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SIXTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1913-1916 







BOSTON 
PUBLISHED BY THg TOOSTEES 
1916 






TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON FEBRUARY 1, 1916. 



JOSIAH H. BENTON, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1919. 

WILLIAM F. KENNEY. SAMUEL CARR. 

Term expires April 30, 1916. Term expires April 30, 1918. 

JOHN A. BRETT. ALEXANDER MANN. 

Term expires April 30, 1917. Term expires April 30, 1920. 



LIBRARIAN. 
HORACE G. WADLIN. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, 
organized in 1 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of 
Chapter 1 14, of the Acts of 1 878, as amended. The Board for 
1852 was a preHminary organization; that for 1853 made the 
first annual report. At first the Board consisted of one alderman 
and one common councilman and five citizens at large, until 
1 867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one alder- 
man, two common councilmen and six citizens at large, two of 
whom retired, unless re-elected, each year, while the members 
from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1 878 the organi- 
zation of the Board was changed to include one alderman, one 
councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 1867; and in 
1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the repre- 
sentation of the City Government upon the Board by an alder- 
man and a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at 
present, consisting of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor, for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring 
each year. The following citizens at large have been members 
of the Board since its organization in 1 852 : 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894- 

BiGELow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-1912. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, 1912- 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908- 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1878-88. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

DeNormandie, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 



HiLLARD, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; Ky-ll. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908- 

Lewis. Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908- 

MoRTON, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy., a.m., 1867-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

WiNSOR, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1 852 to 1 864 ; George Ticknor, in 1 865 ; William W. 
Greenough, from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. 
Haynes, from May 7, 1888, to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. 
B. Abbott, May 12, 1888, to April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. 
Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 1899; Solomon Lin- 
coln. May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; Rev. James De 
Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; JosiAH H. 
Benton, since May 8, 1 908. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was entitled Superintendent.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 -December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858 -January 9, 1868. 

WiNSOR, Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868-Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., m.d.. Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 
1877 -September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

DwiGHT. Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 1 1, 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899- 
December 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 — January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, since February 1, 1903. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1916. 



Departments. 

fCentral Library, Copley Sq 

tEast Boston Branch, llb-l'^l Meridian St. . 

§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway 

lIRoxbury Branch, 46 Millmont St. 

fCharlestown Branch, Monument Sq. 

tBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Rd. . 

^Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 

§South End Branch, 397 Shawmut Ave. 

tjamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 

JWest Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St. 

fCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St 

■fWest End Brcinch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 

fUpham's Corner Branch, Columbia Rd., cor. Bird St. 

fHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 

tNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 

§Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington S 

§ " B. Roslindale Reading Room, Washington St 
land St 

Mattapan Reading Room, 727 Walk Hill St. 

Neponset Reading Room, 362 Neponset Ave. 

Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, cor. 
St 



§ " 


D. 


§ •' 


E. 


§ " 


F. 


§ •' 


G. 


t " 


N 


t " 


P. 


§ " 


R. 


§ " 


S. 


§ '• 


T. 


§ •• 


Y. 


§ " 


Z. 


t " 


23. 


§ " 


24. 


f •• 


25. 



Ash- 



Eldon 



Allston Reading Room, 6 Harvard Ave. 

Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 

Tyler Street Reading Room, Tyler, cor. Oak St. 

Warren Street Reading Room, 392 Warren St. 

Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 1 1 54 Tremonl St. 

Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, De- 
pot Sq ... 

Andrew Square Reading Room, 396 Dorchester St. 

Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St. 

City Point Reading Room, Municipal Building, Broad- 
way ......... 

Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremont St. 

Faneuil Reading Room, 100 Brooks St. . 



Jan. 

May 

July. 
*Jan., 
*Jan.. 

Jan. 

Aug.. 

Sept., 
*Jan. 
*Nov. 

Feb. 



25. 



IJOPENED. 

May 2, 1854 
28, 1871 
I, 1872 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1877 
1877 
6, 1880 
1. 1914 
I. 1896 
Mar. 16, 1896 
*Jan. I, 1912 
Feb. 27. 1913 
June 7. 1875 

Dec. 3, 1878 
Dec. 27, 1881 
Jan. 1, 1883 

Nov. 1, 1886 

Mar. 11. 1889 

Apr. 29. 1892 

Jan. 16. 1896 

May 1. 1896 

Jan. 18. 1897 

Nov. I. 1897 
Mar. 5, 1914 
June 25. 1901 

July 18. 1906 
July 15. 1907 
Mar. 4. 1914 



II In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches and stations the opening 
was in a different location from that now occupied. * As a branch. 1f In building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. % In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. |1 The lessee of the 
Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees . 

Balance Sheet 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Librarian . 
Index to the Annual Report 1915-1916 



1 
16 
20 
27 
74 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Central Library Building 
Map of the Library System 



Frontispiece 
At the end 



To His Honor James M. Curley, 

Ma^or of the Cit^ of Boston : 

Sir, — The Board of Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston present the following report of its condition and 
affairs for the year ending January 31, 1916, being their sixty- 
fourth annual report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The Board organized on May 7, 1915, by the election of 
Josiah H. Benton as President, William F. Kenney, Vice Presi- 
dent, and Delia Jean Deery, Clerk. 

Alexander Mann, a member of the Board, was reappointed, 
and qualified for the term ending April 30, 1920. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts of the Library are of two classes: First, those 
which are to be expended by the Trustees in the maintenance of 
the Library. These consist of the annual appropriation by the 
City Council, and the income from Trust funds, given to the 
Trustees but invested by the City Treasurer under the direction 
of the Finance Committee of the City. During the past year 
these receipts were as follows : 

Annual appropriation ... ..... $407,688.00 

Income from Trust funds ......... 20,600.91 

Unexpended balance of Trust fund income of previous years . . 26,479.89 



Total $454,768.80 

Second, receipts which are accounted for and paid into the 
City treasury for general municipal purposes. These consist of 
receipts from fines for the detention of books, from sales of find- 
ing lists, bulletins, and catalogues; from commissions paid for 
the use of telephone facilities; from sales of waste; and from 



[2] 



payments for lost books, 
been as follows : 



These receipts, during the year, have 



$6,810.83 

11035 

275.72 

86.32 

62.71 

19.12 

578.89 



From fines ........... 

From sales of catalogues, etc. ........ 

From telephone commissions ........ 

From sales of waste ......... 

From sale of paper towels ........ 

From interest on bank deposits ....... 

From payments for lost books ....... 

Total $7,943.94 

The $578.89 received for lost books, being received only to 
replace lost library property has, as heretofore, when paid into the 
City treasury, been added to the appropriation for library mainte- 
nance. A balance sheet showing all the receipts and expendi- 
tures of the Library Department in detail is hereinafter contained. 

CITY APPROPRIATION. 

Nearly all the money which the Trustees can use for the 
maintenance and working of the Library system comes from the 
annual appropriation by the City Council. 

During the past ten years the estimates of the Trustees, the 
recommendations by the Mayor, and the amounts appropriated 
by the City Council have been as follows : 



1906 . 
1907 
1908 . 
1909 

1910 . 

1911 . 

1912 . 
1913 
1914 . 
1915 

The appropriations for these ten years have averaged $8,406 
less than the estimates of the Board. In 1906 and 1910 the 
appropriations equalled the estimates, but in 1915 the appro- 
priation was $20,000 less than the estimate. This is not said 
by way of complaint, because we are aware of the limitations 
which necessarily govern the Council in making appropriations 



ESTIMATES 
OF TRUSTEES. 


AMOUNTS 

RECOMMENDED 

BY MAYOR. 


AMOUNTS 
APPROPRIATED 
BY CITY COUNCIL 


324.550.00 


320,000.00 


324.550.00 


326.100.00 


325,000.00 


325,000.00 


332.800.00 


325,000.00 


310,000.00 


335,200.00 


335,200.00 


349.455.00 


351.978.00 


351,978.00 


351.978.00 


359,497.00 


355,200.00 


355.200.00 


374,665.00 


367,165.00 


367.165.00 


391,996.00 


380,000.00 


380.000.00 


430,619.00 


400,000.00 


400,000,00 


427,688.00 


407,688.00 


407.688.00 



[3] 

for maintenance. It is only stated to dispel the illusion which 
the Examining Committee and many others seem to have that 
the Trustees have only to ask for money to get it. 

HOURS OF SERVICE. 

The hours of service at the Central Library and branches 
remain unchanged. 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the year 42,973 volumes have been added to the 
Library collection, as compared with 46,963 added in 1914. 
Of these, 31,921 were purchased, 7,500 were given to the 
Library, and the remainder were received by exchange, binding 
of periodicals into volumes, etc. TTiere were purchased for 
the Central Library 13,638 volumes and 18,283 for the branch 
libraries and reading-room stations. 

The total amount expended for books, including $6,586.19 
for periodicals, $1,879.33 for newspapers, and $690.58 for 
photographs, was $48,453.18 or about 11.7 per cent of the 
entire expense of the Library for all purposes. 

The corresponding expenditure for the year 1914 was 
$59,563.18, including $7,470.49 for periodicals, $1,919.34 for 
newspapers, and $602.78 for photographs, or, about 14.3 per 
cent of the entire expense of the Library. 

The average cost of all books purchased was $1.15 per vol- 
ume, as against $1 .3 1 in 1 91 4. Of the books purchased 28,672 
were bought from money appropriated by the City, at an average 
cost of $1 .05 a volume, and 3,249 were bought with the income 
of Trust funds, at an average cost of $2.70 a volume. The 
corresponding figures for 1914 were: bought from City appro- 
priation, 34,608; average cost $1.14. From Trust funds in- 
come, 2,687; average cost $3,65. 

BOOK CIRCULATION AND USE OF THE LIBRARY. 

There were issued during the year for direct home use 
299,974 volumes at the Central Library, compared with 274,669 
issued in 1914, and from the Central Library through the 
branches and reading-room stations 79,068 others, while the 



[4] 

branches and reading-room stations also issued 1 ,53 1 ,086 vol- 
umes for direct home use. The corresponding figures in 1914 
were 76,816 and 1,451,514. There were also issued from the 
Central Library, branches and reading-room stations, for use 
at schools and institutions, 224,972 volumes, as against 205,590 
issued in 1914, making the entire issue for use outside the Library 
buildings 2,135,100 volumes, as compared with 2,012,589 in 
1914. 

The use of the Library for general reference and study is un- 
restricted. It is therefore impracticable to record this use statis- 
tically. Its extent, however, is shown by the fact that about half 
a million call slips for the table use of books in Bates Hall in the 
Central Library alone are required during the year. The daily 
use of books and other library material in the Central Library 
and in the branches is doubtless many times greater than the 
home use of books drawn out upon cards. 

BINDING AND REPAIR OF BOOKS. 

During the year 44,543 volumes have been bound in the 
Bindery, as against 40,425 in 1914. Beside this, a large amount 
of miscellaneous work has been completed, such as the folding, 
stitching and trimming of 158,144 library publications, compared 
with 186,650 in 1914, and the mounting of maps and photo- 
graphs, the repairing of books, and making of periodical covers, 
etc. The expense of performing this necessary miscellaneous 
work is equivalent to about 1 7 per cent of the total expense of 
the Department. The ability to do it promptly in our own 
Bindery, greatly promotes the convenience, economy and effi- 
ciency of the library work. 

LIBRARY COOPERATION WITH SCHOOLS, ETC. 

The Trustees continue to cooperate with the educational work 
of the schools, and, during the past year, the Library has supplied 
with books 30 branches and reading-room stations, 1 67 public and 
parochial schools, 61 engine houses and 35 other institutions, and 
sends out upon the average from the Central Library, about 
400 volumes every day by its delivery wagons. The number of 



[5] 

volumes sent on deposit from the Central Library through the 
branch system was 41 ,073, of which 1 0, 1 1 5 were sent to schools. 
TTiere were also sent from the branches themselves and from two 
of the largest reading-room stations 33,838 volumes on deposit, 
distributed among 196 places. Of these, 26,638 were sent to 
schools. That is to say, not only is the collection of the Central 
Library used as a reservoir from which books may be drav^oi for 
use in the branches and reading-room stations, but each of the 
branches and reading-room stations is in itself a reservoir from 
which books are drawn for use by teachers in schools in its 
immediate vicinity. 

TYI.ER STREET AND MT. PLEASANT READING ROOMS. 

The Municipal Buildings on Tyler Street and at the corner 
of Dudley and Vine Streets which, respectively, contain rooms 
for the former Broadway Extension and Mt. Pleasant Reading 
Rooms have been completed. The Tyler Street Reading Room 
was occupied and opened to the public (in place of the old 
Broadway Extension Reading Room) October 29. The Mt. 
Pleasant Reading Room was moved from its old location on 
Dudley Street to the new room on Vine Street and opened to the 
public there on September 1 7. The accommodations provided 
in each case are greatly superior to those in the buildings formerly 
occupied. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

The Trust Funds, that is, property given to the Trustees in 
trust for the uses of the Library, are by law required to be 
invested by the City Treasurer under the direction of the Finance 
Committee of the City. 

A detailed statement of these funds, and the income therefrom, 
is contained in the report of the City Auditor, but a condensed 
statement of the funds invested in City securities is as follows : 

Ariz Fund $ 10.000.00 

Bates Fund ... 50.000.00 

Bigelow Fund , . . . . 1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 100.000.00 

Bowditch Fund ... 10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1,000.00 



Brought fortvard .... .... $172,000.00 



[6] 



Carried forward 
Joseph H. Center Fund . 
Frank Clement Fund . 
Henry Sargent Codman Memorial F 
Cutter Fund .... 
"Elizabeth Fund" under Matchett will 
Daniel Sharp Ford Fund . 
Franklin Club Fund 
Green Fund .... 
Charlotte Harris Fund 
Thomas B. Harris Fund . 
Franklin P. Hyde Fund . 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 
Abbott Lawrence Fund 
Edward Lawrence Fund . 
Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 
Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 
Charles Mead Fund . 
John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 
Phillips Fund .... 
Pierce Fund .... 
Schol field Fund 
Francis Skinner Fund 
South Boston Branch Library Trust F: 
Ticknor Fund .... 
William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 
Townsend Fund 
Treadwell Fund 
Nathan A. Tufts Fund 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 
Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund . 
Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund . 

Total 



$172,000.00 

39.543.14 

2,000.00 

2,854.41 

4,040.00 

25,000.00 

6,000.00 

1.000.00 

2,000.00 

10.000.00 

1.000.00 

1,500.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

500.00 

2.500.00 

1,000.00 

30,000.00 

5,000.00 

61,800.00 

49.550.00 

100.00 

4,000.00 

50,000.00 

4,000.00 

13,987.69 

10,131.77 

5,000.00 

3,300.00 

1,000.00 

$534,307.01 



The income of these Trust Funds is used only for the purchase 
of books and other library material, and of that the income from 
$154»533.00 can be used only for special kinds of books. The 
income of $121 ,750.00 must be spent for books designated as of 
"permanent value" only. The income of only $242,534.00 is 
unrestricted. 

Besides the amounts enumerated, the Trustees have received 
and paid to the City Treasurer the sum of $803.85 on the Alice 
Lincoln Whitney Fund, which sum for the time being is held 
in uninvested cash on deposit at interest. And they have also 
paid to the Treasurer the sum of $700.00 under the bequest of 
James L. Whitney, formerly librarian, to be held and used for 
bibliographical purposes; and from that fund $1,760.80 has 
been expended for the purpose contemplated by the bequest. 



[71 

BEQUESTS OF FRANKLIN P. HYDE. FRANCIS SKINNER 
AND FRANK CLEMENT. 

During the year, by settlement of the estate of Franklin P. 
Hyde, late of Boston, and the transfer of certain securities to the 
residuary legatees, of whom the Library is one, the Trustees 
have received certificates of stock in various corporations, amount- 
to about $2,000 in present value, which have been deposited 
with the City Treasurer, eventually to be sold and the proceeds 
funded as the FrankHn P. Hyde Fund. To this fund has been 
added the sum of $5 1 1 in cash also received from the executor 
of Mr. Hyde. 

The Trustees have also received a final payment, under the 
bequest of Francis Skinner, of $7,508.94, besides 1 6 shares of 
stock of present value of about $896, and they have received 
$1,869.77 from the sale of certain volumes given to the Library 
under the same bequest, which were sold because they duplicated 
volumes already in our collection. These receipts have been 
transmitted to the City Treasurer, to be added to the Francis 
Skinner Fund. 

A bequest to the Library of $2,000, under the will of Frank 
Clement, of Newton, has been paid to the City Treasurer by the 
Trustees, and funded as the Frank Clement Fund. 

The annual income of these several funds is to be used for the 
purchase of books. 

ADDITIONAL BOOKS FOR BRANCH USE. 

Last year, as bearing upon our estimate for library maintenance, 
we called attention to the immediate and imperative necessity for 
additional copies of standard books for the branches and for the 
deposit collection of the branches and stated that it was impossible 
to satisfy the reasonable demands of the public with the present 
supply of such books. Following the purchase of 9,073 volumes 
on many different subjects, which we were able to make in 1914, 
5,799 volumes have been bought during the present year, costing 
about $5,000. TTiese are chiefly books for young readers (in 
grades 1 to 3 of the schools), books for older boys and girls, 
standard fairy tales (in constant demand) and additional vol- 
umes of selected fiction (issued during the past ten years). 



[8] 

REQUESTS FOR NEW READING ROOM STATIONS. 
Requests for opening new reading-room stations frequently 
reach the Trustees, supported by petitions or communications 
from interested citizens. We may repeat what we said last year : 

Reading rooms must be opened by special appropriation from the City 
Government, but when once opened they must be maintained out of the 
regular annual appropriation, and the expense for service, books, trans- 
portation, rent, light, heat and care is thus constantly enlarged. To increase 
the number of reading rooms without at the same time enlarging our financial 
resources, is simply to place burdens upon the existing svstem. If only a 
given amount of money is available for books or service, and the number 
of places where books must be kept or service rendered is increased, then 
every pre-existing place must bear its share of the diminished expenditure 
in order that the hew reading room may be supplied. What the Library 
needs for the present, and from the point of economy and efficient adminis- 
tration, is enlarged equipment to make more effective the operation of its 
present agencies of public service, rather than the establishment of new 
agencies. 

NEW BUILDINGS FOR BRANCHES. 

The expenditures for the addition to the Central Building, 
and the state of the finances of the City probably preclude any 
immediate expenditure for other buildings for the Library Depart- 
ment. As we have pointed out before, however, there should 
be new buildings at West Roxbury and in South Boston as soon 
as the money can be provided. 

The West Roxbury Branch now occupies an old wooden 
building, entirely inadequate, and not well located. The South 
Boston Branch now occupies, as it has since 1872, leased rooms, 
up one flight from the street, which are neither well adapted to 
modern branch administration or accessible without going up 
stairs. The work of both of these branches is increasing, and the 
South Boston Branch is one of the largest in our system. 

ESTIMATES FOR 1916. 

The estimates of the amount required for maintenance of 
the Library during the coming year, sent in as required by City 
ordinance, amount to $432,294.00. 

The Act of the Legislature (Chapter 114 of 1878) consti- 
tuting the Trustees a corporation provides that the Board shall 



[9] 

fix the salaries of its employees individually, and for that purpose 
requires an appropriation for salaries in a lump sum, leaving 
individual salaries to be increased or decreased in the discretion 
of the Board, and the appropriation has always been made in 
that way. This year the Budget schedule sent to us for our 
estimates requires salaries to be itemized and apparently con- 
templates an itemized appropriation. If the appropriation is thus 
made it takes away the power of the Board to fix the salaries 
of its employees. It also results in requiring an estimate for 
salaries to an amount in excess of what will actually be paid, it 
being impossible to take into account, as heretofore, the allowance 
for lost time in the estimates. By "lost time" we mean time 
lost and not paid for by absence of employees from service on 
account of illness, by reason of vacations granted with loss of 
pay, or for other causes; or due to vacancies occurring for 
longer or shorter periods on account of the death or resignation 
of employees and pending the appointment of new incumbents. 
This has heretofore been taken into account in making the esti- 
mate for salaries. It is impossible to take it into account in an 
itemized estimate made in advance for it is impossible to charge 
this lost time upon the individuals who will lose it. 

The Board desires to meet the requirements of the Budget 
schedule as far as possible, and we have accordingly made our 
estimates for full time salaries amounting to $304,439.00, but 
we have suggested to Your Honor and the Council the propriety 
of making the appropriation for salaries in the Library Department 
in a lump sum as heretofore. If this is done our estimate for 
salaries will be $296,675.00. 

ADDITION TO CENTRAL LIBRARY FACILITIES. 

The necessity for an addition to the Central Library building 
to which we have frequently called attention, caused the Trustees 
to apply to your Honor in October last for an appropriation for 
that purpose. 

We said : 

The Trustees of the Public Library desire to bring again to your 
attention the urgent and imperative necessity of providing for the re-location 



[10] 

of the boilers of the central library building, outside the central building; 
the need of additional room for the Branch Department, which is now 
operated, together with its deposit collection, in the central building in con- 
tracted and somewhat unsanitary quarters; the lack of space in the present 
library building for our collections, which have already encroached on 
the Special Libraries' floor to such an extent as to impair seriously the 
proper use of it, and many of which are stored in the basement of the 
building; and also the fact that our Printing and Binding Departments 
are now located in leased quarters at some distance from the central building. 

The central building was opened in 1895, and three boilers for heat- 
ing the building and running the dynamos to hght it were placed under 
the grand staircase in the center of the building twenty-four years ago. 
Any accident to these boilers, which have now nearly reached the normal 
limit of their life, would cause injury to the staircase and to the paintings 
above which would be absolutely irreparable. 

The Branch Library deposit collection from which books are sent to 
the various branches and deposit stations of the Library was not provided 
for when the central building was constructed. It was placed in the only 
position which it could occupy in the building, in its present limited quarters. 
Upon the operation of this department of the Library the branches depend 
for an adequate and sufficient supply of books. It is the very heart of 
the library system. If the flow of books through It is impeded the whole 
Branch service suffers. Any Impairment of its work is felt in all the 
thirty branches and in the 255 deposit stations, such as engine houses, 
schools and Institutions. This department of the Library work has in- 
creased in the last twenty years nearly one hundred and fifty per cent, 
and the pressure upon it by reason of insufficient accommodation at the 
Central Library has become insupportable. 

The books in the Central Library have more than doubled in number, and 
in many departments have long since outgrown the space appropriated to 
them. This has resulted in crowding the corridors, and in placing more 
than 50,000 volumes in the basement 

These matters have been called to our attention and to the attention 
of the City Government many times by the Examining Committees. We 
need only refer to the reports of the Examining Committees of 1912—13, 
1913—14 and 1914—15. They have also been referred to in the various 
reports of the Board to your Honor. 

There is but one way to remedy these difficulties, and that is to take the 
three estates adjoining the central building, on Blagden Street, and there 
erect a suitable well-arranged and well-lighted building for use. We have 
caused preliminary plans to be made for such a building. It will provide 
for placing the boilers outside the present building where they ought to be, 
and from which heat and power can be easily transmitted to the present 
building. It will provide ample and sufficient accommodation for the 
Branch Department and its deposit collection. It will also provide room 



[Ill 

for the books which are now necessarily placed in the corridors and base- 
ment of the present building, and for the further expansion of the Library 
for some time to come; and in the upper story there will be space for the 
Printing and Binding Departments ample for their purpose. 

Such a building could be constructed, according to the best estimates we 
can obtain, for $1 64,003. 

The three estates which must be taken cover 68 feet in width by 1 00 
feet in depth, on which could be erected a building 68 X 90 to the height 
of the present Library cornice, and to a depth of the basement of the present 
building. The three estates with the buildings thereon are assessed for 
$98,000. If we add twenty-five per cent to this we should have 
$122,500. This would make the total cost of the land and buildings 
$286,503. 

We commend this plan to you as the only plan for relieving the very 
serious difficulties under which the library now suffers, and we earnestly urge 
upon you the importance of an appropriation for this purpose. 

In response to this your Honor, on November first, recom- 
mended appropriations as follows: for land, $130,000.00; for 
building, $170,000.00. After a hearing before the Finance 
Committee of the Council, this recommendation was approved 
and the appropriations made by the Council on the twenty-second 
day of November, and their action was approved by your Honor 
on the twenty-fourth of November. The Street Commissioners 
have taken the land, the compensation to the owners amounting 
to $122,500.00 as awarded by the Commissioners has been 
paid, building plans are being prepared, and advertisement for 
contracts will be made as soon as possible. 

We wish to express our appreciation of the prompt action of 
your Honor and the Council in this important matter. 

ANNUAL INVENTORY. 

An annual inventory is made, at the end of each year, of the 
personal property of the Library, except books and other material 
shown on the catalogue or included in the catalogue shelf list. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

As required by the City Ordinance, we appointed an Examin- 
ing Committee for this year, and joined the President of the 
Library Board with it, as Chairman. Those who were appointed 



[12] 

and who have served as members of the Committee are as 
f ollow^s : 

Mr. Horace G. Allen. Rev. Lemuel H. Murlin. 

Dr. J. Bapst Blake. Mr. Michael J. Murray. 

Mr. William M. Bogart. Mrs. John F. O'Brien. 

Mr. George E. Brock. Miss Anne M. Paul. 

Mrs. Augustine J. Bulger. Dr. Melville F. Rogers. 

Rev. Edwin H. Byington. Mr. Henry N. Sheldon. 

Mr. Arthur B. Chapin. Mr. Foster Stearns. 

Mrs. James A. Dorsey. Mr. George S. Stockwell. 

Mr. Augustus A. Fales. Mr. Charles S. Sullivan. 

Mrs. James P. Holland. Mr. E. Mark Sullivan. 

Dr. Henry Jackson. Mr. Cranmore N. Wallace. 

Mrs. Lawrence J. Logan. Mr. Otto A. Wehrle. 

To enable this Committee to perform its duties w^ith con- 
venience and efficiency the follov^ing sub-committees were ap- 
pointed : 

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE. 

This Committee considered the administration of the Library, its work- 
ing as an entire system, including the Central Library and all branches and 
reading-room stations, and, in connection with this, its financial manage- 
ment, including the sources from which its revenue is derived, and the 
manner in which it is expended. Its members were: 

Mr. Allen, Chairman. 
Mr. Murray. Mr. Chapin. 

Mr. Stockwell. Mr. Wallace. 

BOOKS. 

This Committee gave attention to all matters connected with the acqui- 
sition and use of books and other library material, in the Central Library 
and branches. Its members were: 

Mr. Sheldon, Chairman. 
Dr. Jackson. Mrs. Logan. 

FINE ARTS and MUSIC. 

This Committee gave attention to these Departments, including the 
circulation of pictures from the Central Library and branches. Its 
members were: 

Dr. Blake, Chairman. 

Mr. Stearns. Miss Paul. 

Mrs. O'Brien. 



[131 



PRINTING AND BINDING. 

This Committee examined and considered all matters connected with 
the Departments of Printing and Binding, with special attention to the 
expenses of the Departments and the products of each of them. Its 
members were : 

Mr. Wehrle, Chairman. Mr. Bogart. 

BRANCHES AND READING-ROOM STATIONS. 

It was thought best to divide the branches and reading-room stations 
into groups in different parts of the City, and appoint a Committee to 
examine and report with regard to each group. These groups and the 
several Committees thus appointed were as follows: 

SOUTH BOSTON AND SOUTH END BRANCHES, ANDREW SQUARE, CITY POINT AND 
TYLER STREET READING ROOMS. 

Dr. Jackson, Chairman. 
Mrs. Holland. Mrs. Logan. 

CHARLESTOWN AND EAST BOSTON BRANCHES, ORIENT HEIGHTS READING ROOM. 

Mr. Fales, Chairman. 
Mrs. Bulger. Mr. C. S. Sullivan. 

BRIGHTON, JAMAICA PLAIN, WEST ROXBURY AND HYDE PARK BRANCHES, ROSLINDALE, 

BOYLSTON STATION, WARREN STREET, ROXBURY CROSSING, PARKER HILL, 

ALLSTON AND FANEUIL READING ROOMS. 

Mr. Murray, Chairman. 
Mr. E. M. Sullivan. Mrs. Dorsey. 

DORCHESTER, ROXBURY, UPHAM's CORNER, AND CODMAN SQUARE BRANCHES, 

MT. PLEASANT, MT. BOWDOIN, LOWER MILLS, MATTAPAN AND 

NEPONSET READING ROOMS. 

Dr. Rogers, Chairman. 
Rev. E. H. Byington. Mrs. Holland. 

WEST END AND NORTH END BRANCHES. 

Rev. L. H. Murlin, Chairman. 
Mr. Allen. Mr. Wehrle. 

children's department and work with schools. 

This Committee gave special attention to the work which the Library 
is doing for children, and also to what it is doing in connection with the 



[14] 

schools, with regard not only to the way in which the work is done, but 
also as to its extension and its limitation. Its members were : 

Mr. Brock, Chairman. 
Mrs. Bulger. Mr. Stockwell. 

general committee. 

For the purpose of receiving the reports of the work of the various other 
sub-committees, and preparing a draft report of the Examining Committee 
to be considered by it in a meeting of all its members, and for any other 
general purpose connected with the examination of the Library system, a 
sub-committee, called the General Committee was appointed. Its members 
were: 

Rev. L. H. Murlin, Chairman. 
Mr. Brock. Mr. Sheldon. 

The report of the Committee is hereto annexed and included as 
part of this report. 

CONCLUSION. 

The Trustees have held meetings each week during the year 
with the exception of the summer months, the number being 
thirty-five; and one or more of them have given attention to the 
Library affairs at other times, substantially daily throughout the 
year. 

But all this would be of no avail except for the intelligent and 
faithful service of the Librarian and all his assistants. We desire 
to commend the excellence of their work and the fidelity of their 
service to the interests of the Library and the City. 

JosiAH H. Benton, 
William F. Kenney, 
John A. Brett. 
Samuel Carr, 
Alexander Mann, 



[16] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for salaries — 
General administration 
Sunday and evening force . 



James L. Whitney bibliographic account 

To expenditures for books — 
From City appropriation . 
Trust funds income . 
Carnegie gift, Galatea collection 

To general expenditures — 

Newspapers from Todd fund income 

Periodicals .... 

Furniture and fixtures 

Gas 

Electric lighting 

Cleaning 

Small supplies 

Ice , . 

Stationery 

Rents 

Fuel . 

Repairs 

Freights and cartage 

Transportation between Central and B 

Telephone service 

Postage and telegrams 

Travelling expenses ( 

library service) 
Grounds 
Lecture account (including lantern 

operator) .... 
Miscellaneous expense 



Printing Department: 

To expenditures for salaries 
To general expenditures — 

Stock . . . ■ 

Equipment 

Electric light and power 

Contract work . 

Rent .... 

Freights and cartage . 

Insurance . 

Gas .... 

Cleaning 

Small supplies, ice, repairs, furni 



including street 



ilide 



carfares on 



and 



lure and fixtures 



$211,02738 
28,190.99 



30,841.13 

9,067.58 

63.95 



1,879.33 

6,586.19 

7,223.59 

2,867.57 

4,754.57 

11,908.96 

3,844.47 

275.46 

2,213.08 

15,530.31 

16,365.55 

3,594.41 

1,677.61 

6,369.64 

82235 

1,134.18 

276.45 
109.94 

241.60 
1,106.00 



7.649.97 

2,269.92 

2,01835 
160.45 
403.34 
509.03 
81.75 
301.15 
345.76 
168.00 
114.15 



$239,21837 
1.760.80 



39,972.66 



88,78126 



14,021.87 



Carried forward 



$383,754.96 



[17] 



EXPENSES, JANUARY 31, 1916. 



By City Appropriation, 1915-16 
Income fiom Trust funds 
Income from James L. Whitney bibliographic account 
Interest on deposit (London) . 
Payments received for lost books 
Credit on insurance premiums . 



By Balances brought forward, February 1 
Trust funds income on deposit in London . 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
Trust funds income. City Treasury . 
Carnegie gift for Galatea collection . 
James L. Whitney bibliographic account 
Interest on deposit in London . 



1915: 



$407,688.00 

20.600.91 

700.00 

22.80 

578.89 

107.25 



2,729.14 

72.75 

23,750.75 

220.93 

1,890.41 

1 55.46 



Cr. 



$429,697.85 



28.819.44 



Carried forrvarcl 



$458,517.2^ 



[18] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Brought fonoard 

Binding Department: 

To expenditures for salaries ..... 
To general expenditures — 

Stock . . 

Electric light and power ..... 

Contract work 

Rent 

Freights and cartage 

Insurance ........ 

Gas 

Cleaning ........ 

Small supplies, ice, repairs, furniture and fixtures 



To Amount Paid into City Treasury: 
From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Sale of waste paper 
Sale of paper towels (slot machines) 
Interest on bcuik deposit . 



To Balance, January 31, 1916: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
Trust funds income balance, City Treasury 
Carnegie gift for Galatea collection . 
James L. Whitney bibliographic account . 
Interest on deposit in London . 



$29,219.66 

2,772.47 

157.90 

20.04 

1,409.05 
341.83 
215.25 
103.04 
168.00 
133.97 



6,810.83 

110.35 

275.72 

86.32 

62.71 

19.12 



2,959.11 

3,077.84 

33.174.78 

156.98 

829.61 

22.80 



$383,754.96 



34,54121 



7,365.05 



40,221.12 



$465,882.34 



[19] 



EXPENSES. JANUARY 31, 1916. 



Brought forruard . 
By Receipts: 

From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Sale of waste paper 
Sale of paper towels (slot machine) 
Interest on bank deposit 



$6,810.83 

110.35 

275.72 

8632 

62.71 

19.12 



Cr. 

$458.51729 



7.365.05 



$465,882.34 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

1915-1916. 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston : 

Gentlemen, 

We beg to transmit through you to the City Government the 
Report of the Examining Committee appointed by you according 
to ordinance. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL COMMITTEE. 

The Boston Public Library is a great educational organiza- 
tion under the direction of trained experts. It consists of the 
Central Library in Copley Square with 14 branch libraries 
and 16 reading rooms evenly distributed over the city at 30 
strategic centers; books and pictures are distributed among 167 
public and parochial schools, 61 engine houses and 35 institu- 
tions; the branches provide service to 196 depositories and sta- 
tions; so that not only is the Central Library "a reservoir from 
w^hich the books may be draw^n for use in the branches and 
reading rooms, but each of these, in turn, is a reservoir from 
w^hich books are drawn." TTie records show that almost two 
million books circulated last year, these being taken from the 
Central Library and its branches to be used at home. The 
number of persons served in the reading rooms is half a million 
more; and those served at the open shelves and reading tables, 
with books, magazines, and newspapers must be many times 
that number. The Library cooperates with the public, parochial, 
and private schools, beginning with the very youngest of school 
age; besides it has well-equipped children's departments at the 
libraries, under the supervision of trained specialists. The Li- 



[21] 

brary also cooperates with the numerous colleges, universities 
and other institutions of higher learning in and about Boston so 
that many of them rely largely upon the Public Library for 
their library facilities. Finally, and perhaps most important of 
all, it ranks among the most complete American libraries in 
accommodations for scholars and authors in their research and 
writing. The equipment for this educational service represents 
a capital investment approximating eight million dollars, given 
in part by the State of Massachusetts, in part by public spirited 
citizens, but for the most part by the City of Boston. On its 
payroll are about six hundred employees ; the annual cost for light, 
heat, supplies, janitors, engineers, cataloguers, readers, distribu- 
tors, librarians, custodians, purchase of books, etc., demands 
an annual expenditure of half a million dollars; the actual cost, 
however, is much less. This is made possible by the able and 
efficient administration of an unsalaried Board of Trustees; by a 
self-sacrificing corps of workers, the average wage of whom is 
less than similar service in the other departments of the city, 
including the public schools; there is no retiring allowance or 
pension fund; and, most regretable of all, the Trustees, owing 
to the financial limitations under which they labor, are not 
able to buy as many new books annually as the patrons of the 
Library require. The Trustees are conservative in their askings 
of the City Council ; they keep their expenditures within appro- 
priations; our careful investigation fully persuades us that the 
funds are administered with great economy and efficiency. 
Says the Committee on Administration and Finance: 
Continued growth and progress can be made only under the leadership 
of men of ability, and who are interested in its welfare; your Committee 
believes that the Board of Trustees who give their labor without financial 
recompense, and the able Hbrarian and his assistants, are entitled to 
commendation for the broad scope of the Library and its activities. They 
find the affairs well and carefully administered and the institution doing good 
and effective work. The finances appear to be well administered, the 
expenditures wisely made ; and with the bills and payments checked by the 
City Auditing Department, we would make no criticism or suggestion for 
improvement. We commend to the City Council as generous an appro- 
priation of funds as is consistent with the needs of the city in its other 
activities. 



[221 

The great end of this library service is to place the best books 
in circulation and use among the people. On this point the 
Committee on Books says : 

In exanuning the books of the Library we have had in mind that 
they constitute the essential and all-important feature of the institution 
and that all its other parts and all the details of its administration are 
for the final purpose of acquiring the necessary books and of putting 
them to use, either by circulating them among readers or by making them 
available for purposes of enjoyment, culture, study or investigation by 
those who can derive advantage or assistance from their contents. The 
books are designed for the people, adults and children, educated and 
uneducated, those who care only for amusement and those who seek instruc- 
tion. The Library was founded and is maintained out of the money 
and for the benefit of all of these and its aim must be to satisfy the wants 
of all of them. It is, of course, to be regretted that the necessary limits 
of expenditure prevent the complete satisfaction of all the needs that it 
otherwise could be made to serve. There must be many books, highly 
desirable to be put upon the shelves, which cannot be procured. All 
classes must share in this deprivation. Lovers of the highest literature 
and lovers of the sensational novel which may have little or no literary 
merit must alike fail to have all their desires gratified. Scholars who desire 
to carry their researches deeply into recondite branches of art or science 
may need to supplement what they can obtain here by resorting to more 
specialized libraries in the immediate vicinity. Readers of fiction and 
lovers of poetry may not find here all that they desire of their favorite 
authors; and the more cultivated their taste, the higher their appreciation 
of the delicate shades of literary art, the greater may be the shortcomings 
to them, though they should remember that a distinguished English critic 
has declared that it is very difficult, a work of fine discrimination, to dis- 
tinguish between different degrees of literary merit. After all the chief 
merit of books lies in its appeal to the minds and hearts of their readers 
and that appeal is conditioned upon the capacity of those readers. 

With these general views in our minds, and having regard to the amount 
of money available for the purchase of books, we have examined, so far 
as our time has allowed the well-kept catalogues of the library and the 
lists of accessions during the year now ending. And we are satisfied that 
the money spent for books and periodical publications has been used under 
competent guidance and with good judgment. The library offers to the 
public a constantly increasing store of volumes in every department of art, 
science and literature. Its liberal supply of newspapers and magazines 
gives to a large number of people the means af acquainting themselves with 
current events and of obtaining a general view of life at home and abroad. 

Much also has been done for immigrants and their children, especially 
the French, the Germans and the Italians ; recently there have been several 



[23] 

purchases of books for Poles and Bohemians. We confidently expect that 
as increasing numbers of other races call for greater consideration of their 
wants, this need also will be met with a sufficient supply. 

While a very great, perhaps the greatest part of the work of a public 
library should be to provide for the gratification, the edification and the 
mental profit of those who by reason either of poverty or ignorance cannot 
make adequate provision for themselves, yet it remains true that such an 
institution must base its claims to approval and support, not so much upon 
the number of its volumes as upon their real value, — their value, that is, 
to the readers for whom they are intended. Those readers in this case 
include all classes from richest to poorest, people of all tastes from highest 
to lowest and all degrees of education and culture. We find in the books 
that here are offered for use evidence that an earnest and intelligent effort 
has been made to meet the needs of all these people. That there should 
be some deficiencies is unavoidable; that if the selection had rested in the 
hands of others, equally well qualified and animated by an equal desire 
to reach the best results, some different choices would have been made, is, 
of course, manifest. But taking everything into account, we are convinced 
that the needs of the public have been well met, and that the books which 
make up the library are substantially what they ought to be; that proper 
appropriation of the funds to works of permanent value, in contradistinction 
to books serving merely for the amusement of idle hours, has been made. 
It was gratifying to see the large number of the books which are open to 
public examination in Bates Hall and especially the many books on particu- 
lar subjects that may at any time become of marked interest. 

The carefully kept record of each book from the time it enters the 
Library until it is placed upon the shelves and while it is in circulation, the 
exactness of the card catalogues, and the absolute cleanliness of the Library 
as a whole, have much impressed us. The management is to be congratu- 
lated upon the intelligence of its employees and their evident interest in their 
work. It seemed to us in going through the different departments as if we 
were visiting a private library watched over by an enthusiastic bibliophile. 
Such excellence can be obtained only from competent and interested workers. 
One good result of their attention is that the mutilation of books and plates, 
which cannot be wholly avoided, has been diminished this year. 

We feel that the citizens of Boston have a right to be proud of their 
Library and of the collection of books which it contains, as well as of the 
care and intelligence with which its stores are made available. 

The Committee of Fine Arts finds much satisfaction in the 
work of this department, in its growing equipment, and in the 
spirit of usefulness and efficiency of thp staff; it looks forward 
with great pleasure to the new addition on Blagden Street when 
material belonging to the Statistical Department now stored here, 



[24] 

will be removed and this department will have enlarged accom- 
modations. The Committee inquires whether this department 
should not give more emphasis to its service in Industrial Arts and 
to this end recommends that there be added to the staff one assis- 
tant having special knowledge in this field. 

TTie Committee on Music congratulates the city on having so 
unique a collection of volumes on music as they find in the Library, 
referring particularly to the Brown Collection which "makes a 
reference library well nigh perfect.*' It inquires whether the 
music books intended for circulation cannot be housed in the 
space adjoining the Brown Collection, expressing the hope that 
"the circulating musical library will speedily be enlarged." The 
report heartily commends the capable and sympathetic work 
of the custodian. 

The Committee on the Children's Department and Work tifith 
the Schools found much to commend, in the generous aid given 
to the public school teachers and pupils by the circulation of 
books, papers and pictures as the teachers might request; they 
commented most favorably upon the beautiful work done with 
the children at the Central Library and its branches; they were 
greatly impressed with the Story Hour service as they saw it in 
operation; the good results are apparent in acquainting the chil- 
dren with books they should read, in the improvement in the con- 
duct of the children, in the more intimate and helpful personal 
relations developed between the children and the staflf, and in 
the increase in the circulation of the less familiar books. The 
Committee having the highest estimate of this work in connection 
with the schools, suggests that the Trustees might well issue 
another circular similar to the one issued some time ago entitled 
"Privileges which the Boston Public Library offers to Public and 
Parochial Schools." They recognize that this may create a 
wide-spread demand upon the resources of the Library which it 
might be impossible to meet ; but that the importance of bringing 
all the children under the influence of the Library is so great that 
the Trustees may well risk the possibility. While urging this 
policy for specifically children's books and the Story Hour ser- 
vice, the Committee does not feel that the libraries and reading 



[25], 

rooms should be a place for what is known in school circles as 
supplementary reading, as the schools are already equipped with 
such books ; the Library's service should supplement and enlarge 
the work which the Public Schools should do. 

So large an enterprise as the Public Library must require much 
printing and binding. For this reason the Library owns and 
operates its own plant ; it finds this method more satisfactory and 
less expensive than if done by contract. The Committee agrees 
with the Trustees that this arrangement is quite satisfactory, and in 
the interest of efficiency and economy. They find the plant 
small but well organized and wisely administered. 

The 30 branches and reading-room stations were arranged 
by geographical location into five convenient groups for visitation, 
and a sub-committee appointed to each group. In reading the 
reports for former years we discover there was much to praise 
but also much of which to complain. But the Trustees have 
been enterprising, the City has been generous, and gradually the 
grounds of complaint have been disappearing. This year's 
reports are replete with commendations, and have little of which 
to complain. We quote from a report: 

The sub-committee to examine the West End and North End Branches 
found the properties in first class condition and well maintained. At each 
library there was every evidence of an intelligent and sympathetic under- 
standing among the officers of administration in their purposes, spirit and 
methods. The relations existing between the library and the public seem 
to be most happy and cordial. These branches are most effectively serving 
their purposes. 

And here is another report illustrative of most of the reports : 

As a Committee, we visited the branch libraries assigned to us for 
inspection, namely the City Point Reading Room, the South Boston Branch, 
the Andrew Square Reading Room, the South End Branch and the Tyler 
Street Reading Room. 

In the first place, we feel it is incumbent upon us to congratulate the 
Trustees and the City of Boston on the great benefit to the citizens of Boston 
from the establishment of these branches. As a whole we found them 
clean, well-heated, and, in most cases, adequately lighted. A single 
visit assured us that much of the good accomplished resulted from the 
intelligent supervision and devotion to their work of a very capable corps 
of custodians; each custodian apparently differed from the others, in their 



[26] 

methods of administration, and several gave us views as to the management 
of their branch, which seemed to us of much value in the special branch 
under discussion. 

We were glad to find in most of the libraries attractive pictures of value 
to students, and would emphasize the great value of adequate maps easily 
available for study and inspection, which we found in the South Boston 
Branch at 372 Broadway. 

Aside from their value as reading rooms, the daily circulation of books 
is large, ranging from 190 in the small Andrew Square Branch to 600 in 
the South Boston Branch; the average circulation of the five branches 
visited was from 300 to 400 books daily. 

These reports are not all praise ; there are a few which complain 
of conditions which can, and doubtless will be, quickly remedied : 

The Dorchester Branch is poorly situated in a building with the police 
station and the district court. Its ceilings would be a discredit to the 
dingiest tenement in that region. 

Several other suggestions are made of minor improvements in 
the buildings or service, all of which will have the attention of 
the administration. There were also several suggestions made 
by the Committee on Administration and Finance ; some of them 
are in process of adjustment; others await only additional funds. 
But most of them will be adjusted so soon as the new facilities 
on Blagden Street are provided. We congratulate our citizens 
that by this new acquisition to its resources the Library affords 
new evidence of the interest of the Mayor and Council in this 
vastly important city enterprise. We also congratulate the 
Trustees that they have carried the new enterprise along with 
such consummate skill and marked economy. Such service is a 
gratifying instance of the highest type of civic patriotism. 

Adopted at a meeting of the General Committee on January 
10. 1916. 

Della Jean Deery, 
Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

To the Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit my report for the year ending January 
31, 1916. 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

At the Central Library building only minor repairs have been 
made during the year, confined to such matters as always require 
attention in the operation of the plant. Occasional leaks in the 
steam pipes have been stopped, worn valves and valve stems have 
been replaced, and the fire boxes under the three boilers have 
been re-lined, and repairs have been made on the walls of the 
boiler setting. New counter weight drum ropes have been 
placed on the electric elevator, and a new governor rope and 
other worn parts attached to the hydraulic passenger elevator. 
Other routine repairs have been attended to, and the entire steam 
plant and the dynamos and motors are in good order. The 
boilers are regularly inspected by the Hartford Steam Boiler and 
Inspection Company, and the elevators also, by the Otis Com- 
pany. 

The book railway and pneumatic tube system connecting 
the stacks and the delivery desks shows the effect of wear due to 
constant operation in the service since its installation and should 
before long undergo renovation, with the introduction, possibly, 
of improvements in mechanical parts which have been devised 
since its construction. 

Important changes and improvements in the lighting system 
of the Central building have been made. All the table lamps 
and the lamps on the catalogue cases in the Brown Music Room 
have been discontinued, and in place thereof semi-indirect ceiling 



[28] 

fixtures with nitrogen lamps have been introduced. Other semi- 
indirect fixtures have been installed in this building experimen- 
tally or permanently. Repairs on the tile roof, as heretofore, 
have been required after severe winter storms. The roof to the 
arcade surrounding the courtyard will eventually require more 
extensive repairs than have yet been given to it. Its original 
construction was poorly adapted to the rigors of our climate, and 
its condition creates problems not easily solved. Up to the 
present time nothing has been done to it, except such ordinary 
repairs as would carry the work until more extensive reconstruc- 
tion can be undertaken. 

The following are the principal repairs and improvements at 
the branch libraries: 

New shelving as required to provide for the gradual increase 
in number of volumes at Charlestown, Codman Square, Roxbury, 
Mattapan, Neponset, Mt. Bowdoin, Allston, Warren Street, 
Roxbury Crossing, Parker Hill. 

At East Boston and Charlestown stereopticons with reflecto- 
scope attachments and full equipment have been installed as 
intended when the new buildings were planned. At East Bos- 
ton, also, the front lawn spaces have been planted with shrub- 
bery. The West End Branch building has been entirely re- 
painted on the interior, and the iron fencing on the exterior has 
been repainted. Linoleum carpet has been laid on the children's 
gallery in this building. At the Roxbury Branch repainting, 
with other repairs, has been done by our landlord, the Fellowes 
Athenaeum. The renovating, required by constant use, has been 
carried out at the North End Branch, and new linoleum carpet 
provided for the Warren Street Reading Room. 

By the completion of the municipal buildings on Tyler Street 
and at the corner of Dudley and Vine Streets, the reading-rooms 
formerly operated on Broadway Extension and on Dudley Street 
have been provided with new and excellently planned quarters, 
equipped with new furniture. The improvement thus made 
possible has long been needed since the old quarters occupied by 
these reading-rooms were entirely inadequate for the proper 



[29] 



operation of the stations. The new rooms are attractive and con- 
venient, and the circulation in each case has increased since the 
removal, and will, no doubt, continue to increase. 

The building previously leased for the Faneuil Reading Room 
has now become the property of the City, and is a valuable 
addition to the library plant. 

THE USE OF BOOKS. 

The efficiency of a library is popularly supposed to be meas- 
ured by the number of books lent for home use, as shown by the 
figures of recorded circulation. Such figures are easily obtained, 
while other and in many cases more important operations cannot 
be expressed in statistics. The total number of volumes lent 
for use outside the buildings, termed "home use" circulation, for 
the year covered by this report was 2,135,100. This compares 
with 2,012,589, for the preceding year, an advance of more 
than six percent beyond what was then the highest recorded 
circulation since the establishment of the library. 

The details of this circulation are shown in the following tables, 
based, so far as they relate to the Central Library, upon the 
annual report of Mr. Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of the Issue 
Department, and, so far as they relate to the branch libraries, 
upon the monthly reports of the custodians : 

CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 









HOME USE 
DIRECT. 


HOME USE 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


SCHOOLS AND 
INSTITUTIONS 

THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS. 


February. 1915 . . 33.419 


9.839 


9,163 


52.421 


March, 






31,589 


9.091 


9,621 


50,301 


April, 






29.403 


8,668 


9.591 


47.662 


May, 






26,318 


6.711 


9.543 


42.572 


June, 






22,286 


5,655 


9.417 


37.358 


July. 






17.701 


4.310 


648 


22.659 


August, 






18,194 


3.811 


3.181 


25.186 


September, 






17.678 


3.627 


1.979 


23.284 


October, 






21 ,589 


5.032 


5.999 


32.620 


November, 






28,864 


7.265 


7.818 


43.947 


December, 






27,745 


8.372 


9.260 


45.377 


January, 1 9 


16 




25.188 


6.687 


8.973 


40.848 



Totals 



299,974 



79.068 



85.193 



464,235 



[30] 



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[311 
The figures are condensed into the following : 

Bool(s lent for Home Use, including Circulation through Schools and Insiilulions. 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through the 

branches and reading-room stations) 464,235 

From breinches and reading-room stations (other than books received from 

Central) i.670.865 

Total number of volumes lent for home use and through schools and 

institutions 2,135.100 

Comparative. 1914-15. 1915-16. 

Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use ... . 274,669 299,974 

Through branches and reading-room 

stations for home use . . . 76,057 79,068 

350,726 379,042 

Branch Department circulation (exclud- 
ing schools and institutions) : 

Direct home use 

From branch collections . 947,870 975,151 

From reading-room stations . . 503,644 555,929 

1.451,514 1.531,086 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch system) . . . 210,349 224,972 

2,012.589 2. i 35. 100 

It seems necessary to repeat from previous reports that, what- 
ever may be the value of statistics of circulation, they do not show 
the reference use of books within the various reading-rooms, mean- 
ing by that term the use of books by students, scholars engaged 
in important investigations, by teachers in connection with their 
work, by the members of the various University Extension 
Courses, as well as by a considerable number of readers who 
prefer to use books at the Hbrary instead of at home. This 
reading-room use continually increases not only at the Central 
Library but at the branches, and, as stated last year, 

"Figures are cold, the human element alone is really significant, and 
the best evidence of the value of such a library as ours, is not the mere 
number of books charged against borrowers, but the presence of hundreds 
of readers of all ages who may be found constantly in the different rooms 
throughout the system engaged either in serious study or in recreative 
reading." 



[32] 

By our system of operation, the collection of books at the 
Central Library is drawn upon through applications made at the 
branches, and the borrower, who may live in an outlying part 
of the City, need not come to the Central building if he is not 
inconvenienced by the delay of a few hours, required in the trans- 
mission of a desired book by our wagon delivery. During the 
past year 79,260 volumes have been sent out from the Central 
Library to fill applications made at branches. This is an increase 
from 76,816 the number sent out in the preceding year. The 
reports from the Branch Department show that the proportion 
of unsuccessful applications received from the branches, (that 
is, unsuccesful because the desired book was already in the hands 
of another borrower) has this year dropped from 46 to 38 per 
cent. There have been larger demands than usual for books 
relating to subjects of education ; and many requests for books on 
technical subjects ( not possible to keep in the branch collections 
without expensive duplication). The books classed as fiction, 
(including imaginative literature for young readers, as well as 
standard novels) comprised 63 per cent of the number sent from 
the Central Library on branch applications. The number of 
volumes sent from the special deposit collection at the Central 
Library for use by study clubs, or at various institutions (96 in 
number) was 41,073. 

Unbound periodicals numbering 37,570 have been sent to 
City institutions and various other authorized places. 

By what is known as the Inter-Library Loan System, within 
which various libraries are included, we may borrow, for the 
temporary use of our readers, books which we do not own and 
which cannot be easily obtained, the reciprocal arrangement pro- 
viding for occasionally lending, under similar circumstances, books 
from this library. The statistics of this circulation, for two 
successive years appear in the following statement: 

1914-15. 1915-16. 
Lent from this library to other libraries in Massachusetts . . 1,165 1,109 

Lent to libraries outside Massachusetts 282 280 

Totals 1,447 1.389 



[33] 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 184 230 

From libraries outside Massachusetts ..... 76 48 

Totals 260 278 

Borrowed from other libraries for use here .... 38 67 

Books lent under the inter-library plan, are those temporarily 
required by the borrowing library for the purpose of serious 
research. 

The classified "home use" circulation of the branches (read- 
ing-room stations not included) is as follows, for two successive 

years : 

1914-15. 1915-16. 

PERCENTAGES. PERCENTAGES. 

Fiction for adults 31.6 33.0 

Fiction for juvenile readers ...... 39.2 38.0 

Non-fiction for adults 12.5 14.0 

Non-fiction for juvenile readers ..... 16.7 15.0 

100.0 100.0) 

At the Central Library the "home use" circulation shows the 

following percentages: 

1914-15. 1915-16. 

PERCENTAGES. PERCENTAGES. 

Ficrion 45.23 4526 

Non-fiction 54.77 54.74 

100.00 100.00 

The fiction for adult readers includes a considerable proportion 
of so-called "classic" or standard fiction, i.e., the works of Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, and the later writers of established reputa- 
tion, both English and American, as well as current fiction. 
The fiction for juvenile readers includes the standard fairy tales, 
and imaginative literature, new and old, adapted to children of 
various ages. 

BOOKS RECEIVED. 

The total number of volumes added to the library collection 
for the year covered by this report (by purchase, gift or other- 
wise) was 42.973, besides 917 volumes received by purchases, 
23 received by gift, and 26 volumes of periodicals bound, on 
account of Fellowes Athenaeum, and deposited in the Roxbury 



[34] 

Branch. The details relating to these accessions are shown in 
the following tables : 



Books acquired by purchase. 



For the Central Library: 
From City appropriation . 
From Trust Funds income 



1914-15. 


1915-16. 


13,504 


11.255 


1.646 


2,383 


15.150 


13,638 



For branches and reading-room stations: 

From City appropriation . . 21,104 17,417 

From Trust Funds income . . 1,041 866 



22,145 18,283 



37,295 31,921 

By Fellowes Alhenaeiun (for the Rox- 

bury Branch) .... 923 917 

Totals 238,218 32,838 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise: 



Accessions by purchase (including 917 volumes by 
Fellowes Athenaeum, for Roxbury Branch) . 

Accessions by gift (including 23 volumes through 
Fellowes Athenaeum, for Roxbury Branch) . 

Accessions by Statistical Department 

Accessions by exchange ..... 

Accessions of periodicals (bound) . 

Accessions of newspapers (bound) 



CENTRAL 


BRANCHES 


TOTAL 


VOLUMES. 


VOLUMES. 


VOLUMES 


13,638 


19,200 


32.838 


6,578 
396 
575 

2,451 
156 


549 
.... 

395 


7,127 
396 
576 

2,846 
156 



23,794 20,145 43,939 

PURCHASES OF FICTION. 

Of current fiction, 762 volumes have been considered, and of 
this number 145 different titles accepted for purchase; and 2,312 
copies have been bought for circulation in the Central Library 
and branches. The total amount expended for new accessions 
in fiction was $2,683.93, and the average cost per volume $1.16. 
The replacement of worn-out copies of fiction and the purchase 
of additional copies to meet demand has cost $1 1 ,894. (covering 
12,521 volumes). The entire expenditure for books of this 
class therefore was $14,577.93, and this constitutes a little 
more than 36 per cent, of the entire cost of books of all kinds. 
This is a somewhat larger proportionate expenditure for fiction 



[35] , 

than usual, but it includes an exceptional purchase of additional 
copies of imaginative literature for young readers, fairy tales, 
etc. (classed as fiction) and additional copies of standard fiction 
published within ten years, purchased for branch circulation. 

NOTEWORTHY ACCESSIONS. 

The report of Miss Hieodosia E. Macurdy, Chief of the 
Ordering Department, presents details as to important accessions, 
including the following: 

PURCHASES. 

From the works of importance bought for the Central Library the 
following are selected: 

Books relating to or published in Boston, J 697—1 79 f . 

Brown, Jeremiah (?). Christ's example, and the fashion of the world: or 
a ticket looking-glass, with which every one may see his faults. New- 
England: Printed for the author. M, DCC, LXVIII. 

Cheever, Ezekiel. A short introduction to the Latin tongue. For the 
use of the lower forms in the Latin school. Being the accidence ab- 
bridg'd (sic) and compiled in that most easy and accurate method, 
wherein the famous Mr. Ezekiel Cheever taught. The 3d edition. 
Boston in N. E. Printed by B. Green, for Benj. Eliot at his Shop in 
King Street. 1724. 

Colmah, Benjamin. The duty and honour of aged women, delivered 
at the lecture in Boston, March 15, 1711, after the funeral of the 
excellent, Mrs. Abigail Foster, consort and relict of the late honourable 
John Foster, Esqr. Boston: N. E. Printed by B. Green, for Joanna 
Perry, at her shop over against the south side of the Town House. 

i7n. 

Culmann, Leonhard. Sententiae pueriles Anglo-Latinae. Quas e diver- 
sis authoribus ohm collegerat, Leonardus Culman; et in vernaculum 
sermonem nuperrime transtulit, Carolus Hoole: pro primis Latinae 
linguae tyronibus . . . Sentences for children, English and Latin. 
Collected out of sundry authors long since, by Leonard Culman; and 
now translated into English by Charles Hoole: for the first entrers into 
Latin. Boston in N. E. Printed by B. Green, & J. Allen, for 
Samuel Phillips, at the Brick Shop. 1 702. 

Dunton, John. An hue and cry after conscience: or the pilgrims progress 
by candle-hght in search after honesty and plain-dealing. Repre- 
sented under the similitude of a dream, wherein is discovered the pritty 
manner of his setting out, his pleasant humours on his journey. The 



[36] 

disappointment he met with after all his search . . . Boston, Printed 
by John Allen, for Nicholas Boone at the sign of the Bible in Cornhill. 
1 720. 

Jameson, William. A remembrance of former times for this generation, 
and our degeneracy lamented. The first (and second) part. Boston, 
N. E. Printed by B. Green, and J. Allen, for Duncan Campbell, 
at his shop over against the Old-Meeting House. 1 697. 

Lowell, John. The advantage of God's presence with his people in an 
expedition against their enemies. A sermon preached at Newbery, 
May 22, 1755, at the desire, and in the audience of Col. Moses Tit- 
comb, and many others inlisted under him, and going with him in an 
expedition against the French. Boston: N. E. Printed and sold by 
J. Draper in Cornhill. 1755. 

Martyrology, or, a brief account of the lives, sufferings and deaths of those 
two holy martyrs, viz. Mr. John Rogers, and Mr. John Bradford, who 
suffered for the Gospel . . . and were burnt at Smithfield, the former 
on the 14th of February 1554, the latter July 1st, 1555. Boston: 
Printed by S. Kneeland and T. Green. 1 736. 

The New-England Primer improved, for the more easy attaining the true 
reading of English. Adorned with cutts. To which is added, the 
Assembly of Divines Catechism. Boston: Printed by Joseph Bum- 
stead, for David West, in Marlboro' Street. MDCCXCI. 

Veteran, A, pseud. A letter from a veteran, to the officers of the army 
encamped at Boston. America: Printed in the year, 1774. [In 
opposition to the patriots.] 

Wadsworth, Benjamin. Considerations, to prevent murmuring and pro- 
mote patience in Christians, under afflictive providences. In a lecture 
sermon preached Septemb. 19. 1706. In Boston. Boston N. E. 
Printed by B. Green. Sold by Nicholas Boone at his shop. 1 706. 

Wadsworth, Benjamin. An essay to do good. By a dissuasive from 
tavern-haunting and excessive drinking . . . Together with a lecture 
sermon, (preached at Boston, N. E., December 22, 1 709). Boston, 
N. E. Printed by B. Green, for a publick good, 1710. 

Wadsworth, Benjamin. The faithful reprover. Or, an essay to quicken 
Christians, to the faithfully giving and suitably receiving reproofs, as 
there is occasion. In two lecture sermons. Boston in N. England. 
Printed by B. Green, for Samuel Gerrish at the Corner Shop near the 
Old Meeting-House in Corn Hill. 1711. 

Westminster Assembly of Divines. Shorter Catechism. The shorter 
catechism. Composed by the reverend Assembly of Divines, with the 
proofs thereof out of the Scriptures, in words at length. For the benefit 
of Christians in general, and of youth, and children in understanding, 
in particular ; that they may with more ease acquaint themselves with the 
truth according to the Scriptures, and with the Scriptures themselves. 



[371 

Boston in New England. Printed by Bartholomew Green and John 

Allen, for Nicholas Buttolph at his shop. 1701. 

The Library has been able to secure a manuscript collection of Com- 
missary receipts and other papers relating to the Siege of Boston, 1 775— 
1781. This folio volume contains 452 closely written leaves chiefly 
receipts for commissary stores signed by the captains of the companies. — It 
contains also considerable information concerning the officers and men in the 
various regiments of the Continental army at Cambridge and Boston, May. 
to August, 1 775. 

Works acquired for the Department of Fine Arts. 

Accademia filarmonica, Turin, Italy. II palazzo della Accademia filar- 
monica in Torino (gia Caraglio) , nel primo centenario dell' Accademia 
filarmonica, 1814-1914. Milano. 1915. Text, and atlas of 55 
plates. 

Achiardi, Pietro d'. La nuova Pinacoteca Vaticana. Descritta ed illus- 
trata . . . Nei quadri provenienti dalla vecchia Pinacoteca Vaticana 
dalla Pinacoteca del Laterano, dagli appartamenti privati e dai magaz- 
zini dei Palazzi Apostolici. Bergamo. 1914. Plates. 

Arata, Giulio U. L'architettura arabo-normanna e il rinascimento in 
Sicilia. Prefazione di Corrado Ricci. Milano. 1914. lUus. 120 
plates. 

Cox, Raymond. Les soieries d'art, depuis les origines jusqu'a nos jours. 
Ouvrage illustre d'une planche en couleurs et de 1 00 planches en noir. 
Paris. 1914. 

Cunningham, Harry Francis, and others. Measured drawings of Georgi- 
an architecture in the District of Columbia: 1 750— 1 820. New York. 
1914. 66 plans. (A collection of architectural drawings of public 
buildings, houses, churches, etc.) 

Destree, Joseph. Tapisseries et sculptures bruxelloises a I'Exposition d'arl 
ancien bruxellois organisee a Bruxelles au Cercle artistique et litteraire 
de juillet a octobre 1905. Bruxelles. 1906. lUus. 50 plates. 

English Madrigal School (The). Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes. 8 
volumes. London. 1913. 

Contains the Madrigals of Thomas Morley, Orlando Gibbons, John 
Wilbye, and John Farmer. 

Farrenc, Jacques Hippolyte Aristide, and Louise Farrenc, editors. Le 
tresor des pianistes. Collection des oeuvres choisies des maitres de tous 
les pays et de toutes les epoques depuis le XVIe siecle jusqu'a la moitie 
du XlXe. ... Paris. Farrenc. 1861-1872. 20 v. 

Frankau, Julia. The story of Emma, Lady Hamilton. London. 1911. 
2 V. Illus. Colored plates. 

Gusman, Pierre. L'art decoratif de Rome de la fin de la republique 
auIVe siecle. Ser. 1-3. 3 v. 1 80 plates. Paris. 1908-1914. 



[38] 

Hobson, Robert Lockhart. Chinese pottery and porcelain: an account 
of the potter's art in China from primitive times to the present day. 
London. 1915. 2 v. Illus. Plates, some colored. 

Marechal, Pierre Sylvain. Costumes civils actuels de tous les peuples 
connus, dessines d'apres nature, ... 2e edition, revue et corngee. 
Paris. 1 798. 4 v. 305 plates, colored by hand. 

Matthews, James Brander. About the ballet. Extra illustrated with 
portraits of celebrated dancers, and others connected with the ballet from 
the earliest period. Collected and arranged by Charles C. Moreau. 
Scrap-book. New York. 1 89 1 . 

Piccolellis, Giovanni di. Liutai antichi e moderni. Note critico-biogra- 
fiche. Firenze. 1885-86. Illus. Plates. Facsimiles. 2 v. One 
of an edition of 200 copies. Treats of bow instruments. 

Price, Charles Matlack. Posters: a critical study of the development of 
poster design in continental Europe, England and America. Illus- 
trated with forty-two reproductions in color and one hundred and 
twenty in monotone. New York. 1913. 

Ricci, Corrado. I Bibiena, architetti teatraH 1625—1890. Illustrated 
text, with Atlas of 94 plates. Milano. 1915. 

VoUard, Ambroise. Paul Cezanne. Paris. 1914. Illustrated text 
and 56 plates. 

Williamson, George Charles. Andrew & Nathaniel Plimer, miniature 
painters: their lives and their works. London. 1903. Portraits. 
Plates. No. 276 of an edition of 365 copies. 

Miscellaneous books. 

Abendanon, E. C. Geologische schetskaart van Nederlandsch Oost- 
Indie samengesteld in opdracht van het Koninklijk nederlandsch aar- 
drijkskundig genootschap. Den Haag. 1914. 6 sheets. 

Bible. Enghsh. King James Version of 1611. The Holy Bible 
containing the Bookes of the Old & New Testament. Cambridge. 
Printed by John Field . . . and illustrated with chorographical sculps, 
by J. Ogilvy. I 660. 3 v. in 2. Plates. 

Bible. Leabhuir na seintiomna . . . The Books of the Old Testament 
translated into Irish by the care and diligence of Doctor William Bedel, 
Lord Bishop of Kilmore, in Ireland, and for the public good of that 
Nation. London, 1685. (With NewTestament in the Irish charac- 
ter, translated by William O'Donnell. London, 1681.) 2 vols, in 1. 
Cambridge, 1681—85. The editio princeps of the whole Bible in the 
Irish character, the Old Testament appearing for the first time. 

Burbank, Luther. Luther Burbank. His methods and discoveries and 
their practical application. New York. 1914,15. 12 v. Colored 
plates. Facsimiles. 

Brown, Henry Collins. Book of old New York. New York. Privately 
printed. 1913. Plates. Map. The plates, many of which are 



[39] 

colored, are facsimiles of rare prints and photographs from the col- 
lections of Robert Goelet, Percy R. Pyne, 2d, J. Pierpont Morgan, 

and others. 
Commenius, Joh. Amos. Orbis sensualium pictus. Visible world or a 

nomenclature, and pictures of all the chief things that are in the world. 

100 copper-cuts. Translated by Charles Hoole. London. 1705. 

Said to be the first picture book ever made for children. 
Eisenstein, Judah David. Ozar Yisrael: an encyclopedia of all matters 

concerning Jews and Judaism, in Hebrew. 10 vols. New York. 

1907. 
Great Britain. Statutes. The whole volume of statutes at large, which 

at anie time heretofore haue beene extant in print, since Magna Charta, 

untill the xxix yeere of the reigne of our most gratious souereigne Ladie 

Elizabeth. At London, printed for Christopher Barker, 1587. 
Herbertson, Andrew John, and Osbert John Radcliffe Howarth, editors. 

The Oxford survey of the British Empire. Oxford. 1914. 6 v. 

Plates. Maps. 
Kennedy, Archibald. The importance of gaining and preserving the 

friendship of the Indians to the British interest considered. London. 

E. Cave, jun. at St. John's Gate. 1 752. 
Lee, Arthur. An essay in vindication of the continental colonies of 

America, from a censure of Mr. Adam Smith, in his Theory of moral 

sentiments. With some reflections on slavery in general. By an 

American. London. Printed for the author. Sold by T. Becket 

and P. A. De Hondt. MDCCLXIV. 
Qualter, Rodolph. Antichrist, that is to saye: a true reporte, that Anti- 

christe is come. Translated out of the Latin into Englishe. By J. 

O(lde). Imprinted in Southwarke by Christopher Trutheall, 1556. 
Thorburn, Archibald. British birds. Written and illustrated by A. 

Thorburn. . . . Vol. 1, 2. (To be in four volumes.) London. 

1915. 2 V. Colored plates. 
Voelckers, Theodore. View of the Merchants Exchange, State Street, 

and adjacent buildings, 1 842. Etched by Sidney L. Smith. Boston. 

1915. No. 22 of an edition of 65 copies. Size, 17^ X 23|/2 inches. 

There have also been acquired about 1 00 volumes relating to Abraham 
Lincoln chiefly obtained from booksellers' catalogues and auction sales, 
among them what is said to be the first life of Lincoln, issued as Tribune 
Tract No. 6, by John Locke Scripps. "New York. 1860. Horace 
Greeley and Company," and a folio broadside printed within heavy black 
borders on buff paper "To the memory of Abraham Lincoln" . . . 
(Buffalo. 1865.): a collection of 85 volumes in the Polish language 
comprising history, biography, fairy tales and historical fiction, in the 
selection of which the Library was aided by Rev. Alexander Syski and Mr. 
Josef Adamowski: a set, in the first edition, of Captain Cook's Voyages, 



[40] 

9 quarto volumes and 1 folio atlas, with portraits, engraved plates and 
charts: the concluding volumes, 6—8, of the The Harbinger, Boston, 
1847—9, and in this connection 19 unpublished autograph letters from 
George Ripley to John S. Dwight which record the last struggles of The 
Harbinger: five volumes for the Galatea Collection made up of excerpts 
relating to woman, from magazines 1818—1910, mainly from the Edin- 
burgh, Fortnightly and National Reviews, and Blackwood's Magazine. 

Of interest is a volume bought for its association, entitled "An exposition 
of the Creed. London. 1 683. By John Pearson, Bishop of Chester," 
which contains the following note: — "From Rev. Thomas Prince's library. 
This book belonged to and was bought by him in London on May 15, 
1717, just previous to his return to Boston, where he was ordained as pastor 
of the Old South Church. Contains his autograph on reverse of title- 
page and a note in his hand-writing on the fly-leaf preceding the portrait." 

GIFTS. 

The gifts received during the year from 3908 givers number 8369 

volumes, 1 1 ,644 serials, 3 1 7 photographs, 46 lantern slides, and 80 news- 
paper subscriptions. The following list represents some of the more 

important gifts. 

Associated Charities of Boston. 1 32 volumes, 323 numbers, charity 
reports and periodicals. 

Avery, Mrs. Samuel. Sixty-seven volumes, miscellaneous works, 58 
newspapers and a collection of magazines, American Agriculturist, 
Spectator, Boston Journal of Chemistry, etc. 

Benton, Josiah H. 102 volumes, also "The Book of Oaths and the 
several forms thereof, both ancient and modern. London. 1689" in 
manuscript. 

Boston Browning Society. Five volumes for the Browning Collection. 

Brown, Allen A. Forty-five volumes for the Brown Music and Drama 
Collections. 

Cabot, Mrs. Arthur Tracy, Ponkapoag, Mass. Eighteen volumes, in- 
cluding the Memorial History of Boston. 

Calamara, Nicolo S. Twenty-nine pieces of music for the Brown Col- 
lection. 

Coolidge, Baldwin. Photographs of the coins in the Museum of Fine 
Arts, Boston. 9 sheets. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph. Eighteen volumes, miscellaneous works and 71 
numbers of periodicals. 

Estabrook, Miss E. M. 1 35 photographs, French and German actors 
and actresses. 

Fields, Mrs. James T., Estate of. Through Boylston A. Beal, Adminis- 
trator. Five photographs and three daguerreotypes of Whittier. 

Frost, A. L. Thirty-one volumes, scientific works, algebras and geom- 
tries. 



[41] 

Gay, Ernest L. Fifty-one volumes, miscellaneous works and 26 numbers 

of periodicals. 
Gav, Frederick L. Facsimile of "A New Mapp of New England from 

Cape Codd to Cape Sables." (Copy 129, 1912. by Frederick L. 

Gay.) 
Gay, Dr. Warren F. Twenty-five volumes of early issues of the Illus- 
trated London News and Harper's Weekly and 1 38 numbers of Die 

Woche. 
Germany. Kaiserliches Patentamt. Patentschriften. 51 volumes. 
Great Britain Patent Office. Patents for inventions. 92 volumes. 
Hammond, George F., Cleveland. Original designs in architecture. By 

James Lewis. 1 780. 

Prodamus architecturae Goldmannianae. Leonhard Christoph Sturm. 

Augspurg. 1714. 

The Design of Inigo Jones. Vol. 1 & 2. London. 1 770. 
Heartman, Charles F. Phillis Wheatley. Poems and letters. First 

collected edition. 

Six broadsides relating to Phillis Wheatley. 

A critical attempt and a bibliography of her writings. By Charles 

Heartman. 
Heath, D. C, & Co., Boston. Four volumes, text-books, for the school- 
book collection. 
Higginson, Mr. & Mrs. Henry L. Sixty-two volumes, miscellaneous 

works and 267 numbers of periodicals. 
Jackson, Mrs. M. C. 1 08 volumes, including Italian and Spanish litera- 
ture and a number of guide books. 
John Rylands Library, Manchester, England. Catalogue of the Greek 

Papyri in the John Rylands Library. Volume 2. 

Woodcuts of the fifteenth century, reproduced in facsimile. 

Sumerian tablets from Umma in the John Rylands Library. Trans- 
lated by C. L. Bedale. 
Lloyd, Mrs. George H. Fifty-five bound volumes of manuscript music, 

the works of Mr. George H. Lloyd, for the Brown Collection. 
McCormick, Cyrus H., Chicago. Facsimile of the lUinois-W abash Land 

Company manuscript. Privately printed. 1915. 
Moynahan, George. 272 numbers of periodicals. Political Science 

Quarterly, Journal of Political Enconomy, etc. 
Morison, Samuel Eliot. Circular "At a meeting of gentlemen held to 

consider the expediency of instituting a Society for the promotion of a 

taste for Music." Boston. 1826. 
Muss-Arnolt, Dr. W. Twenty-four volumes, chiefly Bibles, Litanies, 

etc., in different languages. 
O'Connell, William, Cardinal, Archbishop of Boston. Sermons and 

addresses of his Eminence, William, Cardinal O'Connell. Volume 4. 

Two copies. 



[42] 

Page, Walter Gilman. Photographs of the Boston Massacre and Paul 

Revere's Ride, from paintings by Walter Gilman Page. 
Perry, Thomas S. Nineteen volumes, miscellaneous works. 
Priscilla Publishing Co. The Modern Priscilla, 1890-1914. 71 vols. 
Ross, Mrs. W. O. Twenty-nine volumes, miscellaneous works and 91 

numbers of periodicals. 
Shaw, S. S. 1 75 pamphlets, miscellaneous reports and periodicals. 
Snow, Miss Alice E. Six volumes of miscellaneous works, 1 7 volumes 

and 93 pieces of sheet music and 47 numbers of The Art Amateur. 
Tower, Mrs. Helen M., Cambridge. Six volumes of music for the 

Brown Collection. 
Trustees under the will of Mary Baker Eddy. Science and health. 1 8 

copies. 

Miscellaneous writings. By Mary Baker Eddy. 21 copies. 

Life of Mary Baker Eddy. By Sibyl Wilbur. 26 copies. 
(Placed in Branches and Reading Rooms.) 
Walcott, George H. The Cosair (Chess). 1 LI numbers. 
Warren, Henry D. Publications of the Societies of the Sons of the 

Revolution. 80 volumes. 
Widener, Joseph E., Philadelphia. Pictures in the Collections of P. A. 

B. Widener at Lynnewood Hall, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. Early 

German, Dutch and Flemish Schools. Privately printed. 1913. 
Young Men's Democratic Club of Massachusetts. 568 volumes, chiefly 

United States histories, literature, etc., 252 periodicals, manuscripts 

made up into 32 volumes, etc. 

THE CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

Under the direction of Mr. S. A. Chevalier, Chief of the 
Catalogue Department, 78,368 volumes and parts of volumes 
have been catalogued. These represent 42,146 different titles. 
Comparative details are as follows: 





VOLS. AND 


"^^^-^^-^ TITLES. 




PARTS. 


PARTS. 


Catalogued (new) : 


1914-15. 


1915-16. 


Central Library Catalogue 


22.017 20,614 


24,515 14,252 


Serials ..... 


5,929 


4,985 


Branches .... 


28,293 24.046 


19,184 16.747 


Re-catalogued .... 


16,316 7,211 


29.684 11.147 



Totals 72,555 51.871 78.368 42.846 

The number of catalogue cards added to the public catalogues 
during the year is 234,237 (21 7,505 at the Central Library, and 



[43] 

1 6,732 at branches) . Since November, 1911, one printed card 
for each title has been sent to the Harvard College Library, and 
we receive its printed cards in exchange. We also set aside one 
printed card for each title for the Library of Congress. Much 
replacement of cards worn or soiled by continuous use has been 
effected during the year, including all the titles in Greek, Russian, 
Hebrew and Arabic. 

The main body of the Allen A. Brown Music Catalogue 
having been completed, a supplementary volume is well advanced 
for publication. 

Other important work performed in the Catalogue Department 
during the year includes the re-arrangement and expansion of the 
special catalogue in the Fine Arts Department, the preparation 
of copy for the new edition of our list of Historical fiction, and 
much general bibliographical work in connection with corres- 
pondence or to meet inquiries made by students in the Library. 

SELECTION OF BOOKS FOR PURCHASE. 

The selection of fiction for purchase has been mentioned. 
Besides works of fiction the more important publications are 
received on approval and carefully examined, and during the 
year 1 50 auction sales catalogues, 1 00 booksellers' general cata- 
logues, with other special lists, and about 1 50 current periodicals 
have been searched for possible purchases. This work is per- 
formed in the Catalogue and Ordering Departments, with the 
assistance of certain members of the staff. Mr. Murdoch, Dr. 
Muss-Arnolt, Mr. Bierstadt, Mr. Chase, Miss Duncan, and 
Mr. Maier, especially, have given valuable assistance. The 
auction sales catalogues have principally been examined by Mr. 
Fleischner. Miss Jordan has examined books for children, and 
Mr. Ward has considered purchases for the branches. Mr. 
Thomas S. Perry, without remuneration, has given aid in selec- 
tion which is appreciated. Finally, suggestions for purchase, 
without regard to where the suggestion originates, pass under 
the revision and approval of the librarian. 



[44] 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The statistics relating to the number of volumes shelved, and 
thus made available for public use, as draw^n from the report of 
Mr. W. G. T. Roffe, in charge of the Shelf Department, are as 
follow^s : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 19,904 

Special collections, new books ........ 2,326 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. .......... 970 



Removed from the Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. ............ 

Net gain, Central Library ......... 

Net gain at branches (including reading-room stations) . . . . 



23,200 



7.975 

15,225 
7,820 

23,045 



Net gain, entire library system ........ 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is show^n in 
the following statement: 

345.734 
360,963 
377,225 
390,982 
404,221 
422,116 
438,594 
453,947 
460,993 
479,421 
492,956 
505,872 
520,508 
536,027 
556.283 
576,237 
597,152 
610,375 
628,297 
663,763 
698,888 
716,050 
746.383 
781.377 
812,264 



1852-53 








9,688 


1877-78 . 


1853-54 








16,221 


187&-79 . 


1854-55 








22.617 


1879-80 . 


1855-56 








28.080 


1880-81 . 


1856-57 








34.896 


1881-82 . 


1857-58 . 








70,851 


1882-83 . 


1858-59 








78.043 


1883-84 . 


1859-60 








85.031 


1884-85 . 


1860-61 








97.386 


1885 . 


1861-62 








105.034 


1886 . 


1862-63 








110.563 


1887 . 


1863-64 








116.934 


1888 


1864-65 








123.016 


1889 . . 


1865-66 








130.678 


1890 . 


1866-67 








136,080 


1891 . 


1867-68 








144.092 


1892 . 


1868-69 








152.796 


1893 . 


1869-70 








160.573 


1894 . 


1870-71 








179.250 


1895 . 


1871-72 








192,958 


1896-97 


1872-73 








209.456 


1897-98 . 


1873-74 








260.550 


1898-99 . 


1874-75 








276,918 


1899-00 


1875-76 








. 297,873 


1900-01 . 


1876-77 








312.010 


1901-02 . 



[45] 



1902-03 
1903-04 
1904-05 
1905-06 
1906-07 
1907-08 
1908-09 



835,904 


1909-10 


848.884 


1910-11 


871.050 


1911-12 


878.933 


1912-13 


903.349 


1913-14 


922.348 


1914-15 


941,024 


1915-16 



Volumes in entire library system ... 
In the branches and reading-room stations . 

These volumes are located as follows : 



%1.522 
987.268 
1.006,717 
1.049,011 
1,067.103 
1.098.702 
1.121.747 

1.121.747 
278.180 



Central l.ibrary . 


843,567 


Brighton 


20,010 


Charlestown 


15,451 


Codman Square . 


5.496 


Dorchester . 


20.560 


East Boston 


16,547 


Hyde Park 


27,785 


Jamaica Plain 


15,606 


North End 


6,200 


Roxbury: 




Fe Howes Athenaeum 8,19 


5 


Owned by City 29,33< 


9 


Total, Roxbury . 


37,534 


South Boston 


17,249 


South End 


16,948 


Upham's Corner . 


9,022 


West End . 


18,394 



9,585 
900 
7,927 
985 
1,464 
5,065 
2,160 
2,727 
3,368 
2,501 
1,873 
2,119 
2,229 
2,089 
3.050 
1,450 
1,886 



West Roxbury . 
Lower Mills (Station A) 
Roslindale (Station B) 
Mattapan (Station D) 
Neponset (Station E) . 
Mt. Bowdoin (Station F) 
Allston (Station G) . 
Mt. Pleasant (Station N) 
Tyler Street (Station P) 
Warren Street (Station R) 
Roxbury Crossing (Station S) 
Boylston Station (Station T) 
Andrew Square (Station Y) 
Orient Heights (Station Z) 
City Point (Station 23) . 
Parker Hill (Station 24) . 
Faneuil (Station 25) . 

CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT, CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

Miss Alice C. Jordan, the Chief of this department, reports 
that 85,834 volumes have been lent for home use (included in 
tables of circulation, pages 30, 31 ), and of this number 66,201 
were lent to borrowers applying for books in the Children's Room, 
the remainder going out through the Branch Department. The 
direct circulation from the Children's Room for home use has 
increased within two years to the extent of 12,455 volumes. No 
record is kept of the number of children who have used books in 
the room. They are of various ages and represent many different 
lines of racial descent, but they find here and gladly use the oppor- 
tunities for recreation and study which the library offers. 

The attendance at the weekly story hour for children at the 
Central Library was 2,262 for the year. It continues to justify 
itself as a satisfactory means of making the Library known to 
children, and for establishing pleasant relations with them. Visits 



[46] 

from classes sent from the schools have continued during the year. 
Miss Jordan has instructed them in the purposes and methods of 
the Library, varying her talks according to the wishes of the 
teachers and the ability of the pupils. Any inflexible scheme is, 
of course, impracticable, and not desirable. As to certain phases 
of this co-operative educational work of the Library and the 
schools, the following is taken from the report of Miss Jordan : 

The exhibit of library aids to school work, shown in connection with the 
meeting of the New England Association of Teachers of English, received 
appreciative attention from teachers within the city as well as those from a 
distance. Teachers in the High schools are now sending pupils to examine 
the illustrated editions of standard books, such as, Ivanhoe, The TaHsman, 
Treasure Island, the Idylls of the King, for the additional interest illustra- 
tions give to the study of hterature. 

With the organization and development of Continuation schools for the 
working boys and girls, have come requests that they be made acquainted 
with the library opportunities. Consequently the teachers have made ar- 
rangements to bring them to the library and to have talks given at the school, 
to arouse an interest in books. That good results have followed is shown by 
a statement, accompanying a request for a deposit of books for boys of four- 
teen to sixteen, to the effect that "The talks given have stimulated a desire 
to read." 

Ten class room visits have been made and eighteen addresses have been 
given to schools, clubs and other associations, on library topics. Beside 
these appointments which related directly to the wider usefulness of the 
library, the Chief of the Department has given courses on children's books 
and reading at Simmons College, at the Training School in Pittsburgh and 
at the Garland School in Boston. Although given outside of library 
hours, these lectures have none the less served to make the Boston Public 
Library more widely known and to give its work with children a certain 
standing. 

Special assistance in list making has been rendered to teachers and 
parents, to playground associations and story tellers. Hardly a day passes 
without a request of this kind. 

The gradual growth in the use of the Teachers' Room in the Children s 
Department, indicates that the teachers are appreciating its resources more 
fully. 

"I have been teaching for four years," said one Boston teacher, "and 
never knew there was such a room in the Library." 

Books have been reserved for eleven University Extension Courses the 
present winter. One of these courses, on Secondary Education, has ap- 
pealed especially to teachers and has undoubtedly brought some teachers 
to the room for the first time. 



[47] 

Transfer of the bound volumes of educational magazines from the Peri- 
odical Room to the gallery of the Children's Room was accomplished early 
in the year, a change which makes it easier for teachers to consult the files 
in connection with other books they may be using. 

TTie increasing use of the Department for teachers' reference 
work and for enlarged general reference work in connection with 
advanced courses of instruction will perhaps make it advisable to 
transfer these functions to some other room in the library. The 
space and attention now devoted to the pedagogical collection 
and to special reservations from time to time are needed for the 
normal expansion of the work with children, and such uses, impor- 
tant as they are, cannot be permitted to restrict permanently the 
facilities for the service properly to be expected from the Chil- 
dren's Department. 

In continuation of the arrangement made by the Arnold Ar- 
boretum, mentioned in mj' report last year, the Children's Room 
has received gifts of specimens of flowering shrubs and trees, 
for which our thanks are due. 

BATES HALL. 

In supplying the calls for books to be used at the reading tables 
in Bates Hall, about 760,000 call slips have been required, 
besides 360,000 slips from Bates Hall readers who have desired 
books for home use. Besides the books from the stacks supplied 
on these call slips, there is unlimited and unrecorded use of the 
volumes on open shelves in the Hall. The maximum attendance 
of readers in this, the chief reading room of the Library, was 
301 , at 5 o'clock P.M. on the twenty-first of October. 

Mr. Oscar A. Bierstadt, Chief of the Reference Department 
reports no diminution in the amount of reference work required to 
meet the inquiries of applicants in the room or in response to 
letters. 

The public catalogue now covers more than a million volumes, 
and it is the duty of the Reference Staff to give every possible 
assistance to readers or to students who are searching for literary 
material on any subject, and who frequently need, not merely 



[48] 

instruction as to the proper use of the catalogue, but competent 
advice as to sources of information, over the v^^ide field of English 
and foreign literature. 

THE SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

These include the departments devoted to the Fine and Tech- 
nical Arts, The Allen A. Brow^n Music Room, the Barton- 
Ticknor libraries, the Allen A. Brovv^n Dramatic Collection, and 
numerous special collections of rare and valuable books in the 
alcoves opening from the Barton-Ticknor Room. As frequently 
pointed out the vv^ork done in connection v^^ith these special col- 
lections is in the highest sense educational, and the training and 
experience of the attendants are essential elements in the effective 
public service given in the rooms devoted to them. So far as 
figures can indicate the extent of this service the follow^ing statis- 
tics, from the report of Mr. Frank H. Chase, Custodian, are 
illuminating : 

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT. 

Direct circulation of books for homs use (included in tables of 
circulation, pages 30, 31) 23,385, compared with 22,071 in 
1914, and 20,668 in 1913. The circulation of pictures as aids 
to study, sent to schools and classes upon request, is an important 
feature of the work of the Department. The figures for the 
year are as follows: 

PORTFOLIOS 

BORROWERS. ISSUED. 

Public schools 1,915 

Private schools ........... 35 

Clubs 24 

Classes ............. 16 

Sent to branches for exhibition or study ....... 253 

Miscellaneous 168 

Total 2.411 

BARTON-TICKNOR ROOM. 

Barton-Ticknor books issued ......... 15,539 

Maps issued 1,074 

Books from other departments, issued for readers in this room . . . 7,275 



[491 



ALLEN A. BROWN MUSIC ROOM. 

Number of volumes issued for use in the room 12,521 . The 
number of volumes added to the collection is 181 of v^hich 33 
have been received from Mr. Brown. Important additions are : 

Scores in autograph of F. S. Converse's music for the Masque of St. 
Louis; Henry F. Gilbert's Negro Rhapsody; the manuscript score of an 
unpublished opera by Julius Eichberg, entitled Sir Marmaduke; Farrenc's 
Tresor des pianistes (20 volumes) ; The songs in Don Quixote, by Purcell 
and others, 1694; and an earlv American rarity, Three Rondos for the 
Pianoforte, (1787). 

Ten volumes of clippings and programmes have been made in 
the room during the year, more than 1 ,000 cards written for the 
Brown Dramatic Index, and the contents of 78 volumes have 
been prepared as copy for the Supplement to the Allen A. Brown 
Music Catalogue now printing. 

The new semi-indirect lighting system installed in this room 
has proved successful. Table lights are no longer needed. 

An excellent portrait of Mr. Brown, to whom the Library is 
indebted for the important collection which bears his name, has 
been hung in the room, a gift from Mr. Samuel Carr, Mr. Augus- 
tus Hemenway, Miss Susan Minns and Mr. Robert Gould Shaw, 
friends of Mr. Brown. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES OF SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

Visits of Classes. 
Classes and study clubs to the number of 1 7 1 have been pro- 
vided with reservations for meetings, and these have included 
1 4,489 students. Among these students are those in attendance 
upon the lectures in Elementary English Composition (Mr. 
Hersey) and upon the Principles of Economics (Professor Met- 
calf ) and the conferences in connection with the University Ex- 
tension Courses. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

The following list includes the free public lectures given at the 
Central Library during the year ending January 31, 1916, and is 
carried forward to include the lectures as originally scheduled for 



[50] 

the remainder of the season, ending on April 23, and shows the 
exhibitions freely open to the public at the Central building: 

Lectures. 

Note: — All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*), were illustrated with 
lantern slides. 

1915 

Sun., Jan. 1 7. The Art of the Theatre. Frank W. C. Hersey, 
AM. 

Mon., Jan. 18. The Chilkat Country and the Olympic Range. Per- 
cival Sayward. (Field and Forest Club.) 

Thu. Jan. 2 1 . The Masterpieces of the Prado Gallery. Martha A. 
S. Shannon. 

Sun., Jan. 24. A Trip through the Great Lakes in a Freighter. W. 
Lyman Underwood. 

Mon., Jan. 25. Alaska. Frederick M. Brooks. (Field and Forest 
Club.) 

Mon., Jan. 25. *Wagner's Die Meistersinger. Havrah Hubbard. 
(Ruskin Club.) 

Thu., Jan. 28. Sunny Hours in Sunny Spain. Francis Henry Wade, 
M.D. 

Sun., Jan. 3L *Reading: Jeanne dArc, by Percy Mackaye. Mar- 
garet Wilson Shipman. 

Thu., Feb. 4. Field Study of Birds' Habits and Food. Edward 
Howe Forbush. 

Fri., Feb. 5. In the Saddle in Crete. Eugene P. Andrews. (Ar- 
chaeological Institute of America.) 

Sun., Feb. 7. *Some Contemporary French Dramatists: I. Sam- 
uel M. Waxman, Ph.D. 

Mon., Feb. 8. * Wagner's Tannhauser. Havrah Hubbard. (Rus- 
kin Club.) 

Thu., Feb. IL Salt Water Fishing in the Atlantic and Pacific 
Oceans. Marshall F. Blanchard. (Field and 
Forest Club.) 

Sun., Feb. 14. The Development of Art in the United States from 
the Viewpoint of the American Federation of Arts. 
Anna Seaton Schmidt. 

Thu., Feb. 18. The Lost Fleet at Samoa. John H. Westfall, 
U.S.N. 

Fri., Feb. 19. Battle Grounds of Julius Caesar in France and Bel- 
gium. Walter Denison. (Archaeological Insti- 
tute of America.) 

Sun.. Feb. 21. *Sir Walter Scott. E. Charlton Black, LL.D. 



[51] 

*Verdi's Otello. Havrah Hubbard. (Ruskin Club.) 
A Cruise to Norway and the Arctic Regions, includ- 
ing Iceland and Spitzbergen, Edith M. Esta- 
brook. (Field and Forest Club.) 
Contemporary Art and the Modern Spirit. Anna 
Seaton Schmidt. 
*Lecture Recital: The Appreciation of Music, and 
the Oratorio as a Form. Maud Wallingford 
Downs. 
China and the Chinese. T. Philip Terry, F.R.G.S. 
*Some Contemporary French Dramatists: II. Sam- 
uel M. Waxman, Ph.D. 
Harvard University. James Hardy Ropes, D.D. 

(Field and Forest Club.) 
Modem Theatrical Producers. Sam Hume. 
Napoleon, from Corsica to St. Helena. Henry 

Warren Poor, A.M. 
New Stories of the Old World. Mabel Francis 
Knight, A.B. 
* Wagner's Parsifal. Havrah Hubbard. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
Venice and Venetian Art. Minna Eliot Tenney 

Peck. 
The Stage as it was. Francis Henry Wade, M.D. 
Experiences in Fire Fighting in the Boston Fire De- 
partment. Daniel F. Serinott. (Field and Forest 
Club.) 
Stage Decoration in America. Sam Hume. (Drama 
League. ) 
*The Philosophy of Materialism and Intuitivism. J. C. 
Whipple. (Ruskin Club.) 
Aspects of American Drama. Frank W. C. Hersey. 

(Drama League.) 
Art in Legend and Story. Minna Eliot Tenney Peck. 
*The Great Lakes: their origin and their influence on 
the conditions of life in North America. Leonard 
Packard. (Field and Forest Club.) 
*The Masque of St. Louis. Joseph Lindon Smith. 
(Drama League.) 
The Greek Theatre, ancient and modern, and the 
Greek Drama on the Modern Stage. Will Hut- 
chins. (Drama League.) 
Fri., May 14. The Irish Dramatists and Ireland. Frank W. C. 
Hersey. 



Mon., 
Tue., 


Feb. 
Feb. 


22. 
23. 


Thu.. 


Feb. 


25. 


Sun., 


Feb. 


28. 


Thu., 
Sun., 


Mar. 
Mar. 


4. 
7. 


Thu., 


Mar. 


11. 


Sun., 
Thu., 


Mar. 
Mar. 


14. 
18. 


Sun., 


Mar. 


2\. 


Mon.. 


Mar. 


22. 


Thu., 


Mar. 


25. 


Sun., 
Thu., 


Mar. 
Apr. 


28. 
8. 


Fri.. 


Apr. 


9. 


Mon., 


Apr. 


12. 


Fri.. 


Apr. 


16. 


Sat., 
Mon., 


Apr. 
, Apr. 


24. 
26. 


Fri.. 


Apr. 


30. 


Sun., 


May 


9. 



Sun., 
Mon., 


Oct. 
Oct. 


10. 
11. 


Thu., 


Oct. 


14. 


Sun., 


Oct. 


17. 


Tue., 
Thu., 


Oct. 
Oct. 


19. 
21. 


Sun., 


Oct. 


24. 


Mon., 


Oct. 


25. 


Thu., 


Oct. 


28. 


Sun., 


Oct. 


31. 


Thu., 


Nov. 


4. 



[52] 

Thu., Oct. 7. The Spirit of the Crusades. Rev. Matthew L. For- 
tier, S.J. 
*Shakespeare in Music. Louis C. Elson. 
*Food and its Influence on Social Conditions. Mrs. 
Norah Johnson Barbour. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Lure of the Amateur Collector. George B. 

Dexter. (Field and Forest Club.) 
Making "Movies" in the Far East. Louis A. Hol- 

man. 
Esperanto. George Winthrop Lee, A.B. 
^English Dances in the Time of Shakespeare. Mrs. 

James J. Storrow. 
*Lecture Recital: Songs of the Ghetto. Henry L. 
Gideon, A. M. 
South America. Don G. Montt. (Field and Forest 

Club.) 
Zeta, the Newest Kingdom (Montenegro). John 
C. Bowker, F.R.G.S. 
*The English Drama when Shakespeare was a boy. 
Katherine Lee Bates, A.M. 
A Raid across the English Channel in the Eleventh 
Century, illustrated by the Bayeux Tapestry 
Sarah E. Palmer, M.D. 
5un., Nov. 7. *Shakespeare's Competitors in the Drama. Felix E. 
Schelling, LL.D. 
8. *Truly Sacred Art. Darius Cobb. (Ruskin Club.) 

11. Prehistoric Palestine. Max Kellner, D.D. (Field 
and Forest Club.) 

12. ^Reading: Maeterlinck's Aglavaine and Selysette. 
Arthur Row. (Drama League.) 

14. Wild Birds and How to Attract them. Ernest 
Harold Baynes. 

15. Massachusetts Forestry compared with Europ>ean 
Forestry. Frank W. Rane. (Field and Forest 
Club.) 

18. *What Story Telling may mean to Children. Marie 
L. Shedlock. (Froebel Club.) 

1 8. A Pleasure Trip to Colorado and CaHfornia. Charles 
H. Bayley. 

2 1 . Journeys with an Indian ; Camping-out-trip« ; Life of 
the Wild Birds and Animals. W. Lyman Under- 
wood. 
Mon., Nov. 22. *Art Education in Massachusetts under the Leadership 
of Walter Smith. Mrs. May Smith-Dean. (Rus- 
kin Club.) 



Mon., 
Thu., 


Nov. 

Nov. 


Fri., 


Nov. 


Sun., 


Nov. 


Mon., 


Nov. 


Thu., 


Nov. 


Thu., 


Nov. 


Sun., 


Nov. 



[53] 

Mon., Nov. 22. The Heritage of a Young American. L. Gertrude 
Howes. (Field and Forest Club.) 
Shakespeare on the Stage. Frank W. C. Hersey. 
Evolution of Oil Painting: From Ornament to Natur- 
alism. Burleigh Parkhurst. 
5. *Poets of the Elizabethan Age. Mrs. Lionel Marks 
(Josephine Preston Peabody). 
*Reading: Alice Brown's Children of Earth. Oliver 

Hinsdell. (Drama League.) 
Through the Heart of the South: From Washington 
to Florida. Guy Richardson. (Field and Forest 
Club.) 
Theatres of Shakespeare's Time. Frank Chouteau 
Brown. 
*The Drama of Michael Angelo, by H. W. Long- 
fellow. Mrs. May Smith-Dean. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Delia Robbia Family: I. Luca della Robbia. 
Charles T. Carruth. 
*Elizabethan England. Roger B. Merriman, Ph.D. 
From Suez to Yokohama. John R. Ainsley. 
The Delia Robbia Family: IL Andrea and Gio- 
vanni della Robbia. Charles T. Carruth. 

Journeys through Unfrequented Paths in Florida. W. 
Lyman Underwood. 

Jasper National Park and the Canadian Rockies. 
Mrs. Stanley Bone. (Field and Forest Club.) 

A Roman Rubbish Heap in Egypt. Charles T. 
Currelly. (Archaeological Institute of America.) 

Treasures of Antiquity on French Soil. Arthur Stod- 
dard Cooley, Ph.D. 
*Shakespeare and Religion. William Allan Neilson, 

Ph.D. 
Massachusetts Birds. Winthrop Packard. (Ruskin 

Club.) 
*Montessori Methods. Mrs. Dorothy Canfield Fisher. 

(Montessori Association.) 
Among the Eskimos of Labrador. A Cleveland 

Bent, A.B. (Field and Forest Club.) 
*Shakespeare, the Playwright. George P, Baker, 

A.B. 
The History of a Fine Art: Lace. Martha A. S. 

Shannon. 
Boston Harbor — The Port of the Puritans. Win- 
field M. Thompson. 



Sun., 


Nov. 


28. 


Thu., 


Dec. 


2. 


Sun., 


Dec. 


5. 


Tue., 


Dec. 


7. 


Thu. 


Dec. 


9. 


Sun., 


Dec. 


12. 


Mon. 


, Dec. 


13. 


Thu., 


Dec. 


16. 


Sun., 


Dec. 


19. 


Thu., 


Dec. 


23. 


Thu., 


Dec. 

1916 


30. 


Sun., 


Jan. 


2. 


Mon. 


. Jan. 


3. 


Wed. 


, Jan. 


5. 


Thu., 


Jan. 


6. 


Sun., 


Jan. 


9. 


Mon.. 


, Jan. 


10. 


Tue., 


Jan. 


11. 


Thu., 


Jan. 


13. 


Sun., 


Jan. 


16. 


Thu., 


Jan. 


20. 


Sun., 


Jan. 


23. 



Thu., 


Jan. 


27. 


Sun., 


Jan. 


30. 


Thu., 


Feb. 


3. 



[54] 

Pleasures of Taking Autochromes Around the World. 
Helen M. Murdoch. 
*Some Incidents and Personal Traits in the Life of 
Charles Dickens. Francis Henry Wade, M.D. 
Brazil, the Land of the Southern Cross, with 
Glimpses of Uruguay. Charles Wellington Fur- 
long, F.R.G.S. 
Sun., Feb. 6. Architecture of Shakespeare's Time. H. Langford 
Warren, A.M. 
A Winter in the Arctic. Samuel Mixter. 
*Abraham Lincoln. William H. Lewis. 
The Modern Brick House and its Ancestors. Frank 
Chouteau Brown. 
^Thomas Carlyle. E. Charlton Black, LL.D. 
A West Indian Winter. Francis Henry Wade, 

M.D. 
Shakespeare and Italy. (A Hterary pilgrimage.) 

Frank W. C. Hersey, A.M. 
The Art of Portraiture. Ernest L. Major. 
*Lecture Recital: The Russian in Folk-Song and 
Opera. Constance Ramsay Gideon and Henry 
L. Gideon. 
The Growth of Worlds. (Study of the Stars.) 
Rev. Joel H. Metcalf. 
*How to Misunderstand Music. Leo R. Lewis, A.M. 
With illustrations on the Pianola. 
Ancient Irish Art. John E. Lynch. 
*Cehic (Irish) Folk-Music. Benedict Fitz Gerald. 
With musical illustrations. 
The Development of Styles in Church Architecture. 
Edward T. P. Graham. 
*Shakespeare and the Printers. George P. Winship. 
A.M. 
Recent American Architecture. Clarence H. Black- 
all, A.M. 
Shakespeare's England. Edmund H. Garrett. 
The Most Beautiful American City. J. Randolph 
Coolidge, Jr., A.M. 
^Shakespeare's Heroines. Mrs. B. P. Cheney, Jr. 
(Julia Arthur.) 
The Pleasures of Tree Study. George Winthrop 
Lee. 
1 6. *Shakespeare as Interpreter of English History. 
Frank H. Chase, Ph.D. 
*The Shakespeare Anniversary. E. Charlton Black, 
LL.D. 



Thu., 
Sun., 
Thu., 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


10. 
13. 
17. 


Sun., 
Thu., 


Feb. 
Feb. 


20. 
24. 


Sun., 


Feb. 


27. 


Thu., 
Sun., 


Mar. 
Mar. 


2. 
5. 


Thu., 


Mar. 


9. 


Sun., 


Mar. 


12. 


Thu., 
Sun., 


Mar. 
Mar. 


16. 
19. 


Thu.. 


Mar. 


23. 


Sun., 


Mar. 


26. 


Thu.. 


Mar. 


30. 


Sun., 
Thu.. 


Apr. 
Apr. 


2. 
6. 


Sun.. 


Apr. 


9. 


Thu.. 


Apr. 


13. 


Sun., 


Apr. 


16. 


Sun., 


Apr. 


23. 



[55] 



Exhibitions at the Central Library. 

Pictures in the Prado Gallery, Madrid. 

Reproductions of pictures by Arthur Grottger. 

Spain. 

Fishing Industries. 

American Art. 

George Washington. 

Work of Boston Artists. 

China. 

Constantinople. 

Napoleon and his Time. 

Venice and Venetian Art. 

Pencil Drawings of Panama, by Clifton P. Kimball. (Lent 
by the artist.) 

Abraham Lincoln. 

Historical Exhibit of Artistic Printing. 

American Indians. 

China. 

South America. 

Palestine. 

American Industries. 

Photographs of European Scenery, by George B. Dexter. 
(Lent by Mr. Dexter.) 
Aug. 2 1 . The States of the Union. 

State Capitols. 

Fenway Court and its Treasures. 

Pageants. (Photographs lent by Miss Lotta Clark, Miss 
Virginia Tanner, and others.) 

South America. 

Cities of the Adriatic. 

Tapestry. 

Palestine. 

Wild Birds. 

Colorado and California. 

Forestry. 

Evolution of Oil Painting. 

Southern United States. 

The Delia Robbia Family and other Italian Renaissance 
Sculptors. 

From Suez to India and Japan. 

Poster Designs. (Lent by Massachusetts Hampton Associa- 
tion.) 



1915. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


25. 


Feb. 


9. 


Feb. 


15. 


Feb. 


20. 


Feb. 


23. 


Mar. 


2. 


Mar. 


15. 


Mar. 


22. 


Apr. 


5. 


Apr. 


12. 


May 


3. 


June 


5. 


June 


22. 


July 


19. 



Sept. 
Oct. 


9. 

1. 


Oct. 


25. 


Nov. 
Nov. 


1. 
8. 


Nov. 


15, 


Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 


29. 

6. 

13. 


Dec. 
Dec. 


20. 
23. 



[561 

1916. 
Jan. 5. Mount Desert. (Photographs and autochromes lent by 

George R. King.) 
Jan. 14. Central and South America. 

1915-1916. 
Oct. 1 — May 1 . Shakespeare Memorial Exhibition. Books and pic- 
tures illustrative of Shakespeare's life, work, and 
time. 

Besides the exhibitions at the Central Library, exhibitions at 
the Branches, upon a definite plan of rotation, from branch to 
branch through the winter season, of material sent from the 
Fine Arts Department, have been open to the public. These 
have included pictures covering the following subjects among 
others : The Shakespeare Country ; South American and Mexi- 
can Scenery ; American Gardens ; San Francisco and the Pacific 
Coast ; American Scenery and Architecture ; European Scenery, 
Cities and Architecture ; England's History as pictured by famous 
artists; Food Products of the World; Modes of Travel; The 
Panama Canal. 

BRANCHES AND STATIONS. 

TTie following figures summarize the operations of the Branch 
Department for the year: 

VOLUMES. 
Circulation through the branches (recorded also on pages 30, 31) . . 1,835,126 
Gain as compared with preceding year ....... 97,206 

Total cost of operation, chargeable against the City appropriation . . $142,797.94 

The number of principal branches is 14, and the number of 
minor branches (reading-room stations) is 16, no change having 
taken place during the year. The Branch Department has also 
served the following subsidiary agencies of distribution: Fire 
Department houses, 61 ; other institutions, 35; public and pa- 
rochial schools, 167; in all (including branches), 293. 

The demand of the public for books to be sent out from the 
Central collections shows continual increase. This method of 
bringing the Central books directly within reach of residents in 
every part of the City is an important function of our Library, 
and the privilege, if once used, is seldom given up. During the 
present year there has been a larger number than ever before of 



[57] 

requests from teachers for books to be used in connection with 
their work. It will never be possible to meet fully all such 
demands, but with enlarged shelf capacity, to be gained in the 
addition to the Central Building, soon to be erected on Blagden 
Street, it will be possible to provide a larger deposit collection 
of the volumes chiefly called for. 

The reports of the Custodians of Branches to Mr. Langdon 
L. Ward, Supervisor of Branches, contain many pertinent refe- 
rences to their work, and I quote some of them. As to the value 
of the plan of circulating Central Library books through the 
Branches, one custodian says: 

While the issue of books directly from the Branch continues to show a 
large increase, it is especially significant to note that the issue of books 
received from the Central Library also shows a steady growth, proving 
that the latter issue supplements the inadequate collection of books at the 
Branch, and provides borrowers in this district with books on technical 
and scientific subjects which it would be impracticable to include in the 
smaller collection. 

As to the work with the schools other custodians say : 

The neighboring school has sent boys into the library during school 
hours with creditable results. Two days were set apart for receptions 
to school teachers of the two grammar schools, and the response was cordial. 

During the year every teacher in the near-by schools has had either a 
deposit of books or pictures borrowed from the library. 

To the high school (of this district) pictures have been lent illustrating 
special features of class work, for example, illustrating the textile industry, 
wheat growing, metallurgical apparatus, etc. One teacher has especially 
commended the usefulness in the teaching of geography, of the pictures 
supplied by the library. 

Relative to the continual demand for new books (partly met 
by special purchases for the branches during the last two years) , 
a custodian says: 

During the winter months the books on engineering, electricity, stenog- 
raphy, bookkeeping and accounting, and the civil service manuals are seldom 
left unused on our shelves. Books on cooking, home making, entertain- 
ment, are asked for by women. 

Another remarks: 

New fiction is (of course) in continual demand. Among the stories 
in greatest request, we find those relating to the war. Among other books 



[58] 

generally asked for are those upon psychology, physiology, travel, adven- 
ture, history, reHgion, the boy scout and camp fire girls movements, and 
books for juvenile readers. 

It is possible that the demand for the simplest easiest English books for 
children and those learning the language — including the easy civic books 
for naturalization — will continue to form the largest group of requests. 

Some of the boys and girls who come to the library do not seem to be 
able to understand the stories from well-known poems, — such as Evange- 
line. They want the stories in prose form. The poetry seems to confuse 
them, and they want everything as simple as possible. They lose all the 
beauty of the story in poetic form. If some of the plays acted in the 
elementary schools were in poetry instead of prose it might help the girls and 
boys to the understanding and love of poetry. 

Unlike other branches we have little call for new fiction. To our 
patrons the old fiction is new. We have quite a call for technical books 
from plumbers, cabinet makers, persons fitting themselves for the civil 
service, men taking engineering courses, teachers wanting whatever material 
relates to their particular branch of work, and large numbers of men 
demanding easy English. Among the ItaHan books taken out recently 
I note Mazzolini, II popolo Italiano; Carducci, Prose; Amicis, Cuore; 
Plutarco, Gli Eroi della Grecia e di Roma; Pozzi, La terra; Plutarco, 
Le vita dei Greci piu illustri ; Gubernatis, Storia comparata degli usi funebri 
in Italia ; Franchi, La Filosofia delle scuole italiani ; Bovio, Scritti filosofici 
e politici; Bambaldi, Amerigo Vespucci. 

The magazines have been read more freely since we have placed cards 
on the table each month indicating interesting articles in the current periodi- 
cals. By this method the attendants, as well as the public are benefited. 
Each member of the force attends to certain magazines, and thus all are 
obliged to keep more or less informed. If the articles were all selected 
by one person, one point of view would be represented, but by distributing 
the work among six people, we are sure of a varied selection. 

The following extracts relate to the circulation and use of 

pictures : 

I believe that the teachers in our schools are coming more and more 
to appreciate the value of the pictures offered by the library as aids in 
making real to the children the wonders of history, science, art and litera- 
ture. 

All the picture exhibits from the Central Library have been interesting 
as well as instructive. Those illustrating scenes in Belgium, Austria- 
Hungary and Germany attracted a great deal of attention from the adults, 
and the boys were very much interested in the pictures of the lighthouses 
and life saving stations. 



[591 

As to the story hour work, at the branches, custodians remark : 

The story hour, discontinued for a time at this branch, was resumed in 
March. There was a total attendance of 1 ,869 with an average of 65 
at the 29 story hours held. The girls in this district like stories better 
than the boys do and their group is always the larger. This year there 
were present 299 more girls than boys. Stories were told from the King 
Arthur legends. The Crossing, Jungle books. Wonder book, and Indian 
legends. It seems to me the children enjoy hearing the stories this year 
more than ever before. They can always tell the story-teller just where 
she left off, in a continued story. When we took registration in the 
schools we spoke to the children about the Library in geenral and the 
Story Hour in particular. The teachers encourage the children to attend. 

One can hardly overestimate the value of the story hour not only as an 
introduction to good reading but as a civilizing and refining influence in 
the lives of the boys and girls. It develops concentration, self-control, 
sympathy, mutual understanding and happy comradeship. Those who 
have frequented the story hours for a year are a leaven among the shifting 
company in the children's room that may be made a help in setting and 
keeping standards of conduct there. 

The story hour has made its place in the Library on its merits. There 
are none now to question its position. Our own group here at the Hbrary 
is composed of about 75 to 1 00 boys who have attended regularly since 
the first story hour three years ago. They are of Polish, Lithuanian, and 
Irish extraction, chiefly, but we have some of Italian and Hebrew descent. 
They have so identified themselves with the story hour that it is not unusual 
for a member of the library staff to describe a lad as "one of the story hour 
boys." Many of them who have attended from the beginning are now in 
high school, but are not yet "too big" for stories. In fact, to some of them 
the story hour has proved a connecting link between the fields of grammar 
school endeavor and the many strange paths opened to them in high school. 
If he has heard the story of the Odyssey or the /Eneid, the boy will at 
least know that what he is trying to read in Greek or Latin is really worth 
reading, though it is rather difficult to translate. I should think a boy's 
sympathetic acquaintance with King Arthur, Robin Hood, and Gulliver 
would cause his English teacher to appreciate the Library Story Hour. 

The story hour work has been carried on at the larger branches 
(as well as at the Central Library) wherever suitable audience 
rooms exist, by Mrs. Mary W. Cronan, who has been assisted 
by others, some of whom are members of our staff who have 
received instructions from Mrs. Cronan. By co-operation with 
the Children's Welfare League of Roxbury there has also been 
story telling at the Mt. Pleasant Reading Room. 



160] 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. John J. Keenan, Chief of the Registration Department, 
presents in his report the usual comparative statistics relating to 
borrowers' cards: 



Held by men and boys .... 

Held by women and girls 

Held by persons over 16 years of age 

Held by persons under 16 years of age 

Pupils' cards (public and parochial schools) 

Students' cards (higher institutions of learning) 

Number of cards available for present use 



IN FORCE 


NET INCREASE 


UARY. 1916. 


FOR THE YEAR. 


47.382 


1.702 


64,817 


3.034 


60.380 


972 


51.819 


3,764 


38,206 


2,188 


30.494 


1,604 


112.199 


4.736 



VARIOUS STATISTICS. 
Distribution of Documents. 
The distribution of library publications for the year is shown 
in the following table: 

Sent to Departments for free distribution ....... 136,509 

Sent to Departments for sale ......... 375 

Free, direct distribution ...,,..... 2,733 

Distributed for library use ......... 94 

The character of the publications issued during the year, for 
the purpose of promoting the convenient use of the Library is 
given below. 

Publications. 
The publications for the year, issued under the editorial super- 
vision of Mr. Lindsay Swift, include : 

Weekly Lists. FVom January 16, 1915 to January 8, 1916, inclusive, 
52 numbers. Edition, each issue, 2500 copies. Consecutive pages, 
in all, 276. 
Quarterly Bulletins. Four numbers. Edition, each issue, 2000 copies. 
Pages, in all, 404. Besides the usual titles of new books, the 
bulletins contained announcements of lectures, etc., in our own 
courses, and in those of the University Extension, Lowell Institute, 
and other institutions. 
Besides the foregoing a pamphlet of 44 pages was issued on 
account of the Shakespeare Tercentenary, relating to the exhibi- 
tion and free lectures given at the Library in noting the Tercen- 
tenary, and including, also, a selected list of working editions of 
Shakespeare, and works relating to Shakespeare, offered by the 
Library. 



[61] 

The Bates Hall Centre Desk, Newspaper and Patent Rooms, 
Central Library. 

The usual statistics, reported by Mr. Pierce E. Buckley, Cus- 
todian, follow: 

Centre Desk- The highest recorded maximum attendance of 
readers in Bates Hall, during any one day was 301 (on October 
31, at 5 P.M.) ; and the smallest maximum for any day was 102 
on Sunday, July 4, at 4 P.M. 

Newspaper Room. The number of papers now regularly filed 
in this room is 301 , not including trade newspapers and maga- 
zines, 82 in number. During the year, three papers have been 
added to the list and 14 have been discontinued or have failed 
to reach us on account of the war in Europe. The largest num- 
ber of readers noted at any one time during the year was 219, on 
January 15 (1916). During only one month (July) was a 
maximum number of less than 100 recorded. 

The newspaper files are constantly in use, and 1 8,035 persons 
consulted 33,200 bound volumes of newspapers during the year, 
as compared with 13,603 persons who used 27,415 volumes in 
the preceding year. During the year a few numbers of 18th 
century papers have been added to the files, which now include 
7,928 volumes, an increase of 1 54 for the year. 
Patent Room. The total number of volumes in our collection 
of patent documents is 13,361, the increase for the year being 
354. The recorded number of persons using the files during the 
year was 1 7,5 1 2 as compared with 1 3,2 1 1 in the preceding year. 
The number of volumes consulted was 1 06,358. 

The Periodical Room, Central Library. 

The usual statistical table which follows shows the number 
of readers in this room, at certain hours, in each of two suc- 
cessive years: 
hours: 10 12 2 4 6 8 10 

1915-16 
1914-15 



A.M 


M. P.M. P.M. 


P.M. P.M. 


P.M. 


9,922 


13,872 21,164 26,873 


19,434 23,402 


8,576 


9,946 


13,998 21.029 26.623 


19.894 23.351 


8347 



[62] 
The use of the bound files is thus shown : 

Bound volumes consulted during the year: 1915-16. 1914-15. 

In the day time (week days) 33,742 33,421 

In the evening or on Sundays 13,401 12,093 

The European War has interfered with the regular receipt of 
our foreign periodicals. Of the 1 , 1 46 periodicals usually taken 
for filing in the periodical room about 86 have not been received 
since August, 1914. Besides the regular periodical room files, 
the following periodicals are available to readers: 

In Fine Arts Department and Music Room ... ... 130 

In Newspaper Room ........... 105 

In Statistical Department .......... 39 

In Teachers* Reference Room ......... 44 

Documents and Statistics. 

Mr. Horace L. Wheeler, in charge of the Statistical Depart- 
ment, reports a gain through the Shelf Department of 590 vol- 
umes. By exchanges and gifts through the American Statistical 
Association, as additions to its collections held here, we have 
received 396 columes and 929 pamphlets (eventually to be 
bound) . By the records of the Shelf Department the Statistical 
Department contains 19,933 volumes definitely placed. 

About 13,000 volumes have been consulted in the department 
during the year, about 4,000 volumes sent to other parts of the 
building for the use of readers; about 2,000 volumes sent out 
through Issue and Branch Departments for home use, and about 
1 ,200 volumes lent directly for home use. 

To avoid misunderstanding as to the purpose of the Statistical 
Department the following, repeated from the report of last year is 
pertinent : 

The name "Statistical Department" requires explanation. The collec- 
tion includes state, municipal and United States government reports and 
many works on economics and relating to social science. Reserves are 
made here for students of subjects represented in the collection, and per- 
sons seeking statistical information upon commercial, financial, or municipal 
problems are frequent visitors 

Sunday and Evening Service, Central Library). 
The average number of books lent on Sundays and holidays, 
for use outside the building was 859 (776 in 1915). The 



[63] 



largest number on any single Sunday (or holiday) was 1,353 
(1,348 in 1915). The largest number of readers in the Bates 
Hall Reading Room on any single Sunday was 30 1 on October 
31 (335 in 1915 on December 13). 

The Printing Department, 
The following table compiled by Mr. Francis Watts Lee, 
Chief, presents a comparative statement of the work of the Print- 
ing Department in each of two successive years, so far as this 
work may be expressed in a statistical statement : 

1914-15. 1915-16. 
Requisitions on hand at opening of year 
Requisitions received during the year 
Requisitions on hand at end of year 
Requisitions filled during the year 
Card Catalogue (Central) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) . 

Cards finished (excluding extras) 

Titles in type, but not printed 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) . 

Cards (approximately) . 
Pamphlets, not elsewhere enumerated 
Call slips ..... 
Stationery and blank forms . 
Signs ..... 

Blank books .... 
Catalogue drawer labels (different) 

The Bindery. 
The usual statistical statement as to the work in the Bindery, 
based upon the report of Mr. James W. Kenney, Chief, follows : 

1914-15. 1915-16. 
Number of volumes bound, various styles 
Magazines stitched 
Volumes repaired 
Volumes guarded 
Maps mounted .... 
Photographs and engravings mounted 
Library publications, folded, stitched and trimmed 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations for library service were given as follows : Grade 
E, June 19, 90 applicants of whom 48 passed; Grade E, Sep- 
tember 25, 83 applicants of whom 34 passed; Grade C, Novem- 
ber 6, 91 applicants of whom 39 passed; Grade B, November 6, 
21 applicants of whom 4 passed. 



149 


152 




2 


149 


150 


18,294 


18,030 


261,685 


217,505 


114 


228 


608 


424 


33,440 


23,320 


24650 


15,480 


1 ,228,500 


3,217,800 


814,825 


876,151 


954 


573 


I 


14 


.... 


3,007 



40,633 


44,543 


192 


225 


3,134 


3,987 


1,600 


1,458 


313 


138 


3.347 


6,225 


192,064 


158,144 



[64] 

CO-OPERATIVE RELATIONS OF THE LIBRARY AND THE SCHOOLS. 

I think it proper to describe here the relations which now exist 
between the Library and the schools. Inquiries upon this sub- 
ject are frequently received. 

The schools of the City are assigned, respectively, to a definite 
branch or reading-room station as a centre of library service. 
The custodians of branches and stations are thus brought into 
intimate relations with a fixed number of schools, to which their 
special attention is devoted, for the promotion of co-operative 
relations. The privileges offered are open to parochial as well 
as to the public schools. 

1 . The Library sends an attendant to each grammar and high 
school at least once a year, at such time as may be convenient 
for the head-master or master, to take applications for library 
cards. 

2. The Library sends to classes deposits of twenty-five or 
more volumes each, as far as its resources permit. The books 
are for topical reference or miscellaneous reading. The charac- 
ter of the books varies, of course, with the needs of the schools. 
Applications for them are made to the Supervisor of Branches, 
Central Library, or to the custodian of a neighboring branch. 
Any losses of books are made good by the School Committee. 

3. Books are reserved as far as possible at a Branch or Station 
for the use of pupils, whenever a teacher so requests. Under 
certain conditions these books may be taken to the school building. 
Crowds of children come to the branches and stations for library 
assistance, as soon as the daily school sessions close. 

4. A set of special catalogues of the Library have been placed 
in the schools, or are available. These are of use to teachers in 
directing the reading of their pupils. 

5. Teachers are especially invited to avail themselves of the 
advantages offered by the Fine Arts Department of the Library. 
From this Department pictures are issued to public, parochial or 
private schools, in portfolios (not more than 25 pictures at one 
time) ; portfolios are usually sent through the Branch or reading- 
room nearest to the school on requests by teachers, specifying the 



[65] 

subects required ; but teachers may select collections of pictures in 
person at the Central Library on presentation of a teacher's card. 

The collection consists of reproductions of paintings, examples 
of sculpture and architecture, pictures relating to physical and 
commercial geography, views of cities, industrial processes, trans- 
portation, costumes and customs, colored pictures of American 
Indians, etc., etc. 

The range of subjects covered may perhaps be best indicated 
by the following list included in portfolios sent to one public 
school, during a single school year: 

Airships and Aeroplanes; American Revolution; Glaciers 
and Erosion ; Canada ; Famous Trees ; Beaches and Shore Lines ; 
Commercial Cities ; Boston and Vicinity ; Industries and Occupa- 
tions; Useful Plants; American Indians; Chasms and Canyons; 
Boston; Western Massachusetts; Evangeline; Land Forms; 
Shipping; Mexico; Indian Life; Asia; New England; Races 
of Men; Mountains and Valleys; Africa; Europe; Leaves and 
Trees; Middle Atlantic States; Lakes and Ponds; North Amer- 
ica ; Scenes in England ; Lakes of Scotland and Ireland ; Ocean 
Forms; Industries of Southern States; Wheat Industry; Boston 
Monuments; Columbus. 

6. To supplement the pictures provided by the Fine Arts 
Department of the Central Library, collections have been formed 
at the branches, of inexpensive pictures likely to be of use to 
teachers in their work. These pictures are chiefly representations 
of birds or animals, or are related to geography, physical and 
political, history, folk life, or the industrial arts. Printed lists 
are available, representing the collections of the large branches. 
Pictures may be drawn from a distant branch, as well as from 
the one nearest to the school. 

7. Both teachers and pupils are cordially invited to become 
familiar with the room at the Central Library known as the 
Teachers' Reference Room. Special facilities are there offered 
to teachers in the use of a professional library of reference books 
on educational subjects. 

Opportunities for older children to do school work are afforded 
by the simpler encyclopaedias and reference books. 



[66] 

8. Instruction in the use of the Library, the card catalogue, 
and the simpler reference books is offered to classes in the schools. 
This instruction is given at the Central Library by appointment 
made with teachers. 

9. Special cards are issued to teachers of public, parochial, 
and private schools, on which may be drawn, for use in connec- 
tion with the school work, not more than six books at one time, 
to be retained not more than four weeks. 

Hie reference books in the Teachers' Reference Room, Cen- 
tral Library, of value to teachers in their work, are classified as 
follows : (a) The history and theory of education ; (b) Psychol- 
ogy; (c) Pedagogical method; (d) Reference books required in 
university extension courses; (e) Books required by teachers in 
their immediate work ; (f) Reference books on the principal sub- 
jects taught in the elementary schools; (g) A partial collection 
of the text-books in use in the public schools; (h) A reference 
set of the best books for children, in special editions. 

The best educational periodicals are filed in the room for 
reading, regularly as received. Besides these books and maga- 
zines which are reserved for use at the reading tables within the 
room, there are books upon the shelves immediately available 
for circulation, relating to the following clasified subjects: 
(a) The theory and practice of kindergarten teaching ; (b) Story 
telling; (c) Music for kindergarten and primary grades. 

The reading tables are arranged for use at all times, including 
evenings and Sundays, and the attendants are especially familiar 
with the collection, and prepared to give such assistance as may 
be required in enabling readers to use it. It is adapted for use 
by teachers in general professional study, for special reading in 
order to keep abreast of current educational thought, and in 
the preparation of class work. 

The room is easily accessible, on the second or principal 
floor of the building, opening from the Children's Reading Room, 
which itself opens from the corridor at the head of the main 
stairway. While books within it are principally for the use 
of teachers, and on account of their character will be mainly 
used by them, nevertheless the older pupils in the schools, or other 



[671 

readers or students who wish to make studious use of such refer- 
ence works, are not refused admission to the room, since the 
Public Library is not for a special class and its privileges are 
necessarily open to all. 

For many years the Library has sought the closest co-opera- 
tion with the schools, and has in various ways offered friendly 
assistance to teachers and pupils. It regards this co-operation 
as an important phase of its work. 

CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENTS AND CUSTODIANS OF BRANCHES 
AND READING-ROOM STATIONS. 

As at present organized, the various departments of the Library 
and the branches and reading-room stations are in charge of the 
following persons: 

Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief of Catalogue Department, 
William G. T. Roffe, in Charge of Shelf Department. 
Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief of Ordering Department. 
Oscar A. Bierstadt, Custodian of Bates Hall Reference Department. 
Pierce E. Buckley, Custodian of Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and 

Newspaper Departments. 
Frank H. Chase, Custodian of Special Libraries. 
Barbara Duncan, In charge of Brown Music Room. 
Walter G. Forsyth, In charge of Barton-Ticknor Room. 
Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of Issue Department. 
Langdon L. Ward, Supervisor of Branches and Stations. 
Alice M. Jordan, Chief of Children's Department. 
John J. Keenan, Chief of Registration Department. 
Horace L. Wheeler, First Assistant, in charge of Statistical Department. 
Francis Watts Lee, Chief of Printing Department. 
James W. Kenney, Chief of Bindery Department. 
Henry Niederauer, Chief of Engineer and Janitor Department. 
Marian W. Brackett, Custodian of Brighton Branch. 
Katherine S. Rogan, Custodian of Charlestown Branch. 
M. Florence Cufflin, Custodian of Codman Square Branch. 
Elizabeth T. Reed, Custodian of Dorchester Branch. 
Ellen O. Walkley, Custodian of East Boston Branch. 
Elizabeth Ainsworth, Custodian of Hyde Park Branch. 
Mary P. Swain, Custodian of Jamaica Plain Branch. 
Edith Guerrier, Custodian of North End Branch. 
Helen M. Bell, Custodian of Roxbury Branch. 
Mary J. Minton, Custodian of South Boston Branch. 
Margaret A. Sheridan, Custodian of South End Branch. 
Josephine E. Kermey, Custodian of Upham's Corner Branch. 



[68] 

Alice M. Robinson, Custodian of West End Branch. 

Carrie L. Morse, Custodian of West Roxbury Branch. 

Mary A. Hill, Custodian of Station A, Lower Mills Reading Room. 

Grace L. Murray, Custodian of Station B, Roslindale Reading Room. 

Emma D. Capewell, Custodian of Station D, Mattapan Reading Room. 

Mary M. Sullivan, Custodian of Station E, Neponset Reading Room. 

Isabel E. Wetherald, Custodian of Station F, Mt. Bowdoin Reading 

Room. 
Katherine F. Muldoon, Custodian of Station G, Allston Reading Room. 
Margaret H. Reid, Custodian of Station N, Mt. Pleasant Reading Room. 
Cora L. Stewart, Custodian of Station P, Tyler Street Reading Room. 
Florence M. Bethune, Custodian of Station R, Warren Street Reading 

Room, 
Katrina M. Sather, Custodian of Station S, Roxbury Crossing Reading 

Room. 
Elizabeth P. Ross, Custodian of Station T, Boylston Station Reading 

Room. 
Edith R. Nickerson, Custodian of Station Y, Andrew Square Reading 

Room. 
Edith F. Pendleton, Custodian of Station Z, Orient Heights Reading 

Room. 
Alice L. Murphy, Custodian of Station 23, City Point Reading Room. 
Mary F. Kelley, Custodian of Station 24, Parker Hill Reading Room. 
Gertrude L. Connell, Custodian of Station 25, Faneuil Reading Room. 

EXPENSES OF THE LIBRARY. 

The expenses of the Library, paid from the City appropriation, 
are shown in detail on the Balance Sheet, page 16—19. To 
enable more ready comparison, for two successive years, the 
following summary is presented of the various items of expense : 

For salaries: 1914-15. 1915-16. 



General administration 


$204,748.05 $211,027.38 


Sunday and evening force 


27,642.19 28,190.99 




tT^O ■^QO'iA 1i'>^Q''lft^7 


From Whitney bibliographic fund 


1,124.38 1,760.80 


(Salaries in the Printing and 




Binding Departments are re- 




ported under those heads, re- 




spectively) 




For books: 




From City appropriation . 


39,673.67 30.841.13 


From trust funds income . 


9,981.02 9,067.58 


From Carnegie gift, for Gala- 




tea collection 


58.86 63.95 


From Sullivan bequest . 


459.80 



50,17335 39.972.66 



Carried forward . . $233,687.97 $280,951.83 



[69] 





1914-15. 


1915-16. 


Brought forward 




^233.687.97 


$280,951.83 


For newspapers, Todd fund in- 






come .... 


$ 1,919.34 




$ 1.879.33 


Periodicals . 


7,470.49 




6.586.19 


Furniture and fixtures . 


4,252.45 




7.223.59 


Gas ..... 


2,376.38 




2.867.57 


Electric lighting . 


4,699.59 




4,754.57 


Cleaning .... 


11,509.91 




11.908.96 


Small supplies 


4.127.34 




3.844.47 


Ice 


216.79 




275.46 


Stationery .... 


2,299.74 




2.213.08 


Rents 


15,495.67 




15,53031 


Fuel 


14,225.61 




16.365.55 


Repairs 


2,981 .29 




3.594.41 


Freights and cartage . 


1.961.17 




1.677.61 


Transportation between Centr 


al 






and branches . 


6,089.60 




6.369.64 


Telephone service 


950.38 




822.35 


Postage and telegrams . 


1.648.12 




1,134.18 


Typewriting 


23.70 






Travelling expenses (includi 


ng 






street car fares on library se 


r- 






vice) .... 


313.51 




276.45 


Grounds .... 


165.06 




109.94 


Lecture account (lantern slic 


es 






and operator) . 


544.85 




241.60 


Miscellaneous expense 


992.81 




1,160.00 






$84,263.80 


$88 781 ''6 


Printing Department: 






For salaries . . 


6.776.50 




7.649.97 


Stock .... 


2.007.08 




2.269.92 


Equipment 


1.864.01 




2.018.35 


Electric light and power . 


102.73 




160.45 


G)ntract work . 


169.93 




403.34 


Rent .... 


450.00 




509.03 


Freights and cartage 


137.84 




81.75 


Insurance 


25425 




301.15 


Gas .... 


341.26 




345.76 


Cleaning .... 


163.15 




168.00 


Small supplies . 


108.98 




114.15 






12.375.73 


Mffl ft? 


Binding Department: 






For salaries 


28.612.88 




29,219.66 


Slock .... 


4,223.06 




2,772.47 


Electric light and power . 


125.95 




157.90 


Contract work . 


107.87 




20.04 


Rent .... 


1 ,350.00 




1,409.05 


Freights and cartage 


696.66 




341 .83 


Insurance 


170.08 




215.25 


Gas . 


56.01 




103.04 


Cleaning 


163.15 




168.00 


Small supplies . 


69.01 




133.97 






35.574.67 


^4 i^Ai 01 






J?*t,J*Tl.^l 


Carried forward 


$415,902.17 


$419,296.17 



[70] 





1914-15 


1915-16. 


Brought forrsari 


$415,902.17 


$419,296.17 


Deposited abroad against foreign 
book purchases. Balance . 




2,849.63 



Totals .... $415,902.17 $421,145.80 

The following summary shows the sources from which the 
money covered by the foregoing items was derived : 

1914-15. 1915-16. 

From City appropriation $400,000.00 $407,688.00 

Various credits (payment for lost books, etc., balances 

from previous years, etc.) 2,358.77 686.14 

Trust funds income, gift and bequest . . 13,543.40 12.771.66 



Total $415,902.17 $421,145.80 

CONCLUSION. 

As I have said, the work of a great public library cannot be 
shown by statistics, however necessary these may be as definite 
records. No one can measure by terms of mathematics the ele- 
ment of personality which enters into all human relations, and 
upon which the success of a public library depends. The great 
libraries of the past were used chiefly by the select and cultured 
few, but the modern public library can no longer remain a mere 
storehouse for books, a museum for the collection of rare volumes, 
nor cater almost entirely to a literary class, whether readers or 
writers. However important these functions, and no great public 
library may neglect them, it must also expand upon its democratic 
side. As a library for the people it must include the business 
man, whose problems have in recent years been broadly considered 
in books. It must aid the workingman, in increasing his 
efficiency, and in some way bring him within its influence to a far 
greater extent than at present. It must provide for the children, 
and introduce them to that great world of books, within which 
they will in after years find pleasure and profit. And more than 
all, perhaps, it must promote the use of books, not merely as 
instruments of knowledge, but as a means of culture and enjoy- 
ment. 

This report imperfectly indicates how the Boston Public 
Library has met these requirements during the past year. I have 
summarized the work of the Statistical Department, with its 



[71] 

collections of documents and reports relating to commerce, manu- 
factures, transportation, the labor question, and questions of eco- 
nomics and social science generally ; of the Fine Arts Department, 
with its extensive collection of books and photographs on archi- 
tecture, design, painting, sculpture, engineering, building con- 
struction, electrical science, and other branches of the fine and 
technical arts; and have referred to its work with classes, its 
lectures and exhibitions, and its circulation of pictures. The 
extensive use of our periodical and newspaper files has been 
mentioned. Besides the use of books in the various depart- 
ments, our circulation has included books for general reading, — 
in the domain of fiction, travels, biography, history, poetry, and 
the drama. Perhaps no other library in the country covers a 
wider field, or by its history and traditions is forced to meet so 
many and so varied demands. It was established, at the begin- 
ning of the public library movement, by scholarly men who, 
mindful of the needs of scholars, placed upon its shelves many 
volumes, which, in the course of time, have become rare, and 
can now be found in few public collections. These have been 
supplemented by others of like character, received by bequests 
or purchased, so that gradually important departments have been 
built up whose growth in later years only insufficient funds have 
limited. Meantime the public demand for books, not merely 
for scholars but for general reading, has increased to an extent 
that could not possibly have been foreseen by the founders of the 
Library, and draws heavily upon our financial resources. The 
income of Trust Funds must be relied upon principally for such 
additions as it is possible to make to our scholarly collections. 
There are gaps in all of them, and none of them can be brought 
to such perfection as we would wish, without the expenditure of 
amounts beyond our present income, and for which we must rely 
mainly on further benefactions. The sums available from the 
annual appropriations of city money can no more than meet, 
indeed can hardly meet, the requirements of the service justly to 
be expected from such a library as this. 

Under present conditions we are often obliged to forego pur- 
chases that would otherwise be made, and to buy with the 



[72] 

purpose of meeting proportionately, so far as possible, the require- 
ments of a cosmopolitan population; to buy, for example, not 
always the books of highest literary merit, but the books which 
are best adapted to meet the needs of readers of varying attain- 
ments and sometimes of untrained literary taste. 

Additions to some of our more important special collections 
during the last two years number as follows : 

VOLUMES. 

Bowditch. (Higher mathematics) 204 

Ticknor. (Spanish literature of especial rarity or value.) ... 59 

Barton. (Shakesperiana.) ......... 25 

Franklin. (Special works relating to governmeent and political economy.) 13 

Lewis. (Special Americana.) ......... 13 

Twentieth Regiment. (Special Civil War literature, regimental histories, 

etc.) ............ 194 

Brown Music. (Rare scores, important works on music or relating to music.) 1 ,086 

Galatea. (Relating to the progress of women.) ...... 163 

Ariz. (Poetry and other works in special editions, or of special import- 
ance.) 459 

Brown Dramatic. (Rare or important works relating to the stage.) . . 173 

Codman. (Landscape architecture.) ...... 36 

The inter-library lending arrangement has been mentioned. 
This, to a limited degree, enables a library to obtain for the 
use of its readers a book which it has not been able to buy, or 
which it has refrained from buying because some other acces- 
sible library has it. Every library whose finances are limited 
must, in order to conserve its resources, co-operate with other 
libraries in the vicinity, and thus avoid extensive duplications 
of purchases by institutions not far apart. This arrangement 
to some extent offsets our inability to buy certain books in limited 
demand, although, as will appear from the statement on pages 
32, 33, of the inter-library operations during the past year, the 
richness of our collections, notwithstanding what they lack of 
completeness, enables us to lend to other libraries many more 
volumes than we have found it necessary to borrow. 

My continued acknowledgements are due to Mr. Otto Fleisch- 
ner. Assistant Librarian, whose faithful services through many 
years have been of great value to the Library, and I also record 
my thanks for the co-operation of the Chiefs of Departments and 
Custodians, and that of members of the staff generally. Upon 
their loyalty and efficiency the effective operation of the Librar)' 



[73] 

depends. I said last year, and now repeat, that nearly all the 
Chiefs and Custodians have been long in the Library service 
and know its resources: 

Inquiries requiring special knowledge are expected to be made to them 
directly, rather than to any minor assistants, and if questions are asked 
which do not fall within the province of the department in which the 
inquiry is made, as is not unlikely, since no one person can be expected to 
know everything, the inquirer will be directed to the proper department. 
Reports of dissatisfaction, for any reason, with the operation of the service, 
or of failure to obtain the information desired, are earnestly solicited by 
the Librarian or Assistant Librarian, one of whom is accessible, without 
formality during the day, or by the representative of the Librarian in charge 
during the evening. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Horace G. Wadlin. 

Librarian. 



INDEX. 



Accessions and additions. (5ce 
Books.) 

Addition to Central Library building, 
9—11, 57; Examining Committee on, 
23, 26. 

Arnold Arboretum, gift of shrubs, etc., 
47. 

Balance sheet, 16-19. 

Barton-Ticknor room, 48. 

Bates Hall, 47. 

Bates Hall Centre Desk, 61. 

Benton, Josiah H., elected President, 1 . 

Bindery, 4, 25, 63. 

Books, additions, 3, 33, 34, 35, 40, 49, 
72 ; average cost, 3 ; for branches, 7 ; 
binding and repair, 4, 63 ; catalogued, 
42; circulation, 3, 29-33, 45, 48, 56, 
62; deposits, 4, 20, 32, 64; expendi- 
tures, 3, 35; Examining Committee on. 
22; fiction, 33-34; gifts, 40-42: 
reference work, 4, 22, 23, 31, 32, 
4^-48, 61, 62 64, 66. 70; selection, 
22, 43; transportation, 32; total num- 
ber, 41-45. 

Branch Department, 56. 

Branches, books, 7, 33, 34, 45, 56; 
circulation, 29, 30—33; deposits, 64: 
Examining Committee on, 25; ex- 
tracts from custodians' reports, 57-59: 
new buildings needed at So. Boston 
and W. Roxbury, 8; pictures at, 65; 
repairs and improvements, 28; requests 
for establishment of new, 8; total vol- 
umes, 45; Mt. Pleasant and Tyler 
Street, new equipment, 5, 28. 

Brown, Allen A., gift of portrait, 49. 

Budget. (5ee Finance.) 

Card holders, 60. 66. 

Catalogue Department, 42. 

Children's Department. 24, 45, 65-66. 



Circulation, 3, 20. 29-33, 45. 48. 57, 
62. 

Clement, Frank, bequest, 7. 

Clubs and classes. 31. 46. 48, 49. 

Deposits, 4, 20, 32, 64. 

Documents and statistics, 62. 70. 

Estimates, 8. 

Evening and Sunday service. 66. 

Examinations, 63. 

Examining Conunittee. 1 1 ; report of, 
20. 

Exhibitions, 46, 49, 59. 

Fiction, 33-34. 

Finance, addition to Central Library 
building, cost, II; appropriations, 2; 
balance sheet, 16-19; bequests. 7; 
books, expenditures. 7. 34; equipment 
and annual cost, 21, 65 ; estimates, 8 ; 
Examining Conmiiltee on, 21 ; re- 
ceipts, I ; salaries and wages, 9; trust 
funds, 5. 71. 

Fine Arts Department, 23, 48, 64, 71. 

Gifts, 40-42, 47, 49. 

Hours of service, 3. 

Hyde, Franklin P., bequest, 7. 

Improvements and repairs, 27. 

Inter-library loans. 32. 72. 

Inventory, 1 1 . 

Issue Department, 29. 

Kenney, William F., elected Vice Pres- 
ident. I . 

Lantern slides. 40. 

Lectures, 49. 

Librarian's report. 27. 

Mann, Alexander, reappointed trustee. I. 

Music room. 24. 49. 

Newspaper room. 61. 

Newspapers, expenditures, 3 ; subscrip- 
tions. 40. 

Ordering Department, 35. 



[75] 



Patent room, 61. 

Periodical room, 61. 

Periodicals, expenditures, 3, 62, 66; 

sent to institutions, 32; tramsferred to 

Children's Dept., 47. 
Photographs and other pictures, 3, 40, 

48, 64. 
Printing Department, 25, 63. 
Publications, 43, 49, 60. 
Receipts. (5ee Finance.) 
Reference work, 4, 22, 23, 31, 32, 46- 

48, 61, 62, 64, 66, 70. 
Registration Department, 60. 
Repairs and improvements, 27. 
Salaries and wages, 9. 



Schools and institutions, 4, 24. 46. 48, 

56. 64. 
Serials, 40. 
Shelf Department, 44. 
Skinner, Francis, bequest, 7. 
Special privilege cards, 66. 
Special Libraries, 23, 48-50. 
Story hour, 24, 45. 
Sunday and evening service, 62. 
Teachers* reference collection, 47, 65- 

66. 
Trust funds. (5ee Finance.) 
Trustees, organization, ! ; meetings, 14. 
University Extension. (See Clubs and 

classes.) 



The Public Library of the City of Boston: Printing Department. 



1 . Central Library, Copley Square. 

Branch Libraries, February 1, 1916. 

2. Brighlon Branch, Holton Library Building, Academy Hill Road 

3. Charleslown Branch, Monument Square, cor. Monument Ave. 

4. Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 

5. East Boston Branch. 276 - 282 Meridian St. 

6. Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. 

7. Roibury Branch, 46 Millmoni St. 

8. South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway. 

9. South End Branch, 397 Shawmut Ave. 

10. Upham's Comer Branch, Columbia Road, cor. Bird St. 

1 1. West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 

1 2. West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St. 

13. Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 

14. North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 

15. Codman Square Branch. Washington, cor. Norfolk St., Dorches 

Delivery Stations. February 1, 1916. 

A. Lower Mills Reading Room. Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

B. Roslmdale Reading Room. Washington, cot. Ashland St. 

D. Mattapan Reading Room. 727 Walk Hill St. 

E. Neponset Reading Room, 362 Neponset Ave. 

F. Moimt Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, cot. Eldon St. 

G. Allston Reading Room, 6 Harvard Ave. 
H. Faneuil Reading Room, 100 Brooks St. 

N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 

P. Tyler Street Reading Room, Tyler, cor. Oak St. 

R. Wanen Street Reading Room, 392 Warren St. 

S. Roibury Crossing Reading Room, 1 1 54 Trcmont St. 

T. Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, Depot Square. 

V. City Point Reading Room, Municipal Building. Broadway. 

X. Parker Hill Reading Room, 1 5 1 8 Tremont St. 

Y. Andrew Square Reading Room, 3% Dorchester St. 

Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St. 




Aiea of City (Land only) 45.60 Square miles. 



PopuUtion (Census o( 1915), 745.439. 



i (HA 



! «ICl .1 



noqsH ^ 



,1^ ,f/_ / 



jdxofl .2 



3 9999 06314 656 5 



25 ^^aiti 



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