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ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1925 




CITY OF BOSTON 
PRINTING DEPARTMENT 
1926 
O 



[Document 12 — 1926.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1925. 



Boston, July 15, 1926. 

Hon. Malcolm E. Nichols, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — The Fire Department made no report 
for the year ending December 31, 1925, as required by 
the provisions of section 24, chapter 4, of the Revised 
Ordinances of 1925. I have therefore compiled the 
attached reports in order that the records of the depart- 
ment may be complete. 

Very truly yours, 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Fire Commissioner. 



City Document No. 12. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 

Boston, January 1, 1926. 
From.- The Chief of Department. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I beg to submit the following summary of activities 
of the department in general for the fiscal year (eleven 
months) of 1925: 

Fire Loss. 

Loss (exclusive of marine loss) .... $5,407,069 92 
Marine loss 45,224 95 

Total loss $5,452,294 87 

Number of alarms 7,702 

Average loss each alarm $707 90 

Number of actual fires . . . . . . 6,268 

Average loss each fire $870 70 

Additions and Changes. 
Apparatus. 

May 19, 1925, an American- LaFrance Type 17 four- 
wheel tractor was placed in service with Ladder Com- 
pany 17. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 17,000 
pounds, seventy-two horse power. This replaced a 
Christie tractor which was placed in reserve. 

May 21, 1925, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed in 
service with Engine Company 11. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds, seventy- two 
horse power. This replaced a piece of apparatus of 
the same type. 

May 22, 1925, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed 
in service with Engine Company 36. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds, seventy-two 
horse power. This replaced a Christie tractor-drawn 
steam fire engine. 

May 23, 1925, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed 
in service with Engine Company 14. Weight, fully 



Fire Department. 3 

equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds, seventy-two 
horse power. This replaced a piece of apparatus of the 
same type. 

May 23, 1925, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 14. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds, seventy-two horse power. This instal- 
lation makes this a two-unit company. 

May 23, 1925, an American-LaFrance Type 17 four- 
wheel tractor was placed in service with Ladder Com- 
pany 11. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 17,000 
pounds, seventy-two horse power. This replaced an 
American-LaFrance city service truck which was later 
assigned to Ladder Company 6. 

May 25, 1925, an American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car was placed 
in service with Engine Company 8. Weight, fully 
equipped, without men, 12,000 pounds, seventy-two 
horse power. This replaced a Christie tractor-drawn 
steam fire engine. 

May 25, 1925, an American-LaFrance combination 
hose and chemical car was placed in service with Engine 
Company 43. Weight, fully equipped, without men, 
10,500 pounds, seventy-two horse power. This replaced 
a Velie combination hose and chemical car. 

July 11, 1925, an American-LaFrance Type 17 four- 
wheel tractor was attached to truck formerly at 
Ladder 17 and placed in service at Ladder Company 26. 
Weight, fully equipped, without men, 17,000 pounds, 
seventy-two horse power. This replaced an American- 
LaFrance city service truck which was placed in service 
at Ladder Company 22. 

November 2, 1925, an American-LaFrance Type 75 
chassis, with Foamite Childs equipment installed, in- 
cluding Foamite tanks, etc., was placed in service at 
the quarters of Water Tower 2 as a new unit. Weight, 
fully equipped without men, 11,000 pounds, seventy-two 
horse power. 

November 17, 1925, an American-LaFrance Type 
17 four-wheel tractor was received from the manufac- 
turer and will later be attached to Ladder Company 18. 
Weight, fully equipped, without men, 17,000 pounds, 
seventy-two horse power. 

November 23, 1925, a Ford one-ton truck, equipped 
with a Kohler power and light plant, 2,000 watt, was 
installed and assigned to the Fire Alarm Branch. This 
apparatus will be used at fires to supply lights. 



4 City Document No. 12. 

Apparatus Reassigned. 

June 4, 1925, an American-LaFrance Type 14 city 
service truck was placed in service with Ladder Com- 
pany 6. This replaced a Christie tractor-drawn truck. 

June 9, 1925, an American-LaFrance Type 14 city 
service truck was placed in service with Ladder Com- 
pany 22. This replaced a Christie tractor-drawn truck. 

July 1, 1925, a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine was taken from reserve and placed in service 
with Engine Company 25, replacing a piece of apparatus 
of the same type. 

October 9, 1925, the American-LaFrance 750-gallon 
combination pumper and hose motor car formerly in 
service at Engine Company 35 was placed in service at 
Engine 4, replacing Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine. On December 21, 1925, this same American- 
LaFrance pumper was placed in service at Engine Com- 
pany 3, replacing a Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine. The Christie tractor-drawn steam fire engine 
formerly in service at Engine Company 4 was placed 
back in service at that company. 

Chiefs' Automobiles. 
Three new Buick touring cars were purchased for the 
use of the Deputy Chiefs of Divisions 2 and 3, and the 
Superintendent of the Fire Alarm Branch; also five 
Buick roadsters for the use of various District Chiefs, 
Supervisor of Motor Apparatus and the Medical Ex- 
aminer, replacing vehicles worn out through constant 
service. 

Buildings. 

The following new and alteration work has been com- 
pleted during the fiscal year (eleven months) ending 
December 31, 1925: 

The new Fire Alarm Signal Station was completed 
and put into operation during the year. Located in 
the Fenway, opposite Westland avenue, away from all 
possible fire hazards, it assures the citizens of Boston 
adequate fire alarm protection for many years to come. 
It is really the finest building of its kind in the entire 
world. Provisions have been made in this building 
whereby in the event of the annexation of any city or 
town, connections may be made and our fire alarm 
system extended into that city or town within twenty- 
four hours from the time of annexation. 






Fire Department. 5 

At Engine 22, Warren avenue, South End, renovating 
and enlarging deputy and district chiefs' quarters, in- 
stalling shower baths, toilet, wash stand, relocating the 
lockers, etc. 

At Engine 3, Harrison avenue and Bristol street, South 
End, installing new house heater, building rear wall in 
boiler pit, waterproofing entire pit, smoke pipe work, etc. 

At Engine 32, Bunker Hill street, Charlestown, re- 
building chimney and wall. 

At Engine 51, Oak square, Brighton, drainage system 
repaired. 

Engine 52, Callender and Lyford streets, Dorchester, 
taking down and rebuilding side wall, repairing floor, etc. 

At Ladder 19, Fourth street, South Boston, taking 
down and rebuilding rear wall of building. 

At Ladder 5, Dorchester and Fourth streets, South 
Boston, rebuilding main door opening and installing 
new main doors. 

At Engine 12, Dudley street, Roxbury, installing oil 
burner and smoke pipe work. 

At Engine 2, and Fourth streets, South Boston, 
installing new heater, smoke pipe work, etc. 

At Engine 34, Western avenue, Brighton, rebuilding 
chimney, removing horse stalls, drains and all unsan- 
itary plumbing, installing new soapstone sink, toilet, 
etc., in rear main floor, installing radiators, building 
brick piers, etc. 

The following work is incomplete at this date: 

Engine 21, Annabel street and Columbia road, new 
quarters. 
Engine 26, new quarters, in abeyance. 
Ladder 17, Harrison avenue, complete renovation. 
Ladder 12, Tremont street, renovation of second floor. 

Tools and Appliances. 

During the year two additional Ross thawing devices 
were purchased and installed on pumpers in the depart- 
ment. This device has proven very efficient in thawing 
out frozen hydrants. 

Seven P. & Q. door openers were purchased and 
placed in service with Ladder Companies 1, 4, 8, 13, 17, 
18 and Rescue Company 1. After a trial of several 
months these tools have proven to be very valuable 
instruments and superior to anything in that line that 
we have had in service in the department. 



6 City Document No. 12. 

The following life-saving devices were installed during 
the year: 

Pulmotor at Ladder Company 9. 

Lungmotors at Ladder Companies 19 and 28. 

Inhalator at Rescue Company 1. 

Apparatus and Equipment. 

Thorough inspections and tests of apparatus, equip- 
ment and hose were conducted at various times during 
the year, and where defects were found, replacements 
or repairs were made immediately, so that the efficiency 
of the department might be maintained at all times. 

Building Inspection. 

The regular practice of systematic weekly inspections 
by officers was carried out through the year, as it has 
been our experience that constant attention in this 
regard is essential in view of the fact that a great many 
property owners, as well as tenants, disregard the warn- 
ings of this department to correct hazardous conditions 
and to comply with the City Ordinances. It is only 
in this manner that the safety of tenants and employees 
can be assured. 

Theaters, moving picture houses and halls were in- 
spected weekly, particular attention being given to the 
condition of fire-extinguishing appliances, as in a great 
many instances in the past the owners of these partic- 
ular types of structures have been prone to neglect 
this phase of protection for their patrons. 

All public buildings and schoolhouses were inspected 
monthly, and conditions as found were reported through 
channels to department headquarters. Whenever de- 
fective conditions were noted, immediate steps were 
taken to remedy same. 

The regular inspections in the various districts were 
made by the district fire prevention inspectors. 

The following is a summary of the activities of the 
Bureau of Building Survey and Inspection Division of 
the Uniform Force which was put into operation on 
February 25, 1925: 

Building surveys . 3,358 

Reinspections 1,172 

Stables 522 



Carried forward 5,052 



Fike Department. 



Brought forward 


. 5,052 


Garages 


. 793 


Personal inspections 


421 


Conditions remedied by personal contact . 


. 1,115 


Reports to State Fire Marshal .... 


192 


Reports to Building Department 


207 


Total 


. 7,780 



Included among the building surveys made were the 
following hazards: Hospitals, motion picture film ex- 
changes, acetylene gas manufacturing plants, dyestuffs, 
chemicals, wholesale druggists, paints and oils, oil facto- 
ries, storage of petroleum products. Warehouses : Boots 
and shoes, leather, cotton, wool, furniture, grocery, cold 
storage, public storehouses, grain elevators, paper and 
cardboard. Factories: Cotton, shoe, rubber goods, 
candy, piano, organ, furniture, box paper, box wood, 
clothing, oil clothing, button, machine shops and 
foundries. Stables. 

It has been the experience of this Bureau that by 
personal contact with owners, an explanation of what 
was wanted and the reasons therefor usually met with 
hearty co-operation, and it was found necessary to refer 
but few cases to the State Fire Marshal for the enforce- 
ment of the laws involved. 

Mutual Aid. 

The department responded to forty-one (41) alarms 
of fire outside of the city limits, divided as follows : 



Winthrop 


1 


Nahant 


1 


Everett 


1 


Newton 


1 


Somerville 


12 


Milton 


25 



It is a source of gratification to note that a great deal 
of good has resulted by this plan of interchange of service 
in time of urgent necessity. 

Drill School. 

During the year thirty-two (32) appointees success- 
fully passed the intensive course of instruction in the 
Department Drill School, together with nine members 
from other departments. There were also three officers 



8 City Document No. 12. 

from other fire departments who attended the Drill 
School and qualified to act as instructors in their own 
departments. 

Fire College. 

Ninety-six (96) officers from this department and 
several officers from suburban departments attended 
the sessions of the Fire College and practically every 
subject in the fire service was treated upon in this 
course. At the completion of the college during the 
coming spring, every officer in the department, both 
captains and lieutenants, will have attended the course 
of instructions. 

Fire Prevention Week. 

Fire Prevention Week was observed in this city during 
the week of October 4 to 11, 1925. Fire stations were 
open to the public between the hours of 12 and 9 p. m. 
for inspection and information as to how the department 
functions and on fire prevention matters, as well as for 
instructions as to the proper method of sending in an 
alarm of fire. All schools were visited by a district 
chief or an officer assigned by him and addresses made 
to the pupils on the subject of fire and prevention of 
fire, and fire drills were also held. A number of posters 
were distributed throughout the city and were dis- 
played on fire stations and in other prominent places 
calling attention to the importance of fire prevention; 
in fact, every effort was made to impress upon the 
general public the necessity of taking every precaution 
against fire, not only as regards their places of business 
or employment, but in their homes as well. 

Hydrants. 

The following is a list of the hydrants in service for 
fire purposes, as of December 31, 1925, showing the 
number and different types of same: 



Ordinary post 
Boston post 

Lowry 

Boston Lowry 

Bachelder and Finneran post 

High pressure 

Boston .... 

Carried forward . 



4,207 

3,089 

1,287 

515 

1,125 

441 

250 

10,914 



Fire Department. 



9 



Brought forward 
Chapman post . 
Ludlow post 
Matthew post 
Coffin post . 



Total 



10,914 

182 

20 

4 

1 

11,121 



High Pressure System. 



The records of our two high pressure stations for the 
year are as follows: 



Station No. 1. 



Station No. 2. 



Total alarms to which pumps responded 

Total time pumps actually operated 

Water discharge recorded on Venturi 
meters. 



218 

74 hours, 52 minutes 

589,000 gallons 



124 

36 hours, 42 minutes 

330,000 gallons 



(Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters, 
they do not record flows under 600 gallons per minute.) 

During the year 1925, the High Pressure Fire System 
has been extended into the following streets: 

Fulton street, Clinton to Lewis streets. 
Lewis street, Fulton to Commercial streets. 
Atlantic avenue, Essex to Summer streets. 
Summer street, Purchase street to Atlantic avenue. 
Richmond street, North street to Atlantic avenue. 
Batterymarch street, Water to Milk streets. 

Including the above mentioned work, the tligh Pres- 
sure System now includes 16.50 miles of piping and 441 
High Pressure Fire Hydrants. 

The continued excellent work performed by this 
system during the past year has again demonstrated 
what a necessary adjunct it is to the fire-fighting force 
in the extinguishment of fires in the high value section 
of the city. 

Recommendations. 

Apparatus. 

I earnestly recommend the purchase of the following 
major motor-driven fire- fighting apparatus, to be located 
as specified below: 

Engine 3, Harrison Avenue and Bris'ol Street, South 
End. — One 750-gallon pumper to replace Christie 
tractor-drawn steam fire engine. 



10 City Document No. 12. 

Engine 4, Bulfinch Street, West End. — One 750-gallon 
pumper to replace Christie tractor-drawn steam fire 
engine. 

Engine 25, Fort Hill Square, City Proper. — One 750- 
gallon pumper to replace Christie tractor-drawn steam 
fire engine. 

Engine 38, Congress Street, South Boston. — One 750- 
gallon pumper to replace Christie tractor-drawn steam 
fire engine. 

I further recommend the purchase of two 750-gallon 
pumpers to be used for Reserve Service and eventually 
replace Engine 32, Bunker Hill street, Charlestown, 
and Engine 28, Centre street, Jamaica Plain. 

Engine 18, Harvard Street, Dorchester. — ■ One combi- 
nation chemical and hose car to replace similar appa- 
ratus practically worn out in service and which should 
be overhauled and placed in reserve. 

Engine J+6, Peabody Square, Ashmont. — One combi- 
nation chemical and hose car to replace similar appa- 
ratus practically worn out in service and which should 
be overhauled and placed in reserve. 

Engine 30, Centre Street, West Roxbury. — One com- 
bination chemical and hose car. This installation 
required to make this a double-unit company. 

Engine 32, Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown. — One 
combination chemical and hose car. This installation 
required to make this a double-unit company. 

Engine 1$, Milton and Hamilton Streets, Readville. — 
One combination chemical and hose car. This installa- 
tion required to make this a double-unit company. 

Engine 53, Walk Hill Street, Forest Hills. — One com- 
bination chemical and hose car. This installation 
required to make this a double-unit company. 

Ladder 3, Harrison Avenue and Bristol Street, South 
End. — One 85-foot aerial truck to replace Christie 
tractor city service truck now inadequate to meet 
conditions in this district. 

Ladder 23, Washington Street, Grove Hall. — One 
85-foot aerial truck to replace American-LaFrance city 
service truck now inadequate to meet conditions in this 
district. The apparatus displaced will be reassigned to 
another company to replace Christie tractor city service 
truck requiring immediate replacement. 

Ladder 31, Saratoga Street, East Boston. — One 85-foot 
aerial truck to be installed at the quarters of Chemical 7 
and a new company to be formed to be known as Ladder 
31. Chemical 7 would be disbanded and the Seagrave 



Fire Department. 11 

wagon now in service there assigned to Engine 11 making 
this a double-unit company. The installation of this 
aerial truck is required to' meet the conditions in this 
district and is recommended by the National Board of 
Fire Underwriters in their 1925 report on City of Boston. 

Ladder 6, River Street, Dorchester Lower Mills. — One 
city service truck to replace similar piece of apparatus 
which has been in service a great many years and which 
should be overhauled and placed in reserve. 

Ladder 20, Andrew Square, South Boston. — One city 
service truck to replace Christie tractor-drawn truck 
which is practically worn out in service. 

Ladder 21, Saratoga Street, East Boston. — One city 
service truck to replace similar type of apparatus which 
has been in service a great many years and which should 
be overhauled and placed in reserve. 

Ladder 25, Centre Street, West Roxbury. — One City 
service truck to replace Christie tractor-drawn truck 
which is practically worn out in service. 

Ladder SO, Washington Street, Egleston Square. — One 
city service truck to replace similar type of apparatus 
which has been in service a great many years and should 
be overhauled and placed in reserve. 

Tower 1, Fort Hill Square, City Proper. — One Type 17, 
four-wheel tractor with rear end tiller attachment to 
replace American and British tractor, the manufacturer 
of this tractor having long since gone out of business and 
no parts for repairs being available. It is essential that 
rear end tiller attachment be installed because the water 
towers have an extra long wheel base and are difficult 
to manoeuvre in our narrow streets aud in the increased 
traffic conditions. 

Tower 3, Pittsburgh Street, South Boston. — One Type 
17, four-wheel tractor with rear end tiller attachment to 
replace American and British tractor for same reasons 
applying to Tower 1. 

I would further recommend the purchase of three 
Type 17, four-wheel tractors to be attached to aerial 
trucks in reserve service which are now equipped with 
worn out Christie tractors. The trucks themselves are 
in good condition and will make an excellent spare unit 
with new tractor attached. 

New Buildings. 
I recommend the erection of a new station in the 
vicinity of Broadway and L street, South Boston, to 
house Engine 2 and Ladder 19. No doubt in the near 



12 City Document No. 12. 

future, the territory along Summer and L streets will be 
built up with manufacturing and mercantile buildings 
requiring proper fire protection on our part. By 
building of new quarters for these two companies we 
could dispense with the present stations of Engine 2 and 
Ladder 19, both old houses and not in the best of 
condition. 

I would also recommend that new quarters be erected 
for Engine 17 and Ladder 7, in the vicinity of Eaton 
square, Dorchester district, which is the most advan- 
tageous location to afford proper protection in that 
section. 

I would also recommend that a new fire station be 
located in the Aberdeen section of Brighton, as that 
part of the city is being built up rapidly with apartment 
houses, and is in need of adequate fire protection. 

I would also recommend the erection of a new house 
in the West Roxbury district in the vicinity of Wash- 
ington and La Grange streets, to provide better fire 
protection for that part of the district. 

I would further recommend that consideration be 
given to the removal of Engine 4 from its present 
quarters on Bulfinch street, and that a new house be 
built in the vicinity of Court or Cambridge streets, 
thereby permitting the disposal of the Bulfinch street 
property, and affording better fire protection to that 
section of the city. 

Remodeling, Fireproofing, Etc. 

Engine 29 and Ladder 11, Chestnut Hill Avenue, 
Brighton. — Renovate and fireproofing of floor, walls 
and ceiling. Special reason for doing this work to 
lower main floor, thus giving more headroom for proper 
storage of new 85-foot aerial ladder truck now assigned 
at these quarters. 

Engine 6, Leverett Street, West End. — This building 
should be thoroughly renovated to provide better living 
quarters for the members stationed there. There is no 
doubt but what this house will remain in its present 
location for many years. 

Engine 22 and Ladder 13, Warren Avenue, South End. — 
Second and third floors of these quarters should be 
renovated. In my opinion all the officers' quarters 
should be located on the second floor and proper sleep- 
ing quarters provided for the men. 

Engine 42 and Ladder 30, Washington Street, Egleston 



Fire Department. 13 

Square. — I suggest that consideration be given to the 
addition of • another story to this station to provide 
more room and better living conditions at these quar- 
ters. At the time this house was built it was intended 
to be occupied by one company. At the present time 
there are two companies located there and the way the 
house is constructed it is not adapted for that purpose. 
Fireproofmg, floor, walls and ceiling; alterations on 
second floor. 

The main floors at the following quarters should be 
fireproof ed : 

Engine 3 and Ladder 3 . Engine 4 . 

Engine 9 and Ladder 2. Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 

Engine 13. Engine 16. 

Engine 18. Engine 19. 

Engine 20 and Ladder 27. Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 

Engine 23. Engine 24. 

Engine 36 and Ladder 22. Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 

Engine 42 and Ladder 30. Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 

Engine 48 and Ladder 28. Ladder 6. 

Ladder 9. Ladder 12. 

Ladder 23. Ladder 24. 

Chemical 7. 

Conclusion. 

To the Boston Board of Fire Underwriters, the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters, the New England 
Insurance Exchange and the National Fire Protection 
Association, who so kindly co-operated with this de- 
partment in the carrying out of many progressive 
measures, I wish to extend my sincere appreciation. 
Also I wish to extend my thanks to the various municipal 
departments, public service corporations and the Boston 
Protective Department, which rendered such valuable 
service during the past year. 

Finally, to the members of the department who so 
devotedly and efficiently performed their many difficult 
and at times hazardous duties, I desire to express my 
heartfelt gratitude, and it is my hope that the depart- 
ment will continue to maintain its position among the 
leading fire departments in the entire world, by render- 
ing the same high standard of service as in the past. 

Respectfully, 

Daniel F. Sennott, 
Chief of Department. 



14 



City Document No. 12. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF FIRE ALARM DIVISION. 



From: The Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report of Fire Alarm Division, 1925. 

I submit herewith the annual report of the Fire 
Alarm Division from February 1, 1925, to December 31, 
1925. 



OPERATING RECORDS. 

These records are for the calendar year 



Note 
ending December 31, 1925. 



First alarms 
Second alarms 
Third alarms 
Fourth alarms 
Fifth alarms 

Total . 



3,748 

73 

34 

10 

1 

3,866 



Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 

Same box received two or more times for same fire . 338 

Adjacent boxes received for same fire .... 273 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 1.3 

Total 624 



Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 

Received from citizens (by telephone) .... 2,388 

Received from Police Department (by telephone) . 308 

Received from Fire Department stations . . . 1,268 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 13 
Mutual aid alarms, adjacent cities and towns classed 

as stills 42 

Emergency services treated as stills .... 84 

Total 4,103 



Still alarms received by telephone for which box 
alarms were later transmitted 



257 



Fire Department. 15 



Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 

Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 
Transmitted by company to department stations . 139 

Department box alarms transmitted in connection with 
same: 
Before automatic alarm ..*.... 8 

After automatic alarm 6 

A. D. T. Company: 

Received at Fire Alarm Office 40 

Department box alarms transmitted in connection 

with same : 

Before A. D. T. alarm was received .... 9 

After A. D. T. alarm was transmitted ... 2 

Received after still alarms were transmitted ... 2 

A. D. T. alarms transmitted to department ... 29 

Summary of Alarms. 

Alarms received : 
Box alarms, including multiples 
Still alarms, all classes .... 
Boston automatic alarms 
A. D. T. alarms ..... 



4,490 

4,103 

139 

40 



Total received from all sources .... 8,772 

Exclude following duplications: 
Box alarms received but not transmitted . . . 624 
Still alarms for which box alarms were transmitted . 257 
Automatic alarms for which box alarms were trans- 
mitted . 14 

A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were previously 

transmitted 11 

Total duplications eliminated 906 

Total alarms, with duplications eliminated, to which 
apparatus responded 7,866 

Fire Alarm Box Records. 

Boxes from which no alarms were received . . 412 

Box tests and inspections 9, 132 

(Note : All keyless doors are tested weekly.) 

New Fire Alarm Headquarters. 

The new building in the Fens now serving as fire 
alarm headquarters, which was started in April, 1924, 
was officially accepted by the city July 1, 1925. The 



16 City Document No. 12. 

Gamewell Company began the installation of fire alarm 
apparatus in May and the work was completed in 
December. On September 17 official dedication cere- 
monies were held and on Sunday, December 27, 1925, 
the new headquarters was put in service and the old 
Bristol street office, which had been in service for 
thirty years, was abandoned. At 8 a. m., December 27, 
1925, the time designated for the cut-over, an alarm was 
received from Box 2328 (pulled by the Aide-to-Com- 
missioner) and was transmitted to the department by 
Fire Commissioner Theodore A. Glynn. 

The City of Boston now has the distinction of having 
the best fire alarm headquarters in the country. No 
expense was spared in making the building as near 
ideal as possible, the site could not be improved upon 
and the equipment is entirely new and contains all the 
latest features. Before plans were made many of the 
latest fire alarm stations in the country were inspected. 
Not only were the latest developments noted but the 
mistakes made by others as well, and this system 
profited thereby. Sufficient space for future growth is 
not an unimportant feature of the new building. Great 
credit is due to all concerned for the results accomplished, 
but especially to Mayor James M. Curley and Fire 
Commissioner Theodore A. Glynn for their broad- 
minded policies. 

Telephone System. 

The old obsolete magneto type telephone system was 
replaced by a modern common battery system with 
ten trunk lines (dial system) to Kenmore Exchange and 
two trunk lines to Roxbury Exchange (manual opera- 
tion). Special lines are provided for connection with 
Police Headquarters, the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company, the A. D. T. Company, Protective Depart- 
ment and Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company. A 
less number of instruments are connected to individual 
department lines than formerly. 

In the old system all outside conductors used in 
telephone system were owned and maintained by this 
department which caused a division of responsibility 
when trouble occurred; now the entire telephone system 
is maintained by the Telephone Company. Over two 
hundred miles of conductors formerly used for telephone 
purposes are now available for fire alarm service. Cir- 



Fire Department. 17 

cuits for trunks and for department lines are about 
equally divided in two cables, following different routes 
from headquarters to the telephone exchange where 
lines to different sections of the city are connected. 

Cable System. 

Eight main cables are terminated at fire alarm head- 
quarters. These cables follow three different routes 
from the building. Circuits are so arranged that none 
enters and leaves in the same cable. This is an impor- 
tant feature in the maintenance of fire alarm service. 

Regular Work. 

Because of the large amount of work required in 
carrying circuits into the new headquarters, no extensive 
additions and changes were made in the system. In 
underground work 2,257 feet of conduits were laid and 
about 20,000 feet of cable was installed; 17 box posts 
and 3 cable test posts were set; 11 box posts damaged 
by vehicles were replaced with new posts and damaged 
parts of 42 other posts were replaced; 7 posts were 
relocated because of change in street lines; 1 test post 
was replaced with a new type post and one was removed 
from service. Four new manholes were built. 

This department installed 15 fire alarm boxes, the 
Schoolhouse Department installed 5 boxes and 4 were 
installed on private property. Six boxes were removed 
from service and all boxes were painted. The usual 
amount of additions and changes were made in station 
electrical equipments. 

Underground Cables Installed. 
Charlestown. 

\ Cond. Feet. 

Bunker Hill street, from Engine 32 house to 

School street 10 2,485 

Bunker Hill street, from School street to 

Carney street 6 775 

Bunker Hill street, Short street and Medford 
street from Engine 32 house to Chappie 
street 6 915 

Cook street, from Bunker Hill street to Med- 
ford street 

Post connections 

Post connections 



6 


721 


15 


295 


10 


90 



18 



City Document No. 12. 



Tremont street, from 

Compton street 
Post connections 
Post connections 
Post connections 
Post connections 



Pole connections 
Pole connections 



City Proper. 
Clarendon street to 



South Boston. 



Cond. 



Feet. 



10 


1,119 


61 


102 


10 


155 


6 


650 


4 


1,145 


10 


495 


4 


1,210 



Dorchester. 
Washington street, from Ashmont street to 

Rockwell street 

Pole connections . . . . 

Pole connections 

Hyde Park. 
Pole connections 



10 


325 


6 


401 


4 


300 



19 



225 



Roxbury. 
Sherborn street, from Commonwealth avenue 

to Bay State road . .... 

Kilmarnock street, from Peterboro street to 

Audubon road 

Post and pole connections . . . . 
Post and pole connections .... 
Post and pole connections 



10 



436 



6 


940 


19 


530 


10 


125 


6 


180 



West Roxbury. 
Spring street, from Centre street to Baker 

street 10 2,542 

Centre street, from Cass street to Grove 

street • 6 2,539 

Pole connection 4 125 



Brighton. 
Academy Hill road, from Washington street 

to Engine 29 

Post and pole connections .... 
Post and pole connections .... 
Post and pole connections .... 



37 


375 


10 


150 


6 


332 


4 


345 



Fire Department. 19 

Box Posts Installed with Duct Lengths. 



Charlestown. 


Feet. 


Alford street and Arlington avenue 
Bunker Hill and School streets 
Bunker Hill and Sackville streets . 
Bunker Hill and St. Martin streets 
Medford street, opposite Belmont street 
Medford street, opposite Chappie street 


29 
18 
37 
14 
16 
37 


South Boston. 




East Sixth and L streets 


11 



Dorchester. 
Oakland street, opposite Rosewood street ... 20 

City Proper. 

Westland avenue, near No. 41 20 

Rutland street, near Newland street .... 22 

Roxbury. 
Bay State road and Sherborn street .... 34 

Boylston street and Audubon road .... 76 

Kilmarnock street and Audubon road .... 220 
Warren and Brunswick streets 13 

West Roxbury. 
Centre and Baker streets 41 

Brighton. 
Warren street and Woodstock avenue . . . . 21 

Allston street and Bellevista road ..... 5 

Box Posts Reset. 
(Broken by Vehicles.) 
Washington and West streets. 
Shawmut avenue and Worcester street. 
Sheridan square. 

Huntington avenue and Forsyth street. 
Beacon street and Massachusetts avenue. 
Boylston street and Massachusetts avenue. 
Walnut avenue and Dale street. 
Washington and Burnett streets. 
Centre and Church streets. 
Commonwealth avenue and St. Paul street. 
Union square. 

Forty-two other posts were damaged by automobiles which 
required replacement of parts in top section of posts. 



20 



City Document No. 12. 



(Relocated — Change of Curb.) 

Bowdoin square 

Tremont and Church streets (signal post) 
Tremont and Stuart streets (signal post) . 
Peterboro and Kilmarnock streets. 
Chestnut Hill avenue and South street 
Commonwealth avenue and Foster street. 

New Test Post. 

Dorchester avenue and Codman street. 
Washington street and Academy Hill road. 
Bunker Hill and Sullivan streets .... 

Test Post Removed. 
Washington and Bartlett streets. 

Test Post Relocated. 
Cambridge street, opposite Bowdoin street (4 ducts) 

Test Posts Replaced. 
Tremont and Compton streets (new type). 

Building Connections. 

To Ladder 19, through Emerson street 

To Engine 29, through Academy Hill road . 

To Police Headquarters, Berkeley street 

New Manholes. 

Emerson street, rear Ladder 19. 
Academy Hill road (2). 
Spring and Gardner streets. 

Ducts Replaced. 

Stoddard street (change of grade) .... 

Battery Wharf 

To Box 1412, Dewey square 

To Box 1481, Washington and Hollis streets 
To Box 231, Beacon street and Charlesgate West 

New Pole Connections. 

Saratoga and Bayswater streets 
Bunker Hill and School streets 
Pope's Hill street, at Neponset avenue 
Oakland street and Richmond road 
Spring and Gardner streets 
Centre and Baker streets 
Centre and Grove streets 
Longwood avenue and Vila street . 



Feet. 

17 
31 



20 



13 



12 



189 

355 

66 



62 
20 
83 
10 
33 



364 

157 

118 

182 

54 

56 

26 

120 



Fire Department. 21 

Ducts Abandoned. 

Feet. 

Alford and Arlington street (pole connection) . . 27 
Bunker Hill, at Trenton street (pole connection) . 44 
Medford street, at Cook street (pole connection) . 87 
Washington and Bartlett streets (2 ducts to test post) , 25 
Cambridge street, at Stoddard street (building con- 
nection) 85 

Spring street, at Centre street (pole connection) . 162 

Public Fire Alarm Boxes Installed. 

2172. Warren and Brunswick streets. 

2318. Bay State road and Sherborn street. 

2328. Westland avenue, near No. 41. 

2344. Boylston street and Audubon road. 

2347. Kilmarnock street and Audubon road. 

2635. Centre and Baker streets. 

2737. Weld street and Chilton road. 

2757. Baker and Lasell streets. 

2772. Gardner street and Gardner place. 

3458. Pope's Hill and Houghton streets. 

3461. Freeport and Conley streets. 

5178. Foster street and Lane park. 

692. Boardman and Leyden streets. 

695. Bayswater and Gold Star streets. 

696. Bayswater street and Waupello road. 

Schoolhouse Boxes Installed. 

2563. Washington Irving School, Poplar street. 

3296. Lucy Stone School, Park street, near Washington street . 

3368. Dorchester High School for Boys, Dunbar avenue. 

529. James A. Garfield School, Oakland street. 

68. Dante Alighieri School, Gove street. 

Private Fire Alarm Boxes Installed. 

1279. State Street Trust Company. 
1484. Boston Dispensary, Bennet street. 
3232. St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Jerome street (re- 
established) . 
669. Boston Airport. 

Fire Alarm Boxes Removed from Service. 

1264. Parker House (temporarily) . 

1352. Massachusetts General Hospital, Allen street gate. 

1442. Orpheum Theatre. 

1453. Boston Theatre. 

1533. Park Square Theatre. 

2393. Highland Spring Brewery, Terrace street. 



22 



City Document No. 12. 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 

Total number 

Owned by Fire Department 

Owned by Schoolhouse Department 

Owned by Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 

Privately owned 



1,340 

938 

233 

57 

112 



Department Boxes. 

On box posts 

On poles . 

On buildings . 

In buildings 

Equipped with keyless doors (bell ringing attachment) 
Equipped with "quick action" doors . 
Equipped with keyless doors (glass guards) . 

Equipped with key doors 

Equipped with auxiliary attachments . 
Designated by red lights 



540 

379 

15 

4 
883 

1 
47 

7 

2 
550 



Schoolhouse Boxes. 
On box posts . . 
On poles . . 

On buildings . . . 
In buildings .... 
Equipped with keyless doors 
Equipped with key doors 
Equipped with auxiliary attachments 
Designated by red lights . 



39 

17 
112 

65 
178 

55 
190 

38 



Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company Boxes. 

On poles 5 

On buildings 17 

In buildings 35 

Equipped with keyless doors 9 

Equipped with key doors 48 

Equipped with auxiliary attachments . . . 57 



Private Boxes 

On poles 

On buildings . . 

In buildings .... 

Equipped with keyless doors 

Equipped with key doors 

Equipped with "quick action" doors 

Equipped with auxiliary attachments 

Designated by red light 



38 
66 
15 
94 

3 
13 

1 



Fire Department. 



23 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts. 



District 1 






80 


District 9 




. 103 


District 2 






69 


District 10 




103 


District 3 






35 


District 11 




122 


District 4 






87 


District 12 




100 


District 5 






50 


District 13 




122 


District 6 






93 


District 14 




108 


District 7 






85 


District 15 




79 


District 8 






104 






Classification 


r of Fire Alarm Boxes 




Academies 


4 


Public hall . 


1 


Armory .... 


1 


Pumping station 


1 


Asylums 


4 


Railroad shops 


5 


Car houses 


10 


Railroad stations 


5 


Cemetery 


1 


Railroad yards 


12 


Church .... 


1 


Retail stores 


4 


City yards 


2 


Restaurant . 


1 


Home for aged people, 


2 


Schoolhouses (pub 


lie) . 233 


Hospitals 


21 


Schoolhouses (p i 


ir o - 


Hotels . 


4 


chial) 


2 


Manufacturing plants, 


28 


Stock yards . 


1 


Museum 


1 


Street boxes (pub 


lie) . 928 


Navy Yards . 


7 


Theatres 


25 


Office buildings 


6 


Warehouses . 


8 


Police station 


1 


Wharves 


9 


Power stations 


7 


Wholesale houses 


4 


Prison . 






1 









Posts and Cable Terminal Boxes. 

Box posts in service 579 

Box posts installed but not yet used .... 4 

Cable posts in service (large size) 74 

Cable posts in service (small size) ... . 16 

Pole cable boxes in service (underground connections) , 256 



Circuits. 
Box circuits . . . 

Tapper circuits 

Gong circuits 
Special signal circuits 
Telephone lines to department stations 
Telephone lines to Kenmore Exchange 
Telephone lines to Roxbury Exchange 
Telephone line to Police Headquarters 
Telephone line to Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany 



66 

14 

13 

3 

64 

10 

2 

1 



24 



City Document No. 12. 



Telephone line to Boston Automatic Fire Alarm 

Company . 

Telephone line to A. D. T. Company .... 
Telephone line to Protective Department . 

Note. — All telephone lines are now owned 
and maintained by Telephone Company. 



Fire Alarm Apparatus. 

Tappers in service . . . . . 166 

Boston tappers in adjoining cities and towns . 6 
Tappers connected to systems of adjoining cities and 

towns in Boston stations 6 

Gongs in service 113 

Registers in service, excepting those in fire alarm 

office 31 

Relays in service, excepting those in fire alarm office, 22 

Telephones in department system 145 

Public telephones rented by department ... 14 



Summary of Work Done. 

Line wire used in new work .... 

Line wire removed 

Aerial cable installed 

Conductors in same 

Aerial cable removed from service . 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed in telephone ducts 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed in department ducts 

Conductors in same 

Total underground cable installed . 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable replaced .... 

Conductors in same 

Conduits laid by Fire Department 
Ducts abandoned . 

Manholes built 

Fire alarm boxes installed by this department 

Fire alarm boxes installed by Schoolhouse Depart 

ment 

Fire alarm boxes installed on private property 
Fire alarm boxes removed from service . 

Box posts set 

Box posts relocated . . . . 



Feet. 

10,580 

38,850 

2,607 

6,664 

3,890 

22,240 

17,152 

150,260 

2,875 

25,045 

20,027 

175,305 

5,158 

115,951 

2,257 

455 

4 
15 

5 

4 

6 

17 

7 



Fire Department. 



25 



Box posts reset or replaced by new 

Cable posts set . ... 

Cable posts replaced by new . 

Cable posts relocated 

Cable posts removed from service . 

Underground cable boxes attached to poles 

Respectfully, 



11 
3 
1 
1 

1 
6 



George L. Fickett, 

Superintendent, Fire Alarm. 



26 City Document No. 12. 



BUREAU OF SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS. 



Boston, January 1, 1926. 

From: The Bureau op Supplies and Repairs. 
To: The Acting Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report for 1925. 

I report that the following is a summary of the activi- 
ties and work performed by the Bureau of Supplies 
and Repairs for the period commencing February 1, 
1925, to December 31, 1925;, inclusive. 

Extensive repairs and alterations to various quarters 
as follows : 



Engine Companies 4, 6, 16, 21, 22, 24, 32, 34, 37, 46, 52 
and 53. 

Ladder Companies 5, 12, 17 and 19. 

Rescue 1. 
Number of jobs performed by shop mechanics . 1 , 150 

Cost $48,15000 

Number of jobs performed by outside concerns . 282 

Cost . $15,935 00 

Various jobs performed by company members, 
stock furnished 

Cost $965 00 



While the quarters of Ladder Company 17 were 
undergoing repairs, the members of Ladder Company 
17 were moved to temporary quarters in the Osgood 
Building, on Bennet street, and later removed to other 
temporary quarters in the Kneeland Building, on Whit- 
more street. 

The quarters of Engine Companies 26 and 35 were 
abandoned during the year and most of the material in 
these quarters that could be salvaged were removed 
by members of the Bureau of Supplies and Repairs to 
the various storage spaces to be used as replacement 
material at the other company quarters. These com- 



Fire Department. 27 

panies are quartered at Engine 4 and Rescue 1, respec- 
tively, pending the erection of new quarters. 

The following company quarters had spaces set aside 
and were used by the Election Commissioners as polling 
places : 

Engine Companies 13, 19, 29, 33, 36, 46, 49 and 51. 

Ladder Company 9. 

New house heaters installed at the quarters of Engine 
Companies 2, 3 and 53. 

Swinging arms attached to gasolene pumps at the 
Repair Shop of the Bureau of Supplies and Repairs and 
Department Garage. 

Gasolene pump salvaged from the quarters of Engine 
Company 21 and installed at quarters of Ladder Com- 
pany 9, replacing defective pump. 

Gasolene pump salvaged from the quarters of Engine 
Companies 26 and 35 and installed at the quarters of 
Engine Company 52 replacing defective pump. 

Oil burning equipment installed at the quarters of 
Engine Company 12. 

Coal depot on Main street, Charlestown, abandoned 
and department equipment removed from same. 

Permission granted to Election Commissioners to 
store polling booths in yard at old Veterinary Hospital. 

Gas masks formerly carried on automobiles of Dis- 
trict Chiefs of Districts 3, 4 and 5 recalled and placed 
on apparatus. 

All life nets in the department inspected, oiled and 
repaired where same was necessary. 

H. and H. inhalator installed on Rescue 1. 

Lung motors installed on Ladders 19 and 28. 

Foam type extinguishers furnished to all company 
quarters where oil burning equipments have been 
installed. 

For the convenience and comfort of the members 
stationed at the various quarters the following articles 
were purchased and distributed. 



29 rugs. 


146 chairs. 


101 dozen sheets. 


11 bedsteads 


100 dozen slips. 


2 tables. 


8| dozen spreads. 


2 desks. 


21 dozen roller towels. 


1 chiffonier. 


2 dozen hand towels. 





28 City Document No. 12. 



Furniture Repaired. 

Number of jobs by our mechanics ... 117 

Cost $946 00 

Number of jobs by outside concerns ... 26 

Cost $917 00 

Motorless Vehicle Activities. 

Five horse-drawn steam fire engines were taken to the 
quarters of Engine Company 4 and auctioned off by the 
City Auctioneer. The purchaser later repudiated his 
purchase and the matter is now in the hands of the Law 
Department. 

One horse-drawn steam fire engine disposed of at 
private sale. 

Sleds for salting hydrants furnished to several com- 
panies. 

Repairs to salt wagons 4 

Cost $54 00 

Motor Activities. 

Twenty-seven motor vehicles purchased, tested and 
placed in service, viz. : 

4 American-LaFrance pumping engines. 

2 American-LaFrance combination chemical and hose cars. 
2 American-LaFrance aerial ladder trucks. 

2 four-wheel American-LaFrance tractors. 

1 American-LaFrance chassis for Foamite equipment. 

3 Buick touring cars. 

5 Buick roadsters. 

1 Ford truck for portable lighting equipment. 
5 Ford emergency cars. 

2 Ford roadsters. 

Cars Turned in. 

1 Buick touring car. 
3 Buick roadsters. 

6 Ford roadsters. 

Motor Vehicles Painted by Outside Concerns. 

3 Ladder trucks. 

2 Hose cars. 

1 Commercial truck. 

2 Ford roadsters. 

1 Ford truck (lighting plant). 



Fire Department. 



29 



Our motor equipment at the present time, consists of 
the following : 



Type. 



In Service. 



In Reserve. 



Unserviceable. 



Pumping engines 

Steam engines (tractor) 

Self-propelled eteam engines. 

Hose cars 

Aerial ladder trucks 

City service ladder trucks. . . 

Water towers 

Chief officers' cars 

Foamite car 

School car 

Rescue car 

Fuel cars 

Portable lighting plant 

Wrecking car 

Motor cycle (fire patrol) 

Commercial trucks 

Emergency cars (Ford) 

Roadsters (Ford) 



46 
4 



40 

14 

16 

3 

29 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

6 

5 

2 



6 

11 
2 

5 
3 
6 
1 

10 



Miscellaneous. 

Foamite equipment, consisting of tanks, hose, pres- 
sure cylinders, etc., were purchased and installed on 
American-LaFrance chassis for combating gasolene and 
oil fires. 

Ladder Company 23 truck and detail of men sent 
to Lexington on April 19 to assist in the Lexington- 
Concord Celebration. 

New style siren horn tried out on Engine Company 33 
pump. 

Experiment made with new style crankcase having 
removable oil troughs on 137-P (Motor Pump School 
pump). This case and one other was later purchased 
and installed on Engine Company 21 and Ladder 
Company 12, respectively. 

Buick roadster in service in District 5 demolished as a 
result of accident, all available parts being salvaged for 
use on other cars of this type. 



30 City Document No. 12. 

Thawing devices furnished to Engine Companies 8 
and 36. 

Two discarded Christie tractors dismantled and parts 
used for replacements. 

One thousand two hundred and eighty-eight com- 
plete inspections of motor vehicles by the engineer of 
motor apparatus. 

Three thousand one hundred and ten calls responded to 
by the emergency crew. 

Upon request of the Street Commissioners eighty-eight 
omnibuses were inspected and passed on by the super- 
visor of motor apparatus. 

Winter side inclosure installed on 088 car. One 
thousand and ninety chauffeurs' licenses renewed. 

Number of repairs by our mechanics . . . 4,335 

Cost $62,496 00 

By outside concerns 936 

Cost . $11,840 00 

Not having proper facilities at our shop certain 
articles were repaired by outside concerns, viz., springs, 
fenders, wheels, storage batteries, carburetors, siren 
horns, pressing on and off solid tires, etc. 



High Pressure, Steam and Marine Service. 

Owing to the illness and retirement of the super- 
intendent of this branch service, responsibility of same 
reverted to the Chief of the Bureau of Supplies and 
Repairs. 

All fireboats inspected by the United States Steam- 
boat inspectors and requirements fulfilled to comply 
with the law. 

Extensive repairs made to Engine Company 44's 
dock by outside concern. 

Emergency repairs performed on electrical equipment 
on pump No. 1 at High Pressure Station No. 2 by trouble 
expert from the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
with the assistance of our men. 

Overhead runways and trolleys installed at High 
Pressure Station Nos. 1 and 2, respectively. 

Turbine engine at High Pressure Station No. 1 
repaired, having new throttles installed. 



Fire Department. 



31 



Number of repairs to fireboats by our mechanics 

Cost . 

Number of repairs to fireboats by outside concerns, 

Cost 

Number of repairs to high pressure stations by our 
mechanics 

Cost . . 

Number of repairs to high pressure station by out- 
side concerns 

Cost 



146 

$5,876 00 

33 

$10,601 00 


8 
$177 00 



$1,209 00 



Motor Pump School. 

Motor Pump School was uninterruptedly maintained 
from April 24 to September 16. 

During this period ten classes were held. 

Fifty-four members of our department and two mem- 
bers of the Canton Fire Department were instructed in 
the care and operation of motor fire pumps. 

On the completion of each class the men attending 
same were examined and furnished with certificates con- 
firming them as motor pump operators. 

At the close of the school session the engineer- 
instructor inspected all thawing devices in the 
department. 

Chauffeur School. 

All new members entering the service were given 
instructions in the care and operation of motor vehicles. 

Special instructions were given to members of aerial 
ladder companies where four-wheel tractors were 
installed. 

All members of the department certified as operators 
and not having a state license were examined by inspec- 
tors from the State Registry of Motor Vehicles for same. 



Purchased. 
Leading cotton hose . 
Leading chemical hose 
f -inch wired hose 
1-inch deck hose 

Total . 



Hose. 



Feet. 

18,500 

1,500 

80 

180 

20,260 



Condemned. 


Feet. 


Leading cotton hose . 


15,450 


Leading rubber hose 


50 


f-inch chemical hose 


1,250 


1-inch deck hose 


180 


4-inch rubber suction hose, 


11 


3-inch flexible suction hose, 


280* 


Deluge hose 


62* 



Total 



17,284 



32 



City Document No. 12. 



Amount of hose in use and in storage ending December 
31, 1925. 



In Use. 
Leading cotton hose . 
Leading rubber hose 
f-inch chemical hose 
1-inch deck hose 
Flexible suction hose 
4-inch rubber suction hose 
Deluge hose 


Feet. 

139,821 

50 

19,750 

900 

825 

1,496 

662| 


In Storage. 
Leading cotton hose . 
f-inch chemical hose 
Flexible suction hose 
4-inch rubber suction hose, 
2 J-inch rubber suction hose, 

Total .... 


Feet. 
5,850 
150 
176 
176 
40 


6,392 


Total . 


163,5041 





Hose Repaired. 



Leading cotton hose . 
1-inch rubber deck hose . 
4§-inch hard rubber suction hose 
f-inch chemical hose 



Total 



Clothing. 



Feet. 

25,600 

175 

22 

2,650 

28,447 



Kind. 



Received 

and 

Distributed. 


Repaired. 


1,273 


1.275 


328 


232 


15 1 


8 


39 


78 


388 


401 


124 


387 


562 




76 





Reissued. 



Trousers 

Sack coats 

Reefers 

Overcoats 

Rubber coats (fire) 

Fire hats 

Caps 

Chin straps 



28 



Conclusion. 

I would suggest that consideration be given toward 
erecting a building in as close proximity to the present 
Bureau of Supplies and Repairs as would be possible to 
obtain for the purpose of storing all our reserve motor 
apparatus to produce more efficient service when replac- 
ing disabled apparatus. 

I would suggest that provisions be made for the dis- 
posing of all surplus equipment which is of no further 
use to this department, this to include discarded engine 



Fire Department. 33 

heaters, horse-drawn engines, Putnam steam power 
engine in shop and unattached Christie motors. 

The fact that we have a considerable amount of cannel 
coal distributed at various fire stations throughout the 
city, I would suggest that all this coal be disposed of 
except that now stored at the old quarters of Ladder 
Company 5 on Fourth street, South Boston. 

I feel that I should reiterate the necessity of having 
the shop suitably arranged to accommodate major 
apparatus, the present shop having been built some years 
ago for the care and upkeep of horse-drawn vehicles. 

Our department garage at No. 618 Harrison avenue, 
used principally for the storage of reserve chief officers' 
cars, trucks and cars of the Fire Alarm Branch, Wire 
Division, and Bureau of Supplies and Repairs, is taxed 
to the limit for space at the present time. This building 
was unused for some few years previous to 1919, at 
which time it was renovated by this department for 
use as a garage and class rooms for the Fire College. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William H. McCorkle, 

Chief, Bureau of Supplies and Repairs. 



34 City Document No. 12. 



REPORT OF MEDICAL EXAMINER. 



Boston, December 31, 1925. 
From: The Medical Examiner. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I submit herewith the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1925. 

Number of cases of illness on file 328 

Number of cases of injury on file 1,756 

Number of injured (but remained on duty) on file 1,214 

Examinations. 

Inspections and examinations at headquarters re- 
corded 1,765 

For appointment as probationary firemen (Civil 

Service) 40 

For appointment from probationary to permanent 

men 31 

At engine houses of firemen, pulmotors, medicine 
chests and visits at homes of firemen, either sick or 
injured and at hospitals 1,200 

During the past year there has been a considerable 
decrease in the number of cases of illness as compared 
with the previous year, but approximately the same 
number of injuries on file. 

The men, at all times, have promptly responded to 
the call of "First Aid" and have rendered faithful and 
valuable service to the public as well as to their brother 
workers in line of duty. 

The recent installation of a H. and H. Inhalators" in 
first aid work is in my opinion the last word in up-to-date 
procedure in the handling of all cases of toxemia from 
gas and smoke. 

It is worthy of record to report that out of 1,756 
injuries on file 1,214 men were treated at quarters or as 
out patients, and remained on duty. 



Fire Department. 35 



Deaths. 



Andrew J. Jennings, February 10, 1925. 

District Chief Edward McDonough, March 31, 1925. 

Daniel F. Kelley, April 13, 1925. 

Owen T. Norton, May 22, 1925. 

James W. McKinney, July 12, 1925. 

John J. Brotherston, July 16, 1925. 

Joseph Smith, September 16, 1925. 

William J. Donnolly, September 22, 1925. 

Francis B. Boyle, October 28, 1925. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William J. McNally, M. D., 

Medical Examiner. 



36 City Document No. 12. 



REPORT OF WIRE DIVISION. 



Boston, December 31, 1925. 

Fbom: Superintendent Wire Division. 
To: The Fire Commissioner. 
Subject: Annual Report. 

I herewith submit annual report of the Wire Divi- 
sion of the Fire Department for the year 1925. 

The underground district for 1925 was prescribed 
and advertised in accordance with the law. 

During the year there were fifty fires and one accident 
caused by electricity. The total of fire losses in so 
far as could be determined was $175,580.96. Thorough 
investigations of the above fires and accidents were 
made by members of this division, and complete reports 
made of the same. 

Inspections have been made of old and new electrical 
construction during the year as far as practicable. 

The total income was $87,714.53. 

INTERIOR DIVISION. 

As provided by law there have been eleven hundred 
and fifty (1,150) inspections made of theaters, places of 
amusement and public halls. Wherever defects were 
reported interested parties were immediately notified to 
attend to the same. 

During the year there were fifty fires and one accident 
caused by electricity. 

Fires in interior of buildings 47 

Fires on poles 3 

Injuries to persons 1 

Notices of new work received 23,002 

Number of permits to turn on current issued 17,073 

Number of incandescent lamps inspected . 1,699,914 

Number of motors inspected 9,605 

Number of buildings in which wiring was com- 
pletely examined . . • ' 6,250 

Number of inspections made 36,038 

Defects reported have been corrected or are in process of 
correction. 

EXTERIOR DIVISION. 

The underground district for the year 1925, as pre- 
scribed under authority of chapter 166 of the Acts of 
1921, comprised the following streets: 



Fire Department. 37 

South Boston. 
A street, from West First street to Dorchester avenue. 
West First street, from New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad to Dorchester street. 
D street, from West First street to Dorchester avenue. 
East Eighth street, from Dorchester street to H street. 
L street, from East Broadway to Columbia road. 

East Boston. 
White street, from Brooks street to Putnam street. 

Dorchester. 
Woodward Park street, from Howard avenue to Folsom street. 
Tolman street, from Neponset avenue to Norwood street. 

Brighton. 
Nottinghill road. 

Lanark road, from Kinross road to Sutherland road. 
Market street, from Washington street, a distance of 3,872 feet 
to a point 47 feet south of the south line of Lincoln street. 

Making a total distance of four miles as prescribed 
by law. 

In these prescribed streets from which poles and over- 
head wires were to be removed, there were standing on 
February 1, 1925 , a total of two hundred and twenty-two 
(222) poles, not including the trolley poles of the Boston 
Elevated Railway, which are exempt, owned by the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company and New Eng- 
land Telephone and Telegraph Company, supporting 
a total of six hundred seventy-one thousand one hundred 
(671,100) feet of overhead wires or a little more than one 
hundred twenty-seven (127) miles owned by the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company, New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company, Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company, Western Union Telegraph Company, 
Boston Fire Department (Fire Alarm Branch) and 
Boston Police Department (Police Signal Service). 

In the selection of new pole locations our engineers 
have accompanied the engineers of the various com- 
panies for the purpose of passing on such locations. 
All carrying poles standing in the streets are stencilled 
by this department for purposes of identification, brass 
tags now being used for this purpose. 

In addition to the regular inspection work necessary 
on account of new construction, the inspection of old 
overhead construction is also included in the duties of 
our inspectors. 



38 City Document No. 12. 

During the past year the inspectors of this division 
have reported one hundred and seven (107) poles de- 
cayed at base and twelve (12) poles leaning or a total 
of one hundred and nineteen (119) poles which were 
replaced by new poles or reset by the various companies 
at the request of this department. 

Thirty-three (33) abandoned poles were also reported 
by our inspectors and were removed by the owners at 
our request. 

The following table shows the overhead work from 
February 1, 1925, to December 31, 1925, inclusive: 

Number of new poles in new locations . . ... 648 

Number of poles replaced, reset or straightened . 623 

Number of poles removed 233 

Number of poles now standing in the public 

streets 17,114 

Number of defects reported . . 2,316 

Number of defects corrected 2,200 

(Other defects in process of correction) . 

Number of notices of overhead construction 15,808 

Number of overhead inspections .... 19,148 

Number of overhead reports 13,359 

Amount of overhead wires removed by owners 

(in feet) 3,260,760 

Underground Construction. 

The ducts used this year for the underground conduits 
of the drawing-in system are of the following type: 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete). 

3. Iron. 

4. Wood. 

In side or residential streets, a considerable amount 
of special underground construction for electric light 
and power purposes (110 and 220 volts) of a type known 
as the " Split Fiber Solid Main System" has been 
installed during the year. 

The electrical approvals for underground electrical 
construction numbered 4,572. 

Number of inspections of underground electrical con- 
struction, 9,668. 

Number of reports of underground electrical con- 
struction, 5,161. 



Fire Department. 39 

Character of Cable Used by the Various Companies. 



Company. 


Kind of Insulation. 


Size. 






500,000 C. M. 






4 and 6 conductor. 


Charlestovra Gas and Electric Com- 
pany. 


Varnished cambric 
and rubber. 


No. 6 to No. 4/0. 


Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 


Rubber and paper. . . 


No. 6 to 1,500,000 C. M. 


pany. 






Fire Alarm Branch (B. F. D.) 










2 to 1,212 pair. 


graph Company. 






Postal Telegraph Cable Company 
and Boston District Messenger 
Company. 


Rubber and paper. . . 


2, 10 and 30 conductor. 


Western Union Telegraph Company 
and Mutual District Messenger 
Company. 


Rubber and paper. . . 


10 to 150 conductor and 6 to 
162 pair. 



Table Showing Underground Work for the Year 1925, February 1 
to December 31, 1925, Inclusive. 



Company. 


a 
o 
O 

"o 


3 

Q 
"8 


a 

a 


"8! 


3«2 


Boston Elevated Railway 


3,475 


33,265 


15,361 


12 


4 




238 


734 




1 


4 


tion. 






Boston Schoolhouse Commission. . 


1,128 


1,113 


3,595 


3 


5 


Charlestown Gas and Electric 
Company. 


3,855 


11,450 


33,024 


3 


215 


Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany. 


103,255 


771,111 


1,872,821 


194 


3,884 


Fire Alarm Branch (B. F. D.) 


502 


604 


21,440 


2 


12 


New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 


20,135 


114,314 


400,339 


29 


92 


Police Signal Service (B. P. D.) . . . 


490 


490 






3 


Postal, Telegraph,Cable Company 
and Boston District Messenger 
Company. 


1,970 


3,838 


1,580 


4 


2 


Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany and Mutual District Mes- 
senger Company. 


4,233 


12,472 


7,207 


12 


7 


Totals 


139,281 


949,391 


2,355,367 


260 


4,228 







Note. — ' ' Split Fiber Solid Main System" of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
is included in the above figures, comprising 25,360 feet of conduit and 48,863 feet of duct. 
The main and feeder tube or armored cable of the ' ' old solid system" of the same company 
are not included. Work on the "old solid system" comprised 250 service connections 
and 7,202 feet of No. 100 three-conductor cable. The above figures also include 1,510 feet 
of conduit and 2,964 feet of duct of the "Split Fiber Solid Main System" of the Charles- 
town Gas and Electric Company. 



40 



City Document No. 12. 



Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power 

December 31, 1925. 



Company. 


o 

■Sph £ 


a . 

-2 (2 .5 


Capacity of 
Incandescent 
Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 


Capacity of 
Arc Lamps 
in Kilowatts. 


So 

■3*8 
M 


£t3 . 


"28 

300 


Boston Elevated Railway Company 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company . . . 


46,702 
54,424 


252,353 
275,400 


4,034 

150,030 

1,650 

125 

140 

25 


1 

3,104 

165 

106 

10 


35S.060 

106,142 

1,600 


84,980 

98,525 

325 


17 

52 

1 


Quaker Building Company 


620 
500 
200 


400 
363 
150 


1 


75 
25 


225 


1 


Sudbury Building Plant 


1 


Totals 


102,446 


528,666 


156,004 


3,386 


465,902 


184,055 


73 







Fire Department. 



41 



LIST OF WIRE DIVISION EMPLOYEES, 
DECEMBER 31, 1925. 



1 Superintendent 




1 Chief inspector 




Inspectors 




7 Inspectors 






4 Inspectors 






5 Inspectors 






4 Inspectors 






3 Inspectors 






1 Engineer 






1 Chief clerk 






1 Clerk and cashier 


1 Clerk and stenographer 


1 Stenographer 


1 Stenographer 




1 Stenographer 




1 Stenciller 




1 Chauffeur 




1 Clerk 




1 Clerk . 







Salary 
Per Annum 

$4,000 
2,700 
2,200 
2,100 
2,000 
1,900 
1,700 
1,600 
2,200 
2,400 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
1,500 
1,300 
1,600 
1,600 
1,400 
1,100 



46 



42 



City Document No. 12. 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATION AND EX- 
PENDITURES FROM FEBRUARY 1, 1924, 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1925, INCLUSIVE. 



Appropriation . 




$91,308 34 




Expenditu 


RES. 




A-l. 


Employees . 


$81,638 81 




F-7. 


Pensions 


550 00 




B-4. 


Car fares 


2,598 80 




B-12. 


Premium on bond 


15 27 




B-13. 


Telephones . 


336 80 




B-35. 


Auto fees 


2 00 




B-39. 


Repairs, etc. 


79 90 




C-4. 


Tires and tubes . 


239 76 




C-9. 


Office .... 


519 00 




C-13. 


Tools, etc. . 


3 45 




D-l. 


Office forms, etc. 


1,903 66 




D-ll 


Gasolene, etc. 


246 00 




E-10. 


Batteries 


8 52 




E-13. 


Paint stock, etc. . 
Dtal expenditures 


321 00 




T 


$88,462 97 




Balance in treasury 


2,845 37 










$91,308 34 



Fire Department. 43 



LIST OF PROPERTY — WIRE DIVISION. 



7 150-300 Weston Direct Current Double Reading Voltmeters. 
1 300-volt Weston Direct Reading Alternating and Direct 

Current Voltmeters. 
1 1,500- volt Weston Direct Reading Voltmeter. 

1 50-amp. Weston Direct Reading Ammeter. 

2 300-volt Weston Alternating and Direct Current Voltmeters. 
1 15-amp. Thomson Alternating Ammeter. 

1 1,500-amp. Weston Direct Reading Mil-ammeter. 
1 200-amp. Thomson Alternating Ammeter. 
1 500-amp. Weston Direct Reading Ammeter. 
1 15-volt Weston Direct Reading Voltmeter. 
1 Queen testing set. 

3 Bichloride of Silver Batteries, each 60 cells. 

1 120- volt Weston Direct Current Miniature Type Voltmeter. 

1 150-volt Weston Direct Current Miniature Type Voltmeter. 

1 Ford truck. 

1 Buick touring car. 

1 Buick runabout. 

1 Camera, complete. 

Respectfully yours, 

Walter J. Burke, 

Superintendent, Wire Division. 



44 



City Document No. 12. 



THE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION. 



Commissioner, Theodore A. Glynn. 

Chief Clerk, James P. Maloney. 

Chief of Department, Daniel F. Sennott. 

District Chief, William H. McCorkle, in charge of Bureau 

of Supplies and Repairs. 
Superintendent of High Pressure, Steam and Marine Service, 

Eugene M. Byington. 
Superintendent of Fire Alarms, George L. Fickett. 
Superintendent of Wire Division, Walter J. Burke. 
Chief Operator and Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarms, 

Richard Donahue. 
Chief Clerk, Wire Division, John F. Flanagan. 
Medical Examiner, William J. McNally, M. D. 

Clerks. 
Fire Department. 
James P. Maloney, Chief Clerk; Edward L. Tierney, Chief 
of License Division, Bureau of Fire Prevention; George F. 
Murphy, Herbert J. Hickey, John J. Coholan, William J. 
Hurley, Frank M. Fogarty, William J. O'Donnell, Thomas W. 
O'Connell, Warren F. Fenlon, Henry J. Egan, Joseph F. 
O'Brien, James P. McKenna, William D. Slattery, John J. 
Shea, James H. Finnerty, Robert W. O'Neil, William V. 
Doherty, William H. Murray, Oscar Kent. 

Wire Division. 
Chief Clerk, John F. Flanagan. 

William McSweeney, Charles S. Carroll, Martin P. Cum- 
mings, Celina A. O'Brien, Mary E. Fleming, May D. Marsh, 
Mary E. Sullivan. 

Headquarters 
1 Commissioner .... 
1 Chief clerk . . . 



1 Medical examiner 

1 Secretary and stenographer 

1 Executive clerk in charge motor 

supplies and repairs 
1 Clerk 
1 Clerk 
1 Clerk 



apparatus 



Clerk 
Clerk 



1 Assistant engineer (messenger)* 

2 Hosemen (clerks)* 

1 Clerk 



Per Annum. 

$7,500 
2,700 
3,500 
2,400 



2,700 
1,800 
1,700 
1,700 
1,400 
1,300 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 



* Detailed from Fire-fighting Branch. 



Fire Department. 



45 



1 Janitress 
1 Elevatorman 



16 



Fire Prevention Bureau. 



1 Chief Fire Prevention 

1 Clerk 

1 Clerk 

1 Clerk . 

1 Clerk 

1 Constable 

1 Captain Fire Prevention 



Per Week. 

$22 00 

Per Annum. 

.$1,700 



Per Annum . 

$2,700 
2,000 
1,700 
1.400 
1,200 
1,600 
2,500 



Fire-fighting Branch. 



1 Chief of Department 

1 Assistant Chief of Department 
6 Deputy chiefs . 

30 District chiefs . 
75 Captains 
109 Lieutenants 

2 Aids-to Chief (lieutenant) 

2 Aids-to Chief 

3 Aids-to-Commission (private) 
3 Engineers (marine) 
6 Masters . 

50 Engineers 

53 Assistant engineers 

1,094 Privates: 

766 . 

41 . 

17 . 

37 . 

233 . 



1,435 



Bureau of Supplies and Repairs. 



1 District Chief in charge 

1 Superintendent, High Pressure Steam and 

Marine Service 

1 Supervisor, motor apparatus . 

1 Shop foreman .... 

1 Lieutenant, foreman hose and harness shop 

1 Motor apparatus engineer 

1 Engineer and architect .... 

1 Storekeeper (hoseman) .... 



Per Annum. 

$5,500 
4,000 
4,000 
3,500 
2,500 
2,300 
2,300 
2,200 
2,200 
2,200 
2,100 
2,100 
2,000 

$2,000 
.,900-$2,000 
: ,800-81,900 
l ,700-81,800 
L,600-$l,700 



Per Annum. 

$3,500 

3,800 
2,900 
2,700 
2,300 
2,700 
2,500 
2,100 



46 



City Document No. 12. 



1 Master plumber (engineer) 
1 Master carpenter (hoseman) 
1 Master painter . 
1 Foreman (auto mechanic) 

5 Privates 
1 Clerk in charge . 
1 Clerk . 
1 Clerk . 
1 Stenographer 
1 Clerk . 

6 Engineers in charge 

11 Engineers (High Pressure Service) 

12 Engineers, motor squad 

3 Firemen 

3 High Pressure engineers . 

1 Engineer 

1 Master steamfitter 

1 Master apparatus painter 

2 Plumbers 

3 Steamfitters 
2 Auto machinists 
9 Painters 
2 Wheelwrights 
6 Machinists . 

12 Auto repairers . 
1 Auto repairer and tester 
1 Auto blacksmith 
1 Battery and ignition man 

6 Blacksmiths 

7 Helpers 

4 Carpenters . 

1 Auto trimmer and canvas worker 
1 Hose repairer and carriage trimmer 
1 Hose and harness repairer 
1 Vulcanizer . 
1 Chauffeur . 
4 Laborers 
1 Brick mason 

1 Rubber goods repairer 

2 Battery and ignition men 
1 Auto mechanic and machinist 
1 Auto repairer and acetylene welder 



Fer Annum. 

$2,200 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
2,000 
2,100 
1,700 
1,600 
1,200 
1,000 
2,300 
2,100 
2,200 

Per Day. 

$6 00 

Per Week. 

$43 00 
42 00 

Per Annum. 

$2,200 
1,900 

Per Day. 

$6 00 



5 50 
5 50 

5 50 

6 00 
5 50 

5 50 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 



S5 50-3 



50 
75 
50 
50 
50 
00 
00 
50 
50 
00 
50 
50 
50 
50 



131 



Fire Department. 



47 



Fire Alarm Branch. 









Per Annum. 


1 Superintendent fire alarm .... $4,000 


1 Assistant superintendent and chief operator, 3,200 


1 Supervising operator . 2,600 


3 Principal operators 






2,500 


3 Operators 






2,300 


2 Operators 






2,200 


2 Assistant operators . 






2,000 


1 Assistant operator (sliding scale) 






$1,700-81,800 


3 Assistant operators (sliding scale) 






$1,600- $1,700 


1 Foreman, construction 






2,800 


1 Assistant foreman, construction 






2,300 


1 Stockman 






1,900 


1 Custodian 






1,700 


1 Clerk 






2,000 


1 Batteryman .... 






2,000 


1 Aid-to-Superintendent 






2,200 






Per Day. 


3 Machinists (7 days) . 




$5 50 


1 Machinist (6 days) 






5 50 


3 Cable splicers .... 






6 25 


5 Inside wiremen .... 






6 10 


4 Repairers and linemen 






5 75 


10 Linemen 






5 50 


1 Laborer 






4 50 


1 Radio electrician .... 






$5 50-$6 10 



52 



48 City Document No. 12. 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 

Daniel F. Sennott. 

Headquarters, Bristol Street. 

The Chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Assistant Chief of Department, Henry A. Fox. 
Division 1. 

Deputy Chiefs, Edward J. Shallow and Henry J. 

Power. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1 . 
District Chiefs, Thomas E. Conroy and Michael F. 

Silva. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 
East Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 
31 (fireboat), 40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, Chemical 7. 

District 2. 
District Chiefs, Philip A. Tague and Hamilton A. 

McClay. 

Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22. 

District 3. 
District Chiefs, Cornelius J. O'Brien and James 

Mahoney. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 
39, 44 (fireboat), Ladders 8, 18, Water Tower 3. 



Fire Department. 49 

District 4- 
District Chiefs, John F. Watson and Avery B. Howard. 

Headquarters, Engine House, 4 Bulfinch Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
Ladders 1, 24, Water Tower 1. 

District 5. 
District Chiefs, Charles A. Donahue and Victor H. 

Richer. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Mason Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Rescue 1. 

Division 2. 

Deputy Chiefs, Albert J. Caulfield and Frank A. 

Sweeney. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 
District Chiefs, Harry M. Hebard and Michael J. 

Tee han. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 
District Chiefs, Thomas H. Downey and John J. 

Kelley. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33, 
Ladders 3, 13, 15, Water Tower 2. 

District 8. 
District Chiefs, Frank J. Sheeran and Dennis 

Driscoll. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26. 



50 City Document No. 12. 

District 11. 
District Chiefs, James F. McMahon and Thomas H. 

Andreoli. 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 41, 
51, Ladders 11, 14. 

Division 3. 
Deputy Chiefs, Walter M. McLean and Joseph A. 

DOLAN. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 

District 9. 
District Chiefs, Joseph H. Kenney and Patrick J. V. 

Kelley. 

Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 21, 23, 
24, Ladder 4. 

District 10. 
District Chiefs, Francis J. Jordan and Charles H. 

Long. 

Headquarters, Engine House 18, Harvard Street, 

Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 52, 
Ladders 7, 29. 

District 12. 
District Chiefs, John N. Lally and Thomas J. Muldoon. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 

Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 
Ladders 10, 23, 30. 

District 13. 
District Chiefs, Michael J. Kennedy and William F. 

Qttigley. 

Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 53, 
Ladders 16, 25. 



Fire Department. 51 

District 1J/.- 
District Chiefs, Allan J. Macdonald and James F. 

Ryan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, Ladders 6, 27. 

District IS. 
District Chiefs, John P. Murray and Henry Krake. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 

Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 49, 
Ladder 28. 



52 



City Document No. 12. 



FIRE STATIONS. 
Location. 



Location. 



Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 


Occupied by 


8,167 


Engine 1 and Ladder 5. 


4,000 


Engine 2. 


4,000 


Engine 3 and Ladder 3. 


6,098 


Engine 4 and Engine 26. 


3,265 


Engine 5. 


2,269 


Engine 6. 


1,893 


Engine 7. 


2,568 


Engine 8. 


4,720 


Engine 9 and Ladder 2. 


1,886 


Engine 10. 


10,000 


Engine 11 and Ladder 21. 


7,320 


Engine 12. 


4,832 


Engine 13. 


5,713 


Engine 14. 


2,803 


Engine 15. 


12,736 


Engine 16 and Ladder 6. 


9,450 


Engine 17 and Ladder 7. 


9,440 


Engine 18. 


7,683 


Engine 19. 


9,000 


Engine 20 and Ladder 27. 


10,341 


Engine 21. 


7,500 


Engine 22 and Ladder 13. 


3,445 


Engine 23. 


4,186 


Engine 24. 


4,175 


Engine 25 and Ladder 8, Tower 1 


2,600 


Engine 27. 


10,377 


Engine 28 and Ladder 10. 


14,358 


Engine 29 and Ladder 11. 


12,261 


Engine 30 and Ladder 25. 




Engine 31. 


8,188 


Engine 32. 



Dorchester and Fourth streets 

Corner of O and Fourth streets 

Bristol street and Harrison avenue 

Bulfinch street 

Marion street, East Boston 

Leverett street 

East street 

Salem street 

Paris street, East Boston 

River street 

Saratoga and Byron streets, East Boston . . . 

Dudley street 

Cabot street 

Centre street 

Dorchester avenue 

Corner River and Temple streets 

Meeting House Hill, Dorchester 

Harvard street, Dorchester 

Babson street, Dorchester 

Walnut street, Dorchester 

Columbia road, Dorchester 

Warren avenue . . . 

Northampton street 

Corner Warren and Quincy streets 

Fort Hill square 

Elm street, Charlestown 

Centre street, Jamaica Plain 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 

Centre street, West Roxbury 

521 Commercial street, on land of Public 
Works Department. 

Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 



Fire Department. 

Fire Stations. — Concluded. 



53 



Location. 



Number 
of Feet 
in Lot. 



Occupied by 



Corner Boylston and Hereford streets 

Western avenue, Brighton 

Monument street, Charlestown 

Corner Longwood and Brookline avenues, 

Congress street 

Sumner street, East Boston 



Harvard avenue, near Cambridge street, 
Brighton. 



Washington street, at Egleston square 

Andrew square 

Northern Avenue Bridge 

Roslin- 



Washington and Poplar street 
dale. 



Dorchester avenue, Ashmont : 

Adjoining South Ferry, East Boston . 



Harvard avenue and Winthrop street, 
Hyde Park. 



Church street 

Milton and Hamilton streets 

Winthrop and Soley streets 

Oak square, Brighton 

Saratoga street, East Boston 

Corner Callender and Lyford streets . . . 
Corner Walk Hill and Wenham streets . 

Friend street 

Dudley street 

Main street, Charlestown 

Tremont street 

Harrison avenue 

Pittsburgh street, South Boston 

Fourth street 

Washington street, Dorchester 

North Grove street 



5,646 
4,637 
5,668 
5,231 
4,000 
4,010 
6,112 

3,848 
5,133 



14,729 

4,875 
11,950 
9,450 

3,412 
14,475 
5,230 
9,889 
9,300 
7,200 
11,253 
1,676 
3,923 
4,290 
4,311 
2,134 
8,964 
3,101 
6,875 
3.91S 



Engine 33 and Ladder 15. 

Engine 34. 

Engine 36 and Ladder 22. 

Engine 37 and Ladder 26. 

Engines 38 and 39. 

Engine 40. 

Engine 41 and Ladder 14. 

Engine 42 and Ladder 30. 
Engine 43 and Ladder 20. 
Engine 44, fireboat. 
Engine 45 and Ladder 16. 

Engine 46. 
Engine 47, fireboat. 
Engine 48 and Ladder 28. 

Rescue 1 and Engine 35. 

Engine 49. 

Engine 50. 

Engine 51. 

Chemical Engine 7. 

Engine 52 and Ladder 29. 

Engine 53. 

Ladder 1. 

Ladder 4. 

Ladder 9. 

Ladder 12. 

Ladder 17. 

Ladder 18 and Tower 3. 

Ladder 19. 

Ladder 23. 

Ladder 24. 



Headquarters Building, Bristol street, 15,679 feet of 
land. 

Water Tower No. 2 is in Headquarters Building. 



54 City Document No. 12. 



OTHER BUILDINGS. 

Bureau S. & R., 363 Albany street, 8,000 feet of land. 

Veterinary Hospital, Atkinson street, 64,442 feet of 
land. 

Coal station, Main street, Charlestown, 2,430 feet of 
land. 

Building No. 11 Wareham street, used by the Fire 
Alarm Branch as workshop and storeroom, 8,500 feet of 
land. 

Building No. 618 Harrison avenue, used as a depart- 
ment garage and repair shop and a school for chauffeurs 
and officers, 3,816 feet of land. 



Fire Department. 



55 



GASOLENE STATIONS. 
Division 1. 



Districts. 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Gallons.) 


Pump. 


280 


1 gallon 


110 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


550 


1 gallon 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


220 


1 gallon. 


120 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


280 


1 gallon. 


550 


1 gallon. 


550 


1 gallon. 


220 


1 quart. 


280 


1 gallon. 


550 


1 gallon. 


550 


1 gallon. 



Engine 5 

Engine 11 

Engine 40 ... . 

Ladder 2 

Chemical 7. . . 
Engine 27 ... . 

Engine 32 

Engine 36.... 

Engine 50 

Ladder 9 

Ladder 8 

Ladder 18 

Engines 38-39 

Engine 4 

Engine 6 

Engine 8 

Ladder 1 , 

Ladder 24 

Engine 7 

Engine 10 

Engines 26-35 

Ladder 17 

Rescue 1 



56 



City Document No. 12. 



Division 2. 



Districts. 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Gallons.; 



Pump. 



6. 

6. 

6. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

8. 

8. 

8. 

8. 
11. 
11. 
11. 
11. 



Engine 1 

Engine 2 

Engine 15 

Engine 43 

Ladder 19 

Engine 3 

Engine 22 

Engine 33 

Bristol street, repair shop 

Department garage 

Engine 13 

Engine 14 

Engine 37 

Ladder 12 

Engine 29 

Engine 34 

Engine 41 

Engine 51 



280 
280 
280 
280 
550 
280 
550 
280 
550 
280 
550 
550 
120 
280 
280 
280 
280 
280 



gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon . 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon. 



Fire Department. 



57 



Division 3. 



Districts. 



Location. 



Capacity. 
(Gallons) 



Pump. 



9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

10 

10 

10 

12 

12 

12 

13 

13 

13 

14 

14 

14 

15 

15 

15 



Engine 12 
Engine 21 
Engine 23 
Engine 24 
Ladder 4 . 
Engine 17 
Engine 18 
Engine 52 
Engine 28 
Engine 42 
Ladder 23 
Engine 30 
Engine 45 
Engine 53 
Engine 20 
Engine 46 
Ladder 6 . 
Engine 19 
Engine 48 
Engine 49 



550 
550 
280 
550 
120 
280 
280 
280 
280 
550 
220 
280 
550 
120 
280 
220 
280 
280 
280 
280 



gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon . 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon, 
gallon. 



58 



City Document No. 12. 



CANNEL COAL STATIONS. 
Division 1. 



Districts. 


Location. 


Capacity. 
(Tons.) 


1 




15 


1 




5 


2 


Engine 36 


2 


3 


Engines 38-39 


6 


3 


Ladder 18 


4 


4 




2 


4 


Ladder 24 


15 









Division 2. 

Engine 2 

Engine 15 

Fourth street (Old Ladder 5). 

Engine 3 

Engine 33 

Engine 13 

Engine 14 

Engine 37 

Engine 29 

Engine 34 

Engine 41 

Engine 51 



6. 
6. 
6. 

7. 

7. 

8. 

8. 

8. 
11. 
11. 
11. 
11. 



6 
2 

40 
4 

25 
8 
2 
5 
5 
5 
5 
2 



Fire Department. 



59 



Division 3. 



9 

9 

9 

9 

10 

10 

12 

12 

13 

13 

14 

14 

15 

15 



Engine 12 
Engine 21 
Engine 23 
Engine 24 
Engine 17 
Engine 18 
Engine 28 
Engine 42 
Engine 30 
Engine 45 
Engine 16 
Engine 20 
Engine 19 
Engine 48 



60 



City Document No. 12. 



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62 



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64 



City Document No. 12. 



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Fire Department. 



71 



Expenditures for the Year. 
Personal Service: 

Permanent employees . ' $2,897,595 29 
Temporary employees . . 874 00 

Unassigned .... 3,494 36 









$2,901,963 65 


Service Other Than Personal: 






Printing and binding 




$15 25 




Advertising and posting 


846 20 




Transportation of persons 


901 41 




Cartage and freight 




399 04 




Hire of teams and 


auto 






trucks . 




397 50 




Light, heat and power 




25,683 98 




Rent, taxes and water 




3,288 73 




Surety bond and insurance 






premiums . 




15 00 




Communication 




3,256 35 




Motor vehicle repairs 


and 






care . . . 




16,632 39 




Care of horses 




10 50 




Cleaning . 




8,415 17 




Disposal of ashes, dirl 


and 






garbage 




3 00 




Medical . 




88 00 




Expert 




215 00 




Fees, service of venires 


, etc., 


353 00 




Photographic and blueprint- 






ing .. . 




1,087 88 




General plant 




62,095 35 


123,703 75 






Equipment : 








Cable, wire, etc. 




$13,346 10 




Electrical 




9,118 47 




Motor vehicles 




152,089 38 




Furniture and fittings 




10,873 65 




Office 




1,789 91 




Marine 




10 75 




Tools and instruments 




47,788 16 




Wearing apparel . 




27,323 07 




General plant 




1,661 18 


264,000 67 


Supplies : 








Office 




$8,142 28 




Food and ice . 




900 51 




Fuel 




81,952 60 




Forage and animal 




26 51 




Carried forward . 


$3,289,668 07 



72 City Document No. 12. 



Brought forward . 
Medical, surgical, laboratory, 
Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Motor vehicle 

Chemicals and disinfectants . 
General plant 

Materials : 
Building . 

Electrical .... 
General plant ... 

Special Items : 

Pensions and annuities 
Workingmen's compensation 



Wire Division: 
Personal Service : 

Permanent employees . . $81,638 81 

Service Other Than Personal : 
Transportation of 

persons . $2,598 80 
Surety bond and in- 
surance premiums 15 27 
Communication 336 80 

Fees, service of ven- 
ires, etc. 2 00 
General plant 79 90 



Equipment : 
Motor vehicles . $239 76 
Office ... 519 00 
Tools and instru- 
ments . 

Supplies : 
Office 
Motor vehicle 

Materials : 
Electrical 
General plant 



3 45 


$1,903 66 
. 246 00 


$8 52 
. 321 00 



158 58 

2,874 57 

31,932 12 

2,773 31 

4,969 42 


$3,289,668 07 
133,729 90 


$18,659 16 

2,894 52 

33,497 71 


55,051 39 


$245,485 21 
72 00 


245,557 21 






$3,724,006 57 



3,032 77 



762 21 



2,149 66 



329 52 



Special Items: 
Pensions and annuities 550 00 



88,462 87 
$,812,469 54 



Fire Department. 



73 



Fire Alarm Signal Station, Back Bay Fens: 
Continuation of payments : 

Contractor, Thomas O'Connor & Co. 

Installing Manual Central Fire Alarm Office 
Equipment, Gamewell Company . 

Architect, O'Connell & Shaw .... 

Heating and ventilating, James S. Cassedy 

Electric wiring, etc., M. B. Foster Electric 
Company .... 

Plumbing, James S. Cassedy 

Employees .... 

Furnishings 

Pedestals 

Tablets 



New Fire Station, Engine 21, Dorchester: 
Payments on account : 

Contractor, Archdeacon & Sullivan . 

Architect, Mulhall & Holmes Company 

Blueprints 

Test borings 



Fire Station, Shawmut avenue and Tremont street : 
Payments on account : 



$107,564 80 


71,697 00 


8,672 81 


8,211 75 


3,916 90 


3,019 45 


3,106 65 


1,175 22 


975 00 


375 00 



Architect, Louis J. St. Amand 
Specifications . 
Blueprints . 

Advertising . . . 



Recapitulation. 

Fire Department 

Fire Alarm Signal Station, Back Bay Fens 
New Fire Station, Engine 21, Dorchester 
Fire Station, Shawmut avenue and Tremont 
street 



$208,714 58 


$38,307 15 

2,868 21 

165 17 

155 25 


$41,495 78 


it: 

$12,420 00 

676 50 

273 86 

14 00 


$13,384 36 


$3,812,469 54 

208,714 58 

41,495 78 

13,384 36 


$4,076,064 26 



74 



City Document No. 12. 



Income. 



Permits for fires in 
open spaces, fire- 
works, blasting, 
transportation and 
storage of explo- 



sives 


$22,463 25 




Sale of old material . 


795 57 




Sale of uniforms, etc., 


29 74 




Sale of badges . 


892 75 




Damage to hose and 






cable 


182 58 




Damage to fire alarm 






posts and boxes . 


1,114 33 




Damage to apparatus, 


159 00 




Sale of coal 


10 00 




Rent .... 


5 00 


$25,652 22 






Wire Division: 






Permits . 




87,714 53 

$113,366 75 



Fire Department. 



75 











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76 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires and Alarms from January 1, 1925, 
to January 1, 1926. 



Alarms, false, needless, bell 

and still 1,402 

Alarms, out of city 54 

Automatic alarms, false 

and accidental 96 

Automobiles 409 

Brush, rubbish, etc 1,575 

Careless use lamp, candle, 64 

Careless use matches and 

set by rats 576 

Careless use pipe, cigar 

and cigarettes 716 

Chimneys, soot burning . . 376 

Clothes near stove 19 

Defective chimney, stove 

pipe and boiler 71 

Electric wires, motors .... 186 

Fireworks and firecrackers, 55 

Gas jet, gas stove 32 

Gasolene, naphtha, ben- 
zine 10 

Grease in ventilator 41 



Hot ashes in wooden re- 
ceptacle 67 

Incendiary and supposed, 28 

Lamp upsetting and ex- 
plosion 8 

Miscellaneous 650 

Oil stove, careless use and 

explosion 36 

Overheated furnace, stove 

and boiler 115 

Set by boys 212 

Sparks from chimneys, 

stove 123 

Sparks from locomotive, 

engine 33 

Spontaneous combustion. . 151 

Thawing water pipes ..... 33 

Unknown 564 

Total ( 7,702 





Fire Extinguished By 


1925. 


F4 

'3 

M 

R 


u 

i 

§ 
CQ 


c 
'Sb 

a 

a 
1 

O 


a 

a 

a 

» 


s 

02 


3 
o 
o 
C 

i 


c 
a 

O 




104 

74 

69 

116 

102 

135 

106 

90 

82 

113 

120 

12S 


25 
29 
59 
89 
52 
64 
4S 
34 
33 
38 
42 
35 


124 

100 

120 

143 

101 

116 

99 

94 

85 

115 

116 

132 


59 

57 

90 

168 

79 

124 

116 

75 

68 

58 

72 

79 


55 
30 
49 
43 
37 
49 
60 
53 
48 
42 
43 
52 


S9 

69 

126 

137 

68 

70 

55 

48 

58 

69 

123 

127 


44 




27 




36 




53 




o2 




22 


July 


5 




24 




32 




36 




32 




30 






Totals 


1,234 


553 


1,345 


1,045 


561 


1,039 


373 







Fire Department. 



77 



Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



1925. 

Jan. 1. 

Jan. 4. 

Jan. 9. 

Jan. 13. 

Jan. 13. 

Jan. 14. 



Jan. 17. 

Jan. 20. 

Jan. 23. 

Jan. 23. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 

Feb. 
Feb. 



24. 
27. 
27. 
30. 



Feb. 14. 
Feb. 16. 

Feb. 20. 

March 2. 
March 8. 
March 16. 

March 18. 

March 27. 
April 13. 



Apri 



I 14. 



April 18. 

April 19. 

April 21. 

May 8. 

May 11. 



Peterborough street, Mrs. Louis Prang et al 

906 and 908 Beacon street, Scobey Hospital et al 

Corner Parker and Station streets, Burkhardt Corporation, 

261 Roxbury Street, City of Eoston (Miles Standish School), 

30-38 Summer street, The Kennedy Company et al 

49-55 Haverhill street and 66-70 Traverse street, Boston 
Supply Company, Inc., et al 

152 Causeway street, Boston & Maine Railroad 

2164-2168 Washington street, D. Siegal et al 

503-523 Medford street, S. M. Howes Company et al 

42-46 Stillman street, Boston & Lowell Bottling Company 
et al 

103 Medford street, Palmer & Parker 

222-230 Commercial street, Howe & Bainbridge et al 

33-36 Commercial Wharf, Berry Dodge Company etal. . . . 

12 and 14 Winter street, Jackson Confectionery Company 
et al 

78 and 80 Beverly street, Gold Brand Confectionery et al. . . 

322-328 Washington street and 1-11 Milk street, F. L. 
Dunne & Co. et al 

4 Central Wharf, Central Engineering Company et al 

119-125 Milk street, New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company 

458-462 Harrison avenue and 2-6 Thayer street, Trimount 
Clothing Company, Inc., et al 

10 Brainerd road, H. Klayman et al 

83-93 Stoughton street, J. A. Aicarde 

1089-1095 Tremont street. Prince Hall, Masonic Grand 
Lodge Corporation 

20 Belgrade avenue and 4-6 Corinth street, Roslindale 
Electric Company et al 

47 Union avenue, Atlantic Cone Company, Inc., et al.. . 

6-12 Beach street, Hy-Grade Dress Company et al 

10 and 12 Williams street, Cabel Manufacturing Company 
et al : 

1112-1118 Boylston street, Arnold Furniture Company et al. 

503-509 Medford street, S. M. Howes Company et al 

810 and 812 Washington street, Chesterfield Furniture 
Company et al 

1-21 South Market street, Boston Fruit & Produce 
Exchange Company et al 

43 and 45 West street, Jay's, Inc., et al 



$44,807 
28,461 
20,715 
35,000 

227,092 

15,811 
71,544 
48,352 
22,911 

33,103 
26,346 
26,590 
68,835 

44,392 
16,707 

172,725 
17,366 

42,608 

17,058 
15,410 
28,236 

20,000 

24,615 
52,647 
36,143 

51,030 

16,228 

158,168 

16,253 

201,952 
58,360 



78 



City Document No. 12. 

Fire Losses. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



1925 

May 14 

May 18 

May 26 

May 28 

June 1 

June 8 

June 17 

June 22 

June 26 

July 3 

July 5 

July 20 

July 25 

July 26 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 11 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 29 

Aug. 29 

Sept. 27 

Oct. 4 

Oct. 25 

Oct. 27 

Nov. 4 

Nov. 23 

Nov. 26 

Dec. 3 

Dec. 3 

Dec. 6 

Dec. 16 

Dee. 23 

Dec. 24 

Dec. 29 

Dec. 31 



7-11 Otis street, Hite & Alkon et al 

959 and 961 Columbus avenue, Landy Brothers et al 

239 Sumner street, Boston Terminal Refrigerating Com- 
pany et al 

6-14 Brattle square, Quincy House et al 

133 Halleek street, J. A. DeVito & Co. et al 

36 India street, Natural Products Company et al 

337 Marginal street, Booth Fisheries Company 

93 and 95 Border street, Manson Lumber Company et al. . . 

7 and 8 Fulton place, S. Rubin Company, et al 

50 Essex street, A. J. Epstein & Co. et al 

1486 Tremont street, Coca-Cola Company et al 

165 Ruggles street, Ruggles Street Baptist Church 

18-40 Washington street, Oppenheim Brothers & Co. et al, 

637 Dudley street, I. A. Hamm et al 

200 Dartmouth street, A. E. Chandler et al 

944-948 Saratoga street, E. J. McHugh 

44 Mildred avenue, M. R. Thomas et al 

121 Eutaw street, V. Micaglia et al 

18-24 Atlantic avenue, Post Publishing Company et al . . . . 

1240A-1254 River street, Dedham & Hyde Park Gas Com- 
pany et al 

272 and 274 Boylston street and 51 Providence street, G. 
H. Wirth Company et al 

520-540 Atlantic avenue, F. P. Bennett & Co., Inc., et al. . . 

22-27 Washington Street North, Ellms, Inc., et al 

38-48 Cornhill, J. Hubbard & Co. et al 

104-116 Tremont street, Horlick & Merkins et al 

Woodman street, Archdiocese of Boston (St. Thomas 
Parochial School) 

117-123 Beverly street and 200 Causeway street, American 
Glue Company et al 

744-756 Washington street, C. E. Osgood Company et al. . . 

102 Arlington avenue, A. D. Donald et al 

222 State street and 73 and 75 Commerce street, Johnson- 
Appleby Company et al 

21 and 23 South Market street and 27 Chatham street, 
Standard Preserve Company et al 

36-42 Fulton street, Abram Re. et al 

30 and 32 Allston street, R. Goodnow 

105-111 Summer street, Eastern Clothing Company et al. . 



$47,131 
16,958 

47,378 
15,503 
22,098 
45,903 
75,926 

108,401 
19,153 
30,750 
24,860 
91,349 
19,103 
42,707 
15,537 
18,409 
33,475 
20,349 

219,502 

42,237 

45,264 
15,664 
21,870 
19,743 
22,707 

18,943 

31,233 
16,994 
24,845 

76,202 

43,999 
63,929 
15,328 
24,532 



Fire Department. 



79 



Statistics. 

Population, January 1, 1925 (estimated) 
Area, square miles .... 
Number brick, etc., buildings 
Number wooden buildings 
Fires in brick, stone, etc., buildings 
Fires in wooden buildings 

Out of city 

Not in buildings, false and needless 

Total alarms .... 



2,099 

1,468 

54 

4,081 



779,620 
47.81 
38,289 
83,022 



7,702 



Fire Loss for Year Ending December 31, 1925. 



Bi 


lildings, 


loss insure 


;d 








$2,366,057 


Contents, 


loss insured 


2,657,999 








$5,024,056 


Buildings, 


loss not insured . $248,792 


Contents, 


loss not insured 134,222 




loss buildi 






QQQ Old. 






OoOjUl^t 


Total 


ngs and contents . 


$5,407,070 


Marine loss 




$45,225 


Yearly Loss 


for the Last Fifteen Years. 


Year ending January 


1, 1912 ... 


$2,232,267 




i u 


a 


1, 1913 . 








2,531,017 




i a 


a 


1, 1914 . 








* 3,138,373 




I a 


a 


1, 1915 . 








3,013,269 




i a 


a 


1, 1916 . 








3,004,600 




( u 


a 


1, 1917 . 








f 2,372,489 




c 11 


a 


1, 1918 . 








| 3,981,227 




i a 


a 


1, 1919 . 








2,822,109 




( a 


u 


1, 1920 . 








2,577,584 




l it 


u 


1, 1921 . 








3,139,566 




( a 


u 


1, 1922 . 








4,010,201 




i a 


a 


1, 1923 . 








3,304,595 




i a 


a 


1, 1924 . 








6,286,299 




( a 


u 


1, 1925 








4,735,595 




i u 


u 


1, 1926 \ 








5,407,070 



* Does not include marine loss of $1,116,4^5, steamship "Templemore." 

t Does not include marine loss of $101,312, steamship "City of Naples" et al. 

X Does not include marine loss of $75,660. 



80 



City Document No. 12. 



Alarms for the Past Ten Years.* 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1925 


3,798 
3,640 
3,239 
2,733 
2,359 
2,029 
2,733 
2,413 
2,252 
2,350 


3,904 
4,353 
4,002 
3,401 
2,888 
2,456 
2,690 
2,649 
2,526 
2,128 


7,702 


1924 

1923 


7,993 
7,241 


1922 


6,134 


1921 


5,247 


1920 


4,485 


1919 : 


5,423 


1918 


5,062 


1917 


4,778 


1916 


4,531 







* Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 



Members Pensioned from February 1, 1925, to 
December 31, 1925. 



John H. Dacey. 
James J. Connollv. 
Peter F. Gately. 
John J. Regan. 
John J. Larkin. 
John G. Culhane. 
John A. Hassey. 
Martin F. Ryder. 
James J. Smith. 
Dennis J. Cadigan. 



Frank J. Punch. 
George F. Cahill. 
William E. Rolfe. 
Michael F. Mahoney. 
James P. Gallagher. 
John H. Coakley. 
Joseph F. Prophet. 
Webster F. Copithorne. 
James Els worth. 
Theodore Gallipeau. 



Death of Members from February 1, 1925, to 
December 31, 1925. 



Andrew J. Jennings. 
Daniel F. Kelley. 
Owen T. Norton. 
James W. McKinney. 
Joseph Smith. 
Francis B. Boyle. 



Edward McDonough. 
William A. Haberlin. 
John A. Coholan. 
John J. Brotherson. 
William J. Donnelly. 



Death of Pensioners from February 1, 1925, to 

December 31, 1925. 
James T. Prendergast. James M. Reed. 



W. J. Van Etten. 
Jacob Schaffer. 
Jeremiah J. Hickey. 
Edward J. Hogan. 



J. F. Bolton. 
C. W. Stevens. 
George L. Spencer. 



Fire Department. 81 



John E. Fitzgerald Medal. 
John J. Leary, Ladder 1. 
Capt. Daniel J. O'Brien, Engine 10. 
Thomas F. Kilduff, Ladder 4. 

Walter Scott Medal. 
Lieut. Dennis J. Condon, Ladder 1. 
James H. Curran, Engine 8. 
Edward J. Crowley, Chemical 7. 

Roll of Merit. 
James F. McMahon, District Chief. 
Capt. Thomas J. Muldoon, Engine 16. 
Capt. Michael J. Teehan, Engine 24. 
Capt. Dennis Driscoll, Engine 37. 
Lieut. Carl S. Bowers, Aide-to-Chief. 
Lieut. Michael J. Dacy, Ladder 20. 
John J. Kennedy, Ladderman, Ladder 13. 
James E. Downey, Hoseman, Retired. 
Lieut. Timothy J. Heffron, Ladder 9. 
Capt. Edward McDonough, Engine 6. 
Capt. Thomas H. Downey, EDgine 22. 
Capt.Joseph P. Hanton, Engine 33. 
Capt. Frederick F. Leary, Ladder 3. 
Lieut. Henry J. Kelly, Engine 32. 
Martin A. Kenealy, Capt. Retired. 



CITY OF »0»TOH 
PRINTINO DfPARTMICr 






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