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ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAE ENDING 31 JANUARY, 1916 




CITY OF BOSTON 
PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1916 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 






1 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1916bost 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1915-16. 



Boston, January 31, 1916. 

Hon. James M. Curley, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Dear Sir, — In accordance with section 24, Revised 
Ordinances, 1898, City of Boston, I submit to your 
Honor the report of the Fire Department for the year 
ending January 31, 1916. 

In addition I transmit herewith reports of the Chief 
of Department and the officers in charge of the different 
branches, and information and statistics concerning the 
work, personnel and property of the department. 

Finances 

The cost of maintenance of the department for the 
past year was $2,053,084.16, an increase over the year 
1914-15 of $45,643.22. 

Personnel of Department. 

On January 31, 1916, the fire-fighting force comprised 
961 men, while on the same day a year previous there 
were 978 men. 

Twenty-four men have been retired on account of 
age and disability during the past twelve months. 



2 City Document No. 14. 

There are 118 employees in the other branches of the 
department, making a total of 1,079 employees in the 
service. 

Fire Prevention. 

Since the ' establishment of the Metropolitan Fire 
Prevention Commission in August, 1914, by an act of 
the General Court, a large amount of extra labor has 
been placed upon this department. Practically all the 
inspection work for the Fire Prevention Commissioner 
in the City of Boston is performed by this department, 
which inspection work is in addition to the regular 
inspections made by the officers and members of the 
Fire Department. Regular inspections have been made 
of schoolhouses, theaters, motion picture houses, public 
buildings, etc. Premises have been inspected for con- 
ditions liable to cause fire and where dangerous condi- 
tions have been found they have been ordered remedied. 
A large amount of very good work has been accomplished 
along these lines. 

By delegation of authority from the Fire Prevention 
Commissioner this department issues permits for fires 
in the open air, for the keeping and storage of inflamma- 
ble fluids, for the keeping and storing of gasolene and 
other volatile fluids in amounts not exceeding 130 
gallons, for the keeping, storage and discharge of fire- 
works and firecrackers, and for the handling and trans- 
portation of explosives. During the past twelve months 
this department issued 8,080 permits of the foregoing 
descriptions. 

Motor Fire Apparatus. 

Thirty-seven pieces of motor apparatus were pur- 
chased, which includes eleven roadsters for the services 
of chief officers. Most of the foregoing apparatus were 
tractors which were attached to apparatus already in 
the service of the city. 

In view of the fact that the value of motor apparatus 
has been so firmly established, and in view of the excellent 
service we have received from it in this city, I believe 
that the City Council would be warranted in giving 
this matter especial attention, and I recommend that 
at least one hundred thousand dollars be appropriated 
annually until the Fire Department is completely 
motorized. 



Fiee Department. 3 

Fire Losses. 

The number of alarms for the twelve months ending 
December 31, 1915, was 5,437, as compared with 5,534 
alarms in 1914. The fire loss for the year amounted to 
$3,004,600, showing a decrease of $40,000 over the pre- 
vious twelve months. Undoubtedly this decrease is 
the result of two important factors connected with the 
department, namely, increased efficiency due to motor- 
ization of apparatus and the large amount of inspection 
work being done by our officers. 

Alterations to Houses. 

The houses of Engine Company 14 on Centre street 
and of Ladder Company 4 on Dudley street, Roxbury, 
are being altered and remodeled to better suit the needs 
of this department. When the houses are completed 
a triple combination motor-driven pumping engine will 
be placed in the house of Engine Company 14, and a 
motor-driven aerial truck and a. motor combination 
chemical and hose wagon will be installed in the house 
of Ladder Company 4. 

There are many houses in the department today 
which should be thoroughly remodeled. The houses 
are very old and at the time they were being built consid- 
eration was not given to the present conditions. 

I would recommend that an appropriation of approxi- 
mately $40,000 be granted to remodel the old municipal 
court building in Dorchester street, South Boston,, to 
accommodate Ladder Company 5, and to remodel the 
quarters of Engine Company 1 adjoining, with a view 
to installing motor apparatus in both buildings. The 
house of Ladder Company 5 is most inadequate for the 
present ladder company stationed there. The building 
was. erected forty-three years ago and arranged for a call 
company with conveniences for one permanent man. 
At present twelve permanent men are quartered in the 
house. The officers' room is very small, being but 21 by 
7 feet in size, and two officers are obliged to sleep in this 
room. If the change is made the two companies would 
adjoin each other in Dorchester street, instead of being 
located around the corner from each other. I believe 
that this change should be made, not only for the health 
and comfort of the men but also for the efficiency of the 
department. 



4 City Document No. 14. 

I would also recommend that $23,000 be appropriated 
to remodel the house of Engine Company 8 in Salem 
street. This is an old fire station where the quarters 
are very cramped and the house should be altered 
throughout, with a view to installing motor apparatus. 

Money should be appropriated to buy land and 
apparatus and to erect a fire station in the Readville 
section. When the town of Hyde Park was annexed 
to Boston there was an old fire station in Readville 
accommodating a hose wagon. This is an old, dilapi- 
dated wooden building, of little or no value, on land 
owned by the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. The sanitary conditions are unhealthful and 
the general accommodations are very poor. Immediate 
action should be taken in this matter in order that the 
living conditions in this house could be improved and 
that better fire service be given this section of the city. 
The only way this can be done is to erect an entirely 
new building at a more central location. 

With the installation of motor apparatus the city is 
confronted with the question of fireproofing its fire 
stations, especially that part of the station in which 
motor apparatus is installed. Such fireproofing is 
required by the regulations of the Fire Prevention Com- 
missioner for the metropolitan district governing garages, 
and will have to be done gradually as the apparatus is 
installed, and for this purpose enough money should be 
allowed in the appropriation each year in order that we 
may keep abreast of the work. 

Conclusion. 

The work of the members of this department has been 
very efficiently performed during the past year, and I 
desire to express my appreciation of the spirit of hearty 
cooperation manifested by the other city departments, 
more especially the Police Department, the Public 
Works Department, the Building Department and the 
Wire Department. 

Yours very respectfully, 

John Grady, 

Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 



Names of Chief Engineers, or Chief of Depart- 
ment, Since the Fire Department was Estab- 
lished, January, 1826. 

Samuel D. Harris 1826-28 

Thomas C. Amory . 1829-35 

William Barnicoat 1836-53 

Elisha Smith, Jr 1854-55 

George W. Bird . 1856-65 

John S. Damrell 1866-74 

William A. Green 1874-84 

Lewis P. Webber 1884-1901 

William T. Cheswell 1901-06 

John A. Mullen 1906-14 

John Grady * 1914 

.Peter F. McDonough 1914-16 



* Appointed Fire Commissioner 



City Document No. 14. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



From: The Chief op the Department, Boston. February 1, 1916. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

The following is the report of the Chief of Department 
for the year ending January 31, 1916: 

During the calendar year the department has re- 
sponded to 5,437 alarms. The fire loss was $3,004,600. 

Additions and Changes. 

February 1, 1915, Water Tower 3 was equipped with 
a two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

April 10, 1915, Water Tower 1 was equipped with a 
two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

April 22, 1915, a motor-driven 85-foot aerial ladder 
truck was placed in service with Ladder Company 8, 
replacing the horse-drawn ladder truck in service with 
that company. 

May 15, 1915, Engine 25 was equipped with a two- 
wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

May 21, 1915, the 85-foot aerial ladder truck in 
service with Ladder Company 18 was equipped with a 
two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

May 28, 1915, a motor-driven combination chemical 
engine and hose wagon was placed in service with 
Engine Company 25, replacing the two-horse hose 
wagon in service with that company. 

July 21, 1915, the 85-foot aerial ladder truck in 
service with Ladder Company 13 was equipped with a 
two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

July 27, 1915, the 75-foot aerial ladder truck in 
service with Ladder Company 17 was equipped with a 
two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

July 28, 1915, the city service combination truck 
and chemical in service with Ladder Company 16 was 
equipped with a two-wheel tractpr, displacing three 
horses. 

September 20, 1915, the horse-drawn box truck in 
service with Ladder Company 12 was replaced by a 
75-foot aerial ladder truck equipped with a two-wheel 
tractor, displacing three horses. 



Fire Department. 7 

October 4, 1915, Engine 43 was equipped with a two- 
wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

October 4, 1915, a motor-driven combination chemical 
engine and hose wagon was placed in service with 
Engine Company 43, displacing the two-horse hose 
wagon. 

October 27, 1915, Ladder 20 was equipped with a 
two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

December 24, 1915, the city service ladder truck and 
chemical in service with Ladder Company 10 was 
equipped with a two-wheel tractor, displacing three 
horses. 

January 7, 1916, the horse-drawn steam fire engine in 
service with Engine Company 17 was replaced by an 
engine equipped with a two-wheel tractor, displacing 
three horses. 

January 12, 1916, Engine 21 was equipped with a 
two-wheel tractor, displacing three horses. 

Two steam fire engines, one 85-foot aerial truck and 
one combination truck and chemical engine were 
equipped with two-wheel tractors and are being used as 
relief apparatus. 

Six gasolene runabouts were purchased for use by 
district chiefs. 

The station in which are housed Engine Company 
4, Chemical Company 1 and Tower Company 1 was 
remodeled. The dormitory was enlarged and better 
toilet and locker room facilities provided. In that por- 
tion where Tower 1 is housed the stable was demolished, 
a granolithic floor and base installed and the ceiling and 
walls fireproofed. 

The station in which are housed Engine Company 
25 and Ladder Company 8 was remodeled. A larger 
dormitory, separate rooms for all officers, and better 
toilet and locker room facilities were provided. All stables 
in these quarters were demolished and floors and bases 
of granolithic and granolithic driveways installed. 

The station in which is housed Ladder Company 15 
was remodeled. A granolithic floor and base was 
installed on the main floor and new Dutch doors 
furnished. 

The station in which are housed Ladder Company 
18 and Tower Company 3 was remodeled. A larger 
dormitory, separate rooms for all officers and better 
toilet and locker room facilities were provided. All 
stables in these quarters were demolished and a grano- 
lithic main floor and base installed. 



8 City Document No. 14. 

The station in which is housed Engine Company 10 was 
remodeled. A new room for the lieutenant and better 
toilet facilities were provided. The stable was demol- 
ished and a granolithic floor and base, steel ceiling, tile 
and plastered walls and new lighting fixtures were 
installed on the main floor. 

Granolithic driveways and walks and a separate 
system of drainage were other items of improvements at 
this station. 

A new fuel depot was erected on land owned by the 
city, off Commercial street, opposite Prince street, to 
replace the depot of Engine Company 8, formerly on 
Salem street, which was sold. 

The station occupied by Engine Company 47 (fire- 
boat) was raised and a new wharf sill installed and all 
exterior wood and metal painted. 

The exteriors of the stations occupied by Engine 
Companies 31 and 44 (fireboats) were painted. 

In the Fire Alarm Office more adequate toilet facilities 
were provided, and wood floors in operating, dynamo, 
toilet rooms and all halls were replaced by floors of 
terrazzo, thereby diminishing the hazard of fire and 
presenting a more sightly condition. 

A new tar and gravel roof, flashings, gutters, conduc- 
tors and ventilators were installed on entire building 
occupied by Engine and Ladder Companies 3. 

Buildings. 

The interiors of the stations are kept up to the 
standard of cleanliness and order demanded. In many 
instances the quarters are cramped and without modern 
facilities, and in at least one are not fit for occupancy. 
The installation of motor apparatus will make necessary 
considerable remodeling, and the discontinuance of hay 
lofts and stables will release space that can be utilized 
for increasing size of dormitories, separate rooms for 
officers and better toilet facilities, and will make many 
of our antiquated stations more comfortable for the men. 

Apparatus and Equipment. 

The apparatus and equipment, including hose, was 
given the annual inspection and test and the necessary 
repairs made to bring everything up to the required 
standard. 



Fire Department. 



Building Inspection. 

Regular inspections are made of theaters, motion 
picture houses, schoolhouses, public buildings and all 
places of public assembly. 

On request signs on roofs have been inspected and 
reported on. 

The system of building inspection throughout the 
city has been continued and good results obtained. 
Many hazardous conditions have been corrected, and in 
this way fires have been prevented. 

Inspections of premises have been made also in con- 
nection with applications for licenses and permits for 
the setting of fires in the open air, and the keeping, 
storage, sale and transportation of explosives and 
inflammables. 

Drills. 

During the year all companies have held weekly 
drills, and all new appointees have passed through the 
regular drill school. 

All regularly assigned chauffeurs of fire apparatus 
were instructed in the department automobile school. 



Mutual Aid. 

The mutually beneficial plan of cooperation with the 
cities and towns on our borders was maintained during 
the year passed. 

Hydrants. 

The following is the number and type of hydrants 
in use for fire service January 31, 1916: 

Boston post 3,623 

Ordinary post 2,978 

Lowry 1,716 

Boston Lowry . 666 

Boston . . . . " . . . . . . 200 

Chapman post 164 

Ludlow post 10 

Coffin post 1 



Total . 



9,358 



10 City Document No. 14. 

High Pressure Fire Service. 

The following is the report of the work done on the 
high pressure fire service as made by the engineer in 
charge of the work: 

There are now installed about five and one half miles of dis- 
tribution piping varying in size from 20-inch, the largest main, to 
8-inch for the hydrant branches, within the district bounded 
approximately by Tremont and Traverse streets, Atlantic 
avenue, Purchase, Beach and Eliot streets. 

The old salt water fireboat mains, comprising about one mile 
of 12-inch pipe and hydrant branches, and extending from 
Central Wharf up Central street, through Post Office square and 
down Congress street to within about 160 feet of the bridge, has 
been connected with the new piping system. Its hydrant 
branches have been changed to 8-inch, new 8-inch high pressure 
valves installed, and the old 6-inch all-composition valves, 
together with one 12-inch valve of the same material, which was 
removed from a dead end in Milk street, have been turned over 
to the Fire Department. Its old hydrants have been replaced 
with the Rourke high pressure hydrants, which have been 
adopted for the entire system, and a total of 176 installed. 

Because of the probable delay in having the proposed pumping 
station in commission it was thought advisable to utilize the 
system as far as possible for the fireboat supply from the 
existing Central Wharf connection in case a conflagration away 
from the waterfront should threaten the district served, and 
several gate valves in the mains have been opened, rendering 
immediately available for this purpose 58 hydrants located 
in Atlantic avenue, Clinton, Central, Milk, Arch, High, Broad, 
Purchase and Congress streets and India square. 

It is hoped that this number will be increased at an early 
date when excessive leakage conditions in many sections of the 
existing system are corrected and by the proposed installation 
of additional hydrants during the year. 

Recommendations. 

Under this heading the items mentioned are in my 
opinion absolutely necessary to keep this department 
up to the proper standard. 



FIRE STATIONS. 

A site should be secured in the Readville section 
of the city and a house built to replace the present 
quarters of Hose Company 49, which are unfit for 
occupancy. 



Fire Department. 11 

The building formerly occupied by the Municipal 
Court in South Boston, which has been turned over to 
this department, should be remodeled for Ladder 
Company 5. 

The station now occupied by Chemical Company 3, 
Winthrop street, Charlestown, should be remodeled for 
an engine company. 

The quarters of Engine Company 8 are not modern 
and are lacking in the proper toilet facilities and should 
be remodeled. 

The substitution of shower rooms for bathtubs and 
furnishing separate rooms for all officers should be 
carried out as far as financial conditions will permit, 
also the painting of all exterior wood and metal on the 
stations. 

APPARATUS. 

Engines. 

A gasolene combination pumping engine, chemical and 
hose wagon with a pump capacity of at least 700 gallons 
per minute for the proposed station in Readville. 

A gasolene combination pumping engine, chemical 
and hose wagon to have a pump capacity of at least 
1,000 gallons per minute for the proposed remodeled 
station on Winthrop street, Charlestown. 

The men now attached to Chemical Company 3 
could be assigned to the proposed engine company, and 
the chemical company then disbanded. 

Gasolene combination pumping engines, chemicals and 
hose wagons with a pump capacity of at least 700 gallons 
per minute to replace the horse-drawn apparatus in the 
quarters of Engine Companies 14, 19, 30, 42 and 48. 

Tractors should be attached to the horse-drawn 
engines in the quarters of Engine Companies 5, 20, 33 
and 36. 

Chemical and Hose Combinations. 

Gasolene combination chemicals and hose wagons to 
replace the horse-drawn apparatus in the quarters of 
Engine Companies 5, 17, 20, 21, 28, 33 and 36 and 
Chemical Companies 7 and 10. 

Ladder Trucks. 
Eighty-five foot, motor-driven, quick-raising aerial 
ladder trucks should be installed in the quarters of 
Ladder Companies 1, 2, 3, 5 and 9 to replace the horse- 
drawn apparatus. 



12 City Document No. 14. 

The horse-drawn combination ladder trucks and 
chemical engines in service with Ladder Companies 6, 
11, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28 should be motorized. 

Relief Apparatus. 
In view of the fact that there are at present numerous 
pieces of motor apparatus in service, which number will 
be largely augmented in the near future, care should be 
taken to have a sufficient number of pieces of relief 
apparatus of all kinds ready to replace the regularly 
assigned apparatus in an emergency. 

Wrecking Wagon. 
I would respectfully recommend the purchase of a 
motor-driven wrecking wagon, to be of a type and power 
best fitted for the purpose. 

MEN. 

I would recommend that a ladder company, to be 
known as Ladder Company 14, be organized as soon as 
possible to man the 85-foot aerial truck proposed for the 
Allston district. 

The new company recommended for Readville should 
consist of a lieutenant and six men, and as Hose Com- 
pany 49 would be disbanded the man now assigned to 
that company could be transferred to the new engine 
company. 

The engine company recommended for the Charles- 
town district would require but seven men as Chemical 
Company 3 would be disbanded and the men trans- 
ferred to the new company. 

In the year just passed the men of the department 
have experienced a particularly hard siege of fire duty, 
and a large number have undergone much sickness and 
injuries. Much credit and praise is due the members 
of the department for the manner in which they have 
performed their duties. 

The morale of the department is excellent and I 
wish to express my gratitude to all other departments 
who have cheerfully cooperated when called upon. 

P. F. McDonough, 

Chief of Department. 



Fire Department. 13 



FIRE ALARM BRANCH. 



From: The Superintendent of Fire Alarm Branch. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report for the Year Ending January 31, 1916. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the Fire 
Alarm Branch for the fiscal year February 1, 1915, to 
February 1, 1916. 

Operating Division. 

Note. — Records of this division are for the calendar 
year 1915. 

Box alarms received and transmitted: 



First alarms ? 

Second alarms 

Third alarms (second omitted on 4) 
Fourth alarms (second omitted on 2) 
Fifth alarm ....... 



Box alarms received and not transmitted : 



2,846 

56 

25 

5 

1 



Alarms received from same box for same fire two or 

more times . . 241 

Alarms received from adjacent boxes for the same fire, 323 

Box alarms received and transmitted as stills . . 21 

Still alarms received and transmitted: 

Received from citizens by telephone to office . . . 1,308 
Received from Police Department by telephone to 

office . . . 197 

Received by companies which responded . . . 1,033 

"Mutual aid" alarms, classified as stills ... 18 

Emergency calls (accidents, etc.) classified as stills . 30 

Still alarms for which box alarms were later transmitted, 161 

Automatic Alarms. 

Boston Automatic alarms received . . . . 135 
Department box alarms received and transmitted for 

same . . . . 15 

A. D. T. alarms received . 28 

A. D. T. alarms transmitted (box alarms received for 

10) ' . . . . 18 



14 • City Document No. 14. 



Total Alarms. 

Box alarms received from all sources .... 3,518 
Box alarms transmitted (including multiples) . . 2,933 
Stills, Automatesi, '''Mutual Aid," Emergency, etc. 
(eliminating those for which box alarms were trans- 
mitted) 2,724 

Total alarms transmitted (all classes) . . . 5,657 

Fire Alarm Box Records.* 

Boxes from which no alarm was received . . . 371 

Boxes from which twenty or more alarms were received, 1 1 

Box tests and inspections , . 12,355 



Improvements in Fire Alarm Office. 

Much progress has been made during the past year 
in reducing the fire hazard at headquarters, both exter- 
ally and internally. Additional fire shutters have been 
placed at windows on exposed sides of the building so 
that all exposed openings are now equipped with shutters 
and sprinkler heads. Quite a quantity of wo >dwork 
has been removed from the Fire Alarm Office; cement 
floors, terrazzo finish, have been laid; modern sanitary 
arrangements have been furnished, much to the comfort 
and convenience of the office force, and the office has 
been repainted. 

The rewiring of the office has been completed. All 
wires concealed are contained in conduits and are insu- 
lated with noninflammable material. The equipment 
of the office has been materially increased. Two addi- 
tional sources for supplying current to the dynamotors 
have been added, viz. : Connections were made to the 
Edison service in the repair shop, and emergency con- 
nections provide the use of the generator which supplies 
the current to operate the motors on Water Tower 2, 
which is housed on the first floor of the headquarters 
building. These additional sources of current make 
available a total of five. 

The equipment for box circuits has been increased 
from fifty to seventy, and for gong and tapper circuits 
from twenty-five to forty, thus making a total office 
equipment for one hundred and ten (110) circuits. 

* Each keyless door is tested semi-weekly. 



Fire Department. 



15 



New relays, registers, dynamo-tors and distributing 
boards have been installed. In brief, the entire electrical 
equipment has been entirely renovated, and, so far as 
practical in an old office, has been replaced with modern 
features. 

Improvements in Department Stations. 

In many of the department stations the electric wiring 
is not up to the present day requirements. Special 
efforts have been made to correct this condition as 
rapidly as possible, and many improvements along this 
line have been made. Four houses have been practically 
rewired, and electricity was substituted for gas in one 
house. In many other houses extended changes in the 
fire alarm and lighting equipment have been made. 

By General Order No. 92, June 11, 1914, the super- 
vision of lighting in department stations and bills for 
same were transferred to this branch. Under this 
order all carbon lamps, except for hand portables, were 
replaced with modern Mazda lamps; the ratings, on 
which charges are based, was changed for many of the 
stations; the wiring and fixtures in many stations were 
overhauled and changed. 

The result of these improvements was an increase of 
20 per cent in lighting efficiency, and a reduction in 
charges of 30 or more per cent, notwithstanding that 
power service has increased because of the more general 
use of storage batteries in connection with the large 
number of pieces of motor apparatus now in service of 
the department. The annual saving in cost charges for 
lighting and power is shown more clearly by comparison 
of cost in 1913, the last full year under old conditions, 
and 1915, the first full year under the new conditions: 



1913. 



19S5. 



Electric light and power for department stations and public 
clocks. 

For gas in department stations 

Cost of Mazda lamps 



$13,957 90 
1,121 05 



$8,088 85 

355 14 
676 29 



Totals. 



$15,078 95 



$9,120 28 



Note. — The 1913 figures were taken from the annual report of expenditures for that 
year, and the 1915 figures are based on bills approved by this branch in 1915. The saving 
shown by these figures is $5,958.67. 



16 City Document No. 14. 



Fire Alarm Boxes. 

During the year 58 fire alarm box stations were added 
to the system; 39 of these were established by this 
department on public streets, 6 were established by the 
Schoolhouse Department and 13 by business concerns 
on private property. 

Twenty-two boxes were removed from poles and 
re-established on lamp-posts. The location of 8 boxes 
were changed. 

Eight box circuits were added, which afforded oppor- 
tunity to reduce the overload on other circuits. 

Outside Construction. 

Thirty-six thousand nine hundred and ninety feet 
of cable, containing about ninety miles of conductors, 
were hauled into underground ducts, principally in the 
East Boston, South Boston, Roxbury and Hyde Park 
districts. 

Thirty-seven new lamp-posts and 5 test posts were 
installed, and 9 lamp-posts and 5 test posts were reset 
or replaced by new posts. 

Three thousand eight hundred and thirty-four feet of 
ducts were laid underground and 2 manholes were built. 
About twenty-eight miles of new wire, in extensions and 
for replacing old wire, were strung on poles, and about 
seventeen miles of wire were removed due to underground 
work. 

All boxes and test posts were repainted. 

Alarm System in Hyde Park. 

The old automatic alarm system which was transferred 
to this department through the annexation of the town 
of Hyde Park to this city, January 1, 1912, has been 
abandoned and all circuits run through to headquarters. 
This change gives this district the advantages of metro- 
politan signal service and brings all circuits under direct 
supervision of the central office. 

Considerable underground work has also been done 
in Hyde Park, thereby eliminating much overhead 
construction. 

Recommendations. 

The importance of installing new cables in the city 
proper cannot be overestimated. The present main 
cables have been in service twenty-five years or more 



Fire Department. 



17 



and though still giving passable service too much reliance 
cannot be placed on them. Another reason is the 
necessity of establishing additional cable routes so that 
the service may be maintained in the event of serious 
damage to our cables through explosion or other causes. 

The usual extensions to the underground service 
should be made this year. 

There are still many sections where signal boxes 
should be established and the red light service, over or 
near the boxes, should be extended. 

New fire alarm posts, with signal boxes on same, 
established during the year and duct lengths to same : 



City Proper. 

North and Cross streets 

Congress and Purchase streets 
Commonwealth avenue and Clarendon street 
Belvidere and Dalton streets .... 
Harrison avenue and Springfield street . 
Shawmut avenue and Brookline street . 

East Boston. 

Day square 

Brooks and Saratoga streets .... 

South Boston. 

Third and L streets 

Dorchester and West Second streets 

Broadway and I street 

Broadway and M street 

Northern avenue and Commonwealth Pier No. 



Feet. 

30 
35 

137 

9 

37 

127 



13 
14 



14 
44 
13 
40 

68 



Dorchester. 

Dorchester avenue and Victoria street 
Waterlow and Elmont streets 



24 
30 



ROXBURY. 

Southampton street, near railroad bridge 
Southampton and Atkinson streets 
Brookford street, opposite Dromey street 
Howard avenue and Sargent street 
Hartford and Robin Hood streets . 
Regent and Fountain streets . 
Walnut avenue and Elmore street . 
Walnut avenue and Crawford street 
Walnut avenue and Ruthven street 
Walnut avenue and Iffley road 
Blue Hill avenue and Seaver street 



11 
44 
65 
39 
56 
13 
40 
45 
14 
38 
120 



18 



City Document No. 14. 



West Roxbury. 

Washington street and Mosgrove avenue ... 12 

Robert and South Fairview streets .... 36 

Centre and Willow streets 113 

Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park avenue and River street .... 37 

Hyde Park avenue and Harvard avenue ... 6 

Hyde Park avenue and Thatcher street ... 30 

Hyde Park avenue and Arlington street ... 39 

Hyde Park avenue and Metropolitan avenue . . 11 

River street and Central avenue . . . . . 16 

Fairmount avenue and Highland street ... 29 

Fairmount avenue and Summit street .... 32 

Fire alarm box posts reset during year : 

Dorchester avenue and D street, on account of new tunnel. 
Broadway and C street, on account of change of curb. 
Tremont street and Van Rensselaer place, on account of broken 

post. 
Harrison avenue and Lenox street, on account of broken post. 
Congress and A streets, on account of broken post. 
Blue Hill avenue and Woodcliff street, on account of broken post. 
Washington street, opposite Erie street, on account of broken 

post. 
Park and Henley streets, Charlestown, on account of broken 

post. 
Bennington and Marion streets, East Boston, on account of 

building moved. 

New test posts established during the year and duct 
lengths to same: 

Feet. 

Berkeley and Marlborough streets, 4 ducts . 45 



Tremont and West Newton streets, 4 ducts 
Broadway and Dorchester street, 4 ducts 
Broadway and L street, 4 ducts . . . 
Hyde Park avenue and River street, 4 ducts 
Cambridge and North Beacon streets, 4 ducts 



19.5 
13 
14 
34 



Test posts replaced by new iron posts during the year: 



Beverly and Traverse streets 

Chauncy and Bedford streets, 4 ducts . . . . 
Columbus avenue and Roxbury street . . . . 

Central square, East Boston 

Dorchester avenue and D street, on account of new 
tunnel : 



Feet. 



40 



Fire Department. 



19 



Conduits Installed. Feet . 

Engine 30, Centre street, West Roxbury, 2 ducts . 98 

Chemical 7 113 

Brooks street, between Bennington and Saratoga 

streets 258 

Prescott street, between Bennington and Saratoga 

streets ' . . 254 

New Pole Connections and Duct Lengths to Same. 

East Boston. Feet. 

Prescott and .Chelsea streets • 147 



South Boston. 
East Second and L streets 
East Fourth and L streets 
East Second and Dorchester streets 
Broadway and street . 
Summer street at viaduct 



48 
35 
50 
58 
75 



Roxbury. 
Southampton street, at Atkinson street 
Dudley street and Harvard avenue 



83 
140 



West Roxbury. 
Washington and Kittredge streets . 
Robert and South Fairview streets 
Centre and Beech streets 
Centre and Maple streets 
Centre and Bellevue streets 

Hyde Park. 
Hyde Park avenue and Arlington street 
Fairmount avenue and Pierce street 
Fairmount avenue and Water street 
Fairmount avenue and Summit street . 



120 
46 
47 
66 
32 



17 
13 
47 

85 



Manholes Built During Year. 

Saratoga and Prescott streets. 

Saratoga and Brooks streets. 

Court and Stoddard streets (handhole). 

Underground Cable Installed During the Year 
East Boston. 
Post, pole and house connections, 15-conductor . 



Post connections, 10-conductor 
Post connections, 4-conductor 



Feet 

574 

989 
498 



20 



City Document No. 14. 



City Proper. Feet. 

Post connections, 61-conductor 120 

Post connections, 37-conductor 72 

Post connections, 10-conductor . . . . . 672 

Post connections, 6-conductor ..... 448 

Post connections, 4-conductor 464 

South Boston. 
Congress street, from Pittsburgh street to Summer 

street, 10-conductor 1,712 

Viaduct, from Summer street to Northern avenue, 

10-conductor 1,331 

Post and pole connections, 19-conductor . . . 204 

Post and pole connections, 10-conductor . . . 813 

Post and pole connections, 6-conductor . . . 1,138 

Roxbury. 

Warren street and Harrison avenue, from Dudley street 

to Rockville park, 20-conductor 1,536 

Walnut avenue, Sigourney street and Glen road, 20- 
conductor 8,345 

Brookford street, from Blue Hill avenue to Dromey 

street, 10-conductor 708 

Fairland street and Mt. Pleasant avenue, 6-con- 
ductor 993 

Brookford and Hartford streets, 4-conductor . . 1,068 

Brookford street and Howard avenue, 4-conductor . 859 

Regent street, from Warren street to Fountain street, 

4-conductor 730 

Pole connections, 10-conductor 290 

Dorchester. 
Post connections, 10-conductor 435 

West Roxbury. 
Post connections, 10-conductor 27 

Hyde Park. 
Hyde Park avenue, from Canterbury street to River 

street, 15-conductor 9,134 

Fairmount avenue, from River street to Summit street, 

6-conductor 3,646 

Post and pole connections, 4-conductor . . . 523 



Fire Alarm Box Stations Established During the Year. 
(Public Boxes.) 

City Proper. 
1252. North and Cross streets. 
1421. Congress and Purchase streets. 
1663. Harrison avenue and East Springfield street. 



Fire Department. 21 

South Boston. 
7216. Baxter and D streets. 
7316. Dorchester and West Second streets. 
7322. East Third and L streets. 
7334. East Third and streets. 

Dorchester. 

3161. Hartford and Robin Hood streets. 

3186. Olney street, near Blake ville street. 

3234. Sawyer and Downer avenues. 

3241. Dorchester avenue and Victoria street. 

3261. Hancock and Jerome streets. 

3371. Woodrow and Ballou avenues. 

3373. Woodrow avenue and Lucerne street. 

3414. Park and Everett streets. 

3452. Train street, opposite Daly Industrial School. 

Roxbury. 

2148. Regent and Circuit streets. 

2176. Blue Hill avenue and Seaver street. 

2182. Humboldt avenue and Seaver street. 

2184. Walnut avenue and Crawford street. 

2345. Brookline avenue, near Pilgrim road. 

2346. Pilgrim road and Short street. 
2385. Minden and Day streets. 

2394. Heath square. 

2395. Minden and Posen streets. 

3115. Massachusetts avenue and Gerard street. 
3137. Burrell and Clifton streets. 
3143. Clifton and Batchelder streets. 

Jamaica Plain. 
2426. Paul Gore street. 
2447. Walnut avenue and Ifney road. 

West Roxbury. 

2518. Washington street and Mosgrove avenue. 

2557. Metropolitan avenue and Maynard street. 

2612. Birch and Albano streets. 

2627. Bellevue street and Howitt road. 

2644. Washington and Cowing streets. 

2654. Centre and Upland streets. 

2711. Fairview and Conway streets. 

2723. Centre and Ainsworth streets. 

2725. Church street and Pierpont road. 

SCHOOLHOUSE BOXES. I 

804. Mary Lyon School, Turner street, Brighton. 
897. Frederic Whitney School, Islington and Armington 
streets. 



22 City Document No. 14. 

1631. John J. Williams School, Groton street. 

2237. William A. Bacon School, Vernon street. 

3177. Quincy E. Dickerman School, Magnolia street. 

7224. George Frisbee Hoar School, West Fifth street. 

Private Boxes. 

442. Navy Yard, telephone office. 

447. Navy Yard, waterfront. 

449. Navy Yard, near east gate. 

1259. John Morrill & Co., 75 Commercial street. (Auxiliary.) 
1266. City Hall Annex. (Auxiliary.) 

1657. Homcepathic Hospital, Harrison avenue. (Auxiliary.) 
2333. Museum of Fine Arts. 

2419. Thomas G. Plant Company, Minden and Posen streets. 
3558. Consumptives' Hospital, River street. 

714. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad shed, 
No. 9 Fargo street. (Auxiliary.) 
7114. Merchants and Miners Steamship Company, Northern 

avenue. 
7335. Walworth Manufacturing Company, East First street. 

803. St. ColumbkihVs Parochial School, Brighton. (Aux- 
iliary.) 

Changes in Location of Fire Alarm Boxes. 

238. From Mt. Pleasant avenue, at Mt. Carmel Convent, to 

Mt. Pleasant avenue and Vine street. 
264. From Walnut avenue and Munroe street to Walnut 

avenue and Elmore street. 
269. From Regent street, opposite Alpine street, to Regent 

and Fountain streets. 
278. From Walnut avenue and Walnut park to Walnut 

avenue and Ruthven street. 
1671. From Chemical House No. 4, Shawmut avenue, to 

Shawmut avenue and West Brookline street. 
2712. From Fairview and South streets to South Fairview 

and Robert streets. 

3236. From Stoughton and Pleasant streets to Stoughton and 

Sumner streets. 

3237. From Edward Everett School, Pleasant street, to 

Pleasant and Thornley streets. 

Some progress was made in renumbering boxes in accordance 
with plan adopted several years ago. 

Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 
Total number 1,083 



Owned by Fire Department 
Owned by Schoolhouse Department . 
Owned by Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company 
Private ownership 



788 

148 

61 

86 



Fire Department. 



23 



Department boxes: 

On lamp-posts . 

On poles .... 

On buildings with lights over them 

On buildings not lighted . 

Equipped with keyless doors 

Equipped with keyless doors with handles under 
glass guards . 

Equipped with key doors 

With auxiliary attachments 
Schoolhouse boxes: 

On lamp-posts . . . 

On poles .... 

On outside of buildings . 

Inside of buildings 

Equipped with keyless doors 

Equipped with key doors 
Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company boxes 

On poles . . 

On outside of buildings 

Inside of buildings 

Equipped with keyless doors 

Equipped with key doors 
Private boxes: 

On poles .... 

On outside of buildings 

Inside of buildings 

Equipped with keyless doors 

Equipped with key doors 



349 

413 

20 

3 

735 

49 

4 

15 

11 
17 
63 
57 
91 
57 

7 

15 
39 

7 
54 

7 
19 
60 
11 

75 



Posts. 
Lamp-posts in service . 
Lamp-posts set but not in service 
Test posts in service 
Pole test boxes in service 



360 

7 

61 

173 



Classification of Fire Alarm Box Stations. 

Academies 4 

Asylums 2 

Ball grounds 1 

Car barns 5 

Cemetery . 1 

Church 1 

Homes for Aged People . 2 

Hospitals ......... 15 

Hotels 6 

Manufacturing plants 21 

Milk depot 1 

Museum 1 

Navy Yard 6 



24 



City Document No. 14. 



Newspaper office . 

Office building 

Police station (Chelsea) 

Power stations 

Prison 

Public buildings 

Public hall . 

Railroad shops 

Railroad stations 

Railroad*yards 

Restaurant 

Retail stores 

Schoolhouses 

Stables 

Stock 'yards 

Street (public) boxes* 

Theaters . 

Warehouse 

Wharves . 

Wholesale houses 

Total 



1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
4 
5 

12 
1 
6 

162 
2 
2 

775 

28 

1 

5 

2 

1,083 



Circuits. 



Number of box circuits 60 

Number of tapper circuits 13 

Number of gong circuits ...... 13 

Number of telephone circuits to department stations, 43 

Number of telephone circuits to Oxford Exchange . 7 

Special telephone circuit to Back Bay Exchange, 1 

Special telephone circuit to Police Headquarters . 1 
Special telephone circuit to A. D. T. Company's 

office 1 

Telephone connection with Boston Automatic Com- 
pany's office 1 

Telephone connection with Boston Protective Com- 
pany No. 1 1 

The above telephone service is from the department 
exchange board. 



Wire, Cable and Conduits. 
Line wire in service 
Aerial cable in service . 
Conductors in same 
Aerial cable conductors in service 
Underground cable in service 
Conductors in same 
Underground cable conductors in service 



Feet. 

1,334,700 
115,530 
657,235 
470,863 
651,100 
10,443,081 

6,044,277 



* There are several boxes installed by the Schoolhouse Department and others which 
are accessible to the public but are not counted as street boxes. 



Fire Department. 



25 



Conduit owned by the Fire Department . 

Ducts in Fire Department conduit .... 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company's 

ducts used by Fire Department .... 
Postal Telegraph Company's ducts used by Fire 

Department 



Feet. 

46,741 
60,136 

448,979 

1,411 



Fire Alarm Apparatus. 

Tappers in service 141 

Boston tappers in adjacent towns and cities . . 6 
Tappers connected to adjacent systems in Boston 

Fire Department stations 6 

Gongs in service 117 

Registers in service (outside of Fire Alarm Office) . 23 

Relays in service 13 

Telephones in department stations .... 136 
Public exchange lines from department exchange 

board 8 

Public Clocks. 

Twenty-seven tower clocks, twenty-three of which are owned 
by the city, are kept in operation by this department. Sixty- 
two reports of clock troubles, most of which were of minor 
importance, were attended to during the year. 



Summary of Work Done. 
New line wire used 
Old wire removed from poles 
Aerial cable installed 
Conductors in same 
Aerial cable removed . 
Conductors in same 
Underground cable installed in ducts of New Enj; 

land Telephone and Telegraph Company 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed in department ducts 

Conductors in same 

Total underground cable installed 

Conductors in same 

Cables used for repairs and on account of new sub 

way 

Conductors in same 
Conduits laid by this department 
Ducts in same .... 
Manholes built by department . 
Pole set by department 
Crossarms used by department . 



Feet. 

148,840 
89,200 
16,726 
73,975 
1,673 
14,106 

32,579 

421,581 

4,411 

49,553 

36,990 

471,134 

1,359 

88,542 

3,454 

3,834 

2 

1 

588 



26 



City Document No. 14. 



Fire alarm boxes installed: 

By Fire Department 

By Schoolhouse Department .... 

By Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company 

By private owners 

Fire alarm lamp-posts set (addition to service) 
Fire alarm lamp-posts reset .... 

Fire alarm test posts installed (addition to service) 
Fire alarm test posts replaced by new 
Fire alarm pole test boxes installed . 



39 
6 
5 
8 

37 
9 
6 
5 

15 



George L. Fickett, 

Superintendent Fire Alarm. 



Fire Department. 27 



SUPERINTENDENT OF REPAIR SHOP. 



Boston, February 17, 1916. 
From: Superintendent op Repair Shop. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

1 respectfully submit the following table showing the 
number of repairs on horse-drawn apparatus and the 
cost, and cost of repairs done outside repair shop. 

The number of repair jobs and the cost, the work being 
done by department mechanics, for the upkeep of the 
houses of the different companies, and stock furnished 
where repairs were made by company members is shown; 
also repairs other than those made by department 
mechanics. 

Repairs on furniture and bedding both in repair shop 
and by outside firms is included. 

HORSE-DEIVEN APPARATUS. 

Number of jobs done in repair shop .... 1,771 

Cost for material and labor $16,270 

Number of jobs done by outside firms .... 202 

Cost of jobs done by outside firms .... $2,534 

Summary of Apparatus Repairs in Repair Shop. 
52 Springs for running gear were attached to different pieces 
of apparatus. 
112 Solid rubber tires were applied to apparatus wheels. 
8 Ladder trucks, 15 fire engines, 8 hose wagons and 6 chemical 
engines were in repair shop and made ready for service. 

2 1,100-gallon nozzles with Siamese connection^ were attached 

to hose wagons. 

Two Steam Engine Boilers Installed. 
Horseless Engine No. 35 had new boiler installed, thereby 
doing away with the throwing of sparks, which was the cause 
of several awning' fires while apparatus was responding to 
alarms. Engine No. 39 had a new boiler installed. 

House Repairs. 
Number of jobs by carpenters, painters, plumbers 

and steamfitter 54 4 

Material and labor $16,51 1 

Outside firms making repairs . . . . . . 71 

Cost $2,80 5 

Repairs made by company members, stock furnished 

from the repair shop $975 



28 



City Document No. 14. 



FUKNITUKE AND BEDDING. 

Cost of repairs by outside firms 

Cost of material and labor in repair shop 
Cost of stock furnished, repairs made by company 
members 



$1,266 

$127 



Three upright boilers were installed in the boiler 
room of the repair shop. These are connected with the 
repair shop, Fire Alarm Branch, and furnish heat and 
power to the Dover Street Bath House. 

To keep the fire apparatus in running order all kinds 
of repairs are made in the Repair Shop Branch, and every 
description of repair work is done by the carpenters, 
painters, plumbers and steamfitter, who are under the 
general supervision of the superintendent of the repair 
shop, to keep the department houses up to a high 
standard, making them safe and sanitary. 

Amount of Hose Purchased and Condemned During 

the Year. 



Hose Purchased. 


Feet. 


Hose Condemned. 


Feet. 


Leading cotton hose 


16,720 


Leading cotton hose 


15,910 


Chemical hose . 


1,000 


Chemical hose . 


1,400 


Flexible suction hose 


200 


Leading rubber hose 


700 


Deluge hose 


200 


Flexible suction hose 


275 


Deck hose . 


100 


Deck hose .... 


100 


Four-inch rubber suctioi 


l 


Deluge hose 


160 


hose . ' . 


20i 


Four-inch rubber suction 








hose .... 
Total . . . : 


52 


Total . 


18,240§ 


18,597 



Amount of Hose in Use and Store February 

1, 1916. 



In Use. 


Feet. 


In Store. 


Feet. 


Leading cotton hose 


114,526 


Leading cotton hose 


2,060 


Chemical hose . 


14,450 


Deluge hose 


166 


Leading rubber hose 


4,750 


Chemical hose . 


100 


Four-inch rubber suction 




Four-inch rubber suction 




hose . . . . 


1,049 


hose .... 


72 


Deck hose . . . . 


900 


Two and one-half inch 




Deluge hose 


800 


rubber suction hose 


40 


Flexible suction hose 


541* 


Flexible suction hose 

Total .... 


m 


Total . . . . 


137,016* 


2,450! 



Respectfully submitted, 

E. M. Byington, 

Superintendent. 



Fire Department. 



29 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT VETERINARY 
HOSPITAL. 



Boston, February 14, 1916. 
From: The Department Veterinarian. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

Sir, — I respectfully report for the year ending 
January 31, 1916, the number of calls received for the 
treatment of sick and injured horses and for medicines 
was 825. There were 309 horses treated at the Veterinary 
Hospital for sickness and injuries and 301 treated in 
their respective quarters for minor troubles. 

There were 315 calls for medicines for emergency use. 
The health and condition of the horses of this department 
is excellent. 

The number of horses purchased, sold, died, killed 
in service and destroyed for the year ending January 
31, 1916, is as follows: 



Total number on hand February 1, 1915 








343 


Total number on hand February 1, 1916 








290 


Horses purchased 








15 


Horses sold 








49 


Horses died 








2 


Horses destroyed . . . . . 








12 


Horses killed in service 








5 


Department ambulance calls 








20 



Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel P. Keogh, M. D. V. 



30 City Document No. 14. 



HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Boston, February 14, 1916. 
From: The Medical Examiner. 

To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I have the honor to report for the year ending February 
1, 1916, as follows: 

Number of cases of illness 368 

Number of cases of injury \ . 831 

Remained on duty 681 

Examinations. 

For appointment as probationary firemen . . . 15 
General examinations, including probationers at the 

expiration of their terms 1,385 

House and hospital visits 139 

The health of the men has been excellent until the 
recent epidemic of grip which has increased the sick list 
very materially. The medicine chests, carried on the 
different apparatus, have been inspected regularly and 
found in good condition, as in previous years, reflecting 
credit on the commanding officers. 

Deaths. 

Michael Walsh, Chief of Fire District No. 9, February 
20, from injuries received while responding to still 
alarm, December 2, 1914. 

Alfred A. Bestwick, Ladder 10, February 28, cancer. 

Charles H. W. Pope, Junior Deputy Chief, July 12, 
pneumonia. 

J. H. Sullivan, Engine 12, July 3, tuberculosis. 

Timothy J. Crowley, Engine 10, August 16, chronic 
nephritis. 

Dennis A. Walsh, Engine 10, December 21, killed at 
Box 1356. 

Charles Willett, Engine 10, December 21, killed at 
Box 1356. 



Fire Department. 31 

T. H. Kehoe, Engine 38-39, January 19, chronic 
nephritis. 

In closing permit me to thank you and your subor- 
dinate officers for the efficient cooperation, courtesy 
and consideration received by me in the discharge of 
my duties. 

Respectfully, 

R. W. Sprague, 

Medical Examiner. 



32 



City Document No. 14. 



MOTOR APPARATUS. 



134 




82 

A'iO 




36 




10 




38 




18 






18,164 




326 




$1,987 



Boston, May 29, 1916. 
From: Supervisor op Motor Apparatus. 
To: The Fire Commissioner: 
Subject: Annual Report. 

1 respectfully submit the following report showing the 
number of repairs on motor-driven apparatus for the 
year 1915-16: 

Total number of jobs done in the repair shop . . 750 

Repairs to ladder trucks . 

Repairs to steamers (tractors) 

Repairs to chiefs' cars 

Repairs to combinations . 

Repairs to chemicals 

Repairs to pumping engines 

Repairs to water towers . 
Cost of labor and material . 
Total number of jobs done by outside firms 
Cost of labor and material .... 

180 Storage batteries recharged. 
110 Prest-O-Lite tanks exchanged. 
154 New tubes purchased. 
265 New shoes purchased. 
700 Tubes repaired. 
160 Shoes repaired. 
110 Tubes scrapped. 
126 Shoes scrapped. 

105 Auto springs were repaired, and attached by mechanics 
in the Repair Shop Branch. 

New Apparatus. 
2 Motor combination hose cars. 
6 Chiefs' runabouts. 
Tractors installed on : . 

2 Steam fire engines. 
1 Water tower. 

4 Aerial ladder trucks. 
4 City service trucks. 

•Respectfully submitted, 

C. E. Stewart, 
Supervisor of Motor Apparatus. 



Fire Department. 



33 



THE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION. 



Commissioner, John Grady. 

Chief Clerk, Benjamin F. Underhill. 

Chief of Department, Peter F. McDonough. 

Superintendent of Construction and Repairs, Eugene M. 

Byington. 
Supervisor of Motor Apparatus, Charles E. Stewart. 
Superintendent of Fire Alarms, George L. Fickett. 
Chief Operator and Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms, 

Richard Donahue. 
Veterinarian, Daniel P. Keogh. 
Medical Examiner, Rufus W. Sprague. 

Clerks. 
George F. Murphy, Daniel J. Quinn, James P. Maloney, 
Edward L. Tierney,' Herbert J. Hickey, John J. Coholan, 
William J. Hurley, Nathan Cohen, Joseph A. Cahalan. 



STRE 


NG r 


rH AND PAY. 




Headquarters. 






Per annum. 


1 Commissioner 

1 Chief clerk 

1 Medical examiner 










$5,000 
2,500 
1,500 


1 Bookkeeper 

2 Clerks 
1 Clerk 
1 Clerk 
1 Clerk 

1 Assistant engineer ( 


mesi 


senger) * 






2,100 
1,800 
1,600 
1,400 
1,200 
1,400 


10 




Fire-fighting Branch. 




1 Chief of department 

2 Deputy chiefs 
15 District chiefs 






$1,500 
3,500 
3,000 


59 Captains 

88 Lieutenants 






2,000 
1,800 


1 Private, aid to commissioner * 






1,400 


1 Private, aid to chief * . 






1,400 


3 Engineers (marine) 






1,700 


48 Engineers .... 






1,500 


47 Assistant engineers 






1,400 


1 Assistant engineer . . 






1,100 



* Detailed from fire-fighting branch. 



34 



City Document No. 14. 



694 Privates: 
463 
51 
45 
84 
33 
10 



Per annum. 

$1,400 
1,300 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
900 
720 



960 



Repair Shop Branch. 



1 Supervisor of motor apparatus .... $3,500 

1 Superintendent 3,000 

1 Captain, assistant superintendent * . 2,000 

1 Lieutenant, foreman of hose and harness shop,* 1,800 

1 Engineer (master plumber) * . . . . 1,600 

1 Hoseman (master carpenter) * 1,600 

1 Hoseman (master painter) * .... 1,600 

3 Privates * 1,400 



Employees. 



1 Clerk 

1 Clerk 

1 Clerk * . 

1 Storekeeper * . . 

1 Engineer . 

3 Firemen . 

2 Plumbers 
1 Steamfitter 
6 Painters . 
1 Wheelwright . 
1 Wheelwright . 
1 Machinist 
6 Machinists 
1 Foreman blacksmith 

4 Blacksmiths . 

5 Blacksmith's helpers 

3 Carpenters 

1 Vulcanizer 

2 Hose and harness repairers 
1 Hose and harness repairer 

1 Chauffeur 

2 Teamsters 



$1,500 
1,000 
1,400 
1,800 

Per day. 

$3 50 



25 
40 
00 
50 
75 
25 
00 
75 
00 
75 
75 
50 
00 
50 
50 
00 
50 



56 



Detailed from fire-fighting branch. 



Fiee Department. 



35 



Fire Alarm Branch. 

1 Superintendent 

1 Chief operator and assistant superintendent 
4 Principal operators 

3 Operators 

4 Assistant operators 

4 Assistant operators . 

Construction Force. 

1 Foreman 

1 Assistant foreman 

1 Clerk 

1 Clerk (stockman)* 

1 Machinist 

2 Machinists 

20 Repairers, linemen and wiremen (average) 

1 Watchman 



45 



Veterinary Hospital Branch. 



1 Veterinarian 

1 Captain, assistant to veterinarian* 

3 Hostlers (average) ...... 

1 Horseshoer 



Per annum. 

$3,000 
2,500 
1,800 
1,600 
1,400 
1,100 



$2,200 
1,600 
1,100 
1,400 

Per day. 

$4 25 
3 75 
3 69 

2 75 



Per annum. 

$3,000 
2,000 

Per day. 

$2 50 
3 50 



1,077 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 
Peter F. McDonough. 
Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 
The Chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into two divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Division 1. 
Deputy Chief, John O. Taber. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. 

* Detailed from fire-fighting branch. 



36 City Document No. 14. 

District 1. 
District Chief, John W. Godbold. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 
East Boston. 
All that portion of the city which is included within 
the district known as East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 
40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, Chemical 7. 

District 2. 

District Chief, Allan J. Macdonald. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 9, Main Street, 
Charlestown. 

All that portion of the city which is included within 
the district known as Charlestown. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 
36, Ladders 9, 22, Chemicals 3, 9. 

District 3. 
District Chief, Stephen J. Rydee. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

All that portion of the city which is included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of State and Devon- 
shire streets, thence easterly through State street to the 
waterfront, thence southeasterly across the harbor to 
the extension of C street, South Boston, thence southerly 
through C street to Cypher street, thence northwesterly 
through Cypher street to B street, then"ce southwesterly 
through B street to West First street, thence westerly 
through West First street to Atlantic Avenue Bridge, 
thence through Atlantic Avenue Bridge and Atlantic 
. avenue to Summer street, thence westerly through Sum- 
mer street to Devonshire street, thence through Devon- 
shire street to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 
39, 44 (fireboat), Ladders 8, 18, Water Tower 3. 

District 4- 
District Chief, John E. Madison. 
Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 
All that portion of the city which is included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of State and Devon- 
shire streets, thence through Devonshire street southerly 



Fire Department. 37 

to Water street, thence westerly through Water street 
to Washington street, thence southerly through Wash- 
ington street to School street, thence through School 
street and Beacon street to Charles street, thence north- 
erly through Charles street to Pinckney street, thence 
westerly through Pinckney street to the Cambridge 
boundary line, thence northerly along said Cambridge 
boundary line to its intersection with the tracks of the 
Eastern Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
thence northeasterly to the Warren Avenue Drawbridge, 
thence easterly to the Charlestown Drawbridge, thence 
northeasterly and then southerly around the waterfront 
to the extension of State street, thence through State 
street to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
31 (fireboat), Ladders 1, 24, Chemical 1, Water Tower 1. 

District 5. 
District Chief, William Coulter. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 

All that portion of the city which is included within a 
line beginning at the intersection of Devonshire and 
Water streets, thence running westerly through Water 
street to Washington street, thence southerly through 
Washington street to School street, thence through School 
street and Beacon street to Charles street, thence 
northerly through Charles street to Pinckney street, 
thence westerly through Pinckney street to the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, thence southerly along said 
boundary line to the extension of Otter street, thence 
through Otter street to Beacon street, thence easterly 
through Beacon street to Arlington street, thence through 
Arlington street to Boylston street, thence easterly 
through Boylston street to Church street, thence through 
Church street to Providence street, thence through 
Providence street to Columbus avenue, thence through 
Columbus avenue to Church street, thence through 
Church street to Tremont street, thence northerly 
through Tremont street to Pleasant street, thence south- 
easterly through Pleasant street and Broadway extension 
to Fort Point channel, thence northerly through Fort 
Point channel to Atlantic Avenue Bridge, thence through 
Atlantic Avenue Bridge and Atlantic avenue to Summer 
street, thence westerly through Summer street to Devon- 
shire street, thence through Devonshire street to the 
point of beginning. 



38 City Document No. 14. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Chemical 2. 

District 6. 

District Chief, Edward J. Shallow. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 
South Boston. 

All that portion of the city which is included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of Atlantic Avenue 
Bridge and Fort Point channel, thence southerly through 
Atlantic Avenue Bridge to West First street, thence 
through West First street to B street, thence northerly 
through B street to Cypher street, thence through 
Cypher street to C street, thence northerly through C 
street to the waterfront, thence by the waterfront south- 
easterly, then westerly to the extension of Columbia 
road, thence through Columbia road to Mt. Vernon 
street, thence through Mt. Vernon street to Willow 
court, thence through Willow court to Massachusetts 
avenue, thence through Massachusetts avenue to the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks 
(inclusive), thence northerly along said tracks (inclusive) 
to the South bay, thence northerly to Fort Point channel, 
thence through Fort Point channel to the point of 
beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20, Chemical 8. 

District 7. 
District Chief, Peter E. Walsh. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 

All that portion of the city which is included within 
a line beginning at the intersection of Beacon and Otter 
streets, thence easterly through Beacon street to Arling- 
ton street, thence through Arlington street to Boylston 
street, thence easterly through Boylston street to 
Church street, thence through Church street to Provi- 
dence street, thence through Providence street to 
Columbus avenue, thence through Columbus avenue 
to Church street, thence through Church street to 
Tremont street, thence northerly through Tremont 
street to Pleasant street, thence easterly through Pleas- 
ant street and Broadway extension to Fort Point 
channel, thence southerly through Fort Point channel 



Fire Department. 39 

to the Roxbury canal, thence southerly through the 
Roxbury canal to Massachusetts avenue, thence north- 
westerly through Massachusetts avenue to the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, thence northeasterly along said 
boundary line to a point opposite the extension of 
Otter street, thence through Otter street to the point 
of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 
33, Ladders 3, 13, 15, Chemical 4, Water Tower 2. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chief, Daniel F. Sennott. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 4, Dudley Street. 
This division comprises Districts 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 
and 15. 

District 8. 
District Chief, William J. Gaffe y. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 

All that portion of the city within a line beginning at 
the intersection of Massachusetts avenue and the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, thence through Massachusetts 
avenue to Washington street, thence southerly through 
Washington street to Marcella street, thence by Marcella 
street to Centre street, by Centre street to New Heath 
street, thence by New Heath street to Heath square to 
Heath street, thence by South Huntington avenue to 
Huntington avenue, thence by Huntington avenue to 
the Brookline boundary line, thence northerly and 
easterly along the Brookline boundary line to the 
Cottage Farm Bridge (inclusive), thence northerly 
through Essex street to the Cambridge boundary line, 
thence easterly by said Cambridge boundary line to the 
point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 37, 
Ladders 12, 26, Chemical 12. 

District 9. 

District Chief, Joseph H. Kenney. 

Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 

All that portion of the city within a line beginning at 

the intersection of the extension of Columbia road and 

the Old Harbor, thence running westerly through 



40 City Document No. 14. 

Columbia road to Mt. Vernon street, thence through 
Mt. Vernon street to Willow court, thence through 
Willow court to Massachusetts avenue, thence through 
Massachusetts avenue to the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad tracks (exclusively), thence northerly 
along said tracks '(exclusive) to the South bay, thence 
westerly along said South bay to the Roxbury canal, 
thence southerly . through the Roxbury canal to Massa- 
chusetts avenue, thence northwesterly through Massa- 
chusetts avenue to Washington street, thence southerly 
through Washington street to Elmore street, thence 
easterly through Elmore street to Monroe street, thence 
easterly through Monroe street to Warren street, thence 
southeasterly through Warren street to Sunderland 
street, thence through Sunderland street to Stanwood 
street, thence through Stanwood street to Columbia 
road, thence northeasterly through Columbia road to 
Stoughton street, thence easterly through Stoughton 
street to Pleasant street, thence through Pleasant street 
to Savin Hill avenue, thence easterly and northerly 
through Savin Hill avenue to Evandale terrace, thence 
through Evandale terrace to waterfront, thence northerly 
along waterfront to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 21, 23, 
24, Ladder 4, Chemical 10. 

District 10. 
District Chief, Walter M. McLean. 

Headquarters, Engine House 18, Harvard Street, 
Dorchester. 
All that portion of the city within a line beginning at 
the intersection of the extension of Evandale terrace and 
Dorchester bay, thence through Evandale terrace to 
Savin Hill avenue, thence northerly and westerly through 
Savin Hill avenue to Pleasant street, thence northerly 
through Pleasant and Stoughton streets to Columbia 
road, thence southerly through Columbia road to Blue 
Hill avenue, thence southerly through Blue Hill avenue 
to Canterbury street, thence through Canterbury street 
to Morton street, thence southerly through Morton 
street to Blue Hill avenue, thence northerly through 
Blue Hill avenue to Woodrow avenue, thence through 
Woodrow avenue to Norfolk street, thence through 
Norfolk street to Centre street, thence through Centre 
street to Adams street, thence northerly through Adams 
street to Mill street, thence through Mill street to Preston 



Fire Department. 41 

street, thence through Preston street to Freeport street, 
thence southerly through Freeport street to Dorchester 
bay, thence northerly along the waterfront to point of 
beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 
Ladders 7, 29, Chemical 11. 

District 11. 
District Chief, Henry A. Fox. ■ 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 
Brighton. 

All that portion of the city included within the dis- 
trict known as Brighton which is west of the Cottage 
Farm Bridge and Essex street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 
41, Ladders 11, 31. 

District 12. 

District Chief, Michael J. Mulligan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 

All that portion of the city known as West Roxbury 
and Jamaica Plain within a line beginning at the inter- 
section of Washington and Morton streets, thence by 
Morton street to Canterbury street, thence by Canter- 
bury street to Blue Hill avenue, thence by Blue Hill 
avenue to Columbia road, thence by Columbia road to 
Stanwood street, thence by Stanwood and Sunderland 
streets to Warren street, thence by Warren street to 
Munroe street, thence by Munroe street to Elmore 
street, thence by Elmore street to Washington street, 
thence by Washington street to Marcella street, thence 
by Marcella street to Centre street, thence by Centre 
street to New Heath street, thence by New Heath street 
to Heath square, thence through Heath square to Heath 
street, thence by Heath street to South Huntington 
avenue, thence by South Huntington avenue to Hunt- 
ington avenue, thence by Huntington avenue to the 
Brookline boundary line, thence southeasterly along said 
Brookline boundary line to Perkins street, thence by 
Perkins street to Prince street, thence by Prince street 
to the Arborway, thence by the Arborway to the point 
of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 
Ladders 10, 23, 30, Chemical 5. 



42 City Document No. 14. 

District 13. 
District Chief, Michael J. Kennedy. 

Headquarters, Engine House 45, corner Washington 
and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 

All that portion of the city beginning at the inter- 
section of Washington and Morton streets, thence by 
Morton street to Harvard street, thence by Harvard 
street to Ashland street, thence by Ashland street to and 
across the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
tracks, thence southerly along the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks to the boundary 
line of Ward 24, thence southwesterly along the said 
boundary line of Ward 24 to the Dedham boundary line, 
thence along the Dedham boundary line to the Newton 
boundary line, thence northeasterly along the Newton 
boundary line to the Brookline boundary line, thence 
southeasterly and thence northerly along said Brookline 
boundary line to Perkins street, thence by Perkins street 
to Prince street, thence by Prince street to the Arborway, 
thence by the Arborway to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 
Ladders 16, 25, Chemical 13. 



District 14. 

District Chief, Maurice Heffernan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 
Dorchester. 

All that portion of the city within a line beginning 
at the intersection of Dorchester bay and Freeport 
street (Commercial Point), thence northerly through 
Freeport street to Preston street, thence through Preston 
street to Mill street, thence through Mill street to 
Adams street, thence southerly through Adams street 
to Centre street, thence through Centre street to Nor- 
folk street, thence through Norfolk street to Woodrow 
avenue, thence through Woodrow avenue to Blue Hill 
avenue, thence southerly through Blue Hill avenue to 
Morton street, thence northwesterly through Morton 
street to Harvard street, thence southerly through Har- 
vard street to Oakland street, thence through Oakland 
street to Rexford street, thence through Rexford street 
to Blue Hill avenue, thence northerly through Blue Hill 
avenue to Fremont street, thence through Fremont 



Fire Department. 43 

street to the Neponset river, thence along the Neponset 
river and Dorchester bay northwesterly to the point of 
beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, Ladders 6, 27. 

District 15. 

District Chief, Joseph A. Dolan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48,- Corner Harvard 
Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 

All that portion of the city within a line beginning 
at the intersection of the extension of Fremont street 
and the Milton boundary line, thence through Fremont 
street to Blue Hill avenue, thence southerly through 
Blue Hill avenue to Rexford street, thence through Rex- 
ford street to Oakland street, thence westerly through 
Oakland street to Ashland street, thence through Ash- 
land street to the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad tracks (inclusive), thence southerly along the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad tracks 
(inclusive) to the boundary line of Hyde Park, thence 
along the Hyde Park boundary line to the Dedham 
boundary line, thence southeasterly along the Dedham 
boundary line to the Milton boundary line, thence 
along the Milton boundary line to the point of beginning. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
Ladder 28, Chemical 14, Hose 49. 

Note. — Wherever a street, channel or bridge is named the center line of each will be 
the line used. Inspections of the following-named islands will be made under special 
orders issued by the Chief of Department: Apple, Castle, Gallop's, George's, Governor's, 
Long, Lovell's, Rainsford, Deer, Thompson's and Spectacle. 



44 



City Document No. 14. 



FIRE STATIONS. 



Location and Valuation. 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Assessed 
Valuation. 


Occupied by 


Dorchester and Fourth streets 


8,169 


$25,800 


Engine 1 and Ladder 5. 


Corner of and Fourth streets 


4,000 


16,200 


Engine 2. 


Bristol street and Harrison avenue . . . 


4,000 


30,000 


Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 


Bulfinch street 

Marion street, East Boston 


6,098 

1,647 


96,000 
9,000 


Engine 4, Chemical 1 and 

Tower 1. 
Engine 5. 




2,269 
1,893 


40,000 
39,200 




East street 


Engine 7. 


Salem street 


2,568 


27,200 


Engine 8. 




4,720 


33,300 


Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 




1,886 


20,500 


Engine 10. 


Saratoga and Byron sts., East Boston, 


10,000 


40,000 


Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 




7,320 
4,832 


25,000 
14,800 


Engine 12. 


Cabot street 


Engine 13. 




5,713 


14,600 






2,803 


18,600 


Engine 15. 


Corner River and Temple streets 


12,736 


19,200 


Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 


Meeting House Hill, Dorchester 


9,450 


17,300 


Engine 17 and Ladder 7. 


Harvard street, Dorchester 


9,440 


18,800 


Engine 18. 




7,683 


14,200 


Engine 19. 


Walnut street, Dorchester 


9,000 


17,300 


Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 




10,341 


17,100 


Engine 21. 




7,500 


62,500 


Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 




3,445 


11,200 


Engine 23. 


Corner Warren and Quincy streets. . . 


4,186 


18,100 


Engine 24. 




4,175 


100,600 


Engine 25 and Ladder 8. 




5,623 
2,600 


212,000 
17,500 


Engines 26 and 35. 




Engine 27. 


Centre street, Jamaica Plain 


10,377 


28,300 


Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 


Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 


14,358 


37,200 


Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 


Centre street, West Roxbury 


12,251 


25,000 


Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 


521 Commercial street, on land of 
Public Works Department. 




10,000 


Engine 31, fireboat. 



Fire Department. 

Fire Stations. — Concluded. 



45 



Location. 



Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 



Assessed 
Valuation. 



Occupied by 



Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 

Corner Boylston and Hereford streets, 

"Western avenue, Brighton 

Monument street, Charlestown 

Corner Longwood and Brookline aves., 

Congress street 

Sumner street, East Boston 



Harvard avenue, near Cambridge 
street, Brighton. 

Washington street, at Egleston square, 

Andrew square 

Northern Avenue Bridge 



Washington and Poplar streets, Ros- 
lindale. 



Dorchester avenue, Ashmont 

Adjoining South Ferry, East Boston. 



Harvard avenue and "Winthrop street, 
Hyde Park. 



Church street 

Corner Winthrop and Soley streets . . . 

Shawmut avenue 

Saratoga street, East Boston 

B street 

Eustis street 

Corner Callender and Lyons streets . . 
Corner Walk Hill and Wenham streets, 

Friend street 

Dudley street 

Main street, Charlestown 

Tremont street 

Harrison avenue 

Pittsburgh street, South Boston 

Fourth street 

Washington street, Dorchester 

North Grove street 

Oak square, Brighton 



8,188 
5,646 
4,637 
5,668 
5,231 
4,000 
4,010 
6,112 

3,S48 
5,133 



14,729 

4,875 

11,950 

9,450 

3,412 
5,230 
889 
9,300 
1,800 
1,790 
7,200 
11,253 
1,676 
3,923 
4,290 
4,311 
2,134 
8,964 
3,101 
6,875 
3,918 



Sprague and Milton streets, Hyde 
Park district, on land owned by the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 



$25,000 
108,000 
17,800 
21,000 
14,300 
40,000 
18,000 
34,500 

22,900 
19,600 
30,000 
22,400 

23,200 
31,600 
40,100 

23,600 
15,400 

4,300 
40,600 

7,800 

8,000 
13,200 
17,800 
37,200 
26,000 
16,000 
25,600 
23,800 
39,900 
10,700 
21,400 
19,800 
42,000 

3,000 



Engine 32. 

Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 

Engine 34. 

Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 

Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 

Engines 38 and 39. 

Engine 40. 

Engine 41. 

Engine 42 and Ladder 30. 
Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 
Engine 44, fireboat. 
Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 

Engine 46. 

Engine 47, fireboat. 

Engine 48, Ladder 28 and 
Chemical 14. 

Chemical Engine 2. 

Chemical 3. 

Chemical Engine 4. 

Chemical Engine 7. 

Chemical Engine 8. 

Chemical Engine 10. 

Chemical 11 and Ladder 29. 

Chemical 13. 

Ladder 1. 

Ladder 4. 

Ladder 9 and Chemical 9. 

Ladder 12 and Chemical 12. 

Ladder 17. ' 

Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 

Ladder 19. 

Ladder 23 and Chemical 5. 

Ladder 24. 

Ladder 31. 

Hose 49. 



46 City Document No. 14. 

Headquarters Building, Bristol street, 15,679 feet 

of land $113,000 

Water Tower No. 2 is in Headquarters Building. 

OTHER BUILDINGS. 

Repair Shop, 363 Albany street, 8,000 feet of 

land $68,000 

Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet 

of land . . 75,000 

Coal station, Dorchester street, 1,610 feet of land, 3,100 

Coal station, Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet 

of land 6,500 

Coal station, Charles River avenue, on land of 

Public Works Department, building cost . . 1,200 

Building No. 11 Wareham street used by the Fire 
Alarm Branch as workshop and storeroom, 
8,500 feet of land 40,000 

Total value of land, wharves and buildings . . 2,247,800 

LEASED BUILDINGS. 

Building No. 50 Bristol street used by the Fire Alarm 
Branch as workshop, storeroom and stable. 

Part of building 240-256 Dover street used as store- 
house for spare apparatus. 

About 800 square feet of shed on Sleeper street (New 
Haven Terminal Stores) used as a coal station. 

Part of building 11 Atherton street used for storage. 



Fire Department. 



47 



CANNEL COAL STATIONS. 



Division 1. 



DlSTEICT. 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Tons.) 



Wagons. 



1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
6 
6 
7 

8 

8 

8 

9 

9 

9 

9 

10 

10 

11 

11 

11 



Engine 11 

Engine 40 

Engine 36 

Ladder 9 

Chemical 3 

Sleeper st 

Engines 38 and 39 

Ladder 18 

Engine 8 

Ladder 24 

Charles River avenue . . 

Engine 26 

Chemical 2 

Engine 2 

Dorchester street, 330. . 
Engine 33 

Division 

Engine 13 

Engine 14 

Engine 37 

Engine 12 

Engine 21 

Engine 23 

Engine 24 

Engine 17 

Engine 18 

Engine 29 

Engine 34 

Engine 41 



12 
20 
35 
35 
15 
45 
6 
1 
5 
16 
50 
20 
35 
20 
20 
25 



40 

10 

20 

5 

6 

5 

7 

3 

5 

7 

7 

10 



48 



City Document No. 14. 

Division 2. — Concluded. 



District. 


Location. 


Capacity. 
(Tons.) 


Wagons. 


11 




10 
20 
9 
9 
9 
5 
7 
4 
8 
10 
1 




12 




1 


12 

13 


Engine 42 


1 

1 


13 




1 


14 


Engine 16 

Engine 20 


1 


14 


1 


14 




15 




1 


15 

15 


Engine 48 

Hose 49 


1 









APPARATUS. 



Engines. — 45 in service, 8 in reserve. 

Ladder Trucks. — 31 in service, 7 in 
reserve. 

Chemical Engines. — 13 in service, 3 in 
reserve. 

Water Towers. — 3 in service, 1 in re- 
serve. 

Fireboats. — 3 in service. 

Hose Wagons. — 38 in service, 8 in re- 
serve. 



Automobiles. — 26 in service, 3 in re- 
serve. 

Delivery Trucks. — 2 in service. 

Motor Combination Wagons. — 5 in 
service, 1 in reserve. 

Miscellaneous. — ■ 41 fuel wagons, 6 re- 
pair wagons, 2 supply wagons, 3 manure 
wagons, 30 hose pungs, 3 jobbing pungs, 
4 fire alarm pungs. 



Fire Department. 



49 



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50 



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Fire Department. 



51 



iH <N CO <N 

ci" ci" oo~ oo 



10 10 o 



E"3 
ft© 



3 ci 






rt oo oo oo oo 



00 00 Cs 



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CO O CO 00 CD O l> 



t> Kh4 «=> 



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in 




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CO CO CO CO CO 



52 



City Document No. 14. 





(•epunoj) 


o 


o 
o 

o 


o 
o 


lO 

CM 


o 

OS 


O 

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CO 


o 




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oo" 


CO 


N 




















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a 


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a 
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CO 


3 


2 


£ 


3 


3 


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CD 


3 






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s 


s 


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E-i 


H 


CO 


H 






•asrpiiis 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


K 






■dranj 


w* 


H. 








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« 


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jo w^ara'BiQ; 


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co 


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o 






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ID 
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Fire Department. 



53 



ia oo co ■* 



*3 a 

XI o 



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C 

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gg 

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3.J3 

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w ffi w 



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CX M M &0 Jjjj cj) 



to CO 


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r/> 


on 


nn 


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« 


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54 



City Document No. 14. 



CO 

p 



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CC 




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Fiee Department. 



55 



Tt< O t~ C5 C5 C5 

o od io" 06" 00 00" 



>OI>t~.i-l«D<MTj<tOC0C0C0 
<M(MT-l<Mr-<(MlMCOeM(M.<M 



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56 



City Document No. 14. 



03 



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Fiee Department. 



57 



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1 and 14 b; 

d lathe. 


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03 

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engine 
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saw. 
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58 



City Document No. 14. 



NUMBER OF RUNS EACH COMPANY HAD FROM 
FEBRUARY 1, 1915, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1916. 



Company. 



>> 

u 


a 


11 


43 


8 


27 


25 


46 


34 


57 


17 


32 


35 


58 


20 


24 


22 


55 


18 


41 


25 


37 


11 


40 


20 


41 


34 


48 


34 


60 


18 


46 


4 


50 


12 


51 


16 


62 


4 


48 


4 


24 


9 


35 


33 


52 


31 


47 


22 


39 


16 


27 


33 


41 


19 


21 


9 


56 


16 


66 


3 


57 


10 


4 


13 


13 









£> 






£l 


>> 




S 






o 
P 


3 

d 
1-1 





Engine 1 
Engine 2 
Engine 3 
Engine 4 
Engine 5 
Engine 6 
Engine 7 
Engine 8 
Engine 9 
Engine 10 
Engine 11 
Engine 12 
Engine 13 
Engine 14 
Engine 15 
Engine 16 
Engine 17 
Engine 18 
Engine 19 
Engine 20 
Engine 21 
Engine 22 
Engine 23 
Engine 24 
Engine 25 
Engine 26 
Engine 27 
Engine 28 
Engine 29 
Engine 30 
Engine 31 
Engine 32 



21 


20 


15 


9 


33 


37 


50 


35 


24 


18 


49 


36 


26 


14 


41 


31 


24 


18 


24 


21 


23 


14 


41 


24 


36 


31 


36 


35 


27 


25 


22 


11 


21 


20 


32 


18 


23 


20 


14 


6 


28 


15 


39 


34 


41 


30 


30 


14 


22 


18 


44 


30 


14 


11 


20 


10 


31 


18 


18 


11 


5 


3 


12 


12 



11 


16 


20 


27 


19 


21 


25 


5 


8 


7 


14 


8 


7 


13 


32 


20 


19 


30 


30 


30 


38 


56 


30 


39 


44 


57 


41 


37 


22 


17 


21 


22 


27 


24 


22 


44 


25 


33 


38 


52 


40 


40 


15 


15 


10 


22 


16 


20 


22 


42 


28 


32 


41 


47 


34 


29 


29 


20 


20 


26 


25 


28 


19 


21 


17 


23 


22 


32 


17 


30 


15 


12 


14 


20 


18 


17 


14 


23 


22 


23 


23 


20 


30 


35 


28 


23 


28 


29 


28 


28 


39 


36 


24 


24 


30 


30 


25 


32 


17 


19 


20 


30 


13 


18 


29 


9 


7 


8 


5 


11 


13 


11 


12 


18 


25 


28 


26 


19 


26 


8 


16 


26 


27 


26 


22 


25 


8 


9 


9 


8 


12 


14 


8 


7 


2 


4 


5 


10 


5 


8 


15 


22 


27 


24 


16 


16 


20 


35 


30 


17 


36 


33 


25 


43 


30 


26 


23 


28 


28 


24 


43 


14 


15 


18 


21 


25 


25 


24 


16 


19 


12 


20 


19 


18 


22 


31 


27 


22 


29 


34 


25 


38 


20 


16 


18 


20 


17 


11 


20 


15 


6 


8 


11 


17 


11 


18 


14 


4 


10 


10 


16 


17 


10 


1 


2 


4 


1 


6 


4 


6 


8 


5 


13 


9 


8 


4 


7 


17 


12 


15 


13 


14 


8 


12 



Fire Department. 59 

Number of Runs of Each Company. — Continued. 



Company. 



>> 

u 
03 

a 

u 

(0 

fa 


o 

03 


26 


34 


13 


54 


2 


5 


16 


10 


21 


60 




4 
35 


17 


14 


35 


19 


82 


15 


31 


13 


47 


4 


21 


4 


65 


11 


85 


9 


20 


7 


73 


7 


42 


36 


60 


17 


34 


26 


47 


28 


39 


15 


42 


4 


50 


20 


33 


24 


45 


17 


8 


9 


55 


13 


53 


36 


49 


29 


57 


17 


24 


25 


28 


1 


24 


28 


28 


10 


25 


11 


25 



<D 

o 

o 


a 

> 
o 


o 

s 

a) 

P 


>> 

03 

3 

d 

03 


25 


21 


23 


29 


11 


14 


11 


10 


4 


1 


3 


4 


15 


17 


7 


13 


24 


26 


15 


14 


2 


1 


2 


4 


18 


11 


15 


27 


22 


26 


24 


16 


19 


19 


17 


17 


21 


14 


17 


22 


34 


20 


22 


21 


11 


3 


8 


15 


7 


15 


12 


14 


19 


26 


20 


25 


14 


13 


8 


8 


9 


7 


10 


5 


7 


5 


9 


6 


47 


71 


52 


44 


22 


23 


26 


14 


22 


24 


28 


36 


26 


26 


29 


42 


28 


19 


21 


29 


4 


8 


13 


9 


25 


21 


25 


18 


43 


36 


34 


38 


14 


17 


8 


15 


7 


15 


14 


13 


9 


15 


14 


10 


25 


31 


21 


42 


33 


34 


25 


43 


* 


* 


* 


* 


21 


15 


20 


28 


2 


7 


4 


6 


24 


29 


21 


28 


8 


7 


7 


17 


17 


11 


9 


14 



Engine 33 . 
Engine 34 . 
Engine 35 . 
Engine 36 . 
Engine 37 . 
Engine 38 . 
Engine 39 . 
Engine 40 . 
Engine 41 . 
Engine 42 . 
Engine 43 . 
Engine 44 . 
Engine 45 . 
Engine 46 . 
Engine 47 . 
Engine 48 . 
Hose 49. . . 
Ladder 1 . 
Ladder 2 . 
Ladder 3 . 
Ladder 4 . 
Ladder 5 . 
Ladder 6 . 
Ladder 7 . 
Ladder 8 . 
Ladder 9 . 
Ladder 10 . 
Ladder 1 1 . 
Ladder 12 . 
Ladder 13 . 
Ladder 14 . 
Ladder 15. 
Ladder 16. 
Ladder 17. 
Ladder 18. 
Ladder 19. 



15 


17 


4 


10 


2 


1 


12 


14 


15 


19 


1 


2 


16 


14 


17 


23 


8 


9 


7 


17 


22 


27 


9 


12 


6 


8 


8 


16 


5 


5 


4 


4 


3 


5 


34 


44 


17 


20 


20 


17 


23 


25 


14 


23 


7 


9 


20 


26 


27 


29 


13 


16 


5 


7 


4 


9 


28 


25 


31 


16 


* 


* 


12 


11 




1 


24 


20 


7 


6 


10 


13 



276 
194 

29 
163 
312 

20 
219 
263 
268 
214 
291 
115 
166 
289 
130 
179 
129 
582 
260 
341 
366 
276 
145 
260 
430 
168 
177 
189 
382 
398 

61 
226 

70 
292 
133 
147 



* Out of service. 



60 City Document No. 14. 

Number of Runs of Each Company. — Concluded. 



Company. 







>> 

i-s 


3 
M 


13 


16 


15 


12 


20 


13 


14 


19 


22 


15 


2 


2 


12 


6 


7 


3 


8 


4 


10 


12 


19 


6 


15 


4 


64 


38 


36 


35 


9 


6 


32 


22 


12 


18 


22 


17 


12 


14 


16 


10 


19 


17 


6 


8 


26 


23 


7 


5 


8 


3 


7 


9 


9 


2 


5 


7 





h 


03 
XI 

O 

o 


5 

> 

o 


19 


13 


20 


18 


15 


14 


29 


24 


20 


31 




6 


12 


12 


8 


12 


7 


8 


17 


21 


11 


26 


10 


16 


52 


68 


38 


40 


12 


12 


20 


27 


28 


17 


22 


25 


28 


11 


6 


12 


20 


22 


16 


15 


20 


23 


3 


10 


7 


7 


14 


12 


8 


4 


5 


3 



Ladder 20. . 
Ladder 21 . . 
Ladder 22 . . 
Ladder 23 . . 
Ladder 24 . . 
Ladder 25 . . 
Ladder 26 . . 
Ladder 27. . 
Ladder 28.. 
Ladder 29 . . 
Ladder 30 . . 
Ladder 31. . 
Chemical 1 
Chemical 2 
Chemical 3 
Chemical 4 
Chemical 5 
Chemical 7 
Chemical 8 
Chemical 9 
Chemical 10 
Chemical 11 
Chemical 12 
Chemical 13 
Chemical 14 

Tower 1 

Tower 2.... 
Tower 3 . . . . 



23 


19 


19 


16 


27 


19 


13 


23 


7 


14 


9 


16 


53 


35 


20 


21 


30 


19 


18 


21 


21 


9 


3 


5 


24 


21 


9 


15 


21 


17 


8 


4 


35 


15 


7 


12 


81 


42 


17 


16 


39 


17 


13 


22 


80 


33 


15 


9 


72 


55 


49 


46 


52 


51 


38 


31 


8 


7 


7 


9 


40 


34 


30 


26 


53 


30 


16 


17 


32 


20 


17 


28 


41 


25 


21 


23 


6 


10 


6 


11 


30 


31 


26 


16 


73 


40 


16 


17 


36 


25 


31 


23 


59 


18 


8 


13 


42 


14 


5 


13 


* 


8 


8 


4 


16 


2 


4 


3 


23 


13 


3 


5 



18 


16 


17 


13 


7 


11 


26 


28 


23 


22 


4 


6 


6 


7 


6 


10 


13 


6 


21 


21 


16 


15 


17 


10 


52 


49 


32 


53 


8 


6 


23 


41 


26 


18 


23 


17 


17 


20 


6 


10 


19 


19 


17 


14 


21 


32 


9 


11 


10 


4 


8 


7 


3 


10 


3 


7 



204 
201 
154 
322 
262 
62 
143 
105 
127 
283 
202 
230 
639 
473 
103 
338 
281 
262 
243 
112 
263 
243 
308 
154 
128 
84 
66 
89 



* Out of service. 



Fire Department. 



61 



Expenditures for the Year. 

Salaries to January 27, 1916, inclusive: 

John Grady, commissioner . $4,986 28 

B. F. Underhill, chief clerk . 2,493 40 

Peter F. McDonough, chief . 4,353 34 

Deputies and district chiefs . 48,232 62 
Members of the various engine, 

ladder and hose companies 1,312,318 54 

Pensioners 140,988 67 

Clerk hire . . . . . 8,883 67 

Injured employees . . . 240 00 



Less amount deducted for cloth 
furnished by the department 



.,522,496 52 
2,922 82 



Repairs of apparatus, including stock sent to 
repair shop: 
Mechanics $61,921 87 



Materials, etc. 

New apparatus 
Horses : 

Hay, grain and straw 

Shoeing . 

Attendants at hospital, medi- 
cine, etc. . 

Harnesses, repairs, etc 

Horse hire 

Repairs and alterations of houses 
Fuel for houses and engines . 
Hardware, tools and supplies 
Hose, pipes and repairs 
Furniture and bedding 
Washing . 

Electric lighting 

Printing 

Uniform cloth . 

Rents 

Medical services 

Expert services 

Hats, badges and buttons 

Stationery 



40,691 37 



546,308 52 
17,990 31 

9,081 96 

1,531 57 

168 25 



1,519,573 70 



102,613 24 
77,581 90 





75,080 61 




53,853 76 




47,170 51 




20,641 31 




20,370 68 


$6,704 74 


[ 


1,436 7( 


) 




8,141 44 




. 7,529 23 






3,325 97 






2,640 20 






2,502 50 






1,821 90 






1,454 77 






1,432 39 






1,316 84 



62 



City Document No. 14. 



Chemicals . . 

Janitor at headquarters . 

Ice 

Expenses of detailed men 
Books, papers and office expenses 

Cas 

Postage 

Electric power .... 
Removing ashes from fireboat 
Traveling expenses . 

Freights 

Medical supplies 
Advertising .... 

Hydrants 

Rent of gas regulators . 



.,201 31 

602 40 

529 20 

497 24 

493 55 

322 17 

300 72 

217 95 

145 88 

125 20 

94 56 

66 81 

65 20 

40 54 

9 75 









$1,951,763 43 


Fire Alarm Telegraph. 




Salaries : 








George L. Fickett, 








superintendent, 


$2,857 44 






Operators, re- 








pairers, etc. 


60,793 38 
$63,650 82 






Less amount de- 








ducted for uniform 








cloth furnished by 








the department . 


158 56 


$63,492 26 










Wire, cable and conduits 


16,578 10 




Instruments, tools and repairs 


11,879 33 




Repairs, alterations 


and exten- 






sions 




3,152 57 




Telephone service . 




1,919 41 




Rents 




1,848 75 




Electric power . 




688 87 




Use of duct in East Boston Tunnel, . 


450 36 




Maps and plans 




449 35 




Car fares and travelin 


g expenses . 


311 02 




Electric light for clocks . 


81 90 




Repairing clocks 




57 81 




Removing bells from towers . 


49 00 




Repairing tower, St. 


Augustine s 






Church . 




350 00 




Time service 




12 00 


101,320 73 












$2,053,084 16 



Fire Department. 



63 



Income. 
Heating and power, Dover Street Bath House 
Changing fire alarm conduits and boxes 
Contributions for damages to fire alarm boxes 

lamp-posts, wagon, etc 
Service of employees 
Permits for fires in open spaces, fireworks, blast 

ing, transportation and storage of explosives 
Sale of badges . 
Sale of old material 
Sale of manure 
Rebate on automobile 
Rents 
Court fees 





. $4,858 64 




95 10 


>, 


252 48 




740 72 




3,000 25 




918 00 




932 82 




193 00 




50 00 




16 00 




2 00 



.1,059 01 



64 



City Document No. 14. 



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Fire Department. 



65 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from January 1, 1915, 
to January 1, 1916. 



Alarms, false, needless, bell 

and still 824 

Alarms out of city 18 

Automatic alarms, false and 

accidental 95 

Automobiles 106 

Brush, rubbish, etc 1,297 

Careless use lamp, candle ... 85 
Careless use matches and 

set by rats 520 

Careless use pipe, cigar and 

cigarette 217 

Chimneys, soot burning .... 230 

Clothes near stove 24 

Defective chimney, stove, 

pipe, boiler 75 

Electric wires, motor 110 

Fireworks and firecrackers . . 13 

Gas jet, gas stove 95 

Gasolene, naphtha, benzine, 55 



Grease in ventilator 58 

Hot ashes in wooden re- 
ceptacle 69 

Incendiary and supposed. . . -81 

Lamp upsetting, explosion . . 69 

Miscellaneous 13 

Oil stove, careless use* and 

explosion 29 

Overheated furnace, stove, 

boiler 146 

Set by boys 76 

Sparks from chimneys, stove, 110 
Sparks from locomotive, en- 
gine 44 

Spontaneous combustion. . . . 128 

Thawing 9 

Unknown 841 

Total 5,437 



1915. 



Fire Extinguished bt 



K 



U 



X 



January. . 
February. 
March. . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 

Totals 



58 
58 
145 
89 
75 
63 
75 
45 
63 
57 
83 
77 



62 
50 
99 
60 
63 
63 
67 
47 
49 
57 
67 
51 



99 
85 
246 
136 
89 
97 
68 
61 
35 
73 
87 
68 



11 
7 
198 
74 
44 
34 
20 
12 
19 
18 
22 



33 

28 
56 
51 
35 
46 
31 
23 
49 
40 
44 
51 



18 

34 
226 
105 
37 
37 
38 
25 
38 
45 
51 
4S 



7 
14 
12 
4 
9 
7 
1 
3 
3 
4 
4 



735 



1,144 



468 



487 



702 



66 



City Document No. 14. 



Fiees Where Loss Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



1915 

Jan. 3 

Jan. 7 

Jan. 25 

Feb. 1 

Feb. 4 

Feb. 21 

Feb. 24 
March 1 
March 3 
March 18 

April 8 

April 15 

April 24 

June 18 

June 18 

July 14 

Aug. 12 

Aug. 31 

Sept. 16 

Sept. 27 

Oct. 23 

Oct. 25 

Oct. 30 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 7 

Nov. 20 

Nov. 24 

Dec. 5. 

Dec. 21 



137-139 Summer street, Liggett Drug Company 

14-28 Oliver street, L. P. Winchenbaugh 

10 Williams street, Harry Ham 

153-155 Washington street, Standard Raincoat Company.. 

Navy Yard, United States Government 

1126-1130 Columbus avenue, Hunt Department Store. . . . 

220-224 Friend street, Globe Upholstery Company 

34-35-36 Central Wharf, Indian Refining Company 

2-12 High street, Burditt & Williams 

641-643 Atlantic avenue, Cobb-Hersey Company 

4 Richards street, Hide & Skin Importing Company 

18 Elm street, Vorenberg & Co., et al 

14-20 L street, Boston National Leather Finishing Company 

15-19 Cross street, Suffolk Overall Manufacturing Com- 
pany 

224-226 Congress street, Kenney Brothers & Wolkins 

11 A Green street, New England Reed Company 

101-111 Summer street, Royal Curtain Manufacturing Com- 
pany 

33-36 Commercial Wharf, Berry Dodge Company 

31-33 Troy street, R. H. White Company 

126 Homes avenue, B. H. Hunt, Jr, et al 

60 Commerce street, Samoset Chocolate Company 

47-51 Chardon street, Richardson, Wright & Co 

101-105 Chestnut street, Chauncey Thomas & Co., Inc . . . 

Eagle street, Boston Elevated Railway Company 

33-35 John street, Chamberlain Company, Inc 

124-132 Summer street, Bedford Manufacturing Company. 

34-39 Washington Street North, Weinberg Dry Goods Com- 
pany 

101 Harvard avenue, J. A. Dowling 

347-357 Cambridge street, National Rubber Clothing Com- 
pany 



$23,078 
77,558 
25,903 
15,100 
20,500 
25,215 
37,937 
16,672 

240,645 

148,923 
23,390 
23,919 

136,843 

21,065 
77,139 

17,742 

22,443 
21,560 
33,994 
23,781 
51,015 
42,529 
111,868 
161,574 
16,099 
31,638 

28,149 
36,711 

55,357 



Fire Department. 



67 



STATISTICS. 



Population, January 1, 1916 
Area, square miles 
Number brick, etc., buildings . 
Number of wooden buildings . 
Fires in brick and stone buildings 
Fires in wooden buildings 

Out of city 

Not in buildings, false and needless 

Total alarms 



1,618 

1,356 

18 

2,445 



754,852 

47.34 

29,669 

73,447 



...... 5,437 

Fire Loss for the Year Ending December 31, 1915. 



Buildings, loss insured 
Contents, loss insured 



Buildings, loss not insured 
Contents, loss not insured 



Total loss buildings and contents 
Marine loss . . . 



$41,491 
134,933 



$1,048,054 
1,773,709 

$2,821,763 



176,424 

?,998,187 
$6,413 



YEARLY LOSS FOR THE PAST FIFTEEN YEARS. 



Year ending 


February 1 


1902 


$1,830,719 


a 


" 1 


1903 


1,762,619 


a 


" 1 


1904 


1,674,333 


u 


" 1 


1905 


2,473,980 


a 


" 1, 


1906 ... 


2,130,146 


u 


" 1 


1907 


1,130.334 


a 


" 1 


1908 


2,268,074 


a 


" 1 


1909 ... 


3,610,000 


a 


" 1 


1910 


■ 1,680,245 


a 


" 1 


1911 (11 months) . 


3,159,989 


u 


January 1 


1912 


2,232,267 


a 


" 1 


1913 


2,531,017 


u 


^H 


1914 


* 3,138,373 


u 


" 1 


1915 


3,013,269 


u 


" 1 


1916 


3,004,600 



* Does not include marine loss of $1,116,475, steamship "Templemore." 
Note. — January loss, 1911, amounting to $165,001, deducted from previous year and 
included in calendar year January 1, 1911,. to January 1, 1912. 



68 



City Document No. 14. 



ALARMS FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS.* 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1915 


2,847 
2,945 
2,594 
2,812 
2,291 
1,864 
2,101 
2,210 
2,441 
1,687 


2,590 

2,589 
2,322 
2,432 
2,142 
1,801 
1,677 
1,700 
1,600 
1,262 


5,437 


1914 


5,534 


1913 


4,916 


1912 


5,244 


1911 


4,433 


1910 (11 months) t 


3,665 


1909 


3,778 


1908 


3,910 


1907 


4,041 


1906 


2,949 







* Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 

t 202 bell and 196 still alarms deducted from year 1910-11 and included in calendar 
year January 1, 1911, to January 1, 1912. 



Fire Department. 



69 



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70 



City Document No. 14. 



ROLL OF MERIT, BOSTON FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Thomas J. Muldoon, Captain, Engine Company 20. 
Michael J. Teehan, Captain, Engine Company 24. 
Denis Driscoll, Captain, Engine Company 37. 
James F. McMahon, Captain, Ladder Company 1. 
Frederick F. Leary, Captain, Ladder Company 3. 
Thomas H. Downey, Captain, Engine Company 29. 
Michael J. Dacey, Lieutenant, Ladder Company 20. 
Joseph P. Hanton, Lieutenant, Chemical Company 4. 
Timothy J. Heffron, Lieutenant, Chemical Company 9. 
Florence Donoghue, Ladderman, Ladder Company 15. 
Patrick. E. Keyes, District Chief, retired. 
Martin A. Kenealy, Captain, retired. 
Charles W. Conway, Captain, retired. 
James E. Downey, Hoseman, retired. 
James F. Bailey, Ladderman, retired. 

Changes from February 1, 1915, to February 1, 1916. 



Number of men appointed to fire force 


. 15 


Number of men reappointed to fire force 


1 


All others . . . . . . 


9 


Resigned 


7 


Pensioned 


. 24 


Deaths ■ 


. 11 


Pensioners died 


. 14 



Members Pensioned from February 1, 1915, to 
February 1, 1916. 



Charles M. Wandless. 
John F. Mooney. 
Joseph W. Brown. 
Warren H. Brown. 
William J. Dower. 
John W. Murphy. 
John F. Mitchell. 
James E. Griffin. 
James McTiernan. 
John J. Katwick. 
Thomas L. Darcy. 
Roscoe E. Handy. 



John H. Wetherbee. 
Thomas I. Carey. 
John J. Burke. 
Andrew J. Burnett. 
Carl P. Franks. 
John E. Donoghue. 
James M. Elliott. 
Frank J. Martin. 
Frank P. Stengel. 
Percy W. Gowen. 
John S. Cleverly. 
Edward A. Hawley. 



Fire Department. 71 



Deaths of Members from February 1, 1915, to 
February 1, 1916. 



Michael Walsh. 
Jeremiah J. Fitzpatrick. 
Charles H. W. Pope. 
Timothy J. Crowley. 
Charles Willett. 
Alfred A. Bestwick. 



Joseph H. Sullivan. 
John F. Haley. 
William Hanlon. 
Dennis A. Walsh. 
Thomas H. Kehoe. 



Pensioners Who Died from February 1, 1915, to 
February 1, 1916. 



Joseph W. Bird. 
Walter W. Wyman. 
Rufus'L. Mason. 
Moses B. Kelton. 
Thomas F. Boggs. 
John A. Mullen. 
Octavius Donnell. 



John D. Kelley. 
Andrew J. McAuliffe. 
Thomas J. Melody. 
John P. McManus. 
Michael Kyle. 
John J. Perry. 
James F. Galvin. 



BOSTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND. 



Boston, January 30, 1916. 

Report of the treasurer of the Boston Firemen's 
Relief Fund from February 1, 1915, to January 31, 1916, 
inclusive. 

The following was the condition of the fund: 

City of Boston 3| per cent bonds . . . $153,000 00 
City of Boston 4 per cent bonds .... 81,000 00 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad bonds . 8,000 00 

Six shares of Boston & Albany Railroad, par 

value 600 00 

Six shares of Fitchburg Railroad, par value . . 600 00 

Two shares of Old Colony Railroad, par value . 200 00 

Four shares of Boston & Lowell Railroad, par 

value • . 400 00 

Eight shares of Massachusetts Gas Company, 

par value 800 00 

One share of Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany, par value 100 00 

Nine snares of American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, par value .... 900 00 
Two shares of Western Union Telegraph, par 

value 200 00 



72 



City Document No. 14. 



Three shares of Boston & Maine Railroad, par 
value 

One share of West End Street Railway 

Two shares of New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad 

Three shares of Old South Building Association, 
par value 

Cash on hand . . . . . 



$300 00 
50 00 

200 00 

300 00 

8,075 50 

,725 50 



Receipts. 
Interest and incom 

earned 
Annual ball 
Donations 
Legacy . 
Checks returned 
Bonds matured 
Cash, February 1, 1915, 



$9,528 55 


14,489 


69 


405 


00 


1,556 


74 


735 


00 


16,000 


00 


1,232 


25 


$43,947 23 



Payments. 
Investments purchased, 
Benefits . . . . 
Professional services 
Auditing .... 
Treasurer's bond . 



810,145 83 

24,028 75 

1,584 65 

50 00 

62 50 



13,947 23 



Cash. 



Securities. 



Total. 



February 1, 1915. 
January 31, 1916. 



$1,232 25 
8,075 50 



$242,600 00 
246,650 00 



$243,832 25 
254,725 50 



President, John Grady, 

Fire Commissioner. 
A. F. Mitchell, Treasurer. 
John F. Hardy, Secretary.