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DEPARTMENT OK PARKS 



TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Commissioners 



FOR THE 



Year Ending January ji, 1902 







PRINTED FOR THE DEPARTMENT 
1902 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioners 1 Report 5 

Superintendent's Report 9 

Engineer's Report 27 

Financial Statements for financial year 1901-1902: 

Expenditures for Land, Construction, and Maintenance . . 34 

Expenditures in Detail ......... 36 

General Exhibit of Appropriations 55 

Appropriations and Balances in Detail 56 

Summary of Expenditures on Account of Park and Playground 

Construction from the Organization of the Board ... 60 
Summary of Expenditures on Account of Public Parks and 
Playgrounds, Land, Construction, and Betterments from the 

Organization of the Board 68 

Park Betterments Collected by City Collector .... 70 

Public Park Debt 70 

Playground Debt 70 

Park Statistics 71 

Appendix 74 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS. 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



Hon. Patrick A. Collins, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — The Board has the honor herewith to submit this 
report for the year ending January 31, 1902. 

In our last annual report we recommended a further 
appropriation of $150,000 to enable us to complete the 
work of park construction, but no action was taken by the 
last city government on this recommendation. We need 
this appropriation of $150,000 to finish the construction of 
those parks upon which comparatively little additional work 
remains to be done. Estimates, in detail, for this work have 
already been sent to you. These include shelter and sanitary 
buildings, which are imperatively needed for the convenience 
and health of the public in many of the parks ; the exten- 
sion of the conduits connecting the Fens with Charles river, 
which will allow of the small square north of Beacon street, 
on Charles river, between Charlesgate east and Charlesgate 
west, to be filled and graded, and the completion of grading, 
loaming, and planting in various parts of the park system. 

The foul condition of the water in the Fens basin, from 
the flow of sewage into it from Stony brook, is a subject 
requiring prompt consideration. It is evident that it will 
be impossible to prevent the pollution of the Fens' basin 
until the waters of the brook cease to flow into the basin. 
This can be brought about either by connecting Stony brook 
with Charles river by a culvert large enough to carry directly 
into the river the entire flow of the brook at all times, or by 
connecting Stony brook with some general sewerage system 
built to prevent the pollution of the Charles river basin. 



6 

Under an order of the City Council, approved by the 
Mayor July 3, 1901, making an appropriation of 1225,000 for 
completing the Strandway, we took, on August 7, Burnham's 
wharf and the adjoining estates, aggregating about twelve 
and one-half acres of land and flats. The area required for 
the extension of Columbia road over this tract is three acres, 
leaving about nine acres available for playground purposes 
when the dock is filled up, the buildings cleared away, and 
the grounds levelled off, which work is now in progress. 

On May 20, 1901, the Board took possession of a small 
square, containing 52,800 square feet, known as Berners 
square, and held in trust under the will of David Sears, 
which provided that the square should be forever kept open 
for ornament and exercise for the benefit of the residents on 
his Longwood property on Brookline avenue, of which it 
formed a part. The Board also took a lot of land on Cam- 
den street, containing 2,190.6 square feet, for an addition to 
the Columbus avenue playground. 

Insufficient appropriations have delayed the necessary 
developments of several of the playgrounds in charge of the 
Board. Our policy is to make all playgrounds available for use 
as fast as they are needed, but not to expend money on them 
in advance of legitimate demands. The needs of the play- 
grounds are pointed out in the annexed report of our Super- 
intendent. We shall require at least $50,000 for their 
improvement to give the public the full benefit of the large 
expenditures already made for the acquisition of the land. 

Appropriations for improving Billings Field and for equip- 
ping First street playground as an out-door gymnasium were 
made by the City Council last November. Work on the 
former has begun, and plans for a locker and lavatory build- 
ing for the latter are being prepared. 

The Refectory building at Franklin Park has proved not 
to be a public success, and no tenant has been able to carry 
on there a successful restaurant. The last lease having 
expired, we are considering whether it might not serve a 
better purpose if used in part as a reading-room and library, 
similar to those established in the Brooklyn and New York 
parks, to contain chiefly books relating to natural history, for 



the use and enjoyment of the general public, as well as for 
students of landscape gardening, botany, ornithology, and 
similar subjects. A representation of the animal and 
vegetable life of our New England States, if it can be 
secured, would add to the interest and value of the library. 
The building will also be used for purposes of a shelter and 
for sanitary purposes. 

Full details of the work of the department during the year 
will be found in the accompanying reports of our Superin- 
tendent and Engineer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Stratton, 

Laban Pratt, 

James M. Prendergast, 

Commissioners. 
Boston, January 31, 1902. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To Charles E. Stratton, Laban Pratt, and James 
M. Prendergast, Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit a report of the work per- 
formed, under the direction of your board in this department, 
during the year 1901 : 

Franklin Park. 

The principal work of planting has been completed in 
Franklin Park, that of the past year having been confined to 
the finishing up of details in the general scheme. The bor- 
dering plantations of trees are fast producing the effect of 
seclusion in the park. Thrifty young woodlands now may 
be found, where once open views of the adjacent streets 
marred the prospect, and detracted from the enjoyment of 
persons driving or walking in the park. To produce as 
quickly as possible this desired effect of a screen, and to pro- 
vide mutual protection, the trees were planted thickly; this 
has necessitated considerable thinning out to avert damage 
from overcrowding. The surplus material has been used in 
making new plantations. From this time on the work of 
planting in Franklin Park might properly be charged to 
maintenance, as the greater part of the material used will be 
obtained from plantations which require thinning out. 

The thinning out of diseased and surplus trees in the old 
woodlands, which has been prosecuted for the past five years, 
continues to bear fruit. The gradual spread on top of a 
healthier growth, made possible by the admission of air and 
light, makes each tree a better specimen of its kind, and at 
the same time enhances the natural woodland effect. 

The floors of many of the woodlands, notably those in the 
Wilderness, need attention in the way of grubbing out tree 
weeds, such as locust, cherry, and other seedlings, which 



10 

grow rankly to the detriment or the exclusion of the more 
natural ground cover of wild shrubbery and herbaceous plants. 
Some work of this character has been done in Long Crouch 
Woods, which was badly infested with wild cherry seedlings. 
This piece of woodland is much frequented by picnic parties ; 
and as the loam covering originally was very thin, over a 
rocky foundation, the trees have suffered from lack of nutri- 
tion and from hard usage. To ameliorate these conditions 
about 9,000 cubic yards of loam were spread over a large part 
of the wood. This gives an additional covering of loam, 
averaging about six and one-half inches in thickness over the 
treated part, which will greatly tend to the improvement of 
the trees, which have been starving in a thin and impover- 
ished soil. 

Other woodlands in Franklin Park are suffering from the 
thinness of the soil covering. Fine tree growth is one of the 
chief features of a pleasing landscape ; and as loam at 
present is offered freely at cheap rates, it would seem to be 
wise to make liberal appropriations for the purchase of this 
prime necessity for producing a good growth of trees on the 
rocky, sterile portions of Franklin Park. 

During most of the season two gangs of four men each 
were kept at the important work of tree pruning. Consider- 
able additional under-drainage was laid in Nazingdale, with 
good results. The greater part of the length of the old 
brook (now carried in a pipe below the surface) was levelled 
and seeded, which made a vast improvement in what was 
once a rough and swampy hollow. 

To improve the entrance to the park from Seaver street 
and Columbus avenue, Walnut avenue was widened between 
Seaver street and the Walnut avenue entrance to seventy 
feet. The foundation was laid for a boundary wall on the 
park side, and the work of the superstructure will commence 
with the opening of spring. 

A decrease in the interest taken in golf, during the past sea- 
son, was noticeable, the total number of players that went 
over the course being 31,007, a decrease of twenty-two and 
one-half per cent, from the attendance of the previous season. 
Early in the year a rearrangement of the links was made, 



11 

by laying out for experienced players a nine-hole course 
around the borders of the meadow, and for beginners a six- 
hole course through the centre and within the lines of the 
nine-hole course. The first tees were changed from the old 
location to Schoolmaster Hill, where a golf house has been 
fashioned out of the tiled shelter. Accommodations are 
there furnished for checking and storing golfing bags and 
clothing. Dressing-rooms for men and women are provided 
also in the building. 

Tennis seems to be increasing in favor. All the available 
ground in Ellicottdale was in use last season. The courts 
were in constant demand, and frequently on Saturday 
afternoons and holidays all who wished to play could not be 
accommodated at once. The Franklin Field courts also 
were well patronized. 

Arnold Arboretum. 
The only work done during the past season in the 
Arboretum consisted of the ordinary maintenance of roads 
and walks, of which the raising of a part of the lower drive 
formed the principal item, it having settled into the peat bed 
over which it is built. 

Olmsted Park and Riverway. 
With the exception of a little additional planting and the 
erection of a sanitary building Olmsted Park is completed, 
as far as construction has been planned. The rearrangement 
of the shrubberies along the water side has greatly added to 
the charm of the lower walk along the Riverway. The 
plantations made during the past four years are doing well. 
A quantity of shrubs were planted the past season, among 
which may be noted the rhododendrons on the slope of the 
bank from Perkins street, at Ward's pond. These are hybrids 
between our native species, which give the required hardiness, 
and the Asian species which impart splendor of bloom. 
Two thousand kalmias are in preparation in our nurseries for 
planting on the east and north slopes of the pond, the 
intention being to continue the slightly gardenesque treat- 
ment in this pretty little hollow. The lilies, lotus, and 



12 

colonies of semi-aquatic plants fringing the pond produced 
a beautiful effect last season. 

The preparation of the water's edge of the Riverway and 
Leverett pond, for planting with semi-aquatic and water- 
loving plants remains to be done. This will give a more 
natural effect at the water line than now exists along the 
rough, stony shore. The plants will be mostly herbaceous ; 
and will include, rushes, sedges, and grasses, also arrow- 
heads, water plantain, willow herbs, ly thrums, with occa- 
sional colonies of water lilies, lotus flowers, and many other 
plants of like character. 

The Fens. 

On the south side of the Fens considerable planting was 
done on the areas where additional loam had been spread the 
previous season. This consisted principally of roses, wax 
myrtle, and a variety of other shrubs. On the north side, 
large plantings were made of goldenbells, honeysuckle, matri- 
mony vine, and aromatic sumac. 

In preceding reports attention has been called to the 
necessity of increasing the depth of loam that covers the dry 
gravel of which the Fens is composed. This is a matter of 
great importance to the future of the trees, which have grown 
to the point where their roots are confined within gravelly 
limits, a condition that prevents further growth and develop- 
ment, and dooms to disappointment the expectation that, in 
the near future, fine trees will grace the Fens and give 
shelter from its wind-swept openness. 

The amount of sewage and filth discharged into the Fens 
pond continues to increase. The condition of the pond 
steadily grows worse; and, during storm periods, the odor 
from the contaminated waters is quite perceptible over the 
whole area covered by the Fens and driveways. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 
The crowded condition of the trees on that portion of 
Commonwealth avenue lying between Arlington and Dart- 
mouth streets made it desirable to remove such trees as were 
injuring the better ones. An improvement was at once 



13 

noticeable. The remaining trees, many of them being good 
specimens of European and American elms, could be seen to 
better advantage; while the sunshine admitted, here and 
there, into the damp floor encouraged the growth of the turf, 
and very much improved the general conditions necessary 
for tree growth. 

Charlesbank. 

The great use made of the mounds by women and children, 
during the summer season, makes it hard to maintain good 
turf, especially if the season is a dry one. In a great meas- 
ure this could be corrected by the equipment of a water 
system, to which,* at frequent intervals, hose and sprinkling 
nozzles could be attached. By dividing the ground to be 
irrigated into sections controlled by valves the work of 
sprinkling could be made almost automatic. 

The trees planted in the past two years have been pro- 
tected by stout tree-boxes. This protection was found to 
be indispensable, as many of the trees were broken down by 
the rough and careless usage to which they were sub- 
jected. A number of additional trees were planted, and 
holes, three feet in depth by ten feet in width, were prepared 
and filled with good loam for further planting in the 
spring. 

The men's gymnasium, under the supervision of Mr. John 
W. Bowler, was well patronized. The women's gymnasium 
also had a successful season. The winter work at the 
women's gymnasium has been increased to eight classes per 
week, four in the afternoon for children, and four in the even- 
ing for women. To accommodate these classes the partition 
wall in the gymnasium hall was moved, thus adding some 
spare office and locker space to the hall. A detailed report, 
by the Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene Association, 
of the work of the gymnasium will be found in the appendix. 

Wood Island Park. 

The bare, bleak hillsides of two or three years ago, at 
Wood Island Park, now are covered with trees, which are 
sufficiently umbrageous to cast a grateful shade over the 



14 

grounds, of which full advantage is taken by the frequenters 
of the park. 

During the past year little work of construction has been 
done. The unsightly man-hole basins on the shore have 
been removed. The base-ball grounds have been improved, 
by grading and levelling, and a number of fixed seats have 
been constructed to accommodate those who gather to watch 
the games. A flight of stone steps, leading from Prescott 
street down to the playground, also has been built. 

A slight improvement in the gymnasium attendance over 
that of the preceding season can be noted. The attendance 
in 1900 was 48,065 ; that of the past season was 48,909. 
Two days in the week the gymnasium was open to women 
and girls, and four days in the week to men and boys. 
The work is still under the direction of Mr. James L. Walsh. 

Charlestowjst Heights. 

During the past season the only work of consequence 
done in this park consisted of a partial rearrangement of the 
shrubberies, the planting of some fresh material, and the 
erection of iron fences at each side of the shelter on the Bun- 
ker Hill-street front. 

The asphalt floor of the open pavilion, which forms the 
roof for the sanitaries and shelter, is in a bad condition, and 
it is doubtful if it can be repaired. A new one, probably, 
will be necessary. 

Marine Park. 

To meet the requirements of this very popular resort, a 
line of fixed seats was constructed from Q street on the 
south to the Farragut monument on the north, a distance of 
1,281 feet. The walk on which they were placed was 
widened to a width of eighteen feet. At the junction of the 
walks, opposite the Head House, a bubble fountain was 
erected. 

Pending the erection of a permanent fence on the Q-street 
boundary, a temporary wire fence has been built to protect 
the newly-planted shrubberies. A number of European elms 
and lindens, which seem to be well adapted for bleak sea-side 



15 

planting, were added to the plantations last season. These 
young plantations are thriving well, and, even now, give 
a wood-like appearance to the park when viewed from the 
harbor. Shrubbery also was planted on the slopes surround- 
ing the ponds, a path or beach being left around the margin 
of each pond of a sufficient width to permit of the free use 
of the ponds for miniature yacht sailing, which is a favorite 
pastime with the smaller boys. For the accommodation of 
the frequenters of Pleasure Bay, a landing for row-boats was 
constructed at the pier. 

No work, other than that of regular maintenance, was 
done at Castle Island, except the building of a number of 
fixed seats. 

Strand way. 

The land necessary for completing the Strandway and 
Columbia road between Mercer and Atlantic streets having 
been taken by your Board, the work of construction between 
these points was commenced last fall by this department, and 
was continued until closed down by bad weather. The con- 
struction of Columbia road throughout the rest of the Strand- 
way will be done by the Street Department, plans for which 
have been prepared and adopted jointly by the Park and 
Street departments. 

Columbia Road. 

During the past season a line of Norway maples was 
planted on Columbia road between Blue Hill avenue and 
Edward Everett square. This planting was made in the bor- 
der of the electric car reservation, and completes the tree 
planting on Columbia road between Blue Hill avenue and 
Dorchester avenue. 

Chestnut Hill Park. 

During the past year bordering plantations were made 
along the north boundary of this park from the Common- 
wealth avenue entrance to the Newton line. The nursery 
was removed and the ground it occupied was planted with a 
variety of trees from which permanent trees can be selected* 



16 

Young spruces were planted on the south boundary. These 
trees will be allowed ample space for individual development. 
The ordinary work of maintenance was done during the 
year. The unnecessary width of the driveway at this park, 
which approximates seventy-five feet, is a source of expense, 
not being nearly covered by wheel traffic it permits of a 
growth of weeds and grasses on its surface which are hard 
to keep down. The cobble gutters, too, are very much out 
of repair and require constant attention. A plan has been 
prepared by the department for narrowing the roadway and 
adding to the width of the planting space on the sides next 
to the park boundaries. This plan, if it could be put into 
execution, would decrease materially the expense of road 
maintenance and at the same time would widen and im- 
prove in appearance and effectiveness the bordering belt 
of planting between the park drive and the streets. The 
estimate of our engineer of the cost of this work, which 
includes the loaming and planting, is $33,750. 

Berners Square. 
{Area 1.2 acres.') 
This square, located on Bellevue and Plymouth streets, 
near Longwood avenue, was taken the past season by the 
department. It contains a number of good elms and maples. 
The trees are injuring each other from their closeness and 
will require some little thinning out. The ground also re- 
quires grading, but no work other than that of a little clear- 
ing up has been done. Probably the best treatment would 
be to grade the ground to a gentle slope from the sides to 
the centre, with provision for carrying off the drainage from 
the centre. 

At Copp's Hill Terraces, Dorchester Park, and West Rox- 
bury Parkway no work was done during the past season, 
except the necessary maintenance work. 

Nurseries. 
In the new addition to the nursery at Franklin Field a 
quantity of material from the seed beds has been set out in 



17 

nursery rows. If a suitable appropriation for the purpose 
is made by the City Council the remainder of the nursery 
will be planted with young material, which will include a 
large number of fine seedling oaks, two years old. This 
will increase the area of the nursery to 7.7 acres. 

It has been necessary to retain the nursery at West Rox- 
bury parkway for the present, or until the trees and shrubs 
can be planted in the parks. The nursery ground at Chest- 
nut Hill has been cleared and planted with permanent trees, 
as has also the old nursery at Franklin Park, with the excep- 
tion of the ground occupied by the seed beds. 

Playgrounds, 
franklin field. 

(Area, 77 Acres. ,) 

At present the Street Department is laying an under- 
ground conduit across Franklin Field to receive the drainage 
of the neighboring district. In the progress of the work the 
surface of the ground has been very much cut up by the 
heavy teaming over it, and will require extensive repairs. 
The old drainage ditches, too, should be filled, as the com- 
pletion of the drainage work now in progress will render 
them unnecessary. 

Furthermore, as set forth in the twenty-fifth annual report, 
the surface of nearly the entire field is in a poor condition 
from settlements. To remedy this, either sufficient loam to 
level the inequalities should be spread over the surface or 
the ground should be ploughed, harrowed and seeded. The 
first plan would be preferable, as the addition of loam to the 
present peaty, spongy surface would make more stable turf. 
The latter plan, however, would be the cheaper one, and in 
the present state of our finances would seem to be the only 
one to adopt. 

While this necessary drainage work interferes with the 
free use of a part of the field for games, and entirely cut off 
skating the past winter, yet the advantages that will accrue at 
the completion of the work in a measure will compensate 
the public for this deprivation. 



18 

Baseball, football, tennis and cricket grounds are provided. 
All have been used freely during the past season. 

CHRISTOPHER GIBSON PLAYGROUND. 
(Area, 5.8 Acres.} 

Dorchester avenue and Park street. Elms, for bordering 
shade trees, have been planted around the larger piece of 
this playground, the smaller triangular piece being bordered 
with Norway maples. 

The baseball and football grounds have been in great 
demand during the past season, and many applications for 
the reservation of the grounds for games have had to be 
refused. 

The triangle was flooded for skating the past winter and 
thousands enjoyed the sport. 

SAVIN HILL BEACH. 

(Area, 18.6 Acres.} 
Springdale street, Dorchester. Last spring the squatters' 
shanties on the beach were removed and a bath-house was 
erected in time for the commencement of the bathing season. 
The bath-house contains thirty-one bathing closets for women 
and fifty-four bathing closets for men, which are free to the 
public, the patrons bringing their own suits and towels. 
Attendants of both sexes are in charge, and the results have 
been very satisfactory. The attendance for the summer was 
14,749. 

NEPONSET PLAYGROUND. 

(Area, 18 Acres.} 
Neponset avenue. During the past season no work, other 
than that of maintenance, has been done on this playground. 
The gravel filling laid on a part of the salt meadow has not 
proved satisfactory by reason of the unequal settlement of the 
ground from the added weight of the filling. Additional 
filling has been put into these depressions, yet the settlement 
still continues, and probably further settlement will occur 
until sufficient solidity is attained. As there now seems to 



19 

be no necessity for raising the grade of the meadow the 
filling up of the slight inequalities of the surface with loam 
would appear to be a better plan of treatment for the re- 
mainder of the playground. As far as material for the pur- 
pose could be obtained, this plan has been adopted and is 
working very well. 

An area of 3.3 acres was flooded and used by skaters dur- 
ing the winter. A sanitary building is much needed at these 
grounds. 

MYSTIC PLAYGEOUND. 

(Area, 2.3 Acres.) 
Chelsea street and Mystic river. At present this play- 
ground is a bare, cindered surface, with fixed seats at the 
sides. A few pieces of apparatus, suitable for the use of 
small children, such as swings, teeters, sand-boxes, etc., are 
being made in the shops of the department. The addition of 
the apparatus will render the playground more inviting to 
the children of the locality and will enlarge its opportunities 
for usefulness, which would still further be enhanced by the 
erection of an open shelter near the sand-boxes, and the 
employment of a female playground-keeper or kindergartner. 
Sanitary accommodations and a drinking fountain are greatly 
needed. 

CHAELESTOWN PLAYGEOUND. 

(Area, 14- Acres. - ) 

Corner Main and Alford streets. Norway maples were 
planted, last spring, along the Alford-street boundary, within 
the playground fence. The Main-street border is ready for 
planting, but it has been considered best to defer this until 
the fence is erected, in order that the trees may have its 
additional protection. Wherever planting has been done in 
the playgrounds it has been found necessary to protect the 
trees by strong wooden boxes, six feet high. Even with such 
guards the trees frequently are mutilated, undoubtedly with 
wilful intent. 

The filling and grading of this playground have not been 
fully completed, yet sufficient well-graded ground is avail- 
able for present needs. 



20 

A skating rink of 2.2 acres was flooded for skating the 
past winter, and was much used. Drinking fountains and a 
sanitary building are much needed ; and, could the Main-street 
fence, for which bids have been obtained, be built, it would 
add greatly to the appearance of that front. 

ROGERS PARK. 

(Area, 6.9 Acres.') 

Foster and Lake streets, Brighton. During the past year 

the work of maintenance only has been done at this park 

and playground. Filling is needed for playground extension, 

also sanitary conveniences. 

NORTH BRIGHTON PLAYGROUND. 

(Area, lJf Acres.) 
Western avenue and Harvard street. Only the regular 
work of maintenance was carried on here the past season. 
This playground is very popular, and a further extension of 
graded playground area is necessary. This can be accom- 
plished by levelling up the uneven surface of the meadow, and, 
as the rougher grading has been done, it will not be a difficult 
matter. Shelter and sanitary buildings and fencing are 
needed. An area of 3.3 acres of ice was prepared, and was 
much enjoyed by skaters the past winter. The principal 
games played at this playground are baseball and football. 
Ground has been prepared also for a quoit club, the mem- 
bers of which seemed to fully appreciate the privilege. 

BILLINGS FIELD. 

(Area, 11 Acres.) 
Lagrange street, near Centre street, West Roxbury. Dur- 
ing last season the under-drainage of this playground was 
finished. To afford a deeper drainage outlet from the field, 
Mr. Samuel B. Dana kindly permitted the department to lay 
a drain across his property. This will greatly improve the 
drainage of the playground, and, unless further settlements 
occur, will render additional filling unnecessary, which would 
be a much more expensive operation. 



21 

The slope of the hill from Bellevue street, which is too 
steep for playground purposes, has been prepared for and 
planted with trees, to afford a wooded shelter for viewing 
the games. At the foot of the slope tennis grounds are 
being graded, on which five courts, if necessary, can be laid 
out. 

Last winter a toboggan slide of 800 feet in length was 
built and kept in order, as also were five acres of ice for 
skating. 

EOSLINDALE PLAYGEOUND. 

(Area, 3.7 Acres.} 

South Walter and Robert streets. With the exception of 
the planting of Norway maples around the street borders, 
no work of construction was done at these grounds the past 
season. 

This playground is very popular for ball games. An ice 
field of 1.6 acres was prepared for skating last winter, which 
was enjoyed by many. Sanitary buildings, grading, and a 
retaining wall are the present requirements. 

COLUMBUS AVENUE PLAYGEOUND. 

(Area, I/..8 Acres.} 

Within the fence line, on the Camden street and Columbus 
avenue boundaries of this playground, a loam bed, twelve 
feet wide, was prepared and planted with Norway maples. 
The smoke and coal dust from the adjacent round-house 
make rather hard conditions for tree growth. A considerable 
amount of grading was done, and a granite bubble fountain, 
for furnishing drinking water, was erected. 

The Civic League was given the management of the 
grounds during the summer and fall, the League paying the 
expenses of the instructors, while the Park Department main- 
tained the grounds. The playground was very popular, and 
fully demonstrated the wisdom of its purchase. 

A portion of the grounds on the Camden street end was 
fenced off for the children, for whom the Civic League erected 
a shelter, and furnished sand-boxes and several pieces of 
simple gymnastic apparatus adapted to the little folks. 



22 

During the winter an ice field of 2.6 acres was formed, by- 
means of a dam, and a large number of people enjoyed the 
sport. To enlarge the area for skating a retaining wall is 
needed on the north line to permit of the raising of the dam. 
A sanitary building also is much needed. 

PRINCE STREET PLAYGROUND. 

(Area, O.If Acres.') 
Prince and North Bennet streets. No work, except that 
of maintenance, was done on this playground last year. Its 
crowded condition, in a densely populated neighborhood, 
would justify a large expenditure to increase its area. 

FIRST STREET PLAYGROUND. 

(Area, fy.6 Acres.) 

First and M streets, South Boston. As a special appro- 
priation of $9,550 has been made by the City Council for 
the improvement of this playground, plans are under con- 
sideration for an open-air gymnasium and a sanitary and 
locker building. 

The grounds were well patronized, last season, for ball 
playing and bicycle racing. During the winter the ice rink 
of 3.1 acres was enjoyed by thousands. 

FELLOWS STREET PLAYGROUND. 

(Area, 0.85 Acres.) 
Fellows and Hunneman streets. In its present bare con- 
dition, this playground is not very inviting, and is not as 
popular with the children as the surrounding sidewalks seem 
to be. A small building has been placed on the grounds, 
and a few pieces of apparatus, consisting of swings, swing- 
ing-ladders, teeter-boards, and sand-boxes are under con- 
struction at the department shops. The assistance of a 
kindergartner would greatly aid in bringing out the possi- 
bilities of this playground. 

ICE SPORTS. 

The winter of 1901-1902 proved to be a good one for all 
ice sports. Although Franklin Field, generally the most 




Uhi 











23 



popular of our skating areas, could not be used, the total 
number of skaters at the various places exceeded that of 
1900-1901. Thirteen horse-planers were in use, and the 
ice was kept in very good condition. Ice was maintained at 
thirteen parks and playgrounds, making a total area of 106.6 
acres. At Jamaica Pond a measured track was laid out, and 
proved to be quite an added attraction. Hockey rinks were 
made at Scarboro' and Jamaica Ponds, Billings Field, Wood 
Island Park, and at Columbus avenue, North Brighton, and 
Roslindale playgrounds. 

By permission of your Board, the Boston Curling Club 
made Scarboro' Pond its headquarters for this grand old 
game. A number of friendly contests were fought, of which 
one was with the Country Club at Clyde Park, that relieved 
the Country Club of the district medal, which it had held 
for a year. An itemized table following will give further 
skating details. 

Skating— Season 1901-1902. 



Name. 


Area. 


Hockey 
Rinks. 


No. of days 
Skating. 


Approximate 
Attendance. 




4.5 acres 

5.0 " 
1.4 " 

2.2 " 

2.6 " 

3.1 " 
1.95 " 

64.5 " 

3.3 " 
3.3 " 
2.1 " 
4.75 " 
7.9 " 




1 

46 
44 
48 
42 
40 
45 
43 
42 
43 
45 
42 
45 


100 


Billings Field 


1 


17,900 




64,050 






27,750 
31,125 

42,800 


Columbus Avenue Playground 


1 


Christopher Gibson Playground.. 




21,350 


2 


159,400 




26,750 
30,100 
23,425 
27,825 
60,125 




1 
1 
1 
1 










Totals 


106.6 acres 


8 




532,700 





Insect Enemies of Trees. 
During the past year Boston has been subjected to an 
invasion of the elm-leaf beetle and the brown-tailed moth. 



24 

Both are pests of the most dangerous character. The elm- 
leaf beetle confines its ravages to the elm tree, and is more 
easy to control than the brown-tailed moth. Then, too, the 
elm-leaf beetle does not commence to eat until the foliage is 
partly developed. This gives an opportunity of spraying the 
foliage with an arsenical solution, which kills the beetle when 
it begins to feed upon the poisoned foliage. The brown-tailed 
moth hibernates in the larval state in nests containing from 
fifty to one hundred each, and then emerges on the first 
warm days of spring and attacks the buds and unfolding 
leaves of the elm, maple, and various other kinds of trees, 
including apple and pear trees. In August or early Septem- 
ber a second brood of larvae attacks the second growth of 
leaves. The second crop of larvae may be successfully com- 
batted by arsenical spraying. The greatest mischief is to be 
apprehended from the first brood, as it cannot be reached by 
poison, and the only remedy known is to pick off the nests 
and burn them. This is a difficult and expensive matter in 
high trees as the nests are found only on the small twigs at 
the ends of the branches. An evidence of the prolific nature 
and energy of the brown-tailed moth is found in the fact, 
that, from an importation into Somerville (supposedly on 
roses from France), in 1897, the moth has spread north to 
central New Hampshire, and south to Scituate. In Allston, 
Brighton, Cambridge, and Somerville, last summer, trees 
were entirely defoliated by them. 

Provision has been made by your Board to fight these 
pests. A gasoline power sprayer, with a capacity of twelve 
gallons per minute, has been constructed in the shops of the 
department. The machinery, comprising a Daimler motor 
and a Fairbanks & Morse triplex pump, is set on a tank of 
470 gallons capacity, and the whole is mounted on a four- 
wheeled contractor's wagon. Our hand spraying apparatus 
has been increased by the purchase of six additional barrel- 
pumps on wheels. With this equipment we expect to be 
able to keep these insects down. They cannot, however, be 
exterminated without concerted action on the part of the 
city authorities, and also of private individuals. 




,/ />Trag : 







25 



Maintenance. 

Each year it is becoming more difficult to maintain the 
parks and playgrounds on the amount appropriated for that 
purpose by the city government. During the past five or 
six years the work of construction has proceeded with great 
rapidity, especially in the matter of planting and on account 
of playground extension. Plantations laid out for orna- 
mental effect are expensive to maintain. As compared with 
other park systems the Boston parks contain a large per- 
centage of such planted areas. Playgrounds, too, are found 
to average high in the cost per acre for maintenance, as com- 
pared with parks of large size. Furthermore, when the 
eight-hour law came into effect, the hours of labor were 
reduced one-ninth ; and the half-holiday on Saturday has 
since been extended, and now covers the whole year. Thus 
maintenance charges have increased to the point where we 
are only able to keep the parks in a mediocre manner, and 
not at all with the degree of perfectness expected of Boston, 
whose parks have a reputation for excellence that is world- 
wide. In comparison with other cities Boston's appropriation 
for park maintenance, per acre, ranks very low, as the follow- 
ing table of the comparative cost of maintaining the parks of 
various cities will show. 

Details of measurements and quantities of work done 
during the past year will be found in the report of Mr. C. E. 
Putnam, engineer of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. Pettigeew, 

Superintendent. 



26 



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27 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Mr. John A. Pettigrew, 

Superintendent : 

Dear Sir, — The following report, for the year ending 
January 31, 1902, is respectfully submitted : 

Commonwealth Aventje. 

Northerly driveway, from Arlington 
street to Massachusetts avenue, re- 
surfaced with two inches of macadam, 15,400 square yards. 

Flagstone cross-walks raised and relaid, 327 square yards. 

Gravel walks resurfaced . . . 8,500 square yards. 

Loam bought and spread on plantations, 139 cubic yards. 

The Fens. 

Curbstone reset ..... 75 linear feet. 

Loam bought and spread on plantations, 1,421 cubic yards. 

RlVERWAY. 

Catch-basins built . . . . 3. 

Drain pipe laid, 8-inch . . . 157 linear feet. 

Driveway raised and resurfaced . . 150 square yards. 

Olmsted Park. 

Walks surfaced with four inches of 

cinders, 1 mile .... 8,839 square yards. 
Walks surfaced with four inches of 

macadam, 0.44 mile . . . 4,344 square yards. 

Stone stairways built in walks, two . 34 granite steps. 

Drain pipe laid : 

8-inch 190 linear feet. 

Catch-basins built .... 4. 



28 



Loam bought and spread on plantations, 
Iron pipe fence built .... 
Driveway raised and resurfaced . 

Arborway. 
8-inch drain pipe laid .... 
Catch-basins built . . - . 
Loam bought and spread on plantations, 
Driveway raised and resurfaced . 



7,727 cubic yards. 
516 linear feet. 
375 square yards. 



120 linear feet. 
7. 
86 cubic yards. 
528 square yards. 



Arnold Arboretum. 
Driveway raised and resurfaced . . 900 square yards. 



Franklin Park. 

Walks built (i mile) .... 

Drain pipe laid : 

4-inch ...... 

3-inch ...... 

Foundation for boundary wall laid 

Excavation for widening Walnut ave- 
nue ...... 

Loam bought and spread on planta- 
tions ...... 



2,928 square yards. 

120 linear feet. 

1,562 linear feet. 

400 linear feet. 

3,500 cubic yards. 

9,805 cubic yards. 



A flight of four stone steps has been built opposite Angel 
street, and a flight of 39 stone steps at Hagborne Hill has 
been removed. 

The arrangement of drives, walks and planting spaces at 
the junction of Pierpont and Playstead roads has been 
changed to conform to the construction of the glade, in place 
of the proposed greeting, and the slopes have been regraded. 

The gate posts and parapet wall at Forest Hills bridge 
have been taken down, and the stone hauled to the site of 
the proposed sanitary building on Schoolmaster Hill. 

The trellis at Schoolmaster Hill arbor has been taken down 
and the stone hauled to the site of the proposed sanitary 
building in Long Crouch woods. 

The potting house has been moved into the yard in front 
of the repair shops, and rearranged for a storehouse and 
office building ; and the greenhouses have been torn down. 



29 

Drilling and pipe-cutting machines have been placed in the 
machine shop. 

An outfit for spraying trees has been made, by mounting a 
li horse power gasoline engine and a 2i-inch by 3-inch triplex 
pump on a 470 gallon tank. The pump and engine are 
coupled directly together, and will deliver twelve gallons per 
minute, against a pressure of 120 pounds per square inch ; or, 
through J-inch nozzles, will throw two streams to a height of 
35 feet. 

Franklin Field. 

The large surface drains, that are being built here, are to 
be completed in May. The unsightly drainage ditch can 
then be filled, the slope along Talbot avenue can be graded, 
and the draining and grading of the field can be completed. 

Drinking fountain erected . . . 1. 

Loam bought and spread on plantations, 659 cubic yards. 

Columbia Road. 

The New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad has 
completed its bridge over Columbia road, at Richfield street ; 
and the unfinished section at that place is being completed 
by the Street Department. 

The Street Department has also completed the abutments, 
and put in place the iron work of the bridges over the Old 
Colony division and Shoreham street. 

Of the section, 1,175 feet in length, between Mercer and 
Atlantic streets, that is being constructed by this depart- 
ment, 500 feet have been subgraded; 150 feet are flats, and 
will require about 12,000 cubic yards of filling before the 
road can be completed. 

Walks macadamized .... 350 square yards. 

Marine Park. 

The shallow water at the end of the channel from Q street 
wharf interferes considerably with the boats running to 
Castle Island. The channel is 1,000 feet long, and has a 



30 

minimum depth of 6£ feet at mean low water. For the first 
400 feet the channel is 100 feet wide, for the remaining 600 
feet it is only 60 feet wide. It ends abruptly about 400 
feet from a point where the natural depth is 6^ feet. But 
little dredging would be required to extend the channel this 
400 feet, as the natural depth is 4i to 6 feet. 

Drinking fountain erected . . . 1. 

Permanent seats built . . . 1,281 linear feet. 

Boat-landing at iron pier built . . 1. 

Drain pipe laid (6-inch) . . . 177 linear feet. 

Castle Island. 
Permanent seats built . . . 779 linear feet. 

Wood Island Park. 

Stone stairway built, one . . . 30 granite steps. 

Permanent seats built . . . 236 linear feet. 

Manholes and tide-gates built . . 4. 

Charlestown Heights. 
Iron fence erected . . . . 123£ linear feet. 

Charlesbank. 

The women's gymnasium apparatus has been covered with 
a wood and canvas roof. 

Loam bought and spread on planta- 
tions ...... 133 cubic yards. 

Copp's Hill Terraces. 

Permanent seats built . . . 216 linear feet. 

North End Beach. 

The Fiske Wharf and Warehouse Trust has built a bulk- 
head and deposited about 1,200 cubic yards of filling under 
the platform, in the rear of the women's bath-house. 



31 



Columbus Avenue Playground. 

Drinking fountain erected . . . 1. 

Open-air shower-baths installed . . 6. 

4-inch drain pipe laid . . . .150 linear feet. 

2-inch water pipe laid . . . .200 linear feet. 

The Civic League has erected a children's shelter and 
playhouse, two frames of gymnastic apparatus, and two ob- 
servation stands with a seating capacity of 1,100 ; also 80 
linear feet of shelter sheds. 

North Brighton Playground. 
Loam bought and used for surfacing . 143 cubic yards. 

Billings Field. 

Drain pipe laid : 

10-inch ...... 975 linear feet. 

3-inch tile. ..... 1,680 linear feet. 

Water pipe laid (3-inch) ... 50 linear feet. 

Loam bought and used for surfacing . 351 cubic yards. 

Neponset Playground. 
Loam bought and used for surfacing . 175 cubic yards. 

Savin Hill Playground. 

A bath locker building, containing 85 lockers, 4 showers, 
an office room and toilet-rooms has been built. 

Water pipe laid : 

8-inch . . . . . .125 linear feet. 

1-inch ...... 325 linear feet. 

6-inch sewer laid .... 475 linear feet. 

Filling bought and used on dike and 

beach ...... 1,100 cubic yards. 

The beach has been cleared of old bath shanties and of 
stones. 



32 



Cost of Maintenance Per Acre, 1895=1901, Inclusive. 



Name of Park. 



Area 

in 
Acres. 



Cost Pee acre. 



OS 
00 
r-l 


OO 


00 


oo 

00 


05 
05 

oo 


e 
o 

05 


$448 


$528 


$519 


$458 


$485 


$534 


122 


121 


125 


98 


119 


126 


155 


212 


201 


207 


177 


247 


51 


94 


97 


72 


71 


110 


60 


90 


140 


136 


119 


126 


27 


23 


19 


26 


24 
3 

75 


19 

6 

115 

| 234 


44 


55 


65 


62 


32 


45 


54 


25 


61 












6 

189 


147 


185 


180 


212 


270 


1 




4 


1 


2 


18 








99 
117 


86 
151 


86 
176 


79 


162 


146 






1 2,338 


t3,308 


551 


26 






715 
910 


480 
680 






444 


825 


1,313 


1,374 


1,223 


970 


1,092 

1 

12 

100 

46 


984 
166 
38 
89 
60 








9 












191 


*1,900 












13 

354 

94 










28 
70 






30 


77 






13 


48 


92 


36 






1 
30 


97 
35 


189 
60 


312 
113 


11 


36 












76 
101 

16 
159 






113 

*994 

5 


221 
47 

27 


300 
11 

61 






5 


4 


458 


682 


606 


525 


579 


563 















Commonwealth avenue 

Fens 

Riverway 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum 

West Roxbury Parkway 

Franklin Park 

Columbia road 

Dorchesterway . . 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Dorchester Park 

Chestnut Hill Park 

Wood Island Park 

North End Beach 

Copps Hill Terraces 

Prince Street Playground 

Charlesbank 

Columbus Avenue Playground. . 

North Brighton Playground 

Rogers Park 

Fellows Street Playground 

Forest Hills Playground 

Roslindale Playground 

Billings Field Playground 

Neponset Playground 

Ashmont Playground 

Christopher Gibson Playground. 

Franklin Field 

Savin Hill Playground 

First Street Playground 

Mystic Playground 

Charlestown Playground 

Charlestown Heights 

Berners square 

* Including filling and gradin 



30 
115 

40 
180 

36 
223 
150 
527 

18.5 
6 

40 

34 

26 

42 

46 
2.7 
0.6 
0.4 

10 
4.8 

14 
6.9 
0.85 

10.3 
3.7 

11 

18 
2.2 
5.8 

77 
6 

4.6 
2.3 

14 
4 
1.2 



t Including maintenance of bath-houses. 



33 



Cost of maintenance (repairs, cleaning and sprinkling) of 
drives, walks, and rides per square yard, not including 
brick and artificial stone walks, 1895 to 1901, inclusive, at 
Commonwealth avenue, the Fens, Riverway, Olmsted Park, 
Arborway, Arnold Arboretum, Franklin Park, Columbia 
road and Marine Park. 



Tear. 


Area of 
Drives. 
Square 
Yards. 


Area of 
Walks. 
Square 
Y"ards. 


Area of 
Rides. 
Square 
Yards. 


Total 
Area. 
Square 
Yards. 


Cost Per 
Square 
Yard. 


Area 
of Drive- 
ways in 
Per Cent, 
of Total 
Area. 


1895 


472,900 
481,900 
500,500 
529.S00 
553,400 
600,100 
600,800 


169,500 
177,400 
186,700 
199,900 
217,700 
240,600 
249,300 


81,700 
83,900 
86,700 
87,400 
87,400 
87,400 
87,400 


724,100 
743,200 
773,900 
817,100 
858,500 
928,100 
937,500 


$0,063 
0.064 
0.056 
0.051 
0.06 
0.062 
0.064 


65 3 


1896 


64 8 


1897 

1898 


64.7 
64 8 


1899 


64 5 


1900 




1901 


64 1 







The drives are macadamized, the walks are surfaced with 
macadam or cinders, and the rides are surfaced with gravel 
and loam. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. E. Putnam, 

Assistant Engineer. 



34 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS. 



Expenditures for Land, Construction and Maintenance from 
February 1, 1901, to January 31, 1902. 



Land. 



Construc- 
tion. 



Mainte- 
nance. 



Totals. 



Main Park System : 

Commonwealth avenue . . . 

Fens 

Hi verway 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum 

West Roxbury Parkway.. 

Franklin Park 

Marine Park System : 

Columbia Road* 

Dorchesterway 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank 

Cbarlestown Heights 

Charlestown Playground . . . 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field 

North End Beach 

Copp's Hill Terraces 

Chestnut Hill Park 

North Brighton Playground 

Neponset Playground 

Billings Field 

First Street Playground 

Prince Street Playground.. 



$4,833 23 



42,179 



3,449 81 



Carried forward . 



$50,462 12 



$569 17 

6,778 08 

1,894 93 

21,176 53 

2,704 43 

581 99 

462 14 

36,546 81 

75,640 40 

134 56 

15,518 81 

4,822 87 

1,991 82 

1,307 17 

727 81 

166 70 

19 87 

4,652 75 

1,917 48 

124 85 

1,623 54 

3,454 39 



$189,567 34 



$17,102 44 

15,461 04 

10,085 52 

19,068 84 

5,893 75 

6,934 43 

465 92 

53,726 79 

4,332 82 

7 00 

153 60 

5,625 01 

8,098 20 

10,124 13 

2,049 56 

1,503 48 

380 34 

10,687 83 

77 00 

292 69 

2,875 96 

924 09 

1,016 27 

1,859 61 

865 30 

198 80 



$179,810 42 



$17,671 61 

22,239 12 

11,980 45 

40,245 37 

8,598 18 

7,516 42 

928 06 

90,273 60 

84,806 45 

141 56 

57,851 49 

10,447 88 

10,090 02 

11,431 30 

2,777 37 

1,670 18 

400 21 

15,340 58 

1,994 48 

417 54 

7,949 31 

4,378 48 

1,016 27 

8,609 85 

865 30 

198 80 



$419,839 88 



* Of this amount $79,315.13 was expended by Street Department. 



35 



EXPENDITURES FOE LAND, ETC. — Concluded. 



Parks. 




Land. 


Construc- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Totals. 






$50,462 12 


$189,567 34 


$179,810 42 
173 75 
204 06 

1,731 43 
382 93 

3,029 35 

7 00 

1,039 89 

1,174 22 


$419,839 88 
173 75 


y 7 


51 
52 

52 
52 

52 
53 
53 
53 

54 
54 
54 


Fellows Street Playground.. 
Christopher Gibson Play- 




365 34 


569 40 




1,731 43 
382 93 






Columbus Avenue Play- 


19,154 65 




22,184 00 
7 00 


Roslindale Playground 

Investigating sites for Play- 






2,500 00 


3,539 89 
1,174 22 

7 00 




7 00 








170 75 
10,298 44 


170 75 








10,298 44 










Totals 




§69,023 77 


$192,432 6S 


$198,022 24 


$460,078 69 







36 



II. 

Expenditures of this Department in detail from February 1, 
1901, to January 31, 1902. 

COMMONWEALTH AVENUE. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 

and materials . . $414 20 
Drainage: labor . . 6 0O 

$420 20 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Loam: materials . . $91 94 
Engineers: labor . . 8 75 

100 69 

Plantations. 

Labor and materials ... 48 28 

17 



MAINTENANCE, 

Roadways, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 

Roads and walks : labor and mate- 
rials $13,105 47 

Grounds: labor and materials . 2,034 84 
Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 1,533 13 

Drainage: labor and materials . 271 93 

Engineers : labor and materials . 80 00 

General work: materials . . 77 07 



17,102 44 

— $17,671 61 



FENS. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $4,889 15 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Loam: materials . . $947 25 
Gradings: labor and ma- 



terials .... 


375 78 


Fence: labor and mate- 




rials .... 


61 02 


Engineers: labor and ma- 




terials .... 


34 60 


General work: labor and 




materials 


18 68 



1,437 33 



Amounts carried forward, $6,326 48 .$17,671 61 



37 

Amounts brought forward, $6,326 48 $17,671 61 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks : labor, $394 54 
Drainage: labor and ma- 
terials . . . . 57 06 

451 60 

$6,778 08 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 

Eoads and walks : labor and mate- 
rials $9,269 84 

Grounds : labor and materials . 3,960 12 

Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 1,154 48 

General work: labor and mate- 
rials 324 15 

Engineers: labor .... 301 25 

Sea-wall and gate chamber: mate- 
rials 

Drainage: labor .... 

Live stock : labor and materials . 



281 33 
164 17 
5 70 
15,461 04 



22,230 12 



RIVERWAY. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $1,044 34 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 
and materials . . $446 15 

Drainage: labor and ma- 
terials . . . . 348 95 

795 10 

Fence. 
Labor 36 87 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Engineers: labor . . $14 00 
General work: labor . 2 62 

Grading: labor . . 2 00 



18 62 
1,894 93 



MAINTENANCE. 



Roadways, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Roads and walks: labor and mate- 
rials $4,282 74 

Grounds: labor and materials . 3,390 17 



Amounts carried forward, $7,672 91 $1,894 93 $39,910 73 



38 

Amounts brought forward, $7,672 91 $1,894 93 $39,910 73 

Buildings: labor and materials 
Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 

General work : labor and materials, 
Engineers: labor .... 
Drainage : labor and materials 



f,672 


HI 


,264 43 


676 


59 


329 


4:3 


82 


00 


60 


10 



10,085 52 
11,980 45 



OLMSTED PARK. 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Boadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 
and materials . . $6,863 93 

Drainage : labor and ma- 
terials . . . . 389 83 

$7,253 76 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . • 6,723 71 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Loam: material . . $5,147 07 

Grading: labor and ma- 
terials .... 

General work: labor and 
materials 

Engineers : labor and ma- 
terials .... 



1,165 


49 






288 


63 






108 


89 


6 710 ft8 




Fence 








m 


331 


21 



Labor and materials 

Signs. 
Signs: materials .... 92 33 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor and materials ... 52 00 

Boating Service. 
Labor 13 44 



$21,176 53 



MAINTENANCE. 

Boadways, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Roads and walks : labor and mate- 
rials .... 

Grounds: labor and materials 

General work: labor and materials, 

Buildings : labor and materials 

Skating: labor and materials 

Stable account: equipment and 
supplies 

Amounts carried forward, $18,433 04 $21,176 53 $51,891 18 



$5,913 09 
5,528 85 
2,703 21 
1,986 35 
1,554 76 

746 78 



Amounts brought for 
Drainage: labor 
Engineers: labor 
Boating service: labor 
Loam: materials 



39 



ward, $18,433 04 $21,176 53 $51,891 18 

351 92 
271 00 
8 88 
4 00 

— 19,068 84 

40,245 37 



ARBORWAY. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $1,222 94 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 
and materials . . $756 20 

Drainage: labor and ma- 
terials . . . 326 94 

1,083 14 

Lighting. 
Electric lights .... 187 98 

Signs. 
Signs: materials .... 100 48 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
Loam: materials . . $57 07 
Engineers: labor . . 19 25 
Grading: labor . . 13 13 
General work : materials, 5 10 

94 55 



2,704 43 



Lawns and Woods. 
Labor 15 34 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 
Roads and walks: labor and mate- 
rials $4,309 54 

Grounds: labor and materials . 981 49 

Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 322 43 

Drainage: labor .... 166 20 

Engineers: labor .... 92 00 

General work : materials . . 22 09 

5,893 75 

8,598 18 

ARNOLD ARBORETUM AND BUSSEY PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 
Drainage: labor and ma- 
terials .... $286 59 
Roads and walks: labor 

and materials . . 58 08 

$344 67 



Amounts carried forward, $344 67 $100,734 73 



40 

Amounts brought forward, $344 67 $100,734 73 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 



Engineers: labor . . $74 25 
Loam: material . • 44 09 



118 34 



Boundary Walls and Gateways. 
Fence: materials .... 116 48 

Plantations. 
Labor 2 50 



MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 

Eoads and walks: labor and ma- 
terials $5,802 36 

Drainage: labor and materials . 573 94 

General work : labor and materials, 351 01 
Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 83 22 

Engineers : labor .... 49 50 

Grounds : labor and materials . 45 00 

Live stock: materials ... 29 40 



6,934 43 
7,516 42 



WEST ROXBURY PARKWAY. 

CONSTBUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor $274 67 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Engineers: labor and ma- 
terials .... $120 55 
Grading: labor . . 2 75 

123 30 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks : labor ... 64 17 

$462 14 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds: labor .... $44192 

Roads and walks : labor . 
Engineers: labor 
General work : materials 
Buildings: materials 



Amount carried forward, 



7 62 




7 00 




6 75 




2 63 






4fi5 02 




9°8 06 








$109,179 21 



41 

Amount brought forward, $109,179 21 

FRANKLIN PARK. 

CONSTKUCTION. 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading: labor and ma- 
terials .... $9,473 16 

Loam: material . . 6,535 88 

General work: labor 
and materials . . 530 60 

Engineers: laborand . 

materials . . . 199 85 

$16,739 49 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . 11,958 25 

Boadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 

and materials . . $3,036 58 

Drainage : labor and ma- 
terials . . . 462 09 

3,498 67 

Arbor and Shelter, Schoolmaster Hill. 

Amount paid under con- 
tract .... $1,550 00 

Labor and materials . 1,113 89 

Plumbing: labor and ma- 
terials .... 425 04 

Architect's commission, 200 40 

3,289 33 

Repair Shops and Storehouse. 
Labor and materials . . . 705 33 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor and materials . . . 209 40 

Settees. 
Materials 117 75 

Shelter, Overlook and Terrace Wall. 
Steps: labor 16 50 

Fences. 

Labor 12 09 

$36,546 81 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds: labor and materials . $23,119 07 
Roads and walks: labor and mate- 
rials 13,195 91 



Amounts carried forward, $36,314 98 $36,546 81 $109,179 21 



42 



Amounts brought forward, 
General work : labor and materials, 
Buildings: labor and materials 
Stable account: equipment and 

supplies . . . 
Drainage : labor and materials 
Engineers : labor and materials 
Live stock: labor and materials 
Skating: labor 
Water supply: materials 



$36,314 98 
6,785 78 
5,503 84 

3,228 95 
730 20 
459 11 
344 64 
310 42 
48 87 



$36,546 81 $109,179 21 



53,726 79 



90,273 60 



COLUMBIA ROAD. 



Proportion of amount paid by Street Depart- 
ment for land, and expenses chargeable to 
this department 



$4,833 23 



CONSTRUCTION. 



Proportion of amount paid by 
Street Department for construc- 
tion, chargeable to this depart- 
ment $74,481 90 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 
Roads and walks : labor . . 446 43 



Labor and materials 



Plantations. 

355 18 

Settees and Signs. 
220 39 



Signs: materials .... 

Grading, Loam and General Work 
Engineers: labor .... 136 50 



75,640 40 



MAINTENANCE. 



Roadways, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 

Roads and walks: labor and mate- 
rials $3,020 12 

Stable account: equipment and 



supplies 


722 59 


Grounds : labor and materials 


328 27 


Drainage: labor .... 


121 92 


Engineers: labor . 


119 00 


General work : materials 


20 92 



4,332 82 
DORCHESTERWAY. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 
Roads and walks: materials . . $120 56 



84,806 45 



Amounts carried forward, 



$120 56 



$284,259 26 



43 

Amounts brought forward, $120 56 $284,259 26 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Engineers: labor .... 14 00 

$134 56 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds and Drainage. 
Engineers : labor 7 00 



STRANDWAY. 



LAND. 



Amount paid for land . . . $42,124 08 

Expenses 55 00 

$42,179 08 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading : labor and ma- 
terials 1 

Engineers : labor and ma- 
terials 

General work : labor and 
materials 



Labor and materials 



"Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks : labor, $622 52 
Drainage: materials . 2 85 

625 37 

15,518 81 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Buildings and Drainage. 

Grounds : labor . . . . $51 91 

Engineers : labor . 



i>10,235 


57 




792 


00 




621 


36 


$11,648 93 






Plantations. 






3,244 51 



Drainage : labor 
Buildings : materials 
Boating service : materials 



46 00 
28 25 
14 72 
12 72 



153 60 



MARINE PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $1,335 58 



141 56 



57,851 49 



Amounts carried forward, $1,335 58 $342,252 31 



44 

Amounts brought forward, $1,335 58 $342,252 31 

Settees. 
Labor and materials . . . 1,150 96 

Boat Service. 
Boat landing : labor and materials, 979 48 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Drainage : labor and ma- 
terials .... $175 00 
Roads and walks : labor, 128 26 

303 26 

Head House. 
Labor and materials . . . 238 41 

Water Supply and Fountains. 
Fountains : labor and Materials . 120 36 

Grading, Loam, and General Work. 

Engineers : labor . . $56 65 
Grading: labor . . 11 28 
General work : materials, 5 10 

73 03 

$4,201 08 



CASTLE ISLAND. 
Settees. 
Labor and materials . . . $459 07 

Structures. 
Tool-house : labor and materials, 162 72 



621 79 



MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 
Buildings : labor and materials 
Roads and walks : labor and mate 

rials 

Stable account : equipments 



General work : labor and materials, 232 11 

Engineers : labor .... 156 00 

Drainage: labor . . . . 121 25 

Boating service : materials . . 84 45 



52,115 03 
1,556 53 

1,034 64 
325 00 



5,625 01 
10,447 



Amount carried forward, $352,700 19 



45 

Amount brought forward, $352,700 19 

WOOD ISLAND PAKK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Drainage: materials . $52S 57 

Koads and walks: labor 

and materials . . 420 53 

Steps: labor and mate- 
rials . . . . 64 50 

$1,013 60 

Water Supply, Fountains and Settees. 

Settees: labor and mate- 
rials .... $436 18 
Fountains: materials . 35 00 

471 18 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . 460 12 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Engineers: labor . . $28 00 
Grading: labor . . 16 92 
General work: labor . 2 00 

46 92 

$1,991 82 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Men's gymnasium — 

Grounds, apparatus and building: 



labor and materials . 


$4,483 10 


Grounds: labor and materials 


1,710 94 


General work: labor and mate- 




rials 


715 07 


Skating: labor .... 


772 60 


Roads and walks: labor and mate- 






312 06 


Drainage : labor and materials 


100 93 


Engineers: labor .... 


3 50 



8,098 20 

10,090 02 



CHARLESBAjSTK. 
construction. 

Plantations. 
Labor $648 96 

Structures. 

Women's gymnasium building: 

labor and materials . . . 525 03 



Amounts carried forward $1,173 99 $362,790 21 



46 

Amounts brought forward, $1,173 99 $362,790 21 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Loam: materials . . $112 54 
General work: labor . 6 89 

119 43 

Walks and Drainage. 
Drainage: labor .... 8 25 



Settees. 
Labor 5 50 



1,307 17 



2,951 


02 


2,843 


13 


551 


06 


233 72 


56 


16 


21 


18 


17 


50 


11 


50 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings and General Work. 

Men's gymnasium — 

Grounds, apparatus and building : 

labor and materials . . . $3,438 86 
Women's gymnasium — 

Grounds, apparatus and building: 
labor and materials . 
Grounds and walks: labor and 
materials ..... 

General work: labor and mate- 
rials ...... 

Skating: labor and materials 
Fence: labor and materials . 
Drainage: labor .... 

Engineers: labor .... 

Boating service: materials . 

10,124 13 
11,431 30 

CHARLESTOWN HEIGHTS. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $346 27 

Fence. 
Fence: labor and materials . . 187 85 

Walks, Gutters and Drainage. 

Walks: labor . . . $140 86 
Drainage: labor and 

materials . . . 48 08 

184 94 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

General work: labor . $3 00 
Engineers: labor . . 1 75 

S 4 75 

$727 81 



Amounts carried forward, $727 81 $374,221 51 



47 

Amounts brought forward, $727 81 $374,22151 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds and walks: labor and 

materials $1,597 58 

Buildings: labor and materials . 434 28 

General work: materials . 12 45 

Drainage: labor .... 5 25 

2,049 56 

2,777 37 

CHARLESTOWN PLAYGROUND. 

CONSTKUCTION. 

Water Supply and Fountains. 
Fountains: materials $166 70 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Skating: labor and materials . $752 69 

Grounds and walks: labor and 

materials 569 30 

Engineers: labor .... 85 00 

General work : materials . . 56 64 
Stable account: equipment and supplies, 37 85 

Drainage: labor .... 2 00 



1,503 48 
1,670 18 



DORCHESTER PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor $19 87 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds and walks : labor . . $296 76 

Engineers: labor .... 39 00 

Skating: labor .... 27 69 

Buildings: labor .... 16 89 



380 34 
400 21 



FRANKLIN FIELD. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $3,030 31 



Amounts carried forward, $3,036 31 $379,069 27 



48 

Amounts brought forward, $3,036 31 $379,069 27 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading: labor and ma- 
terials .... $634 07 

Loam: materials . . 439 31 

Engineers : labor and ma- 
terials . . . . 23 15 

General work: materials, 10 20 

1,106 73 

Water Supply and Fountains. 
Fountains : labor and materials . 226 85 

Walls. 
Labor 171 86 

Walks, Gutters and Drainage. 

Drainage: labor . . $101 00 
Walks: materials . . 10 00 

Ill 00 

$4,652 75 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds and walks: labor and 

materials $5,640 01 

Skating: labor and materials . 2,169 39 

Sheepfold: labor and materials . 1,615 98 

General work: labor and mate- 
rials 475 58 

Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 339 69 

Engineers : labor and materials . 224 18 

Buildings: labor and materials . 122 75 

Drainage: labor and materials . 100 25 

10,687 83 

15,340 58 



NORTH END BEACH. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Clearing, Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Judgment for damages . . . $1,859 73 
Engineers: labor .... 57 75 

— $1,917 48 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks and Buildings. 



Engineers: labor .... 
Grounds : labor and materials 


$42 50 
34 50 


77 00 

1 (\f\\ AQ 










Amount carried forward, 


$396,404 33 



49 

Amount brought forward, $396,404 33 

COPP'S HILL TERRACES. 
CONSTRUCTION. 

Settees. 
Labor and material . . . $68 18 



Plantations. 
Labor 56 67 



$124 85 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 
Grounds and walks : labor and materials . . 292 69 



417 54 



CHESTNUT HILL PARK. 

Land. 
Amount paid for land $3,449 81 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $908 51 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 
Roads and walks: labor 

and materials . . $638 84 
Drainage: labor . . 18 00 

656 84 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
Engineers: labor . . $42 50 
Grading: labor . . 15 69 

58 19 

1,623 54 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roadways, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 
Grounds : labor and materials . $1,423 32 
Roads and walks: labor and mate- 
erials ...... 

Engineers: labor .... 

Drainage : labor and materials 
General work : labor and materials, 
Buildings: materials 



1,326 07 




46 00 




42 22 




20 35 




18 00 






2,875 96 





7,949 31 



NORTH BRIGHTON PLAYGROUND. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
Grading: labor and mate- 
rials .... $1,529 22 
General work: labor and 

materials ... 312 73 
Loam: materials . . 95 59 
Engineers: labor . . 59 50 

$1,997 04 



Amounts carried forward, $1,997 04 $404,77118 



50 



Amounts brought forward, 



Materials 



$1,997 04 

Filling. 

870 47 



,771 18 



Labor and materials 



Plantations. 

475 08 



Walks, Gutters and Drainage. 
Drainage: labor and ma- 



terials 
Walks: labor 



$76 52 
35 28 



111 80 



$3,454 39 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds and walks: labor and 

materials $464 61 

Skating: labor and materials . 437 58 

General work: materials . 14 90 

Engineers : labor .... 7 00 

924 09 



NEPONSET PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds and walks : labor and materials 

Skating: labor and materials 

Loam: materials . 

General work: materials . 

Filling: materials 

Engineers: labor . 



$475 58 

344 35 

106 62 

45 00 

41 22 

3 50 



BILLINGS FIELD. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Walks and Drainage. 
Drainage : labor and materials . $2,56117 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading: labor . .$1,457 97 
Loam: materials . . 234 28 
Engineers: labor . . 198 50 
General work : labor and 

materials . . . 18 08 

1,908 83 



Labor and materials 

Amounts carried forward, 



Plantations. 

1,566 24 



3,036 24 



4,378 48 



1,016 27 



$410,165 93 



51 



Amounts brought forward, $6,036 24 

Gymnasium Apparatus. 

Gymnasium apparatus : 

materials . . . $279 05 
Toboggan slide : labor . 123 31 



Filling. 



Materials 



Materials 



402 36 



234 40 



Water Supply. 

77 24 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Skating : labor and materials 
Grounds and walks: labor and 

materials ..... 
Drainage : labor and materials 
Filling: materials .... 
General work: materials 
Buildings: labor .... 
Stable account: equipment and 

supplies 

Engineers: labor .... 



$796 70 



611 


89 


241 


53 


130 07 


57 


17 


9 75 


9 


00 


3 


50 



MYSTIC PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds: labor and materials 
General work: materials 



$410,165 93 



},750 24 



1,859 61 



FIRST STREET PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Skating: labor and materials .... $414 95 

Grounds and walks: labor and materials . . 332 35 

Loam: materials 98 03 

Drainage: labor 16 47 

Engineers: labor 3 50 



PRINCE STREET PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds and walks : labor and materials . . $190 80 

Engineers: labor 7 00 

General work: materials 1 00 



$171 55 
2 20 



8,609 85 



865 30 



198 80 



173 75 



Amount carried forvmrd, 



$420,013 63 



52 

Amount brought forward, $420,013 63 

FELLOWS STREET PLAYGROUND. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor -$249 85 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading: labor . . $70 49 
General work : materials, 45 00 

115 49 

$365 34 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 

Grounds: labor and materials .... 204 06 

569 40 



CHRISTOPHER GIBSON PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds : labor and materials 
Buildings : labor and materials 



Skating: labor and materials 
General work : materials 
Settees: labor 



341 01 
17 38 
7 50 



1,731 43 



ROGERS PARK. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 
Grounds : labor and materials 382 93 

COLUMBUS AVENUE PLAYGROUND. 

LAND. 

Amount paid for land . . . $19,119 65 

Expenses 35 00 

$19,154 65 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds and walks: labor and 

materials $1,207 05 

Skating: labor and materials . 1,187 43 

Water supply and fountain: mate- 
rials 182 74 

Stable account : equipment and 

supplies 144 71 

Loam: materials .... 74 79 

General work: materials . 71 08 



Amounts carried forward, $2,867 80 $19,154 65 $422,697 39 



53 



Amounts brought forward, 

Filling: materials . 
Buildings: materials 
Drainage : labor and materials 
Engineers: labor 



2,867 80 $19,154 65 $422,697 39 



65 


60 


51 


98 


33 


47 


10 50 



3,029 35 



SAVIN HILL PLAYGROUND. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Bath House. 
Amount paid under con- 
tract .... $1,830 00 
Labor . . . . 194 14 

$2,024 14 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
Grading: labor . . $172 06 
Engineers: labor . . 35 00 

207 06 



22,184 00 



Material 



Filling. 



160 56 



Drainage: labor 



Walks and Drainage. 
108 24 



$2,500 00 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Batb bouse : labor and materials 
Grounds: labor and materials 
General work : materials 
Drainage: materials 
Filling: material . 
Water supply : materials 
Engineers: labor and materials 



$562 42 


145 01 


100 81 


79 46 


66 57 


63 52 


22 10 



1,039 89 



ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

$567 55 

404 25 

141 99 

45 00 

15 43 



Grounds : labor and materials 
Skating: labor and materials 
Drainage : labor and materials 
General work : materials 
Fence: materials . 



ASHMONT PLAYGROUND. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 



Engineers: labor . 

Amount carried forward, 



3,539 89 



1,174 22 



7 00 
$449,602 50 



54 

Amount brought forward, $449,602 50 

BERNERS SQUARE. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 
Grounds: labor 170 75 

PLAYGROUNDS. 

INVESTIGATING SITES, WABD 15. 

Engineers: labor 7 00 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Salaries $7,831 00 

Printing 1,275 28 

Telephones and expenses 477 81 

Carriage-hire 454 00 

Park Investigation expenses 115 00 

Stationery 67 85 

Travelling expenses 42 00 

Office furniture 19 00 

Office library 16 50 

10,298 44 

$460,078 69 



55 



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u 

e. 

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56 



IV. 



Appropriations and Balances in Detail for the Financial 
Year 1901-1902. 

PUBLIC PARKS. 



Balance unexpended January 31, 1901 




$89,613 44 


Loan issued September 4, 1901 


21,000 00 


Amount transferred by City Auditor 


17,565 68 


Amount transferred from Gymnasium 


■ 




3,500 00 




$131,679 12 


EXPENDITURES. 




Commonwealth Avenue . 


$569 17 


Fens 




6,778 08 


Riverway 




1,894 93 


Olmsted Park 




21,176 53 


Arborway 




2,704 43 


Arnold Arboretum and Bussey Park 




581 99 


West Roxbury Parkway . 




462 14 


Franklin Park 




36,546 81 


Dorchesterway .... 




148 56 


Strandway 




42,317 12 


Marine Park 




4,822 87 


Wood Island Park .... 




1,991 82 


Charlesbank 




1,307 17 


Charlestown Heights 




727 81 


Charlestown Playground 




166 70 


Dorchester Park .... 




19 87 


Franklin Field . 




4,652 75 


North End Beach .... 




1,917 48 


Copp's Hill Terraces 




124 85 


Chestnut Hill Park 




1,623 54 


Columbia Road .... 




1,144 50 




$131 679 1° 







NORTH BRIGHTON PLAYGROUND. 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1901 $3,454 39 

EXPE NDITURE S . 

Paid on account of construction $3,454 39 



FELLOWS STREET PLAYGROUND. 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1901 .... 



$365 34 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of construction . 



$365 34 



57 



CHESTNUT HILL PARK (Land). 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1901 $92,234 60 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of land $3,449 81 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 . . 88,784 79 

$92,234 60 

PLAYGROUNDS (Land). 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1901 $149,731 57 

EXPENDITURES. 

Columbus Avenue Playground . . . $19,154 65 
Investigating sites for Playground, Ward 15 . 7 00 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 . . 130,569 92 

,$149,731 57 

GYMNASIUM, WARD 10. 

Amount appropriated under general loan order, dated 

October 1, 1897 $3,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Amount transferred to Public Parks, Land and Construction, $3,500 00 

SPEEDWAY, FRANKLIN FIELD. 

Amount appropriated under loan order approved by the 

Mayor, January 5, 1901 . ■ $ 25,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 .... $25,000 00 

COLUMBIA ROAD. 

Proportion of highway loan, issued as Public Park Loan, in 
year 1901, under Chap. 319, Acts of 1897 .... $79,315 13 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of land .... $4,833 23 

Paid on account of construction . . . 74,481 90 

$79,315 13 

BILLINGS FIELD. 

Amount appropriated under loan order approved by the 

Mayor, November 1, 1901 $10.000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of construction . . . $6,750 24 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 . . 3,249 76 

$10,000 00 



58 



SATIN HILL BEACH. 



Amount transferred from Reserve Fund, by order of City 

Council, June 13, 1901 $2,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of construction $2,500 00 

STRANDWAY. 

Amount appropriated under general loan order approved 
by the Mayor, July 3, 1901 $225,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Expenses on account of land .... $30 00 

Paid on account of construction, . . . 15,350 77 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 . . 209,619 23 

$225,000 00 

PLAYGROUND, WARD 2. 

Amount appropriated under loan order approved by the 
Mayor, October 22, 1901 $25,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 $25,000 00 

GYMNASIUM, FIRST STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Amount appropriated under loan order approved by the 

Mayor, November 1, 1901 $9,550 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 $9,550 00 

PARKS, BRIGHTON DISTRICT. 

Amount appropriated under loan order approved by the 

Mayor, December 18, 1901 $25,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended, January 31, 1902 .... $25,000 00 

PLAYGROUND, WARD 22. 

Amount appropriated under loan order approved by the 

Mayor, January 4, 1902 $30,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 .... $30,000 00 



59 



PAEK DEPARTMENT. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation for financial year 1901-1902 . $190,000 00 

Amount contributed by abutters, Common- 
wealth avenue 6,000 00 

Amount transferred by City Auditor . . 1,800 00 

Collections on account of labor credited to 

appropriation ...... 340 35 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of maintenance as per Ex- 
hibit, page 28 $198,022 24 

Balance merged into General City Funds . 118 11 



INCOME. 



RECEIPTS. 



$198,140 35 



$198,140 35 



Received from rents, sale of buildings, wool, sheep, grass, 
wood, etc $2,603 39 



PAYMENTS. 



Income carried to General City Income . $2,486 37 

Balance on hand January 31, 1902 . . 117 02 



$2,603 39 



60 



V. 

Summary of Expenditures on Account of Park and Play- 
ground Construction from the Organization of the Board, 
October 8, 1875, to January 31, 1902. 



MAIN PARK SYSTEM. 



COMMONWEALTH AVENUE. 



Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage, $84,842 41 

Plantations 12,741 87 

Electric lighting 5,690 65 

Lawns and woods, grading, loam, and gen- 
eral work 3,268 14 

Machinery, tools, etc 884 90 

Settees and signs 458 41 

Plans and designs 22 90 



$107,909 28 



FENS. 

Filling 

Excavating, lawns and woods, grading, loam 

and general work .... 
Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage 
Retaining walls, curb and fence . 
Plantations ...... 

Boylston bridge 

Charlesgate bridge .... 

Agassiz bridge 

Sea-wall, gate-chamber and filling 
Stony brook bridge .... 

Railroad bridge 

vFen bridge 

Plans, designs and superintendence 

Machinery, tools, etc 

Office and general expenses . 

Electric lighting 

Surveying ...... 

Stony brook channel and gate-house 
Water supplies, settees and live stock . 
Duck-house ...... 

Boating-service 



,811 15 



550,289 62 

354,908 18 

118,177 77 

96,974 15 

92,011 43 

65,287 67 

52,013 50 

48,442 99 

40,007 11 

39,995 04 

29,427 80 

27,280 28 

14,188 99 

14,114 92 

7,015 30 

5,472 16 

2,181 28 

1,766 70 

350 00 

306 04 



2,137,022 08 



KIVEBWAY. 

Excavating, lawns and woods, grading loam 
and general work .... 

Filling 

, Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage 
v Longwood avenue bridge 

^Audubon bridge 

« Bridle-path bridge 

Amounts carried forward, 



$193,269 05 

104,143 90 

101,050 47 

66,925 90 

39,654 27 

32,929 09 



$537,972 68 $2,244,931 36 



61 



Amounts brought forward, 

Plantations 

Administration building 
v Foot-bridges and culverts 
v Tremont street bridge .... 
I Brookline avenue bridge 
' Retaining walls ..... 
Bellevue street bridge .... 
Surveys, plans, designs and superintendence 

Shelter 

Electric lighting 

Water supplies, settees and fence 
Machinery, tools, etc. .... 

Boating-service 

Gate-house 



$537,972 68 

28,676 39 

27,005 12 

14,345 00 

13,273 53 

8,936 82 

8,852 06 

8,163 96 

7,196 67 

4,513 65 

2,895 97 

2,298 18 

468 75 

181 21 

105 15 



2,244,931 36 



664,885 14 



OLMSTED PAKE. 

Excavating, lawns and woods, grading, loam 

and general work .$343,631 54 

Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage, 153,208 88 

Plantations 70,163 24 

Retaining-walls, steps and culverts . . 67,285 21 

Pine Bank House and horse-sheds . . 32,774 10 

Electric lighting 10,484 39 

Surveys, plans, designs and superintendence, 10,368 43 

Leverett pond bridge 9,850 59 

Water supply, fountains, settees and signs . 9,115 00 

Foot-bridges and culverts .... 6,843 46 

Machinery, tools, etc 6,167 55 

Boating-service 1,612 18 

Iron railing and fence 1,494 84 

Gate-house 80 73 



723,080 14 



ARBORWAY. 

Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage, $171,145 01 
Lawns and woods, grading grounds, loam 

and general work 89,244 83 

Arches 64,631 57 

Plantations 19,928 39 

Water supply, settees and signs . . . 10,567 97 

Culverts 5,489 53 

Walls 5,063 52 

Stony brook bridge 4,503 43 

Electric lighting 3,638 48 

Filling 2,819 16 

Machinery, tools, etc 2,360 62 

Plans and designs 281 94 

Gas- lamps 80 00 



379,754 45 



ARNOLD ARBORETUM AND BUSSEY PARK. 

$310,015 68 



Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage, 

Lawns and woods, grading, loam and general 

work ........ 

Boundary walls and gateways 

Machinery, tools, etc. . . . . . 

Plans, designs and superintendence 

Amounts carried forward, 



31,927 03 

30,951 66 

3,607 23 

1,652 47 



$378,154 07 $4,012,651 09 



62 



Amounts brought forward, 
Plantations .... 
Water supply and settees 
Surveying .... 



$378,154 07 $4,012,651 09 
1,109 65 

514 20 

100 00 
379,877 92 



WEST BOXBUKY PARKWAY. 

Lawns and woods, grading grounds, loam 

and general work 
Eoadways, gutters and drainage . 

Plantations 

Plans, designs and superintendence 
Walls 



store 



FRANKLIN PARK, 

Eoadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage, 
Lawns and woods, grading grounds, loam 

and general work 

Plantations 

Refectory building 
Park wall and gateways 
Seaver-street improvement . 
Shelter, Overlook and Terrace wall 
Forest Hills bridge 
Scarboro' Pond .... 
Arbor and Shelter, Schoolmaster Hill 
Plans, designs and superintendence 

Reservoir 

Stable building, repair shops and 

house 

Scarboro' Pond bridges 

Water supply, fountains and settees 

Ellicott Arch 

Pergola wall, steps and terrace . 
Carriage-sheds .... 
Ellicott House .... 

Ellicottdale 

Machinery, tools, etc. . 
Temporary buildings and structures 

Playstead 

Propagating-house . 

Electric lighting .... 

Concourse, Scarboro' Hill 

Culverts 

Carriage shelter .... 

Fences 

Boating-service .... 



$12,705 19 


4,525 87 


2,761 02 


577 01 


12 88 


°0 581 




$810,738 28 


573,626 18 


217,996 34 


109,793 15 


89,881 56 


84,817 75 


64,534 09 


52,972 17 


40,943 11 


32,803 44 


28,343 95 


27,634 39 


26,959 72 


26,703 10 


26,484 31 


16,732 21 


16,244 30 


15,510 98 


14,922 87 


12,542 94 


12,413 15 


12,299 11 


10,399 76 


8,205 55 


6,182 09 


3,569 80 


3,129 34 


2,694 70 


1,547 45 


51 16 


2,350,676 



MARINE PARK SYSTEM. 

COLUMBIA ROAD. 



Construction by Street Department 
Roadways, gutters and drainage . 

Plantations 

Settees and signs .... 
Grading, loam and general work . 



Amount carried forward, 



$299,481 90 
446 43 
355 18 
220 39 
136 50 



300,640 40 
$7,064,428 33 



63 



Amount brought forward, 



r,064,428 33 



DORCHESTERWAY. 

Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage . 

Filling 

Grading loam and general work . 
Plans, designs and superintendence 

Culverts 

Plantations 



gen 



STRAND WAY. 

Sea-wall and grading 

Filling 

Lawns and woods, grading, loam and 

eral work ..... 
Public landing and shelter . 
Roadways, gutters and drainage . 
Plantations ..... 

Fence 

Plans, designs and superintendence 
Fountains ..... 
Electric lighting .... 
Culverts 



MARINE PARK. 

Filling, lawns and woods, grading, loam 

and general work .... 
Iron pier and railing .... 

Head-house 

Pier head 

Structures, temporary pier and gas-lights 
Roadways, sidewalks, gutters and drainage 

Plantations 

Bulkhead 

Plans, designs and superintendence 
Water supply, settees and fence . 

Electric lighting 

Boating-service ..... 

Dredging 

Machinery, tools and implements 

CASTLE ISLAND. 

Temporary buildings and structures . 
Clearing, grading grounds and drainage 
Water supply, settees and tent 
Plantations ....*. 
Shelter plans 



$31,660 41 

21,821 82 

9,578 09 

1,317 24 

653 00 

156 56 



$129,578 38 
104,657 72 

41,248 45 

15,013 13 

5,149 60 

3,263 31 

1,739 38 

479 77 

290 44 

178 00 

60 50 



,774 04 

175,571 99 

111,074 54 

67,232 97 

43,829 05 

41,454 47 

12,986 21 

4,996 00 

3,870 46 

3,478 08 

2,453 04 

2,003 09 

1,114 20 

38 00 



$25,751 42 

3,837 98 

2,509 17 

486 98 

100 00 



WOOD ISLAND PARK. 



Lawns and woods, grading, loam and gen 

eral work . 
Neptune bridge 
Filling . 
Field-house . 
Plantations 
Roads, walks, gutters and drainage 

Amounts carried forward. 



$103,396 00 
32,320 63 
29,852 82 
20,283 89 
15,795 15 
15,740 84 



65,187 12 



301,658 68 



1,051,876 14 



32,685 55 



$217,389 33 $8,515,835 82 



64 



Amounts brought forivard, 
Bath-house ...... 

Gymnasium grounds, apparatus and play 

ground 
Foot-bridge and culverts 
Iron fence and frame 
Water supply and settees 
Electric lighting . 
Plans, designs and superintendence 

Tool-house 

Machinery, tools and implements . 



$217,389 33 $ 


8,515,835 82 


9,880 66 




7,280 92 




3,551 90 




3,039 99 




3,011 29 




2,163 53 




1,688 03 




217 59 




42 80 






248,266 04 



CHARLESBANK. 



filling, 



Sea-wall and filling 

Gymnasium grounds, apparatus, 

loam and general work 
Men's Lavatory building 
Women's Lavatory building and children 

shelter 

Plantations . . . . . 
Walks and drainage 
Iron railing, fence and gaslights 
Plans, designs and superintendence 
Water supply and settees 

Damages 

Machinery, tools, etc 



$176,353 90 



53,430 65 


23,250 53 


18,876 91 


14,863 44 


11,777 52 


10,024 55 


2,076 27 


1,078 22 


972 51 


56 00 


312,760 50 



CHARLESTOWN HEIGHTS. 



Grading, lawns and woods, filling, loam and 
general work .... 

Shelter building .... 

Retaining wall .... 

Sidewalks, gutters and drainage . 

Plantations 

Steps 

Plans, designs and superintendence 

Fence 

Water supply, settees, fountains and 
staff 

Electric lighting .... 



flag 



£32,934 00 

27,240 32 
18,838 98 
8,561 03 
8,273 85 
3,971 42 
1,430 59 
672 17 

486 51 
334 00 



CHARLESTOWN PLAYGROUND. 



Grading, loam and general work . 

Fence 

Plantations ..... 
Plans, designs and superintendence 
Water supply and fountains . 
Walks and drainage 
Tool-house 



)UND. 

$12,583 94 


1,703 


09 


484 


GO 


204 99 


171 


GO 


148 


86 


94 


93 



102,742 87 



15,392 01 



DORCHESTER PARK. 

Grading, lawns and woods, loam and gen- 
eral work 

Walls ........ 

Amounts carried forward, 



$4,469 13 
3,623 82 



5,092 95 $9,194,997 24 



65 



Amounts brought forward, 

Shelter 

Plans, designs and superintendence 
Temporary structures . 

Water supply 

Plantations ..... 
Walks and drainage 



5,092 95 $9,194,997 24 

963 32 

797 40 

774 95 

105 53 

57 90 

4 48 

10,796 53 



FRANKLIN FIELD. 

Grading, lawns and woods, loam and general 
work ...... 

Walks, gutters and drainage . 

Plantations 

Buildings 

Fence, flagstaff and wall 

Plans, designs and superintendence 

Machinery, tools, etc. . 

Water supply and fountains . 



NORTH END BEACH. 

Clearing, grading, loam, and general work, 
Administration Building and Women's bath- 
house 

Piers 

Men's bath-house 

Walls 

Iron railing ....... 

Walks and drainage 

Filling 

Plans, designs and superintendence 
Boating-service ....'. 
Band-stand ....... 

Electric lighting 

Water supply, settees and fence . 

Boring ........ 

Temporary building 

Plantations 



COPP'S HILL TERRACES. 

Walls, drainage, grading, loam, and general 

work $29,771 52 

Fences 1,225 68 

Plantations 461 67 

Electric lighting 245 25 

Plans, designs and superintendence . 110 83 

Sidewalks 90 58 

Settees 68 18 

CHESTNUT HILL PARK. 

Plantations $2,138 73 

Roadways, gutters and drainage . . . 816 84 
Grading, lawns and woods, loam and general 

work 255 86 

Fence 31 74 



Amount carried forward, 



$33,914 82 


28,723 93 


15,627 30 


6,744 98 


1,584 83 


815 06 


480 55 


273 74 


88,165 21 


$62,964 27 


42,683 16 


31,823 84 


13,052 97 


8,422 73 


3,698 88 


1,946 63 


1,302 04 


1,189 14 


578 32 


571 44 


407 00 


346 50 


224 62 


33 73 


17 00 


169,262 27 



31,973 71 



3,243 17 



J,498,438 13 



66 

Amount brought forward, $9,498,438 13 
NOKTH BRIGHTON PLAYGROUND. 

Grading, loam and general work . . . $5,801 89 

Filling 2,778 30 

Walks, gutters and drainage . . . 1,428 02 

Plantations 495 06 



NEPONSET PLAYGROUND. 

Filling $5,026 78 

Grading, loam and general work . . . 2,651 64 

Walks and drainage 2,566 14 

Bulkhead . 553 10 

Plans and designs 239 21 

Water supply 152 48 



BILLINGS FIELD. 

Walks and drainage $3,850 95 

Lawns and woods, grading, loam and general 

work 3,731 19 

Filling 3,620 '46 

Plantations 1,566 24 

Gymnasium apparatus 402 36 

Plans and designs 239 37 

Water supply 77 24 



FIRST STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Grading, loam and general work . . . $5,320 40 

Gutters and drainage 2,272 41 

Filling 987 28 

Water supply 912 96 

Plantations 61 80 



PRINCE STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Grading, loam and general work . . . $24 90 

Plantations 9 00 



MYSTIC PLAYGROUND. 

Fence $817 65 

Grading, loam and general work . . . 742 00 

Plantations 158 34 



FELLOWS STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Fence ........ $524 04 

Filling 496 28 

Plantations 274 08 

Grading and general work .... 140 99 

Settees 60 89 



10,503 27 



11,189 35 



13,487 81 



9,554 85 



33 90 



1,717 99 



1,496 28 



Amount carried forward, $9,546,421 58 



67 



Amount brought forward, 

CHRISTOPHER GIBSON PLAYGROUND. 



$9,546,421 58 



Locker and Lavatory building 
Grading, loam and general work 

Filling 

Plantations .... 
Walks and drainage 
Water supply 



ROGERS PARK. 



Walks and drainage 

Fence 

Plantations .... 
Grading, loam and general work 



^6,111 20 

2,304 84 

1,515 04 

90 92 

10 75 

10 00 



$1,263 22 

563 03 

95 58 

78 17 



COLUMBUS AVENUE PLAYGROUND. 

Grading, loam and general work . . . $5,080 20 

Walks and drainage 791 01 

Plantations 51 68 

SAVIN HILL PLAYGROUND. 

Filling $2,430 46 

Bath-house 2,024 14 

Grading, loam and general work . . . 827 55 

Walks and drainage 253 99 



ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

Grading, loam and general work . . . $4,052 75 

Walks and drainage 1,302 56 

Walls 226 00 

Plantations 16 00 

SUNDRY ACCOUNTS. 

General account $73,987 50 

Park Nursery 29,947 07 

Betterment expenses 13,356 10 



10,042 75 



2,000 00 



5,922 89 



5,536 14 



5,597 31 



117,290 67 
$9,692,811 34 



68 



VI. 



Summary of Expenditures on account of Public Parks and 
Playgrounds, Land, Construction and Betterments, from the 
Organization of the Board, October 8, 1875, to January 
SI, 1902. 



LAND. 



Main Park System: 

Fens 

Riverway .... 
Olmsted Park 

Arborway .... 
Arnold Arboretum and Bus- 
sey Park .... 
West Roxbury Parkway 
Franklin Park 

Marine Park System: 
Columbia Road . 
Dorchesterway 
Strandway . 
Marine Park 



Wood Island Park . 
Charlesbank . 
Trinity Triangle 
Charlestown Heights 
Charlestown Playground 
Dorchester Park 
Franklin Field 
North End Beach . 
Copp's Hill Terraces 
Chestnut Hill Park 
North Brighton Playground 
Neponset Playground 
Billings Field . 
Freeport street Triangle 
Prince street Playground 
Mystic Playground 
Fellows street Playground 
Christopher Gibson Playground 
Columbus avenue Playground 
Ashmont Playground 
Savin Hill Playground . 
Roslindale Playground . 
Forest Hills Playground 
Playgrounds, Investigation of sites 



3,254 49 

457,457 53 

1,081,947 60 

245,584 25 

79,343 65 

135,265 29 

1,551,196 63 



$395,833 23 

63,735 54 

565,496 17 

232,972 57 



Main Park system: 
Commonwealth Avenue 
Fens .... 



CONSTRUCTION. 

$107,909 28 
2,137,022 08 



t, 147, 049 44 



1,258,037 51 

132,800 00 

373,916 99 

30,000 00 

50,538 02 

172,923 31 

63,239 97 

157,341 22 

328,364 44 

90,858 19 

61,215 21 

22,107 12 

24,804 39 

47,068 98 

4,000 00 

160,974 70 

50,125 00 

14,503 72 

37,709 58 

287,911 13 

87 18 

27,147 30 

24,825 11 

156 75 

175 79 



r,567,881 05 



Amounts carried forward, $2,244,931 36 



$7,567,881 05 



69 



Amounts brought forward, $2,244,931 36 


$7,567,881 05 


Riverway .... 


364,885 14 




Olmsted Park 


723,080 14 




Arborway .... 


379,754 45 




Arnold Arboretum and Bus- 






sey Park .... 


379,877 92 




West Roxbury Parkway 


20,581 97 




Franklin Park . . . 2,35( 








$6,763,787 93 


Marine Park System : 






Columbia Road ... $ 


300,640 40 




Dorchesterway 


65,187 12 




Strand way .... 


301,658 68 




Marine Park .... 1, 


061,876 14 




Castle Island 


32,685 55 


1,752,047 89 
248,266 04 


Wood Island Park . 




Charlesbank 






312,760 50 


Charlestown Heights 






102,742 87 


Charlestown Playground 






15,392 01 


Dorchester Park .... 






10,796 53 


Franklin Field .... 






88,165 21 


North End Beach . 






169,262 27 


Copp's Hill Terraces 






31,973 71 


Chestnut Hill Park . 






3,243 17 


North Brighton Playground . 






10,503 27 


Neponset Playground 






11,189 35 


Billings Field .... 






13,487 81 


First Street Playground . 






9,554 85 


Prince Street Playground 






33 90 


Mystic Playground . 






1,717 99 


Fellows Street Playground 






1,496 28 


Christopher Gibson Playground 






10,042 75 


Columbus Avenue Playground 






5,922 89 


Savin Hill Playground . 






5,536 14 


Roslindale Playground . 






5,597 31 


Rogers Park .... 






2,000 00 


General Account 






73,987 50 


Park Nursery .... 






29,947 07 






9,679,455 24 


BETTE 


RMENTS 








13,356 10 




$17,260,692 39 



70 



VII. 



Park Betterments Collected by City Collector, 
To February 1, 1902. 



Assessm'ts 
committed 

to 
Collector. 



Abated. 



Net 
Assess- 
ments. 



Collected. 



Outstand- 
ing Feb. 1, 
1902. 



Public Park, Back Bay 

Marine Park 

Franklin Park 

Parkway, Old Harbor. . . . 

" Muddy River. .. 

" West Roxbury . . 

" Dorchester 



$434,600 00 
23,543 00 
135,029 00 
60,789 00 
108,972 00 
154,107 00 
9,713 00 



$144,196 73 
12,616 SO 
122,000 66 
50,426 00 
82,252 25 
113,658 00 
3,055 54 



$926,753 00 



$528,204 98 



$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 
10,363 00 
26,719 75 
40,449 00 
6,657 46 



$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 

8,256 00 
22,862 75 
30,238 00 

5,927 74 



$2,107 00 
3,857 00 
10,211 00 

729 72 



$398,548 02 $381,643 30 



$16,904 72 



VIII. 



Public Park Debt. 

Liabilities. 
Total loan outstanding, January 31, 1902 

Besources. 
Resources of Sinking-Fund, January 31, 1902 
Net Debt, January 31, 1902 



$13,991,300 00 



3,904,629 34 
$10,086,670 66 



* Playground Debt. 

t Outstanding loans, January 31, 1902 



$787,060 98 



*The funds for the payment of this debt being part of the General Sinking-Fund 
cannot be specifically stated, 
t Of this amount $2,454.15 was expended by the Public Grounds Department. 



71 



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74 



APPENDIX. 



REPORT OP THE COMMITTEE OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS EMERGENCY AND HYGIENE ASSOCIATION 
IN CHARGE OF THE WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S 
" DIVISION AT CHARLES BANK. 



Boston, January 13, 1902. 
To the Hoard of Park Commissioner's : 

Gentlemen, — In submitting to you our report for the eleventh 
year of our superintendence at Charlesbank, we would express, first, 
our appreciation of the wooden roof which you have so wisely provided 
for the out-door gymnasium. The children have been able to exer- 
cise longer and more vigorously during the heat of the day than 
was possible before its erection. The growth in agility and strength 
of our young gymnasts acts as a stimulus upon their neighbors, 
inducing them also to try the cure of Charlesbank for their anasmic 
condition of health. 

During the spring and summer there were four weekly classes for 
women, and six for children (the latter being held only during the 
public school vacations) , with a large increase in the daily average 
number of those in the latter. There has also been a daily increase 
since May 15, when the Women's Division opened for the season, in 
the number of those playing in the sand-boxes, and playing or resting 
on the green and in the lodge; and not an accident has occurred in 
the whole place. 

For the first time a public exhibition of work was given, on 
August 29, by the children, before their schools re-opened, that 
represented both their first year and their advanced work in which 
they proudly took part. On following days their raffed work and 
their games on the green were also specially witnessed by the 
public, and their scrap books and other rainy day occupations were 
duly inspected. 

The winter work is now so closely connected with that of the 
summer, that our influence over the children in morals, manners 
and cleanliness has become a marked feature in the district of the 
city from which most of them come. We have three afternoon 
classes, and one on Saturday mornings for them, with four evening- 
classes for the older girls and women. As the upper hall of the 
lodge has been enlarged by moving back the partition there is now 
ample space for gymnastic exercises. 



75 

During the summer Miss Harriet S. Cutler, the Superintendent, 
was assisted in her management by Miss Mary Otis Brigham and 
Miss Gabriella Eliot. The committee feel that the large success of 
the work in all its various phases is due to their fidelity, kindliness, 
and good judgment. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Kate Gannett Wells, 
Anna Phillips Williams, 
Mabel Delano Lord, 

For the Committee. 



STATUTES OF THE COMMONWEALTH RELATING 
TO PUBLIC PAKKS IN THE CITY OE BOSTON. 

TStat. 1901. — Chap. 187.] 

An Act to Authorize the Sale or Abandonment of Cer- 
tain Lands taken for Playground Purposes in the 
City of Boston. 

Section 1. The City of Boston is hereby authorized, upon the 
recommendation of its Board of Park Commissioners, to sell and con- 
vey, for a nominal consideration, to the President and Fellows of 
Harvard College, all or any part of the lands on Washington street, 
in the City of Boston, heretofore taken by it from the President and 
Fellows of Harvard College for playground purposes, and for the 
taking of whicb the President and Fellows of Harvard College have 
received no compensation. Said conveyance shall vest the title to 
said lands in the President and Fellows of Harvard College, their 
successors and assigns, and may be pleaded in reduction of damages 
in any suit for the taking of said land. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

{Approved March 26, 1901.) 



[Stat. 1901. — Chap. 488.] 

An Act to Provide for Widening Walter Street in the 
City of Boston. 

Section 1. Section one of chapter two hundred and ninety-two 
of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-two is hereby 
amended by striking out the whole of said section and inserting in 
place thereof the following: Section 1. The Board of Street Commis- 
sioners of the City of Boston may, in that part of Boston known as 
West Roxbury, widen Walter street to a width not exceeding sixty 
feet, and may take therefor a strip of land from the burial-ground 
situated on the easterly side of said street near Weld street, and 
shall, at the expense of the City of Boston, remove the remains of 
the dead, if any there be, in the part so taken, to some other part of 
the said burial-ground or to some other cemetery; and may also take 
therefor a strip of land from the Arnold arboretum, so-called, on 



76 

the easterly side of said street between the cemetery and Centre 
street: provided, however, that in taking any of the land within the 
arboretum the provisions of the leases to Harvard College relating 
to the land shall be observed; and provided, further , that in making 
any such widening the Board of Street Commissioners shall not be 
bound by any plan heretofore made relating thereto; and the board 
shall determine and the city shall pay all damages to property sus- 
tained by any person or corporation by such taking. 
Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

(Approved June 13, 1901.) 

Note. — An index to the Statutes relating to Public Parks in or near the City of 
Boston, together'with an index to all the preceding park reports, will be found in the 
appendix to the last annual report.