(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

rb 



cH9. 




^ 



EIGHTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1932 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1936 



EIGHTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1932 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1936 



X 

^ 6 .:? ^^ / 



/ >^ 



/p2. 



i3f:±^j (^- 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

4.ie.3S : 2E00 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ELLERY SEDGWICK, President 

Term expires April 30, 1933 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN JOHN L. HALL 

Term expires April 30, 1934 " Term expires April 30, 1936 

FRANK W. BUXTON 

Term expires April 30, 1935 

WILLIAM CARDINAL O'CONNELL 

Term expires April 30, 1937 



MILTON E. LORD 

(Beginning February 1, 1932) 

DIRECTOR 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 14 of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made the first annual report. The Board at 
present consists of five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor for 
five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each year. The follow- 
ing citizens at large have been members of the Board since its organization 
in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926-1931. 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m.. 1879-95. 

Appleton Thomas Gold, a.m., 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett, John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Buxton, Frank W., a.b., 1928- 

Carr, Samuel, 1895-96. 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d.. 1 879-88. 

CoAKLEY, Daniel Henry. 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. 

Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1922-1930. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie, James, d.d, 1895-1908. 

Dwight. Thomas, m.d., 1899-1908. 

DwiNNELL, Clifton Howard, b.s., 1927-28. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d., 1875-79. 

Gaston, William Alexander, ll.b., 1923-27. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Hall, John Loomer, a.b., ll.b., 1931- 

Haynes, Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

HiLLiARD, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 1876-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, m.d.. 1867. 

Lincoln. Solomon, a.m.. 1897-1907. 

Mann. Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1 870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b., 1921-26. 

O'CoNNELL, William Cardinal, 1932- 

Pierce, Phineas. 1888-94. 

Prince. Frederick Octavius. a.m., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 



Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Sedgwick, Ellery, a.b., litt.d., 1930- 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

WiNsoR, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68, 
TTie Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1 852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to May 12. 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12. 1888, to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895, to May 8, 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899, to October 15, 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908, to May 8, 1908; 
Josiah H. Benton, May 8, 1908, to February 6, 1917; William F. 
Kenney, February 13, 1917, to May 7, 1920; Rev. Alexander 
Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; MsGR. Arthur T. 
Connolly, April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein. 
June 13, 1924 to June 19, 1925; Hon. Michael J. Murray, June 
19. 1925 to July 2. 1926; Guy W. Currier. July 2, 1926 to May 
2, 1927; MsGR. Arthur T. Connolly, May 2, 1927 to June 22, 
1928; Louis E. Kirstein, June 22, 1928 to June 21, 1929; Gordon 
Abbott, June 21. 1929 to June 20. 1930; Frank W. Buxton, 
June 20, 1930 to May 15. 1931 ; Louis E. Kirstein. May 15, 1931 
to May 20, 1932; Ellery Sedgwick since May 20, 1932. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; since 
1923, Director.) 

CapEN, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 - December 16. 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858 - January 9. 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d., Superintendent, February 25, 1868 - Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877 - 
September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d. Librarian, October 1. 1878 -Septem- 
ber 30. 1890. 

Dwight, Theodore F., Librarian, April 1 3, 1892 - April 30. 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d., Librarian, February 11, 1895 -April 3, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1899 - January 31, 
1903. 

Wadlin, Horace G., litt.d., Librarian, February 1, 1903 - March 
15. 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 191 7 -June 15, 1917. 

BelDEN, Charles F. D., a.m., LL.B., litt.d.. Director, March 
15, 1917 -October 24, 1931. 

Lord, Milton E., a.b.. Director, since February 1, 1932. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1932. 



Departments. ^Opened. 

*Cenlral Library. Copley Square . 
♦East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. 
§South Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
llFellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
*CharIestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
*Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St 
■fLower Mills Branch, 1110 Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
JSouth End Branch. 65 West Brookline St. 
tjamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St 
JRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
*North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch. 275 Washington St 
§Allston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
$Codman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 
$Mt. Pleasant Branch, 335 Dudley, cor Vine St. 
$Tyler Street Branch, 130 Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
*West End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
^Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts. 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles, cor Tremont St. 
*Boylston Branch, 433 Centre St. ... 

§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler Ave. 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway . 
*Parker Hill Branch, 1497 Tremont St. . 
*Hyde Park Branch, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 
*Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St. . 
§Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 
*Jeffries Point Branch, 22 Webster St. . . . 

IBaker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration Jan. 
*Kirstein Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 

Kirstein Branch, third floor. 
§Phillips Brooks Branch, 12 Hamilton St., Readville . . . May 18. 1931 

^ In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. *ln building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board, "fin building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses. Jin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §Occupies 
rented rooms. liThe lessee of the Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 
JUnder agreement with Harvard. 



May 


2, 


1854 


Jan. 


28, 


1871 


May 


1, 


1872 


July 


16. 


1873 


Jan. 


5 


1874 


Jan. 


5 


1874 


Jan. 


25, 


1875 


June 


7 


1875 


Aug. 




1877 


June, 




1876 


Dec. 


3 


1878 


Jan. 


6 


1880 


Dec. 


27 


1881 


Oct.. 




1882 


Jan. 


1 


1883 


Nov. 


1 


1886 


Mar. 


11 


1889 


Nov. 


12 


1890 


Nov. 


12 


1890 


Jan. 


16 


1896 


Feb. 


1 


1896 


Mar. 


16 


1896 


May 


1 


1896 


Jan. 


18 


1897 


Nov. 


1 


1897 


June 


25 


1901 


July 


18 


1906 


July 


15 


1907 


Jan. 


1 


1912 


Mar. 


4 


1914 


Mar. 


5 


1914 


Oct. 


15 


1921 


Jan. 


15 


1927 


May 


7 


1930 



CONTENTS 



Report of the. Trustees 
Balance Sheet .... 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Director . 
Appendix 



1 

8 
14 
27 
33 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Boylston Branch Libiaiy . 
Jeffries Point Branch Library 
Faneuil Branch Library 



Frontispiece 

Facing page 6 

Facing page 22 



To His Honor James M. Curley, 
Mayor of the Ciiv of Boston. 

Sir: 

Tlie Trustees of the Public Library' of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and a^airs for the 
year ending December 31, 1932, being the eighty-first eumual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 20, 
1932 \N-ith the election of Mr. Ellery Sedg\s'ick as President, 
Mr. John L. Hall as Vice President, and Miss Delia Jean 
Deerj^ as ClerL 

T~he term of .Monsignor Arthur T. Connolly, who had served 
as a Trustee since 1916, expired on April 30. Father Connolly 
gave generously of time and attention to the Library, until his 
active participation in its work had to cease with the advent of 
failing health. His services -svere described and recognized in 
the following Resolution adopted by the Trustees cind ordered 
spread upon the permanent records of the Corporation: 

Monsignor Arthur Theodore Connolly was a Trustee of the Boston 
Public Libran- from June 15, 1916 to November 8, 1932. During this 
long term he was tvsice President of this Board, and has left behind him 
the respect and affection of his colleagues, who deeply s>"mpathize with the 
limitations imposed by illness upon his eager spirit, and now take pleasure 
in recalhng the bene&cence of his work and counsel. Monsignor GjnnoUy 
combined the enthusiasm of the amateur ^Nith the matiirity of disciplined 
judgment. His companionship is pleasant to remember; his services not 
easy to forget. 

His Eminence \X'illiam Cardinal O'Cormell was appointed a 
Tmstee for the term of five j'ears ending Apnl 30, 1937. 

In recognition of the service of Mr. Gordon Abbott cis Trustee 
for the term which had expired in the preceding year, the Board 
adopted the following Resolution and ordered it spread upon the 
permanent records of the Corporation : 



[2] 



The Trustees of the Boston Public Library wish to place on their 
record fitting recognition of the services freely, generously, and persistently 
given by Gordon Abbott during the five years of his important service. 
From June 21, 1929 to June 28, 1930, Mr. Abbott was President of 
this Board, and retired on April 30, 1931, declining reappointment only 
on account of the pressure of other public duties. His term of office 
deserves especial remembrance, for it was owing largely to his vigilance 
and practical energy that the foundations of the Library were reestablished 
on new and adequate piling. 

On February 1, 1932, Mr. Milton Edward Lord assumed 
office as Director of the Library, having been confirmed in this 
appointment by the Board on December 4, 1 93 1 . 

BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted on November 1 , 1 93 1 for the main- 
tenance of the Library during the year 1 932 were later amended 
and reduced. These estimates were as follows: 



Item 
A. — Personal service . 
B. — Service other than personal 
C, — Equipment 
D. — Supplies 
E. — Materials 



Totals 



Original estimate 

$917,219 . 

113,900 . 

214,566 . 

41.280 . 

24.035 . 



$1,311,000 



Amount allowed 

$858,000 

78.340 

1 72.775 

39.440 

19,600 



$1,168,155 



RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the year 1 932 these receipts were : 



Annual appropriation 

Income from trust funds ....... 

Unexpended balance of trust funds income of previous years 



$1,168,155.00 
27.013.68 
49.805.86 



Total . . . $1,244,974.54 

Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the year were 
as follows : 

From fines .......... 

From sales of waste paper ....... 



Carried foirvard 



$22,522.69 
55.18 

$22,577.87 



[31 

Brought forward $22,577.87 

From sales of catalogs, etc. ........ 86.1 1 

From commission on telephone stations ...... 513.01 

From payments for lost books ........ 1,073.92 

Interest on bank deposits ......... iO.29 

Refund 33.15 

Totals .... $24,294.35 



EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 

The total amount expended during 1932 was $1 ,293,971 .29. 
This was divided as follows: 

From city appropriation ........ $1,147,579.89 

From special appropriations ........ 126,345.78 

From the income of trust funds . . . ... . . 20,045.62 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 1 1 7,993, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part by 
gift and exchange. The total number of volumes in the Library 
at the close of the year was 1,631,422. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and from the trust funds income was $1 79,973.00. 



USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The home use of books for the year was 5,567,681 . The use 
of material within the Library's premises for reference and study 
is for the most part unrestricted, and it is therefore impracticable 
to record it. 

In addition to the above noted use of the Central Library arid 
the thirty-four Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 
available to 338 agencies, including engine houses, institutions, 
and schools. 



[4] 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS, 1931 AND 1932 

A comparison of certain statistics of 1 932 with those for 1 93 1 
is noted below : 





1931 


1932 


Total expenditures: city appropriaiion 






and trust funds income 


$1,267,221.00 . 


. $1,167,625.51 


Expended for books and other library 






material from city appropriation 






and trust funds income . 


211,103.00 . 


179,973.00 


Number of volumes added 


131,454 . 


117,993 


Total number of volumes in the Library 


1.572,802 . 


1,631.422 


Borrowed for home use 


4,702,932 . 


5,567,681 


Number of card holders . 


171.176 . 


194.517 



REVISED ORGANIZATION PLAN FOR THE LIBRARY 

On September 1 2 the Board adopted a revised plan of organi- 
zation for the Library. In accordance therev/ith the Director 
was requested to investigate the arrangement of personnel and 
the like necessary for putting the plan into effect. 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

During 1932 there were opened to the public three new 
branch library buildings: for the Faneuil Branch Library, the 
Boylston Branch Library, and the Jeffries Point Branch Li- 
brary. These were constructed under a special appropriation 
of $200,000 approved for the purpose on March 3, 1931 . The 
architects of the Faneuil Branch were Kilham, Hopkins, & 
Greeley; for the Boylston Branch, Maginnis & Walsh; for the 
Jeffries Point Branch, Thomas Williams. 

At the Central Library considerable attention was given to the 
problem of the level of the ground water in the vicinity of Copley 
Square, particularly as this affects the piling and the foundations 
of the Central Library building. In the study of the problem 
the aid of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was en- 
listed. The study was initiated promptly and was still being 
actively carried on as the fiscal year 1932 came to its end, a 
report being expected in the new year. 



[51 

GIFTS 

There was received a bequest of $2000 under the will of the 
late Horace G. Wadlin, Librarian of the Boston Public Library 
from 1 903 to 1917. The bequest was funded, with the income 
to be used for the purchase of books. 

Mr. Harry C. Bentley presented to the Library his collection 
of Early American Works on Accounting and expressed his 
desire to add subsequently to the collection as additional appro- 
priate items should become available. He presented as well the 
sum of $220.38 in connection with the purchase of certain items. 

The Beacon Hill Garden Club made available a much ap- 
preciated gift in the way of adequate planting for the grounds of 
the West End Branch Library. 

The Library received during the year many important gifts 
of books and other library material. A list of the principal gifts 
is to be found in the Appendix on pages 42-44. 

TRUST FUNDS 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare and other im- 
portant books that give value and prestige to a great educational 
institution such as the Library has become. 

As a matter of interest to the public the Board has pleasure in 
listing herein the present trust funds of the Library, with explana- 
tory notes. This list will be found on pages 45—55. 



[6] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE 



Mr. 


George Bramwell Baker 


Mr. 


Mr. 


J. A. Lowell Blake 


Hon. 


Mr. 


Arthur H. Cole 


Mr. 


Mr. 


Allen Curtis 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


Frederic H. Curtiss 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


William J. Davidson 


Mr. 


Miss 


Susan J. Ginn 


Mr. 


Mr. 


Henry Lewis Johnson 


Dr. 


Mr. 


Matt B. Jones 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


James Ernest King 


Rev. 


Mrs. 


Edward L. Logan 


Mr. 


Rev. 


Harry Levi 


Mrs. 



The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of 1932. Its membership included 
the following individuals: 

George R. Nutter 
James P. Parmenter 
Charles O. Pengra 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
Edward M. Pickman 

Walworth Pierce 
Robert Proctor 
David D. Scannell 
Arthur A. Shurchff 
William M. Stinson, S.J. 

Joseph P. Toye 
Frederick Winslow 

It is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens who render such service. Special attention is called to 
the constructive report of the Committee as it appears on pages 
1 4-26 immediately following. 

CONCLUSION 

The Trustees call attention particularly to the report of the 
Director of the Library. This follows on pages 27-32. 

They wish also to express publicly their appreciation of the 
work which the staff of the Library has carried on in the interest 
of the public. 

Frank W. Buxton 

John L. Hall 

Louis E. Kirstein 

William Cardinal O'Connell 

Ellery Sedgwick 



BALANCE SHEET 



[8] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 
Dr. 

Central Library and Branches: 
To Expenditures For: 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing 

and Binding Department employees) . . . $668,048.45 
Temporary employees ...... 109,958.58 

$778,007.03 

To Service Other Than Personal: 

Printing and binding 208.88 

Advertising 52.76 

Transportation of persons 1,744.14 

Cartage and freight 7,666.43 

Light and power 19,386.75 

Rent, taxes and Vk^ater 19,716.00 

Surety bond and insurance 82.04 

Communication ....... 3,502.48 

Cleaning , 1349.25 

Removal of ashes ....... 20.40 

Removal of snow ....... 225.35 

Expert 1.576.77 

Fees 110.60 

Photographic and blueprinting 347.75 

General plant 9,536.82 

65.526.42 

To Expenditure For Equipment: 

Machinery 1.62 

Motorless vehicles 14.95 

Furniture and fittings ...... 9,501 .56 

Office 2,031.98 

Books: 

City Appropriation 1 47,921 .04 

Trust funds income 
(including transfer to 

London account) 20,985.87 168,906.91 

Newspapers : 

City appropriation 942.44 

Trust funds income 2272.49 3,214.93 

Music : 

City appropriation 21 1 .68 

Trust funds income 1,213.64 1,425.32 

Lantern slides: 

City appropriation 78.00 

Trust funds income 80.70 1 58.70 

Periodicals: 

City appropriation 14,489.03 

Trust funds income 1.433.32 15,92235 

Photographs: 

City appropriation 43.37 

Trust funds income 16.40 59.77 

Tools and instruments ...... 850.90 

General plant 3563.67 205.652.66 

Carried forvtard $1,049,186.11 



[91 



EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31, 1932 



Cr. 



By City Appropriation 1932 .... $1,168,155.00 
Income from Trust funds ..... 27.013.68 

Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 700.00 

Interest on deposit in London ..... 46.78 

Transfer from Domestic Funds to London account 1 1 ,000.00 

H. C. Bentley Gift 22038 



$1,207,135.84 



Carried forward 



$1,207,135,84 



[10] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought fortnarJ 
To Expenditures For Supplies: 
Office 

Food and ice 
Fuel 

Forage and animal 
Medical 

Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Agricultural 

Chemicals and disinfectants 
General plant . 



To Expenditures For Material: 
.Building 
Electrical 
General plant 



$1,049,186.11 



To Special Items: 

J. L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 
Francis Skinner, reimbursement 



To Binding Department: 
Salaries 
Light 
Repairs 
Equipment 
Supplies 
Stock 

To Printing Department 
Salaries 
Light 

Communication 
Repairs 
Equipment 
Supplies 
Stock 
Material 
Outside Work 



To Special Appropriations: 

Branch libraries, establishment of 
Central Library Building, 

Fireproofing, improvements, etc. 
Central Library Building 

Foundation improvements, etc. 



7.621.01 

311.73 

18.655.61 

18.35 

72.05 

2,022.89 

486.07 

194.85 

2,387.79 



4.244.38 
2.257.57 
1.249.17 



2.755.42 
43.20 



61.421.02 

66.54 

87.86 

1,354.30 

3.85 

6,046.49 



14,252.05 

44.36 

1.15 

216.41 

224.92 

21.53 

4.558.40 

2.95 

287.88 



113,220.72 

387.30 

12,737.76 



31,770.35 



7.751. 12 



2.798.62 



68.980.06 



19.609.65 

113.220.72 

38730 

12,737.76 



Carried forward 



$1,306,441.69 



1] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31. 1932 



Brought forivard .... 

By Balances Brought Forward from 1931 : 
Trust Funds income. City Treasurer . 
Trust Funds income on deposit in London 
City Appropriation on deposit in London . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . 
Library Building, Foundations . 
Library Building, Fireproofing . 
Branch Libraries, establishment of . 



Cr. 

$1,207,135.84 



49.805.86 

693.97 

3,11739 

8,278.15 

32,485.72 

16,912.10 

121,557.95 



232,851.14 



Carried forwari] 



$1,439,986.95 



21 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forward 



$1306.441.69 



To Amount Paid into City Treasurer: 
Fines 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins . 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books . 
Interest on bank deposit . 
Refunds 
Sales of waste paper 



To Balance, December 31, 1932: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Trust funds income. City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 
H. C. Bentley Gift .... 

To Balance Unexpended: 
General appropriation 
Central Library Building, Fireproofing 
Central Library Building, Foundations 
Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 



22.522.69 
86.11 
513.01 
1.073.92 
10.29 
33.15 
55.18 



2.87 

4.404.53 

57.509.68 

6,222.73 

22038 



20,575.1 1 

16,524.80 

19,747.96 

833723 



24.29435 



68360.19 



65,185.10 



$1,464.28133 



[13] 

EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31 , 1932 

Cr. 

Brought forii^ard $1,439,986.98 

By Receipts: 

From fines 22,522.69 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins ..... 86.1 1 

Commission on telephone stations .... 513.01 

Payments for lost books ...... 1,073.92 

Interest on bank deposit ...... 10.29 

Refund 33.15 

Sales of waste paper . ...... 55.18 

24,294.35 



$1,464,281.33 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee submits its report for 1 932. 

In accordance with the suggestions made in the last report, 
the Committee met in October and substantially completed 
its work by December first. ' The sub-committees were in part 
reorganized so as to avoid overlapping. The thirty-three branch 
libraries were divided into eleven groups of three each, and two 
members were assigned to visit each group. A list of suggestions 
was given to the sub-committees and to the visitors to branches, 
to assist them in their examinations. These changes have all 
worked well, and we advise that they be continued, with the 
additional recommendation that the Examining Committee be 
appointed, and its sub-committees designated, in the spring or 
early summer, so as to give ample time for investigation while 
not postponing the final report beyond December first. 

This report is mainly made up from the reports of the sub- 
committees. These are on file and should be consulted for 
further details. 

I. GENERAL POLICIES 

It has seemed best not to attempt an extended survey of the 
general policies of the Library, but at this particular time and 
under the present circumstances to consider four subjects. 

I. What shall be the policy of the Library in a time of de- 
pression? Shall it expand, or contract, its service? 

At our request the Director has furnished us with some very 
interesting statistics showing the increased use of the Library 
during the period of depression. In substance, while about 5 % 
represents the increase over the preceding year in each of the 



[15] 

four years up to 1931, the increase in 1931 exceeded 13% over 
1930; and, in the twelve months from November 1, 1931 to 
October 31,1 932, there was an increase of more than 1 6% over 
the corresponding period preceding. In 1928 43% of users 
of the Branch Libraries were adults and 57% children. In the 
ten months of 1932 the ratio was just reversed — 57% being 
adults and 43 % children. These figures seem to show the result 
of the depression. The important question is what shall be the 
policy. 

It is obvious that in a time of depression each department of the 
city must make its contribution to the general situation. The 
customary contribution, of course, in most departments would be 
a decreased budget. But there are departments, the work of 
which may be of distinct service in a time of depression. No 
one, of course, would suggest that a public welfare department 
should cut down its activities, or contract its appropriations. 
There are other departments which, in a lesser degree, might 
also be of great service in such a time. Such a department, we 
believe, is the Library. 

The unemployed naturally have leisure. The great problem 
of the future may be to find out how that leisure can be best 
employed, and the fact that leisure is enforced does not alter the 
problem. The old adage that Satan finds mischief for idle hands 
to do is never more applicable than in a time of depression, and 
we believe it is an important function of the municipal authori- 
ties to furnish something for idle hands, and heads as well, if they 
possibly can. It is just the time to throw open the resources of 
the Library to the unemployed. Under guidance they can cer- 
tainly improve themselves, and, if they are only entertained, it 
is much better to have them entertained in a library, with its 
surroundings, than to have them entertained on the street comer, 
or in other places far less desirable. The resources of the Library, 
if they get used to them, will enable them to bear their troubles 
with more patience, and even fit themselves rather better for what 
may come when there is an upward swing of the pendulum. 

Furthermore, we must not forget that it is among the un- 
employed, with their suffering, their anxiety, and their fears. 



[16] 

that the seeds of discontent are chiefly sown, which may blossom 
out into movements quite inimical to our institutions. In the 
present depression there is probably nothing that has been so 
striking as the patience, the courage, and the endurance which the 
unemployed have manifested. But it is not wise to depend too 
much upon the continuance of these virtues. Instead, therefore, 
of leaving the unemployed on the street corner to listen to the 
first demagogue who comes along, it would be a very wise move 
for the city in its own defense, and for a deeper and broader 
reason than merely consideration for the unemployed, to give 
them an opportunity in the Library. 

We therefore recommend that the resources of the Library 
be not lessened, but if possible increased, or at all events con- 
tinued as they are. We further recommend that every efFort be 
made by the staff of the Library to furnish to the unemployed 
suggestions as to the use of the Library, by printed circulars, 
printed lists of books, and, in general, such advice as the staff 
may have the opportunity to give. 

2. The relationship of the Library to the various colleges and 
schools in our vicinity. 

This is a very important problem and deserves careful con- 
sideration. Some definite policy should be adopted. 

We believe that it is of great advantage to our community, in 
ways which it is not necessary to enumerate, that we should con- 
tinue, as we already are, to be a great centre for scholarly re- 
search. The Library may well do its best, in conjunction with 
other libraries, to furnish advanced scholars with ail reasonable 
facilities for research; this should not be abbreviated. 

But it is quite a different matter when the institutions of learn- 
ing, schools and colleges, go farther than this and endeavor to 
save their own finances by having the Library furnish the books 
for reference and collateral reading required by their pupils, 
which in fact they should furnish themselves, at least to the 
extent of having adequate library facilities for the work done 
in their departments. This throws an unnecessary burden upon 
the public treasury and interferes very much with the use the 



[17] 

citizens ought to have of the facihties of the Library. If a college 
or school is to be started, it certainly ought to have an adequate 
library — just as it ought to have an adequate laboratory in the 
event that it undertakes to teach any of the physical sciences. 
It ought not to expect the city to provide the books and facilities 
for the ordinary pupils — whatever may be the policy of the 
Library as to opportunities for reading and research to be given 
to the advanced scholars. 

We therefore recommend that a conference be called with 
the authorities of the various colleges and schools in the vicinity, 
the pupils of which have been accustomed to use our Library, 
and that a frank explanation of the attitude of the Library be 
given at this conference, in the effort to obtain some working 
system under which the Library will not be put to the expense of 
providing books which should be made available from other 
sources. We believe that such a conference would be produc- 
tive of good. But, if it does not result in the determination of 
any policy, we think that the Trustees should consider very care- 
fully whether there should not be a limitation put to the use of 
the Library in this fashion. 

3. Hie problem of publicity. 

At the present time, publicity is essential to any undertaking, 
and the Library is no exception to this rule. The objects of 
publicity for the Library may be at least two-fold. In the first 
place, publicity is necessary to increase the circulation of books 
among the people, and to give them a knowledge of what they 
possess in this great storehouse of books. At the present time 
we do not need publicity of this nature because it would be im- 
possible to satisfy, with our present resources, any demand which 
would thus be stimulated. When means are at hand it will be 
well to investigate the possibility of establishing additional bran- 
ches in department stores, factories, etc. 

TTie second object of publicity is to interest in the Library 
many persons of means and cultivation who are not at present 
interested in it at all. The Library ought to build up a back- 



[181 

ground of interest — such as is displayed by those who con- 
tribute to the Museum of Fine Arts and to the Symphony Or- 
chestra. The possession of this great accumulation of books is 
as much of cultural influence as either the production of art or 
of music, and tends to make its contribution to the general position 
of Boston as a centre for scholarly and cultural research. If 
this be admitted in theory, it of course requires much thought and 
consideration to put it into practice, and perhaps many experi- 
ments may fail before any experiment is reasonably successful. 
We therefore do not undertake to point out in what ways this 
publicity can be gained; we merely mention the general policy, 
which should be, as we believe, to interest persons of means and 
cultivation in the Library, so that the Library may be sustained 
not only by their interest, but also in practical ways by their 
munificence ; we must keep up books of the higher type if we are 
to be a great centre of research. 

We recommend that a fund be placed at the disposal of the 
Director, to be expended in making such experiments as he may 
believe to be effective in gaining this type of publicity. If such 
a fund cannot come from the city appropriation, it might well 
be supplied out of unrestricted trust funds. 

4. Changes to render the branch libraries less institutional. 

Of course the first idea that comes to the mind of anyone who 
learns of a branch library is that it is merely a place for giving 
out books, without subjecting the recipient to the trouble of 
going to the central library. That of course is its prime function. 
But the branch library has the possibility of very much more. 
And in some branch libraries this has been undertaken. It may 
be made physically attractive to its community; it may sei-ve as 
a community centre to stimulate a taste for reading ; and in various 
other directions it may develop more homogeneity than is cus- 
tomarily found in these large urban centres. 

We feel that this type of work can well be extended in some 
branches, whereas in others it cannot be engaged in to advantage. 
We suggest to the branch librarians that, where it is possible, 
they consider in what way such extension can take place. 



119] 



II. ADMINISTRATION 

Three topics have been considered, and the recommendations 
in connection with each of them are given herew^ith. 

1 . To review the business and office practices of the Library, 
with a view to their development along up-to-date and efficient 
lines. 

We recommend that the entire administration of the library 
and the branches be studied with a view to relieving the Director 
of passing on unnecessary details, and placing more responsibility 
in the hands of each department head. The time and energies of 
the Director under the present system of organization must be 
taken up with decisions upon details of operation, which could be 
made adequately by appropriate subordinates. The Director's 
duties should be more largely related to problems of principle 
and policy. To this end we recommend the establishment of 
three main divisions in the Library's organization. Each of 
these should be headed by responsible officers who can relieve 
the Director of much of his present unnecessary executive burden 
and at the same time coordinate the work of the many existing 
independent departments along large functional lines. These 
three functional lines — and therefore the three main divisions 
into which the organization might fall — seem to us to be 
substantially the following: 

a. Circulation (branch libraries) 

b. Reference (central library) 

c. Business operations (the business management 

of the entire librar}'^ system). 
We believe that such an organization will prove much more 
economical and efficient and will eliminate duplication of records. 
To bring this about would necessitate some rearrangement of the 
physical location of certain groups whose activities are analogous, 
and concentrating them, thus bringing them into closer contact. 
We believe that, if this were done, it might be possible to intro- 
duce new methods or modernize methods now in use. 



[20] 

In connection with the suggestion that the administration be 
divided under three main divisions, it would be expected that the 
heads of those divisions might be selected from the Library's 
present force, but we believe that this matter is of such great 
importance that, unless such skilled assistants could be found 
there, some of these positions, as least, might have to be filled 
from the outside. 

If such an organization as suggested could be worked out, 
we believe that many of the problems facing the Library's ad- 
ministration might be solved with ultimate savings in labor, 
including the problem of the increased use of the Library which 
has appeared during the present period. 

2. To consider the problem of missing, stolen and mutilated 
books. 

We appreciate that these problems face all institutions of this 
character. Many libraries have inaugurated the policy of 
obliging all users, both in the main library and in the branches, 
to check all bags and packages at the entrance. This should be 
studied carefully, and if possible developed irrespective of pos- 
sible criticisms and hardships. 

We have been surprised to learn the ease with which access to 
the stacks is possible, and temptations placed in the way of young 
employees. Apparently, risk of loss may be mimimized by a 
curtailment in the number of exits from the main stacks. 

The question of cutting off entirely to the public the entrance 
on the Blagden Street side of the main library, and the cutting 
off of access to stacks from the rest and recreation rooms of the 
employees, should be given early consideration. It might be 
possible even to fence off some portions, if not all, from access 
except to those entitled to entrance. 

A study should be made of some better follow-up policy on 
books, but we believe that the centralization of departmental 
work as suggested would assist materially in locating lost books. 
Also, in connection with the reorganization of the Library, it 
might be well to consider the shifting of the present force of the 
library to day and night work instead of having extra assistance 
at night. 



[21] 

The Trustees have recently had an experience in connection 
with the remitting of fines. We recommend that those to whom 
fines have been remitted be put on probation, and that, unless 
such persons meet the library requirements as to conduct and 
morals, they be prevented from further use of the Library for 
some definite period. 

In connection with the mutilation of books: So far as these 
appear in the departments used by minors, we suggest that co- 
operation be sought between the teachers of schools and the 
heads of the children's departments, to the end that, in courses in 
schools that call for illustrative materials, such minors be called 
upon to report where such illustrations have been procured, and 
that, furthermore, the school authorities be urged to require only 
such illustrations as may be found in the daily papers and Sunday 
supplements. It might be worth considering for each one of the 
children's departments to have a supply of illustrated papers, 
which might be procured if necessary from the outside, from 
which illustrations might be cut. 

3. The Departments of Printing and Binding. 

These departments are ably managed and are doing excellent 
work, but, here as elsewhere, we believe that a more intimate 
supervision and tie-up with the three main divisions recommended 
in this report, would add to their efficiency, and probably effect 
some saving. 

III. BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

While we do not expect that structural changes involving 
large expense can be made at present, we wish to call the at- 
tention of the Trustees to certain defects in the Central Library, 
some of which they may find remediable. 

1 . The lighting of the Abbey and Sargent pictures should 
be improved. Probably the advice of the lighting engineers at 
the Art Museum, who are familiar with such problems, might 
be obtained. 

2. The Newspaper Room needs better ventilation. The 
floor is out of repair. It might be better if the regular entrance 



[22] 

were through the door from the outside lobby. Newspapers 
are now carefully stored in the basement; of these the early 
American issues ought to be placed in fireproof cabinets. 

3. The Statistical Department, which might better be termed 
the Department of Economics and Documents, should have a 
more convenient and suitable approach. 

4. When it becomes possible to make alterations in the 
building, the Children's Room should be on the ground floor 
with a separate entrance. 

IV. BOOKS 

1 . We advise that the method now followed in the choice of 
fiction for adults, viz., selection by a group of competent ex- 
aminers, be extended to non-fiction and juvenile material, so 
that books may be selected and purchased more systematically 
than at present. 

2. We also advise that, in the distribution of books among 
the branches, more attention be paid to the particular types of 
books required in each branch. Statistics as to the use of books 
now compiled in each branch may readily be amplified so as to 
classify fiction and non-fiction in as much detail as may be found 
desirable. The result of such classifications, transmitted fre- 
quently to the Central Library, would serve as a basis for the 
allotment of books to the several branches. The trend of popu- 
lation in each district should also guide in determining the kind 
of books to be supplied. 

V. THE SPECIAL LIBRARIES 

1. We urge upon the Trustees the necessity of taking im- 
mediate measures to preserve from further injury the rare and 
valuable books in the Barton-Ticknor Room. The absence of 
proper ventilation and the lack of moisture are producing the 
most deplorable effects upon many of them. The steam pipes 
should be covered with asbestos, humidifiers should be installed, 
an oil dressing should be applied to many of the bindings, and 



[23] 

the more valuable volumes, at least, should be treated by an 
expert binder. 

2. In the Fine Arts Room a leaking roof should be repaired 
and the large collection of prints should be catalogued. 

3. Some of the young men employed in these and other de- 
partments are given, besides the usual vacation, an extra month 
for service in military training camps. Their prolonged absence 
throws upon the employees w^ho remain an added burden which 
should be lightened. 



VI. CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT AND WORK 
WITH SCHOOLS 

The Children's Room in the Central Library is in excellent 
condition. The Teachers' Room needs better lighting for the 
lower shelves, which could be given if the present lighting fix- 
tureSj or some of them, were to be turned down instead of up as 
they now are. The Adams collection occupies shelves in this 
room much needed for educational works. So the American 
Merchant Marine Library occupies needed space in the Branch 
Issue Department. It is desirable that such libraries, not a part 
of the Library's collections, be housed outside of the building. 

2. The system of sending out books to schools as loan col- 
lections, whether from the Central Library or from branches, 
should be thoroughly examined and revised. Books are often 
left in class rooms for an unreasonable tim.e, and it is doubtful 
whether they are used to the best advantage. A committee 
made up of representatives of the Library and of the schools 
might well study the situation, and if possible evolve a plan 
whereby these books sent to the schools might give a maximum 
amount of service to a maximum number of children, and where- 
by also the librarians of the branch libraries might be brought 
into closer touch with the schools in their neighborhood, so as to 
assist teachers and children to make more profitable use of the 
facilities of the branch library, and especially to turn the at- 
tention of the children to the better books. More, too, should 



[24] 

be done in the schools to teach children to respect books, and not 
to soil or mutilate them. 

3. We suggest that in the branch libraries, while the younger 
children have their own room, another section be reserved for 
readers between the ages of fifteen and eighteen years inclusive, 
so that the section reserved for adults may be kept as a quiet 
place for older people. 

VII. BRANCHES 

From the reports of the sub-committees on the various branches 
we draw these general conclusions. 

1 . A library should not be housed in a building used also 
for other purposes, whether municipal, school, or business. 

2. The departments for children and adults should be so far 
separated that the greater confusion and noise which naturally 
must exist in the children's department may not disturb adult 
readers. 

3. The condition of ventilation in the several branches should 
be examined and improvement made where needed and prac- 
ticable. 

4. A careful examination should be made of the lighting 
arrangements in all branches, to the end that there may be 
sufficient light for reading and study. 

5. Linoleum or other suitable floor covering should be placed 
on floors over which many people pass. Good air, light, and 
quiet are primary requirements in a library. 

6. Speaking tubes or telephones should be installed for easy 
communication between departments on different floors or other- 
wise separted. 

We believe that in some branches, at any rate, improvements 
of the above nature could be made without prohibitory expense 
and would make conditions much better for librarians and 
readers. 

In the following list mention is made of some of the more 
pressing needs of the several branches. More detailed state- 
ments will be found in the visitors' reports on file. 



[25] 

Allston. Should be relocated nearer schools. Linoleum 
needed. 

Andrew Square. In excellent condition. 

BoYLSTON. New. No suggestions. 

Brighton. Linoleum should be laid in basement and re- 
paired on first floor. Lighting too high. 

Charlestown. Adults should be on ground floor and chil- 
dren on floor above. Ventilation in lecture room bad. 

City Point. Better rest rooms needed which could be had by 
using probation officer's room. Noisy floor. Lighting should be 
improved. 

CODMAN Square. Much used by children, and hence noisy 
for adults. 

Dorchester. Telephone or speaking-tube needed between 
adults' and children's departments. Baby clinic twice a week 
should be removed. Lighting satisfactory. 

East Boston. General condition good. Rearrangement of 
counter in children's room needed. Better rest room could be made 
in basement. 

Faneuil. New. Lecture Hall may be required later for 
reading room. 

FelLOWES Athen^UM. Better signs desirable. 

Hyde Park. Wiring in basement not up to present require- 
ments. More linoleum needed to deaden noise. 

Jamaica Plain. Work-room needed. 

Jeffries Point. Bad ventilation. Outside sign desirable. 

KiRSTEIN. Much used, and needs more space. Subject cata- 
logue needed. 

Lower Mills. In good condition. 

MattaPAN. New. No suggestions. 

Memorial. Confusion, as adults and children are in one 
large room with one central desk. Room on street floor might be 
used for separate department. Means of communication with 
janitor's room needed. 

Mount Bowdoin. Rest room used for book repairing, for 
which it is not adapted. Telephone extension in main library advised. 
Exit passageway too narrow. New building between Mount Bow- 
doin and Codman Square desirable. 

Mount Pleasant. Poorly lighted and planned. Interfered 
with by other municipal uses in same building. 

Neponset. Wholly inadequate. Much used and only one 
room. 

North End. Lighted signs needed at entrance. Room for 
adults should be extended into lecture room. Floor needs repair. 
Greatly increased use. Good collection of Italian books. 



[26] 

Orient Heights. Adults and children cannot be properly 
separated. Lower janitor's entrance should have lights. 

Parker Hill. New. Speaker's stand and screen in audi- 
torium desirable. 

Phillips Brooks. Ventilation difficult. Floor noisy. 

RosLINDALE. Too small and has gymnasium overhead. Other 
quarters desirable. Light for desk in children's section needed. 

RoXBURY Crossing. Should ultimately be moved. Bad 
ventilation. Floor noisy. 

South Boston. Better rest room needed. Lighting system 
bad and should be improved as soon as possible. 

South End. Very much used. Ventilation poor. 

Tyler Street. Entrance not well marked. Noise from 
gymnasium overhead. 

UpHAM's Corner. Telephone between adults' and children's 
rooms necessary. Extra shelves and counter desk should be put in. 

West End. Roof leaks. Lighting in children's room poor. 
Ventilation should be improved. 

West RoxBURY. Working quarters might be better arranged. 
Floor covering in assembly room especially needed. Curbing for 
lawn desirable. 

While this report is largely concerneci with improvements 
which we think desirable, we are not unmindful of the great 
amount of good work that is being done. In the Central Library, 
and in the branches, we have found the librarians and assistants 
working intelligently and devotedly, making the best of often 
unsatisfactory conditions and well maintaining the high standards 
of the Library. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, De- 
cember 12, 1932. 

James P. Parmenter, Vice Chairman 

George B. Baker Harry Levi 

J. A. Lowell Blake George R. Nutter 

Arthur H. Cole Charles O. Pengra 

Allen Curtis Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Frederic H. Curtiss Hester Pickman 

William J. Davidson Walworth Pierce 

Susan J. Ginn Robert Proctor 

Henry L. Johnson David D. Scannell 

Matt B. Jones Margaret H. Shurcliff 

James E. King William M. Stinson, S.J. 

Cecilia F. Logan Joseph P. Toye 
Mary W. Winslow 



[271 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston: 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library for 
the year ending December 31, 1 932. 

EFFECTS OF THE DEPRESSION 

During the year the Library experienced to an increasing 
degree the effects of the economic depression. On the positive 
side this was to be noted in an appreciabl}^ increased number of 
individuals using the entire library system and in a greatly 
increased number of books lent to borrowers. On the negative 
side it was to be perceived in decreased appropriations from the 
City for the support of the Library. 

INCREASED USE OF THE LIBRARY 

By the end of 1 932 the number of individuals registered for 
taking books had reached the total of 1 94,5 1 7. There were then 
23,341 more than at the same time a year earlier, an increase of 
14%. That the effects of the depression were at work was 
evident. For instance, in 1 929 45 % of the borrowers from the 
branch libraries were adults and 55% children; by the end of 
1932 the ratio had been just reversed, 55% being adults and 
45% children. Such a change was apparently not a reflection 
of fewer children borrowing fewer books; on the contrary in 
1 932 more children were borrowing more books than ever before. 
It was more than all else a reflection of the fact that more and 
more books were being borrowed by more and more adults. 
Presumably most of the new adult users of the Library came 
from the ranks of the unemployed. 

In their leisure the unemployed everywhere have apparently 
turned to the public library. There seems otherwise to be no 



[28] 

reasonable explanation of the greatly increased use of the Library 
during these last three years, including 1932. Since 1929 there 
has occurred an increase of 42% in the number of books bor- 
rowed for home use. The number lent during 1 932 alone was 
18% greater than the number lent in 1931. The following 
table indicates what has happened : 



1929 . 


NO. 


OF BOOKS LENT 
)R HOME USE 

3,930,068 


PERCENTAGE OF 
INCREASE OVER 
PRECEDING YEAR 


PERCENTAGE OF 
INCREASE OVER 
1929 


1930 . 

1931 . 

1932 . 


4,133,459 
4,702,932 
5,567.681 


; ' 5% : 

. 13% , 

18% 


.' .' "5% ■ 
. . 20% 
. 42% 



In connection with these figures it is of interest to note that, 
whereas the average percentage of increase for the public libraries 
of the country at large during the three years was 37%, the per- 
centage of increase for the Boston Public Library was 42%. It 
should also be borne in mind that the above figures record only a 
part of the use of the Library, i.e., the number of books borrowed 
for home reading. No recorded use of books within the Library's 
premises is available ; it has been evident, however, that the latter 
has increased markedly. The total effect has been by the end of 
1932 to make acute the need for additional assistants and for 
more books, old as well as new. This need is interestingly pre- 
sented from still another point of view on pages 14—16 above 
in the Report of this year's Examining Committee. 

DECREASED APPROPRIATIONS 

With the beginning of the year it became clear that in facing 
the greatly increasing demands noted above the Library was to 
have appreciably decreased funds with which to carry on its 
work. The City appropriated for its support during 1932 the 
amount of $1 , 1 68, 1 55. This was a reduction of $94,349 from 
the amount appropriated for the preceding year 1 93 1 . Op>erating 
expenses had, of course, to be reduced. This was accomplished 
in such a way as not unduly to hamper the Library in meeting 
the ever increasing demands of the public. 



[29] 

Fortunately it was not necessary to curtail the hours of opening 
throughout the library system, except for a Sunday closing of the 
branch libraries and a shortening of the Sunday hours at the 
central library. 

The appropriation for the purchase of books, however, suffered 
appreciably. This was reduced from $175,000 in 1931 to 
$160,000 in 1932. The effect was that, while more and more 
books were being used, read, and worn out, fewer and fewer 
copies were being purchased to meet the demands for books, old 
and new, and particularly to replace those worn out from heavy, 
constant use. 

Improvement of physical facilities had to be put aside for 
better days. The ten year building program, initiated in 1 930, 
for the construction of two new branch library buildings each 
year came to a stop early in 1932, just as there were being com- 
pleted the new buildings begun in 1931 for the Faneuil Branch 
in Brighton, the Boylston Branch in Jamaica Plain, and the 
Jeffries Point Branch in East Boston. 

Yet, despite budgetary restrictions in nearly all directions, the 
Library completed the year doing 42 % more business than in the 
last of the so-called boom years (1929). No appreciable ad- 
ditions had been made to the library staff during the three years. 
All of the additional work had been taken on by the staff, in- 
dividually and jointly, in excellent spirit. 

DEVELOPMENT OF A REVISED PLAN OF ORGANIZATION 

In carrying on an amount of work so greatly augmented it 
became more and more clear that the existing plan of organization 
of the Library was not entirely adequate for effective administra- 
tion. The need for recasting its lines had already been recog- 
nized even before the 1 932 growth in work made it increasingly 
evident. With the advent of a new library administration early 
in 1932 the problem became at once an object of study. 

The plan under which the Library had been operating for 
many years was characterized by a relatively high degree of 
centralization. The result has been that the time and energies of 



130] 

the Director have perforce been taken up with the necessity of 
making decisions upon details of operation. The remedy has 
therefore seemed to he in the development and appointment of 
appropriate subordinate officers to assume responsibihty for the 
detailed operation of the Library, so that the Director may be 
free to concern himself actively with the general duties that are 
properly his. 

It was with a view to meeting this need that there was adopted 
in September a revised plan of organization. This is based upon 
a recognition of the large functional lines along which the major 
activities of the Library fall, namely: 

1 . circulation of books (centered largely in the branch libraries) ; 

2. reference use of books (concentrated chiefly in the central 

library) ; 

3. business operations (the business management of the entire 

library system). 

In recognition of these the new plan provides for the establish- 
ing of three main divisions for the organization of the Library — 
a Circulation Division, a Reference Division, and a Division of 
Business Operations. Within these it is proposed to arrange the 
sixty-five or so departments and branch libraries existing at 
present. A responsible officer is to be named to head each of the 
three divisions, who with subordinate officers will be responsible 
for the entire functioning of his division. The three division 
heads are to be responsible directly to the Director; they will be 
the second ranking officers of the Library. It is intended that 
the Director will thus become the general administrator of the 
entire library system, while the three division heads will be the 
active executive officers for their respective divisions. The effect 
will be a decentralization from the Director down one grade, and 
then up to that grade a centralization at three separate points. 

The development and application of the plan in detail will be 
spread over several years. Some of the steps can be accom- 
plished in the year to come. Others must await the evolution of 
proper and suitable conditions before being attempted. All 
will, of course, be subject to change or revision as necessary or 
desirable. 



[31] 

PERSONNEL 

The implications of the above changes are many for the per- 
sonnel of the Library. Perhaps the most important is that 
extensive training of personnel is necessary for the full success of 
the proposed developments. An appreciably large number of 
individuals within the library sta^ must be constantly in training 
for higher responsibilities. And, which is most important for 
these individuals, there must be an ample number of intermediate 
positions at all grades in which they can gain experience and 
recognition. 

To aid in meeting these training requirements it is proposed 
that the training courses offered by the Library be recast on lines 
differing appreciably from those prevailing since the establish- 
ment of the Library Training Class in 1 927. In June the Train- 
ing Class completed its fifth academic year. It did not resume 
in October its program along the usual lines. Instead preparation 
was instituted upon a new program to be put into effect in 1933. 
The aim of this will be to afford formal training to those who 
have the will and the ability to develop themselves for increased 
responsibilities. The sole requirements for pursuing the new 
training courses will be a willingness to work and an ability to 
achieve. 

It is clear that the members of the present staff of the Library 
will in most instances wish to take advantage of opportunities for 
improving the service which they render to the public. The spirit 
in which they have carried on the many activities of the Library 
under heavily increased demands during the past year is indicative 
of that. It is a pleasure to testify here to the excellence of that 
spirit. 

Outside of the entrance of a new Director into office on 
February 1 , there is only one important change in personnel 
during the year that has to be noted. On August 31, Miss 
Florence F. Richards, Assistant in the Shelf Department in the 
Central Library, retired under the provisions of the Boston Re- 
tirement Act. She was the senior member of the staff in length 
of service, having been in the employ of the Library for fifty-five 
years. 



[32] 



CONCLUSION 

In view of the fact that the limitations of space have prevented 
a detailed presentation of the w^ork of the individual branch 
libraries and departments, attention is called particularly to the 
statistical summaries of their work that appear in the Appendix 
to this Report. 

The Director wishes to express in conclusion his deep apprecia- 
tion of the excellent support which he has received from Trustees 
and Library Staff alike. He is grateful for it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milton E. Lord, 

Director 



[33] 



APPENDIX 



TABLES OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION 





1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


Central Library 


637,977 


678,834 


676,240 


698.627 


728.656 


777.666 


Business Branch 








6.157* 


13.193 


16.604 


Allston 


81,984 


86.960 


97,445 


108.557 


137.709 


1 75,054 


Andrew Square 


92,926 


104.563 


110.225 


116.196 


128.337 


155,574 


Boylston 


68.196 


81.405 


80,097 


79,946 


94306 


147.862 


Brighton 


98,907 


96,586 


92.223 


103,145 


121,032 


139.276 


Charleslown 


110,069 


105.659 


100,483 


100,914 


119,637 


136.845 


City Point 


54,232 


56.686 


83,558 


97,264 


122,619 


1 55,492 


Codman Square 


156,559 


1 57,498 


1 53.372 


158,881 


186,386 


216.780 


Dorchester 


101,957 


109,553 


99,255 


102.790 


115,810 


137.018 


East Boston 


1 40,379 


151,099 


145,759 


1 57,746 


180.859 


218.072 


Faneuil 


50,212 


60,143 


72,005 


78,436 


90.424 


120.007 


Fellowes Athen. 


89,479 


91 .463 


88.381 


85.739 


93.970 


114.937 


Hyde Park 


107,168 


110,679 


108,512 


120.878 


127.888 


1 54,838 


Jamaica Plain 


85,262 


86398 


85,935 


95.895 


118.561 


133.335 


Jeffries Point 


61,893 


63.185 


62,111 


70,768 


75.459 


100.736 


Kirstein 








18,020* 


43.196 


56.971 


Lower Mills 


35.835 


38,428 


44.730 


52,279 


59,692 


76.137 


Mattapan 


95.085 


124,374 


133,210 


139.723 


187.669 


220.675 


Memorial 


171.034 


178.142 


180,344 


1 78,467 


213.320 


246.739 


Mt. Bowdoin 


129.487 


132.424 


134.008 


134.310 


151.456 


168.036 


Mt. Pleasant 


66,315 


72.367 


72,167 


76.956 


82,795 


100.361 


Neponset 


48.331 


48.639 


51,228 


57.043 


60.986 


75.148 


North End 


143,381 


146.616 


145.201 


145326 


1 58333 


185.849 


Orient Heights 


55,625 


49.015 


42.571 


56,954 


60.512 


84.887 


Parker Hill 


45,862 


51.412 


56.209 


60,815 


112.308 


130.042 


Phillips Brooks 










25.713* 


50383 


Roslindale 


113.150 


122,260 


124.995 


130,268 


151,956 


170,287 


Roxbury Crossing 


77.770 


78,269 


78.803 


80.022 


69.034 


77.650 


South Boston 


170.911 


181,376 


171.805 


163,266 


161.244 


189.904 


South End 


116,226 


1 1 7,982 


123,794 


124352 


122.870 


1 50.745 


Tyler Street 


39,868 


42.875 


46.058 


51.195 


59.163 


74,230 


Uphams Corner 


152,140 


171,260 


169,027 


184.595 


201.701 


225.285 


West End 


175.683 


183.887 


180.854 


177.125 


189.543 


219.413 


West Roxbury _ 


1 1 1 ,754 


119.249 


119,463 


120.804 


136.595 


164,843 



3,705,657 3,899,286 3,930,068 4.133.459 4.702,932 5.567.681 



For eight months, May through December. 



[34] 

The net gains in circulation are presented, apart from the 
totals, in the following form: 

VOLUMES 

1927 gain over preceding year ........ 306,520 

1928 gain over preceding year ........ 193,629 

1929 gain over preceding year ........ 30,782 

1930 gain over preceding year ........ 203,391 

1931 gain over preceding year ........ 569,473 

1932 gain over preceding year ........ 864,749 



USE OF BOOKS 
Circulation from Central by Months 



January, 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1932 



Totals 





HOME USE 


SCHOOLS AND 




HOME USE 




INSTITUTIONS 






THROUGH 




TOTALS 


DIRECT 




THROUGH 






BRANCH DEPT. 


BRANCH DEPT. 




38,89! 


9,170 


30,557 


78.618 


38,989 


9,068 


32,348 


80.405 


39,580 


9,720 


32,469 


81.769 


36,294 


8,513 


32.902 


77,709 


31,133 


7.151 


32,527 


70,81 1 


24,569 


6372 


' 12,941 


43,882 


26,715 


5,555 


4.550 


36.820 


26,021 


5.786 


4392 


36.199 


28.900 


6,260 


5346 


40,506 


41,969 


9,151 


15,928 


67.048 


45,213 


10,879 


25,553 


81,645 


40.595 


10,096 


31,563 


82,254 



418,869 



97.721 



261.076 



777.666 



Distribution ok Total Circulation 



Central Library: 

a. Direct .... 

b. Through Branches 

1. Deposit Collections . 

2. General Collections . 

c. Schools and institutions through 

Branch Department 

Business Branch 



Branches: 
Allston 

Andrew Square 
Boylston 
Brighton 
Charlestown 
City Point 



HOME 
USE 

418,869 

69,756 
27.965 



schools and 
institutions 



261,076 



777.666 



16,604 



175,054 




175,054 


155,574 


.... 


155,574 


147,862 




147,862 


125.991 


13,285 


139,276 


128.809 


8.036 


136,845 


155,492 




155,492 



[35] 



Codman Square 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Faneuil 

Fellowes Atlienaeum 

Hyde Park 

Jamaica Plain 

Jeffries Point 

Kirstein 

Lower Mills 

Mattapan 

Memorial 

Mount Bowdoin 

Mount Pleasant 

Nepbnset 

North End 

Orient Heights 

Parker Hill 

Phillips Brooks 

Roslindale 

Roxbury Crossing 

South Boston 

South End 

Tyler Street 

Uphams Corner 

West End 

West Roxbury 

4.602.790 170,621 4.773.411 

These figures are condensed into the following : 

Bool(6 Lent for Home Use, including Circulation through 
Schools and Institutions 



205.295 


11.485 


216.780 


136,048 


970 


137.018 


197,176 


20,896 


218.072 


120.007 




120.007 


100,657 


l'4,'286 


114.937 


148,356 


6,482 


154,838 


119.336 


13,999 


133.335 


100,736 




100.736 


56.971 


.... 


56.971 


76.137 




76.137 


220,675 




220.675 


246,481 


' *258 


246,739 


168,036 


• • . . 


168,036 


100.361 


. . • . 


100,361 


75,148 




75,148 


185.118 


' 731' 


185.849 


84,887 




84,887 


130.042 




130,042 


50.383 


• • . • 


50383 


160.662 


9.625 


170,287 


77,650 


.... 


77.650 


166.225 


23.679 


189.904 


147,271 


3.474 


150.745 


74.230 


.... 


74.230 


225,000 


285 


225.285 


195.512 


23,901 


219.413 


145.608 


19,235 


164.843 



From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 
the branches) ........ 

From Business Branch ........ 

From branches (excluding Looks received from Central Library) . 

Total .... 



Comparative 
Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) 
Direct home use .... 
Through branches 

Business Branch .... 

Branch libraries circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) 

Schools and institutions circulations (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the .Branch system) 



350.675 
87.529 



1931 



438.204 
13.193 

3.775.021 



476.514 
4.702,932 



418.869 
97,721 



777,666 

16,604 

4.773.41 1 

5.567.681 

1932 



516.590 
16,604 

4.602.790 



431.697 
5.567.681 



[36] 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 

1931 1932 

Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 2.389 2,254 

Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts 428 416 

Total 2.817 2,670 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 692 841 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts . . . .178 195 

Total 870 1.036 

The classified direct circulation of the branches was as follows, 
for two successive years: 

1931 1932 

VOLUMES PERCENTAGE VOLUMES PERCENTAGE 



Fiction for adults . 


1 ,503,842 


39.8 


1,988,414 


432 


Non-fiction for adults . 


423.081 


112 


553.638 


12.0 


Juvenile fiction 


1 ,255,640 


33.3 


1 ,401 .932 


30.5 


Juvenile non-fiction 


592,458 


15.7 


658.806 


143 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 
the following percentages: 



Fiction 
Non-fiction 



1931 1932 

PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE 

43.7 453 

563 54.7 



BOOK ACCESSIONS 

BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE 



For the Central Library: 

From City appropriation . 
From trust funds income . 


1931 
1 5,309 
2.962 


18271 


1932 

15.810 

3359 


For branches: 

From City appropriation . 
From trust funds income . 


. 100.124 
1,120 


86.500 
1,618 



101,244 
119.515 



19,169 



88.118 
107.287 



[37] 



The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise: 



Accessions by purchase 
Accessions by gift 
Accessions by exchange 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound 
Accessions by serials bound 

Totals . 







TOTAL 


CENTRAL 


BRANCHES 


VOLUMES 


19.135 


88.1 52 


107.287 


5,316 


1,908 


7.224 


32 


43 


75 


1,789 


24 


1,813 


138 


.... 


138 


1.456 




1.456 



27.866 



90.127 



17.993 



THE CATALOGUE 





1931 




1932 




VOLS. AND 


TITLES 


VOLS. AND TITLES 




PARTS 




PARTS 


Catalogued (new) : 








Central Library Catalogue 


28,764 


22,640 


35.772 23.524 


Serials 


7.361 


.... 


6,756 . . . . 


Branches 


88.331 


78,383 


78.128 69.882 


Recafalogued 


12,836 


7.083 


21.102 8^70 



Totals 



137.292 108.106 141.758 101.676 



SHELF DEPARTMENT 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) . . . 29,964 

Special collections, new books and transfers ..... 4.617 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. ......... 3,085 

37,666 

Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. 13.304 

Net gain at Central L-ibrary ......... 24362 

Net gain at Branches .......... 32,081 

Placed in Business Branch ......... 2,177 

Net gain entire library system ......... 58,620 



[38] 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852^53 . 






9,688 


1893 








597.152 


1853-54 . 






16.221 


1894 








610.375 


1854-55 . 






22,617 


1895 








628,297 


1855-56 . 






28,080 


1896-97 








663,763 


1856-57 . 






34,896 


1897-98 








698,888 


1857-58 . 






70,851 


1898-99 








716.050 


1858-59 . 






78.043 


1899-1900 








746,383 


1859-60 . 






85,031 


1900-01 








781.377 


1860-61 . 






97.386 


1901-02 








812.264 


1861-62 . 






105.034 


1902-03 








835.904 


1862-^3 . 






110,563 


1903-04 








848,884 


1863-64 . 






116,934 


1904-05 








871.050 


1864-65 . 






123.016 


1905-06 








878.933 


1865-66 . 






130,678 


1906-07 








903.349 


1866-67 . 






136,080 


1907-08 








. 922.348 


1867-68 . 






144.092 


1908-09 








941.024 


1868-69 . 






1 52.796 


1909-10 








961 ,522 


1869-70 . 






160.573 


1910-11 








987,268 


1870-71 . 






1 79,250 


1911-12 








1.006,717 


1871-72 . 






192,958 


1912-13 








1.049,011 


1872-73 . 






209,456 


1913-14 








1.067.103 


1873-74 . 






260,550 


1914-15 








1 ,098.702 


1874-75 . 






276.918 


1915-16 








1,121.747 


1875-76 . 






297,873 


1916-17 








1.139.682 


1876-77 . 






321.010 


1917-18 








1.157.326 


1877-78 . 






345.734 


1918-19 








1.173.695 


1878-79 . 






360.963 


1919-20 








1.197.498 


1879-80 . 






377.225 


1920-21 








1,224.510 


1880-81 . 






390,982 


1921-22 








1.258.211 


1881-52 . 






404,221 


1922-23 








1 .284.094 


1882-83 . 






422.116 


1923-24 








1,308,041 


1883-84 . 






438.594 


1924-25 








1,333,264 


1884-85 . 






453.947 


1925 








1,363,515 


1885 






460.993 


1926 








1,388,439 


1886 






479,421 


1927 








1,418,489 


1887 






492.956 


1928 








1 .442.802 


1888 






505.872 


1929 








1.475.743 


1889 






520.508 


1930 








1,526,951 


1890 






536.027 


1931 








1 ,572,802 


189! 






556.283 


1932 








1.631.422 


1892 






576,237 













Volumes in entire library system ........ 1,631,422 

Volumes in the Business Branch ........ 11 ,903 

Volumes in the branches ......... 497,628 



[39] 



These volumes are located as follows ; 



Central Library . 


. 1.121,891 


Mattapan 


16.163 


Business Branch . 


11.903 


Memorial 


21.218 


Allston 


11.927 


Mt. Bowdoin 


13,947 


Andrev/ Square . 


10,628 


Mt. Pleasant 


8,023 


Boylston 


10,592 


Neponset 


7.084 


Brighton 


22.302 


North End 


13.998 


Charlestown 


16.858 


Orient Heights 


8.139 


City Point 


11.787 


Parker Hill 


12.473 


Codman Square . 


17.673 


Phillips Brooks . 


4.153 


Dorchester 


16,520 


Roslindale 


14.441 


East Boston 


23.095 


Roxbury Crossing 


5.453 


Faneuil 


10,895 


South Boston 


22.906 


Fellowes Athenaeum , 


40.646 


South End 


12,649 


Hyde Park 


30.922 


Tyler Street 


7,638 


Jeffries Point 


8,031 


Uphams Corner . 


16.763 


Jamaica Plain 


19.571 


West End 


25,162 


Kirslein 


6,684 


West Roxbury 


21,972 


Lower Mills 


7.315 







THE BINDERY 



style 



Number of volumes bound in various 

Magazines stitched 

Volumes repaired 

Volumes guarded 

Maps mounted 

Photographs and engravings mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1931 


1932 


74.216 


75.393 


106 


107 


1,949 


1,907 


674 


669 


281 


142 


6,433 


5,815 


83,254 


97,200 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1931 1932 

Requisitions received and filled ...... 166 288 

Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) 6.924 10,620 

Cards finished 100.492 123.644 

Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) 792 1,000 

Cards finished 75.765 74,777 

Signs 237 3.115 

Blank forms (numbered series) 2,421.334 6,139,910 

Forms, circulars and sundries (unnumbered) .... 67.750 140.002 

Catalogues, pamphlets, and bibliographical programmes . . 79.550 84.950 



OUTSTANDING .BOOK PURCHASES 



Bible. New Testament. Greek. Rockefeller McCormick New Testa- 
ment. Edited by Edgar J. Goodspeed, Donald W. Riddle and 
Harold R. Willoughby. University of Chicago Press. 1 932. 3 vols. 



[40] 

Brewer. Luther A. My Leigh Hunt library: the first editions with 100 
illustrations. Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The Torch Press. (1932). 
Vol. 1 . Strathmore Bay Path issue. 
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. L'ingenieux hidalgo Don Quichotte de 
la Manche. Traduit par Xavier de Cardaillac et Jean Labarthe et 
orne de 250 bois originaux par Hermann Paul. Maastricht. Leiter- 
Nypels. 1930, 31. 4 vols. Illustrated. Plates. Ornamental capitals. 
Edition limited to 375 copies. 
Eisen, Gustavus A. Portraits of Washington. New York. Robert 

Hamilton & Associates. 1 932. 3 vols. 
Firmicus Maternus, Julius. Begin. lulii Firmici Astronomicorum libri 
octo integri, & emendati, ex Scythicis oris ad nos nuper allati . . . 
Colophon: Venetiis cura, & diligentia Aldi Ro. Mense octob. 1 499. 
(A fine example of one of the earliest productions of the Aldus 
press. ) 
Graves, Gertrude M., compiler. A New England family (Fowle and 
Hunnewell) and their French ancestors, with genealogical records 
of some ancestors, descendants and various affiliated familes. Bos- 
ton. Privately printed. 1930. 
Great Britain. Court of Star Chamber. A decree of Star Chamber con- 
cerning printing made July 1 1, 1637. (New York). The Grolier 
Club. (1884.) Edition limited to 148 copies, on Holland paper. 
(The first publication of the Grolier Club.) 
Homer. The Odyssey. Translated by T. E, Lawrence. Designed by 

Bruce Rogers. London. 1932. Edition limited to 350 copies. 
Le Jeune, Le R. P. L. Dictionnaire general de biographic, histoire, 
litterature, agriculture, commerce, industrie, et des arts, sciences, 
moeurs, coutumes, institutions, politiques et religieuses du Canada. 
Universite d'Ottawa. (1931). 2 vols. Portraits. Plates. Maps. 
Genealogical charts. 
Loris, D. Le thresor des parterres de I'univers, contenant les figures et 
pourtraits des plus beaux compartimens, cabanes, & labyrinths des 
jardinages, tant a I'allemande qu* a la frangoise. Geneva. Estienne 
Gamonet. 1 629. Title within woodcut border. Designs for gardens 
and mazes. Old limp vellum. (The descriptions of "the manner of 
dressing banks and beds in gardens" appear in Latin, French, Ger- 
man and English. One of the earliest printed treatises on gardening 
in English.) 
Mather, Cotton. A midnight cry. An essay for our awakening out of that 
sinful sleep, to which we are at this time too much disposed; and for 
our discovering of what peculiar things there are in this time, that 
are for our awakening. In a discourse given on a day of prayer, 
kept by the North-Church in Boston, I 692. By Cotton Mather. 
Now published for the use of that church, together with a copy 



[41] 

acknowledgements and protestations made in pursuance of the 
Reformation whereto we are to be awakened. Boston. Printed 
by John Allen. I 692. 
Mather, Increase. Two plain and practical discourses concerning I. Hard- 
ness of heart, showing that some, who live under the Gospel, are by 
a judicial dispensation, given up to that judgment, and the signs 
thereof; II. The sin and danger of disobedience to the Gospel. By 
Increase Mather, President of Harvard College in Cambridge, and 
Preacher of the Gospel at Boston in New-England. London. 
Printed for J. Robinson and are to be sold by Samuel Phillips, 
Bookseller in Boston, in New-England, 1 699. 
Moussinac, Leon. Tendances nouvelles du theatre. Choix de decors, 
costumes, details de mise en scene utilises dans les representations 
les plus originales de ces quinze dernieres annees. Precede de 
remarques sur les recentes recherches de I'art du theatre. Paris. Les 
Editions Albert Levy. 1931. Edition limited to 615 copies. Illus- 
trations, some in color. 
Pelham, Henry. A plan of Boston in New England with its environs, in- 
cluding Milton, Dorchester, Roxbury, Brookline, Cambridge, Med- 
ford, Charlestown, parts of Maiden and Chelsea, with the military 
works constructed in those places in the years 1775 and 1776. 
London. Henry Pelham. 1 777. Engraved in aqua tinta by Fran- 
cis Jukes. Size 27 X 38 inches. With the signature of Henry 
Pelham in ink. Framed. 
Pennell, Joseph. Catalogue of the lithographs of Joseph Pennell. Com- 
piled by Louis A. Wuerth. With an introduction by Elizabeth 
Robins Pennell. Boston. Little, Brown. 1931. Plates. Edition 
limited to 425 copies. 
Perleberg, Hans C. Persian textiles. Photographic prints. With an 
introduction by John Cotton Dana. Philadelphia. (19 19-1 93-?) 
2 vols. 50 plates illustrating original Persian and Paisley shawls, 
tapestries and borders. 
Powell, H. M. T. The Santa Fe Trail to California 1 849-1 852. The 
journal and drawings of H. M. T. Powell. Edited by Douglas S. 
Watson. San Francisco. Book Club of CaUfornia. 1931. Edition 
limited to 300 copies. 
Royal Academy of Arts. London. A commemorative catalogue of the 
exhibition of Italian art held in the galleries of the Royal Academy, 
Burlington House, London, Jan. — March, 1930. London. Ox- 
ford University Press. 1931. 2 vols, text and atlas. Portrait in 
color. 
Shakespeare, William. The works of Shakespeare. The text of the 
First folio with quarto variants and a selection of modern readings. 
New York. The Nonesuch Press. 1929-32. Vignettes. Vols. 

1-6. 



[42] 

Wise, Thomas J. The Ashley Library. A catalogue of printed books, 
manuscripts and autograph letters collected by Thomas J. Wise. 
London. Printed for private circulation only. 1922-1930. 10 
vols. Portrait. Plates. Facsimiles. Edition limited to 200 copies. 

OUTSTANDING GIFTS 

Angevine, Ernest. Six hundred and eighty-five topographic atlas sheets 
issued by the United States Geological Survey, and seven atlases of 
Boston and of Massachusetts. 

Bentley, Harry C. Sixty volumes on bookkeeping and accounting; and 
the sum of $220.38 to be expended for the purchase of certain 
designated early American v/orks on bookkeeping, to form the 
nucleus of "The Harry C. Bentley Collection of Books on Book- 
keeping." 

Boston City Messenger. Tercentenary of the founding of Boston: an 
account of the celebration marking the three hundredth anniversary 
of the settlement of the site of the City of Boston, Massachusetts. 
Compiled by direction of His Honor, James M. Curley, Mayor of 
Boston. Boston, 1931. 90 copies. 

British Museum, London. The Luttrell Psalter. Tw^o plates in colour 
and one hundred and eighty-three in monochrome, from the ad- 
ditional manuscript 42,130 in the British Museum, with an intro- 
duction by Eric George Millar. London, British Museum, 1932. 

Catalogue of drawings by Dutch and Flemish artists preserved 
in the Department of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum, 
by Arthur M. Hind. Vol. 4 and 5. London, British Museum, 
1930-1932. 

Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, by Harold 
Mattingly. Vol. 2. London, British Museum, 1930. 

Castle, William R., Washington, D. C. Stars and Stripes. Vol. 1 , 
numbers 1 to 30. Published by the A.E.F. in France. 

Bulletin des armees de la republique. Numbers 1 to 276, 
August 1 5 , 1 9 1 4 to December 12.1917. 

Clark, William Andrews, Jr., Los Angeles. The library of William 
Andrews Clark, Jr. : Wilde and Wildeiana, collated and compiled 
by Robert Ernest Cowan and William Andrews Clark, Jr. Vols. 
4 and 5. San Francisco, 1931. 

Coolidge, Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague, Pittsfield. Oeuvres completes de Jean 
Baptiste Lully, publiees sous la direction de Henry Prunieres: Les 
motets, tome 1 , Miserere Mei Deus ; Les ballets, tome 1 , Ballet du 
temps — ballets des plaisirs — ballet de I'amour malade. Paris, 
1931. 



[43] 

Genoa. Mayor of, Genoa. Christopher Columbus: documents and proofs 
of his Genoese origin. PubHshed by the City of Genoa, Bergamo. 
1932. English-German edition. 

Goodwin, Frances, Estate of. A miscellaneous collection of seven hun- 
dred and eighty-six volumes from the library of Frances Goodwin, 
including a set of the Harvard Classics, the Encyclopedia Ameri- 
cana, and an eight volume set of Shakespeare's plays. 

Great Britain Patent Office, London. Three hundred and ninety volumes 
of patents and specifications for inventions issued by the Great 
Britain Patent Office. 

Hart, Albert Bushnell. The commonwealth history of Massachusetts, 
edited by Albert Bushnell Hart. New York. States History Com- 
pany, 1927-1930. 5 vols. 

Hispanic Society of America, New York City. An archaeological sketch- 
book of the Roman Necropolis at Carmona, by George Edward 
Bonser. Translated from the French by Clara L. Penney. New 
York. The Society, 1931. 

The archaeological expedition along the Guadalquiver, I 880— 
1901, by George Edward Bonser. Translated from the French 
by Clara L. Penney. New York. The Society, 1931. 

Pintores espaiioles en San Lorenzo el Real de El Escorial 
(1566-1613). Por el R. P. Fr. Julian Zarco Cuevas. O.S.A. 
New York. The Society, 1932. 

Pintores italianos en San Lorenzo el Real de El Escorial (1575— 
1613). Por el R. P. Fr. Julian Zarco Cuevas, O.S.A. New 
York. The Society, 1932. 

Ten miscellaneous publications of the Society, issued in 1932. 

Sabatier, Mme. Paul, St. Michel de Chabrillanoux, France. Paul Sa- 
batier (1858—1928): Notes biographiques par Gabriel Maugain; 
bibliographie complete par Henri LeMaitre. Paris, Librarie Fisch- 
bacher, 1931. 

£tudes inedites sur S. Francois d' Assise, par Paul Sabatier, 
editees par Arnold Goffin. Paris, Librarie Fischbacher, 1932. 

Sheffield, Mrs. Amelia D., Providence. Sheffield, Daggett and allied 
f amiles : a genealogical study, with biographical notes, prepared and 
privately printed for Mrs. George St. John Sheffield, by the Ameri- 
can Historical Society, Inc., N. Y., 1932. The volume is bound 
in blue morocco, elaborately tooled, with many illustrations, in- 
cluding coats of arms and hand-painted initial letters. 

Storrow, Mrs. James J. A collection of 1 , 1 69 volumes, including 1 98 
volumes on architecture and allied subjects, several hundred books 
in French, German and Italian, and about fifty volumes of children's 
books and modern English fiction and non-fiction. 

Son of New England: James Jackson Storrow. 1864-1926. 
By Henry Greenleaf Pearson. Boston, 1932. 



[44] 

Taylor, Myron C, New York City. John Underhill, Captain of New- 
England and New Netherland, by Henry C. Shelley, N. Y., D. 
Appleton and Company, 1932. Number 36 of 500 copies printed. 
The Underbills of Warwickshire: their ancestry from the thir- 
teenth century, in England, with special reference to Captain John 
Underhill of the Kenilworth Branch, afterwards of Massachusetts 
and Long Island: an essay in family history. By J. H. Morrison. 
Privately printed, Cambridge University Press, 1932. 

Thomson, John W., Pittsfield. A collection of two hundred and 
seventy-three volumes, including the "Reports of the exploration and 
survey of the most economical and practicable route for a railroad 
from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean" (26v.) ; "Docu- 
ments relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York" 
(21 v.) and several volumes on the care and training of horses. 

Underhill, Francis Jay, Brooklyn. Two hundred and seventeen volumes 
from the library of Francis Jay Underhill, including a forty-eight 
volume set of the works of Sir Walter Scott, bound by Clarke & 
Bedford, and several other volumes in fine bindings. 

Wendell, Mrs. Barrett. A collection of one hundred and forty-six 
volumes, including forty-four volumes of Boston City Documents, a 
I 7— volume set of "Elementi della storia de Sommi Pontefici da 
San Pietro", Rome, 1821 ; and a 1 3 -volume set of "I fasti della 
chiesa nelle vite de' Santi." Milan, 1824. 

Widener, Joseph., Philadelphia. French engravings of the eighteenth 
century in the collection of Joseph Widener, Lynnewood Hall. 
London, privately printed at the Chiswick Press, 1 923. Four folio 
volumes. Number 95 of 1 20 volumes printed for private circulation. 



LECTURES — CONCERTS 

A series of 1 20 free concerts, lectures, and entertainments was 
presented under the auspices of the Library in the Lecture Hall 
of the Central Library. Again the Library was privileged 
through the generosity of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge to 
include in its program a series of chamber concerts. These con- 
certs were given by the South Mountain String Quartet (of 
Pittsfield) on the afternoon and evening of January 24, and by 
the Pro Arte Quartet (of Brussels) on the afternoon and evening 
of May I . The afternoon concerts were held in the Mattapan 
Branch Library and the evening concerts in the Central Library. 



[45] 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1932 
TTiere were held various exhibitions in the Exhibition Room, 
in the Treasure Room, and in the Children's Room of the Central 
Library. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

Artz Fund — Donation from Miss ViCTORiNE Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago: the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as 
the "Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 

$10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. $50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of Charles H. L. N. Ber- 
nard. Received in 1930. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by John P. BiGELOW in August, 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of Robert Charles Bil- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $100,284.29 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. IngeRsoll Bowditch. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. CaleB Davis BraDLEE to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JosEPH H. CENTER, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. $39,908.89 



[46] 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 

$107,092.38 

Clement Fund — Bequest of the late FRANK CLEMENT, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854.41 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of Abram E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 

$4270.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of Sarah A. Matchett, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for the purchase 
of books for the young until otherwise ordered by the Board. Re- 
ceived in 1900. 

$6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees. Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such maimer 



[47] 

as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the PubHc Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of Isabella StewarT 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the BrowTi 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 

1924. $5,000.00 
Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 

1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. 

$2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens," Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 

$10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1884. $1,047.06 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of Alfred Hemenway. Received 
in 1928. $5,000.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of Franklin P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. Kimball. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,039.65 



148] 



Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1,000 each made by Mr. 
Louis E. Kirstein, "to be used for any purpose of the Library 
that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 



October, 1925 
October, 1926 . 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 . 
October, 1929 . 



$1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1.000.00 
1.000.00 



$5,000.00 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of Katherine 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 

$10,000.00 

Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of Helen Lambert of Boston in memory 
of Frederic and Louise Lambert. Received in 1931. The income 
of this fund to be expended for the purchase of books and other 
library material until otherwise ordered by the Board. 

$1,051.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of AbbOTT Lawrence, of Boston. 
Received in 1860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
a permanent value. $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward LawrenCE. of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 

500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Levns Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 



[49J 

for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of ChARLEs MeAD, to constitute the 
Charles Mead PubHc Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the PubHc Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1896. 

$2,530.51 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of Gardner O. North. Received 
in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 
from the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under 
an indenture between Amor HoUingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L. HoUingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870, The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $1 1 ,781 .44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the Papyrus 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

$1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by Jonathan Phillips, of Boston, 
in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said library. $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 
20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 
time being. 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of the 
City. November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27. 1873. $5,000.00 



[50] 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. Distribution of 
residue of estate in May, 1924, $964.30. $1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial to 
Guilford S. Reed; the income to be applied to the purchase of books 
of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his wall bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. $61,879.30 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD Black SewalL: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income to be 
used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner : 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he 
shall judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 



[51] 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1914. $51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be exjjended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary Elizabeth Stew- 
art of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Storrow 
and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson 
Storrow, Senior ; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 

$25,000.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass., or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61 , has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George Ticknor, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 



[52] 

Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the city, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
ceived said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. ToDD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be expend- 
ed by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other countries. 

$50,000.00 

Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel TreaDWELL, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1 872, said beuqest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 



[53] 

of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of Nathan A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 

$10,195.43 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 

for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1 897. $5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest of HoRACE G. WadliN, of 
Reading, former Librarian, who died November 5, 1925, of $2,000 
to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston to be 
permanently funded and the income thereof used for the purchase 
of books. Received in 1 932. $2,030.51 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of GeoRGE C. WaleS: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund. — Bequest of MehiTABLE C. C. Wil- 
SON, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1 9 1 3. $1,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James Lyman Whitney, who died Sep- 
tember 25. 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation. I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 



[54] 

from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. $22,416.05 



In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April. 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 



from : 

Percy Lee Atherton 
William York Peters 
John T. Spaulding 



$ 25.00 

25.00 

100.00 



$150.00 

Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz.: 

$6,800.00 
220.38 
6.800.00 
200.00 
500.00 
980.75 



Samuel Appleton, late of Boston 

H. C. Bentley . 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch . 

Nathaniel L Bowditch . 

James Brown, late of Cambridge 

Andrew Carnegie 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library 
Sally Inman Kast Shepard . 
James Nightingale .... 



the 



335.13 

1 ,000.00 

100.00 



$11,136.26 



[55] 

RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

Arfz Fund $ 10,000.00 

Bates Fund 50.000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 2.000.00 

Bigelow Fund 1.000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 1 00.28429 

Bowditch Fund 10.000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1.000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund 39.908.89 

Central Library Building Fund 150.00 

Children's Fund 107.092.38 

Clement Fund 2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 2,854.41 

Cutter Fund . 4.270.00 

Elizabeth Fund 25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 6.000.00 

Franklin Club Fund 1.000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 5.000.00 

Morris Gest Fund 2,652.50 

Green Fund 2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10.000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 1.047.06 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 5.000.00 

Hyde Fund 3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund 10.039.65 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 5,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 10.000.00 

Helen Lambert Fund 1.051.00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 10.000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund 500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund ...... 500.00 

Charles Mead Fund 2.530.51 

Gardner O. North Fund 2.000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 11,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 1.000.00 

Phillips Fund 30.000.00 

Pierce Fund 5.000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund 1.494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund . 1.000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund ......... 3.858J24 

Scholfield Fund 61.87930 

Sewall Fund 25.000.00 

Skinner Fund 51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund ...... 100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 3.500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund ...... 25.000.00 

Ticknor Fund 4.000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 50.000.00 

Townsend Fund 4.000.00 

Treadwell Fund 13.987.69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10.195.43 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund ....... 5.000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund 2,030.51 

Wales Fund 5.000.00 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 5.000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund ........ 22,416.05 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund 1.000.00 

$782,488.07 



[56] 
OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY 

Director, Milton E. Lord 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus, Frank C. Blaisdell 
Assistant Librarian, Emeritus, Otto Fleischner 

Assistant Librarian, Theodore D. Money 

Assistant to the Director, Richard G. Hensley 

Bates Hall Centre Desk, Newspaper and Patent Department: Pierce E. 

Buckley, Chief. 
Bates Hall Reference Department: Harry W. Mathews, Assistant in 

Charge. 
Bindery Department: James W. Kenney, Chief. 
Branch Department: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor of Branches. 
Catalogue Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 
Children's Department: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor of Work with 

Children. 
Editor: Zoltan Haraszti. 

Engineer and Janitor Department: William F. Quinn, Supt. of Buildings. 
Information Office: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief. 
Library Training Class: Bertha V. Hartzell, Supervisor. 
Ordering Department: Louis Felix Ranlett, Chief. 
Periodical Room: Francis J. Hannigan, Assistant in Charge. 
Printing Department: Francis Watts Lee, Chief. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Special Libraries Department : George S. Maynard, Chief. 
Statistical Department: Margaret C. Lappen, Assistant in Charge. 
Stock Room: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian. 

Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 
Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 
Boylston, Margaret A. Calnan. 
Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 
Business Branch, Mary W. Dietrichson. 
Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 
City Point, Helen L. Morrisey. 
Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 
Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 
East Boston, Theodora B. Scoff. 
Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 
Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 



[57] 

Hyde Park, Sara A. Lyon. 

Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 

Jeffries Point, Mary U. Nichols, Assistant in Charge. 

Kirstein, Grace C. Brady. 

Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 

Mattapan, Ada Aserkoff. 

Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mount Bowdoin, Pearl B. Smart. 

Mount Pleasant, Margaret M. Reid. 

Neponset, Margaret 1. McGovern. 

North End, Mary F. Curley. 

Orient Heights, Catherine E. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Edith R. Nickerson. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Clara L. Maxwell. 

Tyler Street, Caroline Keene, Acting Librarian. 

Uphams Corner, Beatrice Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Carrie L. Morse. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 672 2 




»«*i'« 



x::%im'