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ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1911. 




CITY OF BOSTON 
PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1911 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1911boston 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1910-11. 



Boston, April 25, 1911. 

Hon. John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith the 
report of this department for the year February 1, 
1910, to February 1, 1911. 

During this period there have been three heads 
of this department: February 1 to May 27, 1910, 
Commissioner Samuel D. Parker; from May 27 to 
September 1,6, 1910, Temporary Commissioner Francis 
M. Carroll; from September 16, 1910, to February 
1, 1911, Commissioner Charles D. Daly. 

The loss has been heavy, exceeding $3,000,000. 
This may be partly due to the growth of the city and 
the increase in valuation. You will notice that the 
number of alarms has increased from 3,784 to 4,063. 

Fire-Fighting Force. 

I beg to call attention to the necessity of increasing 
the fire-fighting force of the city. It is no uncommon 
sight to see the most important pieces of apparatus 
in the city attending fires badly undermanned. With 



2 City Document No. 15. 

due respect to the necessity of not increasing expenses, 
and with a reasonable amount of consideration for the 
burdens of the taxpayer, I strongly recommend that 
this department be increased by not less than fifty perma- 
nent men. 

The apparatus and equipment of this department 
are, in the main, in excellent shape. The department 
is confronted by the necessity of a gradual change from 
horse-drawn to motor-driven apparatus. No more 
chiefs' buggies or horse-drawn chemical engines should 
be purchased. It has been definitely established that 
motor apparatus of these types can perform fire work 
with far greater efficiency than horse-drawn vehicles. 
This department will proceed along this line as fast as 
its funds permit. 

The houses of the department are a matter of material 
concern. Many of them are in an old and dilapidated 
condition and are inadequate for men, horses and appara- 
tus. Some are decidedly unsanitary. The department 
proposes to prepare plans and estimates for recon- 
structing some of the nouses. These estimates will be 
forwarded and funds requested as fast as may seem 
justifiable. 

Fire-Alarm Branch. 

Since taking office I have retired four of the aged 
employees at the head of the fire-alarm service, and 
have reorganized this branch on the basis of younger 
men. The results have been most gratifying. The 
important work of transmitting alarms promptly is 
carried out with the highest efficiency. The fire-alarm 
office is being rewired and its delicate machines given a 
long needed overhauling. In the meantime the work 
of extending the underground system and keeping up 
the repairs on the outside circuits is being maintained. 

Repair Shop. 

The department experienced a heavy misfortune in 
the lumber yard fire of August 9, 1910. At this fire 
the repair shop was destroyed and the repair division 
of the department seriously crippled temporarily. The 
necessity of efficient maintenance of the varied equip- 
ment of the department is apparent to any thinking 
person. The loss of the tools, supplies and building 
connected with the service prostrated this division. 



Fire Department. 3 

Under the able direction of the superintendent of repairs 
a temporary shop has been established at 252-256 
Dover street. In these quarters the maintenance of 
the department has been carried on efficiently, and I 
do not feel that there has been any setback in the high 
character of the apparatus and equipment. 

The rebuilding of the repair shop has been pushed. 
A fireproof building with an extra story and an enlarged 
boiler room will be built upon the site of the old 
structure. The work is progressing rapidly and will be 
completed this summer. 

Veterinary Hospital. 

Within the last year the pensioning of Dr. G. W. 
Stimpson necessitated the appointment of a new veteri- 
nary surgeon. The work of this division is being well 
maintained. Excellent horses, in proper numbers, are 
being purchased at a fair figure. 

Fire Prevention. 

The fire risk in the City of Boston is one of the heaviest 
in the world. The steps necessary to meet the situation 
are plain. The underlying necessity is, first, an 
improvement in the building laws. The Department 
has co-operated with the commission appointed by the 
Mayor. Tinder box conditions have been investigated 
and a law is now before the Legislature which, if passed, 
will insure some progress toward better building methods. 
A law requiring all garages to be of first-class construc- 
tion has been prepared and will, doubtless, be enacted. 
Other special risks have been investigated. These 
matters should be pushed not only in this General 
Court but in each succeeding one until a reasonable 
class of construction is insured. 

A second step toward improving building conditions 
is found in the extension of the building limits. This is 
a matter of great importance. The Fire Department, 
in conjunction with the Engineers of the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters, has prepared a tentative 
ordinance asking that these limits be extended. This 
is now before the City Council. The detail of the plan 
may be subject to change, but that the work is necessary, 
and that now is the time to do it, nobody questions. 



City Document No. 15. 



Building Inspection. 

The system of building inspection has been extended 
and developed. During the few months in which it has 
been carried on over seven thousand buildings have 
been inspected. The inspection has covered various 
special risks, such as garages, printing plants, factories, 
tenements, hotels, hay and grain sheds, lumber yards, 
mercantile houses, schoolhouses, theaters, moving picture 
houses, public assembly halls and buildings for the storage 
of explosives, etc. 

When dangerous conditions are found they are 
reported to the owner, the Building Commissioner and 
the Boston Board of Fire Underwriters. The complete 
investigation of these various buildings tends to elim- 
inate dangerous conditions, as has been shown by the 
ready response of owners in correcting those of a fire 
menace character. Many buildings in a state of col- 
lapse have been razed. Others with windows out and 
doors removed have been boarded up, thus eliminating 
the danger of fire from within by intruders. Much 
attention has been paid to buildings in which rubbish 
and litter of all kinds have been allowed to collect, and 
where benzine, naphtha, gasolene and other inflammables 
have been stored for use in a careless manner. In garages 
danger arising from escaping gasolene vapor has been 
minimized by the segregation of heaters and boilers from 
the main building. The regulation governing the stor- 
age of gasolene and the burying of tanks underground is 
being enforced, thus reducing the danger from explosions. 

Great care has been exercised by the explosive 
detail in the inspection of high explosives. Enforce- 
ment of the new regulations, issued by the state police, 
has been rigid. Buildings and structures containing 
high explosives, such as dynamite, blasting powder, 
detonators or blasting caps, fixed ammunition, soluble 
or negative cotton, fireworks and firecrackers and 
inflammable fluids of all kinds, have been frequently 
inspected. 

These inspections have been the means of bringing to 
the attention of the Building Department insufficient 
means of egress, defective buildings, etc., which would 
be a source of great danger in case of fire. It has also 
the additional advantage of acquainting the district 
chiefs with their territory. 



Fire Department. 5 

Adequate building inspection can only result in far 
reaching benefit to the community. 

High Pressure Service. 

A bill providing for the installation of a high pressure 
service through the business district of Boston has been 
submitted to the Legislature, and indications are that 
it will become a law. If this bill is accepted by the 
City Council, the city will have made a material step 
toward modern fire protection. The benefits resulting 
from this system are inestimable. 

The Suburbs. 

Fire protection in the suburbs should be developed. 
I have gathered statistics showing the growth of the 
suburbs in population and valuation. These statistics 
show that there has been practically no increase in the 
fire protection of these districts during a period in which 
population and valuation have increased 30 per cent. 

Mutual Aid. 

The problem of receiving assistance from adjoining 
cities and towns in case of large fires has been investi- 
gated. A Board, consisting of Deputy Chief Grady, 
Chief Perkins and Assistant Superintendent Fire Alarms 
Donahue, have prepared careful plans for the orderly and 
proper handling of metropolitan aid. The extension of 
the tapper service to adjoining towns is being pushed. 
This office has in mind proper cooperation throughout 
the immediate metropolitan district. 

National Board Investigation. 

The National Board of Fire Underwriters, during the 
past six months, has investigated in detail all aspects 
of this department. This report, just published, speaks 
of the department in favorable terms. 

The characteristic high grade of the Boston Fire 
Service has been maintained throughout the year, due 
to a strict attention of officers and men to their duties. 

Very respectfully, 

Charles D. Daly, 

Fire Commissioner. 



City Document No. 15. 



ORGANIZATION. 



Commissioner, Charles D. Daly; term expires May, 1914. 

Chief Clerk, Benjamin F. Underhill. 

Chief of Department, John A. Mullen. 

Deputy Chief, John Grady, First Division. 

Junior Deputy Chief, Peter F. McDonough, Second 

Division. 
Superintendent of Fire Alarms, George L. Fickett. 
Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms and Chief Operator,. 

Richard Donahue. 
Superintendent of Repair Shop and Supervisor of Engines, 

Eugene M. Byington. 
Veterinary Surgeon, Daniel P. Keogh. 
Medical Examiner, Rurus W. Sprague. 



District Ci 


liefs. 






District. Headquarters. 


1. John W. Godbold . . Ladder House 2 


2. Charles H. W. Pope 








9 


3. John 0. Taber 








18 


4. Henry A. Fox . 








Engine House 4 


5. Daniel F. Sennott . 








26-35 


6. Edwin A. Perkins . 








1 


7. John T. Byron 








22 


8. Stephen J. Ryder . 








Ladder House 12 


9. Michael J. Kennedy 








Engine House 12 


10. John W. Murphy . 








18 


11. John E. Madison . 








41 


12. Michael J. Mulligan 








28 


Marine, Robert A. Ritchie 








47 


14. Maurice Heffernan 








46 


Our Roll of Merit contains the names of 




Nathan L. Hussey . . 


Engine 23. 


Edward H. Sawyer (2) 










Ladder 4. 


James F. Bailey 










" 17. 


Eugene Rogers 










". L 


Peter Callahan 










Engine 4. 


Joseph A. Kelley 










Chemical 1. 


Timothy J. Heffron 










Engine 4. 


James E. Downey . 










" 6. 


Frederick F. Leary . 










Ladder 12. 


Florence Donoghue 










Combination 8. 


James J. O'Connor . 










Engine 7. 


James F. McMahon 










Combination 8. 



Fire Department. 



Martin A. Kenealy . 




Engine 


7. 


Denis Driscoll .... 




a 


7. 


William H. Magner 




Ladder 8. 


Thomas J. Muldoon 




Chemical 8. 


Dennis McGee 




Combination 5. 


Joseph P. Hanton 




Ladder 17. 


Michael J. Teehan . 




a 


17. 


Charles W. Conway 




a 


13. 


Michael J. Dacey 




u 


13. 


Patrick E. Keyes 




District Chief. 


Thomas H. Downey 




Engine 


8. 


Force and Pay Roll February 1, 1911. 




Commissioner 


$5,000 per annum 


Chief clerk 


2,500 


a 


Chief of department 


4,000 


a 


Deputy chief 


3,000 


ii 


Junior deputy chief 


2,500 


ii 


Superintendent of fire alarms 


2,500 


u 


Assistant superintendent of fire a] 


arms and 




chief operator .... 


2,300 


ii 


Superintendent of repair shop and super- 




visor of engines .... 


2,500 


ii 


Veterinary surgeon .... 


2,000 


ii 


Assistant to veterinary surgeon 


1,600 


ii 


Medical examiner .... 


1,300 


ii 


Master carpenter .... 


1,300 


ii 


Master painter . . . 


1,300 


ii 


Bookkeeper . ... 


1,650 


ii 


2 Clerks 


1,400 


ii 


1 Clerk 


1,200 


ii 


1 Clerk 


1,100 


ii 


1 Clerk 


900 


ii 


1 Clerk 


800 


ii 


1 Clerk 


700 


ii 


14 District chiefs .... 


2,000 


ii 


56 Captains 


1,600 


ii 


88 Lieutenants .... 


1,400 


ii 


1 Lieutenant, aid to chief . 


1,400 


ii 


1 Lieutenant, foreman hose an< 


i harness 




shop 


1,400 


ii 


2 Engineers 


1,400 


ii 


46 Engineers 


1,300 


ii 


1 Engineer 


1,200 


ii 


44 Assistant engineers . 


1,200 


ii 


647 Privates: 






464 


$1,200 per annum. 


42 


1,100 


ii 


39 


1,000 


ii 


73 ..... 


900 


ii 


29 




720 


ii 



City Document No. 15. 



2 Chief's drivers .... 

3 Chief's drivers .... 


$1 75 per day. 
2 00 


1 Chief's driver . . . 


2 50 " 


3 Hostlers (average) . 

1 Horseshoer .... 


2 25 " 

3 00 " 


1 Shipkeeper .... 


2 00 " 


Fire- Alarm Force. 


4 Operators • 

3 Assistant operators . 
1 Foreman of construction 


$1,600 per annum 
1,200 
2,000 


1 Machinist 

1 Machinist 


4 25 per day. 
4 00 


1 Telegraphers and lineman (average) 3 14 " 
1 Hostler ...... 2 50 " 



Assistant superintendent and one operator on leave 
absence with half pay pending decision on retirement. 



of 



Repair Shop Employees. 



Master plumber 

Engineer . 

Firemen 

Plumbers . 

Steamfitter 

Painter 

Painters 

Painters 

Wheelwrights 

Machinists 

Blacksmiths 

Blacksmith 

Blacksmith's helpers 

Carpenters 

Hose and harness repairers 

Hose and harness repairer 

Vulcanizer 

Laborers .... 

Laborer .... 



1,300 


per annum 


3 25 


per day. 


2 50 


it 


4 40 


(I 


4 00 


u 


3 75 


11 


3 50 


it 


3 16 


it 


3 25 


it 


3 25 


u 


3 50 


it 


3 25 


a 


2 50 


it 


3 50 


it 


3 25 


it 


2 25 


u 


2 50 


it 


2 25 


a 


2 00 


it 



1,006 total force. 



Fire Districts. 



The city is divided into fourteen fire districts as 
follows : 

District 1. 

All that part of Boston known as East Boston. 

District 2. 
All that part of Boston known as Charlestown. 



Fire Department. 9 

District 3. 

The territory bounded on the north by State street, 
on the east by the water front to B street, on the south- 
east by B street, on the south by West First street, 
across Dorchester avenue and Cove Street Bridge to 
Atlantic avenue, and on the west by Atlantic avenue, 
Dewey square, Summer street, Church Green and 
Devonshire street. 

District 4> 

The territory bounded on the north and east by the 
water front, on the south by State, Devonshire, Water, 
Washington, School and Beacon streets, and on the west 
by Charles and Pinckney streets and the Charles river. 

District 5. 

The territory bounded on the north by Water, Wash- 
ington, School, Beacon, Charles and Pinckney streets, 
on the west by the Charles river, Otter, Beacon, Arling- 
ton, Boylston (Short), Church and Providence streets, 
Park square, Columbus avenue, Church and Tremont 
streets, on the south by Pleasant street and Broadway 
extension to bridge across Fort Point channel to Dor- 
chester avenue, and on the east by a line from Dorchester 
avenue across Cove Street Bridge, Atlantic avenue, 
Dewey square, Summer street, Church Green and 
Devonshire street. 

District 6. 

The territory bounded on the north by Broadway 
extension across Fort Point channel, and Dorchester 
avenue to First street, through First street to B street, 
on the west by B street to harbor line, by harbor line 
to Locust street, on the south by Locust and Dorset 
streets to the South bay, and on the west by South bay 
to Broadway Extension Bridge. 

District 7. 

The territory bounded on the west by the Charles 
river, on the north by Otter, Beacon, Arlington, Boylston 
(Short), Church and Providence streets, Park square, 
Columbus avenue, Church, Tremont and Pleasant 
streets and Broadway extension to bridge, on the east 
by Fort Point channel and South bay, and on the south 
by Massachusetts avenue and the Charles river. 



10 City Document No. 15. 

District 8. 

The territory bounded on the north by the Charles 
river and Massachusetts avenue, on the east by Wash- 
ington street, on the south by Atherton and Mozart 
streets, Chestnut avenue, Sheridan and Centre streets, 
Hyde square, Perkins street, South Huntington avenue 
and Castleton street, across Jamaicaway to the Brook- 
line line, and on the west by the Brookline line to Cottage 
Farm Bridge. 

District 9. 

The territory bounded on the north by Massachusetts 
avenue, South bay, Dorset and Locust streets, on the 
east by Dorchester bay, on the south by Evandale ter- 
race, Savin Hill avenue north, Pleasant and Stoughton 
streets, Columbia road, Geneva and Blue Hill avenues, 
Seaver street and Columbus avenue, and on the west by 
Washington street. 

District 10. 

The territory bounded on the north by Geneva 
avenue, Columbia road, Stoughton and Pleasant streets, 
Savin Hill avenue north, Evandale terrace to water 
front, on the east by Dorchester bay and Neponset 
river, on the south by marsh land to Minot street, 
through Adams and Centre streets, Talbot avenue and 
Angell street ; on the west by Canterbury street and 
Blue Hill avenue. 

District 11. 

All that part of Boston known as Brighton, and 
extending east as far as Cottage Farm Bridge. 

District 12. 
All that part of Boston known as West Roxbury, 
bounded on the north by a line from the Brookline line 
across Jamaicaway to Castleton street, through Castle- 
ton street, South Huntington avenue, Perkins street, 
Hyde square, Centre and Sheridan streets, Chestnut 
avenue, Mozart and Atherton streets, Columbus avenue 
and Seaver street, on the east by Blue Hill avenue, 
Canterbury, Morton and Harvard streets, on the south 
by the Hyde Park and Dedham lines, and on the west 
by the Newton and Brookline lines. 

Marine District. 
All buildings or other property, including wharfs, 
bridges, etc., bordering on the water front, beginning 



Fire Department. 



11 



at a point on the northerly side of the reserved chan- 
nel at L Street Bridge, South Boston, thence westerly 
along the harbor line of South Boston to Fort Point 
channel, thence southerly to Dorchester Avenue Bridge, 
thence northerly by the way of Fort Point channel, 
thence along and around the city proper harbor line 
to the Charlestown Bridge, thence northerly along the 
water front around the Charlestown district to Mystic 
river, thence westerly along the Mystic river (south 
side) to Maiden Bridge, or Alford street. Also, begin- 
ning at Jeffries Point at the head of Marginal street, 
thence northerly and westerly along the East Boston 
water front to Chelsea creek, thence easterly .along said 
creek (south side) to the Grand Junction Railroad 
Bridge, and to include all property on the islands in 
Boston Harbor. 

Note.— The lines of Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are affected by the Marine District. 

District 14-- 

The territory bounded on the north by Angell street, 
Talbot avenue, Centre and Adams streets, to Minot 
street, across marsh land to Neponset river, on the 
east by Neponset river, on the south by Neponset river 
and Hyde Park line, on the west by Harvard, Morton 
and Canterbury streets. 



Assignment of Districts. 

Each district is placed under the charge of a district 
chief, as follows: 





Chief in Command. 


Companies in Districts. 


District. 


Engines. 


o3 q 

.S a 

S'm 


CO 3 

13 El 




, 


John W. Godbold 

C. H. W. Pope 

John 0. Taber 


5,9, 11,40 

27, 32, 36 

25, 38, 39 

*4,6, 8 

7, 10, * 26, 35 

* 1,2, 15, 43 

3, * 22, 33 

13, 14,37 

* 12,21,23,24 

17, * 18, 20 
29, 34,* 41 

* 28, 30, 42, 45 

44, * 47 
16, 19,* 46 


7 
3,9 

1 
2 
8 
4 
12 
10 

6 
5,13 

11 


*2, 21 

*9, 22 

8, 14 * 18 

1,24 

17 

5, 19,20 

3, 13, 15 

* 12,26 

4 

7, 23, 27 

11 

10,16,25 

6 




2 




3 


3 


4 


1 


5 

6 

7 


Edwin A. Perkins 

John T. Byron 

Stephen J. Ryder 

Michael J. Kennedy 

John W. Murphy 

John E. Madison 

Michael J. Mulligan 

Robert A. Ritchie 


2 


8 

9 




10 

11 

12 




Marine. . . . 
14 









Headquarters of District Chief. 



12 



City Document No. 15. 



The following property is in charge of the Fire Com- 
missioner : 

Houses. 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Assessed 
Valuation. 


Occupied by 


Dorchester and Fourth streets 


8,167 


$25,800 


Engine 1 and Ladder House 
5 on this lot. 


Corner of and Fourth streets 


4,000 


16,200 


Engine 2. 


Bristol street and Harrison avenue . . . 


4,000 


30,000 


Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 




6,098 


96,000 






Tower 1. 




1,647 


9,000 






2,269 


40,000 






1,893 


36,400 


Engine 7. 




2,568 


24,000 


Engine 8. 




4,720 


29,700 






1,886 


20,500 


Engine 10. 


Saratoga and Byron sts., East Boston, 


10,000 


39,500 


Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 




7,320 


25,000 


Engine 12. 




4,832 


16,000 






5,713 


14,600 


Engine 14. 




2,803 


18,600 


Engine 15. 


Corner River and Temple streets 


12,736 


19,200 


Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 


Meeting House Hill, Dorchester 


9,450 


17,300 


Engine 17 and Ladder 
House 7 on this lot. 




9,440 


18,800 


Engine 18. 




7,683 


14,200 


Engine 19. 




9,000 
10,341 


17,300 

17,100 


Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 




Engine 21. 




7,500 


62,500 


Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 




3,445 


11,200 


Engine 23. 


Corner Warren and Quincy streets 


4,186 


IS, 100 


Engine 24. 




4,175 


100,600 


Engine 25, Ladder 8 and 




Ladder 14. 




5,623 
2,600 


175,000 
18,000 






Engine 27. 




10,377 


28,300 


Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 


Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 


14,358 


37,200 


Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 


Centre street, West Roxbury 


12,251 


25,000 


Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 


Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 


S,188 


26,200 


Engine 32. 


Corner Boylston and Hereford streets 


5,646 


98,000 


Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 




4,637 


17,800 


Engine 34. 




5,668 


21,000 


Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 


Corner Longwood and Brookline aves. 


5,231 


14,300 


Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 



Fire Department. 

Houses. — Concluded. 



13 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Assessed 
Valuation. 


Occupied by 




4,000 


$37,000 


Engines 38 and 39. 




4,010 


18,000 


Engine 40. 


Harvard avenue, near Cambridge 


6,112 


25,500 


Engine 41 and Chemical 6. 


Washington street, at Egleston square, 


3,848 


22,900 


Engine 42 and Chemical 5. 




5,133 


19,600 


Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 


Washington street, corner Poplar 


14,729 

4,875 


22,400 
22,900 


Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 


Dorchester avenue, Ashmont 


Engine 46. 


Church street 


3,412 


23,600 


Chemical Engine 2. 




5,230 


15,700 


Chemical 3. 




889 
9,300 


4,300 
40,600 


Chemical Engine 4. 








1,804 


7,800 




Eustis street 


1,790 


8,000 


Chemical Engine 10. 


Corner Callender and Lyons streets.. . 


7,200 


13,964 


Chemical 11. 


Corner Walk Hill and Wenham streets, 


11,169 


35,446 


Chemical 13. 




1,676 
3,923 


37,200 
26,000 








Main street, Charlestown 


4,290 


16,400 


Ladder 9 and Chemical 9. 




4,311 
2,134 


25,600 
23,500 






Ladder 17. 




8,964 


35,400 


Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 


Fourth street 


3,101 


10,700 


Ladder 19. 




6,875 


21,400 


Ladder 23. 




3,918 


19,800 


Ladder 24. 







Assessed Valuation. 

Fuel house, Dorchester street, 1,610 feet of land, $3,100 

Fuel house, Salem street, 417 feet of land . . 4,000 

Fuel house, Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet 

of land *..'.. 7,000 

Headquarters Building, corner of Albany and 

Bristol streets, 23,679 feet of land . . . 125,000 

Water Tower No. 2 and wrecking wagon are in 

Headquarters Building. 
Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet 

of land 68,300 

Fuel house, Washington, near Dover street, 1,007 

feet of land 10,500 

11,500 feet of land adjoining the South Ferry, 

East Boston, quarters of Engine Company 47, 16,300 

Building not assessed. 



14 



City Document No. 15. 



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Fike Department. 



21 



New Apparatus Purchased During the Year. 

2 85 feet aerial trucks. 

1 First-size Metropolitan steam fire engine. 

1 Second-size Amoskeag steam fire engine. 

1 Combination chemical engine and ladder truck. 

1 Chemical engine. 

1 District chief's wagon. 

1 Sleigh. 

1 Buick roadster. 
Built at Fire Department repair shop : 

1 Hose wagon. 

1 Ladder truck rebuilt, and destroyed in repair shop fire. 

1 Chemical engine rebuilt, and destroyed in repair shop 
fire. 



Amount of hose purchased and condemned during the 
year: 

Leading cotton 
Leading rubber 
Chemical 
Deck . 
Rubber suction 
Flexible suction 
Deluge 



Amount of hose destroyed in repair shop fire, August 
9, 3,586 feet. 
Amount of hose in use and in store February 1, 1911 : 



Purchased. 


Condemned. 


13,300 feet 


9,400 feet 


2,500 " 


800 " 


1,000 " 


1,350 " 


300 " 


100 " 


312 " 


195 " 


200 " 


150 " 


200 " 


48 " 


17,812 feet 


12,043 feet 





In Use. 


In Store. 


Leading cotton .... 


. 100,414 feet 


4,010 feet 


Leading rubber . . ... 


7,600 " 


2,750 " 


Chemical 


. 11,950 " 


200 " 


Deck 


600 " 


300 " 


Rubber suction . . 


956 " 


124* " 


Flexible suction .... 


525 " 


87| " 


Deluge 


816 " 


187| " 


- 


122,861 feet, 


7,659^ feet 


Hors 


ES. 




Purchased during the year 




. 52 


Sold or exchanged 




. 27 


Killed for cause 




. 11 


Killed in service 




. 3 


Died 




3 


Number in the department 




. 408 



22 



City Document No. 15. 



Expenditures for the Year. 



Salaries to January 26, 1911, inclusive: 
Samuel D. Parker, commis- 
sioner, to May 27, 1910, inclu- 
sive 

Francis M. Carroll, temporary 

commissioner, from May 28 to 

September 15, 1910, inclusive . 

Charles D. Daly, commissioner, 



:,643 83 



1,424 65 



from September 16, 1910 . 


1,917 80 




B. F. Underhill, chief clerk 


2,493 40 




John A. Mullen, chief of depart- 






ment 


3,988 92 




Deputy and districts chiefs 


30,391 72 




Members of the various com- 






panies 


1,030,849 63 




Clerks in office .... 


5,662 29 




Pensioners 


102,763 94 
11,181,136 18 




Less amount deducted for cloth, 


3,034 84 

It 


1 170 1A1 CM 




$j.,j 


Horses : 






Hay, grain and straw . 


$52,394 93 




Shoeing 


20,030 54 




Harnesses and repairs . 


13,518 83 




Purchase and exchange of . 


10,599 08 




Attendants at hospital, medicine, 






etc. 


7,481 44 




Horse hire 


4,644 50 


108,669 32 






Repairs of apparatus, including stock sent to 




repair shop : 






Mechanics 


$39,937 12 




Materials, etc. .... 


24,011 02 


63,948 14 


Fuel for houses and engines 




38,219 07 


New apparatus: 






2 aerial ladder trucks . 


$10,597 00 




2 engines ... 


9,815 00 




1 automobile 


1,798 00 




1 combination chemical engine 






and ladder truck 


1,790 00 




1 chemical engine . . ... 


1,408 00 




1 chief's wagon .... 


215 00 




1 sleigh 


107 50 


25,730 50 




. .$] 


Carried forward . 


L,414,668 37 



Fire Department. 



23 



Brought forward . 
Hardware, tools and supplies . 
Hose, pipes and repairs 
Repairs and alterations of houses 
Electric lighting 
Furniture and bedding 
Washing 

Rents 

Printing 

Uniform cloth .... 

Gas 

Medical services 

Hats, badges and buttons 

Stationery 

Chemicals 

Janitress at headquarters 

Ice 

Expenses of detailed men 
Advertising .... 

Traveling expenses . 
Allowance to members for clothes, etc. 

repair shop (order of City Council, 

ber 12, 1910) 
Postage 

Freights and small items 
Automobile insurance 
Expert services . 
Rent of gas regulators 
Medical supplies 



Fire-alarm telegraph: 
Salaries : 

Brown S. Flanders, superin- 
tendent, to November 10, 
1910, inclusive 
George L. Fickett, superintend- 
ent, from November 11, 

1910 

Operators, repairers, etc. . 







$1,414,668 37 






19,397 03 






19,028 71 






18,298 13 






10,453 20 


$8,670 06 


1,201 85 




9,871 91 




8,113 50 






5,304 42 






3,471 34 






1,775 04 






1,751 36 






944 39 






794 51 






713 85 






602 40 






481 00 






394 75 






257 98 






188 76 


, etc., lost a 




uncil, Novem- 






148 25 






80 10 






78 74 






76 25 






75 00 






54 75 






30 57 




$1,517,054 31 



2,515 76 



Less amount deducted for 
cloth 



Wire cables and conduits 
Instruments, tools and repairs 



527 45 
44,163 82 

$47,207 03 

38 47 

$47,168 56 
8,325 36 
4,629 35 



Carried forward 



,123 27$1,517,054 31 



24 



City Document No. 15. 



Brought forward .... 


160,123 27$ 


1,517,054 31 


Repairs and alterations 


2,665 94 




Telephone service 


1,014 26 




Use of duct in East Boston Tun- 






nel 


450 36 




Maps and plans .... 


420 36 




Electric light for clocks . 


248 39 




Car fares and traveling expenses, 


187 31 




Electric power .... 


144 06 




Repairs of clocks .... 


82 10 


65,336 05 




$] 




L,582,390 36 


Fire Station, Lauriat Avenue District. 




Payments on account: 






s Contractors, McGahey & O'Connor 




$12,075 76 


Architects, Moller & Smith . 




603 00 


Printing 




82 98 


Advertising 




2 50 




$12,764 24 



Fire Station, Oak Square and Faneuil Section. 

Payments on account: 
Advertising 



$4 00 



House, Land and Apparatus, Forest Hills. 

Balance of payments: 

Contractor, Martin Flynn $16,355 71 

Architects, Moller & Smith 625 02 

• Fire-alarm cable 591 22 

Conduit 519 70 

Oil tank, etc 96 50 




$18,188 15 


Cost of land $3,966 45 

Cost of building .... 28,979 97 




$32,946 42 





New Fireboat No. 31. 
Continuation of payments: 

Contractors, Bertelsen & Petersen Engineering 

Company 

Architect, Arthur Binney 

Inspector of hull 

Carried forward 



,875 00 
1,362 50 

747 00 

2,984 50 



Fire Department. 



25 



Brought forward . 
Nozzles, pipes, hose, etc. 
Consulting engineer 
Launching 
Advertising 



$42,984 50 

702 20 

400 00 

201 15 

6 60 

$44,294 45 



New Quarters for Fireboat Crew, Boston Side. 

Payments on account: 

Engineering 



$75 00 



Recapitulation. 

Fire Department $1,582,390 36 

New fireboat No. 31 44,294 45 

House, land and apparatus, Forest Hills . . 18,188 15 

Fire station, Lauriat avenue district . . . 12,764 24 

New quarters for fireboat crew, Boston side . 75 00 

Fire station, Oak square and Faneuil section . 4 00 

$1,657,716 20 

Income. 

Permits for keeping explosives .... $7 50 

Rent 32 00 

Permits for keeping fireworks 77 50 

Sale of manure 230 00 

Sale of old material 3,309 64 

Bath Department, steam for Dover Street Bath 

House 3,520 04 



',176 68 



26 



City Document No. 15. 

















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27 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from February 1, 
1910, to February 1, 1911. 



Alarms, accidental, false au- 
tomatic 120 

Alarms, false, needless bell 

and still . 181 

Alarms out of city 28 

Ashes, hot, in wooden recep- 
tacle 50 

Automobiles, igniting of 41 

Boiling over of fat, tar, etc . . 35 
Bonfires, grass, brush, rub- 
bish 704 

Careless use of lamp, candle, 

lantern 81 

Careless use of pipe, cigar, 

cigarette 114 

Chimneys, soot burning. .... . 196 

Chimneys, defective 43 

Clothes too near stove 23 

Defective flue 14 

Defective stovepipe 14 

Defective furnace, stove, 

boiler 3 

Defective gas pipe 14 

Defective fireplace 5 

Electric motor igniting car . . 9 

Electric wires, motor 56 

Explosion and ignition of 

chemicals 5 

Fireworks and firecrackers . . 23 
Friction, picking machines, 

shafting 17 

Fumigating 6 

Gas, escaping and explosion, 7 

Gas jet setting fire 49 

Gas stoves, careless use of, 

and explosion 33 

Grease, igniting in ventilator, 

oven 34 

Kerosene, careless use of in 

lighting fire 2 

Lightning 2 

Incendiary 15 

Incendiary, supposed 42 

Lamp, explosion of 35 

Lamp, upsetting and break- 
ing 50 



Light, smoke, mistaken for 

fire 36 

Matches and rats 21 

Matches and children 124 

Matches, careless use of 238 

Meat burning on stove, in 

oven 27 

Naphtha, gasolene, benzine, 
turpentine, careless use of, 

and ignition 26 

Oil stove, careless use of, and 

explosion 37 

Overheated boiler or steam 

pipe 14 

Overheated stove or furnace, 67 

Plastering, drying 11 

Plumber's, roofer's, painter's 

stove or torch 16 

Rescues, elevators, miscel- 
laneous 25 

Rekindling of ruins 7 

Set by boys 115 

Slacking of lime 8 

Smoky chimney 67 

Smoky lamp 6 

Smoky stove or furnace 86 

Sparks from another fire .... 5 

Sparks from boiler 5 

Sparks from chimney 41 

Sparks from engine or loco- 
motive 89 

Sparks from forge 12 

Sparks from furnace or stove 15 

Sparks from open grate 4 

Spontaneous combustion ... . 37 

Steam escaping 19 

Street fight, family brawl. . . 1 

Unknown 807 

Water, gas pipes, thawing 

out 36 

Water back, bursting of ... . 5 

Wood drying in oven 5 



4,063 



28 



City Document No. 15. 









Fire Extinguished 


BY 






1910-11. 






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26 


54 


3 


39 


18 


26 






81 
50 
66 
51 
94 
55 


27 
27 
25 
23 
46 
23 


83 
59 
38 
51 
76 
53 


61 
40 
18 
32 
67 
53 


36 
30 
29 
25 
32 
30 


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41 
18 
17 
22 
20 


36 
39 
30 
40 
65 
3S 


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1 




1 


August 


2 


September 


44 


23 


29 


16 


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10 


26 






74 
47 


39 
23 


66 
45 


65 
24 


33 
31 


44 
27 


38 
29 




November 


1 


December 


79 


28 


55 


8 


43 


23 


44 




1911. 




















87 


38 


71 


20 


36 


56 


22 








Totals 


771 


348 


680 


407 


392 


388 


433 


7 







Fire Department. 



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30 



City Document No. 15. 



Fire Losses for Year Ending January 31, 1911. 



Buildings 

Contents 



$1,171,968 
2,153,022 



Total 



i,324,990 



Fires Where Loss Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



1910 

Feb. 7. 
Feb. 8. 
Feb. 9. 
Feb. 11. 
Feb. 27. 
March 5. 

March 12. 
March 15. 
March 30. 
April 1 . 
April 14. 
April 14. 
April 16. 
May 12. 

May 28. 

July 3 . 

July 4. 

Aug. 9. 

Aug. 9. 

Aug. 10. 

Aug. 18. 

Aug. 27. 

Sept. 7 . 

Sept. 27. 

Oct. 10. 

Nov. 17. 

Dec. 3. 

Dec. 5. 

Dec. 8. 

Dec. 22. 

Dec. 27. 

1911 

Jan. 11. 
Jan. 22. 



112-116 State street, Tiffin Club et al 

727 Boylston street, T. H. Thomas et al 

Brighton Abattoir, Brighton Packing Company et al 

220 State street, Charles E. Moody Company et al 

Lewis Wharf, Company 

194-200 Summer street, The Boston Rubber Supply 
Company et al 

439 Albany street, Boston Elevated Railway Company. . 

74-78 Canal street, J. M. Mann et al 

941 Washington street, Harmon Westcoat Dahl Company, 

400 Market street, H. C. & CD. Castle etal 

134 Richmond street, John Holman et al 

7-13 Sherman street, Raymond Svndicate et al 

62-70 Water street, Chapin & Trull 

43-47 Kemble street, Poland Laundry Machine 
Company et al 

Mystic Wharf, Export Lumber Company 

78-84 Purchase street, Hodgdon Brass Works etal 

Dunlow place, Boston Belting Company 

55-59 High street, Johns Manville Company et al 

350 Albany street, Blacker & Shepard and repair shop 
Fire Department et al 

92-100 Massachusetts avenue, Maxwell-Briseoe Com- 
pany et al 

169-181 Congress street, Crimmins & Peirce et al 

11 Columbia street, Harry R. Barry et al 

Simpson Dry Dock and Bradley Fertilizer Company. . . . 

89-103 Medford street, Palmer & Parker Company 

167-173 Summer street, Jewish Publishing Company et al., 

386-390 West First street, Mente Company et al 

73-75 Essex street, Simons, Hatch & Whitten et al 

69-75 Chauncy street, E. L. Ham & Co. et al 

144-150 Congress street, Bates & Guild et al 

27-33 Hayward place, Hotel Epicure et al 

39-41 Kingston street, Bedford Manufacturing Company, 

21-23 Portland street, Aldiich & Chisbee 

Clayton and Park streets, Sturtevant Mill Company. . . . 



$19,311 02 
37,204 70 

194,942 95 
49,544 89 
30,765 00 

326,729 92 
270,295 92 
35,199 80 
34,413 26 
38,899 62 
36,798 87 
18,551 45 
15,473 85 

15,242 04 
58,214 11 
19,930 30 
16,863 75 
55,565 77 

364,410 70 

63,674 94 
334,001 27 
19,948 19 
15,275 00 
30,065 67 
22,567 56 
17,058 88 
62,678 06 
67,694 50 
28,296 67 
50,137 53 
28,020 31 



31,897 00 
20,142 00 



Fire Department. 



31 



YEARLY LOSS FOR THE PAST FIFTEEN 
YEARS. 



Year ending February 


1 


1897 




it it 


1 


1898 




a it 


1 


1899 




U it 


1 


1900 




a a 


1 


1901 




(( it 


1 


1902 




u it 


1 


1903 




a u 


1 


1904 




« tt 


1 


1905 




it u 


1 


1906 




u u 


1 


1907 




a a 


1 


1908 




a a 


1 


1909 




it tt 


1 


1910 




a a 


1 


1911 





$1,394,707 
775,525 
1,441,261 
1,630,149 
1,702,217 
1,830,719 
1,762,619 
1,674,333 
2,473,980 
2,130,146 
1,130,334 
2,268,074 
3,610,000 
1,680,245 
3,324,990 



ALARMS FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS. 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1910 


2,066 

2,101 
2,210 
2,441 
1,687 
1,905 
1,580 
1,633 
1,566 
1,349 


1,997 

1,677 
1,700 
1,600 
1,262 
1,210 
1,159 
1,121 
1,099 
977 


4,063 


1909 


3,778 


1908 


3,910 


1907 


4,041 


1906 


2,949 


1905 


3,115 


1904 


2,739 


1903 


2,754 


1902 


2,665 


1901 


2,326 







32 



City Document No. 15. 



BOSTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND. 



From September 1, 1909, to September 1, 1910, 
Inclusive. 

The Fire Commissioner, as president of the Boston 
Firemen's Relief Fund, acknowledges the following 
contributions; these sums were accompanied by letters 
expressing appreciation for services rendered by the 
department : 

Gov. Eben S. Draper 

Mrs. Gardner Blanchard Perry " . 

Estate of Florence Lyman .... 

Lewis Wharf Company 



The receipts from the annual department ball and 
contributions constitute the fund from which sick bene- 
fits and doctors' bills are paid. Destitute members of 
deceased firemen's families are also given assistance 
from this fund. 



$100 00 


25 


00 


3,877 


10 


100 00 


$4,102 


10 



Financial Statement of the Boston 
Relief Fund September 1, 1909, to 
1, 1910, Inclusive. 

Receipts. 

Balance, September 1, 1909 

Net proceeds of ball, February, 1910 

Interest on bonds 

Interest on deposits 

American Trust Company . 

Check canceled 

Donations .... 

Total receipts 

Expenditures. 

Benefits paid $15,261 32 

Massachusetts General Hospital, free 

bed • 200 00 



Firemen's 


September 


$7,845 25 

14,566 76 

7,912 50 

191 88 


1,000 00 


3 00 


4,102 10 



>,621 49 



Carried forward 



$15,461 32 $35,621 49 



Fike Department. 33 



Brought forward . 
Carney Hospital, free bed 
City of Boston bond 
Salaries .... 
Running expenses 



Balance, September 1, 1910 



$15,461 32 
200 00 


$35,621 49 


14,357 28 
500 00 




130 95 






30,649 55 






$4,971 94 



Assets, September 1, 1910. 

$117,000 00 City of Boston bonds at 3| per cent. 
94,000 00 City of Boston bonds at 4 per cent. 
8,000 00 C. B. & Q. R. R. bonds at 4 per cent. 
4,971 94 cash on deposit. 



Total, $223,971 94 



34 City Document No. 15. 



FIRE-ALARM BRANCH. 



From February 1, 1910, to February 1, 1911, 2,128 
first alarms, 50 second, 17 third, 6 fourth, 2 fifth and 
1 sixth (general) alarms were received and transmitted 
to the department. 

For 131 alarms the same box was received one or 
more times and for 184 alarms one or more adjacent 
boxes were received for the same fire; 25 alarms received 
in March for grass fires were treated as " still" alarms, 
one or two pieces of apparatus being notified to respond 
to the box location; together these make a total of 340 
box signals received but not struck out to the depart- 
ment. 

From 292 boxes no alarm was received; eight boxes 
show a record of 20 or more alarms; box 705 has the 
record for the year with 51 alarms; from eight boxes 
(702 to 709, inclusive) 145 first and 2 second alarms were 
received. 

Department companies reported to the operating 
office 1,069 " still" alarms to which they had responded; 
638 telephone reports of fire were received from citizens 
and 187 from the Police Department, making a total of 
825 telephone reports to the operating office for fire. 
For 98 of these reports department box alarms were 
received. 

Reports of 197 automatic alarms were received, 148 
from the Boston Automatic Company, 43 from the 
American District Telegraph Company, and 6 from local 
automatic service; for 11 of the Boston and for 24 of the 
American District Telegraph Company alarms, depart- 
ment box alarms were given. 

Eliminating the "stills" and automatics for which 
department box alarms were transmitted, there were 
162 automatic and 1,769 " still" alarms, and these added 
to the box alarms make a grand total of 4,162 alarms 
received from all sources and passing through the 
operating office during the year. 

During the year the department has added 7 public 
boxes to the system; 10 schoolhouse boxes and 1 private 
box were also added, making 746 boxes in service, and 
6,142 box tests and inspections were made. 



Fire Department. 35 

Six more public telephone lines have been added to 
our telephone system and connected to our switch board, 
5 from the Tremont Exchange, making a total of 7 
from that exchange, and 1 from the Oxford Exchange, 
so that if any cause cuts off service from Tremont 
Exchange we still have an avenue open for the public 
to communicate with this headquarters. One private 
line has been established between this office and police 
headquarters, thus establishing direct communication 
between these two departments of public safety. 

The gong service to Milton, Newton and Somerville 
has been abandoned and tapper service established in 
place; the tapper service has also been extended to 
Brookline and Cambridge so that all alarms and " all- 
out" signals are now transmitted to the departments 
of these cities and towns. Cambridge has extended its 
tapper service to Engine 41 house, Brookline has its 
service to Engine 37; Somerville is connected with Engine 
32, and Milton has connections with Engines 16 and 19. 

Arrangements are now under way to substitute tapper 
service, in place of present gong service, with Chelsea; 
Newton is to connect its service at Engine 29. These 
connections will give opportunity for the extension of 
mutual aid plans. 

The Brighton gong circuit has been, extended to the 
Water Department Pumping Station at Chestnut Hill, 
and a gong installed there so that they may receive 
alarms and be able to regulate the water pressure in 
case of large fires. 

The removal of overhead wires, within the district 
prescribed by Wire Commissioner, for 1910 (Dorchester 
avenue, from Fort Point channel to Romsey street), and 
the necessary underground construction for the same, 
has been completed. Overhead wires have been removed 
and underground construction has been further extended 
in Dorchester avenue, as far as Park street, Dorchester. 

Considerable other underground construction has 
been done during the year and cable used as follows: 
Northampton street, near Engine House 23; Fourth 
street, at Dover Street Bridge, for repairs; Hanover 
street, for new lamp-post Box 709; Chelsea and Gray 
streets, for new lamp-post Box 422 ; Hyde Park avenue 
and Walk Hill street, for new house of Chemical 13. 

The storm of December 25, 1909, caused much damage 
to overhead construction, compelled extensive repairs, 
and in several places new construction was necessary; 



36 City Document No. 15. 

this work was principally in the following territory: 
Massachusetts avenue, from Southampton street to 
Columbia road; Dorchester avenue, from Andrew square 
to Field's Corner; Adams street and Neponset avenue, 
from Dorchester avenue to Engine House 20 ; Rutherford 
avenue, Chapman street to Sullivan square; Academy 
Hill road, from Washington street to Engine House 29; 
First street, E street and Congress street, from A street 
to Box 117; Freeport street, from Dorchester avenue 
to Mills street. 

The equipping of and connecting in service the new 
house of Chemical 11 made necessary new construction 
on poles on Lauriat avenue and Lyons street, cable 
being used. 

A new cable of about 7,000 feet has been run on poles 
in East Boston, on Maverick, Jeffries, Marginal, Cottage 
and Lamson streets, to take the place of overhead wires 
running on same poles with wires of high voltage and 
makes for the betterment of the service. 

The gong installed at the pumping station at Chestnut 
Hill necessitated extensive construction, the circuit being 
extended from the house of Engine 29. 

The work of installing circuit test switches in depart- 
ment houses has been continued and all of the houses 
in West Roxbury have been equipped, and also several 
of the houses in East Boston, Charlestown and South 
Boston. 

The substitution of tapper service for gong service 
in Milton, Newton and Somerville and the extension 
of the tapper service to Cambridge made necessary 
much overhead construction. 

The house of Engines 29 and 34 have been wired and 
equipped for electric lighting and extensive alterations 
and repairs have been done in other department houses. 

The care of thirty-one public clocks and the repairs on 
department clocks has~ caused much work along that 
line. 



Fire Department. 



37 









90,675 feet 








217,005 


a 








37,830 


a 








5,133 


a 








187,037 


a 








37,130 


u 



Summary op Construction Work During the Year. 

New wire used .... 

Old wire taken down 

Overhead cable construction 

Overhead cable removed 

Conductors in cable construction 

Conductors in cable removed . 

Underground cable used in ducts owned by the 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany 

Underground cable used in fire-alarm ducts, 
service connections, etc. (new construction) 

Total underground cable used . ... 

Conductors in same 

Cable used for repairs 

Conductors in same 

Conduits built by this department . 

Ducts laid by this department 

Manholes built 

Fire Department boxes built over . 

Schoolhouse Department boxes built over . 

Total number of boxes built over . 

New public boxes established .... 

New schoolhouse boxes established 

New private boxes established 

Total number of boxes established 

Schoolhouse boxes equipped with keyless doors 

New public boxes placed on lamp-posts 

Public boxes changed from poles to lamp-posts 

Public boxes knocked down and reset 

Total boxes placed on lamp-posts 

Cross-arms used 

Public clock reports attended to 

Department clocks repaired 

Number of box circuits 

Number of boxes in same 

Number of tapper circuits 

Number of tappers in same 

Number of registers in same 

Number of relays in same 

Number of gong circuits . 

Number of gongs, 124 and 1 bell in same 

Number of telephone circuits in service 

Number of public telephone lines to switch board 

Number of private lines from switch board 

Number of telephones connected in department 
circuits 

High pressure signalling circuit 

Miles of box circuits underground 



17,669 

3,971 

21,640 

348,650 

2,635 

57,559 

3,070 

3,757 

1 

31 

26 

57 

7 

10 

1 

18 

37 

3 

7 

6 

16 

406 

59 

75 

44 

746 

10 

121 

3 

1 

13 

125 

40 



128 
1 
395^ 



38 



City Document No. 15. 



Miles of box circuits overhead .... 239 

Miles of gong circuits underground . . . Ill 

Miles of gong circuits overhead .... 40 

Miles of tapper circuits underground ... 86 

Miles of tapper circuits overhead .... 41 

Miles of telephone circuits underground . . 215 

Miles of telephone circuits overhead ... 52 

Miles of high pressure circuit underground . 5£ 

Miles of wire in use underground .... 598 

Miles of wire in use overhead 320 

Number of boxes owned by the Fire Department . 513 

Number of boxes on lamp-posts . . . . 184 

Number of boxes on poles 293 

Number of boxes on fences 1 

Number of boxes on trees ..... 1 

Number of boxes on buildings .... 5 

Number of boxes on buildings with lanterns . 29 

Number of schoolhouse boxes with keyless doors, 37 

Number of schoolhouse boxes with key doors . 88 

Number of auxiliary boxes on poles ... 4 

Number of auxiliary boxes on posts ... 1 

Number of auxiliary boxes on buildings . . 7 

Number of auxiliary boxes in buildings . . 46 

Number of private boxes with keyless doors . 4 

Number of private boxes with key doors . . 50 

The following boxes are private property: 113, 115, 
117, 119, 149, 152, 161, 163, 166, 212, 228, 244, 271, 277, 
279, 283, 297, 299, 328, 342, 358, 359, 434, 442, 443, 
448, 449, 466, 467, 468, 469, 475, 495, 511, 533, 616, 
617, 619, 626, 629, 711, 712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 718, 
719, 720, 721, 722, 724, 725, 726, 727, 728, 729, 730, 
731, 733, 734, 735, 736, 737, 738, 739, 740, 741, 742, 
743, 744, 745, 746, 755, 758, 759, 762, 766, 767, 773, 
776, 778, 779, 781, 782, 788, 789, 791, 792, 793, 794, 
795, 798, 828, 838, 841, 842, 864, 865, 875, 919, 927, 
967, 969, 971, 974, 2236. 



Alarm Bells. 

The fire-alarm telegraph is connected with the fol- 
lowing bell: 

Faneuil Hall, steel, 5,816 pounds, owned by the city. 
Bells owned by the city, which have been disconnected 
from service, are located as follows : 

Berkeley Temple, composition, 2,941 pounds. Formerly 

used on Quincy Schoolhouse. 
City Hall, Charlestown, composition, 3,600 pounds. 



Fire Department. 39 

Engine House No. 1, Dorchester street, South Boston, 
composition, 2,911 pounds. 

Engine House No. 16, Temple street, Dorchester, com- 
position, 4,149 pounds. 

Engine House No. 17, composition, 4,000 pounds. 
Removed and stored at Engine House No. 33. 

Engine House No. 18, composition, 3,184 pounds. 
Removed and stored at Engine House No. 33. 

Engine House No. 19, Mattapan, Dorchester, composi- 
tion, 2,927 pounds. 

Engine House No. 20, Walnut street, Dorchester, com- 
position, 3,061 pounds. 

Engine House No. 21, Columbia road, Dorchester, com- 
position, 3,026 pounds. 

Engine House No. 28, West Roxbury, composition, 
4,000 pounds. 

Engine House No. 29, Brighton, composition, 1,535 
pounds. 

Old Engine House No. 30, West Roxbury, steel, 1,000 
pounds. 

Engine House No. 34, Brighton, composition, 1,501 
pounds. 

Engine House No. 41, Allston, composition, 800 pounds. 

Engine House No. 45, Roslindale, composition, 1,059 
pounds. 

Ladder House No. 4, Dudley street, Roxbury, composi- 
tion, 3,509 pounds. 

Saratoga street M. E. Church, East Boston, steel, 1,968 
pounds. 

Trinity Church, Trenton street, East Boston, composi- 
tion, .1,760 pounds. Formerly used on Castle Street 
Church. 

Van Nostrand's Brewery, Charlestown, composition, 818 
pounds. Formerly used on Old Franklin Schoolhouse. 

Bells formerly in service, located on schoolhouses, have 
been turned over to the Schoolhouse Department. 

Public Clocks. 

The following public clocks are cared for by this 
department : 

City Proper. 

Charles Street Church. 

Christ Church, Salem street, owned by city. 

Commercial Wharf. 

Odd Fellow's Hall, Tremont street, owned by city. 



40 City Document No. 15. 

Old South Church, owned by city. 

Old State House, owned by city. 

Suffolk County Jail, owned by city. 

St. Stephen's Church, Hanover street, owned by city. 

Shawmut Avenue Church. 

Tremont M. E. Church, owned by city. 

Young Men's Christian Union, owned by city. 

South Boston. 

Gaston Schoolhouse, owned by city. 

Lincoln Schoolhouse, owned by city. 

Phillips Church, owned by city. 

St. Augustine's Church, Dorchester street, owned by city. 

East Boston. 

London Street Church, owned by city. 
Lyceum Hall, owned by city. 
Trinity Church, owned by city. 
Orient Heights Church, owned by city. 

Roxbury. 

Winthrop Street Church, owned by city. 
Boston Elevated Railway car house, Columbus avenue, 
owned by city. 

Dorchester. 

Baker Memorial (Upham's Corner), owned by city. 
Neponset Church. 

Tileston School (Mattapan), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church (Milton Lower Mills). 

Charlestown. 

St. Francis de Sales Church. 
City Hall, owned by city. 

- 

West Roxbury. 

Dr. Strong's Church (South Evangelical), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church, Jamaica Plain, owned by city. 
Congregational Church (Roslindale), owned by city. 

Brighton. 
Bennett Schoolhouse, owned by city.