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Full text of "Annual report"

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SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBUC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1925 







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BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1926. 



p'w-;c_ 







SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 

OF THE 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



925 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1926. 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

MPJ . 7 31 , ;6 : rBOO. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON JANUARY 1. 1926. 



MICHAEL J. MURRAY, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1926. 

ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY. LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. 

Term expires April 30, 1927. Term expires April 30, 1929. 

GUY W. CURRIER. WILLIAM A. GASTON. 

Term expires April 30, 1928. Term expires April 30, 1930. 



DIRECTOR. 
CHARLES F. D. BELDEN. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 14, of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made its first annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it consist of one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected, each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present,, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 
Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 
Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 
Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 
BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 
Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 
Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 
Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 
Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 
Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 
Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 
Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 
Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 
CuRRiER, Guy Wilbur, 1922- 
CuRTis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75, 
De Normandie, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1899-1908. 
Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 
Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 
Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923- 
Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 
Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 
HiLLiARD, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 
Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 
Kirstein, Louis Edward, 1919- 
Lewis. Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 



Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton. Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921- 

PiERCE, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99, 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1867-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to Mav 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1838. to 
April 30. 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton, May 8, 1908, to February 6, 1917; William F. 
Kenney, February 13, 1917, to Mav 7, 1920; Re\\ ALEXANDER 
Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; MsGR. Arthur T. 
Connolly, April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein, 
June 13, 1924 to June 19, 1925; Hon. Michael J. Murray since 
June 19, 1925. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(Frcm 1858 lo 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; since 
1923 Director.) 

Capen, Edward, Litrar/an, May 13. 1852 - December 16, 1874. 

Jewett. Charles C. Super'mtendenl, 1858- January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., Supcrinlcndent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., m.d.. Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d., Librarian, February 1 1. 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L.. a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 - January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903 -March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 191 7 -June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., ll.b.. Director, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1926. 



^Opened. 

May 2, 1854 

Jan. 28. 1871 

May 1. 1872 

16, 1873 

5. 1874 

5, 1874 
25. 1875 

7. 1875 
1877 
1877 

3. 1878 

6, 1880 



July 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 
*June 

Aug., 

Sept., 
*Dec. 
*Jan. 



Departments. 
tCenlral Library, Copley Square . 

tEast Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 

§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 

IIFellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Miilmont St. 

■j'Charlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 

tBrighlon Branch, Academy Hill Road 

!J:Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 

JLower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

|South End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. . 

tjamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. 

:j;Roslindaic Branch, 4210 Washington St. 

■fWcst Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 

^Mattapan Branch, 7 Babson St. . 

jNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennct St. . 

§Neponsel Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . 

§Ml. Bowdoin Branch, 202 Washington St. 

§All8lon Branch. 138 Brighton Ave. 

JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 

;j;Mt. Pleasant Branch, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 

JTyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 

I' West End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 

:l:Upham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 

§Warren Street Branch, 392 Warren St. . 

§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 

§Boyl8ton Station Branch, The Lamarline, Depot Square 

§Orient I leighls Branch, 1030 Bennington Si. 

JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 

§Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. 

tHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winlhrop St 

tFaneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St. . 

§Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. 

§jcffries Point Branch. 195 Webster St. 

H In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the 
different location from that now occupied. * As a delivery station. tin building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. % In City building, in pari 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. || T he lessee of the Fcl- 
lowcs Athenaeum, a private library association. 



*Dec. 27. 1881 

*Oct., 1882 

*Jan. 1. 1883 

*Nov. I, 1886 

*Mar. 11. 1889 

*Nov. 12. 1890 

*Apr. 29, 1892 

*Jan. 16. 1896 
Feb. 



*Mar. 
*May 
*Jan. 
*Nov. 



I, 1896 

6, 1896 

1. 1896 

8. 1897 

I. 1897 



*June 25, 1901 

*July 18. 1906 

*July 15. 1907 

Jan. I. 1912 

*Mar. 4. 1914 

*Mar. 5. 1914 

*Oct. 15. 1921 

opening was in 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees . 

Balance Sheet 

Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Director . 

Appendix to the Report of the Director 
Index to the Annual Report 1 925 . 



18 
11 
25 
48 
67 



Map of the Library System 



At the end 



To His Honor Malcolm E. Nichols, 

Mayor of the Cii'y of Boston. 

The Trustees of the PubHc Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31,1 925, being the seventy-fourth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

Mr. William A. Gaston, whose term as a Trustee expired on 
April 30, 1925, was re-appomted for a term ending April 30, 
1930. The Board organized at the annual meeting on June 19, 
1925, by the election of Judge Michael J. Murray as President, 
Mr. Guy W. Currier, Vice-President, and Miss Delia Jean 
Deery, Clerk. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the past year these receipts were : 



Annual appropriation ........ 

Special appropriation (Annex balance) .... 

Income from Trust Funds ...... 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds income of previous year 



$863,772.00 
1 1 ,799.39 
19,235.72 
56,579.93 



$951,387.04 

Receipts which are accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes, during the past year 
have been as follows: 

From fines $15,691.17 

From sales of catalogues etc. ........ 56.93 

From commission on telephone stations ...... 506.29 

From sale of waste paper ......... 245.15 

From payments for lost books ........ 1,262.01 

Interests on bank deposits ......... 6.08 



Total 



$1 7.767.63 



[2] 



ESTIMATES FOR 1926. 



The estimates for the maintenance of the Library for the year 
ending December 31, 1926 in segregated budget form are as 
follows: 



A — Personal service 
B — Service other than personal 
C — Equipment .... 
D — Supplies .... 
E — Materials .... 
F — Special items 



Total . 



$691,721.00 

130,522.00 

1 56,336.00 

35,410.00 

24,779.00 

864.00 

. $1,039,632.00 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the present year, covermg an eleven month period, 
there have been added to the Central Library and branches 
85,163 volumes as against 81,687 in 1924-25. Of these 
72,925 were acquired by purchase and 12,238 by gift, ex- 
changes, etc. The total expenditures for books, periodicals, news- 
papers and other library material from City appropriation and 
Trust Funds income, was $128,729.04. The total number of 
volumes in the Central Library and branches is 1 ,363,5 1 5. 

CIRCULATION. 

The total number of books issued for home use during the 
year was 3, 1 29,78 1 , for eleven months, as against 3, 1 32, 1 94 in 
1924-25, twelve months. As the Director points out, the num- 
ber would soon be doubled if there were more books, more 
branches and the required service to meet the fast-growing de- 
mands made on the Library Department. 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS. 

The Trustees are glad to report the following gifts and be- 
quests during ! 925 : in response to an appeal by the President in 
April setting forth the needs of the Library, the following gifts of 
money were received: from Mr. Percy Lee Atherton, $25, Mr. 
William York Peters, $25, and Mr. John T. Spaulding, $100. 
These were funded as the "Central Library Building Fund" 



[31 

and the Trustees voted that sums of money hereafter received 
without specific direction be added to this Fund until further 
action. 

In October, Mr. Louis E. Kirstein gave to the Library $1000, 
stating his intention to add to the fund each year if able to do so. 
This was funded as the "Louis E. Kirstein Fund". 

In December Mr. Morris Gest gave to the Library $2652.50, 
the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library of 
"The Miracle", which was funded as the "Morris Gest Fund',' 
the income to be used in the interest of dramatic art. 

In December, a bequest under the will of Alice B. Chase 
of an oil painting of "Old Boston," a memorial to her husband 
Theodore Chase, was accepted by the Trustees under approval 
of the Art Commision. 

Many important gifts of books and other library material 
have been received as usual during the year. A detailed state- 
ment of these may be found in the Director's report. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money, and hope that gen- 
erous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare works, which 
give value and rank to a great educational institution but for 
which they hesitate to expend public funds appropriated for more 
popular and pressing use. 

As a matter of interest to the public, the Board has pleasure in 
listing herewith the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. 

Artz Fund. — Donation from MiSS VlCTORINE Thomas ArtZ, of Chi- 
cago; the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose, of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the 
"Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JosHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 



[41 

may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 

Mayor of the city for the time being. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by JoilN P. BiGELOW in August. 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of ROBERT Charles Bil- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purposes of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $100,000.00 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. IngersoLL BowdiTCH. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JOSEPH H. Cenjer, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . . $1 ,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one half per cent Bonds 38,500.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 3 1 , 1925 . . 43.14 



$39,543.14 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Boston Public Library at least three per cent of the amount 
available for department exp>enses from taxes and income in said city. 
In any year when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per 
cent of the amount available for department expenses from taxes and 



[5] 

income in said City, the income given in said will for the purchase 
of books shall be paid to the Rector of T rinity Church in the City 
of Boston to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the 
poor. 

Invested in 

City of Boston; Four and one-quarter per cent Bond $1 5,000.00 
City of Boston Four per cent Bond .... 62,000.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one- 
half per cent Bond 20,000.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Four per cent 

Bond 6,000.00 

Cash in Treasury, December 31, 1925 . . . I 17.74 



$103,117.74 
Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Ff^ANK Clement, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Hf.NRY SargENT CoDMAN, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. 

It is the desire of the subscribers that a special book plate shall be 
inserted in each one of the volumes purchased, identifying it as part 
of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one half per 

cent Bond $2,800.00 

Cash in Treasury, December 31, 1925 . . . 54.41 



$2,854.41 
Cutter Fund — Bequest of Abram E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Three per cent Bond . . . $4,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one half per cent Bond 100.00 

Cash in Treasury, December 31, 1925 . , . 40.00 



$4,140.00 
lizabeth Fund — Bequest of SaRAH A. MatchetT, late of Brookline. 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing e.xtract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 



[6] 

beth fund, to be received, held and securely Invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." 
Inveskd in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel ShaRP Ford to the 
Public Library of the: City of Boston. Received in I 900. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men m Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, 1 homas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to) them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on the 
Public Library, attaching to it the following conditions: "In trust, 
that the income, but the income only, shall, from year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use of 
the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of such 
a character as to be of special interest to young men." 1 he trustees 
expressed a preference for books relative to government and political 
economy. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one quarter 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA Stewart 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. j. Lang." Received in 
1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond .... 1,500.00 

City of Boston Three per cent Bond .... 500.00 



$2,000.00 
Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 



[7] 

will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested of interest, which interest is to be appHed to the purchase 
of books published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one quarter 

per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. HaRRIS, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1 884. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of Franklin P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $3,600.00 

Cash, December 31, 1925 32.40 



$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books $10,000." Received in 1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $10,000.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donation of $1,000 made by Mr. Louis E. 
KiRSTEIN in October 1925, "to be used for any purpose of the Li- 
brary that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $1,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KaTHERINE 
Knapp "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott Lawrence, of Boston, 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said hbrary having 
a permanent value. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one half per 

cent Bond $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of EdWARD LaWRENCE, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 



[8] 

"To hold and apply the Income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of which 
is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as shall be 
fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John A. Lewis 
Library." Received in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of Charles MeaD, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall deem 
consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one half per 

cent Bond $2,500.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received from 
the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under an 
indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and Amor 
L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. McKendry, 
of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 1870. The 
above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 1924, and the 
Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the same under the 
name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books and other library material for the Mattapan 
Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $11 ,780.00 
Cash, December 31, 1925 1.44 



$11,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the Papyrus 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1 ,000.00 



[9] 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 

in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 

of books for said hbrary. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 

20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of 

a free Public Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one half per 

cent Bond $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the city for the 

time being. 
Pierce Fund — Donation made by HeNRY L. PieRCE, Mayor of the 

city, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, I 873. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt. late of Boston 

under the I 4th clause of her will for the benefit of the Dorchester 

Branch, $500.00. 

Distribution of residue of estate on May 7, 1924, $964.30. 

By vote of the trustees the bequest to be funded as the Sarah E. 

Pratt Fund, the income to be applied to the purchase of books for the 

Dorchester Branch. Received in January, 1922. 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1,400.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1925 . . 64.30 



$1,464.30 
Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. 
Invested in ' 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . $33,800.00 
City of Boston Four and one quarter per cent Bond 12,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one half per cent Bonds 6,000.00 

City of Boston Five per cent Bonds . . . 10,000.00 

$61,800.00 



[10] 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD BlaCK SewalL: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 (twenty-five thousand dollars) to be added to 
their funds and the income to be used for the purchase of books." 
Received in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis SkinneR: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries as he shall 
judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at' his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have taken if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
hne, Massachusetts. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond $40,000.00 
City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . . 10,250.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond 200.00 

1 6 shares Worcester Street Railway Company . 1 ,280.00 

Cash, December 31, 1925 2.14 



$51,732.14 
South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $100.00 



[11] 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston PubHc Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that tiie income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $3,500.00 

Partick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of Jive thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass., or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1 908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61 , has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George Ticknor, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four 
thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After 
the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less than 
one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five years 
next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for reference 
or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the Hbrary build- 
ing. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trusts 
and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and money 
are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 
In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said be- 
quests on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the 
care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLlAM C. ToDD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, I 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be ex- 



[12] 

pended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other 

countries. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Townsend Fund — Donation from WiUiam Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Pubhc Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the Hbrary ; 
each of which books shall have been pubhshed in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 1 7, 1872, said bequest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said 1 rustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 3, 1 00.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . . . 9,850.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1925 . . 37.69 



$13,987.69 
Tufts Fund — Bequests of NatHAN A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bonds $10,100.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1925 . . 31.77 

$10,131.77 



[13] 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a mihtary and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of George C. Wales : 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income ( and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. Wil- 
son, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 ,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James Lyman Whitney, who died Sep- 
tember 25. 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. T he first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising during 
the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the name of 
my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said fund after 
its accumulation or so much of said income as may be required, to 
be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are sick and in 
need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem most 
worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income from 
said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just mentioned 
shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Five per cent Bond .... $ 500.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 ,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds .... 3,500.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 



[14] 



and invested and reinvested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bonds . $1,200.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 2,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds .... 7,450.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1925 . . 21.22 



$10,671.22 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 

of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trustees 

of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 

bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 
Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 

the Trustees in April 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 

from 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters .... 

John T. Spaulding 

Invested in City of Boston four per cent Bond 
Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 

made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 

donors, viz. : 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch 

Samuel Appleton, late of Boston . 

Sally Inman Kast Shepard 

James Brown, late of Cambridge . 

Andrew Carnegie .... 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 

James Nightingale .... 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . . 335.13 



25.00 
00.00 
50.00 



$6,800.00 
1.000.00 
1 ,000.00 
500.00 
980.75 
200.00 
100.00 



$10,915.88 



5] 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 



Artz Fund . 

Bates Fund . 

Bigeiow Fund 

Robert Charles Billings Fun 

Bowditch Fund 

Bradlee Fund 

Joseph H. Center Fund 

Central Library Building Fund 

Children's Fund . 

Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman M< 

Cutter Fund 

Elizabeth Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fun 

Franklin Club Fund 

Isabella Stewart Gardne 

Morris Gest Fund 

Green Fund . 

Charlotte Harris Fund 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 

Hyde Fund . 

David P Kimball Fund 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 

Edward Lawrence Fund 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 

Charles Grcely Loring Memorial F 

Charles Mead Fund 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fun 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 

Phillips Fund 

Pierce Fund 

Sarah E Pratt Fund 

Scholfield Fund 

Sewall Fund 

Skinner Fund 

South Boston Branch Library Trust 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 

Ticknor Fund 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fun 

Townsend Fund . 

Treadwell Fund . 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 

Twentieth Regiment Memoria 

Wales Fund 

Mehilable C C. Wilson Fund 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 

James Lyman Whitney Fund 



nd 



^ 10,000.00 
50,000.00 
1,000.00 
100,000.00 
10,000.00 
1,000.00 
39,543.14 
1 50.00 
103,117.74 
2.000.00 
2,854.41 
4.140.00 
25,000.00 
6.000 00 
1 ,000 00 
5,000.00 
2,652.00 
2,000.00 
10,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,63240 
10.000.00 
1,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
500.00 
5,000.00 
500.00 
2.500.00 
11.781.44 
1.000.00 
30,000.00 
5,000.00 
1.464.30 
61 ,800,00 
25,000.00 
51.732.14 
100.00 
3,500.00 
4,000.00 
50,000.00 
4,000.00 
13,987 69 
10,131.77 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
5,000.00 
10.671.22 



$719,758.75 



[16] 

NEEDS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The Trustees wish to call special attention to the report of the 
Director which contains many points of interest in relation to the 
Library. From the report it will be seen that many important re- 
pairs and improvements were carried out during the year. Much 
still remains to be done, and the Trustees have included in their 
budget estimates this year a request for special consideration 
for carrying on the work. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered 
by the Examining Committee of the year. It appears that the 
Library can always rely on the generous and cheerful assistance 
of the best citizens whenever they are asked to render it service. 
The recommendations of the Committee desei-ve and have re- 
ceived careful attention. The Committee for 1925 consisted of: 

Mr. Gordon Abbott. Mr. Jacob J. Kaplan. 

Mr. Percy Lee Atherton. Mr. John C. Kiley. 

Prof. E. Charlton Black. Mr. Malcolm Lang. 

John T. Bottomley, M.D. Gen. Edward L. Logan. 

Mr. W. Irving Bullard. Mrs. Joseph T. Mooney. 

Miss Ida M. Cannon. Mr. Francis P. O'Connor. 

Mr. Clifton H. Dwinnell. Mrs. Fred L. Pigeon. 

Mr. Allan Forbes. Mrs. Arthur Rotch. 

Mr. John I. Fitzgerald. Rev. Lyman V. Rutledge. 

Mr. Hollis; French. Mr. Samuel Sigilman. 

Mr. Lee M. Friedman. Miss Sara H. Stites. 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson. Mr. Charles H. Tyler. 

Mrs. Barrett Wendell. 

The helpful and suggestive report of the Committee is ap- 
pended to the report of the Trustees. 

CONCLUSION. 

1 he Board notes with pleasure and satisfaction the election 
this year to the Presidency of the American Library Association 
of Mr. C. F. D- Belden, the able and efficient Director of the 
Boston Public Library. 

It is interesting to observe in connection therewith that this is 
the second time that such an honor has come to our library, the 



[17J 

former instance being when Mr. Justin Winsor, 50 years ago, 
was chosen as the first president of that association. 

We desire also to record our warm appreciation of the splendid 
spirit of cooperation which everywhere prevails between the Di- 
rector and the entire library staff. 

Michael J. Murray, 
Guy W. Currier, 
Arthur T. Connnolly, 
Louis E. Kirstein, 
William A. Gaston, 



8] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing and 
Binding Departments) ...... 

Temporary employees ...... 



Service other than personal 
Contrart woik (outsids) . 
Advertising 

Transportation of persons . 
Cartage and Freight 
Light and power 
Rent, taxes and water 
Surety bond and insurance 
Communica'ion 
Cleaning towels, etc. 
Removal of snow 
Medical . ... 

Expert .... 
Fees .... 

General Plant Repairs 

To expenditure for equipment 

Machinery 

Furniture and fittings 

Office .... 

Books : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 



Newspapers: 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 
Todd Fund 

Periodicals 

Photographs 

Tools and instruments 

General plant equipment . 

To expenditures for supplies: 
Office .... 

Food and ice . 
Fuel .... 

Forage for animals 
Medical . ■ . 

Laundry, cleaning and toilet 
Agricultural 

Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant 



$97,130.06 
22,598.38 



1,367.01 

1,566.88 



$372,367.74 
143.632.75 



198.74 

65.60 

795.17 

11,556.93 

9.169.01 

1 5.725.49 

17.50 

1,663.32 

974.57 

4.00 

15,00 

1 .429.69 

51,35 

45.291.59 



3.426.20 
6.580.15 
1 ,872.63 



119,728.44 



2,933.89 
9,710.76 
355.95 
1 ,066.49 
2,252.55 



6,733.26 

383.87 

17.496.51 

19.55 

37.54 

1 ,802.64 

258.20 

50.08 

1 ,908.70 



$516,000.49 



86,957.96 



147.927.08 



28.690.35 



Carried fort>ard 



$779,575.88 



[19] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1925 



By City Appropriation 1925 $863,772.00 

Income from Trust funds ..... 19,235.75 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliograpliic account 350.00 

Interest on deposit in London . . . . 191.47 

By Balances Brought Forward from 1925: 

Trust Funds income, City Treasurer . . . 56,579.93 

Trust Funds Income on deposit in London . . 8,821.10 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 3,970.43 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . . 5,620.15 

Library Building Addition, equipping and furnishing 1 1 ,799,39 



Cr. 



$883,459.19 



86.791.00 



CarrieJ forward 



$970,340.19 



[20] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Brought fonvarJ .... 

To expenditures for material 
Building . . . ' . 

Electrical ...... 

General plant ...... 

Special items 

Pensions ....... 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 

Binding Department: 

Salaries ....... 

Slock 

Equipment . . . 

Lioht 



Repairs ...... 

Electrical, tools, Ice and small supplies 
Freight ...... 



Printing Dep.artment: 
Salaries 
Stock. 
Equipment 
Light 
Repairs 
Outside work 
Furniture, tools 



Freight 
Insurance 



and small suppl 



To Amount Paid into City Treasury: 
From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Sale of waste paper . 
Interest on deposit . 

To Balance, December 31, 1925: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
Trust funds income. City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 
Interest on deposit in London 



Balance Unexpended: 

General appropriation . . . • • 

Special appropriation. Library Building Addition 



110.00 

3,773.39 

12,69L66 



791.56 
231.82 



47.944.44 

4.971.15 

2,191.73 

45.67 

38.95 

487.92 

27.00 



9,903.23 

2,624.06 

6,118.97 

30.42 

123.84 

40.76 

1.544.37 

2.93 

89.61 



15.691.17 

56.93 

506.29 

1,262.01 

245.15 

6.08 



3.392.67 

3.250.45 

56,722.87 

5,738.33 

191.47 



1 5,885.65 
1 1 ,799.39 



$779,575; 



16.575.05 



1.023.38 



55,706.85 



20,478.19 



1 7,767.63 



69,295.79 



27,685.04 



$988,107.82 



[21] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1925. 



Brought forward . 
By Receipts: 

From fines .... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and 1 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Sale of Wciste paper . 
Interest on deposit . 



15.691.17 

56.93 

506.29 

1,262.01 

245.15 

6.08 



Cr. 

$970,340 19 



17,767.53 



$988,107.82 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee takes pleasure in submitting its 
report for the year ending December 31, 1 925. 

The Committee appointed for the current year, consisting of 
women and men of widely various interests, has given interested 
and thorough attention to the duties assigned to it. The Com- 
mittee was organized in the usual sub-committees and the various 
assignments were carefully investigated. 

Each sub-committee has made a report in writing, and this 
will be filed with you for specific data. Through the considera- 
tion of these individual reports and discussions of them, the Ex- 
amining Committee wishes to record its highest regard for the 
service rendered by the Boston Public Library through the main 
library and its numerous branches. Members of our Committee 
found many of the branches actively engaged in supplying books 
in close alliance with public school work. There is also great 
need for the further development of the special libraries in con- 
nection with the higher grades of educational and technical work, 
in which Boston now has a large and growing community. 

The subjects to which the Examining Committee urges special 
attention are as follows: 

I The amount used for repairs on the main building, during 
the year, has been economically expended and the results 
so far, are satisfactory. It is urged that a further special 
appropriation be made for the coming year to continue 
the important work of restoration. 



[23] 

The salaries of the staff of the Library are below the proper 
standards, and as soon as the report of the National Body 
on Library Standard Salaries is published, the question 
of a revision of the salaries in the Boston Public Library 
service should be studied and recommendations made by 
the next Committee. 

The needs of the Library for endowment were never more 
urgent. The special libraries can be of great service to 
the large student body. The various groups in the Fine 
Arts Department need funds to acquire early examples 
and modern reference works in both the arts and sciences. 
A study of the question of endowment and contributions 
is urged so that steps may be taken to increase them. 

The sub-committee on branch libraries gave careful atten- 
tion to the needs of different sections of the City, and 
these were the subject of full discussion by the general 
Committee. While it is advisable for the City to own 
eventually all its branches, as contrasted with using rented 
and often unsuitable premises, the Committee appreciates 
the fact that a definite program for new buildings, with 
ensuing increase in taxation, is a part of the larger policy 
of the City. It is essential, however, that a forward look- 
ing building program be followed so that the present un- 
satisfactory conditions in some branches be overcome, and 
the best library service possible rendered to all parts of 
the City. 

A more general understanding of the importance of the ser- 
vice rendered by the Boston Public Library is essential to 
the future of this institution. Those who serve for one or 
more years on the Examining Committee have a much 
deeper appreciation of the far-reaching influence upon the 
pleasures and accomplishments of the youth and citizen- 
ship of this City, than before such contact. It is unfortu- 
nate that the membership of this Committee has such temp- 
orary contact with library affairs. That more continuous 
contact should be established between the library and 
individuals who in a sense will represent community in- 
terests, is urged. 



[24] 

6. It was VOTED : That the Examining Committee recommend 

that the Trustees consider ways and means of creating 

a more continuing and more effective interest on the part 

of the members of the Examining Committee, and suggest 

that they be appointed in rotation for a term of three or 

four years. 

The circulation of over three miUion volumes annually, the 

large use made of the reading rooms, the special libraries and the 

reference works for school use in branch libraries are the visible 

evidences of the successful administration of the Boston Public 

Library. 1 hey also impose a responsibility for wise and liberal 

development which needs a wider publicity of library affairs. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, Jan- 
uary 25, 1926. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Board of Trustees : 

An amendment to the City Charter made by the General 
Court of the Commonwealth in 1924 (Chapter 479) advanced 
the fiscal year of the city one month. In consequence, the Re- 
port herewith respectfully submitted is for an eleven-month 
period, February I to December 31, 1925. 

CIRCULATION AND ACCESSION OF BOOKS. 

The total circulation for the entire library system for the eleven 
month year was 3,129,781 ; this is 12,413 volumes less than the 
circulation for 1924—25. The branch circulation, exclusive of 
deposits to schools and institutions, was 2,306,889, a gain of 
23,1 12 over the previous year. Deposits amounted to 401,765 
volumes. 

Direct home circulation from the Central Library was 608,852 
volumes, a loss of 14,1 72 from the figures of 1924—25. 

Comparative stables of circulation statistics may be found on 
pages 48-5 1 of the Appendix. 

It is interesting to note that the total circulation for the twelve- 
month period, ending January 31, 1926, was 3,307,782. The 
gain in circulation over a similar period in 1 924-25 was 1 75,588 
volumes. 

The total accessions for 1925 were 85,163 volumes, a gain of 
4,308 over 1924-25. Of these 72,925 were acquired by pur- 
chase, 1 0,045 by gift, 1 ,93 1 by binding periodicals, 97 by 
binding newspapers, 1 20 by exchange and 45 through the Ameri- 
can Statistical Association. The purchases were distributed as 
follows: branches, 61,728 volumes, including 6,575 for the 
Deposit Collection ; Central Library, 1 1 , 1 43 volumes, including 
3,586 bought with the income from trust funds. 



[26] 

The expenditure for books for the year totals $128,729.04, 
an increase of $16,319.30 over last year. The city appropria- 
tion amounted to $103,487.85; $719.98 represents funds on 
deposit in London, and $24,521.21 was the income from trust 
funds. 

Sub-divided, the expenditures from the City appropriation 
charged to the book fund, cover $9,644.76 for periodicals, in- 
cluding $3,600.09 for branches; $1,367.01 for newspapers, 
including $320.50 for branches; $92,782.77 for books, includ- 
ing $78,712.04 for branches. 

The expenditures from Trust Funds show $1 ,566.88 paid for 
newspapers; $355.95 for photographs; $91.73 for lantern slides, 
and $22,506.65 for books. 

The year 1 925 brought new obligations and emphasized those 
which are always pressing. The Fellowes Athenaeum Branch 
at Roxbury, which is affiliated with the Fellowes Athenaeum, 
has hitherto depended on funds supplied by the Trustees of the 
Athenaeum for its books. Owing to the increased cost of ad- 
ministering the Athenaeum, this arrangement could not longer 
be carried on and the purchase of current books for this branch 
was taken over by the Library and charged to the City book 
appropriation. 

This year the Library, through the Director, has been enrolled 
as a member of the Founders of the Business Historical Society, 
Incorporated, of Boston, organized "to advance the scientific 
study and development of finance, trade, commerce, industry and 
business generally, by research and instruction." 

The completion of negotiations with the German Patent Office, 
begun in 1924, has resulted in the receipt of the greater part of 
the Patentschriften issued since 1914; the auction sales have 
yielded a fair number of desirable books, a few of which are 
noteworthy; a special collection of modern Spanish literature 
has been added for circulation, and the accessions to the Division 
of Fine Arts have been constant and important. It would not 
be possible to include in this report even a small portion of the 
many works of interest bought during the year. The selection 
of titles which follows shows a few of the more important books 
acquired, 



[27] 

Artinano y de Galdacano, Gerasio de. La arquitectura naval espanola 
(en madera) ; Bosquejo de sus condiciones y rasgos de su evolucion. 
Madrid. 1920. Illus. 

Bible, N. T. The New 1 estament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ, newly translated from the original Greek: and with the 
former translations diligently compared and revised. Massachusetts 
Bay: Boston: Printed by Thomas & John Fleet, at the Bible and 
Heart in Cornhill. 1870. Believed to be the earliest edition of the 
New Testament published in Boston. No other copy has been dis- 
covered. 

Birrell, Augustine. Three essays. I. Book-buying. II. Book-binding. 
III. The office of literature- New York. The Grolier Club, 
1924. 

Boston Massacre. A short narrative of the horrid massacre in Boston, 
perpetrated in the evening of the fifth day of March, 1 770, by the 
soldiers of the XXIXth Regiment; which with the XlVth Regi- 
ment were then quartered there: with some observations on the state 
of things prior to that catastrophe, pp. 1—48; Appendix, pp. 85—88. 
8°, stitched. Printed by Order of the Town of Boston, and sold 
by Edes and Gill, in Queen Street. I 770. 

This is the second issue of the first edition published the same year. 
Pages 85-88, containing a letter to the Duke of Richmond and the 
names of the people in England to whom the pamphlet was sent, are 
not in the first issue. 

Bowen, Frank C. The golden age of sail. With illustrations from con- 
temporary engravings and paintings in the Macpherson collection. 
London. 1925. 

Emerson, William and Georges Cromort. Old bridges of France. A 
series of historical examples from Roman times to the end of the 
XVIH. century. New YorL 1925. 

Evans, Lewis. The castle of Christianitie, detecting the long erring 
estate, asvvell of the Romaine Church, as of the Byshop of Rome: 
together with the defence of the Catholique faith. London. 1568. 
The first edition. 

Grolier Club, New York. Catalogue of original and early editions of 
some of the poetical and prose works of English writers from Wither 
to Prior. New YorL 1905. 3 v. 

Haebler, Conrad. Die deutschen Buchdrucker des XV. Jahrhunderts 
im Auslande. Munchen. 1924. 

Heale, William. An apologie for women: or, an opposition to Mr. Dr. 
G(ager) his assertion. Who held in the Act at Oxforde. Anno. 
1 608. That it was lawfull for husbands to beate their wiues. By 
W. H. of Oxford. 1 609. Galatea Collechon. 

Hubert, Sir Francis. The deplorable life and death of Ed\^'ard the 
Second, King of England. Together with the downefall of the two 



128] 

vnfortunate fauroits, Gavestone and Spencer. London: 1628. The 
first (surreptitious) edition. 

Kommission fiir den Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke. Gesamtkatalog 
der Wiegendrucke. Band I. Liepzig. 1925. 
This great catalogue of Incunabula will be published in 1 2 volumes. 

Morison, Stanley. Four centuries of fine printing. Upwards of six 
hundred examples of the work of presses established during the 
years 1500 to 1914. "With an introductory text and indexes by 
Stanley Morison. London. 1924. 

Morison, Stanley, compiler and editor. Modern fine printing. An ex- 
hibition of printing issued in England, the United States of America, 
France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Czecho-Slovakia, Holland 
and Sweden during the twentieth century. London. 1925. 

Musical Association (London). Proceedings. Sessions 1-43. 1874/75- 
1916/17. London. 1875-1917. 

By this purchase the imperfect set in the Brown Music Library was 
completed. 

Passio domini nostri Jeus Christi ex quattuor evangelistis collecta. Gothic 
letter, double columns, with outline woodcut of the Virgin and Child 
and St. Anne on the last page. Sinenota, sed cociniae retro minores 
(M. Van Werden). 1499. Example of the Cologne press. 

Salmony, Alfred. Sculpture in Siam. London. 1925. 

Shakespeare, William. The plays of William Shakespeare, accurately 
printed from the text of the corrected copies, left by the late George 
Steevens, Esq., and Edmond Malon, Esq. With a glossary. Lon- 
don. 1838. This volume was bought because it contained a so- 
called 'Tore-edge" painting of which the Library had no example. 
On the fore-edge is a painting illustrating Shakespeares' birthplace. 

Theocritus. The idyls of Theocritus, (Bion and Moschus), rendered 
into English prose by Andrew Lang. Illustrated after drawings by 
W. Russell Flint. London. 1922. 2 v. 

Ungerus, Christianus Theophilus. De Aldi Pii Manutii Romani vita 
meritisque in rem Hteratam liber . . . auctus cura S. L. Geret. 
Vitembergae. 1753. 

Wilson, Hardy. Old colonial architecture in New South Wales and 
Tasmania. Sydney. 1924. 

Year book. The. of oriental art and culture. 1924/25 (vol. 1-2,): 
London. 1925. Text, 1 v. Illus. Music; Atlas. 1 v. Edited 
by Arthur Waley. 

During the year 17,916 volumes, 21,524 serials and 760 
photographs have been received as gifts. These figures include 
7,685 volumes and 1 2,1 26 serials received in the Branch Depart- 
ment and Information Office, — material duplicated in the Cen- 



[29] 

tral Library. In addition, 53 newspaper subscriptions were 
continued by the publishers. 

Gifts of money were received from the following : 

Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, the sum of $1000, "to be used for 
any purpose of the Library that the Trustees see fit." 

Mr. Morris Gest, $2,652.50, representing the entire gross re- 
ceipts from the special matinee of The Miracle given for the bene- 
fit of the Boston Public Library (Boston Opera House, Novem- 
ber 30). This was funded as the "Morris Gest Fund," the 
income to be used in the interest of Dramatic Art. 

Mrs. Charles Weld, $15, used for the purchase of a book 
which the Library would not ordinarily buy. 

The generous contributions from the Columbia Phonograph 
Company of New York, the General Phonograph Corporation 
of New York and the Victor Talking Machine Company of 
Camden, New Jersey, have enriched the Library Collection to 
the extent of 3 1 7 records. The Columbia Phonograph Com- 
pany gave 1 38 records, the General Phonograph Corporation, 
41, and the Victor Talking Machine Company, 39. The gift 
of these records was made to enable the Library to illustrate 
the weekly lectures on the Symphony Concerts given by the 
Music Division. 

Other gifts, with the names of the givers, are listed on pages 
59-63 of the Appendix. 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there were 123,994 cards 
available for current use. During the year 28,122 new regis- 
trations and 3 1 ,845 renewals, making a total of 59,967 cards, 
were added through the Central Library and branches. Bor- 
rowers who allowed their home use privileges to lapse number 
54,534, leaving a total of 129,427 "live" cards on December 
31, 1925; a gain of 5,433 over last year. The gain in regis- 
tered "live" cards for a five-year period has been 23,969. 

Cards issued to teachers prior to February 1, 1925, numbered 
9,432. Of this number 1,285 were renewed and 321 added 
during the year, making a total of 1 ,606 teacher's cards in use, 
compared with 1,561 in 1924-25. 



130] 

Of the 3,715 special privilege cards which had been issued 
up to February 1, 1925, there were 367 renewals and 139 new 
cards granted during the year, making a total of 506 special 
privilege cards in use, compared with 429 in 1924—25. 

The outstanding feature of this year's development has been 
the extension of the filing cabinet to include 1 50,000 records, thus 
relieving overcrowded files and providing space for the expansion 
of the numerical record. 

CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes and parts of volumes catalogued 
during 1925 was 106,158, representing 75,809 titles. The 
number of cards added to the catalogues was 1 78,082, of which 
number 140,321 were added to the catalogues in the Central 
Library, and 37,761 to those in the branches. Of the cards 
filed in the Central Library 55,524 were placed in the Bates Hall 
and Issue Department catalogues; 34,594 in the Official cata- 
logues; 15,665 in the Special Libraries catalogues; and 34,538 
were sent to the Library of Congress and Harvard College Li- 
brary, or reserved for the making of lists on special subjects. 
From the Library of Congress the Boston institution has re- 
ceived in return galley proofs of its cards, useful for comparison 
and reference, and printed cards for books on the fine arts and 
technical subjects. From Harvard College the Library has re- 
ceived copies of their printed cards. By means of the "rush" 
system now in use, titles of new books, if bound, were filed in 
the catalogues the day after their shelf-numbers were assigned. 
The falling off from last year in the number of cards printed is 
owing to the loss of one experienced compositor in the Printing 
Department and the thorough overhauling of the linotype ma- 
chines. 

Prmted catalogue cards for all new books has been set aside 
as copy for the Monthly Bulletin, and since December I , type- 
written cards have been made for the editor in advance of 
printing. 

Much revision of classification and cataloguing has been done, 
some of which already appears in the catalogues while some 
still awaits printing. 



[31] 

The abuse of the pubHc catalogues by soiled hands and rough 
handling continues to be a matter of much concern in spite of 
all efforts. Many cards and often entire subjects have to be re- 
placed long before they would need to be if carefully used. The 
fiction catalogue in the Issue Department has been almost entirely 
renewed during the year. 

The routine work of the Shelf Division has proceeded as usual. 
Although more progress was made m shelf-readmg than in late 
years, still more could have been accomplished but for the changes 
in the Fine Arts and Technical Divisions, where a new classi- 
fication, based on the Library of Congress system, was devised 
and put into operation. There have been the usual readjust- 
ments in the shelving of books. In connection with the changes 
in the Special Libraries, the Map Division has been moved to 
Stack 6 and the cabinets formerly in the West Gallery have 
been moved to the North Gallery. 

Statistics relating to the work of the Catalogue and Shelf 
Department may be found on page 52 of the Appendix. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The Monthly Bulletin of Recent Books, which was begun 
in January, 1924, taking the place of the Quarterly^ Bulletin 
and the Weekly List of New Boo^s, has been continued in 
eleven issues, January-November, 1925; 2,075 copies being 
printed of each. The November number closes this series of 
the Bulletin. 

Brief Reading Lists, Nos. 31-34. The subjects were as 
follows : No. 3 1 , Operas : a selected list of scores, librettos and 
related works, compiled by Richard G. Appel, of the Music 
Division. No. 32, the Circus, compiled by L. E. Taylor, of 
the Catalogue Department, in connection with the coming of 
two circuses to Boston in June. No. 33, The Miracle, compiled 
by Mary A. Tenney, of the Catalogue Department, in anticipa- 
tion of Morris Gest's production in Boston of the music-drama 
pantomime of that name. No. 34, A selected list of inexpen- 
sive books for Christmas presents, with names of publishers, prices 
and notes, compiled by Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work 
with Children. 



132] 

Bibliographical lists have been prepared in connection with 
the programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the con- 
certs by the Lenox Quartet given in the lecture hall of the Library. 

Library Life, the staff bulletin of the Library, continues to be 
published by an editorial board of ten members who share the 
work of gathering material, and four of whom are, in turn, Editor- 
in-Chief of one monthly issue. The paper is believed to have 
justified its existence as a record of library activities and a means 
of promoting acquaintance and co-operation. 

A Guide to Serial Publications founded prior to 1918 and 
now or recently current m Boston, Cambridge, and vicmity, com- 
piled and edited by 1 homas Johnston Homer. Part IV has 
for some time been ready for the printer and a considerable por- 
tion of Part V is now also ready. Unusual conditions in the 
Printing Department have caused the publication to be delayed, 
but Part IV will probably appear soon; meanwhile use may be 
made of the material by consultation with Mr. Homer, 

Opportunities for Adult Education in Greater Boston, 1925- 
26. A list of free public lectures and public educational courses, 
offered by the Massachusetts Department of Education, Division 
of University Extension; The Lowell Institute; the Commission 
on Extension Courses; The Public Library of the City of Bos- 
ton; and other institutions. 

BATES HALL. 

The reference work of the Library has gone on at its usual 
even pace. The number of inquiries answered by mail has 
been larger than in any previous year, amounting to 807 letters, 
which came to us from 43 of the 48 states, three Provinces of 
Canada and eight foreign countries; of the total number, 151 
asked for information on points of Genealogy, 

Bates Hall has been well filled during the year, but it has 
always been possible to provide chairs for those who came. The 
largest recorded attendance, on Saturday, December 12, at 
5 p.m. was 309; counting the stools at the Catalogue, the Hall 
accommodates 3 1 6. The total number of books brought from 
the stacks in the eleven-month period covered by this report 



[33] 

was 229,189. The year has been marked by no excitement 
comparable to that caused by the cross-word puzzles of last year; 
although a recent contest devoted to American history has re- 
sulted in the mutilation of a number of volumes by persons who 
apparently think that the removal of a leaf from a book will 
keep it out of the hands of other contestants. 

One hundred and fifty-two new titles have been added to 
the reference collection and 124 annuals or new editions sub- 
stituted for earlier issues. Two hundred and fifty-five books 
have disappeared from the collection during the year and 12 
volumes missing in former years have come to light. The steady 
growth of the collection of Supreme Court Reports has necessi- 
tated the removal of some other legal reference works, most of 
which, however, were out of date. 

The department has received some publicity through the daily 
broadcasting during a considerable portion of the year from 
station WEEI of answers to questions, for which credit was duly 
given to the Library by the announcer. 

At the beginning of the year a new division, that of Genealogy, 
was created in the department and Miss Agnes C. Doyle, long 
first assistant, who has specialized in the subject for many years, 
was appomted assistant-in^charge ; a desk for her use was placed 
in the Hall near the shelves devoted to Genealogy and Heraldry. 
Some re-arrangement has made it possible to assemble a very 
good working collection of genealogical books on the shelves 
available; a card catalogue of coats of arms is now in progress. 
The change in organization is already justifying itself, and seems 
to have the approval of the public. 

In connection with the appointment of Miss Doyle, Mr. 
Michael J. Conroy was advanced to the position of first assistant 
at the Bates Hall Catalogue. 

A great improvement in the appearance of the Hall has been 
made by the laying of the handsome new floor covering of re- 
inforced rubber in the Catalogue enclosure, replacing the badly 
worn cork matting. TTie laying of this floor required the tem- 
porary removal of the catalogue cases and gave an opportunity 
for their rearrangement on a radial plan. High tables have been 
substituted for the old low ones, and thus far the new arrange- 



134] 

ment seems to have many advantages. The enclosure is less 
crowded and it is much easier to keep the drawers replaced in the 
cases. The lighting of the hall is also in process of improvement; 
lampshades of a modern pattern are being substituted for the 
old ones at the catalogues and book cases. 

NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS. 

The number of papers regularly filed in the Newspaper Room 
is 273. During the year nine papers ceased publication or were 
consolidated with other papers. There are 218 daily and 35 
weekly papers received, of which 1 95 are published in the 
United States and 78 in foreign countries. The bound volumes 
now number 9,092, an mcrease of 97 volumes since the last 
report. Readers to the number of 1 8,8 1 4 consulted 34,083 
bound volumes, as compared with 1 8,589 persons who used 
34,057 during the preceding year. 

From various sources missing numbers are constantly being 
added to the files of the 1 8th century papers. The Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society has made photostat copies of num- 
bers of the Boston Newsletter missing from the Library's file, 
which is new practically complete. 

In the collection of Patent Documents, the total number of 
volumes is 18,461, the increase for the year being 910 volumes. 
More than 70,000 numbers of the Patentschrifien have been 
received from the German Patent office during the year. Some 
of the years must remain incomplete; the missing numbers are 
probably abandoned or secret. The volumes are now being 
made up and will shortly be bound. 

The recorded number of persons using the files during the 
year (I 1 months) was 18,649, as compared with 18,465 during 
the previous twelve-month year. The number of volumes con- 
sulted was I 1 0,745, an increase of 112 over those used in 1 924- 
25. 

INFORMATION OFFICE, GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT ROOM 
AND OPEN SHELF ROOM. 

The Information Office continues to be of great service in de- 
flecting from other departments inquiries which are readily an- 



[35] 

svvered from directories, school and college catalogues, recent 
government documents, vocational information pamphlets, and 
publications of chambers of commerce. A large file of street 
and telephone directories has been maintained, partly through 
the generosity of Boston business houses who donated their dis- 
carded directories to the Library for exchange purposes. Many 
directories of other cities were procured in this way. 

The Government Documents have been carefully studied and 
brought up to date during the past year. Now that many of the 
duplicate federal reports and bulletins, which formerly were 
sent free to this Room, must be paid for, only the most important 
and popular are ordered. A complete file of government docu- 
ments is available elsewhere in the Library. A title and sub- 
ject index has been made for the Trade Information Bulletin 
issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. It 
has greatly increased the usefulness of these bulletins and has 
been consulted by about three hundred persons every month. 

The Vocational Information Service continues to gain in ef- 
ficiency ; last year about nine hundred new catalogues and pam- 
phlets were added from federal, state and city departments and 
from private organizations. There is a great demand for in- 
formation regardmg university extension courses. 

The Open Shelf Room increases in popularity. An author 
and title catalogue of the collection has been made and has 
justified its existence. School students are beginning to use the 
room in larger numbers. Books covering topics of current in- 
terest are brought from the stacks and are made readily accessible 
to the public. Though the interest in memoirs, books of travel, 
poems and plays is as keen as ever, there has been a decided 
increase in the demand for books on the subjects treated in the 
American Library Association series, "Reading with a Pur- 
pose." The call for French, Spanish and Italian books is con- 
stant and can be met; but the demand for recent German books 
has been greater than the supply. 

The summer service in the Court Yard during the noon hours 
was appreciated by readers and the circulation of books and 
magazines showed an increase over last year. 



[361 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 



ATTENDANCE. 










10 12 2 


4 


6 


8 


9.45 


A.M. M. P.M. 

4,264 15,875 25,943 
6,432 18,526 32,162 


P.M. 

31,762 
36,427 


P.M. 

21,786 
23,841 


P.M. 

26,619 
27,254 


P.M. 

12,827 
13,763 



The steady increase In the use of periodical literature for 
reference, especially by students, has made it necessary to rear- 
range the division, using the inner room for current periodicals 
and the outer for reference work. New equipment has been 
provided, releasing the wall space for shelving where the most 
used bound periodicals are now housed. There is a new rack 
for current periodicals, which have been first classified and then 
alphabetized. This new arrangement has proved satisfactory, 
both from the reader's and the Library's point of view. 



AT THE HOURS 
1921-22 . 

1924-25 . 

1925 ... 16,927 19,214 33,026 37,026 24,645 27,832 13,891 

The use of bound and unbound periodicals shows the follow- 
ing increase over last year: 

BOUND FILES. 

Bound volumes consulted during the year 1924-1925 1925 (11 months) 

Daytime (week-days) 49.315 50,260 

Evening and Sunday 20,762 22,163 

UNBOUND FILES. 

Unbound periodicals consulted during the year 1924-1925 1925 (II months) 

Daytime (week-days) 57,943 59,675 

Evening and Sunday ..... 25,882 26,719 

The current periodicals, exclusive of those issued by the state 
and federal governments, regularly filed for readers in the Peri- 
odical Department, number 1 ,258. In addition there are filed 
for use by readers in other departments current periodicals espe- 
cially related to the fields covered by such departments, as follows : 

Fine Arts and Music Divisions of the Special Libraries . . . . 136 

Ordering Department .......... 27 

Statistical Department .......... 49 

Teachers' Reference Room and Children's Room ..... 60 

272 
Periodical Room '258 

Total number of current periodicals received 1530 



[37] 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES. 



The Special Libraries include all the collections housed on the 
third floor of the Central Building and comprise the divisions of 
Fine Arts, Music, Technology, and Special Collections (Barton- 
Ticknor Division). 

Many changes have been made in the Special Libraries in the 
effort to secure better service and provide for the growth of the 
collections. Additional accommodation for readers and students 
has been made in the Special Libraries Reading Room and the 
West Gallery. Three new open-shelf alcoves have been or- 
ganized — Fine Arts, Art-Students' Reference, and Chemical 
Reference — and an alcove has been taken for the classified Fine 
Arts accessions. These open shelf additions necessitated the 
shifting of the entire Fine Arts and Technology book collections. 
All the book cabinets have been removed from the West and 
Barton Galleries. About eighty of these have been placed in 
the new cabinet storage room, made by flooring over the second 
balcony of the Statistical Room. 

As explained in the last Annual Report, further changes on 
this floor are greatly needed. Plans have been made for steel 
stacks to be erected in the Barton Gallery alcoves and the ad- 
joining northwest corner room, an expedient which will release 
shelf space for the needed Book-Treasure Room and the united 
music collections, while it will, at the same time, keep together 
the special collections now in the Barton Gallery. 

The Fine Arts Division has continued to build up its im- 
mense collection and, since last July, it has classified all acces- 
sions on an abridged Library of Congress scheme, having a special 
shelf-notation devised by Mr. Michael McCarthy of the Shelf 
Department. The entire Fine Arts open-shelf collection has 
been reclassified, revised, rearranged and shelf-listed, and an 
open-shelf collection of oversize books has been organized for 
the convenience of art students. 

The Technology Division has continued to build up its ad- 
mirably organized book collection and special reference tools, 
described in the last Annual Report. A new reference tool is 
the open-shelf alcove devoted to serial sets in Chemistry. 



[38] 

The Music Division in co-operation with the Extension Di- 
vision of the State Board of Education has arranged for several 
series of interpretative lectures on symphony concerts and operas 
and, for these lectures, has prepared programs and book-lists. 
The gift collection of phonograph records has been enlarged by 
3 1 7 records from publishers. 

The Barton-Ticknor Division (Special Collections) has con- 
tinued to draw attention to the treasures of the Library by monthly 
exhibitions of manuscripts and rare editions of famous authors, 
and Dr. Haraszti's critical descriptions of these exhibitions have 
appeared in Boston newspapers. In his new post of editor, Dr. 
Haraszti will continue to render this service to the Department 
and the Library. 

From February 1 to December 31, 1925, the Department 
put on view thirty exhibitions. Of this number, twelve were of 
books and documents in the possession of the Library; thirty 
were loan exhibitions, only two of them consisting of books. 

The number of books issued for home use from the Special 
Libraries during eleven months was 2 1 ,63 1 . In the same period, 
28,921 pictures and 5,746 lantern slides were issued for use 
outside the Library. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

The urgent demand for books for children could not be denied 
and 39,31 1 volumes, 53 percent of the total number of books 
purchased, were bought at a cost of $41 ,858.39. 

Home use of books drawn on juvenile cards comprised 50 per 
cent of the total circulation of the Library system. In the 
branches alone the proportion was greater, amounting to 58 per 
cent of the total. 

Fifty-three per cent of the card-holders of the Library are 
under sixteen years of age and are, therefore, classed as children. 
Registration in this class was increased 2,966 in 1925; although 
this does not seem as large an increase in normal development 
as might have been expected, it evidently kept pace with the gain 
in adult borrowers, being 54 per cent of the total gain. As the 
Library increases its corps of workers equipped by training and 



X 



[391 

temperament to do intensive work with children, its efforts for 
a fuller registration will be likely to yield greater returns. 

Growth in work with children is to be measured not only by 
an increase in cardholders and home circulation, but by improved 
accommodations in the libraries themselves. There have been 
minor improvements at a number of points, but nowhere else has 
the change been so marked as at Uphams Corner, where the 
swimming tank in the municipal building was taken over as a 
children's room in 1924 and transformed from a naturally cold 
interior into a cheerful and pleasant reading room. This ar- 
rangement afforded an excellent opportunity to organize the 
work with children and put a specially trained assistant in charge 
of it. The results of this step have been noticeable in increased 
circulation, better discipline and more constructive work with 
the children who frequent the branch. 

In all parts of the library system the book collections show the 
effects of the larger expenditure of the last three years. Not 
only are the books in better condition, but the range of selection 
is wider, embracing a greater variety of interests. The reading 
of children to-day shows an earlier arrival at mature tastes and 
the sophistication caused by city life creates a demand for books 
written to suit an adult public. Where one child wanted mystery 
and detective stories ten years ago, there are now twenty who 
are eager to read them. Without catering to this demand, it is 
sometimes possible to offer as substitutes stirring narratives of 
adventure and travel to satisfy the craving for excitement. 

Ability to choose acceptable substitutes and introduce them 
successfully depends upon an ever growing familiarity with books, 
no less than a gift for tactful approach to the reader. In order 
to prepare assistants for this type of personal service to young 
people, two courses in children's literature were given during the 
year to members of the staff in the Central Library and branches. 
It is believed that these lessons have helped the members of the 
classes to give more sympathetic and discriminating assistance 
to boys and girls who use the Library, 

The Library has constant realization of the importance of the 
story hour as a means of introducing books to the children. 
Hundreds of children gather for the weekly story hours in dif- 



[40] 

ferent parts of the city and the continued popularity of this feature 
is the best indication that it suppHes a need. Each year enlarges 
the opportunities offered the story tellers to go into the public 
schools and in these school visits the welcome grows more and 
more cordial at each return. It seems evident, too, that the 
Library, by supplying this entertainment, is building in another 
way for better citizenship in the community, since the story-hour 
establishes habits of quiet, orderly attention in marked contrast 
to the uproarious behavior often noted in the motion picture houses. 
Respect for the library building is always expected and good 
conduct becomes instmctive, for the story hour period at least. 

Relations with the public schools have been friendly and, in 
some parts of the city, close. The Course in Citizenship re- 
cently adopted by the City of Boston occasioned many requests 
for books to help build character through the emphasis laid on 
qualities such as self-control, self-reliance, good workmanship, 
etc. The ingenuity and resourcefulness of attendants have been 
taxed to supply these requirements, as the call has been for spe- 
cific examples of each quality. 

The Central Children's Room has been drawn upon for all 
these demands, since its readers are to be found in every quarter. 
Furthermore, it has made special contacts with many organiza- 
tions and individuals seeking assistance or enlightment on chil- 
dren's books. The collection of finely illustrated editions has 
been used by art sudents, by commercial illustrators, costumers 
and designers, by editors, teachers and parents, as well as by those 
who are simply book lovers. Numerous classes from different 
types of schools have come for instruction on the resources of 
the Library or for reference use of reserved books. 

The fruitful and pleasant co-operation between the Children's 
Museum and the Children's Department continued through ex- 
hibits lent for display wherever showcases were available. Col- 
lections of objects from the Philippine Islands and Japan, besides 
natural objects — minerals, shells and birds^ — were specially en- 
joyed. Many of our library readers made a new and delightful 
connection with the Museum of Fine Arts when they were given 
invitations to attend the summer story hour there. It is a source 
of satisfaction to know that these three institutions can work in 



[41] 

such happy association to enrich the Hves of the children of Bos- 
ton. 

Two related problems confront the Children's Department 
at the Central Library. Solution of the one may mean solution 
of the other. These perplexities have to do with the reasonable 
claims of two groups, the pupils in the high schools and the 
teachers. Any expansion of the Children's Department should 
naturally be in the direction of better service to the young people 
just growing beyond books for children and not yet sufficiently 
experienced to use a large library to good advantage. There 
is ample proof of the need of greater attention to the require- 
ments of high school students and the Children's Department 
attempts to help whenever possible, but space for expansion is 
lacking, unless the adjoining room is used for the purpose, instead 
of for a Teachers' Reference Room as at present. On the other 
hand there has been a marked increase in the use of this room. 

The work of the Teachers' Room is, however, properly a part 
of the general reference department. It began with a small col- 
lection of books for kindergarten teachers and now threatens to 
interfere with the legitimate function of the Children's Depart- 
ment. Not only does the presence of so many adult students 
complicate the work with children and tax the seating capacity 
of the room, but the multiplicity of their requirements lays an 
increasing burden upon the stafF. To keep up with the maga- 
zines on educational subjects, the growing bibliographies on 
topics of current importance, the material for debates, the Uni- 
versity Extension reserves, calls for the entire time of an experi- 
enced reference assistant. It is not fitting that students from 
three universities and many training schools should be obliged 
to come for their assignments to a room which is practically an 
adjunct to the Children's Department. 

THE BRANCH SYSTEM. 

The total circulation through the branches, including books 
issued from Central Library collections on borrowers' cards, was 
2,816,073. This is a gain, in an eleven-month period, of 18,067 
over 1924-25. The number of books issued from the Central 



[42] 

Library through branches was 107,419; this includes 82,611 
from the deposit collection and 24,808 from Central Library 
collections. Sixteen branches gained and fifteen lost in circula- 
tion. The greatest gains were at Mattapan, North End, Fel- 
lowes Athenaeum, Dorchester, Codman Square, Mt. Bowdoin, 
Uphams Corner and Orient Heights; the greatest losses were at 
Roxbury Crossing, Lower Mills and South End. 

The branch circulation for the twelve-month period ending 
January 31, 1926, was 2,978,036 This shows a gain of 
1 80,030 volumes over last year. In this period, twenty-eight 
branches gamed in circulation and three lost. 

The number of volumes sent out on deposit to 326 agencies 
(207 schools, 53 fire engine houses, and 43 institutions of various 
kinds) was 86,400, as against 92,352 last year. The total 
number of volumes sent to schools was 56,328, compared with 
59,216 last year. Of this number 21,630 were sent from the 
Branch Issue Division, Central Library, as compared with 
1 9,393 the year before. The number of books issued on deposit 
from the branch libraries, chiefly to schools, was 34,698, com- 
pared with 39,823 the year before. The number of individual 
teachers supplied was 1,372 as against 1,312 in 1924-25. 

Interlibrary loans for eleven months amounted to 1 ,704 vol- 
umes, 323 less than last year. Thirty-one volumes were bor- 
rowed from other libraries. Of the 1 ,41 1 applications received, 
474 were refused. 

In the branch system, adult education has developed along 
four lines : an obligatory course of training for branch assistants ; 
the preparation of numerous lists, several of which may be used 
as reading courses; the establishment in each branch of an in- 
formation file of material ; and an organized campaign of educa- 
tional publicity. 

In the past six years the personnel turnover has amounted to 
only 22 per cent; compulsory retirement under the pension act 
accounts for 9 per cent of this, and marriage for 6 per cent. 
Considerable progress has been made in the type of examina- 
tion for library service. The old memory test has given way to 
tests for general information and judgment. Assistants who have 
been selected by these tests are now trained in a course which has 



143] 

been started this year. As outlined, it will cover four years. 
The training in the branches will be supplemented by courses 
given in the Central Library. 

A uniform classification for pamphlets and ephemeral material 
has been devised for the entire branch system and in the past 
year this has been put into operation. 

Traveling exhibits have followed a regular schedule during 
the year, as have the ninety-two posters covering a great variety 
of popular subjects. The book-wagon service instituted at Ty- 
ler Street during the summer months was very successful in es- 
tablishing friendly relations with people who had been diffident 
about coming to the library. Adult circulation at the branch, 
both fiction and non-fiction, was increased; the use of American- 
ization books was encouragingly large. Traveling libraries com- 
posed of units of twenty-five each — biography, music, modern 
poetry — were bought to supplement the branch collections on 
these subjects. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

The Library offered eighty-seven free public entertainments 
(lectures, concerts, miracle plays, etc.) in the thirty weeks of 
the lecture season. Of these, thirty-seven lectures were illus- 
trated with lantern slides; eight were concerts; and three were 
miracle plays. The entertainments covered the following fields : 
lectures on travel, 25 ; lectures on literature, and readings, 2 1 ; 
music lectures and concerts, 16; lectures on drama, plays, and 
dramatic readings, 1 1 ; lectures on art, 5 ; scientific lectures. 5 ; 
miscellaneous lectures, 4. 

Fourteen lectures were given under the auspices of the Ruskin 
Club; six by the American Poetry Association, five by the Field 
and Forest Club, five by the Drama League, two by the Lincoln 
House Orchestra, one by the Dickens Fellowship. Six con- 
certs by the Lenox Quartet were given by Mrs. Elizabeth S. 
Coolidge. These were greatly enjoyed by an audience which 
filled the hall at each concert. 

The Hall was also used every week-day, except Thursday, 
in the evening, and several mornings and afternoons as well, by 



[44] 

the State Department of Education, Division of University Ex- 
tension, which offered for a nominal fee courses on a variety of 
subjects. 

Thirty exhibitions were held in the Fine Arts Exhibition Room 
and the Barton-Ticknor Room. In the latter room the material 
shown was mainly bibliographical and included first editions and 
manuscripts relating to Longfellow, Nathaniel Bowditch, 
Thackeray, William Ellery Channing, the Battles of Lexingron 
and Bunker Hill. 

There are certain exhibitions which are shown each year in the 
main exhibition room. These are the House Beautiful Cover 
Design Competition; the competitive poster designs made by 
school children for "Be Kind to Animals" Week; and "Fifty 
Books" chosen each year by the American Institute of Graphic 
Arts for excellence of format. In addition to these, two me- 
morial exhibitions of reproductions of the work of John Singer 
Sargent were given, one at the time of his death, the other to 
supplement the exhibition of originals at the Museum of Fine 
Arts. There were also exhibitions of colour prints; examples 
of the work of the Pre-Raphaelites; material relating to dramatic 
events of importance ; and various collections of book rarities. 

STAFF INSTRUCTION. 

The four courses of instruction for members of the staff de- 
scribed in last year's report were all brought to a successful con- 
clusion. In a number of cases it has been pleasant to see that 
these courses have enabled assistants to pass examinations neces- 
sary for promotion in the service. The present year a course is 
being given by Prof. Robert E. Rogers, of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, on the "Great Classics of Literature 
since the Renaissance." Twenty members of the staff are en- 
rolled in this course, which is the fifth in the important series on 
literary subjects given by Prof. Rogers under the auspices of 
the Massachusetts Division of University Extension. Two 
courses in children's literature are being given by Miss Jordan 
to members of the staff in the Central Library and branches. 



[45] 



THE BINDERY AND PRINTING DEPARTMENTS. 

During the year four new pieces of machinery were installed 
in the Bindery Department. These have added greatly to the 
efficiency of the department, and as a consequence it has not been 
necessary, with one exception, to replace any of those who have 
been retired. The output of the Bindery, (1 1 months), was 
50,206 volumes, 3,202 more than in 1924-25. The number 
of recased new books was 9,458, a slight increase over last year. 

The old linotypes in the Printing Department were exchanged 
for three new models and installed during the summer. These, 
with the new press bought in 1924-25, bring the machinery 
of the department up to date. 

MECHANICAL AND OTHER CHANGES AND REPAIRS. 

Owing to increased appropriations, real progress has been 
made in putting the Central Building and branch libraries in 
repair. The more important changes, in addition to those noted 
in other parts of the Report, are as follows: 

New Uniflow engine and generator. One of the old engmes 
and generators was repaired. 

New boilers in the Annex were retubed. The old boilers were 
removed from beneath the main stairway. 

Book railway was repaired and rebuilt ; all its machinery is now 
in good running order. 

New electrical "service elevator" replaced the old one at the 
Blagden Street entrance. 

New ventilating system was installed for the Lecture Hall. 

Major leaks were stopped on the roof of the Central Buildmg, 
although extensive repairs are still needed. The metal secondary 
roof and catch-pans over the hall were repaired and renewed 
where necessary. 

A centrifugal pump was installed. 

The Record Room was enlarged, painted and relighted. New 
lights were installed in the Fine Arts Gallery, Periodical and 
Statistical Rooms at the Central Library. 

A sprinkler system was installed in two sections of the Central 
Library. 



[46] 

The Fine Arts Gallery, Stack, floors 1-6, Printing Depart- 
ment, window trims and iron work at the Central Building were 
painted. The exterior and interior of the Faneuil Branch Li- 
brary were painted; at the Jamaica Plain Branch the walls were 
painted, as were the main room and children's room at Uphams 
Corner. 

The upper gallery of the Statistical Room was floored over, 
giving much needed space for Fine Arts Department cabinets. 

New shelving was installed in the Lower Mills, Mattapan, 
Neponset, Orient Heights, South Boston, and Uphams Corner 
Branches. Other minor improvements and repairs were made 
throughout the branch system. 

This year it was also possible to improve the lighting in a 
number of the branches. Electric systems were installed at 
Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, Faneuil, Hyde Park, Ja- 
maica Plain, North End, Orient Heights, and Uphams Corner 
Branches. At East Boston the lighting was changed from di- 
rect to indirect. 

RETIREMENTS. 

Durmg the year the following persons were retired under 
the Boston Retirement Act: 

Fellowes Athenaeum Branch: Martha L. C. Berry, second 
assistant, (retired April 30, 1925), entered service 1883; 
Bindery Department: William P. Hemstedt, assistant foreman, 
(retired May 31 , 1925, voluntary), entered service 1883; Maxi- 
milian Eichhorn, forwarder, (retired August 31 , 1925), entered 
service 1904; Ordering Department: Emily O. Frinsdorff, first 
assistant, (retired August 31, 1925, voluntary), entered service 
1894; Jamaica Plain Branch: Nellie F. Riley, first assistant, 
(retired October 31, 1925, voluntary), entered service 1882; 
Executive Department: Adelaide A. Nichols, auditor, (retired 
December 31,1 925) , entered service 1 868; Engineer and Jani- 
tor Department: Thomas J. Sexton, janitor-laborer, (retired De- 
cember 31, 1925), entered service 1916. 



t47] 



CONCLUSION. 

To the employees of the Library system the Director extends 
his sincere appreciation for the services they have rendered during 
the past eleven months. It is a pleasure to acknowledge all the 
honest and individual effort on the part of chiefs of departments, 
librarians of branches, and assistants generally, w^hich has given 
added prestige to the work of the institution. Special recognition 
is made of the loyal and efficient aid of Mr. Frank H. Chase, 
the Reference Librarian. 

. Charles F. D. Belden, 

Director, 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION. 





1920-21 


1921-22 


.1922-23 


1923-24 


1924-25 


1925t 


Central Library 


551,190 


591,640 


590,655 


576,997 


623,024 


608,852 


Branches: 














Allslon 


41,369 


47,328 


53,598 


57,705 


60,358 


63.434 


Andrew Square 


30,76! 


33,944 


33,413 


51,991 


68.196 


68.772 


Boylslon Station 


44,829 


50,033 


55,672 


62,340 


64,871 


64.559 


Brighton 


75,273 


79,397 


83,238 


87,672 


92.702 


89.384 


Charlestown 


9K455 


98,780 


101,140 


99,035 


98,433 


95.288 


City Point 


34.510 


30.300 


38.381 


43,277 


47,441 


50.108 


Codman Square 


91,721 


101.792 


103,810 


113,529 


114.950 


119.758 


Dorchester 


6S,873 


70.396 


67,810 


75,608 


88.628 


90.123 


Dor. Lower Mill 


18,040 


17,765 


17,577 


25,801 


27.259 


25.488 


East Boston 


111,813 


120,234 


120,993 


125,968 


128,771 


125.820 


Faneuil 


24,001 


24,913 


24,944 


27,004 


30,443 


31.560 


*Fellowes Athcnaeun 


1 80,469 


80,933 


79.125 


71.673 


76.007 


84.765 


Hyde Park 


79,592 


80,855 


82,498 


89.716 


95,334 


93.582 


Jamaica Plain 


58,228 


60,507 


59,970 


64,022 


68,630 


67.232 


Jeffries Point 




10,309 


35,925 


40,857 


52,020 


53.004 


Maltapan 


l"6'439 


20,499 


20.497 


27,699 


48,789 


58.290 


Mount Bowdoin 


73,620 


80,492 


83,376 


98.961 


107,679 


112.320 


Mount Pleasant 


49,494 


57,562 


53,846 


52.977 


53,953 


53.778 


Neponset 


22,630 


28,789 


33.263 


40,353 


41,466 


39.479 


North End 


69,846 


85,187 


96,359 


107,329 


117,075 


121.651 


Orient Heights 


21,934 


27,970 


34240 


30,580 


40.605 


45.395 


Parker Hill 


48.89! 


49,209 


49,459 


44,081 


37,038 


39.860 


Roslindale 


73,310 


80,879 


82,597 


89.336 


94.888 


93,154 


f^oxbury Cro.sing 


47,030 


57,609 


55,911 


57,869 


67.153 


58,634 


South Boston 


104,679 


121,194 


124,809 


139,173 


1 52.799 


148,751 


South End . 


99,75! 


97,403 


99,543 


MI ,682 


117.845 


112,578 


Tyler Street 


31,343 


40,039 


39.973 


42,270 


37,321 


37.436 


Upham's Corner . 


113,846 


119,375 


120.257 


109,731 


95,975 


100.288 


Warren Street 


94,991 


104,412 


108.665 


122.159 


136.981 


135.913 


West End . 


123,137 


136,431 


142,470 


I 54.267 


157.321 


1 52.043 


West Roxbury 


54,956 


66,470 


74,970 


81,199 


88,249 


88.482 



Total . . 2,448,776 2,672,646 2.768,984 2,922,861 3,132,194 3,129,781 

*Roxbury Branch renamed Fellowes Athenaeum Branch in 1923. 
*j" For a year of eleven months. 



[49] 



The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form: 



ov€r preceding year 

over preceding year 

over preceding year 

over preceding year 

over preceding year 

from preceding year 

*EIevcn-month period. Gain for the twelve-monlh period was, 175,588 



1920-21 


gain 


1921-22 


gain 


1922-23 


gain 


1923-24 


gain 


1924-25 


gain 


♦1925 


io.cs 



VOLUMES. 

148.044 
223,870 

96,338 
153,877 
209,333 

12.413 



USE OF BOOKS. 
CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 









SCHOOLS AND 


TOTALS 






HOME USE 


INSTITUTIONS 






HOME USE 


THROUGH 


THROUGH 






DIRECT 


BRANCH DEPT. 


BRANCH DEPT. 




February, 1925 . 


33,412 


1 1 .746 


21.440 


66,598 


March, " . 


31,165 


10,528 


22.405 


64,098 


April. " . 


31,406 


11,206 


23.270 


65,882 


May, " . 


28,440 


9,240 


24.420 


62.100 


Jun^, " . 


22,751 


7,694 


23.210 


53.655 


July, ;; . 


18.331 


6.179 


5,515 


30.025 


August, 


19.693 


6.410 


5,775 


31,878 


September, 


18.151 


5.821 


5.635 


29,607 


Oclober, " . 


25,635 


8,463 


10,945 


45.043 


November " . 


34,984 


12.359 


16,980 


64,323 


December, " . 


49,740 


17.773 


28,130 


95,643 



Totals 



313,708 



107,419 



187,725 



DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL CIRCULATION. 



608,852 











HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 


TOTALS 


Central Library: 


USE 


institutions 




a. Direct 


313,708 






b. Through branches 


107,419 






c. Schools and Institutions through 








Branch Department 




187,725 


608,852 


branches: 








Ailston 


63.434 




63,434 


Andrew Square 








68,772 




68,772 


Boylston Station 








64,559 




64,559 


Brighton . 






^ 


53.971 


■}5A\i 


89,384 


Charlestown 








84,645 


10,643 


95.288 


City Point 








50,108 




50.108 


Codman Square 








112.774 


' 6,984 


119,758 


Dorchester 








73,542 


16,581 


90,123 


Dorchester Lower Mills 






25,488 




25,488 


Carried forward 


597,293 


69,621 


666,914 



501 



Broufihl forruaril 
Plasl Boston 
Fatifuil 
Mydc Park 
Followes Aflicn<rum 
jamalra Plain . 
Jrffrios F^oint 
Maflapan 
Ml. Bowdoin 
Ml. r'lra-<anl . 
Neponsel . 
Norlh End 
OnenI Heiglils . 
Parkrr Hill 
Roslindaie . 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boslon . 
South End 
1 yier Sircot 
UpKams Coiner 
Warren Street 
West End 
West Roxbury 

I otais 



HOME 

597,293 

107,344 

31,560 

84,605 

66,600 

58,633 

53,004 

58,290 

107,451 

53,778 

39,479 

120,641 

45,395 

39,860 

84,451 

58,634 

1 32,028 

96,481 

37,436 

98.711 

131,402 

131,844 

71,969 

2,306,889 



SCHOOLS AND 
INSTITUTIONS 

69.621 
18,476 



8,977 
18,165 
8,599 



4.869 



1,010 



8,703 

' 16,723 
16.097 

" 'K577 

4,511 

20.199 

16,513 

214,040 



TOTAL 

666.914 

125,820 

31,560 

93,582 

84,765 

67,232 

53,004 

58.290 

112.320 

53,778 

39,479 

121.651 

45.395 

39,860 

93,154 

58,634 

148,751 

112,578 

37.436 

100.288 

135.913 

I 52.043 

88,482 

2.520.929 



These figures arc condensed into the following : 

Bool(s Icnl for JwiDc use, including circulalinn through 
Schools and Inslilulions. 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 
the branches) .......... 

From branches (excluding books received from Central Library) 



Total 



Comparative. 



Central library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) : 
Dire-t home use .... 
Through branches . . ' . 

Branch l..ibraries circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use . . . ■ 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books f rem Central through 
ihc branch system) 



334.188 
117.089 



1924-25. 

451.277 

2.283.777 

397.140 
3.132,194 



313.708 
107.419 



608,852 
2,520.929 

3,129.781 

1925. 



421,127 

2,306,889 

401.765 
3.129.781 



[51] 



Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years : 

Volumes lent from ih s Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 

Totals ........ . , 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts .... 



Totals . 
Borrowed from othe 



libr 



for 



1924-25. 


1925. 


1.770 
257 


1,449 
255 


2,027 


1,704 


342 
82 


370 
104 


424 


474 


20 


3! 



The classified "home-use" circulation of the branches was as 
follows, for two successive years : 



Fiction for adults 
Non-fiction for adults 
Juvenile fiction . 
Juvenile non-fiction . 



1924-25. 

VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 

713,320 31 

260,051 1 1 

841.116 37 

488,310 21 



1925. 

VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 

720,31! 32 

230,900 10 

893,115 38 

462.563 20 



At the Central Library the classified "home-use" circulation 
shows the following percentage : 



Non-fiction 
Fiction 



1925-24. 1925. 

PERCENTAGE. PERCENTAGE. 

51.7 52.2 

48J 47.8 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 
BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE. 

For the Central Library: 



From City appropriation . . . , 

From trust funds income . . . . 

For branches: 

From City appropriation . . . . 

From trust funds income . . . . 

By Fellowes Athenaeum (for Fellowes Athenae- 
um Branch) ...... 



1924-25. 


1925. 


8,328 
3.774 


7,557 
3.586 



54.289 
92 



12,102 

54,381 
832 



57.874 
3.908 



11.143 



61.782 



Totals 



67,315 



72,925 



[52] 



The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



Accessions by purchase 
Accessions by gift 

Accessions by Statisrical Deparlment 
Accessions by exchange 
Accessions by periodicals bound . 
Accessions by newspapers bound . 







TOTAL 


CENTRAL. 


BRANCHES. 


VOLUMES. 


11.143 


61 .782 


72.925 


9,244 


801 


10.045 


45 




45 


120 




. 120 


1.787 


144 


1.931 


79 


.... 


97 



Totals 



22.436 



62.727 



85,163 



THE CATALOGUE. 



Totals 



1924-25. 



1925. 





VOLS. AND 




VOLS. AND 




Catalogued (new) : 


PARTS 


TITLES 


PARTS 


TITLES 


Central Library Catalogue 


24.135 


13.608 


24,314 


14,702 


Serials ..... 


4.685 




5,868 




Branches .... 


53.301 


44,321 


58,087 


49,494 


Recatalogued .... 


19.007 


15,891 


1 7,889 


11.613 



101,128 73.820 



106,158 75,809 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 



The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use. taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is 



Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collections new books (including continuations) .... 

Special collections, new books and transfers ..... 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 

from branches etc. .......... 



Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. ........... 



Net gain at Central Library 
Net gain at branches 



Net gain, entire library system 



22.308 
1.874 

1.467 

25.649 



14.102 

11.547 
18.704 

30.251 



[53] 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852-53 








9,688 


1889 . 








520,508 


1853-54 








16.221 


1890 . 








536,027 


1854-55 








22,617 


1891 . 








556.283 


1855-56 








28,080 


1892 . 








576.237 


185(^57 








34,896 


1893 . 








597.152 


1857-58 








70,851 


1894 . 








610,375 


1858-59 








78,043 


1895 . 








628,297 


1859-60 








85.031 


1896-97 








663.763 


1860-61 








97,386 


1897-98 








698.888 


1861-62 








105,034 


1898-99 








716,050 


1862-63 








110,563 


1899-1900 








746,383 


1863-64 








116.934 


1900-01 








781.377 


1864-65 








123.016 


1901-02 








812.264 


1865-66 








130,678 


1902-03 








835.904 


1866-67 








136,080 


1903-04 








848.884 


1867-68 








144,092 


1904-05 








871.050 


1868-69 








1 52.796 


1905-06 








878.933 


1869-70 








160,573 


1906-07 








903,349 


1870-71 








179,250 


1907-08 








922.348 


1871-72 








192.958 


1908-09 








941.024 


1872-73 








209.456 


1909-10 








961,522 


1873-74 








260.550 


1910-11 








987,268 


1874-75 








276.918 


1911-12 








1,006,717 


1875-76 








297,873 


1912-13 








. 1,049,011 


1876-77 








312,010 


1913-14 








1.067,103 


1877-78 








345,734 


1914-15 








1,098,702 


1878-79 








360,963 


1915-16 








1,121,747 


1879-80 








377.225 


1916-17 








1,139.682 


1880-81 . 








390,982 


1917-18 








1.157.326 


1881-82 








404,221 


1918-19 








1.173.695 


1882-83 








422,116 


1919-20 








1.197.498 


1883-84 . 








438,594 


1920-21 








1.224.510 


1884-85 . 








453,947 


1921-22 








1,258.211 


1885 . 








460,993 


1922-23 . 








1 .284.094 


1886 . 








479,421 


1923-24 








1.308.041 


1887 . 








492,956 


1924-25 








1 .333,264 


1888 . 








505.872 


1925 . 








1,363,515 


Volumes in entire library system . 










1,363.515 


Volumes in the branches . . . 


. 








365,567 


These volumes are located as 


follows: 


Central Library . 997,948 


Dorchester Lower Mills 2,668 


Allston 






5.465 


East Boston 


20,870 


Andrew Square 






5.179 


Faneuil 




5,261 


Boylston Station 






6,070 


Fellowes Athenaeum 




36.343 


Brighton 






19,201 


Hyde Park 




34,402 


Charlestown 






1 5,596 


Jamaica Plain . 




17,733 


City Point . 






7,546 


Jeffries Point 




3.623 


Codman Square . 






10,615 


Mattapan 




4.130 


Dorcheiter . 






, 


14,618 


Mt. Bowdo 


n 






9.712 



54 



Mt. Pleasant 


5,739 


South Boston 






19,698 


Neponset 


4,159 


South End . 






14,445 


North End 


10,532 


Tyler Street 






5,488 


Orient Heights . 


4.492 


Upham's Corner 






12.830 


Parker Hill 


4.004 


Warren Street 






9,999 


Roslindale . 


11.204 


West End . 






21,622 


Roxbury Crossing 


6.695 


West Roxbury 






1 5,628 



THE BINDERY. 



Number of volumes bound in various styles 

Magazines stitched 

Volumes repaired 

Volumes guarded . 

Maps mounted 

Photographs, engravings, etc., mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1924-25. 


1925. 


55,289 


59.664 


216 


197 


3,046 


2,620 


1.312 


2,144 


35 


49 


3,019 


2.379 


75,278 


64.162 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 



Requisitions received and filled .... 
Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles exclusive of automatic reprint . 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) . 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) . 

Cards fmished (exclusive of extras) . 
Signs ......... 

Blank forms (numbered series) . . 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside numbered series) 

Catalogues, pamphlets and bibliographical programmes 



1924-25. 
181 

16.470 
188,328 

696 

31.218 

3,862 

4,016,630 

80,225 

51,750 



1925. 
293 

1 1 ,058 
140,321 

568 

37,761 

1,825 

3,613.725 

42,531 

67,520 



THE LECTURES OF 1925-1926. 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were 
illustrated with lantern slides. 

1925 
Oct. 1 . Inside a Harem, a Pyramid, a Tomb. Mrs. Alice How- 
land Macomber. 
Oct. 4. The Story of the Boston Theatre. Quincy Kilby. 
Oct. 5. ^This Changing World. Miss Lilian Whiting. (Ruskin 

Club.) ^ 
Oct. 8. Around the World. Walter Wentworth Allerton. 
Oct. 1 I. The Route of the Resolute: a World Tour. John C. 
Bowker. F.R.G.S. 



Oct. 


15 


Oct. 
Oct. 


18, 

18, 


Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 


22, 
25, 
26, 


Oct. 

Nov. 


29, 

1. 


Nov. 


4, 


Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 


5, 
8, 
8, 


Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 


9. 
11. 
12, 



[55] 

From Hell Gate to Golden Gate. Henry Warren Poor, 
A.M. 
^'The Music of the Bible. Charles N. Lanphere. 
^"The Miracle": Its History and Presentation at Home 
and Abroad. Rudolph Kommer. 
Char-a-bancing in the British Isles. Guy Richardson. 
*Music Contrasts and Their Delights. Margaret Anderton. 
^Ruskin's Museums. Mrs. May Smith Dean. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
How the Laymen should view Art. Royal B. Farnum. 
''^Author's Reading from "God's Scarlet Law." Francis 

Henry Wade, M.D. 
^The Composition of Poetry. Charles Hammond Gibson. 
(American Poetry Association.) 
In Viking Lands and Waters. Charles Ernest White. 
*A Ritual for Armistice Day. Henry Augustine Smith, A.M. 
'^l. he Story of St. Francis in Graphic Language. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Ward Perkins. 
Mexico. Dr. Charles E. Spaulding. (Ruskin Club.) 
^The English Comedy of Manners. Walter Pritchard Eaton. 
The Rocky Mountain Hike of 1925. Rev. Charles W. 
Casson. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Nov. 15. "^The Portrait of a Dramatist. Robert E. Rogers. A.M. 

(Drama League Course.) 
Nov. 19. The New Jugo-Slavia. Emma G. Cummings. 
Nov. 22. *Amy Lowell and Present-Day Poetry. George Mark 

Sneath. A.M. 
Nov. 23. ''^Goldsmith and Gray. Mr. Charles Hammond Gibson. 
(Ruskin Club.) 
^Scandinavian Writers. Lorence Munson Woodside. 
'^The Spell of Lyric Poetry. Henry Harmon Chamberlin. 
(American Poetry Association.) 
New England Earthquakes: Yesterday, To-day and To- 
morrow. Kirtley Fletcher Mather, S.B., Ph.D. 
Balearic Islands and Cataluna. Ralph Adams Cram, 

Litt.D., LL.D. 
Holiday Rambles in the Highlands and Lowlands of Eu- 
rope. Olive Ci Grigor. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
^Recital of Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew." Walter 

Bradley Tripp. (Drama League Course.) 
^Reading of Dickens's "Christmas Carol." Walter Bradley 
Tripp. 
Alaska: the Land of Far Delight. Mrs. Charles B. Hall. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Popular Legends in Stained Glass. Orln E. Skinner. 



Nov. 


29, 


Dec. 


2, 


Dec. 


3, 


Dec. 


6, 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


17 



[56] 

Dec. 20. *A Modern Opera: Pfitzner's "Palestrlna." Otto G. T. 
Straub. 

Dec. 20. ^Miracle Plays from the York and Townley Cycles. Com- 
munity Service of Boston, Inc., and Citizens' Public 
Celebrations Association. 

Dec. 2 I . ^Miracle Plays from the York and Townley Cycles. Com- 
munity Service of Boston, Inc., and Citizens' Public 
Celebrations Association. 

Dec. 23. ^Miracle Plays from the York and Townley Cycles. Com- 
munity Service of Boston, Inc., and Citizens' Public 
Celebrations Association. 
^Wordsworth. E. Charlton Black, LL.D. (American 

Poetry Association.) 
^Christmas: Music arranged by Mrs. Robert Nichols; Mes- 
sages, Mrs. Minnie Meserve Soule. (Ruskin Club.) 

^The World's Great Songs. Mme. Beale Morey. 
3. '''^"One Increasing Purpose." Dr. Henry H. Saunderson. 
'^The Influence of Shakespeare on Scott. Wilmon Brewer, 
Ph.D. (American Poetry Association.) 
Treasures of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Martha 
A. S. Shannon. 
^'Reading of Shakespeare's "Macbeth". Mrs. Louisa C. 

James. (Drama League Course.) 
'^Russian Choral Music. Henry Gideon. 
^The Fluman Voice and How to Read It. Walter Babcock 
Swift. A.B., O.B., M.D., B.L.I. (Ruskin Club.) 
Cliff-House and Cave Exploration in Arizona. Alfred Vin- 
cent Kidder, Ph.D. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
'"^Concert by Lincoln House Orchestra. Jacques Hoffman, 

Conductor. 
The Chateau Country of France. Rev. Alwin E. Worman. 

(Old Blake House Chapter, D.A.R.) 
The Glory of England, her Cathedrals and Scenic Beauty. 
Frederick Parsons, F.R.S.A. 
^Visiting an Eastern King. Mrs. John Clarence Lee. 
Virgil and Virgil's Land. Dr. Davis Wasgatt Clark. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
The Land of Evangeline. Rev. A. T. Kempton, D.D. 
^Notable Fiction of the Year. John Clair Minot. 
'^Concert by the Lenox Quartet. 

^'The Fervor of Humanity in the Thought and Art of Robert 
Browning. Helen Archibald Clarke. (American Poetry 
Association.) 
Feb. 4. A History of Lighting. Julius Daniels. 



Dec. 


27. 


Dec. 


28. 


1926 

Jan. 3. 
Jan. 3. 
Jan. 6. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 
Jan. 


10. 
11. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


17. 


Jan. 


20. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 
Jan. 


24. 
25. 


Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 


28. 

31. 

31. 

3. 



Feb. 


7, 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


11 


Feb. 


14, 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


21, 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


25, 



[57] 

Feb. 7. *An Afternoon with Dickens. Members of the Boston 
Branch of Dickens Fellowship. 
^Concert by Lenox Quartet. 

•"^Observance of Ruskin's Birthday: John Ruskin. E. Charl- 
ton Black. LL.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Our National Forests. Philip W. Ayres. (Field and For- 
est Club Course.) 
The Theatre, from Henry Irving to Walter Hampden. 
Frank W. C. Hersey, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
The Spell of the Italian Lakes. Mrs. James Frederick Hop- 
kins. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Jubilee Year of 1 925. William M. Stinson. S.J. 
^'The Folk Song in the Concert Hall. John Tasker Howard. 
^Concert by the Lenox Quartet. 
An Historical Pilgrimage from Maine to Florida in a House- 
boat. Alfred Johnson, A.M., Litt.D. 
Feb. 28. '^Portrait of a Modern Poet. Robert E. Rogers, A.M. 
(American Poetry Association.) 
^Concert by the Lenox Quartet. 
Picturesque England from Chester to Clovelly. Ellen E. 
Page. 
^In Word and Tone: a Program of Associated Poetry and 

Music. Laura Huxtable Porter. 
^Concert by the Lenox Quartet. 
"^'What's What in Books. John Clair Minot. (Ruskin 

Club.) 
Motor Gypsymg and Mountain Climbing Across the Contin- 
ent. Carl S. Whittier. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Theatre Going in Europe To-day. Albert Hatton Gilmer, 
A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
^Concert by the Lenox Quartet. 
French Highv/ays and Byways. Andre Morize, Agrege- 
des-Lettres. 
^Concert by Lincoln House Orchestra. Jacques Hoffman, 
Conductor. 
This Realm! This England! Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Our New and Proposed National Parks, East and West. 

George H. Browne, A.M. 
Trails and Trail Building in the White Mountains. Charles 

Winthrop Blood, Litt.B. 
City Health and Emergencies. Dr. Hollis Godfrey, LL.D., 

D.C.L. 

''^Folk Songs of Europe. Catherine S. Swett, Assisted by 
members of the University Double Quartet and Radcliffe 
Choral Society. 



Feb. 


28. 


Mar. 


4. 


Mar. 


7. 


Mar. 


7. 


Mar. 


8 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


14, 


Mar. 


14. 


Mar. 


18 


Mar. 


21. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


25, 


Mar. 


28, 


Apr. 


1, 


Apr. 


4, 



[58] 

Apr. 8. England in Art and Story. Mrs. James Frederick Hopkins. 
Apr. 1 I , ^Aunt Clarissa Lends her Heirlooms of Two Centuries. Mrs. 

M. Gertrude Cutter. 
Apr. 12. ■''"'The Educational Value of the Library. Mr. Henry A. 

Higgins. Ruskin: A French Critic's View. Prof. Mel- 

vin B. Webber. (Ruskin Club.) 
Apr. 26. ^Author's Reading. Dr. Henry H. Saunderson. (Ruskin 

Club.) 



Mc 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS, 1925. 

Feb. 2. Photographs of stage settings loaned by the Theatre Arts 
Magazine. 
Portolan Atlas. 

Photographs of a Shakespearian Costume Ball. 
2 1 . Original designs for House Beautiful Cover Designs Com- 
petition. 
26. Manuscript letters and first editions of Longfellow (Barton- 
Ticknor Room) . 
Color prints of great paintings (Medici and Seeman prints). 
Illustrations from the descriptive booklet of Balieff's Chauve 

Souris. 
"Fifty Books of 1924," selected by the American Institute 

of Graphic Arts. 
Bowditch memorial exhibition: manuscripts and book rarities 
from the Nathaniel Bowditch Collection. (Barton-Tick- 
nor Room). 
Competitive poster designs and medals loaned by the Massa- 
chusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
to mark "Be Kind to Animals Week." 
15, Manuscripts and printed memorials of the Battle of Lexing- 
ton, to commemorate the 150th Anniversary. (Barton- 
Ticknor Room). 
21 . John Singer Sargent Memorial Exhibition. (Reproduction). 
7. Photographs of old-time Base-ball Players from the Mc- 
Greevy Collection. 
1 0. William Ellery Channing memorial exhibition. Manuscripts 

and editions. (Barlon-Ticknor Room). 
1 I . Reproductions of the work of the Pre-Raphaelite Brother- 
hood. 
2. Editions of the Book of Common Prayer, from the Benton 
Collection, 
1 5. Music commemorating the Battle of Bunker Hill. 

Memorials of the Battle of Bunker Hill. (Barton-Ticknor 
Room). 



7. 
9. 

11. 

26. 



Apr. n 



May 



June 



[.'39] 

July 1 . Documents and prints relating to the early history of the 
United States. 
I 8. Thackeray manuscripts and first editions commemorating the 
I I 4th anniversary of the author's birth. 
Sept. 23. Boston Theatre Memorials, in great part loaned by Mr. 
Quincy Kilby. 
Decorative color prints. 
Oct. 6. Oil paintings and photographs illustrating the Miracle, loaned 
by Morris Gest. 
10. Columbus Day exhibition of rare books and maps. 
29. Fifty Books of 1925. 
Nov. 3. The originals of Subercaseaux's water-color illustrations of 
the Life of Saint Francis, loaned by the Marshall Jones 
Company. 
1 6. John Singer Sargent exhibition of reproductions, supplement- 
ing the exhibition of originals at the Museum of Fine Arts 
and including six oil copies by Sargent from Old Masters, 
loaned by Governor Fuller. 
Dec. 21. Editions of Miracle Plays. (Barton-Ticknor Room). 

29. Paintings and photographs illustrating the Official Mission 
of the Due de Trevise to make known the Franco-Amer- 
ican Society La Sauvegarde de I'art francais. 



SELECTED LIST OF GIFTS AND GIVERS. 

Allen, John K. Liberty Loan Committee of New England. 

Pubhcity Committee's Scrap Book in I volumes. 

Mr. Allen was organizer of the Publicity Committee and its Execu- 

tice Officer during the five loans, 191 7—1919. 
Ailing, Carolyn E. Sixty-nine volumes of miscellaneous works, including a 

number of publications relating to social service study and an illus- 
trated edition of the History of the World War, by Frank W. 

Simonds, in five volumes. 
Baker, Leighton. Thirty-six volumes and I I pieces of music, some in 

manuscript, mainly works of Benjamin F. Baker. 
Baxter, Sylvester. Sixty-five volumes of Spanish literature, history, fiction 

and poetry, a number of which are autographed presentation copies 

by the authors to Mr. Baxter. 
Blake, Miss Sarah Swan, Kittery Point, Maine. Diaries and letters of 

Francis Minot Weld, M.D., with a sketch of his life; A brief history 

and genealogy of the family of Weld, by Sarah Swan Weld Blake. 

Privately printed. Boston, 1925. 
Bradford, Gamaliel, Wellesley Hills. Wives, by Gamaliel Bradford. 

New York (1925) 



[60] 

Brown, Abbie Farwell, Literary Executor of Oscar Fay Adams. The 
literary works of Oscar Fay Adams, including the manuscript of 
notes, written for William Morris's "Summer" (second part of "The 
Earthly Paradise") ; some two dozen short stories collected from 
magazines in which they first appeared; a collection of eighteen 
essays entitled "American Women of Yesterday"; a group of studies 
on "Men of Yesterday"; together with thirty short essays, stories 
and literary sketches, written in the course of the last quarter of the 
past century. 

Buenos Aires, Province of. La Plata. Obras completas y correspondencia 
de Florentino Ameghino. Volume 4. La Plata, 1915. (Con- 
tinuing the set) . 

Champney, Miss Lydia C, Estate of. Twenty volumes of miscellaneous 
works and a collection of music of I 38 volumes and unbound material. 

Clark, William Andrews, Jr.. Library of Los Angeles. Some letters 
from Oscar Wilde to Alfred Douglas, 1892-1897. (Heretofore 
unpublished.) With illustrative notes by Arthur C. Dennison, Jr. 
and Harrison Post, and an essay by A. S. W. Rosenbach. San 
Francisco, 1924. No. 1 1 2 of an edition of 225 copies. 

Committee on Historical Records, Winchester, Mass. Winchester's War 
Records, Civil, Spanish-American, World. Published by the Town 
of Winchester, 1925. 

Coolidge, John Gardner. Random letters from many countries, by John 
Gardner Coolidge. 1924. Autograph copy. 

Coolidge, J. Randolph, Jr. Sixty-eight lantern slides of modern archi- 
tecture. 

Councilman, Mrs. W. T. 363 volumes of miscellaneous works, includ- 
ing a number of text books, 204 numbers of periodicals. Geographic 
Magazine, St. Nicholas etc., a collection of sheet music and 50 
librettos, and 90 photographs. 

Cubberley, Mrs. Ellwood P., Stanford University, California. Notes 
concerning the Van Uxem family in France and the United States. 
Compiled by the sole male survivor of the name in America (Francis 
Van Uxem.) Privately printed. Los Angeles, 1923. 

Curley, Hon. James M. Bronze medal to commemorate the 150th anni- 
versary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, 1 775-1925. 

Dossert, Mrs. F. G., New York City. Mass in B minor for four voices, 
solo, chorus and orchestra, by Frank G. Dossert. Written to com- 
memorate the Golden Jubilee of Pope Leo the Thirteenth and 
produced in St. Peter's Rome, April 23, 1893, under the leadership 
of the composer. 
For the Allen A. Brown Music Library. 

Dunham, Otis Emerson, Cambridge. History of Dunham-on-Trent, with 
Ragnall. Darlton, Wimpton, Kingshaugh, etc. A record of nine 
hundred years. By Rev. Howard Chadwick. Cambridge, I 924. 



[61] 

Endicott, William Crowninshield, Danvers, Massachusetts. Memoir of 
Samuel Endicott ^^^th a genealogy of his descendants, by his great- 
grandson William Crowninshield Endicott, the younger. Boston. 
1924. Privately printed in an edition of 125 copies. 

The Explorers Club, Board of Directors, New York City. A set of 
facsimile reproductions of seven log books of William Scoresby, Sr., 
accompanied by an introductory brochure. New York, 1916, 
1917. No. 83 of 300 copies printed and plates destroyed. 

Farlow, Dr. John W. The child's song book for the use of schools and 
families, Boston, 1 830 ; the Musical Cabinet, by G. J. Webb and 
T. B. Hayward, 1841 — 1842; a bound collection of music for the 
Allen A. Brown Music Library. 

Faxon, John Lyman, Estate of. Through Amos L. Faxon, Executor. 
The finished manuscript of the work entitled, "The Ancient Theatres 
of Europje", by John Lyman Faxon. (Eight volumes of manu- 
script with drawings). 

Gannon, James P. J. Boston Public Library Employees Benefit Asso- 
ciation. Exercises at the dedication of the Tablet in honor of those 
men of the Library who served in the World War, Armistice Day, 
1924. (Programs and clippings in bound volume.) 

Gay, H. Nelson, Director, The Library for American Studies in Italy. 
Forty pubhcations relating to Italian affairs, including programs and 
souvenirs of the Keats-Shelley Memorial in Rome; bulletin of the 
Library of American Studies in Italy, Nos. 1—8; 26 numbers of II 
Piccolissimo, Giornale per i Ragazzi, 191 7—1919. 

Good, Mrs. Isabella J. Two framed photographs of Mozart and Beeth- 
oven. Photographs by Bruckmann from paintings by C. Jaeger. 

Great Britain, Commissioners of Patents. London. Specifications of 
inventions, 205 volumes. 

Gress, Edmund G., Woodhaven, New York, through Norman T. A. 
Munder, Baltimore. Two photographs of Franklin, from the Dup- 
lessis portrait at the Metropohtan Museum of Art; Wish, the song 
of Frankhn, three-colored portrait and decorations engraved in wood 
by Percy Grassby. Published by Noman T. A. Munder & Com- 
pany, Baltimore. 

Hallowell, J. Mott. (From the Library of R. P. Hallowell.) Forty- 
one volumes, mainly anti-slavery literature, including 1 3 volumes of 
the Index, 1870-1876; The Atlanta Constitution, 1887-1888, 4 
v., and two framed pictures, one of Last Moments of John Brown, 
and one of a photograph of a bust of John Brown. 

Harrison, Fairfax, Belvoir, Virginia. Virginia land grants. A study 
of conveyancing in relation to Colonial pohtics, by Fairfax Harri- 
son. Richmond. 1925. 

Hewins, Mrs. Frank A. Twenty-five volumes for the West Roxbury 
Branch Library including 22 volumes of Bell's Cathedral Series. 



^ [62] 

The Irish World, through Austin J. Ford, New York City. The Irish 
World, 1923-1925. 

Johnson, Axel B. Vi Udvandrere, af Joost Dahlerup, Kobenhavn, 1924; 
Sange og Digte paa Dansk og Engelsk, af John Volk, New York, 
1903, and six Victor Records of Danish music. 

King, Mrs. Henry P. and Mr. John T. Spaulding, Sunset Rock. A 
portfolio of pencil sketches by Lester G. Hornby. Privately pub- 
lished for Mrs. Henry P. King and John T. Spaulding. Prides 
Crossing. 1924. 

Kittredge, Prof. George Lyman, Cambridge. Sir Thomas Malory. By 
George Lyman Kittredge. Privately printed. Barnstable. 1925. 
Edition of 50 copies. 

Leavens, T. C, Newtonville. A collection of music of 138 volumes and 
70 pieces of sheet music including a number of full scores and organ 
music. 

Livingston, Mrs. Luther S., Cambridge. Benjamin Franklin's letters to 
Madame Helvetius and Madame la Frete. With an explanatory 
note by Luther S. Livingston. Cambridge. 1925. 

McNeil, Catherine C, New York City. The Clan Macneil. Clann 
Niall of Scotland. By the Macneil of Barra. Chief of the Clan. 
With an introduction by the Duke of Argyll. No. 81 of 200 auto- 
graphed copies. New York. 1923. 

Mather, William G., Cleveland. The portraits of Increase Mather, with 
some notes on Thomas Johnson, an English mezzotinter. By Kenneth 
B. Murdock. For private distribution by William Gwinn Mather. 
Cleveland. 1924. 

Mergenthaler Linotype Company, New York City. Linotype instruction 
book. By John R. Rogers. Brooklyn. 1925. Four copies. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Trustees of. New York City. (At the 
request of Mrs. Edward J. Tytus.) Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
Egyptian Expedition. Robb de Peyster Tytus Memorial Series, 
Volume 4, The tomb of two sculptors at Thebes, by Norman de 
Garis Davies. 1925. (Continuing the set.) 

Minchin, Hamilton, London, England. Some early recollections of Sar- 
gent, by Hamilton Minchin. Letchworth. 1925, Edition of 50 
copies. 

Mixter, Mrs. S.J. Seventy-three volumes of miscellaneous works, includ- 
ing 1 5 publications on Bridge whist. 

Mudgett, Mrs. Louis FI. Fourteen framed photographs of musical artists, 
critics and music societies presented to Louis H. Mudgett; also the 
Commemorative record of the Handel and Haydn Society of Bos- 
ton. 1815-1903. 

Myers, Albert Cook, Philadelphia. Facsimile of Wilham Penn's first 
Charter to the people of Pennsylvania, April 25, 1682. Edited 
by Albert Cook Myers. One of 50 copies on special paper. 



[63] 

Olmstead Brothers, Brookline. A system of parks and playgrounds for 
Birmingham. Prehminary report upon the park problems, needs and 
opportunities of the city and its immediate surroundings. By Olm- 
stead Brothers. (Birmingham, 1925.) 

Page, L. C. & Company. Twenty-three volumes published by L. C. 
Page & Company. 

Pember, Francis W., Warden of All Souls' College, Oxford. Catalogue 
of the Archives in the Muniment Rooms of All Souls' College. Pre- 
pared by Charles Trice Martin. London. 1877. 

Robbins, Reginald C, Pans, France. Forty-three pieces of music, songs 
by Reginald C. Robbins. Paris. 1922-1924. 

Sellers, Edwin Jaquett, Philadelphia. Sellers family of Pennsylvania 
and allied families. By Edwin Jaquett Sellers. Philadelphia. 
1925. Edition of 1 50 copies. 

Sesquicentennial International Exposition, Philadelphia. Pubhcations re- 
lating to the Exposition of 1926. Exliibits. rules and regulations 
and colored posters of Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell. 

Strokoskas, Rev. Francis W., St. Peter's Lithuanian Church. Twenty- 
three volumes in Lithuanian. For the South Boston Branch library. 

1 annenbaum, Dr. Samuel A., New York City. Reclaiming one of Shake- 
spere's signatures. By Samuel A. Tannenbaum, Baltimore. 1925. 

1 appan, Miss M. A. Animal locomotion. An electro photographic in- 
vestigation of consecutive phases of animal movements, 1872—1885, 
By Eadweard Muybridge. Philadelphia. 1887. 

1 itcomb, Everett. Sixty volumes, a miscellaneous collection of chamber 
music and piano works by the folloAving composers: ■ — Brahms, 
Bach, Strauss, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Rubinstein, Grieg, St. Saens, 
Wagner, Franck, Schumann, Beethoven, Schubert and Liszt. Also 
nine pieces, compositions by Everett Titcomb, for the Allen A. 
Brown Library. 

Welcher, The Misses, Hartford, Connecticut. The Warren, Little, 
Lothrop, Park, Dix. Whitman, Fairchild, Piatt, Wheeler, Lance and 
Avery pedigrees of Samuel Putnam Avery, 1847—1920. New 
York. 1925. Edition of 200 copies. 

Wendell, W. G. and Ross L. Lynn, New York City. The Book of the 
Jacob Wendell Scholars. Privately printed. Boston. 1925. 

Wigglesworth, Richard B. Assistant to the Agent General for Repara- 
tion Payments, Berlin. 

Report of the Agent General for Reparation Payments, No. 30, 
1925. Berlin. 

Woodruff, Frederick O. Woodruff genealogy. Matthew Woodruff of 
Farmington, Conn., 1640—1, and ten generations of his descendants, 
together with genealogies of families connected through marriage 
Compiled by George N. Mackenzie and others. 50 copies printed. 
Boston, 1925. 



[64] 



OFFICIALS OF THE LIBRARY. 

Director, Charles F. D. Belden. 

Assistant to Director, Robert A. Howes. 

Reference Librarian Frank H. Chase. 

Executive Secretary, Delia Jean Deery. 

Auditor, Adelaide A. Nichols. 



Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and Newspaper Department: Pierce E. 
Buckley, Chief. 

Patent Division, William J. Ennis, Assistant in Charge. 

Newspaper Division, Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches. 

Central Branch Issue Division, Alice V. Stevens, Assistant in Charge. 

Branch Binding Division, Marian A. McCarthy, Assistant in Charge. 

Shipping Division, Robert F. Dixon, Assistant in Charge. 
*For Branch Librarians, see below. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 

Card Division, T. Francis Brennan, Assistant in Charge. 

Shelf Division, Michael McCarthy, Chief Classifier, in Charge. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Wdrk with 
Children. 

Children's Librarian, Central Library, Mary C. Toy, 
Editor: Zoltan Haraszti. 

Engineer and Janitor Department: William F. Quinn, Supt. of Buildings. 
Genealogy Division: Agnes C. Doyle; Assistant in Charge. 
Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief. 
Ordering Department: Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief, 
Periodical Room: Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 
Printing Department: Francis Watts Lee, Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department: Winlhrop H. Chenery, Chief. 

Fechnology Division, George S. Maynard, Assistant in Charge. 

Music Division, Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 

Barton-Ticknor Division, Everett B. 1 cwksbury. Assistant in Charge. 
Statistical Department: Horace L. Wheeler, Chief. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 
■^Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 
Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 
Boylston Station, Edith R. Nickerson. 



[65] 

Brighton, Marian W. Brackett. 
Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 
City Point, Alice L. Murphy. 
Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 
Dorchester, Edith F. Pendleton. 
East Boston, Laura M. Cross. 
Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 
Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 
Hyde Park, Grace L. Murray. 
Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 
Jeffries Point, Margaret A. Calnan. 
Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 
Mattapan, Lois Clark. 
Mount Bowdoin, Theodora B. Scoff. 
Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 
Neponset, Ellen C. McShane. 
North End, Mary F. Curley (acting). 
Orient Heights, Catharine F. Flannery. 
Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 
Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 
Roxbury Crossing, Katrina M. Sather. 
South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 
South End, Margaret A. Sheridan. 
Tyler Street, Marion C. Kingman. 
Upham's Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 
Warren Street, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 
West End, Fanny Goldstein. 
West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



Central Library, Copley Square. 1 

Branch Libraries, January 1, 1926. 



ch, 3a Norlh Bennel Si. . 
ch. Shawmul Ave. and West Brooklir 
h, Cambridge, cor. Lynde Si. . 
nch, Tyler, cor. Oak Si. . 



City Proper. 

Norlh End Bri 
Soulh End Bri 
West End Bra 
Tyler Street B 

Brighton. 

Brighton Branch, Academy Hill Road 

Allston Branch, 138 Brighton Ave. 

Faneuil Branch, 100 Brooks Si. . 
Charlestown. 

Charleslown Branch, M^ 
Dorchester. 

ch. Arcadi 



I Square, cor. Monument Ave 



Dorchester Brai 
Codman Square 
Upham's Corne 
Lower Mills Bl 
Mallapan Bran< 



St. 



Ada 
h, Washington, cor. 
r Branch, Columbia Road, ( 
anch. Washington, cor. Rich, 
h, 7 Babson St. . 



Norfolk Si. 
cor. Bird St. 
dSl. 



Mount Bowdoin Branch. Washington, cor. Eldon St. 

Neponsct Branch, 362 Neponiet Ave. . 
East Boston. 

East Boston Branch. 276-282 Meridian St. . 

Jeffries PoinI Branch. 195 Webster St. 

Orient HeighU Branch. 1030 Bennilglon St. 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park Branch. Harvard Ave., cor. Winlhrop St. 
Jamaica Plain. 

ich, Sedgwick, cor. South Si. 
ch. Depot Square 



Jamaica Plain Br: 
Boylslon Station Bri 
ROXBURY, 

Fellowes Alheneum 
Warren Street Bran 
Mount Pleasant Bra 



Branch. 46 Milmont St. 
.ch. 392 Warren St. . 
inch. Dudley, cor. Vine St 
Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. 
Roxbury Crossing Branch. 208 Ruggles St. . 
South Boston. 

South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. . 
City Point Branch, Broadway, near H St. . 
West Roxbury. 

West Roxbury Branch. Centre, near Ml. Vernon St 
Roslindale Br.incb, Washington, cor. Ashland St. . 




Area of City (Land only) 45.60 S.|uare mile 



Population (Census of 1925), 779,620. 



INDEX. 



Accessions, 2, 25, 27-28, 51-52. 
Atherton, Percy Lee, 2. 
Balance Sheet, expenses, 19, 21 ; re- 
ceipts, 18, 20. 
Barton-Tickiior Room, 37, 38. 
Bates Hall Centre Desk and Reference, 

32-34. 

Bindery, 45, 54. 

Books, accessions, 2, 25; circulation, 2, 
25, 38, 48-50; total number in Li- 
brary, 2, 53. 

Branches, 41-43; accessions, 28; 
buildings, 45-46; circulation, 41-42, 
^19-50; instiuction, 43 44; personnel, 
42. 

Buildings, 45-46. 

Business Historical Society, 26. 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 30- 
31. 52. 

Chase, Alice B., Bequest of, 3. 

Children's Department and Work with 
Children. 38-41; circulation, 38; in^ 
struction, 44; rooms, 39, 41. 

Circulation, 2, 25, 38, 48-50. 

Columbia Phonograph Company, 29. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Elizabeth S., 43. 

Director, 16; report of, 25-47. 

Employees, instruction, 44; officials, 
64, 65; retirements, 46. 

Estimates, 2. 

Examining Committee, members of, 16; 
report of, 22-24. 

Exhibitions, 38, 44, 58-59. 

Fellowes Athenaeum Branch, 26. 

Finance, balance sheets, 18-21 ; ex- 
penditures, 26; receipts 1 ; trust funds, 
3-15. 



Fine Arts Department, 37. 

Genealogy, Division of. 33. 

General Phonograph Corporation, 29, 

Gest, Morris, 3, 29. 

Gifts and bequests, 2, 28, 29, 59-63. 

Government documents, (See In- 
formation Office). 

Information Office, 34-35. 

Iiiterlibrary loans, 42, 51. 

Kirstein, Louis E., 3, 29. 

Lectures, 43-44, 54-58. 

Music Division, 37, 38. 

Needs of of the Library, 16. 

Newspaper Room, 34. 

Open Shelf Room. (See Information 
Office). 

Patent Room, 34. 

Periodical Room, 36. 

Peters, William York. 2. 

Printing Department, 45, 54. 

Publications, 30, 31-32. 

Registration Department, 29-30. 

Repairs and improvements 16, 45-46. 

Shelf Division, 31, 37. 52. 53. 

Spaulding, John T., 2. 

Special Libraries, 37-38. 

Staff, (See Employees). 

Story Hour. 39-40. 

Teachers' Room, 41. 

Technology Division, 37. 

Trustees, organization of, 1 ; report of, 
1-17. • 

Trust funds, expenditures, 18, 20; re- 
ceipts, 19; statement of, 3-15. 

Victor Talking Machine Company, 29. 

Weld, Mrs. Charles, 29. 



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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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3 9999 06314 665 6