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Full text of "Annual report"

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Given By 
Boston Fire Department 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CIT^' Ol'^ BOSTON 



^■^:.\l; ending DEm^wnTCTt ni. 1932 




(111 ' M n\ '"■■ I \ I .\ 

PRINTTNO DFPARTMEN' 



ANNUAL REPORT 



or THE 



FIEE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF BOSTON 



TEAE ENDi:^G DECEMBER 31, 1932 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1933 






Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1932boston 



OFFICIALS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 

Herbert J. Hickey, 
Executive Secretary of the Department. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 

George L. Fickett, 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division. 

Walter J. Burke, 

Superintendent of Wire Division. 

Edward E. Williamson, 

Superintendent of Maintenance Division. 

Albert J. Caulfield, 
Deputy Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Division. 

Martin H. Spellman, M. D., 

Medical Examiner. 



[Document 12 — 1933. 




ANNUAL REPORT 

„ OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1932. 



Boston, July 31, 1933. 

Hon. James M. Curley, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith a 

report of the activities of the Boston Fire Department 

for the year ending December 31, 1932, as required by 

section 24, chapter 4, of the Revised Ordinances of 1925. 

Fire Loss. 

The total fire loss in the City of Boston, estimated by 
the insurance companies, amounted to $4,240,168.09. 
This is an increase of $36,749 over the loss of 1931. 
There were thirty-three fires with a loss of over fifteen 
thousand dollars as compared with thirty-seven in the 
previous year. The increase in the loss may be at- 
tributed to five severe fires during the year as follows: 

January 4, I. 0. 0. F. Building et al., 507-515 

Tremont street $323,575 65 

January 28, A. Shapiro et al., Beach street . . 169,636 46 

April 9, Automatic Radio Manufacturing Com- 
pany, 112-118 Canal street .... 90,828 35 

July 8, R. H. White Company, 518-536 Washing- 
ton street 112,905 57 

December 5, Ryder & Brown, 51 Melcher street, 121,863 90 

During the year the department responded to 9,407 
alarms of which 5,562 were box alarms and 3,845 were 



City Document No. 12. 



still and automatic alarms. There were 1,168 false 
alarms during the year, an increase of 257 over the year 
1931. 

Fire Prevention. 

The personnel of the fire prevention division has been 
dihgent in its duties during the year and continued 
vigilance has been practiced to reduce the fire hazard. 

During the year all classes of buildings, with the 
exception of one and two family dwellings, were in- 
spected. 

Number of inspections (initial) 325,705 

Number of reinspections 12,122 

Number of complaints reported 8,498 

Number of corrections 23,679 

Number of personal inspections by officers of Fire 

Prevention Division 2,182 

Oil burners inspected 2,026 

Reports of hazardous conditions were sent to other 
departments as follows: 



To Building Department . . . . 

To Health Department 

To Schoolhouse Department . . . . 
Notices sent to correct hazardous conditions 
Personal services by Constable 



2,063 
9 
6 

688 
457 



During the Christmas holiday season a detail of 
inspectors was maintained in and about the shopping 
^nd high value districts and other locations where 
shopping congestion prevailed. 

Special and intensive inspection campaigns were 
conducted in certain sections of the city and daily 
inspections were maintained in several building groups 
where certain hazards and conditions existed. 

In addition to inspections made by the Fire Prevention 
inspectors, the following number of inspections were 
made by District and Company Officers: 



Building inspections . 
Theatre inspections . 
Schoolhouse inspections . 
Public buildings inspected 
Car house inspections 
Inspections of Long and Deer Islands 
Total number of inspections made by Fire Prevention 
inspectors, district and company officers 



66,991 

3,849 

3,815 

920 

91 

24 

449,902 



Fire Department. 



Arson. 



In accordance with the provisions of chapter 383 of 
the Acts of 1931, the Fire Department continued the 
prosecution of the crime of arson and incendiarism 
unrelentlessly. It is quite apparent that the law pro- 
hibiting the setting of fires for malice, gain or fraud, is 
disregarded and violated by a large number of people 
in our city, and to combat this menace the Arson Unit 
of the Fire Prevention Division continued to function 
twenty-four hours a day assisted by police officers 
detailed for this special work by the Police Commis- 
sioner. The squad has responded to all fires as soon as 
they are reported to be of suspicious origin, and in many 
cases before any reports were received. The success of 
the Arson Unit is due in a great measure to the ability 
and integrity of Deputy Chief Albert J. Caulfield who 
organized the unit under my direction, and has con- 
tinued to supervise its operation and participate in- 
timately in all its investigations. 

The record for the Arson Unit for the past twelve 
months is as follows: 



Number of investigations by Arson Unit .... 525 
Number of persons interviewed at Division Office . . 48 

Number of inquests held 49 

Number of cases submitted to District Attorney for action, 20 
Number of cases arraigned in Municipal Court . . .11 

Dismissed 

Held for Grand Jury .... 
Number of cases presented to Grand Jury . 

Number of "No Bills" 2 

Number of indictments . . . . . .14 

Number of trials 

Number of persons convicted .... 
Number of persons indicted and waiting trial 
Number of persons arrested .... 
Number of persons summoned to inquests . 

Department witnesses 258 

Civilian witnesses 281 

Interpreters 3 



16 



4 

4 

34 

36 

542 



Buildings. 

A new fire station at the corner of K and Fourth 
streets. South Boston, was completed and occupied on 
May 2, 1932. The building is three stories, brick, with 
a large drill tower in the rear. The building is occupied 



City Document No. 12. 



by Engine Company 2, formerly located at O and 
Fourth streets, and Ladder Company 19, formerly 
stationed at 715 East Fourth street. The building was 
erected at a cost of $138,085.13, excluding the land. 
The buildings formerly occupied by these two com- 
panies were immediately transferred to the Public 
Buildings Department as soon as they were vacated. 



Fire Apparatus. 

During the year eight motor vehicles were purchased, 
tested and placed in service as follows: 

1 V 12-cylinder Metropolitan 85-foot aerial truck. 

2 V 12-cylinder Metropolitan 1,000-gallon triple combination 

pumpers. 
1 8-cylinder Standard Hupmobile sedan. 
1 8-cylinder Ford coupe. 

3 8-cylinder Ford roadsters with pick-up bodies and closed 

cabs. 
1 Motor cycle was traded in, one school car and seven old 
hose cars were sold at public auction. 

The motor equipment of the department, at the 
present time, consists of the following: 



Type. 



In Service. In Reserve 



Pumping engines 

Steam engines (tractors). 

Hose cars 

Aerial ladder truck 

City service trucks 

Water towers 

Chief oflScers' cars 

School car 

Rescue cars 

Fuel cars 

Portable lighting plants. . 

Wrecking car 

Commercial trucks 

Emergency cars (Ford) , . 
Ford coupes 



23 
7 
3 

34 



FiEE Department. 



High Pressure Service. 

The records of the two high pressure stations for the 
year are as follows: 



Station No. 1. 



Station No. 2. 



Total alarms to which pumps responded. 
Water discharged * 



126 
2,000 gallons 



29.5 
1,390,000 gallons 



* Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters they do not record flows under 600 
gallons per minute. 

At the present time the high pressure system has 501 
hydrants in service and 18.45 miles of 12-inch, 16- 
inch and 20-inch mains. 



Hydrants. 

The following is a list of the hydrants in service for 
fire purposes on December 31, 1932: 



Public. 



Private. 



Ordinary post 

Boston post 

Lowry 

Boston Lowry 

Batchelder and Finneran post. 

Boston 

High pressure 

Chapman post 

Ludlow post 

Matthew post 

Coffin post 



Totals. 



3,577 

2,518 

718 

352 

3,715 

117 

501 

71 

4 



11,574 



131 

24 

33 

5 

.5 

111 



381 



Fire College. 

The first term of the fire college, which was organ- 
ized in 1931, was completed in 1932. Three semesters 
of the college were held in 1932. One hundred and 
twelve officers from the Boston Fire Department 
attended the college, and thirty-eight officers from 
outside departments attended the college. 



6 



City Document No. 12. 



The college was organized with a view to improving 
the efficiency and morale of the department by teach- 
ing the men a systematic and uniform method of opera- 
tion at fires as well as providing them with a technical 
knowledge of their work. 

Mutual Aid. 
The department responded to sixty (60) alarms of 
fire outside the city limits as follows: 

Milton . . . 36 

Somerville 17 

Brookline 1 

Quincy 3 

Everett . 1 

Chelsea 1 

Revere 1 



FIRE ALARM SERVICE. 

The fire alarm service of the department has been 
maintained at its usual high standard. 

Mutual aid alarm service was extended by making 
circuit connections between Boston and Quincy, and 
Boston and Milton. 



Operating Records. 

First alarms 5,562 

Second alarms 75 

Third alarms 16 

Fourth alarms . 3 

Fifth alarm 1 

Total 5,657 

Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 

Same box received two or more times for same fire . 509 

Adjacent boxes received for same fire .... 368 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 8 

Total 885 

Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 

Received from citizens by telephone .... 2,683 

Received from Police Department by telephone . 256 

Received from Fire Department stations . . . 1,180 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 8 
Mutual aid alarms (adjacent cities and towns) treated 

as stills 59 

Emergency service treated as stills .... 154 

Total 4,340 



Fire Department. 7 

Still alarms received by telephone for which box 
alarms were afterwards received and transmitted . 306 

Still alarms received by telephone for which box 
alarms, not received, were transmitted (11 p. m. to 
7 a. m.) 315 

Total 621 



Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 

Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 99 

Box alarms received and transmitted after auto- 
matic alarms had been struck .... 5 

Box alarms not received but transmitted, after 
automatic alarm had been struck (11 p. m. to 

7 a. m.) 22 

Automatic alarms received at fire alarm office but 

not transmitted 2 

American District Telegraph Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 96 

Box alarms received and transmitted after A. D. T. 

alarms had been struck 8 

Box alarms not received but transmitted after 
A. D. T. alarms had been struck (11 p. m. to 
7 a. m.) 29 

A. D. T. alarms received at fire alarm office but 

not transmitted 3 

Summary of Alarms. 
Alarms received : 

Box alarms, including multiples 6,176 

Still alarms, all classes except box alarms . . . 4,332 

Boston automatic alarms ...... 99 

A. D. T. alarms ........ 96 

Total received from all sources .... 10,703 

Box alarms not received but transmitted . . . 366 

11,069 

Exclude following: 

Multiples 95 

Box alarms received but not transmitted . . . 877 

Still alarms for which other alarms were transmitted, 621 
Automatic alarms for which other alarms were 

transmitted 29 

A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were 

transmitted 40 

1,662 



8 



City Document No. 12. 



Total alarms, with eliminations, to which apparatus 
responded: 

First alarms . 

Still alarms 

A. D. T. alarms 

Automatic alarms 



5,562 

3,719 

56 

70 

9,407 



Multiple Alarm Fires. 

With two alarms 

With three alarms 

With four alarms 

With five alarms 

Fire Alarm Box Records. 
Boxes from which no alarms were received . 
Box tests and inspections .... 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 

Owned by Fire Department 

Owned by School Buildings Department 

Owned by Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 

Privately owned 



62 

13 

2 

1 



404 
11,367 



Note, — All street box doors are tested weekly. 



1,173 

260 

47 

153 

1,633 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts. 



District 1 
District 2 
District 3 
District 4 
District 5 
District 6 
District 7 
District 8 



96 

73 

45 

85 

75 

102 

105 

128 



District 9 
District 10 
District 11 
District 12 
District 13 
District 14 
District 15 



110 
129 
149 
106 
165 
141 
123 



Summary of Work Done in 1932. 

Line wire used in new work (approximately) 
Line wire used for replacements (approximately) 
Line wire removed from service (approximately) 
Aerial cable installed in new work 

Conductors in same 

Aerial cable removed from service . 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed (extensions) 



Feet. 

18,850 

10,370 

44,100 

3.400 

11,400 

1,060 

8,560 

42,857 



Fire Department. 



9 



Conductors in same .... 

Underground cable replaced (defective) 

Conductors in same . 

Conduits laid underground 

Ducts in same . 

Ducts abandoned 

Manholes built . 

Handholes built 

Fire alarm boxes installed by this department 

Fire alarm boxes installed by School Buildings De 

partment 

Fire alarm boxes installed on private property 

Fire alarm boxes relocated 

Fire alarm boxes removed from service 

Box posts installed 

Box posts relocated 

Box posts reset or replaced by new 

Cable posts installed 

Cable posts relocated .... 

Cable posts removed from service . 

Underground cable boxes attached to poles 

Underground cable boxes removed from service 



Feet. 

595,647 

13,477 

232,553 

11,092 

11,318 

1,643 

19 

5 

24 

11 

2 

14 

14 
24 
5 
7 
4 
1 
2 
16 
3 



WIRE DIVISION. 

Regular and periodical inspections have been made 
of all theatres, places of amusement, and public halls, 
together with new installations and changes throughout 
the city. 

Thorough investigations were made of all fires and 
accidents reported as due to electrical causes, and 
reports of the same are in the files of the Wire Division. 

Following is a table showing a summary of the work 
of the interior division: 



Notice of new work received .... 
Number of permits issued to turn on current 
Number of incandescent lamps inspected 
Number of motors inspected .... 
Number of inspections made .... 
Number of inspections made of theatres, places 
of amusement and public halls .... 



14,494 
11,549 
2,263,950 
16,692 
35,732 

1,501 



During the year there were ninety-three fires in build- 
ings which after investigation were found to have been 
due to electrical causes, one pole fire, one manhole fire, 
four miscellaneous fires and troubles, and eight injuries 
to persons, one of which was fatal. 



10 City Document No. 12. 

The fire losses from fires due to electrical causes were 
slight, being approximately $17,438.38. 
The income from permits to perform electrical work 

was $42,836.82. 

Exterior Division. 

The underground district for the year 1932, as pre- 
scribed under authority of chapter 101 of the Acts of 
1931, comprised the following streets: 

City Prosper. — Massachusetts avenue, from Harrison ave- 
nue to Albany street. 

Dorchester. — Bird street, from Columbia road to Magnolia 
street; Geneva avenue, from Blue Hill avenue to Vinson 
street. 

Roxbury. — Smith street, from Parker street to St. Alphonsus 
street. 

West Roxbury. — Buchanan road, from Centre street to 
Andover road; Centre street, from the Arborway to South 
street. 

Brighton. — Graychff road, from Commonwealth avenue to 
Gillard road, making a total distance of four miles as prescribed 
by law. 

In these prescribed streets from which poles and over- 
head wires were to be removed, there were standing on 
January 1, 1932, a total of one hundred and forty-nine 
(149) poles (not including the trolley poles of the Bos- 
ton Elevated Railway which are exempt) owned by the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company and New Eng- 
land Telephone and Telegraph Company, these poles, 
in addition to the trolley poles of the Boston Elevated 
Railway, supporting one million nine hundred and 
twenty-five thousand eight hundred (1,925,800) feet 
of overhead wires, owned by the Edison Electric Illumi- 
nating Company, New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, Boston Fire Department (Fire Alarm 
Branch), Boston Police Department (Police Signal 
Service) and Boston Elevated Railway. 

During the past year the inspectors of this division 
have reported one hundred and forty-eight (148) poles 
decayed at base and twenty-nine (29) poles leaning, 
or a total of one hundred and seventy-seven (177) 
poles, which were replaced by new poles or reset by the 
various companies at the request of this department. 



FiEE Depaetment. 11 

The following table shows the overhead work for the 
year from January 1, 1932, to December 31, 1932, 
inclusive : 

Number of new poles in new locations ... 91 

Number of poles replaced, reset or straightened . 764 

Number of poles removed 253 

Number of poles now standing in the public 

streets 17,762 

Number of defects reported 1,810 

Number of defects corrected 1,668 

(Other defects in process of correction.) 

Number of notices of overhead construction . 6,259 

Number of overhead inspections .... 22,302 

Number of overhead reports 7,111 

Number of overhead wires removed by owners 

(infect) 654,874 

Underground Construction. 

The ducts used for the underground conduits of the 
dra wing-in systems are of the following type: 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete). 

3. Iron. 

4. Wood. 

In side or residential streets special underground con- 
struction for electric light and power purposes (110 
and 220 volts), of the type known as the "Split Fiber 
Solid Main System," has also been installed. 

The electrical approvals for underground electrical 

construction numbered 1,636 

Number of inspections of underground electrical 

construction 5,384 

Number of reports of underground electrical con- 
struction 1,318 



12 



City Document No. 12. 



Table Showing Underground Work for the Year 1932. 



Company. 


'3 

o 
O 

"o 


3 

Q 
"o 


O 

"S 


is 


Number of 
Services. 


Boston Elevated Railway 

Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany. 

Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company. 

Boston Fire Department (Fire 
Alarm Branch). 

Boston Low Tension Wire Asso- 
ciation. 

Boston Police Department (Police 
Signal Service) . 

New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. 

School Buildings Department .... 

Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany. 


3,292 
1,600 

82,454 

2,893 

20 

1,112 

9,989 

25 
200 


13,298 
1,818 

283,953 

2,991 

20 

1,112 

42,187 

25 
5,975 


54,373 
22,148 

259,205 

42,857 


12 
1 

149 

6 


1 

47 

866 

24 

1 


32,226 

71,853 

9,676 


12 


30 
38 

1 


Totals 


101,585 


351,379 


1,192,338 


180 


1,008 







Note. — "Split Fiber Solid Main System," of the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany, is included in the above figures, comprising 1,047 feet of conduit and 2,045 feet of 
duct. 



Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power, 

December 31, 1932. 



Company. 


||| 


a) . 

-fflo 


Capacity of 
Incandescent 
Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 


Capacity of 
Arc Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 


Kilowatts of 
Motors. 


S-0 m 


is 




24,360 
54,424 


241,287 
292,816 


4,356 

* 

3,300 
125 
145 


15 

* 

10 


353,454 
* 

6,000 

106 

80 


76,100 

* 

2,000 
230 


22 


Edison Electric Illuminating Company 


69 

2 




620 
500 


400 
363 


1 




1 








79,904 


534,866 


7,926 


25 


359,640 


78,330 


95 







* Unknown. (Meter capacity connected to lines of Edison system, 1,117,323 kilowatts.) 



Fire Department. 13 



Recommendations. 

1. The policy of gradual replacement of old and 
antiquated fire stations should be continued. A Board 
of Survey has been organized by me in the department 
with a view to making a study of conditions and mak- 
ing recommendations which, when adopted, will bring 
about improved housing and living conditions. Loca- 
tions which should receive first consideration are as 
follows : 

Engine 3 and Ladder 3, now located at the corner of 
Bristol street and Harrison avenue, should be rebuilt 
and relocated somewhere in the vicinity of Harrison 
avenue and Wareham street. Engine 23 on Northamp- 
ton street could be included in this project. 

Engine 8 and Ladder 1. — The former is located on 
Salem street, a very narrow, congested street. Ladder 
1 is an old station on Friend street. The property 
occupied by Ladder 1 will probably be needed in con- 
nection with the new East Boston Traffic Tunnel devel- 
opment. A new house for both companies somewhere 
on Hanover street would serve the district more effec- 
tively. 

Engine 16 and Ladder 6, now on River street, Dor- 
chester Lower Mills, should be relocated somewhere 
in the vicinity of Gallivan Boulevard and Codman 
street. 

Engine 20 and Ladder 27, now on Walnut street, near 
Neponset Bridge, should be relocated in the vicinity 
of Neponset avenue and Victory road. 

Engine 25 and Ladder Company 8, at Fort Hill square, 
should receive consideration when funds are available 
for rebuilding. 

A few of the older stations are in good locations but 
should be remodeled to provide proper accommoda- 
tions for the men and apparatus. Among these are 
Engine 13, Engine 22, Engine 24 and Ladder 9. 

A very important matter which will require considera- 
tion within a short time is the enlargement of the 
repair shop of the Maintenance Division so that the 
department will have sufficient space for the storage 
of reserve apparatus and to give more efficient service 
in the replacement of disabled apparatus. 



14 City Document No. 12. 

In the Fire Alarm Division the practice of replacing 
a specified number of old fire alarm boxes with boxes 
of the latest type should be continued. The policy of 
furnishing an up-to-date, fool-proof signal system is 
most essential in order that the Fire Department may 
receive prompt notice of fires. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 15 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES, 1932. 

Fire Department . . . .$4,377,844 00 

Wire Division 101,506 38 

New Fireboat 34,710 44 

New Fire Station, South Boston 

District 59,021 30 

New Fire Stations and Additions 
to and Improvement of Existing 

Fire Stations 67,051 96 

$4,640,134 08 



ANNUAL REPORT OF REVENUE BOSTON 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. YEAR OF 1932. 

Permits for fires in open spaces, fireworks, blast- 
ing, transportation and storage of explosives, 
garage and gasolene storage, oil burners, etc., 

Sale of old material (condemned hose) . . . 

Sale of old material (junk) 

Miscellaneous sales (apparatus, etc.) 

Sale of badges 

Property damage : 

Fire alarm boxes and posts 

Fire apparatus 



$25,346 


25 


444 


63 


104 


35 


289 


06 


491 


25 


741 


04 


877 


89 


$28,294 47 



16 City Document No. 12. 

CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 

Henky a. Fox. 
The chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Assistant Chief of Department, 

Division 1, 

Deputy Chiefs, John J. Kelley and Louis C. 

Stickel. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1. 

District Chiefs, Napeen Boutilier and William 

F. Donovan. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 

East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 

40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, 31. 

District 2. 
District Chiefs, Philip A. Tague and Thomas F. 

Ward. 
Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22, Rescue 3. 

District 3. 
District Chiefs, John J. Kenney and John F. Good. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 
39, 44 (fireboat). Ladders 8, 18, Water Towers 1 and 3, 

District 4- 
District Chiefs, Avery B. Howard and John F. 

McDoNOUGH. 

Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
31 (fireboat), Ladders 1, 24. 



FiKE Depaktment. 17 

District 5. 
District Chiefs, John F. Watson and Dennis J. 

COUGHLIN. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Broadway. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Rescue 1, Water Tower 2. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chiefs, Thomas H. Downey and William F. 

QUIGLEY. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 

District Chiefs, Michael J. Teehan and Edward G. 

Chamberlain. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 

43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 

District Chiefs, Michael F. Minehan and 
Samuel J. Pope. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33, 
Ladders 3, 13, 15. 

District 8. 
District Chiefs, Daniel Martell and Charles H. 

McDonnell. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26. 

District 11. 
District Chiefs, Thomas H. Andreoli and Cornelius J. 

O'Brien. 
Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 41^ 
51, Ladders 11, 14. 



18 City Document No. 12. 

Division 3. 

Deputy Chiefs, Walter M. McLean and Frank A. 

Sweeney. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 

District 9. 

District Chiefs, William H. McCorkle and Edward 

J. Locke. 

Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 23, 24, 
Ladders 4, 23, Rescue 2. 

District 10. 

Districts Chiefs, Daniel J. Hurley and Edward N. 

Montgomery. 

Headquarters, Engine House 17, Parish Street, 

Meeting House Hill. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 21, 

Ladder 7. 

District 12. 
District Chiefs, Timothy F. Donovan and Joseph W. 

Shea. 
Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 
53, Ladders 10, 30. 

District 13. 
District Chiefs, Charles A. Donohoe and Patrick 
J. V. Kelley. 
Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 
Ladders 16, 25. 

District 14- 

District Chiefs, James Mahoney and James F. Ryan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, 52, Ladders 6, 27, 29. 



Fire Department. 



19 



District 15. 
District Chiefs, John P. Murray and Michael D. 

Sullivan. 
Headquarters, Engine House 48, 
Avenue and Winthrop Street, 
Apparatus Located in the District 
49, Ladder 28." 

Alarms 
Building fires 
Automobile fires 



Corner Harvard 
Hyde Park. 
. — Engines 19, 48, 



Rubbish, vacant lot 

Rubbish near building 

Dump 

Brush or grass . 

Other outdoor fires 

False . 

Accidental 

Needless 

Rescue 

Marine 

Out of city calls 

Total alarms 



3,958 
910 
403 
109 
115 

1,020 
563 

1,168 

169 

694 

200 

22 

64 

9,395 



Fire resistive 
Second class 
Frame . 
Other types 



Basement . 
First floor 
Second floor 
Third floor . 
Above third floor 
Roof . 
Outside 



Fires in Buildings. 

Construction of Buildings. 



Point of Origin. 



Extent of Fire. 
Confined to point of origin 
Confined to buildings 
Spread to other buildings 



205 

1,839 

1,910 

4 

3,958 

1,156 
1,149 
567 
392 
198 
149 
347 

3,958 

3,084 

777 
97 



3,958 



20 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires in 


Bm 


Iding 


, 






Chimneys, soot burning . 


434 


Defective chimney 










69 


Sparks from chimney 










128 


Defectively installed heater 










158 


Rubbish near heater 










16 


Hot ashes 










86 


Fuel oil burners 






* 




107 


Starting fires — kerosene or gasolene 










3 


Careless smoking 










973 


Children and matches 










205 


Other careless use of matches . 










281 


Defective wiring 










119 


Electric appliances and motors 










153 


Home dry cleaning . 










13 


Flammable liquids near flame 










24 


Kerosene lamps, stoves . 










20 


Grease, food on stove 










118 


Clothes, furniture too near fire 










73 


Spontaneous ignition 










184 


Fireworks 










34 


Thawing water pipes 










18 


Sparks from machines 










31 


City gas and appHances . 










36 


Miscellaneous known causes . 










221 


Incendiary or suspicious . 










139 


Unknown 










315 


Total 










3,958 



Fire Department, 



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24 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires and Alaems, from January 1, 
1932, to January 1, 1933. 



Automobile 


910 


Rubbish, vacant lot 


403 


Rubbish, near building . . . 


109 


Dump 


115 


Brush or grass 


1,020 


Other outdoor fires 


563 


False 


1,168 
169 


Accidental 


Needless bell and still .... 


694 


Rescue 


200 


Marine 


22 


Out of city calls 


64 


Chimneys, soot bui'ning . . 


434 


Defective chimney 


69 


Sparks from chimney 


128 


Defectively installed 




heater 


158 


Rubbish near heater 


16 


Hot ashes 


86 


Fuel oil burners 


107 


Starting fires (kerosene or 




gasolene) 


3 


Careless smoking 


973 


Children and matches .... 


205 



Other careless use of 

matches 281 

Defective wiring 119 

Electric appliances and 

motors 1 53 

Home dry cleaning 13 

Flammable liquids near 

flame 24 

Kerosene lamps, stoves. . 20 

Grease, food on stove .... 118 
Clothes, furniture too near 

fire 73 

Spontaneous ignition 184 

Fireworks 34 

Thawing water pipes 18 

Sparks from machines. ... 31 

City gas and appliances . . 36 
Miscellaneous known 

causes 221 

Incendiary or suspicious. . 139 

Unknown 315 

Total 9,395 





Fires Extinguished By 


1932 


'3 

a 


c 

C3 

o 

o 


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a o 


s 

a 

4) 
U 

a 

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>> 


S 

a 
S 
a 


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O 
4) 

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a 


a 




January 


45 
67 
43 
49 
36 
28 
22 
32 
28 
31 
53 
59 


26 
32 
22 
29 
19 
19 
34 
19 
31 
17 
28 
25 

301 


1.36 
162 
200 
185 
164 
112 
158 
101 
93 
91 
145 
146 


29 

20 

11 

12 

11 

7 

18 

11 

6 

9 

9 

12 


48 
49 
92 
66 
63 
57 
62 
62 
38 
29 
53 
45 


48 
49 
37 
29 
30 
17 
23 
27 
25 
37 
42 
51 


11 


February 


16 


March 


26 


April 


15 


May 

June 

July 


30 

28 
25 




19 




10 




18 




15 




24 






Totals 


493 


1,693 


156 


664 


415 


237 



Fire Department. 25 

Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 



Jan. 
Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



1932. 

4.. 



15. 
23. 
28. 
31. 
15 
21. 
26. 



March 16. 
March 17. 
April 9. 



May 
May 
June 
June 

July 
July 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



24. 

7. 

30. 

S. 
21. 

3. 
14. 
17. 
20. 

4. 
13. 
13. 
17. 
27. 



507-515 Tremont street, I. O. O. F. Building et al. 



384 and 386 Atlantic avenue, Foster Wharf Corpora- 
tion et al. 

109 and 111 Beach street, Service Manufacturing Com 
pany et al. 

103 and 103A Charles street, Charles Goldberg, Incor- 
porated, et al. 

95-99 South street, Hamilton Perkins Company et al. . 

134-140 Longwood avenue, S. Wachsman et al 

137 Beach street, A. Shapiro et al 

532 Commonwealth avenue, Kenmore Restaurant et al. . 

24 Hewins street, M. Bahn et al 

547 Blue Hill avenue, B. Brooker et al 



102-114 Commercial street. Standard Products Com- 
pany et al. 

253-259 Bowdoin street; Hamilton Hardware Com- 
pany et al. 

515-527 Washington street, F. &. M. Skirt Company, 
et al. 

112-118 Canal street. Automatic Radio Manufacturing 
Company. 

241-249 Friend street, P. Bernstein et al 

446 Albany street, Huntington Wool Company et al . . . 

68 Northampton street. Cable Raincoat Company. . . . 

54-58 Piedmont street, Hollywood Films Corporation 
et al. 

518-536 Washington street, R. H. White Company. . . . 

146-154 Lincoln street, H. S. Petticoat Company, Inc., 
et al. 

702 Beacon street, W. H. Bradford Company et al . . . . 

Charles River Speedway, Metropolitan Driving Club . . 

484-488 Washington street, Grosberg's, Inc 

2 and 4 Nazing street, S. Fredberg et al 

370 West First street, J. C. Murphy Lumber Company . . 

70 Freeport street, Knox & Morse Company 

8-12 Central avenue, T. J. Halpin et al. 

331 Newbury street, H. Kaufman et al 

1282 and 1282A Blue Hill avenue, A. Miller et al 

51 Melcher street, Ryder & Brown 

854 and 856 Washington street, J. Gorakian & Son. . . . 

1458 and 1460 Washington street, S. Zeghibe et al 



5... 
20... 
24... 
28 162 and 164 Lincoln street, Sobel Shoe Company et al. 



8323,577 65 
19,715 67 

19,020 69 

16,815 43 

58,121 87 
21,402 00 
169,636 46 
17,463 48 
16,727 20 
18,712 13 
16,944 12 

25,240 98 

34,390 17 

90,828 35 

15,761 61 

24,055 90 

55,097 12 

48,554 83 

112,905 57 

22,488 84 

33,123 92 
56,000 00 
19,207 10 
17,709 97 
21,653 61 
16,709 57 
20,123 70 
92,062 42 
15,347 .50 
121,863 90 
35,829 99 
18,541 95 
18,312 73 



26 



City Document No. 12. 



Statistics. 
Population, January 1, 1933 (estimated) 
Area, square miles 
Number brick, etc., buildings 
Number of wooden bui.dings 
Fires in brick, etc., buildings 
Fires in wooden buildings 
Fires out of city 
Not in buildings, false and needless 

Total alarms .... 





805,400 




47.81 




43,866 




93,645 


2,044 




1,914 




64 




5,373 





9,395 



FlEE Loss FOR THE YeAR EnDING DECEMBER 31, 1932. 

Buildings, loss insured $2,332,275 28 



Contents, loss insured 






1,907,892 81 


Total loss insured . . . . . $4,240,168 09 


Marine loss 


$124,218 38 


Yearly Loss for the Last Fifteen Years. 






Marine Loss not Included. 


Year ending January 1, 1919 . 


$2,822,109 00 




i a 




1, 1920 . 






2,577,584 00 




i u 




1, 1921 . 






3,139,566 00 




i a 




1. 1922 . 






4,010,201 00 




i a 




1, 1923 . 






3,304,595 00 




i u 




1, 1924 . 






6,286,299 00 




( a 




1, 1925 . 






4,735,595 00 




i a 




1, 1926 . 






5,407,070 00 




i u 




1, 1927 . 






5,199,965 00 




i u 




1, 1928 . 






3,694,642 00 




I a 




1, 1929 . 






3,887,250 00 




I li 




1, 1930 . 






4,129,926 00 




i a 




1, 1931 . 






4,593,622 00 




i u 




1, 1932 . 






4,115,419 00 




i u 




1, 1933 . 






4,240,168 00 



Fire Department. 



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28 



City Document No. 12. 



Alarms tor the Past Ten Years. 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1932 


5,587 
4,727 
4,601 
4,473 
3,867 
3,492 
3,762 
3,798 
3,640 
3,239 


3,808 
3,934 
3,808 
3,979 
3,829 
3,840 
4,108 
3,904 
4,353 
4,002 


9,395 


1931 


8,661 


1930 

1929 

1928 


8,409 
8,452 
7,696 


1927 

1926 

1925 

1924 

1923 


7,332 
7,870 
7,702 
7,993 
7,241 



Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 



John E. Fitzgerald Medal. 

John J. Leary, for 1922. 
Daniel J. O'Brien, for 1923. 
Thomas F. Kilduff, for 1924. 
Dennis M. Condon, for 1927. 
Joseph P. Hanton, for 1929. 

Walter Scott Medal. 
Dennis M. Condon, for 1922. 
James H. Curran, for 1923. 
Edward J. Crowley, for 1924. 
Gilbert W. Jones, for 1927. 
John J. Boyle, for 1929. 



Roll of Merit. 



Carl V. Anderson. 
Carl S. Bowers. 
James J. Buchanan. 
William 0. Cheswell. 
Dennis M. Condon. 
Walter P. Corbett. 
Michael J. Dacy. 
James E. Downey. 
Thomas H. Downey. 
Dennis Driscoll. 
Joseph P. Hanton. 
Timothy J. Heffron. 



Gilbert W. Jones. 
Henry J. Kelly. 
Martin A. Kenealy. 
John J. Kennedy. 
Frederick F. Leary. 
John J. Martin. 
Edward McDonough. 
James F. McMahon. 
Thomas J. Muldoon. 
Edward J. Murphy. 
Arthur A. Ryan. 
Michael J. Teehan. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEJFARTMENT