHnli-, 

Becbe, Uary L., 

UcechBT, Key. Charles, OeorgetoicH. 
BhcIiit. Kcv. WtLUam H.. .Vo. UroolfftOd. 
Bcldca, an. Msiiannc P., triuUtlf. 
Bcldvn, WllltaiD V. Uurrtiwr. 
Bc.kDSp,Jli-.>^iinbaU- J'-ramlnghan. 
ileaaa. lliimliuni U., /.uuwlf. 



BlUiiiga, CharluJi Sfrtm. 
UUb] . H». .1 . 1'., Xvrmiad 
Blaclutone, Mra. LyaUi k^., Ckater, 
Blake, Monliuer, U.l>.. lU'inl..n. 



BIIh, Uev. UtiorlttK K., H:,hjlM. 

BlliH, lira. Cliarlti R., 

Blodgvtr. Ilrujainiii C, Xfrlan. 

Blailgetl, liluu-uu, Sualh iMerjIeliL 

Bloul. Ujrus W., iriucAeitar. 

BlDud, I.f luad, <iiat.m. 

Bwlviill, IIi'V. Jowph C., Il-irl/itnl, Q-ni 

BodwfrU, Mm. Catharluv, 

•Band, Uwjrjw, Jioil-m. 

Bootli, Ciiurli-^ U., CAimfM-. 



Bnckeit, Lvniucl. 



■Breed. Utv. WLllL.iin.r Ratinluiia. 
Brcoer, Cyrul, Dmloti, 
Br««cr, Mr». C. P., " 
Brewer, John S., 
[Iricktll, Fraiiklln, naeerkUI. 
Brlgga.UlMC'aiharlne Clark. WaAam. 
Brlggi, KcT. WlUiam T., Eatt Douglat. 
Brigna, Ifn. Abb/ L., 
BrlBbam,ltexlerP., Wtttbon^. 
Brighnm, Urt. Ueiiirl-., ■' 
*l<rlgliam, Ilev. WUlanl, VlniAciidDB. 
Bn»k,&abflrtO., irAl«B((*J«. 
•Bromlleld Elliabelh, Iloitm. 
Broulu, »ei C. S.. Soul\ nt*rM<l- 
'Oruoki. I'elcrC., £o»foii. 



Brown, Un. Uarrivl L., UoitoK. 
UrowD, ICebucca, WhiUatvUtt. 
Hrowu, Joseph, Qrotoa. 
UrowD, lira. Mary L., aavirhla. 
Kronn, Itubert K , IFHainieUle. 
Urranl, SoIod, 

Itudilln, SliuOD S., AnMl-liM. 
UuuU, Gi'orge C, Si>rl«i[iicM. 
Bulkley, lira. C. K, I'liiUiburgh, ,V. Y. 
Bullanl, Mrs. .lohu, Juu., Medwan. 
Bullard, Ur>. Mary W., Shtrbura. 
iturbi'ck. ^aniuul K., J^niton. 

iturnhaiu, Hubert W., Enar. 

Burr. Charii'i C. ^VinnuAitc. 

Burrage, J. ii., Benton. 

Burr»ps .loiepb, ArUagton. 

Buirage, MarjC, 

Burnll, Amo. C, fxtri-ise. 

•BurHII, Henry, jun, K,M AMagton 

1(t»1i. IKoiry .1 WalfitU. 

Buahby, Sophia W.. i'oitndy. 

Buller, Her, Daniel, Jlatum. 

Bu1h!r,M».JanvI>., " 

Cndy, Uaniel U,. J).l»., Artingloa. 

Caily, lira, llurrlel X., 

C.iUvfell, Iter. W. K., Ilsaaaii. 

Ct,:a\\ deorge, Stntth llnJleg Kill: 

C»i.lli, Siirjiuf]. Si.ri„-,fl.A.I. 



leiuu, <ieoDtc II., ILiverhill. 
[wnlcr. i!ev. Cariiu C , l!-«-l m. 
pi-iiier, ralliarluB K,, t'-i^iiru', 
peuier, Daniel, 
ptM[rr. l-:.l>c>n, 
penler. Iluruce, 



34 



Carr» Charles R., WhiHfuviOe. 

Can*, John C, West Xewbury. 

Carrier, Rev. A. U., MinneapoliBt Min, 

Carruthcrs, Kev. WUliam, Danvert. 

Carter, Edward, Andover, 

Carter, Joshua T., Whitintville. 

Carter, William H., Lmcdl. 

Cary, George C., N. Bi-itlgewattr, 

Cary, Mr«. Mary D , Foxboro\ 

Case, Mrs. Mary Olive, New York City. 

Caswell, Lemuel E., Boston. 

Cate, Georgiana W., Haverhill. 

CHamberUn, John, WhUinsvUle. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel, Westbar</. 

Chandler, Miss Frances E., Andovtr. 

Chandler, U. U., Chnrlestown. 

Chapln, Caleb T., Northboro\ 

Chapiu, John O., WhUiMviUe. 

Chapln, Josiah L., Lawrence. 

Chapin, Marcus, Monson. 

Chapln, Milo, Springfield. 

Chapin, Miss Sarah, WhitinsvUle. 

Chapman, George II., Winchetter. 

Chase, Ann Maria, HaverhiU, 

Chase, Charles W., " 

Chase, David B., Whitinsvillet. 

Chase, George S., HaverhiU. 

Chase, Hezelciah, Lynn. 

Chase, Hezeliiah S., Boston. 

Chase, Robert, HaverhiU. 

Cheever, Ira, Chelsea. 

Child, Miss Anna G., SpHngfield. 

Child, G6orge 11., Springfield, O. 

Child, Mi»» Lucy A., Thct/ordy Vt. 

Childs, Carlos, Ucnnikert N.H. 

Childs, Horace, *< 

Choate, David, M.D., Salem. 

♦Clap, James, Dorchester. 

Clap, Mrs. Rebecca, Boston. 

Clapp, Jamejt B., 

dapp, John C., 

Clapp, Samuel, Foxhoro\ 

Clark, Rev. Edward L., Kew Haven, Conn. 

Clark, Elbridge, Etist Medway, 

Clark, George, Concord. 

Clark, James G., Andover, 

Clark, John L., " 

Clark, Jonathan, Winchester. 

Clark, Rev.*Jo8eph B., Jamaica Plain, 

Clark, Julius L., West Newton. 

•Clark, Rev. L. F., WhitimvUle. 

Clark, Mrs. Miranda D., Bi>ston, 

Clark, Miss Nelly, Sherbom. 

Clark, Oliver R., Tewksbury. 

♦Clark, Rev. P. K., Charltmont. 

Clark, Rowse R., Whitinsvil^e. 

Clark, Rufus W., D.D., Albany, N. T. 

Clarke, Mrs. Adeliza U., Medicay. 

Clarke, Dorus, D.D., Boston, 

Clarke, Francis, Haverhill. 

Clarke, George E., Falmouth, 



t« 



<• 



Clarke, Mrs. Sarah L., Botton. 

Clary, John, Conway. 

Clary, Mrs. S. 8., Wareham. 

Cleaveland, Miss Harriet A., S. DeerfieJd. 

Cleavcland. li^iss Sarah L., ** 

Cleavelaud, Waldo, South Deerfleld, 

Clifford, Wyatt B., Chatham. 

Clough, John K., Cambridgeport, 

Cobb, Andrew B., Newton. 

Cobb, Jacob, Ahington, 

Cobb, Rev. L. H., Springfield, Vt, 

♦Cobb, Richard, Boston, 

♦Codman, Charles R., '* 

Codman, Mrs. Catharine, " 

Coe, Laura E., WhUinscille. 

Coe, Mary A., East Douglas. 

Coggin, Rev. Willium 8., Boxford, 

Coggswell, Caleb, Essex. 

Cogswell, Doane, Bradford, 

Cogswell, Ebenezcr, Ipswich. 

Colby, Albert, Boston, 

Colby, Barak, Henniker, N. H, 

Cole, Asa, West Me/Uoay. 

Cole, Miss Ella A., A fed way. 

Cole, John A., *• 

Cole, John, Westmoreland, N.H. 

Conant, Charles E., WincheMer. 

Conant, Jennie A., Gardner. 

Conn, Horace, Wobum. 

Cook, Asa, Newton. 

Cook, Henry A., Whitimwilte. 

Cook, Mrs. Maria R., Uxbridge, 

Cook, J. Sullivan, Whitinsville, 

Cooley, Mrs. Olive F, Charlemont, 

Cx>olidge, Rev. Amos H., Leicester, 

Coolidge, Joseph, Boston. 

Coolidj^^e, Lowell, Shcrborn, 

♦Coolidge, Mrs. Catharine, " 

♦Copp, Joseph A., D.D., Chelsea, 

Copp, 3Irs. Fedora F., •• 

Cordley, Mrs. Lydla G , Lawrence, 

Corey, Mrs. Mary, Westboro*, 

ComiMh, Mrs. Elizabeth B., CentrevilU. 

Cor«on, John, Harerhill. 

Cousens, Beulah F., Newton Centre. 

Cowdrey, Robert, Winchoter. 

Crafts, 3Irs. Sarah P., Newton, 

Crawford, Ellen A., Bnrre. 

Critteudeu, MUs Rebecca S., Charlemont, 

♦Crittenden, Simeon, •* * 

Crockett, Mrs. Eliza A., Harerhill. 

Crosby, Wilson, Centreville. 

Crosby, Mrs. Eleanor L., ** 

CrOsby, James, Boston. 

Crosby, Mrs. Rebec<;a, *• 

♦Cruickshanks, Mrs. Anna M., Spencer, 

Cruicksbanks, J. DeWitt, Rockford, III. 

Cruickshanks, Miss 3Iary S., •• •' 

Cruickshanks, Miss Mary, Chelsea. 

Cruikshanks, George, Whitiwfville, 

Cumings, Charles H., Harvard. 



' 35 



Cunningham, Mn. John, Oloucuttr. 
Cunier, Uev. Albert 11., Lynn. 
CurtU, Abner, East Abinyton, * 

Cushman, George U., North BridgtwaUr, 
Cnshman, Mrs. Rachel B., " 

Cushman, Joseplf I., New Uraintres, 
Cutler, Rev. Calvin, Auburn'lai€. 
Cutler, Kev. Elijah, Boston. 
CuUer, Rev. Samuel, Hanover. 
Cutter, Charles A., Wnltham. 
Cutter, J. Dana, •• 

Cutter, E., M.D , Wobum. 
Cutter, Stephen, Winchester. 
Cutter, Stephen H., " 
Dakin, Thomas L., Sudburg. 
Dame, Henry, Penbotly. 
Damon, Albert P., Reading. 
Damon, 31 rs. Edward C, Concord. 
Dana, Mrs. Edward, Ipswich. 
*Dana, Samuel, BosVm. 
Dana, Charles U., Wellesley. 
Dane, John, Brookliiie. 
Dane, John H., ** 

Daniell, Mrs. Eliza B., East Medwa^. 
'^Daniell, Otis, Boston. 
Daniels, El^ah R , East Medway. 
Daniels, 3Irs. 3Iariam W., East Afedway. 
Daniels, 3Irs. William, Medway. 
Davis, Alfred N., N. Andorer. 
Davis, Alvah 31., HaverhUl. 
Davis, Henry L., lirad/ord. 
Davis, George L., North Andover. 
Davis, James, Boston. 
*Davis, John, Methuen. 
Davis, John, Somerville. 
Davis, Joshua H., " 
Davis, Lydia K., Dunstable. 
Davis, 3Irs. M. A., Medioay. 
Davis, 3Iiss 3rary U., Concord. 
Davis, Rev. Perley B., Hyde Park. 
Davis, lliaddeus Uriah, DnnsUdtle. 
Davison, George W., Whitinsville. 
Dawes, Rev. tbenrzor, Diyhton. 
Day, 3Iilton B., Bradford. 
Day, Robert L., Newton. 
Dean, 3Iis8 Abbie T., Foxboro^. 
Dean, Clara L., Holhrook. 
Denham, Rev. George, Beverly. 
Deuham, 3Irs. Clara D., " 
' Dickerman, Rev. L) zander, Quincy, III. 
Dickson, Oliver, Concord. 
Dickson, Mrs. Sarah C, " 
Dix, Mrs. Elijah, Boston. 
Dix, Samuel F., Netoton. 
Doane, Heman S., Charlestoian. 
Dodd, Rev. Stephen G., St. John, N. B. 
*Dodge, Rev. John, North Drookfield. 
Dodge, 3Irs. Ann S., " 

Dodge, Mrs. J. M. C, Andover. 
Doggett, Rev. Tho8\, Niagara FaUt, N. T, 
I>oggett, Mrs. Frances L., 



it 



Doggett, William, Niagara F<dU, N. 7. 

Doliber, Miss Sarah Lixzle, Afarblehead. 

*Dorr, John, Boston. 

Dorr, Samuel, ** 

*Dow, Josiah, " 

Dowse, BIrs. Carrie, D., Sherbom, 

*Dow8e, Edward, Dedham. 

Dowse, Elizabeth R. L , Sherbom. 

Drake, Rev. EUis R., Middlrhoro*. 

♦Dudley, P. W.. WhUintviUe. 

Dudley, Mrs. Sarah A., '* 

Dunham, Charles H., Winchester. 

Dunham, Mrs. Mary L., ** * 

Dunlap, Sumner, South DeerJMd. 

Dunton, Hiram P., Spencer. 

Dunn, Edward H., Boston. 

Durfee, Rev. Chas. Stoddard, Troy, N. T. 

Durgin, James, West Newbury. 

♦Dutch, M. Elizabeth, Boston. 

Dutton, 3Ir8. Mary J., ** 

Dwinell, Leonard, MiUbury. 

Dyer, Rev. E. Porter, Shreicsbury. 

Dyer, Mrs. 3Iaria D., Oloucester. 

Eager, William, Boston. 

Eames, 3Irs. Nancy, Sherbom. 

Eames, Warren, \Viluiington. 

♦Eastburn, Rt. Rev. 3(anton, D.D., Boston, 

Eastman, Rev. Lucius R , Jr., Framingham. 

Eastman, Mrs. Jane C, N. E. Conf. 

Eaton, 3Irs. Ann E., Wakejteld. 

Eaton, Eben, Framingham. 

Eaton, Edward, Afedway. 

Eaton, Miss 3Iartha W., Fitchburg. 

Eaton, Lucian, South Deerfidd. 

Eaton, \Villiam, Boston. 

Eaton, W^illlam J., Westbord'. 

Eddy, Joshua, East Middleboro*. 

Edwards, Sirs. Frances S., Dedham. 

t^dwards, Frederick B., N. Chelmsford. 

Edwards, Maria F., " 

Edwards, Nathan B., " 

Edwards, Nathan F., *' 

Edwards, Sybil R., " 

Edwards, Victor E., " 

Eldred, Lorenzo, Falmouth, 

♦Eliot, Samuel, Boston. 

♦Eliot, Samuel A., •* 

Elliott, Robert, Olohe VUlage. 

Ellis, WiUard K., East Medway. 

Ells, Mrs. Elizabeth W., Oberlin, O. 

Ellsworth, Rev. A. A., Waterloo, Iowa, 

Ellsworth, Mrs. A. G. C. C, •* 

♦Elwell, Robert, Boston. 

Emerson, Annie A., Lancaster. 

Emerson, Miss Ellen T., Concord. 

Emerson, Frances V., Lancaster, 

Emerson, Jacob, Jun., Methuen. 

Emerson, Mrs. Jacob, " 

Emerson, R. V. C, Newton. 

Emerson, William, Wettboro^. 

Emery, George F., ** 



it 



36 



Emery, Mrs. Harriet, North Wtjfmouth. 

Emery, Rev. Joahua, ** 

Emery, Mrs. Mary« Chatham, 

Emery, Mrs. 8arah M., Kewburyport. 

♦Everett, Edward, Boston. 

Ewing, Rev. Edward C. Enfield. 

Fairbanks, Ilcrscbel, Haverhill. 

Fairbanks, Herschel P., *' 

♦Fairbanks, Stepben, Bonton. 

Fairbanks, Tirootby R., Medwny. 

♦Farnsworth, Mrs. Abel, Oroton. 

Famsworth, Ezra, Boston. 

Farr, Alba A., Methuen, 

♦Farwell. Stephen T., CambrUlge. 

Faxon. Miss Rachel A., Braintree, 

Fay, Mrs. Addison Q., Concord. 

Fay, Charles IL, WhitineviOe. 

Fay, Cyrus, Westboro*. 

Fay, Josiah C, Hopkinton. 

Fay, 8. A., Weatboro*. 

♦Fayerweather, Mn. Sarah A., Weet- 

boro*. 
♦Fearing, Albert, Boston. 

♦Fearing. Mrs. Albert. *• 
Fearing, Mrs. Maria A., So. Weymouth. 
Felch. I:»aac, Naiick. 
Field, Jolm W., Boston. 

Field. Mrs. Amelia C, '* 
Field, Joel, Mittinetigue. 
Field, Mrs. Edwin, yewtonville. 
Fisher, Mi^s ^-lliza, Medway. 
Fisher, 3Irs. Lewis, Kant Medway. 
Fisher, Milton M., Afedwny Villnye. 
Fisher, Samuel T., Canton. 
Fitike, Daniel T., D.D., Ntwburyport. 
Fiske, George B., Jloiliston. 
Fiiiko, George T., N&ohuryport. 
Fiske, Mary FideUa, " 
Fitch. John A., Hopkinton. 
♦Fitz, Duulel, D.D , Jpawich. 
Fitz, Mrs. Hannah B. D., •' 
Fitz, Daniel, jun., 
Fitz, Daniel F., 

Flagg, Kev. Kufus C, North Andover. 
Flanders. Joseph, JlavcrhiU. 
Fletcher Ephraiiu S., WhitirisciUe. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Emma A., " 
Fletcher, Mrs. Emily M., " 
Fletcher, James, 
Fletcher. Mrs. L. M., 
Fletcher, Lewis C, 
Fletcher, .Samuel J., 
Fletcher, Mrs. Hannah C, Manchester. 
Fletcher. Isaac W., Stoic. 
Fletcher. Nancy B , •' 
Fletcher, liev. Jnme.H, Groton. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Lyilia M., " 
Fletcher, .Stillniun, Winchester. 
Fletcher. Wliliam, 
Flinn, Mr*. I'aulina, Wobttrn. 
Flint, Mrs. Hannah, Peahody. 



«• 



It 



ii 



(I 



«< 



ft 






Flint, Levi M., SUmghion. 

Flint, Thomas, Danvere. 

FloycT, Miss Mary J., Peabody. 

Folger, Allen, Concord, N.H, 

Forbush.WiUlam, WhitinevUle. 

Fork, Kev. George, Ver$SUe»f N. T. 

♦Ford, Tliomas A., Boston. 

Ford, Thomas A., North Bridgewater, 

Ford, Mrs. Eliza C, " 

Fosdick, Charles, Oroton. 

Fosdick. Frederick, " 

♦Fosdick, Rose, " 

♦Fosdick, .Samuel W., " 

Fosdick, Miss Mary, " 

♦Foster, Rev. Aaron, E. Charlemont. 

Foster, Rev. Addison P., MtUden. 

Foster. Mrs. Hattie D., " 

Foster. Mrs. Eliza C., Rowley. 

Foster, Mrs. Harriet L., Witiehendon. 

Foster, Mrs. Mary, Palmer. 

♦Francis, Ebenezer, Boston. 

Frankle. Mrs. Jones, Haverhill. 

French, Mrs. Harriet S., Taunton. 

Frothin<{ham, A. T., Cambridge. 

FulKrton, Rev. Bradford M., Ptdmer. 

Furbcr, Rev. Daniel L., Newton Centre. 

Furber, Mrs. Maria B., " 

Gage, Gawin K., Woburn. 

Gale. Rev. Wakefield, Easthampton. 

♦Gale. Mrs. Wakefield, 

Gale, Justin Edwards, *' 

Gallot, Nathan, Oroton. 

Galloup, I>avid R., Peabody. 

Gammel, Kev. Screno D.. Boxford. 

Gardner, WUlie F., Gardner. 

Garrette, Kev. Edmu'ud Y., JAicrosse^ Wis, 

Garrctte, Mrs. Franzenia W., *• 

Garrette, Flora Gertrude, 

Garrette, Mary Spring, * 

Garrctte, Sarah Arabella, *' 

Gates, Henry C , Chicopee. 

George, Mrs. Ellen K. , " 

Gibson, Mrs. Luther, Groton. 

Gibb^, George L., WhUinsvillt. 

♦Gibbs, Mrs. 3Iary, Boston. 

Gilbert, Benjamin I^., " 

Giles, Mrs. Elizabeth W., RockpoH. 

Giluian. Miss Rebecca I., tioMon. 

Gleusou, Charle.s A., \ew llrnintree. 

Gleason, Rev. (ieorge L., Manchester. 

Glcasou, Mrs. Charlotte A., " 

Gleuaon, liev. J. F., Wlltiam^burg, 

Gleu-son, Mrs. Olive M., •• 

Goodell, H. Augustus!, Whitinsrille. 

Goodwin, A. E., Wfst Ameshnrtf 

Gonlon, .Sumtiol J., B».<fon, 

Gordon, .Mr». Rebecca, '• 

Gordun, Jeannie, '' 

Gott, J. R.. Rockport. 

Gough, Herbert D , Worce^der. 

Gough, John B., Doylston. 



«< 



OiMgh, Kn. ittTj E., fiovUtim. 

Qoold, Krs SBmh W., irwitom'. 
Ooursu, Ulna Abby II., Concord. 
Goorgw Ml8> Hargsret U., " 
•GnnI, Uoifi, ADitnn, 
Gnisie, ReT. Thomin G., AppHon, Wii. 
Gnrtt. Mri. Amuidi K., SundtrJand. 
•Grar, rr»Dd< C, liailoH. 
•Gray, Beorr, 

Grif, John C.. " 

Gray, WUKun, flo/aiwt. 
Greelar, Rev, EdwMil »., HavtrhUl, If.H. 
Gr«e1e7, Un. EdwwTl H., " " 

•Greene, Eei. J. S. C<>pl«T. Brooatiit. 
Grseoe, !te.. Blchsril U., aprli^0M.l. 
Onenwood, CIibt);? H., Gardner. 
Greenwood, Hn. Snlly K., Sherl.am. 
Grcfory I^■l■ Ls» H . jr«( -ImMturji. 

Origg«, Gblrlea D., Walborg'. 
Grlggi, Samuel, " 

Grini, Mn. 8. M., " 

». CnroUne. Foibom'. 



Cultirn 



■!, ChorU 



ud D., 



IlHle, D. Fruk, Chicoiirf. 

Hale, E. J. U., aarcrhill. 

Hale, Un. K.J. M., " 

Hall. Rev. AHen J., iMittvlOe. 

Hall. Mr*. Joseph F., Orotan. 

Hall. Xra. Sanh A., iMimtillt. 

Ham, lira. Calharlne K.. mafhrUrr. 

HamblBton, Rev Wiill.ni.F lyoretiltr. 

Hamlllon, Itcv 11. ]•., Iloalan. 

Hamllloa. E. D., Conteay. 

llumli-n, Itvv, i';.-i)r^'c Si. TOarilan. 

•namnutl, Mn. Uair, Hotlon. 

Hammond, Ker. WUIiain B., AeuHmH. 

Hammond, Xn. Lonlie H., 

fiardn Irk. Thomas, Quincn. 



Hardy Trun 



e, Ber. (iea 



a.Th<m 



n,0. 



Rayward, Hbi Clara, BrabilrK. 

Ilayward, ELIm, 

Hayward, MluHattleL., JriiUlnnlUe. 

llayoiTd, Paul, Alibg. 

!!aviv,„),l. llri-, Ellialwth C, J^anUln. 

Haiel, Mn. Sarah L., Olouatlfr. 

Hsilewood, Hr>. A. M., Evertlt. 

IhHilW. livv. 1' C. Button. 

Ileatey, Bev. Joaeph W., JT. Orliam, La. 

'Heard, ,Ioli». Ipta-i-h 

ll.m.-ui.uv .Mi" llnrrifl. Orofoii. 

Heaibaw, Ftands, Button. 

Henihaw, Hra. Sarah W., " 

Uenahaw, Lanra, 

Ill-nick, Hvv WIUinmD., Onrdnlr. 

Hetiey, Jacob, Foxboro'. 

Heraey, Mn. Folly, mngham. 

Hevrlni Ura. Annellv P., Faxbvn'. 

Ilewins.LcvlE., 
HeKlna,JljgaI.uuJ«uE., 
yewhl, jD'eph, A'f>rU Jtridffeieaiert 
Heywood, Manila W Oardner. 

IKgcinBOn, Stephen, Jun., Boilon 
Hildrtlh. «r«. Mary R , OroloH. 
Iim, Kev (ieorse E . SouUiporl, Conii. 
*IJIll. Heory, Boiton. 
HUl,JDlham, Voburn. 



HUton. WlllUm, liriuir-in 



V. liiil^i.s K., MMud 



Ilartsh 

Harlivfll. I,tp|llv E., Grolon. 
Bafkell, William P., JVorM SrooAKtU. 
Baakini, Myrick, laktrUlt. 
Haatlngi, Hotii!, J^wnfn^k'im. 
•Baleh, Benjamin, K,itl Fntmaulh. 
Ealeh, Anna S., Itraiiford. 
Batch, Well man WlUey, ..IfjUiuim, A^S. 
Batch, Slra. C'airle L., ■■ " 

.. Canptlh. 



HBTcn, Kev 






forge M„ BrimlMd. 



■Kolbr 



k, K. Evei 



nolbmoi. 



Holbrook. Mr*. Jenny M , " 

all. arnfUm. 
KaUand, Mn. Sarah £., Batmi. 
Holland, Mary Cecilia, A'ortA Brtdgtwattr. 

jBcobP., MiUnt. 

,es, Abtel, D.D., CimUHdge. 

rh-tltrt, 10. 



Holm 
•Holmi 



llo 



9, Mb 



MltaPaanyD., ATorfe 

e W Bridgemltr. 
ealllif A , CampOio. 



Hollon, Tbomai S., trineliater. 
"omer, Chailei W., Camb^gt. 

ooker, George H. Si.HTlwm. 
Hooker, Mn. Martha V., BoitOH. 
*Hoopar. Uobert, " 

Hoppio, Ker. Jame) M. , ATeio fldHD, Conn 
" uwr, Mlti Kllia, CV>ficf>rd. 



38 



Howard, Gary, Narih Bridgewattr, 

Howard, David, ** 

Howard, Mrs. H. Frances, ** 

Howard, Mrs. Matilda P., " 

Howard, Ker. Martin S., WUbraham. 

^owe, John, North BridgeuxUer, 

Howe, Martlia L., Gardner. 

Howe, Samuel A., Westboro*. 

Howes, Mrs. Caroline H., CharUmont, 

Howes, Collins, Chatham, 

Howland, Mrs. Hannah M., Contcc^, 

Hoyt, Henry, Boston, 

Hoyt, Mrs. Maria, FramingJiam. 

Hoyt, William H., Boston. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Charles A., Concord, 

Hubbard, Cyrus M., Sunderland, 

Hudson, 8arauel, Vxhridge. 

Hulbert, Charles, Boston, 

Humplirey, Daniel, North Weymouth. 

Hunt, Mrs. Jerusha B., Whitinsville. 

Huntington, Matilda C, Peabody. 

Burd, Francis I'., Wakejield. 

Hutchins, Caroline M., Ifett/ord, 

Hutchins, William E., Lowell. 

Hutchins, 3Iaria J., " 

*Uyslop, David, Boston, 

Ide. Rev. Jacob, Jun., Mansfield. 

Ide, Mrs. Jacob, Jun., '* 

Jackman, Sirs. Sutsan M., Medway. 

Jackson, Mi»s Caroline U.. Newton, 

Jackson, Henry W.j-Boston. 

Jackson, Lnura E. L., *' 

*Jackson, James, " 

•Jackson, Patrick T., *• 

Jackson, Walter, Brookline. 

Jamef^on, Kev. Kphrnim O , EoMt Medway. 

Jeffries, Miss Catharine Amory, Boston. 

Jenkins, Mrs. Maria L., New Betlford. 

Jennison, Rev. Jor<eph F., Canton. 

Jeplison, Miss C. R., Brookline. 

Jewett, Henry, Pepperell. 

Johnson, Charles G., Bradford. 

Johnson, Mrs. Emma E., *' 

Johnson, Fraucin. JVinrhcster. 

Johnson, Peter R., IloUUton. 

Johnson, Bli.ss licbccca, North Andover. 

Johnson, Mrs. 8. W., Framinghnm, N.IT. 

Jones, Augustus T., North BrUlgewcUer. 

Jones, Henry E., HoUUton. 

Jones. Joseph, Holbrook. 

Joslin, Mrs. A. L., Oxford. 

Joy, Mrs. Abigail, Boston. 

Judd, Rev. Burtis, Westbor<P. 

Judd, BIrs. Rebecca Ann, " 

Judson, Mrs. Mary C, Uxbridge. 

Jttdson, Willard, " 

♦Keep, N. C, Boston. 

Keith, Adelbert F., Campello. 

Keith, Albert, 

Keith, Azra B., 

*Kelth, Charles, North Bridgewater. 



t« 



(< 



Keith, Edward Everett, Bridgew iter, 
Keith, Preston B., Campello, 
Keith, Ziba C, •• 

Kelly, George Reed, Haverhill. 
Kelton, George, Gardner. 
Kempton, Mrs. Ellen, Grafton. 
Kendall, Mrs. Abel M., Boston. 
Kendall, Mrs. Mary E., Jflnchester. 
*KendaU. WiUiam, WhUinsvUU. 
Kendrick, John, ffaverhUl. 
Kendrick, Mrs Lydia P., Chatham, 
Kerr, Robert W., Foxhoro\ 
Kerr, Jane K., ** 

Kettelle, Jacob Q., Boston. 
Kielblock, Jane L., CharJestown, 
Kilbon, George B., Springfield. 
Kimball, Benjamin, 2d. Harerhill, 
Kimball, Rev. Caleb, Mfdway. 
Kimball, Charles, Tpswich. 
Kimball, Daniel W., Winchester. 
Kimball, David, Bradftrrd, 
Kimball, Wallace L., " 
Kimball, Mrs. Harriet W.. Lowell. 
♦Kimball, Mrs. Mary B., Falmouth. 
Kimball, John R., Wolmm. 
KimbaU, Mrs. 8ylvia, Westboro*, 
Kingman, Miss Eliza. Boston. 
''Kingman. Miss Sarah, *' 
Kingiibury, Nathaniel, ** 
Kingsbury, John, Bradford, 
KingMbury, Rev. John D., •• 
Kingsbury, Katy, 
Kingsbury, Martha, 
Kittrcdge, Rev. A. E., Chicago. 
Kittredge. C. Brigham, Westboro*, 
♦Knowles, Rev. James D., lioston. 
Knowlton, Rev. Stephen, Neto Hacen^ Vt. 
Knox, Mrs. S., Rock Island^ III. 
Labaree, Rev. John C, Randolph. 
Lambert, Miss Elizabeth G., Rowley. 
Lambert, Thomas R., D.D., Charlestown. 
Lambert William T., " 

Lamson, Edwin, Winchester. 

Lamson, Mrs. Edwin, ** 

Lamson, Gardner Swift, *• 
Lamson, Helen, •' 

Lamson, Kate Glidden, *' 
♦Lane, Anthony, Lancaster. 
Lane, Rev. James P., Bristol, R.I. 
Lane, Mrs. Emma L., " 
Lane, Rev. John W., Whatrly. 
Lane, Mrs. Mary U., •• 

Lane, Mary E., '* 

Lane, John Edward, " 
Lane, Richmond J., East Abington. 
Lang\%'orthy, Rev. Isaac I*., Chelnea. 
Lascll, Josiuh, Whitinsville. 
Lasell, Mrs. Jennie W., *• 
Lathe, Miss Sarah S., Grafton. 
Laurie, Inglis, Owtitonna, Minn. 
♦Lawrence, Amos, Boston. 



K 



1( 



39 



i{ 



II 



Lawrence, Rer. Amos E., Houtatonie, 

Lawrence, Asa, Groton. 

^Lawrence, 3Irs. M. A., ** 

Lawrence, Jolin, 

Lawrence, CiirtU, 

Lawrence, Mrs. Curtis, " 

^Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy T., IFUton, Me. 

Lawton, Mrs. 8. C, WhitimnUe. 

Laynd, John, " 

Leach, Simeon, East Stomjhton, 

Learoyd, Addlaon P., iJanvert. 

Learoyd John 8., " 

Lcavitt, Abner L., Hingham. 

Leavitt, Mrs. I-Utcabeth G., Bo»ion. 

Leavitt, Rev. George U., Canil/ridgeport, 

Lee, Mrs. liuth M., Conway. 

Lee, Rev. Samuel H., Clecdatul, O. 

* Leeds, ISeiijamin, Jirookliue. 

Leeds, Benjamin, Boston, 

Leeds, Mrs. Anne B., *' 

Leeds, Miss Anne G., " 

Lees, Mrs. Samuel, Xorth liilUrica. 

Lefavour, Isi<achar. Bectrly. 

Leland, Calvin, jun., Xatick. 

Leland, Mrs. Charlotte A., Sherbom. 

Leland, Mrs. Lois, ** 

Leonard, Elixa, Foxboro\ 

LiK>nard, James Henry, BridgeuxUer, 

Leonard, James M., '* 

Lewis, Reuben, Oroton, 

Lewis, Mrs. Susan F., " 

Lincoln, Rev. Calvin, Hingham. 

Lincoln, F. \V., Boston. 

Lincoln, James L. C, Sunderland. 

Lincoln, Noah. Boston. 

Little, Alexander E., WeHesley. 

♦Little, Rev. Elbrldge G., 

Little, Mrs. Lucia S., 

Little, Sarah Isabel, 

Little, Stuart, Whitinsville. 

Little. Waldo F., Stwton Centre. 

Little, WiUiam A., '< 

Littlefield, Samuel, SomerviUe. 

♦Livermore, George, Cambridge. 

♦Locke, Kphraiiii, Boston. 

Loomis, Rev. Elihu, ChesterfitUi, III. 

Lord; Abraham, Jpswich. 

Lord, Miss Anna M., " 

Lord, Rev. Charles E., Boston. 

Lord, Edward A., DanverSt 

Lord, John A., Peabody. 

♦Lord, Louisa C, Manchester. 

Loring, Mrs. Hannah W., Sewton Centre. 

Ivoud, Arthur J., Boston. 

Loud, Mrs. Martlia li., Braintree. 

Lovell, Miss 3Iary B., Mvdwny. 

♦Lowell, Charles, D.D., Boston. 

Lumb, William, •• 

Lunt, Charles F., IFinchester. 

Lyman, Rev. George, South Amherst . 

Lyman, Samuel T., Huntington. 



II 



II 



Lyon, Hifls Chloe R , CampeUo. 

Macreoding, Rev.Chas. 8., Providencft R L 

Makepeace, Mrs. Helen M., Gloucegter. 

Maltby, Rev. Erastus, Taunton, 

Mann, Miss Helen L., Gre^njield. 

Manning, Otis, littlfton. 

Manning, Edward W., trotmrn. 

Manning, Walter H., LUtlrton. 

Marble, Mrs. Mary E., Orq/lon. 

Markham, Mrs. Priscilla V.. Pinnfrett Ct. 

Marrett, Lorenzo, Cambridgeport. 

Marsh, Mrs. Abby C, Georgetown. 

Marsh, Eliza\>etb C, Haverhill, 

Marsh, E. J., Leominster. 

Marsh, Lewis A., Chicopee. 

Marsh, Mbs Julia M., Haverhill. 

♦Marston, William, Boston. 

Martin, George H., Britlgetpater. 

Mason, Miss Nellie A., Rtiyalston, 

Mattison, William, WhUinsrilU. 

Maynard, Rev. Joshua L., jmiistonf Vt. 

Maynard, Leander, Shrewsbury. 

McElroy, Richard B., Medway. 

♦McKeau, William, Boston. 

McKeen, l*hilena, Andover. 

McKeen, Phebe, 

McKcnzie, Rev. Alexander, Cambridge, 

McKenzie, EUen H., *• 

McKenzie, Iveunet, " 

♦McLean, Mrs. Ann, Boston. 

McLean, Rev. John K., Sprlngfieldt lU. 

McLoud, Rev. Anson, Top^fittd. 

Means, John O., D.D., Boston, 

Means, Mrs. Jolin O., " 

Means, William G., Andoper. 

Merriam, Abner H., Templeton. 

Merriam, Homer, Springfield. 

Merrill, Rev. James H., Andover, 

Merrill, John K., ALthmn, 

Merrill, Mrs. Harriet U., Winche.ndon. 

Merrill, Rev. Truman A., BeriMrdston, 

Merritt, Clarissa, Conway. 

Merritt, Mrs. Mary A., Montague. 

Messenger, Miss Eliza, Fitchf/urg. 

Mills, Rev. Charles L., Jamaica Plain. 

Mills, 3Irrt. Rebecca B., <' 

MilU, Miss I^ydia, Peabody. 

Minot, WillUim, Boston. 

3Iinot, William, Jun., " 

Alixter, Mrs. Fanny L., " 

Mixter, Mrs. Mar>' R., Hardwick. 

Iklixter, Mrs. S. E , Jto>:k Island, lU. 

Mooar, George, D.D., OttkUiml, Col, 

Moody, James, Whitinsville. 

Moore, Lewis, Sharon. 

Moore, Lillle, Holbrook, 

Moors, Joseph, Groton. 

Moors, Rufus, ** 

Moors, Mrs. Rufus, " 

Hordough, Rev. John H., Portland^ Me, 

Morse, Charles H., Boston, 



40 



Horong, Rer. Thomas, Ipnrtch. 

Morley, Rev. Sardls B , Pitt^eld, 

Morrison, Daniel T., Methuen, 

Horrison, Miss Fancy T., Rowley. 

Morse, Miss Abby P., Emporia t Aiansas. 

Morse, Charles N., Foxboro*. 

Morse, Miss Emily A., Bra4ford' 

Morse, Henry, Naiick. 

Morse, RuAis W., Methtten. 

Morse, William E., Ilradford. 

Moseley, Edward S., Newburyport. 

Mosman, Walter B., AuburndaU. 

Manger, Rev. Theo. T., Lawrence, 

Manger, Mrs. T. T., ** 

Manroe, A. LeB., Medway. 

Manroe, Miss Mary, Concord, 

Marray, Rev. James O., New York City, 

Murray, Mrs . J ulia R. , " 

Nason, Rev. Charles, Wel{fleet, 

Nason, Rev. Elias, BUlericti. 

Needham, Lucie M., New Braintree. 

Needham, Mrs. Mary P., Peafjody. 

Nelson, Jonathan H., Shretosbury, 

NeweU, George H., HollUUm, 

*Newell. Montgomery, BotUm, 

Newhall, Lucy Ann, Stow. 

Newman, Samuel, Peabody, 

Newman, Miss Sarah A., Ipsurich, 

Nichols, Alfred A., West Amesbury, 

Nichols, James R.. HaverhUl, 

Nichols, Joseph. West Ameibury. 

Nichols, Moses, JliwerhiU. 

Nickerson, Mrs. Temple W., Nantucket, 

Nightingale, Rev. Crawford, Oroton, 

Noon, Rev. Sanmel H., N. E. Conference, 

*Norcro8s, Jovian, Wiik^eid. 

Norcross, Airs. Josiah, '* 

Norton, Rev. Ekiward, Quincy, 

Nourse, B. Alden, JFesthoro', 

Nourse, Daniel, JFest Medway. 

Nourse, Helen S., Boston, 

Nourse, Susan H., Bolton. 

Noyes, Alva, North Brul^ewaterx 

Noyes, Jacob, Abington. 

Noyes, Luke B., South Abington. 

Noyes, Rufus S., N. Bridgewater, 

Oatley, G. D., WhUineville. 

Odlin, Benjamin, Exeter, N.H, 

Odlin, Mrs. E. T., " 

Ordway, Aaron I^., New York City. 

Ordway, Miss Charlotte, Bradford, 

Ordway, Herbert, " 

Osborne, George F., Peabody. 

Osgood, George C, Ixnoell. 

Osgood, H. B., WhUinsviUe. 

Packard, Rev. D. Temple, Los Angelas, Col. 

Packard, Edward C, North Britlgewater. 

Packard Mrs. Maria L., CampeUo, 

Packard, S. Edwards, Springfield. 

Packard, S. Franklin, CampeUo, 

Packard, Miss Susie P., " 



Packard, Zibeon, Abington, 
Pago, Abigail L., Atkinson, N, IT, 
Paige, George R., New Salem. 
'^Palne, Mrs. Sarah 31., Holden, 
*Paine, Miss Sarah C, 
Paine, WUUam L., So. Wellfleet. 
Palmer, Rev. Charles Ray. Bridgeport* 
♦Palmer, Rev. Stephen, Needha'ih, 
♦Palmer, Squire, South Deerfield. 
Park. John C, Boston. 
Parker, Andrew, Gloueester, 
Parker, Daniel, Whitinsville, 
♦Parker, John, Boston, 

Parker, Mrs. Sarah, ** 

♦I*arkman, Francis, D J)., ** 
♦Parkman, Samuel, " 

♦Parkmau, Mrs. Sarah, '• 
Parmenter. Mrs. E. J. G., Athol, 
♦Parsons, Gorham, Boston. 
•Parsons William, •• 
Parsons, Rev. R. C, Worcester. 
Parsons, John, jun., Saugus Centre, 
Partridge, Clark. Medway, 
Partridge, Joseph, HoUiston. 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J., West Newton. 
Patrick, Mrs. Martha L., ** 

Patten, Mrs. John F., Lynn. 
Patterson, David H., Methuen, 
Paul, Frederick A., LakevilU. 
Paul, Henry. Newton. 

♦Paul, Mrs. Henry, *• 
♦Paul, Luther, •* 

Paul, Luther, '* 

Paul, Miss Harriet, " 
Paul, Miss Mary, *• 

Paul, Mrs. Ruth B., Medway, 
Fayson, Miss Susan, Foxboro*. 
Payson, William P., ** 
Pearson. Miss Hannah J., Lowell, 
Pease. George W., Salem. 
♦Peck, Rev. David, Sunderland. 
Peckliam, Hubbard, Petersham. 
Peirce, Rev. Bradford K., Boston. 
Peoples, Samuel, Naiick. 
Perkins, Benjamin C, Pealiody. 
Perkins, E. E., North Midtileboro, 
Perkins, Mrs. Elizabeth E., " 
Perkins, J aims H., ^' 

Perkins, James, Peabody. 
♦Perkins, James, Boston. 
♦Perkins, James, Jun., '* 
Perkins, Miss Mary A., Brighton, 
Perkins, Robert S., Danvers. 
♦I'erkins, Thomas H., Boston. 
Perley, Mrs Abigail T., Salem, 
Perley, Jacob, " 

Perry, Aliss Catharine H., Sherbom, 
Perry, James, Danrers. 
Perry Mrs. Ruth O., Marlboro\ 
♦Peters, Inward D., Boston. 
Peters, Mrs. Lydia H., Berlin, 



41 



Pettee, Daniel, SharoH. 

Pettee, Miss KUza J., Forhoro. 

Pettee, Samuel Gardner, SloughUm. 

Pettee, Willard, Foxboro*. 

PbiU!i>8, Alonzo P., Afedway. 

Phillips, George W.. Saugug. 

Phillips, Mrs. Geo. W., " 

^Phillips, Jonathan, Boston, 

PhUlips, Mrs. SaUy, 

Phillips, WiUiam, 

Pickard, Kev. Daniel W., Groveland. 

Pickering. Henry W., Boston. 

Pierce, Albert T., Stouffhton. 

♦Pierce, Rev. Charles H., MQlhury. 

Pierce, Isaac T., WMtinavUle. 

Pierce, Sylvester G., Winchester, 

•Pierpont, Rev. John, Afed/ord. 

Plerscn. Rev. William Henry, Somerville, 

Pike, John, D.D., Rowley, 

Plumb, Rev. Albert U., Boston, 

Plumb, Joseph Dart, " 

Plumer, Mrs. Martha H., Rowley. 

Plummer, Israel, WhUinsvUU, 

Pogue. Mrs. Joseph, Orafton. 

Pollard, Joseph G., Wobum. 

PoUock, Miss Emma A., WMHnsviUe, 

Pomeroy, Fred L., SunderUintl. 

Pomft^t, Mrs. Sarah T., Webster, 

Pond, Almira W., South Maiden, 

Pond, John P., Boston. 

Pond, Mrs. Nancy N., Midway. 

Pond, William E., Wrentham, 

Pool, Solomon, Gloucester. 

Poor, Joseph, Peabody, 

Poor. Nathan H., " 

Porter, J. Edwards, Korth Brool^/leld. 

Porter, Samuel S., Winchester, 

Potter, J. Sturgis. Neieton, 

Pratt, Cornelius, Xorth WeymotUh, 

Pratt, David, •• 

Pratt, Galen. Xorth Bridgewater. 

Pratt, Galen E., *• 

Pratt, Rev. George II.. Seabrookt N.ll, 

Pratt, Norton, Braintree, 

Pratt, Phebe, Sherbom. 

Pratt, Philip W., Abington, 

Pratt, Zebulon, Xorth Middleboro^. 

Pray, John J., Lowell. 

Prentice, Miss Julia, Grafton, 

Prentice, Marvel, WhitinevUU. 

Prentice, James A., " 

Prentiss, Luke, ** 

♦Prescott, William, /Boston. 

♦Prince. Rev. J. M., Georgetown. 

Prince, Mrs. Sarah B., Quincy, 

Pritchard, William, Xewfmryport, 

l^octor, Elizabeth 0., Peabody. 

Proctor, Henry H., " 

Proctor, Mrs. Lucy A., Gloucester, 

Proctor, Miss Mary P., Peabody. 

♦Proctor, Thomdike, 



M 



M 



«1 



PaiTer, Mn. Josiah, Harvard, 
Putnam, Mrs. Elizabeth T., Ore^ton, 
Quincy, Thomas D., Boston. 
Quincy, Mrs. J. C, '* 
Quincy, Thomas D., Jr. " 
Randall, Franklin B., Dover, N,H. 
Randall, Flora Sarah, 
Randall, Mary Elizabeth, 
Rankin, J. Eames, D.D., Washington^ D.C. 
Rankin, Mrs. Mary, " 

Ray, George W., Medieay VUlage. 
Raymond, Helen S., Boston, 
Read, Miss Martha, East Abington. 
Reed, Miss Caroline G., Haverhill, 
Reed, Horace, South Abington. 
Reed, Miss Serissa, East Abington, 
Reed, Mrs. Susan B., Xorth BrooJ^fUld, 
Reeves, Miss Ellen P., Wayland, 
Rice, Mrs. Agnes L., Boston, 
Rice, Edward, Wayland. 
Rice, Mrs. Elizabeth C, Lawrence, 
Rice, Mrs. Henry A,, Boston. 
Rice, Miss M. Augusta, Westbor&, 
Rice, Miss Jenny M., ** 

Rich, Rev. Alonzo B., W, Lebanon, X.H, 
Rich, Rev. A. Judson, Broo^field, 
Rich, Mrs. Harriet L., " 
Richards, Mrs. A. M., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Richards, James F., Campdlo, 
♦Richardson, Bei^amin P., Boston. 
Richardson, John W., Medway. 
Richardson, Luther, Winchester. 
Richardson, Miss Sarah E., Concord. 
Richardson, Stephen, W, Medway, 
Richardson, Sumner, Winchester, 
Ricker, Edmund, West Amesbury, 
Rioker, George E., *< 

♦Ritchie, Andrew, jun., Boston, 
Robbins, Andrew, Oroton, 
Robbins, Chandler, D.D., Boston, 
♦Robbins, Edward H., " 

Roberts, Rev. Jacob, AubumdaU. 
Roberts, Mrs. Mary A., ** 
Roberts, Mrs. Ruth, Manchester. 
Robertson, James, Peabody, 
Robinson, Charles W., Aubumdale, 
Robinson, H. W., Xorth Bridgewater. 
♦Robinson, Rev. Reuben T., Winchester. 
♦Robinson, Mrs. Clara A., ** 

♦Rockwood, John, Groton. 
Rockwood, John T., Springfield. 
Rockwood, Miss Polly S., Ashland, 
♦Rogers, George, Boston. 
Rogers, George L., Xewburyport, 
Rogers, Shubael G., Boston, 

♦Rogers, Rev. William M., " 
Russell, Sarah J., lYamingliam. 
Russellisam'l W. ,XeW'England Co^flerenee. 
Ryder, Marietta, Chatham. 
Safford, Rev. George B., Bwrlin^fton, Ft 
♦Sallibury, Samnel, Boston, 



42 



Sanford, Mrs. Adelfne D., Medway HUage. 

Sanford, Edmund I., Afedway. 

Sanford Henry D., Bridgeieater, 

Sanger, Edward G., Cambrulgeport. 

Sargeant, James C, (ktlAam. 

Sargent, Edmund. West Ameabury. 

*Sargent, Lucius M., Boston, 

Sargent, Samuel Q., Methuen. 

Sawtell, Kpliralm, Oroton. 

Sawyer, George, Campello. 

Sawyer, Martha B., " 

Sawyer, Seth C, Hdtbrook, 

Scales, Edward P., Newton, 

Soott, Uev. Joseph, Maiden, 

*Scuddcr, Charles, Boston, 

Scudder, Mrs. Sarah L., " 

Seagrave, Edward F., Uxbrlfge. 

Seagrave, Mrs. Mary Ann, •* 

Sears, Miss Hannali M., Asl^eld, 

Searer, A. W., Northboro*, 

Seeley, Kaymond U., D.D., Haverhill, 

Seeley, Mrs. Fanny B., *' 

SeUVidge, Thomas O., Boston, 

*Sbattuck, Andrew, Oroton, 

Shattuck, Mrs. Susan P., '< 

Shaw, Mrs. Hannah, Boston, 

Shaw, Mrs. Nancy, Suuth Weymouth. 

Sheldon, Rev. Luther II., Jamesburffh, N.J. 

Sheldon, Mrs. Sarah H., ** 

Shepherd, Thomas, Winchester, 

Shirley, Uev. Arthur, Conway. 

*Sigourney, Andrew, Boston. 

♦Sigoumey, Henry, " 

Sikes, Mrs. Otis, Conway, 

Simonds, Alvan, Boston. 

SkUlings, David N., Winchester. 

*Slack, Kuggles, Boston. 

Slafter, Rev. Edmund F., ** 

Slafter, Mrs. Edmund F., ** 

Sleeper, William C, Methuen, 

Small, Amos T., West Amesbury. 

Small, Mrs. Fidelia Porter, Millbury. 

Small, Samuel A., 

Small, Samuel E., 

Small, Mrs. Sumner, Newton Centre, 

Smith, Mrs. Abby F., Concord, 

Smith, Henry F., '* 

♦Smith, Albert W., Westboro\ 

Smith, Mrs. Lucy Jane, *' 

Smith, Mrs. Clara J., Sunderland. 

Smith, E. B., Wes^eld. 

Smith, Mrs. Frances E. D., Whitinsville, 

Smith, Rev. Edward P., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smith, George P., Boston, 

Smith, Samuel, " 

Smith, Joel, Whitinsville, 

Smith, Jonathan, *' 

Smith, Warren N., " 

Smith, Mrs. Hattie J., Gloucester, 

Sndth, Miss Mary E., Sunderland. 

Smith, Mataon M., D.D , Harford, Ct, 



(« 



It 



Smith, Mrs. Matson M., Jlar^ord^ Ci. 

Smith, Norman, Oroton. 

Smith, Mrs. Mary J.' S 

Smith, Richard, PetAody, 

Smith, Mrs. Charlotte, *' 

Smith, Mrs. Sarah, Andocer. 

Smith, William W., Conway 

Smith, Mrs. T. Berton. 

Snow, Ambrose, South Hadley Falls, 

Snow, Mrs. Caroline. AuhumdeUe, 

Snow, Mrs. Mark, Ch(Uhnm. 

Soule. Henry M., South Abington. 

Southgate, Charles M., St. Johnsbury^ VI, 

♦Southgate, Rev. Robert, nartford, VL 

♦Southgate, Mrs. Mary Frances, ** 

South worth, Mrs. Caroline 31., Medway. 

Spauldiug, Mrs. Charlotte A., Oroton, 

Spaulding, John, Ayer. 

Spooner, William B., Boston, 

Spring. Mrs. Adela C, Whitinsville, 

Stacy, Albert, Concord. 

Stanley, Ezra C, Manchester. 

Stanton, Rev. George F.. South Weymouth. 

Stebbins, I^ev. Milan C, Sitringfldd. 

Stevens, Mrs. George, Lowfll. 

♦Stevens, Norman C, Newton, 

Stevens, Mrs. E. M., '* 

Stevens, Mrs. Benjamin F., Peabody. 

Stevens, Samuel, Gloucester. 

Stickney, William H., Dracut. 

Stoddard, Charles U., North Brookfield, 

♦Stoddard, Lewis T., Brookline. 

Stone, Andrew L., D.D., San FranciseOtCaL 

Stone, Mrs. MatUda F., " 

Stone, Martha A., Newton Centre. 

Storrs, Eunice C, Braintres, • 

♦Storrs, llichard S., D.D. " 

Stowell, Mrs. Abby F., Concord. 

Stowell, Cyrus A., Strufh Deerfield. 

Stowell, D. W.. Westjield, 

Strong, Rev. Elnathan E., TTaltham, 

Strong, Rev. J. C, Leech Lake, Minn. 

Strong, Mrs. J. C, «' •• " 

Studlcy, Austin, East Abington. 

Studley, Edward A., Boston. 

Sugden, Alliis Mary, Bruintree, 

Sumner, Rev. Charlerj B., Monson. 

Sumner, Mrs. H. U., Foxboro\ 

Swan, Frederic M., Dorchester, 

Swazey, Mrs. Frances A. ^ Lynn. 

Swett, Samuel W., Boston, 

Swift, Miss Lottie 11.. Andi)ver. 

Switzcr. Rev. Christopher J., Provincetown. 

Tan, Mrs. Elizabeth K., WhUinsvUle. 

Taft, Mi.^s Emily A., •' 

Tuft, Gustavus E., 

Taft, Mrs. G. E., 

Taft, 8. Jennie, 

Taft, Jacob, Uxbridge, 

Tapley, Gilbert, Danvers, 

♦Tappan, John, Boston. 



«( 



ii 



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43 



II 



«i 



Tarr, William J., Gloucester, 
Taylor, Mrs. Alalansa, Winehe$ter. 
Teele, Rer. Albert K., Milton. 
Teele. Mrs. Cornelia C, " 
Temple, Mark BI., Heading. 
Tenny, 3Irs. Joanna S., Sangus. 
*Tenney, Mrs. Mary P., WincheMer. 
Tenney, Mrs. Apphia S., Geirrgeiown. 
Terry, Rev. James P , South WeymmUh. 
Thacber, Mrs. Anna B., Hyde Park. 
Thacher, Miss CaliDta C, Attleboro*. 
Thacber John, •' 

Thacher, Susan B., Portland^ Me. 
Thacher, Mrs. Susan C, " 
Thacber, William T.. Hyde Park. 
♦Thatcher, Mary Ludlow, Afiddleboro', 
Thayer, Addison S., Medway, 
Thayer, Clara L., »* 

Thayer, Amaisa. Braintree, 
Thayer, E. F. E., 
Thayer, Ira, 
♦Thayer, Mrs. Lilla, •* 
Thayer, Annie M., IJolbrook. 
Thayer, Mrs. Kno», Xorih BridgeuHiter. 
Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, Andover, 
Tliayer.JIrs. Martha C, '* 
Thayer, Oliver, Saltm. 
♦Thayer, Mrs. Jane, Boston. 
Thayer, Robert H., New York City. 
Thayer, Sarah H., Braintree. 
Thayer. William W., Uxbridge. 
Thompson, Mrs. Averlck F., Wareham. 
Thompson. Mrs. Emily B , Concord. 
Thompson, Everett A., North Wotmm. 
Thompson, Samuel A., *• 

Thompiton, Mrs. Anne Eliza, " 
Thompson, George R., North Bridgewater. 
Thompson, Lewis Waldo, W<A)urn. 
Thompson, Stephen, Winchester. 
Thurston, Rev. Richard B., Stan\ford, Ct. 
Timlow, Rev. Ileman R., IFalpole, 
Timlow, Dana C, " 

Tinker, Russell, Grafton. 
Tobey, Miss Jennie E , WhUinsville. 
Tolman, Rev. Richard, ^ampf on, Va. 
♦Tolman, Rev. Samuel II., Lenox. 
Torrey, Miss Elizabeth L., S<futh Weynumth. 
Torrcy. James, North IVeymouth, 
Torrey, Willard, Groton. 
Toulman. Rev. Wm. Vi., Newton Upper Falls. 
Towne, William B., Milord, N.H. 
Trask, Charles H. Jun., Manchester. 
Tra!>k, Mrs.A. il., " 

Trask, i^izzie R., Gloucester. 
Tratik, Samuel, Peahody. 
Tra»>k, Samuel P., Danrers. 
Trlbou, Samuel, North Bridgewater, 
Trowbridge, Mrs. Asa, Brighton. 
Trufant, Harriet Andrews, Abington. 
Trufaut, Philip P., 
Trufant, Walter Ezra, 



•( 



«« 



♦Tucker, Rev. El^ah W , LdHKnont Ct. 

♦Tucker, Jesse, Milton. 

♦Tucker, 3rni. Mary R., " 

♦Tucker, Nathan, •• 

Tucker, Mrs. Nathan, " 

Tucker, Mrs. Hannah W., Dorduster. 

Tucker, John A., " 

Tucker, WlUiam, " 

Tucker, Mrs W. L., •« 

Tucker, William W., Boston. 

Tufts, Charles, Andover. 

Turner, Miss Alice Montgomery, Randolph. 

Tuttle, Miss Martha E., Concord. 

Turtle, Miss Sarah, Chroveland. 

Tuttle, Thomas S., Littleton. 

Twichell, John M., Fitchburg. 

Tyler, Frank H., Bradford. 

Tyler, Jerome W., Boston. 

♦Underbill, Rev. John W., N. Amherst. 

Upton, 31 rs. Lucy K., Peabody. 

Upton, Moses T., Salem. 

Vose, William H., Fitchburg. 

Wadsworth, Mrs. Lucy, Milton. 

Wadsworth, Wililaro, Boston. 

Wakefield, Miss C, Heading. 

Waldron, Rev. Daniel W., Boston. 

Wales, Erastus, Holbrook. 

Wales, Miss Mary Ann, Boston. 

Walker, Dean H., Andover. 

Walker, Miss Frances A., HaverhiU. 

Walker, Rev. Geo. F., Ashby. 

♦Walker, John S., East Medway. 

Walker, Mrs. John S., " 

Walker, Levi, Bridgewater, 

Walker, Ellen A., " 

Walker, Moses, HaverhOl. 

Walker, Nathaniel, " , 

Walker, Robert G., Boston. 

Walker, William M., Bridgewater. 

♦Walley, Samuel U., Boston. 

Walley, Samuel H., " 

Ward', Artemas, " 

Ward, Miss Lydia, SaxonviUe, 

Ward, Samuel, Boston. 

Ward, Bliss H. L. H., Lakeville. 

♦Ward, Rev. James W., •• 

Ward, Mrs. Caroline L., •« 

Ward, Bliss Susan H., ** 

Ward, Salem T., Winchester. 

Warfield, Henry L., Buckland. 

Warner, John, Newton. 

Warner, William, South Deerfield. 

Warren, George W., Boston. 

♦Warren, Mrs. Diantha A., Lynn. 

♦Warren, Mrs. Maria, Grafton. 

♦Warren, Nehemiah, Stow. 

Warren. Francis W., Stow. 

Warren, Jonas, " 

♦Warren, Ludnda, " 

♦Warren, William A., Winchester. 

Washburn,. William B., Greenfield. 



Welota, JofaD, £ott«it. 
Wald, JuDti, •' 

M^ella. M™. M.rlba D., JfortMitn)'. 
Wellnian, jDibuiiW D.D„ ^ffiiidin. 
IVcnrJelt, lira. Cslhartor. lluilon. 
W«ntworth, Albpn, JIiKtrhai. . 
Wcdtworth, I^wi,. JtrldgrmUfr. 
WesioD, .Itmei L. S.. marahrm. 
«>!t,l'rk-e t'., iriiilinnUU. 
Wh*«lei, Aliljiili l! , E411I Mfilimv 
Wheeler, lln..M. it Me^wag. 
WlMler, Mlsj s„i,i,u W i-mbody. 
Whlloonib, I iMir L.. Worcett^. 
WhlUsomb, Un. Abble E., " 
Whltoimb.G. Henry, ■' 

WUIoomb. Lewlt, KoUiroat. 
*Whlteomb, Ueubca, Sanard. 



Wbdoonib, llt»,j\bby F '• 

•Wliltcoiiib, Mrs, Loiil's I1., " 
Whltoomh, J!Im Mbti- M.. " 
While, Asron [.., 3Muy. 
While CanwUua, BrcotritU. 
Wtdti Bdmniid, A'aOtwiit. 
Wliil*. Kewlon, 
•Whlls,Jauii>s, Holloa, 
Whit*, Jwl. Vxbridgt. 
WUU, Jotlib. rettrtkam. 
WWW, tan. Marj C /'ra.ftrots, W.ff, 
WUta, PblneiuA., iPAfKnn^fe. 
While, Thorn 119. n.ilbrnai. 
WU^, Arthur F., Whitiiuvm*. 
Whltls.Chu-leiE., 
WbitlD,Chul«HP., 
•Wmtln, Mm. Catharine H. " 
WUlln, EdKMd, " 

Whllln, Junea F., •• 

WblliD, Un. ritleoM H., '• 
Whllln, 1-Mil, " 

WblUa,Hn. SuahJ.. " 

Wldtln,lfn. SonbB., " 
IVbiling. Lemiitl, Gr„to<i. 
WJilUnDU, t'Jiariw, Lrncrll. 
Wbitmanh. Ura. Dlutba, 3. AMngton. 
WUtnutnh, Marj, ■' 

Whttminb, UlBiUaryJ.. " 

IVbiunor^.. A mil... Maria, Lgnn. 
Whilnef, CbarlM H., Cambridgtperl. 
WhltnajF, Darn a Soai/i araloH. 
WUtDcf, Frrdcilck. IFatminiUr. 
WbiUMj, llelra J SUm . 



Whltnsj, Rkhari D., BpHnafOd. 

Wbltnpy,Hn. Suunna, Itntlaml. 
Whittaker. Iter, (ieorge, SprinaflOd 
Wblllaker, Un llarriel, 
IVhtitemure. Mrs Hai^- R. .S.. Wtitbonf. 
-Wlggloawonb. Iboina.. *«!.-«. 
Wilbur, Joaeph. Tu<^iiian. 
Wild, Uaak'l, ami™ 
Wild. Ul<a UtIbA., South llraintrtt. 
Wilder, llatde W SoiUh Aft^ii. 
WUIrai.EeT Wllllum H.. *«k«iW- 
WUllama, Ulaa Amelia 1'., Sanderland. 
WUliaiu, KcT. C. H. S., Contord. 
WUllima. Hn. C. H. 8 . 
Wmiann.Rei. F^wardF., )FIIUJHn>ille. 
ntllljiraa. HUa EKiabeth C, Oroltm. 
WUllama, Uiaa Mary D., QreBtfitld. 
William*, S.II„ ^ortv™. 
-wmiania, Thumaa S.. AiibvmdaU, 
WlllUmi Epbraln, £j>r<iijDtrU. 
Wlllia, LuHba. Waybmd. 
WUlIa. I.uey Maria, " 
'Wllaon. Itev. Tbomai, BtoughUnt. 
WUfan, Mra C. J.. 
WlDR, John C, lAKBtU. 
Wlnca, Bev. C. Uaurloe, Hartfiird, Conn. 

-VVlnler, bavid Baker. NoriKbridgt. 
WInthrop, Robert C, Bolton. 
'Winlhrop, Tboiai I,., " 
Wlnrell, Un. Lliile H., Ckieago, lU. 
•WItblnaon, Otla, Bmoaint. 
Woloolt. Hr*. EUiabeth, Ptabodt. 
Woleott. William, <■ 

Wowtbury. Slmnii J., StUto». 
Wood, Mr^. Abljrtli, Tr.ifftnru'. 
Wood, Cyma K., AiUmmlvim. 
Wood. Elliabelh C, TOjrbortf. 
Wood, Mil) Jane A., Ontfton. 
Wood, Joaeph W., WMtinmittt. 
Wood. Mn. £. 8., 
Wood, Hn. Samuel F., CKdntford. 
Wood. Mn. Suaan, QrMon. 
Waod.T, Dwlg^I, Wftmbuter. 
Wood, Theodores., '■ 

Woodi, Utia Abble Wheeler. JTiiMn. 
Wooda, Auattn Frank, jVcif Itrriinlmt. 
Woodi, ,lowph Wheeler. BoiIoh. 



WrlKlil, Owrgu L. JfUtiataffut. 
Wyntan. Cbarloa Lnnaatter. 
Wyman, Ituftii, Botlon. 
Wymas, WllUam C, PUeUitrg. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



BARNSTABLB COUXTT. 

West Barnst able , Cong. Ch $8 24 

Denniit/ 8outh Long. Vh 8 01 

Falmouth, First I'ong.Ch. and Soc. 18 25 
South Welltleet.Cong. Ch. aud Soc. 

(IL.M.) 22 00 

$56 60 

BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Easton, Evangel. Cong. Ch 18 72 

Fairhaven, Cong. Ch. and Soc.. .. 9 05 

Mansiicld, Cong.Ch and Soc.( 1 L.M.) 12 00 

$30 77 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

AndOTer, North Trin. Cong. Ch. . . $35 00 

Boxford, Cong. Ch and Soo $13 00 

Andover. Chupel Ch. and Congre- 
gation , 87 60 

Bradford, Cong. Ch. and Soc 14 96 

E^.xex, (.'ong. Cn. Sab. Sch (1 L. M.) 20 00 
Georgetown, Cong. Ch. ana Soc (1 

L.M.) .32 50 

Gloucester, Cong. Ch. and Soc. (2 

L.M.) .f. 63 23 

Grov« laud. Cong. Ch. and Soc 10 00 

iDHwlch, First rh. '• " 22 00 

llarerhill, ( Vniro Cong. Ch. (1 l.m.) 20 00 

Newburyport, Whitiield Cong. Ch. :W IC 

Belleville ♦• " 90 00 

Newbury, Fir.'»t < ong. Ch. and Soc. 19 25 

North >aupu!», Sabbat li School .... 6 00 
I'eabody, Cong. Ch. aud Soc. (IL. 

M.) 33 56 

Saugud, Cong. Cli. and Soc 39 20 

Salcui, Croiut)iu-st Ch 6^1 30 

'* South Ch 4u 74 

Went Anu'.sbury, Cong. Ch. and 

Soc. (1 L. .M.) 60 00 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Conway, Cong.Ch. (2 l.m.) 

Gie«'UhcM, Fir-il i on^. Ch. and Soc. 
^«'Cond •• " " 

3Ioutai:uc, Cong. Ch. and Soc 

Urau^r, •' " ♦• 

i*>outh i)eeiliol(l, Sarah L. Cleave- 

land (1 L >i.) 

Sundirlami, <'oug. Ch. and Soc ... 
Whuiley, Coug.Cli.andftoc. (2 l.m.) 



(i72 45 


64 46 

12 75 

25 W 

lo CO 

2 fcW 


20 00 
20 (JO 
41 I>9 



$it(» 4^ 



IIA>. PDKN roi NTY. 

f hlcopc*'.S<-cou«l Cong.Ch.and Soc. 

•• liunl •• 

Ix)ngnieadow, f.adio^' Moncv. Aua. 
< it'll! U'lni-n's •' 

I'alnuT. Sefomi ( li 

Springtk'ld, 1 hirti Ch. Soc 

Ficdiug liiUs.Cong.Ch. 



$n2 



r>o 
2! 4:. 

20 75 
8 ••>4 

5 50 



-■; I 



West Springfield, First Ch.' 16 00 

Wedtfield, Second Cong.Ch.and Soc. 131 20 

$280 05 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 

Amherst, North Cong. Ch $50 00 

'* FirKt Cong. Ch. and Soc. 20 78 

Greenwich, E. V. Blodgett 6 oa 

Granby, Cong. Ch. and Soc 32 60 

Uadley, Ku8»ell Ch. aud Soc 12 36 

•• First Ch. and Soc 11 35 

•' South FaUa Cong. Ch 82 iO 

Northampton, Edwards Ch. and 

Soc 41 61 

Weathampton, Cong. Ch 24 00 

$280 13 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Acton, Cong. Ch. and Soc $13 25 

Ashland Cong. Ch. and 3oc 2:) 06 

Aahley, ♦' '• 18 17 

Ariington, •• •' 80 02 

Box borough. Cong. Ch 3 06 

( oucord, Cnion Bib. i^oc 89 00 

Groton, Union Cong, Ch. and Soc. 63 60 

llollistou, Firttt Coug C h. and Soc. 43 00 

Littleton, Cong. Ch. and ^oc 6 Ou 

Lowell, John-st. Ch. aud Soc 42 30 

• Kirk.Mt " " 98 00 

3fedford, Mystic <'ong. Ch 3o 46 

Newton. Eliot Ch. aud Soc 104 81 

IVpperell, Cong. Ch 14 06 

Saxonville, Coug. (.'h. aud Soc 14 60 

Sudbury, •' " .... 20 00 

Tewkabun-, " »♦ .... 6i .•« 

Town.xend llarbor. < 'ong. Ch 7 60 

Wakelield, Coug. Ch 2110 

Waverley, Rev. Daniel llutler 15 00 

Westford, Edward Carlton 100 00 

** Con. Ch. aud ^^^oc 2 60 

Woburn, M. E. Ch 7 00 

$800 76 

NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Cohastett, Second Cong. Ch. and 

>oc $I9S3 

Dwlhain, Flr:«t Ch. aud .^oc. OS 13 

Foxborough. (.'oug. Ch. au-1 Soc. . 31 GO 

Franklin. First t oug. C!i. and >oc. 20 3.) 
lioibrook, Wiuthrop Ch. and Soc. 

(2L. m.) 09 73 

Hydi' I'ark, First Ch and >oc 14 66 

Mill way Village, i'oug. Ch. and 

.'^oc. ( 1 L. M.) 33 10 

Medway Ka^t,Cong. ( h. and >oc.. \:'2 :i5 

'• We.^t, ><'C.nid (;oug. Ch... 27 00 

Modilold, i:<.v. J. N. U. Kutou 5 00 

K:uidol])h, Cong ( ii. ami "OC 110 02 

Wn-iifliam, Cynthia Ila\\r.>4 5 (K) 

\V('> mouth. South liiion ill 7 50 

fecund Coug (.h. and 

Soc. (1 L.M.) 20 00 

$4:)4 14 



46 



PLTXOUTH GOUKTT. 

Ablnfftoii, South Cong.Cli. and Soo. 

Brookton, First Cong. Ch 

•* Porter Cong. CU. and Soc. 
Cainpello, Orthodox Cong. Ch. and 

Bridgewater, Cong. Ch. and 800. . . 

'* Central bq. Ch. and 

80c. (1 1..M.) 

Hanover, Cong. Ch 

Uingham, Evangel. Cong. Ch 

•* First Ch. Soc 

LakeviUe, Cong, Ch. and iSoc 

Middleboro, First Coug. Ch 

" North, E.K.Perkins.. 

" Central. Ch. and boc. . 

Plympton, Cong. Cn 

BockJAnd, Cong. Ch. and Soo 



$20 15 


25 00 


20 00 


42 85 


14 30 


22 00 


3 60 


5 26 


78 00 


24 60 


8 80 


6 00 


68 78 


3 40 


100 CO 



$431 71 
SUFFOLK COUNTr. 

Boston, Old South Ch. and Soc. ... $147 00 

•' Soutli, PliiUlps' Cong. Ch. 43 42 

" Park-st. Ch U8 04 

" Highlands, Mrs. McCloud. 50 

" K.D.Warren 400 00 

** Higtdands, Eliot Ch. and 

Soc 63 31 

Boston, Dorchester Village Ch . . . . 30 07 

" Alrieud 60 



Boatoa, Dorchester. Thos J> Qulncy 

(1L.M.) 

Boston, Baptfiit Bethel Ch. and See. 

" D.Whlston 

Brighton Evan. Ch. and Soc 



WORCESTER COrNTT. 

Clinton, First Erangel.Ch.and Soc. 

West Boylston, First Coug. Ch 

Grafton, Cong. Ch 

Harvard, " 

Hubbardston, " 

I.,eouiiuster 

" North 

Leicester, First Cong. Ch. and Soc. 
Lunenburgh, " " 

Northbridge, WhltinsvUle Cong. 

Ch 

Shrewsbunr, Cong. Ch 

Webster, Cung. ch 

Westboro', Cong. (;h. and Soc 

Worcester, a friend 

Winchendon, North Cong. Ch. aud 

Soc 

Worcester, Central Cong. Ch 

** Old South Coug. Ch. and 

Soc 



20 00 


10 60 


200 


43 21 


^867 46 


$4t83 


11 20 


47 00 


10 50 


6 67 


10 76 


3 60 


13 00 


260 


832 26 


13 00 


10 00 


lao 00 


12 00 



27 76 
2140 

21 83 



$1216 16 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 



Annual Collections and Subscrip- 
tions $100 00 

Boston, Captain Winslow, Trust 

l!\ind 17 82 

Hennlker, Nil., Cong. ( h and Soc. 24 60 

Frybur^h. He., Cong. Ch. and Soc. 7 00 

New Englan<l Conterencc 

of M. E. Ch. (0 L.M.) . . $003 89 

Providence, M. E. Ch 345 40 

East Maiue, <' 132 77 

1082 16 



W. 31. Mellcn, Local Agent $89 63 

New Ilautpshire, John Cole and 

wife 20 00 

Edgartown, Mrs. Gannett 2 00 

^eeKonk and East Provideuce.Cong. 

Ch 8 30 

Swanton, Vt., Henry Stone 3 00 

" Harriet U. Stone ... 2 00 



$1366 30 



COLLECTIONS. 

By the Rev. E. F. Slatter, District Superintendent for the American Bible Society. 



u 
II 
n 
<« 
«i 



Boston, Trinity Church | 

Eniniuuucl ** 

St. I'aul's •• 

St.Mark's •• 

Clirist " 

Miss Bradford 

Mr. George f:urtis 

Boston Highlands, St. Jauies' 

Church 

Brooklinc. St Paul's Church 

Nevrton, Lower Falls, St. Mary's 

Church 

Quincy, Christ ( -hurch 

Haverhill, Trinity Church 



030 00 


0(>6 00 


411 00 


26 76 


10 00 


2 00 


60 00 


60 66 


143 03 


81 42 


m 18 


6 00 



Newton, Grace Churcli $29 60 

•*' Miss S. B. C 10 00 

Cambridge, St. John's Chapel $41 00 

S. Boston, St. Matthew's Church. . . 31 60 

Chebea, St. Luke's i hurch 16 24 

Taunton, St. John's Church 16 61 

Lawreuw', Grace church 25 60 

South GrovelHnd,ht . .1 ames' Church 13 00 

Hedlium, St. Paul's Church 37 00 

Charlestown, >t. John's Church, (1 

L.M.) 20 00 

Lincoln, St. Anne's Church 8 68 

$27i0 68 



LEGACIES. 



Aabam, Craig estate $465 00 

Boston. Estate of Mary Tufts, wid- 
ow of (Gardner Tults 80 00 

Framingham, e^tuteof Nancy Bent 688 00 
Uolbrook, estate of Elisha N. llol- 

brook 200 00 

liiddletou, estate of Charlotte U. 

I'row 374 10 



Northbridge, estate of E. W. Flctch- 

er $100 00 

Reading, 3Irs. C aldb Waketicld 20 00 

Salem, estate of N. 1*. Dike 100 UO 

Waltham, estate of Daniel Farrar 1228 76 
Whitinsvllle, estate of 3Irs. Aun 

Dudley 60 00 

$3,206 85 



FORM OF A BEQUEST TO THE SOCIETY. 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Massachusetts Bible Society, 
incorporated in the year cijjhteen hundred and ten, the sum. of 
to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of the Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and policy 
of the Society, should be directed to the Rev. Daniel Butler, Recording 
Secretary, 15 Cornhill, Boston. 



Remittances for books, donations from churches and individuals, and 
orders for books, should be addressed to Rev. Elijah Cutleb, Agent, 15 
Cornhill, Boston. 



Bible Rooms of the Massachusetts Bible Society, 15 Cornliill, Bos- 
ton. AH the issues of the American Bible Society, comprising upwards 
of two hundred and fif>y distinct volumes, are sold at cost. Bibles and 
Testaments in some thirty diflerent languages. Orders by Mail or other- 
wise. E, Cutler, Agent, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESENTED BY 



THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON. 



MAY 29, 1876. 



BEING THEIR 



SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY. 



> < ♦ »-4- 



BOSTON: 
DEPOSITORY, 15CORNHILL. 

1876. 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY. 18767. ' 



— ^xi:«« 



Hon. SAMUEL H. WALLEV. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. VINTON, I). D., Sufiolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Ifcrkshire County. 

Hon. timothy W. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, LL. D., Franklin Ccmnty. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, LL. D., Middlesex County. 

Hon. MILTON M. FISHER, Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN A. HAWES, Bristol County. 

ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

CorresponHtng ^ecrrtarg. 
Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. I). 

l&ecorHing ^ecretarg. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 

Crtasurer. 
CHARLt:S HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

*Suliitor. 
AMOS W. STETSON, F.sq. 



Crtistres. 



Rev. JOHN O. MEANS. U. D. 
Rev. chandler ROBniNS. D. D. 
Rev. ANDREW P. PEABODV. D. D. 
Rev. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU. D. D. 
Rev. PHILLIPS BROOKS. 
Rev. GEORGE F. PENTECOST. 
Bishop ISAAC W. WILEY. 
Rev. EDMUND F. SLAFTER. 
Rev. SAMUEL E HERRICK. 



Hon. JACOB SLEEPER. 
Hon. CHARLES r. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R MARVIN. Esq. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER. F^sg. 
Hon. ROBERT C. WINTHROP. 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE. Esq. 
A.MOS W. STE'l-SON. E<q. 
GEORGE P. DENNY. Rig. 
Hon. E ROCKWOOD HOAR. 



Executtbe Committee. 

TO WH().\f APPLICATIONS ARK TO BK MADE FOR BIHLRS. 

Rev. John O. Means, Charles Henry Parker, and Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY FROM 1809 TO 1876 



m 9 



Hon. William Phillips. . 
Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf. LL. D. 



)Pre0ttients. 



1809 — 27 
1827—49 
1849—54 



Hon. Richard Fletcher. LL. D. 
Hon. Samuel H. WaUey. 



« 854— 59 
1859 



Vict )Prestlients. 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. 
Rev. John T. Kirkland, D D. . 
Rev. Henry Ware. D. D. 
Rev. John Codman, D. D. 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. 
Rev. Francis Parkman. D. D. . 
Rev. Nathaniel L. Frothingham. D 
Rev. William R. Nicholson. D. D. 
William C. Plunkett, E«;q. 
Edward Southworth. Esq. 
John P. Williston, Esq. 
Hon. William B. Washburn. LL. D 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq. . 
Charles P. Whitin. Esq. . 



D. 



1809—16 
1816— a8 
i8a8— 44 
1844—48 
1848—49 

1849—53 
1853 — 61 
x86i — 7a 
186a 

I 86a — 70 
X 86a— 73 
1 86a 
186a 
i86a 



Lee Claflin. Esq. 
Caleb Holbrook. Esq. 
James S. Amory. Esq. 
Hon. John H. Clifford. LL. D. 
Elisha Tucker. Esq. . 
James B. Crocker, Esq. . 
EL S. Moseley, Esq. . 
Charles A. Jessup, Esq. 
Hon. William Claflin, LL. D. 
Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D 
Hon. William Hyde. 
Hon. Timothy W. Carter. 
Hon. Milton M. Fisher. . 
Hon. John A. Hawes. 



i86a — 70 

i86a — 75 

1 86a 

1862—76 

i86a 

t86a 

1 86a 

1870—72 

1871 

187a 

1872 

1873 
1875 

1876 



CorresponHtng Secretaries. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, . 1809—13 
Rev. Samuel C. Thacher, 18 13 — 17 

Rev. Charles Lowell. D. D. . 18x7—18 



Rev. Francis Parkman. D. D. . 1818 — 49 

Rev. Nathaniel L. Frothingham. D. D. 1849 — 53 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. . 1853 



Rev. John Pierce. D. D. . 
Rev. Daniel Sharp. D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosyenor, 
Rev. James D. Knowles. . 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



iSlecorlitng Secretaries. 



1809—28 

i8a8— 30 
1830—31 
1831-33 
1833-39 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Rev. William M. Rogers, 
Rev. George W. Blagden. D. D. 
Rev. George Richards, . 
Rev. Daniel Butler, . 



» 839— 44 
»844— 45 
»845— 49 
» 849— 5a 
1852 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, 
John Tappan. Esq. . 



treasurers. 



1809 — II 

i8ii — la 
1 81 2 — 35 



Henry Edwards, Esq. 
George R. Sampson. Esq. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 



»835— 49 
1849—62 

i86a 



Exectttibe Committees. 



Rev. William E. Channing. D. D. 
Hon. Jonathan Phillips, . 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. . 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 
Edward Tuckerman, Esq. 
Rev. Henry Ware. Jr., D. D. . 
Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. D. 
Charles Tappan, Esq. 
Rev. Francis Parkman. D. D. . 



1809—18 
1809 — 16 
1809—15 
1815-18 
1816—30 
1818—30 
1821—35 
1830—40 

183a— 35 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D 
Henry Edwards, Esq. 
Rev. George Richards. . 
George R. Sampson, Esq. 
Hon. Albert Fearing, 
Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper, 



> 835—49 
1840—49 

1849 — ^ 
1849—62 

1853—76 
i860 
1862 
1876 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts 
Bible Society was held at the rooms of the Society, No. 15 
Cornhill, on Monday, May 29, at ten o'clock, A. M., the Presi- 
dent of the Society, the Hon. Samuel H. Walley, in the 
chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Chas. Henry Parker, Esq., presented his 
Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Sixty-Seventh Annual Report of the Trustees was read 
and accepted. 

The oflficers of the Society were then elected for the coming 
year. 

It was voted to adjourn to the public meeting on Wednesday 
afternoon at three o'clock. 

Agreeably to the vote of adjournment, the Society assem- 
bled at the (new) Old South Church on Wednesday afternoon 
at three o'clock, p. m., and listened to an address by the 
Rev. John Hall, D. D., of New York, which is printed with 
the Annual Report. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



In recounting the events of the year at this our 
annual gathering, we are often called, not only to speak 
of wojk performed, but of workers who have finished 
their course. To this custom the present occasion 
furnishes no exception. Since our last meeting the 
Hon. Albert Fearing has been called to his rest and 
reward. For thirty-three years he served the Society 
as Trustee, and was for twenty- three years a member of 
its Executive Committee. During this long period the 
Society has enjoyed the benefits of his wise counsel and 
his ready aid. A Christian philanthropist, quick to per- 
ceive the evils of society and cheerfully consecrating his 
time and his wealth to their removal, he ever felt that 
the world s hope and the world s cure is to be found in 
the possession of divine truth and in obedience to its 
teachings. For this he labored while he lived, and 
being dead he still speaks in his parting gift to the 
Society and in the richer legacy of his remembered 
life. 

There have been issued from the Depository during 
the year twenty-eight thousand nine hundred and 
twenty-six volumes. Of these, ten thousand eight 
hundred and forty-eight were Bibles ; eight thousand 
five hundred and eighty-six Testaments ; three thousand 



8 

six hundred and fifty-nine Testaments with the Psalms, 
and five thousand eight hundred and thirty-three 
smaller portions of the Scriptures. Of the whole num- 
ber, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-four were 
in various foreign languages. 

The gratuitous issues have amounted to nine thousand 
four hundred and fifty-five volumes, costing $3,267.87. 

They have been appropriated as follows : — To sea- 
men^ one thousand eight hundred and four ; Mission 
Sabbath Schools, eight hundred and sixty-four ; City 
Missions, one thousand one hundred and eighty-five ; 
Public Institutions, three hundred and thirty-one ; to the 
destitute in Massachusetts, two thousand one hundred 
and eighty-seven ; in Maine and New Hampshire, one 
hundred and thirty-one ; in the South and West, three 
hundred and sixty-eight ; by colporters, two thousand 
five hundred and eighty-five. 

The exploration and supply of the city of Lowell, 
begun in December, 1874, has been finished during the 
past year. The colporter, Rev. Mr. Willey, spent nine 
months in this work, visiting nearly eight thousand 
families, of whom eighteen hundred and sixty-eight 
were destitute of the Scriptures, one hundred and forty- 
one being Protestants. One hundred and forty-eight 
destitute families were supplied, four hundred and four 
copies of the Scriptures were sold, and eleven hundred 
and twelve given away. Of the nearly three thousand 
Catholic families visited, twelve hundred were in pos- 
session of the Douay Bible. In summing up his labors 
he says: — ** A few families I failed to reach. Some 
were absent ; some moved into neighborhoods after I 
had visited them ; some did not understand my work 
and were too much occupied to listen to the statement 
of what I was doing, and others still, and among them 



members of our churches, annoyed by my visit, rudely 
shut the door upon me. With these few exceptions, I 
have been kindly received by all classes. I have circu- 
lated the Scriptures in eight different languages. The 
books have been received with many expressions of 
gratitude, and will, I have no doubt, be carefully read. 
With many it is the first time they have owned the 
Scriptures. The destitution, I have found, has not been 
confined to the poor.' In connection with my special 
work I have endeavored, and with success in several 
instances, to promote attendance upon public worship 
among the very large class who statedly neglect it. 
In furtherance of the work I have attended on the 
Sabbath, and during the week, jneetings to the number 
of several hundred. My labors have been severe, but 
have been cheerfully performed in the conviction that 
I was doing the work of the Master and promoting 
the welfare of my fellow men." 

Upon the completion of his work in Lowell, Mr. 
Willey commenced the canvass of the city of Lawrence. 
Thus far he has visited four thousand one hundred and 
seventy-six families ; supplied one hundred and nine 
destitute families, of which ninety-six were Protestant ; 
has sold one hundred copies of the Scriptures, and 
bestowed in charity one hundred and thirty-two. Of 
the nineteen hundred and fifty Catholic families visited, 
five hundred and fifteen had the Douay Bible. 

During the year, the city of Taunton has been can- 
vassed by a colporter, Rev. Mr. Leonard. In a little 
over three months he called upon four thousand one 
hundred and twenty-four families. Of the forty-three 
destitute Protestant families, forty were supplied, and 
forty-nine destitute individuals. One hundred and 
twenty copies of the Scriptures were sold and one 



lO 

hundred and forty-six were given to the poor and 
destitute. 

For a portion of the year a colporter, the Rev. Mr. 
Dwight, has labored in portions of this city, principally 
occupied by our foreign population. Of the two thou- 
sand one hundred families visited, but five hundred and 
fifty were Protestant. Three hundred and fifty copies 
of the Scriptures were distributed, largely by gift. His 
visits were principally among the poor, and in hundreds 
of their families he read the Scriptures and offered 
prayer. His reception was such as greatly to en- 
courage him in his work. 

The Rev. Mr. Slafter has labored for a portion of the 
year among the Episcqpal Churches of the State, and 
their contributions form a very important part of our 
total receipts. 

The income of the Society for the past year amounts 
to $29,760.54. In donations and legacies, $9,219.26. 
Sales of Bibles, $7,649.10. Interest and dividends, 
$8,679.36. Cash on hand at the beginning of the year, 
$4,212.82. The expenditures have been: for Bibles, 
$11,127.67; donations to American Bible Society, 
$2,790.78 ; to Thomas W. Durant, on annuity account, 
$45o ; salaries and colporters, $4,888.88 ; Annual Report 
and expenses of Anniversary, $221 ; rent, freight, and 
incidental expenses, $1,623.84. Balance in the Trea- 
sury, $2,822.19. Carried to investment account toward 
annuity of $5,ooo, and accumulated interest due Thomas 
W. Durant as per contract, $5,836.18. 

The completion of a century of our nation's life, 
naturally leads to a review of its history. In this 
review there is much to interest the friends of the Bible, 
for it reveals the fact that the founders of our govern- 
ment regarded the general diffusion of The Book among 



II 



the people, as a work so important as rightly to demand 
the public care. Thus, in 1777, when, in consequence 
of the war, the usual sources of supply were cut off, the 
subject of printing an edition of the Scriptures was 
referred by Congress to a committee, who reported 
adversely, from the fact, ** that the proper types for 
printing the Bible are not to be found in this country.*' 
They further recommend, that twenty thousand Bibles 
be purchased abroad, a measure which was also found 
to be impracticable from the blockade that virtually 
closed our ports. When private enterprise had suc- 
ceeded in printing a Bible, the edition was examined 
by a committee appointed by Congress, and afterwards 
by a vote of that body commended to the people. 
Thirty-one years later, the friends of the Bible, to sup- 
ply the existing need of the Scriptures, organized associ- 
ations, which, extending with the increase of the people, 
now cover nearly every portion of our inhabited terri- 
tory. The first Society was formed in 1 808. Our own 
Society, the third in the series, was formed in the year 
following. 

The vast collection at Philadelphia of rare, curious 
and useful articles, the product of the genius and art, . 
and productive and beneficent industry of the world, 
contains nothing more interesting to the friend of his 
race, and nothing that more accurately indicates the 
world's true progress, than the apartment containing 
the Bible in the shapes it has borne for the past four 
centuries, and in the hundreds of tongues in which it is 
now imparting its truths to an awaking world. It is 
estimated that one hundred years ago there were not 
more than four millions of Bibles in existence, in fifty 
languages and dialects. One single Society, the British 
and Foreign, in the seventy-one years of its life, has put 



12 



in circulation nearly seventy-four millions of copies of 
the Bible and portions of the Bible, in over two hundred 
languages and dialects, and has expended nearly forty 
millions of dollars in translating, printing and dissemi- 
nating the Scriptures. 

Twelve years after the formation of the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, the American Bible Society was 
formed. In sixty years its total issues of Bibles and 
Testaments and portions of the same, have amounted to 
over thirty-three millions of copies in fifty different 
languages. It has expended in this work more than 
seventeen millions of dollars. 

Since this associated effort of the friends of the Bible 
for its dissemination began, the Christian scholarship of 
the world has produced not far from two hundred and 
fifty versions of the Bible or parts of the Bible, and two 
hundred languages and dialects have thus for the first 
time been enriched with the literature of this Book. 
Indeed, peoples not a few are indebted to the friends of 
the Bible for a written language, with its unnumbered 
benefits. Their speech has been reduced to writing, 
that thus in their own tongue they might possess the 
oracles of God. Through the medium thus provided 
for the entrance of divine truth, light on all subjects per- 
taining to their good finds entrance. They emerge from 
barbarism ; a new intellectual and moral light is theirs ; 
they have come under those influences through which, 
in ever growing improvement, our race shall reach its 
appointed destiny. The Bible was the first printed 
book bestowed upon the then world of readers. As 
successive portions of the human family, by philan- 
thropic and Christian labors are added to that world, 
the Bible is usually the first book in their language. It 
is the pillar of cloud by day and of fire by night to the 



13 

oppressed tribes of earth in their journey to the prom- 
ised land. 

In the success that has attended this work hitherto, 
and in the opening fields at home and everywhere that 
invite our occupation, we are furnished with induce- 
ments to continued and increased exertion. Deeply 
regretting that the means furnished for this work have 
been so inadequate to its proper performance, we are 
yet thankful for what has been effected, and commit the 
results of our work to His care, without whose blessing 
our best intended labors are vain. 



ADDRESS 



OF 



REV. JOHN HALL. D.D 



My Dear Christian Friends : 

It is a very great pleasure, and, as I esteem it, a very high honor lo 
speak here to-day on behalf of the Massachusetts Bible Society, — one 
of the oldest organizations for this noble purpose of Bible diffusion, 
upon this continent. And in attempting to discharge the duty that is 
assigned to me in this hour, I shall not address myself in any degree 
to the learned and the scholarly, who cannot be supposed to need 
instruction, even if I were capable of giving it ; but I shall tr}' to 
speak to the good sense of the average Christian person, upon the 
subject of the Bible, the difficulties that appear in our time to be 
thrown in the way of receiving it, and the light in which we ought to 
regard, as it seems to me, these difficulties. And I trust that that 
good Spirit of God, who has inspired the Word, and whose grace and 
enlightenment have been so fervently invoked, will assist me in 
speaking the truth, so that what is uttered here may forward this 
great cause, and at the same time promote the instruction and 
encouragement of God's people who are gathered together in con- 
nection with his Word. 

And surelv it cannot be considered a mere coincidence that the 
Bible and the highest civilization do so uniformly go together ; — and 
if any one were disposed to regard it as a coincidence, it would be 
extremely difficult for him to account for the uniformity with which it 
is presented among the nations of the earth. Either on the one hand 
we must hold that the Bible is the cause of this high civilization, or 
we must be willing to admit on the other, that highly civilized people 



15 

exhibit a very great preference for the Word. And then again the 
difficulty would be very great to account for the fact that there is such 
an uniform cleaving to the Bible on the part of tribes and kindreds 
and nations and communities that have been, by the hypothesis, 
civilized in other ways, and without its instrumentality. And yet 
there is a strange perverse misreading, as it seems to me, of many 
important matters that are akin at least to the question that is before 
us to-day. There is no manner of doubt, for example, that among 
widely diffused races, and from the most ancient times, there has 
been a tendency to create a priesthood, and to offer sacrifices, so as to 
propitiate the Deity. Now, it has been sometimes suggested that the 
Hebrew race only traveled in the way in which other races of men 
have traveled, and that the sacrifices that are presented to us so 
frequently in the Scriptures, are only one variety of this widely 
diffused habit and tradition found among the races of men. Bui 
surely it would be more reasonable and more just to suppose that 
somewhere very near the fountain-head of the race, this institution of 
sacrifice came to man commended by very high authority, and that its 
origin among the tribes of men is to be found in this commendation, 
— so that wherever men were scattered and dispersed in the progress 
of the ages, they carried with them the broken memories and the 
hereditary traditions of this most ancient appointment. 

In the same way there are found in some of the early oriental 
religious literatures, certain maxims and counsels and statements of 
principle that are confessedly not unlike many things that we find, for 
example, in the book of Proverbs ; and accordingly it has been 
suggested that there is a common origin, and that these statements in 
the Bible stand upon substantially the same basis upon which these 
admirable maxims stand in the literatures to which I have alluded. 
But surely it would be a more reasonable thing to reverse this 
argument, and to suppose that these various oriental religious systems 
derived these maxims, — that have been applauded, it sometimes seems 
to me, a little disproportionately, — derived them from the traditions of 
this revelation, a portion of which confessedly was given to our race 
at a very early period of its history. 

It is the fashion in some quarters just now to write up Mohammed- 
anism, upon the ground of some admirable elements that are found 
in its authoritative writings. Five hundred years after this, it would 
be competent, upon somewhat the same kind of ground, to write up 
the Book of Mormon, because it also contains some exceedingly 
admirable statements, but which a candid and dispassionate reader 



i6 

will be apt to trace, as he would in the case of the Mohammedan 
book, to a source higher than man s original and native powers, up to 
that revelation that has been given in the beginning and recorded in 
this Word. 

It is a very well known circumstance, that among very widely 
scattered races of mankind, and in the most opposite portions of the 
earth, there has been a certain degree of sacredness connected with 
the serpent, and a great tendency on the part (»( many of our race to 
indulge in some form of serpent worship. It is well known how 
many allusions there are in the ancient mythology, and in the 
legendary literature of ancient nations, to serpents and to dragons, and 
to their battles with the saints, and to the victories achieved over them, 
and to the celebrity thus won by the victors. The story of ** Saint 
George and the Dragon," and the still older story associated with Sl 
Patrick and his banishment of serpents, may be taken as specimens 
of these still widely circulated traditions. Now, it has been suggested 
that in consequence of these widely circulated traditions, the Bible 
story of the serpent, with which the Book begins, is to be placed in 
the same category, and regarded in the same light in which we regard 
these strange mythological productions. But surely it would be more 
just and candid to reason in another way, and to suppose that some- 
where near the fountain-head of our race there was some injurious 
contact with the serpent, — some mischief supposed to be done by the 
serpent to the race, some victory over it announced, and some close 
connection between that triumph and the welfare of the human race, 
and that these have been sounding down the ages in broken memories, 
in strange and occasionally distorted forms, but all attesting what a 
deep hold this matter had taken upon the human memory at the 
beginning, and how profound the impression was that the incident 
made upon mankind. 

There have been usually two motives by which men have been 
actuated in presenting their worship. In some instances they have 
set up their priesthood and they have offered their sacrifices, not so 
much in the hope of acquiring positive benefit, as in the hope of 
deprecating wrath that they apprehended ; while, in the other in.stance, 
they have been expecting positive good, and have come with their 
services, as with their petitions, in the hope of brin^rini; this positive 
good down upon them. Now it is not difficult to sec how both these 
principles might come into operation as men sunk lower and lower 
in ignorance, superstition and degradation, and so there might 
come out of that original history verified in the Book of Genesis, 



17 

that widely diffused serpent- worship of which, we apprehend, the 
most perverse misreadings have sometimes been presented in our 
literature. 

If it be permitted to me, it seems that a rough and ready illustra- 
tion of the principle that I am just now adverting to, might be found 
in our own history. It is known to many here how many persons 
have from year to year been exerting themselves to discover Capt. 
Kidd's supposed treasures, upon the banks of the Hudson, and along 
the whole of this northeast shore. Now, there is no difficulty to any 
one who knows the history, in explaining that fruitless search in 
which men engage from time to time. There was a real Capt. Kidd, 
and he did really hide actual treasure. It is a matter of history that 
it was discovered in Gardiner's Island. The Governor of the State of 
Massachusetts, very properly I presume, took possession of it, and it 
must have made a considerable stir at the time. Vague rumors, 
floating traditions, broken statements in relation to that became 
diffused over the country. But the point on which your attention is 
to be fixed is this, — that there needed to be the nucleus of fact to 
give origin to this widely spread tradition and this body of vague 
expectation. There must be one original sound in order to originate 
the echoes. And so, we take it, it is fair and just to believe concern- 
ing that large class of facts with which our current literature deals, 
and so much of which it is inclined at first sight to treat as legendary 
and mythical. There must have been a body of original fact, in 
order to originate and maintain these broken memories and floating 
traditions that have been passing down among the various tribes and 
races of our scattered humanity. 

In the time in which we live, the assault upon the Bible has taken 
a form akin to the times themselves, — as indeed always will be the 
case. There was a time when men were inclined very much to 
discuss questions of pure and abstract evidence ; and then Hume 
came forth with his assault on the ground of miracles. There was a 
time and a place when men were inclined to cast off every kind of 
yoke and trample upon every sort of authority ; and then Voltaire and 
Rousseau, and others of their class, made their assaults upon the 
Word. And it seems to me that if any one is inclined to be dis- 
couraged as to the present condition of this blessed Book in the 
estimation of mankind and in the thought of the Christian Church, 
he may take great confidence to himself from a comparison of the 
present style and type of assault, with the style and type of assault in 
former days. In the time, for example, when Voltaire and his 
3 



i8 

associates led their assault, there was far more of educated mind 
against the Word than there is now. There was for more of strong 
public sentiment against the Word than there is now. There was far 
less living religion to sustain it than there is now. For it is no libel 
upon the churches of those days, to say that there was comparative 
deadness among them. The power that was represented by these 
men and their associates in their assault upon the Word was great, — 
out of all proportion to the power that is represented by present 
assaults ; while on the other hand, the numbers, the character, the 
union, the living enthusiasm, and the spiritual godliness on the part 
of the friends of the Bible now, are out of all proportion to the 
corresponding qualities that were found in the days when religion had 
to resist the assaults of Diderot, Voltaire, Rousseau, and men of that 
class. 

The age in which we live is devoted in a very high degree to the 
pursuit of physical studies ; and among some of the students of this 
class there has been confessedly a tendency to ignore the historical 
authority at least of portions of this blessed Book. Now, it is a very 
easy thing for you and me, dear friends, to form to ourselves a 
somewhat exaggerated notion of the numbers, character, influence 
and extent of hostility on the part of these men. I should be 
the very last to utter a depreciatory word in relation to the students 
of natural science, who have done so much to widen the range of 
human knowledge. I should be inclined to make very little indeed 
of that so-called conflict between the Christian religion and scientific 
inquiry. There does not seem to me to be nearly so much of it as 
one might suppose from current literature. Why, only take the 
trouble to think for yourselves, how many distinguished names you 
would at once recall that are supposed to be enlisted in hostility 
against the Word. The popular mind would enumerate Darwin, and 
Tyndall, and Huxley, and perhaps two or three more men of the 
same class ; and in point of fact there the list ends. Then, again, 
when you come to analyze these men, you find that a number of 
them are very conspicuously before the public, because of their facility 
of communicating knowledge in a popular way. One or two of 
them are most admirable popular lecturers. When you come to 
analyze them a little further, you are forced to this conclusion, — that 
they have a very ardent appreciation each of the other, and that they 
continually avail themselves of opportunities each to magnify the 
services and exalt the names of the others. 

You may say that their books are extremely widely studied, and 



19 

that that is proof what a strong hold they have upon the general 
public mind. Now, I happen to have it on the authority of one of 
the most intelligent and cultivated publishers and booksellers in the 
city of New York, that by far the largest number of purchasers of 
these books are found among the men of my own profession. It is 
the clergy as a whole who mainly buy the works of Darwin, Huxley, 
Tyndall and the rest ; and I say it is eminently creditable to them, 
that they are the purchasers to such a large degree. They have no 
fear of the result ; and they feel that it is right to look at the difficul- 
ties in a manly and honest way; and they wish to be competent 
instructors of their people, and to know therefore the difficulties that 
are put in the way of the people. Now, it seems to me that when a 
just-minded and candid man has taken these things into account, he 
will be apt to feel that even on this side the opposition that seems 
to be raised to the Bible in our time is by no means so alarming 
or so formidable as at first sight it might appear. 

There is one other consideration that it seems to me ought to be 
taken into account I think it a very unlikely thing (I don't speak 
now of intimate personal knowledge, but upon general principles) — 
I think it a very unlikely thing that these men would be willing to 
arrange themselves as opponents of the Bible. I think it a very likely 
thing that many of them would resent the imputation to them of 
conclusions that have been supposed logically to follow from their 
doctrines, or the corollaries and deductions that have been drawn by 
comparatively illiterate men, who wished to put forward their own 
unbelief under the auspices of very distinguished names. I think it 
a very likely thing, for example, that Mr. Darwin goes to his parish 
church like other well-conditioned Englishmen of his class and 
society ; and that he would take it as something offensive to him, if it 
were charged upon him that his independent scientific speculations 
were intended by him, or even adapted in their own nature to throw 
discredit upon these Holy Oracles ; and I feel very sure, that as 
Christian men we ought, in honesty and justice, to be fair in our esti- 
mate of these men, and to give them credit for the precise position in 
which they stand, and the precise ground which they occupy. 

There is one other extenuating circumstance that I feel persuaded 
we ought to take into account. It is an age that is extremely favorable 
to the pursuit of physical studies. These studies are very closely 
connected with "bread and butter" considerations. Their results can 
be utilized very promptly, and turned into money and influence and 
position. Great numbers therefore are drawn towards studies of this 



20 

class. Now, I can hardly help thinking (I speak this with great 
deference and some timidity, — not as a thing that I know intimately, 
but as something that on general principles I should be inclined to 
anticipate) — that men long accustomed to the successful pursuit of 
purely physical studies would thereby be in some degree disqualified 
for entering in perfect fairness upon what may be called spiritual, 
religious investigation. I reason in relation to myself in some such 
way as this : Suppose I had been in the habit for many years of laying 
out my mental strength, such as it is, upon physical investigations. 
To-day some one puts a powder into my hand, and I put it into the 
crucible. To-morrow some one puts an unknown substance into my 
hand, and I try it by chemica 1 tests. The next day some one puts 
another unknown slibstance into my hand, and it is put upon the 
dissecting table and tried with the scalpel. I get the mental habit 
of mastering things, and feeling that they must needs submit in my 
hands to physical tests. And when this has become the bent of my 
mind, so to speak, the bent of my disposition and habit, then there 
comes this Book to me, and it challenges my belief and acceptance. 
But I cannot bring the scalpel to bear upon it. I cannot put it in the 
crucible. It will not go on the dissecting table. It challenges other 
tests, and demands that it shall be examined by laws appropriate to 
itself ; and the pride of my nature is in some degree aroused, and I 
am inclined to say, '*I will not submit to this thing, that will not 
attest itself to me as other things have been wont to attest themselves 
to me. I decline to bow down to it with reverence." Now, I am 
inclined to think that we ought to take these extenuating circum- 
stances into account when we would form a just opinion, moral 
and evidential, of the apparent jarring and collision between the 
students of physical science on the one hand, and the adherents of 
this blessed Book on the other. 

But, dear Christian friends, the line of thought upon which I would 
especially desire to fix your attention in continuation, is this : That 
this pursuit of physical studies is only one of the large number of 
concurring lines along which the human mind is traveling, in the 
advances of our times. Let me indicate to you two or three of these 
concurring lines. There is, for example, the science (for I think it 
deserves to be so called) of Archaeology. It never had so many enlight- 
ened and enthusiastic adherents as it has at this moment. Some of 
the very best minds of our race are deeply interested in its pursuit. 
Nearly three thousand years ago the Chaldean monarch determined to 
found a Royal Library. The facilities to be sure were not very great 



21 

— plates artificially constructed, cakes of soft clay with letters made 
up)on their surface, and then the cakes baked to the requisite degree 
of hardness and laid upon the shelves, with their rude literature. 
This did not make a very auspicious beginning for a Royal Library. 
But when more than two thousand five hundred years have passed 
away, the value of them begins to be apparent. True, the city is 
besieged and burned — burned perhaps over and over again. True, 
the men who would read the books in the library must dig up their 
broken fragments from the mounds and ruins. But a London news- 
paper sends Mr. George Smith to do that very thing, and he does 
it, and brings back the tattered leaves, so to speak, of these old 
royal Chaldean works ; and to the student of Archaeology they give 
the most unexpected corroboration to the ancient histories of the 
most ancient of these books. Soon after Colenso and men of his 
class have been weakening apparently the evidences upon which 
Genesis is commended to our judgment and faith, from those com- 
paratively new departments of human thought, there come corrobo- 
rative evidences that show at what an early stage of human history 
the human fall and the human sin, and the judgments that came 
upon the race, and the deluge, and the fire from heaven, had taken 
a firm hold upon the memory, and may we not believe also, upon the 
conscience of mankind. 

Now, the point I wish you to carry away with you is this : That in 
Archaeology, everything that has been discovered, everything that men 
have yet learned, is in the direction of sustaining and upholding this 
blessed Book. There never was a time when men were giving so 
much attention to ancient art as at this present moment — the art 
particularly that is concerned with pottery and man's early efforts to 
subsidize the earth and convert it into forms of beauty as well as into 
forms of value. This is receiving the closest attention at the present 
time : and every one that has looked into the matter knows how much 
light is cast through these potter)' investigations upon the manners 
and habits, the usages and the degrees of civilization that the peoples 
of the earth have had at specific periods. A few months ago a very 
cultivated New York gentleman, engaged upon the daily press of the 
city, and who I am assured is the highest authority upon this continent 
upon questions connected with art of this kind, was good enough to 
deliver a lecture in a scientific course there, and among the many 
interesting things that he brought out, this was one — that pursuing 
investigations upon this line, independently and without any specific 
relation to the Bible, he was compelled, as an intelligent investigator, 



22 

to believe that the history of our race does not materially differ in 
point of time from what may be regarded as the accepted chronology 
as it is given in this blessed Book ; — in other words, that investiga- 
tions into the history of ancient art, particularly in the line of pottery 
manufactures, goes to show that there is no such antiquity to be 
ascribed to our race as has sometimes been asserted for it on the part 
of literary men. 

But these are not the only lines upon which the human mind is 
now going forward. I do not need to tell you how very earnest and 
enthusiastic are the inquiries that many push in the direction of 
Geography. The race seems to be bent upon subduing and ruling 
over the earth, and therefore it must know the earth, no matter 
through what perils. The north pole, or whatever else is unknown, 
is an object of contemplation to the enthusiastic geographer. It is 
very well known to many of you that for many years there has been 
a special expedition from this continent engaged in the exploration of 
Palestine. There has been a corresponding expedition from the 
British Christian people, — the land being divided between the two 
parties. Every one knows how many allusions there are contained in 
this Book to the places of the Old Testament — more particularly 
Syria and the neighborhood. Every one knows how easy it is to 
detect forgeries when there is a free and frequent mention of places. 
Now, surely it ought to occur to a man of good sense, that if the 
Bible is questionable upon this line of investigation, the unbelievers 
had better send out an exploring expedition and detect the impostures. 
But it is the Christian people that send these expeditions. At least 
they show the confidence they have in the Book. If they doubted it, 
instead of giving their money to sustain these efforts, why, they had 
better pay the gentlemen to stay at home and let nothing be said on 
the subject. But they do not 

I remember in one of the Teachers' Meetings of the church over 
which I preside, hearing a very good illustration given by a thoughtful 
young fellow. Whether it was original with him I cannot say. 
Practically it does not matter. It will serve my purpose here if 
you will permit me to repeat it. In one of the manufacturing 
towns of England there were a great many thefts being committed at 
the works of a cloth manufacturer. The webs of cloth were taken 
away before they were finished, and before they were marked, when 
identification of them as the property of a particular individual was 
excessively difficult. Suspicion at length fell upon a particular person, 
and he was arraigned, and some of the cloth found, as it was believed, 



23 

in his possession. He went into the courts and defended the case, 
and challenged the accuser to prove anything against him. ''Where 
is the mark? where is the evidence that this is your cloth?" Well, 
every body knows how alike one web of cloth unfinished is to another 
web of cloth unfinished, and the question looked embarrassing ; when 
a long-headed foreman of the works where the mischief was being 
done, stood up and said to the jury, "Gentlemen, there were no 
marks put upon this cloth, but the way in which we dry the cloth is 
this: we have frames, and we stick hooks through each end of the 
web, and then we stretch it until it dries. Now, if that is our cloth, 
let some of you gentlemen of the jury go with me to the works, and I 
will show you the hooks on which we stick the webs, and if that is our 
cloth, the holes in the web ought to fit the hooks that I will show 
you. " They thought that was a very common-sense test, and they 
tried it ; and surely enough the hooks and the holes corresponded, 
and a verdict was given for the owner of the cloth, and of guilt upon 
him who had stolen it. 

Now, it is so, Christian friends, — it is so with this Book upon the 
geographical line. What a multitude of places it names ! How 
fearlessly it deals with them, — important places, insignificant places, 
great places and little places. It names their distances, fixes their 
relations, and does all this with the consciousness of men who knew 
they were telling the truth. And men have gone to the place, and 
have searched and examined and sifted and scrutinized, and without 
one single exception yet noticed, the hooks and the holes fit to one 
another, and the book is commended to us on the geographical line, 
as being a true book with a veritable and reliable history. 

History, that I have just now mentioned, is another of the lines on 
which men have been intent for some time past. I do not suppose we 
have ever had so many intelligent students of history as we have at 
this moment ; and if we do not seem to be producing great books 
uf)on the subject, we have a very widely diffused knowledge upon 
the matter. Now, I think it will be admitted by every one, that 
history has not contributed any considerable share to the hostility and 
opposition to the Bible : while on the other hand, history is willing 
to admit that it has received valuable assistance in its pursuits from 
the testimony of this blessed Book. The older men who are here 
recollect very well what an impression was made years ago by the 
introduction of what was called the "destructive style of criticism.*' 
It had its origin in one of the German universities, and, like every- 
thing new and plausible, it spread very rapidly. One distinguished 



24 

man applied the * * destructive criticism " with ruthless relentlessness to 
portions of Grecian and Roman History, and for a time he and his 
colleagues seemed to carry the day. Homer disappeared in the mists. 
Troy went down into, not only oblivion, but nothingness ; and we 
were taught to believe that the very place itself was no more than a 
myth, and that such a thing as Troy, there was no reason to believe 
ever actually existed. But Mr. Schliemann goes over : and he makes 
investigations upon the spot ; and he disinters Troy ; and he introduces 
us to Priam ; and he gives us at least reasonable ground to believe that 
we may still (however they may have troubled us in our school-boy 
days) — we may still have kindly recollections of Hector and Agamem- 
non and Andromache and Menelaus and Paris and the fair Helen 
herself, not as myths, but as real personages, around which we may 
be willing to believe that the genius of Homer and of his times has 
flung a nimbus of enthusiasm — a kind of poetic glory. But the 
point I want to make here is the same as that already illustrated by 
Captain Kidd. There must have been — the human mind is being 
compelled to believe by history, — there must have been the nucleus 
fact in order to originate the circumstances, the mass, if you will, of 
embellishment, or even of exaggeration. 

Now, if it is true that upon these various lines of human investi- 
gation, — Archaeology, Art, History, Geography, — all the evidences that 
are brought to bear, and all the results that are reached, are confirma- 
tory of God's Word, instead of adapted to weaken its authority, this 
ought in all candor to be taken into account by us when we attempt 
to form an estimate of the value of that difficulty (to put it in the 
mildest way) that physical science seems to throw in the path of this 
our blessed Bible. 

The other day I had occasion to converse with a man, who, if I 
were to name him, (and he is a New Englander, although not now in 
New England,) would be accepted as a very high authority upon 
metaphysical studies. I said to him, ** Do you feel any apprehension 
as to the authority of the Word being in any degree shaken by the 
successful prosecution of studies in your particular line?" He seemed 
to look with some degree of surprise upon my putting the ques- 
tion. *'Why, certainly no," he said, '*the more we know of mental 
science the more we see that it, with its discoveries, if you may 
so call them, and its ascertained results, constitute a part of that great 
whole with which God is dealing in the world, and His perfect 
knowledge of this human mind is illustrated and manifested on every 
page of the Word. " 



25 

It is true there are men who feel some degree of difficulty upon 
this ground : — that the Book of Genesis does not certainly, — 
admittedly — does not speak in scientific language of the history of the 
world and the commencement of our race. And now, I would like 
to say a word or two touching that difficulty in the minds of some. 
It is demanded (when you put it in the direct and simple way) that 
we should have in the Bible an inspired scientific history of the world 
and our race — an ''inspired history.'' Well, suppose we had an 
inspired history ; is there any good reason why we should have the 
human mind furnished in that particular direction, and not furnished 
in other kindred directions? Why should not the chemist demand an 
inspired chemistry, the philosopher an inspired philosophy, the phre- 
nologist an inspired phrenology. Then, if inspired in each department, 
there must needs be perfection ; and then we have all the various 
"ologies" given to us in perfection, — phrenology, neurology, archaeo- 
logy, — every one of these different departments of which you can 
think, each adherent demands, — and by the theory has his demand 
supplied, — that he will have inspired information upon this question. 
Well, if that is the case, there is an end of human investigation. 
There is no longer any stimulus to any one to scrutinize, sift, analyze. 
Here are the results, and nothing can be added to them, and nothing 
taken from them. 

Well, but it may be said, "It ought at least to be in scientific 
language. " Scientific language, as every thoughtful man knows, is 
continually fluctuating and changing. The garment, in other words, 
must be expanded as the body grows. Grant this, to begin with, that 
we ought to have the first part of our Bible in scientific language. 
The scientific language of what era, pray.^ The scientific language 
of what age, pray.^ Must it be the scientific language of the age of 
Moses } Who can say that that has not been actually conceded ? 
"Weil," but you say, "that is imperfect. That is what we object 
to.'* Well, the scientific language of what era .^ Say the scientific 
language of our own era. Then it would not have been intelligible 
to all the centuries past ; then it would be obsolete, if science is to 
advance as it has done — obsolete at no distant time in the ages to 
come. Well, but suppose it is demanded that there should be 
scientific statements on this particular department of human knowl- 
edge, then ought there not to be scientific statements of every other 
department of human knowledge, that the Bible in the least degree 
touches. But, suppose there is. Then what would the magnitude of 
our Bible be, — every department of human knowledge touched ; every 
4 



26 

department of human knowledge touched in scientific terms, — touched 
in perfect scientific language, — touched by inspiration, and therefore 
made perfect and complete ? The idea of a Pocket Bible will be out 
of the question. Many of you know the Encyclopaedia Britannica, one 
of our very valuable collections of human knowledge, in twenty-two 
solid quarto volumes, with an index into the bargain. But that would 
seem to me to be a very primer, in comparison with what the work 
must be that would exhaust every , department of human knowledge 
that the Bible has occasion to touch, and that would touch them all 
exhaustively, in scientific language upon which improvement would 
be out of the question. It is better for us to have this book as it is, 
even though men occasionally dare to bring against it charges of 
being obsolete, than to have a book, such as by the hypothesis it 
ought to be if it would satisfy these, as we think, unreasonable and 
extravagant demands. 

This Book is not obsolete in anv true sense, dear Christian friends. 
If you have an itinerary of a hundred years ago, it is obsolete. You 
cannot travel by it any more. Railroads by themselves have changed 
all the ways of traveling. If you take a medical book of a hundred 
years ago, it is practically obsolete ; medical science has gradually 
advanced. If you take a book of military tactics of a hundred years 
ago, it is substantially obsolete. The improvements in gunnery have 
changed military tactics. But who supposes for a moment that this 
Book is obsolete in any such sense as that ? God has not changed. 
He who is the same yesterday, and to-day and forever, Jesus Christ, 
has not changed. The Holy Spirit has not changed. The human 
heart has not changed. Moral qualities have not changed. Right and 
wrong have undergone no variation. The human soul as yet has 
undergone no substantial change. The devil has not yet modified his 
tactics. Heaven is the same. Hell, its dark and awful shadow, is still 
the same, and the way of reaching the one and escaping the other is 
still the same. And while this is the case, this Book never can be 
obsolete. *'The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul. The 
testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple." 

I have sometimes wondered whether our friends who devote them- 
selves to the study of purely scientific matters, would not with pro- 
priety learn a little hesitation, not to say modesty, from the results of 
their past efforts, and the weakening of the positions that they have 
sometimes been led to lake. There is not, for example, any more 
respectable name in science than that of Sir Charles Lyell. I remem- 
ber many years ago how popular for a time his uniformitarian theory 



27 

was. Do not many of you recollect the application he ventured to 
make of that uniformitarian theory, to a single bone of a human body 
that was found at the foot of a cliff on the Mississippi? There was but 
a single bone ; but that bone succeeded in achieving for itself a greater 
degree of notoriety than many a whole man has been able to acquire 
in the world. It was the most famous bone of all its time. There 
it was. at the foot of the cliff, and Sir Charles had his uniformitarian 
theory applied to it completely, and he was able to say just how long 
it took for the forming of riparian masses ; and he put his theory 
and the bone together, and he said in a rather non-committal way, 
"assuming that this theory can be sustained, and assuming that this 
bone was actually where it was found, then we are bound to believe 
that there has been a human population in the valley of the Mississippi 
for at least a hundred thousand years." But the trouble was that they 
were both assumptions, and that both assumptions were speedily upset. 
The uniformitarian theory had to go by the board, for men soon 
began to know that the Mississippi will send down far more clay in 
one year than in another. And then some one came along and said, 
** Sir Charles, if it were asserted that there used to be a graveyard at the 
top of the cliff, and that by the action of the river the cliff was under- 
mined and fell and the bone with it, would not that assist you in 
coming to a simpler explanation of this discovery.? " The worthy man 
was obliged to acknowledge that he could not disprove it. And so 
the whole theory in regard to the bone was effectually demolished. 

I hope it is not irreverent to the men of science, but I have some- 
times amused myself as I passed over the country with speculations as 
to what might come to pass in New Jersey in future days at one of the 
railway cuttings. They have cut through two or three great ledges of 
rock to get from the Jersey fiats into the back country. The cutting 
has been very deep, and into what I am sure is an ancient geological 
formation — one which is extremely hard. Now, will you suppose for 
a moment one of these cuttings to stand open for a generation. In 
the progress of time, two or three railway companies get together, and 
having ceased to fight each other, consolidate their lines, and this 
cutting becomes useless to them and they fill it up. And by and by a 
great city grows over the place. Then, in the course of years, it 
happens that a church or a bank is to be built, and in making the 
necessary excavations, the workmen fall unwittingly upon one of these 
closed-up cuttings. The geologists come along and can tell you how 
old the stone is that is there — two hundred and fifty thousand years at 
least. They open one of these filled-up pits, and as the workmen dig 



28 

out the rubbish, to their amazement and surprise they come uj)on 
•* Vinegar Bitters/' or "Elixir of Life," or "Hall's Balsam," if you 
will. And ihey get the theor}' and the fact perfectly established. 
There is no doubt about it. There it is in good, big, clean, legible 
English letters upon a formation two hundred and fifty thousand 
years old. That may seem to you very ridiculous and absurd. But 
there are things that are only to be laughed at. 

When I was a clergyman in Dublin, a good many years ago, there 
was a new road being made over what is verj' classic ground in that 
fair island. It was the localilv of the famous battle of Clun'arf — 

m 

where Br)'an Boroihme vanquished the Danes, — a very laudable thing 
in him. In making the road, they came upon a number of bones, and 
they had never before found anything in the least degree like them. 
They were not the bones of man, woman or child. What could they 
be? It was upon the place where this famous battle was fought ever 
so many hundred years ago. Workmen have come to find out that 
such curious things bring a price in the scientific market. (The story 
of flint arrow-heads is a curious one in that direction. ) They come 
to find out that these things are salable. In the course of a little 
time the report came in that a numerous collection of bones had been 
found in the place where this battle had been fought, and the theory 
was at once formed that they were human bones, and that they must 
be the bones of persons unlike the present occupants of the island. 
There was a good deal of flurry about the matter. But in my parish 
there was a bright young medical student — a thoughtful fellow, 
thoroughly imbued with the spirit of the Baconian philosophy. (I 
am glad to .say that he is now Professor in the University, and a very 
admirable one at that. ) Instead of speculating at the distance of 
three or four miles, he thought he would go up to the spot and see 
the bones. He got the men to dig a little deeper, and they dug out 
some more bones. At length he came upon an iron ; and then a 
second, and then a third, and then a fourth : and he .said to them, 
"What are those .^" And they said, "Those are the shoes of a 
donkey." "Yes, certainly," said he, "and those are the bones of 
the donkey, and it is nothing but the bones of a donkey that you 
have been making all this fuss about.'* [Laughter. ] 

Let us not, dear friends, leap to rash and hasty conclusions touch- 
ing this blessed Book. Let us not be afraid, although there be here 
and there statements and allegations which at the moment we cannot 
explain. There are many things we cannot explain, which yet we 
believe, and if there is anything that Christians, on purely scientific 



29 

and historic ground, ought to be brave enough and patient enough to 
do, it is this : To wait for further light and to believe that, as in time 
past, so it will be in time to come — a little learning leads men away 
from the Bible, and more will bring them back to it. 

This Book has been tried. Scientists have tried it already, and it 
has not suffered at their hands. In some instances they have realized 
that old fable of the viper that set about gnawing the file ; and as it 
saw the chips it concluded it was making considerable headway with 
its work, until the chips began to be tinted with blood, and then the 
viper, at length and for the first time, awoke to the fact that it was 
rubbing off its own teeth instead of making a hole in the file. 

History has tried this Book, and History owes more to the Book 
than the Book owes to History. Bad men have tried this Book ; 
they have tried it with ignominy and contempt and scorn. There 
were days when they thought it safe to heap ridicule upon it. They 
do not heap ridicule upon it now. No man claiming a place for 
himself among educated scholars would now dare to speak of this 
.Book in the language that was thought to be proper enough in the 
lips of Voltaire. Good men have tried this Book — good men of 
every class and of every condition — lawyers like Sir Matthew Hale, 
soldiers like Havelock and Stonewall Jackson, legislators like Wash- 
ington and like Wilberforce, popular educators like Arnold and 
like Alexander, scientific men like Sir Isaac Newton and Whewell, 
and many another of that class. They have tried it in every variety 
of condition and of circumstances. They have tried in their lives, in 
their temptations, in their sorrows, in their adversities, and in their 
prosperity, and the Book has not failed. And, dear Christian friends, 
you may try it too with confidence. You may lean upon it without 
fear. You may love it without reserve. Yon may stand up for it 
without flinching. You may clasp it to your bosoms without being 
ashamed of it. ** The Word of the Lord endureth forever." 

It is in some wav with this written Word like the Word Incarnate — 
the blessed Jesus. He had a true humanity. He was tired, He was 
hungry, He wept, He felt like a man ; and men, looking at these 
manifestations of true humanity, said to themselves, "That is all. Is 
He not the carpenter's .son ? Do not we know His mother and His sis- 
ters, and all about Him ? " It is so with this Book. It has, if I may 
so say, a true humanity. Here these words are, printed upon com- 
mon paper, with common letters — you put the same in your news- 
paper; printed with common type — other books are so printed; 
printed with common ink — you can get plenty of it in the stores. It 



30 

speaks in human language. It has varieties of style, varieties of char- 
acteristic, varieties, if you will, ©f features and distinction in the com- 
munication of thought. In other words, it has its human side ; and 
men, looking at these things, and looking at these alone, will be apt 
to think it is a mere human book, the outcome of human conscious- 
ness, — the results of human thought and emotion spread over its 
pages. But when they come to look deeper, it is like the Word Incar- 
nate, There is Deity along with the humanity. There is that which 
human consciousness did not create, and which human consciousness 
does not comprehend until enlightened by that Spirit that comes from 
the Father of Lights. And, as we take the Word Incarnate, and 
lean upon Him, and trust Him, and believe Him, and love Him, 
and say of Him, *' Whom, having not seen, we love, and in whom, 
though now we see Him not, yet believing, we rejoice with joy un- 
speakable and full of glory, " so let us take this Book, cling to it, 
rest upon it, love it, diffuse the knowledge of it, and give our money 
to circulate it. 

And let us not hesitate in our belief; let us not waver in our 
conviction that the more completely this Book takes hold of the judg- 
ment and the conscience and the conviction of this American people, 
the stronger guarantee is there that the Nation will hold on its way, 
and be made, in time to come, a yet greater blessing to the nations of 
the earth than it has been in the days that are past. 

So I commend to you, dear friends and brothers, this noble work 
of your State Society. I commend it, if it be needful, yet more to 
your affections, yet more to your consciences, yet more to your judg- 
ment, yet more to your liberality. Scatter the healing leaves. Send 
your representatives abroad with them. They may have some diffi- 
culties and some discouragements now, — you and they — but they that 
sow in tears, in the world's great harvest, shall reap with abounding 
joy. God bless you, and bless the work that He giveth you to do. 



Note. If any apology is needed for the style of the foregoing paragraphs, it is 
in the fact that they are a report of an unwritten address, and that the colloquialisms 
are reproduced with literal exactness. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

JiLY 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the Com- 
miiiee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for carrying into 
effect the object of this Association ; which, being read from the 
Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with 
one amendment, accei)ted and adopted as follows ; viz., — 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a fund 
by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and 
Testaments, to be distributed among all persons inhabiting within the 
State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who 
cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled clergymen 
of every denomination of Christians within the State, who shall, in 
writing, request to be members ; of every person who shall subscribe 
to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not less than two dollars, and 
who shall remain a member so long as he continues the payment of 
that sum ; and of every person who shall subscribe and pay to the 
Treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars, 'he remaining a member 
during life, without being obliged to further contributions. 

3. Subscriptions, for ihe purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the organization 
of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained, notice 
shall be given by the Committee, and also of the time and place of 
the meeting of the Society. 



32 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet, and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treasurer, 
Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who shall con- 
tinue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until successors 
are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen other 
members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom six shall 
be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a Board of 
Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any meet- 
ing, of which public notice shall be given by the President, Treasurer, 
or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among the 
members of the Society, a Committee of three persons, to continue 
in office during the pleasure of the Board of Trustees, who shall have 
the management of the fund, and the distribution of the books pro- 
cured with it, subject and according to such regulations and directions 
as shall from time to time be prescribed by the Trustees at any meet- 
ing held on public notice given as aforesaid ; and the Treasurer shall 
pay the moneys in his hands to the order of the said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes afore- 
said, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into effect the 
purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on regu- 
lar notice being given, for the due exercise of all the powers granted 
by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, or Record- 
ing Secretary, to devise and adopt such further measures as may be 
necessary for preserving the institution, and for effecting the intentions 
of the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the Trus- 
tees petitioned the General Court, and obtained the following 
Act of Incorporation.* 



ACT OF INCORPORATION 



CommoniDealt]^ of iWlasisiad^utfetto. 

In the year of our Lord One Thoisund Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate the 

Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Whereas the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with many 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in common 
use in the churches in New England, for distribution among all persons 
inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of 
others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects of said 
Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Society more 
extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an Act of 
Incorporation. 

Section i . Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives^ in General Court assembled^ and by authority of the same. That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D.. the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D. D., 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D. D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. Peter 
C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph Sewall, 
Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, Esquires, 
the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. Samuel 
H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who may hereafter 
associate, with them for the purposes aforesaid, be, and they hereby are, 
incorporated into a Society, by the name of The Bible Society of 
Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted. That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body cor- 
porate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legislature, 
and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said Society 
shall be capable of taking and receiving from any persons disposed to aid 
the benevolent purposes of this institution any grants or devises of lands 
and tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, bequests, and 
subscriptions of money, or other property, to be used and improved for the 
purposes aforesaid. 

5 



34 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted^ That the said Corporation shall be, and 
hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other than 
that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the whole 
estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted. That the said Society may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted. That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such other 
officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such rules and 
regulations as to them shall appear necessary, provided the same be not 
repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted. That William Phillips, Esq., be and he 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said 
Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and place 
of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the same ; 
may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and may vest 
in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by the said 
Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable to the 
principles of this institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Approved by 
the Governor, Feb, 15, 18 10. 



CommoniDealtl^ of iWa00ac]^u0ett0. 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-five. An Act in addition to an Act to incorporate the 

Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Be it enacted by the StncUe and House of Representatives, in GenercU 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section i. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafter be known by the 
name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name shall 
have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to all its 
liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had not been 
changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, 
and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English lan- 
guage, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now author- 
ized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in common 
use in the churches in New England, anything in the Act incorporating the 
said Society to the contrary notwithstanding. — Approved by the Governor, 
Feb. 27, 1865. 



BY- LAWS. 



-••»■ 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 185 1, the 
following By-Laws were adopted : 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act of 
Incorporation ; namely, **The raising of a fund by voluntary contri- 
bution to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, who 
are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently 
supplied without the aid of others." 



ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the State, may become a member of this Society by signifying 
his request in writing to that effect to the Recording Secretary, who 
shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become members, in 
a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE IIL 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued : and the Treasurer shall keep a 
list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than twenty 
dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the Society for 
life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording Secretary. 



36 

ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen Vice- 
Presidents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, Treasurer, 
and eighteen Trustees, and an Auditor. The President, Vice-Presi- 
dents, Corresponding and Recording Secretaries, and Treasurer, shall 
each be ex-officio members of the Board of Trustees, and the Record- 
ing Secretary shall be the recording officer of that Board. These 
officers shall all be chosen by ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ^^r-^fib Chairman of the Board of Trustees; 
and he, and also the Vice-Presidents and Secretaries and Treasurer, 
shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such officers respec- 
tively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of the 
Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act of Incorpo- 
ration is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the duties of 
all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all funds and 
donations, and generally have and possess all the power and authority 
vested by the Act aforesaid in the Society. It shall be their duty, 
however, at every Annual Meeting, to make and lay before the Society 
a particular Report of all their doings, with all such documents and 
vouchers as may be asked for by any member ; and such Report shall 
be had and considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice 
of Trustees for the year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the Monday 
preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and at this meet- 
ing it shall be competent to transact any business which the Society 
can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall be given by the 
Recording Secretary at least seven days before the holding thereof, by 
notice published in at least one newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by the 
Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three newspapers 
published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at such 
meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 



37 



ARTICLE X. 



The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as they 
may direct, or as the President may at any time call. Five Trustees 
shall be a quorum to transact business. 



ARTICLE XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually, 
shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, a Com- 
mittee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the funds, 
and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with them ; the 
Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of all matters con- 
nected with the agencies of the Society, the appointment of all agents, 
subject to the approval of the Trustees, and the defining of their 
respective duties ; the Committee on the Depository shall have the 
management of all matters connected with the Society's Depository for 
the sale of Bibles, — all of said Committees at all times, however, to 
be subject to the direction and control of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE Xin. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual meet- 
ing, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose by vote of 
a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE-MEMBERS. 

Each Life-Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles and 
Testaments. 

N. B. — The above books will be delivered to members by personal 
application, or to their order ; and they can be issued only for the 
current, not for past years. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



BAKNSTABLB COUNTY. 



Centreville Congregational church. 
Falmouth Congregational church. 
Yarmouth First Congregational church. 



BSRKSHIRS COUN*^. 

Alford, Almira Milligan. 

BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Easton, Congregational Society, 
Fairhaven, Mrs. A. P. Wilder. 
Norton, Congregational church. 
Taunton, by Rev. H. P. Leonard, Local 
Agent, 



|io oo 
as 75 

33 75 

$69 50 
$5 00 

I7 00 
15 00 

13 45 

109 25 

I144 70 
|a 00 



DUKES COUNTY. 

Edgartown. a friend, 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Andover, South church, I43 43 

Free church. a6 31 

Bradford. First church. (3 l. m.) 45 10 

Danvers. First church, (a L. M.) 40 00 

Maple street church, ^i l. m.) 44 41 

Georgetown. Or. Memorial church, (i l. m.) 3a la 
Gloucester, Congregational church. (3 l.m.) 53 91 

by W. M. Mellen, Local Agent. 25 32 

Groveland. Congregational church, 13 75 

Haverhill. Central Congregational church, 12 35 

North Congregational church. 27 43 
Lawrence. Haverhill street Methodist 

Episcopal church, 20 34 

Lawrence st. Congregational church. 43 54 

Manchester, Congregational church. 10 40 

Newburyporl. North Congregational ch. n 57 

Whitfield Congregational church, 15 53 

Belleville Congregational church. 75 35 

Peabody. South Congregational church, 83 95 

Salisbury and Amesbury. Cong, church, 6 63 

Saugus. Congregational church, 14 73 

Wenham. Congregational church, 25 00 

Salem. South Cong church, (2 L.iM.} 94 64 

North Andover. Congregational church, 10 00 

Ipswich. First Congreg.iiioaal church. 25 00 

$799 80 

FRA.S'KLI.N COUNTY. 

Bemardston. Congregational church, I2 00 

Conway, Cong, church, additional,; 3 00 

South Deerfield, Cong, church. '2 l. m.) 40 00 

Greenfield, Second Congregational church, 58 39 

Heath, a friend, 5 00 

Orange, Conzrcijational church, 4 63 

Shelbume. Mr. Uavid Fisk, 50 00 

Warwick. Congregational church, 6 00 

Whatcly, Congregational church, 7 07 

I 176 09 
Franklin Co. Bible Soc. on Book Acc't, 236 53 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 

Chicopee, Second Cong, church, $x8 80 

Tnird Congregational church, 23 75 

South Hadley r alU. First church. 31 00 

Hampden Co. Bible Soc. Int. account, 13 80 
Longmeadow, Ladies' Bene v. Association, 21 37 

Gentlemen's Benevolent Association, 23 2$ 

Monson, Congregational church, i 00 

Palmer, Second Congregational church, 8 88 

West Springfield, First Cong, church, 18 00 

Wilbraham, Cong, church, (i l. m.) 52 25 

$212 90 
Hampden Co. Bib. Soc. on Book Account, 87 68 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 

Amherst. North Congregational church, 
Belchertown, Congregational church, 
Elasthampton, Payson Cong, church, 
Greenwich, Rev. E. P. Blodgett, 
Hadley. Russell church. 

Second Congregational church, 
Hatfield, Congregational church, 
Northampton, Exlwards church, 
Westhampton, Congregational church. 



$27 


00 


46 


00 


35 39 


3 


10 


II 


7« 


8 


•5 


46 


00 


28 


70 


18 


00 



$224 15 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Acton, Congregational church, 
Ashby, Congregational church, 
Ashland, a friend, 
Cambridge. North avenue Cong, church, 

A friend, 
Carlisle, Mrs. Patton, 
Concord, Bible Society, (2 l. m.) 
Groton. Congregational church, (2 i^ m.) 
Lincoln. Congregational church. 
Holliston, Congregational church, 
Littleton. Orthodox Cong, chin'ch. 
Lowell. Pawtucket Cong, church, 

Kirk street Congregational church. 

By Rev. W. Willcy. Local Agent, 
Maynard, Congregational church, 
Melroie, Congregational church, 
Natick, First Congregational church. 
North Reading. Congreg.itional church, 
Newtonvillc. Central Cong, church, 
Pepperell, Congregational church, 
Saxonvillc. Edwards church, 
Shirley, Congregational church. 
Sherborn. Ladies' Bcncv. Soc. 1,2 L. M.) 
Shirley, Conijregational church, 
Tewksbury, Congregational church, 
Townsend, Orthodox Cong, church, 
Waltham. Methodist Episcopal church, 

Trinitarian Congregational cliurch. 

Miss Sarah E. Smith, 
Westford, Congregational church. 
Woburn, Methodist Episcopal church. 



|6 


00 


7 


50 


2 


00 


48 


»7 




as 


X 


00 


103 


00 


57 


70 


22 


36 


22 


ot 


5 


00 


10 


00 


58 


11 


aoo 


12 


40 


23 


11 


41 


50 


5 


00 


«4 


23 


20 


95 


7 


12 


8 


50 


40 


00 


8 


50 


46 


00 


7 


65 


13 


00 


30 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 



184385 



39 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

South Abington, Congregational church. 
Braintrec. Congregational church. 
Cohasset, Second Congregational chiuxh, 
Dedham, Allin Evangelical church, 
Foxboro*. Congregational church, 
Franklin, Congregational church, 
Medway, M.M.Fisher, 

East Congregational church, 
Milton, Congregational church, 
Randolph. First Congregationsil church, 
Sharon, Congregational church, 
Stoughton, Congregational church. 
South Weymouth, becond Cong, church, 

(l L. M.) 

Walpole, Congregational church, 
Weymouth, Union church, 

Fir«t church. 
North Weymouth, Pilgrim church. 
Weymouth and Brainiree, Union church, 
WcUesley. Congregational church. 



l5«3 «5 

PLYMOirTH COUNTY. 

Brockton, Porter Evangelical church, $31 4a 
Campello, Congregational church, 23 25 

Hanover, First Congregational church, a 16 

Middleboro*. First Congregational church, 39 3a 
North Middleboro', Cong, church, (1 l. m.} aa 09 
Lakeville, a friend, 50 

Plymouth, Mrs. Jane B. Gordon, (i l. m.) ao 00 
Plympton, Congregational church, a 00 

Rockland, Congregational church, 75 00 



it4 


03 


»7 


50 


»7 


15 


no 


as 


43 90 


16 


05 


J 


00 


as 


»9 


00 


81 


33 


»5 


36 


>3 


50 


ao 


00 


25 


60 


7 


50 


14 04 


30 35 


'I 


as 

It 





|ao5 74 


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 




Boston, Old South church. 


i97 64 


Baptist Bethel church, 


»7 44 


Amos W. Stetson, 


2$ 00 


David Whiston, 


xa 00 


A friend. 


50 00 


Chelsea, Central Cong. S. School, 


560 


Charlestown. Winthrop church. 


50 00 


Dorchester, Second church. 


xia 00 


Village church. 


a8 67 


South Boston, Phillips church. 


54 ao 



*45a 55 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



Gardner, First Congregational church, 
Lancaster, Congregational church. 
Leicester. First Congregational church, 
Leominster, Orthodox Cong, church, 
Lunenburg. Con^egational church. 
New Braintree, Congregational church. 
North Brookfield, First Cong, church, 

(t L. M.) 
North Leominster, Congregational church. 
Royalston, Congregational chureh, 
Shrewsbury, Congregational church,. 



I40 00 
X3 oa 
19 00 

»7 07 
x6 00 



Spencer, Congregational church. 
Upton, Mrs. E. M. Gore, 
Whitinsville. Congregational church, 
Westboro'. Congregational church. 



aa 00 

J 00 
60 
x6 00 

36 IX 

3 CO 

807 35 
8095 



Winchendon, North Cong, chtirch, $15 68 

Mrs. Sally M. Hyde, 4 00 

Worcester, Central Congregational church, 37 73 

West Boyblon, First Cong, church, xo 70 

f i.aso 77 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 

Wilbraham, Annual collection. 

East Providence, R. I., Cong, church. 

Providence Conf. Meth. I^is. church. 

New England *' " 

New Hampshire " 

Maine 

East Maine 

Fryeburg, Me., Congregational church, 

t».3a7 37 



COLLECTIONS 

Bjf Rfv. E. F. Sla/ter, District SupcrintendeiU 
/or the American Dibl* Society. 



U 00 


ax ox 


a67 69 


505 80 


ai9 87 


190 3* 


ixa 96 


63* 



Trinity church, Boston, 

Emmanuel church, Boston, 

St. Paul's church, Boston, 

Christ church, Boston, 

St. Matthew's church, South Boston, 

(L. M. A. B. s.) 
Mrs. Nancy B. Curtis, Boston, 
St. Luke's church, Chelsea, 
St. John's church, Cambridge, 
St. Paul's church, Brookline, 
Christ church. Quincy, 
St. John's church, Jamaica Plain, 
Church of Our Saviour, Longwood, 
Sl Thomas' church, Taunton, 
St. Paul's church, Stockbridge, 
St. John's church, Northampton, 
St. James' church. South Groveland, 
Grace church, Lawrence, 
Trinity church, Haverhill, 
St. Andrew's church, Hanover, 
Church of the Ascension, Ipswich, 
St Ann's Church, Lincoln, 
Trinity parish, Weymouth, (l. m. a. b. 



$1,054 00 

615 00 

389 00 

10 00 

30 00 

100 00 
13 18 
15 00 

'?7t? 
49 »8 

xia 36 
ao 00 
90 ao 

9 30 



4 

II 
3 



00 

07 
35 

99 

XX 

54 



s.) 30 00 
|a,79o 78 



LEGACIES. 

Ashfield, Asarelah Sears. (^ L. M.) 
Brockton. Perry Southworth. 
Wood's Hole. Braddock GifTord. 
Webster, N. H., Paul Dodge. (1 l. 
Elizabeth Hallock. 



M.) 



Sxoo 00 
50 00 
xo 00 
30 00 
xo 00 

$aoo 00 



FORM OF A BEQUEST TO THE SOCIETY. 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Massachusetts Bible Society, 

incorporated in the year eighteen hundred and ten, the sum of to be 

applied to the charitable uses and purposes of the Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and policy 
of the Society, should be directed to the Rev. Daniel Butler, Recording 
Secretary, 15 Comhill, Boston. 



Remittances for books, donations from churches and individuals, and 
orders for books, should be addressed to Rev. Elijah Cutler, Agent, 
15 Comhill, Boston. 



Bible Rooms of the Massachusetts Bible Society, 15 Cornhill, Bos- 
ton. All the issues of the American Bible Society, comprising upwards 
of two hundred and fifty distinct volumes, are sold at cost. Bibles and 
Testaments in some thirty different languages. Orders by Mail or other- 
wise. 

E. Cutler, Agent, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESENTED BY THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSEHS BIBLE SOCIETY 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON, 



MAY 28, 1877, 



RRING THRIR 



SIXTY-inGIlTII ANNIVERSARY. 



* ♦ 



BOSTON: 

DEPOSITORY, 8 BEACON STREET. 

1877. 



THOMAS TODD, 

9rinttr, 

CQNGKSGATIONAL HOUSE, 
BOSTON. 






^\ 






>C/' 



' * '» 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 1877-8. 



President. 
Hon. SAMUEL H. WALLEY. 

Vice- Presidents. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. VINTON, D. D., Suffolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 

Hon. timothy W. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, LL. D., Franklin County. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, LL. D., Middlesex County. 

Hon. MILTON M. FISHER, Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN A. HA WES, Bristol County. 

ELISHA tucker, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex Count>'. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. D. 

Recording Secretary. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

Auditor. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 



Trustees. 



Rbv. JOHN O. MEANS, D. D. 
Rkv. chandler ROBBINS, D. D. 
Rev. ANDREW P. PEABODY, D. D. 
Rbv. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU, D. D. 
Rev. PHILLIPS BROOKS. 
Rev. GEORGE F. PENTECOST. 
Bishop RANDOLPH S. FOSTER, D. D. 
Rbv. EDMUND F. SLAFTER. 
Rbv. SAMUEL E. HERRICK. 



Hon. JACOB SLEEPER. 
Hon. CHARLES T. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Esq. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 
Hon. ROBERT C. WINTHROP. 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE, Esq. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 
GEORGE P. DENNY, Esq. 
Hon. E. ROCKWOOD HOAR. 



Executive Committee. 
to whom appucations are to be made for bibles. 

Rev. John O. Means, Charles Henry Parker, and Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 



Officers of the Society from 1809 to 1877. 



Hon. William Phillips, . 
Rev. John Pierce, D. D. 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. . 
Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. 
Rev. Henry Ware, D. D. . 
Rev. John Codman, D. D. . 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. 
Rev. Nath'l L. Frothingham, D. D. 
Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. 
William C. Plunkett, Esq. . 
Edward Southworth, Esq. . 
John P. Williston, Esq. 
Hon. William B. Washburn, LL. D. 
Stephen balisbury, Esq. 
Charles P. Whitin, Esq. 



Presidents. 


1809—27 


Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL. D. 


1827—49 


Hon. Samuel H. WaUey. . 


«849— 54 




Vice Presidents. 


1809—16 


Lee Claflin, Esq 


1816— a8 


Caleb Holbrook, Esq. 


1828—44 


James S. Amory, Elsq. 


1844—48 


Hon. John H. Qifford, LL. D. 


1848—49 


Elisha Tucker, Esq. 


1849—53 


James B. Crocker, Esq. 


1853—61 


E. S. Moseley, Esq. 


1861—72 


Charles A. Jessup, Esq. 


1862 


Hon. William Claflin, LL. D. 


1862 — 70 


Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D. D 


1862—72 


Hon. William Hyde, . 


1862 


Hon. Timothy W. Carter, . 


1862 


Hon. Milton M. Fisher, 


1862 


Hon. John A. Hawes, 



1854—59 
1859 



1862—70 

1862—75 

1862 

1862—76 

1862 

1862 

1862 

1870—72 
1871 
1872 
1872 

1873 
1875 
1876 



Corresponding Secretaries. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, 1S09 — 13 
Rev. Samuel C. Thacher, . 1813 — 17 

Rev. Charles Lowell, D. D. . 1817 — 18 



Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. i8i8 — 49 

Rev. NathM L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849—53 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1853 



Recording Secretaries. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor, 
Rev. James D. Knowles, 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



1809—28 
1828—30 
1830—31 
1831—32 
1832—39 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1839—44 

Rev. William M, Rogers, . 1844 — 45 

Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1845—49 

Rev. George Richards, 1849 — 52 

Rev. Daniel Butler, . . 1852 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, 
John Tappan, Esq. 



Treasurers. 



1809 — II 
1811 — 12 
1812—35 



Henry Edwards, Esq. . 
George R. Sampson, Esq. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 



1835—49 
1849—62 
1862 



Executive Committees. 



Rev. William E. Channing, D. D. 1809— iS 

Hon. Jonathan Phillips, . 1809 — 16 

Stephen Higginson, Esq. . . 1S09 — 15 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1815 — 18 ' 

Edward Tuckerman, Esq. . 18 16 — 30 ' 

Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. 1818—30 1 

Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. D. 1821 — 35 

Charles Tappan, Esq. . . . 1830 — 40 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. 1832 — 35 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Henr>' Edwards, Esq. . 
Rev. George Richards, 
George R. Sampson, Esq. 
Hon. Albert Fearing, . 
Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper, 



1835—49 
1840—49 

1849—60 

1849 — 62 

1853—76 

i860 

1862 

1876 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Eighth Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts 
Bible Society was held at the rooms of the Revere Bank, 
No. TOO Franklin Street, on Monday, May 28, at 10 o'clock, 
A. M., the President of the Society, the Hon. Samuel H. 
Walley, in the chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read and 
approved. 

The Treasurer, Chas. Henry Parker, Esq., presented his 

a 

Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Sixty-Eighth Annual Report of the Trustees was read 
and accepted. 

The officers of the Society were then elected for the com- 
ing year. 

Adjourned. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



" Ye have the poor with you always, and whenso- 
ever ye will ye may do them good." This declaration 
of the great Teacher is a perpetual warrant for the 
prosecution of the work in which as a society we are 
engaged, and affords unfailing encouragement for its 
prosecution. The poverty which consists in the desti- 
tution of divine truth exists in every community, and 
success, greater or less, will crown every well-directed 
endeavor for its removal. In the prosecution of our 
work during the year the various methods hitherto 
used have been employed. Portions of the State have 
been canvassed by colporters, who have sold the Scrip- 
tures to all classes as opportunity has offered, and have 
supplied ascertained destitutions wherever practicable. 
Access has bden had to large numbers of destitute per- 
sons through our seamen's chaplains. Sailors visit this 
port from every part of the world. Not a few of these are 
every year confined for a season in the hospital, where 
they enjoy the sympathy and friendly counsel of those 
who labor for their good. In the leisure thus secured, 
and in the removal from the influences usually sur- 
rounding them, they welcome the Bible, and are for the 
time being its constant readers. Effects permanent 
and most happy not seldom result from the possession 
of the Scriptures by these wanderers of our world. 



8 

Doubtless some of the seed falls by the wayside, and 
some among the thorns, and some where there is no 
deepness of earth, but we are allowed to believe that 
some falls into good ground and brings forth fruit, 
and for this we thank God and take courage. One 
thousand nine hundred and sixty-one copies of the 
Scriptures in our own and in many foreign languages 
have thus been distributed, and are now making their 
way to every shore washed by the great and wide sea. 

Through the various missions established for the 
benefit of the poor in this city, one thousand and seven 
hundred copies of the Scriptures have been circulated. 
This number is six hundred in excess of that given 
last year. They have been borne to numerous homes 
of want and sickness, by those whose acts of kindness 
and whose manifested sympathy and interest have 
availingly recommended the message of the Master to 
His suffering poor. 

To the schools of destitute and Sabbathless chil- 
dren, five hundred and fifteen copies of the Scriptures 
have been given, in response to the application of those 
who are endeavoring to gather these neglected and 
straying lambs to the fold of the Good Shepherd. 

Another means of diffusing the Scriptures among 
the needy is found in that, as we confidently believe, 
growing number who from the love of the truth and 
the love of their neighbor, have sought out the wants 
existing around them, and at the Depository found 
their supply. In addition to these ordinary methods 
of distribution, the series of meetings held in this city 
the past season, and the especial efforts made for the 
reformation of the intemperate, have largely increased 
the demand for the Scriptures. 

During the year there have been issued from the 



Depository, twenty-five thousand four hundred and 
seventy-one copies of the Scriptures, nine hundred and 
seventy-four copies of which were in various foreign 
languages. The gratuitous issues have amounted to 
nine thousand seven hundred and fifteen volumes, cost- 
ing $3,331.91. Fifteen thousand seven hundred and 
fifty-six copies have been sold. 

A colporter, Rev. Mr. Willey, was employed for 
several months in the beginning of the year in Law- 
rence and Methuen. He visited two thousand five 
hundred and ninety-three families, of which eight hun- 
dred and seventy-five were foreign. Fifty-seven des- 
titute families were supplied with the Scriptures. 
Five hundred and eighty-six copies were sold and be- 
stowed in charity. Since the completion of this work, 
Mr. Willey has canvassed the city of Newburyport, 
under the direction of the Merrimac Bible Society. 

For three months a colporter, Rev. Mr. Dwight, has 
been employed in this city. His visits, numbering in 
all two thousand three hundred and seventy-three, 
have been largely among the poor, to many of whom 
he has read the Scriptures and given instruction as 
opportunities have offered. With two hundred and 
ninety-eight destitute families he has left portions of 
the Scriptures. He has sold and given away five 
hundred and fifty-three volumes, mostly portions of the 
Bible. 

The income of the Society, including the balance on 
hand at the beginning of the year of $2,822.19, has 
amounted to $26,653.05, viz.: donations and legacies, 
$7»053.i6; sales of Bibles and Testaments, $7,642.91 ; 
interest and dividends, $9,134.79. There has also 
been sent from various parts of the State directly 
to the American Bible Society the further sum of 



10 

$10,318.22. The expenditures have been, for Bibles 
and Testaments, $10,340.12 ; donations to the Ameri- 
can Bible Society, $ 1 ,036.86 ; salaries and colporters, 
$5,037.30; investments, $3,879.28; rent and taxes, 
$1,370.51; annual report and expenses of Anniver- 
sary, $201.75 ; repairs of Depository at Beacon Street, 
freight, postage and incidentals, $455.65 ; cash on 
hand in the treasury, $2,140.36; in the Depository, 
$2,190.41. 

The lease of the premises at Cornhill, long occupied 
by the Society as its Depository, having expired on 
the last day of March, it was not deemed advisable 
to renew it, and on the first of April the Depository 
was removed to its present quarters at No. 8 Beacon 
Street. The change, far too long delayed, is every way 
most desirable. The rooms are on the lower floor, are 
tasteful and easy of access, and at diminished cost fur- 
nish every desirable facility for our work. 

The American Bible Society reports a year of unu- 
sual prosperity. Its income exceeds that of the year 
previous by several thousand dollars, and while its sale 
of Bibles at home has been diminished somewhat in 
consequence of the general depression in business, its 
foreign work is constantly enlarging. In addition to 
the assistance given by missionaries and other friends 
of the Bible, the enlarged work has rendered it neces- 
sary to send laborers to Turkey and Japan and China, 
and on our own Continent to several of the South 
American States and Mexico. The sum of $80,000 
has been expended in the foreign field, and the work 
of supplying the wants of our own country is going 
on with increasing efficiency. 

Amid the revolutions and convulsions that disturb 
our world, the work in which we are engaged moves 



II 

steadily forward. The wide and rapid diffusion of the 
Scriptures is one of the marked features of our times. 
The obstacles that have confined the circulation of 
the Scriptures to a comparatively small portion of our 
race are disappearing, and the time cannot be distant 
when, translated into every language, they shall become 
the common possession of the world. To a consum- 
mation so desirable our labors, however feeble, are 
tending, and we work on, in full view of that surely 
approaching day when " the knowledge of the Lord 
shall fill the earth, even as the waters cover the seas." 



The Four Gospels ; their Differences and their 

Essence, 



A SERMON. 



By rev. CYRUS D. FOSS, D. D., 



President of Wesleyan Univershtt. 



yohn XX: J I. — "But these are written that ye might believe 
THAT Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that 
believing ye might have life through His name." 

The things referred to here are the signs spoken of in the pre- 
vious verse : " And many other signs truly did Jesus in the presence 
of His disciples, which are not written in this book." These signs 
were the post-resurrection appearances of Jesus, and were intended 
to produce faith in him as being the Messiah, the Son of God, and 
the real Saviour of sinners. Beyond all question the resurrection of 
Jesus is the crucial fact on which the Scriptures rest the demonstra- 
tion of the truth of Christianity. An inspired Apostle, the most 
logical of them all, reasons about it on this wise : " If Christ be not 
raised your faith is vain, and our preaching vain ; ye are yet in your 
sins ; they also that have fallen asleep in Christ have perished." 
Thus the Scriptures rest upon the resurrection of Jesus Christ the 
whole system of Christianity. If that fails us there is no Gospel, 
and our faith is utterly vain. I may, therefore, without any strain- 
ing of these words which constitute the text, make them apply to 
the whole of the four Gospels — the four records of the earthly life 
of Jesus Christ ; and may say that all these records are for the 
same purpose as the account of the resurrection, which is the seal 



H 

and crown of the whole. So if Jesus* resurrection was intended to 
prove Him to be the Christ, the Son of God, and a life-giving Sa- 
viour, the same is true of the whole of the records given us by the 
four Evangelists. 

I desire now, by the help of that Holy Ghost, whose presence 
and aid we all invoke, to lead your thoughts to a bird's-eye view of 
the four Gospels, especially as they are illumined by what Pressens^ 
impressively terms, " the fifth Gospel" — that is, the history of Chris- 
tianity. And I shall strive to point out, in the first place, the differ- 
ence between the four Gospels and the characteristics of each ; and 
then to make a summary statement of the essence of their teaching 
concerning the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

I. First let us note the characteristic differences of the four 
Gospels, 

I. The inquiry thus suggested leads us at the outset to ask, Why 
four Gospels] Why more than one? Why did not God inspire 
some one of the four Evangelists to give us a complete biography 
of Jesus Christ ; of every word he uttered, of every act he per- 
formed ? We should then have avoided the necessity of seeking for 
that minute and perfect harmony between the different records 
which has been the effort and the despair of all commentators. 
There is a question logically anterior to this, which we will consider 
for a moment : What is the object of any Gospel ? The answer is 
given us in the text. It is to produce faith without sight. It is to 
awaken in the minds of men a vivid conception of, and a firm be- 
lief in, the Lord Jesus Christ, whom the vast majority of the race 
have never seen, and will never see until the judgment day. Now 
so much as this is plain I am sure ; to bring about this result it 
is best that the record or records should come through men. It 
is not the dry and splendid light of the intellect alone that we 
want on this theme ; it is the warm light and vivid coloring of truth 
incarnated, living, moving and breathing before our eyes. God 
does not therefore write the Gospel on two tables of stone, as he 
did most fitly the law ; but on the fleshly tables of the heart. Nor 
do angelic scribes hand down a perfect biography of Jesus from the 
skies. No ; human beings can best receive and be most profited 
by a Gospel which human minds have received, which human 
hearts have felt, which human hands have written, tingling as they 
wrote. So God has been pleased to reveal himself in this way. 

But why more than one record "i Because no one human mind 



15 

can take in the whole Gospel, and, hence, no one mind can give it 
out There are several sides to the life and character of Jesus 
Christ just as of any other man. If you wish to find out about John 
Wesley you are not content to read Watson's brief memoir; nor 
the fuller records contained in Stevens' admirable " History of the 
Religious movement of the Eighteenth Century, called Method- 
ism ; " nor the three portly volumes of Tyerman's most disenchant- 
ing* yet wondrously enchanting biography. You read all these. 
You read also Wesley's journals, and his letters and his sermons, 
and everything you can find that he has penned ; and thus going 
about him on all sides, and considering him under all circum- 
stances, at last you find out the man. 

I hold it to be a remarkable arrangement in the Divine economy 
that we have several Gospels instead of one. I say " arrange- 
ment," for I cannot believe that He who watches the fall of every 
sparrow, and numbers the hairs of our heads, has left the number 
of records of the life and death and glorious resurrection of His 
only Son, to be the result of accident. Each of the Evangelists re- 
ceived such impressions concerning Christ as were adapted to his 
own nature and wants, and within the range of his capacity, and 
each reproduced his impressions in his narrative. I therefore like 
the titles, " The Gospel according to St. Matthew," etc. It is what 
Matthew saw and felt of the Gospel, and so of the rest. And there 
was a difference. Some acts and words of Jesus especially arrested 
the attention of one of them; some of another. Each records 
some things which all the others omit. Each omits some things 
which others record. 

2. Note some of the things for which we are indebted to only a 
single one of the Evangelists, Matthew alone gives us, in their com- 
pleteness, the Sermon on the Mount, the commission of the Apos- 
tles, the discourses concerning John, the denunciation of the Scribes 
and Pharisees ; and the parable of the tares, the hid treasure, the 
pearl, the draw-net, the unmerciful servant, the laborers in the vine- 
ward, the two sons, the marriage of the King's son, the talents and 
the ten virgins. Mark is to be credited with no considerable addi- 
tional matter, (having given us but one parable unrecorded else- 
where, viz. : the one illustrating the great law of spiritual growth, 
" first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear ; ") 
but he has numerous vivid descriptive touches, which serve the 
double purpose of making. his narrative most real and life-like, and 
of carrying the conviction that he was an eye-witness; such as 



16 



these : ** There was no more room, no, not so much as about the 
door ; " ** The blind man cast away his garments and leaped up 
and came to Jesus ; ". " He looked on them with anger ; " " He 
was looking around to see her that had done this thing;" "Jesus 
sat over against the treasury.'' Luke alone gives us the parentage 
and birth of John the Baptist ; the details of Jesus' birth ; the 
hymns of Zacharias, of the Virgin Mary and of Simeon ; the single 
recorded incident in Jesus' boyhood, and the most instructive state- 
ment that he was still "subject unto his parents, and that he increased 
in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man ; " and the 
full narrative of the ascension, (Mark having only announced the 
fact.) He alone tells us of the widow at Nain, the ten lepers, the 
healing of the ear of Malchus, the two debtors, the good Samari- 
tan, the friend at midnight, the intercession for the barren fig-tree, 
the pharisee and the publican, the rich man and Lazarus ; of Jesus' 
visit to the synagogue at Nazareth, of the ministering women who 
accompanied our Lord through Galilee, of the first miraculous 
draught of fishes ; and of the lost silver, the lost sheep, and the 
lost son. John's Gospel is freighted with more riches peculiar to 
itself than all the others put together. I cannot here even indicate, 
much less cite, a tithe of the unique treasures of this most wonderful 
Gospel. Its first utterance reveals its essence. It is preeminently 
the Gospel of the Word. It shows us not so much God working as 
God spoken. "As in the synoptical Gospels the Incarnate Son is 
mainly displayed to us in the operative majesty of outwardly exer- 
cised omnipotence, so in the fourth Gospel he is mainly revealed to 
us in the majesty of conscious unity with the Eternal Father." 

The very marked peculiarity of the biography of Jesus by his 
bosom friend will be sufficiently suggested if we remember that it 
gives his discourses much the most fully. For example, that on 
" the bread of life," the one to the woman at the well, and his vale- 
dictory- address (filling three long chapters ;) and still further, while 
the other Gospels account for less than two years of Christ's public 
ministry^ and that chiefly in Galilee, this shows us a ministry of 
about three years, a large part of it in or near Jerusalem. 

3. Consider also fA^ different characteristics of the four men and 
of their styles^ and then tell me whether "these four holy pictures, 
painted by four loving hands, of him who was * fairer than the sons 
of men,' were not given us that by var^'ing our postures we might 
catch new beauties and fresh glories." Matthew was a tax gath- 
erer ; chosen doubtless to that office, because he had in some other 



17 

occupation displayed the qualities of attention and method. How 
naturally might we expect from such a man skillful grouping of 
events and a well ordered narrative. There are in particular three 
very signal examples of profoundly instructive and artistically perfect 
groupings of Jesus* words and deeds ; of parables in the thirteenth 
chapter ; of prophecies in the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth ; and 
" the glorious garland of miracles" in the eighth and ninth. Every 
author has his peculiarities of style. Matthew's is antithesis. He 
tells us in close proximity of the Prince of Peace and the bloody 
H^rod; of the adoring Magi and the flight into Egypt; of the 
marvelously beautiful baptism and the terribly tragic temptation. 
Mark had an impulsive nature. He was a second Peter. He 
wrote under Peter's eye, and like Peter, once, at least, fell away ; 
twice Chrysostom thought, and also Gregory the Great and others, 
believing Mark to be the young man with the hastily-seized linen 
garment, who followed a little way and then fled. He held a graphic 
pen, and loved the circumstantial in word, gesture and look. He 
was the most realistic of the Gospel painters. I -have already 
given several instances of that vivid and minute fidelity which is 
almost impossible in romance, and which stamps the second Gospel 
as a veritable statement of facts witnessed by its author. Who but 
an eye-witness would have written thus ? " The waves were beating 
into the ship and he was in the hinder part of the ship asleep on a 
pillow ? " Luke was a physician and a man of culture, the only 
Gentile among the Evangelists ; a reflective man, qualified to dis- 
cern and record motives, as he often did ; eminently fitted to give 
us the connections of events : and so it has been said that while 
Matthew wrote a narrative, and Mark memoirs, Luke wrote a his- 
tory. John was the theologian, tlie holy mystic, the apostle of 
absolute truth, the adoring lover of his Lord, and so most like him. 
4. These different characters of the men, together with the spe- 
cially different objects of their writings, the great purpose being all 
the while the same, gave to their works very different characteristics. 
We can only glance at the peculiarities of the Gospels. The Gos- 
pel of Matthew was primarily the Jews' Gospel. Matthew was a 
pious Jew, and while his book was to have a world-wide interest, it 
evidently had also a special adaptation to those of his own class 
who were patiently waiting for the Messiah. It was an important 
part of his purpose to invite attention to the fact that the New Tes- 
tament had its roots in the Old, that Jesus was the Christ ; and so 
he begins with the genealogy of the Saviour. In his first chapter 



i8 



he traces Him back, step by step, all the way to David. In the 
second he gives three distinct fulfillments of prophecy ; and so he 
challenges the attention and the faith of every man who believed in 
the ancient Scriptures. 

Mark's Gospel was written at Rome, probably under the influence 
of Peter, and it has just as evident an adaptation to the Roman 
world. The Roman was no great talker, but very active — so 
Mark's Gospel is eminently the Gospel of action. In Rome it was 
customary to deify heroes for their deeds, and if it was proposed to 
enroll some new name among the gods, every Roman would ask the 
question, What has he done ? Mark therefore omits the genealogy 
of Christ, mentions his baptism in three verses and his temptation 
in two, gives no full account of Christ's sermons, but proclaims in 
the ears of the heathen of the imperial city his mighty acts. In his 
first chapter we have a narrative of three distinct miracles, beside 
the general statement that " He healed many that were sick of 
divers diseases, and cast out many devils." 

Luke had still a different object. His object is more comprehen- 
sive. He treats of the sayings of Jesus more particularly than Mat- 
thew, and of his deeds more particularly than Mark. Matthew traces 
Jesus up to David ; Luke traces Him to Adam — it is not merely 
the Son of David, it is the Son of Man, whom he preaches to the 
world. He is not content simply to tell of the twelve apostles, but 
of the seventy disciples. He gives us the account of the good 
Samaritan, and makes Jew and Gentile alike. He is a kind of 
Paul among the Evangelists, teaching that salvation is as wide as 
the world. 

Then comes John. He is not content, as Matthew was, to trace 
Jesus back to David; as Luke was, to trace him back to Adam. 
He begins at the beginning — "In the beginning was the Word, 
and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." And from 
that divine starting point, he shows us the meaning of Jesus' pre- 
dicted name, Immanuel ("God with us"). Oh! this wonderful 
fourth Gospel, written by him who had "leaned on Jesus' bosom" 
until he caught the richest music of His throbbing, divine-human 
heart, and had faithfully walked with Him long after all the other 
apostles had received their martyr-crowns ! Clement calls it " the 
Gospel of the spirit;" Pressenstf, "the Gospel of the idea;" 
Ernesti, " the heart of Christ ; " Augustine s:iys, " While the three 
other Evangelists remain below with the man Christ Jesus, and 
speak but little of his Godhead, John, as if impatient of setting his 



19 

foot on the earth, rises from the very first words of his Gospel, not 
only above earth, and the span of air and sky, but above all angels 
and invisible powers, till he reaches Him by whom all things were 
made." 

Such, in rapid outline, are some of the differences between the 
Four Gospels, and some of the special characteristics of each, 

II. In the second place, let us inquire after the sum and essence 
of the teachings of the Four Gospels, as interpreted by that " fifth 
Gospel " which the whole history of Christianity furnishes. 

Now, suppose you were to undertake the office of giving to an 
intelligent and thoughtful heathen, who had never studied these 
records, an answer to the question. Who is Jesus ? What is the 
statement in these records ? and what is the truth of the records as 
commented on and more fully expounded by the history of the 
Christian religion ? What is their teaching about that man who 
once walked the earth ? 

I. The first part of the answer to this question, I think, would 
be this : These five Gospels — Matthew's, Mark's, Luke's, John's 
and God's — ( these five Gospels — the four and the sublime com- 
mentary on them furnished by almost nineteen centuries of Chris- 
tian history, ) teach, to begin with, that Jesus was the most wonder- 
ful man that ever lived upon the face of the earth ; a man who had 
none of those appliances for becoming famous which the great men 
of the world have had. He was not an author ; He was not a sci- 
entist ; He was not a philosopher ; nor a statesman, nor a warrior. 
He never wrote any books ; no proclamations ; no letters ; not one 
line nor word that has survived Him j when He wrote. He wrote in 
the dust. He revealed no scientific truth to man ; no new philo- 
sophical system ; no arts of diplomacy. He assumed no control 
of the governments of the world. He had no army, no sword ; 
He rebuked the only disciple who ever drew sword for Him, and 
healed the mischief that the sword had wrought. And yet, some- 
how, this man has made himself more famous than any other man. 
Infidels admit this. I state the fact and for a moment leave it. 

You would also have to say, concerning this man Jesus, that He 
was a man of a unique, moral and intellectual character; that in these 
respects He stands alone among men in this world. Let me tell 
you what his enemies said. A Roman lady wrote to her husband, 
" Have thou nothing to do with that just man." That weak-kneed 
and forever infamous governor, whose name is known to the world 



20 



only because of his connection with Jesus, said concerning Him 
three times, " I find no fault in Him." His verdict has become the 
verdict of the whole skeptical world ; " I find no fault in Him at 
all." Judas said concerning Him, " I have shed innocent blood." 
The dying thief said, ** He hath done nothing amiss." The centu- 
rion said, " Truly this man was the Son of God." And He Him- 
self said — and His witness is true — "Satan cometh and hath 
nothing in me ; " and " Father, I have glorified Thee on earth ; I 
have finished the work thou gavest me to do." 

Not only is he morally unique among the sons of men, but intel- 
lectually also. In all His teachings that have been reported to us 
men have never found one error. And still further, they have never 
added one iota to His teachings on moral and religious subjects. 
Behold Him going forth into this world — a map of which He had 
never seen — moving about among men immensely His superiors in 
all that education can do, pitched upon by wary lawyers who had 
put their heads together to puzzle Him. Behold Him at all hours, 
subject to the keenest inquisition and never saying — no matter 
how profound the question — as our Judges of Courts of Appeals — 
even those who have sat on the bench forty years, are obliged to 
do — ** Decision reserved." On the instant, this wonderful man 
answered all questions, and not only answered them correctly, but 
in his brief answers brought out without a single mistake those prin- 
ciples of casuistr}' that have for eighteen hundred years been the 
solvents of all questions of conscience. What an intellect had He ! 
In eighteen centuries, during which the human mind has been 
immensely and amazingly busy, men have not added to His teach- 
ings one jot. If any man challenges the statement, let him point 
out to us from all other sources the first ray of moral or religious 
truth that has been added to the teaching of Jesus of Nazareth. 

2. In the next place, the text teaches us that this " yesiis is the 
Christ" Every Jew understood very well what that meant : to 
begin with, that He was the fulfillment, (not the fulfiller alone,) 
of all Messianic prophecy ; that all prophecy about the Messiah 
from the beginning is to meet in Him and be fulfilled in Him. 
When he is on the cross, He is represented as looking down the 
line of prophets to know if any one has uttered the least word of 
unfulfilled prophecy, which He must fulfill before He dies. The 
record runs thus : — 

"After this, Jesus, knowing that all things were now accom- 
plished, that the Scriptures might be fulfilled, saith, ' I thirst' " 



21 



In scanning the line of prophets who had uttered Messianic pre- 
dictions, beholding the face of David, He sees what I doubt 
whether David did see — one iota of prophecy — the dotting of an 
"i," the crossing of a "t" — a word not yet fulfilled — "I thirst." 
Then was fulfilled that apparently insignificant prophecy, " In my 
thirst they gave me vinegar to drink." And then he said, " It is 
finished," and gave up the ghost. All prophecy concerning the 
Messiah meets and is fulfilled in Him. 

Another thing must come to pass ; He must be that wonderful 
double personage ; the most unique of sufferers, and the most tri- 
umphant of monarchs. He must be a strange individual, only one 
side of whom the Jews could see. They, looking for a monarch 
who should make them the kings of the world, saw only one side. 
We see both. As we study it, the fulfillments which He gave us in 
His life and character are amazing. Read Isaiah liii, " a root out 
of a dry ground ; " ** despised and rejected," ** bruised for our iniqui- 
ties ; " and then go back and read, " unto us a son is given, and his 
name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, the Mighty God, the 
Everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his 
government and peace there shall be no end." Yet this mysterious 
and most incomprehensible double picture is perfectly realized in 
Jesus Christ. These records are given us to show that Jesus is the 
Christ. 

3. Let us now advance another step. The Messiah Jesus is 
also "M«f Son of God.'' Suppose that in my place, the form of 
Jesus Christ were standing here to-day, and that He, looking on you 
with infinite tenderness, should say to you, " Whom do men say that 
I, the Son of Man, am } " What would be your answer ? I would 
answer, first of all, O, Lord, they are busy concerning Thee ; in 
eighteen hundred years they have not forgotten Thee. O, brethren, 
the world very well knows that around the person of Jesus Christ the 
battle is to bi waged on whose issue depends the Christian religion. 
They do not talk much about Mohammed now ; not much of Confu- 
cius ; Julius Cffisar and Napoleon the Great are nowhere : men do 
not care for them. But our libraries are full of books about Jesus. 
Strauss and R^nan, Pressens^, Liddon — men of all shades of opin- 
ion — write about Him and inquire about Him. The world is full 
of this wonderful man. And further, I should have to answer. 
Some say Thou art a fancy portrait ; that these Evangelists struck 
out pictures with their rough pencils, which are bright and beauti- 
ful enough for the world to look at for eighteen hundred years. 



22 

And more than that, that this fancy portrait has changed the face 
of the world, and killed polytheism and the old civilization, and 
brought in the new. But those who say this are so contemptible in 
number that we leave them. Many say, " He is a myth." They 
say that He is an individual like Prometheus, who perhaps once 
lived, and that accumulated imaginings have gathered about Him 
until He is far more fancy than fact — and that this is the Jesus of 
the Gospels. But brethren, no myth has ever been possible in the 
world since history began. A myth cannot live in the light of his- 
tory : and history was born before Jesus. When Jesus came into 
the world pens wrote ; and there were public transactions of 
empires. Jesus was not a myth. 

Then suppose He should say, " Whom say ye that I am ? " I, 
like Peter, would be the glad spokesman for you all and say, " Thou 
art the Christ, the Son of the living God.'' In proof of this let us 
consider, first. His testimony about Himself; secondly, the affection 
and confidence He inspired in those who knew Him ; last of all, 
the successes He has achieved. The argument suggested by His tes- 
timony concerning Himself seems to me irresistible. The disciples 
of John the Baptist said to Him, " Art Thou He that should come, 
or do we look for another ? " Jesus replied, " Go tell John again 
the things which ye do hear and see ; the lame walk, the blind re- 
ceive their sight, lepers are cleansed, the dead are raised, and the 
poor have the Gospel preached unto them." That is His answer. 
He claimed in His own right to work miracles. His testimony 
about Himself proves Him divine ; because either He was a fanatic 
or an imposter, or else He told the truth. And if He told the truth 
He is divine. But He was not a fanatic with crazed brain ; He 
understood Himself. He was not only the teacher, but the embodi- 
ment of truth. He has the clearest intellect in all history. Was 
He an imposter ? We see how infidels themselves have given that 
up ; they say He believed what He said. And so His testimony 
about Himself proves Him divine. ^' Si Christus non Deus non 
bonus'^ If He be not God He is not a good man. 

Consider that He was an unlettered Galilean. His neighbors said, 
"Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mar}'?" And behold His 
power over His disciples. Look at St. Paul ! at his willingness to 
preach at Rome ! Rome, the mistress of the world, that had made 
the Mediterranean sea " a Roman lake," girt with the emblems of, 
humanly speaking, resistless power. You know how the word of 
the Roman Emperor was law from the Nile to the Thames. You 



23 

know how tyrannical power was centered in the Roman throne. 
There is now in one of the galleries of France a picture represent- 
ing this Idea very finely, showing you the amphitheatre at Rome 
crowded with its eighty thousand spectators, and the gladiatorial 
combat going on. One man having brought the other down, with 
raised sword he uplifts his eye to the Vestal Virgins, that they may 
signify whether the poor wretch is to live or die. And they turn 
the hand to say " Let him die." Power ground to powder the rights 
of man, and made the State everything. Yet, in the midst of those 
scenes of power that overspread the Roman empire, I find a little, 
homely, unprepossessing man writing a letter, in which he says, " I 
am ready, so much as in me lies, to preach the Gospel to you that 
are at Rome also ; for it is the power of God unto salvation." Oh, 
what a marvelous influence was the knowledge of this person on 
those that believed on Him. ^ 

Then as to His success. There is nothing so successful, brethren, 
as success. There is nothing that carries such conviction, as the 
logic of events. Now, has Jesus done anything on this planet to 
justify His claim .^ He has done this marvelous thing: He has out- 
lived Himself. There was a time when thousands of men would 
have died for the love of Julius Caesar. There was a time when 
every grenadier in France would have stood between a cannon-shot 
and Napoleon But that time has long past in his case. Some of 
you were alive when he died ; and who now cares for him ? Even 
Frenchmen go to his mausoleum as a kind of holiday pastime. 
Napoleon is no more. But there is one grave whose ashes never 
grow cold — that grave where Joseph of Arimathea expected to lie, 
but where the body of Jesus was lain. I said, " one grave whose 
ashes never grow cold ; " I now say, one rifled grave, whose glor}' 
beams out throughout the universe, and the love of which men can 
never lose, because it once was occupied and now is empty. There 
are thousands on the earth to-day who would die for Jesus Christ, 
yet they never saw Him. Let me withdraw that ; they have seen 
Him. There is a sixth sense which God opens, and it can obey 
the call, " Behold the Lamb." We have seen Him to-day. Men 
doubt whether Jesus ever lived. He is more than all to many in 
this audience to-day. He is the one reality. 

These forms will soon fade, but we behold Him by faith, Jesus 
Christ risen from the dead — risen "to give repentance and remis- 
^on of sins. And we are His witnesses of these things." 



24 

In the days of Julian the Apostate, that mighty monarch who set 
himself to overturn Christianity, there was a humble Christian who 
was asked, one day, by Julian's most celebrated orator, with that 
sneer which only a Roman could put on in those days, " What is 
the Galilean carpenter doing now ? " The humble Christian raised 
his face and said, "The Galilean carpenter is making a coffin." 
And it was only a few months before the coffin was done, and in it 
the prostrate form of Julian the Apostate lay, and classic polytheism 
was ended. It is not very long ago since Voltaire said, ** In twenty 
years the Almighty will see fine sport in France ; " but before the 
twenty years were up the Galilean carpenter had another coffin 
ready, and in it lay the prostrate form of the French monarchy. 
And it is within our easy recollection that the modem Nebuchad- 
nezzar of the nations. Napoleon the Little, said to himself, " See 
this great nation which I govern, and this magnificent capital which 
I have beautified ; I will water my soldiers* horses in the German 
Rhine, and my cavalry shall ride through the streets of Berlin." 
And behind him stood the Pope and said, " Do this, my best ser- 
vant, and my temporal power shall be established again among the 
nations." And the Galilean carpenter was building another coffin, 
and in less than two months there lay in it the temporal power of 
the Pope ; and a little later, the prostrate form of Napoleon III. 
And ever since " the Galilean carpenter " has been building coffins 
for His enemies, and weaving crowns of immortal amaranth for His 
friends. 

I have been greatly interested many times, to see what men will 
say about Him, climbing by the stairway of lofty conceptions and 
then stopping short of the truth. The Knights of old called Him 
the mirror of all chivalry ; the monks of the middle ages, the pattern 
of all asceticism ; the philosophers, the enlightener in all truth ; 
Fenelon, the most rapt of mystics ; Vincent de Paul, the most 
practical of philanthropists. An English poet writes : 

" The best of men 
That e're wore earth about Him was a sufferer^ 
A soft, meek, patient, humble, trancjuil spirit. 
The /frj/ true gentUman that ever breathed." 

A skeptical historian calls Him "the explanation of all histor}'," and 
says, ** In all my study of the ancient times, I have always felt the 
want of something, and it was not till I knew our Lord that all was 
clear to me. With Him there is nothing that I am not able to 



25 

solve." Napoleon declares, " Between Him and whoever else in 
the world there is no possible term of comparison." Such are a 
few hints at the testimonies of the unbelievers and half believers, 
extorted from them by their sense of the superhuman character of 
Jesus. 

4. Last of all, and best of all, yesus is a real Saviour. ** These 
things are written that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the 
Son of God ; and that believing, ye might have life through His 
namey This is the golden clasp of the girdle ; this is the centre of 
the truth, He came to save the lost. O, if sin and trouble were im- 
aginary, then a fancy portrait or a myth would answer for a Saviour. 
If the three Hebrew children had only been cast into a painted fur- 
nace of painted fire, then a painted Saviour would have answered. 
But when real men were cast into a real furnace of fire, then only 
a real Deliverer was worth anything to them. O thou afflicted soul, 

" In the furnace God may prove thee, 

Hence to bring thee forth more bright ; 
But can never cease to love thee, 
Though art precious in His sight. 

God is with thee, 
God, thine everlasting light." • 

Sin is real. St. Paul says, " When I would do good, evil is pres- 
ent with me. What I would, I do not, and what I would not, that 
I do. O, wretched man that I am, who shall deliver me from the 
body of this death I " 

What would a fancy sketch or a myth be to such a man as that ? 
But hear this : " There is now no condemnation to them which are 
in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh but after the spirit ; for 
the law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus haA made me free from 
the law of sin and death." 

My dear friends, I do not think of any illustration of this simplest 
and most fundamental truth that has so impressed it on my mind as 
an incident I heard from the lips of Bishop Janes. He told of a 
'Jewish lady in Baltimore who gave herself to Jesus. There was a 
protracted meeting in progress, in which there was noticed a Jewess, 
several evenings. And afterward her experience came to the 
knowledge of the church in this way : her husband, a gay man of 
the world, was in the habit of passing his evenings with congenial 
friends at the theatre or other places of amusement, leaving her 
alone at home. To relieve the monotony of an evening, (the Meth- 
odist church in which a protracted meeting was in progress, being 



26 

situated in the same street,) she slipped out, and, impelled by curi- 
osity, attended one of the services. The first evening's service left 
no particular impression. The question simply arose in her mind, 
just as a cloud flits over the sky, " Suppose that Jesus was the 
Messiah ? " The next night, Jesus was again preached, and before 
the sermon was over the question became more than a question ; 
she said to herself, "Jesus was, perhaps, the Messiah," and it 
greatly distressed her. On the third night the thought seized her 
soul and shook it through and through : " Jesus was the Messiah " 
Of course there came with it — inevitably to a Jewess — the convic- 
tion, " I am lost forever, for my people slew Him ; " and in that 
spirit she went home sobbing and wailing. Her husband returned 
at midnight, and she met him in tears and said at once, " Go to 
some Christian neighbor's and borrow for me a New Testament." 
He tried to laugh her out of her impressions, or argue her out of 
them j but it was of no use, and so for the love he bore her, he 
went out, at half-past twelve in thfe morning, and rang up a Chris- 
tian neighbor. When he came to the door the caller said, " I beg 
your pardon, but will you be so kind as to lend me a New Testa- 
ment." You may be sure the request was most cheerfully granted. 
The neigl)bor thought, " There is work in that house to be done for 
Jesus to-night ; " and as soon as he could properly dress himself, 
he hurried to a Christian brother's, and with him repaired to the 
Jewish mansion. The door was instantly opened and the mistress 
met them with a smile, saying, " I have found Jesus ! " And then 
she told the story 1 have told you, with this addition ; she said that, 
when the Testament was put into her hands, she went into her own 
room alone and, kneeling, she lifted up her face to Heaven and 
cried, "O, Lord, God of my fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, 
give me light, give me light ! " She opened the Testament with 
closed eyes, and chanced to open it where my Bible is open now, at 
the beginning of the Epistle to the Romans. She read slowly ; the 
verses went tearing through her soul like hot thunderbolts, until she 
came to the sixteenth verse, " For I am not ashamed of the gospel 
of Christ j for it is the power of God unto salvation unto every one 
that believeth, A? tA^ Jew first^'' here she stopped. Her bursting 
tears blinded her. She looked again. It is "to the Jew first, and 
also to the Greek." 

As she read these words, she believed them and was saved, and 
knew it. When the Christian brethren came she was a Christian. 
Do men tell us that this is a fancy ? that there is no reality repre- 



27 

sented by such an experience as this ! When a lion becomes a 
lamb ! When a drunkard becomes sober ! When a mean, low, 
driveling youth is made a very apostle ! When Saul passes over 
into Paul ! When a Jewess becomes a Christian ! Only God works 
moral miracles like these. 

So in every temptation, in every trial, in every emergency, the 
road out is the same. This Jesus, who is the Christ, and the Son 
of God, gives life when the soul is ready to perish, through faith in 
His own blessed name. Look into the dungeons of the Inquisition. 
There is the dreadful oublietU^ with only one round entrance from 
above and that covered with a closely fitting marble slab ; egress 
there is none. Down there men were thrust to be starved by 
inches : bread enough for to-day, one ounce less to-morrow, one 
ounce less the next day, and so on, until in misery and wretched- 
ness, they died of starvation, amid blackness of darkness. Yet 
when one such dungeon was opened, there was found the skeleton 
of a man, and eighteen inches above it, written with a piece of coal, 
with the bit of coal still between the skeleton's fingers, this inscrip- 
tion: 

" Oh, Christ ! They may separate me from Thy church, but they 
cannot separate me from Thee." 

Oh, ye sons and daughters of sorrow and of sin, hear ye the word 
of the Lord, and believe it, for the comfort and salvation of your 
souls. Jesus is the Christ. He is the Son of God. Believing on 
Him ye may now have life through His name. By leaving the 
world He became omnipresent in it for all time. Just before He 
disappeared from the gaze of His triumphant disciples at Bethany, 
He said to them, " Lo I am with you alway, even unto the end of 
the world." And then ** He lifted up His hands and blessed them ; 
and it came to pass, while He blessed them. He was parted from 
them, and carried up into Heaven." Ever, ever, Thou once crucified 
and now glorified and omnipresent Redeemer, stand Thou before 
our eyes, as Thou wast last seen by Thine infant church, with Thy 
hands extended over Thy people to bless them ! 

** The soul that on Jesus hath leaned for repose, 
He will not, He will not desert to its foes ; 
That soul, though all hell should endeavor to shake, 
He will never, no never, no never forsake." 

Amen, and Amen. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the Com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for carrying into 
effect the object of this Association ; which, being read from the 
Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with 
one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows ; viz., — 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments to be distributed among all persons inhab- 
iting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled clergy- 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who shall, 
in writing, request to be members ; of every person who shall sub- 
scribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not less than two dol- 
lars, and who shall remain a member so long as he continues the 
payment of that sum ; and of every person who shall subscribe and 
pay to the Treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars, he remaining 
a member during life, without being obliged to further contributions. 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the organiza- 
tion of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained, 
notice shall be given by the Committee, and also of the time and 
place of the meeting of the Society. 



30 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treasurer, 
Corresponding Secretary, and a Recording Secretary, who shall con- 
tinue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until successors 
are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen other 
members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom six shall 
be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a Board of 
Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among 
the members of the Society, a Committee of three persons, to con- 
tinue in office during the pleasure of the Board of Trustees, who 
shall have the management of the fund, and the distribution of the 
books procured with it, subject and according to such regulations 
and directions as shall from time to time be prescribed by the Trus- 
tees at any meeting held on public notice given as aforesaid ; and 
the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in his hands to the order of the 
said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes afore- 
said, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into effect 
the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on reg- 
ular notice being given, for the due exercise of all the powers 
granted by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, or Re- 
cording Secretary, to devise and adopt such further measures as 
may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for effecting 
the intentions of the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the Trustees 
petitioned the General Court, and obtained the following Act of 
Incorporation. 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 



(Sammanurealtlt of J^u^n^thnatttii. 

In the year ol our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate tha 

Bible Society of MassachuMtts. 

Whereas, the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with many 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in com- 
mon use in the churches in New England, for distribution among all per- 
sons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, who are destitute of the 
sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects 
of said Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Soeiety 
more extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an 
Act of Incorporation. 

Section i. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives ^ in General Court assembled, and by authority of the same. That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D. D., 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D. D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. 
Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph 
Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, 
Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. 
Samuel H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who 
may hereafter associate, with them for the purposes aforesaid, be, and 
they hereby are, incorporated into a Society, by the name of The Bible 
Society of Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body cor- 
porate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legislature, 
and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said 
Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any persons disposed 
to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any grants or devises of 
lands and tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, bequests, 
and subscriptions of money, or other property, to be used and improved 
for the purposes aforesaid. 



32 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That the said Corporation shall be, 
and hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacit}% and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. • 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such rules 
and regulations as to them shall appear necessar)', provided the same be 
not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted. That William Phillips, Esq., be and he 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said 
Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and 
place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the 
same ; may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and 
may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by the 
said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable to the 
principles of this institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Afifiroved by 
the Governor, Feb. 13, 18 10. 



(!I!ommonu;tatth of '^^^ut'kvi$t\i%. 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-Five. An Act in addition to an Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section i. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafter be known by 
the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name shall 
have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to all its 
liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had not been 
changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, 
and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English lan- 
guage, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now 
authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in 
common use in the churches in New England, anything in the Act incor- 
porating the said Society to the contrar}^ notwithstanding. — Approved by 
the Governor, Feb. 2j, iS6^. 



BY-LAWS. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 185 1, the 
following By-Laws were adopted. 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act of 
Incorporation ; namely, " The raising of a fund by voluntary con- 
tribution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of 
the version in common use in the churches in New England, for dis- 
tribution among all persons inhabiting within the State and else- 
where, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot 
be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the State, may become a member of this Society by signify- 
ing his request in writing to that effect to the Recording Secretary, 
who shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become mem- 
bers, in a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued ; and the treasurer shall keep a 
list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than twenty 
dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the Society 
for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording Secretary'. 



34 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen Vice- 
Presidents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, Treas- 
urer, and eighteen Trustees, and an Auditor. The President, Vice- 
Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secretaries, and Treas- 
urer, shall each be ex-officio members of the Board of Trustees, and 
the Recording Secretary shall be the recording officer of that Board. 
These officers shall all be chosen by ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of Trustees ; 
and he, and also the Vice-Presidents and Secretaries and Treasurer, 
shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such officers respec- 
tively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of 
the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act of In- 
corporation is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the 
duties of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all 
funds and donations, and generally have and possess all the power 
and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the Society. It shall 
be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, to make and lay 
before the Society a particular Report of all their doings, with all 
such documents and vouchers as may be asked for by any member ; 
and such Report shall be had and considered before the Society 
shall proceed to the choice of Trustees for the year then next 
ensuing. 

ARTICLE VI n. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the Mon- 
day preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and at this 
meeting it shall be competent to transact any business which the 
Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall be given by 
the Recording Secretary at least seven days before the holding 
thereof, by notice published in at least one newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by the 
Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three newspa- 



35 

pers published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at 
such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as 
they may direct, or as the President may at any time call. Five 
Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually, 
shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, a Com- 
mittee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them ; the Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of all 
matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the appointment 
of all agents, subject to the approval of the Trustees, and the defin- 
ing of their respective duties ; the Committee on the Depository 
shall have the management of alY matters connected with the Soci- 
ety's Depository for the sale of Bibles, — all of said Committees at 
all times, however, to be subject to the direction and control of the 
Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or amended at any annual meet- 
ing, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, by vote 
of a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE-MEMBERS. 

Each Life-Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depositor}^ annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles and 
Testaments. 

N. B. — The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued only for 
the current^ not iov past years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE. 



BY THE PAYMENT OF TWENTY DOLLARS AND UPWARDS. 



Aobe, Rer. Frederick R., Boston, 
AW>e, Mrs. Frederick R., *« 
Abbott, Charies H., Lowell, 
Abbott, Rev. Jacob J.» Yarmouiht Me. 
Aborn, John G., ]Vake/ield, 
Adams* Mrs. Catherine H., Conway, 
Adams, Miss Eliza M., H^Uhraham, 
Adams, Elizabeth W., Derry, N, H, 
Adams, Frank N., Medwny. 
Adams, John Clark, Hopkinton, 
Adams, Neherofab, D.D., Boston, 
Adams, Stephen, IVest Medway, 
Adams, William, Bradford, 
Albro, Mrs. Elizabeth S., ]VaItham, 
Albro, Miss Annie £.. '* 

Alden, Alroira S. C, Foxboro', 
Alden, Ebenezer, Randolph, 
Alden, Russell, Campello, 
Alden, Miss Sarah B., Randolph, 
Alden, Miss Sasan, " 

Aldrich, Mrs. Mary B., Westboro\ 
Allen, Mrs. Cjrrus, Franklin. 
Allen, Rev. Nathaniel G., Boston, 
Allen, Richard H., Brainiree. 
AIMS, Willis, Barre, xV. Y. 
Allls, Myron, " 
Allis^ Elliot, '• 
AUis, Edward, Madison, Mick, 
Allls, Elliot, " 

A His, John, Conivay. 
Allis, Irving. Whately. 
Allis, Mrs. Cornelia A., Whately. 
Alvord, Alvin, Skelburne, 
Ames, James S., HaverhUl. 
Ames, Jarvis A., N. E. Conference, 
Ames, R. N., " " 

Andrews, Artemas F., Ashby, 
Andrews, C. L., Boston, 
Andrews, (Jeorge W., Danvers. 
Andrews, Stephen P., Gloucester, 
Andrews, W. T., Boston. 
Andrews, Thomas E., Holliston, 
Andrews, Walter H., Whitinsville. 
Archibald, E^lwanl, Methuen, 



<f 



i< 



Arroes, Miss Clara A., Campello, 

Arms, Mrs. Charles, SoiUk Deerfield, 

Arras, Harriet E., " *« 

Armsby, Mrs. H. A., Wkitinsville, 

Arnold, Susan O., Braintree, 

Atwood, Mrs. Abby, Bergen<, X, J, 

Atwood, Mrs. Elizabeth M., Salem, 

Atwoo4l, Edward S., Boston, 

Atwood, John W., Bergen^ N, J, 

Avery, Rev. William F., Conway, 

Babcock, Mrs. Nancy, Boston. 

Babcock, Mrs. P. W., Skerborn. 

Babcock, William R., D.D.^ Jamaica Plain, 

Babson, Miss Maria R., Gloucester, 

Bachelor, Mrs. Mary A., WkitinsvilU, 

Bacon. George W., Newton, 

Bacon, Jacob, Gloucester, 

Bacon, Joseph N., Newton, 

Barkus, Rev. Joseph W., Tkomaston, Ct, 

Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., Dorchester, 

Bak^r, Francis, Peabody, 

Baker, Susan S., *' 

Balcora, Lincoln, Winckendon, 

Baldwin, Miss Josephine L., Lynn, 

Balmer, William, Jr., WkitinsvUle, 

Ball, Miss Elizabeth, Concord, 

Bancroft, Amasa, Gardner, 

Bancroft, Henry L., Millbury, 

Barbour, Wm. M., D. D., New Havens Ct, 

Barbour, Mrs. Eliza A., " " •• 

Bard well, Francis C, Wkately. 

Barker, Hiram, Brighton. 

Bardsley, Joseph, WkitinsvilU, 

Barnard, William F., Marlboro", 

Barnes, H. H., Lowell. 

Barnes, Ztlpah, Henniker, N. H. 

Barrett, Nathan H., Concord. 

Barrett, Miss Rebecca M.. •* 

Bartlett, Rev. Edward O., Pittsfield. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Eleanor C, Plymoutk. 

Bartlett, Thomas, Boston 

Barrows, Rev. Justin S., N. E. Conference, 

Barrows, Mrs. Adeline E., " '* 

Barrows, Sarah M., Lakexnlle. 



38 



(( 



(< 



*< 



(t 



BftMett, Abiel, Bridgewater, 

Baraet, Henry, Newton. 

BasMtt, Mrs. Lucretia C, Charlttiumt, 

Bassett, Sarah E., Nnvburyport. 

Batohelder, Mrs. Elizabeth H., Btverly. 

Batcbelder, John M., Holiisttm. 

Batcheller, Ezra, North Brookfield. 

Batcheller, Mn. Luthera C, " 

Batchelor, Miss Francis A., WhitinsvUU. 

Batchelor, Stephen F., *' 

Batt, Rev. William J., Stoneham, 

Beal, Alexander, Boston. 

Beal, Mrs. Louisa, Cokasset. 

Beals, Isaac N., CamJ^Uo, 

Bean, Cyrus Beetle, Dover, N. H. 

Bearse, Isaac, Natick. 

Bearse, Miss Olive A., Centreville. 

Beebe, Mrs. James M., Boston. 

Beebe, Frances L., 

Beebe, Edward P., 

Beebe, Emily B., 

Beebe, Mary L., 

Beebe, Marcus F., IVilbrakam. 

Beecher, Bev. Charles, Georgetown. 

Beecber, Rev. William U , No. Brookfield. 

Belden, Mnt. MariHniie P., H'hately. 

Beldeii, William P., Gardner. 

Belknap, Miss Martha W., Framingham. 

Benner, Bumham C, Lowell. 

Benson, Fre«lerick A., Newton. 

Bigelow, I. B., A^. J?. Conference. 

Bigelow, Mrs. Lucy A., Sherborn. 

Biscoe, Mrs. Arthur G., Westboro'. 

Biscoe, Bev. Thomas C, Holliston. 

Billings, Charles £., Newton. 

Bixby, Mrs. J. P., Norwood. 

Blackstone, Mrs. Ly<lia E., Chester ^ N. H. 

Blake, Mortimer, D.D., Taunton. 

Blauchard, Mrs. Abby W., Brook/ield. 

Bianchard, Miss Frances C, Groton. 

Bliss, Rev. Cbarles R., Wakefield. 

Bliss, Mrs. Charles R., << 

Blodgett, Benjamin C, Newton. 

Blood, Simeon, South Deerfield. 

Blood, Cyrus W., Winchester. 

Blood, George D., Groton. 

Blood, Lyman, Groton. 

Bodwell, Rev. Joseph C, Hartford^ Conn. 

Bodwell, Mrs. Catharine, *' *• 

Booth, Charles E., Chicopee. 

Bourne, Thomas B., Foxboro*. 

Boutwell, Mrs. Hannah H., Braintree. 

Bowers, Luke K., Boston. 

Bowers, Mr». Clara H., *• 

Boyden, A. G., Bridgewater. 

Brackett, Rev, Josiah, Charlesto^vn. 

Brackett, Lemuel, Quincy. 

Bran«lenberg, O. C. W., San Francisco, Cul. 

Brant, Aaron, Wakefield. 



Brewer, Cyrus, Boston. 
Brewer, Mrs. C. F., " 
Brewer, John R., " 
Brickett, Franklin, Haverhill. 
Brlggs, Miss Catharine Clark, Wenham. 
Brlggs, Rev. William T., East Douglas. 
Briggs, Mm. Abby L. , " " 
Brigham, Dexter P., Westboro'. 
Brigham, Mrs. Dexter P., " 
Brock. Robert G., Wkitinsville. 
Brooks, Rev. C. S., Putnam, Ct. 
Brown, George M., Bradford. 
Brown, Mrs. Harriet L., Boston. 
Brown, Rebecca, Wkitinsville . 
Brown, Joseph, Groton. 
Brown, Mrs. Mary L., Haverhill. 
Brown, Robert K., Wkitinsville. 
Bryant, Solon, ** 

Bucklin, Simon S., Brookline. 
Buell, George C, Springfield 
Bulkley, Mrs. C. F , Plattsburgk, N. V. 
BuIIard, Mrs. John Jr., Medway. 
BullanI, Mrs. Mary W., Skerborn. 
Burbeck, Samuel K., Boston. 
Burge, Lorenzo, " 

Bumham, Robert W., Essex. 
Burr, Charles C, Auburndale. 
Burrage. J. C, Boston. 
Burrage, Mary C, Arlington. 
Burrlll, Amos C, Uxbridge. 
Bui»h, Henry J., Westfield. 
Bnshby, Sophia W., Peabody. 
Butler, Rev. Daniel, Boston. 
Butler, Mrs. Jane D., " 
Caily, Daniel R., D.D., Arlington. 
Cady, Mrs. Harriet S., *' 
Caldwell, Rev. W. E., Hyannis. 
Camp, George, Soutk Hadley Falls. 
Camp, John. 

Camp, Samuel, Springfield. 
Candlin, Rev. Joseph, Sontkampton. 
Capen, Mrs. Charles, Fratningkam. 
Capen, Rev. John, A^. E. Conference. 
Capen, Mrs. Kev. John, " " 
Capron, John W., Uxbridge. 
Capron, Laura A. W^., " 
Carleton, Horace, Metkuen. 
Carleton, George H., Haverhill. 
Carpenter, Kev. Carlos C, Boston. 
Carpenter, Catharine E., Foxboro*. 
Carpenter, Daniel, 
Cari)enter, Edson, 
Carpenter, Horace, 
Carr, Charlt'S U . Wkitinsville. 
Carr, John C, West Newbury. 
Carrier, Rev. A. H., Minneapolis, Min. 
Carruthers, Rev. William, Pittsfield. 
Carter, Edward, Andor>er. 
Carter, Joshua T., Wkitinsville. 



i< 



»i 



«« 



39 



Carter, William H., Lowell, 

Gary, Qeorge C, Brockton, 

Gary, Mrs. Mary D., Foxhoro\ 

Case, Mrs. Mary Olive, New York City. 

Caswell, Lemuel E., Boston, 

Cate, Oeorgiana W., Haverhill. 

Chad wick, Alonzo C, Lawrence. 

Chamberlln, John, IVkitintvUU. 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Samuel, WeUhortf, 

Chandler, Miss Prances E., Andover. 

Chandler, H. H., CharUstown. 

Chapin, Caleb T., Nortkboro\ 

Chapin, John O., IVkitinsvilU. 

Chapin, Josiah L., Lawrence. 

Chapin, Marcus, Monxon. 

Chapin, Mile, S^ing/ield. 

Chapin, Miss Sarah, Whitinsville. 

Chapman, Qeoi^ H., ]Vinchester, 

Chase, Ann Maria, Haverhill. 

Chase, Charles W., " 

CliAse, David B., IVhitinsvUle. 

Chase, (leorge S., Haverhill. 

Chase, Hezelciab, Lynn. 

Chase, Hezekiah S., Boston. 

Chase, Robert, Haverhill. 

Cheever, Ira, Chelsea. 

Child, Miss Anna G., S^ingfield. 

Child, George H., S^ingjield, O. 

ChiM,MissLucyA., Thetford, Vt. 

Childs, Carlos, Henniker, N. H. 

Childs, Horace, •' ♦* 

Choate, David, M.D., Salem. 

Clapp, James B., Boston. 

Clapp, John C, •« 

Clapp, Samuel, Foxboro*. 

Clark, Rev. Edward L., New York. 

Clark, Elbridge, East Medway. 

Clark, George, Concord. 

Clark, James G., Andover. 

CUrk, John L., *' 

Clark, Jonathan, IVinchester. 

Clark, Rev. Joseph B., Jamaica Plain, 

Clark, Julius L., West Newton. 

Clark, Mrs. Miranda D., Boston. 

Clark, Oliver B., Tewksbury, 

CUrk, Bowse R., WhitinsvUU. 

Clark, Rufhs W., D.D., Albany, H. Y. 

Clarke, Mrs. Adeliza H., Medway. 

Clarke, Dorus, D. D^ Boston. 

Clarke, Francis, Haverhill, 

Clarke, George E., Falmouth. 

Clarke, Mrs. Sarah L., Boston. 

Clarke, Elizabeth L., •* 

Clary, John, Conway. 

Clary, Mrs. S S., MiUon, 

Cleveland, Miss Harriet A., South Deerfield. 

Cleaveland, Miss Sarah L., '< ** 

Cleaveland, William, <* *< 



Clifford, Wyatt B., Chatham. 

Clough, John K., Cambridgeport, 

Cobb, Andrew B., Newton. 

Cobb, Jacob, Abington. 

Col»b, Rev. L. H.. S^ingfield^ Vt. 

Codman, Mrs. Catharine, Boston. 

Coe, Laura E., Whiiinsville. 

Coe, Mary A., East Douglas. 

Coffin. Mrs. C. A., Lynn. 

Coggin, Rev. William S., Boxford. 

Coggswell, Caleb, Essex. 

Cogswell, Doane, Bradford. 

Cogswell, Ebenezer, ipswick. 

Colbum, W. W., N E. Conference. 

Colby, Albert, Boston. 

Colby, Barak, Henniker, N. H. 

Cole, Miss Ella A., Medway. 

Cole, John A., " 

Conant, Charles E., Winchester. 

Comint, Jennie A., Gardner. 

Conn, Horace, Woburn. 

Cook, Asa, Newton. 

Cook, Henry A., Whitinsville. 

Cook, Mrs. Maria R., Uxbridge. 

Cook, J. Sullivan, Whitinsville. 

Cooley, Mrs. Olive F., Charlemoni. 

Coolidge, Rev. Amos H., Leicester. 

Coolidge, Joseph, Boston. 

Coolidge, Lowell, Shtrborn. 

Copp, Mrs. Fedora F., Chelsea. 

Cordley, Mrs. Lydia G., Lawrence. 

Corey, Mrs. Mary, Westboro^. 

Cornish, Mrs. Elizabeth B., Centreville. 

Corsoe, John, Haverhill. 

Cousens, Beulah F., Newton Centre. 

Cowdrey, Robert, Winchester. 

Crafts, Mrs. Sarah P., Newton. 

Crawfonl, Ellen A., Bar re. 

Crittenden, Miss Rebecca S., Charlemont. 

Crockett, Mrs. Eliza A., Haverhill. 

Crosby, Wilson, Centreville. 

Crosby, Mrs. Eleanor L., ** 

Crosby, James, Boston. 

Crosby, Mrs. Rebecca, " 

Cruiukshanks, J. DeWitt, Rock/ord, lU. 

Cruickshanks, Miss Mary S.. Chelsea. 

Cruickshanks, Miss Mary, Chelsea. 

Cruikshanks, George, Whiiinsville. 

Cummingf, Charles H., Harvard. 

Cunningham, Mrs. John, Glimcester. 

Currier, Rev. Albert H., Lynn. 

Curtis, Abner, East Abington. 

Cushnian, George H., Brockton. 

Cushman, Mrs. Rachel B., <* 

Cushman, J«>seph I.> New Braintree. 

Cutler, Rev. Calvin, Auburndale. 

Cutler, Rev. Elijah, Boston. 

Cutler, Rev. Samuel, ** 



40 



Catler, James T., Dorcfuster. 

Gutter, Charles A., Waltkam, 

Cutter, J. Dana, '< 

Cutter, E., M.D., Cambridge, 

Cutter, Stcplien, IVincfuster. 

Cutter, Stephen H., ** 

Dakin, Thomas L., Sudbury. 

Dame, Henry, Peabody. 

Damon, Albert P., Reading. 

Damon, Mrs Edward C, Concord. 

Dana, Mrs. Edward, Woodstock^ Vt. 

Dana, Charles B., WeUesley. 

Dane, John, Boston. 

Dane, John H , " 

Daniell, Mrs. Eliza B., East Afedway. 

Daniels, Elijah B., ** 

Daniels, Mrs. Maria m W., East Medivay. 

Daniels, Mrs. William, Medway. 

Davis, Alfred N., North Andover. 

Davis, Alvah M., Haverhill. 

Davis, Henry L., Bradford. 

Davis, George L., North Andover. 

Davis, JameH, Boston. 

Davis, John. Somerxnlle. 

Davis, Joshua H.. " 

Davis, Lydia K., Dunstable. 

Davis, Mrs. M. A., Medivay. 

Davis, ^liss Mary H., Concord. 

Davis, Kev. Terlcy B., Hyde Park. 

Davis, Tlinddeus Uriah, Dunstable. 

Davison, George W., Whitinsville. 

Dawes, Kev. Ebenezer, Dighton. 

Day, Milton B., Bradford. 

Day, Mrs. Alice A., " 

Day, Robert L., Newton. 

Dean, Miss Abbie T., Foxboro\ 

Dean, Clara L., Holbrook. 

Denham, Uev. Georgt*, Beverly. 

Denham, Mre. Clara D., " 

Dickinson, Mi-s. Myra F., Whately. 

Dickerman, Kev. I^ysander, Quincy^ HI. 

Dickson, Oliver, Concord. 

Dickson, Mrs. Sarah C, '< 

Dight, Rev. A., N. E. Conf. 

Dix, Mrs. Elijah, Boston. 

Dix, Samuel F., Newton. 

Doane, Heraan S., Charlestoron. 

Dodd, Rev. Stephen G., St. John, N. B. 

Dodge, Mrs. Ann S., North Brookfield. 

Dodge, Mrs. J. M. C, Andover, 

Doggett, Rev. Thos., Niagara Falls, N. V. 

Doggett, Mrs. Frances L., ** 

Doggett, William, Niagara Falls, N. V. 

Doliber, Miss Sarah Lizzie, Marblehead. 

Dorr, Samuel, Boston. 

Dowse, Mrs. Carrie D., Sherborn. 

Dowse, Eliza C, " 

Drake, Rev. Ellis R., Middleboro' . 

Dudley, Mrs. Sarah A., WhitinsviUe. 



Dunham, Charles H., Winchester, 
Dunham, Mrs. Mary L., " 
Dunlap, Sumner, South DeerfUld. 
Dunton, Hiram P., Spencer. 
Dunn, Edward H., Boston. 
Durfee, Kev. Chas. Stoddard, Troy, N. Y. 
Durgin, James, West Newbury. 
Dutton, Mrs. Mary J., North HaijUld. 
Dwinell, Leonard, Milibury. 
Dyer, Rev. E. Porter, Shrewsbury. 
Dyer, Mrs. Maria D., Gloucester. 
Eager, William, Boston. 
Eames, Warren, Wilmington. 
Eaton, G. F., N. E. Conf. 
Eastman, Rev. Cyrus L., A''. E. Conf, 
Eaton, George F., ** 

Eastman, Rev. L. R., Jr., Framingham. 
Eastman, Mrs. Jane C, N. E. Conf. 
Eaton, Mrs. Ann E., Wakefield. 
Eaton, Eben, Framingham. 
Eaton, Edward, Medway. 
Eaton, Miss Martha W., Fitchburg. 
Eaton, Lucian, South Deerfield. 
Eaton, William, Boston. 
Eaton, William J., Westboro\ 
Eddy. Jobhua. East Middlebor^ . 
Etlwards, Mrs. Frances S., Dedham. 
Edwards, Frederick B., A'^. Chelmsford. 
Edwai-ds, Maria F., *• 

EdwardSf Nathan B., ** 

Edwards, Nathan F., ** 

Edwards, SybU R., *• 

Edwards, Victor E., *« 

Ela, D. h., -V. E. Conf. 
Elder, Rev. Hugh, Salem. 
Eldred, Lorenzo, Falmouth. 
Elliott, Robert, Globe Village, 
Ellis, Willard K., East Medway. 
Ells, Mrs. Elizabeth W., Oberlin^ O. 
Ellsworth, Rev. A. A., Waterloo, Iowa. 
Ellsworth, Mre. A. G. C. C, *« " 

Emerson, Annie A., Lancaster. 
Emerson, Miss Ellen T., Concord. 
Emerson, Frances V., Lancaster. 
Emerson, Jacob, Jr., Metkuen. 
Emerson, Mrs. Jacob, ** 
Emerson, R. V. C, Newton. 
Emerson, William, Westboro\ 
Emery, George F., •* 
Emery, Mrs. Harriet, North Weymouth. 
Emery, Rev. Joshua, " 

Emery, Mrs. Mary, Chatham. 
Ewell, Rev. John L., Waverley. 
Ewing, Rev. Edward C, Enfield. 
Fairbanks, Herschel, Haverhill. 
Fairbanks, Herschel P., '* 
Fairbanks, Timothy R., Medway. 
Earns worth, Ezra, Boston. 
Farr, Alba A., Methuen. 



41 



Faxon, MIn Rachel A., Braimtree, 

Fay, Mn. Addiaon G., Concord, 

Fay, Gbarle» H., IVhiimtviH*. 

Fay, Cynw, IVestboref. 

Fay, Joaiah C, Hopkinton, 

Fay, 9. A., lVettboro\ 

Fenn, J. W., N. E. Con/. 

Fearing, Mn. Maria A., So. IVeymouik. 

Felch, Isaac, Natick. 

Field, John W., Boston. 

Field, Mrs. Amelia C, << 

Field, Joei, MUtineagMt. 

Field, Mre. Edwin, NrudonvilU. 

Fiaher, Miaa Eliza, Medway. 

¥1aher, Mrs. Lewis, East Medway. 

Fisher, Milton M., Medway VUUge. 

Fisher. Samuel T., Canton. 

Fiske, Mrs. A. W., BrookJUld. 

Fbk, N. B., A^. E. Con/. 

Fbk, Geo. W., Danvers. 

Fiske, Daniel T., D. D., Nrwburyport, 

Fiske, George B , Holliston. 

Fiske, George T., Newburyport. 

Fiske, Mary Fidelia, *« 

Fitch, John A., Hopkinton. 

Fits, Mrs. Mary C, Tops/ield. 

Fits, Daniel, Jr., Ipswick. 

Fits, Daniel F., •• 

Flagg, Kev. Rufus C, Nortk Andover. 

Flanders, Joseph, Haver kill. 

Fletcher, Ephraim S., WkitinsvilU. 

Fletcher, Mrs. Emma A., ** 

Fletcher, Mrs. Emily M., •• 

Fletcher, James, *< 

Fletcher, Mrs. L. M., •» 

Fletcher, Lewis C, «• 

Fletcher, Samael J., ** 

Fletcher, Mrs. Hannah C, Manckester. 

Fletcher, Isaac W., Stovo. 

Fletcher, Nancy B., '* 

Fletcher, Kev. James, Groton. 

Fletcher, Mrs. Lydia M., •* 

Fletcher, Still man, IVinckester. 

Fletcher, William, «* 

Flinn, Mre. Paulina, H^olmrn. 

Flint, Mre. Hannah, Peabody. 

Flint, Levi M., Stougkton. 

Flint, Thomas, Danvers. 

Floyd, Miss Mary J., Peabody. 

Folger, Allen, Concord^ N. H. 

Forbush, William, WkitinsvUU. 

Fork, Rev. George, Versailles, N. Y. 

Ford, Thomas A., Brockton. 

Ford, ilrs. Eliza C, «' 

Fosdick, Charles, Groton. 

Fosdick, Frederick, *« 

Fosdick, Miss Mary, •• 

Foster, Rev. Addison P., Jersey City^ N. J. 

Foster, Mrs. Hattie D., 



(( 



«i 



(t 



f< 






(t 



Foster, Mrs. Eliza C, Roudey. 

Foster, Mrs. Harriet L., IVincktmUn, 

Foster, Mrs. Mary, Palmtr, 

Frankle, Mrs. Jones, HaverkiU. 

French, Mrs. Harriet S., Taunton, 

Frothingham, A. T., Cambridge, 

Fullerton, Rev. Bradford M., Palnur. 

Furber, Kev. Daniel L., Hewton Centre. 

Furber, Mrs. Maria B., *' 

Gage, Eliza Ann, Bradford. 

Gage, Gawin R., IVobnm. 

Gale, Rev. Wakefield, Eastkampton. 

Gale, Justin Edwards, ** 

Gallot, Nathan, Groton. 

Galloup, David R., Peabody, 

Gammel, Rev. Sereno D., Box/or d. 

Ganlner, Willie F., Gardner. 

Garrette, Rev. Edmund Y., Lacrosse, IVis, 

Garrette, Mrs. Franzenia W., 

Garrette, Flora Gertrude, 

Garrette, Mary Spring, 

Garrette, Sarah Anibella, 

Gates, Henry C, Ckicopee. 

George, Mrs. Ellen K., ** 

George, Rev. F. T., N. E. Con/ 

Gibson, Mrs. Luther, Groton. 

GibbH, George L., U^'kitinsville. 

Gilbert, Benjamin R., Boston. 

Giles, Mrs. KUzubetli W., Rockport. 

Glliiian, MlMt Kebecca I., Boston. 

Gleason, Cliarles A., New Braintree, 

(ileason, Kev. George L., Manckester. 

Gluason, Mrs. Charlotte A., " 

Gleason, Kebecca T., Dorckester. 

Gleason, Rev. J. F., Nor/olk, Ct. 

Gleason, Mrs. Olive M. 

Goodell, H. Augustus, WkitinsvUU. 

Gooilwin, A. E., West Anusbnry. 

Gordon, Samuel J., Boston. 

Gonlon, Mrs. Rebecca, *• 

Gordon, Jeannle, *' 

Gott, J. R., Rockport. 

Gough, Herbert D., Worcester. 

Gough, John B., Boylston. 

Gough, Mrs. Mary E., " 

Gould, Mrs. Sarah W., Westboro\ 

Gourgas, Miss Abby M., Concord. 

Gourgas, Miss Margaret U., *' 

Grassle, Rev. Thomas G., AppUton, Wis. 

Graves, Mrs. Amanda R., Sunderland. 

Gray, Horace, Boston. 

Gray, John C, ** 

Gray, William, Holbrook. 

Greeley, Rev. E. H., Haverkill, N. H, 

Greeley, Mrs. Edward H., *• 

Greene, Rev. Richard G., Orange , N. J. 

Greenwood, Charles H., Gardner. 

Greenwood, Mrs. Sally K., Skerborn. 

Gregory, Rev. Lewis, West A mesbury. 



Oiigfs, Charlei D , Wiuktr^. 
OHgn, Swnoel, " 

Grin^ »n. S. H., " 



HiilJ. Arthur H., Brad/tri. 

Hall. Mr». Mary. A,^ia. 

Hall. AllL-e D., 

Hall. Mra. Anglv M , " 

HhII, Harriet E., 

Hall. Kev. Allen J.. L^HttviUt. 

Hall, Mn. JoHi>b7 GrtUm. 

Hall. .Mr». jarali A., Latrn-iUt. 

Ham, Mrs, Cntharina K.. lfim:h,i,r. 

Hawbleloii, Mr.. 8. D., A'. E. Cfnf. 

Hnmbhlnn, Rer. WUllam J., " 

Hanillinn, Kcv B. F i9ki(.-> 

Hamilton, ¥.. D., Camay, 

Hamlsn, Kev OsofgoM., TayHlcn. 

Hanion, Cbu. Lute, S .Vrt-marlni, .V. H 

Hammiiuil, Ra« William B.. Anahmtl. 

Hammoml Mra. LouIhM., 

HanlKloli, Thcunaa, Qriiay. 

Hanlf Truiun Tlumfi,^. O. 

Hate, Rev. OeortaS., ,««/(■•, 

Harnulen Mlu Mary A.,^n.»if>r. 

Harrlnsloti, Rht KU Wlillney. A'. Brtirrly 

Uarluw. Hat. Ilufiw K , Mtilnvty. 

Har 



Hamsnwaj, Mlu Hanlst. Gritn. 
Ilenahaw. FnucU, BrHm. ■ 

Hen^haw. Mra. Saiali W., ■> 
Heiishav. Ijiura. 

I['<rrirk. K..'. -\\-lllUin D.. Gmrdmtr. 
Hener, Mn, Polly, Himflutm. 
Hewins, Mn Aiinetia P , Ftxitr,'. 
Htwiiu, MlH Lonlu E., 



HllUtn, Henrlelta M., MiJ^aa^. 
Illllnn, Itev. .Tohn V.. Bailrfi. 
Hilloii. William. Bra4ftrJ. 
llH.'l.iwk, (ieorgi; M., Brimfitld. 
Hobarl, Pelar. StUin,. 
Hohnii, MlH Piindlla. RrtnUj. 



Ko)l 



nrd. Btri 



Harlwiill, I.nltla E., Orilsn. 
Haakell, Wllllaui P.. .V, Br<vifi,U. 
Hasklna, Myrlck. Lakt^-IU,. 
Ha*IiUKi>, UoIIIb, Frammgham. 
Hatch, AiiiiaS.,^ru4rui'i/. 
HaUh. Wellman Wlllxy, Aiki^sn. .V 
Hatcli,Mn.CarrisL., 
Haven, George A., CamfrlU. 
Haven, Bby. John, Charllt.. 
Hawea, Mn. A. L., Grafts,. 
Haven, Cynlhla, U'nar^in. 
HawpK, Julia, 

Hnyden, AUcs M., Hi^l^i,^. 
Ilay.'«, llev Stephen II., ««f,7». 
Hayn», Etnma )!., T,^h^„J H«rl,« 
Hay wanl, Mlu Clara, Brainlrti. 
Haywarcl. Kllaa, " 

Baywant, Mite Haltie L., ll-iilimfil. 
Haywar-I.-Iahn, 
Hayward. PanI, AMy. 
Hayfood, Mn. Elliabeth C, Fratikli 
Haiel, Mr». Sarah L., Glt-ciiUr. 
Hailewnod, Mn. A. H., F.rtntt. 
Headley, Kev. P. C, Aki/m. 
Healey, Hav. Jowph W., K. OrLans. 



»k, E. V. 



Dk, Mn. Jenny M„ 
1, Mn.Sanli. (>a/>«>. 
HDlland. Mn. Sarah £., Brrlm. 
Ilolland, Mary Cecilia. Bratklni. 
Tolm, Jacob P.. Jlf,M^«. 
lolinec. Miu t^linbelh A.. BilvUtrt, . 
[olnief , Mln Wealthy A.. Camftlh. 



1, Thoi 



!Ktuiltr. 



Hopiilii. Kev. Jamea 
"".Mnier, Mine Ellia, 
ouKhton, CephHI. / 



1. Kev. M 



IIow Frwleri 

Hawe,Mr>.lIanD^ Maria, SHrritrm. 

Howe.SannelA., Wtuim^'. 
Howei. Mrt. Caroline K., Clun-ltmtnl. 

Aik/lrU. 
Kowaf, ColKni, C/ailkam. 

and, Mn. Hannah M., Cmwa^. 
Hoyt, HcnTy. B,>lr». 
Hnyt, Mra. Marin, Framingkam. 
Jloyc Wllllani H., BBtlaa. 

. Chariei A., Cnturd. 

aTt.,S>-HdrrlaiJ. 
lludaoii, Samuel, Uxiridtt. 
Hulbert, Clla^le^ BetliiH. 



43 



Hamphrey, Daniel, N. Weymotak. 
Hunt, Mrs. Jeratlia B., WhiiinsvUle, 
Huntington, Matilda C, Peahody. 
Hurrt, Francis P., IVakefield. 
Hutchinson, Elijah, Danvers. 
Hutchins, Caroline M., West/ord. 
Hutchins, William E., LowtU. 
Hatchins, Maria J., '* 
Ide, Rev. Jacob, Jr., Mansfield. 
Ide, Mrs. Jacob, Jr., " 
Jackman, Mrs. Susan M., Medtaay, 
Jackson, Miss Caroline B., Newton. 
Jackson, Henry W., Boston, 
Jackson, Laura E. L., " 
Jackson, Walter, Brookline. 
Jameson, Rev. Ephraim O., East Medway. 
JefFries, Miss Catharine Amory, Boston. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Maria L., AVw Bedford. 
Jeniii*ion, Rev. Joseph F., Canton. 
Jephson, Miss C. R., Brookline. 

Jewett, Henry, Pe^perell. 

Johnson, Charles G , Bradford, 

Johnson, Mrs. Emma E., ** 

Johnson, Francis, iVinckester. 

Johnson, Peter R., Holliston. 

Johnson, Miss Rebecca, N. Andover. 

Johnson, Mrs. S. W., Framing^ham, N. H. 

Johnson, Alice C, Northampton. 

Johnson, Cora K., BUukington. 

Johnson, Minnie L., 

Johnson, Chandler, 

Ji)hnsou, Edward A., Orange, N. J. 

Johnson. Eftie D., " 

Jones, Augustus T., Brockton. 

J'mes, Henry E., Holliston. 

Jones, Joseph, Holbrook. 

Joslin, Mrs. A. L., Oxford. 

Joy, Mrs. Abigail, Boston. 

Judd, Rev. Burtis, IVestboro' . 

Judd, Mrs. Rebecca Ann, " 

Judd, Mrs. Abby F., " 

Judson, Wiliard, Uxbridge. 

Keith, Rev. A. F., Danielsonville, Conn. 

Keith, Albert, Campello. 

Keith, Azra B., •* 

Keith, Edward Everett, Bridgetvater. 

Keith, Preston B., Campello. 

Keith, ZIba C, 

Kelley, George Reed, Haverhill. 

Kelley, Miner, Chico^ee. 

Kelton, George, Gardner. 

Kempton, Mrs. Ellen, Grafton. 

Kendall, Mrs. Abel M., Boston, 

Kendall, Mrs. Lovine B., Sfiring^eld, 

Kendall, Mrs. Mary E., lyinchester. 

Kendlg, Rev. A. B., xV. E. Conference. 

Kendrick, John. Haverhill, 

Kendrick, Mrs. Lydla F., Chatham. 

Kerr, Robert W., Foxioro*. 



« 



tt 



<< 



•I 



c< 



Kerr, Jane K., 

Kettelle, Jacob Q., Boston. 

Kielblock, Jane L., Charlestown. 

Kilbon, George B., S^ring/uld. 

Kimball, Benjamin,'2il, Haverhill. 

Kimball, Rev. Caleb, Medwxy, 

Kimbiill, Charles, Ipswich. 

Kimball, Daniel W., IVinchtsUr, 

Kimball, David, Bradford, 

Kimball, Walhice L., " 

Kimball, Mrs. Harriet W., Lowell, 

Kimball, John R., lyobnrn. 

Kimball, Mrs. Sylvia, ]Vestboro\ 

Kingman, Miss Eliza, Boston, 

Kingsbury, Nathaniel, ** 

Kingsbury, John, Bradford. 

Kingsbury, Rev. John D. ** 

Kingsbury, Katy, 

Kingsbury, Martha, 

Klttredge, Rev. A. E., Chicago, 

Kittredge, C. Brigliam, lVestbjro\ 

Knowlton, Rev. Stephen, New Havent Vt, 

Knox, Mrs. S , Rock Island^ HI. 

Labaree, Rev. John C, Randolph, 

Lamb, Mrs. W. A., Holdsn. 

Jjambert, Miss Elizabeth G.. RowUy. 

Lambert, Thonuis R., D.D., Charlestown. 

Lambert, William T.. *' 

J^amson, Mrs. Edwin, Winchester. 

Lamson, Gardner Swift, 

Lamson, Helen, 

Lamson, Kate Glidden, 

Lane, Rev. James P., Bristol^ R. I. 

Lane, Mrs. Emma L., 

Lane, Rev. John W., IVhately. 

Lane, Mrs. Mary H., 

Lane, Amy Sanders, 

Lane, Wallace R., 

Lane, John Edward, 

Lane, Mary E. Chapman, Kingston^ N. H. 

Lane, Richmond J., Rockland, 

Langworthy, Rev. Isaac P., Chtlsea. 

Lasel, Josiah, WhitinsvilU, 

Lasell, Mrs. Jennie W., " 

Lathe, Miss Sarah S., Grafton, 

Laurie, Inglls, Owatonna, Minn. 

Lawrence, Rev. Amos E., HouscUonic, 

Lawrence, John, Groton. 

Lawrence, Curtis, " 

Lawrence, Mrs. Curtis, " 

Lawton, Mrs. S. C, fVhUinsville, 

Layml, John, ** 

Leach, Simeon, East Stoughton. 

Learoyd, Addison P., Danvers, 

Learoyd, John S., " 

Leavitt, Abner L., Hingham. 

Leavitt, Mrs. Elizabeth G., Boston. 

Leavitt, Rev. George R., Cambridgeport, 

Lee, Mrs. Rath M., Conway. 



(« 



i« 



t( 



<< 



(< 



(I 



It 



44 



Lee, Kev. Samuel H.» Clevelaiui, O. 
Leeds, Benjamin, Boston. 
Leeds, Mn. Anne B., ** 
Leeds, Mrs. Samuel, North BUUrica, 
Lefkvour, Issachar, Beverly. 
Leland, Calvin, Jr., Natick. 
Leland,Mr8. Charlotte A., Sherborn. 
Leland, Mrs. Lois, <' 

Leonard, Elisa, Foxboro*. 
Leonard, James Henry, Bridgewater. 
Leonard, James M., *' 

Lewis, Mrs. Maria J., So. Weymouth. 
Lewis, Reuben, Groton. 
Lewis, Mrs. Susan F., " 
Lincoln, Kev. Calvin, Hingham. 
Lincoln, F. W., Boston. 
Lincoln, James L. C, Sunderiattd, 
Lincoln, Noali, Boston. 
Little, Alexander E., . Wellesley. 
Little, Mrs. Lucia S., *< 

Little, Sarah Isabel, " 

Little, Stuart, Whitinsville. 
Little, Waldo F., Auburndaie. 
Little, William A., " 
Littletield, Saumel, Somerville. 
LoomiM, Kev. Klihu, Chtster/ield^ lit. 
Lord, Abraham, Ipswuh. 
Lord, Mixt* Anna M., ** 
Lord, Kev. Charles E., Boston. 
Lord, Edward A., Danvers. 
Lord, John A., Peabody. 
Loring, Mrs. Hannah W., Newton Centre. 
Loud, Arthur J., Boston. 
Loud, Mrs. Murtha B., Braintree. 
* Lovell, MliiH Vary B , Medway. 
Lumb, William, Boston. 
Lunt, Charles F., IVinchester. 
Lyman, Kev. George, Northampton. 
Lyman, Samuel T., Huntington. 
Lyon, Miss Chloe K., Campello. 
Macrejuling, Kev. Ch. S., Providence^ R. I. 
Makepeace, Mrs. Helen M., Gloucester. 
Maltby, Kev. Erastus, Taunton. 
Mann, Misss Helen I^., Greenfield. 
Manning, Otis, Littleton. 
Manning, Ed%\Hnl W., Wobnrn. 
Marble, Mrs. Mary E., Gra/ton. 
Markhani, Mrs. Priscilla V., Pom/ret, Ct. 
Marrett, Lorenzo, Cambridgeport. 
Marsh, Mrs. Abby C, Georgetaivn. 
Marsh, Elizabeth C. Haverhill. 
Mar»h, E. J., Leominster. 
Marsh, Lewis A., Chico/ee. 
Marsh, Miss Julia M., Haverhill. 
Martin, (leorge H., Bridgewater. 
Mason, Miss Nellie A., Royalston. 
Mattison, William, Whitinsville. 
Maynard, Kev. Joshua L., WUliston, Vt. 
Maynard, Leander, Shrewsbury , 



it 



t* 



McElroy, Richard B., Medway, 

McKeen, Philena, Andover. 

McKeen, Pbebe, *< 

McKenzie, Rev. Alexander, Cambridge. 

McKenzle, Ellen H., 

McKenzie, Kennet, 

McLean, Rev. John K., Springfield^ III. 

McLoud, Rev. Anson, Topsfitld. 

Means, Rev. James H., I>. D., Dorcktsttr. 

Means, John O., D.D., Boston, 

Means, Mrs. John O., " 

Means, William G., Andover. 

Merriam, Abner H., Templeton. 

Merriam, Homer, Springfield. 

Merrill, Rev. James W.^Andcver, 

Merrill, John K., Methuen. 

Merrill, Mrs. Harriet H., Winchendcn, 

Merrill, Rev. Truman A., Bernardsion. 

Merrill, William, N. E. Conference. 

Merritt, Clarissa, Conway. 

Merritt, Mrs. Mary A., Montague, 

Menler, Cyrus E., A'. E. Conference. 

Me8ler,Rev. 1. A., *• " 

Messenger, Miss Eliza, FUchhurg. 

Mills, Itev. Charles L., Andover. 

Mills, Mrs. Rebecca B., •» 

Mills, Miss Lydia, Peabody. 

Minot, William, Boston. 

Minot, William, Jr., •' 

Mixter, Mrs. Funny L., " 

Mixter, Mrs. Mary R., Hardwick. 

Mixter, Mrs. S. E., Rock Island, III. 

Moo.ir, George, D.D., Oakland, CeU. 

Moo«ly, James, Whitinsville. 

Moore, Lewis, Sharon. 

M<M)rc, Lillie, Holbrook. 

Moors, Joseph, Groton. 

Moors, Rufus, ** 

Moors. Mrs. Kutus, *' 

Montague, Wm. H., North Brookfield. 

Mordough, Rev. John H., Portland^ Me. 

Morse, Charles H., Boston. 

Morong, Rev. Tliomas, Ipswich. 

Morley, Kev. Sardis B., Pittsfield. 

Morrill, Eilward H., Norwood. 

Morrison, Daniel T., Methuen. 

Morrison, Miss Fancy T., Rowley. 

Morse, Miss Abby P., Emporia, Kansas. 

Morse, Charles N., Foxboro\ 

Morse, Miss Emily A., Bradford. 

Morse, Henry, Natick. 

Morse, Kufus W., Methuen. 

Morse. William E., Bradford. 

Moseley, Edward S., Newbury port. 

Mosman, Walter B., Aid>urndaU. 

Munger, Rev. Theo. T., Lawrence. 

Munger, Mrs. T. T., 

Munroe, A. LeB., Medivay. 

Mull roe, Miss Mary, Concord, 



Nft«.n, nev. CharlBD. SV,!!JI„I. 
^acoii, Rev Eliu. Bi/I,'ua. 

un, I.ucle M.,.\V-^ Brainlrrt, 

K<1*on, Jonathan H., s^rmihir^. 
Kaw*l], George H. HsIIUIon. 
Sawhall, LQcy Ann ^(<-Tt., 
Kewnuii, Samuel, PutliaJy. 
KswinaD, MIib SArnb A., Ifmkli. 
Nlcliols, Alfred A., if„IAmjiimy. 
Nlcholi, JoHpb, " " 

Nlcholi, Jusw R., HimTkm. 
Nkfaola. MoH*. " 

Ti'lckersnii. Mn, Tsmple W., CkkofB, 
HltbUngale, Rs«. Craoforcl. ^MfM. 
Koon.BcT.AirreH N. E. Can/n-intt. 
Soon, her. Samnel H., " •' 

Nori:roM.Slni.J«l«h, Wmlufitld. 
yarton, R«*. Eilwanl, Quincy. 
Noam, 6. AlJen, WhiSot,,'. 






•iMrJtv 



S., Srii, 
KoqiM. Soaan M., Btlion. 
Nojea, Alva, ft™i/o». 
No)-M, Jacob. Aiiitgtett. 
Horn, Laka B., ^«/« Aiineltn. 
Hojiaa, JtoOi* S., .V Bridtmalir. 
Oatlny, 6. D. WhaimvOU. 
W,\\n,atmiKmVD,£t,lir, t/. H. 
Odllii,Mn.£.T., " •' 

Ocdoaj, Aaron L., ^»i fVnl Ciiy. 
<Mwa7, Hlaa Cliarlolie, Bradfrrd. 
OcdwaT, Harbart, " 

Olborns.'Oeorge r PcatcJy. 
Owwd. Rev, AI>n)iHni M. U. E. Cttf. 
O^ood, QsargeC., Litirl/. 
Ottaoi, a. B,. U'iitiHn-ilU. 
OTcrbeck. Mn. Jurgnn O., Gluuiisltr. 
PaekaM, Rb». D. Tsmple.ZM ^.^/m, Co/. 
Packard, £<lward 0.. Jtrsfktti,. 
PKkard, Mra. Maria L., CamftlU. 
Packard, 8. nanklln, •• 

Packanl, MlMSnXeP.. " 
Packard, S. Blunnlp. HfrinsAtlJ. 









''>ll^..l 



Palmer, Hev Charlea lU^, Brutriftrt. 
Park, Jolin C., Btitci^ 

Parkac Danlal, iVliiiKitiai,, 
Haiksr M». ^aiab.AnrM. 
Pannenter, Hra.E. J. U., H(iW. 
Panam, Rer. R. C, WerciOtr. 
Panona, John, Jr.. SaMgia Cmiri, 
Partridge, Clark, Mrdmif. 



Partrldga, Joaaiih. HtUilt 
Patrick, Bar. Hmr; J. 
Patrick, Hn.Haraij> I 



iv„l NrwUK. 



Paul, Banrr. >frailim. 
Paul.LaUiBr, " 

Panl, MlM BaiTlat, " 
Paul, Mlia Marr, " 
Paul, Mn. Roth B., mdvutf. 
Pajton, UlH Soaan, Ftiiard. 

Pearw>n, Mil* Hannah J.. LrfBiH. 
Pflaae, Oeorga W., SaUm. 
Peckham, HabbanI, PtUrskam. 
Peine, Rev. BmlRird K,, BaUn. 

People., >..m.Lrl. \\,i:A. 
Porklna, lii-iLJi'mlii i ■., !;ai«fy. 



Perklna, Mn. : 
Perklna, JalnisU^ •< 

Perkins, Jamee, PnUtdy, 
Perklna, HIM Mar; A , Brithitn. 
Perklna, Robert 3.^ Danrtrt. 
Porlej, Haikell, G^rrtilinm. 
Peile)', Mn. Abigail T., S-Uim. 
Perley, Jacob, " 

Perrin, Rot, Wlllard T., JV. E. Cim/iT, 
PecTjr, Ulu Catharine H.. SIkrhrn. 
Perty,JaniB>,Zia«ivri. 
Parry, 'Mn. Rnlli O. , Mitrlbfra' 
Peton, McB. l.fdla H., Btrlin. 
Fe[enHn,,Iolin, .V, E. C«t/trtmt. 
Pettea, Daniel, sliarax. 
Pettee, TA\tA^Va»,4.,Fsikor,i' 
Pettee, Samuel Onnlner Siei-fkisM. 
Pettee, Wlllard, Ftihcrs'. 
PhUUpa, Alonio P., Midt^y. 
Phillip*, Oeorge W., Saifui. 
Piillllpe, Vr,, Ui'.i, IV., 
PbllUpa, Mra. Sallj, BaUtn. 
Philllpa, WlUlam, •' 
Piekortng. Henry W " 
Plarca, Albert T,, Slmf/Uen. 
Pierce, luacT., IVhiiitnill,. 
P1erc«,SyliMterO., JfiW^ri/fr. 
Wullun H 



Pike, 



., RruJiy. 






PlDmb, her. Albert H 
Plumb. JoaeptaDart, 
Pliini-T, Jlr*. Martha «.,Rtwliy. 
PliiiuiHur, Israel, Wlulimivah. 
Pui^ji?, Mrti. JoaephiCr-ii/linii. 
Pollard, JneephO, tVatwis. 
Pollock, Mlu Emma A., lI'Miliniva 
P.'moroy, Fred L., H^tdrrhnd. 
Ponifrei, .Mn. Sarah T WriUrr. 
Pond, Almlra W., Simli Ma/dm. 



46 



Pond, John P., Boston. 

Pond, Mrs. Nancy N., Medway. 

Pond, William E., Wrtntkam. 

Pool, Solomon, Gloucester. 

Poor, Joseph, Peahody. 

Poor, Nathan H.," 

Porter, J. Edwards, Nortk Brookfield. 

Porter, Emma L., " " 

Porter, Samuel S., Winchtster. 

Potter, J. Sturgis, Newton. 

Pratt, Cornelias, North Weynumth. 

Pratt, David, " " 

Pratt, Oalen, Brockton. 

Pratt, Galen E., « 

Pratt, Rev. George H., SeSf^rook, N. H. 

Pratt, Norton, Braintree. 

Pratt, Phebe, Sherborn. 

Pratt, Philip W., Abington. 

Pratt, Zebulon, North MiddUbortf. 

Pray, John J., Lowell. 

Prentice, Miss Julia, Grafton. 

Prentice, Marvel, Whitinsville. 

Prentice, James A., " 

Prentiss, Luke, " 

Preston, Dea. Samuel, Danvers. 

Prince, Mrs. Sarah B., Quincy. 

Pritchard, William, Newburyport. 

Procter, Joseph O., Gloucester. 

Proctor, Elizabeth O., Peabody. 

Proctor, Henry H., " 

Procter, Mrs. Lucy A., Gloucester. 

Puffer, Mrs. Josiah, Harvard. 

Putnam, Mrs. Elizabeth T., Grafton. 

Quincy, Thomas D., Boston. 

Quincy, Mrs. J. C, «« 

Quincy, Thomas D., Jr., '< 

Randall. Franklin B., Dover, N. H. 

Randall, Flora Sarah, " *• 

Randall, Mary Elizabeth, " " 

Rankin, J. Eames, D.D., Washingtouy D. C. 

Rankin, Mrs. Mary, " ♦« 

Ray, George W., Medway Village. 

Raymond, Helen S., Boston. 

Read, Miss Martha, East Abington. 

Reed, Miss Caroline G., Haverhill. 

Reed, Horace, South Abington. 

Reed, Miss Serissa, East Abington. 

Reed, Anna, Rockland. 

Reed, Mrs. Susan B., North Brookfield. 

Reeves. Miss Ellen P., i^ayland. 

Rice, Mrs. Agnes L., Boston. 

Rice, Mrs. Elizabeth C, Lawrence. 

Rice, Edward, Wayland. 

Rice, Kate A. 

Rice, Mrs. Henry A., Boston, 

Rice, Miss M. Augustus, Westboro\ 

Rice, Miss Jenny M., « 

Rich, Rev. Alonzo B., W. Lebanon, N.H. 

Rich, Rev. A. Judson, Brookfield. 



<i 



Rich, Mrs. Harriet L., 
Richards, Mrs. A M., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Richards, Mrs. £. S., A'', f . Conference. 
Richards, James F., Campello. 
Richardson, John W., Medway. 
Richardson, Luther, Winchester. 
Richardson, Miss Sarah E., Concord. 
Richardson, Stephen. West Medway. 
Richardson, Sumner, Winchester. 
Richardson, Rev. W. G., N. E. Conference, 
Richardson, Mrs. C. 0., Concord. 
Ricker, Edmund, West A mesbury. 
Ricker, George E., »' *• 

Bobbins, Andrew, Groton. 
Robblns, Charlotte M., " 
Bobbins, Chandler, D.D., Boston. 
Roberts, Re%^ Jacob, Auburndale. 
Roberts, Mrs. Mary A., •* 
Roberts, Mrs. Ruth, Manchester. 
Robertson, James, Peabody. 
Robinson, Charles W., Auburndale. 
Robinson, H. W., Brockton. 
Rodliff, Horatio H., A^. E. Conference. 

Rockwood, John T., Springfield. 

Rockwood, Miss Polly S., Ashland. 

Rogers, C. S., N. E. Conference. 

Rogers, George L.. Newburyport. 

Rogers, Sliubael G., Boston. 

Russell, Sarah J., Framingham. 

Russell, Samuel W., N. E. Conference. 

Ryder, Marietta, Chatham. 

Saflbrd, Be v. George B., Burlington, Vt. 

Sanderson, Alonzo, N. E. Conference. 

Sanford, Mrs. Adeline D., Medway ViUetge. 

Sanford, Edmund L, Medway. 

Sanford, Henry D., Bridgewater. 

Sanger, Edward G., Cambridgeport. 

Sargeant, James C, Oakham. 

Sargent, Edmund, West Amesbury. 

Sargent, Samuel G., Methuen, 

Sawtell, Ephraim, Groton. 

Sawyer, George, Campello. 

Sawyer, Martha B., " 

Sawyer, Seth C, Holbrook. 

Scales, Edward P., Newton. 

Scott, Rev. Joseph, Maiden. 

Scudder, Mrs. Sarah L., Boston. 

Seagrave, Edward F., Uxbridge. 

Seagrave, Mrs. Mary Ann, <* 

Sears, Herman, Dingwell, Ashfield. 

Sears, Arthur Eldredge, 

Sears, Asarelah Vinton, 

Sears, Edward Ewlng, " 

Sears, Miss Hannah M., ** 

Seaver, A. W., Northbord. 

Seeley, Raymond H., D. D , Haverhill. 

Seeley, Mrs. Fanny B., 

Selden, John Lincoln, Ashfield. 

Self ridge, Thomas O., Boston. 



<• 



« 



i< 



47 



<( 



(« 



SliAttiick, Mrs. Snsan P., Groton, 

Sbawy Mn. Hannah, Boston. 

Shaw, Mrs. Nancy, Sotdh Weymouth, 

Sheldon, Rev. Lather H., Easton. 

Sheldon, Mrs. Sarah H., " 

Shepherd, Thomas, Winchester. 

Shirley, Rev. Arthur, Conway. 

SIkes, Mrs. Otis, '' 

Shumway, Mrs. Emma P., Groton. 

Simonds, Alvan, Boston. 

SkillinKB, David N., Winchester. 

Slafber, Rev. Edmund P., Boston, 

Slafter, Mrs. Edmund P., *' 

Sleeper, William C, Metkuen. 

Small, Amos T., West Amesbury, 

Small, Mrs. Pidelia Porter, MilUmry, 

Small, Samuel A., 

Small, Samuel E., 

Small, Mrs. Sumner, Newton Centre. 

Smith, Mrs. Abby P., Concord. 

Smith, Henry P., " 

Smith, Mrs. Lucy Jane, Westboref. 

Smith, Mrs. Clara J., Sunderland, 

Smith, E. B., Westjield. 

Smith, Mrs. Frances E. D., Whiiinsville. 

Smith Qeorge P., Boston. 

Smith, Samuel, '< 

Smith, Joel, WhitinsvUie, 

Smith, Jonathan, " 

Smith, Warren N., " 

Smith, Mrs. Hattie J., Gloucester. 

Smith, Miss Mary E., Sunderland. 

Smith, Matson M., D.D., Hartford, Ct. 

Smith, Mrs. Matson M., Hartford^ Ct. 

Smith, Norman, Nashua^ N. H. 

Smith, Mrs. Mary J., Groton. 

Smith, Adolphus, Danvers, III. 

Smith, Richard, Peabody, 

Smith, Mrs. Charlotte, *< 

Smith, Mrs. Sarali, Andover. 

Smith, William W., Conway. 

Smith, Mrs. T. Berton. 

Snow, Ambrose, South Hadley FcUU. 

Snow, Mrs. Caroline, Auburndale. 

Snow, Mrs. Mark, Chatham, 

Soule, Henry M., South Abington, 

Southgate, Charles M., Dedham. 

South worth, Mrs. Caroline M., Medway, 

Spaulding, Mrs. Charlotte A., Groton. 

Spaulding, John, Ayer. 

Spofford, Mrs. Julia Ann, Bradford. 

Spooner, William B., Boston, 

Spring, Mrs. Adela C, Whitinsville. 

Stacy, Albert, Concord, 

Stanley, Ezra C, Manchester, 

Stanton, Rev. George P., SotUh WeymoiUh, 

Stebbins, Rev. Milan C, Springfield, 

Stetson, Mrs. Hannah B. D., Quincy, 

Stevens, Mrs. Oeorge, Lowell, 



i( 



<c 



Stevens, Mrs. K M., Newton, 

Stevens, Mrs. Bei^amin P., Peabody, 

Stevens, Samuel, Gloucester, 

Sdckney, William H., Dracut, 

Stoddard, Charles H., North Broohfleld, 

Stone, Andrew L., D.D., San Francisco^ Cal, 

Stone, Mrs. Matilda P., '< 

Stone, Martha A , Newton Centre. 

Storrs, Eunice C, Braintree, 

Stowell, Mrs. Abby P., Concord, 

Stowell, Cyrus A., South Deerfield. 

Stowell, D. W., Westfield, 

Strong, Rev. Elnathan E., Waltham. 

Strong, Rev. J. C, Leech Lahe, Minn, 

Strong, Mrs. J. C, " ** *• 

Studley, Austin, East Abington, 

Studley, Edward A., Boston. 

Sugden, Miss Mary, Braintree, 

Sumner, Rev. Charles B., Monson. 

Sumner, Mrs. H. H., Foxboro*, 

Swan, Frederic M., Dorchester, 

Swasey, Mrs. Prances A., Lynn. 

Swett, Samuel W., Boston. 

Swift, Miss Lottie H., Andover. 

Switzer, Rev. Christopher J., Weston^ yt. 

Taft, Mrs. Elizabeth E., Whitinsvi/le. 

Taft, Miss Emily A., " 

Tafl, Gustavus E., 

Taft, Mrs. G. E., 

Taft, S. Jennie, *' 

Taft, Jacob, Uxbridge. 

Tapley, Gilbert, Danvers, 

Tarr, William J., Gloucester. 

Taylor, Mrs. Malansa, Winchester, 

Taylor, Geo. S., Ckicopee. 

Teele, Rev. Albert K., Milton. 

Teele, Mrs. Cornelia C, " 

Temple, Mark M., Reading. 

Tenney, Mrs. Joanna S., Saugus. 

Tenney, Mrs. Appbia S., Georgetown, 

Thacher, Mrs. Anna B., Hyde Park. 

Thacher, Miss Calista C, Attleboro\ 

Thacher, John, " 

Thacher, Susan B., Portland, Me, 

Thacher, Mrs. Susan C, " ** 

Thacher, William T., Hyde Park. 

Thayer, Addison %.■, Medway. 

Thayer, Clara L., " 

Thayer, Amasa, Braintree. 

Thayer, E. P. E., 

Thayer, Ira, 

Thayer, Annie M., Holbrooh. 

Thayer, Mrs. Enos, Brockton. 

Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, Andover. 

Thayer, Mrs. Martha C, ** 

Thayer, Oliver, Salem. 

Thayer, Robert H., New York City. 

Thayer, Sarah H., Braintree. 

Thayer, WUliam W., Uxbridge. 



4( 



<< 



48 



Thompson, Mrs. Averiok F., IVareAam. 
Thompson, 'Nf.n, Emily B., Concord. 
Thompson, Eyerett A., North tVo^ttrn. 
Thompson, Samuel A., " 

Thompson, Mrs. Anne Eliza, " 
Thompson, George R., Brockton. 
Thompson, Lewis Waldo, ff^'odnrn. 
Thompson, Stephen, H'^inchtster, 
Tharston, Rev. Richard B., Stamford, Ct. 
Timlow, Rev. Heman R., WalpoU, 
Timlow, Dana C, <' 

Tinker, Rassell, Grafton, 
Tinkham, Mr8.Aderd, Bar re Centre , N.Y. 
Titus, E. A., A''. E. Conference. 
Tohey, Miss Jennie E., WkUinsvUle. 
Todd, Mrs. Thomas, Concord. 
Tolman, Rev. Richard, Hampton^ Va. 
Torrey, Mrs. Elizaheth L., South Weynumth. 
Torrey, James, North Weymouth. 
Torrey, Wlllard, Groton. 
Toulman, Rev. Wm. R., NewVn Upper Falls. 
Towne, William B., Miiford, N. H. 
Towne, Joseph H., Salem. 
Towne, Mrs. Bosina C, '< 

Towne, John C, '* 

Trask, Charles H., Jr., Manchester. 

Trask, Mrs. A. H., " 

Trask, Lizsie R., Gloucester. 

Trask, Samuel, Peahody. 

Trask, Samuel P., Danvers. • 

Tribou, Samuel, Brockton. 

Trowbridge, Mrs. Asa, Brighton. 

Trufant, Harriet Andrews, Abingion. 

Trufent, Philip P., '« 

Trufant, Walter Ezra, *' 

Tucker, Mrs. Nathan, Milton. 

Tucker, John A., Dorchester. 

Tucker, William, •* 

Tucker, Mrs. W. L., " 

Tucker, William W., Boston. 

Tufts, Charles, A ndover. 

Turner, Miss Alice Montgomery, Randolph. 

Tuttle, Miss Martha E., Concord. 

Tuttle, Miss Sarah, Groveland. 

Tuttle, Thomas S., Littleton. 

Twichell, John M., Fitchburg. 

Tyler, Frank H., Bradford. 

Tyler, Jerome W., Boston. 

Upton, Mrs. Lucy K., Peabody. 

Upton, Moses T., Salem. 

Vandervoort, Mary F., Dorchester. 

Veazie, Eliza, Danvers. 

Vose, William H., Fitchburg. 

Wads worth, Mrs. Lucy, Milton, 

Wads worth, William, Boston. 

Walt, Daniel, N. E. Conf 

Wakefield, Miss C, Reading. 

Waldron, Be v. Daniel W., Boston. 

Wales, Erastus, Holbrook. 



Wales, Miss Mary Ann, Boston, 
Walker, Dean H., Andover. 
Walker, Miss Frances A., HaverkiU. 
Walker, Bev. Geo. F., Blackstone, 
Walker, Mrs. John S., E. Medway. 
Walker, Levi, Bridgewater. 
Walker, Ellen A., " 
Walker, Moses, Haverhill. 
Walker, Nathaniel, " 
Walker, Bobert O., Boston. 
Walker, William M., Bridgewater. 
Walker, £«lwMrd A., 
Walley, Samuel H., Boston. 
Ward , Artemas, ' * 

Ward, Miss Lydla, Saxonville. 
Ward, Samuel, Boston. 
Ward, Miss H. L. H., LakeviUe. 
Ward, Mrs. Caroline L., *• 
Ward, Miss Susan H., '< 
Ward, Salem T., H'inckester. 
Warfield, Henry L., Buckland. 
Warner, John, Newton. 

Warner, William, S. Deer field. 

Warren, George W., Boston. 

Warren, Francis W., Stow. 

Warren, Jonas, " 

Washburn, William B., Greenfield. 

Washburn, Mrs. William B., ** 

Waterman, Mrs. Caroline, Grafton. 

Watkins, Miss Abby A., Gloucester. 

Weeks, Mrs. L. Caroline, N. Dana. 

Webster, Edwanl, Boscawen, N. H. 

Welch, John, Boston. 

Weld, James, <* 

Wells, Mrs. Martha D., Nortkbor^. 

Wellman, Joshua W., D. D., Maiden. 

Wendell, Mrs. Catharine, Boston. 

Wentworth, Albert, HaverkiU. 

Went worth, Lewis, Bridgewater. 

Wesson, James L. S., IVilbrakam. 

West, Peleg D., IVkitinsville. 

Wheeler, Abijah R., E. Medway. 

Wheeler, Mrs. M. B., Medway. 

Wheeler, Miss Sophia W., Peabody. 

Whltcomb, Oscar L., Worcester. 

Whitcomb, Mrs. Abbie E., «* 

Whltcomb, G. Henry, " 

Whitcomb, Miss Mary M., Harvard. 

Whitcomb, Mrs. Abby F., " 

White, Aaron L., Medway. 

White, Cornelius, Brookville. 

White, Edmund, Holbrook. 

White, Newton, " 

White, Joel, Uxbridge. 

White, Josiah, Peter skam. 

White, Solomon, N. Middlebord. 

White, Mrs. Mary C, Pembroke, N. H. 

White, Phineas A., Wkitinsville, 

White, Thomas, Holbrook. 



49 



u 



«( 



it 



it 



it 



(I 



<i 



u 



14 



WUtin, Artbnr F., WTkitinsvOU, 

Wbitin, Cbarlet £., 

Whitin, CharletP., 

Whitin, Edward, 

Whitin, James F., 

Whitin, Mra. Patience H., '* 

Wbitin, Paul, 

Whidn, Mrs. Sarah J., 

Whitin, Mrs. Sarah B., 

Whiting, Lemael, Groton. 

Whitman, Charles, Lowell. 

Whitmarsh, Mrs. Diantha, S. Abingdon, 

Whitmarsh, Mary, 

Whitmarsh, MUs Mary J., 

Whltmore, Annie Maria, Lynn. 

Whitney, Charles H., Cambridgeport. 

Whitney, Dora S., Sontk Groton. 

Whitney, Frederick, Westminster. 

Whitney, Helen J., Stow. 

Whitney Isaac S., Glimcesttr. 

Whitney, Israel, Boston. 

Whitney, Mrs. Permelia V., Petersham. 

Whitney. Richard D., Springfield. 

Whitney, Mrs. Susanna, Rutland. 

Whittaker, Rev. George, Westfield. 

Whittaker, Mrs. Harriet, " 

Whittemore, Mrs. Mary E. S., lVestboro\ 

Wilbur, Joseph, Taunton. 

Wild, Daniel, Boston. 

Wild, Miss LiTia A., 5'. Braintree. 

Wilder, Hattie W., South Acton. 

WiJIcox, Rev. William H., Reading. 

Williams, Miss Amelia P., Sunderland. 

Williams, C. H. S., Concord. 

Williams, Mrs. C. H. S., '< 

Williams, Rev. fedward F., WhitinsviUe, 

Williams, Miss Elizabeth C, Groton. 



Williams, Miss Mary D., GretnJUld. 

Williams, 8. H., Foxboro*. 

Williams, Ephralm, Springfield. 

Willis, Lnceba, Wayland. 

Willis, Lucy Maria, ** 

Wilson, Rev. Thomas, Eaton^ //. Y. 

Wilson, Mrs. E. P., " 

Wing, John C, Lowell. 

Wines, Rev. C. Maurice, Hartford, Ct. 

Winslow, Pelhani, E. Abingion. 

Winter, David Baker, Northbridge. 

Winthrop, Robert C, Boston. 

Wiswell, Mrs. Lizzie M., Chicago, III. 

Wolcott, Mrs. Elizabeth, Peabody. 

Wolcott, WlUlara, • •• 

Woodbury, Simon J., Sutton. 

Woo<l, Mrs. Abijah, lVestboro\ 

Wood, Cyrus K., Ashburnham. 

Wood, Elizabeth C, Foxboro\ 

Wood, Miss Jane A., Grafton. 

Woo<i, Joseph W., WhitinsvilU. 

Wood, Mrs. E. S., ** 

Wood, Mrs. Samuel F., Chelmsford, 

Wood, Mrs. Susan, Groton. 

Wood, T. Dwlght, Westminster. 

Wood, Theodore S., ** 

Woods, Austin Frank, New Braintree. 

Woods, Joseph Wheeler, Boston. 

Woods, Frederick R., N. E. Conf. 

Woodward, Ebenezer, Newton. 

Woodward, Miss Emily, Newton U. Falls. 

Woodworth, Artemas B., Lowell. 

Worcester, Miss Sallle, Brighton. 

Wright, George L., MUtineague. 

Wyman, Charles, Lancaster. 

Wyman, Rufus, Boston. 

Wyman, William G., Fitchburg. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 



Centreville, Conmgational church, ^9. 10 

Falmouth, First Congregational church, 20.25 
Yarmouth, First Congregational church, 32.12 



$61.47 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



Attleboro', Second Congregational ch. $30.13 
Taunton, Westville Congregational ch. .50 



#30.63 



SS.SBX COUNTY. 



Boxford, Second Congregational ch. $7. 10 

Bradford, Congregational church, 5.00 

Danvers, First church (2 l. m.) 40.00 

Georgetown, First Congregational ch. 12.57 

Orthodox Memorial church, 46-57 

Groveland, Congrej^ational church, 7.00 

Haverhill, North Congregational church, 20.00 

Lawrence, Haverhill st. Methodist E. ch. 21.36 

Lawrence st. Congregational church, 70.72 

South Congregational church, 8.50 

Alonzo C. Chadwick, (i l. m.) 20.00 

W. Willey, Local Agent, 123.14 

Ipswich, First Parish church, 18.14 

Lynn, Central Conjjregational church, 29.55 

Methuen, First Parish church, 20.07 

W. Willey, Local Agent, 28.24 

Newburyport, Whitefield Cong, church, 14.65 

North Congregational church, 11.00 

Prospect Congregational church, 14. 67 

Belleville Congregational church, 74.13 

Salem, Crombic st. Congregational ch. 

(i L. M.) 54- » 7 

South Congregational ch. (i L. M.) 95.25 

Saugus, Congregational church, 9.54 

Wenham, Congregational church, 7.19 

West Newbury, Second Cong, church, 8. 50 

Gloucester, Evangelical Cong, church, 

(1 L. M.) 30.16 



$797.22 



FRANKLIN COU.VTY. 

Ashfield, Congregational church, 
Bemardston, Orthodox Cong, church, 
Conway, Congregational church, 
Greenfield, First Congregational church, 

Second Congregational church. 
Orange, Central Evangelical church, 
Sunderland, Congregational church, 
Whately, Congregational church, 



Franklin Co. Bible Soc. on Book Acc't. 



$S.o8 
2.00 

30.00 
6.46 

21.40 

4-4» 
12.94 

$88.20 
67.18 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 

Chicopee, Second Cong. ch. (2 l. m.) $41.27 

Feeding Hills, Congregational church, 8.53 

Holyoke, Methodist Episcopal church, 6.00 
Longmeadow, Gentlemen's Benevolent 

Association, 24.80 

Ladies' Benevolent Association, 18.20 

Monson, Congregational church, 21.77 

Palmer, Second Congregational church, 8.44 

Springfield, Olivet church, 27.45 

West Springfield, Park street church, 30-00 

Westfield, Second Congregational ch. 32.91 



#219.37 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 



North Amherst, Congregational church, $37.00 

North Hadley, CongregationaU church, 10.20 

Northampton, Florence Cong, church, 54*36 

First Congregational church, 57. 19 

Edwards church, 23.53 

South Hadley Falls, Congregational ch. 27.80 

First church, 26.60 

Northampton, Dea. W. L Edwards, 7.70 



$244.38 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Ashby, Congregational church, $4«5o 

Auburndale, Conirregational church, 62.14 

Concord, Union Bible Society, 98.00 
South Framingham, Congregational ch. 34*oo 

Holliston, Congregational church, 22.14 

Littleton, Evangelical Cong, church, 8.25 

Newton, Elliot church, 60.50 

Newtonville, Congregational church, 28.17 

West Newton, Second Cong, church, 45-55 

Medford. Mystic church, 49-62 

Saxonville, Congregational church, 21.4a 

Methodist Episcopal chiirch, 3.00 
Somcrville. Franklin street Cong, church, 14.39 

Sudbury, Congregational church, 17.60 

Townsend, Congregational church, 6.20 

Waverly, Congregational church, 16.00 

Westford, Congregational church, 2.00 

Woburn, Congregational church, 54-00 

Hopkmton, Congregational church, 29.11 

Tewksbur>', Congre^'ational church, 21.25 



$597.84 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Cohasset. Second Congregational ch. $i9-t7 

Dedhain. .Allin Congregational church, 106.71 

Franklin, First Congregational church, 10.81 

Foxboro. Congregational church, 20.86 

W. H. Judson, 2.00 



51 



Holbrook, Winthrojp Cong. ch. (i l. m.) $51.05 
E. £. Holbrook, 50.00 

Hyde Park, First Congregational church, 12.35 



Medway, Congregational church, 
East Medway, Congregational church, 
Norwood, First Cong. ch. (i l. m.) 
Stoughton, First Congregational church, 
South Weymouth, Second Congrega- 
tional church, (i l. m.) 
Union church, 
Walpole, Congregational church. 



26.11 
22.00 

22.77 
3.60 

ao.oo 

5.00 

11.66 



• #38409 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Bridgewater, Central sq. ch. (i l. m.) $24.25 
Brockton, Porter Evangelical church, 20.87 
Duxbury. Rev. B. Otheman, 10.00 

Marshfield, First Congregational church, 15.86 
Middleboro. First Congregational church, 11.63 
Plympton, Congregational church, 2.40 

Rockland, Congregational church, 50.00 



$135.01 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston, Central Congregational church, $158.02 
Old South, Congregational church, 126.47 

South Boston, Philhps Cong, church, 

Boston, S. D. Warren, 
Baptist Bethel church, 

Boston Highlands, Ger. M. E. church, 

Dorchester, Village church, 

Brighton, Evangelical Congregational ch 

Chelsea, Miss A. M. Dutch, 



50.61 

400.00 

10.26 

5.00 

16.21 

. 39-56 
10.00 



$816.13 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



Barre, Evanj^lical Congregational ch. $13.52 

Brookfield, Congregational ch. (i l. m.) 46.40 

North Brookfield, 50.00 

Clinton, First Evangelical church, 25.00 

Fitchburg, Rollstone church, 12.00 

Harvard, Congregational church, 29.00 

Leominster, Congregational church, 3.50 

Lunenburg, Congregational church, 2.00 

Oxford, First Congregational church, 14.00 

Uxbridge, EyangeTical Con^. church, 41.25 

Westboro, First Congregational church, 85.70 

Webster, First Congregational church, 16.00 

Winchendon, North Congregational ch. 20.00 

Whitinsville, Conj^egational church, 849.50 
West Boylston, First Congregational ch. 7.56 

Holden, Congregational church, 11.70 

$1227.13 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 

Boston, a friend, $1.00 

Boston Highlands, a friend, 4.00 

Campello, Calvin Hatch, 3.00 

Chelsea, Kf iss Ann M. Dutch, 10.00 

Conway, T. P. Field, ^ 2.00 

Fryeburg, Me., Congregational church, 6.40 
Great Fsdls, N. H., First Cong, church, 13.00 

Hampden Co., Bible Soc. Int. Acc't. 13.20 
Holbrook, yearly bequest of 

E. N. Holbrook, ^ 200.00 

Hadley, Mrs. T. S. Huntington, 1.00 

New Eng. Conf. M. E. church. 439'65 

Providence, Conf. M. E. church, 222.83 

Rockland, S. M. Bailey, (i L. m.) 20.00 

Sherborn, a friend, .50 

Sudbury, a friend, 5.00 

$941.58 



COLLECTIONS. 

By Rev. E. P. Sla/Ur, District SuperinUn- 
dent for the A merican Bible Society. 

St. Paul's church, Boston, $100.00 

Rev. Samuel Cutler, 10.00 

St. Paul's church, Brookline, 150.51 

St. Matthew's church, South Boston, 21.00 

St. James church, Boston Highlands. 49.50 

St. Luke's church, Chelsea, 15.00 

Grace church, Lawrence, 36.18 

St. Andrew's church, Hanover, 26.00 

Church of the Ascension, Ipswich, 9.00 

Church of our Saviour, Longwood, 159*67 

St. Paul's church, Dedhanu 30.00 

St. James' church, North Cambridge, 10.00 

Trinity church, a member, Boston, 5.00 

Mr. Porter, Boston, 5.00 

Miss Sarah Hemans, Boston, 5.00 

Trinity church, Lenox, 40.00 

$671.86 



LEGACIES. 

Sturbridge, estate of Maiy A. Bullock, $25.00 

Whately, estate of Eliot C. Allis, 500.00 

Northampton, estate of Eunice Wright, 339.50 

Estate of Lydia Smith, 300.00 

Craig Estate, 81.00 

$124550 



FORM OF A BEQUEST TO THE SOCIETY. 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Massachusetts Bible Soci- 
ety, incorporated in the year eighteen hundred and ten, the sum 

of to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of the 

Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and 
policy of the Society, should be directed to the Rev. Daniel But- 
ler, Recording Secretary, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 



Remittances for books, donations from churches and individ- 
uals, and orders for books, should be addressed to Rev. Elijah 
Cutler, Agent, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 



Bible Rooms of the Massachusetts Bible Society, 8 Beacon 
Street, Boston. All the issues of the American Bible Society, 
comprising upward of two hundred and fifty distinct volumes, are 
sold at cost. Bibles and Testaments in some thirty different lan- 
guages. Orders by Mail or otherwise. 

E. Cutler, Agent, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESENTED BY THE TRUSTEES 



OF THB 



PH$$itt|ii$ilb ^tltb ^umt^, 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON, 



MAY 27, 1878, 



BRING THEIR 



SIXTY-NINTH ANNIVERSARY. 



BOSTON : 

DEI^OSITORY, 8 BEACON STREET. 

1878, 




TtioniM TodJ. Printer, C4Bpef»liMil llnuM, Do^ton. 



■I > <^ 



bf.6 






••-I 



v<' 






OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 1878-9. 



President. 
Hon. ROBERT C. WINTHROP. 

Vice-Presidents. 

Hon. JACOB SLEEPER. Suffolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 

Hon. timothy \V. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Ho.N. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, LL. D., FrankHn County. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY. Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq.. Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN. LL. D., Middlesex County. 

Hon. MILTON M. FISHER, Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Es<j., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN A. HA WES, Bristol County. 

ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. D. 

Recording Secretary. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

Auditor. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 

Trustees. 



Rev. JOHN O. MEANS, D. D. 
Rbv. CHANDLER ROBBINS, D. D. 
Rbv. ANDREW P. PEABODY, D. D. 
Rbv. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU, D. D. 
Rbv. PHILLIPS BROOKS, D. D. 
Rev. GEORGE F. PENTECOST. 
Bishop RANDOLPH S. FOSTER, D. D. 
Rbv. EDMUND F. SLAFTER. 
Rbv. E. S. ATWOOI). 



Hon. JACOB SLEEPER. 
Hon. CHARLES T. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Es^j. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Es<.). 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE, Esq. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 
GEORGE P. DENNY, Esq. 
Hon. E. ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
Hon. JOHN P. PUTNAM. 



Executive Committee. 

TO WHOM APPUCATIONS ARE TO BB MADE FOR BIHLES. 

Rev. John O. Means, Charles Henry Parker, and Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 



Officers of the Society from 1809 to 1878; 



Hon. William Phillips, 

Rev. John Pierce, D. D. 

Hon. Samuel Greenleaf, LL. D. 



Presidents. 

1809—27 j Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL. D. . > 854— 59 
1827—49 ' Hon. Samuel H. Walley, . 1859—78 

«849— 54 I Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, . 1878 



Vice-Presidents. 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. . 
Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. . 
Rev. Henry Ware, D. D. . 
Rev. John Codman, D. D. . 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. . 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. 
Rev. NathM L. Frothmgham, D. D. 
Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. 
William C. Plunkett, Esq. . 
Edward Southworth, Esq. . 
John P. Williston, Esq. 
Hon. William B. Washburn, LL. D. 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq. 
Charles P. Whitin, Esq. 
Lee Claflin, Esq. 



1809 — 16 
1816—28 
1828—44 
1844-48 
1848—49 

1849—53 
1853—61 

1861 — 72 
i86a 

1862 — 70 
1862 — 72 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 — 70 



Caleb Holbrook, Esq. . 
James S. Amory, Esq. . 
Hon. John H. Clifford, LL. D. 
Elisha Tucker, Esq. 
James B. Crocker, Esq. 
E. S. Moseley, Esq. 
Charles A. Jessup, Esq. 
Hon. William Claflin, LL. D. 
Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D. D 
Hon. William Hyde, . 
Hon. Timothy W. Carter, . 
Hon. Milton M. Fisher, 
Hon. John A. Hawes, 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper, . 



1862-75 

1862 

1862—76 

1862 

186a 

1862 

1870—72 

1871 

1872 

1872 

1873 

1875 

1876 

1878 



Corresponding Secretaries. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, 1809 — 13 
Rev. Samuel C. Thacher, . 1813 — 17 

Rev. Charles Lowell, D. D. 181 7 — 18 



Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1818—49 
Rev. NathM L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849—53 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1853 



Recording Secretaries. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor, 
Rev. James D. Knowles, 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



1809—28 
•1828—30 
1830—31 
1831—3* 
1832— 39 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. . 1839 — 44 

Rev. Wiiliam M. Rogers, . 1844 — 45 

Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 1845—49 

Rev. George Richards, 1849—52 

Rev. Daniel Butler, 1852 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, 
John Tappan, Esq. 



Treasurers. 

1809 — II I Henry Edwards, Esq. 

181 1 — 12 George R. Sampson, Esq. . 

1 812 — 35 Cliarles Henry Parker, Esq. 



1835—49 
1849—62 
1862 



Rev. William E. Channing, D.D. 
Hon. Jonathan Phillips, 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. 
Edward Tuckerman, Esq. 
Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. 
Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. D. 
Charles Tappan, Esq. . 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. 



D. 



D. 



Executive Committees. 



1809—18 
1809 — 16 
1809 — 15 
1815—18 
1816 — 30 
1818—30 

1821—35 
1830 — 40 
1832—35 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 


«835— 49 


Henry Edwards, Esq. . 


1840—49 


Rev. George Richards, 


1849—60 


George R. Sampson, Esq. . 


1849 — 62 


Hon. Albert Fearing, . 


1853—76 


Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 


i860 


Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 


1862 


Hon. Jacob Sleeper, . 


1876 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Sixty-Ninth Annual Meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Bible Society was held in the rooms of the 
Society, No. 8 Beacon Street, on Monday, May 27, at 
10 o'clock, A; M., the Hon. Jacob Sleeper in the 
chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read 
and approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq., pre- 
sented his Annual Report, which was read and 
accepted. 

The Sixty-Ninth Annual Report of the Trustees 
was read and accepted. 

The officers of the Society were then elected for 
the coming year. 

Adjourned. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Assembled at the Annual Meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Bible Society, our thoughts first of all revert 
to the loss which the Society has sustained during the 
year in the removal by death of its esteemed President, 
the late Hon. Samuel Hurd Walley. A lineal de- 
scendant of the first President, the venerable Phillips, 
like him presiding over the Society for a period of 
eighteen years, he ever manifested through his long 
term of service an interest in this work, derived from 
an honored and pious ancestry. Amid the engrossing 
labors of a responsible financial position and the 
pressure of impaired health, love to the Book and the 
race it is commissioned to enlighten were the inspi- 
ration of his cheerful and efficient labors. To the 
friends of this charity who have preceded him in work 
and in rest he has been joined, we doubt not, in the 
companionship of just men made perfect in heaven. 

During the year there have been issued from the De- 
pository twenty-nine thousand six hundred and sixty- 
eight copies of the Scriptures. Of these one thou- 
sand five hundred and twenty-six were in various 
foreign languages. Eight thousand four hundred and 
seventy copies were bestowed in charity, at a cost of 
$2,441.60. Twenty-one thousand one hundred and 
ninety-eight copies were sold. As usual, the largest 
number of recipients has been found among the men 



8 



of the sea, two thousand and forty-eight copies having 
been distributed among them. These are now making 
their way over the wide ocean, in their inspired teach- 
ings fit representatives of Him who, when on earth, 
often in the prosecution of his work encountered the 
perils of the sea. This is a very important field for 
the distribution of the Scriptures, and is, we believe, 
faithfully cultivated. Nearly two thousand copies 
have been circulated among the poor of this city, by 
those appointed to labor among them. To mission 
schools eight hundred and seventy-eight copies have 
been given, while seventeen hundred and twenty-eight 
copies have through various agencies been conveyed 
to the poor in different parts of the State. 

Early in the year a colporter canvassed the towns 
of West Newbury, Merrimac, Salisbury and Amesbury 
in Essex County. Twenty-six hundred and fifty-six 
families were visited, two hundred and forty-one of 
which were without the Scriptures. Of these forty- 
three were Protestants. One hundred and ninety- 
seven copies of the Scriptures were sold, four hun- 
dred and seventy-three were given to the poor, and 
seventy-nine destitute families were supplied. 

A colporter has been employed for a portion of the 
year in Hampshire County. He has visited two 
thousand one hundred and thirty-nine families, ninety 
of which were without the Scriptures. Four hundred 
and ninety-three copies of the Scriptures were sold, and 
one hundred and nineteen were given to the destitute. 

For a little more than three months a colporter has 
been employed in this city. His time was spent 
among those who are largely oppressed with material 
want, and the sorer famine of the Word. Among the 
more than twenty-five hundred families visited, the 



time to a large extent was occupied in reading the 
Scriptures and in endeavoring to awaken an interest 
in the truths they unfold. To three hundred and 
fifty-five destitute families some portion of the Script- 
ures was given. In the extreme poverty of the people 
little was effected in the way of sales, only thirty 
being thus disposed of out of the four hundred and 
ninety copies distributed. 

Experience has abundantly shown the benefits of a 
thorough distribution of the Scriptures among the 
people at intervals of a few years. By this means the 
poor, " always with us," are sought out and supplied. 
To the young it affords an opportunity, often im- 
proved, of purchasing their first Bible. Not a few 
individuals are found who by advancing age are quite 
unable to read the Bibles in their possession. . Such a 
work awakens an increased interest in the study of 
the Scriptures, and not unfrequently an abiding recep- 
tion of the message they convey. The time has more 
than come when this work should be performed in 
many portions of our Commonwealth, and we ear- 
nestly hope that the means may be furnished by the 
friends of the Bible for its prosecution. 

The receipts of the Society, including the income 
from its invested funds — which are largely the gift of 
Mr. Thomas W. Durant, and for which an annuity is 
due during his life — have been as follows : From do- 
nations and legacies, $11,831.96; from the sale of 
Bibles and Testaments, $8,541.77 ; return of bank tax 
from the State, $762.66 ; interest and dividends, $8,- 
771.77; cash on hand at the beginning of the year, 
$4,330.77 ; amounting to $34,288.93. The expendi- 
tures have been for Bibles and Testaments, $12,194.54 ; 
salaries and colportage, $4,645.59; donations to the 



lO 



American Bible Society, $3491.25; Thos. W. Durant, 
$450; rent, taxes, and fixtures in the Depository, 
$1,101.04; Annual Report and Sermon, $179.27; 
invested to provide for annuity, $8,967.72 ; postage, 
freight, wrapping paper, etc., $772.92; cash on hand, 
$2,486.60. 

The American Bible Society, with a reduced income, 
reports an increase in the number of copies printed 
and in the amount of its charitable work, which ex- 
ceeds the sum of two hundred and fifty-nine thousand 
dollars. Four hundred and twenty-nine thousand 
families, scattered over the States of our Union, are 
reported as having been visited during the year, forty- 
six thousand of which have been supplied. Ninety 
thousand dollars in cash have been expended upon 
work abroad, besides twenty thousand copies of the 
Scriptures sent from this country. A missionary 
writes from Constantinople : " It is utterly impossible 
to supply enough Bibles and Testaments for the de- 
mand of the Russian army. Mr. Bliss sends box after 
box to Adrianople, as fast as he can get them from 
Europe, and a box is almost always sold off within 
forty-eight hours. The soldiers seem ready to pay 
anything for the books. God grant his blessing to 
this seed-sowing." One hundred and ten persons 
have been employed abroad in the distribution of 
the Scriptures, and their enlarged circulation at home 
and abroad is both a cause and an effect of the im- 
provement so widely manifested in our world. 

The British and Foreign Bible Society reports a 
year of unusual activity. The war recently waged in 
the East has created facilities for the circulation of the 
Scriptures, which the Society has not failed to im- 
prove. At the last accounts more than one hundred 



1 1 



and sixty thousand Bibles and Testaments had been 
sold or given to soldiers in the Russian army, and the 
distribution had been far greater, but for the inability 
to transport the books. Over a wide extent of the 
inhabited world, and in most of the languages and 
dialects now spoken, it has circulated not far from 
three millions of copies of the Scriptures. 

The sacred writer, looking with prophetic eye down 
the ages, declares, " I saw another angel fly in the midst 
of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach 
unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation, 
and kindred, and tongue, and people." What he saw 
in vision is rapidly becoming apparent to our sight. 
For nothing is our age more distinguished than for 
the wide and ever widening diffusion of divine truth. 
Since the commencement of the present century the 
versions of the Bible have increased from fifty-four to 
two hundred and fifty-seven ; and by individual and 
associated effort is the divine message borne, with the 
rapidity of an angel's flight, to the nations. The time 
cannot be distant when the truths of revelation in 
their own language shall be made known to all the 
people inhabiting our world. 

In obedience to the Master s command we engage 
in this work, a work which will not cease till every 
family over the broad earth shall possess the oracles 
of God. 



ANNUAL ADDRESS, 



By rev. a J. F. BEHRENDS, D. D., 

OF PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Bible Societies are something more than convenient channels 
for the wide distribution of the Holy Scriptures. They represent 
and proclaim the common settled faith of our churches as to the 
legitimate place occupied by the Bible in our literature, and in the 
civilization of which that literature is only the expression and the 
exponent. 

Our platform commits us to the defense of the Bible against 
three classes of opponents : Against the atheist or the deist, who 
calls in question the necessity and the possibility of an authorita- 
tive revelation from God; against the rationalist, who refuses to 
entertain the denial of the atheist or the doubt of the deist, but 
who insists that every revelation from God to man, both as to its 
form and contents, must authenticate itself to human reason ; and, 
finally against the Romanist, who breaks faith with the atheist and 
deist and the rationalist, but who maintains that it is neither wise 
nor safe to encourage a universal study of the Holy Scriptures, in- 
asmuch as so high and holy an oracle demands a compactly-formed 
organization of skillful interpreters. 

In the face of these three classes of opponents we maintain the 
authenticity, the plenary authority, and the perspicuity or the uni- 
versal intelligibility of that revelation which God has made unto 
men in the Scriptures of the Old and the New Testaments. 

We insist, first of all, on the fact of a divine revelation. And 
we insist upon it on the a priori ground of the antecedent proba- 
bility, nay, the moral certainty that such a disclosure of the Divine 
Will as the human heart preeminently longs for will be given to 
man. The only rational cosmogony is that which leads us to the 



14 

acceptance of the philosophy of a personal God, which, through 
the operation of what are called " efficient causes," conducts us to 
recognize the sovereignty of " final causes," until we come to con- 
sider the entire universe as simply the organ for the expression and 
the execution of the Holy Will of the Living God. The current 
scepticism of our day, touching miracles, providence and prayer, 
grows out of a crude, mechanical, hard, unspiritual philosophy of 
the universe. It is materialism in disguise ; and with bated breath 
its advocates seek to strike out of our common phraseology those 
three great words, and the marvelous thoughts they represent, 
**Soul," "Moral Law," "God." Start with either of these three 
great verities and you are inevitably conducted to the other two, 
and you are sure to undermine and to overwhelm all sceptical 
speculations ; for these speculations are based upon an insufficient 
and hasty induction from the facts of human consciousness, and 
the facts of human observation and experience. We may call into 
the service of our argument the logical law of supply and demand, 
or the logical law of harmony — for the two are one and the same 
thing. 

Passing through the entrance-doors of your Museum, not far away 
from here, you will see, on the right hand and on the left, great 
slabs upon which are fossil footprints. Your naturalist will take a 
photograph of those fossil footprints, and will be able to construct 
very speedily and very accurately the form of the animal, now- 
extinct. He will do more than that ; by a study of its anatomy, 
and of its internal organization, he will conduct you, with infalli- 
bility of argument, to the period during which and the zone in 
which that animal lived, and will even tell you the food that it 
devoured. And he does all this by a rigid adherence to the law of 
harmony ; by assuming the logical postulate that everywhere and 
always organization and condition face and supplement each other. 
You do not find alligators amid the burning sands of the Lybian 
desert ; nor do you find camels beneath the torrid sun of humid 
Brazil. Organization and condition always supplement each other. 
And with the same infallibility of argument are we conducted from 
a study of man's native organization, the secret, irrepressible gravi- 
tation of his being, to the zone that he inhabits and to the supply 
that alone is able to meet the demands of his nature. Prove to 
me that man cares for nothing but those things that supply his ma- 
terial necessities, that his entire being is satisfied if you give him 
food and shelter, and the argument is conclusive that he is a.deni- 



15 

zen only of the material creation. But prove to me that he has a 
conscience, prove to me that he makes moral distinctions, that he 
discerns intuitively that betwixt .star and star there rolls no such 
distance as there rolls between the right and the wrong, and I 
prove to you, by that very analysis and by that very confession, 
that he is the subject of moral government — that he stands in 
personal relation to the living God, without whom moral law and 
moral government are utterly inconceivable. 

Now, nothing is so characteristic of man, as distinguishing him 
from the merely sentient creation, as the deep-seated, powerful pas- 
sion to know what lies behind ordinary observation — to know what 
are the forces that pulse and throb beneath and behind the spheres 
that touch upon the senses. The animal lives in the present and 
lives for the present. Man's mental life moves in the atmosphere 
of the past and the present and the future. There is in the very 
structure and in the movements of his thought an element of in- 
finity, by which he breaks away from all the limitations of time, and 
dwells in the illimitable past and in the endless eternities to come. 
Your horse is perfectly content if he has a good stall, if he has 
plenty of hay and oats and water — if you treat him kindly. He 
does not ask how horses fared before him. He does not care what 
becomes of horses when they die. But a man is not satisfied with 
eating and drinking and sleeping and dying — not even in his 
childhood. He asks about the past, he inquires about the future. 
He is busy in his secret thoughts with the questions of his origin, 
the meaning of his present existence, and his destiny. These are 
the thoughts that stir him always. Hence the charm of history to 
all men ; to know how men lived and toiled before we came into 
existence. This, too, is the secret of that power which magic, 
in all its forms, has always exercised among men — in the form 
of astrology or sooth-saying, fortune telling or spiritualism. Men 
have studied the courses of the stars; they have examined the 
entrails of victims that have been offered in sacrifice ; they have 
watched the flight of the birds ; they have sought to organize a 
science of necromancy — communing with the spirits of the de- 
parted ; they have spent time, money and energy, freely and 
lavishly — because there is in the human heart an irrepressible, 
insatiable passion to know what lies in the heart of the future. 
That passion, friends, in some way must be gratified. If men turn 
away from the oracles of God, there spring into existence lying 
oracles to which they will pay their devotions. When Saul turned 



i6 



away from the living God he sought out the witch of Endor ; and 
the sudden rebound from the boldest and the most blasphemous 
atheism to the grossest superstition has been a frequent historical 
occurrence, and is one of the most marvelous and significant of men- 
tal and moral phenomena. Some oracle men will have and must 
have ; and it may be said that a man is no longer a man when he 
can honestly say that he cares not what becomes of him when he 
dies. 

Now we argue from the logical law of harmony, or of supply and 
demand, that the questions which man asks by the irrepressible 
pressure of his being, the questions that he asks notwithstanding 
the disquietude and the pain that they cause him, the questions 
whose continued recurrence gives to philosophy all its charm and 
to the history of the world all its moral majesty, must receive 
authoritative answer. The inquisitive soul points to the answering 
oracle. And so the argument conducts us, not merely to the possi- 
bilit}', not merely to the probability, but to the moral certainty of 
an authoritative revelation of the will of God to man. If the child 
be seeking the Father, and if amid all its wanderings its cry is still 
for Him, it is orfly because the Father is seeking the child, and be- 
cause that seeking of the Father's heart is the supreme law of the 
universe. And having thus cleared the ground, the evidence is 
abundant and accumulative that the Bible contains a satisfactory 
reply to all the deepest questions of the human heart. 

But we insist, in the second place, on the plenary authority of 
this revelation of God's Will in his Holy Word. The original, the 
eternal, the immutable Word is none other than Jesus Christ, the 
Son of God and the Son of Man — the God-Man, *'in whom dwelt 
all the fullness of the Godhead bodily." That, I take it, is the 
central truth of our common Christianity. And from the fact of 
the Incarnation we deduce inevitably and infallibly the doctrine of 
plenary inspiration. If Christ be what he claimed to be, and what 
the Church has always acknowledged him to be, then an appeal to 
the Scriptures on which He hath set the seal of His endorsement, 
must be ultimate. We cannot go beyond it. The fact of the In- 
carnation settles the question of the plenary authority of the Scrip- 
tures of the Old and the New Testaments. You may still dispute 
about verbal, or mechanical and dynamic inspiration. Your theo- 
logical terminology may be all unsettled ; the postulate remains 
that, in the last appeal, the reason of man must bow to the Word 
of God, and not the Word of God to the reason of man. 



^7 

A great deal has been said recently about " the authority of our 
moral intuitions." The Word of the Lord Jesus Christ, friends, 
is infinitely more authoritative than the moral intuitions of the 
whole race — fallen in sin as that race is — for the same reason 
that the testimony of one man who sees clearly is worth a great 
deal more than the surmises of ten thousand men who are blind, or 
whose vision is dimmed. The authority of Jesus Christ then is 
greater, in the nature of things, than possibly can be the moral 
intuitions of a race that has been blinded by reason of its sinful- 
ness. For one, I confess that I am old-fashioned enough not to 
believe, as some intimate, that the doctrines of our common 
Christianity in these days are passing through serious revision. 
They have been in the crucible from the beginning until now, and 
no hysterical protests, on this side of the Atlantic or the other, 
will subvert the Truth of God ; that is more settled than the ever- 
lasting hills. There is a great deal of nonsense, as the venerable 
Dr. Hodge, of Princeton, intimated recently, about all the talk as 
to the "currents of modern thought." There is a great deal of 
mental agitation in our day. There has always been mental agi- 
tation. So long as men think there will be agitation ; just as the 
surface of the great sea is never at rest, but is lashed into gigantic 
waves by the merest breath that passes over it. But the fiercest 
storm that leaps with its thunderbolts out of the blackest sky upon 
the surface of the Atlantic does not so much as send a tremor 
through the solid globe on which we stand, or render insecure, for 
even a moment, the great universe of which we are a part. Agita- 
tions there will be ; but the Truth of God is forever firm, and will 
be triumphant even to the enc}. And we ought to have a great deal 
more faith in the government of God than we have alarm at the 
agitations that go on about us, or at the currents of modern 
thinking. 

Now this is not to set Reason and the Bible over against each 
other, as if they were antagonistic. It is simply reminding our- 
selves that the human reason is a very partial and a veiy fallible 
thing — that the reason of man needs a teacher. Of course, men 
ought to be guided by reason — always guided by reason ; but 
whose reason, pray tell me ? There are infinite heights and depths, 
and endless gradations, in reason. God's Word addresses itself to 
my intelligence ; and only so much of this Word as I understand 
\s> practically authoritative to me. It must "find me," as Coleridge 
said ; the Word outside of me must be reproduced and authenti- 



i8 



cated in my personal experience. But is my present apprehension 
of the Truth of God the standard by which every utterance of the 
Divine Will is to be measured ? Am I omniscient ? Am I infal- 
lible ? Am I sure that I have sounded all the seas, scaled all the 
high summits, and swept over all the continents- of truth? Am I 
omniscient ? So long as I am not omniscient I ought to be a very 
modest man. I ought not to sit in judgment upon the declarations 
of Infinite Wisdom and of Infinite Power. 

I am certain of one thing, friends — and my conviction gathers 
force from the whole broad sweep of intellectual progress — that in 
the end the purified, disciplined intellect of man will walk hand in 
hand with the utterances of prophets and apostles, and of Him 
whose authorized representatives they are. But it is well for us to 
remember who is the pupil and who is the teacher. It is not the 
Bible that is to bow to human reason, but it is human reason that 
is to bow to the Bible. In the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, 
and in the persons of His authorized and commissioned representa- 
tives, the highest, holiest reason speaks to us, and in the name of 
reason we stand with uncovered heads and with docile tempers 
before these teachers sent from God. 

I conclude by noting that we insist, not only on the authenticity 
and the plenary authority of the Holy Scriptures, but also on their 
perspicuity, or universal intelligibility, and that this commits us to 
the wide distribution of the Bible. I need not detain you on this 
point. More important than light and pure air and plenty of sun- 
shine to the physical health of a community is the wide-spread 
living knowledge of the Word of God, to secure social peace and 
permanent commercial prosperity. The living knpwledge of the 
Word of God is our surest defense against all the evils that threaten 
us in State and in Church. Communism never can become practi- 
cally dangerous, so long as the thought of a people is dominated 
by the truths of the Word of God. " Mexicanism " in government 
will be speedily frowned down if only the public conscience once 
masters and is mastered by the doctrines set forth in the thirteenth 
chapter of Paul's Epistle to the Romans ; and Romanism we need 
not fear, though we are called constantly to watch against it, so 
long as this Book is left us in our vernacular tongue, and so long 
as ten thousand presses are busy every day, the wide world round, 
in scattering copies of the Scriptures of the Old and the New Tes- 
taments. 



\ 



19 

There is a curious legend of a king against whose life there was 
a secret conspiracy. The story runs that an enchanted cup was 
placed in his hands, filled with the richest and the most fragrant of 
wines, but holding, in invisible solution, the fatal poison. As that 
cup was poised in his hand he made over it the mystic sign of the 
cross, and spoke over it the Word of God. It shivered in his grasp. 

Friends, the true antidote to all the evils that beset us, all the 
dangers that threaten us, is the Word of God living in the heart, 
whether of the man or of the nation. The secret, subtle power of 
that Word, quickened into life and fruitage by the ever-present, 
always-operating Spirit, will check and overthrow all schemes of 
wicked conspiracy. " He that dwelleth in the secret place of the 
Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. Thou 
shalt not be afraid for the terror by night, nor for the arrow 
that flieth by day, nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness, 
nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday. Because thou 
hast made the Lord, which is my refuge, even the Most High, thy 
habitation, there shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague 
come nigh thy dwelling. For He shall give His angels charge over 
thee, to keep thee in all thy ways." 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the Com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose, reported a Plan for carrying into 
effect the object of this Association ; which, being read from the 
Chair, was considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with 
one amendment, accepted and adopted as follows ; viz. : 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring 
Bibles and Testaments to be distributed among all persons inhab- 
iting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred 
Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled clergy 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who shall, 
in writing, request to be members ; of every person who shall sub- 
scribe to pay annually to the Treasurer a sum not less than two 
dollars, and who shall remain a member so long as he continues the 
payment of that sum ; and of every person who shall subscribe and 
pay to the Treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars, he remaining 
a member during life, without being obliged to further contributions. 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee appointed to report a plan for the organiza- 
tion of the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained, 
notice shall be given by the Committee, and also of the time and 
place of the meeting of the Society. 



22 



4- The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a President, Treasurer, 
Corresponding Secretar}', and a Recording Secretary, who shall 
continue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until suc- 
cessors are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen 
other members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom 
six shall be clerg}'men and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a 
Board of Trustees. 

5. The Trustees, or the greater part of them present at any 
meeting, of which public notice shall be given by the President, 
Treasurer, or Recording Secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among 
the members of the Society, a Committee of three persons, to con- 
tinue in office during the pleasure of the Board of Trustees, who 
shall have the management of the fund, and the distribution of the 
books procured with it, subject and according to such regulations 
and directions as shall from time to time be prescribed by the Trus- 
tees at any meeting held on public notice given as aforesaid ; and 
the Treasurer shall pay the moneys in his hands to the order of the 
said Committee. 

6. The Trustees shall apply to the Legislature for an Act to 
incorporate the Society, on the principles and for the purp>oses 
aforesaid, and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into 
effect the purposes of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on 
regular notice being given, for the due exercise of all the powers 
granted by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall 
again meet, on public notice given by the President, Treasurer, or 
Recording Secretary', to devise and adopt such further measures as 
may be necessary for preserving the institution, and for effecting 
the intentions of the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the Constitution, the Trustees 
petitioned the General Court, and obtained the following Act of 
Incorporation. 



ACT OF INCORl^ORATION. 



(Commonwcaltli of PajSijSiarhUjSiettj^. 

In the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate the 

Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Whereas, the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with many 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in com- 
mon use in the churches of New England, for distribution among all per- 
sons inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the 
sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects 
of said Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Society 
more extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an 
Act of Incorporation. 

Section, i. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate andHonse of Repre- 
sentatives^ in General Court assetnbled^ and by authority of the same, That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D. D.,the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D.D., 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D. D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. 
Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph 
Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, 
Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. 
Samuel H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who 
may hereafter associate, with them for the purposes aforesaid, be, and 
they hereby are, incorporated into a Society, by the name of The Bible 
Society of Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted. That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legisla- 
ture, and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said 
Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any persons dis- 
posed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any grants or 
devises of lands and tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, 
bequests, and subscriptions of money, or other propert}', to be used 
and improved for the purposes aforesaid. 



24 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted^ That the said Corporation shall be, 
and hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars^ 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted^ That the said Society may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted^ That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall sec fit, and may make and establish such rules 
and regulations as to them shall appear necessary, provided the same be 
not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted^ That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers prfnted 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said 
Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and 
place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the 
same ; may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and 
may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by 
the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable 
to the principles of this institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Ap* 
proved by the Governor ^ Feb, /j, 18 jo. 



(Sommotturealth of PaietjSiarhuieKtfjet. 

In the year Ei.^htccn Hundred and Sixty-five. An Act in addition to an Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives^ in General 
Court assembled^ and by the authority of the same^ as follows : 

Section i. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafter be known by 
the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name 
shall have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to 
all its liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had not 
been changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, 
and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English lan- 
guage, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now 
authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in 
common use in the churches in New England, anything in the Act incor- 
porating the said Society to the contrary notwithstanding. — Approved 
by the Governor^ Feb. 2j, iS6j, 



BY-LAWS. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, May 26, 1851, the follow- 
ing By-Laws were adopted. 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its Act of 
Incorporation ; namely, " The raising of a fund by voluntary con- 
tribution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of 
the version in common use in the churches in Xew England, for 
distribution among all persons inhabiting within the State and else- 
where, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot 
be conveniently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clerg}'man, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the State, may become a member of this Society by signify- 
ing his request in writing to that effect to the Recording Secretary, 
who shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become mem- 
bers, in a book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued ; and the Treasurer shall keep a 
list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the Treasurer not less than 
twenty dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the 
Society for life, and shall be so enrolled by the Recording Sec- 
retary. 



26 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, fourteen Vice- 
Presidents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, Treas- 
urer, and eighteen Trustees, and an Auditor. The President, 
Vice-Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secretaries, and 
Treasurer, shall each be ex-officio members of the Board of Trustees, 
and the Recording Secretary shall be the recording officer of that 
Board. These officers shall all be chosen by ballot at the Annual 
Meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of Trus- 
tees; and he, and also the Vice-Presidents and Secretaries and 
Treasurer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such offi- 
cers respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The Trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of 
the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the Act of In- 
corporation is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the 
duties of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all 
funds and donations, and generally have and possess all the power 
and authority vested by the Act aforesaid in the Society. It shall 
be their duty, however, at every Annual Meeting, to make and lay 
before the Society a particular Report of all their doings, with all 
such documents and vouchers as may be asked for by any member; 
and such Report shall be had and considered before the Society 
shall proceed to the choice of Trustees for the year then next 
ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be holden on the Mon- 
day preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and at this 
meeting it shall be competent to transact any business which the 
Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall be given by 
the Recording Secretary at least seven days before the holding 
thereof, by notice published in at least one newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by the 
Trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three newspa- 



27 

pers published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at 
such meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 

ARTICLE X. 

The Trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as 
they may direct or as the President may at any time call. Five 
Trustees shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The Trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually, 
shall choose from their own body an Executive Committee, a Com- 
mittee on Agencies, and a Committee on the Depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The Executive Committee shall have the management of the 
funds, and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with 
them ; the Committee on Agencies shall have the direction of all 
matters connected with the agencies of the Society, the appoint- 
ment of all agents, subject to the approval of the Trustees, and the 
defining of their respective duties ; the Committee on the Deposi- 
tory shall have the management of all matters conneqted with the 
Society's Depository for the sale of Bibles — all of said Commit- 
tees at all times, however, to be subject to the direction and control 
of the Trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These By-Laws may be repealed or aniended at any annual meet- 
ing, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, by vote 
of a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE-MEMBERS. 

Each Life-Member of this Society shall be allowed to receive 
from the Depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles 
and Testaments. 

N. B. The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order; and they can be issued only 
for the current, not iox past years. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 



Centreville, CotiKTegational church, $7.15 

Falmouth, First Con^egational church, 21.75 
Yarmouth, Congregational church, 30 80 



BRISTOL COUNTV. 

Attleboro*, Second Congregational ch. 

(2 L. M.} 

Falls Village, Congregational ch. 
Mansfield, Congregational church, 
Norton, of which ^20 is from Mrs. E. 

B. Wheaton to const. Rev. N. G. 

Dean, l. m. 
Taunton, West Congregational church, 

Winslow, Congregational church, 
Wcsthampton, Congregational church, 



$59.70 



$81.87 

9-75 
7-79 



41.00 

12.00 

11.71 

7-78 

$171.90 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Andover, North Conjjregational church, $15.00 

South Congregational church, 20.00 

West Congregational church, 18.00 

Free Congregational church, i3-3o 

Bradford, First Congregational church, 3900 

Boxford, First Congregational church, 12. iK 

Second Congregational church, 6.12 

Danvers, Maple St. Cong, church, iS.fn) 

Essex, First Congregational church, 22.36 

Georgetown, Orthodox Memorial ch. 21.64 

Gloucester, Congregational church, 22.89 

Groveland, Congregational church, 8.5S 

Hamilton, Congregational church, 11.60 

Ipswich, First Congregational church, 20,35 

Lawrence, I*awrence Street church, 18.51 

South Congregational church, 8.57 

Lynn, First Congregational church, 20.14 

Lynfield, Congregational church, 5.17 

West Newburj', Congregational church, 5.00 

Newburyport, Whitfield Cong, church, 7,00 

Belleville, Congregational church, 72.50 

Salem, South Congregational church, 45-50 

Topsfield, Cong, church, (i l. .m.) 27,50 

West Newbury, Second church, 10.00 



$549.60 



FRANKUN COUNTV. 

Buckland, Congregational church, 
Conway, 

Greenfield. Second Cong, church, 
First Congregational church, 
Shelbume Falls, Congregational church, 
Shutesbury, Congregational church, 
Sunderland, Congregational church. 



^7-45 
36.85 

59-^5 
9.08 

4.33 
1. 00 
1. 00 



$119.36 



HAMPDEN COUNTV. 

I..ongmeadow Ladies Benev. Assoc $18.05 

Monson, Congregational church, • 14.49 

Palmer. Second church, 10.17 

Springfield, Olivet church, 14.14 

Memorial church, 30.48 

Westfield, Second church, >7-9» 

Wilbraham, Congregational church, 15-25 

$120.49 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTV. 

North Amherst, Congregational church, $40.67 
North Hadley, Congregational churchi 7.55 
Hatfield, Congregational church, 57'Oo 

Middlefield, Congregational church, 20.57 



$125.79 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Acton. Congregational church, 
Arlington, Congregational church, 
Ashby, Congregational church, 
Cambridgeport, Pilgrim church, 
Conc<)rd, Union Bible Si>ciety. (2 l. m.) 
Groton, Union Congregational church, 
Hopkinton, Congre^tional church, 
Littleton, Congregational church, 
Lowell, John bt. Cong, church, 
Naticlc, First Congregational church, 
Pepperell, Congregational church, 
SaxonviUe, Edwards Cong, church. 
Sherbom, Ladies* Benev. Assoc. (1 l. M. 
Stoneham, Congregational church. 
Tewksbury. Congregational church, 
Waverley, Con^egational ch, (1 l. m.) 
Waltham. Trinitarian Cong. ch. 
Town&end Harbor, Cong, church. 



$3.00 
39-32 
4.00 
16.94 
96.00 
36,10 
35-2i 

7.58 
21.87 

4400 

33.60 

17.00 

) 20.00 

10.50 

24.00 

29.05 

6.75 
$468.05 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 



Franklin Co. Bible Soc. 
on Book Acc't. $96.43 



Cohasset, Second Congregational ch. 
Fr>xborough, Congregational churcli, 
Franklin, Congregational church, 
Hingham, Evangelical Cong, church, 
HolUston, Congregational cnurch. 



$15.56 

38.26 

10.94 

3-50 
".50 

Holbrook, Winthrop Congregational ch. 14.00 
East Med way. Congregational church, 13.60 
Quincy, Evangelical Cong, church, 
Randolph, First Congregational ch. 
Welleslev, Congregational church, 

L. Ff. Horton, 
Weymouth, First Congregational ch. 
North Weymouth, Pilgrim church, 
South Weymouth, Second ch. (1 l. m.) 
Weymouth and Braintree, Cong, church, 23.00 
Wrentham, Congregational church, 21.40 



20.00 
77.00 
7.21 
X0.00 
16.20 
10.00 
20.00 



>3»3.i7 



29 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Bridftewater, Central Square Cone. ch. $25.35 
Brockton, Porter Evang. Cong, church, 14.65 
Campello, Congregational church, 37->° 

Duxbury, Rev. B. Otheman, 5.00 

Hanover, First Congregational church, 2.00 
Rockland, Congregational church, 5o.cx> 

$134.00 



SUFFOLK QPI'NTV. 

Boston, Old South church, 

Shawmut Congregational church. 
South Boston, Phillins Cong, church, 
Dorchester District, Village church, 
Boston, Union Temple church. 

Baptist Bethel church, 



WORCBSTBK COUNTY. 



$98.84 
95.78 
4K.60 
13.33 

20.00 
6.70 

$283.25 



Blackstone, Congregational church, $20.00 
North Brookfield, t irst Cong, church, 

(1 i»M.) 50.00 

West Brookfield, Congregational ch. 18.00 

Dana, North Congregational church, i.oo 

Gardner, First O>ngregational church, 24.97 

Harvard, Congregational church, 1.25 

Lancaster, Congregational church, 20.35 

Leominster, Orthodox Cong, church, 1.25 

North Congregational church, 6.50 

Leicester, First Congregational church, 10.00 

Lunemburg, Congregational church, 1.75 

Oxford, First Congregational church, 18.27 

Sutton, First Con^egatiimal church, 22.85 
Royalston, First Gcmgregational church, 86.50 

South, A Friend, ^ 1.00 

West Bojrlston, Congregational church, 6.00 

Whitinsville, Congregational church, 767.50 

WinchendoUj North Cong, church, 14.61 

Weslboro', Lvaiv^. Cong, church, 81.54 

Uxbridge, First Evang. Cong, church, 30.00 

Upton, First Congregational church, 10.00 

?i»93.34 



MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS. 

Boston, Mrs. Geo. Curtis, $100.00 

S. D. Warren, 200.00 

Edwin H. Sampson, 20.00 

A Friend, 1,00 

Chelsea, Miss A. M. Dutch, 10.00 

Edgartown, G. G. 2.00 

Hampden, Benev. Assoc. Int. Acc*t. 6.15 

N. £. Conference, M. E. church, 354-26 

Providence Conference, M. E. church, 199.50 

East Maine Conference, M. E. church, 186.32 

Holbrook, yearly bequest of £. N. 

Holbrook, 200.00 

Holbrook, yearly bequest of E. E. H. 50.00 

Amesbury, W. Willey, Local Agent, 12.83 

Merrimack, W. Willey. Local Agent, 38.41 

West Newbury, W. Willey. I.ocal Ag»t. 16.11 
Westmoreland, N. H. Mrs. M. E. W. 

Cole, 4.70 



$1401.27 



COLLECTIONS. 



The foHotkfing sums Aavr hten received frotn 

Protestant Ef>iscop€U churches andf&r' 

warded to the A m. Bible Society. 



Trinity Church, Boston, 
Emanuel church, Boston, 
St. Paul's church, Boston, 
Church of our Saviour, Longwood, 



$772.25 
285.00 
203.00 
154.00 

$1413.25 



LEGACIES. 

Boston, A Fiicnd, (1 L. M.) 

Hingham Estate of Hon. Albert Fear- 
ing, Specific legacy 5 Shares I.a'.v- 
reiice Duck Co., par value per share 
$1,000. 

Wevmouth, Wm. T. Brigham, Exec, 
ot estate of Susan Tufts, 

Balance from Craig Estate, 



$279.18 



5000.00 

100.00 
«5.39 

$5394.57 



Form of a Bequest to the Society. 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Massachusetts Bible Soci- 
ety, incorporated in the year eighteen hundred and ten, the sum 

of to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of the 

Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and 
policy of the Society, should be directed to the Rev. Daniel But- 
ler, Recording Secretary, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 



Remittances for books, donations from churches and indi- 
viduals, and orders for books, should be addressed to Rev. Elijah 

Cutler, Agent, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 

E. Cutler, Agmt. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESENTED BY THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



||3$$3t|ti$tib ^lib ^0tbl^, 



AT THEIR ANxVUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON, 



MAY 26, 1879, 



BBING THEIR 



SEVENTIETH ANNIVERSARY. 



BOSTON : 
DEPOSITORY, 8 BEACON STREET, 

1879. 



f-i^^. 



b( i.os .'i I. 



T«««V% -^W^^ t*\1kTV*^ («1k^%l^V-\\«1kVV ♦ft**!^ %«%-\«%. 



^ I' '\ 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 1879-80. 



President. 
Hon. ROBERT C. WINTHROP, LL.D., 

Vice-Presidents. 

Hon. JACOB SLEEPER, Suffolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 

Hon. timothy W. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, LL.D., Franklin County. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, LL.D., Middlesex County. 

Hon. MILTON M. FISHER, Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN A. HAWES, Bristol County. 

ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., BarnsUble County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D.D. 

Recording Secretary. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

Auditor. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 



Rsv. JOHN O. MEANS, D. D. 
Rkv. chandler ROBBINS, D.D. 
Rbv. ANDREW P. PEABODY, D.D. 
Rkv. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU, D.D. 
Rbv. PHILLIPS BROOKS, D. D. 
Rbv. GEORGE F. PENTECOST. 
Bishop RANDOLPH S. FOSTER, D. D. 
Rbv. EDMUND F. SLAFTER. 
Rbv. E. S. ATWOOD. 



Trustees. 

Hon. CHARLES T. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Es^. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esg. 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE, Esq. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 
GEORGE P. DENNY, Esq. 
Hon. E. ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
Hon. JOHN P. PUTNAM. 
ALDEN SPEARE, Esq. 



Executive Committee. 
to whom applications are to bb madb fob biblbs. 

Rev. John O. Means, Charles Henry Parker, and Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 



Officers of the Society from 1809 to 1879. 



Hon. William Phillips, 
Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Hon. Samuel Greenleaf, LL.D. 



Pretidentt. 



1809-27 
1827-49 
1849-54 



Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL.D. . 1854-59 
Hon. Samuel H. Walley, . . 1859-78 

Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, LL.D., 1878 



Vice-PreaidenU. 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. 
Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. 
Rev. Henry Ware, D. D. . 
Rev. John Codman, D. D. 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL.D. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 
Rev. NathM L. Frothingham, D. D 
Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. 
William C. Plunkett, Esq. 
Edward Southworth, Esq. 
John P. Williston, Esq. . 
Hon. William B. Washburn, LL.D 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq. . 
Charles P. Whitin, Esq. . 
Lee Claflin, Esq. 



1809-16 

1816-38 

1828-44 

1844-48 

1848-49 

1849-53 

1853-61 

1861-72 

1S62 

1862-70 

1862-72 

1862 

1862 

1862 

1862-70 



Caleb Holbrook, Esq. , 
James S. Amory, Esq. 
Hon. John H. Clifford, LL.D 
Elisha Tucker, Esq. . 
James B. Crocker, Esq. . 
E. S. Moseley, Esq. 
Charles A. Jessup, Esq. . 
Hon. William Qaflin, LL.D. 
Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D. 
Hon. William Hyde, 
Hon. Timothy W. Carter, 
Hon. Milton M. Fisher, . 
Hon. John A. Hawes, 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper, 



1863-75 

1862 

1862-76 

1862 

1862 

i86a 

1870-72 

1871 

1872-78 

187a 

1873 

1875 

1876 

1878 



Corresponding Secretaries. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, . 1809-13 
Rev. Samuel C. Thacher, . 1813-17 

Rev. Charles Lowell, D. D. . . 1817-18 



Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 181^49 

Rev. NathM L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849-53 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. . 1853 



Recording Secretaries. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor, 
Rev. James D. Knowles, . 
Rev. William Jcnks, D. D. 



1809-28 
182&-30 
1830-31 
1831-32 
i><32-39 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Rev. William M. Rogers, 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Rev. George Richards, 
Rev. Daniel Butler, . 



1839-44 
1844-45 
1845-49 

1849-52 
1853 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher, 
John Tappan, Esq. . 



Treasurers. 



1809-11 

l8ll-12 

1812-35 



Henry Edwards, Esq. 
George R. Sampson, Esq. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 



1835-49 
1849-62 

1863 



Executive Committees. 



Rev. William E. Channing, D. D. 
Hon. Jonathan Phillips, . 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. . 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 
Edward Tuckerman, Esq. 
Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. . 
Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. D. 
Charles Tappan, Esq. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 



1809-18 
1809-16 
1809-15 
1815-18 
1816-30 
1818-30 
1821-35 
1830-40 
1832-35 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D 
Henry Edwards, Elsq. 
Rev. George Richards, 
George R. Sampson, Esq. 
Hon. Albert Fearing, 
Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper, 



1835-49 

1840-49 

1849-60 

1849-63 

1853-76 

i860 

1862 

1876 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Seventieth Annual Meeting of the Massachu- 
setts Bible Society was held in the Chapel of the Old 
South Church, on Monday, May 26, at 3 o'clock, P. M., 
the Hon. Robert C. Wu»jthrop, LL.D., in the chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read 
and approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq., pre- 
sented his Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Seventieth Annual Report of the Trustees was 
presented, and it was moved that the reading be deferred 
till the public meeting. 

The officers of the Society were then elected for the 
coming year. 

Adjourned. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



The record of the past year differs but little from 
that of previous years. As hitherto, by individual and 
associated effort, the ever-occurring destitution of the 
Scriptures has in numerous instances been ascertained 
and supplied, and the number of books sold exceeds that 
of the year previous by nearly two thousand copies. 
This increase has occurred mainly among the cheaper 
varieties, the new twenty-five cent Bible and the five cent 
Testament having been largely called for. Indeed, by 
far the largest number of books sold at the Depository 
are of the cheaper kinds, such as are within the easy 
reach of all but the extremely poor. 

During the year, there have been issued from the 
Depository thirty-one thousand one hundred and sixty- 
two copies of the Scriptures; of which number seven 
hundred and thirty-eight copies were in various foreign 
languages. Twenty thousand and thirty-nine were sold. 
Eleven thousand one hundred and twenty-three were 
bestowed in charity, at a cost of $2,578.77. Through 
sailors' chaplains and other friends of the seamen, one 
thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight were given to 



8 



the men of the sea. One thousand two hundred and 
fifty-six copies were distributed among the poor of this 
city; seven hundred and sixty-three to mission schools; 
to public institutions, six hundred and thirty-one; to 
destitute persons in Massachusetts, four thousand six 
hundred and two; to the destitute in other States, eight 
hundred and ninety-one. 

A colporter was employed for a portion of the year 
in Hampshire East. He visited eight hundred and 
ninety-eight families, and sold and bestowed in charity 
one thousand and twelve volumes. 

The towns of Blandford, Russell, Montgomery, Tol- 
land, East and West Granville, in Hampden West, have 
been canvassed by the resident pastors, with such assist- 
ance as they could gain from their people. Uniform 
testimony is borne by them to the happy effects of this 
work. It has afforded to pastors a pleasant introduction 
to families not accustomed to attend public worship, and 
thus created an impression that this is a part of the 
aggressive work demanded of each local church in 
behalf of the community around it. "I find," writes 
one of these pastors, "the greatest destitution among 
the youth. When a child is able to read, it should have 
its own Bible. It has occurred to me that each church 
should have a depository, where children can be fur- 
nished with a Bible when able to read it. Sure am I 
that our churches are bound to see that the families 
among whom they are located are furnished with the 
Word of Life." 

The towns of Carlisle and Chelmsford, in Middlesex 
County, have been visited, and among the five hundred 
and sixty families comprised in these towns, two hundred 
and forty-six copies of the Scriptures were sold and 
given away. 



The towns of Plymouth, Kingston, Duxbury, Plymp- 
ton, and Brockton, in Plymouth County, have been can- 
vassed by a colporter. Among the four thousand and 
ninety-three Protestant families visited, one hundred and 
seventy-eight were without the Scriptures, and with two 
exceptions were supplied. Six hundred and seven copies 
were sold, and eight hundred and four were given to 
the poor. Twenty-five Roman Catholic families accept- 
ed the gift of a Bible. 

For five months a colporter has labored in this city. 
His visits, amounting to over three thousand, have been 
largely among those whose hard earthly lot is but faintly 
reached by the hallowing influence of Divine Truth. 
To these he has read and explained those portions of 
the Word especially adapted to their condition, and 
with many of them has sought in prayer the blessing of 
God. To these weary pilgrims through a wilderness 
unrelieved by the anticipation of a promised land be- 
yond, it has been his happiness to speak of One who 
pities and forgives, and through whose help they may 
find deliverance from the habits that enslave them. 
None but the most ignorant and the intemperate have 
refused to hear the Scriptures read, and their power to 
interest the lowest form of humanity is abundantly man- 
ifested. Our colporter has been particularly encouraged 
by the reformation, a few months since, of a very intem- 
perate man, through the reading of a copy of the 
Scriptures which he had given him. To five hundred 
and sixty-three destitute families he has given portions 
of the Bible. 

The receipts of the Society have been as follows: 
From the sale of Bibles and Testaments, $7,936.70; 
from donations and legacies, $11,111.39; income from 
general fund, subject to an annuity and interest on 



lO 



accumulations of the same, $9,545.41; cash on hand at 
the beginning of the year, $2486.60. The expenditures 
have been: For Bibles and Testaments, $10,516.77; do- 
nations to the American Bible Society, $4,279; salaries 
and colportage, $4,746.87; to Thos. W. Durant, $500; 
assessment of Lawrence Duck Co., $1,666.67; rent, 
freight, postage, printing, insurance, advertising, fuel, 
gas, stationery, etc., $1,226.57. 

The American Bible Society, with which our own is 
connected as an auxiliary, reports an income, from dona- 
tions and from the sale of Bibles, of over $462,000 — 
being an increase of over $15,000 above the receipts of 
the previous year. The amount expended in gratuitous 
work reaches the large sum of over $263,000. Of this 
amount $110,000 was in cash appropriations to the work 
in foreign lands, besides thirty-four thousand five hun- 
dred and twenty copies of the Scriptures sent from this 
country. Six missionaries, employed in translating the 
Scriptures, have been supported in whole or in part. 
The translation of the Bible into the Turkish language, 
upon which the labor of many years has been bestowed, 
is now completed, and the Scriptures are thus made 
accessible to the millions speaking this language. In 
Japan, the translation of the New Testament has been 
carried on, and will, it is hoped, be finished the present 
year. In China, the version now in general use has 
been revised, and portions of the Scriptures have been 
translated into several dialects. Tours of exploration 
have been made in Egypt, Greece, Syria, Persia, and the 
Caucasus. The preparation and distribution of the 
Scriptures in foreign lands are assuming larger propor- 
tions each year, in connection with missionary labor 
and by its own independent agency. One hundred and 
thirty-nine colporters have been employed abroad, and 



II 



two hundred and thirty-eight thousand copies of the 
Scriptures put in circulation. At home one hundred 
and seventeen colporters have been employed, princi- 
pally in the Southern States. They have visited four 
hundred and forty-five thousand families, and of the 
seventy-seven thousand found destitute, fifty-three thou- 
sand were supplied. The year has been one of great 
activity; and past success and ever-widening fields in- 
vite to enlarged efforts. 

We may appropriately refer on this occasion to a 
kindred institution in the Old World, an institution that, 
on its catholic basis and in its beneficent influence, em- 
bodies and illustrates the Christianity of our fatherland. 
At the recent anniversary of the British and Foreign 
Bible Society, it was stated that its issues during the 
year had amounted to three million three hundred and 
forty thousand — in more than two hundred languages 
and dialects. Four hundred thousand portions of the 
Bible were given away at the Paris Exposition, the 
happy effects of which distribution are coming to light 
through the colporters. In addition to this, the sales in 
France have amounted to ninety-eight thousand copies. 
Fifty thousand copies have been sold in Italy by colpor- 
ters. Nearly half a million of New Testaments have 
been furnished to the Russian soldiers since the com- 
mencement of the late war. The movements of this 
noblest of human organizations remind us of those pro- 
cesses of nature by which the needed waters are taken 
from the sea and dispensed in fertilizing rains over the 
islands and continents of the world. 

The activity that prevails in this department of 
Christian labor, and the wide extent it covers, are among 
the marked and hopeful features of our age, and are 
fitted to strengthen our hopes for the future. It is in 



12 



fullest sympathy with every well directed effort for the 
improved condition of our fellow-men. It is Divine 
Truth, and the love it awakens, that nerves the arms of 
the toilers in the great field of our common humanity. 
In its power to save we have an unshaken belief. That 
humanity and religion alike plead for its diffusion, we 
know. While permitted to bestow the gift to all accord- 
ing to our ability, we would continue in our work, re- 
membering the words of the Master: "The field is the 
world; the seed is the Word of God." 



ANNUAL ADDRESS. 



By rev. ALEXANDER B. JACK. D. D., 



OF HAZELTON, PA. 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS BY HON. ROBERT C. WINTHROP, LL. D., 

PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY. 

I AM sincerely sensible, ladies and gentlemen, of the 
honor of presiding, for a second year, over this venerable 
Society. Instituted, as it was, in 1809, it is on the verge 
of completing seventy full years of existence. It is thus 
but five years younger than the great British and For- 
eign Society, which we all gratefully recognize as the 
parent and preeminent Bible Society of the world. It 
is six or seven years older than the great American Bible 
Society, to which we are proud to serve as an auxiliary. 
Our own sphere of operations is a narrow one, when 
compared with the world-wide range of these grand 
national institutions. But we rejoice in being privileged 
to cooperate with them both in carrying the Sacred 
Scriptures to every household and every hearthstone 
which they may not yet have reached, and in thus tes- 
tifying our deep personal sense of their priceless value to 
every human heart. 

Threescore years and ten, as the Psalmist has said, 
may be taken as the term of individual life; and few 



14 

persons reach that term without the consciousness of 
some abatement of natural strength. But the life and 
vigor of an Association have happily no such limit. In- 
deed, we may well feel, and we all do feel, to-day, that 
our Society is still in its prime; and that, though its 
temporary officers and agents may droop or disappear, 
its own age can only be counted and measured by the 
perpetuity of its object. The Word of our God endur- 
eth forever; and certainly, as long as the earth and the 
world shall continue as they now are, this Society, and 
Societies like this, must go on, and will go on, generation 
after generation, in the glorious work to which they are 
devoted and consecrated. The prophecy and the prom- 
ise are with them : ** They that wait on the Lord shall 
renew their strength ; they shall run and not be weary, 
they shall walk and not faint." 

In congratulating you, therefore, as I heartily do, 
that we have safely and successfully arrived at our 
Seventieth Anniversary, I cannot but feel that even 
seventy times seventy years will be counted hereafter as 
but a day in our history, in view of that immeasurable 
future which, as we are all persuaded, is to witness the 
spreading triumphs of "the Truth as it is in Jesus." 

Let me only detain you longer while I present to 
you the distinguished clergyman who has kindly come 
to us from a distance, to address the Society on this 
noteworthy Anniversary, the Rev. Dr. Alexander B. 
Jack, of Hazelton, Pennsylvania. 



ADDRESS. 



Some years ago a distinguished missionary was called to labor 
beneath the sunny sky of a flourishing heathen isle. One day while 
engaged in the field he required a tool which lay at some distance. 
Taking a piece of paper, he wrote on it with a pencil, and handed it 
to a servant, who knew what he wanted. The servant started off with 
the paper, and handed it to a brother missionary. The missionary 
read it ; and when the very tool they wanted was given to the mes- 
senger, without one word or sign on his part, the untutored savage, 
totally ignorant of writing, or how man could thus communicate with 
man, was filled with amazement, and looking on the paper with a sort 
of awe, he raised it from the ground, examined it with rolling feyes, 
and soon pronounced it "speaking paper." So, even so, wherever 
you find a man who loves his Bible, you have a " speaking paper." 
And there are just as many such papers here as there are believers ; 
for so soon as God, by the instrumentality of man and the power of the 
Holy Spirit, writes His word in love and truth upon a sinner's heart, 
that man becomes a living Bible, a walking Bible, a speaking Bible ; 
and it is just because it is greatly to be desired that all this audience 
should be living Bibles, walking Bibles, speaking Bibles, that I venture 
on behalf of this society to lay before you the claims of the Bible as 
the Word of God. 

In opening up the subject, as there may be some in this assembly 
who wish to know what is meant when it is said that the Bible is the 
Word of God, I would ask you, for your instruction, to notice the fol- 
lowing particulars : 

First, observe the emphasis of the sentiment, the Word of God. 
Christ was God manifest in flesh ; the Bible is God manifest in language. 
The syllabic presence of the Eternal is in the Bible. The vocal abid- 
ing of the Almighty is in the Bible. Language breathed from ever- 
lasting lips makes up the Bible. 

Again, if it is the Word, it is of course all the Word. All Scripture 
— every sentence, every syllable, every utterance — is given by inspira- 



i6 



tion of God. What a sublime conception that gives you of the Bible ! 
To think that what now lies here once lay in the mind of Deity. To 
think that what is now enshrined in syllables was once enshrined in 
God. To think that all those Bible sentiments now circulating round 
our breathing world were breathed by God into the soul of man. 

Again, if it is the Word, if it is all the Word, then it is an unim- 
provable Word. To alter Scripture is to alter God. To touch the 
truth is to touch Jehovah's temple. This book is perfect, even as 
God is perfect. Such in brief is the explanation of the sentence, 
" The Bible is the Word of God." 

I may put this before you in the form of an illustration. To mod- 
ern science we are indebted for some rapid and very wonderful com- 
munications. Our messengers of business now pass almost instanta- 
neously along the earth, through the bowels of the mountain, through 
the crowded city, even through the great wide sea. On they fly ; no 
distance wearies them, no storms or winds can stay their progress ; 
they carry along, on lightning wing, unspoken and unwhispered secrets 
from man to man. Now what these needles — if you have ever seen 
them working, as they are moved by an unseen spirit — what these 
needles, moving to another's will, are in the hands of him who seated 
in his office an hundred miles away commands and conducts the tele- 
graph ; such, if I may be permitted to compare the small with the 
great, were holy men of old in the hands of Him who seated up in 
Heaven guided their fingers or their pens. We are told that holy men 
of old wrote. How did they write? "They wrote as they were 
moved by the Holy Ghost." And while it is true that different por- 
tions of this book are called by different names, it is also true that all 
these different portions are just so many branches of one tree. They 
are one in their origin, and one in their inspiration ; one in their end, 
and one in their object. They are so many streams flowing from a 
single fountain, so many beams shooting forward from a single sun. 
The whole of this Bible, from Genesis to the Apocalypse, is baptized 
in inspiration, and may be named in that one short sentence of the 
Apostle Paul, " An Epistle of Jesus Christ." 

Now opposed to these sentiments is the opinion of some who hold 
that the writers of the Bible needed at one time to be superintended, 
at another time to be directed, at another time to have thoughts sug- 
gested to their minds ; as if the Sun of Righteousness had just looked 
out of Heaven for an hour, flung His rays on one page, and left 
another in comparative obscurity. But where have you a hint of that 
in Scripture ? If no such hint is there, what right have I, or any man, 



17 

to make distinctions ? Is it not evident that the prophets and apostles 
needed more than superintendence, direction, or suggestion, since 
books very similar to theirs might have been produced, and yet error 
have occurred ? If these thijigs are so, I hold that the Holy Spirit not 
only told them what to write, but how to write, and that apart from 
this it is hardly possible to conceive of inspiration at all. If the Holy 
Ghost gave the thoughts, He must in some sense have given the 
words. God would never communicate truth to man, and leave man 
to communicate that truth imperfectly. Men very often mistake the 
language of each other, even when they think they cannot be misun- 
derstood. Therefore, though the writers of the Bible may have been 
compelled to write with accuracy, our faith in their accuracy rests 
exclusively on the assistance of the Holy Spirit. 

But some one may say : Let us stop here for a moment ; let us look 
at this ; let us think of it. Here is a dry list of places ; here is a cata- 
logue of names ; here is a host of genealogies. What inspiration could 
be needed for such things as these ? There are many who can easily 
understand how some passages of Scripture awaken the conviction that 
" Holy men of old spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost." But 
what inspiration was needed for that valley of dry bones, known as the 
book of Chronicles ? The answer to this is very simple and satisfactory. 
Let me give it you in this form : Your child knows that the letter you 
have written has come from you. He sees your fatherly fondness breath- 
ing all throughout it. " It is my father's letter," he cries, " I trace his 
loving heart in every line of it." Your actual handwriting may not be 
on the page, sickness or some other casualty may have rendered an 
amanuensis necessary ; but your child knows your letter, notwithstand- 
ing — knows it by an instinct, an intuition of affection that needs no 
other proof. And how would he treat some brother schoolmate who 
might ask : What of your father do you discover in this or that, in this 
list of places, in that catalogue of names, in this advice about a clock, in 
that instruction about a book? Would he not resent the imperti- 
nence ? Would he not grasp more tightly the precious document ? 
Would he not say at once : You may be far too knowing to sympa- 
thize with me, but there is enough in every line of this to make me 
know my father's voice ; and if he has been at the pains to write down 
simple notices of common things, I see nothing strange in that. I 
love him all the better for his kindness ; and now, whatever you may 
say, I shall still believe that my father had a gracious meaning in all 
he wrote to me ? 

Still, some one may say: This may all be true of the facts of 



iS 



Scripture ; but surely you would not contend in this way for the very 
words. If we get the Bible's scope and purport, we get enough. In 
some of our Bible controversies we have heard very much of this. 
The world has stood aloof, and mocked at our anxiety for the Bible, 
the whole Bible, and nothing but the Bible. We have been asked in 
scorn : What would the world suffer if we should expunge the Song of 
Solomon, or the visions of Zechariah ? The answer is : To talk about 
what the world would suffer is only to beg the question. We are the 
pledged depositaries of a sacred treasure. We are God's trustees for 
future ages. As we have received, so must we transmit. We dare not 
measure the depth of the Almighty's purposes by our puny intellects. 
We dare not obliterate this and the other portion of the Bible, because 
they may happen to have been abused. We dare not curtail our Fath- 
er's legacy, because some of his apostate children are quarreling with 
its dry details. Had the Jews acted after this fashion, of how many 
authentic vindications of our Saviour's mission would the world have 
been left in ignorance. Who could have dreamed that Zechariah's 
"thirty pieces of silver," or that his king, lowly and "riding on an 
ass," were ever to receive fulfillment ? Who could have thought that 
Jeremiah's Rachel weeping for her children was ever to form a part of 
the history of Jesus Christ ? 

In making these remarks, I trust that no one will misinterpret what 
I say. You will not understand me as contending for what is called 
"mechanical dictation." The writers of the Bible were not mere 
machines. They continued to be men. The influences of the Spirit 
did not supersede natural talent. They no more changed a man's 
style than they changed a man's handwriting. I can believe that 
Matthew took short-hand notes, his discourses have such an air of 
freshness about them. I only contend that the Holy Ghost clothed 
these notes in language, and so clothed them that all Matthew's pecu- 
liarities as a man were impressed upon the parchment. The writers 
of the Bible wrote according to their peculiar tastes and tempera- 
ments. There was the rhymer, there was the annalist, there was the 
dry and tedious chronicler. All of these were pressed into the Spirit's 
service ; and that Spirit so guided their pens, so directed their thoughts, 
that every word they wrote was really the Word of God, and that in a 
sense no less exact than if the Spirit had dipped His finger in the 
light of Heaven, and traced the Bible on the everlasting hills. 

Again, you are not to understand me as maintaining thaf all the 
words of Scripture are the ipsissima verba, the identical words of God 
himself. Literally, the Bible is not the Word of God. There are lies 



19 

in the Bible, those for example of Annanias and Sapphira. There is 
craft and cunning in the Bible : that which develops itself in Satan's 
speeches. There is bad theology in the Bible : that which is expressed 
in the sentiments of the friends of Job. There are songs in the Bible : 
the ballads of the Pentateuch, and lasher's popular melodies. In 
such instances inspiration refers not to the thought, but to the correct 
and authentic record of it. It is simply a fact that these things were, 
and that their preservation has been effected for the sake of God's 
believing people ; and therefore, although the Bible as a whole has not 
the seal of God to its truth, it has the seal of God to its utility ; and 
when we speak to you of the Bible being God's Word, you are to 
simply understand that it is God's communication, for that is the 
meaning of the Hebrew term. 

And now having made these remarks on the inspiration of the 
Bible, let me proceed, very briefly, to consider some of the more popu- 
lar arguments which infidelity has used against it. And here, that my 
meaning may be plain, I will make the following supposition : I will 
suppose that you have found in an old library some old manuscripts, 
covered with the dust of ages. When they are opened and wiped 
clean they appear to be certain pamphlets, which when put together 
make up what is called the Bible, that professes to be the Book of 
God. Now, I want to know what you would do with these old manu- 
scripts. Suppose you had found an old copy of this sort in vellum, 
and that you take it to an intelligent infidel. There are few such per- 
sons, but there are a few. Well, we will suppose the infidel under- 
stands these manuscripts as they are placed before him in their origi- 
nal tongues, Hebrew, Chaldee, Greek. That would of course be a 
peculiar case ; but we will suppose such a case, for the sake of argu- 
ment. You give these papers to him, and you say: What do you 
think of them ? Why, it is said that this series of pamphlets, from 
Genesis to the Apocalypse, make up God's Book. So you put them 
into his hands, and you want to know what a sensible and intelligent 
infidel would think of them. Well, he might make some objections, 
and his first remark very likely would be that there are a great many 
books of that sort in the world already ! You would reply : There are a 
great many books of that sort in the world already ! How many ? I am 
not very widely acquainted with that kind of literature ; but how many 
pretend to the same thing ? Oh ! there is the Book of Mormon, the 
Koran of Mahomet, and the Shasters of the Hindoos. He stops there. 
He stops at three ; for there are only three. He cannot mention any 
more. This being the case, you put the Bible in competition with 



20 



these three. It is not very likely that you have read them ; but we 
will suppose that you have, and that you understand them. You take 
the Book of Mormon first, and hardly have you looked at it before you 
spurn it away as an impious and clumsy lie. An old minister lay long 
in his bed, a hopeless hypochondriac. As he lay there, he amused his 
leisure hours by writing imitations of the Apocalypse, the images of 
Ezekiel, and the visions of the prophet Daniel. These were subse- 
quently collected, and passing through artful hands became the basis 
of an outrageous system of rascality and licentiousness. You take the 
Koran next. You examine it with the eye of a critic. What is the 
result ? It is a plagiarism ; it is stolen from the Bible ; and is withal 
a very bad imitation of the original. So that is set aside ; and now 
you only have one left. Well, you examine the Shasters, and your 
decision is that of infidels themselves — that if there is any revelation 
from God at all the Bible is that revelation. This decision no modern 
infidel may have put into words, but all of them admit it in fact. 
They write books against the Bible, but never against the Book of 
Mormon, the Koran, or the Shasters. They know that it would be 
unnecessary to disprove them. The Bible is the only book they try to 
overthrow ; therefore they virtually acknowledge that this is the only 
book that is likely to be a revelation, if there is one. 

" Still," the infidel may say, " this book cannot be true, because it 
opposes science." The answer is : Do you understand science, and do 
you understand this book? Have you compared the one with the 
other, and clearly learned that there is a fair opposition ? " Oh, yes," 
says the infidel, " the book itself, in the first part called Genesis, begins 
with a statement that contradicts science ; it leads us to infer that the 
world is only six thousand years old, and science asserts that the world 
has been millions of ages in existence." Be it so. Does the Bible 
contradict the assertion.^ Begin again and read it. The first two 
verses affirm that " In the beginning God created the heavens and the 
earth, and the earth was without form and void, and darkness was upon 
the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God moved upon the face of 
waters." Now, notice here that the expression "without form and 
void " is a Hebraism for infinite space. If this be true, science and 
the Bible are at one. Science says that the earth has existed millions 
of ages, and the Bible that the earth was first in a condition of chaos, 
but for how long it does not state. Besides, let it be remembered that 
those who were accustomed to transcribe the old manuscripts always 
left a space between the second and third verses of the first chapter 
of Genesis. This they did before geology was born, or thought of. 



21 



It is therefore a mistake to suppose that the Bible opposes science. 
On the contrary, if you investigate the matter, you will find that, 
instead of the Bible opposing science, you must go to the Bible to 
assist you in your scientific explorations. What do the best geologists 
tell us ? They tell us that if we will look at the strata of the earth, 
we shall find that at one time it was impossible for a human being to 
live on it. This is one of their most positive assertions. Moreover, 
they tell us that if we examine the marks on the surface of the earth, 
we shall find that the world in its present form has not been in exist- 
ence more than six thousand years. There are no marks of progress 
that necessarily carry us further back. If the world had been older 
than the Bible represents it to be, then we should find manuscripts and 
monuments that would take us beyond that time. These two facts, 
then — first, that there certainly was a period when no human being 
could live on the face of the earth ; and secondly, that the earth has 
not been inhabited more than six thousand years — these, I say, are 
facts which the Bible had determined long before geology had a 
being. Therefore the Bible helps science. 

Again, the infidel goes on to say that he cannot believe this book 
has come from God, because of the imperfection of the Old Testament 
saints, and because of the ceremonial imperfections of the Jewish law. 
Now, if you look at the imperfection of the Old Testament saints, you 
-will see that this only proves that the book is honest, since, in record- 
ing the history of imperfect men, it gives us the evil that is in their 
characters as well as the good. If in recording their history it had 
made them all good and perfect, the infidel would have said : " This is 
too good to be true ; " while others would have objected that it would 
not be a book for man as man, because it is of no use to any one. A 
history of perfectly good men is not a history adapted to the wants of 
this fallen world. No, we want a history of saints that were once 
great sinners, and who, from being great sinners, became great saints. 
We want a book containing the lives of men with like passions as our- 
selves ; enduring the same trials, and looking to the same God for 
mercy. Then, as to the imperfection of the Mosaic law, no one will 
deny that as a system it was infinitely superior to any system prevalent 
among the heathen, and that its adoption even now would be a great 
reformation to more than half the world. The rites, rituals, and 
ceremonies of that law were the simple and rudimentary school-rules 
under which the childhood of the world was placed until it should 
attain to manhood, and be fit to be under Christ. Some one may say 
that we should have had a perfect Gospel to start with, and that there 



22 



was no necessity for this gradual development. The answer is that 
everything we know, or ever heard of, is marked by this development 
We come into the world as infants, and rise by degrees to manhood. 
It is with the hoary head that we usually associate wisdom and experi- 
ence. The oak never grew to greatness in a day ; it takes a century 
to harden it and bring it to maturit)'. Star by star the hosts of heaven 
march out. Foot by foot the tide comes creeping in upon the shore. 
So it is with all God's works. They are all progressive, and if this 
Mosaic law has come from Him, we have reason to expect that it will 
have the same progressive adaptation. 

Now these are some of the more popular arguments of infidelity, 
and without discussing these and others at greater length, I turn round 
upon the infidel, and ask : If this Bible did not come from God, will 
you please to tell us from whom it did come ? What author had the 
taste, the capacity, and the disposition, to make such a book as this ? 
It seems clear that it did not make itself, for if so, it is the only book 
that has been its own author. However silly a book may be, it takes 
some little talent to make its words run into sentences, and some 
degree of intelligence to put them together. It is so with everything 
else. It is so with the statue, for example ; when we examine a statue, 
we conclude that the sculptor who produced it had skill and taste 
enough to produce a statue of that kind ; and when we look at a rose, 
we say it could not bloom by chance, but that all its parts were laced 
and interlaced by the joint operations of the laws of nature. We say 
of the statue that it is a work of art ; of the rose, it is a work of God. 

■ 

Let us try the Bible by the same rule. 

I need hardly say that no evil spirit or malicious devil would make 
such a book as this. Satan would not make it, because this book is 
good, while he is bad. The whole purpose of the book is to counteract 
his wiles, and put us on our guard against him. Nor need I stop to 
show that no man of ordinary capacity could have made this book. 
There are finer shades of moral power here, and greater purity 
of feeling here, than are to be found in books of human author- 
ship. 

Who, then, wrote this book } I observe that it is manifestly writ- 
ten not by one man, but by many ; and that these men must have lived 
in distinct and distant ages of the world. In view of this, we cannot 
suppose that the writers of the Bible ever put their heads together to 
deceive mankind. It is not a conclave of choice and learned spirits 
entering into some grand confederation to impose upon our simplicity. 



23 

These men never met. One was dead before the other began to write 
at all. How, then, shall we account for the oneness of design, so 
apparent in this book ? How shall we unravel the golden thread that 
runs from Genesis to the Apocalypse ? Surely, we require some 
author living on through all the centuries, until the last number has 
been added. Surely, we require some one who does not die as man 
dies, but who remains to superintend the publication of these 
pamphlets, and to employ the prophets and apostles as His 
amanuenses. 

I have said that there is oneness in the Bible. Some of you may 
want to know in what that oneness consists. To understand it, you 
must go back to the book of Genesis. There you read : "The seed of 
the woman shall bruise the serpent's head." There, also, you find our 
first mother saying, on the birth of Cain : " I have gotten a man from 
the Lord," thinking that Cain was Christ. Why was not Cain the 
Christ ? I cannot tell ; but this very thought of Eve is the thought 
that runs through all the Bible. Turning from Adam who fell, it 
points us to one who should never fall. The prediction of His coming 
is its text of prophecy. The law of His coming supersedes all other 
laws. The oath of his coming is the only oath that is uttered by the 
tongue of God. This truth is the basis of the patriarchal and the 
front of the Jewish dispensation. The theocracy exists for it. Sinai 
shines with it. The temple is invested with it. Death-bed benedic- 
tions mingle with it. Has this book any pathos ? It is to speak of 
Christ. Has this book any affection ? It is to turn to Christ. Has 
this book any tears } It is to shed them at the Saviour's feet. No Alps, 
no Andes, no lofty peak or towering pyramid was ever more distinct 
on shore or sea than is Messiah on the page of Scripture. " To Him 
gave all the prophets witness ; " and to yon shadowy outline sketched 
in Eden, the hand of Prophecy adds unnumbered lines, until there 
stands before us the second man. 

This thought to which I have adverted is one which stamps the 
Bible with a unique, extraordinary, and transcendent value. It is 
comparatively of little moment for a man to be learned in the history 
of the Bible, in the scholarship of the Bible, in the criticism of the 
Bible, even in the morality of the Bible. The great matter is that he 
should be both acquainted and impressed with that method of atoning 
righteousness, that plan of justification by faith, which it is the 
specific object of the Bible to unfold, unwrap, unlock, set home, and 
apply. 



24 

" Within this awful volume lies 
The mystery of mysteries. 
Happiest they of human race 
To whom their God has given grace 
To read, to fear, to hope, to pray ; 
Tu lift the latch, and lead the way. 
And better he had ne'er been born 
Who reads to doubt, or reads to scorn.'* 

We have considered the claims of the Bible and some of the evi- 
dences by which that claim is sustained. If there is truth in the asser- 
tions which have been made, you will not be surprised to hear me say 
that there is no scheme you are so safe to further as the circulation of 
the Word of God. You may have your doubts about other things, but 
this at least is all right. You may not be satisfied with some evangeli- 
ical mission ; you may shake your head, and say, I have no confidence 
in the plan ; you may button up your pockets, and declare you do not 
believe in it. But what objection can you urge against the universal 
circulation of a book which is sustained by evidence that cannot be 
gainsaid, and which has manifestly been sent from Heaven as a 
" Tree of Life, the leaves of which are for the healing of the nations." 

Think of the changes that are likely to be affected when this book 
is read bv every member of the human race. Think of the conversion 
of untold multitudes of heathen now bowing down to stocks and 
stones, or silting in "the darkness and shadow of death." Think of 
the fruitless eflforls of the Papacy to hinder its dissemination — efforts 
which are to us as the guns of a sinking ship ; they tell to the startled 
world that the ark of the Papacy is among the breakers. I go back to 
the period of the Crusades, when along the banks of the Rhine, and 
wandering over the plains of Germany, thousands and tens of thou- 
sands went shedding the blood of the poor trampled Jew, and even the 
blood of their own confreres^ in their engagement to rescue the fancied 
sepulchre of our blessed Lord from the hand of the haughty Saracen. 
My friends, your purpose is much more sublime, your weaix)ns much 
more glorious and more pure. Your work is to rescue souls. Your 
power is not in the falchion or the spear, but in the Sword of the 
Spirit, which is the Word of God. 

Look for one moment at the individual effects, the domestic effects, 
the political effects of this book. First, individual effects. Go to the 
heart of Africa, and look at Robert Moffat. He is coming down to 
the Cape of Good Hope, bringing a man with him who is called the 
** Devil of Africa." He was a savage, and no one who came in con- 
tact with him could regard himself as safe. A word touched that 



25 

man. The Gospel came and melted his heart. Look at India, look at 
Greenland, look at Labrador, look at any mission of the Christian 
church, and you will find that wherever a single word of this book 
comes home to a man's conscience, he sits down calm and gentle as a 
Uttle child. 

Look, again, at its domestic effects. Look at this woman lying on 
a bed of sickness, her face suffused with a hectic flush, the wild shoot- 
ing gleam of the fire of death. She lies there almost etherealized 
enough by consumption to pass into Heaven without going to the 
grave. She has pain, but she has also peace ; for the Spirit of God is 
with her, and the Word of God is her comfort. Look at that descrip- 
tion which Cowper gives us of the English cottage woman, 

" Working quietly at her own door, 
Pillow and bobbins all her little store." 

And laboring on, 

*• A poor woman who 
Just knows, and knows no more, her Bible true, 
A truth the brilliant Frenchman never knew." 

Then look at the contrast he draws between Voltaire, with all the 
splendor of his genius and all the renown of his life, and that simple- 
hearted woman " never heard of half a mile from home." 

Look, again, at the political effects of this book. Look at two 
countries lying close to each other ; you can go from one to the other 
in a very few days. I refer to the two Americas. One distinguished 
by its vine-clad slopes, marked by beauty, genius, and imagination 
(and I know of no people under Heaven who, if they had the Bible, 
would stand out so distinguished as the people of South America). 
Well, look at that country and our own. Look at it ever rocking amid 
the surges of insurrection and revolution ; the other standing out, as 
thank God it does stand out, a place to which all the nations of the 
earth can come, and from which they will ^never be driven away. 
What makes the difference ? Not the sunny clime and gorgeous 
scenery of the one; not the force and fervor of the other. The 
only thing which has made North America what it is to-day is the 
power of religious truth and the force of that living Word, which is 
the kindler of all genius, and the strongest breakwater against all 
crime and insubordination. 

I am careful to make these remarks because we hear so much in 
certain quarters of substitutes for the teaching of the Word of God. 
Men crowd our press-rooms, crowd our platforms, crowd our pulpits, to 



26 



inculcate sentiments which have ruined empires and ruined human 
souls. 

We are told, for example, that if we would renew and renovate 
the world, we must form the morals of the rising race, and train our 
offspring to social virtues. Let this, it is said, be our first endeavor. 
Ulterior attempts are only wasted. The spear of truth rebounds. To 
all such objections we say, circulate the Bible. 

Then we afe told that there are social evils eating out the heart of 
this great republic, brutifying the mind, corrupting the morals, degrad- 
ing the affections of old and young. Let these plagues, it is said, be 
removed. Let men be lifted to respect, and acquainted with principle. 
To all such objections we say, circulate the Bible. 

Then we are told that the ordinance of preaching is too highly val- 
ued, too disproportionately indulged ; that acts of devotion should be 
our chief employment during worship ; that the effect of exhortation is 
but brief and transitory, at best but the impression of the speaker's 
thoughts. To all such objectious we say, circulate the Bible. 

Then it is said that the doctrine of atonement — that doctrine which 
we regard as the cardinal doctrine of the Christian system — must be 
veiled and guarded, encumbered with shadows, or uttered in dark enig- 
mas ; that if we would move the mind we must have outward impres- 
sion, dramatic show, scenic device, moving censors, tender litanies, 
pealing chants, awful aisles. To all such objections we say, circulate 
the Bible. 

The "bow of the cloud spans but a segment of the earth. The bow 
of the covenant, resting its limbs on the poles, spans the great globe 
itself This Bible contains a panacea for all the evils that afHict the 
race; for men of every color and clime and character; for the man of 
the forest, and the man of the wild ; for those who are shivering at the 
poles, and for those who are scorching on the line. And could I now 
pass before you men of every abasement, the most mentally and phy- 
sically enfeebled, the most wretched, the most barbarous, the most 
squalid, the most sanguinary ; the worst of heathen, the prowlers of the 
desert, the thugs of India, the cannibals of the South Pacific ; as this 
procession was winding past you, this Bible would have to say : These 
are the partners of your being ; these are the tenants of your earth ; 
these are the heirs of your futurity ; these are your brothers, though of 
low degree. 

And now in closing and in conclusion, men and brethren, let me 
entreat you to "thank God and take courage." By one of old it was 
said : " The tree is known not by its leaves or by its blossoms, but by 



27 

its fruit ; " and tried by that test, it may be safely affirmed that the Bible 
is the greatest benefactor man has ever had. Wherever it comes, 
peace broods on the lake, righteousness flows in the stream, men weld 
their swords into ploughshares, their spears into pruning-hooks, and the 
spider weaves her web across the cannon's mouth. Art, awaking 
from the sleep of centuries, begins to clothe herselif in strength and 
beauty, to construct a chariot on which speech outstrips the wind, and 
competes with the lightning's flash. Science hammers from the rocks 
their long-buried secrets, weighs the sun and measures the sky, foretells 
the motions of the planets, and calculates the distance of the stars. 
Literature, new-born, examines all the dreams of the sages, this lamp 
of the upper sanctuary burning brightly in her hand. Philosophy no 
longer panders to carnal appetite or sordid passion, but with all the 
singing gladness of conscious purity, becomes the guide of our higher 
thinking, and the minister of our holier virtues. And poetry, before 
how sensual and trifling, now dips her sparkling cup in the river of the 
" Water of Life," or bathing herself in the light of Heaven, becomes 
for the first time holy. 

And religion at length comes back to be a dweller in man's heart ; 
and devotion lifts herself from the dust, and puts on the garments of 
holiness ; and the reign of vice and sensuality is smitten as with a 
dead palsy ; and old forms of error that have grown hoary with age 
are abandoned in disgust, or flung like a stranded vessel to rot upon 
the beach ; and the pride of tyranny and the lust of power sink down 
weary and silent in death, their victims snatched like a pearl from the 
dust, to be added to the crown of Jesus Christ. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the commit- 
tee appointed for that purpose, reported a plan for carrying into effect 
the object of this association ; which, being read from the chair, was 
considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with one amend- 
ment, accepted and adopted as follows, viz. : 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles 
and Testaments to be distributed among all persons inhabiting within 
the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, 
and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all. regularly settled clergy- 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who shall, 
in writing, request to be members ; of every person who shall sub- 
scribe to pay annually to the treasurer a sum not less than two dol- 
lars, and who shall remain a member so long as he continues the 
payment of that sum ; and of every person who shall subscribe and 
pay to the treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars, he remaining a 
member during life, without being obliged to further contributions. 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direction 
of the committee appointed to report a plan for the organization of 
the society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained, notice 
shall be given by the committee, and also of the time and place of 
the meeting of the Society. 



30 

4. The Society shall, on notice g^ven as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a president, treasurer, 
corresponding secretary, and a recording secretary, who shall con- 
tinue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until successors 
are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen other 
members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom six shall 
be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a board of 
trustees. 

5. The trustees, or the greater part of them present at any meet- 
ing, of which public notice shall be given by the president, treasurer, 
or recording secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among the members 
of the Society, a committee of three persons, to continue in office 
during the pleasure of the board of trustees, who shall have the man- 
agement of the fund, and the distribution of the books procured with 
it, subject and according to such regulations and directions as shall 
from time to time be prescribed by the trustees at any meeting held 
on public notice given as aforesaid ; and the treasurer shall pay the 
moneys in his hands to the order of the said committee. 

6. The trustees shall apply to the legislature for an act to incor- 
porate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes aforesaid, 
and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into effect the pur- 
poses of this institution. 

7. When the Societ)' shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on regu- 
lar notice being given, for the due exercise of all the powers granted 
by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the president, treasurer, or recording 
secretary, to devise and adopt such further measures as may be neces^ 
sary for preserving the institution, and for effecting the intentions of 
the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the constitution, the trustees peti- 
tioned the general court, and obtained the following act of incorpo- 
ration. 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 



In the year of our Lord One Thousand Ei^ht Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate the 

Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Whereas, the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with many 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in com- 
mon use in the churches in New England, for distribution among all per- 
sons inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the 
sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects 
of said Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Society 
more extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an 
Act of Incorporation. 

Section i. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives^ in General Court assembled^ and by authority of the same^ That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D. D.^ 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D. D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. 
Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hard, Esq., Mr. Joseph 
Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill^ 
Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. 
Samuel H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who 
may hereafter associate, with them for the purpose aforesaid, be, and 
they hereby are, incorporated into a Societ}', by the name of The Bible 
Society of Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted^ That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legisla- 
ture, and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said 
Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any persons dis- 
posed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any grants or 
devises of land and tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, 
bequests, and subscriptions of money, or other property, to be used 
and improved for the purposes aforesaid. 



32 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted. That the said Corporation shall be, 
and hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall sec fit, and may make and establish such rules 
and regulations as to them shall appear necessary, provided the same be 
not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted. That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said 
Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and 
place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the 
same ; may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and 
may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by 
the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable 
to the principles of this institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — AP' 
proved by the Governor, Feb. 75, 18 10, 



CommontDfaltf^ of i9a00acf)uiBett0« 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-five. An Act in addition to an Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachi'setts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section 1. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafter be known by 
the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name 
shall have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to 
all its liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had not 
been changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, 
and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English lan- 
guage, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now 
authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in 
common use in the churches in New England, anything in the Act incor- 
porating the said Society to the contrary notwithstanding. — Approved 
by the Governor, Feb, 2y, iS6^, 



BY-LAWS. 



At the annual meeting of the Society, May 28, 185 1, the follow- 
ing by-laws were adopted : 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its act of 
incorporation ; namely, " The raising of a fund by voluntary contribu- 
tion, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, who 
are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conve- 
niently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the StcUe^ may become a member of this Society by signifying 
his request in writing to that effect to the recording secretary, who 
shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become members, in a 
book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued ; and the treasurer shall keep a 
list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the treasurer not less than twenty 
dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the Society for 
life, and shall be so enrolled by the recording secretary. 



34 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the society shall be a presidenti fourteen Vice- 
presidents, corresponding secretary, recording secretaty,. treasurer, and 
eighteen trustees, and an auditor. The president, vice-presidents, 
corresponding and recording secretaries, and treasurer, shall each be 
ex-officio members of the board of trustees, and the recording secre- 
tary shall be the recording officer of that board. These officers shall 
all be chosen by ballot at the annual meeting. . 

\ ... 

ARTICLE VI. 

The president shall be cx-offido chairman of the board of trus- 
tees ; and he, and also the vice-presidents and secretaries and treas- 
urer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such officers 
respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of 
the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the act of incor- 
poration is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the duties 
of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all funds and 
donations, and generally have and possess all the power and authority 
vested by the act aforesaid in the Society. It shall be their duty, 
however, at every annual meeting, to make and lay before the Society 
a particular report of all their doings, with all such documents and 
vouchers as may be asked for by any member ; and such report shall 
be had and considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice 
of trustees for the year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be holden on the Mon- 
day preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and at this 
meeting it shall be competent to transact any business which the 
Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall be given by 
the recording secretary at least seven days before the holding thereof, 
by notice published in at least one newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by the 
trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three newspapers 
published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at such 
meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 



35 



ARTICLE X. 

The trustees shall hold regidar semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as they 
may direct or as the president may at anytime call. Five trustees 
shall be a quorum to transact business. 

ARTICLE XI. 

The trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually, 
shall choose from their own body an executive committee, a commit- 
tee on agencies, and a committee on the depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The executive committee shall have the management of the funds, 
and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with them; the 
committee on agencies shall have the direction of all matters con- 
nected with the agencies of the Society, the appointment of all agents, 
subject to the approval of the trustees, and the defining of their 
respective duties; the committee on the depository shall have the 
management of all matters connected with the Society's depository 
for the sale of Bibles — all of said committees at all times^ however, to 
be subject to the direction and control of the trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These by-laws may be repealed or amended at any annual meet- 
ing, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpos^i by vote of 
a majority of those present 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE-MEMBERS. 

Each life-member of this Society shall be allowed to receive from 
the depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles and Tes- 
taments. 

N. B. The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued only for 
the current not ioT past years. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



nARNSTABLR COUNTY. 

Falmouth, Fint Congregational church f 1 13.00 
Centreville, Congregational church, 6.00 



nRISTOL COl'NTY. 

Attleboro*, Second Cong, church, 
Eatton, Congregational church, 
North Kastnn, church of the Unity, 
Mansfield, Congregational church, 
Norton, Congregational church, 
Taunton, Winslow Cong, church, 



$IQ.OO 

^43-45 
5.10 

3-79 
8.61 

30.00 

.S.ao 



FssRX CCl'NTY. 

AmeKbury and Salisbur)', Union Evan- 
gelical chtirch, f 2.45 
Andovcr. South Congregational church, 50.00 
Danvers, Maple St., Cong. S. School, 33.25 
Georgetown, First Cong, church, 4.00 
Gloucester Harbor, Evangelical church, 40.00 
Ipswich, First Cimgregational church, 20.00 
South Congregational church, 16.00 
Lynn, Central Congro^atittnal church, 20.00 
Springfield, Kvangclical Conn, church, 3.«m 
Ncwburyport, Hciievillc Cung. church, 70.78 
Whitfield C»)ngregati«)n.il church, 9.50 
North Andover, Congrc;.!atioMal church, 15.00 
Marblehcad, Fir>t Cong, church, 10.50 
Salem, Crombie St. Cong, church, 31 .32 
."^outh church, 57 <><> 
PealKtdy, South church, 26. iS 
West Newbury, First Con^;. church, 5.00 



FRANK I.IN i'trNTV. 

Greenfield, Second Cong, church, 
Northfield, Cong, church, 
Franklin Co. Bible Society, 

HAMrSlilKK (•■H'NTV. 

Amherst, North Conxregaiional ch. 
Belchertown, by I^>cal Agent, 
X North Hadlcy, Congregational church, 



#4M'^2 

$2:00 
10.00 
21.12 

^451. 12 

548.65 
19.00 
11.86 



HAMPDKN aiUKTY. 

Hampden Benevolent Association, 

Interest Account, 12.00 

Chicopee, Second Congregational ch. 30.27 

Blandford, Congregational church, 10.00 

Monson, Congregational church, >i*95 

Longmeadow Gent's Benev. Assoc. 17.55 

I..adies Benev. Assoc. 18.73 

South Hadley Falls, Congregational ch. 1S.04 

Palmer, Congregational church, 5.00 

Springfield, South Congregational ch. 10.90 

Olivet Congregational church, I3<43 

West Springfield, Congregational ch. 10.00 

Springfield Memorial church, 12.24 

East Granville, Rev. W. Scott, 9 00 

I17q.11 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Bridgewater, Central Square Congrega- 
tional church (1 i> M.), ^S.oo 

Hanover, First Congregational church, 1.80 

Kingston, A. J. Rice, Agent, 20.04 
Marshfield, First Congregational ch. 

(I L. M.), ao.oo 

Middleboro*, Central Congregational ch. 19 00 
North Middleboro*, Cong. ch. S. School, ao.oo 

Duxburv, Rev B. Otheman, 5.00 



SI'KKOI.IC COU.VTY. 

Boston, Old South church. 

Baptist I'.eihel, 

S. L). Warren, 

E. H. Sam])son, 

Mrs. Geo. Curtis, 

A Friend, 

A Friend, 
Boston Highlands, Highland church, 

German M. E. church, 

David Weston, 
South Boston, Phillips church. 
West Roxbury, South Cong, church, 
Chelsea, Miss A. Dutch, 
Dorchester, Village church, 



*7V-5» 



*ii3-S4 

I152.10 

S.06 

200.00 

20.00 

loaoo 

1.00 

.50 

4.00 

3.00 

8.00 

31-47 
33.50 

10.00 

a 1.05 

$582.68 



37 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Braintree, Mica R. A. Faxon, $5*oo 

Brookline, Harvard ConKregational ch. 109.65 
Cohasset, Congregational church, 9.07 

Dedham, First Congregational church, 74*17 

Foxboro*, Congregational church, 14.34 

Franklin, Congregational church, 16.00 

Grant ville, Congregational church, 78. 10 
Hingham, Evang. Congregational ch. 6.53 

Holbrook, E. E. Holbrook, 50.00 

East Medway, Congregational church, 15.00 

West Medway, Congregational church, 17.58 

Norwood, Congregational church, 14- 34 

Walpole, Congregational church, 17.45 

Weymouth and Braintree Union church, 18.56 

South Weymouth, Second Cong. ch. 20.00 

Union Congregational church, 30.00 

South Abington Cong, church, (i l. m.) 30.1a 

$Sa5-8i 

WORCESTER COUNTY. 

Brookfield, Evang. Congregational ch. $10.00 

West Brookfield, First Cong, church, ao.oo 

North Brookfield, First Cong, church, 50.00 
West Boylston, First Congregational ch. 8.25 

Blackstone, Congregational church, 10.78 
Dana, Congregational church, i.oo 

Hardwick, Congregational church, ii-74 

East Douglass, Congregational church, 10.00 

Gilbertville, Congregational church, 19.10 

Fitchburg, Kollstone church, 15.00 
Leominster, Orthodox Cong, church, 1.25 

Lunenburg, Congregational church, 2.00 

North Leominster, Cong, church, 3.00 

Northboro', Congregational church, 20.00 
Princeton, Congregational church, S.oo 

Spencer, Congregational church, 51.00 

Shrewsbury, Congregational church, i5>7i 
Peterehani, Congregational church, 2.56 

Westboro', Congregational church, 67.43 

Webster, First Congregational church, 18.00 

Uxbridge, Evang. Congregational ch. 20.00 

Whitinsvilie, Congregational church, 799<75 

Winchendon, North Congregational ch. 22.19 



MIDDLBSBX COUNTY. 

Acton, Congregational church, $9'*S 

Ashby, Congregational church, 11.25 

Brighton, Evang. Cong, church, 60.00 

Charlestown, Winthrop church, 15.00 

Cambridgeport, Prospect St. church, 5.84 

Concord, Union Bible Society, 92.00 

South Fraroingham, Congregational ch. 36.00 

Harvard, Congregational church, 3.50 

HoUiston, Congregational church, 17.62 

A Friend (4 l. m.), 80.00 

Lowell, First Congregational church, 37. 1 1 

South Congregational church, 2.00 
Lexington, Hancock Congregational ch. 1.04 

Littleton, (Congregational clyirch, 4-75 

Newton, Eliot church, a.oo 

Pepperell, Congregational church. 34-59 

Somerville, Broadway Cong, church, 10.00 

Stoneham, Congregational church, 15.00 

Tewksbury, Congregational church, 28.25 

Winchester, Congregational church, 75>6o 



$530.80 

Ml.<«CBLLA.NEOUS DONATIO.NS. 

East Providence and Seekonk, Cong. ch. $9.09 
Edgartown, Mrs. A. G. Gannett, i.oo 

South Windham, Vt., Mrs. P. C. Jen- 

nison, 2.45 

N. E. Conference, M. K. church, 358.94 



$371-48 

COLLECTIONS. 

Tht following sums kavt hcen received from 

Protestant Episcopal ckurcfus and for- 

warded to the A m. Bible Society. 

Trinity church, Boston, $736.00 

Emmanuel church, Boston, 240.00 

St. Paul's church, Boston, i93-<k> 



$1,169.00 

I LEr.ACIE.S. 

Tewksbury, bequest of Wm. Taylor, $5,700.00 
I Marion, bequest of John Pitcher, 64.02 

Holbrook, yearly bequest of £. N. 

Holbrook, 200.00 



$i,i9<).7f) 



$5,964.02 



Form of a Bequest to the Society. 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Massachusetts Bible Soci- 
ety, incorporated in the year eighteen hundred and ten, the sum 

of to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of the 

Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and 
policy of the Society, should be directed to the Rev. Daniel But- 
ler, Recording Secretary, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 



Remittances for books, donations from churches and indi- 
viduals, and orders for books, should be addressed to Rev. Elijah 

Cutler, Agent, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 

« 

E. Cutler, A^nt. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESENTED BY THE TRUSTEES 



OF THK 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING, IN BOSTON, 



MAY 24, 1880, 



BEING THRIR 



SEVENTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY. 



BOSTON: 
DEPOSITORY, 8 BEACON STREET, 

i88o. 




Thomas Todd, Printer, 

CONtiRRCATIONAL HOUSE, B«»sTON. 




r 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Bible Society, 1880-81 

President. 
Hon. ROBERT C. WINTHROP, LL. D. 

Vice- Presidents. 

Hon. JACOB SLEEPER, Suffolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 

Hon. timothy W. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, LL. D., Franklin County. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, LL. D., Middlesex Countv. 

Hon. MILTON M. FISHER, Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN A. HA WES, Bristol County. 

ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. D. 

Recording Secretary. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

Auditor. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 

General Agent. 
REV. ELIJAH CUTLER. 

Trustees. 



Rev. JOHN O. MEANS, D. D. 
Rev. chandler ROBBINS, D. D. 
Rev. ANDREW P. PEABODY, D. D. 
Rev. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU, D. D. 
Rev. PHILLIPS BROOKS, D. D. 
Bishop RANDOLPH S. FOSTER, D. D. 
Rev. EDMUND F. SLAFTER. 
Rev. EDWARD S. ATWOOD. 
Prof. ALVAH HOVEY. 



Hon. CHARLES T. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Esy. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Es«.» 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE, Es<t. 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 
GEORGE P. DENNY, Esq. 
Hon. E ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
Hon. JOHN P. PUTNAM. 
ALDEN SPEARE, Esq. 



Executive Committee. 

to whom appucations are to be made for bibles. 

Rev. John O. Means, D. D., Charles Henry Parkek, Es*^, 

Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 



Officers of the Society from 1809 to 1880. 



Hon. WUliam PhUHps 
Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Hon. Samuel Greenleaf, LL. D. 



Presidents. 



1809-27 

1827-49 
» 849-54 



Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL. D. 1854-59 

Hon. Samuel H. Walley . . 1859-78 

Hon. Robert C. Winthropp LL. D. . 1878 



Vice-Presidents. 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. 
Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. 
Rev. Henry Ware, D. D. . 
Rev. John Codman, D. D. 
Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 
Rev. NathM L. Frothingham, D. D. 
Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. 
William C. Plunkett, Esq. 
Edward Southworth, Esq. 
John P. Williston, Esq. . 
Hon. WiUiam B. Washburn, LL. D, 
Stephen Salisbury, Esq. . 
Charles P. Whitin, Esq. . 
Lee Qaflin, Esq. 



1809-16 

1816-28 

1828-44 

1844-48 

1848-49 

1849-53 

1853-61 

1861-72 

1863 

1862-70 

1862-72 

1863 

1862 

1862 

1862-70 



Caleb Holbrook, Esq. 

James S. Amory, Esq. 

Hen. John H. Qifford, LL. D. 

Elisha Tucker, Esq. . 

James B. Crocker, Esq. 

E. S. Moseley, Esq. ^ . 

Charles A. Jessup, Esq. . 

Hon. William Claflin, LL. D. 

Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D. D 

Hon. William Hyde . 

Hon. Timothy W. Carter . 

Hon. Milton M. Fisher 

Hon. John A. Hawes 

Hon. Jacob Sleeper . 



1862-75 

1862 

1862-76 

1862 

1862 

1862 

1870-72 

1871 

1872-78 

1872 

1873 
1875 
1876 
1878 



Corresponding Secretaries. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster 1809-13 

Rev. Samuel Thacher 1813-17 

Rev. Charles Lowell, D. D. 1817-18 



Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 1818-49 

Rev. Nath'l L. Frothingham, D. D. 1849-53 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. . 1853 



Recording Secretaries. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor . 
Rev. James D. Knowles . 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



1809-28 
1828-30 
1830-31 
1831-32 
1832-39 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Rev. William M. Rogers . 
Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Rev. George Richards 
Rev. Daniel Butler . 



1839-44 
1844-45 
»845-49 
1849-52 

1852 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher 
John Tappan, Esq. . 



Treasurers. 



1809-11 
1811-12 
1812-35 



Henry Edwards, Esq. 
George R. Sampson, Esq. . 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 



1835-49 
1849-62 
1862 



Executive Committees. 



Rev. William E. Channing, D. D. 
Hon. Jonathan Phillips 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. . 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 
Edward Tuckerman, Esq. 
Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. . 
Rev. Benjaunin B. Wisner, D. D. 
Charles Tappan, Esq. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 



1809-18 
1809-16 
1809-15 
1815-18 
1816-30 
1818-30 
1821-35 
1830-40 

1832-35 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D 
Henry Edwards, Esq. 
Rev. George Richards 
George R. Sampson, Esq. 
Hon. Albert Fearing 
Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper . 



1835-49 
1840^49 
1849-60 
1849-62 

1853-76 
i860 
1862 
1876 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Seventy-first Annual Meeting of the Massachu- 
setts Bible Society was held in the Chapel of the 
[New] Old South Church, on Monday, May 24, at 3 
o'clock, p. M., the Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, LL. D., in 
the chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read 
and approved. 

The Treasurer, Charles Henry Parker, Esq., pre- 
sented his Annual Report, which was read and accepted. 

The Seventy-first Annual Report of the Trustees was 
presented, and it was moved that the reading be deferred 
till the public meeting. 

The Officers of the Society were then elected for the 
coming year. 

Adjourned. 



REPORT. 



The Society whose anniversary we have met to cele- 
brate attains to-day an age exceeding by a year the limit 
assigned to the earthly life of man. Its birth occurred 
early in the present century, — a period destined to be 
forever memorable for the associations, religious and 
philanthropic, which had then their beginning. For cen- 
turies confessors and martyrs had translated the Script- 
ures ; in prison and exile, and at the stake, they had con- 
tended for the right to possess and impart them. In the 
fulness of time God gave them the victory, and Protestant 
Christendom rejoiced in the uplifting power of an un- 
fettered Bible. It was at the period referrred to that the 
benign influence of the Scriptures was shown in the 
numerous activities devised to convey the written Word 
to those needing it, and to remove or alleviate the various 
ills that afflict our race. These streams of beneficence 
we trace back to their one source, the Word of Life, 
which, like the River of Paradise, parting into many 
heads, is conveying light and healing to the world. 

The Massachusetts Bible Society was among the 
earliest of the associations formed for aggressive Chris- 
tian work in our State. The means at its disposal, and 
the field opened to its occupation, contrast strongly with 
those existing to-day. The city, then the town^ of 



8 

Boston, contained but thirty thousand inhabitants. In 
the State there were less than half a million, while the 
population of the whole country was but seven millions 
and a half. No opening for this work existed beyond 
the sea, and previous labors had not developed the best 
methods of ascertaining and supplying existing wants at 
home. Hence, in the reports of the first year we are 
told that three hundred Bibles had been procured, of which 
number thirty six had been sent to the prison of the 
town, eleven poor families had been supplied, fourteen 
had been given to the almshouse, and measures were 
being taken by which they could distribute the remain- 
der where they would be the most useful. But while 
unacquainted with existing wants and with the needful 
details of the work, of the importance of the work itself 
they had no doubt. In the preamble of the Constitution 
adopted by the Society, the purpose is avowed to cir- 
culate the Scriptures in Massachusetts and elsewhere ; 
and that the last word had no narrow or restricted meaning 
is evident from the recorded utterances of that early day. 
Their words have the ring of the true missionary of the 
cross. In one of the earlier meetings of the Society 
the Rev. Dr. Channing thus eloquently pleads for the 
vigorous prosecution of the work, then just begun : 

" No sincere Christain can need argument to convince 
him that he is bound to contribute to the diffusion of 
Christianity through the world. This is a religion de- 
signed for all nations. Jesus Christ commanded his 
disciples to preach it to every creature under heaven ; 
and shall we^do nothing in aid of his great design? Is 
the gospel the appointed instrument of God for restoring 
the world to purity and peace ? Has the son of God 
died to impart this invaluable blessing to our race ? Have 
holy men of all ages toiled and suffered to diffuse it 
through the earth? and to perpetuate it to unknown 



generations; and shall we do nothing to extend the 
knowledge and honor of this salutary truth of the Word 
of eternal life ? " 

These are the words of prophets and apostles, and of 
the whole army of the faithful in past ages. They are 
the words of the fathers. Shall they not find a fitting 
response in the hearts and hands of the sons ? 

Soon after the formation of the American Bible So- 
ciety in 1816, associations auxiliary to it were formed 
extensively in the State, through which the work was 
mainly performed till the year 1849, when the State 
Society partially reoccupied its original field, and al- 
though many have continued to make their contributions 
to the National Society, the State Society has maintained 
in this city a Depository for the distribution of the Script- 
ures by sale or gift, from which have been issued one mill- 
ion one hundred and sixty thousand copies of the Script- 
ures, of which three hundred and twenty-one thousand 
were bestowed in charity. The larger portion of the 
State has several times been visited and re-supplied with 
the Scriptures, and eighty-eight thousand dollars have 
been given to the American Bible Society. The amount 
of the donations sent from the State directly to the 
treasury in New York we are unable to state, but the leg- 
acies during this period have amounted to nearly two 
hundred and seventy thousand dollars. 
• While this brief recital of the work performed by the 
friends of the Bible in our Commonwealth creates a 
feeling of regret that we have fallen so far behind our 
ability, it no less excites our gratitude that we have been 
inclined even to this extent to convey to our neighbors 
at home and our neighbors everywhere the written 
Word of God. 

During the year there have been issued from the 
Depository forty-two thousand four hundred and five 



lO 

copies of the Scriptures. One thousand nine hundred and 
ninety-two of these were in various foreign languages. 
Of the whole number, twenty-five thousand seven hun- 
dred and ninety-five were sold, and ten thousand six 
hundred and ten were given to the destitute, as follows : 
to seamen, two thousand three hundred and thirty-six ; 
City Missions, one thousand four hundred and fifty ; 
Mission Sabbath Schools, four hundred and three ; pub- 
lic institutions, seven hundred and forty-three ; destitute 
in Massachusetts, three thousand five hundred and 
eighty-one ; to the destitute in other States, eight hun- 
dred and seven ; to life members, twelve hundred and 
ninety. 

During the year the towns in Hampden County, east 
of the river, with the exception of Springfield, have been 
canvassed by a colporter, who has also visited West 
Springfield and Southwick, and a portion of Agawam. 
The towns of Westfield and Chester, and a portion of 
Agawam, have been re-supplied through the labors of the 
friends of the Bible, residing there. The work has been 
commenced in Holyoke, and it is expected that it will be 
completed in Springfield the present year. Five thou- 
sand six hundred and thirteen families were visited. 
Two thousand and seventy-three copies were sold, and 
one hundred and eighty-three donated to the poor and 
unsupplied. 

For four months and a half a colporter has been em- 
ployed in this city. His time has for the most part 
been spent in portions of the town occupied by people of 
various nationalities and of differing creeds, but living 
in a nearly uniform condition of poverty and neglect, 
and utter indifference to everything not relating to their 
material wants. Among their wretched homes he has 
labored for months without meeting a single person 
engaged in mission work. He has read the Scriptures 



II 

as opportunity ofifered, and in every practicable way 
endeavored to awaken an interest in their teach- 
ings. His heart has been cheered by the interest 
occasionally manifested in the Bible, and the apparent 
gratitude with which it has been received. In the 
course of his labors more than fifteen hundred families 
were visited, and four hundred and twenty-seven copies 
of the Scriptures, mostly portions of the Bible, were 
distributed. The statements made by our colporter 
afford painful evidence that the land of the shadow of 
death is not far from our dwellings. 

The receipts of the Society have been as follows: 
From sale of Bibles and Testaments, $8,212.83; dona- 
tions, $6,688.74 ; legacies, $8,644.19; interest and divi- 
dends, $9,240.23; bank tax return, $672.73; cash on 
hand at commencement of the year, $693.62 ; making 

a total of $34»i52.34- 

The expenditures have been as follows : Cash paid 
for Bibles and Testaments, $10,621.31; donations to 
American Bible Society, $1,395 ; salaries and gratuity, 
$4,264.87; for colportage, $1,408; rent, $700; gas, 
freight, annual report, and incidental expenses, $724.98 ; 
balance to pay Annuitant, as per contract, $15,038.13. 
In addition to the sums received into our treasury, there 
has been sent from Massachusetts to the American 
Bible Society the additional sum of $10,139, which did 
not pass through our treasury. 

The American Bible Society reports a year of unusual 
activity. Its receipts have been largely in excess of 
those of the preceding year, and its issues have reached 
the large number of one million three hundred and fifty- 
six thousand, of which number two hundred and seventy- 
two thousand were circulated in foreign lands. At 
home one hundred and twenty-two colporters have been 
employed, largely in the Southern States, and have circu- 



12 



lated one hundred and thirty-seven thousand copies. 
Among the more than one half million families visited, 
seventy thousand were found destitute of the Scriptures, 
and supplied. 

In foreign lands the year has been marked by unusual 
activity. Aid has been afforded in translating and 
printing the New Testament in Japanese, and in carry- 
ing forward the translation of the Old Testament, as 
also in translating portions of the Bible in several of the 
colloquial languages of China. The work has been 
carried on in Turkey and Egypt and Syria and Greece, 
and an agent has been appointed for Persia, and for 
Mexico. One hundred and nineteen thousand dollars 
have been appropriated for the foreign work the present 
year. The boundaries of its field are steadily enlarged 
by the increase of missionary labor, and by the growing 
* results of its own independent agency. 

There is much in the history and present condition of 
this work to awaken gratitude and quicken our zeal. 
Obstacles have been removed, new paths have been 
constantly opened, and the blessing of multitudes at 
home and abroad have rested upon it. From Bibleless 
homes in our own land, and from an awakening world, 
arises the cry, " Come over and help us." 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 



BY HON. ROBERT C. WINTHROP, LL. D., 



President of the Society. 



We come, ladies and gentlemen, to the celebration of 
our seventy-first anniversary, in fewer numbers than we 
could have desired, and in fewer numbers, I may add, 
than we had a right to expect, in view of the Cause, 
and of him who is to plead it. But we come, notwith- 
standing, with renewed gratitude to God for all that 
we have been privileged to do in the past, and with 
renewed hope and resolution to accomplish still more in 
the future. 

The report of our Trustees, which has just been read 
by our faithful Recording Secretary, Rev. Mr. Butler, 
has sufficiently informed you of the details and of the 
extent of our operations during the year which is now 
closed ; and I should in vain attempt to add anything 
either important or interesting to what is contained in 
that report. Yet I cannot refrain from a few introduc- 
tory words this afternoon. 

We are passing through a year which is likely to 



become notable in history for the great number of 
centennial or semi-centennial anniversaries of which it 
will have witnessed the celebration. Institutions of 
almost every description have held, or are preparing to 
hold, commemorative festivals of this sort during the 
present year. The Boston Natural History Society has 
recently celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. The Ameri- 
can Academy of" Arts and Sciences is to celebrate its 
hundredth anniversary on the day after to-morrow. The 
State of Massachusetts will hardly forget that her con- 
stitution of government was adopted just a hundred 
years ago. The landing of the Governor and Company 
of the Massachusetts Bay, with the charter of the Colony, 
just two hundred and fifty years ago, is to be commemo- 
rated at Salem next month. The two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the foundation of Boston is to be 
the subject of a sumptuous celebration in September. 
The first Church in Dorchester, and the old First 
Church of Boston, are to observe their two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversaries, also, in June and October respec- 
tively. I know not how many more of such occasions 
may be in contemplation for this blessed year of our 
Lord, 1880. 

Meantime I cannot forget that there is another com- 
memoration which belongs to this year, — not here, 
particularly, not to our own city, or commonwealth, or 
country, exclusively, for it is world-wide in its character, 
— and which has peculiar claims on the remembrance 
and attention of Societies like this. Reaching back for 
its subject not merely for a hundred years, or for two 
hundred, or for two hundred and fifty years, but to a 
period when there was no America on the map of the 
world, and no Columbus or Cabot to discover an Amer- 
ica, — it yet challenges an American recognition, and an 



15 

American sympathy, no less than it appeals to the hearts 
of Protestant Christians, certainly, in every land on which 
the sun shines. 

You will have anticipated me, I am sure, as referring 
to the fact that, to the year 1380 is assigned the com- 
pletion of the first translation of the whole Bible into 
the English language ; and that this is thus the 5CX)th 
year, — the semi-millennial, — of that grand work of 
John Wycliffe. To him the glory belongs of having 
been the first to give the whole Bible to the English 
people in their own tongue, without note or comment. 
He did the work heroically, in the face of threats, de- 
nunciations, and excommunications, which, — inasmuch 
as a fortunate stroke of paralysis, a few years after it 
was finished, had saved him from absolute martyrdom, — 
found their ultimate satisfaction in committing his bones 
to the flames, and casting their ashes into the sea. 

We have had better translations of the Sacred Scrip- 
tures since his day. We have had revisions and 
commentaries of all sorts, with the latest results of 
scientific discoveries, of philological criticism, and of 
archaeological researches. We welcome them all. Cer- 
tainly, we are not afraid of any of them. Moses will 
still stand as the grandest of historians and law-givers. 
David will still be the sweet Psalmist of Christendom, 
as well as of Israel. Isaiah will still startle and thrill 
and convince us by the surpassing majesty, as well as by 
the marvelous minuteness, of his sublime prophecies. 
And Jesus Christ, as portrayed in the Gospel, will be 
the same, ''yesterday, to-day, and forever." Critics and 
commentators will help us and not hurt us. No weapon 
formed against the Word of God will prosper. 

But whatever may have been done, or may still be 
done, for the Bible, that old first translation and its 



i6 

heroic author, can never fail to be remembered with 
gratitude and veneration ; and I should be sorry to have 
this occasion pass away without this brief but distinct 
recognition of his claim to no second share in the mani- 
fold anniversary honors of the year 1880. 

And now without trespassing longer on your attention, 
I hasten to present to you the Rev. Dr. Alexander 
McKenzie, who has kindly consented to deliver our 
annual discourse. 



ADDRESS. 



BY REV. ALEXANDER McKENZIE, D.D., 



OF Cambridge, Mass. 



Mr. President : — We do well year by year to come up to the 
house of the Lord to give thanks to Him for His most Holy Word. 
If its work were finished, and it were laid aside like an old ship, or a 
veteran whose campaigns are over, it has been great enough and good 
enough for a perpetual thanksgiving. If its worth and work had no 
enlargement, we should still be called upon to rejoice in the permanent 
blessings which are in it and are steadily flowing from it for the good 
of the world. But, as a matter of fact, we have new occasion for an 
annual celebration of its wealth and power, in that these are increasing 
as the years go on. The Bible never was so great as it is to-day. 
Not a line has been added to its familiar pages ; a line which had 
been added has been withdrawn. Yet the Book is larger and fuller 
than ever, and of greater value to the world. 

It is truly written that the Word of the Lord endureth forever. It 
is also written that the Word of God is not bound. Its perma- 
nence is not that of the mountain which presses down upon the plain, 
and remains the same from century to century. It is rather the per- 
manence of the tree, which keeps its identity and holds its place, yet 
sends its roots deeper down and its branches further out, and multiplies 
its leaves for the delight and refreshment of man. Rather it is the 
permanence of the man, who retains his personality, yet, if he be manly, 
increases in wisdom and love, grows in grace and in the knowledge of 



i8 

our Lord and Saviour, and makes to himself a greater power for 
good. 

If we regard the Bible in its relation to the necessities of men we 
shall mark its increased value. 

I speak especially of our English Bible when I say that men never 
needed its instruction more than now, and were never so much shut 
up to it. The truths which it was given to impart cannot lose their 
importance. In the quickened activity of our time their interest can- 
not but be enlarged. Men are searching the unseen world they live in, 
and sending their questions through the spaces where we see no 
inhabitant. Of God, and duty, and destiny they are inquiring. The 
whence and whither of life they ask to know. The chief end of 
man and the way to his chief well-being they are seeking to find. 
Whatever the motive or the spirit, these sublime themes are diligently, 
painfully pursued. Meanwhile the voices of nature grow more con- 
fused, and the voices of teachers more divided. The oracles have 
grown dumb. How far this is warranted we need not now pause to 
consider. In the extension of its territory it is necessary that know- 
ledge should be cantoned. Yet no man should be ignorant of the 
things which most concern his duty and his welfare. We cannot 
stand with both our feet on either sea or land, and be broadly 
wise ; to stand firmly we must rest on both. By the study 
of material things and physical forces we cannot come to an 
adequate knowledge of God or of ourselves. We have always 
known this. The professional students of nature are impressing the 
fact upon us. They tell us that we have sought and found too 
much in the world of which we are a part. They change our 
demonstrations to inferences. They limit the declaration of the 
heavens and the revelation of the firmament. Sometimes in a reck- 
less but sometimes in a reverent spirit they do. I do not 
speak of these things to complain of them, but to declare our indepen- 
dence. If these men do not go beyond the truth they do us no harm. 
They make it more needful that in some other way we come to the 
knowledge of ourselves and of Him who made us. They make it 
more certain that in some other way we can attain to this knowledge. 
What God does not say through the heavens, He will say, if we need 
to know it. The knowledge of material things by its increase makes it 
evident that we can know spiritual things which concern us more. 
The lessons of nature witness to the probability of a spiritual revela- 
tion which shall instruct us in that domain of our being where nature 
fails us. The rigid finger of the fossil points to the prophet of the 
voice The enlarged knowledge of the ways of God should convince 



19 

us that we can have the knowledge of God Himself. To know more 
of the body should make us sure we can know more of the soul. Our 
Lord gave men the bread which nourished the flesh that they might 
look for the bread which nourishes the spirit. 

This knowledge which we must have, for which our spirit cries out 
within us ; which the world of nature refuses to furnish, and which her 
priests tell us is not in her ; which the growth of less important learn- 
ing makes almost certain, we find here in the Book. Its voice has lost 
nothing of its distinctness or authority; it has gained in both since 
other voices have faltered and fallen under silence. More solitary 
than of old, the Bible is more grand than ever. More indispensable, 
it is more valuable. Still it answers our questions, and it will 
answer them. Deserted of the masters we come up to its serene and 
sacred bights to hear from the radiant cloud the words of eternal 
wisdom and everlasting life, " I will not leave you comfortless. 
Because I live, ye shall live also." 

Besides this increase in the relative value of the Bible, there is an 
enlargement of its absolute and intrinsic worth. 

1. It is of more worth because it is of worth to more men. 
The number of persons who read the Bible and take it for their 
guide is steadily increasing. Churches are rising up through our own 
land, and in all lands. Men who believe utterly in the Book are 
wandering through the waste places of the earth and among its 
populous countries with the open Bible in their hands. They read, 
and the people hear. Some become doers of the Word, and thus 
become its witnesses and ministers. Every year enlarges the number 
of believers. The gates of the cities turn at the coming of the 
messengers, and the closed continent lies open at their approach, with 
its broad plains and trackless jungles ; its great rivers and massive 
mountains; with its riches, and its blackness; its ivory, and its 
cruelty ; its millions of men, and no God. The book of the Acts of 
the Apostles gains new chapters. The former record has really never 
ended. It runs on like a broad, swift stream. We stand on its banks 
and watch it till it passes beyond our sight, still going on and on. 
When the writer laid aside his pen St. Paul was " preaching the king- 
dom of God, and teaching those things which concern the Lord Jesus 
Christ," and he has been preaching and teaching through the centuries 
since. Other men took up his words and have repeated them in their 
generations. The Scriptures which he received and by commandment 
enlarged have girdled the earth with their lines, and the lines are 
already twisting into a cable which will hold the continents together. 

2. The Bible is greater than ever because it is great to men more 



20 

than ever. It is not merely that more men have received it as a book. 
It has gone into the lives of more men, and become a living force in 
them. Its law has more authority, its mercy more acceptance. It has 
gained the confirmation of the conscience and assumed the control of 
the life. It is in more character and will, and therefore has more 
influence, which is to be continued and increased. A telescope is not 
made larger by having other telescopes made ; but the telescope as an 
instrument and institution is enlarged. A Bible is no greater for the 
making of other Bibles, but the Bible as an institution, and an element 
of control, is the larger. Making Bibles, and readers, and doers, makes 
the Book the more. The continual extension of the Church of God 
means the augmented power of the Word, which is the magna charta 
of His kingdom. 

3. We have to add to this that the truths of the Bible are receiving 
fresh illustrations, which at once increase their vitality and assure 
their permanent influence. I am not able to sing the whole of the 
first verse of Cowper's familiar hymn. I sing three lines with delight, 
and falter on the fourth : — 

" A glory gilds the sacred page, 
Majestic, like the sun : 
It gives a light to every age, 
It gives ." ^ 

Oh, grandly true ! But is it true that it " borrows none " ? The light 
gives itself to the surrounding atmosphere, but it draws from the 
atmosphere something, — that which makes it shine. The Bible is 
indeed independent of the age and of the world itself; but the age 
lightens its pages, and the world interprets and illustrates its teachings. 
Through the study of the works of God we better understand His 
methods as they are partially disclosed in His Word. Science is mak- 
ing a commentary on the simple annals of creation, and furnishing the 
plates which adorn and explain the text. From the prevalence of law 
and design and force discovered in the common things about us, we 
are made more sure of the force and design and law which rule in the 
higher realm of mind and spirit. The principle of the Bible, that sowing 
precedes reaping, and reaping follows sowing, both in time and in 
kind, gives to our work a distinctness of character and result which 
makes it possible to live prudently and fashion the years which are to 
be. The book of Genesis and the gospel of St. John seem unlike ; 
but they begin with the same great truths, and the deeper we read into 
the elder record, the brighter will be the path which on the later pages 
leads us into the high spiritual life of the sons of God. 



21 

Our own experience, and the combined experiences which make 
history, are giving original illustrations of the Biblical fact of a divine 
Providence. To-day the lily wears the beauty with which God has 
clothed it, and the sparrow rests in the security of His watchful care. 
We have found that the winds and waves do obey His will. If the 
miracle is over, the work remains. We cannot read history and see 
through the words without coming upon design and finding the will of 
One who rules above men and nations and events. What good men 
are working for, and devout men are praying for, and the church is 
waiting for, is becoming true, — the petition of our childish lips, " Thy 
kingdom come, Thy will be done." As of old, God raises up leaders 
and priests and prophets. The Christ finds and calls apostles. He 
rules in men. He governs events. From a brass screw comes a boat- 
load of bread for starving Turks and fighting Englishmen, and from the 
bread rises Robert College to hold up the flag of our republic above the 
Bosphorus, and bring in liberty and truth. An embroidered slipper, 
growing under a Christian woman's hands, opens the sealed doors which 
Imprison the Zenana women of India, and lets in comfort and light. 
Read the story of Christian missions to find the Bible incidents 
repeated in the signal working of God's providence in the line of 
his own plan. 

So have we accumulating evidences of His love, and mercy, and for- 
bearance. We read these and believe. The former instances make 
them clear ; but our own lives make them clearer. We believe that 
which was by reason of that which is, and this grows while we sleep. 
The love and kindness of the Bible make their own witness to its worth. 
"Truly," said a girl-wife in India, "truly your Bible must have been 
written by a woman, it contains so many kind things about us." This 
entrance of its mercy into stricken lives, giving them comfort and hope, 
makes the mercy more. We comprehend the pity and gentleness of 
the Word when we find the living illustration of its compassion. 
Prayer never had so much confirmation as now glorifies it. The 
interceding prophet, the importunate widow, the suppliant mother, 
. the beseeching publican, have been a thousand times repeated since 
they passed on. The Bible is rich in its witnesses when it would teach 
us to pray. But it is growing richer in those whom the centuries bring 
forward, in the multitudes who to-day throng about its mercy-seat, and 
come boldly to its throne of grace. 

Thus it is that the truths of the Bible are more and more strongly 
asserted and confirmed and illustrated as year succeeds to year. 

The very sentences of Holy Scripture have in many instances 
acquired an independent character which has enhanced their value 



22 

and the power of the Book in which they belong, from which they 
derive their force. They have taken hold upon human experience, and 
given expression to the highest and deepest thoughts of men. This has 
added to their meaning and worth. The call of our Lord to those 
who labor and are heavy laden ; the beatitudes, which lie aa a benedic- 
tion on good men's lives ; the evangel in the gospel, with its declaration 
of God's love for the world ; the cry of the publican for mercy ; the 
resolve of the prodigal to go home ; the question of the jailer at 
Philippi, and its answer, — these have a being of their own. There is 
a separate personality in the Saviour's last prayer with His disciples ; 
in St. Paul's description of charity, and in his triumphant portrayal of 
the resurrection. One after another we find these true, and thence- 
forth they are more true than ever. 

The Psalms have much of their power in that they are the utterance 
of real life in its changes. The men believed, knew, felt ; therefore 
they wrote. We see the hand of God, and we see the heart of man. 
Such men have never ceased to be. Names change, life keeps its 
course. The thoughtful man, whose years are many, can sing the 
psalter through, and set his own name for the pronouns. It has been 
called the " sacred book of the world." How old it is, and it is ever 
young. The churches have worshiped in its inspiring strains, rising 
in its exultation, bowing in its confession and lament. The people have 
sung its melodies, — merchants, sailors, ploughmen ; sages, soldiers, 
priests ; mothers with their children, kings with their people. Finely 
has the story been told before. Cromwell led his men to victory at 
Dunbar with the 68th Psalm ; Luther strengthened his heart with the 
vigor of the Psalms. Wallace had his psalter hung before him at his 
execution, and died with his eyes fixed upon it. Polycarp, Hildebrand, 
Huss, Columbus, Xavier, Melancthon, Jewell, gave their last breath to 
the words of a psalm. One psalm alone has engraved itself on the 
lives of men. The penitence of the contrite soul has loved to breathe 
out its miserere. Thomas Arnold had the 51st Psalm read to him when 
he lay dying, and John Rogers recited it as he went to the stake. 
Jeremy Taylor transformed it into a prayer. Lady Jane Grey repeated 
its cry for mercy as she ascended the scaffold, and Sir Thomas More 
as he laid his head upon the block. Augustine had written on the 
wall opposite the bed where he lay sick, "The sacrifices of God 
are a broken spirit," and Bernard passed on with this verse upon 
his lips. We draw these instances from other days. They might 
be found nearer to our time and in our time. The Hebrew 
parchment lives in the reverent sentence which looks down from 
the Royal Exchange in London, down on the busy streets and the 



23 

hurrying throng of men claiming ownership and holding in brief 
possession : 

** The earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof.*' 

When our ancient and honored university sought words of blessing for 
her sons, the lesson of her watchful centuries, the embodiment of her 
faith, she found them not in the classic poet and philosopher, or the 
Roman orator, but in the scroll of the Hebrew, prophet. The words 
stand back to back with the names of men who have died for their coun- 
try, face to face with men who are living for their country. In that su- 
preme moment when the fond mother gives the men to their work, over 
their heads they can read the legend of her hope, Qui autem docti 
fuerint fulgebunt — " They that be wise shall shine as the brightness 
of the firmament ; and they that turn many to righteousness, as the 
stars for ever and ever." 

Thus more and more is the Bible making illustrations of itself. 
Men are raised up steadily who confirm the power of its teachings. 
They stand with us and share our life. Every year produces them, and 
in the act gives us more for which to rejoice in the Word of our God. 

4. We are able at this time to recognize the increased value of the 
Bible in the fact of the new version soon to be given to the world. 

It is strong testimony to the hold which our English Bible has 
upon the hearts of the people, and to their conviction of its sanctity, 
extending even to the English words it uses, that there has been a 
tacit consent to let the work of improvement be so long delayed. 
The common heart, loving the words upon which it has been nurtured, 
has been unwilling to have them changed. " They are good enough," 
the people have said. 

It is testimony, also, to the intelligence with which the Bible is 
held, to the reason which is not superstition, and to the faith which is 
more than attachment, that the thoughtful readers of the Book have 
cheerfully yielded to the wisdom of Christian scholars when they have 
said that they were able to improve the work of the Christian scholars 
who wrought so nobly in their day, whose work has lived by right and 
ruled by righteousness. The researches of the intervening centuries 
have brought us nearer to the words which " holy men of God spake 
as they were moved by the Holy Ghost." They have brought also 
the ability to transfer the thoughts of God into our mother tongue with 
greater accuracy. The time has come when the church and the world 
should have the advantage of these prolonged studies and labors. 
Reverent scholars, in the spirit of their predecessors, loving the 
Book and confident of its divine power, are making the knowl- 



24 

edge of the few the possession of the many. We shall keep the 
old and strengthen it with the new» It will be more than ever 
the Word of God. The Bible has had many versions as it has 
gone out to the nations. The entrance into a new country means 
the entrance of the Scriptures into the language of the country. 
As the gospel went eastward, the Greek changed to the Syriac. 
When it went westward, it passed into the Latin. It has been 
transformed into the, languages of the world, that the marvel of 
Pentecost might be repeated, and every man hear it in his own 
tongue wherein he was born. Our English Bible is a monument to 
the growth of learning and piety. It is not the work of one man 
or one time. It has this advantage over the other vernacular versions, 
that it is the result of the protracted labors of many men, working 
apart and working together. The words on the title page of our 
Bible are a disclosure of the methods of its making, — "Translated 
out of the original tongues, and with the former translations diligently 
compared and revised." This is the method of the new version, which 
is to use the resources which diligence has acquired. 

The gain is evident. It is worth something to be able to make this 
fresh assertion of our confidence in the Book. Our ripest scholarship 
presents to the world its ripest fruit, and it is the Scriptures of the 
Old and New Testaments. It is worth something to be able to silence 
the unfriendlv and untrue assertion that the friends of the Bible knew 
it to be full of errors, and did not dare to correct them, or to inform the 
people of their existence. The truth is that the deviations of our 
version from the best Greek manuscripts have been well known. Not 
only have they been known to the clergy, but they have been stated 
with the utmost frankness in the numberless commentaries and other 
treatises which have been placed before all intelligent men and women. 
The new version is to gather up these separate suggestions, determine 
their value and set them in their places, that they may be read con- 
veniently and with confidence. Students will find little that is new, 
but they will find an orderly arrangement of all that is good, made by 
hands competent for the pious work. Preeminently the new version is 
in the interest of the people. The value of it is in this : that they will 
read with greater accuracy what it has pleased God to have written in 
the Book which for evermore bears His name. 

Let it be known that Protestantism has no secrets. It keeps 
nothing under lock and key. Its records lie open. It has but one 
book of divine authority, and that it offers to the sage and to the child. 
It gives its best and all its best to every one who will receive it. 
Within and without its illumined pages it writes its word of liberty 



25 

and intelligence, that " no prophecy of the Scriptures is of any private 
interpretation." 

We turn the pages down which the hands of holy men have traced 
the thought of God, over which has run the sanctifying blood of the 
martyrs of the truth, out of which have come courage, and peace, and 
life for the heroes of the church and the benefactors of the world ; and 
as we turn, we may read with a liberal expectation the promise of our 
Lord, that "when He, the spirit of truth, is come. He will guide you 
into all truth." 

For the greater Bible let us have the greater thankfulness to-day. 

5. We may increase this by our confidence that the Bible is to be 
more truly esteemed, and therefore better read, in the time to come. 
From the furnace into which its sentences have been cast, sometimes 
cruelly, they come out to win the admiration of good men. We feel 
sure of the result. The Bible is to hold its p ace. We believe that it 
is to have a higher place than it has held, and a deeper and broader 
influence. I think I interpret correctly the confidence with which we 
keep this anniversary. We mourn, and with reason, that something of 
the reverent homage which has been paid the book has perished or 
been obscured. It is much to be regretted. The reverence may 
return. Meantime there is something on the other side. I think upon 
it for my comfort, now that we need the solace of hope. I trust it 
will commend itself to you. This is not demonstration, but confidence 
and expectation. If the Bible is read by many with more questioning, 
it seems to be read by some with more thinking. There is more pains 
to find out what is written. Perhaps the Bible was never studied 
more earnestly than now, perhaps never more intelligently. If the 
right to judge and separate is carried too far, possibly what is retained 
has the greater force. We are able to distinguish between inspiration 
and truthfulness. We wish devoutly that all persons held the high 
belief in the inspiration of the Bible which has always characterized 
this Society. That may come. While we wait for it, we are permitted 
to see that a man's belief in the Bible as a revelation from God may 
be defective, while yet he accepts its teachings and acknowledges the 
duty to obey them. If he be sincere in this, he must be led to some- 
thing better than he has. If, as we believe, the Bible is growing in 
value, it will grow in power. People will find it out ; then they will 
read it better. We can trust and wait. 

Out of the present confusion we are quite sure to come into a more 
settled state, when truth will be clearer. Then the Bible will be 
greater. In this we have a common interest. We can have nothing 
to fear. The Book will always be God's Word to us. The 



26 

human element, of which so much is made when men would speak 
lightly of it, has two sides. We can present the other. If they 
were men who wrote, they were men. If they brought their 
infirmities to the writing, as we are told, they brought their in- 
telligence also. Those things can hardly be absurd or incredible 
which men like Moses and Isaiah, John and Paul, believed in all the 
intensity of their character. They had better means than we of know- 
ing whereof they wrote, and they wrote. By all their manhood 
and good sense they will stand as good witnesses to their own 
words. The introduction of the human element is not against us 
but for us. 

The future may bring many discoveries ; we have no cause to fear 
them. If they bring us anything better than the Bible, then we gain 
by that ; if only that which is inferior, we have our common sense left. 
Let the light shine ; let it burn. If any belief turn to ashes, we will 
warm ourselves in the fire whose light gleams upon our face and shines 
along our path. 

In view of these considerations, it is safe to say that the Bible w^ill 
be read better than in the time past ; not by all men, but by those 
who read it. It will mean more to them. The evidence of its divinitv 
will be larger. Its claim to peculiar confidence will be recognized. 
It will be the guide of men in practical righteousness. 

We are becoming reasonably sure of some things. This period of 
disorder and questioning will be succeeded by a period of conviction 
and quiet. Changes may come, but changes will be followed by 
repose. Such is the course of events. What we already know, we are 
to use ; and as the knowledge improves, the results of it will be larger. 

We are to read on from what we know into what we need to know ; 
from the alphabet into the literature. W^e are now sure of God, and 
duty, and immortality ; keeping to these we advance into more light, 
and as we move, the truth will win the commendation of our conscience 
in the sight of God. What has come by the years, let it be received by 
the years, while with a patient searching we find new treasures day by 
day. To the obedient truth will come. The willing man shall know 
the will of God. Every child, every child-like spirit, shall be taught. 
As the Bible has become greater in itself, so can we become greater to 
hold it and be blessed by it. Thus shall we be greater to give it 
to the world. We may not see its immediate influence as did the 
fathers. The times have changed. It was a dull and blind world into 
which the English Bible entered. ** All the prose literature of England, 
save the forgotten tracts of Wyclif, has grown up since the translation 
of the Bible by Tyndall and Coverdale. So far as the nation at large 



27 

was concerned, no history, no romance, hardly any poetry, save the 
little known verse of Chaucer, existed in the English tongue when the 
Bible was ordered to be set up in the churches. . . . For the moment, 
however, its literary effect was less than its social. . . . But far greater 
than its effect on literature or social phrase was the" eflFect of the 
Bible on the character of the people at large. The Bible was as yet 
the one book which was familiar to every Englishman." 

Its influence, has continued. It is not less real because less striking. 
It has done a deep work which will not pass away. The Bible is 
needed to preserve and enlarge this. New generations need the old 
truth, which is ever new. The strangers entering our gates must be 
met by the man with the Book. The ships which traverse the seas 
must bear its comfort, and strength, and companionship on their lonely 
and perilous way. The isles wait for it. The countless millions whom 
we are just touching must have its wisdom and grace. The Book will 
bless man. As in the watered Relds in its own prophetic page, 
everything that liveth, which moveth, whithersoever it shall come, shall 
live. Let Tyndall speak to us as we go hence, " For we have not 
received the gifts of God for ourselves only, or for to hide them ; but 
for to bestow them." 

We have received, and are receiving. We will give, and let the 
light shine brighter and yet brighter unto the perfect day. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the commit- 
tee appointed for that purpose, reported a plan for carrying into effect 
the object of this association ; which, being read from the chair, was 
considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with one amend- 
ment, accepted and adopted as follows, viz. : 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles 
and Testaments to be distributed among all persons inhabiting within 
the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, 
and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled clergy- 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who shall 
in writing, request to be members ; of every person who shall sub- 
scribe to pay annually to the treasurer a sum not less than two dol- 
lars, and who shall remain a member so long as he continues the 
payment of that sum ; and of every person who shall subscribe and 
pay to the treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars, he remaining a 
member during life, without being obliged to further contributions. 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direction 
of the committee appointed to report a plan for the organization of 
the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained, notice 
shall be given by the committee, and also of the time and place of 
the meeting of the Society. 



30 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a president, treasurer, 
corresponding secretary, and a recording secretary, who shall con- 
tinue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until successors 
are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen other 
members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom six shall 
be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a board of 
trustees. 

5. The trustees or the greater part of them present at any meet- 
ing, of which public notice shall be given by the president, treasurer, 
or recording secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among the members 
of the Society, a committee of three persons, to continue in office 
during the pleasure of the board of trustees, who shall have the man- 
agement of the fund, and the distribution of the books procured with 
it, subject and according to such regulations and directions as shall 
from time to time be prescribed by the trustees at any meeting held 
on public notice given as aforesaid ; and the treasurer shall pay the 
moneys in his hands to the order of the said committee. 

6. The trustees shall apply to the legislature for an act to incor- 
porate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes aforesaid, 
and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into effect the pur- 
poses of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on regu- 
lar notice being given, for the due exercise of all the powers granted 
by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the president, treasurer, or recording 
secretary, to devise and adopt such further measures as may be neces- 
sary for preserving the institution, and for effecting the intentions of 
the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the constitution, the trustees peti- 
tioned the general court, and obtained the following act of incorpo- 
ration. 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 



Cotnmontoraltf) of iBBMSLt^uantfi* 

In the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Whereas, the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with many 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in com- 
mon use in the churches in New England, for distribution among all per- 
sons inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the 
sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects 
of said Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Society 
more extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an 
Act of Incorporation. 

Section i. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives, in General Court assembled, and by authority of the same. That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D. D., 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D.,the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D. D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. 
Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph 
Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, 
Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. 
Samuel H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who 
may hereafter associate, with them for the purpose aforesaid, be, and 
they hereby are, incorporated into a Society, by the name of The Bible 
Society of Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legisla- 
ture, and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said 
Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any persons dis- 
posed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any grants or 
devises of land and tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, 
bequests, and subscriptions of money, or other property, to be used and 
improved for the purposes aforesaids. 



32 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted^ That the said Corporation shall be, 
and hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That the said Sodety may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted, That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such rules 
and regulations as to thein shall appear necessary, provided the same be 
not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further en€u:ted, That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said 
Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and 
place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the 
same ; may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and 
may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by 
the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable 
to the principles of this institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Ap- 
P'^oved by the Governor, Feb, /j", i8io. 



Commontoealtt^ of ina00aci)U0ett0« 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-five. An Act in addition to an Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section i. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafter be known by 
the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name 
shall have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to 
all its liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had 
not been changed. 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, 
and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English lan- 
guage, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now 
authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in 
common use in the churches in New England, anything in the Act incor- 
porating the said Society to the contrary notwithstanding. — Approved 
by the Governor, Feb, 2y, i86s» 



BY-LAWS. 



At the annual meeting of the Society, May 28, 185 1, the follow- 
ing by-laws were adopted : 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its act of 
incorporation ; namely, " The raising of a fund by voluntary contribu- 
tion, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State ^nd elsewhere, who 
are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conve- 
niently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE n. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the State, may become a member of this Society by signifying 
his request in writing to that effect to the recording secretary, who 
shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become members, in a 
book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued ; and the treasurer shall keep a 
list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the treasurer not less than twenty 
dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the Society for 
life, and shall be so enrolled by the recording secretary. 



34 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a president, fourteen vice- 
presidents, corresponding secretary, recording secretary, treasurer, and 
eighteen trustees, and an auditor. The president, vice-presidents, 
corresponding and recording secretaries, and treasurer, shall each be 
ex-officio members of the board of trustees, and the recording secre- 
tary shall be the recording officer of that board. These officers shall 
all be chosen by ballot at the annual meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The president shall be ex-officio chairman of the board of trus- 
tees ; and he, and also the vice-presidents and secretaries and treas- 
urer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such officers 
respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of 
the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the act of incor- 
poration is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the duties 
of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all funds and 
donations, and generally have and possess all the power and authorit)* 
vested by the act aforesaid in the Society. It shall be their duty, 
however, at every annual meeting, to make and lay before the Society' 
a particular report of. all their doings, with all such documents and 
vouchers as may be asked for by any member ; and such report shall 
be had and considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice 
of trustees for the year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be holden on the Mon- 
day preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and at this 
meeting it shall be competent to transact any business which the 
Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall be given by 
the recording secretary at least seven days before the holding thereof, 
by notice published in at least one newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by the 
trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three newspapers 
published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at such 
meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 



35 



ARTICLE X. 



The trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as they 
may direct or as the president may at any time call. Five trustees 
shall be a quorum to transact business. 



ARTICLE XI. 

The trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually, 
shall choose from their own body an executive committee, a commit- 
tee on agencies, and a committee on the depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The executive committee shall have the management of the funds, 
and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with them ; the 
committee on agencies shall have the direction of all matters con- 
nected with the agencies of the Society, the appointment of all agents, 
subject to the approval of the trustees, and the defining of their 
respective duties ; the committee on the depository shall have the 
management of all matters connected with the Society's depository 
for the sale of Bibles — all of said committees at all times, however, to 
be subject to the direction and control of the trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These by-laws may be repealed or amended at any annual meet- 
ing, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, by vote of 
a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE MEMBERS. 

Each life member of this Society shall be allowed to receive from 
the depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles and Tes- 
taments. 

N. B. The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued only for 
the current not ior past years. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



BARNSTABLB COUNTY. 

West Barnstable Cong, church, 
Falmouth, First Cong, church, 
Yarmouth, First Cong, church, 

BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Attleboro, Second Cong, church, 
EUiston Cong, church, 
Norton, Wheaton Cong, church, 
Taunton, Winslow Cong, church, 




^5.85 

$34.30 

4.25 
50.00 

8.50 





$87.05 


BSSBX COUNTY. 




Beverly, Washington St. Cong, ch.. 


$11.04 


Amesbury Mills Cong, church, 


10.50 


Andover Chapel, 


68.56 


Bradford Cong, church. 


101.70 


Gloucester, Evangl. Cong, church, 


3500 


Groveland Cong, church. 


6.00 


Ipswich, South Cong, churdi, 


17.00 


First Cong, church. 


32-95 


Lynn, Central Cong, church, 


14.00 


First Cong, church, 


5.a8 


L>-nnfield Center, A Friend, 


I. CM 


Lawrence, South Cong, church. 


3-75 


Andover, South Cong, church, 


50.00 


Danvers, Maple St. Cong. ch. and 




Sabbath school (2 l. m.), 


40.00 


(Georgetown, First Cong, church. 


4.a5 


Newburyport, Whitfield Cong, church, 


10.24 


Belleville Cong, church. 


62.00 


West Newbury, Cong, church, 


5.00 


Salem, South Cong, church. 


33.01 


Crombie St. Cong, church, 


54.00 


Saugus, Cong, church. 


4.07 


Topsfield, Cong, church. 


18.04 




$587.39 


FRANKLIN COU.STV. 




Conway, Cong, church. 


$29.05 


Greenfield, First Cong, church, 


5- 50 


Shelbume, Cong, church, 


"•95 



HAMPDBN COUNTY. 

Chicopee, Cong, church, 
Longmeadow, Gents' Benev. Assoc., 
Longmeadow, Ladies* Benev. Assoc., 



Monson, Cong, church, 
Mitteneague, Cong, church, 
Palmer, Second Cong, church, 
Springfield, South Cong, church. 

Olivet Cong, church, 
West Springfield, First church, 
Wilbraham, 
West Springfield, A Friend, 



HAMPSHIRB COUNTY. 

Belchertown. Cong, church, 
Amherst, North Cong, church. 
North Hadley, Cong, church, 
Greenwich, Rev. E. P. Blodgett, 



9.15 
10.4a 
25.00 
15.10 
14.48 
a6.oo 
17.05 

t.oo 

$176.50 



$46.50 I 

$21.00 ! 

«6.75 
»8.55 




$74.53 



MIDDLBSSX COUNTY. 

Holliston, Cong, church. 
Concord Union Bible Society, 
Acton, Cong, church, 
Ashby, Cong, church, 
Ashland, Cong, church, 
Ariington, Cong, church, 
Cambridgeport, Prospect St. Cong, ch., 
Framingham, Plymouth Cong, church. 
Harvard, Evangl. Cong, church, 

Hopkinton, Cong, church. 

South Framingham, Cong, church, 

Littleton, Ortho. Cong, church, 

Peppcrell, Cong, church, 

Lowell, First Cong, church, 

Newton, Eliot Cong, church, 

Somerville, Franklin St. Cong, church, 

Saxonville, Edwards Cong, church, 

Southboro, Cong, church, 

Sudbury, Cong, church, 

Sherbom, Ladies Benev. Asso. (1 l. m.), 

Townsend, M. E. church, 

Townsend, Cong, church, 

Tewksbury, Cong, church, 

Waltham, Cong, church, 

Waverly, Cong, church, 
Lowell, Kirk St. Cong, church. 



$18.00 

91.00 

6.00 

435 

12.00 
25.00 

3i-»4 
4.00 

6.25 

33-49 
81.50 

5-75 
19.04 

43-59 
5.00 
9.00 

21.10 

9-43 
9.00 

2aoo 
3.50 
5.50 

2aoo 

35.48 
21.86 

"4-57 
$634.45 



37 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Cohasaet, Cong, church, $9*4> 

Braintree, First Cong, church, 12.04 

Dedham, First Cong, church, 40.20 

Franklin, First Cong, church, 8.23 

Grantville, Cong, church, 48.29 

Hingharo, Evangl. Cong, church, 16.85 

Holbrook, Winthrop Cong, church, 21.68 

Yearly Bequest, E. N. H., 200.00 

Yearly Bequest, E. E. H., 25.00 

Hyde Park, Cong; church, 1 1.74 

South Abington, Cong, church, 16.84 

Foxboro, Cong, church, >9>5o 

East Medway, Cong, church, 8.50 

West Medway, Cong, church, 13-83 

South Weymouth, Union Cong, ch., 10.00 

Second Cong, church (i l. m.), 20.00 

Randolph, Clara Belcher, .60 

Weymouth, Holman F. Vickery, 5.00 

Weymouth and Braintree, Cong. ch.. 23.50 

Walpole, Cong, church, 12.25 

Wellesley, Rev. P. D. Cowan, 10.00 

$543.47 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Bridgewater, Central Sq. Cong. ch. 

(1 L. M.), S22.50 
Brocton, Miss Deborah S. Thayer 

(i L. M.), 20.00 

Lakeville, Cong, church, 23.12 

Marshfield, Ortho. Cong, church, 7.09 

Middleboro, First Cong, church, i4-7S 

Plympton, Cong, church, 4.46 

Plymouth, Pilgrimage Cong, church, 14.59 

Scituate, Cong, church, 6.19 





$112.70 


SUFFOLK COyNTY. 




Boston, Old South church, 


#149.20 


A Friend, 


1.00 


Baptist Bethel, 


4.78 


Nancy B. Curtis, 


100.00 


E H. Sampson, 


20.00 


Dorchester, Village church. 


12.91 


Roxbury, Imnuuiuel Cong, church. 


1.00 



S288.89 

WORCXSTBR COUNTY. 

Blackstone, Cong, church, lM.36 

Brookfield, Evangl. Cong, church, 20.00 

North Brookfield, First Cong, church, 50.00 

Gardner, First Cong, church, 15.00 

Globe Village, Evangl. Free church, 23.02 

Gilbertrille, Cong, church, 41-37 

Fitchburg, Rollstone Cong, church, 8.00 

Oxford, First Cong, church, 13.35 



East DougUss, Cong, church, 10.40 

Leominster, Orthodox Cong, church, 4.50 

North Cong, church, 2.75 

Millbury, Second Cong, church, 5.00 

Princeton, Cong, church, 5.00 

Spencer, J. L. Bush, 1,000.00 

Sutton, Cong, church, i9>73 

Uxbridge, Evangl. Cong, church, 15.00 

Warren, First Cong, church, (5.00 

Westboro, Evangl. church and soc., 54.20 

Winchester, Cong, church, 63.52 

Winchendon, North Cong, church, i9>o9 

Worcester, Central Cong, church, 88.35 

West Brookfield, Cong, church, 18.00 

Whitinsville, Cong, church, 786.67 

Westfield, First Cong, church, 20.50 

Second Cong, church, 20.50 

Baptist church, i3<5o 

M. E. church, 13.00 

West Boylston, Cong, church, 7.44 

$2,363.27 



MISCSLLANEOUS. 

E. Sanderson, agent, 
Hampden Benev. Assoc. Int. Ace., 
Great Falls, N. H., First Cong, ch., 
N. E. Conference M. E. ch. (15 l. u.\ 
Springfield, C. £. Thompson, 



S1.48 
12.00 

7-50 

345.17 

1. 00 

$367-15 



COLLSCTIONS. 

T'Ar following sums have been received /rom 

Protestant Episcopal Churches and /or- 

warded to the A m. BiHe Society : 

Trinity church, Boston, $860.00 

Emanuel church, Boston, 336.00 

St. Paul's church, Boston. 84.00 



$1,280.00 



LBGACISS. 

Tewksbury, Estate of Wm. Taylor. $891.30 
Dedham, from Est. of Josh. Bingham, 250.00 
Methuen, balance of bequest, J. F. 

Ingalls, 12.50 

Portland, Me., bequest of Sarah Chase, 10.00 
Hadley, from bequest C. B. Smith, 425.00 

Newburyport, from estate of Anna W. 

Noyes, 2,000.00 

Marion, balance bequest John Pitcher, 35.89 
Boston, from Moses Day estate, 5,000.00 

Leominster, additional from estate of 

Dolly Johnson, 42.00 

$8,666.69 



Form of a Bequest to the Society. 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Massachusetts Bible S«)ci- 
ETY, incorporated in the year eighteen hundred and ten, the sum 

of to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of tht* 

Society. 



Letters relating to Agencies, or to the general interests and 
policy of the Society, should be directed to the Rev. Daniel I*it- 
LER, Recording Secretary, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 



Remittances for books, donations from churches and indi- 
viduals, and orders for books, should be addressed to Rev. Elijah 
Cutler, Agent, 8 Beacon Street, Boston. 

E. Cutler, A^t-nt 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESENTED BY THE TRUSTEES 



OF TUB 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 



AT THEIR ANNUAL MEETING. IX BOSTON, 



MAY 23, 18S1. 



HBINU THEIR 



SEVENTY-SECOND ANNIVERSARY, 



BOSTON: 
DEPOSITORY, S BEACON STREET, 

iSSi. 







^'' f'F-B v-r: 



■■- o- 



I 



24 



1 ' 



OFFICERS 



OP THE 



Massachusetts Bible Society, 1881-82. 

President. 
Hon. ROBERT C. WINTHROP, LL. D. 

Vice-Presidents. 

Hon. JACOB SLEEPER, Suffolk County. 

WILLIAM C. PLUNKETT, Esq., Berkshire County. 

Hon. timothy W. CARTER, Hampden County. 

Hon. WILLIAM HYDE, Hampshire County. 

Hon. WILLIAM B. WASHBURN, LL. D., Franklin County. 

STEPHEN SALISBURY, Esq., Worcester County. 

CHARLES P. WHITIN, Esq., Worcester County. 

Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN. LL. D., Middlesex County. 

Hon. MILTON M. FISHER. Norfolk County. 

JAMES S. AMORY, Esq., Norfolk County. 

Hon. JOHN A. HAWES, Bristol County. 

ELISHA TUCKER, Esq., Plymouth County. 

JAMES B. CROCKER, Esq., Barnstable County. 

EDWARD S. MOSELEY, Esq., Essex County. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Rev. GEORGE W. BLAGDEN, D. D. 

Recording Secretary. 
Rev. DANIEL BUTLER. 

Treasurer. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 

Auditor. • 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 

General Agent. 
Rev. ELIJAH CUTLER. 

Trustees. 



Rbv. JOHN O. MEANS, D. D. 
rbv. chandler ROBBINS, D. D. 

Rbv. ANDREW P. PEABODY, D. D. 
Rbv. WILLARD F. MALLALIEU, D. D. 
Rbv. PHILLIPS BROOKS, D. D. 
Bishop RANDOLPH S. FOSTER, D. D. 
Rbv. EDMUND F. SLAFTER. 
Rbv. EDWARD S. ATWOOD. 
Prof. ALVAH HOVEY, D. D. 



Hon. CHARLES T. RUSSELL. 
THEOPHILUS R. MARVIN, Esq. 
CHARLES HENRY PARKER, Esq. 
HEZEKIAH S. CHASE, Esq 
AMOS W. STETSON, Esq. 
GEORGE P. DENNY, Esq. 
Hon. E. ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
Hon. JOHN P. PUTNAM. 
ALDEN SPEARE, Esq. 



Executive Committee. 

TO WHOM APPLICATIONS ARB TO BB MADB FOR BIBLBS. 

Rev. John O. Means, D. D., Charles Henry Parker, Esq., 

Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 



Officers of the Society from 1809 to 1881. 



Hon. William Phillips 
Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Hon. Samuel Greenleaf, LL. D. 



Rev. John Lathrop, D. D. 

Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D. . 

Rev. Henry Ware, D. D. . 

Rev. John Codman, D. D. 

Hon. Simon Greenleaf, LL. D. 

Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 

Rev. NathM Frothingham, D. D. 

Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. 

William C. Plunkett, Esq. 

Edward Southworth, Esq. 

John P. Willbton, Esq. . 

Hon. William B. Washburn. LL. D. 

Stephen Salisbury, Esq. 

Charles P. Whitin, Esq. . 

Lee Claflin, Esq. 



Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckrainster 
Rev. Samuel Thacher 
Rev. Charles Lowell, D. D. 



Rev. John Pierce, D. D. . 
Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. 
Rev. Cyrus P. Grosvenor . 
Rev. James D. Knuwles . 
Rev. William Jenks, D. D. 



Samuel H. Walley, Esq. 
Hon. Peter O. Thacher 
John Tappan, Esq. . 



Presidents. 




. 1809-J7 


Hon. Richard Fletcher, LL. D. 


■ »854-59 


. 1827-49 


Hon. Samuel H. Walley . 


. 1859-78 


. 1849-54 


Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, LL. D. . 


1878 


Vice-Presidents. 




. 1809-16 


Caleb Holbrook, Esq. 


. 1862-75 


. 1816-28 


James S. Amory, Esq. 


1862 


. 1828-44 


Hon. John H. CliflFord, LL. D. 


1862-76 


. 1844-48 


Elisha Tucker, Esq. . 


1862 


. 1848-49 


James B. Crocker, Esq. . 


1862 


• 1849-53 


E. S. Moseley, Esq 


1862 


. 1853-61 


Charles A. Jessup, Esq. . 


1870-72 


. 1861-72 


Hon. William Claflin, LL. D. . 


1S71 


. 1862 


Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D. D. 


1872-78 


1862-70 


Hon. William Hyde . ! 


1872 


1862-72 


Hon. Timothy W. Carter . 


. 1873 


. 1862 


Hon. Milton M. Fisher . 


1875 


. 1862 


Hon. John A. Hawes 


1876 


. 1862 


Hon. Jacob Sleeper . 


187S 


1862-70 
rrespondini 


g Secretaries. 




1809-13 


Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 


, 1818-4V) 


1813-17 


Rev. NathM L. Frothingham, D. D 


1849-53 


. 1817-18 
iiecording 


Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 
Secretaries. 


■ 1853 


. 180Q-2S 


Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D. 


. 1839-44 


. 1828-30 


Rev. William M. Rogers . 


. 1844-45 


. 1830-31 


Rev. George W. Blagden. D. D. 


. » 845-49 


. 1831-31 


Rev. George Richards 


. 1849-52 


• 1832-39 


Rev. Daniel Butler 


. 1852 


Treas 


urers. 





1809-11 I Henry Edwards, Esq. 
1811-12 George R. Sampson, Esq. 
1812-35 Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 



1835-49 
1849-62 

1862 



Executive Committee. 



Rev. William E. Channing, D. D. 
Hon. Jonathan Phillips 
Stephen Higginson, Esq. . 
Rev. Francis Parkman, D. D. . 
Edward Tuckerman, Esq. 
Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., D. D. . 
Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner, D. D. 
Charles Tappan, Esq. 
Rev. Francis Parkman, T). D. . 



1809-18 
1809-16 
1809-15 
1815-18 
1816-30 
i8i«-3o 
1 82 1-35 
1830-40 
1832-35 



Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D 
Henry Edwards, Esq. 
Rev. George Richards 
George R. Sampson, Esq. . 
Hon. Albert Fearing . 
Rev. John O. Means, D. D. 
Charles Henry Parker, Esq. 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper . 



1835-39 

1840-49 

1849-60 

1849-62 

1853-76 

i860 

1862 

1876 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Seventy-second Annual Meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Bible Society was held at the Rooms of the 
Society, No. 8 Beacon Street, on Monday, May 24, at 
10 o clock, the Vice-President, the Hon. Jacob Sleeper, 
in the chair. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting were read 
and approved. 

The Report of the Treasurer, Chas. Henry Par- 
ker, Esq., was presented and accepted. 

The officers of the Society were then elected for the 
coming year. 

Adjourned. 



REPORT. 



During the past year there have been circulated from 
the Depository thirty-four thousand and forty-nine vol- 
umes. Of these, eight thousand nine hundred and forty- 
one were Bibles; thirteen thousand two hundred and 
twenty-one New Testaments; three thousand and ninety- 
nine Testaments with the Psalms, and eight thousand 
seven hundred and eighty-eight smaller portions of the 
Bible. Of these, twenty-two thousand two hundred and 
seventy were sold, and eleven thousand seven hundred 
and seventy were bestowed in charity, as follows: 
through Life Members, eleven hundred and seventy; to 
sailors, two thousand seven hundred and sixteen ; to the 
poor in this city, mainly through those appointed to 
labor among them, one thousand seven hundred and 
forty-one ; to mission Sabbath schools, five hundred and 
sixty-six ; to charitable and penal institutions, four hun- 
dred and seven ; to the destitute and poor in Massachu- 
setts, three thousand seven hundred and forty-seven; to 
the destitute in other States, seven hundred and eighty- 
two; to the Young Men's Christian Association, four 
hundred and twenty-nine ; to Christian work in Portu- 
gal, two hundred and twelve. Of the whole number, 
one thousand six hundred and fifteen were in various 
foreign languages. 

During the greater part of the year, a colporter has 
been employed in canvassing the towns in the northern 
and western portions of Worcester County. In Middle- 



8 

sex, the towns of Groton, Pepperell, Tyngsborough, Dun- 
stable, and Tewksbury have been supplied. In Spring- 
field, the work has been begun, and will, it is expected, 
be completed during the year. For three months a col- 
porter has been employed in Boston. He called upon 
nearly eleven hundred families, representing every na- 
tionality known among us. By earnest address, accom- 
panied frequently by prayer, he endeavored to gain en- 
trance for the Word to homes as yet unblest by its influ- 
ence. An extract from his report discloses one of his 
methods of working : " I have adopted the practice of 
giving a copy of the New Testament to such children as 
have it not, on two conditions: ist, They shall promise 
me that they will, unless unavoidably prevented, read 
daily ten verses in course to their mothers ; 2d, That 
they will commit to memory weekly one verse of Script- 
ure, beginning with the Sermon on the Mount, and 
recite it to their mother. I have learned that one of the 
young misses to whom I gave a Testament on the 
above conditions, has hopefully experienced its renewing 
power in her heart and life." Over ten thousand fami- 
lies have been visited, and one hundred and ninety poor 
and destitute supplied. Two hundred and fifty-two indi- 
viduals for the time being not connected with families, 
have also been supplied. 

Experience has abundantly demonstrated the value of 
a systematic distribution of the Scriptures. Wants oth- 
erwise unknown arc supplied, and saving attention to 
the truth is not unfrequcntly created by this form of 
labor. Revivals of religion have resulted from the faith- 
ful performance of this work. It was not enough that 
the feast was spread and the guests invited. Importu- 
nity was needed, and a renewed invitation was carried 
to each home and urged upon the acceptance of each. 



The highways and hedges among us are still populous 
with those who await the footsteps of Him that bringeth 
glad tidings. 

The receipts of the Society have been as follows: 
From the sale of Bibles and Testaments, $7,725.00; 
donations, j56,7 10.50; legacies, $3,715.00; investments, 
$5,299.99; from dividends and interest, $8,770.05; bal- 
ance in the treasury and depository at the beginning of 
the year, $296.40, making a total of $32,516.94. The 
further sum of $16,294.86 has been paid from Massachu- 
setts directly to the American Bible Society. 

The expenditures have been as follows : Cash paid for 
Bibles and Testaments, $8,792.87 ; donations to the 
American Bible Society, $1,334.00; salaries, $4,168.04; 
colportage, $1,010.63; rent, taxes, water, freight and pos- 
tage* $1,045.26; printing Annual Report, fuel, gas, and 
incidentals, $281.39; investments, $8,954.00; paid to 
Thomas W. Durant, $319.50; balance in the treasury, 
$6,611.25. 

The American Bible Society reports a year of in- 
creased activity, both in its home and foreign fields. Its 
ssues in this country have amounted to one million one 
hundred and fifty-eight thousand copies, while three 
hundred and forty thousand eight hundred and fifty-four 
volumes have been furnished for the work abroad. The 
gratuitous work of the year has reached the large 
sum of $342,585.00, of which amount $108,120.00 was 
in cash appropriations to foreign lands, besides grants of 
Scriptures sent from this country. 

One hundred and ninety-eight colporters, working 
mostly in the Southern States of the Union, have circu- 
lated two hundred and two thousand five hundred copies 
among the six hundred and ninety-one thousand families 
they visited. In addition to this work of the Society, 



lO 

three thousand and five hundred volunteer unpaid dis- 
tributors are reported. While everywhere the work has 
exceeded that of past years, especial reference is made to 
Japan, respecting which we are told : " More striking 
than anything else is the. readiness of the Japanese to 
purchase and examine the Scriptures now accessible to 
them. Individual colporters have sold two and three 
hundred copies of the Gospels, and in one case five hun- 
derd copies in a single day. Dr. Gulick had occasion to 
print in 1880 more than eleven million pages of Scripture, 
an increase of sevenfold over the preceding year, besides 
what were furnished to other societies. He supplied the 
British societies with thirty-seven thousand nine hun- 
dred and forty-four copies of portions of the Scriptures, 
and issued in other ways sixty-five thousand nine hun- 
dred and seventy-three." 

The British and Foreign Bible Society reports a year 
of usual efficiency and success. In donations and lega- 
cies, j5572,ooo.cx) have been received, and the receipts 
from all sources have reached the large sum of $1,047,- 
000.00. In two hundred and forty languages and dia- 
lects they have issued two millions eight hundred and 
forty-six thousand copies of the Scriptures. Upon their 
labors scattered over almost every accessible portion of 
the world, rests the blessing promised to those who sow 
beside all waters. Its wide and most beneficent labors 
fairly express the love of a great Christian nation to the 
truth and their desire for its extension. 

Nothing indicates more clearly the advance of Chris- 
tianity in our world than the number of translations of 
the Scriptures, in whole or in part, which the present 
century has produced, amounting in all to two hundred 
and twenty-six. The various languages spoken by man 
are rapidly becoming the medium through which he 



II 



may hold converse with his Maker. Divine revelation, 
like the river of paradise, parted into four heads, in 
ever-deepening flood is carrying life and healing to the 
nations. 

Five hundred years ago, the English-speaking people, 
numbering at that time three millions, received the gift 
of the Bible in their own tongue. The obstacles attend- 
ing its diffusion, from the inability to multiply copies of 
the book and from the persecution that attended its pos- 
session, are well known. With varying fortune it has 
made its way down the centuries, the pillar of cloud by 
day and of fire by night to the ever-increasing host that 
has camped about it in rest and followed it in action. 
To-day a hundred millions in both hemispheres, speak- 
ing the language of Wickliffe and happy in the fruit of 
his labors, gratefully welcome another advance of the 
work he began, in the revision of the New Testament, 
now so happily completed. The star that for centuries 
has shone upon our homes, and the homes of our fathers, 
now 

. . . "tricks his beams, and with new-spangled ore 
Flames on the forehead of the morning sky." 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 



BY HON. ROBERT C. WINTHROP, LL.D., 



President of the Society. 



It was only yesterday, my friends, — owing to absence 
from the city, and other accidental causes — that I 
learned that this seventy-second Anniversary Meeting of 
the Massachusetts Bible Society was to be held here 
this evening. I am most glad to find myself in this 
goodly House of Congregational Worship, which I have 
never visited without something of peculiar interest and 
edification ; and I offer the best thanks of the Society, 
of which I am here as President, to your excellent Pas- 
tor, Dr. Webb, for the use of it. Happily, — in view of 
the short notice I have had, — the duties which devolve 
on me on this occasion required but little preparation, 
and I shall proceed to their formal discharge, after a 
very few introductory words, which, I am sure you will 
all agree with me, have not unnaturally suggested them- 
selves to me this evening. 

By a striking coincidence, I received yesterday,. simul- 
taneously with the notice of this meeting, one of the 



14 

large Presentation copies of the Revised New Testa- 
ment, kindly sent to me from the American Committee 
of Revision by Dr. Schaff, the accomplished and devoted 
President of that Committee. take pleasure in ac- 
knowledging it publicly on this occasion, and in offering 
my hearty congratulations to the Committee on the ter- 
mination of their arduous labors. And I may well con- 
gratulate this Society, also, and this whole congregation, 
and all the millions of people on both sides of the Atlan- 
tic, to whom the Word of God is dear, on the comple- 
tion of this most interesting and important work. 

I have had, of course, no sufficient opportunity for ex- 
amining and considering the specific changes which 
have been made in the translation of the Sacred volume. 
Nor would it become me to undertake to pass judgment 
on what has been done by so distinguished and learned 
a company of English and American scholars, — even if 
I had enjoyed the fullest opportunity of reviewing their 
work. 

Their labors are entitled to be judged by their peers ; — 
if, indeed, their peers can anywhere be found ; — and we 
who pretend to no profound Biblical scholarship, or crit- 
ical acquaintance with the editions and languages and 
texts, and ancient manuscripts and codices, which such 
a revision has compelled them to pore over and study, 
may well accept the result with gratitude and with 
confidence. 

We all know that the onerous and responsible task 
has been undertaken and performed diligently, lov- 
ingly, conscientiously, scrupulously, reverently, — in the 
fear of God, and not in any fear of men. We know that 
some of the most gifted minds of alniost every different 
theological school and denomination have cooperated 
in the result. We know that the men who have been 



»5 

engaged in it have prized the old Bible of their homes 
and churches as highly and as tenderly as any of us 
can have done, and that they would have shrunk, as ear- 
nestly as any of us could have shrunk, from every un- 
called-for change or modification of the substance or 
the language of the endeared version of our fathers. 

But, for myself, I rejoice to be equally assured, that 
they have not shrunk from any alterations or omissions 
which they found to be demanded by a conscientious 
and scrupulous fidelity to the original. We can afford 
anything better than to have a jot or a tittle added to 
the Word of God, or a jot or a tittle taken away from 
that Word, by any human interpolation, interpretation, 
or omission. The solemn and well-remembered warning 
with which St. John concluded his wonderful book of 
Revelation may justly be construed as covering and 
including the whole Gospel. 

We may well rejoice, as a Society, and as individuals, 
at the fresh and eager interest which the preparation 
and publication of this Work have already awakened in 
all quarters; — kindling new zeal in the searching of the 
Scriptures by the careful comparison of the new ver- 
sion with the old. And whatever may be the ultimate 
judgment upon its merits, and whether, or not, it shall 
take the place of the old Bible of King James, in our 
churches, in our homes, or in our hearts, we must all 
feel that it will prove a most welcome and valuable aux- 
iliary in the study of the Gospel. 

Meantime, it cannot fail to be an unspeakable satis- 
faction and comfort to every devout believer in Christ, 
that, after ten years of assiduous labor and study, this 
accomplished and learned company of Revisers have 
found so few substantial errors in the old version of 
1611, and have made so few verbal alterations in the 



i6 

text that is so dear to us all; — and that we are thus 
once more confirmed in our cherished convictions of the 
authenticity and truth of the Holy Scriptures, and that 
in them we have indeed the words of eternal life. 

The Bible itself is its own best witness. Its very ex- 
istence after so many ages, its miraculous composition 
by those inspired men, and its marvelous preservation 
from all the accidents of time and chance, bespeak noth- 
ing less than the hand of God. No evolution produced 
that volume; and no revolution of thought, or act, or 
human will, can ever prevail against it. Revisions and 
new versions may improve, or may impair, the letter; 
but they can never change its essential character. The 
Gospel of Jesus Christ, through which he brought life 
and immortality to light, like its Divine Author, is "the 
same yesterday, to-day, and forever." 

It is now my privilege to call upon the Rev. Dr. 
Payne, President of the Wesleyan University at Dela- 
ware, in Ohio, who has kindly consented to deliver our 
Annual Discourse. 



Tfie Bible Tried and Triumphant. 



A DISCOURSE. 

By rev. CHARLES H. PAYNE, D. D., LL. D. 

President of Ohio Wesleyan University. 

(Dblawarb, Ohio.) 



Ps. xviii: jo — "The word of the Lord is tried." 

I PeLi: 2^ — "The word of the Lord endureth forever." 

I cannot be insensible to the honor and the responsibility 
connected with the service to which your kindness calls me 
to-day. The occasion is one which, by reason of its historic 
associations, as well as its immediate significance and direct 
object, cannot fail to kindle the fires of emotion in every 
Christian heart. 

This old and most venerable Bible Society, which to-day 
celebrates its seventy-second anniversary, this honored Presi- 
dent, whose name is familiar in both hemispheres of our globe, 
the distinguished line of ancestors through which that name 
has come down to him, from that conspicuous historic figure — 
the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, this 
illustrious State that, by its respect for the " Higher Law," 
has won for itself the worthy name of the " Biblical Common- 
wealth ; '* all remind us that this occasion is one of no ordinary 
interest, but is linked with holiest memories and worthy of our 
best thought. I would that the unrelenting duties of a too busy 
life had left me ampler time to bring you thoughts more worthy 
of the occasion. ^ 

The most important religious event of the present century 
cannot be absent from our minds to-day, and must give 



i8 



additional interest to the theme which legitimately demands 
our attention. The completion of that great work on which 
distinguished scholars, on both sides of the ocean, have for 
years been engaged, has at length been reached. The revised 
New Testament is now an accomplished fact. To-day for the 
first time we eagerly peruse it, as it comes to us, fresh from the 
hands of the revisers, and anxiously scan its pages to see how 
many familiar words, dear to us by hallowed associations, we 
miss ; and whether the new form will rob the precious volume of 
any of the old and sacred charm. To-day the greatest Book of 
all time begins a new career, with slightly changed outward 
form, but with the same unchanging spirit which has made it 
the miracle of the ages. 

It is a fitting time to pause and bring under brief review the 
claims of this tried and trusty Book. 

A ship was laboring in tempestuous seas, its sides smitten 
and its decks swept by fierce waves. The passengers looked 
in consternation and terror upon the scene, when the com- 
mander's calm and assuring voice was heard saying: "This 
ship has weathered many a severer storm than the present ; she 
is thoroughly tried and perfectly trustworthy; give yourselves 
no alarm." That word gave cheer to many a palpitating heart 
Humanity is tossing on the troubled sea of time, with all its 
hope and its final destiny committed to this Book of books — the 
Bible. Amid the fierce war of opposing forces, with the realiza- 
tion of the measureless interests involved, what marvel if the 
solemn question should start in many a heart and tremble on 
many a lip: " Is this book a safe depository for such momentous 
interests and priceless treasures.^" With what assuring con- 
fidence comes this inspiring utterance, confirmed by the history 
of the ages : " The word of the Lord is tried ; ** " the word of the 
Lord endureth forever ! '* 

Tried indeed is that priceless Word which this Society seeks 
to spread among the needy millions of earth. It is in the cruci- 
ble to-day, as it has been through the long ages, but, as with 
the Hebrews in the fiery furnace, the presence of an unseen 
Power seems so to guard it with a sacred charm, that not a trace 
of the burning flame can be found upon it. But rather as the 



19 

fires burn with fiercer rage and the ages wear away, this Sacred 
Book sheds an ever increasing luster and manifests its divineness 
with ever intensifying power. 

I. Let us give brief consideration to the fact that this Divine 
Book has been thoroughly tried and its value fully tested. 

1. It has been tried in the fires of bitter opposition and 
destructive criticism. Why should men hate and assail the 
Book that brings them such messages of love and hope? 
Because it condemns their sin and brings them face to face 
with a holy Being for whom they have no affinity. The boast 
that a bold and talented blasphemer had recently been greeted 
with a large audience, and could command such an audience at 
his pleasure, has been appropriately answered by a daily secular 
paper: "Yes; the witty, \)laspheming infidel will not soon be 
likely to lack an audience, because there are multitudes of men 
who want to believe that the Bible is false." 

But, from whatever cause, the fires of adverse criticism have 
been kindled around this Holy Book through successive ages. 
Now, it is sheer unreasoning infidel hate, and now it is plausible 
science, with its antagonistic theories, seemingly appealing to 
men*s reason ; now, it is the secular power which arrays itself 
against God's word, and now it is ecclesiastical power, which, in 
God's name, seeks to restrain the spread of his own truth. But, 
as the attacks upon the fervid Wycliffe and the intrepid Luther 
only gave them greater distinction before the world, so every 
assault upon this Divine Word has revealed its value and 
extended its sway. 

2. How thoroughly has the Bible been tried by the crucial 
tests of advancing civilization ? Suppose, for a moment, that it 
were the production of the unaided intellect of man! What 
mind of earth's* most transcendent genius can scan the future 
and discern the secrets that lie hidden in the coming centuries, 
so that never a fresh discovery of the far-advanced ages shall 
falsify the utterance of the far-back years, in the infancy of the 
race ? What wisdom of Zoroaster or Plato can stand the ordeal 
of the nineteenth century.^ 

But here is a Book, portions of which reach back to the dim 



20 

twilight of historic times, upon whose pages the discoveries of 
the on-moving centuries, the revelations of man's latest and 
highest wisdom, have been pouring their intense beams, and lo ! 
like the burning bush of Horeb, it remains unconsumed ! Not 
a single essential feature is disproved or discredited ; nay, rather, 
its heavenly origin and authority are attested by every new ray 
of light which man's increasing knowledge sheds upon it. The 
archaeologist has dug among the buried ruins of Egypt, Assyria, 
and Babylon, only to find on temple, cylinder, and lettered stone, 
corroborations of this Sacred Book. The physicist has searched 
through the arcana of nature, and brought forth her secrets ; the 
astronomer has scaled the heavens and weighed in his balances 
the starry worlds ; the ethnologist has explored the remotest parts 
of the earth and studied the races of mankind ; the historian 
has traced the streams of human history back to their sources ; 
the philologist has investigated the origin and development of 
the babbling tongues of earth ; an army of honored and learned 
men have wandered through every realm of science, in all her 
vast domain of earth and sky, witfi microscope and telescope, 
and from every department of human learning, and every pursuit 
of her votaries, each patient investigator has returned to give 
new sanction to the Sacred Scriptures and add new emphasis to 
the demonstrated fact : '* The word of the Lord is tried," and its 
truth " abideth forever." 

What one of those great granitic facts which startle and thrill 
us as they stand first revealed in God's Word, — the existence of 
a Supreme Being, the heavenly origin and immortal destiny of 
man, the oneness of the human race; the divine creation and 
the unity of the physical universe, — has scientific discovery 
cast a single shadow upon ? 

What race of human beings has Humboldt, or Speke, or Living- 
stone, or Stanley, discovered that did not bear some trace of the 
Creator's image, give some prophecy of a glorious future, and 
attest the high philosophy of St. Paul, declared under the shadow 
of the Athenian Acropolis, that "God hath made of one blood 
all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth ?*' 

How far in advance of this most ancient volume has this 
enlightened nineteenth century reached ? Look around you 



21 

to-day and behold the splendor of its achievements! — its 
proudest products, in government, in law, in philosophy, in 
science, in art, in literature ; mark whatever wins the admiration 
of men, holds them in willing subjection, leads them upward to 
sublimest heights of conquest ; the origin and inspiration of all 
this progress and greatness are found within this Book. Prog- 
ress the world has indeed made, but only as guided by the 
wisdom of these divinely illumined pages ; nor can the borrowed 
light ever transcend its divine source. 

What laws excel those of Moses .^ What poetry that of 
David and Isaiah ? What proverbial wisdom that of Solomon ? 
What scientific descriptions the sublime language of Job.^ 
What philosophy that of Paul ? What lofty moral principles 
the Sermon on the Mount .^ 

The very language of this marvelous Book proclaims its 
divine origin ; its authority, its sublimity, its truthfulness, all 
bespeak their heavenly birth. When one remembers the wild 
and extravagant opinions advocated by the wisest philosophers 
and most learned men of their age, all along the track of history, 
the accuracy and sublimity of the Scriptures in describing that 
concerning which the combined wisdom of their time knew 
positively nothing, is no less than a stupendous miracle, bearing 
unmistakable testimony to their heavenly source. 

How far have the most brilliant discoveries of science in this 
advanced century gotten beyond that majestic creative scene 
when, " in the beginning," God said : " Let light be, and light 
was?" 

Astronomy has revealed the wonders and splendors of the 
rolling spheres, but the grandest revelations of the telescope 
do not surpass the sublimity of the language with which this 
Holy Book, far back before the birth of modern astronomy, bids 
men behold these matchless marvels, exclaiming : " Lo, these 
are parts of his ways, but the thunder of his power who can 
understand ! " 

The light from a thousand million worlds comes streaming on 
the sacred page, only to emphasize its sublime utterance : " The 
heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament showeth 
his handiwork." 



22 



For long ages men have stood in amazement, gazing on the 
shining worlds that roll in silent majesty above us, and wondered 
whether there were any kinship between those far-away spheres 
and this planet of earth; longing for some voice to break the 
silence, some message to assure us of the sisterhood of worlds. 
At length the long preserved silence has been broken ; the mes- 
senger from the distant worlds has come, flying on swiftest wing 
and clad in the white robe of light ; he has entered the chemist's 
laboratory and written his sublime message in ineffaceable char- 
acters in the solar spectrum, declaring the unity of origin and 
harmony of purpose of all the countless worlds that people 
boundless space, and bidding us read the latest and loftiest truth 
of science, in perfect harmony with the teachings of the Inspired 
Book — the universe is one, the hand that formed it is one, the 
matter that constitutes it is one, the laws that govern it are one» 
the plan and purpose that everywhere pervade it are one ; all 
things come from God the Creator; all belong to God the 
Father. 

Turn on the electric light of the nineteenth century and read 
the Bible under its searching glare ! The glorious truth flames 
forth in splendor : " The word of the Lord is tried." " Heaven 
and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away." 

3. This Book has been tried and its value attested by its 
demonstrated adaptation to the varied conditions and multiplied 
wants of humanity. 

The experience of the race has settled a few things. Water 
quenches thirst, bread satisfies hunger, a few medicines are 
specifics for certain diseases. Thirty-three centuries of accred- 
ited history have proved that the Bible, and the Bible alone, 
meets the necessities of the human race. 

All man's wants are here supplied. All his ills are here 
remedied. All his wrongs are here redressed. His spiritual 
nature, always and everywhere seeking sustenance and rest, 
always and everywhere seeks in vain, until coming to this divine 
source it finds the bread, which eating, it hungers no more, the 
rest, which securing, its weariness is at an end. 

There is no member of the great family of man who does not 
want deliverance from his guilt ; the one only relief is here made 



23 

known : a pure and perfect object for his affections ; such a 
being the Bible alone reveals : a certain guide to virtue ; all other 
guides flash false lights on our way : a remedy for a disordered 
nature ; here is proffered the only cure : relief from the restless 
discontent of the heart ; here, and here only, is the needed rest : 
certain knowledge of the dread hereafter ; here, " life and immor- 
tality are brought to light : " supporting strength in the dying 
hour ; this Book alone points out the way to achieve victory over 
" the last enemy," death. 

The ignorance, the poverty, the oppression, the wrong, the 
misery of earth's teeming millions, all find their cure in propor- 
tion as these leaves from the " tree of life," " for the healing of 
the nations " are scattered over the earth, and brought into con- 
tact with the fevered hearts of men. 

Is this a beautiful and brilliant theory to fade away like many 
a philosopher's dream ? Nay, the ages of time and the millions 
of earth's groaning denizens bear witness to these gracious 
truths. *' The word of the Lord is triedl' and a countless multi- 
tude of witnesses attest its truth. Nations have accepted it 
and been lifted into prominence and power. Individuals in all 
classes and conditions have tested its value and found solace and 
strength. That poor man tried its virtue, and it opened to him 
imperishable treasures more valued than the wealth of a kingdom. 
That slave, suffering the bondage of body, or mind, or soul, 
sought its proffered deliverance, and his shackles fell off, while 
his prison door flew open, and he walked forth into " the glorious 
liberty of the sons of God." That sorrowful weeper drank at this 
Sacred Fount, and his tears became as crystal lenses through 
which he saw the Hand of Love above him and the Land of 
Hope before him, and his weeping was changed into joy. That 
bereaved one with smitten heart, sighing for 

... the touch of a vanished hand, 
And the sound of a voice that is still I 

came hither for its holy consolations, and heard a precious mes- 
sage falling from the lips of the Mighty Conqueror, saying : " I 
am he that liveth and was dead and am alive forevermore, amen, 
and have the keys of death and of hell ; " and through falling 



24 

tears he beheld the "vanished hand" beckoning, and heard the 
"voice" that was "still" calling to a reunion amid the change- 
less scenes of the golden city above. 

Yes, this Sacred Book is " tried," and proved true in its every 
promise and prophecy and warning. 

It reveals the worth of man as immeasurably greater than the 
whole material universe, and makes manifest the tender sympathy 
of our common Father, so that we cannot but believe with an 
illustrious astronomer that, " a single tear ebbing from the heart 
of humble sorrow is of more value, in the sight of God, than a 
legion of suns." 

How could humanity spare this Holy Book! 

Blot out of existence any other book, the loss may indeed be 
keenly felt. Paradise Lost — the world misses its loftiest epic ! 
The Novum Organon — physical science feels the void ! The works 
of Kepler and Newton — astronomy halts in its progress ! But blot 
them all out — all works of science and philosophy, of history and 
literature, all the sacred books of time — save the one preemi- 
nent Book — the Sibylline Oracles, the Shasters, the Zendavesta, 
the Vedas, the Koran, and great as would be the loss, the human 
intellect could reproduce what once it has created, and the race 
of man would press forward to its lofty goal, achieving yet 
greater triumphs than the past has witnessed. No heart would 
break ; no hope would die ; no vitalizing force would be eliminated 
from society. 

But blot out the Bible ! A darkened world gropes in rayless 
gloom; a sluggish world finds no worthy motive for its noble 
powers ; a suffering world obtains no relief for its ills ; a sorrowing 
world knows not where to assuage its grief; a guilty world has 
no remedy for its awful burden ; an orphaned world weeps for a 
lost Father ; the hands go back on the dial of time, hope dies in 
the hearts of men, and a pessimistic wail of despair sweeps over 
the shuddering race of men, like the knell of approaching doom. 

n. Because this Word of the Lord has been thus tried and 
has stood the fiery ordeals of the ages, it is therefore a sure 
foundation upon which humanity may build its labors and its 
hopes. 



25 

It is the one foundation upon which the individual may 
securely build his character and successfully base his life-work. 

No other truth seems more trite than this, yet none is farther 
from the grasp of men and more difficult of practical realization. 
The youth who accepts it as the base of all his building has his 
fortune in his own hands, and his future glows with the light of a 
promise that will never fade into disappointing gloom. 

Any degree of skepticism concerning the divine origin and 
authority of the Bible is an element of weakness in one's charac- 
ter and a stumbling-block in his way to real success. The high- 
est degree of personal faith brings the largest measure of per- 
sonal power. Elijah, the terror of kings, Moses, the leader and 
law-giver of a nation, Paul, the greatest of heroic men, Jesus, the 
world's Conqueror, are illustrious examples of a firm belief in 
the divine Word, as a potent force in an individual life. Who- 
ever grasps this unchanging Word with an equally unyielding 
tenacity will follow closely in their footsteps. A skeptical age 
is barren of heroes and fruitful of pigmies. Greatness thrives 
on faith and languishes on unbelief. 

There is no matter of world-wide interest which educators and 
philanthropists need to watch with greater apprehension than the 
decay of faith in the Holy Scriptures and the baneful prevalence 
of unbelief. 

The culture that magnifies the wisdom of men and minifies the 
wisdom of God, that exalts Science by the humiliation of her 
twin sister Religion, " is blind and cannot see afar ofif," and is 
certain to lead its subjects to ultimate mortification and failure. 
One ray of divine light leads to greater victories and richer treas- 
ures than a thousand rush-lights of human learning. He who 
plants in his own mind or in that of another a single seed of 
sacred truth has given to that mind a new stimulus and a new 
strength, the possibilities of which can never be measured. 

The greatest peril of our day is the tide of skeptical question- 
ing of God's Word, which is sweeping on its rapid current a 
number of somewhat thoughtful people. The greatest hope of 
our day is the probability that the current will soon set the other 
way, and the ever-living word of truth will " have free course and 
be glorified," as never before. 



26 

Not only must the individual make the Bible the basis of all 
his hopes of success; it is equally the foundation of all true 
national greatness. 

No graver question ever confronted a nominally Christian 
nation than that which to-day confronts the American nation, 
viz.: its practical attitude toward God*s Holy Word. What 
shall be the policy of the nation and the State in respect to this 
preeminent Book ? Shall it have an honored place in the work- 
ing policy of the nation, entering as a positive factor into its 
schools, its legislation, its administration in home and foreign 
relations ? 

Shall recogfiition or repudiation be practiced ? Shall honor or 
dishonor be accorded to it ? Shall our children be taught to 
revere and obey its sacred teachings by its presence and benign 
influence in the schools where they are educated, or shall its 
expulsion from those schools, silently, yet inevitably, inspire 
within them a disrespect and disregard for its holy truths ? 

These are questions that must be answered; nay, they are 
receiving a practical answer throughout our national domain. 
Neutrality is impossible. Proscription in the schools is practi- 
cally to place upon the Bible national dishonor. Banishment from 
the public schools must and will be logically followed by banish- 
ment from all national recognition and from our national life. 
That such will be the issue of the present contest is our greatest 
national peril. We do well to pause and ponder before such a 
fatal step is taken. We do well, on such an occasion as the pres- 
ent, and wherever our words may exert the slightest influence, 
to utter our solemn warning against such a wide and perilous 
departure from the practice of our venerated fathers. 

How far removed from such a policy was that of the distin- 
guished ancestor of the honored President of this Society, 
to whom I have before alluded — the devout and patriotic 
Governor Winthrop, and all that illustrious band of gen- 
uine statesmen and patriots who laid the foundations of our 
national greatness in this old historic Commonwealth! That 
much-revered Bible that crossed the ocean in the Mayflower 
with those heroic men — a copy of which, owned and oft-read by 
the devoted Elder Brewster, your Massachusetts Historical 



27 

Society still holds in sacred custody and cherishes with becoming 
reverence — taught these worthies a higher ,wisdom, following 
which, they built upon solid and enduring foundations, which we 
should beware of striking from under our national structure. 

We do well to heed the words of that later gifted son of Massa- 
chusetts, Daniel Webster, in this impressive utterance: "If we 
abide by the principles taught in the Bible, our country will go 
on prospering and to prosper; but, if we and our posterity neg- 
lect its instructions and authority, no man can tell how sudden a 
catastrophe may overwhelm us and bury all our glory in profound 
obscurity;" and ere the echo of these pregnant words has died 
upon our ears, let another word of warning come to us from 
New York's illustrious son, William H. Seward, who says : 
'* The whole hope of human progress is suspended on the ever 
growing influence of the Bible." That influence must be fos- 
tered, and not hindered, by the nation that seeks power and perma- 
nence. ** Them that honor me I will honor, and they that despise 
me shall be lightly esteemed," is God's word of promise and of 
warning for nations, as for individuals ; while that other solemn 
note of alarm sounds in our ears the timely admonition : " The 
nation and kingdom that will not serve me shall perish." 

God and His divine Word must be honored by the nation and 
the State in all their varied relations and official acts; in the 
treatment of the red man of the forest, and the almond-eyed 
Chinese, and " our brother in black." 

In solving the gravest and most difficult problem of the age, 
that of the liquor-traffic, with its entailment of incalculable woes 
and curses, this Book of Inspired Wisdom is the only safe guide, 
and will lead to swiftest and surest deliverance. Heeding its 
warnings, we shall take care that we do not "frame mischief into 
a law," nor have " fellowship with the throne of iniquity," nor 
become " partakers of other men's sins." 

Only as this favored nation follows the teachings and fosters 
the influence of this God-given Book, will it escape the peril 
arising from the incoming of the hosts of heterogeneous peoples 
from foreign lands, bringing to our shores the baneful seeds of 
socialism and communism and nihilism. It is beyond all ques- 
tioning that for our nation, established and lifted to its present 



28 



greatness under the direct influence of the Bible, fww to forget 
its Christian origin and history, now to abandon its long-tried 
and virtually Christian policy, and, under the specious name of 
neutrality or pure secularism, practically to ostracize God*s Holy 
Word, would be to foster the growth of all these pernicious 
seeds of civil and social evil — which flourish in the soil of skepti- 
cism, and in an atheistic atmosphere — and would soon cover the 
land with many a death-exhaling upas tree. May a Beneficent 
Providence avert such a fate, and the light of Divine Truth lead 
the nation to yet loftier heights of greatness and of power ! 

The Word of the Lord is tried, the Word of the Lord is true, 
the Word of the Lord is the only foundation of success or hope 
in the individual and the nation ! One other fact demands our 
thought : 

in. The Word of the Lord is to be triumphant. 

The Bible is rapidly and unquestionably marching forward to 
universal conquest. It cannot be defeated ; it is immortal truth 
panoplied with the imperishability of its Author. 

It cannot be effectually bound nor restrained ; as well attempt 
to " bind the sweet influences of Pleiades, or loose the bands of 
Orion," or " guide Arcturus with his sons," or set " dominion " 
to " the ordinances of heaven." 

The visitor in Rome enters the church of San Maria in Via 
Lata, occupying the spot which tradition has marked as the 
place where St. Paul lodged with the centurion. Descending to 
the crypt he reads inscribed upon a pillar these memorable words 
of the imprisoned apostle: "But the Word of God is not 
bound." Whether it were on that very spot that the illustrious 
Christian hero passed a portion of his prison life in Rome, may 
not be definitely known ; but startled by those historic words as 
you read them in the light of the added centuries, you cannot 
but recall the scene when that distinguished " prisoner of the 
Lord" gave utterance to them; and you cannot but stand in 
amazement, in that gloomy crypt, as you remember how the 
words of this inspired apostle sounded out from his place of con- 
finement, and have been echoing round the wide world from that 
day forward, each century adding emphasis to their meaning 



29 

and volume to their influence. Surely, "the Word of God is not 
bound" and the ages bear witness to its ever-widening sway. 

It is a bold attitude which this uncompromising Book assumes, 
as to-day it looks into the face of this nineteenth-century civiliza- 
tion, with its strong tendency to discredit the miraculous, and 
fearlessly asserts its claims to a supernatural origin and a divine 
authority. And despite the rationalistic spirit of the age, this 
Book forces a recognition of its claims from the most advanced 
scholarship and the highest wisdom of our times. While the 
last century with all its discovery and progress has not added a 
single genuine ground for questioning the divine origin of the 
Bible, nor presented a single new obstacle to its reception, what 
new victories has this Book won ; what marvelous progress in its 
path of conquest has it made ! 

Concerning its victories of confirmation^ I have already spoken, 
and need only add a sentence from that illustrious astronomer. 
Sir John Herschel, who says : " All human discoveries seem to 
be made only for the purpose of confirming more and more 
strongly the truths contained in the holy Scriptures;" and this 
emphatic testimony from Professor Dana, one of our foremost 
naturalists, who. concerning the Mosaic record of creation, says : 
" There is so much that the most recent readings of science have 
for the first time explained, that the idea of man as the author 
becomes utterly incomprehensible. By proving the record true, 
science pronounces it divine ; for who could have correctly nar- 
rated the secrets of eternity but God himself.^" 

Concerning the spread of this marvelous Book over the 
nations of earth, and its translation into their varied tongues, 
time fails me to speak. The first translation of the Holy Scrip- 
tures into our English language by the great reformer, John 
Wickliffe, five hundred years ago, has just been commemorated 
with becoming ceremonies of stately and imposing character. 
What a significant and prophetic event was that opening of 
God*s Word to the common people ! What rapid stages of prog- 
ress and triumph have followed in close succession ! Within the 
present century new translations have been made in about two 
hundred and twenty-six languages ; not a few of these languages 
were not rich enough to furnish a word with which to express 



30 

the sublime and precious thought brought to them in this 
priceless message from heaven ; no word for atonement^ forgive- 
ness, gratitude, zxi6, many another; and so the translator must 
seek for an equivalent. But this heaven-sent message will 
awaken these holy emotions and beget these heavenly tempers 
in the hearts of earth's benighted ones, and as their lives become 
enriched their impoverished language will share in the enrich- 
ment, and the desolate hearts of men everywhere shall know 
what the sweet spirit of forgiveness and the holy affection of 
gratitude is, as this beneficent Book achieves its destined tri- 
umphs over the earth. 

Yes, great victories are behind it ; greater triumphs are before 
it. Its teachings are to be declared to all the peoples of this 
teeming earth ; its principles are everywhere to prevail ; its 
promises are to pave the pathway of unborn millions from the 
city of sin below to the city of our God above; its hopes are to 
inspire the hearts of the whole race of man the wide world over ; 
its never-waning light is to break in upon the "habitations of 
darkness " and flood the earth with the radiance of a new creation. 

Fellow-workers in this worthy cause, our duty and our privi- 
lege are clear. If this Book is of heavenly origin, if God is its 
author, and in it He has made known the great truths which 
men need to know, and which it is His will that they should 
know and obey, then, to publish these inestimable truths, to 
diffuse this divine light, is at once the most ennobling work and 
the most exalted privilege of life. 

Wickliffe, and Luther, and Tyndale, and Judson, and Martyn, 
and Carey, and Van Dyke, and a nameless, but honored, host 
besides, have wrought for humanity a work of unparalleled im- 
portance, and every one who, in the humblest way, aids in plac- 
ing a copy of this Sacred Volume in the hands of a brother man. 
or in dropping one of its seed truths in his heart, touches 
humanity with the " superlative educational force " of all time, 
and his labor cannot be in vain nor lose its reward. In this sub- 
lime work I bid this venerable Society and this sympathetic 
audience God-speed. 

We may learn a lesson of inspiration, faithfully to do the work 
which our age imposes upon us, from that pictorial illustration, 



31 

alluded to by Dr. Storrs in his oration at the Wickliflfe celebra- 
tion : Wickliflfe is represented in one age as kindling a spark, 
Huss in another as blowing the spark to a flame, and Luther 
later on, waving on high the lighted torch. That torch is to-day 
within easy reacl^ of every hand throughout the Christian world. 
Let the millions of nominal Christians everywhere quickly and 
eagerly seize this flaming torch of divine truth and bear it over 
all the countries and to all the peoples of this sin-smitten earth, 
until every land shall gleam in its radiance and every heart shall 
glow in its light. 



CONSTITUTION. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE SOCIETY AS ORIGINALLY FORMED 

PREVIOUS TO ITS INCORPORATION. 

July 13, 1809. — The Hon. Theophilus Parsons, from the commit- 
tee appointed for that purpose, reported a plan for carrying into effect 
the object of this association ; which, being read from the chair, was 
considered and debated by paragraphs, and was, with one amend- 
ment, accepted and adopted as follows, viz. : 

THE BIBLE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. The Bible Society is instituted for the purpose of raising a 
fund by voluntary contribution, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles 
and Testaments to be distributed among all persons inhabiting within 
the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, 
and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the aid of others. 

2. The Society shall be composed of all regularly settled clergy- 
men of every denomination of Christians within the State, who shall 
in writing, request to be members ; of every person who shall sub- 
scribe to pay annually to the treasurer a sum not less than two dol- 
lars, and who shall remain a member so long as he continues the 
payment of that sum ; and of every person who shall subscribe and 
pay to the treasurer a sum not less than fifty dollars, he remaining a 
member during life, without being obliged to further contributions. 

3. Subscriptions, for the purpose of ascertaining a competent 
number of members, shall be immediately opened, under the direction 
of the committee appointed to report a plan for the organization of 
the Society. And as soon as fifty subscribers are obtained, notice 
shall be given by the committee, and also of the time and place of 
the meeting of the Society. 



33 

4. The Society shall, on notice given as aforesaid, meet and 
choose by ballot, from among the members, a president, treasurer, 
corresponding secretary, and a recording secretary, who shall con- 
tinue in office until the Society be incorporated, and until successors 
are chosen in their room ; and they, together with eighteen other 
members, to be elected by ballot at the same time, of whom six shall 
be clergymen and twelve shall be laymen, shall form a board of 
trustees. 

5. The trustees or the greater part of them present at any meet- 
ing, of which public notice shall be given by the president, treasurer, 
or recording secretary, shall elect by ballot, from among the members 
of the Society, a committee of three persons, to continue in office 
during the pleasure of the board of trustees, who shall have the man- 
agement of the fund, and the distribution of the books procured with 
it, subject and according to such regulations and directions as shall 
from time to time be prescribed by the trustees at any meeting held 
on public notice given as aforesaid ; and the treasurer shall pay the 
moneys in his hands to the order of the said committee. 

6. The trustees shall apply to the legislature for an act to incor- 
porate the Society, on the principles and for the purposes aforesaid, 
and with all reasonable powers necessary to carry into effect the pur- 
poses of this institution. 

7. When the Society shall be incorporated, it shall meet, on regu- 
lar notice being given, for the due exercise of all the powers granted 
by the charter of incorporation. 

8. If the Society fail of obtaining an incorporation, it shall again 
meet, on public notice given by the president, treasurer, or recording 
secretary, to devise and adopt such further measures as may be neces- 
sary for preserving the institution, and for effecting the intentions of 
the members. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the constitution, the trustees peti- 
tioned the general court, and obtained the following act of incorpo- 
ration. 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 



^oimnontDealtf) of ;^a00aci)U0Ctt0* 

In the year of ou Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten. An Act to incorporate 

the Bible Sodety of Massachusetts. 

Whereas, the persons hereafter named in this Act, together with many 
other citizens of this Commonwealth, have formed themselves into a 
Society for the purpose of raising a fund by voluntary contribution, to be 
appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the version in com- 
mon use in the churches in New England, for distribution among all per- 
sons inhabiting within the State or elsewhere, who are destitute of the 
sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conveniently supplied without the 
aid of others ; and whereas, in order that the pious and laudable objects 
of said Society may be carried into effect, and the charity of said Society 
more extensively diffused, they have, by their Committee, prayed for an 
Act of Incorporation. 

Section i. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives^ in General Court assembled^ and by authority of the same^ That 
William Phillips, Esq., the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., the Rev. Joseph 
Eckley, D. D., the Rev. James Freeman, the Rev. Eliphalet Porter, D. D., 
the Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., the Rev. Thomas Baldwin, D. D., the Hon. 
William Drown, Francis Wright, Esq., the Hon. Isaac Parker, Hon. 
Peter C. Brooks, John Tucker, Esq., Joseph Hurd, Esq., Mr. Joseph 
Sewall, Redford Webster, Samuel Parkman, Joseph May, and Henry Hill, 
Esquires, the Rev. John Pierce, the Rev. Joseph S. Buckminster, and Mr. 
Samuel H. Walley, together with those who have associated, and who 
may hereafter associate, with them for the purpose aforesaid, be, and 
they hereby are, incorporated into a Society, by the name of The Bible 
Society of Massachusetts. 

Sect. 2. Be it further tnacted. That the said William Phillips, and 
others above named, and their associates, shall be and remain a body 
corporate by the said name and title during the pleasure of the Legisla- 
ture, and may have a seal which they may alter at pleasure ; and the said 
Society shall be capable of taking and receiving from any persons dis- 
posed to aid the benevolent purposes of this institution any grants or 
devises of land and tenements in fee-simple, or otherwise, and donations, 
bequests, and subscriptions of money, or other property, to be used and 
improved for the purposes aforesaid. 



35 

Sect. 3. Be H further enacted^ That the said Corporation shall be, 
and hereby are, empowered to purchase and hold any real estate other 
than that which may be given as aforesaid, provided the value of the 
whole estate, real and personal, of said Society, shall not exceed the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted. That the said Society may sue and be 
sued in their corporate capacity, and may appoint an agent or agents to 
prosecute and defend suits with power of substitution. 

Sect. 5. Be it ^further enacted. That the said Society may choose a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretaries, Trustees, and such 
other officers as they shall see fit, and may make and establish such rules 
and regulations as to them shall appear necessary, provided the same be 
not repugnant to the constitution or laws of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted. That William Phillips, Esq., be, and 
hereby is, authorized, by notification in any two of the newspapers printed 
in Boston, to appoint the time and place of the first meeting of said 
Society ; at which meeting the said Society may appoint the time and 
place of their annual and other meetings, and the manner of notifying the 
same ; may choose the officers aforesaid ; may prescribe their duty, and 
may vest in the Trustees, the number of which may be determined by 
the said Society, but shall not exceed thirty, such powers, conformable 
to the principles of this institution, as shall be deemed necessary. — Ap- 
proved by the Governor, Feb, 75, 18 10, 



<Sammaitive»Ub at Pn^^nrlitt^rtt^. 

In the year Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-five. An Act in addition to an Act to incorporate 

the Bible Society of Massachuaetts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section i. The Corporation heretofore established by the name of 
The Bible Society of Massachusetts shall hereafter be known by 
the name of the Massachusetts Bible Society, and by that name 
shall have, hold, and enjoy all its rights and privileges, and be subject to 
all its liabilities and obligations, to the same extent as if its name had 
not been changed. ' 

Sect. 2. The said Society may publish, procure, purchase, circulate, 
and distribute Bibles and Testaments in any other than the English lan- 
guage, in the same manner and to the same extent as they are now 
authorized by law to distribute Bibles and Testaments of the version in 
common use in the churches in New England, anything in the Act incor- 
porating the said Society to the contrary notwithstanding. — Approved 
by the Governor, Feb, 27, 186^, 



BY-LAWS. 



At the annual meeting of the Society, May 28, 185 1, the follow- 
ing by-laws were adopted : 

ARTICLE I. 

This Society is instituted for the purposes set forth in its act of 
incorporation ; namely, " The raising of a fund by voluntary contribu- 
tion, to be appropriated in procuring Bibles and Testaments of the 
version in common use in the churches in New England, for distribu- 
tion among all persons inhabiting within the State and elsewhere, who 
are destitute of the sacred Scriptures, and who cannot be conven- 
iently supplied without the aid of others." 

ARTICLE II. 

Every regularly settled clergyman, of any denomination of Chris- 
tians in the SMe^ may become a member of this Society by signifying 
his request in writing to that effect to the recording secretary, who 
shall keep a record of all persons who shall so become members, in a 
book kept for that purpose. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every person who shall pay to the treasurer not less than two 
dollars annually shall thereby become a member of the Society, so 
long as such payment is continued ; and the treasurer shall keep a 
list of all such persons. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every person who shall pay to the treasurer not less than twenty 
dollars at one time shall thereby become a member of the Society for 
life, and shall be so enrolled by the recording secretary. 



37 



ARTICLE V. 

The officers of the Society shall be a president, fourteen vice- 
presidents, corresponding secretary, recording secretary, treasurer, and 
eighteen trustees, and an auditor. The president, vice-presidents, 
corresponding and recording secretaries, and treasurer, shall each be 
ex-officio members of the board of trustees, and the recording secre- 
tary shall be the recording officer of that board. These officers shall 
all be chosen by ballot at the annual meeting. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The president shall be ex-officio chairman of the board of trus- 
tees ; and he, and also the vice-presidents and secretaries and treas- 
urer, shall perform the duties usually incumbent on such officers 
respectively. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The trustees shall have the management of all the concerns of 
the Society, except the choice of such officers as by the act of incor- 
poration is vested in the Society ; and they shall prescribe the duties 
of all officers, direct the collection and appropriation of all funds and 
donations, and generally have and possess all the power and authority 
vested by the act aforesaid in the Society. It shall be their duty, 
however, at every annual meeting, to make and lay before the Society 
a particular report of all their doings, with all such documents and 
vouchers as may be asked for by any member ; and such report shall 
be had and considered before the Society shall proceed to the choice 
of trustees for the year then next ensuing. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be holden on the Mon- 
day preceding the last Wednesday in May in each year ; and at this 
meeting it shall be competent to transact any business which the 
Society can lawfully do. Notice of this meeting shall be given by 
the recording secretary at least seven days before the holding thereof, 
by notice published in at least one newspaper in Boston. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Special meetings of the Society may be called at any time by the 
trustees, of which notice shall be given in at least three newspapers 
published in Boston, and no business shall be transacted at such 
meeting, excepting that which is specified in the notice. 



38 



ARTICLE X. 



The trustees shall hold regular semi-annual meetings in March 
and September in each year, and such other special meetings as they 
may direct or as the president may at any time call Five trustees 
shall be a quorum to transact business. 



ARTICLE XI. 

The trustees, at their first meeting after their election, annually, 
shall choose from their own body an executive committee, a commit- 
tee on agencies, and a committee on the depository. 

ARTICLE XII. 

The executive committee shall have the management of the funds, 
and the gratuitous distribution of the books procured with them ; the 
committee on agencies shall have the direction of all matters con- 
nected with the agencies of the Society, the appointment of all agents, 
subject to the approval of the trustees, and the defining of their 
respective duties ; the committee on the depository shall have the 
management of all matters connected with the Society's depository 
for the sale of Bibles — all of said committees at all times, however, to 
be subject to the direction and control of the trustees in all respects. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

These by-laws may be repealed or amended at any annual meet- 
ing, or at any special meeting duly called for that purpose, by vote of 
a majority of those present. 



PRIVILEGES OF LIFE MEMBERS. 

Each life member of this Society shall be allowed to receive from 
the depository, annually, the value of one dollar in Bibles and Tes- 
taments. 

N. B. The above books will be delivered to members by per- 
sonal application, or to their order ; and they can be issued only for 
the current, not iox past years. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE. 



BY THE PAYMENT OF TWENTY DOLLARS AND UPWARDS. 



Abbe, ReT. Frederick R., Boston, 
Abbe, Mrs. Frederick R., '* 
Abbott, Charles H., Lowell. 
Abbott, ZebedUh, IViMck£sior, 
Abbott, Mrs. Zebedlah, •< 
Abom, John O., fVakefiold. 
Adams, Miss Eliza M., lyiltrnkam. 
Adams, Elizabeth W., Dtrry^ N. H. 
Adams, Frank N., Evtrett. 
Adams, John Clark, Ho^kinton. 
Adams, Stephen, IVgst Mtdway. 
Adams, William, Br«ulford. 
Albro, Mrs. Elizabeth 8., IValikam. 
Albro, Miss Annie E., ** 

Alden, Almira S. C, Foxboro. 
Alden, BeT. Ebenezer, MarskJUld, 
Alden, Russell, Camilla. 
Alden, Miss Sarah B., Randolph. 
Alden, Miss Sasan, ** 

Aldrich, Mrs. Mary B., Wtsiboro. 
Allen, Mrs. Cyrus, Franklin, 
Allen, Rev. Nathaniel G., Boston. 
Allen, Richard H., Braintree. 
Allis, Willis, Barre, N, Y. 
AUis, Myron, " " 

Allis, Elliot, «« •« 

Allis, Edward, Madison, Mick. 
AUIs, Elliot, «* «• 

Allis, John, Conway. 
AUis, Irvinfc, H^katofy. 
Allis, Mrs. Cornelia A., WkateUy, 
AlTord, Alvln, Shelhtmo, 
Ames, James S., Haverkill. 
Ames, Jarvis A., N. E. Confer onct. 
Ames, R. N., <' " 

Andrews, Artemas F., Ashhy, 
Andrews, C. L., Boston. 
Andrews, George W., Banners. 
Andrews, Stephen P., Gloucester. 
Andrews, W. T., Boston. 
Andrews, Thomas E., Holliston. 
Andrews, Walter H., IVhitinsviUe, 
Angler, Miss Emma B., Foxboro. 
Annis, W. H., E. Pepperell, 
Archibald, Edward, Meiknen. 



Armee, Miss Clara A., Campello. 
Arms, Mrs. Charles, Soutk Deer/Uld. 
Arms, Harriet E., <* *< 

Armsby, Mrs. H. A., IVkHinsville. 
Arnold, Susan O., Braintree. 
Atkinson, Rev. W. H., I/, E. Conference, 
Atwood, Mrs. Abby, Bergen, N. y. 
Atwood, Mrs. Elizabeth M., Salem. 
Atwood, Rev. Edward S., Boston. 
Atwood, John W., Bergen, N. y, 
Avann, Rev. Joseph F., N. E. Conference. 
Avery, Rev. William F., Lamsboro. 
Babcock, Mrs. Nancy, Boston, 
Babcock, Mrs. P. W., Skerbom. 
Babcock, Rev. William R. 
Babson, Miss Maria R., Gloucester. 
Batchelder, John Mason, Holliston, 
Batchelder, Emily, •< 

Bachelor, Mrs. Mary A., WkitistsviUe. 
Bacon, Jacob, Gloucester. 
Bacon, Joseph N., Newton. 
Backus, Rev. Joseph W., Roekpille, Ci, 
Baker, Mrs. Eleanor J. W., Dorchester, 
Baker, Francis, Peabody, 
Baker, Susan S., " 
Baloom, Lincoln, Winckendon, 
Baldwin, Miss Josephine L., Lynn. 
Balmer, William, Jr., WkitinsvilU. 
Ball, Miss Elizabeth, Concord. 
Bancroft, Amasa, Gardner. 
Bancroft, Henry L., Millbury. 
Barbor, Mrs. Anna, Skerbom, 
Barbour, Wm. M., D. D., N^ew Haven, Ct, 
Barbour, Mrs. Eliza A., ** ** 

Bardsley, Joseph, IVkitinsvUU. 
Bard well, Francis C, Wkately. 
Barker, Hiram, Brighton, 
Barnard, William F., Marlboro. 
Barnes, H. H., Lowell. 
Barnes, Zi'pah, Henniker, N. H. 
Barrett, Nathan H., Concord, 
Barrett, Miss Rebecca M., Concord. 
Bartlett, Rev. Edward O., Kingston, R. I. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Eleanor C, Plymoutk. 
Bartlett, Thomas, Boston, 



BUTOW*, B«T. JuUn S., Jf. E. CtufirK 
Bunwa, Hn. AdellM E., " " 

BuTOWi, Mn. Ella, OmJUamd, Cal. 
BuTom, Buali H., LaJHvilU, 
BmmU, ^biel. Bridgrmaur 
BMMtt, Hcnrr Nrmlm. 
BuMt^ Sanli E., Hmturypsri. 
BUebtldM', Mn. £liub«th U,. Ljmt. 
BMebddeT, Proucli, Evtnii. 
B>tch«ldar, Jfllin H.. Hdlisi^. 
Bktebetdar, Boiirt, W.aMrJtBa,. 
Bkliheller, Ein,y/frft BrpdIrfirlJ 
BUcballBT. Mn. LotberaC, 
Batthalor, Mia Fimnoli A., Ifkilaarilli 



•.0. B.,; 



Boabe, Hmrcna F., Wiltratam. 
BaMtiar, Rst. CliarJaa 
BMObar, Itev. WillUni H. 
Baldmi, Mn. HkriwiiM P., Ifliaitfy. 
BaMrni, WlllUm P., GarJutr. 
B«lllTi>p, Ml» Manila W., Framiiiftam. 
fiell, H«r. Saniael, S^millt. 
Bsmli. Mn. Lyillii C, ^V. E. Caii/trrnti. 
Bamta, Mn, LydU A., " " 

Bsmla, Fnnk M., 
Up^m-r, [iunnnin C. £<««a 
Beat, Hn. Ellubetb C, K. HadUy. 
Bait, Mn. L. U., A^. £. Ctn/irrmtt. 
BI|clow, 1. B., N E. fV^W' 
Blgalow, Mn. Laoy S., J'*#r4»^.. 
Blgelov, Hsnl7 C. DtJkam. 
Bteeoa, Mn. Artliur Q., W,tihtn>. 
BUooe, Rer. Thomaa C HelliUii 
i(imi>gi.<:lisr)eiE. NfB.I„H. 



HIack 


I an 


Mn. LtdLa 


K... ClustT 


BUka 




■UB.eM>.D. 




Blsncl 




MlH rui« 


■.C.,e™/B. 


BllM, 






lUlM, 


Bar 


CharleaR., 


Ckitags. 


BIM, 


Hn. 


ChBrtea R., 




lilclg 


<'.-> 




Si^Un. 


Blood 




«rfi.!d. 


Blood,Cy™T., W^K 


kuUr. 


Blood 


»«> 


EeD., Gr^m. 


Blo«l 


Lyn 


lan. Gr*i*M. 





utw«ll,Mn. 



anah H., An. 



Bowen, Luke E.. ^ ■dwrr. 

Bowmi, Mn. Clkn H., ^ iu/«bt. 

Bafdan, A. O., BriJj-ttealtr. 

BnokflO, ReT Joalab, CkarUil-wn. 

Braokett, I^muel, Qimc^ 

Bnndsnberi, O. C. W.. San Frantim, CnJ. 

Brant, Auon, Ifakijltld. 






v.H^v. 



Brlgta, MIn Cktbarlna Claik, WtmJtam. 
BriKga, Bs(. WlUlmin T^ Bml DtHfUu. 
Brioi, Mn. Abbj L., " " 

Brlna, Ralan R.. " '■ 

Brighui, Daxter P., IVuittr: 
Brlghun.Mrn. Dnxti>r P 
Rr..tk,K.ibciIO., H-Julmn.illt. 
Brookt, Bar. C. S., FiUmim, CI. 
Brown, Gbdub M., Brad/trd 
Brown, Mn, Harriet L., BrnMcn. 
Brown, Rabecca, WkitnuuilU. 
Brown, Mn. Mai? L., HmtrkiU. 



MK.. « 



Ilr,a.> 



e.Theodon 



1. WH.lit 



. , BrtaUimt. 
Bnell, Owrge C, W. Sfrinifitld. 
Bulkley, Mn. C. P., RwHur/trd Par, 
Bulluil. Mn. John, Jr., MUtvaf. 
Balloni, Mn. Hikry W., Sk^rhcm. 
jurbvck, SniDuiil K., Bi»Um. 

JurgcM, EdwaM P., Dtdkam. 

Siiniliam. Robert 'W JSatx. 

JaiT, CbiirlM C j^uiurfiJalt, 
Burntge, J C , Bmi-m, 
Burnsa, Maty C, A-rlrngt^m. 
Burrill, Atnut.<?, Uilitidgo. 
Buah.BonryJ Watfitld. 
Bushbj, Sorlili. M'., /•Mf«^. 
Bullet, Rer. Daniel. Bta*H. 
Butler, Mn. Jana D., " 
BoUar, Mn. Henrtatta N„ JAAh^. 
C/Mly Mn. HattlBl S.. IfniUBr.. 



j Camp, Hunual, Sfrirngfiitd. 

Ca|<eii, Mn.Ctiarles, Framinglam, 
I Capen, Kev. Juba,^V £. CM/rrcM 

Cnpan, Hn. lie' Jabn, « 

Capion, John W., ^xir^^. 

Capron, Laura A. W., " 
I CarlatoD, Horace, M'ftan. 



CulaMn, 0«nrt* H.. HavrkiU. 
CtlpanUr, B«t. Cltrloi C, Btiltn. 
Cuptnler, CKtharina E., Prxier: 
C»n>«n"f. DmiIbI. " 

C«r[»ntBr, E<l»on, " 

Clrpenler, HuraM, " 

Cmt, Cfanrls R., WAHftniOi. 
Curr, John C, »■*«( ymtwr^. 
Curler Rev. &. H.,MimmtM'm »tlmi. 
('•rrotliers, Kev. Wlllliin, fairi^pn. 
Carter, EUimrd, AKdnir. 
Carter. JmhiiaT., Wh^inrrillt. 
Caner, Wlllliun H,. Lmtll. 
Carr, awr(s C, Brnkltn. 
Cary, Hn. Marj D., Ftxhtra. 
CaM, Mm. M»TJ Oll»», f/n Ytrk Cilj. 
Ul<vp1I, T^nuK!] E., Atfifn. 
Catc, Usoistana W., Havtrkm. 

rhunbsrllii Ji.lin, H-I,ilif„v,l!,. 



Uln. »n. 9 
r. Mix Piiii 



Chand 

Chandlar, H. K., CkarUilr^ 
CbapiD, Caleb T., NtrtUtn. 
Chapin, John O., WhilinnUU. 
Cb^n, Jotlah L..Zdiomcr. 
Cbapin, MatCQ*, jibiuM. 
Chapin, VLWo.s^rintMd. 
Cbapin, HluBarah, Wkiiinn,ah. 
Chapman, Qe<irm H WmckiiUr. 
Ohaae, Cliatlu W,, SaKimUlt liUmJt. 
CbaH, DaTid B., WAilinrwiai. 
Chaaa, Osorfe S.. Camiridrt. 
Cbau. Hnsklab.^Tn. 
CbaM, H^kla). S. B^„^. 
Cbaa«, Itol^ri, Ntvrrkm. 
Sheerer. i™,C*fi,n, 
CblW. Milt Anna O., SfriMf/liU. 
Cblld, Oeotig H., Sfri.gfi,U, O. 
Child, l.Dej A,, Tllrl/arJ, Vt. 
GUM*. CurlM, H,->.iktr, H. H. 
Cblhia, Uonin, " 
ChoaM, DstIiI, H.D., Stitm. 
Clapp, Janwa B., BtiiltH. 
Cla[9, John C-t " 
Clapli, Stniiiel, Faitare. 
Clapp. Preileriuk A., tfrntiltr. 
Clark, Be7 EUwar.l L., A-™ Ytrk. 
Clark, Elbrldgu. Eiui Mrdmir. 
dark, aearge. Covert. 
Clark, Jamaa a., A ndmr. 
dark, John L., •> 

Clark, Jonalban, Wbuluiltr, 
Oarfc, Re*. Joseph B., Daickt'itr. 
Clark, Julius L., Wnl tfmttn, 
CUA, U» Miranda D., BiHtm. 
Clartl, Oilier R., Tm/uhirr. 
Clark, Roww B., WkiiinrrHU. 
Clark, Rutiu W., D.D., ^tt*,^, AT. K 



Clarke, Hn. Adellia H., MAav- 
Clarke, Donu, D.D., Bttfm. 

ClMke, GeoraeK., FnlmrHlti. 

Clarkn, Hra. Sarah L., BttitH. 

Clarke, Elliabeth L., " 

Clary Mra. S. S., ii/iUn. 

CleTeUnd, MlMimrrleE A., SetOk OirrJbU. 

Cleaiolano. Mlu Sarah L , Stxtk 4fivm. 

aiHota. Wyatl B., O^lkam. 

C1i>»gfa, John K., Ciimiridgifart. 

Cobb, AndieiT B., Ntat'it. 



Cos^n 



., Btjs/trd. 



CDKiwell, l><utne, BraJ/trd. 

Uolburii. W. W., A", S. Ctnftrwua. 
Colbj, AlbMt. A«f