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SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1922-1923 



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1 



BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1923 



SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1922-1923 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1923 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 
MPe ; 6.23,23: 2SC. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON FEBRUARY 1. 1923. 



ALEXANDER MANN. President. 

Term expires April 30, 1925. 
Resigned January 22, 1923. 

GUY W. CURRIER. MICHAEL J. MURRAY. 

Term expires April 30, 1 923. Term expires April 30, 1 926. 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY. 

Term expires April 30, 1 924. Term expires April 30, 1 927. 



LIBRARIAN. 
CHARLES F. D. BELDEN. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 14, of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preHminary or- 
ganization ; that for 1 853 made the first annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Carr. Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

CoAKLEY, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

CuRRiER, Guy Wilbur, 1922- 

CuRTis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 

Dwight. Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

HiLLiARD, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, A.M., 1897-1907. 



Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921- 

Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

TicKNOR, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1 896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1867-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1 866 to April, 1 888 ; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton, May 8, 1908. to February 6, 1917; William F. 

KeNNEY, February 13, 1917, to May 7, 1920; Rev. ALEXANDER 
Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was entitled Superintendent.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 - December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858- January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., m.d.. Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d., Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1 890. 

DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 11,1 895 - April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 - January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903 -March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 191 7 -June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., LL.B., Librarian, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1923. 



Departments, 
■fCentral Library, Copley Sq. 
tEasl Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 
§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
IIRoxbury Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
■fCharlestown Branch, Monument Sq. . . 
tBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Rd. . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
JSouth End Branch, Shawmut Ave. and West Brookline St. 
■fjcimaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 
fWest Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt, Vernon St. 
tWest End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, Columbia Rd„ cor. Bird St 
fHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St 
tNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
^Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St 
^Roslindale Branch, Washington, cor. Ashland St. 
§Warren Street Branch, 392 Warren St. 
§Mount Bowdoin Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St. 
§Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington St. 

Mattapan Reading Room, 7 Babson St. 

Neponsel Reading Room, 362 Neponset Ave 

AUston Reading Room, 138 Brighton Ave. 

Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 

Tyler Street Reading Room, Tyler, cor. Oak St. 

Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 208 Ruggles St. 

Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, De 
pot Sq. ....... 

Andrew Square Reading Room, 396 Dorchester St. 

Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St 

23. City Point Reading Room, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 

24. Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremont St. 

25. Faneuil Reading Room, 100 Brooks St. 

26. Jeffries Point Reading Room, 195 Webster St. 



§ • 


D. 


§ ' 


' E. 


§ • 


• G. 


t • 


• N 


t • 


* P. 


§ • 


• S. 


§ • 


' T. 


§ • 


' Y 


§ * 


• Z. 


t ' 


• 23 



^Opened. 
May 2, 1854 
28. 1871 



Jan. 

May 

July. 
*Jan.. 
*Jan.. 

Jan. 

Aug.. 

Sept.. 
*Jan. 6, 

Feb. 

Mar. 
*Jan. 

Feb. 
*Nov. 
»Sept. 
»Sepl. 
»Feb. 

June 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Mar. 1 1 

Apr. 29 

Jan. 16 

Jan. 18 



I, 1 



25. 



Nov. 1 
Mar. 5 
June 25 
July 18 
July 15 
Mar. 4 
Oct. 15 



872 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1877 
1877 
1880 
1896 
1896 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1919 
1919 
1922 
1875 
1881 
1883 
1889 
1892 
1896 
1897 

1897 
1914 
1901 
1906 
1907 
1914 
1921 



^ In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches and stations the opening 
was in a different location from that now occupied. * As a branch, f J" building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. % In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses, § Occupies rented rooms. || The lessee of the 

Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees 

Balance Sheet ..... 
Report of the Examining Committee . 
Report of the Librarian 

Appendix to the Report of the Librarian 
Index to the Annual Report 1922-1923 



1 
10 
17 
27 
61 
73 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Central Library: The Platform . 
West Roxbury Branch Library . 
West Roxbury Branch: Reading Room 
Map of the Library System 



Frontispiece 

Facing page 22 

" " 54 

At the end 



To His Honor, James M. Curley, 

Mayor of the Cit]) of Boston. 

Sir : — The Board of Trustees of the PubHc Library of 
the City of Boston submits herewith the seventy-first annual 
report of the progress of the Institution for the year ending 
January 31, 1923. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The Board of Trustees organized for the year on May 12, 
1922, by the election of the Reverend Alexander Mann, D.D., 
as President, Mr. Samuel Carr, Vice President, and Miss Delia 
Jean Deery, Clerk. Mr. Guy W. Currier was appointed a 
trustee for the term ending April 30, 1923, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Mr. Samuel Carr. The Rt. Rev. Msgr. 
Arthur T. Connolly was reappointed a trustee for the term end- 
ing April 30, 1927. 

The death of Mr. Samuel Carr on May 29, 1922, ended a 
career of long and faithful service on this Board. At a meeting 
on June 23, 1922, the Trustees placed upon their records the 
following resolution: 

By the death of Mr. Samuel Carr, May 29, 1922, the Board of 
Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston has lost its oldest 
member. Mr. Carr was appointed a trustee June 24, 1895, to fill out 
the unexpired term of Mr. S. A. B. Abbott who had resigned. He 
served until April 30, 1 896, and in June of that year the Trustees placed 
upon record the following resolution: 

"As Mr. Samuel Carr has ceased to be a Trustee of the Public Li- 
brary by reason of the expiration of his term of office, his associates on 
the Board desire to express and record their appreciation of his valuable 
services. It is therefore 

"Resolved, That Mr. Carr, by his faithful and successful discharge 
of his official duties, is entitled to the gratitude of the citizens and friends 
of the Library. 

"Always manifesting deep interest in his trust, he was constant in at- 
tending our meetings and ready at all times to perform his share of the 



[2] 

work. To the many important matters specially referred to his considera- 
tion he gave faithful attention, exhibiting therein excellent judgment and 
great executive ability. 

"His thorough knowledge of business principles and methods enabled 
him to render valuable assistance to the Board, and made his work useful 
and beneficial. 

"Resolved, That the Trustees gratefully accord to him the freedom 
of the alcoves, with the customary privileges." 

Mr. Carr was again appointed a trustee of the Library May 1 , 1 908, 
and served continuously from that date to the time of his death. In Febru- 
ary, 1917, he was elected Vice President which office he continued to hold 
through the remainder of his career. His term of service therefore ex- 
tended over twenty-seven years, almost the lifetime of a generation. 

The City which can command a service like this of a man, prominent 
in the financial and business world, burdened with many responsibilities, 
who gladly gave to the work of the Library the benefit of his business 
ability and wise judgment, may indeed count itself fortunate. To his 
fellow trustees the death of Mr. Carr means not only a loss to the City, 
but a personal sorrow. 

Always courteous and considerate, singularly modest and self-effacing, 
it is not too much to say that Mr. Carr through his long term of service 
endeared himself to every member of the Board. With all his gentleness 
of manner and speech there was also a quiet courage in standing always 
for what he felt to be the highest interests of the Library. He has left to 
the City which he loved a fine example of unselfish and efficient service 
and to his friends of the Library Board a happy memory which they will 
ever cherish. 

Resolved, That this minute be placed upon our records and that a copy 
be sent to Mrs. Carr and also to the press. 

On October 20, 1922, the Rt. Rev. Msgr. Arthur T. Con- 
nolly was elected Vice President of the Board to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Mr. Samuel Carr. 

Later in the year the Board was faced with another loss in the 
resignation of the Reverend Alexander Mann, D.D., its Presi- 
dent, who had been elected Bishop of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Mann was first appointed a trustee of the 
Library by Mayor George A. Hibbard on May 25, 1908, to 
fill out the unexpired term of the Reverend James DeNormandie, 
D.D., who had resigned, the term ending on April 30, 1910. 
He was reappointed by Mayor James M. Curley, and again 
reappointed by Mayor Andrew J. Peters, for a term ending 
April 30, 1925. Since May 20, 1920, Dr. Mann has been 



[3] 

President of the Board. The Trustees have placed upon their 
records the following resolution relative to Bishop Mann's re- 
tirement : 

The resignation of the Reverend Alexander Mann, D.D., as a trustee 
of the Boston Public Library, ends fourteen years of generous service to 
the city he loved so well. He was for several years President of this 
Board. His departure from us supplies a fitting moment in which to 
record our appreciation of the value of his dihgent and faithful work as 
a member of this Board. 

Dr. Mann was a loyal associate, prominent in the life of the community, 
interested in public affairs, and intensely and assiduously devoted to all 
matters that related to the welfare of the Boston Public Library, which 
he regarded as one of the city's finest jewels. We shall ever fondly 
remember his frank sincerity, his charming manner and the strength of 
character which made up his splendid personality. 

Voted, that Bishop Mann be accorded the freedom of the alcoves, and 
that this expression be placed upon the records of the Board, and a copy 
thereof transmitted to Bishop Mann, with assurances of our most dis- 
tinguished consideration and respect. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The money necessary for the maintenance of the Library 
comes from the city of Boston by annual and special appropria- 
tions, as vv^ell as the unexpended balance and income from Trust 
Funds, vv^hich at the close of the year totalled $66,630.50. 

Other sources of income are receipts from fines, from sales of 
catalogues, commissions on telephone stations in the Library, sale 
of waste paper, payments for lost books, and interest on bank 
deposits, which are paid into the City Treasury for general 
municipal purposes, and which for the past year amounted to 
$14,633.6L 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

"The New West Roxbury Branch Library building was dedi- 
cated on Monday, April 1 7, 1 922. This attractive building, 
for which an appropriation of $6 1 ,000 was made in 1 92 1 , is a 
notable addition to the group of library buildings owned by the 
City. 

The South End Branch will soon be moved to its new quarters 



[4] 

in the Municipal Building just completed at the corner of West 
Brookline Street and Shawmut Avenue. 

South Boston is still in need of a new and separate library 
building; the Trustees have called attention to this need for 
many years. This Branch still occupies quarters in the second 
story of a bank building. 

Requests for the establishment of new reading rooms are re- 
ceived from time to time, but the most immediate need for library 
extension is the establishment of a business branch, which has 
been repeatedly urged by the Examining Committee and the 
Trustees. 

ESTIMATES 1923-1924. 

The estimates for the maintenance of the Library for the 
coming year, presented in a Budget already submitted for your 
consideration, amount to $849,716, of which $580,000 is for 
personal service and $269,716 for general maintenance. 

BOSTON RETIREMENT PENSION. 

During the past year the enactment by the Massachusetts 
Legislature of a law known as the Pension Bill, relative to the 
retirement of certain employees of the City of Boston, was ac- 
cepted by the City Government. The passage of such legisla- 
tion has been urged by this Board for more than a dozen years. 
At a meeting of the Board held on June 23, 1922, the following 
action was taken concerning this piece of legislation : 

Resolved, That in the opinion of the Board of Trustees and of the 
Librarian of the Public Library of the City of Boston the Pension Bill 
recently enacted by the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth, is 
a wise, constructive and forward looking piece of legislation possessing 
features of mutual benefit to the city and its employees; and, therefore, 
the members of the Board and the Librarian on behalf of the employees 
of the Public Library earnestly express their hope that it will receive the 
favorable consideration of His Honor the Mayor and the members of the 
City Council. 

LANGDON L. WARD. 

The service of the Library suffered a severe loss in the death 
of Mr. Langdon L. Ward on August 15, 1922. Mr. Ward 



[5] 

had been connected with the Library in important work for 
just over a quarter of a century. At a meeting of the Trustees 
on October 6, 1922, the following resolution was adopted m 
fond remembrance of his devoted service : 

Resolved, That the members of the Board of Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston place on record their appreciation of the 
twenty-six years of faithful servic given by the late Landgdon L. Ward. 

Entering the employ of the Library in 1 896 as Custodian of the Broad- 
way Extension Reading Room, Mr. Ward was appointed Supervisor of 
Branches in 1898, the position which he held at the time of his death. 
During the years of his employment the branch system was greatly enlarged 
and popularized. His patience, enthusiasm, fairness and learning brought 
him the respect and goodwill of his colleagues throughout the Library 
Department. His passing marks the close of a long and efficient term of 
service of a public servant of the City of Boston. 



TABLE OF TRUST FUNDS. 

A detailed statement of these funds, and the income therefrom, 
is contained in the report of the City Auditor, but a condensed 
statement of them is as follows : 

RESTRICTIONS OF GIFT. 

For the purchase of valuable and rare editions of 
the writings, either in verse or prose, of American 
and of foreign authors, "to be known as the Long- 
fellow Memorial Collection." 
To buy "books of permanent value." 
Purchase of books. 
For the purchase of books. 

For "the purchase of books of permanent value and 
authority in mathematics and astronomy," to be 
added to the Bowditch Collection. 
Unrestricted. 
Unrestricted. 

For the purchase of books for the use of the young. 
Available only in years when the City appropriates 
for the maintenance of the Library at least 3% of 
the amount available for department expenses from 
taxes and income in said City. 
For the purchase of books. 

For the purchase of books upon landscape gardening. 
For the purchase of books and for binding for the 
Abram E. Cutter Collection. 



FUND. 

Artz . 


• 


AMOUNT. 

$ 10,000.00 


Bates . 

Bigelow 
Billings . 
Bowditch 


• 


50,000.00 

1 ,000.00 

100,000.00 

10,000.00 


Bradlee . 
Center . 

"Children's" (under 
Benton Will) . 


1,000.00 
39,543.14 

100,000.00 



Clement . 
Codman 
Cutter . 



2,000.00 
2,854.41 
4,100.00 



Carried forward $320,497.55 



[6] 



Brought forward 
"Elizabeth" (under 
Matchett Will) 

Ford 
Franklin Club 

Green . . 
Charlotte Harris 

Thomas B. Harris 
Hyde . 
Knapp . 

Abbott Lawrence 
Edward Lawrence 



Lewis . 

Loring . 

Mead . 
O'Reilly 

Phillips . 

Pierce . 
Pratt . 
Scholfield 
Sewall . 
Skinner . 
South Boston 
Ticknor . 

Todd . 

Townsend 
Treadwell 
Tufts . 
Twentieth Regiment 

Wales . 

Alice L. Whitney 

James L. Whitney 
Wilson . 

Total . 



$320,497.55 
25.000.00 

6.000 00 
1. 000.00 

2.000.00 
10,000.00 

1. 000.00 

3,632.40 

10,000.00 

10.000.00 

500.00 



5,000.00 

500.00 

2.500.00 
1.000.00 

30.000.00 

5,000.00 

500.00 

61.800.00 

25,000.00 

51,732.14 

100.00 

4,000.00 

50.000.00 

4,000.00 
13,987.69 
10,131.77 

5,000.00 



5,000.00 
5,000.00 

7,337.68 
1,000.00 

$678,219.23 



For the purchase of books of "permanent value and 
authority." 
Unrestricted. 

Books of permanent value, preferably books on 
government and political economy. 
Books relating to American history. 
Books for Charleslown Branch, published before 
1850. 

For benefit of the Charlestown Branch. 
Unrestricted. 

For the purchase of books. 
Books having a permanent value. 
"To hold and apply the income and so much of the 
principal as they [the Trustees] may choose to the 
purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said 
Public Library." 

For the purchase of old and rare books to be added 
to the John A. Lewis library. 

Memorial Fund, from the income of which books 
are to be bought for the West End Branch. 
Unrestricted. 

From the Papyrus Club for the purchase of books 
as a memorial of John Boyle O'Reilly. 
"To the maintenance of a free public library." 
"Purchase of books," 

"Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 
For the benefit of the Dorchester Branch. 
To be used for books of permanent value. 
For the purchase of books. 
Unrestricted. 

For benefit of the South Boston Branch. 
Books in Spanish and Portuguese, five years old in 
some one edition. 

The income to be expended annually for current 
newspapers of this and other countries. 
Books five years old in some one edition. 
Unrestricted. 

For the benefit of the Charlestown Branch. 
"For the purchase of books of a military and 
patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove appro- 
priated as a Memorial of the Twentieth Regiment." 
For the purchase of books. 

For the benefit of sick and needy employees and 
the purchase of books. 
For books and manuscripts. 
For the purchase of books. 



[7] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Trustees call attention to the Report of the Examining 
Committee which is appended hereto and included, as required 
by the city ordinance, as a part of this report. Many of the 
suggestions and recommendations embodied in the study of the 
Examining Committee have the sympathy and general approval 
of the Board. The carrying out of certain of the recommenda- 
tions, however, would necessarily require a larger appropriation 
than can at present be expected. Those who served as mem- 
bers of the Examining Committee for the fiscal year are as fol- 
lows : 

Mr. Henry Abrahams. Miss Mary E. T. Healy. 

Miss Esther G. Barrows. Mr. Victor A. Heath. 

Paul F. Butler, M.D. Miss Heloise E. Hersey, 

Mr. Francis M. Carroll. Hubert T. Holland, M.D. 

Mrs. William H. Devine, Mr. Vincent A. Keenan. 

Miss Rosanna M. Dowd, WilHam Jason Mixter, M.D. 

Mr. Walter F. Downey. Mr. Cornelius A. Parker. 

Mrs. Carl Dreyfus. Rev. W. Dewees Roberts. 

Mr. Henry Gideon. Prof. Frank Vogel. 

Mr. Henry E. Hammond. Mr. Robert F. Waul. 

PRIVATE AID FOR THE LIBRARY. 

The Public Library is the only source to which the great 
masses must turn for their reading. An examination of the 
Table of Trust Funds printed as a part of this report will show 
how small is the possible income to be derived therefrom. The 
last fiscal year it amounted to $23,523. 1 4. It will be noted that 
there are only eight funds in excess of $25,000. Attention may 
well be called to the fact that the income from one of the two 
largest funds of $100,000 each has not been available for any 
year since its receipt. This is the "Children's Fund" under the 
will of the late Josiah H. Benton, the income of which is avail- 
able only in years when Boston appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least 3 per cent of the amount available for 



[8] 

department expenses from taxes and income in the said city. In 
the years when such amount is not appropriated, the income 
goes to the poor of the City of Boston. 

For many years this Institution has held a high position among 
the libraries of the country because of its scholarly collections, 
many of them unique, and in some respects unexcelled. It is 
apparent, however, with the development of the Library and the 
extension of its service through branches, reading rooms and de- 
posit stations in all sections of the municipality, the growing and 
reasonable demands for the more popular books of both fiction 
and non-fiction, that the financial burden entailed cannot be met 
by the city alone, generous as it has been in the past. Indeed, 
the time has come M^hen the Library either must lose its scholarly 
standing or must fail to serve the great reading public in its call 
for recreational reading and the less solid books of non-fiction. 
Without an increased income from trust funds it will soon be quite 
out of the question to round out and maintain collections that 
have been in the past of so great service to scholars and research 
students not only in Boston and vicinity, but throughout the 
world. Other big cities can boast of large gifts of money made 
to their libraries by private individuals. On this score Boston, 
holding a distinguished place for its culture among American 
cities, has comparatively little in the way of memory with which 
to thrill its citizens with civic pride. What a city gives for the 
conduct of its public library indicates to the outside world its 
interest in things aside from the mere physical necessities of its 
people. The Trustees urge, therefore, upon private citizens 
who have been able to provide splendidly equipped home libra- 
ries for their own families, the crying need of Boston's thousands 
who hunger for good reading, denied them because unable to 
provide such for themselves, and the great service they may 
render their fellow citizens and posterity by private benefactions, 
the income from which will effectively help meet the ever in- 
creasing demand upon the Central Library and its agencies. 
Surely, Boston with its traditional pride needs but to know the 
situation in which this great Library now finds itself, in order to 
come generously to the rescue. 



[9] 



CONCLUSION. 



The Board wishes, in conclusion, to express its warm appre- 
ciation of the Librarian, the Assistant Librarian, and the whole 
corps of faithful, intelligent and efficient workers who toil in- 
cessantly under conditions not always encouraging, to preserve 
the high place which the Boston Public Library has always held 
among similar institutions throughout the country. Of their 
splendid spirit of cooperation, without which our efforts must 
signally fail, we cannot speak too highly. 

Alexander Mann, 
Arthur T. Connolly, 
Louis E. Kirstein, 
Michael J. Murray, 
Guy W. Currier. 



0] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive 

Bindery Departments) . 
Temporary employees 



of Printing and 



Service other than personal: 
Contract work . 
Postage 

Transportation of persons 
Cartage and freight . 
Light and power 
Rent 

Premium on surety bond 
Communication 
Cleaning, towels, etc. 
Removal of snow 
Examinations 
Expert and architect . 
Fees 

Medical , 

Extermination of insects 
Boiler inspection 
General plant repairs 



To expenditures for equipment: 
Furniture .... 
Office .... 
Books: 

City appropriation . 

Trust funds income 



$361,781.74 
100,088.44 



) 19.39 

1 ,769.01 

254.04 

12,119.13 

9,924.40 

16,945.19 

5.00 

1,246.73 

882.91 

650.10 

115.50 

400.00 

2.40 

36.00 

6.00 

36.00 

5,495.60 



Newspapers : 

Todd fund income 
Treadwell fund income 

Periodicals 

Tools and instruments 

General plant equipment . 



$91,464.12 
19,615.44 



$1,938.03 
329.60 



$461,870.18 



1,930.67 
549.16 



111,079.76 



2,267.63 

9,568.68 

737.17 

578.84 



49,907.40 



126,711.91 



Carried forward 



$638,849.49 



[Ill 

EXPENSES, JANUARY, 31. 1923. 



By City Appropriation 1922-1923 .... $741,993.00 

Income from Trust funds ...... 23,523.14 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographical Account 700.00 

Interest on deposit in London ..... 208.72 



Cr. 



$766,424.86 



Carried forvfard 



$766,424.86 



112] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Drought forward . 
Central Library and Branches; 
To expenditures for supplies: 
Office .... 
Food and ice . 
Fuel .... 

Forage and animals . 
Medical .... 
Laundry, cleaning and loilet 
Agricultural 

Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant . 

To expenditures for material: 
Electrical .... 
General plant . 



Special items: 

To expenditures from Alice L. Whitney Fund 
Pension ....... 



Bindery Department: 

To expenditures for salaries 

Stock . 

Equipment . 

Contract work 

Cleaning 

Repairs 

Light . 

Small supplies 



$ 3,571.29 

453.90 

21.922.38 

9.65 

6.85 

957.26 

191.35 

34.00 

1,717.14 



$1,207.68 
1.997.17 



$ 75.00 
462.88 



$55,023.60 

4,233.90 

54.08 

4.00 

329.35 

54.70 

44.19 

47.72 



Printing Department: 

To expenditures for salaries ...... $12,235.42 

Stock 2,005.44 

Equipment ......... 145.54 

Contract work ........ 353.10 

Cleaning 329.35 

Repairs 87.91 

Light , 3L15 

Small supplies ........ 115.26 



Jeffries Point Reading Room: 
To expenditures for salaries . 
Service other than personal . 
Equipment .... 



$377.62 
706.75 
716.96 



$638,849.49 



28,863.82 



3,204.85 



537.88 



59,791.54 



Carried forward 



15,303.17 



1,801.33 
$747,992.08 



[13] 
EXPENSES, JANUARY, 31, 1923. 



Brought forward 



By Balances brought forward from February I, 1922 
Trust funds income, City Treasury 
Trust Funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 
Jeffries Point Reading Room 



$43,107.36 

15,912.22 

5,392.36 

3,860.61 

1,817.44 



Cr. 

$766,424.86 



70.089.99 



Carried forward 



$836,514.85 



[14] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Brought forward 

To Amount Paid into City Treasury: 

From fines $12,831.46 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists .... 56.51 

Commission on telephone stations 457.73 

Sale of waste paper 396.24 

Payments for lost books 849.09 

Money found 13.22 

Coal penalties 2936 

To Balance, January 31, 1923: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London ... $ 9,650.18 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 4,357.00 

Trust funds income balance. City Treasury . . . 50,934.27 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . . . 4,560.61 

Interest on deposit in London ..... 208.72 

Balance unexpended: 

General appropriation ....... $18,795.88 

Special appropriation (Jeffries Point Reading Room) 16.11 



$747,992.08 



14,633.61 



69,710.78 



18,811.99 



$851,148.46 



[15] 
EXPENSES. JANUARY, 31, 1923. 



Brought forroard ....... 

From fines $12,831.46 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists .... 56.51 

Commission on telephone stations ..... 457.73 

Sale of waste paper ....... 396.24 

Payments for lost books 849.09 

Money found 13.22 

Coal penalties 29.36 



Cr. 

$836,514.85 



14,633.61 



$851,148.46 



[16] 



SPECIAL ACCOUNT 1921-1922. 



Payments made to provide for the unpaid liabilities incurred 
to January 31,1 922, inclusive. 



Personal service: 

Permanent employees . 

Service other than personal: 
Printing and Binding . 
Transportation of persons 
Cartage and freight 
Light and power . 
Rent, taxes and water 
Communication 
Cleaning 

Removal of snow 
Examinations 
General plant 

Equipment : 
Machinery . 
Furniture and fittings 
Tools and instruments 
General plant 



Supplies : 
Office . 
Food and ice 
Fuel 
Medical 
Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant 



Materials: 
Building 
Electrical 
General plant 



$8,386.95 



35.50 

35.40 

L086.68 

2,620.52 

1,662.50 

209.76 

73.71 

39.50 

10.50 

212.74 



$676.22 
24,20 
80.17 
14.25 



$1,070.78 

86.70 

1,794.03 

7,35 

131.55 

2.40 

49.96 



193.00 

85.89 

,681.45 



$14,373.76 



794.84 



3,142.77 



1,960.34 



$20,271.71 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee herewith respectfully submits its 
report, which is compiled from the reports of the sub-committees. 

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE. 

A larger appropriation for "Personal Service" is recom- 
mended in order that the salaries, especially for those members 
of the Library staff holding major positions, may be increased, 
and in order that needed additional assistants may be added to 
the staff of the Central Library and its branches. 

The usefulness of the Library, the efficiency and economy of 
operation, no matter how good the plan, cannot rise higher than 
the intelligence and devotedness of the personnel of this depart- 
ment. Given an efficient, intelligent and devoted Personal 
Service, the Library will increase in its usefulness and it will 
secure the support of the public for its material needs. 

The competition of offices, and more recently of schools, for 
the same kind of brains required for library service, has made 
an increase imperative, if the Library is not to lower its stand- 
ards of intellectual service. The salaries of secretaries, of 
stenographers, of teachers, and also of librarians, in cities much 
smaller than Boston, are now higher than those of the Boston 
Public Library, and the result is that both men and women who 
are worthy of positions of responsibility are not entering the 
service. 

A book appropriation equal to that of the past two years is 
recommended in order to meet the insistent and reasonable de- 



[18] 

mands of the book reading public served by the Library. In 
1916, the appropriation for this purpose was $45,000. To 
make possible an equal purchase in 1922, because of increased 
cost of books, it would be necessary to appropriate upwards of 
$76,000. 

Meanwhile, the circulation has increased from 2,050,238, in 
1 91 6-1 7, to 2,768,984, on February 1 , 1 922, so that the same 
service would require an additional increase of thirty per cent, 
to keep pace with the increased circulation. This would make 
necessary an appropriation this year of at least $ 1 00,000 which 
would furnish no better supply than that furnished in 1916. 

A miscellaneous appropriation sufficiently large, in order that 
the proper equipment may be maintained and in order that the 
necessary major repairs for the Central Library and its branches 
may be carried out. 

An addition to the Annex in order that the Cataloguing and 
Ordering departments may be transferred, thus releasing valu- 
able space on the ground floor of the Central Library for public 
purposes. 

Provision for new reading rooms, for which there is a present 
demand. 

Some relief must be extended to the over-crowded conditions 
now existing in all departments, and the recommendation for the 
installation of the two remaining floors of steel stacks will help 
materially. 

Relative to the addition to the Annex, a plan has been sug- 
gested of opening a book storage building, planned purely for 
utility at some point within a reasonable distance of the Central 
Library, where land values are low, but sufficiently central for 
convenience, to which little-used books for special uses could 
be transferred, and to which readers could be directed. This 
would release much floor space in the Central Library for use. 
This project is for the future, but should be borne in mind for the 
earl^ future. 

The Committee recommends that all possible influence be 
brought to bear by the Examining Committee and Trustees to 
secure the co-operation of the Boston Chamber of Commerce 
in establishing a Business Men's Branch in the new building. 



[19] 



BOOKS AND CATALOGUES. 

The Committee heartily concurs with the report made by the 
Committee last year, and desires to emphasize every point of 
last year's report which has not been acted upon, also to add 
that space could be gained in the catalogue end of Bates Hall if 
the catalogue were set into the walls, as it now is in the same 
room on the wall toward the reading room. This should not be 
costly and would give one-third more room. The Committee 
would also recommend that every branch reading room be 
equipped with electric lights, suitably placed, as eyesight is of 
more value to the possessor than most things. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

TTie Committee wishes to reiterate a very pertinent criticism 
of the committee of last year, namely that the lighting facilities 
in the Art Library be improved. The poor lighting arrange- 
ments are noticeable to a casual observer, to say nothing of one 
who can appreciate proper light for this sort of work. 

In the Music Library the ventilation is very poor and should 
be improved. All music and books relating to music should be 
collected in one room, and this might be done in the present Music 
Room if all the shelving space were utilized. 

In the Barton -Ticknor Room another assistant is needed, 
as the attendant in charge has more work than one person can 
attend to. The alcoves in this room are cold and inhospitable. 

Another suggestion, which, unfortunately, means an outlay of 
money, is to provide metal shelving for these valuable books; 
the present shelving is irregular and certainly not fireproof. 

PRINTING AND BINDING. 

The conditions obtaining in both the Printing and Binding De- 
partments are apparently unchanged from last year, excepting 
a greater degree of efficiency is shown by the work accomplished. 

In the Printing Department the equipment is in good condition, 
but the Committee strongly recommends that the sum of at least 
$600. be expended for the purchase of new fonts of type very 



[20] 

much needed in cataloguing books in foreign languages, and 
which were not purchased because of expenditure during the 
war period. 

The Binding Department is greatly in need of a stitching 
machine to be used to replace hand sewing of books needing 
rebinding, as well as to keep old books in better condition. It is 
a known fact that a new book of fiction to-day will circulate 
six times on the average, whereas the same book re-enforced will 
go thirty-five times. 

The Committee was informed that with the same number of 
employees as last year over thirty-one thousand books of fiction 
alone were handled by this department, which is a great increase 
over last year's output. The present force is working under a 
severe strain and tension and the Committee finds it imperative 
that the number of employees be increased when practicable. 

The Committee concurs with the recommendation of the Ex- 
amining Committee of the past two years that these two im- 
portant departments be maintained in the Library building. 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

The South End Branch Library has been getting ready to 
move for several months, and now hopes to be established in the 
new Municipal Building early in 1923. 

The books have had a very thorough examination, and the 
number has been reduced to about 14,000 volumes. Some of 
the old ones weeded out have been resting unused in the stacks 
for many years. 

The story-telling gives great satisfaction, and it is anticipated 
that in the new building more constant supervision can be given 
since there the whole library will be on one floor. 

The lighting and ventilating of the Andrew Square Reading 
Room are faulty. There is urgent need of Polish books for 
adults. The great volume of attendance is in the evening, and 
discipline is at times difficult. Gas is the lighting medium here; 
there is electricity in the building and it could be installed at 
moderate expense in the library rooms. When it is a question 
of conservation of sight, no expense should be considered. 



[21] 

The City Point Reading Room needs painting, both interior 
and hallways, the latter being much defaced, cut, and generally 
damaged; co-operation of school teachers and principals with 
library authorities might stop this vandalism. The lighting sys- 
tem is poorly placed. The traffic of cars in front of the building 
and dancing upstairs continually dislodge the bulbs. Green 
shaded desk lights for the six desks, lights for tables in adult 
section of the room, and small lights over shelves would help 
here. The ceilings need whitewashing, and after six years of 
occupancy, new shades are needed at the windows ; as reported 
last year, more space is needed. There is no opportunity for 
quiet reading, and concentration is out of the question. More 
space would materially add to efficiency of service. 

The Tyler Street Reading Room is situated in the Municipal 
Building on the floor below the gymnasium, and this is a most 
undesirable location. The noise from the gymnasium is very 
pronounced and annoying, and it is impossible to do any con- 
centrated reading while the gymnasium is being used. The 
lights are about ten feet above the tables, and inadequate for 
proper reading. It would require very little expense to lower 
these lights so that they might be of some practical use to the 
readers. This reading room should be made more attractive, 
as it is a centre where a great deal of good can be done in the 
way of Americanizing a large foreign element. 

With the exception of the Orient Heights Reading Room, the 
quarters of the East Boston and Charlestown group of branches 
and reading rooms are modern, adequate for present needs, and 
in good condition. The lighting system at the East Boston 
Branch should be improved. The Orient Heights Reading 
Room is in urgent need of larger quarters. It has altogether 
outgrown its present accommodations. The generous appro- 
priation for books granted the past year has made possible a 
larger supply of volumes at all the branches and reading rooms. 
More books, however, are needed. A decided effort should 
be made, especially through the public, to lessen the thieving 
and mutilation of books. The Library employees are greatly 
overworked. 



[22] 

The Committee recommends that larger quarters be found for 
the Jamaica Plain Reading Rooms, if possible. More books 
are needed in the Jamaica Plain and Brighton groups. 

The Roxbury Branch is in a very good condition and contains 
an ample supply of books for its requirements. The problem of 
administration in this branch is laborious, owing to the library 
being arranged on two floors. This plan requires additional 
supervision and arduous service, and there is, in consequence, an 
urgent need of either another assistant or of more money to 
pay for extra service. 

While the Roxbury Branch is well patronized by adults and 
children, yet owing to changes in the local population of late 
years, some utilization of social service might tend to increase its 
efficiency. This, of course, is a problem to be solved in many 
localities. 

The room at the Mt. Pleasant Branch is a very desirable one, 
except that the lighting does not seem to be satisfactory. The 
room is a high studded one and the system of lighting is indirect. 
The result is that there is none too much light at the tables, even 
where they are directly under the reflectors, and in one corner 
particularly where the reference books are located, it is too dark 
to permit continuous reading. TTie walls of the room are in 
shabby condition and should be painted. 

In no place is there greater need of the positive social service 
work of the library than at the Dorchester Branch. The popu- 
lation needs the vision encouraged by such an institution. Un- 
fortunately the location could hardly be worse. The situation 
of the Library in the same building with the District Court does 
not encourage attendance and it is believed that this is the reason 
why the growth in circulation has not kept pace with the other 
branches. Moreover the main room is not properly constructed 
to give unobstructed view of the shelves and this doubtedless en- 
courages the loss of books and makes the control of the users 
more difficult. The renovation and rearrangement of the Chil- 
dren's Room has helped greatly and the room in itself is well 
arranged. The objection is its distance from the main room 
on an upper floor. The supply of books is good. Probably 



[23] 

the new building needed is impossible of achievement at this 
time. 

The Neponset Reading Room is well located and has a good 
collection of pictures for children and encourages work with the 
schools. The library room is good in arrangement and the boys 
and girls orderly. 

The Lower Mills Reading Room has an excellent location 
and its size is ample. It is supplied with a good collection of 
books. The librarian should have a regular assistant. 

The report of last year on the Mattapan Branch gave a pic- 
ture of the deplorable lack of support. Since that time the 
librarian has had a regular assistant granted her and that con- 
stitutes an improvement. There is a great opportunity here in 
a district with a large population of children. Need exists for 
making the reading room a real social force. The location is 
fair, but the room is inadequate with no opportunity for expan- 
sion. There is a need here of more books, more tables, and 
some arrangement should be made to place a rail or counter 
about the librarian's station. The room is poorly lighted both 
by windows and artificial light. The walls need painting and 
the ceiling cleaning. The fixtures and the woodwork are dark 
in color and add to the darkness of the room. The floor is of 
hard pine and the tramping of the children coming and going 
makes reading practically impossible. The supply of books for 
school children is inadequate, especially the third, fourth and 
fifth grades. 

TTie Uphams Corner Branch is apparently doing well. Tlie 
location is good, but it needs a new magazine case for the chil- 
dren's room and more shelf room. The latter is a difficult 
problem because the wall space is well occupied. This branch 
seems to be very widely used not only for the purpose of reading, 
but perhaps also because it furnishes social attractions for the 
young people in the neighborhood. 

The Mt. Bowdoin Branch, one of the most crowded as to 
seating capacity, tables and shelf room, has been improved under 
a new arrangement. Perhaps in no place has more been ac- 
complished in the way of efficient handling of a very poorly 



[24] 

arranged and inadequate room. The time will soon come when 
in this most important centre an adequate building must be furn- 
ished. 

The Codman Square Branch continues to be a most valuable 
social and educational centre. The efforts to cooperate with the 
schools to reach the children of the district, to act in educating 
the literary taste of the mothers, and the fact that with some 
drawbacks of construction the building is modern and centrally 
located help to make it one of the most efficient in the city. Al- 
ways to be borne in mind in regard to all these branches is the 
need of more books, more assistants and higher pay in order to 
enable the library to compete with the other professions and lines 
of business to secure educated and efficient service. 

The reading rooms of the North End Branch are cheerful, 
inviting and wellordered. It does practically the work of a set- 
tlement house and does it to the great satisfaction of both the 
public and the workers in the Branch. Its patrons have the 
unique distinction of caring less for novels than for books of 
history and travel. A crying need is for books. They need 
"easy" books, fairy tales, children's books of all kinds. These 
should come in steadily, during every month of the year. If 
the City is to do its duty by the Italian children who throng 
the clean, home-like, well-ordered rooms of this branch, there 
should be a constant stream of new books. 

At the West End Branch, too, there is a large circulation of 
books. Crowds of children are handled day after day with 
efficiency. On a single day during the Christmas vacation eight 
hundred and eighty-five volumes were given out. But at present 
the branch is working under a heavy handicap of inefficient 
housekeeping. It occupies one of the most notable buildings of 
early Boston — the West Church, an object of just pride to 
every lover of old Boston. It is undoubtedly a difficult house to 
keep clean; but no pains should be spared to make its fine en- 
trance and every inch of its good woodwork and suitable furnish- 
ings a spotless memorial to a gracious past. It should be a shining 
example of cleanliness, order and dignity to all the neighborhood 
in which it is set. The Committee re-emphasizes the report of 



[25] 

last year recommending a more modern system of lighting for 
the sake of efficiency and the saving of expense. The lighting 
for the stacks is particularly inconvenient and inadequate as well 
as expensive. 

CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT AND WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

In order to give adequate information relating to the Library 
and the full facilities afforded there, the committee recommends 
that circulars of information be distributed throughout all the 
schools in the city. In this circular the opportunities available in 
the main Library and in the branches should be set forth, to- 
gether w^ith proper means of insuring co-operation between the 
schools and the Library. If properly employed this should be 
of great service to the teachers and pupils of the city and should 
assist also in a reduction of the loss and mutilation of library 
books. This is a matter which needs careful and persistent 
attention, and only the most vigilant efforts on the part of all 
concerned and a development of a high sense of responsibility 
among the youth of the city can assist in reducing this annual 
loss and destruction. 

The Committee desires to express its approval of the use of 
the story hour in various branch libraries under the supervision 
of this department. The numbers that have attended these 
meetings have shown unmistakably the wide-spread appreciation 
of this work. 

CONCLUSION. 

The Committee as a whole desires to endorse the appeal 
for better pay for the Library staff. It is undoubtedly the desire 
of every good citizen to have the trusty staff of the City's great 
treasure of books as well paid, as are the staffs of practically all 
other large American libraries. We have one of the most im- 
portant public libraries in the world, with service equal to any. 
and we have, even in our own State of Massachusetts, several 
smaller libraries paying better salaries. Your Committee de- 
sires to see the Boston Public Library kept in the very first 
rank in every respect. Indeed, several recent reports have been 



[26] 

made covering these matters, but little has been accomplished. 
The Committee wonders whether our Boston spirit of leader- 
ship has been lost. The Boston Public Library is the "mother" 
of all public city libraries tax supported on our continent, and 
should be kept well in the lead within the ability of our con- 
stituency in every detail. 

The main points of the subcommittees are : 1 . A satisfactory 
scale of returns for all employees ; 2. Books; 3. Light; 4. Re- 
pairs and upkeep. Of greatest importance for the whole sys- 
tem is the establishment of a branch library for the business men 
of Greater Boston in the new building of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. The lighting should be gone over in every library and 
reading room, and no expense avoided to render this first class 
in every respect. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, January 
29, 1923. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



To the Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit my report for the year ending January 
31. 1923. 

INTRODUCTION. 

An inadequate appropriation for the Library Department has 
forbidden any important extension, either of service or of per- 
sonnel, during" the year just closed. The Library System, how- 
ever, has made more than satisfactory progress. Heads of de- 
partments and many of the branch librarians report that never 
in the history of the Institution has so great use been made of 
the reading rooms and of the non-circulating collections. Bates 
Hall, the reading rooms in the Special Libraries Department, the 
Children's Room, the Teacher's Room, the Information Office 
and the Open Shelf Room, in the Central Building, have often 
been taxed beyond capacity. The same is true of reading rooms 
in many of the branches throughout the system. 

The large increase in circulation of a year ago — 223,870 
over the year 1920-1921 — was a direct result of the purchase 
of more books for circulation, made possible through the enlarged 
book appropriation of $100,000. It was questioned whether 
the circulation for the current year would show a marked gain, 
but it is a satisfaction to report that the circulation for the past 
year was 2,768,984; a gain of 96,338 over the year 1921-22. 
In 1917-18 the total circulation of the Library System was 
2,028,053 ; the five year period, therefore, including the cur- 
rent year, shows a satisfactory gain in circulation of 740,931. 
With more books, more branches, more service, the figures could 
be enormously increased; the Library Department which re- 
ceived 1 .03 cents on each dollar expended by the City last year. 



[28] 

is on the threshold only of its opportunity for a greatly enlarged 
service. 

REQUIREMENTS. 

The major requirements for the Boston Public Library system 
for the next fiscal year may be summarized as follows : 

1. A larger personal service appropriation in order that 
salaries, especially of those members of the Library staff holding 
major positions, may be increased, and in order that the needed 
additional assistants may be added to the staff at the Central 
Library and branches. 

The last general increase to employees was voted in April 
1 920, when special consideration was given to the middle grade 
employees, those receiving under $2000. The holders of the 
more responsible positions received in most cases no increase in 
wages. Increases were also given at that time to all employees 
in the mechanical departments to meet the salary scales of the 
various unions. The amount allowed for increases in pay in 
1920 totalled some $80,000. Since then no general salary 
increase has been voted. 

2. A book appropriation equal at least to that of the past 
two years, namely $ 1 00,000, in order to meet in part the insistent 
and reasonable demands of the book-reading public served by 
the Library. 

3. Miscellaneous appropriations sufficiently large to make 
possible the maintenance of the proper equipment and the carry- 
ing out of the necessary major repairs at the Central Library, 
branches and reading rooms. 

4. Some provision for the rapid future growth of the Insti- 
tution, especially 

(a) Immediate installation of the two remaining floors of 
steel stacks in the Annex ; 

(b) The addition of two floors to the Annex to provide for 
the transfer of the Catalogue and Ordering Departments, thus 
releasing valuable space on the ground floor of the Central 
Building for public purposes; 



[29] 

(c) New branches and reading rooms in various sections of 
the city for which there is and has been a popular demand. 



BOOKS. 

The Library has acquired the past year 78,309 books, as 
against 77,881 in 1921-22 at a total cost of $1 10,450.35. 

Of this number 67,452 volumes were added by purchase, 
8, 1 65 by gift, and the remainder by exchange, etc. The num- 
ber of gifts represents only those volumes accessioned and cata- 
logued; the total number of volumes received by gift was 
12,968. Of the purchases, 4,701 volumes were bought with 
trust funds at a cost of $18,986.23; 62,751 volumes and the 
periodicals subscribed for throughout the Library System repre- 
sent the outlay of the Budget allowance of $ 1 00,000. The cost 
of periodicals was $9,585.16. Of the total number of books 
bought with the current appropriation, 55,31 1 volumes (86 per 
cent) were placed in branches and in the Deposit Collection 
and included 29,798 volumes (53 per cent of the total) of books 
for younger readers. 

For the second time in the history of the Lib/ary the sum of 
$100,000. has been allowed by the City for the purchase of 
books and periodicals. While from all points of view this seems 
a generous allowance, its chief use has been to supply the thirty- 
two branch libraries with books for circulation. It should be 
noted, however, that when the library year closed there were 
nearly 7,000 titles of books, asked for by the branches for re- 
placement of worn out material, which had been necessarily held 
up during the fall months for lack of money. Taking out the 
cost of periodicals, there was left about $90,000. to equip thirty- 
two branches, the branch deposit collection, the Central Library 
and all the distributing centres with new books, including 
reference books, technical books, new fiction, replacements of 
worn out books, and children's books. 

In the last five years, the manufacturing cost of books has 
almost doubled. Technical books especially are of high cost 
and in constant demand. The call for more and more children's 



[30] 

books is insistent. For every University Extension course given, 
the Library is asked to provide collateral reading. There is 
seemingly no end to the demands made on the book appropria- 
tion. 

For the more important, rare and costly books which extend 
the special collections of fine arts, architecture, music, Americana, 
first editions, etc., the Library depends on the income of Trust 
Funds, and in many cases it has been necessary to forego the 
acquisition of desirable material in all these fields because of the 
inadequacy of this income. 

The fiscal year 1922-23 has been, nevertheless, a year of 
opportunity in sales of early American literature and first editions 
of modern authors. The Artz Collection, consisting of first 
and rare editions, has been enriched to the extent of some three 
hundred volumes, secured chiefly at auction sales. 

A special collection of American poetry and plays covering 
the period 1 786 to 1 850 was obtained at the sale of the Sturges 
library in New York, an unusual assemblage of American litera- 
ture by a collector of note. A complete examination of the 
catalogue of the sale revealed the fact that this Library pos- 
sessed 1 ,469 out of the 1 ,958 titles listed and purchases at the 
sale increased this number by over one hundred volumes. 

To the Brown Music Library the most striking additions have 
been the full score of Mozart's Don Juan, Leipzig (179—?) ; 
Schubert's Erlkonig, Wien, 1 82 1 ; Choral-Buch, enthaltend 
alle zu dem Gesangbuche der Evangelischen Briider-Gemeinen 
von Jahre 1 778 gehorige Melodien, Leipzig, 1 784, all secured 
from Vienna ; a collection of autographs of the Members of the 
Sacred Harmonic Society presented as a testimonial to Sir 
Michael Costa in 1 865 on the Society's first performance of his 
oratorio, Naaman; and 131 songs (with music) of the World 
War. 

Other interesting acquisitions include seven New England 
almanacs issued before 1800, two of which were published in 
Boston, and a number of early American periodicals, among 
them The Broadway Journal, edited by Edgar Allan Poe, 
New York, 1845. 



[31] 

To enable the Technical Division to supply the pressing de- 
mand for books on radio telegraphy, a special purchase was 
made of some sixty of the titles most frequently called for. 
There was also bought in response to an urgent request from a 
constituency of readers a collection of books in Ukrainian, a 
language hitherto unrepresented in the Library. 

In the following list are noted some of the most important 
single works acquired during the year: 

Baldass, Ludwig. Die Wiener Gobelinsammlung. Dreihundert Bild- 
tafeln mit beschreibendem Text und wissenschaftlichen Anmerkungen. 
Amtliche Ausgabe. Wien. 1 920. 1 5 parts. Plates, some colored. 

Blake, William. Illustrations to the Divine Comedy of Dante. Lon- 
don. Printed privately for the Nation Art-Collections Fund. 1922. 
1 02 plates in collotype facsimile. 

Blake, William. WiUiam Blake's designs for Gray's poems repro- 
duced full-size in monochrome or colour from the unique copy belonging 
to His Grace the Duke of Hamilton. London. 1922. Portrait. Plates, 
some colored. 

Boccaccio, Giovanni. II libro di Messer Giovanni Boccaccio, cittadino 
fiorentino chiamato II decameron. Nella Stamperia Ashendeniana, Chel- 
sea. 1 920. 

British Museum. Department of Manuscripts. Catalogue of western 
manuscripts in the old Royal and Kings collections. By Sir George F. 
Warner and Julius P. Gilson. London. 1921. Text, 3 v. ; Atlas, 
125 plates. An important work which has been in preparation since 
1894. 

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The workes of ovr ancient and learned poet, 
Geffrey Chavcer, newly printed. (Edited by Thomas Speight.) Lon- 
don. 1602. Illus. Portrait. 

Dante Alighieri. La Divina Commedia. Facsimile del Codice 
Landiano MCCCXXXVL Pubblicato in centosettantacinque esemplari 
nel VI Centenario dalla morte del poeta. Olschki. Firenze. MCM- 
XXI. Folio. 212 heliotype plates. Esemplare No. 35. 

Darell, John. Strange news from th' Indies; or, East-India passages 
further discovered. London. 1652. 

Dryden, John. The medall. A satyre against sedition. London. 
1 682. On a medal struck by the English Whigs to celebrate the acquittal 
of the Earl of Shaftesbury on the charge of treason. 

Evans, Sir Arthur John. The Palace of Minos. A comparative ac- 
count of the successive stages of the early Cretan civilization as illustrated 
by the discoveries at Knossos. Vol. 1 . London. 1 92 1 . Illus. Plates. 

Gay, John. Fables. By Mr. Gay. London. 1727. Vignettes. 



[32] 

The vignettes are engraved by Fourdrinier, Van der Gucht, Gravelot 
and others. 

Hope, Sir WilHam Henry St. John. Windsor Castle ; an architectural 
history. Collected and written by command of their Majesties Queen 
Victoria, King Edward VII., & King George V. London. 1913. 
Text, 2 V. Plates. 

Japan. Imperial Commission to the Panama-Pacific International Ex- 
position. Japanese temples and their treasures. Edited by His Imperial 
Japanese Majesty's Commission . . . (from the pubHcation of the De- 
partment of the Interior). Tokyo. 1915. Illus. Atlas, 529 plates, 
some colored. (One of an edition of 200 copies.) 

Kitton, Frederick George. Charles Dickens by pen and pencil. 31 
engraved portraits, many being remarque proofs on India paper and 
other illustrations and portraits. With supplement. London. 1889— 
1890. 2v. 

Libby Prison play-bill. The Libby Prison minstrels. Thursday eve- 
ning, Dec. 24, 1863. Programme. Richmond. 1863. Original play 
bill of a theatrical performance given by the Northern officers in Libby 
Prison during their confinement there. 

Louvre, Musee du, Paris. Le Musee du Louvre depuis 1914; dons, 
legs et acquisitions. Paris. 1 9 1 9—2 1 . 3 v. Illus. Portraits. Plates, 

Mather, Cotton. The life and death of the Reverend Mr. John Eliot, 
who was the first preacher of the Gospel to the Indians in America. The 
3d edition carefully corrected. London. 1 694. 

Mercier, Desire Joseph, Cardinal, Archbishop of Malines. Patriotism 
and endurance. Pastoral letter of Cardinal Mercier, Christmas, 1914. 
Illustrated by the Benedictine Nuns of Maredret in the Gothic style of the 
Xlllth and XlVth centuries. Turnhout (Belgium). 1921. 35 illumi- 
nated plates. 

Oakley, Violet. The holy experiment: a message to the world from 
Pennsylvania. Series of mural paintings ... in the Governor's recep- 
tion room and in the Senate Chamber of the State Capitol at Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. 1 922. Illus. 22 colored plates. Illumi- 
nated coat of arms, borders and chapter headings. Autograph facsimiles. 

Sadler, Anthony. The subjects joy for the Kings restoration, cheer- 
fully made known in a sacred masque: gratefully made pubhque for His 
Sacred Majesty. ( 1st edition.) London. 1660. 

Shawn, Edwin C. Ruth St. Denis: pioneer and prophet. Being a 
history of her cycle of oriental dances. (Decorations by W. F. Rauschna- 
bel.) San Francisco. 1920. 2 v. 

Simeoni, Gabriello. Figvre del vecchio (e del nvovo) testamento, 
illustrate di bellissime stanza volgari da Gabriel Simeoni. Nuouamente 
ristampate, et con dihgenza corrette. In Vinegia. 1 5 74. 2 v. in I . 
370 woodcuts. 



[33] 

Shakespeare, William. (Works.) (The Vale Shakespeare.) Deco- 
rated by Charles Ricketts. London. 39 V. 1900-1903. 

Speidell, John. A geometricall extraction. Collected out of the best 
and latest writers. London. 1616. 

As has been stated, xthe gifts received during the year aggre- 
gated 12,968 volumes, 13,078 isues of serials, 763 photographs, 
349 lantern slides and 48 newspaper subscriptions from 5,936 
givers, as compared with 11,193 volumes, 16,362 issues of 
serials, 485 photographs, and 48 newspaper subscriptions from 
5,41 1 givers in 1921. 

The gifts constituted a rather larger number of volumes than 
usual and those of especial interest have been noted as customary 
in the Quarterly Bulletins. The Patent Office of Great Britain 
continues to send its very valuable Patents for Inventions, the 
British Museum has presented its important Subject Index of the 
Modern Books acquired 1916-20, and A Catalogue of the 
Persian printed books in the Museum. The Library is indebted 
to the Siamese Legation at Washington for Buddhaghosa's Com- 
mentary on the Four Nikayas of the Sutta Patika, twelve vol- 
umes in the Pali language of Siam. The volumes constitute a 
complementary issue to the Tripitaka, in 39 volumes, which 
was given to the Library by the King of Siam in 1895. The 
Prefecture du Department de la Seine, Paris, has sent the con- 
tinuing volume (15) of the Histoire generale de Paris and 
Sommier des biens nationaux de la Ville de Paris in two volumes. 

The Library has also received during the year, through Mr. 
William Minot, administrator, a bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, 
late of Boston, the sum of $500. for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch. The Trustees voted to fund this bequest as the Sarah 
E. Pratt Fund, the income to be applied to the purchase of books 
for the Dorchester Branch. 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

On January 31 , 1922, there were outstanding 109,950 regis- 
tration cards. Through the Central Library, its branches and 
reading rooms, there have been added 34,708 new registrations 
and 21,508 renewals, making a total of 56,216 cards added 



[34] 

during the year. There have been 52,283 borrowers who have 
allowed their home use privilege to lapse, making a total of 
113,883 "live" cards on February 1, 1923, a gain of 3,933 
over last year. Among the borrowers who allow their cards to 
lapse each year must be numbered those students who are no 
longer in residence. At the close of the fiscal year there were 
31,472 "live" card registrations of teachers; 712 of this num- 
ber were new registrants — 473 residents of the city and 239 
non-residents who teach in institutions of learning in the City of 
Boston. Special privilege cards were voted by the Trustees to 
1 68 persons ; these, added to the 228 that have been renewed, 
make a total of 396 "live" special privilege cards. 

With the growth of the Library registration and the develop- 
ment of the geographical records, consideration must soon be 
given to the need for more adequate filing cases in the department. 

CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes and parts of volumes catalogued 
during the fiscal year 1922-23 was 91 ,723, and the number of 
titles 62,846. The number of cards added to the catalogues 
was 212,635, of which 184,666 were added in the Central Li- 
brary and 27,969 in the branches. Of the cards filed in the 
Central Library 56,567 were placed in the Bates Hall and Issue 
Department catalogues, 53,772 in the official catalogues, and 
25,601 in the catalogues of the Special Libraries, and lists in 
process. Temporary author and subject, or title cards, were 
filed in the Bates Hall and Fine Arts catalogue within a few days 
after the receipt of every new bound work. Printed catalogue 
cards for all new books have been sent, as usual, to the Editor 
as a basis for copy for the Quarterly Bulletin. One card for 
every title printed was sent to the Library of Congress as in the 
nineteen preceding years, in return for which this Library has 
received galley proofs of the Library of Congress cards. One 
card for each title has also been sent to the Harvard College 
Library, which has sent in return its own printed cards. 

Two vacancies of importance exist in the Catalogue Depart- 
ment, both calling for expert knowledge of cataloguing and ac- 



[35] 

quaintance with foreign languages. Properly qualified persons 
are apparently not to be found, even at a salary somewhat higher 
than the amount at which the positions are graded. Unless 
suitable assistants can be found, and unless vacancies of less 
importance in the Shelf Department are filled, the work of the 
Department will materially suffer. As stated in a previous re- 
port, the work of recommending desirable titles found in bibli- 
ographies, periodicals, lists and texts has been carried on as 
usual. There are besides many instances of service of which 
no record is kept ; translations are made, letters on bibliographical 
and other matters are answered, and readers and investigators 
helped in their researches. These activities cannot appear in 
the statistics of this Department or of other departments, but the 
wide reputation of the Library for generous and scholarly 
service justifies the time given to this work. 

The usual details for two successive years, presented by the 
Chief of the Catalogue Department, may be found on page 65 
of the Appendix. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The fourth volume (Fourth Series) of the Quarterly Bulletin, 
devoted primarily to the presentation of titles of new books, was 
completed in December. It contained 462 pages — an increase 
of about fifty pages over any preceding volume of the series. 
This was due partly to the experiment tried out in the March 
number, and continued through the year, of adding brief titles 
under subject headings, where only the author's name had been 
given heretofore; and partly to the inclusion of a short bibliog- 
raphy in each number. The additional space thus demanded 
was partially offset, however, by abolishing geographical head- 
ings, which had been used in connection with such general sub- 
jects as Literature, History, Economics, Travel, etc. These 
innovations seem to have been generally approved and therefore 
justified. 

Each number, except that of September, has included editorial 
material descriptive of some one of the special libraries, and all 
have given reprints or facsimile reproductions of some valued 



[36] 

document, with explanatory or other notes. In March the 
Bowditch Library, formerly the property of Dr. Nathaniel Bow- 
ditch, was presented, with the assistance of material furnished 
by Dr. Vincent Y. Bowditch, and Mr. James H. Bowditch 
very kindly allowed the Library to make and use a reproduction 
of Gilbert Stuart's portrait of his grandfather, now in his pos- 
session. A facsimile of Boston's first city charter, to celebrate 
the one hundredth anniversary of its granting, and a list of work 
on Pageants and Masques, compiled by Miss E. Carolyn Merrill 
of the Catalogue Department were the other features of the 
March number. In June the Allen A. Brown libraries — both 
the Music and the Dramatic collections — were treated, ac- 
companied by a portrait of Mr. Brown after that by John H. 
Garo, which was presented to the Library by friends of Mr. 
Brown, and now hangs in the Music Room. A facsimile of a 
manuscript account of a journey from Boston to Albany in July, 
1 746, was included in the June number, with editorial notes on 
the purpose of the journey and on the travellers. Books and 
magazine articles on the Project Method of Education were 
the subject of the special list, compiled by Miss Alice M. Jordan, 
Supervisor of Work with Children. The Library having re- 
cently purchased an original leaf of the Gutenberg Bible of 
1450-55, one side of this leaf was reproduced in facsimile for 
the September Bulletin; the only other special item was a list of 
newspapers currently received in the News Room. This list 
was so marked by asterisks as to show also the papers of which 
files are preserved, and was mainly the work of Pierce E. 
Buckley, Custodian of Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and 
Newspaper Departments. In December the story of the Prince 
Library was told, and the Old South Church and Society, by 
whom the Prince Collection was deposited with the Public 
Library, very generously allowed the Library to photograph 
their copy of John Greenwood's portrait of Thomas Prince as a 
frontispiece to the Bulletin. An original letter of the Rev. Jere- 
my Belknap, dealing principally with political conditions in 
Boston in 1 789, formed part of the December issue, and a list 
of maps of Massachusetts, its counties and towns, compiled by 



[37] 

John Murdoch of the Catalogue Department, was added. The 
September and December numbers, following the custom of 
many years, gave space for the announcement of public lectures 
and courses of instruction given, not only within the Library 
building, but in many other centres throughout the city. As an 
indication of educational ideals and standards these announce- 
ments furnish very valuable data. 

Each number of the Bulletin has been printed in an edition of 
two thousand copies, with seventy-five copies on durable paper. 

During the year the Library has also issued the following 
publications: 

Weekly Lists. 52 numbers in editions of 2,500 each, edited 
by Lucien E. Taylor of the Catalogue Department. Beginning 
with February 4, 1922, each list has contained a single-page 
supplement entitled Ten-Book List. These supplements, 53 in 
number, treat of subjects of current interest or in constant request, 
and give the titles of books which, in text and illustrations, make 
the subject vivid for the general reader. Each list has been 
prepared and annotated by a person especially familiar with 
the subject, usually a member of the Staff. 

List of Books on Modern Ireland, (7) +90 pp., a reprint of 
300 copies, with corrections, compiled by Lucien E. Taylor, of 
the Catalogue Department. 

Libri Italiani Moderni, (6) + 108 pp., compiled by Mary 
H. Rollins, of the Catalogue Department; 1000 copies, 75 on 
special paper. 

A Guide to Serial Publications founded prior to 1918 and 
now or recently current in Boston, Cambridge, and vicinity, com- 
piled and edited by Thomas Johnston Homer; part 1 , A-Bibl., 
1050 copies, 50 on special paper, xvi, 96 pages. Eighty-five 
libraries are covered by this union list, and part 1 contains 1 859 
main entries. The remaining material will be printed as rapidly 
as possible; it is, meanwhile, accessible for use in the Barton 
Gallery of the Central Library. 

Librar'^ Life, the Staff Bulletin, entered upon its second year 
in October under the same general management, but with an 
added and well-organized force of assistants, which should in- 
crease its value in the particular fields where it gleans. 



[38] 



BATES HALL. 



The revision of the Reference Collection, begun several years 
ago, has proceeded until only the sections devoted to language 
and geography await a systematic rearrangement. When those 
shelves are completed, the Reference Collection will include 
current books covering the various fields of knowledge as well 
as the well tested books of earlier years. The changes in the 
collection, as a matter of record for the year, total 932 titles 
(1270 volumes). There have been placed on the shelves 400 
new titles (516 volumes) and the current issues of 103 "con- 
tinuations." The volumes on chemistry and physics have been 
transferred to the Technical Division of the Library which has 
assumed charge of those subjects. It is a gratification to note 
that the missing list is smaller than in any year since the con- 
clusion of the war. During 1922—23, 191 volumes disappeared 
from the shelves, but the recovery of 23 volumes missing in 
former years reduces the net loss to 1 68 volumes. 

The year's correspondence has been somewhat larger than 
that of last year. Answers have been sent to 642 inquirers, of 
whom 619 live in the United States and 23 in foreign countries. 

BATES HALL CENTRE DESK, NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS. 

It is impracticable to record the use of the Bates Hall reference 
collections, consisting of over ten thousand volumes on the open 
shelves of the room. The attendance and use of the collections 
has probably held its own in comparison with other years, even 
though there has been a slight decrease in the number of books 
sent from the Library stacks on "Hall Use" slips. The total 
number of volumes sent to Bates Hall during the past three years 
were as follows: 1920-21.224,501; 1921-22,251,141; 
1922-23, 240,600. The largest daily circulation was 1,218 
on March 4, 1922. The maximum attendance was 298 on 
January 29, 1922, at 5 p.m., compared with 336 on October 
30, 1 92 1 , at the same hour. It is inevitable that delays in the 
delivery of books should sometime occur; but comparatively 



[39] 



few persons, compared with the large number using the Hall, 
are inconvenienced. As was stated last year, no improvement 
in service can be anticipated until some modern mechanical sys- 
tem is installed connecting Bates Hall with the distant stacks 
from which the books are sent. 

Newspaper Room. There are 267 newspapers regularly 
placed on file in the Newspaper Room ; of this number 2 1 are 
dailies and 5 7 weeklies ; 1 90 are papers published in the United 
States and 77 in foreign countries. The bound volumes in the 
newspaper collection now number 8,747, of which 96 volumes 
were added during the current year. Readers applying for 
bound files numbered 18,639 and consulted 33,364 volumes, 
an increase over 1921 — 22 of 35 readers and 180 volumes con- 
sulted. Below are listed the number of foreign papers received, 
arranged by countries and by languages, and also the number of 
American papers printed in foreign languages. 

FOREIGN PAPERS BY COUNTRIES. 



Argentine 


Republic 


1 


Egypt . 


1 


Japan 




Australia 


, 


4 


England 


10 


New Zealand . 




Austria . 




I 


Finland . 


I 


Newfoundland 




Belgium . 


, 


1 


France 


5 


Norway . 




Bermuda 






1 


Germany 


7 


Panama . 




Canada . 






10 


Holland . 


1 


Portugal 




Cape Colony 




1 


Hungary 


I 


Scotland 


2 


Chile . 






1 


India 


2 


Spain 


1 


China 






I 


Ireland . 


6 


Sweden . 


3 


Cuba 






2 


Italy . 


2 


Switzerland 


3 


Denmark 






2 


Jamaica . 


1 










FOREIGN PAPERS BY L 


ANGUAGES. 




Danish . 


^ 


2 


French . 


8 


Norwegian 


1 


Dutch . 


. 


1 


German . 


9 


Portuguese 


1 


English . 


, 


45 


Hungarian 


1 


Spanish . 


3 


Finnish . 


• 


1 


Italian 


2 


Swedish . 


3 




AMI 


IRICAN 


PAPERS IN FOREI 


GN LANGUAGES. 




Albanian 




1 


French . 


1 


Spanish . 


I 


Arabic . 


^ , 


1 


German . 


3 


Swedish . 


2 


Armenian 


. 




2 


Greek . 


2 


Welsh . 


1 



Patent Room. The Patent collection now numbers 1 6,293 
volumes, of which number 96 volumes were added during the 
past year, from the United States, Great Britain, France, Cana- 
da, Australia, and New Zealand. No files of German patents 



[40] 

have been received since 1914. The European agents of the 
Library have been unable to obtain continuations, which is much 
to be regretted. 

INFORMATION OFFICE, GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS AND 
OPEN SHELF ROOMS. 

The service offered in these rooms, described in the reports of 
the previous two years, continues to grow. Their position is 
strategically excellent and they save much time for the visitor, 
especially the stranger, who does not know the location of the 
different departments and what they have to offer. In the 
Information Office there are now available several hundred di- 
rectories and telephone books, which are in constant use — a 
service which is warmly appreciated by the public. TTiere are 
also live files on banks and banking, budgets, foreign trade, etc. ; 
news letters from banks, business organizations, and chambers of 
commerce throughout the country are regularly received. The 
vocational file has been brought up to date and is in use con- 
tinually. Indexes have been made for the business and voca- 
tional files and for the current government publications on the 
shelves of the Document Room. 

In the Open Shelf Room books on travel, biography, especial- 
ly memoirs, psychology, business, essays, nature books, and the 
collections in foreign languages, are popular. Books of plays 
and dramatic criticism are much in demand, particularly when 
the dramatic schools in the vicinity of Copley Square are in 
session. The books are in a sense hand picked, with the excep- 
tion of the new volumes of non-fiction ; the shelves are filled in 
the main with books published several years ago, taken from the 
main stacks of the Library. The collection is an ever changing 
one and suggestions from the public are welcomed. One gentle- 
man, an ardent reader of books on travel, lent the attendant a 
card catalogue of the books he had read in the past five years; 
a French teacher in one of the Boston high schools submits 
an occasional list of modern French fiction ; a sociology teacher 
enthusiastically suggests the selection of books on that subject. 



[41] 

A number of readers keep note books and jot down Open Shelf 
Room suggestions as they occur. The chentele of the Open 
Shelf Room, the Information Office, and the Government Docu- 
ments Room is enthusiastically appreciative. 

PERIODICAL ROOM, CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The Custodian of the Periodical Room reports the aggregate 
number reading in the room at certain hours in each of the last 
two years and the number reported Ave years ago, as follows : 







ATTENDANCE. 








At the hours 


10 


12 


2 


4 


6 


8 


9.45 




A.M. 


M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


1922-1923 . 


. 14,871 


16,263 


27.826 


33,109 


22,241 


26,310 


13,216 


1921-1922 . 


14,264 


1 5,875 


25,943 


31,762 


21,786 


25,619 


12,827 


1917-1918. , 


9,873 


12,981 


20,673 


26,327 


18,784 


22,701 


8,522 



The use of bound and unbound files shows a large increase 
over last year, as follows : 

BOUND VOLUMES, 

1922-23. 1921-22. 

Volumes consulted during day 44,843 42,924 

Volumes consulted during evenings and Sundays . . . 18,762 17,581 

UNBOUND NUMBERS OF MAGAZINES. 

1922-23. 1921-22. 

Volumes consulted during day ....... 53,786 53,378 

Volumes consulted during evenings and Sundays . . . 23,47f 22,736 

The figures given show a steady gain over the year 1 92 1 —22 
in the number of readers and in the number of bound and un- 
bound magazines used. It is encouraging to be able to state 
that the work of the Periodical Department has increased in 
every way, not only in the number of periodicals called for, but 
especially in the increase in the use of the department for reference 
work. At times the staff has been taxed to its utmost in assisting 
the large numbers of students that come from the universities, 
colleges and schools seeking information on the topics of the 
day. When funds are available a more modern equipment of 
the Periodical Room should be installed. The periodical racks 
are out of date and are the source of repeated complaints from 
readers. 



[42] 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

Following is a brief indication of the scope of the Special 
Libraries located on the third floor of the Central Building: 

Fine Arts Department, containing books and periodicals in 
the fields of the fine arts (architecture, painting, sculpture, etc.). 
the industrial arts, applied sciences, and technology; also the 
Library's collections of photographs and lantern slides for study 
and for circulation. 

Music Room, the Allen A. Brown reference collection of 
music and literature of music; also a large collection of music 
for home use, musical and dramatic periodicals, indexes and 
scrap-books. 

Barton 'Ticknor Room, special collections mainly restricted to 
use within the building, — Shakespeariana, Americana, Spanish 
literature, Civil War material, dramatic history, maps, etc. 

The number of books issued for home use from the Special 
Libraries during the year was 25,130, compared with 25,256 
in 1 92 1 - 22 and 22,949 in 1 920 - 2 1 . The department added 
601 lantern slides last year to its collection, 262 by purchase and 
339 by gift, bringing the total to 9,736. During the same year 
1,373 prints and photographs were accessioned. The total 
number of photographs and process pictures now available for 
circulation is 66,67 1 . During the year 6, 1 03 lantern slides 
and 2,444 portfolios of pictures were issued. As each port- 
folio consists of an issue of at least twenty-five pictures, the 
circulation of the latter was something over sixty thousand. 

The Technical Division has revised its shelf lists and the 
classed catalogue of both technology and science, thereby making 
the service to the public more efficient. 

The department installed during the Library year thirty-two 
exhibits; four of these were bibliographical — The Hopkins 
Collection of Dickensiana, Musical Rarities, the First Hundred 
Years of the City of Boston, and the Graphic Arts. Exhibits 
of special local interest were Boston 100 years ago, Boston 
school houses, Boston fires. All but eight of the exhibitions, 
which may be found listed in the Appendix on pages 70 and 7 1 , 
were made up from collections owned by the Library. 



[43] 

For the convenience of the patrons of the Music Room a bul- 
letin of the musical events of each week has been prepared and 
posted, together with the pictures, when available, of the artists 
appearing during the week. It is intended to file these bulletins 
with the press criticisms, thus making a complete musical year 
book of Boston, a compilation which should be of value and 
interest. 

The Division promoted in December a series of seven Library 
lectures on Russian opera and, with the cooperation of the Uni- 
versity Extension Division of the State Board of Education, the 
lectures were brought to a successful conclusion. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

The following paragraph from the Report of the Supervisor 
of Work with Children forms an adequate text for a review of 
the year's work : 

Library work with children aims chiefly and ideally to make reading a 
joy and not a task, and to estabHsh a love of good books as a permanent 
satisfaction in life. Three factors are essential to accomplish this, the 
books themselves, the service of properly equipped assistants and rooms 
designed and furnished for the convenience and pleasure of children. 

Books for children. The number added to the branch system 
as replacements, additional copies, or new books for the use of 
children, amounted to 29,798 volumes, and in addition there 
were placed in the Children's Room at the Central Library 1 ,832 
volumes. Of the total number of books purchased for the 
branches, more than fifty per cent were assigned to children. 
This apportionment was reasonable as in all but eight of the 
branches and reading rooms the issue of books to children was 
more than fifty per cent of the circulation, and in only two did it 
fall below forty per cent. The issue of children's books for 
home use throughout the system was 1 ,230,243 out of a total 
of 2,768,984 volumes circulated. With such a degree of in- 
terest in reading manifested by children, at least an equal num- 
ber of books will be required during the next year in order to keep 
the readers the system has gained and make an advance in at- 
tracting others. 



[44] 

The book selection is one of the most important duties of the 
Supervisor. New books are bought only after personal exami- 
nation; replacements for worn out copies are considered in re- 
lation to the supply and demand; titles are dropped from the 
children's rooms and more timely ones take their place whenever 
recent books of information or instruction supersede older ones. 
A special demand from a locality is met by purchasing additional 
copies, it may be of books for beginners in reading, or of some 
other group to fill a special need. It is especially desirable that 
standard books for children should be available in sufficient num- 
ber so that no child need wait, for example, for a copy of the 
Arabian Nights or Robinson Crusoe. Attention is also paid to 
choice of editions, in order to secure the classics in inviting form 
with clear type and good illustrations. Physical appearance 
makes all the difference in the immediate appeal that determines 
whether a child will read a book of his own initiative or only 
through outside suggestion. 

Endeavor is also made to keep the purchase of books for chil- 
dren in proper ratio to the use of the branch or reading room by 
children. At North End, where the percentage of juvenile 
circulation is nearly 87 per cent of the whole, the book fund 
should be spent mainly for children's books; at West Roxbury 
and Faneuil, on the other hand, where the juvenile circulation is 
less than 38 per cent, the allotment should be on another basis. 

Service. The service required of those who come in contact 
with children in a library is of an exacting nature, requiring 
special preparation as well as a certain native fitness. The train- 
ing of assistants to qualify for this work during the year was 
furthered by a course in reference books and by the monthly 
conferences held with the Supervisor. One appointment of a 
trained children's librarian was made in the Charlestown Branch. 
It cannot be too strongly emphasized that the person who knows 
the books can exercise a marked influence on the children's 
choice. By study of book lists, by discussion, but most of all 
by comparative reading, the staff engaged in work with children 
are gaining in ability to give help in book selection and in 
reference work. 



[45] 

Stor]) Hour. An invaluable aid to the work of a children's 
librarian exists in the story hour. This activity offers a per- 
sonal introduction to books through the interpretation of a person 
who appreciates literature and understands how to connect it with 
the interests of boys and girls. The following quotation from 
the report of the Story-teller, Mrs. Mary F. Cronan, indicates 
a fruitful year in this field. 

This year the children welcomed the Story Hour with even more en- 
thusiasm than usual. With one or two exceptions attendance has been 
large in spite of weather and illness. Owing to the anxiety about fuel, re- 
sulting in discomfort and colds at home and school there seemed to be a 
wide-spread feeling of depression among adults. Perhaps that was one 
reason for the children's response to the Story Hour. They craved its 
joyous atmosphere and its freedom from limitations and were glad to leave 
the grown-up world behind. Since the children have not only had the 
joy of one period a week listening to stories, but have been led to the reading 
of many delightful books, the winter must have been lightened for them. 

South Boston, Codman Square, West Roxbury, Charlestown, Faneuil 
and North End have steadily maintained large groups of eager listeners. 
Among these Faneuil had the Story Hour for the first time and the children 
have shown much apreciation. West Roxbury has had two well attended 
groups of different ages. The teachers in a neighboring school take a 
special interest, as before the opening of the new branch building story- 
telling was conducted at the school. 

The majority in attendance at all the groups, with one exception, are 
boys, but the girls who come regularly grow in concentration and extent 
of interests. 

An interesting experiment was the telling of Hugh Walpole's story of 
"Jeremy and the Black Bishop," as an introduction to "The Talisman." 
It is based on a boyhood experience of the author, which led him to his 
delight in Scott. The children listened with absorption, quite sympathizing 
with Jeremy's determination to read the book after he had bought it with 
his own money, and as the world of romance was disclosed to them, from 
one to half a dozen in each group attacked "The Talisman." One small 
boy of nine years read it from cover to cover, later entering into the telling 
in triumphant fashion, allowing no omissions that he considered important. 

The Supervisor notes that the high quality of the stories con- 
tinued by request from week to week is witness that there is no 
occasion for substituting the trivial and mediocre for the best. 
Lorna Doone, Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, The Iliad, 
King Arthur, Quentine Durward, and especially The Talisman, 
have all had seasons of great popularity. 



[46] 

The Americanization Committee of the Boston Chamber of 
Commerce, which for several years has financed story-telUng in 
a number of schools, has this year directed its efforts to other 
channels, resulting in a flood of urgent requests that the Library 
carry on the work thus begun. Where library accommodations 
are unfavorable, Mrs. Cronan has tried to meet the call from the 
schools in some measure, if only for a few weeks. Among the 
schools applying for this privilege have been several pre-voca- 
tional schools in different parts of the city. From one of these a 
teacher writes, "We have never had anything which has given 
the boys such a stimulus to reading as the work of Mrs. Cronan 
and her helpers last year." The Library may well feel gratified 
by the statement of a principal of long experience and great 
understanding: "The story tellers have made a distinct and 
valuable contribution to the education of our pupils." It can- 
not be too strongly emphasized that the best results of story telling 
are achieved only when the libraries can supplement it by pro- 
ducing the books. 

Children s Rooms. The children's room in the new branch 
at West Roxbury, opened in the spring of 1922, is greatly ap- 
preciated by the community. Cramped and restricted in space 
for readers and books, the old quarters made it impossible to 
give the children a fitting idea of how to use a library. Now in 
the new building, with their own large room, suitably furnished 
and well-stocked with books, they are bound to acquire a better 
sense of responsibility for the care and use of public property. 
At Dorchester the improved arrangement has been in force for 
about a year and has simplified some problems and solved others, 
though under the drawbacks of the old Municipal building con- 
ditions will never be entirely satisfactory. 

Cooperation with the Children's Museum in Jamaica Plain, 
previously limited to book deposits at the Museum, has entered 
on a new phase and this year the Museum has begun to send 
exhibits to the children's rooms. The Central Children's Room 
and the Tyler Street Reading Room were selected to receive the 
first exhibits as they are supplied with show cases in which ma- 
terial may be satisfactorily displayed. In the Central Chil- 



[47] 

dren's Room thre collections have been shown, Indian relics, 
winter birds, and minerals and shells. Tyler Street Reading 
Room has had a collection of Chinese articles. 

Central Children s Room. The Central Children's Room 
has carried on its service of specialized work by preparing lists 
of books, answering many letters of inquiry on topics relating to 
children's reading and receiving classes for instruction on the 
use of the Library, as well as meeting the ordinary calls of a 
children's room. During the Supervisor's long absence because 
of illness early in the year, the staff cheerfully and faithfully as- 
sumed added responsibilities in carrying on the work of the 
Department. One assistant has been advanced to a position 
in a reading room where she is clearly demonstrating the value 
of the training she received in the Children's Room at the Central 
Library. 

Teachers' Room. During the convention of the National 
Education Association, in the summer, the New England Asso- 
ciation of School Librarians arranged a display of books, charts, 
and other material in the Teachers' Room and the department 
was visited extensively by persons from different parts of the 
country. The force was called upon to aid in the preparation 
of the exhibition by supplying books and rendering other assis- 
tance. 

The collection of text-books shelved in the Teachers' Room 
was revised and brought up to date to conform with the present 
requirements of the city schools. Part of these books were 
obtained by gifts from the publishers at the request of the Li- 
brary, and part were purchased. This much needed revision 
has greatly increased the usefulness of the collection along the 
lines it attempts to cover, namely the text books required in the 
Junior and Senior high schools of Boston. 

The Teachers' Room gains in popularity with older students 
and continues to present difficult problems of administration. A 
striking growth in the demand for magazines relating to educa- 
tion is noticed, attributable to the numerous courses on the theory 
and practice of education, given at Boston and Harvard Uni- 
versities. Current numbers are kept in the Teachers' Room, 



[48] 

but the needed references, listed in many bibliographies, are 
largely in bound volumes, kept in the gallery of the Children's 
Room. The call for these for the last three months amounted 
to 1,739 volumes. The reading list on the Project Method in 
Education, published in the June Quarterly Bulletin, has been 
noted by the instructors as helpful material. Books have been 
reserved for the use of students in the University Extension 
Courses, in accordance with the practice of recent years. 

The issue of pictures from the files in the Teachers' Room 
has increased to 5,968, the largest number ever supplied by this 
department to teachers and the general public. 

The Supervisor of Work v^ith Children has filled numerous 
engagements, both in the city and outside, to speak on topics 
relating to children's reading, the home library, and the work of 
a children's librarian. 

BRANCHES AND READING ROOMS. 

The number of branch libraries is seventeen, and the number 
of reading rooms fourteen, as compared with sixteen branches 
and fifteen reading rooms a year ago, the Mt. Bowdoin Reading 
Room having been designated a branch, with extension of hours 
and service, on February 1 , 1 922. The subsidiary agencies 
served through the Branch Department include 59 fire engine 
houses, 34 institutions, and 209 schools, of which 1 9 are parochi- 
al schools. The total number of library agencies is 333 as com- 
pared with 320 a year ago. The number of volumes issued on 
borrowers' cards from the Central Library through the Branch 
Department was 1 1 1,070, as against 106,556 in 1921-22 and 
108,169 in 1920-21. These figures show a gain of 4,514 
volumes issued during last year, as compared with the year 
before. This is a normal gain and is largely due to the fact that 
the Branch Deposit Collection was increased by the addition 
of a number of new books, besides duplicate copies of older 
ones. The proportion of unsuccessful calls for books was 49+ 
per cent as against 56+ per cent a year before. Of the total 
unsuccessful requests 66,572 were calls for fiction, as against 
63,288 last year. Of the total number of volumes sent out 



[49] 

from the Central Library through the branches 90,133 were 
taken directly from the shelves of the Branch Deposit Collection. 

During the year fourteen branches gained in circulation and 
three lost ; eight reading rooms gained and six lost. The great- 
est gains in the branches were at North End, West Roxbury, 
West End, and Warren Street; the losses were at Dorchester, 
Roxbury and Jamaica Plain. The greatest gains in the reading 
rooms were at Jeffries Point, City Point, Allston and Orient 
Heights; the reading room losses were at Mt. Pleasant, Roxbury 
Crossing, Andrew Square, Lower Mills, Tyler Street and Mat- 
tapan. 

The number of volumes sent out on deposit to schools, insti- 
tutions and other agencies from the Central Library were 45,286 
as against 44,25 7 last year and 46,972 in 1 920-2 1 . The num- 
ber of volumes sent to schools from the Central Library, branches 
and reading rooms was 56,348 compared with 46,096 last year. 
Of this number 1 8,524 were sent from the Branch Department, 
Central Library, as compared with 1 7,222 the year before. The 
number of books issued on deposit from the branch libraries, 
chiefly to schools, was 37,824 compared with 28,874 the year 
before. The number of individual teachers supplied was 1 ,200 
as against 1 , 1 00 in 1 92 1 —22. 

The total circulation of the branch system for the fiscal year 
was 2,424,014 volumes compared with 2,318,059 the year 
before, and 2,129,407 in 1920-21, or a gain of 105,955 vol- 
umes over the year 1921—22. 

The number of new books bought for the branches was 
16,360, as against 17,477 in 1921-22. There have been re- 
placements to the number of 18,290 volumes, compared with 
1 4,600 the preceding year. The additions to the permanent col- 
lections of the reading rooms were 1 1 ,9 1 6 compared with 1 6, 1 63 
in 1921-22. 

The number of books bound for the branch libraries this past 
year was 23,465 as compared with 21,938 in 1921—22. The 
recasing of new books prior to their being placed in circulation 
has proved most satisfactory and has increased their potential 
circulation nearly three-fold. 



[50] 

The following extracts from the reports submitted by the 
librarians of various branches and reading rooms will be found 
of interest. 

Brighton. In the increased number of children coming to 
borrow books, the work with the schools, and the story-hour, 
much progress has been made. Many of the children who 
come during the noon hours, Saturday mornings, and vacation 
periods are Italians who have not had the home training neces- 
sary to give much respect for the books, which they find con- 
venient weapons to use for banging each other on the head. 

CharlestoTvn. The Children's Room on the first floor is a 
constant delight to many children in this congested district. After 
school the room is always well filled not only with children 
getting their school lessons, but also with many others who use 
the library for recreational reading. During the day the chil- 
dren come for books for parents who have no time to come 
themselves. In the winter evenings every seat is occupied. 
Teachers borrow collections of books and pictures, and reserve 
volumes for their classes. The hall in the basement is frequently 
used for the story-hour and for meetings of community interest. 

Dorchester. Reference work is very important and takes an 
increasing amount of time ; the corner set apart in the children's 
room for reference has been in constant use. 

East Boston. The branch serves a community which is now 
composed,, in the main, of aliens from Italy, Canada, Russia, 
Ireland, England, Sweden and Portugal. The library aims to 
interest these newcomers in the branch and to teach them the 
benefits gained thereby. 

One little girl said recently, "I have left the library." 
"Why," I questioned. "Because my hands get cold going 
there." To hold the interest of children until they shall have 
acquired such a love of literature that not even the elements can 
deter them from seeking it, is our purpose. 

Mt. Bowdo'in. Few adults remain longer in the library than 
is necessary to obtain a copy of the newest fiction or a current 
periodical. This is discouraging but not surprising, when one 



[51] 

considers the bustle and commotion which, because of cramped 
quarters, the Hbrary presents during the crowded hours when 
the room is filled with students from the schools and colleges. 
Perhaps in the near future we may be able to offer peace and 
quiet in a home-like atmosphere where grown-ups too will be 
glad to tarry. 

North End. A library which serves but a small percent of 
its population is either in a wrong location or pursuing a wrong 
policy. The location of the North End Branch is above criti- 
cism. TTie work that can be done here for children is real and 
great. At a low estimate there are ten thousand children who 
should use the branch in this district; the children here have 
double the time to form the library habit and become readers 
between the ages of 7 and 1 1 , than they have between 1 and 1 4. 
At 10 years the little sister is often housekeeper, nurse, and 
earning money at home ; her brother is a small merchant, black- 
ing shoes, and helping in the family store or running errands. 
These children have little time to go out of their way for books, 
but they make the time if the desire to read is there. Although 
at times the branch may resemble a kindergarten and seem to 
hand out more easy books than others, we must put our literary 
dignity aside and step into line with the firm group of educators 
who ask the early years of a child's life for formative purposes. 
A splendid spirit of cooperation exists between the library and 
all masters, teachers, social agencies, etc. In fact the spirit of 
everyone is splendid and friendly; this helps to make our job 
an interesting and happy one. 

Roslindale. Reference work is a very important feature of 
our service to the community. Pupils from the grammar and 
high schools and students from many colleges come to seek in- 
formation on all sorts of subjects. Very few people of foreign 
birth come to the library, very seldom anyone who cannot speak 
English, and never anyone who cannot understand English. 

Roxbur}). In July 1873, this branch was first opened for 
service to the public. For fifty years it has stood with its invita- 
tion of books for recreation and study in a neighborhood that has 
gradually changed in character. From one of families of 



[52] 

American ancestry owning their homes, it has become one of 
apartments and tenements occupied by descendants of families 
to many of which English was not the mother tongue. As ex- 
pressions of appreciation of our service from persons no longer 
residents of this section are frequently received, it is hoped that 
our present service is also satisfactory and that the future will 
give even greater opportunities of usefulness. 

South Boston. The library gives assistance to men taking out 
naturalization papers and has often guided and directed the 
reading of others who have not time to go to night or day school. 
Books on Americanization and easy English reach the parents 
through the children, who usually take one book for themselves 
and one for father or mother. The reading room is used and 
appreciated, especially by men, many of whom work nights, 
while others are temporarily out of employment or are too old to 
work. Many persons who work in the district come to the li- 
brary at the noon hour to read the magazines. 

South End. The branch library has grown so completely 
into the life of the people as to be a very vital part of the com- 
munity. It is a place where all come for study and for recrea- 
tional reading, for help and for advice. The newcomers in the 
neighborhood, especially the foreigner who knows nothing of 
our free institutions, are welcomed and helped. The library is 
a common ground where all meet with equal privileges, where 
light and heat and good reading attract, where courtesy and 
good will help, and where the stranger is made welcome and 
the older resident feels a proprietary interest. 

Uphams Corner. The members of the Post of the American 
Legion, which has headquarters in our building, use the library 
and have many hotly contested arguments. 

Warren Street. The branch serves a district in which be- 
tween forty and fifty thousand Jewish people reside; the re- 
mainder of our reading public is composed of Irish, Italian, 
Swedish, Polish, Hungarian, French, German, and a few 
Chinese. 

West End. To many whose homes are small bedrooms in a 
lodging house — and this section is largely made up of lodging 



[53] 

houses — the library is a place of wholesom recreation. Many 
a pleasant friendship has found its beginning in the Hbrary. 

West Roxbur^. This Hbrary is a community centre and it 
tries in every way to cooperate with all the schools, churches and 
clubs in the district. 

Andrew Square. This district is without any local social 
agency ; there is nothing to fill the need of a recreational centre 
for clubs, classes, etc. We have to make up for this as best we 
can. The children at least come to the library. They congre- 
gate to study their lessons, to read, and to relate happenings at 
school. 

Ci/p Point. The people here appreciate their library privi- 
lege. They are generous and seem grateful for the effort made 
to serve them. The library's service to its public is reflected 
not only in the upward curve of statistical and registration records, 
but in the personal attitude of the community towards its library. 

Faneuil. Material is furnished constantly for lectures and 
debates. This work has caused a steady demand for books from 
the Central Library ; at times people are unreasonable, but as a 
rule appreciative. The chief calls have been for psychology 
and English literature. The automobile books placed on the 
shelves last summer have proved useful. 

Jeffries Point. With five schools in this section, having an 
enrollment of some three thousand children, a great amount of 
reference work is done. The reading room has a large collec- 
tion of books for children. The teachers do their utmost to co- 
operate with the library working for the advancement of their 
pupils. 

Mattapan. The children are most enthusiastic about their 
reading room, especially the Jewish children who show an un- 
common interest. The Jewish people comprise quite a large 
proportion of the community, although we have Irish, Swedish, 
Italian and Armenian patrons. 

Neponset. Although the majority of our adult readers do 
not make a habit of using the library as a reading room, we 
always have at least a few newspaper and periodical readers. 



[54] 

or an employee from Lawley's Shipyard, reading up on ship- 
building. The reference work with the older boys and girls 
plays an important part in our service to the public. 

Orient Heights. Since we have so few adults using the 
library, we devote almost our entire attention to the children 
and place the library as much as possible at the service of the 
schools, both public and parochial. The teachers and sisters 
insist that the children procure library cards and then give them 
assignments in home work which require looking up material in 
the library. 

Parser Hill. The circumstances of the people in this district 
are such that books for ownership are not beyond their desires, 
but beyond their pocketbooks ; these people are readers and 
thinkers, who find much intellectual solace in a book. To many 
boys, who at fourteen believed that knowledge was "usless 
stuff," but who have found at twenty that knowledge is "dollars 
and cents," the library has been of incalculable advantage. For 
these young men the Library has built up a splendid collection 
of books on elementary subjects. 

Roxbur^ Crossing. Although most of our patrons are chil- 
dren, the adults from an important factor in our work. Ours is 
a very cosmopolitan community bringing into contact with each 
other Armenians, Greeks, Jews, Italians, Swedes, Norwegians, 
Irish and Negroes. Through their children they obtain books 
in easy English and naturalization. 

T^ler Street. The staff of the library is composed of assist- 
ants who speak some of the many languages used in the district, 
for example, Arabic, Italian, Yiddish and Greek. There is a 
fairly good collection of books in these languages for circulation, 
and a splendid collection of Americanization books, used prin- 
cipally by the pupils of the Quincy Evening School. 

THE NEW WEST ROXBURY BRANCH LIBRARY. 

On Monday, April 1 7, 1922, the new West Roxbury Branch 
building was dedicated with appropriate ceremony. The build- 
ing is most attractive and convenient, consisting of a one-story 



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[55] 

brick structure, designed in the Colonial style with a flat roof. 
The main floor consists of one large room 38 X 88 feet and 1 6 
feet high, with an ell in the rear containing the librarian's office, 
work room, and stairway to the basement of the building, the 
latter so arranged that books from the Central Library may be 
brought to the rear entrance and taken out of the building at a 
point between the first story and the basement. The entrance 
from the porch to the main floor is through a vestibule which is 
heated when necessary in order to make it comfortable for those 
working at the charging counter, located directly opposite the 
entrance. 

The floor space of the main room is divided by partitions 
glazed with plate glass from a point three feet above the floor. 
The central portion, 22 X 32 feet, is used for the delivery 
room; the reading rooms on either side are 33 X 38 feet. 
Bookcases are arranged around the walls of each room, with 
three shelf cases along the partitions. As the partitions are only 
1 feet high, the impression received on entering the building is 
that of one large room. 

The first story is finished in oak, stained medium brown to the 
height of the bookcases; above the bookcases the plaster walls 
are panelled with wood mouldings and painted a warm gray. 
The finished floor of the entire first story is cork tile, Yl inch 
thick, cemented direct to the concrete floor. 

The basement has a hall with a seating capacity of 225, 
anterooms, lunch and rest rooms, toilet rooms, two storage rooms 
for books, heater and coal storage. All the basement rooms 
are well lighted. The main entrance of the lecture hall is direct 
from the street at one end of the building. 

The only wood used in the structure is the standing finish and 
floor rafters, the latter supported on steel girders. The founda- 
tion walls are of cement, the wall above of brick — water struck 
brick being used for all face work — and the first floor of rein- 
forced concrete. The basement floors are of concrete finished 
with granolithic. The stairs from the basement to the first floor 
are of iron. 

The Superintendent of Buildings and the Library Depart- 



[561 

ment received every consideration and the heartiest cooperation 
during the construction of the building from the architect, Mr. 
Oscar A. Thayer, a resident of West Roxbury devoted to the 
interests of the community. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

Lists of the free lectures in the Library courses of the season, 
of the lectures given in the Library under the auspices of various 
civic associations, and of the public exhibitions held at the Cen- 
tral Library during the year, may be found on pages 67—70 of 
the Appendix. As in former years, the record covers the 
period from the fall of 1922 through the spring of 1923. The 
Lecture Hall at the Central Library has been used again and 
again to its capacity. In addition to the Library lectures given 
on Thursday evenings and Sunday afternoons, the public meet- 
ings and lectures on alternate Monday afternoons of the Ruskin 
Club, and the meetings of many civic associations, the Hall was 
used every week-day evening by the various extension courses 
offered by the State Board of Education. Through death and 
for other causes, several changes were made in the lecture pro- 
gram as originally published in the October Bulletin of the Li- 
brary. On account of the large number of disappointed persons 
who could not gain admittance to the Hall, two lectures were 
graciously repeated, as follows: 

On November 29, The Passion Play of 1922, by Dr. J. C. 
Bowker. 

On February 1 1 , The High History of the Holy Grail, by 
Rev. W. N. Stinson, S.J. 

TTie lectures on music were illustrated by the lecturers with 
the use of the piano, or by church choirs or college glee clubs, 
who gave their services, including transportation. 

Attention is again called to the vital need of improvement in 
the ventilation of the Lecture Hall. So evil are the present 
conditions that unless relief can be given, it would seem ad- 
visable to consider the discontinuance of public meetings until 
the necessary repairs shall have been made. The dingy appear- 



% [57] 

ance of the room itself calls for fresh paint. The need of a 
motion picture equipment grows more apparent each year. Offers 
of several interesting lectures have been declined, because the 
picture rolls illustrating them could not be displayed. 

STAFF INSTRUCTION. 

Five members of the Library Staff availed themselves of the 
privilege of registering for the second term, January - March, 
1922, in the Library School of Simmons College, for the fol- 
lowing courses ; three in library work with children, one in refer- 
ence, and one in history. 

Fifty-five members of the staff attended the twenty lectures on 
the Outlines of English Literature, a special survey for librarians, 
by Prof. R. E. Rogers of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
presented on request through the Extension Division of the State 
Board of Education, beginning January 6, 1922. Twenty- 
eight took the examination at the end of the course, thirteen of 
whom passed and received certificates from the Commonwealth. 
So much enthusiasm resulted from Prof Rogers' course that 
two additional series of lectures on the History of American 
Literature were announced for workers in public and special li- 
braries, beginning November 1 7, 1 922. The first was a course 
of twenty lectures on American Literature from its beginnings 
through the Civil War; the second, a supplementary course of 
ten lectures on American Literature since 1 870. These courses 
were made possible through the cooperation of the Extension 
Division as last year. Fifty members of the staff enrolled for the 
first course of lectures. In general the younger assistants who 
felt the need of this particular instruction in the performance of 
their library work, were encouraged to attend, in preference to 
those who had already passed a Grade B examination, or whose 
duties do not bring them in direct contact with the public. 

The outcome of the series of Informal Talks and Round Table 
Conferences planned for the younger members of the staff weekly 
from January 5 to April 27 inclusive, was most successful. 
The following talks were interspersed each month with informal 



[58] 

discussions at which the assistants were encouraged to express 
their opinions and at which papers by the pupils were read and 
criticised: The Hbrary assistant in the eyes of the pubHc, Mr. 
George H. Tripp; How I became a Hbrarian, Mrs. Bertha V. 
Hartzell; What is a Hbrarian, Mr. George H. Evans; The 
working child and the library. Miss Louise C. Keyes; The 
ethics of a librarian, Mr. Truman R. Temple; Amenities of a 
children's librarian, Mrs. Mary E. Root ; Loyalty : an essential 
trait, Mr. Harold T. Dougherty; What one can get from a 
summer library course. Miss Harriet E. Howe; The library 
assistant as a reader, Mr. Robert K. Shaw; The apprentice 
system in Springfield, Mr. Hiller C. Wellman; Duties and 
rewards of a village librarian, Mrs. Evelyn L. Warren; Your 
future in the library profession, Mr. Charles F. D. Belden. 

No examination was held, but as an incentive to take the 
experiment seriously and in the hope of bringing out unrecog- 
nized abilities, the Librarian offered a prize of a book for the 
best paper on the addresses of each month, and at the end of the 
course two cash prizes, $ 1 5 and $ 1 respectively, for the two 
best papers on the lectures of the entire course. 

A course of ten lectures in Elementary Reference Work, given 
by senior members of the Staff to junior assistants in the Central 
Library and general assistants in the branches and reading rooms, 
began on November 21, 1922. In order to obviate the absence 
from duty of too many assistants at a time, the lecture course 
will be repeated, beginning February 8, 1 923. 

Nineteen library assistants attended the first presentation of the 
course, and at the examination, held at its conclusion, sixteen 
passed. 

It is a pleasure to record that the custodian of the Patent 
Room, Central Library, attended, last Fall, a course of ten 
voluntary lectures on Patent Law at the Law School of Boston 
University. 

CONCLUSION. 
Note is properly here made of the service records of the fol- 
lowing employees who have recently left the Library. 



[59] 

On March 27, 1922. Mr. John F. Locke of the Shelf De- 
partment, who entered the service of the Library on December 
1 0, 1 894, was retired on half pay under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 113 of the Acts and Resolves of the General Court of 
Massachusetts in the year 191 1, providing for the retirement of 
veterans of the Civil War. Mr. Locke was a faithful, much 
loved assistant; he carries vsath him the good will and respect 
of all his colleagues. 

On May 15, Miss Barbara Duncan, in charge of the Allen 
A. Brown Music Room, who entered the service in December 
1907, resigned to become librarian of the Music Library of the 
Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, New York. 
Miss Duncan is particularly qualified to meet this opportunity 
for enlarged responsibility, and her associates bespeak success for 
her in the new and attractive position to which she has been 
called. Mr. Richard G. Appel was appointed temporarily in 
charge of the Music Room on August 21,1 922. 

On August 15, Mr. Langdon L. Ward, Supervisor of 
Branches, who entered service in December 1896, died. His 
death, although not unexpected, came as a shock to all his 
associates. He was a kindly, conscientious, learned gentleman, 
devoted to the problems of his department. His loss will long 
be felt in library circles. Miss Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of 
Circulation, was appointed on October 20, 1 922, to the position 
of Suprvisor of Branches left vacant through the death of Mr. 
Ward. 

On September 1 , Miss Josephine E. Kenney, Librarian of the 
North End Branch who entered service in June 1906, resigned 
to accept appointment to the librarianship of the Jamaica Train- 
ing School for Teachers, Jamaica, Long Island. Miss Kenney 
had been on leave of absence from the Boston Public Library 
since September 7, 1 92 1 . On September 8, Miss Florence M. 
Bethune, Librarian of the West End Branch, who entered 
service in 1903, resigned and soon thereafter married. Both 
Miss Kenney and Miss Bethune were valued and efficient ad- 
ministrators and librarians. 

Acknowledgment is again gratefully made for the continued 



[60] 

cooperation of those members of the staff of the Library Depart- 
ment who, in their several places, have faithfully performed 
the routine work of the institution. I record also my continuing 
appreciation of the efficient service of Mr. Otto Fleischner, 
the Assistant Librarian. 

Respectfuly submitted, 

Charles F. D. Belden, 

Librarian. 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF CENTRAL, BRANCH AND READING ROOM 
CIRCULATION. 





1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 


1921-22 


1922-23 


Central Library 


439.827 


441,582 


507.038 


551.190 


591,640 


590.655 


Branches: 














Brighton 


58,038 


58,764 


71,720 


75,273 


79,397 


83.238 


Charlestown 


78.549 


70.828 


80,900 


91,455 


98,780 


101.140 


Codman Square 


87.038 


78,694 


85,246 


91,721 


101,792 


103.810 


Dorchester 


59.719 


60,513 


68.173 


68,873 


70,396 


67.810 


East Boston 


101.119 


94,971 


1 1 5,062 


111,813 


120,234 


120.993 


Hyde Park 


75.726 


70,363 


78.444 


79,592 


80,855 


82.498 


Jamaica Plain 


48.978 


48,306 


55.771 


58,228 


60,507 


59.970 


Mt. Bowdoin 


.... 


.... 




• • • . 


. • • • 


83.376 


North End 


51.406 


42,123 


59.'676 


69.846 


85,187 


96.359 


Roslindale 


.... 


.... 


66,798 


73,310 


80,879 


82.597 


Roxbury . 


74.919 


71,418 


74,024 


80,469 


80,933 


79.125 


South Boston 


91,503 


89,478 


100,602 


104.979 


121,194 


124.809 


South End 


94,470 


87.465 


94,386 


99,751 


97,403 


99.543 


Upham's Corner 


108,170 


100.009 


111.186 


113,846 


119.375 


120.257 


Warren Street 


.... 




88.720 


94,991 


104.412 


108.665 


West End . 


112,255 


167J81" 


114,162 


123,137 


136,431 


142.470 


West Roxbury 


47,341 


51.519 


55,273 


54,956 


66.470 


74.970 


Reading Rooms: 














Allston 


38,257 


41.217 


43,492 


41,369 


47,328 


53,598 


Andrew Square 


27,264 


27.266 


29,726 


30,761 


33,944 


33,413 


Boylston Station 


33,700 


33.163 


40,758 


44,829 


50,033 


55,672 


City Point . 


48.503 


43.744 


33,784 


34,510 


30,300 


38,381 


Faneuil 


22.625 


21.571 


22,626 


24,001 


24,913 


24,944 


Jeffries Point 


. . 






.... 


10,309 


35,925 


Lower Mills 


18.546 


l'7!897 


l'8',3b8 


18,040 


17.765 


17,577 


Mattapan . 


14.068 


14.757 


16,351 


16,439 


20.499 


20.497 


Mt. Bowdoin 


52.790 


53.200 


68.177 


73,620 


80.492 


.... 


Mt. Pleasant 


40.092 


42.690 


48.098 


49,949 


57,562 


53,846 


Neponset . 


15,530 


18,474 


19.433 


22,630 


28,789 


33.263 


Orient Heights 


13,777 


14,967 


21.133 


21,934 


27,970 


34,240 


Parker Hill 


46,250 


40,044 


52.846 


48,891 


49,209 


49,459 


Roslindale 


51,399 


56,918 


.... 






. . . . 


Roxbury Crossin 


g 32,873 


37.652 


43,232 


47!036 


571609 


55,91 1 


Tyler Street 


16,632 


12.556 


1 5.587 


31,343 


40.039 


39.973 


Warren Street 


73,096 


78.723 


.... 


.... 


.... 


. . . . 



Total 



2,074,455 2,028,053 2,300,732 2,448.776 2,672,646 2.768,984 



[62] 

The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form : 

VOLUMES, 

1917-18 gain over preceding year ........ 24,217 

1918-19 loss from preceding year 46,402 

1919-20 gain over preceding year ........ 272,679 

1920-21 gain over preceding year ........ 148,044 

1921-22 gain over preceding year 223,870 

1922-23 gain over preceding year 96,338 

USE OF BOOKS. 
CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 









HOME USE 
DIRECT. 


HOME USE 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


SCHOOLS AND 
INSTITUTIONS 

THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS. 


February, 1922 . . 39.088 


14,904 


13,723 


67,715 


March, 






36,804 


12,405 


15,775 


64,984 


April, 






35,173 


12,456 


15,575 


63,204 


May, 






29,178 


9,242 


20,420 


58,840 


June, 






23,468 


7,655 


1 5,838 


46,961 


July, 






18,590 


5,561 


1,980 


26,131 


August, 






20,022 


5,261 


1,679 


26,962 


September, 






19,443 


4,862 


1,468 


25,773 


October, 






24,897 


6.478 


6,420 


37,795 


November, 






33,907 


10,569 


13,000 


57,476 


December, 






34,179 


12.097 


14,050 


60,326 


January, 19 


23 




30,221 


9,577 


14,690 


54,488 



Totals 



344,970 



1,067 



134,618 



590,655 



DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL CIRCULATION. 



Central Library: 
a. Direct ...... 

h. Through branches and reading rooms 
c. Schools and institutions, through 
Branch Department 

Branches: 
Brighton 
Charlestown 
Codman Square 
Dorchester 
East Boston 
Hyde Park . 
Jamaica Plain 
Mt, Bowdoin 

Carried forward 



home 


SCHOOLS AND 


TOTAL. 


USE. 


INSTITUTIONS. 




344,970 






1 1 1 ,067 








134,618 


590,655 


47,801 


35,437 


83,238 


90,232 


10,908 


101,140 


97,474 


6,336 


103,610 


59,027 


8,783 


67,810 


101,469 


19,524 


120,993 


76,533 


5,965 


82,498 


50,120 


9.850 


59.970 


83.376 


.... 


83.376 



699.451 



99.743 



799,194 



[63] 



Brought forward 
Roslindale 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
South End . 
Upham's Corner 
Warren Street 
West End . 
West Roxbury 



Reading Rooms: 
Allston 

Andrew Square 
Boylston Station 
City Point . 
Faneuil 
Jeffries Point 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan 
Mt. Pleasant 
Neponset 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill . 
Roxbury Crossing 
Tyler Street 



HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 


USE. 


INSTITUTIONS. 


699.451 


99,743 799.194 


78.933 


3,664 82.597 


62,090 


,17,035 79,125 


109,044 


15,765 124,809 


85,731 


13,812 99,543 


1 11 .568 


8.689 120.257 


107,470 


1,195 108,665 


123,287 


19,183 142,470 


62,333 


12,637 74,970 


1.439,907 


191.723 1,631.630 


53,598 




53.598 


33,413 






33.413 


55,672 






55,672 


38,381 






38.381 


24,944 






24,944 


35.925 






35.925 


17,577 






17,577 


20.497 






20.497 


53.846 






53.846 


33,263 






33.263 


34,240 






34.240 


49,459 






49.459 


55,91 1 






55.91 1 


38,992 


981 39.973 



545.718 



981 



546.699 



These figures are condensed into the following : 

Books lent for home use, including circulation through 
schools and institutions. 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through the 
branches and reading rooms) ........ 

From branches and reading rooms (excluding books received from Central) 2, 



590.655 
1 78.329 



Total 



Comparative. 1921-22. 

Centra! Library circulation: 

Direct home use .... 354,587 
Through branches and reading rooms 106.502 

Branch Department circulation: 
Direct home use 

From branch collections . . 1.335,018 
From reading rooms . . . 575.930 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch System) 



2 
1922 



768.984 
i-23. 



461.089 

1.910,948 
300,609 



344,970 
1 1 1 .067 



1,439,907 
545,718 



456.037 

,985.625 
327.322 



2.672,646 



2,768,984 



[64] 



Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 



Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts . 



Totals ..... 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts 



Totals 
Borrowed from othe 



lib 



raries ror use here 



1921-22. 
1,315 
306 



1922-23. 

1,344 

282 



1,621 



346 
75 



421 
40 



,626 

442 
110 

552 
28 



The classified "home-use" circulation of the branches and 
reading rooms was as follows, for two successive years: 





1921 


-22 




1922-23. 


Branches: 


VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 


VOLUMES. 


PERCENTAGE 


Fiction for adults . 


399,455 




30 


435,081 


30.31 


Non-fiction for adults 


144,243 




11 


1 52,036 


10.6 


Juvenile fiction 


515,342 




39 


537,641 


37.5 


Juvenile non-fiction 


269.694 




20 


309,622 


21.5 


Reading Rooms: 












Fiction 


397,402 




69 


370.559 


67.8 


Non-fiction 


175,528 




31 


175,159 


32.2 



At the Central Library the classified "home-use" circulation 

shows the following percentages : 

1921-22. 



1922-23. 

PERCENTAGES. PERCENTAGES. 



Fiction 48.66+ 

Non-ficrion 51.33+ 



47.86+ 
52.13+ 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 



BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE. 



For the Central Library: 

From City appropriation . 
From trust funds income 

For branches and reading rooms: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 



By Fellowes 
Branch) 

Totals 



Athenaeum (for the 



Roxbury 



1921-22 
7,709 
3,461 
— 11,170 



53,875 



53,875 

1,140 

66,185 



1922- 

7,440 
4,701 

55,311 



23. 
12,141 

55,311 

622 

68,074 



[65] 



Of the 668 volumes acquired by the Fellowes Athenaeum 
during the past year, 622 were purchases, 30 were gifts, and 1 6 
were of periodicals bound. 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



Accessions by purchase (including 622 volumes 
by Fellowes Athenaeum for Roxbury Branch) 

Accessions by gift (including 30 volumes through 
Fellowes Athenaeum for Roxbury Branch) 

Accessions by Statistical Department . 

Accessions by exchange ..... 

Accessions by periodicals bound (including 1 6 
through Fellowes Athenaeum for Roxbury 
Branch) ....... 

Accessions of newspapers bound 



CENTRAL. 


BRANCHES. 


TOTAL 
VOLUMES. 


12,141 


55,933 


68,074 


7,369 


796 


8,165 


129 


.... 


129 


47 


.... 


47 


1,664 


133 


1,797 


97 


.... 


97 



21,447 



56,862 



78,309 



THE CATALOGUE. 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 
Serials .... 
Branches .... 

Recatalogued 



Tota 



VOLS. AND 



TITLES. 



PARTS. 

1921-22. 

31,022 14,608 
4,040 
46,591 
18,872 



39,512 
6,129 



100,525 60.249 



TITLES. 



VOLS. AND 
PARTS. 

1922-23. 
25,533 15,731 



4,127 
48,007 
14,056 



39,937 
7,178 



91,723 62,846 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 21,822 

Special collection, new books and transfers ...... 1 ,868 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. .......... 1 ,765 

25,455 
Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc 11.438 

Net gain. Central Library 14,017 

Net gain at branches (including reading rooms) ...... 11,866 

Net gain, entire library system ......... 25,883 



[66] 



The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852-53 . 








9.688 


1887 . 








492,956 


1853-54 .... 16,221 


1888 . 








505,872 


1854-55 .... 22,617 


1889 . 








520,508 


1855-56 








28,080 


1890 . 








536,027 


1856-57 








34,896 


1891 . 








556.283 


1857-5S 








70,851 


1892 . 








576,237 


1858-59 








78,043 


1893 . 








597,152 


1859-60 








85,031 


1894 . 








610,375 


1860-61 








97,386 


1895 . 








628.297 


1861-62 








105,034 


1896-97 








663.763 


1862-63 








110,563 


1897-98 








698,888 


1863-64 








116,934 


1898-99 








716,050 


1864-65 








123,016 


1899-1900 








746,383 


1865-66 








130,678 


1900-01 








781,377 


1866-67 








136,080 


1901-02 








812,264 


1867-68 








144,092 


1902-03 








835,904 


1868-69 








152,796 


1903-04 








848,884 


1869-70 








160,573 


1904-05 








871,050 


1870-71 








179,250 


1905-06 








878,933 


1871-72 








192,958 


1906-07 








903,349 


1872-73 








209,456 


1907-08 








922,348 


1873-74 








260,550 


1908-09 








941,024 


1874-75 








276,918 


1909-10 








961,522 


1875-76 








297,873 


1910-11 








987,268 


1876-77 








312,010 


1911-12 








. 1,006,717 


1877-78 








345,734 


1912-13 








1,049,011 


1878-79 








360,963 


1913-14 








. 1,067,103 


1879-80 








377,225 


1914-15 








1,098,702 


1880-81 








390,982 


1915-16 








1,121,747 


1881-82 








404.221 


191^17 








1,139,682 


1882-83 








422,116 


1917-18 








1,157,326 


1883-84 








438,594 


1918-19 








1,173,695 


1884-85 








453,947 


1919-20 








1,197,498 


1885 . 








460,993 


1920-21 








. 1,224,510 


1886 . 








479,421 


1921-22 








1,258,211 




1922-23 








1,284,094 


Volumes in entire library system 


, 








1,284,094 


Volumes in the branches and reading rooms 


• 








325.163 


These volumes are located as 


follows : 


Central Library . . . 958,931 


Roxbury : 


Brighton 






1 7,308 


Fellowes Athenaeum 30,973 


Charlestown 






15,414 


Owned by city 5,462 


Codman Square 






8.393 


Total, Roxbury . . . 36,435 


Dorchester . 






1 7,930 


South Boston 






18,152 


East Boston 






20,725 


South End . 






14,052 


Hyde Park. 






32,124 


Upham's Corner 






1 1 ,844 


Jamaica Plain 






17,285 


Warren Street 






7,504 


Mt. Bowdoin 






7.699 


West End . 






20,458 


North End . 






8,975 


West Roxbury 






11,731 


Roslindale 








10,619 


Allston 








3,973 



167] 



Andrew Square 
Boylslon Station 
City Point . 
Faneuil 
Jeffries Point 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan . 



3,628 


Mt. Pleasant 


5,423 


4,290 


Neponsel 


2,575 


5,600 


Orient Heights . 


3.480 


3,405 


Parker Hill 


2.344 


1,894 


Roxbury Crossing 


4.261 


1,684 


Tyler Street 


4.089 


1,869 







THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 



Requisitions received and filled .... 
Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles exclusive of Stack 4 (Printing Dept. count) 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) . 
Signs ......... 



Blank forms (numbered series) .... 
Forms, circulars and sundries (outside numbered series) 
Catalogues and pamphlets ..... 



1921-22. 
337 

15,438 
214,898 

656 

30,960 

1,775 

5,695,995 

46,767 

162,460 



1922-23. 
299 

12,816 
184,666 

480 

27,967 

1,603 

4.202,276 

30,352 

177.000 



THE BINDERY. 



Number of volumes bound in various styles 

Magazines stitched 

Volumes repaired .... 

Volumes guarded .... 

Maps mounted .... 

Photographs and engravings mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1921-22. 


1922-23. 


44,587 


48,544 


239 


265 


2,436 


2,141 


1,381 


1,169 


93 


64 


4,492 


2,929 


163,747 


175.532 



THE LECTURES OF 1922-1923. 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were illustrated 
with lantern slides. 



1922 
Oct. 5 
Oct 



America in the Pacific. Sarah Ellen Palmer. 
8. *The Creative Genius of the American Negro. James Weldon 
Johnson. 

Oct. 9. Florence: her Art, Literature and Social Life. Miss Lilian 
Whiting. (Ruskin Club.) 

Oct. 14. Flower Arrangement. Clarke Thayer. (N. E. Home Eco- 
nomics Association.) 

Oct. 15. Christopher Columbus. Rev. William M. Stinson, S.J. 

Oct. 1 9. A Trip through the Land of EvangeHne. Rev. A. T. Kemp- 
ton. 



Nov. 


2. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


9. 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 


13. 


Nov. 


16. 


Nov. 


18. 



[68] 

Oct. 22. The Times of Shakespeare. Frank Chouteau Brown. 

(Drama League Course.) 
Oct. 23. What's What in Books. John Clair Minot. (Ruskin Club.) 
Oct. 26. The American and Philippino Achievements in the Philippines. 

Mme. J. C. DeVeyra. 
Oct. 29. Interesting Experiences w^ith Birds and Animals. Ernest 
Harold Baynes. 
Transportation. James M. Kimball. 

Old Opera Days and Opera Singers. Francis Henry Wade. 
Our National Forests. Philip W, Ayres. (Field and Forest 

Club Course.) 
Life in the Australian Bush. Captain William Payne. 
Ruskin: John the Baptist of Social Reform. Rev. Davis 
Wasgatt Clarke, D.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
16. §The Passion Play of 1922. John C. Bowker. 

The Social Bond of Everyday Art. Herbert J. Spinder. 
(N. E. Home Economics Association.) 
Nov. 19. Famous Productions of Shakespeare. F. W. C. Hersey. 

(Drama League Course.) 
Nov. 23. The Romance of Arizona. W. D. O'Neil. 
Nov. 26. *The Music of the Western Church. Wallace Goodrich. 

With musical illustrations. 
Nov. 27. Sunny Italy. Mrs. James Frederick Hopkins. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
^Modern Anglo-Irish Poets. Norreys Jephson O'Conor, A.M. 

From Sea to Sea in South America. Emma G. Cummings. 
^Message of Music, or the Art Work of the Future. Mme. 
Beale Morey. With musical illustrations. 
Ruskin Memories in Italy and England. Mrs. May Smith 

Dean. (Ruskin Club.) 
White Mountain Trails. Walter CoUins O'Kane. (Field 
and Forest Club Course.) 
^Intelligent Buying of Clothing. Harriet Ainsworth. (N. E. 

Home Economics Association.) 
*Franz Liszt, the Man and the Artist. Lecture-recital. John 
Orth. 
Luca della Robbia. Charles Theodore Carruth. 
^Reading: "The Christmas Carol." Prof. Walter Bradley 
Tripp. (Dickens Fellowship.) 
Dec. 24. *The Development of Mechanical Music. Geoffrey O'Hara. 

With musical illustrations. 
Dec. 28. Stained Glass as an Artist's Medium. Charles J. Connick. 
Dec. 31. Japan: her People and her Art. Marie A. Moore. 
§ Repeated on November 29. 



Dec. 


3. 


Dec. 


7. 


Dec. 


10. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


14. 


Dec. 


16. 


Dec. 


17. 


Dec. 


21. 


Dec. 


21. 



[69] 



^Modern Development in Radio Communication: Wireless 
Telephony, etc. Emory Leon Chaffee. 
Trip through the National Parks and the Northwest. Charles 

H. Bayley. 
The Camp Fire Girl : through Nature to Womanhood. Rev. 
Charles W. Casson. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
*Food as a Factor in Social Work. Bailey B. Burritt. (N. 

E. Home Economics Association.) 
*Music in Adversity. Archibald Thompson Davison. With 
musical illustrations. 
Some Early American Arts. Edwin James Hipkiss. (Under 
the auspices of the Museum of Fine Arts.) 
^Shakespeare in the Twentieth Century. E. Charlton Black. 
(Drama League Course.) 
The Wonderland of America. Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Opening the Pyramids of Ethiopian Kings. Ashton Sanborn. 
(Under the auspices of the Museum of Fine Arts.) 
§The High History of the Holy Grail. Rev. William M. Stin- 
son, S.J. 
Boston in Fiction. Martha A. S. Shannon. 
*The Orators and Oratory of Shakespeare. Henry Lawrence 

Southwick. (Drama League Course.) 
*The Anniversary of John Ruskin's Birth. Rev. Joseph P. 
MacCarthy, Ph.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
On the Ridgepole of the Continent: first Lessons in Moutain- 
eering. Marcus Morton, Jr. (Field and Forest Club 
Course.) 
*What is Poetry to you? Horace G. Wadlin. 
* Wordsworth. Mrs. Carolyn Hillman. (Ruskin Club.) 

Washington's Visits to Boston. Charles F. Read. 
*The Problem of Popularizing Good Music. Leo R. Lewis. 

With musical illustrations. 
^Portia the Wife. Martha Moore Avery. 
^Washington and Franklin: their Part in the Triumph of the 
American Revolution. Joseph M. Whipple. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
City Planning. Elisabeth M. Herlihy. 
^Romance of Sicily. Vincent Ravi-Booth. 
Some Less Familiar Portions of Germany. Harvey N. 
Shepard. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Mar. 10. Design all about us. Grace A. Cornell. (N. E. Home 
Economics Association.) 

§ Repeated on February 1 1 . 



1923 
Jan. 4. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


II. 


Jan. 


13. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


25. 


Jan. 


28. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


1. 
4. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


II. 
12. 
15. 
18. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


25. 
26. 


Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 


1. 

4. 
8. 



[70] 

Mar. 1 1 . *Poetry in the Making. John Livingston Lowes. 

Mar. 12. Ruskin's Significance To-Day. Agnes Knox Black. (Rus- 

kin Club.) 
Mar. 15. Recent Municipal Activities in Boston. His Honor, the 

Mayor, James M. Curley. 
Mar. 18. *Back to Shakespeare: the Technique of the Spoken Drama. 

Robert E. Rogers. (Drama League Course.) 
Mar. 19. Stamp Collecting as a Hobby. Ralph N. Hall. (Boston 

Philatelic Society.) 
Mar. 22. Bird Banding: the Why and the How. Charles B. Floyd. 
Mar. 25. Getting Back to Nature. How we Answered the Call of the 

Wild. Manly B. Townsend. 
Mar. 26. ^Finding Culture for Oneself. Henry Austin Higgins. (Rus- 

kin Club.) 
Mar. 29. The Fountains of Rome. Cav. L. Melano Rossi. 
Apr. \. Dramatizing the Master Dramatist: Recent Plays upon 

Shakespeare. Albert H. Gilmer. (Drama League 

Course. ) 
Apr. 5. The Art of Drawing: as a Means to an End, and as an End 

in Itself. Alfred Mansfield Brooks. (Under the auspices 

of the Museum of Fine Arts.) 
Apr. 9. Spain. Ellen Page. (Ruskin Club.) 
Apr. 23. '^The American Drama. Gordon Hillman. (Ruskin Club.) 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS. 1922-1923. 
1922 

May. Boston in 1 822. 
July. Early School-books and Boston School-houses. 

Boston, 1817—1921. (Books, prints and drawings.) 
Aug. The Graphic Arts. 
Sept. Hazard's Red Cross painting "For Humanity." 

Samuel Adams. 

Recent Accessions in the Fine Arts. 
Oct. The Work of the American Negro. 

History of Transportation. American Locomotives. 
Nov. Semi-Centennial of the Great Fire of Boston. Boston Fires. 

Forestry. 

The Beggar's Opera, 

Modern Stagecraft. 

Photographs by Hamilton Revelle. 
Dec. Mothercraft and Child Welfare. 

The White Mountains of New Hampshire. 

Luca della Robbia. The Nativity in Art. 

The Art of Stained Glass. 



[71] 

1923 

Jan. Early American Art. 

Egypt. 

The Drama and Eric Papa's original drawings for Chinese stage- 
settings of "The Flame of Love." 
Feb. Mountains of America. 

George Washington. 

"House Beautiful" Cover Design Competition. 

Bicentenary of Death of Sir Christopher Wren. 
Mar. Modern Boston. (Public buildings, parks, etc.) 

Boston Philatelic Society. 

Fountains of Italy. 
April. Reproductions of Drawings by Old Masters. 

Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
Poster-Design Competition. 

American Merchant Marine Library Association Book-plate 
Competition. 

McGreevey Collection of Baseball Photographs. 

Original paintings of Book-illustrations by N. C. Wyeth. 



CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENTS AND LIBRARIANS OF BRANCHES 
AND READING-ROOMS. 

As at present organized, the various departments of the Li- 
brary and the branches and reading-rooms are in charge of the 
following persons : 
Otto Fleischner, Assistant Librarian. 
Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief of Catalogue Department. 
William G. T. Roffe. in charge of Shelf Department. 
Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief of Ordering Department. 
Frank H. Chase, Custodian of Bates Hall Reference Department. 
Pierce E. Buckley, Custodian of Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent ar 

Newspaper Departments. 
Frederic Serex, in charge of Newspaper Room. 
Wilham J. Ennis, in charge of Patent Room. 
Winthrop H. Chenery, Chief of Special Libraries Department. 
Walter Rowlands, in charge of Fine Arts Division. 
George S. Maynard, in charge of Technical Division. 
Richard G. Appel, in charge of Allen A. Brown Music Room. 
Francis J. Hannigan, Custodian of Periodical Room. 
Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of Issue Department. 
John H. Reardon, in charge of Information Office. 
Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches. 



[72] 

Alice V. Stevens, Chief of the Central Branch Issue Division. 

Marian A. McCarthy, in charge of Branch Binding. 

Robert F. Dixon, in charge of Shipping Division. 

Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian of Stock Room. 

Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with Children. 

Mary C. Toy, Children's Librarian, Central Library. 

A. Frances Rogers, Chief of Registration Department. 

Horace L. Wheeler, in charge of Statistical Department. 

Mary H. Rollins, Editor of Publications. 

Francis Watts Lee, Chief of Printing Department. 

James W. Kenney, Chief of Bindery Department. 

Henry Niederauer, Chief of Engineer and Janitor Department. 

Marian W. Brackett, Librarian of Brighton Branch. 

Katherine S. Rogan, Librarian of Charlestown Branch. 

Elizabeth P. Ross, Librarian of Codman Square Branch. 

Elizabeth T. Reed, Librarian of Dorchester Branch. 

Laura M. Cross, Librarian of East Boston Branch. 

EHzabeth Ainsworth, Librarian of Hyde Park Branch. 

Mary P. Swain, Librarian of Jamaica Plain Branch. 

Beatrice M. Flanagan, acting Librarian of Mt. Bowdoin Branch. 

Mary F. Curley, acting Librarian of North End Branch. 

Grace L. Murray, Librarian of Roslindale Branch. 

Helen M. Bell, Librarian of Roxbury Branch. 

M. Florence Cufflin, Librarian of South Boston Branch. 

Margaret A. Sheridan, Librarian of South End Branch. 

Mary F. Kelley, Librarian of Upham's Corner Branch. 

Beatrice C. Maguire, Librarian of Warren Street Branch. 

Fanny Goldstein, Librarian of West End Branch. 

Carrie L. Morse, Librarian of West Roxbury Branch. 

Mary A. Hill, Librarian of Lower Mills Reading Room. 

Emma G. Capewell, Librarian of Lower Mills Reading Rooms. 

Ellen C. McShane, acting Librarian of Neponset Reading Room. 

Katherine F. Muldoon, Librarian of Allston Reading Room. 

Margaret H. Reid, Librarian of Mt. Pleasant Reading Room. 

Edith F. Pendleton, acting Librarian of Tyler Street Reading Room. 

Katrina M. Sather, Librarian of Roxbury Crossing Reading Room. 

Edith R. Nickerson, Librarian of Boylston Station Reading Room. 

Mary Golden, acting Librarian of Andrew Square Reading Room. 

Catherine F. Flannery, Librarian of Orient Heights Reading Room. 

Alice L. Murphy, Librarian of City Point Reading Room. 

Mary M. Sullivan, Librarian of Parker Hill Reading Room. 

Gertrude L. Connell, Librarian of Faneuil Reading Room. 

Margaret A. Calnan, acting Librarian of Jeffries Point Reading Room. 



INDEX. 



Accessions, 29-33, 49; tables, 64-65. 

Allston Reading Room, 49. 

Americana, 30. 

Andrew Square Reading Room, 20, 49, 
53. 

Artz Collection, 30. 

Balance sheet, 10-16; receipts, 3; 
special account, 16. 

Barton -Ticknor Room, 42. 

Bates Hall, Centre Desk and Reference, 
19, 27, 38. 

Benton, Josiah H., trust funds, 7, 8. 

Bethune, Florence M., resignation, 59. 

Bindery, 20, 67. 

Books, 24, 26, 29; accessions, 49, 64- 
65; appropriations recommended, 17, 
28; circulation, 18, 27, 43-44, 48; 
Polish, 20; storage plant, 18. 

Boston Retirement Pension, Resolution 
by Trustees, 4. 

Botvditch Library, 36. 

Branches and reading rooms, 3, 20-25, 
27-28, 48-49; estimates, 4; requests 
for establishment of, 4, 18, 29. 

Brighton Branch, 50. 

Brown Music Library, 30, 36, 42-43. 

Business Branch, establishment urged by 
Trustees, 4; recommended by Ex- 
amining Committee, 18, 26. 

Card-holders, 33, 34, 48. 

Carr, Samuel, elected vice-president, 1 ; 
decease, and resolution by the Trustees, 
1-2. 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 34- 
37, 65-67. 

Central Library, annex, 18, 28; pri- 
vate aid for library, 7-8. 

Chamber of Commerce, Americaniza- 
tion committee, 46; business branch 
library, 26. 

Charlestown Branch, 44-45, 50. 

Children's Department and work with 

children, 25, 27, 36, 43-47, 50-51. 
Children's Museum, 46. 



Circulation, Bates Hall, 38; branches 
and reading rooms, 48—49; Children's 
Room, 43^4; increase, 18, 27; News- 
paper Room, 39; Open Shelf Room, 
40; Periodical Room, 41 ; Special 
libraries, 42; tables, 61-64. 

City Point Reading Room, 21. 49. 53. 

Codman Square Branch, 24-25. 

Connolly, Msgr. Arthur T., reappointed 
a trustee, I ; elected vice president, 2. 

Currier, Guy W., appointment, 1. 

Dorchester Branch, 46, 49, 50. 

Duncan, Barbara, resignation, 59. 

East Boston Branch, 50. 

Employees, 17, 20-23, 34-35, 59; 
chiefs of departments, 71-72; salaries, 
25-26, 28; staff instruction, 57. 

Estimates, 4. 

Examining Committee, members of, 7; 
recommendations of, 17-18; report 
I 7-26. 

Exhibitions, 42, 56, 70-71. 

Faneuil Reading Room, 45, 53, 

Finance, appropriations recommended, 
17, 27; balance sheets, 10-16; re- 
ceipts, 3 ; trust funds, 5-8. 

Fine Arts Department, 42. 

Government documents. (5ee In- 
formation Office.) 

Information Office, Government docu- 
ments and Open Shelf Room, 27, 40. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, 49. 

Jeffries Point Reading Room, 49, 53. 

Kenney, Josephine E., resignation, 59. 

Lectures, 56-58, 67-70. 

Librarian, report of, 27-60. 

Library Life, 37. 

Library staff. (5ee Employees.) 

Locke, John F., retirement, 59. 

Lower Mills Reading Room, 23, 49. 

Mann, Rev. Alexander, D.D., President 
of the Board, 1; resignation, 2; reso- 
lution by Trustees, 3. 

Mattapan Reading Room, 49, 53. 



[74] 



Mt. Bowdoln Reading Room, 23, 50. 
Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, 22. 49. 
Neponset Reading Room, 23, 53. 
Newspaper Room, 39. 
North End Branch, 24, 44-45, 49, 51. 
Open Shelf Room. (5ee Information 

Office.) 
Orient Heights Reading oom, 21, 49, 

54. 
Parker Hill Reading Room, 54. 
Patent Room, 39. 
Periodical Room, 41 . 
Prince Collection, 36. 
Printing Department, 19, 67. 
Publications, 35-37. 
Registration Department, 33-34. 
Roslindale Branch, 51. 
Roxbury Branch, 22, 49, 51. 
Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 49, 

54. 
Salaries. (5ee Employees.) 



South Boston Branch, 4, 45, 52. 

South End Branch, 3, 20, 52. 

Special Libraries, 19, 27, 42. 

Story Hour, 25, 45-46. 

Teachers' Room, 47. 

Technical Division, 31, 38, 42. 

Trust funds, appeal for, 7-8; expendi- 
tures, 11, 13; statement of, 5-6. 

Trustees, organization of, I. 

Tyler Street Reading Room, 21, 46, 49, 
54. 

University Extension Courses, 30, 56- 
57. 

Upham's Corner Branch, 23, 52. 

Ward, Langdon L., decease of, 4, 59; 
resolution by Trustees, 5, 

Warren Street Branch, 49, 52. 

West End Branch, 24, 49, 52. 

West Roxbury Branch, 44-46. 49, 53; 
dedication of new building, 3, 54; 
description of, 55-56. 



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Sketch Map 

BOSTON 

Public Library System 



— Clfy BoaaOarln 

^— Pnitcpsl Thent^/ihnt 



Area of City (Land only) 45.60 Square mile 



Population (Census of 1920). 748,060. 



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