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Full text of "Annual report"

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EIGHTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 



935 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1936 



% to 1,4 






THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

9.6 16: 2 500 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



FRANK W. BUXTON, President 

Term expires April 30, 1940 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN 

Term expires April 30, 1939 

WILLIAM CARDINAL O'CONNELL 

Term expires April 30, 1937 

JOHN L. HALL ELLERY SEDGWICK 

Term expires April 30, 1936 Term expires April 30, 1938 



MILTON E. LORD 

Director, and Librarian 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 



The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of .Boston, organized in 1852, are 
now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter .114 of the Acts of 1878, as 
amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; that for 1853 made 
the first annual report. The Board at present consists of five citizens at large, ap- 
pointed by the Mayor for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each year. 
The following citizens at large have been members of the Board since its organization 
in 1852: 



Abbott, Gordon, a.b., 1926-1931. 
Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, A.M., 

1879-95. 
Appleton, Thomas Gold, A.M., 1852-56. 
Benton, Josiah Henry, LL.D., 1894-1917. 
Bigelow, John Prescott, A.M., 1852-68. 
Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, m.d., 1865-67. 
Bowditch, Henry Pickering, M.D., 

1894-1902. 
Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 
Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 
Brett, John Andrew, LL.B., 1912-16. 
Buxton, Frank W.. A.B., 1928- 
Carr, Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 
Chase, George Bigelow, A.M., 1876-85. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1879-88. 
Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 
Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. 
Currier, Guy Wilbur. 1922-1930. 
Curtis, Daniel Sargent, A.M., 1873-75. 
De Normandie, James, D.D., 1895-1908. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1899-1908. 
Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, B.S., 1927-28. 
Everett, Edward, LL.D., 1852-64. 
Frothingham, Richard, LL.D., 1875-79. 
Gaston, William Alexander, LL.B., 

1923-27. 
Green, Samuel Abbott, M.D., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 



Hall, John Loomer, a.b., ll.b., 1931- 
Haynes, Henry Williamson, A.M., 

1880-94. 
Hilliard, George Stillman, LL.D., 

1872-75; 1876-77 
Kenney, William Francis, A.M., 

1908-1921. 
Kirstein, Louis Edward, 1919- 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, M.D., 1867. 
Lincoln, Solomon, A.M., 1897-1907. 
Mann, Alexander, DJ>., 1908-1923. 
Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 
Murray Michael Joseph, LL.B., 1921-26. 
O'Connell, William Cardinal, 1932- 
Pierce. Phineas, 1888-94. 
Prince, Frederick Octavius, A.M., 1888-99. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1868—77. 
Richards, William Reuben, A.M.. 1889-95. 
Sedgwick, Ellery, A.B., LITT.D., 1930— 
Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, LL.D., 

1852-68. 
Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., 

1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, LL.D., 1852-66. 
Walker, Francis Amasa, LL.D., 1896. 
Whipple, Edwin Percy, A.M., 1868-70. 
Whitmore, William Henry, A.M., 1885-88. 
Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867-68. 



The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1852 to 1864; 
George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, from 1866 to April, 1888; 
Prof. Henry W. Haynes, from May 7. 1888 to May 12, 1888; Samuel A. B. Ab- 
bott, May 12, 1888 to April 30, 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince. October 8, 1895 to May 
8, 1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899 to October 15, 1907; Rev. James De 
Normandie, January 31, 1908 to May 8, 1908; Josiah H. Benton. May 8, 1908 to 
February 6, 1917; William F. Kenney, February 13, 1917 to May 7, 1920; Rev. 
Alexander Mann, May 7, 1920 to January 22, 1923; Msgr. Arthur T. Connolly. 
April 13, 1923 to June 13, 1924; Louis E. Kirstein, June 13. 1924 to June 19. 1925; 
Hon. Michael J. Murray, June 19, 1925 to July 2, 1926; Guy W. Currier, July 2. 
1926 to May 2, 1927; Msgr. Arthur T. Connolly, May 2, 1927 to June 22. 1928; 
Louis E. Kirstein, June 22, 1928 to June 21, 1929; Gordon Abbott. June 21. 1929 
to June 20, 1930; Frank W. Buxton, June 20, 1930 to May 15. 1931; Louis E. 
Kirstein, May 15, 1931 to May 20, 1932; Ellery Sedgwick, May 20, 1932 to May 
5, 1933; John L. Hall, May 5, 1933 to May 18, 1934; William Cardinal O'Connell 
May 18, 1934 to May 6, 1935; Frank W. Buxton since May 6, 1935. 



LIBRARIANS. 

(From 1858 to 1877, the chief executive officer was called Superintendent; from 
1877 to 1923 Librarian; from 1923 to 1934 Director; since 1934 Director 
and Librarian.) 
Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1852-December 16, 1874. 
Jewett. Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 
Winsor, Justin, ll.D.. Superintendent, February 25, 1868-Septcmber 30, 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.n., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877 -September 

30. 1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, L.L.D., Librarian, October I, 1 878-September 30, 1890. 
Dwight. Theodore F„ Librarian, April 13, 1892 -April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, ll.d., Librarian, February 11, 1895-April 3, 1899. 
Whitney, James L., A.m., ^4c(mg Librarian, March 31 1899-December 21 1899; 

Librarian, December 22. 1899-January 31. 1903. 
Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903-March 15, 1917; Acting 

Librarian, March 15, 1917-June 15, 1917. 
Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll.b., litt.d., Director, March 15, 1917-October 

24, 1931. 
Lord, MlLTON E., A.B., Director and Librarian, since February 1, 1932. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1935 



Departments. 
*CentraI Library, Copley Square . 
♦East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. 
§South Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
jjFellowes Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
*Charlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
♦Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road . 
^Dorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St, 
f Lower Mills Branch, 1110 Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
|South End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. 
f Jamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St. 
JRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. . 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
♦North End Branch, 3 a North Bennet St. . 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. . 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch. 275 Washington St. . 
§AlIston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St 
JMt. Pleasant Branch. 335 Dudley, cor Vine St. 
JTyler Street Branch, 130 Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
♦West End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
{Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts. 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles, cor Tremont St. 
*Boylston Branch, 433 Centre St. 
§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler Ave. 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 
♦Parker Hill Branch, 1497 Tremont St. . 
♦Hyde Park Branch, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 
♦Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St. 
§Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 
♦Jeffries Point Branch, 222 Webster St. 
t Baker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration 
♦Kirstein Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 

Kirstein Branch, third floor. 
§Phillips Brooks Branch, 12 Hamilton St., Readville . 



ffOPENED. 
May 2, 1854 
Jan. 28, 1871 
May 1, 1872 
July 16, 1873 
Jan. 5. 1874 
Jan. 5, 1874 
Jan. 25, 1875 
June 7, 1875 
Aug., 1877 
June, 1876 
Dec. 3. 1878 
Jan. 6, 1880 
Dec. 27, 1881 
Oct.. 1882 
Jan. 1, 1883 
Nov. 1. 1886 
Mar. 11. 1889 
Nov. 12, 1890 
Nov. 12. 1890 
Jan. 16, 1896 
Feb. I, 1896 
Mar. 16, 1896 
May 1. 1896 
Jan. 18 1897 
Nov. 1. 1897 
June 25. 1901 
July 18, 1906 
July 15, 1907 
Jan. 1. 1912 
Mar. 4. 1914 
Mar. 5. 1914 
Oct. 15, 1921 
Jan. 15. 1927 
May 7, 1930 



May 18. 1931 



<lln the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. ♦In building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board, "fin building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses, fin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §Occupies 
rented rooms. ||The lessee of the Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 
{Under agreement with Harvard. 



CONTENTS 

Report of the Trustees 1 

Balance Sheet 6 

Report of the Examining Committee . . . . 12 

Report of the Director 20 

Appendix 35 



To His Honor Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31, 1935, being the eighty-fourth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 
The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 6, 

1935 with the election of Mr. Frank W. Buxton as President, 

Mr. Louis E. Kirstein as Vice President, and Miss Elizabeth B. 

Brockunier as Clerk. 

Mr. Frank W. Buxton, whose term as Trustee expired on 

April 30, was re-appointed for the term ending April 30, 1 940. 

BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted on November 1 , 1 934 for the main- 
tenance of the Library during the year 1 935 were later amended 
and reduced. These estimates were as follows : 

Item Estimated Allowed 

A.— Personal service $937,187.75 . . $915,000.00 

B.— Service other than personal . . . 105,915.00 . . 65,935.00 

C.— Equipment 171,075.00 . . 112350.00 

D.~ Supplies 34,375.00 . . 33,330.00 

E.— Materials 28,000.00 . . 20.000.00 

H. — Emergency relief projects ........ 25,100.00 



Total . . . $1,276,552.75 . . $1,171,715.00 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 



[2] 
During the year 1935 these receipts were: 

Annual appropriation ......... $1,171,715.00 

Income from trust funds ......... 24,794.14 

Unexpended balance of trust funds income of previous years . . 67,529.25 

Total .... $1,264,03839 

Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the year were 
as follows : 

From fines . . . . . . . . . . . $21,623.87 

From sales of waste paper ......... 142.17 

From sales of catalogs, etc. ........ 275.10 

From commission on telephone stations ...... 486.95 

From payments for lost books ........ 993.67 

Refund 4.25 

Total .... $23,526.01 

EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 

The total amount expended during 1935 was $1 ,200, 126.04. 
This was divided as follows : 

From city appropriation $1,164,837.67 

From deposits in London ........ 1,555.13 

From special appropriations ........ 10,572.70 

From the income of trust funds ....... 23,160.54 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

The number of volumes added to the library during the year 
was 74,623, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part by 
gift and exchange. The total number of volumes in the Library 
at the close of the year was 1 ,682,848. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and from the trust funds income was $123,023.62. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The home use of books for the year was 4,949,701 . The use 
of material within the Library's premises for reference and study 
is for the most part unrestricted, and it is therefore impracticable 
to record it. 

In addition to the above noted use of the Central Library and 
the thirty-four Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 



[3] 

available to 290 agencies, including engine houses, institutions, 
and schools. 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS, 1934 AND 1935 
A comparison of certain statistics for 1 935 with those for 1 934 
is noted below: 





1934 


1935 


Total expenditures: city appropriation 






and trust funds income . 


$1,130,699.48 . 


. $1,189,55334 


Expended for books and other library 






material from city appropriation 






and trust funds income . 


120,494.05 . 


123.023.62 


Number of volumes added . 


66,059 . 


74,623 


Total number of volumes in the Library 


1,673,609 . 


1,682,848 


Borrowed for home use . 


5,194,351 . 


4,947,701 


Number of card holders . 


182,470 . 


179,064 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

During the year thought and attention have been given to the 
problems resulting from the crowding of the Central Library 
building. Forty years have elapsed since the building was first 
occupied in 1895. Aside from the erection of an annex in 1918 
there has been no additional provision of space. 

The building has become filled to capacity, particularly in the 
book stack. In the years immediately ahead the situation will 
become acute, as additional shelf space becomes necessary for 
housing the ordinary annual growth of the book collections. Steps 
will have to be taken also to remove from the book stack area 
the various activities that have encroached upon it due to crowd- 
ing in other parts of the building. 

Consideration has been given to the desirability of a realloca- 
tion of departmental space in the Central Library building. It is 
believed that changes can, and ought to, be effected in this respect 
that will permit improvement in the Library's services to readers. 
The problem is not easy of solution; it will nevertheless have to 
be faced in the near future. 

For many years the provision of facilities and quarters for the 
library staff has been highly inadequate. Toilet facilities, locker 
space, rest rooms, lunch rooms, training course class rooms, staff 
library, and the miscellaneous facilities and space necessary for a 



[4] 

staff of several hundred individuals are all in need of expansion 
and improvement 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF PROJECTS CARRIED ON 
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE LIBRARY 

Under the auspices of the Federal Emergency Relief Ad- 
ministration there was carried through to completion the chang- 
ing of the shelf lists of the Central Library from the old bound 
folio volumes to a modern arrangement on uniform size catalog 
cards. This project constituted an additional step in a long range 
program designed to bring about the eventual development along 
modern lines of certain of the Library's processes in which im- 
provement has long been desired. In its final stages the project 
permitted extensive activities preparatory to initiating a reclassifi- 
cation of the scholarly book collections of the Central Library on 
a modern classification scheme such as that of the Library of 
Congress. 

There was also continued during the year the project for the 
cleaning of books throughout the entire library system. 

Approximately seven hundred individuals have been em- 
ployed, their wages being provided by the Federal Government, 
and special provision for incidental expenses being made by the 
City. 

GIFTS 

The Library received many important gifts of books and 
other library material during the year. A list of the principal 
gifts is to be found in the Appendix on pages 44-46. 

TRUST FUNDS 

During the year there was received from the residue of the 
estate of the late Daniel S. Ford of Boston the sum of $5,01 7.65, 
which was set up as the Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund, with 
the income to be used for general purposes. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare and other im- 
portant books that give value and prestige to a great educational 
institution such as the Library has become. 



[5] 



As a matter of interest to the public the Board has pleasure 
in listing herein the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. The list will be found on pages 46-57. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of 1935. Its membership included 
the following individuals: 

James P. Parmenter 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
Edward M. Pickman 
Abraham E. Pinanski 
Philip H. Rhinelander 
Charles M. Rogerson 
Arthur A. Shurcliff 
Francis E. Slattery 
Charles H. Taylor 
D. B. Updike 
Henry R. Viets 
Charles F. Weed 
Frederick Winslow 

It is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens who render such service. Special attention is called to 
the constructive report of the Committee as it appears on pages 
12—19 immediately following. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the report of the Director of the Library 
as found on pages 20—34 below. It presents the important 
developments within the Library in the course of the year. 

The Trustees wish to express here their appreciation of the 
work of the entire library staff in meeting the needs of the public 
during 1935. 

Frank W. Buxton 

John L. Hall 

Louis E. Kirstein 

William Cardinal O'Connell 

Ellery Sedgwick 



Mr. 


George Bramwell Baker 


Hon. 


Mr. 


Walter B. Briggs 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


Ralph Adams Cram 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Susan J. Ginn 


Hon. 


Mr. 


Francis X. Hurley 


Mr. 


Dr. 


Henry Jackson 


Mr. 


Mr. 


Herbert F. Jenkins 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


Henry Lewis Johnson 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


Carl T. Keller 


Mr. 


Mr. 


Arthur D. Little 


Mr. 


Rev. 


Robert H. Lord 


Dr. 


Mr. 


Charles D. Maginnis 


Mr. 


Mr. 


George R. Nutter 


Mrs. 



[6] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Central Library and Branches: 
To Expenditures For: 

Permanent employees (exclusive of Printing 

and Binding Department employees) 
Temporary employees .... 



$737,810.19 
100,732.61 



To Service Other Than Personal: 








Printing and Binding 135.96 


Advertising 










26.93 


Transportation of persons . 










1,732.66 


Cartage and freight . 










7,01739 


Light and power 










18,845.12 


Rent, taxes and water 










18,243.00 


Surety bond, and insurance 










83.92 


Communication 










3,985.36 


Cleaning 










1,469.84 


Removal of ashes . 










1930 


Expert 










721.37 


Fees 










5.00 


Photographic and blueprinting 










178.74 


General Plant 










13,87734 


Miscellaneous services 










33934 



To Expenditure For Equipment: 

Electrical 

Motorless vehicles 

Furniture and fittings 

Office 

Books : 

City appropriation 86,268.27 

Trust funds income 18,780.20 

Newspapers: 

City appropriation 1,282.15 

Trust funds income 1,956.04 

Music: 

City appropriation 87.70 

Trust funds income 1,373.48 

Lantern slides: 

City appropriation 32.05 

Trust funds income 20.85 

Periodicals: 

City appropriation 1 1 ,768.95 

Trust funds income 133.26 

Photographs: 

City appropriation 14.00 

Trust funds income 1 .00 

Tools and instruments 

Wearing apparel .... 

General plant .... 

Carried forward .... 



217.29 

145.64 

2,125.25 

2,20437 



105,048.47 

3,238.19 

3,238.19 

52.90 

11,90221 



15.00 

893.1 1 

11.96 

281.52 



$838,542.80 



66,681.27 



127,597.09 



$1,032,821.16 



171 
EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1935 



By City Appropriation 1935 $1,171,715.00 

By Income From Trust Funds .... 24,794.14 
By Income From J. L. Whitney 

Bibliographic Account 700.00 

By Interest on Deposit in London .... 4.85 

By Judaica Bookshelf 166.00 



Cr. 



$1,197,379.99 



Carried forward $1,197,379.99 



[8] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forward 










To Expenditures For Supplies: 




















Medical 23 18 




Laundry, cleaning, toilet 2,863.26 








Chemicals and disinfectants 230.1 1 




General plant 3,059.20 








35,626.34 




To Expenditures For Material: 








Machinery 25 00 




Electrical 2,999.46 












8,976.50 




To Expenditures For Relief Projects, FERA — WPA 




25,722.79 


25,722.79 


To Special Items: 






220.00 


J. L. Whitney Bibliographic account .... 926.00 


926.00 


Louis E. Kirstein, Cataloging ..... 676.67 


676.67 


A. L. Whitney, Sick benefit 629.00 


629.00 


To Binding Department: 




Salaries 57,851.82 




Transportation 








.20 




Gas 








73.86 




Communication 








.49 




Repairs 








214.83 




Equipment 








97.14 




Supplies 








103.07 




Electrical material 








18.00 




Stock 








6,153.75 




Outside work 






. 


18.00 








64,531.16 


To Printing Department 




Salaries 


15,944.64 




Gas 








49.24 




Communication 








.57 




Repairs 








370.54 




Equipment 








57.46 




Supplies 








40.28 




Electrical material . 








57.01 




Stock 








2,770.62 




Outside work . 








86.65 




Miscellaneous services 






45.51 




Machinery material 






1.20 






19,423.72 


To Special Appropriations: 


Fireproofing, improvements, etc. .... 4,867.40 




Branch Libraries, establishment uf . . . . 5,705. i0 






IU.572.70 
.2U0. 126.04 


( on ted jut uun J 








. . $ 



[9] 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1935 



Brought forward ...... 

By Balances Brought Forward From 1934: 

Trust Funds income, City Treasury . 

Trust Funds income on deposit in London . 

City Appropriation on deposit in London . 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 

Library Building, Fireproofing, improvements, etc. 

Library Building, Foundations .... 

Branch Libraries, establishment of . 

H. C. Bentley Gift 



Cr. 

$1,197,379.99 



67,529.25 

1,901.57 

323.04 

2,774.73 

16,524.80 

19,747.96 

7,303.00 

220.38 



116,324.73 



Carried forward 



$1,313,704.72 



[JO] 



Dr. 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 



Brought forward .... 
To Amount Paid Into City Treasury: 
Fines ..... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins . 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books 
Refunds .... 

Sales of waste paper 



$1,200,126.04 



To Balance, December 31, 1935: 

Trust funds income on deposit in London 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Trust funds income, City Treasury . 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 
H. C. Bentley Gift 
Judaica Bookshelf 

To Balance Unexpended, December 31 
General appropriation 
Central Library Building, Fireproofing 
Central Library Building, Foundation 
Branch Libraries, Establishment of . 



1935: 



21,623.87 
275.10 
486.95 
993.67 
4.25 
142.17 



565.61 

108.72 

70,088.85 

2,548.73 

22038 

166.00 



6,877.33 
11,657.40 
19,747.96 

1 ,597.70 



23,526.01 



73,698.29 



39.880.39 



$1,337,230.73 



II 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER 31, 1935 



Cr. 



Broughl forward 
By Receipts: 

From fines .... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books 
Refunds . 
Sales of waste paper . 



$1,313,704.72 



21,623.87 
275.10 
486.95 
993.67 
4.25 
142.17 



23,526.01 



$1,337,230.73 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: — 

The Examining Committee for the year 1935 respectfully 
submits its report. The Committee met for organization in April. 
At that meeting the work of the Committee was planned and 
outlined and immediately thereafter the Sub-Committees were 
appointed. The reports of the Sub-Committees were submitted 
the first week in November. As the complete findings of the 
various Sub-Committees are on file with the Library this report 
will be confined to the matters which we believe to be of the 
most importance. 

The Examining Committee wishes to begin its report with an 
expression of its appreciation of the hearty co-operation of the 
Director and the staff of the Library, both the Central Library 
and all of the Branches. If we do not dwell upon the excellent 
work which is being quietly and effectively carried on, it is 
because our space is limited. 

THE CENTRAL LIBRARY BUILDING 

It has been recognized for a long time that the classical serenity 
with which the Central Library building confronts Copley 
Square, and which has brought it into the list of the very dis- 
tinguished buildings of America, has been secured with con- 
siderable violence to the organization and administration of the 
library housed therein. The difficulties arise in large measure 
from the shape of the building, which is a square around an open 
court with an entrance in the centre of the side facing Copley 



[13] 

Square. As a result, to get to the opposite side on any floor, it is 
necessary to traverse all the rest of the space on that floor. It is 
thus difficult to arrange the Special Libraries where they can 
have adequate space and at the same time be accessible to the 
public wishing to use them. It is also difficult to find appropriate 
room for the carrying on of the necessary administrative work of 
the Library, so that those departments which meet the public 
shall be accessible and those which do not may have proper 
seclusion. In addition, the rooms now used for several of the 
administrative offices are clearly unsatisfactory for the health and 
comfort of the staff. This is true, also, of the rest rooms and 
staff quarters in general. 

We renew the recommendation made by last year's Com- 
mittee that the space in the Central Library building be reallo- 
cated when and as possible. The time has come when it is 
imperative, not only for present use but also for future growth, 
that a rearrangement of some of the Special Libraries and of 
some of the administrative offices be made. The Cataloguing 
and Classification Department, the Book Purchasing Depart- 
ment, the Office of the Chief Librarian of the Reference Divi- 
sion, the Office of the Supervisor of Branch Libraries, the Print- 
ing Department, the Binding Department, and several of the 
Special Libraries should be moved. In some instances a mere 
exchange of location would achieve a vast improvement. The 
necessity of increased space to the rear of the building is rapidly 
becoming imperative. Such expansion would immediately and 
satisfactorily dispose of the difficulties from which the Central 
Library now suffers. 

CATALOGUES 

The importance of adequate and suitable cataloguing cannot 
be exaggerated. We are greatly impressed with the efficiency 
of the card catalogue and the classification scheme installed some 
years ago in the Teachers' Department, which is based upon the 
practice of the Library of Congress. We therefore recommend 
the installation of the Library of Congress classification for the 



[14] 

entire collection of books in the Central Library and note with 
pleasure the marked progress made in that direction as the result 
of the work program financed in part by Federal emergency 
relief funds. 



THE NEED OF BOOKS 

During the depression there has been an increase in the use of 
books, of approximately 42%. In 1934, however, the use of 
books fell slightly below that in 1933, and this drop has con- 
tinued during 1935. The staff of the Library believes that this 
falling off is in large measure due to the failure to purchase 
enough books. This applies not merely to newly published 
books, both reference and popular, but particularly to the re- 
placement of standard worth while books which become worn out. 
The Library's appropriation for new books, replacements, 
periodicals and newspapers, is subject to a fixed charge of 
approximately $36,000 for continuing sets of books, periodicals, 
and the like. Of the remaining balance approximately 60% has 
to be used for the replacement of worn out books and library 
material, of which 60% about seventy-five per cent is expended 
in the Branch Libraries, through which pass by far the largest 
part of circulating books and material. 

The total appropriations of the last five years for new books, 
replacements, periodicals and newspapers, and the balance after 
deducting the fixed charge, and the 60% of the balance that 
has then been available for replacements are set forth below: — - 





Appropriation 


Balance After 


Percentage For 






Fixed Charce 


Replacements 


1931 


. $175,000 . 


. $139,000 . 


. $83,400 


1932 


1 60,000 . 


1 24,000 . 


. 74,400 


1933 


75,000 . 


39,000 . 


. 23,400 


1934 


100,000 . 


64,000 . 


. 38,400 


1935 


1 00,000 . 


64,000 . 


. 38,400 



A Library without enough books to meet the demand is so 
severely handicapped that we urge that the deficiency be made 
up as soon as practicable. 



[15] 

THE USE OF BOOKS AND OF LIBRARY MATERIAL 

To enable the public to understand what books and material 
are available, and how to get at them, we feel that printed guides 
and descriptive pamphlets should be available more extensively 
than at present. A short history of the Library, describing its 
departments and its collections, with a plan showing where each 
is located and may be reached and used, would be most helpful. 
As the card catalogues increase in size, there will be need of 
further printed directions for their use. 

For the aid and general direction of readers at all times when 
the Central Library is open to the public, we suggest the ad- 
visability of establishing in a convenient central location, such as 
the Abbey Room, an administrative headquarters at which there 
will always be on duty a ranking officer of the Library who will 
have the responsibility and the requisite authority for ensuring 
at all times a coordinated activity of the many public departments 
of the Central Library. We believe that improvement in the 
Library's service to the public can follow from such an arrange- 
ment. 

The use of the Central Library by students from nearby 
institutions of learning presents a problem. It is plain that their 
legitimate needs should be met, but that they should not be al- 
lowed to interfere with the needs of the general public. The 
appointment by these nearby colleges of one of their officers to 
co-operate with the library administration in this respect would 
be of assistance. We recommend it. 

The installation of waiting lists for books in great demand, 
both at the Central Library and at the Branch Libraries, would 
be helpful. 

The abuse of the privilege of using books appears to be in- 
separable from their use. The present methods under develop- 
ment by the Library to prevent loss of books are making an 
impression. In support of these we suggest that issue desks be 
placed as near the exits as practicable. 

The Business Branch, housed in the Kirstein Memorial Li- 
brary Building, is seriously handicapped by lack of room for the 



[16] 

storage and use of periodicals. We suggest that careful con- 
sideration be given to the solution of this problem. 

THE SELECTION OF BOOKS 

We are glad to note that plans are under way to develop two 
distinct Book Selection Departments, one for those books de- 
signed primarily for popular circulation through the Branch 
Libraries and one for those books destined for inclusion in the 
extensive scholarly reference and research collections of the 
Central Library. Until the library personnel is enlarged ma- 
terially it cannot be hoped that the staff will contain specialists 
in each of the fields in which special collections of books should 
be built up. In the meanwhile, we suggest that, in fields in which 
the Library does not possess experts on its own staff, the volun- 
tary aid of public spirited specialists and experts be obtained in 
service as members of Reading Committees, as Honorary Cura- 
tors of the Library's special collections, and the like. 

The problems connected with the acquisition of books relate 
not merely to keeping up with current literature ; they include also 
the task of systematically building up those collections that may 
hitherto have been weak or "spotty" and of developing as far 
as resources permit those collections in which the Library aims to 
excel. Hence, we desire to repeat with emphasis the recommen- 
dation made last year that — 

"One of the most valuable services which could be performed for 
the Library would be a thorough analysis of the collections on the 
various subjects with a view to their orderly long range development 
by additions from past as well as contemporary writings." 

If the results of such surveys were published from time to time in 
small pamphlets of descriptive and historical notes such as those 
which the Harvard Library has issued, we think that this might 
be of much value both to the library staff and to the public whom 
we desire to serve, and it might appreciably enhance interest in 
and donations to the Library. We are glad to know that publi- 
cations of this sort have been under contemplation by the library 



[17] 

administration and that the first steps of a survey of the Library's 
collections have been undertaken. 

The maintenance of balance between the purchase of popular 
and of more serious books is a perennial problem. We suggest 
that it would be helpful to have as exact data as possible as to 
the sources and purpose of the demand for the different classes 
of books, and as to the proportion of the Library's book funds 
spent for each class. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN AND WITH SCHOOLS 
The children's work is being carried on most admirably, in 
some instances in the face of quite inadequate room. This lack 
of room is particularly evident in the Memorial Branch Library, 
located in the Roxbury Memorial High School. This school has 
4,000 students. The Library is too small and is not well located. 
There is no available sheltered place for the work with children. 



ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS AND REPORTS 

One of the most important questions which faces any ad- 
ministrative officer is the installation of adequate operating 
records and the derivation therefrom of intelligible and prompt 
reports. These serve the same functions as the reins used in 
driving a horse. No administrative officer of an enterprise of 
any size can possibly be in personal touch with all the varied 
activities. His method of control must of necessity lie through 
actual reports of accomplishment and of projected undertakings. 
This applies not only to accounting, but to all multifarious de- 
partmental activities. We hope that during the coming year it 
will be possible to have studies made which will aid the Director 
to have in adequate form the information which must be his for 
directing the work of the Library. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

There are thirty-three branches of the Boston Public Library, 
located in residential areas, and rendering splendid service. Those 



US] 

branches located in buildings designed as libraries and used ex- 
clusively for library purposes escape the handicaps from which 
suffer those branches housed in municipal buildings of various 
sorts or in leased quarters. The handicaps most frequently en- 
countered are lack of room, inadequate staff quarters and shelf 
space, poor ventilation and heating. An outstanding example of 
such a handicap is the very inadequate exterior lighting in the 
street on which is located the Fellowes Athenaeum in Roxbury. 
This lighting should be seen to at the very earliest moment. 

These physical handicaps have been thoroughly discussed 
before, notably in the report in 1933, to which we wish particu- 
larly to call attention. It is inevitable that some one or more of 
the branches will always suffer from one or more of the handi- 
caps which we have pointed out, unless the City shall cease to 
grow and its residential centres become static. If we were to 
recite the physical handicaps of each branch we should in sub- 
stance be repeating what was said in the 1 933 report. The same 
things might not be said about the same branches, but they would 
probably apply in whole or in part to some other branch. We 
do not think that any useful purpose would be served by such a 
recital. We wish, however, to record our feeling that, when- 
ever the funds are available and the opportunity offers, more 
adequate quarters should be provided for those branches which 
are most severely handicapped. 



CONCLUSION 

The foregoing is submitted in the knowledge that much, if 
not all, we have said is already known and appreciated by the 
Trustees and by the Director, and that the things we deplore 
and those we approve and suggest are receiving thought and 
attention and would be remedied and adopted did the circum- 
stances permit. We hope that by our discussion of them we may 
contribute to that better understanding of the needs of the Library 
by which alone can progress and change be accomplished. 



[19] 



Adopted as the Report of the Examining Committee, No- 
vember 25, 1935. 

Charles M. Rogerson, Vice Chairman 



George Bramwell Baker 
Walter B. Briggs 
Ralph Adams Cram 
Susan J. Ginn 
Francis X. Hurley 
Henry Jackson 
Herbert F. Jenkins 
Henry Lewis Johnson 
Carl T. Keller 
Robert H. Lord 
Charles D. Maginnis 
George R. Nutter 



James P. Parmenter 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
Hester Pickman 
Abraham E. Pinanski 
Philip H. Rhinelander 
Margaret M. ShurclifT 
Lillian C. Slattery 
Charles H. Taylor 
D. B. Updike 
Henry R. Viets 
Charles F. Weed 
Mary W. Winslow 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To the Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston : 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library 
for the year ending December 31, 1935. 

effects of the depression 

Appropriations for the support of the Library during 1935 
remained appreciably below the level that had existed before 
the effects of the economic depression became noticeable. 

Books and facilities continued to be used in the notably in- 
creased fashion that had prevailed since the beginning of the 
depression in 1 929, though not in 1 935 to the same high degree 
as in 1932 and 1933, or in 1934. 

Continued heavy demands were made upon the Library in 
sponsoring and carrying out work projects for the relief of the 
unemployed, under the auspices of the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE LIBRARY 
The City appropriated for the support of the Library during 
1935 the sum of $1,171,715. This was $65,305.19 greater 
than the amount appropriated in 1 934. 

The increase was made up chiefly of the amount necessary 
for the restoration of the salary reductions of 5%, 1«0%, and 
15% that had been in effect since April 21, 1933 for all city 
employees. The restoration became effective as of January 1 , 
1935. 

The appropriation for the purchase of books remained at 
$100,000. The inadequacy of this amount, in view of the 
heavily increased use of the Library, is indicated by the follow- 
ing table: 



[21] 



AMOUNT APPROPRIATED NO. OK BOOKS 

YEAR FOR THE LENT FOR 

PURCHASE OF BOOKS HOME USE 

1925 .... $100,000 . . . 3,129,781 

1926 .... 125,000 . . . 3,499,137 

1927 .... 125,000 . . . 3,705,657 

1928 .... 125,000 . . . 3,899,286 

1929 .... 140,000 . . . 3,930,068 

1930 .... 160,000 . . . 4,133,459 

1931 . . . . 175,000 . . . 4,702,932 

1932 .... 160,000 . . . 5,567,681 

1933 .... 75,000 . . . 5,548,283 

1934 .... 100,000 . . . 5,194,351 

1935 .... 100,000 . . . 4,949,701 

In a later section of this report the need of additional provision 
for the purchase of books is presented in detail. 

The total appropriation for the year included an amount of 
$25,100 for the necessary expenditures incidental to the un- 
employment relief projects which the Library sponsored on 
behalf of the City. By excluding this amount for extraordinary 
expenditures the appropriation for the ordinary operating ex- 
penditures of the Library was $1,146,615. 

CONTINUING INCREASED USE OF THE LIBRARY 
The effects of the economic depression remained clearly recog- 
nizable in the continuing increased use of books and facilities in 
1935 as compared with the pre-depression period. During the 
year there were borrowed for home reading 4,949,701 volumes. 
This figure represents a 26% increase over that for 1 929. 

The following table shows the increased use of the Library 
during six years of economic depression, 1930-1935: 







PERCENTAGE OF 


PERCENTAGE OF 




NO. OF BOOKS LENT 


INCREASE OR DECREASE 


INCREASE 




FOR HOME USE 


OVER PRECEDINC YEAR 


OVER 1929 


1929 . • 


3,930,068 






1930 . 


4,133,459 


'. +5%' ; 


'. +5% 


1931 


4,702,932 


. +13% 


+20% 


1932 . 


5,567.681 


. +18% 


• +42% 


1933 . 


5,548,283 


. -03% 


. +41% 


1934 . 


5,194351 


. - 6% 


. . +32% 


1935 . 


4,949,701 


. - 5% . . 


+26% 



It is clear from these figures that the peak of increased use oc- 
curred in 1932 and 1933. In the two years that have elapsed 



[22] 

since then there has occurred a definite change in trend; a de- 
crease has set in. 

Undoubtedly a number of factors have contributed to this 
change. An improvement in economic conditions, slight though 
it may be, has apparently brought about an increase in employ- 
ment. There have consequently been perhaps fewer persons 
unemployed to make use of the Library's facilities than in the 
early years of the depression. At the same time there is ap- 
parently another factor to which even greater weight must be 
given. This is a lack of books. Gradually during the last 
two years it has been becoming clearly evident that the Library's 
stock of books has been so depleted through the heavy use of the 
depression years that there is no longer an adequate supply 
available for use. They have become worn out to the extent 
that it is no longer possible to offer them in sufficient quantity to 
meet the public demand that nevertheless seems to exist for them. 

To summarize, the Library finished the year 1935 lending 
26% more books than in 1929, the last of the pre-depression 
years ; its appropriation for the purchase of books, however, was 
28% less in 1935 than in 1929. 

THE NEED OF BOOKS 

Funds for the purchase of books come from two sources — 
from appropriations made for the purpose by the Mayor and 
the City Council, and from income received from trust funds 
which have been given to the Trustees specifically for the pur- 
chase of books. In 1935 the appropriation by the City was 
$100,000; the income from trust funds was $24,794.14. 

The larger part of the appropriation made by the City for 
the purchase of library books is devoted to obtaining books that 
are used by the citizens of Boston in their respective sections of 
the city, through their branch libraries. Relatively little of this 
appropriation is given over to purchasing books for the central 
library in Copley Square; for that there is used largely the in- 
come of trust funds which have been given specifically for that 
purpose and are therefore not available for any other use. 

There is given above a table indicating the amounts that have 



[23] 

been appropriated by the City for the purchase of books from 
1925 to 1935. This shows a high point for book appropriations 
in 1 93 1 . Since that date there have occurred drastic reductions. 
These would perhaps not have been unduly serious if their 
effects had been confined to any one year. There are now 
apparent, however, the cumulative effects of the entire range of 
depression years from 1930 to 1935. During these years the 
number of books lent by the Library reached a maximum in- 
crease of 42%, and ended in 1935 showing still an increase of 
26%, over the pre-depression figures of 1929. For six years 
now the demands for books have continued to surpass the possi- 
bilities for supplying them. As a result the book stock, particu- 
larly in the branch libraries, is wearing out so rapidly that 
replacements must be made, and continue to be made, in 
accelerating measure. For instance, during 1935 the Library 
had to discard 57,354 books from the branch libraries, chiefly 
because of wearing out ; to replace these it was able to add only 
52,019, thus falling short by 5,335 volumes. Unless book 
appropriations can be increased, the Library will fall progressive- 
ly farther behind, and in considerably accelerating measure 
because of the continuing increased use of books resulting from 
depression conditions. 

Books are the lifeblood of a library. Without them the flow 
of life throughout the library system cannot be maintained, and 
its closely articulated members (physical facilities and personnel 
both) are without the force necessary to function. It is ques- 
tionable practice to deplete resources by living on capital. This 
is in effect what the Library is doing when it falls appreciably 
behind in replacing books that are worn out. 

To catch up in these arrears — particularly in replacing worn 
out books, and then to proceed to build up the book collections 
to an adequate level — use could be made to advantage for 
several years to come of a minimum annual amount of $1 50,000. 

MISUSE OF BOOKS 

As the need of books has become acute, the Library has 
attempted to husband its resources in every way possible. During 

3 



[24] 

the past year it has been particularly active in facing the prob- 
lems arising from the misuse of books. 

There is a considerable range of misuse of library material. 
Borrowers may fail to return books when due, though most 
books borrowed are eventually returned in due course; yet over 
a number of years two to three thousand volumes per year have 
been found to be "unrecoverable." Books may be stolen from 
open shelves, perhaps not always deliberately with intent not 
to return them eventually; the annual loss in this fashion has 
ranged from twelve to fifteen thousand volumes over a period of 
years. Further, an appreciable number of volumes is found 
mutilated every year. 

During the year 1934 the branch libraries reported 2,262 
books as "unrecoverable" from borrowers. In itself this seemed 
a considerable number and one that ought to and could be 
reduced. On the other hand, since these 2,262 volumes repre- 
sented approximately only one twentieth of 1 % of the total of 
some 4,500,000 volumes lent the record was indeed relatively 
good. Still it seemed entirely possible and desirable to attempt 
to reduce this number of "unrecoverable" books. 

During 1 934, and likewise for each of several years preced- 
ing, the branch libraries reported also a loss of something over 
12,000 volumes from their open shelves, books which had been 
taken by individuals without having them charged, in other 
words by stealing. The loss of 12,000 books during the three 
hundred or so days that the branch libraries are open in the 
course of the year represents a loss of forty volumes per day; 
this, divided among the thirty- three branch libraries, is a daily 
average loss to each branch library of 1 J/^, volumes. This does 
not seem to indicate appreciable carelessness on the part of the 
staffs of the branch libraries. On the other hand, an annual loss 
of 12,000 volumes represents enough books to stock an entire 
new branch library each year. Furthermore, the type of ma- 
terial stolen is generally of the sort that is in such demand that 
the book service of the branch libraries is injured seriously by 
its loss. Inasmuch as the average number of books added 
annually to all of the branches in recent years has been approxi- 



[25] 

mately 48,000, the loss may be visualized by realizing that 
each time four new volumes were purchased and placed on the 
shelves one good book was stolen by an unknown person. Clearly 
it had become desirable to devote definite attention to the possi- 
bility of reducing this appreciably large number of missing books 
each year. 

In the central library a similar situation had come into being, 
varying only in quantity and in contributing circumstances. The 
latter not being for the moment as easily controllable in the 
central library as in the branch libraries, the situation in the 
branch libraries was faced first. It is in the branch libraries 
that there occurs the heaviest demand for books for home use; 
also, it is only in the branches that open shelves are to be found 
to an appreciable extent. 

The experience of the past year has been of considerable 
interest. Calls at secondhand book stores brought to light few 
library books; no flagrant case of re-sale of Boston Public Li- 
brary books was discovered. A high percentage of the books 
stolen each year was found to be from those on school and 
college reading lists, and these books had disappeared at the 
very time school pupils and college students were known to be 
in need of them ; many others were juvenile titles that would not 
attract adult thieves. Suspicion turned naturally upon young 
people. Most of the thieves who were caught were under twen- 
ty years of age or admitted that they had begun to steal library 
books before leaving school. It was found also to be less easily 
possible to apprehend individuals in the act of stealing than to 
find them out after the event. Further, it became clear that a 
correlation seems to exist between an unwillingness to return 
books when they become long overdue, a willingness to steal 
library books or to mutilate them, and a disposition to cause 
disturbance in the libraries themselves. More often than not 
young people who are found injuring the Library's service by 
creating disturbances have been injuring it also by stealing books. 
In similar fashion, individuals who are markedly careless in their 
responsibility for the return of library books properly charged 
to them have frequently been found to be willing also to steal. 



[26] 

In view of all this it seemed best to consider the problem first 
and foremost as one for the prevention of book thievery, not 
primarily for its punishment; and to approach it in terms of the 
known, in the belief that the by-products of this approach would 
be likely to be considerable. It was known, for instance, that 
in 1934 the branch libraries had had to report 2,262 books 
charged to borrowers as "unrecoverable." It was determined 
that in 1935 there were to be fewer books so reported. This 
was to be accomplished by increased personal attention to each 
case. 

When books are taken from the Library, the borrower regis- 
ters his name and address. These are therefore known items 
with which to start to recover volumes from careless borrowers. 
Through prompt attention to individual cases, even to the point 
of considerable personal investigation, the number of volumes 
that proved to be "unrecoverable" in 1935 was only 1 ,399. This 
represented a reduction of 38% from the 1934 number. In 
itself this was a considerable achievement, for the recovery of 
long overdue books occasions in nearly every case the expendi- 
ture of much time and ingenuity. All in all several thousand 
calls have to be made in the course of a year upon borrowers who 
keep library books long overdue and pay no attention to the 
usual forms of notification. In calling from house to house to 
collect overdue books, the Library's investigator frequently sees 
books on tables, or elsewhere in plain sight, that have been stolen ; 
often he is able also to obtain information about the stealing of 
books. As a by-product of such calls during 1935, sixty-seven 
serious cases of stealing were solved. Nineteen of the sixty- 
seven individuals stole by forging or by using some sort of false 
pretense ; the others simply stole books from open shelves, doing 
so in many cases at times when the library staff was too busy in 
one direction to be able to be aware of what was happening 
everywhere in their quarters. Every one of the sixty-seven cases 
had to have careful investigation and preparation, which often 
required several days, followed by a personal hearing. Most 
of the offenders were of school age, or just past it. The hearings 
were conducted with an intent to encourage young people to 



[27] 

meet their responsibility to the Library, through telling them 
facts concerning it, and even about life, which perhaps they had 
not known previously. All hearings of minors were held in the 
presence of one of the parents. The penalties set were usually 
small, but almost invariably they have been met as agreed at the 
hearings ; they have always been assumed by the delinquent and 
not by the parent. It is believed that the Library has established 
friendly relations with almost every one of the families that have 
been involved. 

This procedure is to be continued for a long enough period 
to permit results being carefully evaluated. Its effect already 
has been to prevent the over-detention of books in a growing 
number of cases. It is not safe to tamper with the Library's 
books, and the young people are beginning to recognize this. 
The next checking of shelves to determine the number of missing 
books will not be completed until the end of the summer of 
1 936. There is, however, good reason to believe that the figures 
for missing books will be found definitely reduced. 

It is clearly evident that there is being built up in the minds 
of the residents of Boston a recognition of the need for co- 
operating with the Library in its attempt to prevent its resources, 
intended for all, being abused by the few. 

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF PROJECTS 

During 1935 the Library continued to assume a share, to- 
gether with other departments of the city government, in 
planning, sponsoring, and carrying out work projects for the 
unemployed, under the auspices of the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration. 

In the course of the year there was carried through to com- 
pletion the changing of the shelf lists of the central library from 
the old bound folio handwritten volumes to a modern typed 
arrangement on standard sized catalog cards. This project 
constituted an additional step in a long range program designed 
to bring about the eventual development along modern lines of 
certain of the Library's processes in which improvement has 
long been desired. In its final stages the project permitted ex- 



[28] 

tensive activities preparatory to initiating a reclassification of the 
scholarly book collections of the central library on a modern 
classification scheme such as that of the Library of Congress. 

There was also continued during the year the project for the 
cleaning of books throughout the entire library system. 

These projects provided work for approximately seven hun- 
dred individuals in the course of the year. The cost of personnel 
was borne by the federal government as part of its program for 
the relief of the unemployed. The contribution on the part of 
the Library was that of directing the work, together with pro- 
viding supplies and materials and renting space and equipment, 
for which purpose a special appropriation was made by the City. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

During the year considerable thought has been given to the 
problems resulting from the crowding of the central library 
building. Forty years have elapsed since it was first occupied 
in 1895. Aside from the erection of an annex in 1918 there has 
been no additional provision of space. 

It is the fate of large libraries, particularly those of the refer- 
ence and research type, to become larger. The more thoroughly 
developed their collections are, the more adequately they serve 
the purposes of research. That the Boston Public Library 
should be experiencing growing pains is not peculiar. The same 
situation is to be found elsewhere among the great libraries of 
the country. The Library of Congress occupied in 1897 an 
unusually commodious new building. It soon became filled to 
its existing capacity; it had to add extensive new sections of 
book stack, using as space for the purpose large portions of the 
interior light courts; within the past year it has had to proceed 
to erect an annex building approaching in size the original main 
library building. In New York the main library building of 
the New York Public Library was erected as recently as 191 I ; 
yet a year ago it became necessary to obtain considerable space 
outside for housing the growing collections for which there is no 
longer space in the main library building itself. Similarly ai 
Harvard, the Widener Memorial Library building, erected in 



[29] 

1915, has already become filled almost to capacity, with the re- 
sult that consideration is having to be given to finding additional 
library space elsewhere. 

In Boston, too, the central library building has become filled 
to capacity, particularly in the book stack. In the years im- 
mediately ahead the situation will become acute, as additional 
shelf space becomes necessary for housing the ordinary annual 
growth of the book collections. Steps will have to be taken to 
remove from the book stack area the various activities that have 
encroached upon it, due to lack of space in other parts of the 
building. For years there has been a tendency to crowd a large 
variety of activities into the areas behind the scenes. The charac- 
ter of the beautiful formal public rooms is such that overcrowd- 
ing cannot be permitted in them. There has therefore been only 
the book stack area into which to crowd administrative offices, 
locker rooms, lunch rooms, rest rooms, smoking room, training 
course classroom, and even the extensive space required for the 
central administrative quarters for the branch libraries, with the 
accompanying work of cataloging and repairing branch library 
books, and distributing books to the branch libraries, from the 
so-called central Branch Deposit. As the work of the Library 
has grown in general, the need for space for all of these ac- 
tivities has grown also. At the same time the need of shelving 
space for books has increased as well. There has resulted 
general suffering in all directions. A particularly undesirable 
situation has developed in that large areas of the book stack 
have had to be left open to all who come and go. Such a situation 
is highly detrimental to good administration of the great collec- 
tion of books that is housed in the stack. Here, if anywhere in 
the Library, there should be a rigid control of entrance and exit, 
with access strictly limited to those members of the library staff 
who need it for library business, and to those members of the 
public to whom the privilege of direct access to the book shelves 
is necessary for the proper prosecution of their researches. 

To find a solution for the problem is not easy. Apparently 
either the central library building must be expanded or space 
must be found elsewhere for certain of the Library's activities. 



[30] 

Presumably the City is not in a position to find or to make avail- 
able the extensive funds that would be necessary for erecting an 
addition to the central library building at the present time. The 
only possibility of action is probably to obtain relief by moving 
to some other location those activities for which this is feasible 
and then to re-allocate the existing space in the central library 
building. Consideration has therefore been given to this possi- 
bility. 

Changes can undoubtedly be effected in the allocation of 
space in the central library building that will permit an improve- 
ment in the Library's service to readers. It is clear that the 
problem is not easy of solution in a building of such architectural 
importance and stability. There is little flexibility in the arrange- 
ment of the individual members of the architectural whole. Much 
of the decoration of the building partakes of the nature of 
"national monuments," and as such is quite properly inviolate. 
In addition to such limitations as these there are the limitations 
of choice in finding library activities that are sufficiently inde- 
pendent of others to permit their being placed elsewhere without 
detriment to the general service of the Library. 

Bibliothecally the central library building is given over in 
large part to those activities of the library system that are con- 
sidered as constituting the Reference Division. On the other 
hand there are certain activities in the building that are, or should 
be, a part of the Circulation Division, and need not necessarily 
be carried on in the central library; they might properly be 
housed elsewhere. For instance, the central administrative head- 
quarters for the branch libraries — the so-called Branch De- 
partment — could be housed in almost any location in the city 
that is central. It is a unit that is for the most part self sufficient, 
with its group of clearly related activities, and with its large 
reservoir of books for supplementing the collections of individual 
branch libraries. Likewise, the Newspaper Room for the daily 
reading of current newspapers could probably be removed from 
the central library building without detriment either to its own 
work or the general work of the Library. In its present location, 
on the ground floor immediately next to the main entrance, it 



[31] 

occupies space that is urgently needed for important activities of 
the Reference Division. Certainly its clientele could be served 
perfectly well in any number of locations that are reasonably 
central. Still another department that might be placed elsewhere 
is the Children's Department. The importance of this depart- 
ment is without question. It is nevertheless possible that it 
might be able to carry on its work quite as well in some other 
location. A centrally established Boys and Girls Book House, 
in independent quarters, has much to be said for it. 

If there is to be a successful re-allocation of departmental 
space in the central library building, one or more departments or 
activities will have to be moved from it. Mere mutual interchange 
of space between departments is not possible. If moves are to be 
made, they will have to follow one upon another. Clearly a 
department or an activity cannot be moved unless there is space 
into which to move it. 

The central library building has suffered for many years 
also in its lack of adequate facilities and quarters for the library 
staff. Toilet facilities, locker space, rest rooms, lunch rooms, 
training course classrooms, staff library, and the miscellaneous 
facilities necessary for a staff of several hundred persons are 
woefully inadequate. Provision for the library staff was ap- 
parently overlooked in the erection of the building forty years 
ago. Staff space had therefore to be obtained by crowding in 
here and there, for the most part into the very midst of the book 
stack area, and generally with little segregation from the book 
shelves themselves. From a bibliothecal point of view this has 
been, and is, highly undesirable. Since 1895 the library staff 
has increased considerably in size. There has, however, been 
little additional provision of staff accommodation. The need 
therefor has been acute for some time. More adequate pro- 
vision for the members of the staff would contribute much to 
their well being and would react to the well being of the library 
service as well. 

TRAINING OF PERSONNEL 

The extensive and wide program of training courses that had 
been instituted in 1933 for all full-time members of the library 



[32] 

staff continued into its second academic year in October 1934. 
During the academic year 1934—35 there were 192 members 
of the staff enrolled in twelve full courses (three terms of ten 
weeks each) and eleven one-term courses. These individuals 
took 260 courses; of these, 217 were completed satisfactorily, 
68 with distinction. 

The academic year 1935-36 found 184 members of the 
staff enrolled for courses beginning with the autumn term. Ad- 
ditional enrollments were indicated for the one-term courses to 
follow in the winter and spring terms. 

As had been expected, there were fewer members of the staff 
enrolled in the second academic year (1934-35) than in the 
first year (1933-34). In the second year 192 persons took 
260 courses, as compared with 261 persons taking 268 courses 
during the first year. Yet the. work in the second year may be 
considered to have been in general more satisfactory. There 
were fewer withdrawals and failures. Of the courses taken 
83% were passed, as compared with 77% the preceding year. 
On the other hand the percentage of courses passed with dis- 
tinction dropped from 35% in 1933-34 to 31% in 1934-35. 
For the first term of the academic year 1 935-36 the enrollment 
was 184, as compared with 148 for the first term of the pre- 
ceding year. 

Enrollment in the courses is voluntary. The individual has 
to undertake the work in his own, not library time. The courses 
have been conceived in the spirit of a sharing of experience, 
knowledge, and thought by the more advanced members of the 
staff with those less advanced. They are intended to afford an 
opportunity for training to those who feel in need thereof but 
have not previously had such a possibility within their reach, as 
well as to offer supplementary work to those who have had 
formal library training elsewhere. 

The next step is to make provision for the program of qualify- 
ing and promotional examinations for which the training courses 
were originally conceived as affording aid and preparation. 
During the past year considerable attention has been given to 
the development of a comprehensive and systematic plan of 



[33] 

examinations extending beyond the present Entrance Examina- 
tions which the Library requires for entrance into its service. The 
plan contemplates a series of Qualifying Examinations for pro- 
bationary members of the staff desiring to qualify for appoint- 
ment as assistants in the permanent service, and a series of 
Promotional Examinations for assistants desiring to qualify for 
the upper grades of the permanent service. These examinations 
are to be on a uniform basis for the entire library system. It is 
hoped the final plan may be completed in the course of the 
coming year, and that the new examinations will first be offered 
in the spring of 1937. 

The program of training and the program of examinations are 
intended to be of aid to members of the library staff in their 
personal capacities, as well as to make available to the Library 
and its clientele an increasingly higher level of qualifications in 
the staff as a whole. It is of appreciable significance that two 
hundred members of the library staff are engaged in work and 
study in such a program. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The following appointments to titular positions were made 
during the year: Richard G. Hensley, to be Chief Librarian of 
the Reference Division; James W. Kenney, to be Comp- 
troller, and Lucien E. Taylor, to be Chief of Cataloging and 
Classification Department. 

The following resignations from titular positions occurred: 
Caroline Keene Harris, Branch Librarian, Tyler Street Branch 
Library; and Mildred R. Bradbury, Assistant-in-Charge, Fine 
Arts Department, to become Art Librarian of the Providence 
Public Library. 

Under the provision of the Boston Retirement Act the fol- 
lowing individuals retired from the library service: Alice B. 
Orcutt, First Assistant, after 47 years service; Samuel A. Cheva- 
lier, Chief of the Cataloging and Classification Department, and 
Assistant Librarian, after 41 years service; George S. Maynard, 
Chief of the Special Libraries, after 1 8 years service; Charles E. 
Hardy, Janitor, after 16 years service; Timothy C. Harrington, 



[34] 

Janitor, after 13 years service; and Katherine M. O'Gorman, 
Cleaner, after 12 years service. 

As of the date of their retirement the honorary title of Emeri- 
tus was bestowed upon the following individuals : Otto Fleisch- 
ner, Assistant Librarian, Emeritus ; Samuel A. Chevalier, Chief 
of the Cataloging and Classification Department, and Assistant 
Librarian, Emeritus; and George S. Maynard, Chief of the 
Special Libraries, Emeritus. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the statistical summaries that appear 
in the Appendix to this Report. 

The Director wishes to express on behalf of the library staff 
its appreciation of the friendly support and interest which it has 
had from the Trustees in carrying on the work of the Library. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Milton E. Lord 

Director, and Librarian 



APPENDIX 



COMPARATIVE CIRCULATION STATISTICS 





1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


Central Library 


698,627 


728,656 


777,666 


793,121 


756,018 


737396 


Business Branch 


6,157* 


13,193 


16,604 


17,614 


18,410 


17,921 


Branch Libraries: 














Allston 


108,557 


137,709 


175,054 


192,331 


186,413 


182,203 


Andrew Square 


116,196 


128,337 


155,574 


145,801 


138,638 


130,777 


Boylston 


79,946 


94,306 


147,862 


143,764 


138,595 


137,179 


Brighton 


103,145 


121,032 


139,276 


147,666 


134,388 


130.741 


Charlestown 


100,914 


119,637 


136,845 


144,676 


127,866 


117.525 


City Point 


97,264 


122,619 


1 55,492 


150,036 


144,762 


140,006 


Codman Square 


158,881 


186,386 


216,780 


199,786 


185,451 


168,412 


Dorchester 


102,790 


115,810 


137,018 


140,344 


132,104 


135,821 


East Boston 


157,746 


180,859 


218,072 


214,789 


188,819 


161,227 


Faneuil 


78,436 


90,424 


120,007 


130,252 


138,234 


138.561 


Fellowes Athen. 


85,739 


93,970 


114,937 


109,077 


98,118 


89,857 


Hyde Park 


120,878 


127,888 


154,838 


149,875 


144,011 


141,763 


Jamaica Plain 


95,895 


118,561 


133,335 


131,903 


126,702 


119,760 


Jeffries Point 


70,768 
18,020* 


75,459 
43,196 


100,736 
56,971 


92,499 


80,460 
63388 


76,500 


Kirstein 


65,149 


64,045 


Lower Mills 


52,279 


59,692 


76,137 


81,017 


74,990 


70.928 


Mattapan 


139,723 


187,669 


220,675 


219,300 


205,498 


196,311 


Memorial 


178,467 


213,320 


246,739 


246,757 


222,975 


211,971 


Mt. Bowdoin 


134310 


151,456 


168,036 


158,667 


149,341 


143.823 


Mt. Pleasant 


76,956 


82,795 


100,361 


102,914 


94,640 


89.924 


Neponset 


57,043 


60,986 


75,148 


78,579 


69,638 


64.409 


North End 


145326 


158,333 


185,849 


163,735 


143,351 


123.174 


Orient Heights 


56,954 


60,512 


84,887 


84,233 


92,801 


81.189 


Parker Hill 


60,815 


112,308 


130,042 


125,524 


119,139 


112.165 


Phillips Brooks 




25,713* 


50,383 


51,870 


46,258 


45397 


Roslindale 


130,268 


151,956 


1 70,287 


173,078 


167,562 


154,640 


Roxbury Crossir 


ig 80,022 


69,034 


77,650 


76,023 


75,062 


72,839 


South Boston 


163,266 


161,244 


189,904 


168326 


141,046 


128,979 


South End 


124,352 


122,870 


1 50,745 


155,575 


154,604 


153,478 


Tyler Street 


51,195 


59,163 


74,230 


72,334 


52,578 


47,979 


Uphams Corner 


184,595 


201,701 


225,285 


228,490 


211,399 


199,564 


West End 


177,125 


189,543 


219,413 


218,721 


208,003 


201,373 


West Roxbury 


120,804 
4,133,459 


136,595 
4,702,932 


164,843 
5,567,681 


174,457 
5,548,283 


163,089 
5.194351 


161,864 


Total 


4.949.701 



*For eight months, May through December. 



[36] 

The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form: 

VOLUMES 

1930 gain over preceding year ........ 203391 

1 93 1 gain over preceding year ........ 569,473 

1932 gain over preceding year ........ 864,749 

1933 loss from preceding year ........ 19,398 

1934 loss from preceding year ........ 353,932 

1935 loss from preceding year ........ 244,650 

USE OF BOOKS 

Circulation from Central Library by Months 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



1935 







SCHOOLS AND 






HOME USE 


INSTITUTIONS 




HOME USE 


THROUCH 


THROUCH 




DIRECT 


BRANCH DEPT. 


BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS 


36,977 


7,318 


34,390 


78,685 


35,428 


6,484 


36,500 


78,412 


40,412 


7,626 


37,362 


85,400 


34,964 


6,487 


37,984 


79.435 


30,735 


6,080 


37,662 


74,477 


23,819 


4,458 


14,381 


42,658 


26,037 


4,348 


3346 


33,731 


25,230 


4,304 


3,852 


33386 


27,920 


4,290 


1,555 


33,765 


35,906 


6,551 


10,353 


52,810 


38,340 


6,590 


25,718 


70,648 


35,355 


6,199 


32,435 


73,989 



391,123 



70,735 



275,538 



737,396 



Distribution of Total Circulation 











HOME 


SCHOOLS AND 


TOTALS 


Central Library: use 


INSTITUTIONS 


a. Direct 391,123 






b. Through Branch Libraries 






1. Deposit Collections . . . 43,870 






2. General Collections . . . 26,86;> 






c. Schools and Institutions through 






Branch Department 
Business Branch 




275.538 


737,396 






17,921 


Branch Libraries: 






Allston .... 182,203 


.... 


182,203 


Andrew Square 








130,157 


620 


130,777 


Boylston 








137,179 


.... 


137,179 


Brighton 








125,891 


4,850 


130,741 


Charlestown 








1 1 1 ,498 


6,027 


117,525 


City Point 








140,006 


.... 


140,006 


Codman Square 








160,837 


7.575 


168.412 


Dorchester 








134,291 


1,530 


135.821 



[37] 



East Boston 
Faneuil 
Fellowes Athenaem 
Hyde Park 
Jamaica Plain 
Jeffries Point 
Kirstein 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan 
Memorial 
Mt. Bowdoin 
Mt. Pleasant 
Neponset 
North End 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Phillips Brooks 
Roslindale 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boston 
South End 
Tyler Street 
Uphams Corner 
West End 
West Roxbury 



154,694 


6,533 


161,227 


138,561 




138,561 


76,879 


1*2!978 


89,857 


134,288 


7,475 


141,763 


115,045 


4,715 


119,760 


76,500 


.... 


76,500 


64,045 


.... 


64,045 


70,928 


.... 


70,928 


196311 




196,311 


211,128 


' '843 


211,971 


143,823 


• • • • 


143,823 


89,924 


.... 


89,924 


64,409 


.... 


64,409 


122,916 


258 


123,174 


81,189 


.... 


81,189 


112,165 


.... 


112,165 


45,397 




45397 


144.438 


l'oi202 


154,640 


72,839 




72,839 


111,175 


1*7i804 


128,979 


148,713 


4,765 


1 53,478 


47,979 




47,979 


199367 


' 197 


199,564 


185,362 


16,011 


201,373 


147,907 


13,957 


161,864 



4,078,044 



116,340 



4,194,384 



These figures are condensed into the following: 

Books Lent for Home Use, Including Circulation Through 
Schools and Institutions 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 

the Branch Libraries 737,396 

From Business Branch .......... 17,921 

From Branch Libraries (excluding books received from Central Library) . 4,194,384 

Total 4,949,701 

Comparative Statistics Showing Distribution of Circulation 



1934 



1935 



Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) 
Direct home use 395,440 

Through Branch Libraries . 78,118 



Business Branch .... 

Branch Libraries circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) 

Schools and institutions circulation (in- 
cluding books from Central through 
the branch library system 



473,558 
18,410 


391,123 

70,735 


461,858 
17.921 




4,291,433 




4,078,044 


410,950 




391,878 



5,194,351 



4.949.701 



[38] 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years : 

1934 1935 

Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 2,041 1,933 

Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 435 372 



2.476 2,305 
Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 753 860 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts . . . . 166 139 



919 999 

The classified direct circulation of the branch libraries for 
two successive years was as follows: 

1934 1935 





VOLUMES 


PERCENTAGE 


VOLUMES 


PERCENTAGE 


Fiction for adults . 


2,063,092 


48.1 


1,966,588 


48.2 


Non-fiction for adults . 


588,996 


13.7 


590,051 


14.5 


Juvenile fiction 


1,124,569 


26.2 


1,046,534 


25.7 


Juvenile non-fiction 


514,776 


12.0 


474,871 


11.6 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 
the following percentages : 

1934 1935 

PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE 

Fiction 46.1 45.6 

Non-fiction 53.9 54.4 

BOOK ACCESSIONS 

BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE 

For the Central Library: 1934 1935 

From City appropriation . . 7,327 \2pyy 

From trust funds income . . 3,428 4,699 

10,755 17,298 

For Branch Libraries: 

From City appropriation . . 48,214 45,702 

From trust funds income . . 641 J LI 

48,855 46,429 

59,610 63.727 



[39] 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



Accessions by purchase 
Accessions by gift 
Accessions by exchange 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound 
Accessions by serials bound 

Totals 







TOTAL 


CENTRAL 


BRANCHES 


VOLUMES 


12,498 


51,229 


63,727 


3,282 


924 


4,206 


3 




3 


1,581 


22 


1,603 


104 




104 


4,980 




4,980 



22,448 



52,175 



74,623 



THE CATALOGS 





1934 




1935 




VOLS. AND TITLES 


VOLS. AND 


TIT! IES 




PARTS 


PARTS 




Cataloged (new) : 








Central Library Catalog 


19,371 16,593 


21.492 


15,155 


Serials . . . . 


5,724 .... 


8,528 




.Branch Libraries 


47,604 44,640 


48.713 


45,790 


Recataloged 


9,230 6,883 


10.988 


6,461 



Totals 



81,929 68.116 89,721 67.406 



The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use is: 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) . 
Special collections, new books and transfers .... 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but now found, 
transfers from Branch Libraries, etc. 



19,076 
3,560 

2,121 

24,757 



Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yel replaced, 
transfers, etc. ......... 

Net gain at Central Library ........ 

Net loss at Branch Libraries ........ 

Placed in Business Branch ........ 

Net gain entire library system ........ 



12,902 



11,855 
4,257 
1,641 

9,239 



[40] 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement : 



1852-53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 



Volumes in the Central Library 
Volumes in the Business Branch 
Volumes in the Branch Libraries 



9,688 


1894 


16,221 


1895 


22,617 


1896-97 


28,080 


1897-98 


34,896 


1898-99 


70,851 


1899-1900 


78,043 


1900-01 


85,031 


1901-02 


97,386 


1902-03 


105,034 


1903-04 


110,563 


1904-05 


116,934 


1905-06 


123,016 


1906-07 


130,678 


1907-08 


136,080 


1908-09 


144,092 


1909-10 


152,796 


1910-11 


160,573 


1911-12 


179,250 


1912-13 


192,958 


1913-14 


209,456 


1914-15 


260.550 


1915-16 


276,918 


1916-17 


297,873 


1917-18 


321,010 


1918-19 


345,734 


1919-20 


360,963 


1920-21 


377,225 


1921-22 


390,982 


1922-23 


404,221 


1923-24 


422,116 


1924-25 


438,594 


1925 


453,947 


1926 


460,993 


1927 


479.421 


1928 


492,956 


1929 


505,872 


1930 


520,508 


1931 


536.027 


1932 


556.283 


1933 


576,237 


1934 


597.152 


1935 



610375 

628.297 

663,763 

698,888 

716,050 

746,383 

781,377 

812,264 

835,904 

848,884 

871,050 

878,933 

903349 

922348 

941,024 

961,522 

987,268 

1,006.717 

1,049,011 

1,067,103 

1,098.702 

1.121.747 

1.139.682 

1.157.326 

1.173.695 

1.197,498 

1.224,510 

1,258.211 

1 ,284,094 

1,308,041 

1333,264 

1,363.515 

1388.439 

1,418.489 

1.442.802 

1.475.743 

1.526.951 

1,572,802 

1.631.422 

1.654.017 

1.673,609 

1.682,848 

1,168,503 

17,042 

497,303 



Volumes in entire library system ........ 1 ,682,848 



[41] 



7 hese volumes are located as follows : 



Central Library 
Business Branch 
Branch Libraries: 

Allston 

Andrew Square . 

Boylston 

Brighton 

Charlestown 

City Point . 

Codman Square 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Faneuil 

Fellowes Athenaeum 

Hyde Park 

Jamaica Plain 

Jeffries Point 

Kirstein 

Lower Mills 

Mattapan 



13,630 
11,447 
11.075 
22,520 
17,060 
12.177 
17,269 
16.971 
20,220 
13,348 
41,275 
30,874 
17,151 
8,047 
7.641 
8.125 
16,970 



Memorial 
Mt. Bowdoin 
Mt. Pleasant 
Neponset 
North End 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Phillips Brooks 
Roslindale 
Roxbury Crossing 
South Boston 
South End 
Tyler Street 
Uphams Corner 
West End . 
West Roxbury 



THE BINDING DEPARTMENT 



Number of volumes bound in various styles 
Magazines stitched .... 

Volumes repaired .... 

Volumes guarded .... 

Maps mounted ..... 
Photographs and engravings mounted 
Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



Requisitions received and filled ..... 
Card Catalog (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Card Catalog (Branch Libraries) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Signs ......... 

Blank Forms (numbered series) 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside the numbered series) 
Catalogs, pamphlets, bibliographical programmes . 



4,1 



1934 

69,380 

65 

1,549 

702 

55 

2,640 

82,613 



1934 
215 

17.790 
133.517 

1,070 
69,550 
622 
84,310 
44,900 
60,150 



1,168,503 
1 7,042 

18,710 
13,551 

8.341 

6.787 
12,441 

8,901 
13,282 

5,402 
15,550 

5,866 
20,189 
12,176 

7,686 
17.694 
24.192 
20.735 



1935 

64,701 

64 

1.725 

732 

64 

2.781 

83,520 



1935 
448 

18,636 
242,763 

1,024 

100.842 

25 

7.294.030 

81,200 

47,675 



OUTSTANDING BOOK PURCHASES 

Aesopus. English. A new translation of Aesop's Fables, adorn'd with 
CUTTS; suited to the Fables copied from the Frankfort Edition: 
By the Most Ingenious Artist Christopher Van Sychan . . . Verse, 
by Joseph Jackson. London. Printed for Tho. Tebb ... 1 708. 



[42] 

Andrews, Lancelot. A manual of Private Devotions, with a Manual 

of Directions for the Sicke. London, 1 670. 
Aquinas, S. Thomas. Super quarto libro sententiarum. Folio, old 

morocco, blind tooled with brass bosses and clasps. Mainz, P. 

Schoeffer, 1 469. Initials in color. 
The Arminian Nunnery. London, Thos. Underhill, 1641. 
Bartholomaeus de Chaimis de Mediolano. Interrogatorium sive confes- 

sionale. Heidelberg, Knoblochter, c. 1489. 
Berry & Johnson. Catalogue of specimens of printing types by English 

and Scottish printers and founders 1665—1830. Oxford. 
Blake, William. Illustrations of The Book Of Job by William Blake, 

being all the watercolor designs, pencil drawings and engravings 

reproduced in facsimile. With an introduction by Laurence Bin- 
yon and Geoffrey Keynes. 
Burrough, Edward. A just and Righteous Plea presented unto the King 

of England and his Council. London, 1661. (First edition.) 
Cancionero de Romances en que estan recopilados la mayor parte de los 

Romances Castellanos, que hasta agora se han compuesto. (3d 

edition.) Anvers, Philippo Nucio, 1568. 
Capella, Martianus Mineus Felix. De nuptiis philologia et mercurii, etc. 

Vicenze, Henricum de Sancto Urso, 1 499. 
Claudianus, Claudius. Opera. Parma, Thadaeus Ugoletus, 1 493. 
Conrad, Joseph. Lord Jim. Wm. Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh & 

London, 1900. (First edition.) 
Conrad, Joseph. Nostromo. Harper, London, 1904. (First edition.) 
Conrad, Joseph. Victory. Methuen, London, 1915. (First English 

edition.) 
Cutter, James R. Four letters written during the California Gold Rush. 

San Francisco, 1849—1852. Mss. 
Disputatio S. Trinitatis super redemtione. Cologne, Arnold Ther 

Hoernen, c. 1473. 
Fracastor, Hieronymus. Homocentrica. De causis criticorum dierum 

per eq quae in nobis sunt. Venice, 1538. 4to. With fine wood- 
cut portrait and several diagrams. 
Grosvenor Orderly book, including the Siege of Boston. Headquarters, 

Cambridge, July 3, 1 775-December 25, 1776. Mss. 
Heures a la louenge de Dieu et de la tressaincte et glorieuse Vierge/ 

Marie . . . Printed on vellum. 1 2mo. full levant. Paris, Gillet 

Hardouyn, (n.d.) Illuminated drawings representing scenes in the 

life of Christ and the Virgin Mary. 
Itinerarium seu peregrinatio beatae Mariae virginis. Quarto, with 7 

large woodcut initials and 1 8 full-page woodcuts. Ulm, Johann 

Reger, 1487. 



[43] 

Jolly, David, and others. Thirteen Civil War letters. Oswego, 1861 — 

64. Mss. 
Jonson, Ben. Works, 1640. 3 v. in I. The Magnetick Lady: or, 

Humors Reconcil'd and other works. London, Printed M.CD.XL 

(1440 sic 1640). 
Lapide, Johannes de. Resolutiorum dubiorum. Leipzig, Arnoldus de 

Colonia, 1496. 
Lope de Vega. Comedias. 2 vols. Antwerp, 1 607—' I 1 . 
Lopis, Joannes Valentinus. Aureum formalitatum speculum. Siena, 

Henricus de Haarlem, 1 492. 
Luther, Martin. De captivitate Babylonica Ecclesiae. Praeludium 

Martini Lutheri. 1 2mo. boards. 1521. Portrait of Luther. 
Luther, Martin. De Protestate Papae. 1519. 1 2mo. boards. 
Meredith, George. Diana of the Crossways. Chapman & Hall, 1885. 

(First edition.) 
Meredith, George. The Ordeal of Richard Feverel. Chapman & Hall, 

1859. (First edition.) 
Meredith, George. Vittoria. Chapman & Hall, 1 867. (First edition.) 
Milton, John. Prelatical episcopacy. London, 1641. (First edition.) 
Missale Halberstatense. [With Canon by Schoeffer at Mainz.] holio, 

with woodcuts and illuminated initials. Ulm, Johann Gruninger, 
c. 1500. 
Orderly book. Roxbury, March 3 — April 3, 1 776; New York, May 

2 —June 4, 1776. Mss. 
Panarolo, Domenico. Aerologia. Rome, Domenico Marciani, 1 642. 
Patrizzi, Francisco. Livre tres fructueux et utile a toutes personnes de 

l'institution et administration de la chose publique. Paris, Francois 

Regnault, 1534. With 9 woodcuts. Morocco binding. 
Petrarca, Franciscus. Canzoniere. [With Commentary of Filelfo and 

Lapini.] Venice, Reynsburch and R. de Novimagio, 1478. 
Plutarch. Vitae parallelae. Brescia, Jacobus Britannicus, 1499. Or- 
namental initials. 
Prosper Aquitanus. Responsiones. Brussels, Frat. Vitae Communis, c. 

1480. 
Ratliff, Captain William. Muster roll of Capt. Wm. Ratliff, Company 

G, of the Twenty-eight Regiment of Mississippi Volunteers . . . 

[Jackson, Miss.] 1863. Mss. 
Rolewinckius, Wernerus. Fasciculus temporum. Memmingen, Kunne, 

1482. 
Der Spiegel hochloblicher Bruderschaft des Rosenkrantz Marie der 

allerreinsten Jungfrawen. Leipzig, Melchior Lotter, 1515. Several 

woodcuts; morocco binding. 
Tritheim, Johann. Liber de scriptoribus ecclesiasticis. Basel, Johann 

Amerbach, 1491. 



[44] 

OUTSTANDING GIFTS 

Bentley, Harry C. Bibliography of works on accounting by American 
authors. By Harry C. Bentley and Ruth S. Leonard. Vol. 2. 
Bentley. Boston. 1935. Three copies. 

Forty-eight volumes of books on bookkeeping to be added to 
the Bentley Collection on Bookkeeping: and two volumes on 
accounting. 

British Museum, Trustees of. Fragments of an unknown gospel, and 
other early Christian papyri. Edited by H. Idris Bell and T. C. 
Skeat. 

Catalogue of Arabic printed books in the British Museum. By 
A. G. Ellis. Vol. 3. 

Catalogue of political and personal satires preserved in the 
Department of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum. By 
Mary D. George. Vol. 5, 1771-1783. 

Woodcuts of the XV Century in the Department of Prints 
and Drawings in the British Museum. Edited by Campbell Dodg- 
son. Vols. 1 and 2. London, Trustees of the British Museum, 
1934 and 1935. 

Brownell, Mrs. Crary. A chapter from the manuscript of "French 
Traits", by William Crary Brownell. 

Browning Society of Boston. Ten volumes to be added to the Browning 
Collection in the Boston Public Library: Flush of Wimpole Street 
and Broadwav, by Flora Merrill; Letters of Robert Browning, 
collected by Thomas J. Wise; Elizabeth Barrett Browning letters 
to her sister; Pompilia and her poet, by Harriet Gaylord; Flush, 
a biography, by Virginia Woolf ; Two poets, a dog and a boy, by 
Frances Theresa Russell; Robert Browning through French eyes, 
by A. J. Armstrong; An enquiry into the nature of certain 19th 
century pamphlets, by John Carter & Graham Pollard; and, The 
faith of Robert Browning, bv Edward G. Hermann. 

Coty, Mrs. E. P. . A collection of ninety-five bound volumes and one 
hundred and eightv-eieht unbound pamphlets from the Library of 
the late Mr. H. D. Woods, C.E. The collection contains sixty- 
eiffht volumes of the Memoires et Compte Rendu des Travaux de 
la Societe des Insenieurs Civils de France, covering the years 1 889 
to 1929, and manv other publications relating to civil engineering. 

Drapers' Company. Roll of the Drapers' Company of London. Col- 
lected from the Company's records and other sources, by Percival 
Bovd. Printed by J. A. Gordon at the Andress Press, Croyden, 
1934. 



[45] 

Forbes, Mrs. J. Malcolm. Fayal Dabneys. By Rose Dabney Forbes. 
"This book composed by Rose Dabney Forbes, was made by Vida 
Lindo Guiterman, who, reviving the ancient art of the scribe, let- 
tered and illuminated these pages from June 1931 to February, 
1932, at her studios in Arlington, Vermont and Madison Avenue, 
New York." A photostat facsimile, with hand colored illustra- 
tions and decorated chapter headings. 

Explanation of symbols used in illuminating "Fayal Dabneys." 

Koch, Theodore Wesley. The Slave Ship of Prosper Merimee: a trag- 
edy in black and white. Newly translated with an introduction 
by Eliot Fay, and with illustrations by Kate Rowland. Evanston, 
Northwestern University Library (1934). A first edition, limited 
to three hundred copies, of which this is Number 244. 

Landauer, Mrs. Bella C. Some ephemeral portraits of Lincoln and 
Franklin, from the collections of Bella C. Landauer. Privately 
printed at the Harbor Press, 1935. 

Some Japanese balloon prints, from the collection of Bella C. 
Landauer. Published by the author: printed by Polygraphic Com- 
pany of America, New York, 1935. 

Leroquais, l'Abbe Victor. Le breviare-missel du prieure clunisien de 
Lewes (Collection Georges Moreau). By Abbe Victor Lero- 
quais. Paris, Georges Andrieux, 1935. 

Miller, Dayton C. The Dayton C. Miller Collections relating to the 
Flute. II: Catalogue of books and literary material relating to the 
flute, and other musical instruments, with annotations by Dayton 
C. Miller. Cleveland, privately printed, 1935. 

Anecdotal history of the science of sound, to the beginning of 
the 20th century. By Dayton C. Miller. New York, Macmillan. 
1935. Autographed by Dayton C. Miller for the Brown Music 
Library. 

O'Connell, William Cardinal. Recollections of seventy years. By His 
Eminence, William Cardinal O'Connell. Boston, Houghton Mif 
flin Company, 1934. This first edition consists of five hundred and 
sixty-five copies, printed and bound at the Riverside Press, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts in May, 1934, and autographed by the 
author. 

Golden Jubilee of His Eminence William Cardinal O'Connell. 
Archbishop of Boston, 1884-1934. Privately printed at the 
Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1935. Six copies. 

Palmer, Dr. Sarah. A collection of six hundred and twenty-six lantern 
slides, some colored, of scenes in many countries of Europe and 
North and South America, and of famous paintings and noted 
sculpture of the world. 



[46] 

Ryder, Gideon G. A collection of seventy-one volumes of Boston Tele- 
phone Directories, covering the years 1910 to 1934. 



LECTURES — CONCERTS 

In the Central Library Lecture Hall the Library presented 1 05 pro- 
grams in its annual series of free concerts, lectures, and entertainments. 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1935 

Exhibitions arranged by the Library were on view in the Exhibition 
Room, the Treasure Room, and the Children's Room throughout the year. 



TRUST FUNDS. 

Artz Fund — Donation from Miss Victorine Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago: the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as 
the "Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1 896. 

$10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by Joshua Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." Payable to the 
Mayor of the City for the time being. $50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of Charles H. L. N. Ber- 
nard. Received in 1930. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by John P. BlGELOW in August, 
1 850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of Robert Charles Bil- 
lings. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $100,503.39 



[47] 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll BoWDlTCH. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $ 1 0,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JOSEPH H. CENTER, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. $39,807.58 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. BENTON of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 

$106,892.52 

Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Frank Clement, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854.41 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of Abram E. CUTTER of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 

$4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of Sarah A. MatCHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 
"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 



[48] 

City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for the purchase 
of books for the young until otherwise ordered by the Board. Re- 
ceived in 1900. $6,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford 
to the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for general 
purposes. Received in 1935. $5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of Isabella STEWART 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 

1924. $5,000.00 
Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Mr. MORRIS Gest in December 

1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. $2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 
will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1 850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 



[49] 

Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 

$10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 

Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Received in 1884. $1,048.93 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of ALFRED HEMENWAY. Re- 
ceived in 1928. $5,000.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of FRANKLIN P. Hyde of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KlMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 

be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,271.58 
Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1,000 each made by Mr. 

Louis E. Kirstein, "to be used for any purpose of the Library 

that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 



October, 1925 
October, 1926 . 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 . 
October, 1929 . 



$1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 



$5,000.00 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KATHERINE 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 

$10,002.50 

Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of HELEN Lambert of Boston in 
memory of Frederic and Louise Lambert. Received in 1931. The 
income of this fund to be expended for the purchase of books and 
other library material until otherwise ordered by the Board. 

$1,394.57 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of ABBOTT LAWRENCE, of Boston. 
Received in 1 860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
permanent value. $9,812.52 



[50] 

kdward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward Lawrence, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 

500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be known 
as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the Bos- 
ton Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of CHARLES Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896. 

$2,530.51 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of GARDNER O. NORTH. Received 

in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 
from the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under 
an indenture between Amor Hollings worth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $1 1,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the Papyrus 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 



[51] 

member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

$1,085.02 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 
in April, 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said library. $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 
20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the 
time being. 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1873. $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from SARAH E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. Distribution of 
residue of estate in May, 1 924, $964.30. $ 1 ,494. 1 8 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial 
to Guilford S. Reed ; the income to be applied to the purchase of 
books of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of Arthur ScHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. $62,242.45 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RlCHARD Black SewalL: 
"Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely, To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income to be 
used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 



[52] 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of FRANCIS SKINNER: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he 
shall judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1 9 1 4. $51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of MARY ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Storrow 
and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson 
Storrow, Senior ; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 

$25,000.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thous- 
and dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass., or by 



[53] 

the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together with interest amounting to $339.61 , has been 
expended for books. 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of GEORGE TlCKNOR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the city, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
ceived said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,106.71 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLlAM C- TODD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, 1 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be expend- 
ed by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other countries. 

$49,894.94 

Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of MARY P. TOWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 



[54] 

Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1 872, said beuqcst 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of NATHAN A. TUFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 

$10,736.68 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. $5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest of HORACE G. WADLIN, of 
Reading, former Librarian, who died November 5, 1925, of $2,000 
to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston to be 
permanently funded and the income thereof used for the purchase 
of books. Received in 1932. $2,030.51 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of GEORGE C. WALES: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1 9 1 8. $5,000.00 



[55] 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund. — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. Wil- 
son, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1913. $1,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of JAMES Lyman WHITNEY, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. $26,454.70 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from: 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 

$150.00 



[56] 

Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purchase of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz.: 



Samuel Appleton, late of Boston 

H. C. Bentley . 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch . 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch . 

James Brown, late of Cambridge 

Andrew Carnegie 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library 
Sally Inman Kast Shepard . 
James Nightingale .... 



the 



,1,000.00 
220.38 

6,800.00 
200.00 
500.00 
980.75 

335.13 

1,000.00 

100.00 



$11,136.26 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

Artz Fund $10,000.00 

Bates Fund 50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund 1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 100,503.39 

Bowditch Fund 10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1.000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund 39,807.58 

Central Library Building Fund 150.00 

Children's Fund 106,892.52 

Clement Fund . 2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund ...... 2,854.41 

Cutter Fund 4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund 25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 6.000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund 5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund 1.000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 5.000.00 

Morris Gest Fund 2,652.50 

Green Fund 2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 1 .048.93 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 5.000.00 

Hyde Fund 3,632.40 

Carried forward $396,829.38 



[57] 

Brought forward $396,829.38 

David P. Kimball Fund 10,271.58 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 5,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 10,002.50 

Helen Lambert Fund 1,394.57 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 9,812.52 

Edward Lawrence Fund 500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 500.00 

Charles Mead Fund 2,530.51 

Gardner O. North Fund 2.000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 11,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 1,085.02 

Phillips Fund 30,000.00 

Pierce Fund 5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund 1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund 1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund ......... 3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund 62,242.45 

Sewall Fund 25,000.00 

Skinner Fund 51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund 100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund 25,000.00 

Ticknor Fund 4,106.71 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 49,894.94 

Townsend Fund 4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund 13,987.69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10,736.68 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund 2.030.51 

Wales Fund 5,000.00 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund ........ 26,454.70 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund 1 .000.0 

Total $792,845.76 



[58] 

OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY 
Director's Office 
Director, and Librarian Milton E. Lord 

Clerk of the Trustees Elizabeth B. Brockunier 

Supervisor of Training Bertha V. Hartzell 

Editor of Publications Zoltan Haraszti 



Reference Division 

Chief Librarian of the Reference Division: Richard G. Hensley 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Frank C. Blaisdell 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Samuel A. Chevalier 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Otto Fleischner 

Assistant Librarian Pierce E. Buckley 

Book Selection Department: Louis F. Ranlett, Chief. 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Lucien E. Taylor, Chief. 

General Reference Departments: Pierce E. Buckley, Supervisor. 

Bates Hall Centre Desk: William J. Mulloney, Assistant in Charge. 
Bates Hall Reference Department: Harry W. Mathews, Assistant 

in Charge. 
Information Department: John H. Reardon, Assistant in Charge. 
Newspaper Department: Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 
Periodical Department: Dorothy P. Shaw, In Charge. 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief. 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief. 

Special Reference Departments: Francis J. Hannigan. Supervisor. 
Fine Arts Depariment: Priscilla F. MacFadden. In Charge. 
Music Department: Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 
Genealogy Department: Agnes C. Doyle, Assistant in Charge. 
Patent Department: Thomas J. Manning, In Charge. 
Statistical Department: Elizabeth G. Barry, Assistant in Charge. 
Teachers' Department: Anna L. Manning, Assistant in Charge. 
Business Branch: Mary W. Dietrichson, Business Branch Librarian. 

Chief of the Special Libraies, Emeritus: George S. Maynard. 

Rare Books: Zoltan Haraszti, Keeper of Rare Books. 

Rare Book Department: Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge. 



[59] 

Circulation Division 

Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division: Orlando C. Davis. 
Book Selection Department: Louis F. Ranlett, Chief. 
Children's Work: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor. 
Branch Libraries: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor. 

Branch Librarians: 

Allston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 

Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 

Boylston, Margaret A. Calnan. 

Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 

Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

City Point, Helen L. Morrisey. 

Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 

Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 

East Boston, Theodora B. Scoff. 

Faneuil, Gertrude L. Connell. 

Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 

Hyde Park, Sara A. Lyon. 

Jamaica Plain, Katie F. Albert. 

Jeffries Point, Mary U. Nichols. 

Kirstein, Grace B. Loughlin. 

Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 

Mattapan, Ada Andelman. 

Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mount Bowdoin, Pearl B. Smart. 

Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 

Neponset, Margaret I. McGovern. 

North End, Mary F. Curley. 

Orient Heights, Catherine E. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Phillips Brooks, Edna G. Peck. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Edith R. Nickerson. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Clara L. Maxwell. 

Tyler Street, Mary A. C. Kavin, Acting Branch Librarian. 

Uphams Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Geneva Watson. 
Branch Librarian, Emeritus, Carrie L. Morse. 



[60] 

Division of Business Operations 

Comptroller: James W. Kenney. 

Buildings Department: William F. Quinn, Superintendent. 

Auditor: Helen Schubarth. 

Book Purchasing Department: William C. Maiers, Chief. 

Stock Purchasing Department: Timothy J. Mackin. 

Binding Department: James P. Mooers, In Charge. 

Shipper: Robert F. Dixon. 

Printing Department: Francis W. Lee, Chief. 



'vW' 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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