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ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAE EJ^DII^G 31 JAIN^UAEY, 1913 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1913 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2.010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1913bost 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1912-13. 



Boston, 1 February, 1913. 

Hon. John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Dear Sir, — In accordance with section 24, Revised 
Ordinances, 1898, City of Boston, I have the honor to 
submit herewith report of this department for the year, 
1 February, 1912, to 1 February, 1913. 

Appended are reports of the Chief of Department 
and the heads of the different branches; tables giving 
in detail the organization, work and cost of these 
branches; fire statistics for the year; location and 
valuation of department buildings; valuation of prop- 
erty in charge of the department; description of appa- 
ratus; roll of merit; changes in personnel, and 
treasurer's report of the Relief Fund. 

Finances. 

The cost of maintenance, including all branches, was 
$1,726,116.53, an increase over 1911-12 of $113,721.22. 



2 City Document No. 14. 

This increase was accounted for as follows, none of 
which could be avoided: 



Annexation of Hyde Park 

Increased pay . . . . 

Pay of additional men .... 

Increased price of hay, grain and straw 

Increased price of coal .... 

New boilers, Engine 44, left over from 1911 



$24,000 00 
61,000 00 
13,800 00 
13,800 00 
7,600 00 
15,000 00 

$135,200 00 



Aside from unavoidable increases the maintenance 
cost was $21,500 less than last year. 

The expenditure for permanent improvements under 
special appropriations was $91,485.83. This included 



New fire station and wharf at Northern Avenue 

Bridge for Engine 44 ... . 
New fire station at Oak square, Brighton 
Improvements in fire alarm construction 
Purchase of motor apparatus . 
Additional construction in Repair Shop 



$29,038 62 
35,658 49 

* 17,514 96 

1 8,005 45 

1,268 58 



Fire Fighting Force. 

There are 961 permanent men assigned to duty in the 
fire fighting force as compared with 914 in 1911, an 
increase of 47. 

There are 116 employees in all other branches. 

During the year there have been fifteen retirements 
for age and disability. This covers the criticism of the 
department made two years ago by the National Board 
of Fire Underwriters. 

In line with the country-wide movement the salaries 
of members of all grades were increased during the 
year, as follows: 

Privates, from $1,200 to $1,300. 
Engineers, from $1,300 to $1,400. 
Lieutenants, from $1,400 to $1,600. 
Captains, from $1,600 to $1,800. 
District chiefs, from $2,000 to $2,300. 
One deputy chief, from $2,500 to $2,800. 



* $24,000 additional has been contracted for, but not yet paid, 
t $35,000 additional has been contracted for, but not yet paid. 



Fire Department. 



Detailed Men. 



■ Members of the department heretofore permanently 
detailed to the fire alarm and the repair shop have 
been transferred to those respective branches, so that 
hereafter each branch of the department will show the 
actual number of men employed therein. Previously 
the cost of these men was borne by the fire fighting force 
while their services were rendered elsewhere. 



District Lines. 

The boundary lines of the fire districts have been 
rearranged to remove any uncertainty as to the responsi- 
bility and authority of district chiefs. 



Chauffeurs' School. 

At the school of instruction for chauffeurs an elabo- 
rate equipment has been installed. It consists of an 
automobile chassis with the working parts exposed to 
view of the students (loaned to the department through 
the courtesy of the Studebaker Company), and a 
demonstrating automobile which is set up on a testing 
plant; by this means the student becomes thoroughly 
acquainted with the handling of the speed or transmis- 
sion levers without liability of accident. The instruc- 
tion consists of lectures by a professor of gas engineering 
from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, practical demon- 
stration of automobile construction, practice on testing 
plant, and is completed with road work on a piece of 
motor fire apparatus. 

Inspections. 

There have been 19,408 inspections of schoolhouses, 
theatres, motion picture houses, buildings, etc. 

There have been issued 3,248 permits for fires in the 
open air, blasting, storage and transportation of dyna- 
mite, storage, sale and discharge of fireworks, under 
authority given by statute, ordinance or delegated by 
the district police. 

There have been 126 applications for gasolene licenses 
passed upon by this department. 



City Document No. 14. 



New Regulations. 

A board has been appointed to revise and bring up 
to date the regulations which govern the department. 
That board is now ready to report. 

Civil Service. 

The extension to this department by the Civil Service 
Commission of promotion only by competitive exami- 
nation is, in my opinion, the fairest and most efficient 
method that can be devised. There have been quite a 
number of complaints of injustice to individuals which 
have some warrant in fact, but they are matters that 
can be adjusted at the next examination, and I have 
no doubt will then be remedied by the Civil Service 
Commission. 

Construction, Supplies and Repairs. 
There are now in service, or in course of construc- 
tion, five motor-driven combination chemical and hose 
wagons, four motor-driven city service hook and ladder 
trucks, and twelve chiefs' runabouts. These will be 
placed in the suburbs where the runs are long, namely, 
Orient Heights (East Boston), Dorchester, West Roxbury, 
Hyde Park, Brighton, and the Parker Hill section of Rox- 
bury. They will add materially to the efficiency of the 
department. 

Comparative Cost — Motor Apparatus. 
A careful study has been made of the comparative 
cost of motor and horse-drawn apparatus. The figures 
are very interesting and do not agree with those given 
by the builders of motor apparatus. These figures show 
that in large cities, where the apparatus is called upon 
to respond to alarms frequently, the cost of upkeep, 
including interest on the original investment, is greater 
than the cost of a similar piece of horse-drawn apparatus. 

Example 1. 
Cost of motor-driven combination chemical and hose wagon, 

$5,500. 
Interest, 5 per cent, for one j^ear .... $275 00 

Repairs 38 00 

Supplies and tires . 390 00 

Total $703 00 



Fire Department. 



Example 2. 



Cost of motor-driven combination chemical and hose wagon, 

S5,500. 
Interest, 5 per cent, for one year .... $275 00 

Repairs 315 00 

Supphes and tires . . 574 00 



Total 



Example 3. 



$1,164 00 


$75 00 
100 00 
400 00 


$575 00 



Cost of hose wagon, harness and two horses, $1,500. 
Interest, 5 per cent, for one year .... 
Repairs, harness and wagon, rubber tires 
Hay, grain, shoeing, two horses 

Total 

The balance in one case is in favor of horse-drawn 
apparatus by $133, and in the other case by $589. 

This, of course, does not take into consideration 
efficiency, nor the fact that the department gains the 
services of the driver as an addition to the fire fighting 
force. 

Fireproof Vault for Records. 

A fireproof vault has been built in the repair shop 
in which to store all valuable books, papers and records. 

Fire Alarm. 

By reference to the report of the superintendent of 
this branch it will be seen that many improvements 
have been made toward bringing it up to date. There 
still remain a number of changes to be made in the office, 
which will be completed before another year. The 
question of underground cable construction is a serious 
one, and the city must prepare now to meet it. This 
is taken up in detail in the recommendations made 
later in this report. 

Loss PER Alarm and per Capita. 

During the fiscal year there were 811 more alarms 
than in the previous year. The loss per alarm was $459 
in 1912 as against $507 in 1911, and an average of 
$650 during the last fifteen years. 

The per capita fire loss for the fiscal year was $2.81 
as against an average for the past ten years of $3.58. 



6 City Document No. 14. 

Administration. 

Filing and Correspondence. . 
The headquarters have been rearranged and modern 
methods of correspondence and bookkeeping have been 
introduced, the card system has been extended and the 
flat fihng system installed, all of which should prove to 
be a great saver of time. The same system will be 
introduced into the different branches during the 
coming year. It is the intention to have one standard 
throughout the department. 

Compilation of Statutes and Ordinances. 

The statutes and ordinances bearing on this depart- 
ment have been compiled by Capt. Martin A. Kenealy 
of Engine 43, and are now in the hands of the printer. 
They will be distributed to the department. This is a 
most important work, as heretofore there was nothing 
to show the power, authority and responsibility of the 
Fire Commissioner or the Fire Department under the 
law. 

General Orders. 

A system of issuing general orders has been instituted, 
which gives prompt notice to the department of all 
matters of administration on which it should be informed. 
This method does away with a great deal of unnecessary 
work. 

Specifications for Motor Apparatus. 

An important work has been accomplished in drawing 
up specifications for automobile fire apparatus, and the 
testing of the same. They have been used as a model 
by other cities of the country. 

Permits. 
The forms of permits have been revised to conform 
to the city ordinances and the method of recording and 
issuing them has been improved. 

Fire Prevention. 
The attention of fire departments throughout the 
country for the past two or three years has been drawn 
to the matter of fire prevention as well as fire extinguish- 
ment. This is in line with all modern science in looking 
to the prevention as well as the cure. The figures of 
the annual fire loss in this country are appalling. The 



Fire Department. 7 

more so when it is realized that at least 70 per cent of 
the loss is from preventable fires. Why the subject has 
remained so long quiescent is beyond comprehension. 
The only explanation is the entire unfamiliarity of the 
average citizen with the subject. 

There were 4,522 fires in Boston last year; three- 
quarters of these were caused by carelessness and lack 
of proper regulations. A comprehensive plan of regula- 
tion would save the city over a million dollars a year. 
Such a plan should be immediately adopted. 

At present the power and authority to regulate 
matters looking toward the prevention of fire is scattered 
among seven different departments; none of them 
responsible for fire matters as a whole; most of them 
without sufficient men to enforce such authority as 
they have, and the Fire Department, which has the 
greatest knowledge and experience in such matters, has 
the least authority of all. 

The Fire Commissioner of Boston has recently served 
as a member of the Metropolitan Fire Hazard Com- 
mission, appointed by the Governor of the Common- 
wealth. This commission has been sitting twice a 
week since last August, and has had before it fire chiefs, 
fire prevention engineers, hydraulic engineers, real 
estate experts, architects, state police, chemists, builders, 
insurance men, and other men conversant with fire 
hazards. The commission has listened to their opinions, 
advice and suggestions, and has reported a bill to the 
Legislature. This bill asks for legislation on the fire 
hazard for the whole metropolitan district. Had the 
legislation pertained to the City of Boston alone, I 
believe it could have gone much further; therefore, as 
an official of the city, I deem it my duty to give to the 
city the benefit of the information I have received as a 
member of that commission. I submit the following 
recommendations : 

1. Within the building limits a section should be set 
off where, in the future, only first-class construction 
should be allowed. This section should be bounded as 
follows : 

Starting at the intersection of Berkeley and Boylston 
streets, easterly through Boylston street on both sides, 
to Tremont street, to Park street, to Beacon street, to 
Bowdoin street, to Ashburton place, to Somerset street, 
to Pemberton square all sides, to Cornhill, to Adams 
square, to Exchange street both sides, to State street 



8 City Document No. 14. 

both sides, to the waterfront, thence southeasterly along 
the waterfront to the easterly extension of Kneeland 
street, to Eliot street, to Columbus avenue both sides, 
to Berkeley street both sides,' to Boylston street, the 
point of beginning. 

Scattered through this section are already standing 
many first-class buildings, and it would seem that the 
city as a whole would derive much benefit without 
working any great hardship on the individual. 

2. The iDuilding or fire limits should be extended to 
include all of Charlestown, all of South Boston, all that 
part of East Boston south and west of Trumbull street, 
and all that part of Boston north and east of a line 
beginning at the intersection of the extension of Colum- 
bia road and the Old Harbor, then southwesterly 
through Columbia road to Blue Hill avenue, to Seaver 
street, to Columbus avenue, to Atherton street, to 
Mozart street, to Chestnut street, to Sheridan street, 
to Centre street, to Perkins street, to South Huntington 
avenue, to Castleton street, to the Brookline boundary line. 

3. That no more wooden roofs be allowed to be built 
anywhere in the city. 

4. That in all dwellings housing more than one 
family all construction below the first floor be fire 
resistive. 

5. That in all tenement houses there be no connec- 
tion between the first floor and basement. 

6. That all buildings of five stories or more in height 
be of fire resistive construction. 

7. That fire escapes run to roofs when so ordered 
by the Fire Commissioner. 

8. That all window openings to fire escapes be either 
cut down to the level of the fire escape platform, or 
permanent steps be built so as to facilitate getting out 
of windows onto fire escapes. 

9. That all signs hereafter erected on buildings be 
subject to approval by the Fire Department. 

10. That in all repairs and additions to third-class 
construction the size of the building be not increased 
over 10 per cent. 

11. That the Fire Commissioner be a member of the 
Board of Appeal. 

12. That the School Committee be required to pro- 
vide a course for the study of fire prevention in the 
schools, for fifteen minutes each week. This is done in 
several cities. 



Fire Department. 9 

13. That in buildings of second and third class con- 
struction no horses be allowed to be kept above the 
first floor unless there are two means of egress. 

14. That the sale of stove polish containing benzine, 
gasolene, naphtha or inflammable fluids be prohibited. 

15. That where chimney fires occur, owing to defec- 
tive chimneys, the owners of buildings be fined a reason- 
able amount, and that amount be turned into the 
Firemen's Relief Fund. 

16. That the causing of fire through carelessness be 
made a misdemeanor and punished as such. 

17. That every theatre be required to have a fire 
alarm box on the stage. 

18. All buildings, other than single dwelling houses, 
should be equipped with gas shut-off s, either automatic, 
or manual that can be operated from the outside. 

19. No buildings of any kind should be allowed 
nearer than 10 feet of each other, unless all openings in 
walls within 10 feet of another wall are protected with 
wired glass, metal frames and sashes. 

20. That the use of any but safety matches be 
prohibited. 

If the Metropolitan Fire Hazard Bill is not passed I 
recommend that a fire prevention bureau be established 
by the City of Boston, and the necessarj^ legislation 
petitioned for which will give to the Fire Commissioner 
power to enforce all laws, ordinances and regulations 
relating to fire hazards, fire menaces, fire escapes, fire 
extinguishing apparatus, transportation, sale, use and 
storage of explosives and inflammable materials, hazard- 
ous business, or anything relating to fire prevention now 
held by any other city or state department. The Fire 
Commissioner to grant all licenses and permits relating 
to fire hazards and combustibles, and to have authority 
as follows: 

(a.) To inspect all building plans. 

(6.) To cause obstacles which may interfere with 
means of exit to be removed from floors, hallways, 
stairs, fire escapes, etc. 

(c.) To require and regulate fire drills in theatres, 
public places of amusement, and public and private schools. 

(d.) To require proper safeguards to be placed on 
roof skylights. 

(e.) To order the installation of fire extinguishing 
appliances in railroad yards, lumber yards, factories, 
basements and cellars. 



10 City Document No. 14. 

(/.) To regulate the accumulation and require the 
removal of all combustible rubbish, etc. 

(g.) To regulate the use of salamander stoves. 

(h.) To regulate the storage of combustible chemicals. 

High Pressure. 
The Public Works Department has completed plans 
for the building of the high pressure plant for the con- 
gested business district. It is to be located under- 
ground, in Charles street, between Beacon and Boylston 
streets. Advantage has been taken of the experience of 
New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore in the plans, 
and the Boston plant will be a great improvement over 
these three. When this is completed the city will have 
in the congested district an additional fire fighting equip- 
ment the equivalent of thirty steam fire engines. 

Recommendations. 

' Motor Apparatus. 

I would especially call your attention to the recom- 
mendations of the Chief of Department as to the 
installation of motor apparatus. Plans, as laid down 
by him, will call for $300,000 to be spent during the 
next two years for this purpose. If carried out it would 
practically motorize all of Dorchester, Hyde Park, 
Brighton, West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, and part of 
Charlestown, East Boston and South Boston, and the 
wagons of the repair shop and fire alarm branch. This 
would increase the efficiency of the department at least 
25 per cent. It would also motorize apparatus in the 
downtown district that is seldom called out and make 
for a marked saving of expense. 

I would also recommend that the $15,000 already 
appropriated for a fire station for Parker Hill be trans- 
ferred to motor apparatus to be used for the purchase 
of a motor ladder truck and a motor pumping engine 
to cover the Parker Hill section. This will give this 
section the needed protection. 

New Stations. 

Three new stations should be built this year; one in 

Charlestown, if built on land now used by the Fire 

Department, to cost, with equipment, $40,000; one in 

Dorchester, in the vicinity of King square, to cost. 



Fire Department. 11 

with equipment, $50,000; and one in Readville, to cost, 
with equipment, $25,000; the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad Company will furnish the land 
at a nominal rent. I would, therefore, recommend a 
special appropriation of $115,000 to build three new 
stations as outlined above. 

Salem Street Fire Station. 
I renew my recommendations made to you last year 
that the coal station and fire station of Engine 8 on 
Salem street be disposed off and a new site purchased 
on Hanover street, in the vicinity of Blackstone and 
Richmond streets. This would call for about $50,000 
in addition to the money raised from the sale of the 
Salem street site. 

Fire Alarm Underground Construction. 

I would call your attention to the recommendations 
of the superintendent of fire alarm in regard to under- 
ground construction. There should be additional cable 
laid to establish an independent and interchangeable 
system, so that in case of an accident or breakdown 
another section of cable could be used without inter- 
rupting the service. For this purpose we should need 
this year $31,000 in addition to our regular appropria- 
tion, and I, therefore, recommend a special appropriation 
to cover this amount. During the next four years we 
should spend at least $50,000 a year on this important 
branch of the service. 

Isolated Fire Alarm Office. 

I would again call your attention to the hazardous 
location of the fire alarm office, and recommend that 
new quarters be erected of fireproof construction, and 
in an isolated location. In this connection, in the 
interests of efficiency and economy, I would recommend 
that careful consideration be given to the subject of 
placing the fire alarm office in the new building designed 
for the high pressure pumping plant. Combining these 
two stations into one would mean a saving to the city 
of $75,000 over what they would cost if built separately. 
The original estimate of this department for this prop- 
osition was $225,000, which I find no reason to change 
at this time. 



12 City Document No. 14. 

Winding, Lighting and Repairing Clocks. 

I would again recommend that the expense and labor 
of winding, lighting and repairing clocks of the city be 
transferred to some other department. It not only 
takes firemen away from their duty, but adds to the 
expense of fire fighting. This is unfair, and when the 
figures go out to the country it makes the cost higher 
in comparison with the other cities. It is not any part 
of a fireman's business to wind, light and repair clocks. 

One-way Streets. 

I would again recommend that Mason street and 
Howard street be made one-way streets for the better 
efficiency of the fire companies stationed in or near those 
streets. 

Duplication in Names of Streets. 

I would recommend that the names of streets be 
changed so that there would be no two streets with the 
same name in the city. The increased number of notifi- 
cations of fire to this department by means of the 
telephone, and the confusion that arises in locating the 
fire due to duplication in the names of streets calls for 
these changes. 

In conclusion, I would state that the work of the 
members of this department has been efficiently per- 
formed during the year. I desire to express my appre- 
ciation for the hearty cooperation of the Board of Fire 
Underwriters and the other departments of the city 
with this department, and especially thank the Public 
Works Department, the Police Department, the Build- 
ing Department and the Wire Department. 

Yours very respectfully, 
Chas. H. Cole, 

Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 13 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



From: The Chief of the Department, Boston. 1 February, 1913. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

The following is the report of the Fire Department 
for the year ending 31 January, 1913. 

During the calendar year the department has 
responded to 5,244 alarms. The fire loss was $2,531,017. 

Additions and Changes. 

A gasolene combination chemical engine and hose 
wagon was put in service with Engine 37, replacing the 
horse-drawn hose wagon. This was for the better 
protection of the Parker Hill section. 

A gasolene combination chemical engine and ladder 
truck was installed in the station at the corner of Cal- 
lender and Lyons streets, Dorchester, and a new com- 
pany known as Ladder Company 29 was organized to 
man this apparatus. This was for the better protec- 
tion of the Talbot avenue section of Dorchester. 

A gasolene chemical engine and ladder truck has been 
received, to be installed in the quarters of Engine Com- 
pany 41, and a new company should be organized, to be 
known as Ladder Company 31, to man this apparatus. 
This company will replace Chemical Company 6, which 
should be disbanded. 

A horse-drawn steam fire engine was installed in the 
station of Hose Company 48, Hyde Park, and a com- 
pany to be known as Engine Company 48 was organ- 
ized to man this apparatus, and Hose Company 48 was 
disbanded. 

A water tower equipped with a quick-raising device 
was installed in the quarters of Tower Company 1 and 
the apparatus formerly used by that company placed in 
reserve in the East Boston district. 

A gasolene chemical engine and ladder truck has been 
received, to be installed in the quarters of Engine Com- 
pany 42, and a new company should be organized, to be 
known as Ladder Company 30, to man this apparatus. 
This company will replace Chemical Company 5, which 
should be temporarily disbanded. 



14 City Document No. 14. 

It should later be reorganized to man the gasolene 
combination chemical which is expected soon to be 
installed in the quarters of Ladder Company 23. This 
is for the better protection of the Grove Hall section. 

A gasolene combination chemical has been purchased 
and is expected to be installed in the quarters of Chem- 
ical Company 11 in a short time, replacing the horse- 
drawn apparatus in service with that company. This 
will afford additional protection in the Talbot avenue 
section of Dorchester. 

A gasolene chemical engine and ladder truck has been 
purchased to replace the horse-drawn truck now in serv- 
ice with Ladder Company 21; this is for the better 
protection of the Orient Heights section of East Boston. 

A new berth for Fireboat Engine 44 and station for 
crew, at Northern Avenue Bridge, was completed and 
occupied. 

A new fire station in Oak square was completed and 
is now ready for the installation of the apparatus and 
men. 

Plans and specifications were prepared and bids 
requested to remodel the quarters of Ladder Company 
24. The house should be enlarged to accommodate 
extra men necessary to increase the strength to twelve 
men. 

The services of twenty-seven call men have been dis- 
pensed with in District 15, Hyde Park. 

The single jacket hose in service in Hyde Park at the 
time of annexation was condemned and replaced with 
double jacket hose. 

A motor launch was placed in service for use in the 
marine district. 

Eight turret nozzles were placed on hose wagons, 
making a total of twenty-eight now in service. 

Buildings. 

As in my previous report, I must call your attention 
again to the fact that a great many of the stations in 
this department are not modern. At the time these 
stations were built the department was mainly on a 
call basis, and consequently a small amount of space 
was planned for the housing of the few permanent 
men assigned. The addition of men and horses to meet 
the increasing demands of the service has used up the 
reserve space to the limit. 



Fire Department. 15 

With the incoming of motor apparatus these condi- 
tions will, no doubt, be somewhat improved, as space 
now given to supplies and equipment for horses may be 
utilized for other needs. 

To keep this property in anything like good order 
requires the constant attention of the men in the different 
repair squads. 

The interiors, as regards cleanliness, are in satis- 
factory condition. 

The exterior wood and metal work of several houses 
have been painted since the last report and a plan 
evolved that will in time care for all stations in a similar 
manner. 

Shower baths have been installed in several houses. 
A more sanitary drainage system is installed in the 
house of Ladder 24. A few houses have been remodeled, 
affording separate rooms for lieutenants. 

Apparatus and Equipment. 

The annual inspection and test of apparatus and 
equipment, including hose, found everything in good 
condition. 

Building Inspection. 

Theatres, motion picture houses and all places of 
public assembly in this city were inspected by this 
department for either a new or renewal of license. The 
law compels a yearly renewal. 

A weekly inspection and report was made of theatres 
and motion picture houses. 

Inspections were made and reports submitted weekly 
of buildings which were visited, and hazardous condi- 
tions, when found, were brought to the attention of 
those officials under whose supervision they came. 

A monthly inspection of all fire appliances in schools, 
libraries and other public buildings was made and 
conditions reported. 

On request, signs erected on roofs of buildings were 
inspected and reported on. 

This department made inspections and reports on all 
applications for licenses for the storage of gasolene. 

Many inspections of reported hazardous conditions 
were made by request. 

A member of this department was specially detailed 
to safeguard the transportation of explosives. 

It can be readily seen by the foregoing that this 



16 City Document No. 14. 

department, primarily organized to extinguish fires, has 
demands upon it for other purposes, without the neces- 
sary men, without authority to enforce penalties for 
violations of laws, or to remedy hazardous conditions 
when found. 

It is the duty of officers of this department to visit 
all buildings in their company subdistrict, so as to 
become familiar with inside and exterior conditions. 

This knowledge they must possess to use in fighting 
fire in same, to keep fire from getting in, or to save life. 
If, however, this department is expected to go further, 
then legislation is necessary to give authority, and an 
organization perfected to enforce such authority. A 
special force would be required for this work. 

Drills. 

During the year all companies have held weekly drills 
and all men coming into the department have passed 
through the regular drill school. 

During the year twelve men have successfully passed 
the school of instruction for engineers. 

Mutual Aid. 

The same willingness to cooperate exists in the fire 
departments of the cities and towns adjacent to Boston. 
During the past year we have sent apparatus to Cam- 
bridge, Watertown and Everett. 

Fire Hazard and Prevention. 

With the exception that the incoming motor apparatus 
will add celerity and mobility, and a high pressure 
system will provide larger and more effective streams, 
the science and appliances for extinguishing fire have 
about reached their limit of effectiveness. Thus, fire 
prevention, by removing and curtailing the known 
hazards, is the proper direction in which to move. 

A state commission is at present at work on obtaining 
facts to be used to procure remedial legislation to pre- 
vent this enormous pecuniary loss. 

Civil Service. 

Promotions have been made from the list in order. 

Motor apparatus replacing horse-drawn has changed 
certain requirements to properly man the apparatus of 
this department. 



Fire Department. 



17 



At present an automobile school is maintained to 
teach the operation and care of same. This method of 
obtaining chauffeurs weakens the fire fighting strength 
of the companies in that men are periodically detached 
from them to attend the school. 

As it appears that motor-driven apparatus is to be 
added to this department in considerable numbers in 
the near future, the problem of obtaining the required 
number of men with sufficient knowledge to safely 
operate them will be more complex. 

If feasible, a plan to have the appointees of this 
department equipped with this knowledge would release 
the City of Boston from the expense of maintaining 
such an expensive school and, what is more important, 
would keep more men in quarters. 

Hydrants. 

The following is the number and type of hydrants in 
use for fire service 31 January, 1913: 



Ordinary post 
Boston post . 
Lowry . 
Boston Lowry 
Boston . 
Chapman post 
Ludlow post 
Coffin post . 



2,961 

2,548 

1,937 

754 

217 

181 

13 

1 



Total . . 8,612 



Recommendations. 

Many of the recommendations made in the last annual 
report have been carried out, and I reiterate my request 
for remaining items, with additional recommendations, 
the carrying out of which will, in my opinion, bring this 
department up to the standard of efficiency that our 
citizens expect. 

Fire Stations. 

A site should be secured and a house built in the 
Readville section of Hyde Park to replace the present 
quarters of Hose Company 49, which are not adapted 
for the service. 

A new station should be built on the site of Chemical 
Company 3, Winthrop street, Charlestown, for an engine 
company. 



18 City Document No. 14. 

A new station on the same site for Engine Company 
26-35. These quarters are inadequate for the number 
of men housed there. Any new plan should include 
offices for the Chief of Department. 

Arrangements should be made, if possible, to obtain 
more room in the present building in which are the 
quarters of Engine Company 4, Chemical Company 
1 and Water Tower Company 1, The present smoking 
and recreation room for the men of these companies 
is not fit for the purpose. 

The present site of Engine 17 and Ladder 7 should be 
disposed of, and a new site secured and a station built 
for these companies, or a new house built on the same site. 

A new station is needed to replace present quarters of 
Engine Company 8. 

The City of Boston at the present time owns a lot of 
land in that part of West Roxbury known as German- 
town, which should be held as a site for a future fire 
station. 

If another station is contemplated in the Dorchester 
section, it should be erected in the vicinity of King 
square. 

Now that a municipal building is being erected in 
South Boston that will include the municipal court, 
the building vacated should be remodeled for Ladder 
Company 5. 

Chemical Company 8 is very much in need of a heat- 
ing plant. These quarters are at present heated by 
stoves. 

The recommendations made in the last report for the 
substitution of shower rooms for bathtubs in the houses 
have been generally carried out, and I hope as far each 
year as the financial conditions will permit that this 
necessary adjunct for the comfort of the men will be 
installed in the houses. 

I would recommend that, where possible, the work 
of providing separate rooms for all officers be continued. 

Apparatus. 

Engines. 

A gasolene combination pumping engine and hose 
wagon, to have a pump capacity of at least 700 gallons 
per minute, to be purchased for the Readville station 
to be erected. 

A tractor-drawn steam fire engine, with a pump 



FiEE Department. 19 

capacity of at least 1,000 gallons per minute, for new 
station recommended on Winthrop street, Charlestown. 

A gasolene combination pumping engine and hose 
wagon, to have a pump capacity of at least 700 gallons 
per minute, for service in the new station at Oak square, 
Brighton. 

Also gasolene combination pumping engines and hose 
wagons, of a pump capacity of at least 700 gallons per 
minute, to replace the present horse-drawn steam fire 
engines in the quarters of Engine Companies 2, 11, 19, 
30, 32, 34 and 42. 

Tractors should be applied to the present horse-drawn 
steam fire engines in the quarters of Engine Companies 
10, 20 and 41. 

Chemical and Hose Combination Wagons. 

Gasolene combination chemical and hose wagons to 
replace the present horse-drawn hose wagons in the 
quarters of Engine Companies 5, 16, 17, 20, 28, 29, 41, 
45, 46 and 48. 

A motor-driven high pressure hose wagon for the 
engine company recommended in Charlestown. 

Chemical Engines. 

The horse-drawn chemical engines at present located 
in the houses of Chemical Companies 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
12 and 14, to be replaced by motor-driven chemical 
engines with two tanks each capable of holding at least 
80 gallons. 

Ladder Trucks. 

Seventy-five or 85-foot aerial trucks, motor-driven, 
should be procured for service in the quarters of Ladder 
Companies 4 and 12 to replace the present horse-drawn 
box trucks. 

Motor-driven combination ladder trucks, to replace 
the present horse-drawn trucks should be installed in 
the quarters of the following companies, viz.: Ladder 
Companies 6, 7, 10, 16, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27. 

Tractors should be applied to the present horse-drawn 
apparatus in the houses of Ladder Companies 14 and 15. 

Water Towers. 
The present horse-drawn Water Towers 1, 2 and 3, 
to have tractors installed. This in the interest of 
economy. 



20 City Document No. 14. 

Miscellaneous. 

The district chiefs should be furnished with motor- 
driven runabouts as soon as possible. The handicap of 
a horse-drawn wagon in the outlying districts is strongly- 
felt by the officers in command of these sections. 

Again I reiterate that it would be of great advantage 
to this department, and a measure of economy, to have 
a motor-driven wagon procured to replace the present 
horse-drawn wagon attached to the fire alarm branch, 
and a motor-driven wrecking wagon attached to the 
repair shop. 

Men. 

The following men would be needed to operate the 
recommended apparatus : 

Readville Station. — This company should consist of a 
lieutenant and six men; as two men are at present on 
Hose Company 49, which would be disbanded and the 
men transferred to the new company, this would 
require the appointment of but five men. The services 
of the call men attached to this company could be dis- 
pensed with. 

Oak Square Station. — A lieutenant and seven men 
would be required for this company. 

Grove Hall Station. — A lieutenant and five men will 
be required to man the combination chemical purchased 
for these quarters. 

The engine company recommended for the Winthrop 
street station in Charlestown to replace Chemical 3 
would require but six men, as with Chemical 3 disbanded 
the men on that company could be transferred to the 
engine company. 

Four men would be required to bring Ladder Com- 
pany 24 up to the strength recommended. 

The motor-driven ladder truck recommended for the 
quarters of Engine 41 will require four men. Chemical 
Company 6 should be disbanded and the men trans- 
ferred to the truck. 

The motor-driven ladder truck recommended for the 
quarters of Engine 42 will require three men. Chemical 
Company 5 should be disbanded temporarily and the 
men transferred to the truck. 

In the event of a gasolene combination pumping 
engine replacing the horse-drawn engine now in service 
with Engine Company 11, I recommend that this 
apparatus be installed in Chemical House 7, East 



Fire Department. 21 

Boston, and an engine company be organized to man 
the same. This would require twelve men. 

An additional man should be assigned to each of the 
following companies to bring them up to the proper 
strength, viz.: Engine Companies 2, 5, 16, 19, 24, 29 
and 30. 

The morale of the fire fighting force is excellent, and, 
as always, the willingness to assist displayed by those 
who co-operated with us is worthy of commendation. 

John A. Mullen. 



22 City Document No. 14. 



FIRE ALARM BRANCH. 



From: The Superintendent of Fire Alarm Branch, 

Boston, 14 February, 1913. 
To: The Chief of Department: 
Subject: Report of Fire Alarm Branch for Year 1912-13. 

I herewith submit report of the Fire Alarm Branch 
for the fiscal year, 1 February, 1912, to 1 February, 1913: 

Operating Division.* 

Alarms received and transmitted: 

Bell alarms, first 2,837 

Bell alarms, second 62 

Bell alarms, third 19 

Bell alarms, fourth 7 

Alarms received but not transmitted: 

Alarms received from same box two or more times 

for the same fire 182 

Alarms received from adjacent boxes for same fire . 217 
Alarms received for grass fires, treated as still alarms, 6 

Box Records. 
Boxes from which no alarm was received .... 325 
Boxes from which twenty or more alarms were received, 26 
Box tests and inspections (an average of about eleven 
for each box) 9,467 

Still Alarms. 

Alarms received from citizens by telephone . . . 842 

Alarms received from Police Department by telephone, 151 

Alarms reported by companies to which they responded, 1,248 

Box alarms received for same fires . . . . . 160 

Automatic Alarms. 

Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company, alarms received, 154 

Department box alarms received for same ... 14 

A. D. T. alarms received 24 

Department box alarms received for same ... 6 

Total Alarms. 

Bell alarms 2,925 

Still, automatic and A. D. T. alarms (eliminating those 

from which department box alarms were received) . 2,419 



Grand total of alarms . 5,344 

* Record of alarms from 1 January, 1912, to 31 December, 1912, inclusive. 



Fire Department. 23 



Construction Division. 

Owing to a special appropriation a large amount of 
work has been accomplished this year. Seventy-six 
fire alarm boxes have been established, of which fifty-nine 
are department boxes located on streets, three private 
boxes and four boxes with auxiliary attachments located 
in buildings, and ten schoolhouse boxes, seven of which 
were placed to be of benefit to the general public. 
Twelve boxes were moved to better locations and forty- 
nine changes were made in the numbers of boxes in 
order to have the numbers grouped in a more system- 
atic way. Because of the large increase in the number 
of boxes, four new circuits were made, two of them in 
Brighton, one in the city proper and one in East Boston. 
All boxes and posts were painted by contract. 

Several improvements have been made in the fire 
alarm office. A new 110-circuit testing board was 
installed; a ten-pen ink register was replaced by three 
four-pen registers, and an old fault detector was removed; 
wooden mountings for instruments have been removed 
and slate substituted; registers that record the alarms 
from the Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company and 
from the city of Cambridge were installed ; new storage 
batteries for local circuits, a new charging board and 
new battery racks were set up and many changes were 
made in the office wiring. A new telephone terminal 
and protector boards were installed, and a new cable 
laid to the main terminal room. 

A new filing cabinet was bought for the superin- 
tendent's office; a Western Union Company clock was 
bought for the office; maps of the underground system 
and of circuits have been made and brought up to date. 

Many changes and additions to the lighting and 
signaling system in department houses have been made; 
an entirely new equipment was installed in the new 
quarters of Engine Company 44 at Northern Avenue 
Bridge; new punching registers have been put in service 
in the houses of Chemical Company 8 and Engine Com- 
pany 44, and new registers have been bought for other 
houses. 

Fifty-three new lamp-posts were set up and thirteen 
old ones replaced with new ones. Five new test posts 
were installed and four old ones replaced by new. Iron 
test posts are now being used instead of wooden posts. 
Thirty cable test boxes were established. 



24 City Document No. 14. 

Six thousand nine hundred and seventy feet of 3-inch 
ducts were laid underground to be used mostly for post 
and pole connections. 

In September last a contract was made with the 
American Electrical Works of Phillipsdale, R. I., to 
furnish 60,684 feet of cable of various sizes, and to 
install approximately 53,855 feet. This work has been 
seriously delayed and is yet unfinished. 

The department force has installed about 7,682 feet 
of cable of different sizes in several sections of the city; 
23,280 feet of aerial cable has been strung on poles, and 
approximately twenty-one and one-half miles of new 
wire have been used in the extension of the service and 
in replacing old wire. About forty miles of dead wire 
have been removed from poles. 

Arrangements have been made to install a red light 
over every fire alarm box and to substitute electricity 
for gas in the lamp-posts now in service. Two boxes, 
714 and 71, are already being lighted by electricity. 

The following cable has been laid during the past 
year, but only a comparatively small amount has as 
yet been connected into service: 



Dorchester. 



Feet. 



Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester avenue to Rockdale 

street, 10-conductor cable . . . . . . 1,786 

Park street, Dorchester avenue to Washington street, 

6-conductor cable 3,563 

Melville avenue, Dorchester avenue to Penhallow 

street, 10-conductor cable * 523 

Centre avenue and Centre street, Dorchester avenue to 

Allston street, 6-conductor cable 1,740 

Welles avenue, extension of cable to Washington street, 

10-conductor cable 482 

Mill street, at Preston street (under railroad tracks), 

4-conductor cablef 395 

Washington street. Park street to Roslin street, 10- 
conductor cable 3,742 

Harvard street, Washington street to Blue Hill avenue, 

15-conductor cable 4,602 

Bernard street, Harvard street to Kerwin street, 6-con- 
ductor cable 1,235 

Eldon street, pole connection, 4-conductor cable . . 388 

Bowdoin and Westville streets, Washington street to 

Draper street, 6-conductor cable 3,251 

Upham's Corner, to lamp-post. Box 199, 4-conductor 

cable* 240 

* In service. f Work done by this department. 



Fire Department. 25 

Feet. 

Magnolia street, Dudley street to Oleander street, 6-con- 

ductor cable* . . . : . . . . . 1,253 

Pole connections at various places, 10-conductor cablef, 415 

Pole connections at various places, 4-conductor cable, 120 

Lamp-post connections, 10-conductor cablef ... 60 

ROXBURY. 

Dudley street, Winslow street to Adams street, 10-con- 
ductor cable* 1,342 

Harrison avenue, Northampton street to Dudley street, 

35-conductor cable * 3,141 

Elm Hill avenue, Howland street to Cheney street, 

6-conductor cable* 1,010 

Lamp-post connections, 10-conductor cablef . . . 183 

Jamaica Plain. 

Chestnut avenue, Green street to Paul Gore street, 10- 
conductor cablef 1,635 

Biltmore street. Chestnut avenue to Lamartine street, 

10-conductor cablef 385 

Centre street. Engine House 28 to Eliot street, 15- 

conductor cable 1,413 

South street, EHot street to St. Mark street, 15-con- 

ductor cable 2,953 

Pole connections, 10-conductor cablef .... 174 

Pole connections, 4-conductor cablef .... 86 

Back Bay. 

Brookline avenue, 6-conductor cable 1,401 

Jersej^ street, Brookline avenue to Boylston street, 

6-conductor cable 1,039 

Hemenway and Norway streets, lamp-post connections, 

6-conductor cable 112 

City Proper. 

Bristol street. Headquarters Building to Albany street,- 

35-conductor cable 478 

Albany street, Bristol street to Northampton street, 

35-conductor cable 5,020 

Cumberland street, Huntington avenue to St. Botolph 

street, 10-conductor cable* 291 

Charles street, Mt. Vernon street to Revere street, 

6-conductor cable* 751 

Minot street, Lowell street to Wall street, 10-conductor 

cable 250 

Lamp-post connections, 10-conductor cablef . . . 172 
Northern avenue to quarters of Engine Company 44, 

10-conductor (lead) cable 315 

* In service. t Work done by this department. 



26 



City Document No. 14. 



Northern avenue to quarters of Engine Company 44, 
10-conductor (submarine) cable . . . . ' . 
Eastern avenue to North Ferry, 4-conduetor cable 

Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park avenue, River street to Green street, 10- 
conductor cable 

West River street, Hyde Park avenue to Gordon avenue, 
6-conductor cable 



Feet. 

425 
426 



895 
650 



New Fire Alarm Posts. 

Dorchester. 

Park and Waldeck streets, 1-duct 21 

Melville avenue and Penhallow street, 1-duct ... 25 

Centre and Samoset streets, 1-duct 80 

Dorchester avenue and Beale street, 1-duct ... 35 
Dorchester avenue and Bellows place, 1-duct ... 8 
Washington street, opposite Roslin street, l-cluct . . 8 

Codman square, 1-duct 50 

Harvard and School streets, 1-duct 28 

Harvard and Glenway streets, 1-duct . . . .28 

Harvard and Wales streets, 1-duct 29 

Harvard street and Blue Hill avenue, 1-duct ... 82 
Bernard and Kerwin streets, 1-duct . . . . .15 

Westville street and Dakota road, 1-duct .... 16 

Westville street and Geneva avenue, 1-duct ... 16 

Westville street and Draper street, 1-duct . . . 17.5 

Columbia road and Seaver street, 1-duct .... 94 

Columbia road and Dudley street, 1-duct. ... 36 

Columbia road and Massachusetts avenue, 1-duct . . 38 

Magnolia and Oleander streets, 1-duct .... 19 

Roxhury. 
Dudley and Langdon streets, 1-duct . . . , . .12.5 
Dudley street, opposite Adams street, 1-duct ... 15 
Warren street and Kearsarge avenue, 1-duct ... 20 
Warren and Maywood streets, 1-duct .... 17 
Warren and Carlisle streets, 1-duct . . . . .12 
Elm Hill avenue and Cheney street, 1-duct ... 16 

Wayne and Maple streets, 1-duct 88 

Washington street, opposite Valentine street, 1-duct . 5 
Harrison avenue and Lenox street, 1-duct ... 19 
Blue Hill avenue and Woodcliff street, 1-duct . . 13 

Jamaica Plain. 
Chestnut avenue and Chestnut place, 1-duct . . .15.5 
Lamartine and Biltmore streets, 1-duct .... 8 
Centre and Burroughs streets, 1-duct . . . .20 



Fire Department. 



27 



Centre and Eliot streets, 1-duct 

South street, opposite Jamaica street, 1-duct . 
Washington street, opposite Forest Hills street, 1-duct, 

West Roxhury. 

Centre and Park streets (by Schoolhouse Department), 
1-duct 



Feet. 

14 

42 
5 



16 



Brighton. 

Brighton and Harvard avenues, 1-duct 
Cambridge and Saunders streets, 1-duct . 
Washington and Oakland streets, 1-duct . 
Washington and Fairbanks streets, 1-duct 
Washington and Matchett streets, 1-duct. 
Washington street, at Oak square, 1-duct . 

Back Bay. 

Boylston and Jersey streets, 1-duct . 
Hemenway and Norway streets, 1-duct . 



City Proper. 
Cumberland and St. Botolph streets, 1-duct 
Washington street and Cottage place, 1-duct 
Harrison avenue and Kneeland street, 1-duct 
Franklin and Broad streets, 1-duct 

North square, 1-duct 

Minot street, opposite Wall street, 1-duct 
Charles and Revere streets, 1-duct 

Charlestown. 
Rutherford avenue and Devens street, 1-duct . 
Bartlett and Sullivan streets, 1-duct . 

New Test Posts. 

Park street and Dorchester avenue, 4-duct 
Harrison avenue and Northampton street, 4-duct 
Harrison avenue and Dudley street, 4-duct 
Washington and Market streets, Brighton, 4-duct 
Atlantic and Northern avenues, 3-duct 



44 
25 

27.6 
20.6 
23 
15.8 



33 
41 



118.3 
14 

28.5 
40 
20 

23.6 
22.9 



50.9 
14 



23 

28 
26 
50 
45 



Old Test Posts Replaced by New. 

Tremont and Linden Park streets. 

Tremont street, opposite Northfield street (two old ducts 

replaced by new). 
Forest Hills square. 
Maverick square. 



28 



City Document No. 14. 



New Pole Connections. 
Dorchester. 

Savin Hill avenue and Sydney street, 1-duct 

Savin Hill avenue, opposite Rockdale street, 1-duct 

Park street and Geneva avenue, 1-duct 

Park and Greenbrier streets, 1-duct 

Dorchester avenue and Ashmont street, 1-duct 

Harvard and Waterlow streets, 1-duct . 

Harvard and Greenwood streets, 1-duct 

Harvard street and Blue Hill avenue, 1-duct 

Washington and Eldon streets, 1-duct . 

Centre and Allston streets (by New England Tele 

phone and Telegraph Company), 1-duct . 
Mill and Preston streets (2), 1-duct 

Roxhury. 
Washington and Guild streets, 1-duct . 



Feet. 

63 

66 
146 
111 
135 

33 
187.5 

52 
210 

262.5 
274 



35 



Jamaica Plain. 
Chestnut avenue and Paul Gore street, 1-duct 
Chestnut avenue and Boylston street, 1-duct 
Lamartine and Biltmore streets, 1-duct 
Centre street and Harris avenue, 1-duct 
South and Boynton streets, 1-duct 

Hyde Park. 

Business street, 1-duct 

Dana and Hyde Park avenues, 1-duct . 
Gordon avenue, 1-duct .... 



Brighton. 
Washington and Foster streets, 1-duct . 
Washington and Lake streets, 1-duct . 
Washington and Bigelow streets, 1-duct 
Washington and Tremont streets, 1-duct 
Washington and Parsons streets, 1-duct 



Charlestown. 
Rutherford avenue and Chapman street, 1-duct 

Engine House Duct Connections. 

Northern avenue, Atlantic avenue to drawbridge, 

1-duct 

Harvard street to Engine House 18, 2-duct . 
Oak square to new department house, 3-duct 
Eastern avenue to North Ferry Headhouse, 1-duct 
Bristol street, Albany street to headquarters, 4-duct 



18 
50 
43 
92 
52.5 



260 
33 
20.5 



105 

77.5 
87.6 
54 
38.3 



23 



288 
65 

159 
56 

295 



Fire Department. 29 



Manhole Built. 
Washington street, opposite Forest Hills street. 

Lamp-posts Replaced by New. 

Brattle street (Box 18), top knocked off by team. 
Massachusetts avenue and Beacon street (Box 801), knocked 

down by automobile. 
Cambridge and North Russell streets (Box 24), knocked down 

by team. 
Washington and Milk streets (Box 41), knocked clown by 

automobile. 
Washington street, opposite Boylston street (Box 53), knocked 

down by team. 
Albany and Way streets (Box 65) , knocked down by team. 
Shawmut avenue and Waltham street (Box 73), knocked 

down by team. 
Washington and Green streets (Box 519), knocked down by 

hose wagon. 
Washington and Park streets (Box 364), gas leak. 

Lamp-posts Relocated, 
Boylston and Fairfield streets (Box 90), on account new 

subway. 
Tremont and Winter streets (Box 42), on account new subway, 
Tremont and Berkeley streets (Box 71), on account large 

trolley cars. 
Park square (Box 62), on account change in square, one new 
duct, 12 feet. 

Aerial Cable Installed. 

Feet. 

Chelsea street, East Boston, Maverick square to Day 

street, 10-conductor cable 4,309 

Paul Gore street, Jamaica Plain, 10-conductor cable, 550 
Codman street, Dorchester avenue to Washington 

street, 4-conductor cable 1,250 

River street, Mattapan, 6-conductor cable . . . 1,000 

Various sizes in short lengths in different sections . 16,171 

Public Boxes Installed. 
City Proper. 

Box. Location. 

30, Charles and Revere streets. 
701, Minot street, opposite Wall street. 
710, Franklin and Broad streets. 
714, North square and Garden-court street, 
751, Harrison avenue and Kneeland street, 
771, Washington street and Cottage place. 
804, Hemenway and Norway streets. 



30 City Document No. 14. 

East Boston. 

Box. Location. 

624, Frankfort and Gove streets. 

656, Bennington street and Neptune road. 

Charlestown. 
437, Medford street, opposite Walnut street. 

South Boston. 
164, Summer street, opposite D street. 

Dorchester. 

181, Pleasant and Mayfield streets. 

183, Sydney street, opposite No. 71. 

306, Magnolia and Oleander streets. 

310, East Cottage and Humphreys streets. 

345, Park and Spencer streets. 

350, Canterbury and Austin streets. 

372, Columbia road and Seaver street. 

381, Norfolk and Chipman streets. 

384, Evans and Capen streets. 

396, Almont and Colorado streets. 

912, Pleasant street, opposite Downer avenue. 

916, Fox and Percival streets. 

934, Melville avenue and Penhallow street. 

952, Dorchester avenue, opposite Bellows place. 

954, Dorchester avenue and Beale street. 

960, Adams and Hillsdale streets. 

976, Cedar and Sanford streets. 

983, Tenean street. 

988, Minot and Sheridan streets. 

Roxbury. 

223, Harrison avenue and Lenox street. 

233, Dudley street, oppposite Adams street. 

236, Warren street and Kearsarge avenue. 

244, Lambert street, opposite Lambert avenue. 

257, Centre and Cedar streets. 

263, Washington street, opposite Valentine street. 

274, Elm Hill avenue and Cheney street. 

275, Warren and Carlisle streets. 
282, Wait and Hillside streets. 

303, Blue Hill avenue and Woodcliff street. 



FiEE Department. 31 

Jamaica Plain and West Roxhury. 

Box. ■ Location. 

502, Cranston and Sheridan streets. 

505, Chestnut avenue and Boylston street. 

508, Lamartine and Biltmore streets. 

510, Washington street, opposite Forest Hills street. 

548, Washington street and Highview terrace. 

576, Metropolitan and Augustus avenues. 

585, Florence and Catherine streets. 

590, Maple and Garden streets. 

599, Mt. Vernon street, near Montview street. 

Brighton. 
810, Farrington avenue and Linden street. 
813, Harvard and Brighton avenues. 
836, Cambridge and Saunders streets. 
840, Market street and Western avenue. 

866, Chestnut Hill avenue and South street. 

867, Commonwealth avenue and Wallingford road. 
869, Sutherland road and Beacon street. 

874, Mt. Vernon and Foster streets. 
878, Litchfield and Cygnet streets. 
881, Market and Mapleton streets. 

New Private Boxes. 

120, New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 

Yard, south of Dover street. 
732, Gordon's Olympia Theatre, Washington street. 
785, St. James Theatre, Huntington avenue. 

New Auxiliary Private Boxes. 

298, Trimont Manufacturing Company, Amory street. 
530, Emerson Hospital, Morton street. 
748, John Hancock Building, Devonshire street. 
796, American House, Hanover street. 

New Schoolhouse Boxes. 

2141, Brimmer School, Common street. 
2211, Cumberland and St. Botolph streets, Charles C. 
Perkins School. 

2238, Massachusetts avenue and Washington street, 

Girls' Trade School. 

2239, George T. Angell School, Harrison avenue and 

Hunneman street. 



32 City Document No. 14. 

Box. Location. 

2241, Lewis School, Walnut avenue and Paulding street. 
2336, Beaumont street, opposite No. 59, Ellen H. 

Richards School. 
2524, Florence and Hawthorne streets, Florence School. 
2528, Robert G. Shaw School, Hastings street. 
2616, U. S. Grant School, Paris street. 
2628, John Cheverus School, Pope and Moore streets. 

Changes in Location of Boxes. 
141, Mt. Washington avenue and Granite street to 

Seventh and streets. 
146, Seventh and N streets to Sixth and N streets. 
250, Highland street and Fort avenue to Highland 

and Beech Glen streets. 
276, Warren and Quincy streets to Warren and May- 
wood streets. 
506, Boylston street, opposite Adelaide street, to 

Boylston street and Belmore terrace. 
839, Western avenue. Engine House 34, to Western 

avenue and Telford street. 
915, Eaton square and Percival street to Bowdoin and 

Quincy streets, 
2227, Hugh O'Brien School to lamp-post at Dudley and 

Langdon streets. 
2516, Ellis Mendell School to pole at School and Copley 

streets. 

Boxes Removed From Service. 

Auxiliary Company Boxes. 
166, Perkins Institute for the Blind', Broadway. 
467, Boston & Maine Railroad hay sheds, Rutherford 

avenue. 
726, East side of Long Wharf. 
2236, Perkins Institute for the Blind, Perkins and Day 
streets. 

Schoolhouse Boxes. 

2128, Cook School, Groton street. 

2327, Elbridge Smith School, Dorchester avenue and 

Centre street. 
2616, Old High School, Meridian and Paris streets. 
2814, Brighton High School, Cambridge street. 

Department Boxes. 
698, Chelsea Police Station, Chelsea square (tempo- 
rarily) . 



Fire Department. 



33 



Summary of Work Done. 

New line wire used . 
Old wire taken down 
Aerial cable installed 
Conductors in aerial cable 
Aerial cable removed 
Conductors in aerial cable removed 
Underground cable installed in New England Tele 
phone and Telegraph Company's ducts . 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed in fire alarm ducts 

Conductors in same 

Total underground cable installed (new work) 

Conductors in same 

Cable used for repairs . 

Conductors in same 

Conduits built by this department . . . 
Ducts in same 

Manholes built 

Cross-arms used 

Fire alarm boxes installed (total) .... 
Fire alarm boxes installed by Fire Department . 
Fire alarm boxes installed by Schoolhouse Depart 

ment 

Fire alarm boxes installed by Auxiliary Company 
Fire alarm boxes installed by private ownership . 
Fire alarm boxes removed from service 
Fire alarm posts installed (new) .... 

Fire alarm posts reset 

Fire alarm test posts installed (new locations) 

Fire alarm test posts replaced by new . 

Fire alarm pole test boxes installed ..." 



Feet. 

113,010 
211,410 

23,180 

101,624 

2,319 

14,536 

43,463 
522,311 

6,559 

75,902 

50,022 

598.213 

1,329 
14,816 

4,838 

6,970 

1 

595 

76 

59 

10 
4 
3 
8 

53 

13 
5 
4 

30 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 

Total number 

Owned by Fire Department 

Owned by Schoolhouse Department 
Owned by Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company . 

Owned privately 

Department boxes are established and equipped 

On lamp-posts . . . . 

On poles : 

On buildings with lights over them . 

On buildings without lights over them 

In buildings 

With keyless doors 

With key doors 

With auxiliary attachments 



639 

130 

57 

62 

226 

382 
24 

, 5 
2 

582 
57 
15 



34 



City Document No. 14. 



Schoolhouse boxes are established and equipped 

Inside buildings 

Outside buildings accessible to public 

Outside buildings inaccessible at times 

On poles 

On lamp-po^s ...... 

On building with light 

With keyless doors . . 

With key doors 

Auxiliary Company boxes are established and equipped 

Inside buildings 

Outside buildings . . . . 

On building with light 

With keyless doors 

With key doors 

Private boxes are established and equipped: 

Inside buildings 

Outside buildings - . 

With keyless doors 

With key doors 

Posts. 

Lamp-posts in service 

Lamp-posts not yet in service and set . 

Test posts 

Pole test boxes 



61 
29 
22 
15 
3 
1 
69 
61 

34 

23 

1 

8 
49 

36 

26 

9 

53 



229 
22 
42 

105 



Circuits. 

Number of box circuits (main office) 
Number of box circuits, Hyde Park 
Number of tapper circuits (main office) 
Number of tapper circuits, Hyde Park . 
Number of gong circuits .... 

Bell circuit, Hyde Park 

Special repeater circuit, Hyde Park to main office 
High pressure signaling circuit .... 
Number of telephone circuits to department stations 
Number of telephone circuits to Tremont Exchange 
Number of telephone circuits to Oxford Exchange 
Special circuit to pohce headquarters (telephone) 
Special circuit to American District Telephone Com- 
pany's office 



Wire, Cable and Conduits. 



48 
4 

10 
1 

13 
1 
1 
1 

36 
7 
1 
1 



Line wire in service . ... 
Aerial cable in service 
Conductors in aerial cable 
Underground cable in service . 
Conductors in underground cable 



Feet. 

1,759,450 

95,509 

. 628,661 

. 453,612 

9,041,510 



Fire Department. 



35 



• Feet. 

Conduit owned by the department .... 39,792 

Ducts in conduit 50,543 

Ducts in New England Telephone and Telegraph 

Company's system used by this department . . 338,845 

Apparatus. 

Number of tappers in service 121 

Number of gongs in service 122 

Number of telephones in department sj^stem . . 127 

Number of public exchange telephones ... 8 

Number of registers in service 5 

Number of relays in service 5 

Tower Bells. 

Bells in service: Pounds. 

Faneuil Hall (steel) 5,816 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Central avenue, Hyde 

Park. 
Old Hose House, Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park. 
Whistle in service: 

Hyde Park Electric Light Station. 

Bells Owned by Fire Department, but not in Service. 

Pounds. 

Old City Hall Building, Charlestown, composition . 3,600 
Engine 1, Dorchester street. South Boston, com- 
position 2,911 

Engine 16, Temple street, Dorchester, composition . 4,149 

Engine 19, Norfolk street, Dorchester, composition . 2,927 

Engine 20, Walnut street, Dorchester, composition . 3,061 

Engine 21, Columbia road, Dorchester, composition . 3,02.6 

Engine 29, Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, steel . 1,535 
Engine 30, Old House, Mt. Vernon street. West Rox- 

bury, steel ' 1,000 

Engine 34, Western avenue, Brighton, composition . 1,501 

Engine 41, Harvard avenue, Brighton, composition . 800 
Engine 45, Washington and Poplar streets. West 

Roxbury, composition 1,059 

Ladder 4, Dudley street, Roxbury, composition . . 3,509 
Saratoga Street Church, East Boston, steel . . . 1,968 
Trinity Church, Trenton street, East Boston, compo- 
sition 1,760 

Clocks. 

The care of the department clocks has been transferred 
to the department repair shop. 

Sixty-two reports of tower clocks have been attended 
to. 



36 City Document No. 14. 

Extensive repairs were made on the following clocks: 
Old State House, Unitarian Church, Jamaica Plain, 
Neponset church and the Gaston School. 

The tower of Lyceum Hall was repaired, the expense 
being charged to this department. Because of the 
refusal of the lessee of the building to furnish keys to 
the department, the clock in Lyceum Hall has been out 
of service since 25 November, 1912. 

Following is a List of Public Clocks Cared for 
BY This Department. 

City Proper. 
Charles Street Church. 

Christ Church, Salem street, owned by city. 
Commercial Wharf. 

Odd Fellows Hall, Tremont street, owned by city. 
Old South Church, Washington street, owned by city. 
Old State House, Washington street, owned by city. 
Suffolk County Jail, Charles street, owned by city. 
St. Stephen's Church, Hanover street, owned by city. 
Public Library Branch, Shawmut avenue (Old Shawmut 

Avenue Church). 
Tremont M. E. Church, Tremont and Worcester streets, 

owned by city. 
Young Men's Christian Union, Boylston street, owned 

by city. 

South Boston. 

Gaston Schoolhouse, owned by city. 
Lincoln Schoolhouse, owned by city. 
Phillips Church, Broadway, owned by city. 
St. Augustine's Church, Dorchester street, owned by 
city. 

East Boston. 
London Street Church, owned by city. 
Lyceum Hall, owned by city. 
Trinity Church, Trenton street, owned by city. 
Orient Heights Church, Breed and Ashley streets, 
owned by city. 

Roxhury. 
Winthrop Street Church, owned by city. 
Boston Elevated Railway car house, Columbus avenue, 
owned by city. 



Fire Department. 37 

Dorchester. 
Baker Memorial Church, Columbia road, owned by 

city. 
Neponset Church, Walnut street. 
Tileston School, Norfolk street, owned by city. 

Charlestown. 
St. Francis de Sales Church, Bunker Hill street. 
Old City Hall, City square, owned by city. 

West Roxhury. 
South Evangelical Church (Doctor Strong), Mt. Vernon 

street, owned by city. 
Unitarian Church, Centre and Eliot streets, owned by 

city. 
Congregational Church, Ashland street, owned by city. 

Brighton. 
Bennett Schoolhouse, Chestnut Hill avenue, owned by 
city. 

Recommendations. 

Many improvements should be made in this branch 
to bring the system up to a proper standard. To do 
everything that is necessary would mean a very large 
expenditure, but a special appropriation should be made 
each year in order to accomplish the result. The most 
important thing to consider is to improve present 
conditions rather than to extend the system. The 
following are the more important features of the system 
that demand immediate attention. 

Automobiles. 
The necessity of keeping the fire alarm system always 
in serviceable condition demands means by which 
faults may be located and corrected quickly. At present 
a large amount of valuable time is lost when trouble 
occurs in reaching the seat of the trouble. At times 
many boxes or tappers are out of service when a circuit 
is open, and in case of fire serious results might happen 
because of lack of facilities for the public to notify the 
department. In general work, also, much more could 
be accomplished if so much time were not lost in going 
from place to place. Two runabouts and a small auto- 
truck should be bought to remedy this condition. 



38 City Document No. 14. 

Outside Construction. 

Many of the cables in Boston proper are old and may 
need to be replaced at any time. In order to avoid 
serious trouble, because of defective cable, new cables 
should be laid in various sections to relieve the old 
cables of parts of their loads, and frequent test points 
should be established to make an easily interchangeable 
system. This work is most important. 

The amount of underground cables would be approxi- 
mately 258 miles of wire. The amount of wire removed 
from poles due to the underground work would be 
approximately 62 miles. When installed this cable wire 
should allow for the future and enough extra conductors 
are figured on to provide for additional circuits. In 
some of the locations there are no wires at present, but 
cables must be laid in order to divide present circuits. 

There are about 330 miles of wire strung on poles in 
the system. A large part of this wire is bare and in 
many places on poles with high voltage wires. Much 
of this wire should be renewed and where possible 
wires should be put underground. Thousands of feet of 
ducts are being held in reserve for the use of the city's 
cables. 

Interchangeable System of Underground Cables. 
1 would recommend that enough cable be purchased 
to establish an interchangeable system. This would 
cost, approximately, $31,000, and would give the desired 
protection to the congested districts of the city. 

Boxes. 
There are on file requests for over one hundred signal 
boxes and in most cases these requests should be granted. 
There are many places where the distance between 
boxes is far too great. 

Circuits. 
Some of the box circuits are overloaded and new 
circuits should be made to relieve these conditions. In 
some sections of the city additional tapper circuits 
should be installed so that the striking apparatus in 
too many of the department houses in one section will 
not be on the same circuit. 

Office Apparatus. 
New registers to record alarms from boxes should be 
bought and a new manual transmitter, to be used as a 



Fire Department. 39 

spare machine, should be installed. A new generator 
should be set up in the repair shop to be used for 
fire alarm purposes and at least one more motor generator 
should be purchased. 

Telephone System. 

The telephone system is old and out of date. A new 
common battery system should be installed, but if the 
present system is to be continued public exchange lines 
should be installed in each division and district head- 
quarters. 

Wiring in Department Houses. 

The wiring in the lighting and fire alarm systems in 
several of the department houses is not in accord with 
present day requirements and must be changed. Test 
switches should be installed in all houses so as to facili- 
tate the location of circuit troubles, and in some houses 
additional tappers would improve the service. 

Hyde Park. 
When the service of call men in Hyde Park is dis- 
continued, the tower bells and whistle should be removed 
from the service and the signal boxes timed to corre- 
spond with the Boston system. Circuits should be run 
to the Bristol street office, but the present automatic 
equipment, located in the house of Engine 48, should be 
kept to be used in case of emergency. The boxes in 
this district are old and of an inferior make and should 
be replaced with new and up-to-date types. 

George L. Fickett. 



40 City Document No. 14, 



REPAIR DIVISION, FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



From: The Superintendent of Repair Shop. 

BosTONj 13 February, 1913. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

The following is a report of the work done by the 
Construction and Repair Force during the year 1 February, 
1912, to 1 February, 1913. 

Repairs on Apparatus. 

Total number 2,357 

By outside firms 257 

Among these repairs four engines have been over- 
hauled and three repainted; seven ladder trucks were 
rebuilt in whole or in part and five were painted; two 
hose wagons were overhauled and two painted; three 
chemical engines were overhauled nine chief's wagons 
were overhauled and painted and twelve other wagons 
were overhauled and painted; eight hose wagons were 
equipped with 1,100-gallon Invincible nozzles; 137 
repairs were made on automobiles; eighty-six new 
rubber tires were applied and seventeen rubber tires 
reset. 

Hose. 

Feet. 

Total purchased during year ..... 15,548 

Total condemned during year 17,320 

Amount in use 1 February, 1913 133,339| 

Amount in store 1 February, 1913 .... 3,520| 

All repairs to department hose have been made at the 
department shop. 

Harness. 

No new harness has been purchased during the year. 
All harness requiring it has been repaired or renewed 
by the harnessmakers. 

House Repairs. 

Carpenter, plumber, painter and steam fitting repairs, 

total number 640 



Fire Department. 41 

Nine stations have been renovated, ten have had 
shower baths or new plumbing installed, twenty-three 
have been painted in whole or in part. 

Besides numerous small jobs, such as slight repairs 
and putting in new valves, the heating plants of twenty- 
one fire stations have been replaced with better appa- 
ratus or have been extensively repaired. 

Lumber, paint, etc., to the amount of $2,541 was 
furnished various companies, the work being done by 
the members. 

Furniture Repairs. 

Total number . . 34 

By outside firms . 34 

Supplies. 

Supplies for the fire-fighting branch have been pur- 
chased through the repair shop branch in connection 
with the Supply Department of the city. 

Total amount of supplies purchased .... $21,427 90 
An inventory of all supplies and material was taken 
1 February, 1913, and shows that the value of the 
supplies and material on hand amounted to . $73,399 00 

Eugene M. Byington. 



42 City Document No. 14. 



HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT, BOSTON. 



From: The Medical Examiner. Boston, 3 February, 1913. 

To: The Chief of Department: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I have the honor to report for the year ending 
1 February, 1913, as follows: 

Number of cases of illness 321 

Number of cases of injury . ^ 167 

Examinations. 

For appointment as probationary firemen ... 89 
General examinations, including probationers, at the 

expiration of their terms . 942 

House and hospital visits 116 

The health of the men has been good and the number 
of injuries much smaller than in previous years. The 
thirty-four medicine chests, carried on the different 
apparatus, have been well maintained and kept in 
good order, showing the interest manifested by com- 
manding officers. 

Deaths. 

Ladderman Leroy James, 24 May, 1912, pneumonia. 

Ladderman Charles A. Glennon, 25 June, 1912, 
endocarditis. 

Ladderman Philip T. Smith, 21 August, 1912, fractured 
skull. 

Engineer William H. Clay, 3 December, 1912, diabetes. 

District Chief Robert A. Ritchie, 22 December, 1912, 
valvular heart disease. 

Lieutenant M. D. Greene, 13 January, 1913, degenera- 
tion of the spinal cord. 

In closing allow me to thank you and your subordinate 
officers for the efficient cooperation rendered to me in the 
discharge of my duties. 

RuFUS W. Spkague, M. D. 



Fire Department. 



43 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT VETERINARY 
HOSPITAL. 



From: The Veterinarian. Boston, 3 February, 1913. 

To: The Chief of Department: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I respectfully report the number of horses purchased, 
sold, died and destroyed for year ending 31 January, 
1913, as follows: 



Total number of horses on hand 1 February, 1912 

Total number of horses on hand 1 February, 1913 

Horses purchased 

Horses sold 

Horses died 

Horses destroyed 

Horseshoeing 

Horse hire . 



415 

415 
50 
34 

7 
9 

$18,410 99 
. $618 00 



The general condition of the horses is good. There 
is but one class of apparatus that we have much trouble 
with, and that is the ladder companies in the outlying 
districts. The runs are long and the country hilly, and 
my opinion is that the horses would be better able to 
stand the long runs and hills if they were given more 
consideration by the drivers. 



Daniel P. Keogh, M. D. V. 



44 



City Document No. 14. 



THE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION. 



Commissioner, Charles H. Cole. 

Chief Clerk, Benjamin F. Underhill. 

Chief of Department, John A. Mullen. 

Superintendent of Construction and Repairs, Eugene M. 

Byington. 
Superintendent of Fire Alarms, George L. Fickett. 
Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms and Chief Operator, 

Richard Donahue. 
Veterinarian, Daniel P. Keogh. 
Medical Examiner, Rufus W. Sprague. 



STRENGTH 


AND PAY. 






Headquarters. 


Per annum. 


1 Commissioner $5,000 


1 Chief clerk 








2,500 


1 Medical examiner . 










1,300 


1 Bookkeeper 










1,650 


2 Clerks .... 










1,400 


1 Clerk .... 










1,200 


1 Clerk .... 










1,000 


1 Assistant engineer (messenger) * 








1,300 


1 Private (explosives detail) * 








1,300 


10 


Fire Fighting Branch. 


1 Chief of department $4,000 


1 Deputy chief . 










3,000 


1 Deputy chief . 










2,800 


13 District chiefs 










2,300 


58 Captains .... 










1,800 


93 Lieutenants 










1,600 


1 Lieutenant, aide to chief 










1,600 


3 Engineers 










1,500 


47 Engineers 










1,400 


43 Assistant engineers 










1,300 


3 Assistant engineers 










1,100 


695 Privates: 












445 ... . 










1,300 


33 ... . 










1,200 


63 










1,100 


54 ... . 










1,000 


56 ... . 










900 


44 . . ... 










720 



* Detailed from fire fighting branch. 



Fire Department. 



45 











Per day. 


1 Chief's driver . $2 50 


1 Chief's driver 2 00 


961 

Call Men. 


Per annum. 


3 Temporary call men in District 15 (Hyde Park), $100 


Repair Shop Branch. 


1 Superintendent $2,500 


1 Captain, assistant superintendent * . 


1,800 


1 Lieutenant, foreman of hose and harness shop 


^ 1,600 


1 Engineer * 


1,400 


1 Assistant engineer * 


. 


1,300 


1 Master carpenter * 




1,400 


1 Master painter * . 




1,400 


1 Engineer (master plumber) * 




1,400 


6 Privates* 1,300 


Employees. 


1 Clerk '. . 1,100 


1 Clerk . , . . 








900 

Per day. 


1 Engineer 








$3 25 


3 Firemen .... 








3 25 


2 Plumbers 








4 40 


1 Steamfitter 




* 




4 00 


1 Painter .... 








3 75 


6 Painters .... 








3 50 


2 Wheelwrights . 








3 25 


6 Machinists 






. i 


3 25 


1 Foreman of blacksmiths 








4 00 


3 Blacksmiths . 








3 75 


4 Blacksmith's helpers 








2 75 


1 Blacksmith's helper 








2 50 


3 Carpenters 








3 50 


1 Vulcanizer 








.3 00 


2 Hose and harness repairers 








3 25 


1 Hose and harness repairer 








2 25 


4 Laborers .... 








2 25 


58 


Fire Alarm Branch. 


Per annum. 


1 Superintendent $2,500 


1 Assistant superintendent 2,300 


5 Privates, assistant operators * .... 1,300 


Per day. 


1 Chief's driver* $2 00 



■ Detailed from fire fighting branch. 



46 



City Document No. 14. 



Employees. 





Per anaum. 


1 Clerk . 


S850 


4 Operators 


1,600 


3 Assistant operators 


1,400 


1 Assistant operator 


1,300 


1 Foreman of construction .... 


2,000 




Per day. 


1 Machinist 


$4 00 


1 Machinist 


3 50 


21 Telegraphers and hnemen (average) . 


3 60 


1 Hostler 


2 50 


42 




Veterinary Hospital Branch. 






Per annum. 


1 Veterinarian 


$2,300 


1 Captain, assistant to veterinarian * . 


1,800 


Employees. 






Per day. 


3 Hostlers (average) 


$2 25 


1 Horseshoer 


3 00 



1,080 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 



John A. Mullen. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 

The Chief is in charge of the fire protection for the 
whole city, which is subdivided into two divisions, each 
in charge of a deputy chief. 

Division 1. 
Deputy Chief, John Grady. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 
13 (Marine District). 

District 1. 
District Chief, John W. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 
East Boston. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) which is included within the dis- 
trict known as East Boston. 

* Detailed from fire fighting branch. 



GODBOLD. 

2, Paris Street, 



Fire Department. 47 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 
40, Ladders 2, 21, Chemical 7. 

District 2. 
District Chief, Charles H, W. Pope. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 9, Main Street, 
Charlestown. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within the district 
known as Charlestown. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — ■ Engines 27, 32, 
36, Ladders 9, 22, Chemicals 3, 9. 

District 3. 
District Chief, John O. Taber. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of State and Devonshire streets, 
thence easterly through State street to the waterfront, 
thence southeasterly across the harbor to the extension 
of C street. South Boston, thence southerly through 
C street to Cypher street, thence northwesterly through 
Cypher street to B street, thence southwesterly through 
B street to West First street, thence westerly through 
West First street to Atlantic Avenue Bridge, thence 
through Atlantic Avenue Bridge and Atlantic avenue 
to Summer street, thence westerly through Summer 
street to Devonshire street, thence through Devonshire 
street to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 
39, Ladders 8, 14, 18, Water Tower 3. 

District 4- 
District Chief, Henry A. Fox. 
Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of State and Devonshire streets, 
thence southerly through Devonshire street to Water 
street, thence westerly through Water street to Washing- 
ton street, thence southerly through Washington street 
to School street, thence through School street and 
Beacon street to Charles street, thence northerly through 



48 City Document No. 14. 

Charles street to Pinckney street, thence westerly 
through Pinckney street to the Cambridge boundary 
line, thence northerly along said Cambridge boundary 
line to its intersection with the tracks of the Eastern 
Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, thence north- 
easterly to the Warren Avenue Drawbridge, thence 
easterly to the Charlestown Drawbridge, thence north- 
easterly and then southerly around the waterfront to 
the extension of State street, thence through State street 
to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
Ladders 1, 24, Chemical 1, Water Tower 1. 

District 5. 
District Chief, Daniel F. Sennott. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of Devonshire and Water streets, 
thence running westerly through Water street to Wash- 
ington street, thence southerly through Washington 
street to School street, thence through School street and 
Beacon street to Charles street, thence northerly through 
Charles street to Pinckney street, thence westerly 
through Pinckney street to the Cambridge boundary 
line, thence southerly along said boundary line to the 
extension of Otter street, thence through Otter street to 
Beacon street, thence easterly through Beacon street 
to Arlington street, thence through ArHngton street to 
Boylston street, thence easterly through Boylston street 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Providence street, thence through Providence street to 
Columbus avenue, thence through Columbus avenue 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Tremont street, thence northerly through Tremont 
street to Pleasant street, thence southeasterly through 
Pleasant street and Broadway extension to Fort Point 
channel, thence northerly through Fort Point channel 
to Atlantic Avenue Bridge, thence through Atlantic 
Avenue Bridge and Atlantic avenue to Summer street, 
thence westerly through Summer street to Devonshire 
street, thence through Devonshire street to the point 
of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Chemical 2. 



Fire Department. 49 

District 6. 
District Chief, Edwin A. Perkins. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 
South Boston. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of the 
Marine District) which is included within a line begin- 
ning at the intersection of Atlantic Avenue Bridge and 
Fort Point channel, thence southerly through Atlantic 
Avenue Bridge to West First street, thence through 
West First street to B street, thence northerly through 
B street to Cypher street, thence through Cypher street 
to C street, thence northerly through C street to the 
waterfront, thence by the waterfront southeasterly, 
then westerly to the extension of Columbia road, thence 
through Columbia road to Mt. Vernon street, thence 
through Mt. Vernon street to Willow court, thence 
through Willow court to Massachusetts avenue, thence 
through Massachusetts avenue to the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks (inclusive), thence 
northerly along said tracks (inclusive) to the South 
bay, thence northerly to Fort Point channel, thence 
through Fort Point channel to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20, Chemical 8. 

District 13. {Marine District.) 
Acting District Chief, Capt. Walter S. Eaton. 

Headquarters, Fireboat Engine 44, Northern Avenue 

Bridge. 

All that navigable portion of Boston Harbor and the 
rivers or waters emptying therein which is included 
within the city limits, with all the floats, vessels, ships, 
scows and boats of every description afloat thereon; 
all wharves, docks and piers (exclusive of the buildings 
on said wharves, docks and piers) extending into said 
navigable waters. 

The following islands, with the buildings erected 
thereon, situated in Boston Harbor: 

Governor's, Apple, Deer, Lovell's, Gallop's, George's, 
Long, Rainsford, Spectacle, Thompson's and Castle. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 31, 44,, 
47 (fireboats). 



50 City Document No. 14. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chief, Peter F. McDonough. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 4, Dudley Street. 
This division comprises Districts 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 
14 and 15. 

District 7. 

District Chief, John T. Byron. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) which is included within a line 
beginning at the intersection of Beacon and Otter 
streets, thence easterly through Beacon street to Arling- 
ton street, thence through Arlington street to Boylston 
street, thence easterly through Boylston street to 
Church street, thence through Church street to Provi- 
dence street, thence through Providence street to 
Columbus avenue, thence through Columbus avenue 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Tremont street, thence northerly through Tremont 
street to Pleasant street, thence easterly through Pleas- 
ant street and Broadway extension to Fort Point 
channel, thence southerly through Fort Point channel 
to the Roxbury canal, thence southerly through the 
Poxbury canal to Massachusetts avenue, thence north- 
westerly through Massachusetts avenue to the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, thence northeasterly along said 
boundary line to a point opposite the extension of 
Otter street, thence through Otter street to the point 
of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 
33, Ladders 3, 13, 15, Chemical 4, Water Tower 2. 

District 8. 
District Chief, Stephen J. Ryder. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the 
intersection of Massachusetts avenue and the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, thence through Massachusetts 
avenue to Washington street, thence southerly through 
Washington street to Atherton street, thence westerly 



Fire Department. 51 

through Atherton and Mozart streets to Chestnut avenue, 
thence southerly through Chestnut avenue to Sheridan 
street, thence through Sheridan street to Centre street, 
thence through Centre street to Perkins street, thence 
through Perkins street to South Huntington avenue, 
thence northerly through South Huntington avenue 
to Castleton street, thence through Castleton street 
across Jamaicaway to the Brookline line, thence north- 
erly and westerly along the Brookline boundary line 
to the Cottage Farm Bridge (inclusive), thence northerly 
through Essex street to the Cambridge boundary line, 
thence easterly by said Cambridge boundary line to 
the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26, Chemical 12. 

District 9. 
District Chief, Michael J. Kennedy. 
Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the 
intersection of the extension of Columbia road and the 
Old Harbor, thence running westerly through Columbia 
road to Mt. Vernon street, thence through Mt. Vernon 
street to Willow court, thence through Willow court to 
Massachusetts avenue, thence through Massachusetts 
avenue to the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad tracks (exclusive), thence northerly along 
said tracks (exclusive) to the South bay, thence westerly 
along said South bay to the Roxbury canal, thence 
southerly through the Roxbury canal to Massachusetts 
avenue, thence northwesterly through Massachusetts 
avenue to Washington street, thence southerly through 
Washington street to Columbus avenue, thence easterly 
through Columbus avenue to Seaver street, thence 
through Seaver street to Blue Hill avenue, thence 
northerly through Blue Hill avenue to Geneva avenue, 
thence through Geneva avenue to Columbia road, 
thence northeasterly through Columbia road to Stough- 
ton street, thence easterly through Stoughton street 
to Pleasant street, thence through Pleasant street to 
Savin Hill avenue, thence easterly and northerly through 
Savin Hill avenue to Evandale terrace, thence through 
Evandale terrace to the waterfront, thence northerly 
along the waterfront to the point of beginning. 



52 City Document No. 14. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 21, 
23, 24, Ladder 4, Chemical 10. 

District 10. 
District Chief, John W. Murphy. 

Headquarters, Engine House 18, Harvard Street, 
Dorchester. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the 
intersection of the extension of Evandale terrace and 
Dorchester bay, thence through Evandale terrace to 
Savin Hill avenue, thence northerly and westerly through 
Savin Hill avenue to Pleasant street, thence northerly 
through Pleasant and Stoughton streets to Columbia 
road, thence southerly through Columbia road to 
Geneva avenue, thence westerly through Geneva avenue 
to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through Blue 
Hill avenue to Canterbury street, thence through 
Canterbury street to Morton street, thence southerly 
through Morton street to Blue Hill avenue, thence 
northerly through Blue Hill avenue to Lauriat avenue, 
thence through Lauriat avenue to Norfolk street, 
thence through Norfolk street to Centre street, thence 
through Centre street to Adams street, thence northerly 
through Adams street to Mill street, thence through 
Mill street to Preston street, thence through Preston 
street to Freeport street, thence southerly through 
Freeport street to Dorchester bay, thence northerly 
along the waterfront to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 
Ladders 7, 23, 29, Chemicals 5, 11. 

District 11. 

District Chief, John E. Madison. 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 
Brighton. 

All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) included within the district known 
as Brighton which is west of the Cottage Farm Bridge 
and Essex street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 
41, Ladders 11, 31, Chemical 6. 



Fire Department. 53 

District 12. 
District Chief, Michael J. Mulligan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 

All that portion of the city known as West Roxbury 
and Jamaica Plain within a line beginning at the inter- 
section of the extension of Castleton street and the 
Brookline boundary line, thence through Castleton 
street to South Huntington avenue, thence southerly 
through South Huntington avenue to Perkins street, 
thence easterly through Perkins street to Centre street, 
thence easterly through Centre street to Sheridan 
street, thence through Sheridan street to Chestnut 
avenue, thence northeasterly through Chestnut avenue 
to Mozart street, thence through Mozart street to 
Atherton street, thence through Atherton street to 
Columbus avenue, thence easterly through Columbus 
avenue to Seaver street, thence through Seaver street 
to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through Blue Hill 
avenue to Canterbury street, thence through Canter- 
bury street to Morton street, thence southerly through 
Morton street to Harvard street, thence southerly 
through Harvard street to Ashland street, thence 
westerly through Ashland street to the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks (exclusive), 
thence southerly along the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad tracks to the Hyde Park boundary 
line, thence southwesterly along the Hyde Park boundary 
line to the Dedham boundary line, thence northwesterly 
along the Dedham boundary line to the Newton bound- 
ary line, thence northeasterly by the Newton boundary 
line to the Brookline boundary line, thence southeasterly 
and then northerly along said Brookline boundary line 
to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 30, 
42, 45, Ladders 10, 16, 25, 30, Chemical 13. 

District 14- 
District Chief, Maurice Heffernan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester. 
All that portion of the city (excluding any part of 
the Marine District) within a line beginning at the inter- 



54 City Document No. 14. 

section of Dorchester bay and Freeport street (Commer- 
cial Point), thence northerly through Freeport street 
to Preston street, thence through Preston street to 
Mill street, thence through Mill street to Adams street, 
thence southerly through Adams street to Centre street, 
thence through Centre street to Norfolk street, thence 
through Norfolk street to Lauriat avenue, thence through 
Lauriat avenue to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly 
through Blue Hill avenue to Morton street, thence 
northwesterly through Morton street to Harvard street, 
thence southerly through Harvard street to Oakland 
street, thence through Oakland street to Rexford 
street, thence through Rexford street to Blue Hill 
avenue, thence northerly through Blue Hill avenue to 
Fremont street, thence through Fremont street to the 
Neponset river, thence along the Neponset river and 
Dorchester bay northwesterly to the point of beginning. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — -Engines 16, 20, 
46, Ladders 6, 27. 

District 15. 
Acting District Chief, Capt. John H. Wetherbee. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 
Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 

All that portion of the city within a line beginning 
at the intersection of the extension of Fremont street 
and the Milton boundary line, thence through Fremont 
street to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through 
Blue Hill avenue to Rexford street, thence through 
Rexford street to Oakland street, thence westerly 
through Oakland street to Ashland street, thence 
through Ashland street to the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad tracks (inclusive), thence southerly 
along the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
tracks (inclusive) to the boundary line of Hyde ^ark, 
thence along the Hyde Park boundary line to the 
Dedham boundary line, thence southeasterly along the 
Dedham boundary line to the Milton boundary line, 
thence along the Milton boundary line to the point of 
beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
Ladder 28, Chemical 14, Hose 49. 

Note. — Wherever a street, channel or bridge is named the center line of each will be 
the line used. 



Fire Department. 



55 



FIRE STATIONS. 



Location and Valuation. 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Assessed 
Valuation. 


Occupied by 


Dorchester and Fourth streets 


8,169 


$25,800 


Engine 1 and Ladder 5. 


Corner of and Fourth streets 


4,000 


16,200 


Engine 2. 


Bristol street and Harrison avenue . . . 


4,000 


30,000 


Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 




6,098 
1,647 
2,269 


96,000 

9,000 

40,000 


Engine 4, Chemical 1 and 




Tpwer 1. 
Engine 5. 


Leverett street 


Engine 6. 


East street 


1,893 


37,300 


Engine 7. 


Salem street 


2,568 


26,500 


Engine 8. 




4,720 
1,886 


33,300 
20,500 


Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 


River street 


Engine 10. 


Saratoga and Byron sts., East Boston, 


10,000 


40,000 


Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 


Dudley street 


7,320 


25,000 


Engine 12. 


Cabot street 


4,832 


16,000 


Engine 13. 


Centre street 


5,713 


14,600 


Engine 14. 


Dorchester avenue 


2,803 


18,600 


Engine 15. 


Corner River and Temple streets 


12,736 


19,200 


Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 


Meeting House Hill, Dorchester 


9,450 


17,300 


Engine 17 and Ladder 7. 




9,440 

7,683 

9,000 

10,341 


18,800 
14,200 
17,300 
17,100 


Engine 18. 






Walnut street, Dorchester 


Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 


Columbia road, Dorchester 


Engine 21. 


Warren avenue 


7,500 


62,500 


Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 


Northampton street 


3,445 


11,200 


Engine 23. 


Corner Warren and Quincy streets . . , 


4,186 


18,100 


Engine 24. 




4,175 
5,623 


100,600 
191,000 


Engine 25, Ladder 8 and 


Mason street 


Ladder 14. 
Engines 26 and 35. 


Elm street, Charlestown 


2,600 


18,000 


Engine 27. 


Centre street, Jamaica Plain 


10,377 


28,300 


Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 


Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 


14,358 


37,200 


Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 


Centre street. West Roxbury 


12,251 


25,000 


Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 



56 



City Document No. 14. 

Fire Stations.— Concluded. 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Assessed 
Valuation. 


Occupied by 


521 Commercial street, on land of 




*S15,700 
26,200 
105,000 
17,800 
21,000 
14,300 
39,000 
18,000 
25,500 
22,900 
19,600 

t 
22,400 
22,900 
31,600 
40,100 
23,600 
15,400 

4,300 
40,600 

7,800 

8,000 
13,200 
17,800 
37,200 
26,000 
16,400 
25,600 
23,500 
35,400 
10,700 
21,400 
19,800 
42,000 

t 


Engine 31, fireboat. 

Engine 32. 

Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 


Public Works Department. 
Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 

Corner Boylston and Hereford streets, 


8,188 
5,646 
4,637 
5,668 
5,231 
4,000 
4,010 
6,112 
3,848 
5,133 


Monument street, Charlestown 

Corner Longwood and Brookline aves., 
Congress street 


Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 
Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 
Engines 38 and 39. 
Engine 40. 

Engine 41 and Chemical 6. 
Engine 42 and Ladder 30.i 
Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 
Engine 44, fireboat. 
Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 


Sumner street. East Boston 


Harvard avenue, near Cambridge 

street, Brighton. 
Washington street, at Egleston square, 

Andrew square 


Northern Avenue Bridge 


Washington street, corner Poplar 

street, Roslindale. 
Dorchester avenue, Ashmont 


14,729 
4,875 

11,950 
9,450 
3,412 
5,230 
889 
9,300 
1,800 
1,790 
7,200 

11,253 
1,676 
3,923 
4,290 
4,311 
2,134 
8,964 
3,101 
6,875 
3,918 
9,889 


Adjoining South Ferry, East Boston. . 

Harvard avenue and Winthrop street, 

Hyde Park. 
Church street '. 


Engine 47, fireboat. 

Engine 48, Ladder 28 and 

Chemical 14. 
Chemical Engine 2. 


Winthrop and Soley streets 


Shawmut avenue 


Chemical Engine 4. 


Saratoga street, East Boston 


B street 




Eustis street 


Chemical Engine 10. 
Chemical 11 and Ladder 29. 
Chemical 13. 


Comer Callender and Lyons streets. . . 
Corner Walk Hill and Wenham streets. 
Friend street 


Dudley street 




Main street, Charlestown 




Tremont street 


Ladder 12 and Chemical 12. 




Ladder 17. 


Pittsburgh street. South Boston 

Fourth street 


Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 


Washington street, Dorchester 

North Grove street 


Ladder 23 and Chemical 5.^ 
Ladder 24. 


Oak square, Brighton 


Ladder 31.3 


Sprague and Milton streets, Hyde 


Hose 49. 


Park District, on land owned by the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 







* On building and wharf. f Wharf and building cost $32,000. 

t Building of little value and belongs to city. 
1 March 5, 1913. 2 May 14, 1913. s February 24, 1913. 



Fire Department. 57 

Headquarters Building, corner of Albany and 

Bristol streets, 15,679 feet of land . . _. $113,000 

Water Tower No. 2 and wrecking wagon are in 
Headquarters Building. 

OTHER BUILDINGS. 

Repair Shop, 363 Albany street, 8,000 feet of 

land $68,000 

Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet 

of land 75,000 

Coal station, Dorchester street, 1,610 feet of land, 3,100 

Coal station, Salem street, 417 feet of land . . 4,400 

Coal station. Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet 

of land 6,500 

Total value of land, wharves and buildings . . *2, 177,300 

LEASED BUILDINGS. 

Building No. 50 Bristol street used by the Fire Alarm 
Branch as work shop, storeroom and stable. 

Part of building 240-256 Dover street used as store- 
house for spare apparatus. 

About 800 square feet of shed on Sleeper street (New 
Haven Terminal Stores) used as a coal station. 

Part of building 11 Atherton street used for storage. 

During the year the coal station on Washington street, 
near Dover street, 1,007 feet of land, valued at $10,500, 
was transferred to the Health Department. 

* Including $32,000, cost of wharf and building at Northern Avenue Bridge. 



58 



City Document No. 14. 



CANNEL COAL STATIONS. 



Division 1. 



DiSTHICT. 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Tons.) 



Wagons. 



1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
5 
5 
6 
6 

7 
8 
8, 
8 

9 

I 

9 
9, 
9 
10, 
10 
11, 
11 
11 
11 



Engine 11 

Engine 40 

Engine 36.. 

Ladder 9 

Chemical 3 

Sleeper street 

Engines 38 and 39 

Ladder IS 

Engine 8 

Ladder 24 

Engine 26 

Chemical 2 

Engine 2 

Dorchester street, 330 

Division 2 

Engine 33 

Engine 13 

Engine 14 

Engine 37 

Engine 12 

Engine 21 

Engine 23 

Engine 24 

Engine 17 

Engine 18 

Engine 29 

Engine 34 

Engine 41 

Ladder 31 



12 

20 

35 

35 

15 

45 

6 

1 

5 

16 

20 

35 

20 

20 



25 




40 




10 




20 




5 




6 




5 




7 




3 




5 




7 




7 




10 




10 





Fire Department. 

Cannel Coal Stations. — Concluded. 



59 



District. 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Tons.) 



Wagons. 



12 
12 
12 
12 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
15 



Engine 28 
Engine 30 
Engine 42 
Engine 45 
Engine 16 
Engine 20 
Engine 46 
Engine 19 
Engine 48 
Hose 49 . . 



20 
9 
9 
9 
5 
7 
4 
8 

10 
1 



APPARATUS. 



Steam Engines. — 45 in service, 6 
reserve. 

Ladder Trucks. — 31 in service, 9 
reserve. 

Chemical Engines. — 14 in service, 6 
reserve. 

Water Towers. — 3 in service, 1 
reserve. 

Fireboats. — 3 in service. 

Hose Wagons. — 45 in service, 5 
reserve. 



Chiefs Wago7is. — 16 in service, 1 in 
reserve. 

Motor Cars. — ■ 8 in service. 

Motor Combination Wagons. — 2 in serv- 
ice. 

Miscellaneous. — 41 fuel wagons, 6 re- 
pair wagons, 2 supply wagons, 3 manure 
wagons, 1 caravan, 39 hose pungs, 3 job- 
bing pungs, 4 fire alarm pungs, 3 hydrant 
pungs. 



60 



City Document No. 14. 



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62 



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66 



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67 




(M IM rH 

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68 



City Document No. 14. 






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Fire Department. 



69 



NUMBER OF RUNS EACH COMPANY HAD FROM 
1 FEBRUARY, 1912, TO 1 FEBRUARY, 1913. 



Company. 



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7 


11 


29 


52 


34 


58 


21 


33 


35 


52 


20 


27 


23 


52 


24 


41 


18 


27 


17 


33 


26 


52 


25 


59 


24 


41 


30 


58 


13 


22 


14 


35 


14 


30 


8 


17 


10 


18 


28 


46 


31 


49 


23 


56 


16 


30 


14 


26 


29 


46 


14 


38 


16 


20 


10 


10 


5 


9 


6 


10 


13 


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Engine 1 
Engine 2 
Engine 3 
Engine 4 
Engine 5 
Engine 6 
Engine 7 
Engine 8 
Engine 9 
Engine 10 
Engine 11 
Engine 12 
Engine 13 
Engine 14 
Engine 15 
Engine 16 
Engine 17 
Engine 18, 
Engine 19. 
Engine 20. 
Engine 21 . 
Engine 22. 
Engine 23. 
Engine 24. 
Engine 25. 
Engine 26. 
Engine 27. 
Engine 28. 
Engine 29. 
Engine 30. 
Engine 31. 
Engine 32. 



19 


20 


18 


7 


8 


4 


27 


34 


24 


51 


43 


40 


37 


25 


19 


56 


45 


40 


18 


26 


15 


31 


36 


37 


40 


31 


24 


36 


32 


21 


32 


24 


16 


16 


16 


22 


20 


26 


23 


17 


23 


15 


31 


25 


21 


5 


4 


14 


14 


26 


16 


12 


22 


17 


5 


13 


15 


1 


7 


6 


18 


23 


25 


36 


35 


34 


25 


18 


21 


15 


20 


24 


19 


27 


19 


45 


43 


30 


18 


20 


29 


9 


13 


12 


12 


7 


10 


2 


7 


6 


6 


11 


10 


11 


14 


23 



38 


15 


14 


16 


13 


17 


4 


7 


8 


5 


38 


30 


23 


22 


28 


62 


35 


45 


39 


37 


44 


32 


15 


22 


11 


59 


30 


42 


38 


33 


28 


23 


13 


16 


10 


51 


26 


32 


31 


28 


52 


35 


15 


25 


11 


30 


17 


18 


17 


21 


41 


30 


13 


14 


8 


45 


23 


19 


24 


24 


59 


19 


17 


25 


29 


57 


33 


21 


31 


35 


47 


29 


22 


25 


18 


11 


5 


5 


8 


7 


29 


16 


15 


26 


21 


23 


10 


20 


30 


24 


14 


3 


5 


13 


10 


16 


4 


3 


5 


7 


37 


16 


17 


25 


20 


41 


27 


20 


24 


29 


41 


29 


27 


26 


28 


38 


17 


22 


32 


27 


31 


35 


14 


14 


17 


54 


36 


26 


28 


34 


28 


18 


11 


16 


15 


32 


16 


12 


11 


22 


15 


9 


4 


6 


11 


20 


6 


5 


19 


3 


18 


4 


5 


4 


2 


31 


13 


10 


14 


16 



18 
6 
32 
56 
19 
52 
24 
31 
22 
39 
14 
24 
31 
34 
20 
19 
36 
34 
18 
8 
33 
36 
33 
20 
19 
45 
22 
20 
17 
7 
6 
20 



267 
94 
367 
537 
291 
522 
237 
399 
335 
302 
253 
312 
355 
365 
355 
120 
272 
259 
128 
87 
310 
393 
352 
280 
254 
451 
242 
200 
121 
99 
90 
206 



70 City Document No. 14. 

Number of Runs of Each Company. — Continued. 



Company. 



1-5 


1-5 


31 


32 


15 


10 


3 


6 


36 


21 


39 


47 


6 


3 


36 


31 


38 


39 


19 


18 


26 


42 


59 


55 


19 


19 


28 


20 


31 


25 


18 


22 


8 


5 


10 


7 


57 


63 


37 


44 


50 


30 


51 


49 


51 


43 


23 


11 


43 


28 


47 


65 


34 


28 


11 


27 


9 


12 


49 


65 


43 


38 


34 


38 


19 


16 


18 


12 


26 


31 


18 


18 


23 


17 



Eng: 
Eng: 
Eng; 
Eng; 
Engi 
Eng; 
Eng: 
Eng: 
Eng 
Engi 
Engi 
Eng 
Eng: 
Eng: 
Engi 
Engi 



ne 33. 
ne 34. 
ne 35. 
ne 36. 
ne 37. 
ne 38. 
ne 39. 
ne 40. 
ne 41. 
ne 42. 
ne 43. 
ne 44. 
ne 45. 
ne46. 
ne47. 
ne48. 



Hose 49... 
Ladder 1 . 
Ladder 2 . 
Ladder 3 . 
Ladder 4 . 
Ladder 5 . 
Ladder 6 . 
Ladder 7 . 
Ladder 8 . 
Ladder 9 . 
Ladder 10. 
Ladder 11. 
Ladder 12. 
Ladder 13. 
Ladder 14 . 
Ladder 15. 
Ladder 16. 
Ladder 17. 
Ladder 18. 
Ladder 19. 



10 


9 


20 


20 


20 


20 


11 


7 


8 


7 


11 


6 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


2 


14 


9 


11 


14 


14 


10 


8 


13 


19 


20 


28 


15 


2 


1 


2 




2 


1 


23 


10 


13 


10 


12 


18 


32 


13 


19 


10 


16 


13 


7 


3 


14 


13 


14 


10 


28 


17 


22 


24 


18 


20 


20 


19 


29 


18 


21 


31 


20 


11 


5 


11 


8 


13 


9 


7 


7 


11 


13 


12 


11 


8 


24 


17 


35 


19 


10 


8 


12 


9 


10 


7 


1 


5 


6 


4 


6 


4 


3 


6 


6 


7 


6 


5 


35 


46 


41 


40 


62 


40 


34 


14 


24 


9 


21 


15 


32 


22 


23 


29 


28 


26 


29 


29 


29 


33 


26 


33 


16 


16 


16 


14 


17 


25 


3 


6 


8 


9 


16 


7 


15 


18 


29 


29 


36 


27 


47 


26 


31 


29 


37 


32 


12 


10 


16 


18 


17 


11 


16 


14 


12 


19 


23 


14 


8 


3 


6 


11 


13 


8 


33 


27 


32 


33 


37 


30 


40 


23 


25 


31 


46 


29 


31 


16 


18 


21 


19 


18 


9 


6 


14 


18 


16 


16 


7 


5 


4 


6 


5 


7 


21 


18 


23 


17 


25 


27 


15 


4 


4 


5 


6 


13 


8 


10 


10 


9 


14 


14 



262 
110 

33 
185 
247 

25 
227 
283 
151 
265 
351 
143 
149 
236 
141 

58 

73 
555 
300 
364 
369 
272 
120 
306 
451 
211 
183 
112 
392 
407 
287 
195 

91 
284 
118 
154 



Fire Department. 

Number of Runs of Each Company. — Concluded. 



71 



Company. 


i 

3 




< 


^ 
^ 


a 

1-5 


3 

>-5 


1 

3 
< 


1 
1 

m 


o 


> 
o 


S 

Q 


& 

3 

i 

1-5 


o 


Ladder 20 


13 

32 

12 

20 

29 

2 

4 

2 

3 


15 

24 

13 

30 

21 

1 

12 

8 

7 


16 

16 

23 

27 

22 

3 

3 

5 

5 


15 
15 

9 
16 
14 

2 

8 
15 

4 


47 
30 
34 
41 
27 

2 
14 
26 

9 


41 
39 
22 
27 
23 
11 
25 
18 
5 


19 

29 
9 

15 

15' 
4 
3 
8 
1 


12 

10 

8 

22 

22 

1 

5 

3 

6 


24 
13 
12 
30 
19 

3 
14 
10 

6 


12 

7 

14 

26 

16 

1 

12 

9 

5 


18 
13 
16 
32 
37 

4 
14 
15 

6 


19 

10 

13 

29 

29 

4 

12 

8 

4 

5 

45 

42 

11 

24 

19 

10 

14 

28 

10 

19 

11 

19 

15 

8 

5 

2 

8 


251 


Ladder 21 


238 


Ladder 22 


185 


Ladder 23 


315 


Ladder 24 


274 




38 


Ladder 26 


126 


Ladder 27 


127 


Ladder 28 


61 


Ladder 29 


5 




66 

44 

11 

27 

13 

13 

36 

26 

12 

15 

3 

15 

8 

6 

7 

7 

5 


52 

44 

13 

22 

14 

12 

25 

18 

16 

15 

11 

18 

19 

9 

5 

3 

9 


49 

26 

22 

23 

17 

8 

21 

19 

21 

13 

15 

12 

14 

12 

6 

4 

8 


44 

34 

5 

25 

12 

9 

24 

29 

11 

20 

5 

18 

16 

8 

4 

6 

4 


59 
49 
28 
38 
25 
12 
35 
58 
35 
37 
17 
38 
29 
10 

8 
11 

9 


67 
47 
26 
22 
38 
17 
44 
45 
29 
42 
19 
50 
28 
12 
9 
2 
8 


47 
36 

9 
30 
25 

6 
32 
17 
12 
21 

3 
20 

5 

4 
10 

7 
13 


55 

31 

8 

19 

17 

5 

15 

20 

10 

21 

7 

16 

8 

5 

5 

2 

2 


53 
28 
11 
22 
18 
10 
20 
23 
15 
23 
15 
24 
17 
20 
2 
3 
4 


51 

35 

13 

28 

23 

11 

10 

17 

19 

22 

10 

21 

13 

7 

4 

6 

4 


67 
42 
15 
37 
16 
14 
17 
19 
19 
26 
23 
26 
18 
9 
12 
7 
6 


655 




458 




172 




317 




237 




127 


Chemical 7 ' 


293 
319 




?m 




274 




139 


Chemical 12 


277 


Chemical 13 


190 




110 


Tower 1 


77 


Tower 2 


60 


Tower 3 


80 







72 



City Document No. 14. 



Expenditures for the Year. 



Headquarters 

Salaries 

Printing 

Stationery . . . . 

Care of headquarters 
Traveling expenses . 
Books, papers and office expenses, 

Postage 

Expert accountant services (1911- 

12) 

Expert services (1911-12) 



,897 69 
3,107 59 
1,209 56 
602 40 
514 61 
288 64 
140 86 

75 00 
20 00 



$19,856 35 



Salaries 
Horses : 

Hay, grain and 
straw . 

Shoeing . 

Purchase and ex- 
change 

Harnesses and re- 
pairs . 

Horse hire 



Fire Fighting Force. 

.$1,185,020 39 



562,123 95 
20,577 66 

13,121 40 

8,231 22 
646 00 



Fuel for engines and houses 
Hose, pipes and repairs . 

Supplies 

Electric lighting .... 
Furniture and bed- 
ding . . . $8,292 01 
Washing . . . 1,453 52 



104,700 23 
47,393 34 
14,277 66 
12,696 70 
11,283 95 



Rents .... 

Uniform cloth . 
Medical services 

Gas 

Hats, badges and buttons 
Chemicals 

Ice 

Expenses detailed men 
Hydrant repairs 
Removing ashes from fireboat 
Medical supphes 
Refreshments for men at fires 



9,745 53 

5,269 50 

3,073 

1,652 

1,274 

1,139 

956 

496 

271 

260 

183 

167 
53 



18 
36 
26 
89 
99 
50 
60 
19 
76 
96 
35 



Carried forward 



[,399,917 34 $19,856 35 



Fire Department. 



73 



Brought forward 


$1,399,917 34 


$19,856 35 


Freight . . . . _ . 


47 68 




Lessons in use of automobiles 


15 00 




Advertising .... 


12 60 


1,399,992 62 






Veterinary Hospital. 




Attendants, medicines, etc. . 


. 


8,533 50 


Repair Shop. 




Pay rolls 


. $53,198 53 




Materials, etc. 


36,763 20 




Hardware and tools . 


4,366 54 




Electric power 


231 30 


94,559 57 






Fire Alarm Branch. 




Salaries 


. $52,281 52 




Instruments, tools and repairs 


4,507 02 




Rent 


1,800 00 




Telephone service . 


1,696 37 




Repairs, alterations and extensions, 1,263 26 




Electric power . 


942 46 




Wire, cables and conduits 


852 78 




Use of duct in East Boston tunnel, 450 36 




Repairs to tower, Lyceum Hall, 




East Boston .... 


440 88 




Car fares and traveling expenses, 338 10 




Electric light for clocks . 


290 83 




Maps and plans 


246 09 




Repairing clocks 


23 50 




Trimming trees 


3 50 




Time service .... 


3 16 


65,139 83 






Repairs o. 


f Houses. 




Repairs and alterations 




18,129 19 


Pensions . . . . . 




111,843 37 



New Apparatus. 

Water tower $6,494 50 

Motor launch . . . . . 625 00 

Automobile 575 00 

Twenty-seven extinguishers . . 367 60 



8,062 10 



,726,116 53 



74 



City Document No. 14. 



Special Appropriations. 


Automobile Apparatus. 


Combination chemical and hose car 


$5,500 00 


Two chief's automobiles . . . 


1,970 00 


Expert's services . . .- . 


454 45 


Typewriting ....'.. 


62 50 


Advertising 


11 90 


Traveling expenses . 


6 60 




$8,005 45 


Fire Alarm Branch, Improvements. 


Payments on account: 




Boxes 


$6,009 55 


Iron posts 


3,386 50 


Cables, wires, conduits, etc. 


1,805 60 


Connecting poles, etc 


1,510 04 


Registers 


1,100 00 


Switch board . . . . . 


. . 950 00 


Plans . 


914 02 


Lanterns 


871 20 


Painting boxes 


702 00 


Lumber 


257 78 


Advertising 


8 00 




$17,514 69 


Fireboat Quarters and Pier, Northern Avenue. 


Continuation of payments : 




Building contractor, Christopher F. Br 


3wn . $15,743 02 


Wharf and pier, Lawler Brothers 


11,446 28 


Architects, Maginnis & Walsh . 


1,025 45 


Inspectors 


364 00 


Printing 


189 36 




147 00 


Bitts and small items 


116 31 


Advertising 


7 20 




$29,038 62 


Fire Department Repair Shop, ( 


Construction. 


Continuation of payments: 




Water service pipes .... 


$358 30 


Watchman's clock .... 


355 50 


Gates 


279 00 


Hose and small items .... 


182 00 


Masonry 


93 78 




$1,268 58 



Fire Department. 



75 



Fire Station, Oak Square and Faneuil Section. 
Continuation of payments: 

Site, 9,889 square feet of land, Faneuil street . $ 

Building: 

Contractor, McGahey & 
O'Connor 



Architects, Mag: 
Gasolene tank 
Printing 
Conduits . 
Removing trees 
Advertising 



innis & Walsh, 



$29,565 


18 


1,874 


86 


316 


00 


249 


77 


162 


00 


26 


13 


3 


40 



1,461 15 



32,197 34 
$35,658 49 



Recapitulation. 

Fire Department (including headquarters. Vet 

erinary Hospital and repair shop expenses)* 
Fire alarm branch . 
Repairs of houses 
Pensions . 
New apparatus 
Automobile apparatus 
Fire alarm branch, improvements 
Fireboat quarters and pier, Northern avenue 
Fire Department repair shop, construction 
Fire station, Oak square and Faneuil section 



Income. 
Overpayment of salary . 
Juvenile court fees . 
Sale of one horse . ' . 
Damage to hose 
Damage to fire alarm cable 
Sale of manure . 
Damage to fire alarm boxes 
Sale of badges admitting to fire lines 
Sale of old material 
Permits for keeping, use and transportation of 

fireworks and explosives; fires in open air 
Bath Department, steam for Dover Street Bath 

House 



,522,942 04 

65,139 83 

18,129 19 

111,843 37 

8,062 10 

8,005 45 

17,514 69 

29,038 62 

1,268 58 

35,658 49 

.,817,602 36 



$10 70 


16 


65 


40 


00 


92 


50 


125 35 


227 


00 


283 


14 


319 


00 


507 


07 


943 


75 


3,700 00 



),265 16 



* Of this amount $3,700 is expended for coal used for the Bath Department, and is cred- 
i ted to the appropriation for the Fire Department. 



76 



City Document No. 14. 



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Fire Department. 



77 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from 1 January, 1912, 
TO 1 January, 1913.* 



Alarms, false, needless, bell 
and still, and false auto- 
matic 682 

Alarms out of city 40 

Ashes, in wooden receptacle, 60 

Automobiles 66 

Boiling over of fat, tar, etc . . 46 
Bonfires, rubbish, brush, 

grass 865 

Careless use of lamp, candle, 

lantern 102 

Careless use of matches, pipe, 

cigar, cigarette 539 

Chimneys, soot burning .... 220 

Clothes near stove 29 

Defective chimney, stove- 
pipe, boiler, furnace, fire- 
place 72 

Defective gas pipe, stove, 

heater 18 

Electric wires, motors 100 

Fireworks and firecrackers . . 41 

Friction, shafting, journals . . 28 

Gas escaping and explosion . . 4 

Gas jet, stove, setting fire. . . 94 

Grease in ventilator, oven ... 29 

Kerosene, lighting fire 8 

Lightning 5 

Incendiary and supposed ... 62 

Lamp upsetting, explosion . . 83 



Matches, careless use of, and 

set by rats 175 

Meat, wood, on stove, in 

oven 20 

Naphtha, gasolene, benzine, 
chemicals, careless use of, 

and explosion 52 

Oil stove, careless use of, and 

explosion 45 

Overheated furnace, stove, 

boiler, steam pipes 114 

Plumber's, roofer's, painter's 

stove or torch 27 

Rekindling of ruins 3 

Set by boys 148 

Slacking of lime 6 

Sparks from another fire .... 9 

Sparks from chimney, fur- 
nace, stove, forge, boiler, 

grate 153 

Sparks from locomotive, 

engine 75 

Spontaneous combustion - 68 

Unknown 1,067 

Water, gas pipe, thawing out, 81 
Water back, bursting of . . . . 8 

Total 5,244 



1912. 



Fire Extinguished by 



January. . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . , 
September , 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



111 
76 
74 
68 
85 

125 

127 
77 
69 

106 
82 
85 



48 
27 
37 
28 
28 
48 
49 
29 
31 
49 
33 
31 



90 

83 

72 

64 

110 

125 

55 

42 

57 

81 

117 



10 
16 
25 
28 
27 
107 
129 
25 
21 
64 
22 
33 



55 
51 
39 
40 
33 
67 
53 
38 
26 
32 
24 
39 



32 
20 
54 
41 
27 
28 
55 
22 
16 
39 
43 
77 



31 
43 
37 
50 
85 
67 
42 
45 
25 
42 
40 



1,085 



438 



982 



507 



497 



454 



*Eacli fire is treated as having only one alarm. 



78 



City Document No. 14. 



Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



1912. 

Jan. 7. 
Jan. 9. 
Jan. 14. 
Jan. 16. 
Jan. 17. 
Feb. 1. 
March 2. 
March 6. 
March 11. 
March 27, 
March 30, 
April 2, 
April 9, 
April 15, 
May 7, 
May 22 
June 13 
June 21 
July 5 
July 6 
July 10 
July 10 
July 24 
Aug. 9, 
Sept. 22 
Oct. 23 
Oct. 23, 
Nov. 26, 
Dec. 9, 
Dec. 22, 
Dec. 28 



97 Hemenway street, T. E. Hollander 

91-93 Federal street, Globe- Wernicke Company 

189-191 State street, D. L. Slade Company 

Revere House, Bowdoin square, E. W. Harrison & Co. . . 
235 Forest Hills street, N. E. Moral Reform Society. . . . 

9 Province court, M. J. O'Brien 

210 State street, Atlantic Maritime Company 

Brighton AbattoiB, Brighton Packing Company 

Clarendon street. Clarendon Street Baptist Church 

97-99 Summer street. Consolidated Shirt Waist Company 

Brighton Abattoir, Brighton Packing Company 

88-100 Blackstone street, American Paper Box Company 

190-192 Congress street, H. C. Hansen 

47-51 Farnsworth street. National Lead Company 

309 Huntington avenue. Associated Trust 

786-790 Washington street, Linsky Brothers 

36^0 Sudbury street, A. A. White 

5-11 Bennett street, Ideal Leather Goods Company 

Rear 494 Rutherford avenue, H. P. Hood & Sons 

No. 2 House, Rutherford avenue, E. A. Gillette & Sons. , 
170 Border street, Federal Wharf & Trust Company. ... 

37 Southampton street, Greene Brothers Company 

109 Kingston street, F. M. Batchelder & Co 

14-20 Oliver street, Welsbach Company 

67 Washington street, M. S. Kondazian 

185 Bay State Road, G. P. Hamlin 

105-119 Merrimac street, Dempsey & Co 

20-22 Beacon street, G. L. Shuman & Co 

366-370 Atlantic avenue, D. W. Sullivan & Co 

739-745 Washington street, Seward & Ford 

56-60 Denmark street, H. Green 



120,401 
87,536 
49,650 
94,719 
29,900 
18,202 
25,335 
37,793 
46,768 
31,011 

116,698 
17,567 
57,123 
17,489 
23,462 
36,692 
31,997 
16,910 
41,270 
43,172 
39,320 
15,260 
28,734 
46,723 
17,252 
23,223 
21,316 
30,299 
24,455 
25,740 
16,583 



Fire Department. 



79 



STATISTICS. 



Population, January 1, 1913 . 
Area, square miles .... 
Number of brick and stone buildings 
Number of wooden buildings . 
Fires in brick and stone buildings . 
Fires in wooden buildings 

Out of city 

Not in building, false and needless 

Total alarms 



735,390 

47.34 

28,456 

67,961 

1,752 

1,587 

37 

1,868 

5,244 



Fire Loss for the Year Ending 31 December, 1912. 



Buildings 
Contents 
Marine 

Total 



^,071,879 

1,452,886 

6,252 

^2,531,017 



YEARLY LOSS FOR THE PAST FIFTEEN 
YEARS. 



Year ending February 1 


1899 .... 


$1,441,261 




1900 .... 


1,630,149 


u a 1 


1901 .... 


1,702,217 


U U 1 


1902 .... 


1,830,719 




1903 .... 


1,762,619 


u a 1 


1904 .... 


1,674,333 




1905 .... 


2,473,980 


u u 1 


1906 .... 


2,130,146 


U U -1 


1907 . '. . . 


1,130,334 




1908 .... 


2,268,074 


li a 1 


1909 .... 


3,610,000 




1910 . . . . ' 


1,680,245 




1911 (11 months) . 


3,159,989 


* January 1 


1912 .... 


2,232,267 




1913 .... 


2,531,017 



Note. — January losa, 1911, amounting to $165,001, deducted from previous year and 
included in calendar year January 1, 1911, to January 1, 1912. 



80 



City Document No. 14. 



ALARMS FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS.* 



Yeae. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1912 


2,812 
2,291 
1,864 
2,101 
2,210 
2,441 
1,687 
1,905 
1,580 
1,633 


2,432 

2,142 
1,801 
1,677 
1,700 
1,600 
1,262 
1,210 
1,159 
1,121 


5,244 


1911 


4,433 


1910 (11 months)! 


3,665 


1909 


3,778 


1908 


3,910 


1907 


4,041 


1906 


2,949 


1905 


3,115 


1904 


2,739 


1903 


2,754 







* Each fire is'treated as having only one alarm. 

t 202 bell and 196 still alarms deducted from year 1910-11 and included in calendar year 
January 1, 1911, to January 1, 1912. 



Fire Department. 



81 



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82 City Document No. 14. 



ROLL OF MERIT, BOSTON FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Timothy J. Heffron, Lieutenant, retired. 
James E. Downey, Hoseman, retired. 
Frederick F. Leary, Lieutenant, Engine Company 
26-35. 

Florence Donoghue, Ladderman, Ladder Company 15. 
James F. McMahon, Captain, Ladder Company 2. 
Martin A. Kenealy, Captain, Engine Company 43. 
Denis Driscoll, Lieutenant, Engine Company 14. 
William H. Magner, Lieutenant, Ladder Company 26. 
Thomas J. Muldoon, Lieutenant, Engine Company 18. 
Joseph P. Hanton, Ladderman, Ladder Company 17. 
Michael J. Teehan, Lieutenant, Engine Company 7. 
Charles W. Conway, Captain, Engine Company 37. 
Michael J. Dacey, Lieutenant, Ladder Company 20. 
Patrick E. Keyes, District Chief, retired. 
Thomas H. Downey, Lieutenant, Engine Company 4. 



Fire Department. 



83 



BOSTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND. 



Receipts. 

September 1, 1911, balance from previous year . . $4,928 68 
Net proceeds from Department Ball, February 14, 

1912 . 14,278 21 

Interest on bonds 8,580 00 

Interest on deposits 120 91 

Donations 926 00 

City of Boston bond matured 6,000 00 



Total 

Disbursements. 
Benefits to members and gratuities . 

Treasurer's bond 

Salaries 

Box, International Trust Company vaults . 
Printing, stationery, postage, desks, etc. . 
Free beds, Massachusetts General and Carney 

Hospitals 

Bonds purchased 

Auditing books of " Fund " for 2-/2 years . 
Certificate of deposit purchased, American Trust 

Company 



Balance cash in bank 



Assets, 1 September, 1912. 
$137,000 00 City of Boston 3| per cent bonds. 
88,000 00 City of Boston 4 per cent bonds. 
8,000 00 C. B. & Q. R. R. 4 per cent bonds. 
2,000 00 certificate of deposit American Trust 

Company. 
2,779 75 cash on deposit. 



$34,833 80 


$16,509 77 
62 50 


400 00 


10 00 


234 25 


400 00 


12,308 36 
129 17 


2,000 00 


$32,054 05 
2,779 75 


$34,833 80 



$237,779 75 



Respectfully submitted, 

John Williams, 

Treasurer. 



84 



City Document No. 14. 



Nov. 


24, 


1911 


Jan. 


2, 


1912 


Jan. 


11, 


1912 


Jan. 


11, 


1912 


Jan. 


13, 


1912 


Jan. 


13, 


1912 


Jan. 


20, 


1912 


Feb. 


6, 


1912 


Feb. 


10, 


1912 


April 


6, 


1912 


April 


12, 


1912 


May 


10, 


1912 


May 


27, 


1912 


June 


16, 


1912 



Donations. 

Oriental Tea Company 
Howard Stockton . 
Carter, Rice & Co. . 
L. J. Mutty Company 
Edward E. Babb & Co. 
Fred M. Bachelder & Co. 
Lockwood, Green & Co. 

D. & L. Slade Company 
Henry N. Marr 

E. Stoddard & Son . 
The Arnold Roberts Company 
Felton & Son, Incorporated . 
Sarah P. Joslin, Oxford, Mass. 
Josephine Elliott 



Total 



00 

5 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

50 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

5 00 

25 00 

200 00 

15 00 

1 00 

$926 00 



John Williams, 

Treasurer. 



Changes from 1 February, 1912, to 1 February, 1913. 

Number of men appointed to fire force 89 

Number of men reappointed .3 

All others 10 

Number of men dishonorably discharged .... 5 
Number of men dropped . . . . . . . .27 

Number of men honorably discharged 1 

Number of men resigned 18 

Number of men pensioned 22 

Number of men who have died ...... 7 

Number of pensioners who have died 8 



Members Pensioned from 1 February, 1912, to 1 February, 

1913. 



James M. Reed (U. S.). 
EHzabeth J.Dineen(Acts 1912). 
Phihp G. Flynn, Lieut. 
Joseph H. E. Brown. 
Martin J. Mullen (Acts 1912). 
William C. Greeley, Lieut. 
Thomas H. Wright (U. S.). 
Frederick W. Hayes. 
Charles E. Turner (Acts 1912). 
L. A. Withington (Acts 1912). 
F. L. Fratus (Acts 1912). 



James F. Bailey. 

Peter A. Matthews, Lieut. 

David J. O'Connell. 

WilHam T. McCormack. 

Albert M. Laskey. 

George C. Swift. 

Frank Turnbull. 

Thomas H. Weltch, Captain. 

John T. Weston. 

John I. Quigley. 

Edward R. Stern. 



Fire Department. 



85 



Deaths from 1 February, 1912, to 1 February, 1913. 

Active Force. 



Leroy James .... 

C. Ambrose Glennon 

Philip T. Smith .... 

Wilham H. Clay 

Robert A. Ritchie, District Chief 

James F. McKirn 

Michael D. Greene, Lieutenant 



Wilham A. McLean, 
George W. Brown. 
John D. Gallagher. 
Thomas H. Evans. 



Ladder 13 
Ladder 15 
Ladder 14 
Engine 30 
District 13 
Chemical 9 
Engine 33 



Pensioners. 

N. L. Hussey. 
Edwin A. Smith. 
John H. Murray. 
John E. McGowan. 



City Document No. 14. 



PROMOTION. 



Under the rules of the Civil Service Commission, 
adopted 18 July, 1913, promotions in the Boston Fire 
Department will be made hereafter only after competi- 
tive examination under the following regulations: 

Civil Service Regulations, 66. 

(a.) Promotions in the Fire Department of the City of Boston shall be 
made only after open competitive examination, and by successive grades so 
far as practicable; such examinations to be open to all members of the grade 
from which the promotion is to be made who possess the qualifications as to 
time and nature of service fixed by the commission. 

(6.) Competitive promotion examinations will be held from time to 
time, as often as may be necessary, to meet or to anticipate the needs of 
the higher grades; and due notice will be given by the commission as to 
the dates of such examinations and the qualifications required of candidates. 

(c.) Persons qualified and who desire to take such promotion examina- 
tions shall file notice thereof with the commission at such times as it will fix. 

(d.) Candidates for such promotion examinations will be marked on the 
following subjects: (1) Seniority or length of service; (2) Efficiency and 
record in the department; (3) Physical condition; (4) Knowledge of duties 
and of the law, and such other subjects as the commission may prescribe. 

(e.) As the result of such competitive promotion examinations the com- 
mission will establish promotion lists; and whenever a promotion is to be 
made it will certify, upon requisition of the appointing officer, the names of 
the two persons standing highest on the promotion list; and one of such 
persons so certified shall be entitled to promotion, unless the appointing 
officer shall, upon written charges filed with the commission, satisfy it 
that an additional name should be certified. 

(/.) No recommendation for the promotion of any member of the depart- 
ment shall be considered by the appointmg officer unless it be made by 
the official or officials under whose immediate supervision such member 
has served; and such recommendation by any other person, if made with 
the knowledge and consent of the member serving, shall be sufficient cause 
for debarring him from the promotion proposed. 

(g.) No person shall remain eligible for promotion for more than two 
years upon any promotion list unless the commission shall by vote continue 
the eligibility beyond such period. 

(h.) If the candidates for promotion to any position shall be less than 
three (3) in number, the commission maj' assent to the promotion of a 
candidate nominated by the appointing officer, after the passing by said 
candidate of a suitable noncompetitive examination. 

(i.) The weights for the various subjects in competitive promotion 
examinations shall be as follows: 

Seniority or length of service 5 

Efficiency or record in the department 8 

Knowledge of duties and of law and other prescribed subjects . 6 

Physical condition 1 

20 



Fire Department. 87 

Note. — The New York City weights {see Civil Service Rule 15, Sect. 6) 
are: 

Seniority 20 

Conduct and efficiency 40 

Written papers 40 

100 

(j.) Credit on the subject of seniority shall be given only for the length 
of service in the grade in which the candidate is serving (as shown by the 
records) at the time of the promotion examination, and for which he seeks 
promotion, and shall be as follows: 

The minimum mark shall be 50 per cent. 

Three per cent shall be added for each full year of the first ten years of 
service. 

One per cent shall be added for each full subsequent year. 

Note. — ■ The above is substantially the Chicago rule {see Civil Service 
Rule 7, Sect. 7). In New York (Civil Service Rule 15, Sect. 6) the maxi- 
mum term of service in a position of grade to be considered in the rating 
for seniority is 15 years. 

(fc.) Credit on the subject of efficiency and record in the department 
will be based on two factors: 

(1.) The- candidate's qualifications of judgment, coolness, courage, 
executive ability, capacity for command of men, etc., the candidate's 
mark on examination to be based on the judgment of the Fire Commis- 
sioner filed in writing with the commission. 

(2.) The candidate's record as shown on the official files of the Fire 
Department, including both merits and demerits. 

Text-books used in examinations : 

1. General and special orders referring to administration and fire 
service. 

2. Annual reports concerning personnel and organization. 

3. Department regulations. 

4. BuUdings, boxes, hydrants, apparatus routes, etc., of their district. 

5. Equipment of apparatus. 

6. Fire methods. 

Additional for senior officers: 

Ordinances and statutes relative to the Fire Department. 

Publications, such as the " Crosby-Fiske Handbook of Fire Protec- 
tion" and the "National Board of Fire Underwriters' Reports." 

Possible cases of large fires within their districts and how they shall be 
handled.