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Full text of "Annual report"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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1903 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




With the Compliments of the 



Board of Commissioners of the 
• Department of Parks. 



€xiv at % erst on 



DEPARTMENT OK PARKS 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Commissioners 



Year Ending January $i, 1904 




printed for the Department 



1904 



5$ 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Commissioners' Report 5 

Superintendent's Eeport 9 

Report of Committee of Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene 
Association in Charge of the Women's and Children's Divi- 
sion at Charlesbank 23 

General Exhibit of Appropriations 25 

Expenditures on Account of Land and Construction from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1903, to January 30, 1904 26 

Expenditures on Account of Maintenance from February 1, 1903, 

to January 30, 1904 28 

Income 30 

Park Betterments Collected by City Collector .... 30 

Public Park and Playground Debt 30 

Park Statistics 31 



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in 2010 with funding from 

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DEPARTMENT OF PARKS. 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



Hon. Patrick A. Collins, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — The Board has the honor herewith to submit this 
report for the year ending January 31, 1904. 

The only additions to our parks and playgrounds made 
during the year are as follows : We have acquired a small 
addition to Dorchester Park for the purpose of obtaining an 
entrance to the park from Richmond street. On July 20, 
1903, the Board took 4.5 acres of city property on Marcella 
street, containing some buildings formerly occupied by the 
Children's Institutions Department, for a playground. The 
buildings, which are of no use to this department, will have 
to be removed before the playground can be constructed. 
On August 7, 1903, 2.8 acres of land on Albany and Ran- 
dolph streets were taken by the Board for a playground. 
The buildings are now being removed preparatory to opening 
the playground in the spring. 

A tract of land on Burnham street, between Massachusetts 
avenue and Southampton street, Ward 17, was leased from 
the owners for playground purposes, without expense to this 
department except the small sum necessary to maintain the 
grounds in a condition suitable for play. A small addition 
to our appropriation for maintenance, which would permit 
of the payment of rent for lands for this purpose, would 
enable the Board to supply temporarily the need for play- 
grounds in other localities. We have reluctantly parted with 
3,208 feet of the Prince-street playground for the building 



6 

of a bathhouse by the Bath Department. We sincerely 
trust that we shall be given the means to make good this loss 
in area. 

The question of providing sufficient playground areas for 
the use of the people of Boston has been carefully considered 
by the Board, which feels that it would not fulfil its duty to 
the community now living in the city, and to the larger 
community which will sooner or later occupy it, if it did not 
again call your attention to the importance of this subject. 

Boston is abundantly well supplied with rural parks and 
parkways, but these cannot be generally used as playgrounds 
without interfering with the objects for which they were 
specially created. The city lacks, however, public grounds 
which can be used by young men for purposes of sport and 
recreation, and by young children for the pastimes suited to 
their age. Some progress has been made in recent years in 
supplying this want, but Boston, which has set an example 
to the cities of the world in municipal improvement, is still 
behind other cities in playground equipment. The large use 
and great popularity of the recently acquired Columbus- 
avenue playground are additional evidence of the need of 
such open spaces in other congested districts, and it would 
seem the part of wisdom to acquire land in the still thinly 
populated parts of the city before the increase of population 
makes the price of such land prohibitive. 

The proposed improvements in connection with the build- 
ing of the Charles-river dam will increase the area avail- 
able for public use at the foot of Beacon Hill, but the 
dense population of the North End demands a more ample 
provision for its children than now exists. The Board be- 
lieves that the city can wisely expend a large sum of money 
in acquiring land for such a playground. Such land will 
always be valuable even if the time should ever come when 
it is not needed for purposes of public recreation. 

A playground somewhere on the line of or adjacent to 
Huntington avenue seems very essential for the rapidly in- 
creasing population of that part of the city. Jamaica Plain 
is entirely unprovided with playground space, and it is large 
enough" to demand the establishment of two playgrounds. 



Other playgrounds are needed in other districts. Small 
neighborhood playgrounds, too, are required all through the 
city, that small children may obtain fresh air and exercise out 
of the streets. Such playgrounds as these need not have an 
area of more than a few hundred feet if they are conveniently 
located. 

Our Board cannot but repeat its hope that our public- 
spirited citizens will bear in mind that there is no gift to the 
city which is of greater public use and enjoyment, and brings 
more lasting honor to the name of the donor, than a public 
playground. 

The Board is gratified with the progress that is being made 
by the Street Department in the construction of that part of 
Columbia road which borders the Strandway, the completion 
of which will bring to a conclusion this important work, 
which was begun in 1897, and will permit of the opening of 
the road throughout its whole length, from Franklin Park 
to Marine Park, during the present season. The Board has 
completed the construction of its part of the road over what 
was formerly Burnham's wharf. It remains to plant the 
several acres reserved for plantations. This will be done by 
this department under an arrangement with the Street 
Department, by which the expense of this work will be paid 
by the latter as part of the cost of construction under the 
statute of 189T. 

The action of the Legislature in adopting the recommenda- 
tions of the Commission on the Charles-river dam, and the 
creation of a new commission, by chapter 465 of the Acts of 
last year, to carry out these recommendations, puts upon 
the Board the duty of constructing an embankment on the 
Boston side of Charles river, from Cambridge bridge to the 
Back Bay Fens, whenever the Board, with the approval of 
the Mayor, considers it advisable. We are now studying 
plans for such an embankment. The act also calls for the 
building of channels to divert the waters of Stony brook 
from the Fens to the river and the doing of the necessary 
dredging in the Fens. This work is now being done by the 
Street Department. When it is completed the Fens will at 
last be put into a satisfactory sanitary condition. 



The accompanying report of our Superintendent gives full 
details of the work of the department during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Stratton, 

Laban Pratt, 

James M. Prendergast, 

Commissioners. 
Boston, January 30, 1904. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To Charles E. Stratton, Laban Pratt, and James 
M. Prendergast, Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit a report of the work 
performed under the direction of your Board during the 
year 1903. 

Franklin Park. 

The systematic thinning out of diseased and overcrowding 
trees in the old woodlands, which has been carried on for 
several years past generally throughout the park system, is 
bearing abundant fruit in the improvement in the general 
effect of the woodlands, as well as in the more healthy 
appearance of the trees individually. The cutting having 
been done gradually, the effect of mass has not been im- 
paired, and the letting in of light and air has encouraged the 
growth of side branches. 

The important work of pruning, which is tedious and 
expensive, has also been prosecuted as thoroughly as means 
have allowed. By the end of next year it is expected that 
the old woodlands in the main part of the system will have 
had their initial pruning completed, and that, thereafter, 
they will require only ordinary maintenance care. 

While the West Roxbury Parkway woods have been 
thinned regularly, no pruning has been done except on the 
group of fine oaks near Weld street. 

Dead branches, or stumps of branches, carry decay into 
the heart of the trees and do irreparable injury; hence the 
necessity of provision for carrying on this essential work 
of pruning. 



10 

The young plantations generally are looking well. Thin- 
ning out has been carefully done, but more rapid growth 
would have resulted had we had an appropriation large 
enough to give more cultivation. With each year the area of 
planted ground has increased, with no material increase of 
funds provided for its maintenance, and, consequently, we 
cannot obtain the best possible results in growth. Consider- 
able plantings of oaks were made in the young plantations, 
and also in Long Crouch Woods. About seven acres of the 
meadow (Nazingdale) were plowed, levelled, and seeded with 
red fescue (JFestuea rubra). It would be well to continue 
this work, as circumstances may permit, until the levelling of 
the whole is completed. 

By the erection of a brick building at the administration 
yard, much needed room has been acquired for the growth of 
our repair department and for storage purposes. Space has 
been left in the building for needed public sanitary accommo- 
dation, which it is hoped will be provided the coming season. 

An extension to the winter house for wild ducks has been 
made, to accommodate the flock of swans purchased last 
summer. The collection of wild fowl has proved a great 
attraction to visitors, not only while in their summer home 
in Scarboro' pond, but in their winter quarters, where a stream 
of water runs through their yards, and where they can be 
studied at close range. 

A sanitary building for men and women was erected on 
Schoolmaster hill during the past summer. The building is 
of seam-faced Rockport granite, with slate roof, tiled floors, 
and marble and brass fixtures. Two other sanitary build- 
ings of similar design have been built, one in the Arboretum 
and the other in the Fens. 

Arnold Arboretum. 

A decided improvement has been effected in the lower 
road by the removal of the remainder of the cobble-stone 
gutters and the extension of the macadam to the turf line, 
thus affording more room to the driveway. No other work, 
outside of the regular maintenance work, has been done here. 



11 

Olmsted Paek and Riverway. 

The extension of the loam bed to a point below the surface 
of the waters of Leverett pond and the Riverway was com- 
pleted last spring in time for planting. Ferns, rushes, sedges, 
loosestrifes, marsh marigolds, mallows, iris, and various 
aquatic and semi-aquatic plants were planted along the mar- 
gins, tending to greatly soften and beautify the shore line of 
the waterway. 

A flock of swans and another of wild geese were purchased 
last season for Jamaica pond. These, with the semi-wild 
mallards and black ducks, proved a very pleasing attraction 
for many persons. It is to be regretted that there are no 
suitable nesting places for swans and geese in Jamaica pond. 
We endeavored to provide these by anchoring brush-covered 
rafts, but without success. Mallard and black ducks, how- 
ever, found nesting places on the rafts as well as on the 
islands of the Riverway and Fens. 

Jamaica pond was kept in condition for skating during the 
winter, and many thousands enjoyed the sport. 

The Fens. 

A conduit for carrying the flow of Stony brook from 
Commissioners' channel to Charles river is now in course of 
construction. The work is being done by the Street Depart- 
ment, and is a part of the work authorized under the Charles 
River Basin Act. When completed, the conduit will relieve 
the Fens' basin of the filth now being poured into it from 
Stony brook. It is estimated that about 75,000 cubic yards 
of foul deposit exists in the Fens' basin. This, it is 
expected, will be removed by the Street Department. 

We have done no work of importance in the Fens during 
the past year, except the usual work of maintenance. The 
need of additional loam for the Fens must again be called to 
the attention of your Board. In no cheaper way can any 
improvement be made to the condition of trees and shrubbery 
than by adding loam to the plantations. The Fens are bleak 
and wind-swept ; the subsoil, a clean gravel. These condi- 
tions, when coupled with a thin loam covering, are prohibitive 
of healthy and free growth. 



12 

Commonwealth Avenue. 
Between Brookline avenue and Dartmouth street, about 
one hundred tree holes were prepared in the centre of the 
lawns on each side of the central promenade of Common- 
wealth avenue for planting with English elms. The charac- 
ter of the ground, which is a rilling of clean washed gravel, 
necessitated careful preparation. The holes were dug twenty 
feet square and four feet deep, and tilled with good turfy 
loam. 

Charlesbank. 

Charlesbank received the usual renovation of its shrubbery 
borders, and the replacement of the plants broken and worn 
by the great use made of the grounds. 

The men's gymnasium maintained its reputation for popu- 
larity among young men and boys. Classes were drilled 
twice a day in physical culture by an instructor, who also 
supervised the regular athletic work of the gymnasium. 

The women's gymnasium was well patronized during the 
season. A report in detail of the work will be found else- 
where in this report. 

The men's gymnasium was flooded, as usual, and used by 
thousands for skating. 

Wood Island Park. 

An open-sided shelter was constructed here last summer, 
for use in sudden storms. A building was also put up, con- 
taining a workshop, a storeroom, and sanitary accommodation 
for women. The plantations continue to thrive, and bid fair, 
in a short time, to give a wooded appearance to the park. 
Preparation was made, the past fall, for the planting of a 
number of trees in the spring. The cricket, baseball, and 
tennis grounds are in good condition, and, together with the 
gymnasium, have been much used by the public. 

Charlestown Heights. 
Little has been required at Charlestown Heights, except 
the regular work of maintenance. A number of trees and 
shrubs were planted in the bordering plantations. 



13 

Marine Park and Strandway. 

By reason of their peculiar advantages, Marine Park and 
Castle Island, during the hot weather, are the most popular 
parks in the system. The cooling breezes from the bay, the 
views of the harbor and of the passing ships, and the bath- 
ing, all together make Marine Park one of the most valuable 
of Boston's parks. Between the Boston Yacht Club house 
and the Head House a promenade, with loam spaces for 
trees, was constructed during the past season. 

Work on the Strandway was resumed last spring by the 
Street Department, and is nearly completed as far as Burn- 
ham's wharf. Between Burnham's wharf, or Newman 
street, and the railroad bridge, to the south, the work is 
under construction by the Street Department, with the 
prospect of completion by the end of next summer. That 
portion of the Strandway which is covered by the Burnham 
wharf property purchase was nearly finished last summer by 
the Park Department. Filling is still being received here, 
and we shall be enabled in the spring to add a considerable 
area of newly-filled ground to the playground already estab- 
lished. This playground is very conveniently situated, and 
is much used for ball-playing and skating. 

An arrangement between the Street Department and your 
Board has been made, by which the Park Department will 
do the planting of the loam spaces throughout the length of 
the Strandway. The expense of the work will be charged 
to the fund in the hands of the Street Department on ac- 
count of Columbia-road construction. The completion of 
this work will give a continuous parkway connection, twelve 
and one-half miles in length, extending from the Public 
Garden, by way of Commonwealth avenue, the Fens, River- 
way, Olmsted Park, Arborway, Franklin Park, and Columbia 
road to Marine Park. 

Chestnut Hill Park. 

The drainage of the beech plantation was completed early 
in the season, and a number of oaks and conifers was planted 
in various places in the bordering plantations. Pruning and 



14 

thinning of the woodlands was continued, and the woody- 
slope used for picnic purposes received a dressing of loam 
about four inches in thickness. This will much improve the 
condition of the trees, which were suffering from exposure of 
the roots by the erosion of the soil. The lawn near Beacon- 
street entrance has been opened for play, and was well used 
last season. 

Franklin Field. 

(77 Acres.') 

The bordering belt of trees on the Stratton-street side, 
and on a part of the Blue Hill-avenue side, was planted last 
spring. The construction of a bowling green was commenced 
last fall ; but, on account of the early setting in of winter 
weather, the completion had to be deferred until spring. It 
is expected that the green will be ready for play early in the 
summer. The game is becoming very popular, and the 
opportunity for indulging in it here presented will be appre- 
ciated by the public. 

The ball ground, an area of about forty acres, is in very 
poor condition from the unequal settlement of its surface. 
On summer Saturday afternoons there are usually from twelve 
to eighteen match games played. In addition there are the 
players on sixteen tennis courts, and the cricketers on the 
two cricket creases. Last year the cricket grounds were 
enlarged by moving the tennis courts over to the edge of 
Talbot avenue. Additional courts were made on the Blue 
Hill-avenue end, using up all the level ground to the tree 
belt. The courts are all in good condition, and are provided 
with wire-netting backstops. 

An appropriation for levelling the grounds is very much 
needed, in view of the large use that is made of them, 
Another essential need is that of a field-house, where shelter, 
sanitary arrangements, spray baths, and lockers can be fur- 
nished under one roof. Were these improvements made, 
Franklin Field would soon become an important centre for 
out-door sports. 

A new roof of tar and gravel was put on the sheep barn 
last summer. Our flock of sheep is in good condition. 



15 

About two hundred sheep are kept over winter, which number 
generally increases to about three hundred and seventy-five 
in the spring. The pastoral effect they give to the hillsides 
and meadows of Franklin Park is very pleasing. 

About thirty acres of the ball ground at Franklin Field 
were flooded for skating during the winter. 

Christopher Gibson Playground. 

Dorchester Avenue and Park Street. 
(5.8 Acres.) 

This playground furnishes accommodation for ball games, 
quoits, putting the shot, and similar sports. The children 
occupy the triangle east of Geneva avenue, where simple 
apparatus has been set up for their use, which has proved 
very popular. A woman teacher is employed to guide them 
in their play. Tennis courts and facilities for playing basket- 
ball are also provided. In the winter arrangements are made 
for skating. 

Savin Hill Beach. 

Springdale Street, Dorchester. 
(18.6 Acres.) 

Bathing closets are furnished at this beach for the public, 
free of charge. They number fifty-four for men and thirty- 
one for women. The beach is much frequented, and the 
accommodations are entirely inadequate. An extension of 
the closets to double or treble their number is necessary to 
fully meet the demand. 

Neponset Playground. 

Neponset Avenue. 

(18 Acres.) 

A building containing sanitary accommodations for men 
and women was erected last summer. An iron picket fence 
was put up on the Neponset-avenue side of the field. The 
slope adjoining the fence was loamed, and a line of trees 
planted. 



16 

Considerable trouble is experienced from the settlement 
of that portion of the field which was covered with heavy 
sub-soil to form a basin for skating. The bottom is a com- 
pressible salt meadow peat, and yields in places under the 
filling, yet not to such an extent as to interfere with its use 
as a ball ground. The remainder of the field, however, can 
readily be made into a good playground surface by levelling 
up the slight inequalities with loam, and seeding with grass. 

During the winter months skating was provided at this 
playground. 

Mystic Playground. 

Chelsea Street and Mystic River. 
{2.3 Acres.) 

An open-sided pavilion was erected in the children's 
corner, for the use of mothers and children. This play- 
ground being small, only boys under fourteen years of age are 
permitted to play ball. Quoits and basket-ball equipments 
are furnished. In the children's corner, which is fenced off 
by wire netting, light apparatus and sand-boxes are provided. 
A woman teacher is in charge. 

Charlestown Playground. 

Main and Alford Streets. 
{ljf Acres.) 

At the extreme edges of this playground filling is still in 
progress. Ample ground, however, has been finely graded 
for a skating field, for ball games, and for quoiting. The 
department mechanics are now at work on the gymnasium 
frames and apparatus for the open-air gymnasium. An iron 
picket fence is under contract to enclose the gymnasium. 
Further appropriations for an athletic house and for a fence 
on the Main-street side are needed. Large use of the play- 
ground, for out-door sports, including skating, has been 
made the past year. 



17 
Rogers Park. 

Lake and Foster Streets. 
(6.9 Acres.) 

The objectionable pond in this park has been roughly filled. 
Loaming the surface and seeding down remains to be done. 
The playground is now too small to meet the demands, but 
could be extended were means available for carrying the open 
brook into a conduit. A little grading would then enable us 
to nearly double the playground area. 

North Brighton Playground. 

Western Avenue and Harvard Street. 
(1£ Acres. ) 

No work, other than that of maintenance, was performed 
at this playground during the past season. The increasing 
use made of the grounds requires that provision should be 
made for further grading of the meadow to the north of the 
ball ground. A shelter and sanitary building is also needed. 
An ice field was maintained for skating during the winter. 

Billings Field. 

La Grange Street, near Centre Street, West Roxbury. 
(11 Acres.') 

Outside of the preparation of the ground and the planting 
of a line of Norway maples on the La Grange-street side, no 
work other than that of maintenance was done at this play- 
ground, an important item of which was the filling up of a 
large sink over the bog. Baseball, football, and tennis are 
the principal summer games. The ball field was flooded, as 
usual, for skating. Sanitary and shelter accommodations are 
needed. 

ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

South Walter and Robert Streets. 

(3.7 Acres.) 

A division fence was erected last spring between the play- 
ground and the Pearce property. The playground is very 



18 

popular, and is equipped for baseball and tennis. In winter 
the ball field is flooded for skating. Its needs are a shelter 
and sanitary building, bleachers, and a retaining-wall on 
Robert street. 

COLTJM BUS-AVENUE PLAYGROUND. 

(5 Acres.} 

To mitigate the annoyance from the many passing trains 
and to hide the glaring advertisements painted on the fence, 
a loam space was made last spring, on the north line, and 
planted with Lombardy poplars. 

An appropriation of $10,000 has been made by the City 
Council for a sanitary building. This amount is too small to 
meet the requirements of a building suitable for the needs of 
the playground. A suitable building should contain sanitary, 
shelter, and locker accommodations, and possibly, to meet 
the desire of the Playground committee of the Civic League, 
a room for winter gymnasium and class work. The Civic 
League has furnished and maintained the pavilions and gym- 
nasium apparatus ; it has also borne the expense of the 
instructors and kindergartners. The Park Department 
assumes the general maintenance of the grounds, and pro- 
vides for winter skating. 

The playground is largely used, the frequenters ranging, 
in their lines of interest, from athletes to baby gardeners. 

The construction of a retaining-wall on the north line 
would add about twenty feet to the available width of the 
playground. This consideration, where room is scant, is a 
strong argument in favor of an appropriation for the building 
of the wall. 

Prince-street Playground. 

Prince and North Bennet Streets. 
(04 Acre.} 

A temporary wooden structure, with a canvas roof, was 
put up on this playground, and a few fixed seats were placed. 
To prevent the playground, which is a narrow strip between 
two streets, from being used as a thoroughfare, an iron picket 



19 

fence is under contract for the Prince-street side, the pickets 
of which are so spaced as to permit the passing in or out of 
small children, while large boys and adults will be kept out. 
The North Bennet-street fence can be furnished with a 
gate or opening ; construction on this, however, will have 
to be deferred until the completion of the bathhouse, which 
is to be erected on North Bennet street. 

Some simple gymnastic apparatus, for children's use, is 
now being made in the department shops, and will be set 
up in the spring. This equipment, with the assistance of a 
woman instructor, or kindergartner, will add very much to 
the value of this small breathing spot amid the tenements. 

FlRST-STEEET PLAYGROUND. 

Corner of M Street, South Boston. 
(lf.6 Acres.') 

In this playground a brick building has been erected. It 
contains a locker-room, sanitary accommodations for both sexes, 
and spray baths. It is well and conveniently planned, and 
suits the purpose admirably. The heating plant of this 
building, as well as those of the various sanitaries and repair 
shops built during the past season, was designed and installed 
by employees of the Park Department. 

The out-door gymnasium was enclosed last fall by an iron 
picket fence. The frames and apparatus for the equipment 
of the gymnasium are now being prepared in the department 
shops, and will be set up in the spring. 

Heavy loam having been spread on the ball ground last 
season permitted its flooding for skating this winter. While 
the job was not a perfect one, some leaching of water still 
occurring, yet the ice gave pleasure to many. 

Fellows-street Playground. 

Fellows and Hunneman Streets. 
{0.85 Acre.) 

This little playground, with its apparatus, its kindergarten, 
and fence enclosure, is a real boon to the children of the 



20 

densely populated neighborhood. The small gardens were a 
failure last year because of predatory boys. A trial will 
again be made this year, using seeds instead of plants. 
Perhaps, from such small beginnings, and slow development, 
they may not attract unusual attention, and mischievous 
boys may become gradually accustomed to them. 

An open-sided pavilion was erected in this playground, 
during the past season, by workmen of the Park Department. 
A sanitary building is needed. 

Cottage-street Playground, Ward 2. 

Cottage Street, near Maverick Street, East Boston. 
(3.85 Acres.') 

This playground was entirely graded last season, and 
provision was made for flooding the whole area for skating. 
Large holes were dug around the borders and filled with 
loam in readiness for planting. Backstops were erected for 
ball playing. The needs of the playground include sanitary 
and shelter accommodation, fencing and water service. 

Forest Hills and Mt. Hope Playground. 

Between Washington and Florence Streets. 
(9.6 Acres?) 
No work of improvement on this fine piece of ground has 
yet been done other than rolling with a steam roller. Base- 
ball diamonds have been laid out, and the grass has been 
kept as short as the rough character of the surface would 
permit. The field has been well used and merits improve- 
ment. An appropriation is needed for levelling and for 
water service. 

Marcella-street Playground. 

Marcella and Ritchie Streets. 
(Jj.,5 Acres.') 

This playground, which was acquired from the city last 
summer, is well located in a populous district. Little has 
been done towards its improvement, other than to provide 



21 

sanitary accommodations for men in the old asylum building, 
and the same for women and children in the lodge. A little 
cleaning up of the grounds made them available for play. 

The buildings now on the ground are neither suitable nor 
conveniently situated for adaptation to any probable use in 
connection with playground work. On the contrary, they 
occupy valuable playground space, besides cutting off or dis- 
connecting parts of the grounds, and they would better be 
removed. The whole area of the playground, including the 
ledge in the northeast corner, could then be graded to a level 
suitable for playground purposes. 

Randolph-street Playground. 

Albany and Randolph Streets. 
(2.8 Acres.*) 
This newly acquired playground is located near a thickly 
settled district, and, in size and shape, is well adapted for 
playground purposes. The ground was not cleared of build- 
ings until late in the fall, consequently we were able to 
complete only the drainage of the grounds before the setting 
in of winter. Grading will be commenced as early as possible 
in the spring, and the playground can be opened for use in 
early summer. Studies are now being made of the brick 
building on Randolph street, with a view to its adaptation for 
playground requirements. Gymnasium apparatus for chil- 
dren and boys of large size is now being made at the depart- 
ment shops. 

Berners Square. 

Plymouth and Bellevue Streets, near Longwood Avenue, 
(1.2 Acres.) 
An appropriation is needed for grading, draining, and seed- 
ing this square. It is, however, available for use, although 
very uneven. 

Oak Square. 

Brighton. 
(0.22 Acre.) 
This square required only ordinary maintenance care. 



22 

Sports. 

From year to year an increased interest is manifested in 
athletic sports. Fifty-two baseball diamonds, in seventeen 
playgrounds, and ninety-three tennis courts, in various parts 
of the system, were maintained ; this latter game is very 
popular. Facilities were provided also, in various play- 
grounds, for football ; the attendance at many of the games 
was very large. Attendance at the golf links was not so 
large as in previous years ; 38,290 players went over the 
course this year as against 47,469 last year. 

Thirteen distinct sheets of ice, in various parks and play- 
grounds, were kept in order for skaters ; and it is estimated 
that they were used by 385,000 persons during the skating 
season. Curlers and hockey players enjoyed a long season 
for their games, which was fully taken advantage of by lovers 
of these sports. A toboggan chute was laid down the hill 
from the golf-house and another down Scarboro' hill to the 
Nazingdale meadow in Franklin Park. The season was 
favorable for making a good course, and 12,300 persons 
enjoyed the sport. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. Pettigbew, 

Superintendent. 



23 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS EMERGENCY AND HYGIENE ASSOCIATION 
IN CHARGE OF THE WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S 
DIVISION AT CHARLESBANK. 



Boston, January 9, 1904. 
To the Board of Park Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — In submitting to you our report for the 
thirteenth year of our superintendence of the gymnastic 
training and playground work and of the general hygienic 
and educational values of Charlesbank, we have no unusual 
items of interest to present. 

The work has gone steadily forward on the same lines of 
progress as heretofore. The attendance has been somewhat 
larger than in the previous season, notwithstanding the hin- 
drances necessarily caused by the building of the bridge. 
The enthusiasm among the older pupils in the classes has 
been very marked, women and girls, who are at work all 
day, coming regularly for their gymnastic exercise and con- 
stantly acknowledging their indebtedness to it for such 
measure of health as they possess. 

During the summer season, from May 15 to October 1, it 
was all out-door work save when it rained, women, young 
girls, children, babies, each division in age having its favorite 
occupation. There is no happier spot in Boston than Charles- 
bank playground when several hundred children are frolick- 
ing upon it. 

The in-door work from October 1 to May 15, except when 
the weather permitted the classes to meet out doors, has been 
in three divisions ; two evening classes with an average 
attendance of 50 plus, two morning classes with 20 as the 
average number, and three afternoon and one morning class 
for the little children, who emulate their elders in their zeal. 



24 

As reward for their gymnastic skill they are allowed certain 
intervals of time for making picture scrap books, a pastime 
they greatly enjoy. 

Miss Crowley is the pianist for the evening classes, Miss 
Kosamond Lang and Miss Marjorie Phelps kindly giving 
their services for the morning classes. 

Towards the close of the winter evening classes, last 
spring, Dr. Dudley A. Sargent of Harvard University 
brought some of his own pupils to assist him in obtaining 
tests of the average strength of the Charlesbank pupils ac- 
cording to certain exercises on simple apparatus which he 
has arranged. The exhibition was novel, interesting and sat- 
isfactory. Its results, tabulated in a chart that now hangs 
on the wall of the large class-room, serve as incentive and as 
caution to the pupils in endeavoring to obtain an all-round 
development. 

Miss Harriet S. Cutler is the wise, kind, efficient Superin- 
tendent, whose influence over her pupils is of very large 
value to their character. Miss Agnes O. Brigham, who so 
long has been the admirable first assistant, though with us 
last summer, has resigned her position to accept similar work 
in a Western college. Miss Margaret L. Horst served 
excellently as second assistant in the summer. 

The committee is grateful for the kind consideration with 
which any suggestion of theirs has always been received by 
Superintendent John A. Pettigrew and his assistants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kate Gannett Wells, 
Anna Phillips Williams, 
Mabel Delano Lord, 

For the Committee. 



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26 



Expenditures on Account of Land and Construction, from 





Roads 

and 
Walks. 


Drainage. 


Grading. 


Loam. 


General 
Work. 


Lawns 

and 
Woods. 




§75 00 
463 43 




$5,200 69 
73 40 
96 62 


$4,592 89 
15 30 

725 89 
593 40 


$81 25 
452 75 
151 91 
234 24 
46 02 
227 86 


$108 S9 
36 35 




$1,170 22 




37 64 




349 08 


23 50 


S38 02 






125 41 




1,555 86 


354 62 












533 29 




1,814 94 

100,624 47 

18,689 05 

445 91 

72 42 


1,965 73 

49,917 25 

465 92 


5,948 98 


2,498 95 


2,107 78 

23 50 

688 75 

170 56 

392 75 

30 75 


1,983 36 






2,703 89 
48 75 
84 20 


4,293 43 
34 11 




18 11 




82 29 






51 28 
























62 00 
10 50 
32 25 














31 21 


Franklin Field 




56 71 


1,273 44 


32 83 


2 50 








Chestnut Hill Park 




310 04 


234 88 


855 99 




141 91 






11 50 
282 75 






94 53 


511 70 


66 S2 


332 67 




Billings Field 








14 41 






293 63 

44 00 
63 51 
26 50 
76 50 

45 00 






























63 37 


47 94 










262 21 
184 58 








102 60 
25 25 


2,088 19 
667 97 


























66 98 






15 92 










17 00 


118 25 










361 83 

14 88 








177 66 


2,639 97 

381 63 

1,462 41 


50 00 
3 75 

60 77 














341 50 




























Totals 


$124,184 69 


$55,582 77 


$22,986 76 


$14,850 24 


$5,687 78 


$3,990 86 







* Of this amount, $203,485.73 was expended by Street Department, being proportion 



27 



February 1, 1903, to January 30, 1904. 



Plantations. 


Water 
Supply. 


Buildings. 


Gymnasium 

Apparatus 

and 

Fences. 


Filling. 


Water 
Fowl. 


Dredging. 


Settees. 


Land 

and 

Expenses. 


Totals. 


$1,225 93 

899 87 

5,417 94 

4,630 94 

760 77 




$696 88 
4,970 37 














$11,981 53 


$623 59 


$574 31 












9,279 59 


$308 15 










6,738 15 








$772 22 








7,441 40 
















932 20 


38 S2 

337 03 

46 36 


4,042 18 












$10 50 


6,229 84 


69 70 
7,809 05 
547 92 
405 93 
614 91 
815 83 

88 22 
116 IS 










940 02 


25,S87 47 






171 00 








50,233 62 










52,957 56 


* 204,070 70 


83 27 

58 27 

59 50 






10,226 83 








37,557 07 








$700 00 






2,090 62 


5,498 37 












7,005 36 














170 25 


















116 18 






285 52 
218 18 








$19 26 




366 78 
















259 89 


981 96 

20 50 

285 54 


13 41 


218 08 












2,611 18 














20 50 
















2,314 55 


4,142 91 








70 50 
111 39 








82 00 




125 41 


2,175 09 


S66 08 






19 26 




4,585 70 


20 43 








20 43 




11,665 11 

145 60 

1,120 01 

1,354 32 


3,071 28 

47 25 

243 08 

24 46 








715 71 




15,760 14 














236 85 


11 00 

2 00 

573 84 




25 00 






34 51 




1,497 11 










1,518 59 


60 77 












973 32 












19 44 




2,439 81 


















593 22 


5 40 

52 43 






390 00 












395 40 




25 00 


1,275 27 










1,435 60 














135 25 




















361 83 






108 17 
177 43 




7 00 










2,997 68 






92 47 
226 17 










655 28 
















2,090 85 
















33 00 


33 00 




















$25,356 29 


$1,446 43 


$5S,084 08 


$6,038 80 


$12,024 14 


$943 22 


$700 00 


$808 18 


$55,315 61 


$3S7,999 85 



of highway loan, issued as Public Park loan, under Chap. 319, Acts of 1897. 



28 



Expenditures on Account of Maintenance from 



Roads. 



Walks. 



Grounds. 



Buildings. 



Commonwealth Avenue 

The Fens 

Riverway 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum 

West Roxbury Parkway 

Franklin Park 

Columbia Road 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank 

Charlestown Heights 

Charlestown Playground 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field 

North End Beach 

Copp's Hill Terraces 

Chestnut Hill Park 

North Brighton Playground 

Neponset Playground 

Billings Field 

First-street Playground 

Prince-street Playground 

Mystic Playground 

Fellows-street Playground 

Christopher Gibson Playground.. 

Columbus-avenue Playground 

Savin Hill Playground 

Roslindale Playground 

Forest Hills Playground 

Rogers Park 

Berners Square 

Oak Square 

Cottage-street Playground.Ward 2 

Marcella-street Playground 

Office Expense 



$14,038 25 

6,377 10 

5,221 33 

4,609 23 

4,327 02 

3,508 00 

7 89 

12,327 59 

3,309 59 

24 44 

731 3S 

40 83 



$1,958 90 
533 73 
389 53 
605 61 
147 69 
218 58 



1,496 83 

134 49 

12 67 

1,227 12 

407 00 

44 SS 

110 27 

70 64 



20 13 



3 50 

201 31 

65 42 



7 50 



18 00 
17 50 



$3,046 

5,594 

5,410 

10,409 

1,766 

44 

361 

24,401 

163 

638 

2,148 

1,871 

3,665 

1,468 

1,072 

415 

1,887 

53 

462 

3,015 

628 

435 

692 

435 

2S1 

253 

305 

658 

1,270 

559 

313 

286 

857 

4 

77 

128 

267 



$430 28 

160 72 

1,668 10 

2,371 18 



40 75 

27 25 
9,597 63 



1,403 29 
2,587 04 



524 43 



21 29 
310 64 



6S 22 



78 56 

6 44 

321 72 



4 28 
447 18 
1 75 
142 S8 
3 00 
3 00 
1 89 



6 00 



$55,891 73 



,776 98 



$75,355 17 



§20,227 52 



29 



February 1, 1903, to January 30, 1904. 



General 
Work. 


Sheep and 
Water 
Fowl. 


Skating. 


Library. 


Men's 
Gym- 
nasium. 


Women's 

and 
Children's 

Gym- 
nasium. 


Office 
Expense. 


Totals. 


$564 10 
689 57 














$20,293 93 

13,823 97 

13,777 18 

22,437 85 

6,443 09 

4,406 15 

403 68 


$61 89 












842 74 












2 734 28 


493 16 


$992 66 










94 50 










402 92 














6 75 














5,673 64 
77 00 


671 40 


570 24 


$6S5 04 








55,956 77 

3,881 82 

985 80 








6 70 




303 14 










314 65 












5,845 93 
6,857 52 
10,454 60 
2 144 14 


286 81 




411 50 
148 87 




$1,221 15 
3,425 20 






450 18 






$2,690 87 




19 94 








15 40 




326 63 

16 85 
1,303 32 










1,485 62 
453 44 














71 80 


2,052 12 










5,653 17 
56 50 


3 50 
























466 14 


96 60 














4,818 02 

1,012 58 

734 39 


21 50 




295 47 
203 82 
■262 30 
102 S5 










10 20 






















979 51 


41 41 






152 94 






1 053 98 












281 34 


40 30 








400 35 
284 45 
218 99 






718 24 


36 25 












650 70 


3 75 




304 79 
491 30 








1,632 89 

1,869 46 

711 66 


23 84 






11 49 














13 05 




186 67 










563 65 














289 17 
















859 36 
















4 60 


















3 07 














131 72 


3 50 














309 19 














$10,075 84 


10,075 84 














$12,547 95 


$3,278 57 


$5,920 41 


$685 04 


$5,703 08 


$2,702 36 


$10,075 84 


$202,601 07 



30 



Income. 

RECEIPTS. 

Keceived from rents, sale of buildings, wool, sheep, grass, 
wood, etc 



PAYMENTS. 



Income carried to General City Income 
Balance on hand, January 30, 1904 



3,632 53 
46 70 



3,679 23 



3,679 23 



Park Betterments Collected by City Collector, 
to February 1, 1904. 



Assessm'ts 
committed 

to 
Collector. 



Abated. 



Net 
Assess- 
ments. 



Collected. 



Outstand- 
ing Feb. 1, 
1904. 



Public Park, Back Bay.. . . 

Marine Park 

Franklin Park 

Parkway, Old Harbor 

" Muddy River.... 

" WestRoxbury.. 

" Dorcbester 



$434,600 00 

23,543 00 

135,029 00 

60,789 00 

108,972 00 

154,107 00 

9,713 00 



$144,195 73 

12,616 80 

122,000 66 

50,426 00 

82,927 25 

113,658 00 

3,055 54 



$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 
10,363 00 
26,044 75 
40,449 00 
6,657 46 



$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 

8,256 00 
22,863 75 
31,763 00 

5,927 74 



$2,107 00 

3,181 00 

8,686 00 

729 72 



$926,753 00 



$528,879 98 



$397,873 02 



$383,169 30 



$14,703 72 



Public Park and Playground Debt. 

Liabilities. 
Total loans outstanding, January 30, 1904 . . . $15,748,910 98 

Resources. 
Sinking Fund, January 30, 1904 4,738,155 48 

Net Debt, January 30, 1904 $11,010,755 50 



31 



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