(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

FIFTY-FIFTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



I906-I907 



? 



FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



or THE TKUSTEES 



Public Library 



CITY OF BOSTON 



I906-I907 



BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL FEINTING OFFICE 

1907 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 
Report of the Trustees ...... 1 

Report of the Librarian . . . . . . 6 

Report of the Examining Committee .... 54 

Appendixes : 

I. Financial Statement . . . . . .65 

II. P2xtent of the Library by years .... 87 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, includ- 
ing Branches ....... 89 

IV. Classification : Central Library . . broadside 

V. Classification : Branches ..... 03 



. broadside 

95 
Librarians . . 97 



VI. Registration 
VII. Circulation 
VIII. Trustees for Fifty-five Years 
IX. Examining Committees for Fifty-five Years . . 99 

X. Library Service, including Sunday and Evening 

Service 103 

Index to the Annual Report, 1906-1907 . . . .115 



zy o :« M p » > 
Kf >2ZB;wr 

w 3 3 =■ ;■ o. » S 



L^wWC 



5' £; 



;i:'Sl"o§l 

J^M ^„ r. J. ^ 3 

a § i § ° 8 



"2. 3 



10 

^ ■ • .<■ • • • «fl 

W 5'» ag 3' 0.-3 
o 3 S -^ o ?s 



= ;3! 



;2?g^ 



8 ^iC'i-" ^t 
1 3-2 ?f,' ?3" 

:^2 2-.» 






3 3 3"S" » ^ 
„3rt" Cb 




\Vith the Compliments of 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY I, 1907. 

Departments. Opened. 

Central Library, Copley sq. Established May 2, 1854 Mar. 11, 1895 

I East Boston Branch, 37 Meridian st Jan. 28, 1871 

§ South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway May 1, 1872 

II Roxbury Branch, 46 Millmont st July, 1873 

JCharlestown Branch, City sq *Jan., 1874 

t Brighton Branch, Academy Hill rd *Jan., 1874 

X Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams st Jan. 25, 1875 

§ South End Branch, 397 Shawniut ave Aug., 1877 

I Jamaica Plain Branch, Curtis Hall, Centre st Sept., 1877 

t West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon st *Jan. 6, 1880 

t West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. I-ynde st Feb. 1, 1896 

Station A. Lower Mills Readiug Room, Washington st June 7,1875 

" B. Rosliudale Reading Room, Washington, cor. Ashland St.. Dec. 3,1878 

" D. INLittapan Reading Room, River, cor. Oakland st Dec. 27,1881 

" E. Neponset Delivery Station, 49 Walnut st Jan. 1,1883 

" F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Wasliington, cor. Eldon si Nov. 1, 1886 

" G. Allston Reading Room, 354 Cambridge st Mar. 11,1889 

" J. Codman S<iuare Readiug Room, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. Nov. 12,1890 

" N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Dudley, cor. Magazine st Apr. 29,1892 

" P. Broadway Extension Reading Room, 13 Broadway Ex- 
tension Jan. 16,1896 

" Q. Ui)ham'8 Corner Reading Room, Columbia rd., cor. Bird St., Mar. 16,1896 

" R. Warren Street Reading Room, 390 Warren st May 1,1896 

" S. Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 1154 Tremont st Jan. 18,1897 

" T. Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, Depot sq., Nov. 1,1897 

" W. Industrial School Reading Room, 39 Nortli Bennet st Nov. 3,1899 

" Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington st June 25, 1901 

" 22. North Street Reading Room, 207 North st June 9,1903 

" 23. City Point Reading Room, 615 Broadway July 18,1906 

* As a branch. 

fin buildings owned by the City, and exclusively devoted to Library uses. 

t In City buildings, in i)art devoted to other municipal uses. 

§ Occupies rented rooms. 

II The lessee of the Fellowes Athena3um, a private library association. 



To His Honor John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — The Trustees of the Boston Public Library present 
the following report for the period extending from the end 
of January, 1906, to the end of January, 1907. This is the 
fifty-fifth annual report. 

Mr. Solomon Lincoln was reappointed a Trustee for five 
years from May 1, 1906. The Board organized by electing 
Mr. Solomon Lincoln President, Rev. Dr. James De Nor- 
mandie Vice President, and Miss Delia Jean Deery Clerk. 

The following tables exhibit the receipts and expenditures 
for the year covered by this report : 

Receipts. 

City Appropriation . . . $324,550 00 

Income from Trust Funds , . 15,309 01 

Miscellaneous sources, including 
cash on deposit in London in 
part to meet payments for pur- 
chases during the year, and un- 
expended balances of trust funds 19,823 99 



$359,683 00 



Expenditures. Pebcentages. 



Salaries, including Printing and 

Binding Departments . . $211,446 81 62.49 

Books . . , 
Periodicals 
Newspapers 



General Maintenance 



39,479 16 11.67 

6,497 49 1.93 

2,210 55 .64 

78,756 01 23.27 
■ $338,390 02 



Balance . . • . . * $21,292 98 

It has been deemed advisable to add a column to the table 
of expenditures showing at a glance the percentage of'-'each 
of the items. 

*This balance is composed of certain items of income of trust funds, accrued inter, 
est on deposits, etc., as shown in the Auditor's detailed statement, Appendix 1, 
page 67. 



Year. 


Per cent, of total expendi- 
ture devoted to books 
and periodicals. 


1906-07 




14.24 


*1905-06 




13.79 


*190o-06 




12.53 


*1905 




11.59 


*1906 




18.32 



2 City Document No. 25. 

While it may seem (or rather while it is) unsatisfactory 
that but 14i per cent, has been devoted to the purchase of 
new publications of all kinds, we have to accept the fact 
that the running expenses can be reduced only by a radical 
departure from the system to which the public has become 
accustomed, and which, we believe, it would be sorry to lose. 
After all, as the following table makes clear, the percentage 
which we spend for publications does not compare unfavorably 
with such other large public libraries as we could easily use 
for comparison, being, in fact, larger than in any of the others 
except one. 



Boston . 
Brooklyn 
Chicago . 
Cleveland 
Pittsburgh 

Unfortunately comparisons with New York and Philadel- 
phia are not possible, since figures are not at hand from those 
cities. 

The share devoted to general maintenance — 23.27 per 
cent. — is not unduly large in consideration of the various 
ways in which the library serves the public, apart from the 
ordinary giving out of books at the desks of the various 
libraries and reading rooms. For instance, the sending of 
books from the Central Library to the various branches and 
stations, instead of forcing borrowers to go to the Central, 
the maintenance of many small deposits for the convenience 
of isolated groups of citizens, and the co-operation with the 
schools necessarily involve a heavy expense. 

One new reading room has been opened at City Point. 
Its circulation of 17,835 volumes in a little more than six 
months places it, as the Librarian remarks, among the larger 
reading rooms. While this would seem to fully justify its 
establisliment, it is to be remembered that, as shown in, the 
Librarian's report, very nearly seventy per cent, of the circu- 
lation for home use from the ten branches during the past 
two years has been fiction, and that the percentage of fiction 
taken for home use from the reading rooms is even a little 
greater. This includes juvenile books classed as fiction, the 
percentage of fiction for adults issued from the branches being 
36.40. This can hardly be considered a satisfactory condi- 

* Latest year available. 



Library Department. 3 

tion. Nevertheless it should be borne in mind that it leaves 
out of account the extensive use of books within the build- 
ings, which is constantly increasing, and which, except, per- 
haps, in the case of children, is mainly for more serious 
purposes than the reading of fiction usually indicates. Still 
the time will come when the question will be raised whether 
so large an expense for fiction is justified. Thinking people 
have lost faith in the shibboleth, much in vogue a generation 
ago, that the habit of reading poor, not to say trashy, books 
will breed a longing for something better. The Trustees are 
able to say that great care has been given to the choosing of 
books, and that of late years the average merit of those taken 
by the Library has risen decidedly. The list of additions to 
the Library in the Librarian's report deserves special atten- 
tion. It is very gratifying to note that the total number of 
accessions exceeds that of the preceding year by 3,901 vol- 
umes. This increase is due chieflj^ to purchase, the number 
of books bought exceeding that of the year before by 3,883. 

The Library has suffered a great loss by the sudden death 
on February 9, 1906, of Mr. Edward B. Hunt, who became 
head of the Catalogue Department in 1899. He was most 
efficient and respected in his department, of which he became 
the head after a long apprenticeship. Although they regret 
his loss, the Trustees are glad to feel that his place has been 
satisfactorily filled by the promotion of Mr. S. A. Chevalier, 
formerly the first assistant. Indeed, the Trustees can con- 
gratulate the public as wxU as themselves on the efficiency of 
the several heads of departments. 

During the year many repairs have been made both in the 
central and the branch library buildings which have been 
needed to preserve and to increase their usefulness. 

Among the various efforts made by the Library to co-operate 
with educational forces, that in connection with the Lowell 
Lectures should be alluded to, since more time and thought 
is given to it year by year ; principally by facilitating the 
circulation of suitable books of reference. 

As more fully referred to in our last Annual Report, the 
transfer of medical books from the Central Library to the 
Boston Medical Library (which in as far as these books are 
concerned is to be looked upon as a station of the Public 
Library) is progressing, but is by no means completed. 
The question of determining just what constitutes a medical 
book is not always easy. It is the policy of the Trustees to 
ransfer such books as are in the special province of those 
practising and studying medicine, and to retain in the Cen- 



4 City Document No. 25. 

tral Library works on hygiene, sanitation, hospital construc- 
tion and science which, though valuable to the physician, 
should be kept for the use of those of other professions. 

For detailed information as to the operation of the Library 
the Trustees recommend the study of the Librarian's report. 

The Examining Committee for 1906-07 was composed as 
follows : 



Kev. Daniel Merriman, D. D. 

Chairman^ 
Mrs. Henry S. King, 

Secretary^ 
Mr. Thomas H. Austin, 
Mr. John D. Berran, 
Mr. James B. Connolly, 
Mr. Lam-ence Curtis, 
Mrs. P. O'Meara Edson, 
Rev. F. J. Halloran, 
Mrs. Pinckney Holbrook, 
Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson, 



Rev. Alexander Mann, D. D., 
Miss Caroline Matthews, 
Hon. Arthur Maxwell, 
Mr. Thomas Minns, 
Mr. Robert Lincoln O'Brien, 
Mrs. William Parmelee, 
Dr. WilUam H. Ruddick, 
Mrs. Walter Shaw, 
Rev. Eugene R. Shippen, 
Mr. Frederic E. Snow, 
Rev. Joseph V. Tracy, D. D. 
Rev. Elwood Worcester, D. D. 



The membership of the sub-committees into which the 
body was divided apj)ears in the report of the committee, 
which as usual is published hereinafter. The Trustees cor- 
dially recommend tlie study of this interesting document. 
The committee complains that " a large proportion of its 
members had paid no attention to their appointment, had 
attended none of the meetings, either of the general or sub- 
committees, and had done no work whatever." The report 
says that " several suggestions were made at various times 
that some steps should be taken in the future by the Trus- 
tees to secure a better attendance to their duties on the part 
of the members of the Examining Committee." It is the 
custom of the Trustees to reappoint for a second year mem- 
bers who have served but once. Thus the committee is 
composed of two classes, those who are serving for the first 
time and those who are serving for the second. This year 
no member of the committee wlio has not attended a single 
meeting has been reappointed for 1907-8. This is as far as 
this Board can go. 

It has sometimes been thought that the suggestions of the 
Examining Committee have not received from the Trustees the 
consideration they deserved. Nothing could be more natural 
than such an idea. It is to be remembered, however, that of 
the recommendations of examining committees some relate to 
questions of policy in library management concerning which, 
there may be diverse opinions, and if the opinion of the Board 



Library Department. 5 

is not that of the Examining Committee, it is both just and 
proper that the Board should adhere to the course it believes 
to be right. Again, it is to be expected that a committee 
should make various recommendations which are not acted 
upon because of expense, or because the change would inter- 
fere with important considerations, or because the Board may 
believe that other reforms should take precedence. Finally, 
a committee which is not charged with the carrying out of its 
recommendations may very easily underestimate the disturb- 
ance of existing conditions that some changes might occasion. 
For these and other reasons it is not surprising that many 
recommendations, some of them of much merit, come to 
naught. Probably it always will be so; but the Trustees 
would take this opportunity to express their high apprecia- 
tion of the spirit which induces so many very busy men and 
women to serve their fellow citizens by devoting their time 
to the interests of the Libi'ary. 

A very important event occurred in June, 1906, when the 
American Medical Association met in Boston for the first 
time in thirty years, bringing together many thousand intelli- 
gent and progressive men and women from all parts of the 
country. Recognizing that the Public Library of Boston is 
one of the first institutions such a gathering would wish to 
see, the Trustees made every effort to do justice to the occa- 
sion. For several days guides conducted parties of visitors 
over the building every hour daring the day. There was 
an exhibition of a very interesting and valuable collection of 
engravings and photographs of distinguished physicians and 
surgeons and of pictures of medical scenes. Many of 
these were loaned for the occasion. On the evening of June 
5, a reception was given by the Trustees to the members of 
the Association and to their families to meet his Honor the 
Mayor. The reception was most agreeable. The attendance 
surpassed that of any previous gathering in the Libraiy. The 
guests seemed more than pleased. The Trustees were very 
cordially and efficiently supported in this undertaking by 
Mayor Fitzgerald. 

Solomon Lincoln, 

President, 
James De Noemandie, 

Vice-President, 
JosiAH H. Benton, Jr., 
Thomas F. Boyle, 
Thomas D wight. 



City Document No. 25. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees : 

The report of tlie Librarian for the year ending January 
31, 1907, is hereby submitted : 

The Library System. 

The library system includes : 

The Central Lijarary on Copley Square. 

Ten branch libraries with permanent collections of 
books. 

Seventeen delivery stations (all but one of which are 
reading rooms), and also as places of deposit or delivery, 
forty-four engine houses, twenty-seven institutions and 
ninety-six public and parochial schools. The total number 
of agencies through which the circulation of books is 
provided is, as will be seen, one hundred and ninety-four, 
as compared with one hundred and ninety-nine in 1905-06. 
The decrease is entirely in the list of subsidiary agencies 
(places of dei30sit, etc.), which vary in number from year to 
year. 

One important new reading room has been established 
during the year, namely, the City Point Reading Room, 
located at 617 Broadway, opened for service July 18. 

Finance. 

A record of the receipts and payments for the year is to be 
found in the statement of the Library Auditor (Appendix I.) 

Buildings, Equipment and General Administration. 

The usual routine repairs have been made as required to 
maintain in good order the extensive engineering plant at the 
Central Library. There have been no accidents or breaks 
interfering with the permanent and effective operation of the 
engines and dynamos. The boilers and motors are in good 
order. A five-horse power motor has been installed in the 
carpenter shop, replacing one of two-horse power, a change 
made necessary by an increase in the capacity of the wood- 
working machinery employed. 



LiBEARY Department. 7 

Repairs have been made as needed upon the system of 
piping, in general, and additional piping has been put in to 
extend the vacuum cleaning apparatus to parts of the build- 
ing not covered by the original installation. The electric 
and hydraulic elevators have been maintained in good order, 
and are regularly inspected. The consumption of fuel at the 
Central building has been substantially the same as for the 
preceding year ; 1,600 tons of coal were burned, as against 
1,650 tons received. 

Improvements in Lighting. 

During the year 50 additional electric lamps have been 
installed at the Central Library ; and various improvements 
effected by means of refjectors put in place. In the Cata- 
logue Department, increased light has been provided by 
means of lamps encircling the five columns in the centre of 
the room. 

General Repairs. 

The following general repairs have been carried out at the 
Central building : 

The Periodical Room (No. 1) has been repainted, and a 
book elevator installed ; the tile roofing of the building has 
been extensively repaired, including the replacement of 246 
tiles which were broken or cracked ; and repairs have been 
made to obviate leaks on the roof of the courtyard arcade. 

Repairs and Improvements at Branches. 

A considerable amount of new furniture has been pur- 
chased for the branches and reading rooms, including new 
bookcases at the Brighton and West Roxbury Branches 
and at Upham's Corner. Entirely new plumbing has been 
installed by the Public Buildings Department at the East 
Boston and Jamaica Plain Branches, and this Department 
has also made repairs upon the roof and upon the plumbing, 
and has repainted the interior at Station A (Dorchester Lower 
Mills), and painted the interior at Dorchester Branch. We 
have uncased and reset the radiators at the West End Branch, 
a needed improvement, and have installed a low pressure 
heating boiler, and a large hot water supply boiler, with 
other plumbing improvements at the South End Branch. 
At Station F (Mount Bowdoin), our landlord has made cer- 
tain necessary repairs and provided a new sidewalk and fence. 
Ventilators and a glass screen to shut out draughts have 
been provided at Station G (Allston). Extensive repairs 
have been made at the Roxbury Branch by the Trustees of the 



8 City Document No. 25. 

Fellowes Athenaeum. Several additional fire extinguishers 
have been placed at branches and stations. Wooden tablets 
of uniform design and lettering have been placed outside the 
reading rooms, displaying the hours of opening and closing. 

Lost and Missing Books. 

At the Central Library during the year 907 books have 
been recorded as missing. Of these, 221 were missing from 
or through the Children's Room, and 228 from or through the 
collection used for the deposit stations. From the general 
stacks, apart from fiction, only 143 were missing. Of the 
fiction collection at the Central Library 139 volumes were 
missing, from the open shelves of new books exposed in Bates 
Hall 42, and the Bates Hall open-shelf reference collection 
showed a loss of 67. On the other hand, of the stack books 
drawn for hall use in Bates Hall only 16 were reported as 
missing. 

At the branches and reading rooms 719 volumes were 
recorded as missing from the open shelves and only 53 from 
closed shelves. The number missing from the open shelves 
at the branches was less by 124 than for the preceding year.' 
But the number missing at the reading rooms showed an 
increase, there being 196 volumes lost from the permanent 
collections, as against 103 missed during the preceding year, 
and 225 volumes were lost from books deposited at these 
rooms, as against 210 for the year 1905-1906. As will be 
seen, 1,140 volumes, in the aggregate, were reported as miss- 
ing .through the branches and reading rooms outside the 
Central Library. 

Each year a considerable number of the books reported as 
missing in a previous year re-appear at the Central Library 
or at one of the branches or reading rooms. They are 
usually returned as surreptitiously as they were taken away. 
For example, of books previously missed at the Central 
Library, 240 were returned in 1902; 389 in 1903 ; 336 in 
1904 ; 304 in 1905 ; and 251 in 1906, At the branches, 
where the open shelf privileges are more general, the results 
are not nearly so favorable, only a small part of the missing 
books ever being found. 

FrOx-n what has been said it will be plain that the exposure 
of books upon the oj)en shelves, and their use without much 
restriction, results in a considerable loss, part of which is 
temporary, in a. library used by the mixed population of a 
great city. Careful examination of the figures cited indicates 
also that the books taken are principally of the cheaper sort. 



Library Department. 9 

that many of them are books taken by children, and that in 
numerous instances they are taken not primarily by tlieft, but 
through informal or irregular borrowing, in disregard of the 
proper rules relating to charging upon a library card. It is 
also clear, from our experience, that many books taken from 
the open shelves, no doubt with the intention of returning 
them, never are returned ; probably being thrown aside or for- 
gotten by the irresponsible persons who took them. 

There seems to be no reason for modifying the opinion 
expressed in previous reports. Unquestionably the open- 
shelf system, toward which public libraries have moved dur- 
ing the last ten years, is of great public benefit and 
convenience. That it promotes the use of books no one can 
doubt. It must be admitted, however, that there are 
serious evils attending it unless it is carefully guarded. If 
the missing books involved merely pecuniaiy loss the matter 
would not be of much importance. The expense might be 
charged to profit and loss, and considered justifiable in view 
of the advantages derived. But if books may be taken 
without observance of rules, made for the benefit of the 
Library patrons no less than for the convenience of adminis- 
tration, and returned or not, as those who take them may 
decide, a tendency towards demoralization is at once estab- 
lished, affecting particularly the young. This is far more 
serious than the money loss involved. 

Recently we have put in operation at certain branches 
and reading rooms a system which contemplates the continu- 
ance of reasonable open-shelf privileges, guarded, however, 
so as to supervise and control more closely the young 
persons who use them. The essential points in this system 
are the following: A library card or other ticket of identifi- 
cation must be presented at the custodian's desk before 
access to the children's shelves is granted ; persons under 
eighteen years of age must conform to the same requirement 
before being admitted to the shelves containing non-fiction 
for adults ; no one under eighteen years of age is permitted 
to have free access to shelves containing fiction for adults. 

Obviously, these rules put the younger patrons of the 
Library under certain restraint as to the open-shelf privi- 
leges. But the restraint is of a kind that invoh^es no great 
hardship, while at least permitting the custodians to scan 
more closely those who are admitted to the shelves. It is 
expected that the slight formality required in the presenta- 
tion of a card at the desk will operate as a deterrent to the 
irresponsible visitor. The plan remains an experiment at 
present, but, so far as tried, it promises improvement. An , 



10 City Document No. 25. 

incidental result is the maintenance of better order than 
formerly in some of the more crowded children's rooms. 
Where the plan has been tried for a considerable period the 
custodians report that this is a result, and that the serious 
use of the books is promoted ; also that tlie library card has 
apparently acquired an increased value. The card holders 
feel their responsibility more deeply. The invasion of tlie 
rooms by irresponsible groups, who come for mischief only, 
has ceased.* A change in the rules relating to children's 
fines, hereafter mentioned, also bears upon the matter of loss 
of books from the cldldren's open shelves. 

Modification of Rules Relating to Children's 

Fines. 

Under the rules heretofore in force, the non-payment of 
fines levied whenever books were not returned withici the 
prescribed time deprived the delinquent of library privileges. 
As to adults, this rule, which is usual in all public libraries, 
does not seem unreasonable. With respect to children, how- 
ever, who generally depend upon others for the payment of 
the fines, in many instances thoughtlessly incurred, condi- 
tions appeared which it was desirable to remedy. 

Since no limit was set to the deprivation of privileges, 
except by the payment of the fine, large numbers of children 
became permanently debarred from the use of the Library. 
The difficulty was increased on account of the fact that 
fines, small in amount at first, due from children who were 
not able themselves to pay and who were often ujiwilling to 
ask their parents for the money, or who did not fully appre- 
ciate the state of the case or the effect of the rule, would 
run to amounts so large that payment involved a burden 
greater than the parents were willing to assume. 

The Library has in recent years made a determined effort 
to attract children within its influence. The work it is doing 
and hopes to do with children is of the largest importance. 
Manifestly a rule that operated to discourage or prevent the 
use of the Library by children required modification. The 
purpose of the fine was to secure prompt return of books 
taken by one borrower in order that others might enjoy the 
privilege of using them. In the majority of cases the knowl- 
edge that a fine will otherwise be incurred is sufficient to 
secure regular observance of a rule, without which equal 
privileges cannot be extended to. all. 

In order to establish a penalty which children can under- 
stand, and which is expected to secure the result aimed at in 



Library Department. 11 

the fining system, without permanently excluding children 
from the Library, the rule as to fines has been modified so 
that all fines incurred by persons who are under sixteen years 
of age at the time the fine begins to run shall be cancelled at 
the end of six months. This, in the case of childj-en under 
sixteen years of age, substitutes deprivation of the use of a 
library card, during a fixed term of six months, for the pay- 
ment of a fine in money. If the delinquent prefers, the fine 
can be paid in money, as before, at any time within the six 
months, and the card will then be at once returned to the 
person in whose name it is issued. 

This change in the rule as to children's fines is expected to 
have an indirect effect in diminishing the loss of books from 
the open shelves. Under the old rule, a boy or girl who had 
incurred a fine which remained unpaid, and thereby lost the 
use of a library card, could easily abstract a book from the 
open shelves without the formality of having it charged. 
The fact that the library card was permanently withheld 
unless the fine was paid put before the delinquent a strong 
temptation to secure a book in an unauthorized way. If 
obtained once without detection, the act was repeated, dis- 
regard of rule became chronic, and the scheme was easily 
communicated to others. Since it is now known that after 
an interval the card will be returned, the temptation is weak- 
ened, and it is probable that fewer books will be taken with- 
out having them charged. 

Since the change in the rule, many children who had lost 
the use of cards through the non-payment of fines have- 
reclaimed them. At one large Branch, 115 cards were thus 
re-issued within a single month. The unpaid fines on these 
amounted to $36.09, but much of this would probably never 
have been paid. In this one instance there were 116 young 
persons deprived of the home use of books without limit, 
unless they yielded to the temptation to obtain them irregu- 
larly from the open shelves. 

Books Received. 

In continuation of our regular routine, all important 
American, English and Continental catalogues and publish- 
ers' lists ha,ve been carefully scanned, and the Library has 
been represented at the leading auction sales of the year. 
Accessions from these sources and by gift include many 
important works, apart from current publications, which 
properly find a place in a Library like ours, and which 
materially enhance the value of our collections to scholars as 
well as to the general reader. 



12 City Document No. 25. 

The work of catalogue examination must be performed 
with discrimination, and with knowledge not only of the 
departments of literature covered, but of what this Library 
already contains. In making selections for purchase a shrewd 
knowledge of values is frequently needed, especially as 
relates to rare books and early imprints. The routine work 
involves much drudgery, and the care with which it has 
been performed by the various members of the staff to whom 
it is entrusted deserves appreciative acknowledgment here. 

Mr. James L. Whitney has continued his esj^ecial oversight 
of the current American and English lists. Auction sale 
catalogues of rare books, and those covering certain special 
departments of literature, have been examined by Mr. 
Fleischner, the Assistant Librarian ; Dr. Muss-Arnolt has 
devoted particular attention to foreign lists and reviews; 
Mr. Murdoch has covered the catalogues, lists and reviews of 
scientific books ; Mr. Bierstadt of the Reference Department, 
Mr. Ward of the Branch Department, Mr. Maiers of the 
Ordering Department, and others of the regular force have 
been of great assistance ; and the experience and knowledge 
ot Miss Macurdy, Chief of the Ordering Department, have 
lu no slight degree aided the administration in the important 
work of selection and purchase. 

As in previous years, all important books currently pub- 
lished in this country have been submitted to the Library for 
direct examination as they have come from the press. These, 
as well as the results of the preliminary examination of cata- 
logues by members of the staff, have passed under the review 
of the Librarian, and, as usual, the selections have finally 
been submitted to a voluntary committee of the Trustees, 
the perfected lists coming for approval or rejection, in whole 
or in part, to the full Board each week. 

The results for the year of this careful system of selection 
and purchase are shown in the following statistical statement, 
which also shows the accessions by gift and exchange : 

Central, Branches, Total 
Volumes. Volumes. Volumes. 

Accessions by purchase .... 13,510 9,984 23,494 

Accessions by gift 9,896 525 10,421 

Accessions by exchange .... 671 671 

Accessions by periodicals (bound) . . 2,20;-{ 2,203 

Accessions by Statistical Department . 663 663 

26,943 10,509 37,452 

Books bought for Central Library : 

From city appropriation .... 12,000 
From trust funds income .... 1,510 

Carried forward 13,510 



Library Department. 13 

Brought forward 13,510 

Books bought for branches : 

From city appropriation .... 9,279 

From trust funds income .... 47 

By Fellowes Athenaeum .... 658 



9,984 
— 23,494 

The total accessions as exhibited in the foregoing state- 
ment aggregate 37,452 volumes, as against 33,551 in 
1905-06. 

ENGLISH PROSE FICTION. 

Continuing the policy established in previous years, the 
purchase of fiction has been restricted within conservative 
lines. Substantially all new publications in fiction have been 
carefully examined, however, and selections made up to the 
limit permitted by the established standard. 

The total number of new books considered was 715. Of 
these, 167 titles were selected for purchase, and 1,662 copies 
bought. Replacements of fiction already on our catalogue, 
and the supplying of additional copies, have required the 
purchase of 4,810 volumes. 

Expressed in terms of percentage, the expenditure for fie-" 
tion, including new purchases, replacements and additional 
copies, amounted to 14.48 per cent, of all book expenditure, 
as against 18.65 per cent, in 1905-06 and 20.21 per cent, in 
1904-05. The somewhat smaller relative expenditure for 
fiction, shown in this comparison, is due to the fact that much 
of the larger aggregate expenditure for the year was neces- 
sarily devoted to the standard reference books required in 
the newer reading rooms. 

The following detailed account of the accessions of [the 
year is from the report of Miss Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief 
of the Ordering Department : 

PAYMENTS FOR BOOKS, PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS, 

1906-07. 

The payments for 1906-07 have been as follows : 

City money expended for books : 
For the Central Library (inchid- 

ing S2,346.29 for Deposit) . $19,232 82 

For branches . . . . *9,29968 



Carried forward ...... $28,532 50 

♦As against. $8,7 19.79 in 1905-06. 



14 City Document No. 25. 



Brought forward . 

City money expended for periodicals : 
For Central Librar}^ . 
For branches and stations 



Total city money expended . 

Trust funds expended for books : 
For Central Library . 
For branches .... 

Trust funds expended for news- 
papers ..... 

Total trust funds expended . 
Carnegie fund expended for Central Library 

Total city money and funds expended . . t $48,187 20 

Fellowes Athenfeum paid for books for Roxbury 
Branch, purchased by the Central Library : 

Books $512 92 

Periodicals .. . . ' . 260 48 

773 40 



• 


$28,535 


50 


$4,304 57 






2,192 92 








6,497 


49 




. 


$35,029 


99 


$10,804 68 






122 47 






2,210 55 


13,137 




, 


70 


library 


19 


51 



$48,960 60 



REVIEW OF PURCHASES, 1906-07. 

There have been bought this year 23,494 volumes, ex- 
ceeding by 3,901 the number bought in 1905-06. From the 
wide range of subjects covered by these accessions some of 
the more important will be noted. 

AMERICANA. 

No very striking collections of Americana have been sold at 
auction, and much of the material obtained, relating to colonial 
and revolutionary affairs, has been found in the catalogues of 
foreign booksellers. 

The Department of Colonial History has been strengthened 
by a few works of high importance, rather than numerically ; 
among the accessions being Bullock's Virginia Impartially 
examined and left to publick view . . . London, 1649, 
" a guide for prospective settlers and abounding with details 
of the Colony of the highest value and interest," and Durell's 
A particular account of the taking of Cape Breton from the 
French, by Admiral Warren and Sir William Pepperell, the 
17th of June;" 1745 . . . London, 1745, 

t As against $42,194.57 in 1905-06. 



Library Department. 15 

From the sale of the Library of Sir John Bourinot were 
obtained a number of works relating to the Campaigns of the 
French and Indian Wars, the Hudson Bay Claims and the 
Huguenots in Canada, including Du Calvet, P. Appel a la 
Justice . . . London, 1784 ; Massie, J. An historical account 
of the naval power of France ... to which is added a narra- 
tive of the French at New Foundland from the reign of King 
Charles . . . London, 1762; and a complete set of the 
Collection des Manuscripts du Mardschal de L^vis, in 12 
volumes. Quebec, 1885-95. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The Eighteenth Century newspapers have not received as 
•many accessions as usual, doubtless owing in part to the fact 
that great gains have been made on our deficiencies since 
1900. About 350 numbers in all were added, of which 62 
were to the file of the Boston Weekly Post Bo}^ 93 to the 
Boston Evening Post, 1 to the Boston Gazette (the number, 
containing the Boston Port Bill, May 14, 1774), 26 to the 
Boston Weekly News Letter (of which 20 were published 
before 1750), 1 to the New England Chronicle and 80 to the 
Pennsylvania Gazette, including the postscript issue of De- 
cember 24, 1773, containing the account of the Boston Tea 
Party, the first news of that event published in Philadelphia. 

PERIODICALS. 

On the other hand, a larger number than usual of periodi- 
cals published in the United States from 1793-1850 have been 
secured, including many complete sets of short-lived serials, 
of which The Thespian Oracle, Philadelphia, 1798, the first 
American theatrical magazine, may serve as an example. 

The file of the Massachusetts Magazine has been completed 
with the exception of four numbers, 3, 9, 11 and 12 of 
Volume 8, 1796, and the files of the early Almanacs are also 
beginning to show the result of persistent* attention. Low's, 
for instance, now lacks but two years, 1766 and the last 
issue for 1827. In this connection, the earliest Almanac 
acquired was John Tulley's, published in Boston, for the 
year 1698. 

BROADSIDES. 

Two of the more important Broadsides, selected from the 35 
purchased, are noted as follows : (1) Massachusetts. In the 
House of Representatives, September 17, 1776. Whereas 
doubts may arise in the minds of some of the good people of 
this State, who are willing to go out at this important junc- 



16 City Document No. 25. 

ture against our unnatural enemies . . . about what time 
they shall be held in that service (Boston, 1776). Signed 
by J. Warren, Speaker, and John Avery, Dep. Sec. (2) 
Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock. A 
brief. Whereas the hostile forces of Great Britain . . . 
exerted their powers in the destruction of the town of 
Charlestown . . . and has rendered them unable to build 
a House for the public worship of God . . . Boston, 1782. 
John Hancock. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Prominent among the purchases of interest was the 
acquisition of 39 volumes of material relating to the Boston 
Fire Department and fires in Boston from 1824-28, 1864-87, 
including 5 volumes of manuscript records kept by the late 
John S. Damrell ; 14 volumes of the International Library 
of Technology ; 41 volumes of the Zeitschrift fiir Mathematik 
u. Physik, for the Bowditch Library, completing the set ; 10 
volumes of the Ashbee facsimile reprints of the Shakespeare 
quartos, and 23 volumes of early editions of the separate 
plays; 82 volumes (complete sets) of the Abhandlungen 
unci Berichte d. Konig-Sachsischen Gesellschaft der Wissen- 
schaften. Mathematisch-physische Klasse; 45 volumes of 
the Publications de L';:^cole d. langues orientales vivantes ; the 
complete works.of Thoreau in the " manuscript edition " in 20 
volumes (for the Artz Collection) ; the complete works of 
Poe in 17 volumes ; the complete works of Disraeli in 
20 volumes ; of Besant and Rice in 18 volumes ; the 
History of Science by H. S. and E. H. Williams in 5 
volumes, and the History of Nations, edited by H. C. Lodge, 
in 26 volumes. 

Among the examples of superior book production acquired 
by the Library during the year has been the Ashendene 
Press edition of Dante's Divina Commedia, in 3 volumes, 
London, 1902-5, perhaps the most beautiful edition of this 
work ever printed. The text is in old faced type, printed 
on pure vellum throughout and illustrated with wood 
engravings, copied by W. Hooper and C. Keates from the 
Venice edition of 1491, with illuminated initials. Bound in 
imp green vellum. 

Other examples are the Song of Roland, translated from 
the French by Isabel Butler, Boston, 1906, a folio edition 
with colored illustrations taken from Charlemagne's window 
in Chartres Cathedral ; The Triumph of Petrarch, translated 
by Henry Boyd with an introduction by Guido Biagi, Boston, 
1906, folio edition with plates in facsimile of 15th century 



Library Department. 17 

engravings in the British Museum, printed in humanistic 
type ; and the volumes, as far as issued, published by the 
Merrymount Press in the Humanists' Library, a series of 
books "each one . . . characteristic of some aspect of the 
culture which flourished in Western Europe during the 
period of the Renaissance." 

Additions of note have also been made to the Civil War 
literature in the 20th Regiment Collection ; to the collection 
of Chapbooks, and to the history and literature of the Nether- 
lands. To the collection of fine arts the accessions have been 
mainly current publications of which a partial list is. given. 
A list is also given of a number of single works on various 
subjects to which more than ordinary interest attaches. 

A LIST OF THE INIORE IMPORTANT WORKS ADDED TO THE 
FINE ARTS COLLECTION. 

Andrews, William Loring. Bibliopegy in the L^nited States, 
and kindred subjects. (Illustrated by Sidney L. Smith.) 
Privately printed: New York, 1902. lUus. Facsimiles. 
Most of the plates are colored. 

Andrews, William Loring. Fragments of American history 
illustrated solely by the works of those of our own 
engravers who flourished in the 18tli century. New 
York, privately printed, 1898. 

Armstrong, E. A. Axel Herman Haig and his work, illus- 
trated from his etchings, pencil-drawings, and water- 
colours, with a biography. London, 1905. Plates. 

Barboutan, Pierre B. Biographies des artistes japonais dont 
les oeuvres figurent dans la collection Pierre Barboutau. 
Paris, 1904. 2 vols. 

Binns, W. M. The first century of English porcelain. Lon- 
don, 1906. 

Bond, Francis. Gothic architecture in England. London, 
1905. 

British Museum. Early engraving and engravers in Eng- 
land (1545-1695). A ciitical and historical essay, by 
Sidney Colvin. London, 1905. Illus. 41 plates. 

Burlington Fine Arts Club. Exhibition of pictures of the 
School of Siena. London, (1904). 

Calvert, A. F. Moorish remains in Spain ; with a particular 
account of the Mohammedan architecture and decoration 
in Cordova, Seville and Toledo. London, 1906. Many of 
the plates are colored. 

Dickes, W. F. The Norwich school of painting : being a 
full account of the Norwich exhibitions . . . London, 
1905. 



18 City Document No. 25. 

Fantin-Latour, I. H. J. T. L'oeuvie de Fantin-Latour . . . 
60 plates. Paris, 1906. 

Field, Horace, and Michael Bunney. English domestic archi- 
tecture of the XVII and XVIII centuries. London, 1905. 

Gued}-, Henry, ed. Le Palais du Louvre : exterieur et 
intdrieur. Architecture — sculpture — decoration. En- 
sembles et details. Dourdan (1905). Illus. 60 plates. 

Hendley, T. H. Asian carpets. XVI and XVII century 
designs from the Jaipur palaces. . . . Text, and atlas of 
157 chromo-lithographic plates. London, 1905. " In this 
exhaustive work an endeavor has been made to cover the 
vi^hole known field of eaiiy carpet manufacture." 

Hofstede de Groot. Jan Vermeer van Delft und Karel 
Fabritius. Photograviiren nach ihren bekannten Gemalden. 
. . . Text von Hofstede de Groot. Leipzig, 1905-6, Lief. 
1-3. 

Japanischer Formenschatz. Gesammelt von S. Bing. Plates. 
Leipzig, 1888-91. 

Jefferson, Joseph. De luxe catalogue of the valuable paint- 
ings collected by tlie late Joseph Jefferson. ... 32 plates. 
Facsimiles. New York, 1906. 

Lemonnier, C. Alfred Stevens et son oeuvre. 42 plates. 
Bruxelles, 1906. 

M., L. S. ed. Music cantalenas, songs, etc., from an early 
fifteenth century manuscript. Facsimiles. (London, 
1906.) One of an edition of 100 copies. 

Oriental carpets. English edition by C. Purdon Clarke. 
Supplement, Pts. 1, 2. Vienna, 1906. 

Prokop, August. Die Markgrafschaft Miihren in kunst- 
geschichtlicher Beziehung. Wien, 1904. 4 vols. 

Richter, J. J. & A. C. Taylor. The golden age of classic 
Christian art. London, 1904. 

Rivers, A. H. L. Fox Pitt. Antique works of art from 
Benin. Privately printed, 1900. 

Russia. Commission Imperiale Archdologique. Les mos- 
qudes de Samarcande. Fasc. 1. Gour-Emir. St. Petersburg, 
1905. 
. Seidel, Paul. Gemiilde alter Meister im Besitze seiner 
Majestiit des deutschen Kaisers und Konigs von Preussen. 
Berlin. [1906.] 72 plates. 

Steierraaerkisches Landesmuseum Joanneum, Graz. Alt- 
steirische Wohnriiume im Landesmuseum zu Graz, 
herausg. von Karl Lacher. Leipzig, 1906. 32 plates. 

Steindl, E. Das ungarische Parlamentshaus. Budapest, 
1906. 

Triggs, H. I. The art of garden design in Italy. London, 
1906. 



Librae Y Department. 19 

LIST OF ISnSCELLANEOUS WORKS. 

Alterthunisverein zu Wien. Geschichte der Stadt Wien. 
Redigirt von Albert Starzer. Band 1, 2. Wien, 1897- 
1905. 

Ammann, A. J. F. Geschichte der Familie Ammann von 
Zurich. Text und Atlas. Zurich, 1904. 

Bleeker, P. van. Atlas icthyologique des Indes orientales 
ii^erlandaises public sous les auspices du gouvernenient 
coloniale nderlandais. Amsterdam, 1862-(78). 9 vols., 
colored plates. " A work conceived and executed on a 
most imposing scale." 

Book of Psalms (The). Englished both in prose and metre 
. . . with annotations by Henry Ainsworth. Amsterdam. 
1612. (The first edition of the Brownist version of the 
Psalms.) 

Boswell. History and genealogical tables of the Boswells. 
Their ancient alliances and connections from the founder 
of the name in 1066 to this date 1906. Vol. I. Fac- 
similes. (Leeds.) 1906. (Li 2 vols.) 

British Museum. Catalogue of the Coptic manuscripts in 
the British Museum. By W. E. Crum. London. 1905. 
Fifteen plates of manuscript facsimiles. 

British Museum. Cuneiform texts from Babylonian tablets 
in the British Museum. In 23 portfolios. London. 
1896-1906. 

Carmichael, Alexander. Carmina Gaedelica. Edinburgh. 
1900. 2 vols. 

Cervantes. The history of the valorous and witty knight- 
errant Don Quixote of the Mancha. Translated by 
Thomas Shelton. Illustrated by Daniel Vierge. Vols. 
1, 2. (Issued in 1 vols.) New York. 1906. (Ticknor 
Collection.) 

Club of Odd Volumes. Murdock, Harold, ed. Historic of 
the life and ,death of Sir William Kirkaldy of Grange, 
Knight. . . . Boston. 1906. 

Davies, A. C. Fox. Armorial families. A complete peerage, 
baronetage and knightage, and a directory of some gentle- 
men of coat-armour. Fifth edition. Edinburgh. 1905. 
Contains a list of London Clubs. 

English Schole-Master, The, or certaine rules and helpes, 
whereby the natives of the Netherlandes, may bee, in a 
short time, taoght (sic) to read, understand, and speake, 
the English tongue. Amsterdam. 1663. 

Ercilla Y Zunniga, Alonso de. (La Araucana) Primera, 
segunda y tercera partes de la Araucana. . . . Anvers. 
1597. (Ticknor Collection.) 



20 City Document No. 25. 

Evangeliarium Epistolarium et lectionariiini Aztecum sive 
Mexicanum, ex antique codice Mexicano nuper reperto de- 
promptum, cum praefatione . . . glossario ed. B. Bion- 
delli. Cum fac simile. Mediolani. 1858. 

Flaminius, Marcus Antonius. The scholar's vade niecum. 
A translation . . . with som few alterations. ... As 
also certain idiomatologic and philologic annotations. . . . 
By John Norton. London. 1674. Contains the Latin 
originals. 

Historic churches of America. Illustrated by etchings, 
photogravures and other reproductions from original draw- 
ings . . . with over 200 smaller engravings. With full 
text. 2 vols. Philadelphia. (189-?.) 

Gay, John. The Wife of Bath. A comedy. As it is acted 
at the Theatre-royal in Drury Lane. . . . By Mr. Gay. 
London. 1713. (The first edition.) 

Huth, Henry, Ed. Ancient ballads and broadsides pub- 
lished in England in the 16th century. . . . Reprinted from 
the unique original copies . . . preserved in the Library 
of Henry Huth. London. 1867. Illus. Vignettes. One 
of an edition of 50 copies presented to members of the 
Philobiblon Society. 

Journal of discourses by Brigham Young ... his two coun- 
sellers, the twelve apostles, and others. Reported by G. 
D. Watt, and humbly dedicated to the Latter-day Saints 
in all the world. Vols. 1-26. All published. Liverpool. 
1854-1880. 

Miles, H. D. Pugilistica : being one hundred and forty-four 
years of the history of British boxing. (1719-1863.) 3 
vols. London. 1880. 

Muenster, Sebastian. A briefe collection and compendious 
extract of straunge and memorable things, gathered out of 
the Cosmographye of Sebastian Miinster. Imprinted at 
London in Fleete Streat by Thomas Marshe. Anno 1574. 

Nicholson, Joseph. The standard of the Lord lifted up in 
New England . . . with a warning from the Lord to the 
rulers . . . and people of New England, but more 
especially to the rulers ... of the bloody town of Boston 
who have put the servants of the living God to death. 
Written (in the prison at Boston in New England in 
America) by a fiiend of Israels Commonwealth . . . 
Joseph Nicholson. London. 1660. (On the persecution 
of the Quakers.) 

Paston, George. Social caricature in the eighteenth century. 
Two hundred illustrations. London. 1906. 

Shaw, William Arthur, and George Dames Burtchaell. The 
knights of England. A complete record from the earliest 



I 



Library Department. 21 

time to the present day of the knights of all the orders of 
chivalry in England, Scotla*nd and Ireland, and of knights 
bachelors. London. 1906. 2 vols. 

Whitaker, Joseph Isaac Spadafora. The birds of Tunisia. 
London. 1905. 2 vols. Plates, maps. 

Wickhoff, Franz, ed. Beschreibendes Verzeichnis der illum- 
inierten Handschriften in Oesterreich. Vols. 1 and 2. 
Leipzig. 1905. 

Williams, H. S. Manuscripts, inscriptions and monuments, 
oriental and classical, mediaeval and modern. . . . Com- 
prehending the history of the art of writing. London. 
1902. 203 plates. 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

There were purchased 1,717 photographs, including 167 
color prints of buildings and scenery in the LTnited States. 
In the collection were 241 photographs of historic houses, 
principally in Massachusetts, 62 of Alaskan scenery, and 21 
of the newly discovered petrified forests of Arizona. 

The gifts of photographs numbered 513, and the largest 
and most important collection given was that presented by 
the Woman's Education Association of 216 mounted pictures 
of New Zealand and Australia. 

AUCTION SALES. 

The records of auctions show 80 sales in which the Library 
placed bids, or 26 more than in 1905-6. The amount of 
money authorized to be expended was $6,788.39; the amount 
actually expended was $2,973.28. The number of titles bid 
for was 956 ; the number secured was 666, or 69 per cent., 
comprising 1,777 volumes. In nearly all of the Boston sales 
the Library was personally represented. 

ACCESSIONS AT BRANCHES AND STATIONS. 

To the Branches and Stations a total of 9,981 volumes 
was added. Eliminating certain special purchases for 
reading rooms hereafter mentioned, the branch accessions 
fall behind their last year's total by 169 volumes, due in 
great part to the reduction of replacements of fiction, which 
reached an aggregate of 1,978 volumes (120 additional copies, 
1,858 replacements) as against 3,676 last year. There were 
also added 901 volumes of current fiction, making in all 
2,882 volumes. 

Eight hundred and seventy-five volumes of carefully 
selected works of popular interest, including some necessary 
books of reference, 281 volumes of fiction, also 14 periodi- 



22 City Document No. 25. 

cals, were placed in the new reading room in South 
Boston. 

There was also a special purchase made of encyclopaedias, 
dictionaries, histories, etc., for other reading rooms. Another 
special outlay was $150 for new books for Station Q at 
Upham's Corner, and Station J at Codman Square. These 
accessions made the station collections approach more nearly 
to uniformity, and will doubtless tend largely to increase 
their usefulness. 

The newspaper list has been enlarged by 30 new subscrip- 
tions, 19 of which were for papers published in the United 
States and 11 foreign. 

Gifts for 1906-07. 

The number of givers was 3,861. For the preceding yearr 
1905-06, the number was 3,570, or 291 less than this year- 
The gifts comprise 12,486 volumes, 20,182 serials, 83 news- 
paper subsciptions, 513 photographs, 296 broadsides, 38 manu- 
scripts, 605 maps, 35 posters, 1 medal, and 7 miscellaneous 
items. It is a pleasure to record a larger number than usual 
of genealogies presented to the Library, also that requests for 
gifts of books have met with generous response. 

A selected list of the more important gifts is given as 
follows : 

Appleton William Sumner. One hundred and forty vol- 
umes, 1,735 pamphlets, including a collection of coin cata- 
logues. 
Baxter, Sylvester, Maiden. Twenty-one volumes relating 
to Buenos Aires, also a General map of the Argentine 
Republic and plans of the cities of Buenos Aires and 
Plata. 
Benton, Josiah H., Jr. One hundred and forty volumes and 
52 numbers, including a type written manuscript copy of 
" The Messiah Magnified — By the Mouthes of Babes in 
America." By Marmaduke Matthews, lately a Teaching 
Elder of the Church at Maldon in New England. Lon- 
don, 1659. (Taken from the printed copy in the Brit- 
ish Museum, 1906.) 
Bixby, Miss Almira. Sixty volumes, English classics and 

text books. 
Boston Browning Society. Seventeen volumes and 21 num- 
bers for the Browning Collection. 
Boston Society of Natural History. Sixty-two volumes, 

reports, monographs, etc. 
Bowditch, Dr. Henry P. Two hundred and sixty-seven vol- 
umes and 103 numbers, a miscellaneous collection, chiefiy 
reports. 



LiBEAEY Department. 23 

British Museum. Six volumes, including " Medallic Illustra- 
tions of the History of Great Britain and Ireland." Lon- 
don, 190-4-05. Forty plates in 4 portfolios. 

Brown, Allen A. One hundred and seventy-nine volumes of 
music. 

Channing, Miss Eva. One hundred and forty-four volumes, 
many from the library of the late William Ellery Chan- 
ning, and 47 numbers of periodicals. 

Collins, Frank S., Maiden. One hundred and seventy-five 
volumes, a miscellaneous collection, 30 pieces of music and 
463 Symphony Orchestra Programs. 

Cupples, J. G., Brookline. The Drama of Leonore. By Mrs. 
M. J. Gorton. (Original manuscript.) The Woman of 
Chalk. By John P. Campbell. (Typewritten manuscript.) 

Eliot, The Misses, Roxbury. A collection of old newspapers 
and broadsides, including partial files of the Experiment 
and Office Plolder's Journal, 1834; The Satirist, 1812; 
The Scourge, 1812 ; The Boston Gazette, 1797; The Her- 
ald of Freedom, 1789 ; and a broadside relating to the 
British preparations for the American campaign of 1776, 
entitled " An Interesting Intelligence from Europe." Bos- 
ton. 1776. 

Everett, Dr. William, Quincy, Mass. Five hundred and 
thirty-nine volumes, a miscellaneous collection, and a num- 
ber of maps and charts. 

Farlow, Dr. John W. Nine volumes, including text books in 
Arabic, Hindustani and Italian ; also a portfolio of mounted 
photographs. 

Faxon, Walter, Lexington, Mass. Complete works of Shake- 
speare in forty-five parts, in original covers. N. Y. 18 — ? 

Foote & French. Two hundred and forty-eight volumes, 
reports, etc. 

Garrison, Wendell P. Forty-seven prints and photographs. 

Gay, Ernest L. Forty-two volumes and 82 numbers of the 
Illustrated American. 

Gay, H. Nelson. One hundred and seventy-five volumes 
relating to the Italian "Risorgimento." 

Germany. Patent Office. Twelve thousand one hundred 
and ninety-six numbers of the Patentschriften. 

Gould, Elizabeth Porter, Estate of, through Miss Susan 
Cheever Gould. One hundred and fifty-two volumes, 
presentation copies from the authors to Miss Gould, con- 
tained in a mahogany bookcase ; also four boxes of 
manuscript letters, material relating to clubs, etc. ; and 
portraits of Elizabeth Porter Gould, Augustus Saint- 
Gaudens and Puvis de Chavannes. 



24 City Document No. 25. 

Great Britain. Patent Office. Four hundred and seventy- 
eight volumes, pubUcations of the Patent Office. 

Green, Dr. Samuel A. Twenty-two volumes, 17 manuscripts 
of the Boston Light Infantr}^ two engravings of Benjamin 
Franklin, reproductions of engravings from Book of Voy- 
ages (Dutch), and programs of The Order of Procession, 
etc., relating to the coronation of Queen Victoria. 

Hale, Philip. Thirty-three volumes of music for the Allen 
A. Brown Library. 

Harvey, Mrs. Obed, Gault, Cal. Thirteen newspapers issued 
at the time of the earthquake at San Francisco, including 
"The Call-Chronicle-Examiner," Thursday, April 19, 1906. 

Hiersemann, Karl W., Leipzig. Ninety-nine volumes, med- 
ical dissertations. 

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth. Tvv"enty-one volumes for 
the Galatea Collection. 

Holt, Dr. William L. Ninety-seven volumes of miscellaneous 
works, including a number of bound novels. 

Imperial Archasological Society of St. Petersburg. Sixty- 
four volumes of the publications of the Society. 

Jeffries, Dr. B. Joy. Sixty-one volumes and 97 numbers, 
chiefly medical reports and periodicals. 

Loubat, Due de. Paris. Codex Borgia. Eine altmexican- 
ische Bilderschrift der Bibliothek der Congreratio de 
Proi3aganda Fide. Band 2. 

McLachlan, R. W., Chateau de Ramezay, Montreal. Two 
volumes and a bronze medal struck to commemorate the 
Bi-centennial of the Chateau de Ramezay. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Seven hundred and 
fifty-seven volumes and 578 numbers, a miscellaneous 
collection. 

Minns, Miss Susan. L'exposition retrospective de I'art 
ddcoratif francais. Description par Gaston Migeon, avec 
une introduction par Emile Molinier. Paris (1900). 
Ten port-folios in 2 cases. 

Morris, Miss F. R. One hundred and sixty-seven volumes, 
chiefly reports, and 148 numbers of periodicals. 

Murdoch, Miss. One hundred and ninety-five volumes of 
miscellaneous works and a number of programs, maps and 
newspapers. 

Observatoire Royal de Belgique. Uccle, Belgium. Result- 
ats du Voyage du S. Y. Belgica. 5 volumes. 

Oliver Ditson Company. Fifty-tlu'ee volumes of music. 

Perry, Thomas Sergeant, Paris. Sixteen volumes and 4 
engraved portraits of Benjamin Franklin, 

Putnam, Miss Sarah C. Seventy-four volumes, including 
Latin and Greek text books and 54 numbers of periodicals. 



Library Department. 25 

Roche, James Jeffrey, Genoa, Titi Livii Patavini Historiae 
Romanae Principis Libri omnes Siiperstites, Opriinorum 
Exemplarum collatione recogniti. Patavii, 1694. 4 vol- 
umes. 

Rogers, Miss Catharine L. One hundred and eighty-seven 
volumes. 

Shaw, Quincy A. The concluding volume (8) of Bode's 
Rembrandt. 

Shaw, Samuel S. One hundred and thirty books and 
pamphlets. 

Silsby, Julian. Twenty-three volumes of miscellaneous 
works for Station J. 

Soci^t^ pour la propagation de livres utiles, Athens, 
Greece. Seventy-four volumes in modern Greek of simple 
books on popular subjects. 

Wells, Ralph G., Cambridge, jNIass. Seventy-six guide 
books, 12 pictorial albums, 13 photographs. 

Whiting, Miss Lilian. Ninety-three volumes, including a 
number of autograph copies, 19 photographs, and original 
manuscript letters by Kate Field. 

Woman's Education Association. Two hundred and forty- 
six photographs of scenery in New Zealand, Australia and 
Tasmania. 

The Catalogue Department. 

J\Ir. Edward B. Hunt, Chief of the Catalogue Department 
since February 1, 1900, died suddenly February 9, 1906. 

Mr. Hunt entered the Library service June 1, 1883, as an 
assistant in the Catalogue Department. By successive pro- 
motions he served in important positions in the Department, 
finally becoming its Chief on February 1, 1900. His entire 
service covered 22 years 8 months and 9 daj^s. 

His natural qualifications for the important work entrusted 
to him, his literary attainments, and his exact and scholarl}^ 
methods, developed through years of experience, made him 
one of the most valuable members of our staff. 

Mr. Hunt was born in Sudbury, Massachusetts, on Feb- 
ruary 19, 1855. After passing through the public schools 
of that town he entered tlie Boston Latin School, and later 
Harvard College, graduating thence in the Class of 1878, 
with the degree of A. B., and honors in the classics. 

On account of trouble with his eyes, he lost his annual 
examinations in his sophomore year, and in consequence was 
forced to pass them all during his junior year. This fact 
prevented his being chosen for Phi Beta Kappa. During the 
last two years of his course liis rank was in the first third of 
the class. 



26 



City Document No. 25. 



After graduating, from 1878 to 1881, he was an instructor 
in the classics, mathematics and English at a private school 
in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Later he became tutor to the 
son of Hon. R. J. C. Walker, of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 
and afterward served Mr. Walker as his private secretary in 
Washington. 

He married, 1899, Miss Alice Browne, of Dedham, wha 
survives him. 

Mr. S. A. Chevalier, first assistant, succeeded Mr. Hunt as 
Chief, and other service changes and readjastments of work 
were required. From a report presented by the Chief, the 
following statistical and textual summary is condensed : 





1906-07. 


1905-06. 




Vols, and 
parts. 


Titles. 


Vols, and 
parts. 


Titles. 


Catalogued (new) : 
Bates Hall (Central Library) Cata- 


•27,344 
6,015 
10,228 
15,512 


15,607 


20,174 
4,678 
11,008 
19,121 


15,716 






9,262 
9,244 


10,03& 


Re-catalogued 


9,610 








59,099 


34,113 


54,981 


35,35& 



CATALOGUE CARDS FINISHED AND FILED. 

The Catalogue Department has added 161,520 cards to the 
Central Library catalogues during the year. Besides these, 
16,321 cards have been sent to the branches and 5,784 filed 
in the Co-operative Index. The total output of cards thus 
becomes 183,625. Of the Central Library cards, 61,733 
have been added to the Bates Hall cabinets, duplicating the 
number placed in the official catalogue cases below ; and 
38,054 have been inserted in the catalogue cabinets of the 
Special Libraries. One card for each title printed has been 
sent to the Library of Congress. 



GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL WORK. 

The work upon the Catalogue of the Allen A. Brown 
Musical Collection has been advanced, and 115 galleys set 
up in the Printing Department. This important work 
requires much attention in the Department, and it will be 



Library Department. 27 

continuously carried forward until completed. New cabinets 
containing 312 trays have been placed in position in the Bates 
Hall Catalogue room, and the entire catalogue re-arranged 
and the trays re-labelled. 

The re-cataloguing and re-classifying of our entire col- 
lection of Massachusetts laws and legislative documents, 
alluded to last year, has been completed, except as to a few 
volumes temporarily inaccessible. 

The sets of Colonial laws have been collated and pre- 
pared for the bindery. This collection of Colonial laws 
was at the same time catalogued, and is now for the 
first time represented b}^ printed catalogue cards giving 
accurate descriptions of the volumes. 

The increasing use of the card catalogue demands an 
enlarged amount of work to replace soiled and damaged 
cards. During the year, as this replacement has gone for- 
ward, some of the catalogue headings have been revised and 
reprinted. ]\Iany new guide cards have been made for the 
convenience of the public, and many subjects which had 
become over-grown in respect to the number of titles repre- 
sented have been more minutely classified. 

A list of books in modern Greek contained in the Library 
has been prepared for printing ; and also a manuscript list of 
the Hebrew and Judai'o-German works. 

Shelf Department. 

Mr. W. G. T. Roffe, officer in charge, has prepared the 
annual statistics of the Shelf Department, as presented in 
Appendix IV. 

The number of volumes located by the Shelf Department 
during the year aggregated 15,772 ; the principal classes 
being : Bibliography, 356 ; History, Biography, and Geog- 
raphy, General, 421; American, 2,079; English, 1,181; 
PVench, 44:1 ; Italian, 132 ; German, 523 ; Greek and Latin, 
180 ; Spanish, 60 ; Oriental, 510 ; Theology, Ecclesiastical 
Histor}', etc., 1,157; Social Science, Political Economy, etc., 
886 ; Jurisprudence, 151 ; Medical Science, 281 ; Mathematics, 
Physical Science, etc., 393 ; Useful and Mechanic Arts, 644 ; 
Music, 360; other Fine Arts, 722. 

Additions to the Special Collections include : Statistical 
Department, 1,229; Bowditch Library, 116; Parker, 4; 
Ticknor, 18; Barton, 64; Franklin, 42; Military, 324; Allen 
A. Brown, 277 ; Galatea, 46 ; Codman, 6 ; Artz, 170 ; Brown- 
ing, 15 ; Newspaper Room, 85 ; Patent Room, 544. 

The total number of volumes in the Central Library, 
January 31, 1907, is 706,909, including 2,274 in the 



28 City Document No. 25. 

Duplicate Room (mostly public documents), set aside for 
exchange. Disregaiding the Duplicate Room reservation, 
there are 704,635 volumes in the Central Library, as 
compared with 684,695 volumes January 31, 1906. 

The total number of volumes in the Central Library, 
branches, and iudependent reading rooms is 903,349 
volumes. 

Publications. 

Mr. Lindsay Swift, Editor of Library Publications, presents 
the following statement of the documents issued under his 
supervision during the year : 

The Monthly Bulletin, twelve issues from March, 1906, 
through February, 1907, containing a total of 428 pages, and 
the Annual List, issued early in January, 1907, and con- 
taining 272 pages. Tlie editions of the Monthly Bulletin 
are regularly 5,000 copies a month, except the four issues 
from June to September, inclusive, when they are 4,000 a 
month. The edition of the Annual List this year was 3,600 
copies. 

In September, 1906, there also appeared a new edition 
(20,000 copies) of the Rules and Regulations, 14 pages. 

The Monthly Bulletin contained besides its usual matter 
the following lists : 
Recent Developments in Electricity, by Prof. Charles R. 

Cross. (March, 1906.) 
Certain Prevalent Nervous Developments and the Outlook 

for their Prevention, by Prof. James J. Putnam. (March, 

1906.) 
The Melanesians: Racial Problem, Distribution of Culture, 

Social and Religious Evolution, by Alfred C. Haddon, 

Universitv Lecturer, Cambridge, England. (December, 

1906.) 
Public Energy, by Prof. George E. Woodberrv. (January, 

1907.) 
The English in India and Egypt, by Col. Sir Colin Scott 

Moncrieff. (February, 1907.) 

The above lists were issued in connection with lectures 
before the Lowell Institute, and the titles are furnished by 
the lecturers, who are responsible for their extent and char- 
acter. These lists are now an established feature of 
the Bulletin. On a blackboard in the hall where these lec- 
tures are delivered is a notice calling attention to the fact 
that the Boston Public Library Bulletin contains a list bear- 
ing upon the subject of which the lecture treats. This plan 
and the publication from October to March, inclusive, of the 



Library Department. 



29 



programme of the Lowell Institute courses serve to give the 
Bulletin a wider publicity- 
Other lists in the Bulletin were : 
A Brief List of Books for Boys and Girls about Gardening, 
prepared by Miss Jordan of the Children's Department. 
(May, 1906.) 
A List of Books for Teachers and Students of the Kinder- 
garten, prepared by Miss Jordan. (December, 1906.) 
A programme of Exhibitions at the Central Library, 
Branches and Reading Rooms for 1906-7 appeared in the 
November (1906) Bulletin, and a List of the Public Lectures 
to be given in the Lecture Hall from November, 1906, to 
April, 1907, inclusive, appeared in the Bulletins for Novem- 
ber, 1906, and for January and February, 1907. 

The Bindery. 

The number of volumes bound in the Bindery Department 
during the year aggregated 31,886. The following, besides 
other minor miscellaneous work, was also done as summar- 
ized by Mr. Fiank Ryder, Chief of this Department : volumes 
repaired, 2,236; volumes guarded, 600; maps mounted, 672; 
photographs mounted and engravings mounted, 4,106 ; maga- 
zines stitched, 176; library publications folded, stitched and 
trimmed, 74,223. 

The Printing Department. 

Mr. Francis Watts Lee, Chief of this Department, has 
compiled the following comparative statement, covering the 
work of the department in two successive years : 



Requisitions on hand February 1 

Requisitions received during year 

Requisitions withdrawn . 

Requisitions on hand January 31 

Requisitions filled during year 

Card Catalogue (Central) : 
Titles (Printing Dept. count) 
Cards finished (excl. "extras") 
Titles in type, but not printed 
Guide cards printed 

Card Catalogue (Branches) : 
Titles (Printing Dept. count) 
Cards (approximately) 

Call Shps .... 

Stationery and Blank Forms . 

Signs ..... 

Blank Books .... 



1905-06. 


19(H)-07. 


11 


9 


213 


217 


3 


3 


9 


21 


212 


202 


32,184 


26,432 


220,286 


161,521 


1,800 


2,520 


26,000 


5,700 


288 


384 


14,400 


19,200 


. 2,376,500 


1,654,000 


537,954 


513,742 


645 


534 


9 


17 



30 



City Document No. 25. 



The department has also put in type the regular and in- 
cidental publications of the year,* and part of the Allen A. 
Brown music catalogue, as mentioned in connection with the 
work of the Catalogue Department. 

Distribution of Documents and Supplies. 

Mr. George V. Mooney, in charge of the Stock Depart- 
ment, reports as follows : Number of library publications dis- 
tributed during the year, 70,178 ; number of blank forms 
distributed, 1,990,118. The blank forms included 1,613,000 
call slips. 

Registration. 

The statistical tables relating to registration appear in 
Appendix VI. These have been prepared by Mr. John J. 
Keenan, Chief of the Registration Department. 

On February 1, 1906, there were 76,661 active cards on 
record, and at the end of the year, January 31, 1907, there 
were 76,782. During the year the Department has replaced 
38,805 cards for others filled, soiled or lost. The occurrence 
of contagious diseases in families has required the tempor- 
ary recall of 1,202 cards. The requirements of 88,070 
persons have been attended to during the year. 

The Issue Department of the Central Library. 

A report submitted by Mr. Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of 
the Issue Department, presents the following statistics of 
circulation, "and also gives data for the statements annexed 
relating to the work of the department during the year. 

Circulation. 





Issue for Home Use, 
Central Library. 


Daily Issue through 
Branch Division. 


Total for 
Home Use. 


February 1906 


27,219 
30,386 
23,993 
21,448 
17,233 
16,153 
15,700 
17,786 
24,337 
26,1!46 
23,915 
28,131 


8,121 

8,968 
6,722 
6,229 
5,210 
4,313 
4.567 
4,408 
6,498 
7,656 
7,618 
8,953 


35,840 




39,354 


April, " 


30,715 




27,677 




22,443 


July, " 


20,466 
20,267 






22,194 




30,835 




33 902 




31,533 
37,084 








Totals 


272,547 


79,263 


351,810 







These figures do not include the number of books which 
are sent to engine houses, institutions and schools. 

* See preceding statement entitled " Publications." 



Library Department. 31 



Children's Department. — Central Library. 

Miss Alice M. Jordan, Custodian of the Children's Depart- 
ment, has presented a report from which the following 
extracts are taken : 

The work in this department has followed the usual lines 
of direction of reading, assistance in looking up school sub- 
jects, lessons to classes, visiting schools, and advisory counsel 
in the choice of books for schools, small libraries and homes. 
The aim of all these activities is to place good books within 
the reach of children. 

ISSUE. 

The issue of books to borrowers applying in the rooms at 
the Central Library was not so large as in the years imme- 
diately preceding, but this has permitted a better opportunity 
to be personally helpful to individuals. Direct issue for the 
year was 51,373 ; the year previous it was 58,583. Through 
the Branch Department 17,262 books have been sent b\^ the 
daily delivery to boiTowers, making a total circulation of 
75,795 from the children's rooms at the Central Library, as 
compared with 73,737 in 1905-06. In addition about 500 
volumes were sent by the Branch Department to vacation 
schools, home libraries, and to supplement the ordinary school 
deposits. 

REFERENCE WORK. 

There has been a satisfactory increase in the use of the 
reference collection. Although the text-book collection 
requiies, and will ultimately receive new editions to replace 
old ones, it is much used by teachers and pupils. A better 
quality of reference work is noticeable, due in part, perhaps, 
to the instruction given classes from the schools, which has 
now continued for five years. During 1906 about 800 pupils 
have been instructed in this manner. This number includes 
some students, not children, who expect to become teachers 
later. Such pupils are the more appreciative because their 
need to use the Library in their future work as teachers 
makes the knowledge of its resources of obvious import- 
ance. 

SCHOOLS. 

The relations of the Children's Department and the pub- 
lic schools are cordial, and co-operation is promoted by visit- 
ing and meeting teachers and pupils in the school room. It 



32 City Document No. 25. 

has also been possible for the custodian to meet with two of 
the new associations of parents connected with certain school 
districts and bring to their notice the provision made for chil- 
dren by the Library. 

As productive of a closer union of interests an exhibition 
of pupils' work in hand-loom weaving was shown in the Chil- 
dren's Room in June. Eight schools contributed examples of 
this handiwork, which for the first time had formed a part of 
the course in manual training. The exhibition was stimu- 
lating to the children and attracted equally the attention of 
adult visitors. 

LISTS. 

A new departure has been made this year in the prepara- 
tion by this Deparment of book lists on special subjects for 
publication in the Monthly Bulletin. Two sucli lists were 
completed, one of books on gardening, the other containing 
titles of educational books. The first one was also printed in 
separate leaflet form in the spring. It was designed to fur- 
nish children who had started home gardens with the names 
of simple books giving practical instruction to amateurs. It 
has been used to advantage by clubs and settlements and 
vacation schools. The preparation of the second list was 
undertaken with the help of teachers in different kinder- 
garten training schools, who for several years have made ac- 
tive use of the reference collection of books on education and 
child study. This list is proving a great convenience to the 
many students of kindergarten subjects who use the Library. 
Two short lists of books for school use, on Washington and 
Lincoln , were also made and duplicated for distribution in 
branches and reading rooms. 

PICTURES. 

In connection with the gardening lists, pictures were pre- 
pared and supplied to clubs and social centres. There has 
also been a continuation of the practice of providing teachers 
with pictures illustrating industries and trades, or material to 
be used in teaching history and geography. Requests for 
such pictures are in excess of the supply. 

Bates Hall. 

The number of readers who during the year use the reading 
tables in Bates Hall has not diminished. During the month 
of January, when the severest weather conditions prevailed, 
a count of call slips showed that 27,257 volumes were brought 
from the stacks to the Hall, and the unrecorded use of refer- 



Library Department. 33 

ence books taken from the open shelves undoubtedly increased 
the number of volumes in use to fully 50,000. The enlarged 
freedom of access to the shelves makes it impossible to give 
a complete statement of the books consulted, but an indica- 
tion of the extensive use of the Bates Hall facilities is shown 
in the fact that 730,000 call slips have been required during 
the year, 440,000 for hall use and the others for home use. 
The maximum attendance at any one time was recorded at 
four o'clock P.M., December 16, at which hour 325 readers 
were present. In one month only has the maximum attend- 
ance fallen below 100, namely during August. 

The Special Libraries. 

THE FINE arts DEPARTMENT. 

Photographs. 

The following additions have been made to the photograph 
collections, in the Fine Arts Department: 498 photographs; 
109 process pictures; 834 colored photographs. 

Of the photographs, 331 are of pictures in the Berlin Pic- 
ture Gallery, so that we have now a very good representation 
of that collection. 

A large addition has been made to the collection of colored 
photographs. These are in great demand for circulation 
among schools, and the very large increase in circulation of 
pictures is undoubtedly due to this addition to our resources. 
Among the pictures added are nearly 200 photographs of 
types of people and a very full set of views of Austria-Hun- 
gary. The total number of photographs now shelf-listed is 
18,274; of process pictures 7,420; colored photographs 
1,854. 

The figures above given do not include 849 photographs 
which have not been added to the regular collections, but 
which are to be kept in portfolios and located on shelf 
numbers. Among these are 246 photographs of Australia, 
Tasmania and New Zealand, given by the Woman's Education 
Association ; 97 pictures of Japan and China ; 242 pictures 
of Historic Houses in New England ; 102 views of Alaska, 
New Mexico, Arizona and California. Fifty-one portraits 
have been added to the portrait collection. 

Lantern Slides. 

During the year 820 lantern slides were added, making the 
entire collection now number 1,830. In the summer a large 
number of slides of Italian p'aintings were purchased. The 
others were made to illustrate the public lectures. 



34 City Document No. 25. 

Circulation of Boohs. 

The total number of books issued for home use from the 
Fine Arts Department for the year was 15,785. Of these 
10,005 were issued from the desk in the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment, the remainder through other departments. 

The largest number of books were issued in January, 
when 1,891 were charged ; the smallest number in June, when 
there were 814 issued. 

The Use of Books in the Department. 

No record has been kept of the number of books issued for 
hall use, but tlie attendance has been laige and the tables 
reserved for the Art schools have been well filled and their 
students have made a large use of books. 

Catalogues, Etc. 

A very large number of new catalogue cards has been 
filed, and the entire catalogue has been shifted so that all the 
empty drawers which had been reserved for growth are now 
in use. The indexing of important articles in the current 
magazines has been continued as last year. 

The cataloguing of photographs and process pictures of 
sculpture has been completed by artists and subjects, and a 
beginning has been made of cataloguing the sculpture plates 
in illustrated books and portfolios, as has already been done 
in the case of painting. 

As last year, there was a thorough reading of the shelf list 
of photographs and process pictures during the summer. 

Circulation of Portfolios. 

The comparative tables of the circulation of pictures show 
that there has been a gain of 77 per cent, over all previous 
years in the total circulation. 

Of pictures in portfolios loaned to public schools there 
was a gain of 229, as compared with tliose sent out in 
1905-06, which was at that time the largest number ever 
issued. 

Portfolios were borrowed by 77 public schools, as against 
57 in 1905-06. Certain schools have received a large num- 
ber of portfolios, it appearing that of the 493 issued more 
than half were sent to 14 schools. Sixteen schools have 
received portfolios which never requested Any before. On 
the other hand, 25 schools which borrowed portfolios in 



Library Department. 35 

previous years have not done so this year. There has also 
been a large increase over all other years in the number of 
portfolios issued to clubs. 

Visits of Classes. 

As in past years the lecture hall and the west gallery in 
the Fine Arts Department have been used by schools, clubs 
and classes for regularly appointed meetings. A record of 
the visits has been kept, and in the attendance of schools 
there has been an increase of 572 persons over the preced- 
ing year, of clubs an increase of 214, and in the attendance 
of private classes a decrease of 542. 

Besides these, regular study tables have been reserved 
throughout the year for the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School, the Museum School of Design and the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, and for certain periods of time for 
the Evening Drawing School, classes from Wellesley College, 
Simmons College, Miss Sacker's School and the Emeison 
School of Oratory. 

barton-ticknor room. 

The following statistics cover the work of this room for 
the year : 
Barton-Ticknor books issued . . . . .10,672 

Maps issued ........ 924 

Stack books issued ....... 9,101 

Barton-Ticknor books (maps included) : 
Smallest mimber issued, June 25-July 1 . . . 90 

Largest number issued, November 19-25 . . . 369 

Average number issued . . . . . . 223 

Stack books sent to Barton-Ticknor : 

Smallest number, .July 2-8 ...... 27 

Largest number, January' 7-13 ..... 366 

Average number ....... 175 

Barton Reserves — (Semi-weekly record of stack books 
only) : 

Smallest number reserved, July 18 . . . . . 140 

Largest number reserved, September 12 . . . . 464 

Average number reserved . . . . . . 235 

During the year 1,604 special catalogue cards have been 
written, 731 cabinet catalogue cards copied, and 293 photo- 
graphs shelf-listed. 

Books have been reserved for Wellesley College and Emer- 
son School of Oratory classes. An exhibition illustrating the 



36 City Document No. 25. 

illumination of books was held in the Barton-Ticknor in 
February, 1906. IVIanuscripts, excluding those illuminated, 
have been transferred to the MSS. Room. The Barton cata- 
logue has been supplied with approximately 3,000 guide 
cards. 

Cabinets kept in the Barton have been heretofore cata- 
logued in the Fine Arts catalogue only, an arrangement 
causing much inconvenience to Barton readers. Such cards 
as are already in the Fine Arts catalogue are being copied 
for the Barton, and new sets are now regularly sent here by 
the Catalogue Department. 

ALLEN A. BROWN MUSIC ROOM. 

Of the volumes added to this collection 194 were given by 
Mr. Brown, and 11 came from other sources. 

Among the important orchestral scores received may be 
noted Nicorde's Gloria, Loeffler's Villanelle de Diable, 
Mahler's Sixth Symphony and Debussy's La Mer ; among 
the operatic scores, Bizet's Don Procopio, Humperdinck's 
Heirat wider Willen, Jacques-Dalcroze's Bonhomme Jadis 
and Massenet's Ariane. 

The work of comparing the Fine Arts catalogue with the 
Brown catalogue has been continued from "Music" through 
" Songs with Music, T." Cards in the Fine Arts catalogue 
not previously entered in the Brown catalogue have been 
copied and filed in the latter. Cards in the Brown catalogue 
with Fine Arts numbers, but not entered in the Fine Arts 
catalogue, have been copied and filed in the latter as far 
as " Songs with Music, A." 

LECTURES. 

The following free public lectures have been given in the 
Lecture Hall during the year: 
1906. February 1. Illumination and its Relation to Book 

Decoration. By William Dana Orcutt. Under the auspices 

of the Society of Printers. Illustrated by means of the 

" Reflectoscope." 
February, ,8. Michael Angelo. By Miss Alicia M. Keyes. 

Illustrated. 
February 15. Some Architectural and Railway Surprises in 

Berlin. By John P. Fox. Under the auspices of the 

Boston Architectural Club. Illustrated. 
February 21. Landscape Design. By John Nolen. Under 

the auspices of the Boston Architectural Club. Illustrated. 



Library Department. 37 

March 1. Influences for the Advancement of Printing. By 
Henry Turner Bailey. Under the auspices of the Societ}- 
of Printers. Illustrated. 

March 8. The Library of Congress. By W. Dawson John- 
ston. Illustrated. 

March 15. Palladian Renaissance. By Walter H Kilham. 
Lender the auspices of Boston Architectural Club. Illus- 
trated. 

March 22. The Paintings in the Museum of Fine Arts, 
Boston. By Denman W. Ross. 

March 29. Mediceval Painted Glass. By Harry E. Good- 
hue. Under the auspices of the Boston Architectural 
Club. Illustrated. 

April 5. Decorative Printing. By Henry Lewis Johnson. 
Under the auspices of the Society of Printers. Illus- 
trated. 

April 18. Urban Architecture of Europe and America. 
By J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr. Under the auspices of the 
Boston Architectural Club. Illustrated. 

April 26. English Parish Churches. By Lewis C. New- 
hall. Under the auspices of the Boston Architectural Club. 
Illustrated. 

November 8. Our National Music and its Sources. By 
Louis C. Elson. With illustrations on the piano. 

November 15. The Pyramid Builders and their Art. B}- 
H. H. Powers. Illustrated. 

November 21. Art under the Great Pharaohs. By H. H. 
Powers. Illustrated. 

December 6. History of Harvard College Library. By 
William C. Lane. Illustrated. 

December 13. Great Greek Sculptors of the Fourth Cen- 
tury, B.C. By Prof. Edmund von Mach. Illustrated. 

December 27. American Furniture of the Georgian Period. 
By Allen French. Illustrated. 

1907. January 3. The Youth of Longfellow. (In anticipa- 
tion of the Centenary of Longfellow's Birth, February 27, 
1907.) By Thomas Wentworth Higginson. 

January 10. A Study of Rembrandt's Power. By Miss 
Alicia M. Keyes. Illustrated. 

January 17. The Olympic Games : Their Value in Greek 
Life. By Edward H. Cobb. Illustrated. 

January 24. The Panathenaic Festival and the Acropolis 
of Athens. By Edward H. Cobb. Illustrated. 

January 31. The Civic Improvement Movement in Massa- 
chusetts. By Edward T. Hartmann. Illustrated. 



38 City Document No. 25. 



EXHIBITIONS, CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The following exhibitions have been given in the Fine Arts 
Exhibition Room at the Central Library, many of them in 
connection with the free public lectures : 

1906. February 5-10. Michael A ngelo. In connection with 
a lecture on Michael Angelo by Miss Alicia M. Keyes. 

February 10-12. Chinese Art on the occasion of the visit of 
the Chinese Commissioners to Boston. 

February 12-19. Modern German Architecture. In connec- 
tion with a lecture by Mr. John P. Fox on some Architec- 
tural and Railway Surprises in Berlin. 

February 19-26. Landscape Architecture. In connection 
with a lecture by Mr. John Nolen on Landscape Design. 

February 26-March 12. Library of Congress. In connection 
with Mr. W. Dawson Johnston's lecture on the Librar}- of 
Congress. 

March 12-19. Italian Renaissance Aichitecture. In connec- 
tion with Mr. Walter H. Kilham's lecture on Palladian 
Renaissance. 

March 19-April 2. Paintings in the Museum of Fine Arts, 
Boston. (Photographs loaned by the Museum.) In con- 
nection with a lecture by Mr. Denman Ross on the Paint- 
ings in tlie Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

April 2-21. City Architecture of Europe and America. In 

. connection with a lecture by J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr., on 
Urban Architecture of Europe and America. 

April 21-23. California. Occasioned by the earthquake 
in San Francisco. 

April 23-May 1. English Country Churches. In connection 
with Mr. Louis C. Newhall's lecture on English Parish 
Churches. 

May 1-29. Exhibition of the Work of the Students in the 
Evening School of Design. 

May 29-June 22. Medical books, pictures of medical sub- 
jects, portraits and bookplates of physicians. In observance 
of the session of the American Medical Association. 

June 22-July 22. Retrospective Exposition of French Deco- 
rative Art. Paris, 1900. A collection given by Miss Susan 
Minns. 

July 13-February 1. Books of Hours, Manuscripts and 
printed books. Missals and Prayer books. Many loaned by 
Miss Minns, Mr. Benton, and Harvard College. 

September 1 -October 1. Recent accessions of colored photo- 
graphs. 



Library Department. 39 

October 1-November 1. Further accessions of colored pho- 
tographs. 
November 4-24. Architectural Exhibition by the Boston 

Architectural Club. 
November 1-December 1. Egyptian Art. In connection 
with two lectures by Mr. Harry Huntington Powers on 
the Pyramid Builders and their Art, and Art under the 
Great Pharaohs. 
December 1-January 1 Greek Sculpture. In connection 
with Mr. Edmund von Mach's lecture on Great Greek 
Sculptors of the Fourth Century, B.C. 
1907. January 1 -February 1. Rembrandt. In connection 
with the lecture, A study of Rembrandt's Power by Miss 
Alicia M. Keyes. A collection of Rembrandt's drawings 
was loaned for the exhibition by the Museum of Fine Arts. 
Since September, 1906, there has been on exhibition in 
the case in Sargent Hall a collection of reprints of old news- 
papers. 

The exhibitions given after the close of the lecture season 
and through the summer were of especial interest. A cata- 
logue of the exhibition of prayer books and other books of 
devotion, continuing from July 13 to February 1, as above 
noted, has been publislied by the Library. 

Department of Documents and Statistics. 

Mr. James L. Whitney, Chief of this Department, reports 
that exclusive of the regular series of the Congressional 
documents of the LTnited States, and the Parlimentary docu- 
ments of Great Britain, the entire collection numbers 13,931 
volumes. During the year 1,241 volumes have been added. 
The gifts through the American Statistical Association, 
whose library is in our custody, comprised 612 volumes and 
1,610 numbers or parts of volumes. These have been re- 
ceived from various governments and from societies and in- 
stitutions, as follows : From the United States, 182 volumes, 
543 parts ; Central and South America, 34 volumes, 149 
parts; British Empire, 147 volumes, 241 parts; the Conti- 
nent, 249 volumes, 677 parts. 

Manuscripts. 

Mr. Whitney, Custodian of Manuscripts, has prepared the 
following data as to the accessions for the year: 

Numerous manuscripts of local interest have been received 
recently, including an order dated Boston, June 12, 1681, in 
regard to the smuggling of negroes into Nantasket, and a 



40 City Document No. 25. 

vote of the Town of Boston, March 26, 1734, to establish 
three market places. There is a draft of a letter from the 
Provincial Congress at Concord to the Selectmen of Boston 
and Committee of Correspondence, dated April 4, 1775, ask- 
ing for a conference " upon a matter of the last importance 
to the Town and Province," and a letter and documents as 
to the disposition of troops at the time of the siege of Boston, 
and the condition of affairs within the town; also a draft of 
a proposed subscription for the benefit of the children of 
Joseph Warren. 

Among later papers are a statement of the committee 
appointed to secure a statue of Washington, by Chantrey, 
which is now in the State House at Boston, and a descrip- 
tion of the monument designed for the Pilgrim Society of 
Plymouth, in 1854, the movement for which was never car- 
ried out; also the signatures of sixty-five prominent citizens 
of Boston, agreeing to form a regiment, as volunteers from 
Boston, to aid in enforcing the laws and protecting public 
property in Massachusetts, dated September 12, 1862. 

The records and history of the Boston Fire Department, 
in many volumes, in manuscript and print, have been received, 
also documents relating to the Boston Light Infantry, 1838- 
1844. 

The history of the Atlantic Telegraph is given in docu- 
ments, originals and copies, eighty -seven in number, dated 
from 1854-1867. These papers include reports of meetings 
and addresses, with letters from Cyrus W. Field and others. 

Nearl}^ all the manuscripts added to the Library in recent 
3^ears have been catalogued, and arranged, singly or in groups, 
in folders. These folders or envelopes number 1,000. 

Bkanches and Stations. 

The following details relating to the operation of tlie 
Branch Department for the year are drawn from the Report 
of Mr. I>angdon L. Ward, Supervisor. 

circulation. 

The total circulation for the branch system, including that 
through the Central Library and from schools and institu- 
tions, is 1,188,856 volumes, as against 1,210,498 volumes in 
the year preceding. There is a loss, therefore, of one and 
seven-tenths per cent. The branches show a loss of three 
per cent., but the stations, schools and institutions the slight 
gain of three-tenths of one per cent. Every branch but 
West End has lost in circulation. The loss of over 10,000 



Library Department. 



41 



volumes at the South Boston Branch is to some extent 
accounted for by the establishment of the City Point Read- 
ing Room. The combined circulation of the South Boston 
Branch and the new reading room is, however, many thou- 
sands of volumes greater than the circulation of the branch 
alone for the preceding year. 

The classified circulation of ten branches for two years is 
as follows : 



Direct Home Use Only. 



190C-1907. 



Vols. 



Percent. 



1905-1906. 



Vols. 



Percent. 



notion for adults 

Non-flction for adults 

Juvenile fiction 

Juvenile non-flction . . 



246,396 

125,061 

223,614 

82,373 



36.4 
18.5 
33 
12.1 



254,935 
129,697 
232,949 
87,016 



36.18 
18.41 
33.06 
12.35 



While there is a loss in all classes, the greatest decrease is 
in fiction, both juvenile and adult. Fiction forms 69 per 
cent, of the total. 

The proportion of juvenile books of all kinds to the whole 
issue is 45 per cent.; at the two large reading rooms it is 40 
per cent. Now that the Chief of the Registration Depart- 
ment has for two whole years classified card holders with a 
dividing line of sixteen years instead of eighteen, as formerly, 
it is interesting to note that the children who hold cards are 
a little less than 39 per cent, of the total in both years. 
Neither the juvenile circulation, however, nor the number of 
juvenile card holders shows accurately the proportion of chil- 
dren who draw books from the Library, since children read 
many books not strictly juvenile, many adults, especially 
those who are foreign-born, read juvenile books, and many 
children use a parent's card. But it is probable that the 
children who take books from the Library number from 40 
to 45 per cent, of its constituency. 

Only four stations have gained in circulation during the 
year. These are the new reading rooms, G, Q, R and T. 
The other new reading room, station J, has nearly held its 
own, with a circulation of 45,020 volumes. 

Since it was only for part of the year 1905-06 that Stations 
G, J, R and T were maintained as reading rooms, under 
direct control of the Library staff, the following comparison 
of the present circujation with that of the year 1904-05 may 
be interesting : 



42 City Document No. 25. 

1904-05. 1906-07. 

Shop Stations. Reading Rooms. 
Volumes. Volumes. 

G 14,988 24,948 

J 30,235 45,020 

R .... 20,110 25,174 

T 14,432 21,340 

The circulation of the new City Point Reading Room has 
been 17,835 volumes for a little over six months. This in- 
dicates an issue of over 30,000 volumes per year and puts it 
in the class of large reading rooms. 

The percentage of fiction in the issue from the reading 
rooms is 71. 

In individual cases the reason for a loss in circulation is 
often easily found in a change in the character of the popula- 
tion. The Custodian of Station S (1151 Tremont street) 
reports that the most intelligent readers and frequenters of 
the reading room have moved to better portions of the city, 
and their places have been filled by uncultured people, some 
of whom cannot read. In many cases, as has been pointed 
out before, circulation is affected by the large deposits at the 
schools. That it is also diminished by a more generous sup- 
ply of reference books at the reading room is asserted by 
the Custodian of Station N, who says in her report : " The 
larger the supply of reference books, the greater is the ten- 
dency to do the work at the library rather than take the 
books home." 

There is also a close connection between the circulation 
and the supply of new books. P'or example, the Custodian 
of the East Boston Branch remarks : " A large portion of the 
loss in circulation during the year lies in the first nine months, 
when the accessions averaged 38 a month and the record of 
direct home use was 7,033 less than for the same period last 
year. For the last three months the accessions averaged 159 
a month and the record of home use was only 76 less than for 
the same period last year. Thus it will be seen that an 
increase in the supply of new books (including replacements, 
which circulate as well as new titles) affects the daily issue 
immediately." 

The Custodian of the South Boston Branch gave the fol- 
lowing statistics in her report for April last to illustrate the 
same point : * 

April. Total home use. No. new books. April. Total home use. No new books. 

1902 . . 8,932 104 1905 . . 8,486 171 

1903 . . 9,459 337 1906 . . 7,473 60 

1904 . . 8,375 111 

* See also "The Use of Books," page impost. 



Library Department. 43 

At most branches and reading rooms the week day attend- 
ance either increases or continues good. 

The Sunday attendance and circulation of books have been 
in general satisfactory, though Station G, R and T are used 
principally for reading, and the issue of books is very small. 
The City Point Reading Room has been open on Sunday with 
a large attendance and issue of books. 

DEPOSIT WORK. 

The total number of volumes sent on deposit from the 
branches and two reading rooms was 16,792, as against 15,370 
the preceding year. This includes deposits from certain 
branches to neighboring reading rooms and to three institu- 
tions, but 12,074 volumes, more than two-thirds of the whole, 
were supplied to the schools. These were sent for the most 
part in small lots, and their selection and return to the 
shelves, and the making of the necessary records, involve a 
very large amount of labor. And this, like some other things, 
is a comparatively recent addition to the function of the 
branches, dating only from the year 1899, when six schools 
were supplied with deposits from branches for the first time. 
Meanwhile the number of assistants is very little larger. 

REFERENCE WORK. 

Reference work steadily increases in amount and quality 
at most of the branches and reading rooms. Though the 
ordinary adult public ask for comparatively little help of this 
kind, yet many adults who are studying in the evening 
schools and at home are glad of assistance, as well as members 
of study clubs. Many of these clubs use the neighboring 
branch or reading room to great advantage. Their wants are 
kept in view when books are bought, and books are sent 
frequently from the Central Library for their use in response 
to requests. The largest proportion of reference work, how- 
ever, is done for the pupils of the grammar and high schools. 
All through the annual reports for this year of the Custodians 
of branches and reading rooms are scattered allusions to the 
increase of this part of the work. As examples I give the 
following extracts : " We made an especial effort to interest 
teachers, visiting the school often to see what was needed and 
to be prepared for topics to be taken up. Our reference 
department is flourishing ; it seems to be busy most of the 
time. We have spent much time in helping groups of pupils 
in the use of reference books, teaching them how to use them 
to the best advantage." (From the report of the Custodian, 
Station F.) 



44 City Document No. 25. 

" Two tables are filled every day after school, from four 
until six, with pupils requiring help with their lessons." 
(From the report of the Custodian, Station J.) 

" Both afternoon and evening the rooms have been 
crowded, and much time needs to be spent in keeping order 
and assisting reference workers. The station is much used 
for reference and school work." (From the report of the 
Custodian, Station Z.) 

We keep it steadily in mind that the reference work of 
the branches and reading rooms is perhaps their most im- 
portant function. 

PICTURES. 

The lending of pictures from the branch collections to the 
reading rooms, schools and clubs shows an increase of 101 per 
cent., 9,749 pictures having been sent out, as against 4,849 
the preceding year. These collections of pictures and 
picture bulletins, which were described at some length in 
the last annual report of this department, are steadily 
growing. 

Five hundred and eight portfolios of pictures have been 
sent from the Fine Arts Department this year through the 
branches and stations to schools, clubs and classes, as com- 
pared with 194 sent during the preceding year, an increase 
of 161 per cent. 

The monthly exhibitions at the branches and reading 
rooms of pictures from the Central Library have been 
appreciated more than ever, as several Custodians report. 

The branches and some reading rooms have had also fre- 
quent exhibitions of their own pictures and picture bulletins. 
Other reading rooms have exhibited pictures borrowed from 
branches, from -the Children's Department at the Central 
Library or from the small deposit collection of pictures, from 
which 525 were lent this year. 

BOOKS. 

There have been added to tlie ten branches 2,966 volumes 
of new books, as against 3,291 in the year preceding and 
5,799 in 1904-05. The replacements number only 2,168 
volumes, as against 3,456 the year before. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The cost of the branches and stations, exclusive of sta- 
tionerv and other supplies, was 191,719.74, an increase 
of $2,018.30 over 1905-06. The branches, however, have 
cost only 161,882.70, a decrease of $1,819.13 from the 



Library Department. 45 

amount spent in 1905-06. The expense for salaries has 
increased a little, but the cost of nearly all other items, 
including repairs and furniture, has decreased. Books have 
cost -11,406.43 less than in 1905-06. 

The stations have cost $29,300.69, as against $25,534.62 
last year. Nearly $3,000 of this, however, Avas spent on 
the new City Point Reading Room. The cost of books for 
the permanent collections of the stations, and of periodicals, 
was $5,622.42, as compared with $3,854.63 for the preceding 
year. 

The Schools and the Branch Department. 

There have been sent on deposit to the schools during the 
past year from the Central Library and the branches 19,546 
volumes, as against 19,092 in 1905. 

The number of teachers supplied during the year by the 
branches and reading rooms was 326, as against only 270 in 
the preceding year. 

Books have been reserved at the branches and reading 
rooms for the use of schools, on 131 different occasions, the 
total number of volumes being 1,941. 

Circulation in schools, from deposit collections, is estimated 
to be 75,939 volumes. 

The new High School of Commerce is now regularly sup- 
plied with books from the Roxbury Branch. 

The great increase in the number of pictures sent to the 
schools has been already noted. 

The work with evening schools has been systematized as a 
result of conferences with Mr. Lamprey, the Director of 
Evening Schools. Registrations for library cards are to. be 
taken at all such schools, as they have been already taken at 
some. Deposits of books will be sent as freely as to the 
day schools, though not for home use. Library books are less 
essential, however, at the evening schools, and may not be 
asked for by all masters. 

A list of the evening schools has been sent to all the cus- 
todians, and schools have been assigned to certain branches 
and reading rooms, as the da}' schools are. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY ACTIVITIES BRANCH DEPARTMENT. 

Deposit Work. 
The number of volumes sent on deposit from the Central 
Library was 34,049, as against 35,262 volumes the preceding 
year. The decrease is not absolute, however, since the fig- 
ures for 1905 include a large number of volumes which were 



46 



City Document No. 25. 



returned from certain shop stations that were discontinued, 
and which were sent out again ahnost immediately to reading 
rooms newly established in the same districts. With five 
less stations to supply, the deposit work has been actually 
larger even with a very small supply of books. On the 
other hand the daily issue, which can be controlled only indi- 
rectly by this department, steadily loses. 

The percentage of fiction in the books sent on deposit was 
only 40.7. 

Among the new places of deposit are: Civic League 
House, High School of Commerce, St. John's Seminary, St. 
John's Parochial School, and four engine houses. 

The deposits of seven reading rooms have been enlarged 
during the year. Many further increases are desirable. 

Though for the larger part of the year the deposit collection 
received few books, and for nearly two years had had very 
few replacements of books worn out, yet the net gain for the 
year is 2,290 volumes. This is due to the fact that in 
November last a large part of the replacements which had 
been held for consideration were approved and ordered. 
They will be a factor in the work of the coming year. 

The estimated circulation for the year of the books of the 
deposit collection is 87,337 volumes. 

At the annual shelf reading all the volumes but two were 
accounted for. 

Daily Issue. 

Only 79,268 volumes have been issued this year from the 
Central Library on cards, through the Branch Department, 
as against 89,121 in the preceding year. The classified issue 
for two vears is as follows : 





1906- 


1907. 


1906- 


1906. 




Vols. 


Percent. 


Vols. 


Percent. 




23,943 

25,670 

26,145 

3,505 


30.2 

32.4 

33.0 

4.4 


31,174 

25,571 
29,586 
2,790 


35.0 




28 7 




33 2 




3 1 







Since the loss is entirely in fiction, and the issue of non- 
fiction shows a positive gain, the result is not surprising and 
not much to be regretted. The percentage of unsuccessful 
caids is necessarily high, 47.6, and the percentage of fiction 
in the issue, 63.2, very moderate. The latter percentage 
was 68.9 in the preceding year. 



Library Department. 47 

As was the case last year, there is a much greater decline 
in the issue of books for adults than in juveniles. 

A delivery of books to the garrison of Fort Warren, every 
two weeks, has been established. 

Binding. 
The number of volumes bound for the Branch Depart- 
ment, including the fiction and juveniles of the Central 
Library, is as follows : 

1906-07. 1905-06. 

Books bound in art canvas or half-duck 
(fiction and juveniles) : 

Central books 5,736 8,456 

Branch and station books .... 11,945 11,096 

Books bound in Bates Hall style : 
Branch and station books . . . .2,102 2,127 

Of the 5,736 volumes of Central books, 3,352 were from 
the deposit collection. 

For some time past nearly all the branch books in the 
so-called Bates Hall style have been bound with marbled paper 
sides instead of full canvas. The canvas, though durable, is 
unpleasant to handle and absorbs dirt readily. The art can- 
vas, in which the fiction is bound, is a very unsatisfactory 
material. As an experiment, books were bound a year ago 
in linen buckram, in cowhide and in keratol. These books 
have now been brought together, and we find that either the 
linen buckram or the cowhide back with keratol sides would 
be satisfactory. 

Inter-Lihrary Loans. 
The statistics of inter-library loans are as follows : 



Lent to libraries in Massachusetts 

Lent to Ubraries outside Massachusetts . 

Total 

Applications refused from libraries in Massa 
chusetts ...... 

Applications refused from libraries outside 

Total 

Borrowed from other libraries 



Volumes, Volumes, 

1906-07. 1905-06. 

650 495 

201 157 

851 652 

93 110 

38 62 

131 172 

47 17 



The Department of Patents. 

In this important department we now receive, through 
arrangements effected with agents in London during the 
year, the English specifications and drawings, separately, a 



48 



City Document No. 25. 



soon as issued, instead of waiting until bound volumes are 
made up. Thus we are now able to supply early information 
from the English Patent Office. The German patents have 
for some time been received in this way. 

During the year there has been hung in the Patent Room 
a framed copy of the specification of an English patent, with 
seal attached, issued to John James Greenough, of Wash- 
ington, D. C., dated May 3, 1851, for an invention for apply- 
ing electricity as a motive power for the first time. 

The records for the year show that 57,868 books were 
consulted in the Patent Room, as against 63,078 in 1905-06. 
The number of persons consulting the books was 2,856, an 
increase of 619 as compared with the prcAdous year. Of 
these 1,780 were residents and 1,076 non-residents. 



The Periodical Room, Central Library. 

The following table presents the record of attendance in 
the Periodical Room at certain hours in comparison with the 
preceding year : 

Attendance at 1906-07. 

10 A.M • 7,637 



1905-06. 

10,041 
13,492 
15,897 

*22,257 
19,036 

tl7,534 
6,468 



12 M 11,636 

2 P.M 14,290 

4 P.M 20,430 

6 P.M. 16,816 

8 P.M 17,744 

10 P.M 5,057 

The number of bound volumes from the files consulted in 
the day time was 21,368, as against 22,057 in the preceding- 
year. In the evenings and on Sundays 5,778 bound volumes 
were consulted. Besides these, 23,835 unbound back num- 
bers of magazines were consulted during the day time, and 
13,580 during the evenings and on Sundays, showing in- 
creases from 22,862 and 12,386, respectively, in 1905-06. 

The Newspaper Room, Central Library. 

In accordance with precedent the record of maximum 
attendance on a selected day in each month is presented in 
the following statement, thus indicating the use of the News- 
paper Room : 



Datee. 



Maximum 
Attendance. 



Dates. 



Maximum 
Attendance. 



February 25, 1906 142 

March 11 141 

April 8 182 

May 20 121 

June 17 [Sunday.] 108 

July 1 95 

*At5P.M. 



August 12 101 

September 30 112 

October 7 149 

November 18 114 

December 2 163 

January 13, 1907 147 

tAtgp.M. 



Library Dh;partment. 49 

The number of different papers now represented by issues 
regularly filed is 357, the number added during the year being 
49, as against 8 discontinuations. The room is extensively 
used, especially on Sundays. 

The newspaper files were consulted by 2,380 persons during 
the year, of whom 902 were non-residents. The number of 
bound volumes consulted was 9,489, as against 6,223 in 
1905-06. Additional shelf room has been provided in the 
Newspaper Filing Room, sufficient to accommodate about 
1,500 bound volumes. 

We are constantly adding to our files of early Boston 
papers, such as the News Letter, Boston Gazette, Columbian 
Sentinel, etc., and thus perfecting our sets as opportunity 
permits. Several volumes of newspaper clippings relating to 
Boston fires, collected by the late John S. Damrell, have been 
received during the year, and may now be found in the News- 
paper Department. 

The Use of Books. 

Statistical tables contained in Appendix VII exhibit the 
circulation for home use throughout the Library system. 
The aggregates are: 

Central Library (Including Central Library books 

issued through the branches, stations, etc.) . 366, 8G5 

Branches and stations direct .... 1,094,538 



Total 1,461,403 

as against 1,508,492 for the preceding year. 

Comparative figures relating to circulation for two succes- 
sive years are: 

Central Library Circulation : 

1906-07. 1905-06. 

Direct, home use . .272,547 297,994 

Through branches and 
stations . . . 77,899 87,572 

350,446 385,566 

Branches, direct, home use . . 675,951 702,704 

Stations, direct, home use . . . 329,059 319,491 

Schools and institutions . . . 105,947 100,731 

Totals 1,461,403 1,508,492 



50 City Documemt No. 25. 

These figures require explanation in order that the condi- 
tions reflected by them may not be misunderstood. It is not 
to be inferred that the use of the Library as a whole is 
decreasing. The table relates to circulation for home use only, 
and this constitutes but one element in the activities of the 
Library. The circulation in Bates Hall, in the Fine Arts 
Department, the Patent Room, the Children's Rooms, and 
other reading rooms of the Central Library and at the read- 
ing tables of the several Branches and Stations, much of it 
from open shelves, without the filing of call slips, is not 
recorded, and therefore cannot be shown in figures. This 
unrecorded circulation is largely for the purpose of study and 
mental improvement. In making this statement there is no 
intention of ranking one kind of circulation above another; 
or of assuming that reading for recreation is to be dis- 
couraged or that the use of books in the reading rooms is 
necessarily more important than their use at home. The 
reading room" circulation is extremely important, however, and 
is constantly increasing as tlie facilities for it are enlarged. 
If it could be represented statistically and combined with the 
'figures respecting home use, it would no doubt be seen that 
the use of books in the aggregate is continually gaining. 

By reference to the preceding table it will be noted that 
the circulation through schools and institutions shows an 
increase, principally due to the enlargement of that valuable 
part of our work which depends upon co-operation with the 
educational institutions of the city, public and private ; and, 
incidentally, although the figures do not appear in the table, it 
may be stated that, as shown on page 31 ante, the issue from 
the Children's Rooms at Central, including both direct circula- 
tion and that through applications received from the 
branches, has risen from 73,737 to 75,795. 

The circulation for home use, which this year shows a 
decline, is variable, and appears to be affected by factors some 
of which we may control, others being entirely beyond the 
influence of the Library administration. We have found 
that weather conditions affect it. As pointed out in tiie 
report for 1905—06, protracted inclement weather in- 
creases the home use of books, but weather such as prevailed 
during the months of January, February and March, 1906, 
permitting out-of-door sports and freedom of movement, 
reduces the number of books drawn from the Library for 
home reading. This statement applies to the circulation for 
the first three months of the year covered by the present 
report. 



Library Department. 



51 



General business activity no doubt affects this circulation. 
If persons are continuously employed they find less time for 
reading. This perhaps accounts for part of the decrease of 
the year, especially as it is found that the attendance re- 
corded at certain specified hours in the periodical room at the 
Central Library shows a decline as compared with the preced- 
ing year.* The same statement applies to the Newspaper 
Room at Central. On the other hand, the use of the Patent 
Room, which is principally reference use resting on the 
demands of business, has increased. 

The constant increase of refeience works at the Central 
Building, and also at the branches and stations, accom- 
panied by larger deposits at the schools, is another factor 
tending to diminish the circulation for home use ; and the 
diminution in the supply of new books made available for 
circulation during the early months of the year, due in part 
to the necessaiy diversion of a part of our funds to the 
fitting up of new reading rooms in this and the preceding 
year, also accounts for part of the loss.f 

Lideed, a decline in circulation for home use follows a 
decline in the number of new books, and we have found that, 
up to a certain point, it makes little difference whether the 
accessions are entirely new books or new copies of old books 
replacing copies worn out or lost. The bright, fresh covers 
have an influence in bringing the books into circulation, 
especially when displaj^ed'upon the open shelves. This is 
most graphically brought out in the following table showing 
the number of accessions, including replacements as well as 
new titles, for the first seven and last five months of two 
successive years, in comparison with the circulation for home 
use during the same periods : 





1906-07. 


1905-06. 




Vols, ac- 
quired. 


Circulation 
home use. 


Vol8. ac- 
quired. 


Circulation 
home use. 




7,550 

8,222 


891,170 
570,23S 


10,300 
5,401 


949,282 


September to January, inclusive 


559,210 


Totals 


15,772 


1,461,403 


15,701 


1,508.492 





* See pan;e 48 ante. 

t See, ae to both these points, remarks on page 42 ante. 



62 City Document No. 25. 

If the circulation for the present year is analyzed by means 
of this table, it is at once apparent that, as compared with 
the preceding year, the decline during the first seven months 
from 949,282 to 891,170 followed a decline in the number of. 
volumes acquired from 10,300 to 7,550. During the last five 
months of 1906-07 as compared with the last five months of 
1905-06 the number of volumes acquired increased from 
5,401 to 8,222, and the circulation increased from 559,210 to 
570,233. It is also clear, from this table, that although the 
circulation for the year declined from 1,508,492 to 1,461,403, 
the months in which the decline is shown were those in which 
the number of volumes acquired also show a decline ; the cir- 
culation as compared with the preceding year showing an in- 
crease after the first of September, and continuing to increase 
during rest of the year, following an increase as compared 
with the preceding year in the number of volumes acquired. 
The total nymber of volumes acquired in each year did not 
greath^ differ. 

It may be added, although the statement passes beyond 
the period covered by this report, that the upper movement 
in circulation shown in the last five months of 1906-07 as 
compared with the corresponding months of 1905-06 has 
continued into the subsequent months. 

Sunday and Evening Service. 

The following table from the records of Mr. Frank C. 
Blaisdell, Chief of the Sunday and Evening Service, presents 
comparative figures for two successive years, showing the 
number of books issued for home use on Sundays and holi- 
days : 

Sunday and Holiday* Circulation. 

Sundays ..... 
February 22 ... , 
April 19 

* Closed on all holidays except as specified. 



1906-07. 


1905-06. 


36.687 


37,856 


708 


568 


393 


481 



LiBEARY Department. 



53 



Resignations. 

The following resignations from the service have been 
received during the year : 



Name. 



Department. 



Entered 
Service. 



Resigned. 



Edward B. Hunt..-. 

Axel Z. Fogel 

Margaret M. Bicknell 

John A. Moran 

Colin R. Twamsley 

Margaret J. Kiley 

Ernest Lufkin 

Thomas H. Guinan 

Dorothy Puffer 

Bessie R. Carroll 

Bradley Jones 

.John Desmond 

John J. Brunt 

Lnella K. Leavitt 

Frank DeW. Washburn .. 

John E.Walsh 

Lucie A. Learned 

Gertrude B. Daly 

Jeanette M. Jlarshall 

Margaret A. Barrett 

Alfred G.Ochs 

.James F. Dennison, Jr 

Martin E. Ahlstrom 

Margery H. Carroll 

Jeremiah .J. Sullivan 

Thomas H. Gillis 



Catalogue 

Issue 

Executive 

Engineer aud Janitor, 

Ordering 

Bindery 

Engineer and Janitor, 

Executive 

Roxbury Branch 

Bindery 

Bates Hall 

Special Libraries 

Special Libraries 

Catalogue 

Special Libraries 

Printing 

Executive 

Ordering 

Brighton Branch 

Bindery 

Bindery 

Special Libraries 

Shelf 

Bindery 

Catalogue 

South End Branch 



June 

Oct. 

Apr. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

March 

Nov. 

Sept. 

.Jan., 

June 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

July 

Jan. 

Apr. 

Dec. 

ifarch 

March 

Aug. 

Aug. 

July 

May 

Oct. 



1883. 
1902. 
1896. 
1894. 
1904. 
1889. 
1901. 
1901. 
1878. 
1903. 
1905. 
1905. 
1904. 
1895. 
1904. 
1903. 
1891. 
1901. 
1900. 
1903. 
1900. 
1905. 
1905. 
1902. 
1900. 
1902. 



Feb. 9, 1906 

(■Died) 
Apr. 3, 1906 

Apr. 5, 1906 

May 21, 1906 

May 28, 1906 

June 5, 1906 

June 11, 1906 

July 20, 1906 

July 14, 1906 

(Died) 
Aug. 15, 1906 

Aug. 16, 1906 

Aug. 18, 1906 

Sept. 7,1906 

Sept. 7, 1906 

Sept. 8,1906 

Sept. 15, 1906 

Oct. 8, 1906 

Oct. 11, 1906 

Oct. 12,1906 

Oct. 18, 1906 

Oct. 30, 1906 

Nov. 15, 1906 

Dec. 1,1906 

Jan. 7, 1907 

Jan. 19, 1907 

Jan. 30, 1907 



Examinations. 

But one examination for the Library service was given, 
namely, in Grade E, for boys only, on July 2, 1906 ; 72 
applicants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Horace G. Wadlin, 

Librarian. 
June 7, 1907. 



54 City Document No. 25. 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 
FOR 1906-1907. 



To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library : 

The first meeting of the Examining Commiftee for 1906- 
1907 was held at 8.30 P.M. Friday, May 18, 1900, in the 
Lecture Room of the Libraiy. 

According to custom, Rev. Di-. DeNormandie received the 
Committee on behalf of the Trustees, called the meeting to 
order, and explained the duties of the Committee. Twelve 
members of the Committee were present, jNlr. Curtis and i\lrs. 
Edson arriving after the close of the meeting. 

After the withdrawal of Dr. DeNormandie, Thomas Minns, 
Esq., was chosen temporary Chairman. By a subsequent 
vote. Rev. Daniel Merriman, D.D., then absent, was elected 
permanent Chairman, Dr. William H. Ruddick Vice-Chair- 
man, and Mrs. Henry S. King Secretary. 

It was voted that each member present be requested to 
choose three sub-committees on which he preferred to serve, 
and that, with these preferences in mind, the Chairman be 
authorized to appoint the various sub-committees. 

It was voted to request Mr. Fleischner of the Library staff 
to address the Committee and answer any questions that 
might be asked. The Committee then adjourned to make 
an inspection of the various departments of the Library. 

The Examining Committee met again at 3.30, May 23, 
in the Trustees' Room, when the various sub-committees 
were announced as follows : 



Administration. 

Mr. Thomas INIinns, Chairman. 
Mr. Thomas H. Austin, Rev. Eugene R. Sbippen, 

Mr. John U. Berran, Mr. Frederic E. Snow, 

Miss Caroline Matthews, Rev. Elwood Worcester, D.D. 

Mrs. William Parmelee. 

Books. 

j\Irs. Pinckney Holbrook, Chairman. 
Mr. .James B. Connolly, Mr. Arthur Maxwell, 

Mrs. P. O'Meara Edson, Mrs. Walter Shaw, 

Mrs. Henry S. King, Rev. Joseph V. Tracy, D.I). 



Library Departiment. 55 



Branches. 

Miss Caroline Matthews, Chairman. 
Mr. John D. Berran, Mrs. AVilliam Parmelee, 

Rev. F. J. Halloran, Dr. William H. Ruddick, 

Mrs. Pinckney Holbrook, Mrs. Walter Shaw. 

Mr. Arthur Maxwell, 

Catalogues. 

Rev. F. J. Halloran, Chaxrmai\. 
Mr. Thomas H. Austin, Mr. Robert Lincoln O'Brien, 

Mr. Laurence Curtis, Mr. Frederic E. Snow, 

Rev. Alexander Mann, D.D., Rev. Elwood Worcester, D.D. 

Finance. 

Mr. Laurence Curtis, Chairman. 
Mr. Thomas H. Austin, Dr. William H. Ruddick, 

Mr. Thomas Minns, Mr. Robert Lincoln O'Brien. 

Printing and Binding. 

Dr. William H. Ruddick, Chairman. 
Mr. John D. Berran, Mr. Robert Lincoln O'Brien, 

Mr. Laurence Curtis, Mrs. William Parmelee, 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson, Rev. Eugene Shippeu. 

Mr. Arthur Maxwell, 

Fine Arts. 

Rev. Daniel Merriman, D.D., Chairman. 
Mrs. P. 0'3Ieara Edson, Rev. Alexander Mann, D.D., 

3Irs. Henry S. King, Miss Caroline Matthews, 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson, Rev. Eugene Shippen, 

Rev. Joseph V. Tracy, D.D., Mrs. Pinckney Holbrook. 

This list of the several committees was sent to each mem- 
ber of the general committee, and each chairman was re- 
quested to call his committee together for the discharge of 
their special duties, and to be ready to make a report of their 
action later. 

Every opportunity was given to these various committees 
to visit and inspect the different departments of the Library 
and its branches during the following months. 

The third and final meeting of the general committee was 
held in the Lecture Room of the Library at 3 P.M. Tuesday, 
January 22, 1907, to receive and take action upon the 
reports of the sub-conniiittees and to consider any general 
suggestions that miglit be made. The chairmen of all the 
sub-committees were present and made reports in detail. 
While most of these committees had held more than one 
meeting during the year, giving considerable attention to the 



56 City Document No. 25. 

subjects with which they were entrusted ; and while many 
of them, both as chairmen and individual members, had 
devoted a great deal of time and labor to their special work, 
much regret was expressed by the Committee that a large 
proportion of its members had paid no attention to their 
appointment, had attended none of the meetings, either of 
the general or sub-committees, and had done no work what- 
ever. Several suggestions were made at various times that 
some steps should be taken in the future by the Trustees to 
secure a better attendance to their duties on the part of 
members of the Examining Committee. 

After hearing and discussing the reports of the sub-com- 
mittees, it was voted that all these reports be referred to the 
Chairman, and that he be requested to make the report of the 
Committee to the Trustees, appending thereto each of the sub- 
committees' reports in full, that the Trustees might see the 
details if they should desire. The Committee then adjourned 
si7ie die. 

The Chairman herewith submits an abstract of these reports : 

Administration. — The Library is well organized. The 
heads of departments are well equipped, the assistants alert 
and courteous. The Library has a rapidly increasing use, 
and the city is urged to make large appropriations for it, 
while wealthy citizens are asked to add to its permanent 
funds. 

Better artificial lighting and more advertising of the 
Library are urged. A permanent attendant in the Women's 
lavatory in the Central Library is recommended, with a 
charge for soap and towels. 

It is also suggested that arrangements should be made by 
which books may be ordered by mail or telephone to be held 
at the Central Library until a fixed hour for patrons. 

The extension of the Vacuum Cleaning System is com- 
mended, and also the gieat advantages which the Library 
affords to foreigners. 

Books. — It is suggested that the collection of German 
books is behind the times. In English there seems to be too 
much room taken up by stories that are harmless, to the 
exclusion of those that have real distinction. It is thought 
that too much emphasis may be laid, in the selection of 
fiction, upon " the average uncultivated reader," since such 
readers may be able to appreciate better literature. A com- 
mittee to submit lists of books in which they have personally 
found satisfaction is suggested. 

Branches. — The work of this Committee has been so 
exceptionally diligent and thorough, and their report is so 
minute and complete, that it is herewith submitted in full. 



Library Department. 57 



Branches. 

The Sub-committee on Branches has visited all branches 
and stations and reports tlie following conditions : 

Administration. — Strong, economical, just. 

Examination and Test Paiyers. — Admirable in every 
respect. 

Salaries. — Generous, barring the -fS wage. This the 
committee believes to be too low. It therefore recommends 
that it be raised in all instances where the week's work 
means morning as well as afternoon hours. 

Charging System. — Not sufficiently simple. Computations 
should be by days of the 3'ear rather than by days of the 
month, and library cards should be either done away with 
(see Boston Athenceum) or else held by the staff (see South 
End Branch). 

3fethod of Fining. — Imperfect, in so far as it relates to 
the child. Fines should be retained, lest all responsibility to 
the parent cease, yet an option might Avell be offered the 
child as to the method of payment, whether it shall be in 
money or in service (for suggestions as to service, errands, 
etc., see Station W). Were this done there would be smaller 
likelihood of past records standing against children. Also 
class distinction, as between the well-to-do and the poor, 
would vanish. 

Circulation. — Over-emphasized. Competition is too keen. 
Were the total circulation only of all branches and stations, 
as against the circulation of individual branches and stations, 
given out by the Library authorities, either to the puljlic or 
to custodians, one incentive at least to too active a competi- 
tion would be removed. 

Repetition. — Care should be taken not to repeat work 
already a successful part of the work of another city 
department, or indeed of any institution. The Story Hour 
at Brighton illustrates this point. The hour is for younger 
children only, and the story is the story pure and simple of 
the kindergarten, told, however, less skilfully than in the 
kindergarten. Such being the case, the kindergarten work 
already forming a successful feature of the School Depart- 
ment's work, there seems little real necessity for the Library's 
attempting to duplicate it, even in part. In its place, there- 
fore, the committee recommends the substitution of short 
talks on books and authors to small groups of older children. 

The South End Story Hour (Thursday evening) is more 
satisfactory, in that it is broader in scope, offers laiger oppor- 
tunity, touches the older child only, is more skilfully handled, 



58 City Document No. 25. 

and is in no sense repetition. Its work is not that of the 
School Department. Neither is it that of the Settlement. 
It is strong, experimental work, illustrating active and intelli- 
gent co-operation on the part of three institutions, the Library, 
the Museum and the Settlement. 

Service Rendered Library hy Staff. — Loyal, intelligent. 

Condition of Books. — Excellent. 

Ventilation. — Cbarlestown and East Boston Branches and 
Stations P and R excepted, fair ventilation is everywhere 
possible. Rarely, however, is it found. In three tests of 
heat registration made in six branches and stations, only one 
thermometer registered as low as 78°, whilst several touched 
84°. Windows are too rarely opened, air is not kept circu- 
lating and radiators are on full power. 

Heating. — Extravagant. Fires are too large and too quick. 
Slower firing would mean a smaller purchase of coal. 

Lighting. — Good, except for those rooms using electricity. 
For these the committee recommends that the arms of the 
electric standards be reversed, that is, placed at right angles 
to the tables rather than lengthwise. A reader could then 
sit back in his chair, keep his book in his hand, and have the 
light from over his shoulder. 

School Registration. — Eminently satisfactory. 

Concerniyig Books. — A higher degree of literary excel- 
lence should be sought for in the selection of all Catholic 
books other than the standard Catholic works. 

Books in foreign languages. — More should be purchased, 
not only for the sake of the older people who can read but 
their mother tongue, but also for the sake of the child, to 
whom the knowledge of two languages will mean, in after 
life, an advantage in commercial and industrial competition. 

Books in general. — The crying need of the department is 
an immediate addition to its general deposit. 

Juvenile books. — Fewer should be purchased. There are 
too many, and too large a proportion are of a trivial character. 
The committee recommends a reduction, in titles, of 50 per 
cent., believing this to be none too sweeping. 

The Children's Side of the Work. — Too much is done for 
the child, not enough for the adult. This over-emphasis 
affects the proper balance of the work as a whole. Young 
men are daily demanding technical works relating to profes- 
sions and trades, and more reading space is needed for grown 
people. Until these two wants are supplied, nothing further 
should be done for the child. 

Age Limits. — Tlie committee favors the raising of the 
age limit from 12 to 18 (evening hours only) for all branches 



Library Department. 59 

and stations where the attendance of children crowds out 
that of adults ; and the lowering of the age limit from 16 to 
12 in the use by the child of the adult library in those 
branches having children's rooms. The committee knows 
that custodians are permitted to use, and do use, discretion- 
ary power in regard to this matter ; still, it feels that a 
wrong is done the child who, at the age of 12, 13, 14, 15, is 
not allowed freedom of access to the open shelves of an 
adult library. Were the standard works on English litera- 
ture kept in duplicate copy in the children's rooms the 
present age limit (16) might not be unjust. 

Children's Booms. — " Adult " literature is needed. The 
books in the children's room at the South End Branch (to 
cite but one instance) number 2,400 volumes, every one of 
which, barring certain histories, reference works, and the 
Cambridge edition of the poets, is listed in the finding list 
as "juvenile" liteiature (Y). Cooper, Dickens, Washing- 
ton Irving, George Eliot, Shakespeare are totally without 
representation. Thackeray and Scott have but one volume 
each, Hawthorne but two, and even Miss Yonge but her 
simplest stories. The collection should at once be broadened 
in scope, not by increasing the number of books, for 2,000 to 
3,000 volumes is a thoroughly workable library, but by drop- 
ping present titles and substituting new ones (adult ones). 
It is quite possible, too, that reading rooms for grown people 
might solve more successfully, and at less cost than children's 
rooms, the vexed problem of overcrowded branches and sta- 
tions. If, for example, further growth becomes at any time 
possible at Upham's Corner, the committee hopes it may be 
in this direction. 

School Affiliation. — Not as close as it should be. It is 
suggested, and tlie committee approves the suggestion, that 
a higher standard of co-operation be secured by asking the 
School Committee to designate some one master to act for 
the schools. 

Transportatioyi of School Deposits. — The committee has 
studied existing conditions and tabulated results. But 58 
per cent, of the total number of schools served are found to 
have Library delivery, with a still lower percentage, Central 
excluded. It is also noted that a marked unevenness exists 
in service : — certain sections of the city (Brighton, Dor- 
chestei'. Central) receiving full delivery, other sections 
(South End, Roxbury, West Roxbury) but partial delivery; 
and still others (East Boston, South Boston [one school 
excepted], Jamaica Plain) no delivery whatever. Again, 
that the 42 per cent, of schools furnishing their own trans- 



(30 City Document No. 25. 

poitation suffer because of the extra burden to the teacher, 
necessitated by pupil service, in the wrapping and tying into 
parcels of thousands of books yearly (7,000 volumes for four 
branches) ; because of the necessity of taking boys from 
their classes to fetch and carry; because of the establish- 
ment of a point of possible friction between teacher and 
custodian. The committee therefore condemns the present 
system as not only unsatisfactory, but as scarcely creditable 
to a large city. It believes that all sections of the city 
should receive equality of service, and that delivery, whether 
by auto, wagon, hand or express, should be wholly by one 
agent, and that agent the Library. 

Concerning Circular of Superintendent of Schools, No. 6, 
1901. — Interpreting " any losses of books " (see paragraph 2) 
to mean " all losses of books," the committee feels that the 
Library's practice of at times allowing the teachers to pay 
for such losses themselves is a breaking in spirit, if not in 
fact, of the school agreement. Teachers should undoubtedly 
have the right to protect themselves against an unjust repri- 
mand by a school authority, but this protection would come 
more naturally and with greater dignity from the School 
Committee than from the Library. Again, as loiig as the 
present practice continues, it might be well to recognize it 
in the Annual Report, for the reason that not to do so is 
misleading in that the omission conveys the impression that 
" the bill for missing books for the year . . . paid for by 
the School Committee . . ." (p. 49, Annual Report 1905-06) 
is the bill for the total loss, whilst in leality there is a 
further loss unaccounted for. 

Portable Reading Rooms. — The committee desires to see 
portable reading rooms introduced, l)elieving that they 
would prove serviceable in out-lying and in tenement dis- 
tricts. It favors the experiment of erecting one on the Ath- 
letic Field, Field's Corner, and believes that another might 
solve the problem of where to move to, for Station P, could 
ground be leased for the purpose from the Female Asylum. 

Branches. — Two branches, Dorchester and Jamaica Plain, 
are no longer located at centres of population. Were both 
closed, and reading rooms substituted, the public would 
gain. 

Stations. — The raising of Station Q into a branch, in view 
of the excellent work it is doing as a reading room, would, 
in the opinion of the committee, be a retrogressive act. It 
would also be an extravagance, for it would mean extra 
expense with no corresponding gain in service. 



Library Department. 61 

In the discussion in the general committee of this report 
on branches the great need of larger and better quarters for 
the Dorchester Branch was emphasized, where the accommo- 
dations are inadequate for the growing district. One member 
of the Committee on Branches strongly expressed the opinion 
that no reading room should be placed within 400 feet of a 
liquor saloon, and deplored the bad conditions surrounding 
one or two such rooms where there was much disturbance. 
This opinion was controverted by the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, who urged that such places were just those where 
reading rooms were most needed to counteract the saloon. 

Especial attention was called to the condition of North 
Brighton, as needing better facilities, and regret was 
expressed that the room there had been closed. 

Catalogues. 

The Cataloguing Department is in excellent condition. 
The need of better lighting of the Bates Hall catalogue and 
of more cabinets has been met. It is suggested that valuable 
space is taken up by the co-operative catalogue, which appears, 
to be little used. Clean cards aie being supplied as rapidly 
'as possible. The catalogue room is better lighted. The new 
label on the drawers of the Bates Hall catalogue is com- 
mended. A useful work is the entering under distinct titles 
of valuable monographs, and this is being continued. Cata- 
logues in Branch Libraries are in excellent condition. The 
faithfulness and efficiency of the workers in the Catalogue 
Department are commended. 

Fhiance. 

The Auditor's Report recently issued is a very complete 
statement and does not call for special examination at this 
time. The funds of the Corporation are by law invested l)y 
the Treasurer of the City of Boston. The expenditure of 
the income of said funds is made by requisition upon the 
City Treasurer under a strict system of supervision and 
responsibility by the Trustees. 

Printing and Binding. 

The Binding Department appears to be well equipped and 
to produce work of excellent character. Colors and mate- 
rials chosen make for durability. The Printing Department 
should be one of the most important in the conduct of the 
Library. At present its limitations in equipment and scope 
are such that it is not fulfilling its opportunity for usefulness. 



62 City Document No. 25. 

The making of card catalogues has been developed to a high 
standard. 

It is suggested that the department is not adequate to the 
needs of the Library. There is a small job press for the card 
catalogues ; all of the other press work is done on a small 
old style cylinder which is not well adapted to its work. It 
is recommended that a small rotary press be provided. 
Under present conditions various kinds of printing have to 
wait their turn in press work, so that only one order can go 
on at one time. 

It is recommended that the routine of the office be changed 
so as to relieve the Superintendent of proofreading. 

It is also recommended that there be co-operation between 
the various departments, so that the demands upon the 
printing office can be determined in advance. In this way 
it is thought that the output may be doubled at small cost. 

It is strongly urged that, as the printing and binding are 
carried on in a manufacturing budding, where there are auto- 
mobile establishments, the danger from fire is great ; and the 
risk of loss of valuable books, being rej)aired or bound in the 
bindery, is too serious to be incurred. 

Fine Arts. 

The committee made two careful examinations of, this 
department, They commend the facilities afforded teachers, 
students, classes and groups, from public and private schools, 
to copy, study and receive lessons on works of art. The 
arrangements for putting pictures on special subjects into the 
hands of teachers in the public schools through the branch 
libraries seem to be excellent. 

It is suggested that, in addition to other timely exhibitions 
of pictures and photographs, it might be well if a series of 
pictures of the Madonna could be placed on view at 
Christmas time. 

It is also suggested that there is need of a special guide 
board to the Fine Arts Department, to be placed at the foot 
of the stairway leading thereto. 

In conclusion, the committee trusts that its work may be 
of some slight advantage to the Trustees in their arduous 
responsibilities in the administration of a great public insti- 
tution. 

Respectfully submitted on behalf of the committee. 

Daniel Merkiman, 

Chairman. 
Boston, February, 1907. 



APPENDIXES. 



1906—1907. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



Page. 

I. Financial Statement ..... 65 

II. Extent of the Library by Years ... 87 

III. Net Increase of the Several Departments, 

Including Branches ..... 89 

IV. Classification : Central Library . . broadside 
V. Classification : Branches .... 93 

VI. Registration ...... broadside 

VII. Circulation ....... 95 

VIII. Trustees for Fifty-five Years. Librarians . 97 

IX. Examining Committees for Fifty-five Years . 99 
X. Library Service, Including Sunday and Even- 
ing Service . . . . . . .103 



Index to the Annual Report, 1006-1907 . 115 



APPENDIX I. 



Boston Public Libkary, 
Auditing Department, February 1, 1907. 

To the Trustees : 

Gentlemen, — The undersigned herewith presents a state- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures of the Library De- 
partment for the financial year commencing February 1, 1906, 
and ending January 31, 1907; also a statement concerning 
the trust and other funds, statements covering special appro- 
priations, and a statement of expenditures on account of the 
branches for the twelve years ending 1906-1907. 

Respectfully, 

A. A. Nichols, 

Auditor. 
Receipts. 
Appropriation, 1906-07 . . . . . $324,550 00 

Payments for lost books 361 49 

Income from trust fmids, 1906-07 . . . 15,309 01 

Interest credited : 

From J. S. Morgan & Co. . . $108 72 

On bank deposits .... 86 00 

: 194 72 



- Total receipts $340,415 22 

Balances, February 1, 1906 : 
On deposit, J. S. Morgan & Co., London : 
From income of Trust 

Funds . . .$1,895 93 
From General Funds : 

(City Appropriation), 1,795 08 

$3,691 01 



On deposit. Baring Bros. Co., Ltd., 
London ..... 

Interest accrued on bank deposits. 

Exchange account. (Amounts ac- 
crued from payments for lost 
books, etc.) .... 

Income of Trust Funds (unex- 
' pended balance in city treasury) . 



( 'arried fortoard 



72 75 




1,952 95 




395 07 




13,156 00 






19,267 78 




. 


$359,683 00 



QQ City Document No. 2A. 

Brought forward $359,683 00 

Expenditures. 
Salaries (general Library account, including branches) : 
General administra- 
tion . . $163,742 18 
Sunday and evening 

force. . . 20,213 58 



Books : 

From city appropria- 
tion . . $24,237 53 

City appropriation 
(London account), 4,294 97 

From trust funds in- 
c o m e (including 
London account), 10,927 15 

From gift : 

Andrew Carnegie, 19 51 



$183,955 76 



39,479 16 

Newspapers, from Todd fund 

income .... 2,210 55 

Periodicals, including London 

account .... 6,497 49 

Binding Department : 

Salaries . . 120,446 20 

Stock . . . 2,415 60 

Equipment . . 303 92 

Electric power . 45 30 

Contract work (Brit- 
ish patent speeifi- 
cations, paid 
through J. S. 
Morgan & Co., 
London) . . 640 08 

Rent (11 months) . 825 00 

Miscell a n e o u s ex- 
pense . . . 579 25 

25,255 35 



dnting Department : 






Salaries . 


$7,044 


85 


Stock 


3,575 


10 


Equipment 


1,626 


00 


Electric power 


241 


40 


Contract work 


1,169 


03 


Rent (11 months) . 


458 


36 


Miscella n e o u s ex- 






pense . 


408 


73 



14,523 47 



Carried fonoard . . . $271,921 78 $359,683 00 



Library Department. 



67 



Brought forward 


. 


$271,921 


78 . 


$359,683 


00 


Furniture and fixtures . 


7,719 


38 






Gas . 




2,476 


09 






Electric ligliting . 




2,591 


95 






Cleaning- 




6,342 


84 






Small supplies 




3,370 


44 






Stationery . 




2,235 


87 






Rent . ' . . 




13,226 


16 






Fuel . 




12.873 


03 






Repairs 




6,486 


78 






Freights and cartage 




904 


52 






Transportation between Central 










Library and branches 


4,426 


43 






Delivery stations, rent and service, 


980 


82 






Telephone service 


389 


38 






Postage and telegrams 


1,328 


28 






Typewriting .... 


31 


37 






Travelling expenses 


353 


59 






Grounds ..... 


100 


31 






Premium on Security Bond . 


5 


00 






Architect's services in connection 










with Charlestown Branch Public 










library . . . . 


100 


00 






Vacuum Cleaning System (Exten- 










sion) ..... 


526 


00 


338,390 


02 




items : 




Balance . . . . 


$21,292 


98 


The balance includes the following 






Cash, city treasury, Trust Funds 










income 


. 


$13,396 


00 







On deposit, London : 
J. S. Morgan & Co., 
Trust Funds in- 
come 
General Funds 



;3,827 24 
1,958 04 



Baring Bros. Co., Ltd., London, 
Cash on deposit. New England 

Trust Company : 
Interest accrued on deposits 



5,785 
72 



28 
75 



2,038 95 



$21,292 98 



68 



City Document No. 25. 



GENERAL APPROPRIATION. 



Comparative Statement for Fiscal Years Ending January 31, 1906 and 1907. 



1906-1906. 



1906=1907. 



Salaries : 

General Adniiulstration 

Sunday and evening force . 
Binding": 

Salaries 

Stock 

Contract work , 

Equipment 

Electric power ,.. . 

Books. 



Periodicals 

Furniture and lixtures , 
Gas. 



Electric ligbting. 

Supplies 

Cleaning 

Printing: 

Equipment 

Stock 

Contract work . 

Salaries 

Electric, power. 

Stationery 

Typewriting... . 
Fuel. 



Rent of branches and reading rooms 

Repairs ~... 

Freights and cartage 

Transportation between Central Library and branches. 

Delivery stations 

Travelling expenses 

Postage and telegrams 

Telephone service 

Insurance 

Grounds 

Vacuum Cleaning System 

Premiums on surctj' bond 

Architoct's services (Charlestown Branch) 

Draiiiiig building, death of Mayor Collins 

Remittance to J. S. Morgan & Co., London 



$160, 
19, 



144. 

;,S48. 



$310,100.00 



516.3,742.18 
20,213.58 



20,446.20 
2,415.60 



303.92 
45.30 
24,2.i5.24 
0,488.. ^8 
7,719 38 
2,782.36 
2,665.80 
3,370.44 
6,378.11 

1,626.00 

3,575.10 

1,169.03 

7,044 85 

241.40 

2,235.87 

31.37 

12,873.03 

14,.509..52 

6,486.78 

1,477.11 

4,426.43 

980.82 

353.59 

1,328.28 

389.38 



100.31 

526.00 

5.00 

100.00 



5,000.00 



$325,306.56 



The cost of maintaining the branches makes part of the general items 
of the several appropriations: 

Cost of Branches, 1905-1906 $89,701 44 

Cost of Branches, 1906-1907 91,719 74 

The amount expended for newspapers, books and binding (not in- 
cluded above),'paid from trust funds and city money in the hands of 
London bankers: 

For 1905-1906 $6,648 52 

For 1906-1907 9,014 45 



The amount expended for books, newspapers and photographs (not 
included above), paid from trust funds in the hands of the City Treas- 
urer : 

For 190,5-1906 $8,157 99 

For 1906-1907 9,069 01 



Library Department. 



69 



Special Appropriation. 

Lil)rary Building, Dartmouth street, balance of 
appropriation, February 1, 1906 



^,640 44 



Balance, February 1, 1907 $48,640 44 



This balance will be required to settle outstanding contracts. 
LONDON ACCOUNTS. 



Balances 

from 
1905-1906. 



Remittances 
and Interest, 

1906-1907. 



Total 
Credits. 



Expendi- 
tures, 
1906-07. 



Balances 

Unex- 
pended. 



.1. S. Morgan & Co. 
J. S. Morgan & Co., 


£. s. d. 
757 15 6 


£. 8. d. 

■2, 262 6 41 

22 6 J 


£. s. d. 
3,042 8 4 

15 


£. 8. d. 
1,851 6i 


£. 
1,191 

15 


8. d. 
7 9i 


Baring Bros. Co., 
Ltd 


15 













77-2 15 6 


2,284 12 10 


3,057 8 4 


1,851 6| 


1,206 


7 9i 



70 



City Document No. 25. 



-* CO 



O-l 00 as O GC 
i-l 0> CC rH — 



^ •>* 



00 ic in CO 



O r-i 



20 

"3 o 






■* <M 



r/j iO lO </; 



CO rt -H 



13 "O 



a ■-5 r; 



o — — 



■«; o W 



rH 51 



lO CD I- CO 



Library Department. 



71 





t 




■lesOOiCO'^Ot-COCDOOf-l-^OOi— < 


■* 






oo i-i-*oooo:coc»a>i-(<Nc^t-icc40 


el 






03 m3oooooeoooc5-*t-eoc- 


I c: CD CO 


CO 






CO CO O (M t 


-cncoeocOFHiOrHOOc- 


) 05 








■« c^ K oj >n OJ 




iiOrHiniocMO-a-io 


*1 


































































e 




















































































«& 






o 


• C5 


■ t- o tt> en m 


• cs 


'• 05 













-* 


-* 


•* * oo CO lO 




Hj» 












p 


• t 




; t- — . t- 


- O o 


r-* Tj 


CO 






1^ 










o 


■-H in o» 1- 








CO 






CO 






A 




rH <N 


el 1^ 








CO 


























IM 








ec 






c<f 












































































m 








CO c 


>tO<DOOO(MeOCDf-- 


CO 00 rH 


■* 






<N 


< 03 C 


> CO t- lO CO -"ll - 


' ■* -* 1^ (M 


05 






O iT 


lO c 


COO-lrHOiO'^OOrHOlCOeOCO 













0> Tti 03 CO lO .- 


CD ei CO c 


C3 


CD 








CT) o 


CO o 


Hj*t^rH»Oioc^cC-^t' 




eo 












































r 




r^ 




rH 




<yt 








10 






§ 

«■ 










































o c 


o c 


OOOOOOCOOOOi-H 


^ 






o c 


o c 


oooooooooooo 









t^ c 


o c 


OOOOOICC000040CO 


03 






CO c- 


IC ^ 


o o •* c 


■O CO OS ^ *> 














lO 


CO 


I— < ■* 


<M O 




rH rH lO_ rH 10 


CO 




















e< 








CO 



















































































m 






t^ y- 


<J 


5 C 


to to O TO O 


< CO CO t 




CO CO 




•o 






e» .- 


m c 




: CO -» - 


^ ■^ H)* 1 


• (?) 




OS 






eo ir 


in c 


) CO e-1 - 


H 03 O C5 O ■- 




CO ^ 






rH 






CD >- 


o c 


5 05 -* iC CO m I- 




■* CD C3 ffJ 











<M Cv 


in c 


lO -- 


e) t 




-* CO rH CO eo 




o_ 




































































Ol 






in" 












































































m 




, 


* , 


































o o 


o 


O O O C 


o c 


oooooooooooc 









o o 


o 


o o o c 


o c 


oooooooooooc 


c 







o o 


o 


c o o = 


o c 


oooooooooooc 












o 


O O iO c 




OOOOOOOOCDOOC 





in 






-* 


o lo CO ir 




OOOOOOOOOOOOS^ 





CO 










































(^^ r-i 






o 


(> 


OrHinOrHOICO'^OlCC^ 





oo" 


















10 














r- 








































'» 




^ 


















































b/ 


) 




































c 






r 






































c 
































'S 










"C 







































c 


























A 






e 






























> 






o 






1 


























i 






































"a 

a. 






a 






"u 


























u 





































x, 









: 






s 




















"a 


El 


■J 

c 

oq 




■c 


■5 £ 


■3 




3 


G) 


1: 




a 




a 


u 

£ 


3 








c. 


c: 


o 


o 


ci 

<L 


2 oc 






a 
cj 


c 









t 


J 1-! 

< 










a 




1 


u 




1 \ 


^ 3 


H 

^ 










5 

< 




"-5 


i 




i: 








l£ 


s: 


t- 


a 


o 


d rH 


■M 


CO 


■^ 


IC 


CO 


,^ 


c« 


d 


_• 


^ 








rH 










Ol 01 


^ 


e- 


»< 


(>< 


(N 




e- 




c*: 


CO 







72 



City Document No. 25. 



OJ O 



oo 



D^ Mo 

P P>, C 05 



P3 



P5 S 



05 -M O t- CO 



ir; o to I- 

to 3300 « 
O CD CO '^ 



;o thm o mm 

m 05 00 l^05 

CD m m CO cfl 00 

o CO en o t^ CO 



C3.-I ooe< 



.Z-p p ^ 

w ai o 

i3 fe =« ® 



^ 0) X 

III 
««^ 

5 o o o ..-S 
"^ ,— . ca 

to G C ^^, M "O 
— S3 rt g O - 

•»S« £ q £ 



tr 3: oocoi-H oo 

§ t- 00 l^ IN t^ 

"7 0O[-c35CDtH 



□0 

o . 
a t.'C 
o a; P 

Sftoi o 

bc-S '^^ 
O OJ a; >. 



a^ rt b» M a 



Library Uepartment. 'i '6 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

BiGELOw Fund. — This is a gift from the late John P. Bigelow, of 
Boston, in August, 1850, when Mayor of the City. 

The income from tliis fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 OO 

Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for 
the time being. 

Bates Fund. — This is a gift from the late Joshua Bates, of London, 
in March, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $50,000 OO 

"The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, 
expended in the purchase of such books of permanent value and author- 
ity as may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fund. — This is the bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch, 
of Boston. Received January, 1890. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for . ' $10,000 00 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the pur- 
chase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and 
astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a gift from the late Jonathan Phillips, 
of Boston, in April, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston four per cent Bond, for . $10,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said Library. 

Also a bequest in his will, dated September 20, 1849. 
Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $20,000 00 

The interest on this fund is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a Free Public Library. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of Abbott Law- 
rence, of Boston. Received May, 1860. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $10,00 00 

The interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the 
purchase of books for the said Library having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of Edward Law- 
rence, of Charlestown. Received May, 1886. The following clause 
from his will explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income, and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for , $500 00 



74 City Document No. 25. 

Pierce Fund. — This is a gift from Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, December 
27, 1873. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $5,000 00 

TowNSEND Fund. — This is a gift from William Minot and William 
Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. Townsend, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they may think meritorious. Said 
executors accordingly selected the Public Libray of the City of Bos- 
ton as one of such institutions, and attached the following conditions 
to the legacy : " The income only shall, in each and every year, be 
expended in the purchase of books for the use of the Library; each of 
which books shall have been published in some one edition at least five 
years at the time it may be so purchased." Received April, 1879. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $4,000 00 



TiCKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of 
Boston, he gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his 
books and manuscripts, in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sum, the City is required to spend not less than 
one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five years 
next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the rate 
of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the Spanish 
and Portuguese'languages and literature, five years old in some one edi- 
tion. At the end of twenty-five years the income of said sum is to be 
expended annually in the purchase of books of permanent value, either 
in the Spanish or Portuguese language, or in such other languages as 
may be deemed expedient by those having charge of the Library. 
These books bequeathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible 
for reference or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the 
Library building. If these bequests are not accepted by the City, and 
the trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts 
and money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. 

In order that the City might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of Mr. Ticknor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the City, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said bequests 
on behalf of the City, and made suitable arrangements for the care and 
custody of the books and manuscripts. Received April, 1871. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $4,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund.— This is a gift made in June, 1863, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who at the dissolution of 
the association authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French 
and J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a man- 
ner as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on 
the Public Library, attaching to it the following conditions : "In trust 
that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be expended 
in the purchase of books of permanent value for the use of the free 
Public Library of the City, and as far as practicable of such a character 
as to be of special interest to young men." The Trustees expressed a 
preference for books relative to Government and Political Economy. 
Received June, 1863. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 



Library Department. 75 

Tkeadwell Fund. — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, 
legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the life of his 
wife for her benefit, and, after her decease, to divide the residue then 
remaining in the hands of the trustees as therein provided, and convey 
one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public Library in the City 
of Boston. 

The City Council accepted said bequest, and authorized the Trustees 
of the Public Libary to receive the same, and to invest it in the City of 
Boston Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said trustees 
in such manner as they may deem for the best interests of the Library. 
Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent Bonds, for . $5,550 00 
Invested in the City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bonds, for 1,400 00 

Invested in 16 shares Boston & Albany R.R. Co. stock, par 

value $100 each 1,600 00 

Invested in 6 shares Boston »fe Providence R.R. Co. stock, 

par value $100 each . . 600 00 

Invested in 12 shares Fitchburg R.R. Co. stock, par value 

$100 each 1,200 00 

Invested in 1 share Vermont & Massachusetts R.R. Co. 

stock, par value $100 each 100 00 

Cash in treasury ......... 37 69 

$10,487 69 



Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late 
of Boston, the object of which is stated in the following extract from 
her will: 

" I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000 to be invested 
on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books 
published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own pri- 
vate library, and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." 
Bequest accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. Re- 
ceived April, 1884. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 

ScHOLFiELD FuND. — Bequest of Arthur Schoefield, who died in 
New York, January 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 18, 
1889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum of 
$11,800, which represents the income of said fund, received by him up 
to the time of his death, to be added to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $50,000 00 
" " " " " " " " . 11,800 00 

$61,800 00 

Green Fund. — Gifts from Dr. Samuel A. Green, of Boston, of 
$2,000, the income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books 
relating to American History. 

Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Four " " " 500 00 

Three " " " 500 00 

$2,000 00 



76 City Document No. 25. 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund. — Gift of a citizen 
of South Boston, the income o^ which is to be expended for the benefit 
of tlie South Boston Branch Libi'ary. Keceived September, 1879. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . .$100 GO 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund. — This is a gift from the 
family of Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received January, 
1896. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $500 00 

Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund. — Received from 
the estate of Charles Mead the amount of his legacy, to constitute the 
"Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund,'' for the promotion 
of the objects of the Public Library, in such manner as the government 
of said Library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the Library, to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received October, 189(3. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $2,500 00 

Artz Fund. — This is a gift made in November, 1896, by Miss Vic- 
torine Thomas Artz, of Chicago; the income " to be employed in the 
purchase of valuable rare editions of the writings, either in verse or 
prose, of American and of foreign authors.'' These books are to be 
known as the " Longfellow Memorial Collection." 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $10,000 00 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund. — ^ This fund was received 
from the members of the Papyrus Club, May, 1897. The income thereof 
is to be expended for the purchase of books in memory of their late 
member, John Boyle O'Reilly. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $1,000 00 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund. — This is a gift made in 
April, 1897, by the Association of Officers of the Twentieth Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry. It is to be used for the purchase of books of 
a military and patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove appropri- 
ated as a Memorial of the Twentieth Regiment. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $5,000 00- 

Todd Fund. — This is a gift made in October, 1897, by William C, 
Todd, of Atkinson, New Hampshire. The income is to be expended 
annually in payment for such current newspapers of this and other 
countries as the board of officers for the time being having charge of the 
Public Library of the City of Boston shall purchase. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent Bond, for . $50,000 00 

Bradlee Fund. — A bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee, 
D. D., of Boston, to the Boston Public Library. Received November, 

1897. 

Invested in one City of Boston, Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $1,000 00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund. — This is a contribu- 
tion from the friends of the late Henry Sargent Codman, to be used 
to perpetuate the memory of Mr. Codman, by the purchase of books 
upon landscape gardening. Received January, 1898. 



Library Department. 77 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-lialf i^er cent 

Bond, for $2,800 00 

Casli in City Treasury, January 31, 1906 .... 5441 



$2,854 41 



Ford Fund. — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the Public 
Library of the City of Boston for the purchase of books for youth. 
Received June, 1900. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three per cent Bond, for . $6,000 00 



Cutter Fund. — A bequest of Abram E. Cutter, the income of 
which is to be expended for the purchase of books and for binding for 
the Abram E. Cutter collection. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three per cent Bond, for . $4,000 00 



Lewis Fund. — A bequest of Mrs. John A. Lewis for the purchase 
of sucli old and rare books as shall be fitly selected to augment the col- 
lection known as the John A. Lewis Library, to be known as the Mrs. 
John A. Lewis Fund. 

Invested in one City of 13oston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond, for $5,000 00 



Billings Fund. — From the estate of Robert Charles Billings, 
" This sura to constitute a permanent fund for said Library, to be called 
the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used for the 
purpose of the purchase of books for said Library." 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bonds $100,000 00 

Center Fund. — Bequest of Joseph H. Center. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond $14,000 00 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond 3,000 00 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bond 6,200 00 

Cash in City Treasury, January 31, 1907 150 55 



$23,350 55 



Tufts Fund. — A bequest of the late Nathan A. Tufts, of Charles- 
town, to be known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be 
applied at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the 
Library, to be placed in the Charlestown branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per cent 

Bonds $10,000 00 

Cash in City Treasury, January 31, 1907 .... 131 77 

$10,131 77 



78 City Document No. 25. 

Recapitulation of Public Library Trust Funds. 

Robert Charles Billings Fund $100,000 00 

Scholtield Fund 61,800 00 

Bates Fund 50,000 00 

Todd Fund 50,000 00 

Center Fund 23,350 55 

Phillips Fund 20,000 00 

Treadwell Fund 10,487 69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10,13177 

Phillips Fund 10,000 00 

Bowditch Fund 10,000 00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000 00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 10,000 00 

Artz Fund 10,000 00 

Ford Fund 6,000 00 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 5,000 00 

Pierce Fund 5,000 00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000 00 

Townsend Fund 4,000 00 

Ticknor Fund 4,000 00 

Cutter Fund 4,000 00 

Codman Memorial Fund 2,854 41 

Charles Mead Fund 2,.500 00 

Green Fund 2,000 00 

Bigelow Fund 1,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund * . . . 1,000 00 

Franklin Club Fund 1,000 00 

John Boyle O'Reilly Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

Bradlee Fund 1,000 00 

Edward Lawrence Fund 500 00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund . ' . . . . 500 00 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund . . . . 100 00 

$422,224 42 

















o 






a 

OS 


























S Kij: >.- 


M 










s 2 


^ 










1 








<! ,' 
























j 




a 
a 














■a 

& 

S 






1 




i's 


^ 




;« 














J3 















. 








o 




s 

> 
o 














1 

a 




t5 c « o 
tij li 

2=^ -'S 


o 
1 


i: — a 

2 Ti§ 


1 








it 

a 




a 






2 * 



\ 








.2 
2 


1 1 i 

i 1 ! 


1 1 H ;• 
3^1 = 

1 a f 1 
P § S 2 




3 

1 


j: 




1 1 




« 

fc 


1: 




iH if 

f 1 




a . 5 o^ 

K §•£; s 
1 •«'5 ^ 


•0 
3 

■£ 

g 


a 

£•1 

Ii. 

- a 

^ > 
laL- 

Ja'l 

|:« 

c S 







Si 

a. 

=3 


5 

2 

1 
s. 


a 

-5 

a 
« 






1 
g 










i 


1 o . i 
1 i n 

2 S 2 f 
>. 1 1 1 

t ^ £ 1 


« g S o 

s = r s 
1=1 = 
1 1 1 1 


"5 

1 jf 

1 It 






1 1 




■ 5 

o 


•a a 
a— 






CM 

^ £ 

a^S 
a o 

&.> 

is 


° s 

Ilji 


5 

6 

B 
a 
"o 


'""5 


•D 


1 


1 

z 

a. 


1 

i 

fa 

p ^ 




















^ i-^ '^ 


e 7 


- 


- 




e 




f^ 




bu r< 




^ 


r-" 




r ^ 


■" 




El, 




- 


h" 


£ 


^ 


b. 


■** 


&. 




^ 












































































, — 


- 


— —^ 


,_-/^_^ 




o 


e 


1 1 


1 g S 5 


e o <a 


g 


S 


■* g 


;? 


; = 


p 




° i 


O 


8 I 











to 


g 


1 


S 








12 8 


g ^ 


^ ;2; 


g 


5 




















<a 
















(?» 


c^ 














i-t ■<*■ 










o 







































































s 


* 
































































t-^ 


^ 




-w— , 


























■ ._ 


— , 






































W 










^ 


— -v* u- 


~ 


-*. - 


c 




-T O 


~^ 


^ 


ci n 


■=> -i- r^ t^ 


C-. r- m 


^ 


„, 5- 


.^ 


"7 


t- 


,_ 


,, 


t- 


,^ 







"^ -0 


„ 


„ 


-0 -^ 


~~.^ 1- 


:j (D 








e^ — w 














































ri 




« ^1 




Cl 


i' ?3 


M ^1 


ri -?) 








Si 3-. S 




CT - 












C 




















c^ 






~. 05 


Cl 


a-. 






Oi 




= 


■" 




'^ 






" 




" " 


^ 


"" 


rH ^ 




" "^ " 


- ^ - 


" 


rH rH 


^ 


" 


" 


'^ 


*" 


^ 




^ 


" 


r-. r^ 


" 


*"* 


■" "" 


' 


' 


^ ^ 




a 


_ 


- >-. _- . 






-. _ 






- X 


_- 


_£ 








- =' .-" 


r 


t; 


_- _X 


t; 


^ -^ 








y; 


-- 


^. 


=■ =" 


-- 


~ 


>■ 


6 ''• 


r 






'^ 














^ a V 






































a S. 




a 




a a 


































o ^, ■_ 

































" 


' 


•^ <; -: 


^ 




'' 


c 


< 


^ -■ 


< 


-i: 


4 c 




<: <! c 


>^ C C 


■^ 


■< -7. 


^ 


i-r ►^ 


►T 








^ 


<; 


'-^ 


«! <; 


< 


■< 


^ 


"^ ~- 


Q 




•u 
a 
o 


a 


i § 1 


E 


% 


I 


u 




? - 


g 


„ 


1 S5 


8 5-^- i- 


- = <M 


■jj 


i 7 


o> 


3 ° 


_^ 


S 


2 


-* 


g 


§8 


S 8 


X 


00 


M 


P ' 


lO 




C9 




t- V 




o. 




^•. ■*. 




S 




. n 


















r- 






ir:_ 






<n 


°t 








<o lO_ 










c 


























^ 






c 






w' 


0" 






















o 




" " 






~ 






*"* 
























"" 


" 






" 


~ 


^ 


r- t-^ 


*" 


*" 


PH ^ 


' 


^ « 


■^ *"* 




'/: 
















^. 


, 




































>_. 





. 












■3 


i 


ill 


^ 


I 


1 


s 


s 


i t 




¥ 


g 


1 


1 


i i 


III 


"i" 


g e 


i 


5 


1 


? 


1 


t 


i 


1 


T" 


1 2 






i 


1 


§ 








































































•a! 
















^ 






L 


■ ^; 






^- 










;.- 






















'£ 


J.- 




w 
















o 






! 


5^ 












































.a 
















.s 












t." 












■ .a 










t^ 




















s 


H. o. t? 

•< < a 


1 i 

•5 c 


X. x. 


O 5 o 

<! -5 >5 






1: a 

o. Si 
aa Q 




• i 1 

< o 


2; ■? 


a 


^- 3 


i 


1 1 

!z; 


e 


a. 


1 

c 


S5 


= 


1 


3 S 






■5' 


a 








8 


8 g 8 


f 


g 


s 


g 


8 


g 8 


g 


g 


S 


g 




§88 


8 8 8 


§ 


s 8 


5 


2 


8 


Y" 














"^ 


8 8 


g 


8 


8 8 


8 § 


8 8 


3 


=3 
O 


1 


ill 


1 




1 


g 




i 1 


1 


I 


e 


1 




ill 


1 I § 


2 


i ^ 


1 


1 


1 








i 


i 


\ 



8 


1 1 


8 


1 


§ § 


S_ s 


§ 1 


i 


< 


« 


§ S 2 


< 






"*" 








_^ 




o 










o" 






° 




tc" 


8 




M 


^ 


■*■' of 


- 


g" 


3 




to 




1 

* 






























C 
































1 
< 




c 


^ 


_ 




























M 












_ 
















J 


















• ^ 


c 












-g 




c" 


•§ 














.2 










3 


>• 


1 


2 
^ 

< 


1 


> = 


fr 

, t 

^ 


o 

- & 

1 


1 

a 


^ 1 










'C 


< 






t 




1 






g = 

1 1 
- 1 

^ a 


3 


S 


X 










^ 


•0 


S 


3 
ft 




lb 


< 




.a 




< 
c 

I? 




: 




< 







e 


n*^ 






















^ 


X. S 




^T3 



§1 l^=. 

is ill 

So if aw 

3 5 i..a" 

2 a.? ? 

§ ^'Si 

a ^ '•i. 

J g-o 

■- goS 

- ®'" 5 



aS"^ |3 











*s 





















— 














■oa 




« 














bcc 




a 














rs. 




■s 














X t 

































































(h 








BS5 




t< 






M 








fc, g 




& 






< 












c 






D3 












2 






« 








£0 




s 
























►J 








«_ 














E 






Sg 










^ 


;§ 








3 . 














££ 
S-8 




2S 






cu 








'^is 




is 














Ifl 




■ si 






t^ 












So 






Ed 








- g» 




2§ 
ato 












<! 




-! 






«ii 




































a: 
















H 


s 


















?3 S 5 










t- 


2 




^ 














pa 


■" 




























.-— - 




^ 








bJ 








^ 












H 
















g S 






















^ 




















r/1 




















C 












1- 








/, 











































P3 




















«*- « 















H 


s|| 


1 s. 1 




? S 













Eh'Sb 


<6 
















ii^ 


*" 








































•«1 
























a 
























H 


W > M 


5 S 8 


S 












Ci 






S S 
















H 
























H 



























■^ 






















^ 


























s 


g g 


g 




g 






< 


= ^l 


8 


^ 


8 








^ 






U 








































Q 


Cl. 




















< 












































■n 
























^ 
























u 











































►1 












^ 


t 








3 






ad 














?j 








« 


C3 




B 






B ir 








w 




£? 








a u 








^ 






«s 






•< Z 








ij 


^ 


"^ 




■3 


^ -3 1 








B 


c: 


^ 


> 


;i 


ts u 








s 


-^ 


^ 


" 




i 



Library Department. 



79 





fH O 


.-1 e-i 


O (>« 


o e» 


l-^ 




OS 1 CD 


O Ol 


c 


1 /M 








"O 


lO OS 


cs cs 


CO ■* 


cc 




CD 1 CO 


lO CO 


■^ 1 c< 




T—i fr* 


CO t^ 


CD CO 


OS o 


OS 




^ 


-^ 


OS CJ 


o 1 ei 




«0 

© 


s s; 




CO lO 




X 




<M 1 '1 






1 Tt< 




O^ 00 


CD 1 m^ 


en 00 


OS l^ 






«i <= 


t-^ in 


X |r^. 




1H 


-* 




o 


CO 




t^ 






c^ 1 r- 


CO 




US 




«©■ 




1 ^ 


» 




1 ^ 


«» 






1* 


4» 




1* 




ID 

© 


C3 CO 


"1; 


1 ■* 


«f3 OS 


~~ic 


OS 


o 




>— < 1 >~-i 


X CO 


Ci t o 






■^ 


O CD 


■* ^H 


t- 


CO 


.-«J' 




OS CO 


X TH 


■^ GO 




O CD 


CA 1 OS 


OS i-H 


t- 


X 


■c 




CD 1 Ol 


(N in 


CD 1 -^ 




US 

© 

IH 


cr: 


C3 


CO 1 o 


-* t^ 


•(Z. 


c^ 








OS 
















t- 1 o_ 


"i "K. 


t^ 


03_ 


co_ 




ITS 1 X 


t^ 00 


l^ 


CO 




-« 


f-T 




CO 


m rt" 


(M 


t^ 


■** 




<n' I CO 


CO* 




its' 




«» 




1 ^ 


««■ 




«■ 


^ 






\^ 


«■ 




«& 






-* -. 


~9 


S 


(N 


CO 


iZ 


<M 


o 




OS 1 OS 


CO ■<5« 


■r 


■^ 




© 


^ 


X) 


cr 


o 


CO -* 


o- 


C3 






-^ 


OJ OS 


o- 


f-H 






ei5 


^ 


t- 


X X 




CO 


CO 




CM XJ 


CO OS 





CO 




© 


5 C5 


■^ 


3 


o o 




X 




X CO 










C5^ .— ' 


X 


o 


t- 


"T. 




Ol 

CD 






ira x_ 


"^ X 


a 


O^ 


I' 


cr 






ccT 


CO r-1 


O) 




'*' 




cT CO* 


co" 




lO* 


> 


4f» 




« 


«» 






t# 






1* 


۩ 




«» 


o 






to 


t' 


^ 


OS Oa 


"~5 


o^ 


o? 




CO »o 


t— G* 


a 


00 


03 


^ 






cc 


OS 


OS O 


c 










XT' t^ 


^ 






© 


•r 


s 


r.1 


CO 


,, 


00 


X 


^ 


Ol 




rH CO 


OS m 




(, 




© 


cr 


X 


cc 


■* 








OS 


■^ 




in OS 








o 


o- 


o 


X 


os_ 


t-^ CD 

CO rn" 


CI 


"*. 


•* 




(m" cd" 


CD OJ_ 

CO r^ 


5 


LO" 


«» 




» 


•» 




m 


1© 






|« 


iff 




^ 






t^ 


o 


~x 


CO 


^- 


X 






lO 




X 1 CO 


CO C-l 


tc 


,_, 




© 


c 


»o 


tf~ 


rH 


c^ 


X 




■^ 

Td 






oi 1 t- 


CO CO 




00 


-t-j 


o- 


C-l 


cr 


-H 


<= 


OS 


c«* 


t^ 






o 


t- CO 


Ci- 


CO 


o 


SI 

•© 

1-1 




;e 








\r. 


c 


CO 


CO 




o 1 t- 


r^ CO 


e*" 


-f 


p 


cc 


OO 


o- 


CO 


CD ^ 

CO i-T 


t- 








in 1 CD 
of 1 CO- 


CO_ 00 
CO* 


QC 




o 


» 




«& 


m 




m 


^ 






r 


m 




^ 


s 




. o- 


ID 


r- 


(M 


a. 


CO 


~~c 




»c 




^ 


cc 


^ 


in 


^ 


00 


£ 


SI 


<= 


I- 


o- 


X 


CD CO 


cc 


CO 






o 


o 


X CO 


c^ 


M 


© 


cc 


o 


o- 


CO 


« CO 


cr 


X 


•<»l 




O' 




■* in 






7i 










1 *■ 


t>* 




l- 


OS 


IN 




c 


CO 






0- 


CO 


© 

Si 




o_ 


t^ 


CO 


t~^ o 

CO r-T 


cc 


CO 

- ■* 


00 
CO 






CD 


CO u5_ 
CO i-T 




CO 

cd" 


9 


m 




f» 


^ 




s 


«» 






«& 


«» 




^ 




a- 


t~ 




c 




CO 




■o 


CO 








in o 


r- 


CI 


© 


CO «« 




00 


i^ t- 


X 


IC 


X 


o 


^ 


•* 

OS 


in CO 
in o 


oc 


ib 


00 
0) 


© 


If 


r» 


O 




cr ^ 


•o 


IT 


o 


o 
















^ 


Cf 




X 


e»_ 


o- 


o 


X 




CO 




cc 


01 


in ^ 


•X 


■X.' 




© 




r^ 




in" 


cr 




<N 


(^ 


CO 




c^ 


co" 


CO PH* 




ic' 


o 


« 




«& 


€» 




m 


m 






^ 


» 




^ 








CD 


~^ 




00 X 


~~0C 




o 


o 


IT 


in 




T*l 


cc 


o 




s 


t^ 


t- 


t~" 


■^ 


OS 


t^ 


IN 


•'1' 




o 


■* 


In OS 


? 


o 


o 


«s 


a: 


CD 


IT 


9E 


rj-_ 


ff-l 


IT 


^^ 


00 




If 


■^ 


•^ 


|, 


0" 


CD 


g 


05® 
1H" 


ir 






OS 




m 




OS 


s 




t- 


in 


OT I- 


c 






cc 


O 


'" 


02_ 


o- 

CO 


X 


cr 


00 


n 




cc 
e 


CO 


eo_ oi 

co" 


cr 


't. 


o 

cc 


«©■ 




€» 


m 




«> 


m 






«» 


'W 




X 




ir 




"o- 


lO 




o 


~~o- 


CO 


t- 


io 


o 












1 


o 


c 


CO 


CC 


CO 


cc 


t- 


•<» 


00 


^ 




c 


CD 


OS ^ 


c? 


t^ 


a 




CO 


**• 


s 


^ 


CO 


(N 


o 


o 


OS 


IC 


^ 


OS o 


c^ 


CO 




00 

OS 

1H 




31 


■^ 


?> 


X 




C 


CO 


X 




■^ 


CO 


O rS 




Tjl 




CC 


X) 


" 


t- 


cc 


00 


cr 


CD 


CO 

CO 






co" 


X 


in 


c- 






«» 




s 


«» 




£ 


'* 






m 


* 




m 








o 


~cc 


* CO 


c 




IT 




X 




04 








© 




«s 




o 


o 




t- CO 


IM 


Ol 


OS 


t^ 




X 


CJ -- 


in 




3~ 


M 


CO 


lO 


cc 


OO 


X 


■X 


lO 


CO 


„ 


CO 


\r 


c^ 


_ 


CO 




as 




P 




£J 




J;: 








CO 


t^ 


X 


■^ -^ 


Ir 


•^ 


X 


l^ 


f^ 


^ 


cc 


X 




CO 


■*_ 




O" 


x_ 


00 CD 


oc 


co_ 




35 


e-1 








c<- 








CO 




IM 


CD 








'^ 


s 


«■ 




«» 


m 




» 


i» 






« 


» 




€& 




(M 


X 


~~c? 


CO 


c 


X 


cr 




(M 




C 






o 


TC 




s 


OS 


o- 


CO 


IT 




■* 


CO 


CC 


-* 




s 


o- 


I- 


L- 


y-^ 


s 


s 


'ci 




o 


cr 


r-( 


9S ~ 


■* 


01 


t- 


(S 


X 


X 


X 


CD 


IT 


o 


P< 


OS 

OO 


S 




c 


IS 


OS i-H 


<= 


^ 




CO 


t' 


»o 


cc 






o 




X 


^ 


t:- 


»o 


^ 


x^ 


X 


•"^ 


■^ 








<: 


^1 


= 


CO 


;g 


<ri 






^ 


Cf 


(— » 


cr 


oT 


CO 


,_r 


2- 


t- 




r-T 


^. 


icT 


CJ 


ife 




«» 


«» 




« 


c& 






m 


% 




^ 


P 

C3 


o 

OS 


X 








IT 


o 


"Ic 


CD 


o 








CO -H 




s 


;h 




^* 


-1 


(M 


■* t- 




OS 


>o 


■^ 


r— 


r- ' 


S OS 


cc 


.c 




e-1 


— 


ss 


o- 


X 




(M 


,^ 


X 


CC 


o 


t- 


m 


cr 




cc 


as 

00 






9 


CO 


-^ 


s 




1^ 


CO 


>fs 


c 


r* 


0- 




•rt* 




X 


^^ 


cc 


■* 




« 


a 


''I 


CO* 


CD 


c 


X 
CO 


OJ 


X 


=^ 




^ 


e& 




۩ 


m 




«» 


» 






<» 


€& 




s 


_o 








ir 




CO t- 


~~C£ 


CD 








CO 


X ^ 


if 

c 






to 

OS 


^ 


X) 


•" 


CO 




CO 


M 


lO 


OS 


-* 


I- 


s 


X CD 


o 


ir* 


'^ 


^H 


CD 


^- 


i-H 




'S 


e» 


-* 


cc 


CO 


CC CO 


cc 


CD 


■c 


OS 


2: 




(> 








■^ 


X 


CO 


OS 


Ol 


X 


O' 


Ol 


X 


o 


c3 


X 


CO 


CC 


X 


<^ 


l^ 




•"I 


(>>_ 


-^ 


ir 


a\ 


If 




t- 




oc 








CO 






cr 


t- 


co" 




tM 


co" 








1 co" 




«■ 




<» 


e© 




-» 


«► 






^ 


4& 




h 


CO 




































O 
O 






















aj 














C5 








































































* 




S5 
O 
H 


"5 




S5 
O 
H 




rt 
o 
S 




'A 








O 
so 




■5 










O 


o 








o 




a 










o 
o 






' 




H 


-e 
















a 




J 




^. 










« 1 


ci 

00 




o 

CO 


I 


a 

CD 


a. 
c 


« 


V 


cs 

o 


c 


< 

5 




c 

cs 

o 

o 


Q. 








1-. 


^ 


a 






^ 


«. 






c 






Q. 










O 

o 


y 






o 
o 


X 


c 


c: 


o 


p 






y 








v: 


23 


^ 




a: 


M 






« 


# 


El 




(K 


fS 


S 







8U 



City Document No. 25 





CO 


'X) 


cs 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


,_, 


o 


I-, 


,_i 


2E 


^H 


t- 


CD 


'ji 


t^ 




CD 


r- 




CD 


CO 


eo 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


CD 


*-^ 


o 


o 


.^ 


CO 


CO 


05 


^ 


t' 


(M 


,^ 


Ti- 


CD 


eo 


eo 


(^ 


CO 


CO 


X 


o 

1H 










cc 


Tt« 


CI 


in 


CO 




1- 


CD 


in 








CO 


lO 


13 


co_ 
ic" 


CO 


lO 


lO 


in 


■^ 


CD 


in 


o" 




lO 


CO 


-* 


«© 




m 


ft 


«# 






S- 


m 




m 


m 


«S 






m 




CO 


o 


CD 


-^ 


~~^ 


CD 


,— t 


X 


m 


in 


^ 


iS 


"^ 


■^ 


~~co 


5 


«s 


■^ 


l^ 


CO 


lO 


a 


o 




CO 




X 


33 


33 




C33 


in 


9 


o 


I— 1 




CO 


eo 


<M 


o 


CD 


in 


i-H 


CO 


O 


CD 


fS 


CD 


X 


U3 

O 
Si 

1H 






t— 


03 


^ 


O 










£• 






^ 


?J 


o 


5: 


s 






eo 


t- 


•<i! 


5" 


CD 


CO 


33 


"^^ 


o 

CO 


CD 


CO 


m 




« 


« 


*» 






* 


«■ 




«S 


5^ 


'A 






^ 




00 




~~o5 


<M 


eo 






X 


OJ 


CD 


~~CO 




~in 


5£ 


"3 


CO 


o 




d: 


o 




<N 


■^ 


CO 


0^ 


o 


o> 


■^ 


in 


(N 


o 


t- 


cc 


(n 


o 


CO 


^J4 


CO 


^ 


Oi 


^ 


t 


X 


X 


m 


in 


X 


X 


© 

1-1 


eo 


CO 




CO 


«<J 


o 


33 


:0 




o 




X 




t' 


S2 


in 


CO 


00 


s 


in" 


CO 


C5 


-t 


x__ 


-^ 


X 


in 

->* 


X 


o 

CO 


i- 


CD 


5 


m 




« 


^ 


« 






^ 


yt 






« 


<& 




e» 




C5 


XJ 


~~^ 


[^ 


c5 


00 


CD 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


1^ 


t^ 


o 


X 


rH 


S 


© 


^ 


o 


»h 


in 


T^ 




O 


cc 


in 


t"- 


X 


1-H 


CO 


eo 


•»! 


CO 


lO 


o 




^, 


CD 


05 


lO 


(^ 


(^ 


CO 


t 


33 


CO 


in 


33 


X 


© 

05 

1-1 


o 


tt 




^3 


CO 




O 




C-l 




33 


CO 


CO 


CO 






O) 

CO 




<N 


CO 


CO 


o_ 


lO 


-* 


00 

of 


X 


X 


in 


33 


t- 




''J^ 


«» 




» 


» 




«f 


«» 






m 


«; 




^ 


© 


05 

o 


§ 


"g 


CO 


X 

o 


35 


©» 


X 


■«* 


CO 
33 


-* 


X 


U 


3 


O 


e< 




'N 


o 


CD 


J^ 


CO 


o 


-* 


^ 


m 


O! 


en 


o 


33 


CD 


in 


© 


i 


(M 


CD 




iC 


o 




x 




X 




eo 


"?( 


0- 


o 


t- 


C= 


t~ 


■* 


X 


CO 


00 




CD 


X 


oi_ 




CD 


eo 


33^ 


Oi 


CO 




■* 
» 


eo 




•* 


^ 








Ol 




CO 


©. 


in 


00 


"to 


02 


~CT 


§ 


"Id 

CO 


m 


s 


s 


CO 


X 


S 


g 


(> 


CO 


0-^ 


CD 




o 


■* 


■^ 


in 


1 m 


CO 


<33 


O 


CD 


o 


CD 




s 


1H 
O 
33 




00 


m 
^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


-<* 

X 


§ 


S 


s 


3- 


X 


© 


^ 


00 


00 


o^ 


7^ 


/M 


o* 


E5 


CO 


CO 


~c 


33 


,_l 


m 




o 


^ 


O 




o 


02 


lb 


M 




eo 


in 


S3 


rH 


33 




eo 




o 


■^ 


t- 


lO 


X 


(M 


CO 
00 


t^ 


-* 


eo 


-^ 


CC 


^ 




o 


© 

© 








CO 








'^ 


X 


X 




S 


in 


3- 




IC 


s 


l^ 




o 


X 


C 


CD 


X 


CO 


<i\ 


CO 


X 


X 


•"i. 












CO 






S 










o 






•<s< 


IH 


s& 




m 


m 




6© 






«f 


«> 




m 




■^ 


_^ 


""So 


eo 


"~S 


r- 


00 


CO 


^s 


"^ 


t-- 


s: 


s 


o 


3" 


S 


1 © 


■* 


o 


c 


lO 




co 


X 


X 


m 


r-i 


in 


33 


»"< 


O 


o 


OSss 


o 


00 


X 


^ 


X 


03 


X 


CD 

o 


in 


eo 


CO 


in 


3- 


33 


o- 


9S 


eo 


CO 




?- 


IM 


IC 






eo 


O 




ec 


o 


ir 


o 


30 F^ 


-d 


«; 




CO 


t- 


CO 


CO 


in 


CO 


•* 


in^ 


c- 


CO 


t^ 


co^ 


rH 


IM 






eo" 


(M 








in" 






eo' 


(N 






eo" 




m 




m 


«» 




^ 






^ 


a* 




«» 




CO 


iT" 


00 


^^ 




o^ 


~03 


o> 


t. 


■^ 


CO 


t— 


^ 


X 


"^ 


■* 


TO 


C3 




o 


O 


o: 


CO 


CO 


CD 


(M 


CO 


o< 


"^ 


in 


3- 


33 


o 


CO 


«D 


o 


t^ 


o 


-* 


01 


in 


M* 


,_4 


1 


cc 


in 


I^ 


33 




5d 


'^ 


« 


Oi 


CO 




eo 




<=. 


CO 




in 


u:: 


c 


'C 


^ 


(M 


40 


o- 




t^ 


lO 


cc 


en 




lO 


o- 


.o_ 


r^ 


CD 


X 


in 


00 


e; 






"^ 








eo 


a> 






co" 


(N 






co" 




«» 




m 


m 




•» 


m 






<«> 


#t 




m 


00 


j^ 


o« 


-Tt 


CO 




Ol 


~~x 


1 ^m 


tr- 


o 


■ z£ 


cr^ 


iT 


1^ 


~~c 


01 


05 


(M 


t- 


en 


m 


X 


o 


1 (S 


co 


« 


3- 


CO 


X 


CO 


c^ 


in 


1 


t^ 


C'l 


H 


■* 


eo 


■* 




1 35 




X 




o 




CO 




jS 


t« 




ih 






cc 


o 


cc 




s 


CO 




X 


cr 


CD 




CO 


o» 




I- 


00 




CD 






O 


CO 


I- 


cc 








X 




































00 








eo 
















eo 








Vi 


•H 


«■ 




«» 


«» 




€^ 


«» 






«^ 


i» 




f» 


Si 

p 


iQ 


CO 


»n 


CO 


eo 


o 


1^ 


c:; 


in 


■<* 


j^ 


o 


ir 


t-. 


~~cc 


X 


t- 


t-- 


o 


in 


eo 




in 


CD 


oi 


o 


0- 


in 


o- 


o» 


^ 


■^ 


O 


CO 


00 


oi 




o 


r- 


03 


M< 


-* 


m 


^ 


3- 


■* 


cc 


o 


CO 


■^ 








a 




X 






m 


CD 


CD 






c 




o 


o 


o^ 


e 


« 


CO 


co_ 


cc 


CO 


eo 




■^ 


C_ 


C: 


r-^ 


X 


•~l 


00 


(M 








<M 








of 






-.1^ 


o 






-* 


1H 


m 




fi 


«© 




0© 


» 






m 


m 




«» 


05 


O 


o 


~~5- 


Oi 


CD 


eo 


in 


-* 


CO 


CO 


~e3 


-* 


f<\ 


X 




iS 


o 


o 


X 






o 


<M 


■* 






CO 


X 


"■ 


m 


IM 


CO 




00 




<N 


T-( 






o 




05 


•* 


t-' 


tH 


cr 


CO 


53 


03 


lO 


05 


•rt* 


CT 


CO 






c 




CO 




CO 


in 








^- 


93 


OO 




»C 


*i 


? 








OJ 


in 


in 


CO 


c 


t- 


p 


































oo 








CO 


C- 






eo 


fff 






CO 


o 






eo 


^ 


S 




^ 


^ 




4© 


«» 






«» 


«& 




^ 


IS 
0> 




'^ 




-^ 




la 


^ 


CO 


f^ 


^ 


~~x 


33 


1^ 


CD 


~c 


CO 






CO 


CO 


5 


o 


c 




Ol 


t- 


C4 


o> 


IT 






CO 


<N 


-^ 




,_, 


t- 


^^ 


X 


33 


f^ 


i^ 


-* 


33 


jr 


33 


cr 


01 


05 










CC 


o 








CD 


X 


1- 


^ 


-*< 


cr 


CO 


a 


^ 


1^ 




c 






o_ 






cc 






CO 


X 




































X 








IM 


Ol 






eo 








CO 








eo 


s 




» 


«► 




«» 


4» 






» 


<& 




«& 






"rf 








C3 








05 




g 




"3 










u 




pi 




o 




2 




CJ 




< 




CJ 








55 


'S 




H 




•5 






S 






"O 








O 
H 

s 

2 
5 


o 




CO 




.2 




w 




o 




Pm 




2 
















S 




H 

O 








< 












pa 


05 


c 


o 

p 


a 




(i 


OQ 


ci 


C 




, 


C3 








c 


cc 


c 


_a 


o 


c 




0) 


X' 


c 


C 




c 








o 
o 


a 




T 


,li 


a 




'E 


^ 


c 




"t 


,^ 


c 










M 


c 


o 


c 


. 




O 


c 


^ 


ec 


O 




. 






>• 




cc 


o 


v* 




— 


o 


^^ 




r 


O 


? 






pq 


fr 




■J 


pa 


>£ 




M 


e 


El 




cr 


P5 


El 





Library Department. 



81 











o 


in 


'V^ 


00 


o 


CO 


05 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


00 


c 


■* 


SI 








o 


lO 


^ 


Ci 




lO 




o 


to 




CO 




o 


o 








o 


05 


CO 


^4 


oo 


CO 


CO 


o 


to 


to 


03 




CO 


35 








■n 




•^ 


tb 


h- 






00 






n 














"^ 






o 






■1< 




■11 


-11 - 








00 








«» 






li 


« 






1 * 


^ 


«» 


« 




■-"' 


%^ 








o 


IC 


~~to 


1— 1 


~~o 


io 


-M 


1 ^' 


~~co 


00 


CO 


» 


"(5 


PH 








o 


o 


■1< 


lO 


oo 




o 


Ol 


<35 


03 


lO 




03 


CO 








o 


UO 


■1* 


OJ 


o 


to 


C5 


to 


to 


to 


eo 




,_1 


J-, 








(^^ 


« 








t- 


■1* 




tc 


to 


CO 




11 


to 












CO 


00 






lO 


s 




11 


o 


1 


Ol 










^ 






«■ 


« 






s 


s 


«© 


m 






SI 








^ 


•n 


~~^ 


•* 


~^ 


^ 


t<_ 


ph 


"Id 


to 


~CO 


1 


to 


CO 








o 


to 


to 




o 


to 


t' 


■I* 


o 


lO 


03 




CO 










<D 


CO 


IC 


o 


00 


CO 


■n 


to 


J-, 


t- 


o 


t- 


■11 


ffl 










o 


a^ 


o 


■^ 


c 


■11 


C5 


to 


to 


CO 


t- 
















JJ 


■11 




■* 


o 


'JI 




o 


n 


C3 


to 












le^ 


m 






m 


۩ 


s 


^ 






cT 




























« 






^ 








o 


■1* 


~~^ 


lO 


~o 


^ 


CO 


■n 


~p; 


[^ 


~co 




03 


00 








o 


-* 


•« 


00 


o 


>o 


« 


o 


t~ 


t- 


o 




o 


o 








to 


a 


-* 


05 


00 


to 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


lO 


Ir- 


^ 


-^ 










t-» 












CO 












CO 












cc 


00 






s 


C3_ 


■11 


■* 


05 


CO 


l>4 


CD 








«■ 






•» 


« 








« 


«■ 


m 


^ 


(m" 






















s. 












m 








o 


i_i 


"m 


•^ 


o 


00 


CO 


1—1 


~~OI 


(■■^ 


~o 


— - 


n 


-H 








o 


(M 




CO 


o 


l^ 


-* 


Ol 


l^ 


t- 


SI 


& 


03 


c^ 








-I* 


O 


<» 


<M 


to 


r- 


■1- 


00 


CO 


to 


to 




1^ 


■^ 








<M 


o 










C-. 


^ 


ci; 


CO 


c 


ir 


C5 


iC 








->*l 




ffl 








o_ 










o 










«■ 






«» 


«» 




6^ 


46 


m 


m 












o 


o 


■^ 


^* 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


~~^ 


•* 


i? 


1^ 


^^ 


CO 








o 


o 


1— 1 






CO 


11 


■o 


■n 


■* 


iri 


IT 


11 


o 








to 


1^ 


VD 


»n 


00 


o 


r-i 


C2 


o 


lO 


05 


cr 


00 


,_( 










^ 


ira 




3 




'Xj 


OJ 


t- 




t^ 


^ 












^ 






00 




■* 


o 




CO 




■I- 


ici 










«©■ 






f» 


«■ 




^ 


« 


4» 


% 




r^f" 






















«» 












^e- 








<o 


u:: 


~vj 


CO 


"~o 


IQ 


oo 


CO 


~00 


00 


~o 






rH 








o 


f?! 


CO 


to 


o 


04 


CO 


to 


en 


05 


CO 




■n 


o 








to 


CO 


lO 


^ 


00 


CO 


00 


OS 


y^ 


,_^ 


to 




to 


CO 












o 


•n 


C- ■>)< 


to 






to 




CO 


o 












CO 


00 


-* 




CO 


00 


CO 




^ 


to 


t' 








<& 






m 


m 




«. 


« 


^ 






o 




































8 








o 


m 


^ 


to 


~o 


"C 


l_l 


•■a 


pi 


I-, 






o 


c> 








o 




c> 


to 


o 


■^ 


CO 


o 


CO 


00 






I 










•K 


C5 


m 


CI 


CO 


c 


CO 


^ 


o- 


04 






CI 


^-. 








■H 


to 


d 


« 








lO 




C5 






s-. 










•H 




CO 




■1 




c: 




c^ 


CO 






to 


?D 








m 






•©■ 


4» 




«» 


m 


«& 






« 


^ 








o 


u^ 


•n 


05 


o 


o 




CO 


■n 


11 






to 


<o 








o 


O 


OJ 


<M 


o 




00 


CO 


o 


o 






11 


■^ 








00 


1^ 


t^ 


(M 


00 


,—1 


^p 


CO 


■1 


■n 






»n 


iO 








-* 


to 


Ol 


■H 




00 


to 






-n 






(^ 


^ 














C5 


■* 




CO 


CO 




CO 
















s 






^ 


tfy 




» 


« 


<» 






V. 


^ 








o 


ca 


~00 


r. 


o 


lO 


CO 


CO 


to 


as 






J^ 


t^ 








o 


o 


(M 


00 


o 


(M 




CO 


CO 


00 






— 


I—I 








00 


« 


to 


o 


-■c 


t- 


IP 


o 


(>) 


CM 






11 


"^ 








3 


to 


lO 


o 




r- 


ic 


00 












t" 










(M 


t- 


■1 




CO 


00 


CO 


CO 
















m 






» 


«& 




«■ 


« 


» 






«e 


^ 








Xr- 


lO 


TN 


^ 


l^ 


IT" 


00 


o 


^ 


f^ 








t~- 








to 


lO 


CI 


-* 




o- 


o 




CO 


00 






03 


o 








eo 


lO- 


lO 


-1< 


■n 


-* 




» 


o 


o 






n 


^ 








lo 


t^ 


C5 






to 




■11 


^ 








o 










•* 




CO 


05 


■1H 


oq 




o_ 




CO 






o 










m 






«■ 


m 






4» 


«9 


Ifi 






« 


^ 




CO cc 




= o 


to 


"Ic 


'^ 


~~to 






o 


■11 


11 






QO 


GO 




3i^M 


»o 


00 o 


CO 


CO 


t- 


CO 




to 


lO 


CO 


CO 












00 2—1 


ei 


r:\ to 


•1* 


00 


■n 


o 




to 


n 


o 


o 






00 


00 








00 CO 






to 


o 






M 










?: 


CO 






■<» 


O CO 




CO 


OD 


CO 




•11 






CO 








■* 




^ " 




1-h" «» 






^ 


»» 




fe 


« 


m 






s 


4^ 




;o 




€©■ 






























■-1 lO 


~o= 


m o 


lO 


"~>n 


O 








,_! 


"^ 


lO 






CO 


CO 




■11 eo 




35 O 


to 


ff 


C5 






5 


■11 


CO 


Vi 






00 


00 




m o 


a 


05 <M 


CO 




>ra 






— V 


02 


CO 


CO 






(33 


oa 




SI I^J 






lO 




c^ 






lO 


lO 


lO 








IC5 


>o 




lO 1-1 


to 


<M CO 






00 






CO 




CO 


CO 






1 


■* 




^ 




ecT ■*■ 






«© 






«« 


¥^ 


^ 


tt^ 






€« 


€» 




«» 




m 






































CD 


































































C3 




'Ji 


"n 


























a 




O 




J : 
i-i 


u 
















H 














o 




.2 




!5 
H 




c 




z 

p 




►J 

•«! 


z 

l-H 

1^ 














a 




O c5 







-< 
S 




1 


c 




c. 


o 




E 


J 






0) 




. 1-^ .2 


05 






c 


t, 


3 e 




c 














b ^ 




h 


-i^ 











a 




a 




"E 


1 

c 


? a! 






.5 o 


? 




o 
o 


!^ 


■< 




c 


> s 

3 > 


■* 


1* 


* 




3 - 

5 > 


' 




(/ 


p; 


ft 


cc 


CQ 


1^ 




t/ 


K 


fe. 




^ 




(/ 


J c: 


5 fc 





82 



City Document No. 25. 





o 


(, 


CI 


•-£> 


CD 


CD 


CO 


lO 


lO 


o cr 


■<*« 






o 


o 


00 




CO 


1^ 


ao 


t- 


tP 


o 




Ct 


lO 


lO 




O I-H 


CO 






t' 




•* 


o 


Oi 


lO 


1^ 


CO 


t^ 


e^ 


^, 


Ol 


oc 


Ol o- 


o 






■2 


«^ s 


CO 


« 


Dt 




c; 


lO 


OS 


C4 


c» 


-(< 




!H (N 








to 








■^ 


^( 


J 1-4 


CO 


-* 


o 


co_ 


K 


IC CC 


CD 








l~ ■— 




o 
OS 


_J 








» 








«> 




^ 






<» 


ci" 


«© 






^ 








«» 






«t 










4» 








o 


"00 


<M 


t-* 


o 


•^ 




O (N 


CO 


•^ 






-* OS 


~fc 


CO 


lO 


"i* 


CO 


iC 


CO 


00 


OS 




n- 


O 00 


o» 


t- 




■>* 


CO l~ 


00 


© 


CD 


rM 


CD 


■^ 


us 


<N 


o 


OS 


lO 


O CO 


0* 


OD 




^ 


CO •* 


OS 


US 


»rs 




■^ 


^ 




tCS 


c 


CD 




t- 00 


CO 


CC 




CO 


.-H CD 


o 


« 


•^ 


H^ 




s 


1-\ 






ic: 


CO 


o 






IC 


CO 00 


o^ 


o 

Si 








rM 


'^ 




^ 


cT 


۩ 




^ 


S 




۩ ^ 


CO 


« 






m 








» 






^ 










«& 








~00 


CD 




m 




CO 


~~c5 


















"^ 


>e 


-* 


CD 


'^ 


»o 


CD 


o 


IC 


o 






I-H 


o 




OS 








OS 


o 


CO 


,_, 


©1 


(M 


OS 


00 


•.J* 


Ol 


IQ 




lO 


-J 




CO 








CO 


•* 




"^ 


eb 




I' 


IM 


"^ 


•rs 


!^i 




e^ 
















cc 


^ 


■^ 




I- 


CO 


c_ 








no 






ICS 








iC5 


© 








(m" 


M 






oT 


S 




¥t 


m 




<» 






«> 


s 






^ 








m 
























CD 


OS 






o 


o 


~CO 


CO 


~~os 




OS 


~00 




~Oi 








~^ 


^ 


§0 


& 


»c 


O 


o 


I- 


O) 


OS 


t- 






lO 




IN 








o< 


© 


01 


,__, 


CI 


■^ 


-* 


o 


CO 


'^l 


,_^ 




,.^ 


OS 




Ol 








s 


to 




o 


l'- 






■^ 


f-( 


CO 








lO 












1^3 


c^ 




ib 


CO 


CD 




o_ 


00 


•o 




lO 


■* 




lO 








ICS 


o 

OS 


^ 








«» 






m 


<« 




•» 


«& 


» 






^ 




•£S 








CO 


o 


~ia 


00 


~T^ 






00 














CO 

© 


■'I' 


1—1 


-* 


o 




CO 


CO 


o 


CO 




CO 


Ol 




iO 








*o 


lO 


^ 


1^ 


'^ 


OS 


IN 


cc 


o 


p_( 




,—1 


s? 




t^ 








fc 


IN 

© 

OS 


CC 


to 




o 


1-i 






t- 


o 




o 


CO 




o 








o 




M 


»o 


©1^ - 


s 


lO 


c; 




CO 




CD 


^ 




"9 








IfS 


^ 






ci 


» 






n* 


m 




«. 


» 


<f* 






I& 


« 






m 








^ 
























cc 


tC 


~^ 




o 


CO 


~~00 


•* 






Ol 


"~o« 












"s" 


»> 


CO 


<M 




CO 


o 


»c 


OS 


lO 


IN 




ffl 


•* 




c 








OS 


© 


CO 


kO 


00 




CO 


OS 


CO 


^ 


o 




o 


?= 




cc 








00 






00 


CO 


o 


■^ 


CO 


CO 










I- 




c 








<53 




(j3 


"^ 


"V^ 








^ 




lO 






"^ 












»C5 


© 
OS 








c-T 


« 






_r 


«e 




m 


^ 


« 






^ 


« 






m 








«& 
























iO 










to 












~~ia 












"^ 


1-4 


o 


G<l 


C-1 


lO 


o 




OS 


O) 


6t 




IN 


t- 




c 








o 


© 


CD 


CI 


00 


CO 


CD 


CO 


lO 


lO 


o 




O 


o- 




o 






s 


© 


OS 




CO 






t— 


o: 




■^ 




-* 






cc 








00 


c 


^ 


c^ 


\X> 


•* 






OS 


-^ 






■* 




^ 








"H 


© 
OS 








CT 


^ 






۩ 


«fi 




^ 


«» 


'^ 






f» 


«■ 




m 
































o 


00 


00 


CD 


o 


iO 


■.* 


OS 


"^ 




CO 


""^ 




~s 








~~e5 


© 


00 


o 


o 


Ci 


o 


■^ 


CO 






■^ 


t"" 




c 








o 


1 g 


o 


*c 


o 


O 


QO 


OS 


_, 


CO 


CO 




CO 


OS 




oc 








00 


i* 




-"^^ 


'^ 


t- 




CD 






t- 


















3! 


05 


s 


CO 


lo 








o 


■* 




-* 


■«* 












-<*i 


OS 


^ 






^ 








« 




m 


«& 


«6 






» 








m 








s 
























CD 


CD 


^ 


a 


^ 


o 


~~i 


00 


~~o 




o 


~~S 




t- 








tr- 


OS 
OS 
1 


t- 


C-- 


t- 


(?! 


o 


■* 




lO 


CO 




CD 


c 




OS 






os 


OS 


co 




CD 


CO 


>n 


CO 


CD 


t; 




I;- 






CD 






CO 


OS 
flC 


ȣ5 


C5 




CD 


•^ 


I- 




IN 


CO 




CD 


C£ 




»' 










S 




■^ 


-^ 








o 


■^ 




-* 












■^ 


4» 






«» 






^ 


m 




» 


«/■ 


«© 






«» 








s 








<» 
























ICS 






o 


o 


ta 


>4 


OS 






















00 


•* 


s 


« 


J:- 


o 


•* 




lO 


~f 




■* 


? 




en 






OS 


OS 


(N 


J^ 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


■^ 


lO 


o 




o 


o- 




t^ 






te 




iD 


»o 




C5 


■^ 




CI 










cc 










CO 


t« 


t- 




Ijj 


"^ 






ta 


c:>_ 


m 






Ci- 




o 






lO 


OS 

cc 


<» 






s 








€« 




m 


«■ 


^ 






fir 








s 








S 
























O 


O) 


CO 


1 lo 


cc 


lO 


~~cio 




~~cc 




■s 










■* 


OS 


■<* 




iO 




CO 




i- 


CO 


»c: 




»c 


00 


l^ 








t'- 


00 


C4 




O* 


CO 


1^ 


-* 


lO 


cc 




CO 


CO 


00 






s 


OS 
00 

IH 


OS 


s 


w 


00 


lO 


00 




IC 


cc 




CO 




=2 






CO 


& 




H 


<M 


■^ 




E 


o_ 


■* 




'^ 


CO 


■^ 






•^ 


«» rH* 




e^ 


•6& 








m 




«» 


m 


» 






#» 








«& 








» 
























o 


o 


c 


Ci 


o 




~co 


t- 


F 




CO 












~rH 


© 


o 


c^ 


cc 


ob 


o 


CO 


cc 


CD 


c 




o 


^ 


■* 






-* 


OS 


J^ 


-* 


c 


o 


C) 


o 


f. 


-^ 


0- 




SS 


^• 


OS 






OS 


us 




lO 


ir- 


Ci 






CI 




c 




o 


IT 












ef 


"»* 


a- 






e> 


■* 








-* 


CO 


CO 






CO 


OS 


m 




^ 


'^ 






^ 


* 


> : 


m 


« 


«» 






«# 


GO 








^ 








4» 
























I- 


o 




o 


o 


o 


~a- 


OS 








~~o6 


~~» 






"cD 


»» 


o- 


<D 


iT 




o 




t-- 


en 


!S 




oi 


■^ 


'"' 






rH 


OS 


cc 


j^ 


-^ 


^_i 


-* 


CO 


CI- 


lO 


^ 




^H 


._, 


OD 






00 


•* 


5= 






G-l 


c» 


CO 


1?) 




CC 




00 






£! 












c- 


CD 


C-l 












CO 


CO 


CO 






CO 


OS 


«» 




^ 


«» 






«© 


« 


: 


m 


€& 


€» 






» 
































































5 


















































i 




is 




ai 








: 1 






H 




C5 






r^ 




Q 




c 








; i 






<! 




o 






o 

H 

cc 


o 




o 




■5 
.2 




O 
H 




S 


C 




H 

OS 




o 






53 








<u 




CO 




: a 


S 




u 




aj 






^ 






0. 




!3 




: ^ 


ti 




OD 




Oi 




* 


-d 




« 




-o 




<i5 




• t: 


<< 




w 




•^ 






C^ .2: 


n 


Q 


^ 




c 


0. 




a 


c 




a. 


s 





P 

2 1 




53 


c 


O 


0) 


cj 

CO 


a 




c 


2 a 








f 






o 
o 


a 




s 


o 


I 




m 


- 05 c 




S 


o 




a 


4d '-' 

1. O OS 






y 




^ 


o 


y 




P 


"5 = 




? 




5 "3 




M 


% 




a? 


B 


« 




a 


K a 




t>^ 




p: 


V 







Library Department. 



83 







$577 00 
171 59 
679 72 


GO 


$1,612 46 
253 77 
666 52 

$2,532 75 

$733 73 
172 93 
643 19 


OS 


$482 33 
35 40 
731 78 


$1,249 51 

$122 43 

$1,311 73 
709 18 
326 79 

$2,347 70 

$862 50 

35 17 

388 62 

$I,2S6 29 


$446 66 
59 61 
136 12 


$642 39 

$428 56 

$381 25 

690 21 

1,319 43 

$2,390 89 

$609 18 






$448 00 
39 03 
131 88 


$618 91 
$445 72 

$619 95 
$622 08 






$327 50 

$456 00 
72 93 
121 69 


$650 62 
$436 09 

$585 25 
$664 73 






$338 50 

$421 83 
142 78 
114 55 


$679 16 
$472 34 

$.577 23 
$883 75 






$329 71 
$208 62 

(6 11108.) 

$173 83 

23 95 

106 25 
(6inos.) 

$304 03 
$473 12 

$625 07 
$841 76 






$345 15 
$486 28 






$351 20 
$591 43 
$673 04 






$309 17 
$522 20 






$399 61 
$043 77 
$649 56 






$375 24 
$552 24 






$476 08 
$673 09 
$677 18 






$368 47 
$620 88 






$393 15 

$401 06 
(9 niOB.) 

$379 32 
(8 nios.) 






$319 52 
$336 25 






o 

QC 








$329 98 
$332 07 






$329 48 
$329 48 








H 

CO 

a 

s I 

c 


< 

3 


> 

< 

< 

^ w 


c 


a. 
a 

X 

Is: 




Harvard Street. 

Expense 

Crescent Avenue. 


Upham's Corner. 
Salaries 


Books and Periodicals 

Warren Street. 

Expense 

Books and Periodicals 


"a 

CO 







84 



City Document No. 25. 



t- O O) 

rH CO t- 

l^ -^ CO 

O ^1< O 



O) (M CO I M 



03 CO IC 



t- in rt 



O CO o 



^ IS 



■-I CO 1-1 



00 »C iC 

t~ ■.* IC 

l^ t- -rl< 

05 CO O 



05 IC t— 



I— I (^1 1— ) 



CO i^ ir: CO 

i-H O IM t~ 

O CO C5 -^ 

rH C3 >0 O 



o •* t^ 



rH in r-1 



03 CO CO 



CO lO (M 



-.* 00 o 

O O -H 

i-> lO ^1 

lO OT lO 

05 O C'l 



t^ CO r- 



rH o 



o_ o 



■-. CD I- 



— ^z 



!C CO CO 

iH 05 ^ 

<» O 05 

lO iO t^ 

00 CO 1— 



i-H 1— I t^ 

C5 OJ CO 

CO CO CO 

CO -^ r-« 



CO CO <N 

C5 O OS 

OD CO O 

C> — • ITI 

lo »n cr* 



O 1-1 (N 

CO (^^ CO 

OD 00 OD 

.-I CO -w 



(» n w 



cB M a 



t» M a 



P3 « 



Library Department. 



85 





lO 


T^ 


in 


J-, 


IT- 




o 












03 


p^ 


o 












00 CO 


05 


I— ' 


O 














05 


c: 














05 CO 


05 


CO 


■^ 




o^ 










CD 


CD 


CO 












-fli <Ji 


O 


o 


c< 




r^ 














eo 












lo e< 


t- 


CD 


ff> 




CO 












S 


Oi 












«» 




^ 


» 


m^ 








«& 




» 
















«ft 
































05 e< 


'N 


CO 


"^ 




~~^ 




O CO 


o 


eo 


O 


CO 


CO 


o 


in 


r-i 


CD 




t- o 


CO 


CO 






a 




O OJ 


CO 


o 


CO 


-rj* 






■^ 


05 


CO 




t- o 


'M 


o 


CD 




CO 




ei 


^H 


CO 


-Tf* 


Oi 


CO 


•i* 


CO 


OO 


CD 




iC CO 




o 


O 




in 




•»* 


CD 


o 




05 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 




I- 


"^ 








<i> 




m 






€& 


t^ 


00 


^ 










€©■ 




^ 


m 


«» 






s 






^ 








m 








f» 
































r^^ 






~~03 




c^ 




o o 


ec 


CO 


o 


^ 


-* 


r~. 


o 


CO 


CO 




io . 






lO 




00 




o o 






CD 


t- 


00 


CO 


35 


CO 


ei 




•o • 


# 




o 




CD 




CO oc 


CO 


05 


00 


co 


s» 


00 


in 


X 


CO 




00 




o 




Oi 




';; CO 




03 


OS 




00 


in 


in 




CO 




M* 




















^ 


t~ 


00 


CO 




&I 






■» : 






« 


S' 


^ 




fe 






(» 


«■ 




«■ 




oc 






t^ 




(M 




CO CO 


CO 


Ol 


CD 


00 


•^ 


~~^ 


pH 


00 


03 




rH 










OO 




CO T-H 


o 


o 


CO 




in 


o 


CO 




rH 




05 • 






■^ 




cn 




ca f-H 


00 


00 


t- 


"^ 


pH 


CD 




ph 


O 










^ 




o 




t- r^ 




-* 


(M 


oc 




in 


« 




o 




•**< 










(M 










^ 




00 


CO 




Ol 






«. : 






«■ 


<» 


» 




fc 






>» 


m 






«■ 




00 






,^ 




^ 




o -<* 


-* 


00 


~~io 


CO 


CD 


~~^ 


o- 


a* 


n 




o 






o 




CO 




>n CO 


•^ 


o» 


CO 


00 




a^ 


o- 


■* 


U3 




t^ * 






CI 




00 




OO f-H 


CD 


CD 


CO 


in 


^ 


p_( 


«- 


Oi 


00 










■rt^ 




c 




00 -^ 


35 




■n 


C3 


"^ 






"^ 












■» 






in 




00 


H¥ 


CD 


t^ 


CO 




CO 


C3 




m : 










«#■ 


m 




<» 






«©■ 


m 








































£ 




■<*' 






""P^ 




~e5 




tr- -^ 


1^ 


00 


in 


<^) 


t™ 


~"^ 


CO 


,_, 


^ 




o : 






(M 




eo 




CO CD 


CO 


CO 


(B 


do 


CD 


o 


d 


in 


in 




M • 






O 




CO 




■* in 


■# 


-* 


in 


■^ 


O 


00 


cc 


f^ 


CO 














« 




3D rH 






CO 




CO 


c 


cc 


o 


o 










5' 










c» 


^ 




•«# 






eo 


o_ 




•» 










«' 


■«& 




m 






«» 


^ 








































9^ 




C^ 






t^ 




~S 




o 


01 


Ol 




r-\ 


Ol 


~T^ 




in 


CO 




'^ 






CO 








o 


I—' 


»— ' 




CO 


CO 


CO 


« 


•— < 


CD 




CO • 






00 




m 




00 


f. 


in 




00 


00 


(M 


cc 


CO 


(M 














c 




t~ 




Ol 




•^ 


■* 


CD 


CD 




-* 










^. 






in 












s& 01 


5_ 


l- 




«© : 










S 


^ 




*■ 




■€» 


s 












































^ 




*>! • 






s 




i 




g 


c 


in 


















,^ I 






ir 




t^ 


05 


,^ 


o 


















C^ 














CD 


f- 


00 
























€# 


«» 


in 




CD 


















«» 














•» 




m 


















in 






i? 




~~o 




in^^ 


cc 


pH 


















O ; 






(?) 








Si 


Ci 


o 


















CD 






5- 




T. 






05 
























oi 




c- 
























■o 






۩ 


^ 




^ 


















«* : 














lO 






















o 






c< 




^ 


























CO ; 






in 




''t 




























00 to • 






1- 




^H 




























00 o • 






'^ 
































^B ; 






«» 


«© 


























CO • 














































— 




— 




— 















— 









2 
■< 

H 


— 


■Js 






— 




— 


s 




r 




O 

o 


CO 

la 




a' 


— 


c- 








"5 




oc 












? 




o 

CO 


o 




< 




i 








o 




C 




03 




s 




C 




.2 




a 




C 








'C 








D 






" 




bj 


*E 




'ji 




T 






5 




V 








O 






a 




-5! 

2 


(p 


















Ci4 




O 

o 




H 








e. 










■^ 






O 


G .o 


0) 


5 

CO 


c 




c 


' S 


DO c 


< 


) 02 

1 § 


rt 


6 


a 


_c 




5 a 






't- 




c 


55 

- W 


c 




S -c 




5 
o 




r 


c 


! S. 






X o 


"^ 




s 


> 




c- = 


> >■ 


o 


^ 




c- 


= 


3 X 






^ 


M 


cc 




;^ 


] 


pt 




a 


5 P 


: fc 




M 


W 




p: 


w 





86 



City Document No. 25. 



© 

to 

© 

IH 


02 




o 




-SI 

to 








00 
5 





ire 




CO 

s 




8 


C5 
CO 


- ! 




eo >* 


© 

us 

© 


o ;o o: 
00 ^ eo 

in 5< eo 

!5 " g 


U3 O CO lO 
— ■ O •>< b- 

■^ CO o 


CO -* -* r- 

•* <N 00 

CO ■* 
eo OS •* 

IM CO » 


10 CO 

r-i ire 
ire (M 











US 

© 
© 

C5 


8^3 

o ;o ei 

4» 


,-. o as o 

JO O 00 1-1 

CO 00 to us . 

O -* l-H 


C5 CO CD CD 

s 1 s 1 






•« 






•* 

© 

© 


S g 8 

00 C5 O 
t- CO 02 
lO •* 


§ 8 ig S 

t^ t^ rH CO 

o 00 eo 00 


t~ ■»« 03 

CO t- eo 

.H ire iH CD 
-* t^ (M 


CO ^ 








in 

i 

CO 


© 

© 
© 


IC o o 

5D O rH 
C/j ^ -* 

4» 


02 C -4 

;o i-H «> t^ 


5io 








ire 










01 

s 

ire_ 

CD 


«1 

© 

© 
0> 


J:; ° q; 

-H oi ire 

eo C2 t- 

^ V; ^ 


coo 






















?! 

CO 


1-1 
o 

OS 






























-* 

^ 
^ 


© 
, © 

00 
































at 






























G3 
CO 

CO 



CO 


Oi 

1 

00 
































1 

© 
at 
cc 
































© 

us 
OS 

05 

rH 
































US 

Ot 

1 

& 

00 

1H 


































O 

K 

H 

5 a 

O T 

a: 


a 

r 
e. 

c 

c 

p. 
c 

c 
c 

p: 


a 

P 
a 
C 
C 




d 

z 


50 ^ 

c- 
r 
CC 


c 

Z 

C 

c 
et 

c 






H 
H 

CS 
H 

CO 

a 

H 

M 

Y 
Z .i 

c- 
CO 


c- 

C 
a 

c 

c 
c 

p: 


a 

c 
a 
C 
y 


, 


PS 

g 

fe a 
S 
!«■ 


H 


H 

a 

(2 


c 

■c 
c 
T 
a 
0. 

■c 
c 

c 
c 
p: 


5 

c 

a 







Library Department. 



87 



APPENDIX ir. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY^ Y^EARS. 



Years. 


.9 

53 
0.-2 


Years. 


a 

C OS 

■da 

"IS " 

H 


YEARS. 


.2 

II 

Is 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


37 


1888 


.505,872 


2 


1853-54 


] 6,2-21 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


38 


1889 


520,508 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


39 


1890 


536,027 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


22 


1873-74 


260,5.50 


40 


1891 


556,283 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


41 


1892 


576,237 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


42 


1893 


597,152 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


43 


1894 


610,375 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


44 


1895 


628,297 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


45 


1896-97 


663,763 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


46 


1897-98 


698,888 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


47 


1898-99 


716,050 


1-2 


1863-64 


116,934 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


48 


1899-1900 


746,383 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


49 


1900-1901 


781,377 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


50 


1901-1902 


812,264 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


51 


1902-1903 


835,904 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


34 


1885 


460,993 


52 


1903-1904 


848,884 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


35 


1886 


479,421 


53 


1904-1905 


871,050 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


36 


1887 


492,956 


54 
55 


1905-1906 
1906-1907 


878,933 
903,349 



City Document No. 25. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES JANUARY 31, 1907, 
ACCORDING TO LOCATION. 





-704,635 
2,274 


West Roxbury 


6,651 




Lower Mills (Station A) 

Roslindale (Station B) 

Mattapan (Station D) 

Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 

Allston (Station G) 

Codnian Square (Station J).. 

Mt. Pleasant (Staton N) 

Broadway Ext. (Station P) . . 
Upham's Corner (Station Q) . 
Warren Street (Station R) . . . 
Roxbury Cro8sing(Station S) 
Boylston Station (Station T). 
Industrial School (Station W) 
Orient Heights (Station Z).. . 
North Street (Station 22) .... 
City Point (Station 23) 


258 






t>,fl r Fellowe8 Athenajum 

b '^ 1 

5 « ■( Collection owned by City. 


706,909 

25,546 
10,060 


4,056 
257 

2,015 
300 

2,702 


(§ I, Total, Roxbury branch. 


35,606 
16,713 
25,075 
18,518 
14,039 
15,089 
16,157 
15,183 
14,182 


280 
2,602 




2,783 




300 




483 




303 




219 


South End 


859 


West End 


332 

878 



Library Department. 



89 



X 
t— ( 

Q 

Ph 

< 



03 

cq 

Q 
Q 



CO 

-H 

f5 

W 

Pk 
P 

t> 
«2 

W 
H 

O 

CO 

P5 
O 

!zi 
t-i 

!z; 



^^ 


■^ 




^ 


CO 


t^ 


cr> 


■^ 


■* 


CD 


^ 


t- 


l^ 


'^i 


to 


2; 


CO 


1 


© 

C5 




o 




'jj 




CO 




o 


C^ 


CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


§ 


M 


JD 






C) 




•^ 


(>» 


OS 


'"' 


(54 




CO 


!2- 




oT 






























c5 


o 


































© 




o 




o 


X 

o 






CO 

o 




















































































«o 


o 


CO 


^ 


05 


1- 


o 


e^ 


t~ 


00 


^ 


lO 


^ 


cJ 


00 


Cd 


5S 


© 


t- 


to 


•^ 




o 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


t:~ 


■* 


Tf< 


"3 






CO 








t. 


«1 






Ol 


lO 




CM 




CO 




eo 


CO 

10" 


^ 


oT 


o" 






























































o 




CO 

o 


o 


CO 

O 




_o 


O 


_o 








o 








































rH 




^^ 































to 


o; 


-^ 


CO 


CO 


c^ 


\r 


^ 


o< 


c» 


lO 


(M 


22 


m 


^ 


i_ 


CO 


© 


ei 


TO 






o 


cc 




lO 




CO 


2 




E: 


o< 


CO 


!5 


C<5 


■*. 


-^ 


-^ 


(5> 




■^ 


CO 


t"* 


(M 


CO 


CO 


CO 




** 


»o^ 


IH 


^ 
d 


to" 




























0" 

CI 


•* 




rji 












IS 


















© 
Si 




o 






























1-1 



































'<^ 


Oi 


O 


CO 


C5 


r— 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


c: 


-o 


00 


CO 


,- 


CO 


© 




X- 


M 




CO 


cc 


» 






-* 


en 


^^ 


CO 




'5 


s 


x> 






^ 


o 




-* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 




1C5 


^ 


1H 


ctT 


^ 




























2 


09 


































© 




o 












o 




to 

o 














»H 




'"' 






























09 


00 


-* 


CO 


00 


c-1 


CO 


Ol 


a 


o 


s 


4n 


00 


„ 


05 





M- 


o 


!» 


o 


lO 


'<!' 


CO 






t- 




o 


CO 


£2 


s 


01 


■^ 




CO 




T)< 


tt 


lO 


CO 


CO 


03 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


c^ 







t-^ 


iH 


§ 


'^ 




























e< 


»i 




m 






























© 




o 












6_ 


















iH 




































e^ 


(M 


•^ 


CO 


Ol 


•I^ 


C5 


if: 


o 


^ 


CO 


s 


o 


CO 


^ 


CM 


ir5 . 


© 

s. 


OQ 


(M 


C4 


-*< 




CO 










CJ 


l~ 


C5 


■^ 


X 




•* 
§ 




t- 




o 


lO 


cc 


(^i 


=-. 


r^ 


ir5 


■^ 


« 




CO 


CO^ 


1-1 


































o 

05 
















o 


















1.1 






























1 


C5 


CO 


O 


OD 


lO 


lO 


t- 


•« 


o 


CO 


IC5 


_ 


-* 


^ 


^ 


I- 


© 




C5 


CO 




c» 


Ci 


co 




l- 




o 




f-l 






■^ 




O 




CO 


in 


'ii" 


■^ 


CO 


o_ 


'~' 


ira 


t- 


^ 




^" 


CO 


© 
















CO 




10 


m 






CO 






O 
0» 








_o 








o 




CO 

o 


o 






J 








































© 


t^ 


^ 


^ 


CO 


-i< 


lO 


35 


"* 


<-, 


o 


00 


SS 


2 






u 


© 


CC 










in 


<M 








CO 


o 










c: 


S 


•* 




o 






■^ 


C5 


•* 


ir5 


^ 


'"' 








IH 


s 


«D 




























05 












a. 




X 




CD 














C5 








CO 








o 






CO 












cc 








c 




c 




c 




o 


O 












































fN 


































, 


o 


M 


o 


»o 


Ol 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o: 


CO 


CD 


C5 






10 


A 


m 




Oi 




i 




a 


CM 






'JO 


CO 










OS 


<o 


O 




d 




-.* 




C£ 


CT 


'"' 


CO 


"^ 


'"' 






2- 


1 


o 


<N 


CO 


c>> 


























oc 


»> 
































05 






CO 




a 


a 






















00 

1H 






c 




c 


c 


_c 


C 






c 


























■^ 






'^ 














C5 


.^ 


CD 


CO 


C3 


J^ 


-* 


CD 


^ 


05 


00 


lO 


1-5 






^ 


00 


?- 


o 




a 


iC 


■.i 




133 


o 


CO 


o 




C< 






!S 


05 




o 

00 


Ol 








CO 


(51 


"^ 




CO 


CO 


'"' 






00^ 




(M 






























CO 


05 
















cr 


















1-C 
















Z 




_2 












L 






























£ 


> s 


































c 
































^ 


c 


> 


































^ 


■■ 




















c 




^ 








b 


^ 


•e 






£ 

c 


c 
c 

C" 


5 

^ 


X 

c 

C 




c- 


c- 




c 

c- 

c 


c 

c 

r 


cc 




5 to 






% 


I 


1 


c 


C 

c 

"S 

' c 




> 


< 


c 
c 






1 




3 .9 






i 


- 


"h 


> 1 


i 








5 s 






■5 


■5 


a < 











> 


T 

PC 


c 


> c; 
ft 


•^ 


c 


> "a 




c/ 


- < 


c 


- 1- 


: 
3 « 







90 



City Document No. 25. 



© 

SI 
© 


lO 
O 


^^ c^ ^ 


M CO -* <* m CO X 

O C/j 03 M CD IO — 
O CC 1- 




E5 


£; :^ ?^ 

CO 1- t- 
X X 




CC 






CD 

© 
Si 

US 

© 
Oi 

1H 


aOQOCC•M»O^D35000COrH'*lClO^^CDtHt^ 

50CO in.n;^;;*; --sismoioocj^^rHr^ 

CO iH 1— « rH CD^ C:^ (?I .-« C*D (?! 

S S » to 




S3 
I- 


© 
s» 

o 
cs 


CD 

lO i-H ^ CD 

lO (>) >?> '^^ 


IM 


SI X g 


CO 




X in Ci CO 
iM T rt ei 1-1 




CO 
CO 

01 


1902-1903.1903 1904. 


CO W M CD 
CD_ 


CO 

m 
m 

o 


OQ 




t- 


CC t> CC t- rs 

m 







-* ■* t~ in 
'-H CO ci >o 


CD 
<M 


eo 51 




X 


c~ eo 05 

CO CO IM 








CO 


© 

9 
OS 


2 


GO t- 




3 ^ 




4jH 


CO t- CO CO 
OJ CD I-H m 








CO 


© 

© 
© 
OS 


5 
S 




O 












in 

m 




g 


CO 








1 

C*5 


© 
© 

Si 


IM 
CC 








o 




IM 
1- 




CC 


CO 














CO 


© 

QD 
© 
00 


18 




CO 




























% 


© 
1 

© 

1H 


CO 


o 








i 






















i 

CO 




1 


c 
c 

g 

hi 
■» a 

=> 1 

ft 

f 

E 


•1 

a 


c 

c 

c 

!- 
C 

& 

^ c 


o 

bj 
C 

f 

5 


c 

c 
■c 

c- 

a 

° i 

E 


c 
c 
o 
I- 

c t 

c 

•E 
a 

c 

> 1 

< c 


i 
(- 

C 

c- 
c 

s 

< 


£ 
c 
c 

;- 
t 
C 

-E 

c 

= 

a 
> 
(2. 
> 

c 
Z 

; 


c 

•c 
c 
c 
s- 

c 
E 

1 

c 


£ 

C 

bj 
e- 

£ 

c 
a 
;- 


£ 

c 
c 

F- 

t 

I 

c 
s- 
C 
> 

c 

p: 


c 
c 

t 

C 

cS 

c 
c 

-, c 

1 

,3 

> 
c 
a: 


i 

CC 

1 

"a 

a 

c- 


c 
c 

t 
.£ 

' 1 
c 
c 

X 

(/ 

'£ 

z 


£ 
c 
c 

t 

.£ 
■c 

c 

a 
c- 

E 

V 

6 

■1 


£ 

c 
c 

" I 

c 

c- 

a 
;- 
t« 

- a 

a. 

E 
a 
X 

c 


E 

0. 
1 

f 


£ 
c 

c £ 

e 
"S 

s 
a 

t- 

c 
■5 
d 
t> 





c 





APPENDIX IV. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY CLASSIFICATIONS. 





CLASSES. 










SPECIAL LiBRAltlES. 






■ 


1S68. 


1861. 


1866. 1860. 


1871. 1873. 


1876. 


1877. 


1880. 


188». 


1800. j 1892. 


1804. 


1804. 


1804. 1 1800. 


1906. 


1807. 


1808. 










i 




ii 


i 

ill 


IjI'I 




{t 

1= 


■25 


if 


1= 




II 




-1 


2 s 

1= 


ll 

5~ 


P 


ll 

5" 


1 ■ 

1= 


III 

< 


Is 




1= 


=1 
-5 


P 








If 


1 

Is 




■ 


2,059 
17.142 
10.391 
89.4U3 

eB.sis 

80.350 
13,043 
23,3-28 
11,959 

3,835 
19,961 
SC,88i 

7,789 
41,864 
28,288 

7,847 
10,000 
26,256 
21,475 
26,641 

9,651 
10,340 

9,161 
18,002 


20 
630 
687 
2,873 
1,545 
609 
152 
633 
236 
63 
633 
631 
173 
1,268 
1,122 
196 
208 
419 
649 
729 
429 
670 
418 
735 


2,079 
17,772 
19.978 
9-2,366 
61,063 
30,959 
13,197 
-23,961 
12,194 

3,898 
20,594 
■27,416 

7,962 
43,122 
29,410 

8,043 
10,208 
26,675 
22,124 
27,270 
10,060 
10.910 

9,569 
18,787 


10 
60 
268 
146 
27 
27 
36 
26 
2 
26 
19 

67 

10 
16 
29 
222 
37 
35 
19 
13 


2,079 
17,762 
19,9-28 
92,098 
60,918 
30,932 
13,170 
23,925 
12,168 

3,896 
20,569 
27,396 

7,962 
43,055 
29,3-20 

8,024 
10,198 
26,659 
22,096 
27,048 
;0,043 
10,875 

9,550 
18,724 


35 

17 
108 

77 
"60 

11 

9 

22 

2 

1.387 

68 

146 

6 

65 

3 

3 

15 

4,058 

14 


322 
614 
665 
1,096 
859 
523 
327 
1,426 
1,1711 
. 95 
3-29 
740 


6 
6 
43 
835 
U4 
7 
2 

197 






21 
691 
137 
613 
3,215 
2,474 
338 
254 

225 
471 


15 
33 
424 
3S7 
2,459 
669 
184 
191 
23 

61 


























31 
13 

501 
904 
1.220 
293 
76 
59 
66 
54 
178 
462 
22 
413 
49 
50 
31 
12 
87 
67 
21 






2 
103 
28 
1,500 
63 
166 
25 
88 


2,735 
19,633 
21,971 
105,993 
77,369 
35,908 
14,190 


n. 
III. 


'^'^ll' L and literal- -Mstorv 




278 
54 

371 
22 
68 
31 
20 

136 
4,4-iS 


669 


14 

1 

630 

19 

8 

1 
3 










1 


10 


24 
146 
531 
367 
223 

57 
11 
4 
35 
67 


1 

1 
31 

1 


34 
2,181 
390 
6 
7 
11 
5 
1 
6 


3 

2 

456 




13 

2 

1,198 

6,844 

481 

3 

1,146 

1 

1 

28 

1 


" 


g P > 5 










r e lean hi Jr blT ra hv and^ 6^™ bv 


270 

1 


6S3 


1,710 
3 






^, 


E. llhblstor 'I'l * ifvand el t! I 






VI 


French history, blograplij- and geography 
















German bl.tor' bit Ipby and^ge^grlpby 










4 




Greek Latin and bUoto ^ ^ ^^ ^ 










14.420 




«ianljhandI-ortIueBehl«tor etc 










6,419 


175 
56 
89 

2,763 
7,790 
278 
451 
91 
88 
164 
6 




Oriental blstor ■ eU 


a 


















21,615 








1 


14 




5 


















8,131 






3,533 
1,361 

98 
807 

75 

13 


685 
52 





381 
121 
24 
63 

32 
63 
36 


246 
130 
17 
28 
27 
89 
48 
16 


248 
67 

2 
5 
31 

59 




25 
33 

1 


3 


10 

1 


1 






3 
1 


26 

674 

1 

51 

49 
3 
3 

11 






6 

18 
















34,593 
16,072 
14,101 
27,316 




Political economy 














14 
23 










•3,019 




2 








116 









^ 






3 






















114 

1 

376 
















21 
8 


1 
1 




1 




























2 




6 
37 






XX6. 




















XX'Io. 


MUBlC 




























10,625 








3 

1 


1 
20 






XXIi). 


Fine arts 


13 
38 


30 


1 
1 
26 

1 


129 


14 


43 

84 

93 

3,381 


401 
10 














12 


35 


273 


97 










XXII. 








50 


















XXIII." 




65-i 




652 




652 




47 




13 


2 








150 








16 










X.\IV. 


























XXV. 


Books for tbe blind 


697 
20,1-23 
23,501 


1,799 
3,-200 


704 
21,922 
26.701 


1.348 
9S3 


704 
20,574 
25,718 














































XXVI. 


















































XXVII. 


DepoBlt collectton 










































































































6-9,142 
2,761 


20,423 
314 


598,565 
3,075 


3,523 
702 


696,042 
2,373 


7,305 


13,887 


2,052 


129 


6,446 


13,661 j 5,392 


669 


782 


422 


696 


1,768 


3,019 


10,626 


424 


3,331 


798 


2,676 


481 


4,704 


9,866 


6,430 


13,931 


704,536 




Duplicate room nccouDt 










129 


6,446 


' 




782 




696 


1,768 


3,010 




























581,903 


-20,737 


602,640 


4,.25 


698,415 




13,887 


2,052 


669 


422 


10,626 


4-24 


2,331 


798 


3,675 


481 


4,704 


9,866 


6,430 


13,931 


706,909 








13.661 


' 



Explanation'. — ClasB III. includes general lilstory, etc., when emliraclng several 
r. t'itt I i.,j . _. _ ,._... ^ jjjg Netherlands, 8wltzerlanrt mni Hm ffunnHinn. 
ce and etblcs, education, etc. 



nd collected works of historians. 



(Jlass XXIV, does c 



rludes mechanics, i 



ClaBses IV., V., VI., VII., VIII., S. and XI. include history, ireography, biography, belleB-lcttrca and language of the countrlCB specified. 
•Not yet definitely classified. 



kespcar 
ll imrar) 



; collection of ilie general library. 



e acquired by the library. 



Library Department. 



91 



FJL.ACED ON THE SHELVES FEBRUARY 1, 1906, TO JANUARY 31, 1907. 



Placed on 
the Shelves. 



Condemned, 

Missing, 
Transferred. 



Net Gain. 



Central Library 

Central Library, Duplicate room 

Brighton branch 

Charlestown branch 

Dorchester branch 

East Boston branch 

Jamaica Plain branch 

Koxbury bi-anch, city collection 

RoAbury branch, Fellowes Atheuaiuni 

South Boston branch 

South End branch . .' 

West End branch 

West Roxbury branch 

Lower Mills reading room 

Roslindale reading room 

Mattapan reading room 

Mt. Bowdoin reading room 

Allston reading room 

Coaman Square reading room 

Mt. Pleasant reading room 

Broadway Extension reading room . . . 

Upham's Corner reading room 

Warren Street reading room 

Roxbury Crossing reading room 

Boylston Station reading room 

Industrial School reading room 

Orient Heights reading room 

North Street reading room 

City Point reading room 

Total 



23,094 
314 
540 
472 
503 
819 
522 

19 
668 
707 
597 
714 
335 

66 
386 

77 

267 

146 

1,158 

85 
312 
700 

71 

119 
57 
43 

890 

89S 



34,656 



3,410 
815 
199 

1,355 
570 
580 
318 
423 
242 
426 
200 
537 
73 



52 
3 

55 
I 

105 
2 

218 
66 

2 
19 

1 



9,710 



19,684 

loss 501 

341 

loss S83 

loss 67 

239 

204 

loss 404 

426 

281 

397 

177 

262 

66 

334 

74 

212 

145 

1,053 

83 

94 

634 

69 

58 

118 

57 

37 

878 

878 



24,946 



92 



City Document No. 25. 



l(M'MCO(NOia5CS«i-*00 



CO O It- C^ O .— I tr^ ^,-v| ';u tTvl Ui <J3 ua "iJ 'T 'JU ir;) 

cococco-^cot-coco't'-iooo-^t- co_ -^__co t~ ^^■*_"* '^..'~". 
arir-'~co''cf o'co »o" co"o" i-T ic" t-'c^T c^To" ^■^' 



O'-lQOlOOl-C'rH'* 

loeoost—cococoo 



<N05tO(MCOt-0(MCOi7<l05050505-*-^ 

COT-HCOO-^lCt-TOOTtli-ICOOCO^-^ 



t-COClO-fOOO 
CO (M t- lO CO •* t- t- 



OOT-lT-lC000<N<M»ra(N0>0501'3D'*-* Oi 
COOt^kOOit— l:~05CiC<)(N!D>— lOOlMCO 00 

050ooocoiO®co«5-^'-(i»oao'^co t-h 



iOCOO<Mt-(-*»OC<1 
»OC35CO'-HOO»OOt— 

(Mi-it-o:ie*-<i<cDco_ 
t-^c<r c^To" rt"-^" 



»O0iCOOOC0'rH'-<C0<N05O50i00'*-H 
COOCO>00-^^OiC»<MC^®'-HOiiM<M 
CO O CO O_C0 lO «5 CO CO ■* i-H «D O -^-^ (jq_ 

Q6"ir- co'c4"co"co" »o" co^cT T-T 



iMcor-i^Oicocosq 
r-'o^" r-To" o"'*' 



•.*O(M00OOI:-aiC00<IO05050J-^»0 
■^t— CO-^-^lMC^OOOfM^MCOi-icOlMt- 
OQOOOOCOiOCOCOCO-^i-i«00'-i-^0 

CO 'o n c^ ^ oi ia co'oT i-T 



aO<M(Nt-<NOit-t- 

T»<i— liOt-IMCOOO 

o oi t- CO >-;_■* ^"5, 
f^T-T T-TccT cT-*" 



C000050000iOOOO<M050105C<l-*>0 

oO(»co-^-^C5<MaoaiC<'M«5i-ico(Mr>. 
t-i-cooco-^coooco'^i-icoooo-^oo 

t- o'co"o<f o'co lO" co^cc 



coMOt-'-iifflTjtr— 

COCOCOCOOCO<MCO 

ot-t-C'iOTiHOio 



t-00<r>-*t-O3-H00a35<l(M5D---^ir5(M 
COCOCOO!M'<1<COCOO'>*,-I«5 0_0_tH 00 

t-'"«5"co c<f coco" >cr co'aJ" 



aoc:5-^QOco-i<0'-i 

O5»0t-O0t-'*OCO 



OOiu'5 0i'*COCOCD'HC^0505Ci^O.-l 
■^C0O-^C<iaiO00C0'MiMC0i-(00u3.-H 
O'*00O0^-.*_«0C0C0-^r-lC000'-i'-lt- 

t-'"<o'"cO~tN'"o CO lO" cJoO" 



o o> oi o t- o> c<i 

1-H 00 OS 03 03 C<) 00 

Oi O? CD CO CO CO CO 



COO>-*t-03'-IOOCO'-<(M050303-^000 
C0^Q0^OCsa30000(M<NCO'-it~»OC0 
CO CO O O (M -^^'O COCO-^t-ICOODQOtHCO 

CD'cD CO'o^f Cd' co" lo" (N't-^ 



(M Tt< CD Tj< 05 00 CO 
O 00 03 (M lO <N T»< 
t- rH CD CO O CO CO 



t-OSOOiOC<)'-l'-li003'MOJO>03»OOlO 
QOI— -^^t-OiOJOOt— (MCNCO^-l-^lOOS 
(M (M 00 O ^ '*„''' '^® ■* i-l CD 00 l—^'-l "^ 

cd"co''co~c4"cd''co" o' (M't-' 



W'+ICOTtlCOf-OCO 
■.#C0COt~CO00-*Oi 
i-H (M CO <?^."^"^^<M 00 









;;:= S S 



X5 


,n 


JD 


.o 


;^ 


C} 


-^ 


S 










flnj 




n 




^ 




C 


a 




cd 


Si 


PhMPhPh 






'■=^z: ,.'-^ c 



^^ d te 



e^ CO 

r-l CD 



2§ 






00 2 ^ r- r^ >5 

P ^ ^ =« « 



w — c: s- •— A^ " 

■B u b: <^. '^ '^ 



C/2 ® tH 



c .t; 



5£ 



.2 ^ 



s-i ^ O 

piH H '-: 



• ^ M ^ TO 

^ o ^ 'o ^. r^:? r; .s 



gCQ 

Ci 4^ '- 



!>^^3SP 



<v 



>" © 03 

'" CIS o 



o a 8 

^ ° o * =^ 

aa t, (« — 1 
N > !? 



CS 



c« 






Library Department. 



93 



APPENDIX V. 



CLASSIFICATION. 

Branch Libraries. 
As reported by Custodian of branches January 81, 1907. 



M 



O 



^ 



Roxbury. 



&^<=: 



Reference books 

Genealogy and heraldy. 

Biography 

History 

Fine arts, archaiologj... 
Geography, travels — 

Language 

Literature 

Medicine, hygiene 

Natural science 



Philosoi)hy, ethics, edu 
cation 



Religion, theology 

Sociology 

Law 



Useful and industrial 
arts 



Amusements, games, 
sports 



Fiction 

Books for the young. . 
Bound periodicals — 
Unclassilied 



Total 



428 

12 

1,489 

1,647 

320 

i.oa'j 

99 

1,774 

110 

613 

324 

335 

227 

17 

336 

89 
4,,505 
2,365 

948 



1,485 

6 

1,607 

2,457 

367 

1,029 

84 

1,742 

88 

506 

225 
457 
169 

20 

249 

84 

4,503 

2,362 

674 

6,961 



427 

1 

1,506 

1,540 

362 
1,031 

,91 
1,543 

111 

509 

225 

231 

143 

9 

284 

89 

5,148 

2,987 

1,376 

905 



16,713 



25,075 



18,518 



396 

23 

1,191 

1,428 

289 

785 

72 

1,487 

94 

444 

186 

188 

138 

17 

244 280 

78, 87 

3,585| 4,108 

3,304 2,240 

640 1,337 

50 



460 

5 

1,383 

1,317 

354 

844 

98 

1,363 

88 

516 

219 



188 

35 

933 

740 

147 

618 

46 

936 

61 

196 

133 

244 

52 

5 

112 

56 
3,358 

483 
1,213 

504 



14,639 15,089 



10,060 



1,334 

76 
2,639 
3,072 

630 
1,670 

102 
4,200 

295 
1,156 

382] 
1,183J 

423 1 



59 
2,187 
2,157 
3,460 



25,546 



475 

3 

1,295 

1,435 

389 

91 

1,525 
119 
547 

237 
274 
148 
23 



89 
4,188 
2,653 
1,459 

19 



16,157 



472 

5 

1,586 

1,438 

333 

839 

76 

1,607 

122 

500 

265 

218 

148 

25 

241 

81 
4,123 
1,994 
1,020 

90 



658 

8 

1,366 

1,386 

297 

945 

144 

1,371 

94 

664 

275 
865 
260 

8 

373 

85 

2,580 

1,958 

845 



239 
1 
527 
576 
136 
387 

27 
568 

35 
234 

77 

67 

74 

6 

117 

30 

1,429 

1,741 

356 

24 



15,183 14,182 



6,651 



94 



City Document No. 25, 



CLASSIFICATION OF HOLDERS OF "LIVE CARDS 

JANUARY 31, 1907. 

By Waeds. 



Ward No. 



1,643 
1,59S 
1,264 
1,280 
1,192 
2,131 
1,596 
4,396 
3,292 
5,860 
5,422 
5,282 
1,727 



c o 


4) 2 

5t3 - 
Co 

^5 


25,405 


.0646 


25,929 


.0616 


14,831 


.0852 ■ 


12,499 


.1024 


12,633 


.0943 


29,987 


.0710 


15,579 


.1024 


30,810 


1426 


22,120 


.1488 


23,841 


.3716 


22,353 


.2425 


21,738 


.2429 


21,654 


.0797 



Ward No. 



i^;-? 



Total . 



76,782 



2,266 


22,127 


2,196 


20,310 


2,675 


21,924 


2,490 


24,313 


2,416 


22,121 


1,8.50 


29,?13 


4,768 


41,805 


4,392 


26,533 


2,960 


27,769 


3,271 


26,110 


4,823 


31,650 


3,492 


21,806 



595,380 






.1024 
.1081 
.1220 
.1024 
.1092 
.0633 
.1140 
.1655 
.1065 
.1238 
.1365 
.1601 



.1289 



By Sexes, Ages, Etc. 

Males 31,352 Over 16 years old . 

Females 45,430 Under 16 years old 

Single 67,662 Married (ladies) . 



Pupils 



23,814 Students 



9,680 Teachers . 



47,290 
29,492 

9,120 

3,560 



Teachers' and Special Cards. 

Of the 3,787 teachers' cards issued prior to February 1, 1907, 1,280 
are •' live " cards: of these 1,008 are held by permanent residents (in addi- 
tion to their ordinary cards), and 272 are held by non-residents. 

Of the 1,221 special privilege cards issued prior to February 1, 1907, 
526 are " live " cards; 320 are held by permanent residents, and 206 are 
held by non-residents. 

Total number of application blanks, borrowers' cards, certificates, 
etc., filled in, and filed alphabetically each year since the present numer- 
ical record of borrowers was commenced on February 1, 1899: 



1899-1900 
1900-1901 
1901-1902 
1902-1903 
1903-1904 
1904-1905 
1905-1906 
1900-1907 



58,193 
67,305 
76,394 
71,406 
81,881 
86,856 
89,520 
88,070 



Total 619,625 



APPENDIX VI. 



REGISTRATION DEPARTMKNT. 
Statistical Report, Fehmary J, 1906, to January 31, 1907. 



Central Library 

Brighton Branch 

Charlestown Branch 

Dorchester Branch 

East BoBton Branch. ... 
.Tamaicfl Plain Branch.. 

Roxhury Branch 

South BoRtou Branch... 

South End Branch 

Weet End Branch 

West Roxbury Branch . 

Station A 

B 



at Franklin Park. 



CARDS ISSUED FEBRUARY 1, 1906 — JANUARY 31, 1907. 



Re-Registrations. 



Over Under 



21,433 
1,6! 
3,31 
3,040 
3,602 
2,915 
4,409 
4,723 
2,931 



1,274 

l>i 

1,028 

342 
1,951 

397 



New Registrations. 



Over Under 



Over Under 



32,448 
2,S29 
4,67,i 
4,516 
5,3(13 
4,20S 
6,383 
6,757 
4,206 
5,919 
1,707 
627 



2,123 
2,457 
4,965 
2,007 
2,352 
1,585 
342 











-S 


% 








>•-> 


^» 




b3 


^ M 


H 


sV 




■^J 


OS 


.£^ 




aS 


Si 


^^ 


o 


O 


A 



1,757 
l,4.i4 
2,363 
2,140 



22,0;2 
1,716 
2,574 
3,134 
3,546 
•2,754 
4,020 
4,617 
2,874 
4,133 
l,l.r2 



31 
1,472 

1,754 
3,468 
1,503 
1,733 



3,711 113,984 37,202 76,782 



Library Depaktment. 



95 



APPENDIX VII. 



CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 
Home Use Only. 



Total Circulation, 
Home Use. 



1906- 
1906. 



1906- 
1907 



From Central 

Library through 

Branches and 

Stations, 

Included in 

Central Library 

Circulation, " BI" 



From Branches 
through Stations, 

Included in 
BranchCirculation 



1905- 
1906, 



1906- 
1907 



190.5= 1906- 
1906. 1907. 



Central Library : 
A, direct 



B, through branches 
and stations 



Brighton 

Charlestown . . . 

Dorchester 

East Boston.. . . 
Jamaica Plain.. 

Roxbury 

South Boston. . . 

South End 

West End 

West Roxbury. 
Station A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

J 

L 



Carried forward. 



297,994 

103,572 
43,596 
5t?,630 
57,479 
83,439 
53,556 
87,830 
98,824 
98,653 
137,657 
32,131 

6,962 
38,833 

2,466 

4,951 
10,300 
25,020 
19,713 

1,008 
37,196 

1,715 



1,301,525 



272,547 

94,308 
41,877 
51,424 
55,548 
76,046 
52,061 
80,241 
88,570 
90,608 
154,333 
30,896 
6,607 
35,923 



5,118 

8,520 

24,766 

20,555 



39,062 



1,235,010 



797 

792 

543 

1,616 

1,477 

802 

846 

1,522 

2,802 

1,442 

1,925 

1,697 

481 

2,694 

2,982 

3,181 

4,533 

455 

8,108 

410 



39,105 



753 
G50 
1,511 
1,560 
1,053 
936 
1,342 
3,026 
1,464 
1,428 
1,620 



2,483 
2,338 
2,537 
4,393 



5,958 



33,830 



2 243 



2 17 



774 



96 



City Document No. 25. 

APPENDIX YU.— Concluded. 



Brought forward 

Station JM 

N 

P 

Q 

R 

S 

T : 

U 

w 

Y 

Z 

22 

•23 

Cottage Place 

Fort Revere Garrison 

Fort Warren Garrison. . . 

Franklin Park 

Guild St. Elizabeth 

House of Reformation . . 

Parental School 

§ Schools 

Engine-houses 

Institutions, etc 



Total Circulation. 
Home Use. 



1905- 
1906. 



,301,525 

1,075 

15,714 

24,670 

57,366 

17,308 

13,277 

15,257 

1,967 

7,871 

761 

8,007 

6,151 



4,312 

1,417 

2,495 

960 

23,044 



Total 1,508,492 1,461,403 103,572 



1906- 
1907 



1,235,010 



15,315 
23,771 
62,177 
19,418 
13,022 
16,300 



7,642 



7,457 

5,186 

16,677 

831 



4,341 

1,258 

2,840 

786 

29,372 



1905- 
1906. 



From Central 

Library through 

Branches and 

Stations. 
Included in 
Central Library- 
Circulation, "B." 



39,105 

362 

5,469 

3,3.37 

5,459 

3,721 

4,790 

4,821 

454 

13,627 

336 

3,345 

2,746 



75 



1,306 



110,500 
3,951 



1906- 
1907 



33,830 

4,874 
3,028 
4,180 
4,856 
4,218 
5,040 

12,312 

2,444 
1,959 
1,158 



69 
1,151 



144 



ni,600 

3,445 



From Branches 
through Statious. 

Included in 
BranchCirculation. 



1905- 
1906. 



1906- 
1907. 



774 



n,i46 



1,920 



3900 



1,543 



1 Number sent on deposit. Number used on premises not recorded. 

2 Included in Dorchester Branch Circulation. 

3 " " Roxbury " " 
§ Supplied from Central Library. 



Library Department. 



97 



APPENDIX VIII. 



TRUSTEES FOR FIFTY-FIVE YEARS. 

The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board of 
Trustees from 1852 to 1864; George Ticknor in 1805; WilHam 
W. Greenough, from 1866 to April, 1888; from May 7, 1888, 
to May 12, 1888, Prof. Henry W. Haynes ; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, May 12, 1888, to April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, 
October 8, 1895, to May 8, 1899 ; Hon. Solomon Lincoln has 
served since May 12, 1899. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that for 
1853 made what is called the first annual report. At first it con- 
sisted of one alderman and one common councilman and five 
citizens at large until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to 
consist of one alderman, two common couucilmen and six citizens 
at lai'ge, two of whom retired, unless re-elected, each year, while 
the members from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 
the organization of the Board was changed to include one alder- 
man, one councilman and five citizens at large, as before 1867; 
and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an 
alderman and a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board 
as at present, consisting of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor. 

Citizens at large in small capitals. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-95. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Benton, Josiah H., Jr., 1894- 

1906. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1852-68. 
BowiJiTCH, Henry I., M.D., 1865- 

68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry P.,M.D., 1894- 

1902. 
Boyle, Thomas F., 1902-1906. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. Coffin Jones, 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1878-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Uarr, Samuel, 1895-96. 
Chase, George B., 1876-85. 
Clapp, William W., Jr., 1864-66. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 



Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 

1878-88. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
De Normandie, James, D.D., 

1895-1906. 
Dickinson, M. F., Jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-64. 
DwiGiiT, Thomas, M.D., 1899-1906. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Hon. Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883, 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard. LL.D., 

1875-79. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William W., 1856-88. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 



98 



City Document No. 25. 



Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 

1880-95. 
HiLLARD, Hon. George S., 1872- 

75 ; 1876-77. 
Howes, Osborne, Jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, Hon. John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Lincoln, Hon. Solomon, 1897- 

1907. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 188.3-84. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1870- 

73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen K., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hon. Hugh, 1879-82. 
Peasf, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 



Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Prince, Hon. Frederick O., 

188S-D9. 
Putnam, Georoe, D.D., 1868-77. 
Reed, Sampson, 1852-53. 
Richards, William R., 1889-95. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Philip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Hon. Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1878-79. 
Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 

1852-68. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 1855-56; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., LL.D., 

1877-78. 
TicKNOR, George, LL.D.. 1852-66. 
Tyler, John S., 1863-64; 1866-07. 
Walker, Francis A., LL.D., 

1896. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipi'le, Edwin P., 1868-70. 
Whitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H., 1885-88. 
Whitney, Daniel A., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867. 
Wolcott, Hon. Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



LIBRARIANS. 

1852 to date. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was entitled Superiutendent.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852-December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-Janviary 9, 1868. 

Winsor. Justin, LL.D., Superintendent, Yebx\\?,.vj 25, lS6S-September 

30, 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877- 

September 30, 1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, LL.D., Librarian, October 1, 1878-September 

30, 1890. 
DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892-April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, LL.D., Librarian, February 11, 1895-April 30, 1899. 
Whitney, James L., Acting Librarian, March 31, lS99-December 21, 

1899; Librarian, December 22, 1899-January 31, 1903. 
Wadlin, Horace G., Litt. D., Librarian, February 1, 1903. 



Library Department. 



99 



APPENDIX IX. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR FIFTY-FIVE YEARS. 

The following have served on the Examining Committees for 
the years given. The names in italics are those of Trustees who 
have acted as chairmen of the various committees. The thirty- 
fourth year was from May 1 to December 31, 18S5, a period of 
eight mouths, for which uo Examining Committee was appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G.. 1870. 
Abbott, 8. A. B., 1880, 1894. 
Adams, Brooks, 1894. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, William T., 1875. 
Al^er, Rev. William R., 1870. 
Allen, Hon. Charles, 1899. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890, 1891. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Andrews, Augustus, 1892, 1893. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, William F., 1883, 1899, 

1900. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Arnold, Miss Sarah L., 1902. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, Gilbert, 1877. 
Austin, Thomas H., 1906. 
Babson, Thomas M., 1900, 1901. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bancroft, Robert H., 1894. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Barry, Rev. Richard J., 1895. 
Bartlett, Sidnev, 1869. 
Bates, Hon. John L., 1896, 1897. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Edward, D.D., 1854. 
Bellows, Mrs. John A., 1903, 1904. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890, 1891. 
Berran, John D., 1906. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Biqelow, Hon. John P., 18.56. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, J. Bapst, M.D., 1897, 1898. 
Blake, John G., M.D., 1883, 1891. 
Blake, Mrs. Mary E., 1894, 1900, 

1901. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879,1891. 
Bowdltch, Alfred, 1899, 1900. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowdltch, Henry /., i/.D., 1865. 
Bowditch, Henry P., M.D.. 1881. 
Bowditcli, J. Ingersoll, LL.D., 

1855. 



Bowman, Alfonso, 1867. 

Bowne, Prof. Borden P., 1896, 

1897. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Bragg, Hon. Henry W., 1898, 1899. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Briggs, Frank II., 1903, 1904. 
Brimmer, Hon. Martin, 1890, 1891. 
Brooks, Phillips, D.D., 1871. 
Brown, Allen A., 1894. 
Brown, Francis H., M.D., 1899, 

1900. 
Browne, Alexander Porter, 1891. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, Charles E., M.D., 

1872. 
Burdett, Everett W., 1896, 1897. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, Jr., 1869. 
Byrne, Very Rev. William, 1899, 

1900. 
Byrnes, Timothy E., 1905. 
Carpenter, Rev. Carlos C, 1901, 

1902. 
Carr, Samuel, 1894. 
Carruth, Herbert S., 1892. 
Chadwick, James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, LL.D., 1894. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheever, David W., M.D., 1894. ■ 
Cheever, Miss Helen, 1896, 1897. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
C'lapp, William IF., Jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D.,1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.B., 1882. 
Clement, Edward H., 1894, 1895. 
Coale, George O. G., 1892, 1893, 
Colby, John H., 1900, 1901. 
Collar, William C, 1874. 
Collar, Mrs. William C, 1900, 1901. 
Colleton, Miss Eleanor M., 1904, 

1905. 
Collins, Hon. Patrick A., 1898, 

1899. 
Concannon, John S., 1903, 1904. 



100 



City Document No. 25. 



Connolly, Rev. Arthur T., 1898, 

1899. 
Connolly, James B., 1905, 1906. 
Coolidge, J. Randolph, Jr., 1904, 

1905. 
Corbett, Hon. Joseph J., 1896, 

1897. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Laurence, 1905, 1906. 
Curtis, Thomas B., M D., 1874. 
Gushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884, 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Davis, James C, 1899, 1900. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Derby, Basket, M.D., 1895, 1896. 
Devine, William H., M.D., 1902, 

1908. 
Dewart, Mrs. William H., 1901, 

1902. 
Dexter, Henry M., D.D., 1866. 
Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 
Dolan, Arthur W., 1904. 
Dolan, Rev. F. X., 1901, 1902. 
Dole, Rev. Charles F., 1901, 1902. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 
Donald, E. Winchester, D.D., 1898, 

1899. 
Donnelly, Charles F., 1899, 1900. 
Donovan, Edward J., 1902. 
Donovan, William F., 1904, 1905. 
Doogue, William J., Jr., 1903, 1904. 
Dreyfus, Mrs. Carl, 1901, 1902. 
Dunphy, James W., 1900, 1901. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Joseph T., D.D., 1880. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1880. 
Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 
Eaton, William S., 1887. 
Edes, Henry H., 1886. 
Edson, Mrs. P. O'Meara, 1906. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871. 
Ellis, George E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, Jr., 1878. 
Ensworth, William H., M.D., 1898, 

1899. 
Ernst, Carl W., 1897, 1898. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 
Everett, Sidnev, 1895. 
Fallon, Hon. Joseph D., 1899, 1900. 
Farlow, John W., M.D., 1892, 1893. 
Field, Miss Gretchen, 1898. 
Field, Walbridge A., LL.D., 1866. 
Fields, James T., LL.D., 1872. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 



Fitz, Walter Scott, 1894. 
Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 
Foster, Frank K., 1904, 1905. 
Fowle, William F., 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 
Frothingham, Richard^LL.D., 1876, 
Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D,, 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gargan, Thomas J., 1899, 1900. 
Gargan, Mrs. Thomas J., 1901, 

190?. 
Garland, Mrs. Francis P., 1904, 

1905. 
Garland, George M., M.D., 1895, 

1896. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gerry, E, Peabody, M.D., 1902, 

1903. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872, 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885, 

1899, 1900. 
Gould, A. A., M.D., 1804. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, LL.D., 1877, 1902, 

1903. 
Green, Samuel A.^ M.D., 1868, 
Green, Samuel S., 1895. 
Greenough, William IF., 1858, 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grlnnell, Charles E., 1874, 
Hale, Edward E., D.D,, 1858. 
Hale, Mrs. George S., 1887, 1888, 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Hale, Philip, 1893. 
Halloran, Rev. F, J., 1905, 1906. 
Hamlin, Charles S., 1902, 1903. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 1879, 
Haynes, Prof. Henry W., 1881, 

1884. 
Hayward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John, Jr., 1888, 1889, 1891. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Hellier, Charles E., 1895. 
Hemenway, Alfred, 1898, 1899, 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., D.D., 1888, 



Hersey, MissHeloiseE., 1895, 1896, 
Higginson, Francis L., 1899, 1900, 
Higginson, Thomas W., LL.D., 

1383. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. George -S., 1873. 
Hills, Thomas, 1898, 1899. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.D., 1870. 
Holbrook, Mrs. Pinckney, 1905, 

1906. 



Ltbkary Department. 



101 



Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., M.D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., Jr., LL.D., 

1882. 
Homans, Charles D., M.D., 1867. 
Homans, Mrs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886, 1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Horton, Rev. Edward A., 1899, 1900. 
Hubbard, James M., 1891. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hudson, John E., 1895, 1896. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880, 1893, 

1894. 
Hutchins, Miss Emma, 1895, 1896. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Irwin, Miss Agnes, 1894. 
Jeffries', B. Joy, M.D., 1869. 
Jeffries, William A., 1893. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jenney, Bernard, 1901, 1902. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jewett, Miss Sarah Orne, 1900, 

1901. 
Johnson, Henry Lewis, 1906. 
Johnson, Rev. Robert F., 1900, 

1901. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kellen. William V., 1901, 1902. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
King, Mrs. Henry S., 1906. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lathrop, Hon. John, 1903. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, Miss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lee, Miss Alice, 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Lee, Hon. John H., 1897, 1898. 
Leu-is, Weston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. Frederick W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Hon. Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, A. Lawrence, 1897, 1898. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Daniel O. S., 1902, 1903. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., M.D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
McDonald, Miss Anna Sprague, 

1903, 1904. 
McLaughlin, Edward A., 1903, 

1904. 
McNulty, Rev. John J., 1896, 1897. 
Mann, Alexander, D.D., 1906. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 



Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Miss Ellen F-, 1898, 1899. 
Mason, Frank S., 18y9, 1900. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Matthews, Miss Caroline, 1905, 

1906. 
Maxwell, Hon. Arthur, 1906. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Merriman, Daniel, D.D., 1905, 1906. 
Metcalf, Rev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864, 1905, 1906. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
Morison, Miss Mary, 1892, 1893, 

1895. 
Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 
Morrison, William A., M.D., 1901, 

1902. 
Morse, John T., Jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., Jr., 1878. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis TF., 1871. 
Morton, Johnson, 1901, 1902. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 
Neale, Rollin H., D.D., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882, 1899, 1900. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
OBrien, Hon. Hugh, 1879. 
O'Brien, Robert Lincoln, 1906. 
O'Callaghan, John J., 1895. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
O'Reilly, Miss Mary Boyle, 1902, 

1903. 
Otis, George A., 1860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benjamin H., 

1876. 
Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 
Parker, William L., 1900, 1901. 
Parker, Mrs. William L., 1897, 

1898. 
Parkman, Henry, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882, 1896, 

1897. 
Parmelee, Mrs. William, 1906. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885, 1890, 1891. 
Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Pierce, Hon. Henry L., 1891. 
Pingree, Miss Lalia B., 1894. 
Plant, Mrs. Thomas G., 1904, 1905. 
Prescdtt, William H., LL.D., 

1853. 
Prince, Hon. F. O., 1888, 1889, 

1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 1896. 
Putnam, George, 1900, 1901. 
Putnam, George, I).D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Putnam, William L., 1898, 1899. • 
Randall, Charles M., M.D., 1884. 
Ratshesky, Abraham C, 1904, 

1905. 
Reed, Henry R., 1899, 1900. 



102 



City Document No. 25. 



Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Bobbins, Elliott, M.D., 1893. 
Roberts, Rev. W. Dewees, 1899, 

1900. 
Roche, James Jeffrey, 1898, 1899. 
Rockwell, Miss Maud M., 1902, 

1903. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Rollins, J. Wingate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, John C, LL. D., 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 
Rowe, Henry S., 1903, 1904. 
Ruddick, William H., M.D., 1905, 

1906. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 
Sampson, O. H., 1892, 1893. 
Sanger. Hon. George P., 1860. 
Scates, Mrs. Edward C, 1904, 1905. 
Scigliano, George A., 1905. 
Searle, Charles P., 1898, 1899. 
Sears, J. Montgomery, 1903, 1904. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shattuck, George B., M.D., 1904, 

1905. 
Shaw, Mrs. Walter, 1905, 1906. 
Sheldon, N. Louis, 1903, 1904. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888, 

1889. 
Sherwin, Mrs. Thomas, 1893, 1894. 
Shippen, Rev. Eugene R., 1906. 
Shiirtlejf, Hon. Nathaniel B.., 1857. 
Smith, Azariah, 1895, 1896. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Smith, Miss Minna, 1892. 
Snow, Frederic E., 1906. 
Sowdon, A. J. C, 1892, 1893. 
Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Mrs. Henry H., 1899, 

1900. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D., 1888. 
Stevens, Gen. Hazard, 1903, 1904. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Storrow, Mrs. James J., 1902, 1903. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Supple, Rev. James N., 1903, 1904. 
Teele, John O., 1886. 
Tetlow, Mrs. John, 1902, 1903. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 
Thayer, Rev. George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., LL.D., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 



Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 1891. 
Ticknor, George. LL.D., 1858, 1854, 

1855, 18.59, 1863, 1866. 
Tillinghast, Caleb B., 1895, 1896. 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Todd, William C, 1894. 
Tracy, Joseph V., D.D., 1906. 
Trueblood, Rev. Benjamin F., 1904, 

1905. 
Turner, Miss Frances H., 1899,1900. 
Tuttle, Lucius, 1903, 1904. 
Twombly, Alexander S., D.D., 

1883, 1884. 
Updike, D. B., 1900, 1901. 
Upham, J. Baxter, M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. George H., 1873. 
Vinton, Frederick P., 1903, 1904. 
Wadlin, Horace G., Litt. D., 1899, 

It'OO. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Walsh, Rev. James A., 1902, 1903. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Ware, Mrs. Darwin E., 1899, 1900. 
Warner, Herman J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles II., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878, 

1904, 1905. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1807. 
Weissbein, Louis, 1893. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wells, Samuel, 1900, 1901. 
Wendell, Prof. Barrett, 1895, 1896. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 
Whelton, Daniel A., 1904, 1905. 
Whip2)le, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitmore, Williairi H., 1887. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williams, Harold, M.D., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Williamson, LLrs. William C, 1897, 

1898. 
WiLwn, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854, 
Winthrop, Robert C, Jr., 1887. 
Wood, Frank, 1897, 1898. 
Wood, ISIiss Maria E., 1900, 1901. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Gould, 1888, 

1889. 
Worcester, Elwood, D.D., 1905, 

1906. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



Library DepaetIvient. 



103 



APPENDIX X. 



SCHEDULE OF LIBRARY SERVICE. 

Note. — This schedule has been brought down to May 1, 1907. 

Summary. 





Men. 


Women. 


Total 


Central Library 


103 


92 


195 


Branches and readino- rooms 


17 


72 


89 



120 



161 



284 



Evening and Sunday service, Central Library, * 110. 
Sunday service, branches, 60, 

Extra assistance is employed at the branches. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Name. 


Entered. 




Wadlin, Horace G. . 


1903 


Librarian. 


Fleischner, Otto 


1891 


Ass't Librarian. 


Nichols, Adelaide A. 


1868 


Auditor. 


Deery, Delia .Jean 


1891 




Shumway, Marion H. 


1895 




t Mooney, George V. 


1889 




Dixon, Robert F. X. 


1902 




I Berran, Mary A. C. 


1902 


^ 


J Gatewood, Marie 


1905 




Mackin, Timothy .T. . 


1903 




Lee, Charles 0. 


1904 




CATALOGUE I 


DEPARTMENT 


. 


Chevalier, Samuel A. 


1894 


Chief. 


Swift, Lindsay . 


1878 


Editor. 


Murdoch, .John 


1896 




Muss-Arholt, William 


1907 




Hinckley, George L. . 


1903 




Tenney, Mary A. 


1897 




Rice, Edwin F. 


1885 




Taylor, Lucien E. 


1903 




Bartlett, Mary R. 


1897 




* Serving from one to seven evenings a ^ 


reek each. The total number of positions 



is 39, evenings ; 47, Sundays, 
t Custodian of stock-room. 
J Auditor's Assistant. 



104 



City Document No. 25. 



Name. 


Entered 


Cutler, Dora L. 


1887 


Gould, Ida W. . 


1884 


Mackay, Susan H. 


1901 


Whitman, Frances N. A. . 


1903 


Coolidge, Elsie W. 


1903 


Durand, Susan M. 


1900 


Lilienthal, Flora N. . 


1902 


Merrill, E. Carolyn . 


1906 


Brennan, Thomas F. 


1890 


Campbell, M. Theresa 


1902 


Horgan, John J. 


1902 


Levine, Benjamin 


1907 


ORDERING D 


EPARTME^ 


Macurdy, Theodosia E. 


1889 


Frinsdorff, Emily 0. . 


1894 


Gushing, Helen G. 


1905 


Goddard, Mrs. Frances H. 


1892 


Collins, Margaret F. . 


1901 


Cunniff, Nellie L. 


1895 


Maiers, William C, Jr. 


1897 


San ford, Emma D. . 


1902 


Boyle, Gertrude 


1906 


Courtney, Frances X. 


1906 


Tortorella, Lillian 


1906 


SHELF DEI 


'ARTMENT. 


Roffe, William G. T. 


1881 


Locke, John F. . 


1894 


Connor, George H. . 


1891 


Reardon, John H. . . . 


1896 


Eberhart, John . . . . 


1894 


McCarthy, Michael, Jr. 


1892 


Ward, Joseph W. 


1891 


Muckenstunn, Matthew 


1899 


Lucid, John F. . 


1893 


Gorham, Katharine J. 


1902 


Hennessey, Alice M. 


1901 


Mechan, Michael J. . 


1901 


Doonan, Anna G. . . . 


190B 



Chief. 



Bierstadt, Oscar A. 
Doyle, Agnes C. 
Forsyth, Walter G. 
Benson, Axel L. 



BATES HALL. 

Catalogue and Reference. 

1899 
1885 
1902 
1906 



Custodian. 



Library Department. 



105 





BATES 


HALL. 




Centre 


Desk. 


Name. 




Entered. 


Buckley, Pierce E. 
Conroy, Michael J. 






1891 Custodian 
1897 


Olson, Alphlld . 
Corbett, William J. 






1895 
1906 


Hughes, George H. 






1905 . 




SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 


Currier, Mary T. 
Maynadier, Emily W 
O'Neil, Alice H 






1905 
1905 
1905 


Cassidy, Margaret L. 
Murphy, Annie G. 
Doyle, James L. 






1895 

1888 
1900 


Athridge, John W. 






1904 


Downey, John G. 
Mason, Forest L. 






1904 
1906 


Donahoe, Robert V. 






1907 



STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Documents and Manuscripts. 



Whitney, James L. . 
Wheeler, Horace L. . 
Rosenberg, Morris J. 
McGowan, William A. 


1869 
1900 
1901 
1903 


PERIODICAL 


ROOM. 


Wendte, Frederika . 
Quinlan, George H. . 
Wallace, William C. . 


1895 
1901 
1905 


NEWSPAPER 


ROOM. 


Serex, Frederic 
Ennis, William J. . 


1895 
1900 


PATENT ROOM AND NEWSPAPER 


Mulloney, William J. 
Herekson, Charles E. 
O'Meara, Jeremiah J. 


1892 
1904 
1905 


ISSUE DEPARTMENT. 


Blaisdell, Frank C. . 
Sheridan, Mary C. . . 
Cufflin, M. Florence . 


1876 
1881 
1892 



Chief. 



FILES. 



Chief. 



106 



City Document No. 25. 



Name. 


Entered. 


Wiechmann, Catherine A. . 


1895 


Dowling, S. Jennie . 


1895 


Reynolds, Mary A. 


1894 


Zaugg, Joanna . 


1895 


Hagerty, Mary E. 


1897 


Richards, Florence F. 


1876 


AVilliams, Grace 


1895 


Shauglmessj, Mary A. 


1897 


Bryce, Jean M. . 


1898 


McLaughlin, Alice 


1902 . 


Burke, Mary M. 


1904 


Daley, Agnes J. 


1905 


Day, M. Josephine . 


1899 


Doherty, Bessie L. . 


1905 


Downing, Alice A. 


1905 


Ennis, Flora A. 


1904 


Hayes, Clement T. 


1003 


Lipshutz, William T. . 


1906 


Lynch, Anna G. 


1906 


McMullen, Katheriue M. 


1905 


Maguire, Susan 


1905 


Mantle, Annie E. 


1905 


Mulvaney, Mary E. . 


1904 


Shea, Ella T. . 


1905 


Sullivan, Katherine G. 


1906 


Sullivan, James L. . 


1902 


Zaugg, Julia R. 

• 


1903 


CHILDREN 


'S ROOM. 


Jordan, Ahce M, 


1900 Custodian. 


Grush, Mildred E. . 


1905 


Toy, May C. . 


1903 


Williams, Eleanor M. 


1899 


REGISTRATION 


DEPARTMENT. 


Keenan, John J. 


1885 Chief. 


Hannigan, Frank J. . 


1898 


Barry, Margaret M. . 


1897 


Rogers, Anna F. 


1903 


McNeil, Anna M. 


1903 


PRINTING DI 


APARTMENT. 


Lee, Francis W. 


1894 Chief. 


Geyer, Willfried H. . 


1896 Pressman. 


Boyle, Mary T. M. . 


1903 Compositor. 


Land, Annie F. 


1896 " 


Mnnson, Minnie A. . 


1902 " 


O'Keefe, Charles J. . 


1899 Job pressman 



Library Department. 



107 



Name. 

Ryder, Frank 
Collins, Dennis J. 
Lofstrom, Konrad A. 
Callahan, Frank H. 
Cellarius, Theodore "W 
Connell, William 
Conolly, John F. 
Doyle, M. Joseph 
Eichhorn, Maximilian 
Hemstedt, William P 
Hoeffner, George 
Murphy, John F. 
vSullivan, J, Henry 
Watson, John H. 
O'Brien, John J. 
Grad}', Leo J. . 
Masterson, Therese A 
Abely, Alice M. 
Cooney, Elizabeth F 
Coullahan, Ellen J. 
Denney, Ida G. 
Doiron, Joanna . 
Fitzgerald, Mary E. 
Glancy, Mary A. 
McElaney, Mary T. 
Moriarty, Mary G. 
Parrow, Susan G. 
Potts, Ellen G. . 
Soule, Ellen E. . 



Niederauer, Henry 
McCready, Alexander 
M alone, John P. 
Zittell, George, Jr. 
Herland, Nils J. 
Lacey, Garrett . 
Quirk, Timothy J. 
Karlson, Charles W. 
Williams, John L. 
Berran, Edward 
Frye, Henry W. 
Kelley, James J. 
Murphy, Charles W. 
Kelly, Daniel T. 
MeCarty, Dennis 
McGee, Alexander D 



BINDERY. 




Entered. 




1883 


Foreman. 




1887 


Finisher. 




1892 


a 




1906 


Forwarder. 




1892 


a 




1904 


u 




1900 


u 




1902 


a 




1904 


a 




. • 1883 


u 




1891 


(; 




1885 


(( 




1898 


(( 




1902 


(( 




1902 


Apprentice. 




1904 


Runner. 




1907 


Clerk. 




1906 


Sewer. 




1906 


u 




1905 


il 




1902 


(( 




1896 


a 




1907 


a 




1906 


u 




1902 


li 




1875 


i /, 




1903 


a 




1892 


u 




1891 


u 


JANITOR DEPARTMENT. 


1894 


Chief Engineer 




1895 


Engineer. 




1895 


u 




1891 


u 




1895 


Fireman. 




1904 


( ( 




1906 


(( 




1896 


Electrician. 




1886 


Janitor. 




1903 


u 




1898 


;( 




1900 


(( 




1904 


u 




1906 


Watchman. 




1888 


(( . 




1896 


Painter. 



108 



City Document No. 25. 



Name. 

Lawrence, John A. 
Hanna, William T. 
Cole, William E. 
Kennedy, Patrick A 
Webster, Charles 
Mullen, Mrs. Mary F 



Entered. 




1898 


Carpenter. 


1895 


Marble polisher. 


1898") 


Elevator and 


1906 [ 


coat-room 


1906 ) 


attendants. 


1905 


Matron. 



BRANCH DEPARTMENT. 



Ward, Langdon L. . 


1896 


Stevens, Alice V. 


1899 


Kueffner, Cecilia W. . 


1898 


Adams, Amy W. 


1903 


Heimann, Otto A. 


1890 


Morse, Maud M. 


1877 


Kiernan, Letitia M. . 


1895 


McCarthy, Marion A. 


1895 


Maier, Joseph A. 


1892 


Brown, Richard 


^ 1898 


Fazakas, Chester A. S. 


1901 


Gallagher, George W. 


.1903 



Supervisor of UrancUes 
and Stations. 



BRIGHTON BRANCH. 



Pronty, Louise . 


1902 


Custodian 


Conley, Ellen F. 


1891 




Watson, Geneva 


1904 




Kenney Josephine E. 


1906 




O'Neil, Thomas J. . 


1902 


Janitor. 



CHARLESTOWN BRANCH. 



Cartee, Elizabeth F. . 


1886 


Custodian 


Rogan, Katharine S. . 


1896 




Sullivan, Ellen L. 


1903 




Donovan, Annie M. . 


1899 




Jones, Clara L. 


1903 




Kiley, Mary G. 


1903 




Smith, Thomas E. 


1874 


Janitor. 



DORCHESTER BRANCH. 



Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T. . 


1873 


Custodian 


Griffith, Mary E. 


1886 




Donovan, Mary G. 


1891 




Kellogg, Grace E. 


1898 




Sullivan, Mary M. 


1902 




Halligan, John F. 


1902 


Janitor. 



Library Department. 



109 



EAST BOSTON BRANCH. 



Name. 




Entered. 




Walkley, Ellen 0. 




1897 


Custodian. 


AViug, Alice M. 




1873 




Brackett, Marian W. 




1897 




Bethune, Florence M. 




1903 




Bickford, Lillian A. . 




1891 




Matthews, Everett F. 




1900 


Janitor. 


Donnelly, James J. . 




1904 




JAMAICA PLAIN 


BRANCH 




Swain, Mary P. 




1877 


Custodian. 


Riley, Nellie F. 




1878 




Orciitt, Alice B. 




1887 




Kelley Elizabeth M. . 




1904 




Kenney, Thomas H. . 




1897 


Janitor. 


ROXI 


,URY BRANCH. 




Bell, Helen M. . 




1878 


Custodian . 


Albert, Katie F. 




1892 




Berry, Martha L. C. 




1883 




Griggs, Sarah W. 




1886 




Conuell Gertrude L. 




1903 




Bell, Louise B. 




1906 




Nugent, William B. . 




1906 


Janitor. 


SOUTH 


BOSTON 


BRANCH. 




Robinson, Alice M. . 




1902 


Custodian. 


Eaton, Ellen A. 




1873 




Sampson, Idalene L, 




1878 




McQuarrie, Annie C. 




1894 




Kiley, Catherine F. . 




1904 




Baker, Joseph . 




1872 


Janitor. 


SOUTH 


END BRANCH. 




Sheridan, Margaret A. 




1875 


Custodian. 


McEttrick, Alice 




1902 




Lynch, Emma F. 




1885 




McGrath, Amelia 




1888 




AValsh, Katherine E. 




1903 




Harris William L. 




1907 




Busby, James H. 




1904 


Janitor. 


upham's ( 


CORNER 


BRANCH. 


* 


Brick, Mary L. 


. 


1899 


Custodian. 


Curley, Mary F. 


. 


1905 




Murphy, Margaret A. 


. 


1905 




Connell, Grace M. . 


• 


1906 





* Formerly Station Q — rated as a Branch February 8, 1U07. 



110 



City Document No. 25. 



WEST END BRANCH. 



Name. 


Entered. 




Davis, Mrs. Eliza R. 


1877 


Custodian 


Barton, Margaret S. 


1885 


. 


Forbes, George W. . 


1896 




Kile}^ Mary E. . 


1896 




Millmeister, Rebecca . 


1899 




Riley, M^vry E. 


1891 




Mohan, Eleanor R. 


1907 




Menaker, Naaman 


1903 




Carclarelli, Eugene 


1905 




Sullivan, Daniel J. 


1898 


.Janitor. 



WEST ROXBURY BRANCH. 



Morse, Carrie L. 
Willis, Rebecca E. 
Schwartz, Edward 



Hill, M. Addie . 
Moulton, John ^Y. 



Murray, Grace L. 
Regan, Alice M. 
Stackpole, Freeland E. 



1890 


Custodian 


1903 




1904 


Janitor. 


STATION A. 




1875 


Custodian 


1890 


Janitor. 


STATION B. 




1900 


Custodian. 


1903 




1900 


Janitor. 



STATION D. 
Capewell, Mrs. Emma G. . . 1892 



Custodian. 



STATION E. 
Savil, Susan . . . . 1893 



Custodian. 



STATION F. 



Fairbrother, Mrs. Elizabeth G. . 1887 

Wetherald, Isabel F. . . 1902 



Custodian. 



STATION G. 



Muldoon, Katherine F. 


1896 
STATION J. 


Custodian 


Harkins, Gertrude M. 


1905 


Custodian 


Sargent, Abbie E. 


1906 





Library Department. 



Ill 



STATION N. 



Name. 

Witherell, Anna G. 



Stewfirt, Cora L. 
Barnett, Florence 



Kelly, Mary L. . 
Cross, Laura N. 
Ross, Elizabeth P. 
(jruerrier, Edith W. . 
McDougall, Helen M. 
Boggiano, Iside 
Kelley, Mary F. 



Entered. 

1900 Custodian. 



STATION p. 



1898 Custodian. 
1902 



STATION R. 



1904 Custodian. 



STATION S. 



1901 Custodian. 

STATION T. 

1905 Custodian. 

STATION W. 

1899 Custodian. 



STATION Z. 

1901 

STATION 22. 

1903 

STATION 23. 

1905 



Custodian . 



Custodian. 



Custodian. 



Evening and Sunday Service. 

Central Library. 

Bates Hall. — Officers in charge: Frank C. Blaisdell, Sam- 
uel A. Chevalier, Otto Fleischner, John Murdoch, Lindsay Swift ; 
Assistants: George L. Hinckley, John Murdoch, William G. T. 
Roffe, David L. Williams. Central desk : Thomas F. Brennan, 
George H. Connor, John J. Keenan, John H. Reardon. Care of 
reference books: Robert F. X. Dixon, Charles W. Dolan, Feruald 
Hutchins, Timothy .J. Mackin, Michael J. Meehan, Morris J. 
Rosenberg; Collectors of slijis : John G. Downing, Terence D. 
Gordon, Gardner D. Howie, R. Philip Monahan, Edward T. 



112 City Document No. 25. 

O'Keefe, Isador Singer ; Runners : Francis X. Courtney, Robert 
V. Donahoe, John Gr. Downing, Stanton F. Gorman, William H. 
Kennedy. 

Issue Department. — Officers in charge: Frank C. Blaisdell, 
Pierce E. Buckley, John H. Keardon. Receivers of books: 
Thomas F. Brennan, Otto A. Heimann, Michael McCarthy, Jr., 
Joseph W. Ward. Deliverer of books : Fred W. Blaisdell. Care 
of indicator : Joseph A. Maier, Harry F. Mayer^ Matthew 
Muckensturm, James L. Sullivan, .Jeremiah J. Sullivan. Assist- 
ants at indicator: Max H. Newman, Edward T. O'Keefe, Richard 
F. O'Toole, Prescott Y. Sale, Frederick H. Toye. Care of slips: 
Otto A. Heimann, Harry F. Mayer, Matthew Muckensturm, 
George H. Quinlan, Joseph W. Ward. Desk attendants: Robert 
F. X. Dixon, Axel Z. Fogel, John J. Horgan, Peter V. McFarland, 
Harry F. Mayer. Care of tubes and cars : Robert F. X Dixon, 
Charles W. Dolan, Chester A. S, Fazakas, Thomas G. Goodwin, 
Charles E. Herekson, .John J. Horgan, William A. McGowan, 
Timothy J. Mackin, Michael J. Meehan, James L. Sullivan, .Tere- 
miah J. Sullivan. Bookcase attendant : Thomas G. Goodwin. 
Runners : Abbott G. Allbee, Edward J. Berran, Vincent Brennan, 
Richard Brown, George G. Bulfinch, Jr., .Joseph B. Compton, 
Charles Concannon, John S. Concannon, James J. Cotter, Francis 
X. Courtney, Charles W. Dolan, Robert V. Donahoe, Frank V. 
Flanagan, Terence D. Gordon, Stanton F. Gorman, Leo J. Grady, 
Cornelius A. Guiney, Charles E. Herekson, Louis W. Hickey, 
Gardner D. Howie, Wilham H. J. Kennedy, Constantine E. 
McGuire, Charles V. Mansfield, Edward J. O'Keefe, .Jeremiah .J. 
O'Meara, Holman S. Pearl, Prescott F. Sale, Philip A. E. Sheri- 
dan, Isador Singer, Aram Tatian, William C. Wallace. Chil- 
dren'' s room attendants: Mary A. C. Berran, Jean M. Bryce, 
Maud M. Morse, Mary A. Reynolds, Mary A. Shaughnessy, 
Mary C. Toy, Joanna Zaugg. Extra attendants : William P. 
Hemstedt, Thomas G. Goodwin, Max II. Newman, Richard F. 
O'Toole, Holman S. Pearl, Frederick H. Toye. 

Special Libraries. — In charge of Barton Library: Mary 
T. Currier, Francis W. Lee, David L. Williams. Assistants : 
Edward E. Bruce, John G. Downey, William P. Hemstedt, .Jr., 
Daniel M. Lyons, William A. McGowan. Music room : John 
W. Athridge, Edward E. Bruce, AVilliam P. Hemstedt, .Jr.,' 
Bradley Jones, Daniel M. Lyons, Archer C. Nichols. In charge 
of Fine Arts Department : Frank A. Bourne, Walter G. Forsyth, 
Walter Rowlands. Assistants : .James L. Doyle, William C. 
Maiers, .Jr., Michael .J. Meehan. Extra assistants: John W. 
Athridge, Walter M. Broderick, John Brunt, Loren N. Downs, 
Jr., John G. Downey, Bradley Jones. 

Newspaper Room. — Michael J. Conroy, James L. Doyle, 
William J. Ennis. Nevspyaper files : Arthur E. Cuftiin, Thomas 
H. Gillis, Charles E. Herekson, Jeremiah J. O'Meara, Frederick 
H. Toye. 



LiBKARY Department. 113 

Patent Room. Walter T. Hannigan, Albert J. Plunkett, 
Morris J. Rosenberg. 

Periodical Room. — Michael J. Conroy, AVilliam J. Mulloney, 
Albert .J. Plunkett, George H. Quiulan. 

Registration Desk. — George H. Connor, Frank J. Hannigan, 
John J. Keenan, William J. jMulloney. 

Replacement of Books. — Richard Brown, John F. Lucid, 
Michael McCarthy, Jr., Joseph W. Ward. 

Statistical Department. — Frederic Serex, Horace L.Wheeler. 

Coat Room. — Joseph Kolsky, AVilliam H. Kennedy. 

Elevator. — Patrick A. Kennedy, Charles Webster. 

Sunday Service. 

* Branch Libraries^ Novsemher 1 to May 1. 

BRKiiiTON Branch, 2 to D P.M. — In charge: § Lydia E. 
Stevenson, § Ellen F. Conley ; assistant: § John P. O'Hara, 
§ Mi ah J. Falvey. 

Charlestown Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. In charge : i Ellen L. 
Sullivan, § Annie M. Donovan ; assistant : William Rice. Jan- 
itor : Thomas Smith. 

Dorchester Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge : § Grace E. 
Kellogg, § Mary G. Donovan, § Mary M. Sullivan ; assistant: 
William J. Kennedy. 

East Boston Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: § Florence 
M. Bethune, § Lillian A. Bickford ; assistant : § Thomas F, Brun= 
ton, § Everett F. Matthews, Helen B. Shannon. Janitor: 
James J. Donnelly. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: § Katie 
F. Albert, § Nellie F. Riley; assistant: § Anna G. Doonan, 
§ Alice McEttrick. Janitor: Thomas H. Kenney. 

RoxBURY Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: § Gertrude L. 
Conuell, § Fallen R. Scott; in charge reading room : § Sarah W. 
Griggs, § Martha L. Berry; assistant: § Catherine F. Kiley, 
§ Florence Richards. 

South Boston Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge; Alice B. 
Orcutt ; assistant: Joseph Baker. Janitor: Thomas Saunders. 

South End Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge : § Emma F. 
Lynch, § Katherine S. Rogan ; assistant : § Loren N. Downs, 
§ Fredeiick A. Garth ; t?? charge children' s roo7n : § Amelia F. 
McGrath, § Katherine Wiechmann ; assistant children'' s room : 
Marguerite Coydevant. 

* With the exceiition of the West End Branch, which is open Sundays throughout 
the year. Here certain members of the rejjular week-day force serve Sundays, their 
compensation being for seven days per weels. 

§ Alternate SunaavB. 



114 City Document No. 25. 

Upham's Corner Branch, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: § Mary 
L. Brick, § JMary E. Hagerty ; assistant : § Margaret A. Mur- 
ph}^, § Katherine E. Walsh. 

Station G, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. — In charge.- § Henry 
P. McLaughlin, § M. Florence Cuftlin. 

Station J, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge : John Binda ; assistant : 
W. A. Bailey. 

Station P, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. — In charge : Cora L. 
Stewart; assistant: Mary Linda. 

Station R, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. —In charge : § Abbie 
E. Sargent, § Elizabeth M. Kelley. 

Station S, 2 to 9 P.M. — In charge: § M. Theresa Camp- 
bell, § Mary A. Shaughnessy. 

Station T, 2 to 6 P.JM.,'7 to 9 VM.—In charge: Anna E. 
Monahan. 

Station 23, 2 to 6 P.M., 7 to 9 P.M. — In charge : § Grace 
V. Meehan, § Grace Williams ; assistant : Katherine Lynch. 

§ Alternate Sundays. 



INDEX. 



Americana, additions, 14. 
American Medical Association, recep- 
tion to, 5. 
Appropriation. (.S'ee Finance.) 
Auction sales, -21. 
Auditor, report of, 65. 

Bates Hall, use of, 32. 
Bindery, 29, 47. 

Bool<s, accessions, 11; at branches and 
stations, 21, 44; Allen A. Brown collec- 
tion, 36; Fine Arts collection, 17; cir- 
culation, 4y, 9.5; clagsittcation, 9'2, 93; 
English prose fiction, 13; expenditures, 
2, 13; fiction, purchase and circulation 
of, -2, 3; lists on special subjects, 32; 
lost and missint;-, 8; miscellaneous pur- 
chases, 16; net increase, 89, 9i); placed 
on shelves, 91; number in lilirary, SS; 
transfer of medical collection, 3. 

Boston Medical Library, transfer of med- 
ical Ijooks to, 3. 

Brancli Department, 4.i. 

Branches and Stations, accessions, 21; 
circulation, 40, 95; classification, 93; 
deposit work, 43; reference work, 43; 
pictures, 44; books, 44; expenditures, 
44, 79-86; work with scliools, 45. 

Broadsides, accessions, 15. 

Brown, Allen A., collection, accessions, 
36 ; work on catalogue, 26. 

Buildings, equipment and general ad- 
ministration, 6. 

Catalogue Department, 25. 
Children's Department, 31. 
Circulation, 30, 49, 95. 
City Point Reading Room, opening, 2. 
Classification, Central Litjrar_v, 92; 
branches, 93. 

Deposit work, 43. 

Documents and Statistics, Department 
of, 39. 

Employees, resignations, 53; list of, 103. 

Evening and Sunday service, 52; 
schedule. 111, 113. 

Examining Committee, list, 4; recom- 
mendations, 4; report, 54. 

Examining committees, list of, 99. 

Examinations, 53. 

Exhibitions, 38. 

Expenditures, percentage of, for books 
and periodicals; comparison with otlier 
libraries, 2 ; for maintenance, 2. 

Fiction, percentage of circulation, 2; 

purchase of, 3, 13. 
Financial statement, 65. 



Fine Arts Collection, important addi 

tious, 17. 
Fines, modification of rules relating to 

children, 10. 

Gifts, 22. 

Hunt, Edward B., death of, 3, 25. 

Inter-library loans, 47. 
Issue Department, 30. 

Lantern slides, 33. 

Lectures, 36. 

Librarian, report, 6. 

Librarians, list of, 9S. 

Library, extent of, by years, 87; service 

schedule, 103; system, "6,/??/ leaf. 
Lighting, improvements in, 7. 
Lowell lectures, 3. 

Maintenance, percentage of expendi- 
tures for, 2. 

Manuscripts, 39. 

Medical boots, transfer to Boston Med- 
ical Library, 3. 

Newspaper room, 48. 
Newspapers, expenditures for, 13; acces- 
sions, 15. 

Ordering Department, 13. 

Patent Room, 47. 

Periodical Room, 48. 

Periodicals, expenditures for, 2, 13; ac 

cessions, 15. 
Photographs, 21, 33. 
Pictures, 21, 33,34. 

Portfolios of pictures, circulation, 34. 
Printing Department, 29. 
Publications issued, 28; distribution, 30. 

Repairs, Central and branches, 7. 
Resignations, 53. 
Registration, 30, 94. 

Schools, work with, 31; through Branch 

Department, 45. 
Shelf Department, 27. 
Special libraries, use of, 33. 
Stations. (See Branches and Stations.) 
Station 23, opening, 2. 
Sunday and evening service,52 ; schedule, 

111, 113. 

Trust funds, 70-78. 

Trustees, report of, 1-5; President, Vice 

President and Clerk elected, 1; list of, 

for fifty-five years, 97. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 647 4