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Full text of "Annual report"

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EIGHTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



1934 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1936 



'h^-0L6 



fSY 






THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 
7.8.36 : :500 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



WILLIAM CARDINAL O'CONNELL, President 

Term expires April 30, 1937 

FRANK W. BUXTON ELLERY SEDGWICK 

Term expires April 30, 1935 Term expires April 30, 1938 

JOHN L. HALL LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN 

Term expires April 30, 1936 Term expires April 30, 1939 



MILTON E. LORD 
DIRECTOR, AND LIBRARIAN 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized 
in 1 852, are now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 1 1 4 of the 
Acts of 1878, as amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary or- 
ganization; that for 1853 made the first annual report. The Board at 
present consists of five citizens at large, appointed by the Mayor for 
five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each year. The follow- 
ing citizens at large have been members of the Board since its organization 
in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926-1 93 L 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, a.m., 1879-95. 

Appleton Thomas Gold, a.m.. 1852-56. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, ll.d., 1894-1917. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, a.m., 1852-68. 

BowDiTCH, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1 865-67. 

Bowditch, Henry Pickering, m.d., 1894-1902. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 

Brett. John Andrew, ll.b., 1912-16. 

Buxton, Frank W., a.b., 1928- 

Carr. Samuel, 1895-96. 1908-22. 

Chase, George Bigelow, a.m., 1876-85. 

Clarke, James Freeman, d.d., 1879-88. 

Coakley, Daniel Henry. 1917-19. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. 

Currier. Guy Wilbur, 1922-1930. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, a.m., 1873-75. 

De Normandie. James, d.d. 1895-1908. 

Dwight, Thomas, m.d.. 1899-1908. 

DwiNNELL, Clifton Howard, b.s., 1927-28. 

Everett, Edward, ll.d., 1852-64. 

Frothingham, Richard, ll.d.. 1875-79. 

Gaston. William Alexander, ll.b.. 1923-27. 

Green. Samuel Abbott, m.d., 1 868-78. 

Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 

Hall, John Loomer, a.b., ll.b., 1931- 

Haynes. Henry Williamson, a.m., 1880-94. 

Hilliard, George Stillman, ll.d., 1872-75; 1876-7 7. 

Kenney, William Francis, a.m., 1908-1921. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis Edward, 1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis. Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Mann, Alexander, d.d., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1 870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, ll.b.. 1921-26. 

O'Connell, William Cardinal, 1932- 

PiERCE, Phineas. 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, a.m.. 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, d.d., 1868-77. 



Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Sedgwick, Ellery, a.b., litt.d., 1930- 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, ll.d., 1852-68. 

Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, ll.d., 1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, ll.d., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, ll.d., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, a.m., 1 868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, a.m., 1885-88. 

WiNsoR, Justin, ll.d., 1867-68, 
The Hon, Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1 852 
to 1864; George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough. 
from 1866 to April, 1888; Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 
1888, to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12. 1888. to 
April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895. to May 8. 
1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12. 1899. to October 15. 1907; 
Rev. James De Normandie, January 31, 1908. to May 8, 1908; 
JosiAH H. Benton. May 8, 1908. to February 6, 1917; William F. 
Kenney, February 13. 1917. to May 7, 1920; Rev. Alexander 
Mann, May 7, 1920, to January 22, 1923; Msgr. Arthur T. 
Connolly, April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein. 

Tune 13, 1924 to June 19. 1925; HoN. MiCHAEL J. MURRAY. June 
19. 1925 to July 2. 1926; Guy W. Currier, July 2, 1926 to May 
2, 1927; Msgr. Arthur T. Connolly. May 2, 1927 to June 22. 
1928; Louis E. Kirstein. June 22, 1928 to June 21. 1929; Gordon 
Abbott. June 21, 1929 to June 20, 1930; Frank W. Buxton, 
June 20. 1930 to May 15, 1931 ; Louis E. KiRSTEiN, May 15, 1931 
to May 20, 1932; Ellery Sedgwick, May 20. 1932 to May 5, 
1933; John L. Hall, May 5. 1933 to May 18. 1934; William 
Cardinal O'Connell since May 18, 1934. 

LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; from 
1923 to 1934 Director; since 1934 Director and Librarian.) 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852 - December 16. 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858 - January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, ll.d.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868 - Septem- 
ber 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1 , 1 877 - 
September 30. 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d. Librarian, October 1, 1878 - Septem- 
ber 30, 1890. 

Dwight, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892 - April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 11, 1895 -April 3, 
1899. 

Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899 -De- 
cember 21, 1899; Librarian, December 22, 1899 - January 31, 
1903 

Wadlin, Horace G., litt.d.. Librarian, February 1, 1903 - March 
15, 1917; Acting Librarian, March 15, 1917- June 15. 1917. 

Belden, Charles F. D.. a.m.. ll.b.. litt.d.. Director, March 
15, 1917 -October 24, 1931. 

Lord. Milton E., a.b., Dlreclor, and Librarian, iince hebruaiy i. 

1932. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1934 



Departments. 
*Cential Library, Copley Square . 
*East Boston Branch, Tlb-1%1 Meridian St. 
§South Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
llFellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
*CharIestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
^Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road . 
JDorchesler Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St 
fLower Mills Branch, 1110 Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
JSoulh End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. 
tjamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St 
IRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
*Norlh End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponsel Ave. 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St 
§Aliston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St 
$Mt. Pleasant Branch, 335 Dudley, cor Vine St. 
JTyler Street Branch, 130 Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
*West End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
JMemorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts. 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles, cor Tremont St. 

*Boylston Branch, 433 Centre St 

§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler Ave. 

JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway . 

*Parker Hill Branch, 1497 Tremont St. . . . 

*Hyde Park Branch, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St 

*Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St. .... 

§Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 

♦Jeffries Point Branch, 222 Webster St. . . . 

SBaker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration Jan. 15 

*Kirstein Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 

Kirstein Branch, third floor. 
§Phillips Brooks Branch, 12 Hamilton St., Readville . 



IfOPENED. 


May 


2. 


1854 


Jan. 


28. 


1871 


May 


1. 


1872 


July 


16. 


1873 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


25, 


1875 


June 


7. 


1875 


Aug. 




1877 


June, 




1876 


Dec. 


3. 


1878 


Jan. 


6. 


1880 


Dec. 


27. 


1881 


Oct.. 




1882 


Jan. 


1. 


1883 


Nov. 


1, 


1886 


Mar. 


11. 


1889 


Nov. 


12, 


1890 


Nov. 


12. 


1890 


Jan. 


16. 


1896 


Feb. 


1. 


1896 


Mar. 


16. 


1896 


May 


1. 


1896 


Jan. 


18 


1897 


Nov. 


1. 


1897 


June 


25. 


1901 


July 


18. 


1906 


July 


15. 


1907 


Jan. 


1. 


1912 


Mar. 


4. 


1914 


Mar. 


5, 


1914 


Oct. 


15. 


1921 


Jan. 


15. 


1927 


May 


7. 


1930 


May 


18. 


1931 



Qln the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. *In building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board. \\n building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses. Jin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §Occupie» 
rented rooms. ||lhe lessee of the Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 
J Under agreement with Harvard. 



CONTENTS 

Report of the Trustees ...... 1 

Balance Sheet 6 

Report of the Examining Committee . . . . 12 

Report of the Director ...... 20 

Appendix ......... 27 



To Mis Honor Fredfrick W. Mansfield, 
Ma]^or of the Citv of Boston. 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the Citv of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31,1 934, being the eighty-third annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 
1 8, 1 934 with the election of His Eminence William Cardinal 
O'Connell as President, Mr. Frank W. Buxton as Vice Presi- 
dent, and Miss Elizabeth B. Brockunier as Clerk. 

Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, whose term as a Trustee expired on 
April 30, was re-appointed for the term ending April 30, 1939. 



BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted on November 1 , 1 933 for the main- 
tenance of the Library during the year 1 934 were later amended 
and reduced. These estimates were as follows : 



Item 
A. — Personal service 
B. — Service other than personal 
C. — Equipment 

D. — Supplies .... 
E. — Materials 
H. — • Emergency Relief Projects 



Original estimate 

$805,850.56 
95,815.00 
175,859.00 
34,690.00 
22,450.00 
30,000.00 



Amount allowed 

$824,719.00 
74,065.00 
117,000.00 
33,200.00 
21,000.00 
36.423.81 

$1,106,409:81 



Total . . . $1,164,664.56 

The amount allowed for Personal Service originally was 
$800,000. This was subsequently increased to $824,719 to 
permit in 1 934 the resumption of step rate increases in pay dis- 



[2] 

continued since 1931. During 1934 there were also in effect 
salary reductions for all city employees on a graduated basis 
of 5%, 10%, and 15%. 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the year 1 934 these receipts were : 

Annual appropriation $1,106,409.81 

Income from trust funds ........ 26,306.01 

Unexpended balance of trust funds income of previous years . . 60,080.50 

Total . . $1,192,796.32 

Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the year were 
as follows: 

$22,082.17 



From fines ..... 

From sales of waste paper . 

From sales of catalogs, etc. . 

From commission on telephone stations 

From payments for lost books 

Refund 



59.28 

122.31 

487.13 

659.61 

4.51 

$23,415.01 



EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 

The total amount expended during 1934 was $1,130,706.28 
This was divided as follows: 

From city appropriation $1,106,409.81 

From deposits in London ........ 1 ,205.85 

From special appropriations ........ 6.80 

From the income of trust funds ....... 23,083.82 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

Hie number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 66,059, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part by 
gift and exchange. The total number of volumes in the Library 
at the close of the year was 1,673,609. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and from the trust funds income was $120,494.05. 



[3] 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The home use of books for the year was 5,194,351. The 
use of material within the Library's premises for reference and 
study is for the most part unrestricted, and it is thereiore im- 
practicable to record it. 

In addition to the above noted use of the Central Library and 
the thirty-four Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 
available to 321 agencies, including engine houses, institutions, 
and schools. 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS, !933 and 1934 

A comparison of certain statistics of 1 934 with those for 1 933 
is noted below: 

Tola! expenditures: city appropriation 

and trust funds income 
Expended for books and other library 

material from city appropriation 

and trust funds mcome 
Number of volumes added 
Total number of volumes in the Library 
Borrowed for home use . 
Number of card holders . 

RE-ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY 

Steps were taken during the year to effect additional develop- 
ment of the revised plan of organization of the Library adopted 
by the Board in September 1932. A detailed statement of these 
steps is included in the report of the Director, to be found on 
pages 20-26 below. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Constant vigilance has been necessary in the matter of the 
level of the ground water in the vicinity of the Central Library 
building. Close attention has been given to its study, particu- 
larly as it affects the underpinning, the foundations, and the 
superstructure of the building. 

The emergency relief activities of the Federal Government 
under its Civil Works Administration made possible extensive 
painting of walls and floors both at the Central Library and in 



1933 


1934 


034,945.75 . 


. $1,130,699.48 


i 19.076.63 . 

68.175 . 

1,654,017 . 

5,548,283 . 

197,458 . 


120,494.05 

66.059 

1.673,609 

5,194,351 

182.470 



[4] 

the Branch Libraries. A large project was also carried on under 
these auspices for the cleaning of books throughout the entire 
library system. 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF PROJECTS CARRIED ON 
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE LIBRARY 

In addition to the above physical improvements effected as 
part of the emergency relief projects of the Federal Government 
there were carried on two additional large projects, first under 
the Civil Works Administration, and subsequently under the 
Federal Emergency Relief Administration. The first of these 
provided for changing the cards in the several card catalogs of 
the Central Library to the uniform size employed in most Amer- 
ican libraries. The second provided for the changing of the 
shelf lists of the Central Library from their old handwritten 
folio volumes to a modern arrangement on uniform size catalog 
cards. Both of these projects have contributed materiall / to 
making possible an eventual development along modern lines 
of certain of the Library's processes in which improvement has 
long been desired. The latter project is continuing into the 
coming year. 

Approximately seven hundred individuals have been em- 
ployed, their wages being provided by the Federal Government, 
and special provision for incidental expenses being made by the 
City. 

GIFTS 

During the year the Library received many important gifts 
of books and other library material. A list of the principal gifts 
is to be found in the Appendix on pages 35-37. 

TRUST FUNDS 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare and other im- 
portant books that give value and prestige to a great educational 
institution such as the Library has become. 



[5] 

As a mat.ter of interest to the public the Board has pleasure 
in listing herein the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. The list will be found on pages 38—48 below. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of 1 934. Its membership included the 
following individuals: 

Hon. Elijah Adlow Mr. George R. Nutter 

Mr. George Bramwell Baker Hon. James P. Parmenter 

Mr. Walter B. Briggs Mrs. Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Dr. Arthur H. Cole Mrs. Edward M. Pickman 

Mr. Ralph Adams Cram Hon. Abraham E. Pinanski 

Hon. James M. Curley Mr. Robert Proctor 

Miss Susan J. Ginn Mr. Charles M. Rogerson 

Mr. Francis X. Hurley Mrs. Arthur A. Shurcliff 

Dr. Henry Jackson Mrs. Francis E. Slattery 

Mr. Herbert F. Jenkins Rev. William M. Stinson 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson Mr. Charles H. Taylor 

Mr. Carl T. Keller Mr. D. B. Updike 

Rev. Robert H. Lord Dr. Henry R. Viets 

Mr. Charles D. Maginnis Mr. Charles F. Weed 

Mrs. Frederick Winslow 

It is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens who render such service. Special attention is called to 
the constructive report of the Committee as it appears on pages 
12—19, immediately following. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the report of the Director of the Library 
as found on pages 20-26 below. It presents the important de- 
velopments within the Library during the course of the year. 

To the entire Librar}^ staff we wish here to express our ap- 
preciation of the work which they have rendered to the public. 

Frank W. Buxton 

John L. Hall 

Louis E. Kirstein 

William Cardinal O'Connell 

Ellery Sedgwick 



[6] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Cf.ntral Library and Branches: 
To Expenditures For 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing 

and Binding employees) 
Temporary employees .... 



To Service Other Than Personal 
Printing and binding . 
Advertising 

Transportation of persons . 
Cartage and freight . 
Light and power 
Rent, taxes and wafer 
Surety, bond and insurance 
Communication 
Cleaning 

Removal of ashes 
Removal of snow 
Medical 
Expert 
Fees 

Photographic and blueprinting 
General plant 



To Expenditure for EQUIP^ 

Machinery 

Motorless vehicles 

Furniture and fittings . 

Office 

Books: 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 
(including transfer to 
London account) 

Newspapers : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Music : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Lantern slides: 

Trust funds income 

Periodicals: 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Photographs : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Tools and instruments 

General Plant 



85.195.67 



17.841.23 

918.18 
1.715.25 

77.06 
1.108.87 



13.183.72 
286.22 

45.00 
91.60 



$637,626.02 
116,152.06 



61.04 

2.50 

1 ,808.03 

7,108.0! 

21.203.77 

18,112.74 

389.25 

4.049.23 

1,002.71 

13.60 

363.10 

2.00 

1,853.48 

20.00 

125.30 

25.495.71 



1.571.58 

23.00 

4.617.76 

1.473.07 



103.036.90 

2.633.43 

1.185.93 
31.25 

13.469.94 



136.60 
975.67 
770.46 



$753,77808 



81.610.47 



Carried forivard 



129.925.59 
$965,314.14 



[7] 



EXPENSES. DECEMBER 31, 1934 



Cr. 



By City Appropriation 1934 
By Income from Trust Funds 
•By Income from J. L. Whitney 

Bibliographic Account 
By Transfer from Domestic Funds to 

London Account 



$1,106,409.81 
26,306.01 

700.00 

4,000.00 



1.137.415.82 



Carried foTWarJ 



$1,137,415.82 



[8] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forward 
To Expenditures for Supplies 
Office 
Food 
Fuel 

Forage and animal , 
Medical 

Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Agricultural 

Chemicals and disinfectants 
GenercJ plant 

To Expenditures for Material 
Building 

Electrical .... 

General plant 



$965,314.14 



to elxpenditures for f.e.r.a. projects 

To Special Items 

J. L. Whitney Bibliographic account 
To Binding Department: 

Salaries 

Light 

Repairs 

Equipment 

Supplies 

Building material 

Slock 



To Printing Department 
Salaries 
Light 

Communication 
Repairs 
Equipment 
Supplies 
Stock 
Outside work 



To Special Appropriation : 

Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 
To Amount Paid Into City Treasury: 

Fines ..... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins . 

Commission on telephone stations 

Payments for lost books . 

Refunds ..... 

Sales of waste paper .... 



7,992.84 

1530 

20,169.73 

16.70 

36.97 

1,965.61 

356.39 

258.08 

2.571.67 



5,080.03 
3,778.05 
1,483.82 



55,530.39 

55.26 

265.36 

216.39 

9.37 

1.30 

5.816.11 



12,666.04 

47.54 

3.78 

912.65 

663.64 

38.96 

2.162.45 

141.29 



22,082.17 

1223! 

487.13 

659.61 

4.51 

5928 



33,383.29 



10341.90 
41,04237 



2,087.25 



61,894.18 



16,63635 
6.80 



23.415.01 



Carried forward 



$1,154,121.29 



[9] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 3 1 , 1 934 



Cr. 



Brought formarJ ..... 
By Balance Brought Forward from 1933: 
Trust funds income. City Treasury . 
Trust funds income, on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 
Library Building, Fireproo.'ing, improvements, etc. 
Library Building, Foundations 
Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 
H. C. Bentley Gift 



$1,137,415.82 



60,080.50 

40.88 

i ,528.89 

4,161.98 

16,524.80 

19,747.96 

7,309.80 

220.38 



109,615.19 



Carried forivarJ 



$1,247,031.01 



[10] 
BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought formard 

To Balance, December 31, 1934: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London . 
Trust Funds income, City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 
H. C. Bentley Gift 

To Balance Unexpended, December 31, 1934: 
Central Library Building, Fireproofing . 
Central Library Building, Foundation 
Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 



$1,154,121.29 



1 ,901 .57 

323.04 

67,529.25 

2,774.73 

220.38 



16.524.80 

19,747.96 

7,303.00 



72,748.97 



43.575.76 



Carried forruard 



$1,270,446.02 



Ill] 

EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31. 1934 



Cr. 



Brought forward 
By Receipts: 

From Fines .... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commissions on telephone stations . 
Payments for lost books . 
Refunds .... 

Sales of waste paper .... 



$1,247,031.01 



22,082.17 

122.31 

487.13 

659.61 

4.51 

59.28 



23.415.01 



$1 .270,446.02 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: 

The Examining Committee for the year 1934 respectfully 
submits its report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE 

In accordance with the recommendation made by the Com- 
mittee of 1932, and pursued by the Committee of 1933, the 
Examining Committee of 1934 was appointed and met for 
organization in June. This gave opportunity for an adequate 
period of study and investigation and has made possible the 
rendering of its report within the limits of the calendar year. 
The several sub-committees assigned to the various divisions of 
the work have given careful consideration to the problems of 
the Library and in addition have visited the thirt)'^-three branch 
libraries as a committee of the whole. Each member of the 
Committee visited three branches and only two members were 
assigned in most cases to each branch. As the complete findings 
of the various sub-committees are on file with the Library, it 
appears that a summary of the prominent features will suffice 
for this report. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Perhaps the question of buildings and equipment should have 
first attention. For some years there has been felt some concern 
relative to the foundations of the Central Library building. The 
life and strength of the foundations depend upon the preservation 
of the wooden piles upon which the building rests. The con- 
tinuous checking and rechecking and recording of the water 



[13J 

level in the ground under the Main Library building in Copley 
Square is of vital importance and should be continued. There 
seems also to be a pressing need for decreasing floor loads, 
especially in the bookstacks. This leads the Committee to 
endorse the plans being developed by the Director for rearrange- 
ments in the use of space in the Central Library building, with 
a view to bringing about at the same time greater efficiency in 
administration. In addition to this the Committee hopes that 
the time will soon come to resume the policy of replacing existing 
inadequate branch library buildings in accordance with the long- 
time plan that was in force before the depression. 

BOOK SELECTION 

Next in importance is the consideration of the problem of the 
selection of books. Succeeding Committees have been faced 
constantly with the question of whether or not the Library 
has been maintainmg a proper balance in its two main functions, 
namely, that of meeting popular library needs, and that of 
providing for scholarly reference needs. With limited funds 
it is obviously difficult to maintain a perfect balance in the ful- 
fillment of these functions. Attempts should be made constantly 
to determine the proper ratio between investments in popular and 
scholarly material. The Committee of 1 932 recommended that 
means be provided to enable the Library to make a survey of the 
demands for the various types of material and the sources of 
these demands, and to keep track continuously of the funds 
invested in books of various classes and various subject matters. 
A long step has been taken in this direction in the past year by 
the installation of tabulating machines, making possible the con- 
tinuous collection of data as to the expenditures by groups, and 
the sources of the demand for the purchase of particular materials. 
The statistics thus obtained will be of aid to the library ad- 
ministration in determining with greater accuracy whether the 
Library's funds are being expended to meet the above needs in 
the best possible manner. 

Last year's Committee called attention in its report to the 
improvement in the arrangements for book selection that has 



[14] 

been brought about through the reorganization of the Library. 
It is hoped that as a result of this formal recognition of the 
function of book selection there will follow the appointment of 
expert personnel who will be conversant with the subjects with 
which the Library must deal. It is recognized, however, that 
there is a limit to the number of expert personnel who may be 
employed, and therefore it is recommended that those responsible 
for book selection have the benefit of recommendations from 
outside experts in their respective fields. The Committee sug- 
gests the possibility of securing the uncompensated assistance of 
qualified individuals who will be willing to aid in book selection. 
Such arrangements, no doubt, will result in a more useful de- 
velopment of the Library's collections, particularly for research 
purposes. Perhaps in this connection it is well to recommend 
also a thorough study of the collections in terms of their long- 
time development. 

BOOKBINDING 

Apparently facilities for bookbinding are at present in- 
adequate to the needs of the Library. This, of necessity, brings 
about arrears in the repair and conditioning of books. As the 
use and the growth of the Library increase, this is likely to 
become a serious problem. The availability of Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration funds for aid in this direction 
is suggested for consideration. The problem of the conditioning 
of bindings is highly important, particularly in respect to the 
rare book collections. It is understood that the library adminis- 
tration is giving this problem serious study. Also it is noted that 
there are apparently differences of opinion as to the best methods 
for the preservation of valuable bindings. The Committee urges 
that this study be prosecuted without undue delay and that 
action follow upon the results at the earliest possible moment. 

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 

Funds made available by the Federal Emergency Relief Ad- 
ministration have enabled the Library to make extraordinary 
progress with some of the problems of its cataloging. Many 
problems which were apparent a year ago have been solved with 



115] 

the aid of these funds. As a result the Library will shortly be 
in a position to proceed to a reclassification of its collections 
along modern lines. 

SPACE IN CENTRAL LIBRARY BUILDING 

One of the problems of the Library that is rapidly becoming 
acute is that of finding space for its growing collections. Funda- 
mental moves to meet this situation will apparently have to be 
taken during the coming year. In connection with the re- 
allocation of library space that may have to be considered, par- 
ticularly in the Central Library, the Committee believes that 
certain general principles should be emphasized: 

1 . that the more accessible areas of the Library be employed 
for service to the public rather than for internal library ad- 
ministration ; 

2. that special collections of allied interest be brought into 
as close physical proximity as possible; 

3. that the unsatisfactory conditions surrounding the location 
of the Statistical Department be eliminated; 

4. that those portions of the Library at present employed for 
allied rather than purely library activities be converted in 
their use to purposes that are purely of a library nature, 
and in the Central Library more particularly for the ade- 
quate housing of the special collections. 

It is a pleasure to learn that a beginning of this work of re- 
allocating space in the Central Library building can perhaps be 
made during the year that is ahead. In connection with this 
the Committee wishes to urge also that definite consideration be 
given to the problem of proper air conditioning throughout the 
Central Library building, and particularly in the Rare Book 
Department. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The question of the Library's publications is a vital one. The 
Committee wishes to suggest that the scholarly articles that have 
been appearing in the Library's monthly bulletin might be pre- 
sented in a form more worthy of the dignity of a great scholarly 



[16] 

library, perhaps in a quarterly publication designed for scholars, 
while the present monthly bulletin, or an adaptation thereof, 
might be continued under the title "More Books" and be 
developed for popular consumption, primarily through the branch 
libraries. The Committee believes that there is need for a 
popular bulletin as well as for a more dignified presentation of 
the Library's scholarly activities. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

A number of the problems met by the ordinary reader in his 
use of the Library were considered by a new sub-committee ap- 
pointed for the first time this year, namely, that on the Use of 
the Library. It was the unanimous opinion of this sub-com- 
mittee that improved service to the individual reader is the best 
possible way of encouraging the use of the Library. In this 
connection the Committee is particularly glad to learn of the 
plans under development by the Director for the establishment 
of a central administrative headquarters for readers in the Abbey 
Room, adjacent to the Issue Department and to the Bates Hall 
Card Catalogue and Reading Room, for the handling of com- 
plaints, the clearing up of misunderstandings, and the directing 
of readers, to the end that patrons of the Library may have full 
opportunity for satisfaction in their attempts to master the com- 
plexities of a large library system. The Committee offers also 
the suggestion that there be established a "waiting list" for 
books in constant demand, so that individual readers may be 
notified by postal card when in their turn these books become 
available for their use. It is recommended also that the many 
entrances and exits to the book stacks in the Central Library be 
reduced in number, so that unauthorized individuals may not 
have access to them ; thus helping to reduce book losses from the 
shelves and also facilitating the checking of the work of the 
pages engaged in "running" for books requested by readers. 

RELATIONSHIP OF THE LIBRARY TO SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

The relationship of the Library to the schools and colleges of 
the city constitutes a vital problem. Good results have already 



[171 

been achieved m this direction. The Committee beHeves never- 
theless that there are possibihties for developing a better relation- 
ship between the School Department and the Library Depart- 
ment through the establishment of a continuing committee to 
promote mutual understanding of the possibilities and limitations 
of each department's work. Much study can profitably be 
given to the entire question of this relationship of the Library 
to schools and colleges, particularly with reference to what the 
Library may reasonably be expected to contribute to the work 
of these institutions. The Committee fears that there is grave 
danger that colleges in the neighborhood of the Central Library 
look upon the Library as an annex to their own institutions. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

As noted at the beginning of this report each member of the 
Committee visited three branch libraries. In order that the 
members might conduct their visits intelligently and know 
exactly what they were expected to examine, eleven topics for 
investigation were agreed upon as covering the general con- 
dition of the branch libraries. These were as follows : 

1 . Is the entrance convenient and well lighted ? 

Are there outside signs? Is the street outside well lighted at night? 

2. Is the floor covering in good condition? Does it deaden the noise 
of footsteps? 

3. Is the ventilation good? If not, how can it be improved? 

4. Is the lighting good for readers? If not, can the position of the 
lights be changed, or can they be made brighter and more numerous 
without great expense? 

5. Are adults and children so separated that adults have quiet? 

6. Are the rooms overcrowded? If so, can this situation be relieved 
by re-arranging departments? 

7. Where more than one floor is occupied, is there quick communica- 
tion between floors, i.e., by speaking-tube or telephone? 

8. Are the premises used for other than library purposes, to the 
detriment of the Library? 

9. How is the staff accommodated as to work-rooms, typewriting 
space and rest-rooms? 

10. Are there any special activities in the branch, i.e., collections of 

photographs, etc. ? 
1 1 . Can any small improvements be made without much expense which 

will facilitate the work of the branch? 



[18] 

In addition to the answers to these questions, several recom- 
mendations were offered, all of which are included in the report 
of the Sub-Committee on Branch Libraries, on file with the 
Library. An additional point of interest is that of rendering the 
branch libraries less institutional in character. The Committee 
believes that this process might be aided in large measure through 
the formation of local committees, each committee being de- 
signed to take an interest in, and to support, the branch library 
of its own community. 

FINANCE 

The Committee has found in 1 934 much the same conditions 
existing as in 1 932 and in 1 933 with respect to financial support. 
In those earlier years it seemed best, in view of the depression, 
not to set forth projects which, while needful, required increased 
expenditure, but to confine recommendations to the few matters 
which seemed fundamental. For instance, the Committees of 
each of the last two years recorded themselves strongly in favor 
of at least maintaining the service of the Library, and, if possible, 
expanding it ; certainly not contracting it. It has been truly said 
that "the rediscovery of the Public Library is a by-product of 
the depression." This year's Committee wishes therefore 
earnestly to renew the recommendations made in the past two 
years, that the facilities of the Library be at least maintained, if 
not increased; and certainly not contracted. 

It is the desire of this Committee that it be recorded as sup- 
porting the important recommendations of its predecessors. It 
hopes, for instance, that there may be carried out in the course 
of time the recommendation that there be established a body to 
be known as "The Friends of the Boston Public Library," from 
among whose members there might be furnished each year con- 
tributions, small or large, for the purchase of books and manu- 
scripts which can not ordinarily be obtained through the Library's 
usual appropriations. Attention ought also to be given to plans 
for making better known to the public at large the substantial 
quantity of rare and valuable material in the possession of the 
Boston Public Library. Toward this end it is recommended 



[19] 

that careful consideration be afforded to the pubHshing of a 
brochure presenting a brief history of the Library, enumerating 
its resources, Hsting its special collections, and pointing out the 
need for endowment to develop and build up these collections. 
Such a brochure ought to be the best specimen of the printer's 
art and have attractive illustrations. It should be made available 
to selected individuals, with the hope that they might thereby 
become interested in the Library and in the development of the 
Library's collections. 

CONCLUSION 

In conclusion the Committee wishes to state that it would be 
remiss in its duties if it did not pay tribute to the admirable 
work that is being done by the Director and his large corps of 
assistants. The desire of the Committee in offering its sugges- 
tions is simply to aid them in augmenting the good work already 
done. 

Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, De- 
cember 17, 1934. 

Susan J. Ginn, Vice Chairman 

Elijah Adlow George R. Nutter 

George Bramwell Baker James P. Parmenter 

Walter B. Briggs Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Walter S. Bucklin Hester Pickman 

Arthur H. Cole Abraham E. Pinanski 

Ralph Adams Cram Robert Proctor 

James M. Curley Charles M. Rogerson 

Francis X. Hurley Margaret M. Shurcliff 

Henry Jackson Lillian C. Slattery 

Herbert F. Jenkins William M. Stinson, S.J. 

Henry Lewis Johnson Charles H. Taylor 

Carl T. Keller Henry R. Viets 

Robert H. Lord Charles F. Weed 

Charles D. Maginnis Mary W. Winslow 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF the City of Boston : 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library 
for the year ending December 31,1 934. 

effects of the depression 

The economic depression continued to be clearly recognizable 
in its effects upon the Library's work throughout the year. The 
increased use of books and facilities that had begun after 1 929 
was sustained in appreciable fashion, though not quite to the 
same high degree as in 1 932 and 1 933. Appropriations for the 
support of the Library remained perceptibly depressed; even 
though their total for 1934 showed an increase over that for 
1933, they were notably below the level that had prevailed for 
a considerable period preceding 1933. 

Increased demands were made upon the Library in sponsoring 
and carrying out work projects for the relief of the unemployed, 
under the auspices of the Federal Emergency Relief Adminis- 
tration. 

CONTINUING INCREASED USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The experience of the year indicated that the increased use 
of books arising out of the depression conditions prevailing since 
1 929 was being sustained in appreciable fashion. During 1 934 
there were borrowed for home reading 5,194,351 volumes. This 
figure represents a 32% increase over that for 1929. 

The following table shows the greatly increased use of the 
Library during five years of economic depression, 1 930 - 1 934 : 







PERCENTAGE OF 


PERCENTAGE OF 




NO. OF BOOKS LENT 


INCREASE OR DECREASE 


INCREASE 




FOR HOME USE 


OVER PRECEDING YEAR 


OVER 1929 


1929 . 


3.930.068 




, 


1930 . 


4.133.459 


: +5%' '. '. 


. + 5% 


1931 


4.702.932 


. +13% . . 


+20% 


1932 . 


5.567.681 


. +18% . . 


. +42% 


1933 . 


5.548.283 


. -03% . . 


+41% 


1934 . 


5.194.351 


. - 6% . . 


. +32% 



[21] 

It is to be npted that in 1934 there occurred the first appreciable 
change in the trend of increase that had been prevailing since 
1 929. The number of books lent for home use in 1 934 declined 
by 67( from the number lent in 1933. The average percentage 
of decrease during 1934 for the public libraries of the country 
at large was 8%. 

There would seem to be two reasons underlying this change 
in 1934 from the trend of increase in existence from 1929 to 
1933. The one — which is encouraging from a general point 
of view — is that improvement in general economic conditions 
has apparently been setting in; the unemployed are beginning 
to find employment once more, and there are therefore perhaps 
fewer of them to use libraries. The other — which is markedly 
discouraging from the particular point of view of the Library — 
is that the Library's books have become so worn out by the heavy 
use of the past four to five years that it is no longer possible to 
offer them in sufficient quantity to meet the demand that never- 
theless exists for them. It is to this latter situation that most 
weight is probably to be attached in indicating reasons for the 
decline in the number of books being borrowed. 

In any case it is clear that the Library finished the year 1 934 
lending 32% more books than in 1929, the last of the pre- 
depression years. This is in itself an increase which is notable, 
despite its being slightly under the peak increases of 1932 and 
1933. 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE LIBRARY 

The City appropriated for the support of the Library during 
1 934 the sum of $ 1,1 06,409.8 1 . This was $ 1 1 ,659.8 1 greater 
than the amount appropriated in 1933. The increase was made 
up of the following items: 

For miscellaneous needs ........ $15,515.00 

For the resumption of step rate increases in pay .... 24,719.00 

For the purchase of books ........ 25,000.00 

For emergency relief projects ....... 36,425.81 

$101,659.8! 



[22] 

Throughout many subdivisions of the budget it was necessary 
to make provision for rising costs of materials. For this purpose 
the additional appropriation of $15,515 was made. 

With the advent of a new city administration in 1934 there 
was resumed the practice of granting step rate increases in pay 
for those groups of city workers who had been employed on 
such a basis prior to the discontinuance of the practice in 1 93 1 . 
The library employees had been such a group; consequently an 
additional appropriation in the amount of $24,719 was made 
for the purpose in the course of the year. The resumption of 
such step rate increases proved a most heartening measure to 
members of the library staff. It made possible also an adjust- 
ment in part of a number of cases in which inequalities had 
arisen through the discontinuance of the practice three years 
earlier. 

The appropriation for the purchase of books had suffered 
severely when its amount had been dropped from $160,000 in 
1932 to $75,000 in 1933. For 1934 the appropriation as first 
determined was set at $75,000; in the course of the year an 
additional amount of $25,000 was made available, in recog- 
nition of the need for books made acute by the heavily increased 
use of the Library arising out of the conditions of the economic 
depression. This additional appropriation proved of great aid. As 
shown above, the Library's books have been experiencing notab- 
ly heavy use during the past five years. In fact they have been 
in process of being worn out at so great a rate that it is no longer 
possible to supply them in sufficient quantity, or in sufficiently 
good condition, to meet the public demands. The result has 
been that in 1 934 there occurred a decline of 6% in the number 
of books borrowed by readers for home use, the first appreciable 
change in the trend of increase prevailing since 1 929. There is 
little evidence that the demand for books on the part of the 
public has decreased notably. The chief reason for the decline 
is believed to be the depletion of the Library's book stock. Books 
are being worn out faster than they can be replaced. An acute 
situation in this respect is developing for the years immediately 
ahead. 



[23] 

For emergency relief projects a special appropriation was 
made in the amount of $36,425.81 . This was for the purchase 
of supplies and materials and for the rental of space and equip- 
ment necessary for carrying on several extensive relief projects 
for which the cost of personnel was provided by the federal 
Rovernment. 



UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF PROJECTS 

In the last weeks of 1933 the Library was asked to assume its 
share, together with other departments of the city government, 
in planning, sponsoring, and carrying out work projects for the 
unemployed, under the general auspices of the Civil Works 
Administration then being established by the federal govern- 
ment. Projects were initiated promptly and were continued 
from 1933 into 1934. Originally designed to be of ten weeks 
duration only, the projects were extended in length, and ad- 
ditional projects developed, under the auspices of the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration in succession to the Civil 
Works Administration. 

In the course of the year there was completed the work of the 
large C.W.A. project initiated to make possible the changing 
of the cards in the catalogues of the central library to the uni- 
form size employed in most American libraries. This was suc- 
ceeded by an F.E.R.A, project for changing the shelf lists of 
the central library from large bound folio volumes to uniform 
size catalogue cards. Other projects were carried on for the 
cleaning of books and for the painting of walls, floors, and the 
like throughout the library system. 

These projects provided work for three to four hundred in- 
dividuals in the course of the year. The cost of personnel was 
borne by the federal government as part of its program for the 
relief of the unemployed. The contribution on the part of the 
Library was that of directing the work, together with providing 
supplies and materials and renting space and equipment, for 
which purpose a special appropriation was made by the City. 



[241 

FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF 
REORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY 

During 1933 there was instituted a revised plan of organi- 
zation for the Library which provided for the distribution of 
its activities between a Circulation Division (primarily the branch 
libraries), a Reference Division (primarily the central library), 
and a Division of Business Operations (for the business manage- 
ment of the entire library system) . At the time fiscal conditions 
did not permit the appointment of officers to head either the Cir- 
culation Division or the Reference Division. It was possible, 
however, to make appointments to certain intermediate positions 
within the divisions. 

In 1 934 it became possible to proceed further. Appointments 
were made to the positions of Chief Librarian of the Circula- 
tion Division and Chief Librarian of the Reference Division. 
These officers, and the Comptroller at the head of the Division 
of Business Operations, are to be responsible for the entire func- 
tioning of their respective divisions. As division heads they are 
to report directly to the Director. They will be the second rank- 
ing officers of the Library. The Director is thus to become the 
general administrator of the entire library system, with the divi- 
sion heads serving as the active executive officers of the respective 
divisions. 

One other major change was made during the year. In the 
Reference Division recognition was given to the importance of 
the extensive rare book collections in the possession of the Li- 
brary, and their need for special attention, through the establish- 
ment of the position of Keeper of Rare Books. 

Further developments in the reorganization of the Library 
will be necessary as conditions permit. For the moment certain 
limitations, primarily in physical facilities, prevent the complete 
realization of many desirable rearrangements of departmental 
relationships, particularly along functional lines. Attempts to 
achieve these will have to be made from time to time. A library 
is an organic body. It must recognize that evolution and change 
are a necessary part of its lot. 



[25] 

TRAINING OF PERSONNEL 

In 1 933 there was instituted an extensive and wide program 
of training courses open to all full-time members of the library 
staff. This program was put into full effect at the beginning of 
the academic year in October 1933. 

During the academic year 1933—34 there were 261 members 
of the library staff enrolled in twelve full courses (three terms 
of ten weeks each) and nine one-term courses. Of these indi- 
viduals 202 completed the work satisfactorily; 71 did so with 
distinction. 

The academic year 1934-35 found 168 members of the 
staff enrolled for courses beginning with the autumn term. Ad- 
ditional enrollments were indicated for the one-term courses to 
follow in the winter and spring terms. 

Enrollment in the courses is voluntary. The individual has 
to undertake the work in his own, not library, time. The courses 
are conceived primarily as a sharing of experience, knowledge, 
and thought by the more advanced members of the staff with 
those less advanced. 

These training courses are not expected to produce results 
that will necessarily be extraordinary. They will have been 
worth while if they afford an opportunity for training to those 
who feel in need thereof but have not previously had such a pos- 
sibility within their reach, or if they afford supplementary work 
for those who have had formal library training elsewhere. For 
the Library there should eventually follow a raising of the level 
of the qualifications of the staff as a whole. It is of no little sig- 
nificance that two hundred members of the library staff are 
engaged in work and study in such courses. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The following appointments to titular positions were made 
during the year: Orlando C. Davis, as Chief Librarian of the 
Circulation Division; Richard G. Hensley, as Acting Chief 
Librarian of the Reference Division; James W. Kenney, as 
Acting Comptroller; Zoltan Haraszti, as Keeper of Rare 



[26] 

Books; and Francis J. Hannigan, as Supervisor of Special Ref- 
erence Departments. 

Under the provisions of the Boston Retirement Act the fol- 
lowing individuals retired from the library service : Emil L. Hof- 
man. Pressman in the Printing Department, after 24 years 
service; and Mary A. Hopkins, Cleaner, after 23 years service. 

By death the Library lost the services of Cecilia W. Kueffner, 
Cataloger in the Cataloging and Classification Department, and 
Helen R. Needham, Second Assistant in the Boylston Branch 
Library. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the statistical summaries that appear in 
the Appendix to this Report. 

The Director has pleasure in acknovs^ledging constant sup- 
port from Trustees and Library Staff alike. It has meant much 
to the work of the Library. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Milton E. Lord 

Director, and Librarian 



127] 



APPENDIX 



TABLES OF CENTRAL AND BRANCH CIRCULATION 





1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


Central Library 


676,240 


698,627 


728,656 


777.666 


793,121 


756.018 


Business Branch 




6,157* 


13.193 


16,604 


17.614 


18,410 


Allston 


97,445 


108,557 


137,709 


1 75,054 


192,331 


186,413 


Andrew Square 


110,225 


116,196 


128337 


155,574 


145,801 


138,638 


Boylston 


80,097 


79.946 


94,306 


147,862 


143,764 


138,595 


Brighton 


92,223 


103,145 


121,032 


139,276 


147.666 


134.388 


Charlestown 


100,483 


100,914 


119,637 


136,845 


144.676 


127.866 


City Point 


83,558 


97,264 


122,619 


1 55,492 


150,036 


144.762 


Codman Square 


153,372 


158,881 


186,386 


216,780 


199,786 


185.451 


Dorchester 


99,255 


102,790 


115,810 


137,018 


140344 


132.104 


East Boston 


145,759 


1 57,746 


180.859 


218.072 


214,789 


188.819 


Faneuil 


72,005 


78.436 


90.424 


120,007 


130,252 


138.234 


Fellowes Athen. 


88,381 


85,739 


93,970 


114,937 


109,077 


98.118 


Hyde Park 


108,512 


120,878 


127,888 


154,838 


149,875 


144,011 


Jamaica Plain 


85,935 


95,895 


118,561 


133.335 


131,903 


126,702 


Jeffries Point 


62,111 


70,768 


75.459 


100.736 


92.499 


80,460 


Kirstein 




18.020* 


43,196 


56,971 


65,149 


63388 


Lower Mills 


44,730 


52,279 


59,692 


76.137 


81,017 


74.990 


Mattapan 


133,210 


139,723 


187,669 


220,675 


219,300 


205.498 


Memorial 


180,344 


178,467 


213,320 


246.739 


246.757 


222.975 


Mt. Bowdoin 


134.008 


134,310 


151,456 


168,036 


1 58,667 


149,341 


Mt. Pleasant 


72.167 


76,956 


82,795 


100361 


102,914 


94,640 


Neponset 


51,228 


57,043 


60,986 


75,148 


78,579 


69,638 


North End 


145,201 


145,326 


1 58,333 


185,849 


163,735 


143351 


Orient Heights 


42.571 


56,954 


60,512 


84,887 


84,233 


92,801 


Parker Hill 


56,209 


60,815 


112,308 


130,042 


125,524 


119,139 


Phillips Brooks 






25,713* 


50383 


51.870 


46,258 


Roslindale 


124,995 


130,268 


151,956 


170,287 


1 73,078 


167,562 


Roxbury Crossni 


g 78,803 


80,022 


69,034 


77,650 


76,023 


75,062 


South Boston 


171,805 


163,266 


161,244 


189,904 


168326 


141,046 


South End 


123,794 


124.352 


122,870 


150,745 


155,575 


1 54,604 


Tyler Street 


46,058 


51,195 


59,163 


74,230 


72,334 


52,578 


Uphams Corner 


169,027 


184,595 


201.701 


225,285 


228,490 


211399 


West End 


180,854 


177,125 


189.543 


219.413 


218.721 


208.003 


West Roxbury 


119,463 


120.804 


136,595 


164,843 


174,457 


163.089 


Total 


3,930,068 . 


4,133,459 - 


4.702,932 


5,567,681 


5.548.283 


5,194351 



*For eight months. May through December. 



[281 



The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form : 

VOLUMES 

1929 gain over preceding year 30,782 

1930 gain over preceding year ........ 203391 



1931 gain 


over preceding year 


. 


. 


569,473 


1932 gain 


over preceding year 


. 


. 


864,749 


1933 loss 


from preceding year 


. 


. 


19,398 


1934 loss 


from preceding year 

USE 


OF BOOKS 


. 


353,932 




Circulation from Central by 


Months 








BRANCH DEPT 


SCHOOLS and 






HOME USE 


HOME USE 


INSTITUTIONS 


TOTALS 




DIRECT 


THROUGH 


THROUGH 
BRANCH DEPT. 




January 


1934 . . 37,716 


7,958 


33,760 


79,434 


Februray 






34,885 


6,997 


35,186 


77,068 


March 






39.554 


8,331 


35,436 


83,321 


April 


''^' 




35.638 


6,430 


35,838 


77,906 


May 






32.208 


6,141 


37,112 


75.461 


June 






24,849 


4,851 


14.433 


44,133 


July 






25,582 


4.622 


4.584 


34,788 


August 






25,408 


4,894 


4.193 


34.495 


September 






28,923 


5,291 


2,995 


37.209 


October 






38,245 


7,800 


16.215 


62,260 


November 






. 37.822 


7,770 


28.248 


73.840 


December 






. 34,610 


7,033 


34,460 


76.103 



Totals . 



395.440 



78.118 



282,460 



756,018 



Distribution of Total Circulation 











HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 




Central Library: 




use 


INSTITUTIONS 


TOTALS 


a. Direct 


. , 


395,440 






h. Through Branches 










1. Deposit Collections 




51,672 






2. General Collections . 




26.446 






c. Schools and Institutions 


through 








Branch Department 






282,460 


756,018 


Business Branch 






18.410 


Branches: 








Allsfon 


. 


186,413 


.... 


186.413 


Andrew Square 








138.638 


.... 


138,638 


Boylston 








138,595 




138,595 


Brighton 








127.103 


■7;285 


134,388 


Charlestown 








122,494 


5,372 


127.866 


City Point 








144,762 


.... 


144,762 


Codman Square 








177,839 


7.612 


185,451 


Dorchester 








129,879 


2.225 


132,104 


East Boston 








176.130 


12.689 


188,819 


Faneuil 








138.234 


.... 


138.234 



[29] 



Fellowes Athenaeum 








84,258 


13.860 


98.118 


Hyde Park 








142,037 


1.974 


144.011 


Jamaica Plain 








120,489 


6.213 


126.702 


Jeffries Point 








80,460 




80.460 


Kirstein 








63,388 


. . . • 


63.388 


Lower Mills 








74,990 




74.990 


Mattapan 








205,498 




205.498 


Memorial 








222,601 


' 374 


222,975 


Mount Bowdoin 








149,341 




149,341 


Mount Pleasant 








94,640 




94,640 


Neponset 








69,638 




69,638 


North End 








142,991 


' 360 


143,351 


Orient Heights 








92,801 


. • • • 


92,801 


Parker Hill 








119,139 




119,139 


Phillips Brooks 








46,258 




46,258 


Roslindale 








155,533 


l'2!029 


167.562 


Roxbury Crossing 








75,062 




75,062 


South Boston 








120,750 


20,296 


141,046 


South End 








149,798 


4,806 


1 54,604 


Tyler Street 








52,578 




52,578 


Uphams Corner 








211,198 


" '201' 


211,399 


West End 








190,014 


17,989 


208,003 


West Roxbury 








147,884 


15.205 


163.089 



4.291.433 



128.490 



4.419.923 



These figures are condensed into the following : 

Books Lent for Home Use, including Circulation through 
Schools and Institutions 



From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 
the branches) ........ 

From Business Branch ......... 

From branches (excluding books received from Central Library) . 



Total 



Comparative 

Central Librar)' circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) 
Direct home use .... 437.827 

Through branches . . . 86,470 

Business .Branch ...... 

Branch libraries circulation (ex- 
cluding schools and institutions) . 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the Branch system) ..... 



1933 



524,297 
17,614 

4,589,393 



416^79 

'■). "^48.28^ 



395,440 
78,118 



756,018 

18.410 

4 .419.923 

5.194.351 
1934 



473,558 
18,410 

4,291.433 



410.950 

.,194.^'^l 



[30] 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 

1933 1934 

Volumes lent from this Library fo other libraries in Massachusetts 2,161 2,041 

Lent fo libraries oufsidt of Massachusetts 353 435 

Total 2,514 2.476 

Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 805 753 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts . . . .187 166 

Total 992 919 

The classified direct circulation of the branches was as follows, 
for two successive years : 



Fiction for adults . 
Non-fiction for adults 
Juvenile fiction 
Juvenile non- fiction 



1933 


1934 


VOLUMES PERCENTAGE 


VOLUMES PERCENTAGE 


2,175,120 47.4 


2.063,092 48.1 


595,749 13.0 


588,996 13.7 


1,249,371 27.2 


1.124,569 262 


569,153 12.4 


514.776 12.0 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 
the following percentages : 



Fiction 
Non-fiction 



1933 

PERCENTAGE 
45.8 

54.2 



1934 

PERCENTAGE 

46.1 
53.9 



BOOK ACCESSIONS 

BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE 



For the Central Library: 

From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 

For branches: 

From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 



1933 


1934 


7,482 


7,327 


5,267 


3.428 



41,691 
2,182 



12.749 



43.873 



48,214 
641 



10,755 



48.855 



56.622 



59.610 



[31] 



The follpwing statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



Accessions by purchase 
Accessions by gift 
Accessions by exchange 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound 
Accessions by serials bound 

Totals . 







TOTAL 


CENTRAL 


BRANCHES 


VOLUMES 


10.755 


48.855 


59.610 


3.055 


564 


3.619 


15 


. 


15 


1.407 


78 


1.485 


216 


.... 


216 


1.114 


.... 


1.114 



16.562 



49.497 



66,059 



THE CATALOGUE 



Catalogued (new) : 

Central Library Catalogue 

Serials 

Branches 
Recatalogued 



Totals 



1933 




1934 


VOLS. AND 


TITLES 


VOLS. AND TITLES 


PARTS 




PARTS 


24,218 

7,187 

41.878 

16.057 


19.679 

39,502 
13.019 


19.371 16.593 

5,724 

47,604 44,640 
9,230 6.883 



89340 72,200 81.929 68.116 



SHELF DEPARTMENT 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use, taken from the report of the Shelf Department, is : 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) . . . 15,714 

Special collections, new books and transfers . . • • • 3.168 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but now found, transfers 

from branches, etc. ........ 1.480 

20.362 
Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

.Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, trans- 
fers, etc. • • 3,881 

Net gain at Central Library 16,481 

Net gain at Branches 1341 

Placed in Business Branch 1,770 

Net gain entire library system ......... 19,592 



[32] 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement : 



1852^53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1865^66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 



Volumes in entire library system 
Volumes in the Business Branch 
Volumes in the branches 



9.688 


1894 


16,221 


1895 


22,617 


1896-97 


28.080 


1897-98 


34.896 


1898-99 


70,851 


1899-1900 


78.043 


1900-01 


85.031 


1901-02 


97.386 


1902-03 


105,034 


1903-04 


110.563 


1904-05 


116.934 


1905-06 


123,016 


1906-07 


130,678 


1907-08 


136,080 


1908-09 


144.092 


1909-10 


152.796 


1910-11 


160,573 


1911-12 


179,250 


1912-13 


192.958 


1913-14 


209.456 


1914-15 


260,550 


1915-16 


276.918 


1916-17 


297,873 


1917-18 


321,010 


• 1918-19 


345,734 


1919-20 


360,963 


1920-21 


377,225 


1921-22 


390,982 


1922-23 


404,221 


1923-24 


422,116 


1924-25 


438.594 


1925 


453.947 


1926 


460.993 


1927 


479.421 


1928 


492.956 


1929 


505.872 


1930 


520,508 


1931 


536.027 


1932 


556,283 


1933 


576,237 


1934 


597.152 





610,375 

628,297 

663,763 

698,888 

716,050 

746,383 

781,377 

812,264 

835,904 

848.884 

871,050 

878.933 

903.349 

922.348 

941.024 

961.522 

987,268 

1.006.717 

1,049.011 

1.067.103 

1.098.702 

1.121,747 

1.139.682 

1,157326 

1.173.695 

1.197.498 

1.224.510 

1,258.211 

1 ,284.094 

1.308,041 

1.333,264 

1.363.515 

1.388,439 

1.418,489 

1,442,802 

1,475,743 

1,526,951 

1,572,802 

1,631,422 

1.654,017 

1 .673,609 



1.673.609 

15.401 

501.560 



[33] 
These volumes are located as follows ; 



Central Library . 


1.156.648 


Matfapan 


17,034 


Business Branch . 


15.401 


Memorial 


19,808 


Allsfon 


13,240 


Mt. Bowdoin 


13,420 


Andrew Square . 


11.470 


Mt. Pleasant 


8,154 


Boylston 


10.844 


Neponset 


7,744 


Brighton 


22.304 


North End 


13,267 


Charlestown 


17.051 


Orient Heights . 


8,772 


City Point . 


12.148 


Parker Hill 


13,096 


Codman Square . 


16,951 


Phillips Brooks . 


5.143 


Dorchester 


16.889 


Roslindale 


15,153 


East Boston 


21,607 


Roxbury Crossing 


5,840 


Faneuil 


12.452 


South Boston 


20,845 


Fellowes Athenaeum . 


40,950 


South End . . . . 


12,043 


Hyde Park 


30.655 


Tyler Street 


7,731 


Jamaica Plain 


18,858 


Uphams Corner . 


17.604 


Jeffries Point 


8.274 


West End . 


25.138 


Kirstein 


7,803 


West Roxbury 


21.419 


Lower Mills 


7.853 







THE BINDING DEPARTMENT 



style 



Number of volumes bound in various st 

Magazines stitched . 

Volumes repaired , . , . 

Volumes guarded .... 

Photographs and engravings mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1933 

75.923 

103 

1,825 

763 

2,835 

69.358 



1934 

69,380 

65 

1.549 

702 

2,640 

82,613 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

Requisitions received and filled ...... 

Card Catalogue (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Card Catalogue (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") . ... 

Signs ......... 

Blank forms (numbered series) ..... 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside the numbered series) 
Catalogues, pamphlets, bibliographical programmes . 



1933 
246 



704 

45.760 

1.478 

4,102,335 

47,725 

57.200 



1934 
215 



11.100 17,790 
97.431 133,517 



1,070 

69,550 

622 

4.184,310 

44,900 

60.150 



OUTSTANDING BOOK PURCHASES 
Addison, Joseph. Poems on several occasions. With a dissertation upon 

the Roman poets. London. 1719. 
Chaucer, Geoffrey. The woorkes of Geffrey Chaucer, newly printed, 

with divers addicions. whiche were never in printe before . . . 



[34] 

Colophon (London: Imprinted by John Kyngston for John 

Wright. 1561). 
Davenport, Cyril. Roger Payne, English bookbinder of the eighteenth 

century. Chicago. Printed for the Caxton Club. 1929. 
Donne, John. Letters to severall persons of honour . . . London. 

Printed by John Flesher, for Richard Marriott. 1651. First 

edition. 
Fay, Bernard. Notes on the American press at the end of the eighteenth 

Century. Limited edition of 325 copies. New York. The Gro- 

lierClub. 1927. 
Flavell, John. Husbandry spiritualized: or. The heavenly use of earthly 

things ... 1 0th edition. Boston. Re-printed by John Allen, for 

Nicholas Boone, at the Sign of the Bible in Cornhill, near the Cor- 
ner of School-street. 1 709. 
Fox, Thomas. The Wilmington almanack, or Ephemeris, for the year 

of our Lord 1 775 . . . Wilmington. Printed and sold by James 

Adams, 
lacovleff, A. and S. Elisseeff. Le theatre japonais (Kabuki). Paris. 

Jacques de Brunhoff, chez Jules Meynial. n.d. 
Lamb, Charles and Mary Lamb. Tales from Shakespear, designed for 

the use of young persons. London. Printed for Thomas Hodgkins. 

1807. 2 vols. 
[Milton, John.] The doctrine and discipline of divorce . . . The author, 

I. M. London. Imprinted in the yeare 1645. 
Milton, John. Paradise regain'd : a poem. In IV books. To which is 

added Samson Agonistes. London. Printed by J. M. for John 

Starkey at the Mitre in Fleetstreet, near Temple-Bar. 1671. 
The New-England Primer improved, for the more easy attaining the 

true reading of English. To which is added, The assembly of Di- 
vines, and Mr. Cotton's catechism. Boston. Printed and sold by 

Benjamin Edes and Sons. In Cornhill. 1 784. 
Otway, Thomas. The complete works of . . . Edited by Montague 

Summers. London. Nonesuch Press. 1926. 3 vols. 
Persian manuscripts. Two specimens of Persian writing. 1 wo prayer 

books in Persian. Persian miniature painting, a page from a book. 
Robertson, John W. Bibliography and commentary on the writmgs of 

Edgar A. Poe. San Francisco. The Grabhorn Press. 1934. 

2 vols. 
Roosevelt, Franklin D. Photograph of Cabinet. With autographs of 

members. 
Shelley, Percy Bysshe. Prometheus unbound . . . With other poems. 

London. 1 820. First edition, second issue. 
[Tennyson, Alfred.] Poems. By two brothers. London. Printed for 

W. Simpkin and R. Marshall and J. and J. Jackson. Louth. 1827. 



[35] 

.SELECTED LIST OF GIFTS AND GIVERS 

Amherst College, Trustees of. The Folger Shakespeare Library, Wash- 
ington, PubHshed for the Trustees of Amherst College, Amherst, 
1933. 

Bellows, Mrs. H. P. A collection of sixteen hundred and fifty-six photo- 
graphs, principally architectural views, landscapes, and reproduc- 
tions of famous pictures. 

Boston Athenaeum. John Adams's Book: being notes on a record of 
the births, marriages & deaths of three generations of the Adams 
Family, 1734-1807. Compiled by Henry Adams. Printed for 
the Boston Athenaeum. 1934. (One of) one hundred and fifty 
copies printed by D. B. Updike, The Merrymount Press, Boston, 
in the month of May, 1934. 

Brown, Charles S. The Seamans Family in America, as descended 
from Thomas Seamans of Swansea, Massachusetts, 1 687. Com- 
piled by John Julian Lawton, with the . . . financial assistance of 
Charles Seamans Brown. Privately printed, Syracuse, 1 933. 

Bull, William P. The Perkins Bull Collection: historical paintings by 
Canadian artists illustrating pioneers and pioneering in the County 
of Peel. Printed privately for the founder of the Collection at 
the Town of Brampton in the County of Peel, (1934?). 

De Forest. Col. & Mrs. L. Effingham. Captain John Underbill, 
Gentleman, Soldier of Fortune. By L. Effingham de Forest and 
Anne Lawrence de Forest. New York, De Forest Publishing 
Company, 1934. Designed and printed by the Argus Press as a 
reprint from: Atterbury and Allied Families. One of an edition 
of 75 copies. 

Gallatin, Albert Eugene. Gallatin iconography. By Albert Eugene 
Gallatin. Privately printed, 1 934. One of an edition of one 
hundred copies printed by D. B. Updike, The Merrymount Press, 
Boston, in March, 1934. 

Harrison, Fairfax. Early American turf stock, 1780—1830. Being a 
critical study of the extant evidence for the English, Spanish and 
Oriental horses and mares, to which are traced the oldest American 
turf pedigrees. Volume 1 : Mares. Privately printed. The Old 
Dominion Press, Richmond. 1934. 

Harrison, Francis Burton. Indo-China: a sportsman's opportunity. By 
Archibald Harrison. Privately printed, Mayflower Press, Ply- 
mouth, 1933. Burton chronicles of colonial Virginia, being excerpts 
from the existing records particularly relating to the Burtons of the 
valley of the James and Appomattox, with especial reference to the 
ancestry of Jesse Burton of Lynchburg ( 1 750?— 1 795). By 
Francis Burton Harrison. Privately printed, 1933. 



[36] 

Hispanic Society of America. The visionary gentleman : Don Quijote de 
la Manche. By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. Translated into 
English by Robinson Smith. Third edition, complete, with a life 
of Cervantes, notes and appendices. Parts I and 2. Printed by 
order of the Trustees, Hispanic Society of America, New York, 
1932. Number 1 49 of two hundred numbered copies. Urrabieta 
Vierge and illustrators of Don Quixote (19th and 20th centuries) : 
and exhibition from books in the Library of the Hispanic Society 
of America. Printed by order of the Trustees, New York, 1934. 

Hoff, Madame Whitney. Lettres autographes composant la collection de 
Madame G. Whitney Hoff. Paris, Cornuau, 1 934. "Cet ouvrage 
a ete tire a 200 exemplaires numerotes, sur papier velin d'Arches. 
Exemplaire 88." 

Holbrook, Donald. Memorial biography of Walter Hills Holbrook, 
1861 — 1933. The eighth copy (of ten copies printed). Bound 
in blue leather, with white silk end-pages. 

Lane, Mrs. William C. Manuscript letter, dated July 5, 1849, from 
Helen M. Fiske, to her guardian, Mr. Julius A. Palmer, requesting 
permission for herself and her sister Annie to board with a Mrs. 
Clark in Andover, Massachusetts, during a portion of the summer. 

Lilly, Josiah K. Foster Hall Reproductions: Songs, compositions and 
arrangements by Stephen Collins Foster, 1826—1864. Produced 
by the Staff of Foster Hall. Privately printed by Josiah Kirby 
Lilly, Indianapolis, 1933. This includes two hundred and 
twenty-five pieces of music, and one volume of collected music, 
facsimiles of first (or earliest known) editions of songs by Stephen 
Collins Foster. Number 713 of 1000 sets. 

Marble, Mrs. Arthur De Merrick. Two portfolios, containing one hun- 
dred and ten paintings of wild flowers found in Massachusetts and 
Mississippi, drawn, painted and mounted by Arthur D. Marble. 

Massachusetts Public Works of Art Project. Two hundred and sixty- 
four mounted photographs of the work of artists of the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration, Public Works of Art Project, 
District Number 1 , The New England States. 

Mediaeval Academy of America. Kodex Quartus Sancti lacobi de 
expedimento et conversione Yspanie et Gallecie editus a Beato 
Turpino Archiepiscopo. One of three hundred copies printed at 
the Merrymount Press, Boston, for Ward Thoron, May, 1934. 

Morris, Lawrence J. The Johnson and allied families of Lincolnshire, 
England: being the ancestry and posterity of Lawrence Johnson of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. By Robert Winder Johnson, Sr. 
(1910) and Lawrence Johnson Morris (1934). Printed for 
private circulation, Philadelphia, the Dolphin Press, 1934. 



[37] 

Peabody, Francis G. Francis Weld Peabody, 1881 — 1927: a memoir. 
Privately printed at the Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1933. 

Pforzheimer, Carl H. Surrey's Fourth Boke of Virgill. Edited, with 
introduction, variant readings and notes by Herbert Hartman. Pri- 
vately printed for Carl H. Pforzheimer. Printed by John Johnson 
at the University Press, Oxford. Number 38 of an edition of two 
hundred and fifty copies, of vhich one hundred and twenty-five are 
for private distribution. 

Skinner, William. The Belle Skinner Collection of old musical instru- 
ments, Holyoke, Massachusetts. A descriptive catalogue compiled 
under the direction of William Skinner. 1933. 



LECTURES — CONCERTS 

During 1934 there were given in the Lecture Hall of the 
Central Library 1 1 3 programs under the auspices of the Library. 
This group of lectures, entertainments, and concerts included a 
series of 9 concerts given by the E. R. A. Opera Orchestra. 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1934 

Throughout the year there were on display in the Exhibition 
Room, Treasure Room, and Children's Room numerous ex- 
hibitions assembled from the Library's collections or loaned to 
the Library by outside sources. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

Artz Fund — Donation from MiSS ViCTORlNE Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago: the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as 
the "Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. 

$10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. $50,000.00 



[38] 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of Charles H. L. N. Ber- 
nard. Received in 1930. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by JOHN P. BiGELOW in August, 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of ROBERT CHARLES BlL- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $100,446.10 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. IngeRsoll Bowditch. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. CalEB Davis Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JOSEPH H. Center, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. $39,908.89 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 

$107,060.53 

Clement Fund -^ Bequest of the late FRANK CleMENT, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of HenrY SarGENT CodMAN, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 



[39] 

book pjate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854.41 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of AbRAM E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 

$4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of Sarah A. MaTCHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for the purchase 
of books for the young until otherwise ordered by the Board. Re- 
ceived in 1 900. $6,000.00 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA STEWART 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Bro^ATi 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 

1924. $5,000.00 
Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 

1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 



[40] 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. $2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the CharlestowTi Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1 850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 

$10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1884. $1,048.93 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of Alfred Hemenway. Received 
in 1928. $5,000.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of Fl^NKLlN P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 

be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,271.58 
Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1,000 each made by Mr. 

Louis E. Kirstein, "to be used for any purpose of the Library 

that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 

October. 1925 $1,000.00 



October. 1926 . 
November. 1927 
October, 1928 . 
October, 1929 . 



1,000.00 
1.000.00 
1.000.00 
1.000.00 



$5,000.00 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KaTHERINE 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 



[41] 

request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 

$10,002.50 

Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of Helen Lambert of Boston in memory 
of Frederic and Louise Lambert. Received in 1931. The income 
of this fund to be expended for the purchase of books and other 
library material until otherwise ordered by the Board. $1 ,37 1 .00 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of AbbotT Lawrence, of Boston. 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
a permanent value. $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward Lawrence, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1 886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 

500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH LeWIS, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1 896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of Charles Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1896. 

$2,530.51 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of Gardner O. North. Received 
in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 



[42] 

from the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under 
an indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L, Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $1 1 ,781 .44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PapyruS 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in I 897. 

$1,085.02 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 
in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said library. $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 
20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 
time being. 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. Pierce. Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1873. $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. Distribution of 
residue of estate in May, 1 924, $964.30. $1 ,494. 1 8 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial to 
Guilford S. Reed ; the income to be applied to the purchase of books 
of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 



[43] 

permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766,67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. $62,242.45 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD Black Sewall: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income to be 
used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he 
shall judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1 9 1 4. $51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of MarY ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 



[441 

Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Storrow 
and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson 
Storrow, Senior ; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 

$25,000.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass., or by 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together vkith interest amounting to $339.61, has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George Ticknor, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor, v^dow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the city, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 



[45] 

conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
ceived' said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
• rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,106.71 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. ToDD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be expend- 
ed by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other countries. 

$50,000.00 

Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of MaRY P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1 872, said beuqest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of NathAN A. TUFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 

$10,736.68 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — ■ Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 

for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 



[461 

placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. $5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest of Horace G. Wadlin, of 
Reading, former Librarian, who died November 5, 1925, of $2,000 
to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston to be 
permanently funded and the income thereof used for the purchase 
of books. Received in 1 932. $2,030.51 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of GEORGE C. Wales: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund. — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. Wil- 
son, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1 9 1 3. $1,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James Lyman Whitney, who died Sep- 
tember 25. 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 



[47] 

for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. $25,084.37 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the Cily of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from: 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 1 00.0 

$150.00 

Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz.: 



Samuel Appleton, late of Boston 

H. C. Bentley . 

J. Ingersoll Bov/ditch . 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch . 

James Brown, late of Cambridge 

Andrew Carnegie 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library 
Sally Inman Kast Shepard . 
James Nightingale .... 



the 



$6,800.00 
220.38 
6,800.00 
200.00 
500.00 
980.75 

335.13 

1,000.00 

100.00 

$11,136.26 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

Arfz Fund $ 10.000.00 

Bates Fund 50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund 1.000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 100.482.98 

Bowditch Fund 10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1.000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund 39.908.89 

Carried forward $213,391.87 



[48] 



Brought forward 
Central Library Building Fund 
Children's Fund 
Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 
Cutter Fund 
Elizabeth Fund 
Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 
Franklin Club Fund 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 
Morris Gest Fund 
Green Fund 
Charlotte Harris Fund 
Thomas B. Harris Fund . 
Alfred Hemenway Fund 
Hyde Fund 
David P. Kimball Fund 
L.ouis E. Kirstein Fund 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund . 
Helen Lamber Fund 
Abbott Lawrence Fund 
Edward Lawrence Fund 
Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 
Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 
Charles Mead Fund 
Gardner O. North Fund 
The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 
John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 
Phillips Fund 
Pierce Fund 
Sarah E. Pratt Fund 
Guilford Reed Fund 
John Singer Sargent Fund 
Scholfield Fund 
Sewall Fund 
Skinner Fund 

South Boston Branch Library Trust 
Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 
James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund 
Ticknor Fund 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fun( 
Townsend Fund 
Treadwell Fund 
Nathan A. Tufts Fund . 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fui 
Horace G. Wadlin Fund 
Wales Fund 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
James Lyman Whitney Fund 
Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund 



$213,391.87 

150.00 

107,073.40 

2,000.00 

2.854.41 

4.270.00 

25.000.00 
6.000.00 
1.000.00 
5.000.00 
2,652.50 
2,000.00 

10.000.00 
1 .048.93 
5.000.00 
3.632.40 

10.236.69 
5. 000.00 

i 0.000.00 
1,301.00 

10.000.00 

500.00 

5.000.00 

500.00 

2,530.51 

2.000.00 

11,781.44 
1 ,085.02 

30,000.00 
5.000.00 
1.494.18 
1 .000.00 
3.85824 

62.242.45 

25,000.00 

51.732.14 

100.00 

3,500.00 

25.000.00 
4.106.71 

50.000.00 
4.000.00 

13.987.69 

10,736.68 
5,000.00 
2,030.51 
5.000.00 
5.000.00 

25.084.37 
1.000.00 



[491 

OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY 
Director's Office 
Director, and Librarian Milton E. Lord 

Clerk of the Trustees Elizabeth B. Brockunier 

Supervisor of Training Bertha V. Hartzell 

Editor of Publications Zoltan Haraszti 



Reference Division 

Acting Chief Librarian of the Reference Division: Richard G. Hensley 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Frank C. Blaisdell 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Otto Fleischner 

Assistant Librarian Pierce E. Buckley 

Assistant Librarian Samuel A. Chevalier 

Book Selection Department: Louis F. Ranlett, Chief. 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief. 

General Reference Departments: Pierce E. Buckley, Supervisor. 

Bates Hall Reference Department: Harry W. Mathev^^s, Assistant 

in Charge. 
Information Department: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Newspaper Department: Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 
Periodical Department: Dorothy P. Shaw, In Charge. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief. 

Special Reference Departments: Francis J. Hannigan, Supervisor. 
Special Libraries: George S. Maynard, Chief. 
Fine Arts Department: Mildred R. Bradbury, Assistant in Charge. 
Music Department: Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 
Genealogy Department: Agnes C. Doyle, Assistant in Charge. 
Patent Department: William J. Ennis, Assistant in Charge. 
Statistical Department: Elizabeth G. Barry, Assistant in Charge. 
Teachers' Department: Anna L. Manning, Assistant in Charge. 
Business Branch : Mary W. Dietrichson, Business Branch Librarian. 

Rare Books: Zoltan Haraszti, Keeper of Rare Books. 

Rare Book Department : Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge. 



[50] 

Circulation Division 
Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division: Orlando C. Davis. 
Book Selection Department: Lx)uis F. Ranlett, Chief. 
Children's Work: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor. 

Branch Libraries: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor. 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 

Andrew Square, Elizabeth FI. McShane. 

Boylston, Margaret A. Calnan. 

Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 

Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

City Point, Helen L. Morrisey. 

Codman Square, EHzabeth P. Ross. 

Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 

East Boston, Theodora B. Scoff. 

Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 

Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 

Hyde Park, Sara A. Lyon. 

Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 

Jeffries Point, Mary U. Nichols, Assistant in Charge. 

Kirstein, Grace B. Loughlin. 

Low^er Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 

Mattapan, Ada Aserkoff. 

Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mount Bow^doin, Pearl B. Smart. 

Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 

Neponset, Margaret I. McGovern. 

North End, Mary F. Curley. 

Orient Heights, Catherine E. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Phillips Brooks, Edna G. Peck. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Edith R. Nickerson. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Clara L. Maxwell. 

Tyler Street, Caroline Keene, Acting Librarian. 

Uphams Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Geneva Watson, Assistant in Charge. 
Branch Librarian, Emeritus, Carrie L. Morse. 



[511 

Division of Business Operations 
Acting Comptroller: James W. Kenney. 
Superintendent of Buildings: William F. Quinn. 

Auditor: Helen Schubarth. 

Book Purchasing Department: William C. Maiers, Jr., Chief. 

Stock Purchasing Department: Timothy J. Mackin. 

Binding Department: James P. Mooers, In Charge. 

Shipper: Robert F. Dixon. 

Printing Department: Francis W. Lee, Chief. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

, lllllfillllli 

3 9999 06314 674 8