(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

r^" 



t 



c^ 



o\^iMl 



"^ 




\C|Zi(i-5>t 



Given By 
Boston Fire Department 



3^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIEE DEPAETMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF I^OSTON 



V KAli KS i n .\^ ' 1 'i-.v 1. 



, 1933 




L.ii \ -/i 1,...,. u., 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 
1934 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIKE DEPAETMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY or BOSTON 



YEAE ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1933 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1934 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1933boston 



OFFICIALS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 

Herbert J. Hickey, 

Executive Secretary of the Department. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 

George L. Fickett, 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division. 

Peter F. Dolan, 

Superintendent of Wire Division. 

Edward E. Williamson, 

Superintendent of Maintenance Division. 

Albert J. Caulfield, 
Deputy Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Division. 

Martin H. Spellman, M. D., 
Medical Examiner. 



[Document 12 — 1934.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

I'IRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1933. 



Boston, April 1, 1934. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith 
a report of the activities of the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1933, as required 
by section 24, chapter 4, of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1925. 

Fire Loss. 

The total fire loss for the City of Boston, estimated 
by the insurance companies, amounted to $2,359,806. 
This is $1,890,362 less than the loss for 1932. This 
is the lowest fire loss paid in the City of Boston since 
the year 1912 and shows the effect of the constant and 
vigilant inspection work being performed by the Fire 
Department. 

In addition, the constant and thorough drive on sus- 
picious and incendiary fires undoubtedly accounts for 
a great saving in the fire loss of this city. It was not 
until 1931 that the Fire Commissioner was authorized 
by the Legislature to investigate the crime of arson and 
incendiarism in the City of Boston. When this 
authority was finally granted, an Arson Unit was 
created within the Fire Department, under the direc- 
tion of a deputy chief. A force of investigators was 



2 City Document No. 12. 

kept on duty twenty-four hours a day and police officers 
were detailed to assist in the investigations by the 
Police Commissioner. There are no delays in the 
investigation of suspicious fires in the City of Boston 
at the present time. 

In connection with this tremendous reduction in the 
fire loss, it is worthy of mention here that large fires 
and a heavy fire loss generally accompany a depression 
in business conditions. While New England, as well 
as the nation as a whole, has been suffering from the 
effects of a business depression, it has been possible for 
the Fire Department of the City of Boston to effect a 
considerable reduction in the fire loss. 

During the year the department .responded to 9,093 
alarms, of which 5,496 were box alarms and 3,597 were 
still and automatic alarms. There were 1,573 false 
alarms in Boston during the year 1933, an increase of 
405 over the year 1932. 

Fire Prevention. 

As I have already stated, the fire prevention work 
of the Fire Department has been very diligently per- 
formed by the inspection force of the Fire Prevention 
Division, as well as by district and company officers. 
The effect of this work has been reflected in the great 
reduction in the fire loss. 

During the year all classes of buildings, with the 
exception of one and two family dwellings, were inspected 
at regular intervals. 

Number of inspections 299,141 

Number of reinspections 12,107 

Number of complaints, reported 8,217 

Number of corrections 24,221 

Number of personal inspections by officers of Fire 

Prevention Division 2,732 

Oil burners inspector 1,916 

Total number of inspections and reinspections . 348,334 

Reports of hazardous conditions were sent to other 
departments as follows : 

Reports sent to Building Department . . . . 1,211 

Reports sent to Health Department .... 3 

Reports sent to School Buildings Department . . 3 

Personal services by Constable 434 



Fire Department. 



In addition to the inspections made by the Fire Pre- 
vention Division, the district and company officers made 
the following number of inspections : 



Building inspections . 

Theater inspections . 

Schoolhouse inspections 

Public buildings 

Car House inspections 

Deer Island monthly inspections by District 1 

Long Island monthly inspections by District 3 



65,616 

3,944 

3,781 

833 

72 

12 

12 

74,272 



Under authority granted the Fire Commissioner, 
chapter 383, Acts of 1931, to investigate suspicious fires 
in the City of Boston, every fire in the city which had 
any aspect of incendiarism was thoroughly investigated 
by the Fire Prevention Division. These investiga- 
tions included 107 fires which were reported as of sus- 
picious origin and 246 which were reported as of unknown 
or undetermined origin, making a total of 353 investi- 
gations by the Arson Unit. I submit below a table 
showing in brief the amount of work done by this unit 
during the past year : 

Number of persons interviewed at Fire Prevention office, 31 
Number of hearings held at Fire Alarm Office, Fenway, 35 
Number of hearings held, that on account of insufficient 

evidence were not presented to District Attorney . .14 
Number of hearings presented to District Attorney for 

consideration as to prosecution 21 

Number of cases arraigned in Municipal Court ... 2 

Cases held for Grand Jury 2 

Number of cases presented to Grand Jury by District 

Attorney 15 

(a) Number of cases where indictments were 

returned 12 

(b) Number of No Bills returned ... 3 
Number of cases awaiting action by District Attorney . 6 

Number of trials 28 

Number of cases — conviction obtained .... 15 

Number of persons convicted 20 

Number of persons found not guilty 26 

Number of persons arrested 25 

Number of persons under indictment and awaiting trial . 15 

Number of persons summoned at hearings .... 357 

(a) Department witnesses 184 

(h) Civilian witnesses 172 

(c) Interpreters 1 



City Document No. 12. 



At the present time six members of the Fire Depart- 
ment are assigned to the Arson Unit, assisted by four 
poUce officers from Pohce Headquarters. 

New Buildings. 

A new fire station at 560 Huntington avenue was 
completed and occupied on October 10, 1933. This 
building is of modified colonial design, three stories 
high, of limestone and brick. The building is occupied 
by Engine Company 37 and Ladder Company 26, 
formerly stationed at the corner of Brookline and 
Longwood avenues. The headquarters of the Chief of 
District No. 8 are also in this building. The Chief of 
District No. 8 was formerly stationed at Roxbury Cross- 
ing but this location brings him more in the center of 
the district. 

A new station was needed in this section of the city for 
many years because of the hospitals, school buildings and 
apartment houses and dormitories in the Roxbury- 
Fenway district. The two companies now located in 
this building were formerly stationed at a building 
almost on the city line, which reduces their radius of 
operation practically fifty per cent. Exclusive of the 
land, this building was erected at a cost of $114,979.41. 
The building formerly occupied by the Fire Department 
at Longwood and Brookline avenues was immediately 
transferred to the Public Buildings Department. 

Fire Apparatus. 
Because of the excellent condition of our present 
equipment, and in order to economize in expenditures 
during the year, no major apparatus was purchased 
in 1933. The motor equipment of the department at 
the present time consists of the following: 



Type. 


In Ser\'ice. 


In Reserve. 




52 

48 

23 

8 

3 

41 

3 
1 

2 
1 

12 
8 
3 


9 


Steam engines (tractors) .... 


3 




8 


Aerial ladder trucks. ... 


6 




6 


Water towers ... 


1 


Chief officers' cars . 


8 




1 


Rescue cars 


2 


Fuel cars 


2 


Portable lighting plants 






. 







Emergency cars (Ford) 















Fire Department. 



High Pressure Service, 



The records of the two high pressure service stations 
for the year are as follows: 



Station No. 1. 



Station No. 2. 



Total alarms to which pumps responded. 
Water discharged * 



255 
227,500 gallons 



181 
196,000 gallons 



* Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters they do not record flows under 600 
gallons per minute. 

At the present time the high pressure system has 501 
hydrants in service and approximately 18.45 miles of 
12-inch, 16-inch and 20-inch mains. 



Hydrants. 

The following is a list of the hydrants in service for 
fire purposes on December 31, 1933: 



Public. 



Private. 



Ordinary post 

Boston post 

Lowry 

Boston Lowry 

Batchelder and Finneran post 

Boston 

High pressure 

Chapman post 

Ludlow post 

Matthew post 

Cofiin post 

Total 



131 
24 
.33 
5 
5 
111 

55 
13 
4 



Fire College. 

The sessions of the fire college continued during the 
year, except during the vacation period, and at the con- 
clusion of the third session, on April 11, 1933, all officers 
had completed the course of instructions and the college 
was then opened to the privates. Eighty privates 
received instructions at the fire college during the year. 



6 



City Document No. 12. 



Mutual Aid. 
During the year the department responded to forty- 
three alarms outside the city hmits, divided as follows; 



Milton 


27 


Somerville 


. . .10 


Quincy ..... 


2 


Brookline 


1 


Newton 


2 


Lowell 


1 



Fire Alarm Service. 
During the year the Fire Alarm Service has been 
maintained at its usual high standard of efficiency. In 
order that the Fire Alarm Service might properly be 
equipped to take care of the extension of the system, 
commensurate with the growth of the city, a contract 
was made during the year for new battery switchboards, 
circuit protector boards, relay boards and other items. 
The total amount to be expended for this equipment is 
$46,741. With the addition of this equipment, the 
fire alarm station will be able to take care of gradual 
extensions of its service for many years. 



Operating Records. 



First alarms 
Second alarms 
Third alarms 
Fourth alarms 



5,520 

66 

14 

3 



Total 5,603 

Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 



Same box received two or more times for same fire . 
Adjacent boxes received for same fire .... 
Received from boxes but treated as stills 

Total 

Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 
Received from Citizens by telephone .... 
Received from Police Department by telephone . 
Received from Fire Department stations 
Received from boxes but treated as stills 
Mutual aid alarms (adjacent cities and towns) treated 

as stills 

Emergency service treated as stills .... 



453 

303 

6 

762 



2,420 

219 

1,070 

6 

43 
175 



Total 



3,933 



Fire Department. 



Still alarms received by telephone for which box alarms 

were afterwards received and transmitted . . 218 

Still alarms received by telephone for which box 
alarms, not received, were transmitted (11 p. m. 
to 7 a. m.) 320 

Total 538 

Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 
Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 150 

Box alarms received and transmitted after auto- 
matic alarms had been struck .... 4 

Box alarms not received but transmitted, after 
automatic alarm had been struck (11 p. m. to 
7 a. m.) 16 

Automatic alarms received at fire alarm office but 

not transmitted 7 

American District Telegraph Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 117 

Box alarms received and transmitted after A. D. T. 

alarms had been struck 6 

Box alarms not received but transmitted after 

A. D. T. alarms had been struck (11 p. m. 

to 7 a.m.) 32 

A. D. T. alarms received at fire alarm office but 

not transmitted 14 

Summary of Alarms. 
Alarms received: 

Box alarms received and struck . . . . 5,152 

Box alarms received but not struck .... 756 

Multiple alarms 83 

Still alarms — all classes 3,933 

Boston automatic alarms 150 

A. D. T. alarms 117 

Box alarms not received but transmitted . . . 368 

10,559 

Exclude following: 

Multiples 83 

Box alarms received but not transmitted . . . 756 

Still alarms for which other alarms were transmitted 538 
Automatic alarms for which other alarms were 

transmitted 20 

Automatic alarms received but not transmitted . 7 
A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were 

transmitted 38 

A. D. T. alarms received but not transmitted . . 14 



1,456 



8 



City Document No. 12. 



Total alarms, with eliminations, to which apparatus responded : 

First alarms 5,520 

Still alarms . . 3,395 

Automatic alarms . 123 

A. D. T. alarms 65 



Multiple Alarm Fires. 



With two alarms 
With three alarms 
With four alarms 



9,103 



53 

11 

3 



Fire Alarm Box Records. 
Boxes from which no alarms were received . 
Box tests and inspections .... 



67 



406 
11,233 



Note. — All street box doors are tested weekly. 



False Alarms. 
Box alarms received and struck 
Box alarms received but not struck 

Telephone 

A. D. T 



Automatic 
Box stills 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 

Owned by Fire Department 

Owned by School Buildings Department 

Owned by Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company, 

Privately owned 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts. 



1,541 

21 

28 

3 

3 

4 

1,600 



1,194 

258 

47 

152 

1,651 



District 1 






96 


District 9 






113 


District 2 






73 


District 10 






136 


District 3 






45 


District 11 






150 


District 4 






86 


District 12 






107 


District 5 






75 


District 13 






167 


District 6 






102 


District 14 






143 


District 7 






105 


District 15 






122 


District 8 






130 






Division 1 


. 375 




Division 2 


487 




D 


ivisi( 


3n3 . 


. 788 









Fire Department. 



Summary of Work Done in 1933. Feet 

Line wire used in new work (approximately) . . 15,150 

Line wire used for replacements (approximately) . 16,000 

Line wire removed from service (approximately) . 4,400 

Aerial cable installed, new work 2,120 

Conductors in same 7,180 

Aerial cable removed from service 600 

Conductors in same 3,600 

Underground cable installed (new work) . . . 11,219 

Conductors in same 84,732 

Underground cable replaced ...... 25,369 

Conductors in same 453,696 

Conduits laid underground 3,540 

Ducts in same . . . 3,743 

Ducts abandoned . 1,374 

Manholes built 2 

Handholes built 6 

Fire alarm boxes installed by this department . . 21 

Fire alarm boxes installed on private property . . 1 

Fire alarm boxes relocated 6 

Fire alarm boxes removed from service ... 3 

Box posts installed 19 

Box posts relocated 2 

Box posts reset or replaced by new .... 4 

Cable posts relocated 1 

Underground cable boxes attached to poles ... 5 

Underground cable boxes removed from service . . 2 



WIRE DIVISION. 

Superintendent Walter J. Burke was retired on Jan- 
uary 1, 1933, and Peter F. Dolan, chief inspector, was 
appointed superintendent on March 3, 1933. 

The regular and periodical inspections of all perma- 
nent electrical installations in theaters, places of amuse- 
ments and public halls were carried on during the year, 
together with inspections of new installations and 
changes in electrical work. Thorough investigations 
were made of all fires and accidents reported as due to 
electrical causes and the reports are on file in the Wire 
Division. 

The following is a table showing a summary of the 
work of the interior division of the Wire Division for 
1933: 



Notices of new work received 11,645 

Number of permits issued to turn on current . 9,295 

Number of incandescent lamps inspected . . 2,153,807 

Number of motors inspected . . . . . 15,774 



10 City Document No. 12. 

Number of inspections made 28,972 

Number of inspections made of theatres, places 

of amusement and public halls .... 1,393 

During the year there were ninety-two fires in build- 
ings, eleven manhole troubles, four fires on poles and 
twelve miscellaneous troubles investigated. There were 
seven accidents to persons due to electricity, — none of 
which proved fatal. 

The income received from permits to perform elec- 
trical work is $34,246.33. 

Exterior Division. 
The underground district for the year 1933, as pre- 
scribed under authority of chapter 101 of the Acts of 
1931, comprised the following streets: 

Roxhury. — Humboldt avenue, from Walnut avenue to 
Seaver street; Columbus avenue, from Centre street to Walnut 
avenue; Longwood avenue, from Parker street to St. Alphonsus 
street. 

South Boston. — West Second street, from Dorchester avenue 
to Dorchester street; East Second street, from Dorchester 
street to K street. 

East Boston. — Lexington street, from Meridian street to 
Shelby street; Shelby street, from Saratoga street to Lexington 
street. 

Brighton. — Chiswick road, from Chestnut Hill avenue 
westerly to end of street at 205 Chiswick road; Market street, 
from Lincoln street to Western avenue, making a total distance 
of four miles as prescribed by law. 

In these prescribed streets, from which poles and 
overhead wires were to be removed, there was standing 
on January 1, 1934, a total of one hundred and seventy 
(170) poles (not including the trolley poles of the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company which are exempt) 
owned by the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
and New England Telephone and Telegraph Company, 
supporting one million one hundred thousand nine 
hundred and ninety (1,100,990) feet of overhead wires, 
owned by the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Company, 
Boston Fire Department (Fire Alarm Branch), Boston 
Police Department (Police Signal Service), and Boston 
Elevated Railway. 

During the past year the inspectors of this division 
have reported one hundred and sixteen (116) poles 



Fire Department. 11 

decayed at base and eight (8) poles leaning, or a total 
of one hundred and twenty-four (124) poles, which were 
replaced or reset by the various companies at the request 
of this department. 

The following table shows the overhead work for the 
year from January 1, 1933, to December 31, 1933, 
inclusive : 

Number of new poles set in new locations . . 15 

Number of poles replaced, reset or straightened . 124 

Number of poles removed 7 

Number of poles now standing in the public streets 17,770 

Number of defects reported ..... 977 

Number of defects corrected 718 

(Other defects in process of correction.) 

Number of notices of overhead construction . 1,598 

Number of overhead inspections .... 24,031 

Number of overhead reports 19,593 

Amount of overhead wires removed by owners 

(in feet) 566,240 

Underground Construction. 
The ducts used for underground conduits of the 
dra wing-in systems are of the following type : 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete). 

3. Iron. 

4. Wood. 

In side or residential streets, special underground con- 
struction for electric light and power purposes (110 and 
220 volts), of the type known as the ''SpUt Fiber Solid 
Main System", has also been installed. 

The electrical approvals for underground electrical 

construction numbered 1,070 

Number of inspections of underground electrical con- 
struction 7,905 

Number of reports of underground electrical con- 
struction 1,625 



12 City Document No. 12. 

Table Showing Underground Work for the Year 1933. 



Company. 


•3 
■0 
a 

C 

"o 
g 


3 

Q 
"0 


V 

3 
ffl 




a 






Boston Elevated Railway 

Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany. 

Boston Fire Department (Fire 
Alarm Branch). 


1,400 
1,059 

92,620 

2,320 

1,250 

4,404 

1,000 


5,560 
1,059 

555,055 

2,259 

1,250 

6,654 

1,915 


37,735 
16,756 

480,132 

11,219 


5 

163 
5 


25 

954 

16 

49 


Signal Service). 

New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 

Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany. 


33,545 
1,921 


2 
1 


29 
3 


Totals 


104,053 


573,752 


581,308 


176 


1,076 







Note: — "SpUt Fiber Solid Main System" of Edison Electric lUumi 
included in the above figures, comprising 1,183 feet of conduit and 2,315 



nating Company is 
feet of duct. 



Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power, 

December 31, 1933. 



Company. 


In 

life 


H 


Capaeit.v of 
Incandescent 
Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 


^ am 

ogs 

o 


S o 

as 


"o 


fc.2 




24,360 


241,287 


4,355 

3,000 

* 

140 
125 


15 
300 

* 


353,454 
6,000 

* 

75 
106 


68,800 
2,000 

* 

215 

* 


i 2t 
1201: 

9 




Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 
Hanover Street Trust 


54,424 
500 
620 


292,816 
360 
400 


72 
1 




2 






Totals 


79,904 


534,863 


7,620 


315 


359,635 


71,015 


99 







* Unknown. (Meter capacity connected toIineB of Edison system, 1,110,000 kilowatts.) 
t Main. + Substation. 

I resigned as Fire Commissioner on October 16, 1933, 
after having served in that position since March 5, 1930. 
I accepted a reappointment to this position on January 5, 
1934. From October 16, 1933, to January 5, 1934, 
Eugene M. McSweeney was Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 13 

Recommendations. 

Too much emphasis cannot be placed upon the im- 
portant work that is being done along fire prevention 
lines in the Fire Department during the past three or 
four years. 

I have given the matter of fire prevention considerable 
attention and study. A school has been established for 
the inspectors so that they will be entirely familiar with 
all the common hazards they may encounter during 
their inspection work, as well as the proper method of 
having them corrected. Additional officers were 
assigned to the Fire Prevention Division when the 
force was increased, so that there would be a constant 
check-up at all times of the men who were out doing 
inspection work. I have also arranged to have men 
assigned from the various fire houses to go out each day 
for a few hours to inspect buildings within the company 
districts, supplementing the work of the fire prevention 
inspectors. 

When the Massachusetts Legislature authorized the 
Fire Commissioner to investigate suspicious fires in the 
City of Boston, I organized within the Fire Prevention 
Division an Arson Unit. Members of this unit were 
trained under a deputy chief to investigate causes of 
fires and gather evidence when any suspicious fires were 
reported. Police officers have been assigned to the 
Fire Prevention Division to assist in the prosecution 
of cases when the evidence warrants it. There is no 
doubt that the Fire Prevention Division, with the 
assistance of the Arson Squad, has been of great assist- 
ance to the fire fighting force in the city in reducing the 
fire loss. 

I recommend that the work which has already been 
started be continued in order that the fire loss of the 
City of Boston may show a constant reduction annually. 

False Alarms. 

During the year there were 1,573 false alarms sent 
out over the fire alarm system. This evil seems to be 
growing greater and greater each year, regardless of the 
attention that has been called to it quite frequently in 
the newspapers. This department is now making a 
study of some way to correct this disgraceful practice 
and it is hoped that by bringing the matter forcibly 
to the attention of school children that some of the alarms 



14 City Document No. 12. 

may be eliminated. The greater percentage of these 
alarms are not sounded by children but by some character 
of fanatics who do not seem to realize the danger that 
their acts may cause. Prompt police prosecution and 
severe sentences would undoubtedly be very effective 
in eliminating the number of false alarms sounded in 
the city. 

New Buildings. 
The subject of new building construction is one which 
is under consideration at all times. There are several 
fire houses in the City of Boston which are old and 
antiquated and were never built with a view to accom- 
modating the modern Fire Department equipped with 
motor apparatus. They have been remodeled from 
time to time to serve the city temporarily. When the 
finances of the city will permit, it would be advisable 
to begin a program of rebuilding and relocating some 
fire stations, so that not only will the houses of the 
department be up-to-date, but the efficiency of the 
department will be increased. 

Yours very truly, 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 



15 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES, 1933. 



Fire Department 

Wire Division 

New Fire Stations and Additions to and Improve- 
ments of Existing Fire Stations .... 



1,804,226 83 
83,611 42 

177,345 51 

t,065,183 76 



ANNUAL REPORT OF REVENUE BOSTON FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. YEAR OF 1933. 

Permits for fires in open spaces, fireworks, blast- 
ing, transportation and storage of explosives, 
garage and gasolene storage, oil burners, etc 

Sale of old material (condemned hose) 

Sale of old material (junk) 

Sale of badges 

Damage to property- 
Damage to fire alarm boxes and posts 

Damage to fire apparatus 



$24,607 28 
200 00 
250 79 
350 05 
50 19 
383 15 
138 69 



$25,980 15 



16 City Document No. 12. 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 
Henry A. Fox. 
The chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Division 1. 

Deputy Chiefs, John J. Kelley and Louis C. 

Stickel. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 

This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1. 

District Chiefs, Napeen Boutilier and William 

F. Donovan. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 2, Paris Street, 

East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 

40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, 31. 

District 2. 

District Chief, Philip A. Tague. 

Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22, Rescue 3. 

District 3. 

District Chiefs, John J. Kenney and William A. 

Donovan. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street, 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 

39, 44 (fireboat). Ladders 8, 18, Water Towers 1 and 3. 

District Jj-. 
District Chief, John F. McDonough. 
Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
31 (fireboat). Ladders 1, 24. 



FiKE Department. 17 

District 5. 
District Chiefs, John F. Watson and Dennis J. 

COUGHLIN. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Broadway. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Rescue 1, Water Tower 2. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chiefs, Thomas H. Downey and William F. 

Quigley. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 
District Chiefs, James J. Kane and Edward G. 

Chamberlain. 
Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15,, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 
District Chiefs, Michael F. Minehan and 

Samuel J. Pope. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33^ 
Ladders 3, 13, 15. 

District 8. 

District Chiefs, Daniel Martell and Charles H. 

McDonnell. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 12, Tremont Street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 

37, Ladders 12, 26. 

District 11. 
District Chiefs, Thomas H. Andreoli and Joseph W. 

Shea. 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton, 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 41^ 
51, Ladders, 11, 14. 



18 City Document No. 12. 

Division 3. 
Deputy Chiefs, Walter M. McLean and Frank A. 

Sweeney. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 

District 9. 
District Chiefs, William H. McCorkle and Edward 

J. Locke. 
Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 23, 24, 
Ladders 4, 23, Rescue 2. 

District 10. 

Districts Chiefs, Daniel J. Hurley and Edward N. 

Montgomery. 

Headquarters, Engine House 17, Parish Street, 

Meeting House Hill. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 17, 18, 21, 

Ladder 7. 

District 12. 
District Chiefs, Timothy F. Donovan and Thomas F. 

Ward. 
Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 
53, Ladders 10, 30. 

District 13. 
District Chief, Charles A. Donohoe. 
Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 
Ladders 16, 25. 

District 14- 

District Chiefs, James Mahoney and Walter C. Glynn. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 
46, 52, Ladders 6, 27, 29. 



Fire Department. 



19 



District 15. 

District Chief, William Hart. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 

Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
49, Ladder 28. 

Alarms. 



Building fires 

Automobile fires 

Rubbish, vacant lot 

Rubbish near building 

Dump . 

Brush or grass . 

Other outdoor fires 

False . 

Accidental 

Needless 

Rescue 

Marine 

Out of city calls 



Total alarms 



Fire resistive 
Second class 
Frame . 
Other types 



Fires in Buildings. 
Construction of Buildings. 



Total 



Point of Origin. 



Basement . 
First floor . 
Second floor 
Third floor . 
Above third floor 
Roof . 
Outside 

Total . 



Extent of Fire. 
Confined to point of origin 
Confined to buildings 
Spread to other buildings 



3,726 

959 

283 

127 

62 

573 

525 

1,573 

245 

689 

273 

15 

43 

9,093 



192 

1,817 

1,711 

6 

3,726 



1,202 
1,077 
473 
331 
164 
121 
358 

3,726 



3,055 
589 

82 



Total 



3.726 



20 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires in Buildings 



Chimneys, soot burning . 
Defective chimney . 
Sparks from chimney 
Defectively installed heater 
Kubbish near heater 
Hot ashes .... 
Fuel oil burners 
Careless smoking 
Children and matches 
Other careless use of matches 
Defective wiring 
Electric appliances and motors 
Home dry cleaning . 
Flammable liquids near flame 
Kerosene lamps, stoves . 
Grease, food on stove 
Clothes, furniture too near fire 
Spontaneous ignition 
Fireworks .... 
Thawing water pipes 
Sparks from machines 
City gas and appliances . 
Miscellaneous known causes 
Incendiary or suspicious . 
Unknown .... 



473 
55 
66 

108 
45 
83 

178 

920 

197 

200 
88 

178 

9 

44 

16 

112 
54 

153 
65 
59 
36 
17 

237 
87 

246 



Total 



3,726 



Fire Department. 



21 







• 


o 


• 

o 


o 


o 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










»s 






•» 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1/5 


o 


ir> 


o 


in 


o 


IT) 


o 


















IC 


in 


•^ 


''I" 


r^ 


ro 


fs 


fN 


€/> 


€/» 


y^ 


€/» 


ee 


«/» 


€^ 


«^ 



22 



City Document No. 12. 



o 

;^ 
I— I 

02 
CO 

O 
aT 



<1 
K 

o 

1 

a 

GD 

3 

n 

Pi 


•joop^no Jaqio 


io.-t,-ii-iioo300cocCTt<-<i<co 


IN 


•ssBaQ JO qsnjg 




CO 

in 


•duinQ 


o 


Ttiomrt<Mi-ii-(-*-*io 


IN 

to 


•§nip|ing j^an qsiqqny 


1-1 IM ,-1 (N rt 


IN 


•^07 ^UBOBA 'qeiqqny; 


CO C^iOCOM".-! ,-llMr-l 


S3 

(N 


•eanqoiuocfuy 




"2 


1 
o 


■n!;g es9ip98js[ 


TOC0ro(N(NCOC0<N(NC»5CDO3 


in 


•nag ssaipaaj^ 


iO->^^iMC0500000iO^TtHt^ 


in 

CO 


•anosay 


lOO— i»OiOiO,-^00OTt(cnO 
■-li-l<NrtCN(MC^rtlNCC(M'}l 


CO 


•jB^napiooy 


OIN<Nt^lOir>(NMCDOOC^ 
rtmi-i .-irt.-H(Ni-iCi|(NCD 


in 
■* 

IN 


■asiB^ 


CDiO.-HOiOCOiOtDCncDO'H 
COl^(NOO-HTt<rtOOO^iO 


CO 
in 


s 

o 

Q 

w 

« 

a 


'l^^o.L 


795 
624 
736 
611 
805 
788 
784 
532 
507 
760 
1,011 
1,140 


CO 
o 


•UA10U3IUX1 


;DU3rttO>ncoiOCD03«000 
Mt^lNOO-HTfi^OOO-HiO 


(N 

in 


■oi^'BUioc^ny 




00 

IN 


uapie^no 


CO»CiOTjl5D?DCDCCCOiOt^OS 


05 
CO 


•U'BTllqO^'BAY 


orocootoosccosiNiO'^io 


OS 


■aoiIOtj 


05 05 00 CC CO •— < O t^ CD f-H Qj o 


o 


■gjaquiaj\[ 


OOIM-^CO-H-H-^C^COCOOOIC 


CD 


ai 
S 
K 


•ein^S •I3TJO 


<MOcooo50o>niCi-ioo<rqco 

t>.iCiOOt>-OOOiOCOOCOiO 




•auoqdaiax 


iNiOO)(Nl^tOC0O5-*iO00iO 
■^OCOOJCO-H—i'-H^OOcOCO 


00 

00 
in 

IN 


■xog 


rf0500005-*tDOONt^>-i(M 
005O-*CO"OtO00iOCOtOi-i"O 
■*CO'<j<COTt<-*-<)HCOCO-*!OCD 


CO 

■* 
in 




K 
H 
Z 



> 








c 
< 


> 

^ 1 


1 a- 


_> 


< 


a 

£ 

a 

a: 


a 

■i 

, -J; 
C 


£ 

> 

c 


a 

£ 
a 

a. 

c 




1 

c 





Fire Department. 



23 



•8?ua:juoo 



"sSuTpjing 



■* O (N (M to O 

CO TjH t^ rH -H to 

CO 00 CD 00 00 00 



(M 1-1 CO 



CD 00 (>) 



lO -H CO ^ CO C^ 

»C t^ .-H t^ t--. t^ 

CD »0 X ^ 05 CD 

oT c^" oi rt" t^' cd" 

OOCDtOOC^CO-^C^ 



—I 00 00 00 (N 

o_ -<_ 00 -:i<_ oo_ 
'-I oT in" cd" ■*" 



•s'^ua^troQ 



•sSuipjing; 



_ 0_ .-■_ iO_ 00 

CO CO rH cd" 00 co" co" ■*" 



(M 03 00 00 o 
r-l lO 00 00 o 



-H CD CO 



0> 00 lO lO cq 



00 <N lO —1 



(N to »0 '-' CD CD 

CO lO lO oj >o t>. 

t^_ t- ,-!_ 00_ iO_ lO^ 

t-" Oi OO" ffl (N o" 

O] -H CO CO lO o 



-HTjIlOCOOSCOCOrHlOi-l 

COTl<00mo0CJ>00O3O0r-i 



Tfl lO (N >n 0> CD CO 



CO 00 00 



Oi IN —1 
CD -H CO CO 



CO (N lO 00 
-; (M 1-1 



•paXoj^gaQ vtiiB^ox 



ajq'BJapisTioQ sSbuibq 



CO lO IN 1-1 TJH 



•^q3ilg aSBiuBQ 



■*COt~'-i(N-*00i-it^t^cD 
t»00OcDr~01CDININC0l> 



■3U0^ aSBUI-BQ 



iNlNCOt^lNlNiO'^TlicoOO 
lOTjiiO'-ilNiMOtOCDiNOO 



rt rt IN 



■fijaq^O o^ papna^xg 



cocot^-oojcoiocoiomoo 



•3uip|mg o^ pauguoQ 



lOOiCOf^COlNCOOliCOOO 



■mooy^ o^ paugnoQ 



■siiBQ iS'JiO JO ■jno 



auuBj^ 



'0■«J<l-ll^^lOcO'^rHco^•oo 



IN CO CO 






e 1 



o 2; Q 



24 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires and Alarms, from January 1, 
1933, TO January 1, 1934. 



Automobile 


959 


Rubbish, vacant lot 

Rubbish near building . . . 
Dump 


283 

127 

62 


Brush or grass 

Other outdoor fires 

False 


573 

525 

1,573 


Accidental 

Needless bell and still .... 
Rescue 


245 
689 
273 


Marine 


15 


Out of city calls 

Chimneys, soot burning. . . 

Defective chimney 

Sparks from chimney 

Defectively installed 

heater 

Rubbish near heater 

Hot ashes 


43 

473 

55 

66 

108 
45 
83 


Fuel oil burners 


178 


Careless smoking 

Children and matches. . . . 


920 

197 



Other careless use of 

matches 

Defective wiring 

Electric appliances and 

motors 

Home dry cleaning 

Flammable liquids near 

flame 

Kerosene lamps, stoves. . . 
Grease, food, on stove .... 
Clothes, furniture, too 

near fire 

Spontaneous ignition 

Fireworks 

Thawing water pipes 

Sparks from machines .... 
City gas and appliances. . 
Miscellaneous known 



causes 

Incendiary or suspicious. 
Unknown 



Total. 



200 



178 
9 

44 

16 

112 

54 
153 
65 
59 
36 
17 

237 

87 

246 

9,093 





Fires Extinguished by 


1933. 


'5 

M 


c 

o 

o 

o 
3 

M 


o . 
la « 

'a 8 
o 


B 

CS 


1 
S 


3 
o 

0) 


O 




46 
37 
41 
23 
31 
36 
33 
18 
26 
40 
44 
SI 


21 
26 
24 
26 
20 
30 
20 
1.5 
20 
19 
21 
33 


141 
161 
164 
124 
119 
132 
117 
70 
87 
106 
174 
224 


7 
4 
8 
9 
16 
12 
7 
3 
1 
3 
3 
9 


59 
53 
66 
50 
60 
51 
47 
33 
27 
39 
43 
94 


39 
35 
45 
38 
37 
42 
34 
31 
15 
34 
54 
54 


16 


February. 


17 


March 


16 




9 




15 




13 


July 


18 




18 




15 




23 




26 




28 






Totals .... 


456 


275 


1,619 


82 


622 


458 


214 







Fire Department. 



25 



Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 


Location and Owner. 


Loss, 




1933. 






Jan. 


21 


48-54 Canal street, Imperial Furniture Company et al. 


$18,057 81 




OS 


61-63 Shawmut avenue, M. S. Rosenbaum et al 

84-100 Peterborough street, A. Demajian et al 


29,789 15 


Feb. 


2 


17,126 50 


Feb. 


7 


56 Brighton avenue, Fordham Realty Company etal 


26,693 96 


Feb 


10 

h 19 


868 Broadway, Roman Catholic Archdiocese 


86,287 26 




25-43 Kneeland street, Haymarket Clothing Company 
et al. 


36,242 84 








March 20 


197-201 Congress street, Sager Electrical Supplj' Com- 
pany et al. 


93,114 34 


March 20 


Rear 458 Blue Hill avenue, Grove Hall Chevrolet Com- 
pany et al. 


18,197 00 


June 


9 


137 and 139 Stuart street, E. F. Cloran Company 


18,350 00 


Nov. 


2 


33-35 Bedford street, Laboratory Kitchen et al 


95,821 21 


Nov. 


7 


Central Wharf, Eastern Steamship Company et al 


149,840 53 


Nov. 


IS 


127 and 133 Oliver street, Portland Elevator Company 
et al 


26,408 47 


Dec. 


90 


120 Business street, Baylite Lamp & Shade Company. , 


24,000 00 









Statistics. 
Population, January 1, 1934 (estimated) 
Area, square miles 
Number brick, etc., buildings 
Number of wooden buildings 
Fires in brick, etc., buildings 
Fires in wooden buildings 
Fires out of city 
Not in buildings, false and needless 





805,400 




47.81 




43,975 




93,830 


2,009 




1,717 




43 




5,324 


Qno.q 



Fire Loss for the Year Ending December 31, 1933. 

Buildings, loss insured $1,456,783 09 

Contents, loss insured 903,023 86 



Total loss insured 
Marine loss 



$2,359,806 95 



$917 26 



26 



City Document No. 12. 



Yearly Loss for the Last Fifteen Years. 



Marine Loss not Included. 




Year ending January 1, 1920 . 


$2,577,584 00 


1—1 


1921 . 






3,139,566 00 


U U ti 1 


1922 . 






4,010,201 00 




1923 . 






3,304,595 00 


U U U 1 

-*• 


1924 . 






6,286,299 00 


« « « 1 

•*- 


1925 . 






4,735,595 00 


« « « 1 


1926 . 






5,407,070 00 


« « « 1 


1927 . 






5,199,965 00 


U U « 1 


1928 . 






3,694,642 00 


« « « 1 


1929 . 






3,887,250 00 


« « « ]^ 


1930 . 






4,129,926 00 


« « « 1 


1931 . 






4,593,622 00 


« « "1 


1932 . 






4,115,419 00 


U U U 1 


1933 . 






4,240,168 00 


« « « 1 


1934 . 






2,359,806 00 



Fire Department. 



27 



t/3 
< 

> 
z. 

H 

t/5 

o 

:^ 
< 

< 

O 

E 
O 

o 

E 

< 
a 





































<^ 




"-> 










<^ 




o 

0^ 










2 


















1 


























r^ 




U5 












«^ 




»> 












Ov 






c 














\ 
















\ 








iM« 






•« \ 








•^ 






<© \ 








2 






00 \ 




























\ 








o 






®*\ 








f^ 






© \ 








Ov 






00 « 




























\ 








OS 






f^ \ 








ri 






Ui \ 








CN 






oo » 




























\ 


I 






00 






-e 


\ 






r<« 






©. 


\ 






OS 






r<. 


\ 














\ 






• 








) 






t>. 








/n 






(N 








/ SS 






Os 








/ f^ 












/ 


r 














7^ 








VO 






© 










r^ 






* 










On 
















■" 






















' 


, 








• 






1 










lO 






r* 








r<« 






/s 








On 






/•^ 














/ 














i 








■^ 






»* 








C3 














On 






l» 








"" 
















o 


o 


o o 


o 








o 


o 


o o 


o 








m 


o 


ir> o 


1/5 








Cs 




On 


00 00 




rN 





28 



City Document No. 12. 



Alarms for the Past Ten Years. 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still and 
Automatic. 


Totals. 


1933 


5,496 
5,587 
4,727 
4,601 
4,473 
3,867 
3,492 
3,762 
3,798 
3,640 


3,597 
3,808 
3,934 
3,808 
3,979 
3,829 
3,840 
4,108 
3,904 
4,353 


9,093 


1932 

1931 


9,395 
8,661 


1930 


8,409 


1929 . 


8,452 


1928 


7,696 


1927. 


7,332 


1926 


7,870 


1925. 


7,702 


1924. 


7,993 







Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 

John E. Fitzgerald Medal. 
John J. Leary, for 1922. 
Daniel J. O'Brien, for 1923. 
Thomas F. Kilduff, for 1924. 
Dennis M. Condon, for 1927. 
Joseph P. Hanton, for 1929. 

Walter Scott Medal. 
Dennis M. Condon, for 1922. 
James H. Curran, for 1923. 
Edward J. Crowley, for 1924. 
Gilbert W. Jones, for 1927. 
John J. Boyle, for 1929. 



Roll of Merit. 



Carl V. Anderson. 
Carl S. Bowers. 
James J. Buchanan. 
William O. Cheswell. 
Dennis M. Condon. 
Walter P. Corbett. 
Michael J. Dacy. 
James E. Downey. 
Thomas H. Downey. 
Dennis Driscoll. 
Joseph P. Hanton. 
Timothy J. Heffron. 
Gilbert W. Jones. 



Henry J. Kelly. 
Martin A. Kenealy. 
John J. Kennedy. 
Frederick F. Leary. 
John J. Martin. 
Edward McDonough. 
James F. McMahon, 
Thomas J. Muldoon. 
Edward J. Murphy. 
Arthur A. Ryan. 
Michael J. Teehan. 
John A. O'Connor. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT