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SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1926 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1927. 



SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1926 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1927. 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

6.4.27; 2500 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON JANUARY I, 1927. 



GUY W. CURRIER, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1928. 

ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY. WILLIAM A. GASTON. 

Term expires April 30, 1927. Term expires April 30, 1930. 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. GORDON ABBOTT. 

Term expires April 30, 1929. Term expires April 30, 1931. 



CHARLES F. D. BELDEN. 
DIRECTOR. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 1 4 of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made the first annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected, each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926 — 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

Bowditch, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1 922 — 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923- 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

Hilliard, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

Kirstein, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. > 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 



Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921-26. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1 896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 

The Hon. EDWARD EVERETT was President of the Board from 1 852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1 866 to April, 1 888 ; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
Josiah H. Benton, May 8, 1908, to February 6, 1917; William F. 

KeNNEY, February 13, 1917, to May 7, 1920; Rev. ALEXANDER 

Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; Msgr. Arthur T. 
Connolly, April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein, 
June 13, 1924 to June 19, 1925; Hon. Michael J. Murray, June 
19, 1925 to July 2, 1926; Guy W. Currier since July 2, 1926. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; since 
1923, Director.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 - December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858- January 9, 1868. 

WlNSOR, JUSTIN, LL.D., Superintendent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d., Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

Dwight, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d., Librarian, February 1 1, 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 — January 31, 
1903. 

WADLIN, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903 -March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 1917-June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll.b., Director, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1926. 



Departments. 
"{"Central Library, Copley Square .... 
tEast Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 
§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
|]Fellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
tCharlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
fBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Road 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
$Lower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
$Sou:h End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. . 
"{■Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 
JRosIindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
tWest Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. . 
§Mattapan Branch, 7 Babson St. . 
"fNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. . 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . . 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 202 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch. 138 Brighton Ave. 
JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 
JMt. Pleasant Branch, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 
JTyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 
fWest End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
^Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
§Boylston Station Branch, The Lamartine, Depot Square 
§Orient Heights Branch, 1030 Bennington St. 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal BIdg., Broadway . 
§Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. . 
fHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St 

fFaneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St 

§Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. 
§Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. 



TIOpened. 
May 2, 1854 
Jan. 28. 1871 
May 1, 1872 
July 16, 1873 
Jan. 5, 1874 
Jan. 5, 1874 
Jan. 25, 1875 
June 7, 1875 
1877 
1877 
3, 1878 
6, 1880 



Aug., 
Sept., 

*Dec. 

*Jan. 



*Dec. 27, 1881 
*Oct., 1882 
*Jan. 1, 1883 
*Nov. 1, 1886 
*Mar. 11, 1889 
*Nov. 12, 1890 
*A P r. 29, 1892 
*Jan. 16, 1896 

Feb. 1, 1896 
*Mar. 16, 1896 
*May 1, 1896 
*Jan. 18. 1897 
*Nov. 1. 1897 
*June 25, 1901 
*July 18, 1906 
*July 15, 1907 

Jan. 1, 1912 
♦Mar. 4, 1914 
*Mar. 5. 1914 
*Oct. 15, 1921 



ff In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. * As a delivery station. "f In building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. % In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. || The lessee of the Fel- 
lowes Athenasum, a private library association. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees 1 

Balance Sheet 18 

Report of the Examining Committee .... 22 

Report of the Director 30 

Appendix to the Report of the Director . . . . 52 

Index to the Annual Report 1926 69 



Map of the Library System At the end 



To His Honor Malcolm E. Nichols, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31,1 926, being the seventy-fifth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The Honorable Michael J. Murray resigned as trustee in 
July, and on August 2, Mr. Gordon Abbott was appointed in 
his place for the term ending April 30, 1 93 1 . At the annual 
meeting on July 2, 1926, Mr. Guy W. Currier was elected 
President, Msgr. A. T. Connolly, Vice President, and Miss 
Delia Jean Deery, Clerk. 

At a meeting of the Board on November 1 6, 1 926 the follow- 
ing Resolution on the retirement of Judge Murray was adopted : 

As the Hon. Michael J. Murray has ceased to be a Trustee of the 
Public Library of the City of Boston by reason of resignation at th-" 
expiration of his term of office, his associates on the Board desire to accord 
their appreciation of his five-year period of service. It is, therefore, 

Resolved, That Judge Murray, by his faithful and unselfish devotion 
to his official duties as a member of the Board, as Vice-President and, 
during his final year, as President is entitled to the gratitude of the citizens 
of Boston. j ■''• 

Always regular in attendance at meetings, and ready at all times to 
carry his share of the work; deeply interested in the various problems of 
administration and helpful in their solution; considerate, courteous, and 
unselfish, he won and held the good will and respect of his colleagues. 

Resolved, That the Trustees gratefully accord to him the freedom of 
the alcoves, with the customary privileges, and that a copy of this resolution 
be forwarded to Judge Murray with assurances of the Board's consider- 
ation. 

IMMEDIATE NEEDS. 

The Trustees of the Public Library call attention to the 
urgent necessity for the relocation and more adequate protection 
of the treasures of the Library, consisting of many volumes whose 



[2] 

value cannot be estimated, and thousands of which, if lost, 
could not be replaced. At the request of the Board, reports 
have been submitted relating to the necessary changes and re- 
construction to be undertaken in the Central Library Building 
for the safe-keeping of such material, as follows: — From John 
C. Paige and Co.; from O'Brion, Russell and Co.; and from 
the office of the Building Commissioner of the City of Boston. 

The reports are practically unanimous in their findings and 
recommendations; namely — turning the present Music Room 
into a Treasure Room, with the necessary fire-proof construction 
and equipment, and reconstructing the present Barton-Ticknor 
Room and the North Gallery with fire-proof equipment. These 
changes will allow the safe-guarding against fire of the most 
valuable collections and permit some additional shelving, the 
need for which is already pressing. 

Contemplated changes also include the installation of the 
sprinkler system in the Bindery and Printing Departments in 
the Annex and, of more importance, the completion of the system 
in the basement of the Central Building. 

During the year, also at the request of the Board, the In- 
spection Department of the Associated Factory Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company was asked to submit a report on the present 
electric lighting and power equipment of the Central Building. 

The report submitted was to the effect that the equipment is 
unsafe and should have immediate attention. Action should be 
authorized at once to reduce the existing fire and accident hazard. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the past year these receipts were: 

Annual appropriation $1,000,981.00 

Special appropriation (Annex balance) 11 ,799.39 

Income from Trust Funds ........ 26,117.28 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds income of previous years. . 60,125.54 

$1,099,023.21 



[3] 

Receipts which are accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes, during the past year 
have been as follows: 

From fines $17,620.89 

From sales of catalogues, etc. ....... 98.67 

From commission on telephone stations ...... 578.57 

From sale of waste paper ......... 97.44 

From payments for lost books ........ 1,151.90 

Interest on bank deposits ......... 36.49 

Refund on contract .......... 1 5.48 



Total $19,599.44 

ESTIMATES FOR 1927. 

The estimates for the maintenance of the Library for the year 
ending December 31, 1927 in segregated budget form are as 
follows : 



A — Personal service 

B — Service other than personal 

C — Equipment . . » 

D — Supplies . . . 

E — Materials 

F — Special items, 



$725,800.00 

251,945.00 

182,828.00 

39,230.00 

25,325.00 

864.00 

Total $1,225,992.00 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the present year there have been added to the Central 
Library and branches 93,867 volumes as against 85,163 in 
1 925. Of these, 80, 1 46 were acquired by purchase and 1 3,72 1 
by gift, exchanges, etc. The total expenditure for books, peri- 
odicals, newspapers and other library material from City appro- 
priation and Trust Funds income, was $150,161.92. The 
total number of volumes in the Central Library and branches is 
1,388,439. 

CIRCULATION. 

The total number of books issued for home use during the 
year was 3,499,137, as against 3,129,781 for 1925, a fiscal 
year of eleven months. The gain in home circulation for a 
twelve months' period was 2 1 7,630 volumes. 



[4] 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS. 

The Trustees are glad to report the following gifts and be- 
quests other than books and related material, during 1 926: 

In April, Mrs. Langdon Pearse gave to the Library a marble 
copy of the Psyche of Capua, the original of which is in the 
Museum at Naples; in October, Mr. Louis E. Kirstein gave 
$1000 to be added to the "Louis E. Kirstein Fund" established 
in 1 925 ; in October, Mrs. John Elliott presented, on behalf of 
a committee of citizens, two studies in oil of Mr. Elliott's mural 
painting in the Library "The Triumph of Time" ; and in Novem- 
ber, under a decree of the Supreme Judical Court in Equity of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the Library received the 
sum of $3,858.24, being the balance remaining in the hands of 
the surviving trustees of the fund originally raised to install in the 
Library decorations by the late John S. Sargent, which has been 
funded as the "John Singer Sargent Fund" the income to be. used 
for the care and preservation of the Sargent decorations and 
such other purposes as are set forth in the decree. 

Many important gifts of books and other library material 
have been received during the year. A detailed statement of 
these may be found in the Director's report. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money, and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare works, which 
give value and rank to a great educational institution but for 
which they hesitate to expend public funds appropriated for 
more popular and pressing use. 

As a matter of interest to the public, the Board has pleasure in 
listing herewith the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. 

Artz Fund — Donation from Miss ViCTORlNE Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago; the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose, of 



[5] 

American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the 
"Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JOSHUA BATES, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by John P- BlGELOW in August, 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of Robert CHARLES BlL- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purposes of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 00,000.00 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. INGERSOLL BoWDITCH. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 
per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davis BrADLEE to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 
cent Bond $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JOSEPH H. CENTER, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond $1 ,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bonds 38.500.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1926 43.14 

$39,543.14 
Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. BENTON of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 



[6] 

poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $15,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . . 62,000.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one- 
half per cent Bond 20,000.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Four per cent 

Bond . 6,000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1926 . 117.74 

$103,117.74 

Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Frank CLEMENT, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $2,800.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1926. 54.41 

$2,854.41 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of Abram E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $4,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond 1 00.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1926 40.00 

$4,140.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of SARAH A. MATCHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 



[7] 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of DANIEL SHARP Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston. Received in 1 900. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on the 
Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use of 
the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of such 
a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trustees 
expressed a preference for books relative to government and political 
economy. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA STEWART 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 
1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,652.00 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. GREEN of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond .... 1 ,500.00 

City of Boston Three per cent Bond . . . 500.00 

$2,000.00 



[8] 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested of interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1 850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of THOMAS B. HARRIS, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1 884. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000,00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of FRANKLIN P. HYDE of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $3,600,00 

Cash, December 31, 1926 32.40 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KlMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $10,000.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donation of $1 ,000 made by Mr. Louis E. 
KlRSTEIN in October 1925, "to be used for any purpose of the Li- 
brary that the Trustees see fit to put it to." October, 1 926 $1 ,000.00 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KATHERINE 
KNAPP: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of ABBOTT LAWRENCE, of Boston. 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
a permanent value. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward Lawrence, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 



[9] 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500,00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of which 
is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as shall be 
fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John A. Lewis 
Library." Received in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500,00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of CHARLES Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall deem 
consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $2,500.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received from 
the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under an 
indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and Amor 
L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. McKendry, 
of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 1 870. The 
above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 1924, and the 
Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the same under the 
name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books and other library material for the Mattapan 
Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 1,780.00 
Cash, December 31, 1926 1.44 

$11,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PAPYRUS 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 



[10] 

purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 

in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 

of books for said library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 

20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of 

a free Public Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 

time being. 
Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. PlERCE, Mayor of the 

City, November 29, 1 873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1873. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, 

under the 14th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 

Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. 

Distribution of residue of estate on May 7, 1924, $964.30. 

By vote of the Trustees the bequest to be funded as the Sarah E. 

Pratt Fund, the income to be applied to the purchase of books for the 

Dorchester Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . 1 ,400.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1926 . 64.30 

$1,464.30 
Scholfield Fund — Bequest of Arthur SCHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33,33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $33,800.00 
City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 2,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bonds 6,000.00 

City of Boston Five per cent Bonds ... 1 0,000.00 

$61,800.00 



[11] 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RlCHARD BLACK SewALL: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 (twenty-five thousand dollars) to be added to 
their funds and the income to be used for the purchase of books." 
Received in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of FRANCIS SKINNER: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 
judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have taken if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston I hree and one-half per 

cent Bond $40,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . 1 0,250.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond 200.00 

1 6 shares Worcester Street Railway Company . 1 ,280.00 

Cash, December 31, 1926 . . . . 2.14 

$51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1879. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $100.00 



[12] 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of MARY ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $3,500.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass.. or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61, has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of GEORGE TlCKNOR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four 
thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After 
the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less than 
one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five years 
next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for reference 
or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library build- 
ing. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trusts 
and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and money 
are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 
In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said be- 
quests on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the 
care and custody of the books and manuscripts. Received in 1871. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WlLLIAM C. TODD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1897, 



[13] 

the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be ex- 
pended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other 
countries. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of MARY P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel TREADWELL, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 1 7, 1 872, said bequest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $1,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 3, 1 00.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . . . 9,850.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31 , 1926 . . 37.69 

$13,987.69 
Tufts Fund — Bequest of NATHAN A. TUFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1906. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bonds . $10,100.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1926. . 31.77 

$10,131.77 



[14] 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of GEORGE C. Wales: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of MEHITABLE C. C. WlL- 
SON, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1913. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 ,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James Lyman WHITNEY, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — 1 he twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising during 
the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the name of 
my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said fund after 
its accumulation or so much of said income as may be required, to 
be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are sick and in 
need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem most 
worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income from 
said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just mentioned 
shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 
Invested in City of Boston Five per cent Bond . $ 500.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 ,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . . . 3,500.00 

$5,000.00 



[15; 



James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used" in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bonds $1,200.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 2,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds .... 8,900.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31 , 1926 . . 29.85 

$12,129.85 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trustees 
of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 
Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in Apiil, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . $150.00 
Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 

made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz. : 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch $6,800.00 

Samuel Appleton, late of Boston. . . . 1,000.00 

Sally Inman Kast Shepard 1,000.00 

James Brown, late of Cambridge .... 500.00 

Andrew Carnegie ....... 980.75 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 200.00 

James Nightingale 100.00 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . . 335.13 

. $10,915.88 



[16] 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

Artz Fund $ 10,000.00 

Bates Fund 50,000.00 

Bigelow Fund . 1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 100,000.00 

Bowditch Fund 10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund 39,543.14 

Central Library Building Fund 150.00 

Children's Fund 103,117.74 

Clement Fund 2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 2,854.41 

Cutter Fund 4.140.00 

Elizabeth Fund 25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund 1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund 2.652.50 

Green Fund 2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 1,000.00 

Hyde Fund 3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund 10,000.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund ; ' . 2,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 10,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund ......... 500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund . 500.00 

Charles Mead Fund 2,500.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 11,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 1,000.00 

Phillips Fund 30,000.00 

Pierce Fund 5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund 1,464.30 

John Singer Sargent Fund ......... 3.858.24 

Scholfield Fund 61,800.00 

Sewall Fund 25,000.00 

Skinner Fund 51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund ...... 100.00 

Mary Elizabath Stewart Fund 3,500.00 

Ticknor Fund 4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 50,000.00 

Townsend Fund ........... 4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund 13,987.69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10,131.77 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund ....... 5,000.00 

Wales Fund 5,000.00 

Mehitable C C Wilson Fund 1,000.00 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund . . . . . . . . 12,129.85 

$726,075.62 



[17] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered 
by the Examining Committee of the year. The recommendations 
of this Committee are of real value and have received careful 
attention. The Committee consisted of the following persons: 

Miss Anna M. Bancroft. Mr. Hollis French. 

Prof. E. Charlton Black. Mr. Lee M. Friedman. 

Mr. Jeffrey R. Brackett. Mr. Francis L. Higginson. 

Mr. W. Irving Bullard. Mr. David H. Howie. 

Mr. Herman L. Bush. Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson. 

Mr. Sidney S. Conrad. Mr. Jacob J. Kaplan. 

Prof. Archibald C. Coolidge. Mr. John C. Kiley. 

Mr. Charles P. Curtis, Jr. Gen. Edward L. Logan. 

Mr. William J. Davidson. Mr. Francis P. O'Connor. 

Prof. Arthur S. Dewing. Rev. Lyman V. Rutledge. 

Mr. Clifton H. Dwinnell. Mr. Samuel Sigilman. 

Mr. Francis W. Fabyan. Prof. H. W. Tyler. 

Mr. John I. Fitzgerald. Mrs. Barrett Wendell. 

Their report is appended to this report. 

CONCLUSION. 

Again, in closing, the Board notes with pleasure and ap- 
preciation the effectiveness of the Director and his corps of 
assistants in the intelligent administration of the Library and 
its branches. Owing to their loyal and faithful service, the 
affairs of the Library have moved smoothly and well during 
the year. We are glad to be able to commend the substantially 
uniform excellence of their work. 

Guy W. Currier 
Arthur T. Connolly 
Louis E. Kirstein 
Gordon Abbott 
William A. Gaston 



[18] 



Dr. 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing and 

Binding Departments) ..... 

Temporary employees ..... 



Service other than personal 
Contract work (outside) 
Advertising 

Transportation of persons 
Cartage and freight 
Light and Power 
Rent, taxes and water 
Surety bond and insurance 
Communication . >, 

Cleaning towels, etc* 
Removal of snow 
Medical 
Expert 

Fees .... 

General Plant Repairs 

To expenditure for equipment 
Machinery 
Motorless vehicles 
Furniture and fittings 
Office .... 
Books : 

City appropriation 

Trust funds income 

less transfer to 

London account 
Newspapers: 

City appropriation 

Todd fund 



$438,946.41 
175,947.89 



319.84 

59.00 

598.52 

12,239.36 

15,129.07 

1 7.886.30 

15.55 

2,540.43 

1,335.64 

571.75 

16.67 

3,442.99 

116.10 

40,497.79 



209.92 

105.95 

7,917.45 

971.36 



$113,768.36 



26,707.28 
5,000.00 



21,707.28 135,475.64 



902.17 
2,182.92 



Periodicals 
Photographs . 
Tools and instruments 
General plant equipment 

To expenditures for supplies: 
Office .... 
Food and ice 
Fuel .... 
Forage for animals 
Medical 

Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Agricultural . 
Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant supplies . 

Carried forward 



3,085.09 

10,747.17 

854.02 

1.144.15 

3.181.11 



7,503.67 

458.94 

21,116.39 

28.10 

11.59 

1 ,929.67 

60.45 

81.11 

3,022.56 



$614,894.30 



94,769.01 



163,691.8b 



34,212.48 



$907,567.65 



[19] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1926 



Cr. 



By City Appropriation 1926 

Income from Trust Funds . 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic account. 

Interest on deposit in London . 

Transfer to City appropriation, London account 

By Balances Brought Forward from 1925: 
Trust funds income, City Treasurer . 

plus omission in 1925 report 
Trust funds income on deposit in London . 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 
Library Building Addition, equipping and furnishing 



$1,000,981.00 

26,117.28 

700.00 

182.80 

4,000.00 



56,72187 




10.00 


56,732.87 




3,392.67 




3,441 .92 




5,738.33 


rnishing . 


11,799.39 



$1,031,981.08 



81,105.18 



Carried forward . 



$1,113,086.26 



[20] 



BALANCE SHEET. RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 

Brought forward. 
To expenditure for material: 
Electrical 
General plant . 



Special item: 
Pension 



Binding Department: 
Salaries 
Stock 
Equipment 

Light (Gas for heating) 
Freight 
Repairs 
Ice and small supplies 



Printing Department: 

Salaries ..... 

Stock 

Equipment ..... 
Light (Gas for heating) 
Repairs ..... 
Outside work .... 
Material, ice and small supplies 
Insurance . 



To Amount Paid into City Treasury: 
From fines ..... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books 
Sale of waste paper . 
Interest on deposit 
Refund on contract . 



To Balance, December 31, 1926: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Trust funds income, City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 
Interest on deposit in London . 



Balance Unexpended: 

General appropriation ..... 

Special appropriation, Library Building Addition 



3,852.22 
9,943.56 



863.50 



52,583.15 

5,255.11 

245.53 

48.86 

3.80 

40.85 

48.80 



12,127.72 

3,348.45 

5,711.89 

33.27 

110.38 

226.08 

44.44 

35.10 



1 7,620.89 
9867 
578.57 
1.151.90 
97.44 
36.49 
15.48 



4,040.16 

6,443.50 

58,034.16 

6,438.33 

182.80 



24,057.56 
11,799.39 



$907,567.65 



13.795.78 



863.50 



58.226.10 



21.637.33 



19.599.44 



75.138.95 



35.856.95 



$1,132,685.70 



[21] 



EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31, 1926 



Brought forward . 
By Receipts: 

From fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Sale of waste paper . 
Interest on deposit . 
Refund on contract 



Cr. 

$1,113,086.26 



17,620.89 
98.67 
578.57 
1,151.90 
97.44 
36.49 
15.48 



19.599.44 



$1,132,685.70 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

To the Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston. 

Gentlemen : 

The Examining Committee takes pleasure in submitting its 
Report for the year ending January 3 1 , 1927. 

INTRODUCTION 

The Examining Committee as constituted this year has the 
advantage of the course recently adopted of continuing some 
members from the preceding year. These members have 
brought to this Committee an understanding of some of the 
great problems of the Public Library and its administration, 
while those serving their first term have taken active interest in 
the various duties of this Committee. 

The Examining Committee this year consisted of twenty- 
six members, each having some definite interest or qualifications 
for examining and advising on different functions of the Boston 
Public Library. The Committee was divided into the follow- 
ing Sub-Committees: 

Administration and Finance. 

Buildings and Equipment. 

Branches. 

Printing and Binding. 

Special Libraries. 

Children's Department and Work with Schools. 

Each Sub-Committee consisted of three or more members 

with the exception of the one on Branches. The work of this 

Committee is so definitely a part of the main purpose of an 

advisory committee for the examination and report upon the 



[23] 

condition of property that all members of the Examining Com- 
mittees were assigned to the examination of various groups of 
the thirty-one branches. This course resulted in many visits 
and the careful examination of the condition and work of every 
branch. 

The detailed reports of the Sub-Committees are submitted for 
your consideration. While recognizing that the function of the 
Examining Committee is entirely advisory, its members are fully 
appreciative of the great service being rendered by the Boston 
Public Library and feel strongly the need of co-operative effort 
to properly maintain and extend the buildings and equipment of 
this highly important civic department. 

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

In the opinion of the Committee the amounts allowed for 
various purposes have been economically expended, and al- 
though certain needed repairs have been made, the amount of 
money appropriated for the physical upkeep of the main library 
has not been sufficient to put this beautiful building in the con- 
dition which its importance in the community warrants, to en- 
able it to give the service to the citizens of the City of Boston 
to which they are entitled. 

It is hoped that the appropriation to be asked for by the 
Trustees for repairs and improvements will be granted. 

Your Committee also wishes to repeat the recommendation 
of the Committee appointed last year, that efforts be made to 
obtain further endowment funds for the Library. The Library 
is sadly lacking in this respect. In this great educational centre, 
where 50,000 students this year have made use of the Library's 
facilities, it would seem to the Committee that if the financial 
needs of the Library could be brought before the people of Bos- 
ton and its environs in a forceful way financial interest would be 
awakened and contributions follow. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Though the physical condition of the Copley Square Building 
has been much improved in the last year or two, there still re- 



[24] 

mains a good deal to be done to bring back this building to a 
proper condition. 

The principal change needed is the re-arrangement of the 
present Music Room, the Barton-Ticknor Room and the long 
North Gallery. The needs of a proper Treasure Room have long 
been felt, and the Trustees have wisely decided to adapt the 
Music Room for a Treasure Room where the priceless books 
owned by the Library can be kept and properly viewed. 

The changes required in the building are of a very serious 
nature to accomplish this result and to rearrange the Barton- 
Ticknor Room and the North Gallery, but the results are most 
important and are worth the expenditure of money which it is 
hoped can be arranged on the basis of a bond issue by the City. 

The Committee recommends stressing the policy of building 
branches as separate units under the control of the Trustees, 
where such branches have proved themselves to be successful in 
localities at the present time served through leased quarters. 
Efforts should be made to interest the Mayor and officials in 
this policy, for it is believed that only by carrying it out will the 
problem of the branches be properly solved. In such localities 
as Allston, Mt. Bowdoin, Andrew Square, Boylston Station 
and other places where the branches have proved their great 
value to the public, efforts should now be made to provide library 
service in permanent and satisfactory form by means of modern 
buildings. 

BRANCHES 

The Chairman and members of this Committee received much 
assistance from the Supervisor of Branches, attending a Staff 
Meeting of the Librarians, and were given every opportunity 
of examining the conditions and workings of the branches. 

The natural tendency in persons making a visit, perhaps their 
first visit, to a library is to notice the things which are readily 
seen. Therefore we would stress, in beginning, one part of the 
system of branch libraries which, centering at the Central Li- 
brary, is basic to all the system — the recent development of 
regular training of the large staff, for a higher grade personnel in 
the branches. For the librarians and their assistants — as hos- 



[25] 

tesses, as interpreters of books and of the needs of individual 
readers — can largely make or break the full usefulness of a 
library. 

The following definite suggestions are made, looking towards 
needed improvements in the branches. First, a few general 
statements of ideals to be set up and approached as fast as is 
possible. The management and the use of libraries are 
bettered when they are housed in buildings which are used ex- 
clusively for libraries and whose care, heating, etc., are thus 
controlled by the Library department. Some branches are under 
halls used for gymnasia and meetings, with much noise and 
jarring therefrom. 

There is the usual request for more new books, at the time 
when persons are asking for them. 

Most important, the Committee urges the Trustees that they 
formulate and follow up a definite policy to replace present 
rented quarters with adequate buildings owned by the City. 

PRINTING AND BINDING 

The Printing Department is running to its full capacity, with 
a considerable volume of work ahead. No immediate changes 
in equipment or conduct are considered necessary. 

The Binding Department has to do a large amount of re- 
inforcement of new books, as well as the re-binding of old. The 
sewing machine added a few years ago has greatly increased the 
output of this department and an application has been made for 
another machine of this kind. The Examining Committee ap- 
proves of this request as being a desirable addition. 

The advantages of new equipment and improved methods 
are shown by double the number of books bound now over 
that often years ago with a less number of employees. The Com- 
mittee commends the Printing and Binding Departments as 
being important factors in the conduct of the Library. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES 

Your Sub-Committee reiterates the recommendation made 
last year that steel stacks be installed in the "Barton-Ticknor 



[26] 

Gallery for added space to accommodate the music and pre- 
sent special collections. The use of steel stacks would add 
greatly to the capacity, safety and cleanliness." 

Mention has been made of the desirability of converting the 
present Music Room into a specially protected and fire-proof 
room for the storage and exhibition of the more valuable books. 
This is something which should be done as soon as possible- in 
order to safeguard the Library's treasures and to permit the 
rearrangement of the different departments of the Special Li- 
braries. 

The Sub-Committee also recommends that the repainting be 
continued with due consideration for the season of the year and 
the use required of the different departments. Certain mem- 
bers of the Sub-Commitee have noticed the evidence of leaks 
from the roof coming down inside onto the stacks and cannot 
refrain from expressing their amazement that the Library should 
not have been placed in position to protect its books, to house 
which was the sole purpose of its being built. 

The Sub-Committee believes that the resources of the Special 
Libraries should be much better known to the citizens and that 
continued plans should be taken to secure increased utilization 
through appropriate publicity. As a step in this direction it is 
recommended that the Trustees consider the possible appoint- 
ment of honorary visiting committees on some of the special 
libraries. A small group of interested specialists co-operating 
with the library staff should be able to facilitate desirable con- 
tacts with the students and teachers in the field. This would 
be a simple extension of existing procedure. 

This is the first time that several members of the Sub-Com- 
mittee have had any occasion to observe the condition of the 
Library, beyond perhaps the main staircase. They have been 
amazed and shocked at the condition that the Library has been 
allowed to drift into, not in any way through the fault of the 
staff, but through lack of funds for adequate maintenance. Our 
Public Library is probably the best known asset, the world 
over, that the City of Boston has. It is one of the famous 
libraries of the world. The building is noted for its beauty 



[27] 

and its solid construction. It has been allowed to run down in 
a most deplorable fashion. It seems a pity and almost criminal 
that an instituion of this character, belonging to all the citizens 
of Boston, should be treated in this manner. 

children's department and work with schools 

The Sub-Committee finds that suggestions made by the pre- 
vious committee have been carried out in so far as possible, but 
that much remains to be done and again the emphasis falls on 
increase of appropriations for this department. Juvenile work 
has not come to its own, but has made such advance as to prove 
its value and importance. 

The Committee recommends: 

1. Trained children's librarians in all branches. 

2. Increased facilities for children's use of the library. 

3. Further co-operation between library and schools. 

The fact that children throng to the branches, in twenty out 
of thirty-one cases outnumbering the adults, is significant. It 
calls for a careful study of the situation with a view to the 
needs, welfare and future interests of the child. If he comes 
to a neat, attractive room with chairs, tables, lights and shelves 
adapted to his needs, and finds there a librarian trained to guide 
his reading, he will steadily advance towards the best habitual 
use of the library in years of maturity. 

The story-telling hour in branches and in schools is highly 
commended for its value as an introduction to good reading 
and as an aid to teachers, particularly in English, history and 
art. 

Library and school co-operation is developing rapidly, but 
again progress is limited by lack of resources. Branch li- 
braries in high schools are being tried out. Consignment of 
library books to public schools has proved serviceable, but more 
books and space are needed. 

The Committee notes with pleasure the growing interest taken 
by all in the children's use of the Library. Teachers and 
librarians are particularly to be commended in the many in- 



[28] 

stances where they are working with restricted means, often at 
great personal sacrifice, for the sheer pleasure of meeting the 
eager desire of young readers. School and Library authorities 
in turn seem to be doing all in their power to help, but the 
public remains uninformed and indifferent. The closing sug- 
gestion is accordingly that special publicity be given to the needs 
of children. A special endowment might be created for the 
advancement of Children's Library work in Boston. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The Committee as a whole wishes to emphasize the urgent 
need of remedying some of the conditions which have been 
found to exist. 

1. The necessity of continuing the allotment of funds, as in 

the last two years, for the repairs of the roof and electric 
lighting system, and for painting in the Central Library. 

2. The urgency of obtaining better quarters for some of the 

branches, with the general policy of individual build- 
ings adequate to the future needs of the rapidly growing 
sections of the city. 

3. The plan of co-operation with the Library of the School 

of Business Administration of Harvard University in the 
establishment of a Business Reference Library is com- 
mended as offering an important service to the business 
interests of this community. 

4. The safe-guarding of the manuscript and book treasures 

in a fire-proof location known as the Treasure Room is 
an imperative need, requiring special funds. 

5. The publication of the Bulletin in enlarged form under 

the title "More Books" provides excellent information 
about the libraries and new books. Still greater pub- 
licity is needed in order that the citizens of Boston may 
understand more fully the great services rendered by 
the Library in educational work and as a cultural ser- 
vice to the City as a whole through its Central Library 
and thirty-one branches. 



[29] 



CONCLUSIONS 



The Committee extends its thanks to the Director and Staff 
for the full co-operation extended in examination of the Library 
and its conduct. The insight afforded into the affairs of this 
great institution cannot fail to produce a permanent appreciation 
and the desire that its urgent needs in maintenance, extension 
and endowment be more widely known. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, 
February 25, 1927. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

To the Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1926. 

THE PROGRESS OF THE YEAR. 

Although the past year was unmarked by any event of 
striking significance in the administration of the Library, the 
home circulation of books, as noted below, showed a sturdy 
growth, while the increase in the use of reference material in 
the central building and in the thirty-one branches, of which no 
record is kept, was normal and in volume most encouraging. 
The chief and outstanding complaint of the users of the Library 
system is that they are unable to obtain the required book when 
called for, an evidence of the well-known fact that the Library 
is still unable to buy a sufficient number of copies of a new book 
to meet the reasonable demand for it. 

Many repairs of both major and minor moment have been 
accomplished during 1926. The ventilating system of the Li- 
brary has been re-established and put in good repair, and now 
includes an efficient air-washing equipment. The book railway 
system has been completely over-hauled, and the railways in 
the six floors of stacks are now in satisfactory operation. The 
Central Library boilers have all been re-tubed with new drain 
valves. An automatic oiling system has been installed in the 
power plant. Major repairs on the roof of the Central Building 
have begun. The statistical department, the lecture hall, the 
map room, the central branch department, and the exhibit room 
in the Central Library have all been cleaned and decorated. 
To provide for the increased work of the Central Branch De- 
partment, a mezzanine floor has been built. Throughout the 



[31] 

branch system necessary repairs, painting, and equipment, have 
been carried out. The East Boston Branch Library has been 
re-painted inside and out, and repairs made to the parapet walls. 
Major repairs, including the painting of the exterior wood-work 
have been accomplished at the West End Branch. After thirty 
years of service, the four large ornate groups of lanterns in front 
of the Central Building are being re-built. 

On Monday, September 27, 1926, the Warren Street Branch 
gave up its rented quarters and occupied the fine new rooms 
especially provided for it in the Memorial High School Build- 
ing on the corner of Warren and Townsend Streets, Roxbury. 
This is the only branch library in Boston occupying quarters 
in a school building. The accommodations are ample and at- 
tractive, and it will be most interesting to watch the result 
of this experiment as regards the use of the branch both by child- 
ren and by adults. The Fellowes Athenaeum Branch was 
completely remodeled during the year; and additional reading- 
room space was provided at the Lower Mills and Mattapan 
Branches. 

In March the Library started publication of a monthly bulletin 
under a new name, "More Books," and in a new form. This 
seems to be meeting the need of the public for a classi- 
fied list of new books and is also serving to bring to the attention 
of the citizens of Boston the important possessions and acqui- 
sitions of the Library, as well as its needs. 

The Library has been especially fortunate in being able to 
offer, in conjunction with its regular lecture course, a second 
series of chamber-music concerts through the courtesy of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. They have been eagerly sought 
by an appreciative group of people. As an outcome of the in- 
terest that has developed from the course of lectures on the 
Symphony Concert Programs, now being given for the third year, 
with a total registration of 383, the Library has received as gifts, 
during 1926, 108 records from the Victor Talking Machine 
Company, 47 records from the General Phonograph Corporation, 
and 91 records from the Columbia Phonograph Company; the 
latter company has just presented to the Library their latest Viva- 



[32] 

Tonal phonograph. The records are of the type of compositions 
played during the year by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

During the summer months, in honor of the anniversary of 
the American Library Association, an extensive exhibition was 
held to illustrate library progress during the fifty years which 
have passed since the organization of the Association. Not only 
the publications of the national association and its development 
were featured, but also the work since 1 890 of the Board 
of Free Public Library Commissioners of the Commonwealth, 
of which the Director of the Boston Library is Chairman. The 
major part of the exhibit was naturally given to the growth and 
work of the Public Library of the City of Boston and its branches 
since 1876. The exhibition proved most attractive and gave 
pleasure and satisfaction to hosts of visitors. A descriptive 
pamphlet was issued for distribution, entitled, "A Library Ex- 
hibit, 1876-1926." 

CIRCULATION AND ACCESSION OF BOOKS. 

In the past year the total circulation of books was 3,499,137, 
a gain of 369,356 over the circulation of 1925. This does not 
represent the net gain, however, since the city fiscal year of 1 925 
included but eleven months. For a twelve months' period the 
gain was 2 1 7,630. The total circulation through the branches, 
including books issued from Central Library collections on bor- 
rowers' cards, was 3,158,552. Deposits amounted to 86,570 
volumes, sent to 326 agencies. The total number of volumes 
sent to schools, at the request of 1,472 teachers, was 56,818. 
Interlibrary loans amounting to 1 ,830 volumes, were sent to 
1 ,094 applicants; 592 requests were regretfully refused. Direct 
home circulation from the Central Library was 340,585, a gain 
of 26,877 volumes over 1925. 

There were 3 1 ,693 new registrations and 38,02 1 renewals 
of lapsed privileges during 1926, making a total of 69,714 
cards added during the year. Borrowers who failed to renew 
their cards amounted to 63,696. On December 31 , there was, 
therefore, a total of 135,445 live cards, a gain of 6,018 over 
the previous year. Teachers' registration showed a renewal of 



[33] 

1400 cards and new registrations amounting to 399; this gives 
a total of 1,799 teachers' cards in use. Special privilege cards 
were issued to 658 persons in 1926; of these 504 were renewals 
and 154 new cards. 

The total number of volumes added to the Library collections 
in 1926 was 93,867, acquired as follows: 80,146 by purchase, 
10,772 by gift, 38 by exchange, 2,91 1 by binding periodical 
literature and serials. Of the books purchased, 12,71 1 volumes 
were added to Central Library collections, and 67,435 were 
placed in branch libraries and in the Central branch deposit 
collection. 

Hie total amount expended for accessions by purchase was 
$1 50, 1 61 .92. For the first time in the history of the Library, the 
current city appropriation for books, periodicals, pictures, etc., 
reached the sum of $125,000. In 1916 the city money spent 
for books, periodicals, etc. was $33,561.09, with which 26,426 
volumes, 2,731 periodicals, and other material were bought. 
The question might well be asked why an increase in the book 
allowance of almost three hundred per cent in ten years is in- 
sufficient for present-day needs. The answer is that in this period 
the Library has been steadily expanding, and that new branches, 
new deposit stations, new divisions within the Central Library 
all take their toll of the book fund. Reference collections have 
been built up in the branches; the old and infrequently used 
volumes have been gradually superseded by new books and the 
Bates Hall collections have been brought up to date. New 
developments in the field of knowledge in recent years — psy- 
chology, business administration, adult education, the great 
expansion in the realm of science — call for the acquisition of 
the latest books and periodicals which are indispensable and 
which make large inroads on the book money. Books wear out 
and their replacement is costly. Fiction at $1 .50 or less a volume 
has now been superseded by fiction at $2.00 or more a volume. 
There are also many bibliographical activities in the library 
world, some international in scope, dependent for their support 
on the large libraries which will be chiefly benefited by the re- 
sulting publications, and the book fund should be sufficient to 



[34] 

permit the Library to contribute its share toward their achieve- 
ment. The rapidly opening work of adult education places a 
new responsibiity upon the Library, if it is to play its essential 
part in helping our citizens to add to their power through the 
use of books. 

The increasing appropriations for the purchase of books have 
scarcely kept pace with the advancing demands upon the library ; 
the failure of a corresponding increase in the endowment of the 
Library from private sources has caused it to lose ground in the 
effort to maintain its foremost place among the scholarly public 
libraries of the country. 

A general accounting shows that in 1926 the branches ab- 
sorbed $97,690.62 for books, periodicals and newspapers, 
including $43,162.87 for books for younger readers. The re- 
maining $27,309.38 was expended for the Central Library for 
periodicals, newspapers, the books of the day and, as far as 
funds permitted, the books published two or three years since, 
whose importance seems assured and whose purchase was either 
overlooked or deferred at the time of issue. 

The acquisitions of unusual interest and importance which 
are noted below have been bought with the income from trust 
funds. 

From the Clawson sale of early Elizabethan and Stuart litera- 
ture this Library, with a relatively small sum at its disposal, 
secured six books which are distinct additions to the Barton 
Library. At the sale, said to be one of the greatest book sales 
of modern times, many of the works sold at prices quite beyond 
our resources, but of the 926 books listed in the catalogue, about 
300, including eleven of the thirteen Shakespeare quartos, 
were already possessed by the Library. The titles of the books 
bought are as follows: 

Massinger, Philip, Thomas Middleton and "William Rowley. The 
excellent comedy, called The old law: or A new way to please you. 
Together with an exact and perfect catalogue of all the playes, with 
the authors names. More exactly printed then ever before. 1656. 

Niccols, Richard. The three sisters teares. Shed at the late solemne 
funerals of the royall deceased Henry, Prince of Wales. London: 
Printed by T. S. for Richard Redmer. 1613. 



[35] 

Quarles, Francis. Emblemes by Fra: Quarles. Engraved title and 78 
engravings by Marshall and others. London: Printed by G. M. 
and sold at Iohn Marriots shope. 1635. The first edition, second 
issue. 

Shirley, James. Honoria and Mammon. Whereunto is added the con- 
tention of Ajax and Ulisses, for the armour of Archilles. As it 
was represented by young gentlemen of quality at a private enter- 
tainment of some persons of honour. Engraved portrait by 
Gaywood, dated 1658. London: Printed for John Crook. 
1 659. First edition, second issue. 

Twyne, Thomas. The schoolemaster or teacher of table phylosophie. 
A most pleasant and merie companion, well worthy to be welcomed. 
Black letter. Imprinted at London, by Richard Iohnes. 1 583. 
First edition. 

Wither, George. A collection of emblemes, ancient and moderne. The 
first booke. With the second booke, the third booke, and the fourth 
booke. Engraved frontispiece by Marshall, portrait of Wither by 
John Payne, 200 engraved vignettes by Crispin de Pass and double 
woodcut lottery table at the end. London. Printed by A. M. for 
Richard Royston. 1635. First edition, with the preliminary 
leaf. 

From the Autograph Collection of the late Charles P. 
Greenough of Brookline the Library bought two items of especial 
local interest. 

An original Indian deed of Noddle's Island, "containing . . , one 
thousand acres . . . more or less together with all the fflatts to 
low water mark", made by Charles Joseph, Indian Sachem, to 
Samuel Shrimpton of Boston "for a valuable consideration." This 
deed was confirmed on May 1 , 1 684, by Governor William 
Stoughton and Joseph Dudley and is signed by various Indians in 
release and as witnesses. 

An autograph letter from Richard Clarke, a merchant of Boston to whom 
the "Boston Tea Party" tea was consigned and who, in consequence, 
had been driven to Castle Island. His letter, dated "Castle William, 
March 30, 1 774", is addressed to John Greenough and expresses 
sorrow on hearing that a chest of tea had been destroyed. 

There were also acquired four large manuscript account books of the 
Watertown Arsenal of the Revolutionary Army. The books were 
kept by William Hunt, Commissary in charge of the Arsenal. 
April 19, 1 775 is the date of the first entry and February 28, 1 781 
that of the last. These books are filled with accounts of the dis- 
bursement of stores. 

An important acquisition was an original manuscript Orderly Book, 
from July 8, 1 775 (five days after Washington assumed command) 



[36] 

to October 26, 1 775, written by 2nd Lieutenant Peter Scull, at 
the Camp before Boston; from May 26, 1777 to June 5, 1777, 
at Middlebrook, New Jersey. This manuscript contains general 
orders by Generals Washington, Putnam, Lee and Greene, and the 
regimental commander, Col. Thompson of the Pennsylvania Rifle 
Regiment, covering the period of organization of the American 
Army before Boston. 

From the Britwell Court sale in London only two books were secured: 
"A forme of prayer used at Newport in the Isle of Wight. 1 5 Sept. 
1648" for the Benton Collection; and an Italian grammar written 
in Latin by Scipio Lentulus and "Turned into Englishe by H. G., 
London, 1575." 

The first issue of a pamphlet protesting against taxation was secured in 
the "Rules and orders to be observed by the Anti-Stamp Fire 
Society, Instituted in Boston October 1 , 1 763." Among the 
names listed are those of John Lowell, Herman Brimmer, Thomas 
Hill, Samuel Breck, Nathaniel Bethune, Daniel Sargent and 
William Tudor. Apparently no other copy has been discovered. 

A noteworthy purchase was an Armenian MS. — a complete text of the 
New Testament written on vellum, containing forty full-page 
illustrations and over one hundred illuminated initials and marginal 
ornamentations. The colophon states that the finishing of this book 
was in 924 of the time of Greater Armenia. The year 924 of 
the Armenian calendar corresponds to the year 1 475 of the Christian 
era. The binding of heavy hand-wrought silver was made in 1 663. 

To the Fine Arts collection of the Special Libraries Depart- 
ment the following important works have been added: 
Ardenne de Tizac, Jean Henri d'. Animals in Chinese art. London. 

1923. 

Burlington Fine Arts Club, London. Catalogue of an exhibition of carv- 
ings in ivory. London. 1923. 

Butler, A. J. Islamic pottery. London. 1926. 

Gromort, Georges. Jardins d' Espagne. 2 v. Paris. 1926. 

Richter, Gisela M. A. and Albert W. Barker. Ancient furniture. A 
history of Greek, Etruscan and Roman furniture. Oxford. 1 926. 

Shepherd, J. C. and G. A. Jellicoe. Italian gardens of the Renaissance. 
London. 1925. 

Siren, Osvald. The imperial palaces of Peking. 3 v. Paris 1926. 
(volume 1 received). 

Tanner, P. de. Chinese jade, ancient and modern. Descriptive cata- 
logue. 2 v. Berlin. 1925. 

Visser, H. F. E., editor. The exhibition of Chinese art of the Society 
of Friends of Asiatic art. 2 v. Amsterdam. 1925. 

Yashiro, Yukio. Sandro Botticelli. 2 v. London. 1925. 



[37] 

Among miscellaneous works of interest which have been acquired are 
Monumenta Cartographica, edited by F. C. Wieder, consisting of 
reproductions of unique and rare maps; Poor Richard's Almanack, 
The Way to Wealth as clearly shown in an old Pennsylvania 
Almanack, entitled Poor Richard Improved ; and The Whistle, 
London, Privately printed, 1816. 

During the year gifts have been received as follows : 1 1 ,444 
volumes, 13,504 serials, 2,431 photographs, 52 newspaper sub- 
scriptions, and for current file use in the Branch Division and 
Information Room, 731 volumes and 9,566 pieces of mis- 
cellaneous material, booksellers' catalogues, and government 
publications. 

From Mr. Louis E. Kirstein the sum of one thousand dollars 
was received, to be added to the "Louis E. Kirstein Fund ' and 
the income to be used in accordance with the terms of the original 
gift. 

There was received under a decree of the Supreme Judical 
Court in Equity of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
$3,858.24, being the sum remaining in the hands of the surviving 
trustees of the fund originally raised to install in the Library 
decorations by the late John S. Sargent. This sum has been 
funded as the "John Singer Sargent Fund" and the income will 
be used for the care and preservation of the Sargent decorations 
and such other purposes as are set forth in the decree. 

Mrs. John Elliott, on behalf of a Committee of Citizens, pre- 
sented two studies of Mr. Elliott's mural painting, "The Triumph 
of Time." 

A marble copy of the Psyche of Capua was received from 
Mrs. Langdon Pearse of Winnetka, Illinois. 

Certain additional gifts of interest, with the names of the 
donors, are listed on pages 63-67 of the Appendix. 

CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes and parts of volumes catalogued dur- 
ing 1926 was 109,738 and the number of titles was 74,148. 
Of these, 57,473 volumes (50,246 titles) were assigned to the 
branches and were catalogued in the Branch Department, but 
are included here to show the total bulk of this part of the work. 



[38] 

The number of printed cards added to the catalogues of the 
Central Library alone was 66,1 69, and 26,359 were used in com- 
piling bibliographies, or were reserved for such use in the future. 
The distribution of cards among the departments of the Central 
Library was: Bates Hall 26,763; Official Catalogue, 27,622; 
Special Libraries, 1 1,784. Cards were also sent as usual to the 
Library of Congress and were saved for the Harvard College 
Library. 

In order to hasten the appearance of new books in our cata- 
logues, 1 0,85 1 temporary cards have been typed by the Card 
Division, to be replaced later by printed cards. As the result 
of this device, titles of recent accessions have been in the cata- 
logues as soon as the books have been placed on the shelves. 
Over 4000 cards have also been typed for the use of the Editor. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

With the beginning of 1 926 a new series of the Library bulle- 
tin was started under the title of More Boofys. The chief feature 
of the publication is, as formerly, the selected list of new books. 
Besides the list, however, each issue carries several articles mainly 
relating to the book treasures and manuscripts of the Library. 
There are also popular features, such as notes on important new 
books, on gifts to the Library, and on other matters of Library 
interest. 

The new publication met with instantaneous success. The 
first issue, a triple number, appeared in March, and the edition 
was exhausted in less than three weeks. The demand, ever 
since, has been increasing. During the year six issues were 
printed, with a total of 376 pages. 

In several points the new bulletin differs radically from the 
Quarterly. In More Boofys the classification method has been 
adopted for the list of new books, instead of the dictionary 
method. The classified list is more comprehensible for the 
average reader. He finds there the books in which he is primarily 
interested grouped together under one heading ; and the Synopsis 
of Classification, printed before the list, makes it easy for him 



[39] 

to find a particular group of books sought for. The method of 
classification was, in fact, a return to an old practice. Between 
1896 and 1908 the bulletin of the Library had been arranged 
in the form of a classified list and the records show that the de- 
mand for the bulletin was greatest during those years. 

For a large number of items in the List of New Books, short 
descriptive annotations, indicating the subject, summarizing the 
contents or giving information about the author and his view- 
point, enliven the list and make it more interesting and useful. 

It should be mentioned here that Mr. Zoltan Haraszti, as 
newly appointed Editor of Publications, began his duties with 
the first issue of More Books. Since May, 1 926, Miss Margaret 
Munsterberg has been working as assistant in the Department. 

To the series of Brief Reading Lists, published by the Library, 
one number has been added during the year. In connection 
with the Boston performances of "Carmencita" and "Lysistrata" 
a list (No. 35), The Moscow Art Theatre Musical Studio, was 
compiled by Mr. Lucien E. Taylor, of the Catalogue Depart- 
ment. 

Bibliographical lists have been printed for the lectures on the 
programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, given by the 
Massachusetts Division of University Extension in co-operation 
with the Library. The lists were prepared by Mr. Richard G. 
Appel, assistant in charge of the Music Division. Programs 
and lists were issued also for the Free Chamber Music Concerts, 
given through the generosity of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge 
in the Lecture Hall of the Library. An eight-page leaflet en- 
titled "A Library Exhibit, J 876-1 926," descriptive of an 
exhibition of library progress as illustrated by the American 
Library Association, The Division of Public Libraries of the 
State Board of Education and The Boston Public Library, 
held during the summer months, was issued for distribution. 

Opportunities for Adult Education in Greater Boston — a 
list of free public lectures and public educational courses offered 
by the Massachusetts Division of University Extension, the 
Lowell Institute, the Commission on Extension Courses, the 
Public Library, and other institutions — was also published for 



[40] 

the year 1926-27. The pamphlet, consisting of 92 pages, was 
larger and more comprehensive than any previous issue. 

Part IV, (pages 289-384, Int-Mat.) of the Guide to Serial 
Publications founded prior to 1918 and now or recently current 
in Boston, Cambridge and vicinity, was compiled and issued 
under the editorship of Mr. Thomas Johnston Homer. Part V 
is being prepared for publication. 

BATES HALL. 

The radial arrangement of the catalogue cases has stood the 
test of a year's trial, and is an improvement in many ways over 
the old plan. The public is better distributed about the room, 
it is easier to keep the catalogue drawers in place, and less time 
is wasted by the public at the catalogue than in former years. 
The provision of low tables at the south windows has put an end 
to all complaints of discomfort in using the tables at which the 
catalogue drawers are consulted. 

New lighting has been installed at the catalogue cases, so that 
they are better lighted than ever before. The installation of new 
lights at the book cases in Bates Hall is going forward and is 
approaching a satisfactory completion. 

There have been no major changes in the arrangement of 
the reference collection except those resulting from the organ- 
ization of a Division of Genealogy. Somewhat more space 
has been allotted to Genealogy and Local History and a 
case for new books in this field has been installed beside the 
assistant's desk. On the whole, the space devoted to this sub- 
ject seems now to be adequate to the needs of the Division. Miss 
Doyle, the assistant in charge of the Division, has been busy 
during the year with the organization of her material, the assist- 
ance of readers and the response to inquiries received by mail. 
The new division is justifying itself and the separation of this 
special field from the general work of the Department has been 
a real step in advance. During the year, 228 letters on gene- 
alogical subjects were answered. It is interesting to note that 
27 of these inquiries came from the state of New York, Mass- 



[41] 

achusetts falling to second place in the number of inquiries in 
this field. 

Aside from genealogy, 565 reference letters were answered 
by the department during the year. Of these, 533 came from 
the various states of the Union, and 32 from Canada and seven 
other foreign countries. 

During the fall an investigation of the unsuccessful requests 
for books was undertaken. For about seven weeks, every pub- 
lic department of the Library submitted each morning a list of 
books which could not be supplied to applicants. These lists 
were tabulated and a number of interesting facts came to light. 
It was found that unsuccessful requests fall roughly into the 
following classes: 

(a) Repeated requests for new books of which the supply 
is insufficient. 

These are usually charged "out" and present no problem but 
that of additional purchase. 

(b) Repeated requests for standard books in a few lines, of 
which volumes disappear almost as soon as they are received 
by the Library. These include such groups as translations 
of school texts, text books in popular fields, business books, 
especially those on salesmanship, technical books of a popular 
character, current books of humor, books of recitations, etc. 

(c) "Missing" books whose numbers are still in the catalogue. 

(d) Books misplaced, recently stolen, or otherwise tempo- 
rarily missing, which are, however, not on the "missing" list. 

(e) Books in place on the shelves which fail to be produced 
through the carelessness or inefficiency of stack assistants. 
The second class above presents a special problem which is 

probably common to all large libraries. A certain portion of the 
community feels at certain times a pressing and desperate need 
of certain books which it has not the means or inclination to buy. 
Translations of texts used in school and college may be taken as 
the type of this class of books. Plans are being worked out for 
reserving books of this type for legitimate users. Plans are also 
being made to check the misplacement of books and inefficiency 
in searching for them. 



[42] 



NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS. 

No definite record is kept of the use of the Newspaper Room. 
The capacity of the room has been taxed at all hours of the day 
and evening by persons who consulted the 274 papers regularly 
kept on file. Of these, 214 are daily and 60 weekly papers; 
1 93 are published in the United States and 8 1 in foreign 
countries. The bound volumes now number 9,243, an increase 
of 151 since 1925. 

Seven hundred and fifty new volumes were added to the 
Patent Room during the year. The use of the collection can 
only be estimated, since the shelves are open and the books 
freely accessible to the readers. Over 19,000 persons used the 
room in 1926. 

INFORMATION OFFICE, GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT ROOM 
AND OPEN SHELF ROOM. 

The Information Office grows in usefulness as a clearing 
house for ephemeral material. Here is kept the ready refer- 
ence material which places at the disposal of the public in the 
shortest possible time a directory service, consisting of the latest 
available telephone and city directories of the United States and 
larger European cities; current federal and state documents 
supplemented by lists compiled to assist the public in their use; 
business and vocational files which provide information through 
Chamber of Commerce reports and other business publications; 
and catalogues of educational institutions of every type. 

In the Open Shelf Room an attempt has been made to keep 
books in circulation by a careful study of unusual demands. 
The more popular new books, — for example, Durant's "Story 
of Philosophy," Dorsey's "Why we behave like human beings," 
and Barnes's "Genesis of the World War" — bring into activity 
other books in the field of philosophy, psychology and history. 
The open-shelf collection is constantly changed to meet the 
demand stimulated by the newer books of non-fiction. 

The circulation from the room for 1 926 was 44,097, a gain 
of 2,904 over 1925. The turn-over for each book is estimated 
at 15 times a year. 



[43] 



PERIODICAL ROOM. 

In the Periodical Room there has been a steady growth of 
reference work. One room has been set apart for this purpose; 
clippings of newspaper and other material have been collected 
for debates; a visible guide to all periodicals received by the 
Library has been attached to the wall and made easily accessible 
to inquirers. The use of both bound and unbound periodicals 
showed a normal increase. Over 2,600 volumes were bound in 
1926. 

The current periodicals, exclusive of those issued by state and 
federal governments, regularly filed in the Periodical Depart- 
ment number 1 ,262. In addition there are filed for use by 
readers in other departments current periodicals especially 
relating to the fields covered by those departments, as follows: 

Fine Arts and Music Divisions of the Special Libraries. . . . 131 

Ordering Department. .......... 27 

Statistical Department. .......... 50 

Teachers' Reference Room and Children's Room. ..... 62 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES DEPARTMENT. 

The Special Libraries include all the collections housed on 
the third floor of the Central Building and comprise the divisions 
of Fine Arts, Music, Technology and Special Collections (Bar- 
ton-Ticknor Division). 

The numerous changes in arrangement and organization 
carried out in 1925 and mentioned in the last Annual Report 
have resulted in better service. This improved service is re- 
flected in increased circulation and a marked growth in "hall 
use," which latter cannot be shown by statistics. A number of 
minor improvements have been added in the past year and 
several more important changes in equipment and organization 
of material are under way. 

The renovation and relighting of the Exhibition Room have 
had the satisfactory results anticipated. It is much to be desired 
that the work of refinishing be continued to include the Special 
Libraries Delivery and Reading Rooms, both in great need of 
repainting. 



[44] 

The plans for steel stacks in the North Gallery and the Barton- 
Ticknor Room, the rennishing of these rooms and the conversion 
of the Music Room into a Treasure Room, mentioned in the 
last Annual Report, have been worked out in detail and will 
be put into execution as soon as the necessary funds have been 
secured. 

The Fine Arts Division has continued to build up its import- 
ant collections. The accessions under the new classification 
now fill an entire alcove and are already a great help in reference 
work. The open-shelf collection arranged on the lines of the 
expansive classification made in 1925 has been extended and 
has given service beyond expectations. 

The Technology Division has continued to build up its well 
organized book collection and its equipment of special reference 
tools. To safeguard the collection it has been necessary to 
abolish altogether the shelves for the display of new books, but 
this loss has been repaired by issuing for public distribution a 
monthly mimeographed list, New Technical Books. 

The Music Division has continued its series of interpretive 
lectures on symphony concerts and operas, and for these lectures 
annotated programs and book lists have been issued as during 
the preceding year. 

The number of books issued for home use from the Special 
Libraries during the year was 23,525, an increase of three and 
one-half per cent as compared with last year. For use outside 
the Library there were issued 29,148 pictures and 9,799 lantern 
slides. 

STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The circulation of the statistical books does not vary much. 
In 1926 there were issued for home use 2,196 volumes; 2,037 
were sent to Bates Hall and elsewhere for use within the build- 
ing and 12,000 volumes were used in the department. The 
total number of books housed in the Statistical Department is 
24,337. New books added during the year amounted to 563 
volumes. These figures do not include the documents of various 
states and countries, the administration of which belongs to the 
Statistical Department. 



[45 



WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

Although the total circulation of books to children under 
sixteen years of age was 1 ,631 ,436, or 23 for each of the 70,424 
cardholders in this class, it is apparent that there are still too 
many who are not using library privileges. Registration shows 
that only 62 per cent of enrolled school children are cardholders 
in the Library. 

This situation may be due to the inadequate provisions for 
children in some of the branches. In four of the branch libraries, 
facilities have been much improved during the last year. The 
new Memorial Branch at Roxbury is modern in lay-out and well 
equipped. At Mattapan and Lower Mills additional space was 
secured and the children's work has been given the impetus that 
always follows its separation from that with adults. 

The reconstruction of the building belonging to the Fellowes 
Athenaeum has transformed a dark and unattractive waiting 
room into a pleasant children's room of somewhat old-fashioned 
type, in conformity with the period of the building. A small 
and cheerful club room in the basement affords much satisfaction 
because there can be gathered together on many afternoons the 
informal reading clubs which are conducted by members of the 
library staff. 

However, the need at South Boston, Dorchester, Mount Bow- 
doin, Codman Square and Roslindale is pressing. Seating space 
for the children who flock to the Library is sometimes out of 
the question, and there is not room enough for shelving the re- 
quired number of books. Such conditions explain the inability 
of the Library to hold some of the younger borrowers after 
the first novelty of becoming cardholders has worn off. As an 
offset to the cramped and overcrowded quarters there has been 
a gratifying growth in the force of assistants prepared to give 
special service to children. 

Years of observation of the results of the story hour give 
added assurance of the validity of its employment as a factor in 
library work with children. The fine accomplishment of the 
Library's story tellers in broadening children's interests and 
establishing sound habits of reading is apparent everywhere. 



[46] 

Only two of the branch libraries have been omitted from the 
year's schedule — Brighton, where the story-hour room was 
closed for alterations, and Orient Heights, where it was difficult 
to make suitable arrangements as to audience and time. Both 
places will undoubtedly be included in next year's schedule. 
Work of this kind has been arranged for the older boys and 
girls in the evening, and the results have been especially reward- 
ing. Equally important are the points of contact made through 
story telling in the public schools. Not only is the Library be- 
coming better known by this means, but it is reaching children 
who are obliged to work in their out-of-school hours and are 
unable to keep in touch with the children's rooms- 
Service to schools is growing faster at present than any other 
type of library work and it is toward the wise development of 
such work that the Library should direct its attention. There 
is need for better organization and more unified procedure in 
all relations between the Library and the public schools. Fitting 
organization of a School Department of the Library would 
make it possible to study in a comprehensive way the demands 
of different sections of the city with a view to strengthening weak 
positions and coordinating activities already undertaken. 

THE BRANCH SYSTEM. 

Two districts of the city, namely Readville and Germantown, 
are at present without library branches. A number of other 
sections of the city are without adequate library provisions. 
Several of the existing branches require larger accommodations. 
Suitable provision should be made to permit the establishment of 
at least four new branch libraries and the enlargement of some 
of the present branches. A definite program of branch expan- 
sion should be considered if suitable library service is to be 
equitably given to the present and potential users and cardholders 
of the library system. 

The total circulation through the branches was 3,158,552. 
This is a gain over 1925 of 342,479. The number of books 
issued from the Central Library through branches was 106,456; 



[47] 

this includes 87,004 from the deposit collection and 1 9,452 from 
the stacks of the Central Library. All the branches gained in 
circulation- The greatest gains were at Upham's Corner, Cod- 
man Square, Andrew Square, South Boston, West End, West 
Roxbury, North End and Mount Bowdoin. 

The number of volumes sent on deposit to 326 agencies (212 
schools, 56 fire engine houses, and 38 institutions of various 
kinds) was 86,570 as against 86,400 last year. The total 
number of volumes sent to schools was 56,818, compared with 
56,328 last year. Of this number 19,684 were sent from the 
Branch Issue Division, Central Library. The number of books 
issued on deposit from the branch libraries, chiefly to schools, 
was 37,134, compared with 34,698 in 1925. 

Interlibrary loans amounted to 1,830 volumes, 126 more 
than last year. Of the 1 ,686 applications received, 592 had to 
be refused. Twenty-four volumes were borrowed from other 
libraries. 

In September, 1926, the Warren Street Branch moved into 
large, well-equipped quarters in the new Memorial High School 
in Roxbury. The Fellowes Athenaeum has been entirely re- 
modelled and now has all the conveniences of a modern library 
building. Reading rooms for adults were provided at the Lower 
Mills and Mattapan Branches. In the Branch Department of 
the Central Library a mezzanine floor was built to provide a 
room for staff meetings and a committee room. 

Regular training in library routine is being given by several 
librarians of major branches. Classes in universal history, 
reference, and book mending have been attended by twenty-six 
branch assistants. 

LECTURES AND EXHIBITIONS. 

During the year twenty-two exhibitions were put on view. 
Of this number eleven were of books and documents and four of 
prints and photographs in the possession of the Library. There 
were seven loan exhibitions, none of them comprising books. For 
list of exhibitions see Appendix, pp. 62-63. 



[48] 

In 1926 there were given in the lecture hall 92 lectures and 
entertainments under the auspices of the Library, the Ruskin 
Club, the Drama League, the Field and Forest Club, the Dickens 
Fellowship, and other organizations. They were, as customary, 
free to the public. 

The lectures were in the following fields: travel, 20; literature, 
15; art and archeology, 10; music, 9; drama, 6; and miscellane- 
ous, 13. There were also 19 concerts and plays. Five of the 
concerts were chamber music by Quartets provided by Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge ; the Library of Congress, the Curtis 
Institute of Music, Philadelphia, the Burgin Quartet of Boston, 
and the Myrtle Jordan Trio were the donors of one concert each. 
These concerts appealed to so wide a public that the doors were 
often closed almost an hour before the scheduled beginning. 
Mrs. Coolidge has graciously offered another series, to consist 
of eight concerts, for the season of 1 927-28. For list of lectures, 
etc. see Appendix, pp. 58-65. 

In 1926-27 the Division of University Extension of the State 
Department of Education again used the lecture hall every 
evening except Thursday and Sunday for educational courses. 
Several courses were also scheduled for afternoon or morning 
hours. 

A course on the programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
was offered by the Division of University Extension and the 
Library in collaboration. This was arranged by Richard G. 
Appel, of the Library staff, who was assisted by other musicians, 
notably Alfredo Casella, Aaron Copland, Darius Milhaud, 
Ottorino Respighi, Jesus Sanroma, Roger Huntington Sessions, 
Nicholas Slonimsky, Walter R. Spaulding, Alexander Lang 
Steinert, and Thomas Whitney Surette. 

STAFF INSTRUCTION. 

No special courses of staff instruction have been conducted 
this year, except for branch assistants for whom classes in uni- 
versal history, reference, and book mending were given. Under 
the auspices of the Division of University Extension, Professor 
Robert E. Rogers gave a sixth in his series of courses in literature 



[49] 

primarily for library assistants, entitled "Forms of the Drama." 

The Library has probably done about all that it can hope to 
do in the training of its employees through detached, incidental 
courses. If the quality of the staff is to be further improved, it 
must be done by the gradual organization of a system of training 
within the Library. The practical exclusion of any but college 
graduates from library schools forces back upon the libraries the 
education for minor positions of their employees who have only 
a high-school diploma. 

BINDERY DEPARTMENT. 

The work of the Bindery Department for the year shows a 
substantial increase, made possible by the new equipment in- 
stalled in 1925. The work for the branches is now up to date, 
and it will be possible to make a start on special work which 
has been awaiting such an opportunity. 

The cost of binding 66,946 volumes — the output of the year 
exclusive of miscellaneous work — was $50, 1 36. 1 7. This makes 
the average cost per bound volume, including the repairing of rate 
and valuable books in the Special Collections, sixty-seven cents. 

MECHANICAL AND OTHER CHANGES AND REPAIRS. 
CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The following repairs and improvements were made during 
1926: 

A portion of the tile roof of the Central Building, about one- 
half of the total area, underwent major repairs; some twenty 
thousand tiles were repointed with plastic compound. 

Additional painters employed during the year accomplished 
much necessary work: the Fine Arts Exhibition Room, the 
Lecture Hall and the Branch Department in the Central Library 
were refinished. 

New furnaces were built in the boilers, new grates furnished 
and the feed pump overhauled. 



[50] 

New cables were put on both passenger elevators and guide 
rails were aligned. 

New lighting systems were installed in Bates Hall, the Map 
Room in Stack Six, and the Statistical Department. 

Fire walls have been built in the basement where combustibles 
are stored. 

The Lecture Hall of the Library was given a thorough re- 
novation; new draperies were provided for the stage; other 
draperies were cleaned and emergency exit lights put in place. 

In the Branch Department of the Central Library extensive 
repairs were made, and a new mezzanine floor was built. 

BRANCH SYSTEM. 

The Trustees of the Fellowes Athenaeum remodelled their 
building in accordance with suggestions made by the Director 
and the Supervisior of Branches with the result that the Fellowes 
Athenaeum Branch now possesses the conveniences and the 
attractiveness of a modern branch library. 
A New shelving was installed in Andrew Square, Faneuil, 
Jamaica Plain and Mount Bowdoin Branches. 

New rooms, with equipment, were added to Lower Mills and 
Mattapan Branches. 

Extensive painting was done in the Codman Square, East 
Boston, Faneuil, and Hyde Park Branches. 

New floor covering was placed in the Boylston Station and 
Mount Bowdoin Branches. 

RETIREMENTS. 

During the year the following persons were retired under the 
Boston Retirement Act: 

Bindery: Annie T. Flynn, sewer, (retired April 30, 1926), 
entered service August 20, 1907; Joanna M. J. Doiron, sewer, 
(retired May 31, 1926, voluntary), entered service April 9, 
1896; Engineer and Janitor Department: Hannah Lydon, 
cleaner, (retired May 31, 1926, disability), entered service 
October 17, 1907. 



[51] 



CONCLUSION. 



Again it is a pleasure and privilege to commend the interest 
and devotion of those members of the Library Staff who have 
with diligence performed the routine work of the department. 
Individually and collectively the credit is theirs for the effective 
work of the year. Special recognition is gratefully made of the 
cooperative service of Miss Delia Jean Deery, Executive 
Secretary, and Mr. Frank H. Chase, Reference Librarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles F. D. Belden, 
Director. 



APPENDIX. 



TABLE OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION. 





1921-22 


1922-23 


1923-24 


1924-25 


1925* 


1926 


Central Library . 


591,640 


590,655 


576,997 


623,024 


608,852 


644,896 


Branches: 














Allston 


47,328 


53,598 


57,705 


60,358 


63,434 


74,297 


Andrew Square 


33,944 


33,413 


51,991 


68,196 


68,772 


89,662 


Boylston Station 


50,033 


55,672 


62,340 


64,871 


64,559 


71.261 


Brighton 


79,397 


83,238 


87,672 


92,702 


89,384 


101.286 


Charlestown 


98,780 


101,140 


99,035 


98,433 


95,288 


107.562 


City Point 


30,300 


38,381 


43,277 


47,441 


50,108 


51,154 


Codman Square 


101,792 


103,810 


113,529 


114,950 


119,758 


145,001 


Dorchester 


70,396 


67,810 


75,608 


88,628 


90,123 


100.188 


East Boston 


120,234 


120,993 


125,968 


128,771 


125,820 


138,691 


Faneuil 


24,913 


24,944 


27,004 


30,443 


31,560 


43,782 


Fellowes Athen 


80,933 


79,125 


71,673 


76,007 


84,765 


85,151 


Hyde Park 


80,855 


82,498 


89,716 


95,334 


93,582 


98,147 


Jamaica Plain 


60,507 


59,970 


64,022 


68,630 


67,232 


73.117 


Jeffries Point 


10,309 


35,925 


40,857 


52.020 


53.004 


58.218 


Lower Mills 


1 7,765 


17,577 


25,801 


27,259 


25,488 


32,274 


Mattapan . 


20,499 


20,497 


27,699 


48,789 


58,290 


69,364 


Memorial <J 


104,412 


108,665 


122,159 


136,981 


135,913 


147,263 


Mount Bowdoir 


. 80,492 


83,376 


98,961 


107,679 


112,320 


125,907 


Mount Pleasant 


57,562 


53,846 


52,977 


53,953 


53,778 


59.101 


Nepobset 


28,789 


33,263 


40,353 


41,466 


39,479 


43.349 


North, End 


85,187 


96,359 


107,329 


1 1 7,075 


121.651 


137,896 


Orient Heights 


27,970 


34,240 


30,580 


40,605 


45,395 


58,913 


Parker Hill 


49,209 


49,459 


44,081 


37,038 


39,860 


43,719 


Roslindale , 


80,879 


82,597 


89,336 


94,888 


93,154 


105,074 


Roxbury Crossin 


I 57,609 


55,911 


57,869 


67.143 


58,634 


62,462 


South Boston 


. 121,194 


124,809 


139,173 


152,799 


148,751 


169,625 


South End 


97,403 


99,543 


111,682 


117,845 


112,578 


118,315 


Tyler Street 


40,039 


39,973 


42,270 


37.321 


37,436 


43,421 


Upham's Corner 


19,375 


120,257 


109,731 


95,975 


100,288 


126,010 


West End . 


. 136,431 


142,470 


1 54,267 


157,321 


1 52,043 


169,142 


West Roxbury 


66,470 


74,970 


81.199 


88,249 


88,482 


104,889 


Total. 


2,672,646 


2,768,984 


2,922,861 


3,132,194 


3,129,781 


3,499,137 



* For a year of eleven months. 

•I Formerly Warren Street Branch. 



[53] 

The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form : 



1921-22 gain over preceding year 
1922-23 gain over preceding year 
1923—24 gain over preceding year 
1924—25 gain over preceding year 
1925* loss from preceding year 
1926<J gain from preceding year (of II months) 



USE OF BOOKS. 
CIRCULATION FROM CENTRAL BY MONTHS. 



VOLUMES. 

223,870 
96,338 

1 53,877 

209,333 
12,413 

369.356 





HOME USE 
DIRECT. 


HOME USE 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


SCHOOLS AND 
INSTITUTIONS 

THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS. 


January, 1926 . , 


34,291 


11,899 


20.950 


67.140 


February, 


32,111 


10,481 


21.665 


64.257 


March, 


35,863 


12,244 


22.665 


70.772 


April, 


31,376 


9,439 


22,375 


63.190 


May, 


28,043 


8,185 


22,345 


58,573 


June, 


21,782 


6,993 


19.915 


48,690 


July. ;; . , 


20,368 


5,755 


5,190 


31,313 


August, 


29,412 


5,093 


5,130 


39,635 


September, 


21,633 


5,893 


7,795 


35,321 


October, 


30,790 


9,241 


12,290 


52,321 


November, 


34,881 


10,855 


18,110 


63,846 


December, 


20,035 


10.378 


19,425 


49,838 



Totals 



340,585 



106,456 



197,855 



644,896 



DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL CIRCULATION. 



Central Library: 

a. Direct .... 

b. Through Branches 

c. Schools and Institutions throug 

Branch Department 


HOME 
USE. 

340,585 
106,456 
h 


SCHOOLS AND 
INSTITUTIONS. 

197.855 


TOTAL. 

644,896 


Branches: 

Allston 

Andrew Square . 
Boylston Station .... 
Brighton ..... 
Charlestown ..... 
City Point 


74,297 
89,662 
71,261 
62,492 
95,070 
51,154 

. 443,936 


38',794 
12,492 


74,297 
89,662 
71,261 
101,286 
107,562 
51,154 


Carried forward 


512,86 


495.222 



Eleven months period. 
I Gain over an aproximation of preceding twelve months period 138,279. 



[54] 



Brought forward 
Codman Square 
Dorchester 
East Boston 
Faneuil 
Fellowes Athenaeum 
Hyde Park . 
Jamaica Plain 
Jeffries Point 
Lower Mills . 
Mattapan 
Memorial <I 
Mount Bowdoin 
Mount Pleasant 
Neponset 
North End . 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill . 
Roslindale 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boston 
South End 
Tyler Street . 
Upham's Corner 
West End . 
West Roxbury 



443,936 


512,86 


495,222 


134,058 


10,943 


145,001 


81,203 


18,985 


100,188 


119,491 


19,200 


138,691 


43,782 


• . - . 


43,782 


66,103 


19,048 


85,151 


88,185 


9,962 


98,147 


63,160 


9,957 


73,117 


58,218 


.... 


58,218 


32,274 


.... 


32,274 


69,364 




69,364 


142,893 


'4370 


147.263 


120,268 


5,639 


125,907 


59,101 


.... 


59,101 


43,349 




43,349 


136,825 


l!07l' 


137,896 


58,913 


.... 


58,913 


43,719 




43,719 


94,666 


logos' 


105,074 


62,462 




62,462 


147,442 


22 J 83 


169,625 


104,726 


13,589 


118,315 


43,421 


.... 


43,421 


124,665 


1,345 


126,010 


143,138 


26.004 


169,142 


86,746 


18,143 


104,889 



2,612,108 



242,133 



2,854,241 



These figures are condensed into the following: 

Books Lent for Home Use, including Circulation through 
Schools and Institutions. 



From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 

the Branches) 644.896 

From Branches (excluding books received from Central Library) . 2,854,241 

Total 3,499,137 



Comparative. 




1 


926. 


1 


925. 


Central Library circulation (excl 


u cling 










schools and institutions) : 












Direct home use . 




313,708 




340,585 




Through Branches 




107,419 


421,127 


106.456 


447,041 








Branch Libraries circulation 


(ex- 










eluding schools and institutions) : 










Direct home use . 






2,306,889 




2,612,108 


Schools and institutions circulatio 


n (in- 










eluding books from Central through 










the Branch system) . 


• 




401,765 




439,988 



3,129,781 



3,499,137 



<J Formerly Warren Street Branch. 



[55] 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 

1925. 1926. 
Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 1,449 1,580 

Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 255 250 

Totals i 1,704 1,830 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 370 475 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts . . . . . 104 117 

Totals 474 592 

Borrowed from other libraries for use here ..... 31 24 

The classified "home-use" circulation of the branches was as 
follows, for two successive years: 

1925 1926 

VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 

Fiction for adults . . . 720,311 32 825,834 32 

Non-fiction for adults . . 230,900 10 256,018 10 

Juvenile fiction . . . 893,115 38 1.022,430 39 

Juvenile non-fiction . . . 462,563 20 507,826 19 

At the Central Library the classified "home-use" circulation 
shows the following percentages: 

1925 1926 

PERCENTAGES. PERCENTAGES. 

Fiction 47.8 48.5 

Non-fiction 52.2 51.5 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 



BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE. 



For the Central Library: 

From City appropriation . 
From trust funds income . 

For branches: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income . 



Totals 72,925 80,146 



1925. 
7,557 
3,586 


1926. 
9.474 
3.237 
11.143 

67.435 


12.711 


57,874 
3,908 


61 78° 


67,435 







[56] 



The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise: 



Accessions by purchase . 
Accessions by gift .... 
Accessions by Statistical Department 
Accessions by exchange . 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound 
Accessions by series bound 



12,711 

10,152 

73 

38 

1,566 

142 

1,131 



BRANCHES. 

67,435 

547 



Totals 



25,813 
THE CATALOGUE. 
1925 

VOLS. AND TITLES. 
PARTS. 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 

Serials . 

Branches 
Recatalogued 

Totals . . 



24,314 

5,868 

58,087 

1 7,889 



14,702 

49,494 
11,613 



72 



68,054 



TOTAL 
VOLUMES. 
80,146 

10,699 

73 

38 

1,638 

142 

1,131 



93,867 



1926 

VOLS. AND TITLES. 
PARTS. 



23,496 

5,475 

57,473 

17,819 



14,544 

50,246 
9.358 



106,158 75,809 104,263 74,148 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 
General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 22,522 

Special collection, new books and transfers . . . . . . 2,163 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc . . . . . . . . . . 1,810 

26,495 
Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc 13,313 

Net gain at Central Library . . . . . . . . . 13,182 

Net gain at branches .......... 1 1 ,742 

Net gain, entire library system ......... 24,924 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 

end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 

the following statement: 

1852-53 .... 9.688 1855-56 .... 28,080 

1853-54 .... 16,221 1856-57 .... 34,896 

1854-55 .... 22,617 1857-58 . . . . 70,851 



[57] 



1858-59 








78,043 


1893 . . 






597.152 


1859-60 








85,031 


1894 . . 






610.375 


1860-61 








97,386 


1895 . . 






628.297 


1861-62 








105,034 


1896-97 . 






663,763 


1862-63 








110,563 


1897-98 . 






698,888 


1863-64 


1 






116,934 


1898-99 . 






716,050 


1864-65 








123,016 


1899-1900. 






746,383 


1865-66 








130.678 


1900-01 . 






781,377 


1866-67 








136.080 


1901-02 . 






812,264 


1867-68 








144,092 


1902-03 . 






835,904 


1868-69 








1 52,796 


1903-04 . 






848,884 


1869-70 








160,573 


1904-05 . 






871,050 


1870-71 








179,250 


1905-06 . 






878.933 


1871-72 








192,958 


1906-07 . 






903,349 


1872-73 








209,456 


1907-08 . 






922,348 


1873-74 








260,550 


1908-09 . 






941.024 


1874-75 








276,918 


1909-10 . 






961.522 


1875-76 








297,873 


1910-11 . 






987.268 


1876-77 








321,010 


1911-12 . 






1,006,717 


1877-78 








345.734 


1912-13 . 






1,049,011 


1878-79 








360,963 


1913-14 . 






1,067,103 


1879-80 








377,225 


1914-15 . 






1.098.702 


1880-81 . 








390,982 


1915-16 . 






1.121.747 


1881-82 








404,221 


1916-17 . 






1.139.682 


1882-83 








422,116 


1917-18 . 






1,157.326 


1883-64 . 








438,594 


1918-19 . 






1.173.695 


1884-85 . 








453,947 


1919-20 . 






1.197.498 


1885 . . 








460,993 


1920-21 . 






1. 224.5 10 


1886 . . 








479,421 


1921-22 . 






1.258.211 


1887 . . 








492.956 


1922-23 . 






1.284.094 


1888 . . 








505,872 


1923-24 . 






1.308.041 


1889 . . 








520,508 


1924-25 . 






1.333.264 


1890 . . 








536,027 


1925 . . 






1.363.515 


1891 . . 








556,283 


1926 . . 






1.388.439 


1892 . . 








576,237 










Volumes in entire library system 


. • . 






1.388.439 


Volumes in the branches 


. 






377.309 


These volumes are located as 


follows : 


Central Library . . . 1,011,130 


Mattapan .... 4,667 


Allston 




6,088 


Memorial * 






11.115 


Andrew Square . 




5,974 


Mount Bowdoin 






9.598 


Boylston Station 




6,327 


Mount Pleasant 






6.169 


Brighton 




19,358 


Neponset 






4,665 


Charlestown 




15.533 


North End . 






11.115 


City Point . 




5,629 


Orient Heights 






4.952 


Codman Square . 




11,502 


Parker Hill 






4,858 


Dorchester . 




14,271 


Roslindale . 






11.563 


East Boston 




20,851 


Roxbury Crossing 


! 




7.542 


Faneuil 




5,995 


South Boston 






19.921 


Fellowes Athenaeum 




36,943 


South End . 






14.403 


Hyde Park 




35,020 


Tyler Street 






5.849 


Jamaica Plain 




16,973 


Upham's Corner 






11.758 


Jeffries Point 




3,941 


West End . 






22.332 


Lower Mills 






3,389 


West Roxbury 






16,849 



Formerly Warren Street Branch. 



[58] 



THE BINDERY. 



Number of volumes bound in various style 
Magazines stitched .... 



Volumes repaired 

Volumes guarded 

Maps mounted .... 

Photographs, engravings, etc. mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1925 

59,664 

197 

2,620 

2,144 

49 

2,379 

64,162 



1926 

66,946 

187 

2,176 

1,612 

90 

4,908 

64,573 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

1925 1926 

Requisitions received and filled ...... 293 237 

Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles exclusive of automatic reprint . . . . 11 ,058 5,952 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) .... 140,321 66,169 

Card Catalogue (Branches): 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 568 760 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) .... 37,761 33,583 

Signs L825 735 

Blank forms (numbered series) . . . . . . 3,613,725 3,402,038 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside numbered series) . 45,531 69,370 

Catalogues, pamphlets, and bibliographical programs . . 67,520 55,490 



THE LECTURES OF 1926-1927. 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were 

illustrated with lantern slides. 

1926 
Sept. 27. The Stepping-Stones to the Art of Typography. Dr. Henry 

Guppy. Under the auspices of the Library and the 

Boston Society of Printers. 
Oct. 7. Vacationing in the North Woods. Edwin C. Howard. 

Oct. 1 0. *The Influence of the Dance on Composers of Varied Types 

and Countries. Margaret Anderton. 
Oct. 1 1 . ^Endowed with Divine Vision. Lilian Whiting. A 

Group of Songs. Mrs. Alice Wentworth MacGregor. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Oct. 14. California the Beautiful and the Wonders of the Great 

Southwest. Henry Warren Poor, A.M. (Field and 

Forest Club Course.) 
Oct. 17. ^Dreams: Today's Mirage, Tomorrow's Reality. Nellie 

C. Haynes. 
Oct. 1 7. ^Concert by the Pro Arte Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 

Coolidge Series.) 



[59] 

Oct. 1 8. *The Fellowship of Failhs. Dr. Sarve-Palli Radhakrishnan. 

Singing by Mrs. Alice Wentworth MacGregor. Under 

the auspices of the League of Neighbors. 
Oct. 21. A West Indian Winter. Francis Henry Wade, M.D. 
Oct. 25. *The Art of Living. Carr Schrader. (Ruskin Club.) 
Oct. 24. ^Concert by the Myrtle Jordan Trio. 
Oct. 28. East of Suez. Walter Wentworth Allerton. 
Oct. 31 . El Kahireh, King Fuad's Capital. John C. Bowker, M.D. 
Nov. 4. The Beginnings of the Records: Egypt and Mesopotamia, 

from 3500-500 B. C. Agnes M. Winter. 
Nov. 6. *Pindar and the Greek Lyric Poets. Charles Hammond 

Gibson, President. (American Poetry Association.) 
Nov. 7. ^Eugene G. O'Neil, and John Kelly: Contrasting American 

Dramatists. Sherwin Lawrence Cook. 
Nov. 8. ^Things That Make Men Happy. Rev. Joseph P. 

MacCarthy, Ph.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Nov. 1 1 . *What Public Libraries will do for China. Mary Elizabeth 

Wood. 
Nov. 1 1 . Through Europe with the Field and Forest Club. Rev. 

Charles W. Casson. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Nov. 1 4. A Pageant of Famous Actors, illustrated from the Shaw 

Theatre Museum of Harvard. Frank W. C. Hersey, 

A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
Nov. 1 8. The Smithsonian Institution. Charles G. Abbott, D.Sc. 
Nov. 2 1 . *Songs of the Sunny South. Edna Holmes. ; A Miracle 

Play by Lady Gregory: The Travelling Man. Stroll- 
ing Players, under the direction of Helene Martha Boll. 
Nov. 21. ^Concert by the Lenox Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 

Coolidge Series.) 
Nov. 22. A Session with the American Biblical School of Archae- 
ology, at Jerusalem. Harriett Johnson, A.B. (Ruskin 

Club.) 
Nov. 28. *Wozzeck, a Symphonic Opera: The Long Sought Synthesis 

between Drama and Symphony. Alfred H. Meyer. 
Nov. 29. The Primitive Mind and the Civilized. Herbert Joseph 

Spinden, Ph.D. (Boston Branch of the American 

Folklore Society.) 
Dec. 2. The Medieval Glory of France. Frederick Parsons, 

F.R.S.A. 
Dec. 4. * American Verse before 1 700. Wilmon Brewer, Ph.D. 

(American Poetry Association.) 
Dec. 5. Dr. Johnson and his Circle. William Webster Ellsworth. 
Dec. 9. Glimpses of the Pyrenees, the French Riviera, Switzerland, 

and the Dolomites. Mrs. Harriette Grigor. (Field 

and Forest Club Course.) 



Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


16. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


26. 


Dec. 


27. 



[60] 

The Shakespeare Authorship. Willard Parker. 

Alaska, the Land of Far Delight. Mrs. Charles B. Hall. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
The Beauties of Switzerland. Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 
^Reading of the Christmas Carol. Gertrude L. McQuesten. 

(Boston Branch of the Dickens Fellowship.) 
^Concert by the Flonzaley Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 
Coolidge Series.) 
The Homeland of the Master. Dr. Austen T. Kempton. 
Modern Art. Dorothy Adlow, A.M. 
*Music. John Orth. Ruskin's Christmas Message. (Fors 
Clavigera.) Mrs. Minnie Meserve Soule. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
Dec. 30. Botticelli Seen Through Oriental Eyes. Martha A. S. 
Shannon. 
1927 

Jan. 2. ^Popular Songs of Shakespeare's Day. Emma Marshall 

Denkinger, Ph.D., assisted by Esther Morton Wood, 
Soprano. 

Jan. 6. The Art of the Netherlands. Adriaan Martin de Groot. 

Jan. 8. *Noyes, Masefield, Drinkwater, and other contemporary 

British Poets. Dr. Benjamin Woodbury. (Vice Presi- 
dent of the American Poetry Association.) 

Jan. 9. The Art of the Stage; the Old versus the New Theatre. 

Frank Chouteau Brown. (Drama League Course.) 

Jan. 10. Ruskin and Today; the Balanced Life and Education. 
Arthur W. Gilbert, Ph.D. (Ruskin Club.) 

Jan. 13. A Tenderfoot on Rocky Mountain Trails: from Banff to 
Mt. Robson on Horseback. George H. Browne, A.M. 
(Field and Forest Club Course.) 

Jan. 1 6. *The Poetry of Amy Lowell. Frederic J. W. Hayford. 
(American Poetry Association.) 

Jan. 1 6. *Concert by the Letz Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge 
Series. ) 

Jan. 19. The Life and Art of Edgar Allen Poe. Joseph Lorraine. 

Jan. 20. The Balkans. Eleanor B. Huse. 

Jan. 23. ^Concert by the Lincoln House Orchestra. Jacques Hoff- 
man, Conductor. 

Jan. 24. *Ruskin the Mystic. Rev. Adelbert Lathrop Hudson, A.M., 
S.T.B. (Ruskin Club.) 

Jan. 27. *The English Folk Dance. Mrs. Richard Conant. 

Jan. 30. *Music for the Pianoforte by American Composers. Eliza- 
beth Siedoff. 

Feb. 3. Zion National Park, Cedar Breaks and the North Rim of 
the Grand Canyon National Park. Randall L. Jones. 



[61] 

Feb. 6. *The Music Dramas of Richard Wagner: their Literature, 

Music and Mysticism. Madame Beale Morey. 
Feb. 1 0. Scenes, Personal and Impersonal, about Mount Washing- 
ton. Milton E. MacGregor. (Field and Forest Club 
Course. ) 
Feb. 13. The Leading Producers of the Theatres in Europe: Talks 
with Meierhold, Stanislavsky, Smilgris, Muncis, Rein- 
hardt, Jessner, Antoine and Gemier. Albert Hatton 
Gilmer, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
^Concert by the South Mountain Quartet. (Elizabeth 
Sprague Coolidge Series.) 
14. *John Ruskin: The Value of his Progressive Thinking To- 
day. Nathan C. Starr. (Ruskin Club.) 
Picturesque England from Chester to Clovelly. Ellen E. 
Page. 
*The Return to Normalcy in Poetry. Robert E. Rogers, 
A.M. (American Poetry Association.) 
Italian Cities and Hill Towns. Mrs. James Frederick 
Hopkins. 
^Beethoven's Missa Solennis: a Lecture with Musical Illus- 
trations. Prof. Leo Rich Lewis. 
*The Personal Influence of John Ruskin. William Homer 
Leavitt. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Art of Seeing: Drawing as a Language. Elizabeth 

Ward Perkins. 
Cape Cod: Past, Present, Future. Edwin A. Freeman. 
Through the White Mountains with the Field and Forest 
Club. Rev. Charles W. Casson. (Field and Forest 
Club Course.) 
*Comedy in American Drama. Prof. Robert E. Rogers, 

A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
^Concert by the Curtis Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 
Coolidge Series.) 
Sesame and Lilies — Today. Mrs. Louise Austin Chrimes. 
(Ruskin Club.) 
*Four One-Act Plays. The Strolling Players, under the 

direction of Helene Martha Boll. 
^Concert by the Lincoln House Orchestra. Jacques Hoffman, 
Conductor. 
20 ^Concert by the Burgin Quartet. 

24. ^Dramatic Recital of Oedipus the King, by Sopohocles. Dr. 
Clement B. Shaw. Incidental music composed by John 
K. Paine. 
Mar. 26. ^Beethoven Concert for Young People. Persis Cox, pianist. 



Feb. 


13. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


20. 


Feb. 


24. 


Feb. 


27. 


Feb. 


28. 


Mar. 


3. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


6. 
10. 


Mar. 


13. 


Mar. 


13. 


Mar. 


14. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


20. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


20 
24. 



[62] 

Mar. 27. ^Concert by the Boston Civic Symphony Orchestra. Joseph 
F. Wagner, Conductor. 
27. *Beethoven Concert by the Myrtle Jordan Trio. 

From London to Land's End. Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Local Color: Autochrome illustrations. Helen Messinger 
Murdock, F.R.P.S. 
*Ways and Methods of Modern Music. Nicolas Slonimsky. 
^Concert by Helene Diedrichs, pianist. 

Fifty Books of 1 926. David T. Pottinger. 
^Concert by the London String Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 
Coolidge Series.) 
John Ruskin and the Old Masters. Ellen E. Page. 

(Ruskin Club.) 

Dickens, Pickwick, and the Play. Cosmo Hamilton. 

(Auspices of Boston Branch of the Dickens Fellowship). 

Art and Labor. Gerrit A. Beneker. (Workers Education 

Bureau.) 

*The Public Library, a Factor in Education. Charles 

F. D. Belden, A.M., LL.B. (Ruskin Club.) 
^Longevity and the Science of Living. Dr. Charlotte deG. 

Davenport. 
* Appreciation of Music. John P. Marshall. (Boston 
Civic Music Festival.) 
Armenian Literature and Art. A. Chobanian. 
*Fourth Intersettlement Concert by pupils from the Music 
School Settlements and Music Departments of Settle- 
ments in Greater Boston. 
May 3 1 . *The Civic Theatre Movement. Eva Le Gallienne. 
(Auspices of Dramatic Department of the Community 
Service of Boston.) 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS. 1926. 
Installation 

date 
Jan. 9. Old Maps, from the collection in the Library. 

Feb. 2. Books relating to old valentines (Barton-Ticknor Room.) 
7. Originals and color reproductions of paintings by R. 
Farrington Elwell, loaned by the artist. 
18. One original leaf and a facsimile edition of the Gutenberg 

Bible. 
20. Original designs entered in the "House Beautiful" Cover 
Design Competition. 



Mar. 
Mar. 


27. 
28. 


Mar. 


31. 


Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 


3. 

3. 

7. 

10. 


Apr. 


11. 


Apr. 


17. 


Apr. 


23. 


Apr. 


25. 


Apr. 


28. 


May 


18. 


May 
May 


19. 
27. 



[63] 

Mar- 6. Large photographs of mountain scenery. 

1 0. Books from the library of John Adams to commemorate the 

1 00th anniversary of his death. 
1 6. Material commemorating the 1 50th anniversary of the 

Evacuation of Boston, including the Washington Medal. 
27. Events of Holy Week and Eastertide as depicted by old and 
modern masters. 
Noteworthy editions of the works of Montaigne. (Barton- 
Ticknor Room.) 
Apr. 10. Rare editions of the works of Francis Bacon. (Barton- 
Ticknor Room.) 
Premiated poster designs, loaned by the Massachusetts 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, in 
observance of "Be Kind to Animals Week." 
20. Prints illustrating the work of the Pre-Raphaelite Brother- 
hood. (By request). 
May 4. Bromoils by Leonard Craske, loaned by the artist. 

22. Photographs of public monuments in connection with the 
proposed monument in Copley Square. 
July 15. Library exhibit, marking the 50th anniversary of the 
American Library Association — rare books from the 
Library, Branch system methods, special editions of 
children's books, publicity material from the Massachusetts 
Library Commission, types of material other than books 
available in the Divisions of Fine Arts and Technology. 
Nov. 6. Original designs in New Ornament by Max Hagendorn, 
loaned by the artist. 
22. Examples of historic design from books on ornament in the 
Division of Fine Arts. 
Notable editions of Cervantes and Lope de Vega from the 

Ticknor Collection. 
Examples of fine binding from the Special Collections, in- 
cluding the recently acquired Armenian Manuscript bound 
in silver. (Barton-Ticknor Room.) 
Dec. 6. "Possibilities of Kodak Photography." Prints and enlarge- 
ments loaned by William E. Merrill. 
27. "Creative Illustration." Drawings by children in the Boston 
Public Schools. 



A SELECTED LIST OF GIFTS AND GIVERS. 

Abbey, Mrs. Edwin Austin, New York City. Edwin Austin Abbey, 
Royal Academician. The record of his life and work by E. V. 
Lucas. 1852-1911. 2 v. London, 1921. 



[64] 

Amherst College, Trustees of. Religion in the philosophy of William 
James. By Julius Seely Bixler. The Amherst Books. First Series. 
Boston. 1926. 

Association for the Publication of the Ku Chou Pien, Viscount T. 
Watanabe, President, Tokyo, Japan. (Through the Japanese 
Embassy at Washington.) A complete set of the Ku Chou Pien 
and Supplement in 68 volumes. 

Boston Browning Society. Seven volumes for the Browning Collection, 
including A Concordance to the poems of Robert Browning, by 
Leslie N. Broughton and Benjamin F. Stelter, in two volumes. 
New York, 1924, 1925. Autographed by Leslie N. Broughton. 

Boston Finance Commission. 4 1 5 volumes of Boston City documents and 
reports. 

Bradford, Gamaliel, Wellesley Hills. Darwin, by Gamaliel Bradford, 
Boston. 1926. 

Breitkopf & Hartel, New York City. Concert-Programm-Austausch. 
May, 1899-1901. 36 parts. 

Clark, William Andrews, Jr., Los Angeles. The deserted village. A 
poem by Oliver Goldsmith. With an introduction by William 
Andrews Clark, Jr., No. 55 of an edition of 200 copies printed for 
private distribution. 1926. 
The deserted village. A poem by Dr. Goldsmith. Printed for W. 
Griffin at Garrick's Head, London, 1770. One of 200 copies 
printed in facsimile. 
An elegy written in a country church-yard, by Thomas Gray. Text 
of 1 768 edition with an introduction by James Southall Wilson. 
A forword by William Andrews Clark, Jr., One of 200 copies. 
San Francisco, 1925. 
An elegy wrote in a country church yard. London. 1751. A fac- 
simile of the first edition, with the variants of the first eleven editions 
noted. One of 200 copies. 

Daughters of the American Revolution, The Old South Chapter. Sub- 
scription for the D.A.R. Magazine for 1926. 

Davis, Aaron, Nahant. Twenty-two volumes of miscellaneous works, 
including publications of the American Ambulance in the World 
War, and A treatise on benignity, written by Father Francis 
Arias, S.J., in his second parte of the Imitation of Christ our Lord. 
Translated into English in 1610, from the original of 1541. 

Drew, Mrs. Frank L. A framed colored print of the Frigate Constitution 
for the Children's Room in the West Roxbury Branch Library. 

Fearing, Mrs. Harriet. Seventeen volumes, including The life and letters 

of Walter H. Page, by B. J. Hendrick, 3 v., New York, 1 926. 
Foote, Arthur, Newton Centre. Fifty original charades, by George 
Henschel. Autographed by the author. (For the Allen A. Brown 
Music Library.) 



[65] 

Gaugengigl, Ignaz M. Eighty-two photographs of portraits from paint- 
ings by Ignaz M. Gaugengigl. 

Geer, Walter, Long Island City, New York. The Geer genealogy. A 
historical record of George and Thomas Geer and their descendants 
in the United States, from 1623 to 1923, by Walter Geer. New 
York. 1923. 

Great Britain. Commissioner of Patents. Specifications of inventions. 
1 78 volumes. 

Green, Gladys. A series (first) of sacred songs by Thomas Moore, Esq., 
the music composed and selected by Sir John Stevenson and Mr. 
Moore. London ( 1 8—) . (The Library had the second series 
only of this work.) 
A selection of Irish melodies with accompaniments by Sir John Stevenson 
and characteristic words by Thomas Mcore, Esq. London ( 1 8—) . 
Rossini, La donna del lago. In due atti. ( 1 84—) . Church music 
for public worship. By Ch. Zeuner, organist to the Handel and 
Haydn Society. Boston. 1831. 

Guiteras, Miss Gertrude E., Bristol, R .1. Guiteras, Wardwell and 
allied families. Prepared and privately printed for Gertrude Eliza- 
beth Guiteras, by the American Historical Society. New York, 
1926. In full morocco, inlaid with coat of arms and borders in 
gold and colors. Large folio. 

Hale, Philip. Twenty-six volumes, including a collection of musical and 
dramatic works: Der neue Gottingische . . . Ephorus, Hamburg. 
1727; Der musikalische Patriot, by Mattheson, 1728; Johann 
Mattheson's kleine general Bass-Schule, 1735, and ten volumes of 
mounted newspaper clippings, dramatic and musical criticisms by 
Philip Hale and others; also a copy of Saints' Days (Giorni Santi) 
for orchestra, by Timothy Mather Spelman. 1926. For Allen 
A. Brown Music Library. 

Hardon, Henry W. (for the donors), New York City. Bures of 
Suffolk, England and Burr of Massachusetts Bay Colony, New 
England. By Chauncey Rea Burr. New York. 1926. 

Harper, Henry Howard. High-lights of foreign travel. A memorable 
journey to Palestine, Egypt, Italy and the battle front in France. 
By Henry Howard Harper. Privately printed. New York. 
1925. 

Haskell, Mrs. Florence E., Alton, Illinois. Haskell, Hayner and allied 
families. Genealogical and biographical. Prepared and privately 
printed for Florence E. Haskell by the American Historical Society, 
Inc., 1926. In full morocco, inlaid with coat of arms in color. 

Homans, Miss Marian. 1 65 volumes, including 1 5 1 bound volumes of 
Littell's Living Age and 75 numbers of The Theatre. 

Hubbard, H. A collection of music for orchestra, violin and viola 
studies, also 95 pieces of sheet music. 



[66] 

John Rylands Library, Manchester, England. Eleven volumes, including 
the Catalogue of an exhibition of the earliest printed editions of 
the principal Greek and Latin Classics and of a few manuscripts. 
Manchester. 1 926. 

Lillie, Mrs. John. Sixty-nine volumes of miscellaneous works. 

Minns, Miss Susan. Genealogical histories of Minns and allied families 
in the line of descent of Miss Susan Minns. Issued under the 
editorial supervision of Ruth Lawrence. Bound by Stikeman, in 
full morocco, with coat of arms in color. Large quarto. 

Morse, Constance. Music and music-makers, by Constance Morse. New 
York. 1 926. Autographed copy. 

New England Railway Publishing Company, Boston. Complete files 
of the Pathfinder Guides published by the Company from 1 849 to 
March 1926, a record of train service in New England for 77 
years. 

Page, L. C. & Company. Thirty-four volumes of their current pub- 
lications. 

Pitt, S. A., City Librarian, Glasgow, Scotland. Twenty publications 
of the Glasgow Corporation Public Libraries. 

Pius X Institute of Liturgical Music of the College of the Sacred Heart, 
New York City- Catholic Education Series, music text book. 7 v. 
By Justine Ward, Elizabeth W. Perkins and Malton Boyce. 

Prescott, Rev. George J. A book in the Singhalese language with English 
translation. Said to be a book for children, used to promulgate 
love of animals and promote vegetarianism. This curious and in- 
teresting work consists of twelve folio pages, hand illustrated in 
color and was given to Mr. Prescott's father when he was consul 
at Ceylon about 1861. 

Reed, Mrs. Jennie Eva, Estate of. (Through the Atlantic National 
Bank, Executor.) 115 volumes and 50 booklets and pamphlets, 
including works of Dumas, Washington Irving and J. Fenimore 
Cooper. 

Siam, H. M. the Queen-Aunt of H. M. the King of Siam. Through the 
Siamese Minister, Siamese Legation, Washington, D. C. "Jata- 
katthakatha" Pali text in Siamese characters, ten volumes, 1925. 
(Studies of the Buddhist Scriptures.) 

Siam, H. R. H. Krom Khun Suddha Sininardh. Through the Siamese 
Minister, Siamese Legation, Washington, D. C. "Milindapanha" 
Pali text in Siamese characters, in one volume, 1925. 

Staats, Charles L., Estate of. Chamber music by Beethoven, Weber, 
Winter, Kreutzer and others, orchestral music by Lombard, and 
Gaspard's Collections of 38 airs for two clarinets. 

Storrow, Mrs. James J. (Helen Osborne Storrow). A gift of 2,298 
photographs which were collected by her father-in-law, James J. 
Storrow, who died in 1897. This constitutes one of the largest 



[67] 

gifts of photographs ever received by the Library and includes 
exterior and interior views of twenty English cathedrals and abbeys ; 
chateaux and churches of France; Italian palaces, theatres, shrines 
and statues; views in Algiers, Tunis, France, Germany, Italy and 
Sicily, and reproductions (in Braun prints) of the works of the 
great masters of painting and sculpture in the chief cities of Europe. 

Ware, Mrs. Henry, Brookline. Five framed pictures, a plaster bust of 
Apollo and a bas-relief of Venus, for the Branch libraries. 

West Roxbury Woman's Club. Education Committee. The charm of 
the antique, by Robert and Elizabeth Shackleton: Historic dress 
in America, by Elisabeth McClellan, 1607 to 1870, 2 v., 1904, 
1910: and a subscription to The International Studio for the year 
1926 for West Roxbury Branch. 

Whiting, Miss Lilian. Fifteen volumes of miscellaneous works, including 
Poems by Marie Corelli, and Letters of Louise Imogen Guiney, 
2 v., New York. 1926. 

William L. Clements Library. Randolph G. Adams, Librarian. Three 
volumes, including The Passports, printed by Benjamin Franklin 
at his Passy Press. One of 505 copies printed by Bruce Rogers 
at the Harvard University Press for The William L. Clements 
Library, November, 1925. 

OFFICIALS OF THE LIBRARY. 

Director, Charles F. D. Belden. 

Reference Librarian, Frank H. Chase. 

Executive Secretary, Delia Jean Deery. 

Auditor, Helen Schubarth. 

Bates Hall Centre Desk, Patent and Newspaper Department: Pierce E 
Buckley, Chief. 
Patent Division, William J. Ennis, Assistant in Charge. 
Newspaper Division, Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches.* 

Central Branch Issue Division, Alice V. Stevens, Assistant in Charge. 
Branch Binding Division, Marian A. McCarthy, Assistant in Charge. 
Shipping Division, Robert F. Dixon, Assistant in Charge. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 

Card Division, T. Francis Brennan, Assistant in Charge. 
Shelf Division, Michael McCarthy, Chief Classifier, in Charge. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 
Children. 
Children's Librarian, Central Library, Mary C. Toy. 
Editor: Zoltan Haraszti. 
Engineer and Janitor Department: William F. Quinn, Supt. of Buildings. 

* For Branch Librarians, see below. 



[68] 

Genealogy Division : Agnes C. Doyle, Assistant in Charge. 
Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief. 
Ordering Department: Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief. 
Periodical Room: Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 
Printing Department. Francis Watts Lee, Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department: Winthrop H. Chenery, Chief. 

Technology Division, George S. Maynard, Assistant in Charge. 
Music Division, Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 
Barton-Ticknor Division, Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge. 
Statistical Department: Horace L. Wheeler, Chief. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 

Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 

Boylston Station, Edith R. Nickerson. 

Brighton, Marian W. Brackett. 

Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

City Point, Alice L. Murphy. 

Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 

Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 

East Boston, Laura M. Cross. 

Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 

Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 

Hyde Park, Grace L. Murray. 

Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 

Jeffries Point, Margaret A. Calnan. 

Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 

Mattapan, 

Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mount Bowdoin, Theodora B. Scoff. 

Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 

Neponset, Ellen C. McShane. 

North End, Mary F. Curley. 

Orient Heights, Catherine F. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Katrina M. Sather. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Margaret A. Sheridan. 

Tyler Street, Lois Clark. 

Upham's Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



INDEX. 



Abbott, Gordon, appointed trustee, 1 . 

Accessions, 3, 32-37, 55-56. 

Bates Hall,. 40-41. 

Bindery, 49, 58. 

Books, accessions, 3, 32-37, 55-56; 
circulation, 3, 32-37, 42, 44, 46-47, 
51-54; total in Library, 56-57. 

Branches, 24, 25, 28, 31, 45-47, 50. 

Buildings, 1-2, 23, 24, 25-26, 28, 
49-50. 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 37. 

Children's Department and work with 
Schools, 27, 45. 

Columbia Phonograph Company, 
gift, 31. 

Circulation, 3, 32-37, 42, 44. 46-47, 
51-54. 

Concerts and lectures, 31, 47, 58-62. 

Coolidge, Elizabeth Sprague, gift of 
chamber concerts, 3 1 . 

Connolly, Msgr. elected Vice Presi- 
dent, 1. 

Currier, Guy W., elected President, 1. 

Director, report of, 30-51. 

Elliott, Mrs John, gift of paintings, 

4, 37. 

Employees, instruction, 24, 47, 48; 
officials, 67 ; retirements, 50. 

Estimates, 3. 

Examining Committee, 17; report of, 
22, 29. 

Exhibitions, 32, 47, 62-63. 

Finance, balance sheets, 18—21 ; esti- 
mates, 3 ; Examining Committee on, 
23; expenditures for books, 33-34; 
receipts, 2-3; trust funds, 4-17. 



General Phonograph Corporation, gift, 

31. 
Gifts and bequests, 4, 31, 37. 
Government Documents. (5ee Infor- 
mation Office.) 
Harvard University School of Business 

Administration, co-operation with, 28. 
Information Office, 42. 
Inter-library loans, 47. 
Kirstein, Louis E., gift, 4, 37 
Lectures, (See Concerts and lectures. 
Memorial Branch 31, 47. 
Murray, Michael J. retirement as trustee, 

resolution, 1 . 
Needs of the Library, 1-2, 23-24, 25- 

26, 28. 
Newspaper Room, 42. 
Open Shelf Room. (See Information 

Office.) 
Patent Room, 42. 
Pearse, Mrs. Langdon, gift, 4, 37. 
Periodical Room, 43. 
Printing Department, 25, 58. 
Publications, 28, 31, 38. 
Registeration, 32. 
Repairs and improvements, 1-2, 23— 

24, 25-26, 28, 30-31, 47, 49-50. 
Sargent, John Singer, gift of trustees of 

fund, 4, 37. 
Special Libraries, 25, 43-44. 
Staff, (See Employees.) 
Statistical Department, 44. 
Treasure Room, need of, 1-2, 24, 26, 

28, 44. 
Trustees, organization, 1; report 1-17. 
Victor Talking Machine Company, gift, 

31. 
Warren Street Branch, 31, 47. 



Central Library, Copley Square. 

Branch Libraries, January I, 1927. 



ch, 3a North Bennel St. . 

ch. Shawmut Ave. and West Brooklii 

h, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 

nch. Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 



City Proper. 

North End Br, 

South End Br: 

West End Bra 

Tyler Street B 
Brighton. 

Brighton Branch, Academy Hill R 

Allston Branch. 138 Brighton Ave. 

Faneuil Branch. 100 Brooks St. . 
Charlestown. 

Charlestown Branch. Monument Squ 
Dorchester. 



chester Bra 

Upham"s Corn! 
Lower Mills B 
Mattapan Bran 
Mount Bowdoi 
Neponset Bran 
East Boston. 

East Boston Bi 
Jeff, 



ich, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. . 

Branch. Washington, cor. Norfolk St, 
r Branch, Columbia Road. cor. Bird St. 
anch. Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

:h, 7 Babson St 

, Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St 
h, 362 Neponset Ave. . 

snch. 276-282 Meridian St. . 
Iranch. 195 Websler St. 



ch. 1030 Bennington St. 



rd Av 



Orient Heights B 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park Branch. Hi 
Jamaica Plain. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cc 

Boylston Station Branch, Depot Square 
RoXBURY. 

Fellowes Alhena-um Branch. 46 Milmont Si. 

Memorial Branch. Townsend. cor. Warren St 

Mount Pleasant Branch, Dudley, cor. Vine Si 

Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. 

Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
South Boston. 

South Boston Branch. 372 Broadway . 

anch, 396 Dorchester St. 
Broadway, 



Winthrop St 



South St. 



Andrew Square B 
City Point Brand 
West Roxbury. 

West Roxbury Br 



H St. 



,ch. Centn 



Roslindale Branch. Washinglo 



Ml. Vernon St. 
. Ashland St. . 




Area of City (-and only) 45.60 Square mile 



Population (Census of 1925), 779,620. 



.3"fGUp 
























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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 666 4 



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