(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

•v «* 




SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1927 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1928 



SEVENTY-S1XTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON % 

1927 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1928 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMFNT. 
8. IB. 28 : 2500 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON JANUARY 1, 1928. 



ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1932. 

GUY W. CURRIER. LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. 

Term expires April 30, 1928. Term expires April 30, 1929. 

CLIFTON H. DWINNELL. GORDON ABBOTT. 

Term expires April 30, 1930. Term expires April 30, 1931. 



CHARLES' F. D. BELDEN. 
DIRECTOR. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in I 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 14 of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made the first annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1 867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist cf one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected, each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926- 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

Bowditch, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1922- 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d., 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, b.s., 1927- 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923-1927. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

Hilliard, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

Kirstein, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 



Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921-26. 

Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. . 

Ticknor, Georce, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to Mav 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 18^, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton, May 8, 1908. to February 6, 1917; WlLLIAM F. 
Kenney, February 13, 1917, to Mav 7, 1920; Rev. Alexander 
Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; Msgr. Arthur T. 
Connolly, April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein, 
June 13, 1924 to June 19, 1925; Hon. Michael J. Murray, June 
19, 1925 to July 2, 1926; Guy W. Currier, July 2, 1926 to May 
2, 1927; Msgr. Arthur T. Connolly since May 2, 1927. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; since 
1923, Director.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 - December 16, 1874. 

JEWETT, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858- January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., Superintendent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A.. M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d., Librarian, October 1, 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

Dwight, Theodore F., Librarian. April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d., Librarian, February 11, 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

WHITNEY, James L., A.M., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 — January 31, 
1903. 

WADLIN, HORACE G.. LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903 -March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 1917- June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll.b., Director, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1926. 



Departments. 
fCentral Library, Copley Square .... 
fEast Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 
§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
| Fellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
"fCharlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
tBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Road 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
JLower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
JSouth End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. . 
f Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 
JRosIindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
fWest Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. . 
§Mattapan Branch, 7 Babson St. . 
tNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. . 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponsel Ave. . 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 202 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch. 138 Brighton Ave. 
JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 
JMt. Pleasant Branch, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 
JTyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 
tWest End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Cornpr Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
JMemorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
§Boylston Station Branch, The Lamartine, Depot Square 
§Orient Heights Branch, 1030 Bennington St. 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal BIdg., Broadway . 
§Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. . 
|Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St, 

tFaneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St 

§Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. 

§Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. 

JBaker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. 



Jan. 
May 



^Opened. 
May 2, 1854 
28, 1871 
1. 1872 
July 16, 1873 
Jan. 5, 1874 

5, 1874 
25, 1875 

7, 1875 
1877 
1877 

3, 1878 

6, 1880 



Jan. 

Jan. 
*June 

Aug., 

Sept., 
'Dec. 
*Jan. 



*Dec. 27, 1881 

*Oct., 1882 

*Jan. 1. 1883 

*Nov. 1, 1886 

*Mar. 11, 1889 

*Nov. 12. 1890 

*A P r. 29, 1892 

*Jan. 16, 1896 

Feb. 1, 1896 

*Mar. 16. 1896 

*May 1, 1896 

*Jan. 18, 1897 

*Nov. 1. 1897 

*June 25, 1901 

*JuIy 18, 1906 

*JuIy 15, 1907 



Jan. 
*Mar. 
♦Mar. 
*Oct. 



1. 1912 

4. 1914 

5, 1914 
15. 1921 



Jan. 15, 1927 



tl In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. * As a delivery station. f In building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. J In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. || The lessee of the Fel- 
lowes Athenaeum, a private library association. * Under agreement with Harvard. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees 1 

Balance Sheet 26 

Report of the Examining Committee 30 

Report of the Director 37 

Appendix to the Report of the Director 62 

Index to the Annual Report, 1927 81 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Present Library Building Frontispiece 

Boylston Street Building Facing page 22 

Mason Street Building Facing page 54 

Map of the Library System At the end 



To His Honor Malcolm E. Nichols, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31, 1927, being the seventy-sixth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

Col. William A. Gaston died on July 1 7, and on September 
2, Mr. Clifton H. Dwinnell was appointed in his place for the 
term ending April 30, 1930. At the annual meeting on May 2, 
Msgr. A. T. Connolly was elected President, Mr. Louis E. 
Kirstein, Vice President, and Miss Delia Jean Deery, Clerk. 

IMMEDIATE NEEDS. 

The members of the Board of Trustees are deeply apprecia- 
tive of the consideration given to their request for an appropri- 
ation by which it has been made possible to safeguard more 
adequately the important treasures of the Library. Urgent as 
was the need for these precautionary measures, it is desirable at 
this time to call to your attention certain other matters having to 
do with the rehabilitation of the Central Library Building in 
Copley Square. 

Further protection from fire hazard should be secured by en- 
closing, where practicable, the various stairways in the stacks 
and the book carrier shaft, and by providing fireproof partitions, 
with fire doors, to the stock room and storage room in the base- 
ment. 

Among the necessary major repairs that should be undertaken 
as soon as the money can be secured are : the reconstruction of the 
vaulting under the Dartmouth Street granite platform in front of 
the Library, and the relaying of the platform; the renovation of 
Bates Hall and the Delivery Room, including cleaning, paint- 



[2] 

ing, and the refinishing of the woodwork and wall cases; the 
repair and replacement of worn floors in various parts of the 
building. 

In order to improve still further the ventilation of the building, 
the present roof exhaust fan should be replaced by a modern fan 
of larger capacity with its appropriate motor: the Guastavino 
tile vaulting in various parts of the building should be repaired 
where necessary; the roof of the Annex on Blagden Street, 
including skylights, flashings and ventilators should also be 
renovated. 

The requirements of the Central Building, pressing as they are, 
should not be allowed to obscure the crying need of a number of 
the Branch Libraries for better and larger accommodations. 
The Branches are the channels through which nine-tenths of the 
circulation of the Library is carried on ; they must not be allowed 
to become clogged. In many cases the service of juvenile readers 
and students interferes seriously with the use of the Branch Libra- 
ries by adults; ample room must be provided for the efficient 
service of all ages, if the balance of the Library's work for the 
community is to be properly maintained. 

In some cases this cramped condition can be eliminated only 
by the erection of new buildings especially designed for library 
purposes; in others additional space or better quarters may be 
rented. The Libraries at Allston, Andrew Square, Jeffries 
Point, Mattapan, Mt. Bowdoin, Parker Hill and South Boston 
are in pressing need of new or greatly enlarged accommodations. 
In all of these Branches a rapid expansion of the Library's work 
is possible if adequate quarters are provided; the present year's 
circulation of 95,000 volumes at Mattapan shows an increase of 
375 '/r in the past five years. 

No less important than the needs of the established Branches 
are the urgent demands of certain sections of the city, now re- 
mote from any library, for a fair share in Public Library service. 
The Trustees have caused a careful survey of the entire city to 
be made with a view to determining the relative claims of various 
districts to new branches or improved facilities. As soon as the 
existing library system has been put on an efficient basis, the task 



[3] 

of providing new branches in certain localities should be under- 
taken without delay. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the past year these receipts were : 

Annual appropriation $1,104,569.00 

Special appropriation (Annex balance) ..... 11 ,799.39 

Library Building, Addition, etc 2,416.34 

Income from Trust Funds ...... 26,804.66 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds income of previous years . . 62,074.32 

$1,207,663.71 

Receipts which are accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the past year 
have been as follows : 

From fines $18,529.10 

From sales of catalogues, etc. ........ 100.61 

From commission on telephone stations ...... 696.34 

From payments for lost books . . . . . . . . 1,154.14 

Interest on bank deposits ......... 45.32 

Refund on contract . . . . . . . . . 2.00 



Total $20,527.51 



ESTIMATES FOR 1928. 

The estimates for the maintenance of the Library for the year 

ending December 31, 1 928 in segregated budget form are as 
follows: 

A— Personal service . ' $773,644.00 

B — Service other than personal ... . . . . 220,522.00 

C — Equipment . 1 78,290.00 

D— Supplies 39,680.00 

E — Materials 28,900.00 

F — Special items 864.00 

Total . . . . . . . . . . $1,241,900.00 



[4] 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the year there were added to the Central Library and 
branches 98,487 volumes as against 93,867 in 1926. Of these 
85,766 were acquired by purchase and 1 2,72 1 by gift, exchange, 
etc. The total expenditure for books, periodicals, newspapers 
and other library material from City appropriation and Trust 
Funds income, was $1 52,414.34 The total number of volumes 
in the Central Library and branches is 1 ,418,489. 

CIRCULATION. 

The total number of books issued for home use during the 
year was 3,705,657, as against 3,499,137 for 1926, a gain of 
206,520 volumes. 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS. 

The Trustees are glad to report the following gifts and be- 
quests other than books and related material, during 1927: 

In May, a bequest of $1000 was received under the will of 
Helen Leah Reed as a memorial to Guilford S. Reed, and was 
funded as the "Guilford Reed Fund", the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books of non-fiction; in July a gift of $25,000 
was received from Helen Storrow and Elizabeth Randolph 
Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson Storrow, Senior, and 
was funded as the "James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) 
Fund", the income to be used for the purchase of Italian books; 
in October there was received a check for $29.88 payment in 
final settlement of the residue of the estate of Sarah E. Pratt, to 
be added to the "Sarah R. Pratt Fund" ; and in November, a 
gift of $1000 from Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, to be added to the 
"Louis E. Kirstein Fund" established in 1925, being the third 
contribution to the fund. 

Many important gifts of books and other library material have 
been received during the year. A detailed statement of these 
may be found in the Director's report. 



[5] 
MORE MONEY FOR BOOKS. 

There is no city in the United States in which the public library 
unites so completely as does that of the City of Boston the ac- 
cumulation of a great mass of valuable reference material with 
the provision of popular books for circulation. The possession of 
its great reference collection, built up with intelligent care during 
seventy-five years, has made the Boston Public Library an in- 
stitution of national importance; its treasures are a source of 
pride to the city and have been a potent factor in maintaining the 
position of Boston as a center of scholarship. 

In the early days of its history the Library was the recipient of 
many unique collections of books and of funds, large for those 
days, which enabled it to take and hold a position of leadership 
among the public libraries of the country. At present, however, 
its total invested funds amount to $755,000 and produce an in- 
come of less than $27,000 yearly, which seems pitifully small 
compared with the $22,647,000 endowment of the Reference 
Department of the New York Public Library. The funds which 
we have testify to the munificent public spirit of friends of the 
Library in the past; it is only through a similar munificence that 
the Library will be able to hold its place and to afford to scholars 
in Boston the assistance on which they have always counted. 

The other branch of the Library's work, the circulation of 
books to the people, could also be carried forward more rapidly 
if the city's appropriation for books were increased. The Boston 
Public Library acquired last year a total of 98,487 volumes. 
In the same year the Cleveland Public Library acquired 201 , 1 74 
volumes. The circulation of books in Boston showed a gain 
of 206,520 over the preceding year; in Cleveland the gain in 
circulation was 807,005. Could there be any clearer proof of 
the degree to which the acquisition of books promotes their circu- 
lation? If a library is to help and encourage people to read, it 
must provide the books which they desire. Old books may be 
invaluable for reference, but with a few exceptions they make 
little appeal to borrowers. The Board concurs heartily in the 
recommendation of the Examining Committee that the budget 
item for the purchase of books should be materially increased. 



[6] 



THE GEORGE F. BAKER BRANCH LIBRARY. 

The most important step taken in Library extension during the 
year was the agreement with the authorities of Harvard Uni- 
versity for the consolidation of the great collections of material 
relating to business, contained in the George F. Baker Library of 
the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration and in 
the Public Library of the City of Boston ; the terms of the agree- 
ment constitute the Baker Library a branch of the Boston Public 
Library. 

Each of these collections consists roughly of two sections, one 
comprising live books on the practical aspects of business and the 
methods of carrying it on, the other made up of material relating 
to the past history of business, and consisting largely of reports of 
one sort or another. The live books belonging to the Public 
Library will be retained by it for the convenience of persons 
actively engaged in business who use the Copley Square build- 
ing. To the research worker, however, completeness is of far 
more importance than convenience, and the consolidation of the 
historical material belonging to the two libraries will be for him 
a great boon. It happens that the two collections supplement 
each other admirably, the Public Library being strong in materi- 
al from the earlier periods of American business, while the Baker 
Library has vast quantities of matter covering American business 
in the present century, together with a large number of items from 
foreign countries. 

The orderly consolidation of all this material in Brighton for 
the free use of the public makes accessible to the people of Boston 
the best collection in this country for the study of business history. 
As in the similar arrangement with the Boston Medical Library, 
entered into in 1 906, the books transferred will remain the proper- 
ty of the Public Library of the City of Boston, which may recall 
them at any time ; they will be administered for the Boston Public 
Library by a staff of experts; and, in addition, the citizens of 
Boston are given the right to use an exhaustive accumulation of 
valuable material to which they would otherwise have no access. 

An important feature of the agreement, which follows, pledges 
the co-operation of Harvard University in bringing to accomp- 



[7] 

lishment that long cherished dream of the Board of Trustees and 
the Director of the Library — the establishment of a business 
reference branch in downtown Boston. 



Agreement by and between the Trustees of the Boston 
Public Library and the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. 

Whereas, in order that the material of the Boston Public Library 
relating to business and business education and business administration and 
the material of the Harvard Business Library may be made available in 
such a way as to render the greatest practicable service to the community 
and to the cause of business education and research at a minimum cost, 
it is hereby agreed as follows: 

1 . The Trustees of the Boston Public Library shall constitute the 
Harvard Business Library, located in that part of Boston known as 
Brighton, a depositary for books and other material as hereinafter pro- 
vided, the Harvard Business Library becoming to this extent a branch 
of the Boston Public Library. The books and other material so deposited 
shall be combined with similar material of the Harvard Business Library 
and the two catalogued jointly. 

2. The Harvard Business Library shall furnish the physical facilities 
and equipment as rapidly as possible to take over such books and material 
as shall be agreed upon, thus relieving the Boston Public Library of 
considerable expense for operation and releasing space in the Boston 
Public Library for other uses. 

3. The Harvard Business Library will, as rapidly as its resources 
permit, prosecute the work of introducing the books and material into its 
shelves and cataloguing them. Such sum or sums as the Trustees of the 
Boston Public Library may at any time and from time to time before 
completion of this work contribute to its prosecution the Harvard Business 
School will devote to the purpose, and by so much will the work be 
expedited and the full use of the collection become available earlier. 

4. The Boston Public Library will furnish the Harvard Business 
Library with a copy of the essential information in its existing catalogue 
relating to the transferred material. 

5. The books and other material transferred to the library of the 
Harvard School of Business Administration by the Boston Public Library, 
with the other material belonging to the Business Library and any additions 
however made, shall be available for use by such persons as would be 
entitled to use the same if contained in the Central Building of the Boston 
Public Library, subject to any restrictions made in an instrument of gift 
of any such books or material and to reasonable restrictions to the use 



[8] 

of particular items of books or material which may be made by the 
authorities of the Harvard Business School Library. It is understood that 
the Library of the Harvard School of Business Administration will afford 
reasonable opportunity for such use in its library building, so far as such 
use is consistent with the ordinary and usual service for which the facilities 
of the library are adapted. In the discretion of its authorities, however, 
the Library of the Harvard School of Business Administration may re- 
strict such use in its library building to the extent of its facilities for service; 
in case of such restriction the Boston Public Library may provide for 
such use in its Central Building, and may call for such books and material 
as are required from time to time by its card-holders for such use, in ac- 
cordance with and subject to such reasonable regulations as may be from 
time to time agreed upon between the authorities of the two libraries. 

6. Both libraries are to co-operate to as full an extent as is practicable 
in the inter-loan of books, to the end that the material of each shall be so 
used as to be of maximum benefit to the community. 

7. The books and material intended to be covered by this agreement 
are those pertinent to the work of the Harvard Business Library which 
are not, in the opinion of the Librarian of the Boston Public Library, 
needed for current use of the Boston Public Library. The Librarian of 
the Boston Public Library may at any time recall from deposit specific 
material for which need has arisen. 

8. All details as to the transferring of the books and material to the 
Harvard Business Library under this agreement shall be under the direction 
of the Librarians of the two Libraries. Books and material so transferred 
shall remain the property of the Boston Public Library. Lists of books 
and materials actually delivered shall be signed by the two Librarians or 
someone authorized to sign on their behalf. 

9. It is expected that the arrangement for which provision is made in 
this agreement will be permanent. It is, however, understood that if it 
appears to either party to be undesirable it may be terminated upon con- 
ditions to be the subject of consideration at the time, but which, so far 
as possible, will work a minimum of damage to either party and which 
will leave both with as complete collections of books and material as is 
possible under the circumstances. 

1 0. Each party shall bear the risk of loss by fire or other hazard or 
by theft; it being understood that the Harvard Business Library will give 
the same degree of care to the books and material of both parties. 

1 1 . The two institutions, that is to say, the Trustees of the Boston 
Public Library and the President and Fellows of Harvard College, stand 
ready to co-operate in the establishment, as a branch of the Boston Public 
Library, of a business reference library in the downtown section of Boston, 
to be established, operated and maintained by and in connection with the 
two Libraries. The expense of such a reference library would have to be 



[9] 

borne presumably by the business community, or at any rate by some per- 
son or persons other than the two Libraries. 

In Witness Whereof the parties hereto have caused their official 
seals and signatures to be affixed by their duly authorized officers this 
fifteenth day of January 1927. 

The President and Fellows of Harvard College 
By: A. Lawrence Lowell (signed) 

President. 
The Board of Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston. 

By: Guy W. Currier (signed) 
President. 
Attest: Charles F. D. Belden (signed) 



PROTECTION OF SOME OF THE LIBRARY'S TREASURES. 

The necessity of more adequately protecting the rare and valu- 
able special collections of the Library having been considered by 
the Trustees for some time, the following communication was ad- 
dressed to Your Honor on November 27, 1926: 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

Copley Square, Boston, Mass. 
November 27, 1926. 
Hon. Malcolm E. Nichols, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 
Sir: 

The Trustees of the Public Library desire to bring again to your at- 
tention the urgent necessity for the relocation and more adequate protection 
of the treasures of the library, consisting of many volumes whose value 
cannot be estimated, and thousands which, if lost, could not be replaced. 

Reports have been submitted relating to the necssary changes and 
reconstruction to be undertaken in the Central Library Building for the 
safe-keeping of such material as follows: 

In March 1 926, from John C. Paige & Co. ; in April, from the office 
of the Building Commissioner, and in May, from O'Brion, Russell & Co. 

The Paige report was referred to you on March 1 2, and by you for- 
warded to the Budget Commissioner for consideration. The additional 
reports were obtained and submitted at the latter' s request. 

The reports are practically unanimous in their findings and recom- 
mendations; namely: 



[10] 

Change the present Music Room into a Treasure Room with the 
necessary fire-proof construction and equipment, and reconstruct the present 
Barton-Ticknor Room and the North Gallery with fire-proof equipment. 

These changes will allow the safe-guarding, against fire, of the valuable 
collections, and permit some additional shelving, the need for which is 
already pressing. 

Contemplated changes also include the installation of the sprinkler 
system in the Bindery and Printing Departments in the annex, and of more 
importance, the completion of the system in the basement of the Central 
Building. 

Careful estimates have been submitted as to the probable cost of the 
necessary and desired changes. It is expected that contracts can be let 
covering all the work, and including incidental expenses, for amounts not 
exceeding $260,000 in the aggregate. 

The Board commends this expenditure to you as the only plan for 
meeting a serious situation relating to the proper care of the treasures of 
the library, and earnestly urges upon you the importance of a special 
appropriation for this purpose. 

Very truly yours 

The Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By: Guy W. Currier (signed) 
President. 



In response to this request, and on Your Honor's recommen- 
dation the City Council on December 12, 1927 passed the 
following order: 

"ORDERED: that the sum of two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated to be expended by 
the Trustees of the Public Library for the Central Library Building, 
Fireproof ing, Improvements, etc., and that to meet said appropriation 
the City Treasurer be authorized to issue, from time to time, on the 
request of the Mayor, bonds or certificates of indebtedness of the 
city to said amount." 

TRUST FUNDS. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money, and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare works, which 
give value and rank to a great educational institution but for 



[11] 

which they hesitate to expend public funds appropriated for 

more popular and pressing use. 

As a matter of interest to the public, the Board has pleasure in 

listing herewith the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. 

Artz Fund — Donation from Miss ViCTORlNE Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago; the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose, of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the 
"Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by Joshua Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by John P- BlGELOW in August, 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of ROBERT CHARLES BlL- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purposes of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1 903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $100,000.00 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. INGERSOLL Bowditch. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 
per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. CALEB Davis BRADLEE to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 
cent Bond $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JOSEPH H. CENTER, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 



[12] 

additions to the library. Received in 1905. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds $1 ,600.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bonds 32,300.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one-half 

per cent Bond 6,000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1927. 8.89 

$39,908.89 
Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. BENTON of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $15,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . . 42,000 
City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond . 20,000.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one- 
half per cent Bond 20,000.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Four per cent 

Bond 6,000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1927 . 117.74 

$103,117.74 
Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Frank CLEMENT, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond ....... $2,800.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1927. 54.41 

$2,854.41 



[13] 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of Abram E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $4,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond 1 00.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1927. 40.00 

$4,140.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of Sarah A. Matchett, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of DANIEL Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston. Received in 1 900. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on the 
Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use of 
the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of such 
a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trustees 
expressed a preference for books relative to government and political 
economy. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of Isabella STEWART 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 
1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 



[14] 

of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,652.50 
Green Fund — Donations of Dr. SAMUEL A. GREEN of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond .... 1 ,500.00 

City of Boston Three per cent Bond . . . 500.00 

$2,000.00 
Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE Harris, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested of interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of THOMAS B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1 884. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000,00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of FRANKLIN P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $3,600,00 

Cash, December 31, 1927 32.40 

$3,632.40 
David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KlMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $9,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond 1 ,000 

$10,000.00 
Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donation of $1,000 made by Mr. Louis E. 
KlRSTEIN in October 1925, "to be used for any purpose of the Li- 
brary that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 

October, 1925 $1,000.00 

October, 1926 1,000.00 

November, 1927 1 ,000.00 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $3,000.00 



[15] 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KATHERINE 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott Lawrence, of Boston. 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
a permanent value. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward Lawrence, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500,00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of which 
is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as shall be 
fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John A. Lewis 
Library." Received in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500,00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of Charles Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall deem 
consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $2,500.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 



[16] 

was received, the same being cne-half of the net amount received from 
the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under an 
indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and Amor 
L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. McKendry, 
of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 1870. The 
above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 1924, and the 
Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the same under the 
name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books and other library material for the Mattapan 
Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 1,780.00 
Cash, December 31, 1927 1.44 

$11,781.44 
John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PAPYRUS 

Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 

member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 

purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 

in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 

of books for said library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 

20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of 

a free Public Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 

time being. 
Pierce Fund — Donation made by HENRY L. PlERCE, Mayor of the 

City, November 29, 1 873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1 873. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $4,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond . 1 ,000.00 

$5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 14th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. 
Distribution of residue of estate on May 7, 1924, $964.30. 
By vote of the Trustees the bequest to be funded as the Sarah E. 



[17] 

Pratt Fund, the income to be applied to the purchase of books for the 
Dorchester Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . 1 ,400.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent Bond 90.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December, 1927. 4.18 

$1,494.18 
Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial to 
Guilford S. Reed ; the income to be applied to the purchase of books 
of non-fiction. 

Deposited in Dorchester Savings Bank . . . $1,000.00 
John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. 

Deposited in Dorchester Savings Bank . . . $3,858.24 
Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFlELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33,33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $41,800.00 
City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 2,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bonds 6,000.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent Bonds 2,000.00 

$61,800.00 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RlCHARD BLACK SEWALL: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely, To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 (twenty-five thousand dollars) to be added to 
their funds and the income to be used for the purchase of books." 
Received in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of FRANCIS SKINNER: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 
judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 



[18] 

"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 I years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have taken if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond ' $40,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds ... 1 0,250.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond 200.00 

1 6 shares Worcester Street Railway Company . 1 ,280.00 

Cash, December 31, 1927 2.14 



$51,732.14 
South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Storrow 
and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson 
Storrow, Senior; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 
Deposited in Boston Five Cent Savings Bank . $10,000.00 
" Dorchester Savings Bank . . 5,000.00 

" Suffolk Savings Bank . . . 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 

to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thous- 



[19] 

and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass.. or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1 908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61, has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George TlCKNOR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four 
thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After 
the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less than 
one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five years 
next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for reference 
or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library build- 
ing. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trusts 
and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and money 
are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 
In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said be- 
quests on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the 
care and custody of the books and manuscripts. Received in 1871 . 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — - Donation by WlLLIAM C. TODD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be ex- 
pended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other 
countries. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 
City of Boston Three and three-quarters per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

$50,000.00 



[20] 

Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late DANIEL TrEADWELL, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 1 7, 1 872, said bequest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $1,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 3, 1 00.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . . . 9,850.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31 , 1927. . . 37.69 



$13,987.69 
Tufts Fund — Bequest of NATHAN A. TUFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half 

per cent Bond $ 100.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per 

cent Bonds . ... . 10,000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1927. . 31.77 

$10,131.77 



[21] 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of GEORGE C. Wales: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of MEHITABLE C. C. WlL- 
SON, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library, Received in 1913. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 ,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of JAMES LYMAN WHITNEY, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising during 
the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the name of 
my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said fund after 
its accumulation or so much of said income as may be required, to 
be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are sick and in 
need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem most 
worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income from 
said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just mentioned 
shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond 1,000.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . 4,000.00 

$5,000.00 
James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 



[22] 



thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bonds $1,200.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 2,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . . 10,500.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1927. . 40.64 

$13,740.64 
In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trustees 
of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 
Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in Apiil, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 

Invested in Citv of Boston Four per cent Bond . . $150.00 
Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz. : 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch $6,800.00 

Samuel Appleton, late of Boston. . . . 1,000.00 

Sally Inman Kast Shepard 1,000.00 

James Brown, late of Cambridge .... 500.00 

Andrew Carnegie ....... 980.75 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 200.00 

James Nightingale 100.00 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . . 335.13 

$10,915.88 




BOYLSTON STREET BUILDING. 
Location of Library, 1858-1895. 



[23] 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC 

Artz Fund 
Bates Fund 
Bigelow Fund 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 
Bowditch Fund 
Bradlee Fund 
Joseph H. Center Fund 
Central Library Building Fund 
Children's Fund 
Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 
Cutter Fund 
Elizabeth Fund 
Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 
Franklin Club Fund 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 
Morris Gest Fund 
Green Fund . 
Charlotte Harris Fund 
Thomas B. Harris Fund 
Hyde Fund . 
David P. Kimball Fund 
Louis E. Kirstein Fund 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 
Abbott Lawrence Fund . 
Edward Lawrence Fund 
Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 
Charles Greely Loring Memorial F 
Charles Mead Fund 
The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 
John Boyle O'Reilly Fund . 
Phillips Fund 
Pierce Fund 
Sarah E. Pratt Fund 
uuilford Reed Fund 
/ohn Singer Sargent Fund 
Scholfield Fund 
Sewall Fund 
Skinner Fund 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund 
Mary Elizabath Stewart Fund 
James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund 
Ticknor Fund 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 
Townsend Fund 
Treadwell Fund 
Nathan A. Tufts Fund 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fun 
Wales Fund 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
James Lyman Whitney Fund 
Mehitable C. C Wilson Fund 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

$ 10,000.00 

50,000.00 

1,000.00 

100,000.00 

10,000.00 
1.000.00 

39,908.89 

1 50.00 

103,117.74 

2,000.00 

2,854.41 

4,140.00 

25,000.00 
6,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
2,652.50 
2,000.00 

10,000.00 
1.000.00 
3.632.40 

10.000.00 
3,000.00 

10.000.00 

10.000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

500.00 

2,500.00 

11.781.44 
1.000.00 

30.000.00 

5.000.00 

1494.18 

1 ,000.00 

3.858.24 

61,800.00 

25,000.00 

51.732.14 

100.00 

3.500.00 

25,000.00 
4,000.00 

50,000.00 
4.000.00 

13.987.69 

10,131.77 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

13,740.64 
1,000.00 



$755,082.00 



[24] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 



The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered 
by the Examining Committee of the year. The recommenda- 
tions of this Committee have received careful attention. The 
membership of the Committee consisted of the following persons : 



Miss Anna M. Bancroft. 
Mr. Jeffrey R. Brackett. 
Mr. Herman L. Bush. 
Mr. Frank W. Buxton. 
Mr. Sidney S. Conrad. 
Mr. Henry V. Cunningham. 
Hon. James M. Curley. 
Mr. Frederic H. Curtiss. 
Mr. William J. Davidson. 
Prof. Arthur S. Dewing. 
Mrs. David A. Ellis. 
Mr. Albert W. Finlay. 



Mr. Francis L. Higginson. 

Mr. David H. Howie. 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson. 

Mr. Melville D. Liming. 

Gen. Edward L. Logan. 

Mr. Thomas W. McMahon. 

Mr. Percival Merritt. 

Miss Jane L. Mesick. 

Mr. Samuel Silverman. 

Mis. Francis E. Slattery. 

Prof. H. W. Tyler. 

Mrs. Barrett Wendell. 



CONCLUSION. 

The members of the Board would call to your attention the 
illuminating reports of the Examining Committee and the Direc- 
tor which are, as customary, appended hereunto. They deserve 
to be read by all those interested in the work of a great educa- 
tional and recreational institution of the City of Boston. 

During the year the activities of the Library Department, ever 
growing in variety and magnitude, have moved smoothly and 
well. This result is owing to the loyal and faithful service of 
the Director, the Chiefs of Departments and other persons in 
the service of the Library. We are pleased to be able again to 
commend the substantially uniform excellence of their work. 

Arthur T. Connolly 
Louis E. Kirstein 
Guy W. Currier 
Clifton H. Dwinnell 
Gordon Abbott 



BALANCE SHEET. 
1927 



[26] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing and 



Binding departments) . 










$536,140.25 




Temporary employees 




99,410.84 


$635,551.09 






Service other than personal 








Contract work (outside) . 




281.90 


\ 


Advertising 










108.55 




Transportation of persons 










1 ,369.29 




Cartage and freight 










12,284.91 




Light and power 










13,313.92 




Rent, taxes and water . 










17,303.74 




Surety bond and insurance 










17.50 




Communication 










2.640.90 




Cleaning towels, etc. 










1,273.07 




Removal of snow and ashes 










364.20 




Medical 










9.00 




Expert 










15,968.38 




Fees 










70.00 




Central plant repairs .... 




83,567.71 


148,573.07 






To expenditure for equipment 








Machinery .... 




681.08 




Motorless vehicles .... 




851.50 




Furniture and fittings 




14,563.76 




Office 




950.81 




Books: 








City appropriation i 


1 1 5,479.7? 






Trust funds income 19,455.25 








plus transfer to 








London account 5,000.00 


24,455.2f 


1 39,935.00 




Newspapers : 








City appropriation 


1.317.76 


» 




Todd fund .... 


2.347.0C 


1 3,664.76 




Periodicals .... 




10,499.65 




Photographs .... 






175.20 




Lantern slides . . . . . 






306.45 




Tools and instruments 






1 ,540.43 




General plant equipment 






1 ,979.94 










175,148.58 






To expenditure for supplies 








Office .... 




7,352.05 




Food and ice 










606.59 




Fuel 










22,047.06 




Forage for animals 










29.25 




Medical 










18.20 




Laundry, cleaning, toilet 










2,021.97 




Agricultural 










699.67 




Chemicals and disinfectants 










85.23 




General plant supplies 










2,964.09 










35,824.11 






Carried forward 












$995,096.85 



[27] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1927 



By City Appropriation 1927 $1,104,569.00 

Income from Trust funds ..... 26,804.66 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 700.00 

Interest on deposit in London ..... 211.85 



By Balances Brought Forward from 1926: 
Trust funds income, City Treasury . 
Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 
Library Building Addition, equipping and furnishing 
Library Building Addition, etc. 



58,034.16 
4,040.16 
6,626.30 
6,438.33 

1 1 ,799.39 
2,416.34 



Cr. 



$ 27,716.51 



89,354.68 



Carried fonvard 



$117,071.19 



[28] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forward ..... 




$995,096.85 


To expenditure for material 






Building ...... 


498.00 






3,584 20 




General plant ..... 


11,090.31 


15,172.51 






Special item 






Pension ...... 


863.50 




A. L. Whitney Fund (Employees' sick benefit) 


260.00 


1,123.50 


Binding Department: 






Salaries ...... 


54,718.89 




Stock 


6,114.30 




Equipment ...... 


470.21 




Light 


56.43 




Repairs ...... 


116.13 




Outside work ....... 


.70 




Electrical materials, ice and supplies . 


39.37 


61,516.03 






Printing Department: 






Salaries ...... 


13,628.02 




Stock 


4,385.39 




Equipment ...... 


6,742.33 




Light 


37.62 




Repairs ...... 


1,157.74 




Outside work ...... 


150.51 




Insurance ...... 


89.61 




Telegrams, ice and supplies .... 


54.38 


26,245.60 






To Amount Paid into City Treasury: 






From Fines ...... 


18,529.10 




Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 


100.61 




Payments for lost books .... 


1,154.14 




Interest on bank deposit .... 


45.32 




Commission on telephone stations 


696.34 




Refund 


2.00 


20,527.51 






To Balance, December 31, 1927: 






Trust funds income on deposit in London 


1,133.54 




City appropriation on deposit in London . 


4,198.58 




Trust funds income, City Treasury . 


60,332.04 




James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 


7,138.33 




Interest on deposit in London .... 


211.85 


73,014.34 






Balance Unexpended: 






General appropriation . 


35,255.63 




Central Library Building Addition, etc. 


2,416.34 




Central Library Building Addition, Equipping 


11,799.39 


49,471.36 








1,242.167.70 



[29] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1927 



Brought forward 
By Receipts. 
From Fines 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books 
Interest on bank deposit 
Refund 



$1 



Cr. 

17,071.19 



18,529.10 

100.61 

696.34 

1,154.14 

45.32 

2.00 



20,527.51 



$1,242,167.70 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

To the Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee takes pleasure in submitting its 
report for the year 1927. 

The twenty-four members appointed by you for the year 
1927-8 have been divided into six sub-committees to examine 
into and report upon as many special aspects of the Library, 
while all members form one sub-committee on Branches. The 
Examining Committee has accepted the reports of these sub- 
committees substantially as made, and commends their recom- 
mendations to the Trustees. 

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

(a) Since the report of last year, the rewiring of the main 
Library, which was obsolete and dangerous, has been under- 
taken, but not yet completed. Other repairs, also, for which 
appropriations were made last year, have been started but not 
finished. This work should be expedited. 

(b) The money appropriated in the past for the up-keep 
of the main Library has not been sufficient to keep the property 
in proper repair so that the Library can give adequate service to 
the citizens of Boston. The committee therefore has submitted 
several detailed suggestions for repairs to floors, to the roof, to 
the Lecture Hall, and for remodelling the old manuscript room. 

(c) The committee recommends an increase in the book 
appropriation to $175,000, as the money now appropriated is 
not sufficient to take care properly of the requirements at the main 
Library and its branches. 



[31] 

(J) Although there have been requests for additional 
branch libraries, the committee feels that the first obligation of 
the Library is to "put its house in order" and make the necessary 
repairs and improvements in the central building and branches. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Central Library. The committee made a thorough investi- 
gation and examination of the Central Library building. It is 
quite apparent that the building has not been kept in good con- 
dition and that many changes are needed and much repairing 
work must be done. It is indeed gratifying to learn that the City 
government has appropriated by a loan order $250,000 for 
extensive alterations and changes in the building, and that this 
sum, together with various budgetary provisions, will permit the 
Trustees to remedy many defects in the building and permit of 
some of the changes and alterations desired. The committee is 
advised that from this money, the roof, now in poor condition, 
will be repaired; that the inadequate lighting and defective 
wiring of the building will be cared for ; that the rearrangement 
suggested by the committee on Buildings and Equipment of 
last year, and as proposed by the Trustees, of the present Music 
Room and the Barton-Ticknor Room and the long North Gallery 
will be effected ; that the Treasure Room will become a reality ; 
and that the sprinkler system will be extended and certain other 
general repairs will be made. 

Our Library is recognized as one of the most beautiful build- 
ings in the city, if not in the country, and its beauty should not be 
permitted to suffer by reason of neglect. The committee does 
not know just what general repairs will be made from the funds 
available to the Trustees, but makes the following recommenda- 
tions for repairs and installations in the event that the Trustees 
have not included them within the general repairs. 

The floors throughout the general reading and exhibition 
rooms are in unsatisfactory condition. The beautiful rooms are 
marred because of a repaired or cracked floor. It is suggested 
that a rubber tiled floor similar to that now used in the Children's 
Room be used more extensively throughout the building. 



[32] 

The committee is advised that the Trustees propose to sub- 
stitute, in certain portions of the Library, steel stacks for books 
in place of the wooden ones. This policy should be carried on 
until all the book stacks in the Library, for which more adequate 
protection is desirable, are made of steel. 

Our examination of the basement discloses the fact that many 
books are shelved there. The books in the basement, it is true, 
consist mainly of periodicals and other books very rarely called 
for. The large number of books in the basement indicates the 
necessity of a proper warehouse of some kind where they may be 
properly kept and the books sent for when needed. The Library 
building is quite crowded and much space could be made avail- 
able for library purposes if some sort of an annex were secured. 

The committee recommends that further consideration be given 
to the necessity of cleaning the paintings and walls in the building. 

The committee feels that with the large number of branches 
and the necessity of traveling to them by the Library officials, the 
Trustees may well consider the advisability of securing an auto- 
mobile for the Library officials, especially for the use of the Direc- 
tor and the Supervisors of Branches and of Work with Children. 

Branches. The committee is opposed to the present arrange- 
ment of maintaining branch libraries in business blocks and small 
stores. Such an arrangement, while perhaps economical, is not 
prudent or satisfactory. In several parts of the city branches 
are maintained in small stores never intended for library purposes, 
but remodelled and maintained as far as possible for library pur- 
poses. These branch libraries are sometimes confronted with 
the problem of bad plumbing, improper heating facilities, and 
troublesome landlords who drive as hard a bargain as possible 
when the lease-making period arrives. Adults are required to 
mingle with small children. Space is insufficient and in many 
instances the branch is improperly located because no store is 
available in the desired section of the community. 

BOOKS AND CATALOGUES 

There is growing demand for books sought by readers. So 
far as this demand is constant and permanent, the books sought 
should be owned by the Library in sufficient numbers to provide 



[33] 

a reasonable opportunity for all to have them within a reasonable 
time. Where the demand is evanescent for recent and much ad- 
vertised books, the Public Library cannot be expected to supply 
them for all quickly. 

The supply of children's books is inadequate, and should be 
increased. With the opportunities ever increasing for education of 
adults, with continuation schools and extension courses, the de- 
mand for books for use in these ways is constantly growing. 

To meet all these needs, the only available source is the ap- 
propriation from the City Treasury, which for the last two years 
has been $125,000 each year. This year the Trustees have 
asked for an increase of $25,000 in this appropriation, which the 
committee cordially endorses. 

The committee has considered in what way the income from 
trust funds now available can be augmented in adding to the 
scholarly collections of the Public Library. We can only sug- 
gest to persons in the community who are interested in the 
Library, to support it through donations similar to the support 
now given to the Boston Art Museum; and we suggest the 
feasibility of the organization of a committee to work with and 
under the Trustees of the Public Library for this purpose. 

The catalogues and the system of cataloguing, we believe are 
excellent, and we are informed that the Printing Department is 
now in process of re-organization. 

We recommend that a photostat should be obtained for 
the reproduction of cards already printed, as well as documents, 
portions of books and other contents of the Library, which are 
from time to time sought. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES 

The committee records its great satisfaction in the plans of the 
Board of Trustees and the Director, as also recommended by 
previous Examining Committees, for making more secure the 
care of the important works in the Special Libraries and in \he 
proposed new Treasure Room. In view of the anticipated 
changes in housing the collections, we gave our attention particu- 
larly to the uses made of them. From our observations, the 



[34] 

reference works in the Fine Arts Department are particularly 
useful to students in the higher grades. This phase of library 
service seems most important and to be further developed. 

The new arrangements of technical reference works are also 
noted, and the committee recommends that every possible aid be 
given to craftsmen, students and business men who are not now 
sufficiently familiar with the uses of such works and do not know 
to what extent they are available. 

CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT AND WORK WITH SCHOOLS 

The committee has given thoughtful attention to the Children's 
Department, and is convinced that the work is being efficiently 
done. The committee approves the recommendations made by 
last year's committee, and finds that definite progress has been 
made in carrying them out. 

The need for more books is still pressing, while the need for 
more shelf room is general. In some cases it appears that, during 
the winter months, increased facilities for ventilation would be 
very helpful. 

The Assistant Superintendent of Schools, who is chairman of 
a committee on School and Library co-operation, answering an 
inquiry for suggestions, stated that the Library has always 
generously responded to all calls from the schools and that he 
had no suggestions to offer. 

The policy adopted by some teachers of giving librarians 
ample notice of what books they are likely to need for school or 
home work has worked well. 

It might be helpful if pupils from the higher grades could come 
in groups, say not more than twenty in a group, to one or more of 
the branch libraries to learn the use of the card catalogue, includ- 
ing titles, subjects and authors. It is suggested that pupils making 
such visits might receive school credit. 

Since great stress is being put upon "Adult Education", 
"Reading with a Purpose" and the like, and since the branch 
libraries are crowded and the school houses unoccupied many 
hours each day, it is suggested that rooms in certain school houses 
might be used for the older pupils for school work or reference 



[35] 

work of any kind a few hours each evening, if proper supervision 
and service could be provided. This might relieve the congestion 
at certain libraries and at the same time afford adults opportunity 
for systematic reading, which the Department of Education is 
so strongly advocating. 

BRANCHES 

All of the thirty-one branches have been visited. 

Marked improvements have been made during the year in 
several branches, some of them following recommendations of 
the Examining Committee of a year ago. For example: Dor- 
chester, by the removal of the District Court, has now additional 
room space and an entrance and hall used solely for the Library. 
Again, Brighton has a lecture hall and new lighting. Boylston 
is about to have enlarged quarters with room for adults. West 
End is freshly painted. Neponset is freshly painted and well 
lit. Fire exits have been increased. Such improvements are 
gladly noted and commended. 

More important still is the conviction of the committee that 
much pains is taken by the administrative staff to improve the 
personnel of the librarian service and assistance. The interest 
and intelligence of the workers is indicated in such ways as win- 
dow exhibits and special collections of books for branch neighbor- 
hoods where there are many persons of foreign extraction or 
many persons are following particular industries. 

The marked needs in the service through the branches can 
hardly be overemphasized when we consider that the branches 
are the chief way of reaching the people of the whole city. The 
circulation through many of them is increasing. Many are in 
rapidly growing residential neighborhoods. They are close to 
the schools. They will be used by many more adults if made 
attractive to adults. 

The need most generally expressed is for more books, supplied 
with reasonable promptness from the Central Library in answer 
to requests from branches. The estimate now of unsuccessful 
requests is about 70 per cent. The quality of books requested 
is higher than formerly. 



[36] 

Wholly new or enlarged quarters are urged for Allston, Mt. 
Bowdoin, Parker Hill, and are desirable for Jeffries Point and 
Orient Heights. Conditions at Mt. Bowdoin, crowded with 
children from ten large schools, and having a few seats only for 
adults, in an old wooden building, difficult to keep sanitary — 
altogether are a serious handicap to the staff and distinctly dis- 
creditable to the city. The plan made for enlargement at Parker 
Hill has fallen down. At Codman Square, where there is in- 
creased work with the schools, a separate room for juveniles is 
desirable, such as the large room in the basement, which has a 
separate entrance and stairway to the Library above. On the 
other hand, Mt. Pleasant and Memorial are illustrations of in- 
adequate space for adults, and Memorial illustrates the tendency 
for a branch housed in a school building to be looked upon as 
chiefly for children. 

Fellowes Athenaeum and Mt. Pleasant illustrate the duty of 
considering neighborhood conditions as bearing on the uses of 
branches, such as the need of more adequate street lighting and 
of signs to indicate locations. 

The Examining Committee recommends as a policy that 
branch buildings be erected by the Trustees and devoted wholly 
to library purposes; this policy should be adopted as soon as 
possible. As an alternative, branch libraries may be located in 
schoolhou?es or other public buildings, provided that library 
quarters are kept independent, with a separate entrance, with 
rooms near the street level for both adults and children, and with 
separate lecture hall, storage, and space for all other library re- 
quirements. Privately owned buildings should be avoided. 

We are glad to hear that the Library Trustees are considering 
the appointment of the Examining Committee in the spring, so 
that its report can be made before the Library budget for the 
coming year is determined. Our examination and experience 
lead us strongly to the desirability of this practice. 

The Examining Committee thanks the Director and the staff 
for help and many courtesies. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, 
March 5, 1928. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To the Board of Trustees : 

I respectfully submit my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1927. 

PROGRESS IN THE YEAR OF ANNIVERSARY. 

The year 1927 marked the seventy-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of the Public Library of the City of Boston. While 
there was no formal observance of the anniversary, the occasion 
was recognized during the summer months by an extensive ex- 
hibit of material illustrating the growth and development of the 
Library and by a series of historical articles which appeared in 
the successive issues of the Library bulletin, "More Books". 

The volumes in the Library have grown from less than 1 0,000 
to 1,418,489. The home circulation in 1927 numbered 
3,705,657 volumes. The total annual expenditures have in- 
creased from less than $10,000 to $1,099,1 73. 

To-day it would require a shelf reaching from Boston to Ply- 
mouth, a distance of 35 miles, to hold the books in the Library 
system, while a shelf long enough to reach from Boston to Hart- 
ford, a distance of 1 00 miles, would be necessary to care for the 
books issued in 1927 for home use. If the books used in the 
Central Library and the branches for reference and other pur- 
poses were added to the number of books taken out of the 
Library the shelf would need to be extended another 100 miles, 
or to New York City. 

The outstanding accomplishment of the year was the com- 
pletion of the arrangements by which the George F. Baker 
Library of the Harvard Graduate School of Business Adminis- 
tration became a branch of the Boston Public Library system. 
This great library of books on business and allied subjects, in- 
cluding the collections of the Business Historical Association, is 
freely open to the public for reference, and the closest connection 
is maintained between it and the Central Library in Copley 
Square. 



[38] 

Another interesting feature of the year has been the establish- 
ment of a Training Class, which began its work in October with 
an enrolment of fourteen, and which has already proved its 
value. The class is not intended to take the place of a library 
school, but to provide training for members of the staff and for 
outside applicants who have at least a high school education and 
who are unable to go to a library school. 

The usual normal growth was noted in all departments during 
the year. Although the accessions for the year, including pur- 
chases and gifts, amounted to 98,487 volumes, the outstanding 
complaint of those who use the Library is that they are unable to 
obtain the required book when called for, an evidence of the 
fact that the Library is unable with its present book appropriation 
to buy a sufficient number of copies of a new book to meet the 
normal demand for it. The Library is glad however, to report 
an increase for the year in home circulation of books to the num- 
ber of 306,520 over the circulation for 1926. 

Although there is great need for additional branch libraries, 
two sections of the city, Readville and Germantown, being with- 
out any public library facilities, and although a number of ap- 
plications have been received for the establishment of new bran- 
ches in various sections of the city, the budget for 1 928 contained 
no request for funds to establish additional branches. The first 
obligation of the Library Department is to "put i ts house in 
order" ; to make the necessary repairs and improvements in the 
Central Building and existing branches; and to provide, where 
possible, additional room for branch libraries which are already 
over-crowded or in other ways unsatisfactorily housed. In ten 
of the existing branches additional rooms are needed. The chil- 
dren in these branches have practically driven out adult users. 
Little progress can be made in adult education through the library 
when no adequate provision is made for adult readers or students. 
Two branches are at present entirely too small to meet the needs 
of both children and adults, although separate rooms are 
provided. 

The study of the Central Library and its branches made by 
the members of the Examining Committee of this year will un- 
doubtedly suggest to them many desirable changes and additions, 



[39] 

and will also call attention to the need of additional assistants in 
certain departments and branches. 

From the point of view of the public, as intimated, there is 
outstanding need for more books and better library accommoda- 
tions. In addition to this, the physical needs of the Central 
Library and branches should be given attention as the necessary 
appropriations become available. , 

There will be found on page 68 certain suggestive tables of 
comparisons showing the growth of the Library Department 
during the past twenty-five years, in five-year periods. 

ACCESSIONS AND GIFTS OF THE YEAR. 

The total number of volumes added to the Library collections 
in 1927 was 98,487, acquired as follows: 82,271 by purchase, 
12,577 by gift, 144 by exchange, 3,495 by binding periodicals 
and serials. Of the books purchased, 1 6,127 were added to the 
Central Library and 66,144 were placed in branch libraries 
and in the Central Library Deposit Collection, which serves as 
a reservoir for the branches. 

The total amount expended for accessions by purchase was 
$154,841 .06, which included $27,413.40 paid from the income 
of Trust funds. The corresponding amount for the preceding 
year was $150,161.92 including $24,168.50 paid from Trust 
funds income. 

The City appropriation for books was the same as in 1 926, 
namely, $125,000. The disposition of this appropriation has 
not varied greatly from that of the preceding year. It has enabled 
the Library to extend with fresh material the circulating and 
reference collections of 3 1 branches and the various divisions of 
the Central Library, and has contributed in large measure to the 
repair of the ravages of wear and loss among the older books. It 
has not permitted the purchase of a large number of copies of 
current books of wide interest. To a library with active col- 
lections of books ranging from technology, architecture, painting, 
music, genealogy, statistics, education and works of reference to 
children's books and fiction, the question of satisfying, if only in 
a measure, the demands made by a growing constituency in a 
large city is a constant problem — the problem of adjusting the 



[40] 

increasing need of books to a more or less stationary annual in- 
come. In other words, the pattern is always larger than the cloth. 

The distribution of book funds shows $98,444.75 expended 
for branches and Branch Deposit, including $4,155.96 for 
periodicals and newspapers. In addition, $2,706.69 was drawn 
from branch trust funds to supplement the City appropriation 
in Charlestown, South Boston and Mattapan, making a total for 
branches and Deposit of $101,151.44 The Central Library 
accounting shows an expenditure of $53,689.62, including 
$24,706.71 charged to Trust funds and including also $7,014.94 
for periodicals and $620.61 for newspapers. This expenditure 
for newspapers is in addition to the income from the Todd Fund 
which for several years has been inadequate to cover the cost of 
the list originally subscribed for. 

The important acquisitions of the year include a notable col- 
lection of works for the Bowditch Library bought with the in- 
come of the Bowditch Fund. A catalogue of more than 3,000 
works on mathematics and astronomy assembled in London was 
carefully examined with reference to those already here, and the 
aid and expert judgment of Dr. Harlow Shapley, Director of 
the Harvard College Observatory, were enlisted in making the 
selection. The Library is deeply indebted to Dr. Shapley who 
undertook the checking of desirable titles in the midst of press- 
ing duties. 

Among the older works secured were six titles by Ptolemy, 1515— 
1605; four titles by Sacro Busco, 1490-1584; three titles by Tycho 
Brahe, 1603—1610; Istoria, by Galileo, 1613; Cosmotheoros, by Huy- 
gens, 1699; Prodromus aslronomiae, by Hevelius, 1690; and the first 
edition of Principia, (1687), by Newton. 

The Library has secured an important collection in facsimile of maps 
covering the period of the American Revolution, reproduced from 
originals in the Paris Archives under the direction of Dr. L. C. Karpinski. 

A collection of commemorative material issued in connection with the 
Beethoven Centenary in the principal cities and musical centers of Europe 
is an outstanding acquisition. The collection comprises concert programs 
of music societies, posters, monographs, photographs and excerpts of 
special significance from foreign newspapers and periodicals. T he 
material produced on the continent of Europe was assembled, arranged, 
mounted and indexed in eight portfolios by K. W. Hiersemann, the 



[41] 

Library agent in Leipzig; similar matter issued in England was collected 
by Harold Reeves in London. 

Noteworthy individual works acquired include: 

Bacon, Francis. Of the proficiencie and advancement of learning. Lon- 
don, 1605. (The first edition.) 

The Barons' Book of England, from the Conquest to the 3d year of 
James 1st. Folio manuscript of 86 leaves with 544 coats of arms 
colored by a contemporary hand. Circa 1610. 

Boccaccio. De casibus virorum illustrium. English by Dan John 
Lidgate, monke of Burye. (London, 1554) Colophon. 

A disputation concerning church-members and their children in answer to 
XXI questions . . wherein the state of such children ... is discussed 
by an assembly of Divines meeting at Boston in New England, 
June 4, 1657. Now published by a Lover of Truth. London, 
1659. Published anonymously. Ascribed to Nathaniel and pos- 
sibly Increase Mather in the Brinley and Barlow Catalogues. 

Mather, Cotton. Shaking dispensation. An essay upon the mighty 
Shakes which the hand of Heaven hath given and is giving, to the 
world. With some useful remarks on the death of the French 
King, who left off to make the World a Wilderness and to destroy 
the Cities thereof: on the Twenty-first of August 1715. In a 
sermon on that great occasion at Boston, New England. 1 3d 
VIII m. 1 715. Printed by B. Green. Sold by S. Gerrish . . . 
1715. 

A privately printed set of the Plays and Poems of Shakespeare edited 
by J. Payne Collier, London 1878, of which only 58 copies were 
printed. The set secured for the Library is complete in 43 original 
parts forming eight volumes. 

The following titles represent a brief selection of the important 
books added to the Fine Arts division : 
Bakst, Leon. Inedited works of Bakst. [With] Essays on Bakst by Louis 

Reau, Denis Roche, V. Svietlov and A. Tessier. New York. 1 927. 

Illus. 
Godard, Octave. Jardins de la Cote d'Azur. Paris, 1927. Plates. 

For the Codman Collection of Landscape Architecture. 
Hentschel, Walter. Sachsische Plastik um 1500. Dresden, 1926. 

Illus. A survey of late Gothic sculpture in Saxony. 
Hurlbutt, Frank. Bow porcelain. London, 1926. 56 plates, of 

which 8 are in color. Covers the whole range of Bow manufacture. 
Kaufmann, Isidor. (Reproductions of paintings of Jewish life.) 

(Vienna, 1926). 16 colored plates. 
Mayer, August Liebmann. Dominico Theotocopuli, El Greco. Miin- 

chen, 1926. 90 plates. 



[42] 

Mehta, Nanalal Chamanlal-. Studies in Indian painting. Bombay, 

1926. 61 plates. 
Roerich, George. Tibetan paintings. Paris, 1925. With 17 full 

plate reproductions of Tibetan paintings. 

Among other miscellaneous works of interest acquired are: 

Pierre d'Ailly. Imago Mundi incipit. Circa 1483. A photostat re- 
production of a copy in the Library of Seville (Spain) which con- 
tains 800 annotations which have been ascribed by some to Christo- 
pher Columbus. Reproduced by the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

A set of Enciclopedia Universal ilustrada Europeo-Americana. Pub- 
lished in Barcelona and now in its 58th volume. (For Bates Hall) 

A short-title catalogue of books printed in England, Scotland, and Ireland, 
and of English books printed abroad 1475—1640. Published by 
the London Bibliographical Society and compiled by A. W. Pol- 
lard and G. R. Redgrave. 

The Commonwealth History of Massachusetts, edited by Albert Bush- 
nell Hart, as far as issued. 22 sets for the Central Library and 
branches. 

During the year gifts have been received as follows: From 
various donors, 1 4,239 volumes, 1 5, 1 96 serials, 996 photographs 
and 52 newspaper subscriptions. 

From Mr. Louis E. Kirstein the sum of one thousand dollars, 
to be added to the "Louis E. Kirstein Fund." 

From Mrs. Helen O. Storrow and Miss Elizabeth Randolph 
Storrow, the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars to be funded 
as the "James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund" and the 
income used for the purchase of Italian books, as requested by 
the donors. 

From the executor of the estate of Helen Leah Reed, the sum 
of one thousand dollars, being a bequest to the Library under 
her will, "to be held as a fund called the Guilford Reed Fund 
in memory of Guilford S. Reed, and the income only of this 
fund shall be used for the purchase of books of non-fiction." 

Certain additional gifts of interest, with the names of the 
donors, are listed on pages 75-76 of the Appendix. 

REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

On January 1, 1927 there were 135,445 "live" cards in the 
hands of Boston citizens for the withdrawal of library books 



[43] 

for home use. Through the Central Library and its 3 1 branches 
ches there have been added 30,869 new registrations and 40,81 8 
renewals, making a total of 71 ,687 cards added during the year. 
To offset this, 65,731 borrowers, including students and others 
who are no longer residents, allowed their home-use privilege to 
lapse, making a total of 141,401 "live" cards on December 31, 
1927. The net gain of registered card holders was 5,956 over 
the previous year. 

Prior to January 1, 1927, 10,153 cards had been issued to 
teachers. Of this number 1 ,498 have been renewed and 428 
issued during the year, making a total of 1 ,926 teachers' cards 
in use. Of the 4,008 "special privilege" cards issued prior to 
January 1, 1927, there were 361 renewals and 180 new cards 
granted during the year, making a total of 541 "special privilege" 
cards now in use. 



CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

During the year 1927, the number of volumes and parts of 
volumes catalogued was 115,447, covering 81,736 titles. In- 
cluded in these numbers were 67,602 volumes (57,534 titles) 
assigned to the branch libraries and catalogued in the Central 
Branch Department. 

The number of printed cards added to the catalogues of the 
Central Library alone was 45,424, and 20,075 were used in 
compiling bibliographies, or were reserved for such use in the 
future. The distribution of cards among the departments of the 
Central Library was: Bates Flail, 18,101 ; Official Catalogue, 
18,650; Special Libraries, 8,673. Cards were also sent as 
usual to the Harvard College Library and the Library of Con- 
gress. 

In order to hasten the appearance of new books in our cata- 
logues, 1 1 ,876 temporary cards have been typed by the Card 
Division, to be replaced later by printed cards. As the result 
of this device, titles of recent accessions have been in the cata- 
logues as soon as the books have been placed on the shelves. 
Over 5, 1 00 cards have also been typed for the use of the Editor, 



[44] 
PUBLICATIONS. 

The Library bulletin "More Books", issued in its present 
form and under its new title since March, 1925, has been con- 
ducted along the same lines as last year. The publication is 
now firmly established and has proved to be a success with the 
public. Each issue is received with interest, and the first edition 
of 4,500 copies is usually nearly exhausted within three weeks of 
its publication. Each number carries a classified list of new 
books with descriptive notes and a synopsis of classification, in 
addition to a long article either on the book treasures of the 
Library, or on some topic of literary interest. For instance, the 
March issue contained three separate articles relating to the 
Beethoven Centenary. The September issue was almost entirely 
devoted, as were those of November and December, to the 
seventy-fifth anniversary of the Library. 

Essays contributed by members of the staff were published on 
Joshua Bates, Alexandre Vattemare and Thomas Pennant 
Barton, men prominent among the founders of the Library about 
whom little had been written in recent years. Other articles 
described the collections and activities of the Library, such as the 
Branch system, the Catalogue Department and the Divisions of 
Fine Arts and Technology. Rare books and manuscripts re- 
cently acquired have also been described in separate articles; a 
Revolutionary Orderly Book, for instance, in the May issue, and 
a First Edition copy of Newton's Princlp'ia in the December 
issue. These and similar articles were usually illustrated with 
facsimiles. 

A regular feature of the bulletin is "Ten Books" consisting 
of short and impersonal reviews which call attention to the more 
important new books. The selection aims to be comprehensive, 
ranging from art and literature to sociology and science, and in- 
cluding a wide variety of subjects. Its purpose is to interest the 
intelligent general reader rather than the specialist. 

"Reading the Magazines" is another popular feature. Even 
a few paragraphs on recent articles that have appeared in the 
periodicals, make for timeliness and a few dozen lines on the 
leading foreign magazines give the reader a feeling that there is 



[45] 

breadth of view in the editing of the bulletin. "Library Notes", 
which usually occupy four or five pages, consist mainly of short 
bibliographical notices. Here also may be found certain com- 
munications of interest from the office of the Director. 

Last year there were printed seven issues of "More Books", 
comprising in all, 360 pages. It is the hope of the Library to pub- 
lish ten numbers a year, nine monthly numbers, and for the sum- 
mer months one quarterly. It is hoped that this aim will be 
realized in the near future, in order that it may not be necessary 
to issue double numbers. In the meantime it must be recognized 
that the printing of the bulletin, in addition to the other steadily 
increasing demands on the Printing Department, represents a 
considerable task. 

In connection with the fifth annual conference of the Workers' 
Education Bureau of America, held in Boston in April, 1927, 
the Library published "Brief Reading List, No. 36", entitled 
"Workers' Education, a selected list of books and articles." 

Bibliographical lists have, as usual, been printed for the lec- 
tures on the programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, given 
by the Massachusetts Division of University Extension, in co- 
operation with the Library. Programs and lists were also issued 
for twelve concerts given in the Lecture Hall, prominent among 
which were the eight Chamber Music concerts presented through 
the courtesy of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. 

"Opportunities for Adult Education in Greater Boston," a list 
of courses of lectures free to the public or available at a nominal 
fee, without educational pre-requisites, was again published in 
1927—28; the pamphlet this year contains over one hundred 
pages. 

Part V of the "Guide to Serial Publications founded prior 
to 1918" and now or recently current in Boston, Cambridge, and 
vicinity, is now ready for publication. The material has been 
steadily increased through the generous co-operation of several 
libraries, including the New York Public Library, the Library 
of Congress and the John Crerar Library, and the current cata- 
logue of this material may be consulted in the Barton Gallery 
with the help of Mr. Thomas Johnson Homer, the editor of the 
"Guide." 



[46] 
BATES HALL 

If one may judge from the increase of more than 10% in the 
number of books sent from the stacks for the use of readers, the 
year has been a busy one in Bates Hall. The total for the year 
was 260,623 volumes, with no record of the steady use of books 
from the open shelves in the Hall. 

The Reference Collection is under constant revision; 217 
volumes have been retired to the stacks in the course of the year, 
242 new volumes have been placed in the Hall, and 577 have 
been given new locations in the process of rearrangement. The 
shelves devoted to geography are at present undergoing a com- 
plete revision. The Atlas Collection has been condensed and 
many atlases which were out of date have been retired. An im- 
portant addition of the year has been the Enciclopedia Universal 
Ilustrada, the publication of which began in Barcelona in 1905, 
and which has now, in its fifty-eighth volume, reached the 
letter T. This little-known encyclopaedia is one of the most 
important works of reference produced in modern times. 

The Hall has been improved by the installation of handsome 
oak tables at the Catalogue, and by the completion of the new 
lighting of the bookcases, which greatly facilitates the finding of 
books in the evening. 

The correspondence of the Department shows little change 
from the figures of last year; 229 genealogical inquiries were 
answered by mail, and 574 requests for information on general 
subjects. In this correspondence forty-four of the forty-eight 
United States and seven foreign countries were represented. 

The work of the Division of Genealogy has continued to 
justify itself in improved service to readers. Increased emphasis 
has been laid on the various phases of Adult Education work. 
An office will soon be opened on the lower floor of the Library, 
where a Readers' Adviser may be consulted by the public. The 
sale of the "Reading with a Purpose" pamphlets issued by the 
American Library Association has gone on steadily ; the sales by 
this Library have now reached a total of 1 3,1 50 copies. 

The frequently crowded condition of the Hall raises anew 
the problem of its occupation as a study room by persons who are 



[47] 

using no library books. These students from near-by schools and 
colleges are sometimes careless of the rights of legitimate readers, 
and it is probable that this Library, like many others throughout 
the country, will find it necessary to consider steps for guarding 
itself against abuse by this class of visitors. 

NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS. 

The Newspaper Room continues to be crowded, although 
there is no attempt at a definite record of readers. There are now 
regularly received 213 daily and 55 weekly papers, of which 
190 are published in the United States and 78 in 31 foreign 
countries. One hundred and fourteen volumes of bound news- 
papers have been added to the files, which now contain 9,357. 
In the course of the year 19,264 visitors consulted 33,1 74 bound 
volumes of newspapers — an average of 3 J/2 uses for each 
volume in the collection. No portion of the Library has larger 
possibilities for students of contemporary history than this great 
mass of the news of other years printed while it was still fresh. 

Six hundred and eighty-eight volumes were added to the col- 
lection of patents during the year. It is a satisfaction to record 
that the gaps in the set of German Patentschriften, resulting from 
the War, have been largely filled, so that this valuable file is 
now practically complete. 

INFORMATION OFFICE, GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT ROOM 
AND OPEN SHELF ROOM. 

The Information Office continues to save the time and energy 
of those persons who wish to use the Library but are unfamiliar 
with its many departments. Tourists likewise, in seeking all man- 
ner of information, find the office of great value. During the year 
there has been an increased number of telephone calls for service 
of various kinds from business firms, special libraries, schools and 
individuals. This increase in service rendered is true also of the 
other departments of reference in the Library. 

Approximately 1,115 new catalogues, pamphlets and clip- 
pings have been added to the Vocational Guidance file. The 
attendants have been consulted about every possible kind of 



[48] 

school from the kindergarten to the university. Keen interest 
has been shown in the various phases of the Adult Education 
movement, and some 10,000 announcements of University Ex- 
tension courses have been distributed. 

The Government Document Room was used by about ten 
thousand persons on week days during 1927. Had a record 
been kept of those who came in the evenings and on Sundays this 
figure would have been greatly increased. In order to keep the 
Government material up to date it has been necessary to write 
continually to Washington for new publications and for those for 
which there is a nominal charge. During the year a card "con- 
tinuations" catalogue of Government documents was completed 
for the convenience of those who use the room. This gives the 
Library call-number for each document series and saves the in- 
convenience of looking up the desired material in the Bates Hall 
catalogue. Clippings are made from "The United States Daily" 
and posted on the bulletin board in the entrance hall of the 
Library every day. This has attracted to the Document Room 
many additional inquirers and has also resulted in requests for 
246 of the clippings. 

It has been an unusually busy and successful year for the Open 
Shelf Room. The circulation last year was 46,378, an increase 
of 2,281 over the previous year. Effort is made to keep a fresh 
supply of books constantly on the open shelves. The volumes 
are changed frequently, as the room is so small that the collection 
rapidly becomes familiar to steady patrons. For an hour each 
morning and evening an attendant goes through the stacks of the 
Library making a selection of books for the Open Shelf Room. 
The "stations" of the stacks are often visited as many as six 
times a day in order that the newly returned books may be in- 
spected and additional selections made from them. 

The "Reading with a Purpose" lists have provided the room 
with suggestions for many excellent books. Psychologists, biolo- 
gists, teachers of modern languages and other specialists who 
make frequent use of the Open Shelf Room have been most kind 
in suggesting significant books for the shelves. 

Afternoons and evenings, particularly during the v/inter 
months, the room is so crowded that it is next to impossible to gain 



[49] 

access to the shelves. There is usually a cluster about the charg- 
ing table and an overflow in the Information Office. The out- 
standing complaint of the public is that the Open Shelf Room is 
much too small. Unfortunately it is impossible at the present 
time to provide more adequate space for open shelf service. 

PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

A steady growth is noted in the work of the Periodical De- 
partment, while the service rendered is giving satisfaction not 
only to residents of the city but, as in many other departments of 
the Library, to an ever increasing number of non-residents, many 
coming from long distances for research and for the study of 
current events. 









Attendance. 








At the hours: 


10 


12 


2 4 


6 


8 


9.45 




A.M. 


M. 


P.M. P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


1926 . . 


. 18,263 


21,432 


35,768 39,691 


25,982 


28,376 


14.974 


1927 . . 


. 19,374 


22,197 


37,261, 41,863 


26,192 


29,214 


15,357 


Sundays at 1 


P.M. 












1926 




8654 










1927 . . 




9173 




t 







Bound Volumes. 



Consulted during day .... 
Consulted during evenings and Sundays 



1926 


1927 


53,281 


60,285 


28,431 


24,527 



Back Numbers of Magazines not yet Bound. 



Consulted during day .... 
Consulted during evenings and Sunday 



1926 


1927 


61,315 


66,246 


28,421 


30,124 



The current periodicals, exclusive of those issued by the state 
and federal governments, regularly filed for readers in the 
Periodical Department, number 1,281. In addition there are 
filed for use by readers in other departments current periodicals 



[50] 

especially related to the fields covered by those departments, as 
follows: 

Fine Arts and Music Divisions of the Special Libraries .... 136 

Ordering Department 27 

Statistical Department 55 

Teachers' Reference Room and Children's Room 70 

288 
Periodical Room 1281 

Total number of periodicals currently received 1 569 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES DEPARTMENT. 

The Special Libraries include all the collections housed on the 
third floor of the Central Building and comprise the divisions of 
Fine Arts, Music, Technology, and the special collections of 
the Library contained in the Barton-Ticknor Division. The 
fields covered by these four divisions were defined in detail in the 
Annual Reports for 1923 and 1924. 

The numerous changes in arrangement and organization 
carried out in the past few years have resulted in better service, as 
reflected in the substantial increase in circulation (seven per- 
cent), and a noticeable growth in the "hall use" of books. The 
crowded condition, .especially in the afternoon, of the Fine Arts 
reading room has made it increasingly necessary to use some of 
the West Gallery student tables for general readers. 

During the renovations in the summer months, the entire open- 
shelf reference collection, charging and reference desks, and 
telephone were moved into the West Gallery, and the card cata- 
logue into the south pavilion. The book circulation was not af- 
fected to any degree by this temporary arrangement, but, inas- 
much as it was possible to move only a small part of the circu- 
lating picture collection, a noticeable decrease in the home use 
of pictures resulted. 

Early in the year a "Randex" file, listing Fine Arts and Tech- 
nical periodicals in one alphabet with call-number, was made 
for the Indicator desk, in order to facilitate service to readers. 

The Fine Arts Division has continued to build up its col- 
lections on the new classification schedule, the classified books 



[51] 

now being expanded into two alcoves. No large increase has 
been made in the picture collection, but, owing to an unusual 
opportunity of purchasing lantern slides, the Library has added 
some five thousand selected slides, thereby almost doubling its 
resources. 

The Technology Division has continued work on its special 
reference tools,and has added many pictures to the technical 
picture collection. The moving of all the technical books when 
the alcoves were painted made possible a complete re-shelving 
of the collection, and the separation of the classified books from 
the unclassified. This has improved the service and provided 
room for growth. The usefulness of the chemical reference 
alcove is shown in the large numbers of students and chemists 
who daily consult these books. 

The Music Division, as in former years, has continued its 
series of interpretive lectures on symphony concerts and operas, 
and has issued most interesting and useful annotated programs 
and booklists. 

The number of books issued for home use from the Special 
Libraries during the year was 25,195, an increase of seven per 
cent as compared with last year. For use outside the Library 
there were issued 27,039 pictures and 8,448 lantern slides. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN. 

The year has been one of expansion in children's work 
throughout the Library system. The home use of books drawn 
directly from the Central and branch libraries on children's cards 
amounted to 1 ,691 ,269 volumes, a gain of 59,833 volumes over 
1926. To meet this call on the resources of the department, 
$50,149.61 of the book fund was spent on books for children to 
be placed in the Children's Room of the Central Library and in 
the thirty-one branches, and to be sent on deposit to the schools, 
public and parochial. 

It is worth noting that more than seventy per cent of the amount 
annually spent for children's books goes for the replacement of 
worn-out or missing copies, while only a scant twenty-five per 
cent is spent for new volumes and for additional copies of a 



[52] 

given book required to keep pace with the growth in the number 
of card holders. 

The importance of replacing books, however, cannot be de- 
nied, as the main body of children's literature is composed of 
books that have been tested for years and found acceptable to 
young readers. All replacement orders are given individual con- 
sideration, so that the collections may be kept alive through the 
elimination of titles no longer needed. To simplify the routine 
detail involved in the examination of so many book cards, a list 
of 1 ,000 titles approved for replacement during the year was 
prepared by the Supervisor of Branches and is now in use by 
the branch librarians and by the Order Department. It is hoped 
to compile supplementary lists from time to time, and to revise 
the list at stated intervals. That the present collections gather 
little dust is shown by the high rate of turnover from the shelves 
of the children's rooms; for example, at the North End Branch, 
where, during the winter months, 1 ,200 books are often borrow- 
ed in the space of three hours, the average yearly circulation 
amounts to eighteen times for each book. 

Accommodations. During 1927 one new children's room 
was opened, that at the Dorchester Branch, where highly un- 
suitable quarters on the third floor were replaced by a pleasant, 
well-equipped room on the street level. During the period of 
several months' intermission, when the old room had been ordered 
closed and the new one was not yet ready for occupancy, work 
with children was successfully carried on in the Grover Cleve- 
land School near by. This was an interesting experiment in 
adaptation, promoting friendly relations with the school, and 
incidentally demonstrating how quickly an attractive children's 
room can be organized when need arises. 

At Brighton the assembly or lecture room, which had been 
undergoing alterations, was again made available for the Story 
Hour, and has given satisfactory use for that purpose. After a 
full year in the Memorial High School the Memorial Branch 
is able to show evidences of continued appreciation of its en- 
larged facilities. How far it has been possible to give better 
service, with better equipment, is indicated by a gain of 12,087 
in the number of books drawn on children's cards from Memorial 



[53] 

Branch. Since this is our only branch library in a high school 
building, the measure of its success is a matter of special concern. 
A report from the branch contains this comment: "We have but 
begun to sound the possibilities which can grow out of a closer 
union of the library and the school. A better understanding and 
appreciation of both school and library is slowly but surely grow- 
ing, as a result of our close contact." 

Whenever the opening of a new room admits expansion in 
the work with children, fresh impetus toward healthy growth 
follows. This has been noticeably the experience at Dorchester 
and Memorial branches. Furthermore, the new rooms have 
relieved to some extent the pressure at Mt. Bowdoin, which lies 
between the two, by checking a further increase of circulation 
which had become unwieldy in the present restricted space. 
Particular attention was given to the physical appearance of 
children's rooms in some of the older, less inviting branches. 
A few good pieces of pottery were acquired, and some suitable 
pictures bought to give color and warmth to dark interiors. Ac- 
knowledgments are due to the Junior Red Cross and the Chil- 
dren's Museum for their courtesy in lending stimulating ex- 
hibitions for display in show cases and windows. Different 
members of the staff have also shown judgment and skill in the 
preparation of projects, often spending a great deal of their own 
time voluntarily to make the children's rooms more attractive. 

Schools and Children's Rooms. Deposits of books in the 
schools constitute an important method of extending the knowl- 
edge of library resources among teachers and children alike. 
School circulation amounted to 66,037, and might have been 
much larger if the Library had been able to supply more books. 
Changes in the curriculum are reflected in the requests from 
teachers, not only for books to be used in the classrooms, but 
also in the character of the reference work in the different chil- 
dren's rooms. There has been continued effort to make the 
reference collections more adequate in order to meet new re- 
quirements, especially in the field of industrial and commercial 
subjects. The ordinary type of geography, for example, is not 
enough, as the schools require more current information. For 



[54] 

this purpose, and also for furnishing facts about contemporary 
writers, the librarians rely more and more upon the pamphlet 
files which are being enlarged and strengthened in the different 
children's rooms. 

The requirements of the intermediate or junior high schools 
call for special attention at the present time. As the required 
reading lists include a large proportion of books that are classed 
as adult literature, there is room for a broad and inclusive policy 
which will place more advanced books upon the children's 
shelves, or will admit younger readers to some divisions of the 
general adult collections of the Library system. 

Story Hours. No slackening of the hold that the Story 
Hours have upon children can be seen. Six hundred and eighty- 
three regular story hours were held, with an attendance of 
thousands of children to whom the fine presentation of great 
classics, folklore, and legend was a quickening experience. 
Sufficient proof of the vitality of the story telling is given in the 
continued large attendance year after year, in spite of the multi- 
plication of motion picture houses in practically every locality. 

Requests from teachers and principals for story telling in the 
schools are too numerous to be supplied, and this is the more 
gratifying since the Library story tellers are the only outside 
visitors freely invited to the public schools. 

For the first time the Library was able to include the summer 
vacation schools in a program of story telling, giving one period 
to each school during July and August. As the Museum of 
Fine Arts had discontinued its summer work along this line, the 
teachers and children were especially happy in the connection 
thus made with the great field of good reading. 

Central Children s Room. The laying of the new floor 
covering in the Central Children's Room was an improvement 
long anticipated. It greatly enhances the beauty and comfort 
of the room and gives it increased dignity and finish. 

While the room was closed, an opportunity to practice adap- 
tation was afforded children and staff by the establishment of a 
small collection of books and a temporary charging service in 
the Venetian Lobby outside the room. Although the limitation 
on their habits of selection, combined with lack of seating room, 




MASON STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 
Location of Library, 1854—1858. 



[55] 

decreased the use of the Library by the younger readers and 
markedly affected the circulation of books, it was an interesting 
experiment. It revealed to the staff of the Children's Room the 
readers to whom the Library is indispensable, and who conse- 
quently make the best of an inconvenient situation. Moreover, 
there was a certain unlooked for value in the prominence sudden- 
ly given this phase of library work, which brought it before the 
eyes of the general visitor to whom it was previously 1 unknown. 

During the period of exclusion the annual Children's Book 
Week was observed by a display of books in the small reception 
room on the first floor. Entered upon as a makeshift, this proved 
to be a delightful innovation, affording an admirable opportunity 
to show off the new books among fitting surroundings. With 
the gratifying attendance of 1,739 observant visitors in the six 
weeks it was open, this was far and away the best exhibition of 
new books the Children's Department has ever held. Changes 
were made each day in the type of books shown in order to give 
consideration to different groups in the community who seek 
books from various motives. The staff is deserving of great 
commendation for its excellent and unified work under difficult 
conditions. 

Teachers' Room. The quiet and convenience of a room in 
which one may work with necessary books at hand is appreciated 
not only by individuals who are teaching but equally by the 
students in colleges and other educational institutions. At times 
the capacity of the Teachers' Room is taxed to its limit with 
readers who are making the best use of its facilities. 

Saturday is naturally the busiest day, and many books are 
brought from other parts of the Library on request of teachers 
who are taking advanced courses in one or another of the uni- 
versities and colleges. In order to gain a little more space for 
the necessary expansion, some of the unused titles in the text 
book collection have been withdrawn and the shelves given up to 
material on psychology, curriculum formation, school surveys 
and so forth. , 

Summer school work brought teachers from all parts of the 
country and offered an opportunity to make the Library favorably 



[56] 

known by that best of all methods, service. The imperative need 
of increase in the book stock as well as in the seating capacity of 
this room continues to be its most difficult problem. 

THE BRANCH SYSTEM. 

The total circulation through the branch libraries and the 
Central Branch Department for the year was 3,358,967. This 
is a gain over 1926 of 200,415. The number of books issued 
from the Central Library through branches was 99,070; this 
includes 76,602 from the Deposit Collection and 22,468 from 
the stacks of the Central Library. Twenty-six of the branches 
gained in circulation. The greatest gains were at Uphams 
Corner, Mattapan, Memorial, Roxbury Crossing, Jamaica 
Plain, Codman Square, Hyde Park and Roslindale. 

The number of volumes sent on deposit to 345 agencies (232 
schools, 56 fire-engine houses and 57 institutions of various 
kinds) was 93,269 as against 86,570 last year. The total num- 
ber of volumes sent to schools was 66,037, compared with 56,81 8 
last year. Of this number 26,337 were sent from the Branch 
Issue Division, Central Library. The number of books issued 
on deposit from the branch libraries, chiefly to schools, was 
39,700, compared with 37,134 in 1926. 

Inter-library loans amounted to 1,987 volumes, 157 more 
than last year. Of the 2,569 applications received, 582 had to 
be refused. Twenty-four volumes were borrowed from other 
libraries. 

The Dorchester Branch now rejoices in the finest children's 
room in the system, a room from which the municipal court moved 
about a year ago. The Neponset Branch has been completely 
renovated. A good-sized lecture hall has been added to the 
Brighton Branch; a small lecture hall to Faneuil Branch. The 
grounds of Brighton, Faneuil, Hyde Park and West End have 
been put into shape. Shrubbery has been trimmed and replaced 
and lawns have been reseeded. 

The ever-increasing requests for new buildings in many dif- 
ferent sections of the city attest a growing appreciation on the 
part of the public for the Library's extension service. With six- 



[57] 

teen such requests on file, a survey of the city's library needs 
seemed imperative. This request resulted in the preparation by 
branch librarians and their assistants of thirty detailed maps 
and thirty district guides of information. In this work the Secre- 
tary of the City Planning Board gave generous assistance. 
Using these maps and guides as a basis for study of an extension 
forecast, it has been possible to plot on one large map localities 
which in the near future should be given library service and to 
give adequate reasons for the selection of these localities. 

A standard list of over 200 reference books with which all 
branch librarians and assistants should be familiar, has been 
prepared in loose-leaf form so that it can be readily revised and 
kept up to date. 

The number of good books discarded has been for a long time 
a cause for anxiety. However, when the charging plates in these 
volumes show that months and often years have passed since the 
books were borrowed, and when shelf room is needed for the 
newer books now in demand, it appears wise to remove them. 
To dispose of standard books still in good condition, excepting 
discarded textbooks and out-of-date reference books, seems a 
mistaken policy. A single book on biography or philosophy 
may be useless, but related to others in a collection it frequently 
becomes of value. Hence, these books withdrawn from the 
shelves of the various branches are now being assembled in col- 
lections in the basements or attics of several branches where there 
is room for their care. At Dorchester, for instance, some 2,000 
volumes of biography have been shelved. These books are 
available for students and research workers throughout the city. 

EXHIBITIONS AND LECTURES. 

During the year twenty-eight exhibitions were arranged; 
twenty-two being displayed in the Fine Arts Exhibition Room, 
and six in the Barton-Ticknor Room. Thirteen of the exhibits 
consisted of loan material ; three of them comprising books. Fif- 
teen were made of material owned by the Library. Eight were 
of books and documents; sixteen were of prints, paintings and 



[58] 

photographs; one was an arts and crafts exhibit of old world 
costumes, laces, etc.; one was of small soap sculpture; and an- 
other was the Boston Public Library Anniversary and Historical 
Exhibit. For list of exhibitions see Appendix, pages 73—74. 

During the season 1927-28 there were given in the Lecture 
Hall 138 lectures and entertainments under the auspices of the 
Library, the Dickens Fellowship, the Drama League, the Field 
and Forest Club, the Ruskin Club, and other organizations. 
Following the established custom, they were all free to the public. 

The lectures were in the following fields: travel, 23 ; literature, 
17; music, 11 ; history, 9; drama, 7; art and archeology, 6; 
and miscellaneous, 33. There were also 32 concerts, recitals, 
and plays. Eight of the concerts were made possible through the 
generosity of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, while various 
societies, orchestras, and ensembles contributed one concert each. 
All of these concerts appealed to a public so wide that the doors 
often had to be closed almost an hour before the scheduled be- 
ginning. It is a privilege to announce that The Elizabeth 
Sprague Coolidge Foundation has generously offered a series 
of six concerts for the season of 1 928-29. For list of lectures, 
etc. see Appendix, pages 69-73. 

In 1927-28 the Division of University Extension of the State 
Department of Education, as customary, used the Lecture Hall 
every evening, except Thursday and Sunday, for educational 
courses. Several courses were also scheduled for morning and 
afternoon hours. 

A course on the programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
was again offered by the Division of University Extension in 
collaboration with the Library. This was arranged by Richard 
G. Appel, of the Library staff, who was assisted by other mu- 
sicians, notably Edward Burlingame Hill, Malcolm Lang, John 
P. Marshall, Daniel Gregory Mason, Alfred H. Meyer, Wal- 
ter R. Spalding, and Alexander Tansman. 

THE LIBRARY TRAINING CLASS 

A Training Class, under the supervision of Mrs. Bertha V. 
Hartzell, was opened on October 17, 1927, for applicants de- 



[59] 

siring positions in the Library, and for a few members of the 
present staff who were especially adapted to training for all- 
round library work. 

The subjects in the course for the first year included reference 
work, book selection, the principles of cataloguing and classi- 
fication, work with children and library administration. Practical 
work in the different departments of the Library is a feature of 
the course, as are also visits to other libraries and to bookstores, 
and lectures by librarians of note. 

Students already connected with the Library will take two 
years in training; new students giving full time to the work will 
complete their course in June, 1 928. 

Applicants from outside the Library are either high school 
or college graduates, who have passed the examination for 
admission. The class is limited in number, and candidates must 
be between the ages of eighteen and twenty-five. Preference is 
given to residents of Boston. 

In view of the fact that no tuition is charged, it is expected 
that applicants, upon satisfactory completion of the course and 
subsequent appointment to a position, will remain in the service 
of the Library for a period of at least two years. 

OTHER STAFF INSTRUCTION. 

During the year the Supervisor of Work with Children has 
offered to assistants who came into the work with children 
without the requisite courses in children's literature the usual 
instruction, in amount averaging one period a week. 

The Supervisor of Branches has given instruction to thirty-one 
branch library assistants in reference books and book selection. 
Marian A. McCarthy, assisted by Hilda M. Baker, has con- 
ducted a course in book mending and lettering. 

The work of the Training Class in giving to the employees of 
the Library a better equipment for their duties, is being extended 
downward by means of the new examination for the Ungraded 
Service. Temporary employees, who have not yet graduated 
from high school, are now required at the end of two months of 
experience to pass an examination on the duties in which they 

5a 



[60] 

are engaged; the candidates are given instruction in the work of 
the various departments in preparation for this examination. 

MECHANICAL AND OTHER REPAIRS. 

The reconditioning of the Central Library Building and cer- 
tain of the branch libraries has gone on apace during the year. 
The outstanding accomplishments were as follows: 

About two thirds of the roof-tiles of the Central Library Build- 
ing, of which there are some fifty thousand, have been repointed, 
and repairs have been made on the gutters, cresting, skylights, 
and certain sections of the inner condensation roof. The ex- 
terior facades and the walls of the inner court of the Central 
Building were repointed. 

The catalogue enclosure in Bates Hall has been equipped 
with new tables, shelves, and cases. Rubber tile flooring has 
been placed in the Children's Room. A new electrical switch- 
board has been installed in the basement, while a good start has 
been made in the rewiring of the entire building. The installation 
of added air ducts in the Fine Arts Department has greatly im- 
proved its ventilation. During the summer a new brick side- 
walk was laid on Dartmouth Street. 

In addition to the changes already noted at the Dorchester and 
Brighton branches, the Dorchester, Hyde Park, and Andrew 
Square branches were repainted, as well as the Newspaper and 
Teachers' Rooms and the Fine Arts reading room in the Central 
Building. 

RETIREMENTS. 

During the year the following persons retired under the Boston 
Retirement Act: South Boston Branch: Mary J. Slattery, 
cleaner, (retired January 31, voluntary), entered service Janu- 
ary 10, 1912; West End Branch: Rebecca Millmeister, second 
assistant, (retired June 30, disability), entered service May 12, 
1899; Catalogue Department: Mary A. Tenney, cataloguer, 
(retired June 30, voluntary), entered service January 25, 1897; 
Engineer and Janitor Department: Bridget Healey, cleaner, (re- 



[61] 

tired June 30, voluntary), entered service March 17, 1906; 
South End Branch: Alice McEttrick, first assistant, (retired 
September 30, disability), entered service December 12, 1902. 

CONCLUSION. 

Upon the loyal service of the staff in the Central Library and 
Branches depends the satisfactory and effective operation of 
the entire Library Department. The Director earnestly solicits 
reports of dissatisfaction with the service of the Library or of 
failure to obtain information desired. It should be remember- 
ed that inquiries requiring special knowledge should be made to 
chiefs of departments, branch librarians or first assistants, most 
of whom have been long in the Library service and know its 
resources, rather than to minor assistants. Inquiries by telephone 
are welcome. If questions are asked which do not fall within 
the province of the department of the Central Library, or of the 
branch library, in which the inquiry is made, the inquirer will 
be directed to the proper source of information. 

It is again a privilege to record my continued appreciation of 
the members of the Library staff in the regular day and evening 
service — in minor as well as in major positions — who have 
co-operated so admirably with their Director during the year. 
On the efficient performance of their duty depends the credit for 
the operation of the Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles F. D. Belden, 

Director 



APPENDIX. 



TABLE OF CENTRAL AND 


BRANCH CIRCULATION 






1922-23 


1923-24 


1924-25 


1925* 


1926 


1927 


Central Library 


590,655 


576,997 


623,024 


608,852 


644.896 


657.977 


Branches: 














Allston 


53,598 


57,705 


60,358 


63,434 


74,297 


81,984 


Andrew Square 


33,413 


51,991 


68,196 


68,772 


89,662 


92.926 


Boylston Station 


55,672 


62,340 


64,871 


64,559 


71,261 


68,196 


Brighton 


83,238 


87,672 


92,702 


89,384 


101,286 


98,907 


Charlestown 


101,140 


99,035 


98,433 


95,288 


107,562 


110,069 


City Point 


38,381 


43,277 


47,441 


50,108 


51,154 


54,232 


Codman Square 


103.810 


113,529 


114,950 


119,758 


145,001 


1 56,559 


Dorchester 


67,810 


75.608 


88,628 


90,123 


100,188 


101,957 


East Boston 


120,993 


125,968 


128,771 


125,820 


138,691 


140,379 


Faneuil 


24,944 


27,004 


30,443 


31,560 


43,782 


50,212 


Fellowes Athen. 


79,125 


71,673 


76,007 


84,765 


85,151 


89,479 


Hyde Park 


82,498 


89,716 


95,334 


93,582 


98,147 


107,168 


Jamaica Plain . 


59,970 


64,022 


68,630 


67,232 


73,117 


85,262 


Jeffries Point 


35,925 


40,857 


52,020 


53,004 


58,218 


61,893 


Lower Mills . 


17,577 


25,801 


27,259 


25.488 


32,274 


35,835 


Mattapan 


20,497 


27,699 


48,789 


58,290 


69,364 


95,085 


Memorial 


108,665 


122,159 


136,981 


135,913 


147,263 


171,034 


Mount Bowdoin 


83,376 


98,961 


107,679 


112,320 


125,907 


129,487 


Mount Pleasant 


53,846 


52,977 


53,953 


53,778 


59,101 


66,315 


Neponset 


33,263 


40,353 


41,466 


39,479 


43,349 


48,331 


North End 


96,359 


107,329 


117,075 


121,651 


1 37,896 


143,381 


Orient Heights . 


34,240 


30,580 


40,605 


45,395 


58.913 


55,625 


Parker Hill 


49,459 


44,081 


37,038 


39,860 


43,719 


45,862 


Roslindale . 


82,597 


89,336 


94,888 


93,154 


105,074 


113,150 


Roxbury Crossing 


55,91 1 


57,869 


67,143 


58,634 


62,462 


77,770 


South Boston 


124,809 


139,173 


1 52,799 


148,751 


169,625 


170,911 


South End 


99,543 


1 1 1 ,682 


117,845 


112,578 


118,315 


116,226 


1 yler Street 


39,973 


42,270 


37,321 


37,436 


43,421 


39,868 


Upham's Corner 


120,257 


109,731 


95,975 


100,288 


126,010 


152,140 


West End . 


142,470 


1 54,267 


157,321 


1 52,043 


169.142 


175,683 


West Roxbury . 


74,970 


81,199 


88,249 


88,482 


104,889 


111.754 



Total 



2,768,984 2,922,861 3.132,194 3.129,781 3,499,137 3,705,657 



'For a year of eleven months. 



[63] 

The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form : 

VOLUMES. 

1922-23 gain over preceding year ....... 96,338 

1923-24 gain over preceding year ....... 153,877 

1924-25 gain over preceding year ....... 209,333 

1925* loss from preceding year ....... 12,413 

1926f gain over preceding year (of 11 months) .... 369,356 

1927 gain over preceding year ....... 306,520 

USE OF BOOKS. 

Circulation from Central by Months. 



January, 1927 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



HOME USE 
DIRECT. 


HOME USE 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


SCHOOLS AND 

INSTITUTIONS 

THROUGH 

BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS. 


35,176 


10,663 


21,150 


66,989 


32,944 


9,946 


21,225 


64,115 


36,791 


11,322 


21,635 


69,748 


31,996 


9,094 


22,590 


63,680 


28,701 


8,026 


22,750 


59,477 


21,550 


6,609 


22,750 


50,909 


22,355 


5,406 


6,047 


33,808 


20,663 


5,068 


6,060 


31,791 


22,052 


5,699 


8,240 


35,991 


31,132 


8,403 


14,000 


53,535 


33,008 


9,534 


22,210 


64,752 


30,322 


9,300 


23,560 


63,182 



346,690 



99,070 



212,217 



657,977 



Distribution of Total Circulation. 





HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 




Central Library: 


USE. 


INSTITUTIONS. 


TOTALS. 


a. Direct 


346,690 






b. Through Branches 








1 . Deposit Collection 


76,602 






2 General Collections 


22,468 






c. Schools and Institutions th 


ough 






Branch Department 




212,217 


657,977 


Branches: 








Allston 


81,984 




81 ,984 


Andrew Square 


92,926 




92,926 


Boylston Station 


68,196 




68,196 


Brighton 


75,289 


23,618 


98,907 


Charlestown 


98,098 


11,971 


110,069 


City Point 


54,232 




54,232 


Carried formard 


470,725 


35,589 


506,314 



* Eleven month period. 

t Gain over an approximation of preceding twelve months 233,279. 



[64] 



Brought forward 
Codman Square 
Dorchester 
East Boston 
Faneuil 
Fellowes Athenasum 
Hyde Park 
Jamaica Plain 
Jeffries Point 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan 
Memorial 
Mount Bowdoin 
Mount Pleasant 
Neponset 
North End 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Roslindale 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boston 
South End 
Tyler Street 
Upham's Corner 
West End 
West Roxbury 



470,725 


35,589 


506 314 


144,847 


11,712 


1 56,559 


84,430 


17,527 


101,957 


120,171 


20,208 


140,379 


50.212 




50,212 


71,434 


18,045 


89,479 


95,308 


11,860 


107,168 


72,977 


12,285 


85,262 


61 ,893 




61 ,893 


35,835 




35,835 


95,085 




95,085 


167,356 


' 3,678 


171.034 


124,300 


5,187 


129,487 


66,315 




66,315 


48,331 




48,331 


141,594 


' 1,787 


143,381 


55,625 




55,625 


45,862 




45,862 


102,781 


10,369 


113,150 


77,770 




77,770 


144,820 


26,091 


170,911 


99,230 


16,996 


116,226 


39,868 




39,868 


151,402 


' 738 


152,140 


1 50,794 


24,889 


175,683 


91,776 


19,978 


111,754 



2,810,741 



236,939 



3,047,680 



These figures are condensed into the following : 

Books Lent for Home Use, including Circulation through 
Schools and Institutions. 



From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 
the Branches) .......... 

From Branches (excluding books received from Central Library) 



Total 



Comparative. 



Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) : 
Direct home use .... 
Through Branches 

Branch Libraries circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) : 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch system) 



1926. 



340,585 
106,456 



657,977 
3,047,680 

3,705,657 



1927. 



447,041 
2,612,108 

439,988 
3.499,137 



346,690 
99,070 



445,760 
2.810.741 

447.156 
3.705.657 



[65] 



Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 



Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts . 



in Massachusetts 



Totals ..... 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts 



Totals .... 

Borrowed from other libraries for use here 



1926. 

1.580 

250 


1927. 

1,723 

264 


1,830 


1,987 


475 

117 


478 
104 


592 


582 


24 


24 



The classified direct circulation of the branches was as 
follows, for two successive years : 



1926 1927 

VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 



825,834 . 


32 


901,688 


32 


256,018 


10 


273,932 


10 


1 ,022,430 


39 


1,107,625 


39 


507,826 


19 


527,496 


19 



Fiction for adults . 
Non-fiction for adults 
Juvenile fiction 
Juvenile non-fiction 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 
the following percentages: 



Fiction \ 
Non-fiction 



1926. 

PERCENTAGE. 
48.5 
51.5 



1927. 

PERCENTAGE. 

47.7 
52.3 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 



BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE. 



For the Central Library: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 

For branches: 

From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 



1926. 


1927. 


9,474 


9,870 


3,237 


2,688 



67,435 



12,711 



67.435 



66,424 
3,289 



12,558 



69,713 



Totals 



80,146 



82,271 



[66] 



The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



Accessions by purchase . 
Accessions by gift . 
Accessions by Statistical Department 
Accessions by exchange 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound . 
Accessions by serials bound 

Totals . 



THE 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 

Serials 

Branches 
Recatalogued 

Totals 



CENTRAL. BRANCHES. 


TOTAL 
VOLUMES. 


12,558 


69,713 


82,271 


11,437 


1,060 


12,497 


80 




80 


144 




144 


1 ,622 


70 


1,732 


116 




116 


1,647 




1,647 


27,644 


70,843 


98,487 


CATALOGUE. 






1926 


1927 


VOLS. AND m „ „ 
TITLES. 
PARTS. 


VOLS. AND 
PARTS. 


TITLES. 


23.496 14,544 


25,811 


1 5,932 


5,475 .... 


6,697 




57,473 50,246 


67,602 


57,543 


17,819 9,358 


15,337 


8,261 



104,263 74,148 115,447 81,736 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 
The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is: 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 



General collection, new books(including continuations) .... 

Special collections, new books and transfers ...... 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years, but now found, transfers 
from branches, etc. 



Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. ............ 

Net gain at Central Library ......... 

Net gain at branches ........... 



24,553 
2,081 

1,904 

28,538 



12,304 

16,234 

13,816 

Net gain, entire library system ......... 30,050 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 

1852-53 .... 9.688 1855-56 .... 28,080 

1853-54 .... 16,221 1856-57 .... 34,896 

1854-55 .... 22,617 1857-58 .... 70,851 



[67] 



1858- 


59 






\ 


78,043 


1893 . 








597,152 


1859-60 








85.031 


1894 . 








610,375 


1860-61 








97,386 


1895 . 








628,297 


1861-62 








105,034 


1896-97 








663,763 


1862-63 








110,563 


1897-98 








698,888 


1863-64 








116,934 


1898-99 








716,050 


1864-65 








123,016 


1899-1900 








746,383 


1865-66 








130,678 


1900-01 








781,377 


1866-67 








136.080 


1901-02 








812.264 


1867-68 








144,092 


1902-03 








835,904 


1868-69 








1 52.796 


1903-04 








848,884 


1869-70 








160,573 


1904-05 








871,050 


1870-71 








1 79,250 


1905-06 








878,933 


1871-72 








192,958 


1906-07 








903,349 


1872-73 








209.456 


1907-08 








922,348 


1873-74 








260.550 


1908-09 








941,024 


1874-75 








276,918 


1909-10 








961,522 


1875-76 








297,873 


1910-11 








987,268 


1876-77 








321,010 


1911-12 








. 1,006,717 


1877-78 








345.734 


1912-13 








1,049,011 


1878-79 








360.963 


1913-14 








1,067.103 


1879-80 








377,225 


1914-15 








1,098,702 


1880-81 . 








390,982 


1915-16 








1,121,747 


1881-82 








404,221 


1916-17 








1,139,682 


1882-83 








422,116 


1917-18 








1,157,326 


1883-84 . 








438,594 


1918-19 








1,173,695 


1884-85 . 








453,947 


1919-20 . 








1,197.498 


1885 . 








460,993 


1920-21 . 








1,224,510 


1886 










479.421 


1921-22 . 








1,258.211 


1887 










492.956 


1922-23 . 








1,284,094 


1888 










505.872 


1923-24 . 








1.308,041 


1889 










520,508 


1924-25 . 








1,333.264 


1890 










536,027 


1925 








1,363,515 


1891 










556,283 


1926 








1 ,388,439 


1892 










576,237 


1927 








1,418,489 


Volumes in entire library system . 










1.418,489 


Volumes in the branches 


• 






391,125 


These volumes are located as 


follows : 


Central Library . 1,027,364 


Mattapan . . 6,663 


Allston 




6,675 


Memorial 




12,961 


Andrew Square . 




6,274 


Mount Bowdoin 




10,090 


Boylston Station . 




5,700 


Mount Pleasant . 




6,379 


Brighton 




19,086 


Neponset . 




5,127 


Charlestown 




15,133 


North End. 




11.959 


City Point 




8,433 


Orient Heights . 




5.413 


Codman Square . 




12,328 


Parker Hill . 




5,410 


Dorchester . 




12,957 


Roslindale 




12,182 


East Boston 




21,378 


Roxbury Crossing 




7,486 


Faneuil 




6,758 


South Boston 




20,589 


Fellowes Athenaeum 




37,043 


South End . 




14,678 


Hyde Park . 




35,898 


Tyler Street 




5,966 


Jamaica Plain 




17.555 


Upham's Corner 




12,846 


Jeffries Point 




4,875 


West End 




22,061 


Lower 


Mi 


Is 


. 




3,949 


West Roxb 


ury 






17,273 



[68] 



THE BINDERY. 



Number of volumes bound in various styles 
Magazines stitched .... 

Volumes repaired ..... 
Volumes guarded . . . . 

Maps mounted ..... 

Photographs and engravings, etc. mounted 
Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1926 


1927 


66,946 


68.313 


187 


201 


2,176 


2.036 


1,612 


1.684 


90 


41 


4,908 


3.044 


64,573 


88.997 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 



Requisitions received and filled 
Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) 
Signs ..... 

Blank forms (numbered series) 
Forms, circulars, and sundries (outside 
Catalogues, pamphlets, and bibliographical programs 





1926 


1927 




237 


203 




5,952 


4.050 




66,169 


65.417 




760 


480 




33,583 


32,160 




735 


283 




. 3,402,038 


3,127,019 


lumbered series 


69.370 


46,317 


1 programs 


55,490 


43,695 



[69] 



OHHPO< 


03 


3 70 70 pi O 

!<ccnr 


, ^.O 


H<o 


55 55 35 C 


ft-C ) ^ 


>H H a 2 


^r^ 


es Bo 

RATICtt 

Fund: 

Fund 

pprop 


Catal 
mes ac 

5 • 


j3 ui « - C 


D- O 


HZ D 




s n 


p pi 


i ° 


a a 


m 





CO? 

O 2 5- O m 

g a- T3 ' 

° § 

pi h 

o 
2 



> 

-;C pi 
g in 

S» O 
PfS? 



CO 
H C0OO 



D-2L2 

Co 

H 
Pi 
2 



UJ-6/J- NJ 

O — 00 vj— • 

S> j* V>» NJ ps 

bbsvjvo — 

OO^-UONi 

o-mi^o 



oj-e* 45- 

NJ — NJ^UJ 
.fc* On [sj p\ — 

On "sO N3 "vj 00 
O 00 ■*»■ NJ QN 



OJ£#- -fc. 

On — -fc». 00 ■*>• 

Uivj — sONi 

to or> 01 — ^ 

O sO On ON vO 
O O © Nj 00 



OJ On 

00 O 

00 -fe. 

00 on 



OJ On 

-t^ vO 

— 

— sO 

OJ vO 



OJ On 

OO 00 

c> *o 

bo ho 
OJ -fc». 



\Q 

to 

00 

bO 



-U 

CO 

nO 

CN 

o 



00 

bo 

bJ 

CO 



— OJ 

U> ON 

"©"— 

OJ sO 
on »v] 



— oj 

O0 On 

"—bo 

On o 
"*J O0 



Nj N) 
bO On 

"vO*vO 

ho O 

ON bo 



00 
00 



on 
o 

OJ 



2l 

bo 
k) 

O 



— NJ 

NJ OO 

ON — 
On vj 
*v| OO 



— NJ 

on sO 

00 -u 



O0 — bo 

ON p p> 
bo I kj "on 

0DU*)U> 



00—0 
^1 00 

^] On 

ON — Ui 

M|K)0 



oloo 

00 ! on ON 

"00 ] !u \o 

vO I O sO 



O 

o 
on 



NJ 00 
-U Nj 



O 



CO 

c 



1 


2 





> 


Nj 






O 


_ 


*n 


vO 




O 


H 


f 


I 
m 


O 




vj 


tt 






> 

— H 

r h 
— pi 

Nj 2 



O Nj 00 O -fc' 

obo o^ uo 00 
OO .fe. O Nj O^ 



.*>. Nj ^J — -U 
— -fc. 00 Oj OO 
sO N) N) OO Ui 
vO NJ — 00 -fc>- 

— -* f/j «^J -^ 

O NJ On -fc>. 0^ 
-fc. vj Ui — O0 

In Ln O ■t' ^ 
ff'OOoO- 
v0 4^. NJ — VjJ 



— vp 

tfe. NJ 

ON — 
VjO Ui 



ON ^O 

bo vj 

4>- NJ 

ON 00 



00 — 
— 0-1 

ON ^ 



CN 
CO 



to 
10 

vO 



CO 



I s0 y* 

bo ui 

NJ ON 



— I © — 



NJ O 



OO O 
OO OJ 

*oi ; 00 nj 



NJ NJ 
— NJ 



O 

Oi 

O 
*NJ 

Oo 

OO 



^1 

ON 

00 

\Q 

00 



4». — OO 

tu "nj'nj 
00 I on NJ 



— ON 

O po 

*NJ O 
O0 vj 



— I OJ 00 






vO 


__, 


CO 


on 


00 


ON 


bo 


ON 


"4^ 


NJ NJ 


on 


00 


—■ 


^1 


"»*) 


^ 


ON 


— ■ 



— I NJ 00 

oj : 00 on 

p j NJ^vj 

ON *NJ *Jv 
O0 I NJ on 
NJ I ^ on 



— ■*! 



NJ O0 \D 
00 NJ on 

4». Ui 00 

O I *— "vO 
O ON OJ 
Ji. 1 OJ — ' 



Co 



OO o 
vO NJ 



-fc. , — ■ OJ 
CO t NJ ON 
vO ■ on *. 



vO 


<; 


— ■ 


Pi 


ON 




1 


< 


•vl 


PI 




> 




70 




co 


_^ 




vO 




NJ 




NJ 

1 




NJ 




OO 





NJ 



Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


10. 



[70] 

THE LECTURES OF 1927-1928. 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were 
illustrated with lantern slides. 
1927 

The American Indian Past and Present. Dr. Warren K. 
Moorehead. 
*Paul Claudel, Ambassador and Litterateur. William M. 

Stinson, S. J. 
^Concert. Gordon String Quartet of Chicago. (Elizabeth 

Sprague Coolidge series.) 
*Prof. E. Charlton Black Memorial. Address by Rt. Rev. 
William F. Anderson, D. D. In Memoriam: poem by 
Laura Simmonds. A Group of Songs, rendered by 
Mrs. Alice Wentworth MacGregor, and Raymond 
Coon, Pianist. (Ruskin Club.) 
Today in the Lands of Yesterday: Changing Scenes in 

India, China and Japan. Walter W. Allerton. 
On the Sea of Noon: Glimpses of Borneo, Java, Ceylon, 
and the Philippines. John C. Bowker, M. D. 
^Concert. Boston Chamber Music Trio. 
Our National Parks. Henry Warren Poor, A. M. 

(Under the auspices of the National Park Service, De- 
partment of the Interior, Washington, D. C.) 
Oct. 23. *Folk Songs of the British Isles, France and the South. 

Claramond Thompson, (in costume.) 
Oct. 23. ^Concert. Tokar String Quartet. 
Oct. 24. The Human Side of Egyptian Sculpture. Dows Dunham, 

A. M. (Ruskin Club.) 
Oct. 27. Sharing a Hobby: Studies in Color Photography. Mr. 

and Mrs. Arthur M. Keith. 
Oct. 30. *Our Country's Grandmother. Mrs. Christine von K. Wade. 
Oct. 30. Boston 75 Years Ago. Walter K. Watkins. 
Nov. 3. Famous Actors, Old and New, with Imitations of their 

Acting. Francis Henry Wade, M. D., Ph. D. 
Nov. 6. *Folk Music of Many Lands. (Und^r the auspices of the 

International Institute, Y.W.C.A.) 
Nov. 6. ^Intimate Piano Concert, with interpretative talk. Margaret 

Anderton, Pianist. 
Nov. 10. *The Trend of Contemporary Drama. Clayton Hamilton. 
Nov. 1 0. Forest and Trails in the White Mountains. Philip W. 

Ayres, (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Nov. 1 3. ^Dramatizing the Novel. Frank W. C. Hersey, A.M. 
(Drama League Course.) 



Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


20. 



[71] 

Nov. 1 3. ^Concert. Persinger String Quartet of Santa Barbara. 

(Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge series.) 
Nov. 14. *Dante. Lilian Whiting. (Ruskin Club.) 
Nov. 15. The Riffs of Morocco: Their Customs and Lore. C. S. 
Coon. (Under the auspices of the Boston Branch of 
the American Folk Lore Society.) 
Nov. 1 7. Abraham Lincoln. Guy Richardson. 
Nov. 20. English Music Alive Again. Henry Gideon, A.M., and 

assistants. Musical and lantern illustrations. 
Nov. 20. *Folk Music of Many Lands. (Under the auspices of the 
International Institute, Y.W.C.A.) 
*The Truth about Kipling's India. Dhan Gopal Mukerji. 
* America's Story in Song. Catherine Smith. Musical il- 
lustrations. 
27. ^Concert. Durrell String Quartet. 

A Trip Around the Mediterranean. Harriet Everard 

Johnson, S.T.B. (Ruskin Club.) 
Across Czechoslovakia, the Heart of Europe. C. F. 
Deerbon. 
^Concert. Orchestra of the Lincoln House Association. 
Jacques Hoffmann, Conductor. 
Some Early Playhouses of London. Sarah E. Palmer, 

M. D. 
Through Six National Parks with the Field and Forest 
Club in 1927. Rev. Charles W. Casson. (Field and 
Forest Club Course.) 
I 1. *The Problem Play. Robert E. Rogers, A. M. (Drama 

League Course.) 
I 1 . *Musical Program. Mrs. M. H. Gulesian, Composer- 
Pianist, and Mme Olga Avierino, Soprano. 
Traveller's Luck in Europe. Mrs. Charles B. Hall. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
The Nativity in Stereopticon Slides, Music, and Tableaux: 
a Synthesis of Music, Color, Picture and Action. 
H. Augustine Smith, assisted by the Choral Art Society 
of the School of Religious Education of Boston Uni- 
versity and by soloists. 
Dec. 1 8. When Dickens read the Christmas Carol in Boston on 
Christmas Eve. Edward F. Payne, President, Boston 
Branch of the Dickens Fellowship. 
Dec. 1 8. ^Concert. Musical Art String Quartet of New York. 

(Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge series.) 
Dec. 1 9. *A Christmas Message. Mrs. Minnie Meserve Soule. 
Music by Mrs. Alice Wentworth MacGregor. (Ruskin 
Club.) 



Nov. 
Nov. 


26. 
2V. 


Nov. 
Nov. 


27. 
28. 


Dec. 


1. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


8. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


15. 



[72] 

Dec. 22. *Song and Satire of the Eighteenth Century. Lecture- 
recital. Emma Marshall Denkinger, Ph. D., and 
Esther M. Wood, Soprano. 
The Madonna in Italian Art. Mrs. William Dana Orcutt. 

Long Wharf and the Old Boston Waterfront; History 
and Reminiscences. Gilbert R. Payson. 
^Symbolism in Modern Drama. Robert E. Rogers, A. M. 

(Drama League Course.) 
*Intersettlement Concert by pupils from the Music School 

Settlements. 
*The Making of a Ruskin Collection. Charles E. Good- 
speed. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Lure of New England. Percy A. Brigham. (Field 

and Forest Club Course.) 
Northern Italy and the Dolomites. Rev. A. E. Worman. 
^Legends and Folk Songs of Finland. Aino Saari. Musi- 
cal illustrations. 
*Song Recital. Elsie Winsor Bird, Soprano. 
The Life and Art of Edgar Allan Poe. Joseph Lorraine. 
Flemish and Dutch Art: a comparison and valuation. 
Adriaan M. DeGroot. 
^Concert. Choral Society of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 
22. ^Modern Piano Music of the French, Russian and English 
Schools. Elizabeth Siedoff. Lecture-piano recital. 
*The Witch of Salem: Cadman's New American Opera. 
Grace May Statsman. Musical illustrations. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
Evangeline Country at Apple-blossom Time. Edwin A. 
Freeman. 
*The Educational Value of Play Producing in Schools. 
Marie Ware Laughton, Director, The Out-Door 
Players. 
^Concert. Hart House String Quartet of Toronto. (Eliza- 
beth Sprague Coolidge series.) 
Nature's Mysteries. Dan McCowan. (Contributed by 
the Bureau of Commercial Economics, Washington, 
D. C.) 
^Russian Music. Dr. John P. Marshall. 
^Concert. The Players of Concerted Music. 
The English Lake Country and its Poets. Olive C. Grigor. 
(Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Feb. 12. *Our Social Comedies. Mrs. Carl L. Schrader, President, 
Drama League of Boston. (Drama League Course.) 



Dec. 29. 

1928 
Jan. 5. 


Jan. 


8. 


Jan. 


8. 


Jan. 


9. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 
Jan. 


14. 
15. 


Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 


15. 
19. 
19. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


26. 


Jan. 


29. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


2. 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


5. 
5. 
9. 



[73] 



Feb. 


12 


Feb. 


13 


Feb. 


16 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


23. 


Feb. 


26. 


Feb. 


26. 


Feb. 


27. 


Mar. 


1. 


Mar. 


4. 


Mar. 


4. 


Mar. 


8. 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


12. 


Mar. 


15. 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


25. 



^Concert. Burgin and Durrell String Quartets of Boston. 

(Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge series.) 
*The Observance of John Ruskin's Birthday, February 8, 

1818. (Ruskin Club.) 
Unknown Newfoundland. Robert H. Tait. (Contributed 

by the Bureau of Commercial Economics, Washington, 

D. C.) 

*The Odes of the Roman Poet Horace, in musical settings, 

ancient and modern. W. B. McDaniel, II, A. M. 
*Intersettlement Concert by Pupils from the Music School 

Settlements. 
Gainsborough, Painter of Beautiful Women, 1727—1927. 

Martha A. S. Shannon. 
* Authors and Wives, Face to Face. John E. Pember. 
^Concert. Gertrude Ehrhart, soprano, Carmela Ippolito, 

violin, and Nicolas Slonimsky, piano. 
*The Purpose of Literature. Prof. Earl Augustus Aldrich. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Picturesque Germany. John G. Bucher. (Contributed 

by the Bureau of Commercial Economics, Washington, 

D. C.) 

*Negro Writers and Composers. Recital. Dorothy 

Richardson, contralto, Eleanor Trent Wallace, reader, 

and Dorothy Wood, accompanist. 
^Concert. Boston Civic Symphony Orchestra. Joseph F. 

Wagner, Conductor. 
Mountain and Woodland Trails. Frank H. Sprague. 

(Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Folk Plays: the Foundation of Modern American Drama. 

Albert Hatton Gilmer, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
^Concert. New York String Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 

Coolidge series.) 
*Ruskin's Country. Mrs. Herbert J. Gurney. (Ruskin 

Club.) 
^Varied Program. The Strolling Players. Helene Martha 

Boll, Director. 
^Concert. Orchestra of the Lincoln House Association. 

Jacques Hoffmann, Conductor. 
*Intersettlement Concert by Pupils from the Music School 

Settlements. 
Pilgrim Land and Old New England Whaling. Rev. 

George T. Plummer. 
*Music of the Church, the Home, and the Nation. Mme 

Beale Morey. Vocal and Instrumental illustrations. 



[74] 



Mar. 


26. 


Mar. 


29. 


Apr. 


1. 


Apr. 


1. 


Apr. 
Apr. 


5. 

8. 


Apr. 


8. 


Apr. 


9. 


Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 


12. 

1. 

15. 


Apr. 


15. 


Apr. 


22. 


Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 


23. 
26. 
29. 


May 
May 


3. 
6. 



May 



The Beauties of Switzerland. Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
General Allenby's Palestine Campaign. Lieut. Col. Girard 
L. McEntee. 
*The Shortest Trail to Bird Acquaintance, by Way of Song 

and Call. Lester W. Smith. 
^Concert. The Pierian Sodality Orchestra of Harvard 
University. Nicolas Slonimsky, Conductor. 
Spain, the Land of History and Romance. Ellen E. Page. 
^Reminiscences of Famous Shakesperian Actors. Helen 

Adelaide Shaw. 
' v 'Concert. Lenox String Quartet of New York. (Elizabeth 
Sprague Coolidge series.) 
A New Experiment in Balancing Education. Arthur W. 
Gilbert, Ph. D. Mile Berthe Hebert, soloist. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
Robert Burns. Charles S. Olcott. 
*Piano Recital for Young People. Persis Cox. 
^Platform arrangement of Cyrano de Bergerac, by Edmond 

Rostand. Edward Abner Thompson, A. M. 
*Intersettlement Concert by Pupils from the Music School 

Settlements. 
*The Modern Church Music Renaissance. Carl F. Pfat- 

teicher, Th. D. Musical illustrations. 
*Goya. Ellen E. Page. (Ruskin Club.) 

From London to Land's End. Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 
^Concert. Leonora Choral Society of Bradford Academy. 
Frederick Johnson, Conductor. 
Home Life in Japan. Marguerite Rand. 
The New Art of Mobile Color. G. A. Shook. Color 
Organ and Musical illustrations. 
^Concert. Rose String Quartet of Vienna. (Under the 
auspices of the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation.) 



Installation 

date 
Jan. 14. 



Feb. 



Feb. 



5. 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS. 1927. 
In Exhibition Room. 



Paintings and etchings by Anthony Thieme. 

American Book Illustration. First annual exhibition, by 

American Institute of Graphic Arts. 
Color prints of the works of Jan Vermeer van Delft, from 

collections in the Division of Fine Arts. 



Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


26. 


Mar. 


7. 


Mar. 


19. 


Mar. 


21. 


Apr. 


2. 


Apr. 


4. 



[75] 

Prints of George Washington. 

Centenary exhibition of material relating to Ludwig von 
Beethoven. 

Historic German buildings, to accompany Beethoven 
material. 

Original designs entered in the "House Beautiful" Cover 
Design Competition. 

Memorial exhibition of rare manuscripts and editions of the 
work of Sir Isaac Newton, 1642—1727. 

Fine Printing. Third annual exhibition by The American 
Institute of Graphic Arts. 

"The Graphic Process": a series of actual prints, edited 
by Louis A. Holman — recently acquired by the 
Library. 
Apr. 18. "Workers Education", in connection with the 5th annual 
convention of the Workers Education Bureau of 
America ; including original oil paintings by Gerrit 
A. Beneker. 

Selected work from Lowthorpe School of Landscape Archi- 
tecture for Women. 

"Better Homes Week": material loaned by the Small 
House Service Bureau. 

Resources in the Library for study and research in the 
Fine Arts. 

"Creative Expression in Design and Drawing" ; work by 
pupils in the Boston Public Schools. (Held in Sargent 
Corridor.) 
June 1 . Historical exhibition commemorating the seventy-fifth anni- 

versary of the Boston Public Library; material from 
various departments of the Library. 

Photographic enlargements by William E. Merrill. 

"Fifty Books of the Year" and "Printing for Commerce", 
lent by the American Institute of Graphic Arts. 

"Old World Handicraft", lent by the International Insti- 
tute of the Young Women's Christian Association. 

"Sculpture in Soap", lent by the Procter & Gamble Com- 
pany. 

Color prints of Christmas subjects, from the Seeman and 
Medici collections. 



Apr. 


30. 


May 


2. 


May 


16. 


May 


16. 



Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


15. 


Nov. 


5. 


Dec. 


5. 


Dec. 


17. 



[76] 

IN BARTON-TICKNOR ROOM. 

January Books illustrating the historical development of Children's 

literature. 

January "Masterpieces of Modern Printing." 

April Examples of the work of the Kelmscott Press. 

May Orderly books of the Revolutionary War, including the re- 

cent accession, "Peter Scull's Orderly Book." 

October Pictographs of the Paleolithic and Neolithic eras. 

December Editions of Newton's "Principia," including first editions 
recently acquired by the Library. 

SELECTED LIST OF GIFTS AND GIVERS. 

Antin, Mary, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Original manuscript of 
"The Promised Land" by Mary Antin. For the Artz Collection. 

Bates, Katherine Lee, Wellesley. "The Pilgrim Ship," by Katherine 
Lee Bates. Inscribed copy for the Artz Collection. 

Beethoven Association, The, New York City. Facsimile reproduction of 
the original manuscript of Beethoven's "Sonata Appassionata" which 
belongs to the Library of the Paris Conservatory of Music. No. 1 30 
of 500 copies printed for the Beethoven Association of New York. 

Beneker, Gerrit A., West Newton. Colored reproductions of paintings 
by Gerrit A. Beneker, with descriptive text. 

Connolly, Rt. Rev. Msgr. Arthur T. Fourteen volumes of "Acta 
Sanctae Sedis" 1897 to 1908 inclusive, and nineteen volumes of 
"Acta Apostolicae Sedis. Commentarium Ofhciale" 1909—1927. 
Msgr. Connolly's gift completes and continues the Library set given 
by the late Archbishop Williams in 1897. 

Conway, Katherine E., Estate of, through James J. Conway, Executor. 
A collection of 88 volumes from Miss Conway's private library. 
Many of these are inscribed copies from the authors who were her 
personal friends and include names of well-known contemporary 
writers. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Elizabeth S., of Washington. A set in facsimile of the 
works of Claudio Monteverdi, printed in Venice in 1607 and re- 
printed in Asolo 1926 in a limited edition of 10 volumes. For the 
Music Division. 

Curtis, Miss Mary, Hamilton, Massachusetts. 660 photographs of 
architecture, painting and sculpture in European galleries. 

Deering, Charles, Estate of, Chicago. Tamarit. Some notes con- 
cerning this historical and legendary Catalonian town. Privately 
printed. In English and Spanish. Folio. In % morocco binding. 

Fleischner, Otto. II Libro della bella donna. Composto da Messer 
Federico Luigini da Vdine. Venetio, 1554. 
For the Galatea Collection. 



[77] 

Forbes, Mrs. J. Malcolm, Milton. (Through the Woodrow Wilson 
Foundation). Selected literary and political papers of Woodrow 
Wilson. New York., 1925. Five sets of three volumes each. 

Harper, Henry H. The story of a Nephrectomy. A true history of a 
semi-tragic episode, by Henry H. Harper. Norwood, 1927. 

Hersey, Miss Heloise E. Eighty-two volumes of miscellaneous works 
and 47 numbers of the Anglo-Catholic Congress Books. (London, 

1923.) 

Hispanic Society of America, The President and Trustees of, New York 
City. A complete set of the Publications of the Society in 200 
volumes. A noteworthy addition to the Ticknor Collection of 
Spanish and Portuguese books. 

Loring, Miss Katharine P., Prides Crossing. At Burnside. Verses by 
two friends. (George E. Woodberry and Louisa Putnam Loring) 
"Privately printed by D. B. Updike, The Merrymount Press, Bos- 
ton, in January 1927." For the Artz Collection. 

McGreevy, Michael T. 1 82 photographs of base-ball players covering 
a period of fifty years, collected by Mr. McGreevy. 
"These pictures have accumulated through the past fifty years and 
represent in photographic form the evolution of our great national 
game." From letter of giver. 

Mackay, Clarence H., New York City. The Clarence H. Mackay 
Collection. Italian Schools. By Wilhelm R. Valentiner, New 
York. 1926. In Morocco binding. Large folio. (No. 60 of 
100 copies printed for private distribution.) 

Phillips, Miss Mary E. Edgar Allan Poe the Man. By Mary E. 
Phillips. With a foreword by James H. Whitty. Chicago, 1926, 
2 vols. (Inscribed to Mr. C. F. D. Belden and members of the 
Staff.) 

Sargent, Miss Emily and Mrs. Francis Ormond, London. (Through Mr. 
Thomas A. Fox.) Thirty-five volumes from the London Studio 
of John Singer Sargent. These books were obviously used by Mr. 
Sargent in connection with the decorations in the Library. 

Schirmer, G., Inc., New York City. Seventy-one pieces of music for the 
Allen A. Brown Library. 

Sohier, William D. 294 volumes of miscellaneous literature including 
poetry, history, Civil War, travel, guide books, etc. 

Stinson, Rev. William M., S. J. Boston College in the World War. 
1917-18. Chestnut Hill. (1927.) 
During the year the Columbia Phonograph Company of New York 

and the Victor Talking Machine Company of Camden, N. J., have 

continued to enrich the Library collection to the extent of 1 1 7 and 63 

records respectively. These records, added to the collection of the Library, 

are of great use in illustrating the weekly lectures on the Symphony 

Concerts. 



[78] 

OFFICIALS OF THE LIBRARY. 

Director, Charles F. D. Belden. 

Reference Librarian, Frank H. Chase. 

Executive Secretary, Delia Jean Deery. 

Auditor, Helen Schubarth. 

Bates Hall Centre Desk, Newspaper and Patent Department: Pierce E. 
Buckley, Chief. 

Newspaper Division, Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 

Patent Division, William J. Ennis, Assistant in Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches.* 

Central Branch Issue Division, Alice V. Stevens, Assistant in Charge. 

Branch Binding Division, Marian A. McCarthy, Assistant in Charge. 

Shipping Division, Robert F. Dixon, Assistant in Charge. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 

Card Division, T. Francis Brennan, Assistant in Charge. 

Shelf Division, Michael McCarthy, Chief Classifier, in Charge. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 
Children. 

Children's Librarian, Central Library, Mary C. Toy. 
Editor: Zoltan Haraszti. 

Engineer and Janitor Department: William F. Quinn, Supt. of Buildings. 
Genealogy Division: Agnes C. Doyle, Assistant in Charge. 
Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief. 
Library Training Class: Bertha V. Hartzell, Supervisor. 
Ordering Department: Theodosia E. Macurdy, Chief. 
Periodical Room: Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 
Printing Department. Francis Watts Lee, Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department: , Chief. 

Barton-Ticknor Division, Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge. 

Music Division, Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 

Technology Division, George S. Maynard, Assistant in Charge. 
Statistical Department: Horace L. Wheeler, Chief. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 
Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 
Boylston Station, Pearl B. Smart. 
Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 
Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

• For Branch Librarians, see below. 



[79] 

City Point, Alice L. Murphy. 
Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 
Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 
East Boston, Laura M. Cross. 
Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 
Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 
Hyde Park, Grace L. Murray. 
Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 
Jeffries Point, Margaret A. Calnan. 
Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 
Mattapan, Ada Aserkoff. 
Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 
Mount Bowdoin, Theodora B. Scoff. 
Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 
Neponset, Ellen C. McShane. 
North End, Mary F. Curley. 
Orient Heights, Catherine F. Flannery. 
Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 
Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 
Roxbury Crossing, Edith R. Nickerson. 
South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 
South End, Margaret A. Sheridan. 
Tyler Street, Lois Clark. 
Upham's Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 
West End, Fanny Goldstein. 
West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



INDEX. 



Accessions, (See Books). 

Balance sheet, 26-29. 

Bates Hall, 46. 

Bequests, (See Gifts). 

Bindery, 68. 

Books, accessions, 4, 37-42, 65; de- 
posits, 53, 56; expenditures, 4, 39, 
40, 51; important accessions, 40-42; 
inter-library loans, 56, 65; larger ap- 
propriations needed, 5, 32-33; shelf- 
room, 37; standard reference for 
branches, 57; total number and lo- 
cation, 66-67. 

Borrowers, (See Registration). 

Branches, better quarters, 2, 36, 38; 
books, 39, 40; children's rooms, 52, 
56; Examining Committee on, 32, 
35; Baker Library, 6-9; more need- 
ed, 38, 57; report, 57; volumes in, 67. 

Business Branch, (See George F. 
Baker Library). 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 43, 
66. 

Children's Department, 34, 51-55; at 
branches, 52, 56; staff instruction, 59. 

Circulation, 4, 37, 51, 56, 62-65. 

Comparison of growth, table, 69. 

Concerts (See Lectures and Concerts). 

Connolly, Msgr. A. T., elected Piesi. 
dent, I. 

Deposits, 53, 56. 

Director's report, 37-61 . 

Dwinnell, Clifton H., appointed a trus- 
tee, I . 

Employees (See Staff). 

Estimates, 3. 



Examining Committee, members, 24; 
report, 30—36. 

Exhibitions, 55, 57, 74-76. 

Finance, balance sheet, 26-29; esti- 
mates, 3 ; Examining Committee on, 
30; expenditures, 37; for books, 39- 
40, 51; receipts, 3; special appropri- 
ation, 9-10, trust funds, 10-23. 

Gaston, William A., decease, I. 

George F. Baker Library, transfer of 
business books to, and agreement, 6-9, 

37. 

Gifts and bequests, 4, 39, 42, 76-87. 

Government Document Room, 47. 

Harvard University School of Business 
Administration, (See George F. Baker 
Library). 

Information Office, 47. 

Inter-library loans, 56, 65. 

Kirstein, Louis E., elected Vice Presi- 
dent, 1 ; addition to fund, 4, 42. 

Lecture Hall, use of, 58, 70-74. 

Lectures and Concerts, 58, 70-74. 

Needs, (See Repairs and Improve- 
ments). 

Newspaper Room, 47. 

Open Shelf Room, 47. 

Patent Room, 47. 

Periodical Room, 49. 

Printing Department, 68. 

Publications, 44. 

Reed, Helen Leah, bequest of, 4, 42. 

Registration Department, 42—43. 

Repairs and Improvements, 1-2, 30, 

35-36, 38, 54, 60. 
Retirements, 60. 



[81 



Sarah E. Pratt Fund, addition to, 4. 
Schools work with, 34, 53. 
Seventy-fifth anniversary progress, 37. 
Shelf Department, (See Catalogue). 
Special Libraries, 33, 41-45, 50. 
Staff, instruction, 38, 58-59; officials, 

78; retirements, 60. 
Storrow, Elizabeth Randolph and Helen 

Storrow, gift, 4, 42. 
Story Hour, 54. 



Tables: Accessions, 65—66; circulation, 
62-65; Comparison of growth, 69; 
exhibitions, 74-76; gifts, 76-77; lec- 
tures and concerts, 70-74; trust funds, 
10-23; volumes and location, 66-67. 

Teacher's Room, 55. 

Training Class, 38, 58. 

Treasures, safeguarding etc. 9-10, 31- 
33. 

Trust Funds, 10-23. 

Trustees, organization, 1 ; report 1-24. 



Central Library, Copley Square. 1 

Branch Libraries, January I, 1928. 

City Proper. 

North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. . . .14 

South End Branch, Shawmut Ave. and West Brookline St. 9 

West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. .11 

Tyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . . . P 

Brighton. 

Brighton Branch, Academy Hill Road .... 2 

Allston Branch, 138 Brighton Ave C 

Faneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St H 

Charlestown. 

Charlestown Branch, Monument Square, cor. Monument Ave. 3 
Dorchester. 

Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. . 

Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 

Upham's Corner Branch, Columbia Road, cor. Bird St 

Lower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond Si. 

Matlapan Branch, 7 Babson St. . 

Mount Bowdoin Branch, Washington, cor. Eldon St. 

Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . . 

East Boston. 

East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 

Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. 

Orient Heights Branch, 1030 Bennington St. 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winlhrop St 
Jamaica Plain. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. 

Boylston Station Branch, Depot Square 
Roxbury. 

Fellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Milmont St. 

Memorial Branch, Townsend, cor. Warren St. 

Mount Pleasant Branch, Dudley, cor. Vine St. 

Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. 

Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
South Boston. 

South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . . 

Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. . 

City Point Branch, Broadway, near H St. 
West Roxbury. 

West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St. .12 

Roslindale Branch, Washington, cor. Ashland St. . . .16 




Area of City (Land only) 45.60 Squar 



Population (Census of 1925), 779,620. 



! 

OH ! YTtD 

HhoW 

MA 
.•el 

!lHoG 



iamaI 

nsoM 
Ixofl 

»n ,xflwb6oi. 



KX„?"" JC L| BBARV 



3 9999 06314 667 2 



AM