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ANNUAL BPJPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON 



JANUARY 31, 1912 



Compliments of 



Charles H. Cole, 

FIRE COMMISSIONER. 



CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1912 



■r: 



VNNTJAL REPORT 



FIRE DPJPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON 



JA^UAEY 31, 1912 




CITY OF BOSTON 
PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1912 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1912boston 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1911-12. 



Boston, February 1, 1912. 

Hon. John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — In accordance with section 24 of the Revised 
Ordinances, 1898, City of Boston, I have the honor to 
submit herewith the report of this department for the 
twelve months, February 1, 1911, to February 1, 1912. 
I would call to your attention the reports and tables of 
the Chief of Department, the Superintendents of the 
Repair Shop and Fire Alarm Branch and the Veterinary 
Surgeon, herewith attached, which give in detail the 
figures and workings of the department for the past year. 

The total expenditures for the year were, under 
the regular appropriation, $1,612,395.31; under special 
appropriations, $144,742.53. 

Mr. Charles D. Daly was Fire Commissioner up to 
January 26, 1912. He was succeeded on that date by 
John H. Dunn as Temporary Fire Commissioner. 

Very respectfully, 

John H. Dunn, 

Temporary Fire Commissioner. 



City Document No. 14. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



From the Chief of Department, Boston, February 1, 1912. 
To the Temporary Fire Commissioner: 

The following is' the report of the Fire Department 
for the year ending January 31, 1912. 

During the year the department has responded to 
4,433 alarms. The fire loss was $2,232,267. 

Additions and Changes. 

A third fireboat was put in service and a wharf and 
pier built for same, with a fire station for the crew at 
521 Commercial street. 

A gasolene combination chemical and hose wagon 
was purchased and put in service with Engine Company 
11 as a hose tender. This was for the better protection 
of the Orient Heights section. 

Nine hose wagons were equipped with turret nozzles, 
making a total of twenty now in service. 

A new horse-drawn steam fire engine was purchased 
and put in service as Engine 12. 

A new fireproof building for the repair division has 
been completed and occupied. 

Land has been procured in Oak square, Brighton, 
and plans and specifications prepared for a fire station 
on the site. 

Permission was obtained from the War Department 
and plans and specifications prepared for a new berth 
for Fireboat Engine 44 and station for crew at Northern 
Avenue Bridge to replace present quarters at Central 
Wharf, w^hich are inadequate, and for which this depart- 
ment is paying a yearly rental of $4,000. 

The department headquarters has been equipped with 
a high pressure window sprinkler system which, in view 
of the always existing danger of the surroundings, should 
to some extent lessen the probability of fire from the 
outside destroying this building in which is located the 
fire alarm central station. 

January 1, 1912, the town of Hyde Park was annexed 



Fire Department. 3 

to Boston and the fire department of that town absorbed, 
pursuant to chapter 469 of the Acts of 1911. 

The property and apparatus acquired consisted of a 
fire station in Hyde Park Centre in which was located 
one Seagrave ladder truck, fully equipped; one reserve 
ladder truck, fully equipped; two hose wagons with 
3,400 feet of single jacket hose; one chemical engine 
with two 50-gallon tanks and 300 feet of f-inch rubber 
hose, one exercising wagon, six horses, with harnesses, 
blankets, etc.; a fire station in Readville in which was 
located a hose wagon with 1,950 feet of single jacket 
hose, two horses, harnesses, blankets, etc. 

One captain, one lieutenant, six permanent men and 
thirty call men were taken on by this department. 

Changes in the boundary lines of fire districts 10, 12 
and 14 were effected and a new district known as dis- 
trict 15 was established. This district consists of the 
former town of Hyde Park and the Mattapan section of 
Dorchester. 

Buildings. 

There are 69 buildings for all purposes in charge 
of this department. 

The care of this property is conducted in a systematic 
manner, and the cleanliness of the interiors show the 
evidence of this work. 

The everyday wear and tear on the floors requires the 
constant attention of the men in the carpenters' squad, 
while the men employed to look out for the plumbing 
and painting have plenty of work on hand. 

The fact remains that a great many of the houses are 
not modern, a few are very dilapidated, and at least 
one is in an unsanitary condition and hardly fit for 
occupancy. 

In the near future some of the houses must be 
remodeled, and in any event changes must be made in 
the bathing facilities and inside and outside repairs, 
including painting, done. 

Apparatus and Equipment. 

The apparatus and equipment, including hose, has 
had the usual annual inspection and test and was found 
in condition for good service. 

This department must soon meet the established 
fact that motor-driven apparatus of certain types will 



4 City Document No. 14. 

be more economical and can perform the work more 
efficiently in certain localities than can horse-drawn. 

FiEE Alarm Branch. 

By the rearrangement and addition of equipment in 
the fire alarm operating room higher efficiency is now 
obtained. The operating force has been increased in 
order to give the best service under all conditions. 

A number of new boxes have been established and 
several schoolhouse boxes relocated on the outside of 
the buildings to make them accessible to the public, 
hence more facility for giving alarms. A large amount 
of underground cable has been installed to replace 
overhead wires. 

The same hazard of losing the headquarters building 
by fire from the outside still exists, though probably to a 
lesser extent. For further details of this branch, see 
report of the superintendent, hereto attached. 

Repair Shop Branch. 

The new building has been completed and occupied, 
order has been restored and this most important division 
is now running smoothly. 

It is a four-story structure with a one-story addition 
for the engine room and blacksmith shop. Total cost, 
$105,893.84. The construction is fireproof. The foun- 
dations and floors are reinforced concrete, the roof is 
terra cotta and concrete, all steel is protected by a cover- 
ing of concrete and partitions are terra cotta. The 
window sashes are metal, glazed with wired glass. All 
doors are metal. 

For outside pi:otection there has been installed a high 
service sprinkler system. There is also an automatic 
sprinkler system in the paint shop. On the main or 
apparatus floor pits have been built, thus making it 
easier to repair and inspect certain parts of the apparatus, 
which otherwise would be difficult of access. 

Among the many conveniences are an electric ele- 
vator capable of moving the heaviest apparatus to any 
floor in the building, and a high pressure hydrant for 
testing purposes situated on the apparatus floor. 

The enlarged blacksmith shop fills a long felt want, 
much time and labor being saved by having the work 
nearer the forges. 



FiEE Department. 5 

The following table shows repairs completed on appa- 
ratus and parts of apparatus for the year, the number 
of jobs done by the carpenters, painters, plumbers and 
steamfitters in the various houses in the department, 
and cost of same, also cost of stock furnished the differ- 
ent companies, the members of which completed their 
own repairs. 

Work Done by Repair Shop. 



Number 
of Jobs. 



Labor and 
Material. 



Repairs in shop 

Carpenters, painters, plumbers and steamfitters 

Paint, lumber, etc., furnished, work done in quarters by members 
of the various companies. 



2,181 
624 



$26,913 00 

17,210 00 

2,813 00 



Total for year . 



$46,936 00 



This includes the complete repainting of the interiors 
of the following fire stations: Engines 1, 26-35, 27, 36, 
41; Ladders 12, 18; Chemical 2, and also the painting 
of Fireboats 44 and 47. 

In addition to the regular repair service the following 
apparatus has been rebuilt during the year: Ladders 21 
and 22, and the boilers of Fireboat Engine 44. 

Veterinary Hospital. 

This branch is in first-class order and equipped with 
the most modern appliances for the treatment of horses. 

High Pressure Service. 

Chapter 312 of the Acts of 1911 provides for the 
installation of a high pressure fire system under the direc- 
tion of the Commissioner of Public Works of the City 
of Boston and further provides that the City Council 
may appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 for the purpose 
of defraying expenses incurred under the provisions of 
this act. 

The sum of $150,000 was made available in July 
of last year, and an independent engineering force 
was at once organized by the Commissioner of Public 
Works. Work has been vigorously prosecuted on 
surveys, plans, specifications and general studies of the 
work. 



6 City Document No. 14. 

When the location of the pumping station has been 
definitely settled it will be possible to proceed in a 
very short time with actual construction. 

Building Inspection. • 

A systematic method of building inspection with 
due regard to business interests in the examination of 
premises where conditions of a fire menace exist, is 
an important feature of the daily routine. It is believed 
that the results will justify the means to the end that 
a reduction in fire losses will ensue and that danger to 
life and limb will be minimized. 

If property owners and occupants of their buildings 
where the fire risk is ever in attendance gave sufficient 
attention to the correction of defects in their structures, 
to the elimination of dangers caused by the collection 
of rubbish and litter of all kinds and to the prevention, 
so far as possible, of the careless use of matches and 
the handling and storage of combustibles, the fire 
menace would be reduced to a marked degree. 

Danger from fire is ever lurking in quarters where such 
conditions are in evidence. A conflagration generally 
has its beginning in buildings of fire breeding and fire 
feeding construction, where in its incipiency it gathers 
force and spreads to other structures contiguous to it. 

Frequent inspections are made of premises where 
volatile inflammables and products of petroleum are 
stored, by district chiefs and the inspector of inflam- 
mables and explosives. 

Fire Hazard and Prevention. 

The same fire hazard exists, especially in the suburbs, 
and remedial legislation tending towards improving 
building conditions is necessary to meet the situation. 

Mutual Aid. 

The extension of the tapper service to the adjoining 
cities and towns is slowly but surely bringing about 
the inevitable fire department unit in the metropolitan 
district. 

Uecommendations. 

It is not to be expected that everything mentioned 
under this head can be done at once, nor perhaps in 
the near future, but the items noted constitute what 



Fire Department. 7 

is necessary in my opinion, as to new stations, apparatus 
and men for the better protection of the city. 

Fire Stations. 

A site should be secured and a house built in the 
Readville section to replace the present cjuarters of 
Hose 49, which are not adapted for the service. 

A new house on the site of Chemical Company 3, 
Winthrop street, Charlestown, or the building remodeled 
for an engine company. 

A new station to replace the quarters of Engine Com- 
pany 8 or the house remodeled. These quarters are 
in a dilapidated condition. 

A new station on the same site to replace present 
quarters of Engine Company 26-35 or the house 
remodeled. These quarters are not adapted to the 
number of men now housed there, the sleeping quarters 
being insufficient, unsanitary and unhealthy. 

Any new arrangement in these quarters should 
include offices for the Chief of Department. Those 
at present are inadequate for the business of the chief 
of a fire department as large as that of Boston. 

Entire new plumbing in the quarters of Ladder 24. 

Arrangements should be made, if possible, to obtain 
more room in the present building in which are the 
quarters of Engine Company 4, Chemical Company 1 
and Water Tower Company 1. At present no smoking 
or recreation room worthy of the name is in these 
quarters. 

If it is possible to dispose of the present site of Engine 
Company 17 and Ladder Company 7 to advantage 
it should be done and a more modern house built in 
the immediate vicinity for these companies. The 
alternative is to build a new station or remodel the 
present one on the same site. 

In the event of a change in the location of the South 
Boston Municipal Court the building should be secured 
for quarters for Ladder Company 5. 

A heating plant should be installed in the quarters 
of Chemical Company 8, at present heated by a stove, 
with no heat in bathroom. 

As far each year as the appropriation will permit 
the bathtubs in the houses should be replaced with 
shower rooms. I cannot emphasize too strongly the 
necessity of this recommendation. 



8 City Document No. 14. 

I hardly need call your attention to the necessity 
of providing separate rooms for all officers. There are 
a few stations where the officers are sleeping in the 
dormitory or in the captain's -office. 

The exterior woodwork of the majority of the houses 
needs painting and also the outside brick or stone 
work should be repointed where necessary. 

Apparatus. 

Engines. 

A gasolene combination pumping engine and hose 
wagon, to have pump capacity of at least 700 gallons 
per minute, be purchased for the Readville section. 

A horse or tractor drawn steam fire engine, with a 
pump capacity of at least 1,000 gallons per minute, for 
a new Winthrop street, Charlestown, house. 

A gasolene combination pumping engine, chemical and 
hose wagon, to have a pump capacity of at least 700 
gallons per minute, for service in the new station at 
Oak square, Brighton. In my opinion horse-drawn 
apparatus will have difficulty negotiating the hills in 
this vicinity. 

Chemical and Hose Combination Wagons. 

A gasolene combination chemical and hose wagon 
for service in the quarters of Ladder Company 23, 
Grove Hall section. 

A gasolene combination chemical and hose wagon to 
be stationed in the quarters of Engine Company 37, 
to replace the present horse-drawn hose wagon. This 
is for the better protection of the Parker Hill section. 

A gasolene combination chemical and hose wagon 
for service in the quarters of Chemical 11, Lauriat 
avenue section, to replace the present horse-drawn 
apparatus. This was the original intention and the 
house was so constructed. 

A gasolene combination chemical and hose wagon 
for service in the Hyde Park section, to replace the 
present horse-drawn Chemical 14. 

The horse-drawn hose wagons in certain of the subur- 
ban stations should be replaced by motor-driven com- 
bination chemical and hose wagons, to precede the engine 
on all first alarms and to act as tenders on extra alarms 
or covering. 

The horse-drawn chemicals at present located in the 



FiEE Department. 9 

houses of Chemical Companies 2, 4, 7, 9 and 10, to be 
replaced by gasolene combination chemical and hose 
wagons. 

This is in the interest of economy and in addition 
the latter are capable of carrying 1,000 feet of 2^-inch 
hose which would greatly increase their usefulness. 

The district chiefs should be furnished with motor- 
driven runabouts. If not feasible at this time to supply 
all I strongly recommend the purchase of cars as soon 
as possible for those in charge of the outlying districts. 

It would be of great advantage to this department 
and a measure of economy to have a motor-driven wagon 
attached to the fire alarm branch and one to the repair 
division. 

Ladder Trucks. 

A motor-driven combination ladder truck to be 
stationed in the quarters of Chemical 11, Lauriat 
avenue section. 

A motor-driven combination ladder truck to be 
stationed in the quarters of Engine Company 42, 
Egleston square section, and horse-drawn Chemical 5 
dispensed with. The placing of combination Chemical 
13 in service in Forest Hills has lessened the need of 
Chemical 5, and truck service is needed in this vicinity. 

A motor combination ladder truck to be stationed 
in the quarters of Engine Company 41, AUston, dis- 
pensing with horse-drawn Chemical 6. As a truck must 
be secured for this vicinity it would save the cost of 
building a new house to combine both as recommended. 

A 75-foot aerial truck, motor-driven, if possible, 
should be purchased for service in the quarters of 
Ladder Company 12, to replace the present box truck. 
Increasing the height of buildings in this vicinity, and 
the Plant shoe factory, with nearly 5,000 employees, 
calls for this recommendation. 

Men. 

The following men would be required to properly 
operate the recommended apparatus. 

Readville Station. — This company should consist of a 
lieutenant and six men, as two men are at present on 
Hose 49, which, of course, would be abandoned. This 
would require the appointment of but five men. The 
services of the call men attached to this company 
could be dispensed with, so that it would finally amount 
to very little extra cost to the city. ■ 



10 City Document No. 14. 

Oak Square Station. — ■ The company should consist 
of a Ueutenarit and seven men. 

Grove Hall Station. — The combination chemical recom- 
mended for these quarters would require a lieutenant and 
five men. 

The motor-driven ladder truck in the quarters of 
Chemical 11 would require a lieutenant and seven men. 

The motor-driven ladder truck in the quarters of 
Engine 42, Egleston square section, would require but 
four men, as Chemical Company 5 would be disbanded 
and the men transferred to truck. 

The motor-driven ladder truck in quarters of Engine 
Company 41 would require but five men, as Chemical 
Company 6 would be disbanded and the men transferred 
to truck. 

The new engine company recommended for Winthrop 
street, Charlestown, would require but six men, as 
Chemical Company 3 would be disbanded and the men 
transferred to engine company. 

I would recommend that a few additional men be 
appointed on Ladder Company 28 in Hyde Park section, 
and the call service in the whole section be discontinued. 
This could be done with very little additional expense 
to the city. 

In addition to the above a few men could be used to 
advantage in the suburban districts which are growing 
rapidly and require eternal vigilance to prevent serious 
fires ; however, the substitution of motor-driven f oi horse- 
drawn apparatus will make a good many men available 
for real fire duty who are now engaged in holding horses. 

While at first glance these recommendations appear 
voluminous and expensive they are really in the nature 
of a great saving both to the city and in fire losses. 

Celerity is the first requisite of a fire department and 
this, to-day, is missing to the degree needed, especially 
in the outlying districts, where during the heavy going 
of the winter season, which is generally the most pro- 
lific in fires, even with the extra horses the much needed 
minutes are not saved and as a matter of fact the appa- 
ratus is sometimes fortunate to arrive at all. 

Motor-driven apparatus overcomes this and more. 
It dispels the feeling that always exists after a few long 
runs with horse-drawn apparatus, namely, that the 
horses must be replaced with fresh ones if the apparatus 
is to again leave the station. 



FiEE Department. 11 

It is not to be assumed that this type of apparatus 
should be universally adapted for all sections of the city. 

There always remain those well known fire hazards 
that the powerful streams of the heaviest artillery of 
the Fire Department must cope with to be successful. 

Promotion. 

The method of promotion only after competitive 
examination was established during the year under the 
following civil service rules: 

Civil Service Regulations, 66. 

(a.) Promotions in the Fire Department of the City of Boston shall be 
made only after open competitive examination, and by successive grades so 
far as practicable; such examinations to be open to all members of the grade 
from which the promotion is to be made who possess the qualifications as to 
time and nature of service fixed by the commission. 

(6.) Competitive promotion examinations will be held from time to 
time, as often as may be necessary, to meet or to anticipate the needs of 
the higher grades; and due notice will be given by the commission as to 
the dates of such examinations and the qualifications required of candidates. 

(c.) Persons qualified and who desire to take such promotion examina- 
tions shall file notice thereof with the commission at such times as it will fix. 

{d.) Candidates for such promotion examinations will be marked on the 
following subjects: (1) Seniority or length of service; (2) Efficiency and 
record in the department; (3) Physical condition; (4) Knowledge of duties 
and of the law, and such other subjects as the commission may prescribe. 

(e.) As the result of such competitive promotion examinations the com- 
mission will establish promotion lists; and whenever a promotion is to be 
made it will certify, upon requisition of the appointing officer, the names of 
the two persons standing highest on the promotion list; and one of such 
persons so certified shall be entitled to promotion, unless the appointing 
officer shall, upon written charges filed with the commission, satisfy it 
that an additional name should be certified. 

(/. ) No recommendation for the promotion of any member of the depart- 
ment shall be considered by the appointing officer unless it be made by 
the official or officials under whose immediate supervision such member 
has served; and such recommendation by any other person, if made with 
the knowledge and consent of the member serving, shall be sufficient cause 
for debarring him from the promotion proposed. 

{g.) No person shall remain eligible for promotion for more than two 
years upon any promotion list unless the commission shall by vote continue 
the eligibility beyond such period. 

Qi.) If the candidates for promotion to any position shall be less than 
three (3) in number, the commission may assent to the promotion of a 
candidate nominated by the appointing officer, after the passing by said 
candidate of a suitable noncompetitive examination. 

{%.) The weights for the various subjects in competitive promotion 
examinations shall be as follows: 

Seniority or length of service 5 

Efficiency or record in the department . , . . . . . 8 

Knowledge of duties and of law and other prescribed subjects . . 6 

Physical condition 1 

20 



12 City Document No. 14. 

Note. — The New York City weights (see Civil' Service Rule 15, Sect. 6) 
are: 

Seniority 20 

Conduct and efficiency > 40 

Written papers 40 

100 

(j.) Credit on the subject of seniority shall be given only for the length 
of service in the grade in which the candidate is serving (as shown by the 
records) at the time of the promotion examination, and for which he seeks 
promotion, and shall be as follows: 

The minimum mark shall be 50 per cent. 

Three per cent shall be added for each full year of the first ten years of 
service. 

One per cent shall be added for each full subsequent year. 

Note. — The above is substantially the Chicago rule (see Civil Service 
Rule 7, Sect. 7). In New York (Civil Service Rule 15, Sect. 6) the maxi- 
mum term of service in a position of grade to be considered in the rating 
for seniority is 15 years. 

(k.) Credit on the subject of efficiency and record in the department 
will be based on two factors: 

(1.) The candidate's qualifications of judgment, coolness, courage, 
executive ability, capacity for command of men, etc., the candidate's 
mark on examination to be based on the judgment of the Fire Com- 
missioner filed in writing with the commission. 

(2.) The candidate's record as shown on the ofiicial files of the Fire 
Department, including both merits and demerits. 

Text books used in examinations : 

1. General and special orders referring to administration and fire 
service. 

2. Annual reports concerning personnel and organization. 

3. Department regulations. 

4. Buildings, boxes, hydrants, apparatus routes, etc., of their district. 

5. Equipment of apparatus. 

6. Fire methods. 

Additional for senior officers: 

Ordinances and statutes relative to the Fire Department. 

Pubhcations, such as the " Crosby-Fiske Handbook of Fire Protec- 
tion" and the "National Board of Fire Underwriters' Reports." 

Possible cases of large fires within their districts and how they shall be 
handled. 

To the officers and men of the department I express 
my appreciation of the spirit and manner of their 
work, and thank them for their efforts to sustain* the 
good name of our department with our fellow citizens. 

The other departments which were called on to 
cooperate with us have shown the same hearty response, 
for which I am grateful. 

John A. Mullen. 



Fire Department. 



13 



THE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION. 



Temporary Commissioner, John H. Dunn. 
Chief Clerk, Benjamin F. Underhill. 
Chief of Department, John A. Mullen. 
Superintendent of Fire Alarms, George L. Fickett. 
Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms and Chief Operator, 

Richard Donahue. 
Superintendent of Repair Shop and Supervisor of Engines, 

Eugene M. Byington. 
Veterinary Surgeon, Daniel P. Keogh. 
Medical Examiner, Rufus W. Sprague. 



STRENGTH 


AND PAY. 






Headquarters. 


Per annum 


1 Commissioner $5,000 


1 Chief clerk 










2,500 


1 Medical examiner 










1,300 


1 Bookkeeper 










1,650 


2 Clerks . 










1,400 


1 Clerk 










1,200 


1 Clerk 










800 


1 Assistant engineer (messenger) * . 






1,200 


1 Private (explosives detail) * 






1,200 


10 


Fire-Fighting Force. 


1 Chief of department $4,000 


1 Deputy chief . . . . 






3,000 


1 Junior deputy chief 






2,500 


14 District chiefs 






2,000 


56 Captains 






1,600 


91 Lieutenants 






1,400 


1 Lieutenant, aide to commissioner 






1,400 


1 Lieutenant, aide to chief 






1,400 


3 Engineers 






1,400 


45 Engineers 






1,300 


44 Assistant engineers 






1,200 


2 Assistant engineers . 






1,100 


* 


Detailed froa 


1 fire force. 









14 



City Document No. 14. 



652 Privates: 

478 ... 

37 

70 

55 . 

12 . 

1 Chief's driver 

1 Chief's driver 

914 

Call Men. 

30 Temporary call men in the Hyde Park district 



Per annum 

$1,200 

1,100 

1,000 

900 

720 

Per day 

$2 50 
2 00 



Per annum 

$100 



Repair Shop. 













Per annum 


1 Superintendent $2,500 


LC^tain, assistant superintendent * . . . 1,600 


1 Lieutenant, foreman of hose and harness shop * 1,400 


1 Engineer * 1,300 


1 Assistant engineer * 


1,200 


1 Master carpenter * 


1,300 


1 Master painter * . 


1,300 


1 Engineer (master plumber) * 


1,300 


6 Privates * 1,200 


Employees. 


1 Clerk $1,100 


1 Clerk 










900 

Per day 


1 Engineer . . . 










$3 25 


2 Firemen . 










2 50 


2 Plumbers 










4 40 


1 Steamfitter 










4 00 


1 Painter . 










3 75 


3 Painters . 










3 50 


1 Painter 










3 16 


2 Wheelwrights . 










3 25 


4' Machinists 










3 25 


3 Blacksmiths . 










3 50 


1 Blacksmith 










3 25 


5 Blacksmith's helpers 










2 50 


3 Carpenters 










3 50 


2 Hose and harness repairers 








3 25 


1 Hose and harness repairer 








2 25 


1 Vulcanizer 








2 50 



* Detailed from fire force. 



Fire Department. 



15 



3 Laborers . 

1 Temporary teamster 

1 Temporary fireman 



54 



Fire Alarm Branch. 



1 Superintendent 

1 Assistant superintendent 

5 Privates, assistant operators * 

1 Chief's driver * 



Per day 

$2 25 
2 25 
2 50 



Per annum 

$2,500 
2,300 
1,200 

Per day 

$2 00 



Employees. 

1 Clerk 

4 Operators . . . . . 
3 Assistant operators . . . 
1 Foreman of construction 

1 Machinist 

21 Telegraphers and linemen (average) 
1 Hostler . . . . 



40 



Veterinary Hospital. 



1 Veterinary surgeon 

1 Captain, assistant to veterinary surgeon * 



Per annum 



1,600 
1,200 
2,000 

Per day 

$4 00 
3 13 
2 50 



Per annum 

$2,000 
1,600 



Employees. 



3 Hostlers (average) . 

1 Horseshoer 

1 Temporary horseshoer 



Per day 

$2 25 
3 00 
3 00 



1,055 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 



John A. Mullen. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 

The Chief is in charge of the fire protection for the 
whole city, which is subdivided into two divisions, each 
in charge of a deputy chief. 

* Detailed from fire force. 



16 City Document No. 14. 

Division 1. 

Deputy Chief, John Grady. 
Headquarters, Engine House 25, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 
13 (Marine District). 

District 1. 
District Chief, John W. Godbold. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 
East Boston. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) which is included within the district 
known as East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 
40, Ladders 2, 21, Chemical 7. 

District 2. 

District Chief, Charles H. W. Pope. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 9, Main Street, 
Charlestown. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within the district 
known as Charlestown. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 
36, Ladders 9, 22, Chemicals 3, 9. 

District 3. 
District Chief, John 0. Taber. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of State and Devonshire streets, 
thence easterly through State street to the water front, 
thence southeasterly across the harbor to the extension 
of C street. South Boston, thence southerly through 
C street to Cypher street, thence northwesterly through 
Cypher street to B street, thence southwesterly through 
B street to West First street, thence westerly through 
West First street to Atlantic Avenue Bridge, thence 
through Atlantic Avenue Bridge and Atlantic avenue 



FiKE Department. 17 

to Summer street, thence westerly through Summer 
street to Devonshire street, thence through Devonshire 
street to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 
39, Ladders 8, 14, 18, Water Tower 3. 

District 4- 

District Chief, Henry A. Fox. 

Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of State and Devonshire streets, 
thence southerly through Devonshire street to Water 
street, thence westerly through Water street to Washing- 
ton street, thence southerly through Washington street 
to School street, thence through School street and 
Beacon street to Charles street, thence northerly through 
Charles street to Pinckney street, thence westerly 
through Pinckney street to the Cambridge boundary 
line, thence northerly along said Cambridge boundary 
line to its intersection with the tracks of the Eastern 
division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, thence north- 
easterly to the Warren Avenue Drawbridge, thence 
easterly to the Charlestown Drawbridge, thence north- 
easterly and then southerly around the water front to 
the extension of State street, thence through State street 
to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
Ladders 1, 24, Chemical 1, Water Tower 1. 

District 5. 
District Chief, Daniel F. Sennott. 
Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason. Street. ■ 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of Devonshire and Water streets, 
thence running westerly through Water street to Wash- 
ington street, thence southerly through Washington 
street to School street, thence through School street and 
Beacon street to Charles street, thence northerly through 
Charles street to Pinckney street, thence westerly 
through Pinckney street to the Cambridge boundary 
line, thence southerly along said boundary line to the 



18 City Document No. 14. 

extension of Otter street, thence through Otter street to 
Beacon street, thence easterly through Beacon street 
to ArHngton street, thence through Arlington street to 
Boylston street, thence easterly through Boylston street 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Providence street, thence through Providence street to 
Columbus avenue, thence through Columbus avenue 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Tremont street, thence northerly through Tremont 
street to Pleasant street, thence southeasterly through 
Pleasant street and Broadway extension to Fort Point 
channel, thence northerly through Fort Point channel 
to Atlantic Avenue Bridge, thence through Atlantic 
Avenue Bridge and Atlantic avenue to Summer street, 
thence westerly through Summer street to Devonshire 
street, thence through Devonshire street to the point 
of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Chemical 2. 

District 6. 

District Chief, Edwin A. Perkins. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 
South Boston. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of Atlantic Avenue Bridge and 
Fort Point channel, thence southerly through Atlantic 
Avenue Bridge to West First street, thence through 
West First street to B street, thence northerly through 
B street to Cypher street, thence through Cypher street 
to C street, thence northerly through C street to the 
water front, thence by the water front southeasterly, 
then westerly to the extension of Columbia road, thence 
through Columbia road to Mt. Vernon street, thence 
through Mt. Vernon street to Willow court, thence 
through Willow court to Massachusetts avenue, thence 
through Massachusetts avenue to the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks (inclusive), thence 
northerly along said tracks (inclusive) to the South 
bay, thence northerly to Fort Point channel, thence 
through Fort Point channel to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20, Chemical 8. 



FiKE Department. 19 

District 13. (Marine District.) 

District Chief, Robert A. Ritchie. 

Headquarters, Fireboat Engine 47, house adjoining 
South Ferry, East Boston. 

All that navigable portion of Boston Harbor and the 
rivers or waters emptying therein which is included 
within the city limits, with all the floats, vessels, ships, 
scows and boats of every description afloat thereon; 
all wharves, docks and piers (exclusive of the buildings 
on said wharves, docks and piers) extending into said 
navigable waters. 

The following islands, with the buildings erected 
thereon, situated in Boston Harbor: 

Governors, Apple, Deer, Lovells, Gallops, Georges, 
Long, Rainsford, Spectacle, Thompsons and Castle. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 31, 44, 
47 (fireboats). 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chief, Peter F. McDonough. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 4, Dudley Street. 
This division comprises Districts 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 
14 and 15. 

District 7. 
District Chief, John T. Byron. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) which is included within a line 
beginning at the intersection of Beacon and Otter 
streets, thence easterly through Beacon street to Arling- 
ton street, thence through Arlington street to Boylston 
street, thence easterly through Boylston street to 
Church street, thence through Church street to Provi- 
dence street, thence through Providence street to 
Columbus avenue, thence through Columbus avenue 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Tremont street, thence northerly through Tremont 
street to Pleasant street, thence easterly through Pleas- 
ant street and Broadway extension to Fort Point 
channel, thence southerly through Fort Point channel 
to the Roxbury canal, thence southerly through the 



20 City Document No. 14. 

Roxbury canal to Massachusetts avenue, thence north- 
westerly through Massachusetts avenue to the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, thence northeasterly along said 
boundary line to a point opposite the extension of 
Otter street, thence through Otter street to the point 
of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 
33, Ladders 3, 13, 15, Chemical 4, Water Tower 2. 

District 8. 

District Chief, Stephen J. Ryder. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the 
intersection of Massachusetts avenue and the Cam- 
bridge boundary, line, thence through Massachusetts 
avenue to Washington street, thence southerly through 
Washington street to Atherton street, thence westerly 
through Atherton and Mozart streets to Chestnut avenue, 
thence southerly through Chestnut avenue to Sheridan 
street, thence through Sheridan street to Centre street, 
thence through Centre street to Perkins street, thence 
through Perkins street to South Huntington avenue, 
thence northerly through South Huntington avenue 
to Castleton street, thence through Castleton street 
across Jamaicaway to the Brookline line, thence north- 
erly and westerly along the Brookline boundary line 
to the Cottage Farm Bridge (inclusive), thence northerly 
through Essex street to the Cambridge boundary line, 
thence easterly by said Cambridge boundary line to 
the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26, Chemical 12. 

District 9. 

District Chief, Michael J. Kennedy. 

Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 

the Marine District) within a line beginning at the 

intersection of the extension of Columbia road and the 

Old Harbor, thence running westerly through Columbia 

road to Mt. Vernon street, thence through Mt. Vernon 

street to Willow court, thence through Willow court to 



Fire Department. 21 

Massachusetts avenue, thence through Massachusetts 
avenue to the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad tracks (exclusive), thence northerly along 
said tracks (exclusive) to the South bay, thence westerly 
along said South bay to the Roxbury canal, thence 
southerly through the Roxbury canal to Massachusetts 
avenue, thence northwesterly through Massachusetts 
avenue to Washington street, thence southerly through 
Washington street to Columbus avenue, thence easterly 
through Columbus avenue to Seaver street, thence 
through Seaver street to Blue Hill avenue, thence 
northerly through Blue Hill avenue to Geneva avenue, 
thence through Geneva avenue to Columbia road, 
thence northeasterly through Columbia road to Stough- 
ton street, thence easterly through Stoughton street 
to Pleasant street, thence through Pleasant street to 
Savin Hill avenue, thence easterly and northerly through 
Savin Hill avenue to Evandale terrace, thence through 
Evandale terrace to the water front, thence northerly 
along the water front to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 21, 
23, 24, Ladder 4, Chemical 10. 

District 10. 
District Chief, John W. Murphy. 

Headquarters, Engine House 18, Harvard Street, 
Dorchester. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the 
intersection of the extension of Evandale terrace and 
Dorchester bay, thence through Evandale terrace to 
Savin Hill avenue, thence northerly and westerly through 
Savin Hill avenue to Pleasant street, thence northerly 
through Pleasant and Stoughton streets to Columbia 
road, thence southerly through Columbia road to 
Geneva avenue, thence westerly through Geneva avenue 
to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through Blue 
Hill avenue to Canterbury street, thence through 
Canterbury street to Morton street, thence southerly 
through Morton street to Blue Hill avenue, thence 
northerly through Blue Hill avenue to Lauriat avenue, 
thence through Lauriat avenue to Norfolk street, 
thence through Norfolk street to Centre street, thence 
through Centre street to Adams street, thence northerly 
through Adams street to Mill street, thence through 



22 City Document No. 14. 

Mill street to Preston street, thence through Preston 
street to Freeport street, thence southerly through 
Freeport street to Dorchester bay, thence northerly 
along the water front to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 
Ladders 7, 23, Chemical 11. 

District 11. 
District Chief, John E. Madison. 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 
Brighton. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) included within the district known 
as Brighton which is west of the Cottage Farm Bridge 
and Essex street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 
41, Ladder 11, Chemical 6. 

District 12. 
District Chief, Michael J. Mulligan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 

All that portion of the city known as West Roxbury 
and Jamaica Plain within a line beginning at the inter- 
section of the extension of Castleton street and the 
Brookline boundary line, thence through Castleton 
street to South Huntington avenue, thence southerly 
through South Huntington avenue to Perkins street, 
thence easterly through Perkins street to Centre street, 
thence easterly through Centre street to Sheridan 
street, thence through Sheridan street to Chestnut 
avenue, thence northeasterly through Chestnut avenue 
to Mozart street, thence through Mozart street to 
Atherton street, thence through Atherton street to 
Columbus avenue, thence easterly through Columbus 
avenue to Seaver street, thence through Seaver street 
to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through Blue Hill 
avenue to Canterbury street, thence through Canter- 
bury street to Morton street, thence southerly through 
Morton street to Harvard street, thence southerly 
through Harvard street to Ashland street, thence 
westerly through . Ashland street to the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks (exclusive), 
thence southerly along the New York, New Haven & 



Fire Department. 23 

Hartford Railroad tracks to the Hyde Park boundary 
line, thence southwesterly along the Hyde Park boundary 
line to the Dedham boundary line, thence northwesterly 
along the Dedham boundary line to the Newton bound- 
ary line, thence northeasterly by the Newton boundary 
line to the Brookline boundary line, thence southeasterly 
and then northerly along said Brookline boundary line 
to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 30, 
42, 45, Ladders 10, 16, 25, Chemicals 5, 13. 

District 14- 

District Chief, Maurice Heffernan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 
Dorchester. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the inter- 
section of Dorchester bay and Freeport street (Commer- 
cial Point), thence northerly through Freeport street 
to Preston street, thence through Preston street to 
Mill street, thence through Mill street to Adams street, 
thence southerly through Adams street to Centre street, 
thence through Centre street to Norfolk street, thence 
through Norfolk street to Lauriat avenue, thence 
through Lauriat avenue to Blue Hill avenue, thence 
southerly through Blue Hill avenue to Morton street, 
thence northwesterly through Morton street to Harvard 
street, thence southerly through Harvard street to 
Oakland street, thence through Oakland street to Rex- 
ford street, thence through Rexford street to Blue Hill 
avenue, thence northerly through Blue Hill avenue to 
Fremont street, thence through Fremont street to the 
Neponset river, thence along the Neponset river 
and Dorchester bay northwesterly to the point of 
beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, Ladders 6, 27. 

District 15. 
Acting District Chief, Capt. John H. Wetherbee. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 

Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
All that portion of the city within a line beginning 
at the intersection of the extension of Fremont street 



24 City Document No. 14. 

and the Milton boundary line, thence through Fremont 
street to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through 
Blue Hill avenue to Rexford street, thence through 
Rexford street to Oakland street, thence westerly 
through Oakland street to Ashland street, thence 
through Ashland street to the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad tracks (inclusive), thence southerly 
along the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
tracks (inclusive) to the boundary line of Hyde Park, 
thence along the Hyde Park boundary line to the 
Dedham boundary line, thence southeasterly along the 
Dedham boundary line to the Milton boundary line, 
thence along the Milton boundary line to the point of 
beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
Ladder 28, Chemical 14, Hose 49. 

Note. — Wherever a street, channel or bridge is used the center line of each will be 
the line used. 



FiEE Department. 



25 



FIRE STATIONS. 



Location and Valuation. 



JjOCATION. 



Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 



Assessed 
Valuation. 



Occupied by 



Dorchester and Fourth streets 

Corner of O and Fourth streets 

Bristol street and Harrison avenue . . . 

Bulfinch street 

Marion street, East Boston 

Leverett street 

East street 

Salem street 

Paris street, East Boston 

River street 

Saratoga and Byron sts.. East Boston, 

Dudley street 

Cabot street 

Centre street 

Dorchester avenue 

Corner River and Temple streets 

Meeting House Hill, Dorchester 

Harvard street, Dorchester 

Norfolk street, Dorchester 

■ Walnut street, Dorchester 

Columbia road, Dorchester 

Warren avenue 

Northampton street 

Corner Warren and Quincy streets . . . 

Fort Hill square 

Mason street 

Elm street, Charlestown 

Centre street, Jamaica Plain 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 

Centre street, West Roxbury 



8,167 
4,000 
4,000 
6,098 
1,647 
2,269 
1,893 
2,568 
4,720 
1,886 
10,000 
7,320 
4,832 
5,713 
2,803 
12,736 
9.450 
9,440 
7,683 
9,000 
10,341 
7,500 
3,445 
4,186 
4,175 
5,623 
2,600 
10,377 
14,358 
12,251 



521 Commercial street, on land of 
Public Worljs Department. 



$25,800 
16,200 
30,000 
96,000 
9,000 
40,000 
37,300 
26,500 
33,300 
20,500 
40,000 
25,000 
16,000 
14,600 
18,600 
19,200 
17,300 
18,800 
14,200 
17,300 
17,100 
62,500 
11,200 
18,100 
100,600 
175,000 
18,000 
28,300 
37,200 
25,000 



Engine 1 and Ladder 5. 

Engine 2. 

Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 

Engine 4, Chemical 1 and 

Tower 1. 
Engine 5. 

Engine 6. 

Engine 7. 

Engine 8. 

Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 

Engine 10. 

Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 

Engine 12. 

Engine 13. 

Engine 14. 

Engine 15. 

Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 

Engine 17 and Ladder 7. 

Engine 18. 

Engine 19. 

Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 

Engine 21. 

Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 

Engine 23. 

Engine 24. 

Engine 25, Ladder 8 and 

Ladder 14. 
Engines 26 and 35. 

Engine 27. 

Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 

Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 

Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 

Engine 31, fireboat. 



Building cost $18,000. 



26 



City Document No. 14. 



Fire Stations. — Concluded. 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Assessed 
Valuation. 


Occupied by 


Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 


8,188 


$26,200 


Engine 32. 


Corner Boylston and Hereford streets, 


5,646 


98,000 


Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 


Western avenue, Brighton 


4,637 


17,800 


Engine 34. 


Monument street, Charlestown 


5,668 


21,000 


Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 


Corner Longwood and Brookline aves.. 


5,231 


14,300 


Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 


Congress street 


4,000 


38,000 


Engines 38 and 39. 


Sumner street, East Boston 


4,010 
6,112 
3,848 


18,000 
25,500 
22,900 


Engine 40. 


Harvard avenue, near Cambridge 

street, Brighton. 
Washington street, at Egleston square, 


Engine 41 and Chemical 6. 
Engine 42 and Chemical 5. 


Andrew square 


5,133 


19,600 


Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 










Washington street, corner Poplar 

street, Roslindale. 
Dorchester avenue, Ashmont 


14,729 
4,875 


22,400 
22,900 


Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 
Engine 46. 


Adjoining South Ferry, East Boston. . 


11,950 


31,600 


Engine 47, fireboat. 


Harvard avenue and Winthrop street, 
Hyde Park. 


9,450 
3,412 
5,230 


36,000 
23,600 
15,400 


Engine 48, Ladder 28 and 

Chemical 14. 
Chemical Engine 2. 




Chemical 3. 




889 
9,300 


4,300 
40,600 


Chemical Engine 4. , 




Chemical Engine 7. 




1,800 
1,790 
7,200 


7,800 

8,000 

13,200 


Chemical Engine 8. 


Eustis street 


Chemical Engine 10. 


Corner Callender and Lyons streets . . . 


Chemical 11. 


Corner Walk Hill and Wenham streets. 


11,253 


17,600 


Chemical 13. 


Friend street 


1,676 
3,923 


37,200 
26,000 


Ladder 1. 




Ladder 4. 




4,290 
4,311 
2,134 


16,400 
25,600 
23,500 


Ladder 9 and Chemical 9. 




Ladder 12 and Chemical 12. 


Harrison avenue 


Ladder 17. 


Pittsburgh street. South Boston 


8,964 


35,400 


Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 




3,101 
6,875 


10,700 
21,400 


Ladder 19. 


Washington street, Dorchester 


Ladder 23. 




3,918 


19,800 
* 


Ladder 24. 


Sprague and Milton streets, Hyde Park 
District, on land owned by the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road. 


Hose 49. 







* Building of little value and belongs to city. 



Fire Depaetment. 



27 



OTHER BUILDINGS. 



Assessed Valuation. 



Fuel house, Dorchester street, 1,610 feet of land, $3,100 

Fuel house, Salem street, 417 feet of land . . 4,400 

Fuel house. Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet 

of land 6,500 

Headquarters Building, corner of Albany and 

Bristol streets, 23,679 feet of land . . . 113,000 
Water Tower No. 2 and wrecking wagon are in 

Headquarters Building. 
Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet 

of land 75,000 

Fuel house, Washington, near Dover street, 1,007 

feet of land 10,500 



APPARATUS. 



Steam Engines. — 45 in service, 6 
reserve. 

Ladder Trucks. — 28 in service, 10 
reserve. 

Chemical Engines. — 14 in service, 5 
reserve. 

Water Towers. — ■ 3 in service. 

Fireboats. — 3 in service. 

Hose Wagons. — 45 in service, 5 
reserve. 



Chief's Wagons. — 16 in service, 5 in 
reserve. 

Motor Cars. — 5 in service. 

Motor Combination Wagons. — 2 in ser- 
■\dce. 

Miscellaneous. — 39 fuel wagons, 6 re- 
pair wagons, 2 supply wagons, 3 manure 
wagons, 1 caravan, 39 hose pungs, 2 job- 
bing pungs, 4 fire alarm pungs. 



28 



City Document No. 14. 



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36 



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Fire Department. 



37 



Apparatus Purchased During the Year. 

1 Combination chemical and hose motor car . $5,500 

1 Aerial ladder truck 4,930 

1 Second size Amoskeag steam fire engine . . 4,850 

1 "1910" Cadillac automobile (second hand) . 950 

1 Ladder truck 750 

10 Life nets 525 

1 Double caravan 300 



Hose. 
Amount Purchased and Condemned During the Year. 



Purchased 

(Feet). 


Condemned 
(Feet). 


Leading cotton 10,550 


11,000 


Leading rubber 






1,500 


1,550 


Chemical 






1,500 


1,200 


Deck 






150 


150 


Rubber suction 






— 


10 


Flexible suction 






150 


125 


Deluge 






— 


112 




13,850 


14,147 


Amount in Use and Store February 1, 


1912. 


In Use. 


In Store. 


Leading cotton ..... 106,969 


2,660 


Leading rubber 








9,900 


300 


Chemical 








12,550 


350 


Deck 








900 


— 


Rubber suction 








1,044 


94| 


Flexible suction 








525 


50 


Deluge 








832 


81 



132,720 



O jOoO 2 



Horses. 



Number in the department February 1, 1911 
Purchased during the year .... 


408 
59 




By annexation of Hyde Park 
Total .... 








8 


475 


Sold or exchanged 

Died 








48 

7 




Destroyed .... 
Killed in service 








4 
1 




Total .... 








— 


60 



Number in the department February 1, 1912 



415 



38 



City Document No. 14. 



EXPENDITUEES FOR THE YeAR. 

Salaries to January 25, 1912, inclusive: 

Charles D. Daly, commissioner . $4,986 28 

B. F. Underbill, chief clerk . . 2,493 40 

John A. Mullen, chief . . 3,988 92 

Deputy and district chiefs . 33,314 85 
Members of the various 



fire 



companies . 
Pensioners 
Clerks in office 



Less amount deducted for cloth, 

Horses : 

Hay, grain and straw . 

Shoeing 

Horse hire .... 
Harnesses and repairs . 
Purchase and exchange of . 
Attendants at hospital, medicine, 
etc 



1,067,314 21 

108,601 84 

6,431 88 

^,227,131 38 
2,427 30 



$47,971 60 

19,197 35 

1,496 50 

6,886 77 

12,752 84 

7,886 43 



1,224,704 08 



Repairs of apparatus, including stock sent to 
repair shop: 

Mechanics $39,577 10 

Materials, etc.' .... 19,202 53 



96,191 49 









58,779 63 


Fuel for engines and houses 




39,954 32 


Repairs and alterations of houses 




27,384 17 


Hardware, tools and supplies 




19,455 97 


New apparatus: 






1 Combination chemical engine 




and hose motor car 


$5,500 00 




1 Aerial ladder truck . 




4,930 00 




1 Engine 




4,850 00 




1 Automobile 




950 00 




1 Ladder truck 




750 00 




10 Life nets 




525 00 




1 Caravan 




300 00 








17,805 00 






Hose pipes and repairs 




11,840 79 


Electric lighting 




10,904 09 


Rents 


. . $: 


9,384 27 


Carried forward . 


L,516,403 81 



Fire Departm: 


5NT. 




39 


Brought forward 


$1,516,403 81 


Furniture and bedding . . . S6,436 54 


Washing 1,374 80 




7,811 34 


Uniform cloth 


2,566 96 


Printing 






2,276 67 


Medical service .... 






1,837 36 


Gas 






1,439 36 


Stationery 






1,037 89 


Hats, badges and buttons 






995 96 


Chemicals 






978 09 








695 50 


Janitor at headquarters . 






602 40 


Allowance to members for clothing, etc., lost at 


repair shop fire (order of Common Council 


: 


November 14, 1911) 


. 546 89 


Ice 






495 62 


Books, papers and office expenses 






477 84 


Traveling expenses .... 






442 50 


Expert accountant services . 






425 00 


Insurance 






. 310 02 


Lessons in use of gasolene engines, etc. 






240 00 


Expenses of detailed men 






234 88 


Removing ashes from fireboat 






181 68 


Freights 






179 01 


Postage 






141 70 


Medical supplies .... 






131 83 


Electric power 






125 66 


Advertising 






80 90 


Stenographic work and small items 






51 48 


Rent of gas regulators . 






38 25 




$1,540,748 60 


Fire alarm telegraph : 




Salaries : 




George L. Fickett, superin- 




tendent $2,493 4( 


) 


Operators, repairers, etc. . 


41,8( 


)7 1^ 


^ 



Less amount deducted for 
cloth 



Wires, cables and conduits . 

Instruments, tools and repairs . 
Repairs, alterations and exten- 
sions 

Carried forward .... 



$44,360 58 

8 84 

$44,351 74 
11,717 32 

7,714 73 

3,562 41 



$67,346 20 $1,540,748 60 



40 



City Document No. 14. 



Brought forward 
Telephone service . . 
Electric power .... 
Maps and plans .... 
Use of duct in East Boston 

Tunnel 

Repairing clocks . . . 

Electric light for clocks 

Car fares and traveling expenses. 



Special Appropriations. 

Fireboat Quarters and Pier, Northern Avenue. 
Payments on account: 



$67,346 20 

1,528 87 

964 70 

489 04 

450 36 
347 30 
284 74 
235 50 


$1,540,748 60 
71,646 71 






$1,612,395 31 



Expert services 


$15 00 


Advertising 


3 40 




$18 40 


Department Repair Sho% 


). 


Payments on account: 




Contractor, John F. Griffin Company 


$97,867 20 


Architects, Thomas, Parker & Rice . 


5,886 33 


Plans for heating and ventilating 


661 64 


Benches, etc. 


572 00 


Printing 


361 44 


High pressure piping for engine 


275 00 


Borings and tests 


238 25 


Advertising ...... 


6 40 




$105,868 26 



Fire Station, Lauriat Avenue District. 

Balance of payments: 

Contractors, McGahey & O'Connor . . . $2,997 83 

(Total cost, $15,762.07.) 

Fire Station, Oak Square and Faneuil Section. 

Continuation of payments: 

Expert services $25 00 

Advertising for site ...... 2 80 

$27 80 



i 



Fire Department. 



41 



New Fireboat, No. 31. 

Continuation of payments : 

Contractors, Bertelsen & Petersen Engineering 

Company 

Architect, Arthur Binney 

Hose . . 

Coppering 

Consulting engineer 

Inspector of hull 

Marine instruments, etc. ..... 

Coal 



L3,796 75 

1,371 09 

2,067 50 

503 04 

100 00 

36 00 

32 10 

15 00 













$17,921 48 


New Quarters for Fireboat 31 . 




Continuation of payments : 




Building of, Christopher F. Brown, contractor 


$10,400 00 


Building wharf and dredging dock, W. H. Ellis 


> 


contractor 


6,264 59 


Architect, C. J. Bateman 










624 00 


Engineering . 










307 33 


Printing .... 










134 49 


Tide water displacement 










100 00 


Water service pipe 










67 15 


Advertising 










11 20 


/'nr^c+ +r. rlo + o «17Q»Q7A^ 


$17,908 76 



Recapitulation. 

Fire Department (including Fire Alarm, Repair 

Shop and new apparatus) .... 
Fireboat quarters and pier. Northern avenue 
Department repair shop .... 

Fire Station, Lauriat avenue district . 
Fi-re Station, Oak square and Faneuil section 

New Fireboat, No. 31 

New quarters for fireboat 31 



Income. 

Sale of one book .... 
Labor of fire alarm employees 
Cloth remnants .... 
Rent 

Carried forward 



. $1,612,395 


31 


18 


40 


105,868 


26 


2,997 


83 


27 


80 


17,921 


48 


17,908 


76 


$1,757,137 84 


$2 50 


10 


50 


22 


75 


32 


00 



$67 75 



42 



City Document No. 14, 



Brought forward 

Insurance 

Damage to fire alarm boxes 

Sale of manure 

Permits for keeping of fireworks, explosives, and 

transportation of same; fires in open air and 

blasting 

Sale of badges admitting to fire lines 

Sale of three old bells 

Sale of old material 

Sale of old fireboat. Engine 31 

Bath Department, steam for Dover Street Bath 

House 



$67 75 


50 


00 


138 


47 


227 


00 


243 


25 


329 


00 


1,803 


42 


2,048 


02 


2,555 


00 



3,455 91 



,917 82 



Fire Department. 



43 





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44 



City Document No. 14. 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from January 1, 1911, 
TO January 1, 1912. 



Alarms, accidental, false au- 
tomatic 119 

Alarms, false, needless, bell 

and still 186 

Alarms out of city 31 

Ashes, in wooden receptacle, 64 

Automobiles 45 

Boiling over of fat, tar, etc ... 27 
Bonfires, brush, rubbish, 

grass 739 

Careless use lamp, candle, 

lantern 65 

Careless use pipe, cigar, 

cigarette 142 

Chimneys, soot burning 218 

Clothes near stove 30 

Defective chimney, stove- 
pipe, boiler, furnace, fire- 
place 67 

Defective gas pipe, stove, 

heater 36 

Electric wires, motors 75 

Fireworks and firecrackers. . . 29 

Friction, shafting, journals . . 18 

Gas escaping and explosion . . 12 

Gas jet, stove, setting fire. ... 71 

Grease in ventilator, oven ... 40 

Kerosene, lighting fire 6 

Lightning 2 

Incendiary and supposed ... 41 
Lamp upsetting, explosion. . 90 
Light, smoke, steam, mis- 
taken for fire 46 

Matches, careless use of by 

children and set by rats . . 443 



Meat, wood, on stove, in 

oven 29 

Naphtha, gasolene, benzine, 
chemicals, careless use of, 

and explosion 32 

Oil stove, careless use of, 

and explosion 39 

Overheated furnace, stove, 

boiler and steam pipes .... 86 

Plastering, drying 15 

Plumber's, roofer's, paint- 
er's stove or torch 13 

Rescues, elevators, mis- 
cellaneous. . : 11 

Rekindling of ruins 2 

Set by boys 134 

Slacking of lime 6 

Smoky chimney, furnace, 

lamp, stove 168 

Sparks from another fire 8 

Sparks from chimney, fur- 
nace, stove, forge, boiler, 

grate 119 

Sparks from locomotive, 

engine 118 

Spontaneous combustion .... 45 

Unknown 947 

Water, gas pipe, thawing 

out 16 

Water back, bursting of 3 



4,433 



Fire Department. 



45 









FiKB Extinguished 


BY 












a 


B 










1911. 


2 


^ 




C3 

2 




i 








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§ 


O 


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87 


38 


71 


20 


36 


56 


22 


1 




83 


28 


62 


11 


40 


17 


29 


1 




87 
110 


31 
46 


74 
71 


28 
61 


48 
49 


60 
102 


29 
37 


2 


April 


1 


May 


115 


48 


64 


57 


55 


44 


44 


1 




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107 


36 
62 


64 

78 


32 
99 


37 
39 


22 
35 


36 
65 




July 




August 


59 


26 


47 


19 


30 


8 


29 


1 


September 


42 


29 


40 


10 


18 


15 


18 




October 


57 


31 


34 


16 


18 


19 


28 




November 


72 


29 


50 


15 


23 


35 


33 


2 




78 


25 


58 


16 


21 


46 


49 








Totals 


980 


429 


713 


384 


414 


459 


419 


9 







Fires Where Loss Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 


Location and Owner. 


Loss. 


1911. 

Jan. 11 


21-39 Portland street, Aldrich, Chisbee & Co 


$31,897 00 


Jan. 21 


Clayton street, Sturtevant Mill Company 


20,142 05 


Feb. 8 


7-8 North Market street, A. J. Bartlett et al. . . . . . 


37,270 96 


Feb. 12 


213-225 High street, C. L. Ireson et al 


64,217 57 


April 6 


62-64 Stanhope street, White-Smith Publishing Co. et al... 


68,238 24 


April 12 


8-12 Somerset street, Boston Lodge of Elks et al 


23,207 34 


April 18 


67-69 Commercial street, Boston Wholesale Grocery 
Company et al. 


48,160 65 


April 25 


105 Friend street. Miller & Goldberg et al 


30,690 52 


April 28 


415-429 Atlantic avenue. Fort Hill Storage Warehouse 
Company et al. 


25,529 17 


May 5 


Battery Wharf Lighter No. 6, Foreign Land Cotton Com- 
pany et al. 


18,910 00 


June 11 


1-7 Washington street, Collins Hardware Company et al . 


20,915 60 


June 18 


212 Border street, steamer "Governor Andrew" et al. . . . 


27,003 74 



46 



City Document No. 14. 



FIRES WHERE LOSS EXCEEDED $15,000.— Concluded. 



Date. 


Location and Owner. 


Loss. 


1911. 






June 23 


781-789 Washington street, Polar Waist Company et al.. 


$19,837 19 


July 8 


147-149 Hemenway street, Rose Bloomfield et al 


36,527 00 


July 12 


255 Normandy street, W. H. Newcomb et al 


19,901 96 


July 12 


541-547 Atlantic avenue, August Thiel Company et al. . . 


62,328 41 


July 20 


52-58 Kemble street, Roxbury Shoe Thread Company 
et al. 


20,295 46 


Aug. 1 


39-47 Dunstable street, C. L. York et al 


19,894 66 


Aug. 3 


210 Freeport street. Pope Lumber Company et al 


27,656 20 


Sept. 4 


134 Richmond street, John Holman & Co. et al 


18,277 40 


Sept. 9 


179 Clarendon street, K. A. Skinner et al 


38,166 83 


Sept. 13 


2-28 Dorchester avenue, F. C. Warren Company et al. . . . 


118,900 45 


Sep*. 17 


60-68 Chauncy street, Colonial Manufacturing Company 
et al. 


58,591 84 


Sept. 21 


285-305 Medford street. Holt & Bugbee et al 


60,705 77 


Nov. 15 


16 Portland street, M. C. Rosenfield et al: 


30,454 72 


Dec. 24 


660 Summer street, Boston Molasses Company et al 


267,444 58 



Population (census, 1910) 

Area, square miles . . . . 
Number of brick and stone buildings 

Number of wooden buildings 

Fires in brick and stone buildings .... 

Fires in wooden buildings . . . 

Fires in buildings adjoining and extending beyond 

origin 

Not in building, false and needless 

Total alarms 



670,585 

37.04 

27,699 

63,718 

1,442 

1,290 

69 
1,632 



4,433 



Fire Loss foe, Year Ending December 31, 1911. 

Buildings ■ •. $771,928 

Contents 1,410,535 

Marine . 49,804 



Total 



J,232,267 



Fire Department. 



47 



YEARLY LOSS FOR THE PAST FIFTEEN 
YEARS. 



Year ending February 1, 1897 . 

" 1, 1898 . 

" 1, 1899 . 

1, 1900 . 

" 1, 1901 . 

" 1, 1902 . 

" 1, 1903 . 

1, 1904 . 

" 1, 1905 . 

" 1, 1906 . 

" 1, 1907 . 

" 1, 1908 . 

1, 1909 . 

" 1, 1910 . 

" 1, 1911(11 months) 

January 1, 1912 . 



11,394,707 
775,525 
1,441,261 
1,630,149 
1,702,217 
1,830,719 
1,762,619 
1,674,333 
2,473,980 
2,130,146 
1,130,334 
2,268,074 
3,610,000 
1,680,245 
3,159,989 
2,232,267 



Note. — January loss, 1911, amounting to $165,001, deducted from previous year and 
included in calendar year January 1, 1911, to January 1, 1912. 



ALARMS FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS. 



Yeab. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1911 

1910 (11 months)* 


2,291 

1,864 
2,101 
2,210 
2,441 
1,687 
1,905 
1,580 
1,633 
1,566 
1,349 


2,142 

1,801 
1,677 
1,700 
1,600 
1,262 
1,210 
1,159 
1,121 
1,099 
977 


4,433 

3,665 
3,778 
3,910 
4,041 
2,949 
3,115 
2,739 
2,754 
2,665 
2,326 


1909 

1908 


1907 

1906 

1905 

1904 

1903 

1902 

1901 



* 202 bell and 196 still alarms deducted from year 1910-11, and included in calendar 
year January 1, 1911, to January 1, 1912. 



48 



City Document No. 14. 











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FiEE Department. 49 



ROLL OF MERIT, BOSTON FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Nathan L. Hussey, retired as Second Assistant Chief. 

James F. Bailey, Ladderman, Ladder Company 18. 

Timothy J. Heffron, Lieutenant, Engine Company 27. 

James E. Downey, Hoseman, Engine Company 40. 

Frederick F. Leary, Lieutenant, Engine Company 
26-35. 

Florence Donoghue, Ladderman, Ladder Company 15. 

James F. McMahon, Captain, Ladder Company 2. 

Martin A. Kenealy, Lieutenant, Aide to Commis- 
sioner. 

Denis DriscoU, Lieutenant, Engine Company 14. 

William H. Magner, Hoseman, Engine Company 32. 

Thomas J. Muldoon, Lieutenant, Engine Company 18. 

Joseph P. Hanton, Ladderman, Ladder Company 17. 

Michael J. Teehan, Lieutenant, Engine Company 7. 

Charles W. Conway, Captain, Engine Company 37. 

Michael J. Dacey, Lieutenant, Ladder Company 20. 

Patrick E. Keyes, retired as District Chief. 

Thomas H. Downey, Lieutenant, Engine Company 4. 



50 City Document No. 14. 



FIRE ALARM BRANCH. 



From the Superintendent of Fire Alarms, February 1, 1912. 
To THE Chief of Department: 

I submit herewith the report of this branch for the 
year February 1, 1911, to February 1, 1912: 

Operating Division. 

Alarms received and transmitted : 

Bell alarms (first) received and transmitted . . 2,339 

Bell alarms (second) received and transmitted . . 37 

Bell alarms (third) received and transmitted . . 18 

Bell alarms (fourth) received and transmitted . . 5 

Alarms received but not transmitted: 

Alarms received from same box two or more times 

for same fire 173 

Alarms received from adjacent boxes for same fire . 184 

Alarms received for grass fires, treated as still alarms, 13 

Box Records. 

Boxes from which no alarm was received . . . 263 

Boxes from which two or more alarms were received . 8 

Still Alarms. 

Alarms received from citizens by telephone . . . 666 

Alarms received from Police Department by telephone, 159 

Alarms reported by companies to which they responded, 1,131 

Box alarms received for same fires 125 

Alarms received from Boston Automatic Alarm Com- 
pany 144 

Box alarms received for same fires 18 

Alarms received from A. D. T. Company ... 25 

Box alarms received for same fires . . . . . 4 

Total Alarms. 

Bell alarms . . . 2,399 

Still alarms and automatics (eliminating those from 

which box alarms were received) 2,125 



Grand total 4,524 



FiEE Department. 51 

Construction Division. 

New Construction. 

The following cables were laid underground to replace 
overhead construction: . 

Feet. 

Dorchester avenue and Park street to Peabody square, 

20-conductor cable 4,763 

Dorchester avenue, Codman street to Pierce square, 

20-conductor cable 3,042 

River street. Pierce square to Engine 16, 20-conductor 

cable 1,394 

River street. Engine 16 to Central avenue, 19-conductor 

cable 640 

Welles avenue, Dorchester avenue to Ocean street, 6 and 

10 conductor cable 1,265 

Salem, Charter, Foster and Commercial streets to 

Engine 31, 20-conductor cable 1,655 

Huntington avenue, Rogers avenue to Ruggles street, 

6-conductor cable 1,000 

Boylston and Hemenway streets, Massachusetts avenue 

to Gainsborough street, 6-conductor cable . . . 2,274 
Brighton avenue. Harvard avenue to Union square, 

10-conductor cable 1,700 

Harvard avenue, Brighton avenue to Cambridge street, 

20-conductor cable 1,280 

Cambridge street. Harvard avenue to Union square, 

10-conductor cable . . . 1,606 

Cambridge street, Union square to Washington street, 

20-conductor cable . 4,335 

Washington street, Cambridge street to Market street, 

20-conductor cable 1,148 

Cable laid for extension of service to Engine 48, 
Hyde Park: 

Feet. 

River street at Mattapan square, 10-conductor cable . 420 
River street. Central avenue, Webster street and Win- 

throp street from Huntington avenue to Engine 48 . 3,363 

Cables laid in Chelsea from police station to Engine 1, 
4-conductor 1,716 

New Fire Alarm Posts. 

Feet. 

Dorchester avenue and Centre street, 1-cluct ... 28 

Dorchester and Welles avenues, 1-duct .... 27 

Dorchester avenue and Codman street, 1-duct . . 29 

Pierce square, 1-duct ......... 53 



52 



City Document No. 14. 



Welles avenue and Ocean street, 1-duct . 

Huntington and Rogers avenues, 1-duct . 

Hemenway street, opposite Gainsborough street, 1-duct 

Washington and Guild streets, 1-duct 

South street, opposite Ains worth street, 1-duct 

Cambridge street and Harvard avenue, 1-duct 

Cambridge and North Beacon streets, 1-duct . 

Cambridge and Sparhawk streets, 1-duct 

Washington and Market streets, 1-duct . 

One post was furnished by this department and set by 
the Schoolhouse Department, Massachusetts avenue 
and Washington street, 1-duct 



Feet. 

41 
56 
45 
10 
87 
71 
8 
18 
30 



97 



New Test Posts. 

Bedford and Chauncy streets, 4-duct 

Tremont street, opposite Compton street, 4-duct 



Feet. 

34 
14 



Pole Connections. 

Dorchester and Centre avenues, 2-duct 
Dorchester avenue and Richmond street, 1-duct 
Dorchester avenue and Washington street, 3-duct 
Home for Incurables, 1-duct .... 
Convalescents' Home, 1-duct 
Brighton avenue and Allston street, 1-duct 
Cambridge and North Beacon streets, 3-duct 
Cambridge and Warren streets, 1-duct 
Cambridge and Murdock streets, 1-duct . 
Cambridge and Washington streets, 1-duct 
Academy Hill road and Washington street, 1-duct 
Central avenue and River street, 1-duct . 
Mattapan square (2) , 1-duct .... 
Huntington avenue and River street, 1-duct 



Feet. 

73 
35 

8 
51 
20 
84 
20 
83 
52 
20 
71 
74 
371 
41 



Lamp-posts Knocked Down and New Posts Reset. 

Kneeland and South streets. 
Shawmut avenue and Waltham street. 
Dorchester avenue, near drawbridge. 
Chelsea street, opposite Prospect street. 
Massachusetts avenue and Beacon street. 



Conduit Installed. 

To connect Engine 8 with conduit system, 1-duct, 24 feet. 
To connect Engine 31 with conduit system, 1-duct, 657 feet. 
To connect Engine 48 with conduit system, 1-duct, 252 feet. 



FiEE Department. 53 

Manholes Built. 

Mattapan square. 

Winthrop street (front of Engine 48). 

North End Park. 

Yard of Paving Division (rear of Engine 31) . 

Aerial Cable Strung on Poles. 

River street, Central avenue to Mattapan square, 10- 
conductor. 

River street, Mattapan square to Huntington avenue, 
10-conductor, 14,266 feet. 

Overhead wire has been taken down where under- 
ground work has been done, except in the Brighton 
district. 

Hyde Park. 

In Hyde Park there is an automatic alarm system, 
consisting of sixty-one boxes, one whistle and three 
bells, with central office equipment in quarters of Engine 
48 (formerly fire headquarters). In the central office 
is an 8-circuit repeater, charging and terminal boards 
and storage batteries. This system is still in operation, 
and alarms are transmitted to the Boston office where 
they are recorded on a register. Upon receipt of alarms 
from Hyde Park they are sent out on the Boston system 
in the regular way. Tapper, gong and telephones 
connected with the Boston system, were installed in 
quarters of Engine 48. 

New Fire Alarm Boxes Established. 

240, Washington and Guild streets. 

327, Columbia road and Glendale street. 

340, Bowdoin avenue and Bullard street. 

346, Talbot avenue, opposite Aspinwall road. 

347, Willowwood street, opposite Ballou avenue. 
367, Norfolk and Clarkwood streets. 

511, Boylston and Egleston streets. 

560, South street, opposite Ainsworth street. 

571, Belgrade avenue and Rexhame street. 

649, Chelsea and Putnam streets. 

850, Chestnut Hill avenue and Wallingford road. 

859, Commonwealth avenue and Warren street. 

868, Corey and Wellington roads. 



54 City Document No. 14. 

Peivate Boxes Established. 
433, Mystic Wharf, near yard master's office. 

Auxiliary Boxes Established. 

783, New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
shops, Rogers avenue. 

986, Hallet & Davis piano factory, off Marsh street. 

New Schoolhouse Boxes Established. 

2143, Abraham Lincoln School, Ferdinand street, 
inside building. 

2189, J. L. Motley School, Savin Hill avenue, inside 
building. 

2246, Lafayette School, Ruggles street, outside 
building. 

2255, Bulfinch School, Parker street, near Fisher 
avenue, on pole. 

2311, John Winthrop School, Brookford and Dacia 
streets, outside building. 

2421, J. A. McDonald School, Polk street, on pole. 

2422, Frothingham School, Prospect and Edgeworth 
streets, outside building. 

2429, Benjamin F. Tweed School, Cambridge street, 
inside building. 

2522, Wyman School, Wyman street, outside building. 

2819, William Wirt Warren School, Waverly street, 
outside building. 

The following schoolhouse boxes were moved from the 
inside of buildings to outside in order that they may be 
more accessible to the public: 

2123, Phillips School, Phillips and Anderson streets, 
on building. 

2151, Lawrence School, West Third and B streets, 
on building. 

2163, Capen School, East Sixth and I streets, on pole. 

2185, Stephen Decatur School, Sumner street, oppo- 
site Willis street, on pole. 

2215, Smith Street School, Phillips and Smith streets, 
on pole. 

2217, Comins School, Tremont street, near Parker 
street, on pole. 

2223, Wilham Eustis School, George and Hampden 
streets, on pole. 



Fire Department. 55 

2314, Hawthorne School, Howard avenue and Haw- 
' thorne street, on pole. 

2319, O. W. Holmes School, Harvard and School 
streets, on pole. 

2324, Marshall School, Westville street and Dakota 
road, on pole. 

2513, Hillside School, Elm and Everett streets, on 
pole. 

2514, Agassiz School, Centre and Burroughs street, 
on pole. 

2517, West Roxbury High School, Greenough avenue 
and Elm street, on pole. 

2521, Mt. Vernon School, Mt. Vernon street, near 
Centre street, on building. 

Street Boxes Auxiliarized to Take the Place of School- 
house Boxes Removed. (These Boxes are Owned by 
the Fire Department.) 

32, Pinckney and Anderson streets, Sharp School. 

122, Dorchester and Vinton streets, J. B. O'Reilly 
School. 

134, D and Gold streets, Norcross School. 

147, G street, opposite Sixth street. South Boston 
High School. 

237, Dudley and Putnam streets, Dudley School. 

247, Huntington avenue and Fenwood road, Farragut 
School. 

353, Norfolk and Fremont streets, Lyon and Tileston 
Schools. 

615, Sumner and Lamson streets. Commodore Barry 
School. 

633, Paris and Gove streets, Cudworth School. 

996, Norfolk and Morton streets, Roger Wolcott 
School. 

Schoolhouse Boxes Cut Out of Service. 

2122, Sharp School. 

2162, J. B. O'Reilly School. 

2168, Norcross School. 

2171, South Boston High School. 

2219, Dudley School. 

2235, Farragut School. 

2318, Roger Wolcott School. 



56 City Document No. 14. 

* 2321, Henry L. Pierce School. 

* 2326, Gibson School. 

* 2327, Elbridge Smith School. 
2328, Tileston School. 

* 2338, Gilbert Stuart School. 

2613, John Barry School. 

2614, Cudworth School. 

* 2815, Washington Allston School. 

Locations of the Following Boxes were Changed. 

353, from Engine House 19 to Norfolk and Fremont 
streets. 

365, from Canterbury street to Harvard, near Austin 
street. 

429, from Mystic Wharf to Medford, opposite Decatur 
street. 

523, from Engine House 28 to Pond and Centre 
streets. 

562, from Engine House 30 to Park and Centre streets. 

854, from Engine House 29 to Washington street and 
Chestnut Hill avenue. 

Box Tests. 

Each box was tested on an average of ten times 
during the year. 

Keyless doors are tested twice a week. 

Apparatus in Department Houses. 

The following houses were equipped with new fire 
alarm apparatus : 

Engine 31. New fireboat quarters. 

Engine 48. Formerly Hyde Park Headquarters. 

New repair shop. 

Extensive repairs and alterations were made in the 
lighting systems in many of the department houses. 

Improvements in Fire Alarm Office. 

New wires are being installed to replace the old, 
which were unsafe. The receiving apparatus has been 
rearranged in order to avoid confusion by installing 
an additional relay which flashes a light on each circuit, 

* Boxes cut out of service because Schoolhouse Department was not ready with 
underground connections. 



Fire Department. 



57 



and the local circuits have been changed. The tapper 
transmitter was taken apart and cleaned. Storage 
batteries were installed to replace dynamos on local 
circuits. A register which records alarms from Hyde 
Park was installed. A new lighting arrangement was 
made in the office. Most of the dynamotors have 
been overhauled and put in proper condition. 

Telephones. 

A new contract was made with the New . England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company, whereby the system 
is now maintained by the company, excepting the care 
of outside circuits. Efficient service has been given, 
and the results have been satisfactory considering the 
kind of system. 



Following is a Summary of Work Done. 

Feet. 

New wire used 47,060 

Old wire taken down 71,300 

Overhead cable construction 22,778 

Overhead cable removed 1,000 

Conductors in cable construction 177,567 

Conductors in cable removed 2,000 

Underground cable used in ducts owned by New Eng- 
land Telephone and Telegraph Company (new 

construction) 32,639 

Underground cable used in fire alarm ducts, service 

connections, etc. (new construction) .... 2,754 

Total underground cable used 36,400 

Conductors in same .* . 513,589 

Cable used for repairs 1,007 

Conductors in same . 7,626 

Conduits built by this department .... 2,481 

Ducts laid by this department 2,755 

4 manholes built. 
355 cross-arms used. 

Boxes. 

Total number . 817 

Owned by Fire Department . . . . . . 581 

Owned by Schoolhouse Department .... 120 

Owned by Auxiliary Company 57 

Owned by private parties .59 

Department boxes: 

On lamp posts 194 

On poles 356 

On buildings with lights 26 



58 



City Document No. 14. 



On buildings without lights 

In buildings . 

With keyless doors 

With key doors 

With auxiliary attachment 



SCHOOLHOUSE BoXES. 

Inside buildings ..... 
Outside accessible to public 
Outside accessible to public at times 

With lights 

Keyless doors 

Key doors 



Auxiliary Company Boxes. 

Inside buildings 

Outside buildings . . . ■ . 

On building with light 

With keyless doors 

With key doors . . . '. 



2 

3 

521 

60 

12 



61 

36 

23 

1 

58 
62 



34 

23 

1 

7 
50 



Private Boxes. 

Inside buildings 34 

Outside buildings . . . • 25 

With keyless doors ......... 8 

With key doors 51 

Circuits. 

Number of box circuits ....... 44 

Number of tapper circuits ...... 10 

Number of gong circuits . . . . . ' . . 13 

Special Hyde Park circuit ...... 1 

High pressure signaling circuit . . . . . 1 

Number of telephone circuits . . . . . . 38 

Number of circuits to Tremont Exchange ... 7 

Number of circuits to Oxford Exchange ... 1 

Special circuit to police headquarters .... 1 

Wire, Etc. 

Feet. 

Overhead wire in service . ..... 1,698,650 

Overhead cable in service ... . . . 71,229 

Conductors in overhead cable 520,444 

Underground cable in service 403,590 

Conductors in underground cable . . . . 8,443,297 

Conduit owned by Fire Department .... 35,249 

Ducts in conduit 44,093 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company's 

ducts used by Fire Department .... 296,679 



Fire Department. 



59 



Apparatus. 



Number of tappers in service . 
Number of gongs in service 
Number of telephones in service 
Number of registers in service 
Number of relays in service 



119 

125 

128 

5 

2 



Tower Bells. 

The following bells were sold : 

Engine House No. 17, composition . 

Engine House No. 18, composition . 

Engine House No. 28, composition . 



Pounds. 

4,000 
3,184 
4,000 



Bells Connected in Service. 

Faneuil Hall (steel) . \ 

Arlington Street Church, Hyde Park. 

M. E. Church, Central avenue, Hyde Park. 

Old Hose House, Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park. 



Pounds. 

5,816 



Bells Owned by Fire Department, but not in Service. 

Pounds. 

City Hall (Char lestown), composition ■ . . . . 3,600 
Engine 1, Dorchester street, South Boston, com- 
position 2,911 

Engine 16, Temple street, Dorchester, composition . 4,149 

Engine 19, Mattapan, composition .... 2,927 

Engine 20, Walnut street, Dorchester, composition . 3,061 

Engine 21, Columbia road, Dorchester, composition . 3,026 

Engine 29, Brighton, composition 1,535 

Engine 30, West Roxbury (old house), steel . . 1,000 

Engine 34, Brighton, composition 1,501 

Engine 41, Allston, composition 800 

Engine 45, Roslindale, composition .... 1,059 
Ladder 4, Dudley street, Roxbury, composition . . 3,509 
Saratoga Street Church, East Boston, steel . . 1,968 
Trinity Church, Trenton street. East Boston, com- 
position 1,760 



Bells Owned by Schoolhouse Department. 

Berkeley Temple, formerly on Quincy schoolhouse. Pounds. 

composition 2,941 

Van Nostrand's Brewery, Charlestown, formerly used 

on old Franklin Schoolhouse, composition . . 818 

Whistle in service: 

Hyde Park Electric Light Station, 



60 City Document No. 14. 

Care of Clocks. 

Much time has been devoted to the care of clocks, 
both department and pubhc, and extensive repairs 
have been made. Following is a list of public clocks 
cared for by this department : 

City Proper. 

Charles Street Church. 

Christ Church, Salem street, owned by city. 

Commercial Wharf. 

Odd Fellows' Hall, Tremont street, owned by city. 

Old South Church, owned by city. 

Old State House, owned by city. 

Suffolk County Jail, owned by city. 

St. Stephen's Church, Clark street, owned by city. 

Shawmut Avenue Church. 

Tremont M. E. Church, owned by city. 

Young Men's Christian Union, owned by city. 

South Boston. 

Gaston Schoolhouse, owned by city. 

Lincoln Schoolhouse, owned by city. 

Phillips Church, owned by city. 

St. Augustine Church, Dorchester street, owned by city. 

East Boston. 

London Street Church, owned by city. 
Lyceum Hall, owned by city. 
Trinity Church, owned by city. 
Orient Heights Church, owned by city. 

Roxbury. 

Winthrop Street Church, owned by city. 
Boston Elevated Railway Carhouse, Columbus avenue, 
owned by city. 

Dorchester. 

Baker Memorial (Upham's Corner), owned by city. 

Neponset Church. 

Unitarian Church of the Unity. 

Tileston School (Mattapan), owned by city. 

Unitarian Church (Milton Lower Mills). 



Fire Department. 61 

Charlestown. 

St. Francis De Sales Church. 
City Hall, owned by city. 

West Roxbury. 

Dr. Strong's Church (South Evangelical), owned by city. 
Unitarian Church, Jamaica Plain, owned by city. 
Congregational Church (Roslindale), owned by city. 

Brighton. 
Bennett Schoolhouse, owned by city. 

George L. Fickett. 



62 



City Document No. 14. 



BOSTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND. 



From September 1, 1910, to September 1, 1911, 
inclusive. 

The Fire Commissioner, as president of the Boston 
Firemen's Relief Fund, acknowledges the following con- 
tributions; these sums were accompanied by letters 
expressing appreciation for services rendered by the 
department : 



Mente & Co 

Union Carpet Lining Company 
C. A. Berry .... 
Dr. C. A. Richards 



$100 00 

25 00 

20 00 

5 00 


$150 00 



The receipts from the annual department ball and 
contributions constitute the fund from which sick bene- 
fits and doctors' bills are paid. Destitute raembers of 
deceased firemen's families are also given assistance 
from this fund. 



Financial Statement of the Boston Firemen's 
Relief Fund September 1, 1910, to September 
1, 1911, Inclusive. 

Receipts. 
Balance September 1, 1910 
Net proceeds of ball, February, 1911 
Interest on bonds . 
Interest on deposits 
Donations 
Check cancelled 
Part of benefit returned 



Total receipts 



Expenditures 



Benefits paid . 
Treasurer's bond . 

Carried forward 



$4,971 


94 


14,994 


62 


8,175 


00 


128 


57 


150 


00 


4 


00 


9 


00 


$15,687 40 


43 


30 



5,433 13 



$15,730 70 $28,433 13 



Fire Department. 63 



Brought forward .... 


$15,730 70 $28,433 13 


Salaries : 




Secretary and treasurer, $100 each, 


200 00 


Medical examiner .... 


200 00 


Rent of box, International Trust 




Company 


10 00 


Printing, stationery and postage 


154 50 


Massachusetts General Hospital, free 




bed 


400 00 


Carney Hospital, free bed . 


200 00 


Bonds purchased . . . . 


6,609 25 




23,504 45 


Balance September 1, 1911 . . *. 


. $4,928 68 



Assets September 1, 1911. 

$124,000 00 City of Boston 3^ per cent bonds. 

94,000 00 City of Boston 4 per cent bonds. 

8,000 00 C. B. & Q. R. R. 4 per cent bonds. 

4,928 68 cash on deposit. 



Total, $230,928 68