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Full text of "Annual report"

SEVENTY- SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1923-1924 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1924 




CENTRAL LIBRARY: BATES HALL. 



SEVENTY^ SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBFIARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1923-1924 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1924 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 
MP6; 7.15.24; 2500. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON FEBRUARY 1. 1924. 



ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1927. 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. MICHAEL J. MURRAY. 

Term expires April 30, 1924. Term expires April 30, 1926. 

WILLIAM A. GASTON. GUY W. CURRIER. 



Term expires April 30, 1925. 



Term expires April 30, 1928. 



DIRECTOR. 
CHARLES F. D. BELDEN. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 14, of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preHminary or- 
ganization; that for 1 853 made the first annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it consist of one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected, each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1 878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present,, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

CoAKLEY, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

CuRRiER, Guy Wilbur, 1922- 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1899-1908. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923- 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78, 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

HiLLiARD, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 



Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921- 

PiERCE, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

TiCKNOR, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1867-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

WiNsoR, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton, May 8, 1908, to February 6, 1917; William F. 

KeNNEY, February 13, 1917, to May 7, 1920; Rev. ALEXANDER 

Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; MsGR. Arthur T. 
Connolly, since April 1 3, 1923. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was entitled Superintendent.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1 852 - December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Supcrinlendent, 1858- January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., m.d.. Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 1 1, 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 - January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903 -March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 191 7 -June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., ll.b.. Director, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1924. 



IfOPENED. 

May 2, 1854 
28, 1871 
1. 1872 
16. 1873 
5, 1874 

5. 1874 
25. 1875 

7. 1875 
1877 
1877 

3. 1878 

6, 1880 



Jan. 

May 

July 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 

*June 
Aug., 
Sept., 

*Dec. 

*Jan. 



Departments. 
fCentral Library, Copley Square , 
tEast Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 
§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
IIFeiiowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
tCharlestown Branch, Monument Square 
fBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Road 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
JLower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
JSouth End Branch, Shawmut Ave. and West Brookline St. 
tJamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 
JRoslindale Branch, Washington, cor. Ashland St. 
tWest Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St 

§Mattapan Branch, 7 Babson St *Dec. 27, 1881 

tNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennel St *Oct., 1882 

§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave *Jan. I, 1883 

§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St. . . . *Nov. 1, 1886 

§Allston Branch. 138 Brighton Ave *Mar. II. 1889 

f Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. . . . *Nov. 1 2, 1 890 

JMt. Pleasant Branch, Vine, cor. Dudley St *Apr. 29, 1892 

$Tyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St *Jan. 16, 1896 

tWest End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St Feb. 1, 1896 

JUphams Corner Branch, Columbia Rd., cor. Bird St. . . . *Mar. 16, 1896 

§Warren Street Branch, 392 Warren St *May I, 1896 

§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St *J*i. 18. 1897 

§Boylston Station Branch, The Lamartine, Depot Square . *Nov. 1, 1897 

§Orient Heights Branch, 1030 Bennington St *June 25, 1901 

JCily Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway .... *July 18, 1906 

§Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St »July 15, 1907 

tHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. , . Jan. 1, 1912 

tFaneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St *Mar. 4, 1914 

§Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St *Mar. 5, 1914 

§Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St »Oct. 15,1921 

U In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. * As a delivery station. f In building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. % In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. || The lessee of the Fel- 
lowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees . 

Balance Sheet .... 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Director 

Appendix to the Report of the Director 

Index to the Annual Report 1923-1924 



1 

10 
14 
28 
65 
83 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Central Library: Bates Hall 
South End Branch: Reading Room 
Map of the Library System 



Frontispiece 

Facing page 54 

At the end 



To His Honor, James M. Curley, 

Ma^or of the Cit^ of Boston. 

Sir: — The Board of Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston presents the following report of its condition and 
affairs for the year ending January 31, 1924, being the seventy- 
second annual report, 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

On April 13, 1923, the Right Reverend Monsignor Arthur 
T. Connolly was elected President to succeed Bishop Alexander 
Mann resigned, and Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, Vice President in 
Monsignor Connolly's place. 

Mr. Guy W. Currier was reappointed a trustee for the term 
ending April 30, 1928; and Mr. William A. Gaston was ap- 
pointed a trustee for the term ending April 30, 1925, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Bishop Mann. 

The Board organized at the annual meeting on May 18, 
1923, by the election of Monsignor Connolly as President, Mr. 
Kirstein, Vice President, and Delia Jean Deary, Clerk. 

On October 26, the Board approved a change in the title of 
"Librarian" to that of "Director". 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts of the Library which are to be expended by the 
Trustees in the maintenance of the Library consist of the annual 
appropriation by the Mayor and City Council, and the income 
from Trust Funds given to the Trustees but invested by the City 
Treasurer. During the past year these receipts were 

Annual appropriation .......... $779,935.00 

Special appropriation .......... 50,000.00 

Income from Trust Funds ......... 25,037.00 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds income of previous year . . 69,710.00 



Total $924,682.00 



[2] 

Receipts which are accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes, during the year have 
been as follows 

From fines $15,612.47 

From sales of catalogues, etc 39.04 

From commissions on telephone stations 566.12 

From sale of waste paper ......... 550.64 

From payments for lost books 1,116.61 

Interest on bank deposits 67.77 

Total $17,892.65 



ESTIMATES FOR 1924-25. 

The estimates of the Trustees for the maintenance of the Li- 
brary for the coming year, forwarded to Your Honor in budget 
form, were $905,614, of which $629,421 is for personal service 
and $276,193 for general maintenance. 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the year the Library has added 62,166 volumes by 
purchase as against 68,074 in 1922. Of this number 51,329 
were placed in the branches as against 55,31 1 in 1922; and 
10,837 in the Central Library as against 12,141 in 1922; 57,052 
were bought from the City appropriation at an average cost of 
$1.35 per volume, and 4,032 from Trust Funds income at an 
average cost of $4. 1 4 per volume. 

The total expenditure for books and periodicals was 
$109,405.29 as against $122,916.07 in 1922. Of this amount 
$90,000 represents the expenditure from City appropriation as 
against $100,000 in 1922, and $19,077.56 from Trust Funds 
income as against $21 ,883.27 in 1922. The cost of periodicals 
was $9,351 as against $9,568 in 1922. 

CIRCULATION. 

The total circulation of books for home use, including circu- 
lation through schools and institutions was as follows: 



[3] 

From Central Library, including Central Library books issued through the 

branches 576,997 

From branches, excluding books received from Central Library , . 2,345,864 



Total 2.922,861 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

On May 18, 1923, the Trustees were granted a special appro- 
priation of $50,000 for equipping and furnishing the Addition to 
the Central Library Building; and on May 28, a contract was 
authorized with the Library Bureau for two additional tiers of 
steel stacks, amounting to $32,998. This work was completed 
and accepted on January 12, 1924. Contracts for heating and 
lighting these stacks are now under consideration. 

Other improvements and repairs include a new ventilating sys- 
tem for the Lecture Hall, Central Library, at a cost of $4,164; 
the replacement of certain plumbing at the Central Library, 
$2,902 ; new electric light fixtures. Special Libraries Depart- 
ment, $683; new boiler at the West End Branch, $1,818; 
painting at the Hyde Park Branch, $954; and repairs to wall. 
West End Branch, $698. 



BRANCHES. 

On February 1 , 1923, the South End Branch was opened for 
public use at 9 o'clock a.m. in the new Municipal Building at 
the corner of Shawmut Avenue and West Brookline Street. 

On April 13, on request of Your Honor, the Board had a 
conference with the School Committee, represented by Mr. 
Richard J. Lane, Chairman, and Mr. Jeremiah E. Burke, Su- 
perintendent of Schools, relative to the establishment of branch 
libraries in school buildings. A tentative plan was agreed upon, 
to be worked out later in connection with the erection of new 
school buildings, with special reference to districts where there 
are at present inadequate library facilities. 

On May 1 8, the Board approved a change in the title of read- 
ing room to that of branch; and a grading of all branches as 
major and minor branches. 



[4] 



BRANCH FOR BUSINESS MEN. 



The importance of the estabhshment of a business men's 
branch has been for many years considered by the Trustees as 
an imperative step which the Library should take. The ideal 
location for such a branch, in the judgment of the Trustees, 
would be in the new Chamber of Commerce Building. If up 
to the present this much called for and really necessary extension 
of the Boston Public Library system has not materialized, it is 
not the fault of the Trustees. All that is required is the selection 
of a place for such a branch and the necessary appropriation by 
the city for its maintenance. 

Already a sister city in the State of Rhode Island has taken 
this step with other cities, and quite recently the city of Pitts- 
burgh, following the good example, has appropriated $10,000 
for the establishment and maintenance of a down-town branch 
of the Carnegie Library. The Trustees realize that the cost of 
space for the project in the business center of the city is almost 
prohibitive, but we cannot believe that the civic pride of Boston 
merchants can long allow such a fact to stand in the way of its 
accomplishment. 

If a single room sufficiently large to contain selected material 
of particular interest to persons engaged in commercial and 
technical pursuits were secured, it would not be long before its 
utility and necessity would become so apparent that more ex- 
tensive quarters would be demanded as a necessity. 

While the number of books kept in a business branch must, 
owing to limits of space, be restricted, still a direct telephone to 
the Central Library and a daily delivery service would make it 
possible to draw freely from the extensive collection of reference 
works at the main Library. 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS. 

On May 4, a check for $964.30 was received from the ad- 
ministrator of the estate of Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, on 
account of the distribution of the residue of said estate, and was 
added to the original bequest and funded as the "Sarah E. Pratt 



[5] 

Fund" for the purchase of books for the Dorchester Branch. 

On June 29 the Trustees received a check from the estate of 
Mary Elizabeth Stewart in the amount of $3500, in final settle- 
ment of a bequest under the will of Miss Stewart, which was 
funded as the "Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund" the income to 
be applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

On December 28 the Trustees received notice of a gift to 
the city for the benefit of the Mattapan Branch, in the sum of 
$11,781.44; which was funded as the "Oakland Hall Trust 
Fund", the income to be applied to the purchase of books and 
other library material for the Mattapan Branch. 

Other important gifts include a marble bust of Henry James, 
given by the sculptor. Captain Francis Derwent Wood, R.A. 
of London, England; a collection of 219 volumes of French 
history and literature of French writers of eminence, given by 
Mr. Charles F. Lebon, former professor of French in the En- 
glish High School ; a marble statue by Larkin Goldsmith Mead 
called "Echo", given by Mrs. Henry S. Shaw of Milton for the 
West End Branch; an oil painting by Marcus Waterman called 
"Hayfields" (July) bequeathed to the Library by his brother 
William C. Waterman; and many other gifts largely of single 
works, which are partially recounted in the report of the Director. 
The Trustees renew the hope that the Library may be the con- 
tinued object of large gifts and bequests. It is from such sources 
that the institution must derive the more valuable additions which 
give to it a high and permanent rank. 

RETIREMENT OF MR. OTTO FLEISCHNER. 

During the year the Library has lost the services of many 
employees on account of the Pension Law, among them Mr. 
Otto Fleischner, Assistant Librarian. At the meeting of the 
Board held on December 14, 1923, the following Resolution 
was adopted by the Trustees and ordered spread upon the 
records : 

RESOLVED: that in the retirement of Otto Fleischner the Pubhc 
Library of the City of Boston has been deprived of the services of a 
devoted and capable official who, for more that thirty years, contributed 
much to the life and progress of the institution. Mr. Fleischner entered 



[6] 

the service of the Library on November 23, 1891. Soon after the occu- 
pation of the Copley Square building in 1 895 he was chosen to organize 
the Special Libraries Department which has since been conducted along 
the lines he inaugurated. On January 12, 1900, Mr. Fleischner was 
advanced to the position of Assistant Librarian. In this post, under three 
successive librarians, he labored earnestly and indefatigably in the service 
of the Library, carrying many responsibiHties easily and efficiently. He 
has withdrawn from the Library at the age of seventy, still full of energy 
and zest in life. The Trustees assure to Mr. Fleischner their enduring 
esteem and for his continuing happiness extend their hearty good wishes. 
RESOLVED : that the Board of Trustees accord to him the freedom 
of the alcoves with the customary privileges; that this minute be placed 
upon the records and that a copy of the same be sent to Mr. Fleischner. 



TABLE OF TRUST FUNDS. 

A detailed statement of these funds, and the income therefrom, 
is contained in the report of the City Auditor, but a condensed 
statement of them is as follows : 

RESTRICTIONS OF GIFT. 
For the purchase of valuable and rare editions of 
the writings, either in verse or prose, of American 
and of foreign authors, "to be known as the Long- 
fellow Memorial Collection." 
To buy "books of permanent value." 
Purchase of books. 
For the purchase of books. 

For "the purchase of books of permanent value and 
authority in mathematics and astronomy," to be 
added to the Bowditch Collection. 
Unrestricted. 
Unrestricted. 



For the purchase of books for the use of the young. 
Available only in years when the City appropriates 
for the maintenance of the Library at least 3% of 
the amount available for department expenses from 
taxes and income in said City. 
For the purchase of books. 

For the purchase of books upon landscape gardening. 
For the purchase of books and for binding for the 
Abram E. Cutter Collection. 

For the purchase of books of "permanent value and 

authority." 

Unrestricted. 



FUND. 

Artz 


• 


AMOUNT. 
$ 10,000.00 


Bates . 
Bigelow 
Billings . 
Bowditch 


• 


50,000.00 

1,000.00 

100,000.00 

10,000.00 


Bradlee . 

Center . 

"Children's" (under 

Benton Will) . 


1,000.00 
39,543.14 

103,000.00 



Clement. 
Codman 
Cutter . 


2,000.00 
2,854.41 
4.140.00 


"Elizabeth" (under 
Matchett Will) . 


25,000.00 


Ford . 


6,000.00 



Carried forward $354,537.55 



[7] 



Brought forward 
Franklin Club 

Gr«en 

Charlotte Harris . 

Thomas B. Harris 

Hyde . 

Knapp . 

Abbott Lawrence . 

Edward Lawrence . 



Lewis . 


5.000.00 


Loring . 


500.00 


Mead . 


2,500.00 


Oakland Hall 


11,781.44 


O'Reilly 


1,000.00 


Phillips . 


30,000.00 


Pierce . 


5,000.00 


Pratt . 


1 ,464.30 


Scholfield . 


61,800.00 


Sewall . 


25,000.00 


Skinner . 


51,732.14 


South Boston . 


100.00 


Mary E. Stewart . 


3.500.00 


Ticknor. 


4.000.00 



Todd . 

Townsend 
Treadwell 
Tufts . 
Twentieth Regiment 



Wales . 

Alice L. Whitney 

James L. Whitney 
Wilson . 

Total 



$354,537.55 

1,000.00 Books of permanent value, preferably books on 

government and political economy. 
2,000.00 Books relating to American history. 
10,000.00 Books for Charlesfown Branch, published before 

1850. 
1,000.00 For benefit of the Charlestown Branch. 
3,632.40 Unrestricted. 
10,000.00 For the purchase of books. 
10,000.00 Books having a permanent value. 

500.00 "To hold and apply the income and so much of the 

principal as they [the Trustees] may choose to the 

purchase of special books of reference to be kept 

and used only at the Charlestown Branch of said 

Public Library." 

For the purchase of old and rare books to be added 

to the John A. Lewis Library. 

Memorial Fund, from the income of which books 

are to be bought for the West End Branch. 

Unrestricted. 

Books and library material for the Maltapan 

Branch. 

From the Papyrus Club for the purchase of books 

as a memorial of John Boyle O'Reilly. 

"To the mamtenance of a free public library." 

"Purchase of books." 

"Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 

For the benefit of the Dorchester Branch. 

To be used for books of permanent value. 

For the purchase of books. 

Unrestricted. 

For benefit of the South Boston Branch. 

Unrestricted. 

Books in Spanish and Portuguese, five years old in 

some one edition. 
50,000.00 The income to be expended annually for current 

newspapers of this and other countries. 
4,000.00 Books five years old in some one edition. 
13,987.69 Unrestricted. 

10,131.77 For the benefit of the Charlestown Branch. 
5,000.00 "For the purchase of books of a military and 

patriotic character, to be placed in the alcove appro- 
priated as a Memorial of the Twentieth Regiment." 
5,000.00 For the purchase of books. 
5,000.00 For the benefit of sick and needy employees and 

the purchase of books. 
8,645.84 For books and manuscripts. 
1,000.00 For the purchase of books. 

$698,813.13 



[8] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Trustees call special attention to the report of the Ex- 
amining Committee which is appended hereto and included, as 
required by the city ordinance, as a part of this report. Many 
of the suggestions and recommendations embodied in the same 
have the sympathy and general approval of the Board. Those 
who served as members of the Examining Committee for the fiscal 
year are 

Rev. William J. Barry 

Mrs. I. Tucker Burr 

Paul F. Butler, M.D. 

Mr. Francis M. Carroll 

Miss Rosanna M. Dowd 

Mrs. Carl Dreyfus 

Mr. Henry Gideon 

Mr. Edward S. Goulston 



Miss Heloise E. Hersey 
Mr. Vincent A. Keenan 
Hon. Frank Leveroni 
Mrs. Marguerite J. Martin 
William Jason Mixter, M.D. 
Harold A. Murphy, M.D. 
Miss Mary Ranney 



CONCLUSION. 

The Trustees have held regular semi-monthly meetings during 
the year except during the summer months, for the transaction of 
the business of the Department. They feel that the Library ser- 
vice has been well administered during the year, and that this is 
due to the industry, intelligence, and loyalty with which the 
Director and the employees of the Library have performed their 
respective duties. 

Arthur T. Connolly, 
Louis E. Kirstein, 
Michael J. Murray, 
Guy W. Currier, 
William A. Gaston. 



0] 



BALANCE SHEET. RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing and 

Binding Departments) 

Temporary employees ...... 

Service other than personal 

Advertising .... 

Contract work (Printing outside) 

Postage 

Transportation of persons 

Cartage and freight . 

Light and power 

Rent, taxes and water 

Premium on surety bond 

Communication 

Cleaning, towels, etc. 

Removal of snow 

Examinations . 

Expert and architect 

Fees 

Extermination of insects 

Boiler inspection 

General plant repairs 

To expenditures for equipment 

Furniture and fittings 

Office 

Molorless vehicles ....... 

Tools and instruments ...... 

Books: 

City appropriation .... $80,193.96 

Trust funds income . . . 18,951.40 

Newspapers : 

City appropriation . 
Todd fund . 

Periodicals 

General plant equipment 

To expenditures for supplies 
Office 

Food and ice . 
Fuel 

Forage and animals . 
Medical . 

Laundry, cleaning and toilet 
Agricultural 

Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant . 



M 60.63 
1.615.34 



$362,003.58 
123,208.51 



72.50 

164.65 

1,216.14 

223.76 

12,211.78 

8.923.36 

15,853.00 

22.50 

1,239.07 

1,128.43 

288.36 

126.00 

1,488.77 

11.10 

3.15 

31.00 

17,494.85 



3.168.34 
813.76 
180.00 
651.48 



99,145.36 



2,775.97 

9,043.59 

618.04 



3,685.54 

349.59 

25.050.79 

9.80 

18.54 

1,108.16 

98.84 

58.00 

1,746.47 



$485,212.09 



60.498.42 



116,396.54 



Carried forward 



32.125.73 
$694,232.78 



[11] 



EXPENSES, JANUARY 31. 1924. 



By City Appropriation 1923-1924 .... $779,935.00 

Income from Trust funds ...... 24,205.83 

Income from James L. Whitney bibliographic account . 700.00 

Interest on deposit in London . . . . . 131 .69 

By Balances brought forward from 1923: 

Trust funds income. City Treasury .... 50,934.27 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . . . 9,650.18 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 4,565.72 

James L. Whitney bibliographic account . . . 4,560.61 

Library Building Addition, equipping and furnishing . 50,000.00 



Cr. 



$804,972.52 



19,710.78 



Carried formard 



$816,683.30 



[12] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Brought forward . 

To expenditures for material 
Building . , . , 

Electric . . . . 

General plant . 



$ I 



05.00 
1,675.78 
2.767.00 



Special items 

To expenditures from Alice M. Whitney Fund 
Pensions ........ 

Binding Department: 

Salaries ........ 

Stock 

Equipment ........ 

Cleaning ........ 

Repairs ........ 

Light 

Small supplies ....... 



316.00 
777.87 



57,289.55 
4,475.18 
94.25 
314.19 
43.40 
46.23 
20.90 



Printing Department: 
Salaries 
Stock . 
Equipment . 
Contract work 
Cleaning 
Repairs 
Light . 
Small supplies 



Special Appropriation : Library Building Addition 
Equipping and furnishing ..... 



To Amount paid into City Treasury: 
From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations . 
Sale of waste paper ... 
Payments for lost books 
Interest on deposit ... 



To Balance, January 31, 1924: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on dep>osit in London 
Trust funds income balance, City Treasury 
James L. Whitney bibliographic account 
Interest on deposit in London 



Balance unexpended: 

General appropriation ..... 
Special appropriation. Library Bldg. Addition 



12.104.93 

3.822.54 

761.16 

203.47 

314.17 

152.74 

31.98 

14.48 



34,196.50 



15,612.47 

39.04 

506.12 

550.64 

1,116.61 

67.77 



17,292.45 
4,166.35 

46,61 5.09 

5,260.61 

131.69 



21,653.51 
1 5,803.50 



$694,232.78 



4,547.78 



1,093.87 



62,283.70 



17,405.47 
34.196.50 



17,892.65 



73.466.19 



37.457.01 



$942,575.95 



[13] 
EXPENSES, JANUARY 31, 1924. 







Cr. 


Brought forward ..... 


^ ^ 


$816,683.30 


By Receipts: 






From fines 


15.612.47 




Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists . 


39.04 




Commission on telephone stations . 


506.12 




Sale of waste paper ..... 


550.64 




Payments for lost books .... 


I.I 16.61 




Interest on deposit ..... 


67.77 


1 7 RQ? M 



$942,575.95 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee takes pleasure in submitting its 
report for the year ending January 31. 1924. 

INTRODUCTION. 

In order to examine properly the various functions of the 
Boston Public Library as it is now operating, the work of the 
Examining Committee was divided among the following sub- 
committees : 

Branches. 

Administration and Finance. 

Books and Catalogues. 

Printing and Binding. 

Special Libraries. 

Children's Department and Work with Schools. 

These sub-committees have worked this year, as in the past, 
with the exception of the one on Branches. This committee was 
considered of such importance that it was decided to have all 
the members of the Examining Committee serve on it, so that 
as many visits as possible might be made to the branches; and 
in that way more vital and constructive suggestions might be 
received. The Committee believes this change is more than 
justified, and that it has obtained many suggestions for the good 
of the entire branch system. 

BRANCHES. 

The Sub-Committee on Branches comprises this year all the 
members of the Examining Committee, and is accordingly able 



[15] 

to base its report on more than sixty visits to the various branches. 
This unusually large number of visits marks suitably the Seven- 
tieth Anniversary of the appointment of this historic committee, 
— "to examine the Library and make report of its condition to 
the Trustees." The hundreds of men and women who have 
served as Examiners have testified again and again, since 1853, 
to the kindling of interest and faith in the Library which has 
resulted from their widened knowledge of the service that it 
renders to the city. We acknowledge once more this year that 
we are debtors to the Library, rather than the Library to us, in 
our study of its task and its needs. 

The Committee finds thirty-one branches of the Library in 
operation. Of these, nine are housed in buildings owned by 
the Library; nine in rooms in municipal buildings; and thirteen 
in buildings or rooms leased from private owners. Not one of 
the buildings owned by the Library is unsuitable or unattractive. 
But the conditions of many of the other buildings are a blot on 
the good name of the Library. The first recommendation of 
the Committee is that the Library should be given larger freedom 
in the municipal buildings, — freedom, namely, to keep clean. 
At present, entrances are cluttered and dirty; staircases are de- 
faced and ill-lighted; the janitor's service to the branch library 
is in many cases highly unsatisfactory; yet the Library authori- 
ties are helpless to improve conditions becauses these matters are 
under the care of a separate city department. The branch at 
City Point is typical of these poor conditions. That at Dor- 
chester is wickedly so. Inadequate rooms, repairs sadly ne- 
glected, dirt and disorder reigning in rooms and halls, — and the 
Library not in the least responsible for the conditions. The 
difficulty can be remedied by the application of one of the 
fundamental principles of good housekeeping for public insti- 
tutions. The Library should be given by the City the money 
to do its own cleaning, when housed in municipal buildings. 
Divided responsibility is sure to stand for dirt and disorder. Let 
the united vote of the Examining Committee persuade the City 
to remedy this long-standing abuse. The standard of order and 
beauty held by the Public Library may well be above the 
standards of other municipal departments. Let it do its rightful 



[16] 

share toward lifting the others up, rather than submit tamely 
to being dragged down to the lower level. 

Of the thirteen branches occupying rooms leased from private 
owners, much the same report must be made. Only two or 
three of them are what they ought to be. Many are entirely 
unsuitable in their plan. A square room where children and 
adults must be seated near together, where the Librarian has 
insufficient desk room, where books in the busy hours must be 
heaped on the floor, where quiet is impossible, — all these bad 
features have to be accepted as a matter of course in rented 
rooms. In many places the Librarian has used the utmost 
ingenuity in making the best of inconveniences. But the City 
should certainly lose no time in providing better quarters at 
Roxbury, Mt. Bowdoin, Warren Street, Boylston Station, Jef- 
fries Point, Orient Heights, Mattapan, Roxbury Crossing, 
Parker Hill, and Andrew Square. 

Another evil crying for redress, is the improper lighting of 
many of the branches. Mere business economy would dictate 
that an expert on lighting should be employed to go with the 
Supervisor through the thirty-one branches and prescribe for the 
difficulties which he will find in 85 per cent of them. It is actual 
cruelty to tempt children to read in badly lighted rooms. Even 
the new South End Branch suffers from the lights being too high, 
and has no daylighU — an almost incredible architectural blunder 
for the housing of a library. The Hyde Park Branch, one of 
the best branch buildings, has poor lighting in its children's room. 
The West End Branch, — famous historic building that it is, 
visited by many as a landmark of Old Boston, — has a lighting 
system most inadequate, the lights being several feet too high 
and of too small lighting power. If these most important and 
modern branches must be judged faulty in lighting, what can we 
say of the Mattapan, East Boston, Orient Heights, Dorchester, 
and Lower Mills Branches? Every adult reader is needlessly 
annoyed by being compelled to work in semi-darkness, and 
every child is cruelly exposed to severe eye-strain which may 
involve impaired vision all through life. The City should give 
the Library a sum of money to employ an expert, and he should 



[17] 

have power to advise and install excellent electric lighting in 
every room belonging to the Boston Public Library. 

The branches show this year, to those of the Committee who 
have previously visited them, an encouraging improvement in 
esprit de corps among the employees, and an increased ability 
to render a high grade of community service. 

The visitors of the Committee report various details which 
require attention; but all such matters are reported to the Di- 
rector and to the Supervisor of Branches, and are dealt with as 
promptly as possible. The one insuperable obstacle to immediate 
improvement is the size of the appropriations given to the Library 
by the City. Some of the suggestions made by the visitors hardly 
bear further postponement ; for example, a change of location of 
telephone at the West End Branch, a counter desk at the Tyler 
Street Branch, and new window shades at Upham's Corner. 
It is not wise public policy to reduce expenditure for such repairs 
below the figures given in the Library budget. 

But this year the Sub-Committee on Branches wishes to throw 
special emphasis in its report on just three matters. The first is 
that of improvement in cleanliness and in the keeping up of 
repairs, by making it possible for the branches in municipal build- 
ings, and so far as possible in rented quarters, to be themselves 
responsible for cleaning, painting, etc. The second is the prob- 
lem of proper lighting of all rooms where reading is done. The 
third, and most important, is the old cry, — "Books, books, and 
yet more books!" The real test of the work of a great public 
library is the figures which tell of the growth in circulation. It 
is difficult to compile enlightening statistics as to the use of books 
in the library buildings. A great many books may be called 
for which are little used. On the other hand, with open shelves, 
large numbers of books are used of which no record is kept. 
But the circulation is a tolerably reliable measure of the use of 
the library. During the past five years the branch circulation 
has increased more than 47 per cent. 

For the year 1918 it was 1,755.100 
For the year 1923 it was 2,594,033 

This is an extraordinary record. But it must give us pause when 



[18] 

we discover that the amount of money allotted to the thirty-one 
branches last year for the purchase of new books and the re- 
placing of old ones was only $66,500. In purchasing power 
this is equal, perhaps, to 40,000 volumes, and must suffice for 
all branch replacements, new books, and deposits, a number 
wholly inadequate to meet the fast-growing demands of the 
public. It is only as we ponder on these figures that we begin 
to realize what is the responsibility of the City of Boston, — to 
meet a hunger of the mind as keen as any hunger of the body, — 
to guard against a starvation more bitter and perhaps more 
dangerous that that following a famine. 

If every one of the City authorities could pass an hour in the 
North End Branch (where the circulation for the year was 
107,329), or in the East Boston Branch (with its circulation for 
the year of 125,968), or in the South Boston Branch (with its 
circulation for the year of 1 39, 1 73) , or in the West End Branch 
(with its circulation for the year of 154,267), the appropriating 
authorities might well be inclined to double the amount of money 
for the purchase of books, instead of reducing the sum. 

The call for "easy reading" for our little, foreign-born chil- 
dren is a loud one. So is the call for books in foreign languages, 
with English translation. So is the call for all sorts of books 
supplementary to the work of the schools. Meantime, the great 
tradition of the past bids us not to forget that high scholarship 
has not asked in vain the help of the Boston Public Library. 
Learning does not stand still. We cannot live on the reputation 
of our noble "Special Collections." By our loyalty to those 
whose "plain living and high thinking" put us in possession of our 
treasures, we are bound not to withhold our gifts for to-day's 
needs of the great scholars. The Public Library ought to find 
mention in the will of every man and woman who loves books 
and loves our City. But when bequests are few and far between, 
the demand for service must be met each year. "Books, books 
and yet more books!" The cry comes from the scholar whose 
learning without the great books must go unfed. It comes even as 
loudly from the little child, who, in this country, may in his turn 
become a famous scholar or a great inventor, — and who, like 
the scholar, starves without the prmted page. For men, women. 



[19] 

and children, Carlyle's true words gain emphasis with the parsing 
years, — "In books lies the soul of the whole Past Time; the 
true University of these days is a Collection of Books." 

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE. 

Under the guidance of its Board of Trustees, with the aid of 
the Director and his co-workers, the usefulness of the Boston 
Public Library to the community continues to be enlarged in 
many directions. This widening of the demand for its service is 
likely to go on indefinitely, as a result of the modern methods of 
publicity in making its facilities known. But an increased de- 
mand means both more books and more work in handling them. 
The institution combines the function of a scholarly reference 
library, called upon to meet the needs of a constituency of some 
40,000 students, with those of a lending library seeking to supply 
the demand of a population of over 750,000 for contemporary 
fiction and popular non-fiction. The efFort required to meet both 
these needs is a severe one, which taxes to the utmost both the 
strength of the Library Staff and the available financial resources. 

Books to meet the demand for popular consumption may per- 
haps be furnished from the City appropriation ; but larger perma- 
nent funds must be provided if the store of works for the use of 
scholars is to be kept up to the point where it meets the expecta- 
tions of the students who are drawn to Boston in large numbers 
by the fame of the Library's collections. It is to be hoped that 
public-spirited citizens will strengthen by endowment the re- 
sources of the Library, already built up to such an extent by the 
far-sighted generosity of its benefactors in the past. 

The increase of labor involved in the growing use of the Li- 
brary may be met in one of two ways : by enlarging the staff or 
by laying a heavier burden upon those now employed. It appears 
that in general the Library has been forced to the second of 
these courses. During the past five years, the circulation of books 
has grown 33^4 P^r cent, while the number of employees 
has increased only 13^/3 per cent. The Committee desires to 
commend the loyalty of the Library staff, who have done their 
full share in helping the work of the institution to grow without 
undue demands upon the City's purse. 



[20] 

The Committee is pleased to state that during the past year 
many of the recommendations in the report submitted a year ago 
have been carried into effect, and others are in process of adoption 

One of the problems confronting the Director at the main li- 
brary is that of providing additional space for the accommoda- 
tion of new departments and of departments that should be en- 
larged, TTie Teachers' Room is inadequate for its purpose: 
so is the Children's Room. More open shelf room is necessary. 
If increased space is to be provided, it must be gained either by 
adding at least two floors to the Annex at a heavy expense, or 
by utilizing for the service of the public the area now devoted to 
printing and binding. We recommend that the Trustees and 
Director consider the possibility of removing the printing and 
binding departments to some other location, thus releasing for 
other purposes the space now employed in handling that me- 
chanical work. If this is not feasible, we suggest that the work 
of printing and binding be done outside the Library at the City 
Printing Plant, or elsewhere. 

In addition to the needs of the Children's Room and the 
Teachers' Room, the Periodical and Newspaper Rooms, both 
very widely used, deserve and require better facilities. Here 
modern equipment is necessary, including new racks for the 
periodicals and newspapers. Such improvements we believe 
will be economies in the end. Without presuming to pass judg- 
ment upon mechanical devices off-hand, it appears to us that the 
carrying system is out of date, and that it might well be replaced, 
if funds can be made available for the purpose. 

BOOKS AND CATALOGUES. 

The most important duty of a library is unquestionably to 
supply books to the public. However well-organized are the 
other activities, the conduct of the branches, the perfection of 
the catalogue and delivery systems, the work connected with the 
public schools, etc., — all these are futile if the library cannot 
fulfill its fundamental purpose and offer books in plenty. And 
this requires money. In 1922 the appropriation from the City 
for the purchase of books was $ 1 00,000. Last year this amount 
was cut to $90,000. Out of this sum must be purchased : 



[21] 

( 1 ) All books for the thirty-one branches and the branch 
deposit collection which supplies reading matter to the 289 other 
agencies. 

(2) All the circulating books for the Central Library. 

(3) All the periodicals (costing nearly $10,000 yearly). 

(4) Some of the newspapers (since the increased cost of 
these has made the established newspaper fund inadequate). 

(5) All photographs and lantern slides. 

(6) All books to replace worn-out volumes. 

When we remember the advance in price of popular fiction 
alone and realize that thirty to forty of each of the much-called- 
for novels must be bought, it is easy to see how rapidly the 
money is used. While the several trust funds help out con- 
siderably, many of these are limited in their use and in general 
should be left free for the purchase of expensive rare volumes 
and reference books. 

This Committee recommends that in future the City of Boston 
should appropriate annually a sum large enough to take care of 
all books needed for circulation both at the Central Library and 
at the branches. 

PRINTING AND BINDING. 

This Department appears to be efficiently managed and the 
quality of the production is excellent. Apparently the only 
need of the Department, and that is not a pressing one, is the 
exchange of the old linotype machine for a more modern type. 

The policy of an appropriation per annum for the purchase 
of matrices appears to be a wise one and in the opinion of the 
Committee should be continued. 

This Committee repeats the recommendation of the former 
Committee that a so-called over-sewing or stitching machine 
should be purchased by the City at a cost of approximately Four 
Thousand ($4,000.00) dollars. At the present time there are 
vacancies caused by resignations which need not be filled in the 
event that such machine is purchased. The saving of the salaries 
for these positions will amount in one year to very nearly the cost 
of the machine. For the branch libraries thirty thousand volumes 



[22] 

are rebound each year, and for this work such a machine would 
be available at a saving of six cents per volume. There seems 
to be no valid economic reason why this machine should not be 
installed. 

The reinforcement of books put into effect during the past two 
years has added greatly to the life of the volume and must 
represent a great saving to the Library. 

The Department appears to be well organized and is in 
comfortable quarters. 

In connection with these two Departments there is a grave 
question as to whether or not they should be continued as an 
integral part of the Library. This Committee does not purpose 
to pass upon this question, but believes it should have the thorough 
consideration of the Trustees. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

The Committee on Special Libraries recommends that the 
tables and cabinets in the West Gallery be rearranged ; that two 
more alcoves of the Special Libraries' Reading Room be opened 
for the accommodation of an enlarged open shelf collection and 
that the open shelf architecture collection now located in alcove 
14 of the West Gallery be moved into the new alcoves. It also 
recommends that the school picture work be removed from the 
Special Libraries catalogue and delivery room to some less public 
spot ; that special cases be provided for the more expensive prints, 
especially the Medici prints; that the ventilation of the Music 
Library be improved and that all music books be collected in 
one room. 

children's department and work with schools. 

The Library is doing noteworthy work in the cause of Ameri- 
canization, and for this reason the branches should be near the 
center of foreign population. The visits of the Librarians to the 
various evening schools are acquainting many immigrants with 
the work of the Public Library. In this connection there is a 
great demand for books printed in both English and a foreign 
language. The story telling for adults and children is an im- 



[23] 

portant factor in this work. This Committee hopes to see this 
activity further extended in its usefulness to both foreign and 
native born. 

It is suggested that the schools give instructions in the use of 
the catalogue. A great saving of time and energy would be 
effected if -the teachers gave more definite instructions as to the 
books and subjects which the pupils are required to look up. 
This Committee recommends that Librarians make more frequent 
visits to the schools and gite more talks on the use of the Library, 
to be followed by class visits to the Library, where the class may 
have a lesson on the handling of books and the use of the Li- 
brary. It is further recommended that the schools take advantage 
of the Librarians' ofFer to speak at Teachers' meetings, thus 
revealing the resources of the Library to the teachers. The 
annual observance of Library Day in the schools would serve 
to arouse proper appreciation and interest in the Library, one of 
the greatest and most important of the City institutions. Every 
visit of a Library employee to a school serves to emphasize the 
helpful spirit and unselfish devotion of the employees in their 
effort to introduce the book to the child. 

AFFILIATION BETWEEN THE LIBRARIES OF GREATER BOSTON. 

The General Committee wishes to call to the attention of the 
Library employees the opportunities for advancement contained 
in the following statement; and to the general public the articu- 
lation between the Boston Public Library and all other libraries 
in the State. 

Through the interlibrary loan system the Boston Public Li- 
brary is constantly serving other libraries of the Boston district 
by lending books at their request for the use of residents of the 
various towns and cities surrounding Boston. The Library also 
cooperates in this way with the Athenaeum and the State Li- 
brary, and the various college and university libraries of the 
region. These libraries are all glad to lend the Boston Public 
Library books in the same way for the use of Boston readers, 
and books are frequently borrowed from the Harvard University 
libraries. 



[24] 

Through the Special Libraries Association, an organization 
made up of employees of all the libraries, both public and 
private, in the Boston district, the personnel of the Boston Public 
Library is brought into intimate relations with the other librarians 
of Greater Boston. The Library participates in all the work 
of the Association and there is a close cooperation between this 
Library and all the others which are represented in its member- 
ship. 

Announcements of all courses offered by the Library to its 
employees are sent to the other public libraries of the Boston 
district and the employees of many of these libraries have taken 
advantage of the opportunities thus opened. 

The Library is more and more regarded as a centre of leader- 
ship by the libraries of Greater Boston and it is safe to say that 
it is sure to take a prominent and helpful part in every activity 
aimed at the extension of library service in Eastern Massachusetts. 

INSTRUCTION OFFERED TO EMPLOYEES OF THE 
PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 

In the year 1919, Simmons College opened its courses in the 
academic and Library School departments, free of tuition charge, 
to members of the Library staff recommended by the Director of 
the Library. The courses in the College of Business Administra- 
tion of Boston University have been similarly opened, and about 
thirty members of the Library staff have since taken one or more 
courses in these institutions. 

In 1919-20 instructors in the Simmons College Library School 
gave in the Library a course on "Aims and Methods in Library 
Work," which was taken by thirty-five members of tlie staff. 
This was followed, in 1920-21, by a course in "Reference 
Work," under the instruction of Miss Donnelly, Director of the 
Simmons College Library School, which was taken by fifteen 
members of the staff. In 1919-20 Miss Jordan offered a course 
in "Children's Work" in which some thirty members of the staff 
were enrolled. 

In 1920 the Library offered to its employees a course of 
twenty-five lectures on the organization and resources of the 



[25] 

Boston Public Library system. The talks were given by the 
chiefs of the various departments and the Director. The last 
lecture was on the Free Public Library Commission of the 
Commonwealth and its work. At the close of the course an 
examination was held. It was the general feeling that the course 
was eminently worth while, as it gave a broadened outlook on 
the work of the institution. It is hoped to repeat the course with 
some modifications another year. 

In the year 1922 there was given a series of informal talks 
and conferences by the heads of libraries outside Boston, v/hich 
proved very stimulating to the younger members of the Staff. 
In the following year a course in "Elementary Reference Work" 
was given by members of the staff to two sections of the younger 
employees; a syllabus was prepared for each lecture and there 
was an examination at the end of the course. About thirty-five 
members of the staff were enrolled in the course. In the present 
year two courses are being offered by members of the staff, one 
in "Advanced Reference Work" and one in "Children's Work" ; 
about fifteen persons are enrolled in each of these courses. 

In the past three years, by an arrangement with the University 
Extension Division of the Massachusetts Department of Edu- 
cation, weekly lecture courses in literature arranged especially 
for library assistants, have been given in the Lecture Hall of the 
Library by Professor Robert E. Rogers of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. Tliese lectures have proved exceed- 
ingly valuable both to employees of the Boston Public Library 
and to those of other libraries who have attended the courses in 
large number. In the course on "English Literature" given in 
1922, fifty-five members of Library staff were enrolled; in that 
on "American Literature" in 1922-23, fifty of the staff en- 
rolled. The course in "Modern Continental Literature" given 
during the present season, which makes a somewhat narrower 
appeal, is being taken by thirty-four Library assistants and 
twenty-eight employees of other libraries. 

An innovation is being tried, that promises great success, in 
the offering of a course in Italian given weekly by Miss Eleanor 
M. Colleton of the Hancock School. It is hoped that this course 
will enable many of the thirty employees who are taking it to 



[26] 

qualify for the Library examinations in modern language. 

On the whole, the Library is making progress in the adapta- 
tion of instruction to the needs of its employees and in interesting 
those employees in fitting themselves for a higher type of Library 
service. 

The Committee heartily commends these efforts, and hopes 
the assistants will avail themselves of the opportunities in increas- 
ing numbers. The profession of the Librarian is one in which 
when one stops learning one begins to forget. Only by a 
constantly refreshed and stimulated interest, both in books and 
in people, can the Library successfully make its promotions from 
its own ranks, and at the same time keep abreast of modern 
scholarship, both in literature and in education. The Librarian 
should be the strong link between the book — the best thought 
of the best mind, — and the man, the ruler of himself and of 
his country in a true democracy. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

1 . That the increased demand for books be met. 

2. That the question of obtaining more space for new depart- 
ments be considered. 

3. That the feasibility of the suggested plan of segregating the 
printing and binding departments from the main plant be 
debated. 

4. That larger appropriations and larger permanent endowment 
funds be sought. 

5. That the old linotype machines be exchanged for more 
modern ones. 

6. That larger freedom in overseeing the cleaning of libraries 
housed in municipal buildings be granted. 

7. That the lighting throughout the whole library system be 
improved. 

8. That the salaries of heads of departments be raised to equal 
at least those given by other cities containing equally large 
libraries. 

9. That the opening of a business men's library be accomplished 
as soon as possible. This has been suggested several times 



[27] 

by previous committees, and this Committee hopes the repeti- 
tion of the demand will emphasize the importance of the 
request. 

CONCLUSION. 

The Committee wishes to express its thanks to the Director 
and employees of the Library, with whom the members of the 
Committee have had many cordial conferences, as a result of 
which this report has been made possible. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, January 
28. 1924. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 



To THE Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit my report for the year ending January 
31. 1924. 



ACCESSION AND CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 

A gain of 153,877 in the home circulation of books during 
the year is a matter for satisfaction. The total circulation was 
2,922,861 volumes, compared with 2,768,984 for the year 
previous. Some interesting facts are brought to light by the 
study of these figures. The branch circulation, exclusive of 
"deposits" of books sent to schools and institutions, shows a 
gain of 1 50,074 volumes and the Central Library a loss in direct 
home use of 1 6,1 42 volumes. There was an increase of 23,762 
volumes in the number of books sent from the Central Library 
and branches to schools and institutions. The loss in circula- 
tion from the Central Library would seem to be in line with 
similar losses in circulation reported by many of the large libraries 
of the country. In Boston it is believed to be insignificant. 
Certainly the saturation point of books available for circulation 
from the Library system has not been reached, as it is estimated 
that a borrower fails six or eight times out of every ten that 
he tries to procure from the Library or its branches any modern 
popular book, fiction or non-fiction. Such books are always out, 
and the book appropriation does not permit the purchase of 
additional copies to any extent. A circulation of nearly three 
million is creditable, but if there were more books, more branches 
in those sections of the city at present unprovided for, more 
assistants, competently trained, throughout the system, there is 
every reason to believe that within a very short time the present 
circulation could be doubled. 



[29] 

The City appropriation for books for 1 92 1 -22 and 1 922-23 
was $100,000 each year and the accessions for those years 
were the largest in the history of the Public Library. For the 
year 1 923-24 the allowance for books was cut to $90,000, and 
after setting aside the sums necessary for periodicals and news- 
papers, the money available for books for the Central Library 
and its branches was 15 per cent less than for 1922—23. This 
has resulted in a decreased number of accessions, over 6,000 less 
than last year, and has thrown on the limited Trust Funds the 
burden of purchasing many current books for circulation which 
are customarily bought from the City appropriation. 

The total accessions for the year were 75,534 volumes, of 
which 62,166 were acquired by purchase; 11, 134 by gift ("ac- 
cessioned" and catalogued) ; 1,959 by binding periodicals; 135 
by binding newspapers; 44 by exchange; and 96 through the 
American Statistical Association. The purchases were dis- 
tributed as follows: branches, 51 ,329 volumes, including 5,685 
for the Deposit Collection; Central Library, 10,837 volumes, 
including 4,032 volumes bought with Trust Funds. 

The book expenditures for the year total $109,405.29, of 
which $90,000 represents the money appropriated by the City, 
$327.73 that drawn from funds on deposit in London, and 
$19,077.56 the income derived from Trust Funds. 

Further analysis shows that $79,794.59 (City appropriation) 
was spent for books, of which $67,064 went for branch books; 
that $9,351.59 was spent for periodicals, of which $3,457.09 
was for branches, and $5,894.50 for the Central Library; and 
that the Trust Fund expenditures include $16,698.1 7 for books, 
$344.20 for lantern slides, $419.85 for photographs, as well as 
$1,615.34 for newspapers. Altogether, the Library spent for 
books $96,492.76, against $110,450.35 in 1922-23. 

Of the sum spent for books, the amount expended for new 
fiction was $1 1 ,090.79 for 7,273 volumes, comprising 468 titles, 
of which 4,591 were assigned to branches, 1 ,680 to the Branch 
Deposit Collection, and 1 ,002 to the Central Library. The 
books bought for branches form the major part of the increase 
for the year and for them the major part of the book appropria- 



[30] 

tion was expended. The ratio was 80 per cent of all books 
bought, and 84 per cent of the total expenditure. From year 
to year these books do not vary greatly in character. They com- 
prise the current popular fiction and non-fiction, children's books, 
reference books and replacement copies of books worn out. But 
upon these books depend chiefly the growth and popular service 
of the Library System as expressed in circulation, and any de- 
crease in book purchases reacts unfavorably on this gauge by 
which libraries are wont to measure their effectiveness. 

With lessened resources the buying was concentrated on chil- 
dren's books, those of lower cost, and 31,700 volumes for 
younger readers were placed in branches and 2,000 in the 
Central Library. The purchase of many desirable books of 
reference had to be deferred. That they were needed is perhaps 
evident from the fact that the only edition of the Encyclopaedia 
Britannica possessed by one of the branches is that of 1880. 

The closing months of the financial year present many diffi- 
culties in the way of keeping up an uninterrupted supply of 
books for the branches and the Deposit Collection. Since the 
budget allowance cannot be exceeded nor bills be carried over 
to the next fiscal year, the ordering of books in large numbers 
has practically to be suspended during January. Books bought 
at that time are mainly those which can be charged to Trust 
Funds for the Central Library. There is greatly needed a 
book fund available for branch books and independent of the 
current appropriation, which may be used during this annual 
period in which orders now have to be curtailed. 

The Central Library is fortunate in having on its staff numer- 
ous experts in special fields of knowledge ; and a continuous flow 
of recommendations from them, combined with the steady in- 
flux of books submitted on approval, insures the receipt of the 
important current literature of general interest issued in this 
country and abroad. The acquisition of the exceptional book 
or collection of books depends upon opportunity and available 
means. It frequently happens that means are oftener lacking 
than opportunity, especially as regards material sought at auction 
sales. It is not the policy of the Boston Library to pay excessive 



[31] 

prices, but the Director does recognize its obligation to acquire 
and preserve as many of the records relating to the early history 
of Boston and Massachusetts as its Trust Funds will permit. 
Among the examples of pre-Revolutionary and Revolutionary 
matter of local interest recently secured are: 

A Manuscript Minute Book of the meetings held at the Royal Exchange 
Tavern in Boston, December 21st and 23d, 1773, of the principal 
dealers in teas, with a list of the dealers attending these meetings. 

A Boston Non-Importation meeting broadside of April 19, 1 770, in which 
"Merchants . . . are desired to meet at Faneuil Hall ... to receive 
the report of the Committee of Inspection relative to the most unac- 
countable . . . conduct of several persons who have imported goods 
. . . contrary to the agreement — particularly a quantity of Tea." 

A Boston Port Bill broadside letter, May 12, 1774, stating that "An 
Act has been passed by the British Parliament for blocking up the Har- 
bour of Boston with a Fleet of Ships of War." 

A broadside setting forth the final preparations for an advance against 
Boston, January 19, 1 776, "Whereas General Washington has applied 
for a temporary reinforcement . . . that the Army investing Boston 
should be of strength sufficient to act offensively as well as defensively." 

Governor Gage's Amnesty Proclamation, Boston, June 12, 1 775, Gage's 
last warning to the Revolutionists in which he offers in His Majesty's 
name "most gracious pardon to all who shall lay down their arms ex- 
cepting only . . . Samuel Adams and John Hancock." 

A Massachusetts Slavery broadside, "House of Representative, Nov. 19, 
1 754 — Ordered that the assessors of the several Towns . . . send 
into the Secretary's Office the exact number of the Negro Slaves both 
male and females, sixteen years old and upwards that are within their 
Towns and District." (Apparently the order for the first slave census 
to be taken in Massachusetts showing 2717 slaves, 989 of which be- 
longed to Boston.) 

A Manuscript Letter Book, 1 783-1 785, belonging to S. Codman, a Bos- 
ton Merchant, relating to American shipping and business transactions 
after the Revolution. 

The dispersal of a private library afforded opportunity to 
obtain a collection of 1 6th and 1 7th century books giving a view 
of the state of certain sciences of that time. 

There were added to the Brown Collection of Music six of 
Stephen Foster's songs in first editions and a version of "The 
New Yankee Doodle," printed by J. Hewitt, 18 — , quarto 
music sheets with a cut portrait of Washington. 

Other important acquisitions were: 



[32] 

Monumentl vallcani dl archeologia e d'arte, pubblicali per munlficenza di 
Sua Santita Benedetto XV, a cura della Pontificia accademla romana 
d'archeologia. Volume 1. Roma. 1922. (Continuation of Col- 
lezione artistiche.) 

Morley, Thomas. 

A plaine and easie introduction to practicall musicke, set down in forme 
of a dialogue ; divided into three parts . . . London. 1 608. Dia- 
grams. Decorated title page. 

Price, Captain R. K. 

Astbury, Whieldon and Ralph Wood figures and Toby jugs. Lon- 
don. 1922. 

Rio de Janeiro. 

Theatre municipal do Rio de Janiero. Photogravure illustrations, 
consisting of portraits, exterior and interior views, etc. Rio de Janeiro. 
1913. A presentation copy to Enrico Caruso by the Director of the 
theatre. 

Royal Institute of British Architects. 

Sir Chrisopther Wren, A.D. 1632-1723. Bicentenary memorial 
volume. London. 1923. 

Toesca, Pietro. 

La casa artistica italiana; la casa Bagatti Valsecchi in Milano. Mi- 
lano. 1918. 160 plates. 

White, Stanford. 

Sketches and designs. New York. 1 920. 

The examples cited above have been mainly confined to ex- 
ceptional books, or to some of the more costly works, but there 
has been substantial growth in many directions, especially in the 
collections in the Special Libraries. 

The Library has only fallen short in the number of current 
books bought for popular use and circulation throughout the 
system. 

The gifts received during the year include 14,652 volumes, 
12,005 issues of serials, 942 photographs, 75 lantern slides, 51 
newspaper subscriptions, from 7,155 givers, as compared with 
12,968 volumes, 13,078 serials, 763 photographs, 349 lantern 
slides and 48 newspaper subscriptions from 5,936 givers in 
1922-23. 

There was also received under decree of Court "The Oakland 
Hall Trust Fund" of $11,781.44, accepted by the Trustees, 
"the income to be applied to the purchase of books and other 
library material for the Mattapan Branch." 



[33] 

On pages 77-82 of the Appendix will be found listed a selec- 
tion of the more important gifts of the year, with the names of the 
givers. 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

On January 31, 1924, there were outstanding 11 7, 11 9 "live 
cards", that is, registered cards available for present use in 
the custody of citizens and certain holders of "special privilege 
cards. Through the Central Library and the branches 33,976 
new registrations were taken and 26,927 cards renewed, making 
a total of 60,903 cards issued during the past year. In the 
same period 57,667 borrowers allowed their home use privilege 
to lapse. The net increase in cardholders, therefore, for the 
year was 3,236, compared with 3,933 in 1922-23. 

Teachers' cards to the number of 946 were renewed, and 329 
new cards were issued to teachers, making in all 1 ,275 teachers' 
cards in use compared with 1 ,472 a year ago. 

Special privilege cards were voted by the Board of Trustees 
to 176 persons; these, added to the 228 which were renewed, 
make a total of 404 "live" special privilege cards, compared with 
396 last year. 

At the close of 1923 the department reports the new regis- 
tration record, begun in August, 1919, as including 203,218 
cards ; there is also a geographical record of over 1 20,000 cards. 
During the coming year some provision must be made for the 
more adequate housmg of these important card records which 
have outgrown their present quarters. 

CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes and parts of volumes catalogued 
during 1923-24 was 90,107, representing 64,293 titles. The 
number of cards added to the catalogues was 244,772, of which 
number 203,109 were added to the catalogues in the Central 
Library and 41,663 to those in the branches. The Bates Hall 
and Issue Department catalogues received 56,501 cards; the 
official catalogues, 60,723; the Special Libraries catalogues. 



[34] 

28,887 ; the catalogues of the Library of Congress and Harvard 
College, and lists in process, 56,998 cards. The above figures 
are listed not only as a record of the year's work, valuable in 
making comparisons with that of previous years, but as an indica- 
tion to the layman of the immense amount of detail connected 
with the process of making available through the public card 
catalogues the authors, titles and subjects of the book accessions 
of the year. 

In May, 1923, the Card Division of the Catalogue Depart- 
ment was established, with Mr. Thomas Francis Brennan in 
charge, and five assistants working under his immediate direc- 
tion. The Division has the general supervision of all the cata- 
logues in the Central Library, including their maintenance for the 
convenience of the users, and the oversight of all matters relating 
to the cards, including the filing, after they come from the Print- 
ing Department of the Library or on their receipt from other in- 
stitutions. It is expected that the new Card Division will add 
to the efficiency of the Department and relieve the Chief of 
much detail. Already the results have justified these expecta- 
tions. 

Four positions of importance, which call for special qualifi- 
cations, including a knowledge of foreign languages, remain 
unfilled in the Catalogue Department. The work of the insti- 
tution will continue to suffer just so long as trained, experienced 
persons remain unfound. The reason for these vacancies is not 
far to seek. The salaries available for important places in this 
department, as in others of the Library, are insufficient to attract 
qualified library assistants. 

On page 69 of the Appendix may be found the usual details 
relating to the work of the Catalogue and Shelf Department 
for two successive years. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

In December 1923, the fifth volume of the Quarterly Bulle- 
tin (Fourth Series) was finished. The completed volume filled 
480 pages, 46 pages of which were given over to announcements 
of public lectures and educational courses given not only at the 



[35] 

Public Library but at a number of other educational centres. 
Though the main purpose of the publication was to present 
in dictionary form a list of current additions to the Library's 
shelves, it included the following special articles and reproduc- 
tions : 

In the March number, an account of the John Adams Library, some 
Comments of John Adams on Mary Wollstonecraft's "French Revolu- 
tion," a reproduction of Copley's portrait of Mr. Adams, a facsimile of 
the title-page of the First FoHo Shakespeare, from the original in the 
Barton Collection, and a list of British and American Longer Plays, 
compiled by Michael J. Conroy, of the Bates Hall Reference Department. 

The June number presented a sketch of the Franklin Library, repro- 
ductions of the portraits of Franklin by Duplessis and Greuze, which 
hang in the Trustees' Room of the Central Library, a facsimile of one 
of Franklin's letters to Samuel C. Johonnot, with some notes on the latter, 
and the second edition of a List of References on the Project Method of 
Education, compiled by Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 
Children. 

1 he September issue contained a description of the Gilbert Collection, 
accompanied by a portrait of John Gilbert, together with several items 
connected with Shakespeare, in commemoration of the Tercentenary of the 
First Folio; these include a reprint of Horace Howard Furness's report 
on the Barton Collection, made in 1882, with some remarks on the 
present status of the Collection; views of the exterior and interior of 
the Globe Theatre — "Shakespeare's Theatre"; contemporary prints of 
London Bridge and of part of Queen Elizabeth's funeral procession, all 
supplemented by a List of Works on Shakespeare's England, compiled 
by Mary A. Tenney of the Catalogue Department. 

In the December number the editorial matter related to the Parker 
Library, and was accompanied by a portrait of Theodore Parker from 
Seth Cheney's crayon, and a letter from Parker to Miss Thayer. X^^^'e 
was also a reproduction of Francis Derwent Wood's bust of Henry James, 
which the sculptor had recently presented to the Library. An Index to 
the poems of Robert William Service, prepared by Michael J. Conroy of 
the Bates Hall Reference Department, was also included in this issue. 

Other Library publications of the year included the following : 

Weekh Lists, 52 in number for the year 1923, giving brief titles of 
a selected list of the most recent additions to the Library, compiled by 
Lucien E. Taylor. 

Ten-Book Lists, numbers 52—104 inclusive. Four of the fifty- 
three issues printed during the year were double numbers. The series 
began in 1 922 under the editorship of Mr. Taylor and ceased on Decern- 



[36] 

ber 8. 1923, on the completion of a bA'o vear period. Most of the lists 
were prepared by chiefs of the various departments of the Library; a 
number were compiled by members or officers of various associations whose 
meetin<^s suggested the respective subjects of the lists. In the future. 
Ten-book Lists will be issued irregularly in connection with topics of 
current interest, on the occasion of important anniversaries, or in con- 
nection with conventions and meetings of associations held in the city. 

Brief Reading Lists, Nos. 24-26. The subjects were as follows: 
No. 24, th2 Project Method in Education, compiled by Alice M. Jordan, 
Supervisor of Work with Children; reprinted from the June issue of the 
Quarterly) Bulletin: No. 25, Health and Hygiene, compiled by Lucien 
E. Taylor, prepared in connection with the Boston Health Show; No. 26. 
British and American Longer Plays, 1900-1923, compiled by Michael 
J. Conroy, reprinted from the Quarterh Bulletin for March. 

A Guide to Serial Publications founded prior to 1918 and now or 
recently current in Boston. Cambridge, and vicinity, compiled and edited 
by Thomas Johnston Homer; part II, Bibl.- Esp., 1050 copies, 50 on 
special paper, pages 97-192; main entries nos. 1860-3952. The ma- 
terial for the rest of the alphabet, not yet printed, is accessible for use in 
the Barton Gallery of the Central Library. 

Library Life, the Staff Bulletin of the Library, published on the 1 5th 
of each month, summer months excepted, entered upon its third year 
in October, with an enlarged and reorganized staff selected with the 
purpose of covering the news of interest to the employees in a more sys- 
tematic way by means of a greater division of responsibility. 

BATES HALL. 

The revision of the Bates Hall reference collection progresses 
toward its completion. The sections devoted to encyclopaedias 
and dictionaries has been thoroughly overhauled and constant 
changes have been made in the collection as a whole. The 
movement of books, as a matter of record, has affected 969 titles 
(1415 volumes), besides 102 volumes added as continuations; 
475 new titles (578 volumes) have been added to the collection 
during the year; 250 titles (476 volumes) have been given new 
locations; 184 titles (301 volumes) have been retired as super- 
annuated. The missing list of the year is even smaller than that 
reported a year ago; 165 books have disappeared from the 
shelves and six volumes missing in previous years have been found, 
making a net loss for the year of 1 59 volumes. 



[37] 

The reference work of the Library, with its centre in Bates 
Hall, has been carried on along the traditional lines. The use 
of ths telephone for reference purposes is growing steadily. A 
constantly increasing number of persons call for information in 
this way, and on the other hand, the reference assistants are learn- 
ing to make a larger use of the telephone in running down the 
answers to elusive questions. 

During the summer a questionnaire was prepared and sent to 
the special libraries in Metropolitan Boston, including a con- 
siderable number in addition to those listed in the last edition of 
the Directory of Special Libraries. This questionnaire was the 
means of collecting additional information regarding the re- 
sources of the libraries of Boston and its vicinity, and it is hoped 
that before long a new edition of the Directory of Special Libra- 
ries will be published. In this connection should be mentioned 
the activities of the volunteer Extension Service Committee, 
v/hich resulted in enrolling some fifty organizations which have 
no libraries but which possess large funds of specialized informa- 
tion, most of which they are glad to place at the disposal of the 
public through the reference and information channels of the 
Public Library. 

The year has seen closer co-operation between the Reference 
Department and the branches of the Library, which has taken 
various forms. The Reference Librarian has assisted in revising 
reference collections and lists for various branches and has con- 
ducted a course in reference work for branch assistants. 

The total number of volumes consulted in Bates Hall was 
248,169, an increase of 7,569 over last year. It should be re- 
membered that these figures relate only to the use of volumes 
taken from the stacks, for which regular call slips were filed. 
No account is kept of the many thousands of volumes which 
readers use from the great reference collection in the Bates Hall 
reading room. 

During the winter months, especially on Saturday and Sunday 
afternoons, there have been more readers than seats in Bates 
Hall. A notable feature of the use of the hall is the large per- 
centage of adult non-resident readers who avail themselves of 



[38] 

material not to be found in their own home hbraries in adjacent 
municipaHties. 

In increasing numbers, students from various schools and in- 
stitutions find Bates Hall a convenient place in v/hich to work 
up lecture notes and lessons, study school text books and pre- 
pare their work for the following day. So long as students 
using the Library for these purposes have not interfered with 
adult readers or their accommodation, the Director has made no 
protest. When men and women come to consult books or other 
library material and find the number of students so great that 
seats are unobtainable, it is a question whether students are not 
abusing library privileges. 

The service of the Hall is greatly and increasingly handicapped 
by the wholly inadequate and outworn pneumatic tubes and 
book carrier system which were installed over twenty-five years 
ago. No relief can be hoped for until city appropriations permit 
the installation of a more modern equipment. 

NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS. 

Of the 271 newspapers regularly received by the Library 
191 are American and 80 come from thirty-three foreign coun- 
tries. The daily papers number 214, the weekly 57. During 
the current year six papers were added and two ceased publication 
or were consolidated with other papers. The bound volumes 
now number 8,882, an increase of 1 35 volumes since the last re- 
port. Readers to the number of 18,654 consulted 33,534 
bound volumes during the year, a slight increase over the year 
previous. 

During the year 483 volumes were added to the Patent 
collection which now numbers 16,776 volumes. During the 
twelve months 107,868 volumes were used by 18,163 persons. 
It is unfortunately still impossible to obtain continuations of the 
German patent records, which are lacking for the entire period 
since 1914. The Library receives regularly the volumes from 
New Zealand, Australia, France, Great Britain, Canada and 
the United States. 



[39] 



INFORMATION OFFICE, GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT SERVICE, 
AND OPEN SHELF ROOM. 

The Information Office is now generally recognized by the 
public as a library directing agency, a first aid to the inquirer. 
To this end there has been assembled on the shelves of the room 
such material as will be of most immediate use, including a few 
obvious books of reference, several hundred municipal and tele- 
phone directories, reports from many chambers of commerce, the 
Federal Reserve bulletins and other publications relating to 
banks and banking, surveys of current business and commerce, 
etc. Constant use is made of the large collection of school, 
college and institution catalogues, and the vocational service 
files. The latter files, it will be recalled, were established in 
December, 1920, by the Boston Branch of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae, with the co-operation of the Women's 
Municipal League, the Girls' Trade Education League and the 
Young Women's Christian Association. This collection, ever 
changing in order that it may be kept up to date, consists at 
present of some nine hundred pamphlets and over fifteen hun- 
dred clippings. Gifts of periodicals and pamphlets for the files 
have been received from the Women's Educational and Indus- 
trial LInion, the Associated Industries of Massachusetts, the 
Prospect Union, and the National Research Council. The As- 
sociation of Collegiate Alumnae made a gift of ten dollars for 
special pamphlets and volumes. It is interesting to note that 
men use the vocational file fully as much as women. The in- 
quiries vary with the seasons of the year: in the fall there is a 
lively demand for material on educational opportunities, especial- 
ly evening courses, while in the spring the call is for booklets 
descriptive of summer schools and camps. Special interest has 
been shown in the following occupations: accounting, advertis- 
ing, agriculture, art, automobiles, aviation, engineering, insurance, 
librar}'^ work, music, radio, salesmanship, secretarial work, social 
service, teaching, and the various trades and occupations for the 
handicapped. 



[40] 

The federal and state documents in the room adjoining the 
Information Office are continually sought by men and women 
who have discovered the great value of these official current 
publications dealing with the varied problems of government and 
the results of governmental research. 

The Open Shelf collection of books of non-fiction has main- 
tained its popularity. In the room may be found not only a 
selection of the more recent accessions of the Library, but some 
two thousand volumes no longer considered new but still of 
value, as they treat of many subjects in which the public finds 
abiding interest. The most popular books are in the fields 
of travel and discovery, biography, drama, business, domestic 
science and household arts. Somewhat unusual has been the 
steady call for the so-called "war books" — volumes treating 
not only of the late World War in its many phases, but the 
Civil War, the American Revolution, and the Napoleonic cam- 
paigns. Over 42,000 volumes in all were drawn out for home 
use from the shelves of this small and wholly inadequate room 
during the year. 

PERIODICAL ROOM. 

The number of readers at certain hours, as totalled in each of 
two successive years, and the number reported five years ago, 
are as follows: 

Attendance. 

HOURS 10 12 2 4 6 8 9.45 

a.m. m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. 

1923-1924 . . 15,233 17,416 29,172 35,841 22,416 26,531 13,340 

1922-1923 . . 14,871 16,263 27,826 33,109 22,241 26,310 13,216 

1918-1919 . . 7,264 10,342 18,547 23,201 16,173 19,236 6,072 

The steady increase in the use of bound and unbound periodi- 
cal files is shown by the following figures : 

Bound Files. 

Bound volumes consulted during the year: 1922-1923. 1923-1924. 

Day time (week days) ... . 44,843 46,724 

Evening and Sunday 18,762 19,843 



[41] 

Unbound Files. 

Unbound periodicals consulted: 1922-1923. 1923-1924. 

Day time (week days) ...... 53,786 55,516 

Evening and Sunday 23,479 24,572 

Current periodicals, exclusive of those issued by the State and 
Federal governments, regularly filed for readers, may be found 
distributed as follows : 

Periodical Room . . . . . . . . . . 1,1/9 

Fine Arts Division and Music Room ........ 134 

Statistical Department ........... 48 

Teachers' Reference and Children's Room ....... 57 

Ordering Department ........... 27 

Total 1,445 

The Custodian reports that never have the periodical rooms 
been so crowded. Not infrequently all the available seats are 
occupied. The leading cause of the growing use of periodicals 
is the interest in current events shown by the general public and 
by the students from the various schools and institutions of higher 
learning. In increasing numbers instructors and pupils have 
come from the Boston schools to receive aid and instruction in 
the use of digests and indexes. Inadequate appropriations have 
made impossible the installation of a modern equipment, more 
economical as to space. The inconvenient periodical racks con- 
tinue to be the source of complaint from many readers. It is 
hoped that provision for new tables and cases may soon be forth- 
coming. The enlarged use of periodicals and newspapers is 
only another indication of the desirability of throwing open for 
public purposes the valuable space now occupied by the Cata- 
logue and Ordering Departments, provided these departments 
can be accommodated in additions to the present Central Build- 
ing. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 

The Special Libraries include all the collections housed on 
the third floor of the Central Building, and comprise the follow- 
ing divisions : 

Fine Arts Division. Books, plates, pamphlets and periodi- 
cals on the fine arts, including architecture and city planning. 



[42] 

sculpture, painting, graphic arts, and art crafts; the Codman 
collection on landscape architecture ; material on pageants ; and 
the Library's main collection of photographs, prints, art clippings 
and lantern slides. 

Technology Division. Books on technology, including en- 
gineering in all its branches, manufactures, applied sciences, and 
works in the fields of pure physics and chemistry added since 
1 922 ; also the bound files of technical periodicals. 

The two divisions above named have a common reading-room 
and a book delivery service in communication with all parts of the 
Central Library. 

Music Division. The Allen A. Brown reference collection 
of music and literature of music; also a large collection of music 
for home use, musical and dramatic periodicals, indexes and 
scrap-books. 

Barton -Ticknor Division. Twenty-three special collections 
restricted to use within the building, including Americana, Anti- 
Slavery and Civil War material, books on dramatic history, in- 
cunabula and publications of famous presses, works on mathe- 
matics, Shakespeariana, Spanish literature, books illustrating 
women's activities, etc. The Library's large collection of maps 
and the map catalogue are also to be found in this division. 

Some idea of the complexity of the Special Libraries Depart- 
ment and its service may be obtained from the statement that it 
takes care of about thirty-three different classes of books and 
other library material, arranged according to nine different sys- 
tems of classification or location, noted in eleven catalogues and 
six shelf-lists, and charged for issue in eight indicators. 

The time of the department personnel is, naturally, almost 
wholly absorbed by the daily routine of this complex service, but 
it will be seen that some work of constructive character has been 
accomplished. 

The personnel of the department has been notably strength- 
ened during the year by the appointment of Dr. Zoltan Haraszti, 
an efficient and highly educated assistant who is in charge of the 
Barton -Ticknor Division, filling a vacancy of two years' standing. 



[43] 

The involved shelf arrangement of both the Music and the 
Barton -Ticknor divisions has been completely charted during 
the year. The map collections have been rearranged and over 
ten thousand Anti-Slavery letters have been bound and indexed. 
For the first time, regular monthly exhibitions of rare books and 
manuscripts have been arranged in the Barton Room, and illus- 
trated "special feature" articles describing these exhibits have 
been written for the daily papers. 

The open-shelf music reference collection has been extended 
during the year. The bulletin of musical events in Boston 
posted weekly and described in the report of last year has been 
continued and has been of interest to many visitors. 

The Fine Arts Division has nearly completed a classed cata- 
logue of the accessions of the last four years. Progress has been 
made also in the revision and reclassification of the fine arts open- 
shelf collection, the periodical index, and the collection of art 
clippings known as "decorative detail." 

The Technology Division has continued to build up its classed 
catalogue and has also found time to reclass and renumber its 
entire open-shelf collection. The subjects of pure physics and 
chemistry have been taken over by the division, and a shelf 
classification for these subjects has been printed as a special 
pamphlet. 

From May 1, 1923, to May 1, 1924, the department put on 
view forty-six exhibitions. Fourteen of these were biographical, 
and all but fourteen were made up from collections owned by 
the Library. A complete list of these exhibitions may be found 
on pages 75 and 76 of the Appendix. 

The number of books issued for home use from the Special 
Libraries during the year was 23,121, compared with 25,130 
in 1922-23. This loss in circulation is negligible. It is in- 
teresting to note that every month shows a decrease from the 
figures of the preceding year, excepting the periods, September 
1 5 - November 15, and December 1 6 — January 1 5, which have 
much larger totals than last year. In the fiscal year 4404 lan- 
tern slides and 2 1 84 portfolios of pictures were issued. About 
twenty-five pictures are placed in each portfolio, making the pic- 



[44] 

ture circulation something over 54,000. The total number of 
photographs and process pictures now available is estimated at 
68,560 and that of lantern slides at 10,348. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

The stock of children's books in the Central Library and the 
thirty-one branches has been replenished by the purchase of 
33,763 volumes, which includes new books, additional copies, 
and replacements. Of the total number of books acquired for 
the branches 63 per cent were for children, constituting a larger 
number for this purpose than the Library has ever before pur- 
chased in a single year. The circulation of children's books in 
the branch system was 1 ,236,999 out of a total branch circula- 
tion of 2,345,860. From the Children's Room in the Central 
Library there were issued 73,278 additional books, making a 
total of 1,310,277 volumes classed as children's books lent for 
home use during the fiscal year. A total of 60,913 volumes — 
43,521 from the branch libraries and 17,392 from the Branch 
Issue Division of the Central Library — were sent during the 
same period as deposits to 1 7 1 grammar, 5 high and 1 3 parochial 
schools of the city. 

The above statements imply progress ; they also call attention 
to the need of more books for the use of children, as the insistent 
call on the part of children cannot by any means be satisfied by 
the Library's present supply. It is suggested that inquiry might 
reasonably be made regarding the possibility of securing some 
financial aid from the School Department in providing books 
used exclusively as school deposits to assist children in learning 
to read. At present the deposits sent to schools constitute a 
severe drain on the all too limited collections in the branches and 
deplete the book shelves in the crowded children's rooms of the 
system. 

Sior^ Hour. The results obtained in the library story hour 
organized by experts who are equipped to meet the great oppor- 
tunities of their work continue to be most gratifying. All over 
the city can be felt the impetus to use the library and to read 



[45] 

the finer types of books, traceable to the effective personal in- 
fluence of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cronan and Mrs. Margaret W. 
Powers. 

Story hours have been held at fifty-three different points during 
the year. In all branches where space permits there have been 
groups for longer or shorter terms within the library and there 
are only four branches which have lacked a story hour, held 
either in their own buildings or at neighboring schools. Two of 
these will receive attention early in 1924. 

The following quotations are from the report of Mrs. Cronan : 

There is much in the present day to excite children and distract them 
from reading books which require any concentration. For this reason it is 
more difficult for the story hour to produce readers, but we rejoice to see 
that many of the children do go from Hstening to the story to the reading 
of the book. 

Those who do not read are surely benefited by hearing the stories of 
idealism, patriotism, dehcate fancy, quaint humor and those which give a 
better understanding of children of other countries. 

To meet the requests of responsive readers the libraries need 
to be supplied with the books used by the story-tellers in sufficient 
quantity to prevent repeated disappointment, which tends to dis- 
courage children from further attempts to secure the books. 

It would be impossible for the story-tellers to cover the city in 
out-of-school hours with library groups alone, and the welcome 
accorded to them by teachers and masters of public schools has 
opened a door for unlimited extension work of the most fruitful 
kind. Throughout the winter months the library story hour is 
reaching from 300 to 1000 children each school day. 

Sometimes the principals have needed to be convinced as to the 
place of stories in a school program, but once sure of their value 
to children, they have become warm supporters, asking for the 
continuance of the privilege beyond the time allotted. A few 
of their words of commendation follow: 

The latch-string of this school is always out to you. You could not 
come too often to us. I know of nothing outside the school which has 
been such a help. 

You strengthen the bond between library and school. 

You have something of value to say to the children and we wish to do 
everything in our power to help. 



[461 

This is educational work, so we welcome it in the schools. 
I have no stronger aid in my English work with the children of foreign 
parentage than that given by the story tellers. 

As for the children, their affection for the story tellers is 
touchingly and dramatically expressed in many letters begging 
them to come again. 

Tlie story-tellers testimony reads as follows: 

Story telling has proved to be a bond between Art Museum, Neigh- 
borhood Houses and Library, but now each year seems to bring a closer 
connection betv/een schools and library. It has been a privilege to be 
welcomed in the schools and thus reach such numbers of children who 
need what we have to give and who have no time to listen to stories out- 
side of school hours. 

The advice to Jacob, "Bear a gift in thine hand," seems to apply to 
story telling. We are able to bring a touch of joy to the school, and at 
the same time enhance the value of school deposits, advertise what our 
Library has to offer and emphasize what we cannot say too often, that 
librarians and teachers are working together for the children and can work 
together most effectively when there is united effort and close understanding. 

Children s Rooms. Though crowded conditions prevail in 
several sections of the city, notably those served by the South 
Boston, Warren Street, Jeffries Point, Upham's Corner, and 
Mt. Bowdoin Branch Libraries, accommodations for carrying on 
the work with the children have been improved at a number of 
points. The reading room in the new South End Branch, has 
ample and satisfactory space for the ordinary activities, but as 
yet no suitable place has been found there for the story hour. 
At Roxbury Crossing enlarged quarters have received cordial 
appreciation. The librarian comments as follows: "A visitor, 
a perfect stranger to us, stopped at the desk and said that she 
could not pass by the door without coming into the children's 
room, it was so inviting from the outside." Re-arrangement of 
the Roslindale Branch to admit of a separate entrance for chil- 
dren is a forward step that promises to solve certain problems in 
the administration of that library. 

Central Children s Room. The Supervisor of Work with 
Children states that the personal guidance given to readers in the 
Children's Room of the Central Library indicates the nature of 



[47] 

the assistance which every branch should be able to give. 
Arousing interest in books of real value by substituting those of 
high quality for the mediocre, and encouraging appreciation of 
general literature by introduction of different types of reading 
are the tasks for w^hich the staff is qualifying. There has been 
a development in reference work during the j^ear; many of the 
questions to be answered require a wide knowledge of children's 
literature and acute discernment in the matter of relative values. 
As usual, the Central Children's Room has been visited by many 
classes from schools. 

Teachers* Room. The Teachers' Room has likewise grown 
in usefulness and acceptability. It has furnished reference ma- 
terial for students at universities and training schools, and has 
become a centre for persons taking extension courses. Books 
have been reserved for nineteen courses since September. 

The Department has also been able to supplement the work 
of the Special Libraries Department by issuing 7,892 pictures 
to teachers and schools, exceeding by 1 ,624 the circulation of 
pictures from the Children's Department the previous year. 

Co-operation with Children's Museum. Co-operation with 
the Children's Museum in Jamaica Plain has proceeded in an 
orderly and animating way. The Central Children's Room 
and the Tyler Street Branch have had successive exhibitions 
from the Museum. These have included spring birds, Japanese 
ceremonial dolls, collections of shells, minerals, etc. 

Gift. A gift of dolls of different periods and nations received 
from Mrs. Dwight Blaney is at present assigned to the North 
End Branch, which is assembling a permanent collection of dolls 
of many kinds. 

REORGANIZATION OF WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

All the reports from the branch libraries discuss at some length 
the constantly growing work with children, which the librarians 
are sometimes unable to conduct in a systematic and orderly way 
in rooms of insufficient size or unsatisfactory location. Where 
quarters are large enough to accommodate considerable numbers. 



[48] 

too often there is a crying need of assistants properly qualified to 
give the sort of personal attention which is the basis of sound and 
intelligent relations with boys and girls. The volume and im- 
portance of library work with children leaves no doubt as to the 
pressing necessity of unifying and co-ordinating the work by 
means of a more definite organization than exists at present. In 
twenty-one of the thirty-one branches the use of children's books 
constitutes more than 50 per cent of the total circulation. At 
the North End Branch it reaches 88 per cent, while in all the 
branches the demands for reference work with children are stead- 
ily increasing. Attention must immediately be given to building 
up an adequate body of trained assistants for the development 
of this important phase of the library's activities. The resources, 
time and energy now given to work with children must fail of 
complete fruition so long as there is a lack of the standardization 
which makes for consistency and concerted effort. 

In most other departments of library work the idea that 
"anybody can do anything if he tries" is no longer accepted. 
Assistants in charge of work with children must be fitted by 
temperament and training for their work, which should be put 
upon as sound an educational basis as that of teachers in the 
schools of the city. If the library is to bring good books within 
reach of every child in the city and to foster the habit of dis- 
criminating reading, those selected to carry on the work must 
have a wide knowledge of children's literature and an ability to 
perceive the qualities in books which attract children. This 
fitness, the capacity to furnish wise guidance through the realm 
of books written for children to a point at which true appreciation 
of general literature is reached, can be gained only by intensive 
study and experience. It cannot be attained by casual methods. 

The staff of each of the major branches of the system should 
include a well-trained assistant to lead in this special work. Her 
duties have been outlined as follows by the Supervisor of Work 
with Children : 

She is responsible for the order and attractiveness of the children's 
room. This involves the ability to preserve an atmosphere inviting to 
readers, by handling matters of discipline in the best way possible, and 
keeping physical conditions comfortable and agreeable. A room is made 



[49] 

attractive by means of well arranged pictures, well planned exhibits, and 
chiefly by a sufficient display of books that have decorative value. 

She has the care of the collection of children's books. Books in 
bad condition should be repaired or withdrawn. The character of the 
collection and of the neighborhood should be studied, in order that a 
balanced supply of books of standard merit, or those for which there is 
popular demand, may be recommended. Books which have outlived their 
usefulness should be replaced by others. 

She gives personal assistance to children in the selection of books and 
in reference problems for schools. These duties call for thorough ac- 
quaintance not only with the limits of the children's collection at the 
branch but with the books available at the Central Library, the manifold 
interests of children and the school curricula. 

She helps adults in search of information concerning children's reading. 
The demand from parents and teachers grows with the library's pre- 
paredness to meet it. 

She gives instruction to the younger assistants detailed to help in the 
children's room. 

She assists at the story hours and furthers their influence in every way. 

She visits schools and other institutions connected with child welfare, 
for the purpose of making desirable outside contacts with the library's 
public. 

Training for this special work is best given in schools or 
classes established for this definite end, such as the Library 
School connected with Western Reserve University in Cleveland, 
and that of the Carnegie Library at Pittsburgh. The Boston 
Public Library has no provision for furnishing a training which 
shall provide theoretical and practical instruction given by experts 
who are qualified to teach and sufficiently free from other re- 
sponsibilities to do it effectively. Properly prepared assistants 
for work with children can, however, be obtained if they are 
offered their right place on the library staff, with a salary in ac- 
cord with their attainments. 

Libraries whose work with children has reached a high degree 
of efficiency and success have insisted upon securing a trained 
group of individuals who are expected to lead in this work, under 
the Supervisor of Work with Children. The time seems to have 
come for the Boston Public Library to take its place with other 
large libraries by active reorganization of its work with children 
in accordance with generally accepted standards. 



[50] 



THE BRANCH SYSTEM. 



By vote of the Board of Trustees on May 18, 1923, the 
title "Reading Room" was changed to that of "Branch", and 
the thirty-one branches of the library system were graded as 
Major Branches, A and B, and Minor Branches, C and D. 
The title "Reading Room" has always been misleading in that 
it gave to the uninitiated the impression that it was a room for 
reading purposes, rather than a small branch of the system, at 
which service similar to that in the larger branches was offered to 
the public. The grading of the branches is based on their size, 
location, circulation figures, the scope of activities undertaken 
and the complexity of their problems of administration. 

The subsidiary agencies served through the Branch Depart- 
ment include 56 fire engine houses, 44 institutions of various 
types, and 1 89 schools, of which 1 3 are parochial schools. The 
total number of library agencies through which the Library 
serves the public is 320, as compared with 333 a year ago. The 
number of volumes issued on borrowers' cards from the Central 
Library through the Branch Department was 1 07,250, as against 
1 1 1 ,070 in 1 922-23, and 1 06,556 in 1 92 1 -22. These figures 
show a loss of 3,820 volumes issued during last year as com- 
pared with the year before. The proportion of unsuccessful 
calls for books was 51.5 per cent as against 55 per cent a year 
before. Of the total unsuccessful requests, 52,640 v/ere calls 
for fiction, as against 66,572 last year. Of the total number of 
volumes sent out from the Central Library through the branches 
86,025 were taken directly from the shelves of the Branch De- 
posit Collection. 

The total circulation of the Branch System for the fiscal year 
was 2,594,033 volumes, compared with 2,424,014 the year 
before, a gain in branch circulation of 170,019 volumes. 
Twenty-five branches gained and six lost in circulation. The 
greatest gains were at Andrew Square, Mt. Bowdoin, South 
Boston, Warren Street, South End, West End and North End; 
the losses were at Upham's Corner, Roxbury, Parker Flill, 
Orient Heights, Charlestown and Mt. Pleasant. 



[51] 

The number of volumes sent out from the Central Library on 
deposit to schools, institutions and other agencies was 42,230, 
as against 45,286 last year and 44,257 in 1921-22. The 
number of volumes sent to schools from the Central Library and 
branches was 60,913, compared with 56,348 last year. Of 
this number 1 7,392 were sent from the Branch Issue Division, 
Central Library, as compared with 18,524 the year before. 
The number of books issued on deposit from the branch libraries, 
chiefly to schools, was 43,521, compared with 37,824 the year 
before. The number of individual teachers supplied was 
1,391, as against 1,200 in 1922-23. 

The number of volumes acquired by purchase for branch use 
during the year was 50,151 ; of these 5,685 were placed in the 
branch deposit collection, and 44,466 were distributed among the 
thirty-one branches. These figures represent almost exactly two- 
thirds of the total number of accessions by purchase for the entire 
library system (75,534 volumes) . The number of books bound 
for the branch libraries the past year was 24,626, as compared 
with 23,465 in 1922-23. 

The new South End Branch, opened on February 1, 1923, 
is located in the basement of the Archbishop Williams Municipal 
Building, corner of Shawmut Avenue and West Brookline Street. 
On the main floor is an auditorium seating a thousand, with stage, 
ante-rooms, corridors, etc. A large modern, well-equipped 
gymnasium, with shower baths, lockers, etc., occupies the top 
floor of the building. The branch library, with direct approach 
and separate entrance from West Brookline Street, occupies a 
quiet room fifty-nine feet wide and ninety-nine feet long. Econ- 
omy in construction necessitated sinking the floor some ten 
steps below the sidewalk, which permits the placing of seven- 
foot bookcases around the walls with windows above, admitting 
as much direct side light as is possible under the circumstances. 
The room is amply supplied with the latest and most approved 
type of lighting fixtures, arranged in rows so that the lights farth- 
est from the high side windows can be switched on first, and, as 
the daylight fades, other rows of lights can be turned on until the 
room is fully illuminated. In the centre of the room, running 
back from the entrance, is a corridor enclosed by plate glass in 



[52] 

suitable screen partitions about seven feet high. Here Is located 
the charging desk. On the right of the corridor as you enter is 
the children's room and on the left the adults' room. Through 
the glazed panels, the attendant in charge has an uninterrupted 
view of the whole floor. High bookcases line the walls and are 
built into the alcove of the adults' room, while three-foot shelv- 
ing follows the inside of the dividing partitions, providing alto- 
gether room for over 15,000 volumes. There are fifteen tables, 
each seating nine persons, in the adults' section and fifteen in that 
for children, providing accommodation for two hundred and 
seventy readers at a time. In addition to the main room, there 
is a private room for the branch librarian, and work, lunch and 
toilet rooms. The bookcases, furniture and fittings are of 
stained oak; the walls are tinted a light, dull yellow, and the 
ceilings are ivory white, better to reflect the light. Floors 
throughout are of cork tile, to insure against noise. The archi- 
tect of the building was Mr. J. A. Schweinfurth, of Boston, 
who gave careful consideration to the needs of the branch, and 
at all times co-operated most cordially with the Director and 
other library officials. 

On March 1, 1923, a new room for adults, adjoining the old 
room used for both adults and children, was added to the Rox- 
bury Crossing Branch, nearly doubling the previous floor space 
and permitting an extension of work in this crowded section of 
the city. 

REPORTS FROM THE BRANCHES. 

The reports of the thirty-one branches of the Boston Public 
Library constitute a copious volume in themselves. They afford 
a comprehensive insight into the inner life of the whole organiza- 
tion. Short extracts from these reports are given below. They 
illustrate the specific characteristics of the different branches. 
First, however, it is expedient to sum up certain features common 
to all the reports. 

All the librarians speak of a great Increase In the activities 
of their branches. The circulation of books is larger, reference 
information is much more in demand, and, after school hours, 
every seat is usually occupied. "Our library is really a com- 



[53] 

munity center . . ," is a frequently recurring phrase in the re- 
ports, fully justified by the statistics. 

Because of these growing demands, the problem of the loca- 
tion and housing of the libraries becomes increasingly important. 
The Boston Public Library has some fine, modern library build- 
ings; others are fairly good, but a number of the older quarters 
are to-day entirely to small. Frequent are the complaints of the 
serious inadequacy of these buildings. "The quarters are 
crowded and unattractive . . .", is an often repeated phrase 
in the reports; but with it is also the appeal: "There is here 

a great opportunity for growth, and we must not let it go by 
•* 

In spite of many handicaps, the work done in the branches 
was very satisfactory. The spirit of the librarians — even where 
the conditions are the most difficult — is suggested in this phrase 
from one of the reports : " 'Keep on going' was our slogan in 
the past, and will be also in the future." 

Second only to the problem of housing is that of the branch 
book collections. These are constantly changing; old or un- 
used books are returned to the Central Library, and new acces- 
sions fill their places. The weeding-out, re-arranging and re- 
classifying of the books is constantly going on. The demand 
for more of both fiction and non-fiction is constant. The supply 
is wholly inadequate. The stock, nevertheless, is diversified and 
alive. Many joyous references have been made to the growing 
juvenile collections. 

Many branches are located in districts with an extremely 
heterogeneous population. The reports emphasize the need of 
more books in the native tongues of the foreign-born. Many of 
the newcomers are eager readers, and appreciate library privi- 
leges. Easy English books help the process of their Ameri- 
canization. The librarians are conscious of their obligation in 
this direction. 

The third problem relates to the staff. Harmony is the pre- 
valent note in all the reports. The branch librarian "cannot 
close" her report without referring to the "helpful co-operation 
and loyalty" of the assistants. There have been some necessary 
changes in the personnel of the different branches, and it takes 



[54] 

time for a new person to get fully acquainted with her surround- 
ings, but the work has progressed everywhere smoothly and 
without interruption. There are just complaints in some cases 
of a lack of sufficient assistants. The growing work with the 
children, and the increasing demand for reference information, 
call for more help than is at present available. 

Regarding the work with children, co-operation with the 
schools was closer and more intensive this past year than ever 
before. The process of depositing new collections of books and 
pictures in the schools was continued and extended. TTie libra- 
rians have visited many of the schools and the visits have uni- 
formly resulted in a large number of new registrations. 

The reference work for adult users of the branch system is 
increasing. The libraries constantly seek to attract more men 
and women readers. Closer contact with the big industries of 
the neighborhood has been an outstanding feature of the year's 
activities. Suitable book collections have been deposited in 
many factories, and the attention of the working people has 
been called to the library by posters, notices and personal visits. 
Posters placed in stores have attracted many strangers to the 
library. The use of electric signs, **movie" advertisements and 
news notes in the local papers have become more general during 
the year just ended. 

"There are three kinds of readers," one of the reports justly 
and keenly says, "those who love to read, those who need to 
read, and those who have to read." It is safe to say that the 
branches did their best to develop one large circle of readers: 
those for whom reading is a pleasure and a spontaneous impulse. 

Notes from the separate branch libraries follow: 

Allston. There is a constant demand for new fiction. The 
present quarters are too small to accommodate the public, which 
is growing. The branch needs more shelving, and the walls 
need painting. The gain in circulation was 4, 1 07. 

Andrew Square. The year was a busy and successful one. 
The branch has been entirely renovated, much to the comfort 
and apparent satisfaction of the public. Several hundred new 



[55] 

registrations were received, and the circulation increased 18,578. 
More new Polish books are needed. 

Bo'^lslon Station. This is the library nearest to four gram- 
mar and three primary schools. Since posters have been placed 
in the store windows, strangers in increasing numbers visit the 
library and apply for books. The gain in circulation was 6,668. 

Brighton. Every year the branch serves more and more 
foreign children. Primers and easy books are especially in de- 
mand. The greatest gain in the circulation has come from 
juvenile non-fiction. Half of the readers are adults. They 
ask for fiction, but the supply is not large enough. The gain in 
circulation was 4,434. 

Charlesiotvn. The district has, with perhaps one exception, 
the largest number of transient residents served by any branch 
library. \K'ith every ship that docks for repair work, the library 
has a new group of readers. Strangers in the city, they find the 
library immediately, and use it freely until their ship sails. Oc- 
casionally the same people return within two years, renew their 
cards and tell of libraries at other ports. The lecture hall was 
more used this year than at any time since the year of its opening. 
There was a loss in circulation of 2,105. 

City Point. This section has an extensive foreign population, 
the largest group being Italians; then follow Lithuanians, Ar- 
menians, Belgians, Jews, Dutch and Czechs. By registration 
and the distribution of "easy" books, the library has endeavored 
to further the Americanization process among them. Many of 
the foreign adults, hardly able to express their needs in English, 
ask for copies of the classics in their native tongue. Their 
buoyancy, optimism and appreciation of library privileges give 
an impetus to the work. The gain in circulation was 4,896. 

Codman Square. It is difficult for the outsider to realize how 
much high school pupils use the library; they come morning, 
noon and night. Many adults also require individual attention. 
There was a gain in circulation of 9,719. 

Dorchester. The shelf-list is under careful revision. Many 



[56] 

old books, which had not been off the shelves for years, were 
transferred to the Central Library. The circulation of the past 
year shows an increase of 7,798. 

East Boston. The Branch has a splendid building and an 
excellent collection of books, but the number of staff-workers 
is insufficient. The gain in circulation was 4,975. 

Faneuil. The number of juvenile readers is much larger 
than ever before. This does not imply, however, that the branch 
lacks adult patronage. TTie eldest constant reader is a man of 
103 years. The increase in circulation was 2,060. 

Fellotves Athenaeum. The gradual change in the population 
from native-born Americans to Poles, Letts, Jews, Russians, 
Italians, etc., creates a demand for more books in the native 
tongues of the foreign-born. The stacks are, unfortunately, 
closed, and this influences the circulation. People would take 
out more books if they were allowed to browse among them. 
Loss in circulation, 7,452. 

H'^de Parl^. With a high school next door, several large 
grammar schools and many college students in the district, there 
is an unusual opportunity to increase the usefulness of the library. 
Unfortunately the staff has been too small to do more than the 
routine work. There was a gain in circulation of 7,2 1 8. 

Jamaica Plain. So many writers, artists and teachers live in 
this district that the librarian plans to make a section for the 
works of Jamaica Plain authors. Two hundred and five teach- 
ers reside in the district, ninety-six of whom are registered card- 
holders. Gain in circulation, 4,052. 

Jeffries Point. This is eminently a children's library. Only 
about one-quarter of the books issued are for adults. There are 
a few Italian fathers who come to the library, but their wives ap- 
parently do not find time to read. Gain in circulation, 4,932. 

Lower Mills. This is primarily a residential section, with 
comparatively few industries. Parents often come to supervise 
their children's registration and to talk over the selection of books 
for the use of the boys and girls. Gain in circulation, 8,224. 



[57] 

Mattapan. The quarters are inadequate for such a growing 
library. Much more could be accomplished with a larger book 
collection and more assistants. The demand is for the better 
type of books. Gain in circulation, 7,202. 

Ml Bowdoin. During the greater part of the afternoon, the 
library is crowded with pupils from the neighboring schools. A 
larger space for adults is much needed; in spite of crowded con- 
ditions, 41 per cent of the circulation is adult, showing a gain of 
8 per cent over last year. Gain in circulation, 15,858. 

Mt. Pleasant The library is in close co-operation with the 
schools. One of the teachers in the Parochial School has been 
recently transferred to Halifax, N. S., and writes from there: 
"One great regret is mine: we have no library for children. I 
wish I could send to you as last year and get some of those 
charming books. But the land of Uncle Sam is far away . . . 
Loss in circulation, 869. 

Neponsei. Most of the patrons are old residents, — families 
who have lived here for generations. While in most of the other 
districts the children carry home books for their parents, here the 
parents come in to select books for their children. Gain in cir- 
culation, 7,090. 

North End. The library does not give the people food, 
clothing or other material comforts, but it does give a zest for 
life and a joy in living. The ideal location of the branch, bring- 
ing the library into close contact with the schools and social 
agencies of the district, has helped greatly in accomplishing this 
end. So far as circulation is concerned, the branch continues to 
be a children's library; 88 per cent of the books are issued to 
children. The adult room, however, is well patronized. The 
circulation shows a gain of 1 0,970. 

Orient Heights. The young people like to come to the li- 
brary, for they know that they can get what they want. But 
the attitude of the older people is different, mainly because the 
place is unattractive. If the branch had a larger room and more 
satisfactory equipment, the demands on the library would be 
much greater. Loss in circulation, 3,660. 



[58] 

Parker Hill. Last spring the librarian visited the schools, 
and it is worth noting that from one school alone she received 
one hundred and fifty new registrations. The work with the 
nurses of the hospitals in the vicinity has materially increased. 
Reference work is a vital part of the service. Loss in circula- 
tion, 5.378. 

JRoslindale. This year a children's room was established, 
which has proved a marked success. The gain in circulation is 
6,739. 

Roxbur]) Crossing. The activity of the branch has increased 
in all its phases. This is due in part to the addition of many 
new books and to the opening of a new adult room. Many of 
the adult patrons now prefer to stay and read in the library. 
The reference work takes an increasing amount of time. Gain 
in circulation, 1 ,958. 

South Boston. Nearly every nationality is represented in the 
district. The library has plenty of books on citizenship, but 
should have larger collections in foreign languages. There are 
about 28,000 children of school age in the vicinity. The libra- 
ry is destined to be of vital significance, but in the present quar- 
ters the proper extension of the work is impossible. The library 
has been functioning in the same leased rooms — one flight up 
from the street — for more than fifty-one years. There is a cry- 
ing need for a new and independent library building. Gain in 
circulation, 14,364. 

South End. The library has just completed its first year in 
the new Municipal Building. The removal was accomplished 
without closing the branch, and with no inconvenience to the 
public. The whole effect of the new quarters is agreeable, rest- 
ful and homelike. Many who came at first only to look around 
the building are now constant users of the library. In contrast 
to most of the branches, the majority of the readers are adults. 
The library is in touch with the big industries of the vicinity, 
and has availed itself of every opportunity for publicity which 
might enlarge its field of usefulness. Gain in circulation, 
12,139. 



[59] 

T^ler Street. The neighborhood is most cosmopolitan and 
heterogeneous. There are a great many Jews, Italians, Syrians, 
Irish and Greeks, with a scattering of Armenians, Lithuanians, 
Poles, and Chinese. The library has tried to get in contact with 
the latter and the little Chinese children come to the library in 
appreciable numbers. Members of the staff speak a number of 
the languages of the district, which is a great help in gaining 
new registrations. In the reference room every seat is taken 
almost every night, by high school students. Gain in circulation, 
2,297. 

Upharns Corner. A more adequate children's room and 
more trained assistants are the greatest needs of this branch. Loss 
in circulation, 10,526. 

Warren Street. This is a large Jewish centre. The new 
arrivals, coming from Russia or Poland, are anxious to acquire 
English as a step toward becoming citizens. The ambitious 
Russian Jev/, who has read the works of Tolstoi, Turgenev and 
Dostoevski in the original, often asks for the same books in En- 
glish. There are calls for Italian, and recently for Hungarian 
books. There are five elementary Hebrew schools and two 
Hebrew colleges in the district. Most of their students visit 
the library. The book collection comprises 8,000 volumes, and 
last year the circulation showed an increase of 13,494. 

West End. The library district is a small city in itself, only 
about half a square mile in territory, but with a population of 
over 70,000 inhabitants. The West End can boast of a rail- 
road terminal, a magnificent Esplanade along the Charles River, 
a picturesque Ghetto, a convent, a jail, a clinic, a playground. 
The library, once a church, is architecturally beautiful, an his- 
toric landmark, quiet, dignified, yet active within. The con- 
stituency is most heterogeneous. As a result of the re-arrang- 
ment and re-classification of the books, the collection is a fairly 
live and workable one, and better rounded out than ever before. 
The estimated number of visitors is about eight hundred a day; 
the gain in circulation was 1 1 ,797. 

West Roxbur]). This is a reading community. There are 



[60] 

eight circulating libraries and about twenty book clubs in the 
vicinity of the branch. The library has an excellent picture 
collection, much used not only in the schools, but also by artists. 
Normal Art students, etc. Gain in circulation, 6,229. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

The course of free lectures was given without change as an- 
nounced in the autumn. As customary, the lists of lectures 
given under the auspices of the Library and of various civic and 
other associations, as well as the list of public exhibitions held 
at the Central Library from the fall of 1 923 through the spring 
of 1924, may be found on pages 71-76 of the Appendix. 

The Central Library Lecture Hall was used every week-day 
evening, with the exception of Thursday, by the Division of 
University Extension. The Division also used the hall on Fri- 
day mornings and Tuesday afternoons, and on six Saturda}'^ 
mornings for lectures in French, in co-operation with the Alliance 
Frangaise and the Salon Frangaise de Boston. This year, as 
usual, the Ruskin Club held its fortnightly meetings on Monday 
afternobns. On the alternate Mondays during the fall, a course 
of ten lectures on "Building a Better Citizenship," by Rev. J. 
I. J. Corrigan was held under the auspices of the League of 
Catholic Women. The hall was used by the New England 
Poetry Club on the second Wednesday of the month for a series 
of six open meetings to which the public was welcomed. Fre- 
quent use of the Lecture Hall has also been made by organiza- 
tions holding public meetings, or annual meetings open to the 
public. 

As suggested last year, the addition of a motion picture equip- 
ment would greatly add to the popularity of the lecture courses 
and would open a large field for educational work with children. 

STAFF INSTRUCTION. 

An attractive series of courses was planned for the benefit of 
employees of the Library during the season 1923-24. Four 
courses, each running throughout the entire scholastic year, were 



[61] 

offered, two arranged through the Division of University Ex- 
tension of the State Department of Education, and two given 
by members of the Library staff. They were as follows : 

1. Modern Continental Writers, open to the public, in three series (30 

lectures in all), by Prof. Robert E. Rogers of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, whose courses in English and American 
literature have proved so valuable to members of the staff and the 
general public during the two years past. 

2. Elementary Italian, given by Miss Eleanor M. Colleton of the Han- 

cock School. 

3. Work with Children, given by Miss Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of 

Work with Children. 

4. Reference Work, second course, continuing the work of the previous 

year, given by Mr. Frank H. Chase, Reference Librarian. 

The registration of library employees at the opening of the 
courses was promising: Modern Continental Writers, first ten 
lectures, 34 employees, second ten, 2 1 , and third ten, 1 4 ; Italian, 
30; Work with Children, 1 2 ; Reference Work, 15. 

The appeal of Prof. Rogers's course, which offers an unusual 
opportunity for acquaintance with recent European literature, 
has been wide and the lectures have been attended by assistants 
in a number of other libraries, as well as by a large number of 
the general public. The course in Italian meets a long-felt want 
in enabling library employees to acquire the knowledge of an 
additional language, both as a resource in the performance of 
their duties and as a preparation for the language examination 
required for promotion. The courses in Work with Children 
and in Reference Work are given on alternate Thursday morn- 
ings and are a valuable means of adding to the usefulness of a 
number of the branch assistants. 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS, 

In order to improve the ventilation of the public Lecture Hall 
in the Copley Square building, a new ten-horse power air wash- 
ing machine, with electric fan and the necessary connections with 
air shafts, has been installed. The lighting of the West Gal- 
lery in the Special Libraries Department has been improved by 
the installation of fifteen 300-watt indirect ceiling fixtures. 



[62] 

During the past twelve months a complete new equipment has 
been placed in the men's public lavatory, as well as in the lava- 
tories used by the men and women employees of the Central 
Library. 

Under contract dated June 2, 1923, the Library Bureau 
installed the two remaining tiers of steel stacks in the Annex to 
the main library building. The work was completed and ac- 
cepted on January 12, 1924. The additional floors provide 
about two and a half miles of shelving, with capacity to house 
over 1 00,000 volumes. The heating and lighting contracts are 
now under consideration and it is expected that the equipment 
will be completed early in the new fiscal year. A special appro- 
priation of $50,000 was allowed for this important extension of 
shelf room. 

During the fall a new boiler was installed at the West End 
Branch. The interior of this attractive building, the old West 
Church edifice, a landmark of the West End, has been freshly 
painted throughout. Major or minor improvements, consisting 
of painting, increased shelving, better lighting, etc., have also 
been made at Andrew Square, Flyde Park, Mattapan, Mt. 
Bowdoin, Parker Hill, Roslindaie, Roxbury and V/est End. 

RETIREMENTS AND DEATHS. 

Chapter 521 of the Acts and Resolves passed by the Legis- 
lature of Massachusetts, 1922, entitled "An Act providing re- 
tirement allowances based on annuity and pension contributions 
for employees of the City of Boston or of the County of Suffolk," 
became effective for city and county employees on February 1 , 
1923. It creates the Boston Retirement System and provides 
for the retirement of those employees who grow old or who are 
injured in service, and for aid to the dependents of any who may 
be killed in the service. The plan also furnishes a method of 
automatic saving to those who do not remain long enough to 
receive retirement allowances. All persons who entered service 
after February I, 1923, automatically became members of the 
retirement system, as a part of their contract of employment. 

Under the operation of this law eighteen employees of the 



[63] 

Library Department were retired during the fiscal year 1 923-24. 
Included were Otto Fleischner, Assistant Librarian (retired 
April 30), entered service 1891 ; John Murdoch, first assistant. 
Catalogue Department (retired March 31), entered service 
1896; Elizabeth Ainsworth, Librarian, Hyde Park (retired 
April 30), entered service 1896; Helen M. Bell, Librarian, 
Fellowes Athenaeum, Roxbury (retired May 31), entered ser- 
vice 1878; Emma G. Capewell, Librarian, Mattapan (retired 
September 30) , entered service 1 892 ; Mary A. Hill, Librarian, 
Dorchester Lower Mills (retired April 30), entered service 
1875; Elizabeth T. Reed, Librarian, Dorchester (retired April 
30) , entered service 1 873 ; Mary P. Swain, Librarian, Jamaica 
Plain (retired April 30) , entered service 1877; Isabel E. Weth- 
erald. Librarian, Mt. Bowdoin (retired April 30), entered 
service 1896; Maud M. Morse, Assistant, Branch Issue Divi- 
sion (retired June 30), entered service 1877; Ellen A, Eaton, 
First Assistant, South Boston (retired March 31 ), entered ser- 
vice 1873; Alice M. Wing, First Assistant, East Boston (re- 
tired April 30), entered service 1873; Catherine T. Donnelly, 
Sewer, Bindery Deparment (retired July 31), entered service 
1908; Lucy E. Soule, Sewer, Bindery Department (retired 
April 30), entered service 1891 ; Charles W Karlson, Elec- 
trician (retired May 31), entered service 1896; John P. Ma- 
lone, First Assistant Engineer (retired April 30) , entered service 
1 895 ; Charles W. Murphy, Assistant, Engineer and Janitor 
Department (retired October 25), entered service 1904; and 
Mary F. Mullen, Matron, Central Library (retired May 31), 
entered service 1905. 

With regret are noted the following deaths while in service: 
on December 2 1 , Nellie A. Stone. First Assistant, Hyde Park 
Branch, who entered service in 1 891 ; and on March 1 3, George 
Zittel, Engineer, Central Library, who entered service in 1891. 

CONCLUSION. 

As was pointed out in the report of a year ago, "the time has 
come when the Library either must lose its scholarly standing or 
must fail to serve the great reading public in its call for recrea- 



[64] 

tional reading and the less solid books of non-fiction," unless in- 
creased funds are at the disposition of the Board of Trustees. 
Instead of being among the three or four notable free public 
libraries of the United States, the Boston Library must be content 
to drop into the second class of these institutions of learning. 
There is need of money, not only for books of all kinds, but for 
extended service to the public through new branches, for equip- 
ment of a more modern nature, especially in the Central Library, 
and for a greater number of assistants, adequately trained for the 
professional positions in a great educational institution. 

The Director has the privilege of extending for the last time, 
with feelings of regret, his appreciation of the devoted service 
given to the Library through many years, by those ex-members 
of the staff whose employment came to an end during the year 
under the Boston Retirement System. A report will seem in- 
complete without making special mention of the worth and ser- 
vice of Mr. Otto Fleischner, associated with the Library since 
November 23, 1891, and Assistant Librarian from January 12, 
1900, until his retirement on April 30, 1923. 

On October 26, 1923, Dr. Frank Herbert Chase, who en- 
tered the service of the Library on October 2, 1911, and had 
been Custodian of Bates Hall Reference Department since 
May 19, 1916, was appointed to the newly created position of 
"Reference Librarian, with charge of all matters pertaining to 
the use of books and such other executive work as may be en- 
trusted to him by the Director." It is a pleasure to commend 
the zeal and interest shown by Mr. Chase in his new position. 

I wish also to acknowledge the loyal support during the year 
of the Chiefs of Departments, the Branch Librarians, and the 
members of the staff generally throughout the library system. 
The credit for the effective work of the Library is theirs, indi- 
vidually and collectively. 

Charles F. D. Belden, 

Director. 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION. 





1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 


1921-22 


1922-23 


1923-24 


Central Library 


441,582 


507,038 


551,190 


591,640 


590,655 


576,997 


Branches: 














Brighton 


58,764 


71,720 


75,273 


79,397 


83,238 


87,672 


Charlesfown 


70,828 


80,900 


91,455 


98,780 


101,140 


99,035 


Codman Square 


78,694 


85,246 


91,721 


101,792 


103,810 


113,529 


Dorchester 


60,513 


68,173 


68,873 


70,396 


67,810 


75,608 


East Boston 


94,971 


1 1 5,062 


111,813 


120,234 


120,993 


125,968 


Hyde Park 


70,363 


78,444 


79,592 


80,855 


82,498 


89,716 


Jamaica Plain 


48,306 


55,771 


58,228 


60,507 


59,970 


64,022 


Mt. Bowdoin 


• . * . 








83,376 


98,961 


North End 


42.123 


59^676 


69!846 


85!l87 


96,359 


107,329 


Roslindale 




66,798 


73,310 


80,879 


82,597 


89,336 


*Roxbury . 


7l!4i8 


74,024 


80,469 


80,933 


79,125 


71,673 


South Boston 


89,478 


100,602 


104,979 


121,194 


124,809 


139,173 


South End 


87,465 


94,386 


99,751 


97,403 


99,543 


111,682 


Upham's Cornel 


100,009 


111,186 


113,846 


119,375 


120,257 


109,731 


Warren Street 


.... 


88,720 


94,991 


104,412 


108,665 


122,159 


West End . 


107,181 


114,162 


123,137 


136,431 


142,470 


1 54,267 


West Roxbury 


51.519 


55,273 


54,956 


66,470 


74,970 


81,199 


Allston 


41,217 


43,492 


41,369 


47,328 


53,598 


57,705 


Andrew Square 


27,266 


29,726 


30,761 


33,944 


33,413 


51,991 


Boylston Station 


33,163 


40,758 


44,829 


50,033 


55,672 


62,340 


City Point 


43,744 


33,784 


34,510 


30,300 


38.381 


43.277 


Faneuil 


21,571 


22,626 


24,001 


24,913 


24.944 


27.004 


Jeffries Point 






.... 


10,309 


35.925 


40.857 


Dor. Lower Mill 


3 l'7,'897 


I*8,"3()8 


18,040 


17,765 


17,577 


25.801 


Mattapan . 


14,757 


16,351 


16,439 


20,499 


20,497 


27,699 


Mt. Bowdoin 


53,200 


68,177 


73,620 


80.492 


> • * • 


• . • • 


Mt. Pleasant 


42,690 


48,098 


49,949 


57.562 


53,846 


52.977 


Neponset . 


18,474 


19,433 


22,630 


28.789 


33,263 


40,353 


Orient Heights 


14,967 


21,133 


21,934 


27.970 


34,240 


30,580 


Parker Hill 


40,044 


52,846 


48,891 


49,209 


49.459 


44,081 


Roslindale 


56,918 


.... 






• . • . 


• • • • 


Roxbury Crossin 


g 37,652 


43,232 


47!036 


57;6b9 


55.911 


57,869 


Tyler Street 


12,556 


1 5,587 


31,343 


40,039 


39,973 


42,270 


Warren Street 


78,723 


.... 




.... 


.... 


. . . . 


Total . 


2.028,053 


2,300,732 


2,448,776 


2.672.646 


2.768,984 


2,922,861 



*Renamed Fellowes Athenaeum in 1923. 



[66] 

The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form: 

VOLUMES. 

1918-19 loss from preceding year ........ 46,402 

1919-20 gain over preceding year ........ 272,679 

1920-21 gain over preceding year ........ 148,044 

1921-22 gain over preceding year ........ 223,870 

1922-23 gain over preceding year ........ 96,338 

1923-24 gain over preceding year ........ 153,877 

USE OF BOOKS. 



CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 

SCHOOLS AND 









HOME USE 
DIRECT. 


HOME USE 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


INSTITUTIONS 

THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS. 


February, 1923 . . 33,845 


1 1 ,962 


15,804 


61,611 


March, 






32,054 


11,563 


16,165 


59,782 


April, 






32,050 


10,973 


16,685 


59,708 


May, 






28,829 


8,959 


18.965 


56,753 


June, 






23,746 


7,231 


16,355 


47,332 


July. 






18,043 


5,206 


2,240 


25.489 


August, 






20,035 


5.213 


2,100 


27,348 


September, 






19,070 


4,697 


2,005 


26,042 


October, 






24,189 


6.955 


7,385 


38,529 


November, 






32,498 


11,191 


12,500 


56,189 


December, 






33.558 


12,788 


1 5,700 


62,046 


January, 1 924 




30,911 


10,242 


15,015 


56,168 



Totals 



328,828 



107,250 



140,919 



576.997 



DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL CIRCULATION. 



Central Library: 

a. Direct ...... 

b. Through Branches .... 

c. Schools and Institutions through 

Branch Department . 

Branches: 
Allston 

Andrew Square 
Boylston Station 
Brighton 
Charlestown 
City Point . 
Codman Square 
Dorchester . 
Dorchester Lower Mil 
East Boston 

Carried forward 



HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 




USE. 


INSTITUTIONS. 




328.828 






107.250 








140,919 


576,997 


57.705 




57.705 


51.991 


• • * . 


51,991 


60,871 


1,469 


62,340 


53,789 


33,883 


87,672 


88,402 


10,633 


99,035 


43,277 


.... 


43.277 


105.559 


7.970 


113,529 


64,082 


11,526 


75,608 


25,706 


95 


25,801 


106,240 


19,728 


125,968 



657,622 



85,304 



742,926 



[67] 



Brought fonvard 
Faneuil 
tFellowes Athenaeum 
Hyde Park 
Jamaica Plain 
Jeffries Point 
Mattapan . 
Mt. Bowdoin 
Mt. Pleasant 
Neponset . 
North End . 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Roslindale . 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boston 
South End . 
Tyler Street 
Upham's Corner 
Warren Street 
West End . 
West Roxbury 



HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 


TOTAL. 


USE. 


INSTITUTIONS. 


657,622 


85,304 


742,926 


27,004 


• • • > 


27,004 


57,685 


13,988 


71,673 


77,260 


12,456 


89,716 


52,022 


12.000 


64,022 


40,857 


■ • • • 


40,857 


27,699 




27,699 


97,974 


987 


98,961 


52,977 


• • • • 


52.977 


40,353 


. • . • 


40,353 


104,293 


3.036 


107,329 


30,580 


.... 


30,580 


44,081 


, , 


44,081 


84,307 


5.029 


89.336 


57,677 


192 


57.869 


120,018 


19,155 


139,173 


96,472 


15.210 


111,682 


41,730 


540 


42.270 


102,587 


7.144 


109,731 


121,088 


1.071 


122,159 


134,925 


19.342 


154,267 


66,488 


14,711 


81.199 



2,135,699 



210,165 



2,345.864 



These figures are condensed into the following : 

Books lent for home use, including circulation through 
schools and institutions. 



From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through the 
branches) ........... 

From branches (excluding books received from Central Library) . 



Total 



Comparative. 1922-23. 

Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use ... . 344,970 
Through branches and *reading rooms 1 1 1 ,067 



2 

2 

1923- 



576,997 
345,864 

922,861 
24. 



Branch Department circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use 

From branch collections 
From *reading rooms . 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch system) 



1,439.907 
545,718 



456,037 

1.985.625 

327,322 
2,768.984 



328,828 
107,250 



2,135,699 



436,078 

2,135.699 

351,084 
2,922,861 



■f Hitherto known as Roxbury Branch. * Classed as branches in 1923-24. 



[68] 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive year : 



Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts 



Totals 



Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts 



922-23. 


1923-24 


1,344 
282 


1.596 
246 


L626 


1.842 


442 

no 


462 
92 



Totals 552 554 

Borrowed from other libraries for use here ..... 28 35 

The classified "home-use" circulation of the branches and 
reading rooms was as follows, for two successive years: 

1923-24. 



Branches: 

Fiction for adults . 
Non-fiction for adults 
Juvenile fiction . 
Juvenile non-fiction 

*Reading Rooms: 
Fiction 
Non-fiction . 



1922-23. 

VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 



435,081 

1 52,036 
537.641 
309,622 



370,559 
175,159 



30.31 
10.6 
37.5 
21.5 



67.8 
32.2 



VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 

665,125 31.2 



218,105 
769,182 
477,813 



10.2 
36.1 

22.4 



At the Central Library the classified 
shows the following percentages: 



lome-use circulation 



1922-23. 



1923-24. 



PERCENTAGES. PERCENTAGES. 



FIcrion 47.86+ 47.9 

Non-fichon 52.13+ 52.1 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 
BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE. 



For the Central Library: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income . 

For branches and reading rooms: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income . 

By Fellowes Athenaeum (for 
Branch) .... 



the Roxbury 



Totals 



1922-23. 
7,440 
4.701 



55,31 



12.141 

55,311 

622 

68.074 



1923-24. 
6,805 
4,032 



50,147 
4 



10,837 

50,151 

1,178 

62.166 



*Classed as branches in 1923-24 



[69] 



Of the 1 ,283 volumes acquired by the Fellowes Athenaeum 
during the past year, 1 , 1 78 were purchases, 73 were gifts, and 
32 were of periodicals bound. 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise: 



Accessions by purchase (including 1 1 78 volumes 
by Fellowes Athenaeum) . . . . . 

Accessions by gift (including 73 volumes for 
Fellowes Athenaeum) . , . . . 

Accessions by Statistical Department . 

Accessions by exchange . . . . . 

Accessions by periodicals bound (including 32 
for Fellowes Athenaeum) . . . . 

Accessions of newspapers bound . . . . 



10,837 

9,082 
96 
44 

1,827 
135 

22,021 



51,329 
2,052 

132 
53.513 



TOTAL 
VOLUMES. 

62,166 

11,134 
96 
44 

1,959 
135 

75,534 



THE CATALOGUE. 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 
Serials .... 
Branches 

Recatalogued 



Totals 



VOLS. AND 


TITLES. 


VOLS. AND 


TITLES. 


PARTS. 




PARTS. 




1922-23. 


1923-24. 


25.533 


15,731 


22,172 


14,471 


4,127 




4,528 


. . . 


48,007 


39,937 


48,616 


42.113 


14,056 


7,178 


14,791 


7.709 



91.723 62.846 



90.107 64,293 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 20,910 

Special collections, new books and transfers . . . . . . 2,194 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. . . . . . . . . . . 1,493 

24,597 
Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc 10.086 

Net gain. Central Library .......... 14,511 

Net gain at branches ........... 9,436 

Net gain, entire library system ......... 23,947 



[70] 



The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852-53 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1855-56 
185^57 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1875-76 
187^77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1884-85 

1885 . 

1886 . 

1887 . 



9,688 

16.221 

22,617 

28,080 

34,896 

70,851 

78,043 

85,031 

97,386 

105,034 

110,563 

116,934 

123,016 

130,678 

136,080 

144,092 

1 52,796 

160,573 

1 79,250 

192,958 

209.456 

260,550 

276,918 

297.873 

312,010 

345,734 

360,963 

377.225 

390,982 

404,221 

422.116 

438.594 

453,947 

460,993 

479,421 

492.956 



Volumes in entire library system 

Volumes in the branches and reading rooms 



1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896-97 

1897-98 

1898-99 

1899-1900 

1900-01 

1901-02 

1902-03 

1903-04 

1904-05 

1905-06 

1906-07 

1907-08 

1908-09 

1909-10 

1910-11 

1911-12 

1912-13 

1913-14 

1914-15 

1915-16 

1916-17 

1917-18 

1918-19 

1919-20 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1922-23 

1923-24 



These volumes are located as follows : 



Central Library 






973.442 


East Boston 


AUston 






4,469 


Faneuil 


Andrew Square 






4.050 


'"'Fellowes Athenaeum 


Boylston Station 






4,657 


Hyde Park 


Brighton 






18.000 


Jamaica Plain 


Charlestown 






15,114 


Jeffries Point 


City Point . 






5,819 


Mattapan 


Codman Square 






8,830 


Ml. Bowdoin 


Dorchester . 






13.546 


Ml. Pleasant 


Dorchester Lowe 


r Mil 


Is 


1.711 


Neponset 



505.872 

520,508 

536,027 

556,283 

576.237 

597.152 

610.375 

628.297 

663.763 

698.888 

716.050 

746.383 

781.377 

812,264 

835,904 

848,884 

871.050 

878.933 

903.349 

922,348 

941.024 

961,522 

987,268 

1,006.717 

1.049.011 

1.067.103 

1.098.702 

1.121,747 

1,139,682 

1.157,326 

1,173,695 

1,197.498 

1.224.510 

1.258.211 

1,284.094 

1.308.041 

1.308.041 
334.599 



21,324 

3.766 

36,315 

33,238 

17,392 

2.402 

2.264 

8.509 

5.723 

3.171 



*Hitherto known as Roxbury Branch. 



[71 



North End . 


9.877 


South End . 


14.212 


Orient Heights . 


4,025 


Tyler Street 


4.680 


Parker Hill 


2,750 


Upham's Corner . 


12,846 


Roslindale . 


10,736 


Warren Street . 


8,740 


Roxbury Crossing 


5,078 


West End . 


19,502 


South Boston 


18,872 


West Roxbury . 


12.981 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 



Requisitions received and filled .... 
Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles exclusive of automatic reprint . 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) . 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Dept. count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) . 
Signs ......... 

Blank forms (numbered series) .... 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside numbered series) 
Catalogues and pamphlets ..... 



THE BINDERY. 

Number of volumes bound in various styles . 
Magazines stitched ...... 

Volumes repaired ...... 

Volumes guarded ....... 

Maps mounted ....... 

Photographs and engravings, &c., moimted 
Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed . 



1922-23. 


1923-24. 


299 


294 


12,816 


13,962 


184,666 


203,109 


480 


704 


27,967 


41,536 


1,603 


2,518 


4,202,276 


3,751,465 


30.352 


83,446 


177,000 


157,691 


1922-23. 


1923-24. 


48,544 


52,483 


265 


237 


2.141 


2.245 


1,169 


1,941 


64 


65 


2,929 


3,295 


1 75,532 


157,161 



THE LECTURES OF 1923-1924. 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were 
illustrated with lantern slides. 

1923 
Oct. 1 



id Mrs. Edwin Stodola 



Famous Mothers of History. Mr. 
and Mignon Rounds Gowan. 

Oct. 8. *Art. Hulda Geist. 

^American Poetry. Harriette Fletcher McKinnon. (Ruskin 
Club.) 

Oct. 1 4. Columbus Day as a Get-Together Holiday. Frank Chou- 
teau Brown. (Boston Conservation Bureau.) 

Oct. 1 8. Sunny Italy in Art and Story. Mrs. James Frederick Hopkins. 

Oct. 21. *The Story of Joyce Kilmer. Rev. William M. Stinson, S.J. 

Oct. 22. *The Spirit of Recent Poetry. Rev. Henry Hallam Saunder- 
son. (Ruskin Club.) 

Oct. 25. The Evolution of the Garden. Mary Harrod Northend. 



[72] 

*A SHaker-peprian Tcrccnfenarv and its Significance. E. 
Charlton Black. (Drama League Course.) 
Wild Life in the Blue Mountain Forest. Ernest Harold 

Baynes. 
Sunny Hours in Sunny Spain. Francis Henry Wade, M.D. 
Seal Fishing in the Arctic: a Personal Experience. George 

Allan England. 
English Cathedrals: their Architecture, History and Le- 
gends. Emily M. B. Warren, A.R.B.A., B.W.S. 
1 2. ^Industrial Arts Developed by John Ruskin. Mrs. May Smith 

Dean. (Ruskin Club.) 
14. *Emilv Dickinson. Robert Silliman Hillyer. (New En- 
gland Poetry Club.) 
Camping in our National Forests. Philip W. Ayres. (Field 
and Forest Club Course.) 
*William Byrd and his Contemporaries. Sarah M. Gough. 
Ancestor Hunting in England. J. Gardner Bartlett. 
"Our City of Boston Today." Hon. Michael J. Murray, 
(Boston Conservation Bureau.) 
*The British Poets. Charles Hammond Gibson. (Ruskin 

Club.) 
*Reading of Shakespeare's "King Henry IV, Part I." By 
members of local Shakespeare Clubs. (Drama League 
Course.) 
What Pictures to see in America. Martha A. S. Shannon. 
Imperial India. John C. Bowker, F.R.G.S. 
*Agassiz and Ruskin — Interpreters of Nature. Rev. Davis 
Wasgatt Clark, D.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Imperial India. John C. Bowker, F.R.G.S. 
*Amv Lowell. S. Foster Damon. (New England Poetry 
Club.) 
Dec. 1 3. Skyline Adventures. Walter Collins O'Kane, A.M. (Field 
and Forest Club Course.) 
*Bells and Bell Ringing. Mrs. Arthur A. Shurtleff. 
*Music: Arranged by Mrs. Arthur H. Davison. Christmas 
Message. Mrs. Minnie Meserve Soule. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Passing of the Old West. Lt. Col. Charles WelHngton 
Furlong, F.R.G.S. 
*"The Light of the Star." A Christmas Pageant. By the 
Community Service of Boston. 
27. ^Christmas Reading: "The Story of the Other Wise Man," 
by Henry Van Dyke. F. Beatrice King, assisted by 
Jean Wood Lynch. 
Dec. 30. ^Message of Music, or the Art Work of the Future. Mme. 
Beale Morey. 



Oct. 


28. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


15. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov, 


25. 


Nov. 


26. 


Dec. 


2. 


Dec. 


6. 


Dec. 


9. 


Dec. 


10. 


Dec. 


9. 


Dec. 


12. 



Dec. 
Dec. 


16. 
17. 


Dec. 


20. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


27. 



[73] 

1924 
Jan. 3. Raphael Sanzio, Prince among Painters. Charles Theodore 

Carruth. 
Jan. 6. The Making of a Picture. Philip L. Hale, A.N. A. 
Jan. 9. '^Edwin Arlinstcn Robinson. Abbie Farwell Brown. (New 

England Poetry Club.) 
Jan. 10. Tip Top Times in the Mountains: Two Weeks Hiking on 
White Mountain Trails with the Field and Forest Club. 
Rev. Charles W. Casson. (Field and Forest Club 
Course. ) 
Jan. 1 3. *What Women are doing for Music. Mrs. William Arms 

Fisher. 
Jan. 14. *What's What in Books. John Clair Minot. (Ruskin Club.) 
Jan. 1 7. "Boston in the Next Twenty-Five Years." His Honor, the 
Mayor, James M. Curley. (Boston Conservation Bu- 
reau.) 
Jan. 20. *The Contemporary Movement in the French Theatre from 
Antoine to Copeau. Samuel M. Waxman, Ph.D. 
(Drama League Course.) 
A Trip to Palestine. Anton Hanania. 

Adventures of a Sage Brush Tourist in Wyoming. (W. 
Lyman Underwood. 
*Ruskin in the Life of To-Day. Rev. Joseph P. MacCarthy, 
Ph.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Wonders of the Heavens. Rev. Manly Bacon Towns- 
end. 
^Pirandello and the Modern Itahan Theatre. Robert E. 
Rogers, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
The Wonderland of America. Mrs. Arthur D. Ropes. 
* 105th Anniversary of the Birth of John Ruskin. Dr. Pay- 
son Smith. (Ruskin Club.) 
Abraham Lincoln. Guy Richardson. 
*The Causes of the American Civil War: Lincoln and Web- 
ster. Joseph Whipple. (Ruskin Club.) 
Feb. 1 3. *Sarah Teasdale, "H. D." (Hilda Doolittle Aldington) and 
Edna St. Vincent Millay : their Treatment of the Theme of 
Love. Joseph Auslander. (New England Poetry Club.) 
Feb. 14. The Appalachian Mountain Club Huts and their Relations 
with the Trampers. Milton E. MacGregor. (Field and 
Forest Club Course.) 
Feb. I 7. *Organs and Choirs of Greater Boston. Henry C. Lahee. 
Feb. 21. A Program for Washington's Birthday. Charles F. Read. 

(Boston Conservation Bureau.) 
Feb. 24. ^Shakespeare's Response to "What the Public Wants." John 
Livingston Lowes, Ph.D. 



Jan. 
Jan. 


24. 
27. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


31. 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


7. 
8. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


10. 
II. 



Feb. 


25. 


Feb. 


28. 


Mar. 


2. 


Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 


6. 

9. 

10. 


Mar. 


12. 


Mar. 


13. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


16. 

20. 


Mar. 


23. 


Mar. 


24. 


Mar. 


27. 


Mar. 
Apr. 


30. 
3. 


Apr. 


5. 


Apr. 


6. 


Apr. 


9. 


Apr. 


10. 


Apr. 


13. 


Apr. 


14. 


Apr. 


17. 


Apr. 


20. 


Apr. 


28, 



[74] 

Bonn'e Scotland: the Land of Broom and Heather. Mrs. 

Arthur D. Ropes. (Ruskin Club.) 
The World in its True Colors: a Travel-Talk. Helen 

Messinger Murdoch. F.R.P.S. 
Expressionism in the Theatre. Albert H. Gilmer, A.M. 

(Drama League Course.) 
Italian Gardens. Robert N. Cram. 
*Books and Life. Horace G. Wadlin, Litt.D. 
Around the Bay of Naples. Ellen C. Page. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
*Carl Sandburg. Amy Lowell. (New England Poetry 

Club.) 
The Call of the Mountains. Le Roy Jeffers. (Field and 

Forest Club Course.) 
*Master Music for Young People. Malcolm Lang. 
Our Guardians of Life and Property. Speakers from the 
Boston Fire and Police Departments. (Boston Conser- 
vation Bureau.) 
^Fundamentals in the Theatre, Old and New. F. W. C. 

Hersey, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
*The Value of Critical Literature. Henry Austin Higgins. 
(Ruskin Club.) 
Browning and Ruskin: Prophets of the Twentieth Century. 

Agnes Knox Black. 
The Bible in Stained Glass. Joseph G. Reynolds, Jr. 
Gothic Grandeur: how Rheims Cathedral was built. Rev. 
William M. Stinson, S.J. 
*Igor Stravinsky: "Le Sacre du Printemps." Laurence V. 
Powell. 
Recreational Opportunities of Boston. Mrs. Eva W. White. 
(Boston Conservation Bureau.) 
^Robert Frost. Norreys Jephson O'Conor, A.M. (New 
England Poetry Club.) 
The Revelation of Spain. Ralph Adams Cram, Litt.D., 

LL.D. 

William Blake's Interpretation of the Book of Job. S. 
Foster Damon. 

Joan of Arc: the Genius of Patriotism. Mrs. James Fred- 
erick Hopkins. (Ruskin Club.) 

Southern Utah and the High Sierras: Our New National 
Parks. George H. Browne, A.M. 
*Music of the Passover: a Program for Easter. Henry 

Gideon, A.M., and assistants. 
*The Art Ruskin has given us. Roval B. Farnum. (Ruskin 
Club.) 



[75] 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS. I923-I924. 
1923 

May "Home Sweet Home" Centennial exhibition of music editions. 

Bernhardt Wall's series of etchings "The Russian Players in 
America" and a collection of prints illustrating the Moscow 
Art Theatre Players in their Boston repertory. 
Shakespeare First FoHos and Quartos. 

Loan collection of Czecho-Slovakian glassware and other art hand- 
work, lent by W. V. Slocum and others. Views of Czecho- 
Slovakian cities ; books and music illustrating national costumes, 
folk-dances, etc. 
June "See America First" a collection of artistic photos of American 
scenery by Thomas Ellison. 
Books and prints on Freemasonry. 
July Sir Joshua Reynolds, born July 16, 1723. Books, color prints, 

collotypes and photos illustrating his work. 
Aug. Views of Old New England. Historic houses, etc. 

Canadian Pacific Railway color posters. 
Sept. Fifty books of 1923. 

Francis Parkman. 
Oct. "The Holy Experiment" — color reproductions of Violet Oakley's 
murals in the Pennsylvania State Capitol. 
Reproductions of drawings by Old Masters in the Uffizi. 
Formal gardens. 

Bibliographic exhibition commemorating the Tercentenary of 
Shakespeare's First Folio. 
Nov. "The Holy Experiment," resumed by request. 

Emily M. B. Warren's original water-colors of English church 

interiors. 
Photos of English cathedrals and abbeys. 
Works of Saint Augustin (manuscripts and incunabula). 
Historical book-bindings. 
Unpublished letters of Emily Dickinson. 
Dec. Views of India. 

Color prints of the Nativity and the Madonna — a Christmas 

exhibition. 
New books suitable for Christmas gifts. 
Reproductions in color of designs for Sevres porcelain. 
Sir Isaac Newton's works in older editions. 

1924 

Jan. Color prints of Raphael's Madonnas. 
White Mountain scenery. 



[76] 

Franklinlana — manuscripts, rare editions, old prints, etc. from 
the Library's collection. 
Feb. The Wonderland of America (photographs). 

"House Beautiful" cover-design competition. 

"Round the World," photographs by Helen M. Murdoch. 

Galileo's works. 
Mar. Views of Italian gardens. 

Beadle collection of dime novels, lent by Dr. Frank P. O'Brien. 

Tributes to Franklin, collected by the N. Y. Chapter of Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

Stained glass (cartoons and examples), loaned by Reynolds, 
Francis & Rohnstock. 

Centenary of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony (books and manu- 
scripts) . 

History and art of Ireland. 
April Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 
poster-design competition. 

Tributes to Charles William Eliot on his ninetieth birthday. 

Original designs for picture-play settings, "The Thief of Bagdad." 

Byron centenary exhibition of rare editions. 

LIST OF IMPORTANT GIFTS AND GIVERS. 

The following list comprises a selection of the more important 
gifts of the year with names of the givers : 

Academia das Sclencias de Lisboa. Ten volumes, publications of the 

Academy, including four volumes of a series commemorating the fifth 

centenary of the capture of Ceuta. 
Alden, Frank W., New York. The descendants of Daniel Alden, who 

was sixth in descent from John Alden. Private edition. 1923. 
Ambassade de Belgique, Washington, D. C. Le grand voyage du Roi 

des Beiges aux £tats-Unis d'Amerique. Par Frank Ansel. Bruxelles. 

1921. 

Berg, Francis J. Cyclopedia of engineering. Chicago. 1920, 21. 
7 V. Standard American Locomotive Engineering. Chicago. 1907. 

Boston City Messenger. Boston, 1822 — 1922. The story of its gov- 
ernment and principal activities during one hundred years. By John 
Koren. Boston. 1 922. 35 copies. 

Boston Real Estate Exchange. Assessed value of real estate in Boston. 
1922. 1923. 

Bourdillon, Mrs. Agnes, Oxford, England. Preludes and romances. 
London. 1908; Moth-wings. London. 1913; A lost God. Il- 
lustrations by H. J. Ford. London. 1891 ; Aucassin & Nicolette. 
An old French love story. By Francis W. Bourdillon. 1897. 



[77] 

Bradford, Gamaliel, Wellesley Hills. Damaged souls. By Gamaliel 
Bradford. Boston. 1923. 

British Museum. The fall of Nineveh. A newly discovered Babylonian 
chronicle in the British Museum. Edited by C. J. Gadd. London. 
1923. 

Buker, Horace, Rockford, 111. Fifty-five copies of the Rockford Re- 
public (1922), containing a series entitled "The Cradle of Baseball," 
by Horace Buker. 

Codman, Miss Martha C, Washington, D. C. The journal of Mrs. 
John Amory (Katherine Greene) 1775—1777. With letters from 
her father, Rufus Greene. Edited from manuscripts by Martha C. 
Codman. Privately printed. Boston. 1923. 

Conservatoire Royale de Musique, Bruxelles. Catalogue descriptif & 
analytique du Musee instrumental du Conservatoire. Par Victor 
Charles Mahillin. Numeros 1 a 3300. Gand. 1893-1922. 5 v. 

Cook, Theodore Andrea, London. Leonardo da Vinci, sculptor. An 
illustrated essay on the Albizzi Madonna, formerly known as the 
Signa Madonna, carved by Leonardo in 1478. By Theodore Andrea 
Cook. London. 1923. Sent at the request of Mr. John S. Sargent. 

Covey, Arthur S., Pelham Manor, N. Y. Nine photographs of the 
mural decorations painted for William Filene's Sons Co. by Arthur 
Covey. 

Critchett, C. H. Nineteen directories of New England cities and towns. 
For the Information Room. 

Crosby, Mrs. Stephen Van R. Seventy-nine volumes of miscellaneous 
works and 60 numbers of periodicals. 

Dexter, George B. The lure of amateur collecting. By George Blake 
Dexter. Boston. 1923. 

Dixon, Willis Milnor, Los Angeles. Kith and kin. Containing genea- 
logical data of the families Dixon, Andrus, Battin, Beal and others. 
By Willis M. Dixon. Los Angeles. 1 922. 

Drama League of Boston. 375 volumes and 133 numbers of periodi- 
cals. This gift comprises, in books of plays, the work of seventy-five 
authors represented in ninety-eight different titles, all standard and 
largely modern, in acting editions with stage directions; in periodicals, 
current numbers of The Theatre Magazine and the Theatre Arts 
Magazine and the publications of the Drama League. 

Eaton, Miss L. W. Scrap-book of programs of Boston theatres, 1876- 

1877. 

Edes, Mrs. Henry H., Cambridge. Annals of the Harvard Class of 

1852. By Grace Williamson Edes. Privately printed, Cambridge. 

1922. 
Fowle, C. H., Williamstown. Yankee Doodle, 1846-1847; Sunday 

Mercury, 1848 and 1871; New York Ledger, 1855-1856; New 

York Mercury. 1 859. 



[78] 

Gallagher, Sears. Two etchings by Sears Gallagher: Fishing boats, T 
Wharf; In the Fenway. 

Gould, Miss Susan C. 1 07 autographed photographs, portraits of cele- 
brated people, presented to Elizabeth Porter Gould. 

Gray, Roland. 200 volumes, miscellaneous works, 92 books for the 
blind and 50 numbers of current periodicals. 

Great Britain. Patent Office. Patents for inventions. 108 volumes. 

Green, Mrs. Georgia R. Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States his- 
tory. From 458 A.D. to 1 907. 1 v. 

The Grolier Club, New York City. A descriptive catalogue of the first 
editions in book form of the writings of Percy Bysshe Shelley, based 
on a memorial exhibition held at the Grolier Club, from April 20 to 
May 20, 1922. By Ruth S. Grannis. New York. 1923. 

Hale, Philip. Three volumes for the Music Collection. 

Harper, Henry Howard. Letters and poems of Queen Elisabeth (Car- 
men Sylva). With introduction by Henry Howard Harper. Boston. 
1920. 2 v.; Pope's Epistle: Eloisa to Abelard. With introduction 
and notes by Henry Howard Harper. Original copperplate etchings 
by W. H. W. Bicknell. Boston. 1923. Both printed for members 
of the Bibliophile Society. 

Heartman, Charles F., Metuchen, N. J. The Cradle of the United 
States. Contemporary broadside, pamphlets and books pertaining to 
pre-Revolutionary troubles, the War of Independence and the adoption 
of the Federal Constitution. Described by Charles F. Heartman. 
1 00 copies printed. 

Hills, Frederick S., Albany. Genealogical notes on the Smock family in 
the United States. Compiled by John C. Smock. Albany. 1922; 
New York State men. James H. Manning, editor. Albany. 1922. 
8 parts. Portraits; New York State women. James H. Manning, 
editor. Albany. 1 922. 2 parts. Portraits. 

Howland, Gerald S. Have faith in Coolidge. By Eugene M. Weeks. 
Boston. 1923. Twenty copies. 

Johnson, Frederick. Genealogical tables of the Johnson family. To- 
gether with additional facts, etc., relating to the same family. 1893. 

Jonnesco, Madame Marie, through Frederick A. DePilis, New York City. 
Roumania. By Madame Marie Jonnesco. Introduction by Queen 
Marie of Roumania. New York. 1923. 

Kennedy, Miss Mildred. 758 photographs, various subjects, including 
photographs of foreign architecture. 

Lebon, Charles, former Professor of French in the English High School. 
2 1 9 volumes of French history and literature by French writers of 
eminence. This collection is especially strong in the history of France 
and includes, besides many others, the historical works of Michelet, 
Lamartine, Sainte-Beuve and Bossuet. There is also an interesting 
group of books relating to Moliere and an edition of the Complete works 



[79] 

of Moliere not possessed by this library ; an edition of Ronsard's Works 
in ten volumes, published in 1 604, and Anthology of French poetry, 
1 752—1 866, in four quarto volumes. 

Lee, Joseph. 1 06 volumes, miscellaneous works. 

Leonard, Clarence E., Yonkers, N. M. The Fulton-Hayden-Warner 
ancestry in America. By Clarence E. Leonard. New York. 1923. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Trustees. Robb DePeyster Tytus Memo- 
rial Series: The tomb of Puyemre at Thebes. By Norman de Garvis 
Davies. New York. 1922. 2 v. Sent at the request of Mrs. Ed- 
ward J. Tytus. 

Morss, Mrs. Everett. I 35 volumes of miscellaneous works, including a 
number of volumes of fiction and 86 periodicals. 

Moycr, James A. Introduction to music appreciation and history. By 
Dorothy Tremble Moyer. Boston. 1923. 2 copies. 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Catalogue of the Indian collection in the 
Museum. By Ananda Coomaraswamy. Boston. 1923. 

National Shawmut Bank of Boston. The port of Boston, Prepared 
by the National Shawmut Bank. Boston. 1923. 38 copies. 

New York State Shorthand Reporters' Association, Brooklyn. Proceed- 
ings of the Association, 24 volumes (completing the Library file). 

O'Connell, William, Cardinal. Sermons and addresses of his Eminence 
William, Cardinal O'Connell, Archbishop of Boston. Boston. 1922. 
7v. 

O'Reilly, Rev. James T., O.S.A., Lawrence. Controversies between 
Royal Governors and their Assemblies in the Northern American 
Colonies. By John F. Burns, O.S.A. Privately printed. Boston. 

1923. 

Page, L. C, & Co. Eight of their publications, including The new 
Poland, by Nevin O. Winter. Boston. 1923. 

Page, Walter Oilman. Eight photographs from paintings by Walter 
Oilman Page. 

Peirce, Mrs. Helen M., Northport, Me. Two volumes of material in 
manuscript and print relating to the recruiting of Massachusetts troops 
in the Civil War. One volume consists of correspondence chiefly be- 
tween Brigadier Oeneral Richard A. Peirce and Governor Andrew and 
Edwin M. Stanton. The second volume contains a collection of 
General and Special Orders issued at the Headquarters of the Adjutant 
General, Boston, 1863-1864. This valuable and unusually complete 
file of General Orders and of war-time correspondence has been placed 
in the 20th Regiment Collection. 

Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Phoenix, Ariz. Twenty-five photo- 
graphs of scenes in East Central Arizona, including farms and vine- 
yards, the Roosevelt Dam, the two great canals and the City of Phoenix. 

Quaritch, Bernard, London. A catalogue of books printed in Europe 
during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. London. 1923; A cata- 



[80] 

logue of English and foreign bookbindings offered for sale by Bernard 
Quaritch. London. 1 92 1 . 

Quincy, Mrs. Josiah H. Framed picture for West Roxbury Branch. 
The panorama of the Great Wall of China. 

Rossi, L. Melano. Storia letteraria d'ltalia scritta da una Societa di 
Professori. Milano. 1897. 9 v. ; Storia politica d'ltalia scritta da 
una Societa di Professori. Milano. 1897. 9 v. 

Royal Academy of Sciences of Amsterdam. Summaries of scientific 
work in the fields of oceanography, meteorology, etc., in the Indian 
Archipelago and adjacent islands. 6 v. 

Sayler, Oliver M. The story of the Moscow Art Theatre, 1898-1923. 
Introduction by Oliver M. Sayler. 

Schenkl, J. Pauline, Estate of. Seventy three volumes, by Lytton, Schil- 
ler, Scott, Thackeray and others. 

Schirmer, G., through Mr. O. G. Sonneck, New York. Six volumes of 
music, folk songs and operas. For Brown Collection of Music. 

Schmitt, Albert Felix. The Albert Felix Schmitt exhibition held at the 
galleries of the Boston Art Club, 1 92 1 , and 22 photographs of paint- 
ings by A. F. Schmitt. 

Sonneck, O. G., New York. Studies in song. 6 pieces. By O. G. 
Sonneck. For the Brown Collection of Music, 

Sprague, Phineas Warren. (Through C. F. Libbie & Co.) The 
Spragues of Maiden, Massachusetts. By George Walter Chamberlain. 
Privately printed. Boston. 1923. 

Second Battalion Armory, New York. Second Battalion, Naval Militia, 
New York. Outline history, 1897-1922. (New York, 1922.) 

Shepley, George L., Providence. A Rhode Island slaver. Trade book 
of the sloop Adventure, 1 773—1 774. From the original manuscript 
in the Library of George L. Shepley. Providence. 1922. 

Tudor, Mrs. Frederick, Jr. Photograph of painting of Rear Admiral 
Charles Stewart, U. S. Navy, by Sully. 

Tuesday Shakespere Class. (Through Mrs. Josiah Quincy.) The let- 
ters of Horace Howard Furness. Boston. 1922. 2 v. For West 
Roxbury Branch. 

U. S. Shipping Board: Emergency Fleet Corporation. Planning a trip 
abroad. Edited by Edward Hungerford. New York. 1923. Thir- 
ty-five copies for distribution in Branch Libraries. 

Vassar College Library. Vassar mediaeval studies. Edited by Christa- 
bel F. Fiske. New Haven. 1923. 

Vocational Committee of the Boston Branch of the American Association 
of University Women, through June R. Donnelly. A check for ten 
dollars to be expended in the purchase of material on vocations. 

Walsh, Hon. David I. Speeches of Hon. David I. Walsh, U. S. 
Senate, 1919—1922. Autographed copy. 

Warner, Joseph B., Estate of, through Roger Warner. Collection of 
books, miscellaneous works. 302 volumes. 



[81] 

Waterman, William C, Estate of. A painting by his brother, Marcus 

Waterman, entitled "Hayfields" (July). 
West Roxbury Woman's Club. Six volumes, including The life and 

letters of Walter H. Page. By B. J. Hendrick. 2 v. ; The life of 

Christ. By Giovanni Papini. For West Roxbury Branch. 
Whiting, Miss Lilian. 226 manuscript letters written to Miss Whiting, 

many from Boston authors, to be added to the Kate Field Memorial 

Collection, established through former gifts of Miss Whiting. 
Dr. Williams' Trustees, London. Author catalogue of additions to Dr. 

Williams' Library, in the years 1900—1921. Cambridge. 1923. 
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, Wilmington, N. C. History of the 

I 1 8th Infantry, 6th Brigade. 30th Division, U. S. A. Operations in 

Belgium and France, 1917—1919. 
Wright, Henry B., New Haven. Yale University. The Centennial 

celebration of the founding of the Yale Divinity School, October, 

1922. New Haven. 1922. 

OFFICIALS OF THE LIBRARY. 

Director, Charles F. D. Belden. 

Reference Librarian, Frank H. Chase. 

Executive Secretary, Delia Jean Deery. 

Auditor, Adelaide A. Nichols. 



Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and Newspaper Department: Pierce E. 
Buckley, Chief. 

Newspaper Division, Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 

Patent Division, William J. Ennis, Assistant in Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches. 

Central Branch Issue Division, Alice V. Stevens, Assistant in Charge. 

Branch Binding Division, Marian A. McCarthy, Assistant in Charge. 

Shipping Division, Robert F. Dixon, Assistant in Charge. 
* For Branch Librarians, see page 82. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 

Card Division, T. Francis Brennan, Assistant in Charge. 

Editor of Publications, Mary H. Rollins. 

Shelf Division, William G. T. Roffe, Assistant in Charge. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 
Children. 

Children's Librarian, Central Library, Mary C. Toy. 
Engineer and Janitor Department: Henry Niederauer, Chief. 
Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief. 
Ordering Department: Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief. < 



Periodical Room : Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 
Printing Department: Francis Watts Lee, Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department: Winthrop H. Chenery, Chief. 
Fine Arts Division, Walter Rowlands, Assistant in Charge. 
Technical Division, George S. Maynard, Assistant in Charge. 
Music Division, Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 
Barton -Ticknor Division, Zoltan Haraszti, Assistant in Charge. 
Statistical Department: Horace L. Wheeler, Assistant in Charge. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 
*Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 

Andrew Square, Elizabeth McShane. 

Boylston Station, Edith R. Nickerson. 

Brighton, Marian W. Brackett. 

Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

City Point, Alice Murphy. 

Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 

Dorchester, Edith F. Pendleton. 

East Boston, Laura M. Cross. 

Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 

Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 

Hyde Park, Grace L. Murray. 

Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 

Jeffries Point, Margaret A. Calnan. 

Lower Mills, Nazera Tradd (acting). 

Mattapan, Marion C. Kingman (acting). 

Mt. Bowdoin, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mt. Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 

Neponset, Ellen C. McShane. 

North End, Mary F. Curley (acting). 

Orient Heights, Catharine F. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Katrina M. Sather. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Margaret A. Sheridan. 

Upham's Corner, Mary F. Kelley. 

Tyler Street, Theodora B. Scoff. 

Warren Street, Beatrice C. Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



INDEX. 



Accessions, 2, 28-33, 51, 68-69. 

Administration and finance, 19-20. 

Allen A. Brown Music Library, 31, 42. 

Allston Branch, 54. 

Andrew Square Branch, 16, 54. 

Balance sheet, expenses, 11, 13; re- 
ceipts, 10, 12. 

Barton -Ticknor Room, 42-43. 

Bates Hall, Centre Desk and Reference, 
3^38. 

Bindery, 20. 21-22, 71. 

Books, 20—21 ; accessions, 28-33, 76- 
81; circulation, 17, 28-33. 

Boylston Station Branch, 55. 

Branches, 3, 14-19, 50-60; circula- 
tion, 50-51 ; reports, 52-60. 

Brennan, Thomas Francis, appointment 
as Chief of Card Division, 34. 

Brighton Branch, 55. 

Business Branch, 4. 

Card Division, creation of, 34. 

Card-holders, 33. 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 33- 
34, 69-71. 

Charlestown Branch, 55. 

Chase, Frank H., appointment as Refer- 
ence Librarian, 64. 

Children's Department and Work with 
Children, 20, 22-23, 44-50; instruc- 
tion, 61 , reorganization, 47—49. 

Circulation, 2, 3, 17, 19, 28-33, 43, 
65-68. 

City Point Branch, 15, 55. 

Codman Square Branch, 55. 

Connolly, Msgr. Arthur T., elected 
president, 1 . 

Co-cperation, 23-24. 

Director, 1, 8, 20; report of, 28-64. 

Dorchester Branch, 15, 55-56. 

East Boston Branch, 16, 18, 56. 

Employees, 19,81-82; instruction, 24- 
25, 60-61 ; retirements and deaths, 
62-63. 

Estimates, 2. 



Examining Committee, members of, 8; 
lecommendafions of, 26-27; report of, 

14-27. 

Exhibitions, 43, 60, 75-76. 

Extension Service Committee, 37. 

Faneuil Branch, 56. 

Fellowes Athenaeum Branch, 56. 

Finance, balance sheets, 10—13; trust 
funds, 6, 7, 10-12. 

Fine Arts Department, 41-42, 43. 

Fleischner, Otto, retirement of, 5, 6, 
64. 

Gaston, William A., appointed trustee, 
I. 

Gifts and bequests, 4, 76-81. 

Government Documents. (5ec In- 
formation Office.) 

Haraszti, Zolfan, 42. 

Hyde Park Branch, 16, 56. 

Information Office, 39-40. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, 56. 

Jeffries Point Branch, 16, 56. 

Kirstein, Louis E., elected vice presi- 
dent, 1. 

Lectures, 60, 71-74. 

Librarian. (5ee Director.) 

Library Life, 36. 

Library staff. (5ee Employees.) 

Lower Mills Branch, 16, 56. 

Mattapan Branch, 16, 32, 57. 

Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 16, 57. 

Mt. Pleasant Branch, 57. 

Music Division, 42, 43. 

Neponset Branch, 57. 

Newspaper Room, 20, 38. 

North End Branch. 18, 57. 

Open Shelf Room. (See Information 
Office.) 

Orient Heights Branch, 16, 57. 

Parker Hill Branch, 16, 58. 

Patent Room, 38. 

Periodical Room, 20, 40-41. 

Printing Department, 20, 21-22, 71. 

Publications, 34. 



[84] 



Reading Rooms. (See Branches.) 

Registration Department, 33. 

Repairs and improvements, 3, 61—62. 

Roslindale Branch, 58. 

Roxbury Crossing Branch, 16, 52, 58. 

Roxbury Branch. (See Fellowes Alhe- 
nasum Branch.) 

South Boston Branch, 18, 58. 

South End Branch, 16, 58; new quar- 
ters, 51-52. 

Special Libraries, 22, 41-44. 

Story Hour, 44-46. 



Teachers' Room, 20, 47. 

Technology Division, 42, 43. 

Trust Funds, expenditures, 10, 12; re- 
ceipts, 1 I : statement of, 6, 7. 

Trustees, organization of, 1 ; report of, 
1-8. 

Tyler Street Branch, 17, 59. 

University Extension Courses, 25-26, 

Uphams Corner Branch, 17, 59, 

Warren Street Branch, 16, 59. 

West End Branch, 16, 17, 18, 59. 

West Roxbury Branch, 59-60. 



Central Library, Copley Square. I 

Branch Libraries, February I, 1924. 

City Proper. 

North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. . 

South End Branch, Shawmul Ave. and West Brookline St 

West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. . 

Tyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 

Brighton. 

Brighton Branch, Academy Hill Road 

Allston Branch, 138 Brighton Ave 

Faneuil Branch, 100 Broohs St. . 
Charlestown. 

Charlestown Branch, Monument Square, cor. Monument Ave, 
Dorchester. 

Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. . 

Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 

Upham's Corner Branch, Columbia Road, cor. Bird St. 

Lower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

Matlapan Branch, 7 Babson St. , 

Mount Bowdoin Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St. 

Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . 
East Boston. 

East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 

Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. 

Orient Heights Branch, 1030 Bennington St. 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St 
Jamaica Plain. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. 

Boylston Station Branch, Depot Square 
RoxBURY. 

Fellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Milmont St. 

Warren Street Branch, 392 Warren St. . 

Mount Pleasant Branch, Dudley, cor. Vine St. 

Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. 

Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
South Boston. 

South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 

Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. . 

City Point Branch, Broadway, near H St. . 
West Roxbury. 

West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St. 

Roslindale Branch, Washington, cor. Ashland St. . 




Area of City (Land only) 45.60 Square miles. 



Population (Census of 1920), 748.060. 



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BOSTON PUBLIC UBRARV 



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