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Full text of "Annual report"

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EIGHTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1931 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1932 



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THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

9.7,32: 2500 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN, President 

Term expires April 30, 1934 

ARTHUR T. CONNOLLY FRANK W. BUXTON 



Term expires April 30, 1932 



Term expires April 30, 1935 



ELLERY SEDGWICK 

Term expires April 30, 1933 



JOHN L. HALL 

Term expires April 30, 1936 



CHARLES F. D. BELDEN 

(Deceased October 24, 193!) 

DIRECTOR 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in I 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 1 4 of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preUminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made the first annual report The Board at 
present, consists of five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor, for 
five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each year. The follow- 
ing citizens at large have been members of the Board since its organization 
in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926-1931. 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

BiGELOw, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

Bowditch, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman. Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Buxton, Francis William, a.b., 1928- 

Carr. Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

CoAKLEY, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916- 

Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1922-1930. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d, 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

DwiNNELL, Clifton Howard, b.s., 1927-28, 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923-27. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1 868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Hall, John Loomer, a.b., ll.b., 1931- 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

HiLLiARD, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 76-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921-26. 

Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m., 1888-99. 



Putnam, George* d.d., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-9$. 

Sedgwick, Ellery, a.b., litt.d., 1930- 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

TicKNOR, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68. 
The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1 852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. HenRY W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to Mav 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888. to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton, May 8, 1908, to February 6, 1917; William F. 

Kenney, February 13, 1917, to May 7, 1920; Rev. ALEXANDER 

Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; Msgr. Arthur T. 
Connolly, April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein, 
lune 13, 1924 to June 19, 1925; HoN. MiCHAEL J. MURRAY, June 
19, 1925 to July 2. 1926; Guy W. Currier, July 2. 1926 to May 
2. 1927; MsGR. Arthur T. Connolly, May 2, 1927 to June 22, 
1928; Louis E. Kirstein, June 22, 1928 to June 21, 1929; Gordon 
Abbott, June 21, 1929 to June 20, 1930; Frank W. Buxton, 
June 20, 1930 to May 15, 1931 ; Louis E. Kirstein since May 15, 
1931. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 fo 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; since 
1923, Director.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 - December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858 - January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868 - Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., m.d.. Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d. Librarian, October 1, 1878 - Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

Dwight, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 - April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 11,1 895 - April 3, 
1 899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1 899 ; Librarian, December 22, 1 899 - January 3 1 , 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., litt.d.. Librarian, February 1, 1903 - March 
15, ]9]7; Acting Librarian, March 15, 1917 -June 15, 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll.b., litt.d.. Director, March 
15, 1917 - October 24, 1931. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1931. 



Departments. 
fCentral Library, Copley Square . 
tEasl Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. 
§Soulh Boston Branch, 372 Broadway . 
llFellowes Athenasum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
fCharlesfown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
t.Brighton Branch. Academy Hill Road . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
JLower Mills Branch, Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
fSouth End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. 
tJamaica Plain Branch, Sedgwick, cor. South Si. 
.tRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
tWesl Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 
tMattapan Branch, &-10 Hazleton St. . 
fNorth End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch. 362 Neponset Ave. 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St 
$Mt. Pleasant Branch. Vine, cor. Dudley St. 
JTyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. . 
tWest End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
^Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sti 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
§Boylston Station Branch, 160 Lamartine St. 
§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler St. . 
JCily Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 
tParker Hill Branch, 1497 Tremont St. . 
■f'Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winfhrop St 
tFaneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St. . 
§Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 
§Jeffries Point Branch, 195 Webster St. . 
IBaker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration Jan. 15, 1927 
'j^Kirstein Memorial Library: Business Branch first and second floors; 

Kirstein Branch third floor, 20 City Hall Ave.. . . May 7, 1930 

§Phillips^ Brooks Branch, 12 H amilton St . Readville . . . May 18, 1931 

1|ln the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that noW occupied. * As a delivery station, 'fin building 
owned by City, and cxtlusively devoted to library uses. J In City building, in part 
devoted to other municipal uses. § Occupies rented rooms. ||The lessee of the Fel- 
lowes AtheniEum, a private library association. .* Under agreement with Harvard. 



Ti'OPENED. 


May 


2, 


1854 


Jan. 


28, 


1871 


May 


1, 


1872 


July 


16, 


1873 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


25, 


1875 


*June 


7, 


1875 


Aug. 




1877 


Sept. 




1877 


»Dec. 


3, 


1878 


*Jan. 


6, 


1880 


»Dec. 


27, 


1881 


*Oct., 




1882 


*Jan. 


1, 


1883 


*Nov. 


1, 


1886 


*Mar. 


11. 


1889 


*Nov. 


12, 


1890 


*Apr. 


29, 


1892 


*Jan. 


16, 


1896 


Feb. 


1, 


1896 


*Mar. 


16, 


1896 


*May 


1, 


1896 


*Jan. 


18, 


1897 


*Nov. 


1, 


1897 


*June 


25, 


1901 


*July 


18, 


1906 


*July 


15, 


1907 


Jan. 


1, 


1912 


*Mar. 


4, 


1914 


*Mar. 


5 


1914 


»Oct. 


15. 


1921 



CONTENTS 



Report of the Trustees 

Balance sheet .... 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Director . 

Appendix to the Report of the Director 
Index to the Annual Report 1931 



1 

22 
28 
33 
54 
71 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Parker Hill Branch Library 
Mattapan Branch Library . 
Map of the Library System 



Frontispiece 

Facing page 38 

At the end 



To His Honor James M. Curley, 
Ma^or of the City of Boston. 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31, 1 93 1 , being the eightieth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 1 5, 
1931 with the election of Mr. Louis E. Kirstein as President, 
Mr. Ellery Sedgwick as Vice President, and Miss Delia Jean 
Deery as Clerk. 

The term of Mr. Gordon Abbott who had served as a Trus- 
tee since 1 926, expired on April 30. Mr. Abbott was deeply 
interested in the Library and gave to it much time, and service of 
the highest order. Mr. John L. Hall was appointed to succeed 
him for a term of five years from May 1 , 1 93 1 . 

The Library suffered a severe loss on October 24 in the death 
of its Director, Mr. Charles F. D. Belden. At a meeting of the 
Trustees on December 4, the following Resolution was adopted 
and ordered spread upon the permanent records of the Corpo- 
ration : 

It was given to Charles F. D. Belden to direct the Public Library of 
the City of Boston for fourteen years. Wisely and well he used the 
opportunity. Assuming office with a definite and proper conception of an 
institution whose privilege it is to bring knowledge and pleasure, recreation 
and stimulus to a great and expanding community, he was fortunate enough 
to watch the steady fulfilment of his hopes. Always in sympathy with 
scholarship, he systematically increased the treasures of the Library, and 
expanded the facilities for their use, but never lost sight of his fundamental 
purpose of providing for all the people the means of self-enlightenment 



[2] 

and of enlarging self-respect. Nor did he take the narrow view of a pro- 
fessional educator, but understood that the needs of a community are 
infinite, that people require entertainment and distraction as well as in- 
formation and knowledge. He realized that as it is the privilege of the 
people to go to the Library, so it is the duty of the Library to go to the 
people, and the inauguration of a policy of persistent building and main- 
taining in high efficiency branch libraries throughout the city met with his 
energetic support. We are grateful for the length of his service. We 
are proud of the loyalty which he inspired throughout the great body of 
Library employees, and we recall with satisfaction how far beyond the 
limits of his city he was able to extend the Influence of his principles, and 
the contagion of his enthusiasm. Charles Belden was an ornament to his 
profession, and a faithful steward of his trust. We, the Trustees, who 
have watched the culmination of the work to which he gave his life, are 
willing witnesses to his happy and successful career, and desire to spread 
upon the permanent record of our Library's history this appreciation of a 
firm friend, a good citizen, and a great Librarian. 

On November 24 Mr. Milton Edward Lord was informally 
appointed Director to succeed Mr. Belden. This appointment 
was confirmed at the meeting of the Trustees on December 4. 
Mr. Lord is to assume office on February 1 , 1 932. 

In February, by Chapter 50 of the Acts of 1 93 1 , the Corpo- 
ration was authorized under its charter to take and to hold real 
and personal property to an amount of twenty million dollars, 
this being an amendment of Chapter 1 14 of the Acts of 1878 
which authorized the holding of one million dollars and of a 
Special Act of 1919 authorizing the holding of ten millions. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY. 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the year 1 93 1 these receipts were : 

Annual Appropriation $1,262,504.00 

Special appropriations: Library Building; Fireproofing; Founda- 
tions; and Branch Libraries, Establishment of . . . • 480,750.42 

Income from Trust Funds ^io'nS'52 

Unexpended balance of Trust Funds income of previous years . . 43.05 2.38 

$1,813,113.80 



[3] 

Receipts which are accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the past year 
have been as follows: 



From fines ........ 


. $23,153.36 


From sales of waste paper ..... 


141.88 


From sales of catalogues, etc. ..... 


97.56 


From commission on telephone stations 


529.01 


From payments for lost books ..... 


1,413.01 


Interest on bank deposits ...... 


25.97 


Refund 


7.95 


Total 


$25,368.74 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 131,454, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part by 
gift and exchange. The total number of volumes in the Library 
at the close of the year was 1,572,802. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and from the trust funds income was $21 1 ,103. 

The home use of books for the year was 4,702,932. The use 
of material within the Library buildings for reference and study 
is unrestricted, and it is therefore impracticable to record it. In 
addition to the above use of the Central Library and the 34 
branch libraries, there were sent deposits of books to 303 agen- 
cies, including engine houses, institutions and schools. 

A comparison of certain statistics with those of last year shows 
an interesting increase in the work of the Library : 





1930 


1931 


Total expenditure: city appropriation 






and trust funds income 


$1,168,855 


$1,267,221 


Expended for books and other library 






material from city appropriation 






and lust funds income 


$181,588 


$211,103 


Number of volumes added 


118.527 


131.454 


Total volumes in the Library 






(on shelves) 


1,526,951 


1,572,802 


Circulation 


4,133,459 


4.702.932 


Card holders 


160,201 


171,176 



ESTIMATES FOR 1932. 



The estimates submitted on November 1 for the maintenance 
of the Library for the year ending December 31, 1 932 were 



[4] 

later amended and reduced as requested on January 16, 1932. 
These estimates were as follows : 

Item Original estimate Amended estimate 

A.— Personal service $917,219 $866,124 

B. — Service other than personal 113,900 89,103 

C— Equipment 214,566 195,'975 

D.— Supplies 41.280 39,340 

E.— Materials 24.035 20.000 

$1,311,000 $1,210,542 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS 

The first two buildings erected under Your Honor's building 
program for branch libraries adopted in 1930 were completed 
and opened to the public : the Parker Hill Branch on May 22 and 
the Mattapan Branch on June 22. 

Under a special appropriation of $200,000 approved on 
March 3, 1931 , continuing this program, new buildings are now 
being erected in the Faneuil district of Brighton, Kilham, Hop- 
kins & Greeley, Architects; in the Boylston district of Jamaica 
Plain, Maginnis & Walsh, Architects; and in the Jeffries Point 
district of East Boston, Thomas Williams, Architect. It is 
expected that these buildings will be completed early in the 
spring of 1932. 

The Phillips Brooks Branch of the Library at Readville which 
was closed on December 31, 1924, was reopened for public 
use on May 18. 

Under a special appropriation of $85,000 the platforms of 
the Central Library building on Dartmouth and Boylston Streets, 
and the supporting arches of the same, were reconstructed during 
the summer months. 

During the summer months, also, the Bates Hall Reading 
Room was cleaned and redecorated, the marble floors repaired, 
and certain new furniture installed. 

GIFTS. 

During the year the Library received a bequest of $ 1 000 under 
the will of the late Helen Lambert of Boston, which w^s funded 



[5] 

in accordance with the terms of the same as a memorial to her 
parents, Frederic and Louise Lambert; from Mrs. Benjamin 
A. Kaiser, a marble replica of the statue "The Youth of Michel- 
angelo" by Emilio Zocchi, which has been placed in the new 
Mattapan Branch Library; and from Miss Emily Sargent and 
Mrs. Francis Ormond, sisters of the late John Singer Sargent, 
an original sketch by Mr. Sargent of a study for the unfinished 
central panel of his mural painting in the Library, portraying the 
"Sermon on the Mount." 

On March 3, there was unveiled and formally presented to 
the Library a memorial tablet to Charles Follen McKim, Archi- 
tect, the gift of the Boston Society of the American Institute of 
Architects. This tablet is on the wall of the Central Library 
building at the foot of the stairs leading to the Sargent Gallery. 

TTie Library received during the year, many important gifts 
of books and other library material, a list of the principal ones 
being included in the report of the Director. 

The Trustees are again indebted to the many friends of the 
Library who have contributed so generously to the lecture and 
concert programs. These entertainments are now an interesting 
and important feature of the Library's service to the public, and 
those persons who co-operated so generously are public bene- 
factors to that extent. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 



The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of this year. It was constituted as 
follows : 



J. A. Lowell Blake Mr. 

Arthur H. Cole Hon. 

Frank D. Comerford Mr. 

Allen Curtis Mrs. 

Charles P. Curtis, Jr. Mrs. 

Frederic H. Curtiss Mr. 

Carl Dreyfus Dr. 

Miss Susan J. Ginn Mrs. 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson Rev. 



Mr. 

Mr. 

Mrs 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 



George R. Nutter 
James P. Parmenter 
Charles O. Pengra 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
Edward M. Pickman 
Robert Proctor 
David D. Scannell 
Arthur Shurcliff 
William M. Stinson. S.J. 



[61 

Rev. Harry L.evi Mr. Charles H. Thurber 

Mr. Melville D. Liming Mrs. Fiske Warren 

Mrs. Edward L. Logan Mrs. Frederick Winslow 

Mrs. Eva Whiting White 

li is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens whenever they are asked to render service. Special at- 
tention is called to the constructive report of the Committee ap- 
pended to this report. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money, and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare works, which 
give value and rank to a great educational institution. 

As a matter of interest to the public, the Board has pleasure in 
listing herewith the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. 



TRUST FUNDS. 

Art?. Fund — Donation from MiSS ViCTORINE ThoMAS ArtZ, of Chi- 
cago: the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as 
the "Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1 0,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of Charles H. L. N. Ber- 
nard. Received in 1 930. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by JoHN P. BlGELOW in August, 
1 850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1,000.00 



[7] 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of ROBERT ChARLES Bil- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1 903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one quarter 

per cent Bonds $11,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . $83,000.00 

City of Boston Three and three quarters per cent 

Bonds . . . ■ . . . $6,000.00 

$100,000.00 
Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll BoWDITCH. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 
per cent Bond $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 
cent Bond $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JosEPH H. CENTER, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds $1,600.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bonds 32,300.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one-half 

per cent Bond 6.000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931. . 8.89 

$39,908.89 
Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 



[8] 

to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $15,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . . 36,000.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent 

Bond 6,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond . 20,000.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Three and one- 
Bond 6,000.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Four per cent 

half per cent Bond .... 20,000.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931 . 1 17.74 

$103,117.74 

Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Frank Clement, of Newton, to 

be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 

to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry SaRGENT Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $2,000.00 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . 800.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931 . 54.41 

$2,854.41 
Cutter Fund — Bequest of AbraM E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one half per cent Bond . 1 00.00 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank ... 1 70.00 

$4270.00 
Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of SarAH A. MatcHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 



[9] 

beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston. Received in 1900. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $6,000,00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, I 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow^ them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of Isabella Stewart 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 
1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. MorRIS GesT in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. 
Invested in 

City of Boston Four per cent Bond . . . $500.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarter per cent 

Bond 1000.00 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . 500.00 

$2,000.00 



[10] 



Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested of interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877, 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 
per cent Bond .... . $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1 884. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $1 ,000.00 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of Alfred Hemenway. Received 
in 1928. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds. . $5,000.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of Franklin P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $3,600.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931 . 32.40 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and three-quarters 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . 6,000.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 3,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donation of $1,000 made by Mr. Louis E. 
KiRSTEiN in October 1925, "to be used for any purpose of the Li- 



brary that the Trustees see fit to put it to. 

October, 1925 . 

October, 1926 . 

November, 1927 

October. 1928 . 

October. 1929 . 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank 



$1,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1,000.00 

$5,000.00 



[Ml 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of Katherine 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of AbbotT Lawrence, of Boston. 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
a permanent value. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward Lawrence, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . 500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500.00 

Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of Helen Lambert of Boston in memory 
of Frederic and Louise Lambert. Received in 1931. The income 
of this fund to be expended for the purchase of books and other 
library material until otherwise ordered by the Board. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . .. $1,051.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of ChARLES Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the F^ublic Library in such manner as the government of 



[12] 

said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1896. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond ...... $2,500.00 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of Gardner O. North. Received 
in 1928. 
Deposited in Dorchester Savings Bank . . $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
v\'as received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 
from the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under 
an indenture between Amor HoUingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L. HoUingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1 924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 1,780.00 
Cash, December 31, 1931 . . . . 1.44 

$11,781.44 
John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the Papyrus 

Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 

member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 

purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bond $1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 

in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 

of books for said library. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 

20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 

of a free Public Library. 

Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 

time being. 



[13] 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. PieRCE, Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1 873. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $3,000.00 

City of Boston Three and one-half per cent Bond 2,000.00 

$5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. 
Distribution of residue of estate in May, 1924, $964.30. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $500.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent Bond 90.00 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . . 904. 1 8 

$1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial to 
Guilford S. Reed; the income to be applied to the purchase of books 
of non-fiction. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds $34,800.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bond 1 8,000.00 
City of Boston Four and one-half per cent Bonds 6,000.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per cent Bonds 3,000.00 

$61,800.00 
Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD Black Sewall: 
''Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 



[14] 

of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the Income to be 
used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner: 

'^'^ Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he 
shall judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
''Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his. youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child ot take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1914. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half per 

cent Bond ^ $40,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . 10,450.00 
1 6 shares Worcester Street Railway Company . 1 ,280.00 
Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931 . 2.1 4 

$51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of v/hich is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $3,500.00 



115] 

James Jackson Stonow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen StorroW 
and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson 
Storrow, Senior ; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 

Deposited in Boston Five Cent Savings Bank . $10,000.00 

Dorchester Savings Bank . . 5,000.00 

" Suffolk Savings Bank . . 10.000.00 

$25,000.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass., or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61 , has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George TickNOR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts arid 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor. widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the city, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 



[16] 

ceived said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bond $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. ToDD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be expend- 
ed by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other countries. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $25,000.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarters per 

cent Bond $25,000.00 

$50,000.00 
Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1 872, said beuqest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bonds $4,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . 9,850.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931 . 37.69 

$13,987.69 



[17] 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of Nathan A. Tufts, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be appHed 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the hbrary 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 
Invested in City of Boston Three and one-half 

per cent Bond $100.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . . 9,400.00 

Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . 600.00 

Cash in City Treasury, December 31, 1931 . 31.77 

$10,131.77 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1 89 7. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of GeoRGE C. Wales: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter per 

cent Bond $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund. — Bequest of MehiTABLE C. C. WiL- 
SON, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1913. 
Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . $1 ,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James Lyman WhitneY, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — - The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 



[18] 

sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-quarter 

per cent Bonds $1,000.00 

City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . 4,000.00 

$5,000.00 
James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. 
Invested in City of Boston Four and one-half per 

cent Bonds $1,200.00 

City of Boston Four and one-quarter per cent Bonds 2,500.00 
City of Boston Four per cent Bonds . . 12,050.00 

City of Boston Three and three-quarter per cent Bonds 800.00 
Deposited in Hibernia Savings Bank . . 3,686.89 

$20,236.89 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 
Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from : 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

. John T. Spaulding 100.00 

Invested in City of Boston Four per cent Bond . $150.00 

Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz. : 
J. Ingersoll Bowditch $6,800.0 

Carried forl^ard $6,800.00 



[19] 



Brought jor^ard . . ' . . . . $6,800.00 

Samuel Appleton, late of Boston ... 1 ,000.00 

Sally Inman Kast Shepard .... 1,000.00 

James Brown, late of Cambridge . . . 500.00 

Andrew Carnegie ..... 980.75 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 200.00 

James Nightingale 100.00 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . 335.13 

$10,915.88 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

Arfz Fund $ 10,000.00 

Bates Fund 50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 2.000.00 

Bigelow Fund 1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 100,000.00 

Bowditch Fund 10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund 39,908.89 

Central Library Building Fund 150.00 

Children's Fund 103,117.74 

Clement Fund 2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund ...... 2,854.41 

Cutter Fund 4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund 25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund ' . . . 1 ,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund 2,652.50 

Green Fund 2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000.00 

Thomas ,B. Harris Fund 1,000.00 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 5.000.00 

Hyde Fund 3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund 10,000.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 5,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 10,000.00 

Helen Lambert Fund 1,051.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund ......... 500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund ...... 500.00 

Charles Mead Fund 2,500.00 

Gardner O. North Fund 2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 11,781. 44 

Carried forward $445,918.38 



[20] 

Brought forward $445,918.38 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 1,000.00 

Phillips Fund 30,000.00 

Pierce Fund 5.000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund 1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund 1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund 3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund 61,800.00 

Sewall Fund 25,000.00 

Skinner Fund . 51.732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund ...... 100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund . 3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund ...... 25.000.00 

Ticknor Fund 4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund ....... 50,000.00 

Townsend Fund 4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund • . 13,987.69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10,131.77 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund . . . . « . . 5,000.00 

Wales Fund 5,000.00 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund ........ 5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund ........ 20,236.89 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund 1.000.00 

$773,759.29 

The Trustees desire to express publicly their high appreciation 
of the loyal co-operation of the entire staff during the period when 
the Library was without a Director. Such service contributes 
largely to the permanent success of the Library. 

Louis E. Kirstein 
Ellery, Sedgwick 
Frank W. Buxton 
ArthiUR T. Connolly 
John L. Hall 



BALANCE SHEET 



[22] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Central Library and Branches: 
To expenditures for 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing 

and Binding employees) 
Temporary employees .... 



To expenditure for equipment 

Machinery 

Motorless vehicles 

Furniture and fittings 

Office 

.Books: 

City appropriation 
Trust fund income 

(including transfer to 
London account) 

Newspapers: * 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Music : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Lantern slides: 

City appropriation ' 
Trust funds income 

Periodicals (city) 

Photographs : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Tools and instruments 

General plant equipment 

Carried foTTDard 



176,848.33 



19,985.03 

L598.99 
2,182.78 

886.73 
1.155.23 

57.00 
9.50 



58.83 
927.01 



$653,994.84 
121,336.67 



Service other than personal 




• 








Printing and binding ...... 67.75 


Advertising 










33.25 


Transportation of persons 










1,899.13 


Cartage and freight . 










8.080.36 


Light and power 










21,231.25 


Rent, taxes and water 










22,805.61 


Surety bond and insurance 










12.50 


Communication 










3,697.63 


Cleaning 












1,681.08 


Removal of ashes 












21.20 


Removal of snow 












240.55 


Medical 












4.50 


Expert 












5.571.22 


Fees 












77.00 


Photographic and blueprinting 










625.14 


General plant repair 


s 










48.842.97 



1,239.96 

106.50 

5.631.91 

2.114.92 



196.833.36 



3.781.77 



2.041 .96 



66.50 
14.790.73 



985.84 
M 49.73 
1.715.08 



$775,331.51 



114.891.14 



230,458.26 
$1,120,680.91 



[23] 
EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1931 



Cr. 



By City Appropriation 1931 $1,262,504.00 

Income from Trust funds ...... 26,807.00 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 700.00 

Interest on deposit in London . . . . • . 74.39 

Transfer from Domestic Funds to London account . 9,000.00 

Special appropriation, Foundation, improvements, etc. 85,000.00 



Special appropriation, Branch Libraries, Establishment of 268,000.00 



$1,652,085.39 



Carried forward 



$1,652,085.39 



[24] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forrvanl 

To expenditures for supplies 
Office 

Food and ice 
Fuel 

Forage for animals 
Medical 

Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Agricultural 
Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant supplies 

To expenditures for material 
Building 
Electrial 
General plant 



$1,120,680.91 



To Special items 

J. L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 
A. L. Whitney — sick benefit . 



To Binding Department 
Salaries 
Light 
Repairs 
Equipment 
Supplies 
Material 
Stock 
Outside work 

To Printing Department 
Salaries 

Transportation of persons 
Light 

Communication 
Repairs 
Equipment 
Supplies 
Material 
Stock 
Outside work 



9,839.47 

776.31 

23.151.37 

31.45 

41.44 

2,428.38 

331.75 

.161.13 

2,711.17 



6,393.09 
4,544.32 
1 ,630.30 



1,480.18 
100.00 



63,268.68 

67.86 

446.36 

4,599.88 

26.45 

6.28 

5,941.91 

16.40 



14,386.98 

2.40 

45.24 

3.03 

404.95 

237.50 

41.56 

2.25 

4.592.13 

310.54 



39,472.47 



12,567.71 



1,580.18 



74,373.82 



20,026.58 



Carried forTvard 



$1/268.701 .67 



[25] 
EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31, 1931 



Cr. 



Brought forxvarj ...... 

By Balances Brought Forward from 1930: 

Trust funds income, City Treasury .... 39,156.04 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . . . 3,896.34 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 2,647.49 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . . • 9.058.33 

Special appropriation, Fireproofing, improvements, etc 26,786.15 

Special appropriation. Foundation, improvements, etc. 534.92 

Special appropriation. Branch Libraries, Establishment of 108,429.35 



$1 ,652,085.39 



190,508.62 



Carried forward 



$1,842,594.01 



[26] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Drought forward .... 

To Special Appropriations: 

Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 

Central Library Building, 

Fireproofing, improvements, etc. . 
Transfer to Branch Libraries, Establishment of 



Central Library Building, 

Foundation improvements, etc. 

To Amount Paid into City Treasury: 
Fines 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins . 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Interest on bank deposit . 
Refunds 
Sales of waste paper 

To Balance, December 31, 1931 : 

Trust funds income on deposit in London , 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
Trust funds income, City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 



To Balance Unexpended: 

General appropriation .... 
Central Library Building, Fireproofing, etc. 
Central Library Building, Foundation, etc. 
Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 



254,871.40 



1,874.05 
8,000.00 



53,049.20 



$1,268,701.67 
254,871.40 

9,874.05 
53.049.20 



23,153.36 

97.56 

529.01 

1,413.01 

25.97 

7.95 

141.88 



693.97 

3,117.39 

49,805.86 

8,278.15 



23,246.55 

16,912.10 

32,485.72 

121.557.95 



25,368.74 



61 ,895.37 



194,202.32 



$1,867,962.75 



127] 



EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31, 1931 



Brought forward ...... 

By Receipts: 

From Fines ....... $23,153.36 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists . . . 97.56 

Commission on telephone stations .... 529.01 

Payments for lost books ...... 1,413.01 

Interest on bank deposit ...... 25.97 

Refunds 7.95 

Sales of waste paper ...... 141.88 



Cr. 

$1,842,594.01 



25,368.74 



$1,867,962.75 



Report of the examining committee 



To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF the City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee respectfully submits its report for 
the year 1 93 1 . The twenty-six members appointed by you have 
been divided into six sub-committees, each of w^hich has per- 
formed the w^ork assigned to it in examining the various depart- 
ments of the Main Library, and of visiting and reporting on the 
condition of all the Branch Libraries. 

From the various reports of these sub-committees, which re- 
ports will be filed with you for specific data, this general report 
has been compiled. 

I. It is a pleasure to record the notable and splendid improve- 
ments made during the past year. The Bates Hall Reading 
Room at the Central Library has been cleaned and redecorated ; 
new furniture has been added, and the floors repaired. The 
platform at the Central Library and the supporting arches have 
been reconstructed. The first branch library buildings, erected 
under the Mayor's Building Program, have been opened: the 
Parker Hill Branch on May twenty-second, and the Mattapan 
Branch on June twenty-second. 

II. The making of two surveys is recommended : First, a study 
of the annoying problem of stolen books ; Second, of the grading 
of the positions and salaries of the library staff. 

III. We recommend that the following repairs and alterations 
be made as soon as financial conditions permit : 

The basement storerooms should be furnished with steel 
shelving and be further extended towards Exeter Street under 



[29] 

the platform on the Boylston Street side. The improvements 
now in progress in the hghting system in the Annex should be 
continued. The need of a mezzanine floor on the east side of the 
Branch Libraries Department urged in previous reports of the 
Examining Committee, is again called to the attention of the 
Trustees. The lighting of the Abbey and Sargent paintings 
should be improved. We renew the recommendation made last 
year that the Children's and Teachers' Department be removed 
to the rooms now occupied by the Catalogue and Order Depart- 
ments; that these two departments be transferred to the space 
occupied by the Printing and Binding Department, which might 
find quarters outside the building or on a new floor to be added 
to the Annex. Both the Cataloging and Order Departments are 
seriously handicapped by the lack of proper facilities, and yet the 
efficiency of any large library is largely dependent on the proper 
functioning of these two most important sections. Present con- 
ditions really present an acute problem to which the Trustees 
may well give serious consideration. 

IV. The Committee wishes to place before the Trustees the 
question of the proper position of the Boston Public Library as a 
research institution. A movement is on foot among the libraries 
of Boston and Cambridge for a greater degree of collaboration 
in this field than has hitherto obtained. 

The purpose of this m.ovement is to secure by joint effort a 
better aggregate result in facilities available to advanced in- 
vestigators than would be possible by unorganized endeavor. 
The Boston Public Library is richly supplied with collections 
and material for advanced study, and this committee feels that 
the Trustees should decide what stand the Library should take in 
this important matter. Under this heading the committee wishes 
to record its high approval of the series of the articles appearing 
in the monthly publication, MoRE BooKS on the incunabula 
in the possession of the library. It is to be hoped that the splen- 
did series will be continued and later brought out as a separate 
publication. 

V. It is desirable that a survey be made of the material in the 
Teachers' Room. It has been brought to the attention of the 



[30] 

committee that this highly important room in the Central Library 
might increase its usefulness if the volumes reserved there were 
improved in quantity and quality. Possibly the text books of the 
Boston Schools could be transferred to shelves in the nearest 
stack, and the space thus secured be utilized in the broadening 
of the reference library maintained in the Teachers' Room. 

VI. The w^ork done in the Printing and Binding Departments 
is notably creditable. This year's record shows an increased out- 
put for the binding, and the inspection of the work in hand gives 
an impression of workmanship and materials such as best meet 
the exacting requirements of library service. The committee 
approves the suggestion of the head of the department that a 
method of more expeditious stamping of titles on covers be in- 
stalled in place of the hand operation now in use. In the Barton- 
Ticknor Room the bindings of many volumes are drying and 
cracking because of the close proximity to the steam pipes. These 
pipes should be covered with asbestos. The sad condition of 
many of these books might be obviated or at least partially helped 
by the installation of humidifiers at a small cost. The leather 
bound volumes in this room should be treated with an oil dress- 
ing to counteract the effect of the heat. A simple rubbing with 
Russian oil, or even with vaseline or saddle soap would show a 
noticeable improvement in the appearance of these books. The 
more valuable volumes should be placed without delay in the 
hands of an expert binder for treatment. This, in the mind of 
the committee is simple economy. 

The heating conditions of this beautiful room call for atten- 
tion. The complaint is made that there is a constant current of 
cold air coming from the rotunda at the west end of the gallery. 
This difficulty might be overcome if swinging doors were placed 
at the end of the gallery opening into the rotunda. Before go- 
ing to the expense of installing swinging doors it might be well 
to try a curtain in this opening to see if any result was appreciable. 

VII. Some one should read over the terms of gift of all funds 
which the library has received, and should make excerpts of the 
important clauses of the original documents and these excerpts 
should be copied on cards to form a card catalogue. It may be 



[31] 

found that some of these funds which are not particularly needed 
for the primary purpose stated in the deed of gift, may be avail- 
able, within the discretion of the Trustees, for some other and 
more necessary purpose. 

VIII. The one recommendation concerning the Statistical De- 
partment is that a more suitable entrance be provided. The present 
entrance, through the door leading directly to the men's toilet 
room, is most undesirable, to say the least. The suggestion is 
made that a direct approach to the Statistical Room might be 
gained by using the top of the North Terrace as an approach and 
by the breaking in of a door through the wall at the west end of 
this terrace. This of course is merely a suggestion offered in 
deference to an architect's approval. But something should be 
done to remedy the entirely undesirable condition at present 
existing. 

IX. Attention is again emphatically called to the need of im- 
provement in the Fine Arts and Technical Rooms. The present 
conditions in these rooms are far below the standard that ought to 
characterize the Boston Public Library. The cumbrous wooden 
cases and shelving not only increase the fire risk but lessen to a 
notable extent the space available for readers and make access 
to many of the volumes extremely difficult. These rooms ought 
to be refinished to harmonize with the work already done in the 
Barton-Ticknor and Music sections. 

X. The reports of the visits to the Branch Libraries have been 
made in such a splendid and satisfactory way and with such 
manifest interest that this committee thinks it best to offer them 
to the Board of Trustees just as they were submitted and to 
respectfully ask that the Trustees give to the reading of these 
reports the same whole hearted attention and interest as were 
manifested by those who took so much time and trouble in com- 
piling them. From these various reports, this committee wishes 
to emphasize two facts alone : First, the urgent need of consider- 
ing the situation of the South Boston and City Point Branches; 
Second, the present condition of the Neponset Branch. 

XI. In submitting this report the committee respectfully offers 
the following suggestions for future Examining Committees : 



[32] • 

That the Examining Committee be appointed much earher in 
the year, so that the work may be done during the fall months. 

That a fixed date be made for the reports and that this date 
be not later than December first. 

That a circular of instructions be given to the Examining 
Committee, so that the members may understand what is ex- 
pected of them. 

That each Branch Library be visited by two, instead of five, 
members of the Committee. This would reduce the number of 
libraries to be visited by each committee to two or three instead 
of six or seven as at present. 

That the work of the various sub-committees be more clearly 
defined. Under the present division the work of some of these 
committees seems to overlap, e.g. Administration and Finance 
with that of Buildings and Equipment, which latter in turn over- 
laps with that of Special Libraries. 

It appears to the Committee that the present method of paying 
the employees of the Library is decidely wasteful of their tinae. 
If the Trustees shall agree with this and find that another method 
would be at once practical and meet the wishes of the employees, 
we in that case suggest that the matter be taken up with the proper 
authorities. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, March 
15, 1932. 

J. A. Lowell Blake George R. Nutter 

Arthur H. Cole James P. Parmenter 

Mary M. Comerford Charles O. Pengra 

Allen Curtis Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Charles P. Curtis, Jr. Hester Pickman 

Frederic H. Curtiss Robert Proctor 

Carl Dreyfus David D. Scannell 

Susan J. Ginn Margaret H. Shurcliff 

Henry Lewis Johnson Charles H. Thurber 

Harry Levi Gretchen Warren 

Melville D. Liming Mary W. Winslow 

Cecilia F. Logan Eva Whiting White 
William M. Slinson, S.J., Vice Chairman 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 



To THE Board of Trustees : 

I submit a report of the work of the Library for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1 93 1 , compiled from the reports of the chiefs 
of the various departments. 

ACCESSIONS AND GIFTS 

The total number of volumes accessioned in the library system 
in 1 93 1 was 1 3 1 ,454, acquired as follows : 1 1 9,5 1 5 by pur- 
chase; 2,044 by binding of periodicals; 1,524 by binding of 
serials; 268 by binding of newspapers; 8,032 by gift; and 71 by 
exchange. Material other than books — lantern slides, photo- 
graphs, prints, phonograph records, maps, etc., — amounted to 
21,902 pieces, of which 3,181 were by purchase and 18,721 by 
gift. The total of volumes and pieces accessioned was 1 53,356. 

Of the 131,454 volumes accessioned, 27,199 were placed in 
the Central Library, 1 ,749 in the Business Branch, and 1 02,506 
in the branch libraries in which, throughout this report, the Branch 
Deposit Collection is included. 

The total amount expended was $211,103.24 of which 
$190,556.01 was taken from city appropriation and $20,547.23 
from trust funds income. Of the 128,925 items paid for, 
124,024 were paid for from the city appropriation and 4,901 
from trust funds income. The total number of items acquired 
by purchase, and of purchases accessioned differ because sub- 
scriptions to periodicals, newspapers, and serials in unbound parts 
are counted as items of purchase, but the material received on 
these subscriptions is not entered as an accession until it is bound. 

Of the $190,556.01 expended from the city appropriation 
$145,695.17 was for the branch libraries and $44,860.84 for 
the Central Library. Of the $44,860.84 expended from the 



[34] 

city appropriation for the Central Library $9,638.48 was for 
the Business Branch. Of the $20,547.23 expended from trust 
funds income $1,602.43 was for the branch libraries and 
$18,944.80 for the Central Library. 

In spite of the expenditure for books of a sum much greater 
than that originally anticipated, the demand and need was by no 
means satisfied.' As always a very large part of the branch 
demands for all classes of material could not be satisfied. Many 
more copies of popular titles and many other titles, both separate 
and serials, particularly foreign material, could profitably have 
been bought for Central if the appropriation had allowed. 

The income of trust funds is our dependence for the purchase 
of rare and unusual books to augment our scholarly collections. 
We are constantly being approached with offers of desirable 
rarities that we cannot buy through lack of such funds, and we 
are for the most part excluded from participation in the bidding at 
important auction sales. The purchase in 1929 of the Trent- 
Defoe Collection for $35,000.00 and, in 1930, of the Paul 
Sabatier Franciscan Collection for $3,434.82 so reduced our 
reserve of trust funds income that no extensive purchases could 
be made in 1931 . 

The average cost per volume of all books bought with city 
appropriation in 1931 was $1.48; in 1930, $1.53; in 1929, 
$1.51 ; in 1928, $1.56. The average cost per volume of all 
adult English fiction was $1.38 in 1931 ; $1.46 in 1930; and 
$1.47 in 1929. 

Below appears a small, representative selection of outstanding 
purchases, all made from the income of trust funds upon which 
we are wholly dependent for material of this sort : 

British Museum, London. General Catalogue of printed books. London. 

1931. Vols. 1 and 2, A-Ale. (The entire set, about 160 vols., 

is to appear at the rate of about 20 a year.) 
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. Don Quixote de la Mancha. Motteux 

translation, revised anew ( 1 743) and corrected ... by J. Ozell, 

who likewise added the explanatory notes . . . Reprinted with 

twenty-one illustrations by E. McKnight Kauffer. New York. 

1930. 2 vols. 
Cotton, Charles. The planters manual: being instructions for raismg, 

planting, and cultivating all sorts of fruit-trees, whether stone-fruits 



[35] 

or pepin-fruits, with their natures and seasons . . . Engraved frontis- 
piece by Van Hove. London. 1 675. From the Library of Bever- 
ly Chew, with his bookplate. 
Curtis, Edward S. The North American Indian, being a series of volumes 
picturing and describing the Indians of the United States, the Do- 
minion of Canada, and Alaska . . . New York. 1926, 1930. Vols. 

1 7-20 and portfolios of plates, 1 7—20. (These volumes complete 
the set in 20 volumes and 20 portfolios that has been appearing 
since 1910.) 

Dresser, Henry Eeles. Eggs of the birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhabiting the western Palaearctic Area. London. 1910. 

2 vols. Illustrated. Colored plates. 

The Farmers Almanack (corrected and amended) for the year 1714. 
By N. W. [Nathaniel Whittemore] a lover of the truth. America. 
Printed and sold at the bookseller's shops at Boston in New- 
England. 1714. 8 leaves. A very rare and early issue of a Boston 
almanac. In remarkably fine condition, uncut, unopened, in half 
morocco slip case. A woodcut portrait of Queen Anne on the title 
page. 

The Fleuron; a journal of typography. London. The Fleuron. 1923—28. 
Vols. 1—6. (These volumes complete the set of the publication, 
the Library having previously acquired Vol. 7, the final volume 
issued.) 

Goodspeed, Charles E., editor. Sidney Lawton Smith, designer, etcher, 
engraver; with extracts from his diary and a check-list of his book- 
plates. Boston. 1931. 

Haebler, Conrad. Der deutsche (2 vols.), der italienische, (2 vols.), 
der westeuropaische Wiegendrunck (I vol.) in Original-Typen- 
beispielen. Miinchen. 1927—1928. 

Herbert, Henry William (pseud., Frank Forester). Ingleborough Hall, 
and Lord of the Manor. New York. 1 847 ; Hints to Horsekeepers, 
etc. New York. 1859; and fifty-six other volumes by the same 
author, a part of the library of Harry Worcester Smith, bought to 
augment the Library's already moderately extensive collection of 
works by this first noted American writer of sporting literature. 

James, Philip. Early keyboard instruments from their beginnings to the 
year 1 820. London. 1 930. Illustrated. Portrait. Sixty-five 
plates. Chart. Music. Table. 

Mather, Cotton. Right thoughts in sad hours, representing the comforts 
- and the duties of good men under all their afflictions; and particu- 
larly that one, the untimely death of children, in a sermon delivered 
at Charles-town, New England; under a fresh experience of that 
calamity. London. 1 689. 



[36] 

Mercator. Geraard. The treatise of Gerard Mercator: Literarum Latin- 
arum, quas Italicas, cursoriasque vocant, scribendarum ratio (Ant- 
werp, 1540), Edited in facsimile with an introduction by Jan 
Denuce, Antwerp, and a note by Stanley Morison, London. Fac- 
simile. Antwerp. 1930. Plates. Diagrams. Printer's device. (Num- 
ber 4 of an edition of 200 copies.) 

Mujica, Francisco. History of the skyscraper. Paris. 1929. Plates. 

New England Association of America. Clippings, circulars, photographs, 
announcements, programs, etc., concerning the celebration of the 
Massachusetts Tercentenary, 1930. Scrapbooks (some indexed.) 
25 vols. 

Parker, Theodore. A manuscript, without title, of a History of the 
Jews. Contains a note in Parker's own hand, "I wrote this Mss. 
at Watertown in May and June 1 832 after the school hours. It 
was written with the intention of supplying a want which I felt as a 
teacher. But I found no publisher willing to undertake it." Signed 
and dated, Watertown, 1 832. 

Photographs. Three hundred airplane views of estates, gardens, and 
parks selected as examples of landscape architecture for the Henry 
Sargent Codman Memorial Collection. 

Poley, Arthur F. E. St. Paul's Cathedral, London. Measured, drawn 
and described by Arthur F, E. Poley. London. 1927. 32 plates. 
Vignettes. Autograph facsimile. 

Rolland, H. W. Armoires des families contenues dans I'Armorial general 
de J. B. Rietstap. Paris. 1 903—26. 6 vols. Coats of arms. En- 
graved title-page. 

Wigglesworth, Michael. Meat out of the eater: or meditations concern- 
ing the necessity, end, and usefulness of afflictions unto God's chil- 
dren, all tending to prepare them for, and comfort them under the 
cross. 5th edition. Boston. 1717. 

A bequest of $1 ,000 from the late Helen Lambert of Boston 
was received and funded as "The Helen Lambert Fund in 
memory of Frederic and Louise Lambert." The income is to be 
used for the purchase of books and other library material until 
otherwise ordered by the Board of Trustees. 

In contrast with the year of 1930, 1931 was not a year of 
large gifts of material, but 8,032 volumes and 19,721 miscel- 
laneous items were received and used. A list of the more im- 
portant items may be found on page 67 of the appendix. 

Accessioning the Sabatier collection and the miscellaneous 
section of Professor Trent's library was completed. Consider- 
able time was devoted to handling gift material. 



[37] 



CATALOGUE AND SHELF DEPARTMENT 

During 1931 the number of volumes and parts of volumes 
catalogued was 137,292, covering 108,106 titles. Of these, 
48,961 volumes (29,723 titles) were taken care of in the Cata- 
logue Department and 88,331 volumes (78,383 titles) were 
assigned to the branch libraries and catalogued in the Central 
Branch Department. 

Of the books catalogued in the Catalogue Department 28,764 
volumes and parts (22,640 titles) were new to the Central Li- 
brary; the number of serials added was 7,361 ; and 12,836 
volumes and parts (7,083 titles) were recatalogued — thus 
making the total quoted above. 

The number of printed cards added to the catalogue of Cen- 
tral Library alone was 74,224, distributed as follows: 27,778 
were filed in the Bates Hall catalogue, 30,831 in the official 
catalogue, and 15,615 in the Special Libraries Department In 
addition, 26,268 new printed cards were used for compiling 
bibliographies or for the larger part set aside for such use in the 
future; from this number, cards were also sent as usual to the 
Library of Congress. The total of new printed cards was thus 
100,492. 

In order to hasten the appearance of new books in the cata- 
logues 23,1 77 temporary cards have been typed and filed, later 
to be replaced by printed cards. As a result of this practice 
titles of recent acquisitions have been filed in the catalogues as 
soon as the books have been placed on the shelves. For the use 
of the Editor in making up the list of new books in More 
Book., 1 0,904 cards have been typed. Beginning with Novem- 
ber, titles of new books have been sent to a Boston newspaper 
requesting them for its Sunday edition. To replace old cards 
3,290 other cards were typed. Changes were made and new 
editions were indicated on 55,725 cards, a larger number than 
has ever been done before. 

In addition to the above 75,756 printed cards and 1 1,395 
typed cards were added in the branch catalogue. 

The number of requests for photostats of books, plates, maps 
and manuscripts was about the same as last year. 



[38] 

In addition to the routine work of the Shelf division the mis- 
cellaneous section of the Trent Collection has been classed, a 
classification schedule for the Lewissohn Collection has been 
completed and the cataloguing of the Collection begun. A 
classification schedule for the Sabatier Collection has been pre- 
pared and the cataloguing begun. 

Three shelf lists have been retyped and revised, while a 
fourth is nearly completed. The invoice sheets of books sent on 
deposit to the Harvard Business School Library have been in- 
dexed in order to save time in looking up items which are ques- 
tioned. 



REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT 

On January 1, 1931 there were 160,201 "live" cards, i.e., 
cards available for present use. Through the Central Library 
and its 34 branches, there have been added 34,717 new regis- 
trations and 53,254 renewals, making a total of 87,971 cards 
added during the year. With the 83,205 cards added during 

1930 we have a total of 1 71 ,1 76 "live" cards on December 31 , 

1931 ; a gain of 10,975 over last year. 

During the past year 1 ,591 teacher's cards have been renewed 
and 341 new cards issued, making a total of 1,932 teacher's 
cards now in use. 

Special privilege cards, issued by the Trustees, have been 
granted to 86 new applicants, and 4 1 2 renewed, making a total 
of 498 special privilege cards available for use. 

ISSUE DEPARTMENT 

The number of books issued during the year for home use 
from the Central Library direct to readers was 350,675, an in- 
crease of 1 6,355 over last year. 

In addition to these, 87,529 volumes from the Central Library 
were lent to the various branch libraries for issue to readers by 
them. These are accounted for also in the report of the branches. 



> 

rr, > 



[39] 

The average daily circulation not including the books which 
went through the branches was 985. The largest circulation on a 
single day, February 27, was 1 ,849. The number of works of 
fiction circulating was 153,168. Between June 1st and October 
1 st, for summer reading, 966 books were issued for an extended 
period. 

A large amount of miscellaneous work has been done by 
assistants in the stacks. In all, 69,618 books were relabelled, 
1 ,942 volumes were repaired, 2,596 book covers were shel- 
lacked, 984 Central and 8,440 Deposit books were collated. 

To secure the return of books which were over-detained, 
40,056 mail notices and 4,096 messenger notices were sent out. 
The fines collected for these delays amounted to $4,895.99. For 
1 1 1 lost and 29 damaged books $255.43 were paid to the 
Library. 

This department handles also the articles lost and found in the 
building; 710 articles were found of which 165 were returned 
to the owners. Sums of m.oney amounting to $12.00 found in the 
Library were likewise returned to the owners. 

A special collection was established in the Issue Department 
of books which were found difficult to keep on the shelves in 
the stacks. This collection is made up of translations from the 
classics, text books, books of general interest and other miscel- 
laneous material. It has proved itself a success. Books from it 
are delivered to the borrowers three or four minutes after the 
presentation of the request slips. 

BATES HALL 

During the year 271 ,301 books were sent from the stacks for 
use in Bates Hall, a decrease of 3,444 volumes as compared with 
the previous year. This decrease is easily explainable. It was 
necessary to close Bates Hall from June to October for purposes 
of renovation. In the latter part of June the reference collection 
was moved into the Library's Lecture Hall which was used as a 
substitute reading room. The reference desk and the public 
catalogue were moved into the Delivery Room. The attendance 



[40] 

fell off materially. The reference collection was situated too far 
from the public catalogue and the public refused to be incon- 
venienced by using the Lecture Hall. This condition continued 
until late in September when the renovation of Bates Hall was 
completed. New desks were provided and the Centre Desk 
was relocated in front of the main entrance to the hall. Another 
decided improvement was the placing of the pneumatic tubes 
beside the indicator at the Centre Desk. This lessened con- 
siderably the time required to obtain books from the stacks. 
A separate desk was provided for the officer in charge of the 
Centre Desk and the administration of the hall. Some changes 
were made in the location of sections of the reference collection. 
The maximum attendance for the year was 301 at 5 p.m. on 
January 25. 

The work of the Reference Department did not differ from 
that of previous years. The usual number of inquiries, both in 
person and by telephone, were answered, and 490 letters, coming 
from 4 1 states and territories and several foreign countries, were 
answered. The number of books officially missing from the 
reference shelves was less than in 1 930, and 32 books previously 
reported as missing, were found. 

The Division of Genealogy completed its fifth year of service 
and entered its sixth year in new quarters at the north end of the 
hall. This change in arrangement has provided more space for 
works on genealogy and heraldry. Since research in these fields 
is one of the most popular branches of reference work, this new 
arrangement has been greatly appreciated by the public. There 
are now 1 ,270 volumes on the shelves, 780 of which are devoted 
to American genealogy and 490 to English genealogy and 
heraldry. In the course of the year, 224 letters have been 
answered. There has been no diminution in the requests for 
coats-of-arms and as in previous years pencil sketches have been 
made in response to requests for this material. 

The Readers' Adviser office has been open from one to two 
hours for three afternoons and two evenings a week. There have 
been few formal reading courses followed under the supervision 
of the office but many existing oudines have been recommended 



[41] 

for independent reading. A number of the "Reading with a 
Purpose" series have been recommended. Forty Hsts comprising 
824 titles were typed and sent to readers. Assistance has been 
rendered on from 15 to 20 club programs. Eight displays for 
the Adult Education program have been posted during the year. 

PUBLICATIONS 

More Books, the bulletin of the Library, has completed its 
sixth year under this title. Ten issues were published in 1 93 1 . 
In all, the bulletin comprised 464 pages, 64 pages less than in 
1930. Seven numbers were printed in 4000 copies of each 
issue; of the April and May numbers, 3000, and of the October 
number, 5000, copies were printed. 

As in earlier years, each issue of MoRE Books has carried 
a leading article on the book treasures of the Library or on some 
topic of library interest, and occasionally illustrated with fac- 
simile reproductions. The publication of a detailed descriptive 
catalogue of fifteenth century books in the Library has been con- 
tinued ; three installments having been published during the year 
in the May, June and December issues. The eight installments 
which have so far appeared covered the early books printed in 
Germany and Italy. About six more installments will be needed 
to cover the books published in France, The Netherlands, Spain 
and England. Bibliographers, collectors and other book-lovers 
of early printed books have manifested great interest in this list. 
Several other articles may be mentioned here: the June issue 
contained an essay about the Defoe collection — perhaps the 
most complete collection of Defoe's works in existence — ac- 
quired by the Library from Professor William P. Trent of 
Columbia University. In the February issue, the Washington 
collection bequeathed to the Library in 1929 by the late Mr. 
Walter Updike Lewisson, was described. Two articles, one in 
the September and the other in the October issue, were devoted 
to the Sabatier collection of Franciscan literature, also recently 
acquired by the Library. Three or four other articles will be 
devoted to this unique collection, unequalled in America for 



[42] 

opportunities for research in the field. All these essays were 
original contributions written especially for More Books. In 
March the bulletin published, besides, an address on Charles 
Follen McKim given by Mr. Charles Moore, Chairman of the 
National Commission of Fine Arts, on the occasion of the dedi- 
cation of a memorial tablet to Charles Follen McKim in the 
Boston Public Library. In the June issue, an address, "Why 
Read?" by Mr. George H. Evans, Librarian of the Somerville 
Public Library, was published. 

"Ten Books" and "Library Notes", popular features of the 
bulletin, have been continued. In the first, ten of the outstand- 
ing new books are reviewed in an informative, rather than a 
critical, manner; in the latter, fine editions and other important 
new acquisitions are described in brief paragraphs, and library 
news of public interest and communications from the Director's 
Office are published. 

The articles and notes in all occupy 202 pages out of the 
total of 464. The rest were used for the classified lists of new 
books. 

Bibliographical lists have been printed as in former years for 
the lectures and concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, as 
well as for the free concerts given in the Lecture Hall of the 
Library. 

The Library's annual publication, "Opportunities for Adult 
Education", was issued in the first week in September in an 
edition of 2000 copies. The booklet consisted of 149 pages. 
The list of lectures given in the Boston Public Library was pub- 
lished in a separate pamphlet of eight pages. 

INFORMATION OFFICE AND OPEN SHELF ROOM 

The circulation of books from the Open Shelf Room in 1931 
amounted to 53,805 volumes as compared with 50,1 77 volumes 
in 1930, an increase of 3,628 volumes. The Open Shelf col- 
lection numbers approximately 4,200 volumes and is fixed at that 
figure by the present shelf capacity. Inaugurated eleven years ago 
as an experiment, the non-fiction open shelf idea has met with 
the complete approval of the reading public. The circulation 



[43] 

figures show that there is an average monthly turnover well In 
excess of the size of the collection itself. 

NEWSPAPER AND PATENT ROOMS 

The total number of papers on file is 247, a decrease of three in 
the course of the past year. Of this number, 1 80 are American 
and 67 foreign. There are 1 96 dailies and 5 1 weeklies. 

The collection of bound newspapers consists of 10,034 
volumes, of which 286 were added during the year. There were 
19,545 readers who consulted 34,914 volumes. Provision has 
been made to construct shelving under the reconstructed plat- 
form of the library for storage of some of the early newspaper 
files. It is estimated that this new shelving will make available 
storage space for about ten years' growth in newspaper files. 

The patent collection consists of 13,035 volumes, an increase 
of 881 volumes over last year. During the year 19,198 readers 
used 1 1 1 ,865 volumes. It is quite impossible to record the actual 
use of books on the Open Shelf since these shelves are accessible 
to the public. Five hundred forty-six volumes of patent specifi- 
cations were taken from the shelves and photostat copies were 
made from them in answer to requests from attorneys and other 
users of the patent files. The great majority of these requests 
were for copies of British and German patents. 

PERIODICAL ROOM 

The number of bound volumes on the shelves in the depart- 
ment at the end of the year was 23,797. The current periodicals 
regularly on file, exclusive of those issued by state and federal 
governments, number 1 ,324. In addition, there are on file for 
use by readers in other departments current periodicals relating 
to the fields of knowledge covered by these departments. There 
are 1 59 titles in the Fine Arts, Technology, and Music Divisions 
of the Special Libraries Department, 27 in the Ordering Depart- 
ment, 51 in the Statistical Department, 63 in the Teachers' 
Reference and Children's Rooms, making a total for the Library 
of 1 ,624 periodicals. 



[44] 

The past year has been the busiest one in the history of the 
department. This department is well equipped to provide refer- 
ence material in response to requests for biography, book reviews, 
current events, debate material, magazine history, short stories 
and clippings on special topics. Students are using periodicals 
extensively and during the winter months the room is over- 
crowded, making it difficult to give efficient service to everyone. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES 

The circulation of books from this department was 37,514 
volumes, an increase of nine percent over the record year of 1 930. 
This figure, however, does not by any means represent the actual 
use of the department's collections as the large number of books 
sent out on branch requests is not included, and, except in the Bar- 
ton Ticknor Division where 12,134 volumes were consulted, no 
account can be kept of the books used for reference or hall use. 
The school picture collection had a circulation of 25,258, a 
slight decrease from last year's total due to a lessened call from 
the branches, which an increased issue in the division did not 
quite offset. The loans of lantern slides amounting to 13,108, 
shows a gratifying gain of 3,562, over last year which it is hoped 
to increase still further as the size and scope of the collection 
become better known. The "Clipping Collection" of pictures, 
much used by artists, was made over on a new scheme of arrange- 
ment and greatly enlarged. 

The Music Division has continued the issue of its "Aids to 
the Study of Symphonic Music" to supplement the weekly lec- 
ture on the programs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra; and 
has arranged several exhibitions of musical material including 
the interesting notebooks of the "Schelling Concerts for Chil- 
dren". 

STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

The work of the Statistical Department has increased during 
1 93 1 notwithstanding the fact that the department continues to 



[45] 

function under serious handicaps. The reading room is very 
small and the seating capacity entirely inadequate to accommo- 
date the growing daily attendance. During the busy hours 
patrons are obliged to resort to the use of the window seats, stools 
and in some cases even the attendants' desks. 

The circulation of books for home and hall use totalled 5,006 
in 1931, as compared with 4,700 in 1930. The greatest gain, 
however, showed in the number of persons who used the depart- 
ment and in the steady growth in reference work. The atten- 
dance was 14,992 in 1931, as compared with 12,724 in 1930. 
The number of reference questions totalled 3,916 in 1931 as 
compared with 1,905 in 1930. No record is kept of the books 
used in the department from the open shelves, nor of the atten- 
dance and reference work during the 34 hours of evening and 
Sunday service each week. 

Statistics for last summer showed that the number of books 
sent from the department for use in Bates Hall decreased ap- 
proximately one half, whereas the attendance doubled in the 
department during the time the reference collection was located 
temporarily in the Lecture Hall. These figures indicate that an 
entrance from the main building through the departments having 
elevator service would be of great advantage to the department 
and convenience for the public. 

There were 1,146 volumes added to the collection, making a 
total of 27,199 volumes in the Statistical Department at the 
close of the year. The Department received approximately 
8,234 publications as gifts, of which 98 were received from the 
American Statistical Association. 

Research workers and business people have found the collec- 
tion an invaluable source of reference, especially the extensive 
file of American and British documents. In the present business 
depression, people are showing much interest in economic con- 
ditions and in following closely the financial and business ques- 
tions of the day. Co-operation with the schools, colleges and 
other organizations is maintained and books are assembled and 
held on reserve for classes at the request of instructors. 



[46] 

WORK WITH CHILDREN 

During the year 1931 the home use of children's books 
throughout the library system amounted to 1,902,744, an in- 
crease of 1 62,772 over the previous year. 

By authority of the Trustees, intermediate cards were issued 
to young people 1 4 years of age from the first of May. These 
cards allow a borrower adult privileges with the single exception 
of permission to withdraw seven-day fiction. They are exchange- 
able at 1 6 years for the regular adult borrower's card. As this rule 
allows four books to be issued to boys and girls, it has contributed 
to the greater circulation of adult fiction. Children have flocked 
to the libraries everywhere more than ever before not only for 
books to take home but also to have comfortable quarters in 
which to read or study. 

The different holidays have been observed by exhibitions and 
book displays, culminating in the annual book week activities in 
which organizations all over the country participated in the 
month of November. Conforming to the nation-wide plan the 
Children's Department followed during that week the theme 
"Around the world in books", displaying books that bore a re- 
lation to international friendship or gave an understanding pic- 
ture of countries other than our own. 

The Children's work has benefited markedly by the com- 
pletion of the new buildings at Mattapan and Parker Hill where 
the circulation of children's books was almost double that of 
1930, and the use of the rooms for study and reference work 
exceeds anything ever known at those branches. 

The central children's room fulfils a slightly different function 
from those in the branch libraries, inasmuch as it is called upon 
for reference material for students of children's literature and for 
book lists and advisory service by correspondents. Short lists of 
books were prepared and printed for use during book week. A 
number of editions of junior high school reading lists were made 
ready for the printer. The Supervisor addressed on the subject 
of children's reading some 1 4 groups outside the Library besides 
conducting two classes on the same general theme for members 
of the staff. 



[47] 

The Library sent deposit collections to 741 teachers to be used 
as classroom libraries in the public and parochial schools. These 
books were taken from the deposit collection at Central Library 
and from 1 5 branches in which the juvenile book stock has been 
developed with this end in view. The requirements of the schools 
and the strain that they place on the Library's resources consti- 
tute a difficult problem in co-operation. The Library is unable 
to provide libraries for all the classrooms in the city schools. 

Instruction in the use of library reference books has been 
given to many classes from the schools in different children's 
rooms and good co-operation with the schools exists in other 
respects. 

In the 20 years since the Library started story hours there 
has never been a time when the children responded more eagerly 
than they have during the past year. The unusual craving for 
stories of the imagination is an indication that the story hour is 
taken as a release from the hard realism of present conditions. 
Such constructive v/ork is building for the future no less than 
alleviating the privations of today. 

An undertaking of considerable value was started in March 
when the collection of books in the Teachers' Room was re- 
classified according to the Library of Congress system. The 
assistant in charge of the room, acting under the supervision of a 
committee from other departm.ents, carried this work to a satis- 
factory conclusion. Subsequent use of the room is proving the 
workability of this classification even in a small specialized col- 
lection of books. 

THE BRANCH SYSTEM 

The total circulation through the branch libraries and the cen- 
tral Branch Department for the year was 4,339,064. This is 
a gain of 546,082. 

The total branch circulation is made up of the following items : 
3,375,021 books were issued for home use directly from the 
branches; 476,514 books were issued to schools and various in- 
stitutions, partly from collections of the branches (186,062) 



[48] 

and partly from the branch deposit collection in the Central Li- 
brary (290,452) ; and finally in response to calls from the public 
at the various branches — 62,804 from the deposit collection, 
and 23,725 from the stacks at the Central Library. 

Of the 3,775,021 volumes drawn out for home use directly 
from the branches, 1,926,923 w^ere for adults and 1,848,098 
for juveniles. Among the books for adults there w^ere 1 ,503,842 
volumes of fiction and 423,081 of non-fiction. Among the books 
for juveniles there were 1,255,640 volumes of fiction and 
592,450 of non-fiction. 

The number of volumes sent on deposit from the central col- 
lection and froih branch libraries to 320 agencies was 89,049. 
Among these agencies were 1 7 branches, 47 engine houses, 4 
high schools, 209 grammar schools, 14 parochial schools and 
29 institutions of various kinds. To 227 schools 64,978 volumes 
were sent in all. Last year the number of agencies was 324 and 
the number of volumes sent on deposit was 90,284 ; to 2 1 9 schools 
66,509 books were sent in 1930. Besides books, 36,007 pic- 
tures were sent to schools. 

The inter-library loans amonted to 2,817 volumes: 2,389 
books to libraries in Massachusetts and 428 to libraries outside 
the state. In all, 2,41 2 applications were received, of which 870 
had to be refused. 

Thirty of the branches gained in circulation. The greatest 
gains were at Parker Hill, Mattapan, Memorial, Allston, Cod- 
man Square, City Point, East Boston and Faneuil Branches. 
The largest circulation reached in a branch was 213,320 and 
the lowest 43, 1 96. The increase of 1 4.4% in the circulation of 
books through the branch system is gratifying. 

On May 1 8 the Phillips Brooks Memorial Library reopened 
its doors in the building located at 1 2 Hamilton Street, Read- 
ville. This branch was closed December 31,1 924, as many 
alterations were needed in order to make it possible for the li- 
brary to function satisfactorily. The building is now in admirable 
condition and is the most attractive small branch in the system. 
Although the population of Readville numbers approximately 



[49] 

only 3,000 people, 25,713 volumes were circulated between the 
date of opening and the 3 1 st of December. 

On May 25 the Parker Hill Branch was opened in its new 
building, designed by Cram & Ferguson, on a corner of the 
Mission Hill playground. That the public has appreciated the 
beautiful building and the fine collection of books placed at its 
disposal is evidenced by a notable increase in the number of 
volumes circulated during the period from June 1 to the end of 
the year. 

On June 22 the new Mattapan Branch Building, designed by 
Putnam & Cox, 8-10 Hazleton Street, was opened to the pub- 
lic. From the point of view of ease of operation this branch has 
the best floor layout of any of the branches. From July 1 to 
December 3 1 a marked increase in circulation resulted here as 
at the Parker Hill Branch. 



BUSINESS BRANCH 

At the close of 1 930 there were 8,008 volumes in the branch. 
During 1931 1,749 volumes were added, making a total of 
9,757. Eight hundred and thirty pamphlets were also added. 
The pamphlet file contains some of the most up-to-date and use- 
ful reference material. 

The branch has made a good growth in use as compared with 
the eight months it was open in 1 930. The average daily atten- 
dance from May to December, 1930, was 438; in 1931 for the 
same period it was 607. The largest single day's attendance in 
1930 was 662; in 1931 it was 903. No other library of this 
type has more than one half the number of users. 

Two new methods of publicity were started during the year. 
The Library editor has edited a list of new Business Branch 
books for MoRE BoOKS, and a monthly list of the more im- 
portant reference and circulating books added during the previous 
month is mimeographed the first of each month. Five hundred 
copies of this mimeographed list are taken by the public before 
the end of the month. Several copies of this list are sent to some 



[50] 

of the large firms which have hbrarians, for distribution among 
the departments. 

The window exhibits have been kept going all year with a 
change of display every three weeks. The assistance of a pro- 
fessional window dresser has been invaluable in making the 
windows attractive. 



LIBRARY TRAINING CLASS 

The fourth year of the Library Training Class opened Mon- 
day, September 29, 1 930 and closed Saturday, June 18, 1 93 1 
with a membership of 1 7 regular students and four special stu- 
dents. Courses were given in reference work, library adminis- 
tration, classification, cataloguing, children's literature and book 
selection. 

For the course in reference work about 260 standard refer- 
ence books were studied and discussed. Problems were assigned 
the class, giving them opportunity to do actual fact finding and 
thus put to practical use the knowledge acquired. Talks were 
given on meeting the public and on methods of research. 

The course in library administration began with a study of the 
noteworthy features of the library as described in the "Hand- 
book of the Library." A talk on the American Library As- 
sociation was given by the Supervisor, and its code of ethics for 
librarians was read and discussed. There followed a series of 
lectures by the Director and the heads of departments in which 
each explained the various activities under his jurisdiction. Three 
lessons in book-mending were conducted by the head of the 
Branch Bindery Division. A lecture on standard charging 
systems in use in other libraries v/as given by Miss Florence 
Blunt, Assistant Professor of Library Science at Simmons Col- 
lege. Visits were made to Boston publishing houses and book- 
stores, to the Business Branch, the State Library, and the Boston 
Athenaeum. The functions of the State Division of Public 
Libraries was explained by Miss E. K. Jones and Miss E. L. 
Jones, and Miss Edna Phillips talked to the class upon work 
with new Americans. 



[51] 

The object of the course in classification was to give some 
comprehension of the problems involved in arranging books upon 
library shelves. The emphasis was laid upon the necessity in 
modern times for a logical expansive and flexible order in which 
related subjects would be near one another and general works 
upon a single topic would be followed by specific works upon 
each of its phases ; an order which admits of the intercalation of 
new subjects and the placing of new editions of a work on the 
shelf beside the previous edition. Lessons on modern systems of 
classification were given. With the decimal classification of 
Melvil Dewey as a basis, each student acquired practical ex- 
perience by classifying and assigning call numbers to three or 
four hundred books. 

A course in cataloguing is indispensable to anyone who has 
occasion to use the catalogue of a large library, including as it 
does not merely a knowledge of what information should be 
found upon a catalogue card but the principles of subject head- 
ings, cross references, analytic and other additional entries, and 
filing. Practice in cataloguing actual books was given two 
mornings a week for five months. 

A course in children's literature was designed to give general 
assistants some acquaintance with the different types of books 
included in children's libraries everywhere. During the 30 les- 
sons the class studied and discussed the source material of tra- 
ditional literature, national epics, legends, mediaeval romance 
and poetry. It then passed on to modern books written for 
children. The course aims to teach the principles governing the 
selection of books for boys and girls and to give students a dis- 
criminating sense of values. 

The aim of the course in book selection is to stimulate in each 
student both the desire for wide acquaintance with all types of 
books and the ability to aid in the selection of books for others. 
The students did considerable reading and handed in written 
reviews every week. They also familiarized themselves with 
standard bibliographies and suggestive lists and made bibliogra- 
phies of their own. In the 66 class periods books of information, 
inspiration, and recreation were reported on orally and discussed 



[52] 

and the principles of evaluation applicable to each type were 
formulated. The Supervisor lectured on literary history and the 
theoretical aspects of choosing books for a library. During the 
course additional lectures were given by outsiders and members 
of the staff. 

BINDERY 

The am.ount of work turned out by the Bindery was the 
greatest in the history of the department. A total of 74,216 
volumes were bound as compared with 65,860 in the previous 
year. Eighty-three thousand two hundred and fifty-four library 
publications were forwarded, stitched and trimmed. The total 
number of pieces of work was 1 77,786. 

MECHANICAL AND OTHER REPAIRS 

The usual program of maintenance and repair work was 
carried on and many needed improvements were made in the 
system. The largest undertaking of the year was the recon- 
struction of the platform in front of the building. This platform 
was relaid and the space beneath it will afford the library a most 
valuable storage space. Construction of shelving for bound 
volumes of newspapers has already started. The walls and 
ceiling of Bates Hall were cleaned and redecorated. While 
this work was in progress, a new terazzo floor was laid and the 
furniture — tables, bookcases, chairs and book shelving — 
refinished. New desks were installed for the staff. Ornamental 
iron gates were placed in two of the entrance doors. 

Minor repairs were made to the roof. The power plant was 
tested during the year and very excellent results obtained. Dur- 
ing the year 474,559 kilowatt hours were generated and 1 ,582 
tons of coal consumed, showing a marked saving over the previous 
year. The boilers were all inspected and tests made on them 
to the satisfaction of the State Boiler Inspector. Flow meters 
were installed at the inlet and outlet to the boilers. The con- 
dition shown was so satisfactory that the accuracy of the meters 



[53] 

was doubted. The meters were checked and cahbrated but still 
the same excellent results were obtained. Boiler furnaces were 
rebuilt and many grates installed. Elevators were inspected and 
tested to conform to all existing laws, and all safety devices 
operated satisfactorily. New cables were put on the Annex 
freight elevator and the service elevator. The book railway 
registered 154,702 round trips during the year. 

The lighting system was improved in the Annex book stacks 
and in the Statistical Department by the substitution of Holo- 
phane units for drop cord lights. New electric fixtures were in- 
stalled in the Patent Room, adding much to its appearance. Fire 
prevention equipment was tested and proved to be in operating 
order. Six new fire hose stations were established in the Annex 
building, which, with the interconnection of the telephones on 
the switchboard at night, makes the building safer from the under- 
writers' point of view. The painting force accomplished much 
during the year in the Central and in the branch libraries, reno- 
vating walls, ceilings, and furniture in many rooms in the central 
building and in 1 1 branches. About 400 chairs were repaired 
and refinished during the year. 

CONCLUSION 

During the year only one person retired under the Boston Re- 
tirem.ent Act, namely Grace L. Murray, librarian of the Hyde 
Park Branch who retired voluntarily on October 31. Miss 
Murray entered the service on January 1, 1895. 

On October 24, 1 93 1 there occurred the sudden and untime- 
ly death of the Director, Mr. Charles F. D. Belden, who had 
served in that capacity since March 15, 191 7. His faithful and 
loyal service was well described in the resolution adopted by the 
Trustees at their meeting of December 4, 1931 and which is 
printed in full at page 1 of this volume of reports. 

This report is respectfully submitted in his stead by his suc- 
cessor. 

Milton E. Lord, 

Director 



APPENDIX 



TABLES OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION 





1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


Central Library 


644,896 


657,977 


678.834 


676,240 


698,627 


728,656 


Business Branch 










6,157 


13.193 


Allsfon 


74.297 


81,984 


86,960 


97,445 


108,557 


137.709 


Andrew Square 


89,662 


92.926 


104,563 


110.225 


116,196 


128,337 


Boylston Station 


71,261 


68.196 


81,405 


80,097 


79,946 


94,306 


Brighton 


101,286 


98,907 


96,586 


92,223 


103,145 


121,032 


Charlestown 


107,562 


110,069 


105,659 


100,483 


100,914 


119,637 


City Point 


51,154 


54,232 


56,686 


83,558 


97,264 


122,619 


Codman Square 


145,001 


1 56,559 


157,498 


153,372 


158,881 


186,386 


Dorchester 


100,188 


101,957 


109,553 


99,255 


102,790 


115,810 


East Boston 


138,691 


140,379 


151,099 


145.759 


1 57,746 


180,859 


Faneuil 


43,782 


50,212 


60,143 


72,005 


78,436 


90,424 


Fellowes Athen. 


85,151 


89,479 


91,463 


88,381 


85,739 


93,970 


Hyde Park 


98,147 


107,168 


110,679 


108,512 


120,878 


127,888 


Jamaica Plain 


73,117 


85,261 


86.398 


85,935 


95,895 


118,561 


Jeffries Point 


58,218 


61 .893 


63,185 


62,111 


70,768 


75,459 


Kirstein 










18,020 


43,196 


Lower Mills 


32,274 


35,835 


38,428 


44,730 


52,279 


59,692 


Mattapan 


69,364 


95,085 


124,374 


133,210 


139,723 


187.669 


Memorial 


147,263 


171.034 


178,142 


180,344 


1 78,467 


213.320 


Mt. Bowdoin 


125,907 


129,487 


132,424 


134,008 


134,310 


151.456 


Mt. Pleasant 


59,101 


66,315 


72,367 


72,167 


76,956 


82,795 


Neponset 


43,349 


48,331 


48,639 


51.228 


57,043 


60,986 


North End 


137,896 


143,381 


146,616 


145,201 


145,326 


1 58.333 


Orient Heights 


58,913 


55,625 


49,01 5 


42,571 


56,954 


60,512 


Parker Hill 


43.719 


45,862 


51,412 


56,209 


60,815 


112.308 


Phillips Brooks 












*25,7I3 


Roslindale 


105,074 


113,150 


122,260 


124,995 


130,268 


151,956 


Roxbury Crossing 


62,462 


77,770 


78,269 


78,803 


80,022 


69,034 


South Boston 


169,625 


170,911 


181,376 


171,805 


163,266 


161.244 


South End 


118,315 


116,226 


117,982 


123,794 


124,352 


122,870 


Tyler Street 


43,421 


39,868 


42,875 


46,058 


51,195 


59,163 


Upham's Corner 


126,010 


152,140 


171,260 


169,027 


184,595 


201,701 


West End 


169,142 


175,683 


183,887 


180,854 


177,125 


189,543 


West Roxbury 


104,889 


111,754 


119,249 
3,899,286 


119.463 
3.930,068 


120,804 
4,133,459 


136,595 


Total 3,499,137 ' 


3,705,657 : 


4,702,932 



*For eight months. May through December, 



[55] 

The net gains in circulation are presented, apart from the 
totals, in the following form: 







VOLUMES 


1926* gain over preceding year 


(of 1 1 months) , 


. 369,356 


1927 gain over preceding year 




306,520 


1928 gain over preceding year 




193.629 


1929 gain over preceding year 




30,782 


1930 gain over preceding year 




203,391 


1931 gain over preceding year 




569,473 



USE OF BOOKS 
Circulation from Central by Months 



January. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September ' 
October 
November ' 
December ' 



1931 



Totals 





HOME USE 


SCHOOLS AND 




HOME USE 




INSTITUTIONS 






THROUGH 




TOTALS 


DIRECT 




THROUGH 






BRANCH DEPT. 


BRANCH DEPT. 




34,382 


8,894 


31.365 


74,641 


32.433 


7,998 


32,180 


72,61 1 


36.859 


9,166 


32,917 


78,942 


31,105 


7,605 


33,596 


72,306 


27,777 


6,751 


32,542 


67,070 


21,483 


5,701 


33,770 


60.954 


20,576 


5,061 


6,660 


32,297 


20,116 


4,713 


6.454 


31,283 


22,778 


5,661 


6.525 


34,964 


32,749 


8,591 


14,349 


55,689 


35,612 


8,473 


27,587 


71,672 


34,805 


8,915 


32,507 


76.227 



350.675 



87.529 



290.452 



728.656 



Distribution of Total Circulation 



Central Library: 

a. Direct .... 

h. Through Branches 

1. Deposit Collections . 

2. General Collections . 

c. Schools and Institutions through 
Branch Department 

Business Branch 

Branches: 
Allston 

Andrew Square 
.Boylston Station . . . 



Carried forward 360,352 

Gain over an approximation of preceding twelve months 233,279. 



HOME 
USE 


schools AND 
INSTITUTIONS 


TOTALS 


350.675 






63,804 
23,725 








290.452 


728,656 


13.193 


137.709 

128,337 

94,306 


.... 


137.709 

128.337 

94.306 



360,352 



[56] 



Brought forjvard 








360,352 




360,352 


Brighton .... 104,710 


l'6!322 


121.032 


Charlestown 








108.767 


10,870 


119.637 


City Point 








122.619 


.... 


122,619 


Codman Square 








174.770 


11,616 


186,386 


Dorchester 








112.335 


3,475 


115,810 


East Boston 








160,206 


20,653 


180.859 


Faneuil 








90,424 


.... 


90,424 


Fellowes Athenaeum 








80.590 


13,380 


93,970 


Hyde Park 








120.687 


7,201 


127.888 


Jamaica Plain 








104.390 


14,171 


118,561 


Jeffries Point 








75,459 


• • • • 


75,459 


Kirstein 








43,196 


■ • • • 


43.196 


Lower Mills 








59,692 


• • • > 


59,692 


Mattapan 








187,669 




187,669 


Memorial 








212,976 


' 344 


213,320 


Mount Bowdoin 








151.456 


• • • « 


151.456 


Mount Pleasant 








82.795 


* • • • 


82,795 


Neponset 








60,986 


• . • . 


60.986 


North End 








157.281 


1,052 


1 58.333 


Orient Heights 








60,512 


• • ■ • 


60,512 


Parker Hill 








112,308 


• • • • 


112,308 


Phillips Brooks 








25.713 


• • > • 


25,713 


Roslindale 








142.894 


9,062 


151.956 


Roxbury Crossing 








69,034 




69,034 


South Boston 








137,782 


23^462 


161.244 


South End 








119.092 


3.778 


122,870 


Tyler Street 








59.163 




59.163 


Upham's Corner 








201,435 


' 266 


201.701 


West End 








1 57.950 


31,593 


189,543 


West Roxbury 








117,778 


18,817 


136,595 



3,775,021 



186,062 



3,961 .083 



These figures are condensed into the following: 

Books Lent for Home Use, including Circulalion through 
Schools and Institutions 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 

the branches) ......... 

From Business Branch .......... 

From branches (excluding books received from Central Library) . 



728,656 

13.193 

3.961.083 



Total 4.702,932 



Comparative 1 930 

Central Library circulation (excluding 

schools and institutions) 
Direct home use .... 334,320 
Through branches . . . 87,347 

Carried forward 421.667 



350,675 
87.529 



1931 



438,204 



[57] 

Comparative 1930 1931 

Drought forward 421.667 438.204 

Business Branch 6,157 13,193 

Branch libraries circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) . . . 3,218,102 3,775,021 
Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch system) 487,533 476.514 

4.133.459 4,702.932 

Under the inter-library loan system with other Hbraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 

Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 



Total 



1930 

; 2.250 

525 


1931 
2,389 
428 


2.775 


2,817 


711 
159 


692 
178 



Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts .... 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts 

Total 870 870 

The classified direct circulation of the branches was as follows, 
for two successive years : 





1930 




1931 






VOLUMES 


PERCENTAGE 


VOLUMES 


PERCENTAGE 


Fiction for adults . 


1,187,898 




36.9 


1.503.842 




39.8 


Non-fiction for adults 


346,959 




10.7 


423.081 




11.2 


Juvenile fiction 


1,151,244 




35.4 


1,255,640 




33.3 


Juvenile non-fiction 


532.001 




17.0 


592,458 




15.7 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 
the following percentages: 

1930 1931 



PERCENTAGE 


PERCENTAGE 


45.2 


43.7 


54.8 


56.3 



Fiction ...... 

Non-fiction ...... 

BOOK ACCESSIONS 

BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE 

For the Central Library 1930 1931 

From City appropriation . . . 12.484 15,309 

From trust funds income . . • 4,511 2,962 

Carried forward 16,995 18,271 



[58] 



Brought forji>ard 
T branches: 

From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 



80.529 
308 



16.995 



80.837 
97.832 



100.124 
1,120 



18.271 



101.244 
119.515 



The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



CENTRAL BRANCHES 



Accessions by purchase 
Accessions by gift 
Accessions by exchange 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound 
Accessions by serials bound 

Totals 



18,271 

6,866 

18 

2,001 

268 

1,524 

28,948 



101,244 

1,166 

53 

43 



102.506 



VOLUMES 
TOTAL 
119,515 

8,032 

71 

2,044 

268 

1.524 

131,454 



THE CATALOGUE 

1930 

VOLS. AND TITLES 
PARTS 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 

Serials 

Branches 
Recatalogued 

Totals 



30,108 
6.004 

86,319 
9,213 



21,508 

76.127 
6,247 



VOLS 
PARTS 

28,764 

7.361 

88,331 

12,836 



1931 

AND TITLES 



22,640 

78383 
7,083 



131.644 103,882 137,292 108,106 



SHELJ DEPARTMENT 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) . . . 26,555 

Special collections, new books and transfers ...... 3.585 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc ......... 2.245 

32,385 
Removed. from Central l^ibrary shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. 14,02 6 

Net gain at Central Library ........ 18,359 

Net gain at Branches .......... 25,774 

Placed in Business Branch . . . . . . . . . 1,718 

Net gain entire library system .,......, 45,851 



[59] 



The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852-53 

J 853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

1856-57 

1857-58 

185&-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861 62 

1862-63 

1863^64 

1864-65 

1865^6 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1882^3 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 



9,688 


1892 


16,221 


1893 


22,617 


1894 


28,080 


1895 


34,896 


1896-97 


70,851 


1897-98 


78,043 


1898-99 


85,031 


1899-1900 


97,386 


1900-01 


105,034 


1901-02 


110,563 


1902-03 


116,934 


1903-04 


123,016 


1904-05 


130,678 


1905-06 


136,080 


1906-07 


144,092 


1907-08 


152,796 


1908-09 


160.573 


1909-10 


179,250 


1910-11 


192,958 


1911-12 


209,456 


1912-13 


260,550 


1913-14 


276,918 


1914-15 


297,873 


1915-16 


321,010 


191^17 


345,734 


1917-18 


360,963 


1918-19 


377,225 


1919-20 


390,982 


1920-21 


404,221 


1921-22 


422,116 


1922-23 


438,594 


1923-24 


453,947 


1924-25 


460,993 


1925 


479,421 


1926 


492,956 


1927 


505,872 


1928 


520,508 


1929 


536,027 


1930 


556,283 


193! 



576.237 

597,152 

610,375 

628,297 

663.763 

- 698,888 

716,050 

746.383 

781,377 

812.264 

835,904 

848,884 

871.050 

878.933 

903.349 

922.348 

941.024 

961 .522 

987,268 

1,006,717 

1,049,011 

1.067,103 

1 ,098,702 

1,121,747 

1,139,682 

1.157.326 

1,173,695 

1,197,498 

1,224,510 

1,258,211 

1.284,094 

1.308,041 

1.333,264 

1,363,515 

1 ,388,439 

1,418.489 

1 ,442,802 

1.475.743 

1,526.951 

1 ,572,802 



Volumes in entire library system ........ ' .572,802 

Volumes in the Business Branch ....... 9./2o 

Volumes in th'e branches .......•• 465,54/ 



These volumes are located as follows : 



Central Library . 


. 1,097.529 


Charlestown 


Business Branch . 


9.726 


City Point . 


Allston 


10,320 


Codman Square 


Andrew Square . 


9,214 


Dorchester 


Boylston Station . 


9,422 


East Boston 


Brighton 


21,340 


Faneuil 



16,122 
10,659 
15,991 
15,361 
23,512 
9,728 



[60] 



Fellowes Athenaeum 




39.769 


Orient Heights . 


7,554 


Hyde Park . 




30,973 


Parker Hill 


10.907 


Jamaica Plain 






18,320 


Phillips Brooks . 


2,594 


Jeffries Point 






6,909 


Roslindale 


13,224 


Kirstein 






5,300 


Roxbury Crossing 


5,324 


Lower Mills 






6,478 


South Boston 


22,342 


Mattapan 






14,136 


South End . 


12,672 


Memorial 






20.126 


Tyler Street 


6.907 


Mt. Bowdoin 






12,665 


Upham's Corner 


15,913 


Mt. Pleasant 






7,514 


West End . 


24.027 


Neponset 






6.522 


West Roxbury 


20,725 


North End 






12,977 







THE BINDERY 

Number of volumes bound in various styles 
Magazines stitched .... 

Volumes repaired . .... 

Volumes guarded .... 

Maps mounted ..... 

Photographs and engravings, etc. mounted 
Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



Requisitions received and filled .... 
Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) . 

Cards finished ....... 

Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) . 

Cards finished ...... 

Signs ....... 

Blank forms (numbered series) .... 

Forms, circulars, and sundries (outside numbered series) 
Catalogues, pamphlets, and bibliographical programmes 



1930 


1931 


65,860 


74,216 


121 


106 


1,262 


1,949 


358 


674 


126 


281 


7,534 


6,433 


111,086 


83,254 


1930 


1931 


163 


166 


8.670 


6,924 


91.597 


100,492 


688 


792 


67,974 


75,765 


213 


237 


2,923,150 


2,421,334 


50,420 


67,750 


103,836 


79.550 



LECTURES — CONCERTS 

Under the auspices of the Library 1 32 free concerts, lectures, 
and entertainments were given in the Lecture Hall of the Cen- 
tral Library. A noteworthy contribution to our musical programs 
of the year was the series of six concerts given by the Gordon 
String Quartet through the generosity of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague 
Coolidge. These concerts were given afternoons and evenings 
on the 3rd, 10th, and 1 7th of May, the afternoon concerts being 
given in the South End Branch Library and the evening concerts 
in the Central Library Lecture Hall. 



[61] 



THE LECTURES OF 1931 

All lectures, except those marked with an asterisk (*), were 
illustrated with lantern slides or motion pictures. 

Jan. 4. "The Passing of the Third Floor Back", by Jerome K. 
Jerome. A reading by Grover C. Shaw, A.M. 
Song Recital. Roland E. Partridge, tenor. Lewis M. Stark, 

accompanist. 
Lake Placid Club — An Experiment in Intelligence. H. W. 
Hicks, Vice-President, Lake Placid Club. (Field and 
Forest Club Course.) 
The Theatre in England. Frank W. C. Hersey, A.M. 

(Drama League Course.) 
Concert. Orchestra of the Lincoln House Association. 
Jacques Hoffman, Conductor. 
^Memories of Ruskin. May Smith Dean. Music. (Ruskin 
Club.) 
Illustrations in Art of the Twelve Feasts. Edward W. Forbes. 
Music of the World. Carolyn King Hunt. 
Songs and Legends of the Hebrides. Clara Sias-Davis. 

Frances Murray, accompanist. 
Pamphlet Binding. George Washer and Hubert Gardiner, 
Jr. (Boston Club of Printing House Craftsmen Course.) 
Picturesque Viking Land. Rev. Alwyn Worman. (Auspices 

of Old Blake House Chapter, D.A.R.) 
The Indian Comes to America. Col. Philip A. Moore. (Con- 
tributed by the Bureau of Commercial Economics, Wash- 
ington, D.C.) 
*Your Voice and All It Can Mean to You. Alicia Starratt. 

With music. 
*Opera Talk, with musical illustrations. "Boris Godounov. ' 
Mme Suza Doane. 
The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Walter Rowlands. 
(Ruskin Club.) 
Jan. 26. ^Industrial Trends in Bookbinding. Elbridge W. Palmer. 

(Boston Club of Printing House Craftsmen Course.) 
Jan. 29. Picturesque Switzerland. Arthur R. Davies. 
Jan. 31. Zion, Bryce Canyon, and Grand Canyon National Parks, 
Kaibab National Forest and Cedar Breaks. Randall L. 
Jones. 
Feb. 1 . Modern Art. Mrs. Everett W. Varney. 
Feb. 1. Concert. German Singing Society, A.L.Y. P. S. Under the 
direction of Erdine T. Oedel. 



Jan. 


, 4. 


Jan. 


8. 


Jan 


. 11. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


. 12. 


Jan. 


15. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


25. 


Jan. 


25. 


Jan. 


26. 



Feb. 


5. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


9. 



162] 

Feb. 2. *BIank Book Binding. R. M. Weiser. (Boston Club of 

Printing House Craftsmen Course.) 
Bewitching France. Professor William Sandoz. 
*The Season's Best Play. Robert E. Rogers, A.M. (Drama 

League Course.) 
Chamber Concert. Hoffmann String Quartet. 
^Observance of John Ruskin's Birth Anniversary. Agnes 

Knox Black, A.M. (Ruskin Club.) 
Feb. 9. ^Edition Binding. Roy F. Baker. Unusual Binding. Mrs. 

Katherine Osborn. (Boston Club of Printing House 

Craftsmen Course.) 
Feb. 1 0. The Theatre of Yesterday and Tomorrow. Frank Chouteau 

Brown. (Drama League Course.) 
Feb. 12. Exploration of Mt. Fairweather, Alaska. Bradford Wash- 
burn. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 
Feb. 15. "The Twilight Hour of Yang Kuei Fei", by A. E. Grant- 
ham. A reading by Susan Bartlett. 
Feb. 1 6. Italy ; Beloved of Ruskin. Mrs. Arthur Dudley Ropes. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Feb. 1 6. *Superflnish and Embossed Cover. Paul A. H. Shults. Trade 

Customs. C. A. Mershon. (Boston Club of Printing 

House Craftsmen Course.) 
Feb. 1 9. The Land of Lorna Doone ; A Part of Storied England. Mrs. 

James Frederick Hopkins. 
Feb. 22. *The Speed Limit. Nellie Crie Haynes. 
Feb. 22. Concert. Trio Instrumental de Paris. 
Feb. 26. Spain; Patios and People. Fletcher Briggs. 
Mar. I . The Chateaus of Old Touraine. Marie Ware Laughton. 
Mar. 1 . Concert. Choral Society of the Massachusetts Federated 

Women's Clubs. George Sawyer Dunham, Conductor. 
Mar. 8. *The Theatre Is Dead. Albert R. Lovejoy. (Drama 

League Course.) 
Mar. 8. Piano Recital. Elizabeth Siedoff. 
Mar. 9. Animals — Wild and Domestic. L. Raymond Talbot, 

S.P.C.A. (Ruskin Club.) 
Mar. 12. America's Alphabet of Beauty — from Alaska to Zion. 

Rev. Charles W. Casson. (Field and Forest Club 

Course.) 
Mar. 15. An Afternoon of Miscellaneous Readings. Henry Law- 
rence South wick, Litt.D. 
Mar. 15. Concert. Orchestra of the Lincoln House Association. 

Jacques Hoffman, Conductor. 
Mar. 19. America from Sea to Shining Sea. Mrs. Arthur Dudley 

Ropes. 



[63] 

Mar. 22. An Afternoon of Interpretative Readings from Shakespeare 

and Modern Authors. George J. D. Currie. 
Mar. 22. *Drama and the Little Theatre. Fannie Barnett Linsky. With 

a one-act play by the Ford Hall Little Theatre Players. 
Mar. 23. ^Reading as a Medicine. Mrs. Herbert J. Guerny. (Ruskin 

Club.) 
Mar. 26. Seeing America First. Rev. Jason G. Miller. 
Mar. 29. *Your Home — Its Beauty and Peace. Burritt S. D. Martin. 
Mar. 29. Concert. Boston Civic Symphony Orchestra. Joseph F. 

Wagner, Conductor. 
Mar. 30. A Greek and Byzantine Pilgrimage. Ralph Adams Cram, 

Litt.D., LL.D. 
Apr. 2. The American Country House and its Grounds. Katherine 

Brooks Norcross. 
Apr. 5. ^Through Syrian Streets and Doorways. Mary Parker Dun- 
ning. In Costume. 
Apr. 5. Viola Concert. Joseph Pulvino, violist. Dorthy Stallworth, 

accompanist. 
Apr. 9. Literary Excursions in England and Scotland. Charles S. 

Olcott. 
Apr. 12. Concert. Chamber music compositions of Joseph F. Wagner. 
Apr. 13. *The Meaning of Social Service. John C. S. Andrew, A.M., 

S.T.B. Problems of the Day. Rev. Robert Walker. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Apr. 1 3. New England Hawks and Owls. Dr. John B. May. (Brook- 
line Bird Club Course.) 
Apr. 16. California the Golden. Henry Warren Poor, A.M. 
Apr. 19. ^Lexington and April 19, 1775. Edwin B. Worthen. 
Apr. 1 9. Lecture about Jewish Music. Professor S. Braslavsky. Part 

II. Sacred (Synagogal) music. Soloists. Boston Jewish 

Choral Society. 
Apr. 23. Lonely Australia. Edward S. Harrison. 
Apr. 26. The Lure of Alaska. Mrs. Adelbert Fernald. 
Apr. 27. *TTie Ethical Message of the Victorian Poets. Joseph P. 

MacCarthy, Ph.D., D.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Apr. 30. Finding the Rainbow at the End of the Trail. DeWitt G. 

Wilcox, M.D. 
May 3. Chamber Concert. Gordon String Quartet. Generosity of 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. 
May 4. Annual Meeting. (Ruskin Club.) 
May 10. Chamber Concert. Gordon String Quartet. Generosity of 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. 
May 1 7. Chamber Concert. Gordon String Quartet. Generosity of 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. 



[64] 

Oct. 1 . Program by the Copley Club Singers and Entertainers, under 
the direction of Pauline Hammond Clark. 

Oct. 4. ^Gilbert Stuart; His Life and Paintings. Mrs. Washburn 
Davenport 

Oct. 4. The Colorful Orient. Alice Maynard Field Newkirk. 

Oct. 5. ^Creating One's Life. Lilian Whiting. (Ruskin Club.) 

Oct. 8. Changing China. Walter W. Allerton. In costume. 

Oct. I 1 . *The Care of the Human Body. George B. Alexander. 

Oct. 1 1 . Concert. Jenny Lind Chorus. J. Fritz Hartz, Director. 

Oct. 1 5. Theremin Concert. Micha Tulin, artist, William A. Marr, 
pianist. (Courtesy of M. Steinert and Sons.) 

Oct. 18. ^Literary Reformers of Europe. Robert Merrill Bartlett. 

Oct. 1 8. Voice Development. Nilo Trolli. Josephine Cincatta, dra- 
matic soprano, and assisting artists. 

Oct. 1 9. "What Every Woman Knows", by J. M. Barrie. A read- 
ing by Edith Barnes Grey. Music. (Ruskin Club.) 

Oct. 22. Your Home — Its Beauty and Peace. Burritt S. D. Martin. 

Oct. 25. *High Grade Reading for Children. Charles S. Olcott. 

Oct. 25. Beethoven; the Man, the Musician. Carolyn King Hunt and 
assisting artists. 

Oct. 29. The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Walter Rowlands. 

Nov. 1 . Beauties and History of Niagara Falls. Virginia Wainwright, 

Nov. 1 . Recital. Groups of Italian and Old English Songs. Ethel 
Sleeper Russell. Bertha G. Denny, accompanist. 

Nov. 5. Wonderland of the Far North; Alaska and the Yukon Terri- 
tory. Arthur H. Merritt. 

Nov. 8. The English Theatre. Frank W. C. Hersey. (Drama 
League Course.) 

Nov. 8. Song Recital. Helen True, soprano. Marion C. Whiton, 
accompanist, 

Nov. 9. *The Influence of Poetry, and Original Poems. Jessie Eld- 
ridge Southwick, B.L.I. (Ruskin Club.) 

Nov. 9. South America and some of its Birds. Dr. Charles W. Town- 
send. (Brookline Bird Club Course.) 

Nov. 12. The Canadian Rockies; a Natural Art Gallery. Rev. 
Charles W, Casson. (Field and Forest Club Course.) 

Nov. 15. *Art in Industry. Grace Carlelon Mansfield. 

Nov. 15. Concert. Sulzen String Quartet. Assisting artist, Olga Cur- 
rier, pianist. 

Nov. 1 9. Everlasting Egypt. Walter W. Allerton. In costume. 

Nov. 22. Peter Faneuil, the Jolly Bachelor. Martha A. S. Shannon. 

Nov. 22. Hispano-American Songs. Mme Bertha Hebert. In cos- 
tume. Gladys Pitcher, pianist. 



[65] 

Nov. 23. Some Landmarks in the Shenandoah and Tennessee Valleys. 

Andrew Oliver. Ph.D. (Ruskin Club.) 
Nov. 23. Germany Today. John George Bucher, F.R.G.S. 
Nov. 29. *Why Some People Write and How. Louise Hubert Guyol. 
Nov. 29. Violin Recital. Joseph Pulvino. 
Dec. 3. A Trip to Lake Titicaca. Arthur L. Sweetser. 
Dec. 6. "Disraeli", by Louis N. Parker. A reading by Edward 

Abner Thompson. 
Dec. 6. Concert. Harvard Pierian Alumni Orchestra. Jacques Hoff- 
mann, conductor. 
Dec. 7. The Passion Play at Oberammergau. Mrs. Louise Ruscoe. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Dec. 7. Germany, Her Culture and Beauty. John A. Walz. Ph.D. 

(Auspices of the Inter-racial Citizens' Committee of 

Massachusetts, Mrs. WiUiam Lowell Putnam, Chairman.) 
Dec. 10. Provincetown ; Tip O' the Cape. Percy A. Brigham. (Field 

and Forest Club Course.) 
Dec. 1 3. *The Pulitzer Prize Plays ; a Decade's Record. Robert E. 

Rogers, A.M. (Drama League Course.) 
Dec. 1 3. Concert. Dalma Carli, soprano, Annetta Biagi, soprano, 

and Alfredo Fondacaro. pianist. 
Dec. 14. Christmas Carols. Mme Luisa Tosi, director of program. 

(Ruskin Club.) 
Dec. 1 4. ^Italy's New Role in World Politics. Harold Lord Varney. 

(Ausgices of the Massachusetts Italian Historical Society.) 
Dec. 1 7. Crossing the Andes on Skis. Rupert Maclaurin. 
Dec. 20. Dickens' "Christmas Carol." Edward F. Payne. 
Dec. 20. The Human Voice and its Adaptability. A lecture-recital. 

Alicia Starratt. 
Dec. 27. *Mazzini and Mussolini, the Two Greatest Figures of Modern 

Italy. William A. Frayer. 
Dec. 27. Concert. Lincoln Symphony Orchestra. Jacques Hoffmann, 

conductor. 
Dec. 31. Off the Beaten Path. Henry Warren Poor, A.M. 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1931 

In Exhibition Room 
Installation 

date 
Jan. 3. Samoan handicrafts. Textiles, jewelry, costumes, fans, etc., 
lent by the owTier, Omer Lassonde. Supplemented by 
mounted plates and books illustrating Samoan life and 
arts, from the Library collections. 



[66] 

Jan. 3. Original pen and ink drawings by Thornton Oakley. Lent by 
the American Federation of Arts. 

Feb. 1 6. Thrift posters. Original work of school children of Massa- 
chusetts. Lent by the Savings Bank Association. 

Feb. 23. Original sketches of musicians and dancers lent by the artist, 
Virginia Lee Burton. 

Mar. 9. Travel posters and booklets. Lent by the Railway & Loco- 
motive Historical Society, Cambridge, Mass. 

Mar. 23. Advertising illustration. Examples of commercial art, ex- 
ecuted in various media; lent by the School of Practical 
Arts, Boston. 

Mar. 30. The Pre-Raphaelite School of Painting. Books and re- 
productions from the collections of the Division of Fine 
Arts. 

Apr. 6. Original paintings in water-color, lent by the artist, Charles 
W. Hudson. Supplemented by books and plates on water- 
color from the collections of the Division of Fine Arts. 

Apr. 20. "Be Kind to Animals" posters by school children. Lent by 
the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals. 

Apr. 27. Original oil paintings of landscapes, lent by the artist. Bertha 
I. Barrett. 

May 2. Jewish Book Week. Books and plates from the Library 
collections. 

May n. Fifty Books of 1931 ; Fifty British Books of 1930; Print- 
ing for Commerce, 1930. Lent by the American Institute 
of Graphic Arts. 

June I . Direct Mall Leaders Exhibit. Fifty direct mall advertising 
campaigns, selected from those submitted to the Education- 
al Committee of the Direct Mail Advertising Association. 
Lent by the Dickie-Raymond Company, Inc. 

June 1 5. Health posters, by school children of Norfolk County. Lent 
by the Norfolk County Health Association. 

June 29. Books and plates of representative material from the collec- 
tions of the Division of Fine Arts. 

Aug. 3. "Sculpture in Soap," Soap sculpture submitted to the Na- 
tional Soap Sculpture Committee in the competition spon- 
sored by the Proctor and Gamble Company. Lent by the 
Committee. 

Aug. 17. Reproductions of British Old Masters; Watercolor repro- 
ductions of old bridges in France; Portraits of Musicians; 
Pen sketches of Isadora Duncan. Material from the col- 
lections of the Division of Fine Arts and the Music Room. 



1671 

Sep. 15. Original posters submitted for the "House Beautiful" cover 
design competition. Lent by the House Beautiful Pub- 
Hshing Company. 

Sep. 28. Photographs of Shakespearian plays lent by the Stratford-on- 
Avon Festival Company ; Supplemented by prints from the 
Library collections. 

Oct. 1 9. Ceramics made by students at the Paul Revere Pottery. Sup- 
plemented by books and plates on ceramics from the col- 
lections in the Division of Fine Arts. 

Nov. 2. Prize winning notebooks submitted by children from 6—15 
years of age attending Philharmonic Children's Concerts 
conducted by Ernest Schelling, 1924—1931, in New 
York, Philadelphia and Boston. 

Nov. 30. Reproductions of prints illustrating the early history of flying 
machines and aviation, from the Library collections. Sup- 
plemented by photographs lent by American Airways, Inc. 

Dec. 1 8. Christmas. Prints, books and music from the Library collec- 
tions. Small Nativity scene lent by the Children's Room. 
Christmas tree decorated in the "old fashioned style." 
Scrap books of early greeting cards published by the Louis 
Prang Company, 1875-1896. 



SELECTED LIST OF GIFTS AND GIVERS 

American Brotherhood of Free Reading for the Blind, Los Angeles, 
California. Seven volumes, printed in Braille, Grade 1 '/2, includ- 
ing: The conquest of Antarctica by air, by Richard E. Byrd; More 
than conquerors, by Ariadne Gilbert (3 volumes) ; A daughter of 
the Seine, by Jeanette Eaton (2 volumes) ; and Babbitt, by Sin- 
clair Lewis. 

Blacker Library of Zoology, Montreal, Canada. An introduction to the 
literature of vertebrate zoology, based chiefly on the titles in the 
Blacker Library of Zoology, the Emma Shearer Wood Library of 
Ornithology, the Bibliotheca Osleriana and other libraries of McGill 
University. Compiled and edited by Casey A. Wood. London. 
1931. 

Bolton, Charles K., Boston. Sarah K. Bolton: pages from an intimate 
autobiography, edited by her son. Privately printed, Boston, 1 923. 
On the wooing of Martha Pitkin. By Charles Knowles Bolton, 
Boston, 1895. (Both for the West End Branch Library Author 
Collection.) 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Nineteen pieces from the collec- 
tions of the Museum of Fine Arts, including eleven plaster casts of 



[68] 

animals from the originals by Antoine Louis Barye; replicas of a 
sixteenth-century Jamnitzer Cup, an early seventeenth-century Pyx, 
and other objects of art. 

Brunswick Radio Distributing Company, New York City, New York. 
Seven phonograph records, including the Bach-Schoenberg two 
chorale prelude, and an album (6 records) of Brahms Symphony 
Number 4. 

Carpenter, Annie L., St. Paul, Minnesota. Carpenter and allied families, 
genealogical and biographical. Prepared and printed for Miss 
Annie L. Carpenter by the American Historical Society, Inc., N.Y. 
1 930. Bound in crushed blue levant, elaborately tooled and deco- 
rated, with inlaid coats of arms of families. Hand-decorated title 
page and initials. 

Chase, Mrs. Frank H., Hingham. Poems by Emily Dickinson. Edited 
by two of her friends, T. \V. Higginson and Mabel Loomis Todd. 
Second series, Boston. 1 892. Given by Mrs. Frank H. Chase in 
memory of her husband. 

Comstock, Ada L., Cambridge. Reports of the United States National 
Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement. 6 vols. Wash- 
ington. 1931. 

French, Hollis. Boston. A framed picture of the Bulfinch front of the 
central feature of the Tontine Crescent, the building which housed 
the Boston Library in 1 794, and after which the Business Branch 
is modelled. (To be located in the Kirstein Business Library.) 

Great Britain Patent Office, London, England. Six hundred and eighty- 
one volumes of specifications for inventions, issued by the Great 
Britain Patent Office. 

Hoover, Herbert, Washington, D.C. (Through Lawrence Richey, Secre- 
tary to the President.) The autograph of Herbert Hoover, Presi- 
dent of the United States, upon his photograph, together with a 
letter of transmittal (January 2, 1931) from Lawrence Richey, 
Secretary to the President, to Charles F. D. Belden. The auto- 
graph of the President of the United States upon his proclamation 
for Thanksgiving Day, 1 930, together with a letter of transmittal 
(December 22, 1930) from Lawrence Richey to Frank W. 
Buxton. 

Kaiser, Mrs. Benjamin A., Boston. A reproduction of the statuette 
"Michelangelo fanciullo" representing the youth, Michelangelo, at 
work, by Emilio Zocchi, an Italian sculptor of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. (The statuette is now located in the Mattapan Branch 
Library.) 

King Praja Dhipok, Siam. Phra Tripitaka. Translated from Bali into 
Siamese by the Mahamonghut Academy. Presented as a memorial 
in honor of the late King Phra Mongkut Klao. 



[691 

Morgan, John Pierpont, New York City, New York. The Book of 
Common Prayer, and administration of the sacraments and other 
rites and ceremonies of the Church, according to the use of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, to- 
gether with a PsaUer of the Psalms of David. Printed by D. B. 
Updike, at the Merrymount Press, Boston. 1 930. 

Newton City Clerk, Newton. Tercentenary history of Newton, 1 630— 
1930. By Henry K. Rowe, Newton. 1930. Two copies. 

Palmer, George Herbert, Cambridge. The autobiography of a philos- 
opher. By George Herbert Palmer. Boston. 1931. 

Phillips, Mary E. An etched portrait of Edgar Allan Poe, autographed 
by the artist, A. Garfield Learned, and inscribed "To my dear 
friend, Mary E. Phillips." 

Shibusawa, Viscount Eiichi, Tokyo, Japan. A collotype reproduction, 
in ten volumes of the original set of the Commentary on the Rongo, 
of the" Sung edition, now preserved in the Library of the Imperial 
Household. Tokyo. 1930. One of an edition of three hundred 
copies reproduced by special permission for Sei-en Shibusawa 
Eiichi. 

Storer, Dr. Malcolm, Boston. Medicina in nummis: a descriptive list of 
coins, medals, jetons, relating to medicine, surgery and allied sci- 
ences. By Horatio Robinson Storer. Edited by Malcolm Storer, 
M.D. Boston. 1931. 

Sweet, Henry N. An autographed letter, dated June 6, 1922, from 
Warren G. Harding, then President of the United States, to Mr. 
Henry N. Sweet. 

OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY 

Director, Milton E. Lord 

Assistant Librarian, Theodore D. Money 

Assistant to the Director, Richard G. Hensley 

Bates Hall Centre Desk, Newspaper and Patent Department: Pierce E. 

Buckley, Chief. 
Bates Hall Reference Department: Harry W. Mathews, First assistant, 

in Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 

Children. 
Editor: Zoltan Haraszti. 
Engineer and Janitor Department: William F. Quinn, Supt. of Buildings. 



[70] 

Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief. 
Library Training Class: Bertha V. Hartzell, Supervisor. 
Ordering Department: Louis FeHx Ranlett, Chief. 
Periodical Room: Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 
Printing Department: Francis Watts Lee, Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department : George S. Maynard, Chief. 
Statistical Department: Margaret C. Lappen, Assistant in Charge. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 

Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 

Boylston, Margaret A. Calnan. 

Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 

Business Branch, Mary W. Dietrichson. 

Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

City Point, Helen I. Morrisey. 

Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 

Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 

East Boston, Theodora B. Scoff. 

Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 

Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 

Hyde Park, Sara A. Lyon. 

Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 

Jeffries Point, Mary U. Nichols, Assistant in Charge. 

Kirstein, Grace C. Brady. 

Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 

Mattapan, Ada Aserkoff. 

Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mount Bowdoin, Pearl B. Smart. 

Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 

Neponset, Margaret I. McGovern. 

North End, Mary F. Curley. 

Orient Heights, Catherine F. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Edith R. Nickerson. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Clara L. Maxwell. 

Tyler Street, Caroline Keene, Acting Assistant in Charge. 

Uphams Corner, Beatrice Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



INDEX. 



Abbott, Gordon, term as trustee ex- 
pires, 1 . 

Accessions, (5ee Books). 

Balance Sheet, 22-27. 

Bates Hall, repairs, 4; work of, 39- 
40. 

Belden, Charles F. D., death, reso- 
lutions on, 1—2, 53. 

Bindery, 30. 52, 60. 

Books, accessions, 2, 33, 57, 58; circu- 
lation. 3, 38, 39. 47, 54-57; ex- 
penditures, 2, 33; gifts. 67-69; 
number and location, 59—60; special 
purchases. 34—36. 

Borrowers, (See Registration). 

Boylston Branch, new building for, 
4. 

Branch system, 47; new buildings, 4. 
Examining Committee report on, 28, 
31. 

Budget estimates. 3-4. 

Business Branch. 49. 

Catalogue and Shelf Department. 37, 
58. 

Central Library, platform reconstruc- 
tion and other repairs. 4. 

Charter of Corporation, amended, 2. 

Children's Department, 46. 

Circulation, 3, 3&-39, 47, 54-57. 

Deposits, 48. 

Director's report, 33. 

Examining Committee, 5. 32; report 
of, 28-32. 

Exhibitions, 65-67. 

Faneuil Branch, new building for. 4. 

Finance, balance sheet, 22-27; ex- 
pended for books, 3, 33; receipts. 
2. 3; trust funds. 6-20; state of 
trust funds. 30. 

Gifts, 4, 5. 33. 67-69. 

Hall, John L.. appointed a trustee, 1. 
Inter-library loans. 48. 57. 
Information Office, 42. 



Issue Department, 38. 

Jeffries Point Branch, new building 
for. 4. 

Kaiser, Mrs. Benjamin A., gift of 
statue, 5. 

Kirstein, Louis E., elected President, 
I. 

Lambert, Helen, bequest of. 4. 

Lord, Milton E., appointed Director, 
2. 

Lectures and Concerts, 5, 60-65. 

McKim, Charles F., memorial tablet, 
5. 

Mattapan Branch, new building for, 
4 ; opening. 49. 

Newspaper Room, 43. 

Open Shelf Room, 42. 

Parker Hill Branch, new building for, 
4; opening, 49. 

Patent Room, 43. 

Periodical Room, 43. 

Personnel, grading of positions and 
salaries, recommended by Examin- 
ing Committee. 28; officers, 69. 

Phillips Brooks Branch, reopened. 4, 
48. 

Printing Department. 30, 60. 

Publications, 41. 

Registration Department. 38. 

Repairs and improvements, 4, 50; rec- 
ommended by Examining Committee, 
28-29. 

Retirements, 53. 

Sargent, John S., sisters of, give o- 
riginal sketch to Library. 5. 

Sedgwick, Ellery. elected Vice Presi- 
dent. 1. 

Special Libraries. 31, 44. 

Staff, (See Personnel). 

Statistical Department. 31. 44. 

Teachers' Room, collection, 29. 

Training Class, 50. 

Trustees, organization. I. 

Trust Funds, list of, 6-20; state of, 30. 



Central Library, Copley Square. 1 

Branch Libraries, December 31, 1931. 

City Proper. 

Kirstein Memorial Library, 20 City Hall Ave. 

North End Branch, 3a North Bennel St. 

South End Branch, Shawmut Ave. and West Brookiine St 

West End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St. 

Tyler Street Branch, Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
Brighton. 

Brighton Branch, Academy Hill Road 

Allston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. 

Faneuil Branch, 100 Brooks St. . 
Charlestown. 

Charlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square . 
Dorchester. 

Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. . 

Codman Square Branch. Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 

Upham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Road 

Lower Mills Branch. Washington, cor. Richmond St. 

Mallapan Branch. 8-10 Hazleton St. 

Mount Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St 

Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . 
East Boston. 

East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. . 

Jeffries Point Branch, 222 Webster St. . 

Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler St. 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park Branch, Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop Si, 
Jamaica Plain. 

Jamaica Plain Branch. Sedgwick, cor. South St. . 

Boylslon Station .Branch, 433 Centre St. . 
ROXBURY. 

Fellowes AthenKum Branch, 46 Milmont St. 

Memorial Branch, Townsend. cor. Warren St. . 

Mount Pleasant Branch. Dudley, cor. Vine St. . 

Parker Hill Branch, 1497 Tremont St. . 

Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles St. . 
South Boston. 

South Boston Branch, 372 W. Broadway . 

Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. . 

City Point Branch. Broadway, near H St. 
West Roxbury. 

West Roxbury Branch. Centre, near Ml. Vernon St. 

Roslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. . 




Area of City (Land only) 45.60 Square mile 



Population (Census of 1930). 781,188 



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