(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

BUaTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

3 9999 03 290 933 3 



)f tbe 



€itf of Bcitoi 



'i^ n» A% CI 



P tK 1 UD I w M L 



c7 



Ip^'ip. ^ji tHi ^.Li WI g "M-BBir, «»w n>i ii » a ^qa | 



Ig. B O S 'F & :^ I A. 4^ 



U3^3 
.50 
1905 C.2 




BOSTOTSl 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 




With the Compliments of the 



Board of Commissioners of the 
Department of Parks. 



DKPARXJMKNT OK PARKS 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Commissioners 



Year Ending January 31, 1906 




PRINTED FOR THE DEPARTMENT 



1906 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Commissioners' Eeport 5 

Superintendent's Eeport 9 

Eeport of Committee of Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene 

Association in Charge of the Women's and Children's Division 

at Charlesbank 21 

General Exhibit of Appropriations 23 

Expenditures on Account of Land and Construction from Feb- » 

ruary 1, 1905, to January 31, 1906 24 

Expenditures on Account of Maintenance from February 1, 1905, 

to January 31, 1906 ..." 26 

Income - . 28 

Park Betterments Collected by City Collector . . , , 28 

Public Park and Playground Debt 28 

Park Statistics , . . . , 28 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1905bost 



DEPARTMENT OF PARKS, 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



Hoist. John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — The Board has the honor herewith to submit this 
report for the year ending January 31, 1906. 

The only construction work of importance done by the 
department during the past year, for which special appro- 
priations were provided, has been the improvement of several 
of our playgrounds. The principal work was done at the 
Marcella-street, Randolph-street, and Columbus-avenue play- 
grounds, which have been graded and fenced, and shelter and 
sanitary buildings constructed. A small addition was made 
to Marcella-street playground by taking land, reserved, in 
the first instance, for a street, which was afterwards found to 
be unnecessary. The removal of the buildings formerly on 
the land, and the building of a retaining-wall, now in progress 
and which will permit of filling out to the new line, will 
make a large addition to the area of this playground. The 
new locker and sanitary building adds much to the usefulness 
of this playground. 

Commonwealth playground, located on the filled land 
belonging to the Commonwealth at South Boston, has been 
put in charge of the Board by the City Council, and we have 
built there a small sanitary building and put the playground 
in good condition for use. The uncertain tenure under 



which the City has this playground prevents the Board from 
considering further construction work here. 

The part of Columbia road remaining unfinished east of 
the bridge over the Old Colony Railroad has been practically 
completed. This is the last of the work which the Street 
Department was authorized to do under the Parkway Act of 
1897. The opening of this road throughout its entire length 
from Franklin Park to Marine Park adds a little more than 
four miles to the parkways now under control of the Board, 
and unites the urban and Marine Park systems, making a 
continuous park drive of about twelve miles. 

The retention of Fort Independence by the United States 
Government still postpones provision for proper shelter and 
conveniences for the public on Castle Island. This delay 
in turning over the fort to this department has been due to 
the storage in the fort of submarine mining property, which 
is awaiting accommodations to be provided elsewhere. We 
are constantly urging the War Department to remove this 
property so that the control of these buildings shall pass to 
our hands, as was contemplated by the resolve of Congress 
placing the island under the control of the City as part of its 
park system. 

The Street Department, under authority of the Charles 
River Basin Act of 1903, has completed the new foul-flow 
conduit in the Fens and rebuilt the seven-foot Stony brook 
conduit, through which the water of Stony brook now finds 
access to Charles river. This relieves the Fens from the 
contamination to which it has long been subject from this 
source. The dredging of the Fens' basin, provided for in 
the act referred to, has also been completed in the upper 
basin. 

Chapter 89 of the acts of 1905 authorized the Board to 
exchange land with the Museum of Fine Arts and to enter 
into an agreement with it for relocating and reconstructing 
the Huntington avenue entrance, upon the southerly side 
of which the new Art Museum is to be built. Mutual con- 



veyances of the lands in question were accordingly made, by 
which the City conveyed to the Art Museum 22,481 square 
feet of land adjoining the Museum site, receiving from its 
Trustees a deed for 34,559 square feet of land in exchange. 
We also conveyed to the Museum, for the consideration of 
twenty-three thousand dollars, 9,676 square feet of land on 
the opposite side of the Huntington avenue entrance, and 
made an agreement with the Trustees, for the above-named 
consideration, for them to reconstruct the entrance and the 
parts of the Fens in the vicinity of the entrance which required 
rearrangement. These changes will give a better shaped lot 
for the new Art Museum, and are also to the public advantage 
in improving the park lines. 

Commonwealth avenue from Beacon street to the Newton 
boundary line was, late in the year, placed in charge of this 
Department by the City Council. The roadways are very 
much worn and need resurfacing, for which work we shall 
require an appropriation, as well as for loam and trees, which 
are now much needed. The poor condition of the roadways 
is partly due to automobiles and the high speed at which they 
have been run. This addition of 9.3 miles of roadway, giving 
us forty-two miles of macadamized roads which can only be 
maintained in good condition by frequent rolling with a heavy 
roller and judicious watering, will necessitate a further addi- 
tion to the number of steam rollers and water carts in use by 
the department, and will make a considerable increase in our 
expenditures for maintenance. 

We regret to be obliged to state that, under the present 
inadequate appropriations for maintenance, the general 
quality of the upkeep of our parks and playgrounds is deteri- 
orating. A certain amount of new work is given to the 
department each year, to meet which insufficient or no pro- 
vision is made. The result is that many of our roads are 
worn to the foundations and are in need of heavy repairs, and 
our trees and shi'ubs show the lack of good cultivation. 
This deficiency in the appropriations is very much to be 



regretted, most of all for the sake of the trees, on whose 
health and proper growth depends so much the beauty and 
value of Boston's parks and playgrounds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Stratto^", 
Laban Pratt, 

James M. Prendergast, 

Commissioners. 
Boston, January 31, 1906. , 




OLMSTED PARK — PINE BANK, 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To Charles E. Stratton, Laban Pratt and James 
M. Prendergast, Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit a report of the work 
performed under the direction of your Board during the year 
ending January 31, 1906. 

Franklin Park. 

The improvement in the woodlands generally throughout 
the department becomes more noticeable with each season. 
Our work in thinning out overcrowding or worthless growth, 
and the cutting off of dead and diseased limbs, shows its 
good results in the feathering out of the trees and the more, 
vigorous undergrowth of native shrubs and herbaceous 
plants, strengthened by our letting in light and air. 
Another factor in the improvement of these woodlands has 
been the mulching of the surface with loam where the soil 
covering was found to be thin or poor in quality. We have 
done considerable of this work, yet much remains to be done. 
Many of the old woodlands in Franklin Park are situated 
on rocky slopes with a light covering of loam for their sup- 
port. Additions of loam (for which we need additional 
appropriations) to trees growing under such conditions would 
materially increase their growth and beauty. 

During the past fall and winter extensive preparations 
were made for spring planting, a large number of holes 
being carefully prepared along the Canterbury-street border 
for young oaks. On Juniper hill ground was prepared for 
planting oaks and junipers, and preparations were made along 



10 

the face of the slope of Scarboro hill for planting thorns, 
dogwood and other large-growing shrubbery. Arrangements 
for this sort of planting were also made on the edge of the 
young plantations on the opposite slope of the hill, along the 
Circuit Drive. The material for this work is all at hand in 
the nurseries of the department. Ground was prepared last 
spring in the Wilderness for a colony of mountain laurels. 
The plants were collected from native stock, which had been 
cultivated in the department nurseries for four years, and 
were in fine condition. The planting forms an irregular 
grouping along the road and bridle-path in the Wilderness, 
and promises, in a little time, to be a very pleasing feature. 
The young tree plantations are generally in good condition. 
Much better growth, however, would accrue each year did 
our means permit of a higher degree of cultivation. 

Smoke conditions are becoming more serious with each 
season. Evergreens especially show the effect very markedly. 
At the present rate of increase of smoke pollution in the 
atmosphere a very few years will see the end of evergreen 
conifers in our parks, except as stunted, blackened specimens. 
Therefore the planting of conifers for permanent effect would 
seem to be unwise. 

Efforts have been made for the past two seasons to breed 
pheasants in the park, by using domestic hens as brooders. 
Last year about fifty were carried tlirough until fall, enough 
of which still remam to interest visitors to the park. 
Quail, too, are protected and fed in winter, and are fairly 
plentiful in the Arboretum and in Franklin Park. 

Arnold Aeboeetum, the Arborway and Jamaicaway. 

Except the ordinary work of maintenance, no work of im- 
portance was done in the Arboretum. Along the Arborway, 
Jamaicaway and Riverway a heavy thinning out of large 
shrubs was made. These were prmcipally cornels and vibur- 
nums, which encroached, by overhanging growth, on roads 
and paths. 



Jl 



Olmsted Park. 

In Olmsted Park little was required outside of the work 
of maintenance. As in the Riverway, the remarkable growth 
of the tree and shrubbery plantations called for a large 
amount of thinning out. 

The Fens. 

The work of the Sewer Department in the Fens, together 
with the changes consequent on the new alignment of the 
property of the Museum of Fine Arts, and the filling in of 
the new Fens' playground, made this part of the park system 
anything but an agreeable place during the past season. The 
Fenway drive and adjoining planting spaces over the conduit 
were restored, and some planting was done. Work is now 
in progress on the grading near the Museum grounds and 
gatehouses, with the prospect that the greater portion of this 
ground will be ready for planting in the spring. 

The work of filling the new Fens' playground is still in 
progress, the material being mostly received from the Sani- 
tary Department. At the present rate of progress the filling 
will not be completed until the end of summer. 

The pumping of sewage from the bottom of the Fens' pond 
by the Sewer Department is not yet completed. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 

The young elms planted in the spring of 1904, between 
Dartmouth street and Brookline avenue, have made an excel- 
lent growth. 

Charlesbank. 

The construction work of the Charles River Basin Com- 
mission has interfered sorely with the comfort and convenience 
of those using this recreation ground. However, the marginal 
conduit along Charles street is now completed, and the work 
of restoration of the surface can be undertaken. 



12 

The gymnasiums were as usual well patronized. In the 
men's outdoor gymnasium classes for boys and young men 
were conducted, as in the past. The report of the Massachu- 
setts Emergency and Hygiene Association, giving an account 
of the work done in the women's and children's gymnasium, 
will be found elsewhere in this report. 

Wood Island Park. 

The trees at this attractive resort continue to make 
excellent growth. In consequence, the slopes, which six 
or seven years ago were bare and wind-swept, now give a 
pleasant shade to the many thousands who visit the park 
during the season. The success attending the efforts to es- 
tablish tree growth on Wood Island demonstrates clearly 
that the islands in the harbor could be much enhanced in 
beauty were such portions as could be devoted to the purpose 
planted with suitable trees. 

The gymnasium, also the tennis, baseball and cricket 
grounds were well patronized during the summer season. 
As usual, the gymnasium and baseball grounds were flooded 
in winter for skating. 

Chaelestown Heights. 
Only the ordinary work of maintenance was required here. 

Maeinb Paek and Steandway. 

During the hot weather Marine Park and Castle Island 
are the most popular portions of Boston's system of parks. 
On the bridge or pier promenades, on the soft turf under the 
walls of Fort Independence, or under the fine old horsechest- 
nuts and elms of Castle Island, a cooling breeze can always be 
found. The harbor views, also, are attractive. Many tliou- 
sands enjoy these advantages on fine Sundays and holidays. 

The Strandway drive is now completed, making a continu- 
ous drive on well-kept parkways from Marine Park to the 



I 


■''■■^. 


1 




1 






HWb.I| \i ' 


m 


.,,;'; ,.,.'"■■;'' 




■'■''- ■■ ^# 






Ij 


SffMpi. ' 


m 






'■ M 






"' . 


&W '*! 


1 






-| 








flVf **^ .."•'''.^. 




p. 


': . "'''y'-''- ; '- ■ ^ 










■Hb .^ '"^ 


^JB^H 










If. 








'1 '» 








^ 


yik- 


,|^'-|!' 


^4 * 




«# 








fcv^ ■,.::■ 


'^^ ■ *^ 




^ 






I^^Mmi:'- ' 




a 


f ;t 




% 




1 






■^m 


T'-..i;: 


*f 






■''^H 


9 


4JpW 










.;-> 




1 



13 

Public Garden, a distance of twelve and one-half miles, pass- 
ing on the way through Franklin Park, by the Arnold Arbore- 
tum, through Olmsted Park, the Riverway and the Fens. 

The portion of the Strandway lying between Newman 
street and the railroad bridge is not yet planted. The ground, 
however, is prepared and planting will be commenced with 
the opening of spring. This planting, with the loaming of 
the railroad slopes and the grading between the walk and the 
beach, was not done by the Street Department as part of the 
Strandway construction. An appropriation is needed for 
this work, also for the erection of a fence on the loam space 
extending through the section where it is impossible other- 
wise to protect the trees and shrubbery. 

Filling is still being received opposite Newman street. A 
large part of the newly filled area is now levelled and is used 
as a playground. This area could be somewhat enlarged 
were an appropriation made for the removal of the barn and 
the establishment of an administrative jQ.vd on a lot nearby, 
owned by your department. 

Chestnut Hill Park. 

The dwelling-house and barn fronting on Commonwealth 
avenue have been sold and removed, the cellars filled up, and 
some grading done. From lack of an appropriation, no work 
has been done toward the development of the land last pur- 
chased for the planting of a screen belt. 

Large crowds frequent Chestnut Hill Park on Sundays. 
Tennis, football and baseball fields are furnished on the 
playground and many enjoy the sports. 

Fkanklin Field. 

Talbot and Blue Hill Avenues. 

(77 Acres.) 

Franklin Field, with its forty acres of level field, offers 
great advantages for sport and is the most popular of the 



14 

department's playgrounds. It cannot be termed a local 
playground ; it is a meeting place for contestants in athletic 
sports from every part of Boston and the surrounding towns. 
Eighteen or twenty baseball games between regularly or- 
ganized clubs are frequently played on a Saturday afternoon. 
Three cricket creases and nineteen tennis courts are also 
furnished and are much in demand. 

The seven or eight acres which were plowed, levelled and 
seeded last spring, although used during the summer, have a 
fairly good sod considering the adverse conditions. Another 
area, of about the same size, of the roughest part of the 
ground, was turned under by the plow in the fall and will be 
levelled and seeded next spring. An enlargement of the 
levelled ground is much needed. A large piece of the 
nursery will be cleared next spring. An appropriation, 
however, will be required to get it into suitable condition for 
play. A building, too, is much needed to serve for sanitary 
and locker accommodations. At present the players have no 
facilities for changing or for safe-storing their clothing. 
An appropriation for the above-mentioned purposes is much 
needed. The field, as usual, was flooded and used for 
skating last winter. 

Christopher Gibson Playground. 

Dorchester Avenue and Park Street. 
(5.8 Acres.') 

A portion of this playground is furnished with simple ap- 
paratus for the use of the children. A female teacher is in 
charge, and the results have been very satisfactory. Tennis 
and baseball are popular features of the playground. In the 
winter a part of the ground is flooded for skating. No work, 
other than that of maintenance, has been done during the 
past season. 



15 



Savin Hill Beach. 

Springdale Street, Dorcliester. 
(18.6 Acres.) 
There is need of further extension of facilities for bathers 
at this popular resort. We now have eighty-five closets for 
men and women and two hundred and ten clothing lockers 
for boys. To relieve overcrowding, plans are in preparation 
by your department for the erection of a building to contain 
five hundred and forty-eight lockers for men. This will en- 
able us to turn over the old building of eighty-five closets to 
the exclusive use of women. The beach is in need of sand. 
An appropriation for this purpose is desirable. Skating was 
provided at this playground during the past winter. 

Nepoistset Playground. 

Neponset Avenue. 
(18 Acres.) 

This is a convenient and popular playground for baseball 
games. A playground for children was established here two 
seasons ago. Swings, teeter-boards, tilting-ladders and other 
simple apparatus were installed, and this part of the play- 
ground was placed in charge of a female teacher. 

An appropriation is needed for the purchase of loam for 
levelling the inequalities of the marsh, as the levelled portion 
is now too small for the demand for baseball diamonds, and 
preparations for utilizing more of the marsh should be made. 
A good area of ice for winter skating is provided at this 
playground. 

Mystic Playground. 

Chelsea Street and Mystic River. 
(2.3 Acres.) 
No work was performed on this playground, except the 
usual care of the grounds, which contain a children's corner, 
with apparatus, under the care of a teacher. A baseball dia- 
mond is also maintained. 



16 



Rogers Park. 

Lake and Foster Streets. 
(6.9 Acres.^ 

An appropriation is required to place the brook, which 
runs across the lower end of Rogers Park, underground. 
This will permit of the enlargement of the levelled area for 
play, which is a work much needed. It would also be desirable 
to prepare the ground and to plant trees on the boundaries of 
the playground. A dam was placed across the outlet of the 
brook last fall, and a skating pond made. 

North Brighton Playground. 

Western Avenue and Harvard Street. 

(I4 Acres.} 

An extension of the graded area of this playground, to 
meet the growing demand for ball diamonds, is desirable, and 
an appropriation for the purchase of loam, to fill up the 
inequalities of the meadow lands, is required. Trees should 
be planted on the boundaries of the playground without 
unnecessary delay. This will require an additional appro- 
priation for the preparation of the ground. The playground 
is flooded for skating. 

Billings Field. 

La Grange Street, near Centre Street, West Eoxbury. 
(11 Acres.) 

No work except that of maintenance was done at this 
playground during the past season. Another large sink has 
developed in the centre of the playground. This is caused 
by the shifting of the boggy subsoil, over which the original 
filling was placed. Tennis, baseball and football are the 
favorite summer games ; in winter the ball field is flooded 
for skating. Shelter and sanitary accommodations are 
needed. 



17 



ROSLINDALE PLAYGROUND. 

Soutli Walter and Eobert Streets. 
(S.7 Acres.') 

About one hundred linear feet of bleacliers have been 
erected in this playground. A shelter and sanitary building 
are needed. The playground is very much used, the summer 
games being tennis and baseball ; in winter the field is flooded 
for skating. 

COLTJMBUS-A VENUE PLAYGROUND. 

(j5 Acres.) 

Here the Civic League bears the expense of kindergarten 
and athletic instructors, and also of a teacher in gardening 
work. Provision is made for baseball games, while for boys 
and small children separate enclosures are provided, in 
which gymnastic apparatus, sand-boxes, etc., are installed for 
their use, and many little gardens are cultivated. The 
grounds are flooded for skating in winter. 

PRmCE-STREET PLAYGROUND. 

Prince and North Bennet Streets. 

(O.4 Acre.) 

This playground, located in one of the most congested 
districts, contains teeter-boards, swings, tilting-ladders, etc., 
with a female teacher in charge. This all too little play- 
ground is very much appreciated by the children of the dis- 
trict in which it is located. 

First-street Playground. 

Corner of M Street, Soutli Boston. 

(^4-6 Acres.) 

The frame work of the out-door gymnasium was set up 
during the past season ; an appropriation is needed to com- 



18 

plete its equipment. The grounds, as usual, were flooded 
in the winter for skating. 

Fellows-steeet Playground. 

Fellows and Hiinneman Streets. 
(0.85 Acre.) 

This playground required only the usual work of main- 
tenance during the past season. It is equipped with simple 
gymnastic apparatus for children, a female teacher being in 
charge. A sanitary building is needed. 

Cottage-street Playground. 

Near Maverick Street, East Boston. 
(3.8S Acres.) 

This playground is much used for baseball, and is flooded 
in winter for skating. The pressing needs are fencing and 
sanitary accommodations. 

Forest Hills and Mt. Hope Playground. 

Between Washington and Florence Streets. 
(9.6 Acres.) 

The drainage of this playground has been much improved 
by deepening the brook and running a series of tile drains 
through the lowest parts of the grounds. While the field is 
in fairly good condition and space can be found for at least 
three diamonds, an appropriation for grading would largely in- 
crease its usefulness. Sanitary accomodations, too, are needed. 

Marcella-street Playground. 

Marcella and Eitchie Streets. 
(^.t5 Acres.) 

During the past season a contract was made for the re- 
moval of the old " Home " building and the erection of a 



19 

sanitary and locker building. The sanitaries are completed 
and are now in regular use. The lockers, however, are not 
jet constructed. To overcome the steep grade of the play- 
ground a retaining-wall, with return wings, was built at the 
lower end adjoining the yard of the City Sanitary Depart- 
ment, and the entire playground was graded to an average 
pitch of 27 inches per 100 feet. The grading is now 
nearly completed. The result is very satisfactory, the new 
grade being easy and no obstacle to good play, while, at the 
same time, a large amount of useless space has been made 
available. This playground is in a populous locality and 
cannot fail to be of great benefit to a large number. 

Randolph-street Playground. 

Albany and Eandolph Streets. 
(2.8 Acres.^ 

This playground is located in a populous district and con- 
tains facilities for ball playing. Children's gardens border it on 
three sides. These gardens are protected from flying balls 
by high expanded-metal fencing, and from wandering dogs 
and careless feet, on the street side, by low pipe fences, the 
panels of which are filled with woven wire. Sanitary ac- 
commodations were provided during the past season. A 
children's corner, provided with simple apparatus, occupies 
one corner of the playground. This is supervised by a female 
teacher. The grounds are flooded in winter for skating. 

Commonwealth Playground. 

This playground, the fee of which is in the Commonwealth, 
recently put in our charge, has accommodations for five base- 
ball diamonds. It has also a corner well adapted for a 
children's playground. Sanitary accommodations for men 
have been provided during the past season. The grounds 
are suitable for arrangements for flooding in winter for 
skating. 



20 



Spoets. 

On account of the mildness of the past winter, there was 

not much opportunity for skating, tobogganing and curling. 

There was a slight falling off in golf attendance during the 

season, the number being 28,000 against 32,000 of last year. 

Tennis was very popular. Baseball, as usual, took the lead ; 

of all sports it seems to be the favorite and to retain its hold 

the longest. The demand for football grounds was greater 

than ever before. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. Pettigrbw, 

Superintendent. 



21 



KEPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE MASSA- 
CHUSETTS EMERGENCY AND HYGIENE ASSO- 
CIATION IN CHARGE OF THE WOMEN'S AND 
CHILDREN'S DIVISION AT CHARLESBANK. 



Boston, January 17, 1906. 
To the Board of Park Commissioners : 

Gentlemen", — Our report for this, the fifteenth year of our 
superintendence at Charlesbank, presents no new features of 
special value. The everyday occurrences among the women 
and children, who pass so many of their hours at the lodge, 
on the green or in the gymnasium, though of interest to us, 
have not sufficient importance for a public record. Yet it is 
in the management of such trivial incidents that we find en- 
couragement for the friendly supervision we give. 

The numbers in attendance have been surprisingly good 
when the inconveniences connected with reaching the lodge 
are remembered. Before another season it is expected that 
they will be done away with by the completion of the bridge 
and the laying of the big sewer, when the place again will be 
in order. 

Miss Cutler, the superintendent, was assisted through the 
summer by Miss Mary J. Price, who won the love of the 
children, interested them in their games and was skilful as 
jcacher of gymnastics. 

With the closing of the autumn work in October, Miss 
Cutler's resignation, which was tendered several months pre- 
viously, took effect. She has been the devoted, efficient, wise 
superintendent for many years, giving a personal attention to 
the children that greatly benefited their health and their 



22 

character. Her sincerity enforced the value of her discipline, 
while her cordiality made the children feel at ease with her. 
She has left to the lodge the many books she had collected 
as reading matter for the women and girls, also numerous 
games, scrap and picture books. 

Owing to the difficulty of access, the evening classes have 
been discontinued for the winter. The lodge, however, with 
its big upper playroom, is open every afternoon for several 
hours, and in the autumn and spring there is much time 
which the children can spend on the playground. Miss 
Emma A. Phelps, who so often has acted as vacation super- 
intendent, is in sole charge of this daily afternoon care of the 
children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kate Gannett Wells, 
Anna Phillips Williams. 

For the Committee. 



23 



a 
o 
u 
e< 
a 
< 



4> 

e 
O 



lis 

OS a'"' 






fl to 

•■§■2=0 

CloS I 






O CO 

o o 
o oo 



00 o 
CO C5 
U3 CO 



03 CO 



li3 CO ■^ ■— < T— I CO 1— I 
1-1 C5 CO CO 00 i-H O 
rt -^ CO CO CD CD CO 



O <N Tt< iH t- T* 

C^ (M CO (M C<I O 

' t- CO O C<) t- CO 



)co^O(HcoeooioocD-^cO'-i 

(COCDOOOJ(?^COOlOOOOCO(MOO 

l-^!tllOCO-^#i-IOOOi— lOCOlT^'Tli— I 
lT-lr-l05C0CDi— IOOO(M(MCOC<> 

>co ^cooooocoo»ncoO(M 
Pcf i?4" coco~o" co'co co~ 



lO o 
Oi o 
(M O 



Oi o 



CO o o 

(MO o 

rH O • " ■ i i 1 .' .' O 

CO O o 

Q0_O_ o 

co'eo'^ .!'*!!!! o" 



CO >0 CO -^ 
t- 1-1 C» CO 
(M -^ CO 



9 cc 



<» 



« 



^-2 2 

cS S^ 



§-2 



00OT-HOC0(MTf<,-l>O 

i-HOOOCNtNCOO^CR 

OCOOiOcDOC<l<M 



CO fe 



be 



.2 C4.t^ 






t>5t5-+J 



^a §^ ^^ i*^ fl ^ 






5i 



»W 



ft-cJ 
OS <p 
o ?o 

a> o 



oj es 
OhPh 
o o 



!:, a P 3 
c^ 5 "i O ® 

aO o SS 

5 (u'3 a a 

§ >>°.2.2 

a^ u 

-S'O Oj o o 

o a"^c<ioo 



24 



Expenditures on Account of Land and Construction, 



Roads and 

Walks. 



Drainage. 



Grading. 



General 
Work. 



The Fens 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Franklin Park 

Columbia Road 

Strandway 

Wood Island Park 

Charlestown Playground 

Franklin Field 

Mystic Playground 

Columbus-avenue Playground. 

Ashmont Playground , 

Rogers Park 

Randolph-street Playground. . 

Commonwealth Playground 

Playgrounds 

Marcella-Btreet Playground . . . . 



193 00 
115 00 



3,861 23 



6 00 



634 92 



$127 70 



$24 00 
2,275 49 



34 85 
29 10 



1 50 



206 07 
24 55 

221 81 
90 89 



371 37 



4,129 91 



$6 00 



Totals . 



,709 15 



$193 15 



$7,344 09 



$6 00 



* This amount was expended by Street Department, being proportion 



25 



rom February 1, 


1905, to 


January 31, 1906. 






'lantations. 


Water 
Supply. 


Buildings. 


Gymnasium 
Apparatus 
and Fences. 


Walls. 


Land and 
Expenses. 


Totals. 










$910 12 




$1,003 12 












115 00 


$70 75 
213 19 












70 75 




139 38 








252 67 








*3,861 23 












$12,681 00 


12,681 00 


411 98 










440 98 






$317 06 






2,720 25 












634 92 


ti 






2 66 






208 73 








5,604 48 




5,529 03 












221 81 














90 89 






4,299 15 
1,087 64 


387 16 
66 61 






4,727 16 




$50 05 






1,604 77 






2 00 


2 00 




90 CO 


2,763 09 


28 25 


3,603 74 


10,616 49 








1695 92 


$140 05 


$8,189 26 


$801 74 


$10,018 34 


$12,683 00 


$44,780 70 


f highway 1 


oan, issuec 


as Public Pf 


irk loan, undei 


• Chap. 319, Act 


5 of 1897. 





26 



Expenditures on Account of Maintenance from 



Koads. 



Walks. 



Grounds. 



Buildings. 



Commonwealtli Avenue 

The Fens 

Riverway 

Olmsted Park 

Arborway 

Arnold Arboretum 

West Roxbury Parkway 

Franklin Park 

Columbia Road 

Strandway 

Marine Park 

Wood Island Park 

Charlesbank 

Charlestown Heights 

Charlestown Playground 

Dorchester Park 

Franklin Field 

Copp's Hill Terraces 

Chestnut Hill Park 

North Brighton Playground 

Neponset Playground 

Billings Field 

First-street Playground 

Prince-street Playground 

Mystic Playground 

Fellows-street Playground 

Christopher Gibson Playground . . . 

Columbus-avenue Playground 

Ashmont Playground 

Savin Hill Playground 

Roslindale Playground 

Forest Hills Playground 

Rogers Park 

Oak Square 

Cottage-street Playground, Ward 2. 

Randolph-street Playground 

Marcella-street Playground 

Office Expense 

Commonwealth Park 

Miscellaneous 



$14,096 24 
6,497 60 
7,175 83 
5,838 43 
4,593 26 
4,139 76 



1,411 94 

358 33 
368 24 
575 12 
163 80 
336 59 



$4,885 
9,420 
5,506 

12,551 
4,496 



11,063 23 

5,043 48 

1,122 17 

1,081 10 

37 50 



1,324 94 

276 91 

92 55 

1,857 84 

139 67 

198 37 

238 69 

76 72 

2 00 



472 34 
1,242 69 



54 42 
25 50 
16 00 
2 00 
10 91 



32 00 

7 86 
20 00 
37 66 



8 00 



11 25 
2 25 



924 

32,749 

1,721 

2,998 

4,209 

3,227 

3,560 

1,744 

971 

1,255 

4,111 

372 

4,574 

614 

714 

800 

668 

620 

384 

356 

695 

4,698 

685 

850 

638 

790 

1,207 

24 

590 

1,024 

1,529 



38 73 



$62,403 63 



$7,649 56 



$116,219 79 



1670 28 
1,370 51 
1,838 86 



447 94 
17 75 

8,827 72 



26 00 

1,273 68 

687 07 



485 40 



639 10 



394 93 
999 95' 



630 13 



443 16 

464 79 



),217 27 



27 



-ebruary 1, 1905, to January 31, 1906. 



Drainage. 


General 
Work. 


Sheep and 
Water 
iTowl. 


Skating. 


Men's 
Gymnasium. 


Women's 

and 

Children's 

Gymnasium. 


Office 
Expense. 


Totals. 




1365 30 
378 55 
394 61 
485 17 
350 00 
388 30 












$20,759 20 

17,383 30 

14,815 92 

22,376 26 

9,604 00 

5,888 68 

942 42 




157 79 






















385 15 


1701 95 
















$576 09 
























924 59 


730 88 


385 72 








66,006 94 
7,042 27 
5,099 99 
8,837 62 
7,665 25 
8,958 38 
2,468 52 
1 436 77 












350 00 
415 20 
350 00 
411 92 




611 23 




















425 60 
79 71 


$2,797 54 
3,175 69 










$1,532 15 
















388 77 

19 28 

1,446 04 




















1,276 43 

8,038 79 

372 75 






1,369 60 
































5,871 74 

1,249 34 

1,389 27 

928 14 








609 24 

96 32 

125 43 

298 81 








: 2 00 






165 96 




















4 00 






1 982 29 








246 63 
861 61 

298 74 
226 47 
106 62 




867 41 














777 97 














663 53 








101 67 

89 16 

26 04 

210 71 

196 78 






1,673 51 

5,139 32 

711 15 


208 00 






























1,061 34 
843 52 














339 05 












1,129 25 
1,230 91 

24 67 






23 29 




















63 50 






273 91 
282 90 








928 26 






187 64 






1 949 54 












1,996 98 

9,795 97 

40 23 














$9,795 97 








1 50 








2,321 33 










2,321 33 














1,188 64 


$7,134 97 


$2,543 42 


$6,293 96 


$6,330 83 


$2,771 12 


$9,795 97 


$241,549 16 



















28 



INCOME. 

KECEIPTS. 

Balance from last year $1,826 18 

Eeceived for labor 4,174 66 

Keceived from rents, sale of buildings, wool, 

sheep, grass, wood, etc 3,362 21 

PAYMENTS. 

Appropriation Park Department . . , $5,748 01 

Income carried to General City Income . . 2,419 42 

Sinking Fund 993 77 

Balance on hand, January 31, 1906 . . . 201 85 



5,363 05 



),363 05 



Park Betterments Collected by City Collector, 
to February 1, 1906. 





Assessm'ts 
committed 

to 
Collector. 


Abated. 


Net 
Assess- 
ments. 


Collected. 


Outstand- 
ing Feb. 1, 
1906. 


Public Park, Back Bay . . . . 


$434,600 00 
23,543 00 
135,029 00 
60,789 00 
108,972 00 
154.107 00 
9,713 00 


$144,195 73 
12,616 80 
122,000 66 
50,426 CO 
83,594 25 
113,658 00 
3,055 54 


$290,404 27 
10,928 30 
13,028 34 
10,363 00 
25,377 75 
40,449 00 
6,657 46 


$290,404 27 
10,926 20 
13,028 34 

8,256 00 
23,238 75 
31,763 00 

5,927 74 




Franklin Park 




Parkway, Old Harbor 

" Muddy Eiver. . . 
" West Roxbury.. 
" Dorchester 


$2,107 00 

2,139 00 

8,686 00 

729 72 




$926,753 00 


$529,546 98 


$397,206 02 


$383,544 30 


$13,661 72 



Public Park and Playground Debt. 

Liabilities. 
Total loans outstanding, January 31, 1906 . . . $16,073,410 98 

Resources. 
Sinking Fund, January 31, 1906 5,664,417 85 

Net Debt, January 31, 1906 $10,408,993 13 



29 



o 


OS 


oo 


ai 




0) 


<v 


-o 


t* 


< 


a 

O 


K 


^ 












U^H 


aj 


a 


o 





^ « 



a 



iO<^, 


^ 


C © cS 


1-5 


^ 


5^ 






tx-S 


>-. 


feiO 


OJ 


^■H 





00 ffJ CD CO iO 



CD C^ lO CO O 



•^ 1— I (M 00 CO C^ t-- 



GO CO <>> W 



CO CO C» 



C5 CO i-H 



Ci CO CO 






CO '^ lO O r-< 



CO O CS CO Ol 

'^ o^ eo 



iO CD 0< r-1 



00 »0 CD Oi 



I— t iO O 11^ »— I 



^ C3.3 



CO GO '30 fX! 



G2 C5 05 tX" C5 



Ci 01 O t' i-H 

Ci C5 C3 OS O 
GO CO 00 GO C2 



0^ g 



:3 « '-S 



o fe 



W o 



< -a 



■s 



30 





-c 


to 




































CO 


1 




'H P . 


o 


































« 




o S • 


^ 


































pH 






o 


































o 




ce to o 


s 


































c: 






"*. 




















. 














■* 












































to 


































QQ 




5 « 


o; 


































« 




§"sl 


S 


































1 




2 « 


CO 


































CO 






^ 


































tn 




^ aj 


ai 










_£ 
























a; 




"S)--H^ 


1 








































"* 


" 




s 


" 




* 




" 










" 




s 




fl O Oj 
















in 






















OJ ^ 


§ 




rH 


o 




-* 


CO 




CO 




r- 










■* 




rH 




o 




ei 


1-H 




o 


o 




o 




o 










o 




CO 






CO 


































CO 




, 


m 




































m 




r- cj 


1) 




'V 














o 






to 












3) 




^ c* to 


























OJ 












r^ 






o 




o 














s 

CO 






s 












S 




O 


5 


















o 






■"• 












5 










^ 


Z 






_^ 






























Ti mtJ m 




■c 


2'C to 






■e to 














to 






£ 

O 
c3 


Ian 
flati 
lau 
flati 






III 






II 














2 




< 


; : - r S 

t-; M CO ■* "5 
^ 00 'C in O 


2 

a 
oi 


o 


: : z 


: 


: 


: ' 


c3 


c3 


r 


= 


z 


: 


: 






zc 


C-1 L 


^ia lO rH 


es 


■o 






t-; 


cc 


•* 








CD 


-* 


O 






CO 
tr- 




iH 






*'tH-* 


CO 


t~ 


co'co c 


lO" 


^ 


00 


r^ 


-* 




co_ 














o 


CO 


rH 


<N 






- 


o 


'"' 


rH 


r^ 




o 


ffT 
















^ 


le 


M 


e: 


o 


oc 


rH 


"^ 


<M 


^ 


m 


CD 


OS 


-* 


CO 


O 


Q 


CD 








O 


lO 


•O 




o 


k: 




lO 


rH 


t:~ 


cc 


CO 


00 


t~ 


OS 


11 


o 










^ 


j^ 


OT 


la 


o 


ir 


OO 


CD 


00 


CO 


a- 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CD 


o 


o 


CO 








cc 


t^ 


CO 


o 


rj 




<M 


CO 


<M 






o 


CI 


■M 


** 


o 


o 






03 


CO 


CO 


O 


cr. 


o 


CC 


O^ 


C-; 


o 


CD 








°i. 


00 


CO 


o 


















































cd 


c« 




t' 


o 


c<- 


Its 


t-^ 


CO 


1-^ 






(n" 


o 


CO 


CO 


■<* 








© 




CO 


C^ 


oc 


CO 


iT 


en 






05 


(?5 




CO 


-* 


CO 


(M 




lO 






H 






CO 


CO 










<>1 


-* 




!N 
















w' 




i© 
































«■ 




.2 


o 


to 


CO 


er 




C£ 


o 


CO 


o 


t- 


CO o 


t- 


lO 


~^ 


o 




o 






05 


lO 










-^ 


rH 


OS 


<M 


'^ CO 


c- 


CO 


o 






o 




CO 


lO 


CO 


oc 




l> 


lO 


,_4 


CO 


(M 


T-i O 


r^ 


OS 


00 


c 




J-i 






cc 


00 








c: 


00 


CO 


C5 




O tC 


<2 


CO 


lO 


s 




s 






o 




CO 




^ 








lO 


CO 


(M 












in_ 






3 








































O 


t^ 


(y> 


ai 








IM 


CI- 




C5 


OJ CD 


o 


CO 


!Z 


cc 




co" 




H 


■* 


CO 


■o 






c 


(?> 






CO 


CO 


rH 






tN 




00 






en 




e-i 


c<- 




























o_ 




t< 


fl 


<» 


































o" 




in 


o 


^ 




































O 


O 




































«& 




O 
















































cr 




o 


a 




c^ 


•H 


t- 


e» 


■* 


_ 


CD 


l^^ 


05 


CD 




o 


CO 












o 


o- 




c 


CO 


co 


<M 


■^ 


rH O 




CO 


OS 




c 


(M 








xo 




o 


cc 




a 


CO 


lO 


rH 


^ 


CO cs 


t- 


-* 


CO 




o 


(M 












o 






D- 


tM 


cc 


-* 


CO 


O 05 


o 


o 


CO 






rH 












00 


5- 


c 




05 




CO 


CO 


00 C-1 




oo_ 


o 












03 










































a 




(j: 


cr- 


c: 


C 


(?f 


■* 


r^ 




o o 


<M 


-^ 


t- 




-^ 


■* 










« 


1^ 


• o- 


IC 


) t- 


CO 


lO 




05 rH 


<M 


(M 


-* 






O 






1-^ 


C£ 






"" 










rH 






!M 












t^ 








<» 
































«■ 




h 
















CO 






























CT 










o 


























o 






(X 


















05^ 


















"S o hi) 

, 2 q 
























o: o 

00 OS 
rH rH 


















u ci-H 






z. 










p 


























s! 'a^ 






oj 










oi 






























a- 




S 


5 s 


c 


5 S 


5 




CC 
OS 


5S S"'^ 
OS C2 «« 


o- 


CD 
OS 


cc 

O" 


s 


• & 










oc 




a 


cc 




3 00 






00 




D 00 •" 


oc 


CO 


oc 


a 


oc 








Ph 














- rH 


" 


r- 


r^ 


rH rH =S 
































: a 












ji 






e 


i 

3 ^ 






















: ^ 












<! 






? 






















: o 












1-1 


ft 

S5 



























3 § 








a 


n p^ 


^ 




c 
p 


3 




















H C! 








^ 


^ -5 


!zi 


& 




c 


> S 








S 






• 5 
; < 


t 


: f= 

• c 


M 

2 - 


5 5 
:; o 


< 

p- 




< 

p: 


P 




O 

EH 

IS 

o 

IH 


►H 

<! 
►J 




»- 
P 


4 S 

>! « 

■1 1 

H ^ 

3 P4 


: ? 

1 


i 
i 




P^ 


1. 


3 *a 


> 

< 


\ I 


5 C 




^ 


c 


J 


^ s 


P5^ 


< p 


\ o 


: ^ 








* •" 


H 


) P 


■< j 


H H 


t 


;z 


- ^ 


^ 


2 ^ 


H 




i 


H W C 


3 W 






c 


? ° 


H ^ 


3 
■1 I 


% > 


1 


CC 


a 


H 


3 "^ 


? t 


=1 a 


o 


3 Jz; 


C 


3 


I t 








> "o 

5 £ 


- c 


] \ 




5 


3 3 

91 <! 


P 






i ■ 


i< in 




2 

h 
1- 


; E 

1 P 


I a 








t 


^ t 


c c 


S i 


q M 


c 


■> e 


j C 


3 


D # 


'A, 


3 5 














■ ; 


i t 


H C 


J c 


J 


p 


; & 


H ;? 


5 C 


J * 


^ 




p: 


? - 


« II 




1 



31 



(M 


a ■ 


m 




























1 t» 


O eS 2 


o 




























s 


ci an a 


03 




























c 


Oi-C > - 


■^ 




























Tt" 




fl.rH 
































-" 


oW 


s 




























1 - 


a ™ 


Q^ 




























£ 


iCu <v 


.p- 




























^ 


a o"^ 


P 




























5 


5 




























00 




CQ 




























to 


■a to 


^ 




























o 


1^^ 
































s 




























£ 


^ ^ 


CO 




























t§ 




m 




























aj 


r. ai • 


o 






























1-5 *-! 






























s 


00 




























00 


o 


eo 






















' 






^ 


03 


CS 




CO <1> 


00 




'OS 














5 






05 






z 


'f~ - 

o 

03 


' 


" 


- 


" 


" 


- 


CO 

cc 
oi 


















Cit- 






lO 






lO 




CO 


■* 


CO CO 


GO 


<^. corn- 


t~ 


CO <50 00 


rH C 


i CO 




in" 


O 


ei o 


>d lO 


<N rH 


co 


oi CO <N 


io c: 


5 ci" 






oo 


t- 


rH 05 


CO o 


Ci ;o 


(M 


lO O Ci 


t^ 1^ 


Ci 






^ 


t- 


"* lO 


CO rH 


o o 


00 


t- o -4 


t- G^ 


> CJ 






00 


CO 


05 OO 


oi >o 


O 50 


t^ 


as O .-1 


r-t O 


i o 






o 


o 






O GO 


CS t- 




O O CO 


" I 


- !o 




c3 


t- 


03 


OS lO 


t:~ O 


Ci IM 


GO 


r-l O -* 


CM t- 


uri 






































O 


<a 


s 


CO C3 


«~7 52 


t^ CO 


O 


lO O t- 




" Ci' 




iO 


GO 


»f 


2 rH 


^ ^ 


->* CO 


CO 


©^ »0 CO 


T-K Cf 


D lO 




H 


^ 


l-H 








oo 


















CO 


C4 
H 
<! 
ft 




«■ 




























^ 




o 


f. 


ri "^ 


la o 


o o 


^ 




00 Ci 


t^ t- 


o 


o 


O 


■* 00 


t- <M 


o o 


t- 




CO -* 


t- '^ 


• CO 




^ 


■* 


■^ -^ 


CI rH 


O Ci 


(M 




t- CO 


r-\ C 


i -^ 


o 


a 


CO 


^ e! 


•* CO 


c e^ 


Oi 




Oi o 


t- f- 


CT) 




»c 


■* 


CO o 


0_ lO 


O rH 


Oi 




"i, °?, 


&J 


t- 


1 C0__ 


O 


^ 


GC' 




co" io~ 


cT ocT 


■*" CD 


lO 




cf co" 








H 




00 




















<M 










O^ 






























H 


fl 


o" 




























o" 


cc 


o 
































O 


O 


^ 




























«■ 


O 




































CD 


o 


O (M 


GO 'Ji 


Ci O 


^ 


ir 


&? o 




c 


■ c:i 






C-1 


t~ 


o t~ 


lO GO 


O CO 


rH 


t- 


oo o 




c 


> CO 






(M 


-* 


lO CO 


05 CO 


O t^ 


lO 


cc 


a- 


>o 




c 


\Q 




'6 






(M O 


o o 


a 


■<* 


C-* 


cc 


O (M 




c 


? 00 






'^ 


t-H >0 


t- m 


Oi i-H 


°°- 




O OS 




c 






03 




































o 


O -* 




CO r- 


-** 


IT 


t- CO 




c 


> o 






00 


lO iH 


CO (M 


-* IM 


ff) 


(M 


■^ -* 




c^ 






CO^ 


rH 








CO 


















1-< 






t-T 




























oo" 






«^ 




























«■ 


^ 






. 


, 




























o 










































050 






0!N 
OO 
























00 C3 






OiCi 






























r^,-l 




















CD O 35 




































i»tb^ 






t-c E: 5r 


t^ O rH Ci Ci 


Oi 


(M 


(>> CO 


cr 


c 










m S ca 05 


Ci C50 Ci Ci 


Ci 


O 


o o 


o 


c 












00 P 




00 


CO cooi a 


GO 


oo 


o~ 


Oi Ci 


cr 


oc 






Oh 






I-H 05 I— 


*"* 




1^ ■" 


rH 


r-i 




















i^ 




h : 


r^ 


rH 






~r 


Q 


^ 


« 


Q 














< 




< : 


<! 


-»! 








K 


<i 


^ 


^ 














fcj 




iJ : 


Hi 


iJ 




Q 





& 


jj 


P 


t 
















Ph 


Ph 




!z; 


a 


O 


Ph 


o 


c 














P-l 




Ph : 






c 


U 





<A 




« 


Pi 














H 


e 


; 


!?; 


1^ 


^ 


o 


o 


C5 


Eh 


C! 


C5 










■« 




t 
c 


H ; 


O 

02 




t 
c 


















02 


5. 

e 
s 

o 




H : 


n 


p: 


!h 


H 


1^ 


He 


J 


>J 




^ 




pi 


H : 


go 


> 


S: 


<! 


-< 


P^ 


«a 


Ph 


Ph 






3 

Ph 


H 
Ph 


02 Q 

in 
oo 


1 

02 


C 
K 

GO 


Ph 

>-H 


Ph 


02 
1-1 


02^ 

J 

we 


02 

Ph 


H 

03 
1 
<i 

H 

1-3 

« 
< 


p- 


«. 

-« 




^1 


o 


H O 


Sc 


B 



S 


H 


o 




£ 

^ 




J. 


CD 


H« 


cQ M 


f=Pi 


> 

CD 


?^ 


^^ 


« 


^ 


8 






85 




P4 






o 
O 


m 

o 

P^ 


1^ 

O 
6h 


o 


:zi 

* 


c; 


CJ 





32 





'C 


<a 


















CD 






<w n ■ 


























ooj j2 


o 


















O 






C3 QD O 


cS 


















a 






p-o > 


■* 


















-* 






Jh »— .r-l 


























«<s« 




















1 








1-^ 
























■=^ ^ 


























-4^ QQ 


























tO't-i u 


























fl cc 


s 


















S 






^ « 


00 


















00 






^ 


a> 
























PI O 63 


1 


















s 






^ ^ 


to 

to 


















CD 

CO - 






, 


m 


















□Q 






r' 01 


O) 


















O 






C l> 0^ 


^ 
























2at 


6 








- 
















t^t-i " 


00 


















CO 






o 


^ 


















CO 


























to 








a> 


















2 






c3 


S3 


- 
















o 
si 








to 




c: 


; 


















<: 


to 
























OS 


















oc 








io 




ca 












CO 








CO 


(M 




c 
oc 












(?r 










as 


c 


■* 


t- o- 


CO 


o 


t- 


o 


o 










(M 


t- 




t- o 


'^ 


lO 


o 




rH 










o 


'H 


(^l 


■^ 


IT 


CO 


t- 


r- 


to 


05 










oo 




00 


c 




lO 




'* 


u^ 


-a( 








-2 




5i 


to 


tc 


c^ 


^ 


c 


CO 




r-^ 










oT 












CO 


02 


e< 


s" 








o 


»o 










o 


t- 


« 




c« 








&H 


05 
QO" 










oo" 








cc 
rH 






K 




S 










s 








» 






a 
o 


O 


o 


-* 


t^ 




lO 


o 


t. 


o 


(N 






■ El 


to 


t- 


CO 


£- 




■* 


lO 


o 


»~< 








<< 


^ 


"^ 


<M 


'Jf 




t^ 


t^ 


t- 


to 


OO 






Q 




o 


05 


00 


o 




0-1 




-* 


lO 








o 


« 


(M 


to 


to 




o_ 




05 


CO 


CO 








1o 


























o 


cT 












CO 


OS 


eo 


-* 






to 










oo 


t- 


ff« 


i-i 


o 






H 


a 


to" 










o" 








<= 






CO 

o 


o 
O 


^ 










«» 








«■ 






o 


























































Ci 








o- 


00 








00 










to 








e« 


03 








o: 










iA 










o 








o 








-d 


00 










CO 








CO 


























■^ 








a 


C^ 










o~ 








o 








ei 


CS 










<M 








(M 








J 












00 








00 






^ 


























o 


























O <a !i 


























^§.3 


























tS^J^ 






























C 


c 


IT 




















C 


c- 


cr 


















Ph 


































1 


i 
























vj 


* 
























Ph 


CO 
























K 


> 


















-e 






H 


Z 








a 








03 


^ 


fc 




iJ 


M 








c 








< 
P-i 


c 
s 

1 

p 


C 

a 

p: 




i 


00 

p 


3 
5 


c 
t. 

a 

c 


> 

e 
1 


1 














p: 


c 


Ph 




a 


; (1 


1 


3 
1 





<M o o„ 

n ^- O O 
"M O 03 



■^T^.u'C ,Q 



'3 h. 



p<fl 








PS 




"c S 


00 


gp,^ 




t>1 


^W 


^ 


rh m 


t>> 






■Sifl 


o 


3 fci 


43 


P^O 


n 


© o 




5^ 


"S 



_j3 o 



^Ph 



&°^ t='S^i; 
t/O "S S f^ E 









2c:Oe'^'S^Sgg.mQ 

^ o oi3 -s ?'&? « I' r^ «^- 



is <» 

o'S 






^ is r-*^ r^ ,^ .rT ^ ^ ^ 
* 0««!F 11- ci m « 



OO