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SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1929 




BOSTON 
PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1930 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



1929 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1930 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CIT> OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPAHTMENT. 
S.IZ.SS: 2B00 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ON JANUARY 1. 1930. 



GORDON ABBOTT, President. 

Term expires April 30, 1931 

FRANK W. BUXTON. GUY W. CURRIER. 

Term expires April 30, 1930. Term expires April 30, 1933. 

ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY. LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN. 

Term expires April 30, 1932. Term expires April 30, 1934. 



CHARLES F. D. BELDEN. 
DIRECTOR. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the PubHc Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 I 4 of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made the fust annual report. At first the Board 
consisted of one alderman and one common-councilman and five citizens at 
large, until 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one alder- 
man, two common-councilmen and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, 
unless re-elected, each year, while the members from the City Council were 
elected yearly. In 1 878 the organization of the Board was changed to 
include one alderman, one councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 
1867; and in 1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the 
representation of the City Government upon the Board by an alderman and 
a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board as at present, consisting of 
five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for five-year terms, the term 
of one member expiring each year. The following citizens at large have 
been members of the Board since its organization in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926- 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow. John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Buxton, Francis William, a.b., 1928- 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85, 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1922- 

CuRTis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d.. 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d.. 1899-1908. 

Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, b.s,, 1927-28. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d.. 1875-79. 

Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923-27. 

Green. Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

Hilliard, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, A.M., 1897-1907. 



Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921-26. 

Pierce. Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince. Frederick Octavius. a.m.. 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Shurtleff. Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas. Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

TiCKNOR, George, ll.d.. 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa. ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William 1 Ienry, a.m., 1885-88. 

WiNsoR, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Exerett was President of the Board from 1852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from Mav 7. 
1888. to Mav 12. 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott. May 12, 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8. 1895, to May 8. 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, Mav 12. 18^19, to October 15. 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie. January 31, 1908, to May 8. 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton, May 8. 1908, to February 6. 1917; William F. 

Kenney, February 13, 1917, to May 7. 1920; Rev. ALEXANDER 
Mann. May 7. 1920. to January 22, 1923; MsGR. ARTHUR T. 
Connolly. April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein, 
June 13. 1924 to June 19, 1925; Hon. Michael J. Murray, June 

19, 1925 to July 2, 1926; Guy W. Currier, July 2. 1926 to May 
2. 1927; MsGR. Arthur T. Connolly. May 2. 1927 to June 22. 

1928; Louis E. Kirstein. June 22. 1928 to June 21. 1929; Gordon 
Abbott since June 21, 1929. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; since 
1923. Director.) 

Capen. Edward. Librarian, May 13. 1852 -December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858 -January 9. 1868. 

WiNSOR. Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868 -Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, MellEN, ll.d. Librarian, October 1 , 1 878 - Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

DwiGHT. Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892- April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 1 1. 1895 -April 30, 
1899. 

Whitney. James L.. a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 - January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1. 1903 -March 
15. 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 1917-June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll.b.. Director, since March 15, 1917. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1930. 



Departments. 
fCentral Library, Copley Square . 
tEasl Boston Branch, lld-l^l Meridian St. . 
§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
IJFellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont S-t. 
tCharlesfown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
fBrighlon Branch, Academy Hill Road 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
JLower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
^South End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. . 
tjamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. 
fRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
tWest Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. . 
§Mattapan Branch, 7 Babson St. . 
tNorlh End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. . 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . 
§Ml. Bowdoin .Branch, 271-277 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch. 138 Brighton Ave. 
^Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor, Norfolk St. 
$Mt. Pleasant Branch, Vine, cor. Dudley St. 
JTyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 
fWest End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUphara's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
^Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts. 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
§Boylston Station Branch, The Lamartine, Depot Square 
§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler St. . 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 
§Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. . 
tHyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 
tFaneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St. . 
§Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. 
§Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. 
«Baker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. Jan. 



HO 


PENED. 


May 


2, 


1854 


Jan. 


28, 


1871 


May 


!, 


1872 


July 


16, 


1873 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


5. 


1874 


Jan. 


25, 


1875 


*June 


7, 


1875 


Aug., 




1877 


Sept., 




1877 


*Dec. 


3, 


1878 


*Jan. 


6, 


1880 


*Dcc. 


27, 


1881 


*Oct.. 




1882 


*Jan. 


1, 


1883 


»Nov. 


1, 


1886 


*Mar. 


n. 


1889 


*Nov. 


12, 


1890 


*Apr. 


29. 


1892 


*Jan. 


16, 


1896 


Feb. 


I. 


1896 


»Mar. 


16, 


1896 


*May 


I, 


1896 


*Jan. 


18, 


1897 


*Nov. 


I, 


1897 


»June 


25, 


1901 


»July 


18. 


1906 


•July 


15, 


1907 


Jan. 


1, 


1912 


*Mar. 


4. 


1914 


*Mar. 


5. 


1914 


*Oct. 


15. 


1921 


Jan. 


15, 


1927 



H In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. * As a delivery station. t In building 
owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. % In City building, in pari 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. Ij The lessee of the Fel- 
lowes Athenaeum, a private library association. {Under agreement with Harvard. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Trustees 1 

Balance Sheet 22 

Report of the Examining Committee 28 

Report of the Direrctor 36 

Appendix to the Report of the Director 64 

Index to the Annual Report, 1929 81 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Central Library Building, Copley Square .... Frontispiece 
Map of the Library System , , At the end 



To His Honor James M. Curley, 
Mayor of the Cilv of Boston. 

The Trustees of the PubUc Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31, 1929, being the seventy-eighth 
annual report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

Mr. Louis E. Kirstein whose term as a Trustee expired 
on April 30, 1929, was re-appointed for the term ending 
April 30, 1 934. The Board organized at the annual meeting 
on June 21,1 929 by the election of Mr. Gordon Abbott as 
President, Mr. Frank W. Buxton as Vice President, and Miss 
Delia Jean Deery as Clerk. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 

During the year 1929 these receipts were: 

Annual Appropriation $1,171,544.00 

Special appropriations: Library Bldg., Fireproofing, Foundations, etc. 280,000.00 

Income from Trust Funds ........ 27,444.12 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds Income of previous years . . 60,802.1 I 

$1,539,790.23 



[2\ 

Receipts which are accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the past year 
have been as follows: 

.From fines $20,348.65 

Sales of waste paper .......... 537.51 

From sales of catalogues, etc. ........ 52.50 

From commission on telephone stations ...... 709.02 

From payments for lost books ........ 1,136.23 

Interest on bank deposits ......... 66.83 

Refund 2.50 

Total $22,853.24 

ESTIMATES FOR 1930. 

The estimates for the maintenance of the Library for the year 
ending December 31,1 930, in segregated form are as follows : 



A- 


- Personal service 
















$812,000.00 


B- 


- Service other 


than 


personal 














167,985.00 


C- 


- Equipment 


















223.200.00 


D- 


- Supplies 




. 














45,730.00 


E- 


- Materials 




. 














32,000.00 


F- 


- Special items 




, 














864.00 


G- 


- Miscellaneous 


(br 


ancKes) 














40,000.00 




Total 


$1,321,779.00 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

During the year there were added to the Central Library and 
its branches 1 12,346 volumes as against 96,163 in 1928. Of 
these 94,339 were acquired by purchase and 18,007 by gift, 
exchange, etc. The total expenditure for books, periodicals, 
newspapers and other library material from city appropriation 
and trust funds income, was $192,033.98. The total number of 
volumes in the Central Library and branches is 1,475,743. 

An outstanding purchase of the year, made in January, was 
that of the entire library of Dr. William P. Trent of Columbia 
University. This library consists particularly of works by Daniel 
Defoe or relating to Defoe and his period. It is a collection of 
great scholarly value, undoubtedly the greatest Defoe collection 
in existence. As bought, the library contained 3, 732 volumes of 
Defoe and related material, and 3,854 volumes of general works. 



[3] 

a total of 7,586. If each volume of every title were bound 
separately, the collection would total 9,209 volumes. 

GIFTS. 

The Trustees are glad to report the following gifts other than 
books and related material, during 1929: 

A memorial tablet, of bronze, to Thomas Sergeant Perry, 
given to the Library by friends of Mr. Perry, was placed in 
position in the Court on July 18, 1929. A gift of $1 ,000 from 
Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, to be added to the "Louis E. Kirstein 
Fund" established in 1925, being the fifth contribution to the 
fund. 

The action taken by the Trustees in the matter of the gift of a 
memorial library building by Mr. Louis E. Kirstein was noted in 
the last Annual Report. Since then Messrs. Putnam and Cox 
have been selected as architects of the proposd building, and 
plans and specifications prepared by them were approved in 
August when work was actually begun. It is anticipated that 
the building will be ready for occupancy early in the new year. 

A detailed list of important gifts of books and other library 
material may be found in the Director's report. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

Hie Trustees desire especially to call to the attention both of 
Your Honor, and of all friends of the Library, the appended 
report of the Examining Committee. It is most excellent. The 
members of the Board acknowledge with gratitude the assis- 
tance rendered by the Committee. Its recommendations will 
receive most careful consideration and will be followed as rapid- 
ly as means are found available. The membership of the 
Committee for the year consists of the following persons: 



Miss 


Anna M. Bancroft. 


Mr. 


Hollis French. 


Mr. 


Arthur H. Cole. 


Miss 


Susan J. Ginn. 


Mrs. 


Frank D. Comerford. 


Mr. 


Francis L. Higginson. 


Hon. 


James M. Curley. 


Mr. 


Henry S. Howe. 


Mr. 


Frederic H. Curtiss. 


Mr. 


Henry Lewis Johnson, 


Mr. 


William J. Davidson. 


Mr. 


Melville D. Liming. 


Mr. 


Carl Dreyfus. 


Mrs. 


Edward L. Logan. 


Mr. 


Albert W.- Finlay. 


Mr. 


Percival Merritt. 



[4] 

Prof. Kenneth B. Murdock. Mr. William B. Snow. 

Mr. George R. Nutter. Rev. William M. Stinson, S.J. 

Hon. James P. Parmenter. Mr. Kenneth G. T. Webster. 

Mr. Samuel Silverman. Mrs. Barrett Wendell. 

Mrs. Eva Whiting White. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money, and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare works, which 
give value and rank to a great educational institution. They 
hesitate to so expend public funds appropriated for more popular 
and pressing use. 

As a matter of interest to the public, the Board has pleasure in 
listing herewith the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. 

Artz Fund — Donation from MiSS ViCTORINE Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago; the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose, of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the 
"Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of llie City for the time being. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by John P- Bigelow in August, 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

Ihe income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of Robert CharLES Bil- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purposes of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $100,000.00 



[51 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. Received in 

1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 

purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 

and astronomy. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davfs Bradlee to the 

Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

Invested In Citv of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond ." $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of Joseph H. Center, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds $1 ,600.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bonds 32,300.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one-half 

per cent Bond 6.000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31. 1929. 8.89 

$39,908.89 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the m.aintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 
Invested in Cih' of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $15,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . . 42.000.00 
City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond . 20,000.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one- 
half per cent Bond 20,000.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Four per cent 

Bond 6.000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1 929 . 117.74 

$103,117.74 



[6] 

Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Frank Clement, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry SargeNT Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as pari of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $2,800.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1929 . 54.41 

$2,854.41 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of AbrAM E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $4,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 00.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1929. 30.00 

$4230.00 
Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of SaRAH A. MatchetT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authonty as may be most useful in 
said Library." 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 
Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston. Received in 1900. 
Invested in City of Boston Three per cent Bond . $6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on the 
Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use of 



[7] 

the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of such 

a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trustees 

expressed a preference for books relative to government and political 

economy. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA Stewart 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 
1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond . , . . 1,500.00 

City of Boston Three per cent Bond . . . 500.00 

$2,000.00 
Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested of interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1 884. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000,00 

Alfred Hemenway Fund. — Bequest of Alfred Hemenway. Received 
in 1928. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . $5,000.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of Franklin P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 



[8] 

purchase of books and other Hbrary material. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $3,600,00 

Cash, December 31, 1929 32.40 

$3,632.40 
David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $9,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond 1 ,000.00 

$10,000.00 
Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donation of $1,000 made by Mr. Louis E. 
KiRSTEIN in October 1925, "to be used for any purpose of the Li- 
brary that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 
October. 1925 $1,000.00 



October, 1926 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 
October, 1929 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1,000.00 

$5,000.00 



Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KaTHERINF. 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott LaWRENCE, of Boston. 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
a permanent value. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of EdwARD LaWRENCE, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500,00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH LeWIS, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund; "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 



[9] 

ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of which 
is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as shall be 
fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John A. Lewis 
Library." Received in 1903. 
Invested In City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $5,000.00 

Charles Creely Loring Memorial Fund — - Donation from the family of 
Charles Gref.lv Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond , $500,00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of Charles Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall deem 
consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $2,500.00 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of Gardner O. North. Received 
in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received from 
the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under an 
indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and Amor 
L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. McKendry, 
of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 1870. The 
above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 1924, and the 
Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the same under the 
name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books and other library material for the Mattapan 
Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $11 ,780.00 
Cash, December 31, 1929 1.44 

$n,781.44 
John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PapYRUS 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN Phillips, of Boston, 
in April. 1853. 



[10] 

The interest of this fund Is to be used exclusively for the purchase 

of books for said library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 

20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of 

a free Public Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 
time being. 
Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. PlERCE, Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1 873. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds , $4,000.00 
City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond . 1 ,000.00 

$5,000.00 
Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from SaRAH E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. 
Distribution of residue of estate in May, 1924, $964.30. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . 1 .400.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent Bond 90.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December, 1929. 4.18 

$1,494.18 
Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial to 
Guilford S. Reed ; the income to be applied to the purchase of books 
of non-fiction. 

Deposited in Dorchester Savings Bank . . . $1,000.00 
John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. 

Deposited in Dorchester Savings Bank . . . $3,858.24 
Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFlELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. 



[HI 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $41,800.00 
City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 2,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bonds 6,000.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent Bonds 2,000.00 

$61,800.00 
Sewail Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD BlacK Sewall: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 (twenty-five thousand dollars) to be added to 
their funds and the income to be used for the purchase of books." 
Received in 191 8. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of FrANCIS Skinner: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 
judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have taken if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Pubhc Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Flospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $40,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds ... 1 0,250.00 

City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bond 200.00 

1 6 shares Worcester Street Railway Company . 1 ,280.00 

Cash. December 31, 1929 2.14 

$51,732.14 



[12] 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond . . $100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of MaRY ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Stoiiow 
and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackiori 
Storrow, Senior; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 
Deposited in Boston Five Cent Savings Bank . $10,000.00 
" Dorchester Savings Bank . . 5.000.00 

•* Suffolk Savings Bank . . . 10.000.00 

$25,000.00 
Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston PubHc Library the sum of five thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass.. or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61, has been 
expended for books. 
Ticknor Bequest — By the will of GeORGE TicknoR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four 
thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After 
the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less than 
one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five years 
next succeeding {i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at the 
rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for reference 
or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library build- 
ing. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the trusts 
and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and money 



[13] 

are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 
In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this 
contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished her 
right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and placed 
them under the control of the city, the City Council having previously 
accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library received said be- 
quests on behalf of the city, and made suitable arrangements for the 
care and custody of the books and manuscripts. Received in 1871. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. ToDD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be ex- 
pended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other 
countries. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 
City of Boston Three and three-quarters per 

cent Bond $25.000.00 

$50,000.00 
Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel TreadwelL, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1 872, said bequest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 



[14] 

receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 

of which is to be expended by said Truetees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $1,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 3.1 00.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . . . 9,850.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1929 . . 37.69 

$13,987.69 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of Nathan A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be appHed 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1906. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half 

per cent Bond $ 100.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per 

cent Bonds 10,000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1929. . 31.77 

$10,131.77 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of George C. Wales: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. WiL- 
SON, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Pubhc Library. Received in 1913. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 ,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James LymaN WhitneY, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

AHce Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 



[13] 

fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising during 
the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the name of 
my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said fund after 
its accumulation or so much of said income as may be required, to 
be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are sick and in 
need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem most 
worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income from 
said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just mentioned 
shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond 1,000.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . 4,000.00 

$5,000.00 
James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln W'hitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bonds $1,200.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 4,200.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . 10,700.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarter per cent Bonds 800.00 
Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1929 . 22.76 

$16,922.76 
In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net mcome seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trustees 
of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 
Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in Apiil, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . $ 1 50.00 



[16] 

Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz. : 

J. Ingersoil Bowditch $6,800.00 

Samuel Appleton, late of Boston. . . . 1.000.00 

Sally Inman Kast Shepard 1,000.00 

James Brown, late of Cambridge .... 500.00 

Andrew Carnegie 980.75 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 200.00 

James Nightingale 100.00 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . . 335.13 

$10,915.88 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 



Artz Fund 

Bates Fund . . 

Bigelow Fund 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 

Bowditch Fund 

Bradlee Fund 

Joseph H. Center Fund 

Central Library Building Fund 

Children's Fund 

Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 

Cutter Fund . 

Elizabeth Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 

Franklin Club Fund 

Isabella Stewart Gardner 

Morris Gest Fund 

Green Fund . 

Charlotte Harris Fund 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 

Hyde Fund . 

David P. Kimball Fund 

Louis E. Kirsiein Fund . 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 

Abbott Lawrence Fund . 

Edward Lawrence Fund 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 

Charles Mead Fund 

Carried forivurd 



$ 10,000.00 

50,000.00 

1. 000.00 

100,000.00 

10,000.00 
1.000.00 

39,908.89 

1 50.00 

103,117.74 

2.000.00 

2,854.41 

4.230.00 

25.000.00 
6,000.00 
1.000.00 
5,000.00 
2.652.50 
2,000.00 

10,000.00 
1.000.00 
5,000.00 
3,632.40 

10.000.00 
5.000 on 

10,000.00 
10.000.00 

500.00 
5.000.00 

500.00 
2.500.00 

$429,045.94 



II7J 



Brought forward $429,045.94 

Gardner O. North Fund 2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall TrusI Fund 11.781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 1.000.00 

Phillips Fund 30.000.00 

Pierce Fund 5.000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund 1. 494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund 1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund ......... 3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund 61.800.00 

Sewall Fund 25.000.00 

Skinner Fund 51.732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund ...... 100.00 

Mary Elizabath Stewart Fund 3.500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund ...... 25.000.00 

Ticknor Fund 4.000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 50.000.00 

Townsend Fund 4.000.00 

Treadwell Fund 13.987.69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10.131.77 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 5,000.00 

Wales Fund 5,000.00 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund ......... 16,922.76 

Mehitable C. C Wilson Fund 1.000.00 

$767,354.16 
REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

The question of re-laying the front platform of the Central 
Library was considered by the Trustees early in the year, but as 
an examination disclosed a serious rotting of the piles under the 
mam foundations, work on the platform was temporarily dis- 
continued. Owing to the gravity of the condition of the piling 
as reported by the engineers and the officials of the Building De- 
partment of the City, the Trustees were authorized by the City 
Government to expend during the year $200,000 to explore and 
repair all weakened piles. This ^vork was successfully carried 
out and completed by the Blakeslee Rollins Corporation under 
the supervision of J. R. Worcester and Company, Engineers. 

Note should be taken, however, that unless some method can 
be found and applied whereby the "water-table" underlying the 
Back Bay section of the city can be stabilized, future trouble 
with the underpinning of the Library Building is to be feared. 

The reconstruction of the top floor of the Central Library 



[18] 

building was completed during the year. Other important re- 
pairs and improvements include the installation of a new pnue- 
matic tube system, the reconstruction of the fountain basin in the 
Court, relaying of the marble floor in the Entrance Hall, and the 
Cleaning of the Puvis de Chavannes murals. Further reference 
to these changes may be found in the Director's report. 

Many branch improvements have been made during the year, 
among them, new and enlarged quarters for the Mt. Bowdoin 
and Orient Fleights branches, and the enlargement of the Andrew 
Square and Parker Hill branches. 

MISSING AND DISCARDED BOOKS. 

It is reported that for the year just closed 14,497 volumes 
were missing: 5,080 from the Central Library and 9,4! 7 from 
the 31 branches. "Missing" books include those lost by theft 
or otherwise unaccounted for. Judgnig from the experience of 
other years, a certain proportion of these missing volumes will be 
found during the year I 930. Books put back on the shelves by 
the stack attendants in the wrong place are constantly being dis- 
covered, so that the total number of volumes missing is at no 
time accurate. 

The Boston Public Library is not alone in reporting each year 
a large number of books taken from the open shelves of the main 
library and its branches without being charged. In the main they 
are volumes used and asked for by students in high schools and 
the higher institutions of learning. Since the large majority of 
missing books have their place on the open shelves of the several 
libraries, there would seem to be little promise that their taking 
can be materially lessened except by curtailing the privileges of 
the open shelves. A slow process of education, combined with 
increased watchfulness on the part of the library assistants, rather 
than direct police supervision will, it is hoped, mitigate in some 
measure this perennial theft of library property. 

During the year 41,338 volumes were condemned and with- 
drawn from circulation. These books were unfit for further 
Library use, having become, in the majority of cases, worn out. 



[191 

From the Central Library 6,187 volumes were withdrawn, from 
the Central Branch Library Deposit 3,443 volumes, and from 
the branch libraries of the system 31 ,708 volumes. The number 
of volumes withdrawn from the open shelves of the branch 
libraries, in addition to the above, because seldom asked for or 
obsolete, was 1338. These volumes, however, are available if 
called for by the student or research worker. 

RETIREMENT OF FRANK C. BLAISDELL. 

Mr. Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of the Issue Department, re- 
tired on December 31, 1 929. At a regular meeting of the 
Trustees on January 10, 1930, the following action was taken: 

"RESOLVED: that the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston record their warm appreciation of the faithful ser- 
vice rendered to the Library during fifty-three successive years by 
Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief of the Issue Department, who has just 
reached the age of retirement. Always instinctively a gentleman, 
he has filled a succession of positions with loyalty and discretion, 
and has given a noteworthy example of steadiness and reliability in 
the performance of duty. The best wishes of the Trustees go with 
him as he leaves the service." 

"VOTED: that Frank C. Blaisdell be appointed Assistant Libra- 
rian emeritus as of December 31, 1929." 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion the Board would repeat what was said in the 
report of last year : "We wish to stress the need of more money for 
the purchase of books; we hope both for larger City appropri- 
ations for this purpose and for gifts from individuals for the 
establishment of book funds. A public-spirited citizen can leave 
no better memorial than a fund which shall supply a steady 
stream of valuable new books for the use of the public; such a 
fund is a spring of intellectual nourishment contributing richly 
to the life of the community. Provided with a proper book- 
plate, each book is a worthy reminder during untold years to 
come of the man or woman whose generosity has brought it into 
the hands of the reader who needs it." 



[20] 

The report of the Director which follows gives an account of 
the work of the Library for the past twelve months and is worthy 
of study. It is both interesting and encouraging, and shows that 
the life of the Library has gone on satisfactorily in spite of the 
many groups of laborers m and under the Central building. This 
in large measure has been due to the able and loyal service of the 
Director and his Staff, and we have pleasure in commending their 
excellent work to the interest of the public. 

Gordon Abbott 
Frank W. Buxton 
Arthur T. Connolly 
Guy W. Currier 
Louis E. Kirstein 



BALANCE SHEET 



[22] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing 

and Binding employees) 
Temporary employees .... 



To expenditure for equipment 




Machinery 




Motorless vehicles 




Furniture and fittings 




Office 




Books: 




City appropriation 


129,915.52 


Trust funds income 




(including transfer to 




(London account) 


52.177.76 


Newspapers : 




City appropriation 


2,029.72 


Trust funds income 


L534.60 


Periodicals (city 




Photographs : 




Trust funds income 




Lantern slides: 




City appropriation 


49.80 


Trust funds income 


77.40 


Music : 




City appropriation 


332.10 


Trust funds income 


941.28 



Tools and instruments 
General plant 



Carried foncard 



$590,995.82 
109.119.28 



Service other than personal 














Advertising 105.25 


Transportation of persons 












647.18 


Cartage and freight . 












12,675.16 


Light and power . 












16,873.06 


Rent, taxes and water . 












20,202.28 


Surety bond and insurance 












78.50 


Communication 












2;807.94 


Cleaning 












2,046.60 


Removal of ashes . 












96.00 


Removal of snow 












413.31 


Expert 












9,744.25 


Fees 












115.00 


Photographic and blueprinting 










312.90 


General plant 












74.734.70 



968.24 

384.20 

10,278.43 

1,010.77 



182.093.28 



3,564.32 
9,883,80 



$700,115.10 



92.00 



127.20 



,273.38 
.254,70 
,182.22 



140,852.13 



212,1)2.54 
$1,053,079.77 



[231 



EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31. 1929 



By City Appropriation 1929 .... 1 

Income from Trust funds ..... 
Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 
Interest on deposit in London .... 
Transfer from Domestic Funds to London account 
Special appropriation, Fireproofing, Improvements, etc. 
Special appropriation, Foundation, Improvements, etc 



.171,544.00 

27.444.12 

700.00 

207.58 

5,000.00 

80,000.00 

200,000.00 



Cr. 



1 ,484.895.70 



Carried forward 



$1,484,895.70 



[24] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forivarJ 






, 




$1,053,079.77 


To expenditures for supplies 




Office 9,424.09 




Food and ice ... 










714.29 




Fuel 










20,004.32 




Forage and animal 










28.85 




Medical 










24.43 




Laundry, cleaning, toilet 










2,228.76 




Agricultural 










223.50 




Chemicals and disinfectants 










200.39 




General plant 










2,604.29 








35,452.92 




To expenditures for material 




Building 13,332.97 




Electrical 3,679.64 




General plant 1,099.99 








18,112.60 




To Special item 




Pension 863.50 


863.50 


To Binding Department: 




Salaries 55,902.81 




Light 










51.39 




Repairs 










108.47 




Equipment 










162.47 




Supplies 










10.32 




Electrical material 










20.00 




Stock 










6,529.02 






62,784.48 


To Printing Department: 


Salaries 14,349.35 




Transportation of persons . 










2.35 




Light . . 










34.27 




Communication 










.69 




Repairs 










5.20 




Equipment 










98.54 




Supplies 










50.18 




Stock 










4,354.36 




Out?ide work 










243.00 


IQ 1^7 04 



To Special Appropriation: 
Central Library Building, 

Fireproofing, Improvements, etc. 

Central Library Building, 

Foundation, Improvements, etc. 



Carried forward 



83,353.44 



131.595.79 



83.353.44 



131,595.79 
$1,404,380.44 



[25] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1929 



Brought forward ...... 

By Balances Brought Forward from 1928: 

Trust funds income, City Treasury .... 55,737.35 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . . . 5,064.76 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 3,33 L98 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . . . 7,838.33 

Soecial appropriation, Fireproofing, Improvements, etc. 98,66L76 



$1,484,895.70 



170.634.18 



Carried fortvard 



$1,655,529.88 



[26] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forward 
To Amount Paid into City Treasury 
Fines 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins . 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Interest on bank deposit . 
Refund 
Sales of waste paper . 



To Balance, December 31, 1929: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Trust fuds income, City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 

To .Balance Unexpended: 
General appropriation 
Central Library Building, 

Fireproofing, improvements, etc. 
Central Library Building, 

Foundation, improvements, etc. 



$1 ,404.380.44 



20,348.65 

52.50 

709.02 

1,136.23 

66.83 

2.50 

537.51 



770.34 

1,326.22 

37.652.85 

8.538.33 



39,149.17 
95,308.32 
68,404.21 



22.853.24 



48,287.74 



202,86L70 



Carried forward 



$1,678,383.12 



127] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1929 



Brought forniard 
By Receipts: 
From Fines 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Interest on bank deposit . 
Refund 
Sales of waste paper 



Cr. 

$1,655,529.88 



20.348.65 

52.50 

709.02 

1,136.23 

66.83 

2.50 

537.51 



22,853.24 



Carried foneard 



$1,678,383.12 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 



To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen : 

The Examining Committee submits its report for 1929. As 
heretofore sub-committees have been appointed, who have in- 
vestigated and reported upon the condition of the Library. The 
Committee has in great measure adopted their recommendations. 

BOOKS. 

We find an insistent call for more books both at the Central 
Library and branches; in some cases for special purposes, e.g. 
reference books for children or books in foreign languages in 
parts of the city where there are many immigrants. We earnestly 
recommend that the appropriation for books be placed at the 
amount already submitted in the budget of the Trustees. 

In the purchase of books the Library has to meet many and 
various needs, but the ordinary books procured fall into two 
classes, popular books and those of a more scholarly type. 

The popular books, those which interest and entertain great 
numbers of readers, must be bought in large quantities with 
many copies of each of the better known or more advertised books 
in order to supply even partially a demand which is temporarily 
great even if not lasting. To supply adequately this demand is 
hopeless and useless as the expense would be exhorbitant and the 
result would be a large collection of books of little or no perma- 
nent value. We advise that great care be taken to limit the 
purchase of books of this character in order that the public 
money may be saved for wiser uses. We suggest that it may be 



[291 

worthwhile for the Trustees to consider whether some form of 
"DupHcate Pay Collections" could be put into operation to 
relieve in part the pressure for the newest novels. 

It is also incumbent upon the Librar)'^ to keep up its supply of 
more serious books. The Library has now one of the largest and 
most important collections in the country of works of a scholarly 
type, a high distinction to this city. It has been estimated that 
there are not far from forty thousand persons in Boston and its 
neighborhood who have com.e here for purposes of study. Their 
residence here is not only of value to the ordinary trade and busi- 
ness of the city, but also continues and enhances its reputation 
as a desirable resort for students and persons of cultivation. The 
use made of the Library for study and research is great and the 
supply of books needed to expand our existing collections should 
not be allowed to fail. Here is an opportunity for private benefi- 
cence to supplement the public appropriations. Since the estab- 
lishment of the Library a considerable number of gifts and 
bequests has been received, the income of which has been of the 
utmost value in permitting the purchase of important books which 
otherwise could not have been obtained. We urge that further 
endowments be made by gift or bequest for purchase of books of 
importance. A method used at the Bodleian Library at Oxford 
might well be adopted here. A society or association known as 
"Friends of the Bodleian Library" has been form.ed, each mem- 
ber of which contributes a small sum yearly; the receipts being 
used for the purchase of rare and interesting books. Such an 
association might be formed here to which each member might 
contribute five or ten dollars a year, half the proceeds to be 
used for the immediate purchase of books and half to form the 
nucleus of an endowment fund, the income being added to the 
principal. Even if the membership should at first be small it 
would be constantly increasing, the money would be put to good 
use, and as each member would receive the publications of the 
Library, knowledge of and interest in its work would be more 
v/idely spread than now and might well result in substantial en- 
dowments from persons who previously had been unaware of the 
many activities of the Library for the promotion of education. 
We commend this plan to the attention of the Trustees. 



[301 



SALARIES. 

The work done by the employees is of a high class and the 
salaries paid are in many instances too low. Here as elsewhere 
ill paid work is very poor economy. We recommend that the 
whole question of salaries be carefully considered and that they 
be put at a figure which will compare favorably with the salaries 
paid elsewhere for like services. 

THE CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

Repairs and Improvements. 

The following repairs and improvements recommended by the 

Examining Committee last year have been made or are in process : 

A new rubber tile flooring has been laid in the periodical rooms, and 

renovation of other floors is under consideration, pending adoption 

of the budget. 

A sum to repair service stairs, was included in the budget for 1 930, and 

work will be undertaken very soon. 
Illumination of main stairway and stairs to Sargent Hall is under way. 
The tube room is much improved by the reconstruction of the pneumatic 

tube system. 
The fountain basin was reconstructed during the summer of 1 929 ; new 
bay trees were ordered, and renovation of the grass plot will be 
taken up at the proper season. 
The work of replacing wooden lockers with metal, is now going on. 
The work of repairs to the roof will continue during the summer months, 

until the roof is in good condition. 
The reconstruction of the platform will be taken up as soon as the founda- 
tion work is completed. 
We recommend that the following repairs and improvements 
be made as soon as practicable: 

Main Vestibule. Walls and ceilings should be cleaned. 
Entrance Vestibule. The wooden swinging door should be 
replaced by a suitable glass and bronze swinging door. 

Nen^spaper Room. This room needs a new terrazzo or 
marble slab floor. The ventilation is poor and should be im- 
proved. 

IVesterl;^ Periodical Room. A new chandelier is needed. 
Branch Librar]) Department. A new balcony on the east side 
would greatly relieve the present congestion. 



[31] 

Bates Hall. Walls and ceiling need cleaning. The terrazzo 
floor will have to be replaced soon by marble slabs. 

Children s Room. The stack lighting should be improved. 

Teachers' Room Ventilation and lighting should be im- 
proved. 

Third Floor. This floor is mainly devoted to the housing of 
the Barton-Ticknor, Fine Arts, Technical, and Music collections. 
The reconstruction is already completed in the Barton-Ticknor 
Room and is proceeding in the Music and Treasure Rooms, The 
contrast is striking between the well appointed Barton-Ticknor 
Room, where the changes have so greatly enhanced its beauty and 
usefulness, and the Fine Arts and Technical Rooms where 
wooden shelving and cases increase the fire risk, and greatly limit 
the space available for readers. We urge strongly that the South 
and Southeast Galleries be refimshed and refurnished so as to 
correspond with the work already done m the other portions of 
this floor, although as these galleries are primarily reading rooms 
there need not be the expensive ornamental treatment so appro- 
priate to the Barton-Ticknor Room. We recommend that a 
special grant for this purpose be requested. 

Window Washing. A safer method should be devised of 
washing the outside of the windows of Bates Hall and the Fine 
Arts Department as the present method is dangerous and likely 
to result in accident. 

Annex StacJ^. The lighting is extremely poor. It could 
be improved at comparatively slight cost by using small Holo- 
phane fixtures on the present outlets. The ventilation also is 
unsatisfactory. The glass floors should be replaced when 
cracked by marble slabs so that eventually the floors will be 
entirely of marble. There should be fire hose on all fire risers 
on each floor. 

Administration. 

The work of administration is efficiently carried on. We 
commend especially the use of temporary typed cards in the 
catalogue cases, enabling the immediate use of recent accessions, 
and the interesting and scholarly publication "Pv'Iore Books." 

With the increasing call for photostat copies, we think that it 



[321 

would be true economy for the Library to have a photostat equip- 
ment of its own, thus saving the expense of outside work and the 
risk of sending out valuable manuscripts and books. 

We renew our recommendation of last year that a competent 
proof reader be employed in the Printing Department, thus se- 
curing corrections at an early stage and avoiding the expense of 
changes in proof. 

The mounting and rebinding of old and valuable books in the 
Special Libraries needs increasing attention. Moreover, maps 
have to be put into shape, books from the branches rebound, and 
photographs and views mounted. We recommend the employ- 
ment of an additional binder, qualified to do the careful work 
required in the special libraries, another girl for "pulling and 
sewing," and of another apprentice. 

THE BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

These libraries have all been visited and examined by members 
of the Committee. The librarians and assistants take great in- 
terest in their work and evidently desire to be of as much service 
as possible to the public. Before taking up the branch libraries 
in detail we may state some general considerations applicable to 
them all. 

1 . A library should have the exclusive use of a building 
or part of a building where it will not be hampered or interrupted 
by the activities of other organizations. 

2. Entrances should be well lighted and provided with out- 
side signs clearly visible by day and night. 

3. When children and adults occupy the same rooms ex- 
perience shows that many adults find the conditions annoying and 
give up the use of the library. Wherever possible there should 
be separate children's rooms supervised by librarians especially 
qualified to work with and for children. Moreover, much of the 
best work with children is done in conjunction with the schools; 
hence, there should be the closest and most friendly co-operation 
with the school authorities. 

We make the following suggestions as to the individual 
branches, arranged alphobetically : 



[331 

Allston. This branch is in better quarters than heretofore, 
but before long will need more room, as its use is growing. 

AndreTV Square. The quarters are reasonably adequate for 
the present. 

Bovlston. This branch is badly situated in a rented building 
at the foot of a steep hill with a railroad station and a gasoline 
station adjacent. The lease expires December 31, 1931 with 
notice to vacate required October 31, 1 93 1 . We earnestly 
recommend the erection of a new building in the vicinity. 

Brighton. This branch is on the whole in a satisfactory 
condition. ' 

CharlestoWn. A new floor covering and painting are needed. 

Citv Point. There should be better lighting at the entrance 
and a rest room for the staff. If the upstairs room can be obtained 
for a children's room the South Boston branch might be moved 
here, and in that event a new building should be erected nearer 
City Point, to house City Point branch. 

Codman Square. More space and a better means of entrance 
are needed in the children's room. It would be advantageous if 
meetings of the District Nursing Association and clinics could be 
held elsewhere than in the present lecture room. Filing cabinets 
are needed. 

Dorchester. This branch is in an old municipal building in 
fair condition, but requiring a good deal of repair. Better light- 
ing is urgently needed. The use of the children's room tv/ice a 
week by the Baby Hygiene Association for a clinic is highly 
objectionable. A study for the older children is desirable. The 
children's room, now on another floor, should be brought into 
closer connection with the library. 

East Boston. The upper floor needs repairing. Storm win- 
dows are needed on the west side. 

Faneuil. The building is badly located, has poor light and 
ventilation, and is overcrowded by children so as to cause a fall- 
ing off in its use by adults. We strongly advise a new building 
near Oak Square. 

FelloTves A thenaeum. There is urgent need of better lighting 
at the entrance. An arc light at the corner of Milmont and Guild 
Streets would well serve the purpose. 



[341 

H^de Park. A wire fence about the grounds is recom- 
mended. 

Jamaica Plain. A desk light, new shelving, and chairs for 
older children are needed in the children's room. The office 
should be enlarged. A sink should be placed in the basement 
and the walls cleaned and painted. 

Jeffries Point. The location is excellent. Larger quarters, 
however, are needed. 

Lower Mills. This branch occupies a municipal building 
with the American Legion and needs more space. The Legion 
should be accommodated elsewhere. More room for adults and 
better facilities for the staff are needed. 

Matiapan. This branch is in a leased building and needs 
more room, especially for adults. A new building near the 
present location is recommended. 

Memorial. This branch is in a school building and we sug- 
gest a closer co-operation with the school authorities to regulate 
and make more effective its use by children. There should be 
better lighting in some places and greater facilities for accommo- 
dating adults. 

Mount Bowdoin. This branch has recently been removed 
into new quarters and needs only the completion of some details. 

Mount Pleasant. This branch is in a satisfactory condition. 

Neponset. The single room is wholly inadequate. The 
building should be enlarged or a new one erected. Adjacent 
property might be bought for this purpose. 

North End. This branch is well housed and needs nothing 
beyond what has already been ordered. 

Orient Heights. This branch is adequately housed in a fine 
new building. 

Parser Hill. This branch is in a leased building which is in 
poor condition. The ventilation and lighting are unsatisfactory 
and there should be better accommodations for adults and a better 
rest room. A new building is much needed. 

Roslindale. The space in the municipal building is badly 
crowded and a noisy gymnasium is directly overhead. We 
strongly recommend a new building, or, at least, an addition or 
larger and better placed quarters in the present building. 



[351 

Roxburv Crossing. Better accommodations for adults are 
needed. The ventilation is poor. It is desirable to secure ad- 
ditional space to improve rest room facilities. 

South Boston. Tliis branch is badly cramped and much 
needs separate rooms for children and adults. As above sug- 
gested the South Boston branch might be transferred to the 
municipal building now housing the City Point branch, if more 
room can be obtained there. 

South End. A large sign at the door and a screen in front of 
the delivery desk are needed. 

Tiller Street. As the character of the neighborhood is rapid- 
ly changing this branch should be moved to a more convenient 
location. The building is not adapted to library use. Better 
rest room facilities are needed. 

Uphams Corner. The children's room now in the basement 
should be brought into closer connection with the library. The 
entrance to the children's room is dark and dangerous and should 
be better lighted without delay. A rest room and space for re- 
pairing and cataloguing are much needed. 

West End. Here there is great need of new counters proper- 
ly arranged to facilitate distribution and clerical work. The 
ventilation of the hall and stairway should be improved if the 
use of the hall for distribution is to be continued. 

IVest Roxburv. The roof should be repaired and a new 
stack placed in the adults' department. Inside painting and new 
curtains are desirable. 

NEW BRANCHES. 

The growth of the city will no doubt necessitate additional 
branches of the Library. We heartily approve the suggestion 
that a comprehensive plan be made to cover a number of years 
for the systematic establishment of such new branches. We are 
of the opinion, however, that it is necessary first to provide for the 
pressing needs of the existing branches to some of which we have 
above called attention. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, Febru- 
ary 5, 1930. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit my annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1929. 

In every phase of its life the Public Library of the City of 
Boston has sho\vn healthy growth. On the last day of the year 
there were 1 53,980 card-holders, 5,309 more than a year before; 
1 1 2,346 volumes had been added to the collections, making now 
a total of 1 , 555,148 volumes in the library system. The number 
of books taken out for home use was 3,930,068, a gain of 
30,782 over 1928. In the reading rooms, besides, uncounted 
people have consulted uncounted volumes either received from 
the closed book-stacks or taken from the open shelves. 

The extensive repairs and improvements in the Central Li- 
hrary, which have been going on for several years, have made 
conspicuous progress. The most important among these has 
been the reconstruction of the North Gallery, the Barton-Ticknor 
Room, and the Brown Music Room, which has been provided 
for by the appropriation of $250,000 made by the City Council 
In 1927. The North Gallery, in which most of the Special Col- 
lections of the Library are housed, was completed in October 
1 929, giving the Library a fitting home for its rare books. The 
Barton-Ticknor Room is being reconstructed as the headquarters 
of the Music Division, and the former Brown Music Room is 
being transformed into a Treasure Room, where those books 
which form the chief pride of the Library may be properly 
guarded, with adequate provision for their exhibition. These 
rooms set a new standard of attractiveness and efficiency for the 
whole Library. 

During the year the discovery was jnade that the upper por- 
tions of the piles on which the Library is supported had rotted 
badly as a result of the lowering of the water-table. Emergency 



[37] 

funds were provided for the remedy of this serious condition, and 
foundations of steel and concrete are rapidly replacing the de- 
fective parts of the old piles. 

Further repairs of the year included the reconstruction of the 
fountain basin in the court of the Library, and the installation of 
a new system of pneumatic tubes. At various locations new fire 
doors have been built and additional fire extinguishers have been 
provided. 

The mural paintings of Abbey and Puvis de Chavannes have 
been cleaned, and an addition to the memorials in the Library 
has been made by the erection in the court of a tablet in memory 
of the late Thomas Sergeant Perry. 

An important event of the year was the erection of the Edward 
Kirstein Memorial Library in City Hall Avenue, on the site of 
an abandoned police station which was given by the City for the 
purpose. This building, given by Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, a 
Trustee of the Library, in memory of his father, will be devoted 
to the uses of a Business Branch, equipped and operated as an 
aid to the business community of Boston. Thus what has for 
many years been regarded as the greatest need of Boston's li- 
brary system will be met in a satisfactory way. The upper floor 
of the Kirstein Memorial Library will serve as an ordinary 
branch library for adults. 

The buildings of the Branch system have considerably im- 
proved. New quarters have been secured for the Branches at 
Allston, Orient Heights and Mt. Bowdoin, all three of which 
had been badly cramped for room. At Andrew Square a new 
room for adults has been added, and at Brighton a new children's 
room was opened. 

An interesting activity of the year has been the cooperation 
of the Library, through its Director, in the compiling of the 
quarterly issues of "Better Books," the selective catalogue of 
worthy new books issued by the Board of Trade of Boston Book 
Merchants. This publication, which has been widely circulated 
through public libraries, is proving a valuable force in encourag- 
ing book-buyers to select good books. 

The use of the Lecture Hall by the Library and by outside 
organizations shows a steady increase. As in the year before, a 



[381 

large number of concerts have been given. The free Chamber 
Music Concerts presented by the EHzabeth Sprague CooHdge 
Foundation have received hearty response. The Library Lec- 
ture Course maintains its honored place among the educational 
opportunities of the City. 

The activities of the various Departments may be summarized 
as follows: 

ACCESSIONS AND GIFTS 

The total number of volumes added to the Library collections 
in 1929 was 1 12,346 compared with 96,163 volumes added in 
1928. The volumes were acquired as follows: 94,339 by pur- 
chase, 13,976 by gift, 162 by exchange, 2,339 by binding of 
periodicals, 1,401 by binding of serials, and 129 by binding of 
newspapers. Material other than books — lantern slides, photo- 
graphs, prints, phonographic records, and so forth — numbered 
1 7,62 1 pieces, of which 962 Vv^ere acquired by purchase and 
16,659 by gift. The total number of volumes and pieces ac- 
cessioned thus amounted to 129,970. 

Of the 1 12,346 volumes added 39,290 were placed in the 
Central Library and 73,056 in the Branch Libraries and in the 
Branch Deposit Collection in the Central Library, the latter ser- 
ving as a reservoir for the Branches. 

The total amount expended for purchase of books was 
$192,033.98, of which $142,210.94 was taken from city ap- 
propriations and $49,432.04 from the income of trust funds. The 
corresponding amount for the preceding year was $154,436.42, 
including $28,133.39 paid from the trust funds income. 

The city appropriation for books and library material was 
$140,000, compared with $125,000 the year previous. It is 
necessary to state, however, that the additional $1 5,000 was ap- 
propriated for the books and material necessary for the Edward 
Kirstein Memorial Branch Library. All of the amount appro- 
priated, with the exception of $2.40, was expended. The fact 
that the expenditures from the city appropriation amounted to 
$142,210.94 while the appropriation was only $140,000 is ac- 
counted for by the expenditure in England of sums from previous 
appropriations there on deposit. 



[39] 

Of the $142,210.94 expended from the city appropriation 
$101,897.42 was for the Branches and $40,313.52 for the 
Central Library. 

The year's appropriation for books, however, made it again 
impossible, as above indicated, to approximate the demands made 
on the Library. Only an increased appropriation for books can 
meet these. The following examples of how few copies of out- 
standing books, which led the library demands throughout the 
country, could be bought for the Central Library and its thirty- 
two Branches, make graphic the meagreness of the present appro- 
priation: Of Ernest Dimnet's "The art of thinking" five copies 
were bought for the Central Library, and 39 for the Branches: 
of Lytton Strachey's "Elizabeth and Essex" seven copies for the 
Central Library and 26 for the Branches; of Remarque's "All 
quiet on the Western Front" five copies for the Central Library, 
and 43 for the Branches; of Willard Huntington Wright's "The 
Bishop murder case; a Philo Vance story" three copies for the 
Central Library, and 38 for the Branches. 

The most notable among the acquisitions of the Library was 
the purchase of the library of Professor William P. Trent 
of Columbia University. The library is specially valuable for 
its splendid material bearing on the life and work of Daniel De- 
foe, of which it contains perhaps the best collection in existence. 
Among the significant items are first editions of everv one of 
Defoe's novels, with a single exception; a set of the "Review," 
finer than that in the British Museum; and numerous tracts which 
are believed to be unique. This collection forms a noteworthy 
addition to the resources of the Library for scholars. 

The wide variety of purchases will be indicated by the repre- 
sentative items here listed. They were purchased in the main 
from the income of trust funds : 

Bosv/ell, James. Private papers of James Boswell from Malahide Castle. 
In the collection of Lt. Colonel Ralph He'^ward Isham. Prepared 
for the press by Geoffrey Scott, and now first printed. Vols. 1 -6. 
(New York.) 1928. 6 v. Portrait. Colored plate. Facsimiles. 
No. 150 of an edition of 570 copies printed by William Edwin 
Rudge. 
Burrough, Edward. A general epistle, and greetings of the Father's 
love, to all the saints . . . London. Printed for Thomas Simmons 



[40] 

at the Bull and Mouth neer Aldersgate. 1657. 14 pp. (One of a 
group of nine tracts by the same author bought at the same time.) 

Caedmon. Thp Caedmon m.anuscriot of ATT?lo-Saxon Biblical poetrv. 
Tunliis XI in the Bodleian Librarv. With an introduction bv Sir 
Israel Gollancz. (London.) Milford. 1927. 229 pn. Colored 
plate. Deroratsd covers. (British Academy.) No. 224 of an 
edition of 250 copies. 

Cotterpll. Hovavd Herochel. Old pewter, its makers and marks in 
England, Scotland and Ireland. An account of the old pewterer 
and his craft. Illustrating all known marks and secondary marks 
of ^heold ppwterers . . . lx)ndon. B. T. Batsford. Ltd. (1929). 
432 pp. Illus. Plates. 

EncyrloT'dia Britannica, The. A new survey of universal knowVdcre. 
^4thedi^'on. New York. Enrvclopedia Britannica. Inc. (1929.) 
74 v. Illus. Plates. Maps. Plans. Diagrams. Charts. Tables. 
Facsimiles. 6 sets. 

Gould. lohn. The birds of New Guinea and the adjacent Papuan 
Islands, including many new soecies recently discovered in Aus- 
tralia . . . Completed after the author's death bv R. Bowdler 
Sharpe. London. Henry Sotheran & Co. 1875—88. 5 v, 
Colored plates. 

Maverick- lohn. Heads of sermons of the Rev. John Maverick, preached 
at Dorchester, New Enetland, in the months of Ian. and Feb. 
1631 ... taken bv one of his hearers, and preserved bv one of his 
successors, F.M.H. Apparently contemporary manuscript. In- 
complete. 146 pp. 

Napier, Sir John. Mirifici losarithmorvm cononis constrvctio, et eorum 
ad naturales ipsorum numeros habitudines; vna cvm appendice. de 
alia eaque praestantiore lo?arithmorum specie condenda auibus 
accessere propositiones ad triangula sohaerica facilore calculo re- 
solvenda: una cum annotationibus aliquot doctissimi D. Henrici 
Briggii, in eus & memoratam appendicem. Authore & inventore 
loanne Nepero, Barone Merchistonii, &c. Scoto. Edinbvrgi, Ex- 
cudebat Andreas Hart ... 1619. 67 pp. Diagrams. Ad- 
ditional decorated title page. 

Nirenstein, Nathan, publisher. Preferred business real estate locations 
of the principal cities of the United States and Canada . . . Spring- 
field. Nathan Nirenstein. 1929. 144 atlas sheets. 

Pageant, The. of America. A pictorial history of the United States. 
Independence edition. New Haven. Yale University Press. 
1925-1928. 15 V. Plates. Maps. 1 6 sets. 

Peters, Richard. The two last sermons preached at Christ's Church in 
Philadelphia, Tuly 3, 1 737. Philadelphia. Printed and sold by 
B. Franklin. M,DCC,XXXVII. 29 pp. 



[41] 

Sargent, John Singer. An autograph letter signed. April 24, 1895. To 
James G. Huneker, referring to the WTiter's mural decorations in 
the Boston Public Library. 4 pp. 

Virginia Gazette, The. 1736-1780. (Weekly.) Printed at Williams- 
burg, Virginia. Reproduced by photostat in the Massachusetts 
Historical Society. March 7, 1 766 - June 24, 1771. 

Mr. Louis E. Kirstein made his usual donation of $1 ,000 to 
be added to the "Louis E. Kirstein Fund." 

A selected hst of the more important gifts may be found on 
pp. 77 of the Appendix. 

CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT 

During 1929 the number of volumes and parts of volumes 
catalogued was 1 10,048, covering 79,881 titles. Of these 
49,795 volumes (26,336 titles) were taken care of in the Cata- 
logue Department, and 60,253 volumes (53,345 titles) were as- 
signed to the Branch Libraries and catalogued in the Central 
Branch Department. 

Of the books catalogued in the Catalogue Department 27,203 
volumes and parts ( 1 7,924 titles) were new to the Central Li- 
brary; the number of serials added was 6,702; and 15,890 
volumes and parts (8,412 titles) were recatalogued — ■ thus 
making the total quoted above. 

The number of printed cards added to the catalogues of the 
Central Library alone was 71,646, distributed as follows: 
27,91 I cards Vv'ere filed in Bates Hall Catalogue, 29,682 in the 
Official Catalogue and 14,053 in the Special Libraries Depart- 
ment. In addition, 33,763 new printed cards were used for com- 
piling bibliographies or, for the larger part, set aside for such use 
in the future; from this number, cards were also sent as usual to 
the Library of Congress. The total of new printed cards, thus, 
was 105,409. 

In order to hasten the appearance of new books in the cata- 
logues, 19,615 temporary cards have been typed and filed by 
the Card Division to be replaced later by printed cards. As a 
result of this practice, titles of recent accessions have been in the 
catalogues as soon as the books have been placed on the shelves. 



[42] 

For the use of the Editor in making up the List of New Books 
in "More Books" 4,534 cards have been typed. To replace old 
cards the Division typed and filed, besides, 3,948 other cards. 
Corrections were made and new editions were indicated on 
39,949 cards, a larger number than has ever been done before. 
In addition, thousands of cards have been stamped to indicate 
two or more copies, or removal to the Harvard Business Branch, 
while many other cards have been removed for books that are 
lost, missing or condemned. 

The number of requests for photostats of books, plates, maps 
and manuscripts was about the same as last year. Most of the 
work was done by the Boston Photocopy Print Company and the 
rest at Harvard, the Massachusetts Department of Archives, and 
the Massachusetts Historical Society. The amount charged was 
about $1 ,200. Again it must be emphasized that it would be a 
great saving of time — and that it would be much safer for the 
books and manuscripts — if an outfit could be installed in the 
Library. A part-time operator could take care of all requests. 

The Shelf Division has had a year busier than any other for 
a long time. Besides carrying on its routine activities, the Divi- 
sion has accomplished several important tasks. 

To this Division was assigned the sorting and shelving of the 
Trent Collection. The Defoe items, being the most valuable 
books in the Collection, were separated from the rest. A pre- 
liminar)'^ list was prepared of this group suitable for use until the 
books are permanently shelved. 

The whole Statistical Department was rearranged and put in 
numerical order. 

The Special Collections of the Barton-Ticknor Division, with 
part of the Cabinet Collection, were moved into the new North 
Gallery. The installation of new map-cases in that Division 
made necessary a new classification; the atlases have been sepa- 
rated from the maps in portfolios, and a census of the sheet maps 
has been made preparatory to the work of reclassifying. 

Pending the reconstruction of the new Music Room, the refer- 
ence music collection was moved to a temporary location, the 
M books being shelved at the time in the north-\/c3t corner of the 
new North Gallery. 



[43] 



REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT 

On January 1, 1929 there were 148,671 "live" cards avail- 
able for present use in the hands of residents entitling them to bor- 
row books for home use. Through the Central Library and its 
thirty-two Branches there have been added 30,515 new registra- 
tions and 46,48 1 renewals, making a total of 76,996 cards added 
during the year. There have been 71 ,687 borrowers who have 
allowed their home use privilege to lapse. Thus the total number 
of "live" cards on December 31, 1929 was 153,980 — a gain 
of 5,309 over last year. The gain in the number of card-holders 
in the year previous was 7,270. 

There were 1 0,986 cards issued to teachers prior to January 1 , 
1929. Of this number 1 ,563 have been renev/ed and 369 added 
during the year, making a total of 1 ,932 teachers' cards in use 
compared with 2,047 in 1928. 

Of the 4,341 special privilege cards issued prior to January 1 , 
1929 there have been 422 renewals and 151 new cards is-^ued, 
making a total of 573 special privilege cards compared with 727 
m 1928. 

During the year the Chief of the Registration Department has 
made visits to the Branch Libraries, inspecting registration files 
and offering such suggestions as have been found to be necessary. 
These visits have resulted in a clearer understanding of the details 
of the work and in a smoother functioning between the Central 
Library and the Branches in all matters pertaining to registration. 

ISSUE DEPARTMENT 

The number of books issued last year for home use from the 
Central Library direct to readers was 331,956, a decrease of 
1 6,002 from last year. This decrease may be perhaps explamed 
by the fact that in the early part of the year a new flooring was 
laid in the Delivery Room, and later a staging was erected th.ere 
for the cleaning of the Abbey paintings — both causmg con- 
siderable noise and confusion and creating temporarily an un- 
satisfactory condition. Through the Branches 87,259 books 
were issued to readers ; these however were chiefly taken from the 



[44] 

Branch Deposit Collection and are accounted for in the report 
of the Branches. 

The average daily circulation — not including the books 
which went through the Branches — was 910. The largest cir- 
culation on a single day, on February 23, was 1 ,744. The num- 
ber of works of fiction was 152,175; that of other books was 

179,781. 

The number of missing books (from the general collection. 
Bates Hall, Special Libraries, Children's Room, Open Shelves) 
was 5,266. During the year 1 ,616 volumes reported as missing 
were found. In all, 1 ,042 special requests were made to locate 
certain books for unsuccessful applicants. In 371 cases these 
books were delivered; in 352 they were reserved but not called 
for; in 232 cases there were no definite records, while the re- 
maining number were accounted for as missing, in the bindery, 
etc. 

To recover the books which were over-detained, 4 1 ,859 mail 
notices and 4,777 messenger notices were sent out. The fines 
collected for these delays amounted to $4,490.99. For 1 28 lost 
and 24 damaged books $275.09 were paid to the Library. 

This Department handles also the articles lost and found in 
the building : 1 ,295 articles were found, of which 632 were re- 
turned to the owners, 62 destroyed and the others carried over. 
The sum of $183.00 found in the Library was returned to the 
owners. 

BATES HALL 

During the year 273,265 stack books were used in Bates Hall. 
6,297 more than in 1 928. These figures do not represent all the 
books used in the Hall, as there are no means of recording the use 
of reference books taken from the open shelves. During the 
academic season the Hall is usually crowded. The maximum 
attendance, at a given hour, was on March 3rd, when 3 1 6 per- 
sons were recorded. 

The new mechanical equipment for handling "hall use" slips 
has been a decided improvement. The Centre Desk is now con- 
nected directly with the stacks which has considerably shortened 
the time of book deliveries. 



[45] 

thorough-going revision and much dead material has been re- 
moved. Many of the shelves have become crowded in the course 
of the last few years, and the staff is now engaged in the process 
of relieving the pressure by sending to the stacks the less used 
books. 

In the ordinary work of keeping the Bates Hall collection up 
to date, 1 99 new titles (239 volumes) have been placed on the 
shelves and 1 65 older books have been returned to the stacks. It 
is interesting to note that the Hall now contains 127 volumes 
of annual publications. No less than 23 1 books are, or seem to 
be, missing from the Hall. As some 35 books which failed to be 
found at the shelf-reading in 1928 reappeared during 1929, il 
is safe to assume that many of these will be found. 

The custom of bi-weekly conferences of the Bates Hall staff 
has been instituted, and these meetings have proved very helpful. 

There has been a substantial increase in the use of the depart- 
ment by mail. In all, 872 requests for information were received 
and answered during the year; of these 220 were in the field of 
genealogy and heraldry and the rest were on general topics. 

The work of the Division of Genealogy is greatly appreciated 
by the public. The number of inquiries for the genealogy of 
families of other than English origin is on the increase, indicating 
a growing interest on the part of our more recent immigrants in 
their family history. The appearance of the genealogical shelves 
has been improved by the substitution of fresh volumes for many 
that were badly worn. The V^ital Records of Maine and Con- 
necticut have been placed beside the rapidly growing set of 
Massachusetts Records. The 220 letters answered by the 
Division have come from all but seven states of the Union, and 
from a number of foreign countries. As usual. New York leads 
in the number of inquiries, and this year Ohio stands second. 
There have been numerous requests for coats-of-arms, of which 
drawings have been supplied without charge by the Division. 

At the conference of the American Library Association in 
Washington last May, Mr. Chase presided at the meeting of the 
College and Reference Section, the first meeting ever devoted to 
reference work in public libraries. 



[46] 



PUBLICATIONS 



More Books, the Bulletin of the Library, has completed its 
fourth year. Ten issues have been published as against nine in 

1928, seven in 1927, and six in 1926. With this, the Bulletin 
has finally caught up with the intended schedule : it is the purpose 
of the Library to publish ten issues every year — nine monthly 
numbers during the season and one quarterly for the summer. 

In all, the Bulletin comprises 456 pages, thirty-six pages more 
than in 1 928. Of each issue 4,500 copies were printed, of which 
about 750 were sent by mail to other libraries, newspapers and 
subscribers, while the rest was distributed at the Central Library 
and at the Branches. 

It is worth while to remember that of the old series of the 
Bulletin — while it was still published as a quarterly — only 
2,000 copies were printed. In 1 923, the last year of its ap- 
pearance, 8,000 copies of the old Quarterly Bulletin were mailed 
and distributed as against 45,000 copies of MoRE BoOKS in 

1929. After deducting the mailed and "reserve" copies, the 
comparison seem.s even more striking: in 1923 about 4,000 copies 
were distributed to the general public, and in 1929 no less than 
35,000! It is to be noted, that in 1923 the Bulletin was even 
larger than it has been at any time since ; it occupied 480 pages, 
thirty-four more than in 1929. 

It may be justifiably said, therefore, that MoRE BoOKS has 
maintained the popularity with which it was received at its start. 
And this in spite of the fact that the Library has freely distributed 
in its precincts "Better Books," an annotated quarterly list, pub- 
lished by a group of Boston booksellers. 

This success of MoRE BoOKS is partly due to the fact that it 
publishes the lists of new books in "classified," instead of the 
earlier "dictionary" form. The reader now can conveniently 
turn to the group of books in which he is primarily interested, 
without being compelled to scan through the whole list. Further, 
the adoption of the classified form has reduced the space which 
the list occupies to one-third of its former length, thus leaving 
room for the publication of articles and book-notes. 



[47] 

As in earlier years, each issue of MoRE BoOKS has carried a 
leading article of four to seven thousand words, written on the 
book treasures of the Library or on some topic of library interest, 
and occasionally illustrated with facsimile reproductions. Thus 
the May issue contained an article about a copy of the nrst Latin 
edition of Columbus's letter relative to the discovery of America 
— "The Islands beyond the Ganges," as he called it. In the 
June issue Eliot's Indian Bible was described. In the same num- 
ber was printed for the first time the original draft of the Preface 
to the Bay Psalm Book, written by Richard Mather. In April 
an article appeared about a newly acquired manuscript, "The 
Barons Book of England. " The October issue published a 
description of the manuscripts and other original documents on 
West Indian subjects bequeathed to the Library by Benjamin P. 
Hunt in 1877. The November issue began the publication of a 
detailed descriptive catalogue of the fifteenth-century books in 
the Library. This catalogue, which will run through six or seven 
issues, promises to be one of the most important scholarly under- 
takings of the Library. Earlier in the year, in the January, 
February and March numbers an essay on Shakespeare's in- 
fluence in Hungary was published — the first comprehensive 
study on the subject in the English language. The Kern Sale of 
rare English books gave an opportunity to check up on similar pos- 
sessions of the Library, and the resulting notes were printed in 
the March issue. In the September number an article was pub- 
lished on the recently discovered papers of James Boswell. In 
May appeared an article on Herbert Putnam as Librarian of the 
Boston Public Library; and in December a paper on the Art of 
Reading. All these essays, with the exception of the last two, 
were original contributions, written especially for MoRE BoOKS. 
A regular feature of the Bulletin is, besides, "Ten Books," in 
which ten of the outstanding new books are reviewed in an m- 
formative rather than critical manner. The selection is catholic, 
ranging from art and literature to science and sociology. In 
"Library Notes" fine editions and other important new acquisi- 
tions are described in brief paragraphs. Library news of public 
interest, and communications from the Director's Office find their 
place also in these columns. 



[48] 

The articles and notes, in all, occupied 226 pages out of a 
total of 456. 

Four numbers have been added during the year to the series 
"Brief Reading Lists." No. 39 is entitled "A.pplied Art"; this 
was a contribution of the Library to the activities of the first "Art 
Week in Boston," organized by the Committee on Industrial and 
Civic Art of the Boston Chamber of Commerce. No. 40 con- 
tains a list of books on "Retail Selling" and was compiled at the 
suggestion of the Retail Trade Board of the Boston Chamber 
of Commerce. No. 41, the "Homemaker's Bookshelf," was 
compiled by the American Home Economics Association. And, 
finally. No. 42, entitled "Light's Golden Jubilee, 1879-1929" 
consisted of a selected list of books and articles relating to 
Thomas Alva Edison. 

Bibliographical lists have been printed, as in former years, for 
the lectures on the programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
as well as for the free concerts given in the Lecture Hall of the 
Library, prominent among which were the Chamber Music Con- 
certs presented under the auspices of the Library of Congress, 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation. 

The Library's annual publication "Opportunities for Adult 
Education in Greater Boston" was issued this year in a n-dw font 
of type, which greatly increased its attractiveness. A- number 
of new features were included, which brought its size to 1 46 
pages. It is planned to issue the pamphlet the coming year m 
two sections, so as to make it possible to publish the lists of study 
courses a month earlier than has been feasible m the past. The 
list of lectures — both those given in the Library and those offered 
by the Lowell Institute and other agencies — will appear as a 
separate pamphlet in late September. 

INFORMATION OFFICE AND OPEN SHELF ROOM 

Nine years ago the Information Office, the Open Shelf Room, 
and the Government Document Room began to function in three 
adjoining rooms on the first floor of the Library adjacent to the 
main stairway. During the past year the contents of the Govern- 
ment Document Room were re-transferred to the Statistical De- 



[49] 

partment. This move was expedient since the purpose of ac- 
quainting the pubhc with the value of Government pubhcations 
had been accomplished, and an increased and sustained interest 
in them established. Undoubtedly their present location will be 
equally serviceable; and at the same time much-needed space has 
been gained for the operation of the other units. The first two 
rooms have been given over entirely to open shelf books — books 
selected from the most interesting current acquisitions of the Li- 
brary and constantly renewed ; while the vocational and business 
files, directory files, and school catalogues have been concen- 
trated in the inner room. As a result, the service has been found 
to function with greater ease and flexibility. 

Little mention has been made heretofore of the work which has 
been performed by the information Office through its opportunit}'^ 
to distribute printed matter. A perfunctory check has been kept 
during the past year and the results are of value and of some 
interest to the Library as a whole. The Information Office has 
distributed to the public the following: 

"More Books" 300 a month 

Library Lecture Lists 500 a month 

Adult Education Opportunities 50 a month 

Trustees' Annual Report (1928) 200 a year 

Condensed Guide 50 a month 

How to Find and Procure a Book 50 a month 

University Extension Education Publications 20,000 a year 

Tercentenary publications and miscellaneous publications in large numbers. 

The regular ready-reference material roughly classified as 
Manuals, Almanacs, Social Registers, Time Tables, Geographi- 
cal Gazetteer, World Atlas, and so forth has served adequately 
the ever increasing demand for this kind of material, relieving, at 
the same time, the pressure on other departments for information 
of this type. 

The circulation of books in the Open Shelf Room amounted 
to 49,165 volumes compared with 47,574 in 1928. Consider- 
ing that the collection averages 4,000 volumes, it is interesting to 
observe that the circulation since 1 92 1 has increased by 1 7,974 
volumes. 

It is much to be regretted that the Library is unable to provide 
more space for the Open Shelf service. On many occasions, 
especially during the evening hours in winter, the room is so 



150] 

crowded that one can scarcely move. There surely is no lack of 
interest on the part of the readers : the problem is how to meet that 
interest. 

NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS 

The total number of papers on file is 253, fifteen less than 
last year. Some of these fifteen were dropped, others have 
ceased publication. 

Of the 253 papers on file 1 82 are American and 7 1 are 
foreign. The number of American dailies is 148, that of the 
foreign dailies is 55 ; the number of American weeklies is 34, that 
of the foreign weeklies is 1 6. 

The collection of bound volumes of newspapers consists of 
9,609 volumes. During the year, 19,452 readers consulted 
34,755 volumes as against 19,349 readers and 34,603 volumes 
in 1928. The attendance in the room is always large. The 
maximum was 1 65 on December 29 at five o'clock in the after- 
noon. 

The patent collection consists of 1 1 ,654 volumes, an increase 
of 1 ,041 volumes over last year. During the year, 19,402 persons 
asked for 1 1 1,753 volumes. The actual use of the collection 
was, of course, much larger, smce all books are accessible to the 
public. 

PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT 

The figures for the year 1 929 again show a decided increase 
in the use of the extensive collection of periodicals in the pos- 
session of the Library. The students and pupils from the various 
schools and colleges are continuously searching the periodicals 
for material on current topics. 

It is an interesting fact that the part of the reference work 
which has perhaps been most noticeably gaining in the number 
of requests is that dealing with books and authors. Book reviews 
and criticisms of literary style, comparisons of authors or of books 
are in constant demand. Biographies of authors and any bit of 
information, especially if it has a quality of human interest, arc 
asked for by the reading public. The number of biographies of 
authors in the clipping file has increased one hundred per cent 



[51] 

during the past year. More than two hundred and fifty folders 
containing chppings on various subjects are now available in the 
vertical files. 

Another class of reference work which has shown a substantial 
increase is in the field of period and national costume, doubtless 
because of interest in the Tercentenary Celebration. A list of 
special references on the subject is being compiled. 

ATTENDANCE ON WEEK DAYS. 



At the hours: 10 


12 


2 


4 


6 


8 


9.45 


A.M. 


M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


1928 . . . 20,867 
!929 . . . 21.204 


23,214 
23,792 


39,173 
40,827 


43,819 
44,762 


27,129 
27,943 


29,746 
29,925 


16,043 

16.871 


Sundays at 1 P.M. 














1928 

1929 


10,547 
10,765 













During the day throughout the year 69,842, and during the 
evenings and Sundays 26,143 bound volumes of magazines were 
consulted, as against 68,449 and 25,732 in the previous year. 
The unbound numbers of magazines consulted in the day-time 
were 73,935, and during evenings and Sundays 33, 1 84 as against 
72,827 and 32,538 in the preceding year. 

The number of bound volumes on the shelves in the Depart- 
ment was at the end of the year 23,394. The current periodicals, 
exclusive of those issued by State and Federal Governments, 
rearularly filed for readers in the Periodical Department number 
1,308. 

In addition there are filed in other Departments a number of 
other current periodicals: in the Fine Arts and Music Divisions 
150, in the Ordering Department 27, in the Statistical Depart- 
ment 54, in the Teachers' Reference Room and Children's 
Room 65 — making the total number of periodicals currently 
received in the Central Library 1 ,604. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES DEPARTMENT 

In spite of the general upset due to the reconstruction, the De- 
partment has been able to carry on its work as usual. The circu- 
lation of books amounted to 33,1 10; it was about the same as 



[52] 

last year. The loan of lantern-slides, totalling I 1 ,678, fell off a 
little from last year's record, but still remained far above the 
record of any other year. From the school picture collection 
(entirely rearranged and considerably augmented) 24,053 prints 
were issued, which represents an increase of 1,171. 

The major event of the year was the installation of the Special 
Collections in the splendid new home of the Barton-Ticknor 
Division. The over-crowded condition of the Fine Arts and 
Technology Divisions, partly the result of natural growth, partly 
due to the relocation of the Barton-Ticknor Room, also calls 
for some relief. The extension of the steel stack construction to 
the West and South Galleries would provide much-needed space, 
and would restore the original beauty of these rooms. 

1 he comprehensive reorganization of the Fine Arts picture 
collection, begun in October, 1 928, has reached its first stage. A 
tremendous amount of pictorial material, estimated at 25,000 
pieces, has accumulated in the past years. To date, over 8,000 
of these pictures have been sorted, classified, titled and housed in 
vertical filing cases. Aside from the "process" plates, the entire 
collection of reproductions of paintings is now available for 
reference. Work has been begun, and is progressing steadily, on 
the plates of the unclassified sculpture group. There is a 
large amount of architectural material, but because of the greater 
need for plates on painting and sculpture, the classification of 
architectural plates has been deferred to the future. Practically 
no material has been found in the collection in the fields of 
graphic and applied arts. 

Separate from its own pictorial material, the Division of Fine 
Arts has for many years maintained a large collection of mounted 
pictures for circulation, known as the School Collection. The 
reorganizing of this collection was begun in May, 1929. In 
addition to the task of arranging and classifying the material, 
there was that of discarding many pictures and of adding others 
to the collection. 

The lantern slide collection has been also entirely rearranged 
on a sim_pler and more effective system. An inventory was taken, 
after which indexes were made, covering as nearly as possible 
all the slides in the subject group, and listing alphabetically all 



[53] 

the countries, cities and towns found in the geographical group. 

The Music Division, as in former years, has continued its 
series of interpretive lectures on symphonj' concerts and operas, 
and has issued annotated programs and booklists for them. The 
steadily growing collection of recorded music, with which the 
Allen A. Brown Library is being enriched by the generous gifts 
of the publishers, requires in the new music room suitable pro- 
vision for audition, so that students should be able to compare 
the recorded performances with the scores. 

The number of books used in the Barton-TicI(nor Division 
was 12,178, showing a decrease of 234 from the figure of last 
year. This decrease is amply accounted for by the noise and 
confusion which accompanied the reconstruction work. A great 
gain was observed in the use of the Prince Collection, due to the 
Tercentenary Celebration which brings many research scholars 
to consult the early Americana of the Library. 

Three hundred and twenty-three books have been sent to the 
Bindery for special repair. It is to be hoped that this work may 
be continued until the special collections have all been properly 
cared for. The next pressing need is the repair and mounting of 
valuable maps and pictures. 

It is desirable, besides, that photostat copies be made of the 
rare imprints of which the only library copies are in the special 
collections and which are in constant demand by students. 

STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

The reorganization of the Statistical Department, which had 
a m.ere beginning in December 1 928, has been carried on through- 
out 1929. 

Chief among the changes was, perhaps, the uniting of the cur- 
rent united States Documents (hitherto kept in the Information 
Office) with the main Document Collection. The files were 
checked up, and, where it was possible, the gaps were filled in, 
and the duplicates returned to Washington. 

The entire Department has been rearranged. The whole 
first floor is now filled with reference material, and the balcony is 
devoted to circulating books. An inventory of the books has 



[54] 

been taken, with notes about the missing books on the check-list. 
This inventory will have to be verified next year. The whole 
material in Stack 4 Annex, chiefly foreign document continua- 
tions, was also put in order. Continuations which supplemented 
the Library's files were sent to be bound ; while such material as 
had not been catalogued and which did not fit in with our files 
was listed and offered to the Baker Business Library, the Library 
of Congress and the New York Public Library. The Baker 
Librar)' took about two-thirds of it. 

Besides the document serials'and the publications of the foreign 
banks and chambers of commerce, transferred from the Informa- 
tion Office, a number of much demanded magazines have been 
added to the Department. On the other hand, several expensive 
magazines which were little used were discontinued. 

A beginning has also been made to the recording of con- 
tinuations as received. A special blue card is used for all new 
titles of annuals, etc., which makes it easy to check up whether 
these year-books have arrived or not. A special effort has been 
made to have a more complete and up-to-date set of statistical 
year-books of all countries. First the shelf list was checked and 
then orders were made out for the annuals which had not been 
received in recent j^ears. A letter was written to the commercial 
attache of the American embassy in every country (or to the 
consul-general in the smaller countries) asking what year-books 
of this nature were now being published by the government of 
the country in which he was located. Replies were received 
from all but seven small countries and considerable free material 
was obtained as well as the year-books ordered. 

Along with the reorganization of the Department there has 
been carried on the preparation for the new Kirstein Business 
Branch. Ten thousand dollars worth of books have been order- 
ed, with all important sources of selection consulted and checked. 
Cataloguing has been begun. Publishers of directories and year- 
books were written to for information as to the publication dates 
of the next issues, so that the latest copies of these expensive 
books should be purchased. Much free material has been col- 
lected, such as state manuals, building laws of cities, etc. 



[55] 

The room has been practically full every afternoon, and there 
have been times when there were not enough chairs to accommo- 
date patrons. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN 

The number of books issued to children using the Boston 
Public Library increased from 1,764,374 in 1928 to 1,802,080 
in 1929, a gain of 37,706. Circulation for home use, m so far 
as it affects children, seems to have a direct relation to the size 
of the collection to which they have access. Comparison with 
the published statistics of another city approximately the same 
size, which has a library circulation among children 2 '4 times 
greater than that of Boston, shows that the same city has a book 
stock also 2 '4 times greater. 

Throughout the Branch System fifty-five per cent of the cir- 
culation is classified as juvenile and nowhere is the effect of in- 
creased purchase of books more striking than in the children's 
rooms. Nearly everywhere the need for simple books is pressing. 
Children who have just been admitted as borrowers are easily 
discouraged. When they cannot get what they want their first 
thought is to "stop the Liberry," as they say at the Jeffries Point 
Branch. There, as elsewhere, during the busy hours a line of 
children is invariably waiting for books to be returned and placed 
on the shelves. When there are no easy books obtainable they 
exclaim, "What a liberry! No good books." Too often the 
failure to secure books within his comprehension results in a 
child's believing that he does not like to read and it may be years 
before this feeling is overcome. 

The volume of work with children, however, is not measured 
merely by circulation statistics. In some parts of the city use of 
the libraries as study halls creates a serious housing problem. This 
has been a particularly satisfactory year in the allotment of 
larger and better children's rooms in a number of the Branch 
Libraries. The Library has now five more special rooms for 
children than it had a year ago. 

While the better co-ordination of the Children's Work has 
gone on in every other place, mention must be made of the serious 
handicap on the work in Dorchester because of the encroachment 
of the "Well Babies' Conference" during eight months of the 

5 



[56] 

year. There can be no question of its demoralizing effect upon 
the use of the library by the children of that locality. 

The comparative circulation figures for the Children's Room 
in the Central Library show a decrease for every month except 
October, when there was a slight gain. This is no new condition 
but an inevitable result of the advance of business into the Copley 
Square section and the concomitant retreat of homes. In spite of 
these drawbacks, however, reference work has noticeably in- 
creased. Much of this added demand comes from young people 
and adults who have need of information in a fairly simple form, 
teachers and students working with children, or illustrators and 
designers, scene painters and artists who wish to examine the 
finely printed books included in the children's collections. The 
past year was one of unprecedented production in the field of 
children's books, and the Library was fortunate in being able 
to secure some very fine specimens of book making. 

Reading lists for individuals and groups were prepared as 
occasion called. In anticipation of Tercentenary demands there 
was compiled in the Children's Department a reading list to fit 
the requirements of the elementary grades. Although this list 
has not been printed, but is in mimeographed form only, it has 
been of considerable service, especially to teachers working on 
programs for both city and state. Two editions of a reading list 
for the Junior High School age were prepared in the Department, 
and printed by the Library. 

Exhibits have included some Alice in Wonderland figurines 
lent by the Newark Museum, home and garden models lent by 
the Wheelock School, and a Swiss village scene for which we 
were indebted to the E. T. Slattery Company. The Macmillan 
Company furnished an unusual exhibition in connection with the 
award of the Newbury Medal to Eric Kelly's book, "The 
Trumpeter of Krakow." 

For the third year the display for the annual observance of 
Book Week was arranged in the Venetian Lobby, which affords 
an artistic and colorful setting for the books and pictures. At 
this time the Boston publishers were very generous in allowing 
the Library to exhibit original paintings for some of their new 
books. 



[57] 

During the year there has been a considerable strengthening 
of the staff of assistants with special knowledge of children's 
literature and the methods of work with them. 

School use of the children's rooms continues to increase and in 
several of the Branches which are near school buildings there has 
been a growth in the number of pupils allowed to come to the 
Library for reference work during school hours. In this way the 
pressure after school is relieved and the librarians are enabled to 
give better service. Several of the librarians are now giving 
lessons on the use of the catalogues and books of reference which 
should help to clarify the ideas of school children. From the 
school authorites, teachers and principals there is much fine co- 
operation. Teachers in some sections of the city are prompt to 
notify the library of class assignments, often giving an idea of 
their requirements a week in advance. Some teachers take pride 
in having a class of one hundred per cent borrowers. 

The Library makes a most acceptable contribution to the 
school program when it sends its story-tellers to class rooms or 
assemblies. Admirable work of this kind has been carried on 
durmg 1929. For the first time the Library has had a full year 
of Mr. John J. Cronan's story-telling and the results are most 
rewarding. One becomes more and more convinced that in the 
story hours at schools and in the libraries the authorities possess 
an ideal way to appeal to the minds of many young people. 

THE teachers' ROOM 

While the Teachers' Room reports the busiest year it has 
ever had, statistics to show this are lacking, as books are not cir- 
culated from there. Service is given throughout the year to many 
students and teachers, but the most consistent and serious readers 
are to be found among those students who attend the summer 
schools in this vicinity. Coming as they do from different locali- 
ties with the definite purpose of making the session count for as 
much as possible, they make intensive use of books and periodicals 
for six solid weeks. It has become necessary to keep files of the 
bound periodicals on education in the room, and a new book 
stack was built for this purpose. The Teachers' Room has been 



[58] 

improved in appearance by the laying of a new tiled floor in 
harmony with the adjoining Children's Room. A new catalogue 
has also been installed. Among reference tools the Educational 
Index has proved of signal importance. 

During the summer months occasion was taken to go over the 
picture file to remount and reclassify some items and to discard 
others. Small though the collection is in comparison with that 
in the Fine Arts Department, it has helped to fill requests that 
could not otherwise be met. 

The Supervisor of Work with Children adds each year to her 
other duties the filling of numerous speaking engagements before 
schools, parents' associations and clubs. 

THE BRANCH SYSTEM 

The total circulation through the Branch Libraries and the 
Central Branch Department for the year was 3,598,1 12. This 
is a gain of 46,784 over last year. 

This total circulation was made up of the following items: 
3,037,755 books were issued for home use direct from the Bran- 
ches; 473,098 books were issued to schools and various institu- 
tions partly from collections of the Branches (216,073) and 
partly from the Branch Deposit Collection in the Central Library 
(257,025) ; and finally, in response to calls from individual 
readers at various Branches, 87,259 books were issued from the 
Central Library through the Branches — 69,717 from the De- 
posit Collection and 1 7,542 from the stacks of the Central 
Library. 

Of the 3,037,755 volumes drawn out for home use direct from 
the Branches 1,353,459 were for adults and 1,684,296 for 
juveniles. Among the books for adults there were 1,035,386 
volumes of fiction and 3 1 8,073 of non-fiction ; among the books 
for juveniles there were 1,163,730 volumes of fiction and 
520.566 of non-fiction. 

The number of volumes sent on deposit from the Central 
Branch collection and from Branch Libraries to 338 agencies 
was 87,234. Among these agencies were 15 Branches, 55 
engine houses, 6 high schools, 204 grammar schools, 1 4 parochial 
schools and 44 institutions of various kinds. To the 224 schools 



[59] 

61,991 volumes were sent in all. Last year the number of 
agencies was 364 and the number of volumes sent on deposit, 
85,237; to 239 schools 61,231 books were sent in 1928. 

Besides books, 44,682 pictures were sent to schools. The 
inter-library loans amounted to 2,326 volumes; 1,958 books to 
libraries in Massachusetts and 368 to libraries outside of the 
State. In all, 2,184 applications were received, of which 805 
had to be refused. 

Fifteen of the Branches gained in circulation. The greatest 
gains were at City Point, Faneuil, Allston, Mattapan, Lower 
Mills, South End, Andrew Square and Parker Hill. The 
largest circulation reached at a Branch was 180,854 and the 
lowest, 42,571. 

Important improvements have been made during the year at 
several Branches. In February the Allston Branch was moved 
to new and commodious quarters at 161 Harvard Avenue. The 
resultmg gain in circulation was 10,485. Mt. Bowdoin Branch 
has been moved to attractive quarters at 271 Washington Street, 
Dorchester. Ad Andrew Square a new room for adults has been 
added. Appreciation is shown by the fact that 2,947 more books 
have been drawn by adults smce the room was opened than 
during the corresponding period last year. At Brighton a new 
children's room was opened November thirteenth. Orient Heights 
has been moved from the dilapidated structure it had occupied 
for twenty-eight years into a new building designed especially 
for library purposes. 

During the summer Branch Librarians and their staff co- 
operated in providing material for a comprehensive survey of the 
entire library system, which was accompanied by thirty-one de- 
tailed maps of the thirty-one districts served by Branch Libraries. 

THE LIBRARY TRAINING CLASS 

The second year of the Library Training Class opened Oc- 
tober first, 1928, and ended June 15, 1929. 

During the year the Training Class became the happy pos- 
sessor of a pleasant room of its own, equipped with twent}'^ oak 
desks, two blackboards, a large bookcase, three bulletin boards. 



[60] 

a typewriter for the exclusive use of the students, and a telephone. 

There were seventeen students in all, divided into three groups. 
Six students from outside the Library enrolled for the full eight 
months course; three library assistants enrolled on part time to 
begin the course and finish it in two years ; and eight more library 
assistants were to continue on part time the work begun a year 
ago, and prepare to graduate in June. 

Four of the six courses offered were conducted in the same 
manner as last year; children's literature, conducted by Miss 
Jordan ; and reference work, cataloguing, and classification, con- 
ducted by Mrs. Hartzell, the Supervisor. 

In book selection two classes instead of one were held each 
week, and two phases of the subject were considered: first, the 
theoretical aspect of ordering books for a library, and second, 
the acquiring of a more intimate acquaintance with a great variety 
of books through lectures, reading, and book-reviewing. Dur- 
ing the course talks v/ere given by Mr. Zoltan Haraszti on early 
inscriptions, mediaeval manuscripts, and early printed books. 
Other lecturers were Mr. John Clair Minot, Mr. Leslie T. Little 
of Waltham, and Mr. F. K. W. Drury of the American Library 
Association headquarters. Miss Mildred R. Bradbury, of the 
Fine Arts Division, repeated her talks on book illustration, and 
Mrs. Eleanor Gulick of Wellesley gave another lecture on stan- 
dards for judgmg modern fiction. 

The course in library administration consisted largely, as it 
did last year, of lectures by heads of departments or their repre- 
sentatives; of a thorough study of the interesting features of the 
Building; and of talks on the American Library Association and 
the State Division of Public Libraries. Visits were paid to book- 
stores, the State Library, the Boston Athenaeum, and the Brook- 
line Library. A new feature of the course was the introduction 
of several lessons on book mending, conducted by Miss Marion 
A. McCarthy of the Branch Department. Practical work was 
carried on, as before, in some of the Branch Libraries, and in the 
main departments of the Central Library. 

The work of the Supervisor has included the management of 
the Training Class as a whole, the teaching of four subjects, the 
arrangement of practical work for the students, and talks before 



[61] 

various organizations on the work of the Library Training Class. 
Contacts have also been made with school librarians, and with 
the vocational guidance department of the Boston School System. 



READERS ADVISER. 

The work of the Readers' Adviser has gone on steadily. 
Twenty-seven reading lists have been compiled for readers at 
request. Thirty-five new persons have registered for systematic 
reading. The Readers' Adviser has given talks on Adult Edu- 
cation to a number of groups and has helped in the preparation 
of several club programs. 

The World Conference on Adult Education at Cambridge, 
England, which was the first international meeting of its kind, 
brought out the fact that the work of Adult Education is still in 
a somewhat experimental stage. There is no doubt that when 
methods are entirely worked out the possibilities of Adult Edu- 
cation are almost unlimited. Many countries have gone farther 
than the United States, but in no country have the public libraries 
taken the leading position that they have in America. 



LECTURES — CONCERTS — EXHIBITIONS 

During the year I 18 lectures and concerts were given in the 
Lecture Hall under the auspices of the Library, the Drama 
League, the Field and Forest Club, the Ruskin Club and other 
organizations. A course on the Massachusetts Bay Tercen- 
tenary was also given. Most of the lectures were illustrated. 

The Lecture Hall has contmued to be used by the Division of 
University Extension of the State Department of Education. 
The usual lectures on the concerts of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra were offered by the Massachusetts Division of University 
Extension in collaboration with the Library. They were, as in 
previous years, under the supervision of Mr. Richard G. A.ppel 
of the Library staff, who has had the generous cooperation of 
other musicians. 

Nineteen exhibitions have been arranged during the year in 
the Exhibition Room. Owing to the temporary housing of the 



[62] 

Music Division in the Exhibition Room, no exhibitions were ar- 
ranged after September 15. 

For a complete hst of the lectures, concerts and exhibitions 
see Appendix, pp. 70. 

BINDERY 

For the first time in several years the total of bound volumes 
shows a slight decrease as compared with the preceding year. 
This, however, is accounted for by the retirement of one em- 
ployee who has not yet been replaced, and by the work of re- 
pairing the old books in the Prince Collection. During the year 
over three hundred of these old books were repaired or entirely 
rebound. 

The work of the Bindery has increased to such an extent that 
more help is necessary. All departments in the Central Library 
want more work done for them and the Branches are insatiable. 
This demand is reasonable and is based on necessity. Even a 
small increase in the force would help out a great deal. 

MECHANICAL AND OTHER REPAIRS 

The reconstruction of the third floor of the Library and the 
substitution of steel and concrete for portions of the old piles of 
the foundation, while carried out under contract, have required 
much additional labor on the part of the Department of the 
Superintendent of Buildings. Mention has been made in the 
introduction to this report also of various other improvements, 
such as the installation of a new pneumatic tube system., and the 
reconstruction of the fountain basin in the court-yeard. Repairs 
went on incessantly throughout the year. Here are mentioned 
some of the more important: 

With the exception of Bates Hall, practically the whole Cen- 
tral Library has been repainted. The books in the stacks have 
been cleaned. 

All tables in the Periodical Room were re-surfaced and re- 
finished. New bookcases were built in the Teachers' Room, in 
the Statistical, Branch and Ordering Departments, and in the 
Information Office. 



[63] 

Six of the Branches (Allston, Orient Heights, North End, 
Mt. Bovvdoin, Andrew Square, and Charlestown) were re- 
painted. In five Branches (Upham's Corner, Andrew Square, 
Codman Square, Mt. Pleasant, and Charlestown) the furnish- 
ings were refinished. 

CONCLUSION 

During the year the following persons retired under the Boston 
Retirement Act: Bindery: Margaret C. Kiley, forewoman, (re- 
tired September 30) , entered service March 1 6, 1 889; Binder'^: 
Mary G. Murphy, sewer, (retired December 31, voluntarily), 
entered service February 19, 1915; Issue Department: Frank C. 
Blaisdell, Chief, (retired December 31), entered service Feb- 
ruary 17, 1876. 

The Director has satisfaction in recording his appreciation for 
the services rendered by all the employees of the Library during 
the year. Many persons in the several departments of the 
system have carried on their good work quietly, regularly, and 
efficiently. Opportunity is not given in a formal report either to 
review or specify such service, but it has been noted and is grate- 
fully acknowledged. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles F. D. Belden, 
Director 



APPENDIX. 



TABLE OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION. 

1924-25 1925* 1926 1927 1928 1929 

Central Library 623,024 608,852 644,896 657,977 678,834 676,240 



Allston 


60.358 


63,434 


74,297 


81.984 


86,960 


97,445 


Andrew Square 


68,196 


68,772 


89.662 


92.926 


104,563 


110,225 


Boylston Station 


64,871 


64,559 


71.261 


68.196 


81 ,405 


80,097 


Brighton 


92,702 


89,384 


101,286 


98,907 


96,586 


92,223 


Charlestown 


98,433 


95.288 


107.562 


110.069 


105,659 


100,483 


City Point 


47,441 


50,108 


51.154 


54,232 


56,686 


83,558 


Codman Square 


114,950 


1 19,758 


145,001 


1 56,559 


157.498 


153,372 


Dorchester 


88,628 


90,123 


100.188 


101,957 


109,553 


99,255 


East Boston 


128,771 


125,820 


138,691 


140,379 


151,099 


145,759 


Faneuil 


30,443 


31,560 


43,782 


50,212 


60,143 


72,005 


Fellowes Athen. 


76,007 


84,765 


85,151 


89,479 


91.463 


88.381 


Hyde Park 


95,334 


93,582 


98,147 


107,168 


110,679 


108,512 


Jamaica Plain 


68,630 


67.232 


73,117 


85,262 


86,398 


85,935 


Jeffries Point 


52,020 


53,004 


58,218 


61 ,893 


63.185 


62,111 


Lower Mills 


27,259 


25.488 


32.274 


35,835 


38,428 


44.730 


Mattapan 


48,789 


58,290 


69,364 


95,085 


124,374 


133.210 


Memorial 


136,981 


135,913 


147.263 


171,034 


178,142 


180,344 


Mount Bowdoin 


107,679 


112,320 


125,907 


129,487 


132,424 


1 34,008 


Mount Pleasant 


53,953 


53,778 


59,101 


66,315 


72,367 


72,161 


Neponset 


41,466 


39,479 


43.349 


48,331 


48,639 


51,228 


North End 


1 1 7,075 


121,651 


137,896 


143,381 


146,616 


145,201 


Orient Heights 


40,605 


45,395 


58,913 


55,625 


49,015 


42,571 


Parker Hill 


37,038 


39,860 


43,719 


45,862 


51,412 


56.209 


Roslindale 


94,888 


93.154 


105,074 


113,150 


122.260 


124,995 


Roxbury Crossing 


! 67,143 


58,634 


62,462 


77,770 


78,269 


78,803 


South Boston 


1 52,799 


148,751 


169,625 


170,911 


181,376 


171,805 


South End 


117,845 


112,578 


118,315 


116,226 


1 1 7,982 


123,794 


Tyler Street 


37,321 


37,436 


43,421 


39,868 


42,875 


46,058 


Upham's Corner 


95,975 


100.288 


126,010 


152,140 


171,260 


169.027 


West End 


157,321 


1 52,043 


169.142 


175,683 


183,887 


180,854 


West Roxbury 


88,249 
J,132,I94 


88,482 
3,129,781 


104,889 
3.499,137 


1 1 1 ,754 
3,705,657 


119,249 


1 1 9,463 


Total . ; 


3,899.286 


3,930,068 



*A period of eleven montlis. 



[65] 



The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form : 



1924-25 gain over preceding year 
1925* loss from preceding year 
1926** gain over preceding year (of 1 I months) 

1927 gain over preceding year 

1928 gain over preceding year 

1929 gain over preceding year 



VOLUMES. 

209,333 
12,413 
369,356 
306,520 
193,629 
30.782 



USE OF BOOKS. 
Circulation from Central by Months. 





HOME USE 


HOME USE 


schools and 






DIRECT. 


THROUGH 


INSTITUTIONS 


TOTALS. 




BRANCH DEPT. 


THROUGH 










BRANCH DEPT. 




January. 1929 . 


33,408 


9,135 


28,375 


70,918 


February 


31.301 


7,969 


29.450 


68,720 


March 


33.130 


9,098 


28,755 


70,983 


April 


30.321 


8,104 


28,825 


67,250 


May 


27,104 


7,399 


27,875 


62,378 


June 


22,199 


5.772 


26,795 


54,766 


July 


20,071 


4,803 


4,685 


29,559 


August 


20,425 


4,613 


4,390 


29,428 


September " 


21,403 


5,336 


6,040 


32,779 


October "' 


30,126 


8,154 


15,410 


53,690 


November " 


32,517 


8,815 


24.035 


65,367 


December " 


29,951 


8,061 


32,390 


70,402 



Totals 



331.956 



87.259 



257.025 



676,240 



Distribution of Total Circulation. 



Central Library: 


HOME 

USE. 


schools and 
institutions. 


TOTALS. 


a. Direct ..... 


.331,956 






h. Through Branches 








1 . Deposit Collections . 


69,717 






2. General Collections . 


17,542 






c. Schools and Institutions through 








Branch Department 




257.025 


676.240 


Branches: 








Allston .... 


97,445 




97.445 


Andrew Square .... 


. 110,225 




110,225 


Boylston Station .... 


80,097 




80,097 


Brighton .... 


74.479 


17,744 


92,223 


Charlestown .... 


91,165 


9,318 


100.483 



Carried fortuard 



Ab3A\ 



27,062 



480,473 



*EIeven month period. 

'*Gain over an approximation of preceding twelve months 233,279. 



[66J 



Brought forJvaiJ 
City Poinl 
Codman Square 
Dorchester 
East .Boston 
Faneuil 
Fellowes Athenaeum 
Hyde Park 
Jamaica Plain 
Jeffries Point 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan 
Memorial 
Mount Bowdoin 
Mount Pleasant 
Neponset 
North End 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Roslindale 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boston 
South End 
Tyler Street 
Upham's Corner 
West End 
West Roxbury 



433.41 1 


27.062 


480,473 


83.358 




83.558 


144.012 


" 9,360 


153,372 


92.827 


6.428 


99,255 


131.843 


13,916 


145.759 


72.005 




72.005 


68.863 


19,518 


88.381 


97,110 


1 1 ,403 


108,512 


79.291 


6,644 


85,935 


62.111 




62,111 


44.730 




44.730 


133.210 


.... 


133,210 


178,619 


1.725 


180,344 


131,710 


2,298 


134,008 


72,167 




72,167 


51.003 


' 225 


51,228 


143.933 


1,268 


145,201 


42.571 




42,571 


56.209 




56,209 


1 1 5.409 


' 9,586 


124,995 


78.803 




78,803 


144,620 


27,185 


171,805 


106,676 


17,118 


123,794 


46,058 




46,058 


168.758 


269 


169,027 


142,723 


38,131 


180,854 


95,525 


23.938 


119,463 



3,037,755 



216,073 



3,253,828 



These figures are condensed into the following: 

Books Lent jar Home Use, including Circulation through 
Schools and Institutions. 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 

the branches) .......... 676,240 

From branches (excluding books received from Central Library) . . 3,253,828 

Total 3.930,068 

Comparative. 1928 1929 

Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions). 
Direct home use . . . . 347,958 

Through branches .... 95,469 



Branch Libraries circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) . 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch system) 



1928 

443,427 
3,003,391 

452.468 
3,899,286 



331,956 
87,259 



419,215 
3,037,755 

473,098 
3,930,068 



[67] 



Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is shown 
for two successive years: 



Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 



Total .... 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts 

1' rom libraries outside of Massachusetts 

Total .... 



1928 192<) 

1 .847 1 ,958 
368 368 



2,215 2,326 



540 
106 



646 



670 
135 



805 



The classified direct circulation of the branches was as follows, 
for two successive years: 



Fiction for adults . 
Non-fict!on for adults 
Juvenile fiction 
Juvenile non-fiction 



1928 

VOLUMES. PERCENTAGE. 

1 ,000,443 33 

302,963 10 

1,158.952 39 

541,031 18 



1929 

VOLUMES. PERCENT.\GE. 

1,035,386 34.1 

318,073 10.5 

1,163,730 38.3 

520,566 1 7.1 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 
the following percentages: 



Fiction 

Non-fiction 



1928 


1929 


PERCENTAGE. 
48.3 
51.7 


PERCENTAGE. 

45.8 
54.2 



BOOK ACCESSIONS. 
BOOKS ACQUIRF.D BY PURCHASE. 



For the Central Library: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 



For branches: 

From City appropriations 
From trust funds income . 



1928 
10.526 
3.301 



62,565 
1,041 



13.827 



63.606 



1929 

15,501 

7,390 



70,446 
1,002 



22,891 



71,448 



Totals 



77.433 



94,339 



[68] 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise: 





' 


CENTRAL. BRANCHES. TOTAL 
VOLUMES. 


Accessions 


by purchase 


22,891 


71,448 


94,339 


Accessions 


by gift 


12,351 


1,625 


13,976 


Accessions 


by exchange 


156 


6 


162 


Accessions 


by periodicals bound 


2,314 


25 


2,339 


Accessions 


by newspapers bound 


129 




129 


Accessions 


by serials bound 
Totals 


1,401 




1,401 




39,242 


73,104 


112,346 




THE 


CATALOGUE. 










1928. 


1929. 






VOLS AND 

PARTS. '''''^'■'■ 


VOLS. AND 

PARTJ;. 


TITLES. 


Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue . 


11 MA \15bl 


27.203 


1 7.924 


Serials 




6,827 .... 


6.702 




Branch 


es ... 


58,718 52,446 


60,253 


'53,545 


Recatalogu 


ed .... 
Totals . 


15,383 8,169 


1 5.890 


8,412 




. 108,472 78,167 


110,048 


79,88! 



SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) .... 26,321 

Special collections, new books and transfers . . . . . 3,167 

Books reported lost or missing i/i previous 5'ears but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. ......... 1 ,830 

31,318 
Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 

fers. etc. 13.429 

Net gain at Central Library 17,889 

Net gain at Branches ......... 15,052 

Net gain entire library system .......•■ 32,941 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 

the following statement : 

1852-53 .... 9.688 1R56-57 .... 34,896 

1853-54 .... 16,221 1857-58 .... 70,851 

1854-55 .... 22,617 1858-59 .... 78,043 

1855-56 .... 28.080 1859-60 .... 85,031 



169] 



1860-61 








97,38^ 


1895 . . 






628.297 


1861-62 








105,034 


1896-97 . 






663.763 


1862-63 








110.563 


1897-98 . 






698.888 


1863-64 








116.934 


1898-99 . 






716.050 


1864-65 








123,016 


1899-1900. 






746.383 


1865-66 








130.678 


1900-01 . 






781.377 


1866-67 








136.080 


1901-02 . 






812.264 


1867-68 








144,092 


1902-03 . 






835.904 


1868-69 








1 52.796 


1903-04 . 






848.884 


1869-70 








160.573 


1904-05 . 






871.050 


1870-71 








1 79.250 


1905-06 . 






878.933 


1871-72 








192.958 


1906-07 . 






903.349 


1872-73 








209.456 


1907-08 . 






922.348 


1873-74 








260.550 


1908-09 . 






941.024 


1874-75 








276,918 


1909-10 . 






961.522 


1875-76 








297.873 


1910-11 . 






987.268 


1876-77 








321,010 


1911-12 . 






1.006.717 


1877-78 








345.734 


1912-13 . 






1. 049.011 


1878-79 








360.963 


1913-14 . 






1. 067. 1 03 


1879-80 








377,225 


1914-l> . 






1.098.702 


1880-81 








390,982 


1915-16 . 






1.121.747 


1881-82 








404.221 


1916-17 . 






1.139.682 


1882-83 








422.116 


1917-18 . 






1,157.326 


1883-84 








438,594 


1918-19 . 






1,173,695 


1884-85 








453,947 


1919-20 . 






1.197,498 


1885 . 








460,993 


1920-21 . 






1,224,510 


1886 . 








479,421 


1921-22 . 






1,258,211 


1887 . 








492.956 


1922-23 . 






1,284.094 


1888 . 








505.872 


1923-24 . 






1.308.041 


1889 . 








520.508 


1924-25 . 






1.333.264 


1890 . 








536,027 


1925 






1,363.515 


1891 . 








556,283 


1926 






1.388,439 


1892 . . 








576,237 


1927 






1,418,489 


1893 . 








597.152 


1928 






1 ,442,802 


1894 . 








610,375 


1929 






1 ,475,743 


Volumes in entire library system 


i. 475.743 


Volumes in the branches 


413,188 


These volumes are located as 


follows : 


Central Library . . . 1,062.555 


Mattapan .... 9.558 


Allston 




8,331 


Memorial 




14.861 


Andrew Square . 




7,615 


Mt. Bowdoin 




10,473 


Boylston Station . 




8,009 


Mt. Pleasant 




6.624 


Brighton 




19,836 


Neponset 




5.922 


Charlestovvn 




16,290 


North End 




12.371 


City Point 




10.992 


Orient Heights 




5.795 


Codman Square . 




13,555 


Parker Hill 




6,478 


Dorchester 




13.737 


Roslindale 




12,589 


East Boston 




21.655 


Roxbury Crossing 




6,491 


Faneuil 




8.346 


South Boston 




21,442 


Fellowes Athenaeum 




38,537 


South End 




13,472 


Hyde Park 




30,781 


Tyler Street 




6,748 


Jamaica Plain 




17.849 


Uoham's Corner . 




14,455 


Jeffries Point 




5.107 


West End 




21,032 


Lower Mil 


s 






5.130 


West Roxbury 






19,107 



[70] 



THE BINDERY. 

1928. 1929. 

Number of volumes bound in various styles .... 71,963 67,385 

Magazines stitched ........ 225 211 

Volumes repaired 1.810 " 2,001 

Volumes guarded . 1,895 1,065 

Maps mounted 287 103 

Photographs and engravings, etc. mounted .... 7,087 6,891 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed . . . 106,993 119,174 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

1928. 1929. 

Requisitions received and filled ...... 207 197 

Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) ..... 8,856 6,768 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) 135,137 105,409 

Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) ..... 296 840 

Cards finished (exclusive of extras) ..... 21,768 54,638 

Si^ns 217 263 

Blank forms (numbered series) 3,478,578 3,265.600 

Forms, circulars, and sundries (outside numbered series) . . 53,960 61 ,350 

Catalogues, pamphlets, and bibliographical programmes . . 54,568 68,754 



THE LECTURES OF 1929. 



All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*) were 
illustrated with lantern slides. 

Jan. 3. Fly with Me above Pikes Peak, Crest of the Continent, Gar- 
den of the Gods. Gilbert McClurg. 
^The Restoration Theatre and its Lineage. Robert E. Rogers, 
A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
Concert. South Mountain Quartet. (Elizabeth Sprague 

Coolidge series.) 
A Summer in our National Parks: the wonderland of the 
world. Rev. Charles W. Casson. (Field and Forest 
Club course.) 
The Making of a Statue. Leonard Craske, Sculptor. 
Concert. Orchestra of the Lincoln House Association, Jac- 
ques Hoffmann, Conductor. 
Jan. 1 4. '^Legislative Evening. EHzabeth W. Pigeon, B.Sc. of Ed. 
(Ruskin Club.) 
1 7. The Beauties of Sculpture. Dorothy Adlow. 
20. American Folk Songs of the Trades. Catherine Smith Bailey. 
20. Folk Songs and Poems, in French. Lina M. Gremillot. 



Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


13. 


Jan. 


13. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


24. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


31. 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 


3 


Feb. 


4 



[71] 

Tact and Foil}- in the World of Song. William A. C. 

Zerffi. 
A Wanderer in the Near East and Europe. Nathaniel J. 

Hasenfus. 
Rambling through Europe. John J. Ward. 
Intimate Piano Concert. Margaret Anderton. 
Ruskin as a Spiritual Force in Practical Life. Mrs. Herbert 

J. Gurney. (Ruskin Club.) 
The Life and Art of Edgar Allan Poe. Joseph Lorraine. 
The Early Theatre in America. Frank Chouteau Brown. 

(Drama League Course.) 
Hamlet and John Donne. Theodore Spencer. (New 

England Poetry Club Course.) 
What is Modernism in Advertising and Printing i> Llenry 

Lewis Johnson. 
The Old and the New School in Typography. James Gar- 
field Clarke. (Boston Club of Printing House Craftsmen 
Course.) 
Feb. 7. Gilbert Stuart's Place in American Art. Martha A. S. 
Shannon. 
A Naturalist in the Canadian Rockies. Dan McCowan. 
Concert. Letz String Quartet. (Under the auspices of the 
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C, Elizabeth 
Sprague Coolidge Foundation.) 
^"Observance of John Ruskin's Birthday, February 8, 1819. 
Agnes Knox Black, A.M. (Ruskin Club.) 
Flower Folk of New England. Percy A. Brigham. (Field 
and Forest Club Course.) 
"^George Washington. Albert Bushnell Hart, Ph.D. 
Concert. The Chamber Music Organization of the Boston 
Flute Players' Club. 
Feb. 1 8. The Art of Lithography. Charles F. Shirley. 

What is Rotogravure? Jean Stimmell. (Boston Club of 
Printing House Craftsmen Course.) 
Feb. 2 1 . Varied program of one-act plays. The Strolling Players. 

Helene Martha Boll, Director. 
Feb. 24. Concert. Appleton Chapel Choir of Harvard University. 

Archibald T. Davison, Ph.D., Conductor. 
Feb. 24. Modern Poetry: Reading and Comment. George F. Pear- 
son. 
Feb. 25. ^Anniversary of the Founding of the Boston Ruskin Club. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Feb. 28. Italy, the Land of Romance and Song. Mrs. Arthur Dud- 
ley Ropes. 



Feb. 
Feb. 


10. 
10. 


Feb. 


11. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


17. 
17. 



[72] 

Mar. 3. Dumas fils and Robertson; the Beginnings of Realism. 

Robert E. Rogers, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
Mar. 3. Concert. Burgin String Quartet. (Under the auspices of 
the Library of Congress, Washington, D. C, Elizabeth 
Sprague Coolidge Foundation.) 
Mar. 4. ^'The Art Conception of Water Color and its Value to Adver- 
tising and Printing. Arthur M. Sherrill. 
The Preparation and Mechanical Production of the Jean 
Berte Process of water color printing. J. William Hough- 
ton. 
An Analysis of European Poster Work. George Marsh. 

(Boston Club of Printing House Craftsmen Course.) 
Around the Beautiful Bay of Naples. Ellen E. Page. 
^Henry F. Gilbert, an American Composer. Edward Bur- 
lingame Hill. 
Reading, with Comments. Robert Silliman Hillyer. (New 
England Poetry Club Course.) 
*John Ruskin and the Charles River Basin. What would he 
do with it> Walter Babcock Smith, M.D., and Leonard 
Ware, Jr. (Ruskin Club.) 
Trails and Summits of the Adirondacks. Professor Walter 

C. O'Kane. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
From Alpine Snows to Vesuvian Lava ; a Geological Tour 
of Southwestern Europe. Kirtley F. Mather, Ph.D. 
Mar. 1 7. ^Rudyard Kipling, the Uncrowned Poet Laureate of the 
British Empire. Harry Seymour Ross, A.M. 
How to Beautify Home Grounds. Herbert D. Hemenway. 
Reading: Dramatic Version of the Book of Job. Harriet 

Brooks Moss, A.B., B.L.L 
Lyric Action Recital. Lisa and Alida Paget. Assisted by 

the Kappa Gamma Psi String Orchestra. 
England, the Home of John Ruskin. Mrs. Arthur Dudley 

Ropes. (Ruskin Club.) 
Advancing Aviation. Helen M. Murdock, F.R.P.S. Lumiere 

autochrome slides. 
The Modern Theatre from Irving to Hampden. Frank W. 

C. Flersey, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
Concert. The Harvard University Orchestra. Pierian So- 
dality of 1 808. Nicolas Slonimsky, Conductor. 
Illustration in Modern Printing. Answering the question 
"Why is Modern Art?" Thacher Nelson. (Boston 
Club of Printing House Craftsmen Course.) 
North Shore Gardens. Herbert W. Gleason. 
Historic Boston and its Environs. Arthur Collins Stewart. 



Mar. 


7. 


Mar. 


10. 


Mar. 


10. 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


14 


Mar. 


17. 



Mar. 
Mar. 


21. 
24. 


Mar. 


24. 


Mar. 


25. 


Mar. 


28. 


Mar. 


31. 


Mar. 


31. 


Apr. 


1. 


Apr. 
Apr. 


4. 

7, 



Apr. 


8. 


Apr. 


1 I. 


Ai)r. 
Apr. 


14. 
14. 


Apr. 


18. 


Apr. 


21. 


Apr. 


21. 


Apr. 


22. 


Apr. 


25. 


Apr. 
Apr. 


28. 
28. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


7. 



[73] 

Apr. 7. Concert. Soutli Mountain String Quartet. (Under the aus- 
pices of the Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation.) 
^Jo.seph P. MacCarthv, Ph.D., Speaker. Music. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
Scenic Masterpieces of America. Henry Warren Poor, A.M. 
(Under the auspices of the National Park Service, De- 
partment of the Interior, Washington, D.C.) 
'^European Jazz and Krenek's "Jonny." Nicolas Slonimsky. 
Concert. The MacDowell Chorus. William Ellis Weston, 

Conductor, and Ethel Harding Durant, Accompanist. 
The Missions of California and the Mission Country. Elsie 

Powers Corwin. 
Concert. Leonora Choral Society of Bradford Academy. 
Frederick Johnson, Conductor. , 

Concert. The Waltham Musical Club. Augusto Vannini, 
Director. 
"^Ruskin, Educator and Reformer. Arthur W. Gilbert, Ph.D. 
(Ruskin Club.) 
The United States' Part in Winning the World War. Girard 
L. McEntee, Lt. Col. Infantry, U. S. Army. 
^Random Reading. William M. Stinson, S.J. 
'"^The Symbol in Poetry. S. Foster Damon. (New England 
Poetry Club Course.) 
The Copley Club Singers and Entertainers. Lender the direc- 
tion of Pauline Hammond Clark. 
''^John Brown, the Marching of- his Soul. Henry J. Kilbourn, 

D.D. 

The Primitive Music of the American Indian. Mable F. 
Knight. 
*The Greatest Opportunity for Massachusetts in 300 years. 
Albert Bushnell Hart. (Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary 
Course.) 
Oct. 1 0. In the Wake of the Vikings; Iceland and its Scenery. Charles 
Ernest White. 
Some Comedies of Travel. John C. Bowker, M.D. 
The Spirit of the New Wing of the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts. M. Iris Pappe, B.A. 
^Mussolini. Lilian Whiting. (Ruskin Club.) 
China, wonderland of half-a-hundred centuries. Walter W. 
Allerton. 
*Literary Mosaics. Tales, Folklore, and Legends gathered 
abroad. Mrs. James Frederick Hopkins. 
What I Saw and Heard In Palestine. Rosabella Temple. 
Gertrude Walker-Crowley, soloist. 



Oct. 
Oct. 


13. 
13. 


Oct. 
Oct. 


14. 
17. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


20. 



[74] 

Oct. 21. *Woild Significance of the Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary. 
Hon. Herbert Parker. (Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary 
Course.) 
Oct. 11. *The International Library Conference and Adventures Over- 
seas. Charles F. D. Belden. 
Oct. 11. ''^Playing the Piano by Ear. Guy Maier, pianist. 
Oct. 24. Columbus and his Voyages. Sarah E. Palmer, M D 
F.A.C.S. ■ ■■ 

Oct. 11. ^Glimpses of Literary London. Caroline Ticknor. 
Oct. 27. "^The Average Man and Adult Education through Use of the 
Public Library. Hon. Roland D. Sawyer. 
Red Letter Days in Europe. Mrs. Charles B. Hall. (Rus- 

kin Club.) 
Off the Beaten Track in Australia. Captain Kilroy Harris, 
D.S.O., M.C., F.R.G.S. 
■^William Makepeace Thackeray, the Novelist and the Man. 
Francis Henry Wade, M.D., Ph.D. 
Readings from Shakespeare with Associated Music. Laura 
Huxtable Porter. 
^'The Religious Influences of the Puritans. Rev. Edward M. 
Noyes. (Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary Course.) 
The National Parks of Canada. Arthur H. Merritt. 
Early Glimpses of the American Theatre. Frank W. C. 

Hersey. (Drama League Course.) 
Concert. Alessandro Niccoli, violinist. Assisted by Florence 

Wild, pianist. 
Through the Colorful Canyons of the West. Rev. Charles 

W. Casson. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Goethe's "Faust": an Interpretative Reading. Jessie El- 

dridge Southwick. 
Concert. Wind Instrument Ensemble of Boston. 
A Winter Cruise through the West Indies. Andrew Oliver, 
Ph.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
-•^Why We Are to Celebrate in 1930. Hon. John J. Walsh. 
(Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary Course.) 
Trails and Tales of the Rockies. Col. Philip A. Moore. 
F.R.G.S. (Contributed by the Bureau of Commercial 
Economics, Washington, D. C.) 
^A Canyon Trilogy. Alice Howland Macomber. 
Operatic and Ballad Recital. Mme Alice Baschi and as- 
sisting artists. 
Nov. 25. *The Ethical Implication of Modern Poetry. Joseph P. Mac- 

Carthy, Ph.D., D.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Dec. 1 . Lecture Recital. Mr. and Mrs. Moses H. Gulesian. 
Dec. 1. Mozart's "Bastien and Bastienne." Eleanor Brigham. 



Oct. 


28. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


7. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


17. 


Nov. 


17. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


21. 


Nov. 


2'4. 


Nov. 


24. 



[75] 

Dec. 3. *The Puritan and the American Revolution. Dr. Charles H. 

Bangs. (Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary Course.) 
Dec. 5. Recent Rambles in Greece. Alice Lawton. 
Dec. 8. *T\vo American Comedians: Jefferson and E. H. Sothcrn. 

Robert E. Rogers, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
Dec. 8. ^Before the Footlights and Behind the Scenes. Fannie Barnett 

Linsky. 
Dec. 9. ^Christmas. William E. Gardner. D.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Dec. 12. Some Adirondack Trails. Russell M. L. Carson. (Field 

and Forest Club Course.) 
Dec. 15. George Inness, Jr., Man and Artist. Mrs. Louis J. Richards. 
Dec. 15. Noels de France. A lecture recital by Mme Jeanne Bron- 

del Allen. 
Dec. 16. Musicale. Alice Wentworth MacGregor. (Ruskin Club.) 
Dec. 1 6. "^Our Debt to the Puritans. Hon. Michael J. Murray. 

(Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary Course.) 
Dec. 19. The Germany of Today and Romantic Germany. John 

George Bucher. (Contributed by the Bureau of Com- 
mercial Economics, Washington, D. C.) 
When Dickens Read the "Christmas Carol" in Boston on 

Christmas Eve. Edward F. Payne. 
Negro Spirituals and Plantation Melodies. A Concert. 

Lyric Male Quartet. 
Christmas Mystery Play. With Music. (Under auspices 

of the Dramatic Department of Community Service of 

Boston, Inc.) 
The Psychological Analysis of Handwriting. Maurice H. 

Hilton, Ph.B., graphologist. 
'^The Ethical Implications of Modern Poetry. Joseph P. 

MacCarthy, Ph.D., D.D. (American Poetry Associa- 
tion Course.) 
Costume Song Recital. Claramond Thompson, contralto. 

Assisted by Leon Vartanian, pianist and accompanist. 
^Dorchester Town in Boston and New England History. Rev. 

Adelbert L. Hudson. (Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary 

Course.) 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1929. 

In Exhibition Room. 
Installation 

date 
Jan. 1. "Small Houses": material from competition of the House 
Beautiful Publishing Company, supplemented by books 
from the Division of Fine Arts. 



Dec. 


22. 


Dec. 


22. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


26. 


Dec. 


29. 


Dec. 


29. 


Dec. 


30. 



[76] 

Jan. 14. Original paintings and pastels lent by Mae Bennet-Biown, 

English artist. 
Jan. 27. Photographs and autographed letters of famous musicians, 
lent by Boaz Pillar, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Feb. 9. Lincoln exhibition: pictures and literature lent by Mary Bow- 
ditch Forbes. 
Feb. 1 1 . Travel posters, lent by the Railway and Locomotive Histori- 
cal Society of Harvard University. 
Feb. 17. American Federation of Arts travelling exhibition: drawings 
and paintings illustrating work done by pupils of Anson 
K. Cross. 
Feb. 23. "Chauve-Souris" : loan exhibition of posters and photographs 

of the play. 
Mar. 6. Herbert Hoover: exhibition relative to his inauguration as 

President. 
Mar. I I. "Art in Industry Week": selected books from the titles listed 

in the bibliography issued by the Library. 
Mar. 18. Original paintings by Frank Carson: "Bermuda in Oil and 

Water-colour." 
Mar. 3 1 . Photographs of American history and scenery, lent by David 

W. Butterfield. 
Apr. 15. "Be Kind to Animals" posters, by school children, lent by 
the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals. 
Apr. 22. Origmal drawmgs submitted m the annual cover design com- 
petition of the "House Beautiful" magazme. 
May 6. Posters submitted by school children, illustrating Thrift and 

Safety. 
May 20. "Jewish Book Week": books, manuscripts and prints from 

the Library collections. 
June 2. Autographs, early printed books and works by American 
composers, on the occasion of the Convention of the 
National Federation of Music Clubs. 
June 24. "Boston, Town and Countryside": photographs lent by Wil- 
liam E. Merrill. 
Water-colors and pictures of the proposed improvements of 
the Charles River Basin. 
July 8. Designs submitted in the competition for an official poster for 
the Chicago World's Fair in 1933. 

"Racial Backgrounds of Massachusetts," represented by 
dolls dressed in Old World Costume, lent by the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Women's Clubs. 
July 23. Books and prints from the Division of Fine Arts and the 
Barton-Tlcknor Room, relative to the current Spanish ex- 
positions held in Seville and Barcelona. 



[77] 

Sept. 2. "Picturesque Old France": photographs lent bj' Herbert 
Turner. 
Boston views, lent by John Williams Robbins. 

NOTE. 
Owing to the temporary housing of the Music Division in the Ex- 
hibition Room during reconstruction, no exhibitions v/ere arranged after 
September 1 5 th. 

SELECTED LIST OF GIFTS AND GIVERS. 

Amherst College, Trustees of, Amherst. The Amherst Memorial Volume. 
A record of the contribution made by Amherst College and Amherst 
men in the World War, 1914-18. Edited by Claude M. Fuess. 
1926. 

Bradford, Gamaliel, Wellesley Hills. American Victorians. Published 
as "As God made them," by Gamaliel Bradford. (This is the 
original manuscript composed on the typewriter at the dates indicated 
with the several portraits, and corrected in the author's own hand.) 

Brownmg Society, Boston. Collection of books and pamphlets relating 
to Browning, a number of which were given by Miss Marie Ada 
Molineux to the Society. (For the Browning Collection in the 
Boston Public Library.) 

Burnett, Frances Hodgson, Estate of. (Through Vivian Burnett, Ex- 
ecutor). Holograph manuscript of "The White People," by Frances 
Hodgson Burnett. ("A semi-mystic book, written in the latter part 
of her life.") 

Clark, William Andrews, Jr., Los Angeles. An essay on criticism, by 
Alexander Pope. Printed for W. Lewis in Russel-Street, London, 
1711. Printed in facsimile for William Andrews Clark, Jr., by 
John Henry Nash, in the City of San Francisco, 1 928. 
An essay on criticism, by Alexander Pope. Printed for William 
Andrews Clark, Jr., by John Henry Nash. San Francisco, 1928. 
(No. 53 of 250 copies printed for private distribution only.) 

Columbia Phonograph Company, New York. Thirty-five volumes of 
the "Masterworks" Series of recorded music and other items. One 
hundred and forty-two phonograph records enclosed in portfolios. 
(For the Allen A. Brown Collection.) 

Ford, Jeremiah. Framed Charter of Washington Post No. 32, Grand 
Army of the Republic, in the City of Boston. Signed November 6, 
1867. 

Gay, Eben Howard, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts. De- 
partment of Decorative Arts of Europe and America : The Chippen- 
dale Room from Woodcote Park, Epsom, Surrey, England (circa 
1750). By Eben Howard Gay. No. 45 of an edition of 500 
copies, printed on Aurelian rag paper. Boston, 1928. 



[78] 

Goodspeed's Book Shop. Manuscript volume of eleven sermons preached 
by Rev. Horace Holley, one-time pastor of the Hollis Street Church, 
member of the Boston School Board and overseer of Harvard Uni- 
versity. 
Great Britain. Commissioner of Patents. Specifications of inventions. 

2 1 1 volumes. 
Johnson, George B. Modern merchandising. A series of texts prepared 
as part of the Modern Merchandising Course and Service, by the 
Alexander Hamilton Institute, consisting of ten volumes, also read- 
ing guides, lectures, and problems designed to accompany the text 
of the volumes. New York, 1927. 
Markle, John, New York City. John Markle. Representative Ameri- 
can. Edited by Robert J. Spence. New York, 1929. In full 
morocco, tooled. Bound by Stikeman. (No. 82 of an edition of 
300 copies on Whitchurch hand-made paper.) 
Monks, Dr. George H. Eighty-nine volumes comprising French and Ger- 
man publications and works on drawing and sculpture, including 
Musee de sculpture, antique et moderne du Louvre. Text et 
planches. 12 volumes, 1826—1853; Storia della Scultura, 9 
volumes, Prato, 1823-1284; Buonaventura Genelli's umrisse 
Dante's Gottlicher Komodie, Leipzig, 1867 and Die Renaissance 
im Kunstgewerbe. Sammlung des XVI. und XVII. Jahrhun- 
derts. Redigiert von Max Bach. Stuttgart, 1 884. 
O'Connell, Miss Joanna F(ahilly. A roster of the entire 79 1 members, 
nearly all Charlestown men of whom only fifteen are now living, of 
Abraham Lmcoln Post No. 1 1 , Grand Army of the Republic. 
(Engrossed and framed for hanging in the Charlestown Branch of 
the Public Library of the City of Boston.) 
Sargent, Miss Emily and Mrs. Francis Ormond, Chelsea, England. Ten 
framed studies by John S. Sargent for the decorations in Sargent 
Hall. (The studies are to be hung in the West Gallery of tho 
Library. ) 
Skeel, Mrs. Emily Ellsworth Ford. Mason Locke Weems. His works 
and ways in three volumes. Edited by Emily Ellsworth Ford 
Skeel. Volume I . A bibliography left unfinished by Paul Leicester 
Ford. No. 123 of 200 copies printed; Volume 2 and 3, Letters, 
1 784-1 825. This is No. 1 23 of 300 copies printed. New York, 

1929. 

Victor Talking Machine Company, Camden, N. J. Seventeen volumes 
of "The Musical Masterpiece Series of Victor Records." Phono- 
graph records enclosed in portfolios: with other records to the num- 
ber of one hundred and sixteen in all. (For the Allen A. Brown 
Collection.) 



[79] . 

Weill. David, Paris, France. Collection David Weill. Tome troisieme. 
Dessins. (Two parts.) Notices par Gabriel Henriot, Paris, 1928. 
(No. 88 of a small edition printed. Continuing the set.) 

Welch, Mrs. Edward S. and Mrs. Clifford S. Weaver, Cincinnati. The 
Howard Lineage. The ancestry of Ida Ann Boydstun Welch, 
through her mother, Eoline Frances Howard Boydstun. By Gus- 
line Courson Weaver. Cincinnati, I 929. 

Wetherbee, Wilfred A., Assistant Adjutant-General, G.A.R., Depart- 
ment of Massachusetts. Framed Charter of the late John A. 
Hawes Post I 59. Grand Army of the Republic. Located in East 
Boston Branch Library. 



OFFICIALS OF THE LIBRARY. 

Director, Charles F. D. Belden. 

Reference Librarian, Frank H. Chase. 

Executive Secretary, Delia Jean Deery. 

Auditor, Helen Schubarth. 

Bates Hall Centre Desk, Newspaper and Patent Department: Pierce E. 
Buckley, Chief. 

Newspaper Division, Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 

Patent Division, William J. Ennis, Assistant in Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches.* 

Central Branch Issue Division, Alice V. Stevens, Assistant in Charge. 

Branch Binding Division, Marian A. McCarthy, Assistant in Charge. 

Shipping Division, Robert F. Dixon, Assistant in Charge. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 

Card Division, T. Francis Brennan, Assistant in Charge. 

Shelf Division, Michael McCarthy, Chief Classifier, in Charge. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 
Children. 
. Children's Librarian, Central Library, Mary C. Toy. 
Editor: Zoltan Haraszti. 

Engineer and Janitor Department: William F. Quinn, Supt. of Buildings. 
Genealogy Division : Agnes C. Doyle, Assistant in Charge. 
Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Frank C. Blaisdell, Chief. 
Library Training Class: Bertha V. Hartzell, Supervisor. 
Ordering Department: Louis Felix Ranlett, Chief. 
Periodical Room: Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 

*For Branch Librarians, see below. 



[80] 

Printing Department: Francis Watts Lee. Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department: George S. Maynard, Chief. 

Barton- Ticknor Division, Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge. 

Music Division, Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 
Statistical Department: Mary W. Dietrichson, Chief. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 

Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 
Andrew Square, EHzabeth H. McShane. 
Boylston Station, Pearl B. Smart. 
Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 
Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 
City Point, Helen L. Morrisey. 
Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 
Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 
East Boston, Laura M. Cross. 
Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 
Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 
Hyde Park, Grace L. Murray. 
Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 
Jeffries Point, Margaret A. Calnan. 
Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 
Mattapan, Ada Aserkoff. 
Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 
Mount Bowdoin, Theodora B. Scoff. 
Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 
Neponset, Margaret I. McGovern. 
North End, Mary F. Curley. 
Orient Heights, Catherine F. Flannery. 
Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 
Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 
Roxbury Crossing, Edith R. Nickerson. 
South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 
South End, Margaret A. Sheridan. 
Tyler Street, Lois Clark. 
Upham's Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 
West End, Fanny Goldstein. 
West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



INDEX. 



Abbott, Gordon, elected President, 1 . 

Accessions, (5ee Books).. 

Balance Sheet, 21-27. 

Bates Hall, 44. 

Bindery, 62. 

Blaisdell, Frank C, retirement, 19. 

Books, accessions, 2, 38, 39, 67, 68; 
circulation, 58, 64—67; Examining 
Committee, 28; expenditures, 2, 38; 
gifts, 77-79; inter-library loans, 59, 
67; lost and condemned, 18; special 
purchases, 39^1 ; total number and 
location, 68-70. 

Borrowers, (See Registration). 

Branches, circulation, 58, 64-67; Ex- 
amining Committee on, 35; repairs 
and improvements, 18, 32—35, 37, 59, 
63. 

Business Branch, (5ee Kirstein Me- 
morial Library). 

Buxton, Frank W., elected Vice-Presi- 
dent, I. 

Catalogue and Shelf Department, 41, 
68. 

Children, work with, 55. 

Circulation, 58, 64-67. 

Defoe Collection, 2. 39. 

Deposits, 58. 

Director's Report, 36. 

Examining Committee, members of, 3 ; 
report and recommendations, 28—35. 

Exhibitions, 56, 61, 75-77. 

Finance, balance sheet, 21-27; book 
expenditures, 38; estimates, 2; re- 
ceipts, 1,2; statement of trust funds, 
4-17. 

Foundation repairs, 17, 36. 



Gifts, 3. 38, 77-79. 

Information Office, 48. 

Inter-library loans, 59, 67. 

Issue Department, 43. 

Kirstein, Louis E., re-appomled as 

trustee, I ; addition to trust fund, 41. 
Kirstein Memorial Library, erection of 

building, 3, 37. 
Lectures and concerts, 37, 61, 70-75. 
Mural paintings cleaned, 18, 37. 
Newspaper Room, 50. 
Open Shelf Room, 48. 
Ordering Department, 38. 
Patent Room, 50. 
Periodical Room, 50. 
Perry, Thomas Sergeant, memorial tab- 
let given by friends, 3, 37. 
Printing Department, 70. 
Publications, 46. 
Putnam & Cox, architects for Kirstein 

Memorial Library building, 3. 
Readers' Adviser, 61 . 
Registration Department, 43. 
Repairs and improvements, 17, 18, 30, 

31, 36, 62. 
Retirements, 63. 
Shelf Department, (5ee Catalogue and 

Shelf). 
Special Libraries, 51 ; reconstruction of 

rooms, 1 7, 36. 
Staff, officials, 79; retirements, 63. 
Statistical Department, 53. 
Teachers' Room, 57. 
Training Class, 59. 
Trent Library, purchase, 2, 39. 
Trust Funds, statement of, 4-17. 
Trustees, organization, I ; report 1—20. 



Central Library, Copley Square. 1 

Branch Libraries, December 31, 1929. 

City Proper. 

Norlh End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 

South End Branch. Shawmul Ave. and West Brookline St, 

West End Branch, Cambridge, cor, Lynde St. 

Tyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
Brighton. 

Brighton Branch, Academy Hill Road • 

Allston Branch. 138 Brighton Ave. . 

Faneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St 

Chahlestown. 

Charlestown Branch, Monument Square, cor. Monument Ave 
Dorchester, 

Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. . 

Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St, 

Upharo's Corner Branch, Columbia Road, cor. Bird St 

Lower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

Mattapan Branch, 7 Babson St. , 

Mount Bowdoln Branch, 271-277 Washington St. 

Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. , 
East Boston. 

East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 

Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. 

Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler St. . 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave,, cor. Winthrop St, 
Jamaica Plain. 

Jamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 

Boylslon Station Branch, Depot Square 
RoXBURY. 

Fellowes Athenteum Branch, 46 Milmont St. 

Memorial Branch, Townsend, cor. Warren St. . 

Mount Pleasant Branch, Dudley, cor. Vimc St. . 

Parker Hill Branch, 1518 Tremont St. 

Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . . 
South Boston. 

South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 

Andrew Square Branch, 396 Dorchester St. . 

City Point Branch, Broadway, near H St. 
West Roxbury. 

West Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt, Vernon St. 

Roslindale Branch. Washington, cor. Ashland St, . 




Area of City f I and only) 45.60 Square mile 



Population (Census of 1925), 779.620. 






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