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SEVENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1921-1922 




BOSTON 
PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1922 




CENTRAL LIBRARY: THE INTERIOR COURT. 



SEVENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1921-1922 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1922 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 
MP7: 6,23,22; Z5C. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON FEBRUARY 1. 1922. 



ALEXANDER MANN, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1925. 

ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY. LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. 

Term expires April 30, 1922. Term expires April 30, 1924. 

SAMUEL CARR. MICHAEL J. MURRAY. 

Term expires April 30, 1923. Term expires April 30, 1926. 



LIBRARIAN. 
CHARLES F. D. BELDEN. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 1 4, of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preHminary or- 
ganization; that for 1 853 made the first annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1 867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected, each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1 852: 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908- 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

CoAKLEY, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De NoRMANDiE, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

Hillard, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908- 



Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921- 

PiERCE, Phineas. 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

TicKNOR, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1867-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1 852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; Rev. 
James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; JosiAH 
H. Benton, May 8, 1908, to February 6, 1917; William F. Ken- 

NEY, February 13, 1917, to May 7. 1920; Rev. ALEXANDER MaNN, 
since May 7, 1920. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was entitled Superintendent.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 -December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superinlendent, 1858- January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., Superintendent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1. 
1877 -September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Sep- 
tember 30, 1890. 

DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 - April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 1 1, 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 — January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903 -March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 191 7 -June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., ll.b.. Librarian, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1922. 



Departments, 
fCentral Library, Copley Sq. 
tEasl Boston Branch, IKy-l^l Meridian St 
§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
liRoxbury Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
fCharleslown Branch, Monument Sq. . 
fBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Rd. . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St 
§Soulh End Branch, 397 Shawmut Ave. 
tjamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St< 
JWesl Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St 
jWest End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, Columbia Rd., cor. Bird St, 
fHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St 
fNorlh End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
^iCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St 
JRoslindale Branch, Washington, cor. Ashland St. 
§Warren Street Branch, 392 Warren St. 
§Mount Bowdoin Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St. 
§Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington St. 

Mattapan Reading Room, 7 Babson St 

Neponset Reading Room, 362 Neponset Ave. 

Allston Reading Room, 138 Brighton Ave. 

Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Vine, cor Dudley St. 

Tyler Street Reading Room, Tyler, cor. Oak St. 

Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 208 Ruggles St. 

Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, De 
pot Sq. 

Andrew Square Reading Room, 396 Dorchester St 

Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St, 

City Point Reading Room, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 

Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremonl St 

Faneuil Reading Room, 100 Brooks St. 

Jeffries Point Reading Room, 195 Webster St 



§ • 


' D. 


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• E. 


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' 24. 


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* 25. 


§ * 


' 26. 



^Opened. 


May 


2. 


1854 


Jan. 


28, 


1871 


May 


1, 


1872 


. July. 




1873 


. *Jan.. 




1874 


. *Jan., 




1874 


Jan. 


25, 


1874 


Aug. 




1877 


Sept. 




1877 


. *Jan. 


6. 


1880 


Feb. 


1. 


1896 


Mar. 


16. 


1896 


. *Jan. 


1, 


I9I2 


Feb. 


27. 


1913 


. *Nov. 


1. 


1914 


. *Sept. 


1. 


1919 


. *Sept. 


1. 


1919 


. *Feb. 


I, 


1922 


June 


7, 


1875 


Dec. 


27. 


1881 


Jan. 


I. 


1883 


Mar. 


n. 


1889 


Apr. 


29, 


1892 


Jan. 


16. 


1896 


Jan. 


18, 


1897 


Nov. 


1. 


1897 


Mar. 


5, 


1914 


June 


25. 


1901 


y July 


18. 


1906 


July 


15. 


1907 


Mar. 


4. 


1914 


Oct. 


15, 


1921 



II In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches and stations the opening 
was in a different location from that now occupied. * As a branch, "f In building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. $ In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. || The lessee of the 
Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees 

Balance Sheet .... 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Librarian 
Appendix to the Report of the Librarian 
Index to the Annual Report 1921-1922 



1 

10 
14 
25 
51 
75 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Central Library : The Interior Court 
Map of the Library System 



Frontispiece 
At the end 



To His Honor, James M. Curley, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Sir : — The Board of Trustees of the PubHc Library of the 
City of Boston presents the following report of its condition and 
affairs for the year ending January 31 , 1922, being the seventieth 
annual report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Thursday, June 3, 1921 , when the Reverend Alexander Mann, 
D.D., was elected President, Mr. Samuel Carr, Vice-President, 
and Miss Delia Jean Deery, Clerk. The Honorable Michael 
J. Murray was appointed a trustee for the term ending April 30, 
1926, in place of Mr. William F. Kenney. At the meeting 
held on June 3, 1921, the following resolution on the retirement 
of Mr. Kenney was adopted : 

On April 30, 1 92 1 , Mr. William F. Kenney's term as a Trustee of the 
Library expired. 

Mr. Kenney was first appointed a Trustee on December 30, 1907. 
He has therefore served the Library continuously for a period of fourteen 
years. 

On May 3, 1912, Mr. Kenney was elected Vice President of the 
Board, which office he held up to February 13, 1917, when he was 
elected President of the Board, and served in that capacity until May 7, 
1920. 

Few trustees of the Library have served the institution longer than Mr. 
Kenney, and through all these years he has been most faithful in his at- 
tendance on the meetings of the Board, and has at all times shown a keen 
interest in the welfare of the Library. 

Resolved: That Mr. Kenney be accorded the freedom of the alcoves, 
and that this minute be placed upon the records of the Board of Trustees, 
and that a copy be sent to Mr. Kenney. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts of the Library are of two classes: first, those 
which are to be expended by the Trustees in the maintenance of 



[2] 

the Library. They consist of the annual appropriation by the 
Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust Funds, 
given to the Trustees but invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the past year these receipts were 

Annual appropriation ........•• $747,120.00 

Special appropriation : Jeffries Point ....... 4,000.00 

Income from Trust Funds . 23,531.66 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds income of previous years . . 52,201.68 

Total $826,854.14 

Second, receipts vv^hich are accounted for and paid into the 
City Treasury for general municipal purposes. These receipts 
during the year have been as follows: 

From fines $12,073.92 

From sales of catalogues, etc. ........ 56.19 

From commissions on telephone stations ...... 456.17 

From sale of waste paper ......... 153.22 

From payments for lost books ........ 648.45 

Interest on bank deposits ......... 55.68 



Total $13,452.63 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

On April 6, 1 92 1 , His Honor the Mayor approved an order 
of the City Council for an appropriation of $55,000 to be ex- 
pended by the Superintendent of Public Buildings for a new 
Branch Library building in West Roxbury; and on May 13, 
1 92 1 , the Trustees 

Voted: That the President be requested to inform the Mayor that 
it is the sense of the Board that under the authority of their Charter of 
Incorporation and in their administration for the best interest of the Li- 
brary, appropriations of money for library purposes should be made to the 
Trustees to be expended by them rather than to other departments of the 
City. 

On June 7, 1 92 1 , His Honor the Mayor approved an order 
of the City Council for a special appropriation of $4,000 for the 
establishment of a reading room at Jeffries Point, East Boston. 
This reading room at 195 Webster Street, East Boston, was 
opened to public use on the afternoon of October 15, 1921 . It 
is admirably located on a corner facing Belmont Square, the 
only open space in that section of East Boston in close proximity 



[3] 

to the schools, including the Samuel Adams, the Commodore 
Barry and the Plummer Grammar Schools, and one parochial 
school. At the noon recess there are some 4,000 children con- 
gregated in this Square. The great bulk of the population 
is of Italian blood, and the children, as was to be expected, 
are making large use of the reading room. The Board desires 
to put on record its appreciation of the public spirited service 
of the Americanization Committee of the Boston Chamber of 
Commerce to whom it is largely indebted for a very careful 
survey of all possible sites for the most suitable location of a 
reading room in the Jeffries Point district. 

In connection with the erection of the new branch library 
building at West Roxbury and the establishment of the reading 
room at Jeffries Point the Trustees had the hearty and united 
support of the citizens of those districts, and to their interest is 
largely due the prompt realization of both projects. 

ESTIMATES 1 922 -1 923. 

The estimates of the Trustees for the maintenance of the Li- 
brary for the coming year, forwarded to His Honor the Mayor 
in budget form as usual, were for $828,426 of which $578,602 
is for personal service and $249,824 for general maintenance. 
The total increase asked for amounts to about lO'j^^ per cent 
over the sum allowed for the Department last year. 

The Trustees feel so strongly the importance of a large ap- 
propriation for the purchase of books and an increased appro- 
priation for personal service in order to allow the appointment 
of additional assistants where sorely needed to maintain efficiency 
of the Library service, that in making up the budget they 
have felt it unwise to allow for any increase in salaries other 
than those due to grade increases. The Board has come to this 
conclusion with regret because they still feel the desirability as a 
matter of justice of increased appropriations in order that chiefs 
of departments, first assistants, and librarians of branches and 
reading rooms especially may be paid salaries more adequate 
for services rendered. 

The book appropriation of $100,000 last year we believe has 
been wisely expended, and the absorption of the volumes sent 



[4] 

to the branches and reading rooms and placed on the shelves of 
the Central Library has proven how inadequate the collections 
of the Library were to meet the popular demand for reading, and 
to meet especially the needs of children in all sections of the city. 
The increase in circulation of over 233,000 during the year is a 
significant indication of the efFect of this enlarged appropriation. 
The need for more books, however, is just as great. A visit 
to the branches and reading rooms shows many empty shelves 
and no trace even of the newer books ; they are all in active cir- 
culation. Children and adults still come continually to the Cen- 
tral and to the branch libraries asking for books and material 
which the Library has not been able to buy in sufficient amount 
to meet the steady and increasing demand. The Library can 
only grow in usefulness and popularity to the extent that it is 
able to meet the needs of its constituents. For this reason the 
Trustees have asked for $125,000 for books — $25,000 more 
than the amount allowed last year — and for the sum of $22,880 
for additional assistants greatly needed throughout the system. 
If the Library is to keep pace with its enlarged work, no one of 
the new positions can be omitted without real detriment to direct 
and indirect service to the public. Indeed, too few new assistants 
have been asked for in comparison with the number employed 
in similar departments in other large library systems. 

OPENING OF THE CENTRAL LIBRARY ON HOLIDAYS. 

Heretofore the Central Library building has been closed on 
all holidays, but, as the result of requests received from time to 
time and in view of the fact that there are many persons in the 
city on holidays who desire to visit the building, the Trustees 
decided to open it for public inspection on all holidays except 
July the Fourth, Thanksgiving and Christmas. This opening 
is for inspection, not for service. The Trustees would be glad to 
open the Library not merely for inspection but also for service 
if the funds at their disposal warranted the additional expenditure. 

SARAH E. PRATT BEQUEST. 

The Board of Trustees received on January 20, 1922, a 
check for $500, being a bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of 



[5] 

Boston, for the benefit of the Dorchester Branch. This be- 
quest has been funded as the "Sarah E. Pratt Fund" and the 
income will be applied to the purchase of books for the Dor- 
chester Branch of the Library. 

BRANCH FOR BUSINESS MEN. 

Among the many needs of the Library system of which the 
Trustees are conscious, that which they put first, is a Business 
Men's Branch. The importance of this has been repeatedly 
called to their attention by the reports of the Examining Com- 
mittees and also by many business men of Boston. The ideal 
location for such a branch in the judgment of the Trustees would 
be in the new Boston Chamber of Commerce building which 
is soon to be erected. Such a branch would provide the business 
men of Boston with a library adapted especially to their needs 
in the heart of the business district. It would be equipped to 
supply to the business executive every sort of information which 
he needs, arranged and classified for immediate use. It would 
be exceptionally strong in the fields of manufacture, commerce, 
transportation, finance, insurance, industrial relations, and alHed 
activities, and would also contain general reference and "first- 
aid" collections of both permanent and ephemeral value. The 
establishment of such a branch is in the judgment of the Trustees 
the next and most imperative forward step which the Library 
should take. 

MR. LINDSAY SWIFT. 

The following minute regarding Mr. Lindsay Swift was 
adopted by the Trustees on Friday, October 14, 1921 : 

Lindsay Swift, an employee of the Public Library of the City of Bos- 
ton for 43 years, 3 months and 1 5 days, died suddenly in Cambridge on 
September 11, 1921. Mr. Swift entered the service of the Library in 
the Catalogue Department on May 27, 1878. On February 7, 1896, 
he became Editor of Library Publications, which position he held at the 
time of his death. Under his direction and through his fine literary 
taste and judgment the publications of the Boston Public Library achieved 
an enviable position in the library world. Always a gentleman, com- 
bining the outlook and taste of a scholar with a keen sense of humor, sympa- 
thy and candor outspoken, he endeared himself to his associates. The 
Board of Trustees gratefully place on record their appreciation of his long, 
faithful and efficient service. 



[61 

PORTRAIT OF JOSIAM 1 1. BENTON. 

For twenty-three years Mr. Benton served as a Trustee of the 
Library during nine years of which he was President of the 
Board. His interest in the Library and his estimate of the value 
of its pubHc service was made plain by the great bequest which 
he made to it, the second largest gift to the City in its history. 
Ever since Mr. Benton died, in February, 1917, the Trustees 
have desired to recognize his eminent service and his great gift 
by placing on the walls of the Library a suitable portrait of him. 
The Art Commission of the City is in sympathy with this desire. 
All that is necessary for the carrying out of this purpose is a 
suitable appropriation. 

TABLE OF TRUST FUNDS. 

A detailed statement of these funds, and the income therefrom, 
is contained in the report of the City Auditor, but a condensed 
statement of them is as follows: 

FUND. AMOUNT. RESTRICTIONS OF GIFT. 

Artz . . . $ 10,000.00 For lliP purchase of valuable and rare editions of 

the wrilingR, cither in verse or prose, of American 
and of foreign authors, "to be known a* the Long- 
fellow Memorial Collection." 

Bates . . . 50,000.00 To buy "books of permanent value." 

Bigclow . . 1.000.00 Purchase of books. 

Billings . . . 100,000.00 For the purchase of books. 

Bowditch . . 10,000.00 For "th«; purchase of books of permanent value and 

authority in mathematics and astronomy," to be 
added to the Bowditch Collection. 

Bradlee. . . 1,000.00 Unrestricted. 

Center . . . 39,543.14 Unrestricted. 

"Children's" (under 

Benton Will) . 100,000.00 For the purchase of books for the use of the young. 

Available only in years when the City appropriates 
for the maintenance of the Library at least 3% of 
the amount available for department expenses from 
taxes and mcome m said City. 

Clement . . . 2,000.00 For the purchase of books. 

Codman . . 2,854.41 For the purchase of books upon landscape gardening. 

Cutter . . . 4,100.00 For the purchase of books and for binding for the 

Abram E, Cutter Collection. 

"Elizabeth" (under 

Matchett Will) . 25,000.00 For the purchase of books of "permanent value and 

authority." 



Carried forwanJ $345,497.55 



[7] 



Brought forrvard 
Ford 
Franklin Club 

Green 

Charlotte Harris 

Thomas B. Harris 
Hyde . 
Knapp . 
Ahbott Lawrence 
Edward Lawrence 



Loring 

Mead 
O'Reilly 

Phillips , 

Pierce . 

Pratt 
Scholfield 
Sewall . 
Skinner . 
South Boston 
Ticknor . 

Todd . 

Townsend 

Treadweil 

Tufts 

Twentieth Regiment 

Wales . 

Alice L. "Whitney 

James L. Whitney 
Wilson . 

Total 



$345,497.55 
6.000.00 
1.000.00 

2.000.00 
10.000.00 

1.000.00 
3.632.40 
10.000.00 

10.000.00 
500.00 



5,000.00 

500.00 

2,500.00 
1.000.00 

30.000.00 

5.000.00 

500.00 

61,800.00 

25,000.00 

51.732.14 

100.00 

4,000.00 

50.000.00 

4.000.00 
13.987.69 
10,131.77 

5.000.00 

5,000.00 
5,000.00 

5,880.62 
1.000.00 

$676,762.17 



Unrestricted. 

Books of permanent value, preferably books on 

government and political economy. 

Books relating to American history. 

Books for Charlestown Branch, published before 

1850. 

For benefit of the Charlestown Branch. 

Unrestricted. 

For the purchase of books. 

Books having a permanent value. 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the 

principal as they [the Trustees] may choose to the 

purchase of special books of reference to be kept 

and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said 

Public Library." 

For the purchase of old and rare books to be added 

to the John A. Lewis library. 

Memorial Fund, from the income of which books 

are to be bought for the West End Branch. 

Unrestricted. 

From the Papyrus Club for the purchase of books 

as a memorial of John Boyle O'Reilly. 

"To the maintenance of a free public library." 

"Purchase of books." 

"Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 
For the benefit of the Dorchester Branch. 
To be used for books of permanent value. 
For the purchase of books. 
Unrestricted. 

For benefit of the South Boston Branch. 
Books in Spanish and Portuguese, five years old in 
some one edition. 

The income to be expended annually for current 
newspapers of this and other countries. 
Books five years old in some one edition. 
Unrestricted. 

For the benefit of the Charlestown Branch. 
"For the purchase of books of a military and pa- 
triotic character, to be placed in the alcove appro- 
priated as a Memorial of the Twentieth Regiment." 
For the purchase of books. 

For the benefit of sick and needy employees and 
the purchase of books. 
For books and manuscripts. 
For the purchase of books. 



[8] 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Trustees desire to call special attention to the report of 
the Examining Committee which is appended hereto and included 
as a part of this report. The President of the Board of Trustees 
was chairman of the Committee, and in common with the rest of 
the Trustees was greatly impressed by the interest which was 
shown and by the painstaking service which was rendered by the 
members of the Examining Committee. It is hoped that citizens 
generally will read this report. They will note many recom- 
mendations and suggestions, with most of which the Trustees 
and the Librarian find themselves in hearty sympathy, the carry- 
ing out of which however would necessarily require a much larger 
appropriation than can at present be hoped for. 

Those who w.ere appointed and who have served as members 
of the Examining Committee for the fiscal year are as follows : 

Mr. Henry Abrahams. Hubert F. Holland, M.D. 

Miss Esther G. Barrows. Mr. William V. Kellen. 

Mr. Jeremiah E. Burke. Mr. WilHam A. Leahy. 

Mr. John J. Dailey. Mrs. Helen F. Lougee. 

Mrs. WilHam H. Devine. Mr. Joseph B. Maccabe. 

Mr. William H. Downes. Mr. Francis A. Morse. 

Mr. Jam.es E. Downey. Mrs. Everett Morss. 

Mr. Walter F. Downey. Rev. Charles E. Park, D.D. 

Mrs. David A. ElHs. Mr. Cornelius A. Parker. 

Rev. Harold L. Hanson. Rev. W. Dewees Roberts. 

Mrs. Charles F. Hill. Prof. Frank Vogel. 

Mr. Robert F. Waul. 

CONCLUSION. 

TTie Trustees cannot close this report without calling attention 
to the loyal and efficient service of the Librarian, Assistant Li- 
brarian and members of the staff during the past year. When it 
is borne in mind that there has been a large increase in the amount 
of service in all departments of the system and that the home 
circulation of books has been over 223,000 in excess of the pre- 
vious year, it will be readily understood what this has meant in 
the way of increased labor for a staff which has received but 
few additions to its number during the year. There is a limit 
to the number of books which can be made available for the use 



[9] 

of the public without increasing the personnel of the Library staff. 
The Trustees desire to call the thoughtful attention of Your 
Honor and through you, the citizens of the city, to the fact that 
generous appropriations for the purchase of new books must from 
now on carry with them sufficient money for the necessary in- 
crease in the staff if these books are to be made available for 
public use. 

Alexander Mann, 
Samuel Carr, 
Arthur T. Connolly, 
Louis E. Kirstein, 
Michael J. Murray. 



[10] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing and 
Bindery Departments) ...... 

Temporary employees ...... 



Service other than personal : 
Postage 
Advertising 

Transportation of persons 
Cartage and freight . 
Light and power 
Rent, taxes, and water 
Premium on surety bond 
Communication 
Cleaning, towels, etc. 
Removal of snow 
Examinations 
Expert and architect 
Fees 

Extermination of insects 
Boiler inspection 
General plant repairs 



To expenditures for equipment: 

Furniture ......... 

Office 

Books: 

City appropriation .... $92,509.10 

Trust Funds Income . . . 17,719.75 



Newspapers (from Todd Fund Income) 
Newspapers (from Center Fund Income) 
Periodicals ..... 

Tools and instruments 
General plant equipment . 

To expenditures for supplies: 
Office .... 



Forage and animals . 

Medical .... 

Laundry, cleaning and toilet 

Agricultural 

Chemicals and disinfectants 

General plant . 



$354,894.79 
94,859.88 



$ 1,796.87 

13.00 

229.99 

12,099.13 

1 1 ,633.09 

14,968.46 

5.00 

1 .255.82 

922.56 

308.40 

115.50 

756.68 

7.00 

2.00 

41.00 

24.928.59 



3,753.68 
609.91 



110,228.85 

2,000.00 

444.13 

8,697.22 

507.62 

640.44 



$ 3,151.40 

440.91 

25,394.75 

10.00 

16.14 

991.71 

268.72 

68.60 

1,649.51 



$449,754.67 



69,083.09 



126,881.85 



31,991.74 



Carried forrvarJ 



$677,711.35 



nn 



EXPENSES, JANUARY 31, 1922. 



By City Appropriation 192 1 -1 922 . . . . $747,120.00 

Special appropriation (Jeffries Point Reading Room) . 4,000.00 

Income from Trust Funds ...... 23,531.66 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . 700.00 

Interest on deposit in London ..... 372.39 

By balances brought forward from February 1, 1921 : 

Trust Funds Income, City Treasury .... $52,201.68 

Trust Funds Income on deposit in London . . . 3,747.12 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 6,226.52 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . . . 3,160.61 



Cr. 



$775,724.05 



65,335.93 



Carried forward 



$841,059.98 



[12] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought foTToard 



To expenditures for material: 

Building ....... 

Electrical ...... 

General plant ...... 

Special item: 

To expenditures from Alice L. Whitney Fund 

Binding Department: 

To expenditures for salaries 

Stock . 

Equipment . 

Contract work 

Cleaning 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Printing Department: 
To expenditures for salaries 
Stock . 
Equipment . 
Gas 

Contract work 
Cleaning 
Repairs 
Small supplies 

Jeffries Point Reading Room: 
To expenditures for salaries . 
Service other than personal . 
Equipment ..... 
General supplies .... 

To AMOUNT PAID INTO CiTY TREASURY: 

From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Sale of waste paper 
Payments received for lost books 
Interest on bank deposits 

To BALANCE, JANUARY 31, 1922: 

Trust Funds Income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Trust Funds Income balance, City Treasury 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 



Balance unexpended: 

General appropriation .... 

Special appropriation (Jeffries Point Reading Room) 



5.32 
1,457.41 
2,689.01 



$297.00 

$54,537.48 
3,782.46 
329.88 
14.75 
322.38 
124.67 
131.60 

$12,227.80 

1.623.80 

480.39 

11.57 

277.14 

322.38 

67.62 

145.49 



$742.16 
507.17 
768.34 
164.89 

$12,073.92 

56.19 

465.17 

1 53.22 

648.45 

55.68 

$15,912.22 

5.392.36 

43,107.36 

3,860.61 



$677,711.35 

4.151.74 
297.00 



59.243.22 



15,156.19 



2,182.56 



13,452.63 



68,272.55 

12,227.93 
1,817.44 



$854,512.61 



[13] 
EXPENSES, JANUARY 31, 1922. 



Brought fonvard 



By receipts: 

From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations . 
Sale of waste paper 
Payments received for lost books . 
Interest on bank deposits 



$12,073.92 

56.19 

465.17 

153.22 

648.45 

55.68 



Cr. 

$841,059.98 



13,452.63 



$854,512.61 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

1921-1922. 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

Your Examining Committee takes pleasure in submitting the 
following report, which is compiled from the reports of a num- 
ber of sub-committees. These sub-committees have been as 
thorough and as faithful as possible in their investigations, and 
desire, in the first place to make grateful mention of the cordial 
assistance they have invariably received from attendants and 
officials in the Central Library, the branches and the reading 
rooms. 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Our first suggestion relates to the functions of the Examining 
Committee itself. It seems to us that the Committee might dis- 
charge its duties with more satisfaction to its members and at 
the same time be of greater value to the Library if it were ap- 
pointed in the Spring and permitted to serve throughout the 
remamder of the year. We suggest, also, as a means of givmg 
continuity to the work of successive Committees, that, after the 
members of each new Committee have had an opportunity to 
make themselves familiar with earlier reports, the Trustees meet 
them in conference and review with them the reasons for action 
or inaction on the principal recommendations of the previous 
year. While we realize that these recommendations have no 
binding force, we assume that the Trustees would be glad to 
discuss the problems of the Library with a body of citizens of 
their own selection. 



[15] 

We have observed with some apprehension the inadequacy of 
the Central Library building and manv of the quarters provided 
for the branches and reading rooms. In the Central Library the 
Newspaper and Periodical Rooms are at times uncomfortably 
crowded. There is already evidence of pressure on the Informa- 
tion Bureau, the Document Service Room and the new Open 
Shelf Room. On the second floor the Children's Room is un- 
equal to the demands made upon it in busy hours. The book 
stacks, even with the relief afforded by the annex, will not pro- 
vide for the probable accessions of more than a very limited 
period. The catalogue space in Bates Hall is almost exhausted 
The Statistical Department is hidden away in cramped and some- 
what inaccessible quarters and the Industrial Arts Collection is 
housed on the top floor with the Fine Arts Collection and made 
subsidiary to it, although of an essentially different character. 
The Lecture Hall, unattractive, badly ventilated and poorly 
equipped, is inferior to the halls in many high schools and muni- 
cipal buildings. 

All of these are growing departments or features of the Li- 
brary and the future is likely to see much greater congestion 
in all of them, to say nothing of the creation of new departments. 
In some of the rooms, no doubt, space may be gained by a re- 
arrangement of the material or the furnishings. But it seems to 
us that it is not too early to begin considering plans for the new 
Library building that must inevitably be erected in a few years. 
Such a building ought, if possible, to be adjacent to the present 
structure and connected with it. It is conceivable that the present 
edifice might be reserved for the special collections in the fields 
of music, art, and general scholarship, as well as for the Patent, 
Statistical and Industrial Arts Departments, and might serve as 
a storehouse for much valuable but inert material. Special ex- 
hibitions might also be given here on a larger scale than the present 
facilities permit. In a word, the whole interior of this beautiful 
structure might be set aside for serious research in an atmosphere 
of artistic distinction. If this should be thought desirable, the 
new building might contain the collections which are of more 
general service and those departments that are frequented by 



[16] 

the general public. A larger and finer lecture hall might also 
be included in the plans. 

As the new Central Building ought naturally to embody the 
results of experience in a suitable type of structure, so we believe 
that the outlines of a model branch library should by this time 
have taken rather definite shape as evidenced by the new building 
in West P.oxbury, and that architects commissioned to design 
such buildings should be required to conform to the necessities of 
the Library service, instead of being left free to follow their 
personal inspirations, in particular, we believe that one of the 
great problems of the entire system, — the difficulty of attracting 
adult readers and especially men, — will find its solution in the 
separation of adults and children in the branches. Where this 
separation is practised, as in the South End Branch, we observe a 
marked increase in adult patronage, a reduced percentage of 
works of fiction among the withdrawals for home use, accom- 
panied by a corresponding increase in the proportion of solid 
reading matter, and, incidentally, improved order among the 
younger patrons. As some seven-eights of the circulation origi- 
nates in the branches and reading rooms, it is clear that the ques- 
tion of a satisfactory model for the branch buildings is one of 
primary importance. Pending the gradual embodiment in con- 
crete form of these ideal arrangements, we recommend as com- 
plete a separation of adults and children as the existing conditions 
will allow. 

On the subject of circulation we observe that the number of 
cards discontinued appears to be excessive. While there is a 
somewhat larger number of renewals and new applications and 
a small net annual gain, the loss of some 20,000 card-holders 
every year merits careful study. The published figures show 
that only about one in eight of our population holds a Library 
card, and that each card-holder on an average takes out two 
books a month. We suggest that a reminder sent by mail shortly 
before the expiration of each person's privilege might result in 
retaining many of the lapsing card-holders. Other information 
of value to patrons of the Library might be enclosed. One sees 
many possibilities in a personal communication which every card- 



[17] 

holder would receive in alternate years. Its cost would be 
almost nominal and the benefits could easily be determined after 
a year or two of experiment. 

We note that, as Library service becomes more and more 
complex and the profession develops higher standards, the strain 
upon the employees is increased. The routine duties are more 
exacting, while at the same time there is a greater demand from 
the public for individual attention. The result is a perceptible 
degree of nervous tension among both the branch workers and 
those at the Central Library. A large percentage of all the 
employees combine day and evening work and in the branches 
and reading rooms evening work is required. When it is con- 
sidered that the maximum salary of a branch librarian is only 
about $ 1 ,600 a year and that of an elementary school teacher is 
$2,000, with a great disparity in the hours of service and in the 
period allov^ed for recuperation, it is clear that many of these 
devoted women must find their reward in the satisfaction of the 
work itself and not in the pay, which is less than moderate. It 
seems to us that a more liberal scale of compensation to those 
employees who are charged with heavy responsibilities, accom- 
panied by a readjustment of their hours of service and the adoption 
of measures designed to relax the nervous pressure upon them, 
must figure in any far-sighted plans for the improvement of the 
Library system. 

We endorse, therefore, the efforts of the Trustees and the 
Librarian to obtain from the Mayor and the City Council ap- 
propriations large enough to provide not only for the necessary 
upkeep and extension of the plant and the purchase of books in 
sufficient quantity, but for the efficient conduct of this great in- 
stitution with due regard to the health and welfare of its faithful 
employees. 

We renew the recommendations of previous committees in 
favor of the proposed Business Men's Branch and urge that the 
attention of the Mayor and the City Council be particularly 
drawn to the advantages of this promising feature. 

As a result of our necessarily brief investigations, the impres- 
sion which we retain is one of constant growth and expanding 



[18] 

usefulness in the Library system. This growth is not merely 
quantitative but intensive. It is not to be measured by the in- 
crease in the number of volumes or in the totals of the annual 
budget. It is a matter of scope, not bulk, of adaptation and 
variety rather than mechanical accretion. The present organiza>- 
tion of the Library, as compared with that of twenty years ago, 
reveals a steady movement forward through a process of dif- 
ferentiation, manifesting itself in the development of more and 
more special departments, as fresh opportunities for service have 
disclosed themselves. The duties of the modern librarian are 
no longer confined to the conservation, orderly arrangement and 
delivery of books. The librarian of to-day is expected to teach 
the use of his treasures, to inspire a love for them and to guide 
applicants toward a discriminating selection. He provides ex- 
hibitions and lectures, cooperates actively with all the educational 
forces of the community, and searches out methods pf satisfying 
its various intellectual needs. 

This, we believe, is the conception which animates the present 
authorities of the Public Library. The results of their policy 
seem to us on the whole richly beneficial to the citizens of Bos- 
ton. To specify the many evidences of progress that we have 
noted would be to extend our report beyond its reasonable limits 
and to repeat what has been well expressed in the reports of 
recent committees. We must content ourselves with affirming 
our belief that the Library, while not free from defects, is now 
under vigilant, intelligent control and is achieving practical re- 
sults that are worthy of its best traditions. 

BOOKS AND CATALOGUES. 

The Committee is of the opinion that the Library employees 
should receive an increase in remuneration. Salaries are not 
commensurate with the exacting labor, intelligence and responsi- 
bility demanded of these faithful public servants. They should 
receive pay equal to that granted to those holding similar posi- 
tions in the public libraries of the larger cities of the United 
States. 

The library assistants are not only underpaid, but they are 
also overworked. The greatly increased number of volumes 



[19] 

and the rapidly growing circulation of books make necessary a 
larger force of employees. For example, the Information Office 
and the Open Shelf Room should have each an extra assistant. 
The impaired health of several highly efficient assistants, due 
to overwork, ought to be a convincing argument for a substantial 
addition to the present staff of workers. 

The enlarged appropriation for books granted the past year 
made possible the supplying of certain deficiencies in the collec- 
tions both at the Central Library and the branches. Books for 
children and new Americans, technical and general reference 
works have been added in large numbers. The increased 
patronage of the libraries indicates that these additions have been 
greatly appreciated. To insure a well rounded collection of 
books both at Copley Square and the branches an appropriation 
equal to that of last year should be granted. The Committee 
suggests that a large and representative committee be appointed 
for the more systematic selection of books. An effort should be 
made to secure from public spirited citizens gifts of rare and 
costly volumes. 

The book-carrier system in the Central Library needs reno- 
vation in order that books may be more expeditiously handled. 
Delays in the transmission of volumes, due to defects in the 
carrier system, are annoying both to the employees and patrons. 
The lighting arrangements for the card catalogues in the Central 
Library should be improved. While the lighting standards are 
well placed, the lights are so dim that it is difficult to read the 
cards in the lower drawers of the catalogue cases. The stand- 
ards at the reading tables should be lowered a few inches so 
that more light will be projected on the books and less in the 
eyes of the readers. Improvement in the ventilation of Bates 
Hall is needed. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

The departments of the Library coming under this head are 
the Fine Arts, Music, Technology, Barton -Ticknor, etc., on the 
top floor of the Central Library, and the subjects covered by 
these special libraries include painting, architecture, sculpture, 
decoration, illustration, arts and crafts, music, the various tech- 



[20] 

nical arts applied to industrial uses, and the valuable collections 
kept in the Barton -Ticknor Room, notably those consisting of 
Shakespeariana, Americana, Prayer-books, Extra-illustrated 
books, maps, etc. 

Your committee, recognizing the growing usefulness of the 
Technology Collection and its probable future importance to 
students and specialists, recommends that it be made a distinct 
Special Library, and set off from the Fine Arts Department, of 
which it is now a part. 

Your committee reiterates the recommendation made by last 
year's sub-committee on Fine Arts and Music, to the effect that 
the lamps in the Fine Arts Exhibition Room should be placed 
higher, and provided with shades and reflectors, so that the light 
shall be thrown more effectively on the exhibits and not in the 
eyes of the visitors as at present. 

The circulation of pictures from the Central Library and 
branches is of demonstrated usefulness, and should be further 
developed and extended in connection with the educational ac- 
tivities of the Library. Especially do we emphasize the obvious 
advantage of placing before school children of all ages good 
reproductions of the masterpieces of architecture, sculpture and 
painting. 

PRINTING AND BINDING. 

Your Committee learned from the Chief of the Binding De- 
partment that when a book is sent to his department by some 
branch library or reading room to be repaired, approximately six 
weeks elapses before the book is returned to that library or read- 
ing room. This may be explained by stating that the work in 
the Binding Department has increased thirty-five per cent during 
the past year. Notwithstanding, there are fewer employees in 
the department to-day than there were twelve years ago. If 
proper service is to be maintained, it is absolutely necessary that 
an adequate number of employees be provided. 

The equipment and machinery seem to be in very good con- 
dition to accomplish the work required in both departments. 
However, we believe, and respectfully recommend to the 
Trustees, that a sufficient sum of money be allowed for the pur- 



[21] 

chase of new fonts of type, now very much needed in the 
Printing Department, in order to facilitate the cataloguing of 
books in demand by the foreign-bom population. TTiis would 
assist materially in Americanization work. 

Your Committee agrees with the Examining Committee of 
1920-1921 that these two departments should be maintained 
under the roof of the Library building. 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

From a number of careful and exhaustive reports the follow- 
ing digest is submitted : 

In almost all the branches and reading rooms the attendants 
are greatly overworked and need more assistants. 

The universal demand is for more books. Children's books 
are especially needed in Andrew Square, Tyler Street, South 
Boston, City Point, Roxbury Crossing, West End, and North 
End; while more books in foreign languages and Americaniza- 
tion work are especially needed at Andrew Square, Tyler Street, 
South Boston and Hyde Park. 

A.ttention should be paid to conditions of light and ventilation 
at Andrew Square, City Point, East Boston, Jamaica Plain, 
Warren Street, Mattapan, Mt. Bowdoin, Dorchester, West End. 

New equipment of various kinds is much needed in the 
branches. More especially, floor covering to insure quiet at 
Boylston Station, Dorchester Lower Mills, Mattapan, Mt. 
Bowdoin; a filing cabinet at Andrew Square, and Codman 
Square; a card catalogue at Boylston Station; tables at South 
Boston, Neponset, Codman Square and West End ; more shelf- 
room at Parker Hill and Neponset; chairs at Roxbury Crossing, 
and West End; lockers at Warren Street; a clock at Parker 
Hill; some glass doors at Allston; and curtains at Roxbury 
Crossing. 

Cleaning and minor repairs are needed at West End, City 
Point, Charlestown, Jamaica Plain, Parker Hill, and Mattapan. 
i he doorway at the Brighton Branch could be remodelled to 
secure far greater comfort. 

At some of the branches the present quarters are crowded 
and hopelessly inadequate and should be either enlarged, as is 



[22] 

quite possible in cases, or wholly new quarters secured. This 
comment applies especially to Dorchester, Parker Hill, Mt. 
Pleasant, Field's Corner, Warren Street, Boylston Street, Orient 
Meights, Allston, Roslindale, Roxbury Crossing, Mt. Bowdoin 
and Mattapan. 

Your Committee suggests that the reading rooms at Faneuil 
and Mt. Bowdoin might well be changed into branches. 

Police attendance is needed at Jamaica Plain, Warren Street, 
and Parker Hill. 

It is suggested, in general, that librarians be encouraged to 
organize Clean Hands Clubs among children. Such clubs have 
had beneficial effect where they now exist; also that through co- 
operation with principals and teachers in Public Schools, it may 
be possible to lessen the theft and mutilation of books, which at 
present is a matter demanding attention; also in the interest of 
better home habits, the Trustees consider the advisability of 
adopting earlier hours of closing for the younger children in 
certain of the branches and reading rooms. 

The Library carries a quantity of duplicate titles no longer 
in demand. Is it possible to offer such books for sale to the pub- 
lic of Boston? Also, there are thousands of juvenile books in 
private houses which have outlived their usefulness, but which 
might be most acceptable additions to the Library. Is it possible 
to invite from the public the donation of such books, reserving, 
of course, the right to reject anything unsuited to the Library's 
needs? It is suggested that local committees might incidentally 
serve this purpose, and at the same time give needed encourage- 
ment and support in the solution of their various problems to the 
local libraries. Such a committee is already functioning ad- 
mirably in West Roxbury, and has set an example which in 
our judgment is worthy of emulation. 

CHILDRRN'S Dd'ARlMKNT AND WORK WITH SCHOOLS. 

The Committee recommends that there be appointed an Edu- 
cational Director who should act as a supervisor of the younger 
library assistants. It would be the function of this Director to 
organize and supervise an adequate system of educational guid- 
ance, by means of which service in the Public Library should 



[23] 

become an educational opportunity for the junior members of the 
force. It is hoped, thereby, that their ambition would be stimu- 
lated for advancement, not only in library work, but also in a 
broader life work of service outside. 

The Committee calls attention to the need of trained libra- 
rians in the Children's Department. Still more urgent is the 
need of a high morale among the employees of the Library — a 
morale that can be attained only through increased remuneration 
for the amount of work required. The morale of the force is 
of vital importance. More important than increased number of 
books or employees with new duties, is the personal influence of 
those who come in contact with the children of the schools. The 
loyalty of the existing corps is commended in the highest terms, 
yet the present maximum of compensation cannot fail, as time 
goes on, to lower the general efficiency of the entire working 
force. 

The increase in the number of books has been greatly appre- 
ciated, as is indicated by their use. Further increase in the num- 
ber of books will, however, demand a larger number of trained 
children's librarians. 

The existing condition with reference to the mutilation and 
loss of books is most discouraging, and demands earnest study 
and cooperation on the part of the schools. The Committee sug- 
gests that this matter be taken up with the Superintendent of 
Schools and with the Principals Association in order that some 
method may be devised by which this deplorable condition may 
be remedied. 

The Committee further recommends that there be properly 
organized visits of classes in the schools to the Public Library 
with a view to broadening the knowledge of the children in re- 
gard to the opportunities the Library affords. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, the Committee as a whole wishes to endorse 
and emphasize the appeal for better pay for the Library staff 
made by several of its sub-committees. We appreciate the re- 
luctance of the Trustees to add to the burdens of the taxpayers 
and the difficulty of securing increased appropriations; but the 



[24] 

present scale of pay, when compared with that which prevails in 
other cities, affords reasonable ground for dissatisfaction and 
admittedly tends to deter the best material from entering the 
service. Nothing, in our opinion, would do so much to encourage 
the present staff and to ensure a future supply of desirable appli- 
cants for positions as an earnest plea, fortified by convincing 
tables of comparison, addressed to the Mayor and the City 
Council in behalf of what seems to us a just measure of return 
to the Library workers. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, Febru- 
ary 1. 1922. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

To the Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit my report for the year ending January 
31, 1922. 

SERVICE. 

The Examining Committee of the Library and the Libra- 
rian have called to the attention of the Trustees the need of more 
assistants in certain departments of the Central Library and at 
many of the branches and reading rooms, in order that ade- 
quate service to the public may be maintained. The growth 
of work throughout the system during the past three years has 
been more than normal, but there has been no corresponding 
increase in staff personnel. With the enlarged book appropria- 
tions of the last few years and the resultant handling of many 
thousand more books than in the years previous, with a notable 
increase in circulation and a marked growth in the number of 
Library patrons making use of the reference and other non- 
circulating collections, the strength of the staff has been taxed 
to its utmost. As a matter of fact, there were during the year 
several cases of actual breakdown necessitating leaves of ab- 
sence, and other cases in which librarians and assistants were 
clearly overworked. The solution is to be found only in the 
employment of a larger number of trained assistants, and in the 
filling of certain vacancies now existing. The time has come 
when there must be either a larger appropriation for personal 
service or a curtailment in work and in hours of opening. It is 
unfortunate that this need should be concomitant with the de- 
mand for more funds to pay larger and deserved salaries to 
many assistants already in the service of the Library. Com- 
parison of salaries paid in other libraries which are comparable 
to the Boston institution clearly shows the justness of the con- 



[26] 

tentions of the Librarian and the Examining Committees for 
several years past, urging the propriety of paying the library 
assistants more adequately for their services. 

BOOKS AND MORE BOOKS. 

The opening words of the report of the Librarian for last year 
were as follows: 

The need for more books throughout the Library system is just as 
pressing as it was last year. If the quantity and quality of its collections 
are to be even reasonably met, a decided increase in the book appropriation 
must be made. Although the expenditure of an unusual amount of money 
was made for the purchase of books for children during the past year, 
the children's rooms in many branches show empty shelves. 

The application of these words is equally compelling at the 
opening of the new fiscal year. While it is true that the vol- 
umes on the shelves of the Central Library, its thirty-one branches 
and reading rooms, and its three hundred and twenty deposit 
stations, now number 1 ,258,21 1 , it is not generally realized that 
only about one-half of this total constitutes the circulating col- 
lection of books of the Library, the volumes in popular and 
more or less constant use. Among the non-circulating books 
are to be numbered the many unique special collections of the 
Library, the reference collections in the Central building and 
the branches, reserved for use in the reading rooms of the system, 
the vast number of municipal, state and federal documents and 
reports, the bound files of newspapers and periodicals, the un- 
usual and expensive books, and the many volumes in foreign 
languages, the majority of which are represented by one copy 
only. Then there is the great mass of out-of-date books com- 
prising the early editions of standard texts and treatises, and 
antiquated books in all fields of learning, for which call is seldom 
made. All of this material, however, while seldom in demand 
for home reading, has its legitimate place in a public scholarly 
institution of learning, used by students and research workers in 
many fields. 

In reading the following account of books acquired during the 
fiscal year of 1 92 1 -22, it should be remembered that the increase 
in the average cost of domestic books over the cost in 1 9 1 3 -1 4 is 



[27] 

forty per cent. This increase applies to scientific and technical 
books, books of travel, biography and fiction. Of books pub- 
lished in Great Britain, the average increase in cost is from ten to 
fifteen per cent. The cost of books published on the continent 
of Europe, partially offset by the exchange favorable to the Li- 
brary, is about twenty-five per cent above that of 1913—14. 

During the year just closed 77,881 volumes have been added 
to the Library system, or 1 8, 1 50 volumes more than in 1 920-2 1 . 
Of these 66,185 were purchased, 9,964 were given, 95 were 
acquired through exchange, and 1,637 consisted of bound news- 
papers and periodicals. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and lantern slides, was $121,667,19, in- 
cluding $20,460.87 from Trust funds. The corresponding ex- 
penditure for 1920-21 was $78,954.70. including $17,739.97 
from Trust funds. 

The fact that over 18.000 more books were placed on the 
shelves of the Library system last year than during the twelve 
preceding months doubtless had much to do with the increased 
home circulation of books, which was 2,672,646, a welcome 
increase of 223,870 over the previous year. The home circu- 
lation from the Central Library was about seven and three-tenths 
per cent greater than the .year before, while the circulation from 
the branches and reading rooms showed a gain of about nine and 
three-fifths per cent. All of the sixteen branches, excepting 
the South End Branch, and all of the seventeen reading rooms, 
excepting Lower Mills and City Point, made an increase in the 
number of books drawn for home use from the libraries. On 
page 51 of the Appendix will be found a table showing the 
central, branch and reading room "home circulation" of books 
for the years from 1916—1 7 to 1921-22. inclusive. The Cen- 
tral Library, the branches and reading rooms, all record gains 
in the number of books used for various purposes in the reading 
and study rooms of the Library system. 

From the current city appropriation of $100,000 for books, 
there was expended $99,999.77. plus $1,206.55 paid from the 
London account for books bought abroad, making a total ex- 



[28] 

penditure of $101,206.32 As distinct from purchases paid from 
Trust funds. Of this total, $77,249.23 were expended for 
books for branches and deposit use and $15,259.72 for the 
Central Library. In addition there were expended for current 
periodicals $8,697.22, of which $3,703.23 were for branches 
and $4,993.99 for the Central Library. There were expended 
from Trust funds $20,460.87, of which $17,069.32 were for 
books, $601.96 for photographs, $349.75 for lantern slides, and 
$2,439.84 for newspapers. 

Early in the year 1921 there was made a careful survey of 
the special needs for books, especially in the branches and read- 
ing rooms, and a tentative scheme for purchase was laid out 
dependent upon the appropriation made by the city. This plan 
provided for a greatly increased number of books for children, 
the latest editions of the principal reference books, good working 
collections of books in certain special fields not adequately repre- 
sented, such as technical books, books in the fine and industrial 
arts, books in foreign languages, and a greater liberality in the 
provision of a considerable number of copies of books of popular 
interest, including the subjects of biography, travel and business. 
In the main this provisional plan has been adhered to in the pur- 
chases made from the largest book appropriation in the history of 
the institution, with the natural result that all previous records of 
accessions have been exceeded. 

Among the books which have been acquired were 3 1 ,000 
for younger readers, including 6,000 educational textbooks, at a 
cost of $25,000. From four to ten copies of some of these books 
were placed in each branch and reading room. For reference 
books of higher cost for branches, including the latest editions 
of encyclopaedias, dictionaries, atlases, etc., the sum of $10,000 
was expended; for a specially selected collection of technical 
books, $2,000; and for a collection in the fine and industrial 
arts, $1,200. New fiction, distributed throughout the system, 
constituted 5,219 volumes, comprising 443 titles, of which 87 
were in foreign languages, cost $8,615.08, an average price 
of $1.65 a volume. The smallest number of new books pur- 
chased for a branch (Jamaica Plain) was 1,071, the largest 



[29] 

(West End) 3,527; the smallest number for a reading room 
(Lower Mills) was 360, the largest (Boylston Station) 1,906. 

For the new reading room at Jeffries Point, opened to the 
public October 15, 1921, 1,813 volumes and a group of peri- 
odicals were bought at a cost of $2,846. On account of the 
unforseen cost of equipping this station with reading matter out 
of the general appropriation, it was found necessary to defer any 
large purchase of books on business and related subjects needed 
for the Central Library. Other general purchases consisted of an 
increased number of copies of books much in demand, including 
works of biography, history, travel, and technology; directories 
and books of ready reference for use in the Information Office ; 
Syrian and Armenian books for the Tyler Street Reading Room, 
works in Italian for the North End Branch and the Jeffries 
Point Reading Room, Lithuanian, Polish and Bohemian books 
for the South Boston Branch, Yiddish for the West End and 
the Warren Street Branches, and Spanish and French books 
for the Central Library. From the Trust funds a number of 
important works have been purchased, notably in the field of 
fine arts, although no large collection has been bought as a unit. 

The Library has also notably enriched its collections of books 
on Shakespeare, Dante, mathematics and astronomy, and has 
also acquired important Americana and examples of early print- 
ing. 

It is a disconcerting fact that empty shelves are still often to 
be seen in many of the branch libraries and reading rooms, es- 
pecially in the rooms or sections devoted to the use of children. 
Several hundred new books placed on the shelves to-day are all 
gone tomorrow, while a line of children ask when there will be 
more new books, or when some of the old ones will be returned 
so that they may have their chance with a good story, or a good 
book of travel, biography or science. The need for more books 
is ever present and the problem can be met only through a still 
larger appropriation for their purchase. 

Among the noteworthy works acquired during the year, dif- 
fering widely in content, but as a whole enriching the resources 
of the institution, were two quarto editions of Macbeth, of 1 674 



[30] 

and 1 687, — formerly in the Shakespearian collection of Mars- 
den J. Perry — entirely different issues from any possessed by 
the Library, the edition of 1674 being the first edition of Sir 
William Davenant's alteration of the play, and the edition of 
1 687 the text as played three years later. For the Dante col- 
lection several early editions have been acquired as well as those 
published in connection with the six hundredth anniversary. 
Among these may be noted: 

Dante, con I'expositione di . . . Bernardino Daniello da Lucca. 
Venetia. 1568. 

II codice trivulziano 1 080 della Divlna commedia . . . Milano. 
1921. Facsimile of a manuscript written in the year 1337. 

Other important purchases include: 

The first proclamation issued by the first Provincial Congress of Massa- 
chusetts and the first to be issued without the sanction of a royal governor, 
recommending a day of Public Thanksgiving, Thursday, October 22, 
1774. Printed in Boston 1774. 

A plan of the siege of Yorktown, 1781, by Major Sebastian Bau- 
man, Philadelphia, 1 782. 

Report of the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations on the 
petition of . . . Thomas Walpole, Benjamin Franklin, . . . and their 
associates ... for a grant of lands on the River Ohio, in North America 
for the purpose of erecting a new government. London. 1 772. 

A true servant of his generation ... a sermon ... on the death 
of John Walley, Esq., by Ebenezer Pemberton. Boston. 1712. 

Barbaro, Daniele. La pratica della perspettiva. Venetia. 1569. 

Speidell, John. New logarithmes. The first inuention whereof, was. 
by the Honourable Lo: lohn Nepair Baron of Marchiston, and printed 
at Edenburgh in Scotland, Anno: 1614. London. 1624. 

Brant, Sebastian. Stultifera nauis . , . The ship of fooles, where- 
in is shewed the folly of all states. Translated out of Latin into English 
(verse) by Alexander Barclay, priest. London. (1570.) 

Cervantes. Galatea divida en seys libros. Compuesta por Miguel de 
Cervantes. Paris, 1611. The third edition. 

Mela, Pomponius. Pomponij Melle Cosmographi de situ orbis liber 
primus (-tertius). Impressum. Venetijs. M.CCCC.LXXVIH. 

Moryson, Fynes. An itinerary written . . . first in the Latine tongue, 
and then translated by him into English: containing his ten yeeres travell 
. . . London. 1617. 

Smith, Richard. The assertion and defence of the sacramente of the 
Aulter. London. 1546. 



[31] 

The more important gifts received during the year have been 
noted in the current Quarterly Bulletins of the Library. Gifts 
received from 5,41 1 donors comprised 1 1,193 volumes, 16,362 
serials, 485 photographs, and 48 newspaper subscriptions. 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

On February 1, 1921, there were outstanding 105,458 "live" 
cards, that is, registration cards available for present use. During 
the year 57,637 cards were added, of which 49,371 were new 
registrations and 8,296 being renewals. In the same period 
53,175 persons have allowed their borrowing privilege to lapse, 
so that the total number of "live" cards at the close of the fiscal 
year was 109,950, a gain of 4,492 over the year 1920-21. 
The registration of teachers numbers 1 , 1 69 resident and 249 
non-resident. Special privilege cards have been voted by the 
Trustees to 168 persons and there have been 249 renewals of 
such cards, making 41 7 "live" special privilege cards outstanding. 

An analysis of registration, August 1 , 1 9 1 9, to July 31, 1 92 1 , 
the first two years of the new registration, noted in the Report 
for 1919-20, shows the following interesting distribution of 
"live" cardholders: males over 16 years, 23,699; males under 
16 years, 26,077; females over 16 years, 29,310; females 
under 16 years, 26,720. 

CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

During the year just closed the number of volumes and parts 
of volumes catalogued was 100,525, representing 60,249 titles. 
The usual details for two successive years presented by the Chief 
of the Catalogue Department may be found on page 55 of the 
Appendix. The number of cards added to the catalogues was 
245,858: 214,898 in the Central Library and 30,960 in the 
branches. Of the cards filed in the Central Library, 66,507 
were placed in the Bates Hall and the Issue Department cata- 
logues; 63,741 in the official catalogue; and 84,650 in the 
catalogues of the Special Libraries and bulletins and lists in 
process. Temporary author and subject or title cards were filed 
in the Bates Hall catalogue within a few days after the receipt 



[32] 

of every new bound work. Printed catalogue cards for all new 
books have been sent, as customary, to the Editor as copy for the 
Quarterly Bulletin. 

The work of recommending desirable titles found in bibliog- 
raphies, periodicals, lists and texts has been carried on as usual 
There are besides many instances of service of which no record 
is kept; translations are made, letters on bibliographical and 
other matters are answered, and readers and investigators helped 
in their researches. These activities cannot appear in the sta- 
tistics of the Department, but the wide reputation of the Library 
for generous and scholarly service justifies the time given to 
this work. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The third volume (Fourth Series) of the Quarterly Bulletin 
was finished in December. It contains about 400 pages of 
printed matter and includes a number of reproductions men- 
tioned in detail below. The greater part of the contents of this 
volume is devoted, as usual, to lists of new books, but each num- 
ber has presented editorial matter as well. In the March num- 
ber a description of the Special Collections of the Library was 
printed; the June number gave a welcome to the American 
Library Association, which was holding its convention in this 
vicinity, and an article on "The Quarterly Bulletin: its contents, 
its purposes." In September began a series of more detailed 
accounts of the Special Libraries, and the Barton Library was 
chosen for this number, the Ticknor Library, following in De- 
cember. The December number also brought out a hitherto 
unpublished letter from Nicholas Boylston ( 1 771 ?-1839) with 
some notes on the Boylston family. 

The reproductions which for several years have been a special 
feature of the Bulletin comprised: (March) a view of Tremont 
Street looking north from Warrenton Street before widening 
in 1869, and Champlain's Map of Plymouth Harbor, 1605, 
with brief historical notes; (June) a view of the Central Li- 
brary Building from the Southeast; (September) a portrait 
of Thomas Pennant Barton after a miniature on ivory by Bou- 
chardy, and a portrait of the late editor, Lindsay Swift, after a 



[33] 

photograph by Miss Alice Austin; (December) a portrait of 
George Ticknor after Sloane's copy of a painting by Sully. 

Other publications issued by the Library during the year in- 
cluded the following: 

Catalogue of a Loan Exhibition commemorating the Anni- 
versary of the Death of John Keats, (1821-1921), held at 
the Public Library of the City of Boston, February 21 to March 
14, 1921. (8) + 63 pages. 

List of Books on Modern Ireland, consisting of 90 pages, 
compiled by Lucien E. Taylor of the Catalogue Department, 
published in April. 

Weekly Lists, 53 in number, giving brief titles of the most 
recent additions to the Library and compiled by Lucien E. 
Taylor. 

Brief Reading Lists, nos. 18-23, with a second edition of 
No. 14 (One-act plays). The subjects treated were : No. 18, 
Nature studies: plant and animal life, compiled by Alice M. 
Jordan, Supervisor of work with children; No. 19, Dante, 
prepared in commemoration of the six-hundredth anniversary of 
Dante's death by Lucien E. Taylor; No. 20, Cookery, foreign 
and domestic, compiled by E. Carolyn Merrill of the Catalogue 
Department; No. 21, Disarmament and substitutes for war, 
compiled by Michael McCarthy of the Catalogue Department; 
No. 22, The United States and Japan, compiled by Lucien E. 
Taylor; No. 23, Christmas, compiled by Mary C. Toy, Chil- 
dren's Librarian. 

A new departure in library publications was made in Octo- 
ber when appeared the first number of Library Life: Staff Bulle- 
tin of the Boston Public Library. This periodical which is 
under the editorial supervision of Frank H. Chase of the Refer- 
ence Department, is published on the fifteenth of each month, 
and it carries to the members of the staff items of value and in- 
terest, both professional and personal, from every branch of the 
service — at once a clearing house and a melting pot. A special 
section entitled "With the Juniors" is in charge of Francis P. 
Znotas, of the Children's Room. A supplement sent out with 
each number of Library Life is devoted to the Nen>s Notes on 



[34] 

Government Publications, prepared by Edith Guerrier, Super- 
visor of Circulation, and formerly issued as a separate publication. 

NEW BRANCH BUILDINGS AND READING ROOMS. 

The Jeffries Point Reading Room was opened on October 1 5 
in attractive quarters at 1 95 Webster Street in the thickly popu- 
lated Italian district of East Boston. It promises to become 
one of the most useful reading rooms in the system, and it is 
already evident that w^ithin a short time it will be necessary to 
enlarge its quarters. 

The Library anticipates an opportunity for larger service in 
West Roxbury and in the South End when the new branch 
building and the new Municipal Building now under construc- 
tion are finished and equipped. West Roxbury has an excep- 
tionally well-planned and attractive library building in which 
the citizens of the district will have just cause for pride. The 
library quarters in the South End Municipal Building will be 
pleasant and commodious, but it is to be regretted that the Li- 
brary was located in the basement of the building. 

INFORMATION OFFICE, GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS AND 
OPEN SHELF ROOMS. 

The Information Office opened last year is proving an inval- 
uable adjunct to the work of the Reference Departments through- 
out the Library, In addition to city and business directories, 
a collection of telephone books and other tools for first hand 
information, it contains a comprehensive and steadily growing 
card index to information resources both within the Library and 
outside. The Office maintains rich files of material on voca- 
tional guidance and unemployment, which were originally col- 
lected and organized by outside agencies. In this room may 
be found on file one hundred and seventy current periodicals 
issued by the United States Government and by various business 
organizations including publications of chambers of commerce 
in forty-two states and territories and thirteen foreign countries. 

In the Government Documents Room adjoining the Informa- 
tion Office the current pamphlets of the Federal Government, 
as well as a large number of business and periodical publications 



[35] 

are in constant use. An important feature of the service of this 
office is the filing of chppings from authentic sources on affairs 
of national significance, such as the Conference on the Limitation 
of Armaments, tariff, immigration, etc. Statistical studies and 
tabulations on occupations, industries, finance, wholesale and 
retail prices, transportation and foreign and domestic commerce 
are in process of collection. 

The Open Shelf Room, also adjoining the Information Office, 
is a proved success; the response of the public has been en- 
thusiastic. During the first year over thirty thousand volumes 
of non-fiction have been circulated. New non-fiction is now 
shelved in this room, and the older collections, including twenty- 
odd classes of literature, and numbering over four thousand 
volumes, are in a state of constant revision, which serves to bring 
to the attention of the users of the Library a large number of 
books which otherwise might be forgotten or overlooked. 

The use of the Information Office may roughly be classified 
as follows: 35% of ii;s patrons need to be directed to some other 
part of the Library; 25% are users of telephone books and 
directories; 30% is composed of business men, students and 
teachers who desire current Government and business informa- 
tion; and 10% wish information which may be found in the 
vocational and other files, or in the college catalogues, time tables, 
railway guides and the few general reference books such as the 
World Almanac, Lippincott's Gazetteer, Hotel Red Book, and 
guide-books to the City. 

BATES HALL. 

The Custodian of the Bates Hall Reference Department, in 
his report for the year, comments on the enlarged use of the refer- 
ence collections as follows: 

Older members of the staff are agreed in saying that Bates Hall was 
never before so busy as during the past year ; this has been especially marked 
during vacation periods and other times when the Hall has been wont to 
present a somewhat deserted appearance. Again and again, visitors have 
expressed surprise at the number of readers — especially of men — to be 
found in the Hall at hours when libraries are likely to be comparatively 
empty. This unusual strain upon the resources of the Hall has led to an 



[36] 

increased wear and tear of the reference books, and it will be necessary 
before long to replace a good many which are badly worn. 

It is of interest to note that the growing use of the Information Office 
by those who are in search of a single fact of current information has 
caused no apparent diminution in the use of Bates Hall. All the current 
directories have finally been removed to the Information Office; in this 
as in other directions, the Office is proving a distinct relief to the Hall. 

The contests conducted during the past year by a Boston paper, which 
involved an intensive use of the large dictionaries, have presented a very 
real problem. The wear imposed upon the books by these eager prize- 
seekers is abnormal, and even cruelly destructive. We have now no large 
dictionary which is in reasonably good condition; even the Murray Ox- 
ford Dictionary has suffered severely. 

During the past year 550 books, comprising 939 volumes, 
were placed upon Bates Hall shelves. Of these, 459 (568 vol- 
umes) were new books brought from the stacks, and 191 (371 
volumes) were removed from other locations in Bates Hall. 
The rem.ovals from the Hall include 331 books (460 volumes) 
returned to stack, 60 dismissed from the collection as missing, and 
3 condemned at the Bindery. The total number of changes in 
the Hall and its records thus amounts to 944 books, comprising 
1 ,462 volumes. This does not include the new volumes of 
serials added during the year under the head of "continuations." 
These amount to approximately 200 volumes. 

The Bates Hall Reference Department answered during the 
year a total of 623 inquiries for information received by mail. 
Of these 623 letters, 147 came from Massachusetts and 91 
from New York State. The remaining inquiries were received 
from 40 states of the Union and from the District of Columbia, 
from 5 provinces of Canada, from Porto Rico and from 5 
foreign countries. 

BATES HALL CENTRE DESK, NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS. 
CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The attendance in Bates Hall again shows a marked increase 
over that of the previous year. The maximum number of users 
of books in the Hall was 336 on October 30, at 5 P.M. The 
freedom of access to over ten thousand volumes of reference 
on the open shelves makes it impossible to give an accurate 
statement of the number of these books consulted, but 251,141 



[37] 

books were brought from the Library stacks to readers and 
students at the tables of this main reading room, an increase of 
26,640 over 1920-21. There have been the usual inevitable 
delays in handling so large a number of books, but no improve- 
ment in service can be anticipated until some modern mechanical 
system is installed connecting Bates Hall w^ith the distant stacks 
from which the books are sent. 

In the Newspaper Room 267 papers are currently taken and 
filed for readers. Of this number 190 are published in the 
United States and 11 in thirty-two foreign countries. The fol- 
lowing languages are represented in the foreign collection : En- 
glish, 44 papers ; French, 9 papers ; German, 9 papers ; Spanish, 
4 papers; Swedish, 3 papers; Danish, 2 papers; Italian, 2 
papers; and Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, and Portuguese, 1 
paper each. 

During the year six papers were added and fourteen papers 
either ceased publication or were consolidated with others. 

Readers applying for bound files of newspapers numbered 
1 8,604 ; they consulted 33, 1 84 volumes, a decrease from 1 920- 
21 of 577 readers and an increase of 676 volumes consulted. 
The bound volumes of newspapers now number 8,65 1 of which 
145 were added during the fiscal year. 

The Patent collection now numbers 15,984 volumes of which 
669 were added during the past year, from the United States, 
Great Britain, Germany, France, Canada, Australia, and New 
Zealand. During 1921-22, 18,315 persons consulted 107,498 
volumes of patents. 

PERIODICAL ROOM. 

The Custodian of the Periodical Room reports the aggregate 
number reading in the room at certain hours in each of two suc- 
cessive years and the number reported five years ago, as follows : 







Attendance. 








At the hours 


10 


12 2 4 


6 


8 


9.45 




A.M. 


M. P.M. P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


1921-22 . 


. 14,264 


15,875 25.943 31,762 


21,786 


25,619 


12.827 


1920-21 . 


. 12,372 


14,726 22,653 29.801 


20,617 


24.514 


10.413 



1916-17 . . 9,936 13,783 21,295 26,732 19,331 23,206 8.491 



[38] 

The use of bound and unbound files shows a large increase 
over last year, as follows : 

Bound Volumes. 

1921-22. 1920-21. 

Volumes consulted during day ....... 42,924 36,578 

Volumes consulted during evenings and Sundays . . . 17,581 15,361 

Unbound Numbers of Magazines. 

1921-22. 1920-21. 

Volumes consulted during day ....... 52,378 41,823 

Volumes consulted during evenings and Sundays . . . 22,736 19,745 

The current periodicals, exclu.sive of those issued by state and 
federal governments, regularly filed for readers in the Periodical 
Room number 1 , 1 47. In addition there are filed for use by 
readers in other departments current periodicals especially re- 
lating to the fields covered by such departments, as follows: 

Fine Arts and Music Room 146 

Statistical Department ........... 56 

Teachers Reference Room and Children's Room ...... 54 

The importance and value of periodical literature in reference 
work, and as a source of information on current topics, is being 
realized by students from schools and colleges as never before. 
The Custodian has welcomed classes from elementary and high 
schools with their teachers and has aided in giving instruction 
in the use of guides and indexes to periodicals. The college 
student has become a constant user of the files of periodical litera- 
ture to be found in the Library system. 

DOCUMENTS AND STATISTICS. 

Some fifty-seven thousand volumes constitute the collections 
housed in the Statistical Department of the Central Library. In 
the Statistics Room there are 22,307 volumes, while some 34,500 
volumes conveniently accessible are shelved on the fourth floor of 
the Annex. The Assistant in charge reports that the use of the 
Department has increased rather than fallen off since the opening 
of the room devoted to current federal and state documents ad- 
jacent to the Information Office on the ground floor. Indeed, 
the seating capacity of the department is often insufficient to 
accommodate its readers. There is imperative need for en- 



[39] 

larged quarters for the growing work of this department which 
includes, in addition to statistical material, the Library's collec- 
tion of municipal, state and federal publications and of official 
publications of foreign countries. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

The Special Libraries occupying the third floor of the Central 
building, include the Fine Arts, Technology and Music Divi- 
sions, in addition to the special collections shelved in the Barton- 
Ticknor Room and its adjacent galleries. 

The number of volumes issued for "home use" by the Special 
Libraries during the year was 25,256, as compared with 22,949 
for the previous year. The circulation by divisions was as fol- 
lows: Fine Arts, 7,499 volumes, or 30%; Music, 7,858 vol- 
umes, or 31%; Technology, 9,899 volumes, or 39%. 

The number of portfolios of mounted pictures sent out on 
request, chiefly from schools, was 2,288, compared with 2,223 
last year. During the past twelve months 588 lantern slides 
have been added to the collection, making a total of 9,135. 
The slides loaned during the same period numbered 5,840. 

The number of volumes issued for "hall use" by the Music 
Division was 13,891 ; from the special collections, 17,866. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

The Supervisor of Work with Children reports a year of 
marked activity throughout the system. The work, including 
the story-hour for children in the Central Library and branches, 
has followed in general the lines described at length in previous 
reports. 

The Supervisor comments as follows : 

The year was notable for the unusual supply of children's books made 
possible by a special allowance from the general book appropriation for 
that purpose. According to the figures of the Ordering Department some 
thirty-one thousand orders for replacements and additional or new copies 
of juvenile books were forwarded during the year. In the purchase of 
books for children it is promptness of replacement that is important; not 
the new titles necessarily, but a sufficient supply of standards and classics 
are most needed. The response to this increased book supply was every- 
where evident. It was natural that the circulation should be affected. 



[40] 

but there have been other results fully as noticeable. The desire to 
obtain new books led to the payment of fines on cards which had been 
held in many cases for months because of lack of interest in an unattractive 
book collection. Better discipline is everywhere maintained when a fair 
stock of books preserves the atmosphere of a reading room. 

With the enlarged book allowance the librarians in some branches have 
been able to develop a collection of books for permanent use in the chil- 
dren's room; such collections are especially desirable in neighborhoods 
where there is a likelihood of the shelves being entirely depleted and the 
room losing all semblance of a library. 

Such a collection is of importance too where parents wish to make a 
personal choice of their children's books. Clean books are the best deco- 
ration a room for children can have and the greatest inducement to children 
to become Library users. 

Friendly appreciation of library service by the schools is expressed in 
notes from the teachers in different parts of the city, in the visits of teachers 
to the libraries, and in requests for librarians to speak to classes in the 
schools. Occasionally the children themselves write letters telling of their 
pleasure in the school deposit and designating the books they have particu- 
larly enjoyed. 

Children's Book Week in November was observed in most of the 
branches and reading rooms by special exhibits or by book displays in the 
windows of the libraries. Each year the publicity given at this time to 
the matter of the selection of children's books brings a large number of 
parents to the Library for the aid it can give to them. It also furnishes 
an opportunity for the librarians to address schools and mothers' clubs. 
For free distribution the Library bought from the American Library Asso- 
ciation several thousand copies of an attractively printed list of books 
recommended as Christmas gifts. In Hyde Park the local paper printed 
lists of favorite books whose names were contributed by the children 
through the librarian. At Roxbury Crossing, where bookstores are few, 
the window display in the reading room brought many inquiries from 
parents, and the librarian reports that she could have sold several times 
over such books as Kidnapped and Treasure Island, with Wyeth's illus- 
trations. 

Several exhibits have been held in the Children's Room at the Central 
Library, including a Pilgrim village made by a club whose activities are 
centered in the North End Branch, and several "play projects," the work 
of different classes in the public schools of the city. 

During the summer members of the staff of the Children's Depart- 
ment assisted in book distribution and reading aloud to the patients in the 
children's wards of the Boston City Hospital. 

Many requests for lists of books for individual children have been 
received from correspondents in far distant places and have been answered 
by the Children's Department. In addition two brief reading lists were 



[41] 

prepared: Nature studies: plant and animal life, published in the Spring; 
and Christmas, including references to poems, plays and stories, published m 
November. The latter has been esp>ecially useful, as it makes more gener- 
ally available material vv^hich has been tried out in the Children's Room 
over a term of years. 

It has been possible to extend the story-telling activity into a larger 
number of schools during the year just closed and thus to reach more 
children than ever before. Through the continued interest of the Ameri- 
canization Committee of the Boston Chamber of Commerce a greater 
number of school districts have been visited and the bond between the 
library and the schools strengthened thereby. The library story hours 
have reflected the awakened interest in every instance; the teachers also 
speak with great appreciation of the service the institution is rendering in 
making literature alive for boys and girls. 

Gifts for the purchase of books for the children's room in the East 
Boston Branch were received from the Home Club and the Women's 
Club of East Boston. It is peculiarly gratifying to have such expressions 
of interest in work with children from local institutions. 

In any report of the work with children, due recognition must be given 
to the service of the Teachers' Room which is a part of the Children's 
Department of the Central Library. The care of the educational maga- 
zines and of the books for University Extension Courses placed on de- 
posit there, and the renewal and revision of the general reference collection, 
makes varied and exacting demands upon the attendant in the room. 

During the year just closed the Supervisor of Work with 
Children met twenty-seven engagements to speak on children's 
books or topics relating to the work of her department. 



SUPERVISOR OF CIRCULATION. 

The work of the Supervisor of Circulation is so closely co- 
ordinated with the activities of other departments, especially those 
of the branch system, that it is difficult to give a detailed account 
of it. In general, simplification of routine and the many minor 
processes of re-organization effected during the past two years 
have resulted in a marked reduction of detailed work with a con- 
sequent saving of time and money. Several useful tables of 
statistical data have been worked out by the Supervisor, with 
the aid of the different departments, whereby it is becoming in- 
creasingly possible to forecast future needs of the service as well 
as to survey the work of the past years. The perspective thus 



[42] 

obtained should contribute toward a steady gain in the efficiency 
of the Library. 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

The number of branch Hbraries is 1 6 and the number of 
reading rooms 15, as compared with 16 branches and 14 
reading rooms a year ago. The subsidiary agencies, served 
through the Branch Department, include 58 fire engine houses, 
40 institutions, and 191 schools, of which 19 are parochial 
schools. The total number of Library agencies, therefore, is 
320, as compared with 317a year ago. 

The number of volumes issued on borrowers' cards at the 
Central Library through the Branch Department was 106,556, 
as against 108,169 in 1920-21 and 96,000 in 1919-20. 
These figures show a loss of 1,613 volumes issued during the 
last year. The loss is slight and is to be accounted for chiefly 
by the very generous additions to the permanent collections of 
the branches and reading rooms. Where there is a large supply 
of new books on the shelves of a branch, cardholders are not 
so likely to send to the Central Library. The number of slips 
representing requests for books was practically the same as last 
year, but the proportion of unsuccessful calls for books was 
lower, being 56.6% against 58.8% last year. Of the total 
unsuccessful requests only 63,288 called for fiction, as against 
80,947 a year ago. Of the total number of volumes sent out 
from the Central Library this year through the branches 85,649 
were taken directly from the shelves of the Deposit Collection 
in the Central Library. 

Three branches and 8 reading rooms show substantial gains 
in circulation over the previous year; the increase in circulation 
at the South Boston Branch being over 1 6,000 volumes. 

The number of volumes sent out on deposit from the Central 
Library was 44,257, as against 46,972 last year and 43,013 
in 1919—20. The number of volumes thus sent out often fluc- 
tuates from causes beyond the immediate control of the Library, 
depending, as it does, upon the needs of the schools, institutions, 
and other agencies of deposit. This past year at one time the 
pressure of work at the Central Library caused the omission of 



[43] 

deposits to reading rooms for one month or more, and a delay in 
making up school deposits for a period longer than was desirable. 
The number of volumes sent to schools from the Central Library 
and branches and reading rooms was 46,096, compared with 
43,196 last year. Of this number 17,222 were sent by the 
Branch Department, Central Library, as compared with 1 7,023 
the year before. The number of individual teachers supplied 
was practically the same, being 1 , 1 00 as against 1 , 1 1 8 in 1 920— 
21. 

Attention is called to the following quotations from the re- 
port of Marian A. McCarthy, who has charge of the binding 
of branch books : 

During the past year special attention has been directed to the upkeep 
and repair of the branch books. The pK>or quahty and construction of 
the average book makes vigilance necessary. Trained judgment in the 
care of books is now more important than ever. 

To acquaint branch assistants with the construction of a book and to 
train them as to the best methods and materials to be used in mending, 
classes in book repairing have been held at the Central Library. Here 
exhibits of mending materials and mounted examples of the various pro- 
cesses of book repairing are displayed. Samples of the comparative stages 
in binding a book by machinery and by hand are also exhibited. 

The cooperation of the children in the care of the books has been sought 
by sending to the branch libraries and schools sets of gaily colored posters, 
following them by a little talk on the "story of the book" and an appeal 
for better care of the library books. 

The total circulation of the branch system for the year was 
2,3I8>059 volumes, compared with 2,129,407 the year before, 
and 1,992,987 in 1919-20, a gain of 188,652 volumes over 
the year 1920-21. All of the branches, with the exception 
of one, show a gain in circulation; in some of them a gain of 
over 1 0,000 volumes. All of the reading rooms but three made 
a gain many of them from 5,000 to 10,000 each. The larger 
supply of books was the chief factor in this result. 

The number of new books bought for the branches was I 7,477 
as against 10,688 in 1920—21. There have been replace- 
ments to the number of 1 4,600 volumes compared with 1 2,686 
the year before. The additions to the permanent collections 
of the reading rooms was 16,163 volumes compared with 7,731 



[44] 

in 1920—21. Special attention was given during the year to 
building up the collection of reference books, technical books, 
and books relating to fine arts. The number of books issued 
on deposit from the branch libraries, chiefly to schools, was 
48,357 compared with 45,507 last year. 

In the Appendex to this report may be found interesting 
quotations from the reports of the librarians of several branches 
and reading rooms — quotations valuable because they indicate 
some of the significant and varied activities and problems that 
are met with in the course of the year. 

THE BINDERY AND PRINTING DEPARTMENTS. 

During the year the Finance Commission of the City of Bos- 
ton has made an investigation of the Bindery. A report sub- 
mitted to the Commission by Mr. Frank J. Barnard, Jr., a well- 
known Boston binder, after a study of the Library plant, was 
referred to the Board of Trustees. A Committee of the Board 
asked the Chief of the Library Bindery to reply to the criticisms 
and suggestions presented and then, after a study of the two 
reports, the Committee submitted them to Mr. Charles W. Facey, 
Chief of the Bindery of the Harvard College Library, for his 
consideration. The Committee of the Trustees and the Libra- 
rian gave careful study to the three reports, held conferences with 
Messrs. Kenney and Facey, and then reported to the Board of 
Trustees. After further deliberation by the Board it was de- 
cided that all the activities of the Library Bindery ought to be 
continued in the Central building and that increased appropria- 
tions should be sought in order to place the plant in a position 
to carry on its work with a modern equipment of machinery, an 
economy which will pay for the investment in a short time and 
will increase the present efficiency of the Department. 

The usual statistics furnished by the Chiefs of the Bindery 
and Printing Department may be found on page 63 of the 
Appendix. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

Lists of the Library courses of free lectures given during the 
season, of the lectures given under the auspices of various civic 



[45] 

societies, and of the public exhibitions held at the Central Library 
during the year, may be found on pages 60-63 of the Appendix. 
As in former years, the record covers the period from the fall 
of 1921 through the spring of 1922. 

In the public lecture course on Thursday evenings and Sunday 
afternoons are included, as in former years, the course on out- 
door life provided by the Field and Forest Club, and the course 
on the drama and theatre provided by the Drama League. The 
Boston Ruskin Club continued its public meetings and lectures 
on alternate Mondays. 

The demand for the use of the Lecture Hall has increased 
to such a degree that requests have to be denied repeatedly ; the 
hall was in use every evening, most of the afternoons, and many 
forenoons during the winter. University Extension courses on 
the following topics were given in the Hall: Survey of English 
Literature ( to Library assistants). Elementary English Compo- 
sition, Conversational French, Conversational Spanish, Present- 
day Economics, Foreign Trade, and Public Speaking. A course 
on the Appreciation of Music was given by the Trade Union 
College. Eight public lectures were given under the auspices 
of the New England Home Economics Association and six 
by the Massachusetts State Federation of Women's Clubs. 
Meetings were held by the Women's Auxiliary of the American 
Legion, Boston Elementary Teachers' Club, the Massachusetts 
Library Club, Women's Municipal League, National Council of 
Geography Teachers, Parent -Teachers Association, American 
Folk Lore Society, and the New England Anti- Vivisection 
Society. The Dickens Fellowship again provided the annual 
pre-Christmas reading of Dickens's Christmas Carol. 

Two largely attended public meetings were held by the Mas- 
sachusetts Section, National Civic Federation, and the Massa- 
chusetts Public Interest League, to discuss respectively the 
Sheppard -Towner and the Towner-Sterling bills. 

As the current year marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
free lecture courses given in the main Lecture Hall, it has seemed 
appropriate to print an account of their growth and development. 
They have given great enjoyment and instruction to thousands 



[46] 

of the citizens of Boston and the neighboring municipalities. 
From their inception they have been under the thoughtful direc- 
tion of the Assistant Librarian, Mr. Fleischner, whose interesting 
sketch may be found on page 57 of the Appendix. 

The Pilgrim Tercentenary Exhibition described in the last 
Annual Report was continued into September, and afForded in- 
terest and instruction to thousands of summer tourists. 

In connection with the meeting of the American Medical As- 
sociation held in June there was exhibited Dr. Edward C. Street- 
er's notable collection of early medical texts, supplemented by 
some items loaned by the Boston Medical Library. 

An exhibition of representative books, prints and photographs 
relating to Dante and the sexcentenary of the poet's death was 
held in September; the books remained on view until the end 
of the year. 

The unique collection of original autographs, letters and 
sketches contributed by world-famous personages for the "Book 
of the Fatherless Children of France" was exhibited publicly for 
the first time, and attracted numerous visitors during November. 

The exhibition of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union 
Camera Club proved to be an inspiring display of artistic photog- 
raphy, and revealed unsuspected beauties in familiar Boston 
spots. 

In January the original drawings for the proposed Boston 
war memorial, submitted by the Mayor's Committee, were shown 
in Sargent Hall and attracted much attention. 

Other loan exhibits of wide popularity were the Poster com- 
petitions for school children, held by the Junior Red Cross and 
the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani- 
mals. 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

For the first time in a period of years it has been possible to 
undertake some repairs of major importance. 

Extensive work has been done on the roofs of the Brighton, 
Charlestown, North End, West End and East Boston branches 
and the Lower Mills and Faneuil reading rooms. Exterior 



[47] 

painting has been done on the Brighton, Charlestown, East Bos- 
ton, Hyde Park, North End and West End branches, and the 
Lower Mills and Faneuil reading rooms. Interior painting 
has been done at the East Boston and North End branches. 
Important carpentry repair work has also been done at most of 
the above places, in addition to considerable masonry work and 
steamfitting. Electric lights have been installed at the Faneuil 
Reading Room, and a more modern lighting equipment at the 
North End Branch, the Tyler Street Reading Room and in the 
Children's Room at the Brighton Branch. 

With the approval of the Mayor, the Trustees advertised in 
the Cit]^ Record of July 30 and August 6 for proposals for the 
installation and completion of a new electric passenger elevator 
in the Central Library Building. The contract was awarded 
to the F. W. Payne Company for the sum of $5,624. The 
work on the elevator was completed on November 30, The 
new equipment is a convenience long desired by the public. 

An attractive children's story hour room has been secured at 
the Brighton Branch by partitioning off a section of the basement. 
The Children's Room at the Dorchester Branch has been entire- 
ly rearranged and refitted making an attractive room. Con- 
fidence is expressed that the work with the children of this dis- 
trict will be materially enlarged, now that the children's quarters 
have been made so satisfactory. 

Serious consideration must be given immediately to the need 
of a thorough overhauling and extension of the pneumatic tube 
and electric book carrier systems in the Central Library. Both 
have been in use since the building was first occupied and now 
need almost constant tinkering and repairs in order that even 
unsatisfactory service may be secured. A new up-to-date in- 
stallation will be necessary if quick book delivery from distant 
parts of the stacks is to be secured; the improvement is of suffi- 
cient importance to justify a somewhat large expenditure for the 
necessary equipment. 

In the building of the Blagden Street Annex during the war 
period two entire floors were left unfinished on account of scarcity 
of steel and other materials, and the high cost of labor; this 



[48] 

barren, unproductive and much needed space is a sheer waste 
of capacity and increases the overhead expense. The cost of 
the three steel stacks installed was provided by means outside 
the appropriation for the building or the regular city appropria- 
tion. 

Additional stack room is urgently needed, and a rearrange- 
ment for the Special Libraries Department on account of the 
constant growth of the Technology Division is of paramount 
importance; this division ought to be provided with a new lo- 
cation. Some preliminary studies have been made to provide 
a reference room and stack room in the two unfinished floors and 
also to provide similar accommodations for the inconveniently 
located Statistical Department, with entrance to both depart- 
ments from the Special Libraries floor. 

It is to be regretted that repairs and improvements in the Lec- 
ture Hall, postponed for so many years, are still impossible. 
The ventilation is criminally bad and the Hall itself is distress- 
ingly dingy. The addition of a moving picture equipment, re- 
peatedly recommended by the Examining Committees and fav- 
orably considered by the Trustees, is certainly necessary in an 
up-to-date public hall. 

STAFF INSTRUCTION. 

Twelve members of the Library staff registered at Simmons 
College during the year in seven library courses and also in 
courses in French, Spanish, History, Economics, and Psychol- 
ogy. An unusual opportunity is offered to the employees of 
the institution, when it is realized that practically all courses 
offered by the College, through the courtesy of its President 
and Corporation, are available to them without expense on recom- 
mendation of the Librarian. The difficulty of sparing them 
from the daily routine of work is perhaps the chief reason why 
assistants have not enrolled for courses in larger numbers. 

Professor R. E. Rogers of the Department of English and 
History of the Massachusets Institute of Technology, began on 
January 6, the first of a series of twenty lectures on Outlines of 
English Literature, being a special survey for library assistants. 



[491 

The course is presented on request through the Extension Divi- 
sion of the State Board of Education. 

A series of Informal Talks and Round Table Conferences, 
planned for the younger employees of the Library, began on 
January 5 and will extend to April 27. The course is excep- 
tional inasmuch as it does not aim to give formal instruction. It 
will consist, rather, of homely and interesting addresses by suc- 
cessful librarians on their work in other libraries, showing the 
ambitious and persistent young assistant a sure way to recogni- 
tion and advancement. The value of such a course should be 
marked; the outcome of the series will be noted with much in- 
terest. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

The national Library Association, composed of librarians 
and library trustees, held its forty-third annual Conference at 
Swampscott, Massachusetts, during the week of June 20th. 
The Trustees of the Public Library joined with the Board of 
Free Public Library Commissioners of the Commonwealth in 
inviting the members of the Association to a meeting on Thurs- 
day, June 23, held in the open court of the Central Library 
which was appropriately decorated and lighted for the occa- 
sion. Among the speakers were His Excellency the Governor, 
His Honor the Mayor, the President of the Board of Trustees, 
Josephine Preston Peabody (Marks), Robert Frost and Joseph 
C. Lincoln. Music was furnished by the Harvard Alumni 
Chorus and the Footlight Orchestra. The occasion was 
a memorable one for the Public Library and the American Li- 
brary Association. 

CONCLUSION. 

The resignation of the following persons, long in the employ of 
the Library, is noted with appreciation of their devoted services : 
Frances H. Goddard, on July 15, after nearly twenty-eight 
years service in the Ordering Department; Walter G. Forsyth, 
on September 22 after nearly twenty years given to work in the 
Catalogue, Reference, and Special Libraries departments. 



[50] 

With deepest regret is recorded the death of Lindsay Swift, 
Editor of Library publications, which occurred suddenly on 
September 1 1 after over forty-three years association with the 
Institution. 

The Librarian wishes to thank all the employees of the Li- 
brary system for the services they have rendered during the year. 
A formal annual report does not give opportunity to review and 
specify the good work carried on quietly, regularly and efficiently 
by many persons in the several departments. The sum total of 
all individual honest effort on the part of chiefs of departments, 
librarians of branches and reading rooms, and from members 
of the staff generally, has added prestige to the work of the Li- 
brary and is gratefully acknowledged. 

During the past year, as previously, recognition is made of the 
sympathetic, loyal service of Mr. Otto Fleischner, Assistant 
Librarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles F. D. Belden, 

Librarian. 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF CENTRAL. BRANCH AND READING ROOM 
CIRCULATION. 





1916-17 


1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 


1921-22 


Central Library 


431,846 


439,827 


441,582 


507,038 


551,190 


591,640 


Branches : 














Brighton 


54,871 


58,038 


58,764 


71,720 


75,273 


79,397 


Charlesfown 


78,510 


78,549 


70,828 


80,900 


91,455 


98,780 


Codman Square 


80,557 


87,038 


78,694 


85,246 


91,721 


101.792 


Dorchester . 


59,284 


59,719 


60,513 


68,173 


68,873 


70,396 


East Boston 


94,036 


101,119 


94,971 


1 1 5,062 


111,813 


120,234 


Hyde Park . 


74,404 


75,726 


70,363 


78,444 


79,592 


80,855 


Jamaica Plain . 


47,933 


48,978 


48,306 


55,771 


58,228 


60,507 


North End . 


43,354 


51,406 


42,123 


59,676 


69,846 


85,187 


Roslindale . 








66,798 


73,310 


80,879 


Roxbury 


81, '560 


74!9i9 


71,418 


74,024 


80,469 


80,933 


South Boston 


92,364 


91,503 


89,478 


100,602 


104,979 


121.194 


South End . 


95,308 


94,470 


87,465 


94,386 


99,751 


97.403 


Upham's Corner 


104,514 


108,170 


100,009 


111,186 


113,846 


119.375 


Warren Street 




.... 




88,720 


94.991 


104,412 


West End . 


12L426 


112.255 


l67!l8l' 


114.162 


123,137 


136,431 


West Roxbury 


45,561 


47,341 


51.519 


55.273 


54,956 


66,470 


Reading Rooms: 














Lower Mills 


17,607 


18,546 


17,897 


18,308 


18,040 


17,765 


Roslindale . 


51,221 


51,399 


56,918 




.... 




Mattapan 


13,620 


14,068 


14,757 


i6,35i 


l'6!439 


20,'499 


Neponset 


18,641 


15,530 


18,474 


19,433 


22,630 


28,789 


Mt. Bowdoin , 


47,728 


52,790 


53,200 


68,177 


73,620 


80,492 


Allston 


38,534 


38,257 


41,217 


43,492 


41,369 


47,328 


Ml. Pleasant 


41,432 


40,092 


42,690 


48.098 


49,949 


57.562 


Tyler Street 


22,983 


16,632 


12,556 


15,587 


31,343 


40,039 


Warren Street 


66,890 


73,096 


78,723 


.... 






Roxbury Crossing 


30,647 


32,873 


37.652 


43!232 


47!036 


57,609 


Boylston Station 


31,140 


33,700 


33,163 


40,758 


44,829 


50,033 


Andrew Square 


26,640 


27,264 


27,266 


29,726 


30,761 


33,944 


Orient Heights 


13,753 


13,777 


14,967 


21,133 


21,934 


27,970 


City Point . 


56,612 


48,503 


43,744 


33,784 


34,510 


30.300 


Parker Hill 


45,219 


46,250 


40,044 


52,846 


48,891 


49,209 


Faneuil 


22,109 


22,625 


21,571 


22,626 


24,001 


24.913 


Jeffries Point 


.... 


.... 




.... 




10,309 



Total 



2,050,238 2,074,455 2,028,053 2,300,732 2,448,776 2,672,646 



[52] 

From the above table it may be seen that the circulation 
from the Central Library has shown not only a steady in- 
crease from one year to the next but also that the ratio of 
increase shows a marked advance since the end of the war. 
It will be seen also that the circulation from the branches and 
reading rooms has increased from year to year except during 
1818-19 when, owing to the coal shortage, it was found neces- 
sary to effect a considerable curtailment of the hours during which 
the branch libraries were open. 

These facts will perhaps appear more clearly if the net gains 
and losses in circulation are presented, apart from the totals, 
in the following form: 

VOLUMES 
1917-18 gain over preceding year ........ 24,217 

1918-19 loss from preceding year ........ 46,402 

1919-20 gain over preceding year ........ 272,679 

1920-21 gain over preceding year ........ 148,044 

1921-22 gain over preceding year ........ 223,870 



USE OF BOOKS. 



CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 



February, 1921 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, ;; 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

January, 1922 



HOME USE 
DIRECT. 


HOME USE 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


SCHOOLS AND 
INSTITUTIONS 

THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS. 


38,208 


12,555 


15,067 


65.830 


35,291 


10,700 


14,711 


60.702 


34,086 


10,174 


16.005 


60,265 


31.246 


8,248 


15,172 


54,666 


24,599 


7,576 


16,129 


48,304 


19,267 


5.052 


1,860 


26,179 


20,975 


5,374 


1,645 


27,994 


20,771 


4,831 


1,485 


27,087 


26,998 


6,194 


6,707 


39,899 


34,920 


10,074 


11.762 


56,756 


35,224 


14.662 


12,894 


62,780 


33,002 


11.062 


17.114 


61,178 



Totals. . . 354,587 106,502 130,551 591,640 

The figures of total circulation for the year as shown in the 
first table are distributed in the customary form in the table to 
be found on the next page. 



[53] 



DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL CIRCULATION. 



Central Library: 

a. Direct ...... 

b. Through branches and reading rooms 

c. Schools and institutions, through 

Branch Dept. . . . , 
Branches: 
Brighton 
Charles town 
Codman Square 
Dorchester . 
East Boston . 
Hyde Park . 
Jamaica Plain 
North End . 
Roslindale 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
South End . 
Upham's Corner 
Warren Street 
West End . 
West Roxbury 



Reading Rooms: 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan 
Neponset 
Ml. Bowdoin 
Allston 
Mt. Pleasant 
Tyler Street 
Roxbury Crossing 
Boylston Station 
Andrew Square 
Parker Hill . 
Orient Heights 
City Point . 
Faneuil 
Jeffries Point 

575.930 831 576,761 

These figures are condensed into the following: 

Books lent for home use, including circulation through 
schools and institutions. 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through the 

branches and reading rooms) ........ 591,640 

From branches and reading rooms (other than books received from Cen- 
tral Library) 2,081,006 

Total number of volumes lent for home use and through schools and 

institutions ........... 2,672,646 



USE. 


INSTITUTIONS. 




HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 


TOTAL. 


354,587 






106,502 








130,551 


591,640 


48,310 


31,087 


79,397 


88,605 


10,175 


98,780 


97,304 


4,488 


101,792 


61,312 


9,084 


70,396 


103.290 


16,944 


120,234 


76.778 


4,077 


80,855 


52,547 


7.960 


60,507 


81,598 


3,589 


85,187 


78,540 


2,339 


80,879 


63,535 


1 7,398 


80,933 


106,167 


1 5,027 


121,194 


86,055 


11,348 


97,403 


109,398 


9,977 


119,375 


103,892 


520 


104,412 


123,166 


13,265 


136,431 


54,521 


11,949 


66,470 


1,335.018 


169,227 


1.504,245 


17,765 




17,765 


20,499 




20.499 


28,789 


.... 


28,789 


80,492 


.... 


80,492 


47.328 




47,328 


57.562 


.... 


57,562 


39.208 


831 


40,039 


57.609 


• • . • 


57,609 


50,033 


. • . . 


50,033 


33,944 




33,944 


49,209 


• • • • 


49,209 


27,970 


< • • • 


27,970 


30,300 


• • • « 


30,300 


24,913 


.... 


24.913 


10,309 


.... 


10,309 



[54] 



Comparative. 
Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use .... 

Through branches and reading rooms 

Branch Department circulation (exclud- 
ing schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use 

From branch collections . 
From reading rooms 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the branch system) .... 



1920-21. 



1921-22. 



319,369 
107,998 



1,227,304 
505,136 



427,367 



354,587 
106,502 



1,732,440 



288,969 



1,335,018 
575,930 



461,089 



1,910,948 



300,609 



2,448,776 2,672,646 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 



Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts 



Totals 



Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts . 
From libraries outside of Massachusetts 



1920-21. 


1921-22 


1,311 
278 


1.315 
306 


1,589 


1,621 


395 

54 


346 

75 


449 


421 


37 


40 



Totals ...... 

Borrowed from other libraries for use here 

The clasified "home-use" circulation of the branches and 
reading rooms was as follows, for two successive years: 





1920-21. 


1921-22 


Branches: 


VOLUMES. 


percentage. volumes. 


PERCENTAGE. 


Fiction for adults 
Non-fiction for adults 
Juvenile fiction . 
Juvenile non-fiction . 


357,546 
140,095 
490,095 
233,544 


29.3 
11.5 
40.1 
19.1 


399,455 
144,243 
515,342 
269,694 


30 
11 

39 
20 


Reading Rooms: 










Fiction 
Non-fiction 


351,658 
153.478 


70.0 
30.0 


397,402 
178,528 


69 
31 


At the Central 


Library the classified 


home-use 


circulation 


shows the followin 


g percentages 


• 


1920-21. 

PERCENTAGES. 


1921-22. 

PERCENTAGES. 


Fiction 
Non-fiction . 


: : 




. 49.33 + 

. 50.66+ 


48.66+ 

51.33+ 



[55] 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 



BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE. 



For the Central Library: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 

For branches and reading rooms : 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 

By Fellowes Athenaeum (for the Rox- 
bury Branch) .... 

Totals ..... 



1920-21. 



1921-22. 



7,865 
3,222 


11,087 

34,669 
1,053 


7,709 
3,461 


1 1 170 


34.246 
423 


53,875 


53,875 
1,140 








46,809 


66,185 



Of the 1 ,200 volumes acquired by the Fellowes Athenaeum 
during the past year, 1,140 were purchases, 54 were gifts, and 
6 were of periodicals bound. 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise: 



Accessions by purchase (including 1,140 volumes 
by Fellowes Athenaeum for Roxbury Branch) 

Accessions by gift (including 54 volumes through 
Fellowes Athenaeum for Roxbury Branch) 

Accessions by Statistical Department . 

Accessions by exchange ..... 

Accessions by periodicals bound (including 6 
through Fellowes Athenaeum for Roxbury 
Branch) ....... 

Accessions of newspapers bound 



CENTRAL. 


BRANCHES. 


VOLUMES. 
TOTAL 


11,170 


55,015 


66,185 


8,102 

193 
95 


1,669 


9,771 

193 

95 


1,367 
145 


125 


1,492 
145 



21,072 



56,809 



77,881 



THE CATALOGUE. 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 
Serials ..... 
Branches ..... 

Recatalogued .... 


1920-21. 

22,077 12,868 

4,000 .... 

31,110 26,943 

19,037 11,224 


VOLS. AND 
PARTS. 

1921- 

31,022 

4,040 

46,591 

18,872 


TITLES. 

-22. 
14,608 

39!5i2 
6,129 


Totals ..... 


76,224 


51,035 


100,525 


60,249 



[56] 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 

Special collection, new books and transfers ...... 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 
from branches, etc. .......... 



Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. ............ 



r,880 

1,583 

30,790 



Net gain, Central Library .... 
Net gain at branches (including reading-rooms) 



10,690 

20,100 
13,601 



Net gain, entire library system ......... 33,701 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each j'^ear since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852-53 . 








9,688 


1881-82 








404,221 


1853-54 . 








16,221 


1882-83 








422,116 


1854-55 








22,617 


1883-84 








438.594 


1855-56 . 








28,080 


1884-85 








453.947 


1856-57 








34,896 


1885 . 








460.993 


1857-58 . 








70.851 


1886 










479,421 


1858-59 








78.043 


1887 










492,956 


1859-60 








85.031 


1888 










505.872 


1860-61 








97.386 


1889 










520.508 


1861-62 








105,034 


1890 










536,027 


1862-63 








110,563 


1891 










556.283 


1863-64 








116,934 


1892 










576,237 


1864-65 








123,016 


1893 










597,152 


1865-66 








130,678 


1894 










610,375 


1866-67 








136,080 


1895 










628,297 


1867-68 








144,092 


189^97 








663,763 


1868-69 








1 52,796 


1897-98 








698.888 


1869-70 








160,573 


1898-99 








716,050 


1870-71 








179,250 


1899-1900 








746,383 


1871-72 








192,958 


1900-01 








781,377 


1872-73 








209,456 


1901-02 








812,264 


1873-74 








260,550 


1902-03 








835,904 


1874-75 








276,918 


1903-04 








848,884 


1875-76 








297,873 


1904-05 








871,050 


187^77 








312,010 


1905-06 








878.933 


1877-78 








345,734 


1906-07 








903.349 


1878-79 








360,963 


1907-08 








922.348 


1879-80 








377.225 


1908-09 








941.024 


1880-81 








390.982 


1909- 











961,522 



[57] 



1910-11 
1911-12 
1912-13 
1913-14 
1914-15 
1915-16 



987,268 
1,006,717 
1,049,011 
1,067.103 
1 ,098,702 
1,121,747 



1916-17 
1917-18 
1918-19 
1919-20 
1920-21 
1921-22 



1,139,682 
1,157.326 
1,173.695 
1. 1 97.498 
1.224.510 
1.258.211 



Volumes in entire library system 

Volumes in the branches and reading-rooms 



These volumes are located as follows : 



Central Library 






944,914 


West End . 


Brighton 






17,104 


West Roxbury 


Charlestown 






16,547 


lower Mills 


Codman Square 






7,941 


Maltapan . 


Dorchester . 






19,274 


Neponset 


East Boston 






19.468 


Mt. Bowdoin 


Hyde Park . 






30.355 


Allsfon 


Jamaica Plain 






17,461 


Mt. Pleasant 


North End . 






8,026 


Tyler Street 


Roslindale . 






9,709 


Roxbury Crossing 


Roxbury: 


Boylston Station . 


Fellowes Athenaeum 30,932 


Andrew Square . 


Owned by City 6,333 


Orient Heights . 


Total, Roxbury . . . 37,265 


City Point . 


South Boston 






17.554 


Parker Hill 


South End . 






14,565 


Faneuil 


Upham's Corner 






10,218 


Jeffries Point 


Warren Street 






6.320 





1.258,211 
313.297 



19.752 
1 1 ,465 
1,590 
1,745 
2,333 
7,363 
3,418 
4,771 
4,166 
3,745 
3,716 
3,191 
3,033 
4,291 
2,169 
2,978 
1,764 



FREE PUBLIC LECTURES. 

The first public lecture in the present Library building was 
given in March, 1897. It seems proper therefore to take some 
cognizance of the 25th anniversary of what has developed into 
an important Library activity. 

The early lectures were exclusively on subjects relating to the 
fine arts, and were the expansion of numerous classes and club 
meetings held in the recently opened Fine Arts Deprtment, as a 
means of bringing the collections of books and photographs to 
the attention of school teachers, architects, artists and the general 
public. The first illustrated lectures were given under the aus- 
pices and at the expense of the Unity Art Club and the Pallas 
Club. The attendance was so large at the very beginning that 
some of the lectures had to be repeated several times. 

The present Lecture Hall was used at that period as a news- 
paper reading room, and all kinds of makeshifts had to be re- 
sorted to in the attempt to accommodate the public lectures. 



[58] 

The present Exhibition Room, the Barton Room, and the room 
now occupied by the Statistical Department were used in suc- 
cession. 

The Lecture Hall was formally opened on May 1 7, 1 899. 
Advantage was taken of the gift of a copy of Chantrey's bust 
of Sir Walter Scott, and the unveiling of the bust was made the 
occasion of the opening of the hall. President Solomon Lin- 
coln of the Board of Trustees presided, and the principal ad- 
dress was delivered by President Charles W. Eliot of Harvard 
University; other speakers were Rev. James De Normandie, 
Mayor Josiah Quincy, Prof. A. Lawrence Lowell, Edward 
Robinson, Director of the Museum of Fine Arts, and Hon. 
Charles Francis Adams. 

Under the direct auspices of the Library Trustees, a course of 
lectures was given in the new Lecture Hall in March and April, 
1 900. The speakers were Messrs. Whitney, Swift, Ford and 
Fleischner of the Library staff, Col. T. W. Higginson, Dr. 
William Everett, Rev. E. E. Hale, and Mr, C. W. Ernst. 

A second course offered by the Trustees, on Methods of 
Municipal Administration, was given in March and April, 1 901 , 
the speakers being Professors A. Lawrence Lowell, E. Emer- 
ton, Kuno Francke, and F. G. Peabody of Harvard, Prof. W. 
T. Sedgwick, Mr. Henry Goodnough and Mr. George L. Fox. 

A third course, on the Aesthetic Development of Cities, was 
given in March, April and May, 1 902. 

The Unity Art Club lectures continued until 1 904. In that 
year what may be called the "Thursday evening courses" were 
properly inaugurated. Regular courses were provided by the 
Boston Architectural Club, the Society of Printers, and other 
organizations. 

The Field and Forest Club arranged its first course of lec- 
tures on outdoor life on Monday evenings in 1910; the course 
was combined with the Thursday evening course in 1915, and 
still continues with great success. 

The first lecture under the auspices of the Boston Ruskin 
Club was given in 1907; since 1914 the Club has held bi- 
weekly open meetings in the Lecture Hall, with occasional lec- 
tures on general topics. 



[59] 

The Sunday afternoon lectures were begun in 1912; since 
that year the Boston Drama League has provided four lectures 
annually on the drama and the stage, with growing popularity. 

The first music lecture was given by the late Louis C. Elson in 
1906. At least four lectures on music, with instrumental or 
vocal illustrations, are now regularly included in the Sunday 
courses. 

Since 1908 the programmes for the entire course have been 
printed in the Bulletin for October. 

In 1900 a stereopticon was purchased, and in 1920 a Stein- 
way grand piano was added; it is hoped that a moving picture 
equipment will be installed in the near future. 

In alL nine hundred and sixty lectures have been given by 
five hundred lecturers, of whom four hundred were men and 
one hundred women. Of this number, about thirty were archi- 
tects, thirty-two professors and instructors in Harvard Univer- 
sity, twelve from the Museum of Fine Arts, five from the Massa- 
chusetts Normal Art School, and four each from the Public 
Schools of Boston, Boston College, Boston University, the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, and Tufts College; ten 
lectures were given by members of the Library staff. Yale, 
Brown, Princeton, Wellesley, Simmons, and the New England 
Conservatory of Music also provided one or more lecturers each. 
The remainder of the lecturers have been professional men and 
women, many of national reputation, travellers, scholars, and 
other public-spirited citizens. 

Space does not permit giving even a partial list of the lec- 
turers. The following list of speakers who gave four or more 
lectures will give some idea of the readiness of busy men to give 
their services for the public good: H. T. Bailey, 4; C. H. 
Bayley, 4; E .H. Baynes, 7; E. C. Black, 9; J. C. Bowker, 
8; F. C. Brown, 10; C. T. Carruth, 10; F. H. Chase, 6; A. 
S. Cooley, 19; J. R. Coolidge, Jr., 7; R. A. Cram, 6; O. 
Downes, 10; H. Elliott, 5; L. C. Elson, 4; T. A. Fox, 4; 
C. W. Furlong, 4; T. I. Gasson, 8; H. L. Gideon, 12; A. 
H. Gilmer, 6; F. M. Greene, 13; F. W. Hersey, 31 ; L. 
Jeffers, 3; A. M. Keyes, 4; W. H. Kilham, 6; J. K. Lacock. 



[60] 

4; G. W. Lee, 5; L. R. Lewis, 5; D. G. Lyon, 4; L. C. 
Newhall, 5; C S. Olcott, 4; A. K. Peck, 4; M. E. Peck, 
10; H. W. Poor, 8; H. H. Powers, 13; G. Richardson, 4: 
R. E. Rogers, 5; A. D. Ropes, 7; L. M. Rossi, 4; A. S. 
Schmidt, 5; M. A. S. Shannon, 14; R. C. Sturgis, 4; H. 
Taylor, 4; W. L. Underwood, 16; F. H. Wade, 16; H. G. 
Wadlin, 7; C. H. Walker, 12; L. Whiting, 4. 

These bald figures give no idea of the sacrifices in time and 
energy and even outlay of money of the unselfish men and 
women who without hesitation have repeatedly responded to the 
appeals of the Assistant Librarian for advice and help; this is 
especially true of the days of the inception and early growth of 
the Fine Arts Department. The members of the Boston Archi- 
tectural Club and the Society of Printers will well remember the 
consultations and meetings held to arrange suitable lectures and 
exhibitions and to devise an attractive bait to draw an audience. 

With the exception of four or five cases of severe weather or 
sickness, all the lectures were given as announced in the pro- 
grammes. 

THE LECTURES OF 1921-1922. 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were illustrated 
with lantern slides. 

*Dante. Charles H. Grandgent. 

Italian Art in the time of Dante. George H. Edgell. 
*A general historical Review of the Art of Music. F. Stuart 
Mason. With musical illustrations. 
Dante through Catholic Eyes. Rev. Mark J. McNeal, S.J. 
The Truth about Vivisection. Ernest Harold Baynes. 
The Land of William Tell. Francis Henry Wade. 
^Modern American Dramatists: Introductory Lecture, Wal- 
ter, Moody, Rachel Crothers and others. Frank Chouteau 
Brown. (Drama League Course.) 
Nov. 3. New England: Its Lakes, Rivers, Mountains and Seacoast. 

Eugene S. Jones. 
Nov. 6. Literary Landmarks at Home and Abroad. Charles S. 

Olcott. 
Nov. 1 0. Our National Forests and the Timber Supply. Philip W. 
Ayres. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 



1921 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


16 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


23. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


30. 



[61] 

Nov. 1 3. *Folk Music of the Creoles. Maud Cuney Hare. With 
vocal illustrations by William H. Richardson, baritone. 
Nov. 1 7. Florentine Engraving. FitzRoy Carrington. 
Nov. 20. ^Modern American Dramatists: Edv/^ard Sheldon and "Ro- 
mance." Robert E. Rogers. (Drama League Course.) 
27. Author's Reading of Poems. With introductory talk on 
Modern Poetry. Jeanne Robert Foster. 
I . Jeanne d'Arc. — Maid of France and Saint. Rev. WilHam 

M. Stinson, S.J. 
4. '''^Expression of Truth in Science and Poetry. Alfred C. 

Lane. 
8. Some Italian Mountains of Special Interest. Karl P. Har- 
rington. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
I 1 . Modern American Dramatists : Clyde Fitch. Albert H. 

Gilmer. (Drama League Course.) 
15. European Collecting Experiences. Paul J. Sachs. 
18. ^Patriotic Songs of America. John P. Marshall. With 

musical illustrations. 
22. The Roman Catacombs. Rev. John W. H. Corbett. 
29. American Furniture of the Georgian Period. Allen French. 



1 . Lecture Recital. Edward A. Thompson. 

5. Early Indians: Explorations in the North Woods of Maine. 
Warren K. Moorehead. 

8. Adventures in a Land of Sunshine. W. Lyman Underwood. 
12. Cave-Hunting. Charles Peabody. (Field and Forest Club 

Course.) 

15. ''^Some aspects of Richard Wagner's Art. Hamilton Craw- 
ford Macdougall. With musical illustrations. 

19. *The Great Cycle of Painting. Eben F. Comins. With 
illustrations on the blackboard. 

22. Wild Brother; the Strangest of True Stories from the North 
Woods. W. Lyman Underwood. 

26. Turkey and the Near East. Dr. George L. Richards. 

29 *The Influence of the Stage on the Drama. John Tucker 
Murray. (Drama League Course.) 

2. The Boston of 1822: The Political Background of the 

Change from Town to City. Samuel Eliot Morison. 
5. ^Charles Dickens in the Twentieth Century. E. Charlton 
Black. (Dickens Fellowship.) 

9. Scenery of our Western Mountains. Leroy Jeffers. (Field 

and Forest Club Course.) 
1 2. ^Abraham Lincoln. Hon. Michael J. Murray. 



Feb. 


16. 


Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


23. 
26. 



[62] 

The Arnold Arboretum. Loring Underwood. Illustrated 
with "direct color" autochrome slides. 
*The Pros and Cons of Community Music. Leo R. Lewis. 
With musical illustrations by the Tufts College Musical 
Club. 
Devon: The Land of Sea Kings. Frank Cheney Hersey. 
^Modern American Dramatists: Eugene O'Neill and "Be- 
yond the Horizon." Robert E. Rogers. (Drama League 
Course.) 
Mar. 2. The Mediaeval Glory of France: Paris and the Cathedral 
Cities. Frederick Parsons. 
Wild Life in and near Boston. Manley Bacon Townsend. 
Conservation of Bird Life. Herbert V. Neal. (Field and 
Forest Club Course.) 
^Spreading the News in '75. Horace G. Wadlin. 

Recent American Architecture. J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr. 
^Modern French Music. Edward B. Hill. Assisted by Mme. 
Suza Doane, pianist. 
Michelangelo: Sculptor, Painter, Poet. Charles Theodore 
Carruth. 
^Modern American Dramatists: Augustus Thomas. Frank 
Cheney Hersey. (Drama League Course.) 
Boston Becomes a City: 1822. Its social, literary and 
artistic development. Martha A. S. Shannon. 
2. ^Relationship of Poetry and Music. Mrs. Beatric K. Sto- 
dola. Illustrated by musical readings and piano solos 
by Edwin Stodola. 
The Romance of Time-Telling from the Days of the Cave 
man. Samuel Bernard. 
*The Music of Birds. Arthur Edward Wilson. With 
whisthng imitations. 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS, 1921-1922. 

1921 
May Pilgrim Tercentenary Exhibition. 

Foreign Travel Posters. 

Horsfall's Drawings of Birds. 
June Abbott Thayer Memorial. 

Edward C. Streeter Collection of Early Medical Texts. 
July Pilgrim Tercentenary Ejchibition (resumed). 

August Pilgrim Tercentenary Exhibition. 

September Dante Sexcentenary Exhibition. 
October Switzerland. 

New England Scenery, 



Mar. 
Mar. 


5. 
9. 


Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 


12. 
16. 
19. 


Mar. 


23. 


Mar. 


26. 


Mar. 


30. 


Apr. 


2. 


Apr. 


6. 


Apr. 


9. 



[63] 



November Marechal Foch and Other French Generals of the Great War. 
Howard Leigh's War Lithographs. 

Original Autographs, Letters and Sketches, contributed by 
world-famous personages for the book of the "Fatherless 
Children of France." 
Jeanne d'Arc. 
December Alpine and Other Mountain Scenery. 

Boston Y. M. C. U. Camera Club Exhibition: "Pictorial 
Possibilities of Boston." 



1922 
January 



February 
March 



April 



Curtis's American Indians. 
Design for Proposed War Memorial for Boston. 
The great Cycle of Painting. 
Turkey. 

Music Exhibit for Meeting of Massachusetts Library Club. 
A. A. Hopkins Collection of Dickensiatla. 
Travel Posters. 

Junior Red Cross Poster Competition. 
Recent Tendencies in American Architecture. 
Michelangelo. 

Edward Everett Hale Centenary. 
General U. S. Grant Centenary. 

Mass. Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Poster 
Competition. 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

1920-21. 1921-22. 

Requisitions received and filled ...... 320 337 

Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles exclusive of Stack 4 (Printing Dept. count) . . 14,166 15,438 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) ..... 214,701 214,898 

Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) 408 656 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) .... 4 20,986 30,960 

Signs 1,287 1,775 

Blank forms (numbered series) 3,543,180 3,695,995 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside numbered series) . . 262,210 46,767 

Catalogues and pamphlets 1 49,000 1 62,460 



THE BINDERY. 



Number of volumes bound in various style 

Magazines stitched 

Volumes repaired .... 

Volumes guarded .... 

Maps mounted .... 

Photographs and engravings mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1920-21. 

43,591 

280 

2,278 

1,187 

71 

3,054 

163.227 



1921-22. 

44,587 

239 

2,436 

1,381 

93 

4,492 

163,747 



[64] 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

Extracts from Annual Reports of Branch and Reading Room 
Librarians. 

MT. PLEASANT READING ROOM. 

The work with high school pupils in the library is particularly in- 
teresting. They come seeking knowledge on such a variety of subjects 
that we have to know our reference books very well in order to answer 
their questions. Some merely want to know the name and location of 
the book containing the information, and will look up their own references. 
However, when younger children come in such crowds, all one class 
perhaps, looking for the same matter which they cannot all look up in 
one encyclopaedia, we find what is wanted and tell them about it or read 
to them from the book which contains the desired information. Often 
the children do not understand what their teacher requires of them and 
come asking about the queerest things. Our ingenuity is taxed trying to 
think what they can mean. 

A careful study of the magazines helps us a great deal, and when a 
youthful member of a debating club wishes material on some current 
event we can give him the latest and best. 

TYLER STREET READING ROOM. 

Our registration has increased considerably this year because of our 
efforts in registering at the schools. Personally, I consider our registering 
the eleven classes of the Quincy Evening School this Fall, one of our 
most successful jobs of the year. This piece of work was, to say the 
least, absorbingly human and from an Americanization point of view 
exceedingly valuable. It may be of interest to tell here that these evening 
school classes were composed wholly of adult foreigners, and mostly new 
arrivals who could not speak English. These were: Syrians, Greeks, 
Jews, Italians, Poles, French, Spaniards, Germans, and Chinese, 
men and women, and most of the registration was done in the foreign 
languages, by the library workers, who between them managed to address 
the classes in English, Arabic, Italian, Yiddish, Greek, French, Spanish, 
and German. When our vocabularies in these respective languages ran 
short, we put our meaning across to them in sympathetic gestures and tones 
so that they almost voted us their pals. On the whole, they voiced them- 
selves as liking the "American Library Ladies," and we are confident of 
the fact that not even the Shades of the Mayflower Puritans, nor Presi- 
dent Harding himself, could find any flaw in our honest interpretation of 
America, and its opportunities to these, our eager unfortunate brethren, 
in search of fields and pastures new. . . . 

Our Adult Room is daily increasing in usefulness. In this room we 
have placed our special collection of foreign books in Arabic, Yiddish, 



[65] 

Greek, Italian, French, with a splendid collection of Easy English, and 
books on Citizenship. A few technical and non-fiction books have also 
been added with the hope of meeting the unemployment situation even 
partially, that the help derived from these technical books may at least 
qualify some for better jobs, when an opportunity comes. The room is 
almost always filled with quiet readers of many different races. 

The Reference Room continues to be the most popular place in the Li- 
brary, and one which we must watch very closely because of the valuable 
books added. Every one using this room is supposed to be on his honor, 
but I regret to report that many do not known the definition of honor, for 
the mutilation of bocks in this room during the year has been most de- 
plorable. 

I believe that we may truly say that our constituency is the most varied 
one in the entire city for nationalities, yet it is quite wonderful to have 
the Library serve as the most democratic meeting place in the district. 
The workers are obliged to use foreign languages in the Library daily, 
and this use is most welcome to the adult foreigner. All who come are 
keenly appreciative of the "Open door" and the warm welcome and 
hospitality which we aim to give daily. 

The librarian awarded two prizes for the best two essays on "Abraham 
Lincoln," written by boys who use the library. 

We have had an illustrated lecture recital on "Birdland" which was 
attended by about three hundred people, and a very deHghtful reading of 
"Modern Plays and Stories" by Mrs. Louisa James. 

The Dover-Broadway Community Council has held several meetings 
at the library in the forenoons. 

The St. James Council (Knights of Columbus) held a meeting at the 
library. 

The Committee on Library Extension of the South End Jewish Wel- 
fare Centre met to discuss library conditions at the Tyler Street Library. 

The Syrian Club held a meeting at the Library. 

The local committee for the extension of better neighborhood condi- 
tions held several meetings here with one of the library assistants acting 
as secretary. 

And last, but not least, a grand patriotic concert, composed of local 
talent, and an address by a Civil War veteran, Col. Edward O. Skelton, 
was attended by nearly three hundred children of foreign birth, all loudly 
proclaiming themselves Americans. 

We have taken groups of children to as many things as we could 
possibly be admitted to without charge. 

CODMAN SQUARE BRANCH. 
We are having the story hour now and the attendance has been very 
good up to the last two times. Our average attendance up to the last 
two story hours was 100. The last two days brought the average down 



[66] 

to 92.6, for the 12 story hours. The attendance of the girls was always 
greater than that of the boys, except once. That time the girls were 
beaten by three. Mr. Connelly, the Master of the Emily A. Fifield 
School, has been very kind in reminding his pupils every week of the story 
hour so that the attendance may keep up. Each week one of the girls 
takes a report to Mr. Connelly of the number from his school who were 
present at the story hour and how they behaved. Some of the stories 
told were Erskine Dale, Pioneer, the Christmas Rose, Joyous Quest, and 
fairy stories from the books by Jacobs, stories of Robin Hood, Young 
Lucretia, Little Friend Lydia, Solomon Crow's Christmas Pockets, and 
Pip, from Great Expectations . . . 

During March, April and May I had classes over from the Dorchester 
High School. I had 1 second year EngHsh classes and 3 fourth year 
English classes. I enjoyed having the classes and the teachers told me 
that the pupils like to come over to the library for these talks. 

We have quite a good deal of reference work for adults. A Mission 
Circle in one of the churches studied Japan all this fall. Several ladies 
gave five minute papers each month about different phases of Japanese life 
and customs, so that all our books were used and some had to be sent 
for from Central. 

CHARLESTOWN BRANCH. 

At this Branch there has been a gradual decrease in the number of 
missing books since 1916, when it was 256. This is owing to the greater 
interest on the part of the police officer. The staff is at all times inade- 
quate for watching the public, while the alcoves of the rooms for adults 
give great opportunity for illegal borrowing. . . . 

Because of general unemployment the young men have used the reading 
room during the day more than usual. The evening brings the students, 
from eighth grade to college, and some who come only for amusement. 
It is hard to maintain discipline and quiet for the adult readers. These 
titles, put up at closing time, on a winter evening, show what the different 
readers are interested in. The Life of Shakspeare; Heart of the West; 
The Iron Woman; Milton's Poems; Book of Motor Boats; Our Cas- 
ualty; Melindy; Dyke's Automobile and Gasoline Engine; Dr. Le 
Baron and his Daughters; History of the United States; Romance of a 
Christmas Card; My New Curate; Dictionary of Thoughts; History 
of Ireland ; Standard Dictionary ; Land of the Heather. 

WEST END BRANCH. 
The Children's Room shows the effect of the increased book fund. 
There are more books, and after a summer's work of condemning and 
replacing, the shelves show the result in their improved appearance. How- 
ever, after a busy day they are empty and the children realize that it 
is necessary to come early if they want a book. As has been said before, 



[67] 

the greatest need is in the juvenile collection, where from a collection of 
4,904 volumes there was a direct circulation of 80,921 volumes this 
past year. 

The juvenile collection is 24% of the entire collection, while the juvenile 
circulation is 67% of the total home use. These figures prove how in- 
adequate the juvenile collection is for the demands made upon it. 

The lowering of the age limit for card holders brings yearly more 
children to the library in this crowded community, and our needs arc far 
greater than our supply. 

In this branch it is difficult to determine just who the people are that 
make up our constituency ; for unlike the suburban branches, our problems 
are like those of a large city library. People come here from all parts 
of the city in addition to those from our own district. 

To a great extent it is a shifting population, and consequently we have 
great difficulty often in recovering our over-detained books. Then again, 
there is the task of registering new people, and always training new groups 
of little folks in library ways. 

The Boston University School of Religious Education and Social Ser- 
vice has recently moved into the new Suffolk Law School building, which 
they occupy during the day while the Law School uses the building eve- 
nings. This has brought us many new adult borrowers and the students 
from both schools use the reading room for study and reference work. 

Special attention has been given the foreign born women and girls who 
attend the Bowdoin Evening School. The librarian has made several 
visits to the school, talking to the classes about the library and the special 
books for their use. The 75 women registered at this school have been 
coming regularly to the branch. 

We have among our borrowers many of American birth. We have 
been pleased to note that, of late, the number of these borrowers is in- 
creasing. 

The district continues to be largely residential, although the homes are 
often in the midst of industrial plants, factories and stores. 

The adult Jewish readers are numerous and they come to us from all 
parts of the city for the Yiddish and Russian books. Many Jewish 
people in our own district come only for books in English, — at first, for 
the books to help them learn the English language, and later for the best 
things in English literature. 

The largest part of the work is, as it always has been, with the chil- 
dren. The percentage of juvenile circulation remains about the same 
each year, 67%. This same percentage does not hold good for attendance 
in the reading room. Here the percentage is about 80% adult. 

WARREN STREET BRANCH. 
The reference work always occupies much of our attention without 
cessation in the summer months, as the high school pupils continue their 



[68] 

lesearch work. The various newspaper contests also mean constant use 
of the library facilities. However, the plodding high school pupil and 
eager newspaper contestant are only two of the group. We have the 
business man, whose subjects range from business law to factory manage- 
ment and advertising; the professional man, interested in questions of the 
day and the rather personal material offered in "Old at Forty and Young 
at Sixty" or "How to Develop Your Speaking Voice;" the enthusiastic 
college student, whose subjects are technical and classical; and the plain 
man of the trades, who feels the need of a book on "Practical Wiring" or 
"How to Paint Your House." The follov/ing is a partial list of reference 
topics for the year: Farmers' Aid Bill; Open and Closed Shops; Dif- 
ficulties in Ireland; Japanese Immigration; Government Ownership of 
Railroads; Western Union Cable ; Decline in Prices; Congressional Dis- 
tricts of Massachusetts; Muensterberg ; First Continental Congress; 
Bridges in the United States; The Norsemen; The Magna Charta; 
The Model Parhament; London in Shakespeare's Time; Gutenberg; 
Armistice Day; The Battle of Marathon; Manufacture of Cotton; 
Lewis Carroll; Names of Women Pilgrims; Democracy — Free Trade — 
Time Zones ; Dante — Marco Polo — Samoan Islands ; Balance in Draw- 
ing; Indian Tribes — Wheat^ — Leather — Carpets; Mary Mapes Dodge — ■ 
Krupp — Harvard University; Tragedy and Comedy; Fire Prevention; 
Explorers of the Antarctic Regions ; Christmas Greens ; The City Coun- 
cil; Disarmament; Island of Yap; How to use a Dictionary; Agricul- 
ture in Germany. 

This district offers many opportunities for Americanization work on 
account of the population, which consists largely of Russian Jews. There 
are several schools conducting classes in which the new American may 
learn Enghsh. The hours for these are so arranged that even the busy 
mothers may take advantage of the study offered. This Branch supplies 
much of the pupils' reading material. The Russian immigrant newly 
arrived in the neighborhood, is soon introduced to the library by his in- 
terested relatives, and his first choice of a Russian or Yiddish book is 
followed by an English primer. With the idea of attaining such a result, 
we have placed the Yiddish and Americanization books side by side. 
Although this class has shared in the distribution of new literature, addi- 
tional copies are needed in order to meet the growing demand. There- 
fore, more book recommendations are now being considered. 

SOUTH END BRANCH. 
With the year ending January 15, 1922, the South End Branch 
completes the 44th year of its existence, and presumably the last full year 
in the present building on Shawmut Avenue, formerly known as the 
"Every Day Church." Before the close of the next year it will probably 
be housed in the new municipal building across the way. The branch 
library has a rather migratory history, having occupied since its opening 



[69] 

in 1877 three different dwellings. The proposed change to the muni- 
cipal building will make that its fourth home. In the years that the branch 
has lived and served the people here, it has witnessed many changes in 
the character of the district. From a home and residential section of the 
city, the South End has become largely a lodging house district with its 
changing population of many and varying types. Yet perhaps now, more 
than in the old days, is the library a necessity in this community. For 
the people who come to us need the library more, having few, if any, 
books in their homes. To them the library extends a welcome that is 
friendly, encouraging, and sympathetic. Its doors are open to all, and 
here the native American and the foreign born stranger find a common 
ground and an equal share in the privileges it offers. It has been said, 
and truly, that statistics do not show the real work of a library, and that 
is especially true of the library here. No one viewing the crowded read- 
ing room at the branch on any day or evening during the fall and winter 
months could fail to realize what the branch library means to the people 
in this section. All sorts and conditions of men are to be found here; 
the laborer in his overalls, the business man seeking, some special informa- 
tion, the student from college or high school, teachers, professors, clergy- 
men, the Post Office clerk in his free time, the returned soldier, a large 
proportion of men out of employment, and others who have passed the 
working age. A constant procession through our doors. No records are 
kept, and no identification required for the large use of books, newspapers 
and periodicals in the building. . . . 

The erection of the new municipal building here has interested and 
delighted the entire neighborhood. During the fine weather, the streets 
about the building were thronged with spectators who watched the progress 
of the work with eager interest. It is a really fine building, architecturally 
an ornament to the city, and perfect for the uses for which it was designed. 
The people of the South End may well be proud of its possession. 

The future of the South End Branch Library is to be in this building. 
There seems every reason to hope that with the closer association which 
propinquity gives with all the other activities of the neighborhood, the 
branch library will fill an even more important place in the community, and 
each year will find it a stronger and more efficient agency for the intel- 
lectual and social betterment of the people it serves. 

SOUTH BOSTON BRANCH. 

There was a loss in every item of the daily issue from Central Library 
for the reason that this year there were more books on our own shelves to 
choose from. 

There is a friendly spirit of cordial cooperation between the library and 
the schools. This is especially true of the Shurtleff School. Just a 
week after the schools reopened in the fall. Miss Carrigan (the new prin- 
cipal) invited me to come and talk about the public library and the many 



[70] 

ways In which it can help thie people who learn to use it. I gave this 
talk on September 2 1 , and In the next three days we registered all the 
children (for new and lost cards) who could not show a library card. 
Because Miss Carrlgan believes In the cooperation of the school and the 
library, every teacher in the Shurtleff School has been supplied with a 
deposit of books. 

ROXBURY BRANCH. 
Detective stories and those of western life have been in great demand. 
The practice of requiring book reports from the pupils in the high schools 
has caused constant inquiries for the books in the approved list. Recently 
the contests in the newspapers have brought people to the Branch to con- 
sult the reference books, especially the dictionaries, to obtain or verify 
their answers to questions. While this special use may not result in secur- 
ing regular patrons it helps to advertise the Library and extend knowledge 
of the reference books and the assistance that can be obtained here. . . 

NORTH END BRANCH. 

There are seven clubs connected with the North End Library, each 
one following different lines but with one purpose in view — to promote 
good reading. The total membership in the different clubs is 119 di- 
vided as follows : The Rossi Dramatic Club, 1 6 ; Women of History 
Club, 2 1 ; City Historical Club, 15; St. Anthony's Club, 1 5 ; Little 
Folks Club, 23; Kenney Junior Club, 16; Library Orchestra, 13. 

The Rossi Dramatic Club membership is made up of boys in high 
school and a few who have gone to work. The boys study and present 
for the most part light farces although at an exhibition of the clubs last 
year "The Tea Party" scene from Abraham Lincoln was given. 

The City Historical Club's membership is made up of Httle girls in 
the 6th and 7th grades, who last year studied about the Pilgrims and took 
trips to historical places around Boston. This year they are studying a 
very modified form of "America's making," dressing paper dolls in the 
costumes of each country that has contributed towards its making. 

St. Anthony's Club is a travel club. Imaginary trips are made to 
different countries and compositions are read at the meetings. Its mem- 
bership is made up of boys in the 8th grade and junior high. 

Little Folks Club is made up of very small girls under Miss Nazzaro's 
direction. Fairy plays are given and children's games played at the 
meetings. 

The Kenney Juniors are bright young boys who have formed their 
club for the purpose of debating. They also have organized a basket- 
ball team and have the privilege of using the court at the North Bennet 
Industrial School. 

The Library Orchestra needs no explanation. The boys have im- 
proved greatly in the past year and deserve much credit. 



[71] 

A very successful exhibition of all the Library clubs was given at the 
Michael Angelo School Center last June. The children In the clubs ap- 
preciate the privilege of the club room and very seldom is there an 
absentee. 

EAST BOSTON BRANCH. 

The loss of 89 1 In the books Issued through Central Is the natural result 
following the placing of large numbers of new and attractive volumes on 
the shelves. 

The reference work varies each year with school methods. Today 
it is the junior high and the project method; tomorrow It will be some- 
thing else. With each change we begin our search for new material. 

ROXBURY CROSSING READING ROOM. 
A writer who uses the library daily in her work complimented us on the 
splendid collection of reference books that she found on the shelves. She 
had used many branches of different Hbraries, but the reference collections 
were inadequate. 

CITY POINT READING ROOM. 

Central circulation during the year 1921—1922 represented 12,170 
volumes received, with a percentage of 55% unsuccessful cards. The 
current year 1921—1922 shows a Central circulation of 12,800 volumes 
received or an increase of 53 over what seemed In the year past to have 
been a maximum Central Issue. 

Thus an analysis of the situation seems to indicate that a relatively 
free and unrestricted Central supply operates as a compensation for the 
reading room's inadequacy In serving a public whose diversified need is of 
a sort calculated to strain the resources of a typical reading room collec- 
tion of books. 

There Is a demand for new titles, new authors, new points of view ; — 
a demand which through the Central Issue Is so fully supplied that even our 
fiction fanatics cannot complain that they do not get their share of Cur- 
wood, Galsworthy, Grey or Oppenhelm while such delectable literary 
commodities as "Main Street" and "If winter comes" gradually meet the 
Incessant demand. 

Out of a population composed of Americans, Armenians, Italians, Lithu- 
anians, Poles and Czecho-Slovaks — diversification of taste is to be ex- 
pected. "A" wants Paine's "Age of Reason," — "B" desires the 
"Lives of the Saints," — "C" needs a book on Americanization Civics, — 
"D" must have either Wells' "Outline History of the World" or Van 
Loon's "Story of Mankind." 

Interesting requests pour In from the schools; picture deposits repre- 
* senting winter scenes and sports; illustrations of knights In armor, their 
steeds and crests ; requests for dramatizations of school classics, fairy tales 
and rounds. 



Pageants are now the mode. At present we are looking up pictorial 
matter to aid in the characterization of "Water," which is to be personified 
in a pageant connected with the Good Health Campaign conducted under 
the auspices of the local District Nursing Association Drive for funds. 

Work with the Chamber of Commerce in connection with Americaniza- 
tion still progresses. Miss Agnes Morris, a local pioneer in this field, has 
been appointed secretary. Her work has had its reaction in increasing 
registration of adult Italians embarked towards the goal of citizenship. 

PARKER HILL READING ROOM. 

Our 23 magazines and 3 newspapers are undoubtedly a source of great 
pleasure and advantage to our patrons. Many times they are the only 
available sources of acquiring information on some current event or biog- 
raphy of present interest. They are indispensable to that class of readers 
who are anxious to know something, but not too much, about everything. 

FANEUIL READING ROOM. 

Evidence from all sides shows that this district is fast becoming a 
cosmopolitan one. This is noted as one glances about at the people 
gathered here of an evening eagerly scanning the magazines and papers. 
There are workers of all kinds among them, engineers, clerks, salesmen, 
mechanics, electricians and also professional people. The races repre- 
sented here include besides Americans, Jews, Armenians, Scotch, French, 
Italian, and Belgian. I cite this fact as, up to a few years ago, our 
patrons were chieHy Americans with the exception of a few Jewish families. 
These foreigners are mostly of the better class, men in business either here 
or in the city who have been in the country for some time, long enough 
to have bettered their condition. We have only a few uneducated ones 
who have need of the "English for Foreigners" books. 

CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENTS AND LIBRARIANS OF BRANCHES 
AND READING-ROOMS. 

As at present organized, the various departments of the Li- 
brary and the branches and reading-rooms are in charge of the 
following persons: 

Otto Fleischner, Assistant Librarian. 

Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief of Catalogue Department. 

William G. T. Roffe, in charge of Shelf Department. 

Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief of Ordering Department. 

Frank H. Chase, Custodian of Bates Hall Reference Department. 

Pierce E. Buckley, Custodian of Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and 

Newspaper Departments. 
Frederic Serex, in charge of Newspaper Room. 



[73] 

William J. Ennis, in charge of Patent Room. 

Winthrop H. Chenery, Chief of Special Libraries Department. 

Walter Rowlands, in charge of Fine Arts Division. 

George S. Maynard, in charge of Technical Division. 

Barbara Duncan, in charge of Allen A. Brown Music Room. 

Francis J. Hannigan, Custodian of Periodical Room. 

Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of Issue Department. 

Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Circulation. 

Langdon L. Ward, Supervisor of Branches. 

AHce V. Stevens, in charge of Branch Deposit Collection and Daily Issue 

Marian A. McCarthy, in charge of Branch Binding. 

Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with Children. 

Mary C. Toy, Children's Librarian, Central Library. 

A. Frances Rogers, Chief of Registration Department. 

Horace L. Wheeler, in charge of Statistical Department. 

Mary H. Rollins, acting Editor of Publications. 

Francis Watts Lee, Chief of Printing Department. 

James W. Kenney, Chief of Bindery Department. 

Henry Niederauer, Chief of Engineer and Janitor Department. 

Marian W. Brackett, Librarian of Brighton Branch. 

Katherine S. Rogan, Librarian of Charlestown Branch. 

Elizabeth P. Ross, Librarian of Codman Square Branch. 

Elizabeth T. Reed, Librarian of Dorchester Branch. 

Laura M. Cross, Librarian of East Boston Branch. 

Elizabeth Ainsworth, Librarian of Hyde Park Branch. 

Mary P. Swain, Librarian of Jamaica Plain Branch. 

Isabel E. Wetherald, Librarian of Mt. Bowdoin Branch. 

Mary F. Curley, acting Librarian of North End Branch; Josephine E. 

Kenney, Librarian, on leave of absence. 
Grace L. Murray, Librarian of Roslindale Branch. 
Helen M. Bell, Librarian of Roxbury Branch. 
M. Florence Cufflin, Librarian of South Boston Branch. 
Margaret A. Sheridan, Librarian of South End Branch. 
Mary F. Kelley, Librarian of Upham's Corner Branch. 
Beatrice C. Maguire, Librarian of Warren Street Branch. 
Florence M. Bethune, Librarian of West End Branch. 
Carrie L. Morse, Librarian of West Roxbury Branch. 
Mary A. Hill, Librarian of Lower Mills Reading Room. 
Emma D. Capewell, Librarian of Mattapan Reading Room. 
Beatrice M. Flanagan, Librarian of Neponset Reading Room. 
Katherine F. Muldoon, Librarian of Allston Reading Room. 
Margaret H. Reid, Librarian of Mt. Pleasant Reading Room. 
Fanny Goldstein, Librarian of Tyler Street Reading Room. 
Katrina M. Sather, Librarian of Roxbury Crossing Reading Room. 
Edith R, Nickerson, Librarian of Boylston Station Reading Room. 



[74] 

Edith F. Pendleton, Librarian of Andrew Square Reading Room. 
Catherine F. Flannery, Librarian of Orient Heights Reading Room. 
Alice L. Murphy, Librarian of City Point Reading Room. 
Mary M. Sullivan, Librarian of Parker Hill Reading Room. 
Gertrude L. Connell, Librarian of Faneuil Reading Room. 
Mathilde de Bernardi, Librarian of Jeffries Point Reading Room. 



INDEX. 



American Library Association, annual 
conference: meeting in Court, 49. 

Americanization work of Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, 3. 

Balance sheet, 10—13. 

Bates Hall, Centre Desk and Reference, 
35, 36. 

Benton, Josiah H., portrait desired, 6. 

Bindery, 20, 44; tables, 63; branch 
books, 43. 

Books, additions, 27-29, 43, 55; im- 
portant additions, 30, 31 ; catalogued, 
31, 55; enlarged appropriations for, 
3,4; expenditures, 27-29 ; for Jeffries 
Point, 29; mutilation and theft, 22, 
23; needs, 26, 28; total number and 
location, 56, 57; Examining Commit- 
tee report on, 18. (5ee Circulation.) 

Boston Chamber of Commerce as a lo- 
cation for a business branch, 5; work 
of Americanization Committee at Jef- 
fries Point, 3. 

Branches and reading rooms, 2, 42; 
books added, 43; earlier closing of 
children's rooms, 22; extracts from re- 
ports of librarians, 64-72; inadequacy 
of quarters, 21 ; repairs and improve- 
ments, 21, 47. 

Business Branch, 5, 17. 

Card-holders, suggestions for increas- 
ing number, 16. 

Carr, Samuel, elected Vice President, 1 . 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 31, 
55-57. 

Central Library building inadequate: 
enlargement or new buidling, 1 5. 

Charlestown Branch, 66. 

Children's Department, 39; earlier 
closing at branches, 22. 

Circulation, increase, 4, 8; tables, 51- 
54; Bates Hall, 36; branches, 42, 
43; Children's Dept., 39; deposit, 
42, 43; Newspaper Room, 37; Open 
Shelf Room, 35; Patent Room, 37; 
Periodical Room, 37; Special Libra- 
ries, 39; Statistical Dept, 38. 



City Point Reading Room, 71. 

Codman Square Branch, 65. 

East Boston Branch, 71. 

Elevator, new electric for Central Li- 
brary, 47. 

Employees, chiefs of departments, 72; 
increase in number, 8, 25; loyal and 
efficient, 8; salaries, 17, 18, 23, 25; 
staff instruction, 48. 

Estimates, 3. 

Examining Committee, 8; report, 14— 
24. 

Exhibitions, 44, 62. 

Faneuil Reading Room, 72. 

Finance, appropriation for West Rox- 
bury building, 2; balance sheet, 10- 
1 3 ; estimates, 3 ; expenditures for 
books, 27, 28 ; receipts, 1 , 2 ; trust 
funds, 4, 6-7. 

Forsyth, Walter G., resignation, 50. 

Goddard, Frances H., resignation, 50. 

Government documents. (5ee In- 
formation Office.) 

Holiday opening, 4. 

Information Office, Government Doc- 
uments and Open Shelf Room, 34, 

35, 38. 

Inter-library loans, 54. 

Jeffries Point Reading Room, establish- 
ment, 2, 29, 34. 

Kenney, William F., expiration of term 
as trustee; resolution on retirement, 1. 

Lectures, 44, 60; growth and develop- 
ment, 57-60. 

Lecture Hall, repairs and improvements, 
15, 48. 

Librarian, report, 25. 

Library staff. (5ee Employees.) 

Mann, Rev. Alexander, D.D., elected 
President, 1 . 

Mount Pleasant Reading Room, 64. 

Murray, Hon. Michael J., appointed a 
trustee, 1 . 

Newspaper Room, 36, 37. 

North End Branch, 70. 



[76] 



Open Shelf Room. (See Information 

Office.) 
Parker Hill Reading Room, 72. 
Patent Room, 36, 37. 
Periodical Room, 37. 
Pratt, Sarah E., bequest, 4. 
Printing Department, 20, 44; tables, 63. 
Publications, 32, 33. 
Registration Department, 16, 31. 
Repairs and improvements, 15, 19, 21, 

46. 
Roxbury Branch, 70. 
Salaries. (5ee Employees.) 
Simmons College, classes for library 

staff, 48. 
South Boston Branch, 69. 
South End Branch, 68; new quarters 

for, 34. 



Special Libraries, 19, 20, 39. 

Statistical Department, 38. 

Supervisor of Circulation, 41 . 

Swift, Lindsay, decease, resolution by 
trustees, 5, 50. 

Trust funds, expenditures, 27; state- 
ment of, 6; Sarah E. Pratt bequest 
funded, 4. 

Trustees, appropriations of money for 
library purposes should be made to, 2; 
organization of Board, 1 ; policy com- 
mended by Examining Committee, 18. 

Tyler Street Reading Room, 64. 

Warren Street Branch, 67. 

West End Branch, 66. 

West Roxbury Branch, new building, 2, 

34. 



I . Central Library, Copley Square. 

Branch Libraries, February I, 1922. 

2. Brighton Branch, Holton Library Building, Academy Hill Road. 

3. Charlenown Branch, Monument Square, cor. Monument Ave. 

4. Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 

5. East Boston Branch, 276 - 282 Meridian St. 

6. Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. 

7. Roxbury Branch, 46 Millmont St. 

8. South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway. 

9. South End Branch, 397 Shawmut Ave. 

10. Upham's Gjmer Branch, Columbia Road, cor. Bird St. 

1 1 . West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 

12. West Roxbuiy Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St. 

13. Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 

14. North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 

15. Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 

16. Roslindale Branch, Washington, cor. Ashland St. 

1 7. Warren Street Branch, 392 Warren St. 

18. Mount Bowdoin Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St. 

Reading Rooms, February I, 1922. 

A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

D. Mattapan Reading Room, 7 Babson St. 

E. Neponset Reading Room, 362 Neponsel Ave. 
G. Aliston Reading Room, 138 Brighton Ave. 
H. Faneuil Reading Room, 100 Brooks St. 

N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Vine. cor. Dudley St. 

P. Tyler Street Reading Room. Tyler, cor. Oak St. 

S. Roibury Crossing Reading Room. 208 Ruggles St. 

T. Boylston Station Reading Room. The Lamartine, Depot Square. 

V. Cily Point Reading Room, Municipal Building, Broadway. 

X. Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremont St. 

Y. Andrew Square Reading Room, 396 Dorchester St. 

Z. Orient Height. Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St. 

C. Jeffries Point Reading Room. 195 Webster St. 




Area of City (Land only) 45.60 Square mile: 



Population (Census of 1920), 748.060. 



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