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Cxlg of goston 

DEPARTNIKNT OK PARKS 



TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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BOARD OF Commissioners 



Year Ending January 31, 1905 






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PRINTED FOR THE DEPARTMENT 
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With the Compliments of the 



Board of Commissioners of the 
Department of Parks. 













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DKPARTMIENT OK PARKS 



TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF Commissioners 



Year Ending January 31, 1903 




PRINTED FOR THE DEPARTMENT 
1903 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Commissioners' Keport 6 

Superintendent's Report 9 

Engineer's Report ,21 

Financial Statements for financial year 1902-1903 : 

Expenditures for Land, Construction, and Maintenance . . 28 

Expenditures in Detail 30 

General Exhibit of Appropriations 48 

Appropriations and Balances in Detail 49 

Summary of Expenditures on Account of Public Parks and 
Playgrounds, Land, Construction, and Betterments from the 

Organization of the Board 54 

Park Betterments Collected by City Collector .... 56 

Public Park and Playground Debt 56 

Park Statistics 57 



DEPARTMENT OF PARKS, 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



Hon. Patrick A. Collins, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — The Board has the honor herewith to submit this 
report for the year ending January 31, 1903. 

But one addition to our park area was made during the 
year : One and six-tenths acres, including parts of the pri- 
vate ways known as Reservoir road and Wade street, were 
added to Chestnut Hill park by a taking made November 12, 
1902, which makes the area of that park in charge of this 
Board 55.4 acres. The area under the control of the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board is 160.65 acres, of which 
122.7 acres is in water. 

To the playgrounds the following additions were made : 

On May 16, 1902, 88,668 square feet of land in East Bos- 
ton, bounded by Cottage, Gove, and Lubec streets, and pri- 
vate lots on Maverick street, were taken for a playground 
for Ward 2, and subsequently, on January 6, 1903, the 
Board took a further area of 79,126 square feet, which 
included a part of Lubec street, making the whole area of 
the playground 3.85 acres. 

On June 26, 1902, the Board took 9.6 acres of land on 
Washington street and Florence street, between Forest Hills 
and Roslindale, and near the land previously taken from 
Harvard College for a playground. This last-named land 
was given back to the college, in accordance with its desire, 
and under the provisions of chapter 187 of the Acts of 1901. 

On December 8, 1902, the Board added to the Columbus- 
avenue playground 4,397.4 square feet of land on Camden 
street, occupied by stables. This land was enclosed on three 
sides by the playground. It is hoped that the buildings may 
be found useful in connection with the work of the play- 
ground. 



6 

Oak square, Brighton, containing 9,796 square feet of 
land, formerly used for school purposes, was transferred to 
this department by the City Council March 24, 1902. The 
removal of the building and the grading of the site have 
made a marked improvement at this important street junction. 

A contract was made December 2, 1902, for a building 
with lockers and shower-baths for the athletes, and sanitary 
accommo dations in the basement at First-street playground, 
and plans for other much-needed sanitary and shelter build- 
ings are under way. 

Further appropriations are needed to make some of the 
playgrounds better serve the purpose for which they were 
acquired, as some of them are not yet provided with desir- 
able conveniences and facilities for play. 

A handsome fountain, designed by Mr. Guy Lowell, has 
been placed at the Westland avenue entrance of the Fens. 
This we owe to the generous bequest of Mrs. Ellen C. John- 
son, in memory of her husband, Jesse C. Johnson, and to the 
intelligent and unremitting labors of her executrix, Mrs. 
Hobert S. Russell. 

A playground is needed in Jamaica Plain and one in the 
Centre street district, and much more space should be added 
to the Prince-street playground. A playground in the 
neighborhood of the Fellows-street playground, for the older 
youth, would be of much public benefit. The Board can 
only repeat its suggestion to our rich and public-spirited 
citizens that no better gift can be made to our city, and no 
more enduring monument obtained for the giver than a 
playground. 

The pollution of the water in the Fens by the sewage dis- 
charge from Stony Brook menaces the health of the residents 
in this part of the city, and is an annoyance to visitors to 
this park. It is a serious obstacle to the improvement of 
the neighboring territory. This matter has received careful 
consideration by this Board. We have called attention to it 
in previous reports and in communications to the Mayor and 
the Board of Health. This Board is powerless in the mat- 
ter, which now rests with the Street Department. The 
report of the Commission on the Charles River dam, 



appointed by a resolve of the Legislature of last year, is 
awaited with interest, as it will deal with this question as 
well as others affecting the Fens basin. No time should be 
lost in giving at least temporary relief to the Fens basin from 
the foul water which now enters into it. This is a most 
difficult and serious problem to the Park Department of 
Boston. 

Full details of the work of the department during the year 
will be found in the accompanying reports of our Superin- 
tendent and Engineer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Stratton, 

Laban Pratt, 

James M. Prendergast, 

Commissioners. 
Boston, January 31, 1903. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To Chaeles E. Steatton, Laban Pratt and James 
M. Peendeegast, Commiissioners : 

Gentlemeist, — I herewith submit a report of the work 
performed, under the direction of your Board, during the 
year 1902. 

FeaisTklin Paek. 

The improvement in the old woodlands of Franklin Park 
resulting from the careful and continued thinning out of all 
overcrowding trees and the pruning off of dead and diseased 
branches is very marked. This is especially noticeable in 
the greater spread of branches in the trees and in the 
increase of desirable undergrowth. A considerable area of 
woodland has been cleared of tree weeds, notably in the 
woods opposite and west of the Overlook, on Juniper Hill, 
and in the woods bordering Morton street. On account of 
insufficient funds little was done the past season in adding 
loam to the sterile parts of the old woods. This is regret- 
table, and it is to be hoped, in the interests of the future, 
that sufficient money will be given the Board to permit the 
carrying on of this work. 

Thinning out in the plantations was continued, as in past 
years, to allow room for the full development of trees and 
shrubs. A large part of the material removed was used in 
preparing new plantations, and the remainder was sold. 

The larger part of the work of the past season in Franklin 
Park, however, consisted in the preparation of ground for 
planting and in the care of the young plantations. These 
plantations, owing to the dryness of the three preceding 
seasons, required constant cultivation and the application of 
mulchings for the conservation of moisture in the ground. 
This work extended generall}^ over the entire system of 
parks, and, in consequence, the trees and the shrubs are in 
good growing condition. 



10 

The wall on Walnut avenue, between Seaver street and 
the entrance to Franklin Park, was completed last spring, 
and the slopes behind the wall were graded and planted. 
The construction of the widened street at this point by the 
Street Department would improve very much this important 
entrance to the park. 

The drainage of the Nazingdale hollow was extended into 
EUicottdale, and spurs were carried into the wet spots. It 
is expected that this will complete the tile-drainage of the 
golf course. The beech plantation near the Refectory also 
was tile-drained. 

The public have shown much interest in a small collection 
of native wild fowl colonized at Scarboro' Pond. In view of 
this arrangements have been made for additions to the 
number of species. The location is an admirable one for 
this purpose, as the pond contains three islands well suited 
for nesting and for protection from dogs. The pond is also 
a favorite resort of the public. 

Several pieces of iron and wood-working machinery have 
been purchased for our repair shops. Our equipment now 
enables us to do all our repair work at home, including 
machine and blacksmith work, horseshoeing, carpentering, 
plumbing, painting, pipe-work and harnessmaking. 

Arnold Arboretum. 
The usual care of the roads and walks was continued. 

Olmsted Park and Riverway. 

Along the Riverway and the shores of Leverett Pond the 
work of extending the loam bed to the water's edge is in 
progress. This work will be completed in time to allow of 
the planting in the spring of shrubbery nearly to the shore 
line. Semi-aquatic plants will be planted along the shores. 
This treatment, by softening the present hard shore line, will 
greatly improve this beautiful piece of water. 

The eight pairs of European swans purchased and placed 
in Jamaica Pond, and the native geese and ducks, proved 
very attractive to our many visitors. 



11 



The Fens. 

The subject of the Fens is a discouraging one, not alone 
from the foul condition of its pond, but from the fact that 
its horticultural possibilities are curtailed by a lack of loam 
and by the sterile underlying gravel. 

By constant tilth, shrubbery may be kept in good growth, 
yet trees cannot attain fair proportions under such conditions. 
From time to time additions of loam should be made until 
the accumulated dejjth is sufficient in body to afford nutrition 
for large growth, and, at the same time, to conserve the 
moisture, which is now quickly absorbed by the gravelly 
subsoiL 

The trees bordering the drives have had additions made to 
their loam beds until they now have a continuous bed of 
loam eight feet wide by three and one-half feet in depth. 
Further additions of loam will be required before a fine 
avenue of trees can be expected. Appropriations for increas- 
ing the depth of soil in the Fens would be a wise measure, 
in view of its importance to the future. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 
The improved appearance resulting from the thinning out 
of the trees on the eastern end of Commonwealth avenue is 
clearly apparent. The remaining trees, many of them good 
specimens, can be seen in their individuality, and they now 
have more opportunity for the spread of their branches than 
when they were closely crowded. A thinning out of the 
younger trees, between Dartmouth street and Massachusetts 
avenue, was made during the past season. These trees had 
grown to a point where their branches were beginning to 
intermingle, and serious crowding and damage would soon 
have resulted. This portion of the avenue is underlaid 
mostly with porous gravel, which has a covering of loam not 
exceeding twelve or thirteen inches in thickness. These don- 
ditions certainly are not conducive to a growth of fine trees. 

Charlesbank. 

This useful park continues to draw large numbers of 
people. The mounds are reserved for women and children ; 



12 

the men, however, have free access to the walks and the 
seats on the river front. The gymnasium at the east end is 
for men and boys, the other at the west end for women and 
children. Competent teachers are in charge of the gymna- 
siums, those for the women's gymnasium being under the 
direction of the Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene 
Association. Large numbers enjoy the skating furnished on 
the men's gymnasium grounds. 

Wood Island Paek. 
Tree growth on Wood Island continues to be satisfactory 
in spite of its exposure to strong winds ; and the number of 
visitors, influenced by the improved conditions, increases with 
each year. The gymnasium, ball grounds, cricket grounds, 
tennis and foot-ball grounds and skating fields have been 
kept in good condition, and have been largely patronized 
during the past season. 

Charlestown Heights. 
Outside of the regular maintenance of the grounds, no 
work of importance was done at this park during the past 
season. Being located opposite a large school-house, and 
being a favorite resort for a considerable number of pupils, 
the upkeep is relatively large and is out of proportion to the 
extent of the grounds. 

Marine Park. 

In spite of its exposed position this valuable and beauti- 
ful breathing place is assuming quite a wooded appearance. 
The condition of the trees and shrubbery, like that at Wood 
Island Park, proves that the bleak shores and islands of the 
bay can be clothed with foliage. 

No work other than that of maintenance was done the 
past season, with the exception of the planting of shrubbery 
in various places around the ponds. 

On account of the coolness of the past summer bathers 
were not so numerous as during preceding summers. The 
band concerts given in July and August were attended by 
very large numbers of people. The steamboat service 



13 

between Castle Island and the public landing received the 
usual patronage. 

Straisidway. 

The work of filling, grading and road-making was con- 
tinued on the Burnham wharf property. Sufficient ground 
was graded to form a good ball field of three diamonds, 
which were much used, as were later the three acres which 
were flooded for skating. The work of filling out into the 
bay by the teams of the Sanitary Department is still in 
progress. 

Chestnut Hill Park. 

Outside of the regular maintenance work little was done 
in this park except the pruning and thinning out of the old 
woodlands. Some planting also was done, and preparation 
made for further planting in the spring. The acres added by 
purchase to the north border will permit of a wider planted 
belt, where a border screen is much needed. 

Berners Square. 
In this newly acquired park some thinning of the trees 
was done. A small appropriation will suffice for grading 
and drainage. 

Dorchester Park and West Roxbury Parkway. 

Overcrowding and diseased trees were thinned out. At 
West Roxbury Parkway the fine white oaks near Weld 
street were pruned of dead and diseased limbs. The ordi- 
nary maintenance of the wild bridle-path was continued. 

The Nursery. 
In the Franklin Field nursery a quantity of nursery stock 
from seed beds was set out last spring. The stock generally 
is in good condition, and affords a varied assortment of trees 
and shrubs from which to draw for planting. The newly 
broken ground was sowed to oats and millet for a forage 
crop. Subsequently the ground was twice ploughed, and it 
is now in fine condition for nursery work. To determine 
the species best adapted for golf greens and other games 



14 

requiring a tough turf, a collection of grasses was sown in 
the nursery last spring (for experiment and observation). 

Franklin Field. 
(77 Acres.} 

The Stratton street and Blue Hill avenue borders of Frank- 
lin Field were graded, and reinforced in places with addi- 
tional loam, for the belt of trees varying in width from forty 
to sixty feet to be planted in the coming spring. These 
trees will serve as a protection and a background for the 
field. 

The Street Department having completed the drainage 
conduits early last spring we were enabled to level up and 
throw the whole field open to use. Subsequently this 
department filled the old open ditch along the Talbot avenue 
side, and prepared the ground along its course for a row of 
trees. 

As set forth in recent reports the field generally is uneven 
from unequal settlements in the original grading. The work 
of regrading is too expensive to be undertaken under our 
maintenance appropriation. 

The ball field is in increasing demand. On Saturday 
afternoons, especially, the whole area is occupied by base- 
ball and cricket teams. About forty acres were flooded last 
winter for skating. 

. Cheistophee, Gibson Playground. 

Dorchester Avenue and Park Street. 
{S.8 Acres.) 

In the triangle, or children's corner, some simple apparatus 
was set up, which consisted of swings, swinging ladders and 
teeter boards. A small shelter pavilion was also built, a 
basket-ball outfit was supplied, and tennis courts were laid 
out. The games were carried on under the superintendence 
of a teacher, and this effort to interest the children and 
direct them in their play proved quite successful. The ex- 
pense was light, and the results would fully justify the 
extension of this branch of playground work. 



15 

The field was well patronized during the season, com- 
mencing with base-ball, running through tennis, quoits, and 
ending with skating in winter. 

Savin Hill Beach. 

Springdale Street, Dorchester. 
(^18.6 Acres.^ 
The bathing-house at this beach contains thirty-one rooms 
for women and fifty-four for men. The number of bathers 
last season was 65,500. The accommodations were found to 
be inadequate, and at times several persons had to occupy 
one room. The beach -is well sheltered, and very popular 
with the residents of the neighborhood. Additional rooms 
are needed. 

Nepoisiset Playground. 

Neponset Avenue. 
{18 Acres.^ 
No work other than that of maintenance was done on this 
playground. Settlements of the marsh under the filled part 
of the ground continue to give trouble. The ball field, how- 
ever, was kept in fairly good condition. The skating field 
was flooded as usual. 

Mystic Playground. 

Chelsea Street and Mystic Kiver. 
{2.3 Acres.-) 
Swings, teeter boards, ladders, and sand boxes were in- 
stalled early last season at one end of the playground. A 
small pavilion was also built for shelter. This section was 
fenced off from the remainder of the playground by a woven 
wire fence. A teacher was employed, and this resulted in a 
crowded children's corner. 

Charlestown Playground. 

Main and Alford Streets. 
(14- Acres. ) 
The filling of this playground is not fully completed. 
There is, however, sufficient smoothly graded ground for 



16 

present demands, including an area of 2.2 acres for flooding 
for skating in winter. 

Rogers Park. 

Lake and Foster Streets. 
{6.9 Acres?) 
The slope on the Foster street side of this park was planted 
with shrubs last spring, and some filling and grading was 
done on the playground. More graded space is needed, as 
this playground is much frequented by the young men of 
the neighborhood. To obtain this space it will be necessary 
to carry underground the brook now crossing the park. 
Other needs of this park are filling for the pond and play 
ground, also sanitary conveniences and a shelter. 

North Brighton Playground. 

Western Avenue and Harvard Street. 
(14- Acres.') 
No work other than that of maintenance was done at this 
playground the past season. An extension of the graded 
area is needed for playground purposes, as are also fences 
and the preparation of the ground for the planting of trees 
around its border. A shelter and sanitary building is also 
much needed. The skating field on this playground was 
flooded the past winter. 

Billings Field. 

Lagrange, near Centre Street, West Roxbury. 
(11 Acres.) 
The work of planting the slope at Bellevue street and 
grading and seeding the tennis courts was completed last 
spring. The Lagrange street border also was graded and 
prepared for planting with trees. Under-drainage was laid 
in various wet places, which, with the deepened outlet across 
Lagrange street, very much improved the grounds. A bog- 
hole under one portion of the field gives trouble by settling, 
and repeated filling has not yet found a solid bottom. The 
grounds were flooded as usual last winter for skating. Sani- 
tary and shelter accommodations are needed. 



17 



ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

South Walter and Eobert Streets. 
{3.7 Acres.-) 
During last spring this plaj^ground was finely graded and 
seeded, making a very good field for ball playing. The 
grounds are popular and much used. On this account it 
was found necessary to remove the two large willows which 
stood in the centre of the playground and interfered with 
the games. A sanitary and shelter building is needed here, 
as are also a division fence between the Pearce property and 
the playground, and a retaining-wall on Robert street. A 
skating area of 1.6 acres was provided last winter. 

Columbus- AVENUE Playground. 
(4.5 Acres.') 

The smoke and dust of the neighboring railroad have 
proved too severe for the tender foliage of the Norway 
maples planted around the borders. No work of construction 
was done during the past season. 

The same arrangement a^ to the management of the play- 
ground that obtained last year has been continued. The 
Park Department keeps charge of the ordinary maintenance 
of the grounds and the skating field, while the Civic League 
is allowed to assume the management and expenses of the 
games. The grounds were largely attended during the 
season. 

Prince-street Playground. 

Prince and North Bennet Streets, 
(0.4- Acre.) 

No work other than that of maintenance was done here 
during the past season. 

First-street Playground. 

First and M Streets, South Boston. 
Q-.G Acres.) 
On account of the great difficulty experienced in holding 
water on this playground, and the consequent unsatisfactory 



18 

results, further effort to form an ice field for skating has 
been abandoned until a proper bottom can be made. In the 
mean time the Strandway playground, which contains a good 
field for ice, will serve this district for skating. 

Bleachers with a seating capacity of 500 have been erected 
in the ball field. 

Fellows-stkeet Playground. 

Fellows and Hunneman Streets. 
(0.85 Acre.) 
The introduction into this playground of apparatus for 
children's use made it at once popular. Instead of playing 
on the sidewalks, as had hitherto been their preference, the 
children swarmed into the playground. Children's allotment 
gardens were laid out and planted, and each owner of a plot 
vied with the other in bringing forth results. A little sur- 
reptitious changing of plants was done occasionally, yet a 
fair show remained to the end of the season, when the plants 
were taken by the children to their homes. The teacher, as 
at the other playgrounds, contributed largely to the success 
of the experiment. Sanitary accommodations are needed 
here, also an open-sided shelter over the sand boxes. 

Waed Two Playground. 

Cottage Street, near Maverick Street, East Boston. 
(3.8 Acres. ^ 
A portion of the new playground acquired by purchase 
during the past year was roughly graded, and a base-ball field 
laid out for use last spring. This playground is conveniently 
situated for a well-populated district. Sanitary and shelter 
accommodations, fencing, and ground preparation for planting 
bordering trees are its needs. 

Forest Hills and Mt. Hope Playground. 

(9.6 Acres.} 

This playground, acquired by purchase during the past 

season, is conveniently located for the Forest Hills, Roslin- 

dale and Mt. Hope districts. The ground is nearly level, 

and will require comparatively little labor to bring it into 



19 

good condition for use. By using a six-ton steam roller last 
season two fairly good diamonds were made and equipped 
with backstops. The field was used also for foot-ball games 
last fall. xA.n appropriation is needed for grading and for 
a sanitary building. 

Oak Square. 

Brighton. 
(OM Acre?) 

This small triangle, which was turned over to the Park 
Department by the City Council last season, contained an 
old school building. This has been removed, and the 
asphaltum flooring of the yard has been taken up. There 
are a few good trees on the triangle, and for their benefit 
some gravel was removed from the surface and loam substi- 
tuted. A little additional loam is needed to finish the 
grading in readiness for seeding. The construction of a few 
seats under the shade of the trees will make a pleasant 
resting place. 

Sports and Pastimes. 

An increased interest in golf was manifested the past 
season. The total attendance at the Franklin Park links 
was 47,469 as against 31,007 the previous year. The six- 
hole course for beginners proved of great service in relieving 
the nine-hole course from overcrowding, much of which had 
been caused by the slow play of novices in the game. 

The increased demand for tennis courts necessitated the 
laying out of a number of new courts in various parts of the 
park system. We now have over one hundred courts in 
operation, which, on Saturdays and holidays, are all in use. 

The past winter did not prove a satisfactory one for skat- 
ing. Quickly alternating periods of frost, thaw, or snow 
made the maintenance of ice for skating very difficult. The 
following table gives statistics in detail : 



20 



Skating — Season 1902-1903. 



Name. 



Area, 
Acres. 



Hockey 
Rinks. 



No. of days 
Skating. 



Approximate 
Attendance. 



Billings Field 

Charlesbank 

Charlesto-wTi Playground 

Columbus-avenue Playground.. 
Christopher Gibson Playground 

Franklin Field 

Jamaica Pond 

Neponaet Playground 

North Brighton Playground 

Roslindale Playground 

Strandway Playground 

Scarhoro' Pond 

Wood Island Park 

Totals 



5.0 
1.4 
2.2 
2.6 
1.95 
35.0 
64.5 
3.3 
3.3 
2.1 
3.0 
4.75 
7.9 



11,200 
18,300 

7,050 

7,750 
13,500 
70,075 
31,900 
12,000 

1,950 
14,300 
40,275 

1,550 
18,550 



137 



306 



248,400 



Curling was enjoyed by its devotees at Scarboro' pond. 
Several matched games were played, whicli were watched 
with interest by many people. 

At the various playgrounds, base-ball, foot-ball, and cricket 
games were amply provided for, and largely attended both 
by players and spectators. Forty-four regularly equipped 
diamonds were maintained by the department. The Frank- 
lin Park playground, in addition, furnished accommodation 
for from twelve to fifteen games for boys and young men. 

Details of measurements of work performed during the 
past season will be found in the report of the engineer. 

Your Superintendent desires to note his appreciation of the 
able services of C. E. Putnam, engineer, and Messrs. J. B. 
Shea and J. W. Duncan, assistant superintendents, in the 
execution of the work of the department. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. Pettigrew, 

Superintendent. 



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21 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Mr. John A. Pettigrew, 

Superintendent : 

Dear Sir, — The following report for the year ending 
January 31, 1903, is submitted: 



Commonwealth Avenue. 



Curbs across ends of planting spaces 

raised and reset 
Area of walk resurfaced with gravel 
Drain pipe laid, 10-inch 
Catch-basins built 
Loam bought .... 
Area regraded and seeded . 



1,290 linear feet. 
8,500 square yards. 
245 linear feet. 

2. 
127 cubic yards. 
8 acres. 



A new wearing floor has been laid on the bridge at 
Charlesgate, and the drive at Hotel Somerset has been 
changed to make a carriage entrance to the hotel. 

The Fens. 

The deposit of foul mud and sewage in the Fens Pond is 
probably as large as it was before the pond was partly 
cleaned in 1898, and, should the coming summer be unusu- 
ally warm, the condition of the pond will be worse than ever 
before. 

The cleaning of the pond will be very expensive, and, if 
done while the pollution of Stony Brook is allowed to con- 
tinue, will give only partial relief, and that will be tempo- 
rary. With the present quantity- of pollution entering the 
pond it is impracticable, if not impossible, to maintain cur- 
rents sufficient to prevent the fouling of the water and the 
continuous accumulations of deposits of foul mud. 



22 

The foul-flow conduit, often recommended by the Park 
and Street Departments, should be built at once, and imme- 
diately after it is built the pond should be thoroughly 
cleaned. It can then be easily kept clean and attractive, 
and, if the Charles-River dam is not built, will become, what 
it was designed to be, a salt-water basin surrounded by salt 
marshes ; or, if the dam is built, it will become what will be 
much better, a sluggish fresh-water stream, flowing between 
low banks covered with a luxuriant vegetation. 

The drinking fountain and ornamental gateway that is 
being erected at Westland entrance, under the will of the 
late Ellen C. Johnson, is nearly completed. 

RiVERWAY. 

A new wearing floor has been laid on the Audubon-road 
bridge, and the approach to Longwood bridge has been 
widened and surfaced. 

Olmsted Park. 

A floating island of barrels and timber, covered with loam 
one foot in depth, has been placed in Jamaica Pond for a 
nesting place for the water fowl. 

Ten tennis courts have been laid out at Pine Bank, near 
Perkins street. 

Loam bought . . . . . 129 cubic yards. 

Arborway. 

A new wearing floor has been laid on the bridge over 
Stony Brook. 

Franklin Park. 
Boundary wall built . . . . 419 linear feet. 
Walks graded and surfaced 
Drain pipe laid, 10-inch 
Drain pipe laid, 2-inch 
Bubble fountain erected 



1,100 square yards. 

125 linear feet. 
3,060 linear feet. 
1. 



The duck-house has been moved and enlarged ; the tem- 
porary office and tool-house has been moved, and the interior 



23 

has been rearranged; and a temporary paint-shop has been 
built. Scarboro' Hill and Juniper Hill are being cleared of 
boulders. 

Arnold Arboretum. 
Drain pipe laid, 8-inch . . . 450 linear feet. 

West Roxbury Parkway. 
Material from the widening of Walter street has been 
spread in the grove between Centre and Walter streets. 

Franklin Field. 

The drainage ditch along Talbot avenue has been filled, 
and the grading and loaming of that side of the field has 
been completed. 

Strandway. 

Two wharves and about thirty old buildings have been re- 
moved from the land recently taken near Mercer street. 
The grading and loaming of Columbia road across this land 
has been nearly completed, and the Telford foundation has 
been laid on 1,000 linear feet of the driveway. At the head 
of Old Harbor street there is an area of about 70 acres of 
flats and marsh inside of the harbor line that can be filled. 
This is an excellent location for a large athletic field. 

Curbstone set ..... 1,065 linear feet. 

Telford foundation laid . . . 4,220 square yards. 
Drain pipe laid: 

18-inch . . . . . . 15 hnear feet. 



15-inch . 

10-inch . 
Water pipe laid, 4-inc 
Catch-basins built 
Loam bought 
Filling bought . 



550 linear feet. 

290 hnear feet. 

90 linear feet. 

10. 

8,327 cubic yards. 

7,696 cubic yards. 



Chestnut Hill Park. 
Additional land taken . . . 69,541 square feet. 

Tile drain laid, 2-inch . . . 1,900 linear feet. 

Tennis courts laid out ... 3. 



24 



Oak Square. 
The old school-house has been moved and the ground 
graded. 

Loam bought . . . . . 207 cubic yards. 

Columbus Avenue Playground. 
The Civic League has built a fence along Columbus 
avenue and extended observation seats 160 feet. 

North Brighton Playground. 
Filling bought ..... 290 cubic yards. 
Loam bought ..... 149 cubic yards. 

Rogers Park. 
The Faneuil Valley brook conduit, above and below the 
park, has been built, and should be extended across the park. 
It will cost about |3,000. 

Filling bought ..... 1,818 cubic yards. 
Loam bought ..... 533 cubic yards. 

Fellows-street Playground. 

The boundary fence has been lowered, and twelve swings 
and five tilting ladders have been erected. 

ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

The ground has been cleared of stones and trees, and 307 
linear feet of tile drain has been laid to take away the leak- 
age through the dike. 

Billings Field. 

Drinking fountains erected . . 1. 

Tile drain laid 150 linear feet. 

Filling bought ..... 1,561 cubic yards. 

Loam bought . . . . . 339 cubic yards. 

Christopher Gibson Playground. 
Twelve swings and five tilting ladders have been erected. 



25 



FlEST-STEEET PLAYGROUND. 

A locker building and sanitary, which will contain shower 
baths and 282 lockers, to be used in connection with the gym- 
nasium, also sanitary accommodations for men and women, 
is being erected, and will be completed about May 1. 

Mystic Playground. 
Twelve swings and five tilting ladders have been erected. 

C. E. Putnam, 

Assistant Engmeer. 



26 



EEPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS EMERGENCY AND HYGIENE ASSOCIATION 
IN CHARGE OF THE WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S 
DIVISION AT CHARLESBANK. 



Boston, January 5, 1903. 
To the Honorable Board of Park Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — The gymnastic and educational work at 
Charlesbank continues with unabated zeal, though we have no 
new features of special interest to report to you for this, the 
twelfth year of our superintendence of the place. 

During the summer season, from May 15 to October 1, the 
number in the gymnasium on a hot day at noon varied from 
two or three to two hundred or more on a fine Saturday 
afternoon. On the playground there were slightly fewer 
than last year, owing probably to the number of cool, misty, 
damp days. At times, however, several hundred appeared 
there and in the sand-boxes, one hundred and twenty-five 
often playing together in a single game at one time. 

There were the usual class lessons for beginners and for 
advanced work, as well as the free or voluntary gymnastic work, 
one class in the middle of the summer meeting at 6.30 P.M. 
The " Little Beginners' " class met on Saturday mornings, 
with an enrolment of sixty-two and an average attendance of 
twenty-four, but the "Big Beginners" had a hundred and 
eighteen names on their roll. The devices of plays in the 
sand-boxes and of games, gymnastic and otherwise, were end- 
less. The kindergarten occupations and the dolls' dress- 
making classes were unusually successful. The hurdy-gurdy, 
provided once a week by a friend, in the summer, was as 
much enjoyed by the mothers as by 'the dancers. 

Books, magazines and games have been given by many 
friends, though more are always wanted, which occupy and 
amuse the children in hot summer days as well as in winter, 
after the class work is over. 



27 

Spray baths were used by large numbers of the children 
who wore bloomers. One thousand seven hundred and 
eleven baths were taken from June 1 to September 9, exclu- 
sive of those taken by the women after class work, of which 
no record is kept. 

Owing to the illness of Miss Cutler for many weeks, her 
place was filled by Miss Agnes Otis Brigham, whose assist- 
ants were Miss Mannship, Miss Haskell and Miss Phelps. 
In the autumn. Miss Cutler resumed her position and is in 
sole charge of the winter work, when all the movable 
apparatus is placed in the large upper hall. 

From October 1 to May 15 there are two evening classes 
for grown-up girls, and two morning classes for women and 
four classes for children (three in the afternoons when school 
is over and one on Saturday mornings), who, after their 
regular gymnastic exercise, are allowed the delights of 
" scrapping " ; that is, of pasting printed anecdotes, verses 
and pictures in scrap books, each child having her own hero 
or heroine, McKinley, Lincoln, Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
Queen Victoria being favorite subjects for enterprise. This 
side development of Charlesbank under the guidance of Miss 
Cutler, which yet is not allowed to interfere with its legiti- 
mate work, is bringing large influences for good into the 
lives of the children. 

Miss Crowley is the pianist for the winter classes, her 
salary being borne by the association and the piano being 
lent by a friend. 

The committee is very grateful for the wise attention 
given by Mr. Pettigrew and his assistants to the interests of 
Charlesbank and for their readiness to confer with your 
committee in all helpful ways. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kate Gannett Wells, 
Anna Phillips Williams, 
Mabel Delano Lord, 

For the Committee, 



28 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS. 



Expenditures for Land, Construction and Maintenance from 
February 1, 1902, to January 31, 1903. 



Parks. 



Land. 



Construc- 
tion. 



Main- 
tenance. 



Totals. 



Main Park System: 

Commonwealth avenue 

Fens 

Riverway 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum 

West Roxbury Parkway. . . 

Franklin Park 

Marine Park System : 

Columbia Road * 

Dorcbesterway 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank 

Charlestown Heights 

Charlestown Playground 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field 

Korth End Beach 

<]opp'8 Hill Terraces 

Chestnut Hill Park 

North Brighton Playground, 

Neponset Playground 

Billings Field 

First-street Playground 

Prince-street Playground 



$537 84 



715 40 



23,978 33 



19,500 00 



$1,541 08 

1,652 00 

2,486 06 

3,702 80 

687 51 

474 52 

601 22 

24,466 35 

32,136 43 



37,681 52 
850 19 
451 17 

469 38 
248 51 



733 44 
2,920 51 



7 25 
1,869 07 



3,249 76 
463 01 



$19,953 00 
13,517 18 
10,967 53 
21,902 37 
6,703 74 
5,679 18 
1,054 37 
55,140 36 

4,163 58 
12 80 

267 56 
6,243 51 
7,265 50 
10,440 79 
2,630 25 
1,454 49 

540 00 

8,271 16 

10 83 

335 44 
3,502 82 
1,889 65 
1,472 41 
1,675 29 
1,005 00 

225 33 



$21,494 08 
15,169 18 
13,453 59 

25.605 17 
7,391 25 
6,153 70 
1,665 69 

79.606 71 

36,837 85 
12 80 

38,899 08 
7,093 70 
7,716 67 

10,910 17 
2,878 76 
1,454 49 
1,988 84 

11,191 67 

10 83 

342 69 

29,350 22 
1,889 65 
1,472 41 
4,925 05 
1,468 01 

19,725 33 



Carried forward. 



$45,681 57 $116,691 78 $186,324 14 



$348,697 49 



''Of this amount $32,295.61 was expended by Street Department. 



29 



EXPENDITUKES FOK LAND, BTC. — Concluded. 



Parks. 



Land. 



Construc- 
tion. 



Main- 
tenance. 



Totals. 



Brought forward 

Mystic Playground 

Fellows-street Playground . . 

Christopher Gibson Play- 
ground 

Rogers Park 



Columbus-avenue P 1 a y- 
ground 



Ashmont Playground — 
Savin Hill Playground.. 
Roslindale Playground. . 
Forest Hills Playground. 

Playground, Ward 2 

Trinity Triangle 

Berners Square 

Oak Square 



Playgrounds, Investigating 
sites 



Office expenses. 



Totals. 



$45,681 57 



39,592 71 
43,902 91 



25,010 GO 
47,002 32 



17 00 



$201,206 Dl 



$116,691 78 



10 50 



159 45 
320 51 



$186,324 14 
1,642 98 
1,402 77 

2,068 29 
1,077 04 

2,995 19 

42 00 

1,033 33 

1,454 95 

129 07 

314 83 

2 00 

7 00 

36 75 



$117,182 24 



10,056 40 



$208,586 74 



$348,697 49 
1,642 98 
1,402 77 

2,068 29 
1,087 54 

42,587 90 

43,944 91 

1,033 33 

1,454 95 

25,139 07 

47,317 16 

2 00 

166 45 

357 26 

17 00 

10,056 40 

$526,975 49 



30 



IL 

Expenditures of this Department in detail from February 1, 
1902, to January 31, 1903. 

COMMONWEALTH AVENUE. 

CONSTKUCTION. 

Roadways^ Gutters, and Drainage. 

Hoads and walks: labor . . $726 13 

Plantations. 

Labor and materials . . . 660 62 

Grading, Loam, and General Work. 

Loam: materials . . $74 33 
Engineers: labor . . 30 00 

General Work: labor . 8 25 



112 68 



Lawns and Woods. 

Labor 41 75 

$1,541 08 

MAINTENANCE. 

Eoads, Walks, Grounds, Drainage, and General Work. 

Eoads: labor and materials . . $12,463 04 
Grounds: labor and materials . 4,945 59 
Walks: labor and materials . 1,234 94 
Drainage : labor and materials . 644 69 
General Work: labor and ma- 
terials 603 02 

Engineers: labor .... 140 00 

Loam: material .... 21 72 



19,953 00 
$21,494 08 



FENS. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 

Labor and materials . . . $1,142 77 

Roadways, Gutters, and Drainage. 

Eoads and walks : labor $458 96 
Drainage: labor . . 2 75 



461 71 



Lawns and Woods. 
Labor and materials . . . 28 16 



Amounts carried forward, $1,632 64 $21,494 08 



31 



Amounts brought forward, $1,632 64 

Grading, Loam, and General Work. 



$21,494 08 



Loam: materials 
Grading: labor 



$9 75 
9 61 



19 36 



$1,652 00 



MAINTENANCE, 



Road, Walks, Grounds, Drainage, and General Work. 



Koads: labor and materials . 
Grounds: labor and materials 
Walks : labor and materials . 
General work: labor and mate 

rials 

Engineers: labor and materials 
Drainage : labor and materials 
Live stock: labor and materials 
Boat landing: materials 
Fence: materials . 
Buildings: materials 
Loam: materials . 



$7,177 42 

4,581 09 

772 09 

503 42 

204 85 

114 41 

85 44 

43 01 

16 36 

10 64 

8 45 



13,517 18 



15,169 18 



Labor and materials 



Labor and materials 



RIVERWAY. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 

. $1,506 48 

Lawns and Woods. 
467 48 



Roadways, Gutters, and Drainage. 
Roads and walks: labor . . 323 91 



Grading, Loam, and General Work. 



Loam: materials . 
Grading: labor 
Engineers: labor . 
General work: labor 



$133 18 

30 51 

20 00 

4 50 



188 19 



2,486 06 



MAINTENANCE. 



Road, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage, and General Work. 

Roads: labor and materials . . $5,494 46 

Grounds: labor and materials . 3,452 00 

Buildings: labor and materials . 913 16 

General work: labor and materials, 541 30 

Walks : labor and materials . . 310 48 

Drainage : labor .... 140 68 

Engineers : labor .... Ill 50 

Loam : materials .... 3 95 



10,967 53 



13,453 59 



Amount carried forward. 



),116 86 



32 



Amount brought forward, 

OLMSTED PARK. 

CONSTKUCTION. 

Plantations. 

. $1,829 73 

Lawns and Woods. 
1,358 76 



Labor and materials 



Labor and materials 



Roadways, Gutters and Brainaqe. 



Roads and walks : labor $386 77 
Drainage: labor . . 25 00 



411 77 



Grading, Loam and General Work. 



Engineers : labor , 
Grading : labor 
General work : labor 
Loam: materials . 



Signs: materials 



$36 60 
34 55 
13 00 
12 99 



$50,116 85 



Signs. 



97 04 



5 50 



3,702 80 



MAINTENANCE. 



Eoads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 
Roads: labor and materials . 
General work : labor and materials 
Buildings : labor and materials 
Skating: labor and materials 
Walks : labor and materials . 
Engineers : labor and materials 
Drainage: labor 
Live stock : labor and materials 
Loam: materials 
Boating service: labor . 
Fence: materials 



8;8,479 34 

5,851 12 

2,608 21 

1,936 91 

1,807 57 

510 35 

266 60 

201 35 

103 25 

82 66 

31 19 

23 82 



21,902 37 



25,605 17 



ARBORWAY. 

CONSTEUOTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $542 18 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 
Roads and walks : labor , . 127 33 

Amounts carried forward, $669 51 



$75,722 02 



33 

Amounts brought forward, $669 51 $75,722 02 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
General work: labor .- . . 16 00 



Lawns and Woods. 
Labor 2 00 



$687 51 



$4,151 78 




2,079 36 




271 46 




70 98 




68 00 




62 16 






6,703 74 





MAINTENANCE. 

Beads, Walks, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 

Roads: labor and materials . 
Grounds: labor and materials 
Walks: labor and materials . 
Drainage: labor 
Engineers: labor . 
General work: materials 



ARNOLD ARBORETUM AND BUSSEY PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks : labor $401 99 
Drainage: labor . . 36 03 

$438 02 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
General Work: labor ... 2050 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor 16 00 



7,391 26 



$474 52 



MAINTENANCE. 

Eoads, Walks, Grounds, Drainage and General Work. 

Roads: labor and materials . . $3,937 25 

Drainage : labor and materials . 641 75 

Walks: labor 489 57 

General work : labor and materials, 369 38 

Engineers: labor .... 125 50 

Grounds: labor and materials . 115 73 



5,679 18 

$6,153 70 



WEST ROXBURY PARKWAY. 

* CONSTRUCTION. 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor $463 24 



Amounts carried forward, $463 24 $89,266 97 



34 

Amounts brought forward, $463 24 $89,266 97 

Plantations. 
Labor 134 48 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Engineers: labor . . . . 3 50 

$601 22 

MAINTENANCE. 

Boads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds: labor .... $785 03 

Roads: labor . . . . 121 42 

Buildings: labor .... 68 03 

Fence: materials .... 54 21 

General work : labor and materials, 14 01 

Engineers: labor .... 7 00 

Drainage: labor .... 4 67 



1,054 37 
FRANKLIN PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $9,999 37 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor and materials . . . 5,743 84 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading: labor and ma- 
terials .... 12,944 21 

General work : labor 
and materials . . 1,693 62 

Engineers: labor . . 113 50 

Loam: materials . . 95 62 

4,846 95 

Boadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 
and materials . .$2,207 42 

Drainage : labor and ma- 
terials .... 1,025 57 

3,232 99 

Duck House. 
Labor and materials . . . 611 73 

Bepair Shops and Storehouse. 
Labor and materials ... 25 97 

Signs. 

Materials 5 50 

$24,466 35 



1,655 59 



Amounts carried forward, $24,466 35 $90,922 56 



35 



Amounts brought fonoard, 

MAINTENANCE. 



124,466 35 $90,922 56 



Roads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 
Eoads: labor and materials . 
Buildings : labor and materials 
General work: labor and materials 
Walks : labor and materials . 
Skating: labor 

Live stock: labor and materials 
Drainage: labor and materials 
Engineers : labor and materials 
Water supply and fountains : mate 

rials 

Fence: materials . 



$26,171 62 

11,862 59 

7,986 31 

4,971 76 

1,487 88 

777 45 

353 03 

306 20 

280 55 

131 00 
27 37 



55,140 36 



79,606 71 



COLUMBIA ROAD. 

LAND. 

Proportion of amount paid by Street Depart- 
ment for land, and expenses chargeable to 
this department 



1537 84 



CONSTRUCTION. 



Proportion of amount paid by 
Street Department for construc- 
tion, chargeable to this depart- 
ment 



131,757 77 



Plantations. 


Labor and materials 


348 94 


Roadways, Gutters 


and Drainage. 


Roads and walks: labor, $19 72 
Drainage: labor . 10 00 


29 72 

qo -too Ao 








MAINTENANCE. 


Roads, Walks, Grounds, Drainage, and General Work. 


Roads: labor and materials . 
Grounds: labor and materials 
Drainage: labor and materials 
Walks: labor and materials . 
Engineers: labor .... 
General work: materials 


$3,261 75 

320 08, 

302 33 

175 50 

61 00 

42 92 

4,163 58 

qa 007 or 






Amount carried forward, 


$207,367 12 



36 

Amount brought forward, $207,367 12 

DORCHESTERWAY. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Roads, Walks, Grounds, and Drainage. 



Engineers: labor $10 00 

Walks: materials 2 80 



STRANDWAY. 

LAND. 

Expenses $950 00 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Roadways, Gutters, and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor 
and materials . . $15,320 42 

Drainage : labor and ma- 
terials . . . 2,797 70 

$18,118 12 



Grading, Loam, and General Work. 



Grading: labor and ma- 
terials . . . $9,477 93 

Loam: materials . . 4,907 35 

Engineers : labor and ma- 
terials . . . 1,196 84 

General work: labor and 

materials . . . 345 74 



15,927 86 



Filling. 
Materials . . . . . 2,406 01 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . , . 1,058 52 

Water Supply. 

Materials 86 51 

Temporary Building. 

Materials 80 00 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor 4 50 



37,681 52 



MAINTENANCE. 

Roads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings and Drainage. 

Skating: labor .... $174 20 

Grounds : labor and materials . 45 70 

Engineers: labor . . . . 26 50 



12 80 



Amounts carried forward, $246 40 $38,631 52 $207,379 92 



37 

Amounts brought forward, $246 40 $38,631 52 $207,379 92 

General work: labor and materials, 19 63 

Roads: materials .... 1 53 

267 56 

38,899 08 

MARINE PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $593 68 

Grading, Loam, and General Work. 

Grading: labor . . $156 54 
General work: labor . 75 75 
Engineers: labor . . 5 97 



238 26 



Roadways, Gutters, and Drainage. 

Roads and walks: labor, $10 00 
Drainage: labor . . 8 25 

18 25 

$850 19 

MAINTENANCE. 

Boads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage, and General Work. 

Grounds : labor and materials . $2,937 04 
Buildings: labor and materials . 1,264 26 
Roads: labor and materials . 714 20 

Walks: labor and materials . 
General work : labor and materials. 
Boating service: materials . 
Engineers: labor .... 
Drainage: labor .... 



628 46 




500 21 




99 13 




92 75 




6 56 







6,243 51 



7,093 70 



WOOD ISLAND PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . $266 64 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor • 88 00 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

General work : labor . $25 00 
Engineers: labor . . 20 00 
Grading: labor . . 9 53 

54 53 

Roadways, Gutters, and Drainage. 
Roads and walks: labor . . 42 00 



451 17 



Amounts carried forward, $451 17 $263,372 70 



38 



Amounts brought forward. 



$451 17 $253,372 70 



MAINTENANCE. 

Roads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage, and General Work. 

Men's gymnasium — 

Gromids, apparatus and building: 

labor and materials . . $3,327 82 

Grounds: labor and materials . 2,483 48 

Skating: labor and materials . 527 37 

General work : labor and materials, 495 37 

Walks : labor and materials . . 332 96 

Engineers: labor .... 66 00 

Drainage: labor .... 32 50 



7,265 50 



7,716 67 



Labor 



CHAELESBANK. 

CONSTKUCTION. 

Plantations. 

$271 98 



Grading, Loam and General Work. 

General work : labor . $75 00 
Grading: labor 



Loam: materials 



30 52 

8 88 



114 40 



Labor 



Lawns and Woods. 
83 00 



$469 38 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Buildings and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 

Men's gymnasium — 

Grounds, apparatus and build- 
ing: labor and materials 

Women's gymnasium — 

Grounds, apparatus and build- 
ing: labor and materials 

Skating: labor and materials 

General work: labor and mate- 
rials .... 

Loam: materials . 

Walks : labor and materials 

Drainage: labor 

Engineers: labor . 



3,524 89 



3,107 79 



3,035 88 
374 99 

220 98 

79 52 

75 82 

11 17 

9 75 



10,440 79 



10,910 17 



Labor and materials 

Amounts carried forward 



CHARLESTOWN HEIGHTS. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Plantations. 

1239 46 



$239 46 



$271,999 54 



39 



Amounts brought forward, 
Grading: labor 



$239 46 



$271,999 54 



Grading, Loam and General Work. 
9 05 



$248 51 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds: labor and materials 
Buildings: labor and materials 
Walks: labor and materials 
Drainage : labor and materials 
General work: materials 



$1,765 62 

437 04 

373 98 

38 50 

15 11 



2,630 25 



CHAKLESTOWN PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 


$894 23 


Skating: labor and materials 


431 73 


General work: materials 


51 72 


"Walks: labor . • . • . 


. . 39 45 


Drainage: labor 


. . 17 90 


Loam: materials 


. . 12 96 


Engineers: labor 


6 50 



DORCHESTER PARK. 



2,878 76 



1,454 49 



Amount paid for land 



Labor 



$715 40 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Lawns and Woods. 
$699 07 



Grading, Loam and General Work, 

General work: labor . $17 25 
Engineers: labor . 13 50 

Grading: labor . . 3 62 

34 37 



733 44 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds: labor 

Buildings: labor and materials 

Engineers: labor . 

Skating: labor 

Walks: labor 



Amount carried forward, 



$3G3 55 




121 70 




26 50 




14 50 




13 75 






540 00 




1,988 84 




$278,321 63 



40 

Amount brought forward, 

FEANKLIN FIELD. 

CONSTBUOTION. 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Grading : labor and ma- 
terials . . . .$1,478 00 
Engineers : labor . . 14 75 

. $1,492 75 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . 1,210 62 

Walks, Gutters, and Drainage. 
Drainage : labor .... 97 64 

Shelter Building. 
Labor 75 00 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor 27 75 

Walls. 

Labor 16 75 

$2,920 51 



$278,321 63 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 
Sheepfold : labor and materials 
Skating : labor and materials 
General work : labor and mate 

rials 

Buildings : labor and materials 
Drainage : labor and materials 
Engineers : labor , 
Walks : materials ... 



$4,839 20 

1,426 92 

1,351 48 

359 85 

158 82 

63 69 

60 00 

11 20 



8,271 16 



11,191 67 



NOKTH END BEACH. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks and Buildings. 



Grounds: labor 

Amount carried forward. 



10 83 



,524 13 



41 

Amount brought forward, $289,524 13 

COPP'S HILL TERRACES. 

C0N3TKUCTI0N. 

Grading, Loam and General Wo.rk. 
General work : labor $7 25 

MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

335 44 



Grounds : labor .... $332 19 
Walks : materials .... 3 25 



CHESTNUT HILL PARK. 



Amount paid for land . . . $23,954 70 

Expenses 23 63 

$23,978 33 

CONSTBUOTION. 

Roadways, Gutters and Drainage. 

Drainage : labor . . $782 15 
Roads and walks : labor 
and materials . . 25 00 

$807 15 

Plantations. 
Labor and materials . . . 758 23 

Lawns and Woods. 
Labor and materials . . . 255 69 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
Engineers : labor .... 48 00 



1,869 07 



MAINTENANCE. 



342 69 



Roads, Walks, Grounds, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 
Grounds : labor and materials . $1,961 05 



Roads : labor . 
Walks : labor 
General work : materials 
Drainage : labor 
Buildings : labor . 
Engineers : labor . 



1,224 02 
140 74 
81 58 
74 93 
10 50 
10 GO 



3,502 82 

29,350 22 



Amount carried forward, $319,217 04 



42 



Amount brought forward, $319,217 04 

NORTH BRIGHTON PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE, 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 
Grounds : labor $973 92 



Skating : labor and materials 
Loam : materials 
General work : materials 
Walks : labor 
Drainage : labor . 
Engineers : labor 



713 23 
99 21 
39 89 
39 25 
17 65 
6 50 
1,889 65 



NEPONSET PLAYGROUND. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials . 
Skating : labor and materials . 
Engineers : labor 
Drainage : labor and materials . 
General work : labor and materials 
Walks : labor . 



$991 


82 


362 


98 


75 


00 


26 


13 


14 48 


2 00 



BILLINGS FIELD. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 
Grading: labor and ma- 



terials 
Engineers : labor 



$1,621 01 
33 50 



1,654 51 



Filling. 



Materials 



739 46 



Labor and materials . 



Plantations. 

363 10 



Walks and Drainage. 
Drainage : labor and materials . . 244 44 

Gynasium Apparatus. 

Toboggan slide: materials, $228 65 
Gymnasium apparatus : 

materials . . . 11 30 

239 95 



Fountain: materials . 

Amounts carried forward, 



Water Supply and Fountains. 
8 30 



$3,249 76 



1,472 41 



3,249 76 $322,679 10 



43 



Amounts brought forwai-d^ 



3,249 76 $322,579 10 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds : labor and materials . > $910 86 

Skating : labor and materials . . 571 53 

Filling : materials .... 53 03 

Loam : materials . ^ . . . 49 96 

Engineers : labor .... 35 25 

General work : materials . . . 27 38 

Buildings : materials . . . 20 00 

Drainage : labor and materials . 7 28 

1,675 29 



4,925 05 



FIRST STREET PLAYGROUND. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Locker and Lavatory Building. 

Wales & Holt : architects' 

commission . . . $187 50 
Advertising . . . 37 40 

■ $224 90 



Drainage : labor 



Walks and Drainage. 
122 61 



Grading, Loam and General Work. 

Engineers : labor and materials . 115 50 

$463 01 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials . 
Skating : labor and materials . 
Engineers : labor and materials 
General work : materials . 



$708 


42 


214 84 


74 


74 


7 


00 



1,005 00 



1,468 01 



PRINCE STREET PLAYGROUND. 

LAND. 

Amount paid for land $19,500 00 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds : labor and materials . . $205 50 
Engineers : labor .... 13 50 

Walks : labor G 33 



Amount carried forward. 



225 33 



10,726 33 
$348,097 49 



44 



Amount brought forward, 



$348,697 49 



MYSTIC PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTEKANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Children's Gymnasium — 

Apparatus and shelter : labor and materials, 
Grounds : labor and materials 
Fence : materials 
Walks : labor 
Engineers : labor 
General work : materials . 



$835 40 
677 31 
61 67 
28 75 
23 50 
16 35 



1,642 98 



FELLOWS STREET PLAYGROUND. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials . . . . 
Children's gymnasium — 

Apparatus and shelter: labor and materials, 
Water supply: materials . 
General work : labor and materials 
Loam : materials . 
Engineers: labor 
Drainage: materials 
Walks: labor 
Skating: labor . 



$633 85 



546 43 


93 50 


48 43 


41 29 


27 00 


5 52 


4 00 


2 75 



1,402 77 



CHRISTOPHER GIBSON PLAYGROUND. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds: labor and materials .... $836 80 

Children's gymnasium — 

Apparatus : labor and materials 
Buildings: labor and materials 
Skating: labor and materials 
Engineers: labor 
Loam: materials 
General work : materials . 
Walks: labor 



486 


77 


345 45 


342 71 


21 


76 


17 


04 


15 


77 


2 


00 



2,068 29 



Engineers: labor 
Grading: labor 



ROGERS PARK. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Grading, Loam and General Work. 

$8 50 
2 00 



Amounts carried forward, 



$10 50 



110 50 $353,811 53 



45 



Amounts brought forward, 



$10 50 $353,811 53 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds: labor and materials 
Filling: materials . 
Drainage: materials 
General work : materials 
Engineers: labor . 



$731 76 




306 75 




23 70 




8 33 


• 


6 50 






1,077 04 





1,087 54 



COLUMBUS AVENUE PLAYGROUND. 



Amount paid for land 
Expenses 



139,569 08 
23 63 



$39,592 71 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work. 



Grounds : labor and materials 
Skating : labor and materials 
General work : materials 
Walks: labor .... 
Engineers: labor . 
Fence: materials . 
Gymnasium apparatus : labor and 

materials .... 
Buildings: labor and materials 
Drainage: labor 
Loam: materials . 



^,576 98 

1,025 11 

147 66 

61 17 

50 25 

41 55 

39 05 
23 95 
15 64 
13 83 



2,995 19 



42,587 90 



ASHMONT PLAYGROUND. 



Amount paid for land 
Expenses 



$43,267 91 
635 00 



$43,902 91 



Engineers: labor 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 



42 00 



43,944 91 



SAVIN HILL PLAYGROUND. 



MAINTENANCE. 



Grounds, Walks, Buildings, Drainage and General Work, 
Grounds: labor and materials .... $503 32 



Bath-house: labor and materials 
Amounts carried forward. 



297 13 



45 $441,431 88 



46 

Amounts brought forward, $800 45 $441,431 88 

Filling: materials 214 34 

Engineers: labor 17 00 

General work : materials . . . . . 1 54 



ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds, Walks, Drainage and General Work. 

Grounds: labor and materials .... $666 08 

418 91 
251 44 
60 50 
17 13 
13 24 
13 21 
12 44 
2 00 



Skating: labor and materials 
Drainage: labor .... 
Engineers: labor 
Fence: materials 
General work : materials . 
Gymnasium apparatus: materials 
Buildings : labor and materials . 
Walks: labor .... 



FOREST HILLS PLAYGROUND. 



Amount paid for land . . . $25,000 00 
Expenses 10 00 



$25,010 00 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 
Grounds: labor and materials . . . . . 129 07 



PLAYGROUND, WARD 2. 



LAND. 



Amount paid for land . , . $46,982 32 
Expenses 20 00 



$47,002 32 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 

Grounds: labor and materials . $304 83 

^Engineers: labor .... 10 00 



314 83 



TRINITY TRIANGLE. 



1,033 33 



1,454 



25,139 07 



47,317 15 



MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 
Walks: labor 2 00 

Amount carried forward, $516,378 38 



47 

Amount brought forward^ 

BEKNERS SQUARE. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Lawns and Woods. 

Labor $157 48 

Plantations. 

Labor 1 97 

$159 45 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 
Grounds: labor 7 00 

OAK SQUARE. 

CONSTKUCTION. 

Grading, Loam, and General Work. 
Grading: labor $320 51 

MAINTENANCE. 

Grounds and Walks. 

Grounds: labor $15 25 

Engineers: labor . . . . 13 50 

Walks: labor 8 00 

36 75 



$516,378 38 



166 45 



357 26 



PLAYGROUNDS. 

INVESTIGATING SITES. 

Engineers: labor 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Salaries ...;.... $7,854 00 

Printing 748 88 

Carriage-hire 715 50 

Telephones and expenses 478 14 

Travelling expenses 82 50 

Advertising 71 03 

Stationery 65 38 

Office library 40 97 



17 00 



10,056 40 



1526,975 49 



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49 



IV. 



Appropriations and Balances in Detail for the Financial 
Year 1902-1903. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



Loan authorized June 16, 1902 

" " September 19, 1902 

" " October 30, 1902 

" " but not issued 



$5,000 00 

25,000 00 

30,000 00 

100,000 00 



$160,000 00 



EXPKNDITURES. 



Commonwealth Avenue 

Fens .... 

Riverway 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum and Bussey Park 

West Roxbury Parkway 

Franklin Park 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank 

Charlestown Heights 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field . 

Copp's Hill Terraces 

Chestnut Hill Park 

Columbia Road . 

Berners Square . 

Rogers Park 

Oak Square 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 



$1,541 08 

1,652 00 

2,486 06 

3,702 80 

687 51 


474 52 


601 22 


24,466 35 
850 19 


451 17 


469 38 


248 51 


1,448 84 
2,920 51 


7 25 


1,869 07 
378 66 


159 45 


10 50 


320 51 


115,254 42 

$160,000 00 



CHESTNUT HILL PARK (Land). 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 



?,784 79 



EXPENDITURES. 



Expenses on account of land 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 



$23 63 

88,761 16 



^,784 79 



PLAYGROUNDS {Land). 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 



. $130,569 92 



50 



EXPENDITURES. 



Aslimont Playground 
Columbus-avenue Playground . 
Forest Hills Playground . 
Prince-street Playground . 
Playgrounds, investigating sites 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 



$43,902 91 
39,592 71 
25,010 00 
19,500 00 
17 00 
2,547 30 
$130,569 92 



SPEEDWAY, FRANKLIN FIELD. 
Loan authorized January 5, 1901 $25,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $25,000 00 



COLUMBIA ROAD. 

Proportion of highvpay loan, issued as Public Park Loan, in 
year 1902, under Chap. 319, Acts of 1897 .... $32,295 61 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of land $537 84 

Paid on account of construction . . . 31,757 77 

$32,295 61 

BILLINGS FIELD. 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 $ 3,249 76 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of construction $ 3,249 76 

STRANDWAT. 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1902 .... $209,619 23 

EXPENDITURES. 

Expenses on account of land .... $950 GO 

Paid on account of construction . . . 37,681 52 
Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 . . 170,987 71 



$209,619 23 



PLAYGROUND, WARD 2. 



Loan authorized October 22, 1901 $25,000 00 

Loan authorized October 30, 1902 25,000 00 



$50,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid on account of land $47,002 32 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 . . 2,997 68 

_ $50,000 00 



51 



GYMNASIUM, FIRST-STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Loan authorized November 1, 1901 . . . $9,550 00 
Loan authorized October 30, 1902, but not is- 
sued ... 6,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid on account of construction . . . $463 01 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 . . 15,086 99 



$15,550 00 



$15,550 00 



PARKS, BRIGHTON DISTRICT. 
Loan authorized Decenaber 18, 1901 $25,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid on account of land $23,954 70 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 . . 1,045 80 



$25,000 00 



PLAYGROUND, WARD 22. 
Loan authorized January 4, 1902, but not issued . . $30,000 00 

EXPENDITURES, 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $30,000 00 

PLAYGROUND, WARDS 7 AND 9. 
Loan authorized October 30, 1902, but not issued . . $300,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $300,000 00 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation for financial year 1902-1903 . $200,000 00 

Amount contributed by abutters. Common- 
wealth avenue 5,000 00 

Amount transferred by City Auditor . . 2,208 32 

Collections on account of labor credited to 

appropriation 1,378 42 

$208,586 74 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid on account of maintenance as per Exhibit, page 29 . $208,586 74 

INCOME. 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from rents, sale of buildings, wool, sheep, grass, 

wood, etc $2,727 37 

PAYMENTS. 

Income carried to General City Income . . . $2,727 37 



52 



ASHMONT PLAYGROUND. 

Loan for grading and gymnastic apparatus, authorized 
October 30, 1902, but not issued . ' $4,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 . . . . . $4,000 00 

CASTLE ISLAND. 

Loan for sanitary building, authorized October 30, 1902, 
but not issued $3,000 00 

EXPENDITUEES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $3,000 00 

CHARLESTOWN PLAYGROUND. 

Loan for gymnastic apparatus, shelter and sanitary, 
authorized October 30, 1902, but not issued . . . $7,500 00 

EXPENDITUEES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $7,500 00 

COLUMBUS-AVENUE PLAYGROUND. 

Loan for sanitary building authorized October 30, 1902, 
but not issued $10,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $10,000 00 

DORCHESTER PARK. 

Loan for open-air gymnasium, authorized October 30, 1902, 
but not issued $2,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $2,000 00 

MYSTIC PLAYGROUND. 

Loan for gymnastic apparatus, authorized October 30, 1902, 
but not issued $2,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 .... $2,500 00 



53 



NEPONSET PLAYGROUND. 

Loan for shelter and sanitary building, authorized October 

30, 1902, but not issued $5,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $6,000 00 

WOOD ISLAND PARK. 

Loan for shelter and sanitary building, authorized October 

30, 1902, but not issued $10,000 00 

EXPENDITUBES. 

Balance unexpended January 31, 1903 $10,000 00 



54 



Summary of Expenditures on Account of Public Parki and 
Playgrounds^ Land, Construction and Betterments, from the 



Organization of the 
31, 1903. 



Board, October 8, 1875, to January 



,371 07 

63,735 54 

566,446 17 

232,972 57 



LAND. 
Main Park System : 

Fens $596,254 49 

Kiverway .... 457,457 53 

Olmsted Park . . . 1,081,947 60 

Arborway .... 245,584 25 
Arnold Arboretum and Bus- 

sey Park .... 79,343 65 

"West Roxbury Parkway . 135,265 29 

Franklin Park . . . 1,551,196 63 

Marine Park System : 
Columbia Road 
Dorchesterway 
Strandway . 
Marine Park . 

Wood Island Park . 
Cliarlesbank 
Trinity Triangle 
Charlestown Heights 
Charlestown Playground 
Dorchester Park 
Franklin Field . 
North End Beach . 
Copp's Hill Terraces 
Chestnut Hill Park . 
North Brighton Playground 
Neponset Playground 
Billings Field . . . 
Freeport-street Triangle . 
Prince-street Playground 
Mystic Playground . 
Fellows-street Playground 
Christopher Gibson Playground 
Columbus-avenue Playground 
Ashmont Playground 
Savin Hill Playground 
Roslindale Playground 
Forest Hills Playground 
Playground, Ward 2 
Playgrounds, Investigating sites 



t,147,049 44 



1,259,525 35 

132,800 00 

373,916 99 

30,000 00 

50,538 02 

172,923 31 

63,955 37 

157,341 22 

328,364 44 

90,858 19 

85,193 54 

22,107 12 

24,804 39 

47,068 98 

4,000 00 

180,474 70 

50,125 00 

14,503 72 

37,709 58 

327,503 84 

43,990 09 

27,147 30 

24,825 11 

25,166 75 

47,002 32 

192 79 



Main Park System: 
Commonwealth avenue 
Fens .... 



CONSTRUCTION. 

$109,450 36 
2,138,674 08 



Amounts carried forward, $2,248,124 44 



$7,769,087 ft6 



$7,769,087 56 



55 



Amounts brought forward, $2,248,124 44 



Riverway 
Olmsted Park 

Arborway . . . . 
Arnold Arboretum and Bus- 
sey Park . . . . 
West Roxbury Parkway 
Franklin Park 

Marine Park System: 
Columbia Road 
Dorchesterway 
Strandway . 
Marine Park . 
Castle Island 



Wood Island Park . 
Charlesbank 
Charlestown Heights 
Charlestown Playground 
Dorchester Park 
Franklin Field 
North End Beach . 
Copp's Hill Terraces 
Chestnut Hill Park 
North Brighton Playground 
Neponset Playground 
Billings Field . 
First-street Playground . 
Prince-street Playground 
Mystic Playground . 
Fellows-street Playground 
Christopher Gibson Playground 
Columbus-avenue Playground 
Savin Hill Playground 
Roslindale Playground 
Rogers Park . 
Berners Square 
Oak Square 
General Account 
Park Nursery . 



667,371 20 
726,782 94 
380,441 96 

380,352 44 

21,183 19 

2,375,143 30 



$332,776 83 

65,187 12 

339,340 20 

1,052,726 33 
32,685 55 



$7,769,087 56 



3,799,399 47 



1,822,716 03 

248,717 21 

313,229 88 

102,991 38 

15,392 01 

11,529 97 

91,085 72 

169,262 27 

31,980 96 

5,112 24 

10,503 27 

11,189 35 

16,737 57 

10,017 86 

33 90 

1,717 99 

1,496 28 

10,042 75 

5,922 89 

5,536 14 

5,597 31 

2,010 60 

159 45 

320 51 

73,987 50 

29,947 07 



BETTERMENTS. 



Betterment expenses 



9,796,637 48 



13,356 10 



$17,579,081 14 



56 



VI. 



Park Betterments Collected by City Collector. 
To February 1, 1903. 





Assessm'ts 
committed 

to 
Collector. 


Abated. 


Net 
Assess- 
ments. 


Collected. 


Outstand- 
ing Feb. 1, 
1903, 


Public Park, Back Bay .... 


$434,600 00 
23,543 00 
135,029 00 
60,789 00 
10«,972 00 
154,107 00 
9,713 00 


$144,195 73 
12,616 80 
122,000 66 
50,426 00 
82,252 25 
113,658 00 
3,055 54 


$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 
10,363 00 
26,719 75 
40,449 00 
6,657 46 


$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 

8,256 00 
22,862 75 
31,763 00 

5,927 74 




Franklin Park 




Parkway, Old Harbor 

" Muddy River. .. 
" West Roxbury.. 
" Dorchester 


$2,107 00 

3,857 00 

8,686 00 

729 72 




$926,753 00 


$528,204 98 


?398,548 02 


$383,168 30 


$15,379 72 



VII. 

Public Park and Playground Debt. 

Liabilities, 
Total loan outstanding, January 31, 1903: 



Public Park. 
* Playgrounds 



$14,357,300 00 
946,610 98 



Resources. 
Resources of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1903 
Net Debt, January 31, 1903 



$15,303,910 98 
4,312,189 35 



10,991,721 63 



*Of this amount $2,454.15 was expended by the Public Grounds Department. 



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