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Full text of "Annual report"

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BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




With the Compliments of the 



Board of Commissioners of the 
Department of Parks. 



DEPARTMENT OK PARKS 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Commissioners 



Year Ending January 31, 190^ 




PRINTED FOR THE DEPARTMENT 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Commissioners' Report 5 

Superintendent's Report 8 

Eeport of Committee of Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene 
Association in Charge of the Women's and Children's Division 

at Charlesbank 20 

General Exhibit of Appropriations 23 

Expenditures on Account of Land and Construction from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905 24 

Expenditures on Account of Maintenance from February 1, 1904, 

to January 31, 1905 26 

Income 28 

Park Betterments Collected by City Collector .... 28 

Public Park and Playground Debt 28 

Park Statistics 29 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1904bostmass 



DEPARTMENT OF PARKS. 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



Hon. Patrick A. Collins, 

Mayor of the City of Bostoii: 

Sir, — The Board has the honor herewith to submit this 
report for the year ending January 31, 1905. 

No appropriations for general park construction by loans 
have been made since October 30, 1902, and these appropri- 
ations are exhausted. The absence of any money for con- 
struction purposes is a serious handicap to this department, 
as there are many necessary expenditures which cannot well 
be postponed, and which cannot be paid out of our main- 
tenance appropriation. We need money for buildings for 
sanitary and other purposes, and for the planting of trees 
and shrubs and the care of plantations. Our maintenance 
appropriation will not admit of these expenditures, and a 
small annual appropriation for these purposes will continue 
to be necessary for some years to come, if we are to put the 
parks into the best condition for future use and enjoyment. 
As it is, with our insufficient appropriation, our roadways 
are falling into bad condition, and, worst of all, our young 
plantations are liable to suffer permanent injury because we 
have not the money to give them the needed cultivation. 

We have also, since 1902, received no appropriations for 
additions to our playgrounds, or for their improvement. 

Additional playgrounds are needed in those sections of the 
city that are not served by the playgrounds already existing, 
and improvements are needed in many of these playgrounds 



6 

in order to make them more useful to the community. We 
should be pleased to submit to you a list of our most press- 
ing needs in this particular. 

More bath closets should be provided at Savin Hill Beach, 
as the present number is insufficient to accommodate the 
large number of bathers who, at certain hours of the day, 
throng this beach. A bathhouse should also be erected at 
the southerly extremity of the Strandway, near Mt. Vernon 
street, and the beach improved. Many persons now bathe 
there without proper facilities, and many more would avail 
themselves of the privileges of a bathhouse, which would be 
of great value to this growing section of Dorchester. 

The opening of the Strandway, which is expected to occur 
early in the coming season, will furnish a new and attractive 
drive of nearly two miles along the water front, and will 
serve to increase the use of this shore, always thronged on 
hot summer days by the seekers of health and recreation. 

The act of 1903, amending the law of 1898, which gives 
this Board jurisdiction over streets and lands in the neigh- 
borhood of parks and parkways, while placing under our 
control and direction the planting and care of trees, failed to 
provide for the removal of those which for various causes 
have served their usefulness and should be cut out or re- 
placed. We have, therefore, with your approval, petitioned 
the Legislature for a further amendment of the act to cure 
this defect. 

Before entering upon the construction of the Charles river 
embankment, under the Charles River Basin Act of 1903, it 
will be necessary to obtain an amendment of this act to 
authorize the extension of the embankment to the westerly 
side of the Fens, and also to provide means for its construc- 
tion, the loan authorized in the original act being insufficient 
for the work that is now being done in the Fens by the 
Street Department. This work consists of dredging, to 
remove the foul deposits in the Fens, rebuilding the old 
seven-foot Stony Brook conduit, and constructing a new 



twelve-foot conduit in continuation of the Commissioners' 
channel, so-called, which enters the Fens at Huntington 
entrance. 

This new foul-flow conduit and gatehouse will be completed 
this season, and, Stony brook being turned into its new 
channel, the cause of the foul deposits which have made 
the Fens pond unsanitary will be removed. 

The readjustment of the Huntington entrance, due to the 
work of extending the Commissioners' channel to Charles 
river, enabled this department to join with the Trustees of 
the Art Museum in a plan to revise the lines of the Fens at 
this point, so as to give the Art Museum site a rectilinear 
instead of a curvilinear frontage. A bill to accomplish this 
purpose was passed by the last Legislature, but further study 
of the problem has shown some changes to be necessary, 
which will be the subject of further legislation at the present 
session. 

At the solicitation of those in charge of the erection of 
the Harvard Medical School buildings on Longwood avenue, 
we have prepared some studies with the view of bringing 
this beautiful group of buildings into closer relation with the 
Fens, by the projection of a wide avenue from the Fens to 
Longwood avenue, on the line of the axis of the Medical 
School quadrangle. The matter is now in the hands of the 
Harvard Medical authorities and those interested in the 
lands through which the avenue will run. 

Full details of the work of the department during the 
year will be found in the accompanying report of our 
Superintendent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Stratton, 

Laban Pratt, 

James M. Prendergast, 

Commissioners. 
Boston, January 31, 1905. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To Charles E. Stratton, Laban Pratt, and James 
M. Prendergast, Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit a report of the work 
performed under the direction of your Board during the year 
1904. 

Franklin Park. 

The woodlands and plantations have been carefully looked 
over, and all overcrowding, diseased, and unhealthy material 
has been cut out and removed. Under the method of treat- 
ment practised the past few years, — that of thinning out, 
and, in some cases, of mulching with loam, — the old wood- 
lands have greatly improved in appearance. The young 
plantations, too, are in good condition : yet they do not show 
the rapid growth that might have been accomplished by 
thorough cultivation, which it is to be regretted we have 
been unable to give. During the past winter preparation 
has been made in the Wilderness for planting a large num- 
ber of oaks, flowering dogwoods, witch hazels, thorns, and 
similar material. Ground is being also prepared in the 
young plantations for the planting of young oaks next 
spring. All this material will be furnished from the depart- 
ment nurseries. Among the thorns will be a quantity of the 
new species lately discovered by Prof. Charles S. Sargent. 
The positions of the thorns will be located on a plan of the 
ground, from which, in case of the loss of labels, the indi- 
viduals may be readily relocated. 



Arnold Arboretum. 

No work, other than that of the maintenance of roads, 
walks, and fences has been done in the Arboretum by the 
department during the past year. 

Olmsted Park and Riverway. 

With the exception of the planting of a group of tulip 
trees on the old Francis Parkman place, no work of improve- 
ment has been done during the year in Olmsted Park or the 
Riverway. Considerable additions to the groupings of native 
azalias in the Riverway will be made in the spring in ground 
which has already been prepared. This interesting stretch 
of park land, with its varied features, grows more attractive 
each season. 

The Fens. 

The new conduit connecting the Commissioners' and the 
Stony Brook channels with the Charles river is now nearly 
completed. The work of pumping out sludge from the Fens 
basin is still in progress. These works are being done by 
the Sewer Division of the Street Department of the city. 
The restoration of the surfaces of the roads and loam spaces 
— disturbed by construction operations — and also the re- 
planting, is being done by the Park Department. Work has 
also been commenced on the filling up of a part of the Fens 
basin, near the Fens bridge, for a playground. 

Arrangements have been made with the Trustees of the 
Art Museum, under authority obtained from the Legislature, 
for an interchange of land at the site of the new museum. 
This, together with changes planned in the alignment of the 
driveways, and in the filling up of the Commissioners' channel 
at the Huntington entrance, will materially add to the 
appearance and dignity of the entrance into the Fens at that 
point. 



10 



Commonwealth Avenue. 

English elms were planted on each side of the central 
promenade of Commonwealth avenue, between Dartmouth 
street and Brookline avenue, the ground having been well 
prepared for them the previous season by digging holes, 
twenty feet square and four feet deep, in the dry gravel, 
and filling the holes with composted loam. 



Charlesbank. 

This useful and convenient breathing spot was, as usual, 
largely used by the West End populace. The grassy slopes 
of the central mounds are thrown open to women and to 
children under ten years of age, and on hot summer nights 
they are crowded, while the wide promenade and the long 
line of seats are filled with people who come to enjoy the 
cool refreshing breezes from the valley of the Charles river. 

The men's gymnasium, as in the past, was well patronized. 
In addition to the free use of the apparatus, classes for young 
men and boys were conducted by a competent instructor. 
During the winter the gymnasium grounds were flooded, as 
usual, for skating purposes. 

The women's gymnasium, under the management of the 
Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene Association, had a 
very successful season, as the report of the committee of the 
association, which will be found elsewhere in this report, 
will show. 

Wood Island Park. 

A number of trees were planted early in the year, and 
preparations were made in the fall for additional planting 
next spring. The trees planted a few years ago now begin 
to shade the turfy slopes and to give a general appearance 
of comfort and restfulness, which is very inviting to visitors, 
who come in increasing numbers each season. With its fine 




RIVERWAY— FOOT PATH. 



11 

harbor views, its cricket and baseball fields, its tennis courts, 
and its gymnasium, Wood Island Park is, deservedly, very 
popular. 

Charlestown Heights. 

Charlestown Heights required only the work of ordinary 
maintenance. A few trees were planted on its slopes in the 
spring. 

Marine Park and Strandway. 

Marine Park, as well as Castle Island, has maintained its 
reputation as a place of popular resort for the citizens of 
Boston. Here visitors can always depend upon a cool sea 
breeze, while splendid harbor views, passing shipping, bath- 
ing, and good restaurant accommodations lend additional 
interest. 

On the Strandway the work of road construction was com- 
pleted between Marine Park and Newman street. The 
planting of the loam spaces was also completed between 
these points. Work on the roadway and loam spaces of that 
part lying between Newman street and the railroad bridge is 
still in progress, with the prospect of completion in early 
summer. 

A large quantity of filling has been received at what was 
formerly Burnham's wharf, thus enlarging very materially 
the playground area. This playground is much used in 
summer for ball games ; in winter its surface is flooded for 
skating. 

Chestnut Hill Park. 

The usual thinning out of the old woods and the young 
plantations of trees and shrubbery was done last winter. 
Considerable work is needed on the recently acquired land, 
for which an appropriation will be necessary. 

Chestnut Hill Park has become very popular as a resort for 



12 

immigrants from Central Europe. On Sundays and holidays 
many thousands of this class use the park for an outing. 

Facilities for tennis and baseball are provided ; football 
is also played in its season. 

Franklin Field. 
(77 Acres.} 

During the past season Stratton street, between Lyons 
street and Talbot avenue, was constructed by the depart- 
ment, the construction being a solid macadam roadway with 
a covering of loam two inches in thickness. This improve- 
ment will serve the purpose of a speedway, so long as this is 
found desirable, and at the same time will afford a con- 
venient connection for general driving between Talbot and 
Blue Hill avenues. 

The use of Franklin Field continues to increase each year, 
and the time has now arrived when more of its area should 
be levelled off and brought into use. The forty acres of 
level ground are fairly swarming on Saturdays and holidays 
with cricketers, baseball players, and tennis players ; while 
in winter thousands of skaters disport on its frozen surface. 

About seven acres of the most uneven part of the field 
was ploughed last fall, to be levelled and seeded in the spring. 
This operation should be continued each season until the 
whole present available part of the field has been so treated. 
An appropriation for this purpose and for field extension is 
very desirable, as well as for a field house to contain locker, 
bath, and shelter accommodations. 

A bowling green was constructed last season on the 
upland near Blue Hill avenue. It is expected that the sod 
will be tough enough for use about the first of July, and 
that it will prove a very popular addition to the sports of 
Franklin Field. 




/ 



13 



Christopher Gibson Playground. 

Dorchester Avenue and Park Street. 
(5.8 Acres.) 

A portion of this playground is set apart for the use of 
children, for whom simple apparatus is furnished. A female 
teacher is in charge, and the results have been very satis- 
factory. Tennis courts are provided ; baseball is also a 
popular feature of the playground. A part of the ground is 
flooded for skating in winter. No work, other than that of 
maintenance, has been done during the past season. 

Savin Hill Beach. 

Springdale Street, Dorchester. 
(18.6 Acres.) 
The addition of a house for boys was made at this beach 
last season. The house is 15 feet by 25 feet, and contains 
210 lockers. This addition somewhat relieved the pressure 
for accommodation. There is, however, great necessity for a 
larger number of bath closets, and a corresponding extension 
of beach improvement. 

Neponset Playground. 

Neponset Avenue. 
(18 Acres.) 

Tins is a convenient and popular playground for baseball 
games. A playground for children was established here last 
season. Swings, teeter-boards, til ting-ladders, and other' 
simple apparatus were installed, and the children's play- 
ground was placed in charge of a female teacher. 

An appropriation is needed for the purchase of loam for 
levelling the inequalities of the marsh, as the levelled portion 
is now too small for the demand for baseball diamonds, and 
preparations for utilizing more of the marsh should now be 
made. A good area of ice for winter skating is provided 
at this playground. 



14 



Mystic Playground. 

Chelsea Street and Mystic Eiver. 
(2.3 Acres.) 

No work was performed on this playground, except the 
usual care of the grounds, which contain a children's corner, 
with apparatus, under the care of a teacher. A baseball 
diamond is also maintained. 

Charlestown Playground. 

Main and Alford Streets. 

(14 Acres.) 

This is a much used playground. It contains four or five 
ball grounds, and has facilities for flooding for skating. An 
open-air gymnasium is under construction, the fencing having 
been finished. Filling is still in progress on the outside of 
the graded area, on the edges of the playground bordering 
the water. 

Rogers Park. 

Lake and Foster Streets. 
(6.9 Acres.) 

An appropriation is required to place the brook, which 
runs across the lower end of Rogers Park, underground. 
This will permit of the enlargement of the levelled area for 
play, which is a work much needed. It would also be 
desirable to prepare the ground and to plant trees on the 
boundaries of the playground. 

North Brighton Playground. 

Western Avenue and Harvard Street. 

(llf Acres.) 

An extension of the graded area of this playground, to 
meet the growing demand for ball diamonds, is desirable, and 



15 

an appropriation for the purchase of loam, to fill up the 
inequalities of the meadow lands, is required. 

Trees should be planted on the boundaries of the play- 
ground without unnecessary delay. This will require an 
additional appropriation for the preparation of the ground. 

Billings Field. 

La Grange Street, near Centre Street, West Roxbury. 
(11 Acres.) 

No work except that of maintenance was done at this 
playground during the past season. Another large sink has 
developed in the centre of the playground ; this is caused by 
the shifting of the boggy subsoil, over which the original 
filling was placed. Tennis, baseball, and football are the 
favorite summer games ; in winter the ball field is flooded 
for skating. Shelter and sanitary accommodations are 
needed. 

ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

South Walter and Robert Streets. 

(3.7 Acres.) 

About one hundred linear feet of bleachers were erected 
in this playground last spring. A shelter and sanitary 
building is needed. The playground is very much used, 
the summer games being tennis and baseball ; in winter the 
field is flooded for skating. 

Columbus-avenue Playground. 

(5 Acres.) 

During the past season a retaining wall of reinforced 
concrete was built, which enabled us to carry the grading 
out to the northeast line, adding thereby about one-half of 
an acre of useful space. 



16 

The work of the playground is carried on by a committee 
of the Civic League. This organization bears the expense 
of kindergarten and athletic instructors, and also of a teacher 
in gardening work. Provision is made for baseball games, 
while for boys and small children separate enclosures are 
provided, in which gymnastic apparatus, sand-boxes, etc., are 
installed for their use. The grounds are flooded for skating 
in the winter. 

Prince-street Playground. 

Prince and North Bennet Streets. 
(0.4 Acre.) 

Teeter-boards, swings, til ting-ladders, etc., were set up 
last season, and a female teacher was placed in charge. This 
little playground is very much appreciated by the children 
of the densely populated district in which it is located. 

First-street Playground. 

Corner of M Street, South Boston. 
(Jj.,6 Acres.') 

The frame work of the out-door gymnasium was set up 
during the past season; an appropriation is needed to com- 
plete its equipment. The grounds, as usual, were flooded 
in the winter for skating. 

Fellows-street Playground. 

Fellows and Hunneman Streets. 
(0.85 Acre.) 

This playground required only the usual work of main- 
tenance during the past season. It is equipped with simple 
gymnastic apparatus for children, a female teacher being in 
charge. A sanitary building is needed. 



17 

COTT AGE-STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Cottage Street, near Maverick Street, East Boston. 

(3.85 Acres.') 

Ailantus trees were planted on the border of this play- 
ground last spring. During the past winter the grounds 
were flooded for skating. The needs of the playground are 
sanitary accommodations and fencing. 

Forest Hills and Mt. Hope Playground. 

Between Washington and Florence Streets. 

(9.6 Acres.*) 

During the past season the drainage of this playground 
was much improved by deepening the brook and running a 
series of tile drains through the lowest parts of the grounds. 
While the field is in fairly good condition and space can be 
found for at least three diamonds, an appropriation for grad- 
ing would largely increase its usefulness. Sanitary accom- 
modations, too, are needed. 

Marcella-street Playground. 

Marcella and Ritchie Streets. 
(Jf.5 Acres.) 

No work of improvement has been done on this play- 
ground during the past season, except the cutting down of 
the high fence to five feet in height. The matter of the 
removal of the old " Home " building, and the erection of a 
building for shelter and sanitary accommodations, is now 
under consideration. The grounds were much used during 
the past season for baseball. 



18 
Randolph-street Playground. 

Albany and Randolph Streets. 
(2.8 Acres.) 

This newly acquired playground was graded and drained 
last spring, the grades being arranged to permit of flooding 
the grounds in winter for skating. Loam beds were made, 
around the borders of the playground, fifteen feet in width 
and three and one-half feet in depth. These were planted 
with white ash on the sides bordering the street, and with 
Lombardy poplars on the property lines. Enclosing fences 
of expanded metal were also built on the inner line of the 
spaces, low fences being constructed on the street lines. 
The loam spaces so enclosed can be used for children's 
gardens. A corner for children has been fenced off, in 
which simple gymnastic apparatus has been installed. The 
brick building on the Randolph street side is now being fitted 
up with sanitary accommodations. There is also ample 
room in the building for gymnastic work. This playground 
has been extremely popular with the ball players during the 
past summer ; and in winter thousands enjoyed the skating 
provided for them. 

Parkways and Maintenance. 

It is to be regretted that the appropriations made by the 
City Council are too small to maintain the department in 
proper condition. The roads of the parks and parkways are 
now worn in many places down to the foundations. Such 
surfacing as we have been able to give has been mainly done 
in the effort to make wheeling as smooth as possible under 
the circumstances. Conditions are such now, however, that 
extensive repairs are absolutely necessary. Our young and 
growing plantations, too, are suffering from inadequate culti- 
vation ; in fact, every line of our work shows a lack of the 



19 

care and attention we are unable to give, and the matter is 
earnestly presented for the serious consideration of your 
Board. 

Sports. 

The various sports provided for by the department were 
fully enjoyed. Sixteen distinct sheets of ice, with an area of 
about one hundred acres, in various parks and playgrounds, 
were kept in condition for skating during the winter. The 
toboggan chute on Schoolmaster Hill grows in popularity 
with each season ; it is estimated that about 27,000 persons 
used it during the past winter. Baseball on about fifty 
well kept diamonds claimed the interest of many thousands. 
Tennis seemed to lead the list in public favor; about one 
hundred courts, in different localities, were needed to meet 
the demand of its devotees. About 32,000 golfers used the 
links during the year, a falling off from the previous season 
of about 6,500. The curlers enjoyed a long season and good 
ice. Facilities for football were provided in various play- 
grounds. Generally speaking, the interest in all sports 
seems to be on the increase. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. Pettigrew, 

Superintendent. 



20 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS EMERGENCY AND HYGIENE ASSOCIATION 
IN CHARGE OF THE WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S 
DIVISION AT CHARLESBANK. 



Boston, January 17, 1905. 
To the Board of Park Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — This, the fourteenth year of our superin- 
tendence at Charlesbank, has afforded ample proof, if any 
were needed, of the far-sighted wisdom that established 
playgrounds in crowded city centres. For notwithstanding 
many minor inconveniences due to the building of the bridge, 
women and children still have been eager to go to their 
beautiful playground (and when once inside the enclosure 
have been as sheltered as if no pile driving were going on). 

Though, owing to the kindness of Mr. Pettigrew, an 
entrance for the Superintendent and her assistant was 
effected through the shrubbery, access to the Lodge and con- 
sequently to the playground has been much impeded for the 
general public. In the daytime children did not mind going 
round through the Park, but for busy women, obliged to be 
punctual at the stores where they were employed, and for 
mothers, whose moments of leisure were limited, especially 
at night, the circuitous distance they had to traverse to reach 
the Lodge resulted in a somewhat less attendance than here- 
tofore, the children's afternoon and the women's evening 
classes being noticeably smaller. But those who did come 
attended quite regularly, and were visibly improved in 
health. Miss Rosamond Lang, Miss Marjorie Phelps, and 
Miss Marion Cutler kindly volunteered as pianists for the 
classes, and winter and summer season alike had its delights 
for those who came. 



21 

It is not alone the physical benefits that promote the value 
of Charlesbank, but the moral atmosphere of justice and 
kindness which surrounds the work and discipline of Miss 
Harriet Cutler, the Superintendent, and her assistant, Miss 
Margaret S. Horst ; for the children and grown-up girls who 
go to the place year after year are distinctly benefited by 
its influences. 

Since the opening of this division of Charlesbank, there has 
been a marked change in the nationalities of its frequenters. 
Fourteen years ago, the Irish and colored people prepon. 
derated. Now the Jews lead in numbers, then come the 
Italians, the Irish, and, last of all, the colored people. The 
evening classes, when Miss Ida H. Crowley was the regular 
pianist, were largely composed of young American women. 
In both the afternoon and evening work much indoor gym- 
nastic exercise is obtained through games that are greatly 
enjoyed, which, when properly directed, are as conducive to 
health as if exclusive attention were given to free develop- 
ing movements, or to work with gymnastic appliances. 

The numbers who pass through the Lodge out-doors or 
remain awhile inside of it varied from 1,500 to 2,000 a day, 
with occasional days when there were not more than 1,000 
present. Attendance in the gymnasium proper ranged from 
600 to 700 a day. 

Times have changed since we first were asked to take 
charge of this division of Charlesbank as a playground, gym- 
nasium, and Lodge. Then it all was an experiment and a 
novelty. But its success helped to create the demand for 
playgrounds in different parts of the city, with their gym- 
nasiums, more or less well equipped, and Charlesbank has 
become part of a system instead of being an unique experi- 
ment. 

It is pleasant to recall that seventeen years ago city school 
yards were first opened as playgrounds during the summer 
vacation through the initiative of the Massachusetts Emer- 
gency and Hygiene Association, and to remember that each 



22 

summer since that time the Association has supported and. 
cared for, as playgrounds, a certain number of school yards 
which have been placed at its disposal by the courtesy of the 
city. It is pleasant, also, to note that this idea has been 
adopted by others. 

As it is as helpful as ever to connect private with public 
work, your committee look forward to another year, when 
the bridge will be finished. Then will mothers and children 
each day throughout the year, and all day in summer, find 
at Charlesbank rest for weary nerves, health and muscular 
development for weak bodily conditions, good morals and 
manners for low standards of what is right, and fun for the 
inactivity of dullness. Playground ethics infused through 
gymnastic training help to make good citizens out of boys 
and girls. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kate Gannett Wells, 
Anna Phillips Williams, 
Mabel Delano Lord, 

For the Committee. 



23 



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24 



Expenditures on Account of Land and Construction, 



Roads and 
Walks. 



Drainage. 



Grading 



Loam. 



Commonwealth Avenue. 



The Fens. 



Olmsted Park. 



Arnold Arboretum and Bussey 
Park 



Franklin Park 

Columbia Road 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank Extension 

Charlestown Playground 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field 

Chestnut Hill Park 

North Brighton Playground. . . 

ISTeponset Playground 

First-street Playground 

Prince-street Playground 

Mystic Playground 

Columbus-avenue Playground. 

Ashmont Playground 

Rogers Park 

Randolph-street Playground . . 
Playgrounds 



Totals 



$85 85 

33,289 51 

4,280 14 



52 81 



11 00 
24,365 08 



56 27 



$864 51 



$19,471 22 



796 98 



$616 33 



255 92 



3 00 



1,135 07 
340 89 



20 72 



13 25 



26 98 



152 62 



$62,293 28 



561 31 



),048 78 



92 00 

115 62 

1,109 02 



5,317 24 



$10,054 21 



2,842 15 



J, 479 20 



*This amount was expended by Street Department, being proportion 



from February 1, 


1904, to January 31, 


25 

1905. 








Plantations. 


Water 
Supply. 


Buildings. 


Gymnasium 
Apparatus 
and Fences. 


Filling. 


Wnlls Land and 
walls - Expenses. 


Totals. 






$176 04 
1,918 65 










$176 04 

1,918 65 

20 25 














$20 25 














1,801 06 
2,023 29 










1,801 06 
2 995 40 


21 75 






















* 52,760 73 

197,112 31 

156 50 


2,830 02 






$14 00 






$188,561 34 










2,379 71 


$6 85 


411 44 










3,109 98 

48 00 














11 00 


2,457 29 
1,398 71 








3,606 36 

1,981 32 

24,365 08 

122,730 97 

16 50 










210 00 
























122,730 97 


16 50 


















310 05 
108 25 
163 32 
288 58 
29 13 
180 23 


$7 77 






414 30 












108 25 














163 32 














380 58 










$6,011 27 




6,156 02 
1,338 38 

242 28 


49 13 
















242 28 






311 21 


111 16 


2,262 84 


5,429 95 




43,625 00 
17 50 


60,613 48 
17 50 






















$5,628 57 


$118 01 


$8,604 32 


$10,379 51 


$250 05 


$6,011 27 


$355,144 81 


$482,233 26 



of highway loan, issued as Public Park loan, under Chap. 319, Acts of 1897. 



26 



Expenditures on Account of Maintenance from 



Roads. 



Walks. 



Grounds. 



Buildings. 



Commonwealth Avenue 

The Fens 

Riverway 

Olmsted Park , 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum 

West Roxbury Parkway 

Franklin Park 

Columbia Road . . . , , 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank 

Trinity Triangle 

Charlestown Heights , 

Charlestown Playground 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field 

North End Beach 

Copp's Hill Terraces 

Chestnut Hill Park 

North Brighton Playground 

Neponset Playground 

Billings Field 

First-street Playground 

Prince-street Playground 

Mystic Playground 

Fellows-street Playground 

Christopher Gibson Playground. . . . 

Columbus-avenue Playground 

Ashmont Playground 

Savin Hill Playground 

Roslindale Playground 

Forest Hills Playground , 

Rogers Park , 

Oak Square 

Cottage-street Playground, Ward 2 , 

Randolph-street Playground 

Marcella-street Playground 

Office Expense 

Miscellaneous 



$12,440 21 

9,550 68 

5,862 59 

5,313 93 

4,300 75 

3,748 45 

6 75 

10,649 53 

5,524 92 

1,217 45 

882 24 

14 67 



1,347 14 



51,558 30 
1,045 79 
553 65 
770 64 
307 29 
569 14 



2,066 71 
333 82 

12 00 
910 95 
249 14 

84 34 

16 75 
189 36 
115 43 

27 97 



5 50 



213 19 

4 67 

16 00 

7 50 
61 43 



31 00 



16 00 
59 01 



1 00 

2 75 



20 50 
14 31 



$3,970 16 

4,335 03 

4,208 85 

9,751 71 

2,703 70 

204 85 

413 64 

24,952 17 

2,222 29 

2,632 54 

2,940 47 

1,709 38 

3,615 22 

4 00 

1,237 32 

711 25 

1,023 S8 

1,321 40 

44 83 

470 91 

2,888 79 

285 56 

520 88 

572 46 

758 05 

619 12 

271 80 

223 09 

385 80 

1,056 37 

71 54 

166 00 

584 18 

330 73 

1,814 05 

11 91 

542 14 

65 96 

1,280 92 



$311 72 

950 51 

1,622 39 

2,335 74 



632 16 

18 75 

10,619 92 




931 

655 
308 


78 
91 
30 


444 


26 




589 


84 








460 


52 


1,421 46 




592 85 




1,471 


91 



455 62 
33 25 



),859 31 



,264 14 



$80,922 95 



$23,S56 89 



27 



February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 



Drainage. 


General 
Work. 


Sheep and 
Water 
Fowl. 


Skating. 


Men's 
Gymnasium. 


Women's 

and 

Children's 

Gymnasium. 


Office 
Expense. 


Totals. 




$390 38 
430 75 
523 78 

1,031 62 
533 00 
576 00 












$18,670 77 

16,432 25 

12,771 26 

21,192 93 

7,844 74 

5,935 34 

439 14 




$119 49 






















7S2 65 


$1,236 64 
















$204 74 
























2,472 26 
4 00 


1,332 39 


655 27 








52,748 25 
8,085 03 
4,415 75 














553 76 










124 14 
120 92 
480 16 










5,789 58 
6,568 49 






715 44 
129 32 


$3,103 03 
3,209 24 










$1,737 17 




9,563 75 
20 75 






















1,870 94 


1 50 






665 95 

46 75 

1,526 12 


39 75 
8 37 






1,533 88 

1,109 97 

5,517 86 

50 33 


3 00 












369 58 


1,710 92 




























470 91 
















4,449 12 








708 15 
203 34 
488 91 
310 32 








998 38 










150 51 




1,351 25 












1,068 87 








613 71 






3,164 97 








440 55 
320 36 
240 23 
212 03 

62 68 




1,059 67 




3 50 










626 66 












463 32 








236 83 
348 62 






1,443 51 




15 37 






1,542 05 










71 54 
















1,637 91 








425 10 








1,010 28 


1,286 34 












1,619 82 
















1,814 05 
















11 91 








66 75 

182 12 








608 89 




356 83 




133 15 

337 10 






1,214 18 










1,665 58 












$10,095 69 


10,095 69 




700 10 




| 




700 10 














•$1,495 58 


$8,132 39 


$3,915 45 


$8,499 39 


$7,444 35 


$3,163 52 


$10,095 69 


$217,649 67 



28 



INCOME. 



RECEIPTS. 



Received from rents, sale of buildings, wool, 

sheep, grass, wood, etc 

Received for labor 



PAYMENTS. 



$2,484 45 
6,975 85 


$2,484 45 
5,149 67 
1,826 18 



),460 30 



Income carried to General City Income 
Appropriation Park Department 
Balance on hand, January 31, 1905 . 



Park Betterments Collected by City Collector, 
to February 1, 1905. 



3,460 30 



Assessm'ts 
committed 

to 
Collector. 



Abated. 



Net 
Assess- 
ments. 



Collected. 



Outstand- 
ing Feb. 1, 
1905. 



Public Park, Back Bay.. . 

Marine Park 

Franklin Park 

Parkway, Old Harbor 

" Muddy River.. . 

" West Roxbury. 

" Dorchester 



$434,600 00 

23,543 00 

135,029 00 

60,789 00 

108,972 00 

154,107 00 

9,713 00 



$144,195 73 

12,616 80 

122,000 66 

50,426 00 

82,927 25 

113,658 00 

3,055 54 



$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 
10,863 00 
26,044 75 
40,449 00 
6,657 46 



$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 

8,256 00 
22,863 75 
31,763 00 

5.927 74 



$2,107 00 

3,181 00 

8,686 00 

729 72 



$926,753 00 



$528,879 9S 



$397,873 02 



$383,169 30 



814,703 72 



Public Park and Playground Debt. 

Liabilities. 
Total loans outstanding, January 31, 1905 . . . $15,983,910 98 

Resources. 
Sinking-Fund, January 31, 1905 5,194,240 65 



Net Debt, January 31, 1905 



•$10,789,670 33 



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