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Full text of "Annual report"

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Given By 
Boston Fire Department 






ANN'"^^ '^: ^" ■^"^■^ORT 



.FIRE DEPARTMENT 



(^n^^ OF BOHT 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1930 




PRINTING DEPAETMEN'f-' 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAE ENDIISTG DECEMBER 31, 1980 



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CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1931 



OFFICIALS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissio7ier. 

Herbert J. Hickey, 

Executive Secretary of the Department. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department. 

George L. Fickett, 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division. 

Walter J. Burke, 

Superintendent of Wire Division. 

Edward E. Williamson, 

Superintendent of Maintenance Division. 

Albert J. Caulfield, 

Deputy Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Division. 

William J. McNally, M. D., 

Medical Examiner. 



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[Document 12 — 1931.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1930. 



Boston, March 30, 1931. 

Hon. James M. Curley, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith the 

report of the activities of the Boston Fire Department 

for the year ending December 31, 1930, as required by 

section 24, chapter 4, of the Revised Ordinances of 1925. 

Fire Loss. 
The total fire loss of 1930 in the City of Boston, 
estimated by the insurance companies amounted to 
$5,151,541. There were sixty-five (65) fires where the 
loss was over fifteen thousand dollars each. The out- 
standing fires in this group were as follows: 

January 15, North Harvard street, Harvard 
Athletic Association $119,446 

March 1, 227 and 229 Washington street, Thomp- 
son's Spa 105,034 

June 6, L Street Drawbridge 250,000 

July 4, 141-153 Medford street. Palmer, Parker 

Company et al 193,133 

December 10, 96 Essex street. Economy Um- 
brella Company et al 159,960 

December 24, 11 Columbia street, John Hether- 
ington & Sons et al 116,043 



2 City Document No. 12. 

During the year there were 8,701 alarms of fire of 
which 4,593 were box alarpis and 4,108 were still and 
automatic alarms: 698 false alarms were received 
during the year. There were 28 arrests and 25 con- 
victions of sounding false alarms. 

Fire Prevention. 

The personnel of the Fire Prevention Division was 
increased during the year in order that the work of this 
division might be more effective. 

During the year all classes of buildings, with the 
exception of one and two family dwellings, were in- 
spected by the inspection force. 



Number of inspections (initial) 

Number of reinspections 

Complaints reported 

Conditions corrected by personal contact 
Conditions corrected by service of order 
Number of personal inspections by officers of 

Prevention Division 

Oil burners inspected 

Oil burners reinspected 

Oil burner defects corrected .... 



Fire 



361,246 

24,835 

10,224 

22,111 

520 

2,852 

2,482 

807 

861 



Reports of hazardous conditions were sent to other 
departments as follows: 

To Building Department 2,727 

To State Fire Marshal 39 

Eight hundred and ninety-four notices were sent to 
owners and occupants to correct hazardous conditions 
and 520 personal services and orders of reinspection 
were made by the constable attached to the Fire Pre- 
vention Division. There were twenty prosecutions for 
violations of the fire prevention laws. 

One hundred and sixty-five fires were reported as 
suspicious and forty-one from unknown causes. In- 
vestigations of these fires were made by attaches of the 
Fire Prevention Division. These fires were also re- 
ported to the State Fire Marshal, Police Commissioner 
and the Boston Board of Fire Underwriters. 

The number of inspections made by district and com- 
pany officers during the year, in addition to those of the 
Fire Prevention Division were as follows: 



Fire Department. 



Building inspections .... 

Theatre inspections .... 

Schoolhouse inspections . 

Public building inspections 

Inspections at Long and Deer Islands 

Car house inspections 

Total number of inspections made by Fire Prevention 
Division, district and company officers (includ- 
ing initial and reinspection of all types of build- 
ings) 



62,760 

4,178 

3,848 

909 

24 

108 



464,036 



Eighteen thousand, three hundred and eleven dollars 
and twenty-five cents was collected in fees for permits 
issued by the Fire Prevention Division. 

During the Christmas holiday season a detail of fire 
prevention inspectors was maintained in and about the 
shopping and high value districts and other locations 
where there was congestion due to shopping. 



Buildings. 

On Monday, November 10, 1930, the Fire Depart- 
ment occupied the new fire station erected in Bowdoin 
square. Engine Company 4, Engine Company 6, 
Ladder Company 24, Rescue Company 3 and Water 
Tower 2 and the District Chief of District 4 moved 
into the building on this date. 

The buildings formerly occupied by Engine Company 
6 and Ladder Company 24 were turned over to the Public 
Buildings Department. The building formerly occupied 
by Engine Company 4 and Water Tower 1 was demol- 
ished in connection with the new fire station. Rescue 
Company 3 was transferred from its temporary quarters 
at Engine 50 in Charlestown. The new station is a 
first-class modern fireproof building, erected at a cost 
of $347,905.03, excluding the land. 

Extensive alterations and repairs were made at the 
quarters of Engine Company 9 and Ladder Company 2, 
Paris street, East Boston, and a reinforced concrete floor 
installed. 

The old building, formerly occupied by Ladder Com- 
pany 5 on Fourth street and temporarily used by this 
department as a storehouse, was transferred to the 
Public Buildings Department. 



City Document No. 12. 



Fire Apparatus. 

Thirty-six motor vehicles were purchased, tested and 
placed in service, viz, : 

10 American LaFrance combination hose cars (booster pumps). 

1 American LaFrance combination pump and hose car. 

2 American LaFrance aerial ladder trucks. 

1 American LaFrance 85-foot aerial trailer. 

2 Federal chassis with special type bodies for rescue cars. 
9 Hupmobile sedans. 

4 Hupmobile coupes. 

1 Mack emergency truck. 

1 l|-ton Brockway truck. 

1 2^-ton Sterling truck. 

4 Ford cars with pick-up bodies. 

Eleven (11) pieces of major equipment, ten (10) 
smaller cars and three (3) trucks were traded in as part 
payment for the new equipment. 

The motor equipment at the present time consists of 
the following: 



Pumping engines 

Steam engines (tractors) . 

Hose cars 

Aerial ladder trucks 

City Service trucks 

Water towers 

Chief officers' cars 

School car 

Rescue oars 

Fuel cars 

Portable lighting plants . 

Wrecking car 

Motorcycle (fire patrol) . . 

Commercial trucks 

Emergency cars (Ford) . 
Ford coupes 




High Pressure Service. 

The records of the two high pressure stations for the 
year are as follows: 




OLD QUARTERS OF ENGINE COMPANY 4, BULFINCH STREET, 

REPLACED BY NEW FIRE STATION IN 

BOWDOIN SQUARE. 



Fire Department. 



Station No. 1. 



Station No. 2. 



Total alarms to which pumps responded 

Water discharge recorded on Venturi meters * 



267 
104,000 gallons 



216 
413,000 gallons 



* Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters, they do not record flows under 600 
gallons per minute. 

Hydrants. 
The following is a list of the hydrants in service for 
fire purposes as of December 31, 1930, showing the 
number and different types of hydrants: 



Public. 



Private. 



Ordinary post 

Boston post 

Lowry 

Boston Lowry '. 

Batchelder and Finneran post. 

Boston 

High pressure 

Chapman post 

Ludlow post 

Matthew post. .■ 

Coffin post 



3,874 


133 


2,734 


22 


873 


33 


403 


5 


2,813 


5 


123 


112 


451 




S4 


55 


5 


13 




4 


1 





Totals. 



11,361 



382 



Fire Alarm Service. 

The Fire Alarm Service of the department has been 
maintained at its usual high standard. In order to 
increase the efficiency of the operating force two addi- 
tional men were appointed. 

A change in the manner of striking alarms received 
from the Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company was 
made. Upon receipt of an alarm the Boston Automatic 
Fire Alarm Company transmitted the signal directly 
to the stations in the section where the fire occurred. 
It was deemed advisable to abandon this method and to 
strike the signals to the Fire Alarm Headquarters. 
Upon receipt of the signal in the Fire Alarm Offi.ce a 
special signal was sounded on the tappers to all depart- 
ment stations. 

More fire alarm boxes than usual were installed during 
the past year. Of seventy-seven put in service fifty- 



6 



City Document No. 12. 



nine are owned by this department, three by the School- 
house Department and fifteen by private owners. 
Sixty-eight of the old sector boxes were replaced by 
boxes of the latest type. All street boxes and posts 
were painted. 

Considerable work was done in the Fire Department 
Stations in order to maintain the electrical equipment in 
the department in an efficient working condition. 

A contract was made during the year to furnish 
equipment for ''floating" storage batteries and for 
2,500 cells of batteries to replace batteries worn out in 
service. The power equipment consisted of 130 recti- 
fiers, 2 motor-generators, switchboard apparatus, rack 
for supporting rectifiers, and incidentals. With this 
change in method of supplying electric current to the 
system many beneficial results are expected. 



Opeeating Records. 



First alarms 
Second alarms 
Third alarms 
Fourth alarms 
Fifth alarms 

Total . 



4,593 

104 

23 

5 

2 

4,727 



Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 

Same box received two or more times for same fire . 379 

Adjacent box received for same fire .... 309 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 7 



Total 



695 



Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 

Received from citizens by telephone .... 2,794 

Received from Police Department by telephone . . 247 

Received from Fire Department stations . . • 1,128 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 7 
Mutual aid alarms (adjacent cities and towns) treated 

as stills . 55 

Emergency service treated as stills .... 128 

Total . 4,359 



Still alarms received by telephone for which box 

alarms were afterwards received and transmitted, 306 




OLD FIRE STATION OF LADDER COMPANY 24, NORTH GROVE 

STREET, REPLACED BY NEW FIRE STATION IN 

BOWDOIN SQUARE. 



Fire Department. 7 

Still alarms received by telephone which were after- 
wards followed by box alarms that were not pulled 
(11 p. m. to 8 a. m.) 282 

Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 
Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 142 

Department box received and transmitted in con- 
nection with same: 

Before automatic alarms 6 

After automatic alarms 11 

Automatic alarms transmitted which were followed 

by box alarms that were not pulled ... 33 
Automatic alarms struck after still alarms were trans- 
mitted 1 

American District Telegraph Company: 

Received at fire alarm office ..... 85 

Department boxes received and transmitted in con- 
nection with same: 
Before A. D. T. alarm was received .... 8 

After A. D. T. alarm was transmitted ... 4 

A. D. T. alarms transmitted which were followed by 

box alarms that were not pulled .... 35 

A. D. T. alarms received but not transmitted after 

still alarms were transmitted .... 5 

A. D. T. alarms transmitted to department . . 72 

Summary of Alarms. 
Alarms received: 

Box alarms, including multiples . . . . . 5,422 

Still alarms, all classes ....... 4,572 

Boston automatic alarms 142 

A. D. T. alarms 85 

Total received from all sources 10,221 

Exclude following: 

Multiples 134 

Box alarms received but not transmitted ... 695 

Still alarms for which other alarms were trans- 
mitted 588 

Automatic alarms for which other alarms were 

transmitted 51 

A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were trans- 
mitted 52 



1,520 



Total alarms, with eliminations, to which apparatus 
responded 8,701 



City Document No. 12. 



Multiple Alarm Fires. 



With two alarms 
With three alarms 
With four alarms 
With five alarms 
* With six alarms 



87 

20 

3 

1 

1 



Mutual Aid Response. 



To Milton . 
To Somerville 
To Everett . 
To Newton 
To Norfolk 
To Marlboro 
To Cambridge 
To Dedham 



31 
15 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Fire Alarm Box Records. 

Boxes from which no alarms were received . 

Box tests and inspections 

Note. — All street box doors are tested weekly. 



339 

10,716 



Total number 








1,574 


Owned by Fire Department 


1,116 


Owned by Schoolhouse Department 


259 


Owned by Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 


52 


Privately owned 




147 


Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts. 




District 1 


93 


District 9 


109 


District 2 




74 


District 10 




126 


District 3 




42 


District 11 




145 


District 4 




86 


District 12 




95 


District 5 




75 


District 13 




. 148 


District 6 




102 


District 14 




135 


District 7 




105 


District 15 




114 


District 8 




124 






Division 1 




370 




Division 2 




475 




Division 3 




728 




And one in Chelsea. 







* Five alarms from one box and one alarm fram an adjacent box. 




OLD QUARTERS OF ENGINE COMPANY 6, LEVERETT STREET, 
REPLACED BY NEW FIRE STATION IN BOWDOIN SQUARE. 



Fire Department. 



Summary of Work Done in 1930. 



Approximate 
Number of Feet. 

Line wire used in new work and replacements . . 84,600 

Line wire removed from service 11,000 

Aerial cable installed 5,075 

Conductors in same 21,050 

Aerial cable removed from service 750 

Conductors in same . . 4,920 

Underground cable installed 30,154 

Conductors in same 465,835 

Underground cable replaced 5,900 

Conductors in same 143,600 

Conduits laid underground 4,331 

Ducts in same 4,818 

Ducts abandoned 1,024 

Manholes built 2 

Fire alarm boxes installed by this department . . 59 

Fire alarm boxes installed by Schoolhouse Department, 3 

Fire alarm boxes installed on private property . . 15 

Fire alarm boxes relocated 4 

Fire alarm boxes removed from service ... 2 

Box posts installed . 33 

Box posts relocated 8 

Box posts reset or replaced by new .... 9 

Cable post relocated 1 

Cable post replaced with larger post .... 1 

Cable posts removed 2 

Underground cable boxes attached to poles ... 12 

Underground cable boxes removed from service . . 6 



Wire Division. 

In accordance with chapter 240 of the Acts of 1926, 
the following streets were prescribed for the under- 
ground district for 1930, from which all poles and over- 
head wires were placed underground, making a total 
distance of four miles as prescribed by law: 



East Boston. — Paris street, from Sumner street to Bennington 
street. 

South Boston. — N street, from Columbia road to East 
Second street ; B street, from West First street to West Seventh 
street; C street, from West First street to Old Colony avenue; 
E street, from West Broadway to Old Colony avenue. 

Dorchester. — Baird street, from Blue Hill avenue to Morton 
street; King street, from Adams street to Neponset avenue. 



10 City Document No. 12. 

Brighton. — Winship street, from Washington street to 
Chestnut Hill avenue; Mapleton street, from Murdock street 
to Market street. 

Jamaica Plain. — Centre street, from Holbrook street to the 
Arborway; South street, from Centre street, a distance of 
2,665 feet to a point within 65 feet of the Arborway. 

In these prescribed streets, from which poles and 
overhead wires were to be removed, there were standing 
on January 1, 1930, a total of one hundred and seventy- 
nine (179) poles (not including the trolley poles of the 
Boston Elevated Railway which are exempt), owned by 
the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, New Eng- 
land Telephone and Telegraph Company, and Boston 
Elevated Railway, supporting a total of five hundred 
and thirty thousand eight hundred (530,800) feet of 
overhead wires owned by the Edison Electric Illuminat- 
ing Company, Boston Elevated Railway, New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company, Boston Fire Depart- 
ment (Fire Alarm Branch) and Boston Police Depart- 
ment (Police Signal Service). 

During the year there were 107 fires and 10 accidents 
due to electricity. The total of fire losses in so far as 
could be determined was $146,222.93. The income for 
the year for permits to perform electrical work was 
$70,282.33. 

Interior Division. 

This division made inspections of all new installations 
and continued its inspection of all installations in so far 
as possible. Regular inspections were made of electrical 
equipment of theatres, places of amusement, public 
halls, miniature golf courses, etc. 

Following is a table showing a summary of the work 
of the division: 



Notices of new work received .... 
Number of permits issued to turn on current 
Number of incandescent lamps inspected 
Number of motors inspected . 
Number of buildings in which wiring was com^ 

pletely examined 

Number of inspections made . . . 
Number of inspections made of theatres, places 

of amusement and public halls 
Fires in interior of buildings . 
Fires on poles . . . . . 
Fires in manholes 



20,271 

15,709 

2,346,106 

17,710 

3,883 
35,530 

1,428 

100 

3 

3 



Fire Department. 11 

Miscellaneous fires 1 

Injuries to persons ....... 10 

Exterior Division. 

During the past year the inspectors of this division 
have reported one hundred and seventy-seven (177) 
poles decayed at the base and thirty-one (31) poles 
leaning, or a total of two hundred and eight (208) poles, 
which were replaced by new poles or reset by the various 
companies at the request of this department. 

Five (5) abandoned poles were also reported by our 
inspectors and were removed at our request. 

The following table shows the overhead work for the 
year, from January 1, 1930, to December 31, 1930, 
inclusive : 

Number of new poles in new locations . . . 183 

Number of poles replaced, reset or straightened . 875 

Number of poles removed 200 

Number of poles now standing in the public 

streets 18,019 

Number of defects reported 1,574 

Number of defects corrected 1,475 

(Other defects in process of correction.) 

Number of notices of overhead construction . 8,851 

Number of overhead inspections .... 17,457 

Number of overhead reports 7,215 

Amount of overhead wires removed by owners 

(in feet) 1,776,910 

Underground Construction. 
The ducts used for the underground conduits of the 
dra wing-in system are of the following type: 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete) . 

3. Iron. 

4. Wood. 

In side or residential streets, special underground 
construction for electric light and power purposes 
(110 and 220 volts), of a type known as the ''Split 
Fiber Solid Main System" has also been installed. 

The electrical approvals for underground electrical 

construction numbered 4,103 

Number of inspections of underground electrical con- 
struction 9,004 

Number of reports of underground electrical con- 
struction ■ 3,065 



12 



City Document No. 12. 



Table Showing Underground Work for the Year 1930. 



Company. 


1 

o 
O 

o 

01 


a 

o 


1 
O 


°'3 

is 


i^ 


Boston Elevated Railway 


1,874 


27,627 


85,961 


7 




Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany, successor to Charlestown 
Gas and Electric Company. 


595 


3,408 


43,284 


7 


22 


Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 


41,605 


500,733 


1,548,905 


250 


2,880 


pany. 












Boston Fire Department (Fire 
Alarm Branch). 


155 


155 


30,454 






Boston Police Department (Police 
Signal Service). 






13,000 












New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. 


15,163 


70,791 


165,729 


38 


118 


Boston Low Tension Wire Asso- 
ciation. 


35 


35 








Western Union Telegraph Com- 


606 


2,071 


7,368 


2 




pany. 












Totals . . 


60,033 


604,820 


1,894,701 


304 


3,020 







Note. — "Split Fiber Solid Main Systems" of the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany and Boston Consolidated Gas Company are included in the above figures, comprising 
4,286 feet of conduit and 8,046 feet of duct for the former company, and 287 feet of conduit 
and 574 feet of duct for the latter company. 



Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power, 

December 31, 1930. 



Company. 


lie 


"Sol 


Capacity of 
Incandescent 
Lamps 
in Kilowatts. 


^ o.'S 

o S & 


& o 


o 
111 


11 




43,664 
54,424 


239,370 
292,816 


4,296 

* 

300 
125 
140 


15 

* 


365,512 

* 

4,0C0 

106 

80 


88,080 
* 

2,000 
220 


20 


Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company, 
successor to Charlestown Gas and 


64 
1 




620 
500 


400 
363 


1 




1 






Totals 


99,208 


532,949 


4,861 


15 


369,698 


90,300 


87 







* Unknown. (Meter capacity connected to lines of Edison system 1,101,810 kilowatts.) 



Fire Department. 13 



Fire Department Band. 



In May, 1930, a call was issued to the department 
for members of the department who were interested in a 
band to meet at the quarters of Engine Company 26. 
The response to this invitation was beyond all expecta- 
tions. Approximately one hundred and fifty men 
attended the meeting and plans to organize the band 
started. On September 17, 1930, the band made its 
first public appearance on the streets of Boston in the 
Tercentenary Parade, and for its accomplishment and 
appearance won the admiration of the hundreds of 
thousands of people who watched the parade. The 
organization, instruction and equipping of this band 
required no expenditure of the city's money and has 
placed no financial burden on the City of Boston. The 
expenses of the band were met privately by the Fire 
Commissioner, assisted by those men who undertook 
the purchase of their own instruments. 

The establishment of a band in the Fire Department 
has done much to increase the interest and efficiency 
of the personnel in its work. The band has for its 
purpose a constructive organization to perform some 
beneficial service to the families of members of the 
department who may lose their lives in the performance 
of their duty. The raising of funds and the furnishing 
of relief to the families of members of the department 
who lose their lives in duty is a matter which has practi- 
cally been left entirely with the firemen themselves. 
A musical organization of the type and character 
planned for the Fire Department Band will be the means 
of assisting in raising of money for the relief of these 
families. 

The band has not been organized with any commer- 
cial object in view, but solely for the purpose outlined 
above and to appear on public occasions as a repre- 
sentative organization of the Fire Department. In 
addition it has for its purpose the aiding of any great 
public charity or benefaction, when the times and cir- 
cumstances require its aid. 

Re commend ATI ons . 

The principal objective of the Fire Department is 
the protection of life and property against fire, with 
the thought always in mind to bring about a substantial 



14 City Document No. 12. 

reduction in the fire loss. In order that these purposes 
may be accomplished the department must at all times 
be maintained at a very high state of efficiency. Today 
the personnel and equipment of the department is in 
first-class condition. Certain improvements are neces- 
sary during the coming year to maintain this present 
high standard. 

1. A new fireboat should be built and placed in 
service in the department to replace one of the three 
fireboats now in service. Once each year the boats 
are taken out of service for annual inspection by the 
United States Steamboat Inspectors. Such repairs 
as are required by the inspectors are made before the 
boat is placed back in service. As the boats grow older 
the annual repair bill becomes more and more extensive. 
The replacement of one of the boats by a new boat, 
more modern in type, will result in a tremendous 
increase in the waterfront fire protection and reduce 
the repair bill of the department. I urgently recom- 
mend consideration of this proposition. 

2. A new fire station should be built in the South 
Boston district to provide quarters for Engine Company 
2 and Ladder Company 19. These two companies 
are housed in two old stations, inadequate and anti- 
quated, without proper facilities for modern fire com- 
panies and automobile fire apparatus. At Ladder 
Company 19 the station is too small to place an aerial 
truck in service and considerable delay is caused in 
responding to alarms because of the narrowness of the 
street. At Engine Company 2 there is not room 
enough for a hose car so that the company has to 
operate with one piece of apparatus. An up-to-date 
fire station on a wide street will provide this section of 
the city with the fire protection it should have. 

3. A study of the causes of fires throughout the city 
shows very apparently that many of the fires are due 
to arson. This condition exists to such an extent 
that it is a matter of grave concern, and it is prevalent 
in the residential districts as well as in the commercial 
and mercantile sections of the city. The Fire Com- 
missioner is without statutory power to investigate 
suspicious fires as this authority is placed elsewhere 
by law. While an honest effort is being made to trace 
arson in this city I believe that if the Legislature gave 
to the head of the Fire Department authority to conduct 
investigations better results would be obtained. I 



Fire Department, 15 

recommend, therefore, that at the next session of the 
General Court legislation be introduced to give this 
authority to the Fire Commissioner in the City of Boston. 
4. It is a well known and accepted fact that constant 
study and application are necessary to keep a person 
properly equipped to perform the duties of his position. 
The necessity for such training applies in the Fire 
Department just as it does in any other form of employ- 
ment. I have found however that no organized system 
has been in effect in the Boston Fire Department to 
keep the officers and men properly informed as to their 
work. I propose to devote considerable time and 
effort to establish a fire college in Boston which will 
be without equal in the country. There is no doubt 
that this can be accomplished with the result that 
all members will be fully informed as to their obligations 
and at the same time methods of operation in the 
department will be standardized. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 



16 



City Document No. 12. 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES 1930. 



Fire Department .... $4,642,216 53 
Wire Division .... 103,225 10 
Fire Station, Brighton . . . 19,964 74 
New Fire Station, West End Dis- 
trict, Building .... 330,597 53 
Fire Station, West End District, 

Site 361,209 01 

New Fireboat 44,864 41 



),502,077 32 



ANNUAL REPORT OF REVENUE, BOSTON 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, YEAR OF 1930. 

Income. 

Permits for fires in open spaces; fireworks; 
blasting; transportation and storage of ex- 
plosives; garage and gasolene storage, etc. . $18,311 25 
Sale of old material (condemned hose) . . 419 66 

Sale of old material (junk) 613 89 

Sale of badges 505 75 

Property damage (cable) 137 40 

Property damage (fire alarm boxes and posts) . 904 29 

Property damage (fire apparatus) . . . 692 85 
For labor performed by this department in June 

and July 262 11 

For refund on cable refels in July .... 60 55 

Sale of coal, tires, old lantern beds (miscellaneous) , 104 00 



Wire Division: 
Permits 



Oil 75 
70,282 33 



Total 



5,294 08 



Fire Department. 17 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 
Henry A. Fox. 

The chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Division 1. 
Deputy Chiefs, Henry J. Power and John J. Kelley. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1. 

District Chiefs, Thomas E. Conroy and Henry Krake. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 

East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 

40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, 31. 

District 2. 
District Chiefs, Philip A. Tagite and Hamilton A. 

McClay. 
Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22, Rescue 3. 

District 3. 
District Chiefs, John J. Kenney and John F. Good. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 
39, 44 (fireboat). Ladders 8, 18, Water Towers 1 and 3. 

District 4- 
District Chiefs, Avery B. Howard and John F. 

McDoNOUGH. 

Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
31 (fireboat), Ladders 1, 24. 



18 City Document No. 12. 

District 5. 
District Chiefs, John F. Watson and Dennis J. 

COUGHLIN. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Broadway. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Rescue 1, Water Tower 2. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chiefs, Thomas H. Downey and William F. 

QUIGLEY. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 

District Chiefs, Michael J. Teehan and Edward G. 

Chamberlain. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 
District Chiefs, Napeen Boutilier and Michael F. 

Minehan. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33, 
Ladders 3, 13, 15. 

District 8. 

District Chiefs, Louis C. Stickel and Daniel Martell. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26. 

District IL 
District Chiefs, Thomas H. Andreoli and Cornelius J. 

O'Brien. 
Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 41, 
51, Ladders 11, 14. 

Division 3. 
Deputy Chiefs, Walter M. McLean and Frank A. 

Sweeney. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 



Fire Department. 19 

District 9. 

District Chiefs, William H. McCorkle and Edward 

J. Locke. 

Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 23, 24, 
Ladders 4, 23, Rescue 2. 

District 10. 
District Chiefs, Francis J. Jordan and Charles H. 

Long. 
Headquarters, Engine House 17, Parish Street, 
Meeting House Hill. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 21, 
Ladder 7. 

District 12. 

District Chiefs, Timothy F. Donovan and Joseph W. 

Shea. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 

Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 
53, Ladders 10, 30. 

District 13. 

District Chiefs, Charles A. Donohoe and Patrick 

J. V. Kelley. 

Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 
Ladders 16, 25. 

District IJf.. 

District Chiefs, James Mahoney and James F. Ryan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester, 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, 52, Ladders 6, 27, 29. 

District 15. 
District Chiefs, John P. Murray and Michael D. 

Sullivan. 
Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 

Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
49, Ladder 28. 



20 



City Document No. 12. 




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22 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires and Alarms, from January 1, 
1930, TO January 1, 1931. 

Hot ashes in barrel 90 

Incendiary and supposed, 152 
Lamp upsetting and ex- 
plosion 6 

Miscellaneous 585 

Oil burners 70 

Oil stove, careless use and 



1,703 
68 



90 

793 

1,753 

57 



Alarms, false, needless, bell 

and still 

Alarms out of city 

Automatic alarms, false 

and accidental 

Automobiles 

Brush, rubbish, etc 

Careless use lamp, candle, 
Careless use matches, set 

by rats 427 

Careless use pipe, cigar, 

cigarette 1,046 

Chimneys, soot burning . . 407 

Clothes near stove 1 

Defective chimney, stove 

pipe, boiler 72 

Electric wires, motors .... 283 

Fireworks and firecrackers, 54 

Gas jet, gas stove 15 

Gasolene, benzine, 

naphtha 6 

Grease in ventilator, oven, 41 



explosion 22 

Overheated furnace, stove 

boiler 83 

Set by boys 146 

Sparks from chimney, 

stove 138 

Sparks from locomotive, 

engine 31 

Spontaneous combustion.. 195 

Thawing water pipes 21 

Unknown 54 

Total 8,409 





Fire Extinguished By 


1930. 


"3 

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o 

o 


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o 

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January 


102 


23 


110 


32 


69 


71 


45 




89 


22 


107 


35 


65 


78 


37 




101 
115 
106 

96 
102 

98 


39 
53 
40 
26 
40 
21 


161 
164 
162 
115 
120 
106 


99 
174 
87 
66 
83 
55 


98 
84 
104 
60 
63 
49 


131 

158 
77 
57 
43 
51 


41 




55 




36 




42 


July 


46 


August 


47 


September 


100 


33 


137 


110 


51 


58 


51 




126 
109 
118 


33 
26 
22 


162 
139 
135 


88 
63 
38 


66 
44 
70 


65 
99 
87 


44 




60 




58 






Totals 


1,262 


378 


1,618 


930 


823 


975 


562 







Fire Department. 



23 



Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 


Location and Owner. 


Loss. 




1930. 






Jan. 


2 


7 Jackson street, Atlas Garment Company et al 


$25,670 




3 


556-570 Washington street, E. Oilman et al 


17,889 


Jan. 


12 


37-41 Court street, F. X. McGrath et al 


31,128 


Jan. 


13 


121 Gove street, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church 


15,040 


Jan. 


13 


67 Broad street, High Grade Shoe Repairing Company 
etal. 


17,452 


Jan. 


14 


20 and 22 Canal street, General Furniture Company et al. 


36,080 


Jan. 


15 


North Harvard street. Harvard Athletic Association. . . . 


119,446 


Jan. 


29 


Rear 80 Border street, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corpo- 
ration. 


34,000 


Feb 


1 




20,037 


Feb 


9.. 




15,739 


Feb. 


12 


220 Friend street, Massachusetts Gas and Electric Com- 
pany et al. 


18,733 


Feb. 


13 


439 Albany street, Boston Elevated Railway 


88,881 


Feb 


19 




16,753 


March 1 


227 and 229 Washington street, Thompson's Spa, Inc. . . 


105,034 




1 6 

il2 




27,639 


Marcl: 


92-100 Portland street, Modern Curtains Company 
etal. 


18,376 


March 22.. 




16,063 


March 22.. 




22,975 


March 23 




21,182 


March 27 


556-570 Washington street, R. H. White Company, 
etal. 


63,068 


April 


6 


195-205 A street, Economy Grocery Stores Corporation 
etal. 


46,713 


April 


22 


34 and 36 India street, Natural Products Company et al. 


66,191 




30 




32,390 


May 


8 


53 and 55 Portland street, A. H. Morrison & Sons et al. 


47,806 


May 


19 


252 and 254 Congress street. United China Company 

etal. 


15,108 




27 




50,150 




31 




16,718 




6 




250,000 


June 


7 


15-21 Bromfield street, J. Tarr etal 


20,207 


June 


11 


25-43 Kneeland street, Fashion Cloak and Suit Com- 
pany et al. 


16,129 


June 


23 


104-112 A street, J. J. White Company, Inc. et al 


23,297 



24 



City Document No. 12. 

Fire Losses. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 





1930. 


June 


25 


June 


28 


July 


4 


July 


16 


July 


29 


July 


31 


Aug. 


5 


Aug. 


8 


Aug. 


17 


Aug. 


19 


Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


24. ...:.. . 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


24 


Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


2. 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


19 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


26 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


19 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


27 



107 and 109 West Brookline street, United Furniture 
Factories. 

Off Austin street, Boston & Maine Railroad 

141-153 Medford street, Palmer, Parker Company el al 

9-19 Braintree street, E. T. Ryan Iron Works, Inc. 
et al. 

217 Newbury street, M. E. Casey et al 



146 Northern avenue. New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad et al. 

7 and 9 Dixwell street, F. E. Burnes et al 

221 and 223 Endicott street, Sneirerson Brothers et ah 

60 Factory street. Park Mills etal 

309-315 Huntington avenue, Rush Company etal 

265 Tremont street, Shubert Theatre Corporation 



19-27 Sudbury street. Prime Upholstering Company 
et al. 

Rear 368 Albany street, Cronin Lumber Company et al. 

1044 Washington street, Apollo Theatre Company et al 

479 Beacon street, Oscar Bauer et al 

560 Harrison avenue, Phoenix Shoe Company et al 

91 Summer street, Abbott's, Inc. et al 



186-192 Portland street, Standard Upholstering Com- 
pany et al. 

594-616 Washington street, Marvin Shoe Stores et al. 

25-29 Tremont street, Martin's Women's Shop, et al. . . 

44 and 46 La Grange street, A. Steinert et al 



153 and 155 Fulton street. National Distributing Com- 
pany et al. 

26-32 Atlantic avenue, Philip Goldstein Company et al. 

34 and 36 South street. Old Colony Rynak Leather Com- 
pany et al. 

15 and 17 Columbia street, Adler Richards Company 

et al. 
133 and 135 Essex street, Glaser Brothers et al 



96 Essex street. Economy Umbrella Company et al. 
201-213 Essex street, B. Shir etal 



55-63 Summer street. The New Hat Frame Company 

et al. 
102-106 South street, H. Goldberg & Co. et al 



6-10 Beach street. Queen Quality Undergarment 

Company et al. 
392 and 394 Boylston street, George Gechijian et al 

11 Columbia street, John Hetherington & Sons et al. . . 

162 and 164 Lincoln street, Sobel Shoes, Inc., et al . . . . 



$19,653 

45,000 
193,133 
33,658 

37,466 

24,287 

21,124 
24,025 
31,871 
31,387 
20,852 
18,578 

22,624 
18,600 
23,145 
15,152 
19,391 
24,362 

20,916 
24,875 
39,197 
16,275 

21,161 

74,755 

16,840 
37,469 

159,960 
19,542 
20,148 
27,920 
20,906 
27,849 

116,043 
18,895 



Fire Department. 



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26 



City Document No. 12. 



Statistics, 

Population, January 1, 1931 (estimated) 

Area, square miles .... 

Number brick, etc., buildings . 

Number wooden buildings 

Fires in brick, stone, etc., buildings 

Fires in wooden buildings 

Fires out of city .... 

Not in buildings, false and needless 

Total alarms .... 



2,004 

1,549 

68 

4,788 



805,400 
47.81 
42,879 
92,304 



8,409 



Fire Loss for the Year Ending December 31, 1930. 


Buildings, loss insured 


. $2,319,726 


Contents, loss insured 


2,273,936 


Total loss insured 


. $4,593,662 


Buildings, loss not insured (estimated) . $328,798 


Contents, loss not insured (estimat 
Total loss not insured 


ed) . 229,081 




$557,879 


Marine loss 


$23,130 


Yearly Loss for the Last Fifteen 


Years. 


Marine Loss not Included. 




Year ending January 1, 1917 




$2,372,480 


1, 1918 






3,981,227 


1, 1919 






2,822,109 


1, 1920 






2,577,584 


1, 1921 






3,139,566 


1, 1922 






4,010,201 


1, 1923 






3,304,595 


1, 1924 






6,286,299 


1, 1925 






4,735,595 


1, 1926 






5,407,070 


1, 1927 






5,199,965 


1, 1928 






3,694,642 


1, 1929 






3,887,250 


1, 1930 






4,129,926 


" 1, 1931 






4,593,622 



Fire Department. 



27 



Alarms for the Past Ten Years. 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1930 


4,601 
4,473 
3,867 
3,492 
3,762 
3,798 
3,640 
3,239 
2,733 
2,359 


3,808 
3,979 
3,829 
3,840 
4,108 
3,904 
4,353 
4,002 
3,401 
2,888 


8,409 


1929 


8,452 


1928 


7,696 


1927 


7,332 


1926 


7,870 


1925 .... 


7,702 


1924 


7,993 


1923 


7,241 


1922 


6,134 


1921 


• 5,247 







John E. Fitzgerald Medal. 



John J. Leary, for 1922. 
Daniel J. O'Brien, for 1923. 
Thomas F. Kilduff, for 1924. 



Dennis M. Condon, for 1927. 
Joseph P. Hanton, for 1929. 



Walter Scott Medal. 



Dennis M. Condon, for 1922. 
James H. Curran, for 1923. 
Edward J. Crowley, for 1924. 



Gilbert W. Jones, for 1927. 
John J. Boyle, for 1929. 



Carl V. Anderson. 
Carl S. Bowers. 
James J. Buchanan. 
William 0. Cheswell. 
Dennis M. Condon. 
Walter P. Corbett. 
Michael J. Dacy. 
James E. Downey. 
Thomas H. Downey. 
Dennis Driscoll. 
Joseph P. Hanton. 
Timothy J. Heffron. 



Roll of Merit. 



Gilbert W. Jones. 
Henry J. Kelly. 
Martin A. Kenealy. 
John J. Kennedy. 
Frederick F. Leary. 
John J. Martin. 
Edward McDonough. 
James F. McMahon. 
Thomas J. Muldoon. 
Edward J. Murphy. 
Arthur A. Ryan. 
Michael J. Teehan. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT,