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Full text of "Annual report"

FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 

1910-1911 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1911 



WBRID6E 


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. 




MILTON 



HYDE PARK 



Sketch Map 

BOSTON'' 

Public Library System ' 



"] parks. Cetiefenei and Open 
ZD Temlo/y oufside tfie ti/y 



M. 



. Brighton Branch, Holton Library Build; 

. Charlestown Branch, City Square. 

. Dorchester Branch. Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 

. East Boston Branch, 37 Meridian St- 

. Jamaica Plain Branch. Jackson Hall. Centre St 



I. Central Library, Copley Square. 

Branch Libraries, February i, 1911. 

Academy Hill Road. 7. Roxbur^y Branch, 46 MiUmont St. 



8. South Boston Branch, ^ 
q. South End Branch, ^q-j Shawmut Avenue, 
ift. Upham's Corner Branch, Columbia Road, cor. 
-^ - - - - - - ■ - Lynde St. 

■ Mt. Vern< 



: End Branch, Cambridge, 



la. West Roxbury Branch, Centre, 

Delivery Stations, February i, 191X 

Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington, co 
Roslindale Reading Room, Washington, cor. 
Mattapan Reading Room, 717 Walk Hill St. 
Neponset Reading Room, 363 Neponset Ave. 
Mount Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, 
Allston Reading Room, 6 Harvard Ave. 

Codmau Square Reading Room, Washington, cor. Norfolk St., Dorchester. 
Mt. Pleasant Reading Room. Dudley, cor. Magazine St. 



, Bldon St. 



Broadway Extension Reading Room. 13 Broadway Extension 
K. Warren Street Reading Room, 3<ja Warren St. 
S. Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 1154 Tremont St. 
T. Boylston Station Reading Room. The Lamartine, Depot Squ 
W. Industrial School Reading Room, 39 North Bennet St. 
Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, lojo Bennington St. 
O. North Street Reading Room, 307 North St. 
V. City Point Reading Room, 615 Broadway. 
X. Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremont St. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON FEBRUARY 1. 1911. 



JOSIAH H. BENTON. President. 

Term expires May 1, 1914. 

THOMAS F. BOYLE. WILLIAM F. KENNEY. 

Term expires May I, 1912. Term expires May 1, 1911. 

SAMUEL CARR. ALEXANDER MANN. 

Term expires May 1, 1913. Term expires May 1, 1915. 



LIBRARIAN. 
HORACE G. WADLIN. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, 
organized in 1 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of 
Chapter 1 1 4, of the Acts of 1 878, as amended. The Board for 
1852 was a preliminary organization; that for 1853 made the 
first annual report. At first the Board consisted of one alderman 
and one common councilman cind five citizens at large, until 
1 867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one alder- 
man, two common councilmen and six citizens at large, two of 
whom retired, unless re-elected, each year, while the members 
from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1 878 the organi- 
zation of the Board was changed to include one alderman, one 
councilman, cmd five citizens at large, as before 1867; and in 
1 885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the repre- 
sentation of the City Government upon the Board by an alder- 
man and a councilmsm was abolished, leaving the Board as at 
present, consisting of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor, for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring 
each year. The following citizens at large have been members 
of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, 1852-57. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1 894-. 

BiGELOW, Hon. John Prescott, 1 852-68. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1 865-68. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96. 1908-. 

Chase, George Bigelow, 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1895-1907. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, 1873-75. 

DeNormandie, James, d.d., 1895-1907. 

DwiGHT, Thomas, m.d., 1899-1907. 

Everett, Hon. Edward, 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Prof. Henry Williamson, 1880-94 



HiLLARD, Hon. George Stillman, 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1907- 

LiNcoLN, Solomon, 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-. 

Morton, Hon. Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Pierce Phineas, 1 888-94. 

Prince, Hon. Frederick Octavius, 1 888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel Bradstreet, 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

TicKNOR, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1 896. 

Whipple, Edwin Pevey, 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, 1885-88. 

WiNSOR, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 

The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1 852 to 1 864; George Ticknor, in 1 865 ; William W. 
Greenough, from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. 
Haynes, from May 7, 1888. to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. 
B. Abbott, May 12, 1888. to April 30. 1895; Hon. F. O. 
Prince. October 8, 1895. to May 8, 1899; Solomon Lin- 
coln. May 12, 1899, to October 15. 1907; Rev. James De 
NORMANDIE, January 31, 1908. to May 8, 1908; JosiAH H. 
Benton, since May 8, 1 908. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was entitled Superintendent.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852-Deceniber 16, 1874. 
Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 
WiNSOR, Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1 868-Septem- 

ber 30, 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 

1 877-September 30, 1 878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October 1, 1878-Septem- 

ber 30, 1890. 
DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892-ApriI 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 11,1 895-April 30, 

1899. 
Whitney, James L., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1 899-December 

21, \ 899; Librarian, December 22, 1899-January 31, 1903. 
Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, since February 1 1903. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1911. 

Departments. Opened. 

Central Library, Copley Sq. Established May 2. 1854 Mar. 1 1, 1895 

JEast Boston Branch. 37 Meridian St Jan. 28, 1871 

§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway May 1, 1872 

IIRoxbury Branch, 46 Millmont St July, 1873 

ICharlestown Branch, City Sq *Jan., 1 874 

tBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Rd 'Jan., 1874 

JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St Jan. 25, 1874 

fSouth End Branch. 397 Shawmut Ave Aug., 1877 

§Jamaica Plain Branch, Jackson Hall, (temporarily) Centre St Sept., 1877 

JWest Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St *Jan. 6, 1880 

tWest End Branch. Cambridge, cor. Lynde St Feb. 1 , 1 896 

JUpham's Corner Branch, Columbia Rd., cor. Bird St Mar. 16, 1896 

Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington St June 7, 1875 

B. Roslindale Reading Room, Washington St., cor. Ash- 
land St Dec. 3.1878 

" D. Mattapan Reading Room, 727 Walk Hill St Dec. 27, 1881 

E. Neponset Reading Room, 362 Neponset Ave Jan. 1 , 1 883 

F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, cor. Eldon 

St Nov. 1,1886 

" G. Allston Reading Room, 354 Cambridge St Mar. 1 1, 1889 

J. Codman Square Reading Room, Washington, cor. Nor- 
folk St Nov. 12, 1890 

" N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Dudley, cor. Magazine St. Apr. 29, 1892 
P. Broadway Extension Reading Room, 13 Broadway 

ELxtension Jan. 1 6, 1 896 

" R. Warren Street Reading Room, 390 Warren St May 1, 1896 

S. Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 1154 Tremont St.... Jan. 18,1897 
T. Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, De- 
pot Sq Nov. 1,1897 

" W. Industrial School Reading Room, 39 North Bennet St. . Nov. 3, 1899 

" Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St. . . June 25, 1901 

" 22. North Street Reading Room, 207 North St June 9, 1903 

23. City Point Reading Room, 615 Broadway July 18,1906 

" 24. Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremont St July 15, 1907 

*As a branch. tin building owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. Jin City building, 

in part devoted to other municipal uses. ^Occupies rented rooms. 'IThe lessee of the Fellows* Athe- 
uieum, a private library association. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees 

Balance Sheet . , . 

Report of the Examining Commhtee . 
Report of William F. Kenney, Delegate 

ternational Congress . 
Report of the Librarian 
Index to the Annual Report, 1910-1911 



to the In- 



1 

26 
30 

43 
55 
90 



To His Honor John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — The Board of Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston present the following report of its condition and 
affairs for the year ending January 31, 191 1, being their fifty- 
ninth annual report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The Board organized on May 6, 1910, by the election of 
Mr. Josiah H. Benton as President, Mr. Thomas F. Boyle, 
Vice President, and Miss Delia Jean Deery, Clerk. 

The term of Rev. Alexander Mann expired on April 30, 
1910, and he was re-appointed and qualified a member of the 
Board for five years from that date. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts of the Library are of two classes: First, those 
which are to be expended by the Trustees in the maintenance of 
the Library. These consist of the annual appropriation by the 
City Council, and the income from Trust funds, given to the 
Trustees but invested by the City Treasurer under the direction 
of the Finance Committee of the City. During the past year 
these receipts were as follows: 

Annual appropriation ......... $351,978.00 

Income from Trust funds, including unexpended balance of previous 
year 41,756.30 

Total $393,734.30 

Second, receipts which are accounted for and paid into the 
City treasury. These consist of receipts from fines for the deten- 
tion of books, from sales of finding lists, bulletins, and catalogues ; 
from commissions paid for the use of telephone facilities; from 



[2] 

sales of waste; from payments for lost books; and from money 
found in the Library. These receipts, during the year, have been 
as follows: 

From fine* $5,516.65 

From sales of catalogues, etc. ........ 71.87 

From telephone conunissions ......... 167.57 

From sales of waste .......... 163.81 

From payments for lost books 383.82 

From money found in the Library ....... 2.36 

Total $6,306.08 

The $383.82 received for lost books, being received only to 
replace lost library property is, when paid into the City treasury, 
added to the appropriation for library maintenance. A balance 
sheet showing all the receipts and expenditures of the Library 
Department in detail is hereinafter contained. 

CITY APPROPRIATION. 

As we have pointed out in previous reports, the sum required 
for the proper administration of the Library, taking into account 
the increase in the population of the City, and the enlarged de- 
mands made upon the library system, will require a progressive 
increase in appropriations. Without such cin increase, the Li- 
brary will fail to be efficiently worked and improved to its full 
capacity for the education of our people, and its usefulness will 
surely decrease. The Library cannot simply mark time. It must 
either march forward, or fall behind in its work. The appropria- 
tion last year was fully required for the efficient administration 
and maintenance of the institution. 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the year, 43,319 volumes have been added to the 
library collection. Of these, 27,535 were purchased, 12,426 
were given to the Library, and the remainder were received by 
exchange, binding of periodicals into volumes, etc.; 13,906 vol- 
umes were purchased for the Central Library, and 13,629 for 
the branch libraries and reading-room stations. 



[31 

The total amount expended for books, including $6,880.77 
for periodicals and $2,064.82 for newspapers was $50,002.37, 
or about 1 3 per cent of the entire expense of the Library for all 
purposes. Besides these expenditures, $920.30 was spent for 
photographs. 

The average cost of all books purchased was $1.52 per vol- 
ume. Of the books purchased, 1 7, 1 62 were bought from money 
appropriated by the City, at an average cost of $1.36 a volume, 
and 9,421 were bought with the income of Trust funds, at an 
average cost of $1.82 a volume. 

In the purchase of books the Trustees have endeavored, within 
the means at their command, to provide current instructive and 
useful books for the people and to replace such books worn out 
by use. And they have sought as well to provide books for the 
use of scholars so that the Library may not lose its distinctive 
character not only as a popular library for the use of the people 
but also as a library for scholarly research and work. They are 
convinced that it is only by keeping the Library strong in both 
these directions that it can continue to be a great permanent edu- 
cational institution and of the greatest benefit to the City. 

BOOK CIRCULATION AND USE OF THE LIBRARY. 

There were issued during the year for direct home use 
299,771 volumes at the Central Library, and from the Central 
Library through the branches and reading-room stations 74,182 
others, while the branches cind reading-room stations also issued 
1 ,602,225 volumes for direct home use. There were also issued 
from the Central Library, branches and reading-room stations, 
for use at schools and institutions, 1 59, 1 1 9 volumes* making the 
entire issue for use outside the library buildings 1,671,327 
volumes. 

The use of the Library for general reference and study is un- 
restricted. It is therefore impracticable to record this use statis- 
tically. Its extent, however, is shown by the fact that about half 
a million call slips for the table use of books in Bates Hall alone 
are required during the year. The daily use of books and other 



[4] 

library material in the Central Library and in the branches is 
doubtless many times greater than the home use of books drawn 
out upon cards. 

BINDING AND REPAIR OF BOOKS. 

During the year 37,154 volumes have been bound in the 
Bindery. Besides this, a large amount of miscellaneous v^ork 
has been completed, consisting of the folding, stitching and trim- 
ming of 1 60, 1 06 library publications, the mounting of maps and 
photographs, the repairing of books, the making of periodical 
covers, etc. The expense of performing this necessary miscel- 
laneous work is equivalent to about 25 per cent of the total ex- 
pense of the Department. The ability to do it promptly in our 
own Bindery, greatly promotes the convenience, economy and 
efficiency of the library work. 

The re-binding and repair of books, other than that included 
in ordinary current binding, neglected on account of insufficient 
appropriations in past years, but begun in 1908, has continued 
during the year, 7,710 volumes having been bound by the extra 
force specially employed on this work. 

HOURS OF SERVICE. 

The Central Library and the branches open and their work 
begins at nine o'clock in the morning. The reading-room sta- 
tions open in the afternoon at varying hours, most of them at two 
o'clock. The service continues until ten o'clock at night at the 
Central Library building and at the West End Branch, and un- 
til nine at the other branches and reading-room stations except 
during the summer months. From June 1 5 until September 1 5 
the Central Library and West End Branch are closed at nine 
o'clock. TTie other branches and reading rooms during a shorter 
period close earlier than in winter, most of them at six o'clock. 
The Central Library is in operation 102 week days of twelve 
hours each, 203 week days of thirteen hours each, 1 7 Sundays 
of nine hours each, and 35 Sundays and two holidays of ten 
hours each, making an aggregate of 359 days, or 4,680 hours, 
during each twelve months. 



[51 

The Sunday service as now arranged includes the Central Li- 
brary and the West End Branch throughout the year. All the 
other branches (except the West Roxbury Branch, which has no 
Sunday service) and the eight largest reading rooms provide Sun- 
day service from November 1 to May 1 only. The hours are as 
follows : 

At the Central Library and West End Branch, from twelve 
o'clock to ten o'clock, except that the closing hour is nine o'clock 
from June 15 until September 15. At the South End Branch 
from twelve o'clock to nine o'clock. At the other branches 
(except West Roxbury), and at the eight largest reading rooms 
(namely, Allston, Codman Square, Broadway Extension, War- 
ren Street, Roxbury Crossing, Boylston Station, City Point, 
Parker Hill), from two o'clock to nine o'clock. At all of these 
reading rooms except Codman Square the room is closed from 
six to seven o'clock. 

The total number of hours of Sunday service provided an- 
nually at the Central Library and at the West End Branch is 
507 each; at the South End Branch, 234 hours; at the other 
branches (except West Roxbury) and at the Codman Square 
Reading Room, 182 hours each; and at the following reading 
rooms: Allston, Broadway Extension, Warren Street, Roxbury 
Crossing, Boylston Station, City Point, Parker Hill, 156 hours 
each. 

LIBRARY COOPERATION WITH SCHOOLS, ETC. 

The Trustees continue to cooperate with the educational work 
of the schools as far as possible without impairing the Library 
service in other directions. 

During the past year the Library has been daily supplying 
with books 28 branches and reading rooms, 1 1 1 public and 
parochial schools, 58 engine houses* and 30 institutions, and 
sending out upon the average from the Central Library, about 
400 volumes every day by its delivery wagons. The number of 
volumes sent on deposit from the Central Library through the 
branch system was 41 ,077, of which 8,780 were sent to schools. 
There were also sent from the branches themselves and from two 



[6] 

of the largest reading rooms 2 1 ,308 volumes on deposit, distrib- 
uted among 1 3 1 places. Of these 1 4,522 were sent to schools. 
That is to say, not only is the collection of the Central Library 
used as a reservoir from which books may be dra^vn for use in 
the branches and reading rooms, but each of the branches and 
reading rooms is in itself a reservoir from which books are drawn 
for use by teachers in schools in its immediate vicinity. 

We desire in this connection, however, to renew the sugges- 
tion contained in our last two reports, that the Library cannot be 
made a mere adjunct to the schools without impairing its effi- 
ciency for public use which is the main purpose for which it is 
designed and should be maintained. It must also be borne in 
mind that in so far as the Library aids the schools by doing that 
which the schools would otherwise be required to do, it adds to 
its own expenses and correspondingly reduces the expenses of 
the schools. The question of how far the Library ought, with 
due regard to its other work, or can within the appropriations 

made for it by the City Council, increase its work with the schools 
is therefore important, and requires constant and careful con- 
sideration. 



BRANCH CIRCULATION AND ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The branch libraries circulated for home use in the year just 
closed 685,327 volumes. The reading-room stations, which are 
really minor branches, circulated for home use 383,826 volumes. 
In addition 74, 1 82 volumes were issued from the Central Library 
through these branches and reading rooms. 

The circulation for home use, however, czmnot be taken as an 
adequate measure of the work of the branches, although it is 
the only part of the work which is recorded so as to be expressed 
statistically. Irrespective of the circulation of books for home 
reading the work done through the branches has increased to 
such an extent that the accommodations provided in many of 
the buildings occupied by them are most inadequate and incon- 
venient 



[7] 

As stated in our report last year: Boston should have the 
best equipped library system in the United States. Our citizens 
are proud of its Central Library building, and we believe are 
satisfied with the administration and working of the Library 
Department as a whole. But in respect to the buildings used for 
branches we are, on the whole, behind any other important city 
in the Union. We have no branch library building so con- 
structed as to be operated with the utmost efficiency and economy 
and with the best service for the public. 

The reading-room stations, which are of very great importance 
in bringing instructive books to those who would not otherwise 
have them, — which is the primary purpose of a library sup- 
ported by taxation, — are many of them inadequate and incon- 
venient, badly situated for convenient use, ill-ventilated, and in 
general not creditable to a city of the wealth and population of 
Boston. 

We invite the attention of the City Council especially to the 
matter of better accom.modations for some of our branch libraries 
and reading-room stations, particularly at Charlestown and East 
Boston, in Ward Six and in the district served by the Broadway 
Extension Reading Room. An examination of these branches 
and reading rooms, which we trust will be made, will show what 
they are more forcibly than any description we can give in this 
report. 

The Examining Committee of this year gave much time to the 
consideration of this matter, and made a very full and able report 
upon it. We call attention to all that they have said, and espe- 
cially to the conclusion of their report where they say, "On our 
Central Library building are the words 'Built by the People.' 
Of that stately central building the citizens may well be proud. 
But it is only a part of a system. Most of that system, in ser- 
vices, in uses of rich material, is good. But of it the branch 
libraries and reading rooms are an essential part. They are 
largely the hands which reach out to serve the people. Several 
of those hands, as shown above, are badly crippled on account 
of the insufficient accommodation provided for the operation of 
the branches. We would hide them from visitors to our City. 



[8] 

But they can be made whole and strong, to serve, if the people 
of Boston and their government desire that. The people who, 
under wise leadership, built the central building, and maintain 
the system, will surely remedy these conditions, if enough of the 
people understand them. The citizens who know them, espe- 
cially the residents of the North End, of East Boston and of 
South Boston, have a duty to perform, namely, — to bring to 
the citizens at large, as well as to the City government, the cry- 
ing need of better library facilities in those large neighborhoods." 
The time has passed when the branch libraries can be properly 
operated in buildings partly devoted to other uses. The scheme 
of a municipal building devoted to baths, gymnasiums, and other 
activities, and also providing for the Library, while apparently 
having advantages from the point of view of a neighborhood 
centre, does not properly provide for the work of the Library. 
Hie work the Library is doing is so far educational that it should 
be treated with the same consideration as to its accommodations 
as is given to the schools. Branch library buildings ought to be 
planned especially and solely for library purposes and should be 
dignified but not expensive or elaborate structures. The other 
important cities in the United States are providing for their 
branch libraries, independent buildings of modem construction 
specially adapted to library work. The Trustees are of the 
opinion that the same course should be followed here. It would 
add to the efficiency of the service, and benefit the people at 
large as much as any improvement which could be made in our 
library system. 

NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 

The Newspaper Room at the Central Library, the papers for 
which are mainly purchased from the income of a bequest of the 
late William C. Todd for that purpose, has 343 different papers 
filed for current reading, of which 266 are in the English lan- 
guage, 1 6 French, 1 5 German, 7 Italian, 7 Spanish, 7 Swedish, 
and the rest in 1 4 other languages, including one in Old Hebrew, 
published in Jerusalem, and one in Tagalese and English, pub- 
lished in the Phillipines; also Greek, Russian, Armenian, Po- 



[9] 

lish, Welsh, Hungarian, etc. During the last year about 20,667 
newspaper volumes were consulted by readers. 

One thousand five hundred and thirty-eight different periodi- 
cals, including serial issues published by institutions and by the 
state and national governments, are regularly filed and used in the 
Periodical Room at the Central Library, 1 83 in the Statistical, 
Music, Patent, and Fine Arts Departments and in the Children's 
Room, making with the 88 taken at the branches, 1 ,809 in all. 
These include all the leading periodicals of the world in every 
department of literature and science and in almost every lan- 
guage, all of which find ready readers. 

INTER-LIBRARY LOANS. 

Under the cooperative inter-library loan system books are 
occasionally lent to public libraries in other cities or towns for 
the temporary use of a person who wishes to consult a book 
which his local library does not possess. In this way 915 vol- 
umes were lent to libraries in the State, during the year 1910, 
and to libraries outside Massachusetts 79 volumes. On the other 
hand, a person in Boston can by this arrangement obtain in the 
same way from other libraries books which our Library does not 
have, and during the year 23 volumes were thus borrowed. 

CENTRAL LIBRARY BUILDING. 

On the fifth of May the Trustees made a contract approved 
by the Corporation Counsel as to authority and form and ap- 
proved by His Honor the Mayor, with Bela L. Pratt, for the 
completion of the Central Library building according to the 
original design, by placing bronze statuary on the marble pedes- 
tals previously erected to receive such statuary. This part of the 
work upon the building had originally been contracted for with 
Augustus Saint-Gaudens, but his death prevented the execution 
of it by him. 

Mr. Pratt is now proceeding with the execution of the work, 
which according to the terms of his contract must be completed 
by May 5, 1912, and which it is hoped will be completed at an 



[10] 

earlier date. The contract calls for the payment of $30,000 for 
the completed work, payable in fixed instalments as the work 
goes on. Payments are being made from the appropriation 
authorized by the Legislature in 1891 , Chapter 324 of the Acts 
of 1891, — "for the purpose of enabling the Trustees to com- 
plete the building, etc.** 

SALE OF CENTER BEQUEST REAL ESTATE. 

TTie last remaining piece of real estate received under the 
bequest of Joseph H. Center was sold by the Trustees in June. 
This was the property at 1 5 Arnold Street, consisting of a small 
lot of land and an old house in poor condition. The net proceeds 
of the sale were $1,140.21, and this sum was by vote of the 
Board transmitted to the City Treasurer to be added to the prin- 
cipal of the Center Fund. There will be no further addition to 
this Fund, since all the property received from Mr. Center has 
now been turned into cash and funded, the income to be devoted 
to the purchase of books. The total amount of the Fund, in- 
cluding this final payment, is $39,340.21. 

GIFT TO THE ALLEN A. BROWN COLLECTION. 

A notable and very valuable gift to the Allen A. Brown 
Music Library was received in November from Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry M. Rogers, of Boston, consisting of thirteen finely bound 
volumes of operas, each score illustrated with portraits and orig- 
inal letters of the composers and the singers taking part in the 
production of the pieces, together with original sketches for the 
costumes, by well-known French artists. These volumes, pur- 
chased in Europe by Mr. Rogers, were the personal copies of 
Louis Albert Vizentini who directed the performances in his 
capacity as manager and director of theatres and orchestras in 
Paris and St. Petersburg, and who died in 1 906. 

At the same time there was received by gift through Mr. 
Rogers, to be added to the Allen A. Brown Collection, the 
original manuscripts of various operatic scores by John Barnett, 
sometimes known as the "Father of English opera," who died 



[11] 

in 1890. These scores were presented at the request of Do- 
menico Dragonetti Barnett, of Cheltenham, England; of Regi- 
nald Barnett and Julius Barnett, of London; and of Mrs. Clara 
Kathleen (Barnett) Rogers, of Boston; and in fulfillment of the 
expressed wish of Mrs. Rosamund Mary Liszt (Barnett) Fran- 
cillon, wife of Robert E. Francillon, of London, recently de- 
ceased; all of whom were the children of John Barnett. 

Both these gifts are to be held by the Trustees on the terms 
and subject to the restrictions under which they hold the Allen A. 
Brown Collection. 

DEATH OF MR. JAMES L. WHITNEY. 

Mr. James L. Whitney, formerly Librarian, died September 
25, 1910. After his death the Trustees put upon their records 
the following statement as to his life and services: 

. . . "He had been connected with the Library service 
forty years, ten months and three days. During the early years 
of this extended period the American public library system was 
in process of development, and our own Library, as the first 
important institution of the kind, was making precedents and ac- 
complishing results to which Mr. Whitney, in no slight degree, 
contributed. 

"He was graduated from Yale College in the Class of 1856, 
remaining one year longer as Berkeley Scholar of the House, an 
honor earned by passing the best examination in the classics. 
While at Yale he gained some library experience, first as assist- 
ant librarian for one year and afterwards librarian for one year 
of the library of the Brothers in Unity, a collection of about 
12,000 volumes. 

"In 1868, after some years connection with the business of 
book-selling, he became Assistant Librarian of the Cincinnati 
Public Library, and on November 7, 1869, entered the cata- 
loguing department of our own Library. His subsequent service 
included the following promotions and transfers: Chief of the 
Catalogue Department from 1874 until March 31, 1899; Act- 
ing Librarian from March 31, 1899, until December 22, 1899; 
Librarian from December 22, 1 899, until his resignaton, Febru- 



[121 

ary 1 , 1 903 ; and Chief of the Department of Documents and 
Statistics from February 1, 1903, until his death. 

"While in charge of the Catalogue Department he edited for 
publication the important Ticknor Catalogue of Spcinish books, 
the Hand Book for Readers, the Bulletin of books added to the 
Library, and other printed catalogues and publications. All of 
these, particularly the Ticknor Catalogue, with its elaborate 
notes, exhibited the scholarly research and literary care which 
alway-s marked Mr. Whitney's work as a cataloguer. The pub- 
lic card catalogue, in its present form, is principally due to him. 
It grew under his supervision during twenty years of painstaking 
effort, and the result secured not only the appreciative recognition 
of readers who found the catalogue a practical guide to the col- 
lections within the Library, but also the unqualified commenda- 
tion of competent experts, — materially extending the reputation 
of the Library and enhancing Mr. Whitney's personal reputation 
among his professional contemporaries. 

"His life was in the institution with which he was so long con- 
nected. By his genial manner and kindly spirit he won the 
affection of his associates. He was seldom absent from his desk. 
His duty here was always to him a labor of love. He sought 
always with patriotic devotion to advance the interests of the insti- 
tution, and in passing from it he provided by liberal bequests for 
the continuation of the bibliographical work in which he was 
particularly interested. 

"The Trustees gratefully put upon record their appreciation 
of his long, faithful and efficient service." 

MONEY FOR MAINTAINING AND WORKING THE LIBRARY. 

Substantially all the money which the Trustees can use for the 
maintenance and working of the library system comes from the 
annual appropriation by the City Council. The Trust funds, 
that is, property given to the Trustees in trust for the uses of the 
Library, are by law required to be invested by the City Treasurer 
under the direction of the Finance Committee of the City. 

A detailed statement of these funds and the income therefrom 
is annually contained in the report of the City Treasurer and in 



[13] 

the report of the City Auditor, and therefore is not presented 
here. The income received from them in 1910 was $1 6,497.00. 
This income can only be used for the specific purposes of the 
several trusts under which it is held, which vary widely. Some 
are for the purchase of books for separate branches ; some for the 
addition of books to special collections, such as books on govern- 
ment and political economy, books in the Spanish and Portu- 
guese languages, valuable rare editions of books, books of a mili- 
tary and patriotic character, books in memory of specific persons, 
and, in one case, for books published before 1 850. 

During the past ten years the estimates of the Trustees, the 
recommendations by the Mayor, and the amounts appropriated 
by the City Council have been as follows: 













ESTIMATES 


AMOUNTS 
RECOMMENDED 


AMOUNTS 
APPROPRIATED 


ur its,\jsicc.o. 


BY MAYOR. 


BY CITY COUNCIL. 


1901 $291,713.65 


$300,000.00 


$302,000.00 


1902 . 










310.144.67 


305.000.00 


300.000.00 


1903 . 










318.383.10 


305.500.00 


305.500.00 


1904 . 










320.414.00 


300.000.00 


305.000.00 


1905 . 










325.465.00 


310.000.00 


310.000.00 


1906 . 










324.550.00 


320.000.00 


324.550.00 


1907 . 










326.100.00 


325.000.00 


325.000.00 


1908 . 










332.800.00 


325.000.00 


310.000.00 


1909 . 










335.200.00 


335.200.00 


349.455.00 


1910 . 










351.978.00 


351.978.00 


351,978.00 



PENSIONS AND RETIREMENT OF EMPLOYEES. 

We wish earnestly to press upon the consideration of the City 
Government and of the people of the City, the importance, not 
only from humanitarian but also from business considerations, of 
some provision which will render it unnecessary to retain in our 
service those who have been worn out by years of work in it, and 
whose retirement with suitable provision for their proper support 
is demanded, not only because it is humane but because it is for 
the best business interests of the Library and of the City. 



[141 

As bearing upon this important matter, we state the results of 
an examination made in compliance with the request of Your 
Honor in a circular letter, under date of October 6, 1910, in 
which the attention of the Board is called to Chapter 619 of the 
Acts of 1910, designated as "An Act to Authorize Cities and 
Towns of the Commonwealth to Establish Retirement Systems 
for their Employees." After summarizing the main points of 
this measure your letter continues: "Among the questions that 
arise in relation to the measure are: 

(a) The cost of the system to the City in actual pecuniary 
outlay. 

(b) Its effect on the service in removing aged employees who 
by their example tend to retard the efficiency of younger and more 
active men. 

(c) The positive gain resulting from the substitution of 
younger and stronger men for the retiring veteran. 

(d) The net gain or loss to the City as a whole, measured, 
first in terms of pecuniary outlay, and secondly, in terms of effi- 
ciency. 

We are then asked to consider the question in its various phases 
as it applies to this department. In compliance with your letter, 
computations have been made by the Librarian to determine the 
pecuniary effect of the act as applied to the employees of the 
Library. 

The Act provides for the retirement of employees with annui- 
ties and pensions, first, permissibly at age 60 after continuous 
service of fifteen years, or at nearest age thereafter at which the 
fifteen-year service period terminates, or, secondly, by compul- 
sion at age 70. There is also provision for the retirement of any 
employee at any age after thirty-five years of continuous service. 
Participation in the system is not compulsory as to present em- 
ployees. Persons entering the service after the system is in ope- 
ration must participate unless they are over 55 years of age when 
they enter the service, and in that case their service must end at 
age 70 without annuity or pension. 

The Act provides for contributions by employees, to form a 
basis for annuities, by means of continuous assessments upon 



[151 

wages or salaries, at a rate of not less than one per cent nor more 
than five per cent in amount, as often as the wages or salaries are 
payable, except that employees who receive more them $30 per 
week are not to be assessed upon a sum in excess of $30 weekly. 

Payments to an employee who is retired under the Act are, 
first, an annuity based upon the contributions made by the em- 
ployee by the assessments upon wages or salary as previously 
stated; second, a pension contributed by the City equivalent to 
such an annuity ; and third, a pension for prior service, consisting 
of payments contributed by the City equivalent to such an annuity 
as would have been earned if the employee had made regular 
contribution by similar assessments upon wages or salary from the 
employee's date of entrance to the service to the date of establish- 
ment of the retirement system. 

Two kinds of annuity are offered by the Act. One is a life 
annuity payable monthly; the other a life annuity payable 
monthly, with provision for payment to the legal representatives 
of the annuitant upon his death, of the difference between the 
payments previously made to him and the sum of his contribu- 
tions, with interest. Only the first form has been considered in 
our computations, since under it the larger annual payments 
would be made by the City, and it is the purpose of the compu- 
tations to show the maximum, i e., the greatest possible cost to 
the City, as well as the largest annual payments to the employees. 

Provision is made in the Act for the administration of the 
retirement system, for certain details of mcmagement, and for 
the investment of the contributions of employees. The interest 
derived from such investment is to be compounded with the prin- 
cipal, so as to enlarge the sum upon which the annuities are 
based, and thereby enlarge the annuities and the pensions which 
are contributed by the City in correspondence with the annuities. 
In no case is the total annual payment to an employee to be less 
than $200, and any deficiency is to be made up by contributions 
from the City. 

Any preliminary estimate of the financial effect of the Act 
must be to an extent hypothetical. There are certain points 
which cannot be determined in advance, for example, the exact 



[16] 

number of employees who would elect to participate, the age of 
retirement, etc., but in making the computations as related to the 
Library all employees now 45 years of age or over have been 
considered as participating, and therefore the mziximum cost to 
the City estimated under the following assumptions: 

First. The Act is considered as if it were to go into effect in 
the present year. Retentions of five per cent are to be made 
thereafter from wages or salaries as payable, except that em- 
ployees receiving more than $30 per week are, as provided in the 
Act, not to be assessed in excess of $30 weekly. Ihis would 
provide for the maximum contribution from employees permitted 
under the Act, and would therefore result in the largest possible 
contribution from the City. 

Second. Three different retirement limits have been consid- 
ered: age 60 (or the earliest possible age under the fifteen-year 
service requirement) ; age 65, a point midway between the ear- 
liest and latest possible times of retirement ; and age 70 the com- 
pulsory age of retirement. 

Ihird. In computing the pensions for prior service, present 
wages have been taken as the basis of estimating the contribu- 
tions which the employees would have made if the system had 
been in operation at the time of their entrance into service. If 
the Act were in operation however it would be found that in 
nearly every case wages in the early years of service were smaller 
than present wages. The computed pensions for prior service 
forming part of the annual payments to employees shown in the 
tables are therefore somewhat larger than would actually accrue. 
But, on the other hand, accelerations of prior-service pensions by 
additions of interest accumulations have been disregarded in the 
computations, for two reasons, first, it was found that in many 
cases in dealing with small amounts and limited periods of accu- 
mulation the element of interest would not materially affect the 
result ; and, secondly, the omission of the element of interest was 
considered to offset the excess of present wages over the smaller 
wages in the earlier periods of service. In computing the basis 
of annuities to be derived from employees' future contributions 
and the pension for future service derived from the City's equiva- 



[17] 

lent payments, interest on the employees' contributions has been 
allowed for, at the rate of three per cent, compounded semi- 
cinnually. 

Fourth. Every employee now in the service 45 years of age 
or over has been considered as retiring under the Act. Actually 
the number retiring would be somewhat reduced by the death of 
employees or their separation from the service for other reasons 
before reaching the age of retirement. But the number of em- 
ployees under consideration is so small that this reduction, inas- 
much as it would involve complications in computation, and 
would not affect the result except to slightly reduce the cost to 
the City, has been disregarded. 

Fifth. In computing the maximum annual expense to the City, 
payments to retiring employees are assumed to continue for a 
number of years corresponding to the probability of continuance 
of life, after age 60, 65, or 70 as the case may be, as determined 
by the American experience life tables. 

With these explanations we present tables showing the results 
of the computations. 

The first table shows the number of employees retiring by 
years, under the provisions of the Act, at retiring age 60 (or at 
the age nearest above 60 when the required 15 years of service 
will terminate) . This table assumes therefore that the employees 
will retire at the earliest possible age. It shows the average total 
payment annually per employee, in form of annuity and pension 
combined, the total amount required in each year to meet the 
payments on account of employees retiring in that year, the part 
of such total amount that is earned by employees' contributions, 
and the part contributed by the City. The employees retiring 
in 1911, or immediately upon the establishment of the system, 
would receive a pension for prior service only, all of which 
would be contributed by the City, no annuity fund having been 
established by employees' contributions. 



[181 



EMPLOYEES ASSUMED AS RETIRING AT AGE 60.* 



Years. 


NUMBER 
RETIRING. 


AVERAGE 

PAYMENT 
TO EACH. 


TOTAL AMOUNT 

REQUIRED FOR 

PAYMENTS. 


earned by 
employees' 
contribu- 
TIONS. 


AMOUNT 
CONTRIB- 
UTED BY 
THE CITY. 


1911 


18 


$202 


$3,636 




$3,636 




I9I2 


5 


200 


1,000 


$28 


972 


1913 


4 


200 


800 


35 


765 


1914 


4 


200 


800 


55 


745 


1915 


1 


200 


200 


29 


171 


1916 


3 


200 


600 


41 


559 


1917 


2 


200 


400- 


46 


354 


1918 


3 


200 


600 


84 


516 


1919 


7 


200 


1,400 


330 


1,070 


1920 


4 


200 


800 


156 


644 


1921 


3 


200 


600 


121 


479 


1922 


1 


200 


200 


71 


129 


1923 


2 


234 


468 


147 


321 


1924 


2 


200 


400 


119 


281 


1925 


3 


200 


600 


168 


432 


1926 


7 


200 


1,400 


436 


964 



*Or age nearest 60, possible under the period of service fixed by the statute. 

The second table is identical in scope with that which precedes 
it, except that the retiring age is assumed to be 65; or an age 
midway between the earliest and latest possible years. 



EMPLOYEES ASSUMED AS RETIRING AT AGE 65.* 



Years. 


NUMBER 
RETIRING. 


AVERAGE 

PAYMENT 
TO EACH. 


TOTAL AMOUNT 

REQUIRED FOR 

PAYMENTS. 


EARNED BY 
EMPLOYEES* 
CONTRIBU- 
TIONS. 


AMOUNT 
CONTRIB- 
UTED BY 
THE CITY. 


1911 


5 


$206 


$1,030 




$1,030 




1912 


1 


200 


200 


$6 


194 


1913 


1 


228 


228 


14 


214 


1914 


4 


200 


800 


53 


747 


1915 


3 


254 


762 


84 


678 


1916 


1 


200 


200 


45 


155 


1917 


2 


217 


434 


80 


354 


1918 


8 


200 


1.600 


356 


1.244 


1919 


2 


237 


474 


87 


387 



*Those now over 65 are assumed to retire at once. 



[19] 

EMPLOYEES ASSUMED AS RETIRING AT AGE 65.* 



Years. 


number 
retiring. 


AVERAGE 
PAYMENT 
TO EACH. 


TOTAL AMOUNT 

REQUIRED FOR 

PAYMENTS. 


EARNED BY 
EMPLOYEES* 
CONTRIBU- 
TIONS. 


AMOUNT 
CONTRIB- 
UTED BY 
THE CITY. 


1920 


1 


200 


200 


55 


145 


1921 


5 


200 


1,000 


216 


784 


1922 


4 


262 


1,048 


264 


784 


1923 


2 


200 


400 


108 


292 


1924 


4 


299 


1,196 


403 


793 


1925 


5 


299 


1.495 


434 


1.061 


1926 


4 


211 


844 


326 


518 


1927 


1 


400 


400 


107 


293 


1928 


3 


323 


969 


333 


636 


1929 


3 


264 


792 


282 


510 


1930 


4 


270 


1,080 


387 


693 


1931 


7 


257 


1.799 


744 


1.055 



*Those now over 65 are assumed to retire at once. 



The third table, conforms to the others, except that the retiring 
age is fixed at 70. This table therefore assumes that no employee 
will retire until compelled to do so by arriving at age 70. 



EMPLOYEES ASSUMED AS RETIRING AT AGE 70. 



Years. 


NUMBER 
RETIRING. 


AVERAGE 

PAYMENT 

TO EACH. 


TOTAL AMOUNT 

REQUIRED FOR 

PAYMENTS. 


earned by 
employees' 
contribu- 
TIONS. 


AMOUNT 
CONTRIB- 
UTED BY 
THE CITY. 


1911 


2 


$216 


$432 




$432 




1912 
1913 












1 


200 


200 


$13 


187 


1914 
1915 












1 


200 


200 


24 


176 


1916 


1 


215 


215 


26 


189 


1917 


1 


211 


211 


49 


162 


1918 


1 


369 


369 


64 


305 


1919 


4 


242 


968 


189 


779 


1920 


3 


401 


1.203 


244 


959 


1921 


1 


342 


342 


116 


226 


1922 


2 


355 


710 


189 


521 


1923 


8 


326 


2.608 


782 


1.826 


1924 


2 


302 


604 


181 


423 


1925 


1 


271 


271 


111 


160 



[20] 

EMPLOYEES ASSUMED AS RETIRING AT AGE 70. 



Years. 


NUMBER 
RETIRING. 


AVERAGE 

PAYMENT 
TO EACH. 


TOTAL AMOUNT 

REQUIRED FOR 

PAYMENTS. 


earned by 
employees' 
contribu- 
TIONS. 


AMOUNT 

CONTRIB- 

, UTED BY 

THE CITY. 


1926 


5 


229 


1,145 


420 


725 


1927 


4 


401 


1,604 


490 


1.114 


1928 


2 


278 


556 


200 


356 


1929 


4 


278 


1,912 


721 


1.191 


1930 


5 


452 


2,260 


755 


1,505 


1931 


4 


342 


1,368 


569 


799 


1932 


1 


589 


589 


182 


407 


1933 


3 


492 


1,476. 


554 


922 


1934 


3 


406 


1,218 


486 


732 


1935 


4 


418 


1,672 


653 


1,019 


1936 


7 


399 


2,793 


1,209 


1,584 



It should be pointed out that, as applied to the employees in 
the Library service, of age 45 or over, the contributions from 
vv^ages or salary if made at the highest possible rate permitted by 
the law, i e., five per cent, if the employee retired at age 60 or 
at earliest possible age thereafter permitted by the fifteen-'^ear 
service limitation, would not, on the average, if enlarged by the 
regular pension contributions to be made by the City, both for 
prior and future service, reach the minimum annual payment of 
$200, except in the case of the employees coming to retirement in 
191 1 and 1923. Therefore the City would be obliged to make 
such further contributions as would bring the annual payments 
up to $200. On the other hand, it is equally clear that the 
combined annuities and pensions, payable under the conditions 
assumed in the table, which, it will be remembered, are based 
upon the highest possible rate of contribution by employees, 
would not upon the average exceed $200 per annum per em- 
ployee, except in the instance of those retiring in 1911 and 1 923, 
in which cases, however, the averages are but $202 and $234, 
respectively. 

When the retiring age is assumed at 65, as in the second table, 
those who would retire in 1912, 1914, 1916, 1918, 1920, 
1921 and 1923, would not, upon the average, acquire the right 
to annuity and pensions combined so large as the minimum of 



[21] 

$200, and contributions from the City would be required to 
bring the average up to $200. The average annual payments to 
employees retiring in the other years range from $206 (to those 
retiring in 1931) to $400 (to one retiring in 1927), in only 
eight instances exceeding $250. 

If retirement were deferred until age 70, no employees would 
retire in the years 1912 and 1914. Those retiring in 1913 and 
1915, as shown by the third table, would not acquire right to 
annuity and pensions up to the maximum limit, v^'hich would 
therefore require the City to raise the amount to the sum of $200 
annually. The employees retiring in the other years would re- 
ceive annual payments ranging on the average from $21 1 (year 
1917) to $589 (to one employee only retiring in the year 
1932). 

It will also be clear from these three tables that under the pro- 
visions of the Act employees in the library service if assessed up 
to the limit fixed in the Act, namely, five per cent of their wages 
or salaries, would not upon the average, if retiring at or before 
age 65, become entitled to annuity and pension payments com- 
bined so large as $6.50 per week (except in the single instance 
of the employee retiring at age 65 in the year 1927), and for 
the most part would receive upon the average less than $5 per 
week. If they were retired under compulsion at age 70 the 
average would in one instanec be raised to $1 1 .33 per week (to 
the employee retiring in year 1932) but, although the average 
for the entire number of employees included in the table is $7 
per week, in 22 instances the average does not rise above $6 per 
week. 

The average payments to groups of employees retiring at age 
70 would be as follows: 1 1 employees would receive from $3.85 
to $4.50 per week; 13 employees from $4.65 to $5.96 per 
week; 23 employees from $6.27 to $7.67 per week; 22 em- 
ployees from $7.71 to $9.46 per week; one employee $1 1.33 
per week. The average payments to employees retiring at age 
60 would be, for 49, $3.85 per week, for 18, $3.88 per week, 
and for 2, $4.50 per week. For those retiring at age 65 the 
average payments would be as follows : for 22 employees, $3.85 



[22] 

per week; for 12 employees from $3.96 to $4.38 per week; for 
32 employees from $4.56 to $5.75 per week; 4 employees from 
$6.21 to $7.70 per week. 

It seems clear that no employee would voluntarily retire from 
the service at age 60, upon the small payment per week accruing 
at that age; and that few would do so by choice at age 65. It 
is probable that practically everyone would remain until forced 
to leave at age 70. And the comparatively small weekly allow- 
ance accruing in numerous cases at that advanced age would 
hardly overcome the disinclination of the Trustees to force the 
retirement of faithful employees — wl]o might have little if any 
private means of providing for their maintenance during the few 
remaining years of life. 

The three tables upon the folded insert sheet show the cost per 
year to the City, under the conditions assumed in the preceding 
tables. 

The cost of administration of the general system would under 
the Act be borne by the City, and a part of this cost should of 
course be charged against the Library ; but the exact percentage 
so charged cannot be easily separated, by means of any data 
available to us, and this charge has been ignored in estimating the 
cost to the City of the application of the system to the library 
employees. It would probably not materially affect the results 
as shown in the tables, since the number of library employees in- 
cluded is but a small part of the entire number of city employees 
brought under the Act, and the burden of administration would 
be distributed over the whole number. As to the cost to the City 
therefore, the tables show the maxiwum cost year by year, up to 
1 936, of the application of the Act to the present library force, 
under the conditions assumed, exclusive of cost of administration. 
This maximum would be reduced proportionately?^ if the em- 
ployees were assessed at less than five per cent of their wages or 
salaries (instead of at five per cent as assumed) and would also 
be slightly reduced by the inclusion of interest upon the assessed 
sums, by the death of a few employees before arriving at the 
retiring age, and bv the death of a few before reaching the limit 
of expectancy of life after retirement. On the other hand if the 



Payments contributed by the City on account of employees retiring at age 60. By Years. 



Year 


1911 1912 


1913 1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


[□idaJ payments. 


$3,636 $ 972 


$ 765 $ 745 


$ 171 


$ 559 


$ 354 


$ 516 


$1,070 


$ 644 


$ 479 


$ 129 


$ 321 


$ 281 


$ 432 


$ 964 


$ — 


$ — 


$ — 


$ 


$ — 


$ — 


$ — 


$ — ■ 


$ — 


$ 


CoDtiiiuatioos, 


3.636 


972 765 


745 


171 


559 


. 354 


516 


1,070 


644 


479 


129 


321 


281 


432 


964 


964 


964 


964 


964 


964 


964 


964 


964 


964 






3,636 972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1,070 


644 


479 


129 


321 


281 


432 


432 


432 


432 


432 


432 


432 


432 


432 


432 








3.636 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1.070 


644 


479 


129 


321 


281 


281 


281 


281 


261 


281 


281 


281 


281 


281 








j 


3,434 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1.070 


644 


479 


129 


321 


321 


321 


321 


321 


321 


321 


321 


321 


321 














3.434 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1,070 


644 


479 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 














3,434 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1,070 


644 


479 


479 


479 


479 


479 


479 


479 


479 


479 


















3,434 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1.070 


644 


644 


644 


644 


644 


483 


483 


483 






















3,232 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


1.070 


1.070 


1.070 


1.070 


917 


917 


917 











1 
















3,232 


972 


765 


745 


171 


559 


354 


516 


516 


516 


516 


516 


344 



































3,030 


972 
2.828 


765 

972 

2.424 


745 

765 

972 

1.414 


171 
745 
765 
972 
808 


559 
171 
745 
765 
972 
404 


354 
559 
171 
745 
765 
583 


354 
559 
171 
745 
191 
583 


354 
559 
171 
559 
191 
583 


354 
559 

559 
191 
583 


177 

166 
191 
583 


166 
191 
389 


186 
191 
389 


191 


191 


191 


































202 


202 


202 


202 


202 


202 








' 




Tot Js : 


$3,636 


$4,608 


$5,374 


$6,118 


$6,087 


$6,646 


$7,000 


$7,516 


$8,384 


$9,028 


$9,305 


$9,232 


$9,149 


$8,420 


$8,246 


$8,806 


$8,215 


$7,641 


$7,455 


$7,284 


$6,022 


$5,318 


K772 


$3,280 


$2,797 


$2,318 



Payments contributed by the City on account of employees retiring at age 65. By Years. 



Year 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


Initial payments. 


$1,030 $ 194 


$ 214 


$ 747 


$ 678 


$ 155 


$ 354 


$1,244 


$ 387 


$ 145 


$ 784 


$ 784 


$ 292 


$ 793 


$1,061 


$ 518 


$ 293 


$ 636 


$ 510 


$ 693 


$1,055 


$ — 


$ — 


$ — 


$ — 


$ — 


Continuations. 


1.030 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1.244 


387 


145 


784 


784 


292 


793 


1,061 


518 


293 


636 


510 


693 


1.055 


1.055 


1.055 


1.055 


1.055 








1,030 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


784 


764 


292 


793 


1,061 


518 


293 


636 


510 


693 


693 


693 


693 


693 










1.030 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


764 


784 


292 


793 


1,061 


518 


293 


636 


510 


510 


510 


510 


510 












824 


194 


214 


747 


676 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


764 


784 


292 


793 


1,061 


516 


293 


636 


636 


636 


636 


636 














824 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


784 


764 


292 


793 i 


1,061 


518 


293 


293 


293 


293 


293 
















824 


194 


214 


747 


676 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


764 


784 


292 


793 


1.061 


518 


518 


518 


518 


518 


















824 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


784 


7M' 


292 


793 


1,061 


1.061 


1.061 


1.061 







' 
















618 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


784 


764 


292 


793 


793 


793 


























618 


194 


214 


747 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


764 


784 


292 


292 































412 


194 
206 


214 
194 


747 
214 


678 


155 


354 


1,244 


387 


145 


784 


784 


n 


~ 








Totak: 


$1,030 


$1,224 


$1,438 


$2,185 


$2,657 


$2,812 


$3,166 


$4,410 


$4,591 


$4,736 


$5,314 


$5,892 


$5,978 


$6,577 


$6,677 


$6,517 


$6,655 


$6,937 


$6,203 


$6,509 


$7,419 


$6,635 


$5,851 


$5,559 


$4,766 


$3,705 



Payments contributed by the City on account of employees retiring at age 70. — By Years. 

Year 1911 1912 1913 19141915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 



Initial payments. 
Continuations, 



$ 176 $ 189 $ 162 $ 305 $ 779 $ 959 $ 226 $ 521 $1,826 $ 423 $ 160 $ 725 $1,114 $ 356 $1,191 $1,505 $ 799 $ 407 $ 922 $ 732 



187 



162 



305 



779 



959 



226 



521 1,826 



423 



725 1,114 35b 1,191 1,505 

356 1,191 



1,505 



407 
799 



922 



$1,019 $1,584 

732 1,019 





1 216 


167 


176 


189 


162 


305 


779 


959 


226 


521 


1.626 


423 


160 


725 


1.114 


356 


1,191 


1,505 


799 


407 


922 






216 


187 


176 


189 


162 


305 


779 


959 


226 


521 


1.826 


423 


160 


725 


1.114 


356 


1,191 


1,505 


799 


407 




1 




216 


187 


176 


169 


162 


305 


779 


959 


226 


521 


1.826 


423 


160 


725 


1,114 


356 


1,191 


1,505 


799 












187 


176 


189 


162 


305 


779 


959 


226 


521 


1.826 


423 


160 


725 


1,114 


356 


1,191 


1,505 




I 1 












176 


189 


162 


305 


779 


959 


226 


521 


1,826 


423 


160 , 


725 


1,114 


356 


1,191 


TotaU: $ 432 $ 432 


$ 619 $ 619 $ 579 $ 768 


$ 930 


$1,235 


$1,798 


$2,757 


$2,796 


$3,317 


K967 


$5,201 


$5,199 


$5,619 


$5,954 


$5,351 


$6,316 


$7,300 


$6,273 


$6,257 


$7,019 


$7,026 


$6,931 


$8,159 



[23] 

employees' contributions were assessed at less than five per cent 
of wages and salaries, the average weekly payments to them 
would be proportionately reduced below the average shown in 
the preceding tables. That is, if assessed at one per cent they 
would receive one-fifth of the cimount shown in the tables ; or, if 
assessed two and one-half per cent they would receive one-half 
the amount shown in the tables, etc. 

In our judgment the Act of 1910, to the effect of which your 
inquiries refer, would be of no practical value to this department, 
either by increasing the efficiency of its service, or in reducing the 
expense by the City for the maintenance of the department. 

BRUSSELS INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF ARCHIVISTS AND 

LIBRARIANS. 

The International Congress of Archivists and Librarians, held 
at Brussels, August 28—3 1 , was so notable an occasion in respect 
to library work that the Trustees deemed it proper for the Li- 
brary to be represented at its deliberations. Mr. William F. 
Kenney of the Board, who attended the Congress, made a report 
thereon which is appended hereto. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Trustees appointed an Examining Committee of persons 
not members of the Board, and joined with them the President 
of the Board as Chairman, to examine the Library and make to 
the Board a report of its condition, as required by the ordinance. 
That Committee consisted of the following persons : 



Mr. Jeffrey R. Brackett. 

Mr. G. L. Brune. 

Mr. George W. Chadwick. 

Mr. Henry V. Cunningham. 

Mrs. Wirt Dexter. 

Mr. George C. Dickson. 

Rev. William J. Dixon. 

Mr. Thomas M. Donnelly. 

Miss Rose E. Fitzgerald. 

Mr. James A. Gallivan. 



Miss Heloise E. Hersey. 
Mr. Samuel H. Hudson. 
Mrs. Francis Hurtubis, Jr. 
Mr. Stanton H. King. 
Mr. Frank Leveroni. 
Mr. Joseph B. Maccabe. 
Mr. Alexander L. MacDonald. 
Mr. Max Mitchell. ' 
Mr. Thomas A. Mullen. 
Miss Alice F. Murray. • 



[241 

Miss Elizabeth M. Needham. Rev. James A. Supple. 

Mrs. Ellor Carlisle Ripley. Rev. Wm. H. Van Allen. 

Mr. George H. Sargent. Mr. Thomas M. Watson. 

Rev. Samuel Snelling. Mr. George N. Whipple. 

The report of the Committee is hereto annexed and included 
as part of this report. 

CONCLUSION. 

The Trustees have held regular meetmgs each week during 
the year except during the summer months, for the transaction of 
the business of the Department, which is constantly increasing in 
amount and in the detail required for its proper administration. 

They feel that the Library service has been well administered 
during the year, and that this is due to the industry, intelligence, 
and loyalty with which the employees of the Library have per- 
formed their respective duties. The Trustees are glad to be able 
to bear testimony to the substantially uniform excellence of their 
work. 

JosiAH H. Benton. 
Thomas F. Boyle. 
William F. Kenney. 
Samuel Carr. 
Alexander Mann. 



[26] 



Dr. 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for salaries — 
General administration 
Sunday and evening force 

To expenditures for books — 
From City appropriation . 
Trust funds income 
Carnegie gift, Galatea collection 
Sullivan bequest 



To general expenditures — 

Newspapers, from Todd fund income 

Periodicals 

Furniture and fixtures 

Gas 

Electric lighting 

Cleaning . 

Small supplies 



idB 



fares 



Ic 

Stationery 

Rents 

Fuel 

Repairs 

Freights and cartage . 

Transportation between Central 

Telephone 

Postage and telegrams 

Typewriting 

Travelling expenses (including 

library service) 
Grounds .... 
Lecture account (lantern slides cuid operator) 
Miscellaneous expense .... 



Printing Department: 

To expenditures for salaries ..... 
To general expenditures — 

Stock 

Equipment ....... 

Electric light and power ..... 

Contract work ....... 

Rent 

Freights and cartage ...... 

Insurance ....... 

Gas ........ 

Cleaning ........ 

Small supplies, ice, repairs, furniture and fixtures 



$182,498.10 
26,125.03 



$24,295.89 

15,453.93 

5.50 

2,221.76 



$2,064.82 

6,880.77 

7,099.78 

2,234.43 

1,361.34 

9,530.22 

3,373.77 

259.69 

1,670.48 

16,683.48 

11.919.50 

2.530.76 

1.554,41 

5,242.40 

748.06 

1,191.81 

6.08 

822.38 

532.74 

151.00 

10.00 



$7,029.93 

3.230.47 
2.404.20 
283.10 
487.42 
524.80 
431.25 
195.75 
227.45 
122.20 
190.35 



$208,623.13 



41,977.08 



75.867.92 



Carried forward 



15,126.92 
$341,595.05 



[27] 



EXPENSES, JANUARY 31, 191 1. 



By City Appropriation, 1910-1! . 
Income from Trust funds 
Interest credited on bank deposits 
Payments received for books lost . 
Carnegie gift for Galatea collection 
Sullivan bequest .... 



By Balances brought forward February 1, 1910 
Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Accrued interest on bank deposits 
Trust funds income balance, City Treasury 
Carngeie gift for Galatea collection 
Sullivan bequest ..... 



$351,978.00 

16,497.00 

169.89 

383.82 

100.00 

2,179.64 



$5,349.12 

3,691 .45 

2,230.47 

19,910.18 

200.00 

42.12 



Cr. 



$371,308.35 



31.423.34 



Carried forward 



$402,731.69 



[28] 



Dr. 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Brought forward ...... 

Binding Department: 

To expenditures for salaries . . . . . $28,715.35 

To general expenditures — 

Stock 2.862.63 

Equipment 127.90 

Electric light and power ...... 112.80 

Contract work ........ 6.15 

Rent 924.81 

Freight and cartage ....... 481 .00 

Insurance ........ 195.75 

Gas • . 37.13 

Cleaning 134.21 

Small supplies, ice, repairs, furniture and fixtures . 145.60 

To AMOUNT PAID INTO CiTY TREASURY: 

From fines ......... $5,516.65 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists .... 71.87 

Commission on telephone stations ..... 167.57 

Sale of waste paper ....... 163.81 

Money found in the Library ..... 2.36 

Sale Center fund real estate ..... 1,140.21 

To Balances. January 31, 1911 : 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . . $638.83 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . 460.90 

Trust funds income balance, City Treasury . . 23,598.72 

Accrued interest on bank deposits .... 2,400.36 

Carnegie gift for Galatea collection .... 294.50 



$341,595.05 



33,743.33 



7,062.47 



27,393.31 



$409,794.16 



[29] 



EXPENSES. JANUARY 31. 1911. 



Brought forivarJ 
By Receipts: 
From 



Cr. 

$402,731.69 



''?" ; ■,„•.•,..• • • • • $5,516.65 



Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 

Commission on telephone stations . 

Sales of waste paper . 

Money found in the Library 

Sale of Center fund real estate to be funded 



71.87 

167.57 

163.81 

2.36 

1,140.21 



7.062.47 



$409,794.16 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

A City Ordinance requires the Trustees to "annually appoint 
an Examining Committee of not less than five persons, not mem- 
bers of said Board, who, together with one of said Board as 
Chairman," shall examine the Library and make to the Board a 
report of its condition. 

This Committee was appointed November 4, 1910, with Mr. 
Josiah H. Benton, the representative of the Board of Trustees, 
as Chairman ex officio. Miss Delia Jean Deery of the library 
staff was appointed Clerk, and the work of investigation and re- 
port was distributed among the following sub-committees: 

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE. 

Mr. Samuel H. Hudson, Chairman. 
Mr. George N. Whipple. Mr. G. L. Brune. 

BOOKS AND FINE ARTS. 

Mr. Jeffrey R. Bracketl, Chairman. 
Mr. George W. Chadwick. Rev. Wm. H. Van Allen. 

Mr. George H. Sargent. 

PRINTING AND BINDING. 
Mr. Thomas M. Donnelly, Chairman. Mr. Alexander L. MacDoneJd. 

BRANCHES AND DELIVERY STATIONS. 

SOUTH BOSTON AND SOUTH END BRANCHES, CfTY POINT AND BROADWAY EXTENSION 

READING ROOMS. 

Mr. James A. Gallivan, Chairman. 
Rev. William J. Dixon. Mrs. Francis Hurtubis, Jr. 



[311 

CHARLESTOWN AND EAST BOSTON BRANCHES, ORIENT HEIGHTS READING ROOM. 

Mr. Stanton H. King, Chairman. 
Mr. Joseph B. Maccabe. Mr. Max Mitchell. 

BRIGHTON, JAMAICA PLAIN AND WEST ROXBURY BRANCHES, ROSLINDALE, BOYLSTON 

STATION, WARREN STREET, ROXBURY CROSSING, PARKER HILL AND 

ALLSTON READING ROOMS. 

Rev. Samuel Snelling, Chairman. 
Miss Elizabeth M. Needham. Mr. Thomas M. Watson. 



DORCHESTER. ROXBURY AND UPHAM's CORNER BRANCHES, CODMAN SQUARE. MT. 

PLEASANT, MT. BOWDOIN, LOWER MILLS, MATTAPAN AND NEPONSET 

READING ROOMS. 

Mr. George C. Dickson, Chairman. 
Miss Alice F. Murray. Mr. Thomas A. Mullen. 

WEST END BRANCH. INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL AND NORTH STREET READING ROOMS. 

Miss Heloise E. Hersey, Chairman. 
Rev. Wm. H. Van Allen. Mr. Frank Leveroni. 

children's department and work with schools. 

Mrs. Wirt Dexter, Chairman. 
Rev. James A, Supple. Mr. Henry V. Cunningham. 

Mrs. EUor Carlisle Ripley. Miss Rose E. Fitzgerald. 

GENERAL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Jeffrey R. Brackett, Chairman. 
Rev. James A. Supple. Miss Heloise E. Hersey. 

Mrs. Wirt Dexter. Mr. Max Mitchell. 

The Report of the Examining Committee follows : 

To the Trustees of the Public Library of the Cit^ of Boston: 

The Examining Committee appointed by you, under City 
Ordinance, for the year 1910-11, presents to you and to the 
City Government the following report: 



[32] 

Ten sub-committees, among which the various duties have been 
divided, have given considerable and considerate attention to 
their duties ; several of them have done work which is noteworthy. 
Several of their suggestions, which are for improving the library 
service in details of maintenance or administration, have been 
passed on directly to the Trustees and the Librarian. Some of 
these suggestions are already being carried out. 

One suggestion from the sub-committee on books and fine arts 
should go to the public because it can be carried out only by the 
action of one or more citizens. There is need of a fund, in the 
hands of the Trustees, whose income isf available for purchase of 
books which are desirable, but which cannot be bought from the 
usual resources, which perchance are very costly or have to be 
secured very quickly. The Library now has several funds for 
specified purposes; the proposed emergency fund should be 
wholly unrestricted. May some thoughtful giver make such a 
gift or bequest! 

The sub-committee on administration and finance speaks of 
two matters of direct interest to citizens, especially the many who 
use the Library. One is the complaint that at times there is am 
unusual delay in obtaining books in Bates Hall. This commit- 
tee answers: "From about a dozen tests made by us, we are 
convinced that this service is as good as is possible, considering 
the distance of Bates Hall from the stack-rooms, and other struc- 
tural conditions." Speaking generally, it believes that the public 
receives at the Library consideration and courtesy equal to that 
in any branch of public service. The other and allied matter is 
the compensation received by the minor officials of the Library. 
Some salaries seem to be inadequate. But the committee empha- 
sizes the need, which has already been published by the Trustees, 
of pensions for whose who have served long. It speaks of salaries 
and pensions in the public school system, and adds "the fact that 
there is no law allowing similar financial assistance to employees 
of the Public Library is one that seems to us to merit immediate 
consideration." 

The Examining Committee, as one body and with all possible 
earnestness, brings forward one matter of greatest importance. 



[33] 

The Trustees and former committees have published it, but the 
public generally do not as yet sufficiently feel it to be the public's 
problem. It is the immediate provision of better facilities in sev- 
eral branch libraries and reading rooms. The following extracts 
from reports of several sub-committees set forth vividly but accu- 
ately the greatest of these needs. 

There can be no doubt, says the sub-committee on children 
and work with schools, about the eagerness of the school children 
to read eind use the branches and reading rooms. This is proved 
by the constcint demand for books. It is the children whom we 
hope to train to become a reading generation, but the children of 
Boston or ciny other city will never find pleasure in frequenting 
reading rooms unless these rooms are made attractive. We speak 
of appealing to the child's imagination and teaching him a love 
for the beautiful. We would do well to inculcate these lessons 
by our public institutions. Some of our libraries and reading 
rooms simply cannot acconmiodate the children. No one can 
question the need of more fitting quarters in the East Boston, 
Broadway Extension and North End districts. There is not only 
lack of room, but no attempt can be made under present condi- 
tions to make the rooms fitting or attractive. It remains for a 
people devoted to the interests and welfare of their children to 
demand proper rooms. 

The City Point Reading Room, for example, is in poor loca- 
tion and in too small a room, under a moving picture show, the 
noise of which is distinctly heard in the' reading room. Hiere are 
in the vicinity four schools as well as the Perkins Institute. The 
children from the schools flock in especially between four and 
six o'clock. There is seating capacity for only fifty, whereas, 
twice that number is sometimes in the room. The children stand 
outside and peer in through the windows to see if there are vaceuit 
seats. Inside, when the seats are filled, the children stand around, 
leaning against the wall or the book shelves. The ventilation 
cannot be good under such conditions. Last year the circulation 
of books from this room was large in comparison with other 
reading rooms; it is increasing. But the defects in location and 
accommodation at the City Point Reading Room can be found 



[34] 

in much more aggravated form in the Broadway Extension 
Reading Room. This is within a few feet of the Elevated Rail- 
road, with noise at times deafening. It seats but sixty persons. 
There are over three thousand children over ten years of age in 
the schools which make use of this reading room. Many of them 
use this room for reference work, and in preparation for writing 
compositions. We are told that when the three graduating 
classes of the neighboring schools have home lessons on the same 
night, which require reference reading, all who wish to use the 
reference books cannot even get inside the door. Here young 
men and women who have left school come to read, and older 
men, also. There is only one reading room for children and 
adults. The ventilation is poor. 

The East Boston Branch Library was visited by the sub-com- 
mittee at five o'clock on an afternoon early in December. They 
report that they were astonished by its wretched condition. The 
outside entrance was poorly lighted and extremely uninviting. 
As they stepped into the entrance, the narrow, winding stairway 
seemed more like the old rickety stairway of a forlorn "ram- 
shackle'* than the stairs of a public library. 

The chairman of the Committee, in order to satisfy himself as 
to the numbers that used the Library, made another afternoon 
visit, and from 4 to 4.35 o'clock there entered the Library 87 
children and 22 adults. The children's department was uncom- 
fortably congested. On the way into the Library, he encoun- 
tered eight children on the steps, and questioned them as to why 
they did not go in. Two little girls remarked "There's no room 
in there for us. It's too crowded." During the thirty-five min- 
utes, the place seemed like an overcrowded schoolroom. The 
children had to be kept quiet so as not to disturb the adults who 
were using the Library, and it seemed a pity that the little ones 
could not talk softly to each other regarding the books they were 
to select for their school studies. 

The following statistics and information have been received 
from the East Boston Library Custodian. 



[35] 





CIRCULATION. 




Year. 


VOLUMES. 


POPULATION, 


1870 




23.816 


1872 


' 74.864 




1882 


88.901 




1892 


53.339 




1902 


80,009 




1909 


91.218 




1910 


94.589 


58.488 



The field of the branch is the metropolitan district of Wards 1 
and 2, two and one-half miles long, on the very edge of the city. 
The Library is remote from the geographical centre, and from 
the centre of population of the island. The trend of population 
is to the east and northeast, where the only unoccupied land lies. 
The branch is about two minutes' walk from the tunnel, five from 
Central Square, five from the ferries, twelve from Belmont 
Square, twenty from Chelsea bridge, and forty-five from Orient 
Heights. 

Of the building, erected in 1 846, only the second floor is used 
by the branch, the first floor being occupied by the East Boston 
District Court; the third floor by the Pre- apprentice School in 
Printing and Bookbinding, and the ell by an overflow from the 
Lyman Grammar School. Diagonally across the street is the 
Police Station 7, from which prisoners are brought to the court 
each morning and taken out often at noon in view of the children 
coming to or from school or from the Library. The ring of the 
bell of the patrol wagon always draws a company to the side- 
walk. Many people keep their children from the Library be- 
cause of its nearness to the police station and court. 

The floor space is about 49.5 feet by 57 feet; the seating ca- 
pacity is 42 in the children's portion of the room, and 38 in that 
for adults. The attendance ranges from 200 to 700 daily. On 
December 9, from 7 to 9 P.M., there were present 314 persons, 
202 under and 1 12 over eighteen years of age; at 7.45 there 
were 1 1 present, 69 under and 4 1 over eighteen ; at 8, there 
were 96, 57 under and 39 over. This was an ordinary evening, 
not especially busy for this season. On December 1 2, at about 
4.30, there were 91 children and 12 adults, and at 4.45, 98 chil- 
dren and 15 adults. 



[36] 

The number of books issued December 12 was 484. The 
largest daily issue last year was 580. The branch force is made 
up of five regular workers, three extra runners and a janitor. 

The branch is poorly ventilated. Although it has been re- 
lieved by new ventilators, the windows must be opened wide 
from time to time to change the air. 

Prior to 1 896, the work of the branch consisted mainly in the 
issue and return of books for home and hall use. Since then 
many new activities have contributed to link the branch with the 
educational system and make it more widely useful to the general 
public, although many of these activities are little known. Among 
them may be named, especially, work with the schools, to which 
books are sent on deposit ( 1 ,770 volumes to 59 teachers in 1 909- 
10 and 2,102 volumes to 67 teachers in 1910-1 1 ) or reserved 
at the branch for the use of classes, pictures sent to illustrate 
lessons, reference work at the branch for home lessons or the 
general public, registration for cards at schools, Sunday opening 
and longer hours of opening on week days. 

Within the past ten years, the Trustees have been as generous 
to this branch as the funds entrusted to them have allowed. 
Nevertheless, the collection, which now numbers about 16,000 
volumes, is very shabby and unattractive, because the books cir- 
culate so rapidly that, with the funds in hand, it is impossible to 
make the replenishment keep pace with the legitimate wear and 
tear. During the last ten years, 15,401 new and renewed cards 
have been issued through this branch. The number of live cards 
outstanding (used within two years) is 4,404. 

The constituency of the branch includes many races and all 
ages, classes and conditions of people. The Library is one of 
the very few places where all these meet on common ground. An 
adequate building in a central location would greatly increase its 
use. 

The sub-committee to examine the work done by the Library 
through the West End Branch, the North Street Reading Room 
and the North Bennet Street Reading Room reports that the 
West End Branch is doing with steadily increasing efficiency a 
large work for the West End of the City. The acquisition by 



[37] 

the City of the old West Church, in which the branch is located, 
is each year abundantly justified. The service of the branch is a 
generous one, both to adults and to children. The administration 
is good ; the order and method of the branch are admirable. 

The real problem submitted to this committee is that of the 
conditions in the North End. Ward 6 is set oS by itself, at a 
considerable distance from any other station of the Library. 
Even the West End Branch is more than a mile away through 
the crowded, busy streets, where children could not be safely sent 
even in daylight; and the Central Library in Copley Square is 
inaccessible for either children or adults without the payment of 
two car fares. The North Street Reading Room has been totally 
unsuited for its work, but the building has recently changed hands 
and the Library Trustees are now trying to secure better facilities. 
It may be noted in passing that the securing of available and 
suitable rooms in this crowded quarter of the City is a task of 
almost insuperable difficulty. 

In the Industrial School at 39 North Bennet Street there have 
been two small rooms given to the use of the Library from four 
till ten P.M. The rooms are respectively 24 feet by 25, and 24 
feet by 26,5. A record is kept of the number of persons who 
come to the place for reading and of those who come to take or 
return books. Hie rooms are so small and so crowded that 
scarcely any effort has been or should have been made to increase 
the use of them. Nevertheless, the Custodian reports the follow- 
ing remarkable figures for the months of November and Decem- 
ber. 1910: 



Smallest daily number . 
Largest daily number . 
Average daily number . 
Average weekly number 
Total for month . . . 

About one-fifth of the number of borrowers is included also 
in the recorded attendance. Eliminating this duplication the 
number of applicants served at this station of the Library during 
the two months of November and December, 1910, is thus 
shown to be 20,861. The deposit of books at North Bennet 



Attendance. 


Borrowers. 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER. 


NOVEMBER. 


DECEMBER. 


. . 114 


199 


75 


61 


. . 412 


453 


249 


266 


. . 287 


323 


160 


176 


. . 1,790 


1.753 


1.035 


1.056 


. . 7.190 


6.699 


4,142 


4.573 



138J 

Street has been a very small one because of scanty room, and the 
demands of the readers have been filled chiefly by books ordered 
from the Central Library. Every morning a long list of these 
orders was sent out, and the following table shows the number 
of books distributed during the months of November and Decem- 
ber, 1910, from the Central Library: 



DISTRIBUTION OF BOOKS FROM THE CENTRAL LIBRARY AT NORTH 

BENNET STREET. 

NOVEMBER. DECEMBER. 

Smallest daily number 23 17 

Largest daily number 78 73 

Average daily number 49 48 

Average weekly number 294 288 

Total for month 1.176 1.248 

The books delivered from the Central Library to this reading 
room during the two months of November and December, 1910, 
numbered 2,424. Thus, here, children have been obliged to 
order books largely from the Central Library, without the oppor- 
tunity of looking over the books — a marked contrast with the 
opportunities for children at the Central Library and some 
branches. 

TTie most striking proof, however, of the book hunger of the 
children of Ward 6 cannot be put into figures. It is to be seen 
by anyone who will go to the reading rooms in the affemoon of 
any winter day. Let any warm-hearted student of social condi- 
tions go to the North Bennet Street Reading Room at the hour 
when the boxes of books come in from the Central Library. Let 
the visitor stand for a half hour at the delivery desk, and watch 
the eager faces and the outstretched hands of the children. The 
bright-eyed Italian boy, the keen-faced Jewish girl, the Greek or 
Portuguese is often ragged and ill-fed, and bears the marks of the 
home where severe poverty cramps and dwarfs the life ; but if the 
boxes contained sweetmeats or toys, they would hardly be more 
joyously greeted than are these piles of rusty books. Among the 
children whom we call happier than those who fill North Bennet 
Street there are too many who must be coaxed or driven to taste 
the joy of reading. But in North Bennet Street, the worn, 



[39] 

shabby book is the key to a palace of deHght, and the crowded 
rooms are positively ablaze with the sheer happiness which radi- 
ates from the faces of the scores of reading boys and girls. There 
is surely no part of our City where the hunger for books is so keen 
and so universal as among the crowded tenements of the North 
End, where the children of twenty different nations are being 
made, — well made or ill made, — into American men and 
women. 

So much for the nature of the need for books and for a place to 
read them. Now we must pass to some consideration of the ex- 
tent of that need. Let us set down a few figures, representing 
actual conditions in Ward 6. The population of Ward 6 ac- 
cording to the census of 1910 is 35,758. This has not yet been 
classified as to place of birth, but by applying the percentages 
obtained from the State Census of 1905, it is possible to reach a 
result which shall be substantially correct. We may say, accord- 
ingly, that the Italians comprise 67 per cent (23,957), the He- 
brews 18 per cent (6,436), the Irish 7 per cent (2,503) and that 
the remaining 8 per cent is distributed among several different 
nationalities. About one sixth of the population (in round num- 
bers, 6,000) consists of children between the ages of five and 
fifteen. TTiere are eighteen public school buildings in the ward, 
at which 7,361 pupils are in attendance. Some of these, of 
course, live outside the Ward boundaries, but would naturally 
use the library agencies, as they use the schools within the Ward. 

The congestion of population in this quarter of the City is very 
great. Ward 6 contains one and nineteen hundredths per cent ot 
the land area of the City, and five and thirty-three hundredths 
per cent of the City's population is found in it. The number of 
dwelling houses (exclusive of hotels) is 1 ,5 1 3, and allowing for 
the 9 unoccupied houses, the resident population approximates 
twenty-four to each house. The average in the City at large is a 
little less than ten persons in a house. About one third of the 
families in the Ward are living in tenements of two rooms each, 
and about one third in tenements of three rooms each. This con- 
gestion is increasing rather than diminishing. Conditions as to 
sanitation may have improved slightly in ten years, but the in- 



140] 

crease in population during the last five years is nearly twenty 
per cent, while the gain in the City at large has been but 1 2 per 
cent. Five years ago, the population in Ward 6 numbered about 
1 02 to the acre. Today, it averages 1 22 persons to the acre, as 
against 27 per acre in the City at large. This acreage includes, 
of course, the streets and all open spaces, but even so it will be 
seen that Ward 6 has an extraordinary congestion. 

Anyone familiar with the City knows that there has been no 
increase of living space in the North End in the last five years, — 
or indeed in the last decade. Hie land was all built over many 
years ago, and the tenements were full to overflowing when the 
State Census was taken in 1 905. Yet since that time more theui 
five thousand persons have been added to that teeming population. 
Where they are housed, it is hard to conceive, yet there they are. 

The Committee finds, then, in Ward 6, a large and increasing 
population, made up chiefly of foreign-born elements, having a 
large number of children, and these children notable among the 
City's girls and boys as having eager, acquisitive, and ambitious 
minds. Their longing for books amounts to a passion. They 
find in reading all the romance and imaginative experience for 
which childhood so ardently seeks. Moreover, the use of books 
by these children must in most cases be confined to the rooms pro- 
vided by the City. Reading at home is impossible for a twelve- 
year-old boy, when his five younger brothers and sisters are 
crowded into a two-roomed tenement, in which all the domestic 
work of the household is conducted, and where the short winter 
days are lengthened only by the light of one kerosene lamp. 

Under all these circumstances, the cry for better library facili- 
ties for the North End of Boston should not go another year un- 
heeded. Your Committee feels thrust upon them the solemn 
responsibility of speaking for those who czmnot speak for them- 
selves. No child of the thousands who play on the streets of that 
part of the City should ask the City of Boston for a book and be 
sent empty-handed away. 

It is difficult to state the conditions, the need, the opportunity, 
too strongly. TTie Chairman of this sub-committee will not soon 
forget a single incident which she witnessed in the squalid North 



[41] 

Street Reading Room. The books were being distributed from 
the big wooden chest, while the children crowded about as at the 
unearthing of hid treasure. One little chap on crutches waited 
impatiently in the background. It seemed as if the last book had 
been taken out when his thin voice cried, "Oh, teacher, aint my 
Brownie book come?" There was a whole world of bitter dis- 
appointment in his tone. Then from the very bottom of the box 
his Brownie book was brought forth. He snatched it, tucked it 
under his arm, swung bravely off on his crutches to a corner of a 
table, seated himself, buttressed his elbows on the table and his 
head on his hands, and in two minutes had left behind him lame- 
ness and poverty and ignorance, and had become one who might 
well be the envy of a king. 

The demand of these children is not only for fairy stories and 
for all the mass of imaginative material in the general class of 
"juvenile literature," but also for the books which open the world 
of nature and of art to their minds. "A book all about moths," 
"a book where I can learn how to call the stars," "a book with 
pictures of the North Pole," — these are the sort of requests 
which pour into the ears of the attendants in the children's room 
in the North End. Surely if the City has any duty, she has a 
duty to the children of these new-comers who have yielded to her 
dangerous lure ; and a first step in that duty is the satisfaction of 
their voracious hunger for books. 

For this reading room, three or four large, comfortable rooms, 
with efficient attendants and a greatly increased deposit of books, 
should be provided. The children should be separated from the 
adults for the sake of both. At least one attendant should be 
able to speak Italian, and all the attendants should be skilful in 
filling the needs of children. Your sub-committee strongly begs 
that the Trustees emd the City Council will unite in the working 
out of some plan, which shall relieve the tension of the present 
situation in this crowded cind complex population! 

The Examining Committee would sum up its conclusions as 
follows : 

A chief reason for having examining committees is to interest 



142] 

a larger number of representative citizens in the working, the 
needs and the possibilities of our public library system. On our 
Central Library building are the words, "Built by the People." 
Of that stately central building the citizens may well be proud. 
But it is only a part of a system. Most of that system, in services, 
in uses of rich material, is good. But of it the branch libraries 
and reading rooms are an essential part. They are largely the 
hands which reach out to serve the people. Several of those 
hands, as shown above, are badly crippled on account of the 
insufficient accommodation provided for the operation of the 
branches. We would hide them from visitors to our City. But 
they can be made whole and strong, to serve, if the people of 
Boston and their government desire that. The people who, un- 
der wise leadership, built the central building, and maintain the 
system, will surely remedy these conditions, if enough of the 
people understand them. The citizens who know them, espe- 
cially the residents of the North End, of East Boston and of 
South Boston, have a duty to perform, namely, — to bring to 
the citizens at large, as well as to the City government, the cry- 
ing need of better library facilities in those large neighborhoods. 
The foregoing was adopted as the report of the whole Com- 
mittee at a meeting held January 18, 1911. 

Della Jean Deery, 
Clerk. 



REPORT OF WILLIAM F. KENNEY. A.M., DELE- 

GATE TO THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS 

OF ARCHIVISTS AND LIBRARIANS. AT 

BRUSSELS. AUGUST 28-3 1.1910. 

TTie delegates, consisting of the President, Josiah H. Benton, 
and William F. Kenney, who were appointed by the Board of 
Trustees on July 27, 1 91 0, to represent the Library at the Inter- 
national Congress of Archivists and Librarians at Brussels, Au- 
gust 28—3 1 , beg leave to report as follows : 

The President being unable to attend the Congress, the Li- 
brary was represented by Mr. Kenney who makes the following 
report with reference to his action as a delegate from the Library. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CONGRESS. 

The International Congress of Archivists and Librarians met 
at Brussels Sunday, August 28, 1910, and concluded its pro- 
ceedings Wednesday, August 31, under the auspices of the 
Association of the Belgian Archivists and Librarians, Mons. 
Louis Stainier, Administrator-Inspector of the Royal Library of 
Belgium. There were eighteen countries represented by national 
commissions, twelve countries represented by official delegates, 
delegations from nine Belgian learned societies, forty-nine libra- 
ries and other institutions entered on the registry, and three 
hundred and eighty-nine individual delegates, representing the 
United States, England, Canada, Germany, France, Belgium, 
Holland, Austria, Hungary, Spain, Switzerland, Portugal, Rus- 
sia, Italy, Brazil, Cuba, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Luxem- 
burg, and Monaco. All preliminary arrangements were made by 
an active commission under the official patronage of the Belgian 
government and a commission of patrons including Messrs. S. 
Bormans, President of the Royal Historical Commission of Bel- 



[44] 

gium and A. Delmar, President of the Library Section of the 
Association of Belgian Archivists and Librarians. Added to 
these was a long list of Belgian scholars who served as members 
of honor. 

The Central Commission or working body had as Presidents : 
for archives, Mons. A. Gaillard, General Archivist of the King- 
dom of Belgium, and for libraries. Rev. R. P. Van Den Gheyn, 
S.J., Chief Conservator of the Royal Library of Belgium; as 
Vice Presidents: for archives, Mons. G. Muckle, Archivist of 
the City of Brussels, and for libraries, Mons. F. Gittens, Libra- 
rian of the City of Antwerp; as Secretaries: for archives, Mons. 
J. Cuvelier, Secretary-General of the Association of Belgian 
Archivists and Librarians, and for libraries, Mons. L. Stainier, 
Administrator-Director of the Royal Library of Belgium; as 
Treasurer: Mons. H. Van Der Haege; and as Assistant 
Treasurer: Mons. V. Tourneur. 

Somewhat differently from previous international congresses, 
documents were printed in advance, giving leading questions that 
were to be discussed, in the various sections of archivists and li- 
brarians, with such papers as were prepared on these questions. 
These documents were collated and sent to the various countries 
in sections, with the regrettable result that many of the American 
delegates did not get them before leaving home. Altogether they 
comprised a wide and valuable collection of library literature, 
and will appear later in the volume containing the full report of 
the Congress. 

OPENING SESSION. 

The opening session of the Congress was held in the Confer- 
ence Hall of the Hall of Congresses at the Exposition grounds, 
over four hundred delegates being present, about seventy-five of 
whom were from the United States. 

The Rev. R. P. Van Den Gheyn, S.J., of the Central Com- 
mission opened the proceedings with an address of welcome, and 
presented Mons. A. Gaillard, also of the Central Commission, 
who greeted the delegates with a few well chosen words. The 
Secretaries-General, Messrs. J. Cuvelier and L. Stainier pre- 



[45] 

sented reports of the organizing committee, and nominations 
were then made for the officials of the Congress, and for the 
four sections respectively: archives, libraries, auxiliary collec- 
tions and popular libraries. 

Hie chiefs of the governmental delegations and chairmen of 
the delegations from national associations were chosen as honor- 
ary presidents, and designated men from foreign delegations were 
selected as honorary vice presidents. For permanent Presidents, 
Mons. Muller, Archivist of the Kingdom of Holland, and 
Mons. Henry Martin, Director of the Library of the Arsenal of 
Paris were named. Messrs. J. Cuvelier and L. Stainier were 
elected as Secretaries, and Mons. Van Der Haege, Treasurer. 
Brief addresses were made at the general opening session by 
representatives of the several countries, Mr. Clement Walker 
Andrews, Librarian of the John Crerar Library of Chicago, 
speaking for the United States. An informal reception was ten- 
dered to the delegates at the Maison des Medecins in the Grand 
Place, Sunday evening, for the purpose of getting the members 
of the Congress in communication with each other, and to form 
international acquaintances, an opportunity which was much 
enjoyed by the American delegation. 

SUBDIVISIONS OF THE CONGRESS. 

The Congress divided itself into two groups, for the conduct 
of its business, — the archivists, who were there largely as repre- 
sentatives of the various governments, and the librarians, who 
represented the library associations and organizations, and private 
members. 

The first and third sections of the Congress were devoted to the 
archivists, and the second and fourth sections to the librarians. 
The fourth section was practically a continuation of the second 
section, and it was with these sections that the Boston Public 
Library was particularly concerned. The second section had the 
following officers: Presidents: Mons. E. Chatelain, Librarian 
of the Sorbonne, Paris; Dr. Wilhelm Erman, Director of the 
University Library, Bonn; Mons. Bernhard Lundstedt, Libra- 
rian of the Royal Library, Stockholm; Mons. H. O. Lange, 



[461 

Librarian of the Royal Library, Copenhagen. Vice Presidents: 
Mons. le Dr. A. G. Roos, Director of the University Library, 
Groningen; T. W. Lyster, National Library, Dublin; C. \V. 
Andrews, Librarian of the John Crerar Library, Chicago ; A. E. 
Twentyman, Librarian, Board of Education, London. Secre- 
taries: Messrs. O. Grojean and Th. Goffin. Fourth section: 
Presidents: Dr. H. E. Greve, Conservator of the Royal Li- 
brary, The Hague; Dr. G. F, Bowerman, Librarian of the 
Public Library of the District of Columbia, Washington. Vice 
Presidents: H. Farr, Librarian of the Public Library, Cardiff, 
Wales; Dr. G. Fritz, Librarian of the Library of Charlotten- 
burg, Berlin. Secretarv: Mons. C. H. Defrecheux. 

FIRST SESSIONS OF THE LIBRARY SECTIONS. 

The library sections two and four began their deliberations 
Monday morning, in one of the larger salles, over two hundred 
and fifty members being present. One of the principal questions 
dealt with in the second section was the acquisition of academi- 
cal theses and discussions, and their classification and catalogu- 
ing. The University point of view was presented by Mons. P. 
Vanrycke, Librarian of Lille University. It was voted that 
there should be exchanges of such theses among the universities, 
including exchanges between American and European institu- 
tions, and that the cataloguing and classification of such theses 
should be provided for as fully as possible in the libraries. 
Another important question discussed was the organization of a 
central bureau of information for the libraries of each country, 
and the sentiment of the delegates was that such a bureau should 
be organized in connection with the national and central libra- 
ries of each country. The training required for library service 
was a question which brought forth the liveliest discussion of the 
day. It developed that England has no system comparable with 
that in the United States, where library schools, and library 
courses in American colleges, summer courses, and apprentice- 
ship courses in the popular libraries have been a feature for years. 
It was finally voted that it was desirable to establish a library 
school or schools in each country suited to its conditions, and 



[47] 

that it was desirable that the Hbrary trustees or authorities should 
consider specialized library training in selecting assistants. 

The fourth section was devoted to questions relating to popu- 
lar libraries, and considered the most efficacious means of insti- 
tuting and developing libraries for children and adults. Among 
the subjects assigned for discussion were : 

Independent libraries for children and adults; 

Libraries for children attached to educational institutions or 
institutions reserved for children zuid youth, such as play rooms, 
etc.; 

Popular libraries for adults joined to scientific and general 
libraries ; 

Special rooms reserved for children and youths in the public 
libraries to which those of a certain age are admitted ; 

Facts testifying to the utility of libraries for children from the 
point of view of (first) attendance of schools, (second) books 
read in the libraries or taken home, (third) increase of attendance 
at the library for adults; 

In a children's library, as for adults, should the staff content 
itself by putting at the disposal of the readers the books asked for, 
or should it invite requests by chatting and reading aloud ; 

The advantages and disadvantages of organizing in a large 
town a central popular library having in each of the districts a 
branch supplied from the central library; 

The advantages and disadvantages of organizing in each dis- 
trict a complete cmd independent library. 

CONSIDERATION OF CHILDREN'S LIBRARIES. 

In considering the question of Children's Libraries the dele- 
gate from the Boston Public Library, as a representative of one 
of the largest popular libraries in the world, offered the first 
paper. He was introduced by the chairman, Mr. Farr, of Car- 
diff, Wales, as coming from a city where the interests of the child 
reader were carefully guarded, and where the great system that 
now governs the American libraries was founded. The paper 
dealt with the method employed in the Boston Public Library 
for the cultivation of the reading habit among children, and the 



[481 

cooperation of the library with the public schools. As the for- 
eign libraries have not given much attention to the children, 
rather attending to the scholastic readers, the members of the 
Congress were much interested in the paper, and it was ordered 
to be included in the records of the International Congress. 

England has just begun to take up seriously the establishment 
of children's reading rooms, and at the conclusion of the reading 
of the paper, the President of the English Librarians' Associa- 
tion invited the author to go to Exeter, and exhibit the photo- 
graphs of the Boston Public Library buildings, and deliver an 
address on the system which has made the Boston Public Li- 
brary world famous. 

The paper was then translated into French and read to the 
foreign delegates, by Miss Valfrid Palmgren, who received a 
round of applause for her efforts. Miss Palmgren is well known 
to the staff of the Boston Public Library, having spent several 
months in familiarizing herself with its systematic machinery. 
Upon the motion of Dr. Bowerman, Librarian of the Washing- 
ton, D. C, Public Library, Miss Palmgren was given a vote of 
thanks for her able translation of the paper. 

In connection with this paper on the children's reading room, 
the delegate from the Boston Public Library illustrated the sub- 
jects by a series of photographs showing the entire library system 
of Boston, the main building in Copley Square, all the various 
branch buildings and the reading rooms which are distributed 
in different parts of the City of Boston for adults as well as 
children. These photographs were used as a frieze around three 
walls of the main assembly room, and were of much interest to 
the delegates during the entire session. After the sessions of 
the Congress, they were sent to the English convention at Exeter, 
and were then transferred to the Belgian Royal Library for 
general inspection by the Brussels public. 

UNIFICATION OF LIBRARY SYSTEMS. 

Among the most important subjects discussed in the popular 
library section was that of the unification of the library system, 
such as is in vogue in the City of Boston, where the library is 



[49] 

worked as a unit. This problem occupied the entire session of 
the second day, and addresses were made by delegates from 
Sweden, England, Belgium, France, Switzerland and the 
United States. 

In many of these countries the unit system is not operated, and 
the delegate from the Boston Public Library explained that the 
unit feature was the most importcint administrative policy of the 
Boston Public Library management. Every branch and reading 
room of the Library is controlled from the Copley Square build- 
ing through the librarian-in-chief, and this coherent policy cen- 
tralizes the administration and places the responsibility just 
where it belongs — on the shoulders of the mcin in charge. The 
iibraricm of the Central Library is the librarian of the entire 
system and each custodian is in communication with him daily 
through the superintendent of branches, receiving instructions on 
any point of sufficient importance to call for the adjudication of 
the main office. The Boston Library card may be used at any 
branch or reading room or at the Central Library, and books 
may be taken out at one place and returned at another. This is 
a unique feature of the Boston Public Library. 

The discussion resulted in the adoption of a resolution intro- 
duced by Miss Palmgren of Stockholm, to the effect that the 
International Library Congress placed itself upon record as be- 
ing in favor of the unit system in large cities, thus working the 
entire library as a distinct cooperative organization with the 
librarian-in-chief as its head. 

The delegate from the Boston Public Library introduced a 
resolution that the International Congress, through its various 
representatives in Europe and America, would use every effort 
to break down the barrier that exists between the person who 
wants a book and the library which furnishes it, and to use every 
means to simplify the procurement of books; so that it will be- 
come as easy as possible for any one to use the library. This 
resolution was discussed by representatives from various coun- 
tries and unanimously adopted. 



[501 

FORMAL VOTES OF THE LIBRARY SECTIONS. 

The most important formal votes of the second and fourth sec- 
tions (popular libraries) were as follows: 

That in all the libraries there should be the most complete 
classification possible of theses. 

That whereas the function of the librarians requires scientific 
and special knowledge, the congress votes that a careful profes- 
sional preparation of librarians should be assured, whether by 
special schools or by examinations conformed to programmes 
approved by the national associations of librarians. 

That the governments should publish annually the list of their 
official publications, if not complete, at least containing the publi- 
cations which may be communicated to the public. 

That there should be established an international code for the 
editing of printed catalogue cards. 

That the duty of working out these rules should be confined to 
the national library associations of each language. 

That the code should be constituted according to an under- 
stcinding among such associations. 

That the popular libraries should receive the greatest possible 
development in all countries. 

That the work of the children's libraries should be organized 
in relation with popular libraries, taking into consideration local 
needs and the educative functions of reading. 

That there should be the closest relation between the schools 
and the libraries. 

That from the national point of view, individuals and the pub- 
lic authorities should recognize the necessity for aiding in the 
development of a literature for children based upon national 
legends and history; individuals perhaps cooperating by the 
establshment of prizes for the best workers of this kind, and public 
authorities by buying such books and spreading their use in the 
largest possible measure among libraries dealing with children. 

That the large cities should provide special and individual 
buildings for their public libraries, and that in smaller communi- 
ties the location of the popular library should be in relation with 
the school. 



[51] 

That popular libraries in the same jurisdiction should be as 
far as possible systematized under a central administration with 
a view to realizing the utmost economy, to uniformity of method, 
and especially to the best utilization of their collections. 

That the personnel of branch libraries, as well as of the cen- 
tral library, should have professional training. 

TTiat the loaning of books should be facilitated with the least 
possible restriction. 

COMMENTS ON CERTAIN RESOLUTIONS. 

The Library Journal, in an editorial printed in the October 
number had this to say of the two resolutions, one of which the 
Boston Public Library delegate introduced and the other he 
seconded : 

"The extraordinary unanimity of sentiment on the larger 
propositions . . . was shown especially in the meetings of the 
section of popular libraries. It was of small importance from 
within the library profession that a World Congress should place 
itself on record as holding that there should be the least possible 
'red tape' or barrier between the reader and the book; but this 
meant much in countries of backward library development, 
where, especially in libraries for research, a reader may be 
required to give advance notice that he desires a certain book, 
which would then be at his service the next day or the day after. 

"So also the principle, accepted as settled both in American 
and English cities, that all popular libraries in a city should be 
organized as branches of a centralized system with well-trained 
assistants at the service of the public in the several branches, 
mecint something in Stockholm, where that friend of so many 
American librarians. Miss Palmgren, now a member of the city 
council, is chairman of a committee charged with unifying the 
dozen or more small and ill-equipped libraries existing independ- 
ently in different parts of that city. It was interesting to note, 
indeed, how largely American practices and standards are ac- 
cepted on the Continent by the foremost library workers as pre- 
senting the ideals of library development.** 



[52] 

SOCIAL FEATURES OF THE CONGRESS. 

The Congress was the largest ever held, and the United States 
had more delegates than ever attended a similar event before. 
Many of the delegates were accompanied by friends and rela- 
tives, and altogether there were over one hundred representatives 
from the United States, many of whom were from New England. 

The Belgian committee did everything within its power to 
make the convention, from a social point of view, a success. On 
the afternoon of the first day there was a visit to the Royal Li- 
brary and general archives of the Kingdom. In the evening a 
dinner was given at the Grand Restaurant de la Monnaie^ Rue 
Leopold, which was a most brilliant affair. The speech making 
was informal. 

On Tuesday there was a visit to the library of the Institute de 
Sociologie, pare Leopold, and I. Stanley Jast gave a remarkable 
lecture with lantern slides, on "English Libraries." At 4.30 
P.M. there was a reception in the exhibition of Ancient Art of 
the seventeenth century at the exposition, and a concert of old- 
time music. 

TTie most brilliant function took place Tuesday evening in the 
ancient Brussels Town Hall, one of the most beautiful Gothic 
structures in Europe. The burgomaster and members of the city 
government received the delegates and their women friends, and 
over one thousand persons were in attendance, including the 
members of the Interparliamentary Peace Congress, which was 
holding its session at Brussels the same week. A fine musical 
programme was provided by some of the most eminent singers of 
Europe, an elaborate luncheon was served, and dancing was in 
order. Every detail of the reception was carried out with the 
strictest formality, and the American women present were given 
places of honor in the reception hall. 

LIST OF AMERICAN DELEGATES. 

The following were the representatives from the United 
States: Miss M. E. Ahern, Editor, Public Libraries, Chicago, 
111. ; H. V. Ames, Chairman of the Public Archives Commission, 
University of Pennsylvania; Charles M. Andrews, Librarian of 



[53] 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore; Clement Walker An- 
drews, Librarian of the John Crerar Library, Chicago; Miss 
Grace E. Babbitt, Public Library, Washington, D. C. ; William 
Beer, Librarian of the Howard Memorial Library, New Or- 
leans ; Joseph Berthele, Archivist of the City of Montpelier, Vt. ; 
M. D. Bisbee, Librarian, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire; 
George F. Bowerman, Librarian of the Public Library of the 
District of Columbia, Washington ; R. R. Bowker, Library Jour- 
nal, New York; Clarence S. Brigham, American Antiquarian 
Society, Worcester; Paul Brockett, Smithsonian Institute, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Miss Eliza G. Browning, Indianapolis Public 
Library ; Miss Caroline Burnite, Public Library, Cleveland, O. ; 
Henry S. Burrage, State Librarian of Maine; Miss Jeannette 
Carpenter, Iowa State Teachers' College; Miss Lydia J. Cha- 
pin. Public Library, Lincoln, Mass. ; John Cotton Dana, Libra- 
rian of the Free Public Library, Newark, N. J. ; W. D. Fletcher, 
Amherst College; Miss Elizabeth L. Foote, Public Library, 
New York; Worthington C. Ford, Massachusetts Historical 
Society ; George S. Godard, State Librarian, Connecticut ; Miss 
Elizabeth P. Gray, Chief of the Bindery Department, Wash- 
ington; J. C. M. Hanson, Chief of the Catalogue Division, Li- 
brary of Congress; G. W. Harris, Cornell University Library; 
Miss Adelaide R. Hasse, Public Library, New York; Miss 
Elizabeth L. Horsfall, Public Library, Newton, Mass.; Miss 
Anna G. Hubbard, Public Library, Cleveland, O. ; Gaillard 
Hunt, Chief, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress; Thomas 
W. Koch, University of Michigan Library; W. G. Leland, 
Carnegie Institution, Washington; Fred R. J. Libbie, Boston; 
William F. Livingstone, Assistant State Librarian of Maine; 
Miss A. L. Miles, Carnegie Library, Oklahoma City; J. G. 
Moulton, Librarian, Haverhill, Mass.; Dr. Edward J. Nolan, 
Librarian, Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia ; Misses 
Florence and Jaqueline Overton, Public Library, New York; 
Victor H. Paltsits, State Capital Library, Albany, N. Y. ; Miss 
Mary Plummer, Director of Pratt Institute, School of Library 
Science, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Miss Mary Polk, Librarian Bureau 
of Sciences, Manila, P. I. ; Miss Julia Rankin, Director Came- 



[54] 

gie Library, Atlanta, Ga. ; Dunbar Rowland, Director of 
Archives, Mississippi; Trustee Brown of the Princeton Univer- 
sity Library; Miss Alice W. Shapleigh, Public Library, New- 
ton, Mass.; Miss Ida D. Simpson, Public Library, New York; 
Miss H. Sperry of the Silas Bronson Library, Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Miss Margaret Skinner, Smithsonian Institute, Washing- 
ton; Bernard C. Steiner, Librarian Enoch Pratt Free Public 
Library, Baltimore, Md. ; Miss Belle Sweet, Librarian, Univer- 
sity of Idaho Library; Walter King Stone, University of Mis- 
souri Library, Columbia, Mo. ; Mrs. Shelley Tallhurst, Trustee, 
Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal. ; Miss Mabel Temple, Public 
Library, North Adams, Mass.; Miss Genevieve Traubmann, 
Librarian Northern Normal and Industrial School, Aberdeen, 
S. D. ; Miss Bertha P. Trull, First Assistant Librarian of the 
Institute of Technology, Boston ; Miss Adelaide Underbill, Vas- 
sar College Library, Poughkeepse, N. Y. ; G. B. Utley, Libra- 
rian Public Library, Jacksonville, Fla.; A. J. F. Van Laer, 
Librarian Division of Manuscripts, State Library, Albany, N. 
Y. ; Miss M. A. Waitt, Public Library, New York ; Miss Emma 
Wales, Public Library, Newton, Mass. ; Miss Carrie Watson, 
Librarian, University of Kansas; Miss Alice Wilde, Public 
Library, New York; and Josiah H. Benton and William F. 
Kenney, Trustees of the Boston Public Library. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

To the Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit the following report for the year ending 
January 31, 1911. 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

At the Central Library repairs upon the engines were made 
during the summer, involving among other things the re-babbitting 
and relining of the bearings under the cam shafts, and the engines 
are now in good condition. No repairs have been required upon 
the dynamos. Two boilers have been operated continuously 
during the year (holding one other boiler in reserve for a 
large part of the time), and no repairs upon them have been 
required, except the replacing of two tubes. Various minor 
repairs have been made to other parts of the Central Library 
plant, including the elevators, motors, cind heating and lighting 
system. Improvements have been effected in the lighting of 
Bates Hall by the installation of 74 two-light brackets over the 
bookcases, and in the Newspaper Room the columns through the 
centre of the room have been encircled with bands carrying eight 
lights each. 

At the West End Branch the old fountain basin in the centre 
of the walk has been removed and a new granolithic walk put 
down leading from the main entrance up to the building. Shrub- 
bery has been planted inside the fence enclosing the lot, and 
during the coming season other improvements in grading and 
planting are to be made. Telephones have been installed in 
seven branches. A considerable amount of painting and other 
repair work has been done at the branches and reading rooms 
throughout the library system, and new shelving and other neces- 



[561 

sary furniture provided. About 30 framed pictures have been 
hung at the branches and reading rooms, and others are to be 
supplied. The inventories of each of the departments are being 
made, and when completed -wiW be filed as usual. 

THE USE OF BOOKS. 

The circulation of books for use outside the library buildings, 
familiarly called "home use," is exhibited in the statistical tables 
which follow. It is necessary to repeat the statement, contained 
in previous reports, that these figures show only a part of the use 
of the Library. The reference circulation so-called, i.e., the use 
of books within the reading rooms, is not recorded statistically, 
but this circulation constantly increases, and is fully as important, 
— even more important in some respects — than the home circu- 
lation. The tabulated figures are of value in comparison with our 
own similar figures presented in other years, but they should not 
be closely compared with the records of other libraries, unless it 
is certain that such records have been made upon exactly the 
same system as that in use by us. The tables which are here 
presented, so far as they relate to the Central Library, are from 
the report of Mr. Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of the Issue Depart- 
ment. Those for the branches are derived from the regular 
monthly returns of the custodians. 



[57] 



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[58] 
The figures reported by months are presented in detail : 

CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 



SCHOOLS AND 





HOME USE 


HOME USE 
THROUGH 


INSTITUTIONS 


TOTALS. 




DIRECT. 


BRANCH DEPT. 


THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 




February. 1910 


33,515 


8,964 


8,044 


50,523 


March, 


30,500 


8,070 


8.576 


47,146 


April, " , 


29,301 


7.538 


8,359 


45,198 


May, 


27,287 


5.954 


8,248 


41,489 


June, " . 


23,341 


5,524 


7,681 


36,546 


July. " . 


16,140 


3,493 


2,475 


22,108 


August, " . 


17,237 


3,268 


2,656 


23,161 


September, " . 


18,084 


3.295 


2.621 


24,000 


October, " . 


22,361 


4,819 


5,539 


32,719 


November, " . 


28,751 


6,721 


7,076 


42.548 


December " . 


27,774 


8,444 


7,772 


43,990 


January, 1911 . 


25,480 


8,092 


8,168 


41,740 



Totals 299,771 74.182 77,215 451,168 

The following summary condenses the figures for the entire 
system : 

Boolis lent for Home Use, including Circulation through Schools and Institutions. 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through the 

branches and reading-room stations) ....... 451,168 

From branches and reading-room stations (other than books received from 

Central 1,151,057 



Total number of volumes lent for home use and through schools and 
institutions .......... 



1,602.225 



Comparative statements follow, showing the circulation of 
books for use outside the library buildings in each of two suc- 
ceeding years: 



Central Library circulation 

(excluding schools and institutions): 

Direct home use 297,567 

Through branches zuid reading-room sta- 
tions for home use .... 75,371 

Branch Department circulation 

(excluding schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use 

From branch collections . . 740,691 

From reading-room stations . . 383,765 



190^10. 



372.938 



299,771 
74.182 



1910-11. 



373.953 



Carried forraard 



1,124,456 
1,497,394 



685,327 
383,826 



1,069,153 
1,443,106 



[59] 

Brought forrvard . 1.497.394 1.443.106 

Schools and institutions, circulation: 

(including books from Central through 

the branch system) .... 150.452 159.119 

Totals 1.647.846 1.602,225 

Books have been sent on deposit through the Branch Depart- 
ment to 136 different places as compared with 137 in 1909—10, 
and the number of volumes sent was 41,077 as compared with 
38,298 in 1909-10, a gain of about seven per cent. The pro- 
portion of fiction sent on deposit was 48.4 per cent. Among the 
new places of deposit is the Continuation School connected with 
the boot and shoe industry. These deposit books are sent to 
schools, clubs, public institutions, study classes, etc. 

The percentages of fiction in the books circulated for home 
use were: Central Library (including books sent through the 
branch system), fiction, 53.4 per cent; non-fiction, 46.6 per 
cent. Branches and reading-room stations, fiction, 71 .7 per cent; 
non-fiction, 28.3 per cent. Reduced to single percentages for 
the entire library system, fiction, 66.9 per cent; non-fiction, 33.1 
per cent. The term "fiction," while apparently obvious, never- 
theless, as used in different libraries, includes different classes of 
books. Hence before statistics of the circulation of fiction can 
be properly understood, the kind of books included under the 
term should be defined. Hiey may include cheap and ephem- 
eral novels without literary merit or interest, as well as books 
which have become classic. Of the volumes circulated by us, 
however, and included in these statistical statements, about 
one-half comprise carefully selected stories for young readers. 
Among these are the classic fairy tales and stories of adventure. 
The other books classed as "fiction" are principally standard 
works for adult readers, including the best recent publications 
in this department of literature, and the works of well-known 
writers, — Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, and the other masters 
of English prose fiction. 

Throughout the year the attendants in Bates Hall and in the 
Issue Department have systematically investigated every unsuc- 
cessful or delayed application for books which has been brought 
to their attention. Out of 507 such instances reported, 255 have 



[60] 

resulted in the ultimate delivery to the applicant of the book de- 
sired. In 11 5 other instances the book not found at first has been 
located later and reserved for the applicant, but not afterward 
called for. In the other cases, 1 37 in number, the reason for the 
delay or inability to deliver the book has been traced and ex- 
plained to the applicant. It is inevitable that occasionally delays 
will occur, due, in the majority of cases, to misplacement of the 
book asked for, temporary mal-adjustment of the mechanical 
appliances in use between the stacks and the delivery desks, or 
to some other defect inseparable from a system under which 
many thousand books are handled, and which requires for its 
proper operation perfect adjustment of the mechanical de- 
vices as well as expert and rapid personal service. Only a few 
persons, compared with the large number served daily, are put 
to serious inconvenience, but these few instances are regretted; 
and the criticism resulting from them is persistent, while the 
thousands of cases in which the book is obtained promptly pass 
without comment. 

Applicants sometimes wait a long time for a book, and do not 
report the delay. It would be of assistance if, whenever delay 
seems unreasonable, it were at once reported to the desk attend- 
ant. Usually, if so reported, the cause may be traced and the 
delay overcome; or, if not immediately overcome, prevented 
from again occurring. 

Whenever a large number of books on a special subject is to 
be used within the reading room, it will prevent delay in obtain- 
ing them if the applicant will furnish a list of the works desired 
a few hours in advance. They will then be assembled and re- 
served for immediate use at the time designated. 

BOOKS RECEIVED. 

A statistical statement of the number of books received fol- 
lows: 

Boolfs acquired b^ purchase. 

1909-10. 1910J9n. 

For the Central Library: 

From City appropriation 10,527 8,361 

From Trust Funds income 2,671 5,545 

Carried forward .... 13,198 13,906 



[61 



Brought forivard .... 




13.198 




For branches and reading-room stations: 








From City appropriation 


10.738 




8,801 


From Trust Funds income 


1,270 




3.876 


By Fellowes Athenaeum (for the Rox- 








bury Branch 


1,086 


13,094 - 


920 








Totals 


26,292 





13,906 



13,597 



27,503 



The following statement shows whether the books added to 
the Library during the year have been obtained by purchase, 
gift or exchange: 



Accessions by purchase (including 920 vols, by 
Fellowes Athenaeum, for Roxbury Branch) 

Accessions by gift (including 32 vols, through Fel- 
lowes Athenaeum, for Roxbury Branch) 

Accessions by exchange 

Accessions by Statistical Department 

Accessions of periodicals (bound) 

Accessions of newspapers (bound) 



CENTRAL, 


BRANCHES, 


TOTAL, 


VOLUMES. 


VOLUMES. 


VOLUMES 


13,906 


13,597 


27,503 


11.849 


609 


12.458 


44 




44 


539 




539 


2,148 


425 


2,573 


202 




202 



28,688 14.631 43,319 

PURCHASES OF FICTION. 

The purchases of recent fiction, costing $1,314.02, comprise 
1,358 copies, under 99 different titles, of which 14 were in 
languages other than English. Purchases of fiction, not recent, 
to provide additional copies needed for circulation, and to 
replace worn-out and discarded copies, comprise 10,027 
volumes, costing $8,522.95. The total expenditure for fiction, 
$9,836.97, constitutes 23.4 per cent of the entire amount 
expended for all books. 

NOTEWORTHY ACCESSIONS. 

The annual report prepared by Miss Theodosia E. Macurdy, 
Chief of the Ordering Department, contains details relating to 
the important accessions, from which the following are ex- 
tracted : 

PURCHASES. 

No large collections of books on special subjects have been 
bought, with the exception of 1 ,500 volumes of works by Catho- 



[621 

lie authors, purchased, in accordance with the conditions of the 
gift, from the Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest, for which the sum of 
$2,221 .76* was expended. Included in the Sullivan Collection 
are the works of Lord Acton, Cherance, De Vere, Egan, Faber, 
Gasquet, Gibbons, Lady Herbert, Lingard, Liguori, Manning, 
Nevmian, O'Reilly, Patmore, Rickaby, Roche, St. Francis de 
Sales, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Cardinal Wiseman. Other 
noteworthy works bought with this bequest are 27 sets of the 
Catholic Encyclopaedia ; Mosaici antichi conservati nei Palazzi 
Pontifici del Vaticano: Milano, 1910; and II libro di Giuliano 
da Sangallo. Codice Vaticano Barberiano Latino 4424: 2 vols. 
Lipsia, 1910. 

Considerable material, old and new, on the subject of avia- 
tion, has been secured, including Bruel's Histoire aeronautique 
par les monuments, peints, sculptes, dessines, et graves des ori- 
gines a 1830; avec 200 reproductions en noir et en couleur: 
Paris, 1909. 

Further accessions of books of individual importance are as 
follows : 

Billings, William. The New England psalm-singer: or, American chor- 
ister containing a number of psalm-tunes, anthems, and canons. In four 
and five parts. Engraved by Paul Revere. Boston, New England. 
Printed by Edes & Gill. [ 1 770.] 

Boston, Plan of Boston . . . 1828. [Boston. 1828] (showing 
churches and places of worship, public schools, public buildings, and 
wards). Printed from type. The outlines of the streets and wharves 
are made with printer's rules. 

British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904. Natural history. 
4 V. London. British Museum. 1907, 1908. 

Dante Alighieri. Tutte le opere . . . nuovamente rivedute nel testo . . . 
dal reverendo dottore Edoardo Moore. Chelsea. Nella Stamperia 
Ashendeniana. 1 909. 

De Vinne, T. L. Notable printers of Italy during the 15 th century. 
Illustrated with facsimiles from early editions. [New York.] The 
Grolier Club of the City of New York. 1910. 

— Title-pages as seen by a printer, with numerous illustrations in fac- 
simile, and some observations on the early and recent printing of books. 
[New York.] The Grolier Club of the City of New YorL 1901. 

Giles, Herbert A. A Chinese-English dictionary. Fasc. 1—3. Shang- 
hai. Kelly & Walsh. 1909,1910. 

♦Expended for Central, $892.08; expended for branches, $1,329.68. 



[63] 

Haberlandt, Michael. Oesterreichische Volkskunsl, aus den Sammlungen 
des Museums fiir oesterreichische Volkskunde in Wien. Abt. 1. 
[Textilien und Keramik.] Wien. Lowy. 1910. 

Hobson, R. L. Worcester porcelain. A description of the ware from 
the Wall period to the present day. Illustrated by 92 collotypes and 
1 7 chromo-lithographs. London. Quaritch. 1910. 

Lathrop, John. Innocent blood crying to God from the streets of Boston. 
A sermon occasioned by the horrid murder of Messieurs Samuel Gray, 
Samuel Maverick, James Caldwell, and Crispus Attucks, with Patrick 
Carr, since dead, and Christopher Monk ... on the fifth of March, 
1770. London, printed. Boston: re-printed and sold by Edes & 
Gill, 1771. 

Lemberger, E. Die Bildnis-Miniatur in Deutschland von 1550 bis 1850. 
With 65 plates. Containing over 300 miniatures. Munchen. Bruck- 
mann. [1910?] 

Mc*** O*** Ne***l, pseud. A copy of a letter from Quebeck in 
Canada to a pr**e in******r in France. Dated October 11, 1 747. 
3 pages foho. (Signed at end Mc*** Q*** Ne***l.) Said to be 
printed by B. Franklin. 

Maitres du XVIIIe siecle. Cent portraits de femmes des ecoles anglaise 
et fran^aise. Paris. Petit. 1910. 

Mas y Prat, Benito. La tierra de Maria Santisima. Coleccion de 
cuadros andaluces. Ilustraciones de J. Garcia y Ramos. Barcelona. 
Sucesores de N. Ramirez. (For the Ticknor Collection.) [189—?] 

MemHng, Hans. Scenes of domestic life in Flanders in the early 1 6th 
century. From the Calendar of the famous Grimani-Breviary pre- 
served at Venice. 24 colored plates, reproduced from the original 
miniatures. The Hague. 1910. 

Milton, John. Eikonoklastes, in answer to a book intitl'd Eikon Basilike, 
the portraiture of His Sacred Majesty in his soHtudes and sufferings. 
First edition. London. Printed by Matthew Simmons. 1 649. 

— Joannis Miltonii Angli, Epistolarum f amiliarium liber unus ; quibus 
accesserunt, ejusdem, jam olim in collegio adolescentis, Prolusiones 
quaedam oratoriae. Londini. Impensis Brabazoni Aylmeri . . . 
1 674. First edition. 

— The reason of church-government. Urged against prelaty. London. 
1641. 

New-England Psalter; or Psalms of David. With the Proverbs of 
Solomon and Christ's Sermon on the Mount. Being a proper introduc- 
tion for the training up children in the reading of the Holy Scriptures. 
Boston. Printed by Edes & Gill. 1 758. 

Prince, Thomas. Morning health no security against the sudden arrest 
of death before night. A sermon occasioned by the very sudden death 
of two young gentlemen in Boston, January 14th, 1726, 7. Dedi- 
cated to the youth of the town. Boston: Printed for Daniel Hench- 
man. 1 727. 



[64] 

Ptolemaeus, Claudius. Ptolemei viri Alexandrini Cosmographie. 32 
maps. Folio. Woodcuts. Ulm. L. Hoi. 1482. 

Richter, J. P. The Mond Collection. An appreciation. London. 
Murray. 1910. 2 v. (A description of Dr. Mond's collection of 
pictures, with reproductions.) 

Schreiber, Georg T., and others. Die Nekropole von Kom-esch-Schukafa 
Ausgrabungen und Forschungen. Herausgegeben von Ernst Sieglin. 
2 V. Leipzig. Giesecke & Devrient. 1 908. 

Yerkes, Charles Tyson. Catalogue de luxe of ancient and modern paint- 
ings belonging to the estate of Charles T. Yerkes. 2 v. To be sold 
at unrestricted public sale (Apr. 5-8, 1910). New York. Ameri- 
can Art Association. 1910. 

GIFTS. 

Anonymous. Given in memory of Arthur Mason Knapp. Drawings of 
the Old Masters in the University Galleries and the Library of Christ 
Church, Oxford. 3 volumes folio. Edited by Sidney Colvin. Ox- 
ford. 1907. 
Barnett. From the Children of the late John Barnett of Bedford and 
Leckhampton Hill, England, viz: Domenico Dragonetti Barnett of 
Cheltenham, England; Reginald Barnett and Julius Barnett of Lon- 
don, Clara Kathleen Barnett Rogers of Boston, and in fulfilment of 
the expressed wish of Rosamund Mary Liszt Francillon of London 
(deceased), the following original manuscripts of Operatic Scores 
by John Barnett, to be added to the Allen A. Brown Collection of 
Music: — 

"Win Her and Wear Her" (one volume), a Lyrical Version of 

Mrs. Centlives "A Bold Stroke for a Wife," produced at the 

Lyceum Theatre in 1832. 

"The Mountain Sylph" (two volumes), produced at the Lyceum 

in August, 1834. 

Overture to and separate numbers from "Fair Rosamund" (one 

volume), an opera produced at Drury Lane, February, 1837. 

"Farinelli," opera, (three volumes), produced at Drury Lane in 

1839. 
Benton, Josiah H. Two hundred and three volumes and a framed 
photograph, 38 X 48, of the Gross Glockner from Heiligenblut, for 
the Children's Room. 
Boston Browning Society. Five volumes for the Browning Collection. 
British Museum. Eight volumes published by the Museum, including: 
The Codex Alexandrinus. In reduced photographic facsimile. New 
Testament and Clementine Epistles. London. 1909. 
Texts relating to Saint Mena of Egypt and canons of Nicaea in a 
Nubian dialect. Edited by E. A. Wallis Budge. London. 1909. 



[65] 

Catalogue of manuscript music in the British Museum. Vol. 3. By 
Augustus Hughes-Hughes. 1909. 

Catalogue of the ivory carvings of the Christian era. By O. M. 
Dalton. London. 1909. 

Brown, Allen A. Three hundred and one volumes of music for the 
Brown Collection. 

Ditson, Charles H. Collection of portraits of musical celebrities. Se- 
lected by Gustave Kobbe. 

Oliver Ditson Company. Forty-eight volumes of music (their current 
publications) . 

The Earl of Crawford. Wigan, England. Catalogue of printed books 
preserved at Haigh Hall, Wigan. 4 vols., folio. 

— A bibHography of Royal Proclamations of the Tudor and Stuart 
Sovereigns. 1485—1714. 2 v. 

Fitz, Mrs. W. Scott. Ninety-six volumes, a miscellaneous collection 
and forty-eight numbers. 

Green, Dr. Samuel A. Diary kept at Siege of Louisburg, March 1 5— 
Aug. 14, I 745, by Rev. Joseph Emerson of Pepperell, Mass. With 
notes and introduction by S. A. Green, also a number of photographs, 
town reports, campaign documents, music, etc. 

Hale, Philip. Two hundred and sixty-seven volumes of, or relating to 
music, 93 programs and 61 unbound pieces of music, chiefly for the 
Brown Collection. 

Harris. From the Estate of Miss Georgie M. Harris of Auburndale, 
through the executors, Samuel L. Bailen and Frank Leveroni, a col- 
lection of two thousand and seventy pieces of music and eighteen 
bound volumes, consisting of the orchestral scores of modern com- 
posers (Strauss, Brahms, Tchaikowski) , excellent editions of the piano 
works of Chopin, Schumann, Beethoven, etc., chamber music and 
technical studies for the violin and piano. 

Higginson, Henry L. Forty volumes of miscellaneous literature. 

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth. Twenty-three volumes for the Galatea 
Collection. 

Keith, Mrs. Boudinot, New York City. Oil portrait of Thomas Bailey 
Aldrich, painted by Dora Wheeler Keith. 

Lockwood, Thomas S. [In memory of Samuel Lockwood.l One 
hundred and sixty-one volumes, including atlases, encyclopaedias, his- 
torical works, and works on botany, geography and natural history. 

Morgan, J. Pierpont, Catalogue of the collection of jewels and precious 
works of art, the property of J. Pierpont Morgan. Compiled by G. 
C. Williamson. London. 1910, 

Phillips, Mrs. John C. A collection of English literature of four hundred 
and twenty-eight volumes, choicely bound, and two hundred and 
twenty-one mounted photographs of Italian and Indian subjects. 

Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. (For the Allen A. Brown CoUec- 



[661 

Hon) Thirteen bound volumes of operas, the personal collection made 
by Louis Albert Vizentini of Paris (1841-1906). Besides the 
scores of the operas and the original letters from composers and singers 
taking part in the performances, the works contain many original draw- 
ings made by well known artists who superintended the costuming of 
the operas, and other interesting contemporary data. The composers 
represented are Gounod, Joncieres, Offenbach, Masse, Erlanger, 
Pierne, Bruneau, Massenet, Humperdinck, and Saint-Saens. 

Shaw, Samuel S. One hundred and twenty volumes and fifty numbers 
of periodicals. 

Small, Augustus D. Collection of seventy-nine volumes and three hun- 
dred and twelve magazines, including. The New England Journal of 
Education, The Catholic World, The Catholic Reading Circle Re- 
view, and Mosher's Magazine. 

Thornton, Miss Elizabeth T., Lexington, Mass. (Through Mr. C. E. 
Goodspeed). Four manuscripts and one printed broadside relating to 
the original paroles of Generals Burgoyne and Riedesel, which were 
acquired by the Library in 1 864. 

Threshie, Mrs. L. T., Dalbaatie, Scotland. Autograph MS. letter from 
Prof. Thomas H. Huxley to Lord de Young, written July 24, 1 875. 

White, Robert, M.D. A miscellaneous collection of one thousand three 
hundred volumes, consisting of American text books, Boston and 
United States documents and medical literature. 

THE CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. S. A. Chevalier, Chief of this Department, presents the 
following comparative figures relating to the work of two con- 
secutive years: 

1909_10. 19I0_1I. 



VOLS. AND „„, „„ VOLS. AND 

TrrLES. 

PARTS. PARTS. 



TrrLES. 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue . . 22.939 13,555 20,080 13.355 

Serials 6,830 5.430 

Branches 11,139 10,118 18,733 16,309 

Re-catalogued 14,400 8,460 19,472 12,165 



Totals . , . . . 55,308 32,133 63,715 41,829 

The number of cards added to the catalogues during the year 
is 169,910, of which 153,794 were added to the Central 
Library catalogues, and 16,1 16 to the Branch catalogues. On 
account of the crowding of cards in certain sections of the 
Bates Hall catalogue cases, the entire catalogue has been re- 
arranged, leaving sufficient space in each drawer to provide for 



[67] 

the increase of several years. New labels have been written for 
all the drawers. The first volume of the catalogue of the Allen 
A. Brown Music Library has been issued, also two parts of the 
second volume, and Part III of the second volume (the seventh 
part of the whole work) is in type. The Allen A. Brown 
Dramatic Collection, received by gift from Mr. Brown, num- 
bering 3,860 volumes, has been placed in the Barton-Ticknor 
room. The books have been listed, provisionally arranged, and 
about one-fourth of the entire number finally catalogued. The 
preparation of copy for a new edition in print of the catalogue 
of architectural books in the Library is substantially completed, 
and will therefore be ready for the printer within a short time. 
The miscellaneous work performed in the Department includes 
the preparation of a bibliographical catalogue of the incunabula 
in the possession of the Library, — 112 titles ; and the listing 
of the books relating to cookery bequeathed to the Library by 
the late Maria Parloa. 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The following condensed statement is made from the statis- 
tics compiled by Mr. W. G. T. Roffe, in charge of the Shelf 
Department : 

Placed on the central library shelves during the year: 
General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 18,250 

Special collections, new books ........ 1,950 

Books reported lost, or missing in previous years but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. .......... 458 

20,658 
Removed from the central library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc 4.880 

Net gain at Central Library 15,778 

Net gain at branches and reading-room stations 9,9oo 

Net gain, entire library system Z5./40 



[68] 

The total number of volumes available for public use in the 
Library at the end of each year since the formation of the 
Library is shown in the following statement : 



1852-53 








9.688 1881-82 


404.221 


1853-54 








16.221 1882-83 


422.116 


1854-55 








22.617 1883-84 . 


438.594 


1855-56 








28.080 1884-85 


453.947 


1856-57 








34.896 1885 . 


460.993 


1857-58 








70.851 1886 . 


479.421 


1858-59 








78.043 1887 . 


492.956 


1859-60 








85.031 1888 


505.872 


1860-61 








97.386 1889 .... 


520.508 


1861-62 








105.034 1890 . 


536.027 


1862-63 








110.563 1891 . 


556.283 


1863-64 








116.934 1892 .... 


576.237 


1864-65 








123.016 1893 .... 


597.152 


1865-66 








130.678 1894 . 


610,375 


1866-67 








136,080 1895 . 


628.297 


1867-68 








144.092 1896-97 


663.763 


1868-69 








152.796 1897-98 


698.888 


1869-70 








160.573 1898-99 


716.050 


1870-71 








179.250 1899-00 


746.383 


1871-72 








192.958 1900-01 


781.377 


1872-73 








209,456 1901-02 . 


812,264 


1873-74 








260,550 1 902-03 . 


835,904 


1874-75 








276.918 1903-04 


848,884 


1875-76 








297.873 1904-05 


871,050 


1876-77 








312.010 1905-06 


878.933 


1877-78 








345.734 1906-07 


903.349 


1878-79 








360.963 1907-08 


922.348 


1879-80 








377.225 1908-09 


941.024 


1880-61 








390.982 1909-10 


961,522 



1910-11 



987,268 



These volumes are located as follows: 



Central Library 




767.960 


Brighton 




18,294 


Charlestown 




21,870 


Dorchester 




19,379 


East Boston 




16.205 


Jamaica Plain 




16.161 


Roxbury Branch: 




V. 


Fellowes Athenaeum 27,399 




Owned by City 


8.802 




Total. Roxbury Branch 


36.201 


South Boston 




17.295 


South End 




15.959 


Upham's Corner 




6,211 


West End 




15,771 


West Roxbury 




7,793 


Lower Mills (Station 


A) 


718 



Roslindaie (Station B) . 


5.837 


Maltapan (Station D) 


768 


Neponset (Station E) 


644 


Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 


3.358 


Allston (Station G) 


923 


Codman Square (Station J) 


3.871 


Mt. Pleasant (Station N) 


862 


Broadway Ext. (Station P) 


2.913 


Warren Street (Station R) 


865 


Roxbury Crossing (Station S) 


982 


Boylslon Station (Station T) . 


965 


North Bennet St. (Station W) 


647 


Orient Heights (Station Z) 


1.382 


North Street (Station 22) 


721 


City Point (Station 23) . 


1.841 


Parker Hill (Stahon 24) 


872 



[69] 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The Library has issued the following publications during the 
year, under the editorial supervision of Mr. Lindsay Swft: 

1. Quarterly Bulletin, (four issues), aggregate pages, 336; edition, 

3,100 copies. 

2. Weekly Book List, each week, (53 numbers), aggregate pages, 384; 

edition, 2,500 copies. 

The Bulletin has contained the usual announcements of the 
Lowell Lectures and of the University Extension courses; the 
programmes of exhibitions at the Central Library and at the 
Branches and Reading-room Stations, and the announcements 
of the course of free public lectures given at the Central Library. 
A list of books upon city and town planning, prepared by Miss 
Tuckerman, appeared in the Bulletin issued June 30, and in the 
issue for December 3 1 , a list of books relating to the religious 
life of the Romans was published in connection with the Lowell 
Lectures, by Professor Jesse Benedict Carter. Besides the 
publications above named, a new edition of the Finding List 
of Books Common to the Branches has been published. Hiis 
list is alphabetically arranged, and the books, which, with few 
exceptions, are to be found at all of the larger Branches, are 
listed under author, title, and subject. A description of the sys- 
tem of book classification used at the Branches is also contained 
in this finding list, and since the books are arranged on the open 
shelves according to this system, the public should find some 
knowledge of it very useful. Miss Louise Prouty, Custodian 
of the West End Branch, rendered valuable assistance in the 
work of preparation and revision of this list, for which she is 
entitled to acknowledgment. 

THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Francis Watts Lee, Chief, has compiled the following 

table, showing the miscellaneous work of the Department, in 

two successive years: 

1909-10. 1910-11. 
Requisitions on hand, February 1 ..... . 3 17 

Requisitions received during year ...... 241 202 



[70] 

Requisitions on hand, January 31 17 9 

Requisitions filled during year ...... 224 193 

Card Catalogue (Central) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) 15.468 16,812 

Cards finished (excluding extras) 153,688 170,900 

Titles in type, but not printed 380 168 

Guide cards printed ........ 800 

Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) ...... 264 464 

Cards (approximately) 19,800 34,800 

Pamphlets not otherwise enumerated 63,650 28,425 

Call slips 1,865,000 1,777.795 

Stationery and blank forms 659,937 722,530 

Signs 768 840 

Blank books 58 55 



THE BINDERY. 

Mr. James W. Kenney, Chief of the Bindery, has reported 

the usual statistics of work performed, and these have been put 

into comparison with similar figures for the preceding year, in 

the following general statement: 

1909_10. 1910JI. 

Number of volumes bound, various styles 34,144 37,154 

Volumes repaired 1,971 2,200 

Volumes guarded 1.349 1,584 

Maps mounted 344 978 

Photographs and engravings mounted ..... 3,514 5,521 

Magazines stitched ........ 233 233 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 201,883 160,106 

In qualification of the figures thus presented, it should be said 
that those for the year 1910-1 1 are for 50 weeks only, due to 
closing the period of compiling the figures upon January 15, 
instead of February 1 , in order to hasten the preparation of the 
annual report. 

Various changes in details of mcinagement and in methods of 
performing work, introduced since the incumbency of the present 
Chief, have facilitated the operation of the Bindery and in- 
creased its output. 

DOCUMENTS AND SUPPLIES. 

Mr. George V. Mooney, in charge of the Stock Department 
at the Central Library, reports the following distribution of 
library publications for public use during the year: 



[71] 

Sent to departments for free distribution ....... 106,248 

Sent to departments for sale ......... 1,037 

Free direct distribution .......... 32,782 

Sold direct 306 

Distributed for library use ......... 182 

Total 140,555 

There have also been distributed for use as required in the 
various departments, 1 ,804,000 call slips, and 31 0,67 1 miscel- 
laneous forms. 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

From the annual report of Mr. John J. Keenan, Chief of the 
Registration Department, it is found that the gain for the year 
in the number of cards entitling the holders to borrow books for 
use outside of the Library was 809. The corresponding in- 
crease in the year previous was but 632. The total number of 
outstcmding borrowers' cards, available for use January 15, 
1910, was 86,104. The general routine work of this depart- 
ment shows an increase of about 10 per cent during the year. 
There were 50,684 cards issued to replace lost, soiled and filled 
cards. A brief statistical statement as to card holders follows: 



Cards held by men and boys 

Cards held by women and girls 

Cards held by persons over 16 years of age 

Cards held by persons under 16 years of age 

Teachers' cards ..... 

Pupils' cards (public and parochial schools) 

Students' cards (higher institutions of learning) 



26,046 
60.867 
52.097 
34.816 
4.912 
26.419 
23.014 



CHILDREN S DEPARTMENT. 



During the year there has been an increase in the use of the 
Children's Room at the Central Library, in continuation of the 
tendency shown during the past five years. Although, cis in 
other parts of the Library, the issue of books for home reading 
directly from the room does not properly measure this increase, 
it is to an extent indicative. The increase in this direct circula- 
tion was 2,061 volumes, and the total number of books issued 



[72] 

was 61,010; while 16,846 volumes were sent through the 
Children's Department at the Central Library for home use 
through the branch system. The total number of volumes issued 
for home use from the Children's Department of the Central 
Library was therefore 77,856. 

The following extracts are made from the report of Miss 
Alice M. Jordan, the Custodian: 

The permanent collection of fine, well-illustrated books, begun last 
year in the Reference Room, has been of distinct value as an educational 
factor. In the choice of these books the range has been wide enough to 
include picture books for little children as well as copies of world classics. 
Literary or artistic merit and acceptability to children form the basis of 
selection. We have been gratified by hearing from children that these 
books have given them a desire for reading and from parents and teachers 
that they have found help and enlightenment on the subject of suitable 
books. These two results realize the aim of the collection. . . . 

More young children than usual have been brought to the Library by 
older brothers and sisters, and have added materially to the care of the 
room during the past year. In some cases the children are seemingly too 
young to profit much by library visits, but the older ones cannot come with- 
out them. . . . 

Through looking at picture books the younger ones acquire, we hope. 
standards of art and humor higher than they would attain if left to get 
their ideas from cheap papers alone. . . . 

Cooperation with the schools has continued as in past years. Visits 
from the schools were fewer. It has been possible, however, in some 
cases, to trace the diminished number to temporary causes. . . . 

There have been two reprintings of the brief list prepared in 1 909 for 
the Home and School Association. The first reprinted edition was largely 
distributed at the time of the N. E. A. meeting in July, and the second 
was issued in response to a continuous demand. 

The practice of receiving classes from the schools, for instruc- 
tion in library methods, given by the Custodian of the Children's 
Room, has continued, and I think it proper to repeat from my 
report for last year, that "the experience of several years has 
demonstrated the value of the kind of service rendered by this 
department of the Library through the direct contact with the 
pupils and their teachers by means of the visits of classes referred 
to above. The schools which have accepted this service have 



[73] 



generally continued it. The Library will at any time make 
arrangements with others who have not yet sent classes here. 



BATES HALL. 

TThe maximum attendance of readers in Bates Hall (325) 
was recorded on the afternoon of February 6, 1910. In the 
course of the year, 580,000 call slips for books to be used at 
the tables were required by readers in the hall. This indicates 
the large use of this reading room, and besides this use of books 
from the stacks, there is a constant unrecorded use of the open- 
shelf books from the wall cases. On a busy day, during which 
a record was kept, only 2.5 per cent of the readers called for 
works of fiction. 

Mr. Oscar A. Bierstadt, the Chief of the Reference Depart- 
ment, located in Bates Hall, remarks: 

If any statistics were kept of the volumes consulted and of the visitors 
in Bates Hall, it is reasonable to believe that the figures for the year just 
ended would show a great increase over those of the preceding year. But 
in the largest hall of the entire library system it is quite impracticable to 
count accurately its large number of students, or the thousands of unre- 
corded reference books freely used by them. Many additional chairs 
have lately been placed in the hall, and at times it is difficult to find a 
vacant seat. The character of the studies pursued here is of a high 
order. 

The card catalogue in Bates Hall now contains about 1 ,250,000 
cards, and it is the duty of the attendants to guide visitors through this 
catalogue, or to relieve them altogether of the search for the desired 
books, and this work consumes much time. The books desired take 
such a wide range that the most recondite volumes are liable at any 
moment to be called for. A great library can hardly be said to have 
any dead books. An increasing number of letters inquiring for infor- 
mation have been answered; foreign catalogues have been searched to 
find works suitable for purchase; and a large amount of routine work 
has been done. 

Mr. Pierce E. Buckley, in charge of the Centre Desk, 



[74] 

directly in the hall, in his report also comments upon the char- 
acter of the books called for by readers, as follows: 

On January 1 4, a record of successful applications was kept. There 
were 880 call slips and 1 , 1 02 books were called for. Of this number, 
only 22 slips called for fiction. 

THE SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

The following details are derived from the report of the 
Assistant-in-charge, Miss Florence A. Westcott: 

THE FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT. 
Photographs and Lantern Slides. 

Two notable gifts have been received during the year, one 
of 398 photographs from Mrs. E. S. Green, and one of 221 
photographs from Mrs. J. C. Phillips. A group of 1,833 
photographs of views and industries of different countries has 
been purchased for the circulating collection. The total number 
of photographs and process pictures in the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment, including the Graupner Collection, is: photographs, 
20,068; half-tone and process pictures, 8,971 ; colored photo 
prints, 2,004. The lantern slides now number 3,120, of which 
315 have been acquired during the year. 

Circulation of Books and Pictures. 

The total number of books issued from the Fine Arts Col- 
lection (included in the statement of total circulation, page 58) 
was, directly, for use outside the building, 12,463; indirectly, 
for use through other departments, 6,500; in all, 18,963, as 
compared with 1 7,295 issued in the preceding year. 

BARTON-TIC KNOR ROOM. 

The following statistics show the recorded use of this room: 

Barlon-Ticknor books issued ......... 12,604 

Maps issued 1,212 

Books from other departments, issued for readers applying in this room 10,432 



[75] 

The Barton-Ticknor Rooms are used extensively for research 
work, and each year large numbers of books are reserved for 
the use of students in the colleges in Boston and vicinity. 

ALLEN A. BROWN MUSIC ROOM. 

The number of volumes added to the collection in this room, 
for the year, is 1 ,01 9. Of these, 305 were given by Mr. Brown. 
TTie additions have been unusually interesting. Among the 
more important are the followmg: 

Autograph manuscripts of Cesar Franck, C. M. Widor, John Bamett, 
Dudley Buck, Gustave Strube, and other composers. Two volumes 
containing early and rare American music, London, 1 760—90; the origi- 
nal manuscript collections of The Noblemen and Gentlemen's Catch 
Club, consisting of 32 volumes of catches, canons and glees, comprising 
the compositions submitted to the Catch Club, London, from 1 763— 
1 794, many of them never published. About 1 00 pamphlets on Wagner 
and his works. Works from the library of M. Weckerlin, of Brussels, 
notably Gounod's Ulysse (with corrections by him in manuscript) ; Spon- 
tini's Olimpie: Paris, 1826. 3 vols.; and two orchestral scores of great 
rarity, namely, Gounod's Faust and Massenet's La Navarraise. The 
collection has also been enriched by the Vizentini operatic scores, received 
through Mr. and Mrs. Rogers and mentioned in the lists of gifts on pages 
1 and 65 ante. 

Three exhibition cases have been placed in the Music Room 
for displaying rare works. The use of the room continually 
increases. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES OF THE SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

Visits of Classes. 

TTiere has been an increase in the attendance of classes, for 
whom reservations of tables and library material have been made 
in the Fine Arts Reading Room. The visits have included 38 
study clubs, attended by 1 , 1 08 members ; 116 classes from 
schools or colleges, attended by 787 students; 38 classes under 
private direction with 379 students, and conferences between 
students and instructors in connection with the Harvard-Lowell 



176] 

Collegiate Courses, requiring provision for about 1,400 indi- 
vidual visits. 

Besides the reservations mentioned, provision has been made 
for meetings and conferences by teachers from the public schools, 
and, in the Lecture Hall, for meetings of the Eastern Art and 
Manual Training Association, The New England History 
Teachers' Association, and for other meetings and conferences 
upon literary and educational subjects. 

Circulation of Pictures. 

The following table shows, by years, the circulation of port- 
folios of pictures from the Fine Arts Department to the public 
and private schools: 

Portfolios of Pictures Issued fcp Years. 

Borrowers. 1910. 1909. 1908. 1907. 1906. 1905. 

Public schools . 

Private schools 

Clubs 

Classes 

Miscellaneous 

Totals . 1,689 1,007 952 773 675 381 

It will be seen that the provision of material of this kind for 
the schools from the collections of the Library exhibits a con- 
siderable increase, as compared with the year immediately pre- 
ceding, or indeed with any previous year. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

The following lists enumerate the free public lectures given 
in the Lecture Hall, and the exhibitions given in the Fine Arts 
Exhibition Room at the Central Library during the year: 

Lectures. 

1910. February 3. The White House and its Famous People. By 
Caroline Melbourne Kingman. 



1,497 


860 


832 


646 


493 


264 


9 


26 


21 


32 


50 


30 


31 


35 


49 


68 


88 


53 


35 


22 


24 


12 


12 


6 


117 


64 


26 


15 


32 


28 



[771 

February 8. Recent excavations at Pergamum. By Professor Paul 
Baur. Under the auspices of the Boston Society of the Archaeo- 
logical Institute of America. (In the afternoon.) 

February 8. The Story of the Passion Play at Oberammergau. By 
Rev. John J. Lewis. 

February 10. Historic Castles of England. By George N. Cross. 

February 14. Impressions of South America. By Thomas Barbour. 
Under the auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 
February 1 7. Arts and Crafts, Past and Present. By Anna Sealon 
Schmidt. 

February 24. Around the Bay of Naples. By Arthur Stoddard 
Cooley. 

Mrach 3. Athens. By Arthur Stoddard Cooley. 

March 10. On the Track of Odysseus — New Homeric Questions. 
By Arthur Stoddard Cooley. 

March 1 1 . The Proposed National Forestry Reserve in the White 
Mountains and Southern Appalachians. By Philip W. Ayres. Under 
the auspices of the New England Women's Press Association. 

March 1 7. England and Scotland — Historic, Literary, and Pic- 
turesque. By Henry Warren Poor. 

March 25. Ancient Athens in the Modern City. By Professor W. K. 
Prentiss. Under the auspices of the Boston Society of the Archaeo- 
logical Institue of America. (In the afternoon.) 

March 3 1 . Days with the Birds. By Kate Tryon. 

April 7. A Winter with St. Gaudens. By Jane G. Ryder. 

April I 1 . Mexico. By Flora Kendall Edmond. Under the auspices 
of the Field and Forest Club. 

April 14. The Present and Future of Printing. By Henry Turner 
Bailey. Under the auspices of the Society of Printers. 

April 28. Esperanto. By Arthur Baker. Under the auspices of the 
Boston Esperanto Society. 

May 9. Ministry of Birds. By WilHam Rogers Lord. Under the 
auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 

July 6. Stories of Birds and Children. By Professor Clifton F. Hodge. 
Under the auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 

October 13. The Passion Play of Oberammergau. By Dr. John C. 
Bowker. 

October 1 7. Forestry and Insect Pests. By C. O. Bailey. Under 
the auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 

October 20. Longfellow: the Poet and the Man. By Marian Long- 
fellow O'Donoghue. 



[78] 

October 22. The Esperanto Congress and Progress of the International 
Language. By Dr. D. O. S. Lowell. Under the auspices of the 
New England Esperanto Association. 

October 27. Alaska, the Land of Promise. By Rev. W. M. Par- 
tridge. 

November 3. Greek Art. By F. Melbourne Greene. 

November 10. Japanese Art. By F. Melbourne Greene. 

November 1 7. The Aesthetic Ideals of Greece and Japan. By F. 
Melbourne Greene. 

November 21. A Western Outdoor Trip. By Mary E. Haskell. 
Under the auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 

November 29. Esperanto. By Arthur Blake. Under the auspices of 
the Boston Esperanto Society. 

December 1 . Excavations at Samaria. By Prof. David G. Lyon. 
Under the auspices of the Boston Society of the Archaeological Insti- 
tute of America. (In the afternoon.) 

December 1 . Carthage. By George B. Dexter. 

December 7. The White Mountain Forest Reservation. By Charles 
A. Lawrence. Under the auspices of the New England Women's 

. Press Association. 

December 8. Cortona, a Hill Town of Italy. By Eben F. Comins. 

December 1 2. Norway and the North Cape. By Frederick M. Brooks. 
Under the auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 

December 15. The Passion Play of Oberammergau. By Rev. Thomas 
I. Gasson. 

December 29. Famous Teachers of Music during Ten Centuries: 
Their Methods and their Books. By Leo R. Lewis. (On the occa- 
sion of the meeting of the Music Teachers' National Association.) 

1911. January 5. Holland and the Art of the Dutch. By Eliza- 
beth Fullick. 

January 9. Winter and Sea Birds. By Herbert K. Job. Under the 
auspices of the Field and Forest Club. 

January 12. Photography in relation to Illustration. By J. Horace 
McFarland. Under the auspices of the Society of Printers. 

Exhibitions. 

1910. January 1 7. Pictures of Spain. 

January 1 7. Americana. 

January 20. Phillips Brooks and Trinity Church. 

January 25. Italy. 

January 29. Paris. 

February 7. Historic Castles of England. 

February 15. Arts and Crafts from the Spitzer Collection. 



[79] 

March 1. Pictures of Greece. 

March 14. Exhibition by the Boston Architectural Club of Works of 
Charles F. McKim. 

March 2 1 . Easter Pictures. 

April 5. Works of Augustus St. Gaudens. Printing. 

April 15. Samples of pictures sent to schools. (In conjunction with 
New England History Teachers' Association Meeting.) 

April 20. Portraits of Women, English and French, 1 8th century. 

April 30. Reproductions of drawings. Apphed design. (In connec- 
tion with the meeting of the Eastern Art and Manual Training Asso- 
ciation. ) 

May 7. Kings and Queens of England. Edward VII. Views in 
Kent, Surrey, and Sussex, England. 

May 24. Civil War Pictures. 

June 9. Mountain Scenery. 

June 28. Samples of pictures sent to Boston schools. Selections from 
a collection of 1 2,000 pictures circulated in Boston schools. 

June 28. Early School Text-books. Early Sources of New England 
History. Books by Boston Authors, etc. 

August 22. Vienna. 

September I . Illustrations of Aerial Navigation from its origin to 1 830. 

September 1 . Street Floor. Modern Balloons and Airships. 

September 28. Columbus. Books and pictures. 

September 28. Street Floor. "Christ in Art" and the Passion Play. 

October 24. Alaska. 

October 31. Greek Art. 

November 7. Japanese Art. 

November 14. Exhibition of the National Association for the Promo- 
tion of Industrial Education. 

November 25. Photographs of Northern Africa. 

December 5. Photographs and Water Colors (by Mr. Comins) of 
Cortona, Italy. 

December 12. Photographs of Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. 

December 19. Music. Portraits of Composers. Old scores. Auto- 
graphs. Old music books, etc. 

December 22. Street Floor. Medici prints. 

1911. January 3. Photographs of Holland and Dutch Painting. 
Books, pictures and manuscripts relating to Charles Sumner. 

DEPARTMENT OF DOCUMENTS AND STATISTICS. 

Hiis Department has been in charge of Mr. James L. Whit- 
ney, who died September 25, 1910. Nearly up to the day of 
his death, Mr. Whitney continued the work of more fully cata- 



[80] 

loguing the Chamberlain Collection, to which he had for some 
lime given his direct attention. During the year he had dealt 
with about 1 ,500 manuscripts from this collection. 

Mr. Horace L. Wheeler, first assistant in the Department, 
has been in charge since Mr. Whitney's death, and reports that 
the gifts through the American Statistical Association, for the 
year, comprise 539 volumes and 1 ,950 numbers or parts, even- 
tually to be made up into volumes. 

This Department now contains 16,657 volumes, exclusive of 
documents and reports of a statistical character, on the shelves 
in the second gallery and Special Libraries floor, adjacent to 
the principal collection. As a reference department upon ques- 
tions relating to economics, municipal and social progress, or to 
commercial and industrial subjects, its value and use continually 
increases. Special provision has been made by reservations of 
the books desired by the students from the School for Social 
Workers, and by others from Simmons College, Harvard and 
Wellesley. All books of importance currently published upon 
subjects germane to the Department are added, and the files of 
United States Documents (received by the Library as a gov- 
ernment depository), and of state and municipal or special re- 
ports are made available for public use. The collection thus 
separately maintained forms a municipal reference library and 
reservoir of information upon the important subjects relating to 
social economics. 

BRANCHES AND STATIONS. 
EXPENSE OF OPERATION. 

The total expense of operation of the branch system, charge- 
able against the city appropriation, including the 1 1 principal 
branches and the 1 7 reading-room stations, or minor brcuiches, 
was $107,214.68 for the year. 

The circulation from year to year always exhibits fluctuations 
due to various causes, some of which are local and temporary. 
The branch circulation for the present year is shown in the tables, 
pages 57, 58 and 59. 

TTie attendance in the rooms of readers using the reading 



[81] 

tables, or of pupils from the schools engaged in reference work, 
has been large. The East Boston, Roxbury, Upham's Corner, 
and West Roxbury Branches, and seven of the reading-room 
stations have made substantial gains in total circulation. The 
Sunday attendance and the issue of books on Sundays are larger 
than in 1909-10. The South End and West End Branches 
are now open at 1 2 o'clock on Sunday instead of at two o'clock, 
the opening hour previously, and the attendance warrants the 
continuance of the new rule. The open hours of the West 
Roxbury Branch have been extended, and this branch is now 
open every evening instead of Saturday evenings only. TTie 
increased use of the branch and its enlarged circulation justifies 
the change. 

The number of new books added to the branches during the 
year shows an increase from 3,146 to 7,552 volumes, and the 
increase in the number of books replaced for others worn out or 
condemned is from 4,384 to 5,167 volumes. The number of 
volumes added to the permanent collections of the reading 
rooms is 4,690, as against 2,846 in the preceding year. The 
collections have thus been materially strengthened. 

Mr. Langdon L. Ward, Supervisor of Branches, in his an- 
nual report, summarizes certain details as follows: 

Many books bought with the Sullivan Fund have been added to the 
branches and reading rooms. 

In connection with the preparation of the new Branch Finding List, a 
considerable number of volumes of standard English fiction and books 
of some other classes in which the branches were weak, have been added 
to the collections. 

Additional copies to a greater number than usual have been bought for 
the branches this year. A custodian of one of the branches says on this 
subject in her annual report: 

"Given the collection of books included in the Branch Finding List, 
one can open a branch library anywhere in Greater Boston. But given 
these same books in some one quarter of the city, and the Custodian of 
that Branch must adjust her resources to the demands of her particular 
constituency. The elasticity and the adaptability of the Branches is gained 
in two ways — the daily issue from Central, and the acquisition of 'addi- 
tional copies.' The purpose of 'additional copies' must be borne in mind 
in considering the accessions," 



[82] 

A new edition of the "Finding List of Books Common to the Branches 
of the Public Library of the City of Boston" was issued in November last. 
The old list was a classed catalogue and, therefore, in many alphabets. 
The new one is in the form of a dictionary catalogue, with entries under 
author, title, and subject. These entries are unusually numerous and 
complete, and the list is proving to be of very real service in the work of 
the branch system. 

A copy of this list has been sent to the master of every grammar and 
high school, together with a circular letter with regard to the purpose and 
use of the list. The master was asked to have a copy of the letter given 
to every teacher in his district. The following extract is from the annual 
report of a branch custodian, and relates to the use of this list: "The 
new Branch catalogue was received this fall. It is invaluable to the 
assistant at the branch as well as to the public, and being in dictionary 
form is better understood by the public, who have neither the patience, 
nor the time, to use readily a classified Hst." The list has so much in- 
formation in the way of notes, series entries and sequences, full names, 
cross references, etc., as to be very educative to all employees of the 
department, 

A custodian's handbook, "Rules for the guidance of custodians of 
branches and reading rooms and their assistants," has been printed in 
temporary form. It will be kept in note book covers at the branches and 
reading rooms. Changes in the rules will be noted on the margin of the 
page, which is wide. The book makes about forty pages. It is likely 
that it will be necessary to add twenty or more on other subjects, but the 
most important matters are covered by the present edition. »The follow- 
ing are some of the headings: List of Forms in Use at Branches and 
Reading Rooms or of interest for Reference; Registrations; The Daily 
Issue from the Central Library; Fines; Charges and Care of Money; 
Periodicals; Property Book and Annual Inventory; Fire; Discipline. 

With reference to the work with schools performed in con- 
nection with the branches, Mr. Ward remarks : 

The assignment of schools to the branches and reading rooms is revised 
from time to time as new schools are established or other new conditions 
arise. The custodians of all the branches and reading rooms have schools 
to visit and to supply, either directly or as agents of the Central Library, 
with books and pictures. The custodians for the most part attend to this 
duty very faithfully. One custodian of a reading room visits her school 
twice a month. Another, when she cannot get the teachers to advise her 
in advance of subjects for outside study, engages certain pupils to do this. 
One wrote a letter to every teacher at the beginning of the school year, 
offering books and pictures. Two or three say in their annual reports 



[83] 

that almost all the teachers of their schools have had deposits of books 
or pictures, or that hardly a teacher in the district has not called for some 
assistance during the year. One custodian of a reading room took regis- 
trations in her two schools twice during the year, though required to do 
so only once. At one branch twenty-two more teachers were supplied 
with deposits than the year before. As the teachers' use of library privi- 
leges is purely voluntary, and is closely related to the initiative and faith- 
fulness of the custodians, it would seem that the latter deserve great credit 
for this branch of their work. 

The reference work at the branches is thus referred to : 

Very few of the custodians are trained reference librarians, but many 
of them have profited by the experience they have had and are pains- 
taking in this part of the work, which they all realize is most important. 
The collections of books at the reading rooms have been for some time 
fairly adequate to supply answers to the ordinary reference questions, and 
they are being strengthened every year. Almost all the custodians report 
that the reference work steadily increases. There is a certain amount of 
this work done for adults, especially young men. One custodian speaks 
of making especial effort to get books for adult foreigners who are learn- 
ing English. This is done at several other places. As has always been 
the case, however, a large part of the adults who frequent the branches 
and reading rooms want fiction or light non-fiction. 

The following extracts relating to reference work and to the 
assistance given to readers, are made from the annual reports of 
custodians : 

"The reference work a few years ago was principally performed with 
the grammar grades and with the pupils of the first year of the High 
Schools; but as the pupils whom we helped grew older and became 
farther advanced in school, they still came to the library for assistance, 
and, obtaining it, continued to use the library. At present there are quite 
a number of students from the Normal School, both first and second 
year's classes, who use the library continually." 

"An assistant has had time to typewrite certain poems asked for by 
teachers, which are sent in manila envelopes in place of a book in constant 
use here. Also to typewrite a reading list of books adapted to the boy's 
or girl's grade on the subject of a deposit of pictures asked for by the 
teachers. This list is mounted, in the same manner as the pictures, and 
sent and returned as part of the deposit. The experiment is yet too new 
to permit a report as to the results; but the boys and girls ask for those 
books." 



[84] 

"The question has sometimes been asked *Is this library for boys, 
only?' We answer that it is not, but that we are well pleased with the 
number of boys who spend their spare time here. In fact, if we are biased 
toward any class of readers it is toward the boys. We have an idea that 
girls will read of their own accord, and employ their leisure harmlessly. 
So it has come about that our tables are fully used every evening by young 
men and boys who have formed the library habit. We know them in- 
dividually, know when they leave school for their first job, and often at 
this time we are able to tip the balance in favor of the Evening School, 
and we follow them with suggestion and encouragement." 

The following from Mr. Ward's report is a comprehensive 
description of the nature and purpose of the work done with 
collections of pictures at the branches: 

"To supplement the pictures provided by the Fine Arts Department at 
the Central Library, the branches began some years ago to form collec- 
tions of inexpensive pictures that were likely to be of use to the teachers 
and pupils of the schools of the city. The pictures are chiefly those re- 
lated to nature study, geography, physical and poHtical, history and 
biography, literature, folkHfe, and the industrial arts. For example, out 
of many there are pictures on the following subjects: Birds, animals, 
fruits and flowers, gems, minerals, and ores; New England mountains, 
the Arctic Regions, Egypt, India; Historic men and scenes, explorers, 
the Spanish War, Concord and Lexington; Longfellow's poems. Authors 
and their homes, Burns' country. Scenes from David Copperfield; Indian 
life. Children of other days, Ireland and Irish life. School children of 
different countries; Fishing, lumbering, whaling, bridge building. These 
titles give only an imperfect idea of the variety of the subjects. Full lists 
were printed two years ago for distribution to teachers, and a new edition 
of these lists is in type. 

Many of the pictures have been cut from periodicals or worn out books 
and mounted at the branches. A considerable number, however, are 
obtained by purchase or gift. Picture postcards have been found useful, 
and so have the Perry pictures and other inexpensive collections that may 
be bought. 

The lending of these pictures is not only of definite value to the teachers 
of the public schools, but it promotes intimate relations between the schools 
and the Library, and leads to the wader use of the books. We have 
constant proof of this. In fact the use of the books and of the pictures 
are intimately connected. 

It has been found that the pictures are very valuable in the ungraded 
classes, and also in the kindergartens, in connection with story telling. 

These pictures are also used at the branches for exhibitions, and are 



[85] 

lent by branches to reading rooms for the same purpose. In this way 
they are brought prominently before the eyes of the teachers and children 
who use these library agencies. 

The number of pictures lent from the branch collections, chiefly to 
schools and reading rooms, is 21,719, as against 17,772 in the preceding 
year. 

The number of portfolios of pictures issued from the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment, through the branches and reading rooms, was 1,521, as against 
818 the preceding year. 

Several of the annual reports of the custodians praise the ex- 
hibitions sent to the branches and reading rooms every month by 
the Fine Arts Department, and speak of the interest taken in 
them. The following is an extract from one report : 

"The sets sent from the Central Library for exhibition at the Branch 
have been unusually interesting the past year, especially those on 'The 
evolution of the printed book,* Airships, and the one on Ice-harvesting, 
marble-cutting, etc. Of the branch pictures exhibited, the set illustrating 
the Shakespeare plays attracted considerable attention and comment, as 
did also a set oh American life in the West, consisting mostly of 
sketches by Remington of cow-boys and plain life. As might have been 
expected, these particularly interested the boys." 

TTie branches of the Library are knit together by an effective 
plan of organization, and, as operated in connection with the 
Central Library, they occupy a place in a unified system which 
is of the highest importance. Their relation to the schools is 
close ; they bring the collections of the Central Library near 
to the citizens in their immediate vicinity, and through their own 
collections and by the provision of opportunity for reading within 
the buildings, they form educational centres in the various dis- 
tricts, whereby books are brought within the reach of all. Our 
branches in several instances lack proper buildings, and these 
should be supplied to enable the library system to be operated 
to the point of highest efficiency. Considered merely from the 
point of view of its cost, imperfect operation means waste. 
Work of any kind, — and certainly library work is no excep- 
tion to the general rule, — can never reach the highest plane of 
excellence, if hampered by inadequate or inconvenient physical 
conditions. 



[86] 
THE DEPARTMENT OF PATENTS. 

The number of volumes added to the Patent collection during 
the year is 340, increasing the total number to 1 1 ,308. The 
number of persons consulting the files in this department, for the 
year, is 9,729; an increase of 1,191 over the number recorded 
in 1 909-1 0; and the number of volumes consulted was 67,528; 
an increase of 1 ,074 over the number used in the preceding year. 
As in other departments, there is always a considerable un- 
recorded use of books directly from the open shelves. 

THE PERIODICAL ROOM, CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The record of attendance showing the number of readers in 
the Periodical Room at the Central Library, taken by count at 
specified hours and aggregated for the year, is presented for 
each of two successive years : 



Hours. 


10 


12 


2 


4 


6 


8 


ID 




A.M. 


M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


1910-11 


9,796 


13,890 


20,169 


26,085 


19,710 


23,243 


8.042 


1909-10 


9.632 


13.430 


19.027 


24,932 


20,119 


23,099 


7.949 



The number of bound volumes from the files consulted during 
the year, in the day time, (week days only), was 31,752, as 
compared with 28,559, the number consulted in the preceding 
year; and the number consulted in the evening or on Sunday 
was 10,644, as compared with 8,008 for the preceding year. 
Hie number of unbound back numbers of periodicals issued to 
readers during the day time on week days was 26,782, and in 
the evening or on Sundays, 1 6,643, as compared with 23,507 
and 15,540, thus issued, respectively, in 1909-10. 

THE NEWSPAPER ROOM, CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

Mr. Pierce E. Buckley, in charge of the Department, reports 
the following accessions to the files of numbers of eighteenth 
century newspapers: 



One number each of American Apollo, American Gazette, American 
Intelligencer, Boston Post-Boy, Boston Price Current and Marine In- 
telligencer, Columbian Courier, Columbian Gazetteer, Columbian Mirror 
and Alexandria Gazette, Complete Counting House Companion, Even- 
ing Chronicle, Examiner, Finlay's American Naval and Commercial 
Register, Impartial Gazetteer and Saturday Evening Post, Independent 
Journal, Independent Republican, Massachusetts Mercury, Massachu- 
setts Spy, Merchants' Daily Advertiser, Morning Ray or Impartial 
Oracle, New England Weekly Journal, New Jersey Gazette, New Jersey 
State Gazette, New York Gazetteer and Country Journal, New York 
Gazetteer and Public Advertiser, New York Gazetteer or the Weekly 
Register, NewYork Weekly Chronicle, Pennsylvania Herald and Gen- 
eral Advertiser, Virginia Gazette and Manchester Advertiser, Virginia 
Journal and Alexandria Advertiser. Of the Boston Gazette, six num- 
bers; Boston Newsletter, four numbers; Hartford Gazette, two num- 
bers; Middlesex Gazette, three numbers; Middlesex Journal or Chronicle 
of Liberty (London), 16 numbers; New Hampshire Gazetteer, three 
numbers ; New York Mercury, six numbers ; Pennsylvania Gazette, 1 3 
numbers; Pennsylvania Packet, 249 numbers; and Potomak Guardian, 
three numbers. 

The maximum attendance in the newspaper reading room at 
any one time during the year was 278, on December 4. During 
the year, 9, 1 1 1 persons consulted the bound files of old papers, 
and the number of such volumes used was 20,667. 

SUNDAY AND EVENING SERVICE AT THE CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The average number of books lent upon Sundays and holi- 
days from the Central Library for use outside the library build- 
ing was 749. The largest number lent on any single Sunday 
was 1 ,2 1 7. The largest attendance on any single Sunday in 
the Bates Hall Reading Room was 325, the number present 
February 6, 1910 at 5 P.M. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations for the library service were given as follows: 
April 16, 1910, Grade B (28 applicants, 11 passed); and 
Grade C (45 applicants, 18 passed) ; June 25 and 27, Grade 
E, for boys only ( 1 2 applicants, 7 passed) ; and September 6, 
Grade E (67 applicants, 59 passed). 



[88] 



CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENTS AND CUSTODIANS OF BRANCHES 

AND STATIONS. 

As at present organized, the various departments of the 
Library and the Branches and Reading-room Stations are in 
charge of the following persons: 

Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief of Catalogue Department. 

William G. T. Roffe, In charge of the Shelf Department. 

Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief of Ordering Department. 

Oscar A. Bierstadt, Custodian of Bates Hall Reference Department. 

Pierce E. Buckley, Custodian of Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and 

Newspaper Departments. 
Florence A. Westcott, First Assistant, in charge of the Special Libraries. 
Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of Issue Department. 
Langdon L. Ward, Supervisor of Branches and Stations. 
Alice M. Jordan, Custodian of the Children's Department. 
John J. Keenan, Chief of the Registration Department. 
Horace L. Wheeler, First Assistant, in charge of Statistical Department. 
Francis W. Lee, Chief of Printing Department. 
James W. Kenney, Chief of Bindery Department. 
Henry Niederauer, Chief of Engineer and Janitor Department. 
Eliza R. Davis, Custodian of Brighton Branch. 
Elizabeth F. Cartee, Custodian of Charlestown Branch. 
Elizabeth T. Reed, Custodian of Dorchester Branch. 
Ellen O. Walkley, Custodian of East Boston Branch. 
Mary P. Swain, Custodian of Jamaica Plain Branch. 
Helen M. Bell, Custodian of Roxbury Branch. 
Alice M. Robinson, Custodian of South Boston Branch. 
Margaret A. Sheridan, Custodian of South End Branch. 
Mary L. Brick, Custodian of Upham's Corner Branch. 
Louise Prouty, Custodian of West End Branch. 
M. Addie Hill, Custodian of Station A, Lower Mills Reading Room. 
Grace L. Murray, Custodian of Station B, Roslindale Reading Room. 
Emma D. Capewell, Custodian of Station D, Mattapan Reading Room. 
Mary M. Sullivan, Custodian of Station E, Neponset Reading Room. 
Isabel F. Wetherald, Assistant, in charge of Station F, Mt. Bowdoin 

Reading Room. 
Katherine F. Muldoon, Custodian of Station G, Allston Reading Room. 
Gertrude M. Harkins, Custodian of Station J, Codman Square Reading 

Room. 
Margaret H. Reid, Custodian of Station N, Mt. Pleasant Reading 

Room. 



[89] 

Cora L. Stewart, Custodian of Station P, Broadway Extension Reading 

Room. 
Mary L. Kelly, Custodian of Station R, Warren Street Reading Room. 
Laura N. Cross, Custodian of Station S, Roxbury Crossing Reading 

Room. 
Elizabeth P. Ross, Custodian of Station T, Boylston Station Reading 

Room. 
Florence Bethune, Custodian of Station Z, Orient Heights Reading 

Room. 
Iside Boggiano, Custodian of Station 22, North Street Reading Room. 
Josephine E. Kenney, Custodian of Station 23, City Point Reading 

Room. 
Mary F. Kelley, Custodian of Station 24, Parker Hill Reading Room. 

I desire to record my acknowledgment of the faithful service 
of the foregoing, and of the employees generally, and to thank 
especially Mr. Otto Fleischner, Assistant Librarian, for his 
loyal and efficient cooperation in the work of administration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Horace G. Wadlin. 

Librarian. 



INDEX. 



Accessions. (5ee Books.) 

Additions. (See Books.) 

Appropriation. {See Finance.) 

Balance Sheet, 26-29. 

Barton-Ticknor Room, 74. 

Bates Hall, 59, 73. 87. 

Benton, Josiah H., elected President, 1 . 

Bindery Department, 70. 

Binding' and repair of books, 4. 

Board of Trustees, organization, 1 . 

Books, accessions, 2, 60-69; average 
cost, 3, 61 ; binding and repair, 4; 
branches, 81 ; circulation, 3, 6, 56- 
60, 71; delays in delivery, 32, 59; 
expenditures, 3, 61 ; Fine Arts De- 
partment, 74; hall use, 56, 73, 87; 
inter-library loans, 9; Music Room, 
75; Patent Department, 86; reserved 
for students, 60, 75; sent to schools, 
etc., 5; Statistical Department, 80; 
total number and location, 68. 

Borrowers. (See Card holders.) 

Boyle, Thomas F., elected Vice Presi- 
dent, 1. 

Branches and reading rooms, 88; ac- 
commodations, 6; accessions, 61, 81; 
circulation, 6, 57"59, 80; custodians, 
88; Examining Committee report on, 
33-42; exhibitions, 85; expense of 
operation, 80; finding list, 69; needs, 
6^8, 33-42; pictures hung at, 56; 
pictures, use of, 84; reference work, 
83; repairs, 55; Sunday service, 81 ; 
telephones, 55; total volumes, 68; 
West End fountain removed, 55; 
work with schools, 82. 

Brown, Allen A., Collection, gift to, 
10, 64, 65, 75; Dramatic collection, 
67 ; music catalogue, 67 ; Music Room, 
75. 

Card holders, 71. 

Catalogue Department, 66. 

Center bequest, sale of real estate, 
amount funded, 10. 



Chamberlain Collection, work on 
catalogue, 80. 

Chiefs of departments, 88. 

Children's Department, 71. 

Circulation, 3, 56-60; branches, 6; 
Children's Department, 71 ; fiction, 
59; hall use, 56. 73, 87; Fine Arts 
Department, 74; inter-library loans, 
9; pictures, 76; Patent Department, 
86; Sunday and evening, 87; through 
schools, etc., 5. 

Classes and clubs, 75. 

Delays in delivery of books, 32, 59. 

Deposits, 5, 59. 

Documents. (See Statistical Depart- 
ment.) 

Employees. (See Service.) 

Examining Committee, 23; report, 30- 
42. 

Examinations, 87. 

Exhibitions, 78, 85. 

Expense. (See Finance.) 

Fiction, circulation, 59; purchases, 61. 

Finance, Balance Sheet, 26-29; 
branches, expense of operation, 81 ; 
city appropriation, 2; expenditures 
for books, 3, 60, 61 ; cost of system 
of pensions, 1 3-23 ; maintenance and 
work, 1 2 ; receipts, 1 ; sale of Cen- 
ter estate, 10. 

Fine Arts Department, 74, 85. 

Gifts, 64-66; Fine Arts Department, 
74; Music Room, 10, 64-5, 75; Sta- 
tistical Department, 80. 

Harvard-Lowell Collegiate courses, 
visits, 75. 

Hours of service, 4, 81 . 

Institutions, deposits, 5; circulation, 
59. 

Inter-library loans, 9. 

International Congress of Archivists 
and Librarians at Brussels, 23; re- 
port by Mr. Kenney, 43-54. 

Inventories, 56. 



[91] 



Issue Department, 56. 

Kenney, William F., delegate to In- 
ternational Congress of Archivists and 
Librarians, 23; report on, 43~54. 

Lantern slides, 74. 

Lectures, 76. 

Mann, Rev. Alexander, reappointed 
Trustee for five years, I. 

Newspaper Room, 8, 86; expendi- 
tures, 3. 

Ordering Department, 61 . 

Patent Department, 86. 

Pensions and retirement of employees, 
13-23. 

Periodical Room, 8, 86; expenditures, 
3. 

Photographs and other pictures, 74, 
76, 84, 85. 

Pictures. (See Photographs.) 

Pictures hung at branches, 56. 

Pratt, Bela L., contract for statuary, 9. 

Printing Department, 69. 

Publications, 69, 70. 

Reference work, 56; Bates Hall, 73; 
87; branches, 83. 



Registration Department, 71. 

Repairs and improvements, 55. 

Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. 
Gift to Allen A. Brown Gillection, 
10, 65. 

Schools, work with, 5. 33, 59, 72, 82. 
83,_ 84. 

Service, hours of, 4; pensions and re- 
tirement system, 13-23; well admin- 
istered, 24, 88, 89. 

Shelf Department, 67. 

Special Libraries, 74, 75. 

Statistical Department, 79. 

Statuary for front of Central Library 
building, 9. 

Stock Department, 70. 

Students, attendance, 75; books re- 
served for, 80. 

Sullivan, Patrick F., Bequest, pur- 
chases from, 62, 81. 

Sunday and evening service, 5, 81, 87. 

Telephones at branches, 55. 

Trust funds, expenditures from, 3. 

Whitney, James L., death, 11, 79; 
memorial, II, 12. 



The Public Library of the City of Boston: Printing Department. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 651 6