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Full text of "Annual report"



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FIFTY-FOURTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



I905-I906 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON FEBRUARY I, 1906. 



SOLOMON LINCOLN, President. 
Term expires May i, 1906. 

JOSIAH H. BENTON, jR. JAMES De NORMANDIE. 

Term expires May i, 1909. Term expires May i, 1910. 

THOMAS F. BOYLE. THOMAS DWIGHT. 

Term expires May i, 1907. Term expires May i, 1908. 



Librarian. 
HORACE G. WADLIN. 



^Vith the Compliments of 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE TEUSTEES 



Public Library 



CITY OF BOSTON 



I905-I906 



-^ \ i' ' i>,*^' i 



BOSTON 
MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFPICE 

1900 



iM it.i 






CONTENTS. 



Page. 
Report of the Trustees ...... 1 

Report of the Librarian ...... 6 

Report of the Examining Committee .... 56 

Appendixes : 

I. Financial Statement ...... 67 

II. Extent of the Library by years .... 89 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, includ- 

ing Branches . . . . . . .91 

IV. Classification : Central Library . . broadside 

■ V. Classification : Branches ..... 95 

VI. Registration ..... broadside 

VII. Circulation 98 

VIII. Trustees for Fifty-four Years. — Librarians . . 100 

IX. Examining (^Qijimittee^Jtof Fif^y- four "Shears. ^« J . 102 

X . Library S'^rV^ce',' Irtdudiiig - ".SmKlay- • an'd' Evening 

Service . . »•;.; j •;» "•:•»*; • • • 1*^6 
Index to the Annual Report;*f90o-i906 '. . ,. .117 



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MILTON 


BOSTON 

Public Library System 




HYDE PARK 









Area of City. 43 square : 



Branch Libraries, February i, 1906. 



HriKhton Branch, Holton Library Building. Academy Hill Koiid. 
Charlestown Branch, City Square. 
Dorchester Brunch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
Kast Boston Branch, 37 Meridian St. 
JumHicft Plain Branch, Curtis Hall. Centre St. 



Riixbury Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
South Bosi.in Branth. 37a Broadway. 
Sduth End Branch, agj Shawmut Avenue. 
West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 
West Roxbury Branch. Centre, near Mt. Vern 



1 St. 



B. 



I>. Mattapan Reading Room. River, cor. Oakland St. 

E. Keponset Delivery Station, 49 Walnut St. 

F. Mount Bowdoin Readinis; Room. Washington, cor. Bldon St. 

G. Allston Reading Room, 354 Cambridge St. 
I. Codmnn Square Reading Rnom, Washington cor. Norfolk St.. Dorchester, 

X Mt. 1'leasant Reading Room, Dudley, cor. Magazine St. 



Delivery Stations, February i, 1906, 

;t. P. Broadway Extension Reading Room, 13 Broadway Extension, 

y. Upham's Corner Reading Room, Columbia Road cor. Bird St. 
R, Warren Street Reading Room, 390 Warren St. 
S. Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 115a Tremont St. 

Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, Depot Squa 



W Industrial School Reading Room, 39 North Bennet St. 
Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St. 
22. North Street Reading Room, w.7 North St. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1906. 

Depaktments. Opened. 

Central Library, Copley sq. Established May 2, 1854 Mar. 11, 1895 

X East Boston Branch, 37 Meridian at Jan. 28, 1871 

I South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway May 1, 1872 

IIRoxbury Branch, 46 3Iillmont st July, 1S73 

X Charlestown Branch, City sq '. *Jan., 1874 

t Brighton Branch, Academy Hill rd *Jan., 1874 

X Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams st Jan. 25, 1875 

§ South End Branch, 397 Shawmut ave Aug., 1S77 

X Jamaica Plain Branch, Curtis Hall, Centre st Sept., 1877 

X West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon st *Jan. 6, 1S80 

t West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde st Feb. 1,1896 

Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington si June 7,1875 

" B. Roslindale Reading Room, Washington, cor. Ashland st Dec. 3,1878 

" D. Mattapan Reading Room, River, cor. Oakland st Dec. 27, 1881 

" E. Neponset Delivery Station, 49 Walnut st Ian. 1,18(^3 

" F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, cor. Eldon st Nov. 1, 1886 

" G. Allstou Reading Room, 354 Cambridge st Mar. 11, 1889 

" J. Codnian Square Reading Room, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. Nov. 12, 1890 

" N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Dudley, cor. Magazine st Apr. 29, 1892 

" P. Broadway Extension Reading Room, 13 Broadway Ex- 
tension Jan. 16, 1896 

" Q. Upham's Corner Reading Room, Columbia rd., cor. Bird St.. Mar. 16, 1896 

" R. Warren Street Reading Room, 390 Warren st May 1, 1896 

" S. Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 1154 Tremont st -Jan. 18, 1897 

" T. Boylstou Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, Depot sq.. Nov. 1,1897 

" W. Industrial School Reading Room, 39 North Bennet st Nov. 3,1899 

" Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington st June 25, 1901 

" 22. North Street Reading Room, 207 North st Jnne. 9, 1903 

* As a branch. 

t In buildings owned by the City, and exclusively devoted to Library uses. 

X In City buildings, in part devoted toother municipal uses. 

§ Occupies rented rooms. 

II The lessee of the Fc-llowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 



To His Honor John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — The Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston present the following report of its progress and 
condition during the year ending January 31, 1906, being 
the fifty-fourth annual report of the Trustees. 

The Rev. Dr. James De Normandie, whose term as Trustee 
expired April 30, 1905, was re-appointed for a term of five 
years, beginning May 1, 1905. The corporation w^as subse- 
quently organized by the re-election of ]\Ir. Solomon Lincoln 
as President and the Rev. Dr. De Normandie as Vice-Presi- 
dent. Miss Delia Jean Deery was re-elected Clerk. 

This report is similar in form to that adopted in several 
years immediately preceding, and thus affords ready means 
of estimating the comparative growth of the Library. 

The following tables exhibit the receipts and expenditures 
during the year : 

Receipts. 

City appropriatiou .... $310,000 00 
Income from trust funds . . 15,431 00 

Miscellaneous sources, gifts, etc., in- 
cluding cash on deposit in Lou- 
don in part to meet payments for 
purchases made during the year, 
and unexpended balances of trust 

funds 14,939 55 

$340,370 55 



Expenditures. 
Salaries, including Printing and 

Binding Departments . . . $208,019 39 

Books 33,648 86 

Periodicals 6,712 00 

Newspapers . . . . . 1,833 71 

General maintenance . . . 70,888 81 



321,102 77 
Balance *$19,267 78 

*Tbi8 balance is composed of certain items of income of trust funds, accrued inter- 
ests ou deposits, etc., as shown in the Auditor's detailed statement, Appendix I., 
page 69. 



City Document No. 24. 



The Trustees append, as usual, the report of the Librarian, 
Mr. Wadlin, and the reports of other officials of the Library. 
That of the Librarian is ver}- complete, and should be con- 
sulted by all who desire to obtain a full account of the work 
and condition of the Library for the preceding year. 

The Examining Committee of citizens for the year 
consisted of the following ladies and gentlemen : 



Dr. George B. Shattuck, 

Chairman^ 
Miss Eleanor M. Colleton, 

Secretary ^ 
Timothy E. Byrnes, 
James B. Connoll}', 
J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr., 
Laurence Curtis, 
William F. Donovan, 
Frank K. Foster, 
Mrs, Francis P. Garland, 
Rev. F. J. Halloran, 
Mrs. Pinckney Holbrook, 



Miss Carohne Matthews, 

Rev. Daniel Merrimau, 

Thomas Minns, 

Mrs. Thomas G. Plant, 

Abraham Ratshesk}', 

Dr. William H. Ruddick, 

Mrs. Edward Scates, 

George A. Scigliano, 

Mrs. Walter Shaw, 

Rev. Benjamin F. Trueblood, 

Dr. J. Collins Warren, 

Daniel A. Whelton, 

Rev. Elwood Worcester. 



This committee was very completely organized and sub- 
divided, and the respective sub-committees made very careful 
examination of the condition of the Library and reported 
valuable suggestions. Their report is appended. 

The agencies of the Library were diminished by two this 
5'ear, numbering now 199 instead of 201, as enumerated in 
the last report. This diminution, however, has been more 
than made up by the expansion of certain deposit stations 
into reading rooms. The latter are under the charge of 
regular officials of the Library, contain deposits of books, and 
in general supply much greater provision for their patrons. 
Their greater value appears at once from the immediately 
increased use and the greater circulation of books. 

The new- building at Codman square, Dorchester, erected 
by the Public Buildings Department, has been placed at the 
disposal of the Library, and was opened as a reading room 
on JMarch 6, 1905. This building was designed chiefly for 
Library purposes, and is the only one of the buildings under 
the control of the Trustees which was so planned. It con- 
stitutes a permanent addition of value to the system. During 
the past year a fire occurred in the building, 397 Shaw- 
mut avenue, occupied by the South End Branch. Very 
little damage was done to the property of the Library, and 
only temporary inconvenience suffered while repairs were 
making. A fire also damaged the Old City Hall building in 
Charlestown, but in this case also the Library sustained but 



Library Department. 3 

little loss. Other changes of less importance have occurred 
in the stations under the control of the Trustees, and the 
report of the Librarian gives a full description of these. 
The Vacuum Cleaning System has been installed in the 
Central Library. It has improved the sanitary condition of 
the building, and by thoroughly and quietly removing the 
dust from the shelves, does the work of cleaning economi- 
cally, and in a manner which tends to the better preserva- 
tion of the books. 

The Trustees call attention to the fact that the cost of 
replacing, re-binding, and repairing books, consequent upon 
the growing use of the Library, is a large and increasing 
item of expense. 

The losses resulting from permitting access to the books 
upon open shelves continue to be considerable, although 
chiefly of books of small value. The Trustees, however, 
are still of opinion that these losses are more than compen- 
sated by the more complete and valuable use of the Library 
made possible to those who are permitted to have such access. 

By an arrangement made with the Boston Medical Library, 
the Trustees have constituted that library a deposit station, 
and have sanctioned the ultimate removal for deposit there of 
such medical works now in the Central Library as in the 
judgment both of the Trustees and of the Boston JNIedical 
Library can wisely be thus deposited. No control of the 
books is relinquished, and they are to be open to the use of 
the same persons who would be entitled to use them if they 
remained at the Central Library, the object of establishino- 
this deposit being to avoid the duplication of medical works, 
especiall}- books of a class which are not in popular demand, 
thus securing the advantage that those who desire to consult 
works of this character will find the largest collection under 
one roof. The books and periodicals of which the transfer 
has been authorized are chiefly those of an especially scien- 
tific character, which are not often consulted except by 
professional readers. 

The inevitable growth and expansion of the Library, com- 
mensurate with the growth of the city, entails a laroer 
expenditure for employees and for providing and equipping 
branch libraries and reading rooms ; and the Trustees find, 
as usual, that it is impossible to comply- with all requests 
made to them for expansions of the Library system. On 
the other hand, the provision made by the city for the 
Library has not been substantially increased forseveral years. 
Accordingly the expenditures for books are necessarily first 
diminished. Other expenses cannot be materially reduced. 



4 City Document No. 24. 

Even, however, in the dimmished purchases of books the 
Trustees bear in mind, of course, the necessity of maintaining 
the continuity of previous accessions, and so far as it is 
possible they endeavor to obtain, at the public auctions now 
frequently held in this city and elsewhere, such valuable 
historical matter relating especially to the City of Boston 
and also to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as seems 
to find an appropriate place in the Library. 

In reference to the purchases of books of fiction, the 
Trustees have continued to confine such purchases to works of 
authors of recognized distinction or of deserved popularity, 
and to works of obvious intrinsic merit. It is quite impossible, 
with the funds at the disposal of the Trustees, to purchase 
any large portion of the current fiction of the day, or the num- 
ber of copies required to meet a popular demand ; nor is it in 
the judgment of the Trustees desirable. The collections of the 
Library must be of more permanent value. It is not difficult 
for those who seek lighter literature to obtain it elsewhere. 

By reason, therefore, of the diminished means at the com- 
mand of the Trustees, and for other causes, the number of 
accessions to the Library is considerably less this year than 
during the preceding. The total accessions amount to 33,551 
volumes, of which 21,400 were acquired by purchase. Con- 
siderable purchases of photographs have been made, and the 
publications of the Library have been continued in the direc- 
tions heretofore adopted. 

Especial efforts have been made to reach children by 
means of exhibitions of photographs and of pictures. For 
details relating to all these matters the Trustees refer again 
to the report of the Librarian. 

The catalogue receives constant attention, but it would be 
impossible, in a general report, to indicate the character of 
the work done. 

The Special Libraries are much resorted to. Mr. Allen A. 
Brown continually adds to his generous gifts in the Music 
Library. 

A very complete course of free public lectures was given 
in the Central Librar}^ during the usual lecture season. A 
complete list of the subjects treated in the months covered 
by the present report is given in the report of the Librarian, 
and deserves special attention in order that a knowledge may 
be had of the variety and usefulness of these lectures. The 
names of the speakers who generously gave their services to 
the Library in connection with the course also appear in this 
list, certain lectures having been arranged in co-operation 
with the Boston Society of Printers and the Boston Archi- 



Library Department. 6 

tectural Club. Repeated exhibitions of pictorial art Lave 
been given in the Central Library, and in some cases concur- 
rently with the lectures. 

A considerable number of gifts is regularly received by 
the Trustees, and in some cases the gifts are of considerable 
value. During the year covered by this report, however, the 
Trustees have received no gift of money of large importance. 
The first payment in cash to the Library, under the will of 
Joseph H. Center, of Roxbury, amounting to $14,000, was 
received during September. This sum, to be increased from 
time to time from the proceeds of certain items of real estate 
received from the same source, but not yet disposed of, has 
been funded as the Joseph H. Center Fund, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books and other additions to the 
Library. 

This report is necessarily of very general character, and 
attention is again called to the special report of the Librarian 
for a much more minute and important account of the activ- 
ities of the Library. 

Solomon Lincoln, 

President, 
Jam^s De Normandie, 

Vice-Presidejit, 
JosiAH H. Benton, Jr., 
Thomas F. Boyle, 
Thomas D wight. 

Mat 25, 1906. 



City Document No. 24. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees : 

The report of the Librarian for the year ending January 
31, 1906, is hereby submitted: 

The Library System. 

The Library system includes : 

The Central Library on Copley square. 

Ten branch libraries with permanent collections of books. 

Sixteen delivery stations (all but one of which are reading 
rooms), and also, as places of deposit or delivery, forty 
engine-houses, twenty-nine institutions, and one hundred and 
four public and parochial schools. The total number of 
agencies of all kinds is one hundred and ninety-nine, as 
against two hundred and one in the previous year. The 
reduction in the number of delivery stations from twenty-two 
ta sixteen, which will be hereinafter referred to, affects the 
total, but is partly offset numerically by an increase in the 
number of schools or other institutions to which books are 
sent on deposit. 

Finance. 

A record of the receipts and payments for the year is to 
be found in the statement of the Library Auditor (Appendix 
I.) 

Buildings, Equipment and General Administration. 

The usual routine repairs have been made on the Central 
building, Copley square, and on the branch buildings which 
we own or control. 

At the Central, during the summer, the walls, piers and 
ceilings of the Special Libraries, including the Barton-Ticknor 
and Music Rooms, were entirely renovated under the direction 
of our own painter. 

The valve stems on the high and low pressure cylinders of 
Engine No. 1 have been renewed. A new feed-water heater 
has been installed, and a new system-water tank put in to 
replace one that, after service since the building was 
originally occupied, was found defective on account of 



Library Department. 7 

corrosion. Minor repairs have been made upon the boilers 
and piping system. 

The elevators have been thoroughly examined, and put in 
order, including new hoist ropes and counter-weight drum 
ropes on the electric elevator, and repairs to the safety appa- 
ratus, a new set of tilting sheaves and a new counter-weight 
rope on the hydraulic elevator. 

The heating system of the Central building is in good 
condition. About 1,600 tons of coal have been consumed, a 
decrease of 200 tons as compared with the preceding year, 
due to the mild weather during the winter. The ventilation, 
not always excellent under the crowded condition of some of 
our rooms, has been somewhat improved so far as relates to 
the Lecture Hall by re-opening three large inlets which had 
been closed for some time, permitting the introduction of a 
considerable amount of fresh air. This, while not entirely 
satisfactory, is an improvement. 

No repairs have been required during the year upon the 
dynamos at the Central building, and the motors have been 
regularly operated without a break. The book-railway has 
required but slight repairs, and is now in good order. 

VACUUM CLEANING SYSTEM. 

The installation of the Vacuum Cleaning apparatus at the 
Central building is an important permanent improvement, 
especially from a sanitary point of view, inasmuch as it 
supersedes, in the cleaning of the stacks, the use of brushes 
and sawdust, and enables the work to be thoroughly done 
without raising dust. Although the plant as now con- 
structed is primarily intended for stack-sweeping and for 
cleaning the books and shelves contained in the stacks, the 
connections are arranged so as to be extended for operation 
in other parts of the building. 

NEW BRANCH BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

The new building at Codman square, Dorchester, erected 
by the Public Buildings Department, was placed at the 
disposal of the Library Department and opened as a reading 
room March 6. This is the only agency of the Library 
which occupies a new building erected chiefly for Library 
purposes. Although there is a ward-room in the basement 
having an independent entrance, the remainder of the build- 
ing is entirely devoted to the Library, and in its arrange- 
ment and furnishing the Librarian was consulted, and our 
requirements provided for, although the plans were prepared 



8 City Document No. 24. 

and carried out by the Public Buildings Department, which, 
in offering the rooms to us, agreed to keep the building in 
repair and to provide light, heat and janitor service. 

Since the building was opened the grounds have been put 
in thorough order, and some additional furniture snp]3lied by 
that department. The reading room is convenient, well- 
lighted, and generally attractive. Its location, also, at the 
junction of several main thoroughfares and near the Dor- 
chester High School and the Henry L. Pierce Grammar 
School, could not well be improved. 

As the nucleus of a permanent collection about 1,200 vol- 
umes were placed upon the shelves when the building was 
opened, besides several hundred volumes of deposit books. 
The permanent collection now numbers nearly 1,700 volumes, 
although some of these are books transferred from branches 
and therefore not recent publications. From this small col- 
lection there was a direct circulation during eleven months 
of 34,894 volumes, and besides these, more than 7,000 vol- 
umes were drawn from the Central Library for borrowers at 
this station. 

A serious fire occurred November 9 in the building 397 
Shawmut avenue, occupied by the South End Branch, and 
held by us under lease from the Shawmut Church. The 
fire was caused by a defectiA^e furnace, and although con- 
siderable damage was done to the building the Library prop- 
erty suffered little. The necessary repairs have Ijeen made 
by the owners, the work of the branch proceeding without 
cessation, but not without inconvenience which, under the 
circumstances, it was impossible to avoid. 

On December 12 a fire broke out in the Old City Hall 
building, Charlestown, part of which is occupied by the 
Charlestown Branch, but the Library rooms were but slightly 
damaged, nor were they closed except briefly. The repairs 
were made by the Public Buildings Department, which is in 
control. 

The grounds at the Brighton Branch, Academy Hill road, 
were planted by the Park Department with shrubs early in 
the spring, according to an elaborate scheme, under the ini- 
tiative of the Brighthelmstone Club of Brighton. This, as 
the shrubs mature, will add greatly to the appearance of the 
branch. 

At the East Boston Branch a re-arrangement of the exits 
aids materially in the administration of the room. Allusion 
was made in the last report to the inadequacy of the accom- 
modations at this branch, especially in view of the increasing 
circulation and use of the readino- room. For lack of seats 



Library Department. 9 

436 persons were turned away on Sundays during the last 
three months of the year. 

At the South Boston Branch, located in rooms which we 
hold under lease, the owners have repainted the interior, laid 
cork matting in the main reading room and made other 
repairs. A new fire-escape and also gratings for the exposed 
windows have been provided, and we have supplied some 
new furniture. 

At the West Roxbury Branch, a toilet-room has been put 
in on the main floor by the Public Buildings Department at 
our request. 

The grounds of the West End Branch, which are now 
under our control, have been kept in good condition by the 
Park Department at our expense. The trees were badly 
infected with the tussock moth, requiring special attention. 
At the same time, six trees were removed, under the advice 
of the Park Department, either on account of decay or because 
they interfered with the proper development of other trees. 

Following the fires at the South End and Charlestown 
Branches, previously mentioned, the instructions which had 
been in force with regard to precautions against fire and 
relating to the duty of custodians in case of fire, were ampli- 
fied in a special circular, and additional fire extinguishers 
were sent to the branches and stations. 

Problems in Administration. 

In several respects it seems impossible, under present 
financial limitations, to reach ideal conditions in the admin- 
istration of a great public library, serving a mixed popu- 
lation. Our constant effort is toward such conditions, but 
between the necessity of confining our operations within 
rigid economy of management, and the desire to overcome 
certain defects, which are obvious no less to ourselves than 
to the public, there lies a line of compromise by which our 
action must be determined. 

I do not now especially refer to the insufficient supply of 
books to meet the demand, requiring us constantly to deny 
the requests of borrowers. Demand constantly outruns sup- 
ply, and can only be approximately met, in any case. But 
there are other serious problems. 

For example, books which are in active circulation soon 
become soiled. Borrowers frequently complain of this, and 
members of the Examining Committee have criticised the con- 
dition of certain popular books at the Central Library and at 
the branches. The cause of complaint is legitimate, and is by 



10 City Document No. 24. 

no means disregarded by us, but it is impossible to at once 
replace these books. The expense is prohibitive. To deter- 
mine how long such a book shall be retained in circulation, 
or whether it shall be re-bound when the original binding is 
worn out if, at the same time, it is more or less filthy, calls 
for much discrimination. We condemn and discard such 
books as freely as the money available for replacing them 
permits, but this is far less freely than would be done under 
ideal conditions. Many of the popular books at the branches 
and stations are much soiled. As the custodian of one 
reading room remarks, " Doubtless the time comes when in 
any collection of much used books there are many volumes 
not quite bad enough to be condemned, but far too dirty to 
be pleasant to the touch." 

The books in active circulation become gradually dirty, and 
it is therefore impossible to hold any one person responsible, 
especially when hundreds of children handle the books 
daily. Where there are open shelves the promiscuous use is 
increased. 

We are able through the branch charging system to 
measure the life of a book upon our shelves. Taking six 
popular books as a test, it was recently found that, at a branch 
with a large circulation, such books were often issued from 
100 to 120 times, being re-bound twice. The shortest 
period in the life of the book was that previous to the first 
re-binding. 

As an indication of the care which, from considerations of 
economy, we find it necessary to give in order to reduce the 
cost of replacements, it may be stated that 7,000 volumes 
were repaired during the year at one branch, 7,500 at another 
and 18,000 at another. Missing pages are written to the 
number of several hundred a year at each of the larger 
branches. 

Another problem to which we are giving constant atten- 
tion, but have not _yet solved, is the prevention of losses from 
open shelves. This was mentioned in my last annual report. 
The advantages to the public of the open shelves are 
obvious. The disadvantages set forth last year need not be 
again mentioned. The actual loss during the last twelve 
months aggregates 843 from open shelves at branches, and 
129 from closed shelves, open however to certain applicants. 
There is also a considerable loss from the larger reading- 
rooms and from the deposit collection at the stations. I have 
under consideration, and shall soon propose, certain restric- 
tions which are likely to reduce these losses, without seriously 
impairing the open shelf privilege. The ideal can never be 
reached until the abuses of the privileges are overcome. 




o 3 

O J2 



Library Department. 11 

A third point in which the administration falls below our 
ideal, relates to the length of time which now elapses after 
a book is reported as missing from the shelves before it can 
be replaced. This is now a question of montlis. Patrons do 
not understand the reasons for the delay, and are apt to criti- 
cise it. It is principally a matter of economy. A consider- 
able number of books reported as missing will eventually be 
returned. If immediately replaced unnecessary duplication 
of purchases would result. If our funds were unlimited 
duplication might, of course, be disregarded. But this, 
unfortunately, is not the case. Therefore, as in the replace- 
ment of soiled books, there must be compromise upon some 
line below the ideal, but within our financial resources. To 
reduce the delay as much as possible, under conditions which 
we cannot disregard, is the only open course. 

Transfer of Medical Books. 

Under authorization of the Trustees an agreement has been 
made with the Boston Medical Library in the Fenway, 
whereby a deposit station has been established there for 
medical books, involving the transfer from our collection of 
such volumes as may be mutually decided upon by repre- 
sentatives of each library, to be held on deposit at this 
station, upon conditions which provide for the use of the books 
by the game persons as would be entitled to use them at the 
Central Libraiy. The volumes which it is proposed to 
deposit there are, in general, such strictly professional works 
as are used by medical students or by members of the profes- 
sion. The books deposited are subject to recall at any time, 
and, like all books sent to our other deposit stations, remain 
the property of the Boston Public Library. 

A similar arrangement has been made between the Boston 
Medical Library and other large libraries in the vicinity, in- 
tended to promote a plan for co-operation between the insti- 
tutions concerned, under which the funds of each may be 
used to the best advantage, unnecessary duplication of pur- 
chases avoided, and students, who principally use such books, 
may find the largest possible collection under one roof. 

Nothing except periodicals has as yet been transferred to 
this station. The work of selection for transfer, the making 
of the catalogue reference entries required in the case of 
books deposited, and other work in connection therewith re- 
quires discrimination and must necessarily proceed slowly. 
The continuation of the medical periodical files has been 
taken over by the Medical Library, and the funds thus re- 



12 City Document No. 24. 

leased from our annual expense budget can now be used for 
the purchase of other books. 

Books Received. 

Mr. Thomas S. Perry, who for several years had been 
intrusted with the regular examination of current European 
Continental book lists, in the work of selection for purchase, 
closed his direct connection with the Library in June in 
anticipation of prolonged absence from the country. Since 
that date this service has been rendered by members of the 
regular staff. Mr. James L. Whitney has continued his 
valuable assistance in the examination of American and 
English catalogues and publishers' lists. 

The Librar}" has been represented at every important 
auction daring the year, and, within the limits of our avail- 
able funds, desirable acquisitions from this source have been 
added to our collection. 

We are, as usual, under obligations to those who have 
generously given to the Library much literary material, some 
of which would not have been obtainable by purchase. 

The total accessions for the j'ear, from various sources, 
amount to 33,551 volumes, as against 42,891 for the year 
1904-05. The total accessions, as will be seen, are less than 
those of the preceding year by 9,341 volumes. The total 
number of volumes purchased (21,400) is 6,096 less than for 
the preceding year, the reduction being entirely due to lack 
of funds which could be devoted to this purpose. The total 
number of gifts (11,116) is 4,021 less than for the preceding 
year. The following statistical statement presents the facts 
as to accessions in detail : 

Accessions by purchase . 
Accessions by gift 
Accessions by exchange . 
Accessions by periodicals (bound) . 
Accessions by Statistical Department 

24,034 9,517 33,551 

Books bought for Central Library: 

From City appropriation . . . 8,083 

From trust funds 2,248 

10,331 



Centi-al, 


Branches, 


Totals, 


Volumes. 


Volumes. 


Volumes. 


10,331 


9,278 


19,609 


9,831 


239 


10,070 


1,035 




1,035 


1,791 




1,791 


1,046 




1,046 



Books bought for branches : 

From City appropriation . . . 8,054 

From trust funds ..... 260 

From Fellowes Athenajum . . . 964 



9,278 



19,609 



Library Department. 13 

The diminished purchases have been largely in the depart- 
ment of current publications in foreign languages, but the 
number of volumes ordered for the branches and for deposit 
■work has also been somewhat reduced. It is expected that the 
expenditures in certain directions, which this year have been 
unavoidably large, will not hereafter draw so severely upon 
our general appropriation, and that we shall not be obliged 
to restrict beyond reasonable limits our annual purchases. 
Every year the demands upon the Library increase. The 
increase in population ; the growth of the reading habit, 
which we have sedulously cultivated for some time through 
our work in connection with the schools ; the establish- 
ment of new stations and other agencies for bringing the 
Library near to the people — these inevitably require large 
expenditures for books and general administration, which 
have not thus far been met by a corresponding increase 
in our annual appropriation. 

ENGLISH PROSE FICTION. 

It will, I think, be obvious that, with a comparatively 
limited amount of money which can be devoted to the 
purchase of current publications of all classes, expenditures 
for new fiction must, whether we favor or deplore it, be 
closely restricted. The policy now well established, of con- 
fining our purchases of current novels to those of the highest 
merit as determined by a rather conservative standard, 
necessarily excludes a large number of recent publications, 
but the experience of several years has shown that nearly all 
of the works of fiction which for various reasons we have found 
it impossible to buy, have failed to demonstrate their ability 
to live for even a few brief months. The demand for some 
of them was insistent for a short time. Now their names 
are for the most part forgotten, and nobody cares to read 
them. If we had purchased a considerable number of 
these volumes, the money, so far as present demand is 
concerned, would have been wasted, and the books would 
have taken places on our shelves that are needed for litera- 
ture of a more permanent character. 

It may be justly said, however, that we have bought mean- 
time, so far as our resources permitted, a fair representation 
of the best fiction, that which is likeliest to remain in constant 
request. Our supply of standard English fiction is large, 
and is constantly replaced as the books are worn out. We 
are liberal in providing good fiction for the young. We could 
undoubtedly use to advantage a larger number of copies, 



14 City Document No. 24. 

especially in branch and deposit work, but unless our funds 
are enlarged we cannot expend a larger portion of our money 
in this way, without retarding tlie growth of the Libiary in 
other important directions. 

Durmg the year 774 volumes of English prose fiction 
were received from the publishers, and were considered care- 
fully upon their merits, the reports of the volunteer reading 
committee, as to plots, interest, general characteristics, etc., 
being taken into account, together with other factors, deter- 
mining the merit of the books and their suitability for our 
purposes. Of these, 161 titles were accepted, and author- 
ized for purchase ; 1,230 copies being bought, requiring an 
expenditure of $1,267. If this expenditure for fiction seems 
small, it must be borne in mind that it does not include 
replacements constantly required to keep our collection, as 
catalogued, complete. The following statement will be 
found interesting, bringing out, as it does, the relative ex- 
penditure for fiction in the aggregate, as compared with that 
for books of all kinds : Number of copies of current fiction, 
original purchases, added during the year 1905-06 (Central 
Library and branches), 1,230 ; cost, $1,267. Number of re- 
placements (Central, 710 ; deposit, 66 ; branches and 
stations, 3,504), 4,280 ; cost, $4,280. Additional copies 
(Central, 127; deposit, 601; branches and stations, 162), 
890 ; total number of copies purchased, 6,400 ; cost, $6,437. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that the total expendi- 
ture for fiction was $6,437, covering 6,400 volumes. In com- 
parison, the total expenditure for all books was $34,460.90, 
and the total number of volumes purchased, 19,609. 
For the year preceding, 1904-05, the total expenditure was 
$37,266.84, covering 27,469 volumes, and that for fiction 
$7,532.04, covering 7,556 volumes. Expressed in terms of 
percentage, the expenditure for fiction, including new pur- 
chases, replacements and additional copies, amounted to 
18.65 per cent of all book expenditure in 1905-06, and 
20.21 per cent in the preceding year. 

From a report prepared by Miss Theodosia E. Macurdy, 
Chief of the Ordering Department, the following information 
as to the accessions of the year is presented : 



Library Department. 15 



PAYMENTS FOR BOOKS, PERIODICALS AND NE\VSPAPERS, 

1905-06. 

The payments for 1905-06 have been as follows : 

City money expended for books : 

For the Central Library (including 

$1,670.27 for deposit) . . $14,023 83 
For branches . . . . 8,719 79 

822,743 62 



City money expended for periodicals : 

For Central Library . . .14,643 64 

For branches and stations . . 2,068 36 



6,712 00 

Total City money expended .... $29,455 62 
Trust funds expended for books : 

For Central Library (including $21.55 

for deposit) .... $10,453 88 

For branches ..... 428 77 

Trust funds expended for newspapers . 1,833 71 



Total trust funds expended . . . . 12,71636 

Carnegie fund expended for Central Library . . 22 59 



Total City money and funds expended . . $42,194 57 

Fellowes Athena;um paid for books for Roxbury 
Branch, purchased by the Central Library" : 

Books $845 63 

Periodicals ..... 276 68 

1,122 31 



$43,316 88 



Total amount paid for books, periodicals and newspapers, 

$43,316.88, as against 846,077.85 in 1904-05. 

REVIEW OF PURCHASES, 1905-06. 

There has been no falling off in the past year in the 
acquisition of books on the subjects (outside of current 
publications) to which this Library aims to give unremitting 
attention, viz., material relating to the early history of this 
countr}', particularly the New England States and the City of 
Boston. Besides the various historical documents, broadsides 
and newspapers which have been purchased, there have also 
been added books of note in archa3ology, particularly the litera- 
ture of present day excavations, the issues of Franklin's Press, 
the fine arts, heraldry, and in technical works suited to the 



16 City Document No. 24. 

practical needs of the artisan. The accessions of current 
works in foreign languages have not been as large as usual, 
and the books ordered for branches and deposit have been 
noticeably less than last year. The non-replacement of a 
large number of branch .and deposit books tends to restore 
somewhat the balance which formerly existed in favor of the 
Central Library, but which has been growing steadily in favor 
of the branches for some years. The members of the official 
staff have recommended as heretofore the books relating to 
the subjects with which they are in touch, and Mr. Perry, 
who resigned to go abroad in October, continues to cull from 
the foreign reviews titles of importance for the consideration 
of the Trustees. 

The illustrative titles and lists here given of books bought 
during the year are of necessity selective only, but they show 
the direction in which the literary activity of the Library 
tends, and they account also for a good part of the outlay 
from the book funds. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

To complete as far as possible certain files of early news- 
papers in which the history of colonial and revolutionary 
events is recorded, is one of our reasonable ambitions. The 
work is of necessity slow and piecemeal, yet no opportunity 
is neglected which will add even one number at a time to 
the files of the Boston Post-Boy, The Massachusetts Centi- 
nel or the Pennsylvania Gazette. It is often necessary to 
buy lots in which many duplicates occur in order to secure 
what is needed, but by a system of exchange with other 
libraries these duplicates are disposed of for their equivalent 
in value or in kind. This year there have been bought 1,084 
numbers of these early newspapers at an outlay of $1,343.95, 
and of this number 684 filled existing gaps in our files. 

There Avere also obtained eleven of the Massachusetts 
Credit and Land Bank tracts, issued in 1717-1720, including 
one entitled " The distressed state of the Town of Boston 
considered. 1720." Among the 152 broadsides secured, per- 
haps the most noteworthy was that known as the " Pendleton 
Resolution," passed by the Virginia Convention of May 15, 
1776, and issued from the press of the Virginia Gazette, May 
17, 1776. In it the delegates were instructed to propose a 
Declaration of Independence " to declare the United Colo- 
nies free and independent states, absolved from all allegiance 
or dependence upon the Crown or Parliament of Great 
Britain." 



Library Department. 17 

Another broadside of local interest, received by exchange 
from the Massachusetts Historical Society, was the " Names 
of the streets, lanes and alleys witliin the town of Boston in 
New England. Boston. B. Green. 1708." 

The titles of some of the rarer books purchased, relating 
to the early history of this country, are as follows : 

Castell, AVilliam. A short discoverie of the coasts and continent 
of America, from the equinoctiall northward, and of the 
adjacent isles . . . Prefixed the authors Petition to this 
present Parliament, for the propagation of the Gospel 1 in 
America . . . and a late Ordinance of Parliament for that 
. pm-pose, and for the better government of the English plan- 
tations there . . . Loudon. 1644. 

Chauncy, Charles, D. D. The wonderful narrative: or, a faith- 
ful account of the French prophets, their agitations, extasies, 
and inspirations : . . . Boston, 1742. 

Common Prayer, Book of. Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States. "Proposed Book." The Book of Common 
Prayer, and administration of the Sacraments and other rites 
and ceremonies, as revised and proposed to the use of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, at a convention . . . held 
in Philadelphia from September 27th to October 7th, 1785. 
Philadelphia, 1786. "This book never was accepted by the 
American Church, but was proposed by Bishop White." 

King's Chapel Liturgy. A Liturgy collected principally from the 
Book of Common Prayer, for the use of the First Episcopal 
Church in Boston, together with the Psalter, or Psalms of 
David. Printed by Peter Edes : Boston, 1785. 

Condolence : an elegiac epistle from Lieut. General B-rg-yne, 
captured at Saratoga, Oct. 17th, 1777, to Lieut. Gen. Earl 
C-rnw-11-s, captured at York Town, Oct. 17th, 1781. (By - 
Dorset.) London. 1782. 

Eliot, John, Apostle to the Indians. A further accompt of 
the progresse of the Gospel amongst the Indians in New 
England, and of the means used eft'ectually to advance the 
same. Set forth in certaine letters sent from thence declaring 
a purpose of printing the Scriptures in the Indian tongue into 
which they are already translated . . . London, 1659. 
This tract forms No. 9 of the series issued by the Corporation 
of New England, and completes the Library set. 

Expedition, The, of Major General Braddock to Virginia ; with 
the two regiments of Hacket and Dunbar. Being extracts of 
letters from an officer in one of tliose regiments to his friend 
in London, describing the march and engagement in the woods. 
London. MDCCLV. 

Keith, George. The Christian Quaker; or, George Keith's eyes 
opened. Good news from Pensilvauia [sic]. Containing a 
testimony against that false and ahsurd opinion which some 



18 City Document No. 24. 

hold . . . Printed in Pensilvania [sic], and reprinted in 

London for Elias Keach . . . and John Harris 

1693. 

Mather, Cotton. The good old way. Or, Christianity described, 
from the glorious lustre of it, appearing in the lives of the 
primitive Christians . . . Boston: 1706. 

Pierson, Abraham. Some helps for the Indians. Shewing them 
how to improve their natural reason, to know the true God, 
and the true Christian religion . . . Undertaken at the 
motion, and published by the order of the Commissioners of 
the United Colonies. A catechism in the language of the 
Quiripi Indians. It ends abruptly : "The reason why there 
is so short an imperfect siDecimen given of it is because the 
ships came away from N. E. before any more of the copy 
was wrought off from the presse." 

Wheelwright, John. Mercurius Americanus, Mr. AVelds his 
antitype, or, Massachusetts great apologie examined, being 
observations upon a paper styled, A short story of the rise, 
reign, and ruine of the Familists, Libertines, &c. which infected 
the churches of New-England, &c. Wherein some parties 
therein concerned are vindicated, and the truth generally 
cleared. London, 1645. 

Workman, Giles. Private-men no pulpit-men ; or, a modest 

examination of lay-mens preaching. Discovering it to be 

neither warranted by the Word of God, nor allowed by the 

. Churches of Christ in New-England, [n answer to a 

writing published by John Knowls. London. 1646. 



FRANKLIN IMPRINTS. 

Twenty volumes printed by Benjamin Franklin were 
acquired, including the " Laws of the Library Company of 
Philadelphia, Phil., 1746." In this connection was also 
secured a collection of pamphlets on electricity (40 in all) 
belonging originally to Franklin, and a little book entitled 
" Of education. Especially of young gentlemen. Oxford. 
1677.", bearing the initials B. F. in autograph on the title 
page. 

ARCHAEOLOGY AND EXPLORATION. 

Amelio, Pasquale d', editor. Nvovi scavi di Pompei. Casa dei 
Vettii. Appendice a dipinti mvrali. NapoH. [1904.] 

Bruennow, Rudolf Ernst, and Alfred von Domaszewski. Die 
Provincia Arabia, auf Grund zweier in den Jahren 1897 und 
1898 unternommenen Reiseu und der Berichte friiberer Reisen- 
der beschrieben. Band 1, 2. Strassburg. 1904, 05. 

Bulitchov, N. Fouilles- de la Russie centrale. Kourgans et 
Gorodietz. Reeherches archeologiques sur la ligne de partage 
des eaux de la Volga et du Dnieper. Moscow. 1900. 



Library Department. 19 

ficole Fran^aise d'Extreme-Orient. Fouilles de Delphes. 

1904-05. 
Egypt. Service des antiquites. Annales. LeCaire. 1900-04. 

5 V. 
Gsell, Stephane. Les monuments antiques de I'Algerie. Paris. 

1901. 2 V. 
Hartman, C. V. Archaeological researches in Costa Rica. 

Stoclvhohn. 1901. 
Murray, Margaret A. The Osireion at Abydos. London. 

1904. 
Popofsky, A. Die Acanthariader Plankton-Expedition. Teil 1 : 

Acanthometra. Kiel. 1904. 
Uhle, Max. Pachacamac. Report of the William Pepper, M.D., 

LL.D., Peruvian Expedition of 1896. Translated by C. 

Grosse. [Philadelphia. 1903.] 
Wiegand, Theodor & Schrader, Hans. Priene. Ergebnisse der 

Ausgrabungen und Untersuchungen in den Jahren 1895-98. 

Berlin. 1904. 

FINE ARTS. 

Adler, Friedrich. Mittelalterliche Backstein-Bauwerke des 

preussischen Staates gesammelt und herausgegeben. Berlin. 

1862, 1898. 2 v. 
Arundel Club. Publications. (In progress.) 
Aubert, Joseph Felix. Entwiirfe fiir Spitzen & Stickereien. 

Stuttgart. [190-?] 
Berguer, Heinrich. Handbuch der kirchlichen Kunstaltertiimer 

in Deutschland. Lief. 1, 2. Leipzig. 1905. 
Burger, Fritz. Geschichte des tlorentinischen Grabmals von den 

iiltesten Zeiten bis Michelangelo. Strassburg. 1904. 
Calvert, Albert Frederic. The Alhambra. London. Philip. 

1904. Autograph facsimile. 
Dobson, Henry Austin. AVilliam Hogarth. With an introduc- 
tion on Hogarth's workmanship by Sir Walter Armstrong. 

London. 1902. 
Duerer, Albrecht. Das Skizzenbuch ... in der Konigl. offentl. 

Bibliothek zu Dresden, herausgegeben von Robert Bruck. 

Strassburg. 1905. 
Eeghen, P. van, and Johan Philippe van der Kellen. Het werk 

van Jan en Caspar Luyken. Amsterdam. 1905. 2 v. 
Fenaille, Maurice. L' oeuvre grav6 de P. L. Debucourt [1755- 

1832]. Accompagn^ d'une preface et de notes de Maurice 

Vaucaire . . . Paris. 1899. 
Frankau, Julia. Eighteenth century colour prints: an essay on 

certain stipple engravers and their work in colour. London. 

1900. 
Gower, Lord Ronald Charles Sutherland Leveson. Sir Thomas 

Lawrence. With a catalogue of the artist's exhibited and 

engraved works compiled by Algernon Graves. London. 1900. 
Hirth, Herbert, and Ernst Bassermann- Jordan. Der schone 

Mensch in der Kunst der Neuzeit. Miinchen. 1902. 



20 City Document No. 24. 

Hrdlicka, J. Entwiirfe fiir moderne Spitzen, Stuttgart. [1902.] 

Jacobsen, E. & Ferri, N. Neiientdeckte Michel Angelo Zeich- 
nuugen in den Ufflzien zu Florenz. 1903. 

Joseph, David, Architektonische Meisterwerke alter iind neuer 
Zeit in Deutschland, Eelgien, Holland nnd der Schweiz. 
Berlin. [1896.] 

Josz, Virgile. Antoine Watteau. Sa vie — son oeuvre — son 
6poque. Paris. 1904-05. 

Mucha, Alphouse M. Figures decoratives. Paris. [1905.] 

Nikolai Mikhailovitch, Grand-Duke . . . Portraits russes du 
XVIIIe et XIXe si^cles. Tome 1, fascicule 1, 2. St. P^ters- 
bourg. 1905, (In progress.) 

Original drawings of the Dutch and Flemish schools in the Print- 
room of the State-Museum at Amsterdam, Pis. 1-5, The 
Hague, Nijhoff, [1905,] To be complete in ten parts. 

Phillipps, Evelyn March, The gardens of Italy, By Charles 
Latham. With descriptions by E, March Phillipps, [Lon- 
don,] 1905. 2 V. 

Poete, Cesar Marcel. Les primitifs Parisiens. fitude sur la 
peinture et la miniature a Paris, du XlVe siecle k la Renais- 
sance. Paris. 1904. Facsimiles. 

Ross, Janet Ann. Florentine villas. With reproductions , . . 
from Zocchi's etchings and many line drawings of the villas by 
Nelly Erichsen. London. 1901. 

Statz, V. und Ungewitter, G. Gotisches Musterbuch, Leipzig, 
1905. 

Tajima, Shiichi. Masterpieces selected from the K6rin school : 
with biographical sketches of the artists of the school and some 
critical descriptions. Vol. 1. Tokyo. 1903. Plates, 

Vachon, Marius, L'Hotel de ville de Paris, 1535-1905, Paris. 
1905. 

Vasari Societ3\ Publications. (In progress.) 

Walters, Henry Beauchamp. History of ancient pottery, Greek, 
Etruscan and Roman. Based on the work of Samuel Birch. 
London. Murray, 1905, 2 v, 

Wetzel, Heinrich, and others, editors. Die Decorations-Malerei 
der Gegenwart, Entwiirfe fiir Decken-und Wandmalereien. 
Berlin. [190-?] 

Wharton, Edith. Italian villas and their gardens. Illustrated. 
... by Maxfield Parrish. New York. 1904. 

Williamson, George Charles. The history of portrait miniatures, 
London. 1904. 2 v. Facsimiles, 

PHOTOGRAPHS, 

Five hundred and thirty-seven photographs have been 
bought. They include 107 portraits of soldiers, statesmen 
and writers of the Civil War period, 100 photographs of 
New England historic buildings and colonial and provincial 
houses, 100 platinum prints of places of interest in New 



Library Departmext. 21 

Mexico and the Western United States; also 53 photographs 
of the works of Daniel C. French ; 54 of the buildings at the 
St. Louis Exposition and 14 of the Germanic Museum at 
Harvard College. In this connection there was also bought 
a water color view of Boston, made about 1800. 

Among the miscellaneous purchases may be noted the 
following titles : 

Ackermann, R. The microcosm of London : or, London in min- 
iature. 3 v., roy. 4°. 100 colored plates of the interiors of 
the public buildings, by Pugin and Rowlaudson. [1808-11.] 

Amadis de Gaula. Le premier [qvatriti'me] livre d'Amadis de 
Gavle mis en franyois par le Signeur [sic] des Essars Nicolas 
de Herberay. Anvers. Christophe Plantin. MDLXI. 4 v. 

Bible. Biblia : das ist : die gantze heilige Schrifft : Deudsch. 
Auffs new zugericht. Doct. Martin Luther. Wittemberg, 
M.D.LI. 2 vols, in 1. 

Boccaccio, Giovanni. Life of Dante. Translated by Philip 
Henry Wicksteed. [Cambridge.] 1904. 

Bridges, Noah. Vulgar arithmetique, explayning the secrets of 
that art, after a more exact and easie way than ever . . . 
[London, 1653.] P'or Bowditch Collection. 

Brossard, Charles. Geographic pittoresque et monumentale de 
la France. Paris. 1900-03. 

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The works of Geoffrey Chaucer and others. 
Being a reproduction in facsimile of the first collected edition, 
1532, from the copy in the British Museum. London. [1905.] 

De Walden Library. Vol. 1. Some Feudal Lords and their 
seals MCCCI. Vol. 2. Banners, standards and badges from 
a Tudor MS. in the College of Arms. Vol. 3. A Tudor 
Book of Arms tricked by Robert Cooke : being Harleian MS. 
Nos. 2169 & 6163 blasoned by Joseph Foster. 

Diccionario P^uciclopedico de la lengua espanola. Madrid. 1878. 
2 V. 

Gass, Patrick. A journal of the voyages and travels of a corps 
of discovery under the command of Capt. Lewis and Capt. 
Clarke from the mouth of the Missouri through the interior 
parts of North America to the Pacific Ocean. During 1804, 
1805 and 1806. Pittsburg. Zadok. 1807. 

[The gospels of the fower Euangelistes translated in the olde 
Saxons tyme out of Latin into the vulgare toung of the 
Saxons.] London. 1571. 

Great Britain. Army Lists. 15 volumes, between 1761 and 
1814. 

Grolier Club. Publications. Nine volumes. 

Lean, Vincent Stuckey. Lean's Collectanea. Collections of 
proverbs (English & foreign), folk lore, and superstitions, also 
compilations towards dictionaries of proverbial phrases and 
words, old and disused. Bristol. 1902-1904. 4 volumes in 
5. Fac-simile. 



22 City Document No. 24. 

Livermore, George. Origin, history and character of the New 
England primer ; being a series of articles contributed to the 
Cambridge Chronicle. B}' "The Antiquary." Cambridge, 
1849. 

Medina, Jos6 Toribio. La imprenta en Lima (1584-1824). 
Santiago de Chile, 1904. 2 volumes. Facsimiles. 
Notas bibliograficas referentes a las primeras producciones 
de la imprenta en algunas ciudades de la America espaiiola 
.... (1754-1823.) Santiago de Chile, 1904. 

Mena, Juan de. Coronacion de Juan de Mena al Marques. 
[Zaragoza. 1499?] Black-letter. For the Ticknor Col- 
lection. 

Sandys, George. A paraphrase upon the Divine poems. 
London. CIO.IOC.XXXYI. Music. L. 8.° 

Sharpe, Richard Bowdler, and Claude Wilmot Wyatt. A mono- 
graph of the Hirundinidse, or family of swallows. London. 
1885-1894. 2 vols. 

Testamenta Lambethana being a compleat list of all the wills and 
testaments recorded in the archiepiscopal registers at Lambeth 
from A.D. 1312, to A.D. 1636, extracted by Dr. Ducarel, 
F. R. & A. S. Lambeth Librarian, etc., with a compleat 
index, A.D. 1779. Folio. 

Thorpe, John. Custumale Roffense, from the original manu- 
scripts in the archives of the Dean and Chapter of Rochester ; 
to which are added Memorials of that Cathedral Church ; and 
some account of the remains of churches, chapels, chartries, 
etc. Folio, with portrait and 56 plates of architectural re- 
mains and monuments. 1788. 

Travis, Daniel. An almanack of celestial motions and aspects 
for the year of Christian Era 1710. Boston. 1710. 

University of Cambridge. Facsimiles of rare fifteenth century 
printed books. 

Among the more popular books of reference added to the 
Bates Hall collection are Bartholomew's Survey Atlas of 
England and Wales, 1903; the Cyclopedia of Modern Shop 
Practice, 1904, in 4 volumes : the Cyclopedia of Engineering, 
1904, in 4 volumes; Davies' Art of Heraldr}^, 1904; Great 
Events by Famous Historians, in 20 volumes ; A History of 
All Nations, in 24 volumes ; Burton Holmes' Lectures, in 
10 volumes ; International Library of Technology, volumes 
46-62, and Irish Literature, edited by Justin McCarthy, in 
10 volumes. 

CODMAN SQUARE READING ROOM. 

A collection of 1,400 volumes comprising 1,250 titles (of 
which 507 are fiction) was bought for the Codman Square 
Reading Room. Subsequent additions brought the whole num- 
ber of books purchased for this station up to 1,706 volumes. 



LiBKAKY Department. 23 



AUCTION SALES. 

The records kept of auctions during the year show that 
bids Avere sent to 54 sales (32 in New York, 17 in Boston, 
5 in Philadelphia) ; that 956 books were bid for, and 666, or 
69 per cent, secured. 

GIFTS FOE 1905-06. 

The number of givers was 3,570. The gifts comprise 
12,812 volumes, 13,690 serials, 83 newspaper subscrip- 
tions, 663 photographs, 809 maps, 4 etchings, 2 engrav- 
ings, 2 medals, 2,733 cards, 2,174 manuscripts, 600 
prints, 43 lantern slide plates. From the gifts the follow- 
ing are selected as worthy of mention, and are noted alpha- 
betically by givers : 

Ames, Winthrop. (1) Engraving from original pahiting — 
" FrankUn at the Court of France, 1778. Receiving the 
homage of his genius and the recognition of his country's 
advent among the nations." (2) Engraving from the origi- 
nal picture — " FrankUn before the Lords in Council, White- 
hall Chapel, London, 1774. " 

Anonymous. 21 photographs and 4 etchings. 

Appleton, William S. Catalogue of Greek coins in the Hunter- 
ian Collection, University of Glasgow. V. 2. By George 
McDonald. 

Arnold, Howard Pay sou. Autograph letter signed by Oscar 
Wilde. Discourses concerning Government by Algernon 
Sydney. Published from an original manuscript of the author, 
1698. 

Atkinson, Charles F. 280 volumes of miscellaneous works. 

Benton, Josiah H., Jr. 63 volumes, 1 manuscript, 1 photo- 
graph. The manuscript given by Mr. Benton was the original 
manuscript of the Census of Massachusetts Bay, 1765. 
("The lost census.") Accompanying the manuscript was a 
volume entitled "Early census making in Massachusetts, 
1643-1765." By J. H. Benton, Jr. With a reproduction 
of the lost census of 1765 (recently found) and documents 
relating thereto. Boston, 1905. Facsimiles. 

Biblioteca Nacional, Chile. 30 public documents of the Repub- 
lic of Chile. 

Bishop, Heber R., Estate of. A. T. Paterson, Executor. The 
Bishop Collection — Investigations and Studies in Jade. V. 1 
& 2. (Made from the Collection in the Metropolitan jNIuseum 
of Art ....). 

Bixby, William K. Letters from George Washington to Tobias 
Lear, with an appendix. Printed for private distribution. 
No. 201. 



24 City Document No. 24. 

Borglum, Gntzon. 13 photographs from the works of Gutzon 
Borghim. 

Boston Browning Society. 6 vohimes for the Browning Collec- 
tion, inchiding the original proof sheets of Browning's " Sor- 
dello." This copy contains numerous corrections and altera- 
tions by Robert Browning and a number of the signatures are 
signed at the foot with his initials, " R. B." 

Boston News Bureau, Publishers of. " Boston News Bureau," 
Vols. 34-36. 

Boston Society of Natural History. 307 volumes. A miscella- 
neous collection, containing many foreign theses. 

Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, Estate of, through Mr. Alfred Bowditch. 
Comprising three gifts. 232 volumes, 93 serials, 8 photographs, 
78 letters relating to the Bowditch Library, 87 copies of the 
Bowditch and Ingersoll Ancestry, 228 copies of The Bronze 
Statue. 

Brewster, Frank, acting for the beneficiaries under the will of 
Arthur Croft, Esq., late of Wadhurst, England. A volume 
containing 177 manuscripts, chiefly autograph letters. (See 
report of Manuscript Department.) 

British Museum. 10 volumes, including Franks bequest. Cata- 
logue of British and American book plates bequeathed to 
the . . . British Museum by Sir Augustus Wollaston Franks. 
By E.R. .J. Gambler Howe. V. 1-3. London. 1903-04. 

Brown, Allen A. 296 volumes of music. 

Brown, Dr. Francis H. 47 volumes. 

Browne, Miss Nina E. 115 pamphlets and a miscellaneous col- 
lection of cards and programmes. 

Bureau of University Travel. The University Prints (500). 
Accompanying Von Mach's "Greek and Roman sculpture." 

Caryl, Miss Harriet E. Notes on M^canique cdeste. By Dr. 
Lucian W. Caryl. (Original manuscript.) 

Castilian Club of Boston. Original papers of the Castilian Club 
of Boston, Mass. V. 28, 29 and 30. 

Chadwiek, Dr. .James R. 2 volumes and 72 manuscript letters. 

Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., Estate of, through JMiss Mary Cheney. 
652 volumes, 403 serials, 31 photographs for the Graupner 
Collection, 127 manuscript letters. Two gifts. 

Chivers, Cedric. (1) Bookbindings at the St. Louis Exhibi- 
tion, 1904. (2) Books in beautiful bindings. By Cedric 
Chivers. 

Cormack, Irwin C. Price's View of Boston, 1722. Enlarged 
photograph. 

Crane, Mrs. J. 41 vohmies (bound) of music, 383 pieces of 
sheet music, and 48 opera librettos. 

Ditson, Oliver, Co. 63 volumes of music. 

Everett, William. 107 volumes of miscellaneous works. 

Fay, Eugene F. 80 pamphlets, chiefly reports of the U. S. 
Sanitary Commission, manuscript letters, theatre programmes^ 
maps and charts and a number of newspaper clippings. 

Fernow, B. 18 volumes, including two books on heraldry. 



LiBKAEY Department. 25 

Folsom, Estate of Charles F., of Cambridge, through Mrs. 
Elizabeth C. Folsom. 1,067 autograph letters, 803 volumes, 
56 broadsides, 11 maps and 16 volumes in manuscript. (This 
gift was more fully described in the report of the Manuscript 
Department for 1904. The actual transferral was not made 
until 1905.) 

France. Minist^re de I'instruction publique, Paris. 9 public 
documents. 

Franklin Bi-Centennial Committee, through Mr. Edward S. Sears. 
(1) Extracts from the Autobiography and other writings of 
Benjamin Franklin, suggested for use in the public scnoois 
of the City of Boston. 49 copies. (2) Programme of order 
of exercises of the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of 
Benjamin Franklin. 13 copies. 

French, Daniel Chester. 6 photographs from sculpture by 
Daniel Chester French. 

French, Wilfred A. 117 volumes, 518 serials relating to pho- 
tography. 

Garrison, Wendell P. Artotype print of a hfe mask of William 
Lloyd Garrison. 

Germany. Patent Office. 4,819 numbers of the Patentschriften. 

Great Britain. Patent Office. 125 volumes, pubhcations of the 
Patent Office. 

Green, Dr. Samuel A. 28 volumes ; including Works of Benjamin 
Franklin, by Jared Sparks, 10 volumes. From the Amos 
Lawrence Library (for the Franklin Collection). Broadside 
relating to the trial of William Penn and William Mead, in 
1670. 

Greene, Henry Copley. 10 volumes of French literature and 
" Mercure de France " for 1904. 

Grolier Club. Catalogue of about 130 selected French almanacs 
from a complete collection illustrative of French binding dur- 
ing this period . . . 1694-1883. Exhibited by the Grolier 
Club. Catalogue of an exhibition commemorating the two 
hundredth anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Franklin. 

Grover, Rev. Richard B. Jaffrey, N. H. Births and marriages, 
with a partial census from the burial-ground at Jaffrey Centre. 
Manuscript copy made by Rev. Richard B. Grover. 

Hale, Philip. 274 pieces of music for the Allen A. Brown 
Library. 

Halsey, R. T. H. The Boston Port Bill as pictured by a con- 
temporary London cartoonist. By R. T. H. Halsey, N.Y. 
The Grolier Club. Bound in full levant. 

Hemenway, Augustus. A translation of thirty-two Latin poems 
in honor of Francis Bacon, published by Rawley in 1626. 

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth. 64 volumes for the Galatea 
Collection. 

Holden, Luther L. 50 bound volumes of periodicals, 1 map, 
including The Shoe and Leather Reporter, 1867-69, Daily 
Graphic, Folio, Scientific American, and Morning Star and 
Red Man. 



26 City Document No. 24. 

Holden, Mrs. Luther L. 7 volumes of miscellaneous works, 36 
periodicals, 15 newspapers (old), 4,692 theatre and concert 
programmes. 

Hooper, Mrs. S. T., through Mr. Horace P. Chandler. 39 
volumes, 482 manuscript letters, 42 programmes and circu- 
lars of the Women's Centennial Committee of Massachusetts 
and the Soldiers' Home Bazaar, 1881. Clippings relating to 
the Boston Cooking School. 

Hunterian Coin Catalogue Fund, Trustees of the. Catalogue of 
Greek coins in the Hunterian Collection, University of Glas- 
gow, V. 3. By George McDonald. 

Huntington, Archer M. Collection of Spanish documents- 
manuscripts in the British Museum published in facsimile. 
By Archer M. Huntington. 

Hutton, Mrs. Laurence. Laurence and Eleanor Huttou : Their 
Books of Association. No. 30 of an edition of 152 copies, 
privately printed. 

Indiana, State Library. Documents of the State of Indiana. 
63 volumes. 

Italy. Ministero della pubblica istruzione, Rome. Le opere di 
Gahleo Galilei, V. 16. 

Jeffries, Dr. B. Joy. 103 volumes, 198 numbers, including a file 
of Science, 1901-04, and a number of medical pamphlets. 

Joy, Mrs. Charles H. 14 volumes, chiefly travellers' guide- 
books. 

Jusserand, Jean J., French P^mbassy, Washington, D. C. 
Histoire litter aire du peuple anglais. Par J. J. Jusserand. 
Large paper copy, with the author's autograph. 

Keene, N. H., City Clerk. 20 volumes of Vital statistics of 
Keene, N.H., 1888-1904. 

Kellen, William V. Photographs of early types designed to 
supplement published examples, with reference to the British 
Museum Index, Part 5. Containing 100 plates. Woolley photo- 
graphs, 1899-1901. Photographs of fifteenth-century types. 

Kidder, Nathaniel T. 19 volumes ; including the botanical works 
of Wilham Griffith, 9 volumes. Almanach de Gotha, 7 vol- 
umes. New Orleans Weekly Picayune, V. 5. The Democratic 
Press, 1813. 

Liceaga, Dr. Eduardo. 50 documents and pamphlets relative to 
sanitary affairs in Mexico. 

London. Town Clerk. Calendar of letter-books. Letter-book 
G. Circa A.D. 1352-1374. 

Lowell, Mrs. Lucy B., Estate of, through Miss Lucy Lowell. 
297 volumes. French, German and classical literature. 
Three gifts. 

MacEwen, Walter. 9 photographs from paintings by Walter 
MacEwen. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 69 volumes, miscella- 
neous collection. 

Millet, F. D. 19 photographs from paintings by F. D. Millet. 



Library Department. 27 

Minus, Thomas. 28 packages of pamphlets and newspapers, 

comprising college and educational, railroad and other business 

reports. 
Morton, Dr. William J. Portrait of Dr. AVilliam T. G. Morton, 

discoverer of surgical anivsthesia. Honorary degree in medi- 
cine granted Dr. W. T. G. Morton by Washington University. 

Photograph of the tuition tickets of W. T. G. Morton, in the 

Harvard Medical School. The use of ether as an anissthetic 

at the Battle of the Wilderness, by Dr. W. T. G. Morton. 

Four great Anglo-American medical discoveries, by Dr. 

William E. Stokes. Memoranda relating to the discovery of 

surgical anaesthesia, by W. T. G. Morton. 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 20 photographs. 
New Jersey. Adjutant-General's Office. 43 pamphlets relating 

to military affairs of the State of New Jersey. 
Old South Meeting House, Directors of. Engraved portrait of 

Washington. By J. A. J. Wilcox. 
Peabody, John E. 13 volumes of French literature. 
Perry, T. S. 8 photographs from paintings by Lilla Cabot 

Perry. 
Ross, Mrs. Ellen H. 22 volumes of miscellaneous works, 305 

Nos. of periodicals. 
Small, Mrs. Herbert. Whitman's Ideal democracy and other 

writings. By Helena Born. Also, clippings and other printed 

matter relating to Walt Whitman. 
Smiley, Charles W. 7 volumes, including (1) S aty r arum- Lib ri 

quinque Priores 1555, a Thoma Naogeorgo. (2) Pindari 

Olympia, Pythia, Nemea, Isthmia. Adiuncta est interpre- 

tatio Latina ad verbum. [Geneva.] Oliva Pavli Stephani. 

M.D.XCIX. 
Smith, Anne EHzabeth, Estate of, through Mrs. William C. Ap- 

pleton. 276 volumes, 39 maps, 25 newspapers, 5 broadsides, 

1 chart. Two gifts. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C. 92 volumes, 123 numbers. 
Stallbohm, Miss Caroline. 181 volumes, 51 numbers, chiefly 

New Zealand government documents. 
Tuckerman, Miss Luc}' D. 119 volumes, relating to drawing 

and painting. 
University of Chicago. Library. 48 dissertations submitted for 

the degree of Doctor of Philosoph3\ 
Upham, William P. (1) Two Dutch letters from Emden in 

Hanover, 1659 and 1661, to Evert Jansen Wendell. (2) 

House of John Proctor, witchcraft martyr, 1692. By William 

P. Upham. 
Vinton, Frederic P. 15 photographs from portraits painted by 

Frederic P. Vinton. 
Wakeman, Stephen H. Twenty days with .Julian and Little 

Bunny — A diary b}' .Julian Hawthorne. (One of 30 copies 

printed from the original manuscript.) 
Whiting, Lilian. The Florence of Landor, by Lilian Whiting. 
Whorf, Edward H. (1) Appeal to the citizens of Boston, to be 



28 



City Document No. 24. 



read before voting. (1838.) (2) Massachusetts and bow sbe 

is governed. Address by Gov. Alexander H. Rice. (3) The 

great Anarchist trial. The Haymarket speech. Tales of the 

day. Vols. 1 and 2. 
Williams, Mrs. Francis H. 29 volumes, including History of 

England by Hume and Smollett, 13 volumes. Rollin's Ancient 

history, 2 volumes. 
Woman's Education Association. 392 mounted photographs. 
Xavier Free Publication Society for the Blind. Fabiola, V. I. 

By Cardinal Newman, in raised type. (2 copies.) 

The Catalogue Department. 

From a report prepared by the Chief of the Catalogue and 
Shelf Departments are compiled the following statistics and 
statements : 



Catalogued (new) : 

Bates Hall (Central Library) Cata 
logue 

Serials 

Branches 

Re-catalogued 



Vols, and 
parts. 



20,174 

4,678 

11,008 

19,121 



Titles. 



15,716 



10,030 
9,610 



1904-05. 



Vols, and 
parts. 



21,619 

4,614 

12,773 

16,306 



Titles. 



15,488 



11,418 
10,457 



54,981 



35,356 



55,312 



37,363 



CATALOGUE CARDS FINISHED AND FILED. 

The number of cards added to the Central Library cata- 
logues by the Catalogue Department during the year was 
220,286, as against 244,708 added in the year preceding. 
The reduction was due to the reprinting during the preceding 
year of a considerable number directly from the fiction cata- 
logue without re-cataloguing. Besides the total given, 
17,539 cards were prepared and sent to the branches and 
4,307 filed in the Co-operative periodical index, making a 
total output of 242,132 cards for the year. Of the cards 
filed at the Central Library, 83,969 were added to the Bates 
Hall cases, the same number to the official (departmental) 
catalogue, and 52,348 were added to catalogues of the Special 
Libraries. As in previous years, one card for each title 
printed has been sent to the Library of Congress on exchange 
account. 



Library Department. 29 



GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL WORK. 

Besides the current work of cataloguing, much general 
work is performed by the Catalogue Department. During 
the year, the final preparation for printing of the catalogue 
of the Allen A. Brown Collection of Music has been com- 
pleted. The copy for the new German fiction list was trans- 
mitted to the Library editor, and has since been printed. 
The addition of 312 new drawers in the Bates Hall catalogue 
cases has required the re-arrangement and re-labelling of 
about one-half of the public catalogue. The growth of this 
catalogue will require additional drawers for enlargement 
during the coming year. 

Much time has been given to a thorough revision of the 
scheme for classifying bibles and biblical literature. Many 
of the titles under these heads have been re-written and re- 
arranged in accordance with this scheme. A new scheme 
for cataloguing laws and legislative documents has been pre- 
pared, and the entries under twenty-three States and for the 
District of Columbia have been corrected or re-catalogued 
with great improvement to these divisions of the catalogue. 
A beginning has been made in re-cataloguing and re-an-anging 
the collection of Massachusetts laws. 

SHELF DIVISION. 

The usual statistics of the Shelf Department have been 
prepared by Mr. William G. T. Roffe, officer in charge, and 
may be found in Appendix IV. 

The additions to the shelf list for the year. Central Library 
collection, aggregated 14,583 volumes, the principal classes 
being: Bibliography, 396; History, Biograph}^ and Geog- 
raphy, general, 460 ; American, 2,145 ; English, 1,145 ; 
French, 477; German, 467; Oriental, 441; Theology, 
Ecclesiastical History, etc., 896 ; Social Science, Metaphysics, 
etc., 1,001 ; Natural History and Science, 468 ; Mathematics 
and Physical Science, 474 ; Useful and Industrial Arts, 351 ; 
Mechanic Arts, 365 ; Music, 366 ; Painting, Architecture, 
etc., 652. 

The additions to the special collections included the 
following : Statistical Department, 1,097 ; Bowclitch Library, 
99; Parker, 12; Prince, 1; Ticknor, 35; Barton, 19 
Franklin, 68; Lewis, 1; Military, 110; Brown, 463 
Galatea, 92; Codman, 12; Artz, 193; Browning, 12 
Harris, 31 ; Newspaper Room, 64 ; Patent Room, 392 ; total, 
2,701. A small part of the gain to the Statistical Depart- 



30 City Document No. 24. 

ment and to the A.rtz, Military and Galatea collections was 
due to transfers. 

The total number of volumes in the Central Library, 
January 31, 1906, was 687,456, including 2,761 in the 
Duplicate Room so-called (set aside for exchange). 

Publications. 

The publications of the Library issued during the year, 
under the editorship of Mr. Lindsay Swift, include the 
Monthly Bulletins, issued on the first day of each month 
(aggregate pages, 444 ; regular edition, 5,000 ; free). A 
list of works of fiction in the German language, together 
with translations from the German, contained in the Library, 
issued in October (pages, 171 ; edition, 3,000 ; price 10 
cents) ; and the annual list of new books added during the 
year, issued January 1, 1906 (pages, 312; edition, 3,000; 
price 5 cents). The copy for the foregoing was entirely pre- 
pared in the Library, that for the German list devolving 
upon the editor. In November, a bibliography entitled 
" Contributions toward a Bibliography of the Higher Educa- 
tion of Women" was issued (pages, 63; edition, 1,500; 
price 10 cents). This was supplementary to a similar publi- 
cation issued in 1897, and like that was compiled by a 
Committee of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae ; and 
to such of the titles included within it as were to be found 
in our collections our Library shelf-numbers were added. 

With respect to this publication, as well as to certain 
reference lists issued during the year, in connection with the 
Monthly Bulletin, including one on the History of Philos- 
ophy, prepared by Dr. Benjamin Rand, the Library assumed 
only the printing, neither supervising the preparation of the 
lists nor holding itself responsible for the completeness, cor- 
rectness, form or arrangement of the titles. In the lists of 
this class are included those issued in the Bulletin in con- 
nection with the lectures before the Lowell Institute, in 
each case prepared by the lecturer himself. These are : 

English Literature in the last half of the Nineteenth Century, 

by Thomas Wentworth Higglnson, LL. D. (March, 1905.) 
The Development of Religiou in Japan, by George William 

Knox, D.D., LL. D., of the Union Theological Seminary, New 

York City. (November, 1905.) 
The Development of Shakespeare as a Dramatist, by Professor 

George Pierce Baker of Harvard University. (January, 

1906.) 
The Literary Power of the English Bible, by Professor John Hays 

Gardiner of Harvard University. (February, 1906.) 



Library Department. 31 

In January, 1906, there was issued a brief list of books 
on the history and art of printing (pages, 42 ; with plates ; 
edition, 650 ; price 15 cents) ; prepared by Mr. Otto Fleisch- 
ner in co-operation with the libraries of Harvard University 
and the Boston Atheneeum, and published in connection with 
the commemoration of the bi-centenary of the birth of Franklin, 
and with an exhibition of printing held during the month by 
the Society of Printers in the Exhibition Room of the Library. 

The Bulletin for December, 1905, contained a brief refer- 
ence list on The Hague Conference and International Arbi- 
tration, including periodical references to the Treaty of 
Portsmouth. 

In all, the total number of pages passing under the edi- 
torial supervision of Mr. Swift and contained in the Library 
publications of the year was 1,047. 

The Bindery. 

During the year 35,720 books were bound in the Bindery 
Department ; 2,198 volumes repaired ; 632 volumes guarded ; 
1,685 maps mounted on cloth ; 8,848 photographs and engrav- 
ings mounted ; and 294 magazines stitched. The bindery 
has also performed the miscellaneous job work required, 
portfolios, blocks, covers, etc., the value of which has approx- 
imated nearly 15 per cent of the entire expense of the 
department. The number of Library publications folded, 
stitched and trimmed was 75,482. 

The Printing Department. 

The usual statistical statement, prepared by Mr. Francis 
Watts Lee, Chief of the Printing Department, follows. This 
shows the work performed in 1905-06, as compared with 
1904-05: 

Requisitions on hand February 1 
Requisitions received during year 
Requisitions withdrawn . 
Requisitions on hand January 31 
Requisitions filled during the year . 
Card Catalogue (Central) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) 

Cards finished (excl. " extras ") . 

Titles in type, but not printed 

Headings for Guide Card sets (about) 

Guide Cards printed 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) 

Cards (approximately) 



1904-05. 


1905-06 


4 


11 


206 


213 


5 


3 


11 


9 


194 


212 


41,121 


34,184 


. 264,708 


220,286 


2,300 


1,800 


1,500 




12,000 


26,000 


560 


288 


28,000 


14,400 



32 City Document No. 24. 





1904-05. 


1905-06. 


Call Slips .... 


. 1,810,000 


2,376,500 


Stationery and Blank Forms . 


. 706,541 


537,954 


Signs ..... 


1,301 


645 


Blank Books .... 


6 


9 



The publications of the year, referred to in the report of 
the editor of Library Publications, have also been put in type 
in the Printing Department. 

Distribution of Documents and Supplies. 

Mr. George V. Mooney, in charge of the Stock Depart- 
ment, reports as follows : 

Number of Library publications distributed during the 
year, 76,342; number of blank forms distributed, 2,247,017, 
including 1,748,400 call slips. 

Registration. 

The usual statistical tables relating to registration, pre- 
pared by Mr. John J. Keenan, Chief of the Registration 
Department, appear in Appendix VI. 

Summarizing the facts in brief, it appears that there were 
76,661 active cards in the hands of borrowers at the end of 
the year, as against 73,211 outstanding February 1, 1905, an 
increase of 3,450. 

The requirements of 89,520 patrons were attended to in 
the department, as compared with 86,356 during the preced- 
ing year. 

The number of cards issued in place of others which were 
lost, soiled, or filled, was 40,919, an increase of 2,770 as 
compared with the preceding year. 

There were, at the close of the year, 62 educational insti- 
tutions wliich had filed bonds of indemnity against the loss 
of books borrowed by their non-resident pupils, and these were 
represented by 2,961 registered card holders, as against 2,689 
at the close of the preceding year. 

The Issue Department of the Central Library. 

The statistics of circulation derived from the records of 
this department and submitted in the report prepared by 
Mr. Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief, together with other items 
summarizing the work of the j'ear, are condensed in the 
following statements : 



Library Department. 



33 



CIRCULATION. 



Issue for 

Home Use, 

Central. 



Dail.v Issue 

Through Branch 

Department. 



Total for 
Home Use. 



February, 1905. 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

January, 1906. 



31,224 
34,223 
28,952 
24,445 
19,392 
17,342 
17,279 
18,797 
25,006 
26,045 
25,310 
29,979 



10,197 
10,502 
8,0-15 
7,567 
6,385 
4,863 
4,797 
4,928 
6,649 
8,231 
7,811 
9,143 



41,421 
44,725 
36,997 
32,012 
25,777 
1 2,205 
22,076 
23,725 
31,655 
34,276 
33,121 
39,122 



297,994 



89,118 



387,112 



The books sent on deposit to engine houses, institutions, 
and schools are not included in the foregoing table. A com- 
parison of the total circulation in two successive years 
follows : 



Home use, including Branch Department 
issue ...... 

Home use, not including Branch Depart- 
ment issue ..... 

Average dally circulation (home use), 
iuchiding Branch Department issue 

Average daily circulation (home use), 
not including Branch Department issue. 



1905-06. 

387,112 

297,994 

1,081 

832 



1904-05.. 

401,983 

299,647 

1,116 

832 



The largest daily circulation for home use, not including 
the issue through the Branch Department, was recorded on 
Saturday, February 11, 1905, twelve hours, 1,875 volumes. 

The circulation of English fiction for home use (to 
adults), exclusive of the Branch Department, aggiegated 
100,547 volumes, as against 104,716 for the preceding year. 



34 City Document No. 24. 

The foregoing figures deserve a brief analysis. It will be 
seen that although the total direct circulation for home use 
from the Central Library (that is, circulation excluding 
books sent out through the Branch Department) declined 
from 299,647 to 297,994, nevertheless, excluding the circula- 
tion of adult English fiction (104,716 in 1904-05 and 
100,547 in 1905-06), the circulation increased from 194,931 
to 197,447. That is to say, the direct circulation from the 
Central Library for home use of English fiction for adults 
declined nearly 4 per cent, but the direct circulation exclu- 
sive of this fiction increased somewhat more than 1 per cent. 

Although the total direct circulation for the year slightly 
declined, as shown by the figures, tlie average daily circula- 
tion (direct) did not change. This is due to the fact that 
the Library was in operation one day less in 1905-06 than in 
1904-05. 

Part of the decline in circulation is undoubtedly due to 
weather conditions, over which the Library has no control. 
Protracted inclement weather increases the home use of 
books. On the other hand, weather such as prevailed during 
the winter, permitting out-of-door sports and freedom of 
movement, reduces the number of books drawn for home 
reading. 

Childeen's Department — Central Library. 

The following extracts are from the report of Miss Alice 
M. Jordan, Custodian : 

ISSUE. 

The direct circulation of books to borrowers shows a gain 
over the two preceding years. The total number of books 
issued in 1905-06 was 58,533; the year previous it was 
54,398. The issue to readers through the daily delivery to 
the branches aggregated 15,204. There has been but one 
year in the history of the department when the aggregate 
number of books circulated directly and through the Branch 
Department has exceeded 73,737, the number issued this 
year. Even this does not give the entire issue from the 
department, as the books loaned through the deposit system 
for a longer period than the usual two weeks are not 
included. 

NEW BOOKS. 

Additions to the books in the Children's Room amount to 
about 115 titles for the year. This is perhaps the average 



LiBKARY Department. 35 

rate of expansion, although the tendency is to decrease rather 
than increase the number of titles and to duplicate largely 
the copies of books whose value has been proven by time. 
Books which are but little read are removed from the open 
shelves in order to leave space for others in greater demand. 
Hence the total number kept in the room varies but slightly 
from year to year, not increasing as rapidly as the quantity 
of new books bought would indicate. Notwithstanding the 
use of the Children's Department by as many readers as at 
any time in the past four years, we have recorded the 
smallest loss of books which has occurred since the opening 
of the rooms. Less than I5 per cent of the entire number 
are missing by this year's shelf reading. 

WORK AVITH SCHOOLS. 

The Children's Department continues to aim toward close 
relations with other agencies devoting themselves to the 
interests and education of children. The schools may be 
placed as the most important among such agencies. Our 
co-operation with them falls naturally into three divisions, 
reference work in the Library, instruction given to classes at 
the Library as to how to use the Library, and, thirdly, visits 
of our custodian to schools to aid them in matters relating to 
the Library. In the first division growth is shown not only 
in the amount of work done, but in its quality. From the 
observation of several years it appears that teachers and 
pupils present fewer trivial requests, and a larger number 
legitimately within the province of library reference work. 
Such work in the Children's Department includes not only 
the direct answer to a present question, but the anticipation 
of probable requests along certain well-established lines of 
study, the preparation of reading lists for special occasions 
and for individuals. Instruction to classes from the schools 
has continued in the directions described in previous reports. 
Although a larger number of scliools than ever before were 
invited to share in this instruction only eleven have 
responded, with about eight hundred pupils, during 1905. 
For- visiting schools very little time can be spared from other 
duties. Such visiting is greatly to be desired, however, as it 
offers an opportunity to meet the teachers and to bring to their 
notice the assistance so abundantly provided by the Library. 

REFERENCE COLLECTION FOR TEACHERS. 

The Kindergarten Collection, so-called, kept for some 
years in the Children's Reference Room, and originally 



36 City Document No. 24. 

intended for the use of kindeigaiten teachers, Las been 
extended to include books on psycliology and education used 
also by students. The reference books embracing these sub- 
jects, formerly on the Bates Hall shelves, were lately trans- 
ferred to supply the especial requirements of pedagogical 
students. This enlargement of the scope of the collection 
has materially increased its value. 

STORY HOUR. 

For the purpose of celebrating the centenary of the birth of 
Hans Christian Andersen, a story hour foi children was given 
in the Lecture Hall in April. Miss Sara Cone Bryant told 
Andersen stories to a large and interested audience, and a 
picture bulletin was placed in one of the Children's Rooms to 
illusti ate some of the selections. 

PICTURE WORK. 

During the present winter the picture bulletins have 
seemed to fulfil their purpose acceptably. They have been 
planned with reference to topics of current interest, and have 
aroused more attention than usual, suggesting to teachers 
means of illustrating lessons or of holiday celebration. As 
in the past, it has been possible to utilize some of the picture 
posters prepared at the Central Library in reading rooms in 
other parts of the city. From time to time requests are 
made by children and teachers for pictures to be used in 
school work, illustrating compositions or a topic in history or 
geography. Opportunity to cut from magazines pictures 
which, though not sufficiently valuable for preservation in 
the Fine Arts Department, are yet suitable for this purpose, 
is open to the Children's Department. Some of these 
pictures are used for bulletins, but there is an increasing 
remainder relating to subjects not catalogued in the Fine 
Arts Department for which we have found an existing 
demand. These are simply arranged unmounted in envelopes 
under general headings, or grouped together on a manila 
mount, indexed and filed. 

Bates Hall. 

In Bates Hall the maximum attendance of readers (291) 
was recorded February 5. Except during a single month, 
the maximum attendance has not fallen below 100 readers 
during the year, and during seven months of the year it has 
continued above 200. It is impracticable to record the 



Library Department. 37 

number of volumes consulted in the hall, either from the 
open shelves or from the stacks. There is no diminution 
in the use of the reading tables, but, on the other hand, 
apparently an increase. The following statements as to the 
general use of the reference department and of the other 
work in Bates Hall are taken from a report submitted by 
Mr, Oscar A. Bierstadt, the Custodian : 

The acquisition of new cabinets for the card catalogue has 
so filled up the available space that the removal of the new 
books displayed upon the open shelves at the catalogue end 
of Bates Hall became absolutely necessary. They now occupy 
the ranges adjoining the centre desk, having displaced a few 
reference volumes. At one time 443 of the new books weie 
charged out for home use, about half of the collection. 

Several collections of works appertaining to some timely 
topics have been brought together temporarily at the centre 
desk, as for the anniversary celebrations of Garrison and 
Franklin. 

The arrangement of the reference books in Bates Hall is 
practically finished, and the shelves are nearly all crowded to 
their utmost limit. The Bates Hall reference collection 
numbers by actual count 8,512 volumes. They have all been 
removed from the shelves and critically examined to find 
those in need of re-binding or repairs, and 519 volumes have 
been sent to the bindery during the year. The replacement 
of labels on the reference books soiled by use is a never end- 
ing task. Many readers return the volumes consulted to the 
shelves, but the thousands of them gathered from the tables 
and put back every day by the attendants testify to an im- 
mense use of the reference library. 

The card catalogue in Bates Hall, the main source of in- 
formation concerning the contents of the entire Library, has 
bjen referred to by an increasing number of readers. 

The Special Libraries. 
There are now 109,496 volumes contained iu the Special 
Libraries located on the floor above Bates Hall. These are 
distributed as follows : 

Fine Arts 18,002 

Industrial Arts 10,340 

Music (including the Allen A. Brown Collection, 10,349), 19,500 
Special Collections (including the Ticknor and Barton 
Libraries and U. S. Congressional documents and 

British Parliamentary papers) ..... 61,654 

Total 109,496 



38 City Document No. 24. 

In the Fine Arts room considerable freedom of access is 
permitted, a selected collection of standard works in different 
branches of the fine and industrial arts being located on open 
shelves. Tables are set apart for the use of classes and 
individual students whenever requested, and the lai-ge Fine 
Arts reading room and the one opening from the Barton 
Room are in constant use. 

It is impossible to keep a statistical record of the hall use 
of books from these Special Libraries, but it is increasing. 
From an educational standpoint, no more important work is 
done in the Library than that performed in connection with 
these departments. This work includes the free public 
lectures given each week in the Lecture Hall, and the exhi- 
bitions, many of which are given in co-operation with the 
lectures, arranged in the Exhibition Room during the winter. 

Mr. Frank De W. Washburn, Custodian in charge, has pre- 
pared the following resum^ of the work of the year, includ- 
ing also a brief statement of important additions to the 
collection : 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

During the year the following additions were made by gift 
and purchase, and were added to the photograph collection : 

386 photographs. 
757 process pictures. 
29 colored photographs. 

This does not include the following, which were not added 
to the regular collection of photographs : 

One hundred and eight portraits of Americans, 392 photo- 
graphs of Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand, given by 
the Woman's Education Association ; 54 photographs of the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition ; 144 photographs of Old 
Boston. 

Many of these have been used for exhibition at the 
branches and stations. 

The collection of photographs now numbers 17,776 ; 
process pictures, 7,311 ; colored photographs, 1,020. 

The collection of lantern slides has now reached 1,010, 
and is increasing with the number of public lectures, for use 
in wiiich the}^ are purchased. 

CATALOGUES. 

In order to have the whole subject of architecture entered 
in the general fine arts catalogue in card form, it was decided 



Library Department. 39 

to cut up two of the printed catalogues of architecture and 
paste on cards for that purpose. This work has now been 
completed. 

During the year the cataloguing by subjects of paintings 
illustrated in books and by photographs has been completed. 
It is now possible, therefore, to determine from a consulta- 
tion of this catalogue whether the Library has a certain 
subject or the paintings of a certain artist represented. This 
work is being kept up, and a beginning has also been 
made on the cataloguing of sculpture in like manner. 

All important articles on the Fine Arts in the magazines 
are indexed and the cards filed in the catalogue. Periodicals 
belonging in this department are indexed here ; all others 
are indexed in the Periodical Room. Music periodicals are 
indexed by the attendant in the Brown Library, and the 
cards are added to the Brown catalogue. 

The special catalogues in use in the department have been 
constantly improved. The scheme for classifying photo- 
graphs has been extended so that now it embraces a division 
for photographs of objects of art not included in architecture, 
sculpture and painting, and already a large number of photo- 
graphs have been listed under this heading. 

A large number of photographs and process pictures which 
had accumulated, and for which, in some cases, identification 
was missing, have been shelf-listed and catalogued. 

The collection of posters has been mounted, classified and 
placed in portfolios on the shelves. 

circulation of pictures. 

The comparative tables which are appended to this report 
indicate that there has been a remarkable increase in the 
circulation of portfolios of pictures over other years, and an 
increase of 33 per cent is indicated in the circulation among 
public schools alone. 

The following facts are evident from a consultation of the 
tables : 

1. Portfolios were loaned to 57 public schools during the 
year. 

2. There is an increase over any other year in the num- 
ber of portfolios issued to 15 of these schools. 

3. There is a decrease in the number issued to 21. 

4. Six schools borrowed the same number as last year. 

5. Eleven schools borrowed portfolios who have never 
done so in any previous year. 

6. Thirty schools who borrowed portfolios in previous 
years have not done so this year. 



40 City Document No. 24. 

7. Of the 381 portfolios taken out by schools this year, 
one-half were borrowed by 20 of the 57 schools. 

Lectuhes. 

The following free public lectures have been given at the 
Central Library : 

February 2, 1905. Towers and Bridges. By Richard A. Rice. 

Under the auspices of the Boston Architectural Club. Illus- 
trated. 
February 8. Ruskin. By Rev. Henry G. Spaulding. Under 

the auspices of the Ruskin Club. Illustrated. 
February 9. The Museum of Fine Arts. Classical Anticpiities. 

By Edward Robinson. 
February' 16. Village Architecture of Massachusetts. By J. 

Randolph Coolidge, Jr. Under the auspices of the Boston 

Architectural Club. Illustrated. 
February 23. Museum of Fine Arts. Oriental Collections. 

By Edward S. Morse. Illustrated. 
March 2. Early Gothic of Northern France. By H. Langford 

Warren. Under the auspices of the Boston Architectural Club. 

Illustrated. 
March 9. Museum of Fine Arts. Egyptian Antiquities. By 

Albert M. Lythgoe. Illustrated. 
March 16. Development of Church Architecture in England. 

By Ralph Adams Cram. Under the auspices of the Boston 

Architectural Club. Illustrated. 
March 23. The Semitic Museum, Harvard University. By 

David G. Lyon. Illustrated. 
March 30. Elizabethan Architecture in England. By Robert S. 

Peabod3^ Under the auspices of the Boston Architectural 

Club. Illustrated. 
April 6. The Germanic Museum, Harvard University. By 

Kuno Francke. Illustrated. 
April 8. Sara Cone Bryant. Reading from Hans Christian 

Andersen. 
April 13. Modern I^nglish Domestic Architecture. By R. 

Clipston Sturgis. Under the auspices of the Boston Architec- 
tural Club. Illustrated. 
April 20. The Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University. By 

Charles H. Moore. Illustrated. 
April 27. Roman and Renaissance Villas. By Thomas A. Fox. 

Under the auspices of the Boston Architectural Club. Illus- 
trated. 
November 2. Central and Northern Greece. By Arthur 

Stoddard Cooley. Illustrated. 
November 9. A Greek City of the Dead. By H. H. PoAvers. 

Illustrated. 
November 16. The American School at Athens and its Excava- 
tion. By Arthur Stoddard Cooley. Illustrated. 



Library Department. 41 

November 23. Athens and Athena. By H. H. Powers. IRus- 

trated. 
December 7. Apollo and his Shrines. By H. H. Powers. Illus-^ 

trated. 
December 14. The Peloponnesos. By Arthur Stoddard Cooley. 

IlUistrated. 
December 28. Christian and Pagan in the art of the Renaissance.. 

By H. H. Powers. Illustrated. 
January 4, 1906. What Constitutes Style in Printing. By C. 

Howard Walker. Illustrated. 
Janunry 11. Benjamin Franklin the Printer. By Lindsay 

Swift. 
January 11. The Latest Discoveries in Babylonia. By Eev.. 

John P. Peters. Under the auspices of the Boston Society of 

the Archaeological Institute of America. Illustrated. 
January 18. Theatres, Ancient and Modern. By Clarence H. 

Blackall. Illustrated. 
January 25. Masterpieces of Italian Painting. By William 

Rankin. Illustrated. 

Exhibitions — Central Library. 

These exhibitions of photographs and other material have 
been given at the Central Library, many of them in connec- 
tion with lectures on similar subjects : 

February 6-13, 1905. Greek Art. 

February 13-20. Architecture of Towns and Villages. 

February 20-27. Walters' Collection of Oriental Art. 

February 27-March 6. Gothic Architecture of France. 

March 6-13. Egyptian Art. 

March 13-20. Early Church Architecture of England. 

March 20-27. Assyrian and Chaldean Art. 

March 27-April 3. Elizabethan Architecture. 

April 3-10. German Art. 

April 10-24. English Country Houses. 

April 24-May 8. Roman and Renaissance Villas. 

May 8-26. A recent gift to the Library. A collection of photo- 
graphs given by Miss Laura E. Hall. 

May 26-July 1. Portraits of men conspicuous in the late Civil 
War. 

July 2-29. Cartoons of the Russo-Japanese War. 

July 29-September 1. A recent gift to the Librar3^ A collec- 
tion of photographs given by Rev. Austin B. Carver. 

September 1-October 2. Photographs of Australia, Tasmania 
and New Zealand. A collection of photographs given by 
the Woman's Education Association. 

October 2-30. Photographs of Egypt. A collection of photo- 
graphs loaned by Mr. J. S. Lee. 

October 31-December 1. Athens. 



42 City Document No. 24. 

December 1-23. Books, autograph letters and portraits relating 

to the anti-slavery movement. Shown in honor of the one 

hundredth anniversary of the birth of William Lloyd Garrison. 
December 23-January 1. Pearly Christian Art. 
January 1-29, 1906. Frankliniana. Shown in honor of the 

two hundredth anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Franklin. 

Books, autograph letters and portraits. Specimens of printing. 

Materials, tools and processes of bookbinding. (Exhibit 

loaned by the Newark Free Public Library.) 
January 1-29. Architectural Exhibition, Boston Architectural 

Club and Boston Society of Architects. 

The Barton-Ticknor Room. 

The number of Barton-Ticknor books issued during the 
year was 11,875; besides these 918 maps were issued, and 
8,458 volumes drawn from the stacks for use in the Barton 
Room. Special reservations of books have been phiced on 
the tables here for classes from Simmons College and Welles- 
ley College, and for the Garland Kindergarten Classes. Early 
editions of Shakespeare were also displayed while the Ben 
Greet Company was presenting the plays in Boston. 

Allen A. Brown Music Room. 

Volumes issued . . . . . . . .6,027 

Volumes added ........ 463 

Titles catalogued . . . . . . . 513 

Volumes supplied with indexes ..... 10 

The additions duiing the year have been largely works of 
modern composers, light operas and orchestral scores. Among 
the former may be named Massenet's Cherubim, George's 
Mearka, Bruneau's L'enfant roi, and Puccini's Madama 
Butterfly. Among the latter, symphonies and symphonic 
poems by Rimski-Korsakov, Glazunov, Tcherepnin, and Mah- 
ler, Max Reger's Sinfonietta and Richard Strauss's Sinfonia 
Armestica. A number of organ works was donated by Mr. 
Hale. 

Six thousand six hundred and twenty-five cards were filed ; 
about 800 were written. 

Department of Documents and Statistics. 

Mr. James L. Whitney, Chief of this department, reports 
that the entire collection, exclusive of the regular series of 
the Congressional documents of the United States and the 
Parliamentary documents of Great Britain, numbers 12,702 
volumes. During the year, 1,105 volumes have been added. 



Library Department. 43 

The gifts through the American Statistical Association, 
whose library is in our custody, comprised 982 volumes and 
2,043 pamphlets. 

Manuscripts. 

Mr. Whitney, who is also custodian of manuscripts, has 
prepared the following memoranda relating to the important 
accessions since February 1, 1905: 

A few manuscripts of local interest have been purchased 
recently, including documents relating to the Boston Fire of 
March 20, 1760, and a subscription list, dated December 2, 
1779, of citizens of the Town of Boston "for Cloathing 
our Brethren in the Army " ; also the " Accompt of the 
Time and Expence of the Gentlemen &c who attended his 
Excellency the Governor at the Interview with the Eastern 
Indians at Falmouth in Casco Bay," July, 1732. 

From the beneficiaries under the will of Mr. Arthur Croft, 
late of Wadhurst, England, there have been received one 
hundred and seventy-seven letters, writings and signatures, 
collected by the late Gardner Brewer of Boston. Among 
these is a letter from George Washington, dated Head Quar- 
ters, 28th April, 1783, in regard to tories and refugees who 
were embarking from New York, asking that they be pre- 
vented from carrying off any negroes or other property of 
the inhabitants of the United States, and that any of his own 
slaves found be secured. There are also papers and letters 
of Thomas Jefferson, John Jay, Henry Lee, Benedict Arnold, 
Aaron Burr, Patrick Henry, Francis Marion, Lafayette, 
Steuben, General Heath, Alexander Hamilton, Philip Schuyler, 
John Marshall, John Randolph, William Wirt, Henry Clay, 
Daniel Webster, and Abraham Lincoln, with others of the 
time of the Civil War, while among foreigners are the elder 
Pitt, Lord Brougham, Lord Lyndhurst, John Bright, Napoleon, 
Chateaubriand, and Necker. Among American authors are 
Longfellow, Bryant, Lowell, Whittier, Holmes, Motley, and 
Prescott. There is a poem in the handwriting of Robert 
Burns, entitled "The Rights of Woman. Spoken by Miss 
Fontenelle, at the Theatre in Dumfries," 1793 ; also a Sonnet, 
by Charles Lamb, with letters by Garrick, Mrs. Hemans, 
Harriet Martineau, Leigh Hunt, Turner, Landseer, Talma, 
Verboeckhoven, Tennyson, Dickens, Thackeray, and others. 

The Census of Massacliusetts, known as " The Lost Census 
of 1765," has been found. This valuable manuscript has 
been presented to the Library by Mr. J. H. Benton, Jr., who 
has published a facsimile, together with illustrative docu- 



44 City Document No. 24. 

ments, and an account of " Early census making in Massa- 
chusetts, 1643-1765." 

Volumes containing the proceedings and papers of The 
Franklin Club of Boston have been received through Mr. 
Charles F. Wyman. In 1863, after the dissolution of the 
club, the sum of one thousand dollars was given to this 
Library. 

The documents of the Women's Centennial Executive 
Committee of Boston, dated 1876, have also been given. 

The Bowditch Collection has been increased by a gift of 
manuscripts from the estate of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. 

The Branch System. 

Apart from the maintenance of the ten branches of the 
Library, the policy of establishing service stations in different 
parts of the city for the accommodation of sections more or 
less remote from a branch, or from the Central Library, was 
some time ago adopted in connection with the development 
of the Library system. These stations were of two kinds, 
namely, reading rooms administered directly by members of 
the Library staff, and each equipped with a small collection 
of books, approximating 2,000 volumes, and, secondly, shop 
stations, so-called, which were located in shops, contained a 
small deposit of books, and were agencies, carried on by 
arrangement with the proprietor of the shop, to receive and 
transmit to the Central Library requests from borrowers, and 
to act as intermediaries in the loan and return of books thus 
called for, in connection with the system of daily wagon 
service to and from the Central. This wagon service was 
also operated in connection with the reading rooms, but such 
rooms had a great advantage over the shop stations, in that 
they contained public reading tables, were devoted entirely 
to librury purposes, and being in charge of a Library employee 
were equipped to render a much more important service to 
the public than was possible at a mere place of call, inci- 
dentally located in a business establishment. 

Since the shop stations were easily established, the 
tendency seemed to favor their multiplication, without cor- 
responding increase in efficienc}^ At the same time the 
experience of several years clearly showed the greater value 
of the reading rooms as essential elements in the Library 
system. 

As the result of a general consideration of the subject, 
following a careful investigation and report by a committee 
of the Trustees, upon the question of the distribution, cost. 



Library Department. 46 

and efficiency of stations, various changes were made during 
March and April. The scheme adopted involved the discon- 
tinuance of all the shop stations except the one at Neponset, 
which was retained for the reason that it seived a population 
remote from other library agencies, and the substitution for 
such stations of reading rooms, either newly established for 
the purpose or already so located geographically as to take 
over without great inconvenience the service formerly per- 
formed by one or more of the discontinued shop stations. 

The changes may be sunmiarized as follows : Six shop 
stations were discontinued, namely: Station G (14 Franklin 
street. Alls ton) ; Station H (4 Talbot avenue, Ashmont) ; 
Station J (157 Norfolk street, Dorchester) ; Station M 
(1011 Dorchester avenue) ; Station R (329 Warren street, 
Roxbury) ; Station T (Lamartine, corner Paul Gore street, 
Boylston Station). Four reading rooms of less importance 
than others in point of location or of use were also discon- 
tinued. These were the South End Reading Room, 55 Berkeley 
street ; the Ward Nine Reading Room, 62 Union Park street ; 
the Andrew Square Reading Room, Dorchester street ; and the 
North Brighton Reading Room, 56 Market street, Brighton. 

In place of Stations G, R and T, new reading rooms were 
established as follows : Allston, 354 Cambridge street ; War- 
ren street, 390 Warren street; Boylston Station, The Lamar- 
tine, Depot square. The Codman Square Reading Room 
serves in place of Stations H and J. 

The changes left the Library system with sixteen stations, 
only one of which is a shop station, as against twenty-two 
stations before readjustment, of which seven were shop sta- 
tions. The substitution of reading rooms as described gives 
to the public more space, more books immediately at hand, 
regular supplies of periodicals where none were accessible 
before, and much better service generally. This implies a 
distinct gain in efficiency ; and, as might be expected, all 
the new reading rooms show an increased cii'culation, as com- 
pared with that of the shop stations which were discontinued. 

The actual opening of the reading rooms did not entail 
large expense, but the operating expenses of such a room are, 
of course, greater than those of any single shop station. As 
stated, they perform a larger service, and the change per- 
mitted the closing of six of the least important agencies for- 
merly in operation. 

Besides the changes described, the Mt. Pleasant Reading 
Room on Dudley street was moved from the basement to 
larger and more convenient quarters on the first floor of the 
same building. 



46 



City Document No. 24. 



The general operations of the branch system are summar- 
ized in the following extracts, condensed from the report of Mr. 
Langdon L. Ward, the Supervisor of Branches and Stations : 

CIRCULATIOlSr. 

There is a loss this year in the total circulation from the 
branches (764,434) of one-half of one per cent, the loss being 
chiefly from the direct circulation, that from the Central 
Library remaining nearly stationary. The South Boston, 
South End and West Roxbury branches are the only ones 
that have gained, the two former substantially. The loss at 
Dorchester and Jamaica Plain may be partly attributed to the 
establishment of Stations Q and T as reading rooms, but the 
chief cause of losses is usually an inadequate supply of 
books. 

The classified circulation of the ten branches (exclusive 
of circulation from books sent out on deposit) for two years 
is as follows : 

DIRECT HOME USE ONLY. 



Fiction for adults. . . . 
Non-fiction for adults 

Juvenile fiction 

Juvenile non-fiction . . 



Vols. 



254,935 

129,697 

232,949 

87,016 



Per 
cent. 



36.18 
18.41 
33.06 
12.35 



1904-05. 



Vols. 



264,234 

131,138 

226,636 

90,527 



Per 

cent. 



37.1 
18.4 
31.8 
12.7 



The loss is chiefly in books for adults, especially fiction. 



DEPOSIT WORK. 

Deposits have been sent from the branches to 98 places, as 
against 97 last year. Sixty-four schools are regularly supplied 
by branches, as against 62 in 1904-05, and 270 teachers, in all, 
have been supplied, as against 266 in the preceding year. 
The number of volumes, however, sent to the schools by the 
ranches is only 12,166, as against 14,713 the year before. 
This is partly due to special conditions in the West End 
and Charlestown districts, but partly also to the fact, as one 



Library Department. 47 

custodian points out, that with increased knowledge of what 
the schools want, the deposits are so much more satisfactory 
that they are exchanged only at long intervals. 

PICTURES. 

The number of pictures lent by the branches to reading 
rooms, schools and clubs is 4,849 this year, as compared 
with 1,250 the year before. From the very small deposit 
collection at the Central Library there were also lent 632 
pictures. Probably no activity of the Branch Department 
has developed so much as this during the year. A revised 
list of the pictures and picture bulletins that may be had 
from the branches and from the Children's Room, Central 
Library, was prepared and sent out a few months ago. A 
statement of what pictures can be furnished by the Fine 
Arts Department, Central Library, has also been sent out. 
There has been a large increase in the collections of pictures 
and picture bulletins of the branches and reading rooms. 
These are usually made from pictures cut from periodicals 
not needed for binding, or from material bought or otherwise 
secured by the custodians. The cardboard for mounting is 
provided by the Libraiy. While reading rooms have bor- 
rowed systematically from the branches, and more than ever 
this year, the larger reading rooms are beginning to have 
collections of their own, and almost all have at least a few 
picture bulletins. Several picture bulletins have been sent 
from the Children's Rooms at the Central Library to two 
reading rooms. The schools want especially pictures of 
birds and animals, and those which are related to geography, 
physical and political, to history and to the industrial arts. 
Such pictures we plan to supply, gradually and with little 
expense, from the branches and large reading rooms for the 
most part. A cai'eful attempt is being made to ascertain 
and meet specific demands rather than to collect pictures on 
general subjects. 

A method of meeting the wants of the schools, under 
difficult conditions, is described in the following passage 
from the report of the Custodian of the Broadway Extension 
Reading Room : 

"As but small space is available at the station for pictures, 
effort has been made to adapt the poster idea to the situa- 
tion. Posters illustrating special cities, artists and famous 
men have been made and planned. These can be done in 
sets, to illustrate first the work of a special class and then 
used for general purposes. For instance, a French history 



48 City Document No. 24. 

set, illustrating the geographj^-histoiy work of the seventh 
grade (a subject passed over in two weeks by boys who have 
as background only their double promotion knowledge of 
American histoiy, who many of them will get no other 
schooling on ' France '), consists at present of a poster on 
Joan of Arc, one on the French Revolution, one on Napoleon, 
with projected ones on the American Revolution in compari- 
son, on Parisian famous buildings, on famous French writers 
and scientists. These are mounted on sheets of uniform 
size and of a color especially associated with that country. 
This is, of course, illustration and not tine arts. So 
far, it has interested the children much, and one teacher of 
an ungraded class proposes to adopt the scheme, and places 
her posters at our disposal for use at the station or for loan- 
ing to other schools. Competition is bound to improve the 
quality. Material for the station posters has been accumu- 
lating for some years, largely from condemned volumes of 
magazines. Appropriate pictures suitable for these grades 
can be supplied to the lower grades and the ungraded classes 
more easily than books, few of which exist." 

Pictures from the Fine Arts Department, Central Library, 
have been sent each month for exhibition at the branches and 
reading rooms, as usual. They are more varied in subject 
iis the central collection grows, and are more and more ap- 
preciated. One hundred and ninety -four portfolios of 
pictures were sent from the Central Library to schools and 
clubs through the branches and stations, as against 117 in 
the year 1904. 

BOOKS. 

The ten branches have received this year 3,291 volumes 
of new books, as against 5,799 volumes in the previous year 
■(and 6,007 in the year 1903-04), a decrease of nearly one- 
half. The replacements are less by over 300 volumes. This 
reduced supply is chiefly due to lack of funds. 

EXPENDITURES BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

The total expense of the ten branches is $63,701.83, which 
is an increase of $3,052.46 over the total for the year pre- 
vious. The increase is due to the greater cost of the South 
End Branch in its new quarters. The expense of this 
branch is 112,230.95 for the year, as against $8,788.51 in 
1904 and $4,539.17 in 1903. Books and furniture for the 
ten branches have cost much less, fuel less, light, rent and 
repairs more. If the South End Branch is left out, the 



Library Department. 49 

branches show a decrease in expenditure. That is to say, the 
branches have cost less so far as regards things that it was 
possible to control. 

SCHOOLS. 

The total number of volumes sent to the schools from the 
Central Library and the branches is 19,092, as against 21,899 
volumes last year. The number of schools supplied is, how- 
ever, slightly greater. In one school-room of 50 pupils, to 
which 25 volumes were sent, each circulated 14 times, giving 
a record of 350 books read, or 7 volumes by each pupil. 

The bill for missing books for the year, which was paid 
by the School Department, was $37.40, as against $43.79 
last year. 

More Library finding lists have been sent to the schools. 

Registrations for Library cards have been taken, as usual, 
by the custodians of the branches and reading rooms. 

The establishment of new reading rooms and of new 
schools has made necessary a thorough redistribution of the 
schools, with respect to the relations of the branches and 
reading rooms of the Library to them in providing books 
and taking applications for cards. As before, each branch and 
each reading room is responsible for certain schools, and by 
co-operation with the Central Library the whole held is covered. 

The minute details of what is done for schools at the 
branches and stations cannot well be given. There is a con- 
stant effort to keep in touch with the teachers of the neigh- 
boring schools and to provide books and pictures on the 
subjects prescribed for study. The report of the Custodian 
of Station P illustrates this in a specially forcible manner. 

A circular of information was sent to the parochial schools, 
a few months ago, and ten of them are now supplied, as 
against four a year ago. 



CIRCULATION — STATIONS. 

The stations, schools, and institutions show a total circu- 
lation of 447,984 volumes, as against 444,410 volumes last 
year. A few stations have lost in circulation, several have 
gained by being changed into reading rooms, others have 
been discontinued, and their use appears in the present fig- 
ures only to a limited extent. The school circulation repre- 
sents a gain of nearly 6,000 volumes. The proportion of 
fiction in the circulation of the reading rooms is approxi- 
mately 70 per cent. 



50 City Document No. 24. 

expenditures stations. 

The total cost of the stations is $25,534.62, as against 
$23,305.33 the year before. In the case of nearly every 
reading room except Codman Square, books have cost less 
than in 1904, but the large expenditure for that reading 
room makes the total greater. Rent has cost $4,870. 83 
during the past year, as against $3,585 in 1904, but the 
increase is explained by the establishment of the new read- 
ing rooms. The amount spent for furniture is also much 
greater, and for the same reason. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY ACTIVITIES BRANCH DEPARTMENT. 

Deposit Work. 

We have sent from the Central Library 35,262 volumes 
on deposit, as against 35,090 volumes in 1904-05. The per- 
centage of fiction sent was 40.9, as against 42 per cent last 
3'^ear and 45 per cent the year before. The net gain in the 
deposit collection is only 987 volumes, as against 2,204 
volumes in the year 1904-05. This very small gain is due 
to the fact that a large number of replacements (more than 
2,000) have been held for consideration or refused. Of the 
27,612 volumes now in the deposit collection (of which 
several thousand are either permanently or temporarily dead 
books), 16,338 volumes are now actually out on deposit 
at branches, stations, schools or institutions. No collection 
of books in the Library is more thoroughly used or 
brings greater returns in use for the money expended 
than this. Less than 25,000 volumes of live books 
produce a circulation of approximately 281,000 volumes 
per year, almost as much as the total direct cir- 
culation of the Central Library itself. This implies many 
copies and a considerable number of new titles. The collec- 
tion is the chief resource of the reading rooms, most of which 
have not, like the branches, permanent collections, and it is 
the only reliance of ninet3^-seven schools and institutions. It 
is in reality not a part of the Central Library collection, but 
rather the undifferentiated library of the stations, schools 
and institutions. 

At the annual shelf reading two volumes only were 
unaccounted for. 

The Daily Issue. 
The total number of volumes issued from the Central 
Library on cards sent from the branches and stations, by the 
wagons, is 89,121. This is 13,215 volumes less than were 



Library Department. 



51 



issued in 1904. Tlie issue for two years is divided into 
classes as follows : 





190&-06. 


1904-05. 




Vols. 


Per Cent. 


Vols. 


Per Cent. 


Fiction for adults 


31,174 
25,571 

29,586 
2,7f)0 


35. 
28.7 
33.2 
3.1 


41,520 

25,021 

32,388 

3,406 


40 6 


Non-fiction for adults 


24 4 


Juvenile fiction 


31.7 


Juvenile non-fiction 


3.3 







Last year it was the circulation of adult books that 
increased ; this year, while both the adult and juvenile circu- 
lation have decreased, it is the former that shows the greater 
loss, more than 10,000 volumes in the class of fiction. There 
is a slight decrease in the proportion of unsuccessful cards, 
and the percentage of fiction in the unsuccessful applications 
is only 76, as against 79.9 in the year 1904-05. 

There was a substantial gain last year over the year 
1903-04 in the daily issue, and the loss this year corresponds 
approximately to the issue from the Central Library to 
Stations C, M, U and Y, which were discontinued last 
spring. The readjustment, under the new conditions, of ap- 
plications that were made through these stations to the 
Central Library cannot be traced. But the establishment of 
the reading rooms, G, J, R and T, in place of shop stations, 
has brought in every case an increase of issue from the 
Central Library, except that the issue for J does not quite 
equal the issue for the two shop stations that it replaced. 
These were a considerable distance apart. 



Inter-Lihrary Loans. 

Lent to libraries in Massachusetts . 
Lent to libraries outside Massachusetts . 

Total 

Applications from libraries in Massachusetts 

refused . . . . . . 

Applications from libraries outside Massachu 

setts refused ..... 

Total ...... 

Borrowed from other libraries 



Volumes, Volumes, 
1905-06. 1904-05. 



495 

157 
652 

110 

62 

172 

17 



421 
162 

583 
98 

57 

155 
11 



52 



City Document No. 24. 



Distribution of Periodicals. 

The unbound periodicals have been distributed to 
institutions to the number of 23,565 copies. 



city 



G-eneral. 

Several thousand volumes of books transferred from the 
branches to the Central Library have been disposed of this 
year, some of them having been sold, some added to the Cen- 
tral collection or sent to reading rooms. Last spring, when 
the Blagden-street basement had been cleared of former 
transfers, 4,700 volumes were brought in from Charlestown. 

The Patent Room. 

During the year 63,078 books were consulted in the Patent 
Room. This is an increase from 49,631 as reported in 
1904-05. On the other hand the number of visitors for the 
purpose of consultation was 2,237, as against 2,426 in the 
preceding year. Of these 848 were non-residents. 

The number of volumes in the Patent Room has increased 
during the year from 10,135 to 10,537. 

The Periodical Room. 

The following table shows the record of attendance in the 
Periodical Room, as taken at certain hours in comparison 
with the preceding year : 



1905-06. 


1904-05. 


10,041 


10,472 


13,492 


14,718 


15,897 


17,014 


22,257 


23,225 


19,036 


18,151 


17,534 


17,532 


6,468 


7,371 



Attendance at 

10 A.M. 

12 M. . 

2 P.M. 

5 P.M. 

6 P.M. 
9 P.M. 

10 P.M. 



During the year 22,057 volumes were consulted in the 
daytime, as against 27,071 in the previous yeiir. In the 
evening and on Sundays 6,476 volumes were consulted, as 
against 7,534 in the previous year. Besides these 22,862 
unbound back numbers of periodicals were consulted in the 
daytime, as against 24,353 in the preceding year; and 11,388 
in the evenings and on Sundays, as against 12,346 in the 
preceding year. 



Library Department. 53 



The Newspaper Room. 

The record of maximum attendance on a selected day in 
each month, showing the use of the Newspaper Room, is as 
follows : 



Attendance. nnfpa Attendance. 

Maximum Xo. x^aieb. Maximum No. 



Dates. .r„h=l'.,„" v-„ Dates. 



February 5, 190.5 173 August 6 129 

March 5 149 September 24 116 

April 9 132 October 29 167 

May 14 162 November 19 156 

June 12 104 December 10 148 

July 30 109 January 7, 1906 156 

It will be seen that the maximum attendance on any single 
day for the year (173) was recorded on February 5. 

The number of papers regularly filed at the beginning of 
the year was 312. During the year 13 newspapers have been 
added to the list and 9 discontinued, leaving 316 as the total 
number regularlv received at the close »>f the year, January 
31, 1906. 

During the year the newspaper files (back numbers) were 
consulted by 1,562 visitors, of whom 590 were non-residents. 
The number of bound volumes consulted was 6,223, as "com- 
pared with 5,413 in 1904-05. 

The attendance in the Newspaper Reading Room at times 
exceeds the limit of its capacity. This is especially the case 
on Sundays, and it is frequently necessary to use vacant 
seats in the adjoining Periodical Room, in order to accommo- 
date the public. 

The Use of Books. 

The tables contained in Appendix VII. show the circula- 
tion for home use throughout the Library system for the 
year. The aggregates are : 

Central Library (including Central Library books 

Issued through the branches, stations, etc.) . . 401,566 

Branches and stations direct . . . . .1,106,926 



Total 1,508,492 

as against 1,509,086 for the preceding year. 

Other figures relating to circulation are brought forward 
and put in comparison with those for the year 1904-05 : 



64 



City Document No. 24. 



Total circulation of stations, schools and insti- 
tutions ....... 

On deposit from Central Library . 

Daily issue to branches and stations from 
Central (aggregate) ..... 

Direct circulation, home use, from branches . 

On deposit from branches .... 



1905-06. 



1904-05. 



447,984 444,410 

35,262 35,090 

89,121 102,336 

764,434 768,329 

14,977 18,790 



Sunday and Evening Service. 

The usual table, prepared from the records of Mr. E'rank 
C. Blaisdell, Chief of the Sunday and Evening Service, 
exhibits as follows, the number of books issued for home use 
on Sundays and holidays, for each of two successive years : 



SUNDAY AND HOLIDAY * CIRCULATION. 



Sundays 
February 22 . 
April 19 



1905-06. 1904-05. 

37,856 36,770 

568 527 

481 384 



The regular Sunday use of the reading rooms continues 
large. 

Resignations. 

The service has been affected by the following resignations 
during the year : 



Name. 



Department. 



Entered 
Service. 



Kesigned. 



Edward F. Collier 

James S. Driscoll 

James W. Bridge 

John Finneran 

Charles E. McCarthy 

Charles McGinniss 

Katherine G. Mooney 

Grace Cole 

E. Christine Yeaton 

Ella K. Murray 

Elizaheth K. Reagan 

M. Marguerite Coydevant . . 

Victor Mclnnis 

Charlotte H. Kelly 



Issue 

South End Branch. . . 

Periodical 

Issue 

Bates Hall 

Periodical 

West End Branch. .•. . 

Issue 

Station S 

Registration 

Charlestown Branch 

Issue 

Special Libraries 

Special Lihraries 



July 1, 1904. . . 
June 14,1901.. 
Nov. 10, 1904.. 
Sept. 12, 1904 . 
Aprils, 1905.. 
April 11, 1905. 
Jan. 1,1885.... 
May 10,1897.. 
Oct. 21, 1898... 
Jan. 15, 1886.. 
March 1, 1895. 
May 22,1905.. 
Oct. 7, 1902.... 
Nov. 11, 1895.. 



Feb. 

March 

March 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 



6, 1905 
21, 1905 
25, 1905 
20, 1905 
24, 1905 

2, 1905 

3, 1905 
30, 1905 

1, 1905 
27, 1905 
13, 1905 
27, 1905 
15, 1905 
18, 1905 



* Closed on aU holidays except as specified. 



LiBKARY Department. 



55 



Department. 



Entered 
Service. 



Kesigned. 



Carrie U. Doyle 

Edna M. llersey 

John J. TValdron 

Charles H. Gelpke 

Margaret C. Hartmann... . 

Belle S. Hall 

William C. Prout 

Mrs. Kate Shaughnessy... 

Matthew T. Keenan , 

Marguerite Barton 

Henry J. Graham , 

William J. Adams 

Mrs. Susan E. Livermore 



Bindery 

Children's 

Shelf 

Bates Hall 

Children's 

Bi-ighton Bi-anch 

West End Branch 

Engineer and Janitor, 

Patent 

Special Libraries 

Engineer and Janitor, 

Special Libraries 

Charlestown Branch, 



Aug. 13,1900.. 
July 1, 1898... 
Oct. 2, 1903.... 
Dec. 15, 1903.. 
March 22, 1895 
Aug. 2, 1895... 
May 7, 1902... 
Dec. 4, 1894. . . 
March 2, 1896. 
June 23, 1900.. 
Dec. 15, 1903.. 
Oct. 7, 1905.... 
June 1,1885... 



Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 



22, 1905 
12, 1905 

12, 1905 
2, 1905 

10, 1905 

13, 1905 
15, 1905 
16, 1905 

6, 1905 

11, 1905 
29, 1905 

6, 1906 
19, 1906 



Examinations. 

The following examinations have been given for the 
graded service of the Library, namely: June 24, 1905, 
Grade E (51 applicants) ; January 6, 1906, Grade E 
(36 applicants) ; Grade C (35 applicants), and Grade B 
(17 applicants). 

Respectfully submitted, 

Horace G. Wadlin, 

Librariaii. 
April 27, 1906. 



56 City Document No. 24. 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 
FOR 1905-1906. 



To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

The Examining Committee held its first meeting for organi- 
zation in the Lecture Hall of the Public Library, April 28, 
1905. Mr. Solomon Lincoln, President of the Board of 
Trustees, was present to receive the members of the commit- 
tee, of whom thirteen were in attendance. 

Mr. Lincoln read the city ordinance relative to the appoint- 
ment of an examining committee, and explained briefly the 
nature of the duties of the committee. The committee then 
proceeded to organize by the election of Dr. George B. 
Shattuck as Chairman and of Miss Eleanor N. Colleton as 
Secretary. It was voted that the sub-committee should be 
appointed by the chairman, who requested that individual 
members should express any personal preference for service 
on special committees which they might entertain. 

Mr. Fleischner, the Assistant Librarian, came before the 
committee and answered such questions as the members 
desired to put in relation to the conduct of the various 
departments of the Library. 

The appointment of sub-committees was announced by 
mail April 29, and the chairmen were requested to call their 
committees together for organization. The Examining 
Committee met again May 15. Before the meeting those 
who wished to do so met the chairman in the Librarian's 
office, and were shown over the various departments of the 
Librar}'. The following sub-committees were announced : 

Administration. 
Dr. J. Collins Warren, Chairman^ 
Rev. Daniel Merriman, /Secretcoy , 
Mr. Timothy E. Byrnes, Mr. Thomas Minns, 

Mr. William F. Donovan, Mr. Abraham Ratshesky, 

Mr. Frank K. Foster, Mr. George A. Scighano. 

Books. 
Dr. George B. Shattuck, Chainjian, 
Miss Eleanor M. Colleton, ISecretary^ 
Mr. James B. Connolly, Miss Caroline Matthews, 

Mr. J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr., Mrs. Walter Shaw, 
Mrs. Pinckney Holbrook, Rev. Benjamin F. Trueblood. 



Library Department. 57 



Branches. 

Miss Eleanor M. Colleton, Chairman^ 
Miss Caroline Matthews, Secretary^ 
Mr. "William F. Donovan, Dr. William H. Ruddick, 

Mrs. Francis P. Garland, Mrs. Walter Shaw, 

Rev. F. J. Halloran, Rev. Benjamin F. Trueblood. 

Mrs. Thomas G. Plant, 

Catalogues. 

Mr. Thomas Minns, Chairman^ 

Mrs. Edward Scates, Secretary, 
Mrs. Francis P. Garland, Mr. Abraham Ratshesky, 

Rev. F. J. Halloran, Rev. Elwood Worcester, D.D. 

Mrs. Thomas G. Plant, 

Finance. 

Mr. Laurence Curtis, Chairman, 
Mr. Timothy E. Byrnes, Mr. George A. Scigliano, 

Mr. Abraham Ratshesky, Mr. Daniel A. Whelton. 

Dr. William Ruddick, 

Fine Arts. 

Mr. J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr., Chairman, 
Miss Eleanor M. Colleton, Dr. J. Collins Warren, 

Mrs. Edward Scates, Rev. Elwood Worcester, D.D., 

Dr. George B. Shattuck, Rev. Daniel Merriman. 

Printing and Binding. 

Dr. William H. Ruddick, Chairman, 
Mrs. Pinckney Holbrook, Secretary, 
Mr. James B. Connolly, Mr. Frank K. Foster, 

Mr. Laurence Curtis, Mr. Daniel A. Whelton. 

The desirability of the purchase by the city of the Boyls- 
ton-street property of the Harvard Medical School, in case it 
should be for sale, was brought up by the Chairman of the 
Committee on Administration, and a favorable but informal 
opinion of such action was expressed. 

The majority of the committees reported through their 
chairman that they had met and organized. 

The Examining Committee held a final meeting February 21, 
1906, to hear and discuss the reports of the sub-committees 
on what they had done and the suggestions they wished to 
make. Reports were received from all the committees. 
Nearly all of the committees had held several meetings dur- 
ing the year; most of the committees had been unusually 



58 , City Document No. 24. 

active and assiduous in endeavors to seriously observe and 
study the condition and the working of their departments. 
While the interest taken was very gratifying, it is proper to 
state that it was confined to a comparatively small number of 
the members of the General Committee. Some attended 
meetings constantly, some came occasionally, some, and 
those not a few, did not come at all, or took no part in the 
work of the sub-committees. 

At this final meeting the question of the acquisition by the 
city of the contiguous property of the Harvard Medical 
School was again discussed, and the unanimous opinion was 
expressed that it was most important that the Library should 
in some way control this property. 

The immediate and crying need of proper accommodation 
in a separate building for the branch library in the Charles- 
town District was emphasized, as also the less urgent 
requirement for better quarters in the East Boston District — 
the oldest branch of all. Improvements at the reading room 
on the Broadway Extension were also warmly advocated. 

The practice of story telling to childien was brought up 
by Mr. Merriman, a member of the Committee on Adminis- 
tration. He had been much struck by its successful applica- 
tion at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburg, where it is 
understood the library is fortunate in having a very good 
story teller. The chairman is aware that this question has 
been discussed by the officials of our Library, and that a trial 
was made at the Brighton Branch. Its usefulness would 
probably be greater at some of the branches. It involves 
some expense and depends upon gifts of the story teller for 
its results. First rate story tellers for children are born, and 
if subsequently made are so only in a minor degree. The 
chairman has had submitted to him all the reports on this inter- 
esting subject from the Pittsburg Library, and the Committee 
expresses the hope that the Trustees will give it further 
consideration. 

It was voted that the chairman should make the usual 
annual report to the Trustees, and he accordingly appends a 
summary of the reports of the seven sub-committees as 
rendered. 

Administration. — The placing of one or more large chande- 
liers of twenty lights in the Catalogue Room of the Central 
Library would add to its cheerfulness and promote the efficient 
working of the Library by facilitating the use of the card 
catalogue. When a suitable building for the Charlestown 
Branch is provided it should include large rooms for the use 
of children and good light for evening use. The same obser- 



Library Department. 59 

vation applies to East Boston also. The hanging of useful 
maps and engravings on the walls at the West End and 
South End Branches is recommended. A lighted sign at the 
front door of the Dorchester Branch is needed. Ceilings 
and walls at some of the branches should be cleaned and 
some new curtains provided for windows. 

This sub-committee calls attention to the contemplated 
sale of the adjoining property on which the Harvard Medical 
School building is situated, and would recommend the advisa- 
bility of considering the purchase of this land by the city. 
The Library at present has no accommodation for printing- 
and binding, and this work is done in the building 42 Stan- 
hope street at an annual rental of $1,500. The objections 
to employment of land on the same lot with the Public 
Libraiy for business purposes are obvious. In addition to 
the danger from fire and the interference with light and air, 
is the unfavorable contrast which a modern " business sky- 
scraper " would offer to the beautiful architectural effects of 
the present Library building. 

Books. — Many of the books of fiction in the branches and 
in the Central Library are in poor condition, dirty and ill- 
smelling because ill-used. Can blame for ill-use be fixed and 
penalties inflicted by means of greatei' care and watchfulness 
on the part of employees who deliver and receive books of 
this class ? What length of time might be considered to 
constitute the average life of a book of fiction ? It may be 
easier to ask these questions than to answer them, but the 
committeee would not wish to have them answered by a 
diminution in the works of fiction. 

A greater number of books in foreign languages, when 
there is demand for such, seems desirable. The young 
should be brought up on English, but those in middle life 
and beyond can hardly be weaned altogether from customary 
reading-. 

The question of keeping the books of reference in Bates 
Hall up to date is recognized as attended with some diffi- 
culties. The space is limited, and often, in some subjects, 
when a new book is added an older, though perhaps an 
equally useful one, may have to be displaced. Asa test of 
the serviceableness of this portion of the Library the follow- 
ing query was put to Mr. Bierstadt, the official in charge: 
What is the highest mountain in the United States south of 
Alaska? One hour and thirty minutes was spent in search- 
ing the reference books in Bates Hall, twenty-six in number, 
ranging fron 1889 to 1906, for the answer upon which these 
authorities agree. One important book of reference which 



60 City Document No. 24. 

suggested the doubt giving rise to the question was not men- 
tioned. The result of the test cannot be considered as 
unsatisfactory. 

It is desired to say a good word again in praise of the 
management of the Chiklren Department. 

Branches. — At the first meeting of this sub-committee the 
different branches and reading rooms were divided into 
groups and apportioned to the members for visitation. The 
following suggestions for observation on visits were made by 
the chairman and approved : Ventilation and General Con- 
dition ; Books : number, kind, condition ; Foreign Books : 
character of population, condition of books ; Magazines : 
what provided, what not provided but demanded, are those 
furnished adapted to the population of the neighborhood ? 
Patrons: are they chiefly adults or children? 

Mr. Ward, the Supervisor of Branches, whose unfailing 
courtesy is mentioned, was present at the first meeting, and 
subsequently proposed suggestions were discussed with him. 

The following suggestions are offered : 

1. More attention to ventilation of branches and reading 
rooms is needed. The air in many is very poor, and this, 
with the high temperature, makes continued study or intelli- 
gent reading almost impossible. 

2. Some method to obviate the filthy condition of books 
should be devised. 

3. More uniform helpfulness on the part of the assistants 
is desirable, especially to children and persons not well 
equipped to make the best use of the Library, and this is 
more true in the branches than in the Central Library. The 
instructions sent out by the Supervisor of Branches cover this 
suggestion, but the interpretation of these differs at the 
different branches, and thus their usefulness is greater or less 
in consequence. 

4. More accurate, ready knowledge on the part of assist- 
ants as to the available reference books on historical, geo- 
graphical and scientific subjects — especially of the more 
recent publications — would be desirable. 

5. Probably occasional intervisiting of custodians and 
assistants of branches and reading rooms might be productive 
of more uniform, wholly satisfactory conditions such as 
already exist in many of the branches and reading rooms. 

Catalogues, Bulletins and Finding Lists. — This sub-com- 
mittee has taken much pains in going over the subjects 
confided to it, and makes a very full repoi-t. It recommends 
that additional space for cabinets be provided for the public 
catalogue in Bates Hall, and more space for the co-operative 



Library Department. 61 

catalogue in Bates Hall, if the Trustees consider it advisable 
to continue this, and that some better method be devised 
for the general lighting of the Catalogue Room. Additional 
stack room for the shelving of books is urgently needed. 
And this observation has a direct bearing upon the ques- 
tion of keeping the reference library up to the highest 
standard. 

In previous reports attention has been directed to the 
general condition of the card catalogues and finding lists in 
the main building and in the branches. The committee this 
year have taken up this subject and conclude that it is 
chiefly a question of expense, and think the renewal may 
safely be left to be attended to when the Trustees think it is 
expedient. The renewal of the card catalogue of stack four, 
circulating fiction, reprinted last year, shows how easily and 
successfully a renewal can be made. 

The expediency of furnishing a typewriting machine at 
some of the branches is suggested. Commendation is ex- 
tended to a catalogue, the Avork of Mr. Hunt of the Catalogue 
Department, making available many monographs in large sets 
and collections, which would otherwise be buried under the 
main title. At the branches it was found that the attendants 
had used leisure moments to re-write old and worn cards and 
that the general condition of the catalogue and lists is ex- 
cellent. In this connection this committee takes occasion to 
praise the skilful management of the branches and the de- 
votion of the attendants to their duties. 

In conclusion, the chairman of this committee makes an 
interesting comparison between the report of the Library for 
186-4, when he last served on one of these committees, and 
the report for last jear, 1904-05. The death of Mr. Joshua 
Bates, sometimes spoken of as the founder of the Library, 
occurred in 1864. 

Finance. — The sub-committee on finance had not been 
called together in special meeting. The last printed report 
of the Trustees, recently issued, contains a financial statement 
from the Auditing Department for the fiscal year ending 
January 31, 1905, with the usual voluminous and detailed 
statistics. It did not appear to be expedient to call the com- 
mittee together to consider that report, inasmuch as a whole 
year of further business has already intervened. 

The system of accountability under which are conducted 
the receipts, payments, vouchers, counter-checks, etc., appears 
to be a strict and accurate one, and under the by-laws of the 
corporation the use of the funds is under the direct control 
of the Trustees. 



62 City Document No. 24. 

The attention of the Trustees might be respectfully called 
to the increased and increasing amount of printing done by 
the Department of Printing. 

Fine Arts. — The report of the sub-committee on this de- 
partment is submitted in full : 

In the department of Fine Aits the committee believes 
the accessions to be judiciously chosen and sufficient in 
number to include all the more desirable works as they appear. 
It is rather with the circulation of such works than with 
their acquisition that a problem is presented. 

The resources of the Library in this department seem to be 
insufficiently understood and made use of. The excellent 
bibliography of architecture published eleven years ago should 
be brought down to date and re-issued, and the professional 
organizations of art students and architects should be invited 
to co-operate in its distribution among their numbers. 

It is further suggested that an experiment be made in 
printing upon mailing cards such portions of the monthly 
bulletin as relate to works of fine arts, not including music, 
and that these mailing cards be sent regularly, at cost, to all 
registered applicants. In this way the titles of all works in 
this department would be on file in many an office, workshop 
or studio whose inmates would be thus tempted to make use 
of such books. 

The committee is impressed with the probable value of an 
index of plates compiled from illustrations in this depart- 
ment, and by selection from other departments of the 
Library. Such an index has been found of great assistance 
to students in the Architectural Department at Harvard and 
the Institute of Technology. It makes immediately avail- 
able all the illustrations of any one subject that exist among 
the volumes or photographs in those libraries. With a far 
greater wealth of illustrative material, there is in the Boston 
Library no subject index to make such material available. 
The making of such an index is, however, very expensive, 
although a good beginning was made upon it some years 
ago, thanks to a private gift. The need of it can only be 
pointed out to the Trustees, with the recommendation that 
the work be undertaken as soon as provided for through gifts 
or bequests. 

Printing and Binding. — This department was visited 
several times, and the work seemed to be progressing with 
due economy and despatch. The appearance of thorough- 
ness and devotion on the part of the employees, and the 
courteous and ready attention of the superintendents are 
especially commended. 



Library Department. 63 

The chairman of the general committee permits himself 
to add that those members of the committee who have inter- 
ested themselves in its work feel that they have themselves 
profited by the study of the detailed operations of a great 
and beneficent institution ; they recognize that, even with 
their best endeavor, their observations must in so short a 
time be in some measure hasty and superficial ; but they 
venture to indulge in the hope that some of their sugges- 
tions may be found practicable within the appropriations, and 
thought worthy, in the fullness of time, of bearing a little 
fruit. 

For the Committee, 

George B. Shattuck, 

Chairman. 



APPENDIXES. 



1905—1906. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



Page. 
I. Financial Statement ..... 67 

II. Extent of the Library by Years . . . 89 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, 

Including Branches . . . . . 91 

IV. Classification : Central Library . . broadside 
V. Classification : Branches .... 95 

VI. Registration ...... broadside 

VII. Circulation . 98 

VIII. Trustees for Fifty-four Years. Librarians, 100 
IX. Examining Committees for Fifty-four Years, 102 
X. Library Service, Including Sunday and Even- 
ing Service ....... 106 



Index to the Annual Report, 1905-1906 . 117 



APPENDIX I. 



Boston Public Library, 
Auditing Department, February 1, 1906. 

To the Trustees : 

Gentlemen, — The undersigned herewith presents a 
statement of the receipts and expenditures of the Library 
Department for the financial j'ear commencing February 1, 
1905, and ending January 31, 190G ; also a statement con- 
cerning the trust and other funds, statements covering special 
appropriations, and a statement of expenditures on account 
of the branches for the twelve 3^ears ending 1905-1906. 



Respectfully, 

A. A. Nichols, 



Auditor. 



Receipts. 



Appropriation, 1905-06 8310,000 00 

Payments for lost books ..... 305 07 

Income from Trust Funds, 1905-06 . . . 15,43100 

Interest credited : 

From J. S. Morgan & Co. . 831 49 

On bank deposits ... 44 43 



75 92 
Gift, 1905-06 : 

From Andrew Carneoie . . . . . 100 00 



Total receipts 8326,001 99 

Balances, February 1, 1905 : 
On deposit, J. S. Morgan & Co., London : 

From income of Trust Funds . 81,454 30 

On deposit. Baring Bros. & Co., 

London .... 72 75 

Interest accrued on bank deposits, 1,908 52 

Gifts, unexpended balance : 
From Thomas F. 

Temple . .825 00 

From Richard C. 

Humphreys . . 25 00 

50 00 



Carried forioard . . . $3,485 57 8326,001 99 



68 City Document No. 24. 

Brought forward . . . $3,485 57 $326,001 99 
Income of Trust Funds (unex- 
pended balance in city treas- 
ury) 10,882 99 



14,368 56 



Total balances and receipts .... $340,370 55 

Expenditures. 

Salaries (generalLibrary account, including branches) : 
General administra- 
tion . . $160,677 32 
Sunday and evening 

force . . . 19,952 17 



Books : 






?J cjuju^./ 


•±1/ 


From city appropria- 










tion . . .$21,025 41 






City app ropriation 










( London account) . 


1,718 


21 






From trust funds 










income (including 










Loudon account) 


10,882 


65 






From gift : 










Andrew Carnegie . 


22 


59 


33,648 


86 








Newspapers, from Todd fund 






income 


. 


. 


1,833 


71 


Periodicals, including 


London 






account . 


, 


. 


6,712 


00 


Binding Department : 










Salaries . . $20,148 41 






Stock 


2,031 


64 






Equipment . 


127 


29 






Electric power 


32 


00 






Contract work 


90 


78 






Contract work : (British 










patent specifications, 










paid through J. S. 










Morgan & Co., 










London) . 


320 


36 






Rent .... 


918 


50 






Miscellaneous expense, 


540 


15 


24,209 


13 








Printing Department : 










Salaries 


$7,241 


49 






Scock 


2,137 


26 






Equipment . 


760 


58 






Electric power 


219 


40 







Carried forward, $10,358 73 $247,033 19 $340,370 55 



Library Department. 



69 



Brought forward^ $10,358 73 
Contract work . . 899 89 

Rent .... 518 50 
Miscellaneous expense 478 68 

Furniture and fixtures (includes gifts 

to Station Q) . 
Gas . . . 
Electric lighting 
Cleaning 
Small supplies 
Stationery 
Rent 
Fuel 
Repairs 

Freights and cartage 
Transportation between Central Li 

brary and branches 
Delivery stations, rent and service 
Telephone service . 
Postage and telegrams 
Typewriting . 
Travelling expenses 
Grounds 
Insurance 

Vacuum Cleaning System, balance 
(See Library Building, Dartmouth 

street, furnishing. ) 
Premiums on Security Bond 
Draping building, death of Mayor 
Collins ..... 

Balance ..... 



$247,033 19 $340,370 55 



12,255 80 

6,117 65 

2,377 83 

2,102 60 

7,671 84 

2,965 42 

1,773 43 

11,009 08 

11,619 91 

6,169 21 

812 53 

4,349 19 

1,726 68 

566 29 

1,263 80 

20 83 

369 45 

152 06 

141 39 

450 19 



10 00 
144 40 



The balance includes the following items : 

Cash, city treasur}^. Trust Funds income 
On deposit, Loudon : 
J. S. Morgan & Co. : 

Trust Funds income . $1,927 42 
General Funds . 1,763 59 

$3,691 01 

Barino- Bros. & Co. . . . 72 75 



321,102 77 
$19,267 78 



$13,156 00 



Cash on deposit. New England Trust Company : 
Exchange account : 

Receipts from lost books, post- 
age, etc $395 07 

Interest accrued on deposits . 1,952 95 



3,763 76 



2,348 02 
819,267 78 



70 



City Document No. 24. 



GENERAL APPROPRIATION. 

Comparative Statement for Fiscal Years Ending January 31, 1905 and 1906. 



1904-1905. 1905-1906 



Salaries : 

General administration — 

Sunday and evening force 
Binding: 

Salai'ies 

Stock 

Contract work 

Equipment 

Electric power 

Books. 



Periodicals 

Furniture and fixtures. 
Gas , 



Electric lighting. 

Supplies 

Cleaning 

Printing: 

Equipment 

Stock 

Contract work. 

Salaries 

Electric power. 

Stationery 

Typewriting 

Fuel 



Rent of branches and reading rooms 

Repairs 

Freights and cartage 

Transportation between Central Library and branches — 

Delivery stations 

Travelling expenses 

Postage and telegrams 

Telephone service 

Miscellaneous expense ." 

Insurance 

Grounds 

Vacuum cleaning system, balance (see Library Building, 

Dartmouth street, furnishing) 

Premiums on surety bond 

Expense of celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the 

opening of the Public Library 

Draping building, death of Mayor Collins 

Remittance to J. S. Morgan & Co., London 



$154,746 05 
19,866 20 

19,834 35 

2.785 14 
42 la 
11 42 
39 10 

20,974 93 
6,804 72 
6,137 24 
2,,'J47 82 
2,389 04 
2,128 74 
6,640 93 

3,103 33 

2,966 41 

1.786 i)7 
6,867 98 

180 08 

1,684 21 

35 05 

15,.594 42 

9,9;]7 59 

6,197 19 

1,191 118 

4,244 18 

3,619 72 

592 26 

1,006 68 

241 27 

17 25 

445 67 

48 70 



729 83 



$160,677 32 
19,952 17 

20,148 41 

2,031 64 

90 78 

127 29 

32 00 

21,044 54 

6,668 88 

6,080 05 

2,720 48 

2,159 95 

2,965 42 

7,713 65 

760 58 
2,137 26 

899 89 
7,241 49 

219 40 

1,773 43 

20 83 

11,619 91 

12,446 08 

6,209 21 

1,.337 15 

4,349 19 

1,726 68 

369 45 
1,263 80 

566 29 

141 39 
152 06 

450 19 
10 00 



144 40 

3,848 74 



$305,437 65 



$310,100 00 



The cost of maintaining the branches makes part of the general items 
of the several appropriations : 

Cost of branches 1904-1905 $84,304 22 

Cost of branches 1905-1906 89,701 44 

The amount expended for newspapers, books and binding (not 
included above) paid from trust funds and city money in the hands of 
London bankers : 

For 1904-1905 $6,922 42 

For 1905-1906 6,648 52 

The amount expended for books, newspapers and photographs (not 
included above) paid from trust funds in the hands of the City Treasurer : 

For 1904-1905 $10,280 19 

For 1905-1906 8,157 99 



Library Department. 



71 



Special Appropriations. 

Library Building, Dartmouth street, balance of 

appropriation, February 1,1905 . . . $48,640 44 



Balance, February 1, 1906 



. $48,640 44 



This balance will be required to settle outstanding contracts. 

Library Building, furnishing, balance of city appro- 
priation, February 1, 1905 .... S2,349 81 

Payment : 

Vacuum Cleaning System ..... $2,349 81 



LONDON ACCOUNTS. 





Balances 

from 
1904-1905. 


Remittances 

and Interest, 

1905-1906. 


Total 
Credits. 


Expendi- 
tures, 
1905-1906. 


Balances 
Unex- 
pended. 


.J. S. Morgan & Co. 
J. S. Morgan & Co. 


£. s. d. 
296 19 S 


£. s. d. 
1,8U 6 11 

6 8 n 


£. s. d. 
2,117 15 6 


£. s. d. 
1,360 


£. s. d. 
757 15 6 


Baring Bros. & Co. 


15 


15 




15 










311 19 8 


1,8-20 15 10 


2,132 15 6 


1,360 


772 15 6 



72 



City Docctment No. 24. 



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74 



City Document No. 24. 



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Library Department. 75 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

BiGELOW Fund. — This is a gift from the late John P. Bigelow, of 
Boston, in August, 1850, when Mayor of the City. 

The incQme from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for 
the time being. 

Bates Fund. — This is a gift from the late Joshua Bates, of London 
in March, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $50,000 00 

"The income^ only of this fund is to be, each and every year, ex- 
pended in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority 
as may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the Mayor 
of the City for the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fund. — This is the bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch, 
of Boston. Received January, 1890. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $10.000 00 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the pur- 
chase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and 
astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a gift from the late Jonathan Phillips, 
of Boston, in April, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston four per cent Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said Library. 

Also a bequest in his will, dated September 20, 1849. 
Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $20,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a Free Public Library. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of Abbott Law- 
rence, of Boston. Received May, 1860. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the 
purchase of books for the said Library having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of Edward Law- 
rence, of Charlestown. Received May, 1886. The following clause 
from his will explains its purpose : 

" To hold and apply the income, and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $500 00 



76 City Document No. 24. 

Pierce Fund. — This is a gift from Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, December 
27, 1873. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $5,000 00 

TowxsEND Fund. — This is a gift from William Minot and William 
Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. Townsend, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain 23ortion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they may think meritorious. Said 
executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City of Boston 
as one of such institutions, and attached the following conditions to 
the legacy : " The income only shall, in each and every year, be ex- 
pended in the purchase of books for the use of the Library ; each of 
which books shall have been published in some one edition at least five 
years at the time it may be so purchased." Keceived April, 1879. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $4,000 00 

TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of 
Boston, he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his 
books and manuscripts, in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sum, the City is required to spend not less than 
one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five years 
next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the rate 
of five per cent, per annum) in the purchase of books in the Spanish 
and Portuguese languages and literature, five years old in some one edi- 
tion. At the end of twenty-five years the income of said sum is to be 
expended annually in the purchase of books of permanent value, either 
in the Spanish or Portuguese language, or in such other languages as 
may be deemed expedient by those having charge of the Library. 
These books bequeathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible 
for reference or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the 
Library building. If these bequests are not accepted by the City, and 
the trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts 
and money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. 

In order that the City might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of Mr. Ticknor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the City, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said bequests 
on behalf of the City, and made suitable arrangements for the care and 
custody of the books and manuscripts. Keceived April, 1871. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $4,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund. — This is a gift made in June, 1863, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of 
the association, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French 
and J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a man- 
ner as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on 
the Public Library, attaching to it the following conditions : "In trust 
that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be expended 
in the purchase of books of permanent value for the use of the free 
Public Library of the City, and as far as practicable of such a character 
as to be of special interest to young men." The Trustees expressed a 
preference for books relative to Government and Political Economy. 
Received June, 1863. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four percent Bond, for . $1,000 00 



Library Department. 77 

Treadwell Fund. — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, 
legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the life of his 
wife for her benefit, and, after her decease, to divide the residue then 
remaining in the hands of the trustees as therein provided, and convey 
one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public Library in the City 
of Boston. 

The City Council accepted said bequest, and aiithorized the Trustees 
of the Public Library to receive the same, and to invest it in the City of 
Boston Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said trustees 
in such manner as they may deem for the best interests of the Librai-y. 
Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent Bonds, for . $5,550 00 
Invested in the City of Boston three and one-half per cent 

Bonds, for 1,400 GO 

Invested in 16 shares Boston & Albany R. R. Co. stock, par 

value $100 each 1,600 00 

Invested in 6 shares Boston & Providence R. R. Co. stock, 

par value $100 each 600 00 

Invested in 12 shares Fitchburg R. R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1,200 00 

Invested in 1 share Vermont & Massachusetts R. R. Co. 

stock, par value $100 each 100 00 

Cash in treasury 37 69 

•$10,487 69 



Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late 
of Boston, the object of which is stated in the following extract from 
her will : 

"I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000 to be invested 
on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books 
published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own pri- 
vate library, and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." 
Bequest accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. Re- 
ceived April, 1884. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 

ScHOLFiELD Fund. — Bequest of Arthur Scholfield, who died in 
New York, January 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 18, 
1889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum of 
$11,800, which represents the income of said fund, received by him up 
to the time of his death, to be added to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $50,000 00 
" u t; .t u II u ^ 11,800 00 



$61,800 00 



Green Fund. — Gifts from Dr. Samuel A. Green, of Boston, of 
$2,000, the income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books 
relating to American History, 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 
" " " Four " " " . .500 00 

" " " Three " " " . 500 00 

$2,000 00 



78 City Document No. 24. 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund. — Gift of a citizen 
of South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received September, 1ST9. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $100 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund. — This is a gift from the 
family of Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received January, 
1896. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $500 00 

Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund. — Received from 
the estate of Charles Mead the amount of his legacy, to constitute the 
" Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund," for the promotion 
of the objects of the Public Library, in such manner as the government 
of said Library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the Library, to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received October, 1896. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $2,500 00 

Artz Fund. — This is a gift made in November, 1896, by Miss Vic- 
TORiNE Thomas Artz, of Chicago; the income " to be employed in the 
purchase of valuable rare editions of the writings, either in verse or 
prose, of American and of foreign authors." These books are to be 
known as the "Longfellow Memorial Collection." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . -Sio^ooo qq 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund. — This fund was received 
from the members of the Papyrus Club, May, 1897. The income thereof 
is to be expended for the purchase of books in memory of their late 
member, John Boyle O'Reilly. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund. — This is a gift made in 
April, 1897, by the Association of Ofificers of the Twentieth Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry. It is to be used for the purchase of books of 
a military and patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove appropri- 
ated as a Memorial of the Twentieth Regiment. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $.5,000 00 

Todd Fund. — This is a gift made In October, 1897, by William C. 
Todd, of Atkinson, New Hampshire. The income is to be expended 
annually in payment for such current newspapers of this and other 
countries as the board of officers for the time being having charge of the 
Public Library of the City of Boston shall purchase. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $50,000 00 

Bradlee Fund. — A bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee, 
D.D., of Boston, to the Boston Public Library. Received November, 
1897. 
Invested in one City of Boston Three an done-half per cent 

Bond, for SLOOO 00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund. — This is a contribu- 
tion from the friends of the late Henry Sargent Codman, to be used 
to perpetuate the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books 
upon landscape gardening. Received January, 1898. 



Library Department. 79 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for , • S2,800 00 

Cash in City Treasury, January 31, 1906 .... 54 41 



$2,854 41 

Ford Fund. — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. Received June, 1900. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three per cent Bond, for . $6,000,00 

Cutter Fund. — A bequest of Abram E. Cutter, the income of 
which is to be expended for the purchase of books and for binding for 
the Abram E. Cutter collection. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three per cent Bond, for . $4,000 00 

Lewis Fund. — A bequest of Mrs. John A. Lewis for the purchase 
of such old and rare books as shall be fitly selected to augment the col- 
lection known as the John A. Lewis Library, to be known as the Mrs. 
John A. Lewis Fund. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for S5,000 00 

Billings Fund. — A bequest of Robert Charles Billings, "This 
sum to constitute a permanent fund for said Library, to be called the 
Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used for the pur- 
pose of the purchase of books for said Library." 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bonds $100,000 00 

Center Fund. — Bequest of Joseph H. Center. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond $14,000 00 

Cash in City Treasury, January 31, 1906 .... 538 25 



$14,538 25 



Recapitulation of Public Library Trust Funds. 

Robert Charles Billings Fund .$100,000 00 

Scholfield Fund , . 61,800 00 

Bates Fund 50,000 00 

Todd Fund 50,000 00 

Phillips Fund 20,000 00 

Center Fund 14,538 25 

Treadwell Fund 10,487 69 

Phillips Fund 10,000 00 

Bowditch Fund 10,000 GO 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000 00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 10,000 00 

Artz Fund 10,000 00 

Ford Fund 6,000 00 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 5,000 00 

Pierce Fund 5,000 00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000 00 

Townsend Fund 4,000 00 

Carried forward $881,825 94 



80 City Document No. 24. 

Brought forward $381,825 94 

Ticknor Fund 4,000 00 

Cutter Fund 4,000 00 

Codman Memorial Fund 2,854 41 

Charles Mead Fund 2,500 00 

Green Fund 2,000 00 

Bigelow Fund 1,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 1,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund 1,000 00 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

Bradlee Fund 1,000 00 

Edward Lawrence Fund 500 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fupd .... 500 00 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund .... 100 00 

$403,280 35 



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to 




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tc_ to 


to CT 


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CO 






CO 
















CO 




^ 




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m 


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h 


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^^ 


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o 


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X. 


t- C5 


CO f C3 


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© 


IT 


oo 




QC 


05 


tc 


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to la 


CC 


1- 




in 


o. 1 CO 


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o 




o 


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IT 


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c 


to 


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o 


© 


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ei 








CO 


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& 




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CD 




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CD ' X 


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CO 


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in 1 CO 




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CO 


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m 


cc 


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in 


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CO 


to 


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to 




c; 




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31 




o 


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in 


































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CO 


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m 




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CO 


^^ 


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t- c 


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CO 


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^ 


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c: 


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cc 


00 


o 


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tc 


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X 


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cr 


in 


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CO 


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35 


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X 


o- 


o 




CO 


^ 


CO 


r« 




>n 






to 


o 


to 


C^ 






X 


X 


CO to 




CO 


05 




t- 


w 








to 


o 


V 


t- 


cc 


t-^ 




I' 






































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CO 










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CO 








CO 


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m 




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CO 


CO 


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p. 


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tc 


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o 


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CO 


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la 


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cr 


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to 






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in 




to 


2 


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CO 






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to 








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oo 


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c^ 


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to 


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X 


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in 


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o 


CO 


CO 




o 




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t~ t~ 


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in 


6 


CO 


00 


f^ 


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r^ 


§ 


o 


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cr 


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O! 


M 




o 








ci- 


in 




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C 




X 


t- 


la 


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IM 






t^ 




in 


IC 




C 




t- 


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CO 


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CO 


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CO 


04 






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to 

1 


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3 


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m 


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to 


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cc 


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t- 


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05 


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,— . 


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t^ 


ta 


CO 




to 


to 








to 






■* 


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e^ 


CO 


X 


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IC 


t-;_ 


o 


■^ 


^ 


o_ 








oi_ 


o- 


CO 


X 




































oc 








ci" 


(N 






CO* 


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co" 








CO 


S' 




«» 


» 




«■ 


«f 




^ 


S' 




m 




t- o 


?• 


o 


^ 


CO 


o 


t- 


cr 


^-, 


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r-1 


^ 


f^ 


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Ci 


'll 


t- 


00 




00 


c- 


CO 


»r 




a- 


c 


Ci- 


OO 


to CO 


t- 




C5 


t^ 


to 




r^ 


X 


,—1 


IN 


Ol 


a- 


en 


X 


CO 


t^ CO 


cr 


Tj< 




QC 






to 




CO 


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00 


to CO 




CO 








to 


5C 




c 


00_ 


o 


CO 


tc 


00 


X 






in 


CO 01 


C 


o 


































QCl 








ei" 


























^ 




m 


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« 


^ 




m 


£ 




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no 








w 








to 






























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C3 




W 
H 
oo 




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n 






rt 








2 
O 
H 
S3 
O 


.2 






o 

-3 
o 
X. 

Ch 




Q 




o 

OP 

Hi 




1-9 

Ph 

•< 
o 

(-H 




c 

s 

Ch 








s 


■a 




PS 




« 




p 




r- 




< 




•a 








« 


a 


Q, 


o 




fl 


a 


o 




a 


c 


S 




a 


G. 






a 


c; 


oc 




03 


J 




a 




■»( 




03 


Ot 






a 


m 


c 




c 


QQ 






c 




j; 




_0 




C 






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^ 


c 






^ 


< 




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^ 


c 




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^ 


H 






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p 


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ct 


o 








o 


s 


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c 


o 


c 








o 


>- 




T 


o 


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r 


o 


>> 




'^ 


o 


>- 






pH 


ft 




V 


S3 


fc 




W 


P5 


& 




tr 


P5 


&. 





Library Department. 



83 













o 


1.-5 


CD 


_i 


o 


in 




t^ 


X 


1 * 


X 


m 


IT 


,^ 












o 


o 




in 


00 


o 


33 


OI 


c:3 




in 


c- 


c- 


CO 












o 


lO 


■^ 


3; 


33 


CO 


3- 


CD 


— 


CO 


CO 


,^ 




f^ 












(?■ 


00 










'd 




CO 




X 


■^ 




CO 
















S 










o 




1 


o 


















«» 




4© 


«» 








s. 1 «& 








0" 


























s 




1 


«» 




4» 












o 


■^ 


~~5 


■* 


O 




t- 






1 CD 


cc 


-* 




CD 














CO 


CD 




O 


CD 




■^ 




lO 


o- 






■<J^ 












o 


m 


O 


lO 


CC 


CO 


■<a 


CO 


t-^ 


1 tr- 




t- 




01 














o 




o 


•<s< 


O 




o 




CO 




t-- 






















00 






H 








c 


^ 


C 














Iff 




i» 


X 






^ 


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rq" 






























1 


^ 




«» 












~3 


-* 


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o 


o 


.^ 


~n 


Tj^ 


[^ 


1 "^ 


c<- 


cc 


ff 


X 












o 


-* 


^ 


CO 


o 


lO 


in 


o 


t- 


t- 


c 


0- 


c 















CO 


CT) 


't 


OS 


« 


CD 




C/D 




1 CO 


If 


t— 1— 


^ 




















3 






CO 






t- cc 




CO 












■^ 




c*: 






s 


o 


■^ 


1 5 


3- 




o 


CD 












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^ 


» 








4» 1 4& 


f» 




of 


























s 




1 








•» 












3 


r-i 


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00 




PH 


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3- 




1 rH 












o 


Qi 




CO 


o 






(N 


tr- 




OT 


<= 


S3 1 CN 












"^ 


<3j 


00 


s\ 


J5 


f^ 


^ 


CO 


ee 


CD 


CO C 


t- 1 ^ 


















I- 


lO 


33 




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C 


CO 






33 1 in 












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c 


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s 


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ro 




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in t- 




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CO 


c- 


o 


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^ 


IT 


IT 


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CO 


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X 


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CO 


o 




33 


IT 


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33 cr 


X 


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■* 






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o 










t- ^ 


in 1 X 1 












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s 










CO 




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c» 




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«» 






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1* 


f m 


if} 




























* 












1* 












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lO 


~s 


CO 


o 


in 


~^. 


CO 


cr 


X 


~C 






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c 


C-1 


c^ 








cr 


CO 




33 


CO 


-a 















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CO 


»r 


.^ 


CD 


f^ 


X 


— 




PH 






cc 


CO 


















o 




I- 






t- 



























c<- 


X 


^ 




c» 


00 


cr 


M 


«^ 


cc 


r^ 












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m 


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^ 


^ 


f m 






^ 


oi 






































* 












3 


lO 


^ 


CO 


o 


iCi 




CD 


f; 


X^ 






c 















c 


■^ 


o 


CO 


o 


■^ 




O 


a 


X 






<> 


?i 












(j2 


—5 


JJ- 


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00 


33 




p_, 




^ 









r^ 














CD 


c 






CD 




o 




33 








in 
















Cf 










X 




CO 






c; 


CO 












0f 




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» 






^ 


# 


r » 






# 


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lO 


^ 


o 


— 


in 


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00 




^ 






cc 


CD 












c 


o 


c- 


tM 


o 




ac 


33 


CO 


o 






■* 














oc 


tr- 


t- 


d 


CO 


^^ 


■n 


CO 


■^ 


■^ 








in 












-J 


ee 


(N 


■^ 




CO 


cc 


33 




























■* 


03 








CO 




c? 




















«■ 




«& 


^ 






» 


# 


c » 






# 


r » 












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33 


OC 


t- 


o 


lO 




00 


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I^ 


t— 












c 


■O 


*? 


-J-J 


o 


OI 




^5 


OC 


X 








r-^ 












cc 


lO 


CD 


33 


CO 


t;; 


ir 


o 




n 






'I 


-* 














CO 




CD 








00 


r- 








t- 


t- 
























c 


05 


c 


M 




















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s 


m 






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f. 


to 


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t^ 


m 


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o 




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F 


t- 












cc 


o 


e 


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1— 1 


33 






oc 


X 






3 


33 












^ 


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IT 


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-* 


^ 




CD 


c 


o 






■^ 


-* 














I- 






OI 


CD 






c- 








c 



















S- 


33 












eo 






cc 


CD 












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m 


t» 






^ 


# 


»■ «■ 






^ 


f 4» 


























» 
















yz 


_» 


~~C= 


— 


^ 


CO 


~5^ 


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CO 




■^ 


o 




^ 






a 


X 




00 


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li: 


00 


<= 


CO 




t- 


OS 




cc 


o 




CO 












(X 




(* 


^ 


CO 


M* 


QC 


Tj 


lO 




cc 


(M 


CO 


o 






X 


X 




ir 




00 








1 CD 


o 




05 


CO 












CO 




cc 


5 




o 


S- 


(M 


ci- 


OO 


CO 




■>t 


1- 


V 


« 












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s 


» 




^ 


m 






e© 


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> €& 






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> s 






to 


cr 


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o 










ir 


in 








CO 




^ 


CO 




33 


o 


CD 


ts 


33 








■^ 




CO 






X 


X 




c 


CI 


X 


^ 


CI 


CO 


O 


in 






3- 


33 


o- 


CO 






3- 


33 










o 




lO 


CC 








ir 




IT 










in 




If 








c<- 




■^ 


cc 








CO 


cr 








■^ 












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•» 




¥f 






# 


» «» 


# 


>■ <» 






# 


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o 


■^ 


"^ 


CO 


~o 


— . 


^ 


lO 








o c 




in 






E 







o 


ffl 


o 


a* 


c 


00 


l^ 


lO 






'^ 


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c 


in 






X 


X 






QC 


^ 


05 


00 


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G^ 


-N 






^ 


-* t- Tt 


PH 








f_( 








tf 


00 


cc 


t- 


t-- 


CO 








CD 3- 


oc 


X 






t- 










t- 


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(N 






33 






? 


CO A^ •— 


o» 






cr 


CO 










e-T 


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« 






«fi 


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tf 


> ^ 




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^ 










































oi 




































































c3 






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c; 












ci 






a 










2 




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o 




H 






c 








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S 




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'^ 




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< 

a 




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w 




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s 




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Oh 
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o 




a: 






c 










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"C 






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S5 




g 




X- 










O 




M 




o 




H 




a 




O 






0. 






S 




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H 




^ 




H 




^ 




Ph 




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fi- 








a 
ci 




> 








■«! 








U 




OQ 










o 

S5 




a 


O 


^ 


S 


oc 


f^ 


to 


03 


1 


Z; 


a 


§ 




ai 


^ 






c 


00 


C 


^ 


c 




C 




<u 


CD 


C 


1 






a 


OC 








'E 


^ 


c 




■£ 


4^ 


a 




"C 


iA 


c 


;- 







T 


M 


c 






r 


o 








o 


C 


< 


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o 


c 


rt 






c« 


C 


c 






f 


o 


>' 




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o 


> 




"ci 


o 


> 




? 




cc 


c 








a- 


p 


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cr 


K 


^ 




n 


^ 


V 


& 




V 


p: 


p^ 





84 



City Document No. 24. 



to 
© 


t- -H 


c 


X 


Cl 


^-. 


IT 


-* 


CO c 


« 


■* 




^ 


•^ OS 1 t^ 


O -3< 




m 


CO 00 


OI 


-* 




X 








•^ 


CO t- X 


O r-l 


<£ 


^ 


ir 


Cl 


c 


31 


m 


cc 


r-I 


X 


^^ 


CO •* OS 


© 


ir 










in 


<= 


CO 




t^ X 


CO 


CO 


CO --I CO 1 


M '^ 




1 


CO r-l 




o_ 


ir 


CO 


o_ 






u- 


CO X 










i© 




cT 


«■ 




«» 


■» rH- 1 Co" 


^ 


» 




m 








«f 






m 










1* 




t^ -— ' 


"^ 


CO 


~s 






CO 








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87 



$757 79 
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LiBRAKY Department. 



89 



APPENDIX II. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 







a 






a 






a 
























^ ?? 






no OD 






<« S 






=j.« 






5 <a 






0.2 






£ S 






s'E 






S sh 




Feaks. 






Years. 


B ^ 
o — 




Yeaks. 


5 2 


1 


1852-53 


9,668 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


37 


1888 


505,872 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


38 


1889 


520,508 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


39 


1890 


536,027 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


40 


1891 


556,283 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


23 


1874-76 


276,918 


41 


1892 


576,237 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


42 


1893 


597,152 


7 


1858-69 


78,043 


26 


1876-77 


312,010 


43 


1S94 


610,375 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


44 


1895 


628,297 


9 


1S60-61 


97,386 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


45 


1896-97 


663,763 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


46 


1897-98 


698,888 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


47 


1898-99 


716,050 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


48 


1899-1900 


746,383 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


SI 


1882-83 


422,116 


49 


1900-1901 


781,377 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


50 


1901-1902 


812,264 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


51 


1902-1903 


835,904 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


34 


1885 


460,993 


52 


1903-1904 


848,884 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


35 


1886 


479,421 


53 


1904-1905 


871,050 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


36 


1S87 


492,956 


54 


1905-1906 


878,933 



90 



City Document No. 24. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES JANUARY 31, 1906, 
ACCORDING TO LOCATION. 





684,681 
•2,775 




6,389 
192 




Lower Mills (Station A) 

Roslindale (Station B) 

Mattapan (Station D) 

Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 

Allston (Station G) 






>>j= r Fellowes AthensBum 

•^ i N Collection owned by City. 

qJd 

K L Total, Eoxbury branch. 


687,456 

25,120 
10,464 


3,722 
183 

1,803 
155 


Codman Sq. (Station J) 

Mt. Pleasant (Station K) 

Broadway Ext. (Station P) . . 
Upham's Corner (Station Q) . 
Warren Street (Station R)... 
Roxbury Crossing(Station S) 
Boylston Station (Station T). 
Industrial School (Station W) 
Orient Heights (Station Z) .. 
North Street (Station 22) 


1,649 


35,584 
16,372 
25,958 
18,585 
14,400 
14,885 
15,876 
14,786 
14,005 


197 
2,508 




2,149 
231 




East Boston 

Jamaica Plain 


425 
185 




162 


Sonth End 


822 


West End 


254 







Library Department. 



91 



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92 



City Document No. 24. 



1905-1906. 


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s 




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t 

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£ 
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bi 

f 

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£ 
c 

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b 

c 

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a 

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t> 

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1 
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c 


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Library Department. 



93 



PLACED OX THE SHELVES FEBRUARY 1, 1905, TO JANUARY 31, 1906. 



Placed on 
the Shelves. 



Condemned, 

missing, 
transferred. 



Net Gain. 



Central Library 

Central Library, Duplicate room 

Brighton branch 

Charlestown branch 

Dorchester branch 

East Boston branch 

Jamaica Plain branch 

Roxbury branch, city collection 

Roxbury branch, Fellowes Athenreum. 

South Boston branch 

South End branch 

West End branch 

West Roxbury branch 

Lower Mills reading room 

Roslindale reading room 

South End reading room 

Mattapan reading room 

Mt. Bowdoin reading room 

Allston reading room 

North Brighton reading room 

Codman Square reading room 

Mt. Pleasant reading room 

Broadway Extension reading room 

Upham's Corner reading room 

Warren Street reading room 

Roxbury Crossing reading room 

Boylston Station reading room 

Ward Nine delivery station 

Industrial School reading room 

Andrew Square reading room 

Orient Heights reading room. 

North Street reading room 



23,210 

1,282 

502 

776 

634 

1,014 

589 

IS 

1,091 

1,292 

925 

612 

387 

8 

366 



7 

S9 
155 



1,658 

8 

315 

1,121 

233 

38 

186 



Total. 



36,568 



4,040 

11,945 

553 

5,195 
427 

1,044 
651 
305 
503 

1,221 

680 

654 

66 



54 

168 

1 

37 



146 

9 

2 

247 

68 

2 

14 

1 

395 



246 
3 



28,685 



19,170 

loss 10,663 

loss 51 

loss 4,419 

207 



loss 
loss 



loss 



loss 



loss 



loss 



loss 



30 

62 
287 
588 

71 
245 

42 

321 

8 

312 

168 

6 

52 

155 

146 

1,649 

6 

68 

1,053 

231 

24 
185 
395 

13 
246 

11 

17 

7,883 



94 



City Document No. 24. 






CC O Ol iC itl « M M 
I— OOOiO'ttOOO 



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coot— lOCBt— t-0503 7q(MO-^00CqC0 

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cxTt-'eo'c^f cd"co^ iO moi r-^ 



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t-'cM*" {M^o" rt'-'t" 



lOOSOOOCOi-H— iCOiMO3O5O:00-^rH 
OOCOiCCO'*'*CJOJ(M(MCD^C»'M(M 
C0OC0Oc0»0«3C0C0-*»-lOO-^'*<M 



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t-^of i-Tco'" o'-^i" 



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CO o'co c^Tco'co" lo" oo'cT T-T 



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^ <A r> U 9 U %X. 



^ I — I -U -tJ ^^ C ^ t^ 



APPENDIX IV. 

CKNTRAL LIBRARY CLASSIFICATIONS. 





CLASSES. 


Gekeeal Collection. 




Special I.ibkabies. 


■ 


6 

3 


1868. 


1861. 


1866. 


1869. 


1871. 


187S. 


1876. 1877. 1880. 


1889. 


1890. 1892. 


1891. 189*. 


1894. 


1896. 


1896. 


1897. 




1898. 






1 


ill 


o « " 


till 

.J 


ill 

►J 


s 


9 E 
pa" 


"25 


a.2 
CM 


«5 


it 




4 

.a — 




II 




1= 
Oh" 






1 ■ 

■<'s 


III 


1 

il 
O 




II 


11 


as 


£2 




S - 
1'° 


1 

il 






2,046 
16,639 
18,704 
8C,607 
67,881! 
29,73f. 
12,8'JO 
2-2,784 
11,726 
3,763 
19,404 
26,317 
7,681 
40,679 
27,056 
7,G32 
9,778 
25,815 
20,725 
26,760 
0,250 
9,862 
8,744 
17,1)4 


13 
023 
671 
3,223 
1,711 
646 
183 
57S 
265 
75 
681 
606 
109 
1,228 
1,361 
237 
230 
468 
786 
819 
441 
611 
4J0 
888 






2,069 
17,142 
19,391 
89,493 
69,518 
30,350 
13,046 
23,328 
11,959 

3,836 
19,961 
26,884 

7,789 
41,864 
28,288 

7,847 
10,000 
26,256 
21,476 
26,641 

9,661 
10,340 

9,161 
18,002 


249 

35 

17 
108 

77 

60 

11 
9 
9 

22 

2 

1,387 

58 

146 

6 

66 
3 
3 

15 
4,843 

14 


322 
614 

655 

1,095 

869 

523 

317 

1,426 

1,179 

96 

329 

740 


6 

5 

43 

835 

114 

7 

2 

8 

197 






21 
691 
137 
813 
3,214 
2,474 
338 
264 
617 
200 
226 
471 


16 
33 
424 
387 
2,469 
669 
184 
191 
23 
65 
61 
53 
































31 
13 

601 
903 
1,220 
393 
76 
69 
66 
64 
178 
462 
22 
415 
49 
60 
21 
11 
S7 
67 
21 


2 
98 
28 
1,261 
63 
166 
8 
88 

2 

173 

56 

89 

7 

2,467 

7,170 

263 

447 

86 

87 

168 

3 




II. 
III. 

IV. 




13 
32 
131 

71 
27 
22 
42 
21 

3 
20 
11 

I 
31 
102 
12 

6 
23 
23 
32 
40 
32 

8 
27 


12 

106 
8 
4 
6 
2 
1 

4 

28 

12 

27 
10 
2 
4 
13 
6 
6 
1 

3 




278 

54 

371 

■ 22 

68 

31 

26 

136 

4,410 

6 

250 






13 
1 

689 
19 

8 


75 

270 

4 

1 

1 
1 


8 

2 

1,165 

6,632 

439 

3 

1,014 

1 

1 

28 

1 








1 


47 
10 
184 
10 


22 
141 
522 
369 
221 
16 
56 
11 
4 
34 
66 


1 
1 

31 

1 




3 
21 
2,079 
346 
6 
7 
10 
4 
1 
4 
8 








General hUtory, biography, and geograpliy 








11 


1 

442 




669 


683 


1,397 
34 
3 
























35,282 
14,048 
26,473 
14,210 
























1 

3 










1 
4 
















































1 

5 
























21,002 
36,737 
7,968 
47,690 
33,232 
16.274 
13,.>i81 
26,909 
J2,l(r2 
31,828 
10,367 
10,359 
19,600 
19,057 










1 


14 




5 








6,334 




















3,630 
1,361 
98 
307 
76 
170 
135 
13 


685 
62 




381 
121 
24 
63 
5 
32 
63 
36 


246 
130 
17 
28 
27 
89 
48 
16 


248 
67 
2 
2 
6 
31 
2 
59 




25 
33 

1 


2 




10 

1 


1 






3 
1 


24 
659 




6 
6 






.XI V. 


































14 
23 

1 
25 








108 






t 3,019 




2 


61 
49 
3 
3 
11 










XVII. 


Medical science 




4 






3 










.XVIII. 


















113 

1 
373 








XI.X. 






21 

S 


1 

1 






1 














X.Xa. 




4 

16 










2 






XX!.. 
























.XXIa. 


Music 




























10,348 












1 
20 




XXI6. 




13 

37 


30 


1 
1 
20 
1 


1-29 


14 


43 

84 

93 

3.321 


401 
10 

1 
















12 


34 


271 


3 

1 




97 




XXII. 


Bound volumes of miscellaneous pamjililets 






50 












XXIII. 


Bound volumes of miscellaneous ninnuscrlpts 


C52 








652 




47 




13 




2 








160 










16 




1,037 
3,322 


XXIV. 


Shakespeare 






























XXV. 


Hooks for the blind 


687 
20,465 
22,376 


10 
1,621 
2,316 


1,793 
1,186 


60 
4 


697 
20,123 
23,601 












































XXVI. 


Stack land Juvenile Fiction 
















































20,123 
23,501 


XXVII. 


Deposit collection 




































































































Totals 


602,673 
13,424 


20,609 
1,28-2 


3,709 
10,627 


331 
1,418 


579,142 
2,761 


7,189 


13,883 


2,052 


129 


6,428 


13,697 


6,392 


669 


740 


422 


9.322 


696 


1,444 


3,019 


10,349 


424 


2,286 


792 


2,606 


6,34S 


466 


4,703 


12,702 


684,695 




D upllcate r oom account 
























































Totals 


676,097 


21,791 


14,236 


1,749 


681,903 


7,189 


13,883 


2,062 


129 


6,428 


13,697 


5,392 




740 


422 


9,322 


669 


1,444 


3,019 


10,340 


424 


2,286 


792 


2,506 


6,:M6 


466 


4,703 


12,702 


687,466 








' 



ri«« t'^?r.^oi.';7.fi"/i»„"n;J"if "^®.? "^^J*;?' f'^^i*'^^ ^Y:-' ^^''^^ embracing several rountries. and collected works of bletoria 
UaBB VIU.lncluUeB also Belgium, tbe NuUierlandB, Switzerland, and Ibe Scandinavian natlona. 
UaBB XI V . Includes political science and ethics, education, etc. 



Class XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, etc. 

Class XXI V. docs not include the Sbakcspenre collection of the general library. 

Note. ~ The dates ^'iven in the special libraries column show the year when these collections were acquired by the Library. 



Library Department. 



95 



APPENDIX V. 



CLASSIFICATION. 



Bkanch Libraries. 

As reported by Custodians of branches January 31, 1906. 



'^ 



W 



Roxbury. 



^< 



m 



Reference books 

Genealogy and heraldr)-, 

Biography 

History 

Fine arts, archjeology 

Geography, travels 

Language — 

Literature 

Medicine, hygiene 

Natural science 



Philosophy, ethics, edu- 
cation' 



Religion, theology. 

Sociology 

Law 



Useful and industrial 
arts 



Amusements, games, 
sports 



Fiction 

Books for the young 
Bound periodicals. . 
Unclassified 



415 

12 

1,478 

1,63-2 

319 
1,071 

101 
1,757 

104 

607 

322 

324 

223 

16 

333 

89 

4,436 

2,231 

902 



1,473 

6 

1,596 

2,436 

366 

1,013 

84 

1,721 

84 

500 

225 

455 

166 

20 

243 

83 
4,490 
2,353 
1,547 
7,095 



416 

1 

1,49.- 

1,526 

360 

1,016 

90 

1,525 

107 

501 

223 
230 
139 

9 

278 

88 

5,419 

2,850 

1,363 

949 



380 

23 

1,216 

1,441 

289 

777 

76 

1,513 

93 

437 

191 
191 
141 

IS 

244 

78 

3,608 

3,023 

595 

66 



449 

5 

1,374 

1,308 

357 

832 

100 

1,342 

84 

514 

220 
225 
152 



86 
4,098 
2,161 
1,295 



185 

35 

937 

741 

147 

616 

45 

939 

61 

197 

138 
244 

52 
5 

112 

56 
3,483 

503 
1,468 

505 



1,327 

76 

2,625 

3,059 

626 

1,650 

96 

4,172 

290 
1,142 

379 

1,179 

415 

77 

435 

59 
2,112 
2,029 
3,372 



45' 

3 

1,284 

1,420 

391 

893 

73 

1,505 

117 

540 

231 

272 
145 
23 



4,124 

2,495 

1,475 

63 



440 

5 

1,575 

1,426 

334 

825 

82 

1,579 

120 

493 

264 
214 
142 
25 

236 

80 

4,090 

1,796 

965 

95 



636 

1,354 

1,370 

397 

917 

143 

1,351 

91 

654 

273 
864 
257 

8 

367 

83 

2,521 

2,012 

799 



213 
1 
519 
562 
133 
379 

27 
548 

33 
225 

75 

64 

72 

6 

110 

26 

1,375 

1,680 

317 

24 



Total. 



16,372 



25,956 



18,585 



14,400 



14,885 



10,464 



25,120 15,876 

I 



14,786 



14,005 



6,389 



96 



City Document No. 24. 



CLASSIFICATION OF HOLDERS OF "LIVE CARDS" 
JANUARY 31, 1906. 

By Sex and Occupation. 



Classes. 



Permanent 
Residents. 



^Non- 
residents. 



Males. 
Over 16 years of age. 

Professional classes 

Teachers 

Students 

Business men 

Unemployed 

Laborers 

Under 16 years of age. 

Clerks 

Office and errand boys 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools 

Pupils of Grammar schools 

Other students 



Females. 
Over 16 years of age. 

Professional classes 

Teachers 

Students 

Business women 

Married 

Single, unemployed 

Under 16 years of age. 



Clerks . 



Errand girls 

Unemployed 

Pupils of Latin and High schools. 

Pupils of Grammar schools 

Other students 

Totals 



2,610 


188 


414 


219 


1,962 


1,220 


7,290 


156 


2,318 


516 


396 


8 


1,716 


141 


913 


11 


42S 


18 


1,262 


23 


9,283 


32 


187 


80 



602 


196 


2,154 


320 


2,082 


1,741 


4,561 


182 


8,043 


263 


8,829 


618 


2,072 


113 


640 


2 


1,687 


121 


1,214 


28 


9,316 


76 


314 


96 


70,293 


6,368 



1 Including persons temporarily sojourning in Boston. 
N B —Of the 3,551 teachers' cards issued prior to February 1, 1906, 1,241 are live 
cards-" of these, 993 are held bv permanent residents, in addition to their ordinary 
cards'fnot included in permanent residents' column above), nud 248 are held by non- 



residents (whicli are included in nonresidents column above). 

Of the 1,109 special privilege cards issued prior to 1 ebruary 1, 1906 
cards- 281 are held by permanent residents, and 122 are held by non-resi 



1906, 403 are live 
sidents. 



APPENDIX VI. 



REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

Statistical Beport, February 1, 1905, to January SI, 1906. 



CARDS ISSUED FKBHUARY 1, 1905-JANUARY 31, 1906. 



Re-Registrations. 



Over Under 



Over Under 



New Registrations. 



Over Under 



Over Under 



Over Under 



Over Under 



io 



Centrnl Library 

Brighton Braucli 

Cliarlestown Branch 

Dordiestei* Branch 

Kast BoBtou Branch — 
Jamaica Plain Branch.. 

Roxbury Branch 

.Soutli Boston Branch... 

.South End Branch 

West End Branch 

West Roxbury Branch. 

.Station A 

B 



at Franklin Park. 



21,133 
1,652 
3,473 
3,146 
3,704 
2,926 
4,44S 
4,600 
2,276 
3,977 
1,121 



Totals 73,211 



4,762 
4,804 
6,464 
4,387 
6,494 
7,183 
3,874 
6,077 
1,722 
678 



623 
1,466 

733 
2,676 

393 

648 
2,120 
2,3S1 
3,68.1 
1,687 
2,367 
1,380 



1,372 

1,764 
1,962 
1,472 



21,4.S3 
1,6'J4 
3,380 
3,040 
3,502 
2,915 
4,409 
4,723 
2,931 



1,121 


366 


417 


•272 


2,180 


1,325 


213 


♦138 


356 


•252 


1,406 


4:1 


1,566 


.'i.S 


3,27.! 


1,369 


1,274 


364 


1,566 


147 



3,703 112,355 35,694 



Library Department. 



97 



By Wards. 



avakd xo. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



1,680 
1,512 
1,239 
1,326 
1,280 
2,147 
1,648 
4,469 
3,266 
8,827 
5,402 
5,309 
1,741 



25,405 
25,929 
14,831 
12,499 
12,633 
29,987 
15,579 
30,810 
22,120 
23,841 
22,353 
21,738 
21,654 



.0661 
.0579 
.0835 
.1060 
.1011 
.0715 
.1057 
.1450 
.1476 
.3701 
.2417 
.2442 
.0804 



Ward No. 



14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 . . . . 

23 

24 

25 

Total 



2,228 
2,101 
2,642 
2,461 
2,493 
1,881 
4,682 
4,472 
2,998 
3,289 
4,196 
3,372 



76,661 



O 



22,127 

20,310 
21,924 
24,313 
22,121 
29,213 
41,805 
26,533 
27,769 
26,410 
31,650 
21,806 



595,380 



St3 

^8 



.1006 
.1034 
.1205 
.1012 
.1126 
.0643 
.1119 
.1685 
.1079 
.1245 
.1325 
.1546 



.1287 



Total number of application blanks, borroAvers" cards, cer- 
tificates, etc., filled in, and filed alphabetically each year since 
the present numerical record of borrowers was commenced 
on February 1, 1899: 



1899-1900 . 








58,193 


1900-1901 








67,305 


1901-1902 








76,394 


1902-1903 








71,406 


1903-1904 . 








81,881 


1904-1905 








86,856 


1905-1906 








89,520 


Totals .... 


531,555 



98 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX VII. 



CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 
Home Use Only. 



Central Library : 
A, direct 



B, through branches 
and stations 



Brighton 

Charlcstown.... 

Dorcliester 

East Boston 

Jamaica Plain.. 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . . 

South End 

West End 

West Roxbury. 
Station A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

J 

L 



Total Circulation, 
Home Use. 



1904- 
1905, 



299,647 

115,084 

44,8.51 

60,013 

62,976 

8.5,542 

55,187 

89,463 

92,278 

90,977 

142,872 

.Sl,508 

7,234 

40,083 

11,8.55 

5,405 

8,607 

23,621 

11,658 

8,924 

10,773 

5,388 



1905- 
1906 



297,994 

103,572 
43,596 
58,630 
57,479 
83,439 
53,556 
87,830 
98,824 
98,653 
137,657 
32,131 

6,962 
38,833 

2,466 

4,951 
10,300 
25,020 
19,713 

1,008 
37,196 

1,715 



From Central 

Library through 

Branches and 

Stations. 

Included in 

Central Library 

Circulation, " B." 



1904- 
1905, 



1905- 
1906 



771 

882 

630 

1,662 

1,120 

956 

684 

1,410 

3,048 

1,499 

1,910 

1,938 

2,566 

2,903 

2,214 

4,608 

3,325 

4,091 

6,080 

1,469 



From Branches 
through Stations. 

Included in 
BranchCirculation. 



1904- 1905- 
1905. 1906. 



797 

792 

543 

1,616 

1,477 

802 

846 

1,522 

2,802 

1,442 

1,925 

1,697 

481 

2,694 

2,982 

3,181 

4,533 

455 

8,108 

410 



2 730 



35 
2 367 



2 514 



2 17 



Carried forward 



1,303,946 



1,301,.525 



43,766 



39,105 



1,392 



Library Department. 



99 



APPENDIX VII. — Concluded. 



Brought for icard. 

Station M 

N 

P 

Q 

R 

S 

T 

U 

AV 

Y 

Z 



Cottage Place 

Fort Revere Garrison 

Franklin Park 

Guild St. Elizabeth 

House of Reformation.. . 

Parental School 

§ Schools 

Engine-houses 

Institutions, etc , 



Total Circulation, 
Home Use. 



1904- 1905- 
1905. 1906J 



,303,946 

9,217 

14,594 

25,517 

32,345 

14,141 

13,35S 

11,166 

23,333 

8,671 

6,438 

7,415 

7,056 

1,000 



4,147 

2,036 

1,753 

766 

2-2,187 



1,301,525 

1,075 

15,714 

24,670 

57,366 

17,308 

13,277 

15,257 

1,967 

7,871 

761 

8,007 

6,l.il 

315 



4,312 

1,417 

2,495 

960 

28,044 



Total 1,.509,086 1,508,492 115,084 103,572 3,300 



From Central 

Library through 

Branches and 

Stations. 

Included in 

Central Library 

Circulation, " b!" 



1904- 
1905, 



1905- 
1906. 



43,766 
2,940 
5,684 
2,483 
5,125 
4,086 
4,129 
3,266 
6,786 

13,052 
3,343 
2,782 
3,350 

194 

1,194 

156 



110,100 

2,648 



39,106 

362 

5,469 

3,337 

5,459 

3,721 

4,790 

4,821 

454 

13,627 

336 

3,.345 

2,746 



1,306 



168 



J 10,500 
3,951 



From Branches 
through Stations. 

Included in 
BranchCirculatlon. 



1904- 
1905. 



1905- 
1906. 



* 1,883 
5 25 



* 1,146 



1,920 



1 Number sent on deposit. Number used on premises not recorded. 

- Included in Dorchester Branch Circulation. 

3 <. « Brighton " 

•■ " " Roxbury " " 

6 " " South Boston " " 

§ Supplied from Central Library. 



100 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX VIII. 



TRUSTEES FOR FIFTY-FOUR YEARS. 

The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board of 
Trustees from 1852 to 1864; George Ticknor in 1865; William 
W. Greenough, from 1866 to April, 1888; from May 7, 1888, 
to May 12^ 1888, Prof. Henry W. Haynes ; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, May 12, 1888, to April 30, 1895; Hon. F. 0. Prince, 
October 8, 1895, to May 8, 1899 ; Hon. Solomon Lincoln has 
served since May 12, 1899. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; that for 
1853 made what is called the first annual report. At first it con- 
sisted of one alderman and one common councilman and five 
citizens at large until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to 
consist of one alderman, two common councilmen and six citizens 
at large, two of whom retired, imless re-elected, each year, while 
the members from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 
the organization of the Board was changed to include one alder- 
man, one councilman and five citizens at large, as before 1867; 
and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an 
alderman and a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board 
as at present, consisting of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor. 

Citizens at large in small capitals. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-95. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Benton, Josiah H., Jk., 1894- 

1905. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1852-68. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1865- 

68. 
BowDiTCH, Henky p., M.D., 1894- 

1902. 
Boyle, Thomas F., 1902-1905. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. Coffin Jones, 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Carr, Samuel, 1895-96. 
Chase, George B., 1876-85. 
Clapp, William W., Jr., 1864-66. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 



Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 

1878-88. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
De Normandie, James, D.D., 

1895-1905. 
Dickinson, M. F., Jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1803-64. 
Dwight, Thomas,M.D., 1899-1905. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Hon. Ebward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard, LL.D., 

1875-79. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1868-78. 
Greenough,William W., 1856-88. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70, 



Library Department. 



101 



Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 

1880-95. 
HiLLARD, Hon. George S., 1872- 

75; 1876-77. 
Howes, Osborne, Jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, Hon. John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Lincoln, Hon. Solomon, 1897- 

1905. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1870- 

73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hon. Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 



Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Prince, Hon. Frederick O., 

1888-99. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1868-77. 
Reed, Sampson, 1852-53. 
Richards, William R., 1889-95. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860-61, 
Sears, Philip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Hon. Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1878-79. 
Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 

1852-68. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 185.5-56 ; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., LL.D., 

1877-78. 
TicKNOR, George, LL.D., 1852-66. 
Tyler, John S., 1863-64 ; 1866-67. 
Walker, Francis A., LL.D., 

1896. 
Warren, George W.. 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 
Whitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H.. 1885-88. 
Whitney, Daniel A., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-1885. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNSOR, Justin, LL.D., 1867. 
Wolcott, Hon. Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



LIBRARIANS. 



1852 to date. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive oflicer was entitled Superintendent.) 

Capen, Edw^ard, Librarian, May 13, 1852-December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 

WiNSOR, Justin, LL.D., Superintendent, February 25, 1868-September 

30, 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877- 

September 30, 1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, LL.D., Librarian, October 1, 1878-September 

30, 1890. 
DwiGHT, Theodore F. , Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, Litt. D., Librarian, February 11, 1895-April 30, 1899. 
Whitney, James L., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899-December 21, 

1899; Librarian, December 22, 1899-January 31, 1903. 
Wadlin, Horace G., Litt. D., Librarian, February 1, 1903. 



102 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX IX. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR FIFTY-FOUR YEARS. 
The following have served on the Examining Committees for 
the years given. The names in italics are those of Trustees who 
have acted as chairmen of the various committees. The thirty- 
fourth year was from May 1 to December 31, 1885, a period of 
eight months, for which no Examining Committee was appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. jB., 1880, 1894. 
Adams, Brooks, 18941 
Adams, Neliemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, William T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. AVilliam R., 1870. 
Allen, Hon. Charles, 1899. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Andrews, Augustus, 1892, 1893. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, ]8.')4. 
Apthorp, William F., 1888, 1899, 

1900. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Arnold, Miss Sarah L., 1902. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, Gilbert, 1877. 
Babson, Thomas M., 1900, 1901. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bancroft, Robert H., 1894. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Barry, Rev. Richard J., 1895. 
Bartiett, Sidney, 1869. 
Bates, Hon. John L., 1896, 1897. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Edward, D.D., 1854. 
Bellows, Mrs. John A., 1903, 1904. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890, 1891. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Bkjelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, J. Bapst, M.D., 1897, 1898. 
Blake, John G., M.D., 1883, 1891. 
Blake, Mrs. Mary E., 1894, 1900, 

1901. 
Bodfish, Rev. .Joshua P., 1879, 

1891. 
Bowditch, Alfred, 1899, 1900. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1865. 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, .J. Ingersoll, LL.D., 

1855. 



Bowman, Alfonso, 1867. 
Bowne, Prof. Borden P., 1896, 1897. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Bragg, Hon. Henry W., 1898, 1899. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Briggs, Frank H., 1903, 1904. 
Brimmer, Hon. Martin, 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Phillips, D.D., 1871. 
Brown, Allen A., 1894. 
Brown, Francis H., M.D., 1899,. 

1900. 
Browne, Alexander Porter, 1891. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, Charles E., M.D., 

1872. 
Burdett, Everett W., 1896, 1897. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, Jr., 1869. 
Byrne, Very Rev. William, 1899, 

1900. 
Byrnes, Timothy E., 1905. 
Carpenter, Rev. Carlos C, 1901, 

1902. 
Carr, Samuel, 1894. 
Carruth, Herbert S., 1892. 
Chadwick, James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, LL.D., 1894, 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheever, David W., M.D., 1894. 
Cheever, Miss Helen, 1896, 1897. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapp, William W., Jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D.,1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, B.D., 1882. 
Clement, Edward H., 1894, 1895. 
Coale, George O. G., 1892, 1893. 
Colby, John H., 1900, 1901. 
Collar, William C, 1874. 
Collar, Mrs. William C, 1900, 1901. 
Colleton, Miss Eleanor M., 1904, 

1905. 
Collins, Hon. Patrick A., 1898, 

1899. 
Concannon, John S., 1908, 1904. 



Library Department. 



103 



Connolly, Rev. Arthur T., 1898, 
1899. 

Connolly, James B., 1905. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Jr., 1904, 
1905. 

Corbett, Hon. Joseph J., 1896, 
1897. 

Cud worth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 

Curtis, Charles P., 18(32. 

Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 

Curtis, Laurence, 1905. 

Curtis, Thomas B., M.D., 1874. 

Gushing, Thomas, 1885. 

Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 

Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 

Davis, James C, 1899, 1900. 

Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 

Denny, Henry 6., 1876. 

Derby, Hasket, M.D., 1895, 1896. 

Devine, William H., M.D., 1902, 
1903. 

Dewart, Mrs. William H., 1901, 
1902, 

Dexter, Henry M., D.D., 1866. 

Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 

Dix, James A., 1860. 

Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 

Dolan, Arthur W., 1904. 

Dolan, Rev. F. X., 1901, 1902. 

Dole, Rev. Charles F., 1901, 1902. 

Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 

Donald, E. Winchester, D.D., 1898, 

1899. 
Donnelly, Charles F., 1899, 1900. 
Donovan, Edward J., 1902. 
Donovan, William F., 1904, 1905. 
Doogue, William J., Jr., 1903, 1904. 
Dreyfus, Mrs. Carl, 1901, 1902. 
Dunphy, James W., 1900, 1901. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Joseph T., D.D., 1880. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1880. 
Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 
Eaton. William S., 1887. 
Edes, Henry H., 1886. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871. 
Ellis, George E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, Jr., 1878. 
Ensworth, William H., M.D., 1898, 

1899. 
Ernst, Carl W., 1897, 1898. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 
Everett, Sidney, 1895. 
Fallon, Hon. Joseph D., 1899, 1900. 
Farlow, JohnW., M.D., 1892, 1893. 
Field, Miss Gretchen, 1898. 
Field, Walbridge A., LL.D., 1866. 
Fields, James T., LL.D., 1872. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 
Fitz, Walter Scott, 1894. 



Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 

Foster, Frank K., 1904, 1905. 

Fowle, William F., 1864. 

Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 

Frost, Oliver, 1854. 

Frothing ham, Richard^LL.D., 1876. 

Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D., 
1882. 

Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 

Gargan, Thomas J., 1899, 1900. 

Gargan, Mrs. Thomas J., 1901, 
1902. 

Garland, Mrs. Francis P., 1904, 
1905. 

Garland, George M., M.D., 1895, 
1896. 

Gay, George H., 1876. 

Gerry, E. Peabody, M.D., 1902, 
1903. 

Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 

Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885, 
1899, 1900. 

Gould, A. A., M.D., 1864. 

Grant, Robert, 1884. 

Gray, John C, LL.D., 1877, 1902, 
1903. 

Grem, Samuel A., M.D., 1868. 

Green, Samuel S., 1895. 

Greenough, William W., 1858, 1874, 
1883, 1886. 

Grinnell, Charles E., 1874. 

Hale, Edward E., D.D., 1858. 
Hale, Mrs. George S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Hale, Philip, 1893. 
Halloran, Rev. F. J., 1905. 
Hamlin, Charles S., 1902, 1903. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 1879. 
Haynes, Prof. Henr^j W., 1881, 

1884. 
Hay ward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John, Jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Hellier, Charles E., 1895. 
Hemenway, Alfred, 1898, 1899. 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., D.D., 1888, 

1889. 
Hersey, Miss Heloise E., 1895,1896. 
Higginson, Francis L., 1899, 1900. 
Higginson, Thomas W., LL.D., 

1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hills, Thomas, 1898, 1899. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.D., 1870. 
Holbrook, Mrs. Pinckney, 1905. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., M.D., 1858. 



104 



City Document No. 2'!. 



Holmes, Oliver W., Jr., LL.D., 

1882. 
Homans, Charles D., M.D., 1867. 
Homans, Mrs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886, 1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Horton, Rev. Edward A., 1899, 

1900. 
Hubbard, James M., 1S91. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hudson, John E., 1895, 1896. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880, 1893, 

1894. 
Hutching, Miss Emma, 1895, 1896. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Irwin, Miss Agnes, 1894. 
Jeftries, B. Joy, M.D., 1869. 
Jeffries, William A., 1893. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jenney, Bernard, 1901, 1902. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jewett, Miss Sarah Orne, 1900, 

1901. 
Johnson, Rev. Robert F., 1900, 

1901. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kellen, William V., 1901, 1902. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimhall, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kiik, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lathrop, Hon. John, 1903. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, Miss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lee, Miss Alice, 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lee, Hon. John H., 1897, 1898. 
Leiois, Weston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. Frederick W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Hon. Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L. , 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, A. Lawrence, 1897, 1898. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Daniel O. S., 1902, 1903. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., M.D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
McDonald, Miss Anna Sprague, 

1903, 1904. 
McLaughlin, Edward A., 1903, 

1904. 
McNulty, Rev. John J., 1896, 1897. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Miss Ellen F., 1898, 1899. 
Mason, Frank S., 1899, 1900. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 



Matthews, Miss Caroline, 1905. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Merriman, Rev. Daniel, D.D., 1905. 
Metcalf, Rev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864, 1905. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
Morison, Miss Mary, 1892, 1893, 

1895. 
Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 
Morrison, William A., M.D., 1901, 

1902. 
Morse, John T., Jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., Jr., 1878. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis TF., 1871. 
Morton, Johnson, 1901, 1902. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 
Neale, Rollin H., D.D., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882, 1899, 1900. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
O'Brien, Hon. Hxigh, 1879. 
O'Callaghan, John J., 1895. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
O'Reilly, Miss Mary Boyle, 1902, 

1903. 
Otis, George A., 1860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benjamin H., 

1876. 
Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parker, William L., 1900, 1901. 
Parker, Mrs. William L., 1897, 

189S. 
Parkman, Heni-y, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882, 1896, 

1897. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885, 1890, 1891. 
Phillips, John C, 18S2. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hon. Henry L., 1891. 
Pingree, Miss Lalia B., 1894. 
Plant, Mrs. Thomas G., 1904, 1905. 
Prescott, William H., LL. D., 1853. 
Prince, Hon. F. O., 1888, 1889, 

1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 1896. 
Putnam, George, 1900, 1901. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Putnam, William L., 1898, 1899. 
Randall, Charles M., M.D., 1884. 
Ratshesky, Abraham C, 1904, 

1905. 
Reed, Henry R., 1899, 1900. 
Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Robbins, Elliott, M.D., 1893. 
Roberts, Rev. W. Dewees, 1899, 

1900. 
Roche, James Jeffrey, 1898, 1899. 
Rockwell, Miss Maud M., 1902, 

1903. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Rollins, J. WingatP, 1888, 1889. 



Library Department. 



105 



Ropes, John C, LL. D., 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 
Rowe, Henry S., 1903, 1904. 
Ruddick, William H., M.D., 1905. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 
Sampson, O. H., 1892, 1893. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., ISfiO. 
Scates, Mrs. Edward C, 1904, 1905. 
Scigliano, George A., 1905. 
Searle, Charles P., 1898, 1899. 
Sears, J. Montgomery, 1903, 1904. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shattuck, George B., M.D., 1904, 

1905. 
Shaw, Mrs. Walter, 1905. 
Sheldon, N. Louis, 1903, 1904. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888, 

1889. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 1893, 1894. 
Shurtlef, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Azariah, 1895, 1896. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Smith, Miss Minna, 1892. 
Sowdon, A. J. C, 1892, 1893. 
Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Mrs. Henry H., 1899, 

1900. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D., 1888. 
Stevens, Gen. Hazard, 1903, 1904. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. X., 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Storrow, Mrs. James J., 1902, 1903. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Supple, Rev. James N., 1903, 1904. 
Teele, John O., 1886. 
Tetlow, Mrs. John, 1902, 1903. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 
Thayer, Rev. George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., LL.D., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 
Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, George, LL.D., 1853, 1854, 

1855, 1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tillinghast, Caleb B., 1895, 1896. 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Todd, William C, 1894, 



Trueblood, Rev. Benjamin F., 1904, 

1905. 
Turner,Mis8 Frances H.,1899, 1900. 
Tuttle, Lucius, 1903, 1904. 
Twombly, Alexanders., D.D., 1883, 

1884. 
Updike, D. B., 1900, 1901. 
Upham, J. Baxter, M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. George H., 1873. 
Vinton, Frederick P., 1903, 1904. 
Wadlin, Horace G., Litt. D., 1899, 

1900. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Walsh, Rev. James A., 1902, 1903. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Ware, Mrs. Darwin E., 1899, 1900. 
Warner, Herman J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878, 

1904, 1905. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Weissbein, Louis, 1893. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wells, Samuel, 1900, 1901. 
Wendell, Prof. Barrett, 1895, 1896. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 
Whelton, Daniel A., 1904, 1905. 
WJiipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitmore, William H., 1887. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williams, Harold, M.D., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Williamson, Mrs. William C, 1897, 

1898. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854. 
Winthrop, Robert C, Jr., 1887. 
Wood, Frank, 1897, 1898. 
Wood, Miss Maria E., 1900, 1901. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Gould, 1888, 

1889. 
Worcester, Rev. El wood, D.D , 

1905. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



106 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX X. 



SCHEDULE OF LIBRARY SERVICE. 

Note. —This schedule has been brought down to May 1, 1906. 



Summary. 



Central Library 

Branches and readino- rooms 



198 Men, 106 Women, 92 
88 " 16 " 72 



286 



122 



164 



Evening and Sunday service. Central Library, * 114. 
Sunday service, branches, 65. 

Extra assistance is employed at the branches. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Name. 


Entered. 




Wadlin, Horace C . 


1903 


Librarian. 


Fleischner, Otto 


1891 


Ass't Librarian. 


Nichols, Adelaide A. 


1868 


Auditor. 


Deery, Delia Jean 
Learned, Lucie A. 


1891 
1891 




t Mooney, George V. 
Dixon, Robert F. X. 


1889 
1902 




** Berran, Mary A. C. 

** Gatewood, Marie . 


1902 
1905 




Guinan, Thomas H. . 


1901 




Lee, Charles 0. 


1904 




CATALOGUE 


DEPARTMENT. 


Chevalier, Samuel A. 


1894 


Chief. 


If Swift, Lindsay 
Murdoch, John 


1878 
1896 




Rice, Edwin F. 


1885 




Tenney, Mary A. 
Gould, Ida W. 


1897 

1884 




Hinckley, George L. 
Bartlett, Mary R. 


1903 
1897 




Coolidge, Elsie W. 


1903 




Cutler, Dora L. 


1887 





♦Serving from one to seven evenings a week each. The total number of positions 
18 39, evenings; 47, Sundays. 
** Auditor's Assistant, t Custodian of Stock-room. IT Editor Library Publications. 



Library Department. 



107 



Ncanie. 

Durand, Susan M. 
Leavitt, Luella K. 
Mackay, Susan H. 
Taylor, Lucien E. 
Brennan, Thomas Francis 
Lilienthal, Flora N. . 
Whitman, Frances N. A. 
Campbell, M. Theresa 
Sullivan, Jeremiah J. 
Horgan, John J. 



Entered. 

1900 
1895 
1901 
1903 
1890 
1902 
1903 
1902 
1900 
1902 



ORDERING DEPARTMENT. 



Macurdy, Theodosia E. 
Frinsdorff, Emily O. . 
Gushing, Helen G. 
Goddard, Mrs. Frances H. 
Collins, Margaret F. . 
Cunniff, Nelhe L. 
Maiers, William C, Jr. 
San ford, Emma D. 
Daly, Gertrude B. 
Twamsley, Collin R. . 



1889 
1894 
1905 
1892 
1901 
1895 
1897 
1902 
1901 
1904 



Chief. 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 



Roffe, WiUiam G. T. 
Locke, John F. . 
Connor, George H. 
Reardon, John H. 
Eberhart, John . 
McCarthy, Michael, Jr. 
Ward, Joseph W. 
Muckensturm, Matthew 
Lucid, John F. . 
Gorham, Katharine J. 
Hennessey, Alice M. . 
Meehan, Michael J 
Doonau, Anna G. 
Ahlstrom, Martin E. . 



1881 

1894 

1891 

1896 

1894 

1892- 

1891 

1899 

1893 

1902 

1901 

1901 

1903 

1905 



BATES HALL. 



Bierstadt, Oscar A. 
Buckley, Pierce E. 
Doyle, Agnes C. 
Forsyth, Walter G. 
Conroy, Michael J. 
Olson, Alphild . 
Downey, John G. 



1899 
1891 
1885 
1902 
1897 
1895 
1904 



Custodian. 



108 



City Document No. 24. 



Name. 






Entered. 


Hughes, George H. . 




1905 


Jones, Bradley .... 




1905 


SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 


Washburn, Frank De W. . 




1904 


Currier, Mary T. 






1905 


Maynadier, Emily W. 






1905 


O'Neil, Ahce H. 






1905 


Cassidy, Margaret L. 






1895 


Murphy, Annie Gr. 






1888 


Doyle, James L. 






1900 


Athridge, John W. . 






1904 


Brunt, John J. . 






1904 


Mackin, Timothy J. . 






1903 


Desmond, John P. 






1905 


DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 


Whitney, James L. . 




1869 


Wheeler, Horace L. . 




1900 


Rosenberg, Morris J. 




1901 


McGowan, William A. 




1903 


PERIODIC. 


^L 


ROOM. 


Wendte, Frederika . 




1895 


Quinlan, George H. . 




1901 


Wallace, William C. . 




1905 


NEWSPAP 


ER 


ROOM. 


Serex, Frederic 


. 


1895 


Funis, AVilliam J. . ' . 


• 


1900 


PATENT ROO]\I AND 


NEWSPAPER 


Mulloney, William J. 




1892 


Herekson, Charles E. 


, 


1904 


O'Meara, Jeremiah J. 


• 


1905 


ISSUE DEPARTMENT. 


Blaisdell, Frank C. . 




1876 


Sheridan, Mary C. 






1881 


CulHin, M. Florence . 






1892 


Richards, Florence F. 






1875 


Shumway, Marion H. 






1895 


DowUng, S. Jennie . 






1895 


Reynolds, Mary A. . 






1894 



Chief. 



FILES. 



Chief. 



Library Department. 



109 



Name. 


Entered. 




AViechmauu, Catherine A. . 


1895 




Williams, Grace 


1895 




Zaugg, Joanna . 


1895 




Bryce, Jean M. . 


1898 




Hagerty, Mary E. 


1897 




Shaughnessy, Mary A. 


1897 




Day, Josephine E. 


1899 




Burke, Mary M. . . . 


1904 




Ennis, Flora A. . . . 


1904 




Hayes, Clement T. . 


1903 




Sullivan, James L. . 


1902 




McLaughlin, Alice 


1902 




Mulvaney, Mary E. . 


1904 




McNeil, Anna M. 


1903 




Zaugg, Julia R. 


1903 




Daley, Agnes J. 


1905 




Dennison, James F., jr. 


1905 




Doherty, Bessie L. . 


1905 




Downing, Alice A. 


1905 




McMullen, Katherine M, . 


1905 




Maguire, Susan 


1905 




Mantle, Annie E. 


1905 




Shea, Ella T. . 


1905 




Corbett, William 


1906 




Lynch, Anna Cx. 


1906 




Sullivan, Katherine G-. 


1906 




ISSUE DEPARTMENT, 


children's 


ROOM. 


* Jordan, Alice M. . 


1900 




Ethier, Lillian E. 


1895 




Toy, May C. . 


1903 




Williams, Eleanor M. 


1899 




REGISTRATION 


DEPARTMENT. 


Keen an, John J. 


1885 




Hannigan, Frank J. . 


1898 




Barry, Margaret M. . 


1897 




Rogers, Anna F. 


1903 




PRINTING D 


EPARTMENT. 




Lee, Francis W. 


1894 


Chief. 


Geyer, Willfried H. . 


1896 


Pressman. 


Boyle, Mary T. M. . 


1903 


Compositor. 


Land, Annie F. 


1896 


(( 


Munson, INIinuie A. . 


1902 


(( 


O'Keefe, Charles J. 


1899 


Job pressman. 


Walsh, John E. 


1903 


Apprentice. 


*Inc 


harge. 





110 



City Document No. 24. 



Name. 

Ryder, Frank . 
Collins, Dennis J. 
Lof Strom, Konrad A. 
Cellarius, Theodore W. 
Connell, William 
Connolly, John F. 
Doyle, Michael J. 
Eichhorn, Maximilian L. 
Hoeft'uer, George 
Murphy, John F. 
Ochs, Alfred G. 
Sullivan, J. Henry 
Watson, John H. 
Hemstedt, William P. 
O'Brien, John J. 
Grady, Leo J. . 
Carroll, Margery H. 
Barrett, Margaret A. 
Carroll, Bessie R. 
CouUahan, Ellen J. 
Denney, Ida G. 
Doiron, Joanna . 
Kiley, Margaret J. 
McElaney, Mary T. 
Mori arty, Mary G. 
Nolen, Sarah 
Farrow, Susan G. 
Potts, Ellen F. 
Soule, Ellen E. 



Niederauer, Henry 
McCready, Alexander 
Malone, John P. 
Zittell, George, Jr. 
Herland, Nils J. 
Laeey, Garrett . 
Moran, John A. 
Karlson, Charles W. 
Williams, John L. 
Berrane, Edward 
Frye, Henry W. 
Kelley, James J. 
Murphy, Charles W. 
Kelly, Daniel T. 
McCarty, Dennis 
McGee, Alexander D 



BINDERY. 




Entered. 




1883 


Foreman. 




1887 


Finisher. 




1892 


;( 




1892 


Forwarder. 




1904 


(( 




1900 


u 




1902 


u 




1904 


(; 




1891 


u 




1883 


u 




1900 


a 




1898 


a 




1902 


a 




1883 


Pressman. 




1902 


Apprentice. 




1904 


Runner. 




1902 


Clerk. 




1903 


Sewer. 




1903 


ki 




1905 


a 




1902 


u 




1896 


a 




1889 


u 




1902 


u 




1875 


a 




1891 


u 




1903 


a 




1892 


u 




1891 


a 


JANITOR DEPARTMENT. 


1894 


Chief Engineer 




1895 


Engineer. 




1895 


a 




1891 


a 




1895 


Fireman. 




1904 


u 




1894 


(( 




1896 


Book Motors. 




1886 


Janitor. 




1903 


u 




1898 


u 




1900 


(( 




1904 


u 




1906 


Watchman. 




1888 


u 




1896 


Painter. 



Library Department. 



Ill 



Name. 


Entered. 


Lawrence, John A. . 


1898 


Hanna, William T. 


1895 


Cole, William E. 


1898) 


Lufkin, Ernest S. 


1901 [ 
1906) 


Webster, Charles 


Mullen, Mrs. Mary F. 


1905 



Carpenter 

Marble polisher. 

Elevator and 
c o a t-r o o m 
attendants. 

Matron. 



BRANCH DEPARTMENT. 



Ward, Langdon L. 
Kueffner, Cecilia W 
Stevens, Alice V. 
Adams, Amy W. 
Heimauu, Otto A. 
Morse, Maud M. 
Kiernan, Letitia M. 
McCarthy, Marion A 
Maier, Joseph A. 
Brown, Richard 
Fazakas, Chester A 
Gallagher, George W 



Prout}", Louise . 
Conley, Ellen F. 
Watson, Geneva 
Marshall, Jeanette M 
O'Neil, Thomas J. 







1896 
1898 


Supervisor of Branches 
and Stations. 






1899 








1903 








1890 








1877 








1895 








1895 








1892 








1898 




s. 




1901 
1903 




BRIGHTON BRANCH. 




1902 


Custodian. 






1891 








1904 








1900 






. 


1902 


Janitor. 



CHARLESTOWN BRANCH. 



Cartee, P^lizabeth F. . 


1886 


Custodian 


Eogan, Katharine S. 


1896 




Donovan, Annie M. . 


1899 




Sullivan, Ellen L. 


1903 




Jones, Clara L. 


1903 




Kiley, Mary G. • . 


1903 




Smith, Thomas E. 


1874 


Janitor. 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T. . 


1873 


Custodian 


Griffith, Mary E. 


1886 




Donovan, Mary G. . 


1891 




Kellogg, Grace E. . 


1898 




Sulliv^an, Mary M. . 


1902 




Halligan, John F. 


1902 


Janitor. 



112 



City Document No. 24. 



EAST BOSTON BRANCH. 



Name. 

Walkley, Ellen 0. 
Wing, Alice M. 
Brackett, Marian W 
Bethune, Florence M 
Bickford, Lillian A. 
Matthews, Everett F 
Donnelly, James J. 



Entered. 
1897 

1873 
1897 
1903 
1891 
1900 
1904 



Custod an. 



Janitor, 



Swain, Mary P. 
Riley, Nellie F. 
Albert, Katie F. 
Kelley, Mary F. 
Kenney, Thomas H. 



JAMAICA PLAIN BRANCH. 

1877 Custodian. 

1878 

1892 

1905 



1897 



Janitor. 



Bell, Helen M. 
Puffer, Dorothy 
Berry, Martha L. C 
Griggs, Sarah W. 
Connell, Gertrude 
Kiley, Catherine F 



ROXBURY BRANCH. 

1878 
1878 
1883 
1886 
L. . . 1903 
1904 



Custodian. 



SOUTH BOSTON BRANCH. 



Robinson, AUce M. . 
Eaton, Ellen A. 
Sampson, Idalene L. 
McQuarrie, Annie C. 
Orcutt, Alice B. 
Baker, Joseph . 



1902 
1873 
1878 
1894 
1887 
1872 



Custodian 



Janitor 



SOUTH END BRANCH. 



Sheridan, Margaret A 
McEttrick, Alice 
Lynch, Emma F. 
McGrath, Amelia 
Walsh, Katherine E 
Gillis, Thomas H. 
Busby, James H. 



1875 
1902 
1885 
1888 
1903 
1902 
1904 



Custodian. 



Janitor. 



WEST END BRANCH. 



Davis, Mrs. Eliza R. 
Barton, Margaret S. 
Forbes, George W. . 



1877 
1885 
1896 



Custodian. 



Library Department. 113 

Name. Entered. 

1896 



Kiley, Mary E. 
Kelley, Mary L. 
Millmeister, Rebecca 
Eiley, Mary E. 
Menaker, Naaman 
Cardarelli, Eugene 
Sullivan, Daniel J. . 



1904 
1899 
1891 
1903 
1905 
1898 Janitor, 



WEST ROXBURY branch. 

Morse, Carrie L. . . . 1890 Custodian. 

Willis, Rebecca E. . . . 1903 

Schwartz, Edward . . . 1904 Janitor. 



READING ROOMS AND STATIONS. 
Station. 

A. Lower Mills Heading Room Hill, M. Addie Custodian. 

Moulton, John W Janitor. 

B. Roslindale Readin^Room Murray, Grace L Custodian. 

Regan, Alice M Assistant. 

Stackpole, Freeland E Janitor. 

D. Mattapan Reading Room Capewell, Mrs. Emma G . .Custodian. 

E. Neponset Delivery Station Savil, Susan Custodian. 

F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room. .Fairbrotlier, Mrs. Eliz.G., Custodian. 

Wetherald, Isabel F Assistant. 

G. Allston Reading Room Muldoon, Katherine F. . .Custodian. 

J. Codman Square Reading Room . Harkins, Gertrude M . . . . Custodian. 

Sargent, Abbie E Assistant. 

N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room. . . . Witherell, Anna M Custodian. 

P. Broadway Ex. Reading Room. .Stewart, Cora L Custodian. 

Barnett, Florence Assistant. 

Q. Upham's Corner Reading Room. Brick, Mary L Custodian. 

Curley, Mary F. ) 

Kelley, Elizabeth M. > Assistants. 

Murphy, Margaret A. ) 

R. Warren Street Reading Room. . . Grush, Mildred Custodian. 

S. Roxb'y Crossing Reading Room. Cross, Laura M Custodian. 

T. Boylston Station Reading Room. Ross, Elizabeth P Custodian. 

W. Industrial Sch. Reading Room . . Guerrier, Edith Custodian. 

Z. Orient Heights Reading Room. . McDougall, Helen M Custodian. 

22. North Street Reading Room. . .Boggiano, Iside Custodian. 



Evening and Sunday Service. 

Central Library. 

Bates Hall. — Officers in charge : Frank C. Blaisdell, Samuel 
A. Chevalier, John Murdoch, Lindsay Swift, Frank DeW. Wash- 
burn. Assistants : George L. Hinckley, John Murdoch, William 
G. T. Roffe, David L. Williams. Central desk : Thomas F. 
Brennan, George H. Connor, John J. Keenan, John H. Reardon. 
Care of reference books: Charles AY. Dolan, P'ernald Hutchins, 
Michael J. Meehan, Morris J. Rosenberg, Paul J. Schnabel. 



114 City Document No. 24. 

Collectors of slips : John S. Concannon, William H. Kennedy, 
Edward T. O'Keefe, Isidor Singer. Himners : John Brunt, 
John G. Downe}', Louis W. Hickey, Gardner D. Howie, WiUiam 
H. Kennedy, Edward T. O'Keefe, Holman Pearl, Isidor Singer. 

Issue Department. — Officers in charge : Frank C. Blaisdell, 
Pierce E. Buckley, John H. Reardon. Receivers of books : 
Thomas F. Brennan, Otto A. Heimann, Michael McCarthy, Jr., 
Joseph W. Ward. Deliverer of hooks : YxedW . ^Isd&dQW. Care 
of indicator : Thomas H. Guinan, John L. McKiernan, Joseph 
A. Maier, Matthew Muckensturm, George H. Quinlan. Assist- 
ants at indicator : Edward E. Bruce, Bradley Jones, Max H. 
Newman, Nathaniel A. Sherman, Frederick H. Toye. Care of 
slips : Otto A. Heimann, Joseph A. Maier, Harry F. Mayer, 
Matthew Muckensturm, George H. Quinlan. Desk attendants : 
Robert F. X. Dixon, Axel Z. Fogel, Thomas H. Guinan, John 
Horgan, Peter V. McFarland, Harry F. Mayer, Jeremiah J. 
Sullivan. Care of tubes and cars : Charles D. Campbell, Robert 

F. X. Dixon, Charles W. Dolan, James L. Doyle, Axel Z. Fogel, 
Thomas G. Goodwin, Thomas H. Guinan, John Horgan, William 
A. McGowau, Timothy J. Mackin, Michael J. Meehan, James 
L. Sullivan, Jeremiah J. Sullivan. Bookcase attendant : Thomas 

G. Goodwin. Runners : John W. Athridge, Edward J. Berrau, 
Howard C. Blake, Vincent Brennan, Walter M. Broderick, Rich- 
ard Brown, George G. Bulfinch, Jr., Joseph B. Compton, Charles 
Concannon, .John S. Concannon, James P. Cotter, John P. Des- 
mond, Charles W. Dolan, Loreu N. Downs, Jr., Thomas G. 
Goodwin, Terence Gordon, Leo Grady, Frank P. Hagerty, Chester 
Fazakas, William P. Hemstedt, Jr., Charles E. Herekson, Louis W. 
Hickey, Bradley Jones, William A. McGowan, James J. L. 
McSorley, Charles V. Mansfield, Bartholomew J. O'Brien, Rich- 
ard F. OToole, Holman Pearl, James E. Rush, Prescott F. Sale, 
Phihp A. E. Sheridan, Nathaniel A. Sherman, James J. Sulli- 
van, Aram Tatian. Children'' s room attendants : Mary A. C. 
Berran, Margaret C. Daly, Lillian E. Ethier, Maud M. Morse, 
Marion H. Shumway, Joanna Zaugg. Extra attendants : William 
P. Hemstedt, Thomas G. Goodwin, Wilham P. Hemstedt, Jr., 
Max H. Newman, Thornton T. Penrose, James J Sullivan, 
Frederick H. Toj^e. 

Special Libraries. — In charge of Barton Library : Mary 
T. Currier, Francis W. Lee, David L. Williams. Assistants : 
John W. Athridge, Edward E. Bruce, Daniel M. Lyons, Tim- 
othy J. Mackin. 3Iusic Room : Augustus F. McAloon, Joseph 
A. Murphy, Archer C. Nichols. In charge of Fine Arts De- 
partment : Frank A. Bourne, Walter G. Forsyth, Walter Row- 
lands, Frank DeW. Washburn. Assistants : James L. Doyle, 
John L. McKiernan, WilUam C. Maiers, Jr. Extra assistants : 
Howard C. Blake, John Brunt, John P. Desmond, Clement T. 
Hayes, Augustus F. McAloon, Michael J. Meehan, Thornton T. 
Penrose. 



LiBEAKY Department. 115 

Newspaper Room. — Michael J. Conroy, James L. Doyle, 
William J, Eunis. Neiospaper files : Howard C. Blake, Arthur E. 
Cutlliu, Thomas H. Gillis, James L. Sullivan. 

Patent Rooii. — Walter T. Hannigan, Albert J. Plunkett, 
Morris J. Rosenberg. 

Periodical Rooji. — Michael J. Conroy, William J. Mulloney, 
Albert J. Plunkett, George H. Quinlan. 

Registration Desk. — George H. Connor, Frank J. Hannigan 
John J. Keenan, William J. Mulloney. 

Replacement of Books. — Richard Brown, John F. Lucid, 
Michael McCarthy, Jr., Joseph W. Ward. 

Statistical Department. — Frederic Serex, Horace L. Wheeler. 

Coat Room. — Joseph Kolsky. 

Elevator. — George P. McCulloch. 

Sunday Service. 
* Branch Libraries^ Novemher 1 to May 1. 

Brighton Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — 7?^ charge: § Lydia E. 
Stevenson, § Ellen F. Conley ; assistant : § John P. O'Hara, 
§ Miah J. Falvey. Janitor : Thomas J. O'Neil. 

Charlestown Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge: § Ellen L. 
Sullivan, § Annie M. Donovan ; assistant : Thomas F. Brunton. 
Janitor: Thomas Smith. 

Dorchester Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge : § Mary E. 
Griffith, § Mary G. Donovan, § Mary M. Sullivan ; assistant: 
William J. Kennedj^. 

East Boston Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge : Robert J. 
Kissock ; assistants : § Lillian A. Bickford, § Everett F. 
Matthews, § Helen M. Brackett, § Helen B. Shannon. Janitor : 
James J. Donnelly. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge: § Katie 
F. Albert, § Nellie F. Riley ; assistant : § Anna G. Doonan, 
§ Alice McEttrick. Janitor : Thomas H. Kenney. 

RoxBURY Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge : § Gertrude L. 
Council, § Mabel L. Harrington ; iii charge reading rootn : 
§ Dorothj' Puffer, § Martha L. Berry ; assistants : § Catherine F. 
Kiley, § Ellen R. Scott. 

South Boston Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge: Alice B. 
Orcutt ; assistant : Joseph Baker. Janitor : Thomas Saunders. 

*With the exception of the West End Branch, which is open Sundays throughout 
the year. Here certain members of the regular weelj-day force serve Sundays, their 
compensation being for seven days per week. 

§ Alternate Sundays. 



116 City Document No. 24. 

South End Branch, 2 to 10 P.M. — In charge. : § Emma F. 
Lynch, § Katherine S. Rogau ; assistant: Marguerite Coydevant ; 
in charge children's room : § Amelia F. McGrath, § Katherine 
Wiechmann ; assistant children's room : § Loren N. Downs, 
§ Frederick A. Garth. 

Station G, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 YM.—In charge : § Henry 
P. McLaughlin, § M. Florence Cufflin. 

Station J, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: John Binda; assist- 
ant : W. A. Bailey. 

Station P, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. — In charge : Florence 
Barnett ; assistant : Mary Linda. 

Station Q, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: § Jean M. Biyce, 
§ Mary E. Hagerty ; assistant: § Elizabeth M. Kelley, § Marga- 
ret A. Murphy. 

Station R, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 TM. — In charge : § Flor- 
ence M. Bethune, § Josephine E. Kenney. 

Station S, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 F.M.— In charge : § M. 
Theresa Campbell, § Mary A. Shaughnessy. 

Station T, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. — In charge : Anna E. 
M on ah an. 

§ Alternate Sundays. 



INDE 



Allston Reading Room, established in 
place of shop statiou, 45. 

Andrew Square Reading Room, discon- 
tinued, 45. 

Appropriation. See Finance. 

Ashmont Delivery Station, discontinued, 
45. 

Auction sales, 23. 

Auditor, report of, 67. 

Barton-Ticknor Room, work of, 42. 

Bates Hall, use of, 36. 

Benton, Josiah II., jr., Trustee, 5. 

Bindery, worli of, 31. 

Books, losses from open shelves, 3; cer- 
tain medical works deposited with 
Boston Medical Library, 3, 11; as to 
purchase of fiction, 4; accessions, 4; 
replacing soiled copies, 10; losses from 
open shelves, 10; replacement of miss- 
ing, 11; received, 12; English prose 
fiction, 13; payments for, 15; pur- 
chases, 15; rare purchases, 17; miscel- 
laneous purchases, 21; gifts, 23; circu- 
lation, £3; number in Library, 89, 90; 
net increase, 91, 93; classified, 94, 95; 
circulation, 98. 

Boston Medical Library, certain medical 
works deposited with, 3, 11. 

Boyle, Thomas F., Trustee, 5. 

Boylston Station Reading Room, estab- 
lished in place of shop station, 45. 

Branch Department, work of, 50. 

Brancli Libraries, addresses, _/?;/ leaf; cir- 
culation, 46; deposit work, 46; books 
received, 48; expenditures, 48; work 
with schools, 49; circulation, 50; expen- 
ditures for, 1893-1906, 81; classification, 
95. 

Branch Libraries and Stations, Super- 
visor of, report, 46. 

Brighton Branch, slirubseet out, 8. 

Brown, Allen A., Library, catalogue, 
29; additions, 42. 

Buildings, equipment and general ad- 
ministration, 6. 

Catalogue Department, 28. 

Center, Joseph H., first payment under 

will of, 5. 
Charlestown Brancli, fire in building, 

3, s. 
Children's Department, 34. 
Classification, Central Library, 94; 

branches, 95. 
Coal, consumed, 7. 
Codman Square Reading Room, new 

building for, and opening of, 3, 7; 

volumes bought, 22; in place of shop 

stations H and J, 45. 
Crescent Avenue Delivery Station, dis- 
continued, 45. 

Deery, Miss Delia Jean, re-elected Clerk 
of tne Trustees, 1. 

De Normandie, Rev. Dr. James, re-ap- 
pointed Trustee, 1 ; Vice-President, 1, 5. 

Deposit work, 46, .50. 

Documents and Statistics, Department 
of, report, 42. 



Dorchester Station Delivery Station, dis- 
continued, 45. 
Dwight, Dr. Thomas, Trustee, 5. 

East Boston Branch, exits at, 8; inade- 
quacy of accommodations, 8. 

Employees, resignations, 54; list of, 106. 

English prose fiction, 13. 

Evening and Sunday service, 54; 
schedule, 113. 

Examinations, 55. 

Examining Committee, list of, 2; report 
of, 56. 

Examining Committees, list of, 102. 

Exhibitions, 41. 

Fiction, as to purchase of, 4. 
Finance, 67. 

German fiction list, printed, 29. 
Gifts, 23. 

Inter-library loans, 51. 
Issue Deparlmeut, 32. 

Lectures, 5, 40. 

Librarian, report, 6. 

Librarians, list of, 101. 

Library, agencies, 2; extent of, 89; ser- 
vice schedule, 106. 

Lincoln, Hon. Solomon, President of the 
Trustees, 1, 5. 

Manuscripts, accessions, 43. 
Medical books, transfer of, 3, 11. 
Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, larger 
iiuarters, 45. 

Newspaper Room, 53. 

Newspapers, payments for, 15; early 
<'opies, 16. 

North Brighton Reading Room, discon- 
tinued, 45. 

Open shelves, losses from, 3, 10. 

Patent Room, 52. 

Periodical Room, 52. 

Periodicals, payments for, 15; distribu- 
tion of, 52. 

Photographs, added, 20, 38; circulation 
of, 39; exhibitions, 41. 

Picture bulletins, 36. 

Pictures, lent by branches, 47. 

Printing Department, work of, 31. 

Publications issued, 30; distributed, 32. 

Registration, statement of, 32; statistics 

of, 96. 
Resignations, 54. 

Schools, work with, 35, 49. 

Shelf Department, 29. 

Shop Stations, discontinued, 44. 

South Boston Brancli, repairs, 9. 

South End Branch, fire at, 3, 8. 

South End Reading Room, discontinued, 

45. 
Special Libraries, work of, 37. 
Station C, discontinued, 45. 



118 



City Document No. 24. 



station O, shop station discontinued and 

reading room established, 45. 
Station H, discontinued, 45. 
Station J, new building for, opening of 

as reading room, 3, 7; reading room 

in place of shop stations, 45. 
Station L, discontinued, 45. 
Station M, discontinued, 45. 
Station N, larger quarters, 45. 
Station R, shop station discontinued and 

reading room established, 45. 
Station T, shop station discontinued 

and reading room established, 45. 
Station U, discontinued, 4.5. 
Station Y, discontinued, 45. 
Stations, circulation, 49; expenditures, 

50; expenditures, 1893-1906, 81. 



Story hour, 36. 

Sunday and evening service, 54; sched- 
ule, 113. 

Trust funds, 72, 75. 

Trustees, report of, 1-5; President, Vice- 
President and Clerk elected, 1; list of, 
for fifty-four years, 100. 

Vacuum cleaning system, installed, 3, 7. 

Ward Nine Reading Room, discontinued, 
45. 

Warren Street Reading Room, estab- 
lished in place of shop station, 45. 

West End Branch, grounds at, 9. 

West Roxbury Branch, toilet room, 9. 



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