(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

rb 



t 






Bn 




3- 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAE EJSTDING JANUAKY 31, 1924 




CITY OF BOSTON 
PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1924 

o 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1924bost 



[Document 11 — 1924.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE YEAR 1923-24. 



Boston, January 31, 1924. 

Hon. James M. Ctjrley, 

Mayor oj the City of Boston: 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit, in accord- 
ance with section 24, chapter 3, Revised Ordinances of 
1914, City of Boston, the annual report of the Fire 
Department for the year ending January 31, 1924. 



Finances. 

The total expenditure for the department for the 
year was $3,669,450.65, which includes an appropria- 
tion of $89,311.70 expended by the Wire Division. 

The revenue for the department for the year amounted 
to $91,637.23. 

Fire Loss. 

During the year the department responded to 7,241 
alarms, of which 3,810 were still alarms and 3,431 were 
box alarms. The total number of alarms for 1923 shows 
an increase of 1,107 over the year 1922, which signifies 
that the department experienced a very busy year. 
The fire loss of $6,286,300 also shows a marked increase 
over previous years, and while this loss may be accounted 



2 City Document No. 11. 

for in part to the inflation of property values since the 
World War, it can also be attributed to the fact that 
during 1923 we had at least eight disastrous fires, which 
of themselves account for almost the total of the dif- 
ference between the loss of 1922 and that of 1924. The 
most serious fires where the heaviest losses were suffered 
were as follows : 

January 16, 63 Mt. Vernon street .... $105,250 
January 20, 73-75 ' South street, 170-180 Essex 

street 150,646 

January 22, 118-128 Lincoln street . . . 598,816 

April 14, 185-187 State street 175,035 

April 25, 116-124 Merrimac street . . . 103,710 

May 2, 217-219 State street, 114 Central street, 340,816 

July 18, 374-394 Congress street .... 1,269,300 

November 17, 209-211 State street . . . 123,072 

In addition to the total loss mentioned above there 
was a marine loss of $14,121. 

MOTOEIZATION. 

During the year 1923 twenty-four pieces of motor- 
driven fire fighting apparatus was purchased and in- 
stalled in service. This large purchase of motor appara- 
tus made it possible to complete the motorization of 
the department, and on October 18, 1923, the horse- 
drawn ladder truck attached to Ladder Company 24, 
North Grove street, was replaced by a motor-driven city 
service ladder truck, displacing our last piece of horse- 
drawn equipment. The motorization of the Fire De- 
partment has been extended over a long period of years, 
and followed a policy established by your Honor in 
1912 to install a certain amount each year. This pro- 
gram was carried out effectively, with a slight interrup- 
tion during the war years, and today we have in service 
and reserve, exclusive of chiefs' cars, coal and service 
cars, 145 pieces of motor-driven fire fighting equipment. 
There still remains much work to be done along the 
lines of motorization. We have in service several pieces 
of tractor-drawn equipment which should be replaced 
by apparatus of the type which the department has 
accepted as standard. A formidable reserve equipment 
must be built up and maintained, and I earnestly 
recommend that the policy of purchasing a specified 



Fire Department. 3 

amount of apparatus annually be continued for a few 
years more so that our equipment will be without com- 
parison with any city in the country. 



Fire Prevention. 

Much stress has been laid on the subject of fire pre- 
vention, and I believe considerable good has been 
accomplished along this line. In October Fire Preven- 
tion Week was observed in Boston as it never was ob- 
served before. The Fire Department sent out its appeal 
to schools, churches, civic and fraternal organizations, 
mercantile and commercial interests, and received hearty 
response and co-operation. In the report of the Chief 
of Department a detailed account is given of the activi- 
ties of the week. 

The work of the Bureau of Fire Prevention and Intelli- 
gence has continued to grow and expand. The following 
figures will show how the work of this bureau is in- 
creasing : 





Number 
of Permits. 


Fees 
Received. 


Inspections. 


1921 


10,268 
11,362 
12,611 


§11,114 5C 
13.C06 50 
15,651 00 


104,961 
146,324 
186,734 


1922 

1923 : 







It will be noted from these figures that the fees charged 
for permits are very small. In 1923 the average was 
at the rate of less than $1.25 for each permit. It is very 
evident that in many cases the fee is a dollar or less. 
Practically every permit issued entails one of two in- 
spections by the Fire Department, and I believe that 
the city is entitled to a fee commensurate with the cost 
of their inspections. I strongly recommend, therefore, 
that a complete revision be made of the schedule of fees 
charged for permits issued through the Bureau of Fire 
Prevention and Intelligence so that the city may obtain 
a fair return for the service rendered in issuing these 
permits. 

Fire Alarm Boxes. 

There are 1,299 fire alarm boxes in service through- 
out the city, more than one thousand of which are 
accessible to the public. Exclusive of the boxes owned 



4 City Document No. 11. 

by the Schoolhouse Department, 171 of these boxes 
are privately owned. During the year thirty-one new 
boxes were installed. 

Buildings. 

The most important step in the building program of 
the Fire Department in many years was taken when 
your Honor sent to the City Council an order appro- 
priating $500,000 for the erection of a new fire alarm 
station. For some time past the present fire alarm 
office has been a cause of grave concern to the officials 
of the Fire Department and to others whose business 
identified them with the protection of the city from 
fire. Many times recommendations have been made, 
but no action taken. The present fire alarm office is 
located in a congested section of the city, surrounded 
by many hazards, and more than once has been 
threatened by destruction by serious fires which have 
occurred in the neighborhood. 

This year proper action has been taken. An isolated 
location in the Back Bay Fens has been selected, plans 
have been prepared and contracts have been made for 
a building and equipment that will assure the highest 
type of service and protection for this important branch 
of the Fire Department. The building should be com- 
pleted in the spring of 1925, and when the change over 
is made from the present fire alarm office to the new 
office, Boston will have a fire alarm signal station un- 
surpassed in the country. 

Considerable attention has also been paid to the 
condition of our fire stations. Many of these build- 
ings were erected years ago, and are not adapted to 
the conditions as they exist today. In many of the 
stations minor changes are being made to meet in a 
measure the changed conditions. Some of the build- 
ings will have to be rebuilt from the ground up. 

On JuDe 27, 1923, the work of rebuilding the quarters 
of Engine Company 7, East street, was completed and 
the building dedicated. 

Plans have been drawn and a contract made for the 
erection of a new fire station for Engine Company 40, 
Sumner and Orleans streets, East Boston. This build- 
ing will be torn down and a complete new structure 
erected. 

At Engine 12, Dudley street; Engine 13, Cabot 
street; Engine 18, Harvard street; Engine 19, Norfolk 



Fire Department. 5 

street; Engine 20, Walnut street; Engine 24, Warren 
street; Engine 27, Elm. street, and Engine 28, Centre 
street, extensive repairs and alterations have been made 
to provide suitable housing facilities for the men and 
apparatus. 

During the ensuing year appropriations should be 
provided if possible for a new fire station for Engine 21, 
Columbia road, Engine 17, and Ladder 7, Meeting 
House Hill, Engine 26-35, Mason street. 

In regard to Engine 26-35 I would draw attention 
to the present location of that company in Mason 
street. Owing to the congestion of traffic on Mason 
street and West street, Engines 26 and 35 are severely 
handicapped in making prompt response to alarms of 
fire. The present location of these companies has 
nothing to recommend it for the purpose for which it 
is used. I earnestly recommend that these companies 
be moved to the junction of Shawmut avenue and 
Tremont street where a suitable station can be erected 
on land owned by the city. Quarters could be provided 
in the new station for Rescue Company 1 now housed 
in a station on Church street. The land on Mason 
street is highly assessed and with the sale of this site, 
together with the sale of the land and building on 
Church street, the city should receive an amount that 
will offset a great portion of the cost of a new fire station 
at Shawmut avenue and Tremont street. By the change 
of location the efficiency of these companies would not 
be lessened, but on the contrary would be increased, 
for the actual time consumed in getting out of Mason 
street is greater than the time it will take these com- 
panies to respond to their present assignments from the 
suggested location. Furthermore, the widening of Tre- 
mont street will make the proposed location an ideal 
one. 

Two-Platoon System. 

During the past two months arrangements have 
been made for the inauguration of the two-platoon 
system in the Fire Department, which becomes effective 
on February 1, 1924. On this date thirty-three pro- 
motions will take effect and 210 new men will be ap- 
pointed to the department to put the new system in 
operation. In many cities of the country the system 
was installed piece-meal, but arrangements have been 
made to have the entire department enter on this new 



6 City Document No. 11. 

system at 8 a. m., February 1, 1924. The new men 
have been examined, measured for uniforms, assigned 
and will report to their companies on the above date 
at 8 a. m. Considerable detail work was necessary to 
make this change-over without interfering with the 
efficiency of the department. The work had to be done 
by the clerical force at headquarters, and it is very 
gratifying to note here that the headquarters staff gave 
freely of their time and effort to co-operate with the 
Fire Commissioner and Chief of Department to install 
the system without confusion. 

In the report of the Chief of Department appended 
hereto is a detailed account of how the new system will 
operate. 

Conclusion. 

As always the members and employees of the depart- 
ment have manifested a spirit of devotion to duty and 
I am grateful to them for their co-operation in main- 
taining the Boston Fire Department at the high stand- 
ard of efficiency for which it is recognized. To the 
heads of the various city departments, the public service 
corporations, the Boston Protective Department, and 
the public in general I express my thanks for the 
interest and co-operation manifested. 

Appended hereto are the reports of the Chief of De- 
partment, the Superintendent of the Fire Alarm Branch, 
the District Chief in charge of the Bureau of Supplies 
and Repairs, the Medical Examiner, the Superintendent 
of the Wire Division, together with the schedules of the 
organization and equipment of the department, with 
tables showing the number of alarms, causes of fires, 
fire lpss, etc. 

Yours very truly, 

Theodore A. Glynn, 

Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 



From: The Chief of Department. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I beg to submit the following summary of activities of 
the department in general for the fiscal year 1923-24: 

Fire Loss. 
Loss (exclusive of marine loss) .... $6,286,299 44 
Marine loss 14,120 54 



>,300,419 98 



Number of alarms . . . ... . . 7,241 

Average loss each alarm $870 

Number of actual fires . . • . . . 6,071 

Average loss each fire $1,038 

Additions and Changes. 
Apparatus. 

April 27, 1923, a White truck, equipped for carrying 
coal, was installed as a fuel car at the quarters of Water 
Tower 2. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 10,115 
pounds; 22.5 horse power. 

April 27, 1923, Mack fuel truck was removed from the 
quarters of Rescue Company 1, Church street, and was 
placed in service at the quarters of Engine Company 
38 and 39, Congress street, replacing Buick fuel truck. 

May 5, 1923, a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine was placed in service with Engine Company 8, 
replacing a similar tractor-drawn engine. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 13,000 pounds; 48.6 horse 
power. 

June 26, 1923, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 7, making the company a double unit. 
Weight, fully equipped, without men, 9,000 pounds; 
48.4 horse power. 

July 13, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 37. Weight, fully 



8 City Document No. 11. 

equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse power. 
This replaced a pumper of the same type. 

July 17, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 27. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds, 72 horse power. 
This replaced a horse-drawn steam fire engine and three 
horses. 

July 17, 1923, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 27. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds, 72 horse power. This replaced a horse- 
drawn hose wagon and two horses. 

July 17, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon com- 
bination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 32. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse power. 
This replaced a horse-drawn steam fire engine, horse- 
drawn hose wagon and five horses. 

July 24, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed 
in service with Engine Company 9. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse power. 
This replaced a horse-drawn steam fire engine and three 
horses. 

July 24, 1923, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 9. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a horse- 
drawn hose wagon and two horses. 

July 24, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon com- 
bination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 40. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds. This replaced 
a horse-drawn steam fire engine and three horses. 

July 24, 1923, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 40. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a horse- 
drawn hose wagon and two horses. 

August 6, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 34. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse power. 
This replaced a horse-drawn steam fire engine and three 
horses. 



Fire Department. 9 

August 6, 1923, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 34. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a horse- 
drawn hose wagon and two horses. 

August 14, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 17. Weight, fully equip- 
ped, without men, 12,000 pounds, 72 horse power. 
This replaced a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine. 

August 14, 1923, an American-LaFrance motor- 
driven combination chemical and ladder truck was 
placed in service with Ladder Company 7. Weight, 
fully equipped, without men, 11,000 pounds; 72 horse 
power. This replaced a Robinson motor-driven city 
service truck. 

August 20, 1923, an American-LaFrance motor- 
driven city service ladder truck was placed in service 
with Ladder Company 23. Weight, fully equipped, 
without men, 11,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This 
replaced a horse-drawn ladder truck and three horses. 

September 14, 1923, the location of Water Tower 1 
was changed from Bulfinch street (Engine 4) to Fort 
Hill square, occupying same building as Engine 25 and 
Ladder 8. 

September 18, 1923, an American-LaFrance motor- 
driven city service combination chemical and ladder 
truck was placed in service with Ladder Company 16; 
Weight, fully equipped, without men, 11,000 pounds; 
72 horse power. This replaced a Christie tractor-drawn 
city service truck. 

September 19, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750- 
gallon combination pumper and hose motor car was 
placed in service with Engine Company 29. Weight 
fully equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse 
power. This replaced a horse-drawn steam fire engine 
and three horses. 

September 19, 1923, an American-LaFrance combina- 
tion hose and chemical car was placed in service with 
Engine Company 29. Weight, fully equipped, without 
men, 10,500 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a 
horse-drawn hose wagon and two horses. 

September 28, 1923, an American-LaFrance motor- 
driven city service ladder truck was placed in service 



10 City Document No. 11. 

with Ladder Company 27. Weight, fully equipped, 
without men, 11,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This 
replaced a horse-drawn city service truck and three 
horses. 

October 5, 1923, an American-LaFrance motor-driven 
city service ladder truck was placed in service with 
Ladder Company 19. Weight, fully equipped, without 
men, 11,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a 
horse-drawn city service truck and three horses. 

October 8, 1923, a Christie tractor-drawn city service 
truck was placed in service with Ladder Company 3. 
Weight, fully equipped, without men, 13,500 pounds; 
48.4 horse power. This replaced a horse-drawn city 
service truck and three horses. 

October 8, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 22. Weight, fully equip- 
ped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This 
replaced a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire engine. 

October 15, 1923, an American-LaFrance four-wheel 
tractor, 75-foot aerial truck, was placed in service with 
Ladder Company 2. Weight, fully equipped, without 
men, 17,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a 
horse-drawn truck and three horses. 

October 17, 1923, an American-LaFrance four-wheel 
tractor, 75-foot aerial truck was placed in service with 
Ladder Company 9. Weight, fully equipped, without 
men, 17,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a 
horse-drawn truck and three horses. 

October 18, 1923, an American-LaFrance motor- 
driven city service ladder truck was placed in service with 
Ladder Company 24. Weight, fully equipped, without 
men, 11,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a 
horse-drawn city service truck and three horses. 

October 26, 1923, a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine was placed in service with Engine Company 3. 
Weight, fully equipped, without men, 13,000 pounds; 
48.4 horse power. This replaced a steam fire engine of 
the same type. 

December 12, 1923, a Christie tractor-drawn steam 
fire engine was placed in service with Engine Company 
42. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 13,000 
pounds; 48.4 horse power. This replaced a steam fire 
engine of the same type. 



Fiee Department. 11 

December 18, 1923, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 48. Weight, fully equip- 
ped, without men, 12,000 pounds; 72 horse power. This 
replaced a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire engine. 

January 4, 1924, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 45. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds; 72 horse power. This replaced a similar 
make of hose car of less power, which was later placed in 
service with Engine 18. 

January 19, 1924, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 18. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
9,000 pounds; 48. 4 horse power. This replaced a com- 
bination hose and chemical car of the same type. 

Chiefs' Automobiles. 
A new Buick coupe was purchased for the use of the 
Chief of Department, and also three Buick roadsters for 
use by various chief officers, thus replacing vehicles 
that had become worn through constant service. 

Buildings. 

The following new and alteration work has been com- 
pleted during the fiscal year ending January 31, 1924: 

Engine House 7, East street, was entirely rebuilt and 
dedicated on June 27, 1923. 

An electric passenger elevator was installed at Fire 
Headquarters. This is something which has been badly 
needed for years, in view of the large number of people 
who call at the headquarters' building, not only to the 
Fire Commissioner's office, but also to the Fire Preven- 
tion Bureau and Wire Division, for permits, etc., and 
a great many complaints have been made in the past 
from the public on account of having to climb the long- 
winding stairs to reach the various offices where they 
have business to transact. 

At Engine House 13, Cabot street, the second floor 
was completely remodeled, adding a new shower bath 
and entire new plumbing, lieutenant's room and locker 
rooms. 

At Engine House 18, Harvard street, new shower 
baths, sink room, toilets, building lockers, dressing 



12 City Document No. 11. 

rooms, etc., were installed; also steam changes, mason 
work, and plastering and painting entire quarters. 

At Engine House 12, Dudley street, concreting main 
and cellar floors, new main doors, new hose rack, plumb- 
ing changes. 

At Engine House 19, Babson street, thorough change 
and remodeling of second floor, moving dormitory to 
rear, building new lieutenant's, wash, locker and shower 
rooms; installing a magnesite floor, together with 
necessary changes in heating and complete new plumb- 
ing. 

At Engine House 24, Warren street, a new shower 
bath installed and dormitory enlarged across the end 
of building, this being made possible by discontinuance 
of hay loft. 

At Engine House 20 and Ladder 27, Walnut street, 
shower bath and sink room installed, excavating and 
extending boiler room, building concrete wall over face 
of old foundation, rebuilding chimney and installing 
window. 

At Engine House 27, Elm street, Charlestown, there 
was a reinforced floor slab laid in apparatus room, con- 
crete floor in basement, steam boiler relocated in cellar, 
new radiators installed as necessary throughout the 
house, also necessary plumbing. 

At Engine House 28, Centre street, Jamaica Plain, 
there was a new reinforced concrete floor installed in 
apparatus room as well as in discontinued rear stable. 
To complete the entire remodeling of this building, a 
contract was awarded for brick wainscoting, fireproof 
plastering, inside finish, steam heating, captain's toilet 
room and electrical work. 

At Engine House 32, Bunker Hill street, Charlestown, 
a shower bath was provided, together with other new 
plumbing. 

At Chemical 7, Saratoga street, East Boston, a shower 
bath was installed and various minor improvements. 

At the fire alarm shop, Wareham street, automatic 
sprinklers were installed. 

Plans were drawn and contract let for a new house to 
take the place of Engine House 40, Sumner street, East 
Boston, which was in a dangerous condition, and the 
work is now progressing. While this work is under 
construction, the quarters of Engine Company 40 have 
been moved to Chemical 7, Saratoga street. 



Fire Department. 13 

Oil burning equipment has been installed in the fol- 
lowing houses : 



Engine 1 

Engine 4 

Engine 5 

Engine 6 

Engine 7 

Engine 9 

Engine 15 



Engine 22 
Engine 25 
Engine 28 
Engine 48 
Ladder 4 
Chemical 7 
Repair Shop 



Apparatus and Equipment. 

Thorough inspections and test of apparatus, equip- 
ment and hose were conducted at various times during 
the year. Where defects were found, replacements and 
repairs were immediately made, in order that the 
efficiency of the department should not be impaired 
at any time. 

Building Inspection. 

The usual practice of systematic weekly inspection 
by officers was continued throughout the year, as it has 
been our experience that constant attention in this 
respect is essential, as it is a fact that many property 
owners and tenants disregard the warnings of this de- 
partment to clear stairways, dispose of unsightly and 
dangerous accumulations, and to comply with the city 
ordinances. It is only in this way that the safety of 
tenants and employees can be assured. 

Theatres, moving-picture houses, and halls were 
inspected weekly, particular stress being laid upon the 
condition of fire-extinguishing appliances, as in a great 
many instances in the past the owners of these partic- 
ular types of structures have been prone to neglect this 
phase of protection for their patrons. 

All public buildings and schoolhouses were inspected 
monthly, and conditions as found were reported through 
channels to department headquarters. Defective con- 
ditions were noted and immediate steps were taken to 
remedy same. 

Some 50,000 inspections were made during the year 
by the regular Fire Prevention inspectors, and wherever 
defective conditions were noted, same were followed up 
closely until remedied, and in instances where occupants 
failed to comply with our requests, they were referred 
to the State Fire Marshal's office for further handling. 
At various times during the year, the entire inspection 



14 



City Document No. 11. 



force was concentrated in certain sections of the city, 
where we had reason to believe that bad business con- 
ditions had affected those districts. 

The "Fire Card" which was referred to in my last 
annual report as in the process of preparation, was 
placed in operation during the year. This card shows 
the vital parts of a building, the means of egress to the 
top and to the basement, also vertical and horizontal 
openings, and the openings, if any, into adjoining build- 
ings. The ground plan is drawn on the back of these 
cards. All of the officers of the department have been 
instructed in the use of this card, and have been brought 
to as high a state of efficiency as possible in order that 
the attack of the fire department on a building or any 
part of a building may be effected with the least possible 
delay. 

Mutual Aid. 

The department responded to thirty-seven (37) alarms 
of fire outside of the city limits, divided as follows : 



Cambridge ..... 


1 


Somerville . . 


10 


Nantasket 


1 


Chelsea 


5 


Milton 


19 


Brookline 


1 



It is a source of gratification to note that a great deal 
of good has resulted by this plan of interchange of service 
in time of urgent necessity. 



Drill School. 

During the year fifty (50) appointees successfully 
passed the thirty days' intensive course of instruction, 
as well as one member of the Melrose and one member 
of the New Bedford Fire Departments. Thirty-eight 
(38) Boy Scouts also received instructions therein. 

Fire College. 

Forty-two (42) officers and members of this depart- 
ment attended the lectures at the Fire College. One 
officer of the Newton Fire Department also attended the 
course of lectures. All the officers of this department 
received special instructions in regard to the Fire Card. 



Fire Department. 15 



Company Drills. 

The Company Drills at Headquarters, which com- 
menced September 4, 1923, and finished October 30, 
1923, have been very satisfactory in their results. Each 
company was drilled in ten evolutions, namely : 

1. Connect two lines, 100 feet each, from engine to deluge 
set. 

2. Connect two lines, 100 feet each, from engine to Morse 
gun. 

3. Raise 50-foot ladder to fourth floor window and dog 
same. 

4. Run 200 feet 2|-inch line over 50-foot ladder, up stair- 
way and show pipe out fifth floor window. 

5. Raise 30-foot ladder to fire escape, carry 17-foot roof 
ladder over same to story above. Dog 30-foot ladder. 

6. Run 250 feet 2§-inch line over 30-foot ladder over fire 
escape to roof, 75 feet from ground. 

7. Take life line and haul 25-foot ladder to roof 75 feet from 
ground. 

8. Take life line, haul 200 feet 2§-inch hose to roof. 

9. Run 100 feet 2|-inch hose from engine, connect Morse 
gate and Bresnan nozzle. 

10. Connect chuck to hydrant (flexible suction) water to 
engine. 

The following tables show the result of the drills in 
which all companies participated, except the three fire- 
boat crews. These tables show the list of companies 
drilling, the time consumed in each evolution, and time 
consumed by each company in completing all evolutions. 



16 



City Document No. 11. 











1 


OS o 


-I CO o 


O 




t~ 


lO 
















































W°X 




1 


































^_; 


1 


00 C. OS C3 o 


oo 




© 


© 


oo 


00 


rH 


C2 




o 






§ 


























1-1 














02 




O CS1 00 Tfl CO 


CO 






00 
























r •v co co co 


CO 






CM 


CN 


co 


co 


IO 




m 






e> 






















































































































S 










































CD CO GO in CO 


r~ 




CO 


CO 


t> 






O 










On 








H H —1 r 


1 CM 


(N 




CM 


CM 


'~ l 


CI 


CM 


CM 




CJ 




















































































2 






































CO 




Gi ■**- co r^ »o 


co 








»ra 










^ 






00 




CO CO Tj CO -^ 


■* 




Til 


CO 


Th 


oo 


lO 


CO 




«5 






















































































A 






































m 




t> ffl f i!) ID 


t~ 




in 


no 


















r~i 




CO tt 




' CO 


CN 




CN 


co 


CO 


TP 




CO 






















































H rH i 


rH 


























<< 










































O i-i CO »0 CO 


© 




CO 


on 




00 












K 








CO ** TP TT CO 


CO 




TT< 


ti 












ia 






o 












































































S 








































& 




A 




































£ 

fc 














































O "* C 


: © cn 


Th 




CO 


cs 




1> 


















tm io id co tt 


Tfl 






>o 




tH 








'!< 




K 


Ifl 












































































P 




S 


























' H 












!> 














































































H 








o co i-H ■* © 


o 








© 


o 














■V 






IN IN (N CO CM 


CM 




CM 


co 


rt 


'~ l 


io 






c- 














































S 
































^ 










iH J) Ci CM t- 


CM 




00 


io 


co 


© 


t^ 


t> 




U3 






rO 






* H r "' 


1-1 


1-1 




lO 


T " H 






ti 


rt 
























































































<i 










































■O U0 l> CM © 


CI 




^ 


i> 




lO 




rt 










N 






CN CM CM CO CO 


i-i 




CN 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




-f 














































§ 










































.-i 00 CN © CD 


CD 




CO 


t^ 


•* 


CO 


CD 












^ 






CO CO CO CO CO 


CN 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CN 


CO 


CO 




T 














































§ 






































•TI3JM 




© c 


co a 


© 


O 




t^ 


t^ 


J> 


t> 


co 


CD 




t> 




■sisorgQ 






05 


C\ 


r- 


i— 1 


CM 




CN 


CM 


~ 


- 


CN 


IM 




IN 
















t~ 








































'en 








































O 






























1-1 










E 






CM 
























o 








































2 










o 






2 














o 


















C 




rH 


H 




CD' 


o 


cm 


IN 


t^ 




00 










o- 


IC 


Tl 






O 




co- 


>o 


CM 


CO 


CM 










K 


> 


> > 


> > 


-, > 


» >> 




« 


>. 


;» 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 




>v 








c 


c 


c 


e 


a 


B 


H 


fi 


a 


c 


a 


c 


a 




a 
















K 


C3 


a 




ci 






c3 


G 




a 








f | 


c 


, <- 


< (. 


1 l- 


i ft 


ft 


Q 


ft 


w 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


Q 


» 








c 


b 


t 


F 


ti 


a 


a 


F 


c 


fc 


F, 


fi 


d 








c 


c 


c 


c 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 












L 


c 


L, 


C 


U 


U 




U 


U 


u 


u 


U 


U 




u 








k 


a 












*-. 




a> 


M 








|H 












c 














a 




a 
























































t 


' T3 


to 






W 






HI 


to 




T3 










*. 




c 


a 


c 






C 






a 


c 




r 












r- 


Is 


Is 


Is 


Hi 


W 






h-1 


M 


W 


HH 


W 


W 




h-1 





Fire Department. 



17 



© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


oo 


© 


oo 


oo 


© 


o 


00 


© 


00 


00 


© 






CO 


CO 


IN 


■* 


CM 

CO 


O 

rfi 


m 
•* 


o 


00 


o 

CO 


o 


CO 
CO 


co 


CO 

co 


CO 


- 




co 

IN 


M* 


co 


CO 
IN 


© 


<N 


m 


oo 


o 


Ttl 


l-O 

CM 


2 


o 

<N 


t^ 


X 


o 

CM 






© 
CO 




Ttl 


CO 


CD 
CO 


lO 


"5 
Tfl 


CO 


CN 


CO 


© 

CO 


© 
IN 


o 


CO 


oo 
co 


CO 
CO 






IN 

CO 


00 
IN 


-V 


oo 


lO 


© 


IN 


CI 


co 

CO 


o 
•* 


oo 

CO 


CO 


IN 


CO 


o 

"0 


1^ 

IN 


- 


- 


- 


- 


CM 


























© 


oo 

CM 


IN 


oo 

IN 




00 
CO 


CO 

co 


IN 

CO 


oo 






oo 


Tf 


CO 
IN 


oo 


CO 





KO CM -* O CM 
>0 lO «) O 



CM CO CO 00 



a s s 



o o o o 



SO SO SO ~ £ 

C C G c3 O 

K H H J 6- 



CD O —i CM 00 

r? IC II ^i Tf 





IN 


CI 


IN 


CD 


© 

CO 


CO 


oo 


1C 


IN 
IN 


CO 
IN 


CO 


t- 


o 

co 


© 


3 


m 




O 
CO 


t~ 


CD 


* 


t- 




© 


s 


U5 


l> 


o 

CM 


"0 


us 


oo 


CO 


io 














- 


- 


-" 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


IN 


■* 


IN 


© 

CO 


(N 


CO 
IN 


CO 
CO 


IN 


CO 
CM 


lO 
CM 


wo 


© 

CO 


CM 

CO 


CM 


t> 


CO 
CM 




CO 


co 

CO 


IN 


o 
co 


in 


CO 


CO 


CO 
CM 


lO 
IN 


CM 


CO 
CO 


CD 
CO 


1/3 

CO 


CM 


© 

CM 


o 




03 


00 


oo 


00 


oo 


© 


oo 


o 


oo 


00 


00 


oo 


t> 


© 


© 


© 





a — i -# 



O T-l rt H 



s c s 

g c5 S 

a a a 



o o u a o 









a u o u o o 



a c; ^ eg 



o o o o o 



©CNCO'-lt> 
rt< C0CMCM>-l 
en co m m m 



asses 

OO X© 0000 



CM os CD 
CM CI co CO CM 

b b >> >*> >*> 

g £ c a fl 
S g os a ca 
a a a p, a 

fcSsES 

O O o o o 
OUoOO 



T3-C.S.S.S 
*0 "O Sfc SO SO 

<3 c3 C C C 
HhKHK 



o o o o o 



QCQOC 



18 



City Document No. 11. 






•naj^; 



siaogo 



t- i-i 00 IN ■* -it CO 
iO CO i-l CO Tj« CO CN 



00 i-i O 00 ^h i-l o 
CO ■<* U5 CO "J< CO CO 



■^i IN O CO t~- t^. i-H 

•* CO lO CO i-l CO ■* 



i-H i-i CM 



OS 00 CO O CO 00 (~. 
i-h iO <N (N "3 



CO lO CO CD O t~ CC 
IN CM CO CM CO IN CN 



r. 00 (> N N N 00 



O IN .-I h- CO 00 

.-I CO IN i-l CN 



OS 


oo 


<N 


os 


o 


03 


OS 


co 


OS 


00 


00 


00 


OS 




o 
1*< 


CO 

co 


00 

co 


CO 


oo 

CM 


CO 


o 
■o 


o 

CO 


I-- 

CO 


o 
co 


1.0 

co 


CM 


Tjl 

co 


- 




CO 


00 


o 
co 


os 


IN 


CM 


00 
CM 


CO 
<N 


CC 


CM 


its 


C4 


t- 



IN CO IN i-i' 



tO t^> Tfi iO CO CO 
i-l i-l CO CO IN IN 



■* Tf IN i-l 

ijl (O «) iO 



00 CO CM T i-l 



CJ 


O 


lO 


co 


,-t 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


co 


CM 


CO 


-f 



00 O -i 00 



■H CN CM CN IN i-l 



i-l lO i-l 



rt i-l CO 



Q §• 



s s s a s 



O O V o u u o 



H J H W >-l h5 W 



s s s s s e 

o o o o o o 
O O O O O O 



k a _i « j a 



Fire Department. 



19 





OS 


CM 


CO 


-HI 


CO 




,_, 


W 


to 


m 










CM 








-<l< 




*-' 




rt 


>o 


CO 








oo 


3 


o 


OS 


IN 




s 


OS 


OS 


CO 


cs 


OS 






O 


o 


co 


CM 


CO 




o 


CO 


■* 


CO 




r~ 








•<* 




■* 


■01 




CM 


m 


Tfl 


■* 




IN 


















- 1 








~ 








co 


CO 


o 


m 


co 




IN 


■* 


■* 


CM 


OS 


o 






<N 


co 


CM 


IN 






<N 


<N 


CM 


Ol 




CM 






t- 


o 


CO 


CC 


o 




CO 


"5 






m 


t^ 






CO 


lO 


■* 


co 


in 




m 


co 


CO 


•* 


co 


CO 






Tt< 


o 






lO 




CM 


on 


CO 


on 


co 


f~ 






CO 


1-1 


Tf 


1* 


o 




■* 


CM 


co 


CM 


■* 


CO 






~ 


(N 


rt 


- 


- 




- 1 


- 


n 


- 


^ 


- 






OS 


m 


CO 


-* 


in 




CO 


on 


on 


IN 


on 


lO 






CM 




CO 


-* 






•* 


1-1 


CM 


CO 


m 








- 


CM 


1 


- 


CN 




















,_, 


o 


m 


■* 


o 




co 


CO 


os 


o 


o 


CO 






■<* 


CN 




W 


cm 




tH 


-* 


i- 


•* 


-c" 


^p 








- 


- 




~ 




















co 


CO 


to 


■* 


o 




co 


,_, 


CO 


OS 


o 


o 






1-1 


<N 


a 


co 


CO 




co 


CO 


CO 




CN 


CM 






- 1 


- 


- 


-• 


<N 


























in 


iO 




W 


OS 


m 


,_j 




t~ 






in 






1-1 


■* 




* H 


m 
















* 


- 


- 


~ 




- 




- 


- 


- 


- 








r~ 


CO 


m 


lO 




in 


o 


CO 


_ 


Tt< 


m 






<N 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 




-* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CN 


CM 






OS 




■# 


CO 


m 




in 


00 


CM 


co 


no 


o 






CO 




co 


CO 


-tf 




■* 


co 


co 


m 


<N 


co 








rt 


























CO 


t^ 


t~ 


00 


t^ 




CO 


o 


CO 


t> 


00 


OS 






CN 


*-« 


CM 


^ 


~ 




** 


CM 


~ 


-< 


CM 


CM 




co 




























o 












6 
















H 


CN 


t- 


CO 




CO 


H 


















1-1 


CO 


f* 




CN 


CO 


CM 


■H 


m 




•* 




K 


>, 


>, 


>, 


>> 


>> 


g 


>. 


>1 


>> 


>> 


>> 










c 




B 


K 





c 





8 


CJ 












a! 


si 


as 


C3 




at 




.-1 






3 




a 


ft 


0, 


ft 




ft 


a 


ft 


ft 


ft 






ti 


ti 


ti 


ti 


ti 


M 


R 


Pj 


s 


R 


R 


fi 








o 


o 





o 




o 




o 




o 








O 


u 


u 


u 


u 




u 


u 


o 


a 


u 


u 






h 


» 


o 


as 










h 




u 








■o 


c 


a 


c 


-0 




2 


c 




c 




c 






*0 








•a 




it 


Esfl 




tJI 




a 






a 














c 




c 




a 






hi 


w 


w 


w 


Hi 




UJ 


1=1 




K 




a 





— lOcsm 
co "-i cm m 


OJ « co 
" -*IN 
. . .00 -hi . 


minute 
minute 
minute 
minute 


seconds 
seconds 
seconds 
minute 
seconds 
minute 
minute 
seconds 


00 CO 00 CO 


INNH H ^Hrtt- 



in co - 1 in 

dcCd 

c3 03 03 cd 
O. ft ft ft 

O O O O 

oooo 



T3 M'd ill 
03 C c3 C 



o o o o 

222:2; 



SCfiC 



>i £>>>>.>>>.;>>£>£? >> 

cacagojcjnojojcScci 
&ftC.ftftftftftftft 

SSfc£EER£|R 
o o ° o o o o o ,oo 

«a!so;rtUci>a>S;S 

c a^ c « c a g^.S 
'S'3-d '3-3 'S'Si'S-o m 

sassacccciS 

1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 

-*cMCOTrinoi>ono5© 
6 6 o 6 6 6 6 6 6 o 



20 



City Document No. 11. 













OS 




on 


-* 




oo 






•* 


to 




>c 


CO 


CO CO t 




i*nox 






(M 


1-1 


■* 


•* 


*# 






CO 




CO 


CM 




^ 


CN 


n t* ■ 


"5 


% 




o 


CO 


os 


,_, 


,_i 




o 


00 


o 


os 


OS 




rt 


^ 


O i-t C 






""• 






1-1 


1-1 




* H 




1-1 
















» 










t^ 


CO 


"5 


m 








lO 


CO 




,_, 




CD 


m 


CD 00 C 










•* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 




■* 


co 


m 


co 


co 




CO 


CO 


co o >o 






















































































S 


















































































U5 


00 


CO 


CO 


Tj< 




CO 


oo 


,_, 




CO 




,_, 


,_, 


o CO >o 




e> 






CO 


'""' 


CN 


CN 


in 




CM 


1-1 


co 


CM 


CN 




CO 


■* 


CM •* ■* 










































a 
















































■* 


■* 


■* 


oo 




o 


M 


■* 




CO 




CN 


rt 


■* (> on 




00 








CO 


■* 


w 


<* 




W 


■* 


■* 




-# 




lO 


>o 




tH - 


f 










































s 




1-1 


















1-1 




















in 


00 




lO 


t> 




-* 


,_, 


oc 


00 






co 




lO 1> ttl 




r> 








CN 


-* 


■* 


lO 




•* 


co 


^< 


co 


co 








in co co 










































s 




CN 


1-1 


,H 


1-1 


' H 




^ H 


*" H 


1-1 


TH 


rH 




CN 


CM 


.-H i-l l-H 


OS 








«o 


os 


^ 


Iffl 


CM 




m 




CO 


m 






ia 


rt 


oo on oj 


m 








CM 




■* 


lO 


lO 




■* 


CM 


co 


CM 






>o 


Tt< 


CO CO ■* 


n 


MS 










































































p 








































S5 




<, 










































oo 


o 


T* 


O 


■# 




CS 


as 


OS 


co 






oo 


os 


oo co in 










TjH 


lO 


lO 










■* 


m 


w 












En 








































P 








































O 
> 




s 










1-1 


rt 












1-1 


































































































CO 


on 




lO 


o 




t~ 


00 


l>- 


CO 






t^ 




oo m os 










1-1 




CM 


in 






rH 


1-1 


CM 


CM 


CO 




CO 


•* 


CM •* CO 














































§ 




1-1 


1-1 


* H 


1-1 


<N 




1-1 


1-1 


1-1 


'" H 


rt 




^ 


^ 


r-1 r-l tH 










in 


t> 


on 


CN 


CO 






t~ 


IQ 


CO 


m 




oo 


co 


os oo co 










r "' 






TH 


CM 










CM 






^ 


7-1 


r-l rl 














































s 




































! 








00 


,_, 


,_, 


CO 


CM 




CO 


CM 




CD 






l-~ 


co 


m cm c 










CN 


CN 


■* 


co 


CO 




M< 


CM 


co 


CM 


CN 




CO 


H* 


cm co co 






■ 








































s 












































o 


to 


o 


CD 


os 




CO 


OS 


■* 




CS 




oo 


OS 


,m os c 




_; 






co 


co 


co 


■* 


CM 




■* 


CM 


CO 


co 


CO 




CO 


CO 


co o- 












































s 


































1-1 




■uap\[ 




to 


OS 


os 


CO 


00 




t~ 


CD 


J> 


CO 


t~ 




t^ 


t» 


t> r^ a 


•swotgo 




CN 


IN 


CN 


CM 


CM 




- 


CM 


CM 


-" 


CN 




- 


- 1 


CN 


CM iH 






os 








- 




© 












CM 






















o 












d 





































■* 


CM 






CO 




Os 


CM 


00 


w 






00 






O CO 








CN 






CM 


CM 


o 




m 








CJ 


CN 












K 
Eh 


>> 


;►> 


>> 


S>> 


>> 


(3 


>> 


>i 


>> 


t»i 


Sh 




>> 


>1 


> 


>. >. 






13 


c 


C 


(3 


a 


H 




a 


e 


a 


a 




a 


s 


c 


« s 
















CS 


ce 




ci 


e) 






09 








cj c3 






R 


a 


a 


ft 


P. 


P. 


R 


ft 


a 


a 


a 


a 


R 


ft 


ft 


£ 


^ & 






fa' 


H 


C 


fa' 


s 


fa' 


g 


H 


fj 


fa' 


fi 


s 


? 


B B 








o 


o 




O 


O 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 




o o 








U 


U 


U 


U 


u 




u 


U 


U 


U 


u 




u 


u 


U 


O O 










a> 


u 


0) 


0) 




h 


















i- J; 








a 


a 


T) 


e 


c 




■v 


a 


a 


c 


tJ 




c 




e 


-d T3 




















-o 




M 


w 






M 




CI 


-O "O 












si 










a 


B 








a 
















W 


W 


Hi 


W 


W 




h-1 


W 


w 


W 


h) 




w 




J 




H 


hj 


Hi 





Fiee Department. 



21 



•3 O >-• CM O 
CO IN CO CO CO 



o 


o 


3 


3 


o 


o 


oo 


t- 


OS 


OS 


o 


OS 


o 


o 




IN 

CO 


13 


co 


co 


CO 
CO 


tf 


o 

13 


CO 


<N 

CO 


CO 

CO 


CO 


OS 
CO 


13 


CO 

CO 








- 
























CO 
IN 




IN 


CD 


IN 


oo 

CO 


CO 
CM 


o 

<N 


CI 


00 


CO 

CO 


05 


CO 
IN 


IN 

CO 







-# 13 ■* OS CO 
13 ■* 13 



CO CI CO CD 

■3 Tf T}< T»< 



os 
Tfl 


00 


00 


O 


CD 
CO 


co 

CO 


13 
CM 


CI 


O 


13 
CO 


CO 

CO 


13 
13 


13 


IN 

13 


~ 


<N 


<N 


- 


^ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


n 


- 


- 


- 


- 


o 


-f 


co 


CO 


OS 
CO 


OS 

13 


CO 
CM 


"* 


CO 


CO 
CO 


>3 


13 
CM 


CO 


13 
C4 






■* 
•* 


•* 




00 

13 






13 


CO 
13 


OS 
13 


13 


co 


CI 
13 


CD 






- 


- 




- 
















- 




<N 


(N 


CO 


13 


OS 
IN 


IN 


s 


rf 


CO 


13 
IN 


CD 


CM 


co 


OS 
IN 






oo 

i3 


O 


co 


IN 


CO 


oo 


T-4 


13 
13 


- 


13 
CM 


oo 


O 
CM 


CM 

IN 


1^ 
CM 






13 
(N 


OS 
IN 


co 

CO 


co 


CO 


CO 
CO 


IN 


CM 


OS 
CM 


CM 


13 

co 


CM 

CO 


CM 

Tt< 


CO 
CM 




CO 
CO 


00 

CO 


CO 


<N 

CO 


CO 


co 


CO 

co 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CO 


13 
CO 


CM 


■* 


CO 

CO 




CO 


CO 


00 


13 


t> 


oo 


o> 


C 


00 


t~ 


t>- 


CO 


CO 


CD 


- 


iH 


CM 


- 


- 


IN 


- 1 


CM 


CM 


- 


CM 


CM 


rt 


- 



13 Tj T3 ^ 13 'C 

c c ei a c c 
o o o o o o 



OO00»OTt*O 
rH CO CO CC CO CO 



66 SEES 

OOOOOOst-O! 



13 13 CO CO 



E 5 E s a 

O o o o o 

o o o o u 



r< " tf 

Q E s 



o o o o o 



,=; p, q, g. a 

Q E S E E 

o o o o 

O O O O 



CMCMcMOCOOO 
rH 13 Til CO "^ -^ 

$t >i >» >> >i >» 

a a a a a a 
&&&&&& 

cflaecc, 
EEEEEE 

O O O o o o 

OOOOOO 

OlOOOD 

.s.s.s.s.s.s 

'm'm'm'm So'm 

c c e c c c 
HWHHHH 



OSOCMCOttfS 

OOOOOO 



H ^ &q hJ H 



W ,_) H H ,j 



K W 



QPPQQQ 



22 City Document No. 11. 



Fire Prevention Week. 



October 7 to 13, inclusive, was observed as Fire Pre- 
vention Week and the most intensive campaign in the 
history of the department was conducted along this line. 
Every possible agency was brought into play to make 
this week a success. Civic organizations, mercantile 
and manufacturing interests, department stores, 
churches, schools (both public and parochial), fraternal 
organizations, Boy Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, women's 
clubs, local Boards of Trade and Improvement Asso- 
ciations, insurance and underwriting interests, theaters 
and moving picture houses, newspapers, municipal 
departments, etc. 

The film called "Fire" furnished by the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters was displayed at different 
theaters during the week, as well as numerous slides 
containing short and pithy statements regarding the 
importance of fire prevention. Many of the theaters 
printed in their programs a notice calling attention to 
Fire Prevention Week. 

Fifty thousand "Home Inspection" blanks were dis- 
tributed among the various schools of the city, and these 
blanks were checked up and conditions corrected where 
found necessary. Six hundred copies of the book 
"Safeguarding the Home against Fire" were also dis- 
tributed among the schools. This book, which is issued 
by the National Board of Underwriters, contains much 
valuable information which if imparted to the school 
children in a proper manner will produce wonderful 
results. 

Thousands of posters, fliers, etc., were posted in con- 
spicuous places throughout the city, in shops, store 
windows, elevated and subway stations, bill boards, on 
taxi windows, in fact, everywhere where they could be 
placed to advantage. Thousands of our own Fire Pre- 
vention leaflets were distributed, and this same leaflet 
brought more favorable comment than anything else 
which was issued during the campaign. 

Various officers and members of the department gave 
short four-minute talks in the schools and other places 
of assembly. All houses of the department were open 
to the public and instructions were given on how to 
properly send in an alarm of fire, and short talks given. 



Fire Department. 



23 



This department, co-operating with the Massachu- 
setts Safety Council, set-up, maintained and furnished 
men to operate a fire alarm box at the Health Show in 
Mechanics Building during that week, and these men 
also gave short talks on Fire Prevention. 

A truck with a fire alarm box set up thereon, with 
members to give instructions regarding same, was 
operated throughout the city during that week, and 
another horse-drawn truck bearing large signs with 
pertinent facts regarding Fire Prevention, was also 
operated daily throughout the city. 

A circular letter was sent to over three hundred of the 
leading merchants, manufacturers, wool and cotton 
interests, paint and hardware concerns, etc., calling 
upon them to establish self-inspection systems in their 
various lines of business, and calling their attention to 
the importance of Fire Prevention to those to whom it 
really means the most, namely, the employers through- 
out the city, and in turn to their employees. 

In all, we estimate that approximately five hundred 
thousand people were reached directly during this Fire 
Prevention campaign, and I feel safe in saying that it 
was the most intensive of its kind ever conducted in the 
City of Boston, and I feel certain that very beneficial 
results will accrue therefrom. 



Hydrants. 

The following is a list of the types and number of each, 
of hydrants, in service for fire purposes, as of January 
31, 1924: 



Ordinary post 

Boston post .... 

Lowry 

Boston lowry 

Bachelder & Finneran post 

High pressure 

Boston .... 

Chapman post 

Ludlow post 

Matthew post 

Coffin post .... 



4,147 

3,231 

1,392 

561 

597 

370 

268 

187 

20 

4 

1 



Total 



10,777 



24 



City Document No. 11, 



High Pressure System. 
The records of our two high pressure stations for the 
year are as follows: 

Station No. 1.- — Total alarms to which pumps re- 
sponded, 169; total time pumps actually operated, 
58 hours 3 minutes; water discharge recorded on Ven- 
turi meters, 1,450,000 gallons. 

Station No. 2. — Total alarms to which pumps re- 
sponded, 131; total time pumps actually operated, 
61 hours 46 minutes; water discharge recorded on Ven- 
turi meters, 805,000 gallons. 

(Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters, 
they do not record flows under six hundred gallons per 
minute.) 

The total amount of pipe installed in the High Pres- 
sure Fire System up to January 1, 1924, is as follows: 



12-inch Pipe . 


16-inch Pipe. 


20-inch Pipe. 


18,613 feet. 
3.53 miles. 


33,701 feet. 
6.38 miles. 


20,140 feet. 
3.81 miles. 



Total amount of piping in system: 72,454 feet, or 
13.73 miles. 



Total Length of Pipe that Will be in Completed 

System. 



12-inch Pipe. 


16-inch Pipe. 


20-inch Pipe. 


Total. 


33,956 feet. 39,824 feet. 
6.43 miles. 7.54 miles. 


24,661 feet. 
4.67 miles. 


98,441 feet. 
18.64 miles. 



Total number of hydrants in service, 370. 

The high pressure problem in the City of Boston has 
long since passed through the experimental stages, and 
from the practical work performed under stress it has 
proven an absolute necessity in the extinguishment of 
fires in the high value section of the city. 

Signs on Sprinkler System Alarm Gongs. 
With your approval and that of the Boston Board of 
Fire Underwriters, a uniform sign was adopted which 



Fire Department. 



25 



may be placed near the outside sprinkler alarm gong 
to indicate its purpose and to suggest action in case the 
gong is ringing. This is an enameled iron sign 11^ inches 
by 15 inches, with the words, "Sprinkler Fire Alarm — 
When Bell Rings call Police or Fire Department" in 
white lettering on a red background. 

Recommendations have been made that this sign be 
placed on all buildings having sprinkler systems so 
that the loss of valuable time will be avoided in sending 
in alarms of fire, incidentally reducing the loss by water 
and also by fire, through expediting the Fire Depart- 
ment's response. 

Two-Platoon System. 

In accordance with orders, I visited the cities of Phil- 
adelphia, Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland and New 
York, for the purpose of investigation and study of the 
so-called two-platoon system for fire departments. 

So far as the efficiency of the fire fighting service goes, 
the two-platoon system has not lessened it in these 
cities, with one exception, but if anything, has actually 
increased the efficiency. 

There are, in general, two well recognized methods 
of operating the two-platoon system. The first in the 
twenty-four hour shift — i. e., where one-half of the 
department is on duty for twenty-four hours and is then 
relieved by the other half of the department, and so on. 
This amounts virtually to a day off in two, without meal 
hours for the shift on duty. This system is now in 
force in Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit. In Chicago, 
some of the men do not like this plan on account of the 
question of meals. 

The second method of operation is on the basis of 
two shifts in every twenty-four hours, generally ten 
and fourteen hours alternated, in some cases the alter- 
ation coming by days, in other cases the alternation 
coming by weeks. This latter method is the one which 
is to be adopted by our department, one shift being 
from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m., and the other from 6 p. m. to 
8 a. m., and the tour of duty will be as follows: 



First Day. 


Second Day. 


Third Day. 


Fourth Day. 


Fifth Day. 


Sixth Day. 


On day. 


On day. 


On 24 hours. 


On night. 


On night. 


Off 24 hours. 



26 City Document No. 11. 

Every one of the cities mentioned found it necessary 
to put on a considerable number of additional men, in 
order to put the two-platoon system into operation 
without loss of efficiency to the fire service, and to install 
this system in the Boston Fire Department it will require 
an increase in officers and men as follows: 

3 Deputy Chiefs. 
15 District Chiefs. 

7 Captains. 

8 Lieutenants. 
177 Privates. 

210 Total — All grades. 

One of the principal benefits which will accrue to the 
department with the installation of the Two-Platoon 
System is the increase in man-power in the different 
companies with a corresponding increase in efficiency. 
For example, under the day-in-three system, the actual 
fire fighting force of the department is approximately 
1,200 officers and men, which gives us actually for duty 
every day two-thirds of 1,200 or 800 officers and men. 
Take into consideration also that during almost 12 
hours of the 24, one-third of this 800 are at meals, and 
we find that during almost 12 continuous hours of every 
day we have in the apparatus houses 534 men ready 
for immediate response to an alarm, or less than 50 per 
cent of our total force. Under the Two-Platoon System 
we will have on duty approximately 725 men ready for 
immediate response during every hour of the twenty- 
four. 

Under the day-in-three plan, many leaves of absence 
were granted for various important reasons, when the 
strength of forces would allow, much of which will be 
eliminated under the Two-Platoon System, in view of 
the fact that many things that now require a leave of 
absence will be attended to on the men's off time. 

Of course, from a humanitarian standpoint, the great- 
est benefit accruing from this System is the fact that 
the men will be enabled to spend a good portion of their 
time with their families, which is one of the greatest 
hardships of the day-in-three or five, etc., systems, 
whereby men were home only one day in three or five, 
except for the short time allowed for meal hours, and 
in a great many cases members are located in companies 



Fire Department. 27 

which are so far from their homes that they are able 
to see their families only on their days-off. 

The total additional outlay for the first year which 
will be made necessary by the installation of the Two- 
Platoon System, including the cost of uniforms, fire 
hats, etc., and salaries of additional officers and privates, 
is estimated at $349,647.50. 

Recommendations. 

Apparatus. 
I earnestly recommend the purchase of the following 
major motor-driven fire-fighting apparatus, to be located 
in the houses specified: 

Engine 4, Bulfinch Street, West End. — One 750-gallon 
pumper to replace Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine. 

Engine 33, Boylston and Hereford Streets, Back Bay. — 
One 750-gallon pumper; one combination chemical and 
hose car to replace Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine and a Seagrave hose motor car which is practically 
worn out. 

Engine 39, Congress Street, South Boston. — One 750- 
gallon pumper to replace a Christie tractor-drawn steam 
fire engine. 

Engine 1±2, Washington Street, Egleston Square. — One 
750-gallon pumper to replace a Christie tractor-drawn 
steam fire engine. 

Note. — The boilers on the four (4) tractor-drawn 
steam fire engines mentioned above have so far deteri- 
orated as to necessitate the expenditure of considerable 
money for new boilers. 

Engine 14, Centre Street, Roxbury. — One combination 
chemical and hose car to replace Knox hose car which 
is practically worn out. 

Engine 16, River and Temple Streets, Dorchester Lower 
Mills. — One combination chemical and hose car. This 
installation required to make this a double-unit company. 

Engine 4$, Andrew Square, South Boston. — One com- 
bination chemical and hose car to replace Velie hose 
car which is practically worn out. 

Ladder 6, River and Temple Streets, Dorchester Lower 
Mills. — One city service truck to replace worn-out 
tractor drawn truck. 



28 City Document No. 11. 

Ladder 26, Longwood and Brookline Avenues, Back 
Bay. — One city service truck to replace worn-out tractor 
drawn truck. 

Ladder 4, Dudley Street, Roxbury. — One four-wheel 
tractor. Front drive on this particular apparatus is worn 
out in service and should be replaced as soon as possible. 

Ladder 17, Harrison Avenue, City Proper. — One four- 
wheel tractor. Front drive on this particular apparatus 
is worn out in service and should be replaced as soon as 
possible. 

I would also recommend the purchase of a new rescue 
wagon, specifications to be drawn for same which will 
cover the carrying of delicate mechanism such as gas 
masks, etc., and the establishment of a new rescue 
company, in view of the fact that the present running 
card of Rescue Company No. 1 is really too much for 
one company to handle properly. 

I would further recommend the purchase of two five- 
passenger cars for replacement of cars in service of 
deputy chiefs, and four roadsters to replace cars in use 
by district chiefs. All of these cars are practically 
worn out in service. 



New Buildings. 

Engine 21, Columbia Road, Dorchester. — New building 
on present foundation. 

Engine 17, Ladder 7, Meeting House Hill, Dorchester. — 
New building on a new site. 

I would also recommend a new bungalow fire station 
and site in West Roxbury. 

I further recommend the location of a new engine 
company in the vicinity of Jersey and Boylston streets, 
owing to the rapid growth in that district, and it is both 
a business and dwelling section which requires more 
adequate protection than it has at the present time. 
Recent building operations in that locality have been 
in leaps and bounds and the distance on center between 
Engine House 37, located at Longwood avenue and 
Brookline avenue, Engine House 41 on Harvard street, 
Allston district, and Engine 33 at Boylston and Here- 
ford streets would show clearly that more protection is 
required. 

I also recommend that a new fire station be built at 
the junction of Tremont street and Shawmut avenue 



Fire Department. 29 

over the subway, and that Engine Company 26 and 35 
and High Pressure Company be removed from their 
present location on Mason street to new location herein 
mentioned. Included in this new structure, room 
should be made also for the quarters of the Rescue 
Company and also the Chief of Department. 

Remodeling and Fireproofing. 

Engine 12, Dudley Street. — Finishing first floor, re- 
modeling second floor. 

Engine 27, Elm Street, Charlestown. — Finishing first 
floor, brick, plaster and finish. 

Engine 19, Norfolk Street, Mattapan. — Fireproof floor 
slab, finishing walls and ceiling. 

Engine 34, Western Avenue, Brighton. — Fireproofing 
floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine 20 and Ladder 27, Walnut Street, Dorchester. — 
This building is clearly off center and should be con- 
sidered for relocation. 

Engine 11 and Ladder 21, Saratoga Street, East Boston. — 
Fireproof floor slab, fireproofing walls and ceiling, 
improvements. 

Engine 37 and Ladder 26, Longwood Avenue, Back 
Bay. — Rebuilding. 

Engine 24, Warren Street, Roxhury. — Reinforced floor, 
fireproofing walls and ceiling, first floor. 

Engine 32, Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown. — - Rein- 
forced floor, fireproofing walls and ceiling, first floor, 
remodeling second floor. 

Engine 13, Cabot Street, Roxhury.— Fireproofing first 
floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine Jj-% an d Ladder 30, Egleston Square. — Fire- 
proofing first floor, remodeling second floor. 

Ladder 17, Harrison Avenue, City Proper. — Fire- 
proofing first floor, alterations on second. 

Engine 6, Leverett Street, West End. — Fireproofing 
first floor and remodeling. 

Engine 2, Fourth Street, South' Boston. — ■ Fireproofing 
first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Ladder 23, Washington Street, Dorchester. — ■ Finishing 
alterations second and third floors. 

Engine 3, Harrison Avenue, South End. — Fireproofing 
first floor, walls and ceiling. 



30 City Document No. 11. 

Ladder 3, Harrison Avenue, South End. — Fireproofing 
first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine 22 and Ladder 13, Warren Avenue, South End. — 
Fireproofing first floor, walls and ceiling, remodeling. 

Engine 23, Northampton Street, Roxbury. — Fireproof- 
ing first floor, walls and ceiling, remodeling. 

Engine 29 and Ladder 11, Chestnut Hill Avenue, 
Brighton. — Fireproofing first floor and ceiling. 

Engine 36 and Ladder 22, Monument Street, Charles- 
town. — Fireproofing first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine 45 and Ladder 16, Washington Street, Roslin- 
dale. — Fireproofing floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine 48 and Ladder 28, Harvard Avenue, Hyde 
Park. — Fireproofing first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Ladder 12, Tremont Street, Roxbury. — Fireproofing 
floor, walls and ceiling, also remodeling first floor. 

Engine 9 and Ladder 2, Paris Street, East Boston. — 
Fireproofing first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Ladder 9, Main Street, Charlestown.— Fireproofing 
first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine 47 (fireboat). — Repairs and improvements. 

Ladder 24, North Grove Street, West End. — Fireproof- 
ing first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Rescue 1, Church Street. — Fireproofing first floor, 
walls and ceiling. 

Engine 18, Harvard Street, Dorchester. — • Fireproofing 
floor, walls and ceiling. 

Engine 30 and Ladder 25, Centre Street, West Roxbury. 
Fireproofing floor, walls and ceilings. 

Engine 16 and Ladder 6, River Street, Dorchester Lower 
Mills. — Fireproofing first floor, walls and ceiling. 

Conclusion. 

To the Boston Board of Fire Underwriters, the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters, the New England 
Insurance Exchange, and the National Fire Protection 
Association, who so kindly co-operated with this depart- 
ment in the development of many progressive measures, 
I wish to extend my sincere appreciation. Also to the 
various municipal departments, public service corpora- 
tions, and the Boston Protective Department, which 
rendered such valuable assistance during the past year, 
I wish to express my thanks. 



Fire Department. 31 

Finally, to the members of the department who so 
devotedly and efficiently performed their many difficult 
and, at times, hazardous tasks, I wish to express my 
heartfelt gratitude, and it is my hope that the depart- 
ment will continue its place among the foremost fire 
departments throughout the world, with a continuance 
of the same high caliber of service, as in the past. 

Respectfully, 

John O. Taber, 

Chief of Department. 



32 



City Document No. 11. 



FIRE ALARM BRANCH. 



From: The Superintendent of Fire Alarm Branch. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report of Fire Alarm Branch, 1923-1S24. 

I submit herewith the annual report of the Fire Alarm 
Branch for the fiscal year ending January 31, 1924: 



OPERATING DIVISION. 

Note. — The records of this division are for the 
calendar j^ear 1923. 



Box Alarms Received and Transmitted 



First alarms 
Second alarms 
Third alarms 
Fourth alarms 
Fifth alarms 

Total . 



3,181 
56 
20 

8 
1 

3,266 



Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 

Same box received two or more times for same fire . 299 

Adjacent boxes received for same fire .... 217 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 2 

Total 518 



Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 

Received from citizens (by telephone) .... 2,058 

Received from police' department (by telephone) . 329 

Received from fire department stations (by telephone) , 1,327 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 2 
Mutual Aid alarms, adjacent cities and towns, classed 

as stills 36 

Emergency services, classed as stills .... 58 



Total 



3,810 



Fire Department. 33 

Still alarms received by telephone for which box 

alarms were later transmitted 250 

Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 

Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Transmitted by company to department stations . 198 

Department box alarms transmitted in connection with same: 

Before automatic alarm 10 

After automatic alarm ! 16 

A. D. T. Company: 

Received at fire alarm office 51 

Department box alarms transmitted in connection with same: 

Before A. D. T. alarm was received .... 7 

After A. D. T. alarm was transmitted .... 2 

Received after still alarms were transmitted . . 3 

A. D. T. alarms transmitted to department . . 41 

Summary of Alarms. 
Alarms received: 

Box alarms, including multiples 3,784 

Still alarms, all classes 3,808 

Boston automatic alarms 198 

A. D. T. alarms 51 



Total received from all sources . . . . 7,841 

Excludes following duplications: 
Box alarms received but not transmitted . . . 518 
Still alarms for which box alarms were transmitted . 250 
Automatic alarms for which box alarms were trans- 
mitted 26 

A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were pre- 
viously transmitted 10 

Total duplications eliminated 804 

Total alarms, with duplications eliminated, to which 

apparatus responded 7,037 

Fire Alarm Box Records. 

Boxes from which no alarms were received . . . 422 

Box tests and inspections 8,736 

Note. — All keyless doors are tested weekly. 

CONSTRUCTION DIVISION. 
Exterior Work. 

In the regular work done during the year about 5,760 
feet of underground ducts were laid, 29 new box posts 



34 City Document No. 11. 

were set, 34 new boxes were connected into service and 
about 59,000 feet of underground cable was installed. 

For connections to the proposed new signal station in 
the Fenway district an agreement was made with the 
telephone company whereby about 17,000 feet of ducts 
were installed underground. Of this amount 10,600 
feet are to be reserved for the use of this department. 
In addition to that work eight large size cable terminal 
posts were installed. About 1,475 feet of ducts were 
used to connect these posts to the conduit system. 

New Fiee Alarm Signal Station. 

For several years past efforts have been made to obtain 
a building to house the central office fire alarm equip- 
ment in a location free from conflagration hazard. The 
necessity of such action was made more imperative 
because the present equipment was insufficient to meet 
the requirements. The Boston Board and the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters strongly urged that action 
be taken, but it remained for the present administration 
to do something definite. When the project was finally 
started the Chamber of Commerce heartily endorsed it. 

An appropriation of $500,000 was made and a site 
was selected in the Back Bay Fens with the consent of 
the Legislature. At this time, the beginning of the fiscal 
year 1924-25, the contract for the fire alarm equipment 
amounting to $217,000, has been made with the Game- 
well Fire Alarm Telegraph Company. The conduits 
necessary to connect the present underground cable 
system with the new building have been laid, cable 
terminal posts have been installed, the contract for all 
necessary cables has been made and the plans and 
specifications for the construction of the building have 
been completed. 

Radio. 

Four transmitting and receiving radio stations have 
been installed, one at Fire Headquarters in the fire 
alarm office and one on each of the three fire boats. It 
is now possible to be in direct communication at all 
times with each of the boats. 

Underground Cables Installed. 
Charlestown. 
Medford street, from Chelsea street to Cond - Feet - 

Decatur street 10 266 



Fire Department. 35 



Cond. 


Feet. 


6 


2,508 


6 
4 


867 
108 


10 
10 


1,022 
701 


10 


279 


6 


348 


6 
6 
6 


939 

1,032 

684 



Medford street, from Cook street to Tufts 
street 

Carney street, from Bunker Hill street to 
Medford street 

Building connections 

South Boston. 

I street, from Broadway to East Sixth street, 
East Fourth street, from I street to K street, 
K street, from East Fourth street to East 

Fifth street 

Broadway from Dorchester street to G 

street 

G street, from Broadway to East Sixth 

street 

I street, from Broadway to East First street, 
East First street, from I street to K street, 

Dorchester. 

River street, from Central avenue to Blue 
Hill avenue 

Dorchester avenue, from Savin Hill avenue 
to Freeport street . . . 

Adams street, from Codman street to Granite 
avenue 

Adams street, from King square to Granite 
avenue 

Washington street, Aspinwall road, Whitfield 
street and Talbot avenue, Box 3355 to 
Box 3354 

River street and Central avenue, from En- 
gine 16 to Milton 

Bowdoin, Olney and Richfield streets, from 
Box 3185 to Box 3187 . . . . . 

Post and pole connections .... 

Post and pole connections . ... 

Post and pole connections .... 



Hyde Park. 

River street, from Malta street to Metropoli- 
tan avenue ....... 15 5,641 

Pole connections ...... 6 375 

Roxbury. 

Beacon and St. Mary's streets, from Audubon 

circle to Mountfort street . . ". . 6 1,500 



15 


6,420 


10 


2,282 


10 


1,146 


6 


5,811 


6 


1,658 


6 


1,505 


6 

10 

6 

4 


1,543 

484 

1,511 

1,170 



36 



City Document No. 11. 



Ipswich and Boylston streets from Lans- Cond. Feet. 

do wne street to Jersey street . . . 6 1,691 

Quincy street, from Dacia street to Mag- 
nolia street 10 1 ,460 

Pole connections 6 427 



West Roxbury. 

Belgrade avenue, from Walworth street to 

Colberg avenue, Colberg avenue, Loraine 

street, Belgrade street, Beach street, and 

Anawan avenue to Park street ... 6 7,040 

Maple street, from Centre street to Pomfret 

street ........ 6 2,197 

Poplar street, from Washington street to 

Hillside avenue 6 1,950 

Cornell street, from Colberg. avenue to 

Aldrich street 6 253 

Post connections 10 436 

Post connections 4 58 



Brighton. 

Cambridge street, from North Harvard 

street to Box 5211 6 2,074 

Corey road, from Wellington to Windsor 

road 6 1,354 

Pole connections 6 259 

Post connections 4 422 



Fire Alarm Box Posts Installed with Duct Lengths to 

Same. 

Charlestown. 

Medford and Pearl streets 
Medford and Cottage streets . 
Medford and Decatur streets . 
Medford street, opposite Tufts street . 

Dorchester. 

Hamilton and Barry streets . 
Richfield street and Puritan avenue 
Adams street, opposite Centre street 
Adams and Lonsdale streets . 
Adams and Ashmont streets . 
Adams and Franccnia streets . 
Adams street and Granite avenue, 2 duct 
Florida and King streets .... 
Florida and Templeton streets 



16 feet 


16 feet 


20 feet 


42 feet 


120 feet 


7 feet 


7 feet 


7 feet 


13 feet 


6 feet 


19 feet 


110 feet 


59 feet 



Fire Department. 37 



Dorchester. 
Washington and Rockwell streets 
Washington and Fairmount streets . 
River and Idaho streets . . 

River street, near Consumptives' Hospital 
River and Fremont streets .... 
Talbot avenue and Spencer street 



12 feet 
15 feet 

8 feet 
35 feet 

9 feet 
32 feet 



Hyde Park. 

River and Massasoit streets 32 feet 

River and Blake streets 7 feet 

River street and Reddy avenue ..... 27 feet 

Roxbury. 

Ipswich and Lansdowne streets (2 ducts) ... 6 feet 

Blue Hill avenue and Winthrop street . . . 23 feet 

Quincy and Magnolia streets 20 feet 

West Roxbury. 

Cornell and Aldrich streets 13 feet 

Hyde Park avenue and Canterbury street . . 16 feet 

Brighton. 

Corey and Wellington roads 26 feet 

Myrick and Bayard streets 50 feet 

Fire Alarm Box Posts Reset. 
Humboldt avenue and Townsend street (broken by truck). 
Washington and Dale streets (broken by truck). 
Clarendon and Chandler streets (twice) (broken by truck). 
Washington street, opposite Water street (broken by truck). 
India and Central streets (broken by truck). 
Pierce square (broken by truck). 
Washington and West streets (broken by truck). 
Commonwealth avenue and Clarendon street (broken by truck). 
Albany and Yeoman streets (broken by truck). 
Dudley street, opposite Magnolia street (broken by truck). 
Dorchester avenue and Victoria street (broken by truck). 
Washington and Roslin streets (broken by truck). 
Tremont and Winter streets (broken by truck). 
Tremont and Ruggles streets (broken by truck). 
Clarendon and Stuart streets (broken by truck). 
Commonwealth avenue and Granby street (broken by truck). 
Walnut avenue and Crawford street (broken by truck). 
Causeway and Haverhill streets (broken by truck). 
Park square (broken by truck). 
Washington and Concord streets (change of curb). 
Hyde Park avenue and Walk Hill street (extra pipe) . 18 feet 
Harvard and Glen way streets (grade changed). 



38 



City Document No. 11. 



Spring and Centre streets (change of location). 
School street, opposite Byron court (change of curb). 
Stuart and Carver streets (change of curb). 
Washington and Beech streets (change of curb). 
Chelsea street, opposite Prospect street (change of curb). 
St. Mary's and Mountfort streets (change of curb). 
Tremont and Warrenton streets (broken water main). 
Columbus avenue and Centre street (relocation) 

extension 

Harrison avenue and Kneeland street (out of plumb). 



23 feet 



Thirteen other posts were broken by vehicles which 
required the replacement of top sections of posts. 



New Cable Posts Installed. 

Hemenway and Boylston streets, 5 ducts 
Brookline and Commonwealth avenues, 4 ducts 
Massachusetts avenue and St. Stephen street, ( 

ducts 

Harrison avenue and Florence street, 4 ducts . 
Washington and Northampton streets, 6 ducts 
Tremont and Northampton streets, 6 ducts 
Tremont and Ruggles streets, 6 ducts 
Berkeley and Stuart streets, 6 ducts . 

Cable Posts Replaced. 

Tremont and Clarendon streets. 

Harrison avenue and Beach street. 

Congress and A streets. 

Main and Medford streets. 

Centre and Moraine streets (broken three times). 

Cable Post Relocated. 
Tremont and Stuart streets, 2 ducts . 

Cable Post Removed. 
West First and A streets. 

New Conduits Installed. 

Corey Road, from Wellington road to Cummings 
road 

New Pole Connections. 

Cummings road at Corey road 

Royal street, near Cambridge street . 
Medford street, near Cook street . 
Medford and Terminal streets 



61 feet 
15 feet 

36 feet 
9 feet 

•40 feet 

37 feet 
29 feet 
37 feet 



60 feet 



490 feet 



249 feet 
33 feet 
87 feet 

182 feet 



Fire Department. 



39 



Medford and Tufts streets (Water Department 

building) 

River and Standard streets . 
River and Cedar streets 
River street and Wood avenue . 
Wrentham street, near Dorchester avenue 
Barry street, near Hamilton street . 
Adams and King streets * . . . 
Adams and Beaumont streets * . 
Adams and Minot streets * . 
Adams street, near Codman street * . 
Adams street, at Codman street * 
Marsh street and Granite avenue * . 
Granite avenue and Adams street * . 
Washington and Rockwell streets 
Washington and Bailey streets . 
Quincy street and Howard avenue * . 
Mascoma street at Quincy street * 
Spring and Gardner streets * 
Spring street near Baker street * 



43 feet 

76 feet 

83 feet 

80 feet 

7 feet 

36 feet 

124 feet 

190 feet 

213 feet 

254 feet 

121 feet 
147 feet 
139 feet 

108 feet 

109 feet 
147 feet 
180 feet 
105 feet 

122 feet 



Ducts Abandoned. 

Tremont and Stuart streets, 2 ducts . 
West First and A streets, 2 ducts 
Main and Miller streets, 2 ducts 
Spring and Centre streets, 1 duct 
Hampden street and Norfolk avenue, 1 duct 



14 feet 

54 feet 

55 feet 
23 feet 
70 feet 



Pole and Building Connections Replaced. 

Hampden street and Norfolk avenue . . . 70 feet 
South Ferry House, East Boston .... 65 feet 



Public Fire Alarm Boxes Established. 

Box. Location. 

234. Ipswich and Lansdowne streets. 

244. Opposite 270 Amory street. 

2491. Pond and May streets. 

2547. Florence street and Bex ley road. 

2622. Belgrade avenue and Bradwood street. 

2629. Park and Martin streets. 

2726. Weld street and Parkvale road. 

2734. Weld street and Russett road. 

315. Blue Hill avenue and Winthrop street. 

3187. Richfield street and Puritan avenue. 

3374. Callender and Lucerne streets. 

3428. Adams and Centre streets. 

3443. King and Florida streets. 

* Work done for this department by Telephone Company. 



40 City Document No. 11. 

Box. Location. 

345. Victory road and Houghton street. 

3519. Milton avenue and Fairmount street. 

3563. River and Fremont streets. 

3571. Oakland and Bismarck streets. 

3613. Washington and Rockwell streets. 

3633. Washington and Codman streets. 

3782. Glenwood avenue and Loring street. 

45. Medford and Cottage streets. 

5216. Hooker and Holman streets. 

5218. Myrick and Bayard streets. 

5279. Parsons street and Electric avenue. 

528. Parsons and Surrey streets. 

7165. East First and West First streets. 

SCHOOLHOUSE BOXES ESTABLISHED. 

2185. Henry L. Higginson School, Harrishof street. 

2319. St. Mary's and Mountfort streets, auxiliary to William 

McKinley School. 
2348. Boston Public Latin School, Avenue Louis Pasteur. 
3518. Frank V. Thompson School, Maxwell street. 
681. Daniel Webster School, Lubec street. 

Private Fire Alarm Boxes Established. 

245. Haffenreffer & Co., Bismarck street. 
659. Standard Oil Company, Chelsea street. 
7126. South Boston Dry Dock. 

Fire Alarm Boxes Relocated. 

2492. From Pond and Rockwood streets to Pond street and 

Woodland road. 
2616. From Belgrade avenue and Rexhame street to Belgrade 

and Colberg avenues. 
2621. From Beech and Newburg streets to Beech street and 

Colberg avenue. 
3184. From opposite 50 Barry street to Hamilton and Barry 

streets. 
452. From Medford street, opposite Mystic street to Medford 

and Pearl streets. 
5278. From North Beacon street and Electric avenue to North 

Beacon and Vineland streets. 
7161. From West First street, between E and F streets to 

West First and E streets. 

Fire Alarm Boxes Removed from Service. 

1446. A. Shuman Company, Washington and Summer streets. 
3232. St. Mary's Infant Asylum. 
410. Jacob Foss School, Adams and Chestnut streets. 



Fire Department. 



41 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 

Total number 

Owned by Fire Department .... 
Owned by Schoolhouse Department 
Owned by Automatic Fire Alarm Company 
Privately owned 



1,299 

916 

212 

61 

110 



Department Boxes. 

On box posts 

On poles 

On buildings 

Inside buildings 

Equipped with keyless doors (bell ringing attachment) 
Equipped with keyless doors (glass guards) 

Equipped with key doors 

Equipped with auxiliary attachments 
Designated by red lights 



509 

383 

19 

5 

860 

49 

7 

15 

525 



Schoolhouse Boxes. 
On box posts 

On poles .... 
On buildings 
Inside buildings 
Equipped with keyless doors 
Equipped with key doors 
Equipped with auxiliary attachments 
Designated by red lights . 



26 

15 
103 

68 
156 

56 
168 

21 



Automatic Fire Alarm Company Boxes. 

On poles 6 

On buildings 18 

Inside buildings 37 

Equipped with keyless doors 9 

Equipped with key doors 52 



Private Fire Alarm Boxes. 
On poles .... 
On buildings . - . 
Inside buildings 
Equipped with keyless doors 
Equipped with key doors 
Equipped with auxiliary attachments 



8 
35 
67 
15 
95 
11 



Classification of Fire Alarm Boxes. 



Academies 

Armory 

Asylums 



42 



City Document No. 11. 



Car houses . 

Cemetery . 

Church . 

City yard . 

Home for aged people 

Hospitals 

Hotels 

Manufacturing plants 

Museum 

Navy yard . 

Office buildings . 

Police station 

Power stations . 

Prison . 

Public hall . 

Pumping station 

Railroad shops . 

Railroad stations 

Railroad yards . 

Retail stores 

Restaurant . 

Schoolhouses (public) 

Schoolhouses (parochial) 

Stock yards 

Street boxes (public) 

Theaters 

Warehouses 

Wharves 

Wholesale houses 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts 
District 9 
District 10 
District 11 
District 12 
District 13 
District 14 
District 15 



Two boxes are located outside the city limits. 



District 1 








72 


District 2 








68 


District 3 








33 


District 4 








88 


District 5 








52 


District 6 








92 


District 7 








86 


District 8 








99 



Posts and Cable Terminal Boxes. 

Box posts in service . . . 
Box posts set but not in service .... 
Cable posts in service (large size) .... 
Cable posts in service (small size) .... 
Pole cable boxes in service (underground connection) 

* About one hundred schoolhouse and private boxes are accessible to public but are not 
counted as street boxes. 



Fire Department. 



43 



Circuits. 

Box circuits . 66 

Tapper circuits 14 

Gong circuits • 13 

Special signal circuits 3 

Telephone circuits in department system ... 53 

Telephone circuits to Beach Exchange .... 9 

Telephone circuits to Back Bay Exchange ... 1 

Telephone circuits to Police Headquarters ... 1 

Telephone circuits to A. D. T. Company office . . 1 
Telephone circuits to Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company 1 

Telephone connection to Automatic Fire Alarm Com- 
pany 

Telephone connections to Protective Department . 1 



Fire Alarm Apparatus. 

Tappers in service 

Boston tappers in adjacent cities and towns. 
Tappers connected to adjacent city and town systems 

in Boston stations 

Gongs in service 

Registers in service, excepting those in Fire Alarm 

Office ......... 

Relays in service, excepting those in Fire Alarm Office 
Telephones in department system 



157 
6 

6 
111 

30 

21 

155 



Wires, Cables and Conduits 

Line wire in service 

Aerial cable in service . . . 

Conductors in same 

Aerial cable conductors in service 

Underground cable in service 

Conductors in same 

Underground conductors in service 

Conduits owned by Fire Department 

Ducts in Fire Department conduits 

Ducts used by Fire Department in New Eng- 
land Telephone and Telegraph Company's 
system 

Ducts used by Fire Department in Postal Tele- 
graph system 

Summary of Work Done. 

Line wire used (new work) 

Line wire removed 

Aerial cable installed 

Conductors in same 



230 miles 

7 miles 

49 miles 

23 miles 

178 miles 

2,468 miles 

1,276 miles 

72,384 feet 

91,335 feet 



650,920 feet 
5,717 feet 



43,620 feet 

31,150 feet 

5,720 feet 

17,720 feet 



44 



City Document No. 11. 



Aerial cable removed from service 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed in ducts of New 
England Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany's system . . . ■ . • . 

Conductors in same .... 

Underground cable installed in Fire Depart 
ment ducts 

Conductors in same 

Total underground cable installed (new work) 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable replaced 

Conductors in same 

Conduits laid by this department 

Ducts in same 

Ducts abandoned 

Fire alarm boxes installed by this department 

Fire alarm boxes installed by Schoolhouse De 
partment 

Fire alarm boxes installed on private property 

Fire alarm boxes relocated . 

Fire alarm boxes removed from service 

Box posts set 

Box posts relocated .... 

Box posts reset or replaced by new 

Cable posts set (large size) . 

Cable posts replaced by new 

Cable posts removed from service 

Underground cable boxes on poles installed 



10,730 feet 
52,940 feet 



50,296 feet 
430,887 feet 

8,662 feet 

60,038 feet 

58,958 feet 

490,925 feet 

2,868 feet 

87,228 feet 

4,284 feet 

5,759 feet 

339 feet 

26 

5 
3 
7 
3 

29 
8 

23 
8 
6 
1 

23 



George L. Fickett, 

Superintendent. 



Fire Department. 45 



BUREAU OF SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS. 



From : The Bureau op Supplies and Repairs. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report, 1923-1924. 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Bureau of 
Supplies and Repairs for the year ending January 
31, 1924. 

During the year extensive repairs and alterations 
were made at the following places : 

Engines 6, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 24, 27, 28, 32; phemical 
7; Engine 7, new quarters; Headquarters, elevator 
installed ; Repair shop, boilers overhauled and emergency 
steam line installed; Fire Alarm shop, sprinkler system 
installed. 

Our corps of outside mechanics in addition to then- 
work done at other quarters performed all incidental 
finish on department buildings where work was done by 
contract. (Painting, building hose racks, etc.) 

Number of jobs 874 

Cost $53,497 

Some minor repairs were performed in quarters by 
members, stock being furnished by department. 



Cost of stock 

Cost of miscellaneous repairs by outside concerns . 12,713 

Gasoline tanks of 550-gallon capacity installed at 
quarters of Engines 7, 27, 32; Ladder 2, 19, 24; Chemical 
7. 

Small and defective tanks replaced by others of 550 
gallon capacity at the following quarters: Engines 14, 
22, 42, 45. 

Oil burning equipments installed at Engines 4, 5, 6, 7, 
9, 15, 22, 25, 28, 48; Ladder 4; Chemical 7; Bureau 
repair shop. 

New house heaters installed at Engines 6, 13, 20. 



46 City Document No. 11. 

Motor Activities. 
Thirty- three vehicles purchased, tested and placed 
in service: 

10 Pumping engines, American-La France. 
6 Combination chemical and hose cars, American-La France. 

2 Aerial ladder trucks, American-La France. 

6 City service ladder trucks, American-La France. 
1 Sedan, Buick. 
1 Coupe, Buick. 

3 Roadsters, Buick. 

4 Roadsters, Ford. 

Note. — Buick and Ford cars were painted depart- 
ment color before going into service. 

The following horse-drawn companies were converted 
to motor companies during the year: Engines 9, 27, 
29, 32, 34, 40; Ladders 2, 3, 9, 23, 24, 27. 

Motor vehicles painted complete by shop employees 
during the year: 

1 Sedan, 
6 Touring cars. 
20 Roadsters. 
1 Fuel wagon. 
1 Tractor steam engine. 
3 Hose cars. 

By outside concerns: 

2 Hose cars. 

2 Ladder trucks. 

1 Coupe. 

Steam engines attached to Christie tractors at Engine 
8, 42, 48 condemned. Steam engine 29 attached to 
Engine 8 tractor and placed in service at Engine 8. 

Tractors detached from Engine 42, 48 and placed in 
reserve. 

Engine 8 boiler dismantled, Engine 42, 48 sold. 

Body removed from horse-drawn hose wagon 33 and 
installed on White chassis for use as fuel wagon. 

Three Christie motors rebuilt by shop mechanics. 

Ten Christie motors rebuilt by outside concern. 

Ladder 29 rebuilt and pneumatic tires installed for 
trial. 



Fire Department. 47 

On request of the Street Commissioners 18 omnibuses 
inspected and passed on by the Supervisor of Motor 
Apparatus. 

Perpetual inspection of apparatus is maintained by 
the Engineer of Motor Apparatus, 2,871 inspections 
having been made during the year : 

2,821 calls responded to by Emergency Motor Squad. 
815 chauffeurs' licenses renewed. 

Repairs on motor vehicles by shop mechanics : 

Number of jobs . . . " 4,990 

Cost . $53,520 00 

Number of repairs by outside concerns. . . 1,071 

Cost $10,056 00 



Motorless Vehicle Activities. 

With the complete motorization of the department we 
were left with a considerable amount of horse-drawn 
apparatus on our hands. Every effort was made to 
obtain a market for the sale of this apparatus, and after 
receiving communications from several business con- 
cerns and other departments who had been communi- 
cated with stating that the apparatus was no use to 
them, it was deemed advisible to dispose of it at public 
auction. 

This apparatus was taken to the yard of the veter- 
inary hospital where a public auction was held for its 
disposal by the City Auctioneer. 

For our own needs we retained all the hose wagons, 
six engines and two ladder trucks. 

All the horse-drawn coal wagons being of no further 
use to our department were disposed of at private sales. 

The following was turned over to the Institutions 
Department: Two horse-drawn chemical engines, 
one horse-drawn ladder truck with ladders, one small 
pung. 

Eleven hose wagons and one ladder truck converted 
to pungs. 

Repairs by shop mechanics 177 

Cost $1,385 00 

By outside concerns 11 

Cost $2,310 00 



48 City Document No. 11. 

Marine Service. 
3 fireboats In service. 

House for radio equipment built on deck of Engine 31. 

Permission having been obtained from the Govern- 
ment to name our fireboats in commemoration of members 
of the department who made the supreme sacrifice 
during the world war, signs bearing the names of these 
men were made and installed. 

Repairs by outside concerns 15 

Cost •. . . . $6,351 00 

High Pressure. 

Steam supply pipe at Station No. 1 reduced from 6 
inch to 5 inch. 

Piezometer gauges furnished to Engines 1, 15, 37, 
40, 41, 42. 

All companies furnished with high pressure hydrant 
wrenches. 

Chauffeur School. 

During the year our chauffeur school was uninter- 
ruptedly maintained in order to properly instruct 
members attached to horse-drawn companies prior to 
motorization. 

To assist in this work one man was detailed from the 
Fire Fighting Force to instruct the members in the care 
and operation of Christie tractors. 

One hundred and sixty-four men were examined and 
certified as chauffeurs. 

Motor Pump School. 

Our Motor Pump School was in operation from May 
to October, during which time 13 classes, comprising six 
to seven men, received instructions. 

Eighty-three men qualified for certification as pump 
operators. 

Two members of the Lynn Fire Department received 
instructions at this school. 

Miscellaneous. 
All deck guns on apparatus equipped with shut-off 
valves. 



Fire Department. 



49 



Seven hydrant shower baths made and distributed. 
(One sent to Rainsford Island.) 

Thawing devices installed on Engines 2, 6, 7, 9, 10, 
17, 22, 23, 27, 29, 32, 34, 35, 37, 40, 43, 48, 50. 

Material for testing outside connection for sprinkler 
systems in buildings made up and distributed to the 
several district headquarters. (This material consisted 
of short lengths of 2^-inch hose with male couplings 
attached to one end.) 

Motor Vehicles, Apparatus, etc., in Service and 

Reserve. 



ENGINES. 



Make. 


Kind. 


In 

Service. 


In 
Reserve. 


American-LaFrance 

S^agrave 


Pumpers 

Pumpers 

Steam engines 

Steam engines 


36 
3 

10 
1 


5 
5 




1 






HOSE CARS. 


American-LaFrance 

Seagrave 

Velie 


Combinations 

Combinations 

Hose car 


26 

11 

1 

1 


3 

2 


Mack 




LADDER TRUCKS. 




Aerial 

Aerial 

City service 

City service 


9 
1 
2 
6 
12 






3 


Christie tractor 


3 


WATER TOWERS. 






3 


1 








CHIEF 


OFFICERS' CARS. 








Sedan 

Coupe.. 

Touring cars 


1 

1 

8 

20 




Buick 

Buick 


1 

6 







50 



City Document No. 11. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



Make. 



Kind. 



In 

Service. 



In 

Reserve. 



American-LaFrance 

Pierce Arrow 

Christie 

Mack 

Mack 

Mack 

White 

White 

Ford 

Ford 

Ford 

Knox. 



School car 

Rescue Company 

Tractors 

Cable car 

Fuel car 

Wrecking car 

Commercial trucks.. . . 

Fuel car 

Runabouts 

Emergency cars 

Truck (Wire Division) . 
Hose car 



1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

4 

4 

1 

Unser- 
viceable. 



Hose. 



Purchased. 

Leading cotton hose . 
Chemical hose . 
1-inch rubber deck hose 


Feet. 
13,000 
500 
100 


Total . . . . 


13,600 



Condemned. 






Feet. 


Leading cotton hose . 


13,150 


Leading rubber hose . 


400 


Chemical hose . 


450 


4- inch rubber suction hose, 


210 


3-inch flexible suction hose, 


200 


3|-inch deluge hose . 


87* 



Total 



14,497* 



Amount of hose in 

In Use. 



Leading cotton hose . 


137,066 


Leading rubber hose 


200 


Chemical hose . 


17,300 


1-inch rubber deck hose . 


900 


3-inch flexible suction hose, 


800 


4-inch rubber suction hose, 


1,232 


Deluge hose 


662 


Total .... 


158,160 



use and in stock February 1, 1924. 

In Stock. 

Feet. 

Leading cotton hose . . 5,850 

Chemical hose . . . 1,400 

Deluge hose . . . 12* 

4-inch rubber suction hose, 294 

25-inch rubber suction hose, 40 



Total 



7,596* 



Amount of hose repaired during the year. 



1-inch rubber hose 
2*-inch rubber hose 
2*-inch cotton hose 
3-inch cotton hose 
3*-inch cotton hose 
f-inch chemical hose 



Feet. 

100 

100 

18,300 

4,650 

50 

1,600 



Total 



24,800 



Fire Department. 



51 



CLOTHING. 



Kind. 


Received 

and 

Distributed. 


Repaired. 


Reissued. 


Trousers 


1,103 

583 
122 

32 
304 
727 

50 


339 
138 
69 


10 
31 


Overcoats 


11 




132 


11 


Caps 

Fire hats 




278 









One thousand one hundred and thirty-eight over- 
coats and twenty-four reefers cleansed, pressed and 
placed in storage during the summer. 



52 



City Document No. 11, 



GASOLENE STATIONS. 
Division No. 1. 



Districts. 



Location. 



Capacity 
(Gallons). 



Pump. 



1 

1 
1 
1, 
2 
2, 
2. 
2. 
2 
3. 
3. 
3. 
4. 
4 
4. 
4. 
4. 
5. 
5, 
5 
5, 
5 



Engine 5. 
Engine 11. 
Ladder 2 . 
Chemical 7 
Engine 27 . 
Engine 32 . 
Engine 36 . 
Engine 50. 
Ladder 9 . 
Ladder 8 . 
Ladder 18. 
Engine 39 . 
Engine 4 . 
Engine 6 . 
Engine 8. 
Ladder 1 . 
Ladder 24 . 
Engine 7 . 
Engine 10. 
Engine 26 . 
Ladder 17. 
Rescue 1 . . 



280 
110 
550 
550 
550 
550 
280 
280 
220 
120 
280 
280 
280 
280 
280 
280 
550 
550 
220 
280 
280 
550 



1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 quart. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 quart. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 



Fire Department. 



53 



Division 2. 



Districts. 



Location. 



Capacity 
(Gallons). 


Pump. 


280 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon 


28C 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


120 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 



6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

7 

7 

7, 

7. 

7, 

8 

8, 

8, 

8, 

11 

11. 

11 

11 



Engine 1 

Engine 2 

Engine 15 

Engine 43 

Ladder 19 

Engine 3 

Engine 22 

Engine 33 

Bristol street, repair shop 
Wareham street garage . . . 

Engine 13 

Engine 14 

Engine 37 

Ladder 12 

Engine 29 

Engine 34 

Engine 41 

Engine 51 



54 



City Document No. 11. 



Division 3. 



Districts. 



Location. 



Capacity 
(Gallons). 



Pump. 



9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

10. 

10 

10. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

13. 

13. 

13. 

14. 

14. 

14. 

15. 

15. 

15. 



Engine 12 
Engine 21 
Engine 23 
Engine 24 
Ladder 4 
Engine 17 
Engine 18 
Engine 52 
Engine 28 
Engine 42 
Ladder 23 
Engine 30 
Engine 45 
Engine 53 
Engine 20 , 
Engine 46. 
Ladder 6 
Engine 19. 
Engine 48. 
Engine 49 . 



550 
280 
280 
550 
120 
280 
280 
280 
280 
550 
220 
280 
550 
120 
280 
220 
280 
280 
280 
280 



1 gallon 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 quart. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 quart. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 
1 gallon. 



Provisions have been made for the installation of 
gasolene tanks of large capacity at the new quarters now 
under construction for Engine Companies 31 and 40. 



Fire Department. 



55 



CANNEL COAL STATIONS. 
Division 1. 



District 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Tons.) 



1. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

6 
6 

7 

8 

8 

8 

11 

11 

11 

11 

9 

9. 

9. 

9. 
10. 
12 
13. 
13 
14. 
14 
15. 
15. 



Engine 11 

Chemical 7 

Ladder 9 

Ladder 18 

Ladder 24 

Rescue 1 

Division 2 

Engine 2 

Fourth street 

Engine 33 

Engine 13 

Engine 14 

Engine 37 

Engine 29 

Engine 34 

Engine 41 

Engine 51 

Division 3, 

Engine 12 

Engine 21 

Engine 23 

Engine 24 

Engine 18 

Engine 28 ...... . 

Engine 30 

Engine 45 

Engine 16 

Engine 20 

Engine 19 

Engine 48 



12 
20 
35 
10 
16 
35 



20 
40 
25 
40 
10 
20 
7 
7 
10 
10 



5 
6 
5 
7 
5 

20 
9 
9 
5 
7 
8 

10 



56 



City Document No. 11. 



(•spunoj) 
•*q3ra,W. 



1C 


to 


H 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


11 


o 


co 


o 


o 


^ 


CO 


CO 


■* 


rt 


J* 


2 


CO 


rt 









•a^ojig 



O CO 00 X O CO O 00 O CO O CO 



•dum<j 
jo ja^aniBiQ 



■japmi^O 
jo ja^aniBiQ 



IO . l£3 i^ t^ »0 *0 »C t~ 10 O O »C 



02 

(-1 
O 



O i-i rt rt 



i-i CM i-l 



O Gi Oi O 



J of J? D, 



a S 



;=5 © a 



oJ rv 

■S s 

"-i — 

eft 

< 



= H -S H 
> 3 .S " .2 



O <J 



fa 

OS 

i . 

£ 3 

S a 
<! 



■Sa 

g ft 
< 



Fire Department. 



57 



o 

.'C 


o 


o 


o 

CO 


o 

CO 


O 

CO 


3 
C 


O 

CO 


o 

CO 


O 

CO 


o 
o 


o 

CO 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 


o 
?o 


o 

CO 


o 

CO 




c 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


o 


•n 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


O 


o 


o 


o 






-"»* 








CO 




CN 




" 


^ 


CD 




"" 














-a 


TJ 






Tj 


13 


T3 












73 


13 


T3 


c 






(3 


S 


c 


c 


a 


C. 


S3 




cj 











a 


fl 




r 












c 


O 


C 




c 












o 










































fa 




a 


a 


a 


a. 




a 


1* 




fa 


fa 


£ 


0J 


d 


<u 


00 


oq 


CO 


ou 


7. 


WJ 


K 


CO 


ou 




co 






CO 


CO 


ou 


co 




































so 


CO 


oo 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


cc 


oo 


CO 


cc 


cc 


oo 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






m 












- 








m 






































H. * - 


m 


10 


oo 


m 


IQ 


i- 




m 




w 


m 


■n 






























r~ 










CO 




























O 










CM 




























05 










OS 


































































>. 










>> 


















































































































a 




























c 










6 







































o 




























O 










O 






















































c 






















o 




























is 










C 
















ex 






















o3 
















* 












fa 










fa 






































03 




























c 










h! 
















a 






















C 






















































ft 












03 

a 

V 










cp 

g 
















i- 






















■< 













CN i-c O ■* l-H CO I-H 
CN CM CN O CN CN CN 

05 0^05 05 05 05 



C5 00 05 05 



05 05 C5 05 



CN CN CN CN 



< P 



rH r-1 CN 



p o -< o 



£ § 



S P P 



< CO O 



e s 






M bO 60 



5 s 



° ° s 



ca ^ 



T 03 o3 c3 03 

bt bC bO bO 



m in m m 



fa fc 1% "S 



3 h3 S * fa j 



-< < o 



2* • 
II 

XII 



03 


fa 


fa 


p^ 




03 


03 




*+ 


fa 


fa 


fa 


be 


CI 


C . 


c 






03 Q, 




M 




.a g 




o 


05 






6 


6 


s^ 


1 


< 


-D 


< 


-5j 



pLi fe fe fe 

oJ o3 c3 08 

fa h) tJ fa- 



go* 



s g 
< < 



CN CN CM 



58 



City Document No. 11. 





(•gpnnOcD 


oS 


c 
c 




o 
1 


c 
c 


o 
c<5 

o 


o 


c 
c 

c 


o 




o 
o 
co_ 


c 

K 

C 


c 
c 
c 




O 

o 
o 




■^qSiaAi 




o 






^ 






co 




oo" 




•*»" 






CO" 








C 


































ft.2 


•z 






t 


-c 






■c 


OS 






~ 


*c 


-d 




g> 


£ 


d 


c 






c 


e 






c 








c 


c 


B 




N 


2 U> 
Co 


o 


M 


o 


M 


c 


s 




M 


c 


c 


O 




02 




E 


c 


o 



fa 


o 




E 


c 


a 


0} 






~° 


02 




02 02 




a 


1 






a 


a; 


CO 








co 


















3 
Q 


















































•a^oj^g 


s 


cc 




00 


CC 


CO 


00 


cr 


00 




oo 


CC 


CC 


00 




•dumj 


o 














^n 




M 




IO 






»» 




jo aa^auiBtQ 








<ii 








>o 




»o 
















t>» 


-« 






-** ** 




H« 








■*• 


-«n -*. <*o 




•japnti^o 




!/■ 




CO 


ii- 


ir 




00 


ii- 


03 




oo 


>c 


u: 


r- 




jo jajamtitQ 


































































«5 






















































CS 


























OS 




o 












Q 










































































>1 












































a 










~6 


































d 










0> 


































P. 










TJ 


































g- 










=3 


>> 
































o 












Xt 


























o 

CO 




u 










O 

O 
1 


'3 


























=8 

CB 




•a 










(A 
































03 










« 




























fa 




a 










c 
'So 




























ffl 




CD 

s 










c 




























fa 




<5 










u 










































































•* 




o 


■fa C3 


co 


C 


t- o 


cc 


t> 


t^ 


cc 




o m 










c 


<N O 


CN 


CN 


i-i o 


c 


O 




o 


C-J 


ca 


(N CO 






o: 




a 


33 C3 


cr 


C 


C3 33 


35 


00 


03 C 


ct 


c 


03 00 




.s| 






CC 


rH - 


■~ 


c 


co 


« 




c 




tK 


CO 


r>^ 




*»"> 
























01 


CN 






» fe 




































1X1 CO 






*. 


£ -° 


b 


c 


bi > 

B o 

< z 


> 




03 = 


> 


B 


ft 










O 


P. CD 
<J fa 


3 


p 


- 


3 

1-3 


? 


fa 


2 


c3 
l-S 


CD 

CO 










p 






p 


C 






P 








P 


6 




B 






S 




s 






B 


£ 






£ 


u 






s 


£ 








o 




3 






3 


3 






5 


O 






3 


3 




03 






U 




& 






& 


P 






& 


^ 




OQ 


P 


P 




ft 

a 






hi 




a 




>> 


B 







>- 


C 






^J 


C 


C 










o 




b 


o 


c 




a 


C 






h 


o 


O 




o 






P 




~ 




03 








03 








O 








O 






'C 




c3 




P. 


"5 


"5 




p. 


C3 






£ 


o! 


c3 










P 




hi 




£ 


hi 


hi 




S 


hi 


> 




hi 


hi 














6 




o 


C 


6 




o 


O 


o 

s 

o 




o 


6 


6 








>> 

x> 


"2 




o 






i.O 


i-0 




O 


■o 
t> 




i-O 


lO 

a) 




o 






B 










o 


c 






o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




aJ 




'5 


cc 






(. 


o 


s 


03 


u 


o 


c3 


o • 


u- 


§ 


B 

cS 


S 1 




pq 




t- 


C 


Ph 


V-. 


(-1 


c 


fa 


[^ 


o 


c 


o 


h 




9 2 




V 

^ 




CC 


c. 


1 


fa 

03 

fa 


"3 

fa 


c 


1 


fa 


"3 





fa 

u 


fa 

03 
fa 


fa 
03 
fa 








5 




d 


£ 


.0 


B 


a 


r- 


.o 


C 


c- 


02 


H 


a 


^ 9 








03 






cC 


o 





5 
q 


CC 


$ P. 


a. 


a> 


it 


cc 


C 0D 






E 


>1 

B 
03 


c 




c 
(1) 


a 


CD 


+ 




^3fa 




^5 

c 


<u 


OJ 


.S § 








a 


E 




£ 


a 


JC 


a 


s 


Ojw 


X 


03 


£ 


£ 


-C S 






d 




<; 


C 


£ 


< 


< 


C 


< 


S 


C 


% 


< 


< 


p ^ 




































' * ' 




K 




































B 




































n 




































s 




































& 




































* 










co 


■* 


<o 




CO 


t* 


oo 




OS 


o 




CN 


i 


CO 




CO 




CO 




CO 


CO 




co 




co 


CO 






co 


■w 


^ji 




^ji 





Fire Department. 



59 



H rtO H H nO rt N -I 



ft-3 



II 



.-I (O to 



-H U5 <£> 




CM <M •-< 



o «j 



a I 



J; o. ^; J= 



to ^ —i -s 



*g 



fe 


la 


^ 


«1 


03 


03 


l-J 


(-) 


i-i v° 










C 


C iO 


a . 




cS 


c8t~- 




03 l> 










M 


"S§ 


"E a 


a 


s-y 


a» 


s~ 


■5 


■5 


<! 


o 



60 



City Document No. 11. 



<hj 



&3 









c 




o 


o 


o 


o 




c 


c 


C 


c 


o o 


(spunoj-) 


o 


K 


05 


00 

CO 


CN 


o> 


G 
CN 


c 

CN 


c 


c 


CO t^ 

O h 


"jq^PiVl 


<N 


01 


IN 


IN 


T* 


CO 












00 


























ce 


oi 


"= 


•O 


c 


-3 


a 


^ 


— 

C 


"2 T3 -u -d S 

5 " • -i " 




3 


5 


o 


3 










o o o x 






05 














t 


05 05 05 


GC 


<u 




05 












05 05 05 




02 


cc 


CB 


-Jl 








7L 


31 K » il 


























j 


























3 


























O 


























a 


•3:550.113 


X 


X 


00 


X 


X 


X 












X 


•duinj 


■V 


5 


- 


5? 


IT* 


L _ 












S? 


jo aajauiBiQ 


















































•japuil^O 


t>- 


r- 


1^ 


t- 


X 


X 


>o 


»C 


ir. 


1T 


IS 


OS 


jo aajauiBiQ 




































■* 


t— 


CO 






























o 


c 






















a 










05 


05 


05 




















Q 












































>; 


>> 


2- 






























cd 


a 


o 






























P. 
g 


03 

p. 


£ 






























O 


S 


eg 






























O 


O 
































a 


O 
































> 


t4 


o 




















iS 










o 

e 

o 
o 


o 


o 

05 




















'3 










Oh 


o 

hH 




















« 










o 

1-1 

S3 
S3 

CU 

s 


"3 

13 
O 

-§ 

a 

u 


05 

eg 
J3 
o 
£3 
03 






























13 


S 
















































IOCS 


IOC5 


10 t*- 


CO CM. 


CO 


t^OS 


■* 


■* 


CO 


C^ 


CO 


t^. 




rtO 


HO 


I-cco 


rtOO 


o 


i-i o 






(N 


C- 


C) 


s 




05 35 


05 05 


O5 00 


05t^ 


05 


C5 05 


5 


5 


O 





a 


X 




























as 


























■si 

a, a> 


CM 


CN 


o" 

CM . 

d > 
V O 

55 


d 

03 
•-5 


>-3 


co" 

ti > 
3 O 

<z 


en 


1 


CO 

t bi 
5 
< 


CO 

BI 
3 
< 


cc 
I c 

< 






„ 


^_ 


, 


, 


, 


„ 


, 


, 


£ 


c 


^ c 


1 **H 




03 

13 


03 

c 


3 
C 


3 


o 


03 

c 


C 


C 


e 


£ 


E 


"3 




O 


o 


c! 


s 


o 


O 








3 


3 


•S 




03 


o! 


s 


s 


►H 


d 




c 
c 


. C 
i3 


1, C 
C 


^ 00 




a 


q 


at 


bo 


a 


a 


c 


c 


c 


_C 


O 


h 




u 


h 


03 


03 


c« 


u 

05 
C 












O 




a 


13 


a) 


05 


C5 


4. 

"5 





1 

6 


"o 
t 


c 


. (*= 








O 


o 


05 




k c 


C 


c 


CI) 








£2 


11 


s 


fc4 O 


a 


a 


a 


o 




0, 


■ 1 




>> 


>! 


03 


03 




o >, 


u 




05 


c 


c 




h c 


u B 


P. 


a 




o C 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


O 


3 
« 


o cs 

o! 5 


O 03 
■^ P« 

<s E 


O o 

-go 


O o 

go 


S3 

U hi 

03 O 


2 0, 


cS 

o; 


03 
«- 

S3 




(- 

(5- 

03 


03 

t- 

8! 


03 
03 


05 
O 




HcS 


£6 


H.S 


2 2 


0) 


o 
O 


a 




►J 










0)g 


q> U 


.2 3 


■-S5 


.2.i 


05 fe 







■ c 


03 


03 


0>'a3 

s p, 




.2 o 

J3 


.2 o 


'5-5 


,53 *" 


£ o 

E S 

J3 c 


si 

tip-. 


1- 

£ 


- £ 


2 * 

s £ 


a. 

£ 


£ 


2 ° 

03 P. 




O 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


< 


< 


>< 


< 


< 


s 


K 


























m 


H 


H 


H 


H 


£h 


H 


Ph 


0h 


Ph 


0h 


Oh 




S 
P 


i 


l 


i 

CO 


05 


CO 


O! 


o 


Jit 


o 


IM 


CO 


lO 


o 




o 




o 


o 








a 


O 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 








Fire Department. 



61 



o oi 



CO rH o 



N M rH -^ 



i*. ti 1-1 t- © 

,H i-l ■-< .-I (N 



-U <5 < < 



o g 



to (N 00 



CO CO OJ. CO CI CO CO 



0D 

M 
o 

H 
« 

Q 
Q 





<M 


CO 


>o 


00 


n. 


fr» 


t^ 


U5 


co 


,_, 


m 


CO 


o 




C! 












IN 


IN 












o 


IN 








-N 
















O) 


OS 


OS 


00 


OS 




Cs 


oa 


O! 


o 


a> 


o> 


05 


c 


03 


05 


c. 


oa 


OS 



co oo >-i 



O 6 CO 02 



<J <! O 



O O Q £ O 



Eh 

OS 

►J. 

co a\ 

OS o 03 o 






Eh Eh 



.A H 



,A S "> "5 
fj OO 00 00 



Eh h H H H Eh H 



h S £ fe S £ h 

03 03 03 CO 03 o3 03 
_1 _; J _3 _J _] ^ 



.2 Ch 



02 O O 



c 


c 


© 


C o 


C 


a 


c 


a 


a 


s 


c 






o! 


03 O 


03 


a 


d 


oj 


03 


est 




















































^ 


























01 










B 


c 


c 


B^ 


s 


6 


S 


B 


B 


B 


s 


< 


< 


02 


< 


< 


< 


<i 


<! 


< 


<J 


<! 



62 



City Document No. 11. 



00 .-< 1-1 



m .-H r-l ■-( r-l 



£(2 



» O .-H 



W « N H 



<N ^H TH 



IN <N i-h >-H 

OS O Ol C3 



•< o 



55 § 



O £ O 



Q do O ffi 



h " _o 



H H 



o 3 o 13 



H H Eh Eh 



Ph 


.Jj 




Ph 


+3 





Ph 


Ph 


£ 


o 


.Jj 


33 


Ph 


Ph 


Ph 


Ph 


o3 




Ph 


03 




K 


03 


03 




r^ 




Ph 


S3 


Si 


03 


0J 


1-1 






(-1 


M 




1-1 


h-l 












1-1 


l-l 


fh 1 


c 


H 


£ 


CI 


H 


H 


p< 


fl 


H 


H 


H 


fc 


13 


C 


a 


e 


03 






St 






03 


01 




OQ 






81 


ol 


03 


03 
































































































HI 

s 




to 

— 


s 


-S 


C3 
-5 


0> 

s 


a 


,4 


03 

h3 


t-. 




6 


s 


i 


<1> 




< 


U 


U 


«! 


u 


u 


<J 


< 


U 


o 


U 


U 


<! 


< 


-3 


«< 



rH —I <N 



(N IN CO 



Fire Department. 



63 



■"1 



H h" H 



"•g 



o o o E o W o 



64 



City Document No. 11. 



H 

o 

.J 



H 

O 





5 


■gc 






M 








3 co 






o * 




£ 


ft,® 




>> 








Ct 




03 


"c 




CO 

u 


to 






c 








G> 




CO 


> 




^ 








*** 




03 


T3 




a 


(H 




a 


O 




« 


O 

6 
s" 

_o 

03 

C 

IS 
a 
o 
O 






t- 




6 






CJ 


Oi 




■> 


1-1 




0) 


Ui 




02 






B 












3 


.£) 




Ph 


£ 




>> 








XI 
































p 








pq 


>> 
c 

ea 
a 

S 

o 
U 
o 
> 

03 

64 

03 

m 




PS 








H 








pq 








a 








p 








Z 


t>i 







o 






3 




OQ 






R 






<! 


TJ 




tf 


TJ 




<! 


c3 




Ph 






P-. 


,_^ 


XJ1 


o 


t— i 




£ 


0) 


o 


t 


O 


< 


H 


fi 


. 


Ph 


1 


a 


H 


W 


o 


R 


yj 


bC 


<j 


Uh 
O 


c3 
0) 


% 


w 






CO 




W 


O 




W 


X) 




<J 






Ph 


03 

d 

O 

(13 

g 

'3b 
d 

B 

a> 
-*^ 

>< 

m 





£c± 



O 00 CT> 00 



O g Z P 



to § a> 
•S o ■- 
Eh ~ Eh 



S ,=3 

<! W 



Fire Department. 



65 





moo 




























bH 


































B 






a >> 






























oi 

B 




.0.0 






























d 


+=■* 




























a 


IB 


o 


0' H 


































o .. 






























o3 


02 


""OS 




















oi 








03 


a 


CD 

.s 


4^1 




















IS 








j> 


3 










73 














u 












S3 


2 






CD 
.P 




<D 










o3 

E 








3 


T3 
C 


S 


<S<N 


oi 


oi 


O 

O 

5 




ft 
03 
















CD 


M 


B 

c3 


"~ 73 


"ol 














Ih 
O 






3 




ft 

Eh 

C3 
.3 
02 


CD 
> 
"3 


.3 


.g-ico 

-Co 

goo fl 

°CM 03 


ft 


o 

o 

- 


a? 

e 

ft 

CO 




— 
CO 




-5 


03 


03 


g 

73 

B 
03 


Eh 
CO 

d 

^3 


oi 

d 

o 


"oi 

CO 

3 


=3 
CD 


d 
> 
73 


CD 


>> 

a 

o 


>> 

to 


CM 
>i 

,P 
CO 






"3 [y 
-5 'G 

tH 3 


"S 


"3 

Eh 


d 

03 
.P 


'C 
o 

^5 


3 

^5 


B 
bib 


o 

CD 

s 

3 


11 


s 

"8 

a 




~ 






CM 




























1 t-) 






~ 


5 




h 






















a o 












p 






















<D -4-. 






H^3 






O • 




















£ 

o 
o 


g™ § 

CD >, 3 

m-P ft 

co cd 




u 
o 

o 

a 

u 


£ 03 
co CD 

CD E-, 

mo 


n 


03 


£3 

.Pi-Hi 

CD o 

J5h 




















0) 

a 
'5b 


.s 


bb 

B 

-J3 


o 

ft 


cS 


d 

CD 


"o3 


d !-, 

O CD 




















B 


2 £ 


CD 




o 




C 


u'E 




















H 


"^ 





S 


> 


§ 


o3 3 
* ft 

K'o 






















rB CD O 
. "O .S « 

in bo js{ 


o 

■d 




03 D 

d D 
^5 


1 
03 






















i— i i— t 




rH 


CM 






rt 




















P. 
o 


J, a5 -f 
to a a 




.J, o 

P.O 

ft-d 


























o B 2> 
m cd en 




03 


ho 


























02 

OJ 


-2c 1 g 
St? > 




13 
B 

03 


3 


























M 

03 


U a "G 

o o3 73 




"3 


fccri 


























K 


■1 * J? 




o 


O g 


























73 

d 


>>T3 "g 


CD 

3 


3 


























os 

o 

M 


3§ | 


o 
o3 

a 


o 

Eh 

cd 

£ 


to hC 

^ a 

03 03 




























f-< tn 


































o j 5 


































.p S3 3 


































„* ft 
































S 
o 
o 


is ~ 

c3>0 ,Q 
































a) 
'3 
































ON „ 
































m 


■ rH CD 

CD " » 

o S pq 
































a 


































o 


































h3 


































02 


































js 


■ 






^ 






i^ 






s= 


















Eh' 
















c3 






















^ 


























1 
'a 

OS 

3 


3 

-C 

EC '-* 


S3 


u 

o 
3 


d 
o 




03 
09 

»d 

03 


CD 
CD -S 

"o S3 

u -o 

.§ 3 


o 

3 
eg 


a> 

is 

o 
3 


Eg 

Eh 

CD 
















° ft 


03 
60 


a 

Eh 


C 

3 

a 




O 


3 

^3 


s 


O 
ft 




















































^2 
O 



o 

c3 



o3 
ft 
O) 

Sh 

CD 

-+^ 

E^H 

o 

C4-H 



O 

o 
o 

m 



66 City Document No. 11. 

Conclusion. 

On account of repairs at several of our fire stations 
it was necessary to remove the supply of cannel coal 
from same thereby eliminating the use of these quarters 
as coal depots. 

A sufficient amount of this coal -has been retained in 
each district for supplying steam engines in case of 
emergency. 

The coal shed at the quarters of Engine 36 having 
become dilapidated, I would recommend that it be torn 
down. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William H. McCorkle, 

District Chief. 



Fire Department. 67 



REPORT OF MEDICAL EXAMINER. 



Boston, January 31, 1924. 
From: The Medical Examiner. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I respectfully submit the following report for the year 
ending January 31, 1924: 

Number of cases of illness on file . . . . . 399 

Number of cases of injury on file 1,673 

Number of injured (but remained on duty) on file . 1,273 

Examinations. 

Inspections and examinations at headquarters re- 
corded 1,815 

For appointment as provisional firemen (civil service), 262 

For appointment to Fire Alarm Branch . . . . 4 

For appointment of men on probation .... 50 

At engine houses of firemen, pulmotors, medicine 
chests, and visits at homes of firemen either sick or 
injured and at hospitals 1,040 

The general health of the firemen during the past 
year has been excellent and the books show a decrease 
of 170 men on sick leave from the previous year. The 
above fact is worthy of interest and gratifying as the 
great decrease in illness was obtained, notwithstanding 
a notable increase in the fire-fighting force; on the other 
hand, the number injured shows an increase of 339 
over and above the number recorded as of the previous 
year, due in a measure to a greater number of fires 
experienced, consuming material dangerous to health 
and difficult to handle and endure. 

The officers and men deserve credit for the prompt 
and eager spirit displayed in rendering "first aid" at 
all times when summoned. It is also praiseworthy to 
note and shows a keen regard for faithful service, that 
out of 1,673 cases of injury on file 1,273 men remained on 
duty and had their injuries treated in quarters. 



68 City Document No. 11. 



Deaths. 

Dennis J. Burnett (Fire Alarm Branch), February 10, 1923, 
cerebro-spinal meningitis. 

James J. Caine (District Chief No. 6), March 16, 1923, 
chronic interstitial myocarditis. 

Timothy F. Holland (Wire Division), June 23, 1923, heart 
disease and pneumonia. 

J. Paul Haynes (Wire Division), June 4, 1923, pneumonia. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William J. McNally, M. D., 

Medical Examiner. 



Fire Department. 69 



REPORT OF WIRE DIVISION. 



Boston, January 31, 1924. 

From: Superintendent, Wire Division. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I herewith submit annual report of the Wire Division 
of the Fire Department for the year 1923-24. 

The underground district for 1923-24 was prescribed 
and advertised in accordance with the law. 

During the year there were fifty fires and three acci- 
dents (one fatal) due to electrical causes. The total 
of fire losses in so far as could be determined was 
$17,906.34. Thorough investigations of the above fires 
and accidents were made by members of this Division, 
and complete reports made of the same. 

Rigid inspections have been made of old and new 
electrical construction during the year. 

The total income was $69,786.80. 



70 City Document No. 11. 

EXTERIOR DIVISION. 



The underground district for the year 1923 as pre- 
scribed under authority of chapter 196 of the Acts of 
1921, comprised the following streets: 

Brighton. 
Washington street, from Cambridge street to Commonwealth 
avenue. 

Charlestown. 

Alford street, from Main street to the drawbridge. 
Medford street, from Chelsea street to Cook street. 

Dorchester. 
Alban street, from Welles avenue to Ashmont street. 
Talbot avenue, from Washington street to Bernard street. 
Quincy street, from Columbia road to Blue Hill avenue. 
Adams street, from King square to Minot street. 
Washington street, from Ashmont street a distance of 1,970 
feet, to a point within 530 feet of Codman street. 

South Boston. 
Macallen street, from Dorchester avenue to Foundry street. 

Making a total distance of 4 miles as provided by law. 

In these prescribed streets, from which poles and 
overhead wires were to be removed, there were standing 
on February 1, 1923, a total of two hundred and sixteen 
(216) poles (not including the trolley poles of the Boston 
Elevated Railway which are exempt) owned by the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company, New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company, Charlestown Gas 
and Electric Company, and Postal Telegraph Cable 
Company, supporting a total of one million seven 
hundred fifty-four thousand (1,754,000) feet of over- 
head wires, or a little more than three hundred and 
thirty-two (332) miles owned by the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company, New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company, Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany, Postal Telegraph Cable Company, Charlestown 
Gas and Electric Company, Boston Fire Department 
(Fire Alarm Branch), and Boston Police Department 
(Police Signal Service). 



Fiee Department. 71 

In the selection of new pole locations our engineers 
have accompanied the engineers of the various companies 
for the purpose of passing on such locations. All carry- 
ing poles standing in the streets are stencilled by this 
department for purposes of identification and are plotted 
in atlases on file in our office. All carrying poles stand- 
ing in the streets are inspected and tested yearly by 
the inspectors of this division and at the same time a 
general inspection is made of all overhead construction. 
This work is in addition to the regular inspection work 
necessary on account of new construction. Poles found 
to be leaning or in process of decay are reported to the 
companies owning same and where conditions warrant 
it, poles are condemned. During the past year the 
inspectors of this division reported one hundred and 
twenty-eight (128) poles decayed at base and twenty- 
nine (29) poles leaning or a total of one hundred and 
fifty-seven (157) poles which were replaced by new 
poles or reset by the various companies at the request 
of this department. Seven (7) abandoned poles were 
also reported by our inspectors and were removed by 
the various companies at our request. 

The following table shows the overhead work for the 
year from February 1, 1923, to January 31, 1924, 
inclusive : 



Number of new poles set in new locations . 
Number of poles replaced, reset or straightened 
Number of poles removed 



527 
648 
133 



Number of poles now standing in the public streets, 16,266 

Number of defects reported 3,263 

Number of defects corrected 3,058 

(Other defects in process of correction.) 

Number of notices of overhead construction . 25,714 

Number of overhead inspections .... 40,526 

Number of overhead reports . . . . 26,825 
Amount of overhead wires removed by owners (in 

feet) "... 1,645,692 

Underground Construction. 

The ducts used this year for the underground conduits 
of the dra wing-in system are of the following type : 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete). 

3. Iron. 

4. Wood. 



72 



City Document No. 11. 



In side or residential streets a considerable amount 
of special underground construction for electric light 
and power purposes, of a type known as the " Split 
Fiber Solid System," has been installed during the year. 

The electrical approval for underground electric 
construction numbered four thousand seven hundred 
and five (4,705). 

Number of inspections of underground electrical 
construction, nine thousand five hundred eighty-two 
(9,582). 

Number of reports of underground electrical con- 
struction, four thousand four hundred thirty-four (4,434). 



Character of Cable Used by the Various Companies. 



Company. 


Kind of Insulation. 


Size. 


Boston Elevated Railway Company, 


Rubber 


500,000 and 1,000,000 C. M. 


Charlestown Gas and Electric Com- 
pany. 


Varnished cambric, 
paper and rubber. 


Nos. 6, 4, 2, 1-0, 2-0, 4-0. 


Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 


Rubber and paper . . . 


Nos. S to 1,000,000 C. M. 


pany. 






Fire Alarm Branch (B. F. D.) 




4, 6, 10, 15 conductor. 


New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 


Paper, silk and cotton, 


2 to 1212 pair. 












2 to 30 conductor. 








Boston) 










11 to 100 pair. 









Fire Department. 

Table Showing Underground Work for the Year 1923. 



73 



Company. 







o 


o 


f-i 


— 


— 


a 

03 






3 


<; 


£ 





3m 



Boston Elevated Railway Company, 


8,500 


64,290 


15,519 


18 




Boston Low Tension Wire Associa- 




283 






4 


tion. 










CharlestownGas and Electric" Com- 
pany. 


9,643 


53,516 


90,736 


27 


34 


Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany. 


179,712 


364,812 


1,189,964 


264 


2,419 


Fire Alarm Branch (B. F. D.) 




1,449 


55,200 




29 


New England Telephone~and Tele- 
graph Company. 


59,847 


479,030 


346,777 


147 


138 


Park Department (City of Boston) . . . 


119 


228 






1 


Police Signal Service (B. F. D.) 




16o 


7,500 




1 






175 


1 650 




2 


Schoolhouse Commission _ (City of 
Boston). 


345 


960 


3,420 




5 


Western Union Telegraph Company . 


5,410 


26,310 


13,500 


6 


15 


Totals 


263,576 


991,213 


1,724,266 


462 


2,648 







Note. — "Split Fiber Solid Main System" of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
is included in the above figures comprising 52,035 feet of conduit and 99,787 feet of duct. 
The main and feeder tube or armored cable of the "old solid system" of the same company 
are not included. Work on the "old solid system" comprised 133 service connections 
and 4,691 feet of No. 100 three-conductor armored cable. 



Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power 

January 31, 1924. 



Company. 


u 

a) 

0.05 

tf go 

— feW 

ffl O^H 

-gW 


||| 

Pigs 


Capacity of 
Incandescent 
Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 


g £ 



"3 

"3 
s 




S3.S 

it 


Boston Elevated Railway Company .... 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company . . 


46,702 
51,508 


205,453 
275,400 


3,613 

115,220 

1,500 

50 

125 

25 

140 


2 

2,976 

165 

10 


355,330 

96,802 

1,500 

15 

106 

20 

80 


86,245 

86,785 

300 

15 

230 


17 
47 


Block Plant Electric Light Company. . . 
A. W. Barnes Steam Specialty Company, 
Sudbury Building Plant 


400 
620 
200 
500 


325 
400 
150 
363 




Hanover Street Trust 








Totals 


99,930 


482,091 


120,673 


3,153 


453,853 


173,575 


69 







74 



City Document No. 11. 



INTERIOR DIVISION. 



As provided by law there have been twelve hundred 
eighty-nine (1,289) inspections made of theaters, places 
of amusement and public halls. Wherever defects 
were reported interested parties were immediately 
notified to attend to the same. 

During the year there were fifty fires and three acci- 
dents to persons caused by electricity, one of the 
accidents proving to be fatal. 



Fires in interior of buildings . 

Fires on poles 

Injuries to persons 

Notices of new work received . 

Number of permits to turn on current . 

Number of incandescent lamps inspected 

Number of motors inspected . 

Number of buildings in which wiring was 

pletely examined 

Number of inspections made . 



com 



41 

9 

3 

20,355 

15,030 

1,644,393 

10,043 

4,108 
38,113 



All defects reported have been corrected or are in 
process of correction. 



Fire Department. 



75 



LIST OF WIRE DIVISION EMPLOYEES, 
JANUARY 31, 1924. 



1 Superintendent 




1 Chief Inspector 




10 Inspectors 




8 Inspectors 




5 Inspectors 




5 Inspectors 




1 Inspector 




3 Inspectors 




1 Engineer . 




1 Chief Clerk 




1 Assistant Chief Clerk 


1 Clerk and Stenographer 


1 Clerk .... 


1 Clerk .... 




3 Stenographers . 




1 Chauffeur . 




1 Stenciller . 





Salary 
Per Annum. 

$3,500 
2,500 
2,000 
1,900 
1,800 
1,700 
1,600 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,700 
1,500 
1,240 
1,400 
1,400 
1,400 



45 



76 



City Document No. 11. 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATION AND EXPEN- 
DITURES FROM FEBRUARY 1, 1923, TO 
JANUARY 31, 1924, INCLUSIVE. 



Appropriation .... 


. $90,740 23 




Expenditures. 


A-l. 


Employees . 


$80,801 65 


F-7. 


Pensions 


600 00 


B-l. 


Printing and binding . 


929 00 


B-2. 


Postage .... 


220 00 


B-3. 


Advertising . 


126 70 


B-4. 


Car fares 


2,849 22 


B-12. 


Premium on bond 


6 00 


B-13. 


Telephones . 


297 21 


B-14. 


Auto painting 


50 00 


B-35. 


Auto fees 


2 00 


B-37. 


Photo, etc 


2 10 


B-39. 


Repairs, etc. 


20 85 


C-9. 


Metal desks . 


1,162 30 


C-13. 


Tools, etc. 


33 95 


D-l. 


Office forms, etc. . 


1,790 60 


D-ll. 


Gasolene, etc. 


381 95 


D-16. 


Photo material . . 


2 65 


E-10. 


Batteries 


9 90 


E-13. 


Paint stock, etc. . 
Dtal expenditures . 


25 62 


T 


$89,311 70 


Balance in treasury . 


1,428 53 






$90,740 23 



Fire Department. 77 



LIST OF PROPERTY.— WIRE DIVISION. 



1 1,500-volt Weston Direct Current Voltmeter. 

5 300-volt Weston Direct Current Voltmeters. 

2 300-volt Weston Alternating Current and Direct Current 

Voltmeters. 

1 15-volt Weston Direct Current Voltmeter. 

2 300-volt Weston Direct Current Double Reading Voltmeter. 
1 120-volt Weston Direct Current Miniature Type Voltmeter. 
1 150-volt Weston Direct Cuirent Miniature Type Voltmeter. 
1 500-volt Weston Direct Current Ammeter. 

1 200-volt Weston Alternating Current Ammeter. 

1 50-volt Weston Direct Current Ammeter. 

1 15-volt Weston Alternating Current Ammeter. 

1 1,500-volt Milamperes Weston Direct Current Mil-ammeter. 

6 Bichloride of silver batteries, each 60 cells. 
1 Queen testing set. 

1 Touring car. 
1 Runabout. 
1 Ford truck. 

1 Robe. 

2 Cameras, complete 

Miscellaneous tools used in connection with overhead con- 
struction. 

Draughting instruments. 

Respectfully yours, 

Walter J. Burke, 

Superintendent, Wire Division. 



78 



City Document No. 11. 



THE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION. 



Commissioner, Theodore A. Glynn. 

Chief Clerk, James P. Maloney. 

Chief of Department, John O. Taber. 

Dist. Chief, William H. McCorkle, in charge of Bureau of 

Supplies and Repairs. 
Superintendent of High Pressure, Steam and Marine Service, 

Eugene M. Byington. 
Superintendent of Fire Alarms, George L. Fickett. 
Superintendent of Wire Division, Walter J. Burke. 
Chief Operator and Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms, 

Richard Donahue. 
Chief Clerk, Wire Division, Frank H. Rice. 
Medical Examiner, William J. McNally, M.D. 

Clerks. 
Fire Department. 
James P. Maloney, Chief Clerk; Edward L. Tierney, Chief 
of License Division-Bureau of Fire Prevention; George F. 
Murphy, Herbert J. Hickey, John J. Coholan, William J. 
Hurley, Frank M. Fogarty, William J. O'Donnell, Thomas W. 
O'Connell, Warren F. Fenlon. Henry J. Eagan, Joseph F. 
O'Brien, James P. McKenna, Wm. D. Slattery, John J. Shea, 
James H. Finnerty. 

Wire Division. 

William McSweeney, Charles S. Carroll, Martin P. Cummings 
Selina A. O'Brien, Mary E. Fleming, May D. Marsh. 



Headquarters. 



1 Commissioner . 

1 Chief Clerk 

1 Medical examiner . 

1 Secretary and stenographer 

1 Executive Clerk in charge 

supplies and repairs 
1 Clerk 
1 Clerk 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Clerk . 

Clerk . 

Clerk . 

Assistant engineer (messenger)* 

Hosemen (clerks)* . 



Motor Apparatus 



Per Annum. 

$7,500 
2,500 
3,500 
2,200 

2,500 
1,600 
1,500 
1,400 
1,200 
1,000 
1,800 
1,800 



* Detailed from Fire-fighting Branch. 



Fire Department. 



79 



1 Janitress . . 
Elevator Man 
15 



Fire Prevention Bureau. 



Per Week . 

$20 00 

Per Day . 

$4.00 





Per Annum. 


1 Chief Fire Prevention . 


$2,500 


1 Clerk 


2,000 


1 Clerk 


. . . 1,700 


1 Clerk 


1,200 


1 Constable 


1,500 



Fire-fighting Branch. 





Per Annum. 


1 Chief of Department 


$5,000 


4 Deputy chiefs 


4,000 


15 District chiefs 


3,500 


66 Captains 


2,500 


94 Lieutenants 


2,300 


1 Aide-to-Chief (lieutenant) . . 


2,300 


1 Aide-to-Commissioner (private) . 


1,800 


3 Engineers (marine) 


2,000 


48 Engineers 


1,900 


51 Assistant Engineers . . . . . 


1,800 


2 Assistant engineers 


1,700 


927 Privates: 




807 


$1,800 


25 $] 


L,700-$l,800 


42 $] 


L,600-$l,700 


17 $: 


L,500-$l,600 


36 $: 


L,400-$l,500 



1,213 



Bureau Supplies and Repairs. 



1 District Chief in charge .... 
1 Superintendent, High Pressure Steam and 

Marine Service 

1 Supervisor, motor apparatus 

1 Shop foreman 

1 Lieutenant, foreman hose and harness shop 

1 Auto engineer (engineer) 

1 Engineer and Architect 

1 Storkeeeper (hoseman) 

1 Master plumber (engineer) . 

1 Master carpenter (hoseman) 



Per Annum. 

$3,500 

3,800 
2,700 
2,500 
2,300 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 
1,900 
1,800 



80 



City Document No. 11, 



1 Master Painter 
1 Foreman auto mechanic 
1 Machinist (engineer) 
16 Privates . 
1 Clerk in charge 
1 Clerk 
1 Clerk 

1 Stenographer . 
7 Engineers 

7 Engineers (High Pressure Service) 
4 Assistant engineers (High Pressure Service) 

3 High Pressure engineers .... 
3 Firemen . . . . . 

1 Engineer 

1 Master steamfitter 



2 Plumbers 
1 Steamfitter 

1 Leading painter 
9 Painters . 

2 Wheelwrights . 

1 Leading machinist 
4 Machinists 
9 Auto repairers 

2 Battery and ignition men 
1 Auto repairer and tester 
1 Auto mechanic and machinist 
1 Auto blacksmith . 

1 Battery and ignition man 

4 Blacksmiths . 

5 Blacksmith's helpers 
4 Carpenters 

2 Hose and harness repairers 
1 Hose and harness repairer 
1 Vulcanizer 

1 Chauffeur 

2 Teamsters 
2 Laborers 
1 Steamfitter' s helper 



Per Annum. 

$1,800 
1,900 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
1,400 
1,500 
1,000 
1,900 
1,900 
1,800 

Per Day. 

$7 00 
5 50 

Per Week . 

$40 00 

Per Annum. 

1,800 

Per Day. 

$5 40 
00 
25 
00 
50 
25 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
50 
50 
00 
25 
00 
00 
50 
50 
00 
00 
00 
25 



117 



Fire Department. 



81 



Fire Alarm Branch. 






Per Annum, 


1 Superintendent fire alarm . 


$3,500 


1 Assistant Superintendent and Chief Operator . 3,000 


1 Supervising operator .... 


2,400 


3 Principal operators .... 


2,300 


3 Operators 


2,200 


4 Assistant operators .... 


1,800 


1 Assistant operator (sliding scale) . 


1,500-1,600 


2 Assistant operators (sliding scale) 


1,400-1,500 


1 Foreman construction .... 


2,700 


1 Assistant foreman construction . 


2,200 


1 Stockman . . . . . 


1,800 




Per Day . 


1 Machinist (7 day) .... 


$5 25 


2 Machinists (7 day) .... 


5 00 


3 Cable splicers 


5 75 


5 Inside wiremen 


5 60 


4 Repairers and linemen .... 


5 00 


9 Linemen 


5 00 


1 Laborer 


4 00 



44 



82 City Document No. 11. 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 

John 0. Taber. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 

The Chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Division 1. 

Deputy Chief, Edward J. Shallow. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1. 

District Chief, Henry J. Power. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 

East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 

31 (fireboat), 40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, Chemical 7. 

District 2. 
District Chief, John P. Murray. 
Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22. 

District 3. 
District Chief, Cornelius J. O'Brien. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District.- — Engines 25, 38, 
39, 44 (fireboat), Ladders 8, 18, Water Tower 3. 

District 4- 
District Chief, Charles A. Donohoe. 
Headquarters, Engine House, 4 Bulfinch Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
Ladders 1, 24, Water Tower 1. 



Fire Department. 83 

District 5. 

District Chief, Albert J. Caulfield. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 

35, Ladder 17, Recue 1. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chief, Henry A. Fox. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 
District Chief, Harry M. Hebard. 
Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 
District Chief, Frank A. Sweeney. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33, 
Ladders 3, 13, 15, Water Tower 2. 

District 8. 
District Chief, Frank J. Sheeran. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 
Apparatus Located in. the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26. 

District 11. 

District Chiej, James F. McMahon. 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 41, 
51, Ladders 11, 14. 

Division 3. 
Deputy Chiej, Walter M. McLean. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 



84 City Document No. 11. 

District 9. 
District Chiej, Joseph H. Kenney. 
Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 21, 23 r 
24, Ladder 4. 

District 10. 

District Chiej, Francis J. Jordan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 18, Harvard Street, 

Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 52, 
Ladders 7, 29. 

District 12. 

District Chief, John N. Lally. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 

Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 
Ladders 10, 23, 30. 

District 13. 

District Chief, Michael J. Kennedy. 

Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 53, 

Ladders 16, 25. 

District 14- 

District Chief, Allan J. Macdonald. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, Ladders 6, 27. 

District 15. 

District Chief, Joseph A. Dolan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 

Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 49, 
Ladder 28. 



Fire Department. 



85 



FIRE STATIONS. 

Location. 



Location. 



Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 



Occupied by 



Dorchester and Fourth streets 

Corner of O and Fourth streets 

Bristol street and Harrison avenue 

Bulfinch street 

Marion street, East Boston 

Leverett street 

East street 

* Salem street 

Paris street, East Boston 

River street 

Saratoga and Byron streets. East Boston, 

Dudley street 

Cabot street 

Centre street 

Dorchester avenue 

Corner River and Temple streets 

Meeting House Hill, Dorchester. ....... 

Harvard street, Dorchester 

Babson street, Dorchester 

Walnut street, Dorchester 

Columbia road, Dorchester 

Warren avenue 

Northampton street 

Corner Warren and Quincy streets 

Fort Hill square 

Mason street 

Elm street, Charlestown 

Centre street, Jamaica Plain 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 

Centre street, West Roxbury 



521 Commercial street, on land of Public 
Works Department. 



8,167 
4,000 
4,000 
6,098 
3,265 
2,269 
1,893 
2,568 
4,720 
1,886 
10,000 
7,320 
4,832 
5,713 
2,803 
12,736 
9,450 
9,440 
7,683 
9,000 
10,341 
7,500 
3,445 
4,186 
4,175 
5,623 
2,600 
10,377 
14,358 
12,251 



Engine 1 and Ladder 5. 

Engine 2. 

Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 

Engine 4, Chemical 1 and Tower 1. 

Engine 5. 

Engine 6. 

Engine 7. 

Engine 8. 

Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 

Engine 10. 

Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 

Engine 12. 

Engine 13. 

Enpine 14. 

Engine 15. 

Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 

Engine 17 and Ladder 7. 

Engine IS. 

Engine 19. 

Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 

Engine 21. 

Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 

Engine 23. 

Engine 24. 

Engine 25 and Ladder 8, Rescue 1 

Engines 26 and 35. 

Engine 27. 

Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 

Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 

Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 



86 



City Document No. 11. 

Fire Stations. — Concluded. 



Location. 


Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Occupied by 


Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 


8,188 


Engine 32. 


Corner Boylston and Hereford streets. . . . 


5,646 


Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 




4,637 






5,668 


Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 


Corner Longwood and Brookline avenues, 


5,231 


Engine 37 and Ladder 26 . 




4,000 


Engines 38 and 39. 




4,010 




Harvard avenue, near Cambridge street, 
Brighton. 


6,112 


Engine 41 and Ladder 14. 


Washington street, at Egleston square.. . . 


3,848 


Engine 42 and Ladder 30. 




5,133 


Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 








Washington and Poplar streets, Roslin- 
dale. 


14,729 


Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 




4,875 




Adjoining South Ferry, East Boston 


11,950 


Engine 47, fireboat 


Harvard avenue and Winthrop street, 
Hyde Park. 


9,450 


Engine 48 and Ladder 28. 




3,412 






14,475 






5,230 


Engine 50. 




9,889 






9,300 




Corner Callender and Lyford streets 


7,200 


Chemical 11 and Ladder 29. 


Corner Walk Hill and Wenham streets . . . 


11,253 


Chemical 13. 




1,676 
3,923 






Ladder 4 and Chemical 10. 




4,290 


Ladder 9. 




4,311 


Ladder 12. 




2,134 


Ladder 17. 




8,964 


Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 




3,101 


Ladder 19. 




6,875 






3,918 


Ladder 24. 







Headquarters Building, Bristol street, 15,679 feet of 
land. 

Water Tower No. 2 is in Headquarters Building. 



Fiee Department. 



87 



OTHER BUILDINGS. 

Bureau S. & R. 363 Albany street, 8,000 feet of land. 

Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet of 
land. 

Coal station, Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet of 
land. 

Building No. 11 Wareham street, used by the Fire 
Alarm Branch as workshop and storeroom, 8,500 feet of 
land. 

Building No. 618 Harrison avenue, used as a depart- 
ment garage and repair shop and a school for chauffeurs 
and officers, 3,816 feet of land. 



Expenditures for the Year. 



Personal service: 



Permanent employees 




$2,543,748 61 


Temporary employees 




981 80 


Unassigned 




4,522 90 




•t>4,i¥±\j,4Q6 ol 


Service other than Personal : 






Printing and binding 




$53 75 


Postage .... 




943 90 


Advertising and posting . 




260 30 


Transportation of persons 




949 95 


Cartage and freight . 




429 92 


Hire of teams and auto trucks 


2,634 50 


Heat 




2,471 18 


Light and power 




20,436 69 


Rent, taxes and water 




3,555 36 


Premium on surety bond 




15 00 


Communication 




2,673 84 


Motor vehicle repairs and 


care 


18,191 16 


Motorless vehicle repairs . 




2,210 50 


Cleaning .... 




5,600 57 


Medical .... 




25 00 


Veterinary .... 




900 00 


Fees, service of venires, 


etc. 


580 00 


Boiler inspection 




149 00 


Photographic and blueprinting 


2,339 45 


General plant 




95,901 93 


Horseshoeing and clipping 




3,249 55 




100,0/ 1 00 



Carried forward $2,712,824 86 



88 



City Document No. 11. 



Brought forward 




$2,712,824 86 


Equipment : 






Cable, wire, etc. 


$16,216 06 




Electrical .... 


14,052 40 




Motor vehicles . 


284,144 11 




Stable . . . 


1,965 70 




Furniture and fittings 


7,263 06 




Office 


3,067 39 




Marine .... 


8 70 




Tools and instruments 


27,698 31 




Wearing apparel 


33,798 75 




General plant 


1,097 23 


389,311 71 


Supplies : 






Office 


$6,821 20 




Food and ice 


842 56 




Fuel 


108,363 86 




Forage and animal . 


6,099 15 




Medical, surgical, laboratory- 


192 49 




Laundry, cleaning, toilet . 


2,337 82 




Motor vehicle 


27,626 77 




Chemicals and disinfectants 


2,394 85 




General plant 


3,778 72 




Cloth 


121 00 


158,578 42 






Materials : 






Building 


$21,076 24 




Electrical .... 


3,548 92 




General plant 


33,649 44 


58,274 60 






Special items : 






Pensions and annuities 


$260,314 69 




Workingmen's compensation 


834 67 


261,149 36 










$3,580,138 95 



Wire Division: 
Personal service : 

Permanent employees 
Service other than personal: 

Printing and binding, $929 00 

Postage . . . 220 00 

Advertising and post- 
ing . . . . 126 70 

Transportation of per- 
sons .... 2,849 22 

Premium on surety 
bond ... 6 00 



801 65 



Carried forward 



),801 65 $3,580,138 95 



Fire Depar 

Brought forward 

Communication . 297 21 

Motor vehicle repairs 

and care. . . 50 00 

Fees, service of ve- 
nires, etc. . 2 00 

Photographic and 

blueprinting . 2 10 

General plant . 20 85 


rMENT. 

$80,801 65 

4,503 08 
1,196 25 

2,175 20 

35 52 
600 00 


89 
$3,580,138 95 


Equipment : 
Office . . . $1,162 30 
Tools and instru- 
ments . . . 33 95 




Supplies : 
Office.. . . $1,790 60 
Motor vehicle . 381 95 
General plant . 2 65 




Materials : 

Electrical . . . $9 90 
General plant . 25 62 




Special items: 

Pensions and annuities 


89,311 70 




Building. 
a Company, 

Building. 


Engine 7, New 

Payments on account : 

Contractors, C. & R. Constructio 
Advertising, blueprints, etc. 


$3,669,450 65 

$21,886 00 
4 32 


Engine 40, New 

Contractor, John B. Dolan . 

Architects 

Test borings 

Blueprints 

Advertising 


$21,890 32 

$7,200 90 

2,185 86 

163 15 

123 59 

5 00 




$9,678 50 



90 



City Document No. 11. 



Fire Alarm Signal Station, Back Bay Fens. 



Underground work 


$2,713 36 


Test posts . 


1,760 00 


Freights 


103 74 


Borings 


94 50 


Blueprints . . . 


8 10 




$4,679 70 


Recapitulation. 




Fire Department 


$3,669,450 65 


Engine 7, new building .... 


21,890 32 


Engine 40, new building .... 


9,678 50 


Fire Alarm Signal Station, Back Bay Fens 


4,679 70 




$3,705,699 17 


Income. 




Permits for fires in open spaces, fireworks, blast- 




ing, transportation and storage of explosives 


$15,676 25 


Sale of old material 


2,290 74 


Sale of apparatus, etc 


1,530 68 


Sale of badges 


1,327 00 


Damage to hose and cable .... 


190 12 


Damage to fire alarm posts and boxes 


612 59 


Damage to door 


7 91 


Damage to apparatus 


10 00 


Sale of manure 


4 75 


Refund on freight 


9 46 


Coal penalty 


3 88 


Install fire alarm box 


38 25 


Relocating post 


58 80 




$21,760 43 


Wire Division: 




Permits 


69,876 80 




$91,637 23 



Fire Department. 



91 











^-t 


CO 




CM 


iH 




,_! 


IM 


rH 


^H 


<* 


CM | 


oo 




• 


pa^cu^a ^lIB-joj, 
























| 


~ 








<N 


oo 


CO 


.-i 


rH 


1-1 


00 


TO 


CO 


co 


iO 


CO 


rf 




•ajq^japieuoQ adisuiBQ 


























C3 








m 


■* 


-« 


O 


CO 




CO 


CO 




iO 


IO 










•^q3tlg aSBiuBQ 




CM 






IO 


o 


to 


TO 




CO 


IO 


00 










t^ 




OS 


TO 


- 


r- 


f 












CD 

°i 

co" 






"3UOf>J SSBUI'BQ 


t~ 


t^ 


/J 
CM 


oo 

CD 


CO 


00 
co 


CO 

co 


o 

CO 


CO 


-J 
■o 


CD 
CN 


o 

CM 








-* 


co 


IO 


30 


CO 


■* 


IO 


CO 


CN 


Tf 


co 


•* 


rH 






'AlO P WO 


























IO 








o 




>0 


C 




TO 


CO 




IO 
























CM 


o 




















•Suipjmg ui ^o^[ 








CO 


CM 


co 


CN 


CM 


CM 


■* 




1-1 


00 








as 


t^ 


oo 


T-t 


CO 


■* 


t> 


r~i 


CO 


CO 


■* 


Tt< 


o 




•swq^o °1 pspns^xg 1 


































CO 


co 


m 


IO 


00 


CM 


TO 




















03 








CO 




















•Snipjmg; o; pgtnjuoQ 

1 


CM 


CO 


CN 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CN 


CM 




CN 


CN 


CN 


co" 










Oi 


>o 


CT> 


OO 


TO 


a 


co 


■J^ 
















►5 


•ssajpaa^ 














CM 


■* 


CN 


CO 


^ 


iO 


CO 
iO 






CM 


■o 


CO 


on 


x> 


CO 


X 


•* 






























(M 


00 


M< 


>o 
















•9JIJ 




1—1 




lO 


<N 


co 


CM 


CM 


c^ 


co 


CN 


CN 


CO 




03 






























CO 








CO 


I> 


>~ 


CO 


X 


~ 




— 


IO 












K 




•ssajpaa^i 












** 






" 


CN 




CM 


C3 






t-~ 


CO 


CD 


C3 


o 


CM 


o 


c. 


C3 














■8SP35 


1-1 


1-1 


1-1 




rH 


CN 


CM 


1-1 


CN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 
(M 






pq 


































1^ 


"# 


IO 


CO 


TO 


O 


O 


lO 






























to 




o 


















•3JIJ 










CM 


CM 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CN 




CN 


CN 










cO 


o 


CM 


-N 


JO 


IO 


CO 


CO 






















o 




o 








(^ 


CN 


m 






























cs 


IO 


iO 


Oi 


M< 


O 










a> 


CO 


CM 


a 


CO 


»o 


CM 


CM 


IO 


-. 














•S^U3^U03 


IO 


t~ 


X 


o> 


IO 


o 

CM 


lO 


CM 


C3 


o 
o 


o 

o 


O 
CD 


o 




V 






CO 

cvs 


CM 




io 


CM 




co 


CN 




co 


CO 


1-1 


CO 






CO 


CO 


3C 




TO 


■* 


03 


33 




























rH 


CN 


























CO 




*-i 


00 


CO 


O 


CM 


G3 


CO 


IO 


00 


















CO 


CO 


■* 


00 


















•sSuipjmg; 


CO 


t^ 


CO 




t-H 


CD 


oo 

IO 


IO 

CO 


CD 

CD 


>o 

1- 


o 


1^ 

CM 


CN 

C3 










CD 


>o 


■* 


tj< 


CO 


IO 


■* 


CM 


CO 


co 


■* 


t> 


■o 

IO 
99 










o 


00 




CO 


TO 




CO 






























CO 






00 






























t~ 


03 


IO 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


CN 


00 










CO 


CO 


■* 


oo 






























CM 




'CfH 


O 
CO 


CO 


CD 

CO 


t~ 


IO 




oo 

CM 


CD 


IO 
CO 




u 


3 
































c 


3 


































CD 






— 


t^ 


IO 


to. 


l- 
















1 














OS 


IO 


■* 


IO 








CN 






















■* 


o 


CN 




I> 


IO 


■* 








•sSnip[mg 


CM 
IO 


CD 


IO 


CD 


CD 
00 


oo 

CD 


CD 

o 


- 

IO 


CO 


Oi 


iO 




CN. 










se 




















CN 




°1 
99 










o 


TO 


X 


C~ 


' ". 


l> 


".I 


oc 




„ 


^ 


Q 


1 " 


















CO 
























"F^oi 




lO 




C3 


IO 


CO 


IO 


IO 


IO 


00 


iO 


IO 


CM 






i- 


iO 


~ 


l> 


OS 


CM 


00 


IO 


00 


r- 


CD 




rH 









•UAioa^u^ 














^ 




CN 


iO 


CO 


CM 


CN 






CM 


CM 


rH 


rH 


oo 


- 


CO 


-1- 
















s 


•opBuio^ny 


rt 








r* 


CM 


1-1 


^ 






CM 


CN 


CM 




m 
o 


o 
W 


































oo 


C3 


TO 


OJ 


X 


t- 


X 
















« 


£ 


•auoqdapj, 






CN 


o 




CO 
CM 


03 


t~ 


oo 


03 
CN 


Oi 


00 


>o 

iO 




CO 

K 



« 
Ph 




























IN 






CO 


CD 


— 






-r. 


- 


CD 


























or. 














O 




< 




CM 


CM 


CM 


-* 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CM 


■* 


CN 


CN 




< 






























CO 






rH 


CM 


-r 


X 


r-. 


Tt< 


c 




T-f 






rH 










•aoipj 










"* 


rt 


CM 


CN 


T_l 


rH 




rH 


oo 






CO 


a> 


C 


X 


X 


c 


a- 


CN 


IO 


3 


■* 


t^ 










•sjaquiaj^; 


























03 






CO 

W 


> 


>> 














t-t 




u 

03 


03 

1 

to 

o 

Q 


"Si 








S 


B 
3 
C 

►-3 


3 


c 

fr- 
ee 

% 


1 


• 1 


i a. 

c 


> 


a 
) 5 

< 


CD 


C 

O 


a 

03 
> 

o 


o 



92 



City Document No. 11. 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from January 1, 1923, 
to January 1, 1924. 



Alarms, false, needless, bell 

and still 1,016 

Alarms, out of city 51 

Automatic alarms, false 

and accidental 154 

Automobiles 364 

Brush, rubbish, etc 2,034 

Careless use lamp, candle. 51 

Careless use matches and 

set by rats 395 

Careless use pipe, cigar and 

cigarette 501 

Chimneys, soot burning . . 292 

Clothes near stove 19 

Defective chimney, stove 

pipe, boiler 87 

Electric wires, motors .... 173 

Fireworks and firecrackers, 46 

Gas jet, gas stove 66 

Gasolene, naphtha, ben- 
zine 11 

Grease in ventilator 54 



Hot ashes in wooden recep- 
tacle 

Incendiary and supposed . 

Lamp upsetting and ex- 
plosion 

Miscellaneous 

Oil stove, careless use and 
explosion 

Overheated furnace, stove, 
boiler 

Set by boys 

Spark from chimneys, 
stove 

Sparks from locomotive, 

engine 

Spontaneous combustion . . 

Thawing water pipes 

Unknown 



95 

27 

18 
404 

73 

114 
140 

135 

66 
139 

41 
675 



Total 7,241 



1923. 



Fire Extinguished By 



W 



3 



January. . 
February . 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October . . 
November 
December. 

Totals 



87 
106 
106 
122 
94 
151 
93 
97 
94 
116 
75 
73 



22 

25 
35 
78 
42 
52 
50 
39 
38 
96 
46 
34 



56 
86 
86 

102 
95 

112 
67 
79 
62 

102 
75 



40 

46 

62 

219 

95 

119 

135 

97 

124 

170 

69 

47 



27 
43 
31 
30 
29 
38 
49 
41 
38 
47 
30 
37 



69 

56 

105 

284 

65 

62 

55 

52 

77 

101 

99 

82 



44 
34 
31 
41 
48 
45 
44 
38 
29 
43 
33 
39 



1,214 



:57 



1,010 



1,223 



440 



1,107 



469 



Fire Department. 93 

Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 


Location and Owner. 


Loss. 


1 
Jan. 


923. 

10 

13 

13 

14 

15 
19 
20 

22 
12 
16 
21 

24 
27 

27 

27 
2 

13 

29 

30 

1 

6 

7 

10 

14 

15 

23 

25 

2 

6 
26 
30 


58 and 60 Summer street, Abrahams Company et al 


516,711 
35,221 


Jan. 


36 and 38 Hawkins street and 7? Chardon street, S. M. 


25,783 




63 Mt. Veinon street, H. M. Sweet et al 


105,250 






17,965 




140-148 Harvard avenue, W. P . & J. Cotter et al 


49,201 


Jan. 


73 and 75 South street and 170-180 Essex street, L. Schapiro 


150,646 




1 18- 128 Lincoln street, R. E. McDonald et al 


598,816 


Feb. 
Feb. 


35-39 Arch street, M. Steinert & Son Company et al 


41,760 
23,446 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


132-138 Worcester street, S. & A S. & F. E Pelonsky et al. . . 
530-540 Atlantic avenue, F. P. Bennett & Co., Inc., etal... 
326-330 Washington street, Dorchester, Norfolk Lodge of 


55,980 
28,424 

29,336 


Feb. 


1110-1130 Washington street and 106-112 Dover street, 


30,655 


Feb. 




25,889 


Marcr 


524 and 526 Rutherford avenue, New England Newspaper 


37,216 


Marc! 


132 and 134 Washington street and 1 and 3 Dock square, 


46,888 


Mare! 


Rear 81 Bristol street, J. F. Paul & Co. et al 


25,299 


Ma ret 




17,978 


April 


131-137 Washington street and 53-57 Brattle street, Leopold 


19,858 


April 
April 


266-270 Border street, Acme White Lead and Color Works, 
11-17 East street and 711 Atlantic avenue, American Hide 


56,492 
57,549 


April 


20 and 22 Purchase street and 361 and 363 Atlantic avenue, 


37,302 


April 


185 and 187 State street and 82 and 84 Central street, The 


175,035 


April 


125-131 Federal street, H. S. Hunnewell et al 


29,903 


April 




22,588 


April 


116-124 Merrimac street, H. Traiser & Co., Inc 


103,710 


May 


217 and 219 State street and 114 Central street, Webster 


340,816 


May 
May 
May 


84-88 Hawley street, Kennedy's Clothing Company et al . . . 
121 and 123 East Dedham street, P. H. Graham & Sons et al., 


20,736 
25,658 
16,467 



94 



City Document No. 11. 

Fire Losses. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



May 31 

June 20 

July 5 

July 16 

July IS 

July 19 

July 28 

Aug. 24 

Sept, 13 

Oct. 6 

Oct. 8 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 16 

Nov. 17 

Nov. 17 

Nov. 18 

Nov. 22 

Nov. 30 

Dec. 7 

Dec' 10 

Dec. 15 

Dec. 17 

Dec. 18 



35 and 37 Wareham street, American Slipper Manufactur- 
ing Company et al 

76 and 78 Batterymarch street, Estate of Moses Kimball 
et al 

131-137 Kingston street, Star Manufacturing Company et 
al 

199 Harrison avenue, Boston Shoe Polish Manufacturing 
Company et al 

374-394 Congress street, Thomas Kelly Company et al 

Mill stieet, Storehouse No. 30, W. Ellery et al 

318 Broadway, Boston & Albany et al 

628-636 Washington street and 1-9 Essex street, Hyman 
Brothers et al 

67-73 Sudbury street and 9 Hawkins street, Capitol Uphol- 
stering Company et al 

118 Western avenue, Griffith Keiver Company et al 

160-166 North street, Bay State Upholstering Company 
et al 

694-702 Washington street and 2-12 Kneeland street, Freed- 
man, Levine and Freedman et al 

605-611 Washington street, Weinberg Brothers et al 

65 and 67 Purchase street and 173 and 175 High street, S. 
M. Fay Estate et al 

209 and 211 State street, The Murray Company et al 

1612-1620 Blue Hill avenue, Price Brothers & Mission et al, 

107 and 109 Kingston street and 105 and 107 Essex street, 
Samuel Lieberman et al 

85-91 Essex street, B. & A. Skirt Co. et al 

605-611 Washington stieet, Massachusetts Skirt Company 
et al 

2S8-294 Devonshire street, Northern Commission Com- 
pany et al 

S89-S99 Dorchester avenue, Samuel Levitt et al 

30S9-3099 Washington street and 1 Beethoven street, D. W. 
& S. W. Littlefield et al 

6-14 Congress street and 43 State street, State Street 
Exchange et al 



20,319 

35,979 

17,425 

16,579 

1,269,300 

78,048 

46,143 

27,266 

31,336 
35,183 

16,233 

21,093 
15,363 

79,459 

123,072 

59,358 

15,943 
49,130 

17,586 

24,414 
15,515 

27,360 

16,138 



Statistics. 

Population, January 1, 1924 (estimated) 
Area, square miles .... 
Number brick, etc., buildings 
Number of wooden buildings 



847,942 
47.81 
34,957 

78,825 



Fire Department. 



95 



Fires in brick and stone buildings 


1,784 


Fires in wooden buildings . 


1,364 


Out of city 


51 


Not in buildings 


2,872 


False and needless .... 


1,170 







7,241 



Fire Loss for the Year Ending December 31, 1923. 

Building loss insured $1,830,951 

Contents loss insured 4,110,798 



j,941,749 



Building loss not insured 
Contents loss not insured 



Total loss buildings and contents 
Marine loss 



$101,473 
243,078 



344,551 
5,286,300 



$14,121 



Yearly Loss for the Last Fifteen Years. 



Year ending 


February 


1, 1909 ... 


$3,610,000 


u 


« 


u 


1, 1910 


1,680,245 


a 


a 


a 


1, 1911 (11 months) . 


3,159,989 


a 


u 


January 


1, 1912 


2,232,267 


a 


a 


a 


1, 1913 


2,531,017 


u 


a 


a 


1, 1914 


*3,138,373 


a 


u 


a 


1, 1915 


3,013,269 


a 


a 


a 


1, 1916 


3,004,600 


a 


a 


a 


1, 1917 


t2,372,489 


a 


a 


a 


1, 1918 


£3,981,227 


a 


« 


a 


1, 1919 


2,822,109 


a 


a 


u 


1, 1920 


2,577,584 


« 


a 


(< 


1, 1921 


3,139,566 


a 


a 


ft 


1, 1922 


4,010,201 


a 


a 


ft 


1, 1923 


3,304,595 


a 


u 


ft 


1, 1924 


6,286,300 



* Does not include marine loss of $1,116,475, steamship "Templemore." 
t Does not include marine loss of $101,312, steamship "City of Naples" et al. 
% Does not include marine loss of $75,660. 

Note. — January loss, 1911, amounting to $165,001, deducted from previous year and 
included in calendar year January 1, 1911, to January 1, 1912. 



96 



City Document No. 11. 



Alarms for the Past Ten Years.* 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatics. 


Totale. 


1923 


3,239 
2,733 
2,359 
2,029 
2,733 
2,413 
2,252 
2,350 
2,847 
2,945 


4,002 
3,401 
2,888 
2,466 
2,690 
2,649 
2,526 
2,128 
2,590 
2,589 


7,241 


1922 


6,134 


1921 


5,247 


1920 


4,485 


1919 


5,423 


1918 


5,062 


1917 


4,778 


1916 


4,531 


1915 


5,437 


1914 


5,534 







* Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 



Roll of Merit, Boston Fire Department. 

James F. McMahon, District Chief. 
Edward McDonough. Captain, Engine Company 6. 
Thomas J. Muldoon, Captain, Engine Company 16. 
Thomas H. Downey, Captain, Engine Company 22. 
Michael J. Teehan, Captain, Engine Company 24. 
Joseph P. Hanton, Captain, Engine Company 33. 
Dennis Driscoll, Captain, Engine Company 37. 
Frederick F. Leary, Captain, Ladder Company 3. 
Carl S. Bowers, Lieutenant, Aide to Chief. 
Henry J. Kelly, Lieutenant, Engine Company 32. 
Timothy J. Heffron, Lieutenant, Ladder Company 9. 
Michael J. Dacy, Lieutenant, Ladder Company 20. 
John J. Kennedy, Ladderman, Ladder Company 13. 
Martin A. Kenealy, Captain, retired. 
James E. Downey, Hoseman, retired. 



Fire Department. 



97 



Members Pensioned from February 1, 1923 to 
February 1, 1924. 



William L. Kelley. 
John J. Driscoll. 
James F. Boyle. 
Thomas A. Quinn. 
Mellen R. Joy. 
William S. Abbott. 
John M. McEwan. 
John M. Shanley. 
Frank P. Elliott. 
William Bowers. 
John L. Gannon. 
Frank A. Bailey. 
David Isaacs. 



Michael J. McNamara. 
William J. Cox. 
Arthur W. Helmund. 
Benjamin F. Underhill. 
Edward J. Reavey. 
John E. Fleming. 
Thomas Buckley. 
Edward I. McLaughlin. 
William A. Porter. 
John Connell. 
Peter J. Donovan. 
Williard R. Pulsifer. 
Frank Coyle. 



Death of Members from February 1, 1923 to 
February 1, 1924. 
Dennis J. Burnett. I District Chief James J. Caine. 

J. Paul Haynes. I Timothy F. Holland. 



Death of Pensioners from February 1, 1923 to 
February 1, 1924. 



Jonathan M. Morris. 
Charles P. Smith. 
Stephen W. Fletcher. 
J. E. Corea. 
William H. Guinan. 
Cornelius H. Leary. 
Charles P. Boudreau. 
Ex. Commissioner and Chief 

John Grady. 
Ex. Chief of Department 

Peter F. McDonough. 
John Flavell. 
Edward J. Lynch. 



D. O'Riordan. 
Lawrence Scallan. 
John K. Weelock. 
Thomas F. Frazer. 
Thomas W. Gowen. 
James E. Nolan. 
Lemuel A. Withington. 
W. H. McDonald. 
J. T. Weston. 
Joseph Riley. 
W. J. Muir. 
Charles H. Windhorn. 



98 City Document No. 11. 



BOSTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND. 



To t he Members of the Body Corporate of the Boston Firemen's 
Relief Fund, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sirs,— We hereby certify that we have audited the 
accounts of the Treasurer of the Boston Firemen's Relief Fund 
to the close of business August 31, 1924, and find them correct. 

The deposits in the banks and the checks drawn thereon 
have been compared with the accounts received from the banks, 
and have been found to agree therewith, and are all properly 
entered on the books of the treasurer. 

Income from all sources is accounted for. Payments are 
supported by proper vouchers or by paid checks, and the bal- 
ance on hand at close of business August 31, 1924, is correct. 

We have examined the securities belonging to the fund, and 
find them as stated on schedules herewith. 

We have seen a bond issued by the Employees' Liability 
Assurance Corporation to D. J. Cadigan, treasurer, for 
$25,000.00. 

A summary of receipts and disbursements for the year ending 
August 31, 1924, is appended hereto. 

i Respectfully submitted, 

Amos D. Albee Son & Co., 
Certified Public Accountants. 



Fire Department. 



99 



Receipts and Disbursements from September 1, 1923, to 
August 31, 1924. 

Receipts. 
Amount received from Ball Fund 
Interest on bonds .... $8,373 75 

Less accrued interest paid . . . . 98 09 



Interest on Liberty Loan bonds . 
Dividends on stocks 
Interest on deposits 

Donations 

City of Boston bonds matured . 

American Telephone and Telegraph rights sold 

West End Street Railway stock sold . 



Cancelled checks, not used 



$27,496 46 


8,275 66 


2,059 32 


237 50 


209 91 


377 00 


11,000 00 


31 57 


47 46 



Balance, September 1, 1923 



19,734 88 
28 00 

19,762 88 
9,559 64 

)9,322 52 



Disbursements. 
Death and sick benefits, gratuities, medical attend- 
ance and medicine „ $28,028 10 

Salaries 800 00 

Treasurer's bond . . . . ... . 62 50 

Free bed, Carney Hospital 300 00 

Free bed, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital . . . 200 00 

Free bed, Massachusetts General Hospital . . 200 00 

Box at First National Bank of Boston, vaults . 10 00 

Auditing, twelve months 200 00 

Expenses, stationery, printing, etc .... 430 57 

Legal services 849 50 

Bonds purchased 20,144 10 



Balance, Exchange Trust Company Sav- 
ings Account .... $2,069 67 

Balance, Exchange Trust Company Check- 
ing Account 2,969 77 

Balance, Beacon Trust Company Savings 
Account 3,000 00 

Balance, American Trust Company . 58 31 



1,224 77 



8,097 75 
)9,322 52 



CITY OF BOSTON 
•RINTING DEPAHTMENI 



r-