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Full text of "Annual report"

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FIEE DEPARTMENT 

\D WIRE DIVISIO 



CITY OF BOSTON 



\DI.\(i DECEMBER 31, I 




1936 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAE ENDING DECEMBEK 31, 1935 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1936 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



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http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1935boston 



OFFICIALS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 

Herbert J. Hickey, 

Executive Secretary of the Department. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department, 

George L. Fickett, 
Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division. 

Peter F. Dolan, 

Superintendent of Wire Division. 

Edward E. Williamson, 

Superintendent of Maintenance Division. 

Samuel J. Pope, 

Deputy Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Division. 

Martin H. Spellman, M. D., 
Medical Examiner. 



[Document 12 — 1936. 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1935. 



Boston, January 31, 1936. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith a 
report of the activities of the Boston Fire Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1935, as required by 
section 24, chapter 4, of the Revised Ordinances of 1925. 

Fire Loss. 

The total fire loss for the City of Boston, estimated 
by the insurance companies, amounted to $2,033,107.56, 
of which $1,244,311.15 was on buildings and $788,796.41 
was on contents. This total is $299,172.53 less than in 
1934 and is the lowest fire loss paid in the City of Boston 
since the year 1910. ■ 

The high state of efficiency of the department, com- 
bined with continued inspection work of the Fire Pre- 
vention Division, undoubtedly accounts for a great 
saving in the fire loss of this city In addition, the 
constant and thorough drive on suspicious and incendiary 
fires by the Arson Unit of the Fire Prevention Division 
has been of valuable assistance in reducing the loss. 



2 City Document No. 12. 

The fires showing the greatest loss during the year 
are as follows: 

March 15, 1935, 101-111 Causeway street and 

276-280 Friend street, Diamond Drug and 

Magnesia Company et al $143,288.96 

March 29, 1935, 80 Langdon street, New England 

Company et al 88,511.24 

February 21, 1935, 132 and 134 Beach street, 

Benjamin Shir et al 66,210.28 

May 7, 1935, 353 Marlborough street, Alice 

Lavalle et al 33,316.00 

May 3, 1935, 1248-1254 River street, Sears 

Roebuck et al 32,327.42 

December 26, 1935, rear 286 Rutherford avenue, 

North Shore Fibre Company et al. . . . 30,292. 13 
October 31, 1935, 1486 Tremont street, Nutro 

Beverage Company 27,151.09 

March 14, 1935, 17 and 19 Cypher street, Paul 

O'Sullivan Company et al. . . . 23,656.97 

February 8, 1935, 118-126 Harvard avenue, 

Wonder Bar Cafe et al. . . . . . 23,308.95 

July 10, 1935, 26 and 28 Haymarket square, 

Caporale Brothers & Co. et al 19,903.17 



Finances. 

As in past years the expenditures of the department 
have been carefully watched. Expenditures increased 
over 1934 because of the fact that sliding scale increases 
in salary were again put into effect by your Honor, 
and statutory reductions in salaries were discontinued 
as of January 1, 1935, when all members of the depart- 
ment received regular rates of pay again. I submit 
below a table showing how expenditures of 1935 com- 
pare with those of previous years. 



Year ending December 31, 1935 
31, 1934 
31, 1933 
31, 1932 
31, 1931 
31, 1930 
31, 1929 
31, 1928 
31, 1927 
31, 1926 



$4,161,328.20 
3,677,085.02 
3,804,226.83 
4,377.844.00 
4,620,818.60 
4,642,216.53 
4,552,265.18 
4,357,568.28 
4,183,945.99 
4,290,314.84 



Fire Department. 



Fire Prevention. 



The fire prevention work of the Fire Department 
has been very diligently performed by the inspection 
force of the Fire Prevention Division, as well as by 
district and company officers. Inspectors, on many 
occasions, have given valuable advice to owners and 
occupants on proper protection to their property to 
prevent fires. Fire prevention campaigns have been 
conducted by submitting articles to the daily press, by 
radio and by lectures in schools, lodges and other 
societies. 

During the year all classes of buildings were inspected. 
A special detail of men from the Fire Prevention Divi- 
sion inspected many one and two-family houses with 
the permission of the occupants. This is a step for- 
ward in fire prevention as the Fire Department under 
the law has no authority to inspect one or two family 
houses. 

Number of inspections 206,483 

Number of re-inspections 11,441 

Number of corrections 15,288 

Number of complaints 8,776 

Number of conditions found corrected on re-inspec- 
tions 8,644 

Number of personal inspections 2,681 

Oil burners inspected 1,460 

Reports of hazardous conditions were sent to other 
departments as follows: 

Reports sent to the Building Department . . . 1,272 

Reports sent to School Buildings Department . . 21 

Reports sent to Health Department .... 9 

Personal services by Constable 490 



The following inspections were made by district 
officers and district privates: 



Buildings inspected by district officers 
Inspections by district privates 
Theatre inspections . 
Schoolhouse inspections . 
Public buildings inspections 
Carhouse inspections 
Deer Island monthly inspections 
Long Island monthly inspections 



19,733 

67,130 

3,758 

3,820 

841 

72 

12 

12 



City Document No. 12. 



A brief account of the activities of the Arson Unit, 
in accordance with the provisions of chapter 383 of the 
Acts of 1931, is as follows: 



Number of Police Inspectors assigned to the Fire Pre- 
vention Division from Police Headquarters 
Number of Fire Prevention Inspectors on Arson Squad, 
Number of Investigations by Arson Squad . 

(a) Reported as being suspicious .... 48 

(b) Reported as being unknown or undetermined . 78 

(c) Miscellaneous 182 

Number of persons interviewed at Fire Prevention 

Office ...... . . . 

Number of hearings held at Fire Alarm Office (Fenway) 

Number of hearings held, which, on account of insuffi- 
cient evidence, were not presented to District 
Attorney 9 

Number of cases presented to District Attorney for 
consideration as to prosecution 13 

Number of cases arraigned in Municipal Court 

Cases held for Grand Jurv 3 



4 

6 

308 



28 
22 



Fire Apparatus. 

No new major fire apparatus was purchased during 
1935. The motor equipment of the department at the 
present time consists of the following: 



Type. 



In Reserve. 



Pumping engines 

Steam engine (tractors) 

Hose cars 

Aerial ladder trucks. . . . 

City service trucks 

Water towers 

Chief officers' cars 

School car 

Rescue cars 

Fuel cars 

Pprtable lighting plants 

Wrecking car 

Commercial trucks 

Emergency Ford cars . . 
Ford coupes 



Fire Department. 



C. W. A.— E. R. A.— W. P. A. 

Civil Works Project No. 293 for painting interiors of 
fire stations was continued until April 1, 1935. On this 
date the Emergency Relief Administration was estab- 
lished, replacing the C. W. A. Department projects 
were resubmitted and the new work was known as 
E. R. A. Project No. 2233-B4-53. The personnel was 
reduced from seventy-seven to twenty-nine men. On 
November 25, 1935, the Emergency Relief Administra- 
tion was replaced by the Works Progress Administra- 
tion and the project was known as Works Progress 
Project No. 5069. Approximately forty men were em- 
ployed on this project. At the close of business, 
December 31, 1935, the interiors of fifteen buildings 
had been painted. 

High Pressure Service. 
The records of the two high pressure service stations 
for the year are as follows: 



Station No. 1. 



Station No. 2. 



Total alarms to which pump responded. 
Water discharged * 



251 
441,000 gallons 



192 
42,000 gallons 



* Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters they do not record flows under 600 
gallons per minute. 

Hydrants. 
The following is a list of the hydrants in service on 
December 31, 1935: 



Public. Private. 



Ordinary post 

Boston post 

Lowry 

Boston Lowry 

Batchelder & Finneran post 

Boston 

High Pressure 

Chapman post 

Ludlow post 

Matthew post 

Coffin post 

Total 



130 

25 

33 

5 



55 

13 

4 



384 



6 



City Document No. 12. 



Fire College. 
The sessions of the fire college were conducted during 
the year (except during the vacation period). Approxi- 
mately one hundred and sixty members of the depart- 
ment received instructions at the college during the 



year. 



Department Drills. 



Regular weekly drills were held by all companies in 
the department during the year. In addition, each 
company in the department was given a thorough drill 
by the department drillmaster. 

Pump School. 
Two classes of the motor pump school were held dur- 
ing the year, at which thirteen (13) members of the 
department were instructed in the care and operation 
of motor fire pumps. 

:Chauffeurs' School. 
Thirteen (13) members of the department received 
instructions in the chauffeurs' school during the year 
and were certified as operators of department motor 
vehicles. All members rated as chauffeurs were given 
instructions in the care and operation of motor vehicles. 

Mutual Aid. 
The department responded to sixty-four (64) alarms 
of fire outside of the city limits, divided as follows: 



Milton 

Brookline 

Somerville 

Chelsea 

Newton 



32 
3 

22 
4 
3 



Radio Broadcasts. 
Radio broadcasts were given from time to time over 
Radio Station WBZ, in which the Fire Commissioner, 
Chief of Department, Deputy Chief in charge of Fire 
Prevention and the Superintendent of Maintenance 
participated. The cooperation of the public was asked 
to help reduce the number of fires and the fire loss. 
Valuable information was given for the prevention of 
fires and the public was informed concerning important 
department operations. 



Fire Department. 7 

Fire Alarm Service. 

The Fire Alarm Service has been maintained at its 
usual high standard. Twenty new fire alarm boxes 
were installed by this department. All boxes and posts 
were repainted. Many changes were made in line con- 
struction to improve the system, and electrical equip- 
ment in various department stations was improved. 

Defective cables were replaced and necessary exten- 
sions of the underground system were made. 

Operating Records. 

First alarms 5,664 

Second alarms 70 

Third alarms 21 

Fourth alarms 4 

Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 

Same box received two or more times for same fire . 440 

Adjacent boxes received for same fire .... 320 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 21 

772 



Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 

Received from citizens by telephone . • . . . 2,735 

Received from Police Department by telephone . . 338 

Received from Fire Department stations . . . 1,190 

Received from boxes but treated as stills ... 12 
Mutual aid alarms (adjacent cities and towns) treated 

as stills 61 

Emergency service treated as stills .... 213 



4,549 



Still alarms received by telephone for which box alarms 

were afterwards received and transmitted . . 215 

Still alarms received by telephone from which box 
alarms, not received, were transmitted (11 p. m. 
to 7 a. m.) 322 

Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 
Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 136 

Box alarms received and transmitted after auto- 
matic alarms had been struck .... 4 

Box alarms not received but transmitted after 
automatic alarm had been struck (11 p. m. to 
7 a. m.) 35 

Automatic alarms received at fire alarm office but 

not transmitted 6 



8 City Document No. 12. 

American District Telegraph Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 109 

Box alarms received and transmitted after A. D. T. 

alarms had been struck 5 

Box alarms not received but transmitted after 

A. D. T. alarms had been struck (11 p m. to 

7 a. m.) 21 

A. D. T. alarms received at fire alarm office but not 

transmitted 13 



Summary of Alarms. 
Alarms received: 

Box alarms received and struck . 
Box alarms received but not struck 
Mutiple alarms .... 
Still alarms — all classes 
Boston automatic alarms 
A. D. T. alarms .... 



Box alarms not received but transmitted (11 p m. 
to 7 a. m.) 



Exclude following: 

Multiples 

Box alarms received but not transmitted . 

Still alarms for which other alarms were trans 

mitted 

Automatic alarms for which other alarms 

transmitted 

Automatic alarms received but not transmitted 
A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were trans 

mitted 

A. D. T. alarms received but not transmitted 



were 



5,286 

772 

95 

4,549 
136 
109 



10,947 

378 

11,325 



95 

772 

537 

39 
6 

26 
13 



Total alarms, with eliminations, to which apparatus 
responded : 

First alarms 

Still alarms 

Automatic alarms 

A. D. T. alarms 



Multiple Alarm Fires. 



With two alarms . 
With three alarms 
With four alarms 



5,664 

4,012 

91 

70 

9,837 



50 
17 

4 



Fire Department. 



Mutual Aid Response. 



To Milton . 
To Quincy . 
To Newton . 
To Brookline 
To Somerville 
To Chelsea . 



Fire Alarm Box Records. 
Boxes from which no alarms were received 
Box tests and inspections 



32 

3 
3 

22 
4 



394 
11,451 



Note. — All street box doors are tested weekly. 



False Alarms. 
Box alarms received and struck 
Box alarms received but not struck 
Box alarms treated as stills 

Telephone 

A. D.T 



Automatic 



1,595 

29 

9 

36 

2 

1 

1,672 
Alarm Service. 
Of the 5,286 box alarms received and transmitted to 
the department, 1,595 were false, about 30 per cent. 
This compares with 5,541 received in 1934 with 1,816 
false, about 33 per cent. The Police Department made 
120 arrests of persons sounding false alarms and 80 
convictions were obtained in court, as compared with 
56 arrests in 1934 and 41 convictions. 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 

Total number 

Owned by Fire Department 

Owned by School Buildings Department 

Owned by Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 

Privately owned 

Total boxes on posts 

Total boxes on poles 

Total boxes on buildings 

Total boxes in buildings 

Fire Department Boxes. 
On box posts .... 
On poles ..... 
On buildings . 
In buildings .... 
Equipped with keyless doors . 
Equipped with quick-action doors 



1,687 
1,233 
257 
46 
151 
862 
466 
178 
181 



787 
424 
17 
5 
519 
714 



10 



City Document No. 12. 



Equipped with auxiliary attachments 

Succession type 

Designated by red lights . 



SCHOOLHOUSE BOXES. 

On box posts 

On poles 

On buildings 

In buildings . . . . . 
Equipped with keyless doors . 
Equipped with quick-action doors . 
Equipped with key doors 
Equipped with auxiliary attachments 

Succession type 

Designated by red lights . 



Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Boxes. 

On poles . . 

On buildings .... 

In buildings .... 

Equipped with keyless doors . 

Equipped with quick-action doors 

Equipped with key doors 

Equipped with auxiliary attachments 

Succession type 



Private Boxes 

On posts 

On poles 

On buildings .... 
In buildings .... 
Equipped with keyless doors . 
Equipped with quick-action doors 
Equipped with key doors 
Equipped with auxiliary attachments 
Succession type 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts. 



District 1 . 


102 


District 9 


District 2 . 


72 


District 10 


District 3 . 


46 


District 11 


District 4 . 


88 


District 12 


District 5 . 


74 


District 13 


District 6 . 


101 


District 14 


District 7 . 


104 


District 15 


District 8 . 


136 





Division 1 . . . 382 

Division 2 . 496 

Division 3 . 808 

Also one box in Chelsea. 



• 3 
1,001 

885 



Fire Department. 



11 



Summary of Work Done. 
Line wire used in new work (approximately) 
Line wire used for replacements (approximately) 
Aerial cable installed new work 

Conductors in same 

Aerial cable replaced 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed, new work 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable replaced . 

Conductors in same 

Conduits laid underground 

Ducts abandoned. Owned by department 

Manholes built 

Handholes built 

Fire alarm boxes installed by Fire Department 
Fire alarm boxes installed by School Buildings 

partment 

Fire alarm boxes installed on private property 

Fire alarm boxes relocated 

Fire alarm boxes removed from service 

Box posts installed . . . . 

Box posts relocated . . 

Box posts reset or replaced by new 

Cable posts (small size) installed 

Underground cable boxes (attached to poles) 

stalled 

Underground cable boxes removed from service 



De 



in 



Feet. 

12,000 

29,000 

2,862 

8,948 

4,756 

18,416 

13,581 

66,710 

18,241 

293,955 

4,803 

400 

3 

4 

20 

1 

2 
3 
6 

26 
2 

13 
1 

9 

7 



WIRE DIVISION. 

Regular and periodical inspections have been made 
of all theatres, places of amusement and public halls, 
together with new installations and changes throughout 
the city. 

Thorough investigations were made of all fires and 
accidents reported as due to electrical causes, and 
reports of same are on file in the Wire Division. 

Following is a table showing a summary of the work 
of the interior division of the Wire Division for 1935: 



Notices of new work received .... 
Number of permits issued to turn on current 
Number of incandescent lamps inspected 
Number of motors inspected . . . . 
Number of inspections made .... 
Number of inspections made of theatres, places 
of amusement and public halls 



13,384 
10,306 
2,130,290 
15,756 
30,275 

1,580 



12 City Document No. 12. 

The income received from permits to perform electri- 
cal work was $37,859.65. 

During the year there were one hundred and eleven 
fires in buildings, eleven manhole troubles, seven fires 
on poles, ten miscellaneous troubles and two fatal 
accidents investigated. 

Exterior Division. 
The underground district for the year 1935, as pre- 
scribed under the authority of chapter 101 of the Acts 
of 1931, comprised the following streets: 

Brighton. — Englewood avenue, from Sutherland road to 
Brookline line; Wade street, from Commonwealth avenue to 
end of the street at No. 35. 

East Boston. — Bennington street, from Day square to West- 
brook street and from Breed square to Leyden street; Marion 
street, from Bennington street to Bremen street; Maverick 
street, from Lamson street to Jeffries street. 

South Boston. — East Second street, from K street to M 
street and from N street to Farragut road; P street, from 
East First street to Columbia road; Marine road, from 
Columbia road to N Street to I street. 

Roxbury and Dorchester. — Clifton street, from Shirley street 
to Dudley street. 

Dorchester. — Gallivan Boulevard, from . Adams street at 
Granite avenue to a point fifty (50) feet east of the east line of 
Belton street. 

making a total distance of four miles as prescribed 
by law. 

In these prescribed streets from which poles and wires 
were to be removed there were standing on January 
1, 1935, one hundred and sixty seven (167) poles and 
eight hundred sixty-six thousand, six hundred and 
ninety (866,690) feet of overhead wires, not including 
trolley wires and poles which are exempted by law. 

During the past year inspectors of this division have 
reported seventy-nine (79) poles decayed at base and 
twenty (20) poles leaning, a total of ninety-nine (99) 
poles which were replaced or reset by the various com- 
panies at the request of this department. 

The following table shows the overhead work for the 
year from January 1, 1935 to December 31, 1935, 
inclusive : 

Number of poles set in new locations ... . 41 

Number of poles replaced, reset or straightened . . 880 

Number of poles removed 320 

Number of poles now standing 17,491 



Fire Department. 



13 



Number of defects reported . . . . 
Number of defects corrected . 

(Other defects in process of correction.) 
Number of notices of overhead construction 
Number of overhead inspections 
Number of overhead reports . 
Amount of wires in feet removed by owners 



949 
545 

2,189 
21,126 
16,159 

864,678 



Underground Construction. 
The ducts used for the underground conduits of the 
drawing-in system are of the following type : 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete) . 

3. Iron. 

4. Wood. 

In side or residential streets special underground 
construction for electric light and power purposes 
(110 and 220 volts) of the type known as "Split Fiber 
Solid Main System" has also been installed. 

The electrical approvals for underground electrical 
construction numbered 1,627. 

Number of inspections of underground electrical 

construction 2,366 

Number of reports of underground electrical construc- 
tion 6,231 

Table showing Underground Work for the Year 1935. 



CoMPANT. 


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3 
O 

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CD 

CD 

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3 

Q 
"o 

CD 

fa 


CD 
O 

'o 
a 

CD 

fa 


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CD'S 

■° 3 


o £ 

L* CD 

cD-r 
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1,142 

17,611 

164,115 

2,080 

2,029 

20,695 

368 

10 


14,429 

35,205 
439,697 

31,822 
236,776 

36,940 
249 


5 

121 

8 


29 


pany. 

Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany. 

Boston Fire Department (Fire 
Alarm Branch). 

Boston Police Department (Police 
Signal Service). 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Company. 

Postal Telegraph Cable Company, 


3,638 
29,801 

545 
2,029 
6,113 

184 


979 
12 
29 
14 

1 


ciation. 
Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany. 




5,173 












Totals 


42,310 


208,050 


800,291 


134 


1,064 



Note. — "Split Fiber Solid Main System" of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
is included in the above figures, comprising 1,400 feet of conduit and 2,733 feet of duct. 



14 City Document No. 12. 

Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power. 



Company. 


t4 

o 

-agri 

CD O ^ 

|ws 

Eh 


a) 
-2(2 s 

c« ., M 

Eh 

"3 ° 


Capacity of 
Incandescent 
Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 




CO ° 

£ o 

2 


-d 

CO CD 

'Si 

-h OH 


CD ° 

■z 


Boston Elevated Railway Company . . . 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company. . . . 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 


24,360 

None 

40,232 

400 

620 


241,287 
None 

280,416 
359 
400 


3,549 
3,000 

* 

125 

125 


15 
300 


223,370 
6,300 

* 

75 
125 


48,850 
2,000 

* 

200 


t 15 
2 

t76 
1 


Quaker Building Company 


1 


Totals 


65,612 


522,462 


6,799 


315 


229,870 


51,050 


95 







* Unknown. (Meter capacity connected to lines of Edison system, 1,171,384 K. W..) 

t Generating stations, company and customers sub-stations and primary network units. 

j Two generating and 13 substations. 

Recommendations. 
During the past few years the personnel of the depart- 
ment has been reduced to a great extent. No appoint- 
ments have been made to the fire-fighting force during 
the last two years. In order to maintain the depart- 
ment at an efficient operating strength it will be neces- 
sary to fill some of the vacancies soon. There are now 
nearly one hundred vacancies in the grade of private 
and this number is increasing constantly because of 
deaths and retirements. 



Fire Apparatus. 
Very little major fire apparatus has been purchased 
during the past four years. In order to keep the 
rolling stock of the department in first-class condition 
a certain percentage of apparatus should be replaced 
each year. In my opinion it is sounder economy to 
replace a few pieces of old apparatus each year than 
to wait until necessity forces the replacement of a 
large number at one particular time. 

Buildings. 
Consideration should be given at this time to the 
enlargement of the Repair Shop of the Maintenance 
Division. The addition of another story to the present 
three-story Repair Shop would provide space for the 
proper handling of repairs to major apparatus. 



Fire Department. 15 

The erection of a new garage, with space for the 
storage of about seventy-five cars, should be given 
careful thought and study. The present garage is 
located in an old building and is much too small to 
properly care for the needs of the department. The 
foregoing changes have been recommended as part of 
the P. W. A. program, but should be given considera- 
tion if funds are not available under this program. 

There are several fire stations in the City of Boston 
which are old and antiquated and which were not built 
to accommodate motor fire apparatus. When funds are 
available it would be advisable to rebuild and relocate 
some of these houses so that the department will be 
modernized in every way and its efficiency will be 
increased. 

Yours very truly, 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 



16 



City Document No. 12. 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES, 1935. 



Fire Department 
Wire Division . 



1,161,328 20 

95,259 42 

t,256,587 62 



ANNUAL REPORT OF REVENUE, BOSTON FIRE 
DEPARTMENT, YEAR OF 1935. 

Permits for fires in open spaces; fireworks; 
blasting; transportation and storage of explo- 
sives ; garage and gasoline storage ; oil burners, 
etc. ■ 

Sale of old material (condemned hose) 

Sale of old material (junk) 

Sale of badges ..... 

Damage to fire alarm boxes, posts 
apparatus 

Miscellaneous sales .... 



il burners, 


$24,381 25 




151 87 




476 73 




383 30 


and fire 






1,201 03 




20 39 




$26,632 07 



Fiee Department. 17 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 
Henry A. Fox. 
The chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city, which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Division 1. 

Deputy Chiefs, John J. Kenney and Louis C. 
Stickel. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1. 

District Chiefs, Napeen Boutilier and William F. 

Donovan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 5, Marion Street, 

East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 

40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, 31. 

District 2. 

District Chiefs, Philip A. Tague, and Michael J. 

Aylward. 

Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22. 

District 3. 

District Chief, William A. Donovan. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 

39, 44 (fireboat), Ladders 8, 18, Water Towers 1 and 3. 

District 4. 
District Chiefs, John F. McDonough and James F. 

Sheehan. 
Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bulfinch Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 4, 6, 8, 
31 (fireboat), Ladders 1, 24, Rescue 3. 



18 City Document No. 12. 

District 5. 

District Chiefs, John F. Watson and Dennis J. 

Coughlin. 

Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Broadway. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26,, 

35, Ladder 17, Rescue 1, Water Tower 2. 

Division 2. 
Deputy Chiefs, Thomas H. Downey and William F. 

QUIGLEY. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 

District Chiefs, James J. Kane and Edward G. 

Chamberlain. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 
District Chief, Michael F. Minehan. 
Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33, 
Ladders 3, 13, 15. 

District 8. 
District Chiefs, Daniel Martell and Charles H. 
McDonnell. 
Headquarters, Engine House 37, 560 Huntington 
Ayenue. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26. 

District 11. 
District Chiefs, Thomas H. Andreoli and Joseph W. 

Shea. 
Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 
41, 51, Ladders 11, 14. 



Fire Department. 19 

Division 3. 

Deputy Chief, Frank A. Sweeney. 
Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 

District 9. 
District Chief, William H. McCorkle. 
Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 23, 24, 
Ladders 4, 23, Rescue 2. 

District 10. 

District Chiefs, Daniel J. Hurley and Edward N„ 
Montgomery. 

Headquarters, Engine House 17, Parish Street, 
Meeting House Hill. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — - Engines 17, 18, 21, 
Ladder 7. 

District 12. 
District Chiefs, Timothy F. Donovan and Thomas F. 

Ward. 
Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 53, 
Ladders 10, 30. 

District 13. 
District Chiefs, Charles A. Donohoe and Edward F. 

McCarthy. 
Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 
Ladders 16, 25. 

District lli-. 
District Chiefs, James Mahoney and Walter C. Glynn. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 
Dorchester. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20> 
46, 52, Ladders 6, 27, 29. 



20 



City Document No. 12. 



District 15. 
District Chiefs, William Hart and Allen J. Jarvis. 
Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 
Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
49, Ladder 28. 

Alarms. 

3,657 

889 

377 

143 

198 

971 

683 

1,631 

203 

683 

319 

19 

79 



Building fires 

Automobile fires. 

Rubbish, vacant lot 

Rubbish near buildin 

Dump . 

Brush or grass . 

Other outdoor fires 

False . 

Accidental 

Needless 

Rescue 

Marine 

Out of city calls 



Total alarms 



9,852 



Fire resistive 
Second class 
Frame . 
Other types . 



Fires in Buildings. 

Construction of Buildings. 



Basement . , . 
First floor . 
Second floor 
Third floor . 
Above third floor 
Roof . 
Outside 

Total . 



Point of Origin. 




3,657 

1,190 
1,051 
430 
302 
130 
156 
398 

3,657 



Extent of Fire. 
Confined to point of origin 
Confined to buildings 
Spread to other buildings 



3,059 

519 

79 



Total 



3,657 



Fire Department. 



21 



Causes of Fires in Buildings. 



Chimneys, soot burning . 










454 


Defective chimney 










59 


Sparks from chimney 










88 


Defectively installed heater 










135 


Rubbish near heater 










66 


Hot ashes 










91 


Fuel oil burners 










260 


Starting fires, kerosene or gasoline 










1 


Careless smoking 










951 


Children and matches 










188 


Other careless use of matches . 










140 


Defective wiring 










83 


Electric appliances and motors 










244 


Home dry cleaning . 










4 


Flammable liquids near flame 










38 


Kerosene lamps, stoves 










14 


Grease, food on stove 










105 


Clothes, furniture too near fire 










51 


Spontaneous ignition . 










148 


Fireworks 










52 


Thawing water pipes .... 










39 


Sparks from machines 










23 


City gas and appliances . 










32 


Miscellaneous known causes . 










165 


Incendiary or suspicious . 
Unknown 










70 
156 


Total 


3,657 



22 



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Fiee Department. 



25 



Causes of Fires and Alarms, from January 1, 
1935, to January 1, 1936. 



Automobile 

Rubbish, vacant lot 

Rubbish near buildin 

Dump . 

Brush or grass . 

Other outdoor fires 

False . 

Accidental . 

Needless bell and still 

Rescue . 

Marine 

Out of city calls 

Chimneys, soot burning 

Defective chimney . 

Sparks from chimney 

Defectively installed 

heater 
Rubbish near heater 
Hot ashes . 
Fuel oil burners 
Starting fires, kerosene or 

gasoline . 
Careless smoking 
Children and matches 



377 

143 

198 

971 

683 

1,631 

203 

683 

319 

19 

79 

454 

59 



135 
66 
91 

260 

1 
951 

188 



Other careless use of 

matches . 
Defective wiring 
Electric appliances and 

motors 
Home dry cleaning . 
Flammable liquids n 

flame 
Kerosene lamps, stoves 
Grease, food on stove 
Clothes, furniture, too 

near fire . 
Spontaneous ignition 
Fireworks . 
Thawing water pipes 
Sparks from machines 
City gas and appliances 
Miscellaneous known 

causes 
Incendiary or suspicious 
Unknown . 

Total . 



140 

83 

244 

4 

38 

14 

105 

51 
148 
52 
39 
23 
32 

165 

70 

156 

9,852 





Fires Extinguished By 


1935. 








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1 


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53 


21 


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19 


127 


3 


47 


42 


13 


March 


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32 


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28 


179 
155 


7 

1 


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38 


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34 


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May 


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9 


52 


36 


16 




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28 


34 
30 


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117 


5 
9 


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30 


40 
37 


16 


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34 


21 


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4 


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32 


10 




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23 


99 


8 


22 


39 


15 




29 
29 
46 


29 
26 
30 


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121 
203 


8 
2 
6 


51 
23 
69 


45 
45 
51 


15 




6 


December 


28 




436 


311 


1,668 


63 


498 


497 


184 



26 



City Document No. 12. 



Alarms for the Past Ten Years. 



Year. 


Bell. 


Still 

and 

Automatic. 


Totals. 


1935 


5,657 
5,952 
5,496 
5,587 
4,727 
4,601 
4,473 
3,867 
3,492 
3,762 


4,195 
4,023 
3,597 
3,808 
3,934 
3,808 
3,979 
3,829 
3,840 
4,108 


9,852 


1934 


9,975 


1933 


9,093 


1932 


9,395 


1931 


8,661 


1930 


8,409 


1929 


8,452 




7,696 


1927 . 


7,332 


1926 


7,870 







Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 



Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 


Location and Owner. 


Loss. 




1935. 








Jan. 


16 


72-76 Fulton street, Phoebe Phelps Caramel Company 


$18,826 


88 


Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb 


24 




15,800 


'{t 


28 




19,887 


75 


2 




20,596 


no 


Feb. 


8 


118-126 Harvard avenue, Wonder Bar Cafe et al 


23,308 


95 


Feb. 
Feb. 

Marc 


15 




17,473 


(10 






66,210 


?8 


h 14 


17 and 19 Cypher street, Paul O'Sullivan Company et al. 


23,656 


97 


March 15 


101-111 Causeway street and 276-280 Friend street, 
Diamond Drug and Magnesia Company et al 


143,288 


96 


March 29 


80 Langdon street, New England Company et al 


88,511 


24 


May 


3 


1248-1254 River street, Sears Roebuck & Co. et al 


32,327 


42 


May 
July 


7 




33,316 


)ii) 


10 


26 and 2S Haymarket square, Caporale Brothers & Co. 


19,903 


17 


Aug 


9 


71 Eastern avenue, Quincy Market Cold Storage Com- 


19,344 


94 


ct. 


31 


1486 Tremont street, Nutro Beverage Company 


27,151 


09 


Dec. 


26 


Rear 286 Rutherford avenue, North Shore Fibre Corn- 


30,292 


13 









Fire Department. 



27 



Statistics. 
Population, January 1, 1936 (estimated) 
Area, square miles 
Number of brick, etc., buildings 
Number of wooden buildings . 
Fires in brick, etc., buildings . 
Fires in wooden buildings 
Fires out of city 
Not in buildings, false and needless 





795,256 




47.81 




44,062 




93,726 


2,053 




1,604 




79 




6,116 





9,852 



Fire Loss for the Year Ending December 31, 1935. 

Buildings, loss insured $1,244,311 15 

Contents, loss insured 788,796 41 





Total loss insured 








$2,033,107 


56 


Marine loss 




$37,420 


00 




Yearly 


Loss 


for the Last Fifteen Years. 




Year ending January 1, 1922 . $4,010,201 00 


u 






u 


1 


1923 . 






3,304,595 00 


a 






it 


1 


1924 . 






6,286,299 


00 


a 






a 


1 


1925 . 






4,735,595 


00 


tt 






a 


1 


1926 . 






5,407,070 


00 


a 






it 


1 


1927 . 






5,199,965 


00 


it 






tt 


1 


1928 . 






3,694,642 


00 


u 






it 


1 


1929 . 






3,887,250 


00 


it 






tt 


1 


1930 . 






4,129,926 


00 


il 






a 


1 


1931 . 






4,593,622 00 


a 






a 


1 


1932 . 






4,115,419 


00 


a 






a 


1 


1933 . 






4,240,168 


00 


it 






a 


1 


1934 . 






2,359,806 


00 


u 






a 


1 


1935 . 






2,332,280 


00 


ti 






a 


1 


1936 . 






2,033,107 


00 



28 



City Document No. 12. 



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Fire Department. 



29 



John E. Fitzgerald Medal. 

John J. Leary, for 1922. 
Daniel J. O'Brien, for 1923. 
Thomas F. Kilduff, for 1924. 
Dennis M. Condon, for 1927. 
Joseph P. Hanton, for 1929. 
Patrick J. Flaherty, for 1934. 

Walter Scott Medal. 

Dennis M. Condon, for 1922. 
James H. Curran, for 1923. 
Edward J. Crowley, for 1924. 
Gilbert W. Jones, for 1927. 
John J. Boyle, for 1929. 



Roll of Merit. 



Carl V. Anderson. 
Carl S. Bowers. 
James J. Buchanan. 
William 0. Cheswell. 
Dennis M. Condon. 
Walter P. Corbett. 
Michael J. Dacy. 
James E. Downey. 
Dennis Driscoll. 
Joseph P. Hanton. 
Timothy J. Heffron. 
Gilbert W. Jones. 
Henry J. Kelly. 



Martin A. Kenealy. 
John J. Kennedy. 
Frederick F. Leary. 
John J. Martin. 
Edward McDonough. 
James F. McMahon. 
Thomas J. Muldoon. 
Edward J. Murphy. 
Arthur A. Ryan. 
John A. O'Connor. 
Michael J. Teehan. 
William C. Jeffers. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT